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Sample records for toroidal reverse-field pinch

  1. LASL toroidal reversed-field pinch programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.A.; Buchenauer, C.J.; Burkhardt, L.C.

    1979-01-01

    The determination of the absolute energy loss due to radiation from impurities in the LASL toroidal reversed-field pinch experiment ZT-S is reported. The measurements show that over half the energy loss is accounted for by this mechanism. Thomson-scattering electron density measurements indicate only a gradual increase in temperature as the filling pressure is reduced, indicating an increased energy loss at lower pressures. Cylindrical and toroidal simulations of the experiment indicate either that a highly radiative pinch boundary or anomalous transport is needed to match the experimental results. New effects on the equilibrium due to plasma flows induced by the toroidal geometry are predicted by the toroidal simulations. The preliminary results on the low-temperature discharge cleaning of the ZT-S torus are reported. A description of the upgrade of the ZT-S experiment and the objectives, construction and theoretical predictions for the new ZT-40 experiment are given. (author)

  2. Ideal toroidal stability β limits and shaping effects for reversed field pinch configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paccagnella, R.; Bondeson, A.; Luetjens, H.

    1991-05-01

    The influence of shaping and toroidicity on the ideal MHD stability of the Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) is investigated both with respect to current and pressure driven modes. It is found that triangularity and x-point shaping does not significantly modify the operational limits of RFP, while ellipticity and D-shaping is destabilizing. A simple relation for the stability of current driven modes is also given. (author) 12 figs., 17 refs

  3. Simulation study of toroidal phase-locking mechanism in reversed-field pinch plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusano, Kanya; Tamano, Teruo; Sato, Tetsuya.

    1991-02-01

    The toroidal phase locking process of kink modes in the reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasma is investigated in detail by means of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation. The physical mechanism of phase locking is clarified. The most dominant two linearly unstable kink modes rule over the evolution of other kink modes whereby phase locking takes place. It is confirmed that the phase locking process is not a special phenomenon subject to the resistive boundary condition, but a common feature of the MHD relaxation process in the RFP. The relation between the phase locking and MHD relaxation processes is briefly discussed. (author)

  4. Toroidal fusion reactor design based on the reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenson, R.L.

    1978-07-01

    The toroidal reversed-field pinch (RFP) achieves gross equilibrium and stability with a combination of high shear and wall stabilization, rather than the imposition of tokamak-like q-constraints. Consequently, confinement is provided primarily by poloidal magnetic fields, poloidal betas as large as approximately 0.58 are obtainable, the high ohmic-heating (toroidal) current densities promise a sole means of heating a D-T plasma to ignition, and the plasma aspect ratio is not limited by stability/equilibrium constraints. A reactor-like plasma model has been developed in order to quantify and to assess the general features of a power system based upon RFP confinement. An ''operating point'' has been generated on the basis of this plasma model and a relatively detailed engineering energy balance. These results are used to generate a conceptual engineering model of the reversed-field pinch reactor (RFPR) which includes a general description of a 750 MWe power plant and the preliminary consideration of vacuum/fueling, first wall, blanket, magnet coils, iron core, and the energy storage/transfer system

  5. Observation of a new toroidally localized kink mode and its role in reverse-field--pinch plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamano, T.; Bard, W.D.; Chu, C.; Kondoh, Y.; La Haye, R.J.; Lee, P.S.; Saito, M.; Schaffer, M.J.; Taylor, P.L.

    1987-01-01

    A new type of toroidally localized kink instability, which we named the ''slinky mode,'' was observed in a reversed-field--pinch plasma in the OHTE (Ohmic heating toroidal experiment) device. It is found that the slinky mode is the result of the phase locking of several internal kink modes due to nonlinear coupling and is an effective way to approach the Taylor relaxed state

  6. Toroidal magnetic field system for 2-MA reversed-field pinch experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, J. G.; Linton, T. W.

    The engineering design of the toroidal magnetic field (TF) system for a 2-MA Reversed Field Pinch experiment (ZT-H) is described. ZT-H is designed with major radius 2.15 meters, minor radius 0.40 meters, and a peak toroidal magnetic field of 0.85 Tesla. The requirement for highly uniform fields, with spatial ripple 0.2% leads to a design with 72 equally spaced circular TF coils, located at minor radius 0.6 meters, carrying a maximum current of 9.0 MA. The coils are driven by a 12-MJ capacitor bank which is allowed to ring in order to aid the reversal of magnetic field. A stress analysis is presented, based upon calculated loop tension, centering force, and overturning moment, treating these as a combination of static loads and considering that the periodic nature of the loading causes little amplification. The load transfer of forces and moments is considered as a stress distribution resisted by the coils, support structures, wedges, and the structural shell.

  7. Interchange stability of noncircular reversed field pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, D.A.; Prager, S.C.; Todd, A.M.M.

    1987-08-01

    Interchange (Mercier) stability of toroidal reversed-field-pinch plasmas with noncircular cross-section is evaluated numerically. Marginally stable pressure profiles and beta values are produced. Most shapes, such as indented or vertically elongated, reduce stability by making the net magnetic curvature of the poloidal-field-dominated plasmas yet worse than that of the circle. Horizontally elongated plasmas slightly enhance stability beyond that of the circle as a result of increased shear produced by toroidicity. Such shear enhancement by the toroidal shift of magnetic surfaces might be exploited for future, more comprehensive studies

  8. Reversed field pinch experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberston, S.

    1991-05-01

    The Reversatron RFP is usually operated with toroidal field windings which are a continuous helix of 144 turns. These windings produce a poloidal current which is uniform around the torus. The distribution of current is fixed by the geometry so that the applied field has only an m = 0, n = 0 component. The windings cannot act to stabilize an m = 0 mode with |n| > 0 or any m = 1 mode because these modes will excite no current in the windings. It has recently been suggested that parallel connected field coils might act as a shell by forcing the flux within each winding to be the same. Coils connected in parallel must have the same voltage at their terminals and thus must enclose the same volt-seconds or flux. Data from ZT-40 show that the discharges are more quiescent when parallel or series-parallel connected windings are used

  9. Toroidally localized soft x-ray expulsion at the termination of the improved confinement regime in the TPE-RX reversed-field pinch experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassinetti, L.; Yagi, Y.; Koguchi, H.; Shimada, T.; Hirano, Y.; Sakakita, H.

    2006-04-01

    The pulsed poloidal current drive technique reduces the magnetic chaos that characterizes reversed-field pinch configurations and produces a regime with an improved confinement. In this paper, we describe that, in TPE-RX [Y. Yagi et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 45, 409 (1999)], the termination phase of this regime is due to the increase of the slinky structure that creates a stochastic region and produces the expulsion of energy in a localized toroidal position. Before the plasma reaches the improved confinement regime, the slinky distorts the chain of m =0 islands on the reversal surface. During this regime, the magnetic activity and the phase locking decrease, the distortion in the island chain disappears, and the confinement increases. At the termination of this regime the magnetic activity markedly increases, as well as the phase locking, recreating the distortion in the m =0 magnetic island chain. As a consequence, at the position of the distortion the plasma region inside the reversal surface is characterized by a rapid energy loss, and outside the reversal surface a toroidally localized energy expulsion is induced.

  10. Toroidally localized soft x-ray expulsion at the termination of the improved confinement regime in the TPE-RX reversed-field pinch experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frassinetti, L.; Yagi, Y.; Koguchi, H.; Shimada, T.; Hirano, Y.; Sakakita, H.

    2006-01-01

    The pulsed poloidal current drive technique reduces the magnetic chaos that characterizes reversed-field pinch configurations and produces a regime with an improved confinement. In this paper, we describe that, in TPE-RX [Y. Yagi et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 45, 409 (1999)], the termination phase of this regime is due to the increase of the slinky structure that creates a stochastic region and produces the expulsion of energy in a localized toroidal position. Before the plasma reaches the improved confinement regime, the slinky distorts the chain of m=0 islands on the reversal surface. During this regime, the magnetic activity and the phase locking decrease, the distortion in the island chain disappears, and the confinement increases. At the termination of this regime the magnetic activity markedly increases, as well as the phase locking, recreating the distortion in the m=0 magnetic island chain. As a consequence, at the position of the distortion the plasma region inside the reversal surface is characterized by a rapid energy loss, and outside the reversal surface a toroidally localized energy expulsion is induced

  11. Intelligent shell feedback control in EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch with partial coverage of the toroidal surface by a discrete active coil array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadikin, D.; Brunsell, P. R.; Drake, J. R.

    2006-01-01

    An active feedback system is required for long pulse operation of the reversed field pinch (RFP) device to suppress resistive wall modes (RWMs). A general feature of a feedback system using a discrete active coil array is a coupling effect which arises when a set of side band modes determined by the number of active coils is produced. Recent results obtained on the EXTRAP T2R RFP demonstrated the suppression of independent m = 1 RWMs using an active feedback system with a two-dimensional array of discrete active coils in the poloidal and toroidal directions. One of the feedback algorithms used is the intelligent shell feedback scheme. Active feedback systems having different number of active coils in the poloidal (Mc) and toroidal (Nc) directions (Mc × Nc = 2 × 32 and Mc × Nc = 4 × 16) are studied. Different side band effects are seen for these configurations. A significant prolongation of the plasma discharge is achieved for the intelligent shell feedback scheme using the 2 × 32 active coil configuration. This is attributed to the side band sets including only one of the dominant unstable RWMs and avoiding coupling to resonant modes. Analog proportional-integral-derivative controllers are used in the feedback system. Regimes with different values of the proportional gain are studied. The requirement of the proportional-integral control for low proportional gain and proportional-derivative control for high proportional gain is seen in the experiments.

  12. Reversed field pinch ignition requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werley, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    Plasma models are described and used to calculated numerically the transport confinement (nτ E ) requirements and steady state operation points for both the reversed field pinch (RFP) and the tokamak. The models are used to examine the CIT tokamak ignition conditions and the RFP experimental and ignition conditions. Physics differences between RFPs and tokamaks and their consequences for a D-T ignition machine are discussed. Compared with a tokamak, the ignition RFP has many physics advantages, including Ohmic heating to ignition (no need for auxiliary heating systems), higher beta, lower ignition current, less sensitivity of ignition requirements to impurity effects, no hard disruptions (associated with beta or density limits) and successful operation with high radiation fractions (f RAD ∼ 0.95). These physics advantages, coupled with important engineering advantages associated with lower external magnetic field, larger aspect ratios and smaller plasma cross-sections, translate to significant cost reductions for both ignition and reactor applications. The primary drawback of the RFP is the uncertainty that the present scaling will extrapolate to reactor regimes. Devices that are under construction should go a long way toward resolving this scaling uncertainty. The 4 MA ZTH is expected to extend the nτ E transport scaling data by three orders of magnitude above the results of ZT-40M, and, if the present scaling holds, ZTH is expected to achieve a D-T equivalent scientific energy breakeven, Q = 1. A base case RFP ignition point is identified with a plasma current of 8.1 MA and no auxiliary heating. (author). 19 refs, 11 figs, 3 tabs

  13. Asymmetric flux generation and its relaxation in reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arimoto, H.; Masamune, S.; Nagata, A.

    1985-02-01

    The toroidally asymmetric flux enhancement [''dynamo effect''] and the axisymmetrization of the enhanced fluxes that follows in the setting up phase of Reversed Field Pinch are investigated on the STP-3[M] device. A rapid increase in the toroidal flux generated by the dynamo effect is first observed near the poloidal and toroidal current feeders. Then, this inhomogeneity of the flux propagates toroidally towards the plasma current. The axisymmetrization of the flux is attained just after the maximum of plasma current. The MHD activities decrease significantly after this axisymmetrization and the quiescent period is obtained. (author)

  14. Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor (RFPR) concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Cort, G.E.

    1979-08-01

    A conceptual engineering design of a fusion reactor based on plasma confinement in a Reversed-Field Pinch (FRP) configuration is presented. A 50% atomic mixture of deuterium and tritium (DT) is ohmically heated to ignition by currents flowing in the toroidal plasma; this plasma current also inherently produces the confining magnetic fields in a toroidal chamber having a major and minor radii of 12.7 and 1.5 m, respectively. The DT plasma ignites in 2 to 3 s and burns at 10 to 20 keV for approx. 20 s to give a fuel burnup of approx. 50%. Tritium breeding occurs in a granular Li 2 O blanket which is packed around an array of radially oriented coolant tubes carrying a mixture of high-pressure steam and water. The slightly superheated steam emerging from this blanket would be used to drive a turbine directly. Low-pressure helium containing trace amounts of oxygen is circulated through the packed Li 2 O bed to extract the tritium. A 20-mm-thick copper first wall serves as a neutron multiplier, acts as a tritium barrier, and supports image currents to provide plasma stabilization on a 0.1-s timescale; external windings provide stability for longer times

  15. Reversed field pinch reactor study 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollis, A.A.; Mitchell, J.T.D.

    1977-12-01

    This report, the third of a series on the Reversed Field Pinch Reactor, describes a preliminary concept of the engineering design and layout of this pulsed toroidal reactor, which uses the stable plasma behaviour first observed in ZETA. The basic parameters of the 600 MW(e) reactor are taken from a companion study by Hancox and Spears. The plasma volume is 1.75m minor radius and 16m major radius surrounded by a 1.8m blanket-shield region - with the blanket divided into 14 removable segments for servicing. The magnetic confinement system consists of 28 toroidal field coils situated just outside the blanket and inside the poloidal and vertical field coils and all coils have normal copper conductors. The requirement to incorporate a conducting shell at the front of the blanket to provide a short-time plasma stability has a marked effect on the design. It sets the size of the blanket segment and the scale of the servicing operations, limits the breeding gain and complicates the blanket cooling and its integration with the heat engine. An extensive study will be required to confirm the overall reactor potential of the concept. (author)

  16. Sawteeth in the MST reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckstead, J.A.

    1990-09-01

    A dynamo mechanism has been used in astrophysics to explain the self-generation of the magnetic fields observed throughout the universe. This same type of phenomenon is believed to occur in the reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas. The RFP dynamo has been a major theoretical and experimental investigation since the first observations of the self-reversal process in early pinch research. A discrete dynamo event has been observed in the experimental RFP plasmas; this event is termed the RFP sawtooth. This phenomenon is similar to the sawtooth phenomenon observed in tokamak plasmas, but the two events differ in many respects. Both events are a result of the inward diffusion of the plasma current density. This causes the plasma to become unstable to the m = 1 tearing modes. It has been shown theoretically that the nonlinear interaction of these modes can generate the reversed toroidal field in the RFP. This thesis is a study of the RFP sawtooth phenomenon on the MST RFP. This includes experimental observations as well as 1-D numerical simulations of the sawtooth rise-time. During the rise-time of the sawtooth, the plasma is undergoing a purely diffusive process -- no dynamo is occurring during this phase. The dynamo only occurs during the sawtooth crash. During the rise-time, the m = 1 modes are observed to grow, and nonlinear interactions are observed prior to the sawtooth crash. At the time of the crash, many of the plasma profiles are flattened; these include the current density, the plasma temperature and the plasma density. The period of the sawteeth is observed to increase with the plasma current, as well as the magnetic Reynolds number, S

  17. Dynamo mode dynamics in reversed field pinches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    1999-11-01

    Reversed field pinches (RFPs) are unstable to multiple m=1 tearing modes, resonant in the plasma core. These ``dynamo modes'' are ultimately responsible for the dynamo action which maintains the reversal of the edge toroidal magnetic field against ohmic decay. Unfortunately, the dynamo modes also generally disrupt magnetic flux surfaces in the core, thereby strongly degrading the plasma confinement. However, recent experiments in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) and the Reversed Field Experiment (RFX) indicate that a well-confined RFP plasma is a possibility provided that the amplitude of the dynamo modes is controlled, and the rotation of these modes is also maintained. An analytic formalism has been developed in order to investigate the nonlinear interaction of dynamo modes with one another, with static error-fields, and with eddy currents excited in the vacuum vessel or stabilizing shell. The dynamo modes are found to couple nonlinearly to form a toroidally localized magnetic structure which can be identified as the ``slinky mode,'' reported in many RFP experiments. As the mode amplitudes increase, the slinky mode forms via a series of bifurcations in which the overall mode structure and the plasma rotation profile both change discontinuously. The threshold amplitude for the onset of these bifurcations is similar to that observed experimentally. The absence of mode rotation in RFX (which gives rise to serious edge loading problems) is shown to be due to strong eddy currents excited in the resistive vacuum vessel. Dynamo modes are slowed down by these eddy currents to such an extent that they are easily locked by small static error-fields which would otherwise (i.e., in the absence of the vacuum vessel eddy currents) be unable to affect the mode rotation. Since MST does not possess a resistive vacuum vessel (in MST the thick stabilizing shell also plays the role of the vacuum vessel: in RFX there is a separate vacuum vessel inside the shell) there are no vacuum

  18. Nonlinear reversed field pinch dynamics with nonideal boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Y.L.; Prager, S.C.

    1991-03-01

    The nonlinear behavior of the reversed field pinch bounded by a resistive shell or a distant conducting wall is investigated with a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic code. Nonlinear interaction between modes enhances fluctuation levels as the conducting wall is removed. The enhanced fluctuation induced v x b electric field, which produces the dynamo effect, suppresses toroidal current and enhances surface helicity dissipation. Thus, loop voltage must increase to sustain the current and maintain helicity balance. 46 refs., 21 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Proposal for the ZT-40 reversed-field Z-pinch experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.A.; Machalek, M.D.

    1977-08-01

    A next-generation, toroidal, reversed-field Z-pinch experiment to be constructed at LASL is proposed. On the basis of encouraging ZT-I and ZT-S experimental results, a larger device with a 40-cm bore and a 114-cm major radius is proposed, to extend the confinement time by about an order of magnitude. The new experiment will explore the physics of programming reversed-field pinches in a size range unexplored by previous reversed-field pinch experiments. Model reversed-field pinch reactor calculations show that, if stability is assumed, small fusion reactors are possible if the pinch current density is high. A basic aim will be to delineate the plasma and current density ranges in which stable reversed-field pinches can be produced. Improved vacuum techniques will be used to overcome the radiation losses that probably kept electron temperatures low in the earlier, smaller experiments

  20. Characteristics of reversed field pinch plasmas with a resistive shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamano, T.; Bard, W.D.; Chu, C.

    1987-01-01

    Reversed field pinch plasmas in a resistive shell have been investigated in the OHTE device. Discharges were sustained over 10 ms, much longer than the resistive shell time of 1.5 ms. Global plasma characteristics such as plasma temperature, density, resistance and magnetic fluctuations were very similar to those obtained with the previous highly conducting shell. A new type of toroidally localized kink instability, which we named the ''slinky'' mode, was found. It initially grew with a growth time of approximately the resistive shell time as the linear MHD theories have predicted, but self-healing was usually observed within a few milliseconds. This indicates that a highly conducting shell may not be required for a reversed field pinch, and suggests that linear plasma stability is not always necessary in a confinement system

  1. Physics considerations of the Reversed-Field Pinch fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    A conceptual engineering design of a fusion reactor based on plasma confinement in a toroidal Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) configuration is described. The plasma is ohmically ignited by toroidal plasma currents which also inherently provide the confining magnetic fields in a toroidal chamber having major and minor radii of 12.7 and 1.5 m, respectively. The DT plasma ignites in 2 to 3 s and undergoes a transient, unrefueled burn at 10 to 20 keV for approx. 20 s to give a DT burnup of approx. 50%. Accounting for all major energy sinks yields a cost-optimized system with a recirculating power fraction of 0.17; the power output is 750 MWe

  2. Behaviour of the peripheral plasma in the reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, A.; Sato, K.I.; Arimoto, H.; Yamada, S.; Nagata, A.; Murata, H.

    1986-01-01

    By using Langmuir probes installed behind limiters, time behaviour of the peripheral plasma in the Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) are investigated. They are strongly affected by the confined RFP plasma and are divided into three phases (the initial phase before setting up the RFP configuration, the current rising phase, and the quiescent phase), which are just the same as those of the confined RFP plasma. Typical behaviour of the peripheral plasma have relations to the pump out phenomena and of the toroidal flux generation. (author)

  3. Confinement dynamics in the reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenberg, K.F.

    1988-01-01

    The study of basic transport and confinement dynamics is central to the development of the reversed field pinch (RFP) as a confinement concept. Thus, the goal of RFP research is to understand the connection between processes that sustain the RFP configuration and related transport/confinement properties. Recently, new insights into confinement have emerged from a detailed investigation of RFP electron and ion physics. These insights derive from the recognition that both magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and electron kinetic effects play an important and strongly coupled role in RFP sustainment and confinement dynamics. In this paper, we summarize the results of these studies on the ZT-40M experiment. 8 refs

  4. Reversed-Field Pinch plasma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley, G.H.; Nebel, R.A.; Moses, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    The stability of a Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) is strongly dependent on the plasma profile and the confining sheared magnetic field. Magnetic diffusion and thermal transport produce changing conditions of stability. Despite the limited understanding of RFP transport, modelling is important to predict general trends and to study possible field programming options. To study the ZT-40 experiment and to predict the performance of future RFP reactors, a one-dimensional transport code has been developed. This code includes a linear, ideal MHD stability check based on an energy principle. The transport section integrates plasma profiles forward in time while the stability section periodically checks the stability of the evolving plasma profile

  5. Nonlocal Transport in the Reversed Field Pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spizzo, G.; White, R. B.; Cappello, S.; Marrelli, L.

    2009-09-21

    Several heuristic models for nonlocal transport in plasmas have been developed, but they have had a limited possibility of detailed comparision with experimental data. Nonlocal aspects introduced by the existence of a known spectrum of relatively stable saturated tearing modes in a low current reversed field pinch offers a unique possibility for such a study. A numerical modelling of the magnetic structure and associated particle transport is carried out for the reversed-field pinch experiment at the Consorzio RFX, Padova, Italy. A reproduction of the tearing mode spectrum with a guiding center code1 reliably reproduces the observed soft X-ray tomography. Following particle trajectories in the stochastic magnetic field shows the transport across the unperturbed flux surfaces to be due to a spectrum of Levy flights, with the details of the spectrum position dependent. The resulting transport is subdiffusive, and cannot be described by Rechester-Rosenbluth diffusion, which depends on a random phase approximation. If one attempts to fit the local transport phenomenologically, the subdiffusion can be fit with a combination of diffusion and inward pinch2. It is found that whereas passing particles explore the stochastic field and hence participate in Levy flights, the trapped particles experience normal neoclassical diffusion. A two fluid nonlocal Montroll equation is used to model this transport, with a Levy flight defined as the motion of an ion during the period that the pitch has one sign. The necessary input to the Montroll equation consists of a time distribution for the Levy flights, given by the pitch angle scattering operator, and a distribution of the flight distances, determined numerically using a guiding center code. Results are compared to experiment. The relation of this formulation to fractional kinetics is also described.

  6. Nonlocal Transport in the Reversed Field Pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spizzo, G.; White, R.B.; Cappello, S.; Marrelli, L.

    2009-01-01

    Several heuristic models for nonlocal transport in plasmas have been developed, but they have had a limited possibility of detailed comparison with experimental data. Nonlocal aspects introduced by the existence of a known spectrum of relatively stable saturated tearing modes in a low current reversed field pinch offers a unique possibility for such a study. A numerical modeling of the magnetic structure and associated particle transport is carried out for the reversed-field pinch experiment at the Consorzio RFX, Padova, Italy. A reproduction of the tearing mode spectrum with a guiding center code1 reliably reproduces the observed soft X-ray tomography. Following particle trajectories in the stochastic magnetic field shows the transport across the unperturbed flux surfaces to be due to a spectrum of Levy flights, with the details of the spectrum position dependent. The resulting transport is subdiffusive, and cannot be described by Rechester-Rosenbluth diffusion, which depends on a random phase approximation. If one attempts to fit the local transport phenomenologically, the subdiffusion can be fit with a combination of diffusion and inward pinch. It is found that whereas passing particles explore the stochastic field and hence participate in Levy flights, the trapped particles experience normal neoclassical diffusion. A two fluid nonlocal Montroll equation is used to model this transport, with a Levy flight defined as the motion of an ion during the period that the pitch has one sign. The necessary input to the Montroll equation consists of a time distribution for the Levy flights, given by the pitch angle scattering operator, and a distribution of the flight distances, determined numerically using a guiding center code. Results are compared to experiment. The relation of this formulation to fractional kinetics is also described.

  7. Recent studies of Reversed-Field Pinch reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    The reactor prognoses of a class of confinement scheme that relies primarily on self-fields induced by axial currents flowing within a plasma column are presented. The primary focus has been placed on the toroidal Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP). At the limit of very large current densities is the gas-embedded Dense Z-Pinch (DZP), a small-radius, linear device. Past conventional RFP reactor designs are reviewed. The extention of these conventional RFP reactors to DD advanced-fuel operation is described. The implications are summarized of operating higher-density, compact RFPs as reactors, wherein the current density rather than physical dimensions are scaled. Lastly, the application of very high current densities supported in a sub-millimeter linear current channel, as embodied in the DZP reactor, is reviewed

  8. Pellet refuelling of the ZT-40M reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurden, G.A.; Weber, P.G.; Watt, R.G.; Munson, C.P.; Ingraham, J.C.; Howell, R.B.; Clayton, T.E.; Buechl, K.; Nilles, E.J.

    1987-01-01

    The first pellet refuelling of a reversed field pinch has been successfully demonstrated in ZT-40M. By injecting a series of pellets, density increases of 600% have been observed, with no disruptions. Because of a coincidence of pellet transit time, Ohmic reheat time and particle confinement times (about 0.5 ms) a significant fraction of the plasma inventory 'leaks out' before pellet ablation is complete. Strong on-axis peaking of the density profile due to pellet fuelling is not typically observed; this is due to large poloidal and toroidal deflections observed in the pellet trajectory, beginning in the plasma edge. Asymmetric ablation of the pellet by a suprathermal electron population is suspected and simple modelling can account for the observed trajectories. (author)

  9. Simulation study of dynamo structure in reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, A.; Sato, K.I.; Ashida, H.; Amano, T.

    1992-10-01

    The dynamo structure in the reversed field pinch (RFP) is studied through the nonlinear dynamics of single-helicity mode. Simulation is concentrated upon the physical structure of nonlinear interactions of the plasma flow and magnetic fluctuation. The result indicates that when the initial equilibrium profile is deformed by resistive diffusion, the radial flow is driven near the core of the plasma. As this flow forms a vortex structure and magnetic fluctuation grows radially, the dynamo electric field is spirally induced just inside the reversal surface and then the toroidal flux is increased. This dynamo electric field correlates to nonlinear evolution of the kinetic energy of m=1 mode, and the increase of the toroidal flux is originated in the growth process of the magnetic energy of this mode. Consequently, the RFP configuration can be sustained by the single-helicity evolution of m=1 mode alone, and the electric field induced by the interactions of the toroidal velocity and the radial magnetic field is the most dominant source on the dynamo action. (author)

  10. Does shaping bring an advantage for reversed field pinch plasmas?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, S.C.; Xu, X.Y.; Wang, Z.R.; Liu, Y.Q.

    2013-01-01

    The MHD–kinetic hybrid toroidal stability code MARS-K (Liu et al 2008 Phys. Plasmas 15 112503) is applied to study the shaping effects on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stabilities in reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas, where both elongation and triangularity are taken into account. The ideal wall β (the ratio of the gaso-kinetic to magnetic pressures) limit set by the ideal kink mode/resistive wall mode in shaped RFP is investigated first, followed by a study of the kinetic damping on the resistive wall mode. Physics understanding of the results is provided by a systematic numerical analysis. Furthermore, the stability boundary of the linear resistive tearing mode in shaped RFP plasmas is computed and compared with that of the circular case. Finally, bootstrap currents are calculated for both circular and shaped RFP plasmas. Overall, the results of these studies indicate that the current circular cross-section is an appropriate choice for RFP devices, in the sense that the plasma shaping does not bring an appreciable advantage to the RFP performance in terms of macroscopic stabilities. In order to reach a steady-state operation, future RFP fusion reactors will probably need a substantial fraction of external current drives, due to the unfavourable scaling for the plasma-generated bootstrap current in the RFP configuration. (paper)

  11. Reversed-field pinch configuration with minimum energy and finite beta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Peng

    1989-01-01

    The reversed-field pinch (RFP) configuration has been studied for the case of finite beta. Suydam's condition and the sufficient criterion have been used to examine this configuration. Results of numerical calculations show that the critical value of the pinch parameter Θ for the appearance of the reverse toroidal field increases as the β-value increases. The critical value of Θ for the helical state increases with β as well. Suydam's and Robinson's stability regions increase and shift towards higher values of Θ with increasing β. Theoretical results for finite β coincide with recent RFP experimental results

  12. Behavior of the reversed field pinch with nonideal boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Yung-Lung.

    1988-11-01

    The linear and nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic stability of current-driven modes are studied for a reversed field pinch with nonideal boundary conditions. The plasma is bounded by a thin resistive shell surrounded by a vacuum region out to a radius at which a perfectly conducting wall is situated. The distant wall and the thin shell problems are studied by removing either the resistive shell or the conducting wall. Linearly, growth rates of tearing modes and kink modes are calculated by analytical solutions based on the modified Bessel function model for the equilibrium. The effects of variation of the shell resistivity and wall proximity on the growth rates are investigated. The modes that may be important in different parameter regimes and with different boundary conditions are identified. The nonlinear behaviors are studied with a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics code. The fluctuations generally rise with increasing distance between the conducting wall and the plasma. The enhanced fluctuation induced v x b electric field primarily oppose toroidal current; hence, loop voltage must increase to sustain the constant. Quasilinear interaction between modes typically associated with the dynamo action is identified as the most probable nonlinear destabilization mechanism. The helicity and energy balance properties of the simulation results are discussed. The interruption of current density along field lines intersecting the resistive shell is shown to lead to surface helicity leakage. This effect is intimately tied to stability, as fluctuation induced v x b electric field is necessary to transport the helicity to the surface. In this manner, all aspects of helicity balance, i.e., injection, transport, and dissipation, are considered self-consistently. The importance of the helicity and energy dissipation by the mean components of the magnetic field and current density is discussed. 88 refs., 41 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Evolution equations for magnetic islands in a reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Edmund Po-Ning

    We derive a coupled set of equations, consisting of a partial differential equation (PDE) and several ordinary differential equations (ODEs), which govern the phase evolution of a nonlinear magnetic island chain in a reversed field pinch (RFP), subject to the braking torque due to eddy currents excited in a resistive vacuum vessel and the locking torque due to an external resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP). We first use our phase evolution equations to examine the locking behavior of the island chain; such a study is of interest because tearing modes and their associated magnetic islands generate a toroidally localized magnetic structure (slinky mode) which, if locked to a static RMP, can seriously degrade plasma confinement. A key component of our analysis is the reduction of the original PDE/ODE description of phase evolution to a much simpler and physically transparent (coupled) set of first order ODEs, which possess the novel feature that the radial extent of the region of plasma which co-rotates with the island chain is determined self-consistently, by viscosity. Using these equations, we develop a comprehensive theory of the influence of a resistive vacuum vessel on error-field locking and unlocking thresholds. Our ODE description of phase evolution is limited in that it cannot account for island width evolution, or time-variation in the RMP. Our final step, then, is to develop an extension of our simple phase evolution equations which, when coupled with a (Rutherford-like) island width evolution equation, can completely describe the island chain dynamics in the presence of a rotating RMP with programmable amplitude and frequency waveforms. Consequently, we can use these island evolution equations to model magnetic feedback experiments.

  14. Prospects for fusion applications of reversed-field pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathke, C.G.; Krakowski, R.A.; Hagenson, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    The applicability of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) as a source of fusion neutrons for use in developing key fusion nuclear technologies is examined. This Fusion Test Facility (FTF) would emphasize high neutron wall loading, small plasma volume, low fusion and driver powers, and steady-state operation. Both parametric tradeoffs based on present-day physics understanding and a conceptual design based on an approx.1-MW/m 2 (neutron) driven operation are reported. 10 refs

  15. Quasi-steady operation of reversed field pinches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nebel, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    A three fluid, Lagrangian mesh, transport and stability code (RFPBRN) has been developed and applied to the Reversed Field Pinch reactor concept. Using a circular cylinder, quasi-static approximation, RFPBRN follows the time evolution of the temperature, density, and magnetic field profiles for the RFP while simultaneously monitoring ideal MHD stability. Local stability is monitored for Suydam modes while global stability is monitored using a Rayleigh-Ritz expansion of the energy principle.

  16. Nonlinear dynamo mode dynamics in reversed field pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzpatrick, Richard; Yu, Edmund P.

    2000-01-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of a typical dynamo mode in a reversed field pinch, under the action of the braking torque due to eddy currents excited in a resistive vacuum vessel and the locking torque due to a resonant error-field, is investigated. A simple set of phase evolution equations for the mode is derived: these equations represent an important extension of the well-known equations of Zohm et al. [Europhys. Lett. 11, 745 (1990)] which incorporate a self-consistent calculation of the radial extent of the region of the plasma which corotates with the mode; the width of this region being determined by plasma viscosity. Using these newly developed equations, a comprehensive theory of the influence of a resistive vacuum vessel on error-field locking and unlocking thresholds is developed. Under certain circumstances, a resistive vacuum vessel is found to strongly catalyze locked mode formation. Hopefully, the results obtained in this paper will allow experimentalists to achieve a full understanding of why the so-called ''slinky mode'' locks in some reversed field pinch devices, but not in others. The locking of the slinky mode is currently an issue of outstanding importance in reversed field pinch research. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  17. Nonlinear dynamo mode dynamics in reversed field pinches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Richard; Yu, Edmund P.

    2000-09-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of a typical dynamo mode in a reversed field pinch, under the action of the braking torque due to eddy currents excited in a resistive vacuum vessel and the locking torque due to a resonant error-field, is investigated. A simple set of phase evolution equations for the mode is derived: these equations represent an important extension of the well-known equations of Zohm et al. [Europhys. Lett. 11, 745 (1990)] which incorporate a self-consistent calculation of the radial extent of the region of the plasma which corotates with the mode; the width of this region being determined by plasma viscosity. Using these newly developed equations, a comprehensive theory of the influence of a resistive vacuum vessel on error-field locking and unlocking thresholds is developed. Under certain circumstances, a resistive vacuum vessel is found to strongly catalyze locked mode formation. Hopefully, the results obtained in this paper will allow experimentalists to achieve a full understanding of why the so-called "slinky mode" locks in some reversed field pinch devices, but not in others. The locking of the slinky mode is currently an issue of outstanding importance in reversed field pinch research.

  18. Nonlinear dynamo mode dynamics in reversed field pinches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzpatrick, Richard [Institute for Fusion Studies, Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Yu, Edmund P. [Institute for Fusion Studies, Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2000-09-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of a typical dynamo mode in a reversed field pinch, under the action of the braking torque due to eddy currents excited in a resistive vacuum vessel and the locking torque due to a resonant error-field, is investigated. A simple set of phase evolution equations for the mode is derived: these equations represent an important extension of the well-known equations of Zohm et al. [Europhys. Lett. 11, 745 (1990)] which incorporate a self-consistent calculation of the radial extent of the region of the plasma which corotates with the mode; the width of this region being determined by plasma viscosity. Using these newly developed equations, a comprehensive theory of the influence of a resistive vacuum vessel on error-field locking and unlocking thresholds is developed. Under certain circumstances, a resistive vacuum vessel is found to strongly catalyze locked mode formation. Hopefully, the results obtained in this paper will allow experimentalists to achieve a full understanding of why the so-called ''slinky mode'' locks in some reversed field pinch devices, but not in others. The locking of the slinky mode is currently an issue of outstanding importance in reversed field pinch research. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  19. Soft x-ray measurement of internal tearing mode structure in a reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chartas, G.; Hokin, S.

    1991-01-01

    The structure of internally resonant tearing modes has been studied in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch with a soft x-ray detector system consisting of an imaging array at one toroidal location and several detectors at different toroidal locations. The toroidal mode numbers of m = 1 structures are in the range n = -5, -6, -7. The modes propagate with phase velocity v = 1--6 x 10 6 cm/s, larger than the diamagnetic drift velocity v d ∼ 5 x 10 5 cm/s. Phase locking between modes with different n in manifested as a beating of soft x-ray signals which is found to be strongest near the resonant surfaces of the modes (r/a = 0.1 -- 0.5). 15 refs., 5 figs

  20. Microinstabilities and turbulent transport in the reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmody, Daniel Richard

    The work presented in this thesis is concerned with addressing the nature of drift wave microturbulence in the reversed field pinch (RFP). Microturbulence is an important phenomenon and contributor to heat and particle transport in tokamaks, where it has been studied for several decades, but its role in the RFP is a rather new topic of study. As such, the nature of RFP drift waves and their relationship to their tokamak counterparts is still developing, and many of the results in this work are focused on addressing this challenge. Fundamental advances in microturbulence research have been made in recent decades through two parallel developments: the theoretical framework encompassed in the gyrokinetic model, and the computational power offered by massively-parallel, high-performance computing systems. Gyrokinetics is a formulation of kinetic theory in such a way that the fast timescale gyromotion of particles around magnetic field lines is averaged out. The implementation and use of RFP equilibrium models in gyrokinetic codes constitutes the bulk of this thesis. A simplified analytic equilibrium, the toroidal Bessel function model (TBFM), is used in the gyrokinetic code GYRO to explore the fundamental scaling properties of drift waves in the RFP geometry. Two drift wave instabilities, the ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode and the microtearing mode (MTM) are found to occur, and the relationship of their critical threshold in driving gradients and plasma beta is explored. The critical values in these parameters are found to be above those of similar tokamak cases by roughly a factor of the flux surface aspect ratio. The MTM is found to be stabilized by increasing the RFP pinch parameter theta, making it unlikely for it to unstable in the high-theta improved confinement pulsed poloidal current drive (PPCD) discharges. Efforts are also made to address microinstabilities in specific experimental discharges of the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST). A semi

  1. Electron temperature diagnostics in the RFX reversed field pinch experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartiromo, R.; Carraro, L.; Marrelli, L.; Murari, A.; Pasqualotto, R.; Puiatti, M.E.; Scarin, P.; Valisa, M.; Franz, P.; Martin, P.; Zabeo, L.

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents an integrated approach to the problem of electron temperature diagnostics of the plasma in a reversed field pinch. Three different methods, sampling different portions of the electron distribution function, are adopted, namely Thomson scattering, soft X-ray spectroscopy by pulse-height analysis and filtered soft X-ray intensity ratio. A careful analysis of the different sources of systematic errors is performed and a novel statistical approach is adopted to mutually validate the three independent measurements. A satisfactory agreement is obtained over a large range of experimental conditions, indicating that in the plasma core the energy distribution function is well represented by a maxwellian. (author)

  2. 3-dimensional simulation of dynamo effect of reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koide, Shinji.

    1990-09-01

    A non-linear numerical simulation of the dynamo effect of a reversed field pinch (RFP) with finite beta is presented. It is shown that the m=-1, n=(9,10,11,....,19) modes cause the dynamo effect and sustain the field reversed configuration. The role of the m=0 modes on the dynamo effect is carefully examined. Our simulation shows that the magnetic field fluctuation level scales as S -0.2 or S -0.3 in the range of 10 3 5 , while Nebel, Caramana and Schnack obtained the fluctuation level is independent of S for a pressureless RFP plasma. (author)

  3. Multidimensional MHD computations for the field-reversed theta pinch and the reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnack, D.D.

    1981-01-01

    The study of alternative approaches to the tokamak for the design of a magnetic fusion reactor is an area of active research in both the United States and Japan. Among the most promising of these concepts are the Field-Reversed Theta Pinch (FRTP) and the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP). This paper briefly describes some recent large-scale numerical MHD simulations of these devices

  4. Phase-locking of tearing modes in reversed field pinch plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Richard; Zanca, Paolo

    2001-10-01

    In virtually all reversed field pinch (RFP) experiments, the m=1 and m=0 tearing modes present in the plasma phase-lock together to form a highly peaked, strongly toroidally localized pattern in the perturbed magnetic field. This pattern, which is commonly known as the ``slinky'' pattern, can give rise to severe edge loading problems which limit the maximum achievable toroidal current. A theory is presented which explains all salient features of the slinky pattern seen in the Reversed Field eXperiment (RFX) [F. Gnesotto, et al., Fusion Engineering and Design 25, 335 (1995)]. The central premise is that at high ambient mode amplitude the various tearing modes present in the plasma phase-lock together in a configuration which minimizes the amplitudes of the electromagnetic torques exerted at the various mode rational surfaces. The theory successfully predicts the profiles of the edge radial and toroidal magnetic fields generated by the m=0 and m=1 modes. Moreover, the theory explains the phase relations between the various modes, the presence of a small toroidal offset between the peaks of the m=0 and m=1 contributions to the overall pattern, and the response of the pattern to externally generated m=0 and m=1 magnetic perturbations.

  5. Electrical design of a high current density air-core reversed-field pinch ''ZTP''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reass, W.A.; Cribble, R.F.; Melton, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the electrical design of a small, high current density (10 MA/m 2 ) toroidal reversed-field Z-Pinch (RFP) presently being constructed at Los Alamos. Special purpose magnetic field programs were used to calculate self and mutual inductances for the poloidal field windings. The network analysis program MINI-SCEPTRE was then used to predict plasma current, including the interaction between toroidal and poloidal field circuits, as described by the Bessel function model for RFP's. Using these programs, coil geometry was obtained for minimal field errors and the pulse power systems were optimized to minimize equilibrium control power. Results of computer modeling and implementation of the electrical circuits are presented

  6. Advanced-fuel reversed-field pinch reactor (RFPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1981-10-01

    The utilization of deuterium-based fuels offers the potential advantages of greater flexibility in blanket design, significantly reduced tritium inventory, potential reduction in radioactivity level, and utilization of an inexhaustible fuel supply. The conventional DT-fueled Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor (RFPR) designs are reviewed, and the recent extension of these devices to advanced-fuel (catalyzed-DD) operation is presented. Attractive and economically competitive DD/RFPR systems are identified having power densities and plasma parameters comparable to the DT systems. Converting an RFP reactor from DT to DD primarily requires increasing the magnetic field levels a factor of two, still requiring only modest magnet coil fields (less than or equal to 4 T). When compared to the mainline tokamak, the unique advantages of the RFP (e.g., high beta, low fields at the coils, high ohmic-heating power densities, unrestricted aspect ratio) are particularly apparent for the utilization of advanced fuels

  7. A vented pump limiter for the reversed field pinch RFX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonato, P.

    1998-01-01

    The reversed field pinch (RFP) plasma performance, as in the Tokamak, is strongly correlated with the edge neutral particle control. The drawbacks of the conventional magnetic divertors and throat limiters on the RFP plasma have slackened the application of an active particle control system in existing devices. An advanced solution, based on the idea of the 'vented pump limiter' experimented on Tore Supra, has been conceived for RFX. This type of pump limiter is very attractive for a RFP. In this paper, the design of a 'vented limiter' prototype for RFX is presented. Up to six modules of this limiter can be installed at the equatorial plane of RFX, allowing a particle exhaust efficiency comparable with a divertor or a throat limiter working in a Tokamak. Finally, the optimization of this concept for the next step RFP device is presented. (orig.)

  8. Magnetohydrodynamic effects of current profile control in reversed field pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sovinec, C.R.; Prager, S.C.

    1999-01-01

    Linear and non-linear MHD computations are used to investigate reversed field pinch configurations with magnetic fluctuations reduced through current profile control. Simulations with reduced ohmic drive and moderate auxiliary current drive, represented generically with an electron force term, applied locally in radius near the plasma edge show magnetic fluctuation energies that are orders of magnitude smaller than those in simulations without profile control. The core of the improved configurations has reduced magnetic shear and closed flux surfaces in some cases, and reversal is sustained through the auxiliary current drive. Modes resonant near the edge may become unstable with auxiliary drive, but their saturation levels can be controlled. The space of auxiliary drive parameters is explored, and the ill effects of deviating far from optimal conditions is demonstrated in non-linear simulations. (author)

  9. Confinement in TPE-RX reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagi, Y.; Bolzonella, T.; Canton, A.

    2001-01-01

    Characteristics of the confinement properties of a reversed field pinch (RFP), the TPE-RX (R/a=1.72/0.45 m, R and a are major and minor radii), are presented for the plasma current, I p of 0.2-0.4 MA. TPE-RX has been operational since 1998, and I p =0.5 MA and duration time of up to 0.1 s have been obtained separately. It is found that I p /N (=12x10 -14 Am, N is the line density) is higher than those of other RFPs and poloidal beta, β p , and energy confinement time, τ E , are 5-10% and 0.5-1 ms, respectively, which are comparable with those of other RFPs of comparable sizes (RFX and MST). Pulsed poloidal current drive has recently been tested and the result has shown a twofold improvement of β p and τ E . The improvement is discussed in terms of the dynamic trajectories in the F-Θ plane, where F and Θ are reversal and pinch parameters, respectively. The global confinement properties are compared between the locked and non-locked discharges, which yields a better understanding of the mode-locking phenomena in RFP plasmas. (author)

  10. Ohmic heating of the reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerwin, R.

    1980-04-01

    Simple analytic expressions are found for the global heating rate and the time needed to achieve global power balance with radiation and other losses, in useful agreement with large RFP transport codes. A simple condition is noted, which insures that the heating can be accomplished before appreciable resistive evolution occurs in the pinch profile. The product of poloidal beta, β/sub theta/, and toroidal current, I, that characterizes a condition of global power balance is derived subject to the above-mentioned condition without making key assumptions used by earlier investigators. First, a perfectly steady state (with local power balance) is not assumed, nor is it appropriate to do so. Secondly, the cross-field resistivity is not required to be classical. Since the value of (β/sub theta/ I) plays a fundamental role in determining the kind of device one requires, the foundations of this value are important

  11. Pellet injection in the RFP [Reversed Field Pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurden, G.A.; Weber, P.G.; Munson, C.P.; Cayton, T.E.; Bunting, C.A.; Carolan, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    Observation of pellets injected into the ZT-40M Reversed Field Pinch has allowed a new twist on the usual tokamak ablation physics modeling. The RFP provides a strong ohmic heating regime with relatively high electron drift parameter (ξ/sub drift/ /approximately/ 0.2), in the presence of a highly sheared magnetic field geometry. In situ photos of the pellet ablation cloud using a grated-intensified CCD camera, as well as two-view integrated photos of the pellet trajectory show substantial modification of the original pellet trajectory, in both direction and speed. Depending on the launch geometry, increases in the initial 500 m/s pellet speed by 50% have been observed, and a ski jump deflector plate in the launch port has been used to counteract strong poloidal curvature. In contrast to the tokamak, the D/sub α/ light signature is strongest near the edge, and weaker in the plasma center. Additional information on ion temperature response to pellet injection with 20 μsec time resolution has been obtained using a 5-channel neutral particle analyzer (NPA). The energy confinement is transiently degraded while the beta is largely unchanged. This may be indicative of pellet injection into a high-beta plasma operating at fixed beta. 10 refs., 6 figs

  12. Pellet injection in the RFP (Reversed Field Pinch)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurden, G. A.; Weber, P. G.; Munson, C. P.; Cayton, T. E.; Bunting, C. A.; Carolan, P. G.

    Observation of pellets injected into the ZT-40M Reversed Field Pinch has allowed a new twist on the usual tokamak ablation physics modeling. The RFP provides a strong ohmic heating regime with relatively high electron drift parameter (xi sub drift approx. 0.2), in the presence of a highly sheared magnetic field geometry. In situ photos of the pellet ablation cloud using a grated-intensified CCD camera, as well as two-view integrated photos of the pellet trajectory show substantial modification of the original pellet trajectory, in both direction and speed. Depending on the launch geometry, increases in the initial 500 m/s pellet speed by 50 percent were observed, and a ski jump deflector plate in the launch port has been used to counteract strong poloidal curvature. In contrast to the tokamak, the D sub alpha light signature is strongest near the edge, and weaker in the plasma center. Additional information on ion temperature response to pellet injection with 20 microsec time resolution has been obtained using a 5-channel neutral particle analyzer (NPA). The energy confinement is transiently degraded while the beta is largely unchanged. This may be indicative of pellet injection into a high-beta plasma operating at fixed beta.

  13. Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactors (CRFPR): preliminary engineering considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Miller, R.L.; Embrechts, M.J.; Schnurr, N.M.; Battat, M.E.; LaBauve, R.J.; Davidson, J.W.

    1984-08-01

    The unique confinement physics of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) projects to a compact, high-power-density fusion reactor that promises a significant reduction in the cost of electricity. The compact reactor also promises a factor-of-two reduction in the fraction of total cost devoted to the reactor plant equipment (i.e., fusion power core (FPC) plus support systems). In addition to operational and developmental benefits, these physically smaller systems can operate economically over a range of total power output. After giving an extended background and rationale for the compact fusion approaches, key FPC subsystems for the Compact RFP Reactor (CRFPR) are developed, designed, and integrated for a minimum-cost, 1000-MWe(net) system. Both the problems and promise of the compact, high-power-density fusion reactor are quantitatively evaluated on the basis of this conceptual design. The material presented in this report both forms a framework for a broader, more expanded conceptual design as well as suggests directions and emphases for related research and development.

  14. Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactors (CRFPR): preliminary engineering considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Miller, R.L.; Embrechts, M.J.; Schnurr, N.M.; Battat, M.E.; LaBauve, R.J.; Davidson, J.W.

    1984-08-01

    The unique confinement physics of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) projects to a compact, high-power-density fusion reactor that promises a significant reduction in the cost of electricity. The compact reactor also promises a factor-of-two reduction in the fraction of total cost devoted to the reactor plant equipment [i.e., fusion power core (FPC) plus support systems]. In addition to operational and developmental benefits, these physically smaller systems can operate economically over a range of total power output. After giving an extended background and rationale for the compact fusion approaches, key FPC subsystems for the Compact RFP Reactor (CRFPR) are developed, designed, and integrated for a minimum-cost, 1000-MWe(net) system. Both the problems and promise of the compact, high-power-density fusion reactor are quantitatively evaluated on the basis of this conceptual design. The material presented in this report both forms a framework for a broader, more expanded conceptual design as well as suggests directions and emphases for related research and development

  15. Chaos in reversed-field-pinch plasma simulation and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watts, C.; Newman, D.E.; Sprott, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    We investigate the possibility that chaos and simple determinism are governing the dynamics of reversed-field-pinch (RFP) plasmas using data from both numerical simulations and experiment. A large repertoire of nonlinear-analysis techniques is used to identify low-dimensional chaos. These tools include phase portraits and Poincare sections, correlation dimension, the spectrum of Lyapunov exponents, and short-term predictability. In addition, nonlinear-noise-reduction techniques are applied to the experimental data in an attempt to extract any underlying deterministic dynamics. Two model systems are used to simulate the plasma dynamics. These are the DEBS computer code, which models global RFP dynamics, and the dissipative trapped-electron-mode model, which models drift-wave turbulence. Data from both simulations show strong indications of low-dimensional chaos and simple determinism. Experimental data were obtained from the Madison Symmetric Torus RFP and consist of a wide array of both global and local diagnostic signals. None of the signals shows any indication of low-dimensional chaos or other simple determinism. Moreover, most of the analysis tools indicate that the experimental system is very high dimensional with properties similar to noise. Nonlinear noise reduction is unsuccessful at extracting an underlying deterministic system

  16. Advanced feedback control methods in EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadikin, D.; Brunsell, P. R.; Paccagnella, R.

    2006-07-01

    Previous experiments in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch device have shown the possibility of suppression of multiple resistive wall modes (RWM). A feedback system has been installed in EXTRAP T2R having 100% coverage of the toroidal surface by the active coil array. Predictions based on theory and the previous experimental results show that the number of active coils should be sufficient for independent stabilization of all unstable RWMs in the EXTRAP T2R. Experiments using different feedback schemes are performed, comparing the intelligent shell, the fake rotating shell, and the mode control with complex feedback gains. Stabilization of all unstable RWMs throughout the discharge duration of td≈10τw is seen using the intelligent shell feedback scheme. Mode rotation and the control of selected Fourier harmonics is obtained simultaneously using the mode control scheme with complex gains. Different sensor signals are studied. A feedback system with toroidal magnetic field sensors could have an advantage of lower feedback gain needed for the RWM suppression compared to the system with radial magnetic field sensors. In this study, RWM suppression is demonstrated, using also the toroidal field component as a sensor signal in the feedback system.

  17. The TITAN Reversed-Field Pinch fusion reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-03-01

    The TITAN Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) fusion reactor study is a multi-institutional research effort to determine the technical feasibility and key developmental issues of an RFP fusion reactor, especially at high power density, and to determine the potential economics, operations, safety, and environmental features of high-mass-power-density fusion systems. The TITAN conceptual designs are DT burning, 1000 MWe power reactors based on the RFP confinement concept. The designs are compact, have a high neutron wall loading of 18 MW/m 2 and a mass power density of 700 kWe/tonne. The inherent characteristics of the RFP confinement concept make fusion reactors with such a high mass power density possible. Two different detailed designs have emerged: the TITAN-I lithium-vanadium design, incorporating the integrated-blanket-coil concept; and the TITAN-II aqueous loop-in-pool design with ferritic steel structure. This report contains a collection of 16 papers on the results of the TITAN study which were presented at the International Symposium on Fusion Nuclear Technology. This collection describes the TITAN research effort, and specifically the TITAN-I and TITAN-II designs, summarizing the major results, the key technical issues, and the central conclusions and recommendations. Overall, the basic conclusions are that high-mass power-density fusion reactors appear to be technically feasible even with neutron wall loadings up to 20 MW/m 2 ; that single-piece maintenance of the FPC is possible and advantageous; that the economics of the reactor is enhanced by its compactness; and the safety and environmental features need not to be sacrificed in high-power-density designs. The fact that two design approaches have emerged, and others may also be possible, in some sense indicates the robustness of the general findings

  18. A global analysis of the behaviour of the ZT-40M reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philipps, J.A.; Baker, D.A.; Gribble, R.F.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental data from the reversed field experiment, ZT-40M, have been re-examined in an attempt to determine the scaling behaviour of the physical plasma quantities and their fluctuations. A subset of the data is defined, allowing a reduced number of independent variables to described the behaviour. For flat-top ZT-40M discharges the independent variables are chosen as being the toroidal current, I φ , and the dimensionless pinch parameter, Θ, which is proportional to the ratio of the toroidal current to the toroidal magnetic flux. The amplitudes of the dependent variables, including the electron temperature, plasma resistance, toroidal flux, the ratio of I φ to the mean electron density and their fluctuation amplitudes, exhibit minima as functions of Θ for constant Iφ. These minima move towards lower Θ values with increasing I φ . Over the range of conditions for acceptable operation, the scaling of variables with I φ is not unique but depends on the variation of Θ as I φ increases. The Θ variation is governed by the specific conditions (such as constant poloidal beta, β p ) chosen to set the desired RFP operational constraints. Contour plots of the dependent variables versus the two independent variables, I φ and Θ, allow the determination of the Iφ-Θ trajectory that corresponds to discharges that meet the chosen condition. The analysis shows that the amplitude of the low frequency fluctuations correlates with the mean β p and energy confinement time of ZT-40M. By modifying the external circuits on ZT-40M, low frequency fluctuations were reduced. Comparing the designs of different RFP experiments and their operating behaviour, these modifications suggest design changes for present and future RFP experiments that will benefit their performance. (author). 90 refs, 14 figs, 3 tabs

  19. Energetic electron measurements in the edge of a reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingraham, J.C.; Ellis, R.F.; Downing, J.N.; Munson, C.P.; Weber, P.G.; Wurden, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    The edge plasma of the ZT-40M [Fusion Technol. 8, 1571 (1985)] reversed-field pinch has been studied using a combination of three different plasma probes: a double-swept Langmuir probe, an electrostatic energy analyzer, and a calorimeter--Langmuir probe. The edge plasma has been measured both with and without a movable graphite tile limiter present nearby in the plasma. Without a limiter a fast nonthermal tail of electrons (T congruent 350 eV) is detected in the edge plasma with nearly unidirectional flow along B and having a density between 2% and 10% of the cold edge plasma (T congruent 20 eV). The toroidal sense of this fast electron flow is against the force of the applied electric field. A large power flux along B is measured flowing in the same direction as the fast electrons and is apparently carried by the fast electrons. With the limiter present the fast electrons are still detected in the plasma, but are strongly attenuated in the shadow of the limiter. The measured scrape-off lengths for both the fast electrons and the cold plasma indicate cross-field transport at the rate of, or less than, Bohm diffusion. Estimates indicate that the fast electrons could carry the reversed-field pinch current density at the edge and, from the measured transverse diffusion rates, could also account for the electron energy loss channel in ZT-40 M. The long mean-free-path kinetic nature of these fast electrons suggests that a kinetic process, rather than a magnetohydrodynamic process that is based upon a local Ohm's law formulation, is responsible for their generation

  20. Analysis of resistive tearing-mode in the reversed-field pinch plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshiyama, Hiroshi; Masamune, Sadao; Hamuro, Eitaro; Tamaki, Reiji.

    1985-01-01

    As one of the methods of confining high temperature plasma by magnetic stress, attention has been paid to reversed field pinch (RFP). This RFP is the method of maintaining plasma pressure by combining the poloidal field generated by plasma current and the toroidal field having nearly same intensity, thus forming the toroidal shape, closed magnetic surface. As the typical RFP equipment, there have been TPE-1R(M), HBTX-1A, ZT-40M and OHTE, but in order to anticipate the further development, one of the problems is the resistive instability. In this study, the critical beta value determined by the tearing mode in RFP configuration was examined by analytical and numerical calculation methods. The position of a wall required for the stability was determined by solving a second order differential equation for a radial perturbed magnetic field. The propriety of the computer code for determining the position was examined. The magnetic field configuration having a finite beta value was determined, and its stability against a tearing mode was investigated. For this judgement of the stability, the developed computer code was used. The tearing mode in a Bessel function model, the tearing mode of a finite beta value and others are described. (Kako, I.)

  1. Reversed field pinch operation with intelligent shell feedback control in EXTRAP T2R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Kuldkepp, M.; Menmuir, S.; Cecconello, M.; Hedqvist, A.; Yadikin, D.; Drake, J. R.; Rachlew, E.

    2006-11-01

    Discharges in the thin shell reversed field pinch (RFP) device EXTRAP T2R without active feedback control are characterized by growth of non-resonant m = 1 unstable resistive wall modes (RWMs) in agreement with linear MHD theory. Resonant m = 1 tearing modes (TMs) exhibit initially fast rotation and the associated perturbed radial fields at the shell are small, but eventually TMs wall-lock and give rise to a growing radial field. The increase in the radial field at the wall due to growing RWMs and wall-locked TMs is correlated with an increase in the toroidal loop voltage, which leads to discharge termination after 3-4 wall times. An active magnetic feedback control system has been installed in EXTRAP T2R. A two-dimensional array of 128 active saddle coils (pair-connected into 64 independent m = 1 coils) is used with intelligent shell feedback control to suppress the m = 1 radial field at the shell. With feedback control, active stabilization of the full toroidal spectrum of 16 unstable m = 1 non-resonant RWMs is achieved, and TM wall locking is avoided. A three-fold extension of the pulse length, up to the power supply limit, is observed. Intelligent shell feedback control is able to maintain the plasma equilibrium for 10 wall times, with plasma confinement parameters sustained at values comparable to those obtained in thick shell devices of similar size.

  2. Experiments on the ZT-S reversed-field pinch, August--December 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, A.R.

    1979-06-01

    During the latter half of 1978 the ZT-S reversed-field pinch was used to explore the utility of pitch-programming techniques in setting up stable diffuse pinch profiles. Several experimental observations relating to this goal are presented

  3. Properties of the edge plasma in the rebuilt Extrap-T2R reversed field pinch experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianello, N.; Spolaore, M.; Serianni, G.; Bergsåker, H.; Antoni, V.; Drake, J. R.

    2002-12-01

    The edge region of the rebuilt Extrap-T2R reversed field pinch experiment has been investigated using Langmuir probes. Radial profiles of main plasma parameters are obtained and compared with those of the previous device Extrap-T2. The spontaneous setting up of a double shear layer of E×B toroidal velocity is confirmed. The particle flux induced by electrostatic fluctuations is calculated and the resulting effective diffusion coefficient is consistent with the Bohm estimate. A close relationship between electrostatic fluctuations at the edge and non-linear coupling of MHD modes in the core is found.

  4. Reversed field pinch device of University of Tokyo, REPUTE-I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Nobuyuki

    1985-01-01

    In the University of Tokyo, the research project on a reversed field pinch device started in fiscal year 1983, and the experimental facility REPUTE-1 was constructed. This project is the common project of Science and Engineering Departments, and the facility is used for the research on the plasma in a nuclear fusion reactor core and the education of students. The point that the REPUTE-1 is different from other reversed field pinch devices is that its shell is resistive. It was confirmed by the initial experiment that even though the shell was not electroconductive, a reversed field configuration was formed. The subject for the future is to maintain the equilibrium of plasma by outside normal magnetic fields instead of depending on the shell. The reason why a reversed field pinch device was selected is explained. In fiscal year 1984, the preparation of various instruments for plasma measurement was carried out. The reversed field pinch devices are superior to tokamaks in the principle of plasma containment and the reactor engineering potential. The outline of reversed field pinch devices and the REPUTE-1, and the results of initial experiment are reported. (Kako, I.)

  5. Rotation in a reversed field pinch with active feedback stabilization of resistive wall modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecconello, M.; Menmuir, S.; Brunsell, P. R.; Kuldkepp, M.

    2006-09-01

    Active feedback stabilization of multiple resistive wall modes (RWMs) has been successfully proven in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch. One of the features of plasma discharges operated with active feedback stabilization, in addition to the prolongation of the plasma discharge, is the sustainment of the plasma rotation. Sustained rotation is observed both for the internally resonant tearing modes (TMs) and the intrinsic impurity oxygen ions. Good quantitative agreement between the toroidal rotation velocities of both is found: the toroidal rotation is characterized by an acceleration phase followed, after one wall time, by a deceleration phase that is slower than in standard discharges. The TMs and the impurity ions rotate in the same poloidal direction with also similar velocities. Poloidal and toroidal velocities have comparable amplitudes and a simple model of their radial profile reproduces the main features of the helical angular phase velocity. RWMs feedback does not qualitatively change the TMs behaviour and typical phenomena such as the dynamo and the 'slinky' are still observed. The improved sustainment of the plasma and TMs rotation occurs also when feedback only acts on internally non-resonant RWMs. This may be due to an indirect positive effect, through non-linear coupling between TMs and RWMs, of feedback on the TMs or to a reduced plasma-wall interaction affecting the plasma flow rotation. Electromagnetic torque calculations show that with active feedback stabilization the TMs amplitude remains well below the locking threshold condition for a thick shell. Finally, it is suggested that active feedback stabilization of RWMs and current profile control techniques can be employed simultaneously thus improving both the plasma duration and its confinement properties.

  6. Spectroscopic measurement of the MHD dynamo in the MST reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, J.T.

    1998-09-01

    The author has directly observed the coupling of ion velocity fluctuations and magnetic field fluctuations to produce an MHD dynamo electric field in the interior of the MST reversed field pinch. Chord averaged ion velocity fluctuations were measured with a fast spectroscopic diagnostic which collects line radiation from intrinsic carbon impurities simultaneously along two lines of sight. The chords employed for the measurements resolved long wavelength velocity fluctuations of several km/s at 8--20 kHz as tiny, fast Doppler shifts in the emitted line profile. During discrete dynamo events the velocity fluctuations, like the magnetic fluctuations, increase dramatically. The toroidal and poloidal chords with impact parameters of 0.3 a and 0.6 a respectively, resolved fluctuation wavenumbers with resonance surfaces near or along the lines of sight indicating a radial velocity fluctuation width for each mode which spans only a fraction of the plasma radius. The phase between the measured toroidal velocity fluctuations and the magnetic fluctuations matches the predictions of resistive MHD while the poloidal velocity fluctuations exhibit a phase consistent with the superposition of MHD effects and the advection of a mean flow gradient past the poloidal line of sight. Radial velocity fluctuations resolved by a chord through the center of the plasma were small compared to the poloidal and toroidal fluctuations and exhibited low coherence with the magnetic fluctuations. The ensembled nonlinear product of the ion velocity fluctuations and fluctuations in the magnetic field indicates a substantial dynamo electric field which peaks during the periods of spontaneous flux generation

  7. Rotation in a reversed field pinch with active feedback stabilization of resistive wall modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecconello, M [Division of Fusion Plasma Physics, Association EURATOM -VR, Alfven Laboratory, School of Electrical Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology KTH, SE-10044 Stockholm (Sweden); Menmuir, S [Department of Physics, Association EURATOM -VR, School of Engineering Science, Royal Institute of Technology KTH, SE-10691 Stockhom (Sweden); Brunsell, P R [Division of Fusion Plasma Physics, Association EURATOM -VR, Alfven Laboratory, School of Electrical Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology KTH, SE-10044 Stockholm (Sweden); Kuldkepp, M [Department of Physics, Association EURATOM -VR, School of Engineering Science, Royal Institute of Technology KTH, SE-10691 Stockhom (Sweden)

    2006-09-15

    Active feedback stabilization of multiple resistive wall modes (RWMs) has been successfully proven in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch. One of the features of plasma discharges operated with active feedback stabilization, in addition to the prolongation of the plasma discharge, is the sustainment of the plasma rotation. Sustained rotation is observed both for the internally resonant tearing modes (TMs) and the intrinsic impurity oxygen ions. Good quantitative agreement between the toroidal rotation velocities of both is found: the toroidal rotation is characterized by an acceleration phase followed, after one wall time, by a deceleration phase that is slower than in standard discharges. The TMs and the impurity ions rotate in the same poloidal direction with also similar velocities. Poloidal and toroidal velocities have comparable amplitudes and a simple model of their radial profile reproduces the main features of the helical angular phase velocity. RWMs feedback does not qualitatively change the TMs behaviour and typical phenomena such as the dynamo and the 'slinky' are still observed. The improved sustainment of the plasma and TMs rotation occurs also when feedback only acts on internally non-resonant RWMs. This may be due to an indirect positive effect, through non-linear coupling between TMs and RWMs, of feedback on the TMs or to a reduced plasma-wall interaction affecting the plasma flow rotation. Electromagnetic torque calculations show that with active feedback stabilization the TMs amplitude remains well below the locking threshold condition for a thick shell. Finally, it is suggested that active feedback stabilization of RWMs and current profile control techniques can be employed simultaneously thus improving both the plasma duration and its confinement properties.

  8. Rotation in a reversed field pinch with active feedback stabilization of resistive wall modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecconello, M; Menmuir, S; Brunsell, P R; Kuldkepp, M

    2006-01-01

    Active feedback stabilization of multiple resistive wall modes (RWMs) has been successfully proven in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch. One of the features of plasma discharges operated with active feedback stabilization, in addition to the prolongation of the plasma discharge, is the sustainment of the plasma rotation. Sustained rotation is observed both for the internally resonant tearing modes (TMs) and the intrinsic impurity oxygen ions. Good quantitative agreement between the toroidal rotation velocities of both is found: the toroidal rotation is characterized by an acceleration phase followed, after one wall time, by a deceleration phase that is slower than in standard discharges. The TMs and the impurity ions rotate in the same poloidal direction with also similar velocities. Poloidal and toroidal velocities have comparable amplitudes and a simple model of their radial profile reproduces the main features of the helical angular phase velocity. RWMs feedback does not qualitatively change the TMs behaviour and typical phenomena such as the dynamo and the 'slinky' are still observed. The improved sustainment of the plasma and TMs rotation occurs also when feedback only acts on internally non-resonant RWMs. This may be due to an indirect positive effect, through non-linear coupling between TMs and RWMs, of feedback on the TMs or to a reduced plasma-wall interaction affecting the plasma flow rotation. Electromagnetic torque calculations show that with active feedback stabilization the TMs amplitude remains well below the locking threshold condition for a thick shell. Finally, it is suggested that active feedback stabilization of RWMs and current profile control techniques can be employed simultaneously thus improving both the plasma duration and its confinement properties

  9. The effects of magnetic field errors on reversed field pinch plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almagri, A.F.

    1990-12-01

    Studies of magnetic field error effects on Reversed Field Pinch plasma were carried out on the Madison Symmetric Torus. Magnetic field errors at the poloidal gap were reduced by 18% in rms value. This modest reduction of field errors resulted in improved plasma discharges. The plasma loop voltage was reduced by about 31%, and the plasma resistivity was reduced by 36%. Reversal duration increased by 16%. The character of the sawtooth activity as seen on the toroidal field at the wall changed considerably when field errors were reduced. These results suggest improved plasma confinement. Field errors were reduced further by a factor of six in rms value. With this reduction of field errors, plasma loop voltage was reduced by about a factor of two. The discharge duration doubled. At this low level of field errors, the plasma exhibited coherent magnetic fluctuations. These fluctuations have a poloidal mode number m = 1 and toroidal mode number n = 5 - 10. These modes are typically phase-locked to one another to form a localized perturbation. This perturbation rotates toroidally in the ion-diamagnetic drift direction with a speed of about 10 6 cm/sec. Occasionally these modes are observed to lock to the conducting wall. This locking is believed to be caused by the poloidal gap field errors. These locked discharges tend to be much shorter in duration and to have larger loop voltage. The behavior of locked discharges can be explained by a field-error instability. Some estimates of the internal radial magnetic fields and the resulting magnetic islands are calculated. These calculations show that the field errors need to be reduced to less than 2% of the poloidal field at the wall to reduce islands overlap

  10. Magnetic fluctuation measurements in the thin resistive shell OHTE device operated as a reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Haye, R.J.; Lee, P.S.; Schaffer, M.J.; Tamano, T.; Taylor, P.L.

    1988-01-01

    A small set of magnetic pickup coils inside the thin resistive shell and an extensive set outside are used to monitor high frequency (3-50 kHz) MHD activity in a reversed field pinch discharge of duration long compared to the shell time constant. The MHD activity is dominated by nearly equal amplitude m=0 and m=-1 poloidal modes both of whose frequency spectra peak near the drift frequency, i.e. about 8 to 10 kHz. The m=0 and m=-1 activities are uncorrelated and exhibit strong turbulence; the autocorrelation times for both are about 40 μs, and the toroidal correlation lengths are about equal to the 20 cm shell minor radius b. The toroidal variation of the m=0 activity at a given time when Fourier analysed in toroidal mode n has a power spectrum peaking at n=4-5 or nb/R 0 approx.= 1. The n spectrum for m=-1 is nearly zero up to n=10 and substantial at 11 ≤ n ≤ 16, i.e. those modes which are pitch resonant in the plasma interior. The aperiodic development of a localized helical kink, the slinky mode, stabilizes, i.e. turns off, in turn the m=-1 high frequency activities of the n=11 and 12 modes. This is postulated to be due to the slinky mode flattening the gradient in μ near the axis (μ is the ratio between current density parallel to the magnetic field and the magnetic field strength). (author). Letter-to-the-editor. 11 refs, 5 figs

  11. Spectroscopic measurement of the MHD dynamo in the MST reversed field pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, James Tharp [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1998-09-01

    The author has directly observed the coupling of ion velocity fluctuations and magnetic field fluctuations to produce an MHD dynamo electric field in the interior of the MST reversed field pinch. Chord averaged ion velocity fluctuations were measured with a fast spectroscopic diagnostic which collects line radiation from intrinsic carbon impurities simultaneously along two lines of sight. The chords employed for the measurements resolved long wavelength velocity fluctuations of several km/s at 8-20 kHz as tiny, fast Doppler shifts in the emitted line profile. During discrete dynamo events the velocity fluctuations, like the magnetic fluctuations, increase dramatically. The toroidal and poloidal chords with impact parameters of 0.3 a and 0.6 a respectively, resolved fluctuation wavenumbers with resonance surfaces near or along the lines of sight indicating a radial velocity fluctuation width for each mode which spans only a fraction of the plasma radius. The phase between the measured toroidal velocity fluctuations and the magnetic fluctuations matches the predictions of resistive MHD while the poloidal velocity fluctuations exhibit a phase consistent with the superposition of MHD effects and the advection of a mean flow gradient past the poloidal line of sight. Radial velocity fluctuations resolved by a chord through the center of the plasma were small compared to the poloidal and toroidal fluctuations and exhibited low coherence with the magnetic fluctuations. The ensembled nonlinear product of the ion velocity fluctuations and fluctuations in the magnetic field indicates a substantial dynamo electric field which peaks during the periods of spontaneous flux generation.

  12. Studies of plasma self-organization in toroidal pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamano, T.; Bard, W.D.; LaHaye, R.J.; Schaffer, M.J.; Taylor, P.L.

    1987-01-01

    Plasma self-organizations of toroidal pinch plasmas were observed in the OHTE device. The reversed field pinch discharges were sustained for about 15 ms longer than the shell time constant of 1.5 ms although linear MHD theories predict that MHD instabilities grow on the resistive shell time scale. Detailed studies of MHD activities led to the discovery of a toroidally localized kink mode. The slinky mode is the result of the phase locking of several internal kink modes due to non-linear coupling, and plays an important role in achieving the Taylor relaxed state. This is described in the first part of this lecture. Such phase lockings were observed not only for poloidal mode number m = -1 modes, but also for m = 0 and m = 1 modes. This provides some insight into how a tangled discharge can be formed. Tangled discharge models have been discussed by Rusbridge and others. However, the models do not provide a clean picture. The introduction of localized plasma deformation due to phase locking gives a simplified view of a tangled discharge. This is discussed in the second part of this lecture. The third part of this lecture describes another interesting plasma self-organization observed in the ultra low q regime. The plasma tend to maintain a constant current and shows a ''staircase''-like current behavior. 9 refs., 10 figs

  13. Mode dynamics and confinement in the reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunsell, P.R.; Bergsaker, H.; Brzozowski, J.H.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J.R.; Malmberg, J.-A.; Scheffel, J.; Schnack, D.D.

    2001-01-01

    Tearing mode dynamics and toroidal plasma flow in the RFP has been experimentally studied in the Extrap T2 device. A toroidally localised, stationary magnetic field perturbation, the 'slinky mode' is formed in nearly all discharges. There is a tendency of increased phase alignment of different toroidal Fourier modes, resulting in higher localised mode amplitudes, with higher magnetic fluctuation level. The fluctuation level increases slightly with increasing plasma current and plasma density. The toroidal plasma flow velocity and the ion temperature has been measured with Doppler spectroscopy. Both the toroidal plasma velocity and the ion temperature clearly increase with I/N. Initial, preliminary experimental results obtained very recently after a complete change of the Extrap T2 front-end system (first wall, shell, TF coil), show that an operational window with mode rotation most likely exists in the rebuilt device, in contrast to the earlier case discussed above. A numerical code DEBSP has been developed to simulate the behaviour of RFP confinement in realistic geometry, including essential transport physics. Resulting scaling laws are presented and compared with results from Extrap T2 and other RFP experiments. (author)

  14. Point design for deuterium-deuterium compact reversed-field pinch reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabiri, A.E.; Dobrott, D.R.; Gurol, H.; Schnack, D.D.

    1984-01-01

    A deuterium-deuterium (D-D) reversed-field pinch (RFP) reactor may be made comparable in size and cost to a deuterium-tritium (D-T) reactor at the expense of high-thermal heat load to the first wall. This heat load is the result of the larger percentage of fusion power in charged particles in the D-D reaction as compared to the D-T reaction. The heat load may be reduced by increasing the reactor size and hence the cost. In addition to this ''degraded'' design, the size may be kept small by means of a higher heat load wall, or by means of a toroidal divertor, in which case most of the heat load seen by the wall is in the form of radiation. Point designs are developed for these approaches and cost studies are performed and compared with a D-T reactor. The results indicate that the cost of electricity of a D-D RFP reactor is about20% higher than a D-T RFP reactor. This increased cost could be offset by the inherent safety features of the D-D fuel cycle

  15. Plasma-column instabilities in a reversed-field pinch without a shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    Plasma column instabilities in a Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) without a shell were investigated in the Colorado Reversatron RFP. The Reversatron RFP (aspect ration R/a = 50 cm/8cm) is a toroidal plasma containment device consisting of a vacuum chamber, a thick conducting shell, modular shells, magnetic field producing coils and diagnostics to characterize the plasma. RFP discharges were set up in the Reversatron in three different experimental configurations: with a thick conducting shell, with a modular shell and with no shell. In two of the configurations, a shell enclosed the plasma column to provide some plasma stability. A vertical magnetic field provided equilibrium in experiments without a shell. Data from discharges without a shell indicated that the plasma duration was greatly reduced and the plasma resistance increased compared to the discharges with a thick shell. Plasma position probes indicated large plasma centriod displacements corresponding to a n = 1 and a n = 3 kink coincident with the peak of the plasma current and the start of a discharge termination phase. The modular shell lengthened the discharge duration and lowered the plasma resistance to values intermediate between the plasma with a thick shell and the plasma with no shell. The modular shell suppressed the large plasma column displacements observed in the RFP plasma without a shell

  16. Plasma-column instabilities in a reversed-field pinch without a shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    Plasma column instabilities in a Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) without a shell were investigated in the Colorado Reversatron RFP. The Reversatron RFP (aspect ration R/a = 50 cm/8cm) is a toroidal plasma containment device consisting of a vacuum chamber, a thick conducting shell, modular shells, magnetic field producing coils and diagnostics to characterize the plasma. RFP discharges were set up in the Reversatron in three different experimental configurations: with a thick conducting shell, with a modular shell and with no shell. In two of the configurations, a shell enclosed the plasma column to provide some plasma stability. A vertical magnetic field provided equilibrium in experiments without a shell. Data from discharges without a shell indicated that the plasma duration was greatly reduced and the plasma resistance increased compared to the discharges with a thick shell. Plasma position probes indicated large plasma centriod displacements corresponding to a n = 1 and a n = 3 kink coincident with the peak of the plasma current and the start of a discharge termination phase. The modular shell lengthened the discharge duration and lowered the plasma resistance to values intermediate between the plasma with a thick shell and the plasma with no shell. The modular shell suppressed the large plasma column displacements observed in the RFP plasma without a shell.

  17. Formation and locking of the ``slinky mode'' in reversed-field pinches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    1999-04-01

    The formation and breakup of the "slinky mode" in a Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) is investigated analytically. The slinky mode is a toroidally localized, coherent interference pattern in the magnetic field, which corotates with the plasma at the reversal surface. This mode forms, via a series of bifurcations, as a result of the nonlinear coupling of multiple m=1 core tearing modes. The slinky mode breaks up via a second series of bifurcations. However, the typical mode amplitude below which slinky breakup is triggered is much smaller than that above which slinky formation occurs. Analytic expressions for the slinky formation and breakup thresholds are obtained in all regimes of physical interest. The locking of the slinky mode to a static error field is also investigated analytically. Either the error field arrests the rotation of the plasma at the reversal surface before the formation of the slinky mode, so that the mode subsequently forms as a nonrotating mode, or the slinky mode forms as a rotating mode and subsequently locks to the error field. Analytic expressions for the locking and unlocking thresholds are obtained in all regimes of physical interest.

  18. Single-piece maintenance procedures for the TITAN reversed-field pinch reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grotz, S.P.; Creedon, R.L.; Cooke, P.I.H.; Duggan, W.P.; Krakowski, R.A.; Najmabadi, F.; Wong, C.P.C.

    1987-01-01

    The TITAN reactor is a compact (major radius of 3.9 m and minor plasma radius of 0.6 m), high neutron wall loading (--18MW/m 2 ) fusion energy system based on the reversed-field pinch (RFP) concept. The TITAN-I fusion power core (FPC) is a lithium, self-cooled design with vanadium alloy (V-3Ti-1Si) structural material. The compact design of the TITAN fusion power core (FPC) reduces the system to a few small and relatively low mass components, making toroidal segmentation of the FPC unnecessary. A single-piece maintenance procedure in which the replaceable first wall and blanket is removed as a single unit is, therefore, possible. The TITAN FPC design provides for top access to the reactor with vertical lifts used to remove the components. The number of remote handling procedures is few and the movements are uncomplicated. The annual torus replacement requires that the reusable ohmic-heating coil set and hot-shield assembly be removed and temporarily stored in a hot cell. The used first wall and blanket assembly is drained and disconnected from the coolant supply system, then lifted to a processing room where it is cooled and prepared for Class-C waste burial. The new, pre-tested first wall and blanket assembly is then lowered into position and the removal procedure is reversed to complete the replacement process

  19. ZT-P: an advanced air core reversed field pinch prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenberg, K.F.; Buchenauer, C.J.; Burkhardt, L.C.

    1986-01-01

    The ZT-P experiment, with a major radius of 0.45 m and a minor radius of 0.07 m, was designed to prototype the next generation of reversed field pinch (RFP) machines at Los Alamos. ZT-P utilizes an air-core poloidal field system, with precisely wound and positioned rigid copper coils, to drive the plasma current and provide plasma equilibrium with intrinsically low magnetic field errors. ZT-P's compact configuration is adaptable to test various first wall and limiter designs at reactor-relevant current densities in the range of 5 to 20 MA/m 2 . In addition, the load assembly design allows for the installation of toroidal field divertors. Design of ZT-P began in October 1983, and assembly was completed in October 1984. This report describes the magnetic, electrical, mechanical, vacuum, diagnostic, data acquisition, and control aspects of the machine design. In addition, preliminary data from initial ZT-P operation are presented. Because of ZT-P's prototypical function, many of its design aspects and experimental results are directly applicable to the design of a next generation RFP. 17 refs., 47 figs

  20. Generation and confinement of hot ions and electrons in a reversed-field pinch plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, B E; Almagri, A F; Anderson, J K; Caspary, K J; Clayton, D J; Den Hartog, D J; Ennis, D A; Fiksel, G; Gangadhara, S; Kumar, S; Magee, R M; O'Connell, R; Parke, E; Prager, S C; Reusch, J A; Sarff, J S; Stephens, H D; Brower, D L; Ding, W X; Craig, D

    2010-01-01

    By manipulating magnetic reconnection in Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) discharges, we have generated and confined for the first time a reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasma with an ion temperature >1 keV and an electron temperature of 2 keV. This is achieved at a toroidal plasma current of about 0.5 MA, approaching MST's present maximum. The manipulation begins with intensification of discrete magnetic reconnection events, causing the ion temperature to increase to several kiloelectronvolts. The reconnection is then quickly suppressed with inductive current profile control, leading to capture of a portion of the added ion heat with improved ion energy confinement. Electron energy confinement is simultaneously improved, leading to a rapid ohmically driven increase in the electron temperature. A steep electron temperature gradient emerges in the outer region of the plasma, with a local thermal diffusivity of about 2 m 2 s -1 . The global energy confinement time reaches 12 ms, the largest value yet achieved in the RFP and which is roughly comparable to the H-mode scaling prediction for a tokamak with the same plasma current, density, heating power, size and shape.

  1. Energetic-particle-driven instabilities and induced fast-ion transport in a reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, L.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Anderson, J. K.; Capecchi, W.; Eilerman, S.; Forest, C. B.; Koliner, J. J.; Nornberg, M. D.; Reusch, J.; Sarff, J. S.; Liu, D.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple bursty energetic-particle (EP) driven modes with fishbone-like structure are observed during 1 MW tangential neutral-beam injection in a reversed field pinch (RFP) device. The distinguishing features of the RFP, including large magnetic shear (tending to add stability) and weak toroidal magnetic field (leading to stronger drive), provide a complementary environment to tokamak and stellarator configurations for exploring basic understanding of EP instabilities. Detailed measurements of the EP mode characteristics and temporal-spatial dynamics reveal their influence on fast ion transport. Density fluctuations exhibit a dynamically evolving, inboard-outboard asymmetric spatial structure that peaks in the core where fast ions reside. The measured mode frequencies are close to the computed shear Alfvén frequency, a feature consistent with continuum modes destabilized by strong drive. The frequency pattern of the dominant mode depends on the fast-ion species. Multiple frequencies occur with deuterium fast ions compared to single frequency for hydrogen fast ions. Furthermore, as the safety factor (q) decreases, the toroidal mode number of the dominant EP mode transits from n=5 to n=6 while retaining the same poloidal mode number m=1. The transition occurs when the m=1, n=5 wave-particle resonance condition cannot be satisfied as the fast-ion safety factor (q fi ) decreases. The fast-ion temporal dynamics, measured by a neutral particle analyzer, resemble a classical predator-prey relaxation oscillation. It contains a slow-growth phase arising from the beam fueling followed by a rapid drop when the EP modes peak, indicating that the fluctuation-induced transport maintains a stiff fast-ion density profile. The inferred transport rate is strongly enhanced with the onset of multiple EP modes

  2. Pinch effects and chaotic motion in toroidal confinement devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spizzo, G.; White, R. B.; Cappello, S.; Marrelli, L.; Sattin, F.

    2007-07-01

    Particle transport in toroidal confinement devices is often described in terms of a diffusion constant and an inward pinch velocity: this phenomenological description can be justified by a probabilistic approach (random walk) that simplifies the particle dynamics when the orbits are small enough compared to the system size. This results in a diffusive expression for particle flux. Then, the convective part of the particle flux can be related, for example, to spatial inhomogeneities in temperature or field curvature. When magnetic chaos is present, but the system is not too far from the stochastic threshold, diffusion and pinch can be actually an expression of the sub diffusive nature of the transport, brought about by the presence of a spectrum of long-distance Levy flights. This effect is shown by numerical modelling of the magnetic structure and associated particle transport in conditions relevant for the reversed-field pinch experiment RFX-mod based at Consorzio RFX, Padova. Simulations reproduce the particle motion through guiding center calculations of particle orbits embedded in the magnetic topology, obtained by 3D MHD simulations (code SpeCyl). Results have been used to produce the probability distribution functions (p.d.f.) of jump lengths and waiting times, providing the kernel to integrate in the Montroll equation, which governs the evolution of particle density in the Continuous-time random walk (CTRW) approach. This means that we obtain a transport equation using the knowledge of the kernel which comes directly from the actual particle dynamics. The difference of behavior between trapped and passing particles has also been considered, and has a relevance comparable to sub diffusion in determining the pinch effect. Similar results can be applied to other systems with chaos induces particle transport, e.g. electron transport in Tokamaks. This work was partially supported by DoE contract No. DE-FG03-94ER54271. (Author)

  3. Research operations on reversed field pinch. Performance report, February 12-May 31, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Research operations on reversed field pinch (OHTE) were initiated. The thin conducting shell (resistive shell) experiments have produced new findings, enhancing the understanding of confinement physics. The first milestone, ''Evaluate control of RFP plasma equilibrium in a thin shell device and assess plasma stability (June 1986)'', is expected to be met. Detailed descriptions of each item are given

  4. Edge fluctuations in the MST [Madison Symmetric Torus] reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almagri, A.; Assadi, S.; Beckstead, J.; Chartas, G.; Crocker, N.; Den Hartog, D.; Dexter, R.; Hokin, S.; Holly, D.; Nilles, E.; Prager, S.; Rempel, T.; Sarff, J.; Scime, E.; Shen, W.; Spragins, C.; Sprott, J.; Starr, G.; Stoneking, M.; Watts, C.

    1990-10-01

    Edge magnetic and electrostatic fluctuations are measured in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed field pinch. At low frequency ( e > p e /p e where φ and p e are the fluctuating potential and pressure, respectively). From measurements of the fluctuating density, temperature, and potential we infer that the electrostatic fluctuation induced transport of particles and energy can be substantial. 13 refs., 11 figs

  5. Time-resolved VUV spectroscopy in the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedqvist, Anders; Rachlew-Källne, Elisabeth

    1998-09-01

    Time-resolved VUV spectroscopy has been used to investigate the effects of impurities in a reversed field pinch operating with a resistive shell. Results of electron temperature, impurity ion densities, particle confinement time and 0741-3335/40/9/004/img1 together with a description of the interpretation and the equipment are presented.

  6. Changes in transport and confinement in the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallander, E.; Sallander, J.; Hedqvist, A.

    1999-09-01

    At the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch a non-intrusive approach has been undertaken to monitor transport driven by magnetic fluctuations. Correlations are presented between fluctuations observed in the core and at the edge of the plasma. The fluctuations are characterized and their effect on the confinement of core electron energy is estimated.

  7. Reversed field pinch operation with a thin shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortolani, S.; Antoni, V.; Martini, S.; LaHaye, R.; Schaffer, M.; Tamano, T.; Taylor, P.; GA Technologies, San Diego, CA)

    1987-01-01

    The pulse length in OHTE, operating with a thin conducting shell, has been prolonged by finer control of the plasma position. The plasma sensitivity to equilibrium control further proves the absence of any intrinsic limitation on the plasma performance due to the lack of the perfectly conducting shell. The addition of the external vertical field control has extended the discharge lengths from ∼8 ms to ∼14 ms, with a simultaneous increase in discharge reproducibility. Although MHD linear theory predicts that RFP plasmas are unstable with a resistive shell boundary, no change in gross MHD modes is observed experimentally. However, a toroidally localized kink mode (slinky'' mode) due to nonlinear couplings of several internal kink modes has been found. The experimental indication that a relatively resistive shell (tau/sub shell/ ≅ 1/10 tau/sub pulse/) can provide an adequate MHD stability boundary introduces the possibility of major simplifications and optimizations in the design and construction of the next generation of RFP experiments. In particular, field error constraints on gaps and portholes become much less important and active accurate plasma positioning becomes possible. The latter may prove to be a crucial issue in RFP research where the dissipation in the outer plasma regions can largely determine the loop voltage and therefore the energy confinement time. 7 refs., 4 figs

  8. Analytical study of a reversed-field pinch with rectangular cross section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Peng

    1990-01-01

    An analyic solution of the force-free equation for a toroidal configuration of rectangular cross section is presented. It is shown that the critical value of contraction ratio for the appearance of a reversed field as well as of the ohmic current increases as the elongation of the cross section increases

  9. Error field assessment from driven rotation of stable external kinks at EXTRAP-T2R reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, F. A.; Frassinetti, L.; Brunsell, P. R.; Drake, J. R.; Olofsson, K. E. J.

    2013-04-01

    A new non-disruptive error field (EF) assessment technique not restricted to low density and thus low beta was demonstrated at the EXTRAP-T2R reversed field pinch. Stable and marginally stable external kink modes of toroidal mode number n = 10 and n = 8, respectively, were generated, and their rotation sustained, by means of rotating magnetic perturbations of the same n. Due to finite EFs, and in spite of the applied perturbations rotating uniformly and having constant amplitude, the kink modes were observed to rotate non-uniformly and be modulated in amplitude. This behaviour was used to precisely infer the amplitude and approximately estimate the toroidal phase of the EF. A subsequent scan permitted to optimize the toroidal phase. The technique was tested against deliberately applied as well as intrinsic EFs of n = 8 and 10. Corrections equal and opposite to the estimated error fields were applied. The efficacy of the error compensation was indicated by the increased discharge duration and more uniform mode rotation in response to a uniformly rotating perturbation. The results are in good agreement with theory, and the extension to lower n, to tearing modes and to tokamaks, including ITER, is discussed.

  10. Overview of the TITAN-II reversed-field pinch aqueous fusion power core design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Creedon, R.L.; Grotz, S.; Cheng, E.T.; Sharafat, S.; Cooke, P.I.H.

    1988-03-01

    TITAN-II is a compact, high power density Reversed-Field Pinch fusion power reactor design based on the aqueous lithium solution fusion power core concept. The selected breeding and structural materials are LiNO/sub 3/ and 9-C low activation ferritic steel, respectively. TITAN-II is a viable alternative to the TITAN-I lithium self-cooled design for the Reversed-Field Pinch reactor to operate at a neutron wall loading of 18 MWm/sup 2/. Submerging the complete fusion power core and the primary loop in a large pool of cool water will minimize the probability of radioactivity release. Since the protection of the large pool integrity is the only requirement for the protection of the public, TITAN-II is a passive safety assurance design. 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Overview of the TITAN-II reversed-field pinch aqueous fusion power core design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Creedon, R.L.; Cheng, E.T. (General Atomic Co., San Diego, CA (USA)); Grotz, S.P.; Sharafat, S.; Cooke, P.I.H. (California Univ., Los Angeles (USA). Dept. of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering; California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (USA). Inst. for Plasma and Fusion Research); TITAN Research Group

    1989-04-01

    TITAN-II is a compact, high-power-density Reversed-Field Pinch fusion power reactor design based on the aqueous lithium solution fusion power core concept. The selected breeding and structural materials are LiNO/sub 3/ and 9-C low activation ferritic steel, respectively. TITAN-II is a viable alternative to the TITAN-I lithium self-cooled design for the Reversed-Field Pinch reactor to operate at a neutron wall loading of 18 MW/m/sup 2/. Submerging the complete fusion power core and the primary loop in a large pool of cool water will minimize the probability of radioactivity release. Since the protection of the large pool integrity is the only requirement for the protection of the public, TITAN-II is a level 2 of passive safety assurance design. (orig.).

  12. Enhanced confinement with plasma biasing in the MST reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, D.; Almagri, A.F.; Anderson, J.K.

    1997-06-01

    We report an increase in particle confinement with plasma biasing in a reversed field pinch. Miniature plasma sources are used as electrodes to negatively bias the plasma at the edge (r/a ∼ 0.9). Particle content increases and H α radiation decreases upon application of bias and global particle confinement roughly doubles as a result. Measurements of plasma potential, impurity flow, and floating potential fluctuations indicate that strong flows are produced and that electrostatic fluctuations are reduced

  13. Generation of fast electrons in reversed field pinches by the equilibrium grad |B| force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiksel, G.

    1994-10-01

    It is shown that a decreasing magnetic field profile in reversed-field pinch plasmas leads to formation of an anisotropic electron distribution function at the plasma edge. The mechanism is the conservation of the magnetic moment and the energy of electrons that collisionlessly travel outward in a stochastic magnetic field. As a result, the electrons have high parallel energies and low perpendicular energies at the edge. The details of the distribution function correspond well to experimental results

  14. Resistive Wall Mode Stability and Control in the Reversed Field Pinch

    OpenAIRE

    Yadikin, Dmitriy

    2006-01-01

    Control of MHD instabilities using a conducting wall together with external magnetic fields is an important route to improved performance and reliability in fusion devices. Active control of MHD modes is of interest for both the Advanced Tokamak and the Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) configurations. A wide range of unstable, current driven MHD modes is present in the RFP. An ideally conducting wall facing the plasma can in principle provide stabilization to these modes. However, a real, resistive...

  15. The reversed-field pinch as a poloidal-field-dominated, compact, high-power-density fusion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the feasibility of reversed-field pinch devices as future thermonuclear reactors. Safety, cost, ion temperatures, Lawson numbers, and power densities are reviewed for these types of devices. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  16. Refueling and density control in the ZT-40M reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurden, G.A.; Weber, P.G.; Watt, R.G.; Munson, C.P.; Cayton, T.E.; Buechl, K.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of pellet injection and gas puff refueling have been studied in the ZT-40M Reversed Field Pinch. Multiple deuterium pellets (≤ 6 x 10 19 D atoms/pellet) with velocities ranging from 300 to 700 m/sec have been injected into plasmas with n-bar/sub e/ ∼1 to 5 X 10 19 m -3 , I/sub phi/ ∼100 to 250 kA, T/sub e/(0) ∼150 to 300 eV and discharge durations of ≤ 20 msec. Photographs and an array D/sub α/ detectors show substantial deflection of the pellet trajectory in both the poloidal and toroidal planes, due to asymmetric ablation of the pellet by electrons streaming along field lines. To compensate for the poloidal deflection, the injector was moved up +14 cm off-axis, allowing the pellets to curve down to the midplane. In this fashion, central peaking of the pellet density deposition profile can be obtained. Both electron and ion temperatures fall in response to the density rise, such that β/sub θ/(β/sub θ/ identical to n-bar/sub e/(T/sub e/(0) + T/sub i/)/(B/sub θ/(a)) 2 ) remains roughly constant. Energy confinement is momentarily degraded, and typically a decrease in F (F identical to B/sub phi/(a)/(B/sub phi/)) is seen as magnetic energy is converted to plasma energy when the pellet ablates. As a result of pellet injection at I/sub phi/ = 150 kA we observe T/sub e/(0) α n-bar/sub e//sup -.9 +- .1/, while the helicity based resistivity eta/sub k/ transiently varies as n-bar/sub e//sup .7 +- .1/. While the achievement of center-peaked density profiles is possible with pellet injection, gas puffing at rates strong enough to show a 50% increase in n-bar/sub e/ over a period of 10 msec (∼150 torr-litres/sec) leads to hollow density profiles. The refueling requirements for parameters expected in the next generation RFPs (ZTH, RFX) can be extrapolated from these data using modified tokamak pellet ablation codes

  17. On the stabilization of toroidal pinches by finite larmor radius effects and toroidal magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.; Weiland, J.

    1989-01-01

    The radial eigenvalue problem for internal modes in a large aspect ratio toriodal pinch has been solved. A particularly stable regime for a weak but nonzero toroidal magnetic field has been found. (31 refs.)

  18. Resistive wall modes in the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Malmberg, J.-A.; Yadikin, D.; Cecconello, M.

    2003-10-01

    Resistive wall modes (RWM) in the reversed field pinch are studied and a detailed comparison of experimental growth rates and linear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory is made. RWM growth rates are experimentally measured in the thin shell device EXTRAP T2R [P. R. Brunsell et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 43, 1 (2001)]. Linear MHD calculations of RWM growth rates are based on experimental equilibria. Experimental and linear MHD RWM growth rate dependency on the equilibrium profiles is investigated experimentally by varying the pinch parameter Θ=Bθ(a)/ in the range Θ=1.5-1.8. Quantitative agreement between experimental and linear MHD growth rates is seen. The dominating RWMs are the internal on-axis modes (having the same helicity as the central equilibrium field). At high Θ, external nonresonant modes are also observed. For internal modes experimental growth rates decrease with Θ while for external modes, growth rates increase with Θ. The effect of RWMs on the reversed-field pinch plasma performance is discussed.

  19. Transport asymmetry and release mechanisms of metal dust in the reversed-field pinch configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bykov, I; Bergsåker, H; Frassinetti, L; Brunsell, P R; Vignitchouk, L; Ratynskaia, S; Banon, J-P; Tolias, P

    2014-01-01

    Experimental data on dust resident in the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch are reported. Mobile dust grains are captured in situ by silicon collectors, whereas immobile grains are sampled post mortem from the wall by adhesive tape. The simulation of collection asymmetries by the MIGRAINe dust dynamics code in combination with the experimental results is employed to deduce some characteristics of the mechanism of intrinsic dust release. All evidence suggests that re-mobilization is dominant with respect to dust production. (paper)

  20. Single-Helical-Axis States in Reversed-Field-Pinch Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenzini, R.; Terranova, D.; Alfier, A.; Innocente, P.; Martines, E.; Pasqualotto, R.; Zanca, P.

    2008-01-01

    The transition to a new magnetic topology, characterized by a quasi-single-helicity state with a single helical magnetic axis has been experimentally observed for the first time in a reversed-field-pinch plasma. The occurrence of the new state, which has been dubbed a single-helical-axis state, was found to provide magnetic chaos healing and enhanced thermal content of the plasma. The helical structure extends on both sides of the vessel geometric axis, and is related to exceeding a threshold in the ratio between the amplitude of the dominant MHD mode and the amplitude of the secondary ones

  1. Stability of an RFP [reversed-field pinch] with resistive and distant boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Y.L.; Prager, S.C.

    1987-11-01

    The linear MHD stability of current-driven modes is evaluated for a reversed field pinch in which the plasma is bounded by a thin resistive shell which is surrounded by a vacuum region out to a radius at which a perfectly conducting wall is situated. The effects of variation of the shell resistivity and wall proximity are investigated. Growth rates of tearing modes and kink modes are calculated by analytical solution based on the modified Bessel function model for the equilibrium. Relevence to experiments is discussed. 23 refs., 18 figs., 11 tabs

  2. Data-acquisition system of the reversed field pinch device REPUTE-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuzuki, N.; Aoki, H.; Shinohara, H.; Toyama, H.; Morikawa, J.

    1988-01-01

    The new, compact data-acquisition system of the reversed field pinch device, REPUTE-1, is reported. Its distinctive feature is high flexibility and easy handling. The interface between the computer and measurement devices is CAMAC. The computer and the CAMAC devices are connected to a CAMAC byte serial highway that transmits setup parameters and acquisition data. The computer carries out setup of CAMAC devices and data acquisition automatically by use of CAMAC parameters and the acquisition data base. The maintenance tools for the data base are also provided. The computer system, which consists of a ''TOSBAC DS-600,'' has been in operation for REPUTE-1 since 1985

  3. Lower-hybrid poloidal current drive for fluctuation reduction in a reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchimoto, E.; Cekic, M.; Harvey, R.W.; Litwin, C.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.; Sovinec, C.R.

    1994-06-01

    Current drive using the lower-hybrid slow wave is shown to be a promising candidate for improving confinement properties of a reversed field pinch (RFP). Ray-tracing calculations indicate that the wave will make a few poloidal turns while spiraling radially into a target zone inside the reversal layer. The poloidal antenna wavelength of the lower hybrid wave can be chosen so that efficient parallel current drive will occur mostly in the poloidal direction in this outer region. Three-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) computation demonstrates that an additive poloidal current in this region will reduce the magnetic fluctuations and magnetic stochasticity

  4. Reynolds and Maxwell stress measurements in the reversed field pinch experiment Extrap-T2R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianello, N.; Antoni, V.; Spada, E.; Spolaore, M.; Serianni, G.; Cavazzana, R.; Bergsåker, H.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.

    2005-08-01

    The complete Reynolds stress (RS) has been measured in the edge region of the Extrap-T2R reversed field pinch experiment. The RS exhibits a strong gradient in the region where a high E × B shear takes place. Experimental results show this gradient to be almost entirely due to the electrostatic contribution. This has been interpreted as experimental evidence of flow generation via turbulence mechanism. The scales involved in flow generation are deduced from the frequency decomposition of RS tensor. They are found related to magnetohydrodynamic activity but are different with respect to the scales responsible for turbulent transport.

  5. Resistive wall instabilities and tearing mode dynamics in the EXTRAP T2R thin shell reversed-field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmberg, J.-A.; Brunsell, P. R.

    2002-01-01

    Observations of resistive wall instabilities and tearing mode dynamics in the EXTRAP T2R thin shell (τw=6 ms) reversed field pinch are described. A nonresonant mode (m=1,n=-10) with the same handedness as the internal field grows nearly exponentially with an average growth time of about 2.6 ms (less than 1/2 of the shell time) consistent with linear stability theory. The externally nonresonant unstable modes (m=1,n>0), predicted by linear stability theory, are observed to have only low amplitudes (in the normal low-Θ operation mode of the device). The radial field of the dominant internally resonant tearing modes (m=1,n=-15 to n=-12) remain low due to spontaneous fast mode rotation, corresponding to angular phase velocities up to 280 krad/s. Phase aligned mode structures are observed to rotate toroidally with an average angular velocity of 40 krad/s, in the opposite direction of the plasma current. Toward the end of the discharge, the radial field of the internally resonant modes grows as the modes slow down and become wall-locked, in agreement with nonlinear computations. Fast rotation of the internally resonant modes has been observed only recently and is attributed to a change of the front-end system (vacuum vessel, shell, and TF coil) of the device.

  6. High-flux first-wall design for a small reversed-field pinch reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cort, G. E.; Graham, A. L.; Christensen, K. E.

    To achieve the goal of a commercially economical fusion power reactor, small physical size and high power density should be combined with simplicity (minimized use of high technology systems). The Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) is a magnetic confinement device that promises to meet these requirements with power densities comparable to those in existing fission power plants. To establish feasibility of such an RFP reactor, a practical design for a first wall capable of withstanding high levels of cyclic neutron wall loadings is needed. Associated with the neutron flux in the proposed RFP reactor is a time averaged heat flux of 4.5 MW/sq m with a conservatively estimated transient peak approximately twice the average value. The design for a modular first wall made from a high-strength copper alloy that will meet these requirements of cyclic thermal loading is presented. The heat removal from the wall is by subcooled water flowing in straight tubes at high linear velocities.

  7. Reversed-field pinch experiments in EXTRAP T2R with a resistive shell boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malmberg, J.-A.; Cecconello, M.; Brunsell, P.R.; Yadikin, D.; Drake, J.R.

    2003-01-01

    The EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch has a resistive shell with a magnetic penetration time of 6 ms. This time is intermediate between the dynamo/relaxation cycle time scale (<2ms) and the pulse length (∼20ms). The resonant tearing modes do not wall-lock. They rotate with angular phase velocities in the range of 20 to 600 krad/s. As a result of the rotation the radial component of the perturbations at the shell from the resonant modes is suppressed. Non-resonant (resistive-wall) kink modes are unstable and their linear growth rates have been measured. The measured growth rates follow the trend expected from theoretical estimates for a range of equilibrium parameters. Furthermore, when the resonant modes are rotating, the loop voltage and confinement parameters have values comparable to those of a conducting shell RFP. The poloidal beta is around 10% for a range of current and density. (author)

  8. Density Fluctuation Measurements in the MST Reversed Field Pinch Using a Heavy Ion Beam Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Connor, K. A.; Demers, D. R.; Schatz, J. G.; Schoch, P. M.

    2002-11-01

    Localized measurements of density fluctuations in the hot core of the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed field pinch have been made with a Heavy Ion Beam Probe (HIBP). The density fluctuations are 10 - 20% in the region 0.25corruption, such as ion path effects and electronic noise. The HIBP on MST has 2 additional factors that are not common to most HIBPs. The small machine ports (2" injection port and 4.5" detection port) can result in vignetting of the beam and the constantly changing magnetic fields causes the beam's sample location to move. It is shown that such instrument effects can be accounted for and are small in selected data sets.

  9. Thermal instabilities in the edge region of reversed-field pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goedert, J.; Mondt, J.P.

    1984-04-01

    Thermal stability of the edge region of reversed-field pinch configurations is analyzed within the context of a two-fluid model. Two major sources of instability are identified in combination with a parallel electric field: either an electron temperature gradient and/or a density gradient that leads to rapid growth (of several to many ohmic heating rates) over a region of several millimeters around the mode-rational surfaces in the edge region. The basic signature of both instabilities is electrostatic. In the case of the density gradient mode, the signature relies on the effects of electron compressibility, whereas the temperature gradient mode can be identified as the current-convective instability by taking the limit of zero diamagnetic drift, density gradient, thermal force, drift heat flux, and electron compressibility

  10. Plasma performance and scaling laws in the RFX-mod reversed-field pinch experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Innocente, P.; Alfier, A.; Canton, A.; Pasqualotto, R.

    2009-01-01

    The large range of plasma currents (I p = 0.2-1.6 MA) and feedback-controlled magnetic boundary conditions of the RFX-mod experiment make it well suited to performing scaling studies. The assessment of such scaling, in particular those on temperature and energy confinement, is crucial both for improving the operating reversed-field pinch (RFP) devices and for validating the RFP configuration as a candidate for the future fusion reactors. For such a purpose scaling laws for magnetic fluctuations, temperature and energy confinement have been evaluated in stationary operation. RFX-mod scaling laws have been compared with those obtained from other RFP devices and numerical simulations. The role of the magnetic boundary has been analysed, comparing discharges performed with different active control schemes of the edge radial magnetic field.

  11. High-β, improved confinement reversed-field pinch plasmas at high density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyman, M. D.; Chapman, B. E.; Ahn, J. W.; Almagri, A. F.; Anderson, J. K.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Ebrahimi, F.; Ennis, D. A.; Fiksel, G.; Gangadhara, S.; Goetz, J. A.; O'Connell, R.; Oliva, S. P.; Prager, S. C.; Reusch, J. A.; Sarff, J. S.; Stephens, H. D.; Bonomo, F.; Franz, P.; Brower, D. L.

    2008-01-01

    In Madison Symmetric Torus [Dexter et al., Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] discharges where improved confinement is brought about by modification of the current profile, pellet injection has quadrupled the density, reaching n e =4x10 19 m -3 . Without pellet injection, the achievable density in improved confinement discharges had been limited by edge-resonant tearing instability. With pellet injection, the total beta has been increased to 26%, and the energy confinement time is comparable to that at low density. Pressure-driven local interchange and global tearing are predicted to be linearly unstable. Interchange has not yet been observed experimentally, but there is possible evidence of pressure-driven tearing, an instability usually driven by the current gradient in the reversed-field pinch

  12. Impurity profiles and radial transport in the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallander, J.

    1999-05-01

    Radially resolved spectroscopy has been used to measure the radial distribution of impurity ions (O III-O V and C III-CVI) in the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch (RFP). The radial profile of the emission is reconstructed from line emission measured along five lines of sight. The ion density profile is the fitted quantity in the reconstruction of the brightness profile and is thus obtained directly in this process. These measurements are then used to adjust the parameters in transport calculations in order to obtain consistency with the observed ion density profiles. Comparison between model and measurements show that a radial dependence in the diffusion is needed to explain the measured ion densities.

  13. Confinement dynamics and boundary condition studies in the Reversed Field Pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenberg, K.F.; Ingraham, J.C.; Moses, R.W. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The study of confinement dynamics, including investigation of the boundary conditions required for plasma sustainment, are central to the development of the Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) concept. Recently, several insights into confinement have emerged from a detailed investigation RFP electron and ion dynamics. These insights derive from the recognition that both magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and electron kinetic effects play an important and coupled role in RFP stability, sustainment, and confinement. In this paper, we summarize the results of confinement studies on the ZT-40M experiment, and boundary condition studies on the Wisconsin non-circular RFP experiment. A brief description of the newly commissioned Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) is also presented. 28 refs., 3 figs

  14. Characteristics of magnetized plasma flow for helicity injection into reversed-field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shotaro; Asai, Tomohiko; Nagata, Masayoshi; Koguchi, Haruhisa; Hirano, Yoichi; Sakakita, Hajime; Kiyama, Satoru

    2007-11-01

    The magnetized plasma flow injection experiment has been performed on the large sized reversed-field pinch (RFP) device of TPE-RX. The magnetized plasma flow injection has been demonstrated to support RFP formation fueling and helicity injection. In the start-up experiment with the plasma flow injection, reduced density pump-out, loop voltage and Da emission have been observed clearly. Also the effect of plasma flow on the RFP with improved confinement by PPCD technique has been evaluated. To determine the efficiency of fueling and helicity injection, density, temperature and magnetic structure have been measured by using Langmuir and magnetic probe arrays.The series of experiments will show the magnetic structure and actual helicity and energy contents of injected magnetized plasma flow.

  15. Importance of radial profiles in spectroscopic diagnostics applied to the EXTRAP-T2R reversed-field pinch

    OpenAIRE

    Gravestijn, Bob

    2003-01-01

    The determination of the plasma confinement propertiesdemand data as the electron temperature, the ionic and electrondensity profiles and the radiative emissivity profiles. Thefocus of this thesis is the importance of radial profiles inspectroscopic diagnostics applied to the EXTRAP-T2Rreversed-field pinch. EXTRAP-T2R is a resistive shell reversed-field pinch with amagnetic field shell penetration time much longer than therelaxation cycle time scale. Significant improvements inconfinement pro...

  16. Plasma confinement of Nagoya high beta toroidal pinch experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, K.; Kitagawa, S.; Wakatani, M.; Kita, Y.; Yamada, S.; Yamaguchi, S.; Sato, K.; Aizawa, T.; Osanai, Y.; Noda, N.

    1976-01-01

    Two different types of high β toroidal pinch experiments, STP and CCT, have been done to study the confinement of the plasma produced by theta-pinch. The STP is an axisymmetric toroidal pinch of high β tokamak type, while the CCT is multiply connected periodic toroidal traps. Internal current carrying copper rings are essential to the CCT. Since both apparatuses use the same fast capacitor bank system, they produce not so different plasma temperatures and densities. The observed laser scattering temperature and density is about 50 eV and 4 x 10 15 /cm 3 , respectively, when the filling pressure is 5 m torr. In the experiment of STP, strong correlations are found between the βsub(p) value and the amplitude of m = 2 mode. It has a minimum around the value of βsub(p) of 0.8. The disruptive instability is observed to expand the pinched plasma column without lowering the plasma temperature. Just before the distruption begins, the q value around the magnetic axis becomes far less than 1 and an increase of the amplitude of m = 2 mode is seen. The CCT also shows rapid plasma expansion just before the magnetic field reaches its maximum. Then the trap is filled up with the plasma by this irreversible expansion and the stable plasma confinement is achieved. The energy confinement time of the CCT is found to be about 35 μsec. (orig.) [de

  17. Study on wall locking of multiple tearing modes in reversed field pinch plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, S. C.; Chu, M. S.

    2004-08-01

    The nonlinear interactions between multiple unstable tearing modes and the resistive wall in reversed field pinch plasmas are studied. The nonlinear interactions include the nonlinear electromagnetic interaction between multiple modes, the effect of the eddy currents induced in the resistive wall by the magnetic perturbations of the multiple modes, and the effect of the angular momentum transport due to the viscous diffusion in the plasma. A set of fully time-dependent equations describing the dynamics of the three tearing modes (dynamo modes) has been employed and solved numerically by using the finite element method. Both the time-dependent and the steady state solutions are obtained. It is found that the multiple modes enhance the braking effect of the resistive wall. The "locking threshold" predicted in the case of multiple modes is much smaller than that of the case of the single mode (as far as the same mode is concerned). The formation of the "slinky mode" is clearly demonstrated. The relation of two existing thresholds: "wall locking" and "phase locking" is also discussed. Comparison is made between the time-dependent solution and the steady state solution for two examples, in which the mode amplitudes grow linearly with time. The validity of the steady state assumption, in particular, for the calculation of the viscous torque is discussed. Numerical analysis is applied to the reversed field experiment [F. Gnesotto, P. Sonato, W. R. Baker et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 25, 335 (1995)].

  18. Study on wall locking of multiple tearing modes in reversed field pinch plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, S.C.; Chu, M.S.

    2004-01-01

    The nonlinear interactions between multiple unstable tearing modes and the resistive wall in reversed field pinch plasmas are studied. The nonlinear interactions include the nonlinear electromagnetic interaction between multiple modes, the effect of the eddy currents induced in the resistive wall by the magnetic perturbations of the multiple modes, and the effect of the angular momentum transport due to the viscous diffusion in the plasma. A set of fully time-dependent equations describing the dynamics of the three tearing modes (dynamo modes) has been employed and solved numerically by using the finite element method. Both the time-dependent and the steady state solutions are obtained. It is found that the multiple modes enhance the braking effect of the resistive wall. The 'locking threshold' predicted in the case of multiple modes is much smaller than that of the case of the single mode (as far as the same mode is concerned). The formation of the 'slinky mode' is clearly demonstrated. The relation of two existing thresholds: 'wall locking' and 'phase locking' is also discussed. Comparison is made between the time-dependent solution and the steady state solution for two examples, in which the mode amplitudes grow linearly with time. The validity of the steady state assumption, in particular, for the calculation of the viscous torque is discussed. Numerical analysis is applied to the reversed field experiment [F. Gnesotto, P. Sonato, W. R. Baker et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 25, 335 (1995)

  19. Simulation study of self-sustainment mechanism in reversed-field pinch configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusano, Kanya; Sato, Tetsuya.

    1989-09-01

    3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations are carried out in order to reveal the fundamental mechanism of the self-sustainment process in the reversed-field pinch plasma. It is confirmed that the RFP configuration is sustained in a cyclic process, where the MHD relaxation phase and the resistive diffusion phase appear cyclically and alternatively. In the MHD relaxation process, the RFP plasma approaches a Taylor's minimum energy state, but it departs from there in the diffusion process. In other words, since MHD relaxation processes periodically release excess magnetic energy accumulated in the resistive diffusion phase, RFP plasma can stay in the neighborhood of the minimum energy state. The mechanism of this cyclic process is disclosed. Namely, when at least two ideal kink (m = 1) modes becomes unstable, MHD relaxation can take place. This is because the MHD relaxation progresses through nonlinear reconnection of the m = 0 mode, which is driven by nonlinear coupling between the unstable kink modes. Therefore, self-sustainment processes can be achieved by the nonlinear effects of essentially the m = 0 and 1 modes. The quantitative dependence of the relaxation-diffusion cycle on the aspect ratio of the device is considered along with its dependence on the magnetic Reynolds, number. These results are consistent with recent experiments and indicate that a coherent oscillation, which is often observed in experiments, is necessary for self-sustainment. The influence of self-sustainment processes on particle confinement is briefly discussed. (author)

  20. Cost-constrained design point for the Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor (RFPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1978-01-01

    A broad spectrum of Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor (RFPR) operating modes are compared on an economics basis. An RFPR with superconducting coils and an air-core poloidal field transformer optimizes to give a minimum cost system when compared to normal-conducting coils and the iron-core transformer used in earlier designs. An interim design is described that exhibits a thermally stable, unrefueled, 21 s burn (burnup 50 percent) with an energy containment time equal to 200 times the Bohm time, which is consistent with present-day tokamak experiments. This design operates near the minimum energy state (THETA = B/sub THETA/(r/sub w/)/[B/sub z/] = 2.0 and F = B/sub z/(r/sub w/)/[B/sub z/] = 1.0 from the High Beta Model) of the RFP configuration. This cost-optimized design produces a reactor of 1.5-m minor radius and 12.8-m major radius, that generates 1000 MWe (net) with a recirculating power fraction of 0.15 at a direct capital cost of 970 $/kWe

  1. A conceptual design study of a reversed field pinch fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, S.; Tanaka, S.; Terai, T.; Hashizume, H.

    1989-01-01

    A conceptual design of a Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) fusion reactor with a solid breeder blanket REPUTER-1 has been studied through parametric system studies and detailed design and analysis in order to clarify the technical feasibility of a compact fusion reactor. F-θ pumping is used for driving the plasma current necessary for steady state operation. A maintenance policy of replacing a whole fusion power core including TF coils is proposed to cope with the requirements of high wall loading and high mass power density. For the same reason a normal conductor is selected for most of the coils. The first wall is structurally independent of the blanket. The blanket module is composed of SiC reinforced blocks which form a stable arch so as to keep the stresses in SiC basically compressive. The coolant for the first wall and the limiter is pressurized water, while the coolant for the blanket is helium gas. A number of thin Li 2 O and thick beryllium tiles are packed into the blanket block so as to obtain a proper tritium breeding ratio. A pumped limiter is chosen for the plasma exhaust system. The study has shown the technical feasibility of a high power density fusion power reactor (330 kWe/tonne) with solid breeder blanket and many key physics and engineering issues are also clarified. (orig.)

  2. Resistive wall modes in a reversed field pinch with interchangeable shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Philip; Barrick, Greg; Robertson, Scott

    1992-04-01

    Resistive wall modes have been investigated in a reversed field pinch (Reversatron IIi [IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. PS-16, 667 (1988)]) operated with three different boundary conditions: (1) a copper shell having a magnetic penetration time τs comparable to the discharge duration, (2) a brass shell having τs comparable to the setting-up time, and (3) no shell, which gives τs much shorter than the setting-up time. The brass shell is found to impede the growth of the m=1, n=-6 ``on-axis'' mode observed to grow in the setting-up phase of no-shell discharges. In the sustainment phase, there is a higher level of m=1 modes than with the copper shell and the discharge duration, ion temperature, and plasma current are reduced. The mode spectrum is broad in the sustainment phase and the degradation in discharges cannot be attributed to any single mode. There is evidence for transient mode locking resulting in a slinky mode in copper-shell discharges.

  3. The sine-Gordon equation in reversed-field pinch experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shohet, J. L.; Barmish, B. R.; Ebraheem, H. K.; Scott, A. C.

    2004-08-01

    The focal point of this paper is a nonlinear model which describes localized magnetohydrodynamic modes in reversed-field pinch experiments. To date, nearly all experimental and theoretical work in this area have relied on the use of Fourier decomposition of spatial variations as a function of time. Moreover, due to the complexity of this nonlinear problem, previous work is restricted to the analysis of a relatively small number of modes. In contrast, the model studied in this paper, based on the sine-Gordon equation, addresses the full nonlinearity, does not rely on Fourier decomposition and does not require the range of the nonlinearity to be small. A specific consequence of working with the full nonlinearity is the existence of solitary waves in dispersive media. These solitary waves, a key part of the model, are used to describe the so-called slinky-mode propagating in the plasma. To this end, a remarkable resemblance is seen between the wave forms obtained from experiments and the mathematical predictions of the model.

  4. The sine-Gordon equation in reversed-field pinch experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shohet, J.L.; Barmish, B.R.; Ebraheem, H.K.; Scott, A.C.

    2004-01-01

    The focal point of this paper is a nonlinear model which describes localized magnetohydrodynamic modes in reversed-field pinch experiments. To date, nearly all experimental and theoretical work in this area have relied on the use of Fourier decomposition of spatial variations as a function of time. Moreover, due to the complexity of this nonlinear problem, previous work is restricted to the analysis of a relatively small number of modes. In contrast, the model studied in this paper, based on the sine-Gordon equation, addresses the full nonlinearity, does not rely on Fourier decomposition and does not require the range of the nonlinearity to be small. A specific consequence of working with the full nonlinearity is the existence of solitary waves in dispersive media. These solitary waves, a key part of the model, are used to describe the so-called slinky-mode propagating in the plasma. To this end, a remarkable resemblance is seen between the wave forms obtained from experiments and the mathematical predictions of the model

  5. Ion heating and MHD dynamo fluctuations in the reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scime, E.E.

    1992-05-01

    Ion temperature measurements, time resolved to 10 μs, have been made in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed field pinch (RFP) with a five channel charge exchange analyzer. The characteristic anomalously high ion temperature of RFP discharges has been observed in the MST. The evolution of the ion and electron temperature, as well as density and charge exchange power loss, were measured for a series of reproducible discharges. The ion heating expected from collisional processes with the electrons is calculated and shown too small to explain the measured ion temperatures. The charge exchange determined ion temperature is also compared to measurements of the thermally broadened CV 227.1 nm line. The ion temperature, T i ∼ 250 eV for I = 360 kA, increases by more than 100% during discrete dynamo bursts in MST discharges. Magnetic field fluctuations in the range 0.5 endash 5 MHz were also measured during the dynamo bursts. Structure in the fluctuation frequency spectrum at the ion cyclotron frequency appears as the bursts terminate, suggesting that the mechanism of ion heating involves the dissipation of dynamo fluctuations at ion cyclotron frequencies. Theoretical models for ion heating are reviewed and discussed in light of the experimental results. Similar electron heating mechanisms may be responsible for the discrepancy between measured and expected loop voltages in the RFP. The electrons, as well as the ions, may be heated by turbulent mechanisms, and a RFP energy budget including such phenomena is described

  6. Tokamak-like confinement at high beta and low field in the reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarff, J S; Anderson, J K; Biewer, T M; Brower, D L; Chapman, B E; Chattopadhyay, P K; Craig, D; Deng, B; Hartog, D J Den; Ding, W X; Fiksel, G; Forest, C B; Goetz, J A; O'Connell, R; Prager, S C; Thomas, M A

    2003-01-01

    For several reasons, improved-confinement achieved in the reversed field pinch (RFP) during the last few years can be characterized as 'tokamak-like'. Historically, RFP plasmas have had relatively poor confinement due to tearing instability which causes magnetic stochasticity and enhanced transport. Tearing reduction is achieved through modification of the inductive current drive, which dramatically improves confinement. The electron temperature increases to >1 keV and the electron heat diffusivity decreases to approx. 5 m 2 s -1 , comparable with the transport level expected in a tokamak plasma of the same size and current. This corresponds to a 10-fold increase in global energy confinement. Runaway electrons are confined, and Fokker-Planck modelling of the electron distribution reveals that the diffusion at high energy is independent of the parallel velocity, uncharacteristic of stochastic transport. Improved-confinement occurs simultaneously with increased beta approx. 15%, while maintaining a magnetic field strength ten times weaker than a comparable tokamak. Measurements of the current, magnetic, and electric field profiles show that a simple Ohm's Law applies to this RFP sustained without dynamo relaxation

  7. Studies of fast ion confinement in the MST Reversed Field Pinch*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D.; Almagri, A. F.; Anderson, J. K.; den Hartog, D. J.; Eilerman, S.; Nornberg, M. D.; Sarff, J. S.; Waksman, J.; Fiksel, G.; Belykh, V. V.; Deichuli, P.; Davydenko, V. I.; Ivanov, A. A.; Polosatkin, S.; Stupishin, N.

    2011-10-01

    Studies of fast ion confinement in the MST Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) are performed with a 1 MW hydrogen neutral beam injector (NBI), doped with 3-5% deuterium fuel for creation of beam-target fusion neutrons. It is found that fast ions born from co-current NBI are well confined and roughly consistent with classical behavior in spite of the RFP's stochastic magnetic field. The measured neutron decay times following a ~5 ms NBI pulse approximately agree with the prediction of classical slowing-down theory. The neutron flux at the beam turn-off time increases with plasma density and temperature, also as expected. The estimated fast ion confinement times range from several times to ten times the thermal particle confinement time, and charge-exchange with background neutrals seems to be the dominant fast ion loss mechanism. The slowing-down of fast protons is observed with a multi-energy-channel neutral particle analyzer. These results corroborate previous experiments with very short and low power neutral beam pulses, and are largely in agreement with TRANSP modeling which predicts a centrally peaked fast ion density profile with peak value up to 15% of the plasma density. *Work supported by USDOE.

  8. Design and development of a lower-hybrid antenna for the MST reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, M.; Cekic, M.; Lovell, T.W.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.; Uchimoto, E.

    1995-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies strongly motivated the development of a radio-frequency current drive scheme for current density gradient reduction in the outer region of a reversed field pinch. The preliminary experiments using inductive current drive indicate that such current density profile modification reduces the magnetic fluctuation amplitude and related energy and particle losses. To test the theoretical predictions and to further improve confinement in the MST, the authors are planning a series of lower-hybrid wave experiments. The initial phase is the design and optimization of a low-power antenna to study slow wave propagation in a frequency range 2--3 f LH (200--300 MHz) with parallel index of refraction n parallel ∼10. Ray-tracing calculations, for typical MST plasma parameters, indicate that such a wave will spiral radially into a target zone inside the reversal layer. The antenna consists of an array of tunable loops arranged in the poloidal direction. The design is compatible with the existing box-port openings in the MST conductive shell to prevent additional magnetic field errors associated with large portholes. Antenna vacuum characteristics are studied on a test-stand designed to approximate the geometry of the MST shell. For the initial measurements of plasma response and antenna loading, the authors designed a reduced, easily insertable, vacuum antenna structure. The results of plasma impedance measurements will be compared with the numerical modeling results and incorporated in the optimized design of the antenna for wave propagation experiments

  9. Self-organisation and intermittent coherent oscillations in the EXTRAP T2 reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecconello, M.; Malmberg, J.A.; Sallander, E.; Drake, J.R.

    2002-01-01

    Many reversed-field pinch (RFP) experiments exhibit a coherent oscillatory behaviour that is characteristic of discrete dynamo events and is associated with intermittent current profile self-organisation phenomena. However, in the vast majority of the discharges in the resistive shell RFP experiment EXTRAP T2, the dynamo activity does not show global, coherent oscillatory behaviour. The internally resonant tearing modes are phase-aligned and wall-locked resulting in a large localised magnetic perturbation. Equilibrium and plasma parameters have a level of high frequency fluctuations but the average values are quasi-steady. For some discharges, however, the equilibrium parameters exhibit the oscillatory behaviour characteristic of the discrete dynamo events. For these discharges, the trend observed in the tearing mode spectra, associated with the onset of the discrete relaxation event behaviour, is a relative higher amplitude of m = 0 mode activity and relative lower amplitude of the m = 1 mode activity compared with their average values. Global plasma parameters and model profile calculations for sample discharges representing the two types of relaxation dynamics are presented

  10. Magnetic fluctuation driven cross-field particle transport in the reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheffel, J.; Liu, D.

    1997-01-01

    Electrostatic and electromagnetic fluctuations generally cause cross-field particle transport in confined plasmas. Thus core localized turbulence must be kept at low levels for sufficient energy confinement in magnetic fusion plasmas. Reversed-field pinch (RFP) equilibria can, theoretically, be completely stable to ideal and resistive (tearing) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes at zero beta. Unstable resistive interchange modes are, however, always present at experimentally relevant values of the poloidal beta β θ . An analytical quasilinear, ambipolar diffusion model is here used to model associated particle transport. The results indicate that core density fluctuations should not exceed a level of about 1% for plasmas of fusion interest. Parameters of experimentally relevant stationary states of the RFP were adjusted to minimize growth rates, using a fully resistive linearized MHD stability code. Density gradient effects are included through employing a parabolic density profile. The scaling of particle diffusion [D(r)∝λ 2 n 0.5 T/aB, where λ is the mode width] is such that the effects of particle transport are milder in present day RFP experiments than in future reactor-relevant plasmas. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  11. Self-Organisation and Intermittent Coherent Oscillations in the EXTRAP T2 Reversed Field Pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecconello, M.; Malmberg, J.-A.; Sallander, E.; Drake, J. R.

    Many reversed-field pinch (RFP) experiments exhibit a coherent oscillatory behaviour that is characteristic of discrete dynamo events and is associated with intermittent current profile self-organisation phenomena. However, in the vast majority of the discharges in the resistive shell RFP experiment EXTRAP T2, the dynamo activity does not show global, coherent oscillatory behaviour. The internally resonant tearing modes are phase-aligned and wall-locked resulting in a large localised magnetic perturbation. Equilibrium and plasma parameters have a level of high frequency fluctuations but the average values are quasi-steady. For some discharges, however, the equilibrium parameters exhibit the oscillatory behaviour characteristic of the discrete dynamo events. For these discharges, the trend observed in the tearing mode spectra, associated with the onset of the discrete relaxation event behaviour, is a relative higher amplitude of m = 0 mode activity and relative lower amplitude of the m = 1 mode activity compared with their average values. Global plasma parameters and model profile calculations for sample discharges representing the two types of relaxation dynamics are presented.

  12. Scaling of confinement and profiles in the EXTRAP T2 reversed-field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welander, A.

    1999-01-01

    In the EXTRAP T2 reversed-field pinch the diagnostic techniques for the measurement of electron density and temperature include; Thomson scattering which gives values at three radial positions in the core (r/a = 0, 0.28, 0.56), Langmuir probes which give values at the edge (r/a > 0.9) and interferometry which gives a line-averaged density. The empirical scaling of electron density and temperature including profile information with global plasma parameters has been studied. The density profile is subject to large variations, with an average parabolic shape when the density is low and flatter shapes when the density is increased. The change in the profile shape can be attributed to a shift in the penetration length of neutrals from the vicinity of the wall. The temperature scales roughly as I/n1/2 where I is the plasma current and n is the density. The temperature profile is always quite flat with lower variations and there is a tendency for a flatter profile at higher temperatures.

  13. Spontaneous quasi single helicity regimes in EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassinetti, L.; Brunsell, P. R.; Drake, J. R.; Menmuir, S.; Cecconello, M.

    2007-11-01

    In recent years, good progress toward a better understanding and control of the plasma performance in reversed-field pinch devices has been made. These improvements consist both of the discovery of spontaneous plasma regimes, termed the quasi single helicity (QSH) regime, in which part of the plasma core is no longer stochastic, and of the development of techniques for active control of plasma instabilities. In this paper, a systematic study of spontaneous QSH in the EXTRAP T2R device [P. R. Brunsell, H. Bergsaker, M. Cecconello et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43, 1457 (2001)] is presented. In this device, QSH states can occur spontaneously and it is associated with magnetic and thermal structures. A statistical analysis to determine the most favorable experimental conditions to have a transition to the QSH regime will be presented. The results described here are useful to understand the underlying properties of QSH regimes in view of future applications of the QSH active control in EXTRAP T2R; they are also important to have a comparison with the QSH studied in other devices.

  14. Measurements of hot electrons in the Extrap T1 reversed-field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welander, A.; Bergsåker, H.

    1998-02-01

    The presence of an anisotropic energetic electron population in the edge region is a characteristic feature of reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasmas. In the Extrap T1 RFP, the anisotropic, parallel heat flux in the edge region measured by calorimetry was typically several hundred 0741-3335/40/2/011/img1. To gain more insight into the origin of the hot electron component and to achieve time resolution of the hot electron flow during the discharge, a target probe with a soft x-ray monitor was designed, calibrated and implemented. The x-ray emission from the target was measured with a surface barrier detector covered with a set of different x-ray filters to achieve energy resolution. A calibration in the range 0.5-2 keV electron energy was performed on the same target and detector assembly using a 0741-3335/40/2/011/img2 cathode electron gun. The calibration data are interpolated and extrapolated numerically. A directional asymmetry of more than a factor of 100 for the higher energy electrons is observed. The hot electrons are estimated to constitute 10% of the total electron density at the edge and their energy distribution is approximated by a half-Maxwellian with a temperature slightly higher than the central electron temperature. Scalings with plasma current, as well as correlations with local 0741-3335/40/2/011/img3 measurements and radial dependences, are presented.

  15. Sustained reversed field pinch discharges in OHTE with a resistive shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaHaye, R.J.; Bard, W.D.; Lee, P.S.; Schaffer, M.J.; Tamano, T.; Taylor, P.L.

    1987-01-01

    RFP discharges have been made in the OHTE device whose conducting shell was changed to a 2 mm thickness of brass, characteristic time 1.5 msec, from a 15 mm thickness of aluminum, characteristic time 35 msec. RFP discharges have been sustained with reversed field for up to 14 msec in the 15 msec time constant shell device. Global plasma characteristics were very similar to those obtained with the previous long time constant shell. The equilibrium and stability of the discharge in the brass shell were studied by a variety of magnetic pickup coils inside the shell and an extensive set of 128 coils outside the shell. The 128 outside coils cover 100% of the torus in an array of 4 poloidally and 32 toroidally. The outside pickup loops exhibit a local kin instability with a growth time of about 1 msec i.e., the resistive shell time). The kink is typically one wavelength long (about 0.5 m) corresponding to n ≅ 16 and m = -1. It has the same helical handedness as the magnetic field lines near the axis of the discharge. The perturbation of the plasma by this localized helical kink is analogous to that of a spring toy, a ''slinky'', when it is twisted

  16. The TITAN Reversed-Field Pinch fusion reactor study: Scoping phase report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    The TITAN research program is a multi-institutional effort to determine the potential of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) magnetic fusion concept as a compact, high-power-density, and ''attractive'' fusion energy system from economic (cost of electricity, COE), environmental, and operational viewpoints. In particular, a high neutron wall loading design (18 MW/m/sup 2/) has been chosen as the reference case in order to quantify the issue of engineering practicality, to determine the physics requirements and plasma operating mode, to assess significant benefits of compact systems, and to illuminate the main drawbacks. The program has been divided into two phases, each roughly one year in length: the Scoping Phase and the Design Phase. During the scoping phase, the TITAN design team has defined the parameter space for a high mass power density (MPD) RFP reactor, and explored a variety of approaches to the design of major subsystems. Two major design approaches consistent with high MPD and low COE, the lithium-vanadium blanket design and aqueous loop-in-pool design, have been selected for more detailed engineering evaluation in the design phase. The program has retained a balance in its approach to investigating high MPD systems. On the one hand, parametric investigations of both subsystems and overall system performance are carried out. On the other hand, more detailed analysis and engineering design and integration are performed, appropriate to determining the technical feasibility of the high MPD approach to RFP fusion reactors. This report describes the work of the scoping phase activities of the TITAN program. A synopsis of the principal technical findings and a brief description of the TITAN multiple-design approach is given. The individual chapters on Plasma Physics and Engineering, Parameter Systems Studies, Divertor, Reactor Engineering, and Fusion Power Core Engineering have been cataloged separately.

  17. Controlling fluctuations and transport in the reversed field pinch with edge current drive and plasma biasing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, D.J.G.

    1998-09-01

    Two techniques are employed in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) to test and control different aspects of fluctuation induced transport in the Reversed Field Pinch (RFP). Auxiliary edge currents are driven along the magnetic field to modify magnetic fluctuations, and the particle and energy transport associated with them. In addition, strong edge flows are produced by plasma biasing. Their effect on electrostatic fluctuations and the associated particle losses is studied. Both techniques are accomplished using miniature insertable plasma sources that are biased negatively to inject electrons. This type of emissive electrode is shown to reliably produce intense, directional current without significant contamination by impurities. The two most important conclusions derived from these studies are that the collective modes resonant at the reversal surface play a role in global plasma confinement, and that these modes can be controlled by modifying the parallel current profile outside of the reversal surface. This confirms predictions based on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations that auxiliary current drive in the sense to flatten the parallel current profile can be successful in controlling magnetic fluctuations in the RFP. However, these studies expand the group of magnetic modes believed to cause transport in MST and suggest that current profile control efforts need to address both the core resonant magnetic modes and those resonant at the reversal surface. The core resonant modes are not significantly altered in these experiments; however, the distribution and/or amplitude of the injected current is probably not optimal for affecting these modes. Plasma biasing generates strong edge flows with shear and particle confinement likely improves in these discharges. These experiments resemble biased H modes in other magnetic configurations in many ways. The similarities are likely due to the common role of electrostatic fluctuations in edge transport

  18. Experimental studies of confinement in the EXTRAP T2 and T2R reversed field pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecconello, Marco

    2003-01-01

    The confinement properties of fusion plasmas are affected by magnetic and electrostatic fluctuations. The determination of the plasma confinement properties requires the measurement of several global and local quantities such as the ion and electron temperatures, the electron and neutral density profiles, the radiation emissivity profiles, the ohmic input power and the particle and heat diffusivities. The focus of this thesis is the study of the plasma confinement properties based on measurements of these quantities under different experimental conditions. The studies have been carried out on the reversed field pinch experiments EXTRAP T2 and T2R at the Alfven Laboratory, Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm. Studies carried out in EXTRAP T2 were focused on dynamo activity and on the effect of phase alignment and locking to the wall of magnetic instabilities. These were observed with a dedicated imaging system. The experimental studies in EXTRAP T2R were focused on the measurement of the confinement properties of different configurations. To this aim, a set of diagnostics were used some of which were upgraded, such as the interferometer, while others were newly installed, such as a neutral particle energy analyser and a bolometer array. The dynamo, which is responsible for the plasma sustainment, involves resistive magnetohydrodynamic instabilities that enhance stochastic transport. Furthermore, the plasma confinement properties are in general improved in the presence of mode rotation. The possibility of reducing the stochastic transport and thereby further improving the confinement has been demonstrated in a current profile control experiment. These results indicate that long pulse operations with a resistive shell and current profile control are indeed feasible

  19. Momentum transport during reconnection events in the MST reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuritsyn, Alexey

    2008-11-01

    During reconnection events in the MST reversed field pinch momentum parallel to the magnetic field is observed to be suddenly transported from the core to the edge. This occurs simultaneous with a surge in multiple resistive tearing instabilities. From measurements of the plasma flow and the forces arising from tearing instability (Maxwell and Reynolds stresses) we have established that tearing instabilities induce strong momentum transport. Comparison with nonlinear MHD computation of tearing fluctuations supports this conclusion, although it also indicates that effects beyond single-fluid MHD are likely to be important. The radial profile of the parallel velocity is reconstructed from a combination of diagnostics: Rutherford scattering of injected neutral atoms (for majority ions), charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (for minority ions), and Mach probes (for edge majority ion flow). Maxwell stress has been measured previously in the core by laser Faraday rotation, and both stresses are measured in the edge with probes. A surprising observation is that both the Maxwell and Reynolds stresses are each ten times larger than needed to account for the observed momentum transport (i.e., larger than the inertial and viscous terms in the momentum balance equation). However, they are oppositely directed such that their difference is approximately equal to the rate of change of plasma momentum. The large magnitude of the individual stresses is not predicted by MHD theory; the Maxwell stress also produces a Hall dynamo effect, implying that a two-fluid theory might be necessary for a complete description of momentum transport. To test further the relation between momentum transport and tearing fluctuations, momentum transport was measured perturbatively, by altering plasma rotation with inserted biased electrodes. Biasing is applied in plasmas with large tearing activity and improved confinement plasmas in which tearing activity is reduced by inductive current profile

  20. Investigation of ion heating due to reconnection in the MST reversed-field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiksel, Gennady

    2009-11-01

    Anomalous ion heating in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas is not well understood. In the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed-field pinch experiment, ions are heated rapidly during impulsive reconnection, attaining temperatures exceeding hundreds of eV, often well in excess of the electron temperature. The energy source for this heating is the equilibrium magnetic field energy released during reconnection, but the means by which magnetic energy is converted to ion thermal energy has not yet been established. The results and diagnostic techniques reported here aim to test several distinct theoretical models that could describe the energy conversion is both laboratory and space plasmas: viscous damping of tearing flows, ion cyclotron heating, and stochastic heating. Neutral-beam-based diagnostics are used for ion temperature measurements. Rutherford scattering monitors the majority ions, while charge-exchange- recombination spectroscopy monitors the minority ions. The high spatial (several centimeters) and temporal (tens of microseconds) resolution of these diagnostics allows for detailed comparison of the dynamics of the ion heating with theoretical predictions. The energy budget of the ion heating and its mass scaling in hydrogen, deuterium, and helium plasmas was determined by measuring the fraction of the released magnetic energy converted to ion thermal energy. The fraction ranges from about 10-30% and increases approximately as the square root of the ion mass. Ion heating increasing with ion mass agrees with observations in other laboratory experiments as well as in the solar corona. In addition, a recent upgrade of the charge-exchange diagnostic now allows simultaneous measurement of the perpendicular and parallel ion temperature, facilitating still further discrimination among the proposed heating mechanisms.

  1. Demonstration of Electron Bernstein Wave Heating in a Reversed Field Pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltzman, Andrew H.

    The Electron Bernstein wave (EBW) presents an alternative to conventional electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive in overdense plasmas, where electromagnetic waves are inaccessible. The first observation of rf heating in a reversed field pinch (RFP) using the EBW has been demonstrated on Madison Symmetric Torus (MST). The EBW propagates radially inward through a magnetic field that is either stochastic or has broken flux surfaces, before absorption on a substantially Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance (? = n*?_ce - k_parallel*v_parallel), where n is the harmonic number. Deposition depth is controllable with plasma current on a broad range (n=1-7) of harmonics. Novel techniques were required to measure the suprathermal electron tail generated by EBW heating in the presence of intense Ohmic heating. In the thick-shelled MST RFP, the radial accessibility of the EBW is limited to r/a > 0.8 ( 10 cm), where a=52cm is the minor radius, by magnetic field error induced by the porthole necessary for the antenna; accessibility in a thin-shelled device with actively controlled saddle coils (without the burden of substantial porthole field error) is likely to be r/a> 0.5 in agreement with ray tracing studies. Measured electron loss rates with falloff time constants in the 10s of micros imply a large, non-collisional radial diffusivity; collisional times with background particles are on the order of one millisecond. EBW-heated test electrons are used as a probe of edge (r/a > 0.9) radial transport, showing a modest transition from 'standard' to reduced-tearing RFP operation.

  2. Experimental studies of tearing mode and resistive wall mode dynamics in the reversed field pinch configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malmberg, Jenny-Ann

    2003-06-01

    It is relatively straightforward to establish equilibrium in magnetically confined plasmas, but the plasma is frequently susceptible to a variety of instabilities that are driven by the free energy in the magnetic field or in the pressure gradient. These unstable modes exhibit effects that affect the particle, momentum and heat confinement properties of the configuration. Studies of the dynamics of several of the most important modes are the subject of this thesis. The studies are carried out on plasmas in the reversed field pinch (RFP) configuration. One phenomenon commonly observed in RFPs is mode wall locking. The localized nature of these phase- and wall locked structures results in localized power loads on the wall which are detrimental for confinement. A detailed study of the wall locked mode phenomenon is performed based on magnetic measurements from three RFP devices. The two possible mechanisms for wall locking are investigated. Locking as a result of tearing modes interacting with a static field error and locking due to the presence of a non-ideal boundary. The characteristics of the wall locked mode are qualitatively similar in a device with a conducting shell system (TPE-RX) compared to a device with a resistive shell (Extrap T2). A theoretical model is used for evaluating the threshold values for wall locking due to eddy currents in the vacuum vessel in these devices. A good correlation with experiment is observed for the conducting shell device. The possibility of successfully sustaining discharges in a resistive shell RFP is introduced in the recently rebuilt device Extrap T2R. Fast spontaneous mode rotation is observed, resulting in low magnetic fluctuations, low loop voltage and improved confinement. Wall locking is rarely observed. The low tearing mode amplitudes allow for the theoretically predicted internal non-resonant on-axis resistive wall modes to be observed. These modes have not previously been distinguished due to the formation of wall

  3. Measurement of magnetic turbulence structure and nonlinear mode coupling of tearing fluctuations in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed field pinch edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assadi, S.

    1994-01-01

    Linear and nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability of current-driven modes are studied in the MST reversed field pinch. Measured low frequency (f < 35 kHz) magnetic fluctuations are consistent with the global resistive tearing instabilities predicted by 3-D MHD simulations. At frequencies above 35 kHz, the magnetic fluctuations were detected to be localized and externally resonant. Discrete dynamo events, ''sawtooth oscillations,'' have been observed in the experimental RFP plasmas. This phenomenon causes the plasma to become unstable to m = 1 tearing modes. The modes that may be important in different phases of these oscillations are identified. These results then assist in nonlinear studies and also help to interpret the spectral broadening of the measured data during a discrete dynamo event. Three-wave nonlinear coupling of spectral Fourier modes is measured in the MST by applying bispectral analysis to magnetic fluctuations measured at the plasma edge at 64 toroidal locations and 16 poloidal locations, permitting observation of coupling over 8 poloidal and 32 toroidal modes. Comparison to bispectra predicted by resistive MHD computation indicates reasonably good agreement. However, during the crash phase of the sawtooth oscillation the nonlinear coupling is strongly enhanced, concomitant with a broadened k-spectrum. During the sawtooth formation the plasma is undergoing a pure diffusive process. The dynamo only occurs during the sawtooth crash. High frequency activity prior to a sawtooth crash is caused by nonlinear frequency (small-scale) mode coupling. Growth rate and coupling coefficients of toroidal mode spectra are calculated by statistical modeling. Temporal evolution of edge toroidal mode spectra has been predicted by transfer function analysis. The driving sources of electrostatic fields are different than for the magnetic fields. The characteristics of tearing modes can be altered by external field errors and addition of impurities to the plasma

  4. Polarized radial magnetic fields and outward plasma fluxes during shallow-reversal discharges in the ZT-40M reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, A.R.; Rusbridge, M.G.; Burkhardt, L.C.

    1984-01-01

    The characteristics of edge-region electromagnetic disturbances and of pulsed radial fluxes of plasma to the liner as well as the detailed interrelationship among these processes have been studied on the ZT-40M reversed-field pinch in its normal, shallow-reversal operating regime. The dominant magnetic disturbances are spiky (pulsewidth approx.5--10 μs) low-amplitude (Vertical BarB/sub r//B/sub theta/Vertical Bar -2 )= poloidally symmetric radial-field structures intersecting the vacuum wall and precessing toroidally in the anti-I/sub phi/ sense. The effect of even slight toroidal-field reversal (Vertical BarB/sub phi/(a)Vertical Barroughly-equalB/sub theta/(a)/10) is to polarize these radial-field spikes preferentially positive (i.e., B/sub r/>0) and to increase the speed of the minority (B/sub r/ 0) spikes. Synchronous with the polarized B/sub r/ spikes are intense radially outward fluxes of plasma (instantaneously > or approx. =10 22 m -2 s -1 ) leading to recurrent, large amplitude (Vertical BarΔn/n> or approx. =25%) depletion of the density in the outer quarter of minor radius. The resulting time-averaged global loss-rate per particle is significant (approx.10 3 s -1 )

  5. Error Field Assessment from Driven Mode Rotation: Results from Extrap-T2R Reversed-Field-Pinch and Perspectives for ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, F. A.; Frassinetti, L.; Brunsell, P. R.; Drake, J. R.; Olofsson, K. E. J.

    2012-10-01

    A new ITER-relevant non-disruptive error field (EF) assessment technique not restricted to low density and thus low beta was demonstrated at the Extrap-T2R reversed field pinch. Resistive Wall Modes (RWMs) were generated and their rotation sustained by rotating magnetic perturbations. In particular, stable modes of toroidal mode number n=8 and 10 and unstable modes of n=1 were used in this experiment. Due to finite EFs, and in spite of the applied perturbations rotating uniformly and having constant amplitude, the RWMs were observed to rotate non-uniformly and be modulated in amplitude (in the case of unstable modes, the observed oscillation was superimposed to the mode growth). This behavior was used to infer the amplitude and toroidal phase of n=1, 8 and 10 EFs. The method was first tested against known, deliberately applied EFs, and then against actual intrinsic EFs. Applying equal and opposite corrections resulted in longer discharges and more uniform mode rotation, indicating good EF compensation. The results agree with a simple theoretical model. Extensions to tearing modes, to the non-uniform plasma response to rotating perturbations, and to tokamaks, including ITER, will be discussed.

  6. MHD Stability of Free Boundary Toroidal Z Pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugisaki, Kiwamu

    1990-06-01

    The Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability of a free boundary toroidal Z pinch plasma is investigated. Equilibrium field profiles are chosen so that μ is nearly uniform in the central region, μ and dμ/dr vanish on the boundary and Suydam’s criterion is satisfied throughout the plasma. The stability of the equilibrium is examined for the ratio b of the conducting wall radius to the plasma radius and plasma pressure. The stability of non-resonant ideal modes is determined mainly from the safty factor on the axis. Non-resonant modes are dominant for low plasma pressure, whereas resonant modes are dominant for high plasma pressure. Tearing modes are stable only for b below 1.04. The width of the magnetic islands produced from the tearing modes is evaluated. As b increases, overlap of the magnetic islands occurs over a wide area in the plasma.

  7. Behavior of impurity ion velocities during the pulsed poloidal current drive in the Madison symmetric torus reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakakita, Hajime; Craig, Darren; Anderson, Jay K.; Chapman, Brett E.; Den-Hartog, Daniel J.; Prager, Stewart C.; Biewer, Ted M.; Terry, Stephen D.

    2003-01-01

    We report on passive measurements of impurity ion velocities during the pulsed poloidal current drive (PPCD) in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch. During PPCD, the electron temperature increased and a sudden reduction of magnetic fluctuations was observed. For this change, we have studied whether plasma velocity is affected. Plasma rotation is observed to decrease during PPCD. From measurements of line intensities for several impurities at 10 poloidal chords, it is found that the impurity line emission shifts outward. The ion temperature of impurities is reasonably connected to that measured by charge exchange recombination spectroscopy from core to edge. (author)

  8. Three dimensional equilibrium solutions for a current-carrying reversed-field pinch plasma with a close-fitting conducting shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koliner, J. J.; Boguski, J., E-mail: boguski@wisc.edu; Anderson, J. K.; Chapman, B. E.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Duff, J. R.; Goetz, J. A.; McGarry, M.; Morton, L. A.; Parke, E. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Cianciosa, M. R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Hanson, J. D. [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (United States); Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    In order to characterize the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasmas that bifurcate to a helical equilibrium, the V3FIT equilibrium reconstruction code was modified to include a conducting boundary. RFP plasmas become helical at a high plasma current, which induces large eddy currents in MST's thick aluminum shell. The V3FIT conducting boundary accounts for the contribution from these eddy currents to external magnetic diagnostic coil signals. This implementation of V3FIT was benchmarked against MSTFit, a 2D Grad-Shafranov solver, for axisymmetric plasmas. The two codes both fit B{sub θ} measurement loops around the plasma minor diameter with qualitative agreement between each other and the measured field. Fits in the 3D case converge well, with q-profile and plasma shape agreement between two distinct toroidal locking phases. Greater than 60% of the measured n = 5 component of B{sub θ} at r = a is due to eddy currents in the shell, as calculated by the conducting boundary model.

  9. Measurements and modeling of transport and impurity radial profiles in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuldkepp, M.; Brunsell, P. R.; Cecconello, M.; Dux, R.; Menmuir, S.; Rachlew, E.

    2006-09-01

    Radial impurity profiles of oxygen in the rebuilt reversed field pinch EXTRAP T2R [P. R. Brunsell et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43, 1457 (2001)] have been measured with a multichannel spectrometer. Absolute ion densities for oxygen peak between 1-4×1010cm-3 for a central electron density of 1×1013cm-3. Transport simulations with the one-dimensional transport code STRAHL with a diffusion coefficient of 20m2 s-1 yield density profiles similar to those measured. Direct measurement of the ion profile evolution during pulsed poloidal current drive suggests that the diffusion coefficient is reduced by a factor ˜2 in the core but remains unaffected toward the edge. Core transport is not significantly affected by the radial magnetic field growth seen at the edge in discharges without feedback control. This indicates that the mode core amplitude remains the same while the mode eigenfunction increases at the edge.

  10. Current drive drift waves as a possible mechanism for dynamo effect and transport in reversed field pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briguglio, S.; Romanelli, F.; Vlad, G.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility that a current driven drift wave turbulence may be responsible for the outward ion flux observed in Reversed Field Pinches (RFPs) is investigated; the latter flux was recently proposed as the driving mechanism of the dynamo sustaining the poloidal current in the external region of an RFP discharge. It is shown that this possibility can be supported by the linear theory of current driven drift waves. Finally, on the assumption that the transport is dominated by these instabilities, a scaling law for the temperature in RFPs is derived, which shows an approximately linear dependence on the current and a weak dependence on the size of the machine, in agreement with the experimental results. (author)

  11. A Theoretical Investigation of Mode-Locking Phenomena in Reversed Field Pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard Fitzpatrick

    2004-01-01

    OAK-B135 This paper investigates the formation and breakup of the ''slinky mode'' in an RFP using analytic techniques previously employed to examine mode locking phenomena in tokamaks. The slinky mode is a toroidally localized, coherent interference pattern in the magnetic field which co-rotates with the plasma at the reversal surface. This mode forms, as a result of the nonlinear coupling of multiple m = 1 core tearing modes, via a bifurcation which is similar to that by which toroidally coupled tearing modes lock together in a tokamak. The slinky mode breaks up via a second bifurcation which is similar to that by which toroidally coupled tearing modes in a tokamak unlock. However, the typical m = 1 mode amplitude below which slinky breakup is triggered is much smaller than that above which slinky formation occurs. Analytic expressions for the slinky formation and breakup thresholds are obtained in all regimes of physical interest. The locking of the slinky mode to a static error-field is also investigated analytically. Either the error-field arrests the rotation of the plasma at the reversal surface before the formation of the slinky mode, so that the mode subsequently forms as a non-rotating mode, or the slinky mode forms as a rotating mode and subsequently locks to the error-field. Analytic expressions for the locking and unlocking thresholds are obtained in all regimes of physical interest. The problems associated with a locked slinky mode can be alleviated by canceling out the accidentally produced error-field responsible for locking the slinky mode, using a deliberately created ''control'' error-field. Alternatively, the locking angle of the slinky mode can be swept toroidally by rotating the control field

  12. A theoretical investigation of mode-locking phenomena in reversed field pinches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Fitzpatrick

    2004-03-17

    OAK-B135 This paper investigates the formation and breakup of the ''slinky mode'' in an RFP using analytic techniques previously employed to examine mode locking phenomena in tokamaks. The slinky mode is a toroidally localized, coherent interference pattern in the magnetic field which co-rotates with the plasma at the reversal surface. This mode forms, as a result of the nonlinear coupling of multiple m = 1 core tearing modes, via a bifurcation which is similar to that by which toroidally coupled tearing modes lock together in a tokamak. The slinky mode breaks up via a second bifurcation which is similar to that by which toroidally coupled tearing modes in a tokamak unlock. However, the typical m = 1 mode amplitude below which slinky breakup is triggered is much smaller than that above which slinky formation occurs. Analytic expressions for the slinky formation and breakup thresholds are obtained in all regimes of physical interest. The locking of the slinky mode to a static error-field is also investigated analytically. Either the error-field arrests the rotation of the plasma at the reversal surface before the formation of the slinky mode, so that the mode subsequently forms as a non-rotating mode, or the slinky mode forms as a rotating mode and subsequently locks to the error-field. Analytic expressions for the locking and unlocking thresholds are obtained in all regimes of physical interest. The problems associated with a locked slinky mode can be alleviated by canceling out the accidentally produced error-field responsible for locking the slinky mode, using a deliberately created ''control'' error-field. Alternatively, the locking angle of the slinky mode can be swept toroidally by rotating the control field.

  13. A Theoretical Investigation of Mode-Locking Phenomena in Reversed Field Pinches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Fitzpatrick

    2004-04-07

    OAK-B135 This paper investigates the formation and breakup of the ''slinky mode'' in an RFP using analytic techniques previously employed to examine mode locking phenomena in tokamaks. The slinky mode is a toroidally localized, coherent interference pattern in the magnetic field which co-rotates with the plasma at the reversal surface. This mode forms, as a result of the nonlinear coupling of multiple m = 1 core tearing modes, via a bifurcation which is similar to that by which toroidally coupled tearing modes lock together in a tokamak. The slinky mode breaks up via a second bifurcation which is similar to that by which toroidally coupled tearing modes in a tokamak unlock. However, the typical m = 1 mode amplitude below which slinky breakup is triggered is much smaller than that above which slinky formation occurs. Analytic expressions for the slinky formation and breakup thresholds are obtained in all regimes of physical interest. The locking of the slinky mode to a static error-field is also investigated analytically. Either the error-field arrests the rotation of the plasma at the reversal surface before the formation of the slinky mode, so that the mode subsequently forms as a non-rotating mode, or the slinky mode forms as a rotating mode and subsequently locks to the error-field. Analytic expressions for the locking and unlocking thresholds are obtained in all regimes of physical interest. The problems associated with a locked slinky mode can be alleviated by canceling out the accidentally produced error-field responsible for locking the slinky mode, using a deliberately created ''control'' error-field. Alternatively, the locking angle of the slinky mode can be swept toroidally by rotating the control field.

  14. Formation and locking of the ``slinky mode'' in reversed field pinches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    1998-11-01

    The formation and breakup of the ``slinky mode'' in an RFP is investigated using analytic techniques previously employed to examine mode locking phenomena in tokamaks. The slinky mode is a toroidally localized, coherent interference pattern in the magnetic field which co-rotates with the plasma at the reversal surface. This mode forms, as a result of the nonlinear coupling of multiple m=1 core tearing modes, via a bifurcation which is similar to that by which toroidally coupled tearing modes lock together in a tokamak. The slinky mode breaks up via a second bifurcation which is similar to that by which toroidally coupled tearing modes in a tokamak unlock. However, the typical m=1 mode amplitude below which slinky breakup is triggered is much smaller than that above which slinky formation occurs. Analytic expressions for the slinky formation and breakup thresholds are obtained in all regimes of physical interest. The locking of the slinky mode to a static error-field is also investigated analytically. Either the error-field arrests the rotation of the plasma at the reversal surface before the formation of the slinky mode, so that the mode subsequently forms as a non-rotating mode, or the slinky mode forms as a rotating mode and subsequently locks to the error-field. Analytic expressions for the locking and unlocking thresholds are obtained in all regimes of physical interest. The problems associated with a locked slinky mode can be alleviated by canceling out the accidentally produced error-field responsible for locking the slinky mode, using a deliberately created ``control'' error-field. Alternatively, the locking angle of the slinky mode can be swept toroidally by rotating the control field.

  15. A theoretical investigation of mode-locking phenomena in reversed field pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard Fitzpatrick

    2004-01-01

    OAK-B135 This paper investigates the formation and breakup of the ''slinky mode'' in an RFP using analytic techniques previously employed to examine mode locking phenomena in tokamaks. The slinky mode is a toroidally localized, coherent interference pattern in the magnetic field which co-rotates with the plasma at the reversal surface. This mode forms, as a result of the nonlinear coupling of multiple m = 1 core tearing modes, via a bifurcation which is similar to that by which toroidally coupled tearing modes lock together in a tokamak. The slinky mode breaks up via a second bifurcation which is similar to that by which toroidally coupled tearing modes in a tokamak unlock. However, the typical m = 1 mode amplitude below which slinky breakup is triggered is much smaller than that above which slinky formation occurs. Analytic expressions for the slinky formation and breakup thresholds are obtained in all regimes of physical interest. The locking of the slinky mode to a static error-field is also investigated analytically. Either the error-field arrests the rotation of the plasma at the reversal surface before the formation of the slinky mode, so that the mode subsequently forms as a non-rotating mode, or the slinky mode forms as a rotating mode and subsequently locks to the error-field. Analytic expressions for the locking and unlocking thresholds are obtained in all regimes of physical interest. The problems associated with a locked slinky mode can be alleviated by canceling out the accidentally produced error-field responsible for locking the slinky mode, using a deliberately created ''control'' error-field. Alternatively, the locking angle of the slinky mode can be swept toroidally by rotating the control field

  16. Reversed-field-pinch and ultra-low-q discharges in REPUTE-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, N.; Yoshida, Z.; Kamada, Y.; Saito, M.; Miyamoto, K.

    1987-01-01

    Ultra-low q (ULQ) and very-low q (VLQ) discharge experiments have been done using the REPUTE-1 RFP. It was found that in these q regime, the plasma density and beta are fairly high, and the confinement property is less sensitive to the error field compared to the RFP. However, since the temperature of the REPUTE-1 discharge is limited in low value because of the small plasma current due to the small toroidal field, its magnetic Reynolds number is too small to simulate the reactor plasma behavior. The radiation barrier has not been overcome yet, and consequently the energy confinement time is very short. In order to improve these aspects of the REPUTE-1 experiment, the REPUTE-2 is designed to produce higher toroidal field of 2T. The toroidal field increases slowly to the final value as in the case of the ramp-up mode of the RFP operation. The first stage of the REPUTE-2 project will be devoted to study the confinement physics of RFP, ULQ, and VLQ. In the second stage, innovation of these configurations, such as resistive shell RFP, neutral beam current drive, and higher current density, is planned. 8 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  17. Feedback control of resistive wall modes in the reversed field pinch

    OpenAIRE

    Yadikin, Dimitry

    2004-01-01

    A wide range of unstable current driven MHD modes is present in the re- versed τeld pinch (RFP) conτguration. An ideally conducting wall facing the plasma can stabilize the ideal MHD modes. In the presence of a resistive wall characterized by the wall time τw, fast mode rotation with the frequency exceeding the inverse wall time gives stabilization for resistive MHD modes. The ideal MHD modes in the RFP are non-rotating modes and can not be stabilized by the resistive wall. Instead they are c...

  18. Magnetic and electrostatic fluctuation measurements on the ZT-40M reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, G.; Ingraham, J.C.; Munson, C.P.; Schoenberg, K.F.; Weber, P.G.; Tsui, H.Y.; Ritz, C.P.

    1990-01-01

    It is presently unknown whether anomalous transport in toroidal, magnetically confined plasma systems, if fluctuation induced, is dominated by electrostatic or magnetic turbulence. We are participating in a joint study of the edge plasmas of tokamak, stellarator, and RFP in an attempt to elucidate this issue. We measure magnetic and electrostatic fields using probes inserted into the edge of the ZT-40M RFP. Using the present technique, with stationary probes, these measurements can be done without damaging the probes only for low current discharges (60 kA). In this initial study, we find that both turbulent magnetic and electrostatic transport are of importance. (author) 10 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  19. Locked modes and plasma-wall interaction in a reversed-field pinch with a resistive shell and carbon first wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hokin, S.; Bergsaaker, H.; Brunsell, P.

    2001-01-01

    The Extrap-T2 reversed-field pinch has concluded operation in the OHTE RFP configuration with a resistive shell. This paper summarizes our observations and conclusions regarding wall-locked modes, dynamo activity and plasma-wall interaction with a resistive shell and graphite first wall

  20. Global confinement in the MST (Madison Symmetric Torus) reversed field pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almagri, A.; Assadi, S.; Beckstead, J.; Chartas, G.; Cudzinovic, M.; Den Hartog, D.; Dexter, R.; Hokin, S.; Holly, D.; Klevans, E.; Nebel, R.; Prager, S.; Rempel, T.; Sarff, J.; Scime, E.; Shen, W.; Spragins, C.; Sprott, C.; Starr, G.; Stoneking, M.; Veerasingam, R.; Watts, C.

    1990-10-01

    Global confinement measured in the first six months of MST full design operation is summarized. Central electron temperature and enhancement of resistivity over the Z = 1 Spitzer value are similar to other RFP experiments for the same value of I/N. As in several other RFP experiments, energy confinement time and poloidal beta are found to decrease with increasing plasma current, with maximum values of {tau}{sub E} {approximately} 1 ms and {beta}{sub p} {approximately} 10%. Particle transport may be approximated with a diffusion coefficient D {approximately} 40 m{sup 2}/s for a discharge studied with a 1-d particle-neutral code. A more elaborate code, incorporating heat and impurity transport, indicates an increase of Z{sub eff} with I/N. This code also reveals that the toroidal magnetic field decays resistively between discrete dynamo events, at the rate given by the measured global resistivity. Edge suprathermal electrons are observed as on other RFPs, with temperatures comparable to the central electron temperature and carrying a current density at least 15% of the total measured with an insertable magnetic coil array. Radial magnetic profiles measured with this array may be matched with a Modified Polynomial Function Model equilibrium for a value of {beta}{sub p} which is a factor of two larger than measured, but which is required due to the large values of {Theta} for a given F found in MST discharges ({Theta} = 1.85 at F= {minus}0.15). 15 refs., 14 figs.

  1. Experimental and theoretical studies of active control of resistive wall mode growth in the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, J. R.; Brunsell, P. R.; Yadikin, D.; Cecconello, M.; Malmberg, J. A.; Gregoratto, D.; Paccagnella, R.; Bolzonella, T.; Manduchi, G.; Marrelli, L.; Ortolani, S.; Spizzo, G.; Zanca, P.; Bondeson, A.; Liu, Y. Q.

    2005-07-01

    Active feedback control of resistive wall modes (RWMs) has been demonstrated in the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch experiment. The control system includes a sensor consisting of an array of magnetic coils (measuring mode harmonics) and an actuator consisting of a saddle coil array (producing control harmonics). Closed-loop (feedback) experiments using a digital controller based on a real time Fourier transform of sensor data have been studied for cases where the feedback gain was constant and real for all harmonics (corresponding to an intelligent-shell) and cases where the feedback gain could be set for selected harmonics, with both real and complex values (targeted harmonics). The growth of the dominant RWMs can be reduced by feedback for both the intelligent-shell and targeted-harmonic control systems. Because the number of toroidal positions of the saddle coils in the array is half the number of the sensors, it is predicted and observed experimentally that the control harmonic spectrum has sidebands. Individual unstable harmonics can be controlled with real gains. However if there are two unstable mode harmonics coupled by the sideband effect, control is much less effective with real gains. According to the theory, complex gains give better results for (slowly) rotating RWMs, and experiments support this prediction. In addition, open loop experiments have been used to observe the effects of resonant field errors applied to unstable, marginally stable and robustly stable modes. The observed effects of field errors are consistent with the thin-wall model, where mode growth is proportional to the resonant field error amplitude and the wall penetration time for that mode harmonic.

  2. An energy confinement study of the MST [Madison Symmetric Torus] reversed field pinch using a Thomson scattering diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Den Hartog, D.J.

    1989-11-01

    Thomson scattering measurements of the central electron temperature and density during the plasma current peak have been performed on the MST Reversed Field Pinch (RFP). This Thomson scattering diagnostic was calibrated for absolute electron density measurements. These measurements of T e and n e , when combined with profile assumptions, were used to calculate estimates of energy confinement time (τ E ) and poloidal beta (β θ ). A standard discharge with I p ∼ 400 kA, F ∼ -0.1, and θ ∼ 1.6 typically exhibited T e ∼ 275 eV, n e ∼ 2.0 x 10 13 cm -3 , τ E ≤ 1 ms, and β θ ≤ 8%. The results of a limited plasma current scaling study did not indicate a strong scaling of T e or τ E with I p . The Thomson scattering diagnostic was used in conjunction with a bolometer, VUV radiation monitor, and edge magnetic coils to study the loss of energy from the plasma. Results indicate that thermal transport from stochastic magnetic fields, particle loss, and radiation are important energy loss processes. The experiments done for this study included an F-scan, a paddle limiter insertion series, and an argon doping series. The plasma maintained a constant βτ during these perturbation experiments, suggesting that increases in one energy loss channel are compensated by drops in other channels and increases in input power to the plasma

  3. Study of the confinement properties in a reversed-field pinch with mode rotation and gas fuelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecconello, M.; Malmberg, J.-A.; Drake, J.R. [Department of Fusion Plasma Physics, Alfven Laboratory, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Nielsen, P.; Pasqualotto, R. [Consorzio RFX, Padova (Italy)

    2002-08-01

    An extensive investigation of the global confinement properties in different operating scenarios in the rebuilt EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch (RFP) experiment is reported here. In particular, the role of a fast gas puff valve system, used to control plasma density, on confinement is studied. Without gas puffing, the electron density decays below 0.5x10{sup 19} m{sup -3}. The poloidal beta varies between 5% and 15%, decreasing at large I/N. The energy confinement time ranges from 70 to 225 {mu}s. With gas puffing, the density is sustained at n{sub e}{approx}1.5x10{sup 19} m{sup -3}. However, a general slight deterioration of the plasma performances is observed for the same values of I/N: the plasma becomes cooler and more radiative. The poloidal beta is comparable to that in the scenarios without puff but the energy confinement time drops ranging from 60 to 130 {mu}s. The fluctuation level and the energy confinement time have been found to scale with the Lundquist number as S{sup -0.05{+-}}{sup 0.07} and S{sup 0.5{+-}}{sup 0.1}, respectively. Mode rotation is typical for all the discharges and rotation velocity is observed to increase with increasing electron diamagnetic velocity. (author)

  4. Measurements of the momentum and current transport from tearing instability in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuritsyn, A.; Fiksel, G.; Almagri, A. F.; Miller, M. C.; Mirnov, V. V.; Prager, S. C.; Sarff, J. S.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper measurements of momentum and current transport caused by current driven tearing instability are reported. The measurements are done in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch [R. N. Dexter, D. W. Kerst, T. W. Lovell, S. C. Prager, and J. C. Sprott, Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] in a regime with repetitive bursts of tearing instability causing magnetic field reconnection. It is established that the plasma parallel momentum profile flattens during these reconnection events: The flow decreases in the core and increases at the edge. The momentum relaxation phenomenon is similar in nature to the well established relaxation of the parallel electrical current and could be a general feature of self-organized systems. The measured fluctuation-induced Maxwell and Reynolds stresses, which govern the dynamics of plasma flow, are large and almost balance each other such that their difference is approximately equal to the rate of change of plasma momentum. The Hall dynamo, which is directly related to the Maxwell stress, drives the parallel current profile relaxation at resonant surfaces at the reconnection events. These results qualitatively agree with analytical calculations and numerical simulations. It is plausible that current-driven instabilities can be responsible for momentum transport in other laboratory and astrophysical plasmas.

  5. Los Alamos compact toroid, fast-liner, and high-density Z-pinch programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linford, R.K.; Sherwood, A.R.; Hammel, J.E.

    1981-03-01

    The Compact Toroid (CT) and High Density Z-Pinch (HDZP) are two of the plasma configurations presently being studied at Los Alamos. The purpose of these two programs, plus the recently terminated (May 1979) Fast Liner (FL) program, is summarized in this section along with a brief description of the experimental facilities. The remaining sections summarize the recent results and the experimental status.

  6. Comment on Turbulent Equipartition Theory of Toroidal Momentum Pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahm, T.S.; Diamond, P.H.; Gurcan, O.D.; Rewoldt, G.

    2009-01-01

    This response demonstrates that the comment by Peeters et al. contains an incorrect and misleading interpretation of our paper (Hahm et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 055902 (2008)) regarding the density gradient dependence of momentum pinch and the turbulent equipartition (TEP) theory

  7. Plasma confinement of Nagoya high-beta toroidal-pinch experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, K.; Kitagawa, S.; Wakatani, M.; Kita, Y.; Yamada, S.; Yamaguchi, S.; Sato, K.; Aizawa, T.; Osanai, Y.; Noda, N.

    1977-01-01

    Two different types of high-β toroidal pinch experiments, STP [1] and CCT [2,3], have been done to study the confinement of the plasma produced by a theta-pinch. The STP is an axisymmetric toroidal pinch of high-β tokamak type, while the CCT consists of multiply connected periodic toroidal traps. Internal current-carrying copper rings are essential to the CCT. Since both apparatuses use the same fast capacitor bank system, they produce rather similar plasma temperatures and densities. The observed laser scattering temperature and density is about 50 eV and 4x10 15 cm -3 , respectively, when the filling pressure is 5 mtorr. In the STP experiment, strong correlations are found between the βsub(p) value and the amplitude of m=2 mode. It has a minimum around the value of βsub(p) of 0.8. The disruptive instability is observed to expand the pinched plasma column without lowering the plasma temperature. Just before the disruption begins, the q value around the magnetic axis becomes far less than 1 and an increase of the amplitude of m=2 mode is seen. The CCT also shows rapid plasma expansion just before the magnetic field reaches its maximum. Then the trap is filled up with the plasma by this irreversible expansion and stable plasma confinement is achieved. The energy confinement time of the CCT is found to be about 35 μs. (author)

  8. Stability properties of a toroidal z-pinch in an external magnetic multipole field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, H.G.

    1987-01-01

    MHD stability of m=1, axisymmetric, external modes of a toroidal z-pinch immersed in an external multipole field (Extrap configuration) is studied. The description includes the effects of a weak toroidicity, a non-circular plasma cross-section and the influence of induced currents in the external conductors. It is found that the non-circularity of the plasma cross-section always has a destabilizing effect but that the m=1 mode can be stabilized by the external feedback if the non-circularity is small. (author)

  9. Interferometry and MHD turbulence measurements in toroidal pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutt, T.L.; Evans, D.E.; Wilcock, P.D.

    1976-01-01

    A 10.6 micron interferometer produced 2 to 3 good quality fringes in the HBTX plasma. There is substantial agreement in the electron densities determined by interferometry and by Thomson scattering, but since the former is an absolute measurement and is systematically lower than the Thomson scattering values, the latter may be too great by about 35%. In RF Pinches, turbulence associated with the instability deflects the beam and corrupts the interferogram. However, if the intensity fluctuations induced in this beam by the turbulence, are measured, as is done in the second experiment performed in the FRSX plasma with a HCN laser, the frequency spectrum of the turbulence can be deduced. In this plasma, rms fluctuations in the density were measured by this means to be 20%, and the dominant frequency of the fluctuations multiplied by the tube diameter was approximately Alfven speed, favouring an interpretation of the gross turbulence in this plasma in terms of Alfen waves. (U.K.)

  10. Edge plasma on the toroidal screw pinch device (TPE-2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyama, Hiroko

    1992-01-01

    Helium discharge cleaning just before every screw pinch discharge was effective to produce low q, high density and reproducible plasmas and to improve energy confinement. The specific length of edge density, λ n is the same order to that of small tokamak plasmas and the particle diffusion is the order of Bohm diffusion. The particle confinement time is shorter as the core plasma density increases and q I decreases. The edge density can be changed by helium, deuterium or hydrogen discharge cleaning. In the low recycling plasma (R=0.3∼0.4), just after the helium discharge cleaning, the ion saturation current of the electrostatic probes of edge plasma, j-bar s , is proportional to square of the average core density, n-bar e , in high q plasma (q I ∼3). j-bar s is proportional to n-bar e in low q plasma (q I ∼1.5). Then, the edge density, n e (a)∝n-bar e 2∼2.5 in high q plasma and n e (a)∝n-bar e 1∼1.5 in low q plasma. In the high recycling plasma (R=0.6∼0.8), just after hydrogen or deuterium discharge cleaning, j-bar s is proportional to n-bar e in high q and low q plasma. Then, n e (a)∝n-bar e 1∼1.5 in low q and high q plasma. j-bar s is proportional to q I inversely in the low recycling plasma. As the recycling increases, j-bar s is large and the dependence of j-bar s on q I becomes weak. This dependence coincides with the dependence of density profile of core plasma on q I . The core density profile depends on q I and the profile peaks with increasing of core density in low q plasma or simple theta pinch plasma, in the low recycling plasma. As the recycling increases, the profile becomes broader and the dependence on q I and n-bar e becomes weak. (author)

  11. Helical-D pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaffer, M.J.

    1997-08-01

    A stabilized pinch configuration is described, consisting of a D-shaped plasma cross section wrapped tightly around a guiding axis. The open-quotes helical-Dclose quotes geometry produces a very large axial (toroidal) transform of magnetic line direction that reverses the pitch of the magnetic lines without the need of azimuthal (poloidal) plasma current. Thus, there is no need of a open-quotes dynamoclose quotes process and its associated fluctuations. The resulting configuration has the high magnetic shear and pitch reversal of the reversed field pinch (RFP). (Pitch = P = qR, where R = major radius). A helical-D pinch might demonstrate good confinement at q << 1

  12. Engineering description of the LASL ZT-40 Toroidal Z-Pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, C.F.; Dike, R.S.; Nunnally, W.C.

    1977-01-01

    The ZT-40 Toroidal Z-Pinch experiment is the largest and newest Z-Pinch to be built at Los Alamos. The experiment consists of a discharge tube with a minor diameter of 40 cm and an aspect ratio of 5.7 to 1. The theta and Z-fields are produced by two capacitor banks, each with 650 KJ (at 50 kV) of stored energy. The experiment is controlled by a ''Prime 400'' computer which is dedicated for ZT-40 use. The experiment is to be constructed in two phases. First with a passive crowbar system and then later a power crowbar system will be added so that the load current can be extended about 250 μsec

  13. Studies on the response of resistive-wall modes to applied magnetic perturbations in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoratto, D.; Drake, J. R.; Yadikin, D.; Liu, Y. Q.; Paccagnella, R.; Brunsell, P. R.; Bolzonella, T.; Marchiori, G.; Cecconello, M.

    2005-09-01

    Arrays of magnetic coils and sensors in the EXTRAP T2R [P. R. Brunsell et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 43 1457 (2001)] reversed-field pinch have been used to investigate the plasma response to an applied resonant magnetic perturbation in the range of the resistive-wall modes (RWMs). Measured RWM growth rates agree with predictions of a cylindrical ideal-plasma model. The linear growth of low-n marginally stable RWMs is related to the so-called resonant-field amplification due to a dominant ∣n∣=2 machine error field of about 2 G. The dynamics of the m =1 RWMs interacting with the applied field produced by the coils can be accurately described by a two-pole system. Estimated poles and residues are given with sufficient accuracy by the cylindrical model with a thin continuous wall.

  14. Predictor-based multivariable closed-loop system identification of the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch external plasma response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olofsson, K. Erik J.; Brunsell, Per R.; Rojas, Cristian R.; Drake, James R.; Hjalmarsson, Håkan

    2011-08-01

    The usage of computationally feasible overparametrized and nonregularized system identification signal processing methods is assessed for automated determination of the full reversed-field pinch external plasma response spectrum for the experiment EXTRAP T2R. No assumptions on the geometry of eigenmodes are imposed. The attempted approach consists of high-order autoregressive exogenous estimation followed by Markov block coefficient construction and Hankel matrix singular value decomposition. It is seen that the obtained 'black-box' state-space models indeed can be compared with the commonplace ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) resistive thin-shell model in cylindrical geometry. It is possible to directly map the most unstable autodetected empirical system pole to the corresponding theoretical resistive shell MHD eigenmode.

  15. A spectroscopic system for time- and space-resolved studies of impurities on the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallander, J.

    1998-06-01

    The radial distribution of impurity line emission in the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch (RFP) is studied with a five viewing chord, absolutely calibrated, spectrometer system. The light is analyzed with a single 0.5 m grating spectrometer. Different parts of the entrance slit are used for different channels. This arrangement makes it possible to use the system over a wide wavelength range, from 2500 to 6500 Å, without having to recalibrate the relative sensitivity for the different channels. The rather short plasma pulses of 10-15 ms require a high time resolution. The use of photomultiplier tubes provides a time resolution of 10 μs which is limited by the transient recorders used. The result is a robust, low-cost system that produces reliable measurements of the radial dependence of emission from a wide range of impurity ions.

  16. Measurements of neutral hydrogen profiles on the EXTRAP-T2 reversed-field pinch from time-resolved ? line emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallander, J.; Hedqvist, A.; Rachlew-Källne, E.

    1998-09-01

    The investigations of the radial distributions of 0953-4075/31/17/015/img2 emission from the EXTRAP-T2 reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasma show that the emission profile varies a lot, even during one plasma discharge. At central electron temperatures of about 150 eV it was expected that the 0953-4075/31/17/015/img2 emission should emerge from the plasma centre. In comparison, 0953-4075/31/17/015/img4 is always observed to radiate from the centre. Our measurements of 0953-4075/31/17/015/img2 emission have, however, shown that this is not always the case, the emission often comes from the plasma edge. The analysis of the measurements has led us to conclude that the edge emission comes from charge-exchange recombination with neutral hydrogen near the carbon first wall. These observations provide a way to estimate the change in neutral hydrogen density during local plasma-wall interaction.

  17. Compact-Toroid Fusion Reactor (CTOR) based on the Field-Reversed Theta Pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    Scoping studies of a translating Compact Torus Reactor (CTOR) have been made on the basis of a dynamic plasma model and an overall systems approach. This CTOR embodiment uses a Field-Reversed Theta Pinch as a plasma source. The field-reversed plasmoid would be formed and compressionally heated to ignition prior to injection into and translation through a linear burn chamber, thereby removing the high-technology plamoid source from the hostile reactor environment. Stabilization of the field-reversed plasmoid would be provided by a passive conducting shell located outside the high-temperature blanket but within the low-field superconducting magnets and associated radition shielding. On the basis of this batch-burn but thermally steady-state approach, a reactor concept emerges with a length below approx. 40 m that generates 300 to 400 MWe of net electrical power with a recirculating power fraction less than 0.15

  18. CPRF/ZTH toroidal conducting shell design and fabrication considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballard, E.O.; Gomez, T.; Smith, R.L.; Weldon, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    The authors discuss design in progress of a new generation Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) machine to be fabricated and assembled at Los Alamos National Laboratory during FY 86-92. The Confinement Physics Research Facility (CPRF) houses the front-end ZTH torus. The ZTH consists oof an Inconel 625 vacuum liner supported by an external electrically conducting shell. The shell also supports 48 toroidal field coils that are mounted to the shells external surface

  19. Theory and application of maximum magnetic energy in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.K.

    1992-02-01

    The magnetic energy in an inductively driven steady-state toroidal plasma is a maximum for a given rate of dissipation of energy (Poynting flux). A purely resistive steady state of the piecewise force-free configuration, however, cannot exist, as the periodic removal of the excess poloidal flux and pressure, due to heating, ruptures the static equilibrium of the partitioning rational surfaces intermittently. The rupture necessitates a plasma with a negative q'/q (as in reverse field pinches and spheromaks) to have the same α in all its force-free regions and with a positive q'/q (as in tokamaks) to have centrally peaked α's

  20. Toroidal coupling in the kinetic response to edge magnetic perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spizzo, G.; Agostini, M.; Scarin, P.; White, R. B.; Schmitz, O.; Spolaore, M.; Terranova, D.; Veranda, M.; Vianello, N.

    2017-12-01

    The magnetic topology of the stochastic edge of a helical reversed-field pinch, with helicity m/n , shows to be deeply influenced by higher harmonics (m +/- 1)/ n , with the same n, due to toroidal coupling. As a consequence, by measuring kinetic quantities in a particular θ, φ location, one can incur in substantial errors or mis-interpretations of the kinetic plasma response: only a full 3D coverage of θ, φ angles can reveal the real topology of the plasma. This can be a caveat for MP application in tokamaks, because it shows that toroidal and poloidal sidebands, though smaller than the base mode by a factor  ∼ \

  1. Nonideal magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and toroidal magnetic confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furth, H.P.

    1985-05-01

    The marked divergence of experimentally observed plasma instability phenomena from the predictions of ideal magnetohydrodynamics led in the early 1960s to the formulations of finite-resistivity stability theory. Beginning in the 1970s, advanced plasma diagnostics have served to establish a detailed correspondence between the predictions of the finite-resistivity theory and experimental plasma behavior - particularly in the case of the resistive kink mode and the tokamak plasma. Nonlinear resistive-kink phenomena have been found to govern the transport of magnetic flux and plasma energy in the reversed-field pinch. The other predicted finite-resistivity instability modes have been more difficult to identify directly and their implications for toroidal magnetic confinement are still unresolved.

  2. Reactor burning calculations for a model reversed field pattern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeung, B.C.; Long, J.W.; Newton, A.A.

    1976-01-01

    An outline pinch reactor scheme and a study of electrical engineering problems for cyclic operation has been further developed and a comparison of physics aspects and capital cost made with Tokamak which has many similar features. Since the properties of reversed field pinches (RFP) are now better understood more detailed studies have been made and first results of burn calculations given. Results of the burn calculations are summarised. These are based on a D-T burning model used for Tokamak with changes appropriate for RFP. (U.K.)

  3. The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: overview of titan-2 design; titan-2 fusion-power-core engineering; titan-2 divertor engineering; titan-2 tritium systems; titan-2 safety design and radioactive-waste disposal; and titan-2 maintenance procedures

  4. ''Compact'' reversed-field pinch (CRFP) reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley, G.H.; Nebel, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    These results indicate that a CRFP operating in the range of 100 MWe should be feasible. While the large aspect ratio leads to a 6.4-m major radius, the design still retains many attributes of conventional compact tori, such as simplicity and ease of access. The relatively low Q/sub p/ with batch burns might be satifactory for a demonstration unit. However, to obtain power-plant ''grade'' Q/sub p/, either refueling (possibly by pellets) or larger size plasmas appear necessary

  5. The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research on the titan-1 fusion power core. The major topics covered are: titan-1 fusion-power-core engineering; titan-1 divertor engineering; titan-1 tritium systems; titan-1 safety design and radioactive-waste disposal; and titan-1 maintenance procedures.

  6. The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: overview of titan-2 design; titan-2 fusion-power-core engineering; titan-2 divertor engineering; titan-2 tritium systems; titan-2 safety design and radioactive-waste disposal; and titan-2 maintenance procedures.

  7. Bibliography on reversed field pinches: 1958-1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dancy, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    This bibliography lists all relevant papers discovered by a search of the conference literature since 1958, and in addition many of the papers to which they referred. The list was originally compiled in August 1975 in time for the Pulsed High Beta Conference at Culham, but has since been updated to include all relevant papers presented both at that conference and at the 7th European Conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics, Lausanne, and the references which those papers listed. An author index has also been added. (U.K.)

  8. Demountable toroidal fusion core facility for physics optimization and fusion engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogart, S.L.; Wagner, C.E.; Krall, N.A.; Dalessandro, J.A.; Weggel, C.F.; Lund, K.O.; Sedehi, S.

    1986-01-01

    Following a successful compact ignition tokamak (CIT) experiment, a fusion facility will be required for physics optimization (POF) and fusion engineering research (FERF). The POF will address issues such as high-beta operation, current drive, impurity control, and will test geometric and configurational variations such as the spherical torus or the reversed-field pinch (RFP). The FERF will be designed to accumulate rapidly a large neutron dose in prototypical fusion subsystems exposed to radiation. Both facilities will require low-cost replacement cores and rapid replacement times. The Demountable Toroidal Fusion Core (DTFC) facility is designed to fulfill these requirements. It would be a cost-effective stepping stone between the CIT and a demonstration fusion reactor

  9. Toroidally asymmetric particle transport caused by phase-locking of MHD modes in RFX-mod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenzini, R.; Terranova, D.; Auriemma, F.; Cavazzana, R.; Innocente, P.; Martini, S.; Serianni, G.; Zuin, M.

    2007-01-01

    The particle and energy transport in reversed field pinch experiments is affected by the locking in phase of the tearing modes, also dubbed dynamo modes, that sustain the magnetic configuration. In standard RFP pulses many m = 1 and m = 0 resonant modes have a relatively large amplitude (a spectrum dubbed MH for multiple helicity). The locking in phase of m = 1 tearing modes produces a helical deformation (locked mode (LM)) of the magnetic surfaces in a region of approximately 40 toroidal degrees. The region of the LM is characterized by a strong plasma-wall interaction and by high losses of energy and particles that account for a significant fraction of the input power and of the total particle outflux. The locking in phase of m = 0 modes modifies the plasma radius, shrinking and enlarging the plasma cross section in two wide toroidal regions of about 100 0 . The purpose of this paper is to investigate to what extent the locking in phase of m = 0 modes introduces toroidal asymmetries in the transport properties of the plasma. This study has been carried out investigating the shape of the density profile in the RFX-mod experiment. The analyses show that the profile exhibits a dependence on the toroidal angle, which is related to the deformation of the plasma column due to the locking in phase of m = 0 modes: the least steep density gradients at the edge are found in the region where the plasma column is shrunk, entailing that in this region the particle transport is enhanced. An analogous asymmetry also characterizes the density and magnetic fluctuations at the edge, which are enhanced in the same toroidal region where the particle transport also is enhanced. This result can be considered the first experimental evidence of an instability localized where the plasma column is shrunk

  10. Application of plasma focus device to compression of toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuta, Kazunari

    1980-01-01

    A new concept of compressing a toroidal plasma using a plasma focus device is considered. Maximum compression ratio of toroidal plasma is determined merely by the initial density ratio of the toroidal plasma to a sheet plasma in a focus device because of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. An initiation senario of plasma-linear is also proposed with a possible application of this concepts to the creation of a burning plasma in reversed field configurations, i.e., burning plasma vortex. (author)

  11. Braking due to non-resonant magnetic perturbations and comparison with neoclassical toroidal viscosity torque in EXTRAP T2R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassinetti, L.; Sun, Y.; Fridström, R.; Menmuir, S.; Olofsson, K. E. J.; Brunsell, P. R.; Khan, M. W. M.; Liang, Y.; Drake, J. R.

    2015-09-01

    The non-resonant magnetic perturbation (MP) braking is studied in the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch (RFP) and the experimental braking torque is compared with the torque expected by the neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) theory. The EXTRAP T2R active coils can apply magnetic perturbations with a single harmonic, either resonant or non-resonant. The non-resonant MP produces velocity braking with an experimental torque that affects a large part of the core region. The experimental torque is clearly related to the plasma displacement, consistent with a quadratic dependence as expected by the NTV theory. The work show a good qualitative agreement between the experimental torque in a RFP machine and NTV torque concerning both the torque density radial profile and the dependence on the non-resonant MP harmonic.

  12. Computational methods for reversed-field equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, J.K.; Auerbach, S.P.; Willmann, P.A.; Berk, H.L.; McNamara, B.

    1980-01-01

    Investigating the temporal evolution of reversed-field equilibrium caused by transport processes requires the solution of the Grad-Shafranov equation and computation of field-line-averaged quantities. The technique for field-line averaging and the computation of the Grad-Shafranov equation are presented. Application of Green's function to specify the Grad-Shafranov equation boundary condition is discussed. Hill's vortex formulas used to verify certain computations are detailed. Use of computer software to implement computational methods is described

  13. A comparison between linear and toroidal Extrap systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, B.

    1988-09-01

    The Extrap scheme consists of a Z-pinch immersed in an octupole field generated by currents in a set of external conductors. A comparison between linear and toroidal Extrap geometry is made in this paper. As compared to toroidal systems, linear geometry has the advantages of relative simplicity and of a current drive by means of electrodes. Linear devices are convenient for basic studies of Extrap, at moderately high pinch currents and plasma temperatures. Within the parameter ranges of experiments at high pinch currents and plasma temperatures, linear systems have on the other hand some substantial disadvantages, on account of the plasma interaction with the end regions. This results in a limitation of the energy confinement time, and leads in the case of an ohmically heated plasma to excessively high plasma densities and small pinch radii which also complicate the introduction of the external conductors. (author)

  14. Phase-locking of tearing modes in the reversed field experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Richard; Zanca, Paolo

    2002-06-01

    In the reversed field experiment (RFX) [F. Gnesotto et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 25, 335 (1995)], the m=1 and m=0 tearing modes present in the plasma are observed to phase-lock together to form a highly peaked, strongly toroidally localized, pattern in the perturbed magnetic field. This pattern, which is commonly known as the "slinky" pattern, gives rise to severe edge loading problems which limit the maximum achievable toroidal current. A theory is presented which explains virtually all salient features of the RFX slinky pattern. The central premise of this theory is that at high ambient mode amplitude the various tearing modes occurring in the plasma phase-lock together in a configuration which minimizes the magnitudes of the electromagnetic torques exerted at the various mode rational surfaces. The theory successfully predicts the profiles of the edge radial and toroidal magnetic fields generated by the m=0 and m=1 modes, the phase relations between the various modes, the presence of a small toroidal offset between the peaks of the m=0 and m=1 contributions to the overall slinky pattern, and the response of the pattern to externally generated m=0 and m=1 magnetic perturbations.

  15. Phase-locking of tearing modes in the reversed field experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzpatrick, Richard; Zanca, Paolo

    2002-01-01

    In the reversed field experiment (RFX) [F. Gnesotto et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 25, 335 (1995)], the m=1 and m=0 tearing modes present in the plasma are observed to phase-lock together to form a highly peaked, strongly toroidally localized, pattern in the perturbed magnetic field. This pattern, which is commonly known as the 'slinky' pattern, gives rise to severe edge loading problems which limit the maximum achievable toroidal current. A theory is presented which explains virtually all salient features of the RFX slinky pattern. The central premise of this theory is that at high ambient mode amplitude the various tearing modes occurring in the plasma phase-lock together in a configuration which minimizes the magnitudes of the electromagnetic torques exerted at the various mode rational surfaces. The theory successfully predicts the profiles of the edge radial and toroidal magnetic fields generated by the m=0 and m=1 modes, the phase relations between the various modes, the presence of a small toroidal offset between the peaks of the m=0 and m=1 contributions to the overall slinky pattern, and the response of the pattern to externally generated m=0 and m=1 magnetic perturbations

  16. Experiments on screw-pinch plasmas with elongated cross section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassing, H.W.

    1989-01-01

    In this thesis experiments are described carried out with SPICA II, a toroidal screw-pinch plasma device. this device is the last one in a series of plasma machines of the toroidal screw-pinch differing from its predecessor in its race-track shaped section. In devices of the type toroidal screw-pinch stable confinement is possible of plasmas with larger β values than in a tokamak discharge. In a pinch the plasma is screwed up, during the formation, in such a way that in a relatively small volume a plasma is formated with a high pressure. During the screwing up the plasma is heated by shock heating as well as adiabatic compression. With the modified snowplow model the density and temperature after the formation can be calculated, starting from the initial conditions. When all ions arrive into the plasma column, the density in the column is determined by the volume compression. First purpose of the experiments was to find a stable discharge. Subsequently discharges have been made with a high as possible β in order to investigate at which maximum β it is possible to confine screw-pinch plasmas stably. When these had been found, the nature and importance could be investigated of the processes following which the screw-pinch plasma looses its energy. (author), 75 res.; 95 figs.; 8 tabs

  17. Necessary stability condition for field-reversed theta pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cary, J.R.

    1981-03-01

    Toroidal systems of arbitrary cross section without toroidal magnetic field are analyzed via the double adiabatic fluid equations. Such systems are shown to be unstable if there exists one closed field line on which the average of kapparB 2 is positive, where kappa is the curvature. A similar criterion is derived for linear systems and is applied to a noncircular z-pinch

  18. Proceedings of the international workshop on engineering design of next step reversed field pinch devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, D.B. (comp.)

    1987-11-01

    These Proceedings contain the formal contributed papers, the workshop papers and workshop summaries presented at the International Workshop on Engineering Design of Next Step RFP Devices held at Los Alamos, July 13-17, 1987. Contributed papers were presented at formal sessions on the topics: (1) physics overview (3 papers); (2) general overview (3 papers); (3) front-end (9 papers); (4) computer control and data acquisition (1 paper); (5) magnetics (5 papers); and (6) electrical design (9 papers). Informal topical workshop sessions were held on the topics: (1) RFP physics (9 papers); (2) front-end (7 papers); (3) magnetics (3 papers); and (4) electrical design (1 paper). This volume contains the summaries written by the Chairmen of each of the informal topical workshop sessions. The papers in these Proceedings represent a significant review of the status of the technical base for the engineering design of the next step RFP devices being developed in the US, Europe, and Japan, as of this date.

  19. Theoretical reversed field pinch studies: Progress report, August 31, 1987 to June 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the progress made in Grant DE-FG02-85ER53212 since the end of the last year, August 31, 1987 to the present (June, 1988). Substantial results have emerged in two areas of high importance to the RFP program - nonlinear evolution with nonideal boundaries and self-consistent equilibrium in the presence of field errors. Both of these topics are critical for a basic understanding of RFP physics, for interpretation of current experiments, and for design of future devices and reactors. 3 refs

  20. Global modelling of plasma-wall interaction in reversed field pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagatin, M.; Costa, S.; Ortolani, S.

    1989-01-01

    The impurity production and deuterium recycling mechanisms in ETA-BETA II and RFX are firstly discussed by means of a simple model applicable to a stationary plasma interacting with the wall. This gives the time constant and the saturation values of the impurity concentration as a function of the boundary temperature and density. If the latter is sufficiently high, the impurity buildup in the main plasma becomes to some extent stabilized by the shielding effect of the edge. A self-consistent global model of the time evolution of an RFP plasma interacting with the wall is then described. The bulk and edge parameters are derived by solving the energy and particle balance equations incorporating some of the basic plasma-surface processes, such as sputtering, backscattering and desorption. The application of the model to ETA-BETA II confirms the impurity concentrations of the light and metal impurities as well as the time evolution of the average electron density found experimentally under different conditions. The model is then applied to RFX, a larger RFP experiment under construction, whose wall will be protected by a full graphite armour. The time evolution of the discharge shows that carbon sputtering could increase Z eff to ≅ 4, but without affecting significantly the plasma performance. (orig.)

  1. Global modelling of plasma-wall interaction in reversed field pinches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagatin, M.; Costa, S.; Ortolani, S.

    1989-04-01

    The impurity production and deuterium recycling mechanisms in ETA—BETA II and RFX are firstly discussed by means of a simple model applicable to a stationary plasma interacting with the wall. This gives the time constant and the saturation values of the impurity concentration as a function of the boundary temperature and density. If the latter is sufficiently high, the impurity buildup in the main plasma becomes to some extent stabilized by the shielding effect of the edge. A self-consistent global model of the time evolution of an RFP plasma interacting with the wall is then described. The bulk and edge parameters are derived by solving the energy and particle balance equations incorporating some of the basic plasma-surface processes, such as sputtering, backscattering and desorption. The application of the model to ETA-BETA II confirms the impurity concentrations of the light and metal impurities as well as the time evolution of the average electron density found experimentally under different conditions. The model is then applied to RFX, a larger RFP experiment under construction, whose wall will be protected by a full graphite armour. The time evolution of the discharge shows that carbon sputtering could increase Zeff to ~ 4, but without affecting significantly the plasma performance.

  2. Thomson scattering in the EXTRAP-T2 reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welander, A.

    1996-11-01

    A Thomson scattering system has been installed on the EXTRAP-T2 RFP experiment. The system measures the electron density and temperature in three radial points using three spectral channels. A description of the system, the calibration techniques and examples of data obtained are given. The error bars for the electron temperature measurements are estimated to be < 10% for typical T2-plasmas. 4 refs

  3. Proceedings of the international workshop on engineering design of next step reversed field pinch devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, D.B.

    1987-11-01

    These Proceedings contain the formal contributed papers, the workshop papers and workshop summaries presented at the International Workshop on Engineering Design of Next Step RFP Devices held at Los Alamos, July 13-17, 1987. Contributed papers were presented at formal sessions on the topics: (1) physics overview (3 papers); (2) general overview (3 papers); (3) front-end (9 papers); (4) computer control and data acquisition (1 paper); (5) magnetics (5 papers); and (6) electrical design (9 papers). Informal topical workshop sessions were held on the topics: (1) RFP physics (9 papers); (2) front-end (7 papers); (3) magnetics (3 papers); and (4) electrical design (1 paper). This volume contains the summaries written by the Chairmen of each of the informal topical workshop sessions. The papers in these Proceedings represent a significant review of the status of the technical base for the engineering design of the next step RFP devices being developed in the US, Europe, and Japan, as of this date

  4. Pitch programming of the ZT-S reversed-field pinch experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, A.; Burkhardt, L.C.; Baker, D.A.; Howell, R.B.; Schofield, A.E.; Sgro, A.G.

    1979-01-01

    Pitch programming is only realizable in the non-ideal case and as such is tried on ZT-S. Once the resistivity profile in the plasma is determined along with the appropriate thermal conductivity, then q(t) at the wall possesses a fairly simple mapping to a q(r) for a given time as shown in the experimental results. Thus the resulting q(r) profiles are qualitatively similar to ones desirable from the point of MHD stability theory. The results of this initial investigation indicate that pitch programming should be pursued further as a possible means of setting up desirable equilibrium profiles in an RFP

  5. Experiments of spheromak and reversed field configuration in 2m theta pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogi, Y.; Shimamura, S.; Ogura, H.; Osanai, Y.; Saito, K.; Shiina, S.; Yoshimura, H.

    1981-01-01

    Since the z-current produces the paramagnetic field near the electrodes, the spheromak formation is more difficult in the straight bias field. In order to help the reconnection at the coil ends, the cusp bias coils are added to both ends of the straight coil. Then the spheromak configuration is formed and the plasma is confined for 5 to 10 μs. On the other hand, the RFC continues for about 30 μs in case of the straight bias field. The confinement time is limited by the rotational instability. Although the start time of the instability is not clear, the elongation of the plasma is detected in 15 to 20 μs after the RFC is formed. The period of the rotation is slightly different every shot. Detailed study of the instability is being pursued

  6. Recent results from the ZT-40M reversed-field pinch program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watt, R.G.; Jacobson, A.R.; Massey, R.S.; Mondt, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    Details of equilibrium control and resultant discharge behavior on ZT-40M will be presented. Interesting results in several operating regimes and possible theoretical interpretations will be discussed

  7. Electron Bernstein wave experiments in a over-dense reversed field pinch plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forest, C. B.; Anderson, J.K.; Cengher, M.; Chattopadhyay, P.K.; Carter, M.; Harvey, R.W.; Pinsker, R.I.; Smirnov, A.P.

    2003-01-01

    Experiments and theoretical work show that it is possible to couple power to the EBW in an RFP, and that these waves may be suitable for driving current. The main results of our work thus far are: (1) A coupling theory for a phased array of waveguides is developed and compared to experiment. Both O and X mode polarizations can be used; in general coupling for both is optimized for obliquely launched waves. (2) The surface impedance and reflection coefficients have been measured for EBWs launched by waveguide antennas on the edge of MST. Emission and coupling measurements are both consistent with theoretical models and the measured density gradients at the plasma edge. In particular, the coupling showed a strong asymmetry in N Φ for X-mode launch. (3) Black-body levels of emission have been observed in the ECRF from over-dense MST plasmas, which by reciprocity indicate that coupling to the EBW is possible with external antennas. Emission is preferentially polarized in the X-mode and is affected by density fluctuations at the plasma edge. Mode conversion efficiencies as high as 75% have been observed. (4) Ray tracing of EBW waves, coupled to Fokker Planck calculations show that localized, efficient current drive is possible. Current drive is possible by choosing the poloidal angle of the launching antenna to control the N of the wave. (authors)

  8. Measurements of nonlinear Hall-driven reconnection in the reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharp, Timothy D.

    Complex organisms are able to develop because of the complex regulatory systems that control their gene expression. The first step in this regulation, transcription initiation, is controlled by transcription factors. Transcription factors are modular proteins composed of two distinct domains, the DNA binding domain and the regulatory domain. These molecules are involved in a plethora of important biological processes including embryogenesis, development, cell health, and cancer. Tissue enriched transcription factors Nkx-2.5 and Gata4 are involved in cardiac development and cardiac health. In this thesis the DNA binding specificity of Nkx-2.5 will be analyzed using a high throughput double stranded DNA platform called Cognate Site Identifier (CSI) arrays (Chapter 2). The full DNA binding specificity of Nkx-2.5 and Nkx-2.5 mutants will be visualized using Sequence Specificity Landscapes (SSLs). In Chapter 3, the definition of binding specificity will be investigated by evaluating a number of different DNA binding folds by CSI and SSLs. CSI and SSLs will also be used to evaluate different pyrrole/imidazole hairpin polyamides in order to better characterize these small molecule DNA binding domains. CSI and SSL data will be applied to the genome in order to explain the biological function an artificial transcription factor. Chapter 4 will discuss the mechanism of nonspecific DNA binding. The historical means of predicting DNA binding will be challenged by utilizing high throughput experiments. The effect of salt concentration on both specific and nonspecific binding will also be investigated. Finally, in Chapter 5, a generation of Protein DNA Dimerizer will be discussed. A PDD that regulates transcription on genomic DNA by binding cooperatively with the heart IF Gata4 will be characterized. These studies provide understanding of, and a means to control, how transcription factors sample the endless sea of DNA in the genome in order to regulate gene expression with such wonderful specificity.

  9. B sub 4 C solid target boronization of the MST reversed-field pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Den Hartog, D.J.; Cekic, M.; Fiksel, G.; Hokin, S.A.; Kendrick, R.D.; Prager, S.C.; Stoneking, M.R.

    1992-10-01

    A solid rod of hot-pressed boron carbide is being used as the source of boron during boronization of MST. The most striking result of this procedure is the reduction in oxygen contamination of the plasma (O III radiation, characteristic of oxygen at the edge, falls by about a factor of 3 after boronization.). The radiated power fraction drops to about half its initial value. Particle reflux from the wall is also lowered, making density control simpler. The rod (12.7 mm diameter) is inserted into the edge plasma of normal high-power RFP discharges. B{sub 4}C is ablated from the surface of the rod and deposited in a thin film (a-B/C:H) on the walls and limiters. The energy flux carried by superthermal'' (not runaway'') electrons at the edge of MST appears to enhance the efficient, non-destructive ablation of the boron carbide rod.

  10. B{sub 4}C solid target boronization of the MST reversed-field pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Den Hartog, D.J.; Cekic, M.; Fiksel, G.; Hokin, S.A.; Kendrick, R.D.; Prager, S.C.; Stoneking, M.R.

    1992-10-01

    A solid rod of hot-pressed boron carbide is being used as the source of boron during boronization of MST. The most striking result of this procedure is the reduction in oxygen contamination of the plasma (O III radiation, characteristic of oxygen at the edge, falls by about a factor of 3 after boronization.). The radiated power fraction drops to about half its initial value. Particle reflux from the wall is also lowered, making density control simpler. The rod (12.7 mm diameter) is inserted into the edge plasma of normal high-power RFP discharges. B{sub 4}C is ablated from the surface of the rod and deposited in a thin film (a-B/C:H) on the walls and limiters. The energy flux carried by ``superthermal`` (not ``runaway``) electrons at the edge of MST appears to enhance the efficient, non-destructive ablation of the boron carbide rod.

  11. MHD control experiments in the Extrap T2R Reversed Field Pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrelli, L.; Bolzonella, T.; Brunsell, P.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J.; Franz, P.; Gregoratto, D.; Manduchi, G.; Martin, P.; Ortolani, S.; Paccagnella, R.; Piovesan, P.; Spizzo, G.; Yadikin, D.; Zanca, P.

    2004-11-01

    We report here on MHD active control experiments performed in the Extrap T2R device, which has been recently equipped with a set of 32 feedback controlled saddle coils couples. Experiments aiming at selectively exciting a resonant resistive instability in order to actively induce Quasi Single Helicity states will be presented. Open loop experiments have in fact shown that a spectrum with one dominant mode can be excited in a high aspect ratio device like T2R. In addition, evidences of controlled braking of tearing modes, which spontaneously rotate in T2R, have been gathered, allowing the determination of a threshold for mode wall locking. Different feedback control schemes have been implemented. In particular, mode suppression schemes proved successful in delaying resistive wall modes growth and in increasing the discharge duration: this suggests a hybrid mode control scenario, in which RWM are suppressed and QSH is induced. Radiation imaging and internal magnetic field reconstructions performed with the ORBIT code will be presented.

  12. Experimental studies of tearing mode and resistive wall mode dynamics in the reversed field pinch configuration

    OpenAIRE

    Malmberg, Jenny-Ann

    2003-01-01

    It is relatively straightforward to establish equilibrium inmagnetically confined plasmas, but the plasma is frequentlysucceptible to a variety of instabilities that are driven bythe free energy in the magnetic field or in the pressuregradient. These unstable modes exhibit effects that affect theparticle, momentum and heat confinement properties of theconfiguration. Studies of the dynamics of several of the mostimportant modes are the subject of this thesis. The studies arecarried out on plas...

  13. Experimental studies of confinement in the EXTRAP T2 and T2R reversed field pinches

    OpenAIRE

    Cecconello, Marco

    2003-01-01

    The confinement properties of fusion plasmas are affected bymagnetic and electrostatic fluctuations. The determination ofthe plasma confinement properties requires the measurement ofseveral global and local quantities such as the ion andelectron temperatures, the electron and neutral densityprofiles, the radiation emissivity profiles, the ohmic inputpower and the particle and heat diffusivities. The focus ofthis thesis is the study of the plasma confinement propertiesbased on measurements of ...

  14. Radiated Power and Impurity Concentrations in the EXTRAP-T2R Reversed-Field Pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corre, Y.; Rachlew, E.; Cecconello, M.; Gravestijn, R. M.; Hedqvist, A.; Pégourié, B.; Schunke, B.; Stancalie, V.

    2005-01-01

    A numerical and experimental study of the impurity concentration and radiation in the EXTRAP-T2R device is reported. The experimental setup consists of an 8-chord bolometer system providing the plasma radiated power and a vacuum-ultraviolet spectrometer providing information on the plasma impurity content. The plasma emissivity profile as measured by the bolometric system is peaked in the plasma centre. A one dimensional Onion Skin Collisional-Radiative model (OSCR) has been developed to compute the density and radiation distributions of the main impurities. The observed centrally peaked emissivity profile can be reproduced by OSCR simulations only if finite particle confinement time and charge-exchange processes between plasma impurities and neutral hydrogen are taken into account. The neutral hydrogen density profile is computed with a recycling code. Simulations show that recycling on metal first wall such as in EXTRAP-T2R (stainless steel vacuum vessel and molybdenum limiters) is compatible with a rather high neutral hydrogen density in the plasma centre. Assuming an impurity concentration of 10% for oxygen and 3% for carbon compared with the electron density, the OSCR calculation including lines and continuum emission reproduces about 60% of the total radiated power with a similarly centrally peaked emissivity profile. The centrally peaked emissivity profile is due to low ionisation stages and strongly radiating species in the plasma core, mainly O4+ (Be-like) and C3+ Li-like.

  15. Collapse of core toroidal angular momentum due to the coupling of rotating magnetic islands in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, B. J.

    2015-11-01

    The dynamic, nonlinear evolution of tearing instabilities on DIII-D reveals a coupling of rational surfaces that can lead to phase-locking amongst multiple rotating magnetic island chains. This loss of flow shear increases disruptivity, particularly at the low level of rotation expected in ITER. Bifurcation of differential mode frequency and fluid rotation in hybrid scenario discharges has been interpreted by comparison to a recently developed theory of nonlinear mode coupling. Magnetic islands of different toroidal mode number couple to flatten the toroidal rotation profile, and the resulting phase-locked state is similar to the so-called ``slinky'' mode observed in reversed field pinch devices. Reduction of the edge safety factor increases the momentum transport, easily overwhelming the local torque density available from neutral beam injection. In discharges with q95 ~ 4.5, however, the participating modes do not remain phase-locked. In these cases, ECE-Imaging data have been used to show that the poloidal rotation of the composite, multi-helicity structure exceeds that of the measured carbon (and estimated deuterium) fluid flow. The present model of nonlinear 3-wave mode coupling does not generate the forces required to drive this rotation. Therefore, flow shear inversion represents a transition from phase-locking to a new regime of convective momentum transport in which additional mechanisms become important. These results highlight the importance of controlling multi-mode interactions in order to maintain stabilizing flow shear. Supported by US DOE DE-AC02-09CH11466, DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-FG02-07ER54917, DE-FG02-92-ER54141.

  16. Summary of US-Japan Exchange 2004 New Directions and Physics for Compact Toroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Intrator, T; Nagata, M; Hoffman, A; Guo, H; Steinhauer, L; Ryutov, D; Miller, R; Okada, S

    2005-08-15

    This exchange workshop was an open meeting coordinated by the P-24 Plasma Physics Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory. We brought together scientists from institutions in the US and Japan who are researching the various and complementary types of Compact Toroids (CT). Many concepts, including both experimental and theoretical investigations, are represented. The range spans Field Reversed Configuration (FRC), spheromak, Reversed Field Pinch (RFP), spherical tokamaks, linear devices dedicated to fundamental physics studies, and hybrid transitions that bridge multiple configurations. The participants represent facilities on which significant experiments are now underway: FRC Injection experiment (FIX), Translation Confinement experiment (TCS), Nihon-University Compact Torus Experiment (NUCTE), HITSI (Helicity Injection experiment, Steady Inductive Helicity Injection (HIT-SIHI)), Field Reversed Configuration experiment-Liner (FRX-L), TS-3/4, Sustained Spheromak Experiment (SSPX), Relaxation Scaling Experiment (RSX), HIST, Caltech Spheromak, or in the design process such as MRX-FRC (PPPL), Pulsed High Density experiment (PHD at UW). Several new directions and results in compact toroid (CT) research have recently emerged, including neutral-beam injection, rotating magnetic fields, flux build up from Ohmic boost coils, electrostatic helicity injection techniques, CT injection into other large devices, and high density configurations for applications to magnetized target fusion and translational compression of CT's. CT experimental programs in both the US and Japan have also shown substantial progress in the control and sustainment of CT's. Both in theory and experiment, there is increased emphasis on 3D dynamics, which is also related to astrophysical and space physics issues. 3D data visualization is now frequently used for experimental data display. There was much discussion of the effects of weak toroidal fields in FRC's and possible implications

  17. Compression of toroidal plasma by imploding plasma-liner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuta, Kazunari.

    1979-07-01

    A new concept of compressing a plasma in a closed magnetic configuration by a version of liner implosion flux compression technique is considered. The liner consists of a dense plasma cylinder, i.e. the plasma-liner. Maximum compression ratio of toroidal plasma is determined just by the initial density ratio of the toroidal plasma to the liner plasma because of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. A start-up senario of plasma-liner is also proposed with a possible application of this concept to the creation of a burning plasma in reversed field configurations, i.e. burning plasma vortex. (author)

  18. Transport and Dynamics in Toroidal Fusion Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sovinec, Carl

    2016-01-01

    The study entitled, 'Transport and Dynamics in Toroidal Fusion Systems,' (TDTFS) applied analytical theory and numerical computation to investigate topics of importance to confining plasma, the fourth state of matter, with magnetic fields. A central focus of the work is how non-thermal components of the ion particle distribution affect the 'sawtooth' collective oscillation in the core of the tokamak magnetic configuration. Previous experimental and analytical research had shown and described how the oscillation frequency decreases and amplitude increases, leading to 'monster' or 'giant' sawteeth, when the non-thermal component is increased by injecting particle beams or by exciting ions with imposed electromagnetic waves. The TDTFS study applied numerical computation to self-consistently simulate the interaction between macroscopic collective plasma dynamics and the non-thermal particles. The modeling used the NIMROD code [Sovinec, Glasser, Gianakon, et al., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)] with the energetic component represented by simulation particles [Kim, Parker, Sovinec, and the NIMROD Team, Comput. Phys. Commun. 164, 448 (2004)]. The computations found decreasing growth rates for the instability that drives the oscillations, but they were ultimately limited from achieving experimentally relevant parameters due to computational practicalities. Nonetheless, this effort provided valuable lessons for integrated simulation of macroscopic plasma dynamics. It also motivated an investigation of the applicability of fluid-based modeling to the ion temperature gradient instability, leading to the journal publication [Schnack, Cheng, Barnes, and Parker, Phys. Plasmas 20, 062106 (2013)]. Apart from the tokamak-specific topics, the TDTFS study also addressed topics in the basic physics of magnetized plasma and in the dynamics of the reversed-field pinch (RFP) configuration. The basic physics work contributed to a study of two

  19. Transport and Dynamics in Toroidal Fusion Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sovinec, Carl [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-09-07

    The study entitled, "Transport and Dynamics in Toroidal Fusion Systems," (TDTFS) applied analytical theory and numerical computation to investigate topics of importance to confining plasma, the fourth state of matter, with magnetic fields. A central focus of the work is how non-thermal components of the ion particle distribution affect the "sawtooth" collective oscillation in the core of the tokamak magnetic configuration. Previous experimental and analytical research had shown and described how the oscillation frequency decreases and amplitude increases, leading to "monster" or "giant" sawteeth, when the non-thermal component is increased by injecting particle beams or by exciting ions with imposed electromagnetic waves. The TDTFS study applied numerical computation to self-consistently simulate the interaction between macroscopic collective plasma dynamics and the non-thermal particles. The modeling used the NIMROD code [Sovinec, Glasser, Gianakon, et al., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)] with the energetic component represented by simulation particles [Kim, Parker, Sovinec, and the NIMROD Team, Comput. Phys. Commun. 164, 448 (2004)]. The computations found decreasing growth rates for the instability that drives the oscillations, but they were ultimately limited from achieving experimentally relevant parameters due to computational practicalities. Nonetheless, this effort provided valuable lessons for integrated simulation of macroscopic plasma dynamics. It also motivated an investigation of the applicability of fluid-based modeling to the ion temperature gradient instability, leading to the journal publication [Schnack, Cheng, Barnes, and Parker, Phys. Plasmas 20, 062106 (2013)]. Apart from the tokamak-specific topics, the TDTFS study also addressed topics in the basic physics of magnetized plasma and in the dynamics of the reversed-field pinch (RFP) configuration. The basic physics work contributed to a study of two-fluid effects on interchange dynamics, where

  20. Z-pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan'kov, V.V.

    1991-01-01

    Although pinches, unlike tokamaks, have not occupied a central position in fusion research, their structural simplicity and the wealth of physical processes associated with plasma foci have maintained a steady interest. The development of Z-pinches, including plasma foci, micropinches, and dense Z-pinches, is reviewed. Attention is focused on theoretical as opposed to experimental questions, and on recent work rather than the basic results now found in textbooks. Finally, Soviet work is discussed more fully than work done abroad, and applications to controlled fusion are emphasized

  1. Introduction to Pinch Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rokni, Masoud

    ? How to put energy efficiency and other targets like reducing emissions, increasing plant capacities, improve product qualities etc, into a one coherent strategic plan for the overall site? All these questions and more can be answered with a full understanding of Pinch Technology and an awareness...... of the available tools for applying it in a practical way. The aim here is to provide the basic knowledge of pinch technology concept and how it can be applied across a wide range of process industries. The pinch technology was proposed firstly for optimization of heat exchangers and therefore it is introduced...

  2. Toroid magnet test facility

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Because of its exceptional size, it was not feasible to assemble and test the Barrel Toroid - made of eight coils - as an integrated toroid on the surface, prior to its final installation underground in LHC interaction point 1. It was therefore decided to test these eight coils individually in a dedicated test facility.

  3. Toroidal helical fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucinski, M.Y.; Caldas, I.L.

    1986-08-01

    Using the conventional toroidal coordinate system Laplace's equation for the magnetic scalar potential due to toroidal helical currents is solved. The potential is written as a sum of an infinite series of functions. Each partial sum represents the potential within some accuracy. The effect of the winding law is analysed in the case of small curvature. (Author) [pt

  4. New Toroid shielding design

    CERN Multimedia

    Hedberg V

    On the 15th of June 2001 the EB approved a new conceptual design for the toroid shield. In the old design, shown in the left part of the figure above, the moderator part of the shielding (JTV) was situated both in the warm and cold areas of the forward toroid. It consisted both of rings of polyethylene and hundreds of blocks of polyethylene (or an epoxy resin) inside the toroid vacuum vessel. In the new design, shown to the right in the figure above, only the rings remain inside the toroid. To compensate for the loss of moderator in the toroid, the copper plug (JTT) has been reduced in radius so that a layer of borated polyethylene can be placed around it (see figure below). The new design gives significant cost-savings and is easier to produce in the tight time schedule of the forward toroid. Since the amount of copper is reduced the weight that has to be carried by the toroid is also reduced. Outgassing into the toroid vacuum was a potential problem in the old design and this is now avoided. The main ...

  5. Samus Toroid Installation Fixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stredde, H.; /Fermilab

    1990-06-27

    The SAMUS (Small Angle Muon System) toroids have been designed and fabricated in the USSR and delivered to D0 ready for installation into the D0 detector. These toroids will be installed into the aperture of the EF's (End Toroids). The aperture in the EF's is 72-inch vertically and 66-inch horizontally. The Samus toroid is 70-inch vertically by 64-inch horizontally by 66-inch long and weighs approximately 38 tons. The Samus toroid has a 20-inch by 20-inch aperture in the center and it is through this aperture that the lift fixture must fit. The toroid must be 'threaded' through the EF aperture. Further, the Samus toroid coils are wound about the vertical portion of the aperture and thus limit the area where a lift fixture can make contact and not damage the coils. The fixture is designed to lift along a surface adjacent to the coils, but with clearance to the coil and with contact to the upper steel block of the toroid. The lift and installation will be done with the 50 ton crane at DO. The fixture was tested by lifting the Samus Toroid 2-inch off the floor and holding the weight for 10 minutes. Deflection was as predicted by the design calculations. Enclosed are sketches of the fixture and it relation to both Toroids (Samus and EF), along with hand calculations and an Finite Element Analysis. The PEA work was done by Kay Weber of the Accelerator Engineering Department.

  6. Hall-effect destabilization of global kink modes in a paramagnetic pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurin, A.A.

    1991-01-01

    It has been noted that when averaged over the kink magnetic oscillations observed experimentally in pinches with a reversed field, the Hall electric field generates a solenoidal field that can invert the longitudinal magnetic field on the surface of the plasma column. For a such a magnetic dynamo mechanism to occur, the magnetic oscillations in the current configuration for diffusive pinches must be capable of self-excitation. Here the treatment of Hall effects is of particular interest, because studies of current equilibria have shown that they are unstable to excitation of helicon modes, which arise exclusively through freezing of the magnetic field into the current-carrying electrons. In this paper the author shows that if the characteristic current parameters in the pinch are such that the pinch is highly paramagnetic, the global m = 1 helicon mode is unstable

  7. Dense Z-pinch plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shlachter, J.S.; Hammel, J.E.; Scudder, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    Early researchers recogniZed the desirable features of the linear Z-pinch configuration as a magnetic fusion scheme. In particular, a Z-pinch reactor might not require auxiliary heating or external field coils, and could constitute an uncomplicated, high plasma β geometry. The simple Z pinch, however, exhibited gross MHD instabilities that disrupted the plasma, and the linear Z pinch was abandoned in favor of more stable configurations. Recent advances in pulsed-power technology and an appreciation of the dynamic behavior of an ohmically heated Z pinch have led to a reexamination of the Z pinch as a workable fusion concept

  8. Local electron density measurements in a screw pinch by means of a Michelson interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoekzema, J.A.; Busch, P.J.; Mastop, W.J.

    1976-06-01

    The time-dependent density profile of a toroidal screw-pinch plasma is determined from successive measurements of the line density along different sections of a line through the plasma. The pathlength is varied by the introduction of a hollow quartz tube into the plasma

  9. Momentum transport studies in JET H-mode discharges with an enhanced toroidal field ripple

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, P. C.; Versloot, T. W.; Salmi, A.; Hua, M. D.; Howell, D. H.; Giroud, C.; Parail, V.; Saibene, G.; Tala, T.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, enhancement of the toroidal field (TF) ripple has been used as a tool in order to reveal the impact of the momentum pinch on the rotation profiles in H-mode JET discharges. The analysis showed that flatter rotation profiles were obtained in discharges with a high TF ripple, attributed

  10. Dense sheet Z-pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tetsu, Miyamoto

    1999-01-01

    The steady state and quasi-steady processes of infinite- and finite-width sheet z-pinches are studied. The relations corresponding to the Bennett relation and Pease-Braginskii current of cylindrical fiber z-pinches depend on a geometrical factor in the sheet z-pinches. The finite-width sheet z-pinch is approximated by a segment of infinite-width sheet z-pinch, if it is wide enough, and corresponds to a number of (width/thickness) times fiber z-pinch plasmas of the diameter that equals the sheet thickness. If the sheet current equals this number times the fiber current, the plasma created in the sheet z-pinches is as dense as in the fiber z-pinches. The total energy of plasma and magnetic field per unit mass is approximately equal in both pinches. Quasi-static transient processes are different in several aspects from the fiber z-pinch. No radiation collapse occurs in the sheet z-pinch. The stability is improved in the sheet z-pinches. The fusion criterions and the experimental arrangements to produce the sheet z-pinches are also discussed. (author)

  11. Evident anomalous inward particle pinch in full non-inductive plasmas driven by lower hybrid waves on Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoang, G.T.; Bourdelle, C.; Pegourie, B.; Artaud, J.F.; Bucalossi, J.; Clairet, F.; Fenzi-Bonizec, C.; Garbet, X.; Gil, C.; Guirlet, R.; Imbeaux, F.; Lasalle, J.; Loarer, T.; Lowry, C.; Schunke, B.; Travere, J.M.; Tsitrone, E.

    2003-01-01

    These slides present some characteristics concerning peaked density profile observed in Tore-Supra. It appears that density profile remains peaked for more than 3 minutes in fully LHCD (lower hybrid current drive) discharges. The absence of toroidal electric field and the fact that the ware pinch has vanished across the entire plasma show that toroidal electric field and ware pinch are not the cause of the peaked profile. It is shown that peaked profile is linked to transport properties and can only be explained by a particle pinch velocity 2 orders of magnitude above the neoclassical pinch. It is also shown that the radial profile is in agreement with Isitchenko's formula. (A.C.)

  12. Stage theta pinch experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linford, R.K.; Downing, J.N.; Gribble, R.F.; Jacobson, A.R.; Platts, D.A.; Thomas, K.S.

    1975-01-01

    The Staged Theta Pinch program is designed to study the technological and physics problems associated with producing fat plasmas and separating the implosion heating from the adiabatic compression. Several methods of implosion heating are discussed. Circuit diagrams and theoretical magnetic field behavior are described for the STP and resonant heating experiments. (MOW)

  13. Toroidal nuclear fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Yutaka; Kasahara, Tatsuo; Takizawa, Teruhiro.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To design a device so as to be formed into a large-size and to arrange ports, through which neutral particles enter, in inclined fashion. Structure: Toroidal coils are wound about vacuum vessels which are divided into plural number. In the outer periphery of the vacuum vessels, ports are disposed inclined in the peripheral direction of the vacuum vessels and communicated with the vacuum vessels, and wall surfaces opposed to the ports of the toroidal coils adjacent at least the inclined sides of the ports are inclined substantially simularly to the port wall surfaces. (Kamimura, M.)

  14. Perturbing macroscopic magnetohydrodynamic stability for toroidal plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, Kathryn J.

    We have introduced a new perturbative technique to rapidly explore the dependence of long wavelength ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities on equilibrium profiles, shaping properties, and wall parameters. Traditionally, these relations are studied with numerical parameter scans using computationally intensive stability codes. Our perturbative technique first finds the equilibrium and stability using traditional methods. Subsequent small changes in the original equilibrium parameters change the stability. We quickly find the new stability with an expansion of the energy principle, rather than with another run of the stability codes. We first semi-analytically apply the technique to the screw pinch after eliminating compressional Alfven wave effects. The screw pinch results validate the approach, but also indicate that allowable perturbations to equilibria with certain features may be restricted. Next, we extend the approach to toroidal geometry using experimental equilibria and a simple constructed equilibrium, with the ideal MHD stability code GATO. Stability properties are successfully predicted from perturbed toroidal equilibria when only the vacuum beyond the plasma is perturbed (through wall parameter variations), rather than the plasma itself. Small plasma equilibrium perturbations to both experimental and simple equilibria result in very large errors to the predicted stability, and valid results are found only over a narrow range of most perturbations. Despite the large errors produced when changing plasma parameters, the wall perturbations revealed two useful applications of this technique. Because the calculations are non-iterative matrix multiplications, the convergence issues that can disrupt a full MHD stability code are absent. Marginal stability, therefore, is much easier to find with the perturbative technique. Also, the perturbed results can be input as the initial guess for the eigenvalue for a full stability code, and improve subsequent

  15. Toroidal drift magnetic pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canobbio, E.

    1977-01-01

    A set of azimuthal coils which carry properly dephased rf-currents in the KHz frequency range can be used to heat toroidal plasmas by perpendicular Landau damping of subsonic Alfven waves. The heating mechanism and the rf-field structure are discussed in some detail

  16. Z-Pinch Fusion Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miernik, Janie

    2011-01-01

    Fusion-based nuclear propulsion has the potential to enable fast interplanetary transportation. Shorter trips are better for humans in the harmful radiation environment of deep space. Nuclear propulsion and power plants can enable high Ispand payload mass fractions because they require less fuel mass. Fusion energy research has characterized the Z-Pinch dense plasma focus method. (1) Lightning is form of pinched plasma electrical discharge phenomena. (2) Wire array Z-Pinch experiments are commonly studied and nuclear power plant configurations have been proposed. (3) Used in the field of Nuclear Weapons Effects (NWE) testing in the defense industry, nuclear weapon x-rays are simulated through Z-Pinch phenomena.

  17. Fusion with Z-pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, D.

    1998-06-01

    In the past thirty-six months, great progress has been made in x-ray production using high-current z-pinches. Today, the x-ray energy and power output of the Z accelerator (formerly PBFA-II) is the largest available in the laboratory. These z-pinch x-ray sources have the potential to drive high-yield ICF reactions at affordable cost if several challenging technical problems can be overcome. In this paper, the recent technical progress with Z-pinches will be described, and a technical strategy for achieving high-yield ICF with z-pinches will be presented

  18. Locked modes and plasma-wall interaction in a reserved-field pinch with a resistive shell and carbon first wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hokin, S.; Bergsaaker, H.; Brunsell, P.

    1999-01-01

    The Extrap-T2 reversed-field pinch has concluded operation in the OHTE RFP configuration with a resistive shell. This paper summarizes our observations and conclusions regarding wall-locked modes, dynamo activity and plasma-wall interaction with a resistive shell and graphite first wall

  19. International school of plasma physics course on instabilities and confinement in toroidal plasmas. Varenna (Italy), September 27-October 9, 1971

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-11-01

    The lectures of a Varenna Summer School about the theme Instabilities and Confinement in toroidal Plasmas are given. The topics included are: high-beta toroidal pinches, non-MHD instabilities and anomalous transport, analogy between turbulent transfer in velocity space and plasma collisioned transport in real space, the magnetohydrodynamic approach of plasma confinement in closed magnetic configurations, properties of isodynamical equilibrium configurations and their generalization, transport theory for toroidal plasmas, plasma physics, low-β toroidal machines, the neoclassical theory of transit time magnetic pumping, radio frequency heating of toroidal plasmas, plasma heating at lower hybrid frequency, RF-plasma heating with L-structures, numerical simulation, dynamical stabilization of low frequency waves in inhomogeneous plasmas, dynamic and feedback stabilization of plasmas and problems with nuclear fusion reactors

  20. Observation of Cocurrent Toroidal Rotation in the EAST Tokamak with Lower-Hybrid Current Drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Yuejiang; Xu Guosheng; Wang Fudi; Wang Mao; Fu Jia; Li Yingying; Zhang Wei; Zhang Wei; Chang Jiafeng; Lv Bo; Qian Jinping; Shan Jiafang; Liu Fukun; Ding Siye; Wan Baonian; Lee, Sang-Gon; Bitter, Manfred; Hill, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Lower-hybrid waves have been shown to induce a cocurrent change in toroidal rotation of up to 40 km/s in the L-mode plasma core region and 20 km/s in the edge of the EAST tokamak. This modification of toroidal rotation develops on different time scales. For the edge, the time scale is no more than 100 ms, but for the core the time scale is around 1 s. A simple model based on turbulent equipartition and thermoelectric pinch predicts the experimental results.

  1. Tokamak with liquid metal toroidal field coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkawa, T.; Schaffer, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    Tokamak apparatus includes a pressure vessel for defining a reservoir and confining liquid therein. A toroidal liner disposed within the pressure vessel defines a toroidal space within the liner. Liquid metal fills the reservoir outside said liner. Electric current is passed through the liquid metal over a conductive path linking the toroidal space to produce a toroidal magnetic field within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof. Toroidal plasma is developed within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof

  2. Toroidal rotation studies in KSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. G.; Lee, H. H.; Yoo, J. W.; Kim, Y. S.; Ko, W. H.; Terzolo, L.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K.; KSTAR Team

    2014-10-01

    Investigation of the toroidal rotation is one of the most important topics for the magnetically confined fusion plasma researches since it is essential for the stabilization of resistive wall modes and its shear plays an important role to improve plasma confinement by suppressing turbulent transport. The most advantage of KSTAR tokamak for toroidal rotation studies is that it equips two main diagnostics including the high-resolution X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) and charge exchange spectroscopy (CES). Simultaneous core toroidal rotation and ion temperature measurements of different impurity species from the XICS and CES have shown in reasonable agreement with various plasma discharges in KSTAR. It has been observed that the toroidal rotation in KSTAR is faster than that of other tokamak devices with similar machine size and momentum input. This may due to an intrinsically low toroidal field ripple and error field of the KSTAR device. A strong braking of the toroidal rotation by the n = 1 non-resonant magnetic perturbations (NRMPs) also indicates these low toroidal field ripple and error field. Recently, it has been found that n = 2 NRMPs can also damp the toroidal rotation in KSTAR. The detail toroidal rotation studies will be presented. Work supported by the Korea Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning under the KSTAR project.

  3. Toroidal simulation magnet tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walstrom, P.L.; Domm, T.C.

    1975-01-01

    A number of different schemes for testing superconducting coils in a simulated tokamak environment are analyzed for their merits relative to a set of test criteria. Two of the concepts are examined in more detail: the so-called cluster test scheme, which employs two large background field coils, one on either side of the test coil, and the compact torus, a low-aspect ratio toroidal array of a small number of coils in which all of the coils are essentially test coils. Simulation of the pulsed fields of the tokamak is discussed briefly

  4. Fixed boundary toroidal plasma equilibria with toroidal flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Yanqiang [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Center for Magnetic Fusion Theory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Hu, Yemin; Xiang, Nong [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Center for Magnetic Fusion Theory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2016-04-15

    The fixed boundary toroidal plasma equilibria with toroidal flows are investigated by solving the modified Grad-Shafranov equation numerically in the cylindrical coordinate system. For normal equilibrium configurations with geometry and profiles similar to usual tokamaks with no flow, it is found that the effect of flow is to lead to an outward shift of the magnetic flux surfaces, together with the profiles of pressure, and mass and current densities. The shifts could become significant when the toroidal flow Mach number exceeds 0.5. For non-conventional current profiles, even for the usual tokamak geometry, novel current reversal equilibrium configurations may result, sometimes with changed topology in the poloidal flux function. This change in the topology of plasma equilibrium can be attributed to the large toroidal flow. The computed results may correspond to situations of intense tangential injection during the low toroidal current phase in expected experimental situations.

  5. Quantum mechanics of toroidal anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanas'ev, G.N.

    1990-01-01

    We consider a toroidal solenoid with an electric charge attached to it. It turns out that statistical properties of the wave function describing interacting toroidal anions depend on both their relative position and orientation. The influence of the particular gauge choice on the exchange properties of the wave function is studied. 30 refs.; 6 figs

  6. Device for supporting a toroidal coil in a toroidal type nuclear fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitazawa, Hakaru; Sato, Hiroshi.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To easily manufacture a center block having a strength sufficient to withstand an electromagnetic force exerted on the center of toroidal of a toroidal coil and to increase its reliability. Structure: In a device for supporting toroidal coils wherein the electromagnetic force exerted on the center of toroidal of a plurality of toroidal coils arranged in toroidal fashion, the contact surface between the toroidal coil and the center block is arranged parallel to the center axis of toroidal so as to receive the electromagnetic force exerted on the center of toroidal of the toroidal coil as the component of force in a radial direction. (Taniai, N.)

  7. Toroidal plasma reactor with low external magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beklemishev, A.D.; Khayrutdinov, R.R.; Petviashvili, V.I.; Tajima, T.; Gordin, V.A.; Tajima, T.

    1991-01-01

    A toroidal pinch configuration with safety factor q < 0.5 decreasing from the center to periphery without field reversal is proposed. This is capable of containing high pressure plasma with only small toroidal external magnetic field. Sufficient conditions for magnetohydrodynamic stability are fulfilled in this configuration. The stability is studied by constructing the Lyapunov functional and investigating its extrema both analytically and numerically. Comparison of the Lyapunov stability conditions with the conventional linear theory is carried out. Stable configurations are found with average β near 15%, with magnetic field associated mainly with plasma current. The β value calculated with the external magnetic field can be over 100%. Fast charged particles produced by fusion reactions are asymmetrically confined by the poloidal magnetic field (and due to the lack of strong toroidal field). They thus generate a current in the noncentral part of plasma to reinforce the poloidal field. This current drive can sustain the monotonic decrease of q with radius. 20 refs., 9 figs

  8. Compact toroid challenge experiment with the increasing in the energy input into plasma and the level of trapped magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romadanov, I.V.; Ryzhkov, S.V., E-mail: ryzhkov@power.bmstu.ru

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Compact torus formation method with high level of magnetic flux is proposed. • A compact torus is produced in a theta-pinch-coil with pulse mode of operation. • Key feature is a pulse of current in an axial direction. • We report a level of linked magnetic flux is higher than theta-pinch results. - Abstract: The present work reports on compact toroid hydrogen plasma creation by means of a specially designed discharge system and results of magnetic fields introduction. Experiments in the compact toroid challenge (CTC) device at P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute (FIAN) have been conducted since 2005. The CTC device differs from the conventional theta-pinch formation in the use of an axial current for enhanced efficiency. We have used a novel technique to maximize the flux linked to the plasma. The purpose of this method is to increase the energy input into the plasma and the level of trapped magnetic flux using an additional toroidal magnetic field. A study of compact torus formation with axial and toroidal currents was done and a new method is proposed and implemented.

  9. Neoclassical Drift of Circulating Orbits Due toToroidal Electric Field in Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Qin; Guan, Xiaoyin; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2011-07-19

    In tokamaks, Ware pinch is a well known neoclassical effect for trapped particles in response to a toroidal electric field. It is generally believed that there exists no similar neoclassical effect for circulating particles without collisions. However, this belief is erroneous, and misses an important effect. We show both analytically and numerically that under the influence of a toroidal electric field parallel to the current, the circulating orbits drift outward toward the outer wall with a characteristic velocity O ({var_epsilon}{sup -1}) larger than the E x B velocity, where {var_epsilon} is the inverse aspect-ratio of a tokamak. During a RF overdrive, the toroidal electric field is anti-parallel to the current. As a consequence, all charged particles, including backward runaway electrons, will drift inward towards the inner wall.

  10. Neoclassical Drift of Circulating Orbits Due toToroidal Electric Field in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Hong; Guan, Xiaoyin; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2011-01-01

    In tokamaks, Ware pinch is a well known neoclassical effect for trapped particles in response to a toroidal electric field. It is generally believed that there exists no similar neoclassical effect for circulating particles without collisions. However, this belief is erroneous, and misses an important effect. We show both analytically and numerically that under the influence of a toroidal electric field parallel to the current, the circulating orbits drift outward toward the outer wall with a characteristic velocity O ((var e psilon) -1 ) larger than the E x B velocity, where (var e psilon) is the inverse aspect-ratio of a tokamak. During a RF overdrive, the toroidal electric field is anti-parallel to the current. As a consequence, all charged particles, including backward runaway electrons, will drift inward towards the inner wall.

  11. Instability of Toroidal Magnetic Field in Jets and Plerions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begelman, Mitchell C.

    1998-01-01

    Astrophysical jets and pulsar-fed supernova remnants (plerions) are expected to develop highly organized magnetic structures dominated by concentric loops of toroidal field, Bφ. It has been argued that such structures could explain the polarization properties of some jets and contribute to their lateral confinement through magnetic tension forces. A concentric toroidal field geometry is also central to the Rees-Gunn model for the Crab Nebula, the archetypal plerion, and leads to the deduction that the Crab pulsar's wind must have a weak magnetic field. Yet this kind of equilibrium between magnetic and gas pressure forces, the ``equilibrium Z-pinch'' of the controlled fusion literature, is well known to be susceptible to disruptive localized instabilities, even when the magnetic field is weak and/or boundary conditions (e.g., a dense external medium) slow or suppress global modes. Thus, the magnetic field structures imputed to the interiors of jets and plerions are unlikely to persist for very long. To determine the growth rates of Z-pinch instabilities under astrophysical conditions, I derive a dispersion relation that is valid for the relativistic fluids of which jets and plerions may be composed, in the ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) limit. The dominant instabilities are kink (m = 1) and pinch (m = 0) modes. The former generally dominate, destroying the concentric field structure and probably driving the system toward a more chaotic state in which the mean field strength is independent of radius (and in which resistive dissipation of the field may be enhanced). I estimate the timescales over which the field structure is likely to be rearranged and relate these to distances along relativistic jets and radii from the central pulsar in a plerion. I conclude that the central tenet of the Rees-Gunn model for the Crab Nebula, the existence of a concentric toroidal field well outside the pulsar wind's termination shock, is physically unrealistic. With this assumption

  12. Equivelar toroids with few flag-orbits

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, José; Montero, Antonio

    2018-01-01

    An $(n+1)$-toroid is a quotient of a tessellation of the $n$-dimensional Euclidean space with a lattice group. Toroids are generalizations of maps in the torus on higher dimensions and also provide examples of abstract polytopes. Equivelar toroids are those that are induced by regular tessellations. In this paper we present a classification of equivelar $(n+1)$-toroids with at most $n$ flag-orbits; in particular, we discuss a classification of $2$-orbit toroids of arbitrary dimension.

  13. Next generation toroidal devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Shoichi

    1998-10-01

    A general survey of the possible approach for the next generation toroidal devices was made. Either surprisingly or obviously (depending on one's view), the technical constraints along with the scientific considerations lead to a fairly limited set of systems for the most favorable approach for the next generation devices. Specifically if the magnetic field strength of 5 T or above is to be created by superconducting coils, it imposes minimum in the aspect ratio for the tokamak which is slightly higher than contemplated now for ITER design. The similar technical constraints make the minimum linear size of a stellarator large. Scientifically, it is indicated that a tokamak of 1.5 times in the linear dimension should be able to produce economically, especially if a hybrid reactor is allowed. For the next stellarator, it is strongly suggested that some kind of helical axis is necessary both for the (almost) absolute confinement of high energy particles and high stability and equilibrium beta limits. The author still favors a heliac most. Although it may not have been clearly stated in the main text, the stability afforded by the shearless layer may be exploited fully in a stellarator. (author)

  14. Equations of electron hydrodynamics in low-density pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobrova, N.A.; Sasarov, P.V.

    1990-01-01

    The equations of electron hydrodynamics that describe axisymmetric configurations with a purely toroidal magnetic field in the case when ρ He /α ei /α He , where ρ He is the gyroradius of the electrons and α is the inverse density gradient, are derived. These equations generalize the electron part of the well-known Braginskii system of equations and contain additional dissipative terms, proportional to v ei -1 , which for l ei > α are ∼(l ei /α) 2 times greater than the well-known dissipative effects. The derived system of equations can be employed to describe the later stages of the development of sausages in not very dense z-pinches and to describe the phenomena occurring in plasma switches

  15. Toroidal helical quartz forming machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanks, K.W.; Cole, T.R.

    1977-01-01

    The Scyllac fusion experimental machine used 10 cm diameter smooth bore discharge tubes formed into a simple toroidal shape prior to 1974. At about that time, it was discovered that a discharge tube was required to follow the convoluted shape of the load coil. A machine was designed and built to form a fused quartz tube with a toroidal shape. The machine will accommodate quartz tubes from 5 cm to 20 cm diameter forming it into a 4 m toroidal radius with a 1 to 5 cm helical displacement. The machine will also generate a helical shape on a linear tube. Two sets of tubes with different helical radii and wavelengths have been successfully fabricated. The problems encountered with the design and fabrication of this machine are discussed

  16. Toroidal Trivelpiece-Gould modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoessel, F.P.

    1979-01-01

    Electron plasma waves are treated in quasi-electrostatic approximation in a toroidal cavity of rectangular cross-section in an infinitely strong azimuthal magnetic field. The differential equation for the electrostatic potential, derived from fluid equations, can be separated using cylindrical coordinates. The eigenvalue problem for the radial dependence is solved numerically by a shooting method. Eigenvalues are given for different aspect ratios. Comparison with appropriate modes of the straight geometry shows that the toroidal frequencies generally lie some percent above those for the straight case. Plots of the eigenfunctions demonstrate clearly the influence of toroidicity. The deviation from symmetry (which should appear for straight geometry) depends not only on the aspect ratio but also strongly on the mode numbers. (author)

  17. On the stability limits of the Pinch-conductor current ratio in Extrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, B.

    1987-12-01

    A first attempt is made to take the special stability features of the Extrap confinement scheme into account, thereby including kinetic large Larmor radius (LLR) effects. This approach predicts Extrap to be unstable outside a domain defined by a lower and an upper ratio a - /a x is related to the ratio J p /J v between the pinch current J p and the conductor current J v . Stability within the predicted domain seems to agree with so far performed linear and toroidal experiments, and can explain the observed increase in J p /J v and in the plasma temperature, in terms of an increased ratio a - /a x . According to present analysis, an optimum value of the conductor current J v should further exist with respect to pinch equilibrium and stability, as given by the condition a - approx = a x . (author)

  18. The complex and unique ATLAS Toroid family

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Big parts for the toroid magnets that will be used in the ATLAS experiment have been continuously arriving at CERN since March. These structures will create the largest superconducting toroid magnet ever.

  19. Toroidal and poloidal momentum transport studies in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tala, T [Association EURATOM-Tekes, VTT, PO Box 1000, FIN-02044 VTT (Finland); Crombe, K [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University (Belgium); Vries, P C de [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Oxon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)] (and others)

    2007-12-15

    The present status of understanding of toroidal and poloidal momentum transport in tokamaks is presented in this paper. Similar energy confinement and momentum confinement times, i.e. {tau}{sub E}/{tau}{sub {phi}} {approx} 1 have been reported on several tokamaks. It is more important though, to study the local transport both in the core and edge plasma separately as, for example, in the core plasma, a large scatter in the ratio of the local effective momentum diffusivity to the ion heat diffusivity {chi}{sub {phi}}{sub eff}/{chi}{sub i,eff} among different tokamaks can be found. For example, the value of effective Prandtl number is typically around {chi}{sub {phi}}{sub eff}/{chi}{sub i,eff} {approx} 0.2 on JET while still {tau}{sub E}/{tau}{sub {phi}} {approx} 1 holds. Perturbative NBI modulation experiments on JET have shown, however, that a Prandtl number {chi}{sub {phi}}{sub /}{chi}{sub i} of around 1 is valid if there is an additional, significant inward momentum pinch which is required to explain the amplitude and phase behaviour of the momentum perturbation. The experimental results, i.e. the high Prandtl number and pinch, are in good qualitative and to some extent also in quantitative agreement with linear gyro-kinetic simulations. In contrast to the toroidal momentum transport which is clearly anomalous, the poloidal velocity is usually believed to be neo-classical. However, experimental measurements on JET show that the carbon poloidal velocity can be an order of magnitude above the predicted value by the neo-classical theory within the ITB. These large measured poloidal velocities, employed for example in transport simulations, significantly affect the calculated radial electric field and therefore the E x B flow shear and hence modify and can significantly improve the simulation predictions. Several fluid turbulence codes have been used to identify the mechanism driving the poloidal velocity to such high values. CUTIE and TRB turbulence codes and also

  20. Toroidal and poloidal momentum transport studies in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tala, T.; Crombé, K.; de Vries, P. C.; Ferreira, J.; Mantica, P.; Peeters, A. G.; Andrew, Y.; Budny, R.; Corrigan, G.; Eriksson, A.; Garbet, X.; Giroud, C.; Hua, M.-D.; Nordman, H.; Naulin, V.; Nave, M. F. F.; Parail, V.; Rantamäki, K.; Scott, B. D.; Strand, P.; Tardini, G.; Thyagaraja, A.; Weiland, J.; Zastrow, K.-D.; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2007-12-01

    The present status of understanding of toroidal and poloidal momentum transport in tokamaks is presented in this paper. Similar energy confinement and momentum confinement times, i.e. τE/τphi ≈ 1 have been reported on several tokamaks. It is more important though, to study the local transport both in the core and edge plasma separately as, for example, in the core plasma, a large scatter in the ratio of the local effective momentum diffusivity to the ion heat diffusivity χphieff/χi,eff among different tokamaks can be found. For example, the value of effective Prandtl number is typically around χphieff/χi,eff ≈ 0.2 on JET while still τE/τphi ≈ 1 holds. Perturbative NBI modulation experiments on JET have shown, however, that a Prandtl number χphi/χi of around 1 is valid if there is an additional, significant inward momentum pinch which is required to explain the amplitude and phase behaviour of the momentum perturbation. The experimental results, i.e. the high Prandtl number and pinch, are in good qualitative and to some extent also in quantitative agreement with linear gyro-kinetic simulations. In contrast to the toroidal momentum transport which is clearly anomalous, the poloidal velocity is usually believed to be neo-classical. However, experimental measurements on JET show that the carbon poloidal velocity can be an order of magnitude above the predicted value by the neo-classical theory within the ITB. These large measured poloidal velocities, employed for example in transport simulations, significantly affect the calculated radial electric field and therefore the E × B flow shear and hence modify and can significantly improve the simulation predictions. Several fluid turbulence codes have been used to identify the mechanism driving the poloidal velocity to such high values. CUTIE and TRB turbulence codes and also the Weiland model predict the existence of an anomalous poloidal velocity, peaking in the vicinity of the ITB and driven dominantly

  1. Eigenvalue pinching on spinc manifolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Saskia

    2017-02-01

    We derive various pinching results for small Dirac eigenvalues using the classification of spinc and spin manifolds admitting nontrivial Killing spinors. For this, we introduce a notion of convergence for spinc manifolds which involves a general study on convergence of Riemannian manifolds with a principal S1-bundle. We also analyze the relation between the regularity of the Riemannian metric and the regularity of the curvature of the associated principal S1-bundle on spinc manifolds with Killing spinors.

  2. Lowering the first ATLAS toroid

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The ATLAS detector on the LHC at CERN will consist of eight toroid magnets, the first of which was lowered into the cavern in these images on 26 October 2004. The coils are supported on platforms where they will be attached to form a giant torus. The platforms will hold about 300 tonnes of ATLAS' muon chambers and will envelop the inner detectors.

  3. RF breakdown by toroidal helicons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Bounded whistlers are well-known for their efficient plasma production capabilities in thin cylindrical tubes. In this paper we shall present their radio frequency (RF) breakdown and discharge sustaining capabilities in toroidal systems. Pulsed RF power in the electronmagnetohy- drodynamic (EMHD) frequency ...

  4. RF breakdown by toroidal helicons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bounded whistlers are well-known for their efficient plasma production capabilities in thin cylindrical tubes. In this paper we shall present their radio frequency (RF) breakdown and discharge sustaining capabilities in toroidal systems. Pulsed RF power in the electronmagnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) frequency regime is fed to ...

  5. Onsager relaxation of toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samain, A.; Nguyen, F.

    1997-01-01

    The slow relaxation of isolated toroidal plasmas towards their thermodynamical equilibrium is studied in an Onsager framework based on the entropy metric. The basic tool is a variational principle, equivalent to the kinetic equation, involving the profiles of density, temperature, electric potential, electric current. New minimization procedures are proposed to obtain entropy and entropy production rate functionals. (author)

  6. Collapse analysis of toroidal shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomares, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a study performed to determine the collapse characteristics of a toroidal shell using finite element method (FEM) analysis. The study also included free drop testing of a quarter scale prototype to verify the analytical results. The full sized toroidal shell has a 24-inch toroidal diameter with a 24-inch tubal diameter. The shell material is type 304 strainless steel. The toroidal shell is part of the GE Model 2000 transportation packaging, and acts as an energy absorbing device. The analyses performed were on a full sized and quarter scaled models. The finite element program used in all analyses was the LIBRA code. The analytical procedure used both the elasto-plastic and large displacement options within the code. The loading applied in the analyses corresponded to an impact of an infinite rigid plane oriented normal to the drop direction vector. The application of the loading continued incrementally until the work performed by the deforming structure equalled the kinetic energy developed in the free fall. The comparison of analysis and test results showed a good correlation

  7. Hybrid winding concept for toroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Henrik; Andersen, Thomas; Knott, Arnold

    2013-01-01

    and placement machinery. This opens up the possibility for both an automated manufacturing process and an automated production process of toroidal magnetics such as power inductors, filtering inductors, air core inductors, transformers etc. Both the proposed hybrid and the common wire wound winding...

  8. Z-Pinch Fusion for Energy Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SPIELMAN,RICK B.

    2000-01-01

    Z pinches, the oldest fusion concept, have recently been revisited in light of significant advances in the fields of plasma physics and pulsed power engineering. The possibility exists for z-pinch fusion to play a role in commercial energy applications. We report on work to develop z-pinch fusion concepts, the result of an extensive literature search, and the output for a congressionally-mandated workshop on fusion energy held in Snowmass, Co July 11-23,1999.

  9. Z-Pinch Fusion for Energy Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SPIELMAN, RICK B.

    2000-01-01

    Z pinches, the oldest fusion concept, have recently been revisited in light of significant advances in the fields of plasma physics and pulsed power engineering. The possibility exists for z-pinch fusion to play a role in commercial energy applications. We report on work to develop z-pinch fusion concepts, the result of an extensive literature search, and the output for a congressionally-mandated workshop on fusion energy held in Snowmass, Co July 11-23,1999

  10. Global kink and ballooning modes in high-beta systems and stability of toroidal drift modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvao, R.M.O.; Goedbloed, J.P.; Rem, J.; Sakanaka, P.H.; Schep, T.J.; Venema, M.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical code (HBT) has been developed which solves for the equilibrium, global stability and high-n stability of plasmas with arbitrary cross-section. Various plasmas are analysed for their stability to these modes in the high-beta limit. Screw-pinch equilibria are stable to high-n ballooning modes up to betas of 18%. The eigenmode equation for drift waves is analysed numerically. The toroidal branch is shown to be destabilized by the non-adiabatic response of trapped and circulating particles. (author)

  11. Nonlinear stage of Z-pinch instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garanin, S.F.; Chernyshev, Yu.D.

    1987-01-01

    Nonlinear development of MHD instability of constriction type for Z-pinch with completely skinned current is considered. The two-dimensional numerical calculations of the constriction show that its development enters the stage described by automodel solution, when the constriction length is fixed and plasma compression takes place in an isentropic way. At the perturbation wave length small, as compared with pinch radius, the stage is preceded by a stage reduced to nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor instability. For that case dynamics of the motion of magnetic field ''bubbles'' and plasma ''jets'' is considered. It is shown that plasma jets escaping from the pinch region do not close the pinch from current source

  12. Gas embedded Z-pinch dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto N, Leopoldo A.

    1993-09-01

    An experimental study of the dynamics of a gas embedded Z-pinch discharge is presented. The experiments have been carried out using a pulse power generator capable of delivering d I/d t > 10 12 A/s (GEPOPU, 300 kV, 1.5Ω, 120 ns double transient time). Different preionization schemes are used: laser or micro discharge initiation. The results obtained lead to the proposal of a new configuration, a double column pinch. Discharges in H and He at 1/6, 1/3 1 atm were performed. The diagnostics used included: electrical monitors, holography and multi frame holographic interferometry, from which, voltage, current, electron density profile, line density and pinch radius are obtained, all with temporal resolution. The laser initiated results shows that the pinch expands continuously during ∼ 40 ns, ant it evolves into a helical structure through a m=1 instability. In the micro discharge initiated case continuous expansion without is observed. The double column pinch produces a gas embedded compressional Z-pinch, in which the electron density at the axis increases with time. No significant radial expansion or macroscopic instabilities are observed. A 0-D model of a Z-pinch with variable line density is presented in order to discuss the radial evolution. Bennet temperature, internal pinch structure and stability are also analyzed. Stability is discussed using a Universal Diagram for Z-pinch Stability Regimes. The experimental data are plotted as trajectories in this diagram. (author)

  13. Classification of symmetric toroidal orbifolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Maximilian; Ratz, Michael; Torrado, Jesus [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Department; Vaudrevange, Patrick K.S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    We provide a complete classification of six-dimensional symmetric toroidal orbifolds which yield N{>=}1 supersymmetry in 4D for the heterotic string. Our strategy is based on a classification of crystallographic space groups in six dimensions. We find in total 520 inequivalent toroidal orbifolds, 162 of them with Abelian point groups such as Z{sub 3}, Z{sub 4}, Z{sub 6}-I etc. and 358 with non-Abelian point groups such as S{sub 3}, D{sub 4}, A{sub 4} etc. We also briefly explore the properties of some orbifolds with Abelian point groups and N=1, i.e. specify the Hodge numbers and comment on the possible mechanisms (local or non-local) of gauge symmetry breaking.

  14. Experimental studies of compact toroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The Berkeley Compact Toroid Experiment (BCTX) device is a plasma device with a Marshall-gun generated, low aspect ratio toroidal plasma. The device is capable of producing spheromak-type discharges and may, with some modification, produce low-aspect ratio tokamak configurations. A unique aspect of this experimenal devie is its large lower hybrid (LH) heating system, which consists of two 450MHz klystron tubes generating 20 megawatts each into a brambilla-type launching structure. Successful operation with one klystron at virtually full power (18 MW) has been accomplished with 110 μs pulse length. A second klystron is currently installed in its socket and magnet but has not been added to the RF drive system. This report describes current activities and accomplishments and describes the anticipated results of next year's activity

  15. Transporting the first ATLAS toroid

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The first coil for the ATLAS toroid magnet is transported from its assembly hall at the CERN Meyrin site to the storage hall above the ATLAS cavern. This involves driving the massive transportation vehicle first through the Meyrin site and then across a main road only metres from the France-Swiss border. Eight magnets in total will be transported in this way before being lowered into the experimental cavern where they will be mounted in a huge ring surrounding the detector.

  16. Lower pinch radius limit in EXTRAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, B.

    1989-01-01

    In an Extrap pinch there is a superimposed magnetic octupole field which forms a magnetic separatrix with the field generated by the pinch current. Earlier experiments have shown that the octupole field has a stabilizing influence on the plasma. Regardless of the details of this stabilizing mechanism, it is expected that the influence of the octupole field should become negligible for a sufficiently small ratio between the characteristic pinch and separatrix radii. In other words, there should exist a lower limit of this ratio below which the system approaches the state of an ordinary unstabilized Z-pinch. The present paper presents an extended version of an earlier theoretical model of this lower limit, and its relation to the corresponding critical ratio between the external conductor and pinch currents. This ratio is found to vary substantially with the plasma parameters. (authors)

  17. Plasma sheath dynamics in pinch discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansour, A.A.Abd-Fattah

    1995-01-01

    The main interest of the study was to understand the dynamic and to determine the plasma parameters in the 3.5 meter θ-pinch discharge. The 3.5 meter thetatron plasma device has been reconstructed and developed which consist of four capacitor banks: a) Main pinch capacitor bank, (θ-pinch bank) consists of 40 capacitors connected in parallel each of 1.5 μ F., with maximum energy equal to 48 k Joule. b) Preionization capacitor bank (z-pinch) consists of capacitors connected in series each of 1.5μ F., with maximum energy to 0.94 k Joule. c) Bias field bank consists of 4 capacitors connected in parallel each of 38μ F., with maximum energy equal to 4.46 k Joule. d) Screw pinch capacitor bank consists of 5 capacitors connected in parallel each of 1.5μ F., with maximum energy equal to 6 k Joule

  18. Next-Step scientific objectives, targets, and parameters for reversed-field-pinch (RFP) magnetic fusion energy (MFE) systems: Preliminary thoughts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; DiMarco, J.N.; Miller, R.L.; Werley, K.A.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this document is the quantitative definition of objectives, targets, and parameters of the Next-Step device to follow the present RFX experiment; this device is given the name RFXNS. Although developed over five years ago, much of the material distilled into the 1988 RFP tactical plan is useful in establishing the goals and parameters of RFXNS. This earlier plan established tentative parameters of an RFP next step based on: predictions of RFP ignition and commercial-reactor devices; and the assumed successful operation of highly complementary RFP experiments RFX and ZTH/CPRF. Programmatic changes and evolution that have occurred since 1988 strongly impact the role and characteristics of an RFXNS: the Los Alamos ZTH/CPRF project and fusion program was terminated in mid-construction for reasons of MFE cost savings and concept focusing; great progress has been made in launching ITER; and reactor projections for the tokamak have increased in detail and variety, but not in commercial promise and competitiveness. A brief status of and perspective from each of the above three points is necessary before the key issues and their implementation to form the basis of the RFXNS definition are given

  19. Heating of toroidal plasmas by neutral injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stix, T.H.

    1971-08-01

    This paper presents a brief review of the physics of ion acceleration, charge exchange and ionization, trajectories for fast ions in toroidal magnetic fields, and fast-ion thermalization. The injection of fast atoms is found to be a highly competitive method both for heating present-day experimental toroidal plasmas and for bringing full-scale toroidal CTR plasmas to low-density ignition. 13 refs., 9 figs

  20. Upper pinch radius limit in EXTRAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, B.

    1989-12-01

    A simple static equilibrium model of the Z-pinch is considered where a hot plasma core is surrounded by a cold-mantle (gas blanket). The pinch radius, defined as the radial extension of the fully ionized plasma core, is uniquely determined by the plasma particle. momentum and heat balance equations. In Extrap configurations an octupole field is introduced which imposes a magnetic separatrix on Z-pinch geometry. This makes the conditions for Extrap equilibrium 'overdetermined' when the characteristic pinch radium given by the plasma parameters tends to exceed the characteristic radius of the magnetic separatrix. In this case no conventional pinch equilibrium can exist, and part of the current which is forced into the plasma discharge by external sources must be channelled outside of the separatrix, i.e. into the surrounding support structure of the Extrap conductors and the vessel walls. A possibly existing bootstrap current in the plasma boundary layer is further expected to be 'scraped off' in this case. The present paper gives some illustrations of the marginal case of this upper pinch radius limit, in a state where the pinch current is antiparallel to the external rod currents which generate the octupole field. (authors)

  1. History of the Z-pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovberg, R.H.

    1988-01-01

    The plasma Z-Pinch occupies a unique position in the history of controlled fusion research as the first confinement and heating scheme to be tried experimentally. In contrast to the sophistication of programs being conducted today, in which extensive theoretical and experimental forces are in close collaboration, early pinch experiments were designed on quite elementary theoretical grounds. Indeed, these systems and the results from them provided the focus for much of the rapid development of theoretical plasma physics and magnetohydrodynamics during the 1950's. In comparison to present programs, these early experiments had the considerable advantage of small size and minimal managerial encumbrance. After nearly three decades of abandonment because of difficulties with MHD instabilities, the Z-pinch is arising once again in a new incarnation characterized by microscopic size and time scales, and very high density. Uniquely in the history of the pinch, the new experimental surprises seem encouraging, rather than discouraging, to the goal of thermonuclear fusion

  2. Fast Dump of the ATLAS Toroids

    CERN Document Server

    Dudarev, A; Volpini, Giovanni; Dudarev, Alexey; Kate, Herman Ten

    2010-01-01

    The toroidal magnet system of the ATLAS Detector at CERN consists of a Barrel Toroid (BT) and two End Cap Toroids (ECT-A and ECT-C). Each toroid is built up from eight racetrack coils wound with an aluminum stabilized NbTi conductor and indirectly cooled by forced flow liquid helium. The three toroids operate in series at 20.5 kA with a total stored energy of 1.5 GJ. In order to verify the reliability and effectiveness of the quench protection system, series of fast dump tests have been performed first of the single toroids and finally of the entire toroidal magnet system. In this paper a model to simulate the fast dump of the ATLAS toroids in single mode operation and in full system configuration is presented. The model is validated through comparison with measured data extracted from the ramp-and-quench runs. The calculated energy dissipation in the various coils is in very good agreement (within 1-2\\%) with the enthalpy changes estimated from the temperature measurements of the different parts of the cold ...

  3. Electrostatics of a Family of Conducting Toroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekner, John

    2009-01-01

    An exact solution is found for the electrostatic potential of a family of conducting charged toroids. The toroids are characterized by two lengths "a" and "b", with "a" greater than or equal to "2b". They are closed, with no hole in the "doughnut". The results are obtained by considering the potential of two equal charges, displaced from the…

  4. Toroidal effects on drift wave turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeBrun, M.J.; Tajima, T.; Gray, M.G.; Furnish, G.; Horton, W.

    1992-09-23

    The universal drift instability and other drift instabilities driven by density and temperature gradients in a toroidal system are investigated in both linear and nonlinear regimes via particle simulation. Runs in toroidal and cylindrical geometry show dramatic differences in plasma behavior, primarily due to the toroidicity-induced coupling of rational surfaces through the poloidal mode number m. In the toroidal system studied, the eigenmodes are seen to possess (i) an elongated, nearly global radial extent (ii) a higher growth rate than in the corresponding cylindrical system, (iii) an eigenfrequency nearly constant with radius, (iv) a global temperature relaxation and enhancement of thermal heat conduction. Most importantly, the measured Xi shows an increase with radius and an absolute value on the order of that observed in experiment. On the basis of our observations, we argue that the increase in Xi with radius observed in experiment is caused by the global nature of heat convection in the presence of toroidicity-induced mode coupling.

  5. The physics of fast Z pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryutov, D.D.; Derzon, M.S.; Matzen, M.K.

    1998-07-01

    The spectacular progress made during the last few years in reaching high energy densities in fast implosions of annular current sheaths (fast Z pinches) opens new possibilities for a broad spectrum of experiments, from x-ray generation to controlled thermonuclear fusion and astrophysics. Presently Z pinches are the most intense laboratory X ray sources (1.8 MJ in 5 ns from a volume 2 mm in diameter and 2 cm tall). Powers in excess of 200 TW have been obtained. This warrants summarizes the present knowledge of physics that governs the behavior of radiating current-carrying plasma in fast Z-pinches. This survey covers essentially all aspects of the physics of fast Z pinches: initiation, instabilities of the early stage, magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the implosion phase, formation of a transient quasi-equilibrium near the stagnation point, and rebound. Considerable attention is paid to the analysis of hydrodynamic instabilities governing the implosion symmetry. Possible ways of mitigating these instabilities are discussed. Non-magnetohydrodynamic effects (anomalous resistivity, generation of particle beams, etc.) are summarized. Various applications of fast Z pinches are briefly described. Scaling laws governing development of more powerful Z pinches are presented. The survey contains 52 figures and nearly 300 references

  6. The physics of fast Z pinches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryutov, D.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Derzon, M.S.; Matzen, M.K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-07-01

    The spectacular progress made during the last few years in reaching high energy densities in fast implosions of annular current sheaths (fast Z pinches) opens new possibilities for a broad spectrum of experiments, from x-ray generation to controlled thermonuclear fusion and astrophysics. Presently Z pinches are the most intense laboratory X ray sources (1.8 MJ in 5 ns from a volume 2 mm in diameter and 2 cm tall). Powers in excess of 200 TW have been obtained. This warrants summarizes the present knowledge of physics that governs the behavior of radiating current-carrying plasma in fast Z-pinches. This survey covers essentially all aspects of the physics of fast Z pinches: initiation, instabilities of the early stage, magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the implosion phase, formation of a transient quasi-equilibrium near the stagnation point, and rebound. Considerable attention is paid to the analysis of hydrodynamic instabilities governing the implosion symmetry. Possible ways of mitigating these instabilities are discussed. Non-magnetohydrodynamic effects (anomalous resistivity, generation of particle beams, etc.) are summarized. Various applications of fast Z pinches are briefly described. Scaling laws governing development of more powerful Z pinches are presented. The survey contains 52 figures and nearly 300 references.

  7. The Physics of Fast Z Pinches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RYUTOV,D.D.; DERZON,MARK S.; MATZEN,M. KEITH

    1999-10-25

    The spectacular progress made during the last few years in reaching high energy densities in fast implosions of annular current sheaths (fast Z pinches) opens new possibilities for a broad spectrum of experiments, from x-ray generation to controlled thermonuclear fusion and astrophysics. Presently Z pinches are the most intense laboratory X ray sources (1.8 MJ in 5 ns from a volume 2 mm in diameter and 2 cm tall). Powers in excess of 200 TW have been obtained. This warrants summarizing the present knowledge of physics that governs the behavior of radiating current-carrying plasma in fast Z pinches. This survey covers essentially all aspects of the physics of fast Z pinches: initiation, instabilities of the early stage, magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the implosion phase, formation of a transient quasi-equilibrium near the stagnation point, and rebound. Considerable attention is paid to the analysis of hydrodynamic instabilities governing the implosion symmetry. Possible ways of mitigating these instabilities are discussed. Non-magnetohydrodynamic effects (anomalous resistivity, generation of particle beams, etc.) are summarized. Various applications of fast Z pinches are briefly described. Scaling laws governing development of more powerful Z pinches are presented. The survey contains 36 figures and more than 300 references.

  8. Development of Toroidal Core Transformers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Leon, Francisco [New York Univ. (NYU), Brooklyn, NY (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    2014-08-01

    The original objective of this project was to design, build and test a few prototypes of single-phase dry-type distribution transformers of 25 kVA, 2.4 kV primary to 120 V transformers using cores made of a continuous steel strip shaped like a doughnut (toroid). At different points during the development of the project, the scope was enhanced to include the more practical case of a 25 kVA transformer for a 13.8 kV primary system voltage. Later, the scope was further expanded to design and build a 50 kVA unit to transformer voltage from 7.62 kV to 2x120 V. This is a common transformer used by Con Edison of New York and they are willing to test it in the field. The project officially started in September 2009 and ended in May 2014. The progress was reported periodically to DOE in eighteen quarterly reports. A Continuation Application was submitted to DOE in June 2010. In May 2011 we have requested a non-cost extension of the project. In December 2011, the Statement of Project Objectives (SOPO) was updated to reflect the real conditions and situation of the project as of 2011. A second Continuation Application was made and funding was approved in 2013 by DOE and the end date was extended to May 2014. The technical challenges that were overcome in this project include: the development of the technology to pass the impulse tests, derive a model for the thermal performance, produce a sound mechanical design, and estimate the inrush current. However, the greatest challenge that we faced during the development of the project was the complications of procuring the necessary parts and materials to build the transformers. The actual manufacturing process is relatively fast, but getting all parts together is a very lengthy process. The main products of this project are two prototypes of toroidal distribution transformers of 7.62 kV (to be used in a 13.8 kV system) to 2x120 V secondary (standard utilization voltage); one is rated at 25 kVA and the other at 50 kVA. The 25 k

  9. Ballooning modes or Fourier modes in a toroidal plasma?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, J.W.; Taylor, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    The relationship between two different descriptions of eigenmodes in a torus is investigated. In one the eigenmodes are similar to Fourier modes in a cylinder and are highly localized near a particular rational surface. In the other they are the so-called ballooning modes that extend over many rational surfaces. Using a model that represents both drift waves and resistive interchanges the transition from one of these structures to the other is investigated. In this simplified model the transition depends on a single parameter which embodies the competition between toroidal coupling of Fourier modes (which enhances ballooning) and variation in frequency of Fourier modes from one rational surface to another (which diminishes ballooning). As the coupling is increased each Fourier mode acquires a sideband on an adjacent rational surface and these sidebands then expand across the radius to form the extended mode described by the conventional ballooning mode approximation. This analysis shows that the ballooning approximation is appropriate for drift waves in a tokamak but not for resistive interchanges in a pinch. In the latter the conventional ballooning effect is negligible but they may nevertheless show a ballooning feature. This is localized near the same rational surface as the primary Fourier mode and so does not lead to a radially extended structure

  10. Quasistatic evolution of compact toroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sgro, A.G.; Spencer, R.L.; Lilliequist, C.

    1981-01-01

    Some results are presented of simulations of the post formation evolution of compact toroids. The simulations were performed with a 1-1/2 D transport code. Such a code makes explicit use of the fact that the shapes of the flux surfaces in the plasma change much more slowly than do the profiles of the physical variables across the flux surfaces. Consequently, assuming that the thermodynamic variables are always equilibrated on a flux surface, one may calculate the time evolution of these profiles as a function of a single variable that labels the flux surfaces. Occasionally, during the calculation these profiles are used to invert the equilibrium equation to update the shapes of the flux surfaces. In turn, these shapes imply certain geometric cofficients, such as A = 2 >, which contain the geometric information required by the 1-D equations

  11. Structure of the radial electric field and toroidal/poloidal flow in high temperature toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, Katsumi

    2001-01-01

    The structure of the radial electric field and toroidal/poloidal flow is discussed for the high temperature plasma in toroidal systems, tokamak and Heliotron type magnetic configurations. The spontaneous toroidal and poloidal flows are observed in the plasma with improved confinement. The radial electric field is mainly determined by the poloidal flow, because the contribution of toroidal flow to the radial electric field is small. The jump of radial electric field and poloidal flow are commonly observed near the plasma edge in the so-called high confinement mode (H-mode) plasmas in tokamaks and electron root plasma in stellarators including Heliotrons. In general the toroidal flow is driven by the momentum input from neutral beam injected toroidally. There is toroidal flow not driven by neutral beam in the plasma and it will be more significant in the plasma with large electric field. The direction of these spontaneous toroidal flows depends on the symmetry of magnetic field. The spontaneous toroidal flow driven by the ion temperature gradient is in the direction to increase the negative radial electric field in tokamak. The direction of spontaneous toroidal flow in Heliotron plasmas is opposite to that in tokamak plasma because of the helicity of symmetry of the magnetic field configuration. (author)

  12. Numerical determination of axisymmetric toroidal magnetohydrodynamic equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.L.; Dalhed, H.E.; Greene, J.M.

    1978-07-01

    Numerical schemes for the determination of stationary axisymmetric toroidal equilibria appropriate for modeling real experimental devices are given. Iterative schemes are used to solve the elliptic nonlinear partial differential equation for the poloidal flux function psi. The principal emphasis is on solving the free boundary (plasma-vacuum interface) equilibrium problem where external current-carrying toroidal coils support the plasma column, but fixed boundary (e.g., conducting shell) cases are also included. The toroidal current distribution is given by specifying the pressure and either the poloidal current or the safety factor profiles as functions of psi. Examples of the application of the codes to tokamak design at PPPL are given

  13. Toroidal field ripple effects in large tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckan, N.A.; Tsang, K.T.; Callen, J.D.

    1975-01-01

    In an experimental power reactor, the ripple produced by the finite number of toroidal field coils destroys the ideal axisymmetry of the configuration and is responsible for additional particle trapping, loss regions and plasma transport. The effects of toroidal field ripple on the plasma transport coefficient, the loss of alpha particles and energetic injection ions, and the relaxation of toroidal flows are investigated in a new and systematic way. The relevant results are applied to the ORNL-EPR reference design; the maximum ripple there of about 2.2 percent at the outer edge of the plasma column is found to be tolerable from plasma physics considerations

  14. Rotating bubble and toroidal nuclei and fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royer, G.; Haddad, F.; Jouault, B.

    1995-01-01

    The energy of rotating bubble and toroidal nuclei predicted to be formed in central heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies is calculated within the generalized rotating liquid drop model. The potential barriers standing in these exotic deformation paths are compared with the three dimensional and plane fragmentation barriers. In the toroidal deformation path of the heaviest systems exists a large potential pocket localised below the plane fragmentation barriers. This might allow the temporary survival of heavy nuclear toroids before the final clusterization induced by the surface and proximity tension. (author)

  15. Plasma and current structures in dynamical pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butov, I.Ya.; Matveev, Yu.V.

    1981-01-01

    Dynamics of plasma layers and current structure in aZ-pinch device has been experimentally investigated. It is found that shaping of a main current envelope is ended with its explosion-like expansion, the pinch decaying after compression to separated current filaments. It is also shown that filling of a region outside the pinch with plasma and currents alternating in directions occurs owing to interaction of current loops (inductions) formed in a magnetic piston during its compression with reflected shock wave. Current circulating in the loops sometimes exceeds 1.5-2 times the current of discharge circuit. The phenomena noted appear during development of superheat instability and can be realized, for example, in theta-pinches, plasma focuses, tokamaks. The experiments were carried out at the Dynamic Zeta-pinch device at an energy reserse of up to 15 kJ (V 0 =24 kV) in a capacitor bank. Half-period of the discharge current is 9 μs; Isub(max)=3.5x10sup(5) A. Back current guide surrounding a china chamber of 28 cm diameter and 50 cm length is made in the form of a hollow cylinder. Initial chamber vacuum is 10 -6 torr [ru

  16. Influence of toroidal rotation on tearing modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Huishan; Cao, Jintao; Li, Ding

    2017-10-01

    Tearing modes stability analysis including toroidal rotation is studied. It is found that rotation affects the stability of tearing modes mainly through the interaction with resistive inner region of tearing mode. The coupling of magnetic curvature with centrifugal force and Coriolis force provides a perturbed perpendicular current, and a return parallel current is induced to affect the stability of tearing modes. Toroidal rotation plays a stable role, which depends on the magnitude of Mach number and adiabatic index Γ, and is independent on the direction of toroidal rotation. For Γ >1, the scaling of growth rate is changed for typical Mach number in present tokamaks. For Γ = 1 , the scaling keeps unchanged, and the effect of toroidal rotation is much less significant, compared with that for Γ >1. National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program and National Science Foundation of China under Grants No. 2014GB106004, No. 2013GB111000, No. 11375189, No. 11075161 and No. 11275260, and Youth Innovation Promotion Association CAS.

  17. Steady state compact toroidal plasma production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, William C.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus and method for maintaining steady state compact toroidal plasmas. A compact toroidal plasma is formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun and held in close proximity to the gun electrodes by applied magnetic fields or magnetic fields produced by image currents in conducting walls. Voltage supply means maintains a constant potential across the electrodes producing an increasing magnetic helicity which drives the plasma away from a minimum energy state. The plasma globally relaxes to a new minimum energy state, conserving helicity according to Taylor's relaxation hypothesis, and injecting net helicity into the core of the compact toroidal plasma. Controlling the voltage so as to inject net helicity at a predetermined rate based on dissipative processes maintains or increases the compact toroidal plasma in a time averaged steady state mode.

  18. Bow-shaped toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonanos, P.

    1981-05-01

    Design features of Bow-Shaped Toroidal Field Coils are described and compared with circular and D shaped coils. The results indicate that bow coils can produce higher field strengths, store more energy and be made demountable. The design offers the potential for the production of ultrahigh toroidal fields. Included are representative coil shapes and their engineering properties, a suggested structural design and an analysis of a specific case

  19. Relationships between solid spherical and toroidal harmonics

    OpenAIRE

    Majic, Matt; Ru, Eric C. Le

    2018-01-01

    We derive new relationships expressing solid spherical harmonics as series of toroidal harmonics and vice versa. The expansions include regular and irregular spherical harmonics, ring and axial toroidal harmonics of even and odd parity about the plane of the torus. The expansion coefficients are given in terms of a recurrence relation. As an example application we apply one of the expansions to express the potential of a charged conducting torus on a basis of spherical harmonics.

  20. Low-n shear Alfven spectra in axisymmetric toroidal plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, C.Z.; Chance, M.S.

    1985-11-01

    In toroidal plasmas, the toroidal magnetic field is nonuniform over a magnetic surface and causes coupling of different poloidal harmonics. It is shown both analytically and numerically that the toroidicity not only breaks up the shear Alfven continuous spectrum, but also creates new, discrete, toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes with frequencies inside the continuum gaps. Potential applications of the low-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes on plasma heating and instabilities are addressed. 17 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Low-n shear Alfven spectra in axisymmetric toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.Z.; Chance, M.S.

    1985-11-01

    In toroidal plasmas, the toroidal magnetic field is nonuniform over a magnetic surface and causes coupling of different poloidal harmonics. It is shown both analytically and numerically that the toroidicity not only breaks up the shear Alfven continuous spectrum, but also creates new, discrete, toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes with frequencies inside the continuum gaps. Potential applications of the low-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes on plasma heating and instabilities are addressed. 17 refs., 4 figs

  2. Breakeven Fusion in Staged Z Pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Hafiz; Ney, Paul; Rostoker, Norman; Wessel, Frank

    2008-03-01

    We are studying the prospect for breakeven thermonuclear fusion considering a Mega joule (MJ) class, 100 ns, impulse generator using a modified version of MACH2, a 2-1/2 D, radiation-code. The load is a cylindrical, xenon plasma shell that implodes radially onto a co-axial, deuterium-tritium plasma target. Optimized plasma density and pinch radius lead to a fusion-energy output that is many times the stored capacitor bank energy. In this ``Staged Z-pinch'' shock fronts form that preheat the DT plasma to several hundred eV, before adiabatic compression. During compression, the Xe liner becomes Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) unstable while the DT target remains stable. Proper selection of the initial pinch radius and plasma density is crucial for optimum implosion efficiency.

  3. Depletion zones and crystallography on pinched spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingyuan; Xing, Xiangjun; Yao, Zhenwei

    2018-03-01

    Understanding the interplay between ordered structures and substrate curvature is an interesting problem with versatile applications, including functionalization of charged supramolecular surfaces and modern microfluidic technologies. In this work, we investigate the two-dimensional packing structures of charged particles confined on a pinched sphere. By continuously pinching the sphere, we observe cleavage of elongated scars into pleats, proliferation of disclinations, and subsequently, emergence of a depletion zone at the negatively curved waist that is completely void of particles. We systematically study the geometrics and energetics of the depletion zone, and reveal its physical origin as a finite size effect, due to the interplay between Coulomb repulsion and concave geometry of the pinched sphere. These results further our understanding of crystallography on curved surfaces, and have implications in design and manipulation of charged, deformable interfaces in various applications.

  4. Measurements of high-current electron beams from X pinches and wire array Z pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shelkovenko, T. A.; Pikuz, S. A.; Blesener, I. C.; McBride, R. D.; Bell, K. S.; Hammer, D. A.; Agafonov, A. V.; Romanova, V. M.; Mingaleev, A. R.

    2008-01-01

    Some issues concerning high-current electron beam transport from the X pinch cross point to the diagnostic system and measurements of the beam current by Faraday cups are discussed. Results of computer simulation of electron beam propagation from the pinch to the Faraday cup give limits for the measured current for beams having different energy spreads. The beam is partially neutralized as it propagates from the X pinch to a diagnostic system, but within a Faraday cup diagnostic, space charge effects can be very important. Experimental results show evidence of such effects.

  5. Celebrating the Barrel Toroid commissioning

    CERN Multimedia

    Peter Jenni

    ATLAS invited Funding Agency representatives and Laboratory Heads directly related to the funding and construction of the Barrel Toroid for a small ceremony on 13th December 2006 at Point 1, in order to mark the successful first full excitation of the BT (see last eNews). On that date, which was during the December CERN Council week, several of the Funding Agency Heads or their representatives could be present, representing CEA France, INFN Italy, BMBF Germany, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Russia, JINR Dubna and CERN. Speeches were delivered by the ATLAS spokesperson Peter Jenni thanking the Funding Partners in the name of the Collaboration, by Magnet Project Leader Herman ten Kate tracing the BT construction history, and by the CERN Director-General Robert Aymar congratulating all those who have contributed to the successful project. Herman ten Kate addressing the delegates. The text of the introductory address by Peter Jenni is reproduced here. "It is a great pleasure for me to welcome you all here...

  6. Anomalous transport in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punjabi, A.

    1989-12-01

    When the magnetic moment of particle is conserved, there are three mechanisms which cause anomalous transport. These are: variation of magnetic field strength in flux surface, variation of electrostatic potential in flux surface, and destruction of flux surface. The anomalous transport of different groups of particles resulting from each of these mechanisms is different. This fact can be exploited to determine the cause of transport operative in an experimental situation. This approach can give far more information on the transport than the standard confinement time measurements. To implement this approach, we have developed Monte Carlo codes for toroidal geometries. The equations of motion are developed in a set of non-canonical, practical Boozer co-ordinates by means of Jacobian transformations of the particle drift Hamiltonian equations of motion. Effects of collisions are included by appropriate stochastic changes in the constants of motion. Effects of the loop voltage on particle motions are also included. We plan to apply our method to study two problems: the problem of the hot electron tail observed in edge region of ZT-40, and the energy confinement time in TOKAPOLE II. For the ZT-40 problem three situations will be considered: a single mode in the core, a stochastic region that covers half the minor radius, a stochastic region that covers the entire plasma. A turbulent spectrum of perturbations based on the experimental data of TOKAPOLE II will be developed. This will be used to simulate electron transport resulting from ideal instabilities and resistive instabilities in TOKAPOLE II

  7. Toroidal field coil torque structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaines, A.L.

    1983-01-01

    A torque structure is disclosed particularly suitable for utilization in a power reactor of the Tokamak-type, and operable therein for purposes of providing support for the toroidal field (TF) coils that comprise one of the major operating components of such a Tokamak power reactor. The subject torque structure takes the form of a frame structure that is operable to enable torque loads acting on the TF coils to be equilibrated as close to the area of force application as feasible. The aforesaid torque structure includes an intercoil structure composed of spacer wedges that are interposed between each adjacent pair of TF coils. The spacer wedges, in turn, consist of bearing plates positioned between the TF coils so as to be in contacting relation therewith and a number of cross plates that are cooperatively associated with the bearing plates so as to form therewith a rigid assembly. The intercoil structure is affixed to a segmented, membrane shell that surrounds, encloses and supports the TF coil frames. Access is had to the interior of the shell through an opening formed for this purpose in a reinforced portion of the shell. Eddy current losses are minimized by insulating the joints formed at the juncture of adjoining segments of the shell

  8. Engineering prototypes for theta-pinch devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansborough, L.D.; Hammer, C.F.; Hanks, K.W.; McDonald, T.E.; Nunnally, W.C.

    1975-01-01

    Past, present, and future engineering prototypes for theta-pinch plasma-physics devices at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory are discussed. Engineering prototypes are designed to test and evaluate all components under system conditions expected on actual plasma-physics experimental devices. The importance of engineering prototype development increases as the size and complexity of the plasma-physics device increases. Past experiences with the Scyllac prototype and the Staged Theta-Pinch prototype are discussed and evaluated. The design of the proposed Staged Scyllac prototype and the Large Staged Scyllac implosion prototype assembly are discussed

  9. Development of a plasma pinch photocathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmus, John F.

    The need in advanced Linacs is for a high-performance (emittance, current, and life) cathode that will not poison in the only moderately good vacuums of such systems. Our approach embodies the durability of an unsensitized metal photocathode that is illuminated by a high-Z, high-density plasma pinch formed from a liquid-jet source in vacuum. The principal advantage of this pinch over a laser is both its simplicity and its ability to efficiently produce high-power vacuum ultraviolet radiation. The laser-guided gas-embedded pinch vacuum-ultraviolet source has been converted to a liquid-jet configuration in vacuum. This was undertaken for several reasons. First, the necessity of interposed high-density background gas is avoided. Second, a channel-forming guide laser beam is no longer needed. Finally, a wide variety of high-Z low cost substances are available in liquid form. For these reasons the liquid-jet approach makes sense for a rep-rate version of the pinch illuminator. Background gas absorption of hard UV is lessened. A large gas-transport system is not needed. Radiation output may be optimized through selection of the liquid's vapor pressure, surface tension, density, and composition.

  10. Investigation of plasma instabilities in the stagnated Z pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, V. V.; Chittenden, J. P.; Mancini, R. C.; Papp, D.; Niasse, N.; Altemara, S. D.; Anderson, A. A.

    2012-10-01

    High-resolution laser probing diagnostics at a wavelength of 266 nm allow observation of the internal structure and instabilities in dense stagnated Z pinches, typically hidden by trailing material. The internal structure of the 1-MA Z pinch includes strong kink and sausage instabilities, loops, flares, and disruptions. Mid- and small-scale density perturbations develop in the precursor and main pinch. The three-dimensional shape and dynamics of the wire-array Z pinch are predetermined by the initial configuration of the wire array. Cylindrical, linear, and star wire-array Z pinches present different sets of instabilities seeded to the pinch at the implosion stage. Prolonged implosion of trailing mass can enhance x-ray production in wire arrays. Fast plasma motion with a velocity >100 km/s was observed in the Z pinch at stagnation with two-frame shadowgraphy. Development of instabilities in wire arrays is in agreement with three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations.

  11. Long-wavelength microinstabilities in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, W.W.; Rewoldt, G.

    1993-01-01

    Realistic kinetic toroidal eigenmode calculations have been carried out to support a proper assessment of the influence of long-wavelength microturbulence on transport in tokamak plasmas. In order to efficiently evaluate large-scale kinetic behavior extending over many rational surfaces, significant improvements have been made to a toroidal finite element code used to analyze the fully two-dimensional (r,θ) mode structures of trapped-ion and toroidal ion temperature gradient (ITG) instabilities. It is found that even at very long wavelengths, these eigenmodes exhibit a strong ballooning character with the associated radial structure relatively insensitive to ion Landau damping at the rational surfaces. In contrast to the long-accepted picture that the radial extent of trapped-ion instabilities is characterized by the ion-gyroradius-scale associated with strong localization between adjacent rational surfaces, present results demonstrate that under realistic conditions, the actual scale is governed by the large-scale variations in the equilibrium gradients. Applications to recent measurements of fluctuation properties in TFTR L-mode plasmas indicate that the theoretical trends appear consistent with spectral characteristics as well as rough heuristic estimates of the transport level. Benchmarking calculations in support of the development of a three-dimensional toroidal gyrokinetic code indicate reasonable agreement with respect to both the properties of the eigenfunctions and the magnitude of the eigenvalues during the linear phase of the simulations of toroidal ITG instabilities

  12. Pinch Strengths in Healthy Iranian Children and Young Adult Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman Dianat

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Data on the physical strength capabilities are essential for design-ing safe and usable products and are useful in a wide range of clinical settings especially during treatment of disease affecting the function of the hand. The purpose of this study was to determine peak lateral pinch strength, key pinch strength, tip-to-tip pinch strength and three-jaw pinch strength exertions in a healthy Iranian children and young adult population.Methods: The study was conducted among 511 participants (242 males and 269 females aged 7-30 years. Measurements were carried out with both dominant and non-dominant hands in standard sitting posture using a B&L pinch gauge. Two repetitions of each strength measurement were recorded for each condition and the average value of the two trials was used in the subsequent analysis.Results: The results showed significant differences in the pinch strength data in terms of the age, gender and hand dominance. The lateral pinch strength, key pinch strength, tip-to-tip pinch strength and three-jaw pinch strength exertions by females were 68.4%, 68.8%, 78.8% and 81.8% of those exerted by males, respectively. Strength exertions with the non-dominant hand were 6.4%, 5.2%, 6.6% and 5.1% lower than strength exertions of the dominant hand for the lat-eral pinch strength, key pinch strength, tip-to-tip pinch strength and three-jaw pinch strength exertions, respectively.Conclusion: These findings can be used to fill the gaps in strength data for Iranian population.

  13. Minimum dissipative relaxed states in toroidal plasmas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    field pinch (RFP) as a self-organized state, but its application to tokamak discharges was beset with difficulties. Bhattacharjee and Kwok [2] tried to overcome these by formulat- ing additional global invariants and constructed tokamak equilibria with zero current at the boundary which are stable to ideal and resistive modes.

  14. Effects of toroidicity on resistive tearing modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izzo, R.; Monticello, D.A.; Manickam, J.; Strauss, H.R.; Grimm, R.; McGuire, K.

    1983-03-01

    A reduced set of resistive MHD equations is solved numerically in three dimensions to study the stability of tokamak plasmas. Toroidal effects are included self-consistently to leading and next order in inverse aspect ratio, epsilon. The equations satisfy an energy integral. In addition, the momentum equation yields the Grad-Shafranov equation correct to all orders in epsilon. Low beta plasma are studied using several different q-profiles. In all cases, the linear growth rates are reduced by finite toroidicity. Excellent agreement with resistive PEST is obtianed. In some cases, toroidal effects lead to complete stabilization of the mode. Nonlinear results show smaller saturated island widths for finite aspect ratio compared to the cylindrical limit. If the current channel is wide enough so as to produce steep gradients towards the outside of the plasma, both the finite aspect ratio cases and cylindrical cases disrupt

  15. PDX toroidal field coils stress analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikodem, Z.D.; Smith, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    A method used in the stress analysis of the PDX toroidal field coil is developed. A multilayer coil design of arbitrary dimensions in the shape of either a circle or an oval is considered. The analytical model of the coil and the supporting coil case with connections to the main support structure is analyzed using the finite element technique. The three dimensional magnetic fields and the non-uniform body forces which are a loading condition on a coil due to toroidal and poloidal fields are calculated. The method of analysis permits rapid and economic evaluations of design changes in coil geometry as well as in coil support structures. Some results pertinent to the design evolution and their comparison are discussed. The results of the detailed stress analysis of the final coil design due to toroidal field, poloidal field and temperature loads are presented

  16. Current control necessary for toroidal plasma equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagao, S.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that a significant amount of dipole current is necessary for the plasma equilibrium of toroidal configurations in general. Through the vector product with the poloidal field, this dipole current force has to balance with the hoop force of plasma pressure itself of the annular shape. The measurement of such a current of dipole type may be interesting for the confirmation of the plasma equilibrium in the toroidal system. Moreover it is certained that there is a new mode of a tokamak operation with such a dipole current component and with smaller vertical field than that based on the classical tokamak theory. (author) [pt

  17. Models for large superconducting toroidal magnet systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arendt, F.; Brechna, H.; Erb, J.; Komarek, P.; Krauth, H.; Maurer, W.

    1976-01-01

    Prior to the design of large GJ toroidal magnet systems it is appropriate to procure small scale models, which can simulate their pertinent properties and allow to investigate their relevant phenomena. The important feature of the model is to show under which circumstances the system performance can be extrapolated to large magnets. Based on parameters such as the maximum magnetic field and the current density, the maximum tolerable magneto-mechanical stresses, a simple method of designing model magnets is presented. It is shown how pertinent design parameters are changed when the toroidal dimensions are altered. In addition some conductor cost estimations are given based on reactor power output and wall loading

  18. Toroidal Precession as a Geometric Phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.W. Burby and H. Qin

    2012-09-26

    Toroidal precession is commonly understood as the orbit-averaged toroidal drift of guiding centers in axisymmetric and quasisymmetric configurations. We give a new, more natural description of precession as a geometric phase effect. In particular, we show that the precession angle arises as the holonomy of a guiding center's poloidal trajectory relative to a principal connection. The fact that this description is physically appropriate is borne out with new, manifestly coordinate-independent expressions for the precession angle that apply to all types of orbits in tokamaks and quasisymmetric stellarators alike. We then describe how these expressions may be fruitfully employed in numerical calculations of precession.

  19. The effect of sheared toroidal rotation on pressure driven magnetic islands in toroidal plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegna, C. C. [Departments of Engineering Physics and Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    The impact of sheared toroidal rotation on the evolution of pressure driven magnetic islands in tokamak plasmas is investigated using a resistive magnetohydrodynamics model augmented by a neoclassical Ohm's law. Particular attention is paid to the asymptotic matching data as the Mercier indices are altered in the presence of sheared flow. Analysis of the nonlinear island Grad-Shafranov equation shows that sheared flows tend to amplify the stabilizing pressure/curvature contribution to pressure driven islands in toroidal tokamaks relative to the island bootstrap current contribution. As such, sheared toroidal rotation tends to reduce saturated magnetic island widths.

  20. New material equations for electromagnetism with toroid polarizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubovik, V.M.; Martsenyuk, M.A.; Saha, B.

    1999-09-01

    With regard to the toroid contributions, a modified system of equations of electrodynamics moving continuous media has been obtained. Alternative formalisms to introduce the toroid moment contributions in the equations of electromagnetism has been worked out. The two four-potential formalism has been developed. Lorentz transformation laws for the toroid polarizations has been given. Covariant form of equations of electrodynamics of continuous media with toroid polarizations has been written. (author)

  1. Evolution of the MHD sheet pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthaeus, W.H.; Montgomery, D.

    1979-01-01

    A magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) problem of recurrent interest for both astrophysical and laboratory plasmas is the evolution of the unstable sheet pinch, a current sheet across which a dc magnetic field reverses sign. The evolution of such a sheet pinch is followed with a spectral-method, incompressible, two-dimensional, MHD turbulence code. Spectral diagnostics are employed, as are contour plots of vector potential (magnetic field lines), electric current density, and velocity stream function (velocity streamlines). The nonlinear effect which seems most important is seen to be current filamentation: the concentration of the current density onto sets of small measure near a mgnetic X point. A great deal of turbulence is apparent in the current distribution, which, for high Reynolds numbers, requires large spatial grids (greater than or equal to (64) 2 ). 11 figures, 1 table

  2. Toroidal groups line bundles, cohomology and quasi-Abelian varieties

    CERN Document Server

    Kopfermann, Klaus

    2001-01-01

    Toroidal groups are the connecting link between torus groups and any complex Lie groups. Many properties of complex Lie groups such as the pseudoconvexity and cohomology are determined by their maximal toroidal subgroups. Quasi-Abelian varieties are meromorphically separable toroidal groups. They are the natural generalisation of the Abelian varieties. Nevertheless, their behavior can be completely different as the wild groups show.

  3. ZAPP: Z-pinch atomic physics program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, K.

    1983-01-01

    High-density and high-temperature plasmas have been produced in a z-pinch with a hollow gas puff. A number of interesting atomic-physics phenomena occur in these plasmas and some of these phenomena provide important diagnostic information for characterizing the plasmas. We have been interested in collisions of high-energy electrons with highly stripped ions in these plasmas. Such collisions may produce a population inversion which could result in stimulated emission in the x-ray regime

  4. ATLAS: Full power for the toroid magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The 9th of November was a memorable day for ATLAS. Just before midnight, the gigantic Barrel toroid magnet reached its nominal field of 4 teslas in the coil windings, with an electrical current of 21000 amperes (21 kA) passing through the eight superconducting coils (as seen on the graph). This achievement was obtained after several weeks of commissioning. The ATLAS Barrel Toroid was first cooled down for about six weeks in July-August to -269°C (4.8 K) and then powered up step-by-step in successive test sessions to 21 kA. This is 0.5 kA above the current required to produce the nominal magnetic field. Afterwards, the current was safely switched off and the stored magnetic energy of 1.1 gigajoules was dissipated in the cold mass, raising its temperature to a safe -218°C (55 K). 'We can now say that the ATLAS Barrel Toroid is ready for physics,' said Herman ten Kate, project leader for the ATLAS magnet system. The ATLAS barrel toroid magnet is the result of a close collaboration between the magnet la...

  5. Celebration for the ATLAS Barrel Toroid magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Representatives from Funding Agencies and Barrel Toroid Magnet Laboratories during the ceremony. From left to right: Jean Zinn-Justin (Head of DAPNIA/CEA/Saclay), CERN Director-General Robert Aymar, and Roberto Petronzio (President INFN).Allan Clark (DPNC University Geneva) and Enrique Fernandez (IFAE Barcelona) were among the guests visiting the ATLAS cavern. The barrel toroid is visible in the background. A celebration took place at Point 1 on 13 December to toast the recent powering-up of the ATLAS barrel toroid magnet to full field (Bulletin No. 47-48/06). About 70 guests were invited to attend, mainly composed of representatives from funding partners and key members of the laboratory management teams of the barrel toroid magnet, representing CEA France, INFN Italy, BMBF Germany, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Russia, JINR Dubna and CERN. An introductory speech by ATLAS spokesperson Peter Jenni the scene for evening. This was followed by the ATLAS magnet system project leader Herman Ten Kate's account of the...

  6. ATLAS Barrel Toroid magnet reached nominal field

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

     On 9 November the barrel toroid magnet reached its nominal field of 4 teslas, with an electrical current of 21 000 amperes (21 kA) passing through the eight superconducting coils as shown on this graph

  7. Design of the TPX outboard toroidal limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaubel, K.M.; Anderson, P.M.; Baxi, C.B.

    1995-01-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment outboard limiter system incorporates the passive stabilizer plates, the ripple armor, the toroidal break and the support structures. These components are designed to withstand substantial steady state heat loads and high mechanical forces caused by plasma disruptions. The design of these components has been developed to deal with the challenging thermal, structural and remote handling requirements

  8. Curvature driven instabilities in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, P.

    1986-11-01

    The electromagnetic ballooning mode, the curvature driven trapped electron mode and the toroidally induced ion temperature gradient mode have been studies. Eigenvalue equations have been derived and solved both numerically and analytically. For electromagnetic ballooning modes the effects of convective damping, finite Larmor radius, higher order curvature terms, and temperature gradients have been investigated. A fully toroidal fluid ion model has been developed. It is shown that a necessary and sufficient condition for an instability below the MHD limit is the presence of an ion temperature gradient. Analytical dispersion relations giving results in good agreement with numerical solutions are also presented. The curvature driven trapped electron modes are found to be unstable for virtually all parameters with growth rates of the order of the diamagnetic drift frequency. Studies have been made, using both a gyrokinetic ion description and the fully toroidal ion model. Both analytical and numerical results are presented and are found to be in good agreement. The toroidally induced ion temperature gradients modes are found to have a behavior similar to that of the curvature driven trapped electron modes and can in the electrostatic limit be described by a simple quadratic dispersion equation. (author)

  9. Quantum electron transport in toroidal carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Mark; Encinosa, Mario

    2008-03-01

    Electron transport under bias is treated in tight-binding approximation using a non-equilibrium Green's function approach. Density-of-states D(E), transmissivity T(E), and current ISD are calculated through a (3,3) armchair nanotorus with laterally attached metallic leads and a magnetic field penetrating the toroidal plane. Plateaus in T(E) through the torus are observed as a function of both the relative angle between leads and magnetic flux. Initial computational studies performed with 1800 atoms and attached leads show substantial computational slowdown when increasing the system size by a factor of two. Results are generated by inverting the device Hamiltonian with a standard recursion method extended to account for unit cell toroidal closure. Significant computational speed-up is expected for a parallelized code on a multiprocessor computer cluster. The dependence of electronic features on torus size and torus curvature is tested for three tori with 900, 1800 and 3600 carbon atoms, respectively. References: 1. M. Jack and M. Encinosa, Quantum electron transport in toroidal carbon nanotubes with metallic leads. ArXiv: quant-ph/0709.0760. 2. M. Encinosa and M. Jack, Dipole and solenoidal magnetic moments of electronic surface currents on toroidal nanostructures. J. Comp.-Aided Mat. Design (Springer), 14 (1) (2007) 65 -- 71.

  10. Toroidal 12 cavity klystron : a novel approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazarika, A.B.R.

    2013-01-01

    A toroidal 12 cavity klystron is designed to provide with high energy power with the high frequency microwave RF- plasma generated from it. The cavities are positioned in clock hour positions. The theoretical modeling and designing is done to study the novel approach. (author)

  11. Toroidal Dipole Moment of a Massless Neutrino

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabral-Rosetti, L. G.; Mondragon, M.; Perez, E. Reyes

    2009-01-01

    We obtain the toroidal dipole moment of a massless neutrino τ v l M using the results for the anapole moment of a massless Dirac neutrino a v l D , which was obtained in the context of the Standard Model of the electroweak interactions (SM)SU(2) L x U(1) Y .

  12. Parametric dependences of momentum pinch and Prandtl number in JET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tala, T.; Salmi, A.; Angioni, C.

    2011-01-01

    Several parametric scans have been performed to study momentum transport on JET. A neutral beam injection modulation technique has been applied to separate the diffusive and convective momentum transport terms. The magnitude of the inward momentum pinch depends strongly on the inverse density...... gradient length, with an experimental scaling for the pinch number being -Rvpinch/χφ = 1.2R/Ln +1.4. There is no dependence of the pinch number on collisionality, whereas the pinch seems to depend weakly on q-profile, the pinch number decreasing with increasing q. The Prandtl number was not found to depend...... either on R/Ln, collisionality or on q. The gyro-kinetic simulations show qualitatively similar dependence of the pinch number on R/Ln, but the dependence is weaker in the simulations. Gyro-kinetic simulations do not find any clear parametric dependence in the Prandtl number, in agreement...

  13. On the instability increments of a stationary pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bud'ko, A.B.

    1989-01-01

    The stability of stationary pinch to helical modes is numerically studied. It is shown that in the case of a rather fast plasma pressure decrease to the pinch boundary, for example, for an isothermal diffusion pinch with Gauss density distribution instabilities with m=0 modes are the most quickly growing. Instability increments are calculated. A simple analytical expression of a maximum increment of growth of sausage instability for automodel Gauss profiles is obtained

  14. Plasma dynamics in a staged pinch device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattak, N.A.D.; Ahmed, Z.; Mirza, A.M.; Murtaza, G.

    1998-01-01

    Plasma parameters in fiber initiated fast and dense theta-pinch plasma driven by an annular finite-thickness gas-puff Z-pinch are studied. The imploding gas-puff Z-pinch plasma traps an axial magnetic field B/sub z/, compressing it to large values (of the order of several megagauss) in an extremely short time. The rapidly changing magnetic flux of this field induces an azimuthal current on the surface of the coaxially placed fiber, with a rise time an order of magnitude shorter than the applied Z-pinch current. The shorter rise time of the current stabilizes the pinch against sausage mode of MHD instabilities. Our numerical results demonstrate that for a relatively thick gas-puff layer, the compression occurs before the current saturates. At the peak compression the fuel densities of the order of 10/sup 25/ cm/sup -3/ and temperature above 10 keV can be achieved on a time scale of 0.1 nanoseconds, yielding the Lawson Criterion parameters n tau is approximately equal to 10/sup 14/ sec cm/sup -3/ for D-T fuel. The snow-plow effect incorporated in our model exercise a strong influence on the onset and growth rate of sausage and Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) modes of instabilities. Imposing a rotational velocity on the outer thin gas-puff plasma can control the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Numerical results indicate that the choice of the spin velocity is critical. Large values of the spin velocity, though provide stabilization against the R-T instability at the final stage of compression, however, it adversely reduce the plasma parameters so essential to achieve controlled fusion. Our analysis, therefore, suggests that a judicious choice of the spin velocity is necessary to obtain the desired temperature and density, especially when we seed D-T fiber plasma with a small fraction of high-Z Kr impurity to initiate the radiative collapse. (author)

  15. On the Heating of Ions in Noncylindrical Z-Pinches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svirsky, E. B.

    2018-01-01

    The method proposed here for analyzing processes in a hot plasma of noncylindrical Z-pinches is based on separation of the group of high-energy ions into a special fraction. Such ions constitute an insignificant fraction ( 10%) of the total volume of the Z-pinch plasma, but these ions contribute the most to the formation of conditions in which the pinch becomes a source of nuclear fusion products and X-ray radiation. The method allows a quite correct approach to obtaining quantitative estimates of the plasma parameters, the nuclear fusion energy yield, and the features of neutron fluxes in experiments with Z-pinches.

  16. Shielding and synchrotron radiation in toroidal waveguide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Stupakov

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available We develop a new approach to the calculation of the synchrotron radiation in a toroidal vacuum chamber. Using a small parameter ϵ=sqrt[a/R], where a is the characteristic size of the cross section of the toroid and R is the bending radius, we simplify Maxwell’s equations assuming that the characteristic frequency of the modes ω∼c/aϵ and neglect terms of higher order in ϵ. For a rectangular cross section of the waveguide, we find an analytical solution of the equations and analyze their asymptotics at very high frequency. We then obtain an equation which gives radiation into each synchronous mode. We demonstrate the flexibility of the new method by calculating the frequencies and the loss factors for the lowest modes in square and round waveguides.

  17. Form coefficient of helical toroidal solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amelin, V.Z.; Kunchenko, V.B.

    1982-01-01

    For toroidal solenoids with continuous spiral coil, winded according to the laws of equiinclined and simple cylindrical spirals with homogeneous, linearly increasing to the coil periphery and ''Bitter'' distribution of current density, the analytical expressions for the dependence between capacity consumed and generated magnetic field, expressions for coefficients of form similar to Fabry coefficient for cylindrical solenoids are obtained and dependence of the form coefficient and relative volume of solenoid conductor on the number of revolutions of screw line per one circumvention over the large torus radius is also investigated. Analytical expressions of form coefficients and graphical material permit to select the optimum geometry as to capacity consumed both for spiral (including ''force-free'') and conventional toroidal solenoids of magnetic systems in thermonulear installations

  18. Toroidal plasma response to external fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storer, R.G.

    1998-01-01

    Toroidal plasmas respond to external driving fields in a way which is determined by the coupling of these fields to the spectrum of the plasma. We have extended the toroidal resistive magnetohydrodynamic spectral code, SPECTOR, to include the effects of external fields on tokamak-like plasmas. The code is capable of determining both the stable and unstable modes and also the response to helical applied fields with arbitrary mode structure. Resistivity changes the continuous regions of the ideal MHD spectrum into a set of discrete eigenvalues lying along lines in the complex frequency plane with a spacing which is related to the inverse of the square root of the magnetic Reynolds number. Results are presented which relate the spectral distribution to the plasma response as a function of frequency. (author)

  19. METHODS TO DEVELOP A TOROIDAL SURFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DANAILA Ligia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper work presents two practical methods to draw the development of a surface unable to be developed applying classical methods of Descriptive Geometry, the toroidal surface, frequently met in technical practice. The described methods are approximate ones; the development is obtained with the help of points. The accuracy of the methods is given by the number of points used when drawing. As for any other approximate method, when practically manufactured the development may need to be adjusted on site.

  20. Stellarator approach to toroidal plasma confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.L.

    1981-12-01

    An overview is presented of the development and current status of the stellarator approach to controlled thermonuclear confinement. Recent experimental, theoretical, and systems developments have made this concept a viable option for the evolution of the toroidal confinement program. Some experimental study of specific problems associated with departure from two-dimensional symmetry must be undertaken before the full advantages and opportunities of steady-state, net-current-free operation can be realized

  1. Kinetic Damping of Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, G.Y.; Berk, H.L.; Pletzer, A.

    2005-01-01

    The damping of Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes in JET plasmas is investigated by using a reduced kinetic model. Typically no significant damping is found to occur near the center of the plasma due to mode conversion to kinetic Alfven waves. In contrast, continuum damping from resonance near the plasma edge may be significant, and when it is, it gives rise to damping rates that are compatible with the experimental observations

  2. Self-pinched lithium beam transport experiments on SABRE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, D.L.; Olson, C.L.; Poukey, J.W.; Shokir, I.; Cuneo, M.E.; Menge, P.R.; Johnston, R.R.; Welch, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    Self-pinched transport of ion beams has many advantages for ion-driven ICF applications involving high yield and energy production. The authors are currently preparing for a self-pinched lithium beam transport experiment on the SABRE accelerator. There are three transport elements that must eventually be demonstrated: (1) efficient lithium beam generation and ballistic transport to a focus at the self-pinched transport channel entrance; (2) self-pinched transport in the channel, requiring optimized injection conditions and gas breakdown; and (3) self-pinched transport of the equilibrated beam from the channel into free space, with associated aiming and stability considerations. In the present experiment, a hollow annular lithium beam from an applied-B extraction ion diode will be focused to small radius (r ≤ 2 cm) in a 60 cm long ballistic focus section containing argon gas at a pressure of a few Torr. The self-pinched transport channel will contain a low pressure background gas of 10--40 mTorr argon to allow sufficient net current to confine the beam for long distance transport. IPROP simulations are in progress to optimize the design of the ballistic and self-pinched transport sections. Progress on preparation of this lithium self-pinched transport experiment, including a discussion of transport system design, important gas breakdown issues, and diagnostics, will be presented

  3. Deuterated fibre Z-pinch on the S-300 generator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klir, D.; Kravarik, J.; Kubes, P.; Bakshaev, Yu L.; Blinov, P. I.; Chernenko, A. S.; Danko, S. A.; Korolev, V. D.; Ustroev, G. I.; Ivanov, M. I.; Cai, Hongchun

    2006-01-01

    Dense Z-pinch experiments were carried out on the S-300 generator (3.5 MA, 100 ns, 0.15 Omega) at the Kurchatov Institute in Moscow. The experiments were performed at a peak current of 2 MA with a rise time of about 100 ns. The Z-pinch was formed from a deuterated polyethylene fibre of 100 mu m

  4. Mirror theory applied to toroidal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    Central features of a mirror plasma are strong departures from Maxwellian distribution functions, ambipolar potentials and densities which vary along a field line, end losses, and the mirror field itself. To examine these features, mirror theorists have developed analytical and numerical techniques to solve the Fokker-Planck equation, evaluate the potentials consistent with the resulting distribution functions, and assess the microstability of these distributions. Various combinations of mirror-plasma features are present and important in toroidal plasmas as well, particularly in the edge region and in plasmas with strong rf heating. In this paper we survey problems in toroidal plasmas where mirror theory and computational techniques are applicable, and discuss in more detail three specific examples: calculation of the toroidal generalization of the Spitzer-Haerm distribution function (from which trapped-particle effects on current drive can be calculated), evaluation of the nonuniform potential and density set up by pulsed electron-cyclotron heating, and calculation of steady-state distribution functions in the presence of strong rf heating and collisions. 37 refs

  5. ISX toroidal field coil design and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussung, R.O.; Lousteau, D.C.; Johnson, N.E.; Weed, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    Structural design and analysis aspects of the toroidal field coils for the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX) tokamak are discussed. The overall mechanical design of ISX is predicated on the ability to remove the upper segment of the toroidal field coils to allow access to the toroidal vacuum vessel. The high current, 120 kA, capability of the new 74 MW power supply, coupled with the modest field requirement of ISX, allows the use of room temperature copper coils. Seventy-two turns, grouped into 18 coils, generate a magnet field of 18 kG at the major radius of 90 cm. Finite element structural analysis codes were utilized to determine the distribution of stresses and deflections around a typical turn. Initial material distribution on a coil was sized using the two-dimensional program FEATS. The resulting coil design was then coupled to the center bucking and out-of-plane restraint systems utilizing the NASTRAN code. The boundary conditions for the analytical models used in the two programs were then iterated, reaching satisfactory agreement as to stress contours and location for the joints

  6. The sine-Gordon equation in toroidal magnetic-fusion experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shohet, J. L.

    2007-08-01

    This paper presents a new nonlinear model which describes localized magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes in reversed-field pinch (RFP) experiments. To date, nearly all experimental and theoretical work in this area has relied on the use of Fourier decomposition of spatial variations as a function of time. Moreover, due to the complexity of this nonlinear problem, previous work has been restricted to the analysis of a relatively small number of modes. In contrast, the model studied in this paper, based on the damped-driven sine-Gordon (DDSG) equation, addresses the full nonlinearity, does not rely on Fourier decomposition, and does not require the range of the nonlinearity to be small. A specific consequence of working with the full nonlinearity is the existence of solitary waves in dispersive media. These solitary waves, a key part of the model, are used to describe the so-called slinky mode propagating in the plasma. A remarkable resemblance is seen between the waveforms obtained from experiments and the mathematical predictions of the new model.

  7. Processes governing pinch formation in diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaugrund, A.E.; Cooperstein, G.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1975-01-01

    The process of pinch formation in large aspect ratio diodes has been studied by means of streak photography and time-resolved x-ray detectors. A tight pinch is formed at the anode center by a collapsing thin hollow electron beam. The collapse velocity depends, among other things, on the type of material in the top 1 μm layer of the anode. In a tentative model it is assumed that an anode plasma is at least partially created from gases released from the surface layer of the anode by the heating action of the beam. These gases are ionized by primary, backscattered, and secondary electrons. Ions emitted from this plasma modify the electron trajectories in the diode leading to a radial collapse of the hollow electron beam. The observed monotonic dependence of the collapse velocity on the atomic number of the anode material can be explained by the smooth dependence on Z of both the specific heat and the electron backscatter coefficient. In the case of high-Z anodes the ion expansion time appears to be the factor limiting the collapse velocity. Detailed experimental data are presented

  8. Material testing in a linear theta pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alani, R.; Azodi, H.; Naraghi, M.; Safaii, B.; Torabi-Fard, A.

    1983-01-01

    The interaction of stainless steel 316 and Inconel 625 alloys has been investigated with a thermonuclear-like plasma, n = 10 16 cm -3 and Tsub(i) = 1 keV, generated in the Alvand I linear theta pinch. The average power flux is 10 7 W/cm 2 and the interaction time nearly one μs. A theoretical analysis based on the formation of an observed impurity layer near the material, has been used to determine the properties of the impurity layer and the extent of the damage on the material. Although arcing has been observed, the dominant damage mechanism has been assessed to be due to evaporation. Exposure to single shots has produced very heavily defective areas and even surface cracks on the SS 316 sample, but no cracks were observed on Inconel 625 after exposure to even 18 shots. On the basis of temperature rise and evaporation a comparison is made among materials exposed to plasmas of a theta pinch, shock tube, present generation tokamak and an anticipated tokamak reactor. (orig.)

  9. Fusion Propulsion Z-Pinch Engine Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miernik, J.; Statham, G.; Fabisinski, L.; Maples, C. D.; Adams, R.; Polsgrove, T.; Fincher, S.; Cassibry, J.; Cortez, R.; Turner, M.; hide

    2011-01-01

    Fusion-based nuclear propulsion has the potential to enable fast interplanetary transportation. Due to the great distances between the planets of our solar system and the harmful radiation environment of interplanetary space, high specific impulse (Isp) propulsion in vehicles with high payload mass fractions must be developed to provide practical and safe vehicles for human spaceflight missions. The Z-Pinch dense plasma focus method is a Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF) approach that may potentially lead to a small, low cost fusion reactor/engine assembly1. Recent advancements in experimental and theoretical understanding of this concept suggest favorable scaling of fusion power output yield 2. The magnetic field resulting from the large current compresses the plasma to fusion conditions, and this process can be pulsed over short timescales (10(exp -6 sec). This type of plasma formation is widely used in the field of Nuclear Weapons Effects testing in the defense industry, as well as in fusion energy research. A Decade Module 2 (DM2), approx.500 KJ pulsed-power is coming to the RSA Aerophysics Lab managed by UAHuntsville in January, 2012. A Z-Pinch propulsion concept was designed for a vehicle based on a previous fusion vehicle study called "Human Outer Planet Exploration" (HOPE), which used Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) 3 propulsion. The reference mission is the transport of crew and cargo to Mars and back, with a reusable vehicle.

  10. Rotational instability in a linear theta pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekdahl, C.; Bartsch, R.R.; Commisso, R.J.; Gribble, R.F.; McKenna, K.F.; Miller, G.; Siemon, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    The m=1 ''wobble'' instability of the plasma column in a 5-m linear theta pinch has been studied using an axial array of orthogonally viewing position detectors to resolve the wavelength and frequency of the column motion. The experimental results are compared with recent theoretical predictions that include finite Larmor orbit effects. The frequency and wavelength characteristics at saturation agree with the predicted dispersion relation for a plasma rotating faster than the diamagnetic drift speed. Measurements of the magnetic fields at the ends of the pinch establish the existence of currents flowing in such a way that they short out the radial electric fields in the plasma column. The magnitude of rotation, the observed delay in the onset of m=1 motion, and the magnitude of end-shorting currents can all be understood in terms of the torsional Alfven waves that communicate to the central plasma column the information that the ends have been shorted. The same waves are responsible for the torque which rotates the plasma and leads to the observed m=1 instability. Observations of the plasma in the presence of solid end plugs indicate a stabilization of high-m number modes and a reduction of the m=1 amplitude

  11. Engineering feasibility evaluation of a peristaltic pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boicourt, G.P.

    1977-04-01

    A recent proposal for reducing the end loss of a linear theta pinch is to produce moving magnetic mirrors at the coil ends. The concept entails the sequential pulsing of an axially arranged series of two-turn coaxial coils. The electrical design of such a system presents some unique problems. Ideally, the individual pulse circuits should be completely independent. This would facilitate the design by eliminating interactive effects. In practice, the circuits must be interconnected through isolating inductors to enable the production of a uniform biasing magnetic field. Moreover, the coils must be located physically close together. This produces strong magnetic coupling between the pulse circuits, which can seriously affect the shape and speed of the inward-moving magnetic-mirror field. Possible systems were modeled for the NET-2 circuit analysis code. The models took account of the inductive coupling between the individual circuits in the model. The results show that an increasing magnetic mirror can be produced provided the radius of the theta pinch is not too great compared to the intercoil spacing. The peristaltic field can be maintained for several cycles in the inner coils. The voltage hold-off requirements on the pulse circuit switches are found to be severe, but not impossible to meet

  12. A 'rational' explanation of resonant surfaces in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, R.C.

    1983-05-01

    Resonant surfaces are of fundamental importance in toroidal plasmas, particularly in relation to stability theory. A simple explanation as to why these surfaces are 'resonant' is given in terms of the propagation of localized torsional Alfven and ion acoustic wave packets. These packets are guided along helical field lines in toroidal plasmas, leading to the formation of unstable standing waves on those field lines which close on themselves after one or more toroidal revolutions

  13. Design and performance of FRX-C/T: a compact toroid translation experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gribble, R.; Carroll, T.; Kewish, R.; Reass, W.; Rej, D.; Webster, R.; Yavornik, E.

    1985-01-01

    The FRX-C/T experiment is a combination of the FRX-C theta-pinch, which forms field-reversed configuration (FRC) compact toroids, with a dc solenoid section, where the FRC (typical plasma parameters of n = 1-3 x 10 15 cm -3 , T/sub e/+T/sub i/ = 0.2-0.7 keV, tau/sub E/ approx. 100 μs) is translated and trapped in an axial dc guide field B 0 . The experiment combines pulsed, high-voltage technology for the theta-inch formation region with a dc energized magnet set for the translation section. Five stainless steel tank modules form the translation vacuum chamber. A B 0 field of < 8 kG is generated by the thirty-nine water-cooled pancake magnets of the dc magnet set that is mounted concentric with the vacuum vessel. A dc magnetic mirror (ratio < 5) is at the end of the translation region. The dc magnets are powered by a computer controlled and monitored 0.3 kV, 2.5 MW dc power supply. A computer monitored 78 channel digital thermal switch system and 128 channel analog thermistor system ensure that the coils do not overheat. The 1248-turn dc solenoid is 0.17 m away from the 100-kV theta-pinch coil requiring precautionary measures to minimize transient high voltages induced onto the dc solenoid. A helical quadrupole magnet has been added to the translation vessel to produce a weak B-field that suppresses the n=2 rotational instability

  14. Toroidal magnetic detector for high resolution measurement of muon momenta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanos, Peter

    1992-01-01

    A muon detector system including central and end air-core superconducting toroids and muon detectors enclosing a central calorimeter/detector. Muon detectors are positioned outside of toroids and all muon trajectory measurements are made in a nonmagnetic environment. Internal support for each magnet structure is provided by sheets, located at frequent and regularly spaced azimuthal planes, which interconnect the structural walls of the toroidal magnets. In a preferred embodiment, the shape of the toroidal magnet volume is adjusted to provide constant resolution over a wide range of rapidity.

  15. General Atomic's superconducting toroidal field coil concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcorn, J.; Purcell, J.

    1978-01-01

    General Atomic's concept for a superconducting toroidal field coil is presented. The concept is generic for large tokamak devices, while a specific design is indicated for a 3.8 meter (major radius) ignition/burn machine. The concept utilizes bath cooled NbTi conductor to generate a peak field of 10 tesla at 4.2 K. The design is simple and straightforward, requires a minimum of developmental effort, and draws extensively upon the perspective of past experience in the design and construction of large superconducting magnets for high energy physics. Thus, the primary emphasis is upon economy, reliability, and expeditious construction scheduling. (author)

  16. Electrical disruption in toroidal plasma of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberto, M.; Silva, C.A.B.; Goes, L.C.S.; Sudano, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    The initial phase of ionization of a toroidal plasma produced in hydrogen was investigated using zero-dimensional model. The model describes the temporal evolution of plasma by spatial medium of particle density and temperature, on whole plasma volume. The energy and particle (electrons and ions) balance equations are considered. The electron loss is due to ambipolar diffusion in the presence of magnetic field. The electron energy loss involves ionization, Coulomb interaction and diffusion. The ohmic heating converter gives the initial voltage necessary to disruption. (M.C.K.)

  17. 3D Printing the ATLAS' barrel toroid

    CERN Document Server

    Goncalves, Tiago Barreiro

    2016-01-01

    The present report summarizes my work as part of the Summer Student Programme 2016 in the CERN IR-ECO-TSP department (International Relations – Education, Communication & Outreach – Teacher and Student Programmes). Particularly, I worked closely with the S’Cool LAB team on a science education project. This project included the 3D designing, 3D printing, and assembling of a model of the ATLAS’ barrel toroid. A detailed description of the project' development is presented and a short manual on how to use 3D printing software and hardware is attached.

  18. Analysis of the energetic parameters of a theta pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalcanti, G. H.; Farias, E. E. [Instituto de Fisica, Laboratorio de Plasma e Espectroscopia Atomica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Campus da Praia Vermelha-Gragoata, 24210-340 Niteroi, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2009-12-15

    This work is devoted to study experimentally the performance of a theta pinch when the number of capacitors and turns of magnetic coil and the diameter of the glass tube are changed. To model the theta pinch a simple RLC circuit is used and the measurement of energy transmission from the bank of capacitors to the plasma is made using few experimental resources. In this work it was analyzed more than 2500 curves with a nonlinear procedure. Our results show that it is possible to design an optimized theta pinch making the appropriated choice of energetic parameters and therefore to reduce the stress of the system.

  19. Design of magnetic mirrors for a linear theta pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veglia, V. P.

    1981-01-01

    The problem of generating optimum magnetic mirror fields at the ends of a 50-cm long theta-pinch experiment to study particle flow and loss effects has been investigated. A combination of active and passive mirrors was developed to produce 2-3:1 fields for a 23-kG pinch. Biot-Savart and potential field prediction solutions for the magnetic field distribution were compared with experimental measurements in 2-5-cm long coils for the 50-cm long pinch.

  20. Analysis of the energetic parameters of a theta pinch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, G H; Farias, E E

    2009-12-01

    This work is devoted to study experimentally the performance of a theta pinch when the number of capacitors and turns of magnetic coil and the diameter of the glass tube are changed. To model the theta pinch a simple RLC circuit is used and the measurement of energy transmission from the bank of capacitors to the plasma is made using few experimental resources. In this work it was analyzed more than 2500 curves with a nonlinear procedure. Our results show that it is possible to design an optimized theta pinch making the appropriated choice of energetic parameters and therefore to reduce the stress of the system.

  1. Energy required to pinch a DNA plectoneme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barde, Céline; Destainville, Nicolas; Manghi, Manoel

    2018-03-01

    DNA supercoiling plays an important role from a biological point of view. One of its consequences at the supramolecular level is the formation of DNA superhelices named plectonemes. Normally separated by a distance on the order of 10 nm, the two opposite double strands of a DNA plectoneme must be brought closer if a protein or protein complex implicated in genetic regulation is to be bound simultaneously to both strands, as if the plectoneme was locally pinched. We propose an analytic calculation of the energetic barrier, of elastic nature, required to bring closer the two loci situated on the opposed double strands. We examine how this energy barrier scales with the DNA supercoiling. For physically relevant values of elastic parameters and of supercoiling density, we show that the energy barrier is in the kBT range under physiological conditions, thus demonstrating that the limiting step to loci encounter is more likely the preceding plectoneme slithering bringing the two loci side by side.

  2. Pinching parameters for open (super) strings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Playle, Sam; Sciuto, Stefano

    2018-02-01

    We present an approach to the parametrization of (super) Schottky space obtained by sewing together three-punctured discs with strips. Different cubic ribbon graphs classify distinct sets of pinching parameters; we show how they are mapped onto each other. The parametrization is particularly well-suited to describing the region within (super) moduli space where open bosonic or Neveu-Schwarz string propagators become very long and thin, which dominates the IR behaviour of string theories. We show how worldsheet objects such as the Green's function converge to graph theoretic objects such as the Symanzik polynomials in the α ' → 0 limit, allowing us to see how string theory reproduces the sum over Feynman graphs. The (super) string measure takes on a simple and elegant form when expressed in terms of these parameters.

  3. Z-pinch driven fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slutz, Stephen A.; Olson, Craig L.; Rochau, Gary E.; Dezon, Mark S.; Peterson, P.F.; Degroot, J.S.; Jensen, N.; Miller, G.

    2000-01-01

    The Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is the most powerful multi-module synchronized pulsed-power accelerator in the world. Rapid development of z-pinch loads on Z has led to outstanding progress in the last few years, resulting in radiative powers of up to 280 TW in 4 ns and a total radiated x-ray energy of 1.8 MJ. The present goal is to demonstrate single-shot, high-yield fusion capsules. Pulsed power is a robust and inexpensive technology, which should be well suited for Inertial Fusion Energy, but a rep-rated capability is needed. Recent developments have led to a viable conceptual approach for a rep-rated z-pinch power plant for IFE. This concept exploits the advantages of going to high yield (a few GJ) at low rep-rate (approximately 0.1 Hz), and using a Recyclable Transmission Line (RTL) to provide the necessary standoff between the fusion target and the power plant chamber. In this approach, a portion of the transmission line near the capsule is replaced after each shot. The RTL should be constructed of materials that can easily be separated from the liquid coolant stream and refabricated for a subsequent shots. One possibility is that most of the RTL is formed by casting FLiBe, a salt composed of fluorine, lithium, and beryllium, which is an attractive choice for the reactor coolant, with chemically compatible lead or tin on the surface to provide conductivity. The authors estimate that fusion yields greater than 1 GJ will be required for efficient generation of electricity. Calculations indicate that the first wall will have an acceptable lifetime with these high yields if blast mitigation techniques are used. Furthermore, yields above 5 GJ may allow the use of a compact blanket direct conversion scheme

  4. Compact toroid formation, compression, and acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degnan, J.H.; Bell, D.E.; Baca, G.P.; Dearborn, M.E.; Douglas, M.R.; Englert, S.E.; Englert, T.J.; Holmes, J.H.; Hussey, T.W.; Kiuttu, G.F.; Lehr, F.M.; Marklin, G.J.; Mullins, B.W.; Peterkin, R.E.; Price, D.W.; Roderick, N.F.; Ruden, E.L.; Turchi, P.J.; Coffey, S.K.; Seiler, S.W.; Bird, G.

    1992-01-01

    Research on the formation, compression, and acceleration of milligram Compact Toroids (CTs) will be discussed. This includes experiments with 2-stage coaxial gun discharges and calculations including 2D- MHD. The CTs are formed by 110 μf, 70 KV, 2 MA, 3 μs rise time discharges into 2 mg gas puffs in a 90 cm inner diameter, 7.6 cm gap coaxial gun with approximately 0.15 Tesla of radial-axial initial magnetic field. Reconnection at the neck of the toroidal magnetized plasma bubble extracted from the first stage gun forms the CT. Trapping, relaxation to a minimum energy Taylor state is observed with magnetic probe arrays. Low energy (few hundred KJ, 2 MA) acceleration in straight coaxial geometry, and high energy acceleration using a conical compression stage are discussed. The Phillips Laboratory 1,300 μf, 120 KV, 9.4 MJ SHIVA STAR capacitor bank is used for the acceleration discharge. The charging and triggering of the 36-module bank has been modified to permit use of any multiple of three modules. Highlights of fast photography, current, voltage, magnetic probe array, optical spectroscopy, interferometry, VUV, and higher energy radiation data and 2D-MHD calculations will be presented. Considerably more detail is presented in companion papers

  5. Transport and Dynamics in Toroidal Fusion Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnack, Dalton D

    2006-05-16

    This document reports the successful completion of the OFES Theory Milestone for FY2005, namely, Perform parametric studies to better understand the edge physics regimes of laboratory experiments. Simulate at increased resolution (up to 20 toroidal modes), with density evolution, late into the nonlinear phase and compare results from different types of edge modes. Simulate a single case including a study of heat deposition on nearby material walls. The linear stability properties and nonlinear evolution of Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) in tokamak plasmas are investigated through numerical computation. Data from the DIII-D device at General Atomics (http://fusion.gat.com/diii-d/) is used for the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibria, but edge parameters are varied to reveal important physical effects. The equilibrium with very low magnetic shear produces an unstable spectrum that is somewhat insensitive to dissipation coefficient values. Here, linear growth rates from the non-ideal NIMROD code (http://nimrodteam.org) agree reasonably well with ideal, i.e. non-dissipative, results from the GATO global linear stability code at low toroidal mode number (n) and with ideal results from the ELITE edge linear stability code at moderate to high toroidal mode number. Linear studies with a more realistic sequence of MHD equilibria (based on DIII-D discharge 86166) produce more significant discrepancies between the ideal and non-ideal calculations. The maximum growth rate for the ideal computations occurs at toroidal mode index n=10, whereas growth rates in the non-ideal computations continue to increase with n unless strong anisotropic thermal conduction is included. Recent modeling advances allow drift effects associated with the Hall electric field and gyroviscosity to be considered. A stabilizing effect can be observed in the preliminary results, but while the distortion in mode structure is readily apparent at n=40, the growth rate is only 13% less than the non-ideal MHD

  6. Toroidal asymmetries in divertor impurity influxes in NSTX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Scotti

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Toroidal asymmetries in divertor carbon and lithium influxes were observed in NSTX, due to toroidal differences in surface composition, tile leading edges, externally-applied three-dimensional (3D fields and toroidally-localized edge plasma modifications due to radio frequency heating. Understanding toroidal asymmetries in impurity influxes is critical for the evaluation of total impurity sources, often inferred from measurements with a limited toroidal coverage. The toroidally-asymmetric lithium deposition induced asymmetries in divertor lithium influxes. Enhanced impurity influxes at the leading edge of divertor tiles were the main cause of carbon toroidal asymmetries and were enhanced during edge localized modes. Externally-applied 3D fields led to strike point splitting and helical lobes observed in divertor impurity emission, but marginal changes to the toroidally-averaged impurity influxes. Power coupled to the scrape-off layer SOL plasma during radio frequency (RF heating of H-mode discharges enhanced impurity influxes along the non-axisymmetric divertor footprint of flux tubes connecting to plasma in front of the RF antenna.

  7. Low-frequency fluctuations in a pure toroidal magnetized plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A magnetized, low-β plasma in pure toroidal configuration is formed and ex- tensively studied with ion mass as control parameter. Xenon, krypton and argon plasmas are formed at a fixed toroidal magnetic field of 0.024 T, with a peak density of ~1011 cm−3, ~4 × 1010 cm −3 and ~2 × 1010 cm −3 respectively.

  8. A model code for the radiative theta pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S., E-mail: leesing@optusnet.com.au [INTI International University, 71800 Nilai (Malaysia); Institute for Plasma Focus Studies, 32 Oakpark Drive, Chadstone 3148 Australia (Australia); Physics Department, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Saw, S. H. [INTI International University, 71800 Nilai (Malaysia); Institute for Plasma Focus Studies, 32 Oakpark Drive, Chadstone 3148 Australia (Australia); Lee, P. C. K. [Nanyang Technological University, National Institute of Education, Singapore 637616 (Singapore); Akel, M. [Department of Physics, Atomic Energy Commission, Damascus, P. O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Damideh, V. [INTI International University, 71800 Nilai (Malaysia); Khattak, N. A. D. [Department of Physics, Gomal University, Dera Ismail Khan (Pakistan); Mongkolnavin, R.; Paosawatyanyong, B. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)

    2014-07-15

    A model for the theta pinch is presented with three modelled phases of radial inward shock phase, reflected shock phase, and a final pinch phase. The governing equations for the phases are derived incorporating thermodynamics and radiation and radiation-coupled dynamics in the pinch phase. A code is written incorporating correction for the effects of transit delay of small disturbing speeds and the effects of plasma self-absorption on the radiation. Two model parameters are incorporated into the model, the coupling coefficient f between the primary loop current and the induced plasma current and the mass swept up factor f{sub m}. These values are taken from experiments carried out in the Chulalongkorn theta pinch.

  9. Nonlinear stage of a Z-pinch instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garanin, S.F.; Chernyshev, Y.D.

    1987-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of the sausage instability is analyzed for a Z-pinch with a fully developed skin effect in the current. Two-dimensional numerical calculations carried out on the sausage instability show that its occurrence leads to a stage describable by a self-similar solution when the length of the neck is fixed and the plasma compression is isentropic. At a perturbation wavelength small in comparison with the pinch radius, this stage is preceded by a stage which reduces to a nonlinear Rayleigh--Taylor instability. The dynamics of the motion of magnetic field ''bubbles'' and of plasma ''jets'' is analyzed in this case. The plasma jets emerging from the pinch do not block the pinch from the current source

  10. Formation of a compact toroid for enhanced efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozgovoy, A. G. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Romadanov, I. V.; Ryzhkov, S. V., E-mail: ryzhkov@power.bmstu.ru [Bauman Moscow State Technical University, Moscow 105005 (Russian Federation)

    2014-02-15

    We report here our results on the formation of a plasma configuration with the generic name of compact toroid (CT). A method of compact toroid formation to confine, heat and compress a plasma is investigated. Formation of a compact torus using an additional toroidal magnetic field helps to increase the plasma current to a maintainable level of the original magnetic field. We design the Compact Toroid Challenge (CTC) experiment in order to improve the magnetic flux trapping during field reversal in the formation of a compact toroid. The level of the magnetic field immersed in the plasma about 70% of the primary field is achieved. The CTC device and scheme of high level capturing of magnetic flux are presented.

  11. Mechanical Commissioning of the ATLAS Barrel Toroid Magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Foussat, A; Dudarev, A; Bajas, H; Védrine, P; Berriaud, C; Sun, Z; Sorbi, M

    2008-01-01

    ATLAS is a general-purpose detector designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. Its features include the 4 T Barrel Toroid magnet, the largest superconducting magnet (25 m long, 20 m diameter) that provides the magnetic field for the ATLAS muon spectrometer. The coils integrated at CERN, were tested individually at maximum current of 22 kA in 2005. Following the mechanical assembly of the Barrel Toroid in the ATLAS underground cavern, the test of the full Barrel Toroid was performed in October 2006. Further tests are foreseen at the end 2007 when the system will include the two End Cap Toroids (ECT). The paper gives an overview of the good mechanical test results achieved in comparison with model predictions and the experience gained in the mechanical behavior of the ATLAS Toroidal coils is discussed.

  12. Sausage mode of a high density Z-pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, N.; Rostoker, N.

    1983-01-01

    In Z-pinch experiments at Maxwell Laboratories, Inc., growth rates have been measured by observing optical emission along the pinch axis. Growth rates estimated by means of the usual model of a pinch involving an incompressible fluid and a surface current are too large by a factor of 2-4. X-ray pinhole photographs generally have the appearance of a series of beads that would be expected from instability of the sausage mode. In some cases, particularly the implosion of large diameter wire arrays with BLACKJACK 5, the beads disappear and only the kink instability is apparent. Generalizing the pinch model to include compressibility does not significantly alter the predictions. A further generalization to include distributed current has therefore been considered. It seems likely that the current can penetrate significantly during the lifetime of the pinch. We consider a model of the pinch that is initially an infinite cylinder. For the sausage mode, stability is determined by a simple second order differential equation together with the boundary condition that follows from the wave number and the frequency of the instability

  13. The ZaP Flow Z-Pinch Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shumlak, U.; Nelson, B. A.

    2005-01-01

    The results from the ZaP experiment are consistent with the theoretical predictions of sheared flow stabilization. Z pinches with a sheared flow are generated in the ZaP experiment using a coaxial accelerator coupled to an assembly region. The current sheet in the accelerator initially acts as a snowplow. As the Z pinch forms, plasma formation in the accelerator transits to a deflagration process. The plasma exits the accelerator and maintains the flow in the Z pinch. During the quiescent period in the magnetic mode activity at z=0 cm, a stable Z pinch is seen on the axis of the assembly region. The evolution of the axial velocity profile shows a large velocity shear is measured at the edge of the Z pinch during the quiescent period. The velocity shear is above the theoretical threshold. As the velocity shear decreases towards 0.1kV A , the predicted stability threshold, the quiescent period ends. The present understanding of the ZaP experiment shows that it may be possible for the Z pinch to operate in a steady state if the deflagration process can be maintained by constantly supplying neutral gas or plasma to the accelerator

  14. ATF [Advanced Toroidal Facility] data management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kannan, K.L.; Baylor, L.R.

    1988-01-01

    Data management for the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF), a stellarator located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is provided by DMG, a locally developed, VAX-based software system. DMG is a data storage and retrieval software system that provides the user interface to ATF raw and analyzed data. Data are described in terms of data models and data types and are organized as signals into files, which are internally documented. The system was designed with user accessibility, software maintainability, and extensibility as primary goals. Extensibility features include compatibility with ATF as it moves from pulsed to steady-state operation and capability for use of the DMG system with experiments other than ATF. DMG is implemented as a run-time library of routines available as a shareable image. General-purpose and specialized data acquisition and analysis applications have been developed using the DMG system. This paper describes the DMG system and the interfaces to it. 4 refs., 2 figs

  15. The theory of toroidally confined plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    White, Roscoe B

    2014-01-01

    This graduate level textbook develops the theory of magnetically confined plasma, with the aim of bringing the reader to the level of current research in the field of thermonuclear fusion. It begins with the basic concepts of magnetic field description, plasma equilibria and stability, and goes on to derive the equations for guiding center particle motion in an equilibrium field. Topics include linear and nonlinear ideal and resistive modes and particle transport. It is of use to workers in the field of fusion both for its wide-ranging account of tokamak physics and as a kind of handbook or formulary. This edition has been extended in a number of ways. The material on mode-particle interactions has been reformulated and much new information added, including methodology for Monte Carlo implementation of mode destabilization. These results give explicit means of carrying out mode destabilization analysis, in particular for the dangerous fishbone mode. A new chapter on cyclotron motion in toroidal geometry has ...

  16. Isomorphic routing on a toroidal mesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Weizhen; Nicol, David M.

    1993-01-01

    We study a routing problem that arises on SIMD parallel architectures whose communication network forms a toroidal mesh. We assume there exists a set of k message descriptors (xi, yi), where (xi, yi) indicates that the ith message's recipient is offset from its sender by xi hops in one mesh dimension, and yi hops in the other. Every processor has k messages to send, and all processors use the same set of message routing descriptors. The SIMD constraint implies that at any routing step, every processor is actively routing messages with the same descriptors as any other processor. We call this isomorphic routing. Our objective is to find the isomorphic routing schedule with least makespan. We consider a number of variations on the problem, yielding complexity results from O(k) to NP-complete. Most of our results follow after we transform the problem into a scheduling problem, where it is related to other well-known scheduling problems.

  17. Distance statistics in large toroidal maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guitter, E.

    2010-04-01

    We compute a number of distance-dependent universal scaling functions characterizing the distance statistics of large maps of genus one. In particular, we obtain explicitly the probability distribution for the length of the shortest non-contractible loop passing via a random point in the map, and that for the distance between two random points. Our results are derived in the context of bipartite toroidal quadrangulations, using their coding by well-labeled 1-trees, which are maps of genus one with a single face and appropriate integer vertex labels. Within this framework, the distributions above are simply obtained as scaling limits of appropriate generating functions for well-labeled 1-trees, all expressible in terms of a small number of basic scaling functions for well-labeled plane trees.

  18. Advanced toroidal facility vaccuum vessel stress analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammonds, C.J.; Mayhall, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    The complex geometry of the Advance Toroidal Facility (ATF) vacuum vessel required special analysis techniques in investigating the structural behavior of the design. The response of a large-scale finite element model was found for transportation and operational loading. Several computer codes and systems, including the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center Cray machines, were implemented in accomplishing these analyses. The work combined complex methods that taxed the limits of both the codes and the computer systems involved. Using MSC/NASTRAN cyclic-symmetry solutions permitted using only 1/12 of the vessel geometry to mathematically analyze the entire vessel. This allowed the greater detail and accuracy demanded by the complex geometry of the vessel. Critical buckling-pressure analyses were performed with the same model. The development, results, and problems encountered in performing these analyses are described. 5 refs., 3 figs

  19. Advanced Toroidal Facility vacuum vessel stress analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammonds, C.J.; Mayhall, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    The complex geometry of the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) vacuum vessel required special analysis techniques in investigating the structural behavior of the design. The response of a large-scale finite element model was found for transportation and operational loading. Several computer codes and systems, including the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center Cray machines, were implemented in accomplishing these analyses. The work combined complex methods that taxed the limits of both the codes and the computer systems involved. Using MSC/NASTRAN cyclic-symmetry solutions permitted using only 1/12 of the vessel geometry to mathematically analyze the entire vessel. This allowed the greater detail and accuracy demanded by the complex geometry of the vessel. Critical buckling-pressure analyses were performed with the same model. The development, results, and problems encountered in performing these analyses are described

  20. Shear-dependant toroidal vortex flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khorasani, Nariman Ashrafi; Haghighi, Habib Karimi [Payame Noor University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    Pseudoplastic circular Couette flow in annulus is investigated. The flow viscosity is dependent on the shear rate, which directly affects the conservation equations that are solved in the present study by the spectral method in the present study. The pseudoplastic model adopted here is shown to be a suitable representative of nonlinear fluids. Unlike the previous studies, where only the square of shear rate term in the viscosity expression was considered to ease the numerical manipulations, in the present study takes the term containing the quadratic power into account. The curved streamlines of the circular Couette flow can cause a centrifugal instability leading to toroidal vortices, known as Taylor vortices. It is further found that the critical Taylor number becomes lower as the pseudoplastic effect increases. Comparison with existing measurements on pseudoplastic circular Couette flow results in good agreement.

  1. Design considerations for ITER toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalsi, S.S.; Lousteau, D.C.; Miller, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is a new tokamak design project with joint participation from Europe, Japan, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (U.S.S.R.), and the United States. This paper describes a magnetic and mechanical design methodology for toroidal field (TF) coils that employs Nb 3 Sn superconductor technology. Coil winding is sized by using conductor concepts developed for the U.S. TIBER concept. Manifold concepts are presented for the complete cooling system. Also included are concepts for the coil structural arrangement. The effects of in-plane and out-of-plane loads are included in the design considerations for the windings and case. Concepts are presented for reacting these loads with a minimum amount of additional structural material. Concepts discussed in this paper could be considered for the ITER TF coils

  2. Toroidal microinstability studies of high temperature tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rewoldt, G.; Tang, W.M.

    1989-07-01

    Results from comprehensive kinetic microinstability calculations are presented showing the effects of toroidicity on the ion temperature gradient mode and its relationship to the trapped-electron mode in high-temperature tokamak plasmas. The corresponding particle and energy fluxes have also been computed. It is found that, although drift-type microinstabilities persist over a wide range of values of the ion temperature gradient parameter η i ≡ (dlnT i /dr)/(dlnn i /dr), the characteristic features of the dominant mode are those of the η i -type instability when η i > η ic ∼1.2 to 1.4 and of the trapped-electron mode when η i ic . 16 refs., 7 figs

  3. Compact toroid development, activity plan for spheromaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-06-01

    This document contains the description, goals, status, plans, and approach for the investigation of the properties of a magnetic configuration for plasma confinement identified as the spheromak. This component of the magnetic fusion development program has been characterized by its potential for physical compactness and a flexible range of output power. The included material represents the second phase of spheromak program planning. The first was completed in February 1983 and was reported in DOE/ER-0160, Compact Toroid Development. This planning builds on that previous report and concentrates on the detailed plans for the next several years of the current DOE sponsored program. It has been deliberately restricted to the experimental and theoretical efforts possible within the present scale of effort. A third phase of this planning exercise will examine the subsequent effort and resources needed to achieve near-term (1987 to 1990) spheromak technical objectives

  4. Progress on large superconducting toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.; Luton, J.N.; Thompson, P.B.; Beard, D.S.

    1979-01-01

    Large superconducting toroidal field coils of competing designs are being produced by six major industrial teams. In the US, teams headed by General Dynamics Convair, General Electric, and Westinghouse are under contract to design and fabricate one coil each to specifications established by the Large Coil Program. A facility for testing 6 coils in a toroidal array at fields to 8 to 12 tesla is under construction at Oak Ridge. Through an international agreement, EURATOM, Japan, and Switzerland will produce one coil each for testing with the US coils. Each test coil will have a 2.5 x 3.5 m D-shape winding bore and is designed to operate at a current of 10 to 18 kA at a peak field of 8T while subjected to pulsed fields of 0.14 T applied in 1.0 s. There are significant differences among the six coil designs: five use NbTi, one Nb 3 Sn; three are cooled by pool boiling helium, three by forced flow; five have welded or bolted stainless steel coil cases, one has aluminum plate structure. All are designed to be cryostable at 8T, with structural margin for extended operation. The three US coil teams are almost or completely finished with detailed design and are now procuring materials and setting up manufacturing equipment. The non-US teams are at various stages of verification testing and design. The GDC and GE coils are scheduled for delivery in the spring of 1981 and the others will be completed a year later. The 11-m diameter vessel at the test facility has been completed and major components of the test stand are being procured. Engineering and procurement to upgrade the helium liquifier-refrigerator system are under way

  5. Petascale Parallelization of the Gyrokinetic Toroidal Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ethier, Stephane; Adams, Mark; Carter, Jonathan; Oliker, Leonid

    2010-05-01

    The Gyrokinetic Toroidal Code (GTC) is a global, three-dimensional particle-in-cell application developed to study microturbulence in tokamak fusion devices. The global capability of GTC is unique, allowing researchers to systematically analyze important dynamics such as turbulence spreading. In this work we examine a new radial domain decomposition approach to allow scalability onto the latest generation of petascale systems. Extensive performance evaluation is conducted on three high performance computing systems: the IBM BG/P, the Cray XT4, and an Intel Xeon Cluster. Overall results show that the radial decomposition approach dramatically increases scalability, while reducing the memory footprint - allowing for fusion device simulations at an unprecedented scale. After a decade where high-end computing (HEC) was dominated by the rapid pace of improvements to processor frequencies, the performance of next-generation supercomputers is increasingly differentiated by varying interconnect designs and levels of integration. Understanding the tradeoffs of these system designs is a key step towards making effective petascale computing a reality. In this work, we examine a new parallelization scheme for the Gyrokinetic Toroidal Code (GTC) [?] micro-turbulence fusion application. Extensive scalability results and analysis are presented on three HEC systems: the IBM BlueGene/P (BG/P) at Argonne National Laboratory, the Cray XT4 at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and an Intel Xeon cluster at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Overall results indicate that the new radial decomposition approach successfully attains unprecedented scalability to 131,072 BG/P cores by overcoming the memory limitations of the previous approach. The new version is well suited to utilize emerging petascale resources to access new regimes of physical phenomena.

  6. Commissioning Test of ATLAS End-Cap Toroidal Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Dudarev, A; Foussat, A; Benoit, P; Jeckel, M; Olyunin, A; Kopeykin, N; Stepanov, V; Deront, L; Olesen, G; Ponts, X; Ravat, S; Sbrissa, K; Barth, J; Bremer, J; Delruelle, J; Metselaar, J; Pengo, R; Pirotte, O; Buskop, J; Baynham, D E; Carr, F S; Holtom, E

    2009-01-01

    The system of superconducting toroids in the ATLAS experiment at CERN consists of three magnets. The Barrel Toroid was assembled and successfully tested in 2006. Next, two End-Cap Toroids have been tested on surface at 77 K and installed in the cavern, 100-m underground. The End Cap Toroids are based on Al stabilized Nb-Ti/Cu Rutherford cables, arranged in double pancake coils and conduction cooled at 4.6 K. The nominal current is 20.5 kA at 4.1 T peak field in the windings and the stored energy is 250 MJ per toroid. Prior to final testing of the entire ATLAS Toroidal system, each End Cap Toroid passed a commissioning test up to 21 kA to guarantee a reliable performance in the final assembly. In this paper the test results are described. It includes the stages of test preparation, isolation vacuum pumping and leak testing, cooling down, step-by-step charging to full current, training quenches and quench recovery. By fast discharges the quench detection and protection system was checked to demonstrate a safe e...

  7. Pinch Me - I'm Fusing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derzon, Mark S.

    2000-01-01

    The process of combining nuclei (the protons and neutrons inside an atomic nucleus) together with a release of kinetic energy is called fusion. This process powers the Sun, it contributes to the world stockpile of weapons of mass destruction and may one day generate safe, clean electrical power. Understanding the intricacies of fusion power, promised for 50 years, ,is sometimes difficult because there are a number of ways of doing it. There is hot fusion, cold fusion and con-fusion. Hot fusion is what powers suns through the conversion of mass energy to kinetic energy. Cold fusion generates con-fusion and nobody really knows what it is. Honestly - this is true. There does seem to be something going on here; I just don't know what. Apparently some experimenters get energy out of a process many call cold fission but no one seems to know what it is, or how to do it reliably. It is not getting much attention from the mainline physics community. Even so, no one is generating electrical power for you and me with either method. In this article 1 will point out some basic features of the mainstream approaches taken to hot fusion power, as well as describe why z pinches are worth pursuing as a driver for a power reactor and may one day generate electrical power for mankind

  8. Magnetic field compression using pinch-plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, K.; Tanimoto, M.; Matsumoto, Y.; Veno, I.

    1987-01-01

    In a previous report, the method for ultra-high magnetic field compression by using the pinchplasma was discussed. It is summarized as follows. The experiment is performed with the Mather-type plasma focus device tau/sub 1/4/ = 2 μs, I=880 kA at V=20 kV). An initial DC magnetic field is fed by an electromagnet embedded in the inner electrode. The axial component of the magnetic field diverges from the maximum field of 1 kG on the surface of the inner electrode. The density profile deduced from a Mach-Zehnder interferogram with a 2-ns N/sub 2/-laser shows a density dip lasting for 30 ns along the axes. Using the measured density of 8 x 10/sup 18/ cm/sup -3/, the temperature of 1.5 keV and the pressure balance relation, the magnitude of the trapped magnetic field is estimated to be 1.0 MG. The magnitude of the compressed magnetic field is also measured by Faraday rotation in a single-mode quartz fiber and a magnetic pickup soil. A protective polyethylene tube (3-mm o.d.) is used along the central axis through the inner electrode and the discharge chamber. The peak value of the compressed field range from 150 to 190 kG. No signal of the magnetic field appears up to the instance of the maximum pinch

  9. LASL Controlled Thermonuclear Research Program. Progress report, January--December 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, K.S. (comp.)

    1978-03-01

    This annual progress report is divided into the following sections: (1) Scyllac feedback sector experiments, (2) staged theta-pinch program, (3) toroidal reverse-field pinch, (4) Scylla IV-P linear theta-pinch experiments, (5) gun injection experiment, (6) Scylla I-C, laser-plasma interaction studies, (7) field reversal theta pinch, (8) Implosion Heating Experiment, (9) experimental plasma physics, (10) plasma diagnostics, (11) high-beta tokamak, (12) theory, (13) computers, (14) engineering, (15) magnetic energy transfer and storage, (16) magnetic confinement systems studies, and (17) intense neutron source facility. (MOW)

  10. Finite-Larmor-radius effects on z-pinch stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffel, Jan; Faghihi, Mostafa

    1989-06-01

    The effect of finite Larmor radius (FLR) on the stability of m = 1 small-axial-wavelength kinks in a z-pinch with purely poloidal magnetic field is investigated. We use the incompressible FLR MHD model; a collisionless fluid model that consistently includes the relevant FLR terms due to ion gyroviscosity, Hall effect and electron diamagnetism. With FLR terms absent, the Kadomtsev criterion of ideal MHD, 2r dp/dr + m2B2/μ0 ≥ 0 predicts instability for internal modes unless the current density is singular at the centre of the pinch. The same result is obtained in the present model, with FLR terms absent. When the FLR terms are included, a normal-mode analysis of the linearized equations yields the following results. Marginally unstable (ideal) modes are stabilized by gyroviscosity. The Hall term has a damping (but not absolutely stabilizing) effect - in agreement with earlier work. On specifying a constant current and particle density equilibrium, the effect of electron diamagnetism vanishes. For a z-pinch with parameters relevant to the EXTRAP experiment, the m = 1 modes are then fully stabilized over the crosssection for wavelengths λ/a ≤ 1, where a denotes the pinch radius. As a general z-pinch result a critical line-density limit Nmax = 5 × 1018 m-1 is found, above which gyroviscous stabilization near the plasma boundary becomes insufficient. This limit corresponds to about five Larmor radii along the pinch radius. The result holds for wavelengths close to, or smaller than, the pinch radius and for realistic equilibrium profiles. This limit is far below the required limit for a reactor with contained alpha particles, which is in excess of 1020 m-1.

  11. Study on MHD instabilities in the CECI plasma device using Fourier probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosal, A.C.; Aso, Y.; Ueda, M.

    1991-01-01

    A magnetic diagnostics called Fourier analyser aiming to study MHD instabilities by Fourier series expansion of poloidal magnetic field for m ≤ 3 modes was developed and tested. The diagnostics will be used in the RFP (reversed field pinch) type toroidal plasma device. (M.C.K.)

  12. Physics issues of a proposed program, SPIRIT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Hantao; Yamada, Masaaki

    2000-01-01

    Physics issues of the proposed program, SPIRIT (Self-organized Plasma with Induction, Reconnection, and Induction Techniques) are discussed. The main purpose of this program is to explore the physics of global stability and sustainment of compact toroids, including FRC (field reversed configuration) as well as low-aspect-ratio RFP (reversed field pinch), spheromak and spherical torus. (author)

  13. 1D equation for toroidal momentum transport in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozhansky, V A; Senichenkov, I Yu

    2010-01-01

    A 1D equation for toroidal momentum transport is derived for a given set of turbulent transport coefficients. The averaging is performed taking account of the poloidal variation of the toroidal fluxes and is based on the ambipolar condition of the zero net radial current through the flux surface. It is demonstrated that taking account of the Pfirsch-Schlueter fluxes leads to a torque in the toroidal direction which is proportional to the gradient of the ion temperature. This effect is new and has not been discussed before. The boundary condition at the separatrix, which is based on the results of the 2D simulations of the edge plasma, is formulated.

  14. Performance of a Folded-Strip Toroidally Wound Induction Machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bogi Bech; Jack, Alan G.; Atkinson, Glynn J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the measured experimental results from a four-pole toroidally wound induction machine, where the stator is constructed as a pre-wound foldable strip. It shows that if the machine is axially restricted in length, the toroidally wound induction machine can have substantially...... shorter stator end-windings than conventionally wound induction machines, and hence that a toroidally wound induction machine can have lower losses and a higher efficiency. The paper also presents the employed construction method, which emphasizes manufacturability, and highlights the advantages...

  15. Deformation energy of a toroidal nucleus and plane fragmentation barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauchard, C.; Royer, G.

    1996-01-01

    The path leading to pumpkin-like configurations and toroidal shapes is investigated using a one-parameter shape sequence. The deformation energy is determined within the analytical expressions obtained for the various shape-dependent functions and the generalized rotating liquid drop model taking into account the proximity energy and the temperature. With increasing mass and angular momentum, a potential well appears in the toroidal shape path. For the heaviest systems, the pocket is large and locally favourable with respect to the plane fragmentation barriers which might allow the formation of evanescent toroidal systems which would rapidly decay in several fragments to minimize the surface tension. (orig.)

  16. Progress in gyrokinetic simulations of toroidal ITG turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nevins, W.M.; Dimits, A.M.; Cohen, B.I.; Shumaker, D.E.

    2001-01-01

    The 3-D nonlinear toroidal gyrokinetic simulation code PG3EQ is used to study toroidal ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven turbulence - a key cause of the anomalous transport that limits tokamak plasma performance. Systematic studies of the dependence of ion thermal transport on various parameters and effects are presented, including dependence on E-vectorxB-vector and toroidal velocity shear, sensitivity to the force balance in simulations with radial temperature gradient variation, and the dependences on magnetic shear and ion temperature gradient. (author)

  17. Laser-induced production of large carbon-based toroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyn, M. Elizabeth; He Jibao; Koplitz, Brent

    2005-01-01

    We report on the production of large carbon-based toroids (CBTs) from fullerenes. The process involves two-step laser irradiation of a mixed fullerene target (76% C 60 , 22% C 70 ). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) clearly identifies toroidal-shaped structures as well as Q-shaped constructs. The typical diameters of the CBTs are ∼0.2-0.3 μm with tubular diameters of ∼50-100 nm, but toroids as wide as 0.5 μm are observed making them nanostructures on the verge of being microstructures

  18. Gaseous toroid around Saturn. [Saturnian ring system for atomic hydrogen trapping in Titan atmospheric model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonough, T. R.

    1974-01-01

    The trapping of Titan's escaping atmosphere in the Saturnian system by a toroidal ring is discussed. The radius of the toroid is comparable to Titan's orbit, or about ten times larger than the visible rings. Theoretical atmospheric models are formulated that consider Saturn's gravitational attraction and magnetospheric properties in forming this toroid and in protecting toroid particles from direct ionization by solar wind particles.

  19. Multicenter Survey of the Effects of Rehabilitation Practices on Pinch Force Strength After Tendon Transfer to Restore Pinch in Tetraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanson, M Elise; Jaramillo, Jeffrey P; Dairaghi, Christine A; Murray, Wendy M; Hentz, Vincent R

    2016-06-01

    To identify key components of conventional therapy after brachioradialis (BR) to flexor pollicis longus (FPL) transfer, a common procedure to restore pinch strength, and evaluate whether any of the key components of therapy were associated with pinch strength outcomes. Rehabilitation protocols were surveyed in 7 spinal cord injury (SCI) centers after BR to FPL tendon transfer. Key components of therapy, including duration of immobilization, participation, and date of initiating therapy activities (mobilization, strengthening, muscle reeducation, functional activities, and home exercise), were recorded by the patient's therapist. Pinch outcomes were recorded with identical equipment at 1-year follow-up. Seven SCI rehabilitation centers where the BR to FPL surgery is performed on a routine basis. Thirty-eight arms from individuals with C5-7 level SCI injury who underwent BR to FPL transfer surgery (N=34). Conventional therapy according to established protocol in each center. The frequency of specific activities and their time of initiation (relative to surgery) were expressed as means and 95% confidence intervals. Outcome measures included pinch strength and the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM). Spearman rank-order correlations determined significant relations between pinch strength and components of therapy. There was similarity in the key components of therapy and in the progression of activities. Early cast removal was associated with pinch force (Spearman ρ=-.40, P=.0269). Pinch force was associated with improved COPM performance (Spearman ρ=.48, P=.0048) and satisfaction (Spearman ρ=.45, P=.0083) scores. Initiating therapy early after surgery is beneficial after BR to FPL surgery. Postoperative therapy protocols have the potential to significantly influence the outcome of tendon transfers after tetraplegia. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. PIC Simulations of Dense Plasma Focus Z-pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, A.; Blackfield, D.; Tang, V.; Welch, D.; Rose, D.

    2011-10-01

    Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) Z-pinches are abundant sources of radiation, including neutrons, x-rays, and energetic electron and ion beams. Energetic protons and deuterons up to 10 MeV have been observed from cm-scale-length pinches, implying average acceleration gradients up to 1 GV/m. Gradients of this magnitude could potentially be exploited in the design of a compact accelerator. However, the physical mechanisms behind these immense electric fields are not well understood and thus DPF design cannot currently be optimized to maximize these gradients. At LLNL, we have assembled a DPF Z-pinch experiment and will be using a 4 MV ion probe beam to directly measure pinch-induced gradients. LSP, a fully relativistic electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code is used to perform time-dependent simulations of the pinch phase of the DPF and to gain insight into the origin and evolution of the large accelerating fields. LSP can be used in 2D or 3D geometries and can model the ions kinetically with fluid electrons (hybrid model) or model both species kinetically (fully kinetic model). We present results from both pressure and sheath width scans using LSP. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and supported by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (11-ERD-063) at LLNL.

  1. Computerised pinch dynamometry in the assessment of adult hand spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barden, Hannah L H; Baguley, Ian J; Nott, Melissa T; Heard, Robert; Chapparo, Christine

    2014-12-01

    The hand engages with the environment through the grasp, stabilisation, manipulation and release of objects during everyday tasks, activities and routines. Upper motor neuron syndrome following acquired brain injury may negatively impact hand function, reducing strength, range of motion and motor control. It is important for clinicians to reliably measure such impacts, particularly for the impact of intervention and to monitor change in performance over time. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the test-retest reliability and construct validity of Dynamic Computerised pinch Dynamometry for measuring fine hand motor performance following acquired brain injury. The Dynamic Computerised pinch Dynamometry protocol was completed by 36 community dwelling adults and 27 healthy adults using a simulated pinch and release task in lateral and pincer grip positions. Measurements were conducted over two testing occasions approximately five weeks apart. Dynamic Computerised pinch Dynamometry output was evaluated to determine the test-retest reliability and construct validity of the measure. Test-retest reliability scores using Kendall coefficient of concordance ranged from W = 0.61-0.94. Dynamic Computerised pinch Dynamometry discriminated between participants with and without acquired brain injury (z = 4.97-6.50, P Dynamometry in both lateral and pincer positions had fair to excellent test-retest reliability, and had good construct validity for discrimination between participants with and without acquired brain injury as well as between the affected and non-affected hand of participants with acquired brain injury. © 2014 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  2. Influence of toroidal rotation on resistive tearing modes in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.; Ma, Z. W.

    2015-01-01

    Influence of toroidal equilibrium plasma rotation on m/n = 2/1 resistive tearing modes is studied numerically using a 3D toroidal MHD code (CLT). It is found that the toroidal rotation with or without shear can suppress the tearing instability and the Coriolis effect in the toroidal geometry plays a dominant role on the rotation induced stabilization. For a high viscosity plasma (τ R /τ V  ≫ 1, where τ R and τ V represent resistive and viscous diffusion time, respectively), the effect of the rotation shear combined with the viscosity appears to be stabilizing. For a low viscosity plasmas (τ R /τ V  ≪ 1), the rotation shear shows a destabilizing effect when the rotation is large

  3. Influence of toroidal rotation on resistive tearing modes in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, S.; Ma, Z. W., E-mail: zwma@zju.edu.cn [Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Influence of toroidal equilibrium plasma rotation on m/n = 2/1 resistive tearing modes is studied numerically using a 3D toroidal MHD code (CLT). It is found that the toroidal rotation with or without shear can suppress the tearing instability and the Coriolis effect in the toroidal geometry plays a dominant role on the rotation induced stabilization. For a high viscosity plasma (τ{sub R}/τ{sub V} ≫ 1, where τ{sub R} and τ{sub V} represent resistive and viscous diffusion time, respectively), the effect of the rotation shear combined with the viscosity appears to be stabilizing. For a low viscosity plasmas (τ{sub R}/τ{sub V} ≪ 1), the rotation shear shows a destabilizing effect when the rotation is large.

  4. Toroidal and rotating bubble nuclei and the nuclear fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royer, G.; Fauchard, C.; Haddad, F.; Jouault, B.

    1997-01-01

    The energy of rotating bubble and toroidal nuclei predicted to be formed in central heavy ion collisions at intermediate energies is calculated within the generalized rotating liquid drop model. Previously, a one-parameter shape sequence has been defined to describe the path leading to pumpkin-like configurations and toroidal shapes. New analytical expressions for the shape dependent functions have been obtained. The potential barriers standing in these exotic deformation paths are compared with the three-dimensional and plane-fragmentation barriers. Metastable bubble-like minima only appear at very high angular momentum and above the three dimensional fragmentation barriers. In the toroidal deformation path of the heaviest systems exists a large potential pocket localized below the plane-fragmentation barriers. This might allow the temporary survival of heavy nuclear toroids before the final clusterization induced by the surface and proximity tension

  5. System and method of operating toroidal magnetic confinement devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chance, M.S.; Jardin, S.C.; Stix, T.H.; Grimm, R.C.; Manickam, J.; Okabayashi, M.

    1984-08-30

    This invention pertains to methods and arrangements for attaining high beta values in plasma confinement devices. More specifically, this invention pertains to methods for accessing the second stability region of operation in toroidal magnetic confinement devices.

  6. Effect of toroidicity during lower hybrid mode conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riyopoulos, S.; Mahajan, S.

    1985-11-01

    The effect of toroidicity during lower hybrid mode conversion is examined by treating the wave propagation in an inhomogeneous medium as an eigenvalue problem for ω 2 (m,n),m,n poloidal and toroidal wave numbers. Since the frequency regime near ω 2 = ω/sub LH/ 2 is an accumulation point for the eigenvalue spectrum, the degenerate perturbation technique must be applied. The toroidal eigenmodes are constructed by a zeroth order superposition of monochromatic solutions with different poloidal dependence m, thus they generically exhibit a wide spectrum in k/sub parallel/ for given fixed ω 2 even for small inverse aspect ratio epsilon. In case that the average is in the neighborhood of k/sub min/, the minimum wave number for accessibility of the mode conversion regime, it is expected that excitation of toroidal modes rather than geometric optics will determine the wave coupling to the plasma

  7. Structural design of the superconducting toroidal field coils for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, F.M.G.; Sborchia, C.; Thome, R.J.; Malkov, A.; Titus, P.H.

    1995-01-01

    Structural design issues and features of the superconducting toroidal field (TF) coils for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) will be discussed. Selected analyses of the structural and mechanical behavior of the ITER TF coils will also be presented. (orig.)

  8. Canards and curvature: nonsmooth approximation by pinching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desroches, M; Jeffrey, M R

    2011-01-01

    In multiple time-scale (singularly perturbed) dynamical systems, canards are counterintuitive solutions that evolve along both attracting and repelling invariant manifolds. In two dimensions, canards result in periodic oscillations whose amplitude and period grow in a highly nonlinear way: they are slowly varying with respect to a control parameter, except for an exponentially small range of values where they grow extremely rapidly. This sudden growth, called a canard explosion, has been encountered in many applications ranging from chemistry to neuronal dynamics, aerospace engineering and ecology. Canards were initially studied using nonstandard analysis, and later the same results were proved by standard techniques such as matched asymptotics, invariant manifold theory and parameter blow-up. More recently, canard-like behaviour has been linked to surfaces of discontinuity in piecewise-smooth dynamical systems. This paper provides a new perspective on the canard phenomenon by showing that the nonstandard analysis of canard explosions can be recast into the framework of piecewise-smooth dynamical systems. An exponential coordinate scaling is applied to a singularly perturbed system of ordinary differential equations. The scaling acts as a lens that resolves dynamics across all time-scales. The changes of local curvature that are responsible for canard explosions are then analysed. Regions where different time-scales dominate are separated by hypersurfaces, and these are pinched together to obtain a piecewise-smooth system, in which curvature changes manifest as discontinuity-induced bifurcations. The method is used to classify canards in arbitrary dimensions, and to derive the parameter values over which canards form either small cycles (canards without head) or large cycles (canards with head)

  9. Toroidal high-spin isomers in the nucleus 304120

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staszczak, A.; Wong, Cheuk-Yin; Kosior, A.

    2017-05-01

    Background: Strongly deformed oblate superheavy nuclei form an intriguing region where the toroidal nuclear structures may bifurcate from the oblate spheroidal shape. The bifurcation may be facilitated when the nucleus is endowed with a large angular moment about the symmetry axis with I =Iz . The toroidal high-K isomeric states at their local energy minima can be theoretically predicted using the cranked self-consistent Skyrme-Hartree-Fock method. Purpose: We use the cranked Skyrme-Hartree-Fock method to predict the properties of the toroidal high-spin isomers in the superheavy nucleus 120304184. Method: Our method consists of three steps: First, we use the deformation-constrained Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approach to search for the nuclear density distributions with toroidal shapes. Next, using these toroidal distributions as starting configurations, we apply an additional cranking constraint of a large angular momentum I =Iz about the symmetry z axis and search for the energy minima of the system as a function of the deformation. In the last step, if a local energy minimum with I =Iz is found, we perform at this point the cranked symmetry- and deformation-unconstrained Skyrme-Hartree-Fock calculations to locate a stable toroidal high-spin isomeric state in free convergence. Results: We have theoretically located two toroidal high-spin isomeric states of 120304184 with an angular momentum I =Iz=81 ℏ (proton 2p-2h, neutron 4p-4h excitation) and I =Iz=208 ℏ (proton 5p-5h, neutron 8p-8h) at the quadrupole moment deformations Q20=-297.7 b and Q20=-300.8 b with energies 79.2 and 101.6 MeV above the spherical ground state, respectively. The nuclear density distributions of the toroidal high-spin isomers 120304184(Iz=81 ℏ and 208 ℏ ) have the maximum density close to the nuclear matter density, 0.16 fm-3, and a torus major to minor radius aspect ratio R /d =3.25 . Conclusions: We demonstrate that aligned angular momenta of Iz=81 ℏ and 208 ℏ arising from

  10. Turbulent and neoclassical toroidal momentum transport in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abiteboul, J.

    2012-10-01

    The goal of magnetic confinement devices such as tokamaks is to produce energy from nuclear fusion reactions in plasmas at low densities and high temperatures. Experimentally, toroidal flows have been found to significantly improve the energy confinement, and therefore the performance of the machine. As extrinsic momentum sources will be limited in future fusion devices such as ITER, an understanding of the physics of toroidal momentum transport and the generation of intrinsic toroidal rotation in tokamaks would be an important step in order to predict the rotation profile in experiments. Among the mechanisms expected to contribute to the generation of toroidal rotation is the transport of momentum by electrostatic turbulence, which governs heat transport in tokamaks. Due to the low collisionality of the plasma, kinetic modeling is mandatory for the study of tokamak turbulence. In principle, this implies the modeling of a six-dimensional distribution function representing the density of particles in position and velocity phase-space, which can be reduced to five dimensions when considering only frequencies below the particle cyclotron frequency. This approximation, relevant for the study of turbulence in tokamaks, leads to the so-called gyrokinetic model and brings the computational cost of the model within the presently available numerical resources. In this work, we study the transport of toroidal momentum in tokamaks in the framework of the gyrokinetic model. First, we show that this reduced model is indeed capable of accurately modeling momentum transport by deriving a local conservation equation of toroidal momentum, and verifying it numerically with the gyrokinetic code GYSELA. Secondly, we show how electrostatic turbulence can break the axisymmetry and generate toroidal rotation, while a strong link between turbulent heat and momentum transport is identified, as both exhibit the same large-scale avalanche-like events. The dynamics of turbulent transport are

  11. Polymer- and salt-induced toroids of hexagonal DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Ubbink, J; Odijk, T

    1995-01-01

    A model is proposed for polymer- and salt-induced toroidal condensates of DNA, based on a recent theory of the undulation enhancement of the electrostatic interaction in the bulk hexagonal phase of semiflexible polyions. In a continuum approximation, the thermodynamic potential of a monomolecular toroid may be split up in bulk, surface, and curvature contributions. With the help of an approximate analytical minimization procedure, the optimal torus dimensions are calculated as a function of t...

  12. Transport in the high temperature core of toroidal confinement systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiland, J.

    1994-01-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental results on confinement of hot plasmas in toroidal devices, particularly tokamaks, are discussed from general principal points of view and related to predictions from a toroidal drift wave model using a full transport matrix including off diagonal terms. A reactive fluid model corresponding to a two pole approximation of the kinetic response is used. This model has the ability to reproduce both adiabatic and isothermal limits of the perpendicular dynamics. 106 refs, 8 figs, 1 tab

  13. Magnetostatic Analysis of a Pinch Mode Magnetorheological Valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gołdasz Janusz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The study deals with the pinch mode of magnetorheological (MR fluids’ operation and its application in MR valves. By applying the principle in MR valves a highly non-uniform magnetic field can be generated in flow channels in such a way to solidify the portion of the material that is the nearest to the flow channel’s walls. This is in contrary to well-known MR flow mode valves. The authors investigate a basic pinch mode valve in several fundamental configurations, and then examine their magnetic circuits through magnetostatic finite-element (FE analysis. Flux density contour maps are revealed and basic performance figures calculated and analysed. The FE analysis results yield confidence in that the performance of MR pinch mode devices can be effectively controlled through electromagnetic means.

  14. An important step for the ATLAS toroid magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment's prototype toroid coil arrives at CERN from the CEA laboratory in Saclay on 6 October. The world's largest superconducting toroid magnet is under construction for the ATLAS experiment. A nine-metre long fully functional prototype coil was delivered to CERN at the beginning of October and has since been undergoing tests in the West Area. Built mainly by companies in France and Italy under the supervision of engineers from the CEA-Saclay laboratory near Paris and Italy's INFN-LASA, the magnet is a crucial step forward in the construction of the ATLAS superconducting magnet system. Unlike any particle detector that has gone before, the ATLAS detector's magnet system consists of a large toroidal system enclosing a small central solenoid. The barrel part of the toroidal system will use eight toroid coils, each a massive 25 metres in length. These will dwarf the largest toroids in the world when ATLAS was designed, which measure about six metres. So the ATLAS collaboration decided to build a...

  15. Dynamics of accelerated compact toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLean, H.S.; Eddleman, J.L.; Hammer, J.H.; Hartman, C.W.; Molvik, A.W.

    1990-01-01

    Previous work on the RACE experiment has demonstrated acceleration and focusing of spheromak-type compact toroids of low mass (10 μg), low density (10 13 cm -3 ), and low magnetic field (2 KG). Computer modeling and measurements give reasonably good accounting of ring mass, momentum, and energy. Present work has been toward increasing the ring magnetic field and utilizing inductive storage by compressing similar plasma rings prior to acceleration. The precompression, followed by acceleration has been performed. Ring density and magnetic field have increased (n e ∼ 10 15 cm -3 , B ∼ 4 KG) in the precompression cone, and magnetic field increases (B ∼ 8--12 KG) after compression and during acceleration, however, trajectory measurements have shown an increase in drag or possibly ring mass above that accounted for by the density measurements in the precompression cone. For the low mass/density/field rings, drag forces did not need to be invoked for agreement between modeling and experiment and mass was consistent with electron density measurements. Drag and/or mass change is now apparently important in this higher mass/density/field regime

  16. Toroidal regularization of the guiding center Lagrangian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burby, J. W.; Ellison, C. L.

    2017-11-01

    In the Lagrangian theory of guiding center motion, an effective magnetic field B*=B +(m /e )v∥∇× b appears prominently in the equations of motion. Because the parallel component of this field can vanish, there is a range of parallel velocities where the Lagrangian guiding center equations of motion are either ill-defined or very badly behaved. Moreover, the velocity dependence of B* greatly complicates the identification of canonical variables and therefore the formulation of symplectic integrators for guiding center dynamics. This letter introduces a simple coordinate transformation that alleviates both these problems simultaneously. In the new coordinates, the Liouville volume element is equal to the toroidal contravariant component of the magnetic field. Consequently, the large-velocity singularity is completely eliminated. Moreover, passing from the new coordinate system to canonical coordinates is extremely simple, even if the magnetic field is devoid of flux surfaces. We demonstrate the utility of this approach in regularizing the guiding center Lagrangian by presenting a new and stable one-step variational integrator for guiding centers moving in arbitrary time-dependent electromagnetic fields.

  17. Compact toroid injection into C-2U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Thomas; Gota, H.; Garate, E.; Asai, T.; Matsumoto, T.; Sekiguchi, J.; Putvinski, S.; Allfrey, I.; Beall, M.; Cordero, M.; Granstedt, E.; Kinley, J.; Morehouse, M.; Sheftman, D.; Valentine, T.; Waggoner, W.; the TAE Team

    2015-11-01

    Sustainment of an advanced neutral beam-driven FRC for a period in excess of 5 ms is the primary goal of the C-2U machine at Tri Alpha Energy. In addition, a criteria for long-term global sustainment of any magnetically confined fusion reactor is particle refueling. To this end, a magnetized coaxial plasma-gun has been developed. Compact toroids (CT) are to be injected perpendicular to the axial magnetic field of C-2U. To simulate this environment, an experimental test-stand has been constructed. A transverse magnetic field of B ~ 1 kG is established (comparable to the C-2U axial field) and CTs are fired across it. As a minimal requirement, the CT must have energy density greater than that of the magnetic field it is to penetrate, i.e., 1/2 ρv2 >=B2 / 2μ0 . This criteria is easily met and indeed the CTs traverse the test-stand field. A preliminary experiment on C-2U shows the CT also capable of penetrating into FRC plasmas and refueling is observed resulting in a 20 - 30% increase in total particle number per single-pulsed CT injection. Results from test-stand and C-2U experiments will be presented.

  18. Simplified scaling model for the THETA-pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, K. J.; Thomson, D. B.

    1982-02-01

    A simple ID scaing model for the fast Theta pinch was developed and written as a code that would be flexible, inexpensive in computer time, and readily available for use with the Los Alamos explosive-driven high magnetic field program. The simplified model uses three successive separate stages: (1) a snowplow-like radial implosion, (2) an idealized resistive annihilation of reverse bias field, and (3) an adiabatic compression stage of a Beta = 1 plasma for which ideal pressure balance is assumed to hold. The code uses one adjustable fitting constant whose value was first determined by comparison with results from the Los Alamos Scylla III, Scyllacita, and Scylla IA Theta pinches.

  19. Numerical investigations of Z-pinch plasma instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Yaoyong; Guo Yonghui; Wang Wensheng; Qiu Aici

    2004-01-01

    A two-dimensional, radiation magneto-hydrodynamics model is applied to the simulation of Z-pinch plasma sausage instability. Different implosion mechanisms in the cases of the existence and the non-existence of instability are analyzed, and the effects of various initial density perturbation levels on the x-ray power and energy are investigated. Numerical results show that x-ray energy output is not susceptive to sausage instabilities in a certain extent but x-ray power versus time is evidently dependent on the instabilities. In addition, this paper also studies the effects of numerical treatment of extreme low density in Z-pinch simulations on numerical results

  20. Seeded perturbations in wire array Z-Pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, Allen Conrad; Fedin, Dmitry; Kantsyrev, Victor Leonidovich; Wunsch, Scott Edward; Oliver, Bryan Velten; Lebedev, Sergey V.; Coverdale, Christine Anne; Ouart, Nicholas D.; LePell, Paul David; Safronova, Alla S.; Shrestha, I.; McKenney, John Lee; Ampleford, David J.; Rapley, J.; Bott, S.C.; Palmer, J.B.A.; Sotnikov, Vladimir Isaakovich; Bland, Simon Nicholas; Ivanov, Vladimir V.; Chittenden, Jeremy Paul; Jones, B.; Garasi, Christopher Joseph; Hall, Gareth Neville; Yilmaz, M. Faith; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Deeney, Christopher; Pokala, S.; Nalajala, V.

    2005-01-01

    Controlled seeding of perturbations is employed to study the evolution of wire array z-pinch implosion instabilities which strongly impact x-ray production when the 3D plasma stagnates on axis. Wires modulated in radius exhibit locally enhanced magnetic field and imploding bubble formation at discontinuities in wire radius due to the perturbed current path. Wires coated with localized spectroscopic dopants are used to track turbulent material flow. Experiments and MHD modeling offer insight into the behavior of z-pinch instabilities.

  1. Instability study during implosion in the Tupa Theta-Pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayama, M.E.; Boeckelmann, H.K.

    1986-01-01

    The importance of instabilities which occur during plasma heating in a Theta Pinch, in the implosion phase, is analysed. The plasma diagnostic was done by ultrafast photography and diamagnetic probe. The implosion time and the current layer thickness were calculated using a hybrid code for plasma simulation. The theoretical data were compared with the experimental ones. (M.C.K.) [pt

  2. Parametric dependences of momentum pinch and Prandtl number in JET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tala, T.; Salmi, A.; Angioni, C.; Casson, F. J.; Corrigan, G.; Ferreira, J.; Giroud, C.; Mantica, P.; Naulin, V.; Peeters, A.G.; Solomon, W. M.; Strintzi, D.; Tsalas, M.; Versloot, T. W.; de Vries, P. C.; Zastrow, K. D.

    2011-01-01

    Several parametric scans have been performed to study momentum transport on JET. A neutral beam injection modulation technique has been applied to separate the diffusive and convective momentum transport terms. The magnitude of the inward momentum pinch depends strongly on the inverse density

  3. Plasma experiments on the Scylla I-C theta pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenna, K.F.

    1976-08-01

    Scylla I-C is a small scale (1-meter) research theta pinch developed for the experimental investigation of basic plasma physics processes and advanced concepts. The properties and stability characteristics of the Scylla I-C plasma, over a range of initial fill pressure from 100-500 mTorr D 2 , are discussed

  4. Kinetic theory of sausage instability of z-pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isichenko, M.B.; Kulyabin, K.L.; Yan'kov, V.V.

    1989-01-01

    The linear problem of the development of the sausage instability of a z-pinch is analyzed. Kinetic effects are taken into account for the case of a current with an ideal skin effect. The electrons of the plasma are assumed to be cold, and the ions collisionless. It is also assumed that the magnetic field in the pinch does not affect the motion of the ions. The ions are reflected specularly from the potential jump which arises at the plasma boundary. In the case of long-wave perturbations, with ka much-lt 1 (a is the pinch radius, and k is the wave number), the instability growth rate differs from the hydrodynamic growth rate only by a numerial factor. For short-wave perturbations, ka much-gt 1, kinetic effects lead to a substantial decrease in the growth rate [by a factor of (ka) 1/2 ] from that in the hydrodynamic description. It thus becomes possible to explain the improved stability of z-pinches which is observed experimentally

  5. Investigation of the preionization in the high voltage belt pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protz, R.

    1975-07-01

    The production of plasmas is investigated which are necessary for shock wave experiments. By optimization of a two-stage pre-ionization, an ignition can be initiated down to 0.5 m of Hg deuterium. The plasma is diagnosed with a 90 0 multichannel laser light scattering in the belt-pinch. (GG/LH) [de

  6. Radiative collapse of a Bennett-relaxed z-pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.

    1989-01-01

    The global evolution of a z-pinch has been studied with the assumption of a relaxed state consisting of ions and electrons, each in a rigidly drifting isothermal Maxwellian distribution. This speculative approach has the pragmatic feature of possessing phenomenologically useful global parameters such as drift velocity and temperature that vary in accordance with global physical quantities such as energy and entropy. The plasma gains energy from a time-dependent electric field by means of Poynting's vector. Coulomb collisions between electrons and ions is calculated with a Fokker-Planck treatment analogous to that used by Dreicer to calculate runaways. For a variety of initial conditions and time-independent applied electric fields, the pinch evolution always culminates in a time-independent (attractor) state whose current is the Pease-Braginskii current and whose final radius is proportional to (line density)/sup 3/4//(electric field)/sup 1/2/. Before the final state is attained, the pinch may bounce toward and away from a highly collapsed state. For the case of a Bennett pinch, the classical limit of the resistivity is attained when the line density is much greater than 4πm/sub e//e 2 μ/sub o/; i.e., 3.55 /times/ 10 14 m/sup /minus/1/. 6 refs., 2 figs

  7. More efficient mushroom canning through pinch and exergy analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paudel, Ekaraj; Sman, van der Ruud G.M.; Westerik, Nieke; Awasthi, Ashutosh; Dewi, Belinda P.C.; Boom, Remko M.

    2017-01-01

    Conventional production of canned mushrooms involves multiple processing steps as vacuum hydration, blanching, sterilization, etc. that are intensive in energy and water usage. We analyzed the current mushroom processing technique plus three alternative scenarios via pinch and exergy analysis.

  8. Current redistribution and generation of kinetic energy in the stagnated Z pinch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, V V; Anderson, A A; Papp, D; Astanovitskiy, A L; Talbot, B R; Chittenden, J P; Niasse, N

    2013-07-01

    The structure of magnetic fields was investigated in stagnated wire-array Z pinches using a Faraday rotation diagnostic at the wavelength of 266 nm. The distribution of current in the pinch and trailing material was reconstructed. A significant part of current can switch from the main pinch to the trailing plasma preheated by x-ray radiation of the pinch. Secondary implosions of trailing plasma generate kinetic energy and provide enhanced heating and radiation of plasma at stagnation. Hot spots in wire-array Z pinches also provide enhanced radiation of the Z pinch. A collapse of a single hot spot radiates 1%-3% of x-ray energy of the Z pinch with a total contribution of hot spots of 10%-30%.

  9. Architecture of petawatt-class z-pinch accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. Stygar

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available We have developed an accelerator architecture that can serve as the basis of the design of petawatt-class z-pinch drivers. The architecture has been applied to the design of two z-pinch accelerators, each of which can be contained within a 104-m-diameter cylindrical tank. One accelerator is driven by slow (∼1   μs Marx generators, which are a mature technology but which necessitate significant pulse compression to achieve the short pulses (≪1   μs required to drive z pinches. The other is powered by linear transformer drivers (LTDs, which are less mature but produce much shorter pulses than conventional Marxes. Consequently, an LTD-driven accelerator promises to be (at a given pinch current and implosion time more efficient and reliable. The Marx-driven accelerator produces a peak electrical power of 500 TW and includes the following components: (i 300 Marx generators that comprise a total of 1.8×10^{4} capacitors, store 98 MJ, and erect to 5 MV; (ii 600 water-dielectric triplate intermediate-store transmission lines, which also serve as pulse-forming lines; (iii 600 5-MV laser-triggered gas switches; (iv three monolithic radial-transmission-line impedance transformers, with triplate geometries and exponential impedance profiles; (v a 6-level 5.5-m-diameter 15-MV vacuum insulator stack; (vi six magnetically insulated vacuum transmission lines (MITLs; and (vii a triple-post-hole vacuum convolute that adds the output currents of the six MITLs, and delivers the combined current to a z-pinch load. The accelerator delivers an effective peak current of 52 MA to a 10-mm-length z pinch that implodes in 95 ns, and 57 MA to a pinch that implodes in 120 ns. The LTD-driven accelerator includes monolithic radial transformers and a MITL system similar to those described above, but does not include intermediate-store transmission lines, multimegavolt gas switches, or a laser trigger system. Instead, this accelerator is driven by 210

  10. Physics models in the toroidal transport code PROCTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, H.C.

    1990-08-01

    The physics models that are contained in the toroidal transport code PROCTR are described in detail. Time- and space-dependent models are included for the plasma hydrogenic-ion, helium, and impurity densities, the electron and ion temperatures, the toroidal rotation velocity, and the toroidal current profile. Time- and depth-dependent models for the trapped and mobile hydrogenic particle concentrations in the wall and a time-dependent point model for the number of particles in the limiter are also included. Time-dependent models for neutral particle transport, neutral beam deposition and thermalization, fusion heating, impurity radiation, pellet injection, and the radial electric potential are included and recalculated periodically as the time-dependent models evolve. The plasma solution is obtained either in simple flux coordinates, where the radial shift of each elliptical, toroidal flux surface is included to maintain an approximate pressure equilibrium, or in general three-dimensional torsatron coordinates represented by series of helical harmonics. The detailed coupling of the plasma, scrape-off layer, limiter, and wall models through the neutral transport model makes PROCTR especially suited for modeling of recycling and particle control in toroidal plasmas. The model may also be used in a steady-state profile analysis mode for studying energy and particle balances starting with measured plasma profiles.

  11. Toroidal Plasma Thruster for Interplanetary and Interstellar Space Flights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorelenkov, N.N.; Zakharov, L.E.; Gorelenkova, M.V.

    2001-01-01

    This work involves a conceptual assessment for using the toroidal fusion reactor for deep space interplanetary and interstellar missions. Toroidal thermonuclear fusion reactors, such as tokamaks and stellarators, are unique for space propulsion, allowing for a design with the magnetic configuration localized inside toroidal magnetic field coils. Plasma energetic ions, including charged fusion products, can escape such a closed configuration at certain conditions, a result of the vertical drift in toroidal rippled magnetic field. Escaping particles can be used for direct propulsion (since toroidal drift is directed one way vertically) or to create and heat externally confined plasma, so that the latter can be used for propulsion. Deuterium-tritium fusion neutrons with an energy of 14.1 MeV also can be used for direct propulsion. A special design allows neutrons to escape the shield and the blanket of the tokamak. This provides a direct (partial) conversion of the fusion energy into the directed motion of the propellant. In contrast to other fusion concepts proposed for space propulsion, this concept utilizes the natural drift motion of charged particles out of the closed magnetic field configuration

  12. Pinch modes in the SPEED2 plasma focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kies, W.; Decker, G.; Berntien, U.; Glushkov, D.A.; Sidelnikov, Yu.V.; Koshelev, K.N.; Simanovskij, D.M.; Bobashev, S.V.

    2001-01-01

    Deuterium discharges in the SPEED2 plasma focus (80 kJ, 200 kV, 2 MA, 400 ns) have been found unexpectedly stable within the operational regime as a neutron source. Only at higher filling pressures (above 6 mbar) sometimes m=0 instabilities appeared in the pinch column, especially in discharges of lower efficiency (moderate dynamics and neutron yield). Enhancing the electromagnetic radiation by doping these discharges with heavy gases (e.g. neon, argon) distinctly two pinch modes are produced, the micropinch mode (MPM) or the stable column mode (SCM), with a transition regime where the initial SCM is followed by the MPM. Micropinches are local radiative collapses initiated by m=0 instabilities of low-energy-density pinch plasmas. These instabilities and the successive micropinches can be suppressed by kinetic deuterons produced during dynamical compression of high-energy-density deuterium plasma sheaths. Depending on the relaxation of this fast deuteron component the pinch column can be stabilized for several tens of nanoseconds. While the short-lived (appr.1 ns) micropinches erratically appear as point-like successive flashes along the pinch axis with temperatures about 1 keV and about solid density the reproducible SCM, optimized with respect to the compression ratio, forms a powerful linear radiation source of temperatures and densities similar to the MPM. The SCM needs powerful (fast) drivers in order to use the kinetic ion stabilization, but not necessarily MA currents as available from the SPEED2 driver. This opens the possibility to establish the SCM also in compact experiments like SPEED3 (8 kJ, 80 kV, 0.8 MA, 300 ns) or even SPEED4 (2 kJ, 40 kV 250 kA, 300 ns). (author)

  13. Influence of the centrifugal force and parallel dynamics on the toroidal momentum transport due to small scale turbulence in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peeters, A. G.; Camenen, Y.; Casson, F. J.; Hornsby, W. A.; Snodin, A. P.; Strintzi, D.; Angioni, C.

    2009-01-01

    The paper derives the gyro-kinetic equation in the comoving frame of a toroidally rotating plasma, including both the Coriolis drift effect [A. G. Peeters et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 265003 (2007)] as well as the centrifugal force. The relation with the laboratory frame is discussed. A low field side gyro-fluid model is derived from the gyro-kinetic equation and applied to the description of parallel momentum transport. The model includes the effects of the Coriolis and centrifugal force as well as the parallel dynamics. The latter physics effect allows for a consistent description of both the Coriolis drift effect as well as the ExB shear effect [R. R. Dominguez and G. M. Staebler, Phys. Fluids B 5, 3876 (1993)] on the momentum transport. Strong plasma rotation as well as parallel dynamics reduce the Coriolis (inward) pinch of momentum and can lead to a sign reversal generating an outward pinch velocity. Also, the ExB shear effect is, in a similar manner, reduced by the parallel dynamics and stronger rotation.

  14. Instability and electrical response of small laminar coflow diffusion flames under AC electric fields: Toroidal vortex formation and oscillating and spinning flames

    KAUST Repository

    Xiong, Yuan

    2016-06-24

    Dynamical and electrical responses of a small coflow diffusion flame were investigated by applying a high-voltage alternating current (AC), to a fuel jet nozzle. High-speed imaging and electrical diagnostics were adopted to capture flame dynamics and electrical signals, such as voltage (V ), frequency (f ) and current (I ). In the V -f domain of 0-5kV and 0-5kHz, AC-driven instabilities, resulting in various flame modes such as an oscillation, pinch-off and spinning of flames were identified. Characteristic frequency of each mode was determined and a visualization of near-nozzle flow structures suggested a close causality of initial counter-rotating vortices (inner and outer toroidal vortices - ITV and OTV), to the other observed flame. An axisymmetric ITV shedding was identified within oscillating and pinch-off modes, while asymmetric ITV shedding was identified with the spinning mode. Integrated electric power over several AC periods correlated well with variation in the flame surface area for these instabilities, demonstrating that measured electric power is a potential indicator of combustion instabilities in electric-field-assisted combustion.

  15. Structural analysis of TFTR toroidal field coil conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.A.

    1975-10-01

    The conceptual design evaluation of the V-shaped toroidal field coils on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor has been performed by detailed structural analysis with the finite element method. The innovation provided by this design and verified in this work is the capability to support toroidal field loads while simultaneously performing the function of twist restraint against the device axial torques resulting from the vertical field loads. The evaluations made for the conceptual design provide predictions for coil deflections and stresses. The results are available for the separate effects from toroidal fields, poloidal fields, and the thermal expansion of the coils as well as for the superposition of the primary loads and the primary plus thermal loads

  16. Vlasov tokamak equilibria with sheared toroidal flow and anisotropic pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuiroukidis, Ap, E-mail: kouirouki@astro.auth.gr [Technological Education Institute of Serres, 62124 Serres (Greece); Throumoulopoulos, G. N., E-mail: gthroum@uoi.gr [Department of Physics, University of Ioannina, GR 451 10 Ioannina (Greece); Tasso, H., E-mail: het@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    By choosing appropriate deformed Maxwellian ion and electron distribution functions depending on the two particle constants of motion, i.e., the energy and toroidal angular momentum, we reduce the Vlasov axisymmetric equilibrium problem for quasineutral plasmas to a transcendental Grad-Shafranov-like equation. This equation is then solved numerically under the Dirichlet boundary condition for an analytically prescribed boundary possessing a lower X-point to construct tokamak equilibria with toroidal sheared ion flow and anisotropic pressure. Depending on the deformation of the distribution functions, these steady states can have toroidal current densities either peaked on the magnetic axis or hollow. These two kinds of equilibria may be regarded as a bifurcation in connection with symmetry properties of the distribution functions on the magnetic axis.

  17. Modal analysis of a stiffened toroidal shell sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerreta, R.; Di Pietro, E.; Pizzuto, A.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the modal analysis of a sector of the toroidal vacuum vessel of a new experimental machine for research in the field of controlled thermonuclear fusion (FTU - Frascati Tokamak Upgrade). The vacuum vessel, one of the most critical components of the experimental device, consist of 12 stainless steel toroidal sectors, and it is designed to withstand pulsed electromagnetic loads during operation. Results of the modal analysis of the stiffened toroidal shell sector are compared and discussed with regard to the experimental data. Theoretical eigenvalues and eigenvectors have been predicted by means of ABAQUS finite element code. Experimental analysis has been carried out on a full scale model and natural frequencies have been measured. Satisfactory agreement between experimental and theoretical eigenvalues has been found

  18. Toroidal Superheavy Nuclei in Skyrme-Hartree-Fock Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staszczak, A.; Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2009-01-01

    Within the self-consistent constraint Skyrme-Hartree-Fock+BCS model (SHF+BCS), we found equilibrium toroidal nuclear density distributions in the region of superheavy elements. For nuclei with a sufficient oblate deformation (Q 20 < -200 b), it becomes energetically favorable to change the genus of nuclear surface from 0 to 1, i.e., to switch the shape from a biconcave disc to a torus. The energy of the toroidal (genus=1) SHF+BCS solution relative to the compact (genus=0) ground state energy is strongly dependent both on the atomic number Z and the mass number A. We discuss the region of Z and A where the toroidal SHF+BCS total energy begins to be a global minimum

  19. Linear wave propagation in a hot axisymmetric toroidal plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaun, A. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Centre de Recherche en Physique des Plasma (CRPP)

    1995-03-01

    Kinetic effects on the propagation of the Alfven wave are studied for the first time in a toroidal plasma relevant for experiments. This requires the resolution of a set of coupled partial differential equations whose coefficients depend locally on the plasma parameters. For this purpose, a numerical wave propagation code called PENN has been developed using either a bilinear or a bicubic Hermite finite element discretization. It solves Maxwell`s equations in toroidal geometry, with a dielectric tensor operator that takes into account the linear response of the plasma. Two different models have been implemented and can be used comparatively to describe the same physical case: the first treats the plasma as resistive fluids and gives results which are in good agreement with toroidal fluid codes. The second is a kinetic model and takes into account the finite size of the Larmor radii; it has successfully been tested against a kinetic plasma model in cylindrical geometry. New results have been obtained when studying kinetic effects in toroidal geometry. Two different conversion mechanisms to the kinetic Alfven wave have been described: one occurs at toroidally coupled resonant surfaces and is the kinetic counterpart of the fluid models` resonance absorption. The other has no such correspondence and results directly from the toroidal coupling between the kinetic Alfven wave and the global wavefield. An analysis of a heating scenario suggests that it might be difficult to heat a plasma with Alfven waves up to temperatures that are relevant for a tokamak reactor. Kinetic effects are studied for three types of global Alfven modes (GAE, TAE, BAE) and a new class of kinetic eigenmodes is described which appear inside the fluid gap: it could be related to recent observations in the JET (Joint European Torus) tokamak. (author) 56 figs., 6 tabs., 58 refs.

  20. Induction Motor with Switchable Number of Poles and Toroidal Winding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUNTEANU, A.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of an induction motor provided with toroidal stator winding. The ring-type coils offer a higher versatility in obtaining a different number of pole pairs by means of delta/star and series/parallel connections respectively. As consequence, the developed torque can vary within large limits and the motor can be utilized for applications that require, for example, high load torque values for a short time. The study involves experimental tests and FEM simulation for an induction machine with three configurations of pole pairs. The conclusions attest the superiority of the toroidal winding for certain applications such as electric vehicles or lifting machines.

  1. On the longitudinal coupling impedance of a toroidal beam tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, H.; Tepikian, S.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, the longitudinal coupling impedance of a smooth toroidal beam tube is derived. By treating the torus as a slow-wave structure, the well-known method of describing the impedance in terms of cavity resonances can be used. A simple analytical expression for the coupling impedance of a toroidal beam tube with square cross section valid in the low-frequency limit is obtained. The results from the present study are compared with previously published solutions and qualitative differences are pointed out. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  2. Tokamak configuration analysis with the method of toroidal multipoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micozzi, P.; Alladio, F.; Crisanti, F.; Marinucci, M.; Tanga, A.

    1989-01-01

    In the study of tokamak machines able to sustain plasmas of thermonuclear interest (JIT, IGNITOR, NET, CIT, ET), there is a strong quest for engineering optimization of the circuital components close to the plasma. We have developed a semianalytical axisymmetric MHD equilibrium code based on the technique of the poloidal ψ flux function expansion in toroidal harmonic series. This code is able to optimize the necessary currents in the poloidal circuits in order to sustain a plasma of fixed shape (also x-point configuration), toroidal current and poloidal β. (author) 4 refs., 4 figs

  3. Development and verification of printed circuit board toroidal transformer model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pejtersen, Jens; Mønster, Jakob Døllner; Knott, Arnold

    2013-01-01

    by comparing calculated parameters with 3D finite element simulations and experimental measurement results. The developed transformer model shows good agreement with the simulated and measured results. The model can be used to predict the parameters of printed circuit board toroidal transformer configurations......An analytical model of an air core printed circuit board embedded toroidal transformer configuration is presented. The transformer has been developed for galvanic isolation of very high frequency switch-mode dc-dc power converter applications. The theoretical model is developed and verified...

  4. Heat removal in INTOR via a toroidal limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mioduszewski, P.

    1981-01-01

    In the present paper the potential of removing about 100 MW of thermal plasma power via a toroidal limiter in INTOR is studied. The heat flux distributions on various limiter configurations are calculated and the thermal response of a graphite tile limiter is estimated on the base of a one-dimensional heat conduction approach. The evaporation rates which have to be expected for the given energy flux densities and radiation cooled graphite tiles are evaluated. According to the present understanding it should be possible to remove 100 MW power from the INTOR plasma via a radiation cooled toroidal limiter. (author)

  5. Neoclassical diffusion in toroidal three-cut magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemov, V.V.; Shishkin, A.A.

    1975-01-01

    Quasi-classical diffusion is investigated in the regime of toroidal drift of 'bananas' in a three cut magnetic field. Unlike previous papers, it is supposed that the inhomogeneity of a helical magnetic field epsilonsub(k) is of the same order or less than that of the toroidal inhomogeneity epsilonsub(t). The case is considered when the efficient frequency of particle collisions exceeds that of the 'banana' precession around the magnetic axis. Expressions for diffusion flows and coefficients are obtained that transform into available ones at epsilonsub(h) > > epsilonsub(t) [ru

  6. A direct calculation of current drive in toroidal geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, J.C.; Phillips, C.K.; Bonoli, P.T.

    1998-01-01

    The magnitude and radial profiles of noninductive currents driven by fast magnetosonic waves in tokamaks have been calculated directly from the wave-induced quasilinear flux in a toroidal geometry and a Green's function for the current. An expression for the quasilinear flux has been derived which accounts for coupling between modes in the spectrum of waves launched from the antenna. A Fokker-Planck code for the Green's function and a full wave code for the electric field in the quasilinear flux are used to evaluate the current in a specified toroidal geometry

  7. Current drive by asymmetrical heating in a toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gahl, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    This report describes the first experimental observation of current generation by asymmetrical heating of ions. A unidirectional fast Alfven wave launched by a slow-wave antenna inside the Texas Tech Tokamak, asymmetrically heated the ions. Measurements of the asymmetry of the toroidal plasma current with probes at the top and bottom of the toroidal plasma column confirmed the current generation indirectly. Current generation, obtained in a one-species, hydrogen plasma, is a phenomenon which had not been predicted previously. Calculations of the dispersion relation for the fast Alfven wave near the fundamental cyclotron resonance in a one-species, hydrogen plasma, using warm plasma theory, support the experimental results

  8. Initial temperature profiles of the PDX inner toroidal limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulrickson, M.; Kugel, H.W.

    1983-01-01

    The temperature profiles resulting from plasma operation on the PDX vertical, large area, inner toroidal limiter have been measured during both ohmic and neutral beam heated discharges using a scanning infrared camera. An asymmetric double peaked temperature profile is seen after neutral beam heated discharges. Disruptions in ohmically heated discharges are found to be preceded by a single peaked deposition and succeeded by a initially symmetric double peaked deposition. The results were compared with the Schmidt model for scrapeoff at a toroidal limiter and it was found that the measured double peaked temperature profiles yielded scrape-off lengths consistent with previous measurements

  9. Effects of 3D magnetic perturbations on toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callen, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    Small three-dimensional (3D) magnetic field perturbations have many interesting and possibly useful effects on tokamak and quasi-symmetric stellarator plasmas. Plasma transport equations that include these effects, most notably on diamagnetic-level toroidal plasma flows, have recently been developed. The 3D field perturbations and their plasma effects can be classified according to their toroidal mode number n: low n (say 1-5) resonant (with field line pitch, q = m/n) and non-resonant fields, medium n (∼20, due to toroidal field ripple) and high n (due to microturbulence). Low n non-resonant fields induce a neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) that damps toroidal rotation throughout the plasma towards an offset rotation in the counter-current direction. Recent tokamak experiments have generally confirmed and exploited these predictions by applying external low n non-resonant magnetic perturbations. Medium n toroidal field ripple produces similar effects plus possible ripple-trapping NTV effects and ion direct losses in the edge. A low n (e.g. n = 1) resonant field is mostly shielded by the toroidally rotating plasma at and inside the resonant (rational) surface. If it is large enough it can stop plasma rotation at the rational surface, facilitate magnetic reconnection there and lead to a growing stationary magnetic island (locked mode), which often causes a plasma disruption. Externally applied 3D magnetic perturbations usually have many components. In the plasma their lowest n (e.g. n = 1) externally resonant components can be amplified by kink-type plasma responses, particularly at high β. Low n plasma instabilities (e.g. resistive wall modes, neoclassical tearing modes) cause additional 3D magnetic perturbations in tokamak plasmas. Tearing modes in their nonlinear (Rutherford) regime bifurcate the topology and form magnetic islands. Finally, multiple resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) can, if not shielded by plasma rotation effects, cause local magnetic

  10. Electron diamagnetism and toroidal coupling of tearing modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowley, S.C.; Hastie, R.J.

    1987-10-01

    Using a simple model for the layer of the tearing mode, we demonstrate that toroidally coupled tearing modes with two rational surfaces are most unstable when the ω*'s of the electrons at the rational surfaces are equal. The onset of instability may then occur because of the tuning of ω* rather than the passage of Δ'-like quantities through zero. This mechanism for the onset of instability is sharp since the resonance is narrow. The effect of toroidal rotation is also discussed. 7 refs., 2 figs

  11. Transient eddy currents on finite plane and toroidal conducting surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weissenburger, D.W.; Christensen, U.R.

    1979-04-01

    this report applies a previously presented mesh analysis method to calculate transient eddy currents in conducting surfaces. Example calculations are presented for a planar conducting sheet of finite dimensions and also for a toroidal conducting surface which represents the vacuum vessel of the TFTR. For the toroidal sheet, branch inductances are initially calculated by num erically integrating the vector potential function, then the branch matrix is transformed into a mesh matrix. For the flat sheet, an analytic expression is given which enables direct calculation of the mesh inductance matrix. Streamline plots of the eddy current distributions are shown at successive time steps for each example.

  12. Studies on electromagnetic and charged particles radiations from pinched plasma sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neog, Nirod Kumar

    Nuclear fusion is a process in which under certain condition, two light nuclei combine together to form a new heavier nucleus with consequent release of energy. It is to be noted that two fusing nuclei must come closer and closer until they react to form a single nucleus. But it is very difficult to squeeze of two nuclei to form a heavy nucleus due to the electrostatic coulomb repulsion between them. So, in order to over come this mutual electrostatic repulsion, the nuclei must have enough kinetic energy. This can be achieved by giving thermal energy to the fusing nuclei. Different schemes (like pinch effect, inertial confinement, magnetic confinement, etc.) have come out to provide necessary thermal energy to the fusing nuclei. One of such remarkable scheme, pinch effect, was invented during the mid of last century to achieve nuclear fusion. When a large current is passed through a conducting gas medium, its setup an azimuthal magnetic field, which tends to pinch the gas at the axis, thus generating high temperature and high density conducting ionized gas (plasma). This phenomenon is called as pinch effect. The self-generated magnetic field of the pinching plasma gives necessary thermal energy for fuse of light nuclei. A theory of pinch effect was first put forward by Bennett and later improved by others. The attempts of getting pinch fusion plasma led to give birth of theta-pinch and Z-pinch devices. Though both the approaches have failed to achieve the desired goal due to various plasma instabilities and other factors, still these devices are used in laboratories to study pinch plasma and to understand the mechanisms of neutron production, ion and electron production, and X-ray emission. Various other devices like compressional Z-pinch, exploding wire Z-pinch, gas puff Z-pinch, vacuum spark, gas embedded Z-pinch, capillary discharge plasma and plasma focus based on the principle of Z-pinch have developed in different laboratories all around the world to over

  13. Effects of Toroidal Rotation Sshear on Toroidicity-induced Alfven Eigenmodes in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podesta, M; Fredrickson, E D; Gorelenkov, N N; LeBlanc, B P; Heidbrink, W W; Crocker, N A; Kubota, S

    2010-08-19

    The effects of a sheared toroidal rotation on the dynamics of bursting Toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes are investigated in neutral beam heated plasmas on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 557 (2000)]. The modes have a global character, extending over most of the minor radius. A toroidal rotation shear layer is measured at the location of maximum drive for the modes. Contrary to results from other devices, no clear evidence of increased damping is found. Instead, experiments with simultaneous neutral beam and radio-frequency auxiliary heating show a strong correlation between the dynamics of the modes and the instability drive. It is argued that kinetic effects involving changes in the mode drive and damping mechanisms other than rotation shear, such as continuum damping, are mostly responsible for the bursting dynamics of the modes.

  14. Effects of Toroidal Rotation Shear on Toroidicity-induced Alfven Eigenmodes in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podesta, M.; Bell, R.E.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Gorelenkov, N.N.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Crocker, N.A.; Kubota, S.; Yuh, H.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of a sheared toroidal rotation on the dynamics of bursting Toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes are investigated in neutral beam heated plasmas on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) (M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 557 (2000)). The modes have a global character, extending over most of the minor radius. A toroidal rotation shear layer is measured at the location of maximum drive for the modes. Contrary to results from other devices, no clear evidence of increased damping is found. Instead, experiments with simultaneous neutral beam and radio-frequency auxiliary heating show a strong correlation between the dynamics of the modes and the instability drive. It is argued that kinetic effects involving changes in the mode drive and damping mechanisms other than rotation shear, such as continuum damping, are mostly responsible for the bursting dynamics of the modes.

  15. Spectroscopic diagnosis of foam z-pinch plasmas on SATURN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, T.J.; Derzon, M.S.; Allshouse, G.; Deeney, C.; Jobe, D.; McGurn, J.; MacFarlane, J.J.; Wang, P.

    1996-01-01

    Solid and annular silicon aerogel and agar foams were shot on the accelerator SATURN to study plasma initiation, acceleration, and stagnation. SATURN delivers 7 MA with a 50 nsec rise time to these foam loads. We fielded several spectroscopic diagnostics to measure plasma parameters throughout the z-pinch discharge. A spatially resolved single frame time-gated EUV spectrometer measured the extent of plasma ablation off the surface foam. A time integrated crystal spectrometer showed that characteristic K shell radiation of silicon in the aerogel and of S and Na impurities in the agar were all attenuated when the foam loads were coated with a conductive layer of gold. The time resolved pinhole camera showed that in general the quality of the pinch implosions was poor but improved with increasing efforts to improve current continuity such as prepulse and conductive coatings

  16. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the spherical pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, H.B.; Hilko, B.; Panarella, E.

    1994-01-01

    The spherical pinch (SP) concept is an outgrowth of the inertial confinement model (ICF). Unlike the ICF where instabilities, especially the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, have been studied extensively, the instability study of the spherical pinch has just begun. The Raleigh-Taylor instability is investigated for the first time in the SP in the present work. By using the simple condition for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability ∇p · ∇p < O (density and pressure gradients have opposite direction), we have qualitatively identified the regions for development of instabilities in the SP. It is found that the explosion phase (central discharge) is stable and instabilities take place in the imploding phase. However, the growth rate for the instability is not in exponential form, and the appearance of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability does not prevent the main shock wave from converging to the center of the sphere

  17. D-D fusion experiments using fast z pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spielman, R.B.; Baldwin, G.T.; Cooper, G.

    1994-01-01

    The development of high current (I > 10 MA) drivers provides us with a new tool for the study of neutron-producing plasmas in the thermal regime. The imploded deuterium mass (or collisionality) increases as I 2 and the ability of the driver to heat the plasma to relevant fusion temperatures improves as the power of the driver increases. Additionally, fast ( 2 fiber arrays were imploded in a fast z-pinch configuration on Sandia's Saturn facility generating up to 3 x 10 12 D-D neutrons. These experiments were designed to explore the physics of neutron-generating plasmas in a z-pinch geometry. Specifically, we intended to produce neutrons from a nearly thermal plasma where the electrons and ions have a nearly Maxwellian distribution. This is to be clearly differentiated from the more usual D-D beam-target neutrons generated in many dense plasma focus (DPF) devices

  18. D-D fusion experiments using fast Z pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spielman, R.B.; Baldwin, G.T.; Cooper, G.

    1998-03-01

    The development of high current (I > 10 MA) drivers provides the authors with a new tool for the study of neutron-producing plasmas in the thermal regime. The imploded deuterium mass (or collisionality) increases as I 2 and the ability of the driver to heat the plasma to relevant fusion temperatures improves as the power of the driver increases. Additionally, fast ( 2 fiber arrays were imploded in a fast z-pinch configuration on Sandia's Saturn facility generating up to 3 x 10 12 D-D neutrons. These experiments were designed to explore the physics of neutron-generating plasmas in a z-pinch geometry. Specifically, the authors intended to produce neutrons from a nearly thermal plasma where the electrons and ions have a nearly Maxwellian distribution. This is to be clearly differentiated from the more usual D-D beam-target neutrons generated in many dense plasma focus (DPF) devices

  19. On the dynamics of cylindrical z-pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solov'ev, L.S.

    1984-01-01

    The stationary configurations of cylindrical plasma flow in the framework of two-liquid relativistic electromagnetic gas dynamics (REMG)) and nonlinear radial oscillations of the plasma cylinder with longitudinal current in the framework of classical monoliquid MGD are considered. It is shown that at sufficiently high conductivity Z-pinch is stable relative to one-dimensional radial perturbations and its motion represents respectively nonlinear radial oscillations. In case of a rather low conductivity or low particle concentration there is in cross section a stability also in relation to the development of sausage type instability. The performed investigations of cylindrical equilibrium and radial oscillations give a qualitative representation on plasma behaviour in Z-pinch at the initial stage of it compression and expansion as well as on motion in an average plane of the developing sausage type instability

  20. Seeded perturbations in wire array z-pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, Allen Conrad; Kantsyrev, Victor Leonidovich; Wunsch, Scott Edward; Oliver, Bryan Velten; Lebedev, Sergey V.; Safronova, Alla S.; Maxwell, J.; McKenney, John Lee; Ampleford, David J.; Rapley, J.; Bott, S.C.; Palmer, J.B.A.; Bland, Simon Nicholas; Jones, Brent Manley; Chittenden, Jeremy Paul; Garasi, Christopher Joseph; Hall, Gareth Neville; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Deeney, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    The impact of 3D structure on wire array z-pinch dynamics is a topic of current interest, and has been studied by the controlled seeding of wire perturbations. First, Al wires were etched at Sandia, creating 20% radial perturbations with variable axial wavelength. Observations of magnetic bubble formation in the etched regions during experiments on the MAGPIE accelerator are discussed and compared to 3D MHD modeling. Second, thin NaF coatings of 1 mm axial extent were deposited on Al wires and fielded on the Zebra accelerator. Little or no axial transport of the NaF spectroscopic dopant was observed in spatially resolved K-shell spectra, which places constraints on particle diffusivity in dense z-pinch plasmas. Finally, technology development for seeding perturbations is discussed

  1. Characterisation of Plasma Filled Rod Pinch electron beam diode operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, James; Bland, Simon; Chittenden, Jeremy

    2016-10-01

    The plasma filled rod pinch diode (aka PFRP) offers a small radiographic spot size and a high brightness source. It operates in a very similar to plasma opening switches and dense plasma focus devices - with a plasma prefill, supplied via a number of simple coaxial plasma guns, being snowploughed along a thin rod cathode, before detaching at the end. The aim of this study is to model the PFRP and understand the factors that affect its performance, potentially improving future output. Given the dependence on the PFRP on the prefill, we are making detailed measurements of the density (1015-1018 cm-3), velocity, ionisation and temperature of the plasma emitted from a plasma gun/set of plasma guns. This will then be used to provide initial conditions to the Gorgon 3D MHD code, and the dynamics of the entire rod pinch process studied.

  2. Tungsten Z-Pinch Long Implosions on the Saturn Generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOUGLAS, MELISSA R.; DEENEY, Christopher; SPIELMAN, RICK B.; COVERDALE, CHRISTINE A.; RODERICK, N.F.; HAINES, M.G.

    1999-01-01

    Recent success on the Saturn and Z accelerators at Sandia National Laboratories have demonstrated the ability to scale z-pinch parameters to increasingly larger current pulsed power facilities. Next generation machines will require even larger currents (>20 MA), placing further demands on pulsed power technology. To this end, experiments have been carried out on Saturn operating in a long pulse mode, investigating the potential of lower voltages and longer implosion times while still maintaining pinch fidelity. High wire number, 25 mm diameter tungsten arrays were imploded with implosion times ranging from 130 to 240 ns. The results were comparable to those observed in the Saturn short pulse mode, with risetimes on the order of 4.5 to 6.5 ns. Experimental data will be presented, along with two dimensional radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations used to explain and reproduce the experiment

  3. The Superconducting Toroid for the New International AXion Observatory (IAXO)

    CERN Document Server

    Shilon, I.; Silva, H.; Wagner, U.; ten Kate, H.H.J.

    2013-01-01

    IAXO, the new International AXion Observatory, will feature the most ambitious detector for solar axions to date. Axions are hypothetical particles which were postulated to solve one of the puzzles arising in the standard model of particle physics, namely the strong CP (Charge conjugation and Parity) problem. This detector aims at achieving a sensitivity to the coupling between axions and photons of one order of magnitude beyond the limits of the current detector, the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST). The IAXO detector relies on a high-magnetic field distributed over a very large volume to convert solar axions to detectable X-ray photons. Inspired by the ATLAS barrel and end-cap toroids, a large superconducting toroid is being designed. The toroid comprises eight, one meter wide and twenty one meters long racetrack coils. The assembled toroid is sized 5.2 m in diameter and 25 m in length and its mass is about 250 tons. The useful field in the bores is 2.5 T while the peak magnetic field in the windings is 5....

  4. Toroidal and poloidal momentum transport studies in Tokamaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tala, T.; Andrew, Y.; Giroud, C.

    2007-01-01

    The present status of understanding of toroidal and poloidal momentum transport in tokamaks is presented in this paper. Similar energy confinement and momentum confinement times, i.e. τE/τφ ≈ 1 have been reported on several tokamaks. It is more important though, to study the local transport both ...

  5. Toroidal and poloidal momentum transport studies in JET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tala, T.; Andrew, Y.; Crombe, K.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on the recent studies of toroidal and poloidal momentum transport in JET. The ratio of the global energy confinement time to the momentum confinement is found to be close to tau(E)/tau(phi) = 1 except for the low density or low collisionality discharges where the ratio is tau(E...

  6. Toroidal bubbles with circulation in ideal hydrodynamics: A variational approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruban, V.P.; Juul Rasmussen, J.

    2003-01-01

    Incompressible, inviscid, irrotational, unsteady flows with circulation Gamma around a distorted toroidal bubble are considered. A general variational principle that determines the evolution of the bubble shape is formulated. For a two-dimensional (2D) cavity with a constant area A, exact...

  7. Preparing an ATLAS toroid magnet end-cap for lowering

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2007-01-01

    One of the two 13-m high toroid magnet end-caps for the ATLAS experiment being transported from the construction hall to the experimental area. The end-cap will be lowered into the ATLAS cavern and attached to an end of the detector.

  8. First ATLAS Barrel Toroid coil casing arrives at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The first of eight 25-metre long coil casings for the ATLAS experiment's barrel toroid magnet system arrived at CERN on Saturday 2 March by road from Heidelberg. This structure will be part of the largest superconducting toroid magnet ever made.   The first coil casing for the toroidal magnets of Atlas arrives at Building 180. This is the start of an enormous three-dimensional jigsaw puzzle. Each of the eight sets of double pancake coils will be housed inside aluminium coil casings, which in turn will be held inside a stainless steel vacuum vessel. A huge construction, the casing that arrived at CERN measures 25 metres in length and 5 metres in width. It weighs 20 tones. And this is just the beginning of the toroid jigsaw: by early April a batch of four double pancake coils, which altogether weighs 65 tones, will arrive from Ansaldo in Italy. The first vacuum vessel will also be arriving from Felguera in Spain this month. It will take about two years for all these 25 m long structures of casings, coils a...

  9. The problem of evolution of toroidal plasma equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostomarov, D.; Zaitsev, F.; Shishkin, A.

    1999-03-01

    This paper is devoted to an advanced mathematical model for a self-consistent description of the evolution of free boundary toroidal plasmas, with a description of numerical algorithms for the solution of the appropriate non-linear system of integro-differential equations, and discussion of some results from the model. (author)

  10. Barrel Toroid fully charged to nominal field, and it works!

    CERN Multimedia

    Herman ten Kate

    After a few weeks of testing up to intermediate currents, finally, on Thursday evening November 9, the current in the Barrel Toroid was pushed up to its nominal value of 20500 A and even 500 A beyond this value to prove that we have some margin. It went surprisingly well. Of course, the 8 coils forming the toroid were already tested individually at the surface but still, some surprise may have come from those parts added to the toroid in the cavern for the first time like the 8 cryoring sections linking the coils as well as the valve box at the bottom in sector 13 regulating the helium flow or the current lead cryostat on the top in sector 5. No training quenches, nothing to worry about, and the test was concluded with a fast dump triggered at 00:40 in the very early morning of November 10. (left) The toroid current during the evening and night of November 9. (right) The test crew oscillated between fear and hope while looking at the control panels as the current approached 21kA. Big relief was in the...

  11. Low-frequency fluctuations in a pure toroidal magnetized plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xenon, krypton and argon plasmas are formed at a fixed toroidal magnetic field of 0.024 T, with a peak density of ~1011 cm−3, ~4 × 1010 cm −3 and ~2 × 1010 cm −3 respectively. The experimental investiga- tion of time-averaged plasma parameter reveals that their profiles remain insensitive to ion mass and suggests that ...

  12. Construction and initial operation of the Advanced Toroidal Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyon, J.F.; Bigelow, T.S.; Colchin, R.J.; Crume, E.C.; Dunlop, J.L.; England, A.C.; Glowienka, J.C.; Goulding, R.H.; Harris, J.H.; Hills, D.L.; Hiroe, S.; Horton, L.D.; Howe, H.C.; Isler, R.C.; Jernigan, T.C.; Langley, R.A.; Menon, M.M.; Mioduszewski, P.K.; Murakami, M.; Neilson, G.H.; Rasmussen, D.A.; Rome, J.A.; Saltmarsh, M.J.; White, T.L.; Wilgen, J.B.; Wing, W.R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Bell, G.L. (Auburn Univ., AL (USA)); Bell, J.D.; Morris, R.N.; Whitson, J.C. (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Computing and Telecommunications Div., Oak Ridge, TN (US)); Benson, R.D.; Chipley, K.K.; Cole, M.J.; Johnson, R.L.; Nelson, B.E.; Thompson, P.B.; White, J.A. (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Engineering Div., Oak Ridge, TN (US)); Wade, M.R. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) torsatron was designed on a physics basis for access to the second stability regime and on an engineering basis for independent fabrication of high-accuracy components. The actual construction, assembly, and initial operation of ATF are compared with the characteristics expected during the design phase.

  13. Evidence of Inward Toroidal Momentum Convection in the JET Tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tala, T.; Zastrow, K.-D.; Ferreira, J.

    2009-01-01

    Experiments have been carried out on the Joint European Torus tokamak to determine the diffusive and convective momentum transport. Torque, injected by neutral beams, was modulated to create a periodic perturbation in the toroidal rotation velocity. Novel transport analysis shows the magnitude an...

  14. Feedback control of resistive wall modes in toroidal devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.Q.

    2002-01-01

    Active feedback of resistive wall modes is investigated using cylindrical theory and toroidal calculations. For tokamaks, good performance is obtained by using active coils with one set of coils in the poloidal direction and sensors detecting the poloidal field inside the first wall, located at the outboard mid-plane. With suitable width of the feedback coil such a system can give robust control with respect to variations in plasma current, pressure and rotation. Calculations are shown for ITER-like geometry with a double wall. The voltages and currents in the active coils are well within the design limits for ITER. Calculations for RFP's are presented for a finite number of coils both in the poloidal and toroidal directions. With 4 coils in the poloidal and 24 coils in the toroidal direction, all non-resonant modes can be stabilized both at high and low theta. Several types of sensors, including radial and internal poloidal or toroidal sensors, can stabilize the RWM, but poloidal sensors give the most robust performance. (author)

  15. Theoretical studies of non inductive current drive in compact toroids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farengo, R; Lifschitz, AF; Caputi, KI; Arista, NR; Clemente, RA

    Three non inductive current drive methods that can be applied to compact toroids axe studied. The use of neutral beams to drive current in field reversed configurations and spheromaks is studied using a Monte Carlo code that includes a complete ionization package and follows the exact particle

  16. Toroidal and poloidal momentum transport studies in tokamaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tala, T.; Crombé, K.; Vries, P.C. de

    2007-01-01

    The present status of understanding of toroidal and poloidal momentum transport in tokamaks is presented in this paper. Similar energy confinement and momentum confinement times, i.e. τE/τφ ≈ 1 have been reported on several tokamaks. It is more important though, to study the local transport both ...

  17. Calculation of quasispherical liner compression in a compact toroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belikov, V.V.; Goloviznin, V.M.; Kurtmullaev, R.Kh.; Semenov, V.N.

    This work considers the evolution of a compact toroid as the volume and shape of the cavity changes, all the way up to the values of the degree of compression K which are of practical interest, i.e., K approx. = 1000, at which thermonuclear plasma parameters can be achieved

  18. Sausage mode of a pinched charged particle beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E.P.

    1981-01-01

    The axisymmetric oscillations of a self-pinched charged particle beam are analyzed using a dispersion relation derived from a 3/2 dimensional model. This calculation includes the effects of rounded profiles, finite conductivity, a steady return current, and phase mix damping among particle orbits. However, only the lowest order radial mode of distortion is treated, and this is done in an approximate fashion

  19. Electron temperature distribution measurement in Z pinch by the laser radiation absorption method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkisov, G.S.; Ehtlisher, B.

    1995-01-01

    The paper proposes a new method for measuring the temperature of internal region of Z-pinch; the method is based on laser probing of plasma and simultaneous measurements of absorption profiles and interferential run-on of probing radiation phase inside Z-pinch. It is shown that opaque pinch region which occurs laser probing experiments is related to the absorption of radiation. It is shown that laser radiation which has passed through Z-pinch features sufficiently high degree of coherence which enables interferometry of absorption region. The values of electron density and electron temperature were recovered in the experiments with Z-pinches (produced after an explosion of 20 μm aluminium wire by 50 ns pulse of current of about 250 kA for necking the pinch of ∼ 1.4 x 10 20 cm -3 and ∼ 530 eV, respectively. 11 refs., 4 figs

  20. Simulation tools for pinched-electron-beam radiographic diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley Humphries

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe capabilities of an integrated software suite to simulate pinched-electron-beam diodes for pulsed radiography. In contrast to other reported work using particle-in-cell methods, we employ a ray-tracing code (Trak with advanced capabilities for modeling beam-generated magnetic fields. Ray tracing is a direct approach to a steady-state solution and involves less work than a particle-in-cell calculation. The second software component, GamBet, is a new Monte Carlo code for radiation transport that incorporates effects of the complex electric and magnetic fields at the radiation target. The ray-tracing approach exhibits good convergence in calculations for the diode geometry of the compact radiography (CRAD program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. With a 1.5 MV, 30 ns driver, we predict that the diode can produce a beam with axial length ∼1  mm that generates isotropic bremsstrahlung radiation exceeding 1 rad at 1 m. The ray-tracing procedure encounters convergence problems when applied to the rod-pinch geometry, a configuration used in several pulsed radiographic machines. We observe a fundamental difference in the nature of electron orbits in the two diodes. There is an increased chance for particle-orbit feedback in the rod pinch, so that equilibrium solutions are sensitive to small changes in emission characteristics.

  1. Pinch Related Research At Institute For Plasma Research, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyam, Anurag

    2006-01-01

    Several pinch related experiment, their drivers and related diagnostics are being developed in our laboratory. The first set of experiments is to investigate various aspects of magnetized target fusion (MTF/MAGO). To drive the liner, in Z or theta pinch configuration, a 1.2 MJ, 3.6 MA capacitor bank is developed. For liner diagnostics flash radiography, VISAR and pyrometery are being developed. To produce magnetized (target) plasma a 120 kJ, 3 MA and several other banks are developed. Hot magnetized Plasma will be diagnosed by optical schlieren, interferometery and X-Ray spectrometry. A terra-watt system consisting of a Marx bank and water line delivering 800 kA at 1.6 MV will be commissioned, soon. The device will be used to study different pinch (wire array) configurations for production of electro-magnetic radiations. Smaller pulsed power systems, consisting of 1MV/500 kV Marx bank/tesla transformer and than water or solid state (cables) pulse forming network (coax) are also being developed for capillary discharge and other experiments. Two plasma foci experiments are also being conducted. The effort is produce a repetitively operating compact plasma focus.

  2. Pinched Ion Beam Transport in the Target Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbluth, M.; Lee, E. P.; Briggs, R. J.

    2000-10-01

    Ion beam pulses for fusion reactors have a very high charge per unit length and may carry a high current. In order to avoid thermal blowup and focus to a small spot, it is required to be charge neutral and desirable to have a pinching magnetic field. This requires that the neutralizing electrons flow relative to the ions, and of course the pinch behavior depends on the return current path. Since the electrons have small gyroradii a fluid, charge neutral model is adopted. After the pulse has been well detached from the chamber entrance hole and is distant from all emitting surfaces fields, we look for a steady-state solution in the beam frame with electrons recirculating. We find the conditions for such "plasmoid" solutions, indicating the desirability of shaping the radial profile and find that while the outer part of the beam pulse is blown out, the core may be reasonably well pinch-confined. The effects of interactions with background gas and plasma are discussed. We plan to study possible instabilities-kink, sausage, Rayleigh-Taylor and filamentation.

  3. Reconsideration of the m=0 Z-pinch stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheffel, J.; Coppins, M.

    1993-01-01

    Possible paths for obtaining linear stability against the m=0 mode in the Z-pinch are studied. Using a generalized energy principle, the necessary and sufficient Chew-Goldberger-Low (CGL) m=0 stability criterion is derived. This criterion is less restrictive than that of ideal MHD, although it also requires the boundary plasma pressure to be finite. It is shown that the edge pressure cannot be stably upheld by a surface current. By instead assuming a finite pressure external gas, it is found that an edge pressure to on-axis pressure ratio of 0.5 is required for stability of a constant current density profile. A parabolic current density profile lowers the limit to the value 0.17. The growth rates are shown to be monotonically decreasing as a function of the external gas pressure. Detailed derivations of the boundary conditions are also given. The results aid in clarifying the experimental stability of four major Z-pinch experiments. Finite Larmor radius stabilization is hence required to maintain stability in future fibre pinch experiments in vacuum, implying line densities less than 10 19 m -1 . (author). 28 refs, 10 figs

  4. Grip and Pinch Strength Norms for Michigan Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel M. Phillips M.S., OTRL

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to create a norm reference of current grip and pinch strength norms for working-age Michigan adults. This normative study included a convenience sample of 179 volunteers who were employees at car plants in South East Michigan or hospital sites in West Michigan. Participants’ ages ranged from between 20 and 62 years of age with a mean age of 49.15 years. There were 78 females (44% and 101 males (56%. Subjects were classified by gender and in the age categories of ages 20 to 49 years and ages 50-62 years. Grip and pinch strength norms were collected following the American Society of Hand Therapy protocol. The norms from these working adults were calculated with descriptive statistics for males and females in two age classifications: ages 20 to 49 and ages 50 to 62 years. Standard Errors (SE are better than the 1985 norms for both males and females ages 20 to 49 years. SEs are higher than the ages 20 to 49 years’ norms for the ages 50 to 62 years age categories in both males and females. These norms offer a point of comparison for clinicians to use for clients in Michigan who are ages 20 to 62 years and who have a goal to improve their grip strength. Clients’ grip and pinch strength could be compared to their age level or gender norms using the comparison for one standard deviation above, below, or at the means.

  5. Dynamical conservation of invariants by toroidal trajectories of guiding centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misguich, J.H.

    1992-03-01

    The classical problem of calculating toroidal trajectories is treated here by comparing the results of two different methods in a given magnetic configuration, a standard divergence-free magnetic field model. The present work consists of adapting the analytical criteria of MERCIER et al. for classical toroidal trajectories, and to examine numerically the dynamical conservation of the toroidal invariant. The first method is based on the evolution equations for the guiding centres. These equations are then solved numerically (code TRATORIA) and the trajectories are drawn for different initial conditions. We use a modified standard model for the magnetic field, which insures a manifestly divergence-free field. Moreover we take into account the contribution of the poloidal field to the total strength of the magnetic field. These corrections contribute to the analytical expression of the conserved toroidal momentum. The latter is verified to be conserved by the present numerical simulation with a precision generally of the order of 10 -14 . The second method is based on the analytical treatment of the invariants to yield a semi-analytical (semi graphical) determination of the intersection point of a given trajectory with the equatorial plane. Both methods allows one to recover well-known toroidal trajectories with passing and trapped particles (bananas). The present analysis brings a clear description of some other, less well-known types of trajectories, namely the stagnation orbits, the smallest D-shape banana, some small circulating de-flated bananas, some huge classical bananas (potatoes), and the largest puffed bananas which exhibit only local mirroring, along with several kind of escaping or open trajectories which are of importance for fast ion losses and target damages in the machines

  6. Preliminary study of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in wire-array Z-pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Kaihui; Feng Kaiming; Li Qiang; Gao Chunming

    2000-01-01

    It is important to research into the MHD Rayleigh-Taylor instability developed in Z-pinch implosion. A snowplough model of the single wire Z-pinch is presented. The perturbation amplitude of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the wire-array Z-pinch is analyzed quantitatively. Sheared axial flow is put forward to mitigate and reduce the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. And other approaches used to mitigate MHD instability in such a super-fast process are explored

  7. The ZaP Flow Z-Pinch Project - Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shumlak, Uri [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Nelson, Brian A. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2013-12-31

    The ZaP Flow Z-Pinch Project is a project to extend the performance of the flow Z-pinch experiment at the University of Washington to investigate and isolate the relevant physics of the stabilizing effect of plasma flow. Experimental plasmas have exhibited an enhanced stability under certain operating parameters which generate a flow state (axial flows in Z-pinches and VH mode in tokamaks). Flow has also been suggested as the stabilizing mechanism in astrophysical jets.

  8. Drop Pinch-Off for Discrete Flows from a Capillary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson M.C.T.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The problem of drop formation and pinch-off from a capillary tube under the influence of gravity has been extensively studied when the internal capillary pressure gradient is constant. This ensures a continuous time independent flow field inside the capillary tube typically of the Poiseuille flow type. Characteristic drop ejection behaviour includes: periodic drop ejection, drop ejection with associated satellite production, complex dripping, chaotic behaviour and jetting. It is well known that this characteristic behaviour is governed by the Weber (We and Ohnesorge (Oh numbers (for a given Bond number and may be delineated in a We verses Oh operability diagram. An in-depth physical understanding of drop ejection is also of great importance to industry where the tight control of drop size and ejection velocity are of critical importance in industrial processes such as sealants used in electronics assembly and inkjet printing. However, the use of such a continuous flow approach for drop ejection in industry is often impractical since such flows cannot be operator controlled. For this reason it is important to investigate so-called discrete pipe flows where the flow can be turned on and off at will. This means the flow inside the pipe is now time-dependent being controlled in a step-wise fashion. As a first stage in the investigation of drop pinch-off behaviour in discrete pipe flows this paper will study the critical pinch-off time required for drop ejection starting from a pendant drop. This is the discrete amount of time the pipe flow is turned on for in order for a drop to be ejected from the capillary. A Newtonian incompressible free-surface CFD flow code developed at the University of Leeds is used to investigate the critical pinch-off time for a range of internal pipe velocities (the central flow maximum in Poiseuille flow. It is found that the time required for drop ejection to occur decreases exponentially with internal pipe velocity

  9. Self-pinched transport of intense ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ottinger, P.F.; Neri, J.M.; Stephanakis, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    Electron beams with substantial net currents have been routinely propagated in the self-pinched mode for the past two decades. However, as the physics of gas breakdown and beam neutralization is different for ion beams, previous predictions indicated insufficient net current for pinching so that ion beam self-pinched transport (SPT) was assumed impossible. Nevertheless, recent numerical simulations using the IPROP code have suggested that ion SPT is possible. These results have prompted initial experiments to investigate SPT of ion beams. A 100-kA, 1.2-MeV, 3-cm-radius proton beam, generated on the Gamble II pulsed-power accelerator at NRL, has been injected into helium in the 30- to 250-mTorr regime to study this phenomenon. Evidence of self-pinched ion beam transport was observed in the 35- to 80-mTorr SPT pressure window predicted by IPROP. Measured signals from a time- and space-resolved scattered proton diagnostic and a time-integrated Li(Cu) nuclear activation diagnostic, both of which measure protons striking a 10-cm diameter target 50 cm into the transport region, are significantly larger in this pressure window than expected for ballistic transport. These results are consistent with significant self-magnetic fields and self-pinching of the ion beam. On the other hand, time-integrated signals from these same two diagnostics are consistent with ballistic transport at pressures above and below the SPT window. Interferometric electron line-density measurements, acquired during beam injection into the helium gas, show insignificant ionization below 35 mTorr, a rapidly rising ionization fraction with pressure in the SPT window, and a plateau in ionization fraction at about 2% for pressures above 80 mTorr. These and other results are consistent with the physical picture for SPT. IPROP simulations, which closely model the Gamble II experimental conditions, produce results that are in qualitative agreement with the experimental results. The advantages of SPT for

  10. High energy density Z-pinch plasmas using flow stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shumlak, U., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Golingo, R. P., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Nelson, B. A., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Bowers, C. A., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Doty, S. A., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Forbes, E. G., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Hughes, M. C., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Kim, B., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Knecht, S. D., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Lambert, K. K., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Lowrie, W., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Ross, M. P., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu; Weed, J. R., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu [Aerospace and Energetics Research Program, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, 98195-2250 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    The ZaP Flow Z-Pinch research project[1] at the University of Washington investigates the effect of sheared flows on MHD instabilities. Axially flowing Z-pinch plasmas are produced that are 100 cm long with a 1 cm radius. The plasma remains quiescent for many radial Alfvén times and axial flow times. The quiescent periods are characterized by low magnetic mode activity measured at several locations along the plasma column and by stationary visible plasma emission. Plasma evolution is modeled with high-resolution simulation codes – Mach2, WARPX, NIMROD, and HiFi. Plasma flow profiles are experimentally measured with a multi-chord ion Doppler spectrometer. A sheared flow profile is observed to be coincident with the quiescent period, and is consistent with classical plasma viscosity. Equilibrium is determined by diagnostic measurements: interferometry for density; spectroscopy for ion temperature, plasma flow, and density[2]; Thomson scattering for electron temperature; Zeeman splitting for internal magnetic field measurements[3]; and fast framing photography for global structure. Wall stabilization has been investigated computationally and experimentally by removing 70% of the surrounding conducting wall to demonstrate no change in stability behavior.[4] Experimental evidence suggests that the plasma lifetime is only limited by plasma supply and current waveform. The flow Z-pinch concept provides an approach to achieve high energy density plasmas,[5] which are large, easy to diagnose, and persist for extended durations. A new experiment, ZaP-HD, has been built to investigate this approach by separating the flow Z-pinch formation from the radial compression using a triaxial-electrode configuration. This innovation allows more detailed investigations of the sheared flow stabilizing effect, and it allows compression to much higher densities than previously achieved on ZaP by reducing the linear density and increasing the pinch current. Experimental results and

  11. Energy balance in a Z pinch with suppressed Rayleigh–Taylor instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baksht, R. B.; Oreshkin, V. I.; Rousskikh, A. G.; Zhigalin, A. S.

    2018-03-01

    At present Z-pinch has evolved into a powerful plasma source of soft x-ray. This paper considers the energy balance in a radiating metallic gas-puff Z pinch. In this type of Z pinch, a power-law density distribution is realized, promoting suppression of Rayleigh–Taylor (RT) instabilities that occur in the pinch plasma during compression. The energy coupled into the pinch plasma, is determined as the difference between the total energy delivered to the load from the generator and the magnetic energy of the load inductance. A calibrated voltage divider and a Rogowski coil were used to determine the coupled energy and the load inductance. Time-gated optical imaging of the pinch plasma showed its stable compression up to the stagnation phase. The pinch implosion was simulated using a 1D two-temperature radiative magnetohydrodynamic code. Comparison of the experimental and simulation results has shown that the simulation adequately describes the pinch dynamics for conditions in which RT instability is suppressed. It has been found that the proportion of the Ohmic heating in the energy balance of a Z pinch with suppressed RT instability is determined by Spitzer resistance and makes no more than ten percent.

  12. A Reactor Development Scenario for the FuZE Sheared-Flow Stabilized Z-pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Harry S.; Higginson, D. P.; Schmidt, A.; Tummel, K. K.; Shumlak, U.; Nelson, B. A.; Claveau, E. L.; Forbes, E. G.; Golingo, R. P.; Stepanov, A. D.; Weber, T. R.; Zhang, Y.

    2017-10-01

    We present a conceptual design, scaling calculations, and development path for a pulsed fusion reactor based on a flow-stabilized Z-pinch. Experiments performed on the ZaP and ZaP-HD devices have largely demonstrated the basic physics of sheared-flow stabilization at pinch currents up to 100 kA. Initial experiments on the FuZE device, a high-power upgrade of ZaP, have achieved 20 usec of stability at pinch current 100-200 kA and pinch diameter few mm for a pinch length of 50 cm. Scaling calculations based on a quasi-steady-state power balance show that extending stable duration to 100 usec at a pinch current of 1.5 MA and pinch length of 50 cm, results in a reactor plant Q 5. Future performance milestones are proposed for pinch currents of: 300 kA, where Te and Ti are calculated to exceed 1-2 keV; 700 kA, where DT fusion power would be expected to exceed pinch input power; and 1 MA, where fusion energy per pulse exceeds input energy per pulse. This work funded by USDOE ARPA-E and performed under the auspices of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-734770.

  13. Achieving a high-Q response in metamaterials by manipulating the toroidal excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuancheng; Zhang, Fuli; Shen, Nian-Hai; Fu, Quanhong; Wei, Zeyong; Li, Hongqiang; Soukoulis, Costas M.

    2018-03-01

    The excitation of toroidal multipoles in metamaterials is investigated for a high-Q response at a subwavelength scale. In this paper, we explore the optimization of toroidal excitations in a planar metamaterial comprised of asymmetric split ring resonators (ASRRs). It is found that the scattering power of a toroidal dipole can be remarkably strengthened by adjusting the characteristic parameter of ASRRs: an asymmetric factor. Interestingly, the improvement in toroidal excitation accompanies an increment of the Q factor of the toroidal metamaterial; it is shown that both the scattering power of the toroidal dipole and the Q factor increase more than one order by changing the asymmetric factor of ASRRs. The optimization in the excitation of a toroidal multipole provides an opportunity to further increase the Q factor of the metamaterial and boost light-matter interactions at the subwavelength scale for potential applications in low-power nonlinear processing and sensitive photonic applications.

  14. Stabilization of ballooning modes with sheared toroidal rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.L.; Waelbroeck, F.L.; Hassam, A.B.; Waltz, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    Stabilization of magnetohydrodynamic ballooning modes by sheared toroidal rotation is demonstrated using a shifted circle equilibrium model. A generalized ballooning mode representation is used to eliminate the fast Alfven wave, and an initial value code solves the resulting equations. The s-α diagram (magnetic shear versus pressure gradient) of ballooning mode theory is extended to include rotational shear. In the ballooning representation, the modes shift periodically along the field line to the next point of unfavorable curvature. The shift frequency (dΩ/dq, where Ω is the angular toroidal velocity and q is the safety factor) is proportional to the rotation shear and inversely proportional to the magnetic shear. Stability improves with increasing shift frequency and direct stable access to the second stability regime occurs when this frequency is approximately one-quarter to one-half the Alfven frequency, ω A =V A /qR. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  15. Shock absorbing properties of toroidal shells under compression, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugita, Yuji

    1985-01-01

    The author has previously presented the static load-deflection relations of a toroidal shell subjected to axisymmetric compression between rigid plates and those of its outer half when subjected to lateral compression. In both these cases, the analytical method was based on the incremental Rayleigh-Ritz method. In this paper, the effects of compression angle and strain rate on the load-deflection relations of the toroidal shell are investigated for its use as a shock absorber for the radioactive material shipping cask which must keep its structural integrity even after accidental falls at any angle. Static compression tests have been carried out at four angles of compression, 10 0 , 20 0 , 50 0 , 90 0 and the applications of the preceding analytical method have been discussed. Dynamic compression tests have also been performed using the free-falling drop hammer. The results are compared with those in the static compression tests. (author)

  16. Compact toroid injection experiment in JFT-2M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, T.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2001-01-01

    Compact toroid (CT)injection experiments with H-mode plasmas were carried out for the first time in JFT-2M. The soft x-ray emission profile shows central penetration of CT in H-mode plasma heated by 1.2 MW NBI as well as in OH plasmas, with toroidal magnetic field of 0.8 T. The line-averaged electron density rapidly increased by Δn-bar e ∝0.2x10 19 m -3 at a rate of 4x10 21 m -3 /s in H-mode and the fuelling efficiency was roughly 20%.The asymmetrical radial profile in the soft x-ray emission was produced for ∝ 50 μs by the central penetration of CT. (author)

  17. Magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium of axisymmetric systems with toroidal rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansur, N.L.P.

    1986-01-01

    A model for studying magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium of axisymetrically confined plasma with toroidal rotation, extended to the Grad. Shafranov equation is presented. The expression used for the scalar pressure is modifiec, and the influence of toroidal magnetic field is included, The equation for general motion of axisymetrically confined plasma, particularizing for rotation movements is described. Two cases are compared: one supposes the entropy as a function of poloidal magnetic flux and other supposes the temperature as a function of flux. The equations for these two cases obtaining a simplified expression by others approximations are established. The proposed model is compared with Shibata model, which uses density as function of flux, and with the ideal spheromak model. A set of cases taking in account experimental data is studied. (M.C.K.) [pt

  18. A toroidal inductor integrated in a standard CMOS process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandi, Luca; Andreani, Pietro; Temporiti, Enrico

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a toroidal inductor integrated in a standard 0.13 um CMOS process. Finite-elements preliminary simulations are provided to prove the validity of the concept. In order to extract fundamental parameters by means of direct calculations, two different and well-known approaches are......H and 1.1 nH up to 20 GHz (physical limit for the measurement equipment) and a quality factor approaching 10 at 15 GHz. No self-resonance is observed within the measurement range.......This paper presents a toroidal inductor integrated in a standard 0.13 um CMOS process. Finite-elements preliminary simulations are provided to prove the validity of the concept. In order to extract fundamental parameters by means of direct calculations, two different and well-known approaches...

  19. Kinetic global analysis of Alfven eigenmodes in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuyama, A.

    2002-01-01

    Systematic study on low to medium n (toroidal mode number) Alfven eigenmodes (AE) in tokamaks and helical systems is presented. Linear stability of AE in the presence of energetic ions was studied using the kinetic full-wave code TASK/WM.We have reproduced the destabilizing effect of toroidal co-rotation on TAE for JT-60U parameters. We have found the existence of reversed-shear-induced Alfven eigenmode (RSAE) which localizes near the q minimum in a reversed magnetic shear configuration. Two kinds of mode structures are identified for energetic particle mode (EPM) below the TAE frequency gap. The coupling to lower-frequency modes such as drift waves and MHD modes as well as the effect of trapped particles are also taken into account. For a helical plasma, the existence of GAE in the central region and TAE in the off-axis region was confirmed. (author)

  20. Control and monitoring of the Tore Supra toroidal superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prou, M.

    1989-07-01

    Light nuclei controlled fusion reactions are seen as a possible way to produce nuclear energy. For this reason, the interest in hot plasma researches in tokamaks has increased. The Tore Supra main characteristic is related to the superconducting magnet coils. They allow a suitable energy balance, however, they require an accurate and preventive fault detection. The Tore Supra machine and the different methods to detect a transition (from superconducting to normal mode) in the toroidal coils are described. The voltage of the coils, the pressure of the helium superfluid at 1.8 K and the electric current in the circuit parallel resistances, are measured. A computer aided control system allows the toroidal field monitoring (current in the coils, fault detection). The superconducting magnet configuration chosen for Tore Supra seems to be suitable for future large Tokamak devices [fr