WorldWideScience

Sample records for total energetic costs

  1. Energetic cost of communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, Philip K; Salazar, Vielka L

    2011-01-15

    Communication signals may be energetically expensive or inexpensive to produce, depending on the function of the signal and the competitive nature of the communication system. Males of sexually selected species may produce high-energy advertisement signals, both to enhance detectability and to signal their size and body condition. Accordingly, the proportion of the energy budget allocated to signal production ranges from almost nothing for many signals to somewhere in excess of 50% for acoustic signals in short-lived sexually selected species. Recent data from gymnotiform electric fish reveal mechanisms that regulate energy allocated to sexual advertisement signals through dynamical remodeling of the excitable membranes in the electric organ. Further, males of the short-lived sexually selected species, Brachyhypopomus gauderio, trade off among different metabolic compartments, allocating energy to signal production while reducing energy used in other metabolic functions. Female B. gauderio, by contrast, do not trade off energy between signaling and other functions. To fuel energetically expensive signal production, we expect a continuum of strategies to be adopted by animals of different life history strategies. Future studies should explore the relation between life history and energy allocation trade-offs.

  2. Estimating Instantaneous Energetic Cost During Gait Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-31

    energetic cost. Its 327   accuracy benefits from a personalized model for each subject, but for some situations, it may suffice to 328   use the...Activity 380   Patterns During Robotic - and Therapist-Assisted Treadmill Walking in Individuals With 381   Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury. Phys Ther 86...of level walking with powered ankle 410   exoskeletons . Journal of Experimental Biology 211: 1402–1413, 2008. 411   25. Schmalz T, Blumentritt S

  3. Complete cost insertion in the evaluation within the energetic planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, Lineu Belico dos; Udaeta, Miguel Edgar Morales; Carvalho, Claudio Elias

    1999-01-01

    The article discusses the environment, social and economic costs in the energetic planning. In this context, it is introduced the Complete Costs Evaluation boarding and it is presented a case study based on a kind of fertilizer produced in Sao Paulo, a Brazilian state. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation were also presented and the results were discussed

  4. Energetic Cost of Ichthyophonus Infection in Juvenile Pacific Herring (Clupea pallasii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna J. Vollenweider

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The energetic costs of fasting and Ichthyophonus infection were measured in juvenile Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii in a lab setting at three temperatures. Infected herring incurred significant energetic costs, the magnitude of which depended on fish condition at the time of infection (fat versus lean. Herring that were fed continually and were in relatively good condition at the time of infection (fat never stored lipid despite ad libitum feeding. In feeding herring, the energetic cost of infection was a 30% reduction in total energy content relative to controls 52 days post infection. Following food deprivation (lean condition, infection caused an initial delay in the compensatory response of herring. Thirty-one days after re-feeding, the energetic cost of infection in previously-fasted fish was a 32% reduction in total energy content relative to controls. Body composition of infected herring subsequently recovered to some degree, though infected herring never attained the same energy content as their continuously fed counterparts. Fifty-two days after re-feeding, the energetic cost of infection in previously-fasted fish was a 6% reduction in total energy content relative to controls. The greatest impacts of infection occurred in colder temperatures, suggesting Ichthyophonus-induced reductions in body condition may have greater consequences in the northern extent of herring's range, where juveniles use most of their energy reserves to survive their first winter.

  5. Energetic Cost of Ichthyophonus Infection in Juvenile Pacific Herring (Clupea pallasii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollenweider, Johanna J; Gregg, Jake L; Heintz, Ron A; Hershberger, Paul K

    2011-01-01

    The energetic costs of fasting and Ichthyophonus infection were measured in juvenile Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) in a lab setting at three temperatures. Infected herring incurred significant energetic costs, the magnitude of which depended on fish condition at the time of infection (fat versus lean). Herring that were fed continually and were in relatively good condition at the time of infection (fat) never stored lipid despite ad libitum feeding. In feeding herring, the energetic cost of infection was a 30% reduction in total energy content relative to controls 52 days post infection. Following food deprivation (lean condition), infection caused an initial delay in the compensatory response of herring. Thirty-one days after re-feeding, the energetic cost of infection in previously-fasted fish was a 32% reduction in total energy content relative to controls. Body composition of infected herring subsequently recovered to some degree, though infected herring never attained the same energy content as their continuously fed counterparts. Fifty-two days after re-feeding, the energetic cost of infection in previously-fasted fish was a 6% reduction in total energy content relative to controls. The greatest impacts of infection occurred in colder temperatures, suggesting Ichthyophonus-induced reductions in body condition may have greater consequences in the northern extent of herring's range, where juveniles use most of their energy reserves to survive their first winter.

  6. Energetic costs of mange in wolves estimated from infrared thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Paul C.; Almberg, Emily S.; Haase, Catherine G; Hudson, Peter J.; Maloney, Shane K; Metz, Matthew C; Munn, Adam J; Nugent, Paul; Putzeys, Olivier; Stahler, Daniel R.; Stewart, Anya C; Smith, Doug W.

    2016-01-01

    Parasites, by definition, extract energy from their hosts and thus affect trophic and food web dynamics even when the parasite may have limited effects on host population size. We studied the energetic costs of mange (Sarcoptes scabiei) in wolves (Canis lupus) using thermal cameras to estimate heat losses associated with compromised insulation during the winter. We combined the field data of known, naturally infected wolves with data set on captive wolves with shaved patches of fur as a positive control to simulate mange-induced hair loss. We predict that during the winter in Montana, more severe mange infection increases heat loss by around 5.2 to 12 MJ per night (1240 to 2850 kcal, or a 65% to 78% increase) for small and large wolves, respectively accounting for wind effects. To maintain body temperature would require a significant proportion of a healthy wolf's total daily energy demands (18-22 MJ/day). We also predict how these thermal costs may increase in colder climates by comparing our predictions in Bozeman, Montana to those from a place with lower ambient temperatures (Fairbanks, Alaska). Contrary to our expectations, the 14°C differential between these regions was not as important as the potential differences in wind speed. These large increases in energetic demands can be mitigated by either increasing consumption rates or decreasing other energy demands. Data from GPS-collared wolves indicated that healthy wolves move, on average, 17 km per day, which was reduced by 1.5, 1.8 and 6.5 km for light, medium, and severe hair loss. In addition, the wolf with the most hair loss was less active at night and more active during the day, which is the converse of the movement patterns of healthy wolves. At the individual level mange infections create significant energy demands and altered behavioral patterns, this may have cascading effects on prey consumption rates, food web dynamics, predator-prey interactions, and scavenger communities.

  7. Cognitive cost as dynamic allocation of energetic resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, S Thomas; Schrater, Paul

    2015-01-01

    While it is widely recognized that thinking is somehow costly, involving cognitive effort and producing mental fatigue, these costs have alternatively been assumed to exist, treated as the brain's assessment of lost opportunities, or suggested to be metabolic but with implausible biological bases. We present a model of cognitive cost based on the novel idea that the brain senses and plans for longer-term allocation of metabolic resources by purposively conserving brain activity. We identify several distinct ways the brain might control its metabolic output, and show how a control-theoretic model that models decision-making with an energy budget can explain cognitive effort avoidance in terms of an optimal allocation of limited energetic resources. The model accounts for both subject responsiveness to reward and the detrimental effects of hypoglycemia on cognitive function. A critical component of the model is using astrocytic glycogen as a plausible basis for limited energetic reserves. Glycogen acts as an energy buffer that can temporarily support high neural activity beyond the rate supported by blood glucose supply. The published dynamics of glycogen depletion and repletion are consonant with a broad array of phenomena associated with cognitive cost. Our model thus subsumes both the "cost/benefit" and "limited resource" models of cognitive cost while retaining valuable contributions of each. We discuss how the rational control of metabolic resources could underpin the control of attention, working memory, cognitive look ahead, and model-free vs. model-based policy learning.

  8. Cognitive cost as dynamic allocation of energetic resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Thomas Christie

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available While it is widely recognized that thinking is somehow costly, involving cognitive effort and producing mental fatigue, these costs have alternatively been assumed to exist, treated as the brain's assessment of lost opportunities, or suggested to be metabolic but with implausible biological bases. We present a model of cognitive cost based on the novel idea that the brain senses and plans for longer-term allocation of metabolic resources by purposively conserving brain activity. We identify several distinct ways the brain might control its metabolic output, and show how a control-theoretic model that models decision-making with an energy budget can explain cognitive effort avoidance in terms of an optimal allocation of limited energetic resources. The model accounts for both for subject responsiveness to reward and the detrimental effects of hypoglycemia on cognitive function. A critical component of the model is using astrocytic glycogen as a plausible basis for limited energetic reserves. Glycogen acts as an energy buffer that can temporarily support high neural activity beyond the rate supported by blood glucose supply. The published dynamics of glycogen depletion and repletion are consonant with a broad array of phenomena associated with cognitive cost. Our model thus subsumes both the cost/benefit and limited resource models of cognitive cost while retaining valuable contributions of each. We discuss how the rational control of metabolic resources could underpin the control of attention, working memory, cognitive lookahead, model-free vs. model-based policy learning as well as the pattern of generalization of cognitive improvements due to video-game training experiments.

  9. Energetic cost of feeding territories in an Hawaiian honeycreeper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, F Lynn; MacMillen, Richard E

    1976-09-01

    By analysis of time budgets the daily energy expenditure in territorial individuals of a Hawaiian honeycreeper (Vestiaria coccinea, Fam. Drepanididae) were estimated during the nonbreeding season and compared to that of nonterritorial individuals. The mean rise in living costs was 2.3 kcal/24 h or 17% of the nonterritorial energy budget. The most costly territorial behavior was advertisement rather than chasing, and total territorial cost was seen to be little affected by the number of intruders or the size of the territory. These results are compared with data on feeding (nonbreeding) territories of other nectar-feeding birds. The suggestion is made that hummingbirds may be more likely to develop nonbreeding territorial behavior in any set of environmental circumstances than are honeycreepers because of relatively lower total cost of advertisement plus chasing.

  10. Total generating costs: coal and nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-02-01

    The study was confined to single and multi-unit coal- and nuclear-fueled electric-generating stations. The stations are composed of 1200-MWe PWRs; 1200-MWe BWRs; 800-and 1200-MWe High-Sulfur Coal units, and 800- and 1200-MWe Low-Sulfur Coal units. The total generating cost estimates were developed for commercial operation dates of 1985 and 1990; for 5 and 8% escalation rates, for 10 and 12% discount rates; and, for capacity factors of 50, 60, 70, and 80%. The report describes the methodology for obtaining annualized capital costs, levelized coal and nuclear fuel costs, levelized operation and maintenance costs, and the resulting total generating costs for each type of station. The costs are applicable to a hypothetical Middletwon site in the Northeastern United States. Plant descriptions with general design parameters are included. The report also reprints for convenience, summaries of capital cost by account type developed in the previous commercial electric-power cost studies. Appropriate references are given for additional detailed information. Sufficient detail is given to allow the reader to develop total generating costs for other cases or conditions

  11. Total Cost of Ownership and Cost-to-Serve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariassen, Frederik

    2007-01-01

    Artiklen reviewer den eksisterende litteratur vedrørende økonomistyringsværktøjerne Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) og Cost-to-Serve (CtS). Herefter kortlægges det, hvordan TCO og CtS bidrager til en identificering af direkte omkostninger såvel som indirekte omkostninger henholdsvis up-stream og down...

  12. Energetic and economic cost of nuclear heat − impact on the cost of desalination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dardour Saied

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An exploratory study has been carried out to evaluate the cost of heat supplied by a pressurized water reactor type of nuclear reactors to thermal desalination processes. In the context of this work, simplified models have been developed to describe the thermodynamics of power conversion, the energetics of multi-effect evaporation (MED, and the costs of electricity and heat cogenerated by the dual-purpose power plant. Application of these models show that, contrary to widespread belief, (nuclear-powered MED and seawater reverse osmosis are comparable in terms of energy effectiveness. Process heat can be produced, in fact, by a relatively small increase in the core power. As fuel represents just a fraction of the cost of nuclear electricity, the increase in fuel-related expenses is expected to have limited impact on power generation economics.

  13. Procedure for estimating permanent total enclosure costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukey, M E; Prasad, C; Toothman, D A; Kaplan, N

    1999-07-01

    Industries that use add-on control devices must adequately capture emissions before delivering them to the control device. One way to capture emissions is to use permanent total enclosures (PTEs). By definition, an enclosure which meets the US Environmental Protection Agency's five-point criteria is a PTE and has a capture efficiency of 100%. Since costs play an important role in regulatory development, in selection of control equipment, and in control technology evaluations for permitting purposes, EPA has developed a Control Cost Manual for estimating costs of various items of control equipment. EPA's Manual does not contain any methodology for estimating PTE costs. In order to assist environmental regulators and potential users of PTEs, a methodology for estimating PTE costs was developed under contract with EPA, by Pacific Environmental Services, Inc. (PES) and is the subject of this paper. The methodology for estimating PTE costs follows the approach used for other control devices in the Manual. It includes procedures for sizing various components of a PTE and for estimating capital as well as annual costs. It contains verification procedures for demonstrating compliance with EPA's five-point criteria. In addition, procedures are included to determine compliance with Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards. Meeting these standards is an important factor in properly designing PTEs. The methodology is encoded in Microsoft Exel spreadsheets to facilitate cost estimation and PTE verification. Examples are given throughout the methodology development and in the spreadsheets to illustrate the PTE design, verification, and cost estimation procedures.

  14. Energetic Cost of Ichthyophonus Infection in Juvenile Pacific Herring (Clupea pallasii)

    OpenAIRE

    Johanna J. Vollenweider; Jake L. Gregg; Ron A. Heintz; Paul K. Hershberger

    2011-01-01

    The energetic costs of fasting and Ichthyophonus infection were measured in juvenile Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) in a lab setting at three temperatures. Infected herring incurred significant energetic costs, the magnitude of which depended on fish condition at the time of infection (fat versus lean). Herring that were fed continually and were in relatively good condition at the time of infection (fat) never stored lipid despite ad libitum feeding. In feeding herrin...

  15. Energetic and developmental costs of mounting an immune response in greenfinches (Carduelis chloris)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amat, Juan A.; Aguilera, Eduardo; Visser, G. Henk

    It is assumed that there is a trade-off between the costs allocated to mounting an immune defence and those allocated to costly functions such as breeding and moulting. The physiological basis for this is that mounting an immune response to pathogen challenge has energetic and/or nutrient costs

  16. Procedure for estimating permanent total enclosure costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukey, M.E.; Prasad, C.; Toothman, D.A.; Kaplan, N.

    1999-07-01

    Industries that use add-on control devices must adequately capture emissions before delivering them to the control device. One way to capture emissions is to use permanent total enclosures (PTEs). By definition, an enclosure which meets the US Environmental Protection Agency's five-point criteria is a PTE and has a capture efficiency of 100%. Since costs play an important role in regulatory development, in selection of control equipment, and in control technology evaluations for permitting purposes, EPA has developed a Control Cost Manual for estimating costs of various items of control equipment. EPA's Manual does not contain any methodology for estimating PTE costs. In order to assist environmental regulators and potential users of PTEs, a methodology for estimating PTE costs was developed under contract with EPA, by Pacific Environmental Services, Inc. (PES) and is the subject of this paper. The methodology for estimating PTE costs follows the approach used for other control devices in the Manual. It includes procedures for sizing various components of a PTE and for estimating capital as well as annual costs. It contains verification procedures for demonstrating compliance with EPA's five-point criteria. In addition, procedures are included to determine compliance with Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards. Meeting these standards is an important factor in properly designing PTEs. The methodology is encoded in Microsoft Exel spreadsheets to facilitate cost estimation and PTE verification. Examples are given throughout the methodology development and in the spreadsheets to illustrate the PTE design, verification, and cost estimation procedures.

  17. Energetic costs of performance in trained and untrained Anolis carolinensis lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lailvaux, Simon P; Wang, Andrew Z; Husak, Jerry F

    2018-03-12

    The energetic costs of performance constitute a non-trivial component of animals' daily energetic budgets. However, we currently lack an understanding of how those costs are partitioned among the various stages of performance development, maintenance, and production. We manipulated individual investment in performance by training Anolis carolinensis lizards for endurance or sprinting ability. We then measured energetic expenditure both at rest and immediately following exercise to test whether such training alters the maintenance and production costs of performance. Trained lizards had lower resting metabolic rates than controls, suggestive of a maintenance saving associated with enhanced performance as opposed to a cost. Production costs also differed, with sprint-trained lizards incurring the largest energetic performance cost and experiencing the longest recovery times compared to endurance trained and control animals. Although performance training modifies metabolism, production costs are probably the key drivers of trade-offs between performance and other life-history traits in this species. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. The total lifetime costs of smoking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, S.R.; Prescott, E.; Sørensen, T.I.A.

    2004-01-01

    Net costs of smoking in a lifetime perspective and, hence, the economic interests in antismoking policies have been questioned. It has been proposed that the health-related costs of smoking are balanced by smaller expenditure due to shorter life expectancy.......Net costs of smoking in a lifetime perspective and, hence, the economic interests in antismoking policies have been questioned. It has been proposed that the health-related costs of smoking are balanced by smaller expenditure due to shorter life expectancy....

  19. Designing the optimal bit: balancing energetic cost, speed and reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Abhishek; Gopalkrishnan, Manoj; Ouldridge, Thomas E; Jones, Nick S

    2017-08-01

    We consider the challenge of operating a reliable bit that can be rapidly erased. We find that both erasing and reliability times are non-monotonic in the underlying friction, leading to a trade-off between erasing speed and bit reliability. Fast erasure is possible at the expense of low reliability at moderate friction, and high reliability comes at the expense of slow erasure in the underdamped and overdamped limits. Within a given class of bit parameters and control strategies, we define 'optimal' designs of bits that meet the desired reliability and erasing time requirements with the lowest operational work cost. We find that optimal designs always saturate the bound on the erasing time requirement, but can exceed the required reliability time if critically damped. The non-trivial geometry of the reliability and erasing time scales allows us to exclude large regions of parameter space as suboptimal. We find that optimal designs are either critically damped or close to critical damping under the erasing procedure.

  20. Evidence against the energetic cost hypothesis for the short introns in highly expressed genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niu Deng-Ke

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In animals, the moss Physcomitrella patens and the pollen of Arabidopsis thaliana, highly expressed genes have shorter introns than weakly expressed genes. A popular explanation for this is selection for transcription efficiency, which includes two sub-hypotheses: to minimize the energetic cost or to minimize the time cost. Results In an individual human, different organs may differ up to hundreds of times in cell number (for example, a liver versus a hypothalamus. Considered at the individual level, a gene specifically expressed in a large organ is actually transcribed tens or hundreds of times more than a gene with a similar expression level (a measure of mRNA abundance per cell specifically expressed in a small organ. According to the energetic cost hypothesis, the former should have shorter introns than the latter. However, in humans and mice we have not found significant differences in intron length between large-tissue/organ-specific genes and small-tissue/organ-specific genes with similar expression levels. Qualitative estimation shows that the deleterious effect (that is, the energetic burden of long introns in highly expressed genes is too negligible to be efficiently selected against in mammals. Conclusion The short introns in highly expressed genes should not be attributed to energy constraint. We evaluated evidence for the time cost hypothesis and other alternatives.

  1. Comparative locomotor costs of domestic dogs reveal energetic economy of wolf-like breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, Caleb M; Williams, Terrie M

    2017-01-15

    The broad diversity in morphology and geographic distribution of the 35 free-ranging members of the family Canidae is only rivaled by that of the domesticated dog, Canis lupus familiaris. Considered to be among nature's most elite endurance athletes, both domestic and wild canids provide a unique opportunity to examine the variability in mammalian aerobic exercise performance and energy expenditure. To determine the potential effects of domestication and selective breeding on locomotor gait and economy in canids, we measured the kinematics and mass-specific metabolism of three large (>20 kg) dog breed groups (northern breeds, retrievers and hounds) of varying morphological and genomic relatedness to their shared progenitor, the gray wolf. By measuring all individuals moving in preferred steady-state gaits along a level transect and on a treadmill, we found distinct biomechanical, kinematic and energetic patterns for each breed group. While all groups exhibited reduced total cost of transport (COT) at faster speeds, the total COT and net COT during trotting and galloping were significantly lower for northern breed dogs (3.0 and 2.1 J kg -1  m -1 , respectively) relative to hound (4.2 and 3.4 J kg -1  m -1 , respectively) and retriever dogs (3.8 and 3.0 J kg -1  m -1 , respectively) of comparable mass. Similarly, northern breeds expended less energy per stride (3.5 J kg -1  stride -1 ) than hounds or retrievers (5.0 and 4.0 J kg -1  stride -1 , respectively). These results suggest that, in addition to their close genetic and morphological ties to gray wolves, northern breed dogs have retained highly cursorial kinematic and physiological traits that promote economical movement across the landscape. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Mate guarding in the Seychelles warbler is energetically costly and adjusted to paternity risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komdeur, J

    2001-10-22

    Males may increase their fitness through extra-pair copulations (copulations outside the pair bond) that result in extra-pair fertilizations, but also risk lost paternity when they leave their own mate unguarded. The fitness costs of cuckoldry for Seychelles warblers (Acrocephalus sechellensis) are considerable because warblers have a single-egg clutch and, given the short breeding season, no time for a successful replacement clutch. Neighbouring males are the primary threat to a male's genetic paternity. Males minimize their loss of paternity by guarding their mates to prevent them from having extra-pair copulations during their fertile period. Here, I provide experimental evidence that mate-guarding behaviour is energetically costly and that the expression of this trade-off is adjusted to paternity risk (local male density). Free-living males that were induced to reduce mate guarding spent significantly more time foraging and gained significantly better body condition than control males. The larger the reduction in mate guarding, the more pronounced was the increase in foraging and body condition (accounting for food availability). An experimental increase in paternity risk resulted in an increase in mate-guarding intensity and a decrease in foraging and body condition, and vice versa. This is examined using both cross-sectional and longitudinal data. This study on the Seychelles warbler offers experimental evidence that mate guarding is energetically costly and adjusted to paternity risk.

  3. Energetic Cost of Subacute Chlorpyrifos Intoxication in the German Cockroach (Dictyoptera: Blattellidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Achim; Jensen, Karl-Martin Vagn; Kristensen, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The energetic cost of a sublethal treatment with chlorpyrifos was estimated by use of direct microcalorimetry to measure metabolic heat in susceptible and resistant strains of the German cockroach Blattella germanica L. Moreover, one of the detoxifcation enzyme systems known to be involved...... in detoxifcation of chlorpyrifos, glutathione-S-transferase, was measured. Individual cockroaches were exposed for 20 min on a glass-surfaces treated with 1.14 ...  g/cm2 of chlorpyrifos. There was no difference in glutathione-S-transferase activity of susceptible or resistant strains after the treatment. The heat...

  4. Direct cost comparison of totally endoscopic versus open ear surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, N; Mohammadi, A; Jufas, N

    2018-02-01

    Totally endoscopic ear surgery is a relatively new method for managing chronic ear disease. This study aimed to test the null hypothesis that open and endoscopic approaches have similar direct costs for the management of attic cholesteatoma, from an Australian private hospital setting. A retrospective direct cost comparison of totally endoscopic ear surgery and traditional canal wall up mastoidectomy for the management of attic cholesteatoma in a private tertiary setting was undertaken. Indirect and future costs were excluded. A direct cost comparison of anaesthetic setup and resources, operative setup and resources, and surgical time was performed between the two techniques. Totally endoscopic ear surgery has a mean direct cost reduction of AUD$2978.89 per operation from the hospital perspective, when compared to canal wall up mastoidectomy. Totally endoscopic ear surgery is more cost-effective, from an Australian private hospital perspective, than canal wall up mastoidectomy for attic cholesteatoma.

  5. The energetic cost of gait retraining: A pilot study of the acute effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townshend, Andrew D; Franettovich Smith, Melinda M; Creaby, Mark W

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the acute effect of gait retraining aimed at reducing tibial peak positive acceleration (PPA) on energetic cost (VO 2 ). Intervention with a pre/post-test design. University biomechanics laboratory. 12 healthy male runners (23.4 ± 5.3 years, 179.7 ± 4.3 cm, 75.6 ± 9.2 kg). Tibial PPA and oxygen consumption (VO 2 ) were measured after a five minute baseline run and at the end of a gait retraining session aimed at minimizing tibial PPA. Tibial PPA significantly decreased between baseline and after gait retraining (32.6%, p = 0.007). VO 2 significantly increased between the two time periods (9.3%, p = 0.008). There was no correlation between change in tibial PPA and change in VO 2 (p = 0.956, r = 0.018). Practitioners who aim to reduce injury risk by minimizing tibial PPA in runners need to consider the possible acute effect on performance as a result of changes in VO 2 . Further investigation is warranted to understand the energetic cost of different kinematic strategies used by individuals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Exogenous stress hormones alter energetic and nutrient costs of development and metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschman, Lucas J; McCue, Marshall D; Boyles, Justin G; Warne, Robin W

    2017-09-15

    Variation in environmental conditions during larval life stages can shape development during critical windows and have lasting effects on the adult organism. Changes in larval developmental rates in response to environmental conditions, for example, can trade off with growth to determine body size and condition at metamorphosis, which can affect adult survival and fecundity. However, it is unclear how use of energy and nutrients shape trade-offs across life-stage transitions because no studies have quantified these costs of larval development and metamorphosis. We used an experimental approach to manipulate physiological stress in larval amphibians, along with respirometry and 13 C-breath testing to quantify the energetic and nutritional costs of development and metamorphosis. Central to larval developmental responses to environmental conditions is the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal/interrenal (HPA/I) axis, which regulates development, as well as energy homeostasis and stress responses across many taxa. Given these pleiotropic effects of HPA/I activity, manipulation of the HPA/I axis may provide insight into costs of metamorphosis. We measured the energetic and nutritional costs across the entire larval period and metamorphosis in a larval amphibian exposed to exogenous glucocorticoid (GC) hormones - the primary hormone secreted by the HPA/I axis. We measured metabolic rates and dry mass across larval ontogeny, and quantified lipid stores and nutrient oxidation via 13 C-breath testing during metamorphosis, under control and GC-exposed conditions. Changes in dry mass match metamorphic states previously reported in the literature, but dynamics of metabolism were influenced by the transition from aquatic to terrestrial respiration. GC-treated larvae had lower dry mass, decreased fat stores and higher oxygen consumption during stages where controls were conserving energy. GC-treated larvae also oxidized greater amounts of 13 C-labelled protein stores. These results

  7. Total life cycle cost model for electric power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardullo, M.W.

    1995-01-01

    The Total Life Cycle Cost (TLCC) model for electric power stations was developed to provide a technology screening model. The TLCC analysis involves normalizing cost estimates with respect to performance standards and financial assumptions and preparing a profile of all costs over the service life of the power station. These costs when levelized present a value in terms of a utility electricity rate. Comparison of cost and the pricing of the electricity for a utility shows if a valid project exists. Cost components include both internal and external costs. Internal costs are direct costs associated with the purchase, and operation of the power station and include initial capital costs, operating and maintenance costs. External costs result from societal and/or environmental impacts that are external to the marketplace and can include air quality impacts due to emissions, infrastructure costs, and other impacts. The cost stream is summed (current dollars) or discounted (constant dollars) to some base year to yield a overall TLCC of each power station technology on a common basis. While minimizing life cycle cost is an important consideration, it may not always be a preferred method for some utilities who may prefer minimizing capital costs. Such consideration does not always result in technology penetration in a marketplace such as the utility sector. Under various regulatory climates, the utility is likely to heavily weigh initial capital costs while giving limited consideration to other costs such as societal costs. Policy makers considering external costs, such as those resulting from environmental impacts, may reach significantly different conclusions about which technologies are most advantageous to society. The TLCC analysis model for power stations was developed to facilitate consideration of all perspectives

  8. Economics of human performance and systems total ownership cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onkham, Wilawan; Karwowski, Waldemar; Ahram, Tareq Z

    2012-01-01

    Financial costs of investing in people is associated with training, acquisition, recruiting, and resolving human errors have a significant impact on increased total ownership costs. These costs can also affect the exaggerate budgets and delayed schedules. The study of human performance economical assessment in the system acquisition process enhances the visibility of hidden cost drivers which support program management informed decisions. This paper presents the literature review of human total ownership cost (HTOC) and cost impacts on overall system performance. Economic value assessment models such as cost benefit analysis, risk-cost tradeoff analysis, expected value of utility function analysis (EV), growth readiness matrix, multi-attribute utility technique, and multi-regressions model were introduced to reflect the HTOC and human performance-technology tradeoffs in terms of the dollar value. The human total ownership regression model introduces to address the influencing human performance cost component measurement. Results from this study will increase understanding of relevant cost drivers in the system acquisition process over the long term.

  9. Stretching Your Energetic Budget: How Tendon Compliance Affects the Metabolic Cost of Running.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas K Uchida

    Full Text Available Muscles attach to bones via tendons that stretch and recoil, affecting muscle force generation and metabolic energy consumption. In this study, we investigated the effect of tendon compliance on the metabolic cost of running using a full-body musculoskeletal model with a detailed model of muscle energetics. We performed muscle-driven simulations of running at 2-5 m/s with tendon force-strain curves that produced between 1 and 10% strain when the muscles were developing maximum isometric force. We computed the average metabolic power consumed by each muscle when running at each speed and with each tendon compliance. Average whole-body metabolic power consumption increased as running speed increased, regardless of tendon compliance, and was lowest at each speed when tendon strain reached 2-3% as muscles were developing maximum isometric force. When running at 2 m/s, the soleus muscle consumed less metabolic power at high tendon compliance because the strain of the tendon allowed the muscle fibers to operate nearly isometrically during stance. In contrast, the medial and lateral gastrocnemii consumed less metabolic power at low tendon compliance because less compliant tendons allowed the muscle fibers to operate closer to their optimal lengths during stance. The software and simulations used in this study are freely available at simtk.org and enable examination of muscle energetics with unprecedented detail.

  10. evaluation of total annual costs of heat exchanger networks using

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    after solving the first problem using RPA based heat integration gave a minimum total annual cost (TAC) of $237, ... mathematical programming and non-RPA based Hint software. ... The concept of pinch analysis evolved over the years.

  11. A general approach to total repair cost limit replacement policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Beichelt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A common replacement policy for technical systems consists in replacing a system by a new one after its economic lifetime, i.e. at that moment when its long-run maintenance cost rate is minimal. However, the strict application of the economic lifetime does not take into account the individual deviations of maintenance cost rates of single systems from the average cost development. Hence, Beichet proposed the total repair cost limit replacement policy: the system is replaced by a new one as soon as its total repair cost reaches or exceeds a given level. He modelled the repair cost development by functions of the Wiener process with drift. Here the same policy is considered under the assumption that the one-dimensional probability distribution of the process describing the repair cost development is given. In the examples analysed, applying the total repair cost limit replacement policy instead of the economic life-time leads to cost savings of between 4% and 30%. Finally, it is illustrated how to include the reliability aspect into the policy.

  12. Energetic cost of active branchial ventilation in the sharksucker, Echeneis naucrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, J F; Lomholt, J P

    1983-01-01

    active to ram gill ventilation were from 10-50 cm s-1, depending on the size of the fish. 3. Oxygen consumption increased between 3.7 and 5.7% when the fish shifted from ram gill ventilation to active branchial pumping. 4. When water velocity was increased beyond the threshold for ram gill ventilation......1. Sharksuckers use active branchial ventilation when swimming or at rest in stationary water. When attached to a moving object or when placed in a water current, they shift to ram gill ventilation as water velocity exceeds a certain threshold. 2. Water velocities required for the transition from......, no further increase in oxygen consumption was observed. 5. It is concluded that the energetic cost of active ventilation in sharksuckers is lower than has previously been reported for fish in general....

  13. Total cost of ownership: Getting past the 10% solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.F.

    1996-01-01

    As the refining industry strives to succeed in a more-competitive world, some fresh ideas are needed to counter the headlines of plant closings, layoffs, and corporate restructurings. Other industries facing the same pressures have discovered opportunities to reduce cost in a more human and effective manner by using some tools borrowed from the Total Quality process to enhance the procurement process. Experience suggests that the purchase cost is a small fraction of the actual cost of a commodity and is often dwarfed by hidden costs. Discovering and eliminating the hidden costs of variation, nonoptimal operations, and poorly aligned vendor relations is vital to economic survival. The purpose of this paper is to suggest some fresh approaches to vendor-customer relations that can dramatically reduce undesired costs

  14. [Total knee and hip prosthesis: variables associated with costs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Espiñeira, Carmen; Escobar, Antonio; Navarro-Espigares, José Luis; Castillo, Juan de Dios Lunadel; García-Pérez, Lidia; Godoy-Montijano, Amparo

    2013-01-01

    The elevated prevalence of osteoarthritis in Western countries, the high costs of hip and knee arthroplasty, and the wide variations in the clinical practice have generated considerable interest in comparing the associated costs before and after surgery. To determine the influence of a number of variables on the costs of total knee and hip arthroplasty surgery during the hospital stay and during the one-year post-discharge. A prospective multi-center study was performed in 15 hospitals from three Spanish regions. Relationships between the independent variables and the costs of hospital stay and postdischarge follow-up were analyzed by using multilevel models in which the "hospital" variable was used to group cases. Independent variables were: age, sex, body mass index, preoperative quality of life (SF-12, EQ-5 and Womac questionnaires), surgery (hip/knee), Charlson Index, general and local complications, number of beds and economic-institutional dependency of the hospital, the autonomous region to which it belongs, and the presence of a caregiver. The cost of hospital stay, excluding the cost of the prosthesis, was 4,734 Euros, and the post-discharge cost was 554 Euros. With regard to hospital stay costs, the variance among hospitals explained 44-46% of the total variance among the patients. With regard to the post-discharge costs, the variability among hospitals explained 7-9% of the variance among the patients. There is considerable potential for reducing the hospital stay costs of these patients, given that more than 44% of the observed variability was not determined by the clinical conditions of the patients but rather by the behavior of the hospitals.

  15. evaluation of total annual costs of heat exchanger networks using

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study presents pinch analysis of some heat exchanger networks (HENs) problems using Hint integration (HINT) software. Three examples reported to have been solved using different approaches by various researchers to obtain the least possible total annual cost (TAC) were solved using the Hint software. In this work ...

  16. Descriptive display of total alpha, energetics, TOC, oxlate as TOC, and H2O sample data from Hanford waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SIMPSON, B.C.

    1999-01-01

    In March 1999, staff at Lockheed Makn Hanford Company (LMHC) were asked to make a presentation to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) about the safety of the waste tanks at the Hanford Site and the necessity for further tank sampling. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory provided a statistical analysis of available tank data to help determine whether additional sampling would in fact be required. The analytes examined were total alpha, energetics, total organic carbon (TOC), oxalate as TOC and moisture. These analytes serve as indicators of the stability of tank contents; if any of them fall above or below certain values, further investigation is warranted (Dukelow et al. 1995). PNNL performed an analysis of the data collected on these safety screening analytes with respect to empirical distributions and the established Safety Screening Data Quality Objectives (SS DQO) thresholds and Basis for Interim Operations (BIO) limits. Both univariate and bivariate analyses were performed. Summary statistics and graphical representations of the data were generated

  17. Cost-identification analysis of total laryngectomy: an itemized approach to hospital costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedhia, Raj C; Smith, Kenneth J; Weissfeld, Joel L; Saul, Melissa I; Lee, Steve C; Myers, Eugene N; Johnson, Jonas T

    2011-02-01

    To understand the contribution of intraoperative and postoperative hospital costs to total hospital costs, examine the costs associated with specific hospital services in the postoperative period, and recognize the impact of patient factors on hospital costs. Case series with chart review. Large tertiary care teaching hospital system. Using the Pittsburgh Head and Neck Organ-Specific Database, 119 patients were identified as having total laryngectomy with bilateral selective neck dissection and primary closure from 1999 to 2009. Cost data were obtained for 112 patients. Costs include fixed and variable costs, adjusted to 2010 US dollars using the Consumer Price Index. Mean total hospital costs were $29,563 (range, $10,915 to $120,345). Operating room costs averaged 24% of total hospital costs, whereas room charges, respiratory therapy, laboratory, pharmacy, and radiology accounted for 38%, 14%, 8%, 7%, and 3%, respectively. Median length of stay was 9 days (range, 6-43), and median Charlson comorbidity index score was 8 (2-16). Patients with ≥1 day in the intensive care unit had significantly higher hospital costs ($46,831 vs $24,601, P cost differences with stratification based on previous radiation therapy ($27,598 vs $29,915 with no prior radiation, P = .62) or hospital readmission within 30 days ($29,483 vs $29,609 without readmission, P = .97). This is one of few studies in surgery and the first in otolaryngology to analyze hospital costs for a relatively standardized procedure. Further work will include cost analysis from multiple centers with investigation of global cost drivers.

  18. Retail clinic utilization associated with lower total cost of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Andrew; Dunham, Lisette; Snower, Kristen; Hu, Min; Matlin, Olga S; Shrank, William H; Choudhry, Niteesh K; Brennan, Troyen

    2013-04-01

    To better understand the impact of retail clinic use on a patient's annual total cost of care. A propensity score matched-pair, cohort design was used to analyze healthcare spending patterns among CVS Caremark employees in the year following a visit to a MinuteClinic, the retail clinics inside CVS pharmacies. De-identified medical and pharmacy claims for CVS Caremark employees and their dependents who received care at a retail clinic between June 1, 2009, and May 31, 2010, were matched to those of subjects who received care elsewhere. High-dimensional propensity score and greedy matching techniques were used to create a 1-to-1 matched cohort that was analyzed using generalized linear regression models. Individuals using a retail clinic had a lower total cost of care (-$262; 95% confidence interval, -$510 to -$31; P = .025) in the year following their clinic visit than individuals who received care in other settings. This savings was primarily due to lower medical expenses at physicians' offices ($77 savings, P = .008) and hospital inpatient care ($121 savings, P = .049). The 6022 retail clinic users also had 142 (12%) fewer emergency department visits (P = .01), though this was not related to significant cost savings. This study found that retail clinic use was associated with lower overall total cost of care compared with that at alternative sites. Savings may extend beyond the retail clinic visit itself to other types of medical utilization.

  19. Group-level competition influences urinary steroid hormones among wild red-tailed monkeys, indicating energetic costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeggi, Adrian V; Trumble, Benjamin C; Brown, Michelle

    2018-04-10

    Various theories emphasize that intergroup competition should affect intragroup cooperation and social relationships, especially if the cost of intergroup competition outweighs that of intragroup competition. This cost of intergroup competition may be quantified by changes in physiological status, such as in the steroid hormones cortisol (C) and testosterone (T), which rise or are depressed during periods of energetic stress, respectively. Here we tested for changes in urinary C and T after intergroup encounters (IGEs) among wild red-tailed monkeys (Cercopithecus ascanius), a species that experiences frequent intergroup feeding competition, at the Ngogo station in Kibale National Park, Uganda. We assayed 108 urine samples, of which 36 were collected after IGEs, from 23 individuals in four social groups. Bayesian multilevel models controlling for various confounds revealed that IGEs increased C and decreased T relative to baseline, consistent with an energetic cost to IGEs. The C change was more apparent in samples collected early after IGEs, suggesting an anticipatory increase, whereas the T change was stronger in later samples, suggesting sustained energetic trade-offs. Hormone responses were not affected by the IGE outcome. This cost to intergroup competition, together with little evidence for intragroup competition in redtails and other guenons, establishes an interesting test case for theories emphasizing the effect of intergroup competition on intragroup cooperation. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. About Russian nuclear energetic perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laletin, N.I.

    2003-01-01

    My particular view about Russian nuclear energetics perspectives is presented. The nearest and the further perspectives are considered. The arguments are adduced that the most probable scenario of nuclear energetic development is its stabilization in the near future. Fur further development the arguments of supporters and opponents of nuclear energetics are analyzed. Three points of view are considered. The first point of view that there is not alternative for nuclear energetics. My notes are the following ones. a) I express a skeptic opinion about a statement of quick exhaustion of fossil organic fuel recourses and corresponding estimations are presented. b) It is expressed skeptic opinion about the statement that nuclear energetics can have a visual influence on ''steam effect''. c) I agree that nuclear energetics is the most ecological technology for normal work but however we can't disregard possibilities of catastrophic accidents. The second point of view that the use of nuclear energetics can't have the justification. I adduce the arguments contrary to this statement. The third point of view that nuclear energetics is a usual technology and the only criteria for discussions about what dimension and where one ought develop it is total cost of its unit. Expressed an opinion that the deceived for the choose of a way the skill of the estimate correctly and optimized so named the external parts of the unit energy costs for different energy technologies. (author)

  1. Internal Logistics System Selection with Total Cost of Ownership Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Inês; Pimentel, Carina; Godina, Radu; Matias, João C. O.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper a methodology was followed in order to support the decision-making of one industrial unit regarding its internal logistics system. The addressed factory was facing issues with their internal logistics approach. Some alternatives were pointed out and a proper total cost of ownership (TCO) analysis was developed. This analysis was taken in order to demonstrate the more cost-effective solution for the internal logistics system. This tool is more and more valued by the companies, due to their willing to reduce the costs that are associated with the way of doing business. Despite the proposal of the best choice for the internal logistics system of the enterprise, this study also intends to present some conclusions about the match between the nature of the industrial unit and the logistics systems that best fit the requirements of those.

  2. En differentieret tilgang til total cost of ownership (TCO)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariassen, Frederik

    2010-01-01

    Økonomistyring er en nødvendig brik i forsøget på at kunne styre dele af eller hele forsyningskæden, og til dette bruges diverse økonomistyringsværktøjer. Denne artikel omhandler økonomistyringsværktøjet 'total cost of ownership', og hvordan dette kan bruges til at forbedre samarbejdet med...

  3. Energetic cost of bot fly parasitism in free-ranging eastern chipmunks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Careau, Vincent; Thomas, Donald W; Humphries, Murray M

    2010-02-01

    The energy and nutrient demands of parasites on their hosts are frequently invoked as an explanation for negative impacts of parasitism on host survival and reproductive success. Although cuterebrid bot flies are among the physically largest and most-studied insect parasites of mammals, the only study conducted on metabolic consequences of bot fly parasitism revealed a surprisingly small effect of bot flies on host metabolism. Here we test the prediction that bot fly parasitism increases the resting metabolic rate (RMR) of free-ranging eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus), particularly in juveniles who have not previously encountered parasites and have to allocate energy to growth. We found no effect of bot fly parasitism on adults. In juveniles, however, we found that RMR strongly increased with the number of bot fly larvae hosted. For a subset of 12 juveniles during a year where parasite prevalence was particularly high, we also compared the RMR before versus during the peak of bot fly prevalence, allowing each individual to act as its own control. Each bot fly larva resulted in a approximately 7.6% increase in the RMR of its host while reducing juvenile growth rates. Finally, bot fly parasitism at the juvenile stage was positively correlated with adult stage RMR, suggesting persistent effects of bot flies on RMR. This study is the first to show an important effect of bot fly parasitism on the metabolism and growth of a wild mammal. Our work highlights the importance of studying cost of parasitism over multiple years in natural settings, as negative effects on hosts are more likely to emerge in periods of high energetic demand (e.g. growing juveniles) and/or in harsh environmental conditions (e.g. low food availability).

  4. Primary vs Conversion Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Cost Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Garwin; Wright, David J.; Snir, Nimrod; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Increasing hip fracture incidence in the United States is leading to higher occurrences of conversion total hip arthroplasty (THA) for failed surgical treatment of the hip. In spite of studies showing higher complication rates in conversion THA, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid services currently bundles conversion and primary THA under the same diagnosis-related group. We examined the cost of treatment of conversion THA compared with primary THA. Our hypothesis is that conversion THA will have higher cost and resource use than primary THA. Methods Fifty-one consecutive conversion THA patients (Current Procedure Terminology code 27132) and 105 matched primary THA patients (Current Procedure Terminology code 27130) were included in this study. The natural log-transformed costs for conversion and primary THA were compared using regression analysis. Age, gender, body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologist, Charlson comorbidity score, and smoker status were controlled in the analysis. Conversion THA subgroups formed based on etiology were compared using analysis of variance analysis. Results Conversion and primary THAs were determined to be significantly different (P conversion THA has significantly greater cost and resource use than primary THA. In order to prevent disincentives for treating these complex surgical patients, reclassification of conversion THA is needed, as they do not fit together with primary THA. PMID:26387923

  5. Total medical costs of treating femoral neck fracture patients with hemi- or total hip arthroplasty: a cost analysis of a multicenter prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.T.P.W. Burgers (Paul); M. Hoogendoorn (Martine); E.A.C. Van Woensel; R.W. Poolman (Rudolf); M. Bhandari (Mohit); P. Patka (Peter); E.M.M. van Lieshout (Esther)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractSummary: The aim of this study was to determine the total medical costs for treating displaced femoral neck fractures with hemi- or total hip arthroplasty in fit elderly patients. The mean total costs per patient at 2 years of follow-up were €26,399. These results contribute to cost

  6. Molecular approaches to solar energy conversion: the energetic cost of charge separation from molecular-excited states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrant, James R

    2013-08-13

    This review starts with a brief overview of the technological potential of molecular-based solar cell technologies. It then goes on to focus on the core scientific challenge associated with using molecular light-absorbing materials for solar energy conversion, namely the separation of short-lived, molecular-excited states into sufficiently long-lived, energetic, separated charges capable of generating an external photocurrent. Comparisons are made between different molecular-based solar cell technologies, with particular focus on the function of dye-sensitized photoelectrochemical solar cells as well as parallels with the function of photosynthetic reaction centres. The core theme of this review is that generating charge carriers with sufficient lifetime and a high quantum yield from molecular-excited states comes at a significant energetic cost-such that the energy stored in these charge-separated states is typically substantially less than the energy of the initially generated excited state. The role of this energetic loss in limiting the efficiency of solar energy conversion by such devices is emphasized, and strategies to minimize this energy loss are compared and contrasted.

  7. An energetic perspective on tissue regeneration: The costs of tail autotomy in growing geckos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starostová, Zuzana; Gvoždík, Lumír; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2017-04-01

    Tail autotomy is a crucial antipredatory lizard response, which greatly increases individual survival, but at the same time also compromises locomotor performance, sacrifices energy stores and induces a higher burden due to the ensuing response of regenerating the lost body part. The potential costs of tail autotomy include shifts in energy allocation and metabolic rates, especially in juveniles, which invest their energy primarily in somatic growth. We compared the metabolic rates and followed the growth of juvenile males with and without regenerating tails in the Madagascar ground gecko (Paroedura picta), a nocturnal ground-dwelling lizard. Geckos with intact tails and those that were regrowing them grew in snout-vent-length at similar rates for 22weeks after autotomy. Tail regeneration had a negligible influence on body mass-corrected metabolic rate measured at regular intervals throughout the regenerative process. We conclude that fast-growing juveniles under the conditions of unrestricted food can largely compensate for costs of tail loss and regeneration in their somatic growth without a significant impact on the total individual body mass-corrected metabolic rate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Energetic costs of protein synthesis do not differ between red- and white-blooded Antarctic notothenioid fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Johanne M; Grove, Theresa J; O'Brien, Kristin M

    2015-09-01

    Antarctic icefishes (Family Channichthyidae) within the suborder Notothenioidei lack the oxygen-binding protein hemoglobin (Hb), and six of the 16 species of icefishes lack myoglobin (Mb) in heart ventricle. As iron-centered proteins, Hb and Mb can promote the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that damage biological macromolecules. Consistent with this, our previous studies have shown that icefishes have lower levels of oxidized proteins and lipids in oxidative muscle compared to red-blooded notothenioids. Because oxidized proteins are usually degraded by the 20S proteasome and must be resynthesized, we hypothesized that rates of protein synthesis would be lower in icefishes compared to red-blooded notothenioids, thereby reducing the energetic costs of protein synthesis and conferring a benefit to the loss of Hb and Mb. Rates of protein synthesis were quantified in hearts, and the fraction of oxygen consumption devoted to protein synthesis was measured in isolated hepatocytes and cardiomyocytes of notothenioids differing in the expression of Hb and cardiac Mb. Neither rates of protein synthesis nor the energetic costs of protein synthesis differed among species, suggesting that red-blooded species do not degrade and replace oxidatively modified proteins at a higher rate compared to icefishes but rather, persist with higher levels of oxidized proteins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cost Savings of Nuclear Power with Total Fuel Reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solbrig, Charles W.; Benedict, Robert W.

    2006-01-01

    The cost of fast reactor (FR) generated electricity with pyro-processing is estimated in this article. It compares favorably with other forms of energy and is shown to be less than that produced by light water reactors (LWR's). FR's use all the energy in natural uranium whereas LWR's utilize only 0.7% of it. Because of high radioactivity, pyro-processing is not open to weapon material diversion. This technology is ready now. Nuclear power has the same advantage as coal power in that it is not dependent upon a scarce foreign fuel and has the significant additional advantage of not contributing to global warming or air pollution. A jump start on new nuclear plants could rapidly allow electric furnaces to replace home heating oil furnaces and utilize high capacity batteries for hybrid automobiles: both would reduce US reliance on oil. If these were fast reactors fueled by reprocessed fuel, the spent fuel storage problem could also be solved. Costs are derived from assumptions on the LWR's and FR's five cost components: 1) Capital costs: LWR plants cost $106/MWe. FR's cost 25% more. Forty year amortization is used. 2) The annual O and M costs for both plants are 9% of the Capital Costs. 3) LWR fuel costs about 0.0035 $/kWh. Producing FR fuel from spent fuel by pyro-processing must be done in highly shielded hot cells which is costly. However, the five foot thick concrete walls have the advantage of prohibiting diversion. LWR spent fuel must be used as feedstock for the FR initial core load and first two reloads so this FR fuel costs more than LWR fuel. FR fuel costs much less for subsequent core reloads ( 6 /MWe. The annual cost for a 40 year licensed plant would be 2.5 % of this or less if interest is taken into account. All plants will eventually have to replace those components which become radiation damaged. FR's should be designed to replace parts rather than decommission. The LWR costs are estimated to be 2.65 cents/kWh. FR costs are 2.99 cents/kWh for the first

  10. Reverse-total shoulder arthroplasty cost-effectiveness: A quality-adjusted life years comparison with total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Daniel; Nyland, John; Krupp, Ryan

    2016-02-18

    To compare reverse-total shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) cost-effectiveness with total hip arthroplasty cost-effectiveness. This study used a stochastic model and decision-making algorithm to compare the cost-effectiveness of RSA and total hip arthroplasty. Fifteen patients underwent pre-operative, and 3, 6, and 12 mo post-operative clinical examinations and Short Form-36 Health Survey completion. Short form-36 Health Survey subscale scores were converted to EuroQual Group Five Dimension Health Outcome scores and compared with historical data from age-matched patients who had undergone total hip arthroplasty. Quality-adjusted life year (QALY) improvements based on life expectancies were calculated. The cost/QALY was $3900 for total hip arthroplasty and $11100 for RSA. After adjusting the model to only include shoulder-specific physical function subscale items, the RSA QALY improved to 2.8 years, and its cost/QALY decreased to $8100. Based on industry accepted standards, cost/QALY estimates supported both RSA and total hip arthroplasty cost-effectiveness. Although total hip arthroplasty remains the quality of life improvement "gold standard" among arthroplasty procedures, cost/QALY estimates identified in this study support the growing use of RSA to improve patient quality of life.

  11. THE ENERGETIC COST OF FEATHER SYNTHESIS IS PROPORTIONAL TO BASAL METABOLIC-RATE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VISSER, GH; DAAN, S

    1993-01-01

    The cost of feather production, C(f) (kJ . [g dry feathers]-1), differs substantially between species. We studied the molt cost in one insectivorous songbird (bluethroat, Luscinia s. svecica) and one granivorous songbird (common redpoll, Carduelis f. flammea), We wanted to test whether differences

  12. The Cost of Joint Replacement: Comparing Two Approaches to Evaluating Costs of Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palsis, John A; Brehmer, Thomas S; Pellegrini, Vincent D; Drew, Jacob M; Sachs, Barton L

    2018-02-21

    In an era of mandatory bundled payments for total joint replacement, accurate analysis of the cost of procedures is essential for orthopaedic surgeons and their institutions to maintain viable practices. The purpose of this study was to compare traditional accounting and time-driven activity-based costing (TDABC) methods for estimating the total costs of total hip and knee arthroplasty care cycles. We calculated the overall costs of elective primary total hip and total knee replacement care cycles at our academic medical center using traditional and TDABC accounting methods. We compared the methods with respect to the overall costs of hip and knee replacement and the costs for each major cost category. The traditional accounting method resulted in higher cost estimates. The total cost per hip replacement was $22,076 (2014 USD) using traditional accounting and was $12,957 using TDABC. The total cost per knee replacement was $29,488 using traditional accounting and was $16,981 using TDABC. With respect to cost categories, estimates using traditional accounting were greater for hip and knee replacement, respectively, by $3,432 and $5,486 for personnel, by $3,398 and $3,664 for space and equipment, and by $2,289 and $3,357 for indirect costs. Implants and consumables were derived from the actual hospital purchase price; accordingly, both methods produced equivalent results. Substantial cost differences exist between accounting methods. The focus of TDABC only on resources used directly by the patient contrasts with the allocation of all operating costs, including all indirect costs and unused capacity, with traditional accounting. We expect that the true costs of hip and knee replacement care cycles are likely somewhere between estimates derived from traditional accounting methods and TDABC. TDABC offers patient-level granular cost information that better serves in the redesign of care pathways and may lead to more strategic resource-allocation decisions to optimize

  13. An analysis of the energetic cost of the branchial and cardiac pumps during sustained swimming in trout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    FARRELL, AP; STEFFENSEN, JF

    1987-01-01

    Experimental data are available for the oxygen cost of the branchial and cardiac pumps in fish. These data were used to theoretically analyze the relative oxygen cost of these pumps during rest and swimming in rainbow troutSalmo gairdneri. Efficiency of the heart increases with activity and so...... the relative oxygen cost of the cardiac pumps decreased from 4.6% at rest to 1.9% at the critical swimming speed. The relative oxygen cost of the branchial pump is significant in the resting and slowly swimming fish, being 10 to 15% of total oxygen uptake. However, when swimming trout switch to a ram mode...... of ventilation, a considerable saving in oxygen cost is accrued by switching the cost of ventilation from the branchial to the tail musculature. Thus, the relative oxygen cost of the branchial and cardiac pumps actually decreases at critical swimming speed compared to rest and therefore is unlikely to be a major...

  14. Optimization of some eco-energetic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purica, I.; Pavelescu, M.; Stoica, M.

    1976-01-01

    An optimization problem of two eco-energetic systems is described. The first one is close to the actual eco-energetic system in Romania, while the second is a new one, based on nuclear energy as primary source and hydrogen energy as secondary source. The optimization problem solved is to find the optimal structure of the systems so that the objective functions adopted, namely unitary energy cost C and total pollution P, to be minimum at the same time. The problem can be modelated with a bimatrix cooperative mathematical game without side payments. We demonstrate the superiority of the new eco-energetic system. (author)

  15. Impact Of Total Quality Management (TQM), Activity Based Costing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Time (JIT), and Total Quality Management (TQM) as strategic initiatives lead to improved financial performance in the Turkish textile industry. Strong evidence emerged that there is a strong positive association between using ABC, JIT or TQM ...

  16. Mate guarding in the Seychelles warbler is energetically costly and adjusted to paternity risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Komdeur, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Males may increase their fitness through extra-pair copulations (copulations outside the pair bond) that result in extra-pair fertilizations, but also risk lost paternity when they leave their own mate unguarded. The fitness costs of cuckoldry for Seychelles warblers (Acrocephalus sechellensis) are

  17. How accurately can we estimate energetic costs in a marine top predator, the king penguin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsey, Lewis G; Fahlman, Andreas; Handrich, Yves; Schmidt, Alexander; Woakes, Anthony J; Butler, Patrick J

    2007-01-01

    King penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus) are one of the greatest consumers of marine resources. However, while their influence on the marine ecosystem is likely to be significant, only an accurate knowledge of their energy demands will indicate their true food requirements. Energy consumption has been estimated for many marine species using the heart rate-rate of oxygen consumption (f(H) - V(O2)) technique, and the technique has been applied successfully to answer eco-physiological questions. However, previous studies on the energetics of king penguins, based on developing or applying this technique, have raised a number of issues about the degree of validity of the technique for this species. These include the predictive validity of the present f(H) - V(O2) equations across different seasons and individuals and during different modes of locomotion. In many cases, these issues also apply to other species for which the f(H) - V(O2) technique has been applied. In the present study, the accuracy of three prediction equations for king penguins was investigated based on validity studies and on estimates of V(O2) from published, field f(H) data. The major conclusions from the present study are: (1) in contrast to that for walking, the f(H) - V(O2) relationship for swimming king penguins is not affected by body mass; (2) prediction equation (1), log(V(O2) = -0.279 + 1.24log(f(H) + 0.0237t - 0.0157log(f(H)t, derived in a previous study, is the most suitable equation presently available for estimating V(O2) in king penguins for all locomotory and nutritional states. A number of possible problems associated with producing an f(H) - V(O2) relationship are discussed in the present study. Finally, a statistical method to include easy-to-measure morphometric characteristics, which may improve the accuracy of f(H) - V(O2) prediction equations, is explained.

  18. HIGH ECCENTRICITY EOQ TOTAL COST FUNCTION YIELDS JIT RESULTs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willian Roach

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available No estoque de bens perecíveis, o custo de armazenamento H é muito maior do que o previsto na fórmula clássica do lote econômico do pedido (EOQ. Para bens perecíveis, a função custo total no EOQ é um pico e não uma reta horizontal. Esta forma pontiaguda leva o modelo EOQ a produzir entregas just in time (JIT - resultados semelhantes. O efeito pontiagudo (excentricidade da curva de custo total do lote econômico EOQ depende apenas do custo de armazenamento (H e não da demanda anual (D ou do custo do pedido (S. D e S determinam o nível (altura da curva de custo total do estoque (TC, mas não a forma.

  19. Comparative and Cumulative Energetic Costs of Odontocete Responses to Anthropogenic Disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    communicative sound and click production and the metabolic costs of changes in vocal behavior in bottlenose dolphins, have empirically measured the...marine mammals . OBJECTIVES This investigation comprises five major objectives, executed over three years. The objectives are: (1) compare the...through The Marine Mammal Stranding Program and selected the best scans for our investigation. Analysis of CT scan data (see Fig. 2) have been

  20. Total cost of performing analog-to-digital upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrigo, T.

    1993-01-01

    The financial well-being of nuclear power plants in the United States is dependent on reducing costs. Rapid advances in industrial technology have created a conundrum for utility executives and their engineering staffs. Digital technology is being touted as beneficial in many ways; however, a number of significant issues have been raised regarding the adequacy and financial viability of digital systems in nuclear power plants. Actual or perceived problems with digital system design, development, and installation have caused significant financial losses for nuclear utilities. This paper provides a list of problems that must be considered in performing an analog-to-digital conversion or for doing a large digital upgrade. It is desirable that the full financial risks associated with these types of upgrades are considered. Specific problems encountered at Palo Verde nuclear generating station are reviewed to emphasize some of the problem areas

  1. Effects of the Length of Stay on the Cost of Total Knee and Total Hip Arthroplasty from 2002 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, Ilda B; Martin, Brook I; Moschetti, Wayne E; Jevsevar, David S

    2017-03-01

    Utilization of total knee and hip arthroplasty has greatly increased in the past decade in the United States; these are among the most expensive procedures in patients with Medicare. Advances in surgical techniques, anesthesia, and care pathways decrease hospital length of stay. We examined how trends in hospital cost were altered by decreases in length of stay. Procedure, demographic, and economic data were collected on 6.4 million admissions for total knee arthroplasty and 2.8 million admissions for total hip arthroplasty from 2002 to 2013 using the National (Nationwide) Inpatient Sample, a component of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project. Trends in mean hospital costs and their association with length of stay were estimated using inflation-adjusted, survey-weighted generalized linear regression models, controlling for patient demographic characteristics and comorbidity. From 2002 to 2013, the length of stay decreased from a mean time of 4.06 to 2.97 days for total knee arthroplasty and from 4.06 to 2.75 days for total hip arthroplasty. During the same time period, the mean hospital cost for total knee arthroplasty increased from $14,988 (95% confidence interval [CI], $14,927 to $15,049) in 2002 to $22,837 (95% CI, $22,765 to $22,910) in 2013 (an overall increase of $7,849 or 52.4%). The mean hospital cost for total hip arthroplasty increased from $15,792 (95% CI, $15,706 to $15,878) in 2002 to $23,650 (95% CI, $23,544 to $23,755) in 2013 (an increase of $7,858 or 49.8%). If length of stay were set at the 2002 mean, the growth in cost for total knee arthroplasty would have been 70.8% instead of 52.4% as observed, and the growth in cost for total hip arthroplasty would have been 67.4% instead of 49.8% as observed. Hospital costs for joint replacement increased from 2002 to 2013, but were attenuated by reducing inpatient length of stay. With demographic characteristics showing an upward trend in the utilization of joint arthroplasty, including a shift

  2. Energetic Systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energetic Systems Division provides full-spectrum energetic engineering services (project management, design, analysis, production support, in-service support,...

  3. Cost-effectiveness of positive contrast and nuclear arthrography in patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swan, J.S.; Braunstein, E.M.; Capello, W.; Wellman, H.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have compared the cost effectiveness of contrast arthrography (CA) and nuclear arthrography (NA), in which In-111 chloride is injected with the contrast material, of total hip arthroplasties. Their series included 48 cases of surgically proved loose femoral components. The cost per true-positive result was obtained by taking the total cost of the examinations in surgically proved cases and dividing by the number of true-position cases. The cost of CA was $297 and the cost of NA was $335. For CA, the cost per true positive was $1,018, and for the NA the cost per true positive was $946. In spite of higher initial cost, NA is more cost effective than CA on a cost per true-positive case basis. NA is cost effective in evaluating hip arthroplasties in which there is suspicion of a loose femoral component

  4. Electrochromic Windows: Process and Fabrication Improvements for Lower Total Costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Burdis; Neil Sbar

    2007-03-31

    The overall goal with respect to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is to achieve significant national energy savings through maximized penetration of EC windows into existing markets so that the largest cumulative energy reduction can be realized. The speed with which EC windows can be introduced and replace current IGU's (and current glazings) is clearly a strong function of cost. Therefore, the aim of this project was to investigate possible improvements to the SageGlass{reg_sign} EC glazing products to facilitate both process and fabrication improvements resulting in lower overall costs. The project was split into four major areas dealing with improvements to the electrochromic layer, the capping layer, defect elimination and general product improvements. Significant advancements have been made in each of the four areas. These can be summarized as follows: (1) Plasma assisted deposition for the electrochromic layer was pursued, and several improvements made to the technology for producing a plasma beam were made. Functional EC devices were produced using the new technology, but there are still questions to be answered regarding the intrinsic properties of the electrochromic films produced by this method. (2) The capping layer work was successfully implemented into the existing SageGlass{reg_sign} product, thereby providing a higher level of transparency and somewhat lower reflectivity than the 'standard' product. (3) Defect elimination is an ongoing effort, but this project spurred some major defect reduction programs, which led to significant improvements in yield, with all the implicit benefits afforded. In particular, major advances were made in the development of a new bus bar application process aimed at reducing the numbers of 'shorts' developed in the finished product, as well as making dramatic improvements in the methods used for tempering the glass, which had previously been seen to produce a defect which appeared as a

  5. Cost of goods sold and total cost of delivery for oral and parenteral vaccine packaging formats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedita, Jeff; Perrella, Stefanie; Morio, Matt; Berbari, Michael; Hsu, Jui-Shan; Saxon, Eugene; Jarrahian, Courtney; Rein-Weston, Annie; Zehrung, Darin

    2018-03-14

    Despite limitations of glass packaging for vaccines, the industry has been slow to implement alternative formats. Polymer containers may address many of these limitations, such as breakage and delamination. However, the ability of polymer containers to achieve cost of goods sold (COGS) and total cost of delivery (TCOD) competitive with that of glass containers is unclear, especially for cost-sensitive low- and lower-middle-income countries. COGS and TCOD models for oral and parenteral vaccine packaging formats were developed based on information from subject matter experts, published literature, and Kenya's comprehensive multiyear plan for immunization. Rotavirus and inactivated poliovirus vaccines (IPV) were used as representative examples of oral and parenteral vaccines, respectively. Packaging technologies evaluated included glass vials, blow-fill-seal (BFS) containers, preformed polymer containers, and compact prefilled auto-disable (CPAD) devices in both BFS and preformed formats. For oral vaccine packaging, BFS multi-monodose (MMD) ampoules were the least expensive format, with a COGS of $0.12 per dose. In comparison, oral single-dose glass vials had a COGS of $0.40. BFS MMD ampoules had the lowest TCOD of oral vaccine containers at $1.19 per dose delivered, and ten-dose glass vials had a TCOD of $1.61 per dose delivered. For parenteral vaccines, the lowest COGS was achieved with ten-dose glass vials at $0.22 per dose. In contrast, preformed CPAD devices had the highest COGS at $0.60 per dose. Ten-dose glass vials achieved the lowest TCOD of the parenteral vaccine formats at $1.56 per dose delivered. Of the polymer containers for parenteral vaccines, BFS MMD ampoules achieved the lowest TCOD at $1.89 per dose delivered, whereas preformed CPAD devices remained the most expensive format, at $2.25 per dose delivered. Given their potential to address the limitations of glass and reduce COGS and TCOD, polymer containers deserve further consideration as alternative

  6. The total lifetime health cost savings of smoking cessation to society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Gitte Susanne; Prescott, Eva; Sørensen, Thorkild I A

    2005-01-01

    Smoking cessation has major immediate and long-term health benefits. However, ex-smokers' total lifetime health costs and continuing smokers' costs remain uncompared, and hence the economic savings of smoking cessation to society have not been determined.......Smoking cessation has major immediate and long-term health benefits. However, ex-smokers' total lifetime health costs and continuing smokers' costs remain uncompared, and hence the economic savings of smoking cessation to society have not been determined....

  7. Economical aspects of nuclear energetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celinski, Z.

    2000-01-01

    The economical aspects of nuclear power generation in respect to costs of conventional energetics have been discussed in detail. The costs and competitiveness of nuclear power have been considered on the base of worldwide trends taking into account investment and fuel costs as well as 'social' costs being result of impact of different types of energetics on environment, human health etc

  8. Flare energetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S. T.; Dejager, C.; Dennis, B. R.; Hudson, H. S.; Simnett, G. M.; Strong, K. T.; Bentley, R. D.; Bornmann, P. L.; Bruner, M. E.; Cargill, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    In this investigation of flare energetics, researchers sought to establish a comprehensive and self-consistent picture of the sources and transport of energy within a flare. To achieve this goal, they chose five flares in 1980 that were well observed with instruments on the Solar Maximum Mission, and with other space-borne and ground-based instruments. The events were chosen to represent various types of flares. Details of the observations available for them and the corresponding physical parameters derived from these data are presented. The flares were studied from two perspectives, the impulsive and gradual phases, and then the results were compared to obtain the overall picture of the energics of these flares. The role that modeling can play in estimating the total energy of a flare when the observationally determined parameters are used as the input to a numerical model is discussed. Finally, a critique of the current understanding of flare energetics and the methods used to determine various energetics terms is outlined, and possible future directions of research in this area are suggested.

  9. From the Cover: Environmental, economic, and energetic costs and benefits of biodiesel and ethanol biofuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jason; Nelson, Erik; Tilman, David; Polasky, Stephen; Tiffany, Douglas

    2006-07-01

    Negative environmental consequences of fossil fuels and concerns about petroleum supplies have spurred the search for renewable transportation biofuels. To be a viable alternative, a biofuel should provide a net energy gain, have environmental benefits, be economically competitive, and be producible in large quantities without reducing food supplies. We use these criteria to evaluate, through life-cycle accounting, ethanol from corn grain and biodiesel from soybeans. Ethanol yields 25% more energy than the energy invested in its production, whereas biodiesel yields 93% more. Compared with ethanol, biodiesel releases just 1.0%, 8.3%, and 13% of the agricultural nitrogen, phosphorus, and pesticide pollutants, respectively, per net energy gain. Relative to the fossil fuels they displace, greenhouse gas emissions are reduced 12% by the production and combustion of ethanol and 41% by biodiesel. Biodiesel also releases less air pollutants per net energy gain than ethanol. These advantages of biodiesel over ethanol come from lower agricultural inputs and more efficient conversion of feedstocks to fuel. Neither biofuel can replace much petroleum without impacting food supplies. Even dedicating all U.S. corn and soybean production to biofuels would meet only 12% of gasoline demand and 6% of diesel demand. Until recent increases in petroleum prices, high production costs made biofuels unprofitable without subsidies. Biodiesel provides sufficient environmental advantages to merit subsidy. Transportation biofuels such as synfuel hydrocarbons or cellulosic ethanol, if produced from low-input biomass grown on agriculturally marginal land or from waste biomass, could provide much greater supplies and environmental benefits than food-based biofuels. corn | soybean | life-cycle accounting | agriculture | fossil fuel

  10. Differences in muscle fiber size and associated energetic costs in phylogenetically paired tropical and temperate birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Ana Gabriela; Williams, Joseph B

    2014-01-01

    Tropical and temperate birds provide a unique system to examine mechanistic consequences of life-history trade-offs at opposing ends of the pace-of-life spectrum; tropical birds tend to have a slow pace of life whereas temperate birds the opposite. Birds in the tropics have a lower whole-animal basal metabolic rate and peak metabolic rate, lower rates of reproduction, and longer survival than birds in temperate regions. Although skeletal muscle has a relatively low tissue-specific metabolism at rest, it makes up the largest fraction of body mass and therefore contributes more to basal metabolism than any other tissue. A principal property of muscle cells that influences their rate of metabolism is fiber size. The optimal fiber size hypothesis attempts to link whole-animal basal metabolic rate to the cost of maintaining muscle mass by stating that larger fibers may be metabolically cheaper to maintain since the surface area∶volume ratio (SA∶V) is reduced compared with smaller fibers and thus the amount of area to transport ions is also reduced. Because tropical birds have a reduced whole-organism metabolism, we hypothesized that they would have larger muscle fibers than temperate birds, given that larger muscle fibers have reduced energy demand from membrane Na(+)-K(+) pumps. Alternatively, smaller muscle fibers could result in a lower capacity for shivering and exercise. To test this idea, we examined muscle fiber size and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity in 16 phylogenetically paired species of tropical and temperate birds. We found that 3 of the 16 paired comparisons indicated that tropical birds had significantly larger fibers, contrary to our hypothesis. Our data show that SA∶V is proportional to Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity in muscles of birds.

  11. Environmental, economic, and energetic costs and benefits of biodiesel and ethanol biofuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jason; Nelson, Erik; Tilman, David; Polasky, Stephen; Tiffany, Douglas

    2006-07-25

    Negative environmental consequences of fossil fuels and concerns about petroleum supplies have spurred the search for renewable transportation biofuels. To be a viable alternative, a biofuel should provide a net energy gain, have environmental benefits, be economically competitive, and be producible in large quantities without reducing food supplies. We use these criteria to evaluate, through life-cycle accounting, ethanol from corn grain and biodiesel from soybeans. Ethanol yields 25% more energy than the energy invested in its production, whereas biodiesel yields 93% more. Compared with ethanol, biodiesel releases just 1.0%, 8.3%, and 13% of the agricultural nitrogen, phosphorus, and pesticide pollutants, respectively, per net energy gain. Relative to the fossil fuels they displace, greenhouse gas emissions are reduced 12% by the production and combustion of ethanol and 41% by biodiesel. Biodiesel also releases less air pollutants per net energy gain than ethanol. These advantages of biodiesel over ethanol come from lower agricultural inputs and more efficient conversion of feedstocks to fuel. Neither biofuel can replace much petroleum without impacting food supplies. Even dedicating all U.S. corn and soybean production to biofuels would meet only 12% of gasoline demand and 6% of diesel demand. Until recent increases in petroleum prices, high production costs made biofuels unprofitable without subsidies. Biodiesel provides sufficient environmental advantages to merit subsidy. Transportation biofuels such as synfuel hydrocarbons or cellulosic ethanol, if produced from low-input biomass grown on agriculturally marginal land or from waste biomass, could provide much greater supplies and environmental benefits than food-based biofuels.

  12. Cranking up the heat: relationships between energetically costly song features and the increase in thorax temperature in male crickets and katydids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erregger, Bettina; Kovac, Helmut; Stabentheiner, Anton; Hartbauer, Manfred; Römer, Heinrich; Schmidt, Arne K D

    2017-07-15

    Sexual displays of acoustically signalling insects are used in the context of mate attraction and mate choice. While energetic investment in sound production can increase the reproductive success of the sender, this entails metabolic costs. Resource allocation to sexually selected, reproductive traits can trade off against allocation to naturally selected traits (e.g. growth, immunity) when individuals' energy budgets are limited. Estimating the magnitude of the costs invested in acoustic signalling is necessary to understand this trade-off and its influence on fitness and life history. To compare the costs associated with acoustic signalling for two ensiferan species, we simultaneously took respiratory measurements to record the rate of CO 2 production and used infrared thermography to measure the increase in thorax temperature. Furthermore, to identify what combinations of acoustic parameters were energetically costly for the sender, we recorded the calling songs of 22 different cricket and katydid species for a comparative analysis and measured their thorax temperature while they sang. Acoustic signalling was energetically costly for Mecopoda sp. and Anurogryllus muticus , requiring a 12- and 16-fold increase over resting levels in the CO 2 production rate. Moreover, calling increased thorax temperature, on average by 7.6 and 5.8°C, respectively. We found that the song intensity and effective calling rate, not simply the chirp/trill duty cycle or the pulse rate alone, were good predictors for the thorax temperature increase in males. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Intensive care unit drug costs in the context of total hospital drug expenditures with suggestions for targeted cost containment efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altawalbeh, Shoroq M; Saul, Melissa I; Seybert, Amy L; Thorpe, Joshua M; Kane-Gill, Sandra L

    2018-04-01

    To assess costs of intensive care unit (ICU) related pharmacotherapy relative to hospital drug expenditures, and to identify potential targets for cost-effectiveness investigations. We offer the unique advantage of comparing ICU drug costs with previously published data a decade earlier to describe changes over time. Financial transactions for all ICU patients during fiscal years (FY) 2009-2012 were retrieved from the hospital's data repository. ICU drug costs were evaluated for each FY. ICU departments' charges were also retrieved and calculated as percentages of total ICU charges. Albumin, prismasate (dialysate), voriconazole, factor VII and alteplase denoted the highest percentages of ICU drug costs. ICU drug costs contributed to an average of 31% (SD 1.0%) of the hospital's total drug costs. ICU drug costs per patient day increased by 5.8% yearly versus 7.8% yearly for non-ICU drugs. This rate was higher for ICU drugs costs at 12% a decade previous. Pharmacy charges contributed to 17.7% of the total ICU charges. Growth rates of costs per year have declined but still drug expenditures in the ICU are consistently a significant driver in this resource intensive environment with a high impact on hospital drug expenditures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. How do high cost-sharing policies for physician care affect total care costs among people with chronic disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Haichang; Harman, Jeffrey S; Yang, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    This study examines whether high cost-sharing in physician care is associated with a differential impact on total care costs by health status. Total care includes physician care, emergency room (ER) visits and inpatient care. Since high cost-sharing policies can reduce needed care as well as unneeded care use, it raises the concern whether these policies are a good strategy for controlling costs among chronically ill patients. This study used the 2007 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey data with a cross-sectional study design. Difference in difference (DID), instrumental variable technique, two-part model, and bootstrap technique were employed to analyze cost data. Chronically ill individuals' probability of reducing any overall care costs was significantly less than healthier individuals (beta = 2.18, p = 0.04), while the integrated DID estimator from split results indicated that going from low cost-sharing to high cost-sharing significantly reduced costs by $12,853.23 more for sick people than for healthy people (95% CI: -$17,582.86, -$8,123.60). This greater cost reduction in total care among sick people likely resulted from greater cost reduction in physician care, and may have come at the expense of jeopardizing health outcomes by depriving patients of needed care. Thus, these policies would be inappropriate in the short run, and unlikely in the long run to control health plans costs among chronically ill individuals. A generous benefit design with low cost-sharing policies in physician care or primary care is recommended for both health plans and chronically ill individuals, to save costs and protect these enrollees' health status.

  15. Controlling costs without compromising quality: paying hospitals for total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, Michael; Fry, Donald E; Jones, Barbara L; Meimban, Roger J; Pine, Gregory J

    2010-10-01

    Unit costs of health services are substantially higher in the United States than in any other developed country in the world, without a correspondingly healthier population. An alternative payment structure, especially for high volume, high cost episodes of care (eg, total knee replacement), is needed to reward high quality care and reduce costs. The National Inpatient Sample of administrative claims data was used to measure risk-adjusted mortality, postoperative length-of-stay, costs of routine care, adverse outcome rates, and excess costs of adverse outcomes for total knee replacements performed between 2002 and 2005. Empirically identified inefficient and ineffective hospitals were then removed to create a reference group of high-performance hospitals. Predictive models for outcomes and costs were recalibrated to the reference hospitals and used to compute risk-adjusted outcomes and costs for all hospitals. Per case predicted costs were computed and compared with observed costs. Of the 688 hospitals with acceptable data, 62 failed to meet effectiveness criteria and 210 were identified as inefficient. The remaining 416 high-performance hospitals had 13.4% fewer risk-adjusted adverse outcomes (4.56%-3.95%; P costs ($12,773-$11,512; P costs. A payment system based on the demonstrated performance of effective, efficient hospitals can produce sizable cost savings without jeopardizing quality. In this study, 96% of total excess hospital costs resulted from higher routine costs at inefficient hospitals, whereas only 4% was associated with ineffective care.

  16. Supplier managed inventory in the OEM supply chain : the impact of relationship types on total costs and cost distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyen, van P.L.M.; Bertrand, J.W.M.; Ooijen, van H.P.G.; Vandaele, N.J.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the impact of four variants of supplier managed inventory on total costs and cost distribution in a capital goods supply chain consisting of a parts supplier who delivers parts to an original equipment manufacturer’s assembly plant. The four supplier managed inventory variants differ

  17. The adoption of total cost of ownership for sourcing decisions - a structural equations analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, Marc; Anderson, James C.; Wynstra, Finn

    2005-01-01

    This study investigates the adoption of total cost of ownership (TCO) analysis to improve sourcing decisions. TCO can be seen as an application of activity based costing (ABC) that quantifies the costs that are involved in acquiring and using purchased goods or services. TCO supports purchasing

  18. Association of Hospital Costs With Complications Following Total Gastrectomy for Gastric Adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selby, Luke V; Gennarelli, Renee L; Schnorr, Geoffrey C; Solomon, Stephen B; Schattner, Mark A; Elkin, Elena B; Bach, Peter B; Strong, Vivian E

    2017-10-01

    Postoperative complications are associated with increased hospital costs following major surgery, but the mechanism by which they increase cost and the categories of care that drive this increase are poorly described. To describe the association of postoperative complications with hospital costs following total gastrectomy for gastric adenocarcinoma. This retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected gastric cancer surgery database at a single National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center included all patients undergoing curative-intent total gastrectomy for gastric adenocarcinoma between January 2009 and December 2012 and was conducted in 2015 and 2016. Ninety-day normalized postoperative costs. Hospital accounting system costs were normalized to reflect Medicare reimbursement levels using the ratio of hospital costs to Medicare reimbursement and categorized into major cost categories. Differences between costs in Medicare proportional dollars (MP $) can be interpreted as the amount that would be reimbursed to an average hospital by Medicare if it paid differentially based on types and extent of postoperative complications. In total, 120 patients underwent curative-intent total gastrectomy for stage I through III gastric adenocarcinoma between 2009 and 2012. Of these, 79 patients (65.8%) were men, and the median (interquartile range) age was 64 (52-70) years. The 51 patients (42.5%) who underwent an uncomplicated total gastrectomy had a mean (SD) normalized cost of MP $12 330 (MP $2500), predominantly owing to the cost of surgical care (mean [SD] cost, MP $6830 [MP $1600]). The 34 patients (28.3%) who had a major complication had a mean (SD) normalized cost of MP $37 700 (MP $28 090). Surgical care was more expensive in these patients (mean [SD] cost, MP $8970 [MP $2750]) but was a smaller contributor to total cost (24%) owing to increased costs from room and board (mean [SD] cost, MP $11 940 [MP $8820]), consultations (mean [SD

  19. Strategies for reducing implant costs in the revision total knee arthroplasty episode of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbuluk, Ameer M; Old, Andrew B; Bosco, Joseph A; Schwarzkopf, Ran; Iorio, Richard

    2017-12-01

    Implant price has been identified as a significant contributing factor to high costs associated with revision total knee arthroplasty (rTKA). The goal of this study is to analyze the cost of implants used in rTKAs and to compare this pricing with 2 alternative pricing models. Using our institutional database, we identified 52 patients from January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2014. Average cost of components for each case was calculated and compared to the total hospital cost for that admission. Costs for an all-component revision were then compared to a proposed "direct to hospital" (DTH) standardized pricing model and a fixed price revision option. Potential savings were calculated from these figures. On average, 28% of the total hospital cost was spent on implants for rTKA. The average cost for revision of all components was $13,640 and ranged from $3000 to $28,000. On average, this represented 32.7% of the total hospital cost. Direct to hospital implant pricing could potentially save approximately $7000 per rTKA, and the fixed pricing model could provide a further $1000 reduction per rTKA-potentially saving $8000 per case on implants alone. Alternative implant pricing models could help lower the total cost of rTKA, which would allow hospitals to achieve significant cost containment.

  20. A decision-making framework for total ownership cost management of complex systems: A Delphi study

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Russel J.

    This qualitative study, using a modified Delphi method, was conducted to develop a decision-making framework for the total ownership cost management of complex systems in the aerospace industry. The primary focus of total ownership cost is to look beyond the purchase price when evaluating complex system life cycle alternatives. A thorough literature review and the opinions of a group of qualified experts resulted in a compilation of total ownership cost best practices, cost drivers, key performance factors, applicable assessment methods, practitioner credentials and potential barriers to effective implementation. The expert panel provided responses to the study questions using a 5-point Likert-type scale. Data were analyzed and provided to the panel members for review and discussion with the intent to achieve group consensus. As a result of the study, the experts agreed that a total ownership cost analysis should (a) be as simple as possible using historical data; (b) establish cost targets, metrics, and penalties early in the program; (c) monitor the targets throughout the product lifecycle and revise them as applicable historical data becomes available; and (d) directly link total ownership cost elements with other success factors during program development. The resultant study framework provides the business leader with incentives and methods to develop and implement strategies for controlling and reducing total ownership cost over the entire product life cycle when balancing cost, schedule, and performance decisions.

  1. Animal board invited review: Dairy cow lameness expenditures, losses and total cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolecheck, K; Bewley, J

    2018-03-20

    Lameness is one of the most costly dairy cow diseases, yet adoption of lameness prevention strategies remains low. Low lameness prevention adoption might be attributable to a lack of understanding regarding total lameness costs. In this review, we evaluated the contribution of different expenditures and losses to total lameness costs. Evaluated expenditures included labor for treatment, therapeutic supplies, lameness detection and lameness control and prevention. Evaluated losses included non-saleable milk, reduced milk production, reduced reproductive performance, increased animal death, increased animal culling, disease interrelationships, lameness recurrence and reduced animal welfare. The previous literature on total lameness cost estimates was also summarized. The reviewed studies indicated that previous estimates of total lameness costs are variable and inconsistent in the expenditures and losses they include. Many of the identified expenditure and loss categories require further research to accurately include in total lameness cost estimates. Future research should focus on identifying costs associated with specific lameness conditions, differing lameness severity levels, and differing stages of lactation at onset of lameness to provide better total lameness cost estimates that can be useful for decision making at both the herd and individual cow level.

  2. [Preliminary analysis of total cost and life quality for elder patients with femoral neck fracture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haonan; He, Liang; Zhang, Guilin; Gong, Xiaofeng; Li, Ning

    2015-09-01

    To analyze the total cost and life quality of the femoral neck fracture patients who received different surgery and supplement comprehensive data of osteoporotic fracture. One hundred and five patients above 60-year old who were diagnosed femoral neck fracture and received operation in Department of Orthopedics & Traumatology, Beijing Jishuitan Hospital were admitted into our study from August 2013 to December. According to the type of surgery there were 52 and 53 cases in internal fixation (IF) group and hemiarthroplasty (HA) group respectively. At first we collected the medical expense of the patients before and during hospitalization. And then the 1-year medical and non-medical expenses were collected by the cost diary ever 3 months after discharge. At the last follow-up we evaluated the life quality by the EuroQol-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) and calculated the total cost. Outcome All the patients completed the operation successfully. No nonunion or delayed union cases in IF group, and no cases received revision surgery in both groups. The total average cost was 59 584.9 yuan including 79.1% medical cost and 20.9% non-medical cost. The primary treatment cost accounts for 84.1% of the medical cost. The cost for home care accounts for 90.7% of the non-medical care. The total and medical cost of IF group just account for 40.3% and 38.5% of the HA group and the non-medical showed no significant difference between the 2 groups (P>0.05). In addition the data of life quality and walking capability also showed no significant difference. The main cost for the femoral neck fracture is medical expense in 1-year follow-up. Both surgeries can provide satisfactory outcome, however IF may be more cost-effective compared to the HA because of the less total cost.

  3. Resource use and costs associated with opioid-induced constipation following total hip or total knee replacement surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wittbrodt ET

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Eric T Wittbrodt,1 Tong J Gan,2 Catherine Datto,1 Charles McLeskey,1 Meenal Sinha3 1US Medical Affairs, AstraZeneca, Wilmington, DE, USA; 2Department of Anesthesiology, Stony Brook Medicine, Stony Brook, NY, USA; 3Premier Applied Sciences, Premier, Inc., Charlotte, NC, USA Purpose: Constipation is a well-known complication of surgery that can be exacerbated by opioid analgesics. This study evaluated resource utilization and costs associated with opioid-induced constipation (OIC. Patients and methods: This retrospective, observational, and propensity-matched cohort study utilized the Premier Healthcare Database. The study included adults ≥18 years of age undergoing total hip or total knee replacement as inpatients who received an opioid analgesic and were discharged between January 1, 2012, and June 30, 2015. Diagnosis codes identified patients with OIC who were then matched 1:1 to patients without OIC. Generalized linear and logistic regression models were used to compare inpatient resource utilization, total hospital costs, inpatient mortality, and 30-day all-cause readmissions and emergency department visits. Results: Of 788,448 eligible patients, 40,891 (5.2% had OIC. Covariates were well balanced between matched patients with and without OIC (n=40,890 each. In adjusted analyses, patients with OIC had longer hospital lengths of stay (3.6 versus 3.3 days; p<0.001, higher total hospital costs (US$17,479 versus US$16,265; p<0.001, greater risk of intensive care unit admission (odds ratio [OR]=1.12, 95% CI: 1.01–1.24, and increased likelihood of 30-day hospital readmissions (OR=1.16, 95% CI: 1.11–1.22 and emergency department visits (OR=1.38, 95% CI: 1.07–1.79 than patients without OIC. No statistically significant difference was found with inpatient mortality (OR=0.89, 95% CI: 0.59–1.35. Conclusion: OIC was associated with greater resource utilization and hospital costs for patients undergoing primarily elective total hip or total knee

  4. Using value-based total cost of ownership (TCO) measures to inform subsystem trade-offs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radziwill, Nicole M.; DuPlain, Ronald F.

    2010-07-01

    Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) is a metric from management accounting that helps expose both the direct and indirect costs of a business decision. However, TCO can sometimes be too simplistic for "make vs. buy" decisions (or even choosing between competing design alternatives) when value and extensibility are more critical than total cost. A three-dimensional value-based TCO, which was developed to clarify product decisions for an observatory prior to Final Design Review (FDR), will be presented in this session. This value-based approach incorporates priority of requirements, satisfiability of requirements, and cost, and can be easily applied in any environment.

  5. Determining the total cost of reverse supply chain operations for original equipment manufacturers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Samuel Brüning; Jacobsen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    When original equipment manufacturers (OEM) examine whether or not to invest in a reverse supply chain (RSC), managers need insight into not only the cost savings and new revenue streams the RSC enables, but also the total cost of the RSC itself. Using case study research the study examines what...... cost parameters constitute the total cost (TC) of the RSC. The specific RSC that the study seeks the TC for consists of 1) end-product refurbishing, 2) component refurbishing, and 3) sales of used materials back to original suppliers or independent recyclers for materials recycling....

  6. Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling Equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsden, T.

    2013-04-01

    This report discusses an analysis of the total cost of ownership of fuel cell-powered and traditional battery-powered material handling equipment (MHE, or more typically 'forklifts'). A number of fuel cell MHE deployments have received funding support from the federal government. Using data from these government co-funded deployments, DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has been evaluating the performance of fuel cells in material handling applications. NREL has assessed the total cost of ownership of fuel cell MHE and compared it to the cost of ownership of traditional battery-powered MHE. As part of its cost of ownership assessment, NREL looked at a range of costs associated with MHE operation, including the capital costs of battery and fuel cell systems, the cost of supporting infrastructure, maintenance costs, warehouse space costs, and labor costs. Considering all these costs, NREL found that fuel cell MHE can have a lower overall cost of ownership than comparable battery-powered MHE.

  7. Variation in the cost of care for primary total knee arthroplasties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Derek A; Kaplan, Robert S

    2017-03-01

    The study examined the cost variation across 29 high-volume US hospitals and their affiliated orthopaedic surgeons for delivering a primary total knee arthroplasty without major complicating conditions. The hospitals had similar patient demographics, and more than 80% of them had statistically-similar Medicare risk-adjusted readmission and complication rates. Hospital and physician personnel costs were calculated using time-driven activity-based costing. Consumable supply costs, such as the prosthetic implant, were calculated using purchase prices, and postacute care costs were measured using either internal costs or external claims as reported by each hospital. Despite having similar patient demographics and readmission and complication rates, the average cost of care for total knee arthroplasty across the hospitals varied by a factor of about 2 to 1. Even after adjusting for differences in internal labor cost rates, the hospital at the 90th percentile of cost spent about twice as much as the one at the 10th percentile of cost. The large variation in costs among sites suggests major and multiple opportunities to transfer knowledge about process and productivity improvements that lower costs while simultaneously maintaining or improving outcomes.

  8. Total life-cycle cost analysis of conventional and alternative fueled vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardullo, M.W.

    1993-01-01

    Total Life-Cycle Cost (TLCC) Analysis can indicate whether paying higher capital costs for advanced technology with low operating and/or environmental costs is advantageous over paying lower capital costs for conventional technology with higher operating and/or environmental costs. While minimizing total life-cycle cost is an important consideration, the consumer often identifies non-cost-related benefits or drawbacks that make more expensive options appear more attractive. The consumer is also likely to heavily weigh initial capital costs while giving limited consideration to operating and/or societal costs, whereas policy-makers considering external costs, such as those resulting from environmental impacts, may reach significantly different conclusions about which technologies are most advantageous to society. This paper summarizes a TLCC model which was developed to facilitate consideration of the various factors involved in both individual and societal policy decision making. The model was developed as part of a US Department of Energy Contract and has been revised to reflect changes necessary to make the model more realistic. The model considers capital, operating, salvage, and environmental costs for cars, vans, and buses using conventional and alternative fuels. The model has been developed to operate on an IBM or compatible personal computer platform using the commercial spreadsheet program MicroSoft Excell reg-sign Version 4 for Windows reg-sign and can be easily kept current because its modular structure allows straightforward access to embedded data sets for review and update

  9. Reduction of Total Ownership Costs (R-TOC) Best Practices Guide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reed, Danny

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the Reduction of Total Ownership Costs (R-TOC) program is to achieve readiness improvements in weapon systems by improving the reliability of the systems or the efficiency of the processes used to support...

  10. Do illness rating systems predict discharge location, length of stay, and cost after total hip arthroplasty?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E. Rudasill, BA

    2018-06-01

    Conclusions: These findings suggest that although ASA classifications predict discharge location and SOI scores predict length of stay and total costs, other factors beyond illness rating systems remain stronger predictors of discharge for THA patients.

  11. Minimizing total costs of forest roads with computer-aided design ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    imum total road costs, while conforming to design specifications, environmental ..... quality, and enhancing fish and wildlife habitat, an appropriate design ..... Soil, Water and Timber Management: Forest Engineering Solutions in Response to.

  12. Use of predefined biochemical admission profiles does not reduce the number of tests or total cost

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pareek, Manan; Haidl, Felix; Folkestad, Lars

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate whether the use of predefined biochemical profiles as an alternative to individually ordered blood tests by the treating physicians resulted in fewer tests or a lower total cost.......The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate whether the use of predefined biochemical profiles as an alternative to individually ordered blood tests by the treating physicians resulted in fewer tests or a lower total cost....

  13. Comparative cost analyses: total flow vs other power conversion systems for the Salton Sea Geothermal Resource

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, G.W.

    1978-09-18

    Cost studies were done for Total Flow, double flash, and multistage flash binary systems for electric Energy production from the Salton Sea Geothermal Resource. The purpose was to provide the Department of energy's Division of Geothermal Energy with information by which to judge whether to continue development of the Total Flow system. Results indicate that the Total Flow and double flash systems have capital costs of $1,135 and $1,026 /kW with energy costs of 40.9 and 39.7 mills/kW h respectively. The Total Flow and double flash systems are not distinguishable on a cost basis alone; the multistage flash binary system, with capital cost of $1,343 /kW and energy cost of 46.9 mills/kW h, is significantly more expensive. If oil savings are considered in the total analysis, the Total Flow system could save 30% more oil than the double flash system, $3.5 billion at 1978 oil prices.

  14. Cost of Radiotherapy Versus NSAID Administration for Prevention of Heterotopic Ossification After Total Hip Arthroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, Jonathan B.; Chen, Sea S.; Shah, Anand P.; Coon, Alan B.; Dickler, Adam

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Heterotopic ossification (HO), or abnormal bone formation, is a common sequela of total hip arthroplasty. This abnormal bone can impair joint function and must be surgically removed to restore mobility. HO can be prevented by postoperative nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use or radiotherapy (RT). NSAIDs are associated with multiple toxicities, including gastrointestinal bleeding. Although RT has been shown to be more efficacious than NSAIDs at preventing HO, its cost-effectiveness has been questioned. Methods and Materials: We performed an analysis of the cost of postoperative RT to the hip compared with NSAID administration, taking into account the costs of surgery for HO formation, treatment-induced morbidity, and productivity loss from missed work. The costs of RT, surgical revision, and treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding were estimated using the 2007 Medicare Fee Schedule and inpatient diagnosis-related group codes. The cost of lost wages was estimated using the 2006 median salary data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Results: The cost of administering RT was estimated at $899 vs. $20 for NSAID use. After accounting for the additional costs associated with revision total hip arthroplasty and gastrointestinal bleeding, the corresponding estimated costs were $1,208 vs. $930. Conclusion: If the costs associated with treatment failure and treatment-induced morbidity are considered, the cost of NSAIDs approaches that of RT. Other NSAID morbidities and quality-of-life differences that are difficult to quantify add to the cost of NSAIDs. These considerations have led us to recommend RT as the preferred modality for use in prophylaxis against HO after total hip arthroplasty, even when the cost is considered

  15. Time-driven activity based costing of total knee replacement surgery at a London teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Alvin; Sabharwal, Sanjeeve; Akhtar, Kashif; Makaram, Navnit; Gupte, Chinmay M

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a time-driven activity based costing (TDABC) analysis of the clinical pathway for total knee replacement (TKR) and to determine where the major cost drivers lay. The in-patient pathway was prospectively mapped utilising a TDABC model, following 20 TKRs. The mean age for these patients was 73.4 years. All patients were ASA grade I or II and their mean BMI was 30.4. The 14 varus knees had a mean deformity of 5.32° and the six valgus knee had a mean deformity of 10.83°. Timings were prospectively collected as each patient was followed through the TKR pathway. Pre-operative costs including pre-assessment and joint school were £ 163. Total staff costs for admission and the operating theatre were £ 658. Consumables cost for the operating theatre were £ 1862. The average length of stay was 5.25 days at a total cost of £ 910. Trust overheads contributed £ 1651. The overall institutional cost of a 'noncomplex' TKR in patients without substantial medical co-morbidities was estimated to be £ 5422, representing a profit of £ 1065 based on a best practice tariff of £ 6487. The major cost drivers in the TKR pathway were determined to be theatre consumables, corporate overheads, overall ward cost and operating theatre staffing costs. Appropriate discounting of implant costs, reduction in length of stay by adopting an enhanced recovery programme and control of corporate overheads through the use of elective orthopaedic treatment centres are proposed approaches for reducing the overall cost of treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Analysis of the total system life cycle cost for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-05-01

    The total-system life-cycle cost (TSLCC) analysis for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program is an ongoing activity that helps determine whether the revenue-producing mechanism established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 -- a fee levied on electricity generated in commercial nuclear power plants -- is sufficient to cover the cost of the program. This report provides cost estimates for the sixth annual evaluation of the adequacy of the fee and is consistent with the program strategy and plans contained in the DOE's Draft 1988 Mission Plan Amendment. The total-system cost for the system with a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a facility for monitored retrievable storage (MRS), and a transportation system is estimated at $24 billion (expressed in constant 1988 dollars). In the event that a second repository is required and is authorized by the Congress, the total-system cost is estimated at $31 to $33 billion, depending on the quantity of spent fuel to be disposed of. The $7 billion cost savings for the single-repository system in comparison with the two-repository system is due to the elimination of $3 billion for second-repository development and $7 billion for the second-repository facility. These savings are offset by $2 billion in additional costs at the first repository and $1 billion in combined higher costs for the MRS facility and transportation. 55 refs., 2 figs., 24 tabs

  17. Pre-fracture individual characteristics associated with high total health care costs after hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schousboe, J T; Paudel, M L; Taylor, B C; Kats, A M; Virnig, B A; Dowd, B E; Langsetmo, L; Ensrud, K E

    2017-03-01

    Older women with pre-fracture slow walk speed, high body mass index, and/or a high level of multimorbidity have significantly higher health care costs after hip fracture compared to those without those characteristics. Studies to investigate if targeted health care interventions for these individuals can reduce hip fracture costs are warranted. The aim of this study is to estimate the associations of individual pre-fracture characteristics with total health care costs after hip fracture, using Study of Osteoporotic Fractures (SOF) cohort data linked to Medicare claims. Our study population was 738 women age 70 and older enrolled in Medicare Fee for Service (FFS) who experienced an incident hip fracture between January 1, 1992 and December 31, 2009. We assessed pre-fracture individual characteristics at SOF study visits and estimated costs of hospitalizations, skilled nursing facility and inpatient rehabilitation stays, home health care visits, and outpatient utilization from Medicare FFS claims. We used generalized linear models to estimate the associations of predictor variables with total health care costs (2010 US dollars) after hip fracture. Median total health care costs for 1 year after hip fracture were $35,536 (inter-quartile range $24,830 to $50,903). Multivariable-adjusted total health care costs for 1 year after hip fracture were 14 % higher ($5256, 95 % CI $156 to $10,356) in those with walk speed total health care costs after hip fracture in older women. Studies to investigate if targeted health care interventions for these individuals can reduce the costs of hip fractures are warranted.

  18. The Relationship between Cost Leadership Strategy, Total Quality Management Applications and Financial Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali KURT

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Firms need to implement some competition strategies and total quality management applications to overcome the fierce competition among others. The purpose of this study is to show the relationship between cost leadership strategy, total quality management applications and firms’ financial performance with literature review and empirical analysis. 449 questionnaires were conducted to the managers of 142 big firms. The data gathered was assessed with AMOS. As a result, the relationship between cost leadership strategy, total quality management applications and firms’ financial performance has been gathered. In addition, the relationship between TQM applications and financial performance has also been gathered.

  19. Clinical benefit and cost effectiveness of total knee arthroplasty in the older patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krummenauer F

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Total knee arthroplasty (TKA is an effective, but also cost-intensive health care procedure for the elderly. Furthermore, bearing demographic changes in Western Europe in mind, TKA-associated financial investment for health care insurers will increase notably and thereby catalyze discussions on ressource allocation to Orthopedic surgery. To derive a quantitative rationale for such discussions within Western Europe's health care systems, a prospective assessment of both the benefit of TKA from a patient's perspective as well as its cost effectiveness from a health care insurer's perspective was implemented. Methods A prospective cost effectiveness trial recruited a total of 65 patients (60% females, who underwent TKA in 2006; median age of patients was 66 years (interquartile range 61 - 74 years. Before and three months after surgery patients were interviewed by means of the EuroQol-5D and the WOMAC questionnaires to assess their individual benefit due to TKA and the subsequent inpatient rehabilitation. Both questionnaires' benefit estimates were transformed into the number of gained quality adjusted life years [QALYs]. Total direct cost estimates for the overall care were based on German DRG and rehabilitation cost rates [€]. The primary clinical endpoint of the investigation was the individual number of QALYs gained by TKA based on the WOMAC interview; the primary health economic endpoint was the marginal cost effectiveness ratio (MCER relating the costs to the associated gain in quality of life [€/QALY]. Results Total direct costs for the overall procedure were estimed 9549 € in median. The WOMAC based interview revealed an overall gain of 4.59 QALYs (interquartile range 2.39 - 6.21 QALYs, resulting in marginal costs of 1795 €/QALY (1488 - 3288 €/QALY. The corresponding EuroQol based estimates were 2.93 QALYs (1.75 - 5.59 QALYs and 3063 €/QALY (1613 - 5291 €/QALY. Logistic regression modelling identified the

  20. Total costs and benefits of biomass in selected regions of the European Union - BioCosts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, A de; Costa, F B [Coimbra Univ. (Portugal). Inst. de Sistemas e Robotica; Bauen, A [London Univ. (United Kingdom). Div. of Life Sciences; and others

    1998-11-01

    In the BioCosts project, representative biomass-to-electricity and biomass-to-transport-service fuel cycles located at different sites within the European Union have been evaluated concerning their environmental and economic performance. Each case study was compared to a fossil-fuel fired reference case. The case studies examined comprise: utilisation of forestry residues in the Naessjoe circulating fluidized bed combustion plant, Sweden, versus the use of Polish coal in the same plant; utilisation of forestry residues and short-rotation coppice for industrial combined heat and power production in Mangualde, Portugal, versus the use of fuel oil in an engine generating heat and power; production of biogas from manure slurry for municipal combined heat and power generation at Hashoej, Denmark, versus the use of Danish natural gas in the same engine; gasification of woody biomass for combined heat and power generation in Vaernamo, Sweden, and Eggborough, UK, versus the use of coal in the Naessjoe plant mentioned above and a UK power plant; production of cold-pressed rape-seed oil and its use in a cogeneration plant at Weissenburg, Germany, versus the use of diesel fuel in a similar engine; production of rape-seed oil methyl ester and its use for goods transport in Germany, versus the use of diesel fuel in the same fleet of trucks; production of ethyl tertiary butyl ether from sugar beets and sweet sorghum for transport applications in France, versus the use of methyl tertiary butyl ether from fossil sources for the same purpose 130 refs, 25 figs, 42 tabs. Research funded in part by the European Commission in the JOULE III programme

  1. Bearing Procurement Analysis Method by Total Cost of Ownership Analysis and Reliability Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusaji, Wildan; Akbar, Muhammad; Sukoyo; Irianto, Dradjad

    2018-03-01

    In making bearing procurement analysis, price and its reliability must be considered as decision criteria, since price determines the direct cost as acquisition cost and reliability of bearing determine the indirect cost such as maintenance cost. Despite the indirect cost is hard to identify and measured, it has high contribution to overall cost that will be incurred. So, the indirect cost of reliability must be considered when making bearing procurement analysis. This paper tries to explain bearing evaluation method with the total cost of ownership analysis to consider price and maintenance cost as decision criteria. Furthermore, since there is a lack of failure data when bearing evaluation phase is conducted, reliability prediction method is used to predict bearing reliability from its dynamic load rating parameter. With this method, bearing with a higher price but has higher reliability is preferable for long-term planning. But for short-term planning the cheaper one but has lower reliability is preferable. This contextuality can give rise to conflict between stakeholders. Thus, the planning horizon needs to be agreed by all stakeholder before making a procurement decision.

  2. Managing the total cost of risk exposures through risk mapping techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unione, A.J.; Rode, D.M.

    1998-01-01

    In a competitive power market, power producers are exposed to an increasingly broad spectrum of financial risks. The cumulative impact of these financial risks is known collectively as the Total of Cost of Risk. The concept of Total of Cost of Risk presents the business reality of a company's exposure to potentially devastating financial consequences in an integrated and useful way. In this way, a strategy of managing Total Cost of Risk in the most cost effective way can become a means of ensuring long term business health and security. This paper will examine the use of risk mapping as a tool for visually understanding Total Cost of Risk, thus creating an enhanced situational awareness and an integrated basis for risk management decision. The evaluation process, available through the use of risk maps allows the power producers to pro-actively implement prudent business decisions concerning the design, operation and maintenance of power plants. Risk mapping is thus a means for harmonizing operational objectives, such as improved plant reliability, with corporate strategies and goals in terms of an effective risk management program

  3. Time-based analysis of total cost of patient episodes: a case study of hip replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltokorpi, Antti; Kujala, Jaakko

    2006-01-01

    Healthcare in the public and private sectors is facing increasing pressure to become more cost-effective. Time-based competition and work-in-progress have been used successfully to measure and improve the efficiency of industrial manufacturing. Seeks to address this issue. Presents a framework for time based management of the total cost of a patient episode and apply it to the six sigma DMAIC-process development approach. The framework is used to analyse hip replacement patient episodes in Päijät-Häme Hospital District in Finland, which has a catchment area of 210,000 inhabitants and performs an average of 230 hip replacements per year. The work-in-progress concept is applicable to healthcare--notably that the DMAIC-process development approach can be used to analyse the total cost of patient episodes. Concludes that a framework, which combines the patient-in-process and the DMAIC development approach, can be used not only to analyse the total cost of patient episode but also to improve patient process efficiency. Presents a framework that combines patient-in-process and DMAIC-process development approaches, which can be used to analyse the total cost of a patient episode in order to improve patient process efficiency.

  4. Hybrid Cloud Computing Architecture Optimization by Total Cost of Ownership Criterion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Valeryevna Makarenko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Achieving the goals of information security is a key factor in the decision to outsource information technology and, in particular, to decide on the migration of organizational data, applications, and other resources to the infrastructure, based on cloud computing. And the key issue in the selection of optimal architecture and the subsequent migration of business applications and data to the cloud organization information environment is the question of the total cost of ownership of IT infrastructure. This paper focuses on solving the problem of minimizing the total cost of ownership cloud.

  5. Assessment of energetic costs of AhR activation by β-naphthoflavone in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes using metabolic flux analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nault, Rance; Abdul-Fattah, Hiba; Mironov, Gleb G.; Berezovski, Maxim V.; Moon, Thomas W.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to environmental contaminants such as activators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) leads to the induction of defense and detoxification mechanisms. While these mechanisms allow organisms to metabolize and excrete at least some of these environmental contaminants, it has been proposed that these mechanisms lead to significant energetic challenges. This study tests the hypothesis that activation of the AhR by the model agonist β-naphthoflavone (βNF) results in increased energetic costs in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes. To address this hypothesis, we employed traditional biochemical approaches to examine energy allocation and metabolism including the adenylate energy charge (AEC), protein synthesis rates, Na + /K + -ATPase activity, and enzyme activities. Moreover, we have used for the first time in a fish cell preparation, metabolic flux analysis (MFA) an in silico approach for the estimation of intracellular metabolic fluxes. Exposure of trout hepatocytes to 1 μM βNF for 48 h did not alter hepatocyte AEC, protein synthesis, or Na + /K + -ATPase activity but did lead to sparing of glycogen reserves and changes in activities of alanine aminotransferase and citrate synthase suggesting altered metabolism. Conversely, MFA did not identify altered metabolic fluxes, although we do show that the dynamic metabolism of isolated trout hepatocytes poses a significant challenge for this type of approach which should be considered in future studies. - Highlights: • Energetic costs of AhR activation by βNF was examined in rainbow trout hepatocytes. • Metabolic flux analysis was performed on a fish cell preparation for the first time. • Exposure to βNF led to sparing of glycogen reserves and altered enzyme activities. • Adenylate energy charge was maintained despite temporal changes in metabolism

  6. Assessment of energetic costs of AhR activation by β-naphthoflavone in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes using metabolic flux analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nault, Rance, E-mail: naultran@msu.edu [Ottawa-Carleton Institute of Biology, Department of Biology and Centre for Advanced Research in Environmental Genomics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Abdul-Fattah, Hiba [Ottawa-Carleton Institute of Biology, Department of Biology and Centre for Advanced Research in Environmental Genomics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Mironov, Gleb G.; Berezovski, Maxim V. [Ottawa-Carleton Institute of Biology, Department of Biology and Centre for Advanced Research in Environmental Genomics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Moon, Thomas W. [Ottawa-Carleton Institute of Biology, Department of Biology and Centre for Advanced Research in Environmental Genomics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2013-08-15

    Exposure to environmental contaminants such as activators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) leads to the induction of defense and detoxification mechanisms. While these mechanisms allow organisms to metabolize and excrete at least some of these environmental contaminants, it has been proposed that these mechanisms lead to significant energetic challenges. This study tests the hypothesis that activation of the AhR by the model agonist β-naphthoflavone (βNF) results in increased energetic costs in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes. To address this hypothesis, we employed traditional biochemical approaches to examine energy allocation and metabolism including the adenylate energy charge (AEC), protein synthesis rates, Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase activity, and enzyme activities. Moreover, we have used for the first time in a fish cell preparation, metabolic flux analysis (MFA) an in silico approach for the estimation of intracellular metabolic fluxes. Exposure of trout hepatocytes to 1 μM βNF for 48 h did not alter hepatocyte AEC, protein synthesis, or Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase activity but did lead to sparing of glycogen reserves and changes in activities of alanine aminotransferase and citrate synthase suggesting altered metabolism. Conversely, MFA did not identify altered metabolic fluxes, although we do show that the dynamic metabolism of isolated trout hepatocytes poses a significant challenge for this type of approach which should be considered in future studies. - Highlights: • Energetic costs of AhR activation by βNF was examined in rainbow trout hepatocytes. • Metabolic flux analysis was performed on a fish cell preparation for the first time. • Exposure to βNF led to sparing of glycogen reserves and altered enzyme activities. • Adenylate energy charge was maintained despite temporal changes in metabolism.

  7. Total cost estimates for large-scale wind scenarios in UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dale, Lewis; Milborrow, David; Slark, Richard; Strbac, Goran

    2004-01-01

    The recent UK Energy White Paper suggested that the Government should aim to secure 20% of electricity from renewable sources by 2020. A number of estimates of the extra cost of such a commitment have been made, but these have not necessarily included all the relevant cost components. This analysis sets out to identify these and to calculate the extra cost to the electricity consumer, assuming all the renewable electricity is sourced from wind energy. This enables one of the more controversial issues--the implications of wind intermittency--to be addressed. The basis of the assumptions associated with generating costs, extra balancing costs and distribution and transmission system reinforcement costs are all clearly identified and the total costs of a '20% wind' scenario are compared with a scenario where a similar amount of energy is generated by gas-fired plant. This enables the extra costs of the renewables scenario to be determined. The central estimate of the extra costs to electricity consumers is just over 0.3 p/kW h in current prices (around 5% extra on average domestic unit prices). Sensitivity analyses examine the implications of differing assumptions. The extra cost would rise if the capital costs of wind generation fall slower than anticipated, but would fall if gas prices rise more rapidly than has been assumed, or if wind plant are more productive. Even if it is assumed that wind has no capacity displacement value, the added cost to the electricity consumer rises by less than 0.1 p/kW h. It is concluded that there does not appear to be any technical reason why a substantial proportion of the country's electricity requirements could not be delivered by wind

  8. Swimming physiology of European silver eels (Anguilla anguilla L.): energetic costs and effects on sexual maturation and reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palstra, Arjan P; van den Thillart, Guido E E J M

    2010-09-01

    The European eel migrates 5,000-6,000 km to the Sargasso Sea to reproduce. Because they venture into the ocean in a pre-pubertal state and reproduce after swimming for months, a strong interaction between swimming and sexual maturation is expected. Many swimming trials have been performed in 22 swim tunnels to elucidate their performance and the impact on maturation. European eels are able to swim long distances at a cost of 10-12 mg fat/km which is 4-6 times more efficient than salmonids. The total energy costs of reproduction correspond to 67% of the fat stores. During long distance swimming, the body composition stays the same showing that energy consumption calculations cannot be based on fat alone but need to be compensated for protein oxidation. The optimal swimming speed is 0.61-0.67 m s(-1), which is approximately 60% higher than the generally assumed cruise speed of 0.4 m s(-1) and implies that female eels may reach the Sargasso Sea within 3.5 months instead of the assumed 6 months. Swimming trials showed lipid deposition and oocyte growth, which are the first steps of sexual maturation. To investigate effects of oceanic migration on maturation, we simulated group-wise migration in a large swim-gutter with seawater. These trials showed suppressed gonadotropin expression and vitellogenesis in females, while in contrast continued sexual maturation was observed in silver males. The induction of lipid deposition in the oocytes and the inhibition of vitellogenesis by swimming in females suggest a natural sequence of events quite different from artificial maturation protocols.

  9. Total inpatient treatment costs in patients with severe burns: towards a more accurate reimbursement model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Tarun; Koljonen, Virve; Seifert, Burkhardt; Volbracht, Jörk; Giovanoli, Pietro; Plock, Jan; Moos, Rudolf Maria

    2015-01-01

    Reimbursement systems have difficulties depicting the actual cost of burn treatment, leaving care providers with a significant financial burden. Our aim was to establish a simple and accurate reimbursement model compatible with prospective payment systems. A total of 370 966 electronic medical records of patients discharged in 2012 to 2013 from Swiss university hospitals were reviewed. A total of 828 cases of burns including 109 cases of severe burns were retained. Costs, revenues and earnings for severe and nonsevere burns were analysed and a linear regression model predicting total inpatient treatment costs was established. The median total costs per case for severe burns was tenfold higher than for nonsevere burns (179 949 CHF [167 353 EUR] vs 11 312 CHF [10 520 EUR], interquartile ranges 96 782-328 618 CHF vs 4 874-27 783 CHF, p <0.001). The median of earnings per case for nonsevere burns was 588 CHF (547 EUR) (interquartile range -6 720 - 5 354 CHF) whereas severe burns incurred a large financial loss to care providers, with median earnings of -33 178 CHF (30 856 EUR) (interquartile range -95 533 - 23 662 CHF). Differences were highly significant (p <0.001). Our linear regression model predicting total costs per case with length of stay (LOS) as independent variable had an adjusted R2 of 0.67 (p <0.001 for LOS). Severe burns are systematically underfunded within the Swiss reimbursement system. Flat-rate DRG-based refunds poorly reflect the actual treatment costs. In conclusion, we suggest a reimbursement model based on a per diem rate for treatment of severe burns.

  10. The Relationship between Cost Leadership Strategy, Total Quality Management Applications and Financial Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Ali KURT; Cemal ZEHİR

    2016-01-01

    Firms need to implement some competition strategies and total quality management applications to overcome the fierce competition among others. The purpose of this study is to show the relationship between cost leadership strategy, total quality management applications and firms’ financial performance with literature review and empirical analysis. 449 questionnaires were conducted to the managers of 142 big firms. The data gathered was assessed with AMOS. As a result, the relationship between ...

  11. Linking the spare parts management with the total costs of ownership: An agenda for future research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, O.; Roda, I.; Macchi, M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This manuscript explores the link between Spare Parts Management and Total Costs of Ownership or Life Cycle Costs (LCC). Design/methodology/approach: First, this work enumerates the different managerial decisions instances in spare parts management that are present during the life cycle of a physical asset. Second, we analyse how those decision instances could affect the TCO of a physical asset (from the economic point of view). Finally, we propose a conceptual framework for incorporating the spare parts management into a TCO model. Findings: The recent literature lacks discussions on the integration of spare parts management with the Total Costs of Ownership (TCO). Based in an extensive literature revision we can declare that the computation of costs related to spare parts management has been neglected by TCO models. Originality/value: The contribution of this paper is twofold. First, a literature review and identification of a series of spare parts management decision instances and its relationship with TCOs is presented in this paper. Second, a conceptual framework is suggested for linking those decisions instances to a total cost of ownership perspective. Some research questions and future research challenges are presented at the end of this work.

  12. Linking the spare parts management with the total costs of ownership: An agenda for future research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, O.; Roda, I.; Macchi, M.

    2016-07-01

    Purpose: This manuscript explores the link between Spare Parts Management and Total Costs of Ownership or Life Cycle Costs (LCC). Design/methodology/approach: First, this work enumerates the different managerial decisions instances in spare parts management that are present during the life cycle of a physical asset. Second, we analyse how those decision instances could affect the TCO of a physical asset (from the economic point of view). Finally, we propose a conceptual framework for incorporating the spare parts management into a TCO model. Findings: The recent literature lacks discussions on the integration of spare parts management with the Total Costs of Ownership (TCO). Based in an extensive literature revision we can declare that the computation of costs related to spare parts management has been neglected by TCO models. Originality/value: The contribution of this paper is twofold. First, a literature review and identification of a series of spare parts management decision instances and its relationship with TCOs is presented in this paper. Second, a conceptual framework is suggested for linking those decisions instances to a total cost of ownership perspective. Some research questions and future research challenges are presented at the end of this work.

  13. Linking the spare parts management with the total costs of ownership: An agenda for future research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Duran

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This manuscript explores the link between Spare Parts Management and Total Costs of Ownership or Life Cycle Costs (LCC. Design/methodology/approach: First, this work enumerates the different managerial decisions instances in spare parts management that are present during the life cycle of a physical asset. Second, we analyse how those decision instances could affect the TCO of a physical asset (from the economic point of view. Finally, we propose a conceptual framework for incorporating the spare parts management into a TCO model. Findings: The recent literature lacks discussions on the integration of spare parts management with the Total Costs of Ownership (TCO. Based in an extensive literature revision we can declare that the computation of costs related to spare parts management has been neglected by TCO models. Originality/value: The contribution of this paper is twofold. First, a literature review and identification of a series of spare parts management decision instances and its relationship with TCOs is presented in this paper. Second, a conceptual framework is suggested for linking those decisions instances to a total cost of ownership perspective. Some research questions and future research challenges are presented at the end of this work.

  14. Total hip arthroplasty revision due to infection: a cost analysis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klouche, S; Sariali, E; Mamoudy, P

    2010-04-01

    The treatment of total hip arthroplasty (THA) infections is long and costly. However,the number of studies in the literature analysing the real cost of THA revision in relation to their etiology, including infection, is limited. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the cost of revision of infected THA and to compare these costs to those of primary THA and revision of non-infected THA. We performed a retrospective cost analysis for the year 2006 using an identical analytic accounting system in each hospital department (according to internal criteria) based on allotment of direct costs and receipts for each department. From January to December 2006, 424 primary THA, 57 non-infected THA revisions and 40 THA revisions due to infection were performed. The different cost areas of the patient's treatment were identified.This included preoperative medical work-up, medicosurgical management during hospital stay,a second stay in an orthopedic rehabilitation hospital (ORH) and post-hospitalisation antibiotic therapy after revision due to infection, as well as home-based hospitalisation (HH) costs, if this was the selected alternative option. We used the national health insurance fee schedule found in the "Common classification of medical procedures" and the "General nomenclature of professional procedures" applicable in France since September 1, 2005. Hospital costs included direct costs (hospital overhead costs) and indirect costs, (medical, surgical, technical settings and net general service expenses). The calculation of HH costs and ORH costs were based on the average daily charge of these departments. The cost of primary THA was used as the reference.We then compared our surgical costs with those found for the corresponding comparable hospital stay groups (Groupes homogènes de séjour). The average hospital stay (AHS) was 7.5 +/- 1.8 days for primary THA, 8.9 +/- 2.2 days for non-infected revisions and 30.6 +/- 14.9 days for revisions due to infection

  15. A METHOD OF THE MINIMIZING OF THE TOTAL ACQUISITIONS COST WITH THE INCREASING VARIABLE DEMAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELEONORA IONELA FOCȘAN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Over time, mankind has tried to find different ways of costs reduction. This subject which we are facing more often nowadays, has been detailed studied, without reaching a general model, and also efficient, regarding the costs reduction. Costs reduction entails a number of benefits over the entity, the most important being: increase revenue and default to the profit, increase productivity, a higher level of services / products offered to clients, and last but not least, the risk mitigation of the economic deficit. Therefore, each entity search different modes to obtain most benefits, for the company to succeed in a competitive market. This article supports the companies, trying to make known a new way of minimizing the total cost of acquisitions, by presenting some hypotheses about the increasing variable demand, proving them, and development of formulas for reducing the costs. The hypotheses presented in the model described below, can be maximally exploited to obtain new models of reducing the total cost, according to the modes of the purchase of entities which approach it.

  16. Total cost of ownership in the services sector: A case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Hurkens (Krisje); W. van der Valk (Wendy); J.Y.F. Wynstra (Finn)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractFew detailed studies exist of the trade-offs to be made when developing a comprehensive, strategically focused total cost of ownership (TCO) model. Moreover, most studies of TCO have been conducted in manufacturing firms, with little or no TCO research directed toward service

  17. Multi-Product Total Cost of Function for Higher Education: A Case of Bible Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshal, Rajindar K.; Koshal, Manjulika; Gupta, Ashok

    2001-01-01

    This study empirically estimates a multiproduct total cost function and output relationship for comprehensive U.S. universities. Statistical results for 184 Bible colleges suggest that there are both economies of scale and of scope in higher education. Additionally, product-specific economies of scope exist for all output levels and activities.…

  18. Permanent magnet design for magnetic heat pumps using total cost minimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teyber, R.; Trevizoli, P. V.; Christiaanse, T. V.; Govindappa, P.; Niknia, I.; Rowe, A.

    2017-11-01

    The active magnetic regenerator (AMR) is an attractive technology for efficient heat pumps and cooling systems. The costs associated with a permanent magnet for near room temperature applications are a central issue which must be solved for broad market implementation. To address this problem, we present a permanent magnet topology optimization to minimize the total cost of cooling using a thermoeconomic cost-rate balance coupled with an AMR model. A genetic algorithm identifies cost-minimizing magnet topologies. For a fixed temperature span of 15 K and 4.2 kg of gadolinium, the optimal magnet configuration provides 3.3 kW of cooling power with a second law efficiency (ηII) of 0.33 using 16.3 kg of permanent magnet material.

  19. Time-driven Activity-based Cost of Fast-Track Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Signe E; Holm, Henriette B; Jørgensen, Mira

    2017-01-01

    this between 2 departments with different logistical set-ups. METHODS: Prospective data collection was analyzed using the time-driven activity-based costing method (TDABC) on time consumed by different staff members involved in patient treatment in the perioperative period of fast-track THA and TKA in 2 Danish...... orthopedic departments with standardized fast-track settings, but different logistical set-ups. RESULTS: Length of stay was median 2 days in both departments. TDABC revealed minor differences in the perioperative settings between departments, but the total cost excluding the prosthesis was similar at USD......-track methodology, the result could be a more cost-effective pathway altogether. As THA and TKA are potentially costly procedures and the numbers are increasing in an economical limited environment, the aim of this study is to present baseline detailed economical calculations of fast-track THA and TKA and compare...

  20. Cost Analysis of Total Joint Arthroplasty Readmissions in a Bundled Payment Care Improvement Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clair, Andrew J; Evangelista, Perry J; Lajam, Claudette M; Slover, James D; Bosco, Joseph A; Iorio, Richard

    2016-09-01

    The Bundled Payment for Care Improvement (BPCI) Initiative is a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services program designed to promote coordinated and efficient care. This study seeks to report costs of readmissions within a 90-day episode of care for BPCI Initiative patients receiving total knee arthroplasty (TKA) or total hip arthroplasty (THA). From January 2013 through December 2013, 1 urban, tertiary, academic orthopedic hospital admitted 664 patients undergoing either primary TKA or THA through the BPCI Initiative. All patients readmitted to our hospital or an outside hospital within 90-days from the index episode were identified. The diagnosis and cost for each readmission were analyzed. Eighty readmissions in 69 of 664 patients (10%) were identified within 90-days. There were 53 readmissions (45 patients) after THA and 27 readmissions (24 patients) after TKA. Surgical complications accounted for 54% of THA readmissions and 44% of TKA readmissions. These complications had an average cost of $36,038 (range, $6375-$60,137) for THA and $38,953 (range, $4790-$104,794) for TKA. Eliminating the TKA outlier of greater than $100,000 yields an average cost of $27,979. Medical complications of THA and TKA had an average cost of $22,775 (range, $5678-$82,940) for THA and $24,183 (range, $3306-$186,069) for TKA. Eliminating the TKA outlier of greater than $100,000 yields an average cost of $11,682. Hospital readmissions after THA and TKA are common and costly. Identifying the causes for readmission and assessing the cost will guide quality improvement efforts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Impact Of Health Care Delivery System Innovations On Total Cost Of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kevin W; Bir, Anupa; Freeman, Nikki L B; Koethe, Benjamin C; Cohen, Julia; Day, Timothy J

    2017-03-01

    Using delivery system innovations to advance health care reform continues to be of widespread interest. However, it is difficult to generalize about the success of specific types of innovations, since they have been examined in only a few studies. To gain a broader perspective, we analyzed the results of forty-three ambulatory care programs funded by the first round of the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation's Health Care Innovations Awards. The innovations' impacts on total cost of care were estimated by independent evaluators using multivariable difference-in-differences models. Through the first two years, most of the innovations did not show a significant effect on total cost of care. Using meta-regression, we assessed the effects on costs of five common components of these innovations. Innovations that used health information technology or community health workers achieved the greatest cost savings. Savings were also relatively large in programs that targeted clinically fragile patients-clinically complex populations at risk for disease progression. While the magnitude of these effects was often substantial, none achieved conventional levels of significance in our analyses. Meta-analyses of a larger number of delivery system innovations are needed to more clearly establish their potential for patient care cost savings. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  2. Physiological constraints and energetic costs of diving behaviour in marine mammals: a review of studies using trained Steller sea lions diving in the open ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, David A S; Hindle, Allyson G; Gerlinsky, Carling D; Goundie, Elizabeth; Hastie, Gordon D; Volpov, Beth L; Trites, Andrew W

    2017-01-01

    Marine mammals are characterized as having physiological specializations that maximize the use of oxygen stores to prolong time spent under water. However, it has been difficult to undertake the requisite controlled studies to determine the physiological limitations and trade-offs that marine mammals face while diving in the wild under varying environmental and nutritional conditions. For the past decade, Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus) trained to swim and dive in the open ocean away from the physical confines of pools participated in studies that investigated the interactions between diving behaviour, energetic costs, physiological constraints, and prey availability. Many of these studies measured the cost of diving to understand how it varies with behaviour and environmental and physiological conditions. Collectively, these studies show that the type of diving (dive bouts or single dives), the level of underwater activity, the depth and duration of dives, and the nutritional status and physical condition of the animal affect the cost of diving and foraging. They show that dive depth, dive and surface duration, and the type of dive result in physiological adjustments (heart rate, gas exchange) that may be independent of energy expenditure. They also demonstrate that changes in prey abundance and nutritional status cause sea lions to alter the balance between time spent at the surface acquiring oxygen (and offloading CO 2 and other metabolic by-products) and time spent at depth acquiring prey. These new insights into the physiological basis of diving behaviour further our understanding of the potential scope for behavioural responses of marine mammals to environmental changes, the energetic significance of these adjustments, and the consequences of approaching physiological limits.

  3. Using Electromagnetic Algorithm for Total Costs of Sub-contractor Optimization in the Cellular Manufacturing Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Shahriari

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a non-linear binary programing for optimizing a specific cost in cellular manufacturing system in a controlled production condition. The system parameters are determined by the continuous distribution functions. The aim of the presented model is to optimize the total cost of imposed sub-contractors to the manufacturing system by determining how to allocate the machines and parts to each seller. In this system, DM could control the occupation level of each machine in the system. For solving the presented model, we used the electromagnetic meta-heuristic algorithm and Taguchi method for determining the optimal algorithm parameters.

  4. Cost-Effective Mobile-Based Healthcare System for Managing Total Joint Arthroplasty Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitsaki, Marina; Koutras, George; Heep, Hansjoerg; Koutras, Christos

    2017-01-01

    Long-term follow-up care after total joint arthroplasty is essential to evaluate hip and knee arthroplasty outcomes, to provide information to physicians and improve arthroplasty performance, and to improve patients' health condition. In this paper, we aim to improve the communication between arthroplasty patients and physicians and to reduce the cost of follow-up controls based on mobile application technologies and cloud computing. We propose a mobile-based healthcare system that provides cost-effective follow-up controls for primary arthroplasty patients through questions about symptoms in the replaced joint, questionnaires (WOMAC and SF-36v2) and the radiological examination of knee or hip joint. We also perform a cost analysis for a set of 423 patients that were treated in the University Clinic for Orthopedics in Essen-Werden. The estimation of healthcare costs shows significant cost savings (a reduction of 63.67% for readmission rate 5%) in both the University Clinic for Orthopedics in Essen-Werden and the state of North Rhine-Westphalia when the mobile-based healthcare system is applied. We propose a mHealth system to reduce the cost of follow-up assessments of arthroplasty patients through evaluation of diagnosis, self-monitoring, and regular review of their health status.

  5. Cost per case or total cost? The potential of prevention of hand injuries in young children – Retrospective and prospective studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlsson Katarina

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health-care costs for hand and forearm injuries in young children are poorly documented. We examined costs in 533 children injured years 1996–2003. Methods Health-care costs and costs for lost productivity were retrospectively calculated in children from three catchment areas in Sweden. Seven case categories corresponding to alternative prevention strategies were constructed. Results Over time, diminishing number of ward days reduced the health-care cost per case. Among children, the cost of lost productivity due to parental leave was 14 percent of total cost. Fingertip injuries had low median costs but high total costs due to their frequency. Complex injuries by machine or rifle had high costs per case, and despite a low number of cases, total cost was high. Type of injury, surgery and physiotherapy sessions were associated with variations in health-care cost. Low age and ethnic background had a significant effect on number of ward days. Conclusion The costs per hand injury for children were lower compared to adults due to both lower health-care costs and to the fact that parents had comparatively short periods of absence from work. Frequent simple fingertip injuries and rare complex injuries induce high costs for society. Such costs should be related to costs for prevention of these injuries.

  6. 12 CFR Appendix K to Part 226 - Total Annual Loan Cost Rate Computations for Reverse Mortgage Transactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Appendix K to Part 226—Total Annual Loan Cost Rate Computations for Reverse Mortgage Transactions (a... loan cost rate for various transactions, as well as instructions, explanations, and examples for.... (2) Term of the transaction. For purposes of total annual loan cost disclosures, the term of a...

  7. Incorporating a total cost perspective intothe purchasing strategy : A case study of amedium sized retail compan

    OpenAIRE

    EKSTRÖM, MARCUS; FAHNEHJELM, CAROLINA

    2016-01-01

    The retail industry is today characterized by downward price pressure, and the increasedcompetition in the industry has led to pressure on profit margins. Purchasing and supply chainmanagement have become areas of increased strategic importance and play a crucial role inthe business performance. This study aims to extend previous literature in these fields byproviding the existing research with an empirical study on how the purchasing strategy canincorporate a total cost perspective of the su...

  8. Clinical and cost effectiveness-related aspects of retransfusion in total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobosz, Bartłomiej; Dutka, Julian; Dutka, Lukasz; Maleta, Paweł

    2012-01-01

    An increasing demand for blood products forces the rationalisation of management and conservation of blood. The aim of the study is to evaluate the possibility of retransfusion of blood conservation and the cost-effectiveness of this procedure when employed in Total Hip Replacement and Total Knee Arthroplasty. This prospective cohort study involved two groups of patients. Group I comprised 50 patients who underwent blood retransfusion and in several cases had supplementary allogeneic transfusion. Group II, a control group, consisted of 50 patients who did not receive retransfusion. The retransfusion in Group I enabled the recovery of a mean amount of 364.5 ml (± 52.7) of blood in THR patients and 403.8 ml (± 110.7) in TKA patients. Demand for allogeneic blood transfusions in Group I versus Group II was 46% lower in THR patients and 42% lower in TKA patients. The blood recovered for retransfusion is biologically valuable with regard to cellular elements and plasma chemistries. In the costs evaluation, the total savings in Group I were 5,000 PLN. Retransfusion of recuperated blood from postoperative drainage tubing is a simple and safe method that provides clinical and cost-effectiveness advantages.

  9. Changes in Energy Cost and Total External Work of Muscles in Elite Race Walkers Walking at Different Speeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chwała Wiesław

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to assess energy cost and total external work (total energy depending on the speed of race walking. Another objective was to determine the contribution of external work to total energy cost of walking at technical, threshold and racing speed in elite competitive race walkers.

  10. Episode of Care Payments in Total Joint Arthroplasty and Cost Minimization Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwachukwu, Benedict U; O'Donnell, Evan; McLawhorn, Alexander S; Cross, Michael B

    2016-02-01

    Total joint arthroplasty (TJA) is receiving significant attention in the US health care system for cost containment strategies. Specifically, payer organizations have embraced and are implementing bundled payment schemes in TJA. Consequently, hospitals and providers involved in the TJA care cycle have sought to adapt to the new financial pressures imposed by episode of care payment models by analyzing what components of the total "event" of a TJA are most essential to achieve a good outcome after TJA. As part of this review, we analyze and discuss a health economic study by Snow et al. As part of their study, the authors aimed to understand the association between preoperative physical therapy (PT) and post-acute care resource utilization, and its effect on the total cost of care during total joint arthroplasty. The purpose of this current review therefore is to (1) describe and analyze the findings presented by Snow et al. and (2) provide a framework for analyzing and critiquing economic analyses in orthopedic surgery. The study under review, while having important strengths, has several notable limitations that are important to keep in mind when making policy and coverage decisions. We support cautious interpretation and application of study results, and we encourage maintained attention to economic analysis in orthopedics as well as continued care path redesign to maximize value for patients and health care providers.

  11. Methodology of Evaluation of the Impact of Picking Area Location on the Total Costs of Warehouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apsalons Raitis

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The picking system and the layout of the picking area are the key drivers for the evaluation of a warehouse picking cost. There are five variants for organizing the picking process of orders in a warehouse. The choice of a specific variant depends on the total cost of picking. The picking cost is evaluated within an uninterrupted picking process. It means that no stock out occurs in the time period of the picking process. The storing area and the picking area are created as two separate zones for picking quantities of the customer’s orders; the principle of division of orders is observed strictly. Referring to the locations of stock keeping units (SKU, two approaches of the layout of SKU in the picking area can be estimated. The first one is the single picking location for each single SKU, where replenishment is realized in the picking process. The second one - various picking locations for each single SKU, and the replenishment here is realized just only prior to a picking process or after it. The main benefits of the economy of the picking cost as far as these two approaches are concerned are the shortest picking route in the first case and one common replenishment option in the second case.

  12. Dark respiration of leaves and traps of terrestrial carnivorous plants: are there greater energetic costs in traps?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adamec, Lubomír

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 1 (2010), s. 121-124 ISSN 1895-104X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : Aerobic respiration * metabolic costs * trap specialization Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.685, year: 2010

  13. Cost-effectivness analysis of total thyroidectomy vs radioiodine for Graves disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prokić Anđelka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the patients suffering from hyperthyroidism 60-80% have Graves' disease. The initial therapy of Graves's disease are antithyroid drugs. If the remission is not achieved after 12-18 months, the patients should be directed to surgical treatment or to the therapy with radioactive iodine. The aim of this study was to compare cost/effectiveness ratios for radioactive iodine and total thyroidectomy. The analysis was made using Markov model, from the perspective of Republic Fund for Health Insurance in Serbia. Duration of one cycle in the model is six months, and the time horizon is 30 years. Monte Carlo simulation was performed for 1000 virtual patients as well as the analysis of sensitivity with the variation of parameters ± 50%. For total thyroidectomy the insurance should provide 138.389,72 RSD / 57, 83 QALY i.e. 2.393,04 dinars for one quality-adjusted life year, and for radioactive iodine the insurance should provide 110.043,64 RSD / 57,82 QALY i.e. 1.903,37 dinars for one quality-adjusted life year. This economic analysis showed that radioactive iodine has better ratio of costs to clinical effectiveness as opposed to total thyroidectomy.

  14. Energetic map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This report explains the energetic map of Uruguay as well as the different systems that delimits political frontiers in the region. The electrical system importance is due to the electricity, oil and derived , natural gas, potential study, biofuels, wind and solar energy

  15. Efficiency and Cost Analysis of Cell Saver Auto Transfusion System in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Gökhan Bilgili

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blood loss and replacement is still a controversial issue in major orthopaedic surgery. Allogenic blood transfusion may cause legal problems and concerns regarding the transmission of transfusion-related diseases. Cellsaver Systems (CSS were developed as an alternative to allogenic transfusion but CSS transfusion may cause coagulation, infection and haemodynamic instability. Aims: Our aim was to analyse the efficiency and cost analysis of a cell saver auto-transfusion system in the total knee arthroplasty procedure. Study Design: Retrospective comparative study. Methods: Those patients who were operated on by unilateral, cemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA were retrospectively evaluated. Group 1 included 37 patients who were treated using the cell saver system, and Group 2 involved 39 patients who were treated by allogenic blood transfusion. The groups were compared in terms of preoperative haemoglobin and haematocrit levels, blood loss and transfusion amount, whether allogenic transfusion was made, degree of deformity, body mass index and cost. Results: No significant results could be obtained in the statistical comparisons made in terms of the demographic properties, deformity properties, preoperative laboratory values, transfusion amount and length of hospital stay of the groups. Average blood loss was calculated to be less in Group 1 (p<0.05 and cost was higher in Group 1 (p<0.05. Conclusion: Cell saver systems do not decrease the amount of allogenic blood transfusion and costs more. Therefore, the routine usage of the auto-transfusion systems is a controversial issue. Cell saver system usage does not affect allogenic blood transfusion incidence or allogenic blood transfusion volume. It was found that preoperative haemoglobin and body mass index rates may affect allogenic blood transfusion. Therefore, it is foreseen that auto-transfusion systems could be useful in patients with low haemoglobin level and body mass index.

  16. Patterns of pharmacotherapy and health care utilization and costs prior to total hip or total knee replacement in patients with osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Ariel; Bozic, Kevin; Stacey, Brett; Edelsberg, John; Sadosky, Alesia; Oster, Gerry

    2011-08-01

    To examine patterns of pharmacotherapy and health care utilization and costs prior to total knee replacement (TKR) or total hip replacement (THR) in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Using a large US health insurance claims database, we identified all patients with OA who were ages ≥40 years and had undergone TKR or THR between January 1, 2006 and December 31, 2007. Patients with care utilization and costs over the 2-year period preceding surgery. A total of 16,527 patients met all study entry criteria. Their mean ± SD age was 56.6 ± 6.1 years, and 56% of them were women. In the 2 years preceding surgery, 55% of patients received prescription nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, 58% received opioids, and 50% received injections of corticosteroids. The numbers of patients receiving these drugs increased steadily during the presurgery period. The mean ± SD total health care costs in the 2 years preceding surgery were $19,466 ± 29,869, of which outpatient care, inpatient care, and pharmacotherapy represented 45%, 20%, and 20%, respectively. Costs increased from $2,094 in the eighth calendar quarter prior to surgery to $3,100 in the final quarter. Patients with OA who undergo THR or TKR have relatively high levels of use of pain-related pharmacotherapy and high total health care costs in the 2-year period preceding surgery. Levels of utilization and cost increase as the date of surgery approaches. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  17. Social profile and cost analysis of deep infection following total hip replacement surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lucia Frazão

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To characterize the socio-economic and demographic profile of patients undergoing surgery for revision total hip arthroplasty regarding the diagnosis of deep prosthetic infection. METHODS: Twenty patients were retrospectively studied, admitted in the period between 2009 and 2010 by the Hip Surgery Group with the diagnosis of deep prosthetic infection, whose proposed treatment was surgical. This study was carried out in the presence of the patient by completing two forms applied by the social worker of the Group. RESULTS: In a 20-patient sample, 40% were male, 45% were working age, 50% of patients originated from the capital, 85% depended on benefits, 70% were retired, 60% of patients were from this hospital, and 40% were from other services. The average cost of patients to the public system was R$ 55,821.62 per patient and the total spent on treatment of patients in the study exceeded one million Brazilian reals, totalling R$ 1,116,432.40. CONCLUSION: Infection from total hip arthroplasty generates a major expense to the social security system and to the public healthcare system. Physicians must always be alert to the possible risk factors and perioperative care, striving to minimize this complication.

  18. Blood Transfusion During Total Ankle Arthroplasty Is Associated With Increased In-Hospital Complications and Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Michael A; Huntley, Samuel R; Baker, Dustin K; Smith, Kenneth S; Hudson, Parke W; McGwin, Gerald; Ponce, Brent A; Johnson, Michael D

    2018-04-01

    Total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) is an increasingly used, effective treatment for end-stage ankle arthritis. Although numerous studies have associated blood transfusion with complications following hip and knee arthroplasty, its effects following TAA are largely unknown. This study uses data from a large, nationally representative database to estimate the association between blood transfusion and inpatient complications and hospital costs following TAA. Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database from 2004 to 2014, 25 412 patients who underwent TAA were identified, with 286 (1.1%) receiving a blood transfusion. Univariate analysis assessed patient and hospital factors associated with blood transfusion following TAA. Patients requiring blood transfusion were more likely to be female, African American, Medicare recipients, and treated in nonteaching hospitals. Average length of stay for patients following transfusion was 3.0 days longer, while average inpatient cost was increased by approximately 50%. Patients who received blood transfusion were significantly more likely to suffer from congestive heart failure, peripheral vascular disease, hypothyroidism, coagulation disorder, or anemia. Acute renal failure was significantly more common among patients receiving blood transfusion ( P < .001). Blood transfusions following TAA are infrequent and are associated with multiple medical comorbidities, increased complications, longer hospital stays, and increased overall cost. Level III: Retrospective, comparative study.

  19. Total staff costs to implement a decision support system in nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Castilho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to identify the direct labor (DL costs to put in practice a decision support system (DSS in nursing at the University Hospital of the University of São Paulo (HU-USP. METHOD: the development of the DSS was mapped in four sub-processes: Conception, Elaboration, Construction and Transition. To calculate the DL, the baseline salary per professional category was added to the five-year additional remuneration, representation fees and social charges, and then divided by the number of hours contracted, resulting in the hour wage/professional, which was multiplied by the time spend on each activity in the sub-processes. RESULTS: the DL cost corresponded to R$ 752,618.56 (100%, R$ 26,000.00 (3.45% of which were funded by a funding agency, while R$ 726,618.56 (96,55% came from Hospital and University resources. CONCLUSION: considering the total DL cost, 72.1% related to staff wages for the informatics consulting company and 27.9% to the DL of professionals at the HU and the School of Nursing.

  20. Efficiency and cost analysis of cell saver auto transfusion system in total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgili, Mustafa Gökhan; Erçin, Ersin; Peker, Gökhan; Kural, Cemal; Başaran, Serdar Hakan; Duramaz, Altuğ; Avkan, Cevdet

    2014-06-01

    Blood loss and replacement is still a controversial issue in major orthopaedic surgery. Allogenic blood transfusion may cause legal problems and concerns regarding the transmission of transfusion-related diseases. Cellsaver Systems (CSS) were developed as an alternative to allogenic transfusion but CSS transfusion may cause coagulation, infection and haemodynamic instability. Our aim was to analyse the efficiency and cost analysis of a cell saver auto-transfusion system in the total knee arthroplasty procedure. Retrospective comparative study. Those patients who were operated on by unilateral, cemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA) were retrospectively evaluated. Group 1 included 37 patients who were treated using the cell saver system, and Group 2 involved 39 patients who were treated by allogenic blood transfusion. The groups were compared in terms of preoperative haemoglobin and haematocrit levels, blood loss and transfusion amount, whether allogenic transfusion was made, degree of deformity, body mass index and cost. No significant results could be obtained in the statistical comparisons made in terms of the demographic properties, deformity properties, preoperative laboratory values, transfusion amount and length of hospital stay of the groups. Average blood loss was calculated to be less in Group 1 (pblood transfusion and costs more. Therefore, the routine usage of the auto-transfusion systems is a controversial issue. Cell saver system usage does not affect allogenic blood transfusion incidence or allogenic blood transfusion volume. It was found that preoperative haemoglobin and body mass index rates may affect allogenic blood transfusion. Therefore, it is foreseen that auto-transfusion systems could be useful in patients with low haemoglobin level and body mass index.

  1. [A totally implantable venous access device. Implantation in general or local anaesthesia? A retrospective cost analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuld, J; Richter, S; Moussavian, M R; Kollmar, O; Schilling, M K

    2009-08-01

    Implantation of venous access port systems can be performed in local or general anesthesia. In spite of the increasing rate of interventionally implanted systems, the surgical cut-down represents a safe alternative. Thus, the question arises whether--in context to the increasing health-economic pressure--open implantation in general anesthesia is still a feasible alternative to implantation in local anesthesia regarding OR efficiency and costs. In a retrospective analysis, 993 patients receiving a totally implantable venous access device between 2001 and 2007 were evaluated regarding OR utilization, turnover times, intraoperative data and costs. Implantations in local (LA) and general anesthesia (GA) were compared. GA was performed in 762 cases (76.6 %), LA was performed in 231 patients (23.3 %). Mean operation time was similar in both groups (LA 47.27 +/- 1.40 min vs. GA 45.41 +/- 0.75 min, p = 0.244). Patients receiving local anesthesia had a significantly shorter stay in the OR unit (LA 95.9 +/- 1.78 min vs. GA 105.92 +/- 0.92 min; p cut (LA 39.57 +/- 0.69 min vs. GA 50.46 +/- 0.52 min; p material costs were significantly lower in the LA group compared with the GA group (LA: 400.72 +/- 8.25 euro vs. GA: 482.86 +/- 6.23 euro; p systems in local anesthesia is superior in comparison to the implantation under general anesthesia regarding procedural times in the OR unit and costs. With the same operation duration, but less personnel and material expenditure, implantation in local anesthesia offers a potential economic advantage by permitting faster changing times. Implantation in GA only should be performed at a special request by the patient or in difficult venous conditions. Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart.New York.

  2. CO2 substitution potential and CO2 reduction costs of an energetic exploitation of solid biomasses in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becher, S.

    1995-01-01

    For the reduction of the anthropogenic greenhouse effect, the CO 2 , emissions are clearly to be reduced in future, according to the resolution made by the Federal Republic. Against the background of this objective, possible contributions of the biogenous solid fuels for the reduction of the CO 2 release of fossil origin are presented and discussed. For that, first the existing potentials of biomass in Germany and their present use are shown. Based on this, the CO 2 emissions by the present use already avoided, as well as the existing unexploited potentials of the CO 2 reduction potentials still to be exploited are determined. In accordance with an 'integral' starting point, thereby all pre- and post-positioned processes are considered. Finally, the specific CO 2 reduction costs are analysed and compared with other options. (orig.) [de

  3. Analysis of the total system life cycle cost for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program: executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-04-01

    The total-system life-cycle cost (TSLCC) analysis for the Department of Energy's Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Progrram is an ongoing activity that helps determine whether the revenue-producing mechanism established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 is sufficient to cover the cost of the program. This report is an input into the third evaluation of the adequacy of the fee. The total-system cost for the reference waste-management program in this analysis is estimated to be 24 to 30 billion (1984) dollars. For the sensitivity cases studied in this report, the costs could be as high as 35 billion dollars and as low as 21 billion dollars. Because factors like repository location, the quantity of waste generated, transportation-cask technology, and repository startup dates exert substantial impacts on total-system costs, there are several tradeoffs between these factors, and these tradeoffs can greatly influence the total cost of the program. The total-system cost for the reference program described in this report is higher by 3 to 5 billion dollars, or 15 to 20%, than the cost for the reference program of the TSLCC analysis of April 1984. More than two-thirds of this increase is in the cost of repository construction and operation. These repository costs have increased because of changing design concepts, different assumptions about the effort required to perform the necessary activities, and a change in the source data on which the earlier analysis was based. Development and evaluation costs have similarly increased because of a net addition to the work content. Transportation costs have increased because of different assumptions about repository locations and several characteristics of the transportation system. It is expected that the estimates of total-system costs will continue to change in response to both an evolving program strategy and better definition of the work required to achieve the program objectives

  4. Analysis of the total system life cycle cost for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program: Volume 2, Supporting information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    This report provides cost estimates for the fifth evaluation of the adequacy of the fee and is consistent with the program strategy and plans. The total-system cost for the reference cases in the improved-performance system is estimated at $32.1 to $38.2 billion (expressed in constant 1986 collars) over the entire life of the system, or $1.5 to $1.6 billion more than that of the authorized system (i.e., the system without an MRS facility). The current estimate of the total-system cost for the reference cases in the improved-performance system is $3.8 to $5.4 billion higher than the estimate for the same system in the 1986 TSLCC analysis. In the case with the maximum increase, nearly all of the higher cost is due to a $5.2-billion increase in the costs of development and evaluation (D and E); all other system costs are essentially unchanged. The cost difference between the improved-performance system and the authorized system is smaller than the difference estimated in last year's TSLCC analysis. Volume 2 presents the detailed results for the 1987 analysis of the total-system life cycle cost (TSLCC). It consists of four sections: Section A presents the yearly flows of waste between waste-management facilities for the 12 aggregate logistics cases that were studied; Section B presents the annual total-system costs for each of the 30 TSLCC cases by major cost category; Section C presents the annual costs for the disposal of 16,000 canisters of defense high-level waste (DHLW) by major cost category for each of the 30 TSLCC cases; and Section D presents a summary of the cost-allocation factors that were calculated to determine the defense waste share of the total-system costs

  5. Distributed Flexibility Management Targeting Energy Cost and Total Power Limitations in Electricity Distribution Grids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bessler, Sanford; Kemal, Mohammed Seifu; Silva, Nuno

    2018-01-01

    Demand Management uses the interaction and information exchange between multiple control functions in order to achieve goals that can vary in different application contexts. Since there are several stakeholders involved, these may have diverse objectives and even use different architectures...... to actively manage power demand. This paper utilizes an existing distributed demand management architecture in order to provide the following contributions: (1) It develops and evaluates a set of algorithms that combine the optimization of energy costs in scenarios of variable day-ahead prices with the goal...... to improve distribution grid operation reliability, here implemented by a total Power limit. (2) It evaluates the proposed scheme as a distributed system where flexibility information is exchanged with the existing industry standard OpenADR. A Hardware-in-the-Loop testbed realization demonstrates...

  6. Noninvasive Hemoglobin Monitoring: A Rapid, Reliable, and Cost-Effective Method Following Total Joint Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J Ryan; Camp, Christopher L; Stitz, Amber; Young, Ernest Y; Abdel, Matthew P; Taunton, Michael J; Trousdale, Robert T

    2016-03-02

    Noninvasive hemoglobin (nHgb) monitoring was initially introduced in the intensive care setting as a means of rapidly assessing Hgb values without performing a blood draw. We conducted a prospective analysis to compare reliability, cost, and patient preference between nHgb monitoring and invasive Hgb (iHgb) monitoring performed via a traditional blood draw. We enrolled 100 consecutive patients undergoing primary or revision total hip or total knee arthroplasty. On postoperative day 1, nHgb and iHgb values were obtained within thirty minutes of one another. iHgb and nHgb values, cost, patient satisfaction, and the duration of time required to obtain each reading were recorded. The concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) was utilized to evaluate the agreement of the two Hgb measurement methods. Paired t tests and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were utilized to compare mean Hgb values, time, and pain for all readings. The mean Hgb values did not differ significantly between the two measurement methods: the mean iHgb value (and standard deviation) was 11.3 ± 1.4 g/dL (range, 8.2 to 14.3 g/dL), and the mean nHgb value was 11.5 ± 1.8 g/dL (range, 7.0 to 16.0 g/dL) (p = 0.11). The CCC between the two Hgb methods was 0.69. One hundred percent of the patients with an nHgb value of ≥ 10.5 g/dL had an iHgb value of >8.0 g/dL. The mean time to obtain an Hgb value was 0.9 minute for the nHgb method and 51.1 minutes for the iHgb method (p measurement, resulting in a savings of $26 per Hgb assessment when the noninvasive method is used. Noninvasive Hgb monitoring was found to be more efficient, less expensive, and preferred by patients compared with iHgb monitoring. Providers could consider screening total joint arthroplasty patients with nHgb monitoring and only order iHgb measurement if the nHgb value is protocol had been applied to the first blood draw in our 100 patients, approximately $2000 would have been saved. Extrapolated to the U.S. total joint arthroplasty practice

  7. Clinical Outcomes and 90-Day Costs Following Hemiarthroplasty or Total Hip Arthroplasty for Hip Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Christine I; Vose, Joshua G; Nunley, Ryan M

    2017-09-01

    In the era of bundled payments, many hospitals are responsible for costs from admission through 90 days postdischarge. Although bundled episodes for hip fracture will have a separate target price for the bundle, little is known about the 90-day resource use burden for this patient population. Using Medicare 100% Standard Analytic Files (2010-2014), we identified patients undergoing hemiarthroplasty or total hip arthroplasty (THA). Patients were aged 65 and older with admitting diagnosis of closed hip fracture, no concurrent fractures of the lower limb, and no history of hip surgery in the prior 12 months baseline. Continuous Medicare-only enrollment was required. Complications, resource use, and mortality from admission through 90 days following discharge (follow-up) were summarized. Four cohorts met selection criteria for analysis: (1) hemiarthroplasty diagnosis-related group (DRG) 469 (N = 19,634), (2) hemiarthroplasty DRG 470 (N = 77,744), (3) THA DRG 469 (N = 1686), and (4) THA DRG 470 (N = 9314). All-cause mortality during the study period was 51.6%, 29.5%, 48.1%, and 24.9% with mean 90-day costs of $28,952, $19,243, $29,763, and $18,561, respectively. Most of the patients waited 1 day from admission to surgery (41%-51%). Incidence of an all-cause complication was approximately 70% in each DRG 469 cohort and 14%-16% in each DRG 470 cohort. This study confirms patients with hip fracture are a costly subpopulation. Tailored care pathways to minimize post-acute care resource use are warranted for these patients. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Factors Influencing the Total Inpatient Pharmacy Cost at a Tertiary Hospital in Malaysia: A Retrospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali Jadoo, Saad Ahmed

    2018-01-01

    The steady growth of pharmaceutical expenditures is a major concern for health policy makers and health care managers in Malaysia. Our study examined the factors affecting the total inpatient pharmacy cost (TINPC) at the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre (UKMMC). In this retrospective study, we used 2011 administration electronic prescriptions records and casemix databases at UKMMC to examine the impact of sociodemographic, diagnostic, and drug variables on the TINPC. Bivariate and multivariate analyses of the factors associated with TINPC were conducted. The mean inpatient pharmacy cost per patient was USD 102.07 (SD = 24.76). In the multivariate analysis, length of stay (LOS; B = 0.349, P < .0005) and severity level III (B = 0.253, P < .0005) were the primary factors affecting the TINPC. For each day increase in the LOS and each increase of a case of severity level III, there was an increase of approximately USD 11.97 and USD 171.53 in the TINPC per year, respectively. Moreover, the number of prescribed items of drugs and supplies was positively associated with the TINPC (B = 0.081, P < .0005). Gender appears to have affected the TINPC; male patients seem to be associated with a higher TINPC than females (mean = 139.55, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 112.97-166.13, P < .001). Surgical procedures were associated with higher cost than medical cases (mean = 87.93, 95% CI: 61.00-114.85, P < .001). Malay (MYR 242.02, SD = 65.37) and Chinese (MYR 214.66, SD = 27.99) ethnicities contributed to a lower TINPC compared with Indian (MYR 613.93, SD = 98.41) and other ethnicities (MYR 578.47, SD = 144.51). A longer hospitalization period accompanied by major complications and comorbidities had the greatest influence on the TINPC. PMID:29436248

  9. The Cost-Effectiveness of Dual Mobility Implants for Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Computer-Based Cost-Utility Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Brian T; McLawhorn, Alexander S; Westrich, Geoffrey H

    2017-05-03

    Dislocation remains a clinically important problem following primary total hip arthroplasty, and it is a common reason for revision total hip arthroplasty. Dual mobility (DM) implants decrease the risk of dislocation but can be more expensive than conventional implants and have idiosyncratic failure mechanisms. The purpose of this study was to investigate the cost-effectiveness of DM implants compared with conventional bearings for primary total hip arthroplasty. Markov model analysis was conducted from the societal perspective with use of direct and indirect costs. Costs, expressed in 2013 U.S. dollars, were derived from the literature, the National Inpatient Sample, and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. Effectiveness was expressed in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). The model was populated with health state utilities and state transition probabilities derived from previously published literature. The analysis was performed for a patient's lifetime, and costs and effectiveness were discounted at 3% annually. The principal outcome was the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER), with a willingness-to-pay threshold of $100,000/QALY. Sensitivity analyses were performed to explore relevant uncertainty. In the base case, DM total hip arthroplasty showed absolute dominance over conventional total hip arthroplasty, with lower accrued costs ($39,008 versus $40,031 U.S. dollars) and higher accrued utility (13.18 versus 13.13 QALYs) indicating cost-savings. DM total hip arthroplasty ceased being cost-saving when its implant costs exceeded those of conventional total hip arthroplasty by $1,023, and the cost-effectiveness threshold for DM implants was $5,287 greater than that for conventional implants. DM was not cost-effective when the annualized incremental probability of revision from any unforeseen failure mechanism or mechanisms exceeded 0.29%. The probability of intraprosthetic dislocation exerted the most influence on model results. This model

  10. Force Structure: Restructuring and Rebuilding the Army Will Cost Billions of Dollars for Equipment but the Total Cost Is Uncertain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    St. Laurent, Janet A

    2008-01-01

    .... Several factors are contributing to the uncertainties about future costs. First, the Army's $43.6 funding plan for equipping modular units was based on preliminary modular unit designs and did not fully consider the needs of National Guard units...

  11. Analysing uncertainty around costs of innovative medical technologies: the case of fibrin sealant (QUIXIL) for total knee replacement.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steuten, Lotte Maria Gertruda; Vallejo-Torres, Laura; Bastide, Philippe; Buxton, Martin J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a relatively simple cost model comparing the costs of using a commercial fibrin sealant (QUIXIL®) in addition to conventional haemostatic treatment vs. conventional treatment alone in total knee replacement (TKR) surgery, and demonstrates and discusses how one- and two-way

  12. Variation in the cost of care for primary total knee arthroplasties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek A. Haas, MBA

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: The large variation in costs among sites suggests major and multiple opportunities to transfer knowledge about process and productivity improvements that lower costs while simultaneously maintaining or improving outcomes.

  13. Efforts to Support Consumer Enrollment Decisions Using Total Cost Estimators: Lessons from the Affordable Care Act’s Marketplaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannelli, Justin; Curran, Emily

    2017-02-01

    Issue: Policymakers have sought to improve the shopping experience on the Affordable Care Act’s marketplaces by offering decision support tools that help consumers better understand and compare their health plan options. Cost estimators are one such tool. They are designed to provide consumers a personalized estimate of the total cost--premium, minus subsidy, plus cost-sharing--of their coverage options. Cost estimators were available in most states by the start of the fourth open enrollment period. Goal: To understand the experiences of marketplaces that offer a total cost estimator and the interests and concerns of policymakers from states that are not using them. Methods: Structured interviews with marketplace officials, consumer enrollment assisters, technology vendors, and subject matter experts; analysis of the total cost estimators available on the marketplaces as of October 2016. Key findings and conclusions: Informants strongly supported marketplace adoption of a total cost estimator. Marketplaces that offer an estimator faced a range of design choices and varied significantly in their approaches to resolving them. Interviews suggested a clear need for additional consumer testing and data analysis of tool usage and for sustained outreach to enrollment assisters to encourage greater use of the estimators.

  14. Infrastructure expenditures and costs. Practical guidelines to calculate total infrastructure costs for five modes of transport. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-11-01

    Transport infrastructures in general, and the Trans European Transport Network (TEN-T) in particular, play an important role in achieving the medium and long-term objectives of the European Union. In view of this, the Commission has recently adopted a revision of the guidelines for the TEN-T. The main consequences of this revision are the need for a better understanding of the investments made by the member states in the TEN-T and the need for ensuring optimal consistency in the reporting by the Members States of such investments. With Regulation number 1108/70 the Council of the European Communities introduced an accounting system for expenditure on infrastructure in respect of transport by rail, road and inland waterways. The purpose of this regulation is to introduce a standard and permanent accounting system for infrastructure expenditures. However maritime and aviation infrastructure were not included. Further, the need for an effective and easy to apply classification for infrastructure investments concerning all five transport modes was still pending. Therefore, DG TREN has commissioned ECORYS Transport and CE Delft to study the expenditures and costs of infrastructure, to propose an adequate classification of expenditures, and to propose a method for translating data on expenditures into data on costs. The objectives of the present study are threefold: To set out a classification of infrastructure expenditures, in order to increase knowledge of expenditures related to transport infrastructures. This classification should support a better understanding of fixed and variable infrastructure costs; To detail the various components of such expenditures for five modes of transportation, which would enable the monitoring of infrastructure expenditures and costs; and to set up a methodology to move from annual series of expenditures to costs, including fixed and variable elements.

  15. Risk and Cost of 90-Day Complications in Morbidly and Superobese Patients After Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meller, Menachem M; Toossi, Nader; Johanson, Norman A; Gonzalez, Mark H; Son, Min-Sun; Lau, Edmund C

    2016-10-01

    This study investigated the risk and cost of postoperative complications associated with morbid and super obesity after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A retrospective cohort study was conducted of patients who underwent TKA using Medicare hospital claims data. The International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification diagnosis code V85.4x was used to identify morbidly obese patients (body mass index [BMI] ≥40 kg/m(2)) and superobese patients (BMI ≥50 kg/m(2)) in 2011-2013. Patients without any BMI-related diagnosis codes were used as controls. Twelve complications occurred in the 90-day period after TKA were analyzed using multivariate Cox models, adjusting for patient demographic, morbidity, and institutional factors. In addition, hospital charges and payments were compared from primary surgery through subsequent 90 days. Morbidly obese patients showed a significantly elevated risk in most complications examined, with a 2-fold or higher risk in dislocation and wound dehiscence. In addition, death, periprosthetic joint infection, acute renal failure, and knee revision had significant hazard ratios between 1.5 and 2.0. However, risk of deep vein thrombosis and acute myocardial infarction did not increase for the morbidly obese patients. Superobese patients had significant increase in risk of infection, wound dehiscence, acute renal failures, revisions, death, and readmission compared with patients with BMI 40-49 kg/m(2). Significant dose-response trend was found between the level of BMI and risk for death, dislocation, implant failure, infection, readmission, revision, wound dehiscence, and acute renal failure. Controlling for patient and institutional factors, each TKA had an average total hospital charges of $75,884 among superobese patients, compared to $65,118 for the control group, a difference of $10,767. Medicare payment for the superobese patients was also higher, but only by $2703. Morbidly obese patients pose a significantly

  16. Assessing the Total cost of ownership of ERP systems : Case study analysis on the factors behind customer costs in recent minor implementations

    OpenAIRE

    Rydgård, Göran; Palmberg, Nils

    2010-01-01

    This master’s thesis presents a model for calculating the total cost of ownership (TCO) of relatively small ERP implementations, including two years of running the system. The main factors affecting the cost items in the model are also analyzed, based in part on four case projects that the consultancy company Acando has carried out recently and in part on literature. The case projects were investigated through interviews with key actors in the projects from Acando and the customer, and throug...

  17. Effect of Body Mass Index and Psychosocial Traits on Total Knee Replacement Costs in Patients with Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waimann, Christian A; Fernandez-Mazarambroz, Rodrigo J; Cantor, Scott B; Lopez-Olivo, Maria A; Barbo, Andrea G; Landon, Glenn C; Siff, Sherwin J; Lin, Heather; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E

    2016-08-01

    Clinical and psychosocial attributes are associated with clinical outcomes after total knee replacement (TKR) surgery in patients with osteoarthritis (OA), but their relationship with TKR-related costs is less clear. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of clinical and psychosocial attributes on TKR costs. We conducted a 6-month prospective cohort study of patients with knee OA who underwent TKR. We examined baseline demographic, clinical [body mass index (BMI) and comorbidities], and psychosocial attributes (social support, locus of control, coping, depression, anxiety, stress, and self-efficacy); baseline and 6-month OA clinical outcomes [Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain and function]; and 6-month direct and indirect TKR-related costs. Multiple regression was performed to identify determinants of TKR-related costs. We included 212 patients; 66% were women, 71% were white, and the mean age was 65.2 years. The mean baseline WOMAC pain score was 55 (SD 19) and WOMAC function score was 54 (SD 20). Mean total TKR-related costs were US$30,831 (SD $9893). Multivariate regression analyses showed that increasing BMI and anxiety levels and decreasing levels of positive social interactions were associated with increased costs. A lower cost scenario with a lower range of normal BMI (19.5), highest positive social interaction, and no anxiety predicted TKR costs to be $22,247. Predicted costs in obese patients (BMI 36) with lowest positive social interaction and highest anxiety were $58,447. Increased baseline BMI, anxiety, and poor social support lead to higher TKR-related costs in patients with knee OA. Preoperative interventions targeting these factors may reduce TKR-related costs, and therefore be cost-effective.

  18. The true costs of participatory sanitation: Evidence from community-led total sanitation studies in Ghana and Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocker, Jonny; Saywell, Darren; Shields, Katherine F; Kolsky, Pete; Bartram, Jamie

    2017-12-01

    Evidence on sanitation and hygiene program costs is used for many purposes. The few studies that report costs use top-down costing methods that are inaccurate and inappropriate. Community-led total sanitation (CLTS) is a participatory behavior-change approach that presents difficulties for cost analysis. We used implementation tracking and bottom-up, activity-based costing to assess the process, program costs, and local investments for four CLTS interventions in Ghana and Ethiopia. Data collection included implementation checklists, surveys, and financial records review. Financial costs and value-of-time spent on CLTS by different actors were assessed. Results are disaggregated by intervention, cost category, actor, geographic area, and project month. The average household size was 4.0 people in Ghana, and 5.8 people in Ethiopia. The program cost of CLTS was $30.34-$81.56 per household targeted in Ghana, and $14.15-$19.21 in Ethiopia. Most program costs were from training for three of four interventions. Local investments ranged from $7.93-$22.36 per household targeted in Ghana, and $2.35-$3.41 in Ethiopia. This is the first study to present comprehensive, disaggregated costs of a sanitation and hygiene behavior-change intervention. The findings can be used to inform policy and finance decisions, plan program scale-up, perform cost-effectiveness and benefit studies, and compare different interventions. The costing method is applicable to other public health behavior-change programs. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Preliminary estimates of the total-system cost for the restructured program: An addendum to the May 1989 analysis of the total-system life cycle cost for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-12-01

    The total-system life-cycle cost (TSLCC) analysis for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program is an ongoing activity that helps determine whether the revenue-producing mechanism established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 - a fee levied on electricity generated and sold by commercial nuclear power plants - is sufficient to cover the cost of the program. This report provides cost estimates for the sixth annual evaluation of the adequacy of the fee. The costs contained in this report represent a preliminary analysis of the cost impacts associated with the Secretary of Energy's Report to Congress on Reassessment of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program issued in November 1989. The major elements of the restructured program announced in this report which pertain to the program's life-cycle costs are: a prioritization of the scientific investigations program at the Yucca Mountain candidate site to focus on identification of potentially adverse conditions, a delay in the start of repository operations until 2010, the start of limited waste acceptance at the monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility in 1998, and the start of waste acceptance at the full-capability MRS facility in 2,000. Based on the restructured program, the total-system cost for the system with a repository at the candidate site at Yucca Mountain in Nevada, a facility for monitored retrievable storage (MRS), and a transportation system is estimated at $26 billion (expressed in constant 1988 dollars). In the event that a second repository is required and is authorized by the Congress, the total-system cost is estimated at $34 to $35 billion, depending on the quantity of spent fuel and high-level waste (HLW) requiring disposal. 17 figs., 17 tabs

  20. Is total pancreatectomy as feasible, safe, efficacious, and cost-effective as pancreaticoduodenectomy? A single center, prospective, observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadei, Riccardo; Ricci, Claudio; Taffurelli, Giovanni; Guariniello, Anna; Di Gioia, Anthony; Di Marco, Mariacristina; Pagano, Nico; Serra, Carla; Calculli, Lucia; Santini, Donatella; Minni, Francesco

    2016-09-01

    Total pancreatectomy is actually considered a viable option in selected patients even if large comparative studies between partial versus total pancreatectomy are not currently available. Our aim was to evaluate whether total pancreatectomy can be considered as feasible, safe, efficacious, and cost-effective as pancreaticoduodenectomy. A single center, prospective, observational trial, regarding postoperative outcomes, long-term results, and cost-effectiveness, in a tertiary referral center was conducted, comparing consecutive patients who underwent elective total pancreatectomy and/or pancreaticoduodenectomy. Seventy-three consecutive elective total pancreatectomies and 184 pancreaticoduodenectomies were compared. There were no significant differences regarding postoperative outcomes and overall survival. The quality of life, evaluated in 119 patients according to the EQ-5D-5L questionnaire, showed that there were no significant differences regarding the five items considered. The mean EQ-5D-5L score was similar in the two procedures (total pancreatectomy = 0.872, range 0.345-1.000; pancreaticoduodenectomy = 0.832, range 0.393-1.000; P = 0.320). The impact of diabetes according to the Problem Areas in Diabetes (PAID) questionnaire did not show any significant differences except for question 13 (total pancreatectomy = 0.60; pancreaticoduodenectomy = 0.19; P = 0.022). The cost-effectiveness analysis suggested that the quality-adjusted life year was not significantly different between the two procedures (total pancreatectomy = 0.910, range 0.345-1.000; pancreaticoduodenectomy = 0.910, range -0.393-1.000; P = 0.320). From this study, it seems reasonable to suggest that total pancreatectomy can be considered as safe, feasible, and efficacious as PD and acceptable in terms of cost-effectiveness.

  1. Federal Regulations: Efforts to Estimate Total Costs and Benefits of Rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-04-07

    the Chamber of Commerce , academicians, the media, and others, and is sometimes cited with a high degree of certainty ." For example, some articles...House of Representatives, Feb . 25,2004; and testimony of William P . Kovacs, Vice President, U .S. Chamber of Commerce , before the Subcommittee on Energy...estimated the annual cost to employers of the Family and Medical Leave Act at $825 million, but that the Chamber of Commerce estimated the cost at between $3

  2. Determining the Cost-Savings Threshold and Alignment Accuracy of Patient-Specific Instrumentation in Total Ankle Replacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Kamran S; Matson, Andrew P; Nwachukwu, Benedict U; Scott, Daniel J; Mather, Richard C; DeOrio, James K

    2017-01-01

    Traditional intraoperative referencing for total ankle replacements (TARs) involves multiple steps and fluoroscopic guidance to determine mechanical alignment. Recent adoption of patient-specific instrumentation (PSI) allows for referencing to be determined preoperatively, resulting in less steps and potentially decreased operative time. We hypothesized that usage of PSI would result in decreased operating room time that would offset the additional cost of PSI compared with standard referencing (SR). In addition, we aimed to compare postoperative radiographic alignment between PSI and SR. Between August 2014 and September 2015, 87 patients undergoing TAR were enrolled in a prospectively collected TAR database. Patients were divided into cohorts based on PSI vs SR, and operative times were reviewed. Radiographic alignment parameters were retrospectively measured at 6 weeks postoperatively. Time-driven activity-based costing (TDABC) was used to derive direct costs. Cost vs operative time-savings were examined via 2-way sensitivity analysis to determine cost-saving thresholds for PSI applicable to a range of institution types. Cost-saving thresholds defined the price of PSI below which PSI would be cost-saving. A total of 35 PSI and 52 SR cases were evaluated with no significant differences identified in patient characteristics. Operative time from incision to completion of casting in cases without adjunct procedures was 127 minutes with PSI and 161 minutes with SR ( P cost-savings threshold range at our institution of $863 below which PSI pricing would provide net cost-savings. Two-way sensitivity analysis generated a globally applicable cost-savings threshold model based on institution-specific costs and surgeon-specific time-savings. This study demonstrated equivalent postoperative TAR alignment with PSI and SR referencing systems but with a significant decrease in operative time with PSI. Based on TDABC and associated sensitivity analysis, a cost-savings threshold

  3. Self-reported Function, Health Resource Use, and Total Health Care Costs Among Medicare Beneficiaries With Glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prager, Alisa J; Liebmann, Jeffrey M; Cioffi, George A; Blumberg, Dana M

    2016-04-01

    The effect of glaucoma on nonglaucomatous medical conditions and resultant secondary health care costs is not well understood. To assess self-reported medical conditions, the use of medical services, and total health care costs among Medicare beneficiaries with glaucoma. Longitudinal observational study of 72,587 Medicare beneficiaries in the general community using the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (2004-2009). Coding to extract data started in January 2015, and analyses were performed between May and July 2015. Self-reported health, the use of health care services, adjusted mean annual total health care costs per person, and adjusted mean annual nonoutpatient costs per person. Participants were 72,587 Medicare beneficiaries 65 years or older with (n = 4441) and without (n = 68,146) a glaucoma diagnosis in the year before collection of survey data. Their mean age was 76.9 years, and 43.2% were male. Patients with glaucoma who responded to survey questions on visual disability were stratified into those with (n = 1748) and without (n = 2639) self-reported visual disability. Medicare beneficiaries with glaucoma had higher adjusted odds of inpatient hospitalizations (odds ratio [OR], 1.27; 95% CI, 1.17-1.39; P total health care costs and $2599 (95% CI, $1985-$3212; P total and nonoutpatient medical costs. Perception of vision loss among patients with glaucoma may be associated with depression, falls, and difficulty walking. Reducing the prevalence and severity of glaucoma may result in improvements in associated nonglaucomatous medical conditions and resultant reduction in health care costs.

  4. Incidence, risk factors and the healthcare cost of falls postdischarge after elective total hip and total knee replacement surgery: protocol for a prospective observational cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Anne-Marie; Ross-Adjie, Gail; McPhail, Steven M; Monterosso, Leanne; Bulsara, Max; Etherton-Beer, Christopher; Powell, Sarah-Jayne; Hardisty, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The number of major joint replacement procedures continues to increase in Australia. The primary aim of this study is to determine the incidence of falls in the first 12 months after discharge from hospital in a cohort of older patients who undergo elective total hip or total knee replacement. Methods and analyses A prospective longitudinal observational cohort study starting in July 2015, enrolling patients aged ≥60 years who are admitted for elective major joint replacement (n=267 total hip replacement, n=267 total knee replacement) and are to be discharged to the community. Participants are followed up for 12 months after hospital discharge. The primary outcome measure is the rate of falls per thousand patient-days. Falls data will be collected by 2 methods: issuing a falls diary to each participant and telephoning participants monthly after discharge. Secondary outcomes include the rate of injurious falls and health-related quality of life. Patient-rated outcomes will be measured using the Oxford Hip or Oxford Knee score. Generalised linear mixed modelling will be used to examine the falls outcomes in the 12 months after discharge and to examine patient and clinical characteristics predictive of falls. An economic evaluation will be conducted to describe the nature of healthcare costs in the first 12 months after elective joint replacement and estimate costs directly attributable to fall events. Ethics and dissemination The results will be disseminated through local site networks and will inform future services to support older people undergoing hip or knee joint replacement and also through peer-reviewed publications and medical conferences. This study has been approved by The University of Notre Dame Australia and local hospital human research ethics committees. Trial registration number ACTRN12615000653561; Pre-results. PMID:27412102

  5. Quantifying the total cost of infrastructure to enable environmentally preferable decisions: the case of urban roadway design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosse, Conrad A; Clarens, Andres F

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to reduce the environmental impacts of transportation infrastructure have generally overlooked many of the efficiencies that can be obtained by considering the relevant engineering and economic aspects as a system. Here, we present a framework for quantifying the burdens of ground transportation in urban settings that incorporates travel time, vehicle fuel and pavement maintenance costs. A Pareto set of bi-directional lane configurations for two-lane roadways yields non-dominated combinations of lane width, bicycle lanes and curb parking. Probabilistic analysis and microsimulation both show dramatic mobility reductions on road segments of insufficient width for heavy vehicles to pass bicycles without encroaching on oncoming traffic. This delay is positively correlated with uphill grades and increasing traffic volumes and inversely proportional to total pavement width. The response is nonlinear with grade and yields mixed uphill/downhill optimal lane configurations. Increasing bicycle mode share is negatively correlated with total costs and emissions for lane configurations allowing motor vehicles to safely pass bicycles, while the opposite is true for configurations that fail to facilitate passing. Spatial impacts on mobility also dictate that curb parking exhibits significant spatial opportunity costs related to the total cost Pareto curve. The proposed framework provides a means to evaluate relatively inexpensive lane reconfiguration options in response to changing modal share and priorities. These results provide quantitative evidence that efforts to reallocate limited pavement space to bicycles, like those being adopted in several US cities, could appreciably reduce costs for all users. (letter)

  6. Quantifying the total cost of infrastructure to enable environmentally preferable decisions: the case of urban roadway design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosse, Conrad A.; Clarens, Andres F.

    2013-03-01

    Efforts to reduce the environmental impacts of transportation infrastructure have generally overlooked many of the efficiencies that can be obtained by considering the relevant engineering and economic aspects as a system. Here, we present a framework for quantifying the burdens of ground transportation in urban settings that incorporates travel time, vehicle fuel and pavement maintenance costs. A Pareto set of bi-directional lane configurations for two-lane roadways yields non-dominated combinations of lane width, bicycle lanes and curb parking. Probabilistic analysis and microsimulation both show dramatic mobility reductions on road segments of insufficient width for heavy vehicles to pass bicycles without encroaching on oncoming traffic. This delay is positively correlated with uphill grades and increasing traffic volumes and inversely proportional to total pavement width. The response is nonlinear with grade and yields mixed uphill/downhill optimal lane configurations. Increasing bicycle mode share is negatively correlated with total costs and emissions for lane configurations allowing motor vehicles to safely pass bicycles, while the opposite is true for configurations that fail to facilitate passing. Spatial impacts on mobility also dictate that curb parking exhibits significant spatial opportunity costs related to the total cost Pareto curve. The proposed framework provides a means to evaluate relatively inexpensive lane reconfiguration options in response to changing modal share and priorities. These results provide quantitative evidence that efforts to reallocate limited pavement space to bicycles, like those being adopted in several US cities, could appreciably reduce costs for all users.

  7. Energy & Energetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-22

    lithium pertained to the poor morphology of lithium electrodeposits produced during cell recharge in the organic solvent based electrolytes of the time...physical response of the material, including plasticity, fragmentation, defect- nucleated reactions, andmelting. In light of the possible roles of shear...in low cost and robust microrobots,” M.S. thesis , Dept. Mech. Eng., Univ. Maryland, College Park, MD, 2010. [20] C. Morris and B. Parviz, “Micro-scale

  8. Evaluation of the Influence of the Logistic Operations Reliability on the Total Costs of a Supply Chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukinskiy Valery

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays in logistics integral processes between the material and related flows in supply chains are getting developed more and more. However, in spite of increasing volume of statistical data which reflect the integral processes, the influence evaluation issues of the logistic operations reliability indexes on the total logistics costs remain open and require the corresponding researches implementation.

  9. Reducing Customers’ Total Cost of Ownership Within a Software Supply Network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slinger, S.R.L.; Rijsemus, W.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes how the company Cordys avoids the ERP problems from the last 15 years by improving the software release, delivery, deployment, and maintenance processes. These ERP problems, such as costly ERP migrations and highly complex maintenance procedures, are circumvented by the

  10. RANKED SET SAMPLING FOR ECOLOGICAL RESEARCH: ACCOUNTING FOR THE TOTAL COSTS OF SAMPLING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers aim to design environmental studies that optimize precision and allow for generalization of results, while keeping the costs of associated field and laboratory work at a reasonable level. Ranked set sampling is one method to potentially increase precision and reduce ...

  11. Total and Marginal Cost Analysis for a High School Based Bystander Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Joshua L.; Bush, Heather M.; Coker, Ann L.; Brancato, Candace J.; Clear, Emily R.; Recktenwald, Eileen A.

    2018-01-01

    Costs of providing the Green Dot bystander-based intervention, shown to be effective in the reduction of sexual violence among Kentucky high school students, were estimated based on data from a large cluster-randomized clinical trial. Rape Crisis Center Educators were trained to provide Green Dot curriculum to students. Implementing Green Dot in…

  12. Functional and oncologic outcomes after excision of the total femur in primary bone tumors: Results with a low cost total femur prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Puri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The extent of tumor may necessitate resection of the complete femur rarely to achieve adequate oncologic clearance in bone sarcomas. We present our experience with reconstruction in such cases using an indigenously manufactured, low-cost, total femoral prosthesis (TFP. We assessed the complications of the procedure, the oncologic and functional outcomes, and implant survival. Materials and Methods: Eight patients (four males and four females with a mean age of 32 years, operated between December 2003 and June 2009, had a TFP implanted. The diagnosis included osteogenic sarcoma (5, Ewing′s sarcoma (1, and chondrosarcoma (2. Mean followup was 33 months (9-72 months for all and 40 months (24-72 months in survivors. They were evaluated by Musculoskeletal Tumor Society score, implant survival as well as patient survival. Results: There was one local recurrence and five of seven patients are currently alive at the time of last followup. The Musculoskeletal Tumor Society score for patients ranged from 21 to 25 with a mean of 24 (80%. The implant survival was 88% at 5 years with only one TFP needing removal because of infection. Conclusions: A TFP in appropriately indicated patients with malignant bone tumors is oncologically safe. A locally manufactured, cost-effective implant provided consistent and predictable results after excision of the total femur with good functional outcomes.

  13. Total direct cost, length of hospital stay, institutional discharges and their determinants from rehabilitation settings in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, S K; Ng, T P; Yong, D; Fong, N P; Gerald, K

    2006-11-01

    Length of hospital stay (LOHS) is the largest determinant of direct cost for stroke care. Institutional discharges (acute care and nursing homes) from rehabilitation settings add to the direct cost. It is important to identify potentially preventable medical and non-medical reasons determining LOHS and institutional discharges to reduce the direct cost of stroke care. The aim of the study was to ascertain the total direct cost, LOHS, frequency of institutional discharges and their determinants from rehabilitation settings. Observational study was conducted on 200 stroke patients in two rehabilitation settings. The patients were examined for various socio-demographic, neurological and clinical variables upon admission to the rehabilitation hospitals. Information on total direct cost and medical complications during hospitalization were also recorded. The outcome variables measured were total direct cost, LOHS and discharges to institutions (acute care and nursing home facility) and their determinants. The mean and median LOHS in our study were 34 days (SD = 18) and 32 days respectively. LOHS and the cost of hospital stay were significantly correlated. The significant variables associated with LOHS on multiple linear regression analysis were: (i) severe functional impairment/functional dependence Barthel Index institutional discharges (22 to acute care and 17 to nursing homes). On multivariate analysis the significant predictors of discharges to institutions from rehabilitation hospitals were medical complications (OR = 4.37; 95% CI 1.01-12.53) and severe functional impairment/functional dependence. (OR = 5.90, 95% CI 2.32-14.98). Length of hospital stay and discharges to institutions from rehabilitation settings are significantly determined by medical complications. Importance of adhering to clinical pathway/protocol for stroke care is further discussed.

  14. Cost of post-operative intravenous iron therapy in total lower limb arthroplasty: a retrospective, matched cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Manuel; Gómez-Ramírez, Susana; Martín-Montañez, Elisa; Naveira, Enrique; Seara, Javier; Pavía, José

    2014-01-01

    Background Requirements for allogeneic red cell transfusion after total lower limb arthroplasty are still high (20–50%), and post-operative intravenous iron has been shown to reduce transfusion requirements for this surgery. We performed a cost analysis to ascertain whether this alternative is also likely to be cost-effective. Materials and methods Data from 182 matched-pairs of total lower limb arthroplasty patients, managed with a restrictive transfusion protocol and without (control group) or with post-operative intravenous iron (iron group), were retrospectively reviewed. Acquisition and administration costs of iron (iron sucrose or ferric carboxymaltose) and allogeneic red cell concentrates, haemoglobin measurements, and prolonged stay in hospital were used for blood management cost analysis. Results Patients in the iron group received 600 mg intravenous iron, without clinically relevant incidents, and had a lower allogeneic transfusion rate (11.5% vs 26.4% for the iron and control groups, respectively; p=0.001). The reduction in transfusion rate was more pronounced in anaemic patients (17% vs 40%; p=0.015) than in non-anaemic ones (9.6% vs 21.2%; p=0.011). There were no differences with respect to post-operative infection rate. Patients receiving allogeneic transfusion stayed in hospital longer (+1.9 days [95% CI: 1.2–2.6]). As intravenous iron reduces the allogeneic transfusion rate, both iron formulations were cost-neutral in the different cost scenarios (−25.5 to 62.1 €/patient for iron sucrose, and −51.1 to 64.4 €/patient for ferric carboxymaltose). Discussion In patients presenting with or without pre-operative anaemia, post-operative intravenous iron after total lower limb arthroplasty seems to be safe and is associated with reduced transfusion rates, without incremental costs. For anaemic patients, its efficacy could be increased by associating some other blood-saving method. PMID:24120595

  15. Deep water tie-back economics capex vs opex and the total costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarlton, Oran D. [Oil States Industries Inc., Arlington, TX (United States)

    2005-07-01

    This paper explores the real cost and time benefits associated with the current, past, and future contracting strategies associated with subsea developments. It looks at the real cost associated with out sourcing engineering development and the impact of engineering, procurement, installation, and construction (EPIC) contracts. Development costs are first and foremost in the minds of operators as a field is analyzed for development potential. The cycle starts with an analysis of the geological information to estimate the potential value in the field. It proceeds to conceptual design where the first development methodology and cost estimates are prepared. If the project is initially viable it will proceed from conceptual design to Front End Engineering and Design (FEED) where a complete development plan is prepared with possible options and recommendations. Engineering companies may as a part of the FEED prepare a Request for Quotation (RFQ) which is sent to potential suppliers. As part of a FEED contract, an engineering company may also review responses to the RFQ and provide recommendations for selected suppliers. Typically large subsea projects are divided into several major categories such as: topsides; subsea production systems; wells; subsea umbilical risers and glow lines (SURF), and commissioning in order to simplify management and procurement. Many times these contracts are awarded as EPIC contracts to further simplify management and internal procurement efforts. A case study is presented which challenges current contracting strategies and presents an option for a lower cost and a better way forward with respect to the short term and a focus on the long term. (author)

  16. Total cost of ownership of CHP SOFC systems: Effect of installation context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arduino, Francesco; Santarelli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are one of the most interesting between the emerging technologies for energy production. Although some information about the production cost of these devices are already known, their operational cost has not been studied yet with sufficient accuracy. This paper presents a life cycle cost (LCC) analysis of CHP (combined heat and power) SOFC systems performed in hospitals located in various cities of the US and one in Italy. In this study the strong effects of the installation context will be analyzed using a customized use phase model for each location. The cost effectiveness of these devices has been proved without credits in Mondovi (IT), New York (NY) and Minneapolis (MN) where the payback time goes from 10 to 7 years. Considering the credits, it is possible to obtain economic feasibility also in Chicago (IL) and reduce the payback for other cities to values from 4 to 6 years. In other cities like Phoenix (AZ) and Houston (TX) the payback can’t be reached in any case. The life cycle impact assessment analysis has shown how, even in the cities with cleaner electricity grid, there is a reduction in the emissions of both greenhouse gases and pollutants. - Highlights: •Life cycle cost analysis has been performed for CHP SOFC systems. •The strong effects of the installation context have been analyzed. •Economic feasibility has been proven in new york, Minneapolis and Mondovi. •Economic feasibility can’t be reached in phoenix and Houston. •SOFC always provide a reduction in the emissions of greenhouse gases and pollutant.

  17. Total cost of ownership of electric vehicles compared to conventional vehicles: A probabilistic analysis and projection across market segments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Geng; Inderbitzin, Alessandro; Bening, Catharina

    2015-01-01

    While electric vehicles (EV) can perform better than conventional vehicles from an environmental standpoint, consumers perceive them to be more expensive due to their higher capital cost. Recent studies calculated the total cost of ownership (TCO) to evaluate the complete cost for the consumer, focusing on individual vehicle classes, powertrain technologies, or use cases. To provide a comprehensive overview, we built a probabilistic simulation model broad enough to capture most of a national market. Our findings indicate that the comparative cost efficiency of EV increases with the consumer's driving distance and is higher for small than for large vehicles. However, our sensitivity analysis shows that the exact TCO is subject to the development of vehicle and operating costs and thus uncertain. Although the TCO of electric vehicles may become close to or even lower than that of conventional vehicles by 2025, our findings add evidence to past studies showing that the TCO does not reflect how consumers make their purchase decision today. Based on these findings, we discuss policy measures that educate consumers about the TCO of different vehicle types based on their individual preferences. In addition, measures improving the charging infrastructure and further decreasing battery cost are discussed. - Highlights: • Calculates the total cost of ownership across competing vehicle technologies. • Uses Monte Carlo simulation to analyse distributions and probabilities of outcomes. • Contains a comprehensive assessment across the main vehicle classes and use cases. • Indicates that cost efficiency of technology depends on vehicle class and use case. • Derives specific policy measures to facilitate electric vehicle diffusion

  18. Ranking periodic ordering models on the basis of minimizing total inventory cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadali Keramati

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to provide proper policies for inventory under uncertain conditions by comparing different inventory policies. To review the efficiency of these algorithms it is necessary to specify the area in which each of them is applied. Therefore, each of the models has been reviewed under different forms of retailing and they are ranked in terms of their expenses. According to the high values of inventories and their impacts on the costs of the companies, the ranking of various models using the simulation annealing algorithm are presented, which indicates that the proposed model of this paper could perform better than other alternative ones. The results also indicate that the suggested algorithm could save from 4 to 29 percent on costs of inventories.

  19. Varying energetic costs of Brent Geese along a continuum from aquatic to agricultural habitats: the importance of habitat-specific energy expenditure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Kevin Kuhlmann; Clausen, Preben; Fox, Anthony David

    2013-01-01

    and alert than birds feeding in aquatic areas, and also spent much less time roosting. Frequency of disturbance was found to be higher in terrestrial habitats compared to aquatic habitats. These stress-related behavioural differences between habitats highlight the vulnerability of the species associated...... with adapting to different food sources. Combining time-budgets with activity-specific BMR-multiplicators showed that activity-based metabolic rates ranged from 1.7 to 2.7 × BMR within habitats exploited by Brent Geese, and emphasized that aquatic areas represent the energetically least expensive foraging...... habitat for these birds. This is largely the result of habitat-specific variation in time spent flying. These findings underline the importance of measuring habitat-specific behaviour and disturbance when studying avian energetics, and demonstrate the risk of uncritically using allometric relationships...

  20. Implementation of Distance Support (DS) to Reduce Total Ownership Cost (R-TOC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Policy of 22 Mar 2007, states that DS combines people, processes and technology into a collaborative infrastructure regardless of geographic location...Tech Assist Data for Submarine Enterprise 120 FTA Events Performed 164 MH Via On-Si te Support Average Cost Per Event (Based on $60.00 Per Hour...CFFC/Command Policy) 16% Success Rate Overa l l On Al l FTA Events 37% Success Rate On Out-Of-Area Events Average MHs Per Event 19 MH Via DS

  1. Efficiency and Cost Analysis of Cell Saver Auto Transfusion System in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa Gökhan Bilgili; Ersin Erçin; Cemal Kural; Altuğ Duramaz; Cevdet Avkan; Gökhan Peker; Serdar Hakan Başaran

    2014-01-01

    Background: Blood loss and replacement is still a controversial issue in major orthopaedic surgery. Allogenic blood transfusion may cause legal problems and concerns regarding the transmission of transfusion-related diseases. Cellsaver Systems (CSS) were developed as an alternative to allogenic transfusion but CSS transfusion may cause coagulation, infection and haemodynamic instability. Aims: Our aim was to analyse the efficiency and cost analysis of a cell saver auto-transfusion system ...

  2. The Principle of Energetic Consistency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Stephen E.

    2009-01-01

    A basic result in estimation theory is that the minimum variance estimate of the dynamical state, given the observations, is the conditional mean estimate. This result holds independently of the specifics of any dynamical or observation nonlinearity or stochasticity, requiring only that the probability density function of the state, conditioned on the observations, has two moments. For nonlinear dynamics that conserve a total energy, this general result implies the principle of energetic consistency: if the dynamical variables are taken to be the natural energy variables, then the sum of the total energy of the conditional mean and the trace of the conditional covariance matrix (the total variance) is constant between observations. Ensemble Kalman filtering methods are designed to approximate the evolution of the conditional mean and covariance matrix. For them the principle of energetic consistency holds independently of ensemble size, even with covariance localization. However, full Kalman filter experiments with advection dynamics have shown that a small amount of numerical dissipation can cause a large, state-dependent loss of total variance, to the detriment of filter performance. The principle of energetic consistency offers a simple way to test whether this spurious loss of variance limits ensemble filter performance in full-blown applications. The classical second-moment closure (third-moment discard) equations also satisfy the principle of energetic consistency, independently of the rank of the conditional covariance matrix. Low-rank approximation of these equations offers an energetically consistent, computationally viable alternative to ensemble filtering. Current formulations of long-window, weak-constraint, four-dimensional variational methods are designed to approximate the conditional mode rather than the conditional mean. Thus they neglect the nonlinear bias term in the second-moment closure equation for the conditional mean. The principle of

  3. Cost-utility analysis comparing radioactive iodine, anti-thyroid drugs and total thyroidectomy for primary treatment of Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Peter J; McLeod, Donald S A; Little, Richard; Gordon, Louisa

    2016-12-01

    Little data is in existence about the most cost-effective primary treatment for Graves' disease. We performed a cost-utility analysis comparing radioactive iodine (RAI), anti-thyroid drugs (ATD) and total thyroidectomy (TT) as first-line therapy for Graves' disease in England and Australia. We used a Markov model to compare lifetime costs and benefits (quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs)). The model included efficacy, rates of relapse and major complications associated with each treatment, and alternative second-line therapies. Model parameters were obtained from published literature. One-way sensitivity analyses were conducted. Costs were presented in 2015£ or Australian Dollars (AUD). RAI was the least expensive therapy in both England (£5425; QALYs 34.73) and Australia (AUD5601; 30.97 QALYs). In base case results, in both countries, ATD was a cost-effective alternative to RAI (£16 866; 35.17 QALYs; incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) £26 279 per QALY gained England; AUD8924; 31.37 QALYs; ICER AUD9687 per QALY gained Australia), while RAI dominated TT (£7115; QALYs 33.93 England; AUD15 668; 30.25 QALYs Australia). In sensitivity analysis, base case results were stable to changes in most cost, transition probabilities and health-relative quality-of-life (HRQoL) weights; however, in England, the results were sensitive to changes in the HRQoL weights of hypothyroidism and euthyroidism on ATD. In this analysis, RAI is the least expensive choice for first-line treatment strategy for Graves' disease. In England and Australia, ATD is likely to be a cost-effective alternative, while TT is unlikely to be cost-effective. Further research into HRQoL in Graves' disease could improve the quality of future studies. © 2016 European Society of Endocrinology.

  4. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Total Hip Arthroplasty Performed by a Canadian Short-Stay Surgical Team in Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegelmilch, Michael; Rashiq, Saifee; Moreau, Barbara; Jarrín, Patricia; Tran, Bach; Chuck, Anderson

    2017-01-01

    Few charitable overseas surgical missions produce cost-effectiveness analyses of their work. We compared the pre- and postoperative health status for 157 total hip arthroplasty (THA) patients operated on from 2007 to 2011 attended by an annual Canadian orthopedic mission to Ecuador to determine the quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained. The costs of each mission are known. The cost per surgery was divided by the average lifetime QALYs gained to estimate an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) in Canadian dollars per QALY. The average lifetime QALYs (95% CI) gained were 1.46 (1.4-1.5), 2.5 (2.4-2.6), and 2.9 (2.7-3.1) for unilateral, bilateral, and staged (two THAs in different years) operations, respectively. The ICERs were $4,442 for unilateral, $2,939 for bilateral, and $4392 for staged procedures. Seventy percent of the mission budget was spent on the transport and accommodation of volunteers. THA by a Canadian short-stay surgical team was highly cost-effective, according to criteria from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence and the World Health Organization. We encourage other international missions to provide similar cost-effectiveness data to enable better comparison between mission types and between mission and nonmission care.

  5. Feasibility studies to improve plant availability and reduce total installed cost in IGCC plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, Kevin [General Electric Company, Houston, TX (United States); Anasti, William [General Electric Company, Houston, TX (United States); Fang, Yichuan [General Electric Company, Houston, TX (United States); Subramanyan, Karthik [General Electric Company, Houston, TX (United States); Leininger, Tom [General Electric Company, Houston, TX (United States); Zemsky, Christine [General Electric Company, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-03-30

    The main purpose of this project is to look at technologies and philosophies that would help reduce the costs of an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plant, increase its availability or do both. GE’s approach to this problem is to consider options in three different areas: 1) technology evaluations and development; 2) constructability approaches; and 3) design and operation methodologies. Five separate tasks were identified that fall under the three areas: Task 2 – Integrated Operations Philosophy; Task 3 – Slip Forming of IGCC Components; Task 4 – Modularization of IGCC Components; Task 5 – Fouling Removal; and Task 6 – Improved Slag Handling. Overall, this project produced results on many fronts. Some of the ideas could be utilized immediately by those seeking to build an IGCC plant in the near future. These include the considerations from the Integrated Operations Philosophy task and the different construction techniques of Slip Forming and Modularization (especially if the proposed site is in a remote location or has a lack of a skilled workforce). Other results include ideas for promising technologies that require further development and testing to realize their full potential and be available for commercial operation. In both areas GE considers this project to be a success in identifying areas outside the core IGCC plant systems that are ripe for cost reduction and ity improvement opportunities.

  6. Leveraging Real-World Evidence in Disease-Management Decision-Making with a Total Cost of Care Estimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh-Nghia; Trocio, Jeffrey; Kowal, Stacey; Ferrufino, Cheryl P; Munakata, Julie; South, Dell

    2016-12-01

    Health management is becoming increasingly complex, given a range of care options and the need to balance costs and quality. The ability to measure and understand drivers of costs is critical for healthcare organizations to effectively manage their patient populations. Healthcare decision makers can leverage real-world evidence to explore the value of disease-management interventions in shifting total cost trends. To develop a real-world, evidence-based estimator that examines the impact of disease-management interventions on the total cost of care (TCoC) for a patient population with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). Data were collected from a patient-level real-world evidence data set that uses the IMS PharMetrics Health Plan Claims Database. Pharmacy and medical claims for patients meeting the inclusion or exclusion criteria were combined in longitudinal cohorts with a 180-day preindex and 360-day follow-up period. Descriptive statistics, such as mean and median patient costs and event rates, were derived from a real-world evidence analysis and were used to populate the base-case estimates within the TCoC estimator, an exploratory economic model that was designed to estimate the potential impact of several disease-management activities on the TCoC for a patient population with NVAF. Using Microsoft Excel, the estimator is designed to compare current direct costs of medical care to projected costs by varying assumptions on the impact of disease-management activities and applying the associated changes in cost trends to the affected populations. Disease-management levers are derived from literature-based concepts affecting costs along the NVAF disease continuum. The use of the estimator supports analyses across 4 US geographic regions, age, cost types, and care settings during 1 year. All patients included in the study were continuously enrolled in their health plan (within the IMS PharMetrics Health Plan Claims Database) between July 1, 2010, and June 30

  7. Energetics Conditioning Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energetics Conditioning Facility is used for long term and short term aging studies of energetic materials. The facility has 10 conditioning chambers of which 2...

  8. Process Improvement Project Using Tranexamic Acid Is Cost-Effective in Reducing Blood Loss and Transfusions After Total Hip and Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demos, Harry A; Lin, Zilan X; Barfield, William R; Wilson, Sylvia H; Robertson, Dawn C; Pellegrini, Vincent D

    2017-08-01

    Tranexamic acid (TXA) has been associated with decreased blood loss and transfusion after total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purpose of this study was to examine both transfusion utilization and the economic impact of a Process Improvement Project implementing TXA for THA and TKA. After standardization of TXA administration in THA and TKA patients, retrospective data were compared from 12 consecutive months before (group A, n = 336 procedures) and after (group B, n = 436 procedures) project initiation. TXA administration increased with project implementation (group A = 3.57%, group B = 86.01%) and was associated with reductions in perioperative hemoglobin decrement (20.2%), patients transfused (45%), and number of units transfused per patient (61.9%). Cost savings were notable per patient ($128) and annually program wide ($55,884) with the primary THA subgroup contributing the most to the savings. No increase in adverse effects was observed. Standardized administration of TXA is an effective and economically favorable blood-reduction strategy for patients undergoing elective THA or TKA. Although reduction in transfusions with TXA may be greater after TKA, the economic and clinical impact of transfusion reduction is more substantial in THA patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. What is the Best Strategy to Minimize After-Care Costs for Total Joint Arthroplasty in a Bundled Payment Environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slover, James D; Mullaly, Kathleen A; Payne, Ashley; Iorio, Richard; Bosco, Joseph

    2016-12-01

    The post-acute care strategies after lower extremity total joint arthroplasty including the use of post-acute rehabilitation centers and home therapy services are associated with different costs. Providers in bundled payment programs are incentivized to use the most cost-effective strategies. We used decision analysis to examine the impact of extending the inpatient hospital stay to avoid discharge of patients to a post-acute rehabilitation facility. The results of this decision analysis show that extended acute hospital care for up to 5.2 extra days to allow for home discharge, rather than discharge to a post-acute inpatient facility can be financially preferable, provided quality is not negatively impacted. The data demonstrate that because the cost of additional acute care hospital days is relatively small and because the cost of an extended post-acute inpatient rehabilitation facility is high, keeping patients in the acute facility for a few extra days and then discharging them directly to home may result in an overall lower cost than discharge after a shorter hospital stay to an expensive post-acute facility. However, this approach will have challenges, and future studies are needed to evaluate this change in strategy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Power plant allocation in East Kalimantan considering total cost and emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muslimin; Utomo, D. S.

    2018-04-01

    The fulfillment of electricity need in East Kalimantan is the responsibility of State Electricity Company/Perusahaan Listrik Negara (PLN). But PLN faces constraints in the lack of generating capacity it has. So the allocation of power loads in East Kalimantan has its own challenges. Additional power supplies from other parties are required. In this study, there are four scenarios tested to meet the electricity needs in East Kalimantan with the goal of minimizing costs and emissions. The first scenario is only by using PLN power plant. The second scenario is by combining PLN + Independent Power Producer (IPP) power plants. The third scenario is by using PLN + Rented power plants. The fourth scenario is by using PLN + Excess capacity generation. Numerical experiment using nonlinear programming is conducted with the help of the solver. The result shows that in the peak load condition, the best combination is scenario 2 (PLN + IPP). While at the lowest load condition, the cheapest scenario is PLN + IPP while the lowest emission is PLN + Rent.

  11. A total cost perspective on use of polymeric materials in solar collectors – Importance of environmental performance on suitability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, Bo; Persson, Helena; Meir, Michaela; Rekstad, John

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A polymeric solar collector system was compared with two traditional ones. • It was found the best in terms of climatic performance per solar heat collected. • The differences in climatic cost between the systems compared however are small. • The low climatic cost makes solar heating better compared to natural gas heating. • Use of Ecoindicator 99 for environmental cost makes solar heating even better. - Abstract: To assess the suitability of solar collector systems in which polymeric materials are used versus those in which more traditional materials are used, a case study was undertaken. In this case study a solar heating system with polymeric solar collectors was compared with two equivalent but more traditional solar heating systems: one with flat plate solar collectors and one with evacuated tube solar collectors. To make the comparison, a total cost accounting approach was adopted. The life cycle assessment (LCA) results clearly indicated that the polymeric solar collector system is the best as regards climatic and environmental performance when they are expressed in terms of the IPPC 100 a indicator and the Ecoindicator 99, H/A indicator, respectively. In terms of climatic and environmental costs per amount of solar heat collected, the differences between the three kinds of collector systems were small when compared with existing energy prices. With the present tax rates, it seems unlikely that the differences in environmental and climatic costs will have any significant influence on which system is the most favoured, from a total cost point of view. In the choice between a renewable heat source and a heat source based on the use of a fossil fuel, the conclusion was that for climatic performance to be an important economic factor, the tax or trade rate of carbon dioxide emissions must be increased significantly, given the initial EU carbon dioxide emission trade rate. The rate would need to be at least of the same order of magnitude

  12. Direct hospital costs of total laparoscopic hysterectomy compared with fast-track open hysterectomy at a tertiary hospital: a retrospective case-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhou, Yoon J J; Pather, Selvan; Loadsman, John A; Campbell, Neil; Philp, Shannon; Carter, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    To assess the direct intraoperative and postoperative costs in women undergoing total laparoscopic hysterectomy and fast-track open hysterectomy. A retrospective review of the direct hospital-related costs in a matched cohort of women undergoing total laparoscopic hysterectomy (TLH) and fast-track open hysterectomy (FTOH) at a tertiary hospital. All costs were calculated, including the cost of advanced high-energy laparoscopic devices. The effect of the learning curve on cost in laparoscopic hysterectomy was also assessed, as was the hospital case-weighted cost, which was compared with the actual cost. Fifty women were included in each arm of the study. TLH had a higher intraoperative cost, but a lower postoperative cost than FTOH (AUD$3877 vs AUD$2776 P funding model in our hospital is inaccurate when compared to directly calculated hospital costs. © 2013 The Authors ANZJOG © 2013 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  13. Benefits of using customized instrumentation in total knee arthroplasty: results from an activity-based costing model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibesku, Carsten O; Hofer, Pamela; Portegies, Wesley; Ruys, C J M; Fennema, Peter

    2013-03-01

    The growing demand for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) associated with the efforts to contain healthcare expenditure by advanced economies necessitates the use of economically effective technologies in TKA. The present analysis based on activity-based costing (ABC) model was carried out to estimate the economic value of patient-matched instrumentation (PMI) compared to standard surgical instrumentation in TKA. The costs of the two approaches, PMI and standard instrumentation in TKA, were determined by the use of ABC which measures the cost of a particular procedure by determining the activities involved and adding the cost of each activity. Improvement in productivity due to increased operating room (OR) turn-around times was determined and potential additional revenue to the hospital by the efficient utilization of gained OR time was estimated. Increased efficiency in the usage of OR and utilization of surgical trays were noted with patient-specific approach. Potential revenues to the hospital were estimated with the use of PMI by efficient utilization of time saved in OR. Additional revenues of 78,240 per year were estimated considering utilization of gained OR time to perform surgeries other than TKA. The analysis suggests that use of PMI in TKA is economically effective when compared to standard instrumentation.

  14. Contribution of blood oxygen and carbon dioxide sensing to the energetic optimization of human walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jeremy D; O'Connor, Shawn M; Selinger, Jessica C; Donelan, J Maxwell

    2017-08-01

    People can adapt their gait to minimize energetic cost, indicating that walking's neural control has access to ongoing measurements of the body's energy use. In this study we tested the hypothesis that an important source of energetic cost measurements arises from blood gas receptors that are sensitive to O 2 and CO 2 concentrations. These receptors are known to play a role in regulating other physiological processes related to energy consumption, such as ventilation rate. Given the role of O 2 and CO 2 in oxidative metabolism, sensing their levels can provide an accurate estimate of the body's total energy use. To test our hypothesis, we simulated an added energetic cost for blood gas receptors that depended on a subject's step frequency and determined if subjects changed their behavior in response to this simulated cost. These energetic costs were simulated by controlling inspired gas concentrations to decrease the circulating levels of O 2 and increase CO 2 We found this blood gas control to be effective at shifting the step frequency that minimized the ventilation rate and perceived exertion away from the normally preferred frequency, indicating that these receptors provide the nervous system with strong physiological and psychological signals. However, rather than adapt their preferred step frequency toward these lower simulated costs, subjects persevered at their normally preferred frequency even after extensive experience with the new simulated costs. These results suggest that blood gas receptors play a negligible role in sensing energetic cost for the purpose of optimizing gait. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Human gait adaptation implies that the nervous system senses energetic cost, yet this signal is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that the blood gas receptors sense cost for gait optimization by controlling blood O 2 and CO 2 with step frequency as people walked. At the simulated energetic minimum, ventilation and perceived exertion were lowest, yet subjects

  15. Template-Directed Instrumentation Reduces Cost and Improves Efficiency for Total Knee Arthroplasty: An Economic Decision Analysis and Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLawhorn, Alexander S; Carroll, Kaitlin M; Blevins, Jason L; DeNegre, Scott T; Mayman, David J; Jerabek, Seth A

    2015-10-01

    Template-directed instrumentation (TDI) for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) may streamline operating room (OR) workflow and reduce costs by preselecting implants and minimizing instrument tray burden. A decision model simulated the economics of TDI. Sensitivity analyses determined thresholds for model variables to ensure TDI success. A clinical pilot was reviewed. The accuracy of preoperative templates was validated, and 20 consecutive primary TKAs were performed using TDI. The model determined that preoperative component size estimation should be accurate to ±1 implant size for 50% of TKAs to implement TDI. The pilot showed that preoperative template accuracy exceeded 97%. There were statistically significant improvements in OR turnover time and in-room time for TDI compared to an historical cohort of TKAs. TDI reduces costs and improves OR efficiency. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Integrated batch production and maintenance scheduling for multiple items processed on a deteriorating machine to minimize total production and maintenance costs with due date constraint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahedi Zahedi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses an integrated model of batch production and maintenance scheduling on a deteriorating machine producing multiple items to be delivered at a common due date. The model describes the trade-off between total inventory cost and maintenance cost as the increase of production run length. The production run length is a time bucket between two consecutive preventive maintenance activities. The objective function of the model is to minimize total cost consisting of in process and completed part inventory costs, setup cost, preventive and corrective maintenance costs and rework cost. The problem is to determine the optimal production run length and to schedule the batches obtained from determining the production run length in order to minimize total cost.

  17. Associations between preoperative physical therapy and post-acute care utilization patterns and cost in total joint replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Richard; Granata, Jaymes; Ruhil, Anirudh V S; Vogel, Karen; McShane, Michael; Wasielewski, Ray

    2014-10-01

    Health-care costs following acute hospital care have been identified as a major contributor to regional variation in Medicare spending. This study investigated the associations of preoperative physical therapy and post-acute care resource use and its effect on the total cost of care during primary hip or knee arthroplasty. Historical claims data were analyzed using the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Limited Data Set files for Diagnosis Related Group 470. Analysis included descriptive statistics of patient demographic characteristics, comorbidities, procedures, and post-acute care utilization patterns, which included skilled nursing facility, home health agency, or inpatient rehabilitation facility, during the ninety-day period after a surgical hospitalization. To evaluate the associations, we used bivariate and multivariate techniques focused on post-acute care use and total episode-of-care costs. The Limited Data Set provided 4733 index hip or knee replacement cases for analysis within the thirty-nine-county Medicare hospital referral cluster. Post-acute care utilization was a significant variable in the total cost of care for the ninety-day episode. Overall, 77.0% of patients used post-acute care services after surgery. Post-acute care utilization decreased if preoperative physical therapy was used, with only 54.2% of the preoperative physical therapy cohort using post-acute care services. However, 79.7% of the non-preoperative physical therapy cohort used post-acute care services. After adjusting for demographic characteristics and comorbidities, the use of preoperative physical therapy was associated with a significant 29% reduction in post-acute care use, including an $871 reduction of episode payment driven largely by a reduction in payments for skilled nursing facility ($1093), home health agency ($527), and inpatient rehabilitation ($172). The use of preoperative physical therapy was associated with a 29% decrease in the use of any post-acute care

  18. Nuclear energetics all over the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojcik, T.

    2000-01-01

    The actual state and tendencies of nuclear power further development for different world regions have been presented and discussed. The problem of safety of energetic nuclear reactors, radioactive waste management and related problems have been discussed in respect of regulations in different countries. The economical aspects of nuclear energetics in comparison with different fossil fuel power plants exploitation costs has been presented as well. The official state of international organizations (IAEA, WANO, HASA etc.) have been also shown in respect to subject presented

  19. Cost-effectiveness of cervical total disc replacement vs fusion for the treatment of 2-level symptomatic degenerative disc disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ament, Jared D; Yang, Zhuo; Nunley, Pierce; Stone, Marcus B; Kim, Kee D

    2014-12-01

    Cervical total disc replacement (CTDR) was developed to treat cervical spondylosis, while preserving motion. While anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) has been the standard of care for 2-level disease, a randomized clinical trial (RCT) suggested similar outcomes. Cost-effectiveness of this intervention has never been elucidated. To determine the cost-effectiveness of CTDR compared with ACDF. Data were derived from an RCT that followed up 330 patients over 24 months. The original RCT consisted of multi-institutional data including private and academic institutions. Using linear regression for the current study, health states were constructed based on the stratification of the Neck Disability Index and a visual analog scale. Data from the 12-item Short-Form Health Survey questionnaires were transformed into utilities values using the SF-6D mapping algorithm. Costs were calculated by extracting Diagnosis-Related Group codes from institutional billing data and then applying 2012 Medicare reimbursement rates. The costs of complications and return-to-work data were also calculated. A Markov model was built to evaluate quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) for both treatment groups. The model adopted a third-party payer perspective and applied a 3% annual discount rate. Patients included in the original RCT had to be diagnosed as having radiculopathy or myeloradiculopathy at 2 contiguous levels from C3-C7 that was unresponsive to conservative treatment for at least 6 weeks or demonstrated progressive symptoms. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of CTDR compared with ACDF. A strong correlation (R2 = 0.6864; P sensitivity analysis, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio value stays below the threshold of $50,000 per QALY in most scenarios (range, -$58,194 to $147,862 per QALY). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of CTDR compared with traditional ACDF is lower than the commonly accepted threshold of $50,000 per QALY. This remains true with varying input

  20. A Flexible Job Shop Scheduling Problem with Controllable Processing Times to Optimize Total Cost of Delay and Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Mokhtari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the flexible job shop scheduling problem with machine flexibility and controllable process times is studied. The main idea is that the processing times of operations may be controlled by consumptions of additional resources. The purpose of this paper to find the best trade-off between processing cost and delay cost in order to minimize the total costs. The proposed model, flexible job shop scheduling with controllable processing times (FJCPT, is formulated as an integer non-linear programming (INLP model and then it is converted into an integer linear programming (ILP model. Due to NP-hardness of FJCPT, conventional analytic optimization methods are not efficient. Hence, in order to solve the problem, a Scatter Search (SS, as an efficient metaheuristic method, is developed. To show the effectiveness of the proposed method, numerical experiments are conducted. The efficiency of the proposed algorithm is compared with that of a genetic algorithm (GA available in the literature for solving FJSP problem. The results showed that the proposed SS provide better solutions than the existing GA.

  1. Life cycles of energetic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adnot, Jerome; Marchio, Dominique; Riviere, Philippe; Duplessis, B.; Rabl, A.; Glachant, M.; Aggeri, F.; Benoist, A.; Teulon, H.; Daude, J.

    2012-01-01

    This collective publication aims at being a course for students in engineering of energetic systems, i.e. at learning how to decide to accept or discard a project, to select the most efficient system, to select the optimal system, to select the optimal combination of systems, and to classify independent systems. Thus, it presents methods to analyse system life cycle from an energetic, economic and environmental point of view, describes how to develop an approach to the eco-design of an energy consuming product, how to understand the importance of hypotheses behind abundant and often contradicting publicised results, and to be able to criticise or to put in perspective one's own analysis. The first chapters thus recall some aspects of economic calculation, introduce the assessment of investment and exploitation costs of energetic systems, describe how to assess and internalise environmental costs, present the territorial carbon assessment, discuss the use of the life cycle assessment, and address the issue of environmental management at a product scale. The second part proposes various case studies: an optimal fleet of thermal production of electric power, the eco-design of a refrigerator, the economic and environmental assessment of wind farms

  2. A protocol for sustained reduction of Total Parenteral Nutrition and cost savings by improvement of nutritional care in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schaik, Rian; Van den Abeele, Kurt; Melsens, Glenn; Schepens, Peter; Lanssens, Truus; Vlaemynck, Bernadette; Devisch, Maria; Niewold, Theo A

    2016-10-01

    Malnutrition and the use of Total Parenteral Nutrition (TPN) contribute considerably to hospital costs. Recently, we reported on the introduction of malnutrition screening and monitoring of TPN use in our hospital, which resulted in a large (40%) reduction in TPN and improved quality of nutritional care in two years (2011/12). Here, we aimed to assure continuation of improved care by developing a detailed malnutrition screening and TPN use protocol involving instruction tools for hospital staff, while monitoring the results in the following two years (2013/14). A TPN decision tree for follow up of TPN in patients and a TP-EN instruction card for caregivers was introduced, showing TPN/EN introduction schedules based on the energy needs of patients according to EB guidelines, also addressing the risk of refeeding syndrome. TPN patients were monitored by dietitians and TPN usage and costs were presented to the (medical) staff. Screening and treatment of malnourished patients by dietitians is simultaneously ongoing. In 2014 48% of patients, hospitalized for at least 48 h, were screened on malnutrition, 17% of them were diagnosed at risk, 7.9% malnourished and treated by dietitians. TPN usage dropped by 53% and cost savings of 51% were obtained due to 50% decrease of TPN users in 2014 versus 2010. TPN over EN ratio dropped from 2.4 in 2010 to 1.2 in 2014. Sustained improvement of nutritional care and reduction of TPN usage and costs is possible by introduction of procedures embedded in the existing structures. Copyright © 2016 European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The energetic significance of cooking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmody, Rachel N; Wrangham, Richard W

    2009-10-01

    While cooking has long been argued to improve the diet, the nature of the improvement has not been well defined. As a result, the evolutionary significance of cooking has variously been proposed as being substantial or relatively trivial. In this paper, we evaluate the hypothesis that an important and consistent effect of cooking food is a rise in its net energy value. The pathways by which cooking influences net energy value differ for starch, protein, and lipid, and we therefore consider plant and animal foods separately. Evidence of compromised physiological performance among individuals on raw diets supports the hypothesis that cooked diets tend to provide energy. Mechanisms contributing to energy being gained from cooking include increased digestibility of starch and protein, reduced costs of digestion for cooked versus raw meat, and reduced energetic costs of detoxification and defence against pathogens. If cooking consistently improves the energetic value of foods through such mechanisms, its evolutionary impact depends partly on the relative energetic benefits of non-thermal processing methods used prior to cooking. We suggest that if non-thermal processing methods such as pounding were used by Lower Palaeolithic Homo, they likely provided an important increase in energy gain over unprocessed raw diets. However, cooking has critical effects not easily achievable by non-thermal processing, including the relatively complete gelatinisation of starch, efficient denaturing of proteins, and killing of food borne pathogens. This means that however sophisticated the non-thermal processing methods were, cooking would have conferred incremental energetic benefits. While much remains to be discovered, we conclude that the adoption of cooking would have led to an important rise in energy availability. For this reason, we predict that cooking had substantial evolutionary significance.

  4. Analysis of the total system life cycle cost for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program: Volume 1, The analysis and its results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    This report provides cost estimates for the fifth evaluation of the adequacy of the fee and is consistent with the program strategy and plans. The total-system cost for the reference cases in the improved-performance system is estimated at $32.1 to $38.2 billion (expressed in constant 1986 dollars) over the entire life of the system...or $1.5 to $1.6 billion more than that of the authorized system (i.e., the system without an MRS facility). The current estimate of the total-system cost for the reference cases in the improved-performance system is $3.8 to $5.4 billion higher than the estimate for the same system in the 1986 TSLCC analysis. In the case with the maximum increase, nearly all of the higher cost is due to a $5.2-billion increase in the costs of development and evaluation (D and E); all other system costs are essentially unchanged. The cost difference between the improved-performance system and the authorized system is smaller than the difference estimated in last year's TSLCC analysis. Volume 2 presents the detailed results for the 1987 analysis of the total-system life cycle cost (TSLCC). It consists of four sections: Section A presents the yearly flows of waste between waste-management facilities for the 12 aggregate logistics cases that were studied; Section B presents the annual total-system costs for each of the 30 TSLCC cases by major cost category; Section C presents the annual costs for the disposal of 16,000 canisters of defense high-level waste (DHLW) by major cost category for each of the 30 TSLCC cases; and Section D presents a summary of the cost-allocation factors that were calculated to determine the defense waste share of the total-system costs

  5. The kinematic viscosity influence on energetic cost of oil pipeline flow; Influencia da viscosidade cinematica sobre o custo energetico no escoamento de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucena, Kennedy F.M. [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica da Paraiba (CEFET-PB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Torres, Euriclides G.; Lacerda, Ivonaldo de S.; Machado, Erica C.M.N. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, PB (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    In the petroleum pipelines flow the objective of the maximum production with the minor cost is desired, considering the techniques, operational and administrative restrictions. One of the biggest difficulties in the pipelines flow is related to increase of viscosity that the fluids produced can present and to the variations during the transport. In this study had been analyzed through computational simulations, using Smart Pumping software, the hydraulic behavior of the network and the operational cost with energy consumption, in function of the variation of the viscosity. Two scenes had been simulated, using a initial kinematic viscosity of 3,029x10{sup -5} m{sup 2}/s, that it was reduced gradually until the minimum limit of 10% of initial viscosity, remaining the too much constant the fluid properties. In scene 1 it was verified that the reduction of viscosity implied in the reduction of the energy cost in up to 14,53%, increase of the daily production in up to 3,88% and the reduction in the cost for m3 flowed off in up to 17,73%, without alterations in the operations. Scene 2 presented similar behavior to scene 1, however, had been necessary interventions to get operations that did not violate the restrictions. The results had ratified the interference of viscosity in the operations and the system petroleum flow costs. (author)

  6. Computed tomography for preoperative planning in minimal-invasive total hip arthroplasty: Radiation exposure and cost analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huppertz, Alexander, E-mail: Alexander.Huppertz@charite.de [Imaging Science Institute Charite Berlin, Robert-Koch-Platz 7, D-10115 Berlin (Germany); Department of Radiology, Medical Physics, Charite-University Hospitals of Berlin, Chariteplatz 1, D-10117 Berlin (Germany); Radmer, Sebastian, E-mail: s.radmer@immanuel.de [Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Rheumatology, Immanuel-Krankenhaus, Koenigstr. 63, D-14109, Berlin (Germany); Asbach, Patrick, E-mail: Patrick.Asbach@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Medical Physics, Charite-University Hospitals of Berlin, Chariteplatz 1, D-10117 Berlin (Germany); Juran, Ralf, E-mail: ralf.juran@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Medical Physics, Charite-University Hospitals of Berlin, Chariteplatz 1, D-10117 Berlin (Germany); Schwenke, Carsten, E-mail: carsten.schwenke@scossis.de [Biostatistician, Scossis Statistical Consulting, Zeltinger Str. 58G, D-13465 Berlin (Germany); Diederichs, Gerd, E-mail: gerd.diederichs@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Medical Physics, Charite-University Hospitals of Berlin, Chariteplatz 1, D-10117 Berlin (Germany); Hamm, Bernd, E-mail: Bernd.Hamm@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Medical Physics, Charite-University Hospitals of Berlin, Chariteplatz 1, D-10117 Berlin (Germany); Sparmann, Martin, E-mail: m.sparmann@immanuel.de [Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Rheumatology, Immanuel-Krankenhaus, Koenigstr. 63, D-14109, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    Computed tomography (CT) was used for preoperative planning of minimal-invasive total hip arthroplasty (THA). 92 patients (50 males, 42 females, mean age 59.5 years) with a mean body-mass-index (BMI) of 26.5 kg/m{sup 2} underwent 64-slice CT to depict the pelvis, the knee and the ankle in three independent acquisitions using combined x-, y-, and z-axis tube current modulation. Arthroplasty planning was performed using 3D-Hip Plan (Symbios, Switzerland) and patient radiation dose exposure was determined. The effects of BMI, gender, and contralateral THA on the effective dose were evaluated by an analysis-of-variance. A process-cost-analysis from the hospital perspective was done. All CT examinations were of sufficient image quality for 3D-THA planning. A mean effective dose of 4.0 mSv (SD 0.9 mSv) modeled by the BMI (p < 0.0001) was calculated. The presence of a contralateral THA (9/92 patients; p = 0.15) and the difference between males and females were not significant (p = 0.08). Personnel involved were the radiologist (4 min), the surgeon (16 min), the radiographer (12 min), and administrative personnel (4 min). A CT operation time of 11 min and direct per-patient costs of 52.80 Euro were recorded. Preoperative CT for THA was associated with a slight and justifiable increase of radiation exposure in comparison to conventional radiographs and low per-patient costs.

  7. Extending total parenteral nutrition hang time in the neonatal intensive care unit: is it safe and cost effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balegar V, Kiran Kumar; Azeem, Mohammad Irfan; Spence, Kaye; Badawi, Nadia

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effects of prolonging hang time of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) fluid on central line-associated blood stream infection (CLABSI), TPN-related cost and nursing workload. A before-after observational study comparing the practice of hanging TPN bags for 48 h (6 February 2009-5 February 2010) versus 24 h (6 February 2008-5 February 2009) in a tertiary neonatal intensive care unit was conducted. The main outcome measures were CLABSI, TPN-related expenses and nursing workload. One hundred thirty-six infants received 24-h TPN bags and 124 received 48-h TPN bags. Median (inter-quartile range) gestation (37 weeks (33,39) vs. 36 weeks (33,39)), mean (±standard deviation) admission weight of 2442 g (±101) versus 2476 g (±104) and TPN duration (9.7 days (±12.7) vs. 9.9 days (±13.4)) were similar (P > 0.05) between the 24- and 48-h TPN groups. There was no increase in CLABSI with longer hang time (0.8 vs. 0.4 per 1000 line days in the 24-h vs. 48-h group; P < 0.05). Annual cost saving using 48-h TPN was AUD 97,603.00. By using 48-h TPN, 68.3% of nurses indicated that their workload decreased and 80.5% indicated that time spent changing TPN reduced. Extending TPN hang time from 24 to 48 h did not alter CLABSI rate and was associated with a reduced TPN-related cost and perceived nursing workload. Larger randomised controlled trials are needed to more clearly delineate these effects. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2012 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  8. Cost-analysis of robotic-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy versus total abdominal hysterectomy for women with endometrial cancer and atypical complex hyperplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herling, Suzanne Forsyth; Palle, Connie; Møller, Ann M.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to analyse the hospital cost of treatment with robotic-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy and total abdominal hysterectomy for women with endometrial cancer or atypical complex hyperplasia and to identify differences in resource use and cost. MATERIAL...... AND METHODS: This cost analysis was based on two cohorts: women treated with robotic-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy (n = 202) or with total abdominal hysterectomy (n = 158) at Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark. We conducted an activity-based cost analysis including consumables and healthcare...... professionals' salaries. As cost-drivers we included severe complications, duration of surgery, anesthesia and stay at the post-anesthetic care unit, as well as number of hospital bed-days. Ordinary least-squares regression was used to explore the cost variation. The primary outcome was cost difference...

  9. [Fuel Rod Consolidation Project]: The estimated total life cycle cost for the 30-year operation of prototypical consolidation demonstration equipment: Volume 4, Phase 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The Total Life Cycle Costs have been developed for the construction, operation and decommissioning of a single line of hot-cell-enclosed production consolidation equipment operating on spent fuel at the rate of 750 MTU/year for 30 years. The cost estimate is for a single production line that is part of an overall facility at either a Monitored Retrievable Storage or a Repository facility. This overall facility would include other capabilities and possibly other consolidation lines. However, no costs were included in the cost estimate for other portions of the plant, except that staff costs include an overhead charge that reflects the overhead support services in an overall facility

  10. Energetics of the built environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeang, K

    1974-07-01

    Energetics, the study of energy transformations within ecosystems, provide a useful framework for examining the relationships between the built environment (a manmade ecosystem) and the natural environment. Values are provided for using energy indices in modeling, comparing design alternatives, improving designed systems, conserving nonrenewable resources, comparing impacts, and studying energy utilization patterns as a whole. The accounting of the energy cost of a proposed project would provide additional criteria for evaluating the impact of human developments on the natural environment. (3 diagrams, 12 tables)

  11. Analysis of the total system life cycle cost for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. Volume 1. The analysis and its results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-04-01

    The total-system life-cycle cost (TSLCC) analysis for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program is an ongoing activity that helps determine whether the revenue-producing mechanism established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 is sufficient to cover the cost of the program. This report provides cost estimates for the fourth evaluation of the adequacy of the fee. The total-system cost for the reference authorized-system program is estimated to be 24 to 32 billion (1985) dollars. The total-system cost for the reference improved-performance system is estimated to be 26 to 34 billion dollars. A number of sensitivity cases were analyzed. For the authorized system, the costs for the sensitivity cases studied range from 21 to 39 billion dollars. For the improved-performance system, which includes a facility for monitored retrievable storage, the total-system cost in the sensitivity cases is estimated to be as high as 41 billion dollars. The factors that affect costs more than any other single factor for both the authorized and the improved-performance systems are delays in repository startup. A preliminary analysis of the impact of extending the burnup of nuclear fuel in the reactor was also performed; its results indicate that the impact is insignificant: the total-system cost is essentially unchanged from the comparable constant-burnup cases. The current estimate of the the total-system cost for the reference authorized system is zero to 3 billion dollars (9%) higher than the estimate for the reference system in the January 1985 TSLCC analysis

  12. Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients With Multiple Myeloma: An Activity-based Costing Analysis, Comparing a Total Inpatient Model Versus an Early Discharge Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Massimo; Console, Giuseppe; Russo, Letteria; Meliado', Antonella; Meliambro, Nicola; Moscato, Tiziana; Irrera, Giuseppe; Messina, Giuseppe; Pontari, Antonella; Morabito, Fortunato

    2017-08-01

    Activity-based costing (ABC) was developed and advocated as a means of overcoming the systematic distortions of traditional cost accounting. We calculated the cost of high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) in patients with multiple myeloma using the ABC method, through 2 different care models: the total inpatient model (TIM) and the early-discharge outpatient model (EDOM) and compared this with the approved diagnosis related-groups (DRG) Italian tariffs. The TIM and EDOM models involved a total cost of €28,615.15 and €16,499.43, respectively. In the TIM model, the phase with the greatest economic impact was the posttransplant (recovery and hematologic engraftment) with 36.4% of the total cost, whereas in the EDOM model, the phase with the greatest economic impact was the pretransplant (chemo-mobilization, apheresis procedure, cryopreservation, and storage) phase, with 60.4% of total expenses. In an analysis of each episode, the TIM model comprised a higher absorption than the EDOM. In particular, the posttransplant represented 36.4% of the total costs in the TIM and 17.7% in EDOM model, respectively. The estimated reduction in cost per patient using an EDOM model was over €12,115.72. The repayment of the DRG in Calabrian Region for the ASCT procedure is €59,806. Given the real cost of the transplant, the estimated cost saving per patient is €31,190.85 in the TIM model and €43,306.57 in the EDOM model. In conclusion, the actual repayment of the DRG does not correspond to the real cost of the ASCT procedure in Italy. Moreover, using the EDOM, the cost of ASCT is approximately the half of the TIM model. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The effect of fiscal incentives on market penetration of electric vehicles: A pairwise comparison of total cost of ownership

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lévay, Petra Zsuzsa; Drossinos, Yannis; Thiel, Christian

    2017-01-01

    An important barrier to electric vehicle (EV) sales is their high purchase price compared to internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles. We conducted total cost of ownership (TCO) calculations to study how costs and sales of EVs relate to each other and to examine the role of fiscal incentives in reducing TCO and increasing EV sales. We composed EV-ICE vehicle pairs that allowed cross-segment and cross-country comparison in eight European countries. Actual car prices were used to calculate the incentives for each model in each country. We found a negative TCO-sales relationship that differs across car segments. Compared to their ICE vehicle pair, big EVs have lower TCO, higher sales, and seem to be less price responsive than small EVs. Three country groups can be distinguished according to the level of fiscal incentives and their impact on TCO and EV sales. In Norway, incentives led to the lowest TCO for the EVs. In the Netherlands, France, and UK the TCO of EVs is close to the TCO of the ICE pairs. In the other countries the TCO of EVs exceeds that of the ICE vehicles. We found that exemptions from flat taxes favour big EVs, while lump-sum subsidies favour small EVs. - Highlights: • Pairwise comparison of EV and ICE vehicle TCO and sales in eight European countries. • In NO, EV TCO is lower than ICE TCO; in NL, FR, and UK, EV TCO is slightly higher. • Compared to ICE vehicles, big EVs have lower TCO and higher sales than small EVs. • Exemptions from flat taxes favour big EVs, lump-sum subsidies favour small EVs. • Most popular EV models: Tesla Model S, Nissan Leaf, Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV.

  14. Energetic costs of reproduction in female northern muriquis, Brachyteles hypoxanthus (Primates: Platyrrinhi: Atelidae Os custos enérgeticos de reprodução em fêmeas de muirqui-do-norte (Primates: Platyrrinhi: Atelidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danusa Guedes

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Infant care is known to impose high energetic costs on female primates because in addition to lactation, most primate mothers also provide transport for their offspring. Many studies have documented the high energetic costs of lactation, but less is known about energetic costs of infant carrying and their effects on the recovery of maternal physical condition. We compared the activities of female northern muriquis (Brachyteles hypoxanthus Kuhl, 1820 over a 12-month period at the RPPN Feliciano Miguel Abdala, Minas Gerais, Brazil to investigate whether mothers during their weaning year behaved differently than mothers in their post-weaning year, when they resumed reproductive cycling and copulating, and conceived again. We found no significant differences in the behavioral activity budgets of mothers in their weaning year (n = 4 versus post-weaning year (n = 5, despite the significantly higher proportion of time that mothers in their weaning year spent in close proximity with their infants and carrying their infants compared to mothers in their post-weaning year. We suggest that the energy budgets of weaning are similar to those of post-weaning in female northern muriquis.O cuidado parental é conhecido por impor um elevado custo energético às fêmeas primatas, pois, além da lactação, muitas mães primatas também provêm transporte aos filhotes. Diversos estudos têm documentado o elevado custo energético da lactação, no entanto, pouco se sabe sobre o custo energético para o transporte do filhote e seus efeitos na recuperação da condição física das mães. Nós comparamos as atividades de fêmeas muriquis (Brachyteles hypoxanthus Kuhl, 1820, durante um período de 12 meses, na RPPN Feliciano Miguel Abdala, Minas Gerais Brasil, a fim de investigar se as mães durante o ano de desmame dos filhotes se comportavam diferentemente das mães no ano pós-desmame, quando elas recomeçaram o ciclo reprodutivo e de cópulas, e quando estavam

  15. Joint estimation of vertical total electron content (VTEC) and satellite differential code biases (SDCBs) using low-cost receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baocheng; Teunissen, Peter J. G.; Yuan, Yunbin; Zhang, Hongxing; Li, Min

    2018-04-01

    Vertical total electron content (VTEC) parameters estimated using global navigation satellite system (GNSS) data are of great interest for ionosphere sensing. Satellite differential code biases (SDCBs) account for one source of error which, if left uncorrected, can deteriorate performance of positioning, timing and other applications. The customary approach to estimate VTEC along with SDCBs from dual-frequency GNSS data, hereinafter referred to as DF approach, consists of two sequential steps. The first step seeks to retrieve ionospheric observables through the carrier-to-code leveling technique. This observable, related to the slant total electron content (STEC) along the satellite-receiver line-of-sight, is biased also by the SDCBs and the receiver differential code biases (RDCBs). By means of thin-layer ionospheric model, in the second step one is able to isolate the VTEC, the SDCBs and the RDCBs from the ionospheric observables. In this work, we present a single-frequency (SF) approach, enabling the joint estimation of VTEC and SDCBs using low-cost receivers; this approach is also based on two steps and it differs from the DF approach only in the first step, where we turn to the precise point positioning technique to retrieve from the single-frequency GNSS data the ionospheric observables, interpreted as the combination of the STEC, the SDCBs and the biased receiver clocks at the pivot epoch. Our numerical analyses clarify how SF approach performs when being applied to GPS L1 data collected by a single receiver under both calm and disturbed ionospheric conditions. The daily time series of zenith VTEC estimates has an accuracy ranging from a few tenths of a TEC unit (TECU) to approximately 2 TECU. For 73-96% of GPS satellites in view, the daily estimates of SDCBs do not deviate, in absolute value, more than 1 ns from their ground truth values published by the Centre for Orbit Determination in Europe.

  16. Energetic certification in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    At community level the problem of energy quality control in a building was introduced by EEC recommendation n. 93/76 in 1993. In this item are reported some notes on energetic certification in European countries [it

  17. Energetics Laboratory Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — These energetic materials laboratories are equipped with explosion proof hoods with blow out walls for added safety, that are certified for safe handling of primary...

  18. Economic analysis of two-stage septic revision after total hip arthroplasty: What are the relevant costs for the hospital's orthopedic department?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasch, R; Assmann, G; Merk, S; Barz, T; Melloh, M; Hofer, A; Merk, H; Flessa, S

    2016-03-01

    The number of septic total hip arthroplasty (THA) revisions is increasing continuously, placing a growing financial burden on hospitals. Orthopedic departments performing septic THA revisions have no basis for decision making regarding resource allocation as the costs of this procedure for the departments are unknown. It is widely assumed that septic THA procedures can only be performed at a loss for the department. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether this assumption is true by performing a detailed analysis of the costs and revenues for two-stage septic THA revision. Patients who underwent revision THA for septic loosening in two sessions from January 2009 through March 2012 were included in this retrospective, consecutive cost study from the orthopedic department's point of view. We analyzed variable and case-fixed costs for septic revision THA with special regard to implantation and explantation stay. By using marginal costing approach we neglected hospital-fixed costs. Outcome measures include reimbursement and daily contribution margins. The average direct costs (reimbursement) incurred for septic two-stage revision THA was €10,828 (€24,201). The difference in cost and contribution margins per day was significant (p cost for septic revision THA performed in two sessions. Disregarding hospital-fixed costs the included variable and case fixed-costs were covered by revenues. This study provides cost data, which will be guidance for health care decision makers.

  19. A pilot study to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of ondansetron and granisetron in fractionated total body irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbs, S.J.; Cassoni, A.M. [Middlesex Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    1996-11-01

    The duration of the antiemetic effect of granisetron was examined in a pilot study of patients (n = 26) undergoing a standard emetogenic stimulus in the form of total body irradiation fractionated over 3-4 days, in a randomized comparison with twice-daily ondansetron. A single intravenous dose of granisetron at the onset of therapy was effective over the entire follow-up period in 50% (6/12) of patients, compared with 77% (10/13) prescribed twice-daily oral ondansetron for 3 or 4 days. The response rate within the first 24 hours from the start of irradiation was 67% (8/12) for granisetron and 77% (10/13) for ondansetron. Granisetron and ondansetron was therefore of similar efficacy within the first 24-hour period, but granisetron was less efficaceous more than 24 hours after the onset of therapy. Patients who required a second dose of granisetron did so at intervals of 12, 42, 47 and 48 hours following the first fraction of radiotherapy. The cost per patient in this study was 48 for granisetron and {sub 1}54 for ondanestron, but the dose scheduling we used cannot be recommended in view of the lower effectiveness of granisetron. (author).

  20. A pilot study to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of ondansetron and granisetron in fractionated total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbs, S.J.; Cassoni, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    The duration of the antiemetic effect of granisetron was examined in a pilot study of patients (n = 26) undergoing a standard emetogenic stimulus in the form of total body irradiation fractionated over 3-4 days, in a randomized comparison with twice-daily ondansetron. A single intravenous dose of granisetron at the onset of therapy was effective over the entire follow-up period in 50% (6/12) of patients, compared with 77% (10/13) prescribed twice-daily oral ondansetron for 3 or 4 days. The response rate within the first 24 hours from the start of irradiation was 67% (8/12) for granisetron and 77% (10/13) for ondansetron. Granisetron and ondansetron was therefore of similar efficacy within the first 24-hour period, but granisetron was less efficaceous more than 24 hours after the onset of therapy. Patients who required a second dose of granisetron did so at intervals of 12, 42, 47 and 48 hours following the first fraction of radiotherapy. The cost per patient in this study was 48 for granisetron and 1 54 for ondanestron, but the dose scheduling we used cannot be recommended in view of the lower effectiveness of granisetron. (author)

  1. Rising Use Of Observation Care Among The Commercially Insured May Lead to Total And Out-Of-Pocket Cost Savings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrion, Emily R; Kocher, Keith E; Nallamothu, Brahmajee K; Ryan, Andrew M

    2017-12-01

    Proponents of hospital-based observation care argue that it has the potential to reduce health care spending and lengths-of-stay, compared to short-stay inpatient hospitalizations. However, critics have raised concerns about the out-of-pocket spending associated with observation care. Recent reports of high out-of-pocket spending among Medicare beneficiaries have received considerable media attention and have prompted direct policy changes. Despite the potential for changed policies to indirectly affect non-Medicare patients, little is known about the use of, and spending associated with, observation care among commercially insured populations. Using multipayer commercial claims for the period 2009-13, we evaluated utilization and spending among patients admitted for six conditions that are commonly managed with either observation care or short-stay hospitalizations. In our study period, the use of observation care increased relative to that of short-stay hospitalizations. Total and out-of-pocket spending were substantially lower for observation care, though both grew rapidly-and at rates much higher than spending in the inpatient setting-over the study period. Despite this growth, spending on observation care is unlikely to exceed spending for short-stay hospitalizations. As observation care attracts greater attention, policy makers should be aware that Medicare policies that disincentivize observation may have unintended financial impacts on non-Medicare populations, where observation care may be cost saving.

  2. Total cost of care lower among Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries receiving care from patient-centered medical homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hasselt, Martijn; McCall, Nancy; Keyes, Vince; Wensky, Suzanne G; Smith, Kevin W

    2015-02-01

    To compare health care utilization and payments between NCQA-recognized patient-centered medical home (PCMH) practices and practices without such recognition. Medicare Part A and B claims files from July 1, 2007 to June 30, 2010, 2009 Census, 2007 Health Resources and Services Administration and CMS Utilization file, Medicare's Enrollment Data Base, and the 2005 American Medical Association Physician Workforce file. This study used a longitudinal, nonexperimental design. Three annual observations (July 1, 2008-June 30, 2010) were available for each practice. We compared selected outcomes between practices with and those without NCQA PCMH recognition. Individual Medicare fee-for-service (FFS) beneficiaries and their claims and utilization data were assigned to PCMH or comparison practices based on where they received the plurality of evaluation and management services between July 1, 2007 and June 30, 2008. Relative to the comparison group, total Medicare payments, acute care payments, and the number of emergency room visits declined after practices received NCQA PCMH recognition. The decline was larger for practices with sicker than average patients, primary care practices, and solo practices. This study provides additional evidence about the potential of the PCMH model for reducing health care utilization and the cost of care. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  3. Multi-objective ACO algorithms to minimise the makespan and the total rejection cost on BPMs with arbitrary job weights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhao-hong; Pei, Ming-li; Leung, Joseph Y.-T.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate the batch-scheduling problem with rejection on parallel machines with non-identical job sizes and arbitrary job-rejected weights. If a job is rejected, the corresponding penalty has to be paid. Our objective is to minimise the makespan of the processed jobs and the total rejection cost of the rejected jobs. Based on the selected multi-objective optimisation approaches, two problems, P1 and P2, are considered. In P1, the two objectives are linearly combined into one single objective. In P2, the two objectives are simultaneously minimised and the Pareto non-dominated solution set is to be found. Based on the ant colony optimisation (ACO), two algorithms, called LACO and PACO, are proposed to address the two problems, respectively. Two different objective-oriented pheromone matrices and heuristic information are designed. Additionally, a local optimisation algorithm is adopted to improve the solution quality. Finally, simulated experiments are conducted, and the comparative results verify the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed algorithms, especially on large-scale instances.

  4. Radiation hormesis: an ecological and energetic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, P A

    2001-09-01

    Organisms in natural habitats are exposed to an array of environmental stresses, which all have energetic costs. Under this ecological scenario, hormesis for ionizing radiation becomes an evolutionary expectation at exposures substantially exceeding background. This conclusion implies that some relaxation of radiation protection criteria is worthy of serious consideration. Copyright 2001 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  5. Determining the True Cost to Deliver Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty Over the Full Cycle of Care: Preparing for Bundling and Reference-Based Pricing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGioia, Anthony M; Greenhouse, Pamela K; Giarrusso, Michelle L; Kress, Justina M

    2016-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act accelerates health care providers' need to prepare for new care delivery platforms and payment models such as bundling and reference-based pricing (RBP). Thriving in this environment will be difficult without knowing the true cost of care delivery at the level of the clinical condition over the full cycle of care. We describe a project in which we identified true costs for both total hip and total knee arthroplasty. With the same tool, we identified cost drivers in each segment of care delivery and collected patient experience information. Combining cost and experience information with outcomes data we already collect allows us to drive costs down while protecting outcomes and experiences, and compete successfully in bundling and RBP programs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The advanced launch system: Application of total quality management principles to low-cost space transportation system development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, M. G.; Rothwell, T. G.; Rosenberg, D. A.; Oliver, M. B.

    Recognizing that a major inhibitor of man's rapid expansion of the use of space is the high cost (direct and induced) of space transportation, the U.S. has embarked on a major national program to radically reduce the cost of placing payloads into orbit while, at the same time, making equally radical improvements inlaunch system operability. The program is entitled "The Advanced Launch System" (ALS) and is a joint Department of Defense/National Aeronautics and Space Administration (DoD/NASA) program which will provide launch capability in the post 2000 timeframe. It is currently in Phase II (System Definition), which began in January 1989, and will serve as a major source of U.S. launch system technology over the next several years. The ALS is characterized by a new approach to space system design, development, and operation. The practices that are being implemented by the ALS are expected to affect the management and technical operation of all future launch systems. In this regard, the two most significant initiatives being implemented on the ALS program are the practices of Total Quality Management (TQM) and the Unified Information System (Unis). TQM is a DoD initiative to improve the quality of the DoD acquisition system, contractor management systems, and the technical disciplines associated with the design, development, and operation of major systems. TQM has been mandated for all new programs and affects the way every group within the system currently does business. In order to implement the practices of TQM, new methods are needed. A program on the scale of the ALS generates vast amounts of information which must be used effectively to make sound decisions. Unis is an information network that will connect all ALS participants throughout all phases of the ALS development. Unis is providing support for project management and system design, and in following phases will provide decision support for launch operations, computer integrated manufacturing, automated

  7. Total Joint Arthroplasty Patients' Education on Financial Issues and Its Connection to Reported Out-of-Pocket Costs-A European Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copanitsanou, Panagiota; Valkeapää, Kirsi; Cabrera, Esther; Katajisto, Jouko; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Sigurdardottir, Arun K; Unosson, Mitra; Zabalegui, Adelaida; Lemonidou, Chryssoula

    2017-04-01

    Total joint arthroplasty is accompanied by significant costs. In nursing, patient education on financial issues is considered important. Our purpose was to examine the possible association between the arthroplasty patients' financial knowledge and their out-of-pocket costs. Descriptive correlational study in five European countries. Patient data were collected preoperatively and at 6 months postoperatively, with structured, self-administered instruments, regarding their expected and received financial knowledge and out-of-pocket costs. There were 1,288 patients preoperatively, and 352 at 6 months. Patients' financial knowledge expectations were higher than knowledge received. Patients with high financial knowledge expectations and lack of fulfillment of these expectations had lowest costs. There is need to establish programs for improving the financial knowledge of patients. Patients with fulfilled expectations reported higher costs and may have followed and reported their costs in a more precise way. In the future, this association needs multimethod research. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Energy management for cost reduction in the production. TEEM - Total Energy Efficiency Management; Energiemanagement zur Kostensenkung in der Produktion. TEEM - Total Energy Efficiency Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westkaemper, Engelbert; Verl, Alexander (eds.)

    2009-07-01

    Within the workshop of the Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Engineering and Automation IPA (Stuttgart, Federal Republic of Germany) at 6th October, 2009, in Stuttgart the following lectures were held: (1) Presentation of Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Engineering and Automation IPA (Engelbert Westkaemper); (2) TEEM - Total Energy Efficiency Management - ''With energy management to an energy efficient production'' (Alexander Schloske); (3) DIN EN 16001 Introduction of an energy management system - utilization and advantages for companies (Sylvia Wahren); (4) Analysis of the energy efficiency with power flow - Support and implementation at factory planning and optimization of production (Klaus Erlach); (5) Total Energy Efficiency Management - Approaches at the company Kaercher in injection moulding for example (Axel Leschtar); (6) Modelling the embodied product energy (Shahin Rahimifard); (7) Acquisition of energy data in the production - Technologies and possibilities (Joachim Neher); (8) Active energy management by means of an ''energy control centre'' - Analysis of the real situation and upgrading measures in the production using coating plants as an example (Wolfgang Klein); (9) Visualisation and simulation of energy values in the digital factory (Carmen Constantinescu, Axel Bruns).

  9. Use of Quantile Regression to Determine the Impact on Total Health Care Costs of Surgical Site Infections Following Common Ambulatory Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Margaret A; Tian, Fang; Wallace, Anna E; Nickel, Katelin B; Warren, David K; Fraser, Victoria J; Selvam, Nandini; Hamilton, Barton H

    2017-02-01

    To determine the impact of surgical site infections (SSIs) on health care costs following common ambulatory surgical procedures throughout the cost distribution. Data on costs of SSIs following ambulatory surgery are sparse, particularly variation beyond just mean costs. We performed a retrospective cohort study of persons undergoing cholecystectomy, breast-conserving surgery, anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and hernia repair from December 31, 2004 to December 31, 2010 using commercial insurer claims data. SSIs within 90 days post-procedure were identified; infections during a hospitalization or requiring surgery were considered serious. We used quantile regression, controlling for patient, operative, and postoperative factors to examine the impact of SSIs on 180-day health care costs throughout the cost distribution. The incidence of serious and nonserious SSIs was 0.8% and 0.2%, respectively, after 21,062 anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, 0.5% and 0.3% after 57,750 cholecystectomy, 0.6% and 0.5% after 60,681 hernia, and 0.8% and 0.8% after 42,489 breast-conserving surgery procedures. Serious SSIs were associated with significantly higher costs than nonserious SSIs for all 4 procedures throughout the cost distribution. The attributable cost of serious SSIs increased for both cholecystectomy and hernia repair as the quantile of total costs increased ($38,410 for cholecystectomy with serious SSI vs no SSI at the 70th percentile of costs, up to $89,371 at the 90th percentile). SSIs, particularly serious infections resulting in hospitalization or surgical treatment, were associated with significantly increased health care costs after 4 common surgical procedures. Quantile regression illustrated the differential effect of serious SSIs on health care costs at the upper end of the cost distribution.

  10. Estimating Total Program Cost of a Long-Term, High-Technology, High-Risk Project with Task Durations and Costs That May Increase Over Time

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brown, Gerald G; Grose, Roger T; Koyak, Robert A

    2006-01-01

    .... Each task suffers some risk of delay and changed cost. Ignoring budget constraints, we use Monte Carlo simulation of the duration of each task in the project to infer the probability distribution of the project completion time...

  11. Cost-effectiveness of heat and moisture exchangers compared to usual care for pulmonary rehabilitation after total laryngectomy in Poland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Retèl, Valesca P.; van den Boer, Cindy; Steuten, Lotte M. G.; Okła, Sławomir; Hilgers, Frans J.; van den Brekel, Michiel W.

    2015-01-01

    The beneficial physical and psychosocial effects of heat and moisture exchangers (HMEs) for pulmonary rehabilitation of laryngectomy patients are well evidenced. However, cost-effectiveness in terms of costs per additional quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) has not yet been investigated. Therefore,

  12. Predictors for total hospital and cardiology cost claims among patients with atrial fibrillation initiating dabigatran or acenocoumarol in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, M S; van Leent, M W J; Tieleman, R G; Jansman, F G A; Cao, Q; Postma, M J; van Hulst, M

    2017-01-01

    Aims: The prevalence of atrial fibrillation (AF) has increased over the past years due to aging of the population, and healthcare costs associated with AF reflect a significant financial burden. The aim of this study was to explore predictors for the real-world AF-related in-hospital costs in

  13. Cost-Effectiveness of Reverse Total Shoulder Arthroplasty Versus Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair for Symptomatic Large and Massive Rotator Cuff Tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhni, Eric C; Swart, Eric; Steinhaus, Michael E; Mather, Richard C; Levine, William N; Bach, Bernard R; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N

    2016-09-01

    To compare the cost-effectiveness within the United States health care system of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair versus reverse total shoulder arthroplasty in patients with symptomatic large and massive rotator cuff tears without cuff-tear arthropathy. An expected-value decision analysis was constructed comparing the costs and outcomes of patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair and reverse total shoulder arthroplasty for large and massive rotator cuff tears (and excluding cases of cuff-tear arthropathy). Comprehensive literature search provided input data to extrapolate costs and health utility states for these outcomes. The primary outcome assessed was that of incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty versus rotator cuff repair. For the base case, both arthroscopic rotator cuff repair and reverse total shoulder were superior to nonoperative care, with an ICER of $15,500/quality-adjusted life year (QALY) and $37,400/QALY, respectively. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was dominant over primary reverse total shoulder arthroplasty, with lower costs and slightly improved clinical outcomes. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was the preferred strategy as long as the lifetime progression rate from retear to end-stage cuff-tear arthropathy was less than 89%. However, when the model was modified to account for worse outcomes when reverse shoulder arthroplasty was performed after a failed attempted rotator cuff repair, primary reverse total shoulder had superior outcomes with an ICER of $90,000/QALY. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair-despite high rates of tendon retearing-for patients with large and massive rotator cuff tears may be a more cost-effective initial treatment strategy when compared with primary reverse total shoulder arthroplasty and when assuming no detrimental impact of previous surgery on outcomes after arthroplasty. Clinical judgment should still be prioritized when formulating treatment plans for these

  14. Photoactive energetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, David E.; Hanson, Susan Kloek; Scharff, Robert Jason; Veauthier, Jacqueline Marie; Myers, Thomas Winfield

    2018-02-27

    Energetic materials that are photoactive or believed to be photoactive may include a conventional explosive (e.g. PETN, nitroglycerine) derivatized with an energetic UV-absorbing and/or VIS-absorbing chromophore such as 1,2,4,5-tetrazine or 1,3,5-triazine. Absorption of laser light having a suitably chosen wavelength may result in photodissociation, decomposition, and explosive release of energy. These materials may be used as ligands to form complexes. Coordination compounds include such complexes with counterions. Some having the formula M(L).sub.n.sup.2+ were synthesized, wherein M is a transition metal and L is a ligand and n is 2 or 3. These may be photoactive upon exposure to a laser light beam having an appropriate wavelength of UV light, near-IR and/or visible light. Photoactive materials also include coordination compounds bearing non-energetic ligands; in this case, the counterion may be an oxidant such as perchlorate.

  15. Skilled Nursing Facility Partnerships May Decrease 90-Day Costs in a Total Joint Arthroplasty Episode Under the Bundled Payments for Care Improvement Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behery, Omar A; Kouk, Shalen; Chen, Kevin K; Mullaly, Kathleen A; Bosco, Joseph A; Slover, James D; Iorio, Richard; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    2018-03-01

    The Bundled Payments for Care Improvement initiative was developed to reduce costs associated with total joint arthroplasty through a single payment for all patient care from index admission through a 90-day post-discharge period, including care at skilled nursing facilities (SNFs). The aim of this study is to investigate whether forming partnerships between hospitals and SNFs could lower the post-discharge costs. We hypothesize that institutionally aligned SNFs have lower post-discharge costs than non-aligned SNFs. A cohort of 615 elective, primary total hip and knee arthroplasty subjects discharged to an SNF under the Bundled Payments for Care Improvement from 2014 to 2016 were included in our analysis. Patients were grouped into one of the 3 categories of SNF alignment: group 1: non-partners; group 2: agreement-based partners; group 3: institution-owned partners. Demographics, comorbidities, length of stay (LOS) at SNF, and associated costs during the 90-day post-operative period were compared between the 3 groups. Mean index hospital LOS was statistically shortest in group 3 (mean 2.7 days vs 3.5 for groups 1 and 2, P = .001). SNF LOS was also shortest in group 3 (mean 11 days vs 19 and 21 days in groups 2 and 1 respectively, P Total SNF costs and total 90-day costs were both significantly lower in group 3 compared with groups 1 and 2 (P total 90-day costs, without increased risk of readmissions, compared with other SNFs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cost-effectiveness of total hip and knee replacements for the Australian population with osteoarthritis: discrete-event simulation model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Higashi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Osteoarthritis constitutes a major musculoskeletal burden for the aged Australians. Hip and knee replacement surgeries are effective interventions once all conservative therapies to manage the symptoms have been exhausted. This study aims to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of hip and knee replacements in Australia. To our best knowledge, the study is the first attempt to account for the dual nature of hip and knee osteoarthritis in modelling the severities of right and left joints separately. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a discrete-event simulation model that follows up the individuals with osteoarthritis over their lifetimes. The model defines separate attributes for right and left joints and accounts for several repeat replacements. The Australian population with osteoarthritis who were 40 years of age or older in 2003 were followed up until extinct. Intervention effects were modelled by means of disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs averted. Both hip and knee replacements are highly cost effective (AUD 5,000 per DALY and AUD 12,000 per DALY respectively under an AUD 50,000/DALY threshold level. The exclusion of cost offsets, and inclusion of future unrelated health care costs in extended years of life, did not change the findings that the interventions are cost-effective (AUD 17,000 per DALY and AUD 26,000 per DALY respectively. However, there was a substantial difference between hip and knee replacements where surgeries administered for hips were more cost-effective than for knees. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Both hip and knee replacements are cost-effective interventions to improve the quality of life of people with osteoarthritis. It was also shown that the dual nature of hip and knee OA should be taken into account to provide more accurate estimation on the cost-effectiveness of hip and knee replacements.

  17. Forecast of nuclear energetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikora, W

    1976-01-01

    The forecast concerning the development of nuclear energetics is presented. Some information on economics of nuclear power plants is given. The nuclear fuel reserves are estimated on the background of power resources of the world. The safety and environment protection problems are mentioned.

  18. Predictors for total medical costs for acute hemorrhagic stroke patients transferred to the rehabilitation ward at a regional hospital in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Min; Ke, Yen-Liang

    2016-02-01

    One-third of the acute stroke patients in Taiwan receive rehabilitation. It is imperative for clinicians who care for acute stroke patients undergoing inpatient rehabilitation to identify which medical factors could be the predictors of the total medical costs. The aim of this study was to identify the most important predictors of the total medical costs for first-time hemorrhagic stroke patients transferred to inpatient rehabilitation using a retrospective design. All data were retrospectively collected from July 2002 to June 2012 from a regional hospital in Taiwan. A stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis was used to identify the most important predictors for the total medical costs. The medical records of 237 patients (137 males and 100 females) were reviewed. The mean total medical cost per patient was United States dollar (USD) 5939.5 ± 3578.5.The following were the significant predictors for the total medical costs: impaired consciousness [coefficient (B), 1075.7; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 138.5-2012.9], dysphagia [coefficient (B), 1025.8; 95% CI = 193.9-1857.8], number of surgeries [coefficient (B), 796.4; 95% CI = 316.0-1276.7], pneumonia in the neurosurgery ward [coefficient (B), 2330.1; 95% CI = 1339.5-3320.7], symptomatic urinary tract infection (UTI) in the rehabilitation ward [coefficient (B), 1138.7; 95% CI = 221.6-2055.7], and rehabilitation ward stay [coefficient (B), 64.9; 95% CI = 31.2-98.7] (R(2) = 0.387). Our findings could help clinicians to understand that cost reduction may be achieved by minimizing complications (pneumonia and UTI) in these patients.

  19. Consideration of the energetic quality of buildings during specificaton of adequacy limits for the cost of housing and heating in line with the social security statute book; Die Beruecksichtigung der energetischen Gebaeudequalitaet bei der Festlegung von Angemessenheitsgrenzen fuer die Kosten der Unterkunft und Heizung nach dem Sozialgesetzbuch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malottki, Christian von

    2012-07-27

    The author of the contribution reports on the consideration of the energy quality of buildings during the specification of adequacy limits for the cost of housing and heating in line with the social security statute book. Subsequently to the description of the legal and technical energy starting situation, the methods used to describe the energy quality of buildings, the methods of survey of pricing differences as well as the possibilities of application of an energetically differentiated suitability level are described.

  20. A Case Report: Cornerstone Health Care Reduced the Total Cost of Care Through Population Segmentation and Care Model Redesign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Dale E; Hamory, Bruce H; Terrell, Grace E; O'Connell, Jasmine

    2017-08-01

    Over the course of a single year, Cornerstone Health Care, a multispecialty group practice in North Carolina, redesigned the underlying care models for 5 of its highest-risk populations-late-stage congestive heart failure, oncology, Medicare-Medicaid dual eligibles, those with 5 or more chronic conditions, and the most complex patients with multiple late-stage chronic conditions. At the 1-year mark, the results of the program were analyzed. Overall costs for the patients studied were reduced by 12.7% compared to the year before enrollment. All fully implemented programs delivered between 10% and 16% cost savings. The key area for savings factor was hospitalization, which was reduced by 30% across all programs. The greatest area of cost increase was "other," a category that consisted in large part of hospice services. Full implementation was key; 2 primary care sites that reverted to more traditional models failed to show the same pattern of savings.

  1. Energetic and economic optimization of industrial systems compared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeGoff, P.; Rivero, R.; de Oliverira, S.; Schwarzer, B.

    1990-01-01

    Industrial processes can be represented as open systems where available energy (exergy) enters, utilized energy (exergy content of goods and services) exits and degraded energy (destroyed exergy) is rejected into the environment. The overall evaluation of each process can be made according to an energy accounting (in terms of exergy or of primary fossil energy) or a financial accounting (in terms of national or foreign currency). In any case, the process can be optimized by determining the best compromise between the costs of the various input fluxes. According to the needs of the decision maker one can choose the most convenient value criterion which would be to minimize: the total cost in national currency, for a project engineer working for a private company; the payments in foreign currency, for a public organization; the total energy consumption, for a hypothetical decision maker responsible for the world's non renewable fossil energy; the entropy production in order to increase the thermodynamic efficiency of the process. This paper presents and compares some examples of energetic and economic optimizations, according to various criteria. The examples given concern a heat exchanger, the drying of beet pulp and some heat transformers for upgrading industrial waste heat. Furthermore, the authors generalize the concept of pay-back time through the ratio of the invested capital cost and of the operating cost given in terms of exergy or of primary energy. Numerical values are given for an oil-fired boiler

  2. It Is a Brave New World: Alternative Payment Models and Value Creation in Total Joint Arthroplasty: Creating Value for TJR, Quality and Cost-Effectiveness Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kevin K; Harty, Jonathan H; Bosco, Joseph A

    2017-06-01

    The increasing cost of our country's healthcare is not sustainable. To address this crisis, the federal government is transiting healthcare reimbursement from the traditional volume-based system to a value-based system. As such, increasing healthcare value has become an essential point of discussion for all healthcare stakeholders. The purpose of this study is to discuss the importance of healthcare value as a means to achieve this goal of value-based medicine and 3 methods to create value in total joint arthroplasty. These methods are to: (1) improve outcomes greater than the increased costs to achieve this improvement, (2) decrease costs without affecting outcomes, and (3) decrease costs while simultaneously improving outcomes. Following these guidelines will help practitioners thrive in a bundled care environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Prevention of low back pain in the military cluster randomized trial: effects of brief psychosocial education on total and low back pain-related health care costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, John D; Wu, Samuel S; Teyhen, Deydre S; Robinson, Michael E; George, Steven Z

    2014-04-01

    Effective strategies for preventing low back pain (LBP) have remained elusive, despite annual direct health care costs exceeding $85 billion dollars annually. In our recently completed Prevention of Low Back Pain in the Military (POLM) trial, a brief psychosocial education program (PSEP) that reduced fear and threat of LBP reduced the incidence of health care-seeking for LBP. The purpose of this cost analysis was to determine if soldiers who received psychosocial education experienced lower health care costs compared with soldiers who did not receive psychosocial education. The POLM trial was a cluster randomized trial with four intervention arms and a 2-year follow-up. Consecutive subjects (n=4,295) entering a 16-week training program at Fort Sam Houston, TX, to become a combat medic in the U.S. Army were considered for participation. In addition to an assigned exercise program, soldiers were cluster randomized to receive or not receive a brief psychosocial education program delivered in a group setting. The Military Health System Management Analysis and Reporting Tool was used to extract total and LBP-related health care costs associated with LBP incidence over a 2-year follow-up period. After adjusting for postrandomization differences between the groups, the median total LBP-related health care costs for soldiers who received PSEP and incurred LBP-related costs during the 2-year follow-up period were $26 per soldier lower than for those who did not receive PSEP ($60 vs. $86, respectively, p=.034). The adjusted median total health care costs for soldiers who received PSEP and incurred at least some health care costs during the 2-year follow-up period were estimated at $2 per soldier lower than for those who did not receive PSEP ($2,439 vs. $2,441, respectively, p=.242). The results from this analysis demonstrate that a brief psychosocial education program was only marginally effective in reducing LBP-related health care costs and was not effective in reducing

  4. A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Reverse Total Shoulder Arthroplasty versus Hemiarthroplasty for the Management of Complex Proximal Humeral Fractures in the Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterhoff, Georg; O'Hara, Nathan N; D'Cruz, Jennifer; Sprague, Sheila A; Bansback, Nick; Evaniew, Nathan; Slobogean, Gerard P

    2017-03-01

    There is ongoing debate regarding the optimal surgical treatment of complex proximal humeral fractures in elderly patients. To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA) compared with hemiarthroplasty (HA) in the management of complex proximal humeral fractures, using a cost-utility analysis. On the basis of data from published literature, a cost-utility analysis was conducted using decision tree and Markov modeling. A single-payer perspective, with a willingness-to-pay (WTP) threshold of Can$50,000 (Canadian dollars), and a lifetime time horizon were used. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was used as the study's primary outcome measure. In comparison with HA, the incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-year gained for RTSA was Can$13,679. One-way sensitivity analysis revealed the model to be sensitive to the RTSA implant cost and the RTSA procedural cost. The ICER of Can$13,679 is well below the WTP threshold of Can$50,000, and probabilistic sensitivity analysis demonstrated that 92.6% of model simulations favored RTSA. Our economic analysis found that RTSA for the treatment of complex proximal humeral fractures in the elderly is the preferred economic strategy when compared with HA. The ICER of RTSA is well below standard WTP thresholds, and its estimate of cost-effectiveness is similar to other highly successful orthopedic strategies such as total hip arthroplasty for the treatment of hip arthritis. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Reducing Length of Stay, Direct Cost, and Readmissions in Total Joint Arthroplasty Patients With an Outcomes Manager-Led Interprofessional Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arana, Melissa; Harper, Licia; Qin, Huanying; Mabrey, Jay

    The purpose of this quality improvement project was to determine whether an outcomes manager-led interprofessional team could reduce length of stay and direct cost without increasing 30-day readmission rates in the total joint arthroplasty patient population. The goal was to promote interprofessional relationships combined with collaborative practice to promote coordinated care with improved outcomes. Results from this project showed that length of stay (total hip arthroplasty [THA] reduced by 0.4 days and total knee arthroplasty [TKA] reduced by 0.6 days) and direct cost (THA reduced by $1,020 per case and TKA reduced by $539 per case) were significantly decreased whereas 30-day readmission rates of both populations were not significantly increased.

  6. Physics of energetic ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Physics knowledge (theory and experiment) in energetic particles relevant to design of a reactor scale tokamak is reviewed, and projections for ITER are provided in this Chapter of the ITER Physics Basis. The review includes single particle effects such as classical alpha particle heating and toroidal field ripple loss, as well as collective instabilities that might be generated in ITER plasmas by energetic alpha particles. The overall conclusion is that fusion alpha particles are expected to provide an efficient plasma heating for ignition and sustained burn in the next step device. The major concern is localized heat loads on the plasma facing components produced by alpha particle loss, which might affect their lifetime in a tokamak reactor. (author)

  7. Knee Joint Distraction Compared to Total Knee Arthroplasty for Treatment of End Stage Osteoarthritis: Simulating Long-Term Outcomes and Cost-Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Woude, J A D; Nair, S C; Custers, R J H; van Laar, J M; Kuchuck, N O; Lafeber, F P J G; Welsing, P M J

    2016-01-01

    In end-stage knee osteoarthritis the treatment of choice is total knee arthroplasty (TKA). An alternative treatment is knee joint distraction (KJD), suggested to postpone TKA. Several studies reported significant and prolonged clinical improvement of KJD. To make an appropriate decision regarding the position of this treatment, a cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis from healthcare perspective for different age and gender categories was performed. A treatment strategy starting with TKA and a strategy starting with KJD for patients of different age and gender was simulated. To extrapolate outcomes to long-term health and economic outcomes a Markov (Health state) model was used. The number of surgeries, QALYs, and treatment costs per strategy were calculated. Costs-effectiveness is expressed using the cost-effectiveness plane and cost-effectiveness acceptability curves. Starting with KJD the number of knee replacing procedures could be reduced, most clearly in the younger age categories; especially revision surgery. This resulted in the KJD strategy being dominant (more effective with cost-savings) in about 80% of simulations (with only inferiority in about 1%) in these age categories when compared to TKA. At a willingness to pay of 20.000 Euro per QALY gained, the probability of starting with KJD to be cost-effective compared to starting with a TKA was already found to be over 75% for all age categories and over 90-95% for the younger age categories. A treatment strategy starting with knee joint distraction for knee osteoarthritis has a large potential for being a cost-effective intervention, especially for the relatively young patient.

  8. Early assessment of the likely cost-effectiveness of a new technology: A Markov model with probabilistic sensitivity analysis of computer-assisted total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hengjin; Buxton, Martin

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study is to apply a Markov model to compare cost-effectiveness of total knee replacement (TKR) using computer-assisted surgery (CAS) with that of TKR using a conventional manual method in the absence of formal clinical trial evidence. A structured search was carried out to identify evidence relating to the clinical outcome, cost, and effectiveness of TKR. Nine Markov states were identified based on the progress of the disease after TKR. Effectiveness was expressed by quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). The simulation was carried out initially for 120 cycles of a month each, starting with 1,000 TKRs. A discount rate of 3.5 percent was used for both cost and effectiveness in the incremental cost-effectiveness analysis. Then, a probabilistic sensitivity analysis was carried out using a Monte Carlo approach with 10,000 iterations. Computer-assisted TKR was a long-term cost-effective technology, but the QALYs gained were small. After the first 2 years, the incremental cost per QALY of computer-assisted TKR was dominant because of cheaper and more QALYs. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was sensitive to the "effect of CAS," to the CAS extra cost, and to the utility of the state "Normal health after primary TKR," but it was not sensitive to utilities of other Markov states. Both probabilistic and deterministic analyses produced similar cumulative serious or minor complication rates and complex or simple revision rates. They also produced similar ICERs. Compared with conventional TKR, computer-assisted TKR is a cost-saving technology in the long-term and may offer small additional QALYs. The "effect of CAS" is to reduce revision rates and complications through more accurate and precise alignment, and although the conclusions from the model, even when allowing for a full probabilistic analysis of uncertainty, are clear, the "effect of CAS" on the rate of revisions awaits long-term clinical evidence.

  9. Seven-year cost-effectiveness of ProDisc-C total disc replacement: results from investigational device exemption and post-approval studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radcliff, Kris; Lerner, Jason; Yang, Chao; Bernard, Thierry; Zigler, Jack E

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the 7-year cost-effectiveness of cervical total disc replacement (CTDR) versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for the treatment of patients with single-level symptomatic degenerative disc disease. A change in the spending trajectory for spine care is to be achieved, in part, through the selection of interventions that have been proven effective yet cost less than other options. This analysis complements and builds upon findings from other cost-effectiveness evaluations of CTDR through the use of long-term, patient-level data from a randomized study. METHODS This was a 7-year health economic evaluation comparing CTDR versus ACDF from the US commercial payer perspective. Prospectively collected health care resource utilization and treatment effects (quality-adjusted life years [QALYs]) were obtained from individual patient-level adverse event reports and SF-36 data, respectively, from the randomized, multicenter ProDisc-C total disc replacement investigational device exemption (IDE) study and post-approval study. Statistical distributions for unit costs were derived from a commercial claims database and applied using Monte Carlo simulation. Patient-level costs and effects were modeled via multivariate probabilistic analysis. Confidence intervals for 7-year costs, effects, and net monetary benefit (NMB) were obtained using the nonparametric percentile method from results of 10,000 bootstrap simulations. The robustness of results was assessed through scenario analysis and within a parametric regression model controlling for baseline variables. RESULTS Seven-year follow-up data were available for more than 70% of the 209 randomized patients. In the base-case analysis, CTDR resulted in mean per-patient cost savings of $12,789 (95% CI $5362-$20,856) and per-patient QALY gains of 0.16 (95% CI -0.073 to 0.39) compared with ACDF over 7 years. CTDR was more effective and less costly in 90.8% of probabilistic

  10. Cost-Effectiveness of Five Commonly Used Prosthesis Brands for Total Knee Replacement in the UK: A Study Using the NJR Dataset.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Pennington

    Full Text Available There is a lack of evidence on the effectiveness or cost-effectiveness of alternative brands of prosthesis for total knee replacement (TKR. We compared patient-reported outcomes, revision rates, and costs, and estimated the relative cost-effectiveness of five frequently used cemented brands of unconstrained prostheses with fixed bearings (PFC Sigma, AGC Biomet, Nexgen, Genesis 2, and Triathlon.We used data from three national databases for patients who had a TKR between 2003 and 2012, to estimate the effect of prosthesis brand on post-operative quality of life (QOL (EQ-5D-3L in 53 126 patients at six months. We compared TKR revision rates by brand over 10 years for 239 945 patients. We used a fully probabilistic Markov model to estimate lifetime costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs, incremental cost effectiveness ratios (ICERs, and the probability that each prosthesis brand is the most cost effective at alternative thresholds of willingness-to-pay for a QALY gain.Revision rates were lowest with the Nexgen and PFC Sigma (2.5% after 10 years in 70-year-old women. Average lifetime costs were lowest with the AGC Biomet (£9 538; mean post-operative QOL was highest with the Nexgen, which was the most cost-effective brand across all patient subgroups. For example, for 70-year-old men and women, the ICERs for the Nexgen compared to the AGC Biomet were £2 300 per QALY. At realistic cost per QALY thresholds (£10 000 to £30 000, the probabilities that the Nexgen is the most cost-effective brand are about 98%. These results were robust to alternative modelling assumptions.AGC Biomet prostheses are the least costly cemented unconstrained fixed brand for TKR but Nexgen prostheses lead to improved patient outcomes, at low additional cost. These results suggest that Nexgen should be considered as a first choice prosthesis for patients with osteoarthritis who require a TKR.

  11. A Total Cost of Ownership Model for Low Temperature PEM Fuel Cells in Combined Heat and Power and Backup Power Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    University of California, Berkeley; Wei, Max; Lipman, Timothy; Mayyas, Ahmad; Chien, Joshua; Chan, Shuk Han; Gosselin, David; Breunig, Hanna; Stadler, Michael; McKone, Thomas; Beattie, Paul; Chong, Patricia; Colella, Whitney; James, Brian

    2014-06-23

    A total cost of ownership model is described for low temperature proton exchange membrane stationary fuel cell systems for combined heat and power (CHP) applications from 1-250kW and backup power applications from 1-50kW. System designs and functional specifications for these two applications were developed across the range of system power levels. Bottom-up cost estimates were made for balance of plant costs, and detailed direct cost estimates for key fuel cell stack components were derived using design-for-manufacturing-and-assembly techniques. The development of high throughput, automated processes achieving high yield are projected to reduce the cost for fuel cell stacks to the $300/kW level at an annual production volume of 100 MW. Several promising combinations of building types and geographical location in the U.S. were identified for installation of fuel cell CHP systems based on the LBNL modelling tool DER CAM. Life-cycle modelling and externality assessment were done for hotels and hospitals. Reduced electricity demand charges, heating credits and carbon credits can reduce the effective cost of electricity ($/kWhe) by 26-44percent in locations such as Minneapolis, where high carbon intensity electricity from the grid is displaces by a fuel cell system operating on reformate fuel. This project extends the scope of existing cost studies to include externalities and ancillary financial benefits and thus provides a more comprehensive picture of fuel cell system benefits, consistent with a policy and incentive environment that increasingly values these ancillary benefits. The project provides a critical, new modelling capacity and should aid a broad range of policy makers in assessing the integrated costs and benefits of fuel cell systems versus other distributed generation technologies.

  12. Control Analysis Of Tobacco Raw Material Supplies Using Eoq Method Economic Order Quantity To Reach Efficiency Total Costs Of Raw Material In Pr. Sukun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiwik Sudarwati

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The raw material inventory control system determines and guarantees the availability of raw material stock in the right quantity quality and timing. The problem in this research is the procurement of raw materials of tobacco. PR. Sukun still often experiences the excess. This is related to the frequency of raw material purchases and the quantity of raw material purchases which can lead to waste of working capital embedded in raw material inventory raw material ordering costs and raw material storage costs. The purpose of this research is to know how to make an efficiency level in procurement of raw material inventory between EOQ method compared with policy of PR. Sukun. The type of research used is analytic descriptive type. Data analysis begins by analyzing raw material quantity comparison total raw material inventory cost and raw material cost between PR Sukun policy with EOQ method. Based on the results of research known that by using EOQ method can be much more efficient compared to policy of PR. Sukun. The quantity and frequency of purchasing raw materials is less but still take into account the safety stock and reorder point so the production process is not disturbed. In addition the cost of purchasing ordering costs and raw materials storage costs less so as to create efficiencies on the cost of raw materials inventory. PR. Sukun in the procurement of raw material inventory should use EOQ method to be more efficient and take into account the safety stock and reorder point to avoid the inventory excess of raw materials.

  13. Associations between preoperative Oxford hip and knee scores and costs and quality of life of patients undergoing primary total joint replacement in the NHS England: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibich, Peter; Dakin, Helen A; Price, Andrew James; Beard, David; Arden, Nigel K; Gray, Alastair M

    2018-04-10

    To assess how costs and quality of life (measured by EuroQoL-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D)) before and after total hip replacement (THR) and total knee replacement (TKR) vary with age, gender and preoperative Oxford hip score (OHS) and Oxford knee score (OKS). Regression analyses using prospectively collected data from clinical trials, cohort studies and administrative data bases. UK secondary care. Men and women undergoing primary THR or TKR. The Hospital Episode Statistics data linked to patient-reported outcome measures included 602 176 patients undergoing hip or knee replacement who were followed up for up to 6 years. The Knee Arthroplasty Trial included 2217 patients undergoing TKR who were followed up for 12 years. The Clinical Outcomes in Arthroplasty Study cohort included 806 patients undergoing THR and 484 patients undergoing TKR who were observed for 1 year. EQ-5D-3L quality of life before and after surgery, costs of primary arthroplasty, costs of revision arthroplasty and the costs of hospital readmissions and ambulatory costs in the year before and up to 12 years after joint replacement. Average postoperative utility for patients at the 5th percentile of the OHS/OKS distribution was 0.61/0.5 for THR/TKR and 0.89/0.85 for patients at the 95th percentile. The difference between postoperative and preoperative EQ-5D utility was highest for patients with preoperative OHS/OKS lower than 10. However, postoperative EQ-5D utility was higher than preoperative utility for all patients with OHS≤46 and those with OKS≤44. In contrast, costs were generally higher for patients with low preoperative OHS/OKS than those with high OHS/OKS. For example, costs of hospital readmissions within 12 months after primary THR/TKR were £740/£888 for patients at the 5th percentile compared with £314/£404 at the 95th percentile of the OHS/OKS distribution. Our findings suggest that costs and quality of life associated with total joint replacement vary systematically with

  14. The cost of post-operative shed blood salvage after total knee arthroplasty: an analysis of 1,093 consecutive procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Manuel; Ariza, Daniel; Campos, Arturo; Martín-Montañez, Elisa; Pavía, José

    2013-01-01

    Background Requirements for allogeneic red cell transfusion after total knee arthroplasty are still high (20–50%), and salvage and reinfusion of unwashed, filtered post-operative shed blood is an established method for reducing transfusion requirements following this operation. We performed a cost analysis to ascertain whether this alternative is likely to be cost-effective. Materials and methods Data from 1,093 consecutive primary total knee arthroplasties, managed with (reinfusion group, n=763) or without reinfusion of unwashed salvaged blood (control group, n=330), were retrospectively reviewed. The costs of low-vacuum drains, shed blood collection canisters (Bellovac ABT®, Wellspect HealthCare and ConstaVac CBC II®, Stryker), shed blood reinfusion, acquisition and transfusion of allogeneic red cell concentrate, haemoglobin measurements, and prolonged length of hospital stay were used for the blood management cost analysis. Results Patients in the reinfusion group received 152±64 mL of red blood cells from postoperatively salvaged blood, without clinically relevant incidents, and showed a lower allogeneic transfusion rate (24.5% vs 8.5%, for the control and reinfusion groups, respectively; p =0.001). There were no differences in post-operative infection rates. Patients receiving allogeneic transfusions stayed in hospital longer (+1.9 days [95% CI: 1.2 to 2.6]). As reinfusion of unwashed salvaged blood reduced the allogeneic transfusion rate, both reinfusion systems may provide net savings in different cost scenarios (€ 4.6 to € 106/patient for Bellovac ABT, and € −51.9 to € 49.9/patient for ConstaVac CBCII). Discussion Return of unwashed salvaged blood after total knee arthroplasty seems to save costs in patients with pre-operative haemoglobin between 12 and 15 g/dL. It is not cost-saving in patients with a pre-operative haemoglobin >15 g/dL, whereas in those with a pre-operative haemoglobin cost-saving, its efficacy could be increased by

  15. Increased Severe Trauma Patient Volume is Associated With Survival Benefit and Reduced Total Health Care Costs: A Retrospective Observational Study Using a Japanese Nationwide Administrative Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Akira; Shiraishi, Atsushi; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Murata, Kiyoshi; Otomo, Yasuhiro

    2017-06-07

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the associations of severe trauma patient volume with survival benefit and health care costs. The effect of trauma patient volume on survival benefit is inconclusive, and reports on its effects on health care costs are scarce. We conducted a retrospective observational study, including trauma patients who were transferred to government-approved tertiary emergency hospitals, or hospitals with an intensive care unit that provided an equivalent quality of care, using a Japanese nationwide administrative database. We categorized hospitals according to their annual severe trauma patient volumes [1 to 50 (reference), 51 to 100, 101 to 150, 151 to 200, and ≥201]. We evaluated the associations of volume categories with in-hospital survival and total cost per admission using a mixed-effects model adjusting for patient severity and hospital characteristics. A total of 116,329 patients from 559 hospitals were analyzed. Significantly increased in-hospital survival rates were observed in the second, third, fourth, and highest volume categories compared with the reference category [94.2% in the highest volume category vs 88.8% in the reference category, adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval, 95% CI) = 1.75 (1.49-2.07)]. Furthermore, significantly lower costs (in US dollars) were observed in the second and fourth categories [mean (standard deviation) for fourth vs reference = $17,800 ($17,378) vs $20,540 ($32,412), adjusted difference (95% CI) = -$2559 (-$3896 to -$1221)]. Hospitals with high volumes of severe trauma patients were significantly associated with a survival benefit and lower total cost per admission.

  16. The total cost of logistics in supplier selection, under conditions of multiple sourcing, multiple criteria and capacity constraint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elnaz Bani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a mathematical model to solve a multi-objective decision making supplier selection problem. The proposed problem considers three objective functions: the first objective function minimizes the cost of purchasing the products while the second objective function minimizes the due dates and finally the third objective function maximizes the customer satisfaction. The resulted problem is formulated as mixed integer programming and, therefore, we use invasive weed optimization technique to solve the resulted problem. The performance of the proposed model is compared with NSGA II based on different criteria such as mean ideal distance and quality matrix. The preliminary results indicate that the proposed model performs relatively well compared with alternative method.

  17. A multi-perspective cost-effectiveness analysis comparing rivaroxaban with enoxaparin sodium for thromboprophylaxis after total hip and knee replacement in the German healthcare setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zindel Sonja

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients undergoing major orthopaedic surgery (MOS, such as total hip (THR or total knee replacement (TKR, are at high risk of developing venous thromboembolism (VTE. For thromboembolism prophylaxis, the oral anticoagulant rivaroxaban has recently been included in the German diagnosis related group (DRG system. However, the cost-effectiveness of rivaroxaban is still unclear from both the German statutory health insurance (SHI and the German hospital perspective. Objectives To assess the cost-effectiveness of rivaroxaban from the German statutory health insurance (SHI perspective and to analyse financial incentives from the German hospital perspective. Methods Based on data from the RECORD trials and German cost data, a decision tree was built. The model was run for two settings (THR and TKR and two perspectives (SHI and hospital per setting. Results Prophylaxis with rivaroxaban reduces VTE events (0.02 events per person treated after TKR; 0.007 after THR compared with enoxaparin. From the SHI perspective, prophylaxis with rivaroxaban after TKR is cost saving (€27.3 saving per patient treated. However, the cost-effectiveness after THR (€17.8 cost per person remains unclear because of stochastic uncertainty. From the hospital perspective, for given DRGs, the hospital profit will decrease through the use of rivaroxaban by €20.6 (TKR and €31.8 (THR per case respectively. Conclusions Based on our findings, including rivaroxaban for reimbursement in the German DRG system seems reasonable. Yet, adequate incentives for German hospitals to use rivaroxaban are still lacking.

  18. Use of Tranexamic acid is a cost effective method in preventing blood loss during and after total knee replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umer Chaudhry Muhammad

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & Purpose Allogenic blood transfusion in elective orthopaedic surgery is best avoided owing to its associated risks. Total knee replacement often requires blood transfusion, more so when bilateral surgery is performed. Many strategies are currently being employed to reduce the amount of peri-operative allogenic transfusions. Anti-fibrinolytic compounds such as aminocaproic acid and tranexamic acid have been used systemically in perioperative settings with promising results. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of tranexamic acid in reducing allogenic blood transfusion in total knee replacement surgery. Methodology This was a retrospective cohort study conducted on patients undergoing total knee replacement during the time period November 2005 to November 2008. Study population was 99 patients, of which 70 underwent unilateral and 29 bilateral knee replacement. Forty-seven patients with 62 (49.5% knees (group-I had received tranexamic acid (by surgeon preference while the remaining fifty-two patients with 66 (51.5% knees (group-II had did not received any tranexamic acid either pre- or post-operatively. Results The mean drop in the post-operative haemoglobin concentration in Group-II for unilateral and bilateral cases was 1.79 gm/dl and 2.21 gm/dl, with a mean post-operative drainage of 1828 ml (unilateral and 2695 ml (bilateral. In comparison, the mean drop in the post-op haemoglobin in Group-I was 1.49 gm/dl (unilateral and 1.94 gm/dl (bilateral, with a mean drainage of 826 ml (unilateral and 1288 ml (bilateral (p-value Interpretation Tranexamic acid is effective in reducing post-operative drainage and requirement of blood transfusion after knee replacement.

  19. Energetics of bacterial photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebard, David N; Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2009-09-10

    We report the results of extensive numerical simulations and theoretical calculations of electronic transitions in the reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides photosynthetic bacterium. The energetics and kinetics of five electronic transitions related to the kinetic scheme of primary charge separation have been analyzed and compared to experimental observations. Nonergodic formulation of the reaction kinetics is required for the calculation of the rates due to a severe breakdown of the system ergodicity on the time scale of primary charge separation, with the consequent inapplicability of the standard canonical prescription to calculate the activation barrier. Common to all reactions studied is a significant excess of the charge-transfer reorganization energy from the width of the energy gap fluctuations over that from the Stokes shift of the transition. This property of the hydrated proteins, breaking the linear response of the thermal bath, allows the reaction center to significantly reduce the reaction free energy of near-activationless electron hops and thus raise the overall energetic efficiency of the biological charge-transfer chain. The increase of the rate of primary charge separation with cooling is explained in terms of the temperature variation of induction solvation, which dominates the average donor-acceptor energy gap for all electronic transitions in the reaction center. It is also suggested that the experimentally observed break in the Arrhenius slope of the primary recombination rate, occurring near the temperature of the dynamical transition in proteins, can be traced back to a significant drop of the solvent reorganization energy close to that temperature.

  20. Energetics Manufacturing Technology Center (EMTC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energetics Manufacturing Technology Center (EMTC), established in 1994 by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) Manufacturing Technology (ManTech) Program, is Navy...

  1. Cost-effectiveness of antibiotic prophylaxis for dental patients with prosthetic joints: Comparisons of antibiotic regimens for patients with total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaar, Daniel D; Park, Taehwan; Swiontkowski, Marc F; Kuntz, Karen M

    2015-11-01

    Clinician uncertainty concerning the need for antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent prosthetic joint infection (PJI) after undergoing dental procedures persists. Improved understanding of the potential clinical and economic risks and benefits of antibiotic prophylaxis will help inform the debate and facilitate the continuing evolution of clinical management guidelines for dental patients with prosthetic joints. The authors developed a Markov decision model to compare the lifetime cost-effectiveness of alternative antibiotic prophylaxis strategies for dental patients aged 65 years who had undergone total hip arthroplasty (THA). On the basis of the authors' interpretation of previous recommendations from the American Dental Association and American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, they compared the following strategies: no prophylaxis, prophylaxis for the first 2 years after arthroplasty, and lifetime prophylaxis. A strategy of foregoing antibiotic prophylaxis before dental visits was cost-effective and resulted in lower lifetime accumulated costs ($11,909) and higher accumulated quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) (12.375) when compared with alternative prophylaxis strategies. The results of Markov decision modeling indicated that a no-antibiotic prophylaxis strategy was cost-effective for dental patients who had undergone THA. These results support the findings of case-control studies and the conclusions of an American Dental Association Council on Scientific Affairs report that questioned general recommendations for antibiotic prophylaxis before dental procedures. The results of cost-effectiveness decision modeling support the contention that routine antibiotic prophylaxis for dental patients with total joint arthroplasty should be reconsidered. Copyright © 2015 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Balancing selected medication costs with total number of daily injections: a preference analysis of GnRH-agonist and antagonist protocols by IVF patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sills, E Scott; Collins, Gary S; Salem, Shala A; Jones, Christopher A; Peck, Alison C; Salem, Rifaat D

    2012-08-30

    During in vitro fertilization (IVF), fertility patients are expected to self-administer many injections as part of this treatment. While newer medications have been developed to substantially reduce the number of these injections, such agents are typically much more expensive. Considering these differences in both cost and number of injections, this study compared patient preferences between GnRH-agonist and GnRH-antagonist based protocols in IVF. Data were collected by voluntary, anonymous questionnaire at first consultation appointment. Patient opinion concerning total number of s.c. injections as a function of non-reimbursed patient cost associated with GnRH-agonist [A] and GnRH-antagonist [B] protocols in IVF was studied. Completed questionnaires (n = 71) revealed a mean +/- SD patient age of 34 +/- 4.1 yrs. Most (83.1%) had no prior IVF experience; 2.8% reported another medical condition requiring self-administration of subcutaneous medication(s). When out-of-pocket cost for [A] and [B] were identical, preference for [B] was registered by 50.7% patients. The tendency to favor protocol [B] was weaker among patients with a health occupation. Estimated patient costs for [A] and [B] were $259.82 +/- 11.75 and $654.55 +/- 106.34, respectively (p cost difference increased. This investigation found consistently higher non-reimbursed direct medication costs for GnRH-antagonist IVF vs. GnRH-agonist IVF protocols. A conditional preference to minimize downregulation (using GnRH-antagonist) was noted among some, but not all, IVF patient sub-groups. Compared to IVF patients with a health occupation, the preference for GnRH-antagonist was weaker than for other patients. While reducing total number of injections by using GnRH-antagonist is a desirable goal, it appears this advantage is not perceived equally by all IVF patients and its utility is likely discounted heavily by patients when nonreimbursed medication costs reach a critical level.

  3. Association between muscle atrophy/weakness and health care costs and utilization among patients receiving total knee replacement surgery: a retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen SY

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Shih-Yin Chen,1 Ning Wu,1 Yuan-Chi Lee,1 Yang Zhao21Health Economics and Epidemiology, Evidera, Lexington, Massachusetts, 2Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, New Jersey, USAPurpose: The aim of the study reported here was to examine health care resource utilization, costs, and risk of rehospitalization for total knee replacement (TKR patients with and without muscle atrophy/weakness (MAW.Patients and methods: Individuals aged 50–64 years with commercial insurance or 65+ years with Medicare Supplemental Insurance (Medicare who had a hospitalization for TKR between January 1, 2006 and September 30, 2009 were identified from a large US claims database. First hospitalization for TKR was defined as the index stay. All patients were classified into three cohorts according to when MAW was diagnosed relative to TKR: pre-MAW, post-MAW, and no MAW. The association between MAW and health care costs over the 12-month post-index period and the probability of rehospitalization were assessed via multivariate regressions.Results: The study sample included 53,696 Medicare and 46,058 commercial insurance TKR patients. Controlling for cross-cohort differences, both the pre- and post-MAW cohorts had significantly higher total health care costs (Medicare US$4,201 and US$9,404 higher, commercial insurance US$2,737 and US$6,640 higher, respectively than the no MAW cohort (all P < 0.05. The post-MAW cohort in both populations was also more likely to have any all-cause or replacement-related rehospitalization compared with the no MAW cohort.Conclusion: Among US patients undergoing TKR, those with MAW had higher health care utilization and costs than patients without MAW.Keywords: rehospitalization, resource utilization, Medicare, health insurance, USA

  4. Rural energetic development: cuban experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilera Barciela, M.

    1994-01-01

    The development of electro energetic national system in Cuba has been directed to the following objectives: to brake the rural population's exodus toward the cities, electrification of dairy farm, interconnection to the system electro energetic of all the sugar central production, these improves the rural population's conditions life

  5. Balancing selected medication costs with total number of daily injections: a preference analysis of GnRH-agonist and antagonist protocols by IVF patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sills E

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During in vitro fertilization (IVF, fertility patients are expected to self-administer many injections as part of this treatment. While newer medications have been developed to substantially reduce the number of these injections, such agents are typically much more expensive. Considering these differences in both cost and number of injections, this study compared patient preferences between GnRH-agonist and GnRH-antagonist based protocols in IVF. Methods Data were collected by voluntary, anonymous questionnaire at first consultation appointment. Patient opinion concerning total number of s.c. injections as a function of non-reimbursed patient cost associated with GnRH-agonist [A] and GnRH-antagonist [B] protocols in IVF was studied. Results Completed questionnaires (n = 71 revealed a mean +/− SD patient age of 34 +/− 4.1 yrs. Most (83.1% had no prior IVF experience; 2.8% reported another medical condition requiring self-administration of subcutaneous medication(s. When out-of-pocket cost for [A] and [B] were identical, preference for [B] was registered by 50.7% patients. The tendency to favor protocol [B] was weaker among patients with a health occupation. Estimated patient costs for [A] and [B] were $259.82 +/− 11.75 and $654.55 +/− 106.34, respectively (p  Conclusions This investigation found consistently higher non-reimbursed direct medication costs for GnRH-antagonist IVF vs. GnRH-agonist IVF protocols. A conditional preference to minimize downregulation (using GnRH-antagonist was noted among some, but not all, IVF patient sub-groups. Compared to IVF patients with a health occupation, the preference for GnRH-antagonist was weaker than for other patients. While reducing total number of injections by using GnRH-antagonist is a desirable goal, it appears this advantage is not perceived equally by all IVF patients and its utility is likely discounted heavily by patients when nonreimbursed medication costs

  6. a Circleless "2D/3D Total STATION": a Low Cost Instrument for Surveying, Recording Point Clouds, Documentation, Image Acquisition and Visualisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, M.

    2013-07-01

    Hardware and software of the universally applicable instrument - referred to as a 2D/3D total station - are described here, as well as its practical use. At its core it consists of a 3D camera - often also called a ToF camera, a pmd camera or a RIM-camera - combined with a common industrial 2D camera. The cameras are rigidly coupled with their optical axes in parallel. A new type of instrument was created mounting this 2D/3D system on a tripod in a specific way. Because of it sharing certain characteristics with a total station and a tacheometer, respectively, the new device was called a 2D/3D total station. It may effectively replace a common total station or a laser scanner in some respects. After a brief overview of the prototype's features this paper then focuses on the methodological characteristics for practical application. Its usability as a universally applicable stand-alone instrument is demonstrated for surveying, recording RGB-coloured point clouds as well as delivering images for documentation and visualisation. Because of its limited range (10m without reflector and 150 m to reflector prisms) and low range accuracy (ca. 2 cm to 3 cm) compared to present-day total stations and laser scanners, the practical usage of the 2D/3D total station is currently limited to acquisition of accidents, forensic purpuses, speleology or facility management, as well as architectural recordings with low requirements regarding accuracy. However, the author is convinced that in the near future advancements in 3D camera technology will allow this type of comparatively low cost instrument to replace the total station as well as the laser scanner in an increasing number of areas.

  7. Plerixafor mobilization leads to a lower ratio of CD34+ cells to total nucleated cells which results in greater storage costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanhehco, Yvette C; Adamski, Jill; Sell, Mary; Cunningham, Kathleen; Eisenmann, Christa; Magee, Deborah; Stadtmauer, Edward A; O'Doherty, Una

    2010-01-01

    Plerixafor (Mozobil, AMD3100) with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilizes more CD34+ cells/kg compared to G-CSF alone. Given that plerixafor enhances mobilization of multiple white blood cell lineages, we determined if more storage space is required for products collected from patients mobilized with plerixafor. A review of the medical records of 15 patients mobilized with chemotherapy and G-CSF (control) and 14 patients mobilized with plerixafor plus G-CSF (plerixafor) was performed. Data on demographics, baseline characteristics, CD34+ cells/kg, total nucleated cells, total mononuclear cells, total apheresis sessions, and total bags for storage were collected. Mean values were determined and compared using Student's t-test. We found that the proportion of CD34+ cells among total nucleated cells was less in the plerixafor group compared to the control group (P = 0.0427). More nucleated cells (10.7 x 10(10) vs. 7.1 x 10(10), P =0.0452) and mononuclear cells (9.7 x 10(10) vs. 5.9 x 10(10), P = 0.0059) were mobilized with plerixafor plus G-CSF. However, there was no significant difference in CD34+ cells/kg, total CD34+ cells or the proportion of mononuclear cells among total nucleated cells between the two groups. More storage bags were required for the plerixafor group compared to the control group (15 vs. 9, P = 0.0299). Mobilization with plerixafor plus G-CSF resulted in a smaller proportion of CD34+ cells collected and a greater number of storage bags. An increase in the number of bags required for stem cell storage may be logistically problematic and will also lead to increased costs for storage of stem cells.

  8. Assessing energy projects from the viewpoint of individual economic branches and total economy. The role of economic efficiency analysis, cost-benefit analysis and multicriteria methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sell, A.

    1992-01-01

    Energy is an extremely important good and means of production not only for the individual branches of economy but, due to its essential meaning to the development of a region or a national economy and its external effects connected with production and consumption, also of great interest to all economic branches. This article deals with the relation of analyses in individual economical branches and those in total economy and with the question of what the importance of cost-benefit analyses and other methods is in the analysis in total economy. The author also mentions the planning as in the special literature the planning and evaluation phases are not analytically separated which is seen especially in the discussion about the multi-criteria methods. (orig.) [de

  9. GLOBAL ENERGETICS OF SOLAR FLARES. IV. CORONAL MASS EJECTION ENERGETICS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.

    2016-01-01

    This study entails the fourth part of a global flare energetics project, in which the mass m cme , kinetic energy E kin , and the gravitational potential energy E grav of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) is measured in 399 M and X-class flare events observed during the first 3.5 years of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission, using a new method based on the EUV dimming effect. EUV dimming is modeled in terms of a radial adiabatic expansion process, which is fitted to the observed evolution of the total emission measure of the CME source region. The model derives the evolution of the mean electron density, the emission measure, the bulk plasma expansion velocity, the mass, and the energy in the CME source region. The EUV dimming method is truly complementary to the Thomson scattering method in white light, which probes the CME evolution in the heliosphere at r ≳ 2 R ⊙ , while the EUV dimming method tracks the CME launch in the corona. We compare the CME parameters obtained in white light with the LASCO/C2 coronagraph with those obtained from EUV dimming with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the SDO for all identical events in both data sets. We investigate correlations between CME parameters, the relative timing with flare parameters, frequency occurrence distributions, and the energy partition between magnetic, thermal, nonthermal, and CME energies. CME energies are found to be systematically lower than the dissipated magnetic energies, which is consistent with a magnetic origin of CMEs.

  10. Electrical initiation of an energetic nanolaminate film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tringe, Joseph W.; Gash, Alexander E.; Barbee, Jr., Troy W.

    2010-03-30

    A heating apparatus comprising an energetic nanolaminate film that produces heat when initiated, a power source that provides an electric current, and a control that initiates the energetic nanolaminate film by directing the electric current to the energetic nanolaminate film and joule heating the energetic nanolaminate film to an initiation temperature. Also a method of heating comprising providing an energetic nanolaminate film that produces heat when initiated, and initiating the energetic nanolaminate film by directing an electric current to the energetic nanolaminate film and joule heating the energetic nanolaminate film to an initiation temperature.

  11. Trends in primary total hip arthroplasty in Spain from 2001 to 2008: Evaluating changes in demographics, comorbidity, incidence rates, length of stay, costs and mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimenez-Trujillo Isabel

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hip arthroplasties is one of the most frequent surgical procedures in Spain and are conducted mainly in elderly subjects. We aim to analyze changes in incidence, co-morbidity profile, length of hospital stay (LOHS, costs and in-hospital mortality (IHM of patients undergoing primary total hip arthroplasty (THA over an 8-year study period in Spain. Methods We selected all surgical admissions in individuals aged ≥40 years who had received a primary THA (ICD-9-CM procedure code 81.51 between 2001 and 2008 from the National Hospital Discharge Database. Age- and sex-specific incidence rates, LOHS, costs and IHM were estimated for each year. Co-morbidity was assessed using the Charlson comorbidity index. Multivariate analysis of time trends was conducted using Poisson regression. Logistic regression models were conducted to analyze IHM. Results We identified a total of 161,791 discharges of patients having undergone THA from 2001 to 2008. Overall crude incidence had increased from 99 to 105 THA per 100.000 inhabitants from 2001 to 2008 (p 2 and in 2008, the prevalence of 1-2 or >2 had increased to 20.4% and 1.1% respectively (p Conclusions The current study provides clear and valid data indicating increased incidence of primary THA in Spain from 2001 to 2008 with concomitant reductions in LOHS, slight reduction IHM, but a significant increase in cost per patient. The health profile of the patient undergoing a THA seems to be worsening in Spain.

  12. Cogeneration Power Plants: a Proposed Methodology for Unitary Production Cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metalli, E.

    2009-01-01

    A new methodology to evaluate unitary energetic production costs in the cogeneration power plants is proposed. This methodology exploits the energy conversion factors fixed by Italian Regulatory Authority for Electricity and Gas. So it allows to settle such unitary costs univocally for a given plant, without assigning them a priori subjective values when there are two or more energy productions at the same time. Moreover the proposed methodology always ensures positive values for these costs, complying with the total generation cost balance equation. [it

  13. Energetic solar particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, M.

    1975-01-01

    In this review, some of the important aspects of energetic solar particles and their relation to solar physics are discussed. The major aspects of solar cosmic ray studies currently under investigation are identified and attention is focussed on the problems of the physical processes in the sun which may be responsible for these phenomena. The studies of the composition and energy spectra of solar cosmic ray nuclei are related to the basic problem of particle acceleration process in sun and to the composition of elements in solar atmosphere. The composition of higher energy (>20 MeV/amu) multiply charged nuclei of He, C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si and Fe give information on the abundance of elements in the solar atmosphere. At lower energies (approximately 1-10 MeV/amu), the abundances of these elements show enhancements relative to solar abundances and these enhancements are believed to be due to particle acceleration mechanisms operative in the sun which are not fully understood at present. Studies of the relative abundances of H 2 , H 3 and He 3 isotopes and Li, Be, B nuclei in the solar cosmic rays can also be studied. The question of the relationship of the accelerated particles in the sun to the optical flare phenomena is discussed. Further studies of different aspects of these phenomena may give important clues to a wide ranging phenomena in the active sun. The observational methods employed for these studies are mentioned. (A.K.)

  14. Analysis of the energetic sector through the national energetic matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garzon Lozano, Enrique

    2007-01-01

    The author shows the results of the national energetic balance 1975-2005, through the energetic matrix of the country, giving an annual growth of 5.1% in this period of offer of primary energy, where the mineral coal participates with 9,6%, the hydraulic energy with 4,8%, natural gas with 4,2%, trash with 2,4% and petroleum with 2,2%, while the firewood fell in 0,5%

  15. Comparison of turnaround time and total cost of HIV testing before and after implementation of the 2014 CDC/APHL Laboratory Testing Algorithm for diagnosis of HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Derrick J; Yao, Joseph D

    2017-06-01

    Updated recommendations for HIV diagnostic laboratory testing published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Association of Public Health Laboratories incorporate 4th generation HIV immunoassays, which are capable of identifying HIV infection prior to seroconversion. The purpose of this study was to compare turnaround time and cost between 3rd and 4th generation HIV immunoassay-based testing algorithms for initially reactive results. The clinical microbiology laboratory database at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN was queried for 3rd generation (from November 2012 to May 2014) and 4th generation (from May 2014 to November 2015) HIV immunoassay results. All results from downstream supplemental testing were recorded. Turnaround time (defined as the time of initial sample receipt in the laboratory to the time the final supplemental test in the algorithm was resulted) and cost (based on 2016 Medicare reimbursement rates) were assessed. A total of 76,454 and 78,998 initial tests were performed during the study period using the 3rd generation and 4th generation HIV immunoassays, respectively. There were 516 (0.7%) and 581 (0.7%) total initially reactive results, respectively. Of these, 304 (58.9%) and 457 (78.7%) were positive by supplemental testing. There were 10 (0.01%) cases of acute HIV infection identified with the 4th generation algorithm. The most frequent tests performed to confirm an HIV-positive case using the 3rd generation algorithm, which were reactive initial immunoassay and positive HIV-1 Western blot, took a median time of 1.1 days to complete at a cost of $45.00. In contrast, the most frequent tests performed to confirm an HIV-positive case using the 4th generation algorithm, which included a reactive initial immunoassay and positive HIV-1/-2 antibody differentiation immunoassay for HIV-1, took a median time of 0.4 days and cost $63.25. Overall median turnaround time was 2.2 and 1.5 days, and overall median cost was $63.90 and $72.50 for

  16. Energetic policies 2005-2030

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This power point exhibition shows the following topics: energy analysis, production and use, supply and demand, consumption, energy sources, energetic prospective of Uruguay country, medium and long term perspectives.

  17. An integer batch scheduling model considering learning, forgetting, and deterioration effects for a single machine to minimize total inventory holding cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusriski, R.; Sukoyo; Samadhi, T. M. A. A.; Halim, A. H.

    2018-03-01

    This research deals with a single machine batch scheduling model considering the influenced of learning, forgetting, and machine deterioration effects. The objective of the model is to minimize total inventory holding cost, and the decision variables are the number of batches (N), batch sizes (Q[i], i = 1, 2, .., N) and the sequence of processing the resulting batches. The parts to be processed are received at the right time and the right quantities, and all completed parts must be delivered at a common due date. We propose a heuristic procedure based on the Lagrange method to solve the problem. The effectiveness of the procedure is evaluated by comparing the resulting solution to the optimal solution obtained from the enumeration procedure using the integer composition technique and shows that the average effectiveness is 94%.

  18. Hemophilia A Pseudoaneurysm in a Patient with High Responding Inhibitors Complicating Total Knee Arthroplasty: Embolization: A Cost-Reducing Alternative to Medical Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kickuth, Ralph; Anderson, Suzanne; Peter-Salonen, Kristiina; Laemmle, Bernhard; Eggli, Stefan; Triller, Juergen

    2006-01-01

    Joint hemorrhages are very common in patients with severe hemophilia. Inhibitors in patients with hemophilia are allo-antibodies that neutralize the activity of the clotting factor. After total knee replacement, rare intra-articular bleeding complications might occur that do not respond to clotting factor replacement. We report a 40-year-old male with severe hemophilia A and high responding inhibitors presenting with recurrent knee joint hemorrhage after bilateral knee prosthetic surgery despite adequate clotting factor treatment. There were two episodes of marked postoperative hemarthrosis requiring extensive use of subsititution therapy. Eleven days postoperatively, there was further hemorrhage into the right knee. Digital subtraction angiography diagnosed a complicating pseudoaneurysm of the inferior lateral geniculate artery and embolization was successfully performed. Because clotting factor replacement therapy has proved to be excessively expensive and prolonged, especially in patients with inhibitors, we recommend the use of cost-effective early angiographic embolization

  19. Degradation of Energetic Compounds using Zero-Valent Iron (ZVI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    aquatic plants, thermophilic biological regeneration of GAC, Fenton’s oxidation, electrolytic oxidation and anaerobic fluidized bed reactor. However...attack by oxygenase enzymes (Bruhn et al., 1987). Therefore, these energetic compounds are often removed from wastewater by costly physical-chemical... enzymes (Bruhn et al., 1987; Knackmuss, 1996). Chemical oxidation methods (e.g., advanced oxidation processes) are also ineffective because of the

  20. Musical Tasks and Energetic Arousal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hayoung A; Watson, Angela L

    2018-03-08

    Music is widely recognized as a motivating stimulus. Investigators have examined the use of music to improve a variety of motivation-related outcomes; however, these studies have focused primarily on passive music listening rather than active participation in musical activities. To examine the influence of participation in musical tasks and unique participant characteristics on energetic arousal. We used a one-way Welch's ANOVA to examine the influence of musical participation (i.e., a non-musical control and four different musical task conditions) upon energetic arousal. In addition, ancillary analyses of participant characteristics including personality, age, gender, sleep, musical training, caffeine, nicotine, and alcohol revealed their possible influence upon pretest and posttest energetic arousal scores. Musical participation yielded a significant relationship with energetic arousal, F(4, 55.62) = 44.38, p = .000, estimated ω2 = 0.60. Games-Howell post hoc pairwise comparisons revealed statistically significant differences between five conditions. Descriptive statistics revealed expected differences between introverts' and extraverts' energetic arousal scores at the pretest, F(1, 115) = 6.80, p = .010, partial η2= .06; however, mean differences failed to reach significance at the posttest following musical task participation. No other measured participant characteristics yielded meaningful results. Passive tasks (i.e., listening to a story or song) were related to decreased energetic arousal, while active musical tasks (i.e., singing, rhythm tapping, and keyboard playing) were related to increased energetic arousal. Musical task participation appeared to have a differential effect for individuals with certain personality traits (i.e., extroverts and introverts).

  1. Quinquennial National Program (1990-1994) for the Energetic Modernization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The Mexican Energetics Sector currently has the eighth possition regarding reserves of hydrocarbons and the sixth regarding oil production, the installed capacity in electricity matters is among the first 20 of the world. The Program established first, a general balance of the situation in which the energetics sector lays today. It also points out the strategic role that this sector holds, as well an on the solutions to the problems faced. This Program establishes the objectives pursued by the energetics sector and that are as follows: to guarantee enough supply of energetics, to strenghten the link between the energetics sector and economy, society and environmental protection, to consolidate an energetics sector that is more current and better integrated. This Program presents the proposal to tend to five priorities: productivity, saving and effective use of energy, financing of the development and expansion of the offer, to diversify sources, as well as an efficient participation in international markets. In the chapter the effort regarding supply and demand of energy, it is evident that the effort made to expand the offer must be great, facing the total demand of energy demonstrated by the figures. For 1994 this demmand is of 31 - 36 % greater to that observed in 1988. Lastly, two statistic documents are enclosed, one historic, with general pointers of the sector, and another with the basic variables for national energy balance

  2. Energetic consequences of sexual size dimorphism in nestling red-winged blackbirds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiala, K.L.; Congdon, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    The energy budget of nestling Red-winged Blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) was determined using doubly labeled water ( 3 HH 18 O) to measure field metabolic rate (FMR) and body component data to measure growth energy. Sex-specific measurements permitted the evaluation of the effects of this species' substantial sexual size dimorphism on FMR and total energetics. FMR averaged CO 2 release of 5.12 mL.g -1 .h -1 , or 0.129 kJ.g -1 .h -1 , with no significant differences between the sexes. Daytime FMRs of CO 2 production (5.34 mL.g -1 .h -1 ) were higher, but not significantly so, than nighttime FMRs (4.45 mL.g -1 .h -1 ). Water influx averaged 0.95 mL.g -1 .d -1 , with daytime rates (1.22 mL.g -1 .d -1 ) significantly higher than nighttime (0.40 mL.g -1 d -1 ) rates. Total assimilated energy from hatching to fledging was 1014 and 797 kJ for male and female nestlings, respectively. The sexual differences in total energetics reflected differences in body size of the nestlings and suggest that there is a greater cost to the parents in raising males than in raising females

  3. Second School of Nuclear Energetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    At 3-5 Nov 2009 Institute of Nuclear Energy POLATOM, Association of Polish Electrical Engineers (SEP) and Polish Nuclear Society have organized Second School of Nuclear Energetics. 165 participants have arrived from all Poland and represented both different central institutions (e.g. ministries) and local institutions (e.g. Office of Technical Inspection, The Voivodship Presidential Offices, several societies, consulting firms or energetic enterprises). Students from the Warsaw Technical University and Gdansk Technical University, as well as the PhD students from the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (Warsaw) attended the School. 20 invited lectures presented by eminent Polish specialists concerned basic problems of nuclear energetics, nuclear fuel cycle and different problems of the NPP construction in Poland. [pl

  4. COMPARISON OF TWO TOTAL RNA EXTRACTION PROTOCOLS FROM CHO-K1 CELLS FOR RT-PCR: CUT-OFF COST FOR RESEARCHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasila Packeer Mohamed

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Various methods have been described to extract RNA from adherent mammalian cells. RNA isolation in conjunction with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR is a valuable tool used to study gene expression profiling. This approach is now being used in mammalian cell bioprocessing to help understand and improve the system. The objective of this study was to compare and determine the most suitable RNA extraction method for CHO-K1 cells in a setting where a relatively large amount of samples was involved. Total RNA was extracted using Total RNA purification kit (without DNase treatment; Norgen, Canada and RNeasy mini kit (with DNase treatment; Qiagen, USA respectively. The extracted RNA was then reverse transcribed, and the cDNA was subjected to PCR-amplifying 18S. Yield from RNeasy kit was significantly higher (0.316 ± 0.033 µg/µl; p=0.004 than Total RNA purification kit (0.177 ± 0.0243 µg/µl. However, RNA purity for both methods was close to 2.0 and there was no significant difference between the methods. Total RNA purification kit is less expensive than RNeasy kit. Since there is no DNase treatment step in the former, extraction time for RNA is shorter. When the extracted RNA was subjected to RT-PCR, both methods were able to show detection of 18S at 219 bp.   Therefore, this study demonstrates that both protocols are suitable for RNA extraction for CHO-K1 cells. RNeasy mini kit (Qiagen is recommended if higher yields is the primary concern and Total RNA Purification kit (Norgen is recommended if time and cost are concerned. ABSTRAK: Pelbagai kaedah telah digunakan untuk mengekstrak RNA daripada sel mamalia lekat.  Pemencilan RNA dengan menggunakan reaksi rantai polimerase transkripsi berbalik (RT-PCR merupakan kaedah penting yang digunakan dalam mengkaji pernyataan gen berprofil.  Pendekatan ini kini digunakan dalam pemprosesan bio sel mamalia untuk memahami dan menambah baik sistem.  Tujuan kajian dijalankan

  5. The cumulative cost of additional wakefulness: dose-response effects on neurobehavioral functions and sleep physiology from chronic sleep restriction and total sleep deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dongen, Hans P A.; Maislin, Greg; Mullington, Janet M.; Dinges, David F.

    2003-01-01

    were near-linearly related to the cumulative duration of wakefulness in excess of 15.84 h (s.e. 0.73 h). CONCLUSIONS: Since chronic restriction of sleep to 6 h or less per night produced cognitive performance deficits equivalent to up to 2 nights of total sleep deprivation, it appears that even relatively moderate sleep restriction can seriously impair waking neurobehavioral functions in healthy adults. Sleepiness ratings suggest that subjects were largely unaware of these increasing cognitive deficits, which may explain why the impact of chronic sleep restriction on waking cognitive functions is often assumed to be benign. Physiological sleep responses to chronic restriction did not mirror waking neurobehavioral responses, but cumulative wakefulness in excess of a 15.84 h predicted performance lapses across all four experimental conditions. This suggests that sleep debt is perhaps best understood as resulting in additional wakefulness that has a neurobiological "cost" which accumulates over time.

  6. Energetic and exergoeconomic assessment of a multi-generation energy system based on indirect use of geothermal energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akrami, Ehsan; Chitsaz, Ata; Nami, Hossein; Mahmoudi, S.M.S.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a geothermal based multi-generation energy system, including organic Rankine cycle, domestic water heater, absorption refrigeration cycle and proton exchange membrane electrolyzer, is developed to generate electricity, heating, cooling and hydrogen. For this purpose, energetic, exergetic and exergoeconomic analysis are undertaken upon proposed system. Also, the effects of some important variables, i.e. geothermal water temperature, turbine inlet temperature and pressure, generator temperature, geothermal water mass flow rate and electrolyzer current density on the several parameters such as energy and exergy efficiencies of the proposed system, heating and cooling load, net electrical output power, hydrogen production, unit cost of each system products and total unit cost of the products are investigated. For specified conditions, the results show that energy and exergy efficiencies of the proposed multi-generation system are calculated about 34.98% and 49.17%, respectively. The highest and lowest total unit cost of the products estimated approximately 23.18 and 22.73 $/GJ, respectively, by considering that geothermal water temperature increases from 185 °C to 215 °C. - Highlights: • A multigeneration energy system based on geothermal energy is developed. • The energetic, exergetic and exergoeconomic analysis are undertaken upon proposed system. • The influences of several significant parameters are investigated. • The energy and exergy efficiencies of the entire system are calculated around 34.98% and 49.17%.

  7. Running Economy from a Muscle Energetics Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared R. Fletcher

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The economy of running has traditionally been quantified from the mass-specific oxygen uptake; however, because fuel substrate usage varies with exercise intensity, it is more accurate to express running economy in units of metabolic energy. Fundamentally, the understanding of the major factors that influence the energy cost of running (Erun can be obtained with this approach. Erun is determined by the energy needed for skeletal muscle contraction. Here, we approach the study of Erun from that perspective. The amount of energy needed for skeletal muscle contraction is dependent on the force, duration, shortening, shortening velocity, and length of the muscle. These factors therefore dictate the energy cost of running. It is understood that some determinants of the energy cost of running are not trainable: environmental factors, surface characteristics, and certain anthropometric features. Other factors affecting Erun are altered by training: other anthropometric features, muscle and tendon properties, and running mechanics. Here, the key features that dictate the energy cost during distance running are reviewed in the context of skeletal muscle energetics.

  8. Heliospheric Observations of Energetic Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summerlin, Errol J.

    2011-01-01

    Heliospheric observations of energetic particles have shown that, on long time averages, a consistent v^-5 power-law index arises even in the absence of transient events. This implies an ubiquitous acceleration process present in the solar wind that is required to generate these power-law tails and maintain them against adiabatic losses and coulomb-collisions which will cool and thermalize the plasma respectively. Though the details of this acceleration process are being debated within the community, most agree that the energy required for these tails comes from fluctuations in the magnetic field which are damped as the energy is transferred to particles. Given this source for the tail, is it then reasonable to assume that the turbulent LISM should give rise to such a power-law tail as well? IBEX observations clearly show a power-law tail of index approximately -5 in energetic neutral atoms. The simplest explanation for the origins of these ENAs are that they are energetic ions which have charge-exchanged with a neutral atom. However, this would imply that energetic ions possess a v^-5 power-law distribution at keV energies at the source of these ENAs. If the source is presumed to be the LISM, it provides additional options for explaining the, so called, IBEX ribbon. This presentation will discuss some of these options as well as potential mechanisms for the generation of a power-law spectrum in the LISM.

  9. About the wind energetics development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strebkov, D.S.; Kharitonov, V.P.; Murugov, V.P.; Sokol'skij, A.K.

    1996-01-01

    The review of wind power energetics state in USA, Europe, Russia is given. The data of EC on wind power plants production in different periods are presented. The directions of scientific-research works with the purpose of increasing the level of wind power industry of Russia corresponding to economics demands were elaborated. (author). 8 refs., 3 tabs

  10. Introduction to global energetic problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gicquel, R.

    1992-01-01

    This book gives a view on global energetic problems and proposes a thorough economic analysis on principle aspects taken into account: energy supply, depending energy sources and available technologic channels, relationships between macro-economy and energy demand, new size of energy problems (environmental effects, overcosts of renewable energy sources, necessity of an high technologic development...). 38 refs

  11. Energetic consumption levels and human development indexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boa Nova, Antonio Carlos

    1999-01-01

    The article overviews the energetic consumption levels and human development indexes. The human development indexes are described based on the United Nations Development Programme. A comparison between the energetic consumption levels and human development indexes is also presented

  12. The location of energetic compartments affects energetic communication in cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikke eBirkedal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The heart relies on accurate regulation of mitochondrial energy supply to match energy demand. The main regulators are Ca2+ and feedback of ADP and Pi. Regulation via feedback has intrigued for decades. First, the heart exhibits a remarkable metabolic stability. Second, diffusion of ADP and other molecules is restricted specifically in heart and red muscle, where a fast feedback is needed the most. To explain the regulation by feedback, compartmentalization must be taken into account. Experiments and theoretical approaches suggest that cardiomyocyte energetic compartmentalization is elaborate with barriers obstructing diffusion in the cytosol and at the level of the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM. A recent study suggests the barriers are organized in a lattice with dimensions in agreement with those of intracellular structures. Here, we discuss the possible location of these barriers. The more plausible scenario includes a barrier at the level of MOM. Much research has focused on how the permeability of MOM itself is regulated, and the importance of the creatine kinase system to facilitate energetic communication. We hypothesize that at least part of the diffusion restriction at the MOM level is not by MOM itself, but due to the close physical association between the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR and mitochondria. This will explain why animals with a disabled creatine kinase system exhibit rather mild phenotype modifications. Mitochondria are hubs of energetics, but also ROS production and signaling. The close association between SR and mitochondria may form a diffusion barrier to ADP added outside a permeabilised cardiomyocyte. But in vivo, it is the structural basis for the mitochondrial-SR coupling that is crucial for the regulation of mitochondrial Ca2+-transients to regulate energetics, and for avoiding Ca2+-overload and irreversible opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore.

  13. SIMULATION OF ENERGETIC NEUTRAL ATOMS FROM SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Linghua [Institute of Space Physics and Applied Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Li, Gang [Department of Space Science and CSPAR, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Shih, Albert Y. [Solar Physics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20770 (United States); Lin, Robert P. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F., E-mail: wanglhwang@gmail.com [Institut fuer Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, University of Kiel, Leibnizstrasse 11, D-24118 Kiel (Germany)

    2014-10-01

    Energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) provide the only way to observe the acceleration site of coronal-mass-ejection-driven (CME-driven) shock-accelerated solar energetic particles (SEPs). In gradual SEP events, energetic protons can charge exchange with the ambient solar wind or interstellar neutrals to become ENAs. Assuming a CME-driven shock with a constant speed of 1800 km s{sup –1} and compression ratio of 3.5, propagating from 1.5 to 40 R{sub S} , we calculate the accelerated SEPs at 5-5000 keV and the resulting ENAs via various charge-exchange interactions. Taking into account the ENA losses in the interplanetary medium, we obtain the flux-time profiles of these solar ENAs reaching 1 AU. We find that the arriving ENAs at energies above ∼100 keV show a sharply peaked flux-time profile, mainly originating from the shock source below 5 R{sub S} , whereas the ENAs below ∼20 keV have a flat-top time profile, mostly originating from the source beyond 10 R{sub S} . Assuming the accelerated protons are effectively trapped downstream of the shock, we can reproduce the STEREO ENA fluence observations at ∼2-5 MeV/nucleon. We also estimate the flux of ENAs coming from the charge exchange of energetic storm protons, accelerated by the fast CME-driven shock near 1 AU, with interstellar hydrogen and helium. Our results suggest that appropriate instrumentation would be able to detect ENAs from SEPs and to even make ENA images of SEPs at energies above ∼10-20 keV.

  14. A comparison of energetic ions in the plasma depletion layer and the quasi-parallel magnetosheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuselier, Stephen A.

    1994-01-01

    Energetic ion spectra measured by the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers/Charge Composition Explorer (AMPTE/CCE) downstream from the Earth's quasi-parallel bow shock (in the quasi-parallel magnetosheath) and in the plasma depletion layer are compared. In the latter region, energetic ions are from a single source, leakage of magnetospheric ions across the magnetopause and into the plasma depletion layer. In the former region, both the magnetospheric source and shock acceleration of the thermal solar wind population at the quasi-parallel shock can contribute to the energetic ion spectra. The relative strengths of these two energetic ion sources are determined through the comparison of spectra from the two regions. It is found that magnetospheric leakage can provide an upper limit of 35% of the total energetic H(+) population in the quasi-parallel magnetosheath near the magnetopause in the energy range from approximately 10 to approximately 80 keV/e and substantially less than this limit for the energetic He(2+) population. The rest of the energetic H(+) population and nearly all of the energetic He(2+) population are accelerated out of the thermal solar wind population through shock acceleration processes. By comparing the energetic and thermal He(2+) and H(+) populations in the quasi-parallel magnetosheath, it is found that the quasi-parallel bow shock is 2 to 3 times more efficient at accelerating He(2+) than H(+). This result is consistent with previous estimates from shock acceleration theory and simulati ons.

  15. Very energetic photons at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bawa, A.C.; Krawczyk, M.

    1991-01-01

    We show that every energetic photons in the backward direction can be produced in deep inelastic Compton scattering at HERA. Assuming a fixed energy of 9 GeV for the initial photons and 820 GeV for the protons a high rate is found for the production of final photons with a transverse momentum equal to 5 GeV/c and energy between 40 GeV and 300 GeV. These energetic photons arise mainly from the scattering of the soft gluonic constituents of the initial photon with quarks from the proton. They are produced in the backward direction in coincidence with a photon beam jet of energy ∝ 9 GeV in the forward direction. (orig.)

  16. Energetically resolved multiple-fluid equilibria of tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hole, M J; Dennis, G

    2009-01-01

    In many magnetically confined fusion experiments, a significant fraction of the stored energy of the plasma resides in energetic, or non-thermal, particle populations. Despite this, most equilibrium treatments are based on MHD: a single fluid treatment which assumes a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution function. Detailed magnetic reconstruction based on this treatment ignore the energetic complexity of the plasma and can result in model-data inconsistencies, such as thermal pressure profiles which are inconsistent with the total stored kinetic energy of the plasma. Alternatively, ad hoc corrections to the pressure profile, such as summing the energetic and thermal pressures, have poor theoretical justification. Motivated by this omission, we generalize ideal MHD one step further: we consider multiple quasi-neutral fluids, each in thermal equilibrium and each thermally insulated from each other-no population mixing occurs. Kinetically, such a model may be able to describe the ion or electron distribution function in regions of velocity phase space with a large number of particles, at the expense of more weakly populated phase space, which may have uncharacteristically high temperature and hence pressure. As magnetic equilibrium effects increase with the increase in pressure, our work constitutes an upper limit to the effect of energetic particles. When implemented into an existing solver, FLOW (Guazzotto et al 2004 Phys. Plasmas 11, 604-14), it becomes possible to qualitatively explore the impact of resolving the energetic populations on plasma equilibrium configurations in realistic geometry. Deploying the modified code, FLOW-M, on a high performance spherical torus configuration, we find that the effect of variations of the pressure, poloidal flow and toroidal flow of the energetic populations is qualitatively similar to variations in the background plasma. We also study the robustness of the equilibrium to uncertainties in the current profile and the energetic

  17. [Are Higher Prices for Larger Femoral Heads in Total Hip Arthroplasty Justified from the Perspective of Health Care Economics? An Analysis of Costs and Effects in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunert, R; Schleifenbaum, S; Möbius, R; Sommer, G; Zajonz, D; Hammer, N; Prietzel, T

    2017-02-01

    Background: In total hip arthroplasty (THA), femoral head diameter has not been regarded as a key parameter which should be restored when reconstructing joint biomechanics and geometry. Apart from the controversial discussion on the advantages and disadvantages of using larger diameter heads, their higher cost is another important reason that they have only been used to a limited extent. The goal of this study was to analyse the price structure of prosthetic heads in comparison to other components used in THA. A large group of patients with hip endoprostheses were evaluated with respect to the implanted socket diameter and thus the theoretically attainable head diameter. Materials and Methods: The relative prices of various THA components (cups, inserts, stems and ball heads) distributed by two leading German manufacturers were determined and analysed. Special attention was paid to different sizes and varieties in a series of components. A large patient population treated with THA was evaluated with respect to the implanted cup diameter and therefore the theoretically attainable head diameter. Results: The pricing analysis of the THA components of two manufacturers showed identical prices for cups, inserts and stems in a series. In contrast to this, the prices for prosthetic heads with a diameter of 36-44 mm were 11-50 % higher than for 28 mm heads. Identical prices for larger heads were the exception. The distribution of the head diameter in 2719 THA cases showed significant differences between the actually implanted and the theoretically attainable heads. Conclusion: There are proven advantages in using larger diameter ball heads in THA and the remaining problems can be solved. It is therefore desirable to correct the current pricing practice of charging higher prices for larger components. Instead, identical prices should be charged for all head diameters in a series, as is currently established practice for all other THA components. Thus when

  18. Energetic charged particles above thunderclouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fullekrug, Martin; Diver, Declan; Pincon, Jean-Louis; Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Phelps, Alan D.R.; Bourdon, Anne; Helling, Christiane; Blanc, Elisabeth; Honary, Farideh; Kosch, Mike; Harrison, Giles; Sauvaud, Jean-Andre; Lester, Mark; Rycroft, Michael; Kosch, Mike; Horne, Richard B.; Soula, Serge; Gaffet, Stephane

    2013-01-01

    The French government has committed to launch the satellite TARANIS to study transient coupling processes between the Earth's atmosphere and near-Earth space. The prime objective of TARANIS is to detect energetic charged particles and hard radiation emanating from thunderclouds. The British Nobel prize winner C. T. R. Wilson predicted lightning discharges from the top of thunderclouds into space almost a century ago. However, new experiments have only recently confirmed energetic discharge processes which transfer energy from the top of thunderclouds into the upper atmosphere and near-Earth space; they are now denoted as transient luminous events, terrestrial gamma-ray flashes and relativistic electron beams. This meeting report builds on the current state of scientific knowledge on the physics of plasmas in the laboratory and naturally occurring plasmas in the Earth's atmosphere to propose areas of future research. The report specifically reflects presentations delivered by the members of a novel Franco-British collaboration during a meeting at the French Embassy in London held in November 2011. The scientific subjects of the report tackle ionization processes leading to electrical discharge processes, observations of transient luminous events, electromagnetic emissions, energetic charged particles and their impact on the Earth's atmosphere. The importance of future research in this area for science and society, and towards spacecraft protection, is emphasized. (authors)

  19. 2007 Insensitive Munitions and Energetic Materials Technology Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-18

    Assessment – EIPT chair rotates each calendar year between NAVAIR and NAVSEA Page 9 Networks for collaboration Technology Oriented: Energetic Materials...Analysis IM Explosive Fill for 120mm and/or 155mm Arena Test & Qualificationr t lifi ti Must Show Improvement Review of Filter 1 Data for 3...Arena Test & Qualificationr t lifi ti Must Show Improvement PM-CAS Common Low-cost IM Explosives Program “Funnel” framework to progressively screen

  20. Energetic tradeoffs control the size distribution of aquatic mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gearty, William; McClain, Craig R.; Payne, Jonathan L.

    2018-04-01

    Four extant lineages of mammals have invaded and diversified in the water: Sirenia, Cetacea, Pinnipedia, and Lutrinae. Most of these aquatic clades are larger bodied, on average, than their closest land-dwelling relatives, but the extent to which potential ecological, biomechanical, and physiological controls contributed to this pattern remains untested quantitatively. Here, we use previously published data on the body masses of 3,859 living and 2,999 fossil mammal species to examine the evolutionary trajectories of body size in aquatic mammals through both comparative phylogenetic analysis and examination of the fossil record. Both methods indicate that the evolution of an aquatic lifestyle is driving three of the four extant aquatic mammal clades toward a size attractor at ˜500 kg. The existence of this body size attractor and the relatively rapid selection toward, and limited deviation from, this attractor rule out most hypothesized drivers of size increase. These three independent body size increases and a shared aquatic optimum size are consistent with control by differences in the scaling of energetic intake and cost functions with body size between the terrestrial and aquatic realms. Under this energetic model, thermoregulatory costs constrain minimum size, whereas limitations on feeding efficiency constrain maximum size. The optimum size occurs at an intermediate value where thermoregulatory costs are low but feeding efficiency remains high. Rather than being released from size pressures, water-dwelling mammals are driven and confined to larger body sizes by the strict energetic demands of the aquatic medium.

  1. Liquid surface model for carbon nanotube energetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Mathew, Maneesh; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2008-01-01

    an important insight in the energetics and stability of nanotubes of different chirality and might be important for the understanding of nanotube growth process. For the computations we use empirical Brenner and Tersoff potentials and discuss their applicability to the study of carbon nanotubes. From......In the present paper we developed a model for calculating the energy of single-wall carbon nanotubes of arbitrary chirality. This model, which we call as the liquid surface model, predicts the energy of a nanotube with relative error less than 1% once its chirality and the total number of atoms...... the calculated energies we determine the elastic properties of the single-wall carbon nanotubes (Young modulus, curvature constant) and perform a comparison with available experimental measurements and earlier theoretical predictions....

  2. Effect of type of binder on growth, digestibility, and energetic balance of Octopus maya

    OpenAIRE

    Rosas, C; Tut, J; Baeza, J; Sanchez, A; Sosa, V; Pascual, C; Arena, L; Domingues, P; Cuzon, Gerard

    2008-01-01

    The present study was designed to test the effects of type of binder on growth, nutritional physiology, total apparent digestibility, and some elements of the energetic balance of early O. maya juveniles. Two experiments were performed. One was aimed at evaluating the effect of type of binder on growth, nutritional physiology, and energetic balance and the other at knowing the effect of the binder on total apparent digestibility of O. maya. Binder type affected growth and survival of early O....

  3. Energetic and exergetic analysis of waste heat recovery systems in the cement industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karellas, S.; Leontaritis, A.-D.; Panousis, G.; Bellos, E.; Kakaras, E.

    2013-01-01

    In a typical cement producing procedure, 25% of the total energy used is electricity and 75% is thermal energy. However, the process is characterized by significant heat losses mainly by the flue gases and the ambient air stream used for cooling down the clinker (about 35%–40% of the process heat loss). Approximately 26% of the heat input to the system is lost due to dust, clinker discharge, radiation and convection losses from the kiln and the preheaters. A heat recovery system could be used to increase the efficiency of the cement plant and thus contribute to emissions decrease. The aim of this paper is to examine and compare energetically and exergetically, two different WHR (waste heat recovery) methods: a water-steam Rankine cycle, and an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC). A parametric study proved that the water steam technology is more efficient than ORC in exhaust gases temperature higher than 310 °C. Finally a brief economic assessment of the most efficient solution was implemented. WHR installations in cement industry can contribute significantly in the reduction of the electrical consumptions operating cost thus being a very attractive investment with a payback period up to 5 years. - Highlights: • This paper presents waste heat recovery as a way to gain energy from the exhaust gases in a cement plant. • Water steam cycle and ORC has been analyzed for waste heat recovery. • The energetic and exergetic evaluation of the two waste heat recovery processes is presented and compared

  4. Energetic particles in the heliosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Simnett, George M

    2017-01-01

    This monograph traces the development of our understanding of how and where energetic particles are accelerated in the heliosphere and how they may reach the Earth. Detailed data sets are presented which address these topics. The bulk of the observations are from spacecraft in or near the ecliptic plane. It is timely to present this subject now that Voyager-1 has entered the true interstellar medium. Since it seems unlikely that there will be a follow-on to the Voyager programme any time soon, the data we already have regarding the outer heliosphere are not going to be enhanced for at least 40 years.

  5. Thermal-spectrum recriticality energetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwinkendorf, K.N.

    1993-12-01

    Large computer codes have been created in the past to predict the energy release in hypothetical core disruptive accidents (CDA), postulated to occur in liquid metal reactors (LMR). These codes, such as SIMMER, are highly specific to LMR designs. More recent attention has focused on thermal-spectrum criticality accidents, such as for fuel storage basins and waste tanks containing fissile material. This paper resents results from recent one-dimensional kinetics simulations, performed for a recriticality accident in a thermal spectrum. Reactivity insertion rates generally are smaller than in LMR CDAs, and the energetics generally are more benign. Parametric variation of input was performed, including reactivity insertion and initial temperature

  6. Active interrogation using energetic protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, Christopher L.; Chung, Kiwhan; Greene, Steven J.; Hogan, Gary E.; Makela, Mark; Mariam, Fesseha; Milner, Edward C.; Murray, Matthew; Saunders, Alexander; Spaulding, Randy; Wang, Zhehui; Waters, Laurie; Wysocki, Frederick

    2010-01-01

    Energetic proton beams provide an attractive alternative when compared to electromagnetic and neutron beams for active interrogation of nuclear threats because they have large fission cross sections, long mean free paths and high penetration, and they can be manipulated with magnetic optics. We have measured time-dependent cross sections and neutron yields for delayed neutrons and gamma rays using 800 MeV and 4 GeV proton beams with a set of bare and shielded targets. The results show significant signals from both unshielded and shielded nuclear materials. Measurements of neutron energies yield suggest a signature unique to fissile material. Results are presented in this paper.

  7. Structural energetics of noble metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mujibur Rahman, S.M.

    1982-06-01

    Structural energetics of the noble metals, namely Cu, Ag, and Au are investigated by employing a single-parameter pseudopotential. The calculations show that the lowest energy for all of these metals corresponds to FCC - their observed crystal structure. The one-electron contribution to the free energy is found to dominate the structural prediction for these metals. The present investigation strongly emphasizes that the effects due to band hybridization and core-core exchange play a significant role on the structural stability of the noble metals. (author)

  8. APPLICATION OF TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT (TQM) SYSTEMS AND PROGRAMS (DEMING/JURAN/SIX SIGMA) TO LOWER INSTRUCTIONAL COST& INCREASE QUALITY OF SERVICE IN COLLEGES OF AGRICULTURE

    OpenAIRE

    Nefstead, Ward E.; Gillard, Steve A.

    2004-01-01

    I. History of the TQM movement II. Nature of the Problem: Escalating Costs of Instruction and Reduced Revenue III. Use of Cause-Effect Analysis (Isikawa Diagrams) IV. DMAIC Analysis and Six Sigma V. Use of Computer Software in DMAIC and Six Sigma VI. Summary and Conclusions

  9. Experience of Minas Gerais Energetic Company (CEMIG) in feasibility studies from hydroelectric power plants: energetic-economic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, O.C.; Bras, A.J.F.; Batista Neto, R.P.; Salles Filho, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    The experience of Minas Gerais Energetic Company (CEMIG) - Brazil, on the use of dimensioning methodology for hydroelectric power plant from the Coordinated Group of Planning System was described, showing the problems with its use and the solutions, mainly the reservoir and the dimension of installed potential. It was concluded that the calculation procedures of the marginal costs for dimensioning, so as to become these costs more representative in future structure of the Brazilian generator park and less dependent to the oscillation due to conjuncture problems, must be re-evaluated. (C.G.C.). 7 refs, 3 figs, 1 tab

  10. Energetic Techniques For Planetary Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbee, B.; Bambacus, M.; Bruck Syal, M.; Greenaugh, K. C.; Leung, R. Y.; Plesko, C. S.

    2017-12-01

    Near-Earth Objects (NEOs) are asteroids and comets whose heliocentric orbits tend to approach or cross Earth's heliocentric orbit. NEOs of various sizes periodically collide with Earth, and efforts are currently underway to discover, track, and characterize NEOs so that those on Earth-impacting trajectories are discovered far enough in advance that we would have opportunities to deflect or destroy them prior to Earth impact, if warranted. We will describe current efforts by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to assess options for energetic methods of deflecting or destroying hazardous NEOs. These methods include kinetic impactors, which are spacecraft designed to collide with an NEO and thereby alter the NEO's trajectory, and nuclear engineering devices, which are used to rapidly vaporize a layer of NEO surface material. Depending on the amount of energy imparted, this can result in either deflection of the NEO via alteration of its trajectory, or robust disruption of the NEO and dispersal of the remaining fragments. We have studied the efficacies and limitations of these techniques in simulations, and have combined the techniques with corresponding spacecraft designs and mission designs. From those results we have generalized planetary defense mission design strategies and drawn conclusions that are applicable to a range of plausible scenarios. We will present and summarize our research efforts to date, and describe approaches to carrying out planetary defense missions with energetic NEO deflection or disruption techniques.

  11. Energetic aspects of skeletal muscle contraction: implications of fiber types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rall, J A

    1985-01-01

    In this chapter fundamental energetic properties of skeletal muscles as elucidated from isolated muscle preparations are described. Implications of these intrinsic properties for the energetic characterization of different fiber types and for the understanding of locomotion have been considered. Emphasis was placed on the myriad of physical and chemical techniques that can be employed to understand muscle energetics and on the interrelationship of results from different techniques. The anaerobic initial processes which liberate energy during contraction and relaxation are discussed in detail. The high-energy phosphate (approximately P) utilized during contraction and relaxation can be distributed between actomyosin ATPase or cross-bridge cycling (70%) and the Ca2+ ATPase of the sacroplasmic reticulum (30%). Muscle shortening increases the rate of approximately P hydrolysis, and stretching a muscle during contraction suppresses the rate of approximately P hydrolysis. The economy of an isometric contraction is defined as the ratio of isometric mechanical response to energetic cost and is shown to be a fundamental intrinsic parameter describing muscle energetics. Economy of contraction varies across the animal kingdom by over three orders of magnitude and is different in different mammalian fiber types. In mammalian skeletal muscles differences in economy of contraction can be attributed mainly to differences in the specific actomyosin and Ca2+ ATPase of muscles. Furthermore, there is an inverse relationship between economy of contraction and maximum velocity of muscle shortening (Vmax) and maximum power output. This is a fundamental relationship. Muscles cannot be economical at developing and maintaining force and also exhibit rapid shortening. Interestingly, there appears to be a subtle system of unknown nature that modulates the Vmax and economy of contraction. Efficiency of a work-producing contraction is defined and contrasted to the economy of contraction

  12. Barnacle geese achieve significant energetic savings by changing posture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter G Tickle

    Full Text Available Here we report the resting metabolic rate in barnacle geese (Branta leucopsis and provide evidence for the significant energetic effect of posture. Under laboratory conditions flow-through respirometry together with synchronous recording of behaviour enabled a calculation of how metabolic rate varies with posture. Our principal finding is that standing bipedally incurs a 25% increase in metabolic rate compared to birds sitting on the ground. In addition to the expected decrease in energy consumption of hindlimb postural muscles when sitting, we hypothesise that a change in breathing mechanics represents one potential mechanism for at least part of the observed difference in energetic cost. Due to the significant effect of posture, future studies of resting metabolic rates need to take into account and/or report differences in posture.

  13. Barnacle geese achieve significant energetic savings by changing posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tickle, Peter G; Nudds, Robert L; Codd, Jonathan R

    2012-01-01

    Here we report the resting metabolic rate in barnacle geese (Branta leucopsis) and provide evidence for the significant energetic effect of posture. Under laboratory conditions flow-through respirometry together with synchronous recording of behaviour enabled a calculation of how metabolic rate varies with posture. Our principal finding is that standing bipedally incurs a 25% increase in metabolic rate compared to birds sitting on the ground. In addition to the expected decrease in energy consumption of hindlimb postural muscles when sitting, we hypothesise that a change in breathing mechanics represents one potential mechanism for at least part of the observed difference in energetic cost. Due to the significant effect of posture, future studies of resting metabolic rates need to take into account and/or report differences in posture.

  14. Energetic materials and methods of tailoring electrostatic discharge sensitivity of energetic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, Michael A.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Wallace, Ronald S.; Pantoya, Michelle L.; Collins, Eric S.

    2016-11-01

    An energetic material comprising an elemental fuel, an oxidizer or other element, and a carbon nanofiller or carbon fiber rods, where the carbon nanofiller or carbon fiber rods are substantially homogeneously dispersed in the energetic material. Methods of tailoring the electrostatic discharge sensitivity of an energetic material are also disclosed.

  15. Analysis of the relationship cost-effectiveness of the myocardial gammagraphy studies and the impact to the total expenditure by diagnostic of ischemic cardiopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valenzuela F, A.G.; Perez C, J.P.; Arreola O, H.; Valenzuela F, A.A.; Soto M, H.; Arguero S, R.

    2005-01-01

    Recent advances in pharmacology, diagnostic and invasive procedures provide a series of modalities that diminish the morbidity and increase the long term survival in the patients that have suffered a heart attack to myocardium. The stratification by risk is an essential element for the handling of the survivors of heart attack to myocardium. In their attention it is looked for to optimize the therapeutic benefit, to diminish the unnecessary diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and to improve the efficiency. For example, a coronariography in sick with heart attack to myocardium it is not cost-effective if not is clinically suitable. Of there that from the institutional point of view, this is, of the Mexican Institute of the Public Health, they are required of appropriate reference approaches and counter reference to grant to the sick person, the best service that is the one in this case the diagnostic and the handling of the ischemic cardiopathy with the smallest waste of resources. The estimation of the annual survival is the base of the stratification, it constitutes the angular stone of the early handling of the heart attack to myocardium. The goal for the clinical would be to identify patients with intermediate risk, since, this risk makes them candidates to therapy interventionist. As long as those with low risk won't require intervention. This would allow the decrease of rates by revenues of heart attack to myocardium, and therefore to diminish the hospital staying rates. The Nuclear Cardiology (myocardial gammagraphy) it is not the only invasive method available to evaluate the myocardial perfusion in sick in who coronary illness is suspected. When the myocardial gammagraphy is carried out in appropriate population, the cost it diminishes because it restricts the necessity of additional invasive evaluations. This because the nuclear cardiology has predictive value so much for the mortality like to detect myocardial viability. Based on these probabilities

  16. Total protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003483.htm Total protein To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The total protein test measures the total amount of two classes ...

  17. Energetic evolution of cellular Transportomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darbani, Behrooz; Kell, Douglas B.; Borodina, Irina

    2018-01-01

    of the transition from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. The transportome analysis also indicated seven bacterial species, including Neorickettsia risticii and Neorickettsia sennetsu, as likely origins of the mitochondrion in eukaryotes, based on the phylogenetically restricted presence therein of clear homologues......) than in primitive eukaryotes (13%), algae and plants (10%) and in fungi and animals (5–6%). This decrease is compensated by an increased occurrence of secondary transporters and ion channels. The share of ion channels is particularly high in animals (ca. 30% of the transportome) and algae and plants...... of modern mitochondrial solute carriers. Conclusions: The results indicate that the transportomes of eukaryotes evolved strongly towards a higher energetic efficiency, as ATP-dependent transporters diminished and secondary transporters and ion channels proliferated. These changes have likely been important...

  18. Cosmic Ray Energetics and Mass

    CERN Multimedia

    Baylon cardiel, J L; Wallace, K C; Anderson, T B; Copley, M

    The cosmic-ray energetics and mass (CREAM) investigation is designed to measure cosmic-ray composition to the supernova energy scale of 10$^{15}$ eV in a series of ultra long duration balloon (ULDB) flights. The first flight is planned to be launched from Antarctica in December 2004. The goal is to observe cosmic-ray spectral features and/or abundance changes that might signify a limit to supernova acceleration. The particle ($\\{Z}$) measurements will be made with a timing-based charge detector and a pixelated silicon charge detector to minimize the effect of backscatter from the calorimeter. The particle energy measurements will be made with a transition radiation detector (TRD) for $\\{Z}$ > 3 and a sampling tungsten/scintillator calorimeter for $\\{Z}$ $\\geq$1 particles, allowing inflight cross calibration of the two detectors. The status of the payload construction and flight preparation are reported in this paper.

  19. Energetic model of metal hardening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignatova O.N.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on Bailey hypothesis on the link between strain hardening and elastic lattice defect energy this paper suggests a shear strength energetic model that takes into consideration plastic strain intensity and rate as well as softening related to temperature annealing and dislocation annihilation. Metal strain hardening was demonstrated to be determined only by elastic strain energy related to the energy of accumulated defects. It is anticipated that accumulation of the elastic energy of defects is governed by plastic work. The suggested model has a reasonable agreement with the available experimental data for copper up to P = 70 GPa , for aluminum up to P = 10 GPa and for tantalum up to P = 20 GPa.

  20. Ecological problems of thermonuclear energetics. Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivintsev, Yu V

    1980-01-01

    A review of preliminary quantitative estimates of radiation hazard of thermonuclear reactors is presented. Main attention is given to three aspects: nonradiation effect on environment, radionuclide blow-ups at normal operation and emergency situations with their consequences. The given data testify to great radiological advantages of thermonuclear energetics as compared with the modern nuclear energetics with thermal and prospective fast reactors.

  1. Energetics of basic karate kata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussweiler, Jens; Hartmann, Ulrich

    2012-12-01

    Knowledge about energy requirements during exercises seems necessary to develop training concepts in combat sport Karate. It is a commonly held view that the anaerobic lactic energy metabolism plays a key role, but this assumption could not be confirmed so far. The metabolic cost and fractional energy supply of basic Karate Kata (Heian Nidan, Shotokan style) with duration of about 30 s were analyzed. Six male Karateka [mean ± SD (age 29 ± 8 years; height 177 ± 5 cm, body mass 75 ± 9 kg)] with different training experience (advanced athletes, experts, elite athletes) were examined while performing one time and two time continuously the sport-specific movements. During Kata performance oxygen uptake was measured with a portable spirometric device, blood lactate concentrations were examined before and after testing and fractional energy supply was calculated. The results have shown that on average 52 % of the energy supply for one Heian Nidan came from anaerobic alactic metabolism, 25 % from anaerobic lactic and 23 % from aerobic metabolism. For two sequentially executed Heian Nidan and thus nearly doubling the duration, the calculated percentages were 33, 25 and 42 %. Total energy demand for one Kata and two Kata was approximately 61 and 99 kJ, respectively. Despite measured blood lactate concentrations up to 8.1 mmol l(-1), which might suggest a dominance of lactic energy supply, a lactic fraction of only 17-31 % during these relatively short and intense sequences could be found. A heavy use of lactic energy metabolism had to be rejected.

  2. The energetics of electric organ discharge generation in gymnotiform weakly electric fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Vielka L; Krahe, Rüdiger; Lewis, John E

    2013-07-01

    Gymnotiform weakly electric fish produce an electric signal to sense their environment and communicate with conspecifics. Although the generation of such relatively large electric signals over an entire lifetime is expected to be energetically costly, supporting evidence to date is equivocal. In this article, we first provide a theoretical analysis of the energy budget underlying signal production. Our analysis suggests that wave-type and pulse-type species invest a similar fraction of metabolic resources into electric signal generation, supporting previous evidence of a trade-off between signal amplitude and frequency. We then consider a comparative and evolutionary framework in which to interpret and guide future studies. We suggest that species differences in signal generation and plasticity, when considered in an energetics context, will not only help to evaluate the role of energetic constraints in the evolution of signal diversity but also lead to important general insights into the energetics of bioelectric signal generation.

  3. Energetic and economical comparison for biomass fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galins, A.; Grundulis, A.; Zihmane, K.

    2003-01-01

    The common agricultural biomass, such as wheat straw, rape straw, wheat small corn, wheat forage, rape oil cakes and other, we can use as fuel for heat production. The biomass application for burning depends on economical situation on agriculture and fuel market. Energetic and economical parameters of agricultural biomass are estimated and compared to wooden grain. As parameters for comparison used the biomass heat value Q (MJ/kg), specific cost per 1 kWh heat production C 0 (Ls/kWh) and the fuel consumption per 1 kWh heat production M 0 (kg/kWh). The rape oil cakes have best heat value (20.82 MJ/kg), but cheapest heat energy we can get from rape straw (0.0046 Ls/kWh). Expenses of heat production for forge wheat corn (0.011 Ls/kWh) are alike to wooden chip (0.0103 Ls/kWh) and wooden grain (0.0122 Ls/kWh) (authors)

  4. Energetics of thermoregulation by an industrious endotherm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Timothy D

    2012-01-01

    Thermoregulation by modern industrial humans is unique among endothermic animals, in that it is largely accomplished by controlling the temperature of our external environment. The objective of this study was to view the relationship between thermoregulatory energy use and environmental temperature in modern humans from the perspective of comparative physiology. Monthly residential energy use estimates from the US Energy Information Administration were divided by the annual number of American households from the US Census Bureau, giving average monthly energy consumption per American household for the years 2006 through 2010. Monthly energy consumption was then plotted against average monthly temperature across the United States from the National Climatic Data Center. The resulting graph bore a striking resemblance to a classic Scholander-Irving curve, exhibiting clear upper (22°C) and lower (15°C) critical temperatures, and an increase in energy use as temperatures extend above (90 W °C(-1) increase) or below (244 W °C(-1) decrease) those critical temperatures. Allometric equations from comparative physiology indicate that the energetic costs of our current thermoregulatory habits are ∼30 to 50 times those predicted for an endotherm of our size. Modern humans have redefined what it means to be a homeothermic endotherm, using large quantities of extrametabolic energy to regulate the temperature of our surroundings. Despite this sophistication, the signal of our individual physiology is readily discernible in national data on energy consumption. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. energetic performance analysis of drying agricultural products

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    ... a solar box dryer aided by a tracking device, and open air drying over an effective total drying time of 6 hours each day, for 5 days. ... cost in the use of modern dryers. Drying can be ..... speed, cloud cover and humidity respectively. 4.2 Solar ...

  6. Impact of Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES) on 90-Day Episode Costs and Post-Acute Care Utilization in Total Knee Replacement Patients with Disuse Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Sarmistha; Chughtai, Morad; Sultan, Assem A; Khlopas, Anton; Sodhi, Nipun; George, Nicole E; Etcheson, Jennifer I; Gwam, Chukwuweike U; Newman, Jared M; Samuel, Linsen T; Bhave, Anil; DaVanzo, Joan E; Mont, Michael A

    2017-12-22

    This study evaluated differences in: 1) total episode payments, 2) probability of hospital readmission, 3) probability of inpatient rehab facility (IRF) and utilization, and 4) probability of skilled nursing care facility (SNF) utilization in patients who had disuse atrophy and underwent a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and either did, or did not, receive preoperative home-based neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) therapy. We used the Medicare limited dataset for a 5% sample of beneficiaries from 2014 and 2015 to construct episodes-of-care for TKA (DRG-470) patients with disuse atrophy who underwent a TKA during the 30 days prior to hospital admission and 90 days post-discharge. Patients were stratified into those who either did or did not receive pre- and postoperative NMES therapy. An ordinary least square (OLS) model was used to estimate the impact of NMES on total episode. Linear probability models were used to estimate the impact of NMES on SNF or IRF utilization and readmission. A $3,274 reduction in episode payments for patients who used preoperative NMES versus those who did not (ptotal episode payments and SNF utilization for TKA patients with disuse atrophy who had NMES therapy was demonstrated.

  7. Sustainability expensive? : the costs of energetic sustainability transparent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Proveniers, A.G.W.J.; Schaefer, W.F.; Rovers, P.M.; Berg, van den R.M.J.; Weerdt, van der D.; Wamelink, H.; Prins, M.; Geraedts, R.

    2009-01-01

    The overall climate is changing; the main cause of this change in climate is the increasing discharge of carbon dioxide. This is caused by using fossil energy, such as petroleum, coal and other natural sources. The culprit of this exuberant consumption of natural sources is humanity. This applies

  8. The energetic cost of walking: a comparison of predictive methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Ann Kramer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The energy that animals devote to locomotion has been of intense interest to biologists for decades and two basic methodologies have emerged to predict locomotor energy expenditure: those based on metabolic and those based on mechanical energy. Metabolic energy approaches share the perspective that prediction of locomotor energy expenditure should be based on statistically significant proxies of metabolic function, while mechanical energy approaches, which derive from many different perspectives, focus on quantifying the energy of movement. Some controversy exists as to which mechanical perspective is "best", but from first principles all mechanical methods should be equivalent if the inputs to the simulation are of similar quality. Our goals in this paper are 1 to establish the degree to which the various methods of calculating mechanical energy are correlated, and 2 to investigate to what degree the prediction methods explain the variation in energy expenditure. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We use modern humans as the model organism in this experiment because their data are readily attainable, but the methodology is appropriate for use in other species. Volumetric oxygen consumption and kinematic and kinetic data were collected on 8 adults while walking at their self-selected slow, normal and fast velocities. Using hierarchical statistical modeling via ordinary least squares and maximum likelihood techniques, the predictive ability of several metabolic and mechanical approaches were assessed. We found that all approaches are correlated and that the mechanical approaches explain similar amounts of the variation in metabolic energy expenditure. Most methods predict the variation within an individual well, but are poor at accounting for variation between individuals. CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that the choice of predictive method is dependent on the question(s of interest and the data available for use as inputs. Although we used modern humans as our model organism, these results can be extended to other species.

  9. The energetic cost of walking: a comparison of predictive methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Patricia Ann; Sylvester, Adam D

    2011-01-01

    The energy that animals devote to locomotion has been of intense interest to biologists for decades and two basic methodologies have emerged to predict locomotor energy expenditure: those based on metabolic and those based on mechanical energy. Metabolic energy approaches share the perspective that prediction of locomotor energy expenditure should be based on statistically significant proxies of metabolic function, while mechanical energy approaches, which derive from many different perspectives, focus on quantifying the energy of movement. Some controversy exists as to which mechanical perspective is "best", but from first principles all mechanical methods should be equivalent if the inputs to the simulation are of similar quality. Our goals in this paper are 1) to establish the degree to which the various methods of calculating mechanical energy are correlated, and 2) to investigate to what degree the prediction methods explain the variation in energy expenditure. We use modern humans as the model organism in this experiment because their data are readily attainable, but the methodology is appropriate for use in other species. Volumetric oxygen consumption and kinematic and kinetic data were collected on 8 adults while walking at their self-selected slow, normal and fast velocities. Using hierarchical statistical modeling via ordinary least squares and maximum likelihood techniques, the predictive ability of several metabolic and mechanical approaches were assessed. We found that all approaches are correlated and that the mechanical approaches explain similar amounts of the variation in metabolic energy expenditure. Most methods predict the variation within an individual well, but are poor at accounting for variation between individuals. Our results indicate that the choice of predictive method is dependent on the question(s) of interest and the data available for use as inputs. Although we used modern humans as our model organism, these results can be extended to other species.

  10. ENERGETIC FERMI/LAT GRB 100414A: ENERGETIC AND CORRELATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urata, Yuji; Tsai, Patrick P.; Huang, Kuiyun; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Tashiro, Makoto S.

    2012-01-01

    This study presents multi-wavelength observational results for energetic GRB 100414A with GeV photons. The prompt spectral fitting using Suzaku/WAM data yielded spectral peak energies of E src peak of 1458.7 +132.6 –106.6 keV and E iso of 34.5 +2.0 –1.8 × 10 52 erg with z = 1.368. The optical afterglow light curves between 3 and 7 days were effectively fitted according to a simple power law with a temporal index of α = –2.6 ± 0.1. The joint light curve with earlier Swift/UVOT observations yields a temporal break at 2.3 ± 0.2 days. This was the first Fermi/LAT detected event that demonstrated the clear temporal break in the optical afterglow. The jet opening angle derived from this temporal break was 5. 0 8, consistent with those of other well-observed long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The multi-wavelength analyses in this study showed that GRB 100414A follows E src peak -E iso and E src peak -E γ correlations. The late afterglow revealed a flatter evolution with significant excesses at 27.2 days. The most straightforward explanation for the excess is that GRB 100414A was accompanied by a contemporaneous supernova. The model light curve based on other GRB-SN events is marginally consistent with that of the observed light curve.

  11. Modeling the marine resources consumed in raising a king penguin chick: an energetics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsey, L G; Butler, P J; Fahlman, A; Bost, C-A; Woakes, A J; Handrich, Y

    2008-01-01

    Accurate estimates of penguin energetics would represent an important contribution to our understanding of the trophodynamics of the Southern Ocean ecosystem and our ability to predict effects of environmental change on these species. We used the heart rate-rate of oxygen consumption technique to estimate rate of energy expenditure in adult king penguins raising a chick, in combination with data from the literature on changes in adult mass, chick energy requirements, and prey energy density. Our model estimated a variety of energetic costs and quantities of prey consumption related to raising a king penguin chick during the austral summer. The total energy requirements of a king penguin chick at the Crozet Archipelago from hatching until reaching a mass of 8 kg 90 d later is 271 MJ, representing the consumption of 38.4 kg of myctophid fish. A successfully breeding male requires 0.78 kg d(-1) of fish during the entirety of the incubation period and 1.14 kg d(-1) during the subsequent 90 d of chick rearing. Assuming the same energy requirements for females, the estimated 580,000 pairs of king penguins that breed successfully at Crozet each year, together with their chicks, consume a total of around 190,000 tons of fish during the incubation and summer rearing periods combined. If, due to depletion of fish stocks, the diet of breeders and chicks during the summer becomes identical to the typical diet of adults during the austral winter, the mass of prey required by both adults and chicks combined (where the chick still reaches 8 kg after 90 d) would increase by more than 25%.

  12. Scaling the Thrust Production and Energetics of Inviscid Intermittent Swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoz, Emre; Moored, Keith

    2015-11-01

    Many fish have adopted an intermittent swimming gait sometimes referred as a burst-and-coast behavior. By using this gait, fish have been estimated at reducing their energetic cost of swimming by about 50%. Lighthill proposed that the skin friction drag of an undulating body can be around 400% greater than a rigidly-held coasting body, which may explain the energetic savings of intermittent swimming. Recent studies have confirmed the increase in skin friction drag over an undulating body, however, the increase is on the order of 20-70%. This more modest gain in skin friction drag is not sufficient to lead to the observed energy savings. Motivated by these observations, we investigate the inviscid mechanisms behind intermittent swimming for parameters typical of biology. We see that there is an energy savings at a fixed swimming speed for intermittent swimming as compared to continuous swimming. Then we consider three questions: What is the nature of the inviscid mechanism that leads to the observed energy savings, how do the forces and energetics of intermittent swimming scale with the swimming parameters, and what are the limitations to the benefit? Supported by the Office of Naval Research under Program Director Dr. Bob Brizzola, MURI grant number N00014-14-1-0533.

  13. The importance of the property total cost on the formulation of the policy for acquisition of the government enterprises from the energy sector; A importancia do custo total de propriedade na formulacao da politica de aquisicao das empresas estatais do setor de energia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, Andre Cristiano Silva; Ignacio, Anibal Alberto Vilcapoma; Fernandes, Elton; Sampaio, Lea Maria Dantas; Araujo, Renato Samuel Barbosa de [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Nucleo de Estudos de Tecnologia, Gestao e Logistica; Cardoso, Flavio Correa; Moreira, Pedro de Souza; Silva, Sergio Vargas da [FURNAS Centrais Eletricas S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Aquisicoes de Materiais

    2006-07-01

    This article discusses the approach to total cost of the property (TCP) as an instrument for the formulation of policies for acquisitions of the Brazilian electric sector enterprises. Also the article discusses legal aspects which rules the acquisition processes such as the Law 8666/93, the Decree 2745/98 and the Law Sarbanes and Oxley which regulates the enterprises which stocks in the US stock exchanges. This article points out in the direction to alternatives and perspectives for the formulation of a new policy of acquisition not priorizing the less buying price, but also the life cycle of the product, viewing the reduction of the total costs of the enterprises assets, as the high investments are forecasted for the electric sector.

  14. Energetics of swimming by the ferret: consequences of forelimb paddling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, Frank E; Baudinette, Russell V

    2008-06-01

    The domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo) swims by alternate strokes of the forelimbs. This pectoral paddling is rare among semi-aquatic mammals. The energetic implications of swimming by pectoral paddling were examined by kinematic analysis and measurement of oxygen consumption. Ferrets maintained a constant stroke frequency, but increased swimming speed by increasing stroke amplitude. The ratio of swimming velocity to foot stroke velocity was low, indicating a low propulsive efficiency. Metabolic rate increased linearly with increasing speed. The cost of transport decreased with increasing swimming speed to a minimum of 3.59+/-0.28 J N(-1) m(-1) at U=0.44 m s(-1). The minimum cost of transport for the ferret was greater than values for semi-aquatic mammals using hind limb paddling, but lower than the minimum cost of transport for the closely related quadrupedally paddling mink. Differences in energetic performance may be due to the amount of muscle recruited for propulsion and the interrelationship hydrodynamic drag and interference between flow over the body surface and flow induced by propulsive appendages.

  15. The Energetic Demands and Planetary Footprint of Alternative Human Diets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshel, G.; Martin, P. A.

    2005-12-01

    Agriculture is one of the major vehicles of human alteration of the planetary environment. Yet different diets vary vastly in terms of both their energetic demands and overall planetary footprint. We present a quantitative argument that demonstrates that plant-based diets exert vastly smaller planetary environmental cost than animal-based ones. We demonstrate that under a reasonable and readily defensible set of assumptions, a plant-based diet differs from the average American diet by as much energy as the difference between driving a compact and efficient sedan and a Sport Utility Vehicle.

  16. Total algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tel, G.

    We define the notion of total algorithms for networks of processes. A total algorithm enforces that a "decision" is taken by a subset of the processes, and that participation of all processes is required to reach this decision. Total algorithms are an important building block in the design of

  17. ENERGETIC FERMI/LAT GRB 100414A: ENERGETIC AND CORRELATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urata, Yuji; Tsai, Patrick P. [Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, Chung-Li 32054, Taiwan (China); Huang, Kuiyun [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Yamaoka, Kazutaka [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Aoyama Gakuin University, 5-10-1, Fuchinobe, Sayamihara 229-8558 (Japan); Tashiro, Makoto S., E-mail: urata@astro.ncu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Shimo-Okubo, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan)

    2012-03-20

    This study presents multi-wavelength observational results for energetic GRB 100414A with GeV photons. The prompt spectral fitting using Suzaku/WAM data yielded spectral peak energies of E{sup src}{sub peak} of 1458.7{sup +132.6}{sub -106.6} keV and E{sub iso} of 34.5{sup +2.0}{sub -1.8} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 52} erg with z = 1.368. The optical afterglow light curves between 3 and 7 days were effectively fitted according to a simple power law with a temporal index of {alpha} = -2.6 {+-} 0.1. The joint light curve with earlier Swift/UVOT observations yields a temporal break at 2.3 {+-} 0.2 days. This was the first Fermi/LAT detected event that demonstrated the clear temporal break in the optical afterglow. The jet opening angle derived from this temporal break was 5.{sup 0}8, consistent with those of other well-observed long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The multi-wavelength analyses in this study showed that GRB 100414A follows E{sup src}{sub peak}-E{sub iso} and E{sup src}{sub peak}-E{sub {gamma}} correlations. The late afterglow revealed a flatter evolution with significant excesses at 27.2 days. The most straightforward explanation for the excess is that GRB 100414A was accompanied by a contemporaneous supernova. The model light curve based on other GRB-SN events is marginally consistent with that of the observed light curve.

  18. Optimising multi-product multi-chance-constraint inventory control system with stochastic period lengths and total discount under fuzzy purchasing price and holding costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allah Taleizadeh, Ata; Niaki, Seyed Taghi Akhavan; Aryanezhad, Mir-Bahador

    2010-10-01

    While the usual assumptions in multi-periodic inventory control problems are that the orders are placed at the beginning of each period (periodic review) or depending on the inventory level they can happen at any time (continuous review), in this article, we relax these assumptions and assume that the periods between two replenishments of the products are independent and identically distributed random variables. Furthermore, assuming that the purchasing price are triangular fuzzy variables, the quantities of the orders are of integer-type and that there are space and service level constraints, total discount are considered to purchase products and a combination of back-order and lost-sales are taken into account for the shortages. We show that the model of this problem is a fuzzy mixed-integer nonlinear programming type and in order to solve it, a hybrid meta-heuristic intelligent algorithm is proposed. At the end, a numerical example is given to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed methodology and to compare its performance with one of the existing algorithms in real world inventory control problems.

  19. Commentary on community-led total sanitation and human rights: should the right to community-wide health be won at the cost of individual rights?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartram, Jamie; Charles, Katrina; Evans, Barbara; O'Hanlon, Lucinda; Pedley, Steve

    2012-12-01

    The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) set out to halve the proportion of the population without access to basic sanitation between 1990 and 2015. The slow pace of progress has lead to a search for innovative responses, including social motivation approaches. One example of this type of approach is 'Community-led Total Sanitation' (CLTS). CLTS represents a major shift for sanitation projects and programmes in recognising the value of stopping open-defecation across the whole community, even when the individual toilets built are not necessarily wholly hygienic. However, recent publications on CLTS document a number of examples of practices which fail to meet basic ethical criteria and infringe human rights. There is a general theme in the CLTS literature encouraging the use of 'shame' or 'social stigma' as a tool for promoting behaviours. There are reported cases where monetary benefits to which individuals are otherwise entitled or the means to practice a livelihood are withheld to create pressures to conform. At the very extreme end of the scale, the investigation and punishment of violence has reportedly been denied if the crime occurred while defecating in the open, violating rights to a remedy and related access to justice. While social mobilisation in general, and CLTS in particular, have drastically and positively changed the way we think about sanitation, they neither need nor benefit from an association with any infringements of human rights.

  20. Sex-specific energetics of Pacific walruses (Odobenus rosmarus divergens) during the nursing interval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noren, Shawn R.; Udevitz, Mark S.; Jay, Chadwick V.

    2016-01-01

    Habitat use and activity patterns of Pacific walruses (Odobenus rosmarus divergens) have changed with climate-induced reductions in sea ice. Increases in the time active in water could result in negative energy balance, precluding females from sustaining lactation, which could impact population demographics. Little is known about lactation costs in walruses. We examined the energetics of 0–2-yr-old walrus calves by using Bayesian hierarchical models based on longitudinal husbandry records of growth (n = 6 females and 7 males) and caloric intake (n = 5 females and 6 males) as a proxy for maternal lactation costs. Males and females had similar growth patterns; mean mass increased from 68 kg at birth to 301 kg by 2 yr. Females had a 2,000 kcal kg−1 higher mass storage (growth) cost than males; females typically synthesize and deposit greater amounts of adipose, which is more energy dense than lean tissue. In contrast, males had higher metabolic (basal and activity) costs, ranging from 600 to 1,800 kcal d−1 greater than similarly sized females; males are typically leaner, and muscle is more metabolically active than adipose. Yet total daily energy requirements (storage plus metabolic components) were similar across sexes, summing to approximately 190,000 kcal over the first month postpartum. Based on these estimates and assuming that 8,103 kcal is recovered from 1 kg of mass loss in adult female walruses, suckling calves could deplete 23 kg of their mother’s body mass over the first month after parturition if none of the lactation costs is met through ingested prey.

  1. A Model of Batch Scheduling for a Single Batch Processor with Additional Setups to Minimize Total Inventory Holding Cost of Parts of a Single Item Requested at Multi-due-date

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim Halim, Abdul; Ernawati; Hidayat, Nita P. A.

    2018-03-01

    This paper deals with a model of batch scheduling for a single batch processor on which a number of parts of a single items are to be processed. The process needs two kinds of setups, i. e., main setups required before processing any batches, and additional setups required repeatedly after the batch processor completes a certain number of batches. The parts to be processed arrive at the shop floor at the times coinciding with their respective starting times of processing, and the completed parts are to be delivered at multiple due dates. The objective adopted for the model is that of minimizing total inventory holding cost consisting of holding cost per unit time for a part in completed batches, and that in in-process batches. The formulation of total inventory holding cost is derived from the so-called actual flow time defined as the interval between arrival times of parts at the production line and delivery times of the completed parts. The actual flow time satisfies not only minimum inventory but also arrival and delivery just in times. An algorithm to solve the model is proposed and a numerical example is shown.

  2. Hovering and forward flight energetics in Anna's and Allen's hummingbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Christopher James; Dudley, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Aerodynamic theory predicts that the mechanical costs of flight are lowest at intermediate flight speeds; metabolic costs of flight should trend similarly if muscle efficiency is constant. We measured metabolic rates for nine Anna's hummingbirds (Calypte anna) and two male Allen's hummingbirds (Selasphorus sasin) feeding during flight from a free-standing mask over a range of airspeeds. Ten of 11 birds exhibited higher metabolic costs during hovering than during flight at intermediate airspeeds, whereas one individual exhibited comparable costs at hovering and during forward flight up to speeds of approximately 7 m s(-1). Flight costs of all hummingbirds increased at higher airspeeds. Relative to Anna's hummingbirds, Allen's hummingbirds exhibited deeper minima in the power curve, possibly due to higher wing loadings and greater associated costs of induced drag. Although feeding at a mask in an airstream may reduce body drag and, thus, the contributions of parasite power to overall metabolic expenditure, these results suggest that hummingbird power curves are characterized by energetic minima at intermediate speeds relative to hovering costs.

  3. Hydro energetic inventory study from Chapecozinho river

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimenta, S.C.; Sureck, M.A.A.; Nascimento, P.R.; Kawasaki, M.; Silva Felipe, R. da.

    1990-01-01

    The Hydro energetic Inventory Study in Chapecozinho River Basin, Brazil is described, comparing the proposed results in 1979 with the actual review in 1989. An analysis for solution the socio-economic and environment problems is also presented. (author)

  4. Energetic particle observations at the subsolar magnetopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Eccles

    Full Text Available The pitch-angle distributions (PAD of energetic particles are examined as the ISEE-1 satellite crosses the Earth’s magnetopause near the subsolar point. The investigation focuses on the possible existence of a particular type of distribution that would be associated with a source of energetic particles in the high-latitude magnetosphere. PADs, demonstrating broad, persistent field-aligned fluxes filling a single hemisphere (upper/northern or lower/southern, were observed just sunward of the magnetopause current layer for an extended period of many minutes. These distributions are a direct prediction of a possible source of energetic particles located in the high altitude dayside cusp and we present five examples in detail of the three-dimensional particle distributions to demonstrate their existence. From these results, other possible causes of such PADs are examined.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (energetic particles, precipitating; magnetopause, cusp and boundary layers; magnetospheric configuration and dynamics

  5. Global Positioning System (GPS) Energetic Particle Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Energetic particle data from the CXD and BDD instrument on the GPS constellation are available to the space weather research community. The release of these data...

  6. Modeling Thermal Ignition of Energetic Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gerri, Norman J; Berning, Ellen

    2004-01-01

    This report documents an attempt to computationally simulate the mechanics and thermal regimes created when a threat perforates an armor envelope and comes in contact with stowed energetic material...

  7. Organization of the national energetic institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waltenberg, D.A.M.

    1983-01-01

    This text broaches, in a critical pourt of view, the organization of national energetic institutions, the need of a law revision, the problem of the rising of tariff and shows the decisions of GC01 [pt

  8. Safer energetic materials by a nanotechnological approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegert, Benny; Comet, Marc; Spitzer, Denis

    2011-09-01

    Energetic materials - explosives, thermites, populsive powders - are used in a variety of military and civilian applications. Their mechanical and electrostatic sensitivity is high in many cases, which can lead to accidents during handling and transport. These considerations limit the practical use of some energetic materials despite their good performance. For industrial applications, safety is one of the main criteria for selecting energetic materials. The sensitivity has been regarded as an intrinsic property of a substance for a long time. However, in recent years, several approaches to lower the sensitivity of a given substance, using nanotechnology and materials engineering, have been described. This feature article gives an overview over ways to prepare energetic (nano-)materials with a lower sensitivity.Energetic materials - explosives, thermites, populsive powders - are used in a variety of military and civilian applications. Their mechanical and electrostatic sensitivity is high in many cases, which can lead to accidents during handling and transport. These considerations limit the practical use of some energetic materials despite their good performance. For industrial applications, safety is one of the main criteria for selecting energetic materials. The sensitivity has been regarded as an intrinsic property of a substance for a long time. However, in recent years, several approaches to lower the sensitivity of a given substance, using nanotechnology and materials engineering, have been described. This feature article gives an overview over ways to prepare energetic (nano-)materials with a lower sensitivity. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details for the preparation of the V2O5@CNF/Al nanothermite; X-ray diffractogram of the V2O5@CNF/Al combustion residue; installation instructions and source code for the nt-timeline program. See DOI: 10.1039/c1nr10292c

  9. Energetic and spatial constraints of arterial networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Rossitti

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available The principle of minimum work (PMW is a parametric optimization model for the growth and adaptation of arterial trees. A balance between energy dissipation due to frictional resistance of laminar flow (shear stress and the minimum volume of the blood and vessel wall tissue is achieved when the vessel radii are adjusted to the cube root of the volumetric flow. The PMW is known to apply over several magnitudes of vessel calibers, and in many different organs, including the brain, in humans and in animals. Animal studies suggest that blood flow in arteries is approximately proportional to the cube of the vessel radius, and that arteries alter their caliber in response to sustained changes of blood flow according to PMW. Remodelling of the retinal arteriolar network to long-term changes in blood flow was observed in humans. Remodelling of whole arterial networks occurs in the form of increase or diminishing of vessel calibers. Shear stress induced endothelial mediation seems to be the regulating mechanism for the maintenance of this optimum blood flow/vessel diameter relation. Arterial trees are also expected to be nearly space filing. The vascular system is constructed in such a way that, while blood vessels occupy only a small percentage of the body volume leaving the bulk to tissue, they also crisscross organs so tightly that every point in the tissue lies on the boundary between an artery and a vein. This review describes how the energetic optimum principle for least energy cost for blood flow is also compatible with the spatial constraints of arterial networks according to concepts derived from fractal geometry.

  10. Structure of Energetic Particle Mediated Shocks Revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostafavi, P.; Zank, G. P.; Webb, G. M.

    2017-01-01

    The structure of collisionless shock waves is often modified by the presence of energetic particles that are not equilibrated with the thermal plasma (such as pickup ions [PUIs] and solar energetic particles [SEPs]). This is relevant to the inner and outer heliosphere and the Very Local Interstellar Medium (VLISM), where observations of shock waves (e.g., in the inner heliosphere) show that both the magnetic field and thermal gas pressure are less than the energetic particle component pressures. Voyager 2 observations revealed that the heliospheric termination shock (HTS) is very broad and mediated by energetic particles. PUIs and SEPs contribute both a collisionless heat flux and a higher-order viscosity. We show that the incorporation of both effects can completely determine the structure of collisionless shocks mediated by energetic ions. Since the reduced form of the PUI-mediated plasma model is structurally identical to the classical cosmic ray two-fluid model, we note that the presence of viscosity, at least formally, eliminates the need for a gas sub-shock in the classical two-fluid model, including in that regime where three are possible. By considering parameters upstream of the HTS, we show that the thermal gas remains relatively cold and the shock is mediated by PUIs. We determine the structure of the weak interstellar shock observed by Voyager 1 . We consider the inclusion of the thermal heat flux and viscosity to address the most general form of an energetic particle-thermal plasma two-fluid model.

  11. Structure of Energetic Particle Mediated Shocks Revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mostafavi, P.; Zank, G. P. [Department of Space Science, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Webb, G. M. [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2017-05-20

    The structure of collisionless shock waves is often modified by the presence of energetic particles that are not equilibrated with the thermal plasma (such as pickup ions [PUIs] and solar energetic particles [SEPs]). This is relevant to the inner and outer heliosphere and the Very Local Interstellar Medium (VLISM), where observations of shock waves (e.g., in the inner heliosphere) show that both the magnetic field and thermal gas pressure are less than the energetic particle component pressures. Voyager 2 observations revealed that the heliospheric termination shock (HTS) is very broad and mediated by energetic particles. PUIs and SEPs contribute both a collisionless heat flux and a higher-order viscosity. We show that the incorporation of both effects can completely determine the structure of collisionless shocks mediated by energetic ions. Since the reduced form of the PUI-mediated plasma model is structurally identical to the classical cosmic ray two-fluid model, we note that the presence of viscosity, at least formally, eliminates the need for a gas sub-shock in the classical two-fluid model, including in that regime where three are possible. By considering parameters upstream of the HTS, we show that the thermal gas remains relatively cold and the shock is mediated by PUIs. We determine the structure of the weak interstellar shock observed by Voyager 1 . We consider the inclusion of the thermal heat flux and viscosity to address the most general form of an energetic particle-thermal plasma two-fluid model.

  12. Energetic constraints, size gradients, and size limits in benthic marine invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebens, Kenneth P

    2002-08-01

    Populations of marine benthic organisms occupy habitats with a range of physical and biological characteristics. In the intertidal zone, energetic costs increase with temperature and aerial exposure, and prey intake increases with immersion time, generating size gradients with small individuals often found at upper limits of distribution. Wave action can have similar effects, limiting feeding time or success, although certain species benefit from wave dislodgment of their prey; this also results in gradients of size and morphology. The difference between energy intake and metabolic (and/or behavioral) costs can be used to determine an energetic optimal size for individuals in such populations. Comparisons of the energetic optimal size to the maximum predicted size based on mechanical constraints, and the ensuing mortality schedule, provides a mechanism to study and explain organism size gradients in intertidal and subtidal habitats. For species where the energetic optimal size is well below the maximum size that could persist under a certain set of wave/flow conditions, it is probable that energetic constraints dominate. When the opposite is true, populations of small individuals can dominate habitats with strong dislodgment or damage probability. When the maximum size of individuals is far below either energetic optima or mechanical limits, other sources of mortality (e.g., predation) may favor energy allocation to early reproduction rather than to continued growth. Predictions based on optimal size models have been tested for a variety of intertidal and subtidal invertebrates including sea anemones, corals, and octocorals. This paper provides a review of the optimal size concept, and employs a combination of the optimal energetic size model and life history modeling approach to explore energy allocation to growth or reproduction as the optimal size is approached.

  13. Totally James

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Tom

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an interview with James Howe, author of "The Misfits" and "Totally Joe". In this interview, Howe discusses tolerance, diversity and the parallels between his own life and his literature. Howe's four books in addition to "The Misfits" and "Totally Joe" and his list of recommended books with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender,…

  14. Thermophilic Adaptation in Prokaryotes Is Constrained by Metabolic Costs of Proteostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venev, Sergey V; Zeldovich, Konstantin B

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Prokaryotes evolved to thrive in an extremely diverse set of habitats, and their proteomes bear signatures of environmental conditions. Although correlations between amino acid usage and environmental temperature are well-documented, understanding of the mechanisms of thermal adaptation remains incomplete. Here, we couple the energetic costs of protein folding and protein homeostasis to build a microscopic model explaining both the overall amino acid composition and its temperature trends. Low biosynthesis costs lead to low diversity of physical interactions between amino acid residues, which in turn makes proteins less stable and drives up chaperone activity to maintain appropriate levels of folded, functional proteins. Assuming that the cost of chaperone activity is proportional to the fraction of unfolded client proteins, we simulated thermal adaptation of model proteins subject to minimization of the total cost of amino acid synthesis and chaperone activity. For the first time, we predicted both the proteome-average amino acid abundances and their temperature trends simultaneously, and found strong correlations between model predictions and 402 genomes of bacteria and archaea. The energetic constraint on protein evolution is more apparent in highly expressed proteins, selected by codon adaptation index. We found that in bacteria, highly expressed proteins are similar in composition to thermophilic ones, whereas in archaea no correlation between predicted expression level and thermostability was observed. At the same time, thermal adaptations of highly expressed proteins in bacteria and archaea are nearly identical, suggesting that universal energetic constraints prevail over the phylogenetic differences between these domains of life. PMID:29106597

  15. Analysis of disease patterns and cost of treatments for prevention of deep venous thrombosis after total knee or hip replacement: results from the Practice Analysis of THromboprophylaxis after Orthopaedic Surgery (PATHOS study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Degli Esposti L

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Luca Degli Esposti,1 Guido Didoni,2 Teresa Simon,3 Stefano Buda,1 Diego Sangiorgi,1 Ezio Degli Esposti11CliCon Health, Economics and Outcomes Research, Ravenna, Italy; 2BMS Italy, Rome, Italy; 3BMS Global, Princeton, NJ, USAIntroduction: Venous thromboembolism (VTE is a well-known complication of total hip replacement (THR and total knee replacement (TKR. Various drugs have been introduced in an attempt to reduce the mortality as well as the short-term and long-term morbidity associated with the development of VTE. The aim of this study was to analyze drug utilization for thromboprophylaxis and the cost of illness in real clinical practice in patients with THR or TKR.Materials and methods: A multicenter, retrospective, observational cohort study based on local health unit administrative databases was conducted. All patients (≥18 years old discharged for THR/TKR procedures between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2008 were included in the study. The date of first hospital discharge was the index date; patients were followed up for a period of 12 months.Results: A total of 10,389 patients were included: 3516 males (33.8%, 69.4 ± 10.4 years and 6873 females (66.2%, 71.7 ± 9.0 years, of which 5483 (52.8% were discharged for THR and 4906 (47.2% for TKR. First antithrombotic treatments after discharge were enoxaparin (3937, 37.9%, heparin (3752, 36.1%, antiplatelet agents (658, 6.3%, vitamin K antagonists (276, 2.7%, fondaparinux (136, 1.3%, combinations (185, 1.8%, and no therapy (1445, 13.9%. Overall, we observed 2347 (22.6% treatment changes; median duration of antithrombotic treatment was 23 days (range 11–47 for THR and 22 days (range 11–46 for TKR. During the follow-up period, we observed 129 cases of VTE (120 per 10,000 patients, five post-thrombotic syndrome (4.8 per 10,000 patients, and three heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (2.9 per 10,000 patients. Median cost for both THR and TKR was €9052.00 (range €8063.00–€9084.96, with

  16. Custo médio do Módulo de Coleta de sangue total pelo método ABC The mean cost of collection of whole blood units by the ABC method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugênia M. A. Ubiali

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Os procedimentos em hemoterapia são complexos e caros. Exigem processos controlados e validados, equipamentos calibrados e monitorados e insumos qualificados, validados e inspecionados antes e durante o uso. Isto acarreta, além dos gastos diretos, gastos indiretos especificamente relacionados à garantia da qualidade e da segurança transfusionais, além dos gastos indiretos usuais de qualquer produto ou serviço. Procurando avaliar com maior aproximação estes custos e buscando evitar as distorções das apropriações de custos por rateios, o presente estudo utilizou o sistema de Custeio Baseado em Atividades - ABC, para apurar o custo médio do Módulo de Coleta de sangue total no Hemocentro de Ribeirão Preto - SP, unidade sede, no primeiro semestre de 2006. O maior impacto no custo médio apurado se deveu aos custos monetários diretos, entretanto os custos indiretos não foram desprezíveis. O custo médio obtido para desempenho das atividades que compõem o Módulo de Coleta foi de R$ 35,20, que é 68,75% superior ao valor pago na tabela SIA/SUS para este módulo. A metodologia desenvolvida pode ser aplicada aos outros procedimentos dos serviços de hemoterapia, permitindo a avaliação dos custos de seus processos, evitando desperdícios, aprimorando o seu funcionamento e gerando evidências objetivas que demonstrem os custos reais da hemoterapia de qualidade para as instâncias financiadoras públicas e privadas.The procedures in hemotherapy are complex and expensive. They demand a controlled and validated process. They also require calibrated and monitored equipment and qualified and validated materials, inspected before and during use. This causes, apart from direct expenses, indirect expenses related to the guarantee of quality and transfusional safety, as well as the usual indirect costs of any product or service. The present study used the Activity-Based Costing system - ABC, to find the mean cost of collection of whole blood

  17. Economic assessment of energetic scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandjean, Alain; Bureau, Dominique; Schubert, Katheline; Henriet, Fanny; Maggiar, Nicolas; Criqui, Patrick; Le Teno, Helene; Baumstark, Luc; Crassous, Renaud; Roques, Fabien

    2013-09-01

    This publication gathers contributions proposed by different members of the Economic Council for a Sustainable Development (CEDD) on the issue of energy transition, and more precisely on scenarios elaborated with respect to energy transition. A first set of contributions addresses models of energy transition (assessment of scenario costs to reach a factor 4; the issue of de-carbonation of energy consumption; study of ELECsim, a tool to highlight costs of scenarios of evolution of the electric power system). The second part addresses arbitrations and choice assessment (the importance of social and economic impacts of scenarios; challenges related to the joint definition of the discount rate and of the evolution of carbon value in time; the issue of assessment of the integration of renewable energies into the power system)

  18. Importance of energetic solar protons in ozone depletion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephenson, J A.E.; Scourfield, M W.J. [Natal Univ., Durban (South Africa). Space Physics Research Inst.

    1991-07-11

    CHLORINE-catalysed depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer has commanded considerable attention since 1985, when Farman et al. observed a decrease of 50% in the total column ozone over Antarctica in the austral spring. Here we examine the depletion of stratospheric ozone caused by the reaction of ozone with nitric oxide generated by energetic solar protons, associated with solar flares. During large solar flares in March 1989, satellite observations indicated that total column ozone was depleted by {approx} 9% over {approx} 20% of the total area between the South Pole and latitude 70{sup o}S. Chlorine-catalysed ozone depletion takes place over a much larger area, but our results indicate that the influence of solar protons on atmospheric ozone concentrations should not be ignored. (author).

  19. Importance of energetic solar protons in ozone depletion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephenson, J.A.E.; Scourfield, M.W.J.

    1991-01-01

    CHLORINE-catalysed depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer has commanded considerable attention since 1985, when Farman et al. observed a decrease of 50% in the total column ozone over Antarctica in the austral spring. Here we examine the depletion of stratospheric ozone caused by the reaction of ozone with nitric oxide generated by energetic solar protons, associated with solar flares. During large solar flares in March 1989, satellite observations indicated that total column ozone was depleted by ∼ 9% over ∼ 20% of the total area between the South Pole and latitude 70 o S. Chlorine-catalysed ozone depletion takes place over a much larger area, but our results indicate that the influence of solar protons on atmospheric ozone concentrations should not be ignored. (author)

  20. On contribution of energetic and heavy ions to the plasma pressure: Storm Sept 27 - Oct 4, 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronberg, E. A.; Mouikis, C.; Kistler, L. M.; Dandouras, I. S.; Daly, P. W.; Welling, D. T.; Grigorenko, E. E.

    2015-12-01

    Contribution of the energetic ions (>> 40 keV) and of heavy ions into the total plasma pressure is often neglected. In this study we evaluate the contribution of these components for the storm observed from September 27 to October 4 in 2002. The thermal component of the pressure for the protons, helium and oxygen at 0--40 keV/q is measured by the Cluster/CIS/CODIF sensor. The contribution of the energetic ions at energies >> 40 keV is calculated from the Cluster/RAPID/IIMS observations. The results show that before the storm has initiated, the contribution of the energetic ions in to the total pressure is indeed negligible in the tail plasma sheet, less than ˜1%. However, with the storm development contribution of the energetic part becomes significant, up to ˜30%, towards the recovery phase and cannot be neglected. Heavy ions contribute to the 27% of the total pressure and half of them are energetic. The contribution of energetic ions to the pressure of the ring current (L≃5) is significant. The heavy ions play a dominant role in the plasma pressure, about 62% during the main phase of the magnetic storm. Half of them are energetic ions. The SWMF/BATS-R-US MHD model underestimates the contribution of the energetic and heavy ions in to the ion distribution in the magnetotail plasma sheet and the ring current. The ring current plasma pressure distorts the terrestrial internal magnetic field and defines magnetic storm. Therefore, it is essential to take in to account the contribution of the energetic and heavy ions.

  1. Energetic particle pressure in intense ESP events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lario, D.; Decker, R. B.; Roelof, E. C.; Viñas, A.-F.

    2015-09-01

    We study three intense energetic storm particle (ESP) events in which the energetic particle pressure PEP exceeded both the pressure of the background thermal plasma Pth and the pressure of the magnetic field PB. The region upstream of the interplanetary shocks associated with these events was characterized by a depression of the magnetic field strength coincident with the increase of the energetic particle intensities and, when plasma measurements were available, a depleted solar wind density. The general feature of cosmic-ray mediated shocks such as the deceleration of the upstream background medium into which the shock propagates is generally observed. However, for those shocks where plasma parameters are available, pressure balance is not maintained either upstream of or across the shock, which may result from the fact that PEP is not included in the calculation of the shock parameters.

  2. Biogas - energetical and environmental point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skele, A.; Upitis, A.; Kristapsons, M.; Goizevskis, O.; Ziemelis, I.

    2003-01-01

    Energy sector has been one of the most important priorities since reestablishment of independence of Latvia. The deficiency of energy resources in Latvia has created a need to assess all the possibilities to utilise all possibilities to utilise all the energy resources, including the biological ones, to motivate the trends in the development of energetic in Latvia. A huge non-utilised reserve in Latvia is methane fermentation of organic agricultural and municipal residue and sewage from food industry. The organic mass of solid and liquid waste of different origin and its energetic potential for rural region have been investigated. The work deals with an integrated system of the utilisation of agricultural waste with the anaerobic (biogas) and the thermal processes. Presently the anaerobic waste utilisation, in combination with the production of biogas and organic fertiliser, is considered as one of the energetically most efficient and environment-friendly ways of organic fertiliser utilisation (authors)

  3. Mechanics and energetics in tool manufacture and use: a synthetic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liyu; Brodbeck, Luzius; Iida, Fumiya

    2014-01-01

    Tool manufacture and use are observed not only in humans but also in other animals such as mammals, birds and insects. Manufactured tools are used for biomechanical functions such as effective control of fluids and small solid objects and extension of reaching. These tools are passive and used with gravity and the animal users' own energy. From the perspective of evolutionary biology, manufactured tools are extended phenotypes of the genes of the animal and exhibit phenotypic plasticity. This incurs energetic cost of manufacture as compared to the case with a fixed tool. This paper studies mechanics and energetics aspects of tool manufacture and use in non-human beings. Firstly, it investigates possible mechanical mechanisms of the use of passive manufactured tools. Secondly, it formulates the energetic cost of manufacture and analyses when phenotypic plasticity benefits an animal tool maker and user. We take a synthetic approach and use a controlled physical model, i.e. a robot arm. The robot is capable of additively manufacturing scoop and gripper structures from thermoplastic adhesives to pick and place fluid and solid objects, mimicking primates and birds manufacturing tools for a similar function. We evaluate the effectiveness of tool use in pick-and-place and explain the mechanism for gripper tools picking up solid objects with a solid-mechanics model. We propose a way to formulate the energetic cost of tool manufacture that includes modes of addition and reshaping, and use it to analyse the case of scoop tools. Experiment results show that with a single motor trajectory, the robot was able to effectively pick and place water, rice grains, a pebble and a plastic box with a scoop tool or gripper tools that were manufactured by itself. They also show that by changing the dimension of scoop tools, the energetic cost of tool manufacture and use could be reduced. The work should also be interesting for engineers to design adaptive machines. PMID:25209405

  4. Sawteeth stabilization by energetic trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samain, A.; Edery, D.; Garbet, X.; Roubin, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    The analysis of a possible stabilization of sawteeth by a population of energetic ions is performed by using the Lagrangian of the electromagnetic perturbation. It is shown that the trapped component of such a population has a small influence compared to that of the passing component. The stabilization threshold is calculated assuming a non linear regime in the q=1 resonant layer. The energetic population must create a stable tearing structure if the average curvature effect on thermal particles in the layer is small. However, this effect decreases the actual threshold

  5. Clinical- and cost-effectiveness of the STAR care pathway compared to usual care for patients with chronic pain after total knee replacement: study protocol for a UK randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylde, Vikki; Bertram, Wendy; Beswick, Andrew D; Blom, Ashley W; Bruce, Julie; Burston, Amanda; Dennis, Jane; Garfield, Kirsty; Howells, Nicholas; Lane, Athene; McCabe, Candy; Moore, Andrew J; Noble, Sian; Peters, Tim J; Price, Andrew; Sanderson, Emily; Toms, Andrew D; Walsh, David A; White, Simon; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael

    2018-02-21

    Approximately 20% of patients experience chronic pain after total knee replacement. There is little evidence for effective interventions for the management of this pain, and current healthcare provision is patchy and inconsistent. Given the complexity of this condition, multimodal and individualised interventions matched to pain characteristics are needed. We have undertaken a comprehensive programme of work to develop a care pathway for patients with chronic pain after total knee replacement. This protocol describes the design of a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the clinical- and cost-effectiveness of a complex intervention care pathway compared with usual care. This is a pragmatic two-armed, open, multi-centred randomised controlled trial conducted within secondary care in the UK. Patients will be screened at 2 months after total knee replacement and 381 patients with chronic pain at 3 months postoperatively will be recruited. Recruitment processes will be optimised through qualitative research during a 6-month internal pilot phase. Patients are randomised using a 2:1 intervention:control allocation ratio. All participants receive usual care as provided by their hospital. The intervention comprises an assessment clinic appointment at 3 months postoperatively with an Extended Scope Practitioner and up to six telephone follow-up calls over 12 months. In the assessment clinic, a standardised protocol is followed to identify potential underlying causes for the chronic pain and enable appropriate onward referrals to existing services for targeted and individualised treatment. Outcomes are assessed by questionnaires at 6 and 12 months after randomisation. The co-primary outcomes are pain severity and pain interference assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory at 12 months after randomisation. Secondary outcomes relate to resource use, function, neuropathic pain, mental well-being, use of pain medications, satisfaction with pain relief, pain frequency, capability

  6. Energetic Extremes in Aquatic Locomotion by Coral Reef Fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Christopher J.; Johansen, Jacob L.; Steffensen, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Underwater locomotion is challenging due to the high friction and resistance imposed on a body moving through water and energy lost in the wake during undulatory propulsion. While aquatic organisms have evolved streamlined shapes to overcome such resistance, underwater locomotion has long been considered a costly exercise. Recent evidence for a range of swimming vertebrates, however, has suggested that flapping paired appendages around a rigid body may be an extremely efficient means of aquatic locomotion. Using intermittent flow-through respirometry, we found exceptional energetic performance in the Bluelined wrasse Stethojulis bandanensis, which maintains tuna-like optimum cruising speeds (up to 1 metre s−1) while using 40% less energy than expected for their body size. Displaying an exceptional aerobic scope (22-fold above resting), streamlined rigid-body posture, and wing-like fins that generate lift-based thrust, S. bandanensis literally flies underwater to efficiently maintain high optimum swimming speeds. Extreme energetic performance may be key to the colonization of highly variable environments, such as the wave-swept habitats where S. bandanensis and other wing-finned species tend to occur. Challenging preconceived notions of how best to power aquatic locomotion, biomimicry of such lift-based fin movements could yield dramatic reductions in the power needed to propel underwater vehicles at high speed. PMID:23326566

  7. Energetic extremes in aquatic locomotion by coral reef fishes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Fulton

    Full Text Available Underwater locomotion is challenging due to the high friction and resistance imposed on a body moving through water and energy lost in the wake during undulatory propulsion. While aquatic organisms have evolved streamlined shapes to overcome such resistance, underwater locomotion has long been considered a costly exercise. Recent evidence for a range of swimming vertebrates, however, has suggested that flapping paired appendages around a rigid body may be an extremely efficient means of aquatic locomotion. Using intermittent flow-through respirometry, we found exceptional energetic performance in the Bluelined wrasse Stethojulis bandanensis, which maintains tuna-like optimum cruising speeds (up to 1 metre s(-1 while using 40% less energy than expected for their body size. Displaying an exceptional aerobic scope (22-fold above resting, streamlined rigid-body posture, and wing-like fins that generate lift-based thrust, S. bandanensis literally flies underwater to efficiently maintain high optimum swimming speeds. Extreme energetic performance may be key to the colonization of highly variable environments, such as the wave-swept habitats where S. bandanensis and other wing-finned species tend to occur. Challenging preconceived notions of how best to power aquatic locomotion, biomimicry of such lift-based fin movements could yield dramatic reductions in the power needed to propel underwater vehicles at high speed.

  8. New Physics with Energetic Top Quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Andeen, Timothy; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Many theories beyond the Standard Model predict new phenomena which decay to energetic top quarks. Searches for such new physics models are performed using the ATLAS experiment at the LHC using proton-proton collision data collected in 2015 and 2016 with a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. Selected recent results will be discussed.

  9. Energetic utilisation of biomass in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barotfi, I.

    1994-01-01

    Energetic utilisation of biomass has been known since prehistoric times and was only pushed into the background by the technological developments of the last century. The energy crisis and, more recently, environmental problems have now brought it back to the fore, and efforts are being made worldwide to find modern technical applications for biomass and contribute to its advance. (orig.) [de

  10. Energetic utilization of dietary fiber in pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnen, M.M.J.A.

    2003-01-01

    The energetic utilization of fermentable dietary fiber (fDF) of different fiber sources and its relation to physical activity and housing conditions was studied in three experiments. In all experiments the daily intake of digestible nutrients, nitrogen and energy balances, heat production, and

  11. Energetic materials standards – Chemical compatibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuukkanen, I.M.; Bouma, R.H.B.

    2014-01-01

    Subgroup A Energetic Materials Team, SG/A (EMT), develops and maintains standards that are relevant to all life-cycle phases of ammunition/weapon systems. STANAG 4147 is the standard regarding chemical compatibility of explosives with munition components, and is a document of prime importance.

  12. Capturing the most energetic cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantsch, P.

    1999-01-01

    The methods of energy measurement applied to the most energetic cosmic rays are described. The rays are so rare that two gigantic systems of detectors are proposed to detect at least some of them (the Pierre Auger Project ). (Z.J.)

  13. Physics with energetic radioactive ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, W.F.

    1996-01-01

    Beams of short-lived, unstable nuclei have opened new dimensions in studies of nuclear structure and reactions. Such beams also provide key information on reactions that take place in our sun and other stars. Status and prospects of the physics with energetic radioactive beams are summarized

  14. ENERGETIC CHARGE OF AN INFORMATION PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popova T.M.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Main laws of technical thermodynamics are universal and could be applied to processes other than thermodynamic ones. The results of the comparison of peculiarities of irreversible informational and thermodynamic processes are presented in the article and a new term “Infopy” is used. A more precise definition of “infopy” as an energetic charge is given in the article.

  15. Metabolic Cost of the Activation of Immune Response in the Fish-Eating Myotis (Myotis vivesi: The Effects of Inflammation and the Acute Phase Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aída Otálora-Ardila

    Full Text Available Inflammation and activation of the acute phase response (APR are energetically demanding processes that protect against pathogens. Phytohaemagglutinin (PHA and lipopolysaccharide (LPS are antigens commonly used to stimulate inflammation and the APR, respectively. We tested the hypothesis that the APR after an LPS challenge was energetically more costly than the inflammatory response after a PHA challenge in the fish-eating Myotis bat (Myotis vivesi. We measured resting metabolic rate (RMR after bats were administered PHA and LPS. We also measured skin temperature (Tskin after the LPS challenge and skin swelling after the PHA challenge. Injection of PHA elicited swelling that lasted for several days but changes in RMR and body mass were not significant. LPS injection produced a significant increase in Tskin and in RMR, and significant body mass loss. RMR after LPS injection increased by 140-185% and the total cost of the response was 6.50 kJ. Inflammation was an energetically low-cost process but the APR entailed a significant energetic investment. Examination of APR in other bats suggests that the way in which bats deal with infections might not be uniform.

  16. 2 keV filters of quasi-mono-energetic neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adib, M.; Habib, N.; El-Mesiry, M.S.; Bashter, I.I.; Saleh, A.; Fathallah, M.

    2013-01-01

    A simulation study for the production of 2 keV filters of quasi-mono-energetic neutrons based on the deep interference minima in the 45 Sc total cross-section was carried out. A computer code QMENF-II was adapted to calculate the optimum amounts of the 45 Sc as a main filter element and additional component ones to obtain sufficient intensity at high resolution and purity of the filtered quasi-mono-energetic neutrons. The emitted neutron spectrum from nuclear reactor and from the reaction of 2.6 MeV protons on a lithium fluoride target at the accelerator beam port, are used for simulation

  17. Energetics in a model of prebiotic evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intoy, B. F.; Halley, J. W.

    2017-12-01

    Previously we reported [A. Wynveen et al., Phys. Rev. E 89, 022725 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.89.022725] that requiring that the systems regarded as lifelike be out of chemical equilibrium in a model of abstracted polymers undergoing ligation and scission first introduced by Kauffman [S. A. Kauffman, The Origins of Order (Oxford University Press, New York, 1993), Chap. 7] implied that lifelike systems were most probable when the reaction network was sparse. The model was entirely statistical and took no account of the bond energies or other energetic constraints. Here we report results of an extension of the model to include effects of a finite bonding energy in the model. We studied two conditions: (1) A food set is continuously replenished and the total polymer population is constrained but the system is otherwise isolated and (2) in addition to the constraints in (1) the system is in contact with a finite-temperature heat bath. In each case, detailed balance in the dynamics is guaranteed during the computations by continuous recomputation of a temperature [in case (1)] and of the chemical potential (in both cases) toward which the system is driven by the dynamics. In the isolated case, the probability of reaching a metastable nonequilibrium state in this model depends significantly on the composition of the food set, and the nonequilibrium states satisfying lifelike condition turn out to be at energies and particle numbers consistent with an equilibrium state at high negative temperature. As a function of the sparseness of the reaction network, the lifelike probability is nonmonotonic, as in our previous model, but the maximum probability occurs when the network is less sparse. In the case of contact with a thermal bath at a positive ambient temperature, we identify two types of metastable nonequilibrium states, termed locally and thermally alive, and locally dead and thermally alive, and evaluate their likelihood of appearance, finding maxima at an optimal

  18. Physico-mathematical model of motor vehicle of divided weight with unifying energetic element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid M. Petrov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The traction characteristics are important for ensuring of motor vehicle work process. In providing the traction characteristics the average velocity of mobile energetic transport grows, energy costs for work process execution are uprating and operation costs are reducing. The implementation of traction characteristics is performed by transmission of mobile energetic transport. Aim: The aim of the work is improvement of torque transfer technology from the engine to the wheel driving forces through the establishment of new construction of divided weight vehicle transmission. Materials and Methods: Consider a motor vehicle of divided weight with unifying energetic element which performs rotary motions relative to the vehicle frame. Results: It was shown that, the momentum which creates the rotational motion depends on the module and the direction of rotation speed of the unifying energetic element. For the first time, the technology and design of vehicle transmission which differs from previous designs by significant simplifying of the torque transmission from the engine to driving wheels at increased value of efficiency coefficient were proposed.

  19. Recent progress of hybrid simulation for energetic particles and MHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todo, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Several hybrid simulation models have been constructed to study the evolution of Alfven eigenmodes destabilized by energetic particles. Recent hybrid simulation results of energetic particle driven instabilities are presented in this paper. (J.P.N.)

  20. Advances in magnetospheric physics, 1971--1974: energetic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, H.I. Jr.

    1974-12-01

    An account is given of energetic particle research in magnetospheric physics for the time period 1971--1974. Emphasis is on relating the various aspects of energetic particles to magnetospheric processes. 458 refs. (U.S.)

  1. Total quality accounting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrijašević Maja

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The focus of competitive "battle" shifted from the price towards non-price instruments, above all, towards quality that became the key variable for profitability increase and achievement of better comparative position of a company. Under such conditions, management of a company, which, according to the established and certified system of total quality, strives towards achieving of a better market position, faces the problem of quality cost measurement and determination. Management, above all, cost accounting can help in solving of this problem, but the question is how much of its potential is being used for that purpose.

  2. Middle infrared (wavelength range: 8 μm-14 μm) 2-dimensional spectroscopy (total weight with electrical controller: 1.7 kg, total cost: less than 10,000 USD) so-called hyperspectral camera for unmanned air vehicles like drones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Naoyuki; Saito, Tsubasa; Ogawa, Satoru; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2016-05-01

    We developed the palm size (optical unit: 73[mm]×102[mm]×66[mm]) and light weight (total weight with electrical controller: 1.7[kg]) middle infrared (wavelength range: 8[μm]-14[μm]) 2-dimensional spectroscopy for UAV (Unmanned Air Vehicle) like drone. And we successfully demonstrated the flights with the developed hyperspectral camera mounted on the multi-copter so-called drone in 15/Sep./2015 at Kagawa prefecture in Japan. We had proposed 2 dimensional imaging type Fourier spectroscopy that was the near-common path temporal phase-shift interferometer. We install the variable phase shifter onto optical Fourier transform plane of infinity corrected imaging optical systems. The variable phase shifter was configured with a movable mirror and a fixed mirror. The movable mirror was actuated by the impact drive piezo-electric device (stroke: 4.5[mm], resolution: 0.01[μm], maker: Technohands Co.,Ltd., type:XDT50-45, price: around 1,000USD). We realized the wavefront division type and near common path interferometry that has strong robustness against mechanical vibrations. Without anti-mechanical vibration systems, the palm-size Fourier spectroscopy was realized. And we were able to utilize the small and low-cost middle infrared camera that was the micro borometer array (un-cooled VOxMicroborometer, pixel array: 336×256, pixel pitch: 17[μm], frame rate 60[Hz], maker: FLIR, type: Quark 336, price: around 5,000USD). And this apparatus was able to be operated by single board computer (Raspberry Pi.). Thus, total cost was less than 10,000 USD. We joined with KAMOME-PJ (Kanagawa Advanced MOdule for Material Evaluation Project) with DRONE FACTORY Corp., KUUSATSU Corp., Fuji Imvac Inc. And we successfully obtained the middle infrared spectroscopic imaging with multi-copter drone.

  3. Stroller running: Energetic and kinematic changes across pushing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcantara, Ryan S; Wall-Scheffler, Cara M

    2017-01-01

    Running with a stroller provides an opportunity for parents to exercise near their child and counteract health declines experienced during early parenthood. Understanding biomechanical and physiological changes that occur when stroller running is needed to evaluate its health impact, yet the effects of stroller running have not been clearly presented. Here, three commonly used stroller pushing methods were investigated to detect potential changes in energetic cost and lower-limb kinematics. Sixteen individuals (M/F: 10/6) ran at self-selected speeds for 800m under three stroller conditions (2-Hands, 1-Hand, and Push/Chase) and an independent running control. A significant decrease in speed (p = 0.001) and stride length (ppushing method had a significant effect on speed (p = 0.001) and stride length (ppushing technique influences stroller running speed and kinematics. These findings suggest specific fitness effects may be achieved through the implementation of different pushing methods.

  4. Energetic technologies and environmental impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    issues are compiled in the third part. There is a section devoted to plant emission and atmospheric pollution, a second section on the effects of chemical pollutants on living beings and a last chapter on the social costs of the energy production. Finally, the forth part collects some activities related to information theory, high energy physics, superconductivity and radiation metrology

  5. Energetic Constraints on Fungal Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Luke L M; Jones, Nick S; Fricker, Mark D

    2016-02-01

    Saprotrophic fungi are obliged to spend energy on growth, reproduction, and substrate digestion. To understand the trade-offs involved, we developed a model that, for any given growth rate, identifies the strategy that maximizes the fraction of energy that could possibly be spent on reproduction. Our model's predictions of growth rates and bioconversion efficiencies are consistent with empirical findings, and it predicts the optimal investment in reproduction, resource acquisition, and biomass recycling for a given environment and timescale of reproduction. Thus, if the timescale of reproduction is long compared to the time required for the fungus to double in size, the model suggests that the total energy available for reproduction is maximal when a very small fraction of the energy budget is spent on reproduction. The model also suggests that fungi growing on substrates with a high concentration of low-molecular-weight compounds will not benefit from recycling: they should be able to grow more rapidly and allocate more energy to reproduction without recycling. In contrast, recycling offers considerable benefits to fungi growing on recalcitrant substrates, where the individual hyphae are not crowded and the time taken to consume resource is significantly longer than the fungus doubling time.

  6. Analysis of energetic exploitation of straw in Vojvodina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodic, Sinisa N.; Dodic, Jelena M.; Popov, Stevan D.; Zekic, Vladislav N.; Rodic, Vesna O.; Tica, Nedeljko Lj.

    2011-01-01

    The Autonomous Province of Vojvodina is an autonomous province in the Republic of Serbia. It is located in the northern part of the country, in the Pannonia plain. Vojvodina is an energy-deficient province. The average yearly quantity of the cellulose wastes in Vojvodina amounts to about 9 millions tons barely in the agriculture, and the same potential on the level of Serbia estimates to almost 13 million tons. This study gives the analysis of energetic exploitation of straws from stubble cereals processed in different forms. Costs for the equipment that uses biomass in the EU are approximately two times higher with respect to those for the equipment for combustion of natural gas or of fuel oil. Costs of investments for combustion of biomass in Vojvodina if compared with the cited data are approximately for 40-50% lower. The difference of the investment costs for the construction of such units is because units for straw combustion designed and constructed in our country, have neither the complicated devices for manipulation of fuels, nor the devices for the waste gasses processing. The definite conclusions about the economic justification of the energetic exploitation of stubble straws can be obtained only by comparison of costs of the so obtained energy, with the costs of energy obtained through the combustion of classical fuels. Previous comparisons were the most often based on the comparisons of value of prices of the equivalent straw quantity with the process of fuel oil of other classical fuels. Such the comparisons leaded to the very positive evaluations of the economical effects of straws, without taking into account the realizability of the named method. Namely, comparisons of straw and fuel oil hardly could lead to the conclusion that these two fuels are mutually substitutable. According to its physical properties, straw is most similar to firewood, but the preciousness and lacking of this the very resource excludes it from the comparative analysis, so

  7. Assessment of accident energetics in LMFBR core-disruptive accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauske, H.K.

    1977-01-01

    An assessment of accident energetics in LMFBR core-disruptive accidents is given with emphasis on the generic issues of energetic recriticality and energetic fuel-coolant interaction events. Application of a few general behavior principles to the oxide-fueled system suggests that such events are highly unlikely following a postulated core meltdown event

  8. Total Thyroidectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez Moris E

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Total thyroidectomy is a surgery that removes all the thyroid tissue from the patient. The suspect of cancer in a thyroid nodule is the most frequent indication and it is presume when previous fine needle puncture is positive or a goiter has significant volume increase or symptomes. Less frequent indications are hyperthyroidism when it is refractory to treatment with Iodine 131 or it is contraindicated, and in cases of symptomatic thyroiditis. The thyroid gland has an important anatomic relation whith the inferior laryngeal nerve and the parathyroid glands, for this reason it is imperative to perform extremely meticulous dissection to recognize each one of these elements and ensure their preservation. It is also essential to maintain strict hemostasis, in order to avoid any postoperative bleeding that could lead to a suffocating neck hematoma, feared complication that represents a surgical emergency and endangers the patient’s life.It is essential to run a formal technique, without skipping steps, and maintain prudence and patience that should rule any surgical act.

  9. Overall energetic situation; Energiewirtschaftliche Gesamtsituation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahl, Ulrich; Blesl, Markus [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Energiewirtschaft und Rationelle Energieanwendung (IER); Thoene, Eberhard [Zentrum fuer Energieforschung (ZfES), Stuttgart (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The different influence of climatic, economic and structural conditions lead 2014 in Germany in total to a significant decline in primary energy demand. There the influences of the individual setting has affected differently. The further improving economic developments influenced the energy demand in industry and commerce during the year only slightly to increase the consumption. The annual average of the still high energy prices and measures to improve efficiency affected both in private consumption as well as in industrial and commercial sector a damping of consumption. However, the greatest influence on the development of consumption is resulting from the exceptionally mild weather, whereby the energy demand for the provision of space heating declined strongly compared at an average year. Overall, the primary energy consumption decreased by the increased influence of demand-reducing conditions over the previous year -4.7%, reaching its lowest level for the whole levels of Germany since 1990. [German] Der unterschiedliche Einfluss der klimatischen, oekonomischen und strukturellen Rahmenbedingungen fuehrte 2014 in Deutschland insgesamt zu einem erheblichen Rueckgang bei der Primaerenergienachfrage. Dabei wirkten sich die Einfluesse der einzelnen Rahmenbedingungen unterschiedlich aus. Die sich weiter verbessernde konjunkturelle Entwicklung beeinflusste die Energienachfrage bei Industrie und Gewerbe im Verlauf des Jahres nur leicht verbrauchssteigernd. Das im Jahresdurchschnitt immer noch hohe Energiepreisniveau und Massnahmen zur Effizienzsteigerung wirkten sich dagegen sowohl beim privaten Konsum als auch in Industrie und Gewerbe verbrauchsdaempfend aus. Der groesste Einfluss auf die Verbrauchsentwicklung resultiert jedoch aus der aussergewoehnlich milden Witterung, wodurch die Energienachfrage fuer die Bereitstellung von Raumwaerme im Vergleich zu einem Durchschnittsjahr stark zurueckging. Insgesamt verringerte sich durch den staerkeren Einfluss der

  10. The energetic performance of a novel hybrid solar thermal and chemical looping combustion plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafarian, Mehdi; Arjomandi, Maziar; Nathan, Graham J.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A hybrid solar chemical looping combustion power cycle is reported. • The cycle is studied for two configurations, with and without an after-burner. • The oxygen carrier particles are used as storage medium for solar thermal energy. • Total solar shares of 41.4% and 60% are achieved with and without the after-burner. • Efficiencies of 50% and 44.0% are achieved with and without the after-burner. - Abstract: The overall energetic performance of a gas turbine combined cycle powered by a hybrid cycle between a solar thermal and a chemical looping combustion (CLC) system firing methane is reported for two configurations. In one case, the outlet from the air reactor is fed directly to a gas turbine, while in the other an after-burner, also firing methane, is added to increase the gas turbine inlet temperature. The cycle is simulated using Aspen Plus software for the average diurnal profile of normal irradiance for Port Augusta, South Australia. The first law efficiency, total solar absorption efficiency, average and peak fractional power boosts, total solar share, net solar to electrical efficiency, fraction of pressurised CO 2 , incremental CO 2 avoidance and the exergy efficiency for both cycles are reported. The calculations predict a first law efficiency of 50.0% for the cycle employing an after-burner, compared with 44.0% for that without the after-burner. However, this is achieved at the cost of decreasing the solar share from 60.0%, without the after-burner, to 41.4% with it. Also reported is the sensitivity analysis of performance to variations in key operating parameters. The sensitivity analysis shows that further improvements to the performance of the cycle are possible

  11. Energetic Combustion Devices for Aerospace Propulsion and Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litchford, Ron J.

    2000-01-01

    Chemical reactions have long been the mainstay thermal energy source for aerospace propulsion and power. Although it is widely recognized that the intrinsic energy density limitations of chemical bonds place severe constraints on maximum realizable performance, it will likely be several years before systems based on high energy density nuclear fuels can be placed into routine service. In the mean time, efforts to develop high energy density chemicals and advanced combustion devices which can utilize such energetic fuels may yield worthwhile returns in overall system performance and cost. Current efforts in this vein are being carried out at NASA MSFC under the direction of the author in the areas of pulse detonation engine technology development and light metals combustion devices. Pulse detonation engines are touted as a low cost alternative to gas turbine engines and to conventional rocket engines, but actual performance and cost benefits have yet to be convincingly demonstrated. Light metal fueled engines also offer potential benefits in certain niche applications such as aluminum/CO2 fueled engines for endo-atmospheric Martian propulsion. Light metal fueled MHD generators also present promising opportunities with respect to electric power generation for electromagnetic launch assist. This presentation will discuss the applications potential of these concepts with respect to aero ace propulsion and power and will review the current status of the development efforts.

  12. Energetic particles at venus: galileo results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D J; McEntire, R W; Krimigis, S M; Roelof, E C; Jaskulek, S; Tossman, B; Wilken, B; Stüdemann, W; Armstrong, T P; Fritz, T A; Lanzerotti, L J; Roederer, J G

    1991-09-27

    At Venus the Energetic Particles Detector (EPD) on the Galileo spacecraft measured the differential energy spectra and angular distributions of ions >22 kiloelectron volts (keV) and electrons > 15 keV in energy. The only time particles were observed by EPD was in a series of episodic events [0546 to 0638 universal time (UT)] near closest approach (0559:03 UT). Angular distributions were highly anisotropic, ordered by the magnetic field, and showed ions arriving from the hemisphere containing Venus and its bow shock. The spectra showed a power law form with intensities observed into the 120- to 280-keV range. Comparisons with model bow shock calculations show that these energetic ions are associated with the venusian foreshock-bow shock region. Shock-drift acceleration in the venusian bow shock seems the most likely process responsible for the observed ions.

  13. Energetics of edge oxidization of graphene nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuma, Airi; Yamanaka, Ayaka; Okada, Susumu

    2018-06-01

    On the basis of the density functional theory, we studied the geometries and energetics of O atoms adsorbed on graphene edges for simulating the initial stage of the edge oxidization of graphene. Our calculations showed that oxygen atoms are preferentially adsorbed onto the graphene edges with the zigzag portion, resulting in a large adsorption energy of about 5 eV. On the other hand, the edges with armchair shape are rarely oxidized, or the oxidization causes substantial structural reconstructions, because of the stable covalent bond at the armchair edge with the triple bond nature. Furthermore, the energetics sensitively depends on the edge angles owing to the inhomogeneity of the charge density at the edge atomic sites.

  14. Green colorants based on energetic azole borates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glück, Johann; Klapötke, Thomas M; Rusan, Magdalena; Stierstorfer, Jörg

    2014-11-24

    The investigation of green-burning boron-based compounds as colorants in pyrotechnic formulations as alternative for barium nitrate, which is a hazard to health and to the environment, is reported. Metal-free and nitrogen-rich dihydrobis(5-aminotetrazolyl)borate salts and dihydrobis(1,3,4-triazolyl)borate salts have been synthesized and characterized by NMR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, mass spectrometry, and vibrational spectroscopy. Their thermal and energetic properties have been determined as well. Several pyrotechnic compositions using selected azolyl borate salts as green colorants were investigated. Formulations with ammonium dinitramide and ammonium nitrate as oxidizers and boron and magnesium as fuels were tested. The burn time, dominant wavelength, spectral purity, luminous intensity, and luminous efficiency as well as the thermal and energetic properties of these compositions were measured. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. The composition of corotating energetic particle streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, R.E.; von Rosenvinge, T.T.; McDonald, F.B.

    1978-01-01

    The relative abundances of 1.5--23 MeV per nucleon ions in corotating nucleon streams are compared with ion abundances in particle events associated with solar flares and with solar and solar wind abundances. He/O and C/O ratios are found to be a factor of the order 2--3 greater in corotating streams than in flare-associated events. The distribution of H/He ratios in corotating streams is found to be much narrower and of lower average value than in flare-associated events. H/He in corotating energetic particle streams compares favorably in both lack of variability and numerical value with H/He in high-speed solar wind plasma streams. The lack of variability suggests that the source population for the corotating energetic particles is the solar wind, a suggestion consistent with acceleration of the corotating particles in interplanetary space

  16. Energetic Particle Estimates for Stellar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngblood, Allison; Chamberlin, Phil; Woods, Tom

    2018-01-01

    In the heliosphere, energetic particles are accelerated away from the Sun during solar flares and/or coronal mass ejections where they frequently impact the Earth and other solar system bodies. Solar (or stellar) energetic particles (SEPs) not only affect technological assets, but also influence mass loss and chemistry in planetary atmospheres (e.g., depletion of ozone). SEPs are increasingly recognized as an important factor in assessing exoplanet habitability, but we do not yet have constraints on SEP emission from any stars other than the Sun. Until indirect measurements are available, we must assume solar-like particle production and apply correlations between solar flares and SEPs detected near Earth to stellar flares. We present improved scaling relations between solar far-UV flare flux and >10 MeV proton flux near Earth. We apply these solar scaling relations to far-UV flares from exoplanet host stars and discuss the implications for modeling chemistry and mass loss in exoplanet atmospheres.

  17. Assessment of CRBR core disruptive accident energetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theofanous, T.G.; Bell, C.R.

    1984-03-01

    The results of an independent assessment of core disruptive accident energetics for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor are presented in this document. This assessment was performed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission under the direction of the CRBR Program Office within the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. It considered in detail the accident behavior for three accident initiators that are representative of three different classes of events; unprotected loss of flow, unprotected reactivity insertion, and protected loss of heat sink. The primary system's energetics accommodation capability was realistically, yet conservatively, determined in terms of core events. This accommodation capability was found to be equivalent to an isentropic work potential for expansion to one atmosphere of 2550 MJ or a ramp rate of about 200 $/s applied to a classical two-phase disassembly

  18. Energetic Issues Concerning the Content of Money

    OpenAIRE

    Negoescu Gheorghe; Radu Riana Iren

    2012-01-01

    In full times of crisis, money has become increasingly more important. We put the issue to analyze whether money can be considered a form of energy. The article is taking into consideration the conservation of energy and for money is due to kinetic energy during the boom and to potential energy during the crisis. In the article is also made an illustration of the energetic content of money at a company’s level.

  19. Multiphase Combustion of Metalized Nanocomposite Energetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-19

    on thermal conductivity and absorption coefficient for consolidated aluminum nanoparticles, International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, (06...28. Stacy, S.C., Zhang, X., Pantoya, M.L., Weeks, B., Effect of Density on Thermal Conductivity and Absorption Coefficient for Consolidated Aluminum...energetic powder to ESD stimuli generated from a piezo electric crystal ( PZT ). Results show that a high PZT dielectric strength leads to faster

  20. Problems Of Transport Energetics In Lithuania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrazevicius, A.; Baublys, J.

    2001-01-01

    Lithuania has more than one million of transport means, the thermal capacity of which is about 50 mill. kW, i.e. 10 times more than the capacity of all thermal power stations. In the 21st century electrical energy will be used for transport means instead of petrol, and new capacities of electric stations in Lithuania will be necessary. All perspective transport means are described and conclusions for Lithuanian energetics are presented. (author)

  1. The energetic alpha particle transport method EATM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkpatrick, R.C.

    1998-02-01

    The EATM method is an evolving attempt to find an efficient method of treating the transport of energetic charged particles in a dynamic magnetized (MHD) plasma for which the mean free path of the particles and the Larmor radius may be long compared to the gradient lengths in the plasma. The intent is to span the range of parameter space with the efficiency and accuracy thought necessary for experimental analysis and design of magnetized fusion targets

  2. Computational Chemistry Toolkit for Energetic Materials Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    industry are aggressively engaged in efforts to develop multiscale modeling and simulation methodologies to model and analyze complex phenomena across...energetic materials design. It is hoped that this toolkit will evolve into a collection of well-integrated multiscale modeling methodologies...Experimenta Theoreticala This Work 1-5-Diamino-4- methyl- tetrazolium nitrate 8.4 41.7 47.5 1-5-Diamino-4- methyl- tetrazolium azide 138.1 161.6

  3. Nuclear energy I, Non-energetic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lartigue G, J.; Navarrete T, M.; Cabrera M, L.; Arandia, P.A.; Arriola S, H.

    1986-01-01

    The nuclear energy is defined as the energy produced or absorbed in the nuclear reactions, therefore, these are divided in endothermic and exothermic. The exothermic nuclear reactions present more interest from the point of view of its applications and they can show in four main forms: radioactivity (from 0 to 4 MeV/reaction; light nucleus fusion ( ∼ 20 MeV/reaction), heavy nucleus fusion (∼ 200 MeV/reaction) and nucleons annihilation ( ∼ 2000 MeV/reaction). Nowadays only the fission has reached the stage of profitable energetic application, finding the other three forms in research and development. The non-energetic applications of the nuclear energy are characterized by they do not require of prior conversion to another form of energy and they are made through the use of radioisotopes as well as through the use of endothermic reaction caused in particle accelerators. In this work are presented some of the non-energetic applications with its theoretical and experimental basis as well as its benefits of each one. (Author)

  4. Sol-Gel Manufactured Energetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Randall L.; Lee, Ronald S.; Tillotson, Thomas M.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Swansiger, Rosalind W.; Fox, Glenn A.

    2005-05-17

    Sol-gel chemistry is used for the preparation of energetic materials (explosives, propellants and pyrotechnics) with improved homogeneity, and/or which can be cast to near-net shape, and/or made into precision molding powders. The sol-gel method is a synthetic chemical process where reactive monomers are mixed into a solution, polymerization occurs leading to a highly cross-linked three dimensional solid network resulting in a gel. The energetic materials can be incorporated during the formation of the solution or during the gel stage of the process. The composition, pore, and primary particle sizes, gel time, surface areas, and density may be tailored and controlled by the solution chemistry. The gel is then dried using supercritical extraction to produce a highly porous low density aerogel or by controlled slow evaporation to produce a xerogel. Applying stress during the extraction phase can result in high density materials. Thus, the sol-gel method can be used for precision detonator explosive manufacturing as well as producing precision explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics, along with high power composite energetic materials.

  5. Energetic Particles Dynamics in Mercury's Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Brian M.; Ryou, A.S.; Sibeck, D. G.; Alexeev, I. I.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the drift paths of energetic particles in Mercury's magnetosphere by tracing their motion through a model magnetic field. Test particle simulations solving the full Lorentz force show a quasi-trapped energetic particle population that gradient and curvature drift around the planet via "Shabansky" orbits, passing though high latitudes in the compressed dayside by equatorial latitudes on the nightside. Due to their large gyroradii, energetic H+ and Na+ ions will typically collide with the planet or the magnetopause and will not be able to complete a full drift orbit. These simulations provide direct comparison for recent spacecraft measurements from MESSENGER. Mercury's offset dipole results in an asymmetric loss cone and therefore an asymmetry in particle precipitation with more particles precipitating in the southern hemisphere. Since the planet lacks an atmosphere, precipitating particles will collide directly with the surface of the planet. The incident charged particles can kick up neutrals from the surface and have implications for the formation of the exosphere and weathering of the surface

  6. Calculation of the energetics of chemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunning, T.H. Jr.; Harding, L.B.; Shepard, R.L.; Harrison, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    To calculate the energetics of chemical reactions we must solve the electronic Schroedinger equation for the molecular conformations of importance for the reactive encounter. Substantial changes occur in the electronic structure of a molecular system as the reaction progresses from reactants through the transition state to products. To describe these changes, our approach includes the following three elements: the use of multiconfiguration self-consistent field wave functions to provide a consistent zero-order description of the electronic structure of the reactants, transition state, and products; the use of configuration interaction techniques to describe electron correlation effects needed to provide quantitative predictions of the reaction energetics; and the use of large, optimized basis sets to provide the flexibility needed to describe the variations in the electronic distributions. With this approach we are able to study reactions involving as many as 5--6 atoms with errors of just a few kcal/mol in the predicted reaction energetics. Predictions to chemical accuracy, i.e., to 1 kcal/mol or less, are not yet feasible, although continuing improvements in both the theoretical methodology and computer technology suggest that this will soon be possible, at least for reactions involving small polyatomic species. 4 figs.

  7. Cost of reproduction in selected species of zooplankton (rotifers and cladocerans)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarma, S.S.S.; Nandini, S.; Gulati, R.D.

    2002-01-01

    Reproduction is an energetically costly biological process. Among the freshwater zooplankton, rotifers and cladocerans reproduce parthenogenetically and the cost of reproduction can be estimated using the life table data from demographic studies. Reduced probability of future survival or future

  8. Distribution and Fate of Energetics on DoD Test and Training Ranges: Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    of this project was to develop a low-cost, fieldable process for the rapid decontamination of energetic material from range scrap. Debris was...types of range contaminants such as heavy metals, petroleum products, and radioactive compounds when appropriate. Just as data generated on U.S...Generally, stainless steel scoops were used to sample noncohesive soils such as sands and gravels, and specially designed corers were used in more

  9. Impact of cosmic rays and solar energetic particles on the Earth’s ionosphere and atmosphere

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Velinov, P. I. Y.; Asenovski, S.; Kudela, K.; Laštovička, Jan; Mateev, L.; Mishev, A.; Tonev, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 3, 26 March (2013), A14/1-A14/17 ISSN 2115-7251 Grant - others:European COST Action(XE) ES0803 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : cosmic rays * solar energetic particles * ionization * ionosphere * atmosphere * solar activity * solar-terrestrial relationships Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 2.519, year: 2013 http://www.swsc-journal.org/articles/swsc/abs/2013/01/swsc120040/swsc120040.html

  10. Study on penetration-induced initiation of energetic fragment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Xiangxin; Xu, Heyang

    2017-09-01

    In order to investigate penetration-induced initiation of energetic fragment penetrating target, PTFE/Al (mass ratio 73.5/26.5) pressed and sintered into a Ф8mm × 8mm cylinder. To form energetic fragment, the cylinder was put into a closed container made by 35CrMnSiA. The container is 12mm long, 2mm thick. Energetic fragments were launched by a 14.5mm ballistic gun with a series of velocities and the penetrate process was simulated by AUTODYN-3D. The results show that the stress peak of energetic material exceed the initiation threshold, and energetic material will deflagrate, when energetic fragments impact velocity more than 800 m/s. The research results can provide reference for designs of energetic warhead.

  11. Energetics of dislocation transformations in hcp metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Zhaoxuan; Yin, Binglun; Curtin, W.A.

    2016-01-01

    Dislocation core structures of hcp metals are highly complex and differ significantly among the hcp family. Some dislocations undergo unconventional transformations that have significant effects on the material plastic flow. Here, the energetics of dislocation dissociations are analyzed in a general anisotropic linear elastic theory framework for transformations in which changes in the partial Burgers vectors are small. Quantitative analyses on various transformations are made using DFT-computed stacking fault energies and partial Burgers vectors. Specifically, possible transformations of the mixed, edge, and screw 〈c+a〉 and screw 〈a〉 dislocations in 6 hcp metals (Mg, Ti, Zr, Re, Zn, Cd) are studied. Climb dissociation of mixed or edge 〈c+a〉 dislocations to the Basal plane is energetically favorable in all 6 metals and thus only limited by thermal activation. The 〈c+a〉 screw dislocation is energetically preferable on Pyramidal I for Ti, Zr, and Re, and on Pyramidal II for Zn and Cd. In Mg, the energy difference between screw 〈c+a〉 on Pyramidal I and II planes is small, suggesting relatively easy cross-slip. For the screw 〈a〉, Basal dissociation is energetically favorable in Mg, Re, Zn and Cd, while Prism dissociation is strongly favorable in Ti and Zr. Only Ti, Zr and Re show a metastable state for dissociation on the Prism plane, and the energy difference between screw 〈a〉 on the Prism and Pyramidal I planes is relatively small in all systems, suggesting relatively easy cross-slip of 〈a〉 in Ti and Zr. The elastic analysis thus provides a single framework able to capture the controlling energetics for different dissociations and slip systems in hcp metals. When the calculated energy differences are very small, the results point to the need for detailed modeling of the atomistic core structure. Moreover, the analyses rationalize broad experimental observations on dominant slip systems and dislocation behaviours, and provide

  12. Energetic ion diagnostics using neutron flux measurements during pellet injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidbrink, W.W.

    1986-01-01

    Neutron measurements during injection of deuterium pellets into deuterium plasmas on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) indicate that the fractional increase in neutron emission about 0.5 msec after pellet injection is proportional to the fraction of beam-plasma reactions to total fusion reactions in the unperturbed plasma. These observations suggest three diagnostic applications of neutron measurements during pellet injection: (1) measurement of the beam-plasma reaction rate in deuterium plasmas for use in determining the fusion Q in an equivalent deuterium-tritium plasma, (2) measurement of the radial profile of energetic beam ions by varying the pellet size and velocity, and (3) measurement of the ''temperature'' of ions accelerated during wave heating. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Energetic ion diagnostics using neutron flux measurements during pellet injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidbrink, W.W.

    1986-01-01

    Neutron measurements during injection of deuterium pellets into deuterium plasmas on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) indicate that the fractional increase in neutron emission about 0.5 msec after pellet injection is proportional to the fraction of beam-plasma reactions to total fusion reactions in the unperturbed plasma. These observations suggest three diagnostic applications of neutron measurements during pellet injection: (1) measurement of the beam-plasma reaction rate in deuterium plasmas for use in determining the fusion Q in an equivalent deuterium-tritium plasma, (2) measurement of the radial profile of energetic beam ions by varying the pellet size and velocity, and (3) measurement of the ''temperature'' of ions accelerated during wave heating. 18 refs., 3 figs

  14. Energetic diversification in the interconnected electric system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villanueva M, C.; Beltran M, H.; Serrano G, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    three regions of the curve of load duration, as one hopes the demand evolves. It is concluded with a series of observations regarding the sensitivity analysis of the cost of the nucleo electric central compared with that of the power stations of combined cycle and their impact in the total costs of the generated electricity in the national interconnected system. The important reductions of CO 2 emissions to the atmosphere when limiting the use of combined cycle centrals are also noticed. (Author)

  15. Mammalian energetics. Flexible energetics of cheetah hunting strategies provide resistance against kleptoparasitism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scantlebury, David M; Mills, Michael G L; Wilson, Rory P; Wilson, John W; Mills, Margaret E J; Durant, Sarah M; Bennett, Nigel C; Bradford, Peter; Marks, Nikki J; Speakman, John R

    2014-10-03

    Population viability is driven by individual survival, which in turn depends on individuals balancing energy budgets. As carnivores may function close to maximum sustained power outputs, decreased food availability or increased activity may render some populations energetically vulnerable. Prey theft may compromise energetic budgets of mesopredators, such as cheetahs and wild dogs, which are susceptible to competition from larger carnivores. We show that daily energy expenditure (DEE) of cheetahs was similar to size-based predictions and positively related to distance traveled. Theft at 25% only requires cheetahs to hunt for an extra 1.1 hour per day, increasing DEE by just 12%. Therefore, not all mesopredators are energetically constrained by direct competition. Other factors that increase DEE, such as those that increase travel, may be more important for population viability. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  16. Energetic optimization as a result of improvement for social comfort: international example

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melandri, D.

    2007-07-01

    Comfort of human beings is related to the availability of energetic sources. In these terms, connection between comfort and energy becomes synonymous of connection between comfort and productivity. Thus Energy Management can be considered as a tool to optimize different parameters, with clear results on global efficiency of all processes. A clear energetic analysis, besides standard evaluation, can bring to optimization of following parameters: Lay out, Human resources, Internal logistic processes, Business productivity. Through energetic cost, for example, it is possible to have reference indicators useful for the lay out and number of employees optimization in offices. An International study has been conducted in this sense, with important and surprising results. A design for a building in Australia shows that an excellent energetic efficiency brings to an annual saving of 10 ml dollars, as a result of the improved efficiency of the working area. Similar examples can be found in several parts of the world. For these reasons, in civil and tertiary sector, some important pollution causes must be considered during the design of energy efficiency systems: atmospheric pollution due to chemical agents and radiations, acoustic pollution, vibration pollution, microclimate states, lighting. All these elements are part of the study. (auth)

  17. Hydrodynamic trails produced by Daphnia: size and energetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramarathna, Lalith N; Noss, Christian; Lorke, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on quantifying hydrodynamic trails produced by freely swimming zooplankton. We combined volumetric tracking of swimming trajectories with planar observations of the flow field induced by Daphnia of different size and swimming in different patterns. Spatial extension of the planar flow field along the trajectories was used to interrogate the dimensions (length and volume) and energetics (dissipation rate of kinetic energy and total dissipated power) of the trails. Our findings demonstrate that neither swimming pattern nor size of the organisms affect the trail width or the dissipation rate. However, we found that the trail volume increases with increasing organism size and swimming velocity, more precisely the trail volume is proportional to the third power of Reynolds number. This increase furthermore results in significantly enhanced total dissipated power at higher Reynolds number. The biggest trail volume observed corresponds to about 500 times the body volume of the largest daphnids. Trail-averaged viscous dissipation rate of the swimming daphnids vary in the range of 1.8 x 10(-6) W/kg to 3.4 x 10(-6) W/kg and the observed magnitudes of total dissipated power between 1.3 x 10(-9) W and 1 x 10(-8) W, respectively. Among other zooplankton species, daphnids display the highest total dissipated power in their trails. These findings are discussed in the context of fluid mixing and transport by organisms swimming at intermediate Reynolds numbers.

  18. Parasites of fish larvae: do they follow metabolic energetic laws?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Gabriela; Landaeta, Mauricio F; Palacios-Fuentes, Pamela; George-Nascimento, Mario

    2015-11-01

    Eumetazoan parasites in fish larvae normally exhibit large body sizes relative to their hosts. This observation raises a question about the potential effects that parasites might have on small fish. We indirectly evaluated this question using energetic metabolic laws based on body volume and the parasite densities. We compared the biovolume as well as the numeric and volumetric densities of parasites over the host body volume of larval and juvenile-adult fish and the average of these parasitological descriptors for castrator parasites and the parasites found in the fish studied here. We collected 5266 fish larvae using nearshore zooplankton sampling and 1556 juveniles and adult fish from intertidal rocky pools in central Chile. We considered only the parasitized hosts: 482 fish larvae and 629 juvenile-adult fish. We obtained 31 fish species; 14 species were in both plankton and intertidal zones. Fish larvae exhibited a significantly smaller biovolume but larger numeric and volumetric densities of parasites than juvenile-adult fish. Therefore, fish larvae showed a large proportion of parasite biovolume per unit of body host (cm(3)). However, the general scaling of parasitological descriptors and host body volume were similar between larvae and juvenile-adult fish. The ratio between the biovolume of parasites and the host body volume in fish larvae was similar to the proportion observed in castrator parasites. Furthermore, the ratios were different from those of juvenile-adult fish, which suggests that the presence of parasites implies a high energetic cost for fish larvae that would diminish the fitness of these small hosts.

  19. Life cycle costs for the optimized production of hydrogen and biogas from microalgae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Markus A.; Weiss, Annika

    2014-01-01

    Despite the known advantages of microalgae compared with other biomass providers or fossil fuels, microalgae are predominately produced for high-value products. Economic constraints might limit the commercial energetic use of microalgae. Therefore, we identify the LCCs (life cycle costs) and economic hot spots for photoautotrophic hydrogen generation from photoautotrophically grown Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in a novel staggered PBR (photobioreactor) and the anaerobic digestion of the residual biomass to obtain biogas. The novel PBR aims at minimizing energy consumption for mixing and aeration and at optimizing the light conditions for algal growth. The LCCs per MJ amounted to 12.17 Euro for hydrogen and 0.99 Euro for biogas in 2011 for Germany. Market prices per MJ of 0.02 Euro for biogas and 0.04 Euro for hydrogen are considerably exceeded. Major contributors to operating costs, about 70% of total LCCs, are personnel and overhead costs. The investment costs consist to about 92% of those for the PBR with a share of 61% membrane costs. The choice of Madrid as another production location with higher incident solar irradiation and lower personnel costs reduces LCCs by about 40%. Projecting LCCs to 2030 with experience curves, the LCCs still exceed future market prices. - Highlights: • Life cycle cost assessment of hydrogen and biogas from microalgae in a novel photobioreactor. • Current and future (2030) economically viable production unlikely in Germany. • Personnel and photobioreactor costs are major cost drivers. • Changing the production location may significantly reduce the life cycle costs

  20. Development of high pressure deuterium gas targets for the generation of intense mono-energetic fast neutron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzek, J.; Richardson, K.; Franklyn, C.B.; Waites, A.; McMurray, W.R.; Watterson, J.I.W.; Tapper, U.A.S.

    1999-01-01

    Two different technical solutions to the problem of generation of mono-energetic fast neutron beams on the gaseous targets are presented here. A simple and cost-effective design of a cooled windowed gas target system is described in the first part of this paper. It utilises a thin metallic foil window and circulating deuterium gas cooled down to 100 K. The ultimate beam handling capability of such target is determined by the properties of the window. Reliable performance of this gas target system was achieved at 1 bar of deuterium gas, when exposed to a 45 μA beam of 5 MeV deuterons, for periods in excess of 6 h. Cooling of the target gas resulted in increased fast neutron output and improved neutron to gamma-ray ratio. The second part of this paper discusses the design of a high pressure, windowless gas target for use with pulsed, low duty cycle accelerators. A rotating seal concept was applied to reduce the gas load in a differentially pumped system. This allows operation at 1.23 bar of deuterium gas pressure in the gas cell region. Such a gas target system is free from the limitations of the windowed target but special attention has to be paid to the heat dissipation capability of the beam dump, due to the use of a thin target. The rotating seal concept is particularly suitable for use with accelerators such as radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linacs that operate with a very high peak current at low duty cycle. The performance of both target systems was comprehensively characterized using the time-of-flight (TOF) technique. This demonstrated that very good quality mono-energetic fast neutron beams were produced with the slow neutron and gamma-ray component below 10% of the total target output

  1. Solar Energetic Particle Studies with PAMELA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravar, U.; Christian, E. R.; deNolfo, Georgia; Ryan, J. M.; Stochaj, S.

    2011-01-01

    The origin of the high-energy solar energetic particles (SEPs) may conceivably be found in composition signatures that reflect the elemental abundances of the low corona and chromosphere vs. the high corona and solar wind. The presence of secondaries, such as neutrons and positrons, could indicate a low coronal origin of these particles. Velocity dispersion of different species and over a wide energy range can be used to determine energetic particle release times at the Sun. Together with multi-wavelength imaging, in- situ observations of a variety of species, and coverage over a wide energy range provide a critical tool in identifying the origin of SEPs, understanding the evolution of these events within the context of solar active regions, and constraining the acceleration mechanisms at play. The Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA)instrument, successfully launched in 2006 and expected to remain operational until at least the beginning of 2012, measures energetic particles in the same energy range as ground-based neutron monitors, and lower energies as well. It thus bridges the gap between low energy in-situ observations and ground-based Ground Level Enhancements (GLE) observations. It can measure the charge (up to Z=6) and atomic number of the detected particles, and it can identify and measure positrons and detect neutrons-an unprecedented array of data channels that we can bring to bear on the origin of high-energy SEPs. We present prelimiary results on the for the 2006 December 13 solar flare and GLE and the 2011 March 21 solar flare, both registering proton and helium enhancements in PAMELA. Together with multi- spacecraft contextual data and modeling, we discuss the PAMELA results in the context of the different acceleration mechanisms at play.

  2. Synthesis of a new energetic nitrate ester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez, David E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Nitrate esters have been known as useful energetic materials since the discovery of nitroglycerin by Ascanio Sobrero in 1846. The development of methods to increase the safety and utility of nitroglycerin by Alfred Nobel led to the revolutionary improvement in the utility of nitroglycerin in explosive applications in the form of dynamite. Since then, many nitrate esters have been prepared and incorporated into military applications such as double-based propellants, detonators and as energetic plasticizers. Nitrate esters have also been shown to have vasodilatory effects in humans and thus have been studied and used for treatments of ailments such as angina. The mechanism of the biological response towards nitrate esters has been elucidated recently. Interestingly, many of the nitrate esters used for military purposes are liquids (ethylene glycol dinitrate, propylene glycol dinitrate, etc). Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) is one of the only solid nitrate esters, besides nitrocellulose, that is used in any application. Unfortunately, PETN melting point is above 100 {sup o}C, and thus must be pressed as a solid for detonator applications. A more practical material would be a melt-castable explosive, for potential simplification of manufacturing processes. Herein we describe the synthesis of a new energetic nitrate ester (1) that is a solid at ambient temperatures, has a melting point of 85-86 {sup o}C and has the highest density of any known nitrate ester composed only of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen. We also describe the chemical, thermal and sensitivity properties of 1 as well as some preliminary explosive performance data.

  3. Observation of enhanced radial transport of energetic ion due to energetic particle mode destabilized by helically-trapped energetic ion in the Large Helical Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, K.; Isobe, M.; Kawase, H.; Nishitani, T.; Seki, R.; Osakabe, M.; LHD Experiment Group

    2018-04-01

    A deuterium experiment was initiated to achieve higher-temperature and higher-density plasmas in March 2017 in the Large Helical Device (LHD). The central ion temperature notably increases compared with that in hydrogen experiments. However, an energetic particle mode called the helically-trapped energetic-ion-driven resistive interchange (EIC) mode is often excited by intensive perpendicular neutral beam injections on high ion-temperature discharges. The mode leads to significant decrease of the ion temperature or to limiting the sustainment of the high ion-temperature state. To understand the effect of EIC on the energetic ion confinement, the radial transport of energetic ions is studied by means of the neutron flux monitor and vertical neutron camera newly installed on the LHD. Decreases of the line-integrated neutron profile in core channels show that helically-trapped energetic ions are lost from the plasma.

  4. Energetic particle instabilities in fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharapov, S.E.; Alper, B.; Challis, C.D.; Gryaznevich, M.P.; Kiptily, V.G.; Voitsekhovich, I.; Berk, H.L.; Breizman, B.N.; Borba, D.N.; Nabais, F.; Classen, I.G.J.; Edlund, E.M.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Fu, G.Y.; Ghantous, K.; Gorelenkov, N.N.; Kramer, G.J.; Nazikian, R.; Podesta, M.; White, R.B.; Eriksson, J.; Hellesen, C.; Fasoli, A.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Lauber, P.; Thun, C. Perez von; Gassner, T.; Goloborodko, V.; Schoepf, K.; Yavorskij, V.; Hacquin, S.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Lilley, M.K.; Lisak, M.; Nyqvist, R.; Osakabe, M.; Todo, Y.; Toi, K.; Pinches, S.D.; Porkolab, M.; Shinohara, Koji; Van Zeeland, M.A.

    2012-11-01

    Remarkable progress has been made in diagnosing energetic particle instabilities on present-day machines and in establishing a theoretical framework for describing them. This overview describes the much improved diagnostics of Alfvén instabilities and modelling tools developed world-wide, and discusses progress in interpreting the observed phenomena. A multi-machine comparison is presented giving information on the performance of both diagnostics and modelling tools for different plasma conditions outlining expectations for ITER based on our present knowledge. (author)

  5. Solar energetic particles and radio burst emission

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Miteva, R.; Samwel, S. W.; Krupař, Vratislav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7 (2017), č. článku A37. ISSN 2115-7251 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GJ17-06818Y Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : solar energetic particles * solar radio burst emission * solar cycle Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 2.446, year: 2016 https://www.swsc-journal.org/ articles /swsc/abs/2017/01/swsc170028/swsc170028.html

  6. Energetic Ion Loss Diagnostic for the Wendelstein 7-AS Stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darrow, D. S.; Werner, A.; Weller, A.

    2000-01-01

    A diagnostic to measure the loss of energetic ions from the Wendelstein 7-AS (W7-AS) stellarator has been built. It is capable of measuring losses of both neutral beam ions and energetic ions arising from ion cyclotron resonant heating. The probe can measure losses of both clockwise and counterclockwise-going energetic ions simultaneously, and accepts a wide range of pitch angles in both directions. Initial measurements by the diagnostic are reported

  7. The Energetics of Economics (Money as access to Energy)

    OpenAIRE

    Ternyik, Stephen I.

    2013-01-01

    Money is being portrayed as temporal access to energy and a new methodical approach to the energetics of the human economy is introduced.The economic evolution of world system energetics is put into the historical focus of all global monetary civilization, reaching back to Sumerian city states.This long wave energetics of human economic action clearly points to the biophysical boundaries of the globalized monetary production economy which is also based on natural law.The future perspective of...

  8. Energetics of hydrogen bonding in proteins: a model compound study.

    OpenAIRE

    Habermann, S. M.; Murphy, K. P.

    1996-01-01

    Differences in the energetics of amide-amide and amide-hydroxyl hydrogen bonds in proteins have been explored from the effect of hydroxyl groups on the structure and dissolution energetics of a series of crystalline cyclic dipeptides. The calorimetrically determined energetics are interpreted in light of the crystal structures of the studied compounds. Our results indicate that the amide-amide and amide-hydroxyl hydrogen bonds both provide considerable enthalpic stability, but that the amide-...

  9. Total Factbook 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This report presents the activities and results of the Group Total-Fina-Elf for the year 2003. It brings information and economic data on the following topics: the corporate and business; the upstream activities with the reserves, the costs, standardized measure and changes of discounted future net cash flow,oil and gas acreage, drilling, liquefied natural gas, pipelines; downstream activities with refining and marketing maps, refinery, petroleum products, sales, retail gasoline outlets; chemicals with sales and operating income by sector, major applications, base chemicals and polymers, intermediates and performance polymers. (A.L.B.)

  10. Total 2004 fact book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This report presents the activities and results of the Group Total-Fina-Elf for the year 2004. It brings information and economic data on the following topics: the corporate and business; the upstream activities with the reserves, the costs, standardized measure and changes of discounted future net cash flow,oil and gas acreage, drilling, liquefied natural gas, pipelines; downstream activities with refining and marketing maps, refinery, petroleum products, sales, retail gasoline outlets; chemicals with sales and operating income by sector, major applications, base chemicals and polymers, intermediates and performance polymers. (A.L.B.)

  11. Dynamic optimization of a biped model: Energetic walking gaits with different mechanical and gait parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang An

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Energy consumption is one of the problems for bipedal robots walking. For the purpose of studying the parameter effects on the design of energetic walking bipeds with strong adaptability, we use a dynamic optimization method on our new walking model to first investigate the effects of the mechanical parameters, including mass and length distribution, on the walking efficiency. Then, we study the energetic walking gait features with the combinations of walking speed and step length. Our walking model is designed upon Srinivasan’s model. Dynamic optimization is used for a free search with minimal constraints. The results show that the cost of transport of a certain gait increases with the increase in the mass and length distribution parameters, except for that the cost of transport decreases with big length distribution parameter and long step length. We can also find a corresponding range of walking speed and step length, in which the variation in one of the two parameters has no obvious effect on the cost of transport. With fixed mechanical parameters, the cost of transport increases with the increase in the walking speed. There is a speed–step length relationship for walking with minimal cost of transport. The hip torque output strategy is adjusted in two situations to meet the walking requirements.

  12. Workshop 'Reducing the share of drilling in the total cost of geothermal power generation'; Workshop 'Senkung des bohrtechnischen Anteils an den geothermischen Stromgestehungskosten'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    For a further development of geothermal power generation, technological adaptations of drilling technology will be required that will reduce the specific power generation cost. This workshop discussed the options for adaptation and the resulting cost improvements. Both technical and non-technical issues were tackled. The full-text documents of the workshop (overheads) can be downloaded at http://www.ie-leipzig.de. Subjects were: (1) Downhole engine technology; (2) New drilling equipment in consideration of geothermal requirements; (3) New drilling equipment in consideration of geothermal requirements; (4) Innovative drilling concepts/ Current cost allotment; (5) Higher efficiency in drilling with flushing adapted to drilling horizons; (6) MWD/LWD technologies of the KW industry; (7) Completion technology in geothermal plants; (8) Time and cost planning in drilling plans; (9) Cost-optimized drilling from a drilling contractor's view; (10) Requirements and obstacles in the licensing of new drilling equipment. (orig.)

  13. Synthesis and evaluation of energetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhosh, G.

    Over the years new generations of propellants and explosives are being developed. High performance and pollution prevention issues have become the subject of interest in recent years. Desired properties of these materials are a halogen-free, nitrogen and oxygen rich molecular composition with high density and a positive heat of formation. The dinitramide anion is a new oxy anion of nitrogen and forms salts with variety of metal, organic and inorganic cations. Particular interest is in ammonium dinitramide (ADN, NH4N(NO 2)2) which is a potentially useful energetic oxidizer. ADN is considered as one of the most promising substitutes for ammonium perchlorate (AP, NH4ClO4) in currently used composite propellants. It is unique among energetic materials in that it has no carbon or chlorine; its combustion products are not detrimental to the atmosphere. Unquestionable advantage of ADN over AP is the significant improvement in the performance of solid rocket motors by 5-15%. The present thesis is centered on the experimental results along with discussion of some of the most pertinent aspects related to the synthesis and characterization of few dinitramide salts. The chemistry, mechanism and kinetics of the formation of dinitramide salts by nitration of deactivated amines are investigated. The evaluation of the thermal and spectral properties along with the adsorption and thermal decomposition characteristics of the dinitramide salts are also explored in this thesis.

  14. Modelling of energetic molecule-surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerford, M.

    2000-09-01

    This thesis contains the results of molecular dynamics simulations of molecule-surface interactions, looking particularly at fullerene molecules and carbon surfaces. Energetic impacts of fullerene molecules on graphite create defect craters. The relationship between the parameters of the impacting molecule and the parameters of the crater axe examined and found to be a function of the energy and velocity of the impacting molecule. Less energetic fullerene molecules can be scattered from a graphite surface and the partitioning of energy after a scattering event is investigated. It is found that a large fraction of the kinetic energy retained after impact is translational energy, with a small fraction of rotational energy and a number of vibrational modes. At impact energies where the surface is not broken and at normal incidence, surface waves axe seen to occur. These waves axe used to develop a method of desorbing molecules from a graphite surface without damage to either the surface or the molecules being desorbed. A number of fullerene molecules are investigated and ways to increase the desorption yield are examined. It is found that this is a successful technique for desorbing large numbers of intact molecules from graphite. This technique could be used for desorbing intact molecules into a gas phase for mass spectrometric analysis. (author)

  15. Energetic particle effects on global MHD modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of energetic particles on MHD type modes are studied by analytical theories and the nonvariational kinetic-MHD stability code (NOVA-K). In particular we address the problems of (1) the stabilization of ideal MHD internal kink modes and the excitation of resonant ''fishbone'' internal modes and (2) the alpha particle destabilization of toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) via transit resonances. Analytical theories are presented to help explain the NOVA-K results. For energetic trapped particles generated by neutral-beam injection (NBI) or ion cyclotron resonant heating (ICRH), a stability window for the n=1 internal kink mode in the hot particle beat space exists even in the absence of core ion finite Larmor radius effect (finite ω *i ). On the other hand, the trapped alpha particles are found to resonantly excite instability of the n=1 internal mode and can lower the critical beta threshold. The circulating alpha particles can strongly destabilize TAE modes via inverse Landau damping associated with the spatial gradient of the alpha particle pressure. 23 refs., 5 figs

  16. Energetics of the terrestrial bow shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamrin, Maria; Gunell, Herbert; Norqvist, Patrik

    2017-04-01

    The solar wind is the primary energy source for the magnetospheric energy budget. Energy can enter through the magnetopause both as kinetic energy (plasma entering via e.g. magnetic reconnection and impulsive penetration) and as electromagnetic energy (e.g. by the conversion of solar wind kinetic energy into electromagnetic energy in magnetopause generators). However, energy is extracted from the solar wind already at the bow shock, before it encounters the terrestrial magnetopause. At the bow shock the supersonic solar wind is slowed down and heated, and the region near the bow shock is known to host many complex processes, including the accelerating of particles and the generation of waves. The processes at and near the bow shock can be discussed in terms of energetics: In a generator (load) process kinetic energy is converted to (from) electromagnetic energy. Bow shock regions where the solar wind is decelerated correspond to generators, while regions where particles are energized (accelerated and heated) correspond to loads. Recently, it has been suggested that currents from the bow shock generator should flow across the magnetosheath and connect to the magnetospause current systems [Siebert and Siscoe, 2002; Lopez et al., 2011]. In this study we use data from the Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) mission to investigate the energetics of the bow shock and the current closure, and we compare with the MHD simulations of Lopez et al., 2011.

  17. Origins of energetic ions in the Earth's magnetosheath. Final Report, 8 May 1991 - 5 Jun. 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuselter, S.A.; Shelley, E.G.; Klumpar, D.M.

    1992-06-01

    The analysis and interpretation of the combined scientific data from the Hot Plasma Composition Experiment (HPCE) and the Charge Energy Mass (CHEM) spectrometer on the Active Mesospheric Particle Tracer Experiment (AMPTE) Charge Composition Explorer (CCE) spacecraft are discussed. These combined data sets have and will be used to survey the energetic ion environment in the Earth's magnetosheath to determine the origins and relative strengths of the energetic ion populations found there. A computer code was developed to analyze and interpret the data sets. The focus of the first year was on the determination of the contribution of leaked magnetospheric protons to the total energetic proton population. Emphasis was placed on intervals when the AMPTE spacecraft was in the plasma depletion layer because it was argued that in this region, only the leaked population contributes to the energetic ion population. Manipulation of the CHEM data and comparison of the CHEM and HPCE data over their common energy range near the magnetopause also contributed directly to a second study of that region

  18. Energetic particles and ionization in the nighttime middle and low latitude ionosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voss, H.D.; Smith, L.G.

    1977-01-01

    Seven Nike Apache rockets, each equipped with an energetic particle spectrometer (12 E 80 keV) and electron-density experiments, were launched from Wallops Island, Virginia and Chilca, Peru, under varying geomagnetic conditions near midnight. At Wallops Island the energetic particle flux (E 40 keV) is found to be strongly dependent on Kp. The pitch-angle distribution is asymmetrical about a peak at 90 D signifying a predominately quasi-trapped flux and explaining the linear increase of count rate with altitute in the altitude region 120 to 200 km. The height-averaged ionization rates derived from the electron-density profiles are consistent with the rates calculated from the observed total particle flux for magnetic index Kp 3. In the region 90 to 110 km it is found that the nighttime ionization is primarily a result of Ly-beta radiation from the geocorona and interplanetary hydrogen for even very disturbed conditions. Below 90 km during rather disturbed conditions energetic electrons can be a significant ionization source. Two energetic particle precipitation zones have been identified at midlatitudes

  19. Energetic particles and ionization in the nighttime middle and low latitude ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, H. D.; Smith, L. G.

    1977-01-01

    Seven Nike Apache rockets, each equipped with an energetic particle spectrometer (12 E 80 keV) and electron-density experiments, were launched from Wallops Island, Virginia and Chilca, Peru, under varying geomagnetic conditions near midnight. At Wallops Island the energetic particle flux (E 40 keV) is found to be strongly dependent on Kp. The pitch-angle distribution is asymmetrical about a peak at 90 D signifying a predominately quasi-trapped flux and explaining the linear increase of count rate with altitute in the altitude region 120 to 200 km. The height-averaged ionization rates derived from the electron-density profiles are consistent with the rates calculated from the observed total particle flux for magnetic index Kp 3. In the region 90 to 110 km it is found that the nighttime ionization is primarily a result of Ly-beta radiation from the geocorona and interplanetary hydrogen for even very disturbed conditions. Below 90 km during rather disturbed conditions energetic electrons can be a significant ionization source. Two energetic particle precipitation zones have been identified at midlatitudes.

  20. The energetic, physiological, and behavioral response of lemon sharks (Negaprion brevirostris) to simulated longline capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouyoucos, Ian A; Suski, Cory D; Mandelman, John W; Brooks, Edward J

    2017-05-01

    Commercial fisheries bycatch is a considerable threat to elasmobranch population recovery, and techniques to mitigate sub-lethal consequences can be improved with data on the energetic, physiological, and behavioral response of individuals to capture. This study sought to estimate the effects of simulated longline capture on the behavior, energy use, and physiological stress of juvenile lemon sharks (Negaprion brevirostris). Captive sharks equipped with acceleration biologgers were subjected to 1h of simulated longline capture. Swimming behaviors were identified from acceleration data using a machine-learning algorithm, energetic costs were estimated using accelerometer-calibrated relationships and respirometry, and physiological stress was quantified with point-of-care blood analyzers. During capture, sharks exhibited nine-fold increases in the frequency of burst swimming, 98% reductions in resting, and swam as often as unrestrained sharks. Aerobic metabolic rates during capture were 8% higher than for unrestrained sharks, and accounted for a 57.7% increase in activity costs when excess post-exercise oxygen consumption was included. Lastly, sharks exhibited significant increases in blood lactate and glucose, but no change in blood pH after 1h of capture. Therefore, these results provide preliminary insight into the behavioral and energetic responses of sharks to capture, and have implications for mitigating sub-lethal consequences of capture for sharks as commercial longline bycatch. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Wingbeat kinematics and energetics during weightlifting in hovering hummingbirds across an elevational gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groom, Derrick J E; Toledo, M Cecilia B; Welch, Kenneth C

    2017-01-01

    Hummingbirds differentially modify flight kinematics in response to the type of challenge imposed. Weightlifting is associated with increases in stroke amplitude (the angle swept by the wings) to increase the angular velocity of the wings and generate the requisite lift, but only up to 160°. Conversely, flight in hypodense air is accomplished by increasing the angular velocity of the wing through increases in wingbeat frequency and stroke amplitudes, with larger increases in amplitude than seen in weightlifting flight. The kinematic differences between these two challenges may be facilitated by the lower energetic costs associated with overcoming drag and inertial forces over the wing during hypodense flight. Thus, we hypothesized that energetic expenditure is what limits the kinematics of weightlifting flight, with lower air densities permitting increases in angular velocity at comparatively lower costs. To explore the kinematic and energetic effects of air density and weightlifting on hovering flight performance, video and respirometric recordings of weightlifting were performed on four species of hummingbirds across an elevational gradient. Contrary to our hypothesis, wingbeat frequency did not vary due to elevation. Instead, wingbeat frequency seems to increase depending on the power requirements for sustaining hovering flight. Furthermore, metabolic rates during hovering increased with angular velocity alone, independent of elevation. Thus, it appears that the differential responses to flight challenges are not driven by variation in the flight media.

  2. Preliminary Hazard Analysis of Supercritical Fluid Separation of Energetic Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1997-01-01

    .... Army Research Laboratory (ARL) and elsewhere, particularly at the Phasex Corporation, Lawrence, MA, has demonstrated the feasibility of separating the energetic moieties by use of supercritical CO2...

  3. Ultrafast Vibrational Spectrometer for Engineered Nanometric Energetic Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dlott, Dana

    2002-01-01

    The proposer requested funding for laser equipment that would be used to study engineered nanometric energetic materials consisting of nanometer metal particles, passivation layers and oxidizing binders...

  4. Segregation and redistribution of end-of-process energetic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, R.A.; Cummins, B.; Gonzalez, M.A.

    1993-03-01

    A system recovering then recycling or reusing end-of-process energetic materials has been developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The system promotes separating energetic materials with high potential for reuse or recycling from those that have no further value. A feature of the system is a computerized electronic bulletin board for advertising the availability of surplus and recovered energetic materials and process chemicals to LLNL researchers, and for posting energetic materials, ''want ads.'' The system was developed and implemented to promote waste minimization and pollution prevention at LLNL

  5. Hunter-gatherer energetics and human obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontzer, Herman; Raichlen, David A; Wood, Brian M; Mabulla, Audax Z P; Racette, Susan B; Marlowe, Frank W

    2012-01-01

    Western lifestyles differ markedly from those of our hunter-gatherer ancestors, and these differences in diet and activity level are often implicated in the global obesity pandemic. However, few physiological data for hunter-gatherer populations are available to test these models of obesity. In this study, we used the doubly-labeled water method to measure total daily energy expenditure (kCal/day) in Hadza hunter-gatherers to test whether foragers expend more energy each day than their Western counterparts. As expected, physical activity level, PAL, was greater among Hadza foragers than among Westerners. Nonetheless, average daily energy expenditure of traditional Hadza foragers was no different than that of Westerners after controlling for body size. The metabolic cost of walking (kcal kg(-1) m(-1)) and resting (kcal kg(-1) s(-1)) were also similar among Hadza and Western groups. The similarity in metabolic rates across a broad range of cultures challenges current models of obesity suggesting that Western lifestyles lead to decreased energy expenditure. We hypothesize that human daily energy expenditure may be an evolved physiological trait largely independent of cultural differences.

  6. Hunter-gatherer energetics and human obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Pontzer

    Full Text Available Western lifestyles differ markedly from those of our hunter-gatherer ancestors, and these differences in diet and activity level are often implicated in the global obesity pandemic. However, few physiological data for hunter-gatherer populations are available to test these models of obesity. In this study, we used the doubly-labeled water method to measure total daily energy expenditure (kCal/day in Hadza hunter-gatherers to test whether foragers expend more energy each day than their Western counterparts. As expected, physical activity level, PAL, was greater among Hadza foragers than among Westerners. Nonetheless, average daily energy expenditure of traditional Hadza foragers was no different than that of Westerners after controlling for body size. The metabolic cost of walking (kcal kg(-1 m(-1 and resting (kcal kg(-1 s(-1 were also similar among Hadza and Western groups. The similarity in metabolic rates across a broad range of cultures challenges current models of obesity suggesting that Western lifestyles lead to decreased energy expenditure. We hypothesize that human daily energy expenditure may be an evolved physiological trait largely independent of cultural differences.

  7. Mechanics and energetics in tool manufacture and use: a synthetic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liyu; Brodbeck, Luzius; Iida, Fumiya

    2014-11-06

    Tool manufacture and use are observed not only in humans but also in other animals such as mammals, birds and insects. Manufactured tools are used for biomechanical functions such as effective control of fluids and small solid objects and extension of reaching. These tools are passive and used with gravity and the animal users' own energy. From the perspective of evolutionary biology, manufactured tools are extended phenotypes of the genes of the animal and exhibit phenotypic plasticity. This incurs energetic cost of manufacture as compared to the case with a fixed tool. This paper studies mechanics and energetics aspects of tool manufacture and use in non-human beings. Firstly, it investigates possible mechanical mechanisms of the use of passive manufactured tools. Secondly, it formulates the energetic cost of manufacture and analyses when phenotypic plasticity benefits an animal tool maker and user. We take a synthetic approach and use a controlled physical model, i.e. a robot arm. The robot is capable of additively manufacturing scoop and gripper structures from thermoplastic adhesives to pick and place fluid and solid objects, mimicking primates and birds manufacturing tools for a similar function. We evaluate the effectiveness of tool use in pick-and-place and explain the mechanism for gripper tools picking up solid objects with a solid-mechanics model. We propose a way to formulate the energetic cost of tool manufacture that includes modes of addition and reshaping, and use it to analyse the case of scoop tools. Experiment results show that with a single motor trajectory, the robot was able to effectively pick and place water, rice grains, a pebble and a plastic box with a scoop tool or gripper tools that were manufactured by itself. They also show that by changing the dimension of scoop tools, the energetic cost of tool manufacture and use could be reduced. The work should also be interesting for engineers to design adaptive machines. © 2014 The Author

  8. Hardware concepts for a large low-energetics LMFBR core. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutter, E.; Batch, R.V.

    1980-12-01

    A design study was made to identify a practical set of hardware configurations that would embody the requirements developed in the numerical study of a low-energetics core and blanket for a prototype large breeder reactor. Dimensioned drawings are presented for fuel, blanket, reflector/shield, and control rod subassemblies. A horizontal cross section drawing shows how these subassemblies are arranged in the total core/blanket assembly. A core support is illustrated showing a dual plenums arrangement

  9. ASSESSMENT OF WATER PUMPING SYSTEM AND IMPROVEMENT IN HYDRO-ENERGETIC PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto da Gama Rego

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the policy of sanitation services for all and the need t o lower electricity consumption, the current analysis evaluates the water pumping s ystem and defines actions for the improvement of hydro-energetic performance. The present research was divided into two sections: assessment of the water pumping syst em (based on hydro- energetic simulation and an analysis of the impact of ineffici ency on electric energy consumption (based on computer simulation. Results revealed th at methodology was satisfactory and that the main operational issues could be iden tified and corrections could be computer-simulated. A potential 16% reduction in consu mption and in electricity costs could be obtained.

  10. Energetics and biomechanics as determining factors of swimming performance: updating the state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Tiago M; Bragada, José A; Reis, Víctor M; Marinho, Daniel A; Carvalho, Carlos; Silva, António J

    2010-03-01

    The biophysical determinants related to swimming performance are one of the most attractive topics within swimming science. The aim of this paper was to do an update of the "state of art" about the interplay between performance, energetic and biomechanics in competitive swimming. Throughout the manuscript some recent highlights are described: (i) the relationship between swimmer's segmental kinematics (segmental velocities, stroke length, stroke frequency, stroke index and coordination index) and his center of mass kinematics (swimming velocity and speed fluctuation); (ii) the relationships between energetic (energy expenditure and energy cost) and swimmer's kinematics; and (iii) the prediction of swimming performance derived from above mentioned parameters. Copyright 2009 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Cost of ventilation and effect of digestive state on the ventilatory response of the tegu lizard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovgaard, Nini; Wang, Tobias

    2004-07-12

    We performed simultaneous measurements of ventilation, oxygen uptake and carbon dioxide production in the South American lizard, Tupinambis merianae, equipped with a mask and maintained at 25 degrees C. Ventilation of resting animals was stimulated by progressive exposure to hypercapnia (2, 4 and 6%) or hypoxia (15, 10, 8 and 6%) in inspired gas mixture. This was carried out in both fasting and digesting animals. The ventilatory response to hypercapnia and hypoxia were affected by digestive state, with a more vigorous ventilatory response in digesting animals compared to fasting animals. Hypoxia doubled total ventilation while hypercapnia led to a four-fold increase in total ventilation both accomplished through an increase in tidal volume. Oxygen uptake remained constant during all hypercapnic exposures while there was an increase during hypoxia. Cost of ventilation was estimated to be 17% during hypoxia but less than 1% during hypercapnia. Our data indicate that ventilation can be greatly elevated at a small energetic cost.

  12. Energetic and financial evaluation of solar assisted heat pump space heating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellos, Evangelos; Tzivanidis, Christos; Moschos, Konstantinos; Antonopoulos, Kimon A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Four solar heating systems are presented in this work. • Various combinations between solar collectors and heat pumps are presented. • The systems are compared energetically and financially. • The use of PV and an air source heat pump is the best choice financially. • The use of PVT with a water source heat pump is the best solution energetically. - Abstract: Using solar energy for space heating purposes consists an alternative way for substituting fossil fuel and grid electricity consumption. In this study, four solar assisted heat pump heating systems are designed, simulated and evaluated energetically and financially in order to determine the most attractive solution. The use of PV collectors with air source heat pump is compared to the use of FPC, PVT and FPC with PV coupled with a water source heat pump. A sensitivity analysis for the electricity cost is conducted because of the great variety of this parameter over the last years. The final results proved that for electricity cost up to 0.23 €/kW h the use of PV coupled with an air source heat pump is the most sustainable solution financially, while for higher electricity prices the coupling of PVT with an water source heat pump is the best choice. For the present electricity price of 0.2 €/kW h, 20 m"2 of PV is able to drive the air source heat pump with a yearly solar coverage of 67% leading to the most sustainable solution. Taking into account energetic aspects, the use of PVT leads to extremely low grid electricity consumption, fact that makes this technology the most environmental friendly.

  13. Stages in the energetics of baroclinic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlanski, Isidoro; Sheldon, John P.

    1995-10-01

    The results from several idealized and case studies are drawn together to form a comprehensive picture of "downstream baroclinic evolution" using local energetics. This new viewpoint offers a complementary alternative to the more conventional descriptions of cyclone development. These additional insights are made possible largely because the local energetics approach permits one to define an energy flux vector which accurately describes the direction of energy dispersion and quantifies the role of neighboring systems in local development. In this view, the development of a system's energetics is divided into three stages. In Stage 1, a pre-existing disturbance well upstream of an incipient trough loses energy via ageostrophic geopotential fluxes directed downstream through the intervening ridge, generating a new energy center there. In Stage 2, this new energy center grows vigorously, at first due to the convergence of these fluxes, and later by baroclinic conversion as well. As the center matures, it begins to export energy via geopotential fluxes to the eastern side of the trough, initiating yet another energy center. In Stage 3, this new energy center continues to grow while that on the western side of the trough decays due to a dwinding supply of energy via fluxes from the older upstream system and also as a consequence of its own export of energy downstream. As the eastern energy center matures, it exports energy further downstream, and the sequence begins anew. The USA "Blizzard of'93" is used as a new case study to test the limits to which this conceptual sequence might apply, as well as to augment the current limited set of case studies. It is shown that, despite the extraordinary magnitude of the event, the evolution of the trough associated with the Blizzard fits the conceptual picture of downstream baroclinic evolution quite well, with geopotential fluxes playing a critical rôle in three respects. First, fluxes from an old, decaying system in the

  14. Enhancing Reactivity in Structural Energetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glumac, Nick

    2017-06-01

    In many structural energetic materials, only a small fraction of the metal oxidizes, and yet this provides a significant boost in the overall energy release of the system. Different methodologies to enhance this reactivity include alloying and geometric modifications of microstructure of the reactive material (RM). In this presentation, we present the results of several years of systematic study of both chemical (alloy) and mechanical (geometry) effects on reactivity for systems with typical charge to case mass ratios. Alloys of aluminum with magnesium and lithium are considered, as these are common alloys in aerospace applications. In terms of geometric modifications, we consider surface texturing, inclusion of dense additives, and inclusion of voids. In all modifications, a measurable influence on output is observed, and this influence is related to the fragment size distribution measured from the observed residue. Support from DTRA is gratefully acknowledged.

  15. Type Ia Supernovae: Energetics, Neutronization and Nucleosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truran, James W.; Calder, Alan C.; Townsley, Dean M.; Seitenzahl, Ivo R.; Peng, Fang; Vladimirova, Natalia; Lamb, Donald Q.; Brown, Edward F.

    2007-01-01

    The utility of Type Ia supernovae, not simply as probes of the distance scale but also as a means of constraining the properties of dark energy, demands a significant improvement in theoretical predictions of their properties in outburst. To this end, we have given substantial effort to quantifying the energetics and nucleosynthesis properties of deflagration fronts in the interiors of the putative carbon-oxygen white dwarf progenitors of Type Ia thermonuclear supernovae. We briefly review some essential features of our flame model and its properties in this paper and discuss its implications both for our multidimensional numerical simulations of SNe Ia and for nucleosynthesis (specifically 56Ni production) in SNe Ia and Galactic chemical evolution

  16. Solar energetic particles and radio burst emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miteva Rositsa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a statistical study on the observed solar radio burst emission associated with the origin of in situ detected solar energetic particles. Several proton event catalogs in the period 1996–2016 are used. At the time of appearance of the particle origin (flare and coronal mass ejection we identified radio burst signatures of types II, III and IV by inspecting dynamic radio spectral plots. The information from observatory reports is also accounted for during the analysis. The occurrence of solar radio burst signatures is evaluated within selected wavelength ranges during the solar cycle 23 and the ongoing 24. Finally, we present the burst occurrence trends with respect to the intensity of the proton events and the location of their solar origin.

  17. Energetics study of West African dust haze

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omotosho, J.B.

    1988-10-01

    The causes of the large and often persistent negative anomalies of equivalent potential temperature observed in the 900-700 hpa layer and which occurs in association with dust haze outbreaks over Kano in winter is investigated. Energetics results indicate that the primary mechanism for such anomalies is the horizontal transport of drier and, to a lesser extent, colder air at the upper levels by eddy motions, with consequent destabilization of the atmospheric boundary layer over the station. This is suggested as the mobilization mechanism responsible for raising dust from the surface over the Bilma/Faya-Largeau source region much further poleward. Temperature inversions were also found to be more pronounced during dust spells than in clear periods. (author). 18 refs, 6 figs, 2 tabs

  18. Effective charge of energetic ions in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, M.; Brandt, W.

    1983-01-01

    The effective charge of energetic ion, as derived from stopping power of metals, is calculated by use of a dielectronic-response function method. The electronic distribution in the ion is described through the variational principle in a statistical approximation. The dependences of effective charge on the ion velocity, atomic number and r/sub s/-value of metal are derived at the low-velocity region. The effective charge becomes larger than the real charge of ion due to the close collisions. We obtain the quasi-universal equation of the fractional effective electron number of ion as a function of the ratio between the ionic size and the minimum distance approach. The comparsion between theoretical and experimental results of the effective charge is performed for the cases of N ion into Au, C and Al. We also discuss the equipartition rule of partially ionized ion at the high-velocity region

  19. Energetically Modified Cement (EMC) - Performance Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronin, Vladimir; Elfgren, Lennart [Luleaa Univ. of Technology (Sweden). Centre for High Performance Cement

    2003-03-01

    Energetically Modified Cements, EMC, made of intensively milled cement (50%) and fillers (50%) of quartz or fly ash have been compared to blends of Ordinary Portland Cement, OPC, and fillers. The EMCs have better properties than other blends and are comparable to unblended OPC. This remarkable fact can probably be explained as follows. The grinding process reduces the size of both cement grains and fillers. This combined with the creation of micro defects gives the ground cement a very high degree of hydration. The increased early hydration and a better distribution of hydration products results in an extensive pore size refinement of the hardened binder. This pore size refinement leads to a favorably reduced permeability and diffusivity and very good mechanical properties.

  20. Towards an energetic theory of brittle fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francfort, G.; Marigo, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    The drawbacks of the classical theory of brittle fracture, based on Griffith's criterion, - a notion of critical energy release rate -, and a fracture toughness k, are numerous (think for instance the issue of crack initiation) and penalize its validity as a good model. Are all attempts at building a macroscopic theory of fracture doomed? The variety and complexity of micro-mechanical phenomena would suggest that this is indeed the case. We believe however that structural effects still preside over fracture and consequently propose to modify slightly Griffith theory without altering its fundamental components so that it becomes amenable to the widest range of situations. The examples presented here will demonstrate that a revisited energetic framework is a sound basis for a theory which can be used at the engineering level and which reconciles seemingly contradictory viewpoints. (authors)

  1. Forces and energetics of intermittent swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floryan, Daniel; Van Buren, Tyler; Smits, Alexander J.

    2017-08-01

    Experiments are reported on intermittent swimming motions. Water tunnel experiments on a nominally two-dimensional pitching foil show that the mean thrust and power scale linearly with the duty cycle, from a value of 0.2 all the way up to continuous motions, indicating that individual bursts of activity in intermittent motions are independent of each other. This conclusion is corroborated by particle image velocimetry (PIV) flow visualizations, which show that the main vortical structures in the wake do not change with duty cycle. The experimental data also demonstrate that intermittent motions are generally energetically advantageous over continuous motions. When metabolic energy losses are taken into account, this conclusion is maintained for metabolic power fractions less than 1.

  2. Energetics of swimming of schooling fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, John Fleng

    2012-01-01

    , i.e. nearest neighbour distance, water temperature, gill oxygen extraction, gill ventilation capacity, etc. Fish swimming in a school have been shown to have energetic advantages when trailing behind neighbours, resulting in up to 20% energy saving. The effect of this energy saving is that the fish......Soc for experimental Biol Annual Meeting - Salzburg 2012 John F. Steffensen (University of Copenhagen, Denmark) When a fish school swims through the water, every individual consumes a certain amount of oxygen, which means that less will be available for the trailing fish in the school. In 1967 Mc......Farland and Moss reported that the oxygen saturation decreased approximately 30% from the front to the rear of an approximately 150-m long school of mullets swimming in normoxic water. They also observed that the decline in oxygen saturation at the rear resulted in the school disintegrating into smaller separate...

  3. Energetics of dislocation nucleation under a nanoindenter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chuanli; Xu Guanshui

    2005-01-01

    We present an analysis of dislocation nucleation under an idealized nanoindenter based on the variational boundary integral formulation of the Peierls-Nabarro dislocation model. By solving the embryonic dislocation profiles, corresponding to the relative displacements between the two adjacent atomic layers along the slip plane, we have determined the critical conditions for athermal dislocation nucleation as well as the activation energies required to thermally activate embryonic dislocations from their stable to unstable saddle point configurations. The effect of the size of the indenter on the energetics of dislocation nucleation is quantitatively characterized. The result is compared with a simplified analysis based on the application of the Rice model for dislocation nucleation at a crack tip

  4. Energetics of dislocation nucleation under a nanoindenter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Chuanli [College of Mechanical Engineering, Yangtze University, Jingzhou, Hubei 434023 (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Xu Guanshui [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States)]. E-mail: guanshui.xu@ucr.edu

    2005-07-25

    We present an analysis of dislocation nucleation under an idealized nanoindenter based on the variational boundary integral formulation of the Peierls-Nabarro dislocation model. By solving the embryonic dislocation profiles, corresponding to the relative displacements between the two adjacent atomic layers along the slip plane, we have determined the critical conditions for athermal dislocation nucleation as well as the activation energies required to thermally activate embryonic dislocations from their stable to unstable saddle point configurations. The effect of the size of the indenter on the energetics of dislocation nucleation is quantitatively characterized. The result is compared with a simplified analysis based on the application of the Rice model for dislocation nucleation at a crack tip.

  5. Flexible energetic materials and related methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heaps, Ronald J.

    2018-03-06

    Energetic compositions and methods of forming components from the compositions are provided. In one embodiment, a composition includes aluminum, molybdenum trioxide, potassium perchlorate, and a binder. In one embodiment, the binder may include a silicone material. The materials may be mixed with a solvent, such as xylene, de-aired, shaped and cured to provide a self-supporting structure. In one embodiment, one or more reinforcement members may be added to provide additional strength to the structure. For example, a weave or mat of carbon fiber material may be added to the mixture prior to curing. In one embodiment, blade casting techniques may be used to form a structure. In another embodiment, a structure may be formed using 3-dimensional printing techniques.

  6. Energetic Di- and Trinitromethylpyridines: Synthesis and Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiying Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Pyridine derivatives based on the addition of trinitromethyl functional groups were synthesized by the reaction of N2O4 with the corresponding pyridinecarboxaldoximes, then they were converted into dinitromethylide hydrazinium salts. These energetic compounds were fully characterized by IR and NMR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, and X-ray crystallography. These pyridine derivatives have good densities, positive enthalpies of formation, and acceptable sensitivity values. Theoretical calculations carried out using Gaussian 03 and EXPLO5 programs demonstrated good to excellent detonation velocities and pressures. Each of these compounds is superior in performance to TNT, while 2,6-bis(trinitromethylpyridine (D = 8700 m·s−1, P = 33.2 GPa shows comparable detonation performance to that of RDX, but its thermal stability is too low, making it inferior to RDX.

  7. Baseline composition of solar energetic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, J.

    1985-01-01

    We analyze all existing spacecraft observations of the highly variable heavy element composition of solar energetic particles (SEP) during non- 3 He-rich events. All data show the imprint of an ever-present basic composition pattern (dubbed ''mass-unbiased baseline'' SEP composition) that differs from the photospheric composition by a simple bias related to first ionization potential (FIP). In each particular observation, this mass-unbiased baseline composition is being distorted by an additional bias, which is always a monotonic function of mass (or Z). This latter bias varies in amplitude and even sign from observation to observation. To first order, it seems related to differences in the A/Z* ratio between elements (Z* = mean effective charge)

  8. A combined energetic and economic approach for the sustainable design of geothermal plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, Alessandro; Vaccaro, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Exploitation of medium to low temperature geothermal sources: ORC power plants. • Integrated energetic and economic approach for the analysis of geothermal power plants. • A brief overview of the cost items of geothermal power plants. • Analysis of specific cost of geothermal power plants based on the method proposed. • Analysis of sustainability of geothermal energy systems based on resource durability. - Abstract: The perspectives of future development of geothermal power plants, mainly of small size for the exploitation of medium–low temperature reservoirs, are discussed and analyzed in the present paper. Even if there is a general interest in new power plants and investments in this sector are recognized, the new installations are reduced; the apparent advantage of null cost of the energy source is negatively balanced by the high drilling and installation costs. A key element for the design of a geothermal plant for medium temperature geothermal source is the definition of the power of the plant (size): this is important in order to define not only the economic plan but also the durability of the reservoir. Considering that it is not possible that the development of geothermal industry could be driven only by an economic perspective, the authors propose a method for joining energetic and economic approaches. The result of the combined energetic and economic analysis is interesting particularly in case of Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) power plants in order to define a suitable and optimal size and to maximize the resource durability. The method is illustrated with reference to some particular case studies, showing that the sustainability of small size geothermal plants will be approached only if the research for more economic solutions will be combined with efforts in direction of efficiency increase

  9. Structure and energetics correlations in some chlorohydroxypyridines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, Margarida S.; Matos, Maria Agostinha R.; Morais, Victor M.F.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Study of the structure and energetics of some chlorohydroxypyridines. • Enthalpies of formation and sublimation were determined by calorimetric techniques. • Structure and energy correlations were established. • Quantum chemical calculations allowed estimation of enthalpies of formation. -- Abstract: We have performed a study of the structure and energetics of some chlorohydroxypyridines based on experimental calorimetry techniques and high level ab initio computational calculations. The standard (p° = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpies of formation of 2-chloro-3-hydroxypyridine (2-Cl-3-OHPy), 2-chloro-6-hydroxypyridine (2-Cl-6-OHPy) and 3-chloro-5-hydroxypyridine (3-Cl-5-OHPy) in the crystalline phase, at T = 298.15 K, were derived from the respective standard massic energies of combustion measured by rotating-bomb combustion calorimetry, in oxygen, at T = 298.15 K. The standard molar enthalpies of sublimation, at T = 298.15 K, were measured by Calvet microcalorimetry. From these experimentally determined enthalpic parameters we have derived the standard molar enthalpies of formation of the three compounds in the gaseous phase, at T = 298.15 K: 2-Cl–3-OHPy, −(76.8 ± 2.0) kJ · mol −1 ; 2-Cl-6-OHPy, −(105.0 ± 1.7) kJ · mol −1 , 3-Cl-5-OHPy −(61.2 ± 2.4) kJ · mol −1 . These values were compared with estimates obtained from very accurate computational calculations using the G3(MP2)//B3LYP composite method and appropriately chosen reactions. These calculations have also been extended to the remaining chlorohydroxypyridine isomers that were not studied experimentally. Based on B3LYP/6-31G ∗ optimized geometries and calculated G3(MP2)//B3LYP absolute enthalpies some structure–energy correlations were discussed

  10. Energetic particle perspective of the magnetopause

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, D.J.; Fritz, T.A.; Wilken, B.; Keppler, E.

    1979-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of energetic (>24 keV) particle data obtained from the Isee satellites during a series of magnetopause crossings which occurred at 0000--0400 hours UT (approx.1030 hours LT) on November 20, 1977. The primary energetic particle data used are the three-dimensional distributions obtained from the Isee A satellite. Correlative magnetic field measurements are used to relate the particle behavior to magnetic field characteristics at and earthward of the magnetopause. We find that to first order the magnetopause can be regarded as a perfectly absorbing boundary for trapped >24-keV particles, that it is nearly alway in motion, and that boundary waves are often present. We find that the observed dayside magnetopause motion is consistent with a large-scale radial motion having an approx.10-min period plus superimposed boundary waves with a 90- to 150-s period. More qualitatively, we find that the data require a third and longer period (approx. 30 min) magnetopause motion upon which the above, shorter-period motions are superimposed. Consistent with the picture of absorbing boundary, we find no evidence of microturbulent processes at the magnetopause which significantly affect the directional trapped particle flux to within 9--36 km of the boundary. We therefore conclude that the radial gradient to the magnetopause observed in the directional, >24-keV, dayside, near-equatorial, magnetospherically trapped particle flux is due to internal magnetospheric processes. Just outside the magnetopause in the magnetosheath we observe a broad (approximately hemispherical) field-aligned flow of >24-keV ions away from the magnetosphere. The absolute intensity and spectral characteristics of this flow and its relation to the magnetopause and the trapped particle population indicate that it is formed by the leakage of trapped particles from the radiation belts

  11. Energetic assessment of soybean biodiesel obtainment in West ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-07-16

    Jul 16, 2014 ... Energetic outputs added up to 3,003.75 MJ and energy balance was 57,132.54 MJ. ... biodiesel, the study was divided into three stages: soybean farming, ... considering energetic consumptions with labor, seeds, diesel oil, ... model MF 283(4X2 TDA), power 63.2 kW (86 cv) in the engine, board weight.

  12. Energetic particle physics with applications in fusion and space plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1997-01-01

    Energetic particle physics is the study of the effects of energetic particles on collective electromagnetic (EM) instabilities and energetic particle transport in plasmas. Anomalously large energetic particle transport is often caused by low frequency MHD instabilities, which are driven by these energetic particles in the presence of a much denser background of thermal particles. The theory of collective energetic particle phenomena studies complex wave-particle interactions in which particle kinetic physics involving small spatial and fast temporal scales can strongly affect the MHD structure and long-time behavior of plasmas. The difficulty of modeling kinetic-MHD multiscale coupling processes stems from the disparate scales which are traditionally analyzed separately: the macroscale MHD phenomena are studied using the fluid MHD framework, while microscale kinetic phenomena are best described by complicated kinetic theories. The authors have developed a kinetic-MHD model that properly incorporates major particle kinetic effects into the MHD fluid description. For tokamak plasmas a nonvariational kinetic-MHD stability code, the NOVA-K code, has been successfully developed and applied to study problems such as the excitation of fishbone and Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (TAE) and the sawtooth stabilization by energetic ions in tokamaks. In space plasmas the authors have employed the kinetic-MHD model to study the energetic particle effects on the ballooning-mirror instability which explains the multisatellite observation of the stability and field-aligned structure of compressional Pc 5 waves in the magnetospheric ring current plasma

  13. Computational studies on energetic properties of nitrogen-rich ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Computational studies on energetic properties of nitrogen-rich energetic materials with ditetrazoles. LI XIAO-HONGa,b,∗ and ZHANG RUI-ZHOUa. aCollege of Physics and Engineering, Henan University of Science and Technology, Luoyang 471 003, China. bLuoyang Key Laboratory of Photoelectric Functional Materials, ...

  14. Energetic adaptations persist after bariatric surgery in severely obese adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Energetic adaptations induced by bariatric surgery have not been studied in adolescents or for extended periods postsurgery. Energetic, metabolic, and neuroendocrine responses to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery were investigated in extremely obese adolescents. At baseline and at 1.5, 6, and...

  15. Rocket measurements of energetic particles in the midlatitude precipitation zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, H. D.; Smith, L. G.; Braswell, F. M.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements of energetic ion and electron properties as a function of altitude in the midlatitude zone of nighttime energetic particle precipitation are reported. The measurements of particle fluxes, energy spectra and pitch angle distributions were obtained by a Langmuir probe, six energetic particle spectrometers and an electrostatic analyzer on board a Nike Apache rocket launched near the center of the midlatitude zone during disturbed conditions. It is found that the incident flux was primarily absorbed rather than backscattered, and consists of mainly energetic hydrogen together with some helium and a small energetic electron component. Observed differential energy spectra of protons having an exponential energy spectrum, and pitch angle distributions at various altitudes indicate that the energetic particle flux decreases rapidly for pitch angles less than 70 deg. An energetic particle energy flux of 0.002 ergs/sq cm per sec is calculated which indicates the significance of energetic particles as a primary nighttime ionization source for altitudes between 120 and 200 km in the midlatitude precipitation zone.

  16. Temperature-influenced energetics model for migrating waterfowl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aagaard, Kevin; Thogmartin, Wayne E.; Lonsdorg, Eric V.

    2018-01-01

    Climate and weather affect avian migration by influencing when and where birds fly, the energy costs and risks of flight, and the ability to sense cues necessary for proper navigation. We review the literature of the physiology of avian migration and the influence of climate, specifically temperature, on avian migration dynamics. We use waterfowl as a model guild because of the ready availability of empirical physiological data and their enormous economic value, but our discussion and expectations are broadly generalizable to migratory birds in general. We detail potential consequences of an increasingly warm climate on avian migration, including the possibility of the cessation of migration by some populations and species. Our intent is to lay the groundwork for including temperature effects on energetic gains and losses of migratory birds with the expected consequences of increasing temperatures into a predictive modeling framework. To this end, we provide a simulation of migration progression exclusively focused on the influence of temperature on the physiological determinants of migration. This simulation produced comparable results to empirically derived and observed values for different migratory factors (e.g., body fat content, flight range, departure date). By merging knowledge from the arenas of avian physiology and migratory theory we have identified a clear need for research and have developed hypotheses for a path forward.

  17. Very High Performance High Nitrogen Energetic Ingredients and Energetic Polymers for Structural Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-31

    13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES SoUoWtoo^ 14. ABSTRACT This project investigated new energetic materials for use with a triazole cured binder system ...The reaction was repeated using two equivalents of KH. An even more insoluble product was obtained. Figure 8 and 9 show the C-13 and N-15 CP/MAS...Sonnenberg, M. Hada, M. Ehara, K. Toyota , R. Fukuda, J. Hasegawa, M. Ishida, T. Nakajima, Y. Honda , O. Kitao, H. Nakai, T. Vreven, J. A. Montgomery, Jr

  18. Energetic materials: crystallization, characterization and insensitive plastic bonded explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heijden, Antoine E.D.M. van der; Creyghton, Yves L.M.; Marino, Emanuela; Bouma, Richard H.B.; Scholtes, Gert J.H.G.; Duvalois, Willem [TNO Defence, Security and Safety, P. O. Box 45, 2280 AA Rijswijk (Netherlands); Roelands, Marc C.P.M. [TNO Science and Industry, P. O. Box 342, 7300 AH Apeldoorn (Netherlands)

    2008-02-15

    The product quality of energetic materials is predominantly determined by the crystallization process applied to produce these materials. It has been demonstrated in the past that the higher the product quality of the solid energetic ingredients, the less sensitive a plastic bonded explosive containing these energetic materials becomes. The application of submicron or nanometric energetic materials is generally considered to further decrease the sensitiveness of explosives. In order to assess the product quality of energetic materials, a range of analytical techniques is available. Recent attempts within the Reduced-sensitivity RDX Round Robin (R4) have provided the EM community a better insight into these analytical techniques and in some cases a correlation between product quality and shock initiation of plastic bonded explosives containing (RS-)RDX was identified, which would provide a possibility to discriminate between conventional and reduced sensitivity grades. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  19. Energetics and phasing of nonprecessing spinning coalescing black hole binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagar, Alessandro; Damour, Thibault; Reisswig, Christian; Pollney, Denis

    2016-02-01

    We present an improved numerical relativity (NR) calibration of the new effective-one-body (EOB) model for coalescing nonprecessing spinning black hole binaries recently introduced by Damour and Nagar [Phys. Rev. D 90, 044018 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevD.90.044018]. We do so by comparing the EOB predictions to both the phasing and the energetics provided by two independent sets of NR data covering mass ratios 1 ≤q ≤9.989 and dimensionless spin range -0.95 ≤χ ≤+0.994 . One set of data is a subset of the Simulating eXtreme Spacetimes (SXS) catalog of public waveforms; the other set consists of new simulations obtained with the Llama code plus Cauchy characteristic evolution. We present the first systematic computation of the gauge-invariant relation between the binding energy and the total angular momentum, Eb(j ), for a large sample of, spin-aligned, SXS and Llama data. The dynamics of the EOB model presented here involves only two free functional parameters, one [a6c(ν )] entering the nonspinning sector, as a 5PN effective correction to the interaction potential, and one [c3(a˜1,a˜2,ν )] in the spinning sector, as an effective next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order correction to the spin-orbit coupling. These parameters are determined [together with a third functional parameter Δ tNQC(χ ) entering the waveform] by comparing the EOB phasing with the SXS phasing, the consistency of the energetics being checked afterwards. The quality of the analytical model for gravitational wave data analysis purposes is assessed by computing the EOB/NR faithfulness. Over the NR data sample and when varying the total mass between 20 and 200 M⊙ the EOB/NR unfaithfulness (integrated over the NR frequency range) is found to vary between 99.493% and 99.984% with a median value of 99.944%.

  20. Energetic Materials Effects on Essential Soil Processes: Decomposition of Orchard Grass (Dactylis glomerata) Litter in Soil Contaminated with Energetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    availabilities of their respective food sources (bacteria and fungi ), were also unaffected-or-increasing in soil with CL-20 treatments. This is...ENERGETIC MATERIALS EFFECTS ON ESSENTIAL SOIL PROCESSES: DECOMPOSITION OF ORCHARD...GRASS (DACTYLIS GLOMERATA) LITTER IN SOIL CONTAMINATED WITH ENERGETIC MATERIALS ECBC-TR-1199 Roman G. Kuperman Ronald T. Checkai Michael Simini

  1. Energetic balance from biodiesel production of oilseed radish (Raphanus sativus L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siqueira, Rubens [Parana Agronomical Institute (IAPAR), Londrina, PR (Brazil)], E-mail: siqueira@iapar.br; Gamero, Carlos Antonio [Universidade Estadual Paulista (FCA/UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Agronomicas; Boller, Walter [University of Passo Fundo (UPF), RS (Brazil). Agronomical and Veterinary College

    2008-07-01

    It was evaluated the energetic balance and the energetic efficiency of the oilseed radish (Raphanus sativus L.) crop under the no-tillage system. The energy input totalized 6,718 MJ ha{sup -1} where the industrial processing, the fertilizer and the herbicide had participation of 30.7; 23.0 and 20.2 %, respectively. The energy production was 56,650.94 MJ ha{sup -1} and the produced grains have represented 33.2 % of the total. The energetic demand for the production of one kg of biomass of the aerial part, one kg of oil and one kg of biodiesel were respectively 1,829; 19,000 and 27,422 kJ. There was a return of 8.44 for each energy unit used in the process. The net gain of energy was 49,932 MJ ha{sup -1} which is equivalent in energy to 1,295 L diesel oil. (author)

  2. Potential for the energetic use of waste gas in Flanders; Potentieel voor het energetisch gebruik van stortgassen in Vlaanderen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Spiegeleer, E. [Vlaamse Instelling voor Technologisch Onderzoek, Mol (Belgium)

    1999-03-01

    The department of Natural Resources and Energy of the Ministry of the Flemish Community wanted to know the stand of affairs of the use of waste gas on the Flemish landfills in 1998. On the basis of a multi-phase model for waste gas production (according Dutch model) and data provided by the operators, the waste gas potential could be calculated for each landfill. The total waste gas production in Flanders is estimated at 75 million m3 in 1999. This brings the extracting amount of waste gas at 60 million m3 (in optimal circumstances, extracting efficiency 80%). Because the activities will continue for some years on categorie2 landfills, the waste gas production will increase. But the global waste gas potential will decrease as an effect of the evolution in the composition (less organic material) and the amount of waste that will be dumped, plus the landfills will be closed gradually. The possible savings of primary energy and the reduced CO2-emissions by the energetic apply of the global waste potential in Flanders is being estimated at about 695.000 GJ or 63.000 ton CO2. The generation of electricity with the help of a gas engine-generator unit is from technical and economical point of view the most achievable option for the operators. The price of the delivered energy is decisive for the cost-effectiveness of concrete investment projects. Only subsidies of the government makes the pay-back time for waste gas projects acceptable.

  3. Data for the analysis of non-energetic consumption under greenhouse gas aspects. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, M.; Jochem, E.; Marscheider-Weidemann, F.; Radgen, P.; Brandt, U.; Luellau, A.; Marquardt, J.; Sutter, J.

    1996-06-01

    Non-energetic consumption is the consumption in non-energy-related terms of energy sources as listed in the national energy statistics /VDI 4600/, i.e., essentially fossil primary and secondary energy sources such as natural gas, naphtha and fuel oil. These energy sources are present in converted form mainly in plastic products, chemical fibres, paints and varnishes as well as in lubricants, fertilizers and bitumen. Because of the non-negligible share of non-energetic consumption in total emissions of climate-relevant substances and the foreseeable long-term accumulation of a carbon dioxide emission potential in long-lived products and in landfills, the investigation pursues the following aim: to make, by means of highly differentiated input-output tables, a technologically differentiated life cycle analysis including production, external trade, phase of use, and waste treatment for the years 1989, 2005, and 2020. (orig./UA)

  4. Energetics and formation mechanism of borders between hexagonal boron nitride and graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawahata, Hisaki; Yamanaka, Ayaka; Maruyama, Mina; Okada, Susumu

    2018-06-01

    We studied the energetics of two-dimensional heterostructures consisting of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and graphene with respect to the border structure and heterobond species using density functional theory. A BC heterobond is energetically preferable at the border between h-BN and graphene. We also found that the polarization at the zigzag border increases the total energy of the heterostructures. Competition between the bond formation energy and the polarization energy leads to chiral borders at which BC heterobonds are dominant. By taking the formation process of the heterostructures into account, the zigzag border with BC heterobonds is found to be preferentially synthesized from graphene edges under hydrogen-rich conditions.

  5. Energetically efficient proportional-integral-differential (PID) control of wake vortices behind a circular cylinder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Pramode K; Mathew, Sam; Shaiju, A J; Patnaik, B S V

    2016-01-01

    The control of vortex shedding behind a circular cylinder is a precursor to a wide range of external shear flow problems in engineering, in particular the flow-induced vibrations. In the present study, numerical simulation of an energetically efficient active flow control strategy is proposed, for the control of wake vortices behind a circular cylinder at a low Reynolds number of 100. The fluid is assumed to be incompressible and Newtonian with negligible variation in properties. Reflectionally symmetric controllers are designed such that, they are located on a small sector of the cylinder over which, tangential sliding mode control is imparted. In the field of modern controls, proportional (P), integral (I) and differential (D) control strategies and their numerous combinations are extremely popular in industrial practice. To impart suitable control actuation, the vertically varying lift force on the circular cylinder, is synthesised for the construction of an error term. Four different types of controllers considered in the present study are, P, I, PI and PID. These controllers are evaluated for their energetic efficiency and performance. A linear quadratic optimal control problem is formulated, to minimise the cost functional. By performing detailed simulations, it was observed that, the system is energetically efficient, even when the twin eddies are still persisting behind the circular cylinder. To assess the adaptability of the controllers, the actuators were switched on and off to study their dynamic response. (paper)

  6. Energetic consequences of human sociality: walking speed choices among friendly dyads.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janelle Wagnild

    Full Text Available Research has shown that individuals have an optimal walking speed-a speed which minimizes energy expenditure for a given distance. Because the optimal walking speed varies with mass and lower limb length, it also varies with sex, with males in any given population tending to have faster optimal walking speeds. This potentially creates an energetic dilemma for mixed-sex walking groups. Here we examine speed choices made by individuals of varying stature, mass, and sex walking together. Individuals (N = 22 walked around a track alone, with a significant other (with and without holding hands, and with friends of the same and opposite sex while their speeds were recorded every 100 m. Our findings show that males walk at a significantly slower pace to match the females' paces (p = 0.009, when the female is their romantic partner. The paces of friends of either same or mixed sex walking together did not significantly change (p>0.05. Thus significant pace adjustment appears to be limited to romantic partners. These findings have implications for both mobility and reproductive strategies of groups. Because the male carries the energetic burden by adjusting his pace (slowing down 7%, the female is spared the potentially increased caloric cost required to walk together. In energetically demanding environments, we will expect to find gender segregation in group composition, particularly when travelling longer distances.

  7. Economic, Energetic, and Environmental Impact Evaluation of the Water Discharge Networks from Mining Works

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Cristian Rada

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable development represents an optimistic scenario for the evolution of contemporary civilization. The object of this paper is to define certain evaluation criteria regarding the performances of water discharge networks from mining works, and propose a method for aggregating the specific indicators for monetary costs, energetic costs, and environmental impact-related costs. The global pollution index (GPI represents a method for assessing environment health status or pollution levels. The GPI quantitatively expresses this status based on its index, which results from a ratio between the ideal value and the given value of certain quality indices that are considered specific for the analyzed environmental factors at certain moments. The proposed method in this paper tries to perform a synergistic aggregation of the balance sheet of harmfulness and classic balance sheets for matter and energy for an industrial process.

  8. Balancing energetic and cognitive resources: memory use during search depends on the orienting effector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solman, Grayden J F; Kingstone, Alan

    2014-09-01

    Search outside the laboratory involves tradeoffs among a variety of internal and external exploratory processes. Here we examine the conditions under which item specific memory from prior exposures to a search array is used to guide attention during search. We extend the hypothesis that memory use increases as perceptual search becomes more difficult by turning to an ecologically important type of search difficulty - energetic cost. Using optical motion tracking, we introduce a novel head-contingent display system, which enables the direct comparison of search using head movements and search using eye movements. Consistent with the increased energetic cost of turning the head to orient attention, we discover greater use of memory in head-contingent versus eye-contingent search, as reflected in both timing and orienting metrics. Our results extend theories of memory use in search to encompass embodied factors, and highlight the importance of accounting for the costs and constraints of the specific motor groups used in a given task when evaluating cognitive effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. COST MEASUREMENT AND COST MANAGEMENT IN TARGET COSTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moisello Anna Maria

    2012-07-01

    total cost of ownership (TCO. Moreover the activity based analyses reveals the opportunities for rationalizing the supply related activities and containing costs and it enables the effective involvement of the supplier in the process of target costing when he provides activity based information on the costs sustained to produce the product/service: the purchaser can evaluate the impact, in terms of cost, of the activities requested of the supplier and, as a result, he has the chance to rationalize these activities by reducing their number or intensity and enables the effective involvement of the supplier in the process of target costing. The paper gives a contribution in the advancement of costing methodologies applicable to the target costing, proposing the use of a flexible model that supports the decision process according to different time horizons so that effectively supports target costing. The model is suitable for production characterized by high complexity in terms of number and intensity of activities

  10. Wood, straw, energetic crops... Biomass energy. A sustainable alternative for your projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    After having briefly recalled the French and European legal context promoting the use of renewable energies, this document highlights the challenges associated with such a development. They concern the environment, the energetic independence, the cost of energy, and the local and rural development. It evokes the actions and labels which favour the improvement and the renewal of domestic heating equipment, the large number of installations using biomass for collective heating or for industrial heating. It indicates the objectives of the biomass energy programme for 2007-2010, and describes the French energy conservation agency (ADEME) role and missions within this programme

  11. Efeito do consumo excessivo de oxigênio após exercício e da taxa metabólica de repouso no gasto energético Efecto del consumo excesivo de oxígeno después del ejercicio y de la tasa metabólica de reposo en el desgaste energético Effects of excess post-exercise oxygen consumption and resting metabolic rate in energetic cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giselle Foureaux

    2006-12-01

    y recuperación (EPOC - consumo excesivo de oxígeno después del ejercicio, y en la segunda se encuentra la tasa metabólica de reposo (TMR. De esta forma, el objetivo de este trabajo de revisión ha sido el de investigar el efecto de EPOC y de TMR como coadyuvantes en los programas de adelgazamiento, buscando discutir los divergentes resultados encontrados en la literatura, en lo que se refiere a la magnitud y duración de EPOC, así como discutir el efecto del ejercicio en TMR. Los estudios demostraron, de una forma general, que el ejercicio de mayor intensidad es capaz de promover un mayor EPOC, al ser comparado con un ejercicio de intensidad menor y, cuando compararon el ejercicio de resistencia con el aeróbico, se verifica un mayor EPOC en el primero. En relación a las alteraciones de TMR, los resultados agudos muestran un aumento significativo, pero los resultados a largo plazo son más discrepantes, debido a la dificultad de medir esa variable, sin superestimarla. En conclusión, la literatura apunta que la periodicidad de un entrenamiento que pueda maximizar tanto EPOC como TMR, que pueden ser importantes factores para adelgazamiento, a pesar del costo energético de esas variables en una sesión de ejercicio se muestre pequeño, a largo plazo podrá ser bastante significativo. Sin embargo, nuevos estudios deberán ser realizados con el intuito de confirmar estas evidencias.The constant growth of obesity and overweight only goes to show the need of intervention to reverse those figures. In this context, physical activity can contribute with a double effect, through acute and chronic physiological changes: in the first condition one can find the energetic cost from exercising and recovery (EPOC - excess post-exercise oxygen consumption, and in the second, the resting metabolic rate (RMR. Thus, this revision's goal was to investigate the effect of EPOC and RMR as supporting factors in weight-control programs, willing to discuss the different results found

  12. Fabrication and Characterization of Al/NiO Energetic Nanomultilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YiChao Yan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The redox reaction between Al and metallic oxide has its advantage compared with intermetallic reaction and Al/NiO nanomutlilayers are a promising candidate for enhancing the performance of energetic igniter. Al/NiO nanomutlilayers with different modulation periods are prepared on alumina substrate by direct current (DC magnetron sputtering. The thicknesses of each period are 250 nm, 500 nm, 750 nm, 1000 nm, and 1500 nm, respectively, and the total thickness is 3 μm. The X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscope (SEM results of the as-deposited Al/NiO nanomutlilayers show that the NiO films are amorphous and the layered structures are clearly distinguished. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS demonstrates that the thickness of Al2O3 increases on the side of Al monolayer after annealing at 450°C. The thermal diffusion time becomes greater significantly as the amount of thermal boundary conductance across the interfaces increases with relatively smaller modulation period. Differential scanning calorimeter (DSC curve suggests that the energy release per unit mass is below the theoretical heat of the reaction due to the nonstoichiometric ratio between Al and NiO and the presence of impurities.

  13. Magnetosphere energetics during substorm events IMP 8 and Geotail observations

    CERN Document Server

    Belehaki, A

    2001-01-01

    Magnetospheric energetics during substorm events is studied in this paper. Three events were selected, a weak substorm, a large isolated one and finally a prolonged period of substorm activity with multiple intensifications. It is assumed that the energy, that entered the magnetosphere due to electromagnetic coupling with the solar wind, is described by the epsilon parameter, proposed by Perreault and Akasofu (1978). High resolution, magnetic field and plasma data from the MGF and LEP experiments on board Geotail were analyzed to determine the timing of plasmoid release, its dimensions, its convection velocity and finally the energy carried by each plasmoid. Plasmoids were defined as structures with rotating magnetic fields and enhanced total pressure. Tailward plasmoid bulk speed in the distant tail varied from 350 to 750 km/s. Their dimensions in the X/sub GSM/ direction was found to be from 4.5 to 28 R/sub E/, and their duration did not exceed 5 min. The average energy carried by each plasmoid in the dista...

  14. Internal Transport Barrier Driven by Redistribution of Energetic Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, K.L.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Ruskov, E.; Petty, C.C.; Greenfield, C.M.; Nazikian, R.; Budny, R.

    2004-01-01

    Alfven instabilities excited by energetic ions are used as a means to reduce the central magnetic shear in a tokamak via redistribution of energetic ions. When the central magnetic shear is low enough, ballooning modes become stable for any plasma pressure gradient and an internal transport barrier (ITB) with a steep pressure gradient can exist. This mechanism can sustain a steady-state ITB as demonstrated by experimental data from the DIII-D tokamak. It can also produce a shear in toroidal and poloidal plasma rotation. Possible application of this technique to use the energetic alpha particles for improvement of burning plasma performance is discussed

  15. PoET: Polarimeters for Energetic Transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Mark; Barthelmy, Scott; Hill, Joanne

    2008-01-01

    This presentation focuses on PoET (Polarimeters for Energetic Transients): a Small Explorer mission concept proposed to NASA in January 2008. The principal scientific goal of POET is to measure GRB polarization between 2 and 500 keV. The payload consists of two wide FoV instruments: a Low Energy Polarimeter (LEP) capable of polarization measurements in the energy range from 2-15 keV and a high energy polarimeter (Gamma-Ray Polarimeter Experiment - GRAPE) that will measure polarization in the 60-500 keV energy range. Spectra will be measured from 2 keV up to 1 MeV. The PoET spacecraft provides a zenith-pointed platform for maximizing the exposure to deep space. Spacecraft rotation will provide a means of effectively dealing with systematics in the polarization response. PoET will provide sufficient sensitivity and sky coverage to measure statistically significant polarization for up to 100 GRBs in a two-year mission. Polarization data will also be obtained for solar flares, pulsars and other sources of astronomical interest.

  16. Shock interactions with heterogeneous energetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarrington, Cole D.; Wixom, Ryan R.; Damm, David L.

    2018-03-01

    The complex physical phenomenon of shock wave interaction with material heterogeneities has significant importance and nevertheless remains little understood. In many materials, the observed macroscale response to shock loading is governed by characteristics of the microstructure. Yet, the majority of computational studies aimed at predicting phenomena affected by these processes, such as the initiation and propagation of detonation waves in explosives or shock propagation in geological materials, employ continuum material and reactive burn model treatment. In an effort to highlight the grain-scale processes that underlie the observable effects in an energetic system, a grain-scale model for hexanitrostilbene (HNS) has been developed. The measured microstructures were used to produce synthetic computational representations of the pore structure, and a density functional theory molecular dynamics derived equation of state (EOS) was used for the fully dense HNS matrix. The explicit inclusion of the microstructure along with a fully dense EOS resulted in close agreement with historical shock compression experiments. More recent experiments on the dynamic reaction threshold were also reproduced by inclusion of a global kinetics model. The complete model was shown to reproduce accurately the expected response of this heterogeneous material to shock loading. Mesoscale simulations were shown to provide a clear insight into the nature of threshold behavior and are a way to understand complex physical phenomena.

  17. The energetic ion substorm injection boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, R.E.; Sibeck, D.G.; McEntire, R.W.; Krimigis, S.M.

    1990-01-01

    The substorm injection boundary model has enjoyed considerable success in explaining plasma signatures in the near-geosynchronous region. However, the injection boundary has remained primarily a phenomenological model. In this paper the authors examine 167 dispersionless energetic ion injections which were observed by AMPTE CCE. The radial and local time distribution of the events as a function of Kp is qualitatively similar to that envisioned in the injection boundary model of Mauk and McIlwain (1974). They argue that particles observed during dispersionless injections are locally energized during the disruption of the cross-tail current sheet. Therefore they identify the injection boundary, as derived from the spatial distribution of dispersionless injections, with the earthward edge of the region of the magnetotail which undergoes current sheet disruption during the substorm expansion phase. The authors show that this qualitative model for the generation of the injection boundary can provide an explanation for the dispersionless nature, the double spiral shape, and the Kp dependence of the boundary

  18. Reactive thermal waves in energetic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Larry G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Reactive thermal waves (RTWs) arise in several energetic material applications, including self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS), high explosive cookoff, and the detonation of heterogeneous explosives. In this paper I exmaine ideal RTWs, by which I mean that (1) material motion is neglected, (2) the state dependence of reaction is Arrhenius in the temperature, and (3) the reaction rate is modulated by an arbitrary mass-fraction-based reaction progress function. Numerical simulations demonstrate that one's natural intuition, which is based mainly upon experience with inert materials and which leads one to expect diffusion processes to become relatively slow after a short time period, is invalid for high energy, state-sensitive reactive systems. Instead, theory predicts that RTWs can propagate at very high speeds. This result agrees with estimates for detonating heterogeneous explosives, which indicate that RTWs must spread from hot-spot nucleation sites at rates comparable to the detonation speed in order to produce experimentally-observed reaction zone thicknesses. Using dimensionless scaling and further invoking the high activation energy approximation, I obtain an analytic formula for the steady plane RTW speed from numerical calculations. I then compute the RTW speed for real explosives, and discuss aspects of their behavior.

  19. PLASMA ENERGETIC PARTICLES SIMULATION CENTER (PEPSC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berk, Herbert L.

    2014-05-23

    The main effort of the Texas group was to develop theoretical and simplified numerical models to understand chirping phenomena often seen for Alfven and geodesic acoustic waves in experimental plasmas such as D-III-D, NSTX and JET. Its main numerical effort was to modify the AEGIS code, which was originally developed as an eigenvalue solver. To apply to the chirping problem this code has to be able to treat the linear response to the continuum and the response of the plasma to external drive or to an internal drive that comes from the formation of phase space chirping structures. The theoretical underpinning of this investigation still needed to be more fully developed to understand how to best formulate the theoretical problem. Considerable progress was made on this front by B.N. Breizman and his collaborators and a new reduced model was developed by H. L. Berk and his PhD student, G. Wang which can be uses as simplified model to describe chirping in a large aspect ratio tokamak. This final report will concentrate on these two directions that were developed as well as results that were found in the work with the AEGIS code and in the progress in developing a novel quasi-linear formulation for a description of Alfvenic modes destabilized by energetic particles, such as alpha particles in a burning plasma.

  20. On perspectives of developments in energetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frey, T.

    1994-04-01

    The strategy towards politically and economically independent Estonia has created an urgent need to elaborate a lot of problems of tactics in the energy use as well as in the perspectives of the energy import versus export. Today Estonia produces rather a considerable amount of electricity, reaching some 1.2 thousand kWh per capita year. Nevertheless, technocratically-minded people are looking toward to introducing at least one nuclear power plant to our native area of merely 45 000 square kilometers. The Estonia n Council of Ecology is taking the opportunity of considering the alternatives to this proposal, organizing an energetics-focused ecological conference just on the 5. anniversary of the Chernobyl accident. The corresponding data show that Estonia might be able, in the coming 5 years, to rise the efficiency in the commercial energy use by 15 per cent, to reduce the amount of energy-consuming industry, mostly military, by another 15 per cent, and extend the use of wood, peat, wind, water and sunshine taken together by a third 15 per cent. All in all, it turns out that in 1995 there exists no need for energy import on the full balance level. The outlook deserves attention, indeed. (author)