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Sample records for toluene-degrading methanogenic consortium

  1. Metabolism of 3-methylindole by a methanogenic consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jidong Gu; Berry, D.F. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg (United States))

    1992-08-01

    A methanogenic 3-methylindole (3-MI)-degrading consortium, enriched from wetland soil, completely mineralized 3-MI. Degradation proceeded through an initial hydroxylation reaction forming 3-methyloxindole. The consortium was unable to degrade oxindole or isatin, suggesting a new pathway for 3-MI fermentation. 3-Methylindole was identified by mass spectroscopy, ultraviolet spectroscopy, and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry.

  2. Multiple Syntrophic Interactions in a Terephthalate-Degrading Methanogenic Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lykidis, Athanasios; Chen, Chia-Lung; Tringe, Susannah G.; McHardy, Alice C.; Copeland, Alex 5; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2010-08-05

    Terephthalate (TA) is one of the top 50 chemicals produced worldwide. Its production results in a TA-containing wastewater that is treated by anaerobic processes through a poorly understood methanogenic syntrophy. Using metagenomics, we characterized the methanogenic consortium tinside a hyper-mesophilic (i.e., between mesophilic and thermophilic), TA-degrading bioreactor. We identified genes belonging to dominant Pelotomaculum species presumably involved in TA degradation through decarboxylation, dearomatization, and modified ?-oxidation to H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} and acetate. These intermediates are converted to CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} by three novel hyper-mesophilic methanogens. Additional secondary syntrophic interactions were predicted in Thermotogae, Syntrophus and candidate phyla OP5 and WWE1 populations. The OP5 encodes genes capable of anaerobic autotrophic butyrate production and Thermotogae, Syntrophus and WWE1 have the genetic potential to oxidize butyrate to COsub 2}/H{sub 2} and acetate. These observations suggest that the TA-degrading consortium consists of additional syntrophic interactions beyond the standard H{sub 2}-producing syntroph ? methanogen partnership that may serve to improve community stability.

  3. Microbial characterization of toluene-degrading denitrifying consortia obtained from terrestrial and marine ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Y-J; Joo, Y-H; Hong, I-Y; Ryu, H-W; Cho, K-S

    2004-10-01

    The degradation characteristics of toluene coupled to nitrate reduction were investigated in enrichment culture and the microbial communities of toluene-degrading denitrifying consortia were characterized by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) technique. Anaerobic nitrate-reducing bacteria were enriched from oil-contaminated soil samples collected from terrestrial (rice field) and marine (tidal flat) ecosystems. Enriched consortia degraded toluene in the presence of nitrate as a terminal electron acceptor. The degradation rate of toluene was affected by the initial substrate concentration and co-existence of other hydrocarbons. The types of toluene-degrading denitrifying consortia depended on the type of ecosystem. The clone RS-7 obtained from the enriched consortium of the rice field was most closely related to a toluene-degrading and denitrifying bacterium, Azoarcus denitrificians (A. tolulyticus sp. nov.). The clone TS-11 detected in the tidal flat enriched consortium was affiliated to Thauera sp. strain S2 (T. aminoaromatica sp. nov.) that was able to degrade toluene under denitrifying conditions. This indicates that environmental factors greatly influence microbial communities obtained from terrestrial (rice field) and marine (tidal flat) ecosystems.

  4. Degradation of substituted indoles by an indole-degrading methanogenic consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jidong Gu; Berry, D.F. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg (United States))

    1991-09-01

    Degradation of indole-degrading methanogenic consortium enriched from sewage sludge proceeded through a two-step hydroxylation pathway yielding oxindole and isatin. The ability of this consortium to hydroxylate and subsequently degrade-substituted indoles was investigated. Of the substituted indoles tested, the consortium was able to transform or degrade 3-methylindole, and 3-indolyl acetate. Oxindole, 3-methyloxindole, and indoxyl were identified as metabolites of indole, 3-methylindole, and 3-indolyl acetate degradation, respectively. Isatin (indole-2, 3-dione) was produced as an intermediate when the acetate degradation, respectively, Isatin (indole-2,3-dione) was produced as an intermediate when the consortium was amended with oxindole, providing evidence that degradation of indole proceeded through successive hydroxylation of the 2- and 3-positions prior to ring cleavage between the C-2 and C-3 atoms on the pyrrole ring of indole. The presence of a methyl group ({emdash}CH{sub 3}) at either the 1- or 2-position of indole inhibited the initial hydroxylation reaction. The substituted indole, 3-methylindole, was hydroxylated in the 2-position but not in the 3 position and could not be further metabolized through the oxindole-isatin pathway. Indoxyl (indole-3-one), the deacetylated product of 3-indolyl acetate, was not hydroxylated in the 2-position and thus was not further metabolized by the consortium. When an H atom or electron-donating group (i.e., {emdash}CH{sub 3}) was present at the 3-position, hydroxylation proceeded at the 2-position, but the presence of electron-withdrawing substituent groups (i.e., {emdash}OH or {emdash}COOH) at the 3-position inhibited hydroxylation.

  5. The contribution of fermentative bacteria and methanogenic archaea to azo dye reduction by a thermophilic anaerobic consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, dos A.B.; Cervantes, F.J.; Madrid, de M.P.; Bok, de F.A.M.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lier, van J.B.

    2006-01-01

    The contribution of fermentative bacteria and methanogenic archaea to azo dye reduction by a thermophilic anaerobic consortium was studied. Additionally, the effects of different electron-donating substrates and the redox mediator riboflavin on dye reduction were assessed by using either a

  6. Biodegradation and growth characteristics of a toluene-degrading ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A toluene-degrading strain was isolated from active sludge in this study. Both growth characteristic and the performance to degrade toluene by the strain in batch culture mode were evaluated. Results showed that the isolated strain presented a good ability to remove toluene with the maximum removal efficiency of 93.8%.

  7. The function of a toluene-degrading bacterial community in a waste gas trickling filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A.R.; Arvin, E.

    1999-01-01

    ) during two weeks. In spite of the low fraction in the biofilm, the toluene degraders supported growth of the dominating part of non-toluene-degrading heterotrophs in the biofilm, as toluene was the sole carbon source supplied to the system. The maximum intrinsic growth rate of P. putida in the biofilm......The function of a community of toluene-degrading bacteria in a biofilm system was investigated with regard to growth and toluene degradation in order to investigate substrate interactions in the community. This was done by the combination of experimental observations using a specific...... and the activity of P. putida, a representative of the toluene-degrading species in the biofilm which have been described previously (Pedersen et al., 1997) were simulated. The simulation indicated that the volume fraction of the toluene degraders in the biofilm decreased from 12% to only 2% (11% of dry weight...

  8. Characterization and performance of a toluene-degrading biofilm developed on pumice stones

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    Sacceddu Pasquale

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hydrocarbon-degrading biofilms in the treatment of contaminated groundwaters have received increasing attention due to the role played in the so-called "biobarriers". These are bioremediation systems in which a microbial consortium adherent to a solid support is placed across the flow of a contaminated plume, thus promoting biodegradation of the pollutant. Results A microbial consortium adherent to pumice granules (biofilm developed from a toluene-enriched microflora in a mini-scale system, following continuous supply of a mineral medium containing toluene, over a 12-month period. Observation by scanning electron microscopy, together with quantification of the biomass attached to pumice, evidenced the presence of abundant exopolymeric material surrounding the cells in the biofilm. Toluene removal monitored during 12-month operation, reached 99%. Identification of the species, based on comparative 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA sequence analysis, revealed that Rhodococcus erythropolis and Pseudomonas marginalis were the predominant bacterial species in the microbial consortium. Conclusion A structurally complex toluene-degrading biofilm, mainly formed by Rhodococcus erythropolis and Pseudomonas marginalis, developed on pumice granules, in a mini-scale apparatus continuously fed with toluene.

  9. Activity of toluene-degrading Pseudomonas putida in the early growth phase of a biofilm for waste gas treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A.R.; Møller, S.; Molin, S.

    1997-01-01

    the increase of active biomass and polymers was linear. In order to investigate the toluene degradation, various toluene degraders from the multispecies biofilm were isolated, and a Pseudomonas putida was chosen as a representative of the toluene-degrading population. A specific rRNA oligonucleotide probe...... was used to follow the toluene-degrading P. putida in the multispecies biofilm in the filter by means of number and cellular rRNA content. P. putida appeared to detach from the biofilm during the first three days of growth, after which P. putida was found at a constant level of 10% of the active biomass...... in the biofilm. Based on the rRNA content, the in situ activity was estimated to be reduced to 20% of cells grown at maximum conditions in batch culture. The toluene degraded by P. putida was estimated to be a minor part (11%) of the overall toluene degradation. (C) 1997 John Wiley & Sons, Inc....

  10. Use of fluorinated compounds to detect aromatic metabolites from m-cresol in a methanogenic consortium: Evidence for a demethylation reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Londry, K.L.; Fedorak, P.M. (Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada))

    1993-07-01

    m-Cresol is one of the most abundant phenols in wastewater from hydrocarbon processing and coal conversion processes and at creosote-contaminated sites. The study of the anaerobic degradation of m-cresol has been hampered by the long acclimation time required to obtain active cultures as well as the difficulty of maintaining cultures. Fluorine can be introduced into a biologically active molecule to block metabolism, and fluorophenols are effective tools for studying phenol degradation. This study uses fluorinated analoges of phenol and m-cresol to help elucidate the pathway of m-cresol degradation under methanogenic conditions (anaerobic sewage sludge with a methanogenic m-cresol-degrading consortium). 49 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Effect of trichloroethylene on the competitive behavior of toluene-degrading bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mars, Astrid E.; Prins, Gjalt T.; Wietzes, Pieter; Koning, Wim de; Janssen, Dick B.

    The influence of trichloroethylene (TCE) on a mixed culture of four different toluene-degrading bacterial strains (Pseudomonas putida mt-2, P. putida F1, P. putida GJ31, and Burkholderia cepacia G4) was studied with a fed-batch culture. The strains were competing for toluene, which was added at a

  12. Use of Fluorinated Compounds To Detect Aromatic Metabolites from m-Cresol in a Methanogenic Consortium: Evidence for a Demethylation Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londry, Kathleen L.; Fedorak, Phillip M.

    1993-01-01

    Anaerobic sewage sludge was used to enrich a methanogenic m-cresol-degrading consortium. 6-Fluoro-3-methylphenol was synthesized and added to subcultures of the consortium with m-cresol. This caused the accumulation of 4-hydroxy-2-methylbenzoic acid. In a separate experiment, the addition of 3-fluorobenzoic acid caused the transient accumulation of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid. Inhibition with bromoethanesulfonic acid caused the accumulation of benzoic acid. Thus, the proposed degradation pathway was m-cresol → 4-hydroxy-2-methylbenzoic acid → 4-hydroxybenzoic acid → benzoic acid. The m-cresol-degrading consortium was able to convert exogenous 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and benzoic acid to methane. In addition, for each metabolite of m-cresol identified, the corresponding fluorinated metabolite was detected, giving the following sequence: 6-fluoro-3-methylphenol → 5-fluoro-4-hydroxy-2-methylbenzoic acid → 3-fluoro-4-hydroxybenzoic acid → 3-fluorobenzoic acid. The second step in each of these pathways is a novel demethylation which was rate limiting. This demethylation reaction would likely facilitate the transformation of the methyl group to methane, which is consistent with the results of a previous study that showed that the methyl carbon of m-[methyl-14C]cresol was recovered predominantly as [14C]methane (D. J. Roberts, P. M. Fedorak, and S. E. Hrudey, Can. J. Microbiol. 33:335-338, 1987). The final aromatic compound in the proposed route for m-cresol metabolism was benzoic acid, and its detection in these cultures merges the pathway for the methanogenic degradation of m-cresol with those for the anaerobic metabolism of many phenols. PMID:16348996

  13. Classes of organic molecules targeted by a methanogenic microbial consortium grown on sedimentary rocks of various maturities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaux eMesle

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Organic-rich shales are populated by methanogenic consortia that are able to degrade the fossilized organic matter into methane gas. To identify the organic fraction effectively degraded, we have sequentially depleted two types of organic-rich rocks, shales and coal, at two different maturities, by successive solvent extractions to remove the most soluble fractions (maltenes and asphaltenes and isolate kerogen. We show the ability of the consortia to produce methane from all rock samples, including those containing the most refractory organic matter, i.e. the kerogen. Shales yielded higher methane production than lignite and coal. Mature rocks yielded more methane than immature rocks. Surprisingly, the efficiency of the consortia was not influenced by the removal of the easily biodegradable fractions contained in the maltenes and asphaltenes. This suggests that one of the limitations of organic matter degradation in situ may be the accessibility of the carbon and energy source. Indeed, bitumen has a colloidal structure that may limit the accessibility to asphaltenes in the bulk rock. Solvent extractions might favor the access to asphaltenes and kerogen by modifying the spatial organization of the molecules in the rock matrix.

  14. Classes of organic molecules targeted by a methanogenic microbial consortium grown on sedimentary rocks of various maturities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meslé, Margaux; Dromart, Gilles; Haeseler, Frank; Oger, Philippe M

    2015-01-01

    Organic-rich shales are populated by methanogenic consortia that are able to degrade the fossilized organic matter into methane gas. To identify the organic fraction effectively degraded, we have sequentially depleted two types of organic-rich sedimentary rocks, shale, and coal, at two different maturities, by successive solvent extractions to remove the most soluble fractions (maltenes and asphaltenes) and isolate kerogen. We show the ability of the consortia to produce methane from all rock samples, including those containing the most refractory organic matter, i.e., the kerogen. Shales yielded higher methane production than lignite and coal. Mature rocks yielded more methane than immature rocks. Surprisingly, the efficiency of the consortia was not influenced by the removal of the easily biodegradable fractions contained in the maltenes and asphaltenes. This suggests that one of the limitations of organic matter degradation in situ may be the accessibility to the carbon and energy source. Indeed, bitumen has a colloidal structure that may prevent the microbial consortia from reaching the asphaltenes in the bulk rock. Solvent extractions might favor the access to asphaltenes and kerogen by modifying the spatial organization of the molecules in the rock matrix.

  15. Isolation and characterization of a novel toluene-degrading, sulfate-reducing bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beller, H R; Spormann, A M; Sharma, P K; Cole, J R; Reinhard, M

    1996-01-01

    A novel sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from fuel-contaminated subsurface soil, strain PRTOL1, mineralizes toluene as the sole electron donor and carbon source under strictly anaerobic conditions. The mineralization of 80% of toluene carbon to CO2 was demonstrated in experiments with [ring-U-14C]toluene; 15% of toluene carbon was converted to biomass and nonvolatile metabolic by-products, primarily the former. The observed stoichiometric ratio of moles of sulfate consumed per mole of toluene consumed was consistent with the theoretical ratio for mineralization of toluene coupled with the reduction of sulfate to hydrogen sulfide. Strain PRTOL1 also transforms o- and p-xylene to metabolic products when grown with toluene. However, xylene transformation by PRTOL1 is slow relative to toluene degradation and cannot be sustained over time. Stable isotope-labeled substrates were used in conjunction with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to investigate the by-products of toluene and xylene metabolism. The predominant by-products from toluene, o-xylene, and p-xylene were benzylsuccinic acid, (2-methylbenzyl)succinic acid, and 4-methylbenzoic acid (or p-toluic acid), respectively. Metabolic by-products accounted for nearly all of the o-xylene consumed. Enzyme assays indicated that acetyl coenzyme A oxidation proceeded via the carbon monoxide dehydrogenase pathway. Compared with the only other reported toluene-degrading, sulfate-reducing bacterium, strain PRTOL1 is distinct in that it has a novel 16S rRNA gene sequence and was derived from a freshwater rather than marine environment. PMID:8919780

  16. Enhanced biofilm production by a toluene-degrading Rhodococcus observed after exposure to perfluoroalkyl acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weathers, Tess S; Higgins, Christopher P; Sharp, Jonathan O

    2015-05-05

    This study focuses on interactions between aerobic soil-derived hydrocarbon degrading bacteria and a suite of perfluorocarboxylic acids and perfluoroalkylsulfonates that are found in aqueous film-forming foams used for fire suppression. No effect on toluene degradation rate or induction time was observed when active cells of Rhodococcus jostii strain RHA1 were exposed to toluene and a mixture of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) including perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) at concentrations near the upper bounds of groundwater relevance (11 PFAAs at 10 mg/L each). However, exposure to aqueous PFAA concentrations above 2 mg/L (each) was associated with enhanced aggregation of bacterial cells and significant increases in extracellular polymeric substance production. Flocculation was only observed during exponential growth and not elicited when PFAAs were added to resting incubations; analogous flocculation was also observed in soil enrichments. Aggregation was accompanied by 2- to 3-fold upregulation of stress-associated genes, sigF3 and prmA, during growth of this Rhodococcus in the presence of PFAAs. These results suggest that biological responses, such as microbial stress and biofilm formation, could be more prominent than suppression of co-contaminant biodegradation in subsurface locations where poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances occur with hydrocarbon fuels.

  17. Characterization and performance of a toluene-degrading biofilm developed on pumice stones

    OpenAIRE

    Di Lorenzo, Alessandra; Varcamonti, Mario; Parascandola, Palma; Vignola, Rodolfo; Bernardi, Adriano; Sacceddu, Pasquale; Sisto, Raffaello; de Alteriis, Elisabetta

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Hydrocarbon-degrading biofilms in the treatment of contaminated groundwaters have received increasing attention due to the role played in the so-called "biobarriers". These are bioremediation systems in which a microbial consortium adherent to a solid support is placed across the flow of a contaminated plume, thus promoting biodegradation of the pollutant. Results A microbial consortium adherent to pumice granules (biofilm) developed from a toluene-enriched microflora in a...

  18. Isolation and characterization of Magnetospirillum sp strain 15-1 as a representative anaerobic toluene-degrader from a constructed wetland model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer-Cifuentes, Ingrid; Lavanchy, Paula Maria Martinez; Marin-Cevada, Vianey

    2017-01-01

    Previously, Planted Fixed-Bed Reactors (PFRs) have been used to investigate microbial toluene removal in the rhizosphere of constructed wetlands. Aerobic toluene degradation was predominant in these model systems although bulk redox conditions were hypoxic to anoxic. However, culture-independent ...

  19. CO sub 2 incorporation and 4-hydroxy-2-methylbenzoic acid formation during anaerobic metabolism of m-cresol by a methanogenic consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, D.J.; Fedorak, P.M.; Hrudey, S.E. (Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada))

    1990-02-01

    The metabolism of m-cresol by methanogenic cultures enriched from domestic sewage sludge was investigated. In the initial studies, bromoethanesulfonic acid was used to inhibit methane production. This led to the accumulation of 4.0 {+-} 0.8 mol of acetate per mol of m-cresol metabolized. These results suggested that CO{sub 2} incorporation occurred because each molecule of m-cresol contained seven carbon atoms, whereas four molecules of acetate product contained a total of eight carbon atoms. To verify this, ({sup 14}C)bicarbonate was added to bromoethanesulfonic acid-inhibited cultures, and those cultures yielded ({sup 14}C)acetate. Of the label recovered as acetate, 89% was found in the carboxyl position. Similar cultures fed (methyl-{sup 14}C)m-cresol yielded methyl-labeled acetate. A {sup 14}C-labeled transient intermediate was detected in cultures given either m-cresol and ({sup 14}C)bicarbonate or bicarbonate and (methyl-{sup 14}C)m-cresol. The intermediate was identified as 4-hydroxy-2-methylbenzoic acid. In addition, another metabolite was detected and identified as 2-methylbenzoic acid. This compound appeared to be produced only sporadically, and it accumulated in the medium, suggested that the dehydroxylation of 4-hydroxy-2-methylbenzoic acid led to an apparent dead-end product.

  20. Isolation and characterization of Magnetospirillum sp. strain 15-1 as a representative anaerobic toluene-degrader from a constructed wetland model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Meyer-Cifuentes

    Full Text Available Previously, Planted Fixed-Bed Reactors (PFRs have been used to investigate microbial toluene removal in the rhizosphere of constructed wetlands. Aerobic toluene degradation was predominant in these model systems although bulk redox conditions were hypoxic to anoxic. However, culture-independent approaches indicated also that microbes capable of anaerobic toluene degradation were abundant. Therefore, we aimed at isolating anaerobic-toluene degraders from one of these PFRs. From the obtained colonies which consisted of spirilli-shaped bacteria, a strain designated 15-1 was selected for further investigations. Analysis of its 16S rRNA gene revealed greatest similarity (99% with toluene-degrading Magnetospirillum sp. TS-6. Isolate 15-1 grew with up to 0.5 mM of toluene under nitrate-reducing conditions. Cells reacted to higher concentrations of toluene by an increase in the degree of saturation of their membrane fatty acids. Strain 15-1 contained key genes for the anaerobic degradation of toluene via benzylsuccinate and subsequently the benzoyl-CoA pathway, namely bssA, encoding for the alpha subunit of benzylsuccinate synthase, bcrC for subunit C of benzoyl-CoA reductase and bamA for 6-oxocyclohex-1-ene-1-carbonyl-CoA hydrolase. Finally, most members of a clone library of bssA generated from the PFR had highest similarity to bssA from strain 15-1. Our study provides insights about the physiological capacities of a strain of Magnetospirillum isolated from a planted system where active rhizoremediation of toluene is taking place.

  1. Activity and three-dimensional distribution of toluene-degrading Pseudomonas putida in a multispecies biofilm assessed by quantitative in situ hybridization and scanning confocal laser microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Pedersen, Anne Rathmann; Poulsen, L.K.

    1996-01-01

    As a representative member of the toluene-degrading population in a biofilter for waste gas treatment, Pseudomonas putida was investigated with a 16S rRNA targeting probe, The three-dimensional distribution of P. putida was visualized in the biofilm matrix by scanning confocal laser microscopy....... demonstrating that P. putida was present throughout the biofilm. Acridine orange staining revealed a very heterogeneous structure of the fully hydrated biofilm, with cell-free channels extending ft om the surface Into the biofilm. This indicated that toluene may penetrate to deeper layers of the biofilm......, and consequently P. putida may be actively degrading toluene in all regions of the biofilm. Furthermore, measurements of growth rate-related parameters fur P. putida showed reduced I RNA content and cell size (relative to that ill a batch culture), indicating that the P. putida population mas not degrading toluene...

  2. Syntrophy in Methanogenic Degradation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Worm, P.; Müller, N.; Plugge, C.M.; Stams, A.J.M.; Schink, B.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter deals with microbial communities of bacteria and archaea that closely cooperate in methanogenic degradation and perform metabolic functions in this community that neither one of them could carry out alone. The methanogenic degradation of fatty acids, alcohols, most aromatic compounds,

  3. Preparation and Characterization of Au/Pd Modified-TiO2 Photocatalysts for Phenol and Toluene Degradation under Visible Light—The Effect of Calcination Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Cybula

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rutile loaded with Au/Pd nanoparticles was prepared using a water-in-oil microemulsion system of water/AOT/cyclohexane followed by calcination. The effect of calcination temperature (from 350 to 700°C on the structure of Au/Pd nanoparticles deposited at rutile matrix and the photocatalytic properties of Au/Pd-TiO2 was investigated in two model reactions (toluene degradation in gas phase and phenol degradation in aqueous phase. Toluene was irradiated over Au/Pd-TiO2 using light emitting diodes (LEDs, λmax⁡ = 415 nm. The sample 0.5 mol% Pd/TiO2 exhibited the highest activity under visible light irradiation in gas and aqueous phase reaction among all photocatalysts calcined at 350°C, while the sample modified only with gold nanoparticles showed the lowest activity. The Au/Pd-TiO2 sample calcinated at 350°C possesses the highest photocatalytic activity when degrading phenol under visible light, which is 14 times higher than that of the one calcinated at 450°C. It was observed that increasing temperature from 350 to 700°C during calcination step caused segregation of metals and finally resulted in photoactivity drop.

  4. Desulfotignum toluenicum sp. nov., a novel toluene-degrading, sulphate-reducing bacterium isolated from an oil-reservoir model column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ommedal, Hege; Torsvik, Terje

    2007-12-01

    A Gram-negative, sulphate-reducing bacterium (strain H3(T)) was isolated from an oil-reservoir model column. The new isolate was able to oxidize toluene coupled to hydrogen sulphide production. For growth, the optimum salt concentration was 1.5 % (w/v), the optimum pH was 7.2 and the optimum temperature was 34 degrees C. The cells were straight to slightly curved rods, 0.6-1.0 microm in diameter and 1.4-2.5 microm in length. The predominant fatty acids were C(16 : 0), C(16 : 1)omega7c and C(17 : 0) cyclo, and the cells also contained dimethylacetals. Cloning and sequencing of a 1505 bp long fragment of the 16S rRNA gene showed that strain H3(T) is a member of the Deltaproteobacteria and is related closely to Desulfotignum balticum DSM 7044(T). The G+C content of the DNA was 52.0 mol% and the DNA-DNA similarity to D. balticum DSM 7044(T) was 56.1 %. Based on differences in DNA sequence and the unique property of toluene degradation, it is proposed that strain H3(T) should be designated a member of a novel species within the genus Desulfotignum, for which the name Desulfotignum toluenicum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is H3(T) (=DSM 18732(T)=ATCC BAA-1460(T)).

  5. The Genome of the Toluene-Degrading Pseudomonas veronii Strain 1YdBTEX2 and Its Differential Gene Expression in Contaminated Sand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Morales

    Full Text Available The natural restoration of soils polluted by aromatic hydrocarbons such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and m- and p-xylene (BTEX may be accelerated by inoculation of specific biodegraders (bioaugmentation. Bioaugmentation mainly involves introducing bacteria that deploy their metabolic properties and adaptation potential to survive and propagate in the contaminated environment by degrading the pollutant. In order to better understand the adaptive response of cells during a transition to contaminated material, we analyzed here the genome and short-term (1 h changes in genome-wide gene expression of the BTEX-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas veronii 1YdBTEX2 in non-sterile soil and liquid medium, both in presence or absence of toluene. We obtained a gapless genome sequence of P. veronii 1YdBTEX2 covering three individual replicons with a total size of 8 Mb, two of which are largely unrelated to current known bacterial replicons. One-hour exposure to toluene, both in soil and liquid, triggered massive transcription (up to 208-fold induction of multiple gene clusters, such as toluene degradation pathway(s, chemotaxis and toluene efflux pumps. This clearly underlines their key role in the adaptive response to toluene. In comparison to liquid medium, cells in soil drastically changed expression of genes involved in membrane functioning (e.g., lipid composition, lipid metabolism, cell fatty acid synthesis, osmotic stress response (e.g., polyamine or trehalose synthesis, uptake of potassium and putrescine metabolism, highlighting the immediate response mechanisms of P. veronii 1YdBTEX2 for successful establishment in polluted soil.

  6. Metabolism of methanogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaut, M

    1994-01-01

    Methanogenic archaea convert a few simple compounds such as H2 + CO2, formate, methanol, methylamines, and acetate to methane. Methanogenesis from all these substrates requires a number of unique coenzymes, some of which are exclusively found in methanogens. H2-dependent CO2 reduction proceeds via carrier-bound C1 intermediates which become stepwise reduced to methane. Methane formation from methanol and methylamines involves the disproportionation of the methyl groups. Part of the methyl groups are oxidized to CO2, and the reducing equivalents thereby gained are subsequently used to reduce other methyl groups to methane. This process involves the same C1 intermediates that are formed during methanogenesis from CO2. Conversion of acetate to methane and carbon dioxide is preceded by its activation to acetyl-CoA. Cleavage of the latter compound yields a coenzyme-bound methyl moiety and an enzyme-bound carbonyl group. The reducing equivalents gained by oxidation of the carbonyl group to carbon dioxide are subsequently used to reduce the methyl moiety to methane. All these processes lead to the generation of transmembrane ion gradients which fuel ATP synthesis via one or two types of ATP synthases. The synthesis of cellular building blocks starts with the central anabolic intermediate acetyl-CoA which, in autotrophic methanogens, is synthesized from two molecules of CO2 in a linear pathway.

  7. Rumen methanogens: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirohi, S K; Pandey, Neha; Singh, B; Puniya, A K

    2010-09-01

    The Methanogens are a diverse group of organisms found in anaerobic environments such as anaerobic sludge digester, wet wood of trees, sewage, rumen, black mud, black sea sediments, etc which utilize carbon dioxide and hydrogen and produce methane. They are nutritionally fastidious anaerobes with the redox potential below -300 mV and usually grow at pH range of 6.0-8.0 [1]. Substrates utilized for growth and methane production include hydrogen, formate, methanol, methylamine, acetate, etc. They metabolize only restricted range of substrates and are poorly characterized with respect to other metabolic, biochemical and molecular properties.

  8. The Geobiochemistry of Methanogen Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, A.; Shock, E.

    2013-12-01

    A principle of geobiochemistry is that adaptation over evolutionary time includes a thermodynamic drive to minimize costs of making biomolecules like proteins and lipids. If so, then biomolecule abundances will reflect, at least in part, their relative stabilities at the conditions imposed by external environments. We tested this hypothesis by comparing relative stabilities of 138 orthologous proteins between a representative lake-sediment methanogen (Methanoculleus marisnigri) and a representative rumen methanogen (Methanospirillum hungatei) at the compositional constraints of their respective environments. Chemical affinities of the proteins were calculated based on pH, temperature, and concentrations of dissolved hydrogen, bicarbonate, ammonia, and hydrogen sulfide, together with standard Gibbs energies of formation of proteins from the elements predicted with a group additivity algorithm for unfolded proteins [1]. Methanogens were chosen as they are chemoautotrophs and their metabolism proceeds at relatively small affinities. Also, they are found in a variety of compositionally varying habitats like rumen, sediments, hydrothermal systems and sewage. The methanogens selected belong to the same order of taxonomy and are closely related. Preliminary results show that a majority of the proteins belonging to the rumen methanogen (66%) are more stable in the rumen environment, while a majority of the proteins belonging to the lake-sediment methanogen (58%) are more stable at sediment conditions. In a separate observation, it was noted that while the complete protein ';proteasome subunit alpha' of another rumen methanogen (Methanobrevibacter smithii) was less stable in its more reducing habitat as compared to a sewage methanogen (Methanothermobacter thermoautotophicus), its first 26 amino acid residues (N terminal) were in fact more stable in its own environment. These 26 residues are reported to be unique as compared to other proteasome proteins and are suggested to

  9. Conductive properties of methanogenic biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Lesnik, Keaton Larson; Liu, Hong

    2018-02-01

    Extracellular electron transfer between syntrophic partners needs to be efficiently maintained in methanogenic environments. Direct extracellular electron transfer via electrical current is an alternative to indirect hydrogen transfer but requires construction of conductive extracellular structures. Conductive mechanisms and relationship between conductivity and the community composition in mixed-species methanogenic biofilms are not well understood. The present study investigated conductive behaviors of methanogenic biofilms and examined the correlation between biofilm conductivity and community composition between different anaerobic biofilms enriched from the same inoculum. Highest conductivity observed in methanogenic biofilms was 71.8±4.0μS/cm. Peak-manner response of conductivity upon changes over a range of electrochemical potentials suggests that electron transfer in methanogenic biofilms occurs through redox driven super-exchange. The strong correlation observed between biofilm conductivity and Geobacter spp. in the metabolically diverse anaerobic communities suggests that the efficiency of DEET may provide pressure for microbial communities to select for species that can produce electrical conduits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. BACTERIAL CONSORTIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payel Sarkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum aromatic hydrocarbons like benzen e, toluene, ethyl benzene and xylene, together known as BTEX, has almost the same chemical structure. These aromatic hydrocarbons are released as pollutants in th e environment. This work was taken up to develop a solvent tolerant bacterial cons ortium that could degrade BTEX compounds as they all share a common chemical structure. We have isolated almost 60 different types of bacterial strains from different petroleum contaminated sites. Of these 60 bacterial strains almost 20 microorganisms were screene d on the basis of capability to tolerate high concentration of BTEX. Ten differe nt consortia were prepared and the compatibility of the bacterial strains within the consortia was checked by gram staining and BTEX tolerance level. Four successful mi crobial consortia were selected in which all the bacterial strains concomitantly grew in presence of high concentration of BTEX (10% of toluene, 10% of benzene 5% ethyl benzene and 1% xylene. Consortium #2 showed the highest growth rate in pr esence of BTEX. Degradation of BTEX by consortium #2 was monitored for 5 days by gradual decrease in the volume of the solvents. The maximum reduction observed wa s 85% in 5 days. Gas chromatography results also reveal that could completely degrade benzene and ethyl benzene within 48 hours. Almost 90% degradation of toluene and xylene in 48 hours was exhibited by consortium #2. It could also tolerate and degrade many industrial solvents such as chloroform, DMSO, acetonitrile having a wide range of log P values (0.03–3.1. Degradation of aromatic hydrocarbon like BTEX by a solvent tolerant bacterial consortium is greatly significant as it could degrade high concentration of pollutants compared to a bacterium and also reduces the time span of degradation.

  11. Methanogenic paraffin degradation proceeds via alkane addition to fumarate by 'Smithella' spp. mediated by a syntrophic coupling with hydrogenotrophic methanogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrik, Boris; Marks, Christopher R; Davidova, Irene A; McInerney, Michael J; Pruitt, Shane; Duncan, Kathleen E; Suflita, Joseph M; Callaghan, Amy V

    2016-09-01

    Anaerobic microbial biodegradation of recalcitrant, water-insoluble substrates, such as paraffins, presents unique metabolic challenges. To elucidate this process, a methanogenic consortium capable of mineralizing long-chain n-paraffins (C28 -C50 ) was enriched from San Diego Bay sediment. Analysis of 16S rRNA genes indicated the dominance of Syntrophobacterales (43%) and Methanomicrobiales (26%). Metagenomic sequencing allowed draft genome assembly of dominant uncultivated community members belonging to the bacterial genus Smithella and the archaeal genera Methanoculleus and Methanosaeta. Five contigs encoding homologs of the catalytic subunit of alkylsuccinate synthase (assA) were detected. Additionally, mRNA transcripts for these genes, including a homolog binned within the 'Smithella' sp. SDB genome scaffold, were detected via RT-PCR, implying that paraffins are activated via 'fumarate addition'. Metabolic reconstruction and comparison with genome scaffolds of uncultivated n-alkane degrading 'Smithella' spp. are consistent with the hypothesis that syntrophically growing 'Smithella' spp. may achieve reverse electron transfer by coupling the reoxidation of ETFred to a membrane-bound FeS oxidoreductase functioning as an ETF:menaquinone oxidoreductase. Subsequent electron transfer could proceed via a periplasmic formate dehydrogenase and/or hydrogenase, allowing energetic coupling to hydrogenotrophic methanogens such as Methanoculleus. Ultimately, these data provide fundamental insight into the energy conservation mechanisms that dictate interspecies interactions salient to methanogenic alkane mineralization. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Methanogens in the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubner, Ruth-Sophie; Schleper, Christa; Firneis, Maria G.; Rittmann, Simon

    2015-04-01

    The last decade of space science revealed that potential habitats in the Solar System may not be limited to the classical habitable zone supporting life as we know it. These microorganisms were shown to thrive under extremophilic growth conditions. Here, we outline the main eco-physiological characteristics of methanogens like their response on temperature, pressure, or pH changes or their resistance against radiation or desiccation. They can withstand extreme environmental conditions which makes them intriguing organisms for astrobiological studies. On Earth, they are found for example in wetlands, in arctic and antarctic subglacial environments, in ruminants, and even in the environment surrounding the Mars Desert Research Station in Utah. These obligate anaerobic chemolithoautotrophs or chemolithoheterotrophs are able to use e.g. hydrogen and C1 compounds like CO2, formate, or methanol as energy source and carbon source, respectively. We point out their capability to be able to habitat potential extraterrestrial biospheres all over the planetary system. We will give an overview about these possible environments on Mars, icy moons like Europa or Enceladus, and minor planets. We present an overview about studies of methanogens with an astrobiological relevance and we show our conclusions about the role of methanogens for the search for extraterrestrial life in the Solar System. We will present first results of our study about the possibility to cultivate methanogens under Enceladus-like conditions. For that, based on the observations obtained by the Cassini spacecraft concerning the plume compounds, we produce a medium with a composition similar to the ocean composition of this icy moon which is far more Enceladus-like than in any (published) experiment before. Eventually, we give an outlook on the feasibility and the necessity of future astrobiological studies with these microbes. We point out the importance of future in-situ or even sample and return missions to

  13. Adaptation of Methanogenic Inocula to Anaerobic Digestion of Maize Silage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martyna Wojcieszak

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A well-balanced microbial consortium is crucial for efficient biogas production. In turn, one of a major factor that influence on the structure of anaerobic digestion (AD consortium is a source of microorganisms which are used as an inoculum. This study evaluated the influence of inoculum sources (with various origin on adaptation of a biogas community and the efficiency of the biomethanization of maize silage. As initial inocula for AD of maize silage the samples from: (i an agricultural biogas plant (ABP which utilizes maize silage as a main substrate, (ii cattle slurry (CS, which contain elevated levels of lignocelluloses materials, and (iii raw sewage sludge (RSS with low content of plant origin materials were used. The adaptation of methanogenic consortia was monitored during a series of passages, and the functionality of the adapted consortia was verified through start-up operation of AD in two-stage reactors. During the first stages of the adaptation phase, methanogenic consortia occurred very slowly, and only after several passages did the microbial community adapts to allow production of biogas with high methane content. The ABP consortium revealed highest biogas production in the adaptation and in the start-up process. The biodiversity dynamics monitored during adaptation and start-up process showed that community profile changed in a similar direction in three studied consortia. Native communities were very distinct to each other, while at the end of the Phase II of the start-up process microbial diversity profile was similar in all consortia. All adopted bacterial communities were dominated by representatives of Porphyromonadaceae, Rikenellaceae, Ruminococcaceae, and Synergistaceae. A shift from low acetate-preferring acetoclastic Methanosaetaceae (ABP and RSS and/or hydrogenotrophic Archaea, e.g., Methanomicrobiaceae (CS prevailing in the inoculum samples to larger populations of high acetate-preferring acetoclastic

  14. Isolation and characterization of methanogenic bacteria from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isolation and characterization of methanogenic bacteria from brewery wastewater in Kenya. Sylvia Injete Murunga, Duncan Onyango Mbuge, Ayub Njoroge Gitau, Urbanus Ndungwa Mutwiwa, Ingrid Namae Wekesa ...

  15. International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The InterLymph Consortium, or formally the International Consortium of Investigators Working on Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Epidemiologic Studies, is an open scientific forum for epidemiologic research in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  16. Methanogens as Models for Life on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickol, R. L.; Waddell, W. H.; Kral, T. A.

    2014-07-01

    Four methanogen species have been subjected to various martian conditions in order to test their suitability as candidates for life on Mars. These conditions include low pressure, low temperature and analog regoliths.

  17. Metabolic interactions between methanogenic consortia and anaerobic respiring bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stams, A.J.; Oude Elferink, S.J.; Westermann, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Most types of anaerobic respiration are able to outcompete methanogenic consortia for common substrates if the respective electron acceptors are present in sufficient amounts. Furthermore, several products or intermediate compounds formed by anaerobic respiring bacteria are toxic to methanogenic...

  18. Metabolic interactions between methanogenic consortia and anaerobic respiring bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stams, A.J.; Oude Elferink, S.J.; Westermann, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Most types of anaerobic respiration are able to outcompete methanogenic consortia for common substrates if the respective electron acceptors are present in sufficient amounts. Furthermore, several products or intermediate compounds formed by anaerobic respiring bacteria are toxic to methanogenic ...

  19. Effect of ammonium and acetate on methanogenic pathway and methanogenic community composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotidis, Ioannis; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Kotsopoulos, T. A.

    2013-01-01

    H, and temperature. In our study, the effect of acetate and ammonia concentration on the methanogenic pathway from acetate and on the methanogenic communities was elucidated in two experiments: one where inocula were gradually exposed to increasing concentrations of acetate or ammonia, and another with direct...... exposure to different ammonia concentrations. The methanogenic pathway was determined by following the production of (14) CH(4) and (14) CO(2) from acetate labeled in the methyl group (C-2). Microbial communities' composition was determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Upon acclimatization......, acclimatization process resulted in no pathway shift with the mesophilic acclimatized culture. When nonacclimatized thermophilic culture was exposed to high ammonia levels (7 g NH4 +-N L(-1) ), aceticlastic Methanosarcinaceae spp. was found to be the dominant methanogen....

  20. Fate of neptunium in an anaerobic, methanogenic microcosm.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banaszak, J. E.

    1998-12-21

    Neptunium is found predominantly as Np(IV) in reducing environments, but Np(V) in aerobic environments. However, currently it is not known how the interplay between biotic and abiotic processes affects Np redox speciation in the environment. In order to evaluate the effect of anaerobic microbial activity on the fate of Np in natural systems, Np(V) was added to a microcosminoculated with anaerobic sediments from a metal-contaminated fresh water lake. The consortium included metal-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic microorganisms, and acetate was supplied as the only exogenous substrate. Addition of more than 10{sup {minus}5} M Np did not inhibit methane production. Total Np volubility in the active microcosm, as well as in sterilized control samples, decreased by nearly two orders of magnitude. A combination of analytical techniques, including VIS-NIR absorption spectroscopy and XANES, identified Np(IV) as the oxidation state associated with the sediments. The similar results from the active microcosm and the abiotic controls suggest that microbian y produced Mn(II/HI) and Fe(II) may serve as electron donors for Np reduction.

  1. Gene order phylogeny and the evolution of methanogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiwei Luo

    Full Text Available Methanogens are a phylogenetically diverse group belonging to Euryarchaeota. Previously, phylogenetic approaches using large datasets revealed that methanogens can be grouped into two classes, "Class I" and "Class II". However, some deep relationships were not resolved. For instance, the monophyly of "Class I" methanogens, which consist of Methanopyrales, Methanobacteriales and Methanococcales, is disputable due to weak statistical support. In this study, we use MSOAR to identify common orthologous genes from eight methanogen species and a Thermococcale species (outgroup, and apply GRAPPA and FastME to compute distance-based gene order phylogeny. The gene order phylogeny supports two classes of methanogens, but it differs from the original classification of methanogens by placing Methanopyrales and Methanobacteriales together with Methanosarcinales in Class II rather than with Methanococcales. This study suggests a new classification scheme for methanogens. In addition, it indicates that gene order phylogeny can complement traditional sequence-based methods in addressing taxonomic questions for deep relationships.

  2. Community Hospital Telehealth Consortium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Williams, Elton

    2003-01-01

    The Community Hospital Telehealth Consortium is a unique, forward-thinking, community-based healthcare service project organized around 5 not-for-profit community hospitals located throughout Louisiana and Mississippi...

  3. Community Hospital Telehealth Consortium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Williams, Jr, Elton L

    2007-01-01

    The Community Hospital Telehealth Consortium is a unique, forward-thinking, community-based healthcare service project organized around 5 not-for-profit community hospitals located throughout Louisiana and Mississippi...

  4. Enrichment of high ammonia tolerant methanogenic culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotidis, Ioannis; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Proietti, Nicolas

    Ammonia is the major toxicant in full scale anaerobic digesters of animal wastes which are rich in proteins and/or urea, such as pig or poultry wastes. Ammonia inhibition decreases methane production rates, increases volatile fatty acids concentration and leads to economic losses for the biogas...... was derived from a full scale biogas reactor (Hashøj, Denmark), fed with 75% animal manure and 25% food industries organic waste. Basal anaerobic medium was used for the enrichment along with sodium acetate (1 g HAc L-1) as a carbon source. Fluorescence insitu hybridization (FISH) was used to determine...... microbial community composition. The outcome of the enrichment process was a mesophilic aceticlastic methanogenic enriched culture able to withstand high ammonia loads and utilize acetate and form methane stoichiometrically. FISH analysis showed that the methanogens of the enriched culture belonged...

  5. Molecular Biology and Physiology of Methanogenic Archaebacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-27

    3, 12]. Genetic exchange systems are not developed to a similar extent; at this writing, transformation methods have been published for Methanococcus ...like transfer of genes in Methanococcus voltae strain PS (G. Bertani. 1989. Abstr. Ann. Mtg. Amer. Soc. Microbiol. 1-30, p. 222), and Leisinger...solvents, and so on. Literature Cited. 1. Bertani, G., and L. Baresl. 1987. Genetic transformation in the methanogen Methanococcus voltae PS. J. Bacteriol

  6. Volatile hydrocarbons inhibit methanogenic crude oil degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela eSherry

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Methanogenic degradation of crude oil in subsurface sediments occurs slowly, but without the need for exogenous electron acceptors, is sustained for long periods and has enormous economic and environmental consequences. Here we show that volatile hydrocarbons are inhibitory to methanogenic oil biodegradation by comparing degradation of an artificially weathered crude oil with volatile hydrocarbons removed, with the same oil that was not weathered. Volatile hydrocarbons (nC5-nC10, methylcyclohexane, benzene, toluene and xylenes were quantified in the headspace of microcosms. Aliphatic (n-alkanes nC12-nC34 and aromatic hydrocarbons (4-methylbiphenyl, 3-methylbiphenyl, 2-methylnaphthalene, 1-methylnaphthalene were quantified in the total hydrocarbon fraction extracted from the microcosms. 16S rRNA genes from key microorganisms known to play an important role in methanogenic alkane degradation (Smithella and Methanomicrobiales were quantified by quantitative PCR. Methane production from degradation of weathered oil in microcosms was rapid (1.1 ± 0.1 µmol CH4/g sediment/day with stoichiometric yields consistent with degradation of heavier n-alkanes (nC12-nC34. For non-weathered oil, degradation rates in microcosms were significantly lower (0.4 ± 0.3 µmol CH4/g sediment/day. This indicated that volatile hydrocarbons present in the non-weathered oil inhibit, but do not completely halt, methanogenic alkane biodegradation. These findings are significant with respect to rates of biodegradation of crude oils with abundant volatile hydrocarbons in anoxic, sulphate-depleted subsurface environments, such as contaminated marine sediments which have been entrained below the sulfate-reduction zone, as well as crude oil biodegradation in petroleum reservoirs and contaminated aquifers.

  7. Methanogens: methane producers of the rumen and mitigation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Sarah E; Wright, André-Denis G; McBride, Brian W

    2010-12-30

    Methanogens are the only known microorganisms capable of methane production, making them of interest when investigating methane abatement strategies. A number of experiments have been conducted to study the methanogen population in the rumen of cattle and sheep, as well as the relationship that methanogens have with other microorganisms. The rumen methanogen species differ depending on diet and geographical location of the host, as does methanogenesis, which can be reduced by modifying dietary composition, or by supplementation of monensin, lipids, organic acids, or plant compounds within the diet. Other methane abatement strategies that have been investigated are defaunation and vaccines. These mitigation methods target the methanogen population of the rumen directly or indirectly, resulting in varying degrees of efficacy. This paper describes the methanogens identified in the rumens of cattle and sheep, as well as a number of methane mitigation strategies that have been effective in vivo.

  8. Methanogens: Methane Producers of the Rumen and Mitigation Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E. Hook

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Methanogens are the only known microorganisms capable of methane production, making them of interest when investigating methane abatement strategies. A number of experiments have been conducted to study the methanogen population in the rumen of cattle and sheep, as well as the relationship that methanogens have with other microorganisms. The rumen methanogen species differ depending on diet and geographical location of the host, as does methanogenesis, which can be reduced by modifying dietary composition, or by supplementation of monensin, lipids, organic acids, or plant compounds within the diet. Other methane abatement strategies that have been investigated are defaunation and vaccines. These mitigation methods target the methanogen population of the rumen directly or indirectly, resulting in varying degrees of efficacy. This paper describes the methanogens identified in the rumens of cattle and sheep, as well as a number of methane mitigation strategies that have been effective in vivo.

  9. Novel molecular markers for the detection of methanogens and phylogenetic analyses of methanogenic communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz eDziewit

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Methanogenic Archaea produce approximately one billion tons of methane annually, but their biology remains largely unknown. This is partially due to the large phylogenetic and phenotypic diversity of this group of organisms, which inhabit various anoxic environments including peatlands, freshwater sediments, landfills, anaerobic digesters and the intestinal tracts of ruminants. Research is also hampered by the inability to cultivate methanogenic Archaea. Therefore, biodiversity studies have relied on the use of 16S rRNA and mcrA [encoding the α subunit of the methyl coenzyme M (methyl-CoM reductase] genes as molecular markers for the detection and phylogenetic analysis of methanogens.Here, we describe four novel molecular markers that should prove useful in the detailed analysis of methanogenic consortia, with a special focus on methylotrophic methanogens. We have developed and validated sets of degenerate PCR primers for the amplification of genes encoding key enzymes involved in methanogenesis: mcrB and mcrG (encoding β and γ subunits of the methyl-CoM reductase, involved in the conversion of methyl-CoM to methane, mtaB (encoding methanol-5-hydroxybenzimidazolylcobamide Co-methyltransferase, catalyzing the conversion of methanol to methyl-CoM and mtbA (encoding methylated [methylamine-specific corrinoid protein]:coenzyme M methyltransferase, involved in the conversion of mono-, di- and trimethylamine into methyl-CoM.The sensitivity of these primers was verified by high-throughput sequencing of PCR products amplified from DNA isolated from microorganisms present in anaerobic digesters. The selectivity of the markers was analyzed using phylogenetic methods. Our results indicate that the selected markers and the PCR primer sets can be used as specific tools for in-depth diversity analyses of methanogenic consortia.

  10. Progress in the development of vaccines against rumen methanogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedlock, D N; Janssen, P H; Leahy, S C; Shu, D; Buddle, B M

    2013-06-01

    Vaccination against rumen methanogens offers a practical approach to reduce methane emissions in livestock, particularly ruminants grazing on pasture. Although successful vaccination strategies have been reported for reducing the activity of the rumen-dwelling organism Streptococcus bovis in sheep and S. bovis and Lactobacillus spp. in cattle, earlier approaches using vaccines based on whole methanogen cells to reduce methane production in sheep have produced less promising results. An anti-methanogen vaccine will need to have broad specificity against methanogens commonly found in the rumen and induce antibody in saliva resulting in delivery of sufficiently high levels of antibodies to the rumen to reduce methanogen activity. Our approach has focussed on identifying surface and membrane-associated proteins that are conserved across a range of rumen methanogens. The identification of potential vaccine antigens has been assisted by recent advances in the knowledge of rumen methanogen genomes. Methanogen surface proteins have been shown to be immunogenic in ruminants and vaccination of sheep with these proteins induced specific antibody responses in saliva and rumen contents. Current studies are directed towards identifying key candidate antigens and investigating the level and types of salivary antibodies produced in sheep and cattle vaccinated with methanogen proteins, stability of antibodies in the rumen and their impact on rumen microbial populations. In addition, there is a need to identify adjuvants that stimulate high levels of salivary antibody and are suitable for formulating with protein antigens to produce a low-cost and effective vaccine.

  11. Study of methanogen communities associated with different rumen protozoal populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanche, Alejandro; de la Fuente, Gabriel; Newbold, Charles J

    2014-12-01

    Protozoa-associated methanogens (PAM) are considered one of the most active communities in the rumen methanogenesis. This experiment investigated whether methanogens are sequestrated within rumen protozoa, and structural differences between rumen free-living methanogens and PAM. Rumen protozoa were harvested from totally faunated sheep, and six protozoal fractions (plus free-living microorganisms) were generated by sequential filtration. Holotrich-monofaunated sheep were also used to investigate the holotrich-associated methanogens. Protozoal size determined the number of PAM as big protozoa had 1.7-3.3 times more methanogen DNA than smaller protozoa, but also more endosymbiotic bacteria (2.2- to 3.5-fold times). Thus, similar abundance of methanogens with respect to total bacteria were observed across all protozoal fractions and free-living microorganisms, suggesting that methanogens are not accumulated within rumen protozoa in a greater proportion to that observed in the rumen as a whole. All rumen methanogen communities had similar diversity (22.2 ± 3.4 TRFs). Free-living methanogens composed a conserved community (67% similarity within treatment) in the rumen with similar diversity but different structures than PAM (P methane mitigation strategies. © 2014 The Authors. FEMS Microbiology Ecology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  12. Anaerobic methanogenic treatment of phenolic wastewaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorak, P.M.; Hrudey, S.E.

    1982-09-01

    Batch culture experiments using domestic anaerobic sewage sludge were carried out with a variety of aromatic compounds to determine whether methanogenic fermentations of these substrates could be established. Of the 11 phenolics tested, only phenol and p-cresol were fermented to methane. The acclimation time for the degradation of these two substrates increased as their concentrations increased. In batch cultures, phenol or p-cresol were not degraded when their concentrations were greater than 500 and 400 mg/l respectively, although at higher concentrations, the methanogenic fermentations of non-phenolic substrates were not inhibited. Thus the phenolic-degrading bacteria are more susceptible to inhibition by the toxic substrates than are the methane bacteria. Four dimethylphenol isomers inhibited methane fermentation at 500 but not at 300 mg/l. Maximum degradation rates for phenol and p-cresol were found to be 42 and 52 mg/l/d respectively. Draw-and-feed cultures were established on these substrates, and the phenol-degrading culture showed a substrate removal efficiency of over 99.8%. The reactor, operated with a hydraulic retention time of 25 d and a solids retention time approaching infinity, received a nutrient solution containing 500 mg/l phenol. Preliminary batch cultures inoculated with oil sands tailings pond sludge indicate that microorganisms may exist therein, which are capable of anaerobically degrading o- and m-cresol, 2,5- and 3,5-dimethylphenol, and 3,4-dihydroxytoluene. Overall, these findings indicate that the anaerobic methanogenic degradation of phenolic wastewaters is biochemically feasible. 110 refs., 18 figs., 11 tabs.

  13. Characterization of a Methanogenic Community within an Algal Fed Anaerobic Digester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Joshua T.; Tramp, Cody; Sims, Ronald C.; Miller, Charles D.

    2012-01-01

    The microbial diversity and metabolic potential of a methanogenic consortium residing in a 3785-liter anaerobic digester, fed with wastewater algae, was analyzed using 454 pyrosequencing technology. DNA was extracted from anaerobic sludge material and used in metagenomic analysis through PCR amplification of the methyl-coenzyme M reductase α subunit (mcrA) gene using primer sets ML, MCR, and ME. The majority of annotated mcrA sequences were assigned taxonomically to the genera Methanosaeta in the order Methanosarcinales. Methanogens from the genus Methanosaeta are obligate acetotrophs, suggesting this genus plays a dominant role in methane production from the analyzed fermentation sample. Numerous analyzed sequences within the algae fed anaerobic digester were unclassified and could not be assigned taxonomically. Relative amplicon frequencies were determined for each primer set to determine the utility of each in pyrosequencing. Primer sets ML and MCR performed better quantitatively (representing the large majority of analyzed sequences) than primer set ME. However, each of these primer sets was shown to provide a quantitatively unique community structure, and thus they are of equal importance in mcrA metagenomic analysis. PMID:23724331

  14. Metabolic interactions in methanogenic and sulfate-reducing bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stams, A.J.M.; Plugge, C.M.; Bok, de F.A.M.; Houten, van B.H.G.W.; Lens, P.N.L.; Dijkman, H.; Weijma, J.

    2005-01-01

    In environments where the amount of electron acceptors is insufficient for complete breakdown of organic matter, methane is formed as the major reduced end product. In such methanogenic environments organic acids are degraded by syntrophic consortia of acetogenic bacteria and methanogenic archaea.

  15. Phosphate inhibition on thermophilic acetoclastic methanogens: a warning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulo, P.L.; Santos, dos A.B.; Ide, C.N.; Lettinga, G.

    2005-01-01

    The inhibitory effect of phosphate on acetoclastic-methanogens was investigated for three different thermophilic (55 degrees C) anaerobic consortia. When 70 mM of phosphate was tested, acetoclastic methanogens was completely inhibited in "Eerbeek" sludge which is dominated by Methanosaeta-like

  16. Genomic Characterization of Methanomicrobiales Reveals Three Classes of Methanogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iain; Ulrich, Luke E.; Lupa, Boguslaw; Susanti, Dwi; Porat, Iris; Hooper, Sean D.; Lykidis, Athanasios; Sieprawska-Lupa, Magdalena; Dharmarajan, Lakshmi; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla; Saunders, Elizabeth; Han, Cliff; Land, Miriam; Lucas, Susan; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Whitman, William B.; Woese, Carl; Bristow, James; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2009-05-01

    Methanomicrobiales is the least studied order of methanogens. While these organisms appear to be more closely related to the Methanosarcinales in ribosomal-based phylogenetic analyses, they are metabolically more similar to Class I methanogens. In order to improve our understanding of this lineage, we have completely sequenced the genomes of two members of this order, Methanocorpusculum labreanum Z and Methanoculleus marisnigri JR1, and compared them with the genome of a third, Methanospirillum hungatei JF-1. Similar to Class I methanogens, Methanomicrobiales use a partial reductive citric acid cycle for 2-oxoglutarate biosynthesis, and they have the Eha energy-converting hydrogenase. In common with Methanosarcinales, Methanomicrobiales possess the Ech hydrogenase and at least some of them may couple formylmethanofuran formation and heterodisulfide reduction to transmembrane ion gradients. Uniquely, M. labreanum and M. hungatei contain hydrogenases similar to the Pyrococcus furiosus Mbh hydrogenase, and all three Methanomicrobiales have anti-sigma factor and anti-anti-sigma factor regulatory proteins not found in other methanogens. Phylogenetic analysis based on seven core proteins of methanogenesis and cofactor biosynthesis places the Methanomicrobiales equidistant from Class I methanogens and Methanosarcinales. Our results indicate that Methanomicrobiales, rather than being similar to Class I methanogens or Methanomicrobiales, share some features of both and have some unique properties. We find that there are three distinct classes of methanogens: the Class I methanogens, the Methanomicrobiales (Class II), and the Methanosarcinales (Class III).

  17. Sulfate reduction with methanol by a thermophilic consortium obtained from a methanogenic reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidova, I.A. [Wageningen Agricultural Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Microbiology; Stams, A.J.M. [Wageningen Agricultural Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Microbiology

    1996-12-31

    An enrichment culture obtained from anaerobic granular sludge of a bench-scale anarobic reactor degraded methanol at 65 C via sulfate reduction and acetogenesis. Sulfate reduction was the dominant process (S{sup 2-}/acetate=2.5). No methane formation was observed. Approximately 30% of the methanol was converted by acetogenic bacteria to acetate, while the remainder was degraded by these bacteria to H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} in syntrophy with hydrogen-consuming sulfate-reducing bacteria. Pure cultures of sulfate-reducing and acetogenic bacteria were isolated and characterized. (orig.)

  18. Ammonia effect on hydrogenotrophic methanogens and syntrophic acetate oxidizing bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Han; Fotidis, Ioannis; Angelidaki, Irini

    methanogens. Two pure strains of hydrogenotrophic methanogens (i.e: Methanoculleus bourgensis and Methanoculleus thermophiles) and two pure strains of SAO bacteria (i.e: Tepidanaerobacter acetatoxydans and Thermacetogenium phaeum) were inoculated under four different ammonia (0.26, 3, 5 and 7g NH4+-N....../L) and free ammonia levels (Mesophilic: 3.31, 38.2, 63.68 and 89.15 g NH3-N/L. Thermophilic: 8.48, 97.82, 163.03 and 228.24 g NH3-N/L). The results indicated that both T. acetatoxydans and T. phaeum were more sensitive to high ammonia levels compared to the hydrogenotrophic methanogens tested. Additionally......, the total incubation periods of hydrogenotrophic methanogens were significantly shorter compared to the SAO bacteria incubation periods. Thus, it seems that hydrogenotrophic methanogens could be equally, if not more, tolerant to high ammonia levels compared to SAO bacteria....

  19. Ammonia effect on hydrogenotrophic methanogens and syntrophic acetate oxidizing bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Han; Fotidis, Ioannis; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia-rich substrates can cause inhibition on anaerobic digestion process. Syntrophic acetate oxidizing bacteria (SAOB) and hydrogenotrophic methanogens are important for the ammonia inhibitory mechanism on anaerobic digestion. The roles and interactions of SAOB and hydrogenotrophic methanogens...... to ammonia inhibition effect are still unclear. The aim of the current study was to determine the ammonia toxicity levels of various pure strains of SAOB and hydrogenotrophic methanogens. Moreover, ammonia toxicity on the syntrophic cultivated strains of SAOB and hydrogenotrophic methanogens was tested. Thus......, four hydrogenotrophic methanogens (i.e. Methanoculleus bourgensis, Methanobacterium congolense, Methanoculleus thermophilus and Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus), two SAOB (i.e. Tepidanaerobacter acetatoxydans and Thermacetogenium phaeum) and their syntrophic cultivation, were assessed under 0...

  20. Methanogenic Degradation of Poly(3-Hydroxyalkanoates)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budwill, Karen; Fedorak, Phillip M.; Page, William J.

    1992-01-01

    Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) and the copolymer poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) were fermented to methane and carbon dioxide within 16 days by an anaerobic sewage sludge consortium. The cultures adapted quickly to metabolize these polymeric compounds, and between 83 and 96% of the substrate carbon was transformed to methane and carbon dioxide. PMID:16348705

  1. Kansas Wind Energy Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenbacher, Don [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States)

    2015-12-31

    This project addresses both fundamental and applied research problems that will help with problems defined by the DOE “20% Wind by 2030 Report”. In particular, this work focuses on increasing the capacity of small or community wind generation capabilities that would be operated in a distributed generation approach. A consortium (KWEC – Kansas Wind Energy Consortium) of researchers from Kansas State University and Wichita State University aims to dramatically increase the penetration of wind energy via distributed wind power generation. We believe distributed generation through wind power will play a critical role in the ability to reach and extend the renewable energy production targets set by the Department of Energy. KWEC aims to find technical and economic solutions to enable widespread implementation of distributed renewable energy resources that would apply to wind.

  2. IPD-Work consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Virtanen, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    of countries. The aim of the consortium is to estimate reliably the associations of work-related psychosocial factors with chronic diseases, disability, and mortality. Our findings are highly cited by the occupational health, epidemiology, and clinical medicine research community. However, some of the IPD-Work......'s findings have also generated disagreement as they challenge the importance of job strain as a major target for coronary heart disease (CHD) prevention, this is reflected in the critical discussion paper by Choi et al (1). In this invited reply to Choi et al, we aim to (i) describe how IPD-Work seeks......Established in 2008 and comprising over 60 researchers, the IPD-Work (individual-participant data meta-analysis in working populations) consortium is a collaborative research project that uses pre-defined meta-analyses of individual-participant data from multiple cohort studies representing a range...

  3. The BADER Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    BiOM: The Director of the BADER Consortium was invited to participate in a local (Newark, DE) demonstration of the BiOM Bionic Lower Leg System. BiOM...trials of the DEKA Arm and have agreed to facilitate upcoming and future clinical trials. Dr. Tim Brindle of the VA attended the BADER Annual Meeting...clinical care for members of the Armed Forces, veterans, and civilians who have undergone amputation, traumatic brain injury, and other serious

  4. Different cultivation methods to acclimatise ammonia-tolerant methanogenic consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hailin; Fotidis, Ioannis A; Mancini, Enrico; Angelidaki, Irini

    2017-05-01

    Bioaugmentation with ammonia tolerant-methanogenic consortia was proposed as a solution to overcome ammonia inhibition during anaerobic digestion process recently. However, appropriate technology to generate ammonia tolerant methanogenic consortia is still lacking. In this study, three basic reactors (i.e. batch, fed-batch and continuous stirred-tank reactors (CSTR)) operated at mesophilic (37°C) and thermophilic (55°C) conditions were assessed, based on methane production efficiency, incubation time, TAN/FAN (total ammonium nitrogen/free ammonia nitrogen) levels and maximum methanogenic activity. Overall, fed-batch cultivation was clearly the most efficient method compared to batch and CSTR. Specifically, by saving incubation time up to 150%, fed-batch reactors were acclimatised to nearly 2-fold higher FAN levels with a 37%-153% methanogenic activity improvement, compared to batch method. Meanwhile, CSTR reactors were inhibited at lower ammonia levels. Finally, specific methanogenic activity test showed that hydrogenotrophic methanogens were more active than aceticlastic methanogens in all FAN levels above 540mgNH 3 -NL -1 . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Phylogenetic analysis of methanogens from the bovine rumen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forster Robert J

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interest in methanogens from ruminants has resulted from the role of methane in global warming and from the fact that cattle typically lose 6 % of ingested energy as methane. Several species of methanogens have been isolated from ruminants. However they are difficult to culture, few have been consistently found in high numbers, and it is likely that major species of rumen methanogens are yet to be identified. Results Total DNA from clarified bovine rumen fluid was amplified using primers specific for Archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences (rDNA. Phylogenetic analysis of 41 rDNA sequences identified three clusters of methanogens. The largest cluster contained two distinct subclusters with rDNA sequences similar to Methanobrevibacter ruminantium 16S rDNA. A second cluster contained sequences related to 16S rDNA from Methanosphaera stadtmanae, an organism not previously described in the rumen. The third cluster contained rDNA sequences that may form a novel group of rumen methanogens. Conclusions The current set of 16S rRNA hybridization probes targeting methanogenic Archaea does not cover the phylogenetic diversity present in the rumen and possibly other gastro-intestinal tract environments. New probes and quantitative PCR assays are needed to determine the distribution of the newly identified methanogen clusters in rumen microbial communities.

  6. Methanogenic Conversion of CO2 Into CH4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, S.H., Ferry, J.G., Schoell, M.

    2012-05-06

    This SBIR project evaluated the potential to remediate geologic CO2 sequestration sites into useful methane gas fields by application of methanogenic bacteria. Such methanogens are present in a wide variety of natural environments, converting CO2 into CH4 under natural conditions. We conclude that the process is generally feasible to apply within many of the proposed CO2 storage reservoir settings. However, extensive further basic R&D still is needed to define the precise species, environments, nutrient growth accelerants, and economics of the methanogenic process. Consequently, the study team does not recommend Phase III commercial application of the technology at this early phase.

  7. The potential of Methanogenic Life in the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubner, R.-S.; Firneis, M. G.; Leitner, J. J.; Schleper, C.; Rittmann, S. K.-M. R.

    2015-10-01

    Methanogens from the domain Archaea are obligate anaerobic chemolithoautotrophs or chemolithoheterotrophs producing methane (CH4). For the CH4-production they primarily use various C1 typecompounds (like carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), formate (HCO- 2)), but some strains are also able to utilize methanol (CH3OH), acetate, or even methylsulfides for energy production. The capability of methanogens thriving under various extreme environments on Earth is astonishing. Their enormous diversity and the similarity between their growth conditions and the environmental conditions on extraterrestrial bodies throughout the Solar System make methanogens to an ideal test object for astrobiological experiments.

  8. Different cultivation methods to acclimatise ammonia-tolerant methanogenic consortia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Hailin; Fotidis, Ioannis; Mancini, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    Bioaugmentation with ammonia tolerant-methanogenic consortia was proposed as a solution to overcome ammonia inhibition during anaerobic digestion process recently. However, appropriate technology to generate ammonia tolerant methanogenic consortia is still lacking. In this study, three basic...... reactors (i.e. batch, fed-batch and continuous stirred-tank reactors (CSTR)) operated at mesophilic (37°C) and thermophilic (55°C) conditions were assessed, based on methane production efficiency, incubation time, TAN/FAN (total ammonium nitrogen/free ammonia nitrogen) levels and maximum methanogenic...... activity. Overall, fed-batch cultivation was clearly the most efficient method compared to batch and CSTR. Specifically, by saving incubation time up to 150%, fed-batch reactors were acclimatised to nearly 2-fold higher FAN levels with a 37%-153% methanogenic activity improvement, compared to batch method...

  9. The Nitrogenase in a Methanogenic Archaebacterium and Its Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-02-02

    Methanococcus thermolithotrophicus (4) shows the highest similarity with this alternative nitrogenase makes attractive the possibility that methanogen...of nitrogenase structural genes of the thermophilic archaebacterium Methanococcus thermolithotrophicus. Molec. Microbiol. 3: 541-551. 5. Pope, N. P

  10. PHOSPHOLIPIDS OF FIVE PSEUDOMONAD ARCHETYPES FOR DIFFERENT TOLUENE DEGRADATION PATHWAYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry (LC/ESI/MS) was used to determine phospholipid profiles for five reference pseudomonad strains harboring distinct toluene catabolic pathways: Pseudomonas putida mt-2, Pseudomonas putida F1, Burkholderia cepacia G4, B...

  11. The International Human Epigenome Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Hirst, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The International Human Epigenome Consortium (IHEC) coordinates the generation of a catalog of high-resolution reference epigenomes of major primary human cell types. The studies now presented (see the Cell Press IHEC web portal at http://www.cell.com/consortium/IHEC) highlight the coordinated...

  12. Hawaii Space Grant Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Luke P.

    2005-01-01

    The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium is composed of ten institutions of higher learning including the University of Hawai'i at Manoa, the University of Hawai'i at Hilo, the University of Guam, and seven Community Colleges spread over the 4 main Hawaiian islands. Geographic separation is not the only obstacle that we face as a Consortium. Hawai'i has been mired in an economic downturn due to a lack of tourism for almost all of the period (2001 - 2004) covered by this report, although hotel occupancy rates and real estate sales have sky-rocketed in the last year. Our challenges have been many including providing quality educational opportunities in the face of shrinking State and Federal budgets, encouraging science and technology course instruction at the K-12 level in a public school system that is becoming less focused on high technology and more focused on developing basic reading and math skills, and assembling community college programs with instructors who are expected to teach more classes for the same salary. Motivated people can overcome these problems. Fortunately, the Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium (HSGC) consists of a group of highly motivated and talented individuals who have not only overcome these obstacles, but have excelled with the Program. We fill a critical need within the State of Hawai'i to provide our children with opportunities to pursue their dreams of becoming the next generation of NASA astronauts, engineers, and explorers. Our strength lies not only in our diligent and creative HSGC advisory board, but also with Hawai'i's teachers, students, parents, and industry executives who are willing to invest their time, effort, and resources into Hawai'i's future. Our operational philosophy is to FACE the Future, meaning that we will facilitate, administer, catalyze, and educate in order to achieve our objective of creating a highly technically capable workforce both here in Hawai'i and for NASA. In addition to administering to programs and

  13. Methanogenic Archaea and human periodontal disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepp, Paul W.; Brinig, Mary M.; Ouverney, Cleber C.; Palm, Katherine; Armitage, Gary C.; Relman, David A.

    2004-01-01

    Archaea have been isolated from the human colon, vagina, and oral cavity, but have not been established as causes of human disease. In this study, we reveal a relationship between the severity of periodontal disease and the relative abundance of archaeal small subunit ribosomal RNA genes (SSU rDNA) in the subgingival crevice by using quantitative PCR. Furthermore, the relative abundance of archaeal small subunit rDNA decreased at treated sites in association with clinical improvement. Archaea were harbored by 36% of periodontitis patients and were restricted to subgingival sites with periodontal disease. The presence of archaeal cells at these sites was confirmed by fluorescent in situ hybridization. The archaeal community at diseased sites was dominated by a Methanobrevibacter oralis-like phylotype and a distinct Methanobrevibacter subpopulation related to archaea that inhabit the gut of numerous animals. We hypothesize that methanogens participate in syntrophic relationships in the subgingival crevice that promote colonization by secondary fermenters during periodontitis. Because they are potential alternative syntrophic partners, our finding of larger Treponema populations sites without archaea provides further support for this hypothesis. PMID:15067114

  14. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-06-30

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2007 through June 30, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the 2007 GSTC Spring Meeting; (2) Identifying the 2007 GSTC projects, issuing award or declination letters, and begin drafting subcontracts; (3) 2007 project mentoring teams identified; (4) New NETL Project Manager; (5) Preliminary planning for the 2007 GSTC Fall Meeting; (6) Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC project final reports; and (7) Outreach and communications.

  15. Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levesque, Stephen [EWI, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2013-04-05

    This report summarizes the activities undertaken by EWI while under contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for the management and operation of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium (NFC). The NFC was established by EWI to independently develop, evaluate, and deploy fabrication approaches and data that support the re-establishment of the U.S. nuclear industry: ensuring that the supply chain will be competitive on a global stage, enabling more cost-effective and reliable nuclear power in a carbon constrained environment. The NFC provided a forum for member original equipment manufactures (OEM), fabricators, manufacturers, and materials suppliers to effectively engage with each other and rebuild the capacity of this supply chain by : Identifying and removing impediments to the implementation of new construction and fabrication techniques and approaches for nuclear equipment, including system components and nuclear plants. Providing and facilitating detailed scientific-based studies on new approaches and technologies that will have positive impacts on the cost of building of nuclear plants. Analyzing and disseminating information about future nuclear fabrication technologies and how they could impact the North American and the International Nuclear Marketplace. Facilitating dialog and initiate alignment among fabricators, owners, trade associations, and government agencies. Supporting industry in helping to create a larger qualified nuclear supplier network. Acting as an unbiased technology resource to evaluate, develop, and demonstrate new manufacturing technologies. Creating welder and inspector training programs to help enable the necessary workforce for the upcoming construction work. Serving as a focal point for technology, policy, and politically interested parties to share ideas and concepts associated with fabrication across the nuclear industry. The report the objectives and summaries of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

  16. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-05-10

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January 1, 2006 through March 31, 2006. Activities during this time period were: (1) Organize and host the 2006 Spring Meeting in San Diego, CA on February 21-22, 2006; (2) Award 8 projects for co-funding by GSTC for 2006; (3) New members recruitment; and (4) Improving communications.

  17. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel Morrison; Elizabeth Wood; Barbara Robuck

    2010-09-30

    The EMS Energy Institute at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) has managed the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) since its inception in 2003. The GSTC infrastructure provided a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. The GSTC received base funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Oil & Natural Gas Supply Program. The GSTC base funds were highly leveraged with industry funding for individual projects. Since its inception, the GSTC has engaged 67 members. The GSTC membership base was diverse, coming from 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. The membership was comprised of natural gas storage field operators, service companies, industry consultants, industry trade organizations, and academia. The GSTC organized and hosted a total of 18 meetings since 2003. Of these, 8 meetings were held to review, discuss, and select proposals submitted for funding consideration. The GSTC reviewed a total of 75 proposals and committed co-funding to support 31 industry-driven projects. The GSTC committed co-funding to 41.3% of the proposals that it received and reviewed. The 31 projects had a total project value of $6,203,071 of which the GSTC committed $3,205,978 in co-funding. The committed GSTC project funding represented an average program cost share of 51.7%. Project applicants provided an average program cost share of 48.3%. In addition to the GSTC co-funding, the consortium provided the domestic natural gas storage industry with a technology transfer and outreach infrastructure. The technology transfer and outreach were conducted by having project mentoring teams and a GSTC website, and by working closely with the Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI) to

  18. Atlantic Coast Environmental Indicators Consortium

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — n 2000, the US EPA granted authority to establish up to five Estuarine Indicator Research Programs. These Programs were designed to identify, evaluate, recommend and...

  19. COnsortium of METabolomics Studies (COMETS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The COnsortium of METabolomics Studies (COMETS) is an extramural-intramural partnership that promotes collaboration among prospective cohort studies that follow participants for a range of outcomes and perform metabolomic profiling of individuals.

  20. NCI Pediatric Preclinical Testing Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI has awarded grants to five research teams to participate in its Pediatric Preclinical Testing Consortium, which is intended to help to prioritize which agents to pursue in pediatric clinical trials.

  1. Effect of different ammonia sources on aceticlastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Hailin; Fotidis, Ioannis; Kissas, Konstantinos

    2018-01-01

    , in this study, the inhibitory effect of a “natural” ammonia source (urea) and NH4Cl, on four pure methanogenic strains (aceticlastic: Methanosarcina thermophila, Methanosarcina barkeri; hydrogenotrophic: Methanoculleus bourgensis, Methanoculleus thermophilus), was assessed under mesophilic (37 °C......) and thermophilic (55 °C) conditions. The results showed that urea hydrolysis increased pH significantly to unsuitable levels for methanogenic growth, while NH4Cl had a negligible effect on pH. After adjusting initial pH to 7 and 8, urea was significantly stronger inhibitor with longer lag phases to methanogenesis...... compared to NH4Cl. Overall, urea seems to be more toxic on both aceticlastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens compared to NH4Cl under the same total and free ammonia levels....

  2. Swiss Industrial Biocatalysis Consortium (SIBC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirz, Beat; Kittelmann, Matthias; Meyer, Hans-Peter; Wohlgemuth, Roland

    2010-01-01

    Taking up the common challenges in biocatalysis, a group of industrialists decided to react with a bottom-up solution, and created the Swiss Industrial Biocatalysis Consortium (SIBC). The Swiss Industrial Biocatalysis Consortium is a pre-competitive working group to better implement and utilize existing know-how and resources in biocatalysis, and to influence and shape the economic and educational political environment. Recent examples of activities are outlined.

  3. Hickory Consortium 2001 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2003-02-01

    As with all Building America Program consortia, systems thinking is the key to understanding the processes that Hickory Consortium hopes to improve. The Hickory Consortium applies this thinking to more than the whole-building concept. Their systems thinking embraces the meta process of how housing construction takes place in America. By understanding the larger picture, they are able to identify areas where improvements can be made and how to implement them.

  4. Effect of ammonia on hydrogenotrophic methanogens and syntrophic acetate oxidizing bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Han; Fotidis, Ioannis; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-01-01

    methanogens. Two pure strains of hydrogenotrophic methanogens (i.e: Methanoculleus bourgensis and Methanoculleus thermophiles) and two pure strains of SAO bacteria (i.e: Tepidanaerobacter acetatoxydans and Thermacetogenium phaeum) were inoculated under four different ammonia (0.26, 3, 5 and 7g NH4+-N...... compared to the hydrogenotrophic methanogens tested. Thus, it seems that hydrogenotrophic methanogens could be equally, if not more, tolerant to high ammonia levels compared to SAO bacteria....

  5. A simple model for simultaneous methanogenic-denitrification systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garibay-Orijel, C.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær; Rinderknecht-Seijas, N.

    2006-01-01

    We describe a useful and simple model for studies of simultaneous methanogenic-denitrification (M-D) systems. One equation predicts an inverse relationship between the percentage of electron donor channeled into dissimilatory denitrification and the loading ratio X given by grams degradable COD per...... gram nitrate-N in the influent. It allows the determination of the extent of use of organic matter by the denitrification and the methanogenic pathways for a given concentration of nitrate salts in the influent. This equation was validated with experimental data from the literature and good agreement...

  6. Molecular Signatures of Methanogens in Cultures and Environmental Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summons, R. E.; Embaye, T.; Jahnke, L. L.; Baumgartner, M.

    2002-12-01

    The core lipids of methanogens comprise C20 and C40 isoprenoid chains, linked through ether bonds to glycerol. Additional structural diversity is encoded into the polar head groups that are attached to the glycerol ether cores. These compounds are potentially very useful as taxonomic markers in microbial mats and other environmental samples while the nature of the hydrocarbon chains provide a means to identify methanogenic inputs to ancient sediments. The structural diversity of methanogen polar lipids is most valuable when it can be directly correlated to 16S rRNA phylogeny. On the other hand, this diversity can also leads to analytical challenges because there is no single approach that works for all structural types. While some intact methanogen lipids have been identified using mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy, the most common means of analysing the lipid cores involves cleavage of the ether bonds using HI and subsequent reduction of the alkyl iodides to hydrocarbons with LiAlH4. One class of methanogenic lipids, the 3?-hydroxyarchaeols, escaped detection for some years because strong acid treatments in the analysis protocols destroyed hydroxyl-containing isoprenoid chains. We have been systematically re-examining the lipids of methanogens, using milder procedures involving weak acid hydrolysis of polar head groups, derivatisation to form trimethylsilyl ethers and analysis by GC-MS. As well as archaeol, sn-2- and sn-3-hydroxyarchaeol, we have tentatively identified a dihydroxyarchaeol in several Methanococcus sp. For Methanococcus thermolithotrophicus an analysis of the total lipid extracts using BBr3 as an ether cleavage reagent followed by LiBEt3H, reduction revealed a very complex mixture consisting of phytane, phytenes, biphytane, biphytenes and a suite of related alcohols. The latter compounds were analysed by GC-MS as their trimethylsilyl ethers and found to comprise a mixture tentatively identified as phytan-N-ol and biphytan-N-ol where N= 3 or 7

  7. Syntrophic Degradation of Lactate in Methanogenic Co-cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Birte; Stahl, David

    2010-05-17

    In environments where the amount of the inorganic electron acceptors (oxygen, nitrate, sulfate, sulfur oroxidized metal ions (Fe3+;Mn4+) is insufficient for complete breakdown of organic matter, methane is formed as the major reduced end product. In such methanogenic environments organic acids are degraded by syntrophic associations of fermenting, acetogenic bacteria (e.g., sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) as"secondary fermenters") and methanogenic archaea. In these consortia, the conversion of lactate to acetate, CO2 and methane depends on the cooperating activities of both metabolically distinct microbial groups that are tightly linked by the need to maintain the exchanged metabolites (hydrogenandformate) at very low concentrations.

  8. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziemkiewicz, Paul; Vandivort, Tamara; Pflughoeft-Hassett, Debra; Chugh, Y Paul; Hower, James

    2008-08-31

    Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, “clean coal” combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered “allowable” under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and privatesector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

  9. Snapshot of methanogen sensitivity to temperature in Zoige wetland from Tibetan plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li eFu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Zoige wetland in Tibetan plateau represents a cold environment at high altitude where significant methane emission has been observed. However, it remains unknown how the production and emission of CH4 from Zoige wetland will respond to a warming climate. Here we investigated the temperature sensitivity of methanogen community in a Zoige wetland soil under the laboratory incubation conditions. One soil sample was collected and the temperature sensitivity of the methanogenic activity, the structure of methanogen community and the methanogenic pathways were determined. We found that the response of methanogenesis to temperature could be separated into two phases, a high sensitivity in the low temperature range and a modest sensitivity under mesophilic conditions, respectively. The aceticlastic methanogens Methanosarcinaceae were the main methanogens at low temperatures, while hydrogenotrophic Methanobacteriales, Methanomicrobiales and Methanocellales were more abundant at higher temperatures. The total abundance of mcrA genes increased with temperature indicating that the growth of methanogens was stimulated. The growth of hydrogenotrophic methanogens, however, was faster than aceticlastic ones resulting in the shift of methanogen community. Determination of carbon isotopic signatures indicated that methanogenic pathway was also shifted from mainly aceticlastic methanogenesis to a mixture of hydrogenotrophic and aceticlastic methanogenesis with the increase of temperature. Collectively, the shift of temperature responses of methanogenesis was in accordance with the changes in methanogen composition and methanogenic pathway in this Zoige wetland sample. It appears that the aceticlastic methanogenesis dominated at low temperatures is more sensitive than the hydrogenotrophic one at higher temperatures.

  10. In-vitro model for studying methanogens in human gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tottey, William; Gaci, Nadia; Borrel, Guillaume; Alric, Monique; O'Toole, Paul W; Brugère, Jean-François

    2015-08-01

    Reported failures with gnotobiotic animal models led us to establish an in-vitro model of reciprocal conversion of methanogenic and non methanogenic microbiota from human fecal samples. Consequences on gas and microbiota compositions are reported. This should facilitate the study of the controversial role of gut methanogens in human health. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Vaccination of Sheep with a Methanogen Protein Provides Insight into Levels of Antibody in Saliva Needed to Target Ruminal Methanogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subharat, Supatsak; Shu, Dairu; Zheng, Tao; Buddle, Bryce M; Kaneko, Kan; Hook, Sarah; Janssen, Peter H; Wedlock, D Neil

    2016-01-01

    Methane is produced in the rumen of ruminant livestock by methanogens and is a major contributor to agricultural greenhouse gases. Vaccination against ruminal methanogens could reduce methane emissions by inducing antibodies in saliva which enter the rumen and impair ability of methanogens to produce methane. Presently, it is not known if vaccination can induce sufficient amounts of antibody in the saliva to target methanogen populations in the rumen and little is known about how long antibody in the rumen remains active. In the current study, sheep were vaccinated twice at a 3-week interval with a model methanogen antigen, recombinant glycosyl transferase protein (rGT2) formulated with one of four adjuvants: saponin, Montanide ISA61, a chitosan thermogel, or a lipid nanoparticle/cationic liposome adjuvant (n = 6/formulation). A control group of sheep (n = 6) was not vaccinated. The highest antigen-specific IgA and IgG responses in both saliva and serum were observed with Montanide ISA61, which promoted levels of salivary antibodies that were five-fold higher than the second most potent adjuvant, saponin. A rGT2-specific IgG standard was used to determine the level of rGT2-specific IgG in serum and saliva. Vaccination with GT2/Montanide ISA61 produced a peak antibody concentration of 7 × 1016 molecules of antigen-specific IgG per litre of saliva, and it was estimated that in the rumen there would be more than 104 molecules of antigen-specific IgG for each methanogen cell. Both IgG and IgA in saliva were shown to be relatively stable in the rumen. Salivary antibody exposed for 1-2 hours to an in vitro simulated rumen environment retained approximately 50% of antigen-binding activity. Collectively, the results from measuring antibody levels and stablility suggest a vaccination-based mitigation strategy for livestock generated methane is in theory feasible.

  12. Bioaugmentation of an acetate-oxidising anaerobic consortium in up-flow sludge blanket reactor subjected to high ammonia loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotidis, Ioannis; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Angelidaki, Irini

    . in association with Methanoculleus spp. strain MAB1), is an acetate oxidising methanogenic consortium that can produce methane (CH4) at high ammonia levels. In the current study the bioaugmentation of the SAO culture in a mesophilic up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor subjected to high ammonia loads...... was tested. The co-cultivation in fed-batch of a fast-growing hydrogenotrophic methanogen (i.e. Methanoculleus bourgensis) with the SAO culture was also investigated. Results obtained clearly demonstrated that bioaugmentation of SAO culture in a UASB reactor was not possible most probably due to the slow...... growth of the culture. The incubation period (duration of lag+exponential phase) of SAO culture was reduced more than 30% when it was cocultivated with Methanoculleus bourgensis, in fed-batch reactors. Therefore, the bioaugmentation of the SAO culture along with Methanoculleus bourgensis in a UASB...

  13. Metabolic reconstruction of the archaeon methanogen Methanosarcina Acetivorans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maranas Costas D

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methanogens are ancient organisms that are key players in the carbon cycle accounting for about one billion tones of biological methane produced annually. Methanosarcina acetivorans, with a genome size of ~5.7 mb, is the largest sequenced archaeon methanogen and unique amongst the methanogens in its biochemical characteristics. By following a systematic workflow we reconstruct a genome-scale metabolic model for M. acetivorans. This process relies on previously developed computational tools developed in our group to correct growth prediction inconsistencies with in vivo data sets and rectify topological inconsistencies in the model. Results The generated model iVS941 accounts for 941 genes, 705 reactions and 708 metabolites. The model achieves 93.3% prediction agreement with in vivo growth data across different substrates and multiple gene deletions. The model also correctly recapitulates metabolic pathway usage patterns of M. acetivorans such as the indispensability of flux through methanogenesis for growth on acetate and methanol and the unique biochemical characteristics under growth on carbon monoxide. Conclusions Based on the size of the genome-scale metabolic reconstruction and extent of validated predictions this model represents the most comprehensive up-to-date effort to catalogue methanogenic metabolism. The reconstructed model is available in spreadsheet and SBML formats to enable dissemination.

  14. Survival of methanogens during desiccation: implications for life on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Michael G; Kral, Timothy A

    2006-08-01

    The relatively recent discoveries that liquid water likely existed on the surface of past Mars and that methane currently exists in the martian atmosphere have fueled the possibility of extant or extinct life on Mars. One possible explanation for the existence of the methane would be the presence of methanogens in the subsurface. Methanogens are microorganisms in the domain Archaea that can metabolize molecular hydrogen as an energy source and carbon dioxide as a carbon source and produce methane. One factor of importance is the arid nature of Mars, at least at the surface. If one is to assume that life exists below the surface, then based on the only example of life that we know, liquid water must be present. Realistically, however, that liquid water may be seasonal just as it is at some locations on our home planet. Here we report on research designed to determine how long certain species of methanogens can survive desiccation on a Mars soil simulant, JSC Mars-1. Methanogenic cells were grown on JSC Mars-1, transferred to a desiccator within a Coy anaerobic environmental chamber, and maintained there for varying time periods. Following removal from the desiccator and rehydration, gas chromatographic measurements of methane indicated survival for varying time periods. Methanosarcina barkeri survived desiccation for 10 days, while Methanobacterium formicicum and Methanothermobacter wolfeii were able to survive for 25 days.

  15. Studies on methanogenic consortia associated with mangrove sediments of Ennore.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ahila, N.K.; Kannapiran, E.; Ravindran, J.; Ramkumar, V.S.

    , 2 methanogens and homoacetogens in a gas-lift reactor. Water Sci. Technol., 45, 75-80 (2002). Wolin, E.A., M.J. Wolin and R.S. Wolfe: Formation of methane by bacterial extracts. J. Biol. Chem., 238, 2882-2886 (1963). Zinder, S.H.: Physiological...

  16. Conversion and toxicity characteristics of formaldehyde in acetoclastic methanogenic sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez-Gil, G.; Kleerebezem, R.; Lettinga, G.

    2002-01-01

    An unadapted mixed methanogenic sludge transformed formaldehyde into methanol and formate. The methanol to formate ratio obtained was 1:1. Formaldehyde conversion proceeded without any lag phase, suggesting the constitutive character of the formaldehyde conversion enzymes involved. Because the rate

  17. Methanogens in humans: potentially beneficial or harmful for health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Prem Prashant; Conway, Patricia Lynne; Schlundt, Jørgen

    2018-04-01

    Methanogens are anaerobic prokaryotes from the domain archaea that utilize hydrogen to reduce carbon dioxide, acetate, and a variety of methyl compounds into methane. Earlier believed to inhabit only the extreme environments, these organisms are now reported to be found in various environments including mesophilic habitats and the human body. The biological significance of methanogens for humans has been re-evaluated in the last few decades. Their contribution towards pathogenicity has received much less attention than their bacterial counterparts. In humans, methanogens have been studied in the gastrointestinal tract, mouth, and vagina, and considerable focus has shifted towards elucidating their possible role in the progression of disease conditions in humans. Methanoarchaea are also part of the human skin microbiome and proposed to play a role in ammonia turnover. Compared to hundreds of different bacterial species, the human body harbors only a handful of methanogen species represented by Methanobrevibacter smithii, Methanobrevibacter oralis, Methanosphaera stadtmanae, Methanomassiliicoccus luminyensis, Candidatus Methanomassiliicoccus intestinalis, and Candidatus Methanomethylophilus alvus. Their presence in the human gut suggests an indirect correlation with severe diseases of the colon. In this review, we examine the current knowledge about the methanoarchaea in the human body and possible beneficial or less favorable interactions.

  18. Relating methanogen community structure and anaerobic digester function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocher, B T W; Cherukuri, K; Maki, J S; Johnson, M; Zitomer, D H

    2015-03-01

    Much remains unknown about the relationships between microbial community structure and anaerobic digester function. However, knowledge of links between community structure and function, such as specific methanogenic activity (SMA) and COD removal rate, are valuable to improve anaerobic bioprocesses. In this work, quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) were developed using multiple linear regression (MLR) to predict SMA using methanogen community structure descriptors for 49 cultures. Community descriptors were DGGE demeaned standardized band intensities for amplicons of a methanogen functional gene (mcrA). First, predictive accuracy of MLR QSARs was assessed using cross validation with training (n = 30) and test sets (n = 19) for glucose and propionate SMA data. MLR equations correlating band intensities and SMA demonstrated good predictability for glucose (q(2) = 0.54) and propionate (q(2) = 0.53). Subsequently, data from all 49 cultures were used to develop QSARs to predict SMA values. Higher intensities of two bands were correlated with higher SMA values; high abundance of methanogens associated with these two bands should be encouraged to attain high SMA values. QSARs are helpful tools to identify key microorganisms or to study and improve many bioprocesses. Development of new, more robust QSARs is encouraged for anaerobic digestion or other bioprocesses, including nitrification, nitritation, denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation, and enhanced biological phosphorus removal. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Methane production from coal by a single methanogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, S.; Mayumi, D.; Mochimaru, H.; Tamaki, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Yoshioka, H.; Suzuki, Y.; Kamagata, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Previous geochemical studies indicate that biogenic methane greatly contributes to the formation of coalbed methane (CBM). It is unclear, however, what part of coal is used for the methane production and what types of microbes mediate the process. Here we hypothesized that methylotrophic methanogens use methoxylated aromatic compounds (MACs) derived from lignin. We incubated 11 species of methanogens belonging to order Methanosarcinales with 7 types of MACs. Two strains of methanogens, i.e., Methermicoccus shengliensis AmaM and ZC-1, produced methane from the MACs. In fact, these methanogens used over 30 types of commercially available MACs in addition to methanol and methylamines. To date, it is widely believed that methanogens use very limited number of small compounds such as hydrogen plus carbon dioxide, acetate, and methanol, and only three methanogenic pathways are recognized accordingly. Here, in contrast, two Methermicoccus strains used many types of MACs. We therefore propose this "methoxydotrophic" process as the fourth methanogenic pathway. Incubation of AmaM with 2-methoxybenzoate resulted in methanogenesis associated with the stoichiometric production of 2-hydroxybenzoate. Incubation with 2-methoxy-[7-13C] benzoate and with [13C] bicarbonate indicated that two thirds of methane carbon derived from the methoxy group and one third from CO2. Furthermore, incubation with [2-13C] acetate resulted in significant increases of 13C in both methane and CO2. These results suggest the occurrence of O-demethylation, CO2 reduction and acetyl-CoA metabolism in the methoxydotrophic methanogenesis. Furthermore, incubation of AmaM with lignite, subbituminous or bituminous coals in the bicarbonate-buffered media revealed that AmaM produced methane directly from coals via the methoxydotrophic pathway. Although 4 types of MACs were detected in the coal media in addition to methanol and methylamines, their total concentrations were too low to account for the methane

  20. H2-independent growth of the hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanococcus maripaludis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Kyle C; Lie, Thomas J; Jacobs, Michael A; Leigh, John A

    2013-02-26

    Hydrogenotrophic methanogenic Archaea require reduced ferredoxin as an anaplerotic source of electrons for methanogenesis. H(2) oxidation by the hydrogenase Eha provides these electrons, consistent with an H(2) requirement for growth. Here we report the identification of alternative pathways of ferredoxin reduction in Methanococcus maripaludis that operate independently of Eha to stimulate methanogenesis. A suppressor mutation that increased expression of the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase resulted in a strain capable of H(2)-independent ferredoxin reduction and growth with formate as the sole electron donor. In this background, it was possible to eliminate all seven hydrogenases of M. maripaludis. Alternatively, carbon monoxide oxidation by carbon monoxide dehydrogenase could also generate reduced ferredoxin that feeds into methanogenesis. In either case, the reduced ferredoxin generated was inefficient at stimulating methanogenesis, resulting in a slow growth phenotype. As methanogenesis is limited by the availability of reduced ferredoxin under these conditions, other electron donors, such as reduced coenzyme F(420), should be abundant. Indeed, when F(420)-reducing hydrogenase was reintroduced into the hydrogenase-free mutant, the equilibrium of H(2) production via an F(420)-dependent formate:H(2) lyase activity shifted markedly toward H(2) compared to the wild type. Hydrogenotrophic methanogens are thought to require H(2) as a substrate for growth and methanogenesis. Here we show alternative pathways in methanogenic metabolism that alleviate this H(2) requirement and demonstrate, for the first time, a hydrogenotrophic methanogen that is capable of growth in the complete absence of H(2). The demonstration of alternative pathways in methanogenic metabolism suggests that this important group of organisms is metabolically more versatile than previously thought.

  1. Shape memory alloy consortium (SMAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacot, A. Dean

    1999-07-01

    The application of smart structures to helicopter rotors has received widespread study in recent years. This is one of the major thrusts of the Shape Memory Alloy Consortium (SMAC) program. SMAC includes 3 companies and 4 Universities in a cost sharing consortium funded under DARPA Smart Materials and Structures program. This paper describes the objective of the SMAC effort, and its relationship to a previous DARPA smart structure rotorcraft program from which it originated. The SMAC program includes NiTinol fatigue/characterization studies, SMA actuator development, and ferromagnetic SMA material development. The paper summarizes the SMAC effort, and includes background and details on Boeing's development of a SMA torsional actuator for rotorcraft applications. SMA actuation is used to retwist the rotorcraft blade in flight, and result in a significant payload increase for either helicopters or tiltrotors. This paper is also augmented by several other papers in this conference with specific results from other SMAC consortium members.

  2. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    The Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) program was developed as a focused program to remove and/or minimize the barriers for effective management of over 123 million tons of coal combustion byproducts (CCBs) annually generated in the USA. At the time of launching the CBRC in 1998, about 25% of CCBs were beneficially utilized while the remaining was disposed in on-site or off-site landfills. During the ten (10) year tenure of CBRC (1998-2008), after a critical review, 52 projects were funded nationwide. By region, the East, Midwest, and West had 21, 18, and 13 projects funded, respectively. Almost all projects were cooperative projects involving industry, government, and academia. The CBRC projects, to a large extent, successfully addressed the problems of large-scale utilization of CCBs. A few projects, such as the two Eastern Region projects that addressed the use of fly ash in foundry applications, might be thought of as a somewhat smaller application in comparison to construction and agricultural uses, but as a novel niche use, they set the stage to draw interest that fly ash substitution for Portland cement might not attract. With consideration of the large increase in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum in response to EPA regulations, agricultural uses of FGD gypsum hold promise for large-scale uses of a product currently directed to the (currently stagnant) home construction market. Outstanding achievements of the program are: (1) The CBRC successfully enhanced professional expertise in the area of CCBs throughout the nation. The enhanced capacity continues to provide technology and information transfer expertise to industry and regulatory agencies. (2) Several technologies were developed that can be used immediately. These include: (a) Use of CCBs for road base and sub-base applications; (b) full-depth, in situ stabilization of gravel roads or highway/pavement construction recycled materials; and (c) fired bricks containing up to 30%-40% F

  3. The ocean sampling day consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo

    2015-01-01

    Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world’s oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate...... the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our...

  4. A Vaccine against Rumen Methanogens Can Alter the Composition of Archaeal Populations▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Yvette J.; Popovski, Sam; Rea, Suzanne M.; Skillman, Lucy C.; Toovey, Andrew F.; Northwood, Korinne S.; Wright, André-Denis G.

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to formulate a vaccine based upon the different species/strains of methanogens present in sheep intended to be immunized and to determine if a targeted vaccine could be used to decrease the methane output of the sheep. Two 16S rRNA gene libraries were used to survey the methanogenic archaea in sheep prior to vaccination, and methanogens representing five phylotypes were found to account for >52% of the different species/strains of methanogens detected. A vaccine based on a mixture of these five methanogens was then formulated, and 32 sheep were vaccinated on days 0, 28, and 103 with either a control or the anti-methanogen vaccine. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis revealed that each vaccination with the anti-methanogen formulation resulted in higher specific immunoglobulin G titers in plasma, saliva, and rumen fluid. Methane output levels corrected for dry-matter intake for the control and treatment groups were not significantly different, and real-time PCR data also indicated that methanogen numbers were not significantly different for the two groups after the second vaccination. However, clone library data indicated that methanogen diversity was significantly greater in sheep receiving the anti-methanogen vaccine and that the vaccine may have altered the composition of the methanogen population. A correlation between 16S rRNA gene sequence relatedness and cross-reactivity for the methanogens (R2 = 0.90) also exists, which suggests that a highly specific vaccine can be made to target specific strains of methanogens and that a more broad-spectrum approach is needed for success in the rumen. Our data also suggest that methanogens take longer than 4 weeks to adapt to dietary changes and call into question the validity of experimental results based upon a 2- to 4-week acclimatization period normally observed for bacteria. PMID:19201957

  5. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Consortium Agreement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Asada, Haruhiko

    1999-01-01

    ... of Phase 2 of the Home Automation and Healthcare Consortium. This report describes all major research accomplishments within the last six months since we launched the second phase of the consortium...

  6. Community Hospital Telehealth Consortium (CHTC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-12-30

    technology to improve and expand the opportunity for rural and urban underserved populations to receive quality, affordable health care....The Community Hospital Telehealth Consortium (CHTC) is a unique, forward-thinking, community-based healthcare service project organized around 6 not

  7. East bay fire chiefs' consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael Bradley

    1995-01-01

    The traditional approach to planning for public fire protection has been based on independent actions by each fire department or district. The county fire chiefs’ associations, while providing interagency communication, were not adequate to deal with the regional nature of the wildland urban interface problem. The formation of the East Bay Fire Chiefs’ Consortium grew...

  8. Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium (BTEC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium is an open scientific forum organized to foster the development of multi-center, international and inter-disciplinary collaborations that will lead to a better understanding of the etiology, outcomes, and prevention of brain tumors.

  9. Vaccination of Sheep with a Methanogen Protein Provides Insight into Levels of Antibody in Saliva Needed to Target Ruminal Methanogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supatsak Subharat

    Full Text Available Methane is produced in the rumen of ruminant livestock by methanogens and is a major contributor to agricultural greenhouse gases. Vaccination against ruminal methanogens could reduce methane emissions by inducing antibodies in saliva which enter the rumen and impair ability of methanogens to produce methane. Presently, it is not known if vaccination can induce sufficient amounts of antibody in the saliva to target methanogen populations in the rumen and little is known about how long antibody in the rumen remains active. In the current study, sheep were vaccinated twice at a 3-week interval with a model methanogen antigen, recombinant glycosyl transferase protein (rGT2 formulated with one of four adjuvants: saponin, Montanide ISA61, a chitosan thermogel, or a lipid nanoparticle/cationic liposome adjuvant (n = 6/formulation. A control group of sheep (n = 6 was not vaccinated. The highest antigen-specific IgA and IgG responses in both saliva and serum were observed with Montanide ISA61, which promoted levels of salivary antibodies that were five-fold higher than the second most potent adjuvant, saponin. A rGT2-specific IgG standard was used to determine the level of rGT2-specific IgG in serum and saliva. Vaccination with GT2/Montanide ISA61 produced a peak antibody concentration of 7 × 1016 molecules of antigen-specific IgG per litre of saliva, and it was estimated that in the rumen there would be more than 104 molecules of antigen-specific IgG for each methanogen cell. Both IgG and IgA in saliva were shown to be relatively stable in the rumen. Salivary antibody exposed for 1-2 hours to an in vitro simulated rumen environment retained approximately 50% of antigen-binding activity. Collectively, the results from measuring antibody levels and stablility suggest a vaccination-based mitigation strategy for livestock generated methane is in theory feasible.

  10. An intertwined evolutionary history of methanogenic archaea and sulfate reduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Susanti

    Full Text Available Hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis and dissimilatory sulfate reduction, two of the oldest energy conserving respiratory systems on Earth, apparently could not have evolved in the same host, as sulfite, an intermediate of sulfate reduction, inhibits methanogenesis. However, certain methanogenic archaea metabolize sulfite employing a deazaflavin cofactor (F(420-dependent sulfite reductase (Fsr where N- and C-terminal halves (Fsr-N and Fsr-C are homologs of F(420H(2 dehydrogenase and dissimilatory sulfite reductase (Dsr, respectively. From genome analysis we found that Fsr was likely assembled from freestanding Fsr-N homologs and Dsr-like proteins (Dsr-LP, both being abundant in methanogens. Dsr-LPs fell into two groups defined by following sequence features: Group I (simplest, carrying a coupled siroheme-[Fe(4-S(4] cluster and sulfite-binding Arg/Lys residues; Group III (most complex, with group I features, a Dsr-type peripheral [Fe(4-S(4] cluster and an additional [Fe(4-S(4] cluster. Group II Dsr-LPs with group I features and a Dsr-type peripheral [Fe(4-S(4] cluster were proposed as evolutionary intermediates. Group III is the precursor of Fsr-C. The freestanding Fsr-N homologs serve as F(420H(2 dehydrogenase unit of a putative novel glutamate synthase, previously described membrane-bound electron transport system in methanogens and of assimilatory type sulfite reductases in certain haloarchaea. Among archaea, only methanogens carried Dsr-LPs. They also possessed homologs of sulfate activation and reduction enzymes. This suggested a shared evolutionary history for methanogenesis and sulfate reduction, and Dsr-LPs could have been the source of the oldest (3.47-Gyr ago biologically produced sulfide deposit.

  11. Reducing methane emissions in sheep by immunization against rumen methanogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, A D G; Kennedy, P; O'Neill, C J; Toovey, A F; Popovski, S; Rea, S M; Pimm, C L; Klein, L

    2004-09-28

    This work was conducted to determine if methane emissions from sheep immunized with an anti-methanogen vaccine were significantly lower than methane emissions from non-immunized sheep, to test the effectiveness of two different vaccine formulations (VF) on methane abatement, and to compare methane emissions measured using a closed-circuit respiration chamber and the sulphur-hexafluoride (SF6) tracer technique. Thirty mature wether sheep were randomly allocated to three treatment groups (n = 10). One group received an immunization of adjuvant only on days 0 and 153 (control), a second group received an immunization with a 3-methanogen mix on days 0 and 153 (VF3 + 3), and a third group received an immunization of a 7-methanogen mix on day 0 followed by a 3-methanogen mix on day 153 (VF7 + 3). Four weeks post-secondary immunization, there was a significant 7.7% reduction in methane production per kg dry matter intake in the VF7 + 3 group compared to the controls (P = 0.051). However, methane emissions from sheep immunized with VF7 + 3 were not significantly different when compared to the sheep in the control group (P = 0.883). The average IgG and IgA antibody titres in both plasma and saliva of the VF3 + 3 immunized sheep were four to nine times higher than those immunized with VF7 + 3 (Pmethane estimates were consistently higher than the respiration chamber estimates and that there was no significant correlation between the SF6 methane estimates and the respiration chamber methane estimates (R2 = 0.11).

  12. The nif Gene Operon of the Methanogenic Archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Peter S.; Blank, Carrine; Leigh, John A.

    1998-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation occurs in two domains, Archaea and Bacteria. We have characterized a nif (nitrogen fixation) gene cluster in the methanogenic archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis. Sequence analysis revealed eight genes, six with sequence similarity to known nif genes and two with sequence similarity to glnB. The gene order, nifH, ORF105 (similar to glnB), ORF121 (similar to glnB), nifD, nifK, nifE, nifN, and nifX, was the same as that found in part in other diazotrophic methanogens and except for the presence of the glnB-like genes, also resembled the order found in many members of the Bacteria. Using transposon insertion mutagenesis, we determined that an 8-kb region required for nitrogen fixation corresponded to the nif gene cluster. Northern analysis revealed the presence of either a single 7.6-kb nif mRNA transcript or 10 smaller mRNA species containing portions of the large transcript. Polar effects of transposon insertions demonstrated that all of these mRNAs arose from a single promoter region, where transcription initiated 80 bp 5′ to nifH. Distinctive features of the nif gene cluster include the presence of the six primary nif genes in a single operon, the placement of the two glnB-like genes within the cluster, the apparent physical separation of the cluster from any other nif genes that might be in the genome, the fragmentation pattern of the mRNA, and the regulation of expression by a repression mechanism described previously. Our study and others with methanogenic archaea reporting multiple mRNAs arising from gene clusters with only a single putative promoter sequence suggest that mRNA processing following transcription may be a common occurrence in methanogens. PMID:9515920

  13. Biodegradation of pesticide and indolic compounds under methanogenic conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Ji-Dong

    1991-01-01

    Degradability of atrazine, cyanazine, and dicamba under methanogenic conditions was evaluated using serum bottle microcosms containing wetland soil inocula obtained from three different sites. Pesticides were monitored by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and the production of methane was measured with a gas chromatograph (GC). Dicamba was the most susceptible to degradation in the microcosms, followed by cyanazine. Atrazine was not degraded in the wetl...

  14. Corn in consortium with forages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássia Maria de Paula Garcia

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The basic premises for sustainable agricultural development with focus on rural producers are reducing the costs of production and aggregation of values through the use crop-livestock system (CLS throughout the year. The CLS is based on the consortium of grain crops, especially corn with tropical forages, mainly of the genus Panicum and Urochloa. The study aimed to evaluate the grain yield of irrigated corn crop intercropped with forage of the genus Panicum and Urochloa. The experiment was conducted at the Fazenda de Ensino, Pesquisa e Extensão – FEPE  of the Faculdade de Engenharia - UNESP, Ilha Solteira in an Oxisol in savannah conditions and in the autumn winter of 2009. The experimental area was irrigated by a center pivot and had a history of no-tillage system for 8 years. The corn hybrid used was simple DKB 390 YG at distances of 0.90 m. The seeds of grasses were sown in 0.34 m spacing in the amount of 5 kg ha-1, they were mixed with fertilizer minutes before sowing  and placed in a compartment fertilizer seeder and fertilizers were mechanically deposited in the soil at a depth of 0.03 m. The experimental design used was a randomized block with four replications and five treatments: Panicum maximum cv. Tanzania sown during the nitrogen fertilization (CTD of the corn; Panicum maximum cv. Mombaça sown during the nitrogen fertilization (CMD of the corn; Urochloa brizantha cv. Xaraés sown during the occasion of nitrogen fertilization (CBD of the corn; Urochloa ruziziensis cv. Comumsown during the nitrogen fertilization (CRD of the corn and single corn (control. The production components of corn: plant population per hectare (PlPo, number of ears per hectare (NE ha-1, number of rows per ear (NRE, number of kernels per row on the cob (NKR, number of grain in the ear (NGE and mass of 100 grains (M100G were not influenced by consortium with forage. Comparing grain yield (GY single corn and maize intercropped with forage of the genus Panicum

  15. Energetic and hydrogen limitations of thermophilic and hyperthermophilic methanogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, L. C.; Holden, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents are a unique ecosystem, based ultimately not on photosynthesis but chemosynthetic primary production. This makes them an excellent analog environment for the early Earth, and for potential extraterrestrial habitable environments, such as those on Mars and Europa. The habitability of given vent systems for chemoautotrophic prokaryotes can be modeled energetically by estimating the available Gibbs energy for specific modes of chemoautotrophy, using geochemical data and mixing models for hydrothermal fluids and seawater (McCollom and Shock, 1997). However, modeling to date has largely not taken into account variation in organisms' energy demands in these environments. Controls on maintenance energies are widely assumed to be temperature-dependent, rising with increasing temperature optima (Tijhuis et al., 1993), and species-independent. The impacts of other environmental stressors and particular energy-gathering strategies on maintenance energies have not been investigated. We have undertaken culture-based studies of growth and maintenance energies in thermophilic and hyperthermophilic methanogenic (hydrogenotrophic) archaea from deep-sea hydrothermal vents to investigate potential controls on energy demands in hydrothermal vent microbes, and to quantify their growth and maintenance energies for future bioenergetic modeling. We have investigated trends in their growth energies over their full temperature range and a range of nitrogen concentrations, and in their maintenance energies at different hydrogen concentrations. Growth energies in these organisms appear to rise with temperature, but do not vary between hyperthermophilic and thermophilic methanogens. Nitrogen availability at tested levels (40μM - 9.4 mM) does not appear to affect growth energies in all but one tested organism. In continuous chemostat culture, specific methane production varied with hydrogen availability but was similar between a thermophilic and a hyperthermophilic

  16. Corn in consortium with forages

    OpenAIRE

    Cássia Maria de Paula Garcia; Marcelo Andreotti; Marcelo Carvalho Minhoto Teixeira Filho; Keny Samejima Mascarenha Lopes; Ciniro Costa; Erikelly Aline Ribeiro de Santana

    2013-01-01

    The basic premises for sustainable agricultural development with focus on rural producers are reducing the costs of production and aggregation of values through the use crop-livestock system (CLS) throughout the year. The CLS is based on the consortium of grain crops, especially corn with tropical forages, mainly of the genus Panicum and Urochloa. The study aimed to evaluate the grain yield of irrigated corn crop intercropped with forage of the genus Panicum and Urochloa. The experiment was c...

  17. John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nall, Marsha

    2004-01-01

    The John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium is an inter-institutional research and technology development, beginning with ten projects in FY02 that are aimed at applying GRC expertise in fluid physics and sensor development with local biomedical expertise to mitigate the risks of space flight on the health, safety, and performance of astronauts. It is anticipated that several new technologies will be developed that are applicable to both medical needs in space and on earth.

  18. Appalachian clean coal technology consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutz, K.; Yoon, Roe-Hoan [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    The Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium (ACCTC) has been established to help U.S. coal producers, particularly those in the Appalachian region, increase the production of lower-sulfur coal. The cooperative research conducted as part of the consortium activities will help utilities meet the emissions standards established by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, enhance the competitiveness of U.S. coals in the world market, create jobs in economically-depressed coal producing regions, and reduce U.S. dependence on foreign energy supplies. The research activities will be conducted in cooperation with coal companies, equipment manufacturers, and A&E firms working in the Appalachian coal fields. This approach is consistent with President Clinton`s initiative in establishing Regional Technology Alliances to meet regional needs through technology development in cooperation with industry. The consortium activities are complementary to the High-Efficiency Preparation program of the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, but are broader in scope as they are inclusive of technology developments for both near-term and long-term applications, technology transfer, and training a highly-skilled work force.

  19. Impact of long-term partial aeration on the removal of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol in an initially methanogenic fluidized bed bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garibay-Orijel, Claudio; Hoyo-Vadillo, Carlos; Ponce-Noyola, Teresa; García-Mena, Jaime; Poggi-Varaldo, Héctor Mario

    2006-08-05

    A fluidized bed bioreactor (FBBR) was operated for more than 1000 days under two regimes, Methanogenic (M) and Methanogenic-Aerobic (M-A), to remove 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP) and phenol (Phe) from a synthetic wastewater, containing different amounts of TCP and Phe, using different aeration flow-rates (0, 2.13, and 1.06 NL O(2)/L.day). M conditions (80:20 mg/L of TCP:Phe, 0 NL O(2)/L.day) showed similar TCP and Phe removal (>95%). Nevertheless accumulation of 4-chlorophenol (4CP) up to 16 mg/L and Phe up to 4 mg/L was observed, while in M-A conditions (80:20 mg/L of TCP:Phe, 2.13 NL O(2)/L.day) TCP and Phe removal achieved 99.9(+)% and after 70 days no accumulation of intermediates were detected. The increase of TCP and Phe in the influent under M-A conditions from 80:20 to 120:30 mg/L of TCP:Phe did not negatively affect the removal of TCP, intermediates and Phe; in fact, they were similar to those in previous M-A conditions. The decrease in the oxygen flow rate from 2.13 to 1.06 NL O(2)/L.day had no negative effect on pollutant removals, which were as high as in previous two M-A conditions. The specific methanogenic activity of bioparticles of the fluidized bed decreased with long-term partial aeration, starting from 1.097 mmol CH(4)/h.g(TKN) in the M regime (day 60) to TCP and less chlorinated intermediates could be achieved in an initially methanogenic FBBR under conditions of partial aeration, although long-term operation seemed to negatively affect the methanogenic activity of biomass. It is also likely that after extended aeration the microbial community was finally enriched with strains with the ability to attack 2,4,6-TCP under aerobic conditions. This report represents the first evidence of a long exposure to oxygen of an anaerobic microbial consortium that efficiently remove TCP. (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Methylotrophic methanogenic Thermoplasmata implicated in reduced methane emissions from bovine rumen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Morten; Schwab, Clarissa; Jensen, Bent Borg

    2013-01-01

    Rumen methanogens are major sources of anthropogenic methane emissions, and these archaea are targets in strategies aimed at reducing methane emissions. Here we show that the poorly characterised Thermoplasmata archaea in bovine rumen are methylotrophic methanogens and that they are reduced upon...... transcripts, indicating that these Thermoplasmata degrade methylamines. Their methylotrophic methanogenic lifestyle was corroborated by in vitro incubations, showing enhanced growth of these organisms upon methylamine supplementation paralleled by elevated methane production. The Thermoplasmata have a high...... potential as target in future strategies to mitigate methane emissions from ruminant livestock. Our findings and the findings of others also indicate a wider distribution of methanogens than previously anticipated....

  1. Conversion of Crude Oil to Methane by a Microbial Consortium Enriched From Oil Reservoir Production Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina eBerdugo-Clavijo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The methanogenic biodegradation of crude oil is an important process occurring in petroleum reservoirs and other oil-containing environments such as contaminated aquifers. In this process, syntrophic bacteria degrade hydrocarbon substrates to products such as acetate, and/or H2 and CO2 that are then used by methanogens to produce methane in a thermodynamically dependent manner. We enriched a methanogenic crude oil-degrading consortium from production waters sampled from a low temperature heavy oil reservoir. Alkylsuccinates indicative of fumarate addition to C5 and C6 n-alkanes were identified in the culture (above levels found in controls, corresponding to the detection of an alkyl succinate synthase gene (assA in the culture. In addition, the enrichment culture was tested for its ability to produce methane from residual oil in a sandstone-packed column system simulating a mature field. Methane production rates of up 5.8 μmol CH4/g of oil/day were measured in the column system. Amounts of produced methane were in relatively good agreement with hydrocarbon loss showing depletion of more than 50% of saturate and aromatic hydrocarbons. Microbial community analysis revealed that the enrichment culture was dominated by members of the genus Smithella, Methanosaeta, and Methanoculleus. However, a shift in microbial community occurred following incubation of the enrichment in the sandstone columns. Here, Methanobacterium sp. were most abundant, as were bacterial members of the genus Pseudomonas and other known biofilm forming organisms. Our findings show that microorganisms enriched from petroleum reservoir waters can bioconvert crude oil components to methane both planktonically and in sandstone-packed columns as test systems. Further, the results suggest that different organisms may contribute to oil biodegradation within different phases (e.g., planktonic versus sessile within a subsurface crude oil reservoir.

  2. Degradation of hydrocarbons under methanogenic conditions in different geosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straaten, Nontje; Jiménez García, Núria; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Krueger, Martin

    2014-05-01

    With increasing energy demand the search for new resources is becoming increasingly important for the future energy supply. Therefore the knowledge about fossil fuels like oil or natural gas and their extraction should be expanded. Biodegraded oil is found in many reservoirs worldwide. Consequently, it is very important to get insight in the microbial communities and metabolic processes involved in hydrocarbon degradation. Due to the lack of alternative electron acceptors in hydrocarbon-rich geosystems, degradation often takes place under methanogenic conditions. The aim of the present study is to identify the microorganisms and mechanisms involved in the degradation of complex hydrocarbons, like BTEX and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, using culture dependent and independent techniques. For this purpose enrichment cultures from marine sediments, shales, coal and oil reservoirs are monitored for their capability to degrade alkanes and aromatic compounds. Moreover the environmental samples of these different geosystems analysed for evidence for the in situ occurrence of methanogenic oil degradation. The gas geochemical data provided in several cases hints for a recent biological origin of the methane present. First results of the microbial community analysis showed in environmental samples and enrichment cultures the existence of Bacteria known to degrade hydrocarbons. Also a diverse community of methanogenic Archaea could be found in the clone libraries. Additionally, in oil and coal reservoir samples the degradation of model hydrocarbons, e.g. methylnaphthalene, hexadecane and BTEX, to CH4 was confirmed by 13C-labeling. To explore the mechanisms involved in biodegradation, the enrichments as well as the original environmental samples are further analysed for the presence of respective functional genes.

  3. Magnetic resonance microscopy of iron transport in methanogenic granules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartacek, Jan; Vergeldt, Frank J.; Gerkema, Edo; Jenicek, Pavel; Lens, Piet N. L.; Van As, Henk

    2009-10-01

    Interactions between anaerobic biofilms and heavy metals such as iron, cobalt or nickel are largely unknown. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive method that allows in situ studies of metal transport within biofilm matrixes. The present study investigates quantitatively the penetration of iron (1.75 mM) bound to ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) into the methanogenic granules (spherical biofilm). A spatial resolution of 109 × 109 × 218 μm 3 and a temporal resolution of 11 min are achieved with 3D Turbo Spin Echo (TSE) measurements. The longitudinal relaxivity, i.e. the slope the dependence of the relaxation rate (1/ T1) on the concentration of paramagnetic metal ions, was used to measure temporal changes in iron concentration in the methanogenic granules. It took up to 300 min for the iron-EDTA complex ([FeEDTA] 2-) to penetrate into the methanogenic granules (3-4 mm in diameter). The diffusion was equally fast in all directions with irregularities such as diffusion-facilitating channels and diffusion-resistant zones. Despite these irregularities, the overall process could be modeled using Fick's equations for diffusion in a sphere, because immobilization of [FeEDTA] 2- in the granular matrix (or the presence of a reactive barrier) was not observed. The effective diffusion coefficient ( D ejf) of [FeEDTA] 2- was found to be 2.8 × 10 -11 m 2 s -1, i.e. approximately 4% of D ejf of [FeEDTA] 2- in water. The Fickian model did not correspond to the processes taking place in the core of the granule (3-5% of the total volume of the granule), where up to 25% over-saturation by iron (compare to the concentration in the bulk solution) occurred.

  4. Trace elements induce predominance among methanogenic activity in anaerobic digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babett Wintsche

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Trace elements play an essential role in all organisms due to their functions in enzyme complexes. In anaerobic digesters, control and supplementation of trace elements lead to stable and more efficient methane production processes while trace element deficits cause process imbalances. However, the underlying metabolic mechanisms and the adaptation of the affected microbial communities to such deficits are not yet fully understood. Here, we investigated the microbial community dynamics and resulting process changes induced by trace element deprivation. Two identical lab-scale continuous stirred tank reactors fed with distiller’s grains and supplemented with trace elements (cobalt, molybdenum, nickel, tungsten and a commercial iron additive were operated in parallel. After 72 weeks of identical operation, the feeding regime of one reactor was changed by omitting trace element supplements and reducing the amount of iron additive. Both reactors were operated for further 21 weeks. Various process parameters (biogas production and composition, total solids and volatile solids, trace element concentration, volatile fatty acids, total ammonium nitrogen, total organic acids/alkalinity ratio, and pH and the composition and activity of the microbial communities were monitored over the total experimental time. While the methane yield remained stable, the concentrations of hydrogen sulfide, total ammonia nitrogen, and acetate increased in the trace element-depleted reactor compared to the well-supplied control reactor. Methanosarcina and Methanoculleus dominated the methanogenic communities in both reactors. However, the activity ratio of these two genera was shown to depend on trace element supplementation explainable by different trace element requirements of their energy conservation systems. Methanosarcina dominated the well-supplied anaerobic digester, pointing to acetoclastic methanogenesis as the dominant methanogenic pathway. Under trace element

  5. Consortium for Health and Military Performance (CHAMP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center's work addresses a wide scope of trauma exposure from the consequences of combat, operations other than war, terrorism, natural and humanmade disasters,...

  6. Method for Indirect Quantification of CH4 Production via H2O Production Using Hydrogenotrophic Methanogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubner, Ruth-Sophie; Rittmann, Simon K-M R

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogenotrophic methanogens are an intriguing group of microorganisms from the domain Archaea. Methanogens exhibit extraordinary ecological, biochemical, and physiological characteristics and possess a huge biotechnological potential. Yet, the only possibility to assess the methane (CH4) production potential of hydrogenotrophic methanogens is to apply gas chromatographic quantification of CH4. In order to be able to effectively screen pure cultures of hydrogenotrophic methanogens regarding their CH4 production potential we developed a novel method for indirect quantification of the volumetric CH4 production rate by measuring the volumetric water production rate. This method was established in serum bottles for cultivation of methanogens in closed batch cultivation mode. Water production was estimated by determining the difference in mass increase in a quasi-isobaric setting. This novel CH4 quantification method is an accurate and precise analytical technique, which can be used to rapidly screen pure cultures of methanogens regarding their volumetric CH4 evolution rate. It is a cost effective alternative determining CH4 production of methanogens over CH4 quantification by using gas chromatography, especially if applied as a high throughput quantification method. Eventually, the method can be universally applied for quantification of CH4 production from psychrophilic, thermophilic and hyperthermophilic hydrogenotrophic methanogens.

  7. Acetate oxidation is the dominant methanogenic pathway from actetate in the absence of Methanosaetaceae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Batstone, Damien J.; Trably, Eric

    2006-01-01

    lake were surveyed for their dominant methanogenic population by using fluorescent in situ hybridization and for the degree of acetate oxidation relative to aceticlastic conversion by using radiolabeled [2-C-14]acetate in batch incubations. When Methanosaetaceae were not present, acetate oxidation...... was the dominant methanogenic pathway. Acetielastic conversion was observed only in the presence of Methanosaetaceae....

  8. Methanogenic archaea and sulfate reducing bacteria co-cultured on acetate: teamwork or coexistence?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozuolmez, D.; Na, H.; Lever, M.A.; Kjeldsen, K.U.; Jørgensen, B.B.; Plugge, C.M.

    2015-01-01

    Acetate is a major product of fermentation processes and an important substrate for sulfate reducing bacteria and methanogenic archaea. Most studies on acetate catabolism by sulfate reducers and methanogens have used pure cultures. Less is known about acetate conversion by mixed pure cultures and

  9. Assessing the Ecophysiology of Methanogens in the Context of Recent Astrobiological and Planetological Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Taubner, Ruth-Sophie; Schleper, Christa; Firneis, Maria G.; Rittmann, Simon K.-M. R.

    2015-01-01

    Among all known microbes capable of thriving under extreme and, therefore, potentially extraterrestrial environmental conditions, methanogens from the domain Archaea are intriguing organisms. This is due to their broad metabolic versatility, enormous diversity, and ability to grow under extreme environmental conditions. Several studies revealed that growth conditions of methanogens are compatible with environmental conditions on extraterrestrial bodies throughout the Solar System. Hence, life...

  10. Methane Production and Methanogenic Archaea in the Digestive Tracts of Millipedes (Diplopoda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šustr, Vladimír; Chroňáková, Alica; Semanová, Stanislava; Tajovský, Karel; Šimek, Miloslav

    2014-01-01

    Methane production by intestinal methanogenic Archaea and their community structure were compared among phylogenetic lineages of millipedes. Tropical and temperate millipedes of 35 species and 17 families were investigated. Species that emitted methane were mostly in the juliform orders Julida, Spirobolida, and Spirostreptida. The irregular phylogenetic distribution of methane production correlated with the presence of the methanogen-specific mcrA gene. The study brings the first detailed survey of methanogens’ diversity in the digestive tract of millipedes. Sequences related to Methanosarcinales, Methanobacteriales, Methanomicrobiales and some unclassified Archaea were detected using molecular profiling (DGGE). The differences in substrate preferences of the main lineages of methanogenic Archaea found in different millipede orders indicate that the composition of methanogen communities may reflect the differences in available substrates for methanogenesis or the presence of symbiotic protozoa in the digestive tract. We conclude that differences in methane production in the millipede gut reflect differences in the activity and proliferation of intestinal methanogens rather than an absolute inability of some millipede taxa to host methanogens. This inference was supported by the general presence of methanogenic activity in millipede faecal pellets and the presence of the 16S rRNA gene of methanogens in all tested taxa in the two main groups of millipedes, the Helminthophora and the Pentazonia. PMID:25028969

  11. An overview of the role of rumen methanogens in methane emission ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methane is the most effective global warming greenhouse gas and methanogens are the key microbiota in methane emission. Emerging research focuses on ruminant methanogens due to their emission of methane globally; of which around 20% is from livestock. Enhanced techniques revealed the methangens diversity, ...

  12. Detection of methanogenic archaea in seawater particles and the digestive tract of a marine fish species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Maarel, MJEC; Sprenger, W; Haanstra, R; Forney, LJ

    1999-01-01

    A methanogen-specific nested PCR approach was used to detect methanogenic archaea in seawater particles of the North Sea and the feces and the digestive tract of flounder (Platichthys flesus), a fish found in the North Sea. A number of 16S rDNA sequences with 97.6-99.5% similarity to

  13. Community Structure in Methanogenic Enrichments Provides Insight into Syntrophic Interactions in Hydrocarbon-Impacted Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fowler, Jane; Toth, Courtney R. A.; Gieg, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    The methanogenic biodegradation of crude oil involves the conversion of hydrocarbons to methanogenic substrates by syntrophic bacteria and subsequent methane production by methanogens. Assessing the metabolic roles played by various microbial species in syntrophic communities remains a challenge......-impacted environments. In this study, a methanogenic crude oil-degrading enrichment culture was successively transferred onto the single long chain fatty acids palmitate or stearate followed by their parent alkanes, hexadecane or octadecane, respectively, in order to assess the impact of different substrates......) could be retained within a community even in the absence of hydrocarbon substrates. Despite substrate-related diversity changes, all communities were dominated by hydrogenotrophic and acetotrophic methanogens along with bacteria including Clostridium sp., members of the Deltaproteobacteria, and a number...

  14. Methanobacterium Dominates Biocathodic Archaeal Communities in Methanogenic Microbial Electrolysis Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Siegert, Michael

    2015-07-06

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Methane is the primary end product from cathodic current in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) in the absence of methanogenic inhibitors, but little is known about the archaeal communities that develop in these systems. MECs containing cathodes made from different materials (carbon brushes, or plain graphite blocks or blocks coated with carbon black and platinum, stainless steel, nickel, ferrihydrite, magnetite, iron sulfide, or molybdenum disulfide) were inoculated with anaerobic digester sludge and acclimated at a set potential of -600 mV (versus a standard hydrogen electrode). The archaeal communities on all cathodes, except those coated with platinum, were predominated by Methanobacterium (median 97% of archaea). Cathodes with platinum contained mainly archaea most similar to Methanobrevibacter. Neither of these methanogens were abundant (<0.1% of archaea) in the inoculum, and therefore their high abundance on the cathode resulted from selective enrichment. In contrast, bacterial communities on the cathode were more diverse, containing primarily δ-Proteobacteria (41% of bacteria). The lack of a consistent bacterial genus on the cathodes indicated that there was no similarly selective enrichment of bacteria on the cathode. These results suggest that the genus Methanobacterium was primarily responsible for methane production in MECs when cathodes lack efficient catalysts for hydrogen gas evolution. (Figure Presented).

  15. Restricted diversity of dental calculus methanogens over five centuries, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Hong T T; Nkamga, Vanessa D; Signoli, Michel; Tzortzis, Stéfan; Pinguet, Romuald; Audoly, Gilles; Aboudharam, Gérard; Drancourt, Michel

    2016-05-11

    Methanogens are acknowledged archaeal members of modern dental calculus microbiota and dental pathogen complexes. Their repertoire in ancient dental calculus is poorly known. We therefore investigated archaea in one hundred dental calculus specimens collected from individuals recovered from six archaeological sites in France dated from the 14(th) to 19(th) centuries AD. Dental calculus was demonstrated by macroscopic and cone-beam observations. In 56 calculus specimens free of PCR inhibition, PCR sequencing identified Candidatus Methanobrevibacter sp. N13 in 44.6%, Methanobrevibacter oralis in 19.6%, a new Methanomassiliicoccus luminyensis-like methanogen in 12.5%, a Candidatus Nitrososphaera evergladensis-like in one and Methanoculleus bourgensis in one specimen, respectively. One Candidatus Methanobrevibacter sp. N13 dental calculus was further documented by fluorescent in situ hybridization. The prevalence of dental calculus M. oralis was significantly lower in past populations than in modern populations (P = 0.03, Chi-square test). This investigation revealed a previously unknown repertoire of archaea found in the oral cavity of past French populations as reflected in preserved dental calculus.

  16. Hydrogen or formate: Alternative key players in methanogenic degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schink, Bernhard; Montag, Dominik; Keller, Anja; Müller, Nicolai

    2017-06-01

    Hydrogen and formate are important electron carriers in methanogenic degradation in anoxic environments such as sediments, sewage sludge digestors and biogas reactors. Especially in the terminal steps of methanogenesis, they determine the energy budgets of secondary (syntrophically) fermenting bacteria and their methanogenic partners. The literature provides considerable data on hydrogen pool sizes in such habitats, but little data exist for formate concentrations due to technical difficulties in formate determination at low concentration. Recent evidence from biochemical and molecular biological studies indicates that several secondary fermenters can use both hydrogen and formate for electron release, and may do so even simultaneously. Numerous strictly anaerobic bacteria contain enzymes which equilibrate hydrogen and formate pools to energetically equal values, and recent measurements in sewage digestors and biogas reactors indicate that - beyond occasional fluctuations - the pool sizes of hydrogen and formate are indeed energetically nearly equivalent. Nonetheless, a thermophilic archaeon from a submarine hydrothermal vent, Thermococcus onnurineus, can obtain ATP from the conversion of formate to hydrogen plus bicarbonate at 80°C, indicating that at least in this extreme environment the pools of formate and hydrogen are likely to be sufficiently different to support such an unusual type of energy conservation. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Diversity and ubiquity of thermophilic methanogenic archaea in temperate anoxic soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiao-Lei; Friedrich, Michael W; Conrad, Ralf

    2006-03-01

    Temperate rice field soil from Vercelli (Italy) contains moderately thermophilic methanogens of the yet uncultivated rice cluster I (RC-I), which become prevalent upon incubation at temperatures of 45-50 degrees C. We studied whether such thermophilic methanogens were ubiquitously present in anoxic soils. Incubation of different rice field soils (from Italy, China and the Philippines) and flooded riparian soils (from the Netherlands) at 45 degrees C resulted in vigorous CH(4) production after a lag phase of about 10 days. The archaeal community structure in the soils was analysed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) targeting the SSU rRNA genes retrieved from the soil, and by cloning and sequencing. Clones of RC-I methanogens mostly exhibited T-RF of 393 bp, but also terminal restriction fragment (T-RF) of 158 and 258 bp length, indicating a larger diversity than previously assumed. No RC-I methanogens were initially found in flooded riparian soils. However, these archaea became abundant upon incubation of the soil at 45 degrees C. Thermophilic RC-I methanogens were also found in the rice field soils from Pavia, Pila and Gapan. However, the archaeal communities in these soils also contained other methanogenic archaea at high temperature. Rice field soil from Buggalon, on the other hand, only contained thermophilic Methanomicrobiales rather than RC-I methanogens, and rice field soil from Jurong mostly Methanomicrobiales and only a few RC-I methanogens. The archaeal community of rice field soil from Zhenjiang almost exclusively consisted of Methanosarcinaceae when incubated at high temperature. Our results show that moderately thermophilic methanogens are common in temperate soils. However, RC-I methanogens are not always dominating or ubiquitous.

  18. Tri-District Arts Consortium Summer Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Charlotte O.

    1990-01-01

    The Tri-District Arts Consortium in South Carolina was formed to serve artistically gifted students in grades six-nine. The consortium developed a summer program offering music, dance, theatre, and visual arts instruction through a curriculum of intense training, performing, and hands-on experiences with faculty members and guest artists. (JDD)

  19. Global Consortium on Security Transformation | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The proposed Global Consortium on Security Transformation emerged from discussions between members of an informal network of scholars and practitioners in the fields of security reform and governance in different regions of the South. This grant will establish the Consortium as a joint venture between the Institute of ...

  20. Methanogens in hypersaline environments and their substrates for methane production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, J. A.; Kelley, C. A.; Chanton, J.; Tazaz, A.; Bebout, B.

    2009-12-01

    The goal of our study was to determine the dominant substrates being used by methanogens in salt ponds in Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico. These are extreme environments that have been used as analogs for ancient life, terrestrial and extraterrestrial. Microbial mat and/or sediments from the ponds, amended either with site water only (controls) or with site water and various substrates, were incubated in N2 flushed serum vials. We hypothesized that trimethylamine, a degradation product of the osmoregulant glycine betaine, would be a dominant substrate in all ponds, as has been previously reported. Additionally we incubated with methanol, dimethylsulfide, monomethylamine, bicarbonate, and acetate, all reported to be substrates of great importance in other hypersaline environments. Concentrations of methane in the vial headspaces were monitored through time to obtain methane production rates. As expected, trimethylamine stimulated methane production over the controls in all incubations. Dimethylsulfide and methanol also stimulated methane production; the former increased methane production in the lowest salinity pond (55 ppt salinity) and the latter at one of the highest salinity ponds (184 ppt salinity). In addition to methane production data, stable carbon isotopic values of the methane in methane-rich bubbles collected at the sites as well as in the particulate organic carbon (POC) of the microbial mat/sediment were obtained. Fractionation factors, a measure of the isotopic differences between methane and substrate, can help indicate dominant substrates. Published fractionation factors differ depending on the substrate used and increase in the following order of use by methanogens: acetate, dimethylsulfide, CO2 reduction/trimethylamine and methanol. Since trimethylamine was used as a substrate at all of these sites, high fractionation factors in the range of 1.05 to 1.07 (the published range for trimethylamine) were expected. However, the apparent

  1. Method for indirect quantification of CH4 production via H2O production using hydrogenotrophic methanogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth-Sophie eTaubner

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ydrogenotrophic methanogens are an intriguing group of microorganisms from the domain Archaea. They exhibit extraordinary ecological, biochemical, physiological characteristics colorbox{yellow}{and have a huge biotechnological potential}. Yet, the only possibility to assess the methane (CH$_4$ production potential of hydrogenotrophic methanogens is to apply gas chromatographic quantification of CH$_4$.In order to be able to effectively screen pure cultures of hydrogenotrophic methanogens regarding their CH$_4$ production potential we developed a novel method for indirect quantification of colorbox{yellow}{the} volumetric CH$_4$ production rate by measuring colorbox{yellow}{the} volumetric water production rate. This colorbox{yellow}{ } method was established in serum bottles for cultivation of methanogens in closed batch cultivation mode. Water production was colorbox{yellow}{estimated} by determining the difference in mass increase in an isobaric setting.This novel CH$_4$ quantification method is an accurate and precise analytical technique, colorbox{yellow}{which can be used} to rapidly screen pure cultures of methanogens regarding colorbox{yellow}{their} volumetric CH$_{4}$ evolution rate. colorbox{yellow}{It} is a cost effective alternative colorbox{yellow}{determining} CH$_4$ production of methanogens over CH$_4$ quantification by using gas chromatography, especially if colorbox{yellow}{ } applied as a high throughput quantification method. colorbox{yellow}{Eventually, the} method can be universally applied for quantification of CH$_4$ production from psychrophilic, thermophilic and hyperthermophilic hydrogenotrophic methanogens.

  2. [Genetics of the methanogenic bacterium Methanococcus voltae with attention to genetic control mechanisms]: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The development of methanogen plasmid gene vectors would be greatly expedited by knowledge of the structure of methanogen transcription and translation signals. This would allow the directed insertion of a gene of choice downstream of the appropriate DNA sequences so as to bring about expression of that gene in the methanogen. The cloning of a Mc. voltae gene which complemented a hisA mutation in both E. coli and S. typhimurium has been reported. Characterization of the cloned gene indicated that both transcription and translation of the methanogen gene were initiated on the cloned methanogen DNA fragment. The methanogen hisA gene was sequenced and its sequence compared to a hisA-complementing gene isolated from Mc. vannielii. These studies demonstrated that each of these genes contained a eubacterial-like ribosome binding site (G-G-T-G) immediately upstream of the translation initiation codon which strongly suggests that methanogen messenger RNA can be recognized and translated by E. coli ribosomes and, perhaps, vice versa. 5 refs

  3. Thermophilic anaerobic acetate-utilizing methanogens and their metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mladenovska, Zuzana

    Six strains of thermophilic anaerobic acetate-utilizing methanogens were isolated from different full-scale thermophilic biogas plants in China and Denmark. The strain isolated from the Chinese biogas plant was designated KN-6P and the isolates from the Danish full-scale biogas plants were......, utilizing the substrates acetate, methanol and methylamines but not hydrogen/carbon dioxide. Strain Methanosarcina sp. SO-2P was able to grow mixotrophically on methanol and hydrogen/carbon dioxide with methane formation from hydrogen and carbon dioxide occurring after methanol depletion. All six...... that the similarity level between strains from the Danish biogas plants and Methanosarcina thermophila TM-1 was higher than 70%, and thus these strains should be considered as organisms belonging to the species Methanosarcina thermophila. DNA of strain KN-6P was only distantly related to the DNA of Methanosarcina...

  4. Progression of methanogenic degradation of crude oil in the subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekins, B.A.; Hostettler, F.D.; Herkelrath, W.N.; Delin, G.N.; Warren, E.; Essaid, H.I.

    2005-01-01

    Our results show that subsurface crude-oil degradation rates at a long-term research site were strongly influenced by small-scale variations in hydrologic conditions. The site is a shallow glacial outwash aquifer located near Bemidji in northern Minnesota that became contaminated when oil spilled from a broken pipeline in August 1979. In the study area, separate-phase oil forms a subsurface oil body extending from land surface to about 1 m (3.3 ft) below the 6-8-m (20-26 ft)-deep water table. Oil saturation in the sediments ranges from 10-20% in the vadose zone to 30-70% near the water table. At depths below 2 m (6.6 ft), degradation of the separate-phase crude oil occurs under methanogenic conditions. The sequence of methanogenic alkane degradation depletes the longer chain n-alkanes before the shorter chain n-alkanes, which is opposite to the better known aerobic sequence. The rates of degradation vary significantly with location in the subsurface. Oil-coated soils within 1.5 m (5 ft) of land surface have experienced little degradation where soil water saturation is less than 20%. Oil located 2-8 m (6.6-26 ft) below land surface in areas of higher recharge has been substantially degraded. The best explanation for the association between recharge and enhanced degradation seems to be increased downward transport of microbial growth nutrients to the oil body. This is supported by observations of greater microbial numbers at higher elevations in the oil body and significant decreases with depth in nutrient concentrations, especially phosphorus. Our results suggest that environmental effects may cause widely diverging degradation rates in the same spill, calling into question dating methods based on degradation state. Copyright ?? 2005. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists/Division of Environmental Geosciences. All rights reserved.

  5. Growth of methylaminotrophic, acetotrophic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenic bacteria on artificial supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia, H; Vidal, R; Baeza, M; Reyes, J E; Aspe, E

    1997-06-01

    The efficiency of organic matter degradation in attached biomass reactors depends on the suitable selection of artificial support for the retention of bacterial communities. We have studied the growth on glass and clay beads of methylaminotrophic, acetotrophic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenic bacterial communities isolated from anaerobic reactors. Bacterial counts were performed by the standard MPN technique. Experiments were performed in 50 ml vials for 12 days at 35 degrees C. Increase in the counts of methylaminotrophic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens occurred on both glass and clay beads. The latter support material also stimulated the growth rate of methylaminotrophic methanogens.

  6. Gene Ontology Consortium: going forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO; http://www.geneontology.org) is a community-based bioinformatics resource that supplies information about gene product function using ontologies to represent biological knowledge. Here we describe improvements and expansions to several branches of the ontology, as well as updates that have allowed us to more efficiently disseminate the GO and capture feedback from the research community. The Gene Ontology Consortium (GOC) has expanded areas of the ontology such as cilia-related terms, cell-cycle terms and multicellular organism processes. We have also implemented new tools for generating ontology terms based on a set of logical rules making use of templates, and we have made efforts to increase our use of logical definitions. The GOC has a new and improved web site summarizing new developments and documentation, serving as a portal to GO data. Users can perform GO enrichment analysis, and search the GO for terms, annotations to gene products, and associated metadata across multiple species using the all-new AmiGO 2 browser. We encourage and welcome the input of the research community in all biological areas in our continued effort to improve the Gene Ontology. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. NASA space radiation transport code development consortium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, L. W.

    2005-01-01

    Recently, NASA established a consortium involving the Univ. of Tennessee (lead institution), the Univ. of Houston, Roanoke College and various government and national laboratories, to accelerate the development of a standard set of radiation transport computer codes for NASA human exploration applications. This effort involves further improvements of the Monte Carlo codes HETC and FLUKA and the deterministic code HZETRN, including developing nuclear reaction databases necessary to extend the Monte Carlo codes to carry out heavy ion transport, and extending HZETRN to three dimensions. The improved codes will be validated by comparing predictions with measured laboratory transport data, provided by an experimental measurements consortium, and measurements in the upper atmosphere on the balloon-borne Deep Space Test Bed (DSTB). In this paper, we present an overview of the consortium members and the current status and future plans of consortium efforts to meet the research goals and objectives of this extensive undertaking. (authors)

  8. International Radical Cystectomy Consortium: A way forward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Johar Raza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC is an emerging operative alternative to open surgery for the management of invasive bladder cancer. Studies from single institutions provide limited data due to the small number of patients. In order to better understand the related outcomes, a world-wide consortium was established in 2006 of patients undergoing RARC, called the International Robotic Cystectomy Consortium (IRCC. Thus far, the IRCC has reported its findings on various areas of operative interest and continues to expand its capacity to include other operative modalities and transform it into the International Radical Cystectomy Consortium. This article summarizes the findings of the IRCC and highlights the future direction of the consortium.

  9. The LBNL/JSU/AGMUS Science Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This report discusses the 11 year of accomplishments of the science consortium of minority graduates from Jackson State University and Ana G. Mendez University at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  10. Ammonia tolerant enriched methanogenic cultures as bioaugmentation inocula to alleviate ammonia inhibition in continuous anaerobic reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotidis, Ioannis; Wang, Han; Angelidaki, Irini

    Ammonia is the most common inhibitor of anaerobic digestion (AD) process, resulting in suboptimal exploitation of the biogas potential of the feedstocks, causing significant economic losses to the biogas plants. Ammonia is mainly inhibiting the aceticlastic methanogens, while the hydrogenotrophic...... methanogens are more robust to ammonia toxicity effect. It has been shown that bioaugmentation of a pure strain of a hydrogenotrophic methanogen (i.e. Methanoculleus bourgensis) in an ammonia inhibited continuous anaerobic reactor can improve methane production more than 30%. Nevertheless, cultivation...... of a pure culture, to be used as bioaugmentation inoculum, poses technical difficulties due to the required sterile conditions and the special growing media. On the contrary acclimatized enrichment methanogenic cultures have lower requirements to sterility. In the present study, we used an enriched ammonia...

  11. Assessing the Ecophysiology of Methanogens in the Context of Recent Astrobiological and Planetological Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth-Sophie Taubner

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Among all known microbes capable of thriving under extreme and, therefore, potentially extraterrestrial environmental conditions, methanogens from the domain Archaea are intriguing organisms. This is due to their broad metabolic versatility, enormous diversity, and ability to grow under extreme environmental conditions. Several studies revealed that growth conditions of methanogens are compatible with environmental conditions on extraterrestrial bodies throughout the Solar System. Hence, life in the Solar System might not be limited to the classical habitable zone. In this contribution we assess the main ecophysiological characteristics of methanogens and compare these to the environmental conditions of putative habitats in the Solar System, in particular Mars and icy moons. Eventually, we give an outlook on the feasibility and the necessity of future astrobiological studies concerning methanogens.

  12. Assessing the Ecophysiology of Methanogens in the Context of Recent Astrobiological and Planetological Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubner, Ruth-Sophie; Schleper, Christa; Firneis, Maria G.; Rittman, Simon K.-M. R.

    2015-12-01

    Among all known microbes capable of thriving under extreme and, therefore, potentially extraterrestrial environmental conditions, methanogens from the domain Archaea are intriguing organisms. This is due to their broad metabolic versatility, enormous diversity, and ability to grow under extreme environmental conditions. Several studies revealed that growth conditions of methanogens are compatible with environmental conditions on extraterrestrial bodies throughout the Solar System. Hence, life in the Solar System might not be limited to the classical habitable zone. In this contribution we assess the main ecophysiological characteristics of methanogens and compare these to the environmental conditions of putative habitats in the Solar System, in particular Mars and icy moons. Eventually, we give an outlook on the feasibility and the necessity of future astrobiological studies concerning methanogens.

  13. RDX Biodegradation by a Methanogenic Enrichment Culture Obtained from an Explosives Manufacturing Wastewater Treatment Plant

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adrian, Neal

    1998-01-01

    .... Serum bottles containing 100 ml of a basal salts medium amended with 10 percent (v/v) sludge from the anoxic filter at the plant were amended with RDX and incubated under methanogenic conditions...

  14. Biodiversity and composition of methanogenic populations in the rumen of cows fed alfalfa hay or triticale straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yunhong; Xia, Yun; Seviour, Robert; Forster, Robert; McAllister, Tim A

    2013-05-01

    It is clear that methanogens are responsible for ruminal methane emissions, but quantitative information about the composition of the methanogenic community in the bovine rumen is still limited. The diversity and composition of rumen methanogens in cows fed either alfalfa hay or triticale straw were examined using a full-cycle rRNA approach. Quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization undertaken applying oligonucleotide probes designed here identified five major methanogenic populations or groups in these animals: the Methanobrevibacter TMS group (consisting of Methanobrevibacter thaueri, Methanobrevibacter millerae and Methanobrevibacter smithii), Methanbrevibacter ruminantium-, Methanosphaera stadtmanae-, Methanomicrobium mobile-, and Methanimicrococcus-related methanogens. The TMS- and M. ruminantium-related methanogens accounted for on average 46% and 41% of the total methanogenic cells in liquid (Liq) and solid (Sol) phases of the rumen contents, respectively. Other prominent methanogens in the Liq and Sol phases included members of M. stadtmanae (15% and 33%), M. mobile (17% and 12%), and Methanimicrococcus (23% and 9%). The relative abundances of these methanogens in the community varied among individual animals and across diets. No clear differences in community composition could be observed with dietary change using cloning techniques. This study extends the known biodiversity levels of the methanogenic communities in the rumen of cows. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Determination of Inhibitory Concentration of Oxytetracycline on Methanogenic Bacteria by in vitro Study

    OpenAIRE

    Hassan Hashemi; Mahdi Safari; Abbas Khodabakhshi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Antibiotics have the potential to adversely affect the microbial community. For anaerobic digestion, a sufficient methanogenic population needs to be preserved in the system. The main aim of this study was determination of inhibitory concentration of oxytetracycline on methanogenic bacteria.Methods: A 120 mL jacketed bioreactor with a 90 mL working volume was inoculated granular sludge from an anaerobic digester, substrate and different concentration of oxytetracycline with 10 d...

  16. A comprehensive study into the molecular methodology and molecular biology of methanogenic Archaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, M.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2001-01-01

    Methanogens belong to the kingdom of Euryarchaeota in the domain of Archaea. The Archaea differ from Bacteria in many aspects important to molecular work. Among these are cell wall composition, their sensitivity to antibiotics, their translation and transcription machinery, and their very strict...... procedures. Efficient genetic manipulation systems, including shuttle and integration vector systems, have appeared for mesophilic, but not for thermophilic species within the last few years and will have a major impact on future investigations of methanogenic molecular biology....

  17. Sensitivity and adaptability of methanogens to perchlorates: Implications for life on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kral, Timothy A.; Goodhart, Timothy H.; Harpool, Joshua D.; Hearnsberger, Christopher E.; McCracken, Graham L.; McSpadden, Stanley W.

    2016-01-01

    In 2008, the Mars Phoenix Lander discovered perchlorate at its landing site, and in 2012, the Curiosity rover confirmed the presence of perchlorate on Mars. The research reported here was designed to determine if certain methanogens could grow in the presence of three different perchlorate salt solutions. The methanogens tested were Methanothermobacter wolfeii, Methanosarcina barkeri, Methanobacterium formicicum and Methanococcus maripaludis. Media were prepared containing 0%, 0.5%, 1.0%, 2%, 5% and 10% wt/vol magnesium perchlorate, sodium perchlorate, or calcium perchlorate. Organisms were inoculated into their respective media followed by incubation at each organism's growth temperature. Methane production, commonly used to measure methanogen growth, was measured by gas chromatography of headspace gas samples. Methane concentrations varied with species and perchlorate salt tested. However, all four methanogens produced substantial levels of methane in the presence of up to 1.0% perchlorate, but not higher. The standard procedure for growing methanogens typically includes sodium sulfide, a reducing agent, to reduce residual molecular oxygen. However, the sodium sulfide may have been reducing the perchlorate, thus allowing for growth of the methanogens. To investigate this possibility, experiments were conducted where stainless steel nails were used instead of sodium sulfide as the reducing agent. Prior to the addition of perchlorate and inoculation, the nails were removed from the liquid medium. Just as in the prior experiments, the methanogens produced methane at comparable levels to those seen with sodium sulfide as the reductant, indicating that sodium sulfide did not reduce the perchlorate to any significant extent. Additionally, cells metabolizing in 1% perchlorate were transferred to 2%, cells metabolizing in 2% were transferred to 5%, and finally cells metabolizing in 5% were transferred to 10%. All four species produced methane at 2% and 5%, but not 10

  18. Methanogenic food web in the gut contents of methane-emitting earthworm Eudrilus eugeniae from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Kristin; Hunger, Sindy; Brown, George G; Tsai, Siu M; Cerri, Carlos C; Conrad, Ralf; Drake, Harold L

    2015-08-01

    The anoxic saccharide-rich conditions of the earthworm gut provide an ideal transient habitat for ingested microbes capable of anaerobiosis. It was recently discovered that the earthworm Eudrilus eugeniae from Brazil can emit methane (CH4) and that ingested methanogens might be associated with this emission. The objective of this study was to resolve trophic interactions of bacteria and methanogens in the methanogenic food web in the gut contents of E. eugeniae. RNA-based stable isotope probing of bacterial 16S rRNA as well as mcrA and mrtA (the alpha subunit of methyl-CoM reductase and its isoenzyme, respectively) of methanogens was performed with [(13)C]-glucose as a model saccharide in the gut contents. Concomitant fermentations were augmented by the rapid consumption of glucose, yielding numerous products, including molecular hydrogen (H2), carbon dioxide (CO2), formate, acetate, ethanol, lactate, succinate and propionate. Aeromonadaceae-affiliated facultative aerobes, and obligate anaerobes affiliated to Lachnospiraceae, Veillonellaceae and Ruminococcaceae were associated with the diverse fermentations. Methanogenesis was ongoing during incubations, and (13)C-labeling of CH4 verified that supplemental [(13)C]-glucose derived carbon was dissimilated to CH4. Hydrogenotrophic methanogens affiliated with Methanobacteriaceae and Methanoregulaceae were linked to methanogenesis, and acetogens related to Peptostreptoccocaceae were likewise found to be participants in the methanogenic food web. H2 rather than acetate stimulated methanogenesis in the methanogenic gut content enrichments, and acetogens appeared to dissimilate supplemental H2 to acetate in methanogenic enrichments. These findings provide insight on the processes and associated taxa potentially linked to methanogenesis and the turnover of organic carbon in the alimentary canal of methane-emitting E. eugeniae.

  19. Methanogens at the top of the world: occurrence and potential activity of methanogens in newly deglaciated soils in high-altitude cold deserts in the Western Himalayas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin eAschenbach

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Methanogens typically occur in reduced anoxic environments. However, in recent studies it has been shown that many aerated upland soils, including desert soils also host active methanogens. Here we show that soil samples from high–altitude cold deserts in the western Himalayas (Ladakh, India produce CH4 after incubation as slurry under anoxic conditions at rates comparable to those of hot desert soils. Samples of matured soil from three different vegetation belts (arid, steppe, and subnival were compared with younger soils originating from frontal and lateral moraines of receding glaciers. While methanogenic rates were higher in the samples from matured soils, CH4 was also produced in the samples from the recently deglaciated moraines. In both young and matured soils, those covered by a biological soil crust (biocrust were more active than their bare counterparts. Isotopic analysis showed that in both cases CH4 was initially produced from H2/CO2 but later mostly from acetate. Analysis of the archaeal community in the in situ soil samples revealed a clear dominance of sequences related to Thaumarchaeota, while the methanogenic community comprised only a minor fraction of the archaeal community. Similar to other aerated soils, the methanogenic community was comprised almost solely of the genera Methanosarcina and Methanocella, and possibly also Methanobacterium in some cases. Nevertheless, approximately 103 gdw-1 soil methanogens were already present in the young moraine soil together with cyanobacteria. Our results demonstrate that Methanosarcina and Methanocella not only tolerate atmospheric oxygen but are also able to survive in these harsh cold environments. Their occurrence in newly deglaciated soils shows that they are early colonisers of desert soils, similar to cyanobacteria, and may play a role in the development of desert biocrusts.

  20. Reduction of Fe(III) oxides by phylogenetically and physiologically diverse thermophilic methanogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Chihaya; Kato, Souichiro; Kimura, Satoshi; Ishii, Masaharu; Igarashi, Yasuo

    2014-09-01

    Three thermophilic methanogens (Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, Methanosaeta thermophila, and Methanosarcina thermophila) were investigated for their ability to reduce poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxides (ferrihydrite) and the inhibitory effects of ferrihydrite on their methanogenesis. This study demonstrated that Fe(II) generation from ferrihydrite occurs in the cultures of the three thermophilic methanogens only when H2 was supplied as the source of reducing equivalents, even in the cultures of Mst. thermophila that do not grow on and produce CH4 from H2/CO2. While supplementation of ferrihydrite resulted in complete inhibition or suppression of methanogenesis by the thermophilic methanogens, ferrihydrite reduction by the methanogens at least partially alleviates the inhibitory effects. Microscopic and crystallographic analyses on the ferrihydrite-reducing Msr. thermophila cultures exhibited generation of magnetite on its cell surfaces through partial reduction of ferrihydrite. These findings suggest that at least certain thermophilic methanogens have the ability to extracellularly transfer electrons to insoluble Fe(III) compounds, affecting their methanogenic activities, which would in turn have significant impacts on materials and energy cycles in thermophilic anoxic environments. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Methanogenic archaea in marcellus shale: a possible mechanism for enhanced gas recovery in unconventional shale resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Yael Tarlovsky; Kotcon, James; Mroz, Thomas

    2015-06-02

    Marcellus Shale occurs at depths of 1.5-2.5 km (5000 to 8000 feet) where most geologists generally assume that thermogenic processes are the only source of natural gas. However, methanogens in produced fluids and isotopic signatures of biogenic methane in this deep shale have recently been discovered. This study explores whether those methanogens are indigenous to the shale or are introduced during drilling and hydraulic fracturing. DNA was extracted from Marcellus Shale core samples, preinjected fluids, and produced fluids and was analyzed using Miseq sequencing of 16s rRNA genes. Methanogens present in shale cores were similar to methanogens in produced fluids. No methanogens were detected in injected fluids, suggesting that this is an unlikely source and that they may be native to the shale itself. Bench-top methane production tests of shale core and produced fluids suggest that these organisms are alive and active under simulated reservoir conditions. Growth conditions designed to simulate the hydrofracture processes indicated somewhat increased methane production; however, fluids alone produced relatively little methane. Together, these results suggest that some biogenic methane may be produced in these wells and that hydrofracture fluids currently used to stimulate gas recovery could stimulate methanogens and their rate of producing methane.

  2. Diversity of methanogenic archaea in a mangrove sediment and isolation of a new Methanococcoides strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyimo, Thomas J; Pol, Arjan; Jetten, Mike S M; den Camp, Huub J M Op

    2009-02-01

    Mangrove forest sediments produce significant amounts of methane, but the diversity of methanogenic archaea is not well known at present. Therefore, 16S rRNA gene libraries were made using archaea-specific primers and DNA extracted directly from Tanzanian mangrove sediment samples as a template. Analysis of sequence data showed phylotypes closely related to cultivated methylotrophic methanogenic archaea from the marine environment, or distantly related to acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenic archaea. In an attempt to isolate relevant methanogenic archaea, we succeeded in obtaining a new mesophilic methylotrophic methanogenic archaeon (strain MM1) capable of utilizing methanol and methylated amines as the only substrates. Under optimum conditions, the cells of strain MM1 exhibited a high specific growth rate (mu) of 0.21+/-0.03 (i.e. doubling time of 3.2 h) on both methanol and trimethylamine. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain MM1 clustered with five environmental clones, indicating that MM1 is an important methanogenic methylotroph in mangrove sediments. Based on physiological and phylogenetic analyses, strain MM1 is proposed to be included in the species of Methanococcoides methylutens.

  3. Seryl-tRNA Synthetases from Methanogenic Archaea: Suppression of Bacterial Amber Mutation and Heterologous Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drasko Boko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Methanogenic archaea possess unusual seryl-tRNA synthetases (SerRS, evolutionarily distinct from the SerRSs found in other archaea, eucaryotes and bacteria. Our recent X-ray structural analysis of Methanosarcina barkeri SerRS revealed an idiosyncratic N-terminal domain and catalytic zinc ion in the active site. To shed further light on substrate discrimination by methanogenic-type SerRS, we set up to explore in vivo the interaction of methanogenic-type SerRSs with their cognate tRNAs in Escherichia coli or Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The expression of various methanogenic-type SerRSs was toxic for E. coli, resulting in the synthesis of erroneous proteins, as revealed by β-galactosidase stability assay. Although SerRSs from methanogenic archaea recognize tRNAsSer from all three domains of life in vitro, the toxicity presumably precluded the complementation of endogenous SerRS function in both, E. coli and S. cerevisiae. However, despite the observed toxicity, coexpression of methanogenic-type SerRS with its cognate tRNA suppressed bacterial amber mutation.

  4. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by the thermophilic methanogen Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajesh; Dong, Hailiang; Liu, Deng; Zhao, Linduo; Marts, Amy R.; Farquhar, Erik; Tierney, David L.; Almquist, Catherine B.; Briggs, Brandon R.

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant progress on iron reduction by thermophilic microorganisms, studies on their ability to reduce toxic metals are still limited, despite their common co-existence in high temperature environments (up to 70 °C). In this study, Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, an obligate thermophilic methanogen, was used to reduce hexavalent chromium. Experiments were conducted in a growth medium with H2/CO2 as substrate with various Cr6+ concentrations (0.2, 0.4, 1, 3, and 5 mM) in the form of potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7). Time-course measurements of aqueous Cr6+ concentrations using 1,5-diphenylcarbazide colorimetric method showed complete reduction of the 0.2 and 0.4 mM Cr6+ solutions by this methanogen. However, much lower reduction extents of 43.6%, 13.0%, and 3.7% were observed at higher Cr6+ concentrations of 1, 3 and 5 mM, respectively. These lower extents of bioreduction suggest a toxic effect of aqueous Cr6+ to cells at this concentration range. At these higher Cr6+ concentrations, methanogenesis was inhibited and cell growth was impaired as evidenced by decreased total cellular protein production and live/dead cell ratio. Likewise, Cr6+ bioreduction rates decreased with increased initial concentrations of Cr6+ from 13.3 to 1.9 μM h-1. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy revealed a progressive reduction of soluble Cr6+ to insoluble Cr3+ precipitates, which was confirmed as amorphous chromium hydroxide by selected area electron diffraction pattern. However, a small fraction of reduced Cr occurred as aqueous Cr3+. Scanning and transmission electron microscope observations of M. thermautotrophicus cells after Cr6+ exposure suggest both extra- and intracellular chromium reduction mechanisms. Results of this study demonstrate the ability of M. thermautotrophicus cells to reduce toxic Cr6+ to less toxic Cr3+ and its potential application in metal bioremediation, especially at high temperature subsurface radioactive waste disposal

  5. Methanogenic Oil Degradation in the Dagang Oil Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Núria; Cai, Minmin; Straaten, Nontje; Yao, Jun; Richnow, Hans Hermann; Krüger, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Anaerobic biodegradation is one of the main in situ oil transformation processes in subsurface oil reservoirs. Recent studies have provided evidence of biodegradation of residual oil constituents under methanogenic conditions. Methane, like other biogenic gases, may contribute to reduce the viscosity of oil and enhance its flow characteristics (making it more available) but it can also be used as a energy source. So the aim of the present study was to provide reliable information on in situ biotransformation of oil under methanogenic conditions, and to assess the feasibility of implementing a MEOR strategy at this site. For this reason, chemical and isotopic analyses of injection and production fluids of the Dagang oil field (Hebei province, China) were performed. Microbial abundances were assessed by qPCR, and clone libraries were performed to study the diversity. In addition, microcosms with either oil or 13C-labelled hydrocarbons were inoculated with injection or production waters to characterize microbial processes in vitro. Geochemical and isotopic data were consistent with in situ biogenic methane production linked to aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon degradation: GC-MS profiles of petroleum samples were nearly devoid of n-alkanes, linear alkylbenzenes, and alkyltoluenes, and light PAH, confirming that Dagang oil is mostly highly weathered. In addition, carbon and hydrogen isotopic signatures of methane (δ13CCH4 and δDCH4, respectively), and the bulk isotopic discrimination (Δδ13C) between methane and CO2 (between 32 and 65 ) were in accordance with previously reported values for methane formation during hydrocarbon degradation. Furthermore, methane-producing Archaea and hydrocarbon-degrading Bacteria were abundant in produced oil-water samples. On the other hand, our laboratory degradation experiments revealed that autochthonous microbiota are capable of significantly degrade oil within several months, with biodegradation patterns resembling those

  6. A Methanogenic Origin for Molybdenum-Nitrogenase (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, E.; Miller, S.; Hamilton, T.; Lavin, M.; Peters, J.

    2009-12-01

    The taxonomic distribution and phylogenetic relationships of proteins required for molybdenum (Mo)-nitrogenase that arose by gene fusion and duplication reveals that Mo-nitrogenase was not associated with LUCA, but rather emerged in the strictly anaerobic methanogenic archaea and was acquired in bacteria via lateral gene transfer in an anoxic environment. Therefore, it was hypothesized that Mo-nitrogenase emerged early during the evolution of life, perhaps prior to the emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis. To test this hypothesis, we examined the evolutionary relationships of paralogous proteins required for the biosynthesis of the nitrogenase active site cofactor and bacteriochlorophyll (Bch), which indicated that Mo-nitrogenase predates the emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis. Importantly, the age of nodes delineating the major diversification of Mo-dependent nitrogenase is similar to the maximum age for the emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis, suggesting that the diversification of Mo-nitrogenase may have been promoted by the emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis, most likely through the widespread oxidation of Mo-sulfides and subsequent increases in Mo bioavailability. These findings imply that Mo-dependent biological nitrogen fixation emerged prior to the transition from the Archean to the Proterozoic and the widespread oxidation of the atmosphere and ocean. Further, the results imply that the emergence and evolution of biological nitrogen fixation is closely tied to the evolution of the redox of the global biosphere.

  7. Methanogens at the top of the world: occurrence and potential activity of methanogens in newly deglaciated soils in high-altitude cold deserts in the Western Himalayas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aschenbach, K.; Conrad, R.; Řeháková, Klára; Doležal, Jiří; Janatková, Kateřina; Angel, R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 4, Dec 2013 (2013), Ar.359 ISSN 1664-302X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-13368S Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : methanogens * desert areas * cold climate Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.941, year: 2013

  8. Higher-level classification of the Archaea: evolution of methanogenesis and methanogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éric Bapteste

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We used a phylogenetic approach to analyze the evolution of methanogenesis and methanogens. We show that 23 vertically transmitted ribosomal proteins do not support the monophyly of methanogens, and propose instead that there are two distantly related groups of extant archaea that produce methane, which we have named Class I and Class II. Based on this finding, we subsequently investigated the uniqueness of the origin of methanogenesis by studying both the enzymes of methanogenesis and the proteins that synthesize its specific coenzymes. We conclude that hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis appeared only once during evolution. Genes involved in the seven central steps of the methanogenic reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2 are ubiquitous in methanogens and share a common history. This suggests that, although extant methanogens produce methane from various substrates (CO2, formate, acetate, methylated C-1 compounds, these archaea have a core of conserved enzymes that have undergone little evolutionary change. Furthermore, this core of methanogenesis enzymes seems to originate (as a whole from the last ancestor of all methanogens and does not appear to have been horizontally transmitted to other organisms or between members of Class I and Class II. The observation of a unique and ancestral form of methanogenesis suggests that it was preserved in two independent lineages, with some instances of specialization or added metabolic flexibility. It was likely lost in the Halobacteriales, Thermoplasmatales and Archaeoglobales. Given that fossil evidence for methanogenesis dates back 2.8 billion years, a unique origin of this process makes the methanogenic archaea a very ancient taxon.

  9. The Effects of Perchlorates on the Permafrost Methanogens: Implication for Autotrophic Life on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakova, Viktoria; Oshurkova, Viktoria; Yoshimura, Yoshitaka

    2015-09-09

    The terrestrial permafrost represents a range of possible cryogenic extraterrestrial ecosystems on Earth-like planets without obvious surface ice, such as Mars. The autotrophic and chemolithotrophic psychrotolerant methanogens are more likely than aerobes to function as a model for life forms that may exist in frozen subsurface environments on Mars, which has no free oxygen, inaccessible organic matter, and extremely low amounts of unfrozen water. Our research on the genesis of methane, its content and distribution in permafrost horizons of different ages and origin demonstrated the presence of methane in permanently frozen fine-grained sediments. Earlier, we isolated and described four strains of methanogenic archaea of Methanobacterium and Methanosarcina genera from samples of Pliocene and Holocene permafrost from Eastern Siberia. In this paper we study the effect of sodium and magnesium perchlorates on growth of permafrost and nonpermafrost methanogens, and present evidence that permafrost hydogenotrophic methanogens are more resistant to the chaotropic agent found in Martian soil. In this paper we study the effect of sodium and magnesium perchlorates on the growth of permafrost and nonpermafrost methanogens, and present evidence that permafrost hydogenotrophic methanogens are more resistant to the chaotropic agent found in Martian soil. Furthermore, as shown in the studies strain M2(T) M. arcticum, probably can use perchlorate anion as an electron acceptor in anaerobic methane oxidation. Earth's subzero subsurface environments are the best approximation of environments on Mars, which is most likely to harbor methanogens; thus, a biochemical understanding of these pathways is expected to provide a basis for designing experiments to detect autotrophic methane-producing life forms on Mars.

  10. The Effects of Perchlorates on the Permafrost Methanogens: Implication for Autotrophic Life on Mars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoria Shcherbakova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The terrestrial permafrost represents a range of possible cryogenic extraterrestrial ecosystems on Earth-like planets without obvious surface ice, such as Mars. The autotrophic and chemolithotrophic psychrotolerant methanogens are more likely than aerobes to function as a model for life forms that may exist in frozen subsurface environments on Mars, which has no free oxygen, inaccessible organic matter, and extremely low amounts of unfrozen water. Our research on the genesis of methane, its content and distribution in permafrost horizons of different ages and origin demonstrated the presence of methane in permanently frozen fine-grained sediments. Earlier, we isolated and described four strains of methanogenic archaea of Methanobacterium and Methanosarcina genera from samples of Pliocene and Holocene permafrost from Eastern Siberia. In this paper we study the effect of sodium and magnesium perchlorates on growth of permafrost and nonpermafrost methanogens, and present evidence that permafrost hydogenotrophic methanogens are more resistant to the chaotropic agent found in Martian soil. In this paper we study the effect of sodium and magnesium perchlorates on the growth of permafrost and nonpermafrost methanogens, and present evidence that permafrost hydogenotrophic methanogens are more resistant to the chaotropic agent found in Martian soil. Furthermore, as shown in the studies strain M2T M. arcticum, probably can use perchlorate anion as an electron acceptor in anaerobic methane oxidation. Earth’s subzero subsurface environments are the best approximation of environments on Mars, which is most likely to harbor methanogens; thus, a biochemical understanding of these pathways is expected to provide a basis for designing experiments to detect autotrophic methane-producing life forms on Mars.

  11. Methanogenic archaea and sulfate reducing bacteria co-cultured on acetate: teamwork or coexistence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derya eOzuolmez

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Acetate is a major product of fermentation processes and an important substrate for sulfate reducing bacteria and methanogenic archaea. Most studies on acetate catabolism by sulfate reducers and methanogens have used pure cultures. Less is known about acetate conversion by mixed pure cultures and the interactions between both groups. We tested interspecies hydrogen transfer and coexistence between marine methanogens and sulfate reducers using mixed pure cultures of two types of microorganisms. First, Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris (DSM 1744, a hydrogenotrophic sulfate reducer, was cocultured together with the obligate aceticlastic methanogen Methanosaeta concilii using acetate as carbon and energy source. Next, Methanococcus maripaludis S2, an obligate H2- and formate-utilizing methanogen, was used as a partner organism to M. concilii in the presence of acetate. Finally, we performed a coexistence experiment between M. concilii and an acetotrophic sulfate reducer Desulfobacter latus AcSR2. Our results showed that D. vulgaris was able to reduce sulfate and grow from hydrogen leaked by M. concilii. In the other coculture, M. maripaludis was sustained by hydrogen leaked by M. concilii as revealed by qPCR. The growth of the two aceticlastic microbes indicated co-existence rather than competition. Altogether, our results indicate that H2 leaking from M. concilii could be used by efficient H2-scavengers. This metabolic trait, revealed from coculture studies, brings new insight to the metabolic flexibility of methanogens and sulfate reducers residing in marine environments in response to changing environmental conditions and community compositions. Using dedicated physiological studies we were able to unravel the occurrence of less obvious interactions between marine methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria.

  12. The quantitative significance of Syntrophaceae and syntrophic partnerships in methanogenic degradation of crude oil alkanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, N D; Sherry, A; Grant, R J; Rowan, A K; Hubert, C R J; Callbeck, C M; Aitken, C M; Jones, D M; Adams, J J; Larter, S R; Head, I M

    2011-11-01

    Libraries of 16S rRNA genes cloned from methanogenic oil degrading microcosms amended with North Sea crude oil and inoculated with estuarine sediment indicated that bacteria from the genera Smithella (Deltaproteobacteria, Syntrophaceace) and Marinobacter sp. (Gammaproteobacteria) were enriched during degradation. Growth yields and doubling times (36 days for both Smithella and Marinobacter) were determined using qPCR and quantitative data on alkanes, which were the predominant hydrocarbons degraded. The growth yield of the Smithella sp. [0.020 g(cell-C)/g(alkane-C)], assuming it utilized all alkanes removed was consistent with yields of bacteria that degrade hydrocarbons and other organic compounds in methanogenic consortia. Over 450 days of incubation predominance and exponential growth of Smithella was coincident with alkane removal and exponential accumulation of methane. This growth is consistent with Smithella's occurrence in near surface anoxic hydrocarbon degrading systems and their complete oxidation of crude oil alkanes to acetate and/or hydrogen in syntrophic partnership with methanogens in such systems. The calculated growth yield of the Marinobacter sp., assuming it grew on alkanes, was [0.0005 g(cell-C)/g(alkane-C)] suggesting that it played a minor role in alkane degradation. The dominant methanogens were hydrogenotrophs (Methanocalculus spp. from the Methanomicrobiales). Enrichment of hydrogen-oxidizing methanogens relative to acetoclastic methanogens was consistent with syntrophic acetate oxidation measured in methanogenic crude oil degrading enrichment cultures. qPCR of the Methanomicrobiales indicated growth characteristics consistent with measured rates of methane production and growth in partnership with Smithella. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Methanogenic archaea and sulfate reducing bacteria co-cultured on acetate: teamwork or coexistence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozuolmez, Derya; Na, Hyunsoo; Lever, Mark A; Kjeldsen, Kasper U; Jørgensen, Bo B; Plugge, Caroline M

    2015-01-01

    Acetate is a major product of fermentation processes and an important substrate for sulfate reducing bacteria and methanogenic archaea. Most studies on acetate catabolism by sulfate reducers and methanogens have used pure cultures. Less is known about acetate conversion by mixed pure cultures and the interactions between both groups. We tested interspecies hydrogen transfer and coexistence between marine methanogens and sulfate reducers using mixed pure cultures of two types of microorganisms. First, Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris (DSM 1744), a hydrogenotrophic sulfate reducer, was cocultured together with the obligate aceticlastic methanogen Methanosaeta concilii using acetate as carbon and energy source. Next, Methanococcus maripaludis S2, an obligate H2- and formate-utilizing methanogen, was used as a partner organism to M. concilii in the presence of acetate. Finally, we performed a coexistence experiment between M. concilii and an acetotrophic sulfate reducer Desulfobacter latus AcSR2. Our results showed that D. vulgaris was able to reduce sulfate and grow from hydrogen leaked by M. concilii. In the other coculture, M. maripaludis was sustained by hydrogen leaked by M. concilii as revealed by qPCR. The growth of the two aceticlastic microbes indicated co-existence rather than competition. Altogether, our results indicate that H2 leaking from M. concilii could be used by efficient H2-scavengers. This metabolic trait, revealed from coculture studies, brings new insight to the metabolic flexibility of methanogens and sulfate reducers residing in marine environments in response to changing environmental conditions and community compositions. Using dedicated physiological studies we were able to unravel the occurrence of less obvious interactions between marine methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria.

  14. Transduction-like gene transfer in the methanogen Methanococcus voltae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertani, G.

    1999-01-01

    Strain PS of Methanococcus voltae (a methanogenic, anaerobic archaebacterium) was shown to generate spontaneously 4.4-kbp chromosomal DNA fragments that are fully protected from DNase and that, upon contact with a cell, transform it genetically. This activity, here called VTA (voltae transfer agent), affects all markers tested: three different auxotrophies (histidine, purine, and cobalamin) and resistance to BES (2-bromoethanesulfonate, an inhibitor of methanogenesis). VTA was most effectively prepared by culture filtration. This process disrupted a fraction of the M. voltae cells (which have only an S-layer covering their cytoplasmic membrane). VTA was rapidly inactivated upon storage. VTA particles were present in cultures at concentrations of approximately two per cell. Gene transfer activity varied from a minimum of 2 x 10(-5) (BES resistance) to a maximum of 10(-3) (histidine independence) per donor cell. Very little VTA was found free in culture supernatants. The phenomenon is functionally similar to generalized transduction, but there is no evidence, for the time being, of intrinsically viral (i.e., containing a complete viral genome) particles. Consideration of VTA DNA size makes the existence of such viral particles unlikely. If they exist, they must be relatively few in number;perhaps they differ from VTA particles in size and other properties and thus escaped detection. Digestion of VTA DNA with the AluI restriction enzyme suggests that it is a random sample of the bacterial DNA, except for a 0.9-kbp sequence which is amplified relative to the rest of the bacterial chromosome. A VTA-sized DNA fraction was demonstrated in a few other isolates of M. voltae.

  15. Fractionation of carbon isotopes by thermophilic methanogenic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, M.V.; Belyaev, S.S.; Zyakun, A.M.; Bondar, V.A.; Shipin, O.P.; Laurinavichus, K.S.

    1985-01-01

    The authors investigated the pattern of fractionation of stable carbon isotopes by the thermophilic methane-forming bacteria under different growth conditions and at various rates of formation of methane. A pure culture of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum was used in the experiments under the following growth conditions: temperature 65-70 0 C; pH 7.2-7.6; NaCl content 0-0.9 g/liter. The methanogenic bacteria were cultivated in 0.15 liter flasks in mineral medium. A mixture of CO 2 and H 2 in a 1:4 ratio by volume served as the sole carbon and energy source. In all experiments, not more than 5% of the initial CO 2 level was utilized. The rate of methane generation was altered by adjusting the physicochemical growth parameters (temperature from 45-70 0 C, salinity from 0.9 to 40 g/liter NaCl, pH from 6.3 to 7.2). Methane in the samples was quantitatively determined in a chromatograph which had a flame-ionization detector and a column containing Porapak Q sorbent at T = 120 0 C. The carrier gas was CO 2 . The average specific rate of methane formation was calculated as ml CH 4 per mg dry biomass of bacteria per h. Soluble mineral carbon was isolated form the acidified culture liquid in the form of CO 2 and was quantitatively determined in a Chrom-4 chromatography provided with a katharometer and a column containing activated charcoal at T = 150 0 . The gas carrier was helium. The isotopic composition of carbon was determined in a CH-7 mass-spectrometer and was expressed in 13 C values (per thousand) with respect to the international PDB standard

  16. Effect of adding carbon fiber textiles to methanogenic bioreactors used to treat an artificial garbage slurry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Kengo; Morita, Masahiko; Hirano, Shin-Ichi; Ohmura, Naoya; Igarashi, Yasuo

    2009-08-01

    To compare the performances and microbial populations of methanogenic reactors with and without carbon fiber textiles (CFT), we operated small-scale (200 ml) reactors using a slurry of artificial garbage. For both types of reactors, the organic loading rate (OLR) was stepwisely and rapidly increased in the same manner. Start-up period was shortened by adding CFT. Reactors with CFT showed greater efficiency for removal of suspended solid and volatile suspended solid than reactors without CFT at a long hydraulic retention time (HRT) between 8 and 13 days. The reactors with CFT maintained stable methane production at an OLR of 15.3 g dichromate chemical oxygen demand (CODcr)/l/day and DNAs from microorganisms were highly concentrated in adhering fractions on CFT. As shown by quantitative PCR analysis, the proportions of methanogenic archaea were conserved more than 25% in adhering fractions on CFT in reactors with CFT. By contrast, reactors without CFT showed accumulation of volatile fatty acid and deteriorated at an OLR of 2.4 gCODcr/l/day. Methanogenic proportions dropped to 17.1% in suspended fractions of reactors without CFT. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis revealed that all archaeal DGGE bands in both types of reactors were related to methanogens, but more bands were observed in reactors with CFT. Thus the higher performance of reactors with CFT likely reflects the greater abundance of microorganisms and methanogenic diversity.

  17. Elevated ground-level O3 negatively influences paddy methanogenic archaeal community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Youzhi; Lin, Xiangui; Yu, Yongchang; Zhang, Huayong; Chu, Haiyan; Zhu, Jianguo

    2013-01-01

    The current knowledge regarding the effect of global climate change on rice-paddy methane (CH4) emissions is incomplete, partly because information is limited concerning the mechanism of the microbial response to elevated ground-level ozone (O3). A field experiment was conducted in the China Ozone Free-Air Concentration Enrichment facility in a rice–wheat rotation system to investigate the responses of methanogenic archaeal communities to elevated ground-level O3 by culture-independent and -reliant approaches. We found that elevated ground-level O3 inhibited methanogenic activity and influenced the composition of paddy methanogenic communities, reducing the abundance and diversity of paddy methanogens by adversely affecting dominant groups, such as aceticlastic Methanosaeta, especially at the rice tillering stage. Our results indicated that continuously elevated ground-level O3 would negatively influence paddy methanogenic archaeal communities and its critical ecological function. These findings will contribute to a comprehensive understanding of the responses and feedbacks of paddy ecosystems to global climate change. PMID:24217205

  18. Application of Pseudomurein Endoisopeptidase to Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization of Methanogens within the Family Methanobacteriaceae▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kohei ; Terada, Takeshi; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Shinzato, Naoya; Meng, Xian-Ying; Enoki, Miho; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2006-01-01

    In situ detection of methanogens within the family Methanobacteriaceae is sometimes known to be unsuccessful due to the difficulty in permeability of oligonucleotide probes. Pseudomurein endoisopeptidase (Pei), a lytic enzyme that specifically acts on their cell walls, was applied prior to 16S rRNA-targeting fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). For this purpose, pure cultured methanogens within this family, Methanobacterium bryantii, Methanobrevibacter ruminantium, Methanosphaera stadtmanae, and Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus together with a Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus-containing syntrophic acetate-oxidizing coculture, endosymbiotic Methanobrevibacter methanogens within an anaerobic ciliate, and an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) granule were examined. Even without the Pei treatment, Methanobacterium bryantii and Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus cells are relatively well hybridized with oligonucleotide probes. However, almost none of the cells of Methanobrevibacter ruminantium, Methanosphaera stadtmanae, cocultured Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, and the endosymbiotic methanogens and the cells within UASB granule were hybridized. Pei treatment was able to increase the probe hybridization ratio in every specimen, particularly in the specimen that had shown little hybridization. Interestingly, the hybridizing signal intensity of Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus cells in coculture with an acetate-oxidizing H2-producing syntroph was significantly improved by Pei pretreatment, whereas the probe was well hybridized with the cells of pure culture of the same strain. We found that the difference is attributed to the differences in cell wall thicknesses between the two culture conditions. These results indicate that Pei treatment is effective for FISH analysis of methanogens that show impermeability to the probe. PMID:16950902

  19. Geographical distribution of methanogenic archaea in nine representative paddy soils in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianhui Zu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Paddy field methanogenic archaea are responsible for methane (CH4 production and contribute significantly to climate change. The information regarding the spatial variations in the abundance, the diversity and the composition of such ecologically important microbes, however, is quite limited at large scale. In this investigation, we studied the abundance, alpha diversity and geographical distribution of methanogenic archaeal communities in nine representative paddy sites, along a large latitudinal gradient in China, using pyrosequencing and real-time quantitative PCR. It is found that all paddy soils harbor constant methanogenic archaeal constituents, which is dominated by family Methanocellaceae (37.3%, Methanobacteriaceae (22.1%, Methanosaetaceae (17.2% and Methanosarcinaceae (9.8%. Methanogenic archaeal abundance is primarily influenced by soil C (R=0.612, P=0.001 and N (R=0.673, P=0.001 contents, as well as alpha diversity by soil pH (PD: R=-0.552, P=0.006; Chao1: R=-0.615, P=0.002. Further exploration revealed that both spatial distance (R=0.3469, P=0.001, partial mental test and soil chemical variables mainly about soil C and N (R=0.2847, P=0.001 are the two major factors affecting methanogenic archaeal community composition distribution in paddy soils. This finding will allow us to develop a better picture of the biogeographic ranges of these ecologically important microbes and get deeper insights into their ecology.

  20. Methanogenic community composition in an organic waste mixture in an anaerobic bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryta, Agata; Oszust, Karolina; Brzezińska, Małgorzata; Ziemiński, Krzysztof; Bilińska-Wielgus, Nina; Frąc, Magdalena

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the study was to elucidate the substantial relationship between the compositions of methanogen community that assembles in the anaerobic digester mass and link it to methane production activity. The results of the metagenomic studies were used to evaluate how the methanogen structure changes during an anaerobic digestion process under various waste retention times (21, 23, 25, 29, 33, 39, 47 and 61 days). Phylogenetically coherent populations of methanogens were assessed by 16S rRNA gene next-generation sequencing and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting of a specific molecular marker, the mcrA gene. The results indicated multiple phylogenetically diverse methanogen populations associated with the various steps of anaerobic digestion. The stages of the anaerobic digestion process and waste retention times determine the microbial composition. The most dominant and acclimated microbial communities in all samples belonged to the genera Methanosaeta and Methanobacterium. The methane yield was consistent with the results of the microbial community structure, which indicated that acetotrophic Methanosaeta was the most active and most important during the methanogenic stage.

  1. Molecular Analysis of Methanogen Richness in Landfill and Marshland Targeting 16S rDNA Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Shailendra; Kundu, Sharbadeb; Ghosh, Sankar K; Maitra, S S

    2015-01-01

    Methanogens, a key contributor in global carbon cycling, methane emission, and alternative energy production, generate methane gas via anaerobic digestion of organic matter. The methane emission potential depends upon methanogenic diversity and activity. Since they are anaerobes and difficult to isolate and culture, their diversity present in the landfill sites of Delhi and marshlands of Southern Assam, India, was analyzed using molecular techniques like 16S rDNA sequencing, DGGE, and qPCR. The sequencing results indicated the presence of methanogens belonging to the seventh order and also the order Methanomicrobiales in the Ghazipur and Bhalsawa landfill sites of Delhi. Sequences, related to the phyla Crenarchaeota (thermophilic) and Thaumarchaeota (mesophilic), were detected from marshland sites of Southern Assam, India. Jaccard analysis of DGGE gel using Gel2K showed three main clusters depending on the number and similarity of band patterns. The copy number analysis of hydrogenotrophic methanogens using qPCR indicates higher abundance in landfill sites of Delhi as compared to the marshlands of Southern Assam. The knowledge about "methanogenic archaea composition" and "abundance" in the contrasting ecosystems like "landfill" and "marshland" may reorient our understanding of the Archaea inhabitants. This study could shed light on the relationship between methane-dynamics and the global warming process.

  2. Molecular Analysis of Methanogen Richness in Landfill and Marshland Targeting 16S rDNA Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailendra Yadav

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Methanogens, a key contributor in global carbon cycling, methane emission, and alternative energy production, generate methane gas via anaerobic digestion of organic matter. The methane emission potential depends upon methanogenic diversity and activity. Since they are anaerobes and difficult to isolate and culture, their diversity present in the landfill sites of Delhi and marshlands of Southern Assam, India, was analyzed using molecular techniques like 16S rDNA sequencing, DGGE, and qPCR. The sequencing results indicated the presence of methanogens belonging to the seventh order and also the order Methanomicrobiales in the Ghazipur and Bhalsawa landfill sites of Delhi. Sequences, related to the phyla Crenarchaeota (thermophilic and Thaumarchaeota (mesophilic, were detected from marshland sites of Southern Assam, India. Jaccard analysis of DGGE gel using Gel2K showed three main clusters depending on the number and similarity of band patterns. The copy number analysis of hydrogenotrophic methanogens using qPCR indicates higher abundance in landfill sites of Delhi as compared to the marshlands of Southern Assam. The knowledge about “methanogenic archaea composition” and “abundance” in the contrasting ecosystems like “landfill” and “marshland” may reorient our understanding of the Archaea inhabitants. This study could shed light on the relationship between methane-dynamics and the global warming process.

  3. Random mutagenesis identifies factors involved in formate-dependent growth of the methanogenic archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattler, Christian; Wolf, Sandro; Fersch, Julia; Goetz, Stefan; Rother, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Methane is a key intermediate in the carbon cycle and biologically produced by methanogenic archaea. Most methanogens are able to conserve energy by reducing CO2 to methane using molecular hydrogen as electron donor (hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis), but several hydrogenotrophic methanogens can also use formate as electron donor for methanogenesis. Formate dehydrogenase (Fdh) oxidizes formate to CO2 and is involved in funneling reducing equivalents into the methanogenic pathway, but details on other factors relevant for formate-dependent physiology of methanogens are not available. To learn more about the factors involved in formate-dependent growth of Methanococcus maripaludis strain JJ, we used a recently developed system for random in vitro mutagenesis, which is based on a modified insect transposable element to create 2,865 chromosomal transposon mutants and screened them for impaired growth on formate. Of 12 M. maripaludis transposon-induced mutants exhibiting this phenotype, the transposon insertion sites in the chromosome were mapped. Among the genes, apparently affecting formate-dependent growth were those encoding archaeal transcription factor S, a regulator of ion transport, and carbon monoxide dehydrogenase/acetyl-CoA synthase. Interestingly, in seven of the mutants, transposons were localized in a 10.2 kb region where Fdh1, one of two Fdh isoforms in the organism, is encoded. Two transcription start sites within the 10.2 kb region could be mapped, and quantification of transcripts revealed that transposon insertion in this region diminished fdhA1 expression due to polar effects.

  4. Methanogenic degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in subsurface environments remediation, heavy oil formation, and energy recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, N D; Sherry, A; Hubert, C; Dolfing, J; Head, I M

    2010-01-01

    Hydrocarbons are common constituents of surface, shallow, and deep-subsurface environments. Under anaerobic conditions, hydrocarbons can be degraded to methane by methanogenic microbial consortia. This degradation process is widespread in the geosphere. In comparison with other anaerobic processes, methanogenic hydrocarbon degradation is more sustainable over geological time scales because replenishment of an exogenous electron acceptor is not required. As a consequence, this process has been responsible for the formation of the world's vast deposits of heavy oil, which far exceed conventional oil assets such as those found in the Middle East. Methanogenic degradation is also a potentially important component of attenuation in hydrocarbon contamination plumes. Studies of the organisms, syntrophic partnerships, mechanisms, and geochemical signatures associated with methanogenic hydrocarbon degradation have identified common themes and diagnostic markers for this process in the subsurface. These studies have also identified the potential to engineer methanogenic processes to enhance the recovery of energy assets as biogenic methane from residual oils stranded in petroleum systems. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Methanogenic activity and diversity in the centre of the Amsterdam Mud Volcano, Eastern Mediterranean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Cassandre Sara; John Parkes, R; Cragg, Barry A; L'Haridon, Stephane; Toffin, Laurent

    2012-07-01

    Marine mud volcanoes are geological structures emitting large amounts of methane from their active centres. The Amsterdam mud volcano (AMV), located in the Anaximander Mountains south of Turkey, is characterized by intense active methane seepage produced in part by methanogens. To date, information about the diversity or the metabolic pathways used by the methanogens in active centres of marine mud volcanoes is limited. (14)C-radiotracer measurements showed that methylamines/methanol, H(2)/CO(2) and acetate were used for methanogenesis in the AMV. Methylotrophic methanogenesis was measured all along the sediment core, Methanosarcinales affiliated sequences were detected using archaeal 16S PCR-DGGE and mcrA gene libraries, and enrichments of methanogens showed the presence of Methanococcoides in the shallow sediment layers. Overall acetoclastic methanogenesis was higher than hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, which is unusual for cold seep sediments. Interestingly, acetate porewater concentrations were extremely high in the AMV sediments. This might be the result of organic matter cracking in deeper hotter sediment layers. Methane was also produced from hexadecanes. For the most part, the methanogenic community diversity was in accordance with the depth distribution of the H(2)/CO(2) and acetate methanogenesis. These results demonstrate the importance of methanogenic communities in the centres of marine mud volcanoes. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Dual investigation of methanogenic processes by quantitative PCR and quantitative microscopic fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Sung; Westerholm, Maria; Scherer, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Monitoring of methanogenic communities in anaerobic digesters using molecular-based methods is very attractive but can be cost-intensive. A new and fast quantification method by microscopic image analysis was developed to accompany molecular-based methods. This digitalized method, called quantitative microscopic fingerprinting (QMF), enables quantification of active methanogenic cells (N mL(-1)) by their characteristic auto-fluorescence based on coenzyme F420 . QMF was applied to analyze the methanogenic communities in three biogas plant samples, and the results were compared with the relative proportion of gene copy numbers obtained with the quantitative PCR (qPCR). Analysis of QMF demonstrated dominance of Methanomicrobiales and Methanobacteriales in relation to the total methanogenic community in digesters operating at high ammonia concentrations, which corresponded to the results established by qPCR. Absolute microbial counts by QMF and the numbers obtained by qPCR were not always comparable. On the other hand, the restricted morphological analysis by QMF was enhanced by the capability of qPCR to identify microbes. Consequently, dual investigations of both methods are proposed to improve monitoring of anaerobic digesters. For a rough estimation of the methanogenic composition in anaerobic digesters, the QMF method seems to be a promising approach for the rapid detection of microbial changes. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Molecular Characterization of Methanogenic Communities in Core Sediments of the Dajiuhu Peatland, Central China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R.; Wang, H.

    2017-12-01

    Methane (CH4) is an important greenhouse gas with a global warming potential 22 times greater than carbon dioxide. Large amounts of CH4 can be produced and released by methanogenesis in peatland ecosystems, which make peatland ecosystems play an important role in mediating global climate change. Here we report the abundance and distribution of methanogenic communities and their correlation with physicochemical parameters along two sediment cores in the Dajiuhu Peatland via quantitative PCR, clone library construction of functional genes and statistical analysis. Uncultured Group and Fen Cluster were found to be the dominant methanogens at the upper part of the cores, and Rice and Related Rice Cluster became dominant in the bottom of the cores. Quantitative PCR showed that abundances of methanogenic communities ranged from 104 to 106 copies/ng DNA throughout the cores. Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) indicated that dissolved oxygen (DO) (P=0.046, F=1.4) was the main factor significantly controlling methanogenic communities. Our results enhance the understanding of the compositions and variations of methanogenic communities vertically and greatly help us to further investigate process of microbial methanogenesis in Dajiuhu Peatland.

  8. A Staff Education Consortium: One Model for Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetler, Cheryl Beth; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the development, organization, activities, problems, and future of a staff education consortium of five medical center hospitals in Boston. The purposes of the consortium are mutual sharing, reduction in duplication, and cost containment of educational programing. (JOW)

  9. 76 FR 20690 - International Consortium of Orthopedic Registries; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration International Consortium of Orthopedic Registries; Public... Administration (FDA) is announcing a public workshop entitled ``International Consortium of Orthopedic Registries... orthopedic registries that have orthopedic implant information and create a research network to advance the...

  10. 24 CFR 943.118 - What is a consortium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING AGENCY CONSORTIA AND JOINT VENTURES Consortia § 943.118 What is a consortium? A consortium consists of two or more PHAs that join together to perform planning, reporting, and other...

  11. Midwest Transportation Consortium : 2003-2004 annual report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: The Midwest Transportation Consortium (MTC) recently completed its fifth year : of operation. In doing so, the consortium has established itself as an effective : network that promotes the education of future transportation professional...

  12. Factors influencing the degradation of garbage in methanogenic bioreactors and impacts on biogas formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Masahiko; Sasaki, Kengo

    2012-05-01

    Anaerobic digestion of garbage is attracting much attention because of its application in waste volume reduction and the recovery of biogas for use as an energy source. In this review, various factors influencing the degradation of garbage and the production of biogas are discussed. The surface hydrophobicity and porosity of supporting materials are important factors in retaining microorganisms such as aceticlastic methanogens and in attaining a higher degradation of garbage and a higher production of biogas. Ammonia concentration, changes in environmental parameters such as temperature and pH, and adaptation of microbial community to ammonia have been related to ammonia inhibition. The effects of drawing electrons from the methanogenic community and donating electrons into the methanogenic community on methane production have been shown in microbial fuel cells and bioelectrochemical reactors. The influences of trace elements, phase separation, and co-digestion are also summarized in this review.

  13. Towards the identification of methanogenic archaeal groups as targets of methane mitigation in livestock animals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit eSt-Pierre

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In herbivores, enteric methane is a by-product from the digestion of plant biomass by mutualistic gastrointestinal tract (GIT microbial communities. Methane is a potent greenhouse gas that is not assimilated by the host and is released into the environment where it contributes to climate change. Since enteric methane is exclusively produced by methanogenic archaea, the investigation of mutualistic methanogen communities in the GIT of herbivores has been the subject of ongoing research by a number of research groups. In an effort to uncover trends that would facilitate the development of efficient methane mitigation strategies for livestock species, we have in this review summarized and compared currently available results from published studies on this subject. We also offer our perspectives on the importance of pursuing current research efforts on the sequencing of gut methanogen genomes, as well as investigating their cellular physiology and interactions with other GIT microorganisms.

  14. New approach to control the methanogenic reactor of a two-phase anaerobic digestion system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachs, J. von; Meyer, U.; Rys, P.; Feitkenhauer, H. [ETH Zurich (Switzerland). Laboratorium fuer Technische Chemie

    2003-03-01

    A new control strategy for the methanogenic reactor of a two-phase anaerobic digestion system has been developed and successfully tested on the laboratory scale. The control strategy serves the purpose to detect inhibitory effects and to achieve good conversion. The concept is based on the idea that volatile fatty acids (VFA) can be measured in the influent of the methanogenic reactor by means of titration. Thus, information on the output (methane production) and input of the methanogenic reactor is available, and a (carbon) mass balance can be obtained. The control algorithm comprises a proportional/integral structure with the ratio of (a) the methane production rate measured online and (b) a maximum methane production rate expected (derived from the stoichiometry) as a control variable. The manipulated variable is the volumetric feed rate. Results are shown for an experiment with VFA (feed) concentration ramps and for experiments with sodium chloride as inhibitor. (author)

  15. The Consortium Method of Educational Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynes, Bill; McIntosh, Gordon

    1979-01-01

    In offering an alternative approach to organizing major curriculum changes, this paper presents a case study and analysis of a consortium project in which the need for change, the change process, and the curriculum writing all took place at the local level. (Author/IRT)

  16. Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M. Griffith (Linda); M. Cowan (Morton); L.D. Notarangelo (Luigi Daniele); R. Kohn (Robert); J. Puck (Jennifer); S.-Y. Pai (Sung-Yun); B. Ballard (Barbara); S.C. Bauer (Sarah); J. Bleesing (Jack); M. Boyle (Marcia); R.W. Brower (Ronald); R.H. Buckley (Rebecca); M. van der Burg (Mirjam); L.M. Burroughs (Lauri); F. Candotti (Fabio); A. Cant (Andrew); T. Chatila (Talal); C. Cunningham-Rundles (Charlotte); M.C. Dinauer (Mary); J. Dvorak (Jennie); A. Filipovich (Alexandra); L.A. Fleisher (Lee); H.B. Gaspar (Bobby); T. Gungor (Tayfun); E. Haddad (Elie); E. Hovermale (Emily); F. Huang (Faith); A. Hurley (Alan); M. Hurley (Mary); S.K. Iyengar (Sudha); E.M. Kang (Elizabeth); B.R. Logan (Brent); J.R. Long-Boyle (Janel); H. Malech (Harry); S.A. McGhee (Sean); S. Modell (Sieglinde); S. Modell (Sieglinde); H.D. Ochs (Hans); R.J. O'Reilly (Richard); R. Parkman (Robertson); D. Rawlings (D.); J.M. Routes (John); P. Shearer (P.); T.N. Small (Trudy); H. Smith (H.); K.E. Sullivan (Kathleen); P. Szabolcs (Paul); A.J. Thrasher (Adrian); D. Torgerson; P. Veys (Paul); K. Weinberg (Kenneth); J.C. Zuniga-Pflucker (Juan Carlos)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) is a network of 33 centers in North America that study the treatment of rare and severe primary immunodeficiency diseases. Current protocols address the natural history of patients treated for severe combined immunodeficiency

  17. Investigation into the effect of high concentrations of volatile fatty acids in anaerobic digestion on methanogenic communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke-Whittle, Ingrid H., E-mail: ingrid.whittle@uibk.ac.at [Institut für Mikrobiologie, Universität Innsbruck, Technikerstraße 25, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Walter, Andreas [Institut für Mikrobiologie, Universität Innsbruck, Technikerstraße 25, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Ebner, Christian [Abwasserverband Zirl und Umgebung, Meilbrunnen 5, 6170 Zirl (Austria); Insam, Heribert [Institut für Mikrobiologie, Universität Innsbruck, Technikerstraße 25, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Different methanogenic communities in mesophilic and thermophilic reactors. • High VFA levels do not cause major changes in archaeal communities. • Real-time PCR indicated greater diversity than ANAEROCHIP microarray. - Abstract: A study was conducted to determine whether differences in the levels of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) in anaerobic digester plants could result in variations in the indigenous methanogenic communities. Two digesters (one operated under mesophilic conditions, the other under thermophilic conditions) were monitored, and sampled at points where VFA levels were high, as well as when VFA levels were low. Physical and chemical parameters were measured, and the methanogenic diversity was screened using the phylogenetic microarray ANAEROCHIP. In addition, real-time PCR was used to quantify the presence of the different methanogenic genera in the sludge samples. Array results indicated that the archaeal communities in the different reactors were stable, and that changes in the VFA levels of the anaerobic digesters did not greatly alter the dominating methanogenic organisms. In contrast, the two digesters were found to harbour different dominating methanogenic communities, which appeared to remain stable over time. Real-time PCR results were inline with those of microarray analysis indicating only minimal changes in methanogen numbers during periods of high VFAs, however, revealed a greater diversity in methanogens than found with the array.

  18. Methanogenic H2 syntrophy among thermophiles: a model of metabolism, adaptation and survival in the subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topcuoglu, B. D.; Stewart, L. C.; Butterfield, D. A.; Huber, J. A.; Holden, J. F.

    2016-12-01

    Approximately 1 giga ton (Gt, 1015 g) of CH4 is formed globally per year from H2, CO2 and acetate through methanogenesis, largely by methanogens growing in syntrophic association with anaerobic microbes that hydrolyze and ferment biopolymers. However, our understanding of methanogenesis in hydrothermal regions of the subseafloor and potential syntrophic methanogenesis at thermophilic temperatures (i.e., >50°C) is nascent. In this study, the growth of natural assemblages of thermophilic methanogens from Axial Seamount was primarily limited by H2 availability. Heterotrophs supported thermophilic methanogenesis by H2 syntrophy in microcosm incubations of hydrothermal fluids at 55°C and 80°C supplemented with tryptone only. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing, only heterotrophic archaea that produce H2, H2-consuming methanogens, and sulfate reducing archaea were found in 80°C tryptone microcosms from Marker 113 vent. No bacteria were found. In 55°C tryptone microcosms, sequences were found from H2-producing bacteria and H2-consuming methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria. In order to model the impact of H2 syntrophy at hyperthemophilic temperatures, a co-culture was established consisting of the H2-producing hyperthermophilic heterotroph Thermococcus paralvinellae and a H2-consuming hyperthermophilic methanogen Methanocaldococcus bathoardescens. When grown alone in a chemostat, the growth rates and steady-state cell concentrations of T. paralvinellae decreased significantly when a high H2 (70 µM) background was present. H2 inhibition was ameliorated by the production of formate, but in silico modeling suggests less energetic yield for the cells. H2 syntrophy relieved H2 inhibition for both the heterotroph and the methanogenic partners. The results demonstrate that thermophilic H2 syntrophy can support methanogenesis within natural microbial assemblages and may be an important alternative energy source for thermophilic autotrophs in marine geothermal environments.

  19. Establishment of a Methanogenic Benzene-Degrading Culture and its Implication in Bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, W.; Luo, F.; Bawa, N.; Guo, S.; Ye, S.; Edwards, E.

    2017-12-01

    Benzene is a known human carcinogen and it is a common pollutant in groundwater, mainly resulting from petrochemical industry. Anaerobic degradation of benzene has significant advantages over aerobic processes for in situ bioremediation. In this study, new methanogenic and sulfate-reducing benzene degrading cultures have been enriched. Microbial community composition was characterized with two other previously established benzene-degrading cultures, and their potential use in bioaugmentation is investigated. In this study, a lab microcosm study was conducted anaerobically with contaminated soil and groundwater from a former chemical plant. Benzene degradation was observed in the presence of co-contaminants and electron donor. Through repetitive amendment of benzene, two enrichment cultures have been developed under sulfate and methanogenic conditions. Results from DNA amplicon sequencing and qPCR analysis revealed that an organism similar to previously described benzene-degrading Deltaproteobacterium has been enriched. The microbial community of this culture was compared with other two methanogenic benzene-degrading enrichment cultures that were derived from an oil refinery and a decommissioned gasoline station, and have been maintained for decades. Deltaproteobacterium ORM2-like microbes were dominate in all enrichment cultures, which brought to light benzene-degrading microbes, ORM2 were enriched under different geological conditions distributed around the world. The relative abundance of methanogens was much lower compared to previously established cultures, although substantial amount of methane was produced. The peripheral organisms also vary. To investigate effectiveness of using ORM2-dominant enrichment cultures in bioremediation, microcosm studies were set up using contaminated materials, and a ORM2-dominating methanogenic benzene-degrading culture was used for bioaugmentation. Results revealed that benzene degradation was speeded up under methanogenic or

  20. Inhibitory effects of ammonia on methanogen mcrA transcripts in anaerobic digester sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chen; Yuan, Quan; Lu, Yahai

    2014-02-01

    Methanogens in anaerobic ammonia-rich digesters show differential responses to ammonia stress. The mechanism for this is poorly understood. In the present study, we determined the rates of methane production, the composition of methanogen mcrA (the gene coding for the alpha subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase) and their transcripts in response to ammonium addition in the anaerobic sludge retrieved from a full-scale digester treating swine manure. The rate of CH4 production substantially reduced with increased addition of ammonium. The analysis of natural (13)C abundances of CH4 and CO2 indicated that the aceticlastic methanogenesis was more sensitive than hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that mcrA copy number decreased by one order of magnitude in the treatment with a large amount of ammonium (10 g NH4+-N L(-1)) but did not change much with treatments of smaller amounts (3 and 7 g NH4+-N L(-1)) compared with the control. T-RFLP analysis of mcrA compositions showed that the structure of the methanogen community remained highly stable, with Methanosaetaceae dominating the methanogen community in all incubations. The composition of mcrA transcripts, however, showed a substantial response to the addition of ammonium. The relative abundance of Methanosaetaceae transcripts declined with increasing amounts of ammonium, whereas the transcript level of Methanobacteriales mcrA was relatively resistant. The differential responses corresponded to the shift of methanogenic pathway inferred from (13)C isotope fractionation. Our study suggests that methanogens in anaerobic sludge have a strong mcrA transcriptional response to ammonia stress without a change in the community structure. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Development of methanogenic consortia in fluidized-bed batches using sepiolite of different particle size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, J M; Rodríguez, F; Valle, L; Muñoz, M A; Moriñigo, M A; Borrego, J J

    1996-09-01

    The addition of support materials, such as sepiolite, to fluidized-bed anaerobic digesters enhances the methane production by increasing the colonization by syntrophic microbiota. However, the efficiency in the methanogenesis depends on the particle size of the support material, the highest level of methane production being obtained by the smaller particle size sepiolite. Because of the porosity and physico-chemical characteristics of these support materials, the anaerobic microbial consortia formed quickly (after one week of incubation). The predominant methanogenic bacteria present in the active granules, detected both by immunofluorescence using specific antibodies and by scanning electron microscopy, were acetoclastic methanogens, mainly Methanosarcina and Methanosaeta.

  2. Visualization of candidate division OP3 cocci in limonene-degrading methanogenic cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Schauer, Regina; Probian, Christina

    2012-01-01

    Members of candidate division OP3 were detected in 16S rRNA gene clone libraries from methanogenic enrichment cultures that utilized limonene as a carbon and energy source. We developed probes for the visualization of OP3 cells. In situ hybridization experiments with newly designed OP3-specific...... probes [OP3-565 and Eub-338(VI)] revealed abundant small OP3 cocci attached to larger cells. Syntrophic Deltaproteobacteria, OP3 cells, and methanogens affiliating with Methanoculleus and Methanosaeta formed the limonenedegrading community....

  3. Effect of dietary fiber on the methanogen community in the hindgut of Lantang gilts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Z; Liang, J B; Liao, X D; Wright, A D G; Wu, Y B; Yu, B

    2016-10-01

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate the effect of dietary fiber on methanogenic diversity and community composition in the hindgut of indigenous Chinese Lantang gilts to explain the unexpected findings reported earlier that Lantang gilts fed low-fiber diet (LFD) produced more methane than those fed high-fiber diet (HFD). In total, 12 Lantang gilts (58.7±0.37 kg) were randomly divided into two dietary groups (six replicates (pigs) per group) and fed either LFD (NDF=201.46 g/kg) or HFD (NDF=329.70 g/kg). Wheat bran was the main source of fiber for the LFD, whereas ground rice hull (mixture of rice hull and rice bran) was used for the HFD. Results showed that the methanogens in the hindgut of Lantang gilts belonged to four known species (Methanobrevibacter ruminantium, Methanobrevibacter wolinii, Methanosphaera stadtmanae and Methanobrevibacter smithii), with about 89% of the methanogens belonging to the genus Methanobrevibacter. The 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene copies of Methanobrevibacter were more than three times higher (P0.05) was observed in 16S rRNA gene copies of Fibrobacter succinogenes between the two dietary groups, and 18S rRNA gene copies of anaerobic fungi in gilts fed LFD were lower than (Peffect of different fiber source on the methanogen community, a follow-up in vitro fermentation using a factorial design comprised of two inocula (prepared from hindgut content of gilts fed two diets differing in their dietary fiber)×four substrates (LFD, HFD, wheat bran, ground rice hull) was conducted. Results of the in vitro fermentation confirmed that the predominant methanogens belonged to the genus of Methanobrevibacter, and about 23% methanogens was found to be distantly related (90%) to Thermogymnomonas acidicola. In vitro fermentation also seems to suggest that fiber source did change the methanogens community. Although the density of Methanobrevibacter species was positively correlated with CH4 production in both in vivo (P<0.01, r=0

  4. The dominant acetate degradation pathway/methanogenic composition in full-scale anaerobic digesters operating under different ammonia levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotidis, Ioannis; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Angelidaki, Irini

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia is a major environmental factor influencing biomethanation in full-scale anaerobic digesters. In this study, the effect of different ammonia levels on methanogenic pathways and methanogenic community composition of full-scale biogas plants was investigated. Eight full-scale digesters...... operating under different ammonia levels were sampled, and the residual biogas production was followed in fed-batch reactors. Acetate, labelled in the methyl group, was used to determine the methanogenic pathway by following the 14CH4 and 14CO2 production. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation was used...... to determine the methanogenic communities’ composition. Results obtained clearly demonstrated that syntrophic acetate oxidation coupled with hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis was the dominant pathway in all digesters with high ammonia levels (2.8–4.57 g NH4 +-N L−1), while acetoclastic methanogenic pathway...

  5. A Three-Component Microbial Consortium from Deep-Sea Salt-Saturated Anoxic Lake Thetis Links Anaerobic Glycine Betaine Degradation with Methanogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violetta La Cono

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial communities inhabiting the deep-sea salt-saturated anoxic lakes of the Eastern Mediterranean operate under harsh physical-chemical conditions that are incompatible with the lifestyle of common marine microorganisms. Here, we investigated a stable three-component microbial consortium obtained from the brine of the recently discovered deep-sea salt-saturated Lake Thetis. The trophic network of this consortium, established at salinities up to 240, relies on fermentative decomposition of common osmoprotectant glycine betaine (GB. Similarly to known extreme halophilic anaerobic GB-degrading enrichments, the initial step of GB degradation starts with its reductive cleavage to trimethylamine and acetate, carried out by the fermenting member of the Thetis enrichment, Halobacteroides lacunaris TB21. In contrast to acetate, which cannot be easily oxidized in salt-saturated anoxic environments, trimethylamine represents an advantageous C1-substrate for methylotrophic methanogenic member of the Thetis enrichment, Methanohalophilus sp. TA21. This second member of the consortium likely produces hydrogen via methylotrophic modification of reductive acetyl-CoA pathway because the initial anaerobic GB cleavage reaction requires the consumption of reducing equivalents. Ecophysiological role of the third member of the Thetis consortium, Halanaerobium sp. TB24, which lacks the capability of either GB or trimethylamine degradation, remains yet to be elucidated. As it is true for cultivated members of family Halanaerobiaceae, the isolate TB24 can obtain energy primarily by fermenting simple sugars and producing hydrogen as one of the end products. Hence, by consuming of TB21 and TA21 metabolites, Halanaerobium sp. TB24 can be an additional provider of reducing equivalents required for reductive degradation of GB. Description of the Thetis GB-degrading consortium indicated that anaerobic degradation of osmoregulatory molecules may play important role in the

  6. Relation between methanogenic archaea and methane production potential in selected natural wetland ecosystems across China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Y. Liu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Methane (CH4 emissions from natural wetland ecosystems exhibit large spatial variability at regional, national, and global levels related to temperature, water table, plant type and methanogenic archaea etc. To understand the underlying factors that induce spatial differences in CH4 emissions, and the relationship between the population of methanogenic archaea and CH4 production potential in natural wetlands around China, we measured the CH4 production potential and the abundance of methanogenic archaea in vertical soil profiles sampled from the Poyang wetland in the subtropical zone, the Hongze wetland in the warm temperate zone, the Sanjiang marsh in the cold temperate zone, and the Ruoergai peatland in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau in the alpine climate zone. The top soil layer had the highest population of methanogens (1.07–8.29 × 109 cells g−1 soil in all wetlands except the Ruoergai peatland and exhibited the maximum CH4 production potential measured at the mean in situ summer temperature. There is a significant logarithmic correlation between the abundance of methanogenic archaea and the soil organic carbon (R2 = 0.72, P < 0.001, n = 13 and between the abundance of methanogenic archaea and the total nitrogen concentrations (R2 = 0.76, P < 0.001, n = 13 in wetland soils. This indicates that the amount of soil organic carbon may affect the population of methanogens in wetland ecosystems. While the CH4 production potential is not significantly related to methanogen population (R2 = 0.01, P > 0.05, n = 13, it is related to the dissolved organic carbon concentration (R2 = 0.31, P = 0.05, n = 13. This suggests that the methanogen population might be not an effective index for predicting the CH4 production in wetland

  7. Consortium for Verification Technology Fellowship Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadler, Lorraine E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-06-01

    As one recipient of the Consortium for Verification Technology (CVT) Fellowship, I spent eight days as a visiting scientist at the University of Michigan, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences (NERS). During this time, I participated in multiple department and research group meetings and presentations, met with individual faculty and students, toured multiple laboratories, and taught one-half of a one-unit class on Risk Analysis in Nuclear Arms control (six 1.5 hour lectures). The following report describes some of the interactions that I had during my time as well as a brief discussion of the impact of this fellowship on members of the consortium and on me/my laboratory’s technical knowledge and network.

  8. Midwest Nuclear Science and Engineering Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Wynn Volkert; Dr. Arvind Kumar; Dr. Bryan Becker; Dr. Victor Schwinke; Dr. Angel Gonzalez; Dr. DOuglas McGregor

    2010-12-08

    The objective of the Midwest Nuclear Science and Engineering Consortium (MNSEC) is to enhance the scope, quality and integration of educational and research capabilities of nuclear sciences and engineering (NS/E) programs at partner schools in support of the U.S. nuclear industry (including DOE laboratories). With INIE support, MNSEC had a productive seven years and made impressive progress in achieving these goals. Since the past three years have been no-cost-extension periods, limited -- but notable -- progress has been made in FY10. Existing programs continue to be strengthened and broadened at Consortium partner institutions. The enthusiasm generated by the academic, state, federal, and industrial communities for the MNSEC activities is reflected in the significant leveraging that has occurred for our programs.

  9. Midwest Nuclear Science and Engineering Consortium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkert, Wynn; Kumar, Arvind; Becker, Bryan; Schwinke, Victor; Gonzalez, Angel; McGregor, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the Midwest Nuclear Science and Engineering Consortium (MNSEC) is to enhance the scope, quality and integration of educational and research capabilities of nuclear sciences and engineering (NS/E) programs at partner schools in support of the U.S. nuclear industry (including DOE laboratories). With INIE support, MNSEC had a productive seven years and made impressive progress in achieving these goals. Since the past three years have been no-cost-extension periods, limited -- but notable -- progress has been made in FY10. Existing programs continue to be strengthened and broadened at Consortium partner institutions. The enthusiasm generated by the academic, state, federal, and industrial communities for the MNSEC activities is reflected in the significant leveraging that has occurred for our programs.

  10. Overview of the Inland California Translational Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkas, Linda H.

    2017-05-01

    The mission of the Inland California Translational Consortium (ICTC), an independent research consortium comprising a unique hub of regional institutions (City of Hope [COH], California Institute of Technology [Caltech], Jet Propulsion Laboratory [JPL], University of California Riverside [UCR], and Claremont Colleges Keck Graduate Institute [KGI], is to institute a new paradigm within the academic culture to accelerate translation of innovative biomedical discoveries into clinical applications that positively affect human health and life. The ICTC actively supports clinical translational research as well as the implementation and advancement of novel education and training models for the translation of basic discoveries into workable products and practices that preserve and improve human health while training and educating at all levels of the workforce using innovative forward-thinking approaches.

  11. Efficient treatment of garbage slurry in methanogenic bioreactor packed by fibrous sponge with high porosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Kengo; Sasaki, Daisuke; Morita, Masahiko; Hirano, Shin-Ichi; Matsumoto, Norio; Ohmura, Naoya; Igarashi, Yasuo

    2010-05-01

    Adding a supporting material to a methanogenic bioreactor treating garbage slurry can improve efficiency of methane production. However, little is known on how characteristics (e.g., porosity and hydrophobicity) of the supporting material affect the bioreactor degrading garbage slurry. We describe the reactor performances and microbial communities in bioreactors containing hydrophilic or hydrophobic sheets, or fibrous hydrophilic or hydrophobic sponges. The porosity affected the efficiency of methane production and solid waste removal more than the hydrophilic or hydrophobic nature of the supporting material. When the terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism technique was used at a lower organic loading rate (OLR), microbial diversities in the suspended fraction were retained on the hydrophobic, but not the hydrophilic, sheets. Moreover, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) performed at a higher OLR revealed that the excellent performance of reactors containing fibrous sponges with high porosity (98%) was supported by a clear increase in the numbers of methanogens on these sponges, resulting in larger total numbers of methanogens in the reactors. In addition, the bacterial communities in fractions retained on both the hydrophobic and hydrophilic fibrous sponges differed from those in the suspended fraction, thus increasing bacterial diversity in the reactor. Thus, higher porosity of the supporting material improves the bioreactor performance by increasing the amount of methanogens and bacterial diversity; surface hydrophobicity contributes to maintaining the suspended microbial community.

  12. Genomic analysis of methanogenic archaea reveals a shift towards energy conservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilmore, Sean P.; Henske, John K.; Sexton, Jessica A.

    2017-01-01

    and methanol metabolism in Mbac. bryantii and CO2 metabolism in Msph. cuniculi. The newly proposed substrates establish an important foundation with which to decipher how methanogens behave in native communities, as CO2 and formate are common electron carriers in microbial communities....

  13. Reduction of structural Fe(III) in nontronite by methanogen Methanosarcina barkeri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D.; Dong, Hailiang H.; Bishop, M.E.; Wang, Hongfang; Agrawal, A.; Tritschler, S.; Eberl, D.D.; Xie, S.

    2011-01-01

    Clay minerals and methanogens are ubiquitous and co-exist in anoxic environments, yet it is unclear whether methanogens are able to reduce structural Fe(III) in clay minerals. In this study, the ability of methanogen Methanosarcina barkeri to reduce structural Fe(III) in iron-rich smectite (nontronite NAu-2) and the relationship between iron reduction and methanogenesis were investigated. Bioreduction experiments were conducted in growth medium using three types of substrate: H2/CO2, methanol, and acetate. Time course methane production and hydrogen consumption were measured by gas chromatography. M. barkeri was able to reduce structural Fe(III) in NAu-2 with H2/CO2 and methanol as substrate, but not with acetate. The extent of bioreduction, as measured by the 1,10-phenanthroline method, was 7-13% with H2/CO2 as substrate, depending on nontronite concentration (5-10g/L). The extent was higher when methanol was used as a substrate, reaching 25-33%. Methanogenesis was inhibited by Fe(III) reduction in the H2/CO2 culture, but enhanced when methanol was used. High charge smectite and biogenic silica formed as a result of bioreduction. Our results suggest that methanogens may play an important role in biogeochemical cycling of iron in clay minerals and may have important implications for the global methane budget. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Peptidolytic microbial community of methanogenic reactors from two modified UASBs of brewery industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Díaz

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We studied the peptide-degrading anaerobic communities of methanogenic reactors from two mesophilic full-scale modified upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB reactors treating brewery wastewater in Colombia. Most probable number (MPN counts varied between 7.1 x 10(8 and 6.6 x 10(9 bacteria/g volatile suspended solids VSS (Methanogenic Reactor 1 and 7.2 x 10(6 and 6.4 x 10(7 bacteria/g (VSS (Methanogenic Reactor 2. Metabolites detected in the highest positive MPN dilutions in both reactors were mostly acetate, propionate, isovalerate and, in some cases, negligible concentrations of butyrate. Using the highest positive dilutions of MPN counts, 50 dominant strains were isolated from both reactors, and 12 strains were selected for sequencing their 16S rRNA gene based on their phenotypic characteristics. The small-subunit rRNA gene sequences indicated that these strains were affiliated to the families Propionibacteriaceae, Clostridiaceae and Syntrophomonadaceae in the low G + C gram-positive group and Desulfovibrio spp. in the class d-Proteobacteria. The main metabolites detected in the highest positive dilutions of MPN and the presence of Syntrophomonadaceae indicate the effect of the syntrophic associations on the bioconversion of these substrates in methanogenic reactors. Additionally, the potential utilization of external electron acceptors for the complete degradation of amino acids by Clostridium strains confirms the relevance of these acceptors in the transformation of peptides and amino acids in these systems.

  15. Methane production and methanogenic Archaea in the digestive tracts of millipedes (Diplopoda)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šustr, Vladimír; Chroňáková, Alica; Semanová, Stanislava; Tajovský, Karel; Šimek, Miloslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 7 (2014), e102659 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/09/1570 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : methane production * methanogenic Archaea * digestive tracts of millipedes Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 3.234, year: 2014

  16. Stress management skills in the subsurface: H2 stress on thermophilic heterotrophs and methanogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topcuoglu, B. D.; Holden, J. F.

    2017-12-01

    Marine hyperthermophilic heterotrophs and methanogens belonging to the Thermococcales and Methanococcales are often found in subsurface environments such as coal and shale beds, marine sediments, and oil reservoirs where they encounter H2 stress conditions. It is important to study the H2 stress survival strategies of these organisms and their cooperation with one another for survival to better understand their biogeochemical impact in hot subsurface environments. In this study, we have shown that H2 inhibition changed the growth kinetics and the transcriptome of Thermococcus paralvinellae. We observed a significant decrease in batch phase growth rates and cell concentrations with high H2 background. Produced metabolite production measurements, RNA-seq analyses of differentially expressed genes and in silico experiments we performed with the T. paralvinellae metabolic model showed that T. paralvinellae produces formate by a formate hydrogenlyase to survive H2 inhibition. We have also shown that H2 limitation caused a significant decrease in batch phase growth rates and methane production rates of the methanogen, Methanocaldococcus jannaschii. H2 stress of both organisms can be ameliorated by syntrophic growth. H2 syntrophy was demonstrated in microcosm incubations for a natural assemblage of Thermococcus and hyperthermophilic methanogens present in hydrothermal fluid samples. This project aims to describe how a hyperthermophilic heterotroph and a hyperthermophilic methanogen eliminate H2 stress and explore cooperation among thermophiles in the hot subsurface.

  17. Micro-scale H2-CO2 dynamics in a hydrogenotrophic methanogenic membrane reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia-Robledo, Emilio; Ottosen, Lars Ditlev Mørck; Voigt, Niels Vinther

    2016-01-01

    the activity and stratification of hydrogen consumption above such a membrane was investigated by use of microsensors for hydrogen and pH. A hydrogenotrophic methanogenic community that was able to consume the hydrogen flux within 0.5 mm of the membrane with specific rates of up to 30 m3 H2 m-3 day-1 developed...

  18. Decreasing ammonia inhibition in thermophilic methanogenic bioreactors using carbon fiber textiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Kengo; Morita, Masahiko; Hirano, Shin-ichi; Ohmura, Naoya; Igarashi, Yasuo

    2011-05-01

    Ammonia accumulation is one of the main causes of the loss of methane production observed during fermentation. We investigated the effect of addition of carbon fiber textiles (CFT) to thermophilic methanogenic bioreactors with respect to ammonia tolerance during the process of degradation of artificial garbage slurry, by comparing the performance of the reactors containing CFT with the performance of reactors without CFT. Under total ammonia-N concentrations of 3,000 mg L(-1), the reactors containing CFT were found to mediate stable removal of organic compounds and methane production. Under these conditions, high levels of methanogenic archaea were retained at the CFT, as determined by 16S rRNA gene analysis for methanogenic archaea. In addition, Methanobacterium sp. was found to be dominant in the suspended fraction, and Methanosarcina sp. was dominant in the retained fraction of the reactors with CFT. However, the reactors without CFT had lower rates of removal of organic compounds and production of methane under total ammonia-N concentrations of 1,500 mg L(-1). Under this ammonia concentration, a significant accumulation of acetate was observed in the reactors without CFT (130.0 mM), relative to the reactors with CFT (4.2 mM). Only Methanobacterium sp. was identified in the reactors without CFT. These results suggest that CFT enables stable proliferation of aceticlastic methanogens by preventing ammonia inhibition. This improves the process of stable garbage degradation and production of methane in thermophilic bioreactors that include high levels of ammonia.

  19. Reductive decolourisation of azo dyes by mesophilic and thermophilic methanogenic consortia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cervantes, F.J.; Santos, dos A.B.; Madrid, de M.P.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lier, van J.B.

    2005-01-01

    The contribution of acidogenic bacteria and methanogenic archaea on the reductive decolourisation of azo dyes was assessed in anaerobic granular sludge. Acidogenic bacteria appeared to play an important role in the decolourising processes when glucose was provided as an electron donor; whereas

  20. Toxic effects of pollutants on the Mineralization of 4-chlorophenol and Benzoate in methanogenic river sediment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beelen P; van Vlaardingen PLA

    1993-01-01

    The toxic effects of pollutants on the mineralization of 2 mug/l [U-14C] 4-chlorophenol and benzoate were studied in microcosms with methanogenic sediment from the Rhine river. In contrast with studies using a high substrate concentration no lag time was observed and the half-lives for

  1. Molecular analysis of methanogenic archaea in the forestomach of the alpaca (Vicugna pacos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    St-Pierre Benoit

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methanogens that populate the gastrointestinal tract of livestock ruminants contribute significantly to methane emissions from the agriculture industry. There is a great need to analyze archaeal microbiomes from a broad range of host species in order to establish causal relationships between the structure of methanogen communities and their potential for methane emission. In this report, we present an investigation of methanogenic archaeal populations in the foregut of alpacas. Results We constructed individual 16S rRNA gene clone libraries from five sampled animals and recovered a total of 947 sequences which were assigned to 51 species-level OTUs. Individuals were found to each have between 21 and 27 OTUs, of which two to six OTUs were unique. As reported in other host species, Methanobrevibacter was the dominant genus in the alpaca, representing 88.3% of clones. However, the alpaca archaeal microbiome was different from other reported host species, as clones showing species-level identity to Methanobrevibacter millerae were the most abundant. Conclusion From our analysis, we propose a model to describe the population structure of Methanobrevibacter-related methanogens in the alpaca and in previously reported host species, which may contribute in unraveling the complexity of symbiotic archaeal communities in herbivores.

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of an Obligately Methylotrophic Methanogen, Methanococcoides methylutens, Isolated from Marine Sediment

    KAUST Repository

    Guan, Yue

    2014-11-20

    Methanococcoides methylutens, the type species of the genus Methanococcoides, is a slightly halophilic methanogenic archaeon with a methylotrophic metabolism. Here, we present the annotated draft genome sequence of M. methylutens, which comprises 2,508,511 bp with 2,482 coding sequences, 51 tRNA genes, and a G+C content of 42.5%.

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of the Halophilic Methylotrophic Methanogen Archaeon Methanohalophilus portucalensis Strain FDF-1T

    KAUST Repository

    L’Haridon, Stéphane

    2018-01-17

    We report here the complete genome sequence (2.08 Mb) of Methanohalophilus portucalensis strain FDF-1T, a halophilic methylotrophic methanogen isolated from the sediment of a saltern in Figeria da Foz, Portugal. The average nucleotide identity and DNA-DNA hybridization analyses show that Methanohalophilus mahii, M. halophilus, and M. portucalensis are three different species within the Methanosarcinaceae family.

  4. Carbon nanotubes accelerate methane production in pure cultures of methanogens and in a syntrophic coculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salvador, Andreia F.; Martins, Gilberto; Melle-Franco, Manuel; Serpa, Ricardo; Stams, Alfons J.M.; Cavaleiro, Ana J.; Pereira, M.A.; Alves, M.M.

    2017-01-01

    Carbon materials have been reported to facilitate direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) between bacteria and methanogens improving methane production in anaerobic processes. In this work, the effect of increasing concentrations of carbon nanotubes (CNT) on the activity of pure cultures of

  5. Anaerobic Biodegradation of Soybean Biodiesel and Diesel Blends under Methanogenic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biotransformation of soybean biodiesel and the inhibitory effect of petrodiesel were studied under methanogenic conditions. Biodiesel removal efficiency of more than 95% was achieved in a chemostat with influent biodiesel concentrations up to 2.45 g/L. The kinetics of anaerobic...

  6. Methanogenic Food Web in Gut Contents of the Methane-Emitting Earthworm Eudrilus eugeniae from Brazil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulz, Kristin; Hunger, S.; Brown, G.G.; Tsai, S.M.; Cerri, C.C.; Conrad, R.; Drake, H.

    2015-01-01

    The anoxic saccharide-rich conditions of the earthworm gut provide an ideal transient habitat for ingested microbes capable of anaerobiosis. It was recently discovered that the earthworm Eudrilus eugeniae from Brazil can emit methane (CH4) and that ingested methanogens might be associated with this

  7. Methanogenic degradation of (amino)aromatic compounds by anaerobic microbial communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linkova, Y.V.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Degradation of a range of aromatic substrates by anaerobic microbial communities was studied. Active methanogenic microbial communities decomposing aminoaromatic acids and azo dyes into CH4 and CO2 were isolated. Products of primary conversion were found to be 2-hydroxybenzyl and benzyl alcohols

  8. Rapid degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid facilitated by acetate under methanogenic condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhiman; Xu, Xiaohui; Dai, Meng; Wang, Lin; Shi, Xiaoshuang; Guo, Rongbo

    2017-05-01

    Acetate can be used as an electron donor to stimulate 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), which has not been determined under methanogenic condition. This study applied high-throughput sequencing and methanogenic inhibition approaches to investigate the 2,4-D degradation process using the enrichments obtained from paddy soil. Acetate addition significantly promoted 2,4-D degradation, which was 5-fold higher than in the acetate-unsupplemented enrichments in terms of the 2,4-D degradation rate constant. Dechloromonas and Pseudomonas were the dominant 2,4-D degraders. Methanogenic inhibition experiments indicated that the 2,4-D degradation was independent of methanogenesis. It was proposed that the accelerated 2,4-D degradation in the acetate-supplemented enrichment involved an unusual interaction, where members of the acetate oxidizers primarily oxidized acetate and produced H 2 . H 2 was utilized by the 2,4-D degraders to degrade 2,4-D, but also partially consumed by the hydrogenotrophic methanogens to produce methane. The findings presented here provide a new strategy for the remediation of 2,4-D-polluted soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Methanomethylovorans thermophila sp. nov., a thermophilic, methylotrophic methanogen form an anaerobic reactor fed with methanol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, B.; Parshina, S.N.; Doesburg, van W.C.J.; Lomans, B.P.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    A novel thermophilic, obligately methylotrophic, methanogenic archaeon, strain L2FAWT, was isolated from a thermophilic laboratory-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor fed with methanol as the carbon and energy source. Cells of strain L2FAWT were non-motile, irregular cocci, 0·7¿1·5 µm in

  10. Kinetic and thermodynamic control of butyrate conversion in non-defined methanogenic communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junicke, H; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Kleerebezem, R

    2016-01-01

    Many anaerobic conversions proceed close to thermodynamic equilibrium and the microbial groups involved need to share their low energy budget to survive at the thermodynamic boundary of life. This study aimed to investigate the kinetic and thermodynamic control mechanisms of the electron transfer during syntrophic butyrate conversion in non-defined methanogenic communities. Despite the rather low energy content of butyrate, results demonstrate unequal energy sharing between the butyrate-utilizing species (17 %), the hydrogenotrophic methanogens (9-10 %), and the acetoclastic methanogens (73-74 %). As a key finding, the energy disproportion resulted in different growth strategies of the syntrophic partners. Compared to the butyrate-utilizing partner, the hydrogenotrophic methanogens compensated their lower biomass yield per mole of electrons transferred with a 2-fold higher biomass-specific electron transfer rate. Apart from these thermodynamic control mechanisms, experiments revealed a ten times lower hydrogen inhibition constant on butyrate conversion than proposed by the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1, suggesting a much stronger inhibitory effect of hydrogen on anaerobic butyrate conversion. At hydrogen partial pressures exceeding 40 Pa and at bicarbonate limited conditions, a shift from methanogenesis to reduced product formation was observed which indicates an important role of the hydrogen partial pressure in redirecting electron fluxes towards reduced products such as butanol. The findings of this study demonstrate that a careful consideration of thermodynamics and kinetics is required to advance our current understanding of flux regulation in energy-limited syntrophic ecosystems.

  11. Effects of volatile fatty acid concentrations on methane yield and methanogenic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yanlin; Wang, Jianbo; Meng, Liang [Engineering Technology Academy, Huazhong Agriculture University, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2009-05-15

    Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) are important mid-products in the production of methane, and their concentrations affect the efficiency of fermentation. However, their effects on methane yield and methanogenic bacteria growth have been less extensively studied. To address these effects, acetic acid, propionic acid, butyric acid and ethanol were used as substrates and an L{sub 9}(3{sup 4}) orthogonal table was adopted to design anaerobic digestion tests. When the highest concentrations of ethanol, acetic acid and butyric acid were 2400, 2400 and 1800 mg L{sup -1}, respectively, there was no significant inhibition of the activity of methanogenic bacteria. However, when the propionic acid concentration was increased to 900 mg L{sup -1}, significant inhibition appeared, the bacteria concentration decreased from 6 x 10{sup 7} to 0.6-1 x 10{sup 7} ml{sup -1} and their activity would not reconvert. These effects resulted in the accumulation of ethanol and VFAs, and the total methane yield consequently became very low (<321 ml). The original propionic acid concentration had a significant inhibitory effect on methanogenic bacteria growth (P < 0.01). An optimization analysis showed that ethanol, acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acid at concentrations of 1600, 1600, 300 and 1800 mg L{sup -1}, respectively, led to the maximum accumulative methane yield of 1620 ml and the maximum methanogenic bacteria concentration of 7.3 x 10{sup 8} ml{sup -1}. (author)

  12. Selenate removal in methanogenic and sulfate-reducing upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenz, M.; Hullebusch, van E.D.; Hommes, G.; Corvini, P.F.X.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2008-01-01

    This paper evaluates the use of upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) bioreactors (30 degrees C, pH = 7.0) to remove selenium oxyanions from contaminated waters (790 mu g Se L-1) under methanogenic and sulfate-reducing conditions using lactate as electron donor. One UASB reactor received sulfate at

  13. Effects of different fertilizers on methane emissions and methanogenic community structures in paddy rhizosphere soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jing; Yuan, Yongkun; Zhu, Yihang; Cao, Linkui

    2018-06-15

    Paddy soil accounts for 10% of global atmospheric methane (CH 4 ) emissions. Many types of fertilizers may enhance CH 4 emissions, especially organic fertilizer. The aim of this study was to explore the effects of different fertilizers on CH 4 and methanogen patterns in paddy soil. This experiment involved four treatments: chemical fertilizer (CT), organic fertilizer (OT), mixed with chemical and organic fertilizer (MT), and no fertilizer (ctrl). The three fertilization treatments were applied with total nitrogen at the same rate of 300 kg N ha -1 . Paddy CH 4 , soil physicochemical variables and methanogen communities were quantitatively analyzed. Rhizosphere soil mcrA and pmoA gene copy numbers were determined by qPCR. Methanogenic 16S rRNA genes were identified by MiSeq sequencing. The results indicated CH 4 emissions were significantly higher in OT (145.31 kg ha -1 ) than MT (84.62 kg ha -1 ), CT (77.88 kg ha -1 ) or ctrl (32.19 kg ha -1 ). Soil organic acids were also increased by organic fertilization. CH 4 effluxes were significantly and negatively related to mcrA and pmoA gene copy numbers, and positively related to mcrA/pmoA. Above all, hydrogenotrophic Methanocella and acetoclastic Methanosaeta were the predominant methanogenic communities; these communities were strictly associated with soil potassium, oxalate, acetate, and succinate. Application of organic fertilizer promoted the dominant acetoclastic methanogens, but suppressed the dominant hydrogenotrophic methanogens. The transformation in methanogenic community structure and enhanced availability of C substrates may explain the increased CH 4 production in OT compared to other treatments. Compared to OT, MT may partially mitigate CH 4 emissions while guaranteeing a high rice yield. On this basis, we recommend the local fertilization pattern should change from 300 N kg ha -1 of organic manure to the same level of mixed fertilization. Moreover, we suggest multiple

  14. Hydrocarbon activation under sulfate-reducing and methanogenic conditions proceeds by different mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Ian; Gray, Neil; Aitken, Caroline; Sherry, Angela; Jones, Martin; Larter, Stephen

    2010-05-01

    Microbial degradation of alkanes typically involves their conversion to fatty acids which are then catabolised by beta-oxidation. The critical step in this process is activation of the hydrocarbon. Under oxic conditions this is catalyzed by monooxygenase enzymes with the formation of long chain alcohols. In the absence of oxygen alternative alkane activation mechanisms have been observed or proposed. Fumarate addition to alkanes to form alkyl succinates is considered a central process in anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation. Comparative studies of crude oil degradation under sulphate-reducing and methanogenic conditions revealed distinctive patterns of compound class removal and metabolite formation. Alkyl succinates derived from C7 to C26 n-alkanes and branched chain alkanes were found in abundance in sulfate-reducing systems but these were not detected during methanogenic crude oil degradation. Only one other mechanism of alkane activation has been elucidated to date. This involves addition of carbon derived from bicarbonate/CO2 to C-3 of an alkane chain to form a 2-ethylalkane with subsequent removal of the ethyl group leading to the formation of a fatty acid 1 carbon shorter than the original alkane. 2-ethylalkanes have never been detected as metabolites of anaerobic alkane degradation and were not detected in crude oil-degrading methanogenic systems. Due to the range of alkanes present in crude oil it was not possible to infer the generation of C-odd acids from C-even alkanes which is characteristic of the C-3 carboxylation mechanism. Furthermore genes homologous to alkysuccinate synthetases were not detected in the methanogenic hydrocarbon degrading community by pyrosequencing of total DNA extracted from methanogenic enrichments cultures. beta-oxidation genes were detected and intriguingly, alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase genes were present. This offers the possibility that alkane activation in the methanogenic system does not proceed via acid metabolites

  15. Midwest superconductivity consortium. 1993 Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    The Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, in the fourth year of operations further strengthened its mission to advance the science and understanding of high T{sub c} superconductivity. The goals of the organization and the individual projects continue to reflect the current needs for new knowledge in the field and the unique capabilities of the institutions involved. Group efforts and cooperative laboratory interactions to achieve the greatest possible synergy under the Consortium continue to be emphasized. Industrial affiliations coupled with technology transfer initiatives were expanded. Activities of the participants during the past year achieved an interactive and high level of performance. The number of notable achievements in the field contributed by Consortium investigators increased. The programmatic research continues to focus upon key materials-related problems in two areas. The first area has a focus upon {open_quotes}Synthesis and Processing{close_quotes} while the second is centered around {open_quotes}Limiting Features in Transport Properties of High T{sub c} Materials{close_quotes}.

  16. Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Linda M; Cowan, Morton J; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Kohn, Donald B; Puck, Jennifer M; Pai, Sung-Yun; Ballard, Barbara; Bauer, Sarah C; Bleesing, Jack J H; Boyle, Marcia; Brower, Amy; Buckley, Rebecca H; van der Burg, Mirjam; Burroughs, Lauri M; Candotti, Fabio; Cant, Andrew J; Chatila, Talal; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Dinauer, Mary C; Dvorak, Christopher C; Filipovich, Alexandra H; Fleisher, Thomas A; Bobby Gaspar, Hubert; Gungor, Tayfun; Haddad, Elie; Hovermale, Emily; Huang, Faith; Hurley, Alan; Hurley, Mary; Iyengar, Sumathi; Kang, Elizabeth M; Logan, Brent R; Long-Boyle, Janel R; Malech, Harry L; McGhee, Sean A; Modell, Fred; Modell, Vicki; Ochs, Hans D; O'Reilly, Richard J; Parkman, Robertson; Rawlings, David J; Routes, John M; Shearer, William T; Small, Trudy N; Smith, Heather; Sullivan, Kathleen E; Szabolcs, Paul; Thrasher, Adrian; Torgerson, Troy R; Veys, Paul; Weinberg, Kenneth; Zuniga-Pflucker, Juan Carlos

    2014-02-01

    The Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) is a network of 33 centers in North America that study the treatment of rare and severe primary immunodeficiency diseases. Current protocols address the natural history of patients treated for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, and chronic granulomatous disease through retrospective, prospective, and cross-sectional studies. The PIDTC additionally seeks to encourage training of junior investigators, establish partnerships with European and other International colleagues, work with patient advocacy groups to promote community awareness, and conduct pilot demonstration projects. Future goals include the conduct of prospective treatment studies to determine optimal therapies for primary immunodeficiency diseases. To date, the PIDTC has funded 2 pilot projects: newborn screening for SCID in Navajo Native Americans and B-cell reconstitution in patients with SCID after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Ten junior investigators have received grant awards. The PIDTC Annual Scientific Workshop has brought together consortium members, outside speakers, patient advocacy groups, and young investigators and trainees to report progress of the protocols and discuss common interests and goals, including new scientific developments and future directions of clinical research. Here we report the progress of the PIDTC to date, highlights of the first 2 PIDTC workshops, and consideration of future consortium objectives. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  17. Removal of Triphenylmethane Dyes by Bacterial Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheriaa, Jihane; Khaireddine, Monia; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Bakhrouf, Amina

    2012-01-01

    A new consortium of four bacterial isolates (Agrobacterium radiobacter; Bacillus spp.; Sphingomonas paucimobilis, and Aeromonas hydrophila)-(CM-4) was used to degrade and to decolorize triphenylmethane dyes. All bacteria were isolated from activated sludge extracted from a wastewater treatment station of a dyeing industry plant. Individual bacterial isolates exhibited a remarkable color-removal capability against crystal violet (50 mg/L) and malachite green (50 mg/L) dyes within 24 h. Interestingly, the microbial consortium CM-4 shows a high decolorizing percentage for crystal violet and malachite green, respectively, 91% and 99% within 2 h. The rate of chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal increases after 24 h, reaching 61.5% and 84.2% for crystal violet and malachite green, respectively. UV-Visible absorption spectra, FTIR analysis and the inspection of bacterial cells growth indicated that color removal by the CM-4 was due to biodegradation. Evaluation of mutagenicity by using Salmonella typhimurium test strains, TA98 and TA100 studies revealed that the degradation of crystal violet and malachite green by CM-4 did not lead to mutagenic products. Altogether, these results demonstrated the usefulness of the bacterial consortium in the treatment of the textile dyes. PMID:22623907

  18. Removal of Triphenylmethane Dyes by Bacterial Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihane Cheriaa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A new consortium of four bacterial isolates (Agrobacterium radiobacter; Bacillus spp.; Sphingomonas paucimobilis, and Aeromonas hydrophila-(CM-4 was used to degrade and to decolorize triphenylmethane dyes. All bacteria were isolated from activated sludge extracted from a wastewater treatment station of a dyeing industry plant. Individual bacterial isolates exhibited a remarkable color-removal capability against crystal violet (50 mg/L and malachite green (50 mg/L dyes within 24 h. Interestingly, the microbial consortium CM-4 shows a high decolorizing percentage for crystal violet and malachite green, respectively, 91% and 99% within 2 h. The rate of chemical oxygen demand (COD removal increases after 24 h, reaching 61.5% and 84.2% for crystal violet and malachite green, respectively. UV-Visible absorption spectra, FTIR analysis and the inspection of bacterial cells growth indicated that color removal by the CM-4 was due to biodegradation. Evaluation of mutagenicity by using Salmonella typhimurium test strains, TA98 and TA100 studies revealed that the degradation of crystal violet and malachite green by CM-4 did not lead to mutagenic products. Altogether, these results demonstrated the usefulness of the bacterial consortium in the treatment of the textile dyes.

  19. Roles of thermophilic thiosulfate-reducing bacteria and methanogenic archaea in the biocorrosion of oil pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Renxing; Grizzle, Robert S; Duncan, Kathleen E; McInerney, Michael J; Suflita, Joseph M

    2014-01-01

    Thermophilic sulfide-producing microorganisms from an oil pipeline network were enumerated with different sulfur oxyanions as electron acceptors at 55°C. Most-probable number (MPN) analysis showed that thiosulfate-reducing bacteria were the most numerous sulfidogenic microorganisms in pipeline inspection gauge (PIG) scrapings. Thiosulfate-reducing and methanogenic enrichments were obtained from the MPN cultures that were able to use yeast extract as the electron donor. Molecular analysis revealed that both enrichments harbored the same dominant bacterium, which belonged to the genus Anaerobaculum. The dominant archaeon in the methanogenic enrichment was affiliated with the genus Methanothermobacter. With yeast extract as the electron donor, the general corrosion rate by the thiosulfate-reducing enrichment (8.43 ± 1.40 milli-inch per year, abbreviated as mpy) was about 5.5 times greater than the abiotic control (1.49 ± 0.15 mpy), while the comparable measures for the methanogenic culture were 2.03 ± 0.49 mpy and 0.62 ± 0.07 mpy, respectively. Total iron analysis in the cultures largely accounted for the mass loss of iron measured in the weight loss determinations. Profilometry analysis of polished steel coupons incubated in the presence of the thiosulfate-reducing enrichment revealed 59 pits over an area of 71.16 mm(2), while only 6 pits were evident in the corresponding methanogenic incubations. The results show the importance of thiosulfate-utilizing, sulfide-producing fermentative bacteria such as Anaerobaculum sp. in the corrosion of carbon steel, but also suggest that Anaerobaculum sp. are of far less concern when growing syntrophically with methanogens.

  20. Roles of thermophilic thiosulfate-reducing bacteria and methanogenic archaea in the biocorrosion of oil pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renxing eLiang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermophilic sulfide-producing microorganisms from an oil pipeline network were enumerated with different sulfur oxyanions as electron acceptors at 55 oC. Most-probable number (MPN analysis showed that thiosulfate-reducing bacteria were the most numerous sulfidogenic microorganisms in pipeline inspection gauge (PIG scrapings. Thiosulfate-reducing and methanogenic enrichments were obtained from the MPN cultures that were able to use yeast extract as the electron donor. Molecular analysis revealed that both enrichments harbored the same dominant bacterium, which belonged to the genus Anaerobaculum. The dominant archaeon in the methanogenic enrichment was affiliated with the genus Methanothermobacter. With yeast extract as the electron donor, the general corrosion rate by the thiosulfate-reducing enrichment (8.43 ± 1.40 milli-inch per year, abbreviated as mpy was about 5.5 times greater than the abiotic control (1.49 ± 0.15 mpy, while the comparable measures for the methanogenic culture were 2.03 ± 0.49 mpy and 0.62 ± 0.07 mpy, respectively. Total iron analysis in the cultures largely accounted for the mass loss of iron measured in the weight loss determinations. Profilometry analysis of polished steel coupons incubated in the presence of the thiosulfate-reducing enrichment revealed 59 pits over an area of 71.16 mm2, while only 6 pits were evident in the corresponding methanogenic incubations. The results show the importance of thiosulfate-utilizing, sulfide-producing fermentative bacteria such as Anaerobaculum sp. in the corrosion of carbon steel, but also suggest that Anaerobaculum sp. are of far less concern when growing syntrophically with methanogens.

  1. Trace elements affect methanogenic activity and diversity in enrichments from subsurface coal bed produced water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Burcu; Perry, Verlin Ryan; Sheth, Mili; Gomez-Alvarez, Vicente; Chin, Kuk-Jeong; Nüsslein, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Microbial methane from coal beds accounts for a significant and growing percentage of natural gas worldwide. Our knowledge of physical and geochemical factors regulating methanogenesis is still in its infancy. We hypothesized that in these closed systems, trace elements (as micronutrients) are a limiting factor for methanogenic growth and activity. Trace elements are essential components of enzymes or cofactors of metabolic pathways associated with methanogenesis. This study examined the effects of eight trace elements (iron, nickel, cobalt, molybdenum, zinc, manganese, boron, and copper) on methane production, on mcrA transcript levels, and on methanogenic community structure in enrichment cultures obtained from coal bed methane (CBM) well produced water samples from the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. Methane production was shown to be limited both by a lack of additional trace elements as well as by the addition of an overly concentrated trace element mixture. Addition of trace elements at concentrations optimized for standard media enhanced methane production by 37%. After 7 days of incubation, the levels of mcrA transcripts in enrichment cultures with trace element amendment were much higher than in cultures without amendment. Transcript levels of mcrA correlated positively with elevated rates of methane production in supplemented enrichments (R(2) = 0.95). Metabolically active methanogens, identified by clone sequences of mcrA mRNA retrieved from enrichment cultures, were closely related to Methanobacterium subterraneum and Methanobacterium formicicum. Enrichment cultures were dominated by M. subterraneum and had slightly higher predicted methanogenic richness, but less diversity than enrichment cultures without amendments. These results suggest that varying concentrations of trace elements in produced water from different subsurface coal wells may cause changing levels of CBM production and alter the composition of the active methanogenic community.

  2. Trace elements affect methanogenic activity and diversity in enrichments from subsurface coal bed produced water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu eÜnal

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Microbial methane from coal beds accounts for a significant and growing percentage of natural gas worldwide. Our knowledge of physical and geochemical factors regulating methanogenesis is still in its infancy. We hypothesized that in these closed systems, trace elements (as micronutrients are a limiting factor for methanogenic growth and activity. Trace elements are essential components of enzymes or cofactors of metabolic pathways associated with methanogenesis. This study examined the effects of eight trace elements (iron, nickel, cobalt, molybdenum, zinc, manganese, boron, and copper on methane production, on mcrA transcript levels, and on methanogenic community structure in enrichment cultures obtained from coal bed methane well produced water samples from the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. Methane production was shown to be limited both by a lack of additional trace elements as well as by the addition of an overly concentrated trace element mixture. Addition of trace elements at concentrations optimized for standard media enhanced methane production by 37%. After seven days of incubation, the levels of mcrA transcripts in enrichment cultures with trace element amendment were much higher than in cultures without amendment. Transcript levels of mcrA correlated positively with elevated rates of methane production in supplemented enrichments (R2=0.95. Metabolically-active methanogens, identified by clone sequences of mcrA mRNA retrieved from enrichment cultures, were closely related to Methanobacterium subterraneum and Methanobacterium formicicum. Enrichment cultures were dominated by M. subterraneum and had slightly higher predicted methanogenic richness, but less diversity than enrichment cultures without amendments. These results suggest that varying concentrations of trace elements in produced water from different subsurface coal wells may cause changing levels of coal bed methane production and alter the composition of the active

  3. The correlation of Mycolic acid production by a toluene degrading Mycobacterium in the presence of cholesterol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giti Emtiazi *

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cell wall mycolic acids (MA from Mycobacterium tuberculosis are presented as antigens that can be used to detect antibodies as surrogate markers of active Tuberculosis (TB disease, even in HIV coinfected patients. The use of the complex mixtures of natural MA is complicated by apparent antibody cross-reactivity with cholesterol. Mycolic acid is not only related to diagnosis of TB disease but also similar structure of mycolic acid in saprophyte strains are excellent candidate for drug delivery especially for nasal spray. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of cholesterol on mycolic acid synthesis and potential of saprophyte mycolic acid to drug delivery. Materials and methods: Toluene enrichment medium was used for isolation of mycolic acid producing bacteria. A fast growing, acid fast bacterium was identified by PCR reaction and the related sequence of 16S rRNA gene was deposited in the NCBI Genbank with accession number jn64433. Production of mycolic acid was investigated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC in different media. Results: Here the effect of cholesterol on biosynthesis of mycolic acids by saprophyte Mycobacterium isolated from marine water is was reported. HPLC analyses showed the mycolic acid extracted from saprophyte. Mycobacterium had one, early, cluster of peaks, like Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mobacterium bovis.This strain is a fast growing bacterium and cholesterol might promote longer fatty acid production. Discussion and conclusion: The similarity between mycolic acid from isolated and patogenic mycobacteria offers that mycolic acid obtained from saprophyte Mycobacterium can be useful as a drug carrier. Addition of egg yolk to media induced longer fatty acid production by isolating that is suitable for delivery of drugs into the macrophage.

  4. Isolation and characterization of a novel toluene-degrading, sulfate-reducing bacterium.

    OpenAIRE

    Beller, H R; Spormann, A M; Sharma, P K; Cole, J R; Reinhard, M

    1996-01-01

    A novel sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from fuel-contaminated subsurface soil, strain PRTOL1, mineralizes toluene as the sole electron donor and carbon source under strictly anaerobic conditions. The mineralization of 80% of toluene carbon to CO2 was demonstrated in experiments with [ring-U-14C]toluene; 15% of toluene carbon was converted to biomass and nonvolatile metabolic by-products, primarily the former. The observed stoichiometric ratio of moles of sulfate consumed per mole of tolu...

  5. Detection of Toluene Degradation in Bacteria Isolated from Oil Contaminated Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainon Hamzah; Tavakoli, A.; Amir Rabu

    2011-01-01

    Toluene (C 7 H 8 ) a hydrocarbon in crude oil, is a common contaminant in soil and groundwater. In this study, the ability to degrade toluene was investigated from twelve bacteria isolates which were isolated from soil contaminated with oil. Out of 12 bacterial isolates tested, most of Pseudomonas sp. showed the capability to grow in 1 mM of toluene compared with other isolates on the third day of incubation. Based on enzyme assays towards toluene monooxygenase, Pseudomonas aeruginosa UKMP-14T and Bacillus cereus UKMP-6G were shown to have the highest ability to degrade toluene. The toluene monooxygenase activity was analysed by using two calorimetric methods, Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and indole-indigo. Both of the methods measured the production of catechol by the enzymatic reaction of toluene monooxygenase. In the HRP assay, the highest enzyme activity was 0.274 U/ mL, exhibited by Pseudomonas aeruginosa UKMP-14T. However, for indole-indigo assay, Bacillus cereus UKMP-6G produced the highest enzyme activity of 0.291 U/ ml. Results from both experiments showed that Pseudomonas aeruginosa UKMP-14T and Bacillus cereus UKMP-6G were able to degrade toluene. (author)

  6. Simultaneous growth on citrate reduces the effects of iron limitation during toluene degradation in Pseudomonas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dinkla, IJT; Janssen, DB

    Rhizoremediation has been suggested as an attractive bioremediation strategy for the effective breakdown of pollutants in soil. The presence of plant root exudates such as organic acids, sugars, and amino acids that may serve as carbon sources or biosynthetic building blocks and the limited

  7. Low strength ultrasonication positively affects the methanogenic granules toward higher AD performance. Part I: Physico-chemical characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cho, S. K.; Hwang, Yuhoon; Kim, D. H.

    2013-01-01

    To elucidate the correlation between enhanced biogas production and changed physico-chemical properties of methanogenic granules after low strength ultrasonication, in this study, the effects of low strength ultrasonication on the settling velocity, permeability, porosity, and fluid collection...... efficiency of the methanogenic granules were investigated. In addition, their morphological changes were visualized using a scanning electron microscopic technique. The experimental results indicate that low strength ultrasonication increased both the permeability (37%) and specific surface area (230...... to the ultrasonicated granules. The microbial community shift caused by the changed physico-chemical properties of the methanogenic granules will be further analyzed in part II of this study....

  8. Computational Modeling of Fluctuations in Energy and Metabolic Pathways of Methanogenic Archaea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luthey-Schulten, Zaida [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Carl R. Woese Inst. for Genomic Biology

    2017-01-04

    The methanogenic archaea, anaerobic microbes that convert CO2 and H2 and/or other small organic fermentation products into methane, play an unusually large role in the global carbon cycle. As they perform the final step in the anaerobic breakdown of biomass, methanogens are a biogenic source of an estimated one billion tons methane each year. Depending on the location, produced methane can be considered as either a greenhouse gas (agricultural byproduct), sequestered carbon storage (methane hydrate deposits), or a potential energy source (organic wastewater treatment). These microbes therefore represent an important target for biotechnology applications. Computational models of methanogens with predictive power are useful aids in the adaptation of methanogenic systems, but need to connect processes of wide-ranging time and length scales. In this project, we developed several computational methodologies for modeling the dynamic behavior of entire cells that connects stochastic reaction-diffusion dynamics of individual biochemical pathways with genome-scale modeling of metabolic networks. While each of these techniques were in the realm of well-defined computational methods, here we integrated them to develop several entirely new approaches to systems biology. The first scientific aim of the project was to model how noise in a biochemical pathway propagates into cellular phenotypes. Genetic circuits have been optimized by evolution to regulate molecular processes despite stochastic noise, but the effect of such noise on a cellular biochemical networks is currently unknown. An integrated stochastic/systems model of Escherichia coli species was created to analyze how noise in protein expression gives—and therefore noise in metabolic fluxes—gives rise to multiple cellular phenotype in isogenic population. After the initial work developing and validating methods that allow characterization of the heterogeneity in the model organism E. coli, the project shifted toward

  9. Latest Developments of the Isprs Student Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detchev, I.; Kanjir, U.; Reyes, S. R.; Miyazaki, H.; Aktas, A. F.

    2016-06-01

    The International Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ISPRS) Student Consortium (SC) is a network for young professionals studying or working within the fields of photogrammetry, remote sensing, Geographical Information Systems (GIS), and other related geo-spatial sciences. The main goal of the network is to provide means for information exchange for its young members and thus help promote and integrate youth into the ISPRS. Over the past four years the Student Consortium has successfully continued to fulfil its mission in both formal and informal ways. The formal means of communication of the SC are its website, newsletter, e-mail announcements and summer schools, while its informal ones are multiple social media outlets and various social activities during student related events. The newsletter is published every three to four months and provides both technical and experiential content relevant for the young people in the ISPRS. The SC has been in charge or at least has helped with organizing one or more summer schools every year. The organization's e-mail list has over 1,100 subscribers, its website hosts over 1,300 members from 100 countries across the entire globe, and its public Facebook group currently has over 4,500 joined visitors, who connect among one another and share information relevant for their professional careers. These numbers show that the Student Consortium has grown into a significant online-united community. The paper will present the organization's on-going and past activities for the last four years, its current priorities and a strategic plan and aspirations for the future four-year period.

  10. University Research Consortium annual review meeting program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-07-01

    This brochure presents the program for the first annual review meeting of the University Research Consortium (URC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). INEL is a multiprogram laboratory with a distinctive role in applied engineering. It also conducts basic science research and development, and complex facility operations. The URC program consists of a portfolio of research projects funded by INEL and conducted at universities in the United States. In this program, summaries and participant lists for each project are presented as received from the principal investigators

  11. University Research Consortium annual review meeting program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    This brochure presents the program for the first annual review meeting of the University Research Consortium (URC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). INEL is a multiprogram laboratory with a distinctive role in applied engineering. It also conducts basic science research and development, and complex facility operations. The URC program consists of a portfolio of research projects funded by INEL and conducted at universities in the United States. In this program, summaries and participant lists for each project are presented as received from the principal investigators.

  12. History of the Tinnitus Research Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, James B

    2016-04-01

    This article describes the creation and accomplishments of the Tinnitus Research Consortium (TRC), founded and supported through philanthropy and intended to enrich the field of tinnitus research. Bringing together a group of distinguished auditory researchers, most of whom were not involved in tinnitus research, over the fifteen years of its life it developed novel research approaches and recruited a number of new investigators into the field. The purpose of this special issue is to highlight some of the significant accomplishments of the investigators supported by the TRC. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Tinnitus". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium: 1994 Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-01-01

    The mission of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, is to advance the science and understanding of high {Tc} superconductivity. During the past year, 27 projects produced over 123 talks and 139 publications. Group activities and interactions involved 2 MISCON group meetings (held in August and January); with the second MISCON Workshop held in August; 13 external speakers; 79 collaborations (with universities, industry, Federal laboratories, and foreign research centers); and 48 exchanges of samples and/or measurements. Research achievements this past year focused on understanding the effects of processing phenomena on structure-property interrelationships and the fundamental nature of transport properties in high-temperature superconductors.

  14. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium: 1994 Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The mission of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, is to advance the science and understanding of high T c superconductivity. During the past year, 27 projects produced over 123 talks and 139 publications. Group activities and interactions involved 2 MISCON group meetings (held in August and January); with the second MISCON Workshop held in August; 13 external speakers; 79 collaborations (with universities, industry, Federal laboratories, and foreign research centers); and 48 exchanges of samples and/or measurements. Research achievements this past year focused on understanding the effects of processing phenomena on structure-property interrelationships and the fundamental nature of transport properties in high-temperature superconductors

  15. Stable acetate production in extreme-thermophilic (70ºC) mixed culture fermentation by selective enrichment of hydrogenotrophic methanogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, F.; Zhang, Y.; Ding, J.; Dai, K.; Van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.; Zeng, R.J.

    2014-01-01

    The control of metabolite production is difficult in mixed culture fermentation. This is particularly related to hydrogen inhibition. In this work, hydrogenotrophic methanogens were selectively enriched to reduce the hydrogen partial pressure and to realize efficient acetate production in

  16. An improved enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for whole-cell determination of methanogens in samples from anaerobic reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A.H.; Ahring, B.K.

    1997-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was developed for the detection of whole cells of methanogens in samples from anaerobic continuously stirred tank digesters treating slurries of solid waste. The assay was found to allow for quantitative analysis of the most important groups of methanogens...... in samples from anaerobic digesters in a reproducible manner. Polyclonal antisera against eight strains of methanogens were employed in the test, The specificities of the antisera were increased by adsorption with cross-reacting cells. The reproducibility of the assay depended on the use of high......-quality microtiter plates and the addition of dilute hydrochloric acid to the samples. In an experiment on different digester samples, the test demonstrated a unique pattern of different methanogenic strains present in each sample. The limited preparatory work required for the assay and the simple assay design make...

  17. Phenotypic properties and microbial diversity of methanogenic granules from a full-scale UASB reactor treating brewery wastewater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diaz, E.E.; Stams, A.J.M.; Amils, R.; Sanz, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    Methanogenic granules from an anaerobic bioreactor that treated wastewater of a beer brewery consisted of different morphological types of granules. In this study, the microbial compositions of the different granules were analyzed by molecular microbiological techniques: cloning, denaturing gradient

  18. Ammonia tolerant syntrophic acetate-oxidizing bacteria involved in the methanogenic degradation of protein-rich material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsson, M.; Roos, S.; Schnurer, A.

    2009-07-01

    Inhibition of aceticlastic methanogens by ammonia during anaerobic degradation of protein-rich materials, e.g. fish industry waste water, slaughter house waste or distillers waste causes development of an alternative mechanism of methane formation from acetate. (Author)

  19. Quantitation and identification of methanogens and sulphate reducers in Olkiluoto groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bomberg, M.; Nyyssoenen, M.; Itaevaara, M.

    2010-08-01

    The GEOFUNC Project focuses on the microbiology connected to safety and risk assessment of the final disposal of high radioactive nuclear waste. Methanogenic archaea and sulphate reducing bacteria are significant groups of microorganisms in anaerobic environments, and are of crucial concern for the safe long term storage of nuclear waste in deep bedrock. The sulphate reducing bacteria are able to produce sulphide which may cause corrosion of the copper in the radioactive waste storage capsules. Methanogens, on the other hand, may produce quantities of methane from various organic carbon compounds, CO 2 and H 2 . Methane may both serve as carbon source for methanotrophic microbial groups, and may also cause mobilization of radionuclides, as a result of gas discharge through fractures in the bedrock. The transition zones between the sulphate rich and methane rich waters are locations for microbial processes where the methane may serve as carbon source for sulphate reducing bacteria, which in turn would produce corrosive sulphides. It has been estimated that only 1-10 % of all the microorganisms present in the environment can be isolated and cultivated. Uncultured microorganisms can be identified and their numbers in the environment quantified by identification of specific marker genes that are essential for their functions by use of molecular methods. Methanogens, for example, can be identified by their genes for methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA), which is an essential enzyme involved in the production of methane. The mcrA is specifically present only in methanogenic archaea. Sulphate reducers are identified by their dissimilatory sulphite reductase genes (dsrB), which are present in and essential for all microorganisms performing dissimilatory sulphate reducing. In the GEOFUNC project, a quantitative PCR method (qPCR) was developed for the detection of methanogens and sulphate reducers. This method is based on specific quantitative detection of marker genes

  20. The genome sequence of the rumen methanogen Methanobrevibacter ruminantium reveals new possibilities for controlling ruminant methane emissions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinead C Leahy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Methane (CH(4 is a potent greenhouse gas (GHG, having a global warming potential 21 times that of carbon dioxide (CO(2. Methane emissions from agriculture represent around 40% of the emissions produced by human-related activities, the single largest source being enteric fermentation, mainly in ruminant livestock. Technologies to reduce these emissions are lacking. Ruminant methane is formed by the action of methanogenic archaea typified by Methanobrevibacter ruminantium, which is present in ruminants fed a wide variety of diets worldwide. To gain more insight into the lifestyle of a rumen methanogen, and to identify genes and proteins that can be targeted to reduce methane production, we have sequenced the 2.93 Mb genome of M. ruminantium M1, the first rumen methanogen genome to be completed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The M1 genome was sequenced, annotated and subjected to comparative genomic and metabolic pathway analyses. Conserved and methanogen-specific gene sets suitable as targets for vaccine development or chemogenomic-based inhibition of rumen methanogens were identified. The feasibility of using a synthetic peptide-directed vaccinology approach to target epitopes of methanogen surface proteins was demonstrated. A prophage genome was described and its lytic enzyme, endoisopeptidase PeiR, was shown to lyse M1 cells in pure culture. A predicted stimulation of M1 growth by alcohols was demonstrated and microarray analyses indicated up-regulation of methanogenesis genes during co-culture with a hydrogen (H(2 producing rumen bacterium. We also report the discovery of non-ribosomal peptide synthetases in M. ruminantium M1, the first reported in archaeal species. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The M1 genome sequence provides new insights into the lifestyle and cellular processes of this important rumen methanogen. It also defines vaccine and chemogenomic targets for broad inhibition of rumen methanogens and represents a significant

  1. 2,6,10,15,19-Pentamethylicosenes in Methanolobus bombayensis, a marine methanogenic archaeon, and in Methanosarcina mazei

    OpenAIRE

    VanderMaarel, MJEC; Huber, R; Damste, JSS; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    1997-01-01

    2,6,10,15,19-Pentamethylicosenes (PMEs) containing three to five double bonds have been found in the methanogenic archaea Methanosarcina mazei (DSM 3338), a strain isolated from sewage sludge, and in Methanolobus bombayensis (OCM 438), a non-extremophilic archaeon isolated from a marine sediment. This finding gives additional support for the use of compounds with the PME carbon skeleton as markers for methanogenic activity in marine environments. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  2. A Flexible System for Cultivation of Methanococcus and Other Formate-Utilizing Methanogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Long

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Many hydrogenotrophic methanogens use either H2 or formate as the major electron donor to reduce CO2 for methane production. The conventional cultivation of these organisms uses H2 and CO2 as the substrate with frequent replenishment of gas during growth. H2 is explosive and requires an expensive gassing system to handle safely. Formate is as an ideal alternative substrate from the standpoints of both economy and safety but leads to large changes in the culture pH during growth. Here, we report that glycylglycine is an inexpensive and nontoxic buffer suitable for growth of Methanococcus maripaludis and Methanothermococcus okinawensis. This cultivation system is suitable for growth on liquid as well as solid medium in serum bottles. Moreover, it allows cultivation of liter scale cultures without expensive fermentation equipment. This formate cultivation system provides an inexpensive and flexible alternative for the growth of formate-utilizing, hydrogenotrophic methanogens.

  3. Methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria in oil sands fine tailings waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holowenko, F. M.; Fedorak, P. M. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Biological Sciences; MacKinnon, M. D. [Syncrude Canada Ltd, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2000-10-01

    In addition to adding to greenhouse gas emissions, the production of methane in the fine tailings zone of Syncrude Canada's lease near Fort McMurray, Alberta, threatens to affect the performance of the settling basin and impact on reclamation plans. Methanogenic as well as sulfur reducing bacteria have been found within the fine tailings zone of various oil sands waste settling basins. This paper presents a description of the methanogenic population in the fine tailings and evaluates the effects of sulfate additions and prolonged sample storage on methanogenesis with serum bottle microcosms. Methane yield values were determined from total methane produced in batch microcosms monitored for over a year. Results showed that at present two to five per cent of the fine tailings volume is present as methane. Methanogenesis was found to be inhibited by sulfate addition which stimulated bacterial competition for available substrate. 47 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs.

  4. The influence of substrate transport limitation on porosity and methanogenic activity of anaerobic sludge granules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alphenaar, P.A. (Agricultural Univ., Wageningen (Netherlands). Dept. of Environmental Technology); Perez, M.C. (Agricultural Univ., Wageningen (Netherlands). Dept. of Environmental Technology); Lettinga, G. (Agricultural Univ., Wageningen (Netherlands). Dept. of Environmental Technology)

    1993-05-01

    The relationship between porosity, diameter and methanogenic activity of anaerobic granules has been investigated. Experiments with different granular sludges revealed that substrate transport limitations increase with the diameter of the granules. As a consequence, autolysis can occur in the core of the granule, producing hollow granules. The porosity measurements revealed that the hollow centre is not available for substrate transport. Possibly as an effect of bacterial lysis, the porosity decreases in the more interior layers of the granules. This results in a inactive inner part of the large granules, which is not involved in the treatment process; the specific methanogenic activity decreases with granule size. No marked difference in substrate affinity is observed between granules of different sizes, which probably indicates that for large granules only the exterior is biological active. (orig.)

  5. Monitoring methanogenic population dynamics in a full-scale anaerobic digester to facilitate operational management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Julie; Williams, Haydn; Dinsdale, Richard; Guwy, Alan; Esteves, Sandra

    2013-07-01

    Microbial populations in a full-scale anaerobic digester fed on food waste were monitored over an 18-month period using qPCR. The digester exhibited a highly dynamic environment in which methanogenic populations changed constantly in response to availability of substrates and inhibitors. The methanogenic population in the digester was dominated by Methanosaetaceae, suggesting that aceticlastic methanogenesis was the main route for the production of methane. Sudden losses (69%) in Methanosaetaceae were followed by a build-up of VFAs which were subsequently consumed when populations recovered. A build up of ammonium inhibited Methanosaetaceae and resulted in shifts from acetate to hydrogen utilization. Addition of trace elements and alkalinity when propionate levels were high stimulated microbial growth. Routine monitoring of microbial populations and VFAs provided valuable insights into the complex processes occurring within the digester and could be used to predict digester stability and facilitate digester optimization. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A Flexible System for Cultivation of Methanococcus and Other Formate-Utilizing Methanogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liangliang; Lupa, Boguslaw

    2017-01-01

    Many hydrogenotrophic methanogens use either H2 or formate as the major electron donor to reduce CO2 for methane production. The conventional cultivation of these organisms uses H2 and CO2 as the substrate with frequent replenishment of gas during growth. H2 is explosive and requires an expensive gassing system to handle safely. Formate is as an ideal alternative substrate from the standpoints of both economy and safety but leads to large changes in the culture pH during growth. Here, we report that glycylglycine is an inexpensive and nontoxic buffer suitable for growth of Methanococcus maripaludis and Methanothermococcus okinawensis. This cultivation system is suitable for growth on liquid as well as solid medium in serum bottles. Moreover, it allows cultivation of liter scale cultures without expensive fermentation equipment. This formate cultivation system provides an inexpensive and flexible alternative for the growth of formate-utilizing, hydrogenotrophic methanogens. PMID:29348732

  7. Divergent responses of methanogenic archaeal communities in two rice cultivars to elevated ground-level O3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianwei; Tang, Haoye; Zhu, Jianguo; Lin, Xiangui; Feng, Youzhi

    2016-06-01

    Inhibitive effect of elevated ground-level ozone (O3) on paddy methane (CH4) emission varies with rice cultivars. However, little information is available on its microbial mechanism. For this purpose, the responses of methane-metabolizing microorganisms, methanogenic archaea and methanotrophic bacteria to O3 pollution were investigated in the O3-tolerant (YD6) and the O3-sensitive (IIY084) cultivars at two rice growth stages in Free Air Concentration Elevation of O3 (O3-FACE) system of China. It was found that O3 pollution didn't change the abundances of Type I and Type II methanotrophic bacteria at two rice stages. For methanogenic archaea, their abundances in both cultivars were decreased by O3 pollution at the tillering stage. Furthermore, a greater negative influence on methanogenic archaeal community was observed on IIY084 than on YD6: at tillering stage, the alpha diversity indices of methanogenic archaeal community in IIY084 was decreased to a greater extent than in YD6; IIY084 shifted methanogenic archaeal community composition and decreased the abundances and the diversities of Methanosarcinaceae and Methanosaetaceae as well as the abundance of Methanomicrobiales, while the diversity of Methanocellaceae were increased in YD6. These findings indicate that the variations in the responses of paddy CH4 emission to O3 pollution between cultivars could result from the divergent responses of their methanogenic archaea. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Thermophilic methanogenic Archaea in compost material: occurrence, persistence and possible mechanisms for their distribution to other environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thummes, Kathrin; Schäfer, Jenny; Kämpfer, Peter; Jäckel, Udo

    2007-12-01

    Since compost is widely used as soil amendment and the fact that during the processing of compost material high amounts of microorganisms are released into the air, we investigated whether compost may act as a carrier for thermophilic methanogens to temperate soils. All eight investigated compost materials showed a clear methane production potential between 0.01 and 0.98 micromol CH(4) g dw(-1)h(-1) at 50 degrees C. Single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and cloning analysis indicated the presence of Methanosarcina thermophila, Methanoculleus thermophilus, and Methanobacterium formicicum. Bioaerosols collected during the turning of a compost pile showed both a highly similar SSCP profile compared to the corresponding compost material and clear methane production during anoxic incubation in selective medium at 50 degrees C. Both observations indicated a considerable release of thermophilic methanogens into the air. To analyse the persistence of compost-borne thermophilic methanogens in temperate oxic soils, we therefore studied their potential activity in compost and compost/soil mixtures, which was brought to a meadow soil, as well as in an agricultural soil fertilised with compost. After 24h anoxic incubation at 50 degrees C, all samples containing compost showed a clear methanogenic activity, even 1 year after application. In combination with the in vitro observed resilience of the compost-borne methanogens against desiccation and UV radiation we assume that compost material acts as an effective carrier for the distribution of thermophilic methanogens by fertilisation and wind.

  9. Methanogenic diversity and activity in hypersaline sediments of the centre of the Napoli mud volcano, Eastern Mediterranean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Cassandre Sara; Parkes, R John; Cragg, Barry A; L'Haridon, Stéphane; Toffin, Laurent

    2011-08-01

    Submarine mud volcanoes are a significant source of methane to the atmosphere. The Napoli mud volcano, situated in the brine-impacted Olimpi Area of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, emits mainly biogenic methane particularly at the centre of the mud volcano. Temperature gradients support the suggestion that Napoli is a cold mud volcano with moderate fluid flow rates. Biogeochemical and molecular genetic analyses were carried out to assess the methanogenic activity rates, pathways and diversity in the hypersaline sediments of the centre of the Napoli mud volcano. Methylotrophic methanogenesis was the only significant methanogenic pathway in the shallow sediments (0-40 cm) but was also measured throughout the sediment core, confirming that methylotrophic methanogens could be well adapted to hypersaline environments. Hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis was the dominant pathway below 50 cm; however, low rates of acetoclastic methanogenesis were also present, even in sediment layers with the highest salinity, showing that these methanogens can thrive in this extreme environment. PCR-DGGE and methyl coenzyme M reductase gene libraries detected sequences affiliated with anaerobic methanotrophs (mainly ANME-1) as well as Methanococcoides methanogens. Results show that the hypersaline conditions in the centre of the Napoli mud volcano influence active biogenic methane fluxes and methanogenic/methylotrophic diversity. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Fermentative hydrogen production by microbial consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maintinguer, Sandra I.; Fernandes, Bruna S.; Duarte, Iolanda C.S.; Saavedra, Nora Katia; Adorno, M. Angela T.; Varesche, M. Bernadete [Department of Hydraulics and Sanitation, School of Engineering of Sao Carlos, University of Sao Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Sao-carlense, 400, 13566-590 Sao Carlos-SP (Brazil)

    2008-08-15

    Heat pre-treatment of the inoculum associated to the pH control was applied to select hydrogen-producing bacteria and endospores-forming bacteria. The source of inoculum to the heat pre-treatment was from a UASB reactor used in the slaughterhouse waste treatment. The molecular biology analyses indicated that the microbial consortium presented microorganisms affiliated with Enterobacter cloacae (97% and 98%), Clostridium sp. (98%) and Clostridium acetobutyricum (96%), recognized as H{sub 2} and volatile acids' producers. The following assays were carried out in batch reactors in order to verify the efficiencies of sucrose conversion to H{sub 2} by the microbial consortium: (1) 630.0 mg sucrose/L, (2) 1184.0 mg sucrose/L, (3) 1816.0 mg sucrose/L and (4) 4128.0 mg sucrose/L. The subsequent yields were obtained as follows: 15% (1.2 mol H{sub 2}/mol sucrose), 20% (1.6 mol H{sub 2}/mol sucrose), 15% (1.2 mol H{sub 2}/mol sucrose) and 4% (0.3 mol H{sub 2}/mol sucrose), respectively. The intermediary products were acetic acid, butyric acid, methanol and ethanol in all of the anaerobic reactors. (author)

  11. BIODEGRADATION OF MTBE BY A MICROORGANISM CONSORTIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Alimohammadi, A. R. Mesdaghinia, M. Mahmoodi, S. Nasseri, A. H. Mahvi and J. Nouri

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Methyl Tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE is one of the ether oxygenates which its use has been increased within the last twenty years. This compound is produced from isobutylene and methanol reaction that is used as octane index enhancer and also increases dissolved oxygen in gasoline and decreases carbon monoxide emission in four phased motors because of better combustion of gasoline. High solubility in water (52 g/L, high vapor pressure (0.54 kg/cm3, low absorption to organic carbon of soil and presence of MTBE in the list of potentially-carcinogens of U.S EPA has made its use of great concern. The culture media used in this study was Mineral Salt Medium (MSM. The study lasted for 236 days and in three different concentrations of MTBE of 200, 5 and 0.8 mg/L. A control sample was also used to compare the results. This research studied the isolation methods of microbial consortium in the MTBE polluted soils in Tehran and Abadan petroleum refinery besides MTBE degradation. The results showed the capability of bacteria in consuming MTBE as carbon source. Final microbial isolation was performed with several microbial passages as well as keeping consortium in a certain amount of MTBE as the carbon source.

  12. The NIH Extracellular RNA Communication Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra M. Ainsztein

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Extracellular RNA (exRNA Communication Consortium, funded as an initiative of the NIH Common Fund, represents a consortium of investigators assembled to address the critical issues in the exRNA research arena. The overarching goal is to generate a multi-component community resource for sharing fundamental scientific discoveries, protocols, and innovative tools and technologies. The key initiatives include (a generating a reference catalogue of exRNAs present in body fluids of normal healthy individuals that would facilitate disease diagnosis and therapies, (b defining the fundamental principles of exRNA biogenesis, distribution, uptake, and function, as well as development of molecular tools, technologies, and imaging modalities to enable these studies, (c identifying exRNA biomarkers of disease, (d demonstrating clinical utility of exRNAs as therapeutic agents and developing scalable technologies required for these studies, and (e developing a community resource, the exRNA Atlas, to provide the scientific community access to exRNA data, standardized exRNA protocols, and other useful tools and technologies generated by funded investigators.

  13. Environmental Drivers of Differences in Microbial Community Structure in Crude Oil Reservoirs across a Methanogenic Gradient

    OpenAIRE

    Shelton, Jenna L.; Akob, Denise M.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; Fierer, Noah; Spear, John R.; Warwick, Peter D.; McCray, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Stimulating in situ microbial communities in oil reservoirs to produce natural gas is a potentially viable strategy for recovering additional fossil fuel resources following traditional recovery operations. Little is known about what geochemical parameters drive microbial population dynamics in biodegraded, methanogenic oil reservoirs. We investigated if microbial community structure was significantly impacted by the extent of crude oil biodegradation, extent of biogenic methane production, a...

  14. Conductive iron oxide minerals accelerate syntrophic cooperation in methanogenic benzoate degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, Li; Tang, Jia; Wang, Yueqiang; Hu, Min; Zhou, Shungui, E-mail: sgzhou@soil.gd.cn

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Paddy soil contaminated with benzoate incubated with hematite and magnetite. • Iron oxides addition enhanced methanogenic benzoate degradation by 25–53%. • The facilitated syntrophy might involve direct interspecies electron transfer. • Bacillaceae, Peptococcaceae, and Methanobacterium are potentially involved. - Abstract: Recent studies have suggested that conductive iron oxide minerals can facilitate syntrophic metabolism of the methanogenic degradation of organic matter, such as ethanol, propionate and butyrate, in natural and engineered microbial ecosystems. This enhanced syntrophy involves direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) powered by microorganisms exchanging metabolic electrons through electrically conductive minerals. Here, we evaluated the possibility that conductive iron oxides (hematite and magnetite) can stimulate the methanogenic degradation of benzoate, which is a common intermediate in the anaerobic metabolism of aromatic compounds. The results showed that 89–94% of the electrons released from benzoate oxidation were recovered in CH{sub 4} production, and acetate was identified as the only carbon-bearing intermediate during benzoate degradation. Compared with the iron-free controls, the rates of methanogenic benzoate degradation were enhanced by 25% and 53% in the presence of hematite and magnetite, respectively. This stimulatory effect probably resulted from DIET-mediated methanogenesis in which electrons transfer between syntrophic partners via conductive iron minerals. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that Bacillaceae, Peptococcaceae, and Methanobacterium are potentially involved in the functioning of syntrophic DIET. Considering the ubiquitous presence of iron minerals within soils and sediments, the findings of this study will increase the current understanding of the natural biological attenuation of aromatic hydrocarbons in anaerobic environments.

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of an Obligately Methylotrophic Methanogen, Methanococcoides methylutens, Isolated from Marine Sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yue; Ngugi, David K; Blom, Jochen; Ali, Shahjahan; Ferry, James G; Stingl, Ulrich

    2014-11-20

    Methanococcoides methylutens, the type species of the genus Methanococcoides, is a slightly halophilic methanogenic archaeon with a methylotrophic metabolism. Here, we present the annotated draft genome sequence of M. methylutens, which comprises 2,508,511 bp with 2,482 coding sequences, 51 tRNA genes, and a G+C content of 42.5%. Copyright © 2014 Guan et al.

  16. Diversity of methanogens in the hindgut of grower and finisher pigs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the diversity of the methanogens in the hindgut of two different weight groups of pigs and correlated it with the amount of digested organic carbon (OC) and various components of dietary fiber. Five grower (58.9 ± 1.15 kg) and five finisher (89.4 ± 0.85 kg) Duroc × Landrace × Large Yorkshire female pigs ...

  17. Microbial diversity and methanogenic activity of Antrim Shale formation waters from recently fractured wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuchter, Cornelia; Banning, Erin; Mincer, Tracy J; Drenzek, Nicholas J; Coolen, Marco J L

    2013-01-01

    The Antrim Shale in the Michigan Basin is one of the most productive shale gas formations in the U.S., but optimal resource recovery strategies must rely on a thorough understanding of the complex biogeochemical, microbial, and physical interdependencies in this and similar systems. We used Illumina MiSeq 16S rDNA sequencing to analyze the diversity and relative abundance of prokaryotic communities present in Antrim shale formation water of three closely spaced recently fractured gas-producing wells. In addition, the well waters were incubated with a suite of fermentative and methanogenic substrates in an effort to stimulate microbial methane generation. The three wells exhibited substantial differences in their community structure that may arise from their different drilling and fracturing histories. Bacterial sequences greatly outnumbered those of archaea and shared highest similarity to previously described cultures of mesophiles and moderate halophiles within the Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and δ- and ε-Proteobacteria. The majority of archaeal sequences shared highest sequence similarity to uncultured euryarchaeotal environmental clones. Some sequences closely related to cultured methylotrophic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens were also present in the initial well water. Incubation with methanol and trimethylamine stimulated methylotrophic methanogens and resulted in the largest increase in methane production in the formation waters, while fermentation triggered by the addition of yeast extract and formate indirectly stimulated hydrogenotrophic methanogens. The addition of sterile powdered shale as a complex natural substrate stimulated the rate of methane production without affecting total methane yields. Depletion of methane indicative of anaerobic methane oxidation (AMO) was observed over the course of incubation with some substrates. This process could constitute a substantial loss of methane in the shale formation.

  18. Chloroform degradation in methanogenic methanol enrichment cultures and by Methanosarcina barkeri 227.

    OpenAIRE

    Bagley, D M; Gossett, J M

    1995-01-01

    The effects of methanol addition and consumption on chloroform degradation rate and product distribution in methanogenic methanol enrichment cultures and in cultures of Methanosarcina barkeri 227 were investigated. Degradation of chloroform with initial concentrations up to 27.3 microM in enrichment cultures and 4.8 microM in pure cultures was stimulated by the addition of methanol. However, methanol consumption was inhibited by as little as 2.5 microM chloroform in enrichment cultures and 0....

  19. Enhanced methanogenesis from hexadecane and ethylbenzene under non-methanogenic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegert, Michael; Cichocka, Danuta; Herrmann, Steffi; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Springael, Dirk; Krüger, Martin

    2010-05-01

    Microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) may provide access to remaining, but yet inaccessible petroleum in reservoirs. The microbial conversion of heavy hydrocarbon remnants into gaseous methane could at least provide access to energy which would otherwise be lost. On the other hand, methanogenesis could remove toxic hydrocarbons from contaminated aquifers and sediments. Therefore, sediment samples from a contaminated sea port basin were investigated to assess the in situ potential for methanogenic hydrocarbon degradation. Since this process is believed to be a sequential syntrophic procedure, non-methanogenic conditions were created in sediment microcosms to facilitate the first hydrocarbon attacking step. To achieve this, a high electron potential was created by the addition of ferrihydrite, manganese oxide, nitrate or sulfate as electron acceptors. Hexadecane, ethylbenzene or naphthalene were used as model carbon substrates. Methanogenesis evolved rapidly from set ups treated with iron and manganese, but not nitrate, reflecting the in situ conditions at the site. Surprisingly, on sulfate methanogenesis was neither inhibited nor significantly supported. Methane formation rates were the highest with hexadecane as substrate, followed by ethylbenzene and naphthalene. Methane was removed in high rates at the same time by anaerobic methanotrophs. The microbial community in situ and in vitro was dominated by members of the Geobacteraceae. Their methanogenic partners were quantified, targeting the genes encoding for the methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA). Methane consumption in the microcosms and the presence of methanotrophic anaerobes belonging to the ANME-1 and ANME-2 clusters suggest anaerobic methanotrophy as an accompanying process. mcrA genes belonging to the ANME-1 & -2 clusters were detected in lower copy numbers than the methanogenic mcrA, which is in good agreement with the activity measurements. These results indicate that the in situ stimulation of

  20. Diversity of methanogens in the hindgut of captive white rhinoceroses, Ceratotherium simum

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Yu-heng; Wright, Andr?-Denis G; Li, You-long; Li, Hua; Yang, Qi-hong; Luo, Ling-juan; Yang, Ming-xian

    2013-01-01

    Background The white rhinoceros is on the verge of extinction with less than 20,200 animals remaining in the wild. In order to better protect these endangered animals, it is necessary to better understand their digestive physiology and nutritional requirements. The gut microbiota is nutritionally important for herbivorous animals. However, little is known about the microbial diversity in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of the white rhinoceros. Methanogen diversity in the GIT may be host spec...

  1. Iron oxides alter methanogenic pathways of acetate in production water of high-temperature petroleum reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Pan; Hong, Bo; Mbadinga, Serge Maurice; Wang, Li-Ying; Liu, Jin-Feng; Yang, Shi-Zhong; Gu, Ji-Dong; Mu, Bo-Zhong

    2017-09-01

    Acetate is a key intermediate in anaerobic crude oil biodegradation and also a precursor for methanogenesis in petroleum reservoirs. The impact of iron oxides, viz. β-FeOOH (akaganéite) and magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ), on the methanogenic acetate metabolism in production water of a high-temperature petroleum reservoir was investigated. Methane production was observed in all the treatments amended with acetate. In the microcosms amended with acetate solely about 30% of the acetate utilized was converted to methane, whereas methane production was stimulated in the presence of magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) resulting in a 48.34% conversion to methane. Methane production in acetate-amended, β-FeOOH (akaganéite)-supplemented microcosms was much faster and acetate consumption was greatly improved compared to the other conditions in which the stoichiometric expected amounts of methane were not produced. Microbial community analysis showed that Thermacetogenium spp. (known syntrophic acetate oxidizers) and hydrogenotrophic methanogens closely related to Methanothermobacter spp. were enriched in acetate and acetate/magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) microcosms suggesting that methanogenic acetate metabolism was through hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis fueled by syntrophic acetate oxidizers. The acetate/β-FeOOH (akaganéite) microcosms, however, differed by the dominance of archaea closely related to the acetoclastic Methanosaeta thermophila. These observations suggest that supplementation of β-FeOOH (akaganéite) accelerated the production of methane further, driven the alteration of the methanogenic community, and changed the pathway of acetate methanogenesis from hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis fueled by syntrophic acetate oxidizers to acetoclastic.

  2. Microbial diversity and methanogenic activity of Antrim Shale formation waters from recently fractured wells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia eWuchter

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Antrim Shale in the Michigan Basin is one of the most productive shale gas formations in the U.S, but optimal resource recovery strategies must rely on a thorough understanding of the complex biogeochemical, microbial, and physical interdependencies in this and similar systems. We used Illumina Miseq 16S rDNA sequencing to analyze the diversity and relative abundance of prokaryotic communities present in Antrim shale formation water of three closely spaced recently fractured gas-producing wells. In addition, the well waters were incubated with a suite of fermentative and methanogenic substrates in an effort to stimulate microbial methane generation. The three wells exhibited substantial differences in their community structure that may arise from their different drilling and fracturing histories. Bacterial sequences greatly outnumbered those of archaea and shared highest similarity to previously described cultures of mesophiles and moderately halophiles within the Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and δ- and ε-Proteobacteria. The majority of archaeal sequences shared highest sequence similarity to uncultured euryarchaeotal environmental clones. Some sequences closely related to cultured methylotrophic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens were also present in the initial well water. Incubation with methanol and trimethylamine stimulated methylotrophic methanogens and resulted in the largest increase in methane production in the formation waters, while fermentation triggered by the addition of yeast extract and formate indirectly stimulated hydrogenotrophic methanogens. The addition of sterile powdered shale as a complex natural substrate stimulated the rate of methane production without affecting total methane yields. Depletion of methane indicative of anaerobic methane oxidation was observed over the course of incubation with some substrates. This process could constitute a substantial loss of methane in the shale formation.

  3. Enriched ammonia-tolerant methanogenic cultures as bioaugmentation inocula in continuous biomethanation processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotidis, Ioannis; Treu, Laura; Angelidaki, Irini

    2017-01-01

    Many ammonia-rich biomass sources, such as manures and protein-rich substrates, are potential inhibitors of the anaerobic digestion (AD) process. It was previously demonstrated that bioaugmentation of Methanoculleus bourgensis MS2T in an ammonia inhibited process in a continuous stirred tank...... over the domestic methanogenic population. Finally, this study showed that the enriched culture alleviated ammonia toxicity 25% more efficiently than the previously used pure culture....

  4. Unexpected competitiveness of Methanosaeta populations at elevated acetate concentrations in methanogenic treatment of animal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Si; Cheng, Huicai; Liu, Jiang; Hazen, Terry C; Huang, Vicki; He, Qiang

    2017-02-01

    Acetoclastic methanogenesis is a key metabolic process in anaerobic digestion, a technology with broad applications in biogas production and waste treatment. Acetoclastic methanogenesis is known to be performed by two archaeal genera, Methanosaeta and Methanosarcina. The conventional model posits that Methanosaeta populations are more competitive at low acetate levels (<1 mM) than Methanosarcina and vice versa at higher acetate concentrations. While this model is supported by an extensive body of studies, reports of inconsistency have grown that Methanosaeta were observed to outnumber Methanosarcina at elevated acetate levels. In this study, monitoring of anaerobic digesters treating animal wastewater unexpectedly identified Methanosaeta as the dominant acetoclastic methanogen population at both low and high acetate levels during organic overloading. The surprising competitiveness of Methanosaeta at elevated acetate was further supported by the enrichment of Methanosaeta with high concentrations of acetate (20 mM). The dominance of Methanosaeta in the methanogen community could be reproduced in anaerobic digesters with the direct addition of acetate to above 20 mM, again supporting the competitiveness of Methanosaeta over Methanosarcina at elevated acetate levels. This study for the first time systematically demonstrated that the dominance of Methanosaeta populations in anaerobic digestion could be linked to the competitiveness of Methanosaeta at elevated acetate concentrations. Given the importance of acetoclastic methanogenesis in biological methane production, findings from this study could have major implications for developing strategies for more effective control of methanogenic treatment processes.

  5. Microbial ecology of methanogenic crude oil biodegradation; from microbial consortia to heavy oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Head, Ian M.; Maguire, Michael J.; Sherry, Angela; Grant, Russell; Gray, Neil D.; Aitken, Carolyn M.; Martin Jones, D.; Oldenburg, Thomas B.P.; Larter, Stephen R. [Petroleum Research Group, Geosciences, University of Calgary (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents the microbial ecology of methanogenic crude oil biodegradation. Biodegraded petroleum reservoirs are one of the most dramatic indications of the deep biosphere. It is estimated that heavy oil and oil sands will account for a considerable amount of energy production in the future. Carbon, a major resource for deep subsurface microorganisms, and energy are contained in large quantities in petroleum reservoirs. The aerobic to anaerobic paradigm shift is explained. A key process for in-situ oil biodegradation in petroleum reservoirs is methanogenesis. New paradigms for in-reservoir crude oil biodegradation are discussed. Variations in anaerobic degradation of crude oil hydrocarbons are also discussed. A graph shows the different patterns of crude oil biodegradation under sulfate-reducing and methanogenic conditions. Alternative anaerobic alkane activation mechanisms are also shown. From the study, it can be concluded that methanogenic crude oil degradation is of global importance and led to the establishment of the world's enormous heavy oil deposits.

  6. Production of Ethane, Ethylene, and Acetylene from Halogenated Hydrocarbons by Methanogenic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belay, Negash; Daniels, Lacy

    1987-01-01

    Several methanogenic bacteria were shown to produce ethane, ethylene, and acetylene when exposed to the halogenated hydrocarbons bromoethane, dibromo- or dichloroethane, and 1,2-dibromoethylene, respectively. They also produced ethylene when exposed to the coenzyme M analog and specific methanogenic inhibitor bromoethanesulfonic acid. The production of these gases from halogenated hydrocarbons has a variety of implications concerning microbial ecology, agriculture, and toxic waste treatment. All halogenated aliphatic compounds tested were inhibitory to methanogens. Methanococcus thermolithotrophicus, Methanococcus deltae, and Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum ΔH and Marburg were completely inhibited by 7 μM 1,2-dibromoethane and, to various degrees, by 51 to 1,084 μM 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,2-dibromoethylene, 1,2-dichloroethylene, and trichloroethylene. In general, the brominated compounds were more inhibitory. The two Methanococcus species were fully inhibited by 1 μM bromoethanesulfonic acid, whereas both Methanobacterium strains were only partly inhibited by 2,124 μM. Coenzyme M protected cells from bromoethanesulfonic acid but not from any of the other inhibitors. PMID:16347389

  7. Dosing of anaerobic granular sludge bioreactors with cobalt: Impact of cobalt retention on methanogenic activity

    KAUST Repository

    Fermoso, Fernando G.

    2010-12-01

    The effect of dosing a metal limited anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor with a metal pulse on the methanogenic activity of granular sludge has thus far not been successfully modeled. The prediction of this effect is crucial in order to optimize the strategy for metal dosage and to prevent unnecessary losses of resources. This paper describes the relation between the initial immobilization of cobalt in anaerobic granular sludge cobalt dosage into the reactor and the evolution of methanogenic activity during the subsequent weeks. An operationally defined parameter (A0· B0) was found to combine the amount of cobalt immobilized instantaneously upon the pulse (B0) and the amount of cobalt immobilized within the subsequent 24. h (A0). In contrast with the individual parameters A0 and B0, the parameter A0· B0 correlated significantly with the methanogenic activity of the sludge during the subsequent 16 or 35. days. This correlation between metal retention and activity evolution is a useful tool to implement trace metal dosing strategies for biofilm-based biotechnological processes. © 2010.

  8. Performance and methanogenic community of rotating disk reactor packed with polyurethane during thermophilic anaerobic digestion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yingnan; Tsukahara, Kenichiro; Sawayama, Shigeki

    2007-01-01

    A newly developed anaerobic rotating disk reactor (ARDR) packed with polyurethane was used in continuous mode for organic waste removal under thermophilic (55 o C) anaerobic conditions. This paper reports the effects of the rotational speed on the methanogenic performance and community in an ARDR supplied with acetic acid synthetic wastewater as the organic substrate. The best performance was obtained from the ARDR with the rotational speed (ω) of 30 rpm. The average removal of dissolved organic carbon was 98.5%, and the methane production rate was 393 ml/l-reactor/day at an organic loading rate of 2.69 g/l-reactor/day. Under these operational conditions, the reactor had a greater biomass retention capacity and better reactor performance than those at other rotational speeds (0, 5 and 60 rpm). The results of 16S rRNA phylogenetic analysis indicated that the major methanogens in the reactor belonged to the genus Methanosarcina spp. The results of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis suggested that the cell density of methanogenic archaea immobilized on the polyurethane foam disk could be concentrated more than 2000 times relative to those in the original thermophilic sludge. Scanning electron microphotographs showed that there were more immobilized microbes at ω of 30 rpm than 60 rpm. A rotational speed on the outer layer of the disk of 6.6 m/min could be appropriate for anaerobic digestion using the polyurethane ARDR

  9. Ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis as a tool for monitoring methanogenic Archaea changes in an anaerobic digester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciesielski, Slawomir; Bułkowska, Katarzyna; Dabrowska, Dorota; Kaczmarczyk, Dariusz; Kowal, Przemyslaw; Możejko, Justyna

    2013-08-01

    The applicability of a newly-designed PCR primer pair in examination of methanogenic Archaea in a digester treating plant biomass was evaluated by Ribosmal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (RISA). To find a suitable approach, three variants of RISA were tested: (1) standard, polyacrylamide gel-based, (2) automated, utilized capillary electrophoresis (GA-ARISA), and (3) automated microfluidics-based (MF-ARISA). All three techniques yielded a consistent picture of archaeal community structure changes during anaerobic digestion monitored for more than 6 weeks. While automated variants were more practical for handling and rapid analysis of methanogenic Archaea, the gel-based technique was advantageous when micro-organism identification was required. A DNA-sequence analysis of dominant bands extracted from the gel revealed that the main role in methane synthesis was played by micro-organisms affiliated with Methanosarcina barkeri. The obtained results revealed that RISA is a robust method allowing for detailed analysis of archaeal community structure during organic biomass conversion into biogas. In addition, our results showed that GA-ARISA has a higher resolution and reproducibility than other variants of RISA and could be used as a technique for tracking changes in methanogenic Archaea in an anaerobic digester.

  10. Potential use of highly insoluble carbonates as carbon sources by methanogens in the subsurface of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kral, Timothy A.; Birch, Whitney; Lavender, Lauren E.; Virden, Bryant T.

    2014-10-01

    Methanogens, microorganisms in the domain Archaea, have been studied as life forms that might inhabit the subsurface of Mars. These organisms can use carbon dioxide as a carbon source, a compound that is abundant in the martian atmosphere. But if they exist in the deep subsurface where the carbon dioxide may not penetrate, they would have to rely on another source of carbon. Magnesium carbonate and calcium carbonate have been detected at the martian surface, and there is no reason to believe that they would not be in the subsurface as well. In the research reported here, we asked if these carbonates could possibly serve as carbon sources for four species of methanogens. Methanothermobacter wolfeii, Methanobacterium formicicum and Methanococcus maripaludis were able to produce a small amount of methane (approximately 0.4-0.8% headspace gas) when either carbonate was the carbon source available while Methanosarcina barkeri only produced significant methane (also 0.4-0.8%) when calcium carbonate was the carbon source. The amounts produced were dependent on methanogenic species, carbonate used and pH. At equilibrium, a small amount of carbon dioxide (approximately 0.05-0.15% headspace gas as well as in liquid media) was generated by these carbonates, and this carbon dioxide was most likely the carbon compound that was being metabolized. Background carbon dioxide from the atmosphere was not sufficient for measureable methane production.

  11. Evaluation of Different Feeds for Their Potential to Generate Methane and Change Methanogen Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seon-Ho Kim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Optimization of the dietary formulation is the most effective way to reduce methane. Nineteen feed ingredients (brans, vegetable proteins, and grains were evaluated for their potential to generate methane and change methanogen diversity using an in vitro ruminal fermentation technique. Feed formulations categorized into high, medium and low production based on methane production of each ingredient were then subjected to in vitro fermentation to determine the real methane production and their effects on digestibility. Methanogen diversity among low, medium and high-methane producing groups was analyzed by PCR-DGGE. The highest methane production was observed in Korean wheat bran, soybean and perilla meals, and wheat and maize of brans, vegetable protein and cereal groups, respectively. On the other hand, corn bran, cotton seed meal and barley led to the lowest production in the same groups. Nine bacteria and 18 methanogen 16s rDNA PCR-DGGE dominant bands were identified with 83% to 99% and 92% to 100% similarity, respectively. Overall, the results of this study showed that methane emissions from ruminants can be mitigated through proper selection of feed ingredients to be used in the formulation of diets.

  12. Performance of thermophilic anaerobic digesters using inoculum mixes with enhanced methanogenic diversity

    KAUST Repository

    Ghanimeh, Sophia

    2017-05-30

    BACKGROUND Reportedly, various mixes of seeds were quasi-randomly selected to startup anaerobic digesters. In contrast, this study examines the impact of inoculating thermophilic anaerobic digesters with a designed mix of non-acclimated seeds based on their methanogen composition, using Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (QPCR) of 16S rRNA gene, to achieve high abundance and diversity of methanogens. RESULTS Based on QPCR results, two seed mixes were selected to inoculate two anaerobic digesters: digester (A) was inoculated with a control seed consisting of digestate, manure, and activated sludge; and digester (B) was inoculated with a further methanogen-enriched seed consisting of the control seed with added compost and leachate. Both seed combinations yielded a balanced microflora that is able to achieve a successful startup. However, upon reaching steady state, digester B exhibited lower propionate levels, resulting in lower VFA concentration and increased buffering capacity, indicating greater stability. Acetotrophs and hydrogenotrophs were dominated by Methanosarcinaceae and Methanobacteriales, respectively, in both digesters, exhibiting an average ratio of 66-to-34% in A and 76-to-24% in B during steady state. CONCLUSION The inoculation strategy in digester B resulted in improved stability, lower propionate concentration and 10% higher relative abundance of acetotrophs.

  13. Anaerobic metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds by sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boopathy, R.; Kulpa, C.F.

    1994-01-01

    Ecological observations suggest that sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria might metabolize nitroaromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions if appropriate electron donors and electron acceptors are present in the environment, but this ability had not been demonstrated until recently. Most studies on the microbial metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds used aerobic microorganisms. In most cases no mineralization of nitroaromatics occurs, and only superficial modifications of the structures are reported. However, under anaerobic sulfate-reducing conditions, the nitroaromatic compounds reportedly undergo a series of reductions with the formation of amino compounds. For example, trinitrotoluene under sulfate-reducing conditions is reduced to triaminotoluene by the enzyme nitrite reductase, which is commonly found in many Desulfovibrio spp. The removal of ammonia from triaminotoluene is achieved by reductive deamination catalyzed by the enzyme reductive deaminase, with the production of ammonia and toluene. Some sulfate reducers can metabolize toluene to CO 2 . Similar metabolic processes could be applied to other nitroaromatic compounds like nitrobenzene, nitrobenzoic acids, nitrophenols, and aniline. Many methanogenic bacteria can reduce nitroaromatic compounds to amino compounds. In this paper we review the anaerobic metabolic processes of nitroaromatic compounds under sulfate-reducing And methanogenic conditions

  14. Institutional Support : Consortium for Economic and Social Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Institutional Support : Consortium for Economic and Social Research (CRES) Sénégal. The Consortium pour la recherche économique et sociale (CRES) is an association of a multidisciplinary team of researchers based in Dakar, Sénégal. Its activities are organized under five departments: growth, poverty and equity; local ...

  15. Urban Consortium Energy Task Force - Year 21 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-04-01

    The Urban Consortium Energy Task Force (UCETF), comprised of representatives of large cities and counties in the United States, is a subgroup of the Urban Consortium, an organization of the nation's largest cities and counties joined together to identify, develop and deploy innovative approaches and technological solutions to pressing urban issues.

  16. An isolated bacterial consortium for crude oil biodegradation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2011-12-16

    Dec 16, 2011 ... designed using DesignExpert 6.0.8 software by optimizing the amount of crude oil, microbial inoculum and sludge which are initially ... Key words: Crude oil, bacterial consortium, kinetics, bioremediation, biostimulation, natural attenuation. ... For the preparation of the consortiums, colonies were plated on.

  17. The Consortium for Higher Education Tax Reform Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Postsecondary and Economic Success, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This White Paper presents the work of the Consortium for Higher Education Tax Reform, a partnership funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation as part of the second phase of its Reimagining Aid Design and Delivery (RADD) initiative. Consortium partners are the Center for Postsecondary and Economic Success at CLASP, the Education Trust, New…

  18. Aims, organization and activities of the consortium for underground storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stucky, G.

    1977-01-01

    The consortium of Swiss authorities interested in underground storage (the petroleum oil and gas industries, for fuel storage; the nuclear industry for radioactive waste disposal), was initiated in 1972. The author outlines the motives behind the formation of the consortium and outlines its structure and objectives. The envisaged projects are outlined. (F.Q.)

  19. The Black Rock Forest Consortium: A narrative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzetto-More, Nicole Antoinette

    The Black Rock Forest is a 3,785-acre wilderness area whose richly forested landscape represents the splendor of the Hudson Valley Region of New York State. Although originally intended to become the home of wealthy banker James Stillman, it was his son Ernest whose love of conservation caused him to embrace the then new and revolutionary practice of sustainable forestry and establish Black Rock in 1928. Due to Ernest Stillman's foresight, the property was protected from development and bequeathed to Harvard University following his death for the establishment of an experimental forest. The modern environmental movement in America began when the Black Rock Forest was threatened with development by Consolidated Edison, and the people of the surrounding community banded together, battling tirelessly for over 17 years to stop the degradation of this historic forest. The outcome of this crusade marked a hallmark win for the environment leaving an illustrious and inveterate legacy. The campaign resulted in the watershed legislation the National Environmental Policy Act, the formation of several environmental advocacy groups, the creation of the Council on Environmental Quality of the Executive Office of the President, as well as set a precedent for communities to initiate and win cases against major corporations in order to safeguard natural resources. In the midst of the controversy it became apparent that alternative futures for the Forest needed to be explored. As a result of a committee report and one man's vision, the idea emerged to create a consortium that would purchase and steward the Forest. With a formation that took nearly fifteen years, the Black Rock Forest Consortium was formed, a unique amalgamation of K--12 public and private schools, colleges and universities, and science and cultural centers that successfully collaborate to enhance scientific research, environmental conservation, and education. The Consortium works to bridge the gaps between learners

  20. A consortium approach to glass furnace modeling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S.-L.; Golchert, B.; Petrick, M.

    1999-04-20

    Using computational fluid dynamics to model a glass furnace is a difficult task for any one glass company, laboratory, or university to accomplish. The task of building a computational model of the furnace requires knowledge and experience in modeling two dissimilar regimes (the combustion space and the liquid glass bath), along with the skill necessary to couple these two regimes. Also, a detailed set of experimental data is needed in order to evaluate the output of the code to ensure that the code is providing proper results. Since all these diverse skills are not present in any one research institution, a consortium was formed between Argonne National Laboratory, Purdue University, Mississippi State University, and five glass companies in order to marshal these skills into one three-year program. The objective of this program is to develop a fully coupled, validated simulation of a glass melting furnace that may be used by industry to optimize the performance of existing furnaces.

  1. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-03-31

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), established a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that is focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The SWC represents a partnership between U.S. petroleum and natural gas producers, trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the NETL. This document serves as the twelfth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period included: (1) Drafting and releasing the 2007 Request for Proposals; (2) Securing a meeting facility, scheduling and drafting plans for the 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; (3) Conducting elections and announcing representatives for the four 2007-2008 Executive Council seats; (4) 2005 Final Project Reports; (5) Personal Digital Assistant Workshops scheduled; and (6) Communications and outreach.

  2. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium: 1995 Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The mission of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, is to advance the science and understanding of high Tc superconductivity. During the past year, 26 projects produced over 133 talks and 127 publications. Three Master's Degrees and 9 Doctor's of Philosophy Degrees were granted to students working on MISCON projects. Group activities and interactions involved 2 MISCON group meetings (held in January and July); the third MISCON Summer School held in July; 12 external speakers; 81 collaborations (with universities, industry, Federal laboratories, and foreign research centers); and 54 exchanges of samples and/or measurements. Research achievements this past year focused on understanding the effects of processing phenomena on structure-property interrelationships and the fundamental nature of transport properties in high-temp superconductors

  3. Perspectives of International Human Epigenome Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Bum Bae

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available As the International Human Epigenome Consortium (IHEC launched officially at the 2010 Washington meeting, a giant step toward the conquest of unexplored regions of the human genome has begun. IHEC aims at the production of 1,000 reference epigenomes to the international scientific community for next 7-10 years. Seven member institutions, including South Korea, Korea National Institute of Health (KNIH, will produce 25-200 reference epigenomes individually, and the produced data will be publically available by using a data center. Epigenome data will cover from whole genome bisulfite sequencing, histone modification, and chromatin access information to miRNA-seq. The final goal of IHEC is the production of reference maps of human epigenomes for key cellular status relevant to health and disease.

  4. ZATPAC: a model consortium evaluates teen programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Kathryn; Murphy, Dana; Parsons, Chris

    2009-09-01

    How do we advance the environmental literacy of young people, support the next generation of environmental stewards and increase the diversity of the leadership of zoos and aquariums? We believe it is through ongoing evaluation of zoo and aquarium teen programming and have founded a consortium to pursue those goals. The Zoo and Aquarium Teen Program Assessment Consortium (ZATPAC) is an initiative by six of the nation's leading zoos and aquariums to strengthen institutional evaluation capacity, model a collaborative approach toward assessing the impact of youth programs, and bring additional rigor to evaluation efforts within the field of informal science education. Since its beginning in 2004, ZATPAC has researched, developed, pilot-tested and implemented a pre-post program survey instrument designed to assess teens' knowledge of environmental issues, skills and abilities to take conservation actions, self-efficacy in environmental actions, and engagement in environmentally responsible behaviors. Findings from this survey indicate that teens who join zoo/aquarium programs are already actively engaged in many conservation behaviors. After participating in the programs, teens showed a statistically significant increase in their reported knowledge of conservation and environmental issues and their abilities to research, explain, and find resources to take action on conservation issues of personal concern. Teens also showed statistically significant increases pre-program to post-program for various conservation behaviors, including "I talk with my family and/or friends about things they can do to help the animals or the environment," "I save water...," "I save energy...," "When I am shopping I look for recycled products," and "I help with projects that restore wildlife habitat."

  5. A consortium approach to molecular genetic services. Scottish Molecular Genetics Consortium.

    OpenAIRE

    Brock, D J

    1990-01-01

    The four Scottish university medical genetics centres formed a consortium in 1985 to provide a DNA based service in prenatal diagnosis, carrier detection, and predictive testing for a range of Mendelian disorders. Each centre took sole responsibility for laboratory analyses of an assigned set of disorders, while families continued to be investigated and patients counselled within their own areas. DNA was extracted from relevant tissues in the centre most convenient to the family member and th...

  6. Immobilization Patterns and Dynamics of Acetate-Utilizing Methanogens Immobilized in Sterile Granular Sludge in Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jens Ejbye; Ahring, Birgitte Kjær

    1999-01-01

    Sterile granular sludge was inoculated with either Methanosarcina mazeii S-6, Methanosaeta concilii GP-6, or both species in acetate-fed upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors to investigate the immobilization patterns and dynamics of aceticlastic methanogens in granular sludge. After several months of reactor operation, the methanogens were immobilized, either separately or together. The fastest immobilization was observed in the reactor containing M. mazeii S-6. The highest effluent concentration of acetate was observed in the reactor with only M. mazeii S-6 immobilized, while the lowest effluent concentration of acetate was observed in the reactor where both types of methanogens were immobilized together. No changes were observed in the kinetic parameters (Ks and μmax) of immobilized M. concilii GP-6 or M. mazeii S-6 compared with suspended cultures, indicating that immobilization does not affect the growth kinetics of these methanogens. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using polyclonal antibodies against either M. concilii GP-6 or M. mazeii S-6 showed significant variations in the two methanogenic populations in the different reactors. Polyclonal antibodies were further used to study the spatial distribution of the two methanogens. M. concilii GP-6 was immobilized only on existing support material without any specific pattern. M. mazeii S-6, however, showed a different immobilization pattern: large clumps were formed when the concentration of acetate was high, but where the acetate concentration was low this strain was immobilized on support material as single cells or small clumps. The data clearly show that the two aceticlastic methanogens immobilize differently in UASB systems, depending on the conditions found throughout the UASB reactor. PMID:10049862

  7. The impact of dissolved organic carbon on the spatial variability of methanogenic archaea communities in natural wetland ecosystems across China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Deyan; Ding, Weixin; Jia, Zhongjun; Cai, Zucong

    2012-10-01

    Significant spatial variation in CH(4) emissions is a well-established feature of natural wetland ecosystems. To understand the key factors affecting CH(4) production, the variation in community structure of methanogenic archaea, in relation to substrate and external environmental influences, was investigated in selected wetlands across China, using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Case study areas were the subtropical Poyang wetland, the warm-temperate Hongze wetland, the cold-temperate Sanjiang marshes, and the alpine Ruoergai peatland on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. The topsoil layer in the Hongze wetland exhibited the highest population of methanogens; the lowest was found in the Poyang wetland. Maximum CH(4) production occurred in the topsoil layer of the Sanjiang Carex lasiocarpa marsh, the minimum was observed in the Ruoergai peatland. CH(4) production potential was significantly correlated with the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration but not with the abundance or diversity indices of methanogenic archaea. Phylogenetic analysis and DOC concentration indicated a shift in the dominant methanogen from the hydrogenotrophic Methanobacteriales in DOC-rich wetlands to Methanosarcinaceae with a low affinity in wetlands with relatively high DOC and then to the acetotrophic methanogen Methanosaetaceae with a high affinity in wetlands with low DOC, or with high DOC but rich sulfate-reducing bacteria. Therefore, it is proposed that the dominant methanogen type in wetlands is primarily influenced by available DOC concentration. In turn, the variation in CH(4) production potential in the wetlands of eastern China is attributable to differences in the DOC content and the dominant type of methanogen present.

  8. Changes in methane emission, rumen fermentation, and methanogenic community in response to silage and dry cornstalk diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Liu; Zhuping, Zhu; Tongjun, Guo; Yongming, Luo; Hongmin, Dong

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of silage or dry cornstalk diets on methane emission, rumen fermentation, and methanogenic community, and reveal whether the change of methanogenic compositions was related to the methane production. A total of 39 sheep were divided into four groups, fed diets of different concentrate level based on silage or dry cornstalk roughage for 40 days. It was found that, at 20% concentrate level, the sheep fed silage could suppress methanogenesis significantly in contrast with the silage diet (p sheep significantly lower than 3.78 in the dry cornstalk-fed sheep (p methane output was related to roughage types. Furthermore, the methanogens was found to be significantly lower abundance (p sheep. Compared with dry cornstalk diet, silage diet of 20% concentrate reduced methane production, decreased methanogenic abundance, and induced change of Methanobrevibacter composition at strain levels. This study showed variation of methanogenic compositions at strain level and its probable relationship with methane production, and provided microbial information to explain the low methane output when the animals were fed silage. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. The response of archaeal species to seasonal variables in a subtropical aerated soil: insight into the low abundant methanogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wei; Jiao, Na; Ma, Cenling; Fang, Sa; Phelps, Tommy J; Zhu, Ruixin; Zhang, Chuanlun

    2017-08-01

    Archaea are cosmopolitan in aerated soils around the world. While the dominance of Thaumarchaeota has been reported in most soils, the methanogens are recently found to be ubiquitous but with low abundances in the aerated soil globally. However, the seasonal changes of Archaea community in the aerated soils are still in the mist. In this study, we investigated the change of Archaea in the context of environmental variables over a period of 12 months in a subtropical soil on the Chongming Island, China. The results showed that Nitrososphaera spp. were the dominant archaeal population while the methanogens were in low proportions but highly diverse (including five genera: Methanobacterium, Methanocella, Methanosaeta, Methanosarcina, and Methanomassiliicoccus) in the aerated soil samples determined by high throughput sequencing. A total of 126 LSA correlations were found in the dataset including all the 72 archaeal OTUs and 8 environmental factors. A significance index defined as the pagerank score of each OTU divided by its relative abundance was used to evaluate the significance of each OTU. The results showed that five out of 17 methanogen OTUs were significantly positively correlated with temperature, suggesting those methanogens might increase with temperature rather than being dormant in the aerated soils. Given the metabolic response of methanogens to temperature under aerated soil conditions, their contribution to the global methane cycle warrants evaluation.

  10. Zero-valent iron enhanced methanogenic activity in anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge after heat and alkali pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaobin; Feng, Yinghong; Quan, Xie

    2015-04-01

    Heat or alkali pretreatment is the effective method to improve hydrolysis of waste sludge and then enhance anaerobic sludge digestion. However the pretreatment may inactivate the methanogens in the sludge. In the present work, zero-valent iron (ZVI) was used to enhance the methanogenic activity in anaerobic sludge digester under two methanogens-suppressing conditions, i.e. heat-pretreatment and alkali condition respectively. With the addition of ZVI, the lag time of methane production was shortened, and the methane yield increased by 91.5% compared to the control group. The consumption of VFA was accelerated by ZVI, especially for acetate, indicating that the acetoclastic methanogenesis was enhanced. In the alkali-condition experiment, the hydrogen produced decreased from 27.6 to 18.8 mL when increasing the ZVI dosage from 0 to 10 g/L. Correspondingly, the methane yield increased from 1.9 to 32.2 mL, which meant that the H2-utilizing methanogenes was enriched. These results suggested that the addition of ZVI into anaerobic digestion of sludge after pretreated by the heat or alkali process could efficiently recover the methanogenic activity and increase the methane production and sludge reduction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Establishing an International Soil Modelling Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereecken, Harry; Schnepf, Andrea; Vanderborght, Jan

    2015-04-01

    -change-feedback processes, bridge basic soil science research and management, and facilitate the communication between science and society . To meet these challenges an international community effort is required, similar to initiatives in systems biology, hydrology, and climate and crop research. We therefore propose to establish an international soil modelling consortium with the aims of 1) bringing together leading experts in modelling soil processes within all major soil disciplines, 2) addressing major scientific gaps in describing key processes and their long term impacts with respect to the different functions and ecosystem services provided by soil, 3) intercomparing soil model performance based on standardized and harmonized data sets, 4) identifying interactions with other relevant platforms related to common data formats, protocols and ontologies, 5) developing new approaches to inverse modelling, calibration, and validation of soil models, 6) integrating soil modelling expertise and state of the art knowledge on soil processes in climate, land surface, ecological, crop and contaminant models, and 7) linking process models with new observation, measurement and data evaluation technologies for mapping and characterizing soil properties across scales. Our consortium will bring together modelers and experimental soil scientists at the forefront of new technologies and approaches to characterize soils. By addressing these aims, the consortium will contribute to improve the role of soil modeling as a knowledge dissemination instrument in addressing key global issues and stimulate the development of translational research activities. This presentation will provide a compelling case for this much-needed effort, with a focus on tangible benefits to the scientific and food security communities.

  12. SEEA SOUTHEAST CONSORTIUM FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, Timothy [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance; Ball, Kia [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance; Fournier, Ashley [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance

    2014-01-21

    In 2010 the Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance (SEEA) received a $20 million Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) under the U.S. Department of Energy’s Better Building Neighborhood Program (BBNP). This grant, funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, also included sub-grantees in 13 communities across the Southeast, known as the Southeast Consortium. The objective of this project was to establish a framework for energy efficiency retrofit programs to create models for replication across the Southeast and beyond. To achieve this goal, SEEA and its project partners focused on establishing infrastructure to develop and sustain the energy efficiency market in specific localities across the southeast. Activities included implementing minimum training standards and credentials for marketplace suppliers, educating and engaging homeowners on the benefits of energy efficiency through strategic marketing and outreach and addressing real or perceived financial barriers to investments in whole-home energy efficiency through a variety of financing mechanisms. The anticipated outcome of these activities would be best practice models for program design, marketing, financing, data collection and evaluation as well as increased market demand for energy efficiency retrofits and products. The Southeast Consortium’s programmatic impacts along with the impacts of the other BBNP grantees would further the progress towards the overall goal of energy efficiency market transformation. As the primary grantee SEEA served as the overall program administrator and provided common resources to the 13 Southeast Consortium sub-grantees including contracted services for contractor training, quality assurance testing, data collection, reporting and compliance. Sub-grantee programs were located in cities across eight states including Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each sub

  13. Multi-University Southeast INIE Consortium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawari, Ayman; Hertel, Nolan; Al-Sheikhly, Mohamed; Miller, Laurence; Bayoumi, Abdel-Moeze; Haghighat, Ali; Lewis, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    The Multi-University Southeast INIE Consortium (MUSIC) was established in response to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education (INIE) program. MUSIC was established as a consortium composed of academic members and national laboratory partners. The members of MUSIC are the nuclear engineering programs and research reactors of Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), North Carolina State University (NCSU), University of Maryland (UMD), University of South Carolina (USC), and University of Tennessee (UTK). The University of Florida (UF), and South Carolina State University (SCSU) were added to the MUSIC membership in the second year. In addition, to ensure proper coordination between the academic community and the nation's premier research and development centers in the fields of nuclear science and engineering, MUSIC created strategic partnerships with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) including the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project and the Joint Institute for Neutron Scattering (JINS), and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). A partnership was also created with the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) with the aim of utilizing their reactor in research if funding becomes available. Consequently, there are three university research reactors (URRs) within MUSIC, which are located at NCSU (1-MW PULSTAR), UMD (0.25-MW TRIGA) and UF (0.10-MW Argonaut), and the AFRRI reactor (1-MW TRIGA MARK F). The overall objectives of MUSIC are: (a) Demonstrate that University Research Reactors (URR) can be used as modern and innovative instruments of research in the basic and applied sciences, which include applications in fundamental physics, materials science and engineering, nondestructive examination, elemental analysis, and contributions to research in the health and medical sciences, (b) Establish a strong technical collaboration between the nuclear engineering faculty and the MUSIC URRs

  14. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, Joel [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2011-12-01

    The United States has more oil and gas wells than any other country. As of December 31, 2004, there were more than half a million producing oil wells in the United States. That is more than three times the combined total for the next three leaders: China, Canada, and Russia. The Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) is a partnership that includes domestic oil and gas producers, service and supply companies, trade associations, academia, the Department of Energy’s Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil (SCNGO) at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). The Consortium was established in 2000. This report serves as a final technical report for the SWC activities conducted over the May 1, 2004 to December 1, 2011 timeframe. During this timeframe, the SWC worked with 173 members in 29 states and three international countries, to focus on the development of new technologies to benefit the U.S. stripper well industry. SWC worked with NETL to develop a nationwide request-for-proposal (RFP) process to solicit proposals from the U.S. stripper well industry to develop and/or deploy new technologies that would assist small producers in improving the production performance of their stripper well operations. SWC conducted eight rounds of funding. A total of 132 proposals were received. The proposals were compiled and distributed to an industry-driven SWC executive council and program sponsors for review. Applicants were required to make a formal technical presentation to the SWC membership, executive council, and program sponsors. After reviewing the proposals and listening to the presentations, the executive council made their funding recommendations to program sponsors. A total of 64 projects were selected for funding, of which 59 were fully completed. Penn State then worked with grant awardees to issue a subcontract for their approved work. SWC organized and hosted a total of 14 meetings

  15. Molecular Diversity of Methanogens in Feedlot Cattle from Ontario and Prince Edward Island, Canada▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, André-Denis G.; Auckland, Clare H.; Lynn, Denis H.

    2007-01-01

    The molecular diversity of rumen methanogens in feedlot cattle and the composition of the methanogen populations in these animals from two geographic locations were investigated using 16S rRNA gene libraries prepared from pooled PCR products from 10 animals in Ontario (127 clones) and 10 animals from Prince Edward Island (114 clones). A total of 241 clones were examined, with Methanobrevibacter ruminantium accounting for more than one-third (85 clones) of the clones identified. From these 241 clones, 23 different 16S rRNA phylotypes were identified. Feedlot cattle from Ontario, which were fed a corn-based diet, revealed 11 phylotypes (38 clones) not found in feedlot cattle from Prince Edward Island, whereas the Prince Edward Island cattle, which were fed potato by-products as a finishing diet, had 7 phylotypes (42 clones) not found in cattle from Ontario. Five sequences, representing the remaining 161 clones (67% of the clones), were common in both herds. Of the 23 different sequences, 10 sequences (136 clones) were 89.8 to 100% similar to those from cultivated methanogens belonging to the orders Methanobacteriales, Methanomicrobiales, and Methanosarcinales, and the remaining 13 sequences (105 clones) were 74.1 to 75.8% similar to those from Thermoplasma volcanium and Thermoplasma acidophilum. Overall, nine possible new species were identified from the two clone libraries, including two new species belonging to the order Methanobacteriales and a new genus/species within the order Methanosarcinales. From the present survey, it is difficult to conclude whether the geographical isolation between these two herds or differences between the two finishing diets directly influenced community structure in the rumen. Further studies are warranted to properly assess the differences between these two finishing diets. PMID:17483285

  16. Biogas production and methanogenic archaeal community in mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, D; Kurola, J M; Lähde, K; Kymäläinen, M; Sinkkonen, A; Romantschuk, M

    2014-10-01

    Over 258 Mt of solid waste are generated annually in Europe, a large fraction of which is biowaste. Sewage sludge is another major waste fraction. In this study, biowaste and sewage sludge were co-digested in an anaerobic digestion reactor (30% and 70% of total wet weight, respectively). The purpose was to investigate the biogas production and methanogenic archaeal community composition in the anaerobic digestion reactor under meso- (35-37 °C) and thermophilic (55-57 °C) processes and an increasing organic loading rate (OLR, 1-10 kg VS m(-3) d(-1)), and also to find a feasible compromise between waste treatment capacity and biogas production without causing process instability. In summary, more biogas was produced with all OLRs by the thermophilic process. Both processes showed a limited diversity of the methanogenic archaeal community which was dominated by Methanobacteriales and Methanosarcinales (e.g. Methanosarcina) in both meso- and thermophilic processes. Methanothermobacter was detected as an additional dominant genus in the thermophilic process. In addition to operating temperatures, the OLRs, the acetate concentration, and the presence of key substrates like propionate also affected the methanogenic archaeal community composition. A bacterial cell count 6.25 times higher than archaeal cell count was observed throughout the thermophilic process, while the cell count ratio varied between 0.2 and 8.5 in the mesophilic process. This suggests that the thermophilic process is more stable, but also that the relative abundance between bacteria and archaea can vary without seriously affecting biogas production. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Thermoplasmatales and Methanogens: Potential Association with the Crenarchaeol Production in Chinese Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuyan Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Crenarchaeol is a unique isoprenoid glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether (iGDGT lipid, which is only identified in cultures of ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota. However, the taxonomic origins of crenarchaeol have been debated recently. The archaeal populations, other than Thaumarchaeota, may have associations with the production of crenarchaeol in ecosystems characterized by non-thaumarchaeotal microorganisms. To this end, we investigated 47 surface soils from upland and wetland soils and rice fields and another three surface sediments from river banks. The goal was to examine the archaeal community compositions in comparison with patterns of iGDGTs in four fractional forms (intact polar-, core-, monoglycosidic- and diglycosidic-lipid fractions along gradients of environments. The DistLM analysis identified that Group I.1b Thaumarchaeota were mainly responsible for changes in crenarchaeol in the overall soil samples; however, Thermoplasmatales may also contribute to it. This is further supported by the comparison of crenarchaeol between samples characterized by methanogens, Thermoplasmatales or Group I.1b Thaumarchaeota, which suggests that the former two may contribute to the crenarchaeol pool. Last, when samples containing enhanced abundance of Thermoplasmatales and methanogens were considered, crenarchaeol was observed to correlate positively with Thermoplasmatales and archaeol, respectively. Collectively, our data suggest that the crenarchaeol production is mainly derived from Thaumarchaeota and partly associated with uncultured representatives of Thermoplasmatales and archaeol-producing methanogens in soil environments that may be in favor of their growth. Our finding supports the notion that Thaumarchaeota may not be the sole source of crenarchaeol in the natural environment, which may have implication for the evolution of lipid synthesis among different types of archaea.

  18. Acetoclastic methanogens in an anaerobic digester could be susceptible to trace metal supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, C; Bega, A; Unlu, C; Chadderton, R A; McKean, W R; Kohl, P M; Hunt, J A; Keaney, J; Willis, J L; Duran, M

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of nutrient supplementation on anaerobic biomass. While many studies emphasized the importance of supplementing trace metals such as iron, cobalt, and nickel for maximum methanogenic activity, there is no evidence whether such supplements, even at relatively low concentration, could perturb anaerobic biomass. Effects of supplementing nutrients, including yeast extract, on anaerobic biomass from two full-scale mesophilic digesters, operating under different conditions, at the North East Water Pollution Control Plant in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, were assessed using biochemical methane potential tests. The results show that acetoclastic methanogens from a recently cleaned digester was not stimulated by nutrient supplementation at relatively low concentrations and a slight perturbation was observed when supplementation was at a relatively high concentration. Furthermore, greater degree of susceptibility to the trace metal supplementation was observed for biomass from another digester that had not been cleaned for over 10 years, thus it had reduced active volume due to grit accumulation. For instance, supplementation of 200 mg/L of iron as FeCl(2)·4H(2)O to the biomass from the reduced-active-volume digester caused 17% reduction in CH(4) production, as compared to a control which did not receive any supplements, while the same concentration had no effect on the biomass from full-active-volume digester. Results strongly suggest that acetoclastic methanogens stressed due to reduced hydraulic/solids retention time may be susceptible to trace metal addition. Therefore, trace metal supplementation for anaerobic digesters should be considered on a case by case basis.

  19. Comprehensive computational analysis of Hmd enzymes and paralogs in methanogenic Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leigh John A

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methanogenesis is the sole means of energy production in methanogenic Archaea. H2-forming methylenetetrahydromethanopterin dehydrogenase (Hmd catalyzes a step in the hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis pathway in class I methanogens. At least one hmd paralog has been identified in nine of the eleven complete genome sequences of class I hydrogenotrophic methanogens. The products of these paralog genes have thus far eluded any detailed functional characterization. Results Here we present a thorough computational analysis of Hmd enzymes and paralogs that includes state of the art phylogenetic inference, structure prediction, and functional site prediction techniques. We determine that the Hmd enzymes are phylogenetically distinct from Hmd paralogs but share a common overall structure. We predict that the active site of the Hmd enzyme is conserved as a functional site in Hmd paralogs and use this observation to propose possible molecular functions of the paralog that are consistent with previous experimental evidence. We also identify an uncharacterized site in the N-terminal domains of both proteins that is predicted by our methods to directly impart function. Conclusion This study contributes to our understanding of the evolutionary history, structural conservation, and functional roles, of the Hmd enzymes and paralogs. The results of our phylogenetic and structural analysis constitute datasets that will aid in the future study of the Hmd protein family. Our functional site predictions generate several testable hypotheses that will guide further experimental characterization of the Hmd paralog. This work also represents a novel approach to protein function prediction in which multiple computational methods are integrated to achieve a detailed characterization of proteins that are not well understood.

  20. The effect of operational conditions on the sludge specific methanogenic activity and sludge biodegradability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitao, R. C.; Santaella, S. T.; Haandel, A. C. van; Zeeman, G.; Lettinga, G.

    2009-01-01

    The Specific Methanogenic Activity (SMA) and sludge biodegradability of an anaerobic sludge depends on various operational and environmental conditions imposed to the anaerobic reactor. However, the effects of hydraulic retention time (HRT), influent COD concentration (COD i nf) and sludge retention time (SRT) on those two parameters need to be elucidated. This knowledge about SMA can provide insights about the capacity of the UASB reactors to withstand organic and hydraulic shock loads, whereas the biodegradability gives information necessary for final disposal of the sludge. (Author)

  1. The effect of operational conditions on the sludge specific methanogenic activity and sludge biodegradability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitao, R. C.; Santaella, S. T.; Haandel, A. C. van; Zeeman, G.; Lettinga, G.

    2009-07-01

    The Specific Methanogenic Activity (SMA) and sludge biodegradability of an anaerobic sludge depends on various operational and environmental conditions imposed to the anaerobic reactor. However, the effects of hydraulic retention time (HRT), influent COD concentration (COD{sub i}nf) and sludge retention time (SRT) on those two parameters need to be elucidated. This knowledge about SMA can provide insights about the capacity of the UASB reactors to withstand organic and hydraulic shock loads, whereas the biodegradability gives information necessary for final disposal of the sludge. (Author)

  2. Cultivation of methanogenic community from 2-km deep subseafloor coalbeds using a continuous-flow bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imachi, H.; Tasumi, E.; Morono, Y.; Ito, M.; Takai, K.; Inagaki, F.

    2013-12-01

    Deep subseafloor environments associated with hydrocarbon reservoirs have been least explored by previous scientific drilling and hence the nature of deep subseafloor life and its ecological roles in the carbon cycle remain largely unknown. In this study, we performed cultivation of subseafloor methanogenic communities using a continuous-flow bioreactor with polyurethane sponges, called down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) reactor. The sample used for the reactor cultivation was obtained from 2 km-deep coalbeds off the Shimokita Peninsula of Japan, the northwestern Pacific, during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 337 using a riser drilling technology of the drilling vessel Chikyu. The coalbed samples were incubated anaerobically in the DHS reactor at the in-situ temperature of 40°C. Synthetic seawater supplemented with a tiny amount of yeast extract, acetate, propionate and butyrate was provided into the DHS reactor. After 34 days of the bioreactor operation, a small production of methane was observed. The methane concentration was gradually increased and the stable carbon isotopic composition of methane was consistency 13C-depleted during the bioreactor operation, indicating the occurrence of microbial methanogenesis. Microscopic observation showed that the enrichment culture contained a variety of microorganisms, including methanogen-like rod-shaped cells with F420 auto-fluorescence. Interestingly, many spore-like particles were observed in the bioreactor enrichment. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA genes showed the growth of phylogenetically diverse bacteria and archaea in the DHS reactor. Predominant archaeal components were closely related to hydrogenotrophic methanogens within the genus Methanobacterium. Some predominant bacteria were related to the spore-formers within the class Clostridia, which are overall in good agreement with microscopic observations. By analyzing ion images using a nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (Nano

  3. Methanogenic Paraffin Biodegradation: Alkylsuccinate Synthase Gene Quantification and Dicarboxylic Acid Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberding, Lisa K; Gieg, Lisa M

    2018-01-01

    Paraffinic n -alkanes (>C 17 ) that are solid at ambient temperature comprise a large fraction of many crude oils. The comparatively low water solubility and reactivity of these long-chain alkanes can lead to their persistence in the environment following fuel spills and pose serious problems for crude oil recovery operations by clogging oil production wells. However, the degradation of waxy paraffins under the anoxic conditions characterizing contaminated groundwater environments and deep subsurface energy reservoirs is poorly understood. Here, we assessed the ability of a methanogenic culture enriched from freshwater fuel-contaminated aquifer sediments to biodegrade the model paraffin n -octacosane (C 28 H 58 ). Compared with that in controls, the consumption of n -octacosane was coupled to methane production, demonstrating its biodegradation under these conditions. Smithella was postulated to be an important C 28 H 58 degrader in the culture on the basis of its high relative abundance as determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. An identified assA gene (known to encode the α subunit of alkylsuccinate synthase) aligned most closely with those from other Smithella organisms. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) and reverse transcription qPCR assays for assA demonstrated significant increases in the abundance and expression of this gene in C 28 H 58 -degrading cultures compared with that in controls, suggesting n -octacosane activation by fumarate addition. A metabolite analysis revealed the presence of several long-chain α,ω-dicarboxylic acids only in the C 28 H 58 -degrading cultures, a novel observation providing clues as to how methanogenic consortia access waxy hydrocarbons. The results of this study broaden our understanding of how waxy paraffins can be biodegraded in anoxic environments with an application toward bioremediation and improved oil recovery. IMPORTANCE Understanding the methanogenic biodegradation of different classes of hydrocarbons has important

  4. Potential for direct interspecies electron transfer in methanogenic wastewater digester aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morita, Masahiko; Malvankar, Nikhil S; Franks, Ashley E

    2011-01-01

    no significant capacity for conversion of hydrogen to methane. The aggregates converted formate to methane but at rates too low to account for the rates at which that the aggregates syntrophically metabolized ethanol, an important component of the reactor influent. Geobacter species comprised 25% of 16S r......, with conductivities 3-fold higher than the conductivities previously reported for dual-species aggregates of Geobacter species in which the two species appeared to exchange electrons via interspecies electron transfer. The temperature dependence response of the aggregate conductance was characteristic of the organic...... for electron exchange in some methanogenic systems....

  5. Impact of fulvic acids on bio-methanogenic treatment of municipal solid waste incineration leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Yan; Lei, Yuqing; Liu, Zhao; Xue, Yiting; Sun, Dezhi; Wang, Li-Ying; Holmes, Dawn E

    2016-12-01

    A considerable amount of leachate with high fulvic acid (FA) content is generated during the municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration process. This incineration leachate is usually processed by downstream bio-methanogenic treatment. However, few studies have examined the impact that these compounds have on methanogenesis and how they are degraded and transformed during the treatment process. In this study, a laboratory-scale expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactor was operated with MSW incineration leachate containing various concentrations of FA (1500 mg/L to 8000 mg/L) provided as the influent. We found that FA degradation rates decreased from 86% to 72% when FA concentrations in the reactor were increased, and that molecular size, level of humification and aromatization of the residual FA macromolecules all increased after bio-methanogenic treatment. Increasing FA influent concentrations also inhibited growth of hydrogenotrophic methanogens from the genus Methanobacterium and syntrophic bacteria from the genus Syntrophomonas, which resulted in a decrease in methane production and a concomitant increase in CO 2 content in the biogas. Sequences most similar to species from the genus Anaerolinea went up as FA concentrations increased. Bacteria from this genus are capable of extracellular electron transfer and may be using FA as an electron acceptor for growth or as a shuttle for syntrophic exchange with other microorganisms in the reactor. In order to determine whether FA could serve as an electron shuttle to promote syntrophy in an anaerobic digester, co-cultures of Geobacter metallireducens and G. sulfurreducens were grown in the presence of FA from raw leachate or from residual bioreactor effluent. While raw FA stimulated electron transfer between these two bacteria, residual FA did not have any electron shuttling abilities, indicating that FA underwent a significant transformation during the bio-methanogenic treatment process. These results are

  6. Astroparticle Physics European Consortium Town Meeting Conference

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The Astroparticle Physics European Consortium (APPEC) invites you to a town meeting at the Grand Amphithéatre de Sorbonne in Paris on the 6th and 7th April 2016 to discuss an update of the 2011 APPEC Astroparticle Physics roadmap, to be published in September 2016. In 2014 APPEC decided to launch an update of the 2011 Roadmap, transforming it to a “resource aware” roadmap. The intention was to gauge the financial impact of the beginnings of operation of the large global scale observatories put forward in the previous roadmap and to examine the possibilities of international coordination of future global initiatives. The APPEC Scientific Advisory Committee examined the field and prepared a set of recommendations. Based on these recommendations, the APPEC General Assembly drafted a set of “considerations” to be published by end of February 2016 and be debated in an open dialogue with the community, through the web page but primarily at the town meeting of 6-7 April. Based on this debate the final re...

  7. Fluorescence in situ hybridization probing of protozoal Entodinium spp. and their methanogenic colonizers in the rumen of cattle fed alfalfa hay or triticale straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Y; Kong, Y H; Seviour, R; Forster, R J; Kisidayova, S; McAllister, T A

    2014-01-01

    To develop and test a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) based technique and to identify and quantify simultaneously those methanogenic populations colonizing Entodinium spp. in the rumen of cows fed different forages. New FISH probes targeting protozoal Entodinium spp. were designed and used together with FISH probes for methanogens in the cow rumen. The composition and relative abundance of methanogenic populations colonizing Entodinium simplex-, E. caudaum- and Entodinium furca-related populations were similar. Methanogens including Methanobrevibacter thaueri, Methanobrevibacter millerae and Methanobrevibacter smithii, and members of Methanomicrobium and Methanosphaera were generally the predominant colonizers of protozoa, regardless of the forage fed to cattle. Individual animals appeared to differ in which ruminal methanogenic populations colonized each of the individual Entodinium spp. Simultaneous FISH probing is shown here to be a reliable and effective approach to investigate the dynamics of symbiotic relationships between ruminal protozoa and methanogens at a single cell level. Phylogenetically closely related Entodinium spp. were colonized by similar methanogenic populations regardless of the forage fed. This is the first report of the methanogenic archaeal populations that specifically colonize Entodinium spp. as identified using simultaneous FISH probing. Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology Reproduced with the permission of the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.

  8. Heavy-machinery traffic impacts methane emissions as well as methanogen abundance and community structure in oxic forest soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Beat; Niklaus, Pascal A; Kremer, Johann; Lüscher, Peter; Zimmermann, Stephan

    2011-09-01

    Temperate forest soils are usually efficient sinks for the greenhouse gas methane, at least in the absence of significant amounts of methanogens. We demonstrate here that trafficking with heavy harvesting machines caused a large reduction in CH(4) consumption and even turned well-aerated forest soils into net methane sources. In addition to studying methane fluxes, we investigated the responses of methanogens after trafficking in two different forest sites. Trafficking generated wheel tracks with different impact (low, moderate, severe, and unaffected). We found that machine passes decreased the soils' macropore space and lowered hydraulic conductivities in wheel tracks. Severely compacted soils yielded high methanogenic abundance, as demonstrated by quantitative PCR analyses of methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) genes, whereas these sequences were undetectable in unaffected soils. Even after a year after traffic compression, methanogen abundance in compacted soils did not decline, indicating a stability of methanogens here over time. Compacted wheel tracks exhibited a relatively constant community structure, since we found several persisting mcrA sequence types continuously present at all sampling times. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a rather large methanogen diversity in the compacted soil, and most mcrA gene sequences were mostly similar to known sequences from wetlands. The majority of mcrA gene sequences belonged either to the order Methanosarcinales or Methanomicrobiales, whereas both sites were dominated by members of the families Methanomicrobiaceae Fencluster, with similar sequences obtained from peatland environments. The results show that compacting wet forest soils by heavy machinery causes increases in methane production and release.

  9. Methanogenic pathways in Alaskan peatlands at different trophic levels with evidence from stable isotope ratios and metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L.; Liu, X.; Langford, L.; Chanton, J.; Roth, S.; Schaefer, J.; Barkay, T.; Hines, M. E.

    2017-12-01

    To better constrain the large uncertainties in emission fluxes, it is necessary to improve the understanding of methanogenic pathways in northern peatlands with heterogeneous surface vegetation and pH. Surface vegetation is an excellent indicator of porewater pH, which heavily influences the microbial communities in peatlands. Stable C isotope ratios (d13C) have been used as a robust tool to distinguish methanogenic pathways, especially in conjunction with metagenomic analysis of the microbial communities. To link surface vegetation species compositions, pH, microbial communities, and methanogenic pathways, 15 peatland sites were studied in Fairbanks and Anchorage, Alaska in the summer of 2014. These sites were ordinated using multiple factor analysis into 3 clusters based on pH, temp, CH4 and volatile fatty acid production rates, d13C values, and surface vegetation composition. In the ombrotrophic group (pH 3.3), various Sphagna species dominanted, but included shrubs Ledum decumbens and Eriophorum vaginatum. Primary fermentation rates were slow with no CH4 detected. The fen cluster (pH 5.3) was dominated by various Carex species, and CH4 production rates were lower than those in the intermediate cluster but more enriched in 13C (-49‰). Methanosaeta and Methanosarcina were the dominant methanogens. In the intermediate trophic level (pH 4.7), Sphagnum squarrosum and Carex aquatilis were abundant. The same methanogens as in fen cluster also dominated this group, but with higher abundances, which, in part, lead to the higher CH4 production rates in this cluster. The syntrophs Syntrophobacter and Pelobacter were also more abundant than the fen sites, which may explain the d13CH4 values that were the lighetest among the three clusters (-54‰). The high methanogenic potential in the intermediate trophic sites warrant further study since they are not only present in large areas currently, but also represent the transient stage during the evolution from bog to fen in

  10. Responses of methanogenic and methanotrophic communities to elevated atmospheric CO2 and temperature in a paddy field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Liu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Although climate change is predicted to affect methane (CH4 emissions in paddy soil, the dynamics of methanogens and methanotrophs in paddy fields under climate change have not yet been fully investigated. To address this issue, a multifactor climate change experiment was conducted in a Chinese paddy field using the following experimental treatments: (1 enrichment of atmospheric CO2 concentrations (500 ppm, CE, (2 canopy air warming (2°C above the ambient, WA, (3 combined CO2 enrichment and warming (CW, and (4 ambient conditions (CK. We analyzed the abundance of methanogens and methanotrophs, community structures, CH4 production and oxidation potentials, in situ CH4 emissions using real-time PCR, T-RFLP and clone library techniques, as well as biochemical assays. Compared to the control under CE and CW treatments, CH4 production potential, methanogenic gene abundance and soil microbial biomass carbon (SMBC significantly increased; the methanogenic community however remained stable. The canopy air warming treatment only had an effect on CH4 oxidation potential at the ripening stage. Phylogenic analysis indicated that methanogens in the rhizosphere were dominated by Methanosarcina, Methanocellales, Methanobacteriales and Methanomicrobiales, while methanotrophic sequences were classified as Methylococcus, Methylocaldum, Methylomonas, Methylosarcina (Type I and Methylocystis (Type II. However, the relative abundance of Methylococcus (Type I decreased under CE and CW treatments and the relative abundance of Methylocystis (Type II increased. The in situ CH4 fluxes indicated similar seasonal patterns between treatments; both CE and CW increased CH4 emissions. In conclusion results suggest that methanogens and methanotrophs respond differently to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations and warming, thus adding insights into the effects of simulated global climate change on CH4 emissions in paddy fields.

  11. Hydrogen limitation and syntrophic growth among natural assemblages of thermophilic methanogens at deep-sea hydrothermal vents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begüm D. Topçuoğlu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Thermophilic methanogens are common autotrophs at hydrothermal vents, but their growth constraints and dependence on H2 syntrophy in situ are poorly understood. Between 2012 and 2015, methanogens and H2-producing heterotrophs were detected by growth at 80°C and 55°C at most diffuse (7-40°C hydrothermal vent sites at Axial Seamount. Microcosm incubations of diffuse hydrothermal fluids at 80°C and 55°C demonstrated that growth of thermophilic and hyperthermophilic methanogens is primarily limited by H2 availability. Amendment of microcosms with NH4+ generally had no effect on CH4 production. However, annual variations in abundance and CH4 production were observed in relation to the eruption cycle of the seamount. Microcosm incubations of hydrothermal fluids at 80°C and 55°C supplemented with tryptone and no added H2 showed CH4 production indicating the capacity in situ for methanogenic H2 syntrophy. 16S rRNA genes were found in 80°C microcosms from H2-producing archaea and H2-consuming methanogens, but not for any bacteria. In 55°C microcosms, sequences were found from the H2-producing bacteria and H2-consuming methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria. A co-culture of representative organisms showed that Thermococcus paralvinellae supported the syntrophic growth of Methanocaldococcus bathoardescens at 82°C and Methanothermococcus sp. strain BW11 at 60°C. The results demonstrate that modeling of subseafloor methanogenesis should focus primarily on H2 availability and temperature, and that thermophilic H2 syntrophy can support methanogenesis within natural microbial assemblages and may be an important energy source for thermophilic autotrophs in marine geothermal environments.

  12. Comparison of methanogen diversity of yak (Bos grunniens) and cattle (Bos taurus) from the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Methane emissions by methanogen from livestock ruminants have significantly contributed to the agricultural greenhouse gas effect. It is worthwhile to compare methanogen from “energy-saving” animal (yak) and normal animal (cattle) in order to investigate the link between methanogen structure and low methane production. Results Diversity of methanogens from the yak and cattle rumen was investigated by analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences from rumen digesta samples from four yaks (209 clones) and four cattle (205 clones) from the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau area (QTP). Overall, a total of 414 clones (i.e. sequences) were examined and assigned to 95 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) using MOTHUR, based upon a 98% species-level identity criterion. Forty-six OTUs were unique to the yak clone library and 34 OTUs were unique to the cattle clone library, while 15 OTUs were found in both libraries. Of the 95 OTUs, 93 putative new species were identified. Sequences belonging to the Thermoplasmatales-affiliated Linage C (TALC) were found to dominate in both libraries, accounting for 80.9% and 62.9% of the sequences from the yak and cattle clone libraries, respectively. Sequences belonging to the Methanobacteriales represented the second largest clade in both libraries. However, Methanobrevibacter wolinii (QTPC 110) was only found in the cattle library. The number of clones from the order Methanomicrobiales was greater in cattle than in the yak clone library. Although the Shannon index value indicated similar diversity between the two libraries, the Libshuff analysis indicated that the methanogen community structure of the yak was significantly different than those from cattle. Conclusion This study revealed for the first time the molecular diversity of methanogen community in yaks and cattle in Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau area in China. From the analysis, we conclude that yaks have a unique rumen microbial ecosystem that is significantly different from that of cattle

  13. The nation's first consortium to address waste management issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikel, C.J.

    1991-01-01

    On July 26, 1989, the secretary of the Department of Energy (DOE), Admiral James Watkins, announced approval of the Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC). The consortium is composed of New Mexico State University (NMSU), the University of New Mexico, the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories. This pilot program is expected to form a model for other regional and national programs. The WERC mission is to expand the national capability to address issues associated with the management of hazardous, radioactive, and solid waste. Research, technology transfer, and education/training are the three areas that have been identified to accomplish the objectives set by the consortium. The members of the consortium will reach out to the DOE facilities, other government agencies and facilities, and private institutions across the country. Their goal is to provide resources for solutions to waste management problems

  14. 78 FR 47674 - Genome in a Bottle Consortium-Progress and Planning Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    ... principal motivation for this consortium is to enable performance assessment of sequencing and science-based... progress of the consortium work, continue to get broad input from individual stakeholders to update or refine the consortium work plan, continue to broadly solicit consortium membership from interested...

  15. 77 FR 43237 - Genome in a Bottle Consortium-Work Plan Review Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ... principal motivation for this consortium is to enable performance assessment of sequencing and science-based... National Institute of Standards and Technology Genome in a Bottle Consortium--Work Plan Review Workshop... stakeholders about the draft consortium work plan, broadly solicit consortium membership from interested...

  16. Immobilization patterns and dynamics of acetate-utilizing methanogens in sterile granular sludge from upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Jens Ejbye; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    1999-01-01

    Sterile granular sludge was inoculated with either Methanosarcina mazeii S-6, Methanosaeta concilii GP-6, or both species in acetate-fea upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors to investigate the immobilization patterns and dynamics of aceticlastic methanogens in granular sludge. After......, but where the acetate concentration was low this strain was immobilized on support material as single cells or small clumps, The data clearly show that the two aceticlastic methanogens immobilize differently in UASB systems, depending on the conditions found throughout the UASB reactor....

  17. Immobilization patterns and dynamics of acetate-utilizing methanogens immobilized in sterile granular sludge in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Jens Ejbye; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    1999-01-01

    Sterile granular sludge was inoculated with either Methanosarcina mazeii S-6, Methanosaeta concilii GP-6, or both species in acetate-fea upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors to investigate the immobilization patterns and dynamics of aceticlastic methanogens in granular sludge. After......, but where the acetate concentration was low this strain was immobilized on support material as single cells or small clumps, The data clearly show that the two aceticlastic methanogens immobilize differently in UASB systems, depending on the conditions found throughout the UASB reactor....

  18. Effects of mineral salt supplement on enteric methane emissions, ruminal fermentation and methanogen community of lactating cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohua; Liu, Chong; Chen, Yongxing; Shi, Rongguang; Cheng, Zhenhua; Dong, Hongmin

    2017-08-01

    We evaluated the effects of mineral salt supplement on enteric methane emissions, ruminal fermentation and methanogen community of dairy cows over a whole lactation period. Ten Holstein cows fed a total mixed ration (TMR) diet were randomly allocated into two groups, one supplied with mineral salts as the treatment group and the other as the control group. The methane measurement showed that the ingestion of mineral salts lowered enteric methane emissions significantly (P methane emissions by mineral salt intake could be attributed to decreased density of methanogenic archaea and that fluctuations in methane emission over the lactation period might be related to Methanobrevibacter diversity. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  19. Biodeterioration studies of thermoplastics in nature using indigenous bacterial consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd. Shahbaz Anwar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermoplastics, poly vinyl chloride and low-density polyethylene were treated in the presence of indigenously developed bacterial consortium in laboratory and natural conditions. The consortium was developed using four bacteria, selected on the basis of utilization of PVC as primary carbon source, namely P. otitidis, B. aerius, B. cereus and A. pedis isolated from the plastic waste disposal sites in Northern India. The comparative in-vitro treatment studies as revealed by the spectral and thermal data, illustrated the relatively better biodegradation potential of developed consortium for PVC than the LDPE. Further, the progressive treatments of both the thermoplastics were conducted for three months under natural conditions. For this purpose, bioformulation of consortium was prepared and characterized for the viability up to 70 days of storage at 25±1ºC. The consortium treated polymer samples were monitored through SEM and FT-IR spectroscopy. Analytical data revealed the biodeterioration potential of the developed consortium for PVC and LDPE, which could help in disposing the plastic waste.

  20. Low pressure microenvironments: Methane production at 50 mbar and 100 mbar by methanogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickol, Rebecca L.; Kral, Timothy A.

    2018-04-01

    Low pressure is often overlooked in terms of possible biocidal effects when considering a habitable environment on Mars. Few experiments have investigated the ability for microorganisms to actively grow under low pressure conditions, despite the atmosphere being a location on Earth where organisms could be exposed to these pressures. Three species of methanogens (Methanobacterium formicicum, Methanosarcina barkeri, Methanococcus maripaludis) were tested for their ability to actively grow (demonstrate an increase in methane production and optical density) within low-pressure microenvironments at 50 mbar or 100 mbar. M. formicicum was the only species to demonstrate both an increase in methane and an increase in optical density during the low-pressure exposure period for experiments conducted at 50 mbar and 100 mbar. In certain experiments, M. barkeri showed an increase in optical density during the low-pressure exposure period, likely due to the formation of multicellular aggregates, but minimal methane production (<1%). During incubation following exposure to low pressure, cultures of all species resumed methane production and increased in optical density. Thus, low pressure may not be a biocidal factor for certain methanogen species, with growth possible under low-pressure conditions. Results indicate that low pressure exposure may just be inhibitory during the exposure itself, and metabolism may resume following incubation under more ideal conditions. Further work is needed to address growth/survival under Mars surface pressures.

  1. Determination of Inhibitory Concentration of Oxytetracycline on Methanogenic Bacteria by in vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Hashemi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Antibiotics have the potential to adversely affect the microbial community. For anaerobic digestion, a sufficient methanogenic population needs to be preserved in the system. The main aim of this study was determination of inhibitory concentration of oxytetracycline on methanogenic bacteria.Methods: A 120 mL jacketed bioreactor with a 90 mL working volume was inoculated granular sludge from an anaerobic digester, substrate and different concentration of oxytetracycline with 10 days cycles and intermittent mixing. The reactor was operated at 35 ± 2 ° C. The inhibitory effect of antibiotic was evaluated by monitoring biogas production.Results: Based on the findings from each batch, complete inhibitory concentration of oxy tetracycline  was  in  concentration  of  800  mg  L-1.  Significant  relation  was  seen  between inoculated antibiotic concentrations and methane production (r=-0.86.Conclusion: The addition of antibiotics to the biomass affected the utilization of fatty acids, resulting in unfavorable effects on methanogenesis. Thus, overusing of antibiotics can adverse effects of intestinal flora.

  2. Abiotic and biotic transformations of 1,1,1-trichloroethane under methanogenic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, T.M.; McCarty, P.L.

    1987-01-01

    A common industrial solvent, 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA), is one of the most frequently found contaminants in ground water. The fate of TCA in ground water is complicated by the different possible abiotic and biotic transformations that it may undergo. Abiotic transformation of TCA can result in a mixture of 1,1-dichloro-ethylene (1,1-DCE) and acetic acid, as shown by others. This study confirms that TCA can be biotransformed by reductive dehalogenation to 1,1-dichloroethane (1,1-DCA) and chloroethane (CA) under methanogenic conditions. Also, reductive dehalogenation of 1,1-DCE to vinyl chloride (VC) is confirmed. This study demonstrates that these transformations can occur stoichiometrically. In addition, [ 14 C]TCA, [ 14 C]-1,1-DCA, [ 14 C]-1,1-DCE, [ 14 C]CA, and [ 14 C]VC were at least partially mineralized to 14 CO 2 under similar methanogenic conditions.23 references, 3 figures, 4 tables

  3. Low Pressure Tolerance by Methanogens in an Aqueous Environment: Implications for Subsurface Life on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickol, R. L.; Kral, T. A.

    2017-12-01

    The low pressure at the surface of Mars (average: 6 mbar) is one potentially biocidal factor that any extant life on the planet would need to endure. Near subsurface life, while shielded from ultraviolet radiation, would also be exposed to this low pressure environment, as the atmospheric gas-phase pressure increases very gradually with depth. Few studies have focused on low pressure as inhibitory to the growth or survival of organisms. However, recent work has uncovered a potential constraint to bacterial growth below 25 mbar. The study reported here tested the survivability of four methanogen species ( Methanothermobacter wolfeii, Methanosarcina barkeri, Methanobacterium formicicum, Methanococcus maripaludis) under low pressure conditions approaching average martian surface pressure (6 mbar - 143 mbar) in an aqueous environment. Each of the four species survived exposure of varying length (3 days - 21 days) at pressures down to 6 mbar. This research is an important stepping-stone to determining if methanogens can actively metabolize/grow under these low pressures. Additionally, the recently discovered recurring slope lineae suggest that liquid water columns may connect the surface to deeper levels in the subsurface. If that is the case, any organism being transported in the water column would encounter the changing pressures during the transport.

  4. Bacteria and methanogens differ along the gastrointestinal tract of Chinese roe deer (Capreolus pygargus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhipeng; Zhang, Zhigang; Xu, Chao; Zhao, Jingbo; Liu, Hanlu; Fan, Zhongyuan; Yang, Fuhe; Wright, André-Denis G; Li, Guangyu

    2014-01-01

    The current study provides the insight into the bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and methanogens presented in the rumen and cecum of the Chinese roe deer (Capreolus pygargus). The ruminal, ileal, cecal, and colonic contents, as well as feces, were obtained from each of the three, free-range, roe deer ingesting natural pasture after euthanasia. For the bacterial community, a total of 697,031 high-quality 16S rRNA gene sequences were generated using high-throughput sequencing, and assigned to 2,223 core operational taxonomic units (OTUs) (12 bacterial phyla and 87 genera). The phyla Firmicutes (51.2%) and Bacteroidetes (39.4%) were the dominant bacteria in the GIT of roe deer. However, the bacterial community in the rumen was significantly (Proe deer, respectively. However, the abundance of Methanobrevibacter smithii was higher in the rumen than in the cecum (P = 0.004). These results revealed that there was intra variation in the bacterial community composition across the GIT of roe deer, and also showed that the methanogen community in the rumen differed from that in the cecum.

  5. Methanogen community structure in the rumens of farmed sheep, cattle and red deer fed different diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyanathan, Jeyamalar; Kirs, Marek; Ronimus, Ron S; Hoskin, Simone O; Janssen, Peter H

    2011-05-01

    Development of inhibitors and vaccines that mitigate rumen-derived methane by targeting methanogens relies on knowledge of the methanogens present. We investigated the composition of archaeal communities in the rumens of farmed sheep (Ovis aries), cattle (Bos taurus) and red deer (Cervus elaphus) using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to generate fingerprints of archaeal 16S rRNA genes. The total archaeal communities were relatively constant across species and diets, and were less variable and less diverse than bacterial communities. There were diet- and ruminant-species-based differences in archaeal community structure, but the same dominant archaea were present in all rumens. These were members of three coherent clades: species related to Methanobrevibacter ruminantium and Methanobrevibacter olleyae; species related to Methanobrevibacter gottschalkii, Methanobrevibacter thaueri and Methanobrevibacter millerae; and species of the genus Methanosphaera. Members of an archaeal group of unknown physiology, designated rumen cluster C (RCC), were also present. RCC-specific DGGE, clone library analysis and quantitative real-time PCR showed that their 16S rRNA gene sequences were very diverse and made up an average of 26.5% of the total archaea. RCC sequences were not readily detected in the DGGE patterns of total archaeal 16S rRNA genes because no single sequence type was abundant enough to form dominant bands. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Steady state characteristics of acclimated hydrogenotrophic methanogens on inorganic substrate in continuous chemostat reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ako, Olga Y; Kitamura, Y; Intabon, K; Satake, T

    2008-09-01

    A Monod model has been used to describe the steady state characteristics of the acclimated mesophilic hydrogenotrophic methanogens in experimental chemostat reactors. The bacteria were fed with mineral salts and specific trace metals and a H(2)/CO(2) supply was used as a single limited substrate. Under steady state conditions, the growth yield (Y(CH4)) reached 11.66 g cells per mmol of H(2)/CO(2) consumed. The daily cells generation average was 5.67 x 10(11), 5.25 x 10(11), 4.2 x 10(11) and 2.1 x 10(11) cells/l-culture for the dilutions 0.071/d, 0.083/d, 0.1/d and 0.125/d, respectively. The maximum specific growth rate (mu(max)) and the Monod half-saturation coefficient (K(S)) were 0.15/d and 0.82 g/L, respectively. Using these results, the reactor performance was simulated. During the steady state, the simulation predicts the dependence of the H(2)/CO(2) concentration (S) and the cell concentration (X) on the dilution rate. The model fitted the experimental data well and was able to yield a maximum methanogenic activity of 0.24 L CH(4)/g VSS.d. The dilution rate was estimated to be 0.1/d. At the dilution rate of 0.14/d, the exponential cells washout was achieved.

  7. A systems level predictive model for global gene regulation of methanogenesis in a hydrogenotrophic methanogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sung Ho; Turkarslan, Serdar; Reiss, David J; Pan, Min; Burn, June A; Costa, Kyle C; Lie, Thomas J; Slagel, Joseph; Moritz, Robert L; Hackett, Murray; Leigh, John A; Baliga, Nitin S

    2013-11-01

    Methanogens catalyze the critical methane-producing step (called methanogenesis) in the anaerobic decomposition of organic matter. Here, we present the first predictive model of global gene regulation of methanogenesis in a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, Methanococcus maripaludis. We generated a comprehensive list of genes (protein-coding and noncoding) for M. maripaludis through integrated analysis of the transcriptome structure and a newly constructed Peptide Atlas. The environment and gene-regulatory influence network (EGRIN) model of the strain was constructed from a compendium of transcriptome data that was collected over 58 different steady-state and time-course experiments that were performed in chemostats or batch cultures under a spectrum of environmental perturbations that modulated methanogenesis. Analyses of the EGRIN model have revealed novel components of methanogenesis that included at least three additional protein-coding genes of previously unknown function as well as one noncoding RNA. We discovered that at least five regulatory mechanisms act in a combinatorial scheme to intercoordinate key steps of methanogenesis with different processes such as motility, ATP biosynthesis, and carbon assimilation. Through a combination of genetic and environmental perturbation experiments we have validated the EGRIN-predicted role of two novel transcription factors in the regulation of phosphate-dependent repression of formate dehydrogenase-a key enzyme in the methanogenesis pathway. The EGRIN model demonstrates regulatory affiliations within methanogenesis as well as between methanogenesis and other cellular functions.

  8. A novel group of abyssal methanogenic archaebacteria (Methanopyrus) growing at 110 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, R.; Kurr, M.; Jannasch, H. W.; Stetter, K. O.

    1989-12-01

    THE organisms with the highest growth temperature known so far are members of the archaebacterial genus Pyrodictium1'2. These anaerobic sulphur reducers thrive at temperatures of up to 110 °C within a shallow hydrothermal system off Vulcano, Italy. Only a few hyperthermophilic methanogens are known-members of the genus Methanothermus, which grow exclusively within terrestrial fields of fumaroles from which sulphurous gas is emitted and show an upper growth temperature of 97 °C (ref. 3), and some members of the genus Methanococcus, which grow within deep-sea hydro-thermal systems at temperatures up to about 90 °C (ref. 4). We have now isolated a novel group of methanogenic archaebacteria growing at least at 110°C from sediment samples taken by the research submersible Alvin at the Guaymas Basin hot vents (Gulf of California). This finding demonstrates the unexpected biogenic methanogenesis at temperatures above 100 °C, and, in view of biogeochemistry, could explain isotope discrimination at temperatures that were thought to be unfavourable for biological methanogenesis.

  9. Interaction of anammox bacteria and inactive methanogenic granules under high nitrogen selective pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Shou-Qing; Fessehaie, Anania; Lee, Po-Heng; Gao, Bao-Yu; Xu, Xing; Sung, Shihwu

    2010-09-01

    Granular anammox reactors usually adopted anaerobic/aerobic granules as source sludge, in which the washout of other species and enrichment of anammox biomass were very slow because of the competition of the coexisting bacteria. In this study, inactive methanogenic granules were proved to be suitable for rapid anammox granulation under high nitrogen concentrations by investigating their interaction with anammox bacteria. The start-up nitrite concentration was significantly higher than the published toxic level for anammox bacteria and other lab-scale studies. The nitrogen loading rate increased from 141 to 480 mg/L/d in 120 days operation with a total nitrogen removal efficiency of 96.0+/-0.6%. Anammox granules with a diameter of 1.3+/-0.4mm were observed over the course of three months. Molecular analysis showed that over 67% of the cells in the anammox granules were anammox bacteria after 90 days. The accommodations and proliferations of anammox bacteria in the inactive methanogenic granules might be the main reason for the high anammox purity in a short period. The important role of the extracellular polymer in the granule structure was observed via morphological observation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Archaea and Bacteria Acclimate to High Total Ammonia in a Methanogenic Reactor Treating Swine Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Esquivel-Elizondo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhibition by ammonium at concentrations above 1000 mgN/L is known to harm the methanogenesis phase of anaerobic digestion. We anaerobically digested swine waste and achieved steady state COD-removal efficiency of around 52% with no fatty-acid or H2 accumulation. As the anaerobic microbial community adapted to the gradual increase of total ammonia-N (NH3-N from 890±295 to 2040±30 mg/L, the Bacterial and Archaeal communities became less diverse. Phylotypes most closely related to hydrogenotrophic Methanoculleus (36.4% and Methanobrevibacter (11.6%, along with acetoclastic Methanosaeta (29.3%, became the most abundant Archaeal sequences during acclimation. This was accompanied by a sharp increase in the relative abundances of phylotypes most closely related to acetogens and fatty-acid producers (Clostridium, Coprococcus, and Sphaerochaeta and syntrophic fatty-acid Bacteria (Syntrophomonas, Clostridium, Clostridiaceae species, and Cloacamonaceae species that have metabolic capabilities for butyrate and propionate fermentation, as well as for reverse acetogenesis. Our results provide evidence countering a prevailing theory that acetoclastic methanogens are selectively inhibited when the total ammonia-N concentration is greater than ~1000 mgN/L. Instead, acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens coexisted in the presence of total ammonia-N of ~2000 mgN/L by establishing syntrophic relationships with fatty-acid fermenters, as well as homoacetogens able to carry out forward and reverse acetogenesis.

  11. Squalenes, phytanes and other isoprenoids as major neutral lipids of methanogenic and thermoacidophilic 'archaebacteria'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornabene, T. G.; Langworthy, T. A.; Holzer, G.; Oro, J.

    1979-01-01

    The neutral lipids from nine species of methanogenic bacteria (five methanobacilli, two methanococci, a methanospirillum and a methanosarcina) and two thermoacidophilic bacteria (Thermo-plasma and Sulfolobus) have been analyzed. The neutral lipids were found to comprise a wide range (C14 to C30) of polyisoprenyl hydrocarbons with varying degrees of saturation. The principal components represented the three major isoprenoid series (C20 phytanyl, C25 pentaisoprenyl, and C30 squalenyl), in contrast with the neutral lipids of extreme halophiles, which consist predominantly of C2O (phytanyl, geranylgeraniol), C30 (squalenes), C40 (carotenes) and C50 (bacterioruberins compounds), as reported by Kates (1978). These results, which indicate strong general similarities between genetically diverse organisms, support the classification of these organisms in a separate phylogenetic group. The occurrence of similar isoprenoid compounds in petroleum and ancient sediments and the fact that the methanogens, halophiles and thermoacidophiles live in conditions presumed to have prevailed in archaen times suggest that the isoprenoid compounds in petroleum compounds and sediment may have been directly synthesized by organisms of this type

  12. Biotransformation of tetrachloroethylene to trichloroethylene, dichloroethylene, vinyl chloride, and carbon dioxide under methanogenic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, T.M.; McCarty, P.L.

    1985-01-01

    Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), common industrial solvents, are among the most frequent contaminants found in groundwater supplies. Due to the potential toxicity and carcinogenicity of chlorinated ethylenes, knowledge about their transformation potential is important in evaluating their environmental fate. The results of this study confirm that PCE can be transformed by reductive dehalogenation to TCE, dichloroethylene, and vinyl chloride (VC) under anaerobic conditions. In addition, [ 14 C]PCE was at least partially mineralized to CO 2 . Mineralization of 24% of the PCE occurred in a continuous-flow fixed-film methanogenic column with a liquid detention time of 4 days. TCE was the major intermediate formed, but traces of dichloroethylene isomers and VC were also found. In other column studies under a different set of methanogenic conditions, nearly quantitative conversion of PCE to VC was found. These studies clearly demonstrate that TCE and VC are major intermediates in PCE biotransformation under anaerobic conditions and suggest that the potential exists for the complete mineralization of PCE to CO 2 in soil and aquifer systems and in biological treatment processes

  13. The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) - Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Kartik; Mills, Elisabeth A. C.; Hooper, Eric; National Astronomy Consortium

    2015-01-01

    The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC; see https://sites.google.com/site/nraonac/) is a growing national partnership between majority and minority universities and institutions with the goal of increasing the numbers of under-represented minorities and students who might otherwise be overlooked by the traditional academic pipeline into STEM, or related, careers. The NAC model is based on the successful 'Posse Foundation' model for undergraduate success and incorporates all its major components: pre-training of cohorts to prepare them for the research experience, joint weekly cohort activities throughout the research summer, peer- and multiple mentoring, weekly discussion of various aspects of professional and career development, continued engagement of students in science after return to home institution and lifelong mentoring. The mentors also form a cohort, exchanging information and learning from each other. With its partner institutions, the NAC aims to build a complete pipeline from undergraduate through career for the next generation of scientists and engineers. Our annual goal is to create two to three cohorts of four to five students at each site (currently NRAO-Charlottesville, NRAO-Socorro and U. Wisconsin - Madison). Recruitment occurs in the fall semester with seminars and colloquia in partnership with faculty at the minority serving institutions and the GRAD-MAP program at the University of Maryland. In this talk we describe in detail all the components of the NAC and report on our progress. We are keen to interact and partner with new universities and institutions and encourage them to contact the NAC at nac4stem@googlegroups.com.

  14. Antioxidant activity of the probiotic consortium in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saule Saduakhasova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Available evidence suggests that probiotics have different biological functions that depend on several mechanisms, such as antioxidant and DNA-protective activities. The probiotic consortium includes bacterial cultures such as Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus plantarum, and other bacterial cultures isolated from traditional Kazakh dairy products (ayran, kumys, shubat, and healthy clinical material. The aim of this study was to investigate the total antioxidant activity of the consortium of probiotic bacteria and to determine the activity of superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase, and DNA-protective action. Material and methods: In vitro comet assay was used to determine the antigenotoxicity of the probiotic consortium. Total antioxidant activity was determined using a method of analysis with Trolox as the equivalent. The analysis method of superoxide dismutase activity assesses the inhibition rate of the nitroblue tetrazolium reduction to formazan by superoxide dismutase. Determination of glutathione reductase activity is based on the measurement of the NADPH oxidation speed. Results: A significantly high level of the total antioxidant activity of the probiotic consortium intact cells (15.3 mM/ml was observed whereas the activity index of  lysate  was 11.1 mM/ml. The superoxide dismutase activity of probiotic consortium lysate was evaluated, with values that peaked at 0.24 U/mg protein. The superoxide dismutase activity of the consortium was lower in comparison to L.fernentum E-3 and L.fernentum E-18 cultures with values of 0.85 U/mg and 0.76 U/mg protein, respectively. SOD activity of probiotic consortium whole cells was not observed, which is typical for lactic acid bacteria. Glutathione reductase plays an important role in the optimal protection from oxidative stress. Glutathione reductase activity of the studied probiotic consortium was low; moreover, the activity of the lysate was two times

  15. Potential of biogenic methane for pilot-scale fermentation ex situ with lump anthracite and the changes of methanogenic consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiuqing; Chen, Yanmei; Wu, Ruiwei; Nie, Zhiqiang; Han, Zuoying; Tan, Kaili; Chen, Linyong

    2018-04-01

    Pilot-scale fermentation is one of the important processes for achieving industrialization of biogenic coalbed methane (CBM), although the mechanism of biogenic CBM remains unknown. In this study, 16 samples of formation water from CBM production wells were collected and enriched for methane production, and the methane content was between 3.1 and 21.4%. The formation water of maximum methane production was used as inoculum source for pilot-scale fermentation. The maximum methane yield of the pilot-scale fermentation with lump anthracite amendment reached 13.66 μmol CH 4 /mL, suggesting that indigenous microorganisms from formation water degraded coal to produce methane. Illumina high-throughput sequencing analysis revealed that the bacterial and archaeal communities in the formation water sample differed greatly from the methanogic water enrichment culture. The hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanocalculus dominated the formation water. Acetoclastic methanogens, from the order Methanosarcinales, dominated coal bioconversion. Thus, the biogenic methanogenic pathway ex situ cannot be simply identified according to methanogenic archaea in the original inoculum. Importantly, this study was the first time to successfully simulate methanogenesis in large-capacity fermentors (160 L) with lump anthracite amendment, and the result was also a realistic case for methane generation in pilot-scale ex situ.

  16. Methane fluxes and the functional groups of methanotrophs and methanogens in a young Arctic landscape on Disko Island, West Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Jesper Riis; Barrera Romero, Alejandro Jose; Jørgensen, Niels O. G.

    2015-01-01

    Arctic soils are known to be important methane (CH4) consumers and sources. This study integrates in situ fluxes of CH4 between upland and wetland soils with potential rates of CH4 oxidation and production as well as abundance and diversity of the methanotrophs and methanogens measured with pyros......Arctic soils are known to be important methane (CH4) consumers and sources. This study integrates in situ fluxes of CH4 between upland and wetland soils with potential rates of CH4 oxidation and production as well as abundance and diversity of the methanotrophs and methanogens measured......) at wetland sites compared to other Arctic wetlands. Potential CH4 oxidation was similar for upland and wetland soils, but the wetter soils produced more CH4 in active and permafrost layers. Accordingly, the abundance of methanogenic archaea was highest in wetland soils. The methanotrophic community also...... as methanogens were detected. This study indicates that the magnitude of CH4 oxidation and the direction of the flux, i.e. uptake or emission, are linked to different methanotrophic communities in upland and wetland soils. Also, the observed link between production/consumption rates and the microbial abundance...

  17. Activity and viability of methanogens in anaerobic digestion of unsaturated and saturated long-chain fatty acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sousa, D.Z.; Salvador, A.F.; Ramos, J.; Guedes, A.P.; Barbosa, S.; Stams, A.J.M.; Alves, M.M.; Pereira, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Lipids can be anaerobically digested to methane, but methanogens are often considered to be highly sensitive to the long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) deriving from lipids hydrolysis. In this study, the effect of unsaturated (oleate [C18:1]) and saturated (stearate [C18:0] and palmitate [C16:0]) LCFA

  18. Stable acetate production in extreme-thermophilic (70°C) mixed culture fermentation by selective enrichment of hydrogenotrophic methanogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Yan; Ding, Jing; Dai, Kun; van Loosdrecht, Mark C. M.; Zeng, Raymond J.

    2014-06-01

    The control of metabolite production is difficult in mixed culture fermentation. This is particularly related to hydrogen inhibition. In this work, hydrogenotrophic methanogens were selectively enriched to reduce the hydrogen partial pressure and to realize efficient acetate production in extreme-thermophilic (70°C) mixed culture fermentation. The continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) was stable operated during 100 days, in which acetate accounted for more than 90% of metabolites in liquid solutions. The yields of acetate, methane and biomass in CSTR were 1.5 +/- 0.06, 1.0 +/- 0.13 and 0.4 +/- 0.05 mol/mol glucose, respectively, close to the theoretical expected values. The CSTR effluent was stable and no further conversion occurred when incubated for 14 days in a batch reactor. In fed-batch experiments, acetate could be produced up to 34.4 g/L, significantly higher than observed in common hydrogen producing fermentations. Acetate also accounted for more than 90% of soluble products formed in these fed-batch fermentations. The microbial community analysis revealed hydrogenotrophic methanogens (mainly Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus and Methanobacterium thermoaggregans) as 98% of Archaea, confirming that high temperature will select hydrogenotrophic methanogens over aceticlastic methanogens effectively. This work demonstrated a potential application to effectively produce acetate as a value chemical and methane as an energy gas together via mixed culture fermentation.

  19. Toxic effects exerted on methanogenic, nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria by chemicals used in a milk analysis laboratory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopez-Fiuza, J.; Buys, B.; Mosquera-Corral, A.; Omil, F.; Mendez, R.

    2002-01-01

    The toxic effects caused by the chemicals contained in wastewaters generated by laboratories involved in raw milk analyses were assessed using batch assays. These assays were carried out separately with methanogenic, ammonium-oxidizing, nitrite-oxidizing and denitrifying bacteria. Since sodium azide

  20. Methanogenic community changes, and emissions of methane and other gases, during storage of acidified and untreated pig slurry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Søren O; Højberg, Ole; Poulsen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    H was nearly constant at values of 5.5 and 6.5. Ammonia losses were reduced by 84 and 49%, respectively, while CH4 emission with both acidification techniques was reduced by >90%. T-RFLP fingerprints showed little effect of acidification or storage time. A major T-RF of 105 bp could represent methanogens...

  1. Comparison of droplet digital PCR and quantitative real-time PCR in mcrA-based methanogen community analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Gwan Kim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Two different quantitative PCR platforms, droplet digital PCR (dd-PCR and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR, were compared in a mcrA-based methanogen community assay that quantifies ten methanogen sub-groups. Both technologies exhibited similar PCR efficiencies over at least four orders of magnitude and the same lower limits of detection (8 copies μL-DNA extract−1. The mcrA-based methanogen communities in three full-scale anaerobic digesters were examined using the two technologies. dd-PCR detected seven groups from the digesters, while qPCR did five groups, indicating that dd-PCR is more sensitive for DNA quantification. Linear regression showed quantitative agreements between both of the technologies (R2 = 0.59–0.98 in the five groups that were concurrently detected. Principal component analysis from the two datasets consistently indicated a substantial difference in the community composition among the digesters and revealed similar levels of differentiation among the communities. The combined results suggest that dd-PCR is more promising for examining methanogenic archaeal communities in biotechnological processes.

  2. Inhibitory effect and mechanism of azo dyes on anaerobic methanogenic wastewater treatment: Can redox mediator remediate the inhibition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ruobin; Chen, Xiaoguang; Luo, Ying; Ma, Puyue; Ni, Shengsheng; Xiang, Xinyi; Li, Gang

    2016-11-01

    Inhibitory effect of azo dyes on anaerobic methanogenic wastewater treatment (AMWT) has been studied mainly focusing on biological toxicity in the batch test with simulated sole co-substrate. Detailed information on inhibitory effect and mechanism of azo dyes during the long-term operation with real complex co-substrate is limited. Moreover, whether redox mediator (RM) could remediate the inhibition is still unclear in previous studies, especially under the complex scenario. In this study, the real textile wastewater with alternative concentrations of azo dyes (0-600 mg/L) were used to operate a lab-scale high-rate anaerobic methanogenic bioreactor for 127 days, and 50 μM anthraquinone-2-sulfonate (AQS) as RM was added at the last period of operation. Azo dyes with concentration of 600 mg/L could cause significant inhibition on overall (decolorizing and methanogenic) performance of AMWT. Specific methanogenic activity assays showed that acetoclastic methanogens was more susceptible to high concentration azo dyes than hydrogenotrophic methanogens. The spatial distribution of extracellular polymeric substance in the anaerobic granular sludge (AGS) showed that the high biological toxicity of azo dyes was mainly attributed to enrichment effect in tightly bound-EPS (TB-EPS). The channels of AGS was clogged by azo dyes, which was evidenced by the hard release of aromatic amines in EPSs as well as decreased porosity of AGS and scanning electron microscope images. Meanwhile, the settling ability, particle size and strength of AGS all deteriorated after azo dyes concentration exceeded 450 mg/L. The dosing of AQS could mostly remediate overall performance of the bioreactor even if the recovery of acetoclastic methanogens was slow. However, except for the porosity with a part of recovery, physical characteristics of AGS hardly recovered, and washout of sludge from the bioreactor was still happening. It suggested that additional attention should be paid to prevent sludge

  3. Bacteria and methanogens differ along the gastrointestinal tract of Chinese roe deer (Capreolus pygargus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhipeng Li

    Full Text Available The current study provides the insight into the bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT and methanogens presented in the rumen and cecum of the Chinese roe deer (Capreolus pygargus. The ruminal, ileal, cecal, and colonic contents, as well as feces, were obtained from each of the three, free-range, roe deer ingesting natural pasture after euthanasia. For the bacterial community, a total of 697,031 high-quality 16S rRNA gene sequences were generated using high-throughput sequencing, and assigned to 2,223 core operational taxonomic units (OTUs (12 bacterial phyla and 87 genera. The phyla Firmicutes (51.2% and Bacteroidetes (39.4% were the dominant bacteria in the GIT of roe deer. However, the bacterial community in the rumen was significantly (P<0.01 different from the other sampled regions along the GIT. Secondly, Prevotella spp., Anaerovibrio spp., and unidentified bacteria within the families Veillonellaceae and Paraprevotellaceae were more abundant in the rumen than in the other regions. Unidentified bacteria within the family Enterobacteriaceae, Succinivibrio spp., and Desulfovibrio spp. were more predominant in the colon than in other regions. Unidentified bacteria within the family Ruminococcaceae, and Bacteroides spp. were more prevalent in the ileum, cecum and fecal pellets. For methanogens in the rumen and cecum, a total of 375,647 high quality 16S rRNA gene sequences were obtained and assigned to 113 core OTUs. Methanobrevibacter millerae was the dominant species accounting for 77.3±7.4 (S.E % and 68.9±4.4 (S.E % of total sequences in the rumen and cecum of roe deer, respectively. However, the abundance of Methanobrevibacter smithii was higher in the rumen than in the cecum (P = 0.004. These results revealed that there was intra variation in the bacterial community composition across the GIT of roe deer, and also showed that the methanogen community in the rumen differed from that in the cecum.

  4. Environmental drivers of differences in microbial community structure in crude oil reservoirs across a methanogenic gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna L Shelton

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Stimulating in situ microbial communities in oil reservoirs to produce natural gas is a potentially viable strategy for recovering additional fossil fuel resources following traditional recovery operations. Little is known about what geochemical parameters drive microbial population dynamics in biodegraded, methanogenic oil reservoirs. We investigated if microbial community structure was significantly impacted by the extent of crude oil biodegradation, extent of biogenic methane production, and formation water chemistry. Twenty-two oil production wells from north central Louisiana, USA, were sampled for analysis of microbial community structure and fluid geochemistry. Archaea were the dominant microbial community in the majority of the wells sampled. Methanogens, including hydrogenotrophic and methylotrophic organisms, were numerically dominant in every well, accounting for, on average, over 98% of the total archaea present. The dominant Bacteria groups were Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Enterobacteriaceae, and Clostridiales, which have also been identified in other microbially-altered oil reservoirs. Comparing microbial community structure to fluid (gas, water, and oil geochemistry revealed that the relative extent of biodegradation, salinity, and spatial location were the major drivers of microbial diversity. Archaeal relative abundance was independent of the extent of methanogenesis, but closely correlated to the extent of crude oil biodegradation; therefore, microbial community structure is likely not a good sole predictor of methanogenic activity, but may predict the extent of crude oil biodegradation. However, when the shallow, highly biodegraded, low salinity wells were excluded from the statistical analysis, no environmental parameters could explain the differences in microbial community structure. This suggests that the microbial community structure of the 5 shallow up-dip wells was different than the 17 deeper, down-dip wells, and that

  5. Climate Clever Clovers: New Paradigm to Reduce the Environmental Footprint of Ruminants by Breeding Low Methanogenic Forages Utilizing Haplotype Variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parwinder Kaur

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Mitigating methane production by ruminants is a significant challenge to global livestock production. This research offers a new paradigm to reduce methane emissions from ruminants by breeding climate-clever clovers. We demonstrate wide genetic diversity for the trait methanogenic potential in Australia’s key pasture legume, subterranean clover (Trifolium subterraneum L.. In a bi-parental population the broadsense heritability in methanogenic potential was moderate (H2 = 0.4 and allelic variation in a region of Chr 8 accounted for 7.8% of phenotypic variation. In a genome-wide association study we identified four loci controlling methanogenic potential assessed by an in vitro fermentation system. Significantly, the discovery of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP on Chr 5 in a defined haplotype block with an upstream putative candidate gene from a plant peroxidase-like superfamily (TSub_g18548 and a downstream lectin receptor protein kinase (TSub_g18549 provides valuable candidates for an assay for this complex trait. In this way haplotype variation can be tracked to breed pastures with reduced methanogenic potential. Of the quantitative trait loci candidates, the DNA-damage-repair/toleration DRT100-like protein (TSub_g26967, linked to avoid the severity of DNA damage induced by secondary metabolites, is considered central to enteric methane production, as are disease resistance (TSub_g26971, TSub_g26972, and TSub_g18549 and ribonuclease proteins (TSub_g26974, TSub_g26975. These proteins are good pointers to elucidate the genetic basis of in vitro microbial fermentability and enteric methanogenic potential in subterranean clover. The genes identified allow the design of a suite of markers for marker-assisted selection to reduce rumen methane emission in selected pasture legumes. We demonstrate the feasibility of a plant breeding approach without compromising animal productivity to mitigate enteric methane emissions, which is one of the most

  6. Effects of Spartina alterniflora invasion on the communities of methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria in estuarine marsh sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jemaneh eZeleke

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of plant invasion on the microorganisms of soil sediments is very important for estuary ecology. The community structures of methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB as a function of Spartina alterniflora invasion in Phragmites australis-vegetated sediments of the Dongtan wetland in the Yangtze River estuary, China, were investigated using 454 pyrosequencing and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR of the methyl coenzyme M reductase A (mcrA and dissimilatory sulfite-reductase (dsrB genes. Sediment samples were collected from two replicate locations, and each location included three sampling stands each covered by monocultures of P. australis, S. alterniflora and both plants (transition stands, respectively. qPCR analysis revealed higher copy numbers of mcrA genes in sediments from S. alterniflora stands than P. australis stands (5- and 7.5-fold more in the spring and summer, respectively, which is consistent with the higher methane flux rates measured in the S. alterniflora stands (up to 8.01 ± 5.61 mg m-2 h-1. Similar trends were observed for SRB, and they were up to two orders of magnitude higher than the methanogens. Diversity indices indicated a lower diversity of methanogens in the S. alterniflora stands than the P. australis stands. In contrast, insignificant variations were observed in the diversity of SRB with the invasion. Although Methanomicrobiales and Methanococcales, the hydrogenotrophic methanogens, dominated in the salt marsh, Methanomicrobiales displayed a slight increase with the invasion and growth of S. alterniflora, whereas the later responded differently. Methanosarcina, the metabolically diverse methanogens, did not vary with the invasion of, but Methanosaeta, the exclusive acetate utilizers, appeared to increase with S. alterniflora invasion. In SRB, sequences closely related to the families Desulfobacteraceae and Desulfobulbaceae dominated in the salt marsh, although they displayed minimal changes with the S

  7. Molecular Characterization of the Archaeal Community in an Amazonian Wetland Soil and Culture-Dependent Isolation of Methanogenic Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siu M. Tsai

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Tropical wetlands are the major natural source of methane released into the atmosphere, producing about 60% of all natural emissions. The great wetland areas of the Amazon basin are the largest source of methane in this region, contributing an estimated 5% of the total emissions from the world’s flooded areas. However, despite the important role that methanogenic archaea play in these environments, there have been few studies on the composition of their archaeal communities. In this survey, four 16S rRNA archaeal clone libraries from different depths were constructed to examine the archaeal community in an Amazon wetland soil. A total of 599 clones were used to perform diversity and phylogenetic analyses. A broad, diverse archaeal community was found at the site, with the diversity decreasing as the depth increased (Shannon index range: 2.40–1.94. Phylogenetic analysis revealed sequences belonging to two archaeal phyla, with 65% classified as Crenarchaeota and 35% classified as Euryarchaeota. Within the Euryarchaeota group, most sequences were clustered into the Methanococci and Methanomicrobia classes, two groups of methanogens. Based on the abundance of methanogenic organisms, culture–dependent isolation was used to isolate these organisms. To enhance the growth of methanogenic archaea, a modified atmosphere (H2:CO2 = 80:20 was established combined with an anoxic environment for 18 months. Among the isolates, the genera Methanosarcina and Methanobacterium were detected throughout the anaerobic in vitro cultivation, indicating a possible role for these organisms in methane production. In conclusion, these exploratory molecular and culture–dependent approaches enhance our understanding of the archaeal community and methanogenic archaea living in wetland soils of the eastern Amazon and their role in methane production.

  8. Climate Clever Clovers: New Paradigm to Reduce the Environmental Footprint of Ruminants by Breeding Low Methanogenic Forages Utilizing Haplotype Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Parwinder; Appels, Rudi; Bayer, Philipp E; Keeble-Gagnere, Gabriel; Wang, Jiankang; Hirakawa, Hideki; Shirasawa, Kenta; Vercoe, Philip; Stefanova, Katia; Durmic, Zoey; Nichols, Phillip; Revell, Clinton; Isobe, Sachiko N; Edwards, David; Erskine, William

    2017-01-01

    Mitigating methane production by ruminants is a significant challenge to global livestock production. This research offers a new paradigm to reduce methane emissions from ruminants by breeding climate-clever clovers. We demonstrate wide genetic diversity for the trait methanogenic potential in Australia's key pasture legume, subterranean clover ( Trifolium subterraneum L.). In a bi-parental population the broadsense heritability in methanogenic potential was moderate ( H 2 = 0.4) and allelic variation in a region of Chr 8 accounted for 7.8% of phenotypic variation. In a genome-wide association study we identified four loci controlling methanogenic potential assessed by an in vitro fermentation system. Significantly, the discovery of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) on Chr 5 in a defined haplotype block with an upstream putative candidate gene from a plant peroxidase-like superfamily (TSub_g18548) and a downstream lectin receptor protein kinase (TSub_g18549) provides valuable candidates for an assay for this complex trait. In this way haplotype variation can be tracked to breed pastures with reduced methanogenic potential. Of the quantitative trait loci candidates, the DNA-damage-repair/toleration DRT100-like protein (TSub_g26967), linked to avoid the severity of DNA damage induced by secondary metabolites, is considered central to enteric methane production, as are disease resistance (TSub_g26971, TSub_g26972, and TSub_g18549) and ribonuclease proteins (TSub_g26974, TSub_g26975). These proteins are good pointers to elucidate the genetic basis of in vitro microbial fermentability and enteric methanogenic potential in subterranean clover. The genes identified allow the design of a suite of markers for marker-assisted selection to reduce rumen methane emission in selected pasture legumes. We demonstrate the feasibility of a plant breeding approach without compromising animal productivity to mitigate enteric methane emissions, which is one of the most significant

  9. Development of a vaccine to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions in agriculture: vaccination of sheep with methanogen fractions induces antibodies that block methane production in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedlock, D N; Pedersen, G; Denis, M; Dey, D; Janssen, P H; Buddle, B M

    2010-02-01

    To develop an understanding of the immune responses of ruminants to methanogens, and to provide proof of a concept that harnessing the immune system of ruminants is a potentially viable approach to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture. Four subcellular fractions, namely cytoplasmic, two cell-wall preparations, and cell wall-derived proteins were prepared from Methanobrevibacter ruminantium M1. Twenty sheep (10 months of age) were vaccinated with these fractions or with whole cells (n=4 per group). Sheep were re-vaccinated once after 3 weeks, and antibody responses to M. ruminantium M1 antigens in sera and saliva measured using ELISA at 2 weeks after the second vaccination. Antigens recognised by the antisera were visualised using Western blotting. The antisera were tested in vitro for their impact on M. ruminantium M1, measuring the effect on cell growth, methane production, and ability to induce agglutination. Basal levels (pre-vaccination) of antibodies against M. ruminantium M1 antigens were low. Vaccination with the antigenic fractions induced strong antibody responses in serum. Both IgG and IgA responses to methanogen antigens were detected in saliva following vaccination. Western blot analysis of the antisera indicated reactivity of antibodies, and a wide range of proteins was present in the different methanogen fractions. Antisera against the various fractions agglutinated methanogens in an in-vitro assay. In addition, these antisera decreased the growth of a pure culture of a methanogen and production of methane in vitro. Antigens from methanogens are immunogenic in ruminants, and antisera from sheep vaccinated with fractions of methanogens have a significant impact on these organisms, inducing cell agglutination, and decreasing growth of methanogens and production of methane. Only antisera to selected methanogen fractions were able to achieve these effects. The results demonstrate the feasibility of a vaccination strategy to mitigate emission

  10. Reductive transformation and inhibitory effect of ethylene under methanogenic conditions in peat-soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsgaard, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Ethylene (C2H4), which is a potent gaseous plant hormone, has often been found to accumulate in anoxic soils where pathways of anaerobic C2H4 oxidation are so far unknown and other C2H4 transformation processes are uncommon. The present study shows that ethylene was reduced almost...... stoichiometrically (89–92%) to ethane (C2H6) in peat-soil microcosms incubated under methanogenic conditions. Methanogenesis started after a prolonged anoxic lag-phase (>29 weeks) where added ethylene prevailed despite the availability of nitrate (NO3−) as an alternative electron acceptor. Methanogenesis, as well...... as ethylene reduction to ethane, was inhibited by 90% at 1% oxygen. Likewise, methanogenesis and ethane formation was gradually inhibited (to a similar extent) by increasing ethylene concentrations above 0.2%; this inhibition eventually reached 90–95% at 2.2–4.5% C2H4. The present results extend the known...

  11. Effects of oxytetracycline, tylosin, and amoxicillin antibiotics on specific methanogenic activity of anaerobic biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdi Amin

    2012-01-01

    Materials and Methods: To evaluate the inhibitory antibiotics amoxicillin, tetracycline, and tylosin on biomass activity, specific methanogenic activity (SMA using anerobic biomass batch; into 120 ml vials: 30 ml biomass and 70 ml substrate including volatile fatty acids, mainly acetic acid and various concentrations of antibiotics were added. Methane gas production replacement through solution of KOH (2 N as an absorber of CO 2 and bromine thymol blue as indicator was measured. Each batch was tested for 10 days. Results: Based on the findings, inhibitory concentration of oxytetracycline, amoxicillin, and tylosin were 8000, 9000, and 9000 mg/L, respectively. Conclusions: This study showed that with increasing concentrations of antibiotics, the produced biogas volume from biomass per unit weight is decreased. COD removal was 42-82 % due to long retention time and adsorption to flocks.

  12. Specific methanogenic activity (SMA of industrial sludge from the aerobic and anaerobic biological treatment

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    Danieli Schneiders

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, specific methanogenic activity (SMA tests were performed on textile sludge and food industry sludge. The textile sludge from an activated sludge was collected at the entrance of the secondary biologic clarifier and the food sludge was collected in a UASB reactor. Once collected, the sludges were characterized and tested for SMA. It was found that the microrganisms present in the food sludge had SMA of 0.17 gCOD-CH4 gSSV.d-1 and 337.05 mL of methane production, while the microrganisms of the textile sludge presented 0.10 gCOD-CH4 gSSV.d-1 of SMA and 3.04 mL of methane production. Therefore, the food sludge was more suitable to be used as a starting inoculum in UASB.

  13. Methanogenic Archaea and oral infections – ways to unravel the black box

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Peter Horz

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Archaea, organisms that make up the third domain of cellular life are members of the human oral microflora. They are strikingly less diverse than oral bacteria and appear to be relatively rare with respect to their numerical abundance. Since they have been exclusively found in association with oral infections such as periodontitis and apical periodontitis and given their unique physiology and energy metabolism, it is highly plausible that they are more than just secondary colonizers of infected areas, but instead are actively involved in the overall poly-microbial infection process. Conversely, it is a highly challenging task to clearly demonstrate their possible active participation – mostly due to the difficulty to grow them in routine microbiology laboratories. This current review points out the importance for understanding the medical impact of methanogens and aims at devising strategies for elucidating the true function of archaea in the oral ecosystem.

  14. Posttranslational Processing of Methanococcus voltae Preflagellin by Preflagellin Peptidases of M. voltae and Other Methanogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Jason D.; Jarrell, Ken F.

    2000-01-01

    Methanococcus voltae is a mesophilic archaeon with flagella composed of flagellins that are initially made with 11- or 12-amino-acid leader peptides that are cleaved prior to incorporation of the flagellin into the growing filament. Preflagellin peptidase activity was demonstrated in immunoblotting experiments with flagellin antibody to detect unprocessed and processed flagellin subunits. Escherichia coli membranes containing the expressed M. voltae preflagellin (as the substrate) were combined in vitro with methanogen membranes (as the enzyme source). Correct processing of the preflagellin to the mature flagellin was also shown directly by comparison of the N-terminal sequences of the two flagellin species. M. voltae preflagellin peptidase activity was optimal at 37°C and pH 8.5 and in the presence of 0.4 M KCl with 0.25% (vol/vol) Triton X-100. PMID:10633127

  15. Localization of Methyl-Coenzyme M Reductase as Metabolic Marker for Diverse Methanogenic Archaea

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    Christoph Wrede

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Methyl-Coenzyme M reductase (MCR as key enzyme for methanogenesis as well as for anaerobic oxidation of methane represents an important metabolic marker for both processes in microbial biofilms. Here, the potential of MCR-specific polyclonal antibodies as metabolic marker in various methanogenic Archaea is shown. For standard growth conditions in laboratory culture, the cytoplasmic localization of the enzyme in Methanothermobacter marburgensis, Methanothermobacter wolfei, Methanococcus maripaludis, Methanosarcina mazei, and in anaerobically methane-oxidizing biofilms is demonstrated. Under growth limiting conditions on nickel-depleted media, at low linear growth of cultures, a fraction of 50–70% of the enzyme was localized close to the cytoplasmic membrane, which implies “facultative” membrane association of the enzyme. This feature may be also useful for assessment of growth-limiting conditions in microbial biofilms.

  16. Anaerobic biodegradation of fluoranthene under methanogenic conditions in presence of surface-active compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchedzhieva, Nadezhda; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Angelidaki, Irini

    2008-01-01

    Bacillus cereus isolated from municipal wastewater treatment plant was used as a model strain to assess the efficiency of two anionic surfactants, a chemical surfactant and a biosurfactant during fluoranthene biodegradation under anaerobic methanogenic conditions. The surfactants selected...... for the study were linear alkyl benzene sulphonates (LAS) and rhamnolipid-biosurfactant complex from Pseudomonas sp. PS-17. Biodegradation of fluoranthene was monitored by GC/MS for a period up to 12th day. No change in the fluoranthene concentration was registered after 7th day. The presence of LAS enhanced...... the cell growth as well as the fluoranthene biodegradation. The rhamnolipid-biosurfactant at both used concentrations inhibited the cell growth and had no effect on the biodegradation rate. It was shown that LAS did not affect the microbial cell permeability and its positive effect on fluoranthene...

  17. Integrated biogas upgrading and hydrogen utilization in an anaerobic reactor containing enriched hydrogenotrophic methanogenic culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Gang; Angelidaki, Irini

    2012-01-01

    Biogas produced by anaerobic digestion, is mainly used in a gas motor for heat and electricity production. However, after removal of CO2, biogas can be upgraded to natural gas quality, giving more utilization possibilities, such as utilization as autogas, or distant utilization by using...... the existing natural gas grid. The current study presents a new biological method for biogas upgrading in a separate biogas reactor, containing enriched hydrogenotrophic methanogens and fed with biogas and hydrogen. Both mesophilic- and thermophilic anaerobic cultures were enriched to convert CO2 to CH4...... by PCR–DGGE. Nonetheless, they all belonged to the order Methanobacteriales, which can mediate hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Biogas upgrading was then tested in a thermophilic anaerobic reactor under various operation conditions. By continuous addition of hydrogen in the biogas reactor, high degree...

  18. Methanomassiliicoccus luminyensis gen. nov., sp. nov., a methanogenic archaeon isolated from human faeces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dridi, Bédis; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Ollivier, Bernard; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2012-08-01

    During attempts to obtain novel, human-associated species of the domain Archaea, a coccoid micro-organism, designated strain B10(T), was isolated in pure culture from a sample of human faeces collected in Marseille, France. On the basis of its phenotypic characteristics and 16S rRNA and mcrA gene sequences, the novel strain was classified as a methanogenic archaeon. Cells of the strain were non-motile, Gram-staining-positive cocci that were approximately 850 nm in diameter and showed autofluorescence at 420 nm. Cells were lysed by 0.1% (w/v) SDS. With hydrogen as the electron donor, strain B10(T) produced methane by reducing methanol. The novel strain was unable to produce methane when hydrogen or methanol was the sole energy source. In an atmosphere containing CO(2), strain B10(T) could not produce methane from formate, acetate, trimethylamine, 2-butanol, 2-propanol, cyclopentanol, 2-pentanol, ethanol, 1-propanol or 2,3-butanediol. Strain B10(T) grew optimally with 0.5-1.0% (w/v) NaCl, at pH 7.6 and at 37 °C. It required tungstate-selenite for growth. The complete genome of the novel strain was sequenced; the size of the genome was estimated to be 2.05 Mb and the genomic DNA G+C content was 59.93 mol%. In phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, the highest sequence similarities (98.0-98.7%) were seen between strain B10(T) and several uncultured, methanogenic Archaea that had been collected from the digestive tracts of a cockroach, a chicken and mammals. In the same analysis, the non-methanogenic 'Candidatus Aciduliprofundum boonei' DSM 19572 was identified as the cultured micro-organism that was most closely related to strain B10(T) (83.0% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). Each of the three treeing algorithms used in the analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain B10(T) belongs to a novel order that is distinct from the Thermoplasmatales. The novel strain also appeared to be distinct from Methanosphaera stadtmanae DSM 3091(T) (72

  19. Increased methane production in cyanobacteria and methanogenic microbe co-cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Tracey; Kwan, Matthew; Adler, Lewis; Mills, Toby J; Neilan, Brett A; Conibeer, Gavin; Patterson, Robert

    2017-11-01

    A novel light-to-bioenergy system produced 3.5 times the baseline methane output using a co-culture of cyanobacteria (Oscillatoria sp.) and a methanogenic microbial community. Analysis of micronutrients in the system during the growth phase indicated that cobalt, iron, nickel and zinc were not appreciably consumed. The stable consumption and return of macronutrients calcium and magnesium were also observed. Essential macronutrients nitrogen, in the form of nitrate, and phosphorus showed no cycling during the growth phase and were depleted at rates of 0.35mg/L/day and 0.40µg/L/day, respectively. Biofilm formation increased the resilience of biomass to bacterial degradation in an anaerobic digester, as shown by viability assays of cyanobacterial biofilms in the co-culture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Molecular Biomarker-Based Biokinetic Modeling of a PCE-Dechlorinating and Methanogenic Mixed Culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heavner, Gretchen L. W.; Rowe, Annette R.; Mansfeldt, Cresten B.; Pan, Ju Khuan; Gossett, James M.; Richardson, Ruth E.

    2013-04-16

    Bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes via anaerobic reductive dechlorination relies upon the activity of specific microbial population-most notably Dehalococcoides (DHC) strains. In the lab and field Dehalococcoides grow most robustly in mixed communities which usually contain both fermenters and methanogens. Recently, researchers have been developing quantitative molecular biomarkers to aid in field site diagnostics and it is hoped that these biomarkers could aid in the modeling of anaerobic reductive dechlorination. A comprehensive biokinetic model of a community containing Dehalococcoides mccartyi (formerly D. ethenogenes) was updated to describe continuously fed reactors with specific biomass levels based on quantitative PCR (qPCR)-based population data (DNA and RNA). The model was calibrated and validated with subsets of chemical and molecular biological data from various continuous feed experiments (n = 24) with different loading rates of the electron acceptor (1.5 to 482 μeeq/L-h), types of electron acceptor (PCE, TCE, cis-DCE) and electron donor to electron acceptor ratios. The resulting model predicted the sum of dechlorination products vinyl chloride (VC) and ethene (ETH) well. However, VC alone was under-predicted and ETH was over predicted. Consequently, competitive inhibition among chlorinated ethenes was examined and then added to the model. Additionally, as 16S rRNA gene copy numbers did not provide accurate model fits in all cases, we examined whether an improved fit could be obtained if mRNA levels for key functional enzymes could be used to infer respiration rates. The resulting empirically derived mRNA “adjustment factors” were added to the model for both DHC and the main methanogen in the culture (a Methanosaeta species) to provide a more nuanced prediction of activity. Results of this study suggest that at higher feeding rates competitive inhibition is important and mRNA provides a more accurate indicator of a population’s instantaneous

  1. Methanoculleus sediminis sp. nov., a methanogen from sediments near a submarine mud volcano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sheng-Chung; Chen, Mei-Fei; Lai, Mei-Chin; Weng, Chieh-Yin; Wu, Sue-Yao; Lin, Saulwood; Yang, Tsanyao F; Chen, Po-Chun

    2015-07-01

    A mesophilic, hydrogenotrophic methanogen, strain S3Fa(T), was isolated from sediments collected by Ocean Researcher I cruise ORI-934 in 2010 near the submarine mud volcano MV4 located at the upper slope of south-west Taiwan. The methanogenic substrates utilized by strain S3Fa(T) were formate and H2/CO2 but not acetate, secondary alcohols, methylamines, methanol or ethanol. Cells of strain S3Fa(T) were non-motile, irregular cocci, 0.5-1.0 μm in diameter. The surface-layer protein showed an Mr of 128,000.The optimum growth conditions were 37 °C, pH 7.1 and 0.17 M NaCl. The DNA G+C content of the genome of strain S3Fa(T) was 62.3 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that strain S3Fa(T) was most closely related to Methanoculleus marisnigri JR1(T) (99.3% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). Genome relatedness between strain S3Fa(T) and Methanoculleus marisnigri JR1(T) was computed using both genome-to-genome distance analysis (GGDA) and average nucleotide identity (ANI) with values of 46.3-55.5% and 93.08%, respectively. Based on morphological, phenotypic, phylogenetic and genomic relatedness data, it is evident that strain S3Fa(T) represents a novel species of the genus Methanoculleus, for which the name Methanoculleus sediminis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is S3Fa(T) ( = BCRC AR10044(T) = DSM 29354(T)).

  2. Ruminal fermentation of Anti-methanogenic Nitrate- and Nitro-Containing Forages In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin C. Anderson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate, 3-nitro-1-propionic acid (NPA and 3-nitro-1-propanol (NPOH can accumulate in forages and be poisonous to animals if consumed in high enough amounts. These chemicals are also recognized as potent anti-methanogenic compounds, but plants naturally containing these chemicals have been studied little in this regard. Presently, we found that nitrate-, NPA- or NPOH-containing forages effectively decreased methane production, by 35 to 87%, during in vitro fermentation by mixed cultures of ruminal microbes compared to fermentation by cultures incubated similarly with alfalfa. Methane production was further decreased during incubation of mixed cultures also inoculated with Denitrobacterium detoxificans, a ruminal bacterium known to metabolize nitrate, NPA and NPOH. Inhibition of methanogens within the mixed cultures was greatest with the NPA- and NPOH-containing forages. Hydrogen accumulated in all the mixed cultures incubated with forages containing nitrate, NPA or NPOH but was dramatically higher, exceeding 40 µmol hydrogen/mL, in mixed cultures incubated with NPA-containing forage but not inoculated with D. detoxificans. This possibly reflects the inhibition of hydrogenase-catalyzed uptake of hydrogen produced via conversion of 50 µmol added formate per mL to hydrogen. Accumulations of volatile fatty acids revealed compensatory changes in fermentation in mixed cultures incubated with the nitrate-, NPA- and NPOH-containing forages as evidenced by lower accumulations of acetate, and in some cases higher accumulations of butyrate and lower accumulations of ammonia, iso-buytrate and iso-valerate compared to cultures incubated with alfalfa. Results reveal that nitrate, NPA and NPOH that accumulate naturally in forages can be made available within ruminal incubations to inhibit methanogenesis. Further research is warranted to determine if diets can be formulated with nitrate-, NPA- and NPOH-containing forages to achieve efficacious mitigation in

  3. Biosynthesis of 4-thiouridine in tRNA in the methanogenic archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuchen; Zhu, Xiang; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Orlando, Ron; Söll, Dieter; Whitman, William B

    2012-10-26

    4-Thiouridine (s(4)U) is a conserved modified nucleotide at position 8 of bacterial and archaeal tRNAs and plays a role in protecting cells from near-UV killing. Escherichia coli employs the following two enzymes for its synthesis: the cysteine desulfurase IscS, which forms a Cys persulfide enzyme adduct from free Cys; and ThiI, which adenylates U8 and transfers sulfur from IscS to form s(4)U. The C-terminal rhodanese-like domain (RLD) of ThiI is responsible for the sulfurtransferase activity. The mechanism of s(4)U biosynthesis in archaea is not known as many archaea lack cysteine desulfurase and an RLD of the putative ThiI. Using the methanogenic archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis, we show that deletion of ThiI (MMP1354) abolished the biosynthesis of s(4)U but not of thiamine. MMP1354 complements an Escherichia coli ΔthiI mutant for s(4)U formation, indicating that MMP1354 is sufficient for sulfur incorporation into s(4)U. In the absence of an RLD, MMP1354 uses Cys(265) and Cys(268) located in the PP-loop pyrophosphatase domain to generate persulfide and disulfide intermediates for sulfur transfer. In vitro assays suggest that S(2-) is a physiologically relevant sulfur donor for s(4)U formation catalyzed by MMP1354 (K(m) for Na(2)S is ∼1 mm). Thus, methanogenic archaea developed a strategy for sulfur incorporation into s(4)U that differs from bacteria; this may be an adaptation to life in sulfide-rich environments.

  4. Biosynthesis of 4-Thiouridine in tRNA in the Methanogenic Archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuchen; Zhu, Xiang; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Orlando, Ron; Söll, Dieter; Whitman, William B.

    2012-01-01

    4-Thiouridine (s4U) is a conserved modified nucleotide at position 8 of bacterial and archaeal tRNAs and plays a role in protecting cells from near-UV killing. Escherichia coli employs the following two enzymes for its synthesis: the cysteine desulfurase IscS, which forms a Cys persulfide enzyme adduct from free Cys; and ThiI, which adenylates U8 and transfers sulfur from IscS to form s4U. The C-terminal rhodanese-like domain (RLD) of ThiI is responsible for the sulfurtransferase activity. The mechanism of s4U biosynthesis in archaea is not known as many archaea lack cysteine desulfurase and an RLD of the putative ThiI. Using the methanogenic archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis, we show that deletion of ThiI (MMP1354) abolished the biosynthesis of s4U but not of thiamine. MMP1354 complements an Escherichia coli ΔthiI mutant for s4U formation, indicating that MMP1354 is sufficient for sulfur incorporation into s4U. In the absence of an RLD, MMP1354 uses Cys265 and Cys268 located in the PP-loop pyrophosphatase domain to generate persulfide and disulfide intermediates for sulfur transfer. In vitro assays suggest that S2− is a physiologically relevant sulfur donor for s4U formation catalyzed by MMP1354 (Km for Na2S is ∼1 mm). Thus, methanogenic archaea developed a strategy for sulfur incorporation into s4U that differs from bacteria; this may be an adaptation to life in sulfide-rich environments. PMID:22904325

  5. Low pressure and desiccation effects on methanogens: Implications for life on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kral, Timothy A.; Altheide, Travis S.; Lueders, Adrienne E.; Schuerger, Andrew C.

    2011-02-01

    Conditions on the surface of Mars would appear to be too hostile for life as we know it. But the subsurface is another matter. If liquid water is present, even intermittently, life forms present would at least be protected from the lethal radiation bombarding the surface. However, life would have to contend with variations in pressure and possibly extended periods of desiccation. The research reported here involves both active metabolism (methanogenesis) at 400 and 50 mbar of pressure, pressures that would be found in the near subsurface of Mars, and survival following desiccation at both 1 bar (a pressure that would be found in the Martian subsurface) and 6 mbar (the lowest pressure at the surface and very near subsurface). The three methanogens tested for active metabolism, Methanothermobacter wolfeii, Methanosarcina barkeri and Methanobacterium formicicum, all demonstrated methane production at both 400 and 50 mbar on JSC Mars-1, a Mars soil simulant. Methane production at 50 mbar was much reduced compared to that at 400 mbar, most likely due to the greater stress at the lower pressure. In desiccation survival experiments, M. barkeri had survived 330 days of desiccation at 1 bar, while M. wolfeii and M. formicicum survived 180 and 120 days, respectively. Methanococcus maripaludis did not survive desiccation at all at 1 bar. At 6 mbar, M. wolfeii, M. barkeri and M. formicicum survived 120 days of desiccation while M. maripaludis survived 60 days. These results along with results from previous research would seem to indicate that there is no reason that methanogens could not inhabit the subsurface of Mars.

  6. Vitamin and Amino Acid Auxotrophy in Anaerobic Consortia Operating under Methanogenic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubalek, Valerie; Buck, Moritz; Tan, BoonFei; Foght, Julia; Wendeberg, Annelie; Berry, David; Bertilsson, Stefan; Eiler, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Syntrophy among Archaea and Bacteria facilitates the anaerobic degradation of organic compounds to CH 4 and CO 2 . Particularly during aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon mineralization, as in the case of crude oil reservoirs and petroleum-contaminated sediments, metabolic interactions between obligate mutualistic microbial partners are of central importance. Using micromanipulation combined with shotgun metagenomic approaches, we describe the genomes of complex consortia within short-chain alkane-degrading cultures operating under methanogenic conditions. Metabolic reconstruction revealed that only a small fraction of genes in the metagenome-assembled genomes encode the capacity for fermentation of alkanes facilitated by energy conservation linked to H 2 metabolism. Instead, the presence of inferred lifestyles based on scavenging anabolic products and intermediate fermentation products derived from detrital biomass was a common feature. Additionally, inferred auxotrophy for vitamins and amino acids suggests that the hydrocarbon-degrading microbial assemblages are structured and maintained by multiple interactions beyond the canonical H 2 -producing and syntrophic alkane degrader-methanogen partnership. Compared to previous work, our report points to a higher order of complexity in microbial consortia engaged in anaerobic hydrocarbon transformation. IMPORTANCE Microbial interactions between Archaea and Bacteria mediate many important chemical transformations in the biosphere from degrading abundant polymers to synthesis of toxic compounds. Two of the most pressing issues in microbial interactions are how consortia are established and how we can modulate these microbial communities to express desirable functions. Here, we propose that public goods (i.e., metabolites of high energy demand in biosynthesis) facilitate energy conservation for life under energy-limited conditions and determine the assembly and function of the consortia. Our report suggests that an

  7. Influence of DNA isolation on Q-PCR-based quantification of methanogenic Archaea in biogas fermenters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, I; Mundt, K; Sontag, M; Baumstark, I; Nettmann, E; Klocke, M

    2010-03-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (Q-PCR) is commonly applied for the detection of certain microorganisms in environmental samples. However, some environments, like biomass-degrading biogas fermenters, are enriched with PCR-interfering substances. To study the impact of the DNA extraction protocol on the results of Q-PCR-based analysis of the methane-producing archaeal community in biogas fermenters, nine different protocols with varying cell disruption and DNA purification approaches were tested. Differences in the quantities of the isolated DNA and the purity parameters were found, with the best cell lysis efficiencies being obtained by a combined lysozyme/SDS-based lysis. When DNA was purified by sephacryl columns, the amount of DNA decreased by one log cycle but PCR inhibitors were eliminated sufficiently. In the case of detection of methanogenic Archaea, the chosen DNA isolation protocol strongly influenced the Q-PCR-based determination of 16S rDNA copy numbers. For example, with protocols including mechanical cell disruption, the 16S rDNA of Methanobacteriales were predominantly amplified (81-90% of the total 16S rDNA copy numbers), followed by the 16S rDNA of Methanomicrobiales (9-18%). In contrast, when a lysozyme/SDS-based cell lysis was applied, the 16S rDNA copy numbers determined for these two orders were the opposite (Methanomicrobiales 82-95%, Methanobacteriales 4-18%). In extreme cases, the DNA isolation method led to discrimination of some groups of methanogens (e.g. members of the Methanosaetaceae). In conclusion, for extraction of high amounts of microbial DNA with high purity from samples of biogas plants, a combined lysozyme/SDS-based cell lysis followed by a purification step with sephacryl columns is recommended. Copyright 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Ruminal Fermentation of Anti-Methanogenic Nitrate- and Nitro-Containing Forages In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Robin C.; Ripley, Laura H.; Bowman, Jan G. P.; Callaway, Todd R.; Genovese, Kenneth J.; Beier, Ross C.; Harvey, Roger B.; Nisbet, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate, 3-nitro-1-propionic acid (NPA) and 3-nitro-1-propanol (NPOH) can accumulate in forages and be poisonous to animals if consumed in high enough amounts. These chemicals are also recognized as potent anti-methanogenic compounds, but plants naturally containing these chemicals have been studied little in this regard. Presently, we found that nitrate-, NPA-, or NPOH-containing forages effectively decreased methane production, by 35–87%, during in vitro fermentation by mixed cultures of ruminal microbes compared to fermentation by cultures incubated similarly with alfalfa. Methane production was further decreased during the incubation of mixed cultures also inoculated with Denitrobacterium detoxificans, a ruminal bacterium known to metabolize nitrate, NPA, and NPOH. Inhibition of methanogens within the mixed cultures was greatest with the NPA- and NPOH-containing forages. Hydrogen accumulated in all the mixed cultures incubated with forages containing nitrate, NPA or NPOH and was dramatically higher, exceeding 40 μmol hydrogen/mL, in mixed cultures incubated with NPA-containing forage but not inoculated with D. detoxificans. This possibly reflects the inhibition of hydrogenase-catalyzed uptake of hydrogen produced via conversion of 50 μmol added formate per milliliter to hydrogen. Accumulations of volatile fatty acids revealed compensatory changes in fermentation in mixed cultures incubated with the nitrate-, NPA-, and NPOH-containing forages as evidenced by lower accumulations of acetate, and in some cases, higher accumulations of butyrate and lower accumulations of ammonia, iso-buytrate, and iso-valerate compared to cultures incubated with alfalfa. Results reveal that nitrate, NPA, and NPOH that accumulate naturally in forages can be made available within ruminal incubations to inhibit methanogenesis. Further research is warranted to determine if diets can be formulated with nitrate-, NPA-, and NPOH-containing forages to achieve efficacious mitigation

  9. Ruminal Fermentation of Anti-Methanogenic Nitrate- and Nitro-Containing Forages In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Robin C; Ripley, Laura H; Bowman, Jan G P; Callaway, Todd R; Genovese, Kenneth J; Beier, Ross C; Harvey, Roger B; Nisbet, David J

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate, 3-nitro-1-propionic acid (NPA) and 3-nitro-1-propanol (NPOH) can accumulate in forages and be poisonous to animals if consumed in high enough amounts. These chemicals are also recognized as potent anti-methanogenic compounds, but plants naturally containing these chemicals have been studied little in this regard. Presently, we found that nitrate-, NPA-, or NPOH-containing forages effectively decreased methane production, by 35-87%, during in vitro fermentation by mixed cultures of ruminal microbes compared to fermentation by cultures incubated similarly with alfalfa. Methane production was further decreased during the incubation of mixed cultures also inoculated with Denitrobacterium detoxificans, a ruminal bacterium known to metabolize nitrate, NPA, and NPOH. Inhibition of methanogens within the mixed cultures was greatest with the NPA- and NPOH-containing forages. Hydrogen accumulated in all the mixed cultures incubated with forages containing nitrate, NPA or NPOH and was dramatically higher, exceeding 40 μmol hydrogen/mL, in mixed cultures incubated with NPA-containing forage but not inoculated with D. detoxificans. This possibly reflects the inhibition of hydrogenase-catalyzed uptake of hydrogen produced via conversion of 50 μmol added formate per milliliter to hydrogen. Accumulations of volatile fatty acids revealed compensatory changes in fermentation in mixed cultures incubated with the nitrate-, NPA-, and NPOH-containing forages as evidenced by lower accumulations of acetate, and in some cases, higher accumulations of butyrate and lower accumulations of ammonia, iso-buytrate, and iso-valerate compared to cultures incubated with alfalfa. Results reveal that nitrate, NPA, and NPOH that accumulate naturally in forages can be made available within ruminal incubations to inhibit methanogenesis. Further research is warranted to determine if diets can be formulated with nitrate-, NPA-, and NPOH-containing forages to achieve efficacious mitigation in

  10. Bioconversion of carbon dioxide to methane using hydrogen and hydrogenotrophic methanogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabranska, Jana; Pokorna, Dana

    2017-12-14

    Biogas produced from organic wastes contains energetically usable methane and unavoidable amount of carbon dioxide. The exploitation of whole biogas energy is locally limited and utilization of the natural gas transport system requires CO 2 removal or its conversion to methane. The biological conversion of CO 2 and hydrogen to methane is well known reaction without the demand of high pressure and temperature and is carried out by hydrogenotrophic methanogens. Reducing equivalents to the biotransformation of carbon dioxide from biogas or other resources to biomethane can be supplied by external hydrogen. Discontinuous electricity production from wind and solar energy combined with fluctuating utilization cause serious storage problems that can be solved by power-to-gas strategy representing the production of storable hydrogen via the electrolysis of water. The possibility of subsequent repowering of the energy of hydrogen to the easily utilizable and transportable form is a biological conversion with CO 2 to biomethane. Biomethanization of CO 2 can take place directly in anaerobic digesters fed with organic substrates or in separate bioreactors. The major bottleneck in the process is gas-liquid mass transfer of H 2 and the method of the effective input of hydrogen into the system. There are many studies with different bioreactors arrangements and a way of enrichment of hydrogenotrophic methanogens, but the system still has to be optimized for a higher efficiency. The aim of the paper is to gather and critically assess the state of a research and experience from laboratory, pilot and operational applications of carbon dioxide bioconversion and highlight further perspective fields of research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Augmentation of a Microbial Consortium for Enhanced Polylactide (PLA) Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Nimisha R; Sekhar, Vini C; Nampoothiri, K Madhavan

    2016-03-01

    Bioplastics are eco-friendly and derived from renewable biomass sources. Innovation in recycling methods will tackle some of the critical issues facing the acceptance of bioplastics. Polylactic acid (PLA) is the commonly used and well-studied bioplastic that is presumed to be biodegradable. Considering their demand and use in near future, exploration for microbes capable of bioplastic degradation has high potential. Four PLA degrading strains were isolated and identified as Penicillium chrysogenum, Cladosporium sphaerospermum, Serratia marcescens and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa. A consortium of above strains degraded 44 % (w/w) PLA in 30 days time in laboratory conditions. Subsequently, the microbial consortium employed effectively for PLA composting.

  12. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium - Final Progress Report October 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bement, Arden L.

    2001-10-23

    The basic mission of the Consortium was to advance the science and understanding of high-T{sub c} superconductivity and to promote the development of new materials and improved processing technology. Focused group efforts were the key element of the research program. One program area is the understanding of the layered structures involved in candidate materials and the factors that control their formation, stability and relationship superconductor properties. The other program area had a focus upon factors that limit or control the transport properties such as weak links, flux lattice behavior, and interfaces. Interactions among Consortium d with industrial armiates were an integral part of the program.

  13. Comparison of methanogen diversity of yak (Bos grunniens and cattle (Bos taurus from the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Xiao

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methane emissions by methanogen from livestock ruminants have significantly contributed to the agricultural greenhouse gas effect. It is worthwhile to compare methanogen from “energy-saving” animal (yak and normal animal (cattle in order to investigate the link between methanogen structure and low methane production. Results Diversity of methanogens from the yak and cattle rumen was investigated by analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences from rumen digesta samples from four yaks (209 clones and four cattle (205 clones from the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau area (QTP. Overall, a total of 414 clones (i.e. sequences were examined and assigned to 95 operational taxonomic units (OTUs using MOTHUR, based upon a 98% species-level identity criterion. Forty-six OTUs were unique to the yak clone library and 34 OTUs were unique to the cattle clone library, while 15 OTUs were found in both libraries. Of the 95 OTUs, 93 putative new species were identified. Sequences belonging to the Thermoplasmatales-affiliated Linage C (TALC were found to dominate in both libraries, accounting for 80.9% and 62.9% of the sequences from the yak and cattle clone libraries, respectively. Sequences belonging to the Methanobacteriales represented the second largest clade in both libraries. However, Methanobrevibacter wolinii (QTPC 110 was only found in the cattle library. The number of clones from the order Methanomicrobiales was greater in cattle than in the yak clone library. Although the Shannon index value indicated similar diversity between the two libraries, the Libshuff analysis indicated that the methanogen community structure of the yak was significantly different than those from cattle. Conclusion This study revealed for the first time the molecular diversity of methanogen community in yaks and cattle in Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau area in China. From the analysis, we conclude that yaks have a unique rumen microbial ecosystem that is significantly different

  14. Methane emission and community composition patterns of rumen bacteria and methanogens in Holstein dairy cows as affected by silage type and dietary fat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Morten; Højberg, Ole; Canibe, Nuria

    Silage type and dietary fat supplementation can affect enteric methane (CH4) emissions from dairy cows. However, the impact of dietary interventions on the rumen microbiota is still not fully understood. The present study used six rumen cannulated Holstein cows (6x4 incomplete Latin Square......) to investigate effects of silages with different methanogenic potential (early grass, late grass, and maize) combined with a CH4-reducing feed additive (crushed rapeseed) on bacterial and methanogenic communities in the rumen. Bacterial and methanogenic community patterns were evaluated by T-RFLP analysis of 16S...... rRNA and methyl co-enzyme M reductase (mcrA) genes, respectively. Methanogen abundances were evaluated by qPCR using two mcrA-targeting primer sets. Silage type significantly affected CH4 emissions and rumen acetate:propionate ratios, being highest for late grass and lowest for maize. Dietary fat...

  15. Computational Astrophysics Consortium 3 - Supernovae, Gamma-Ray Bursts and Nucleosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woosley, Stan [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States)

    2014-08-29

    Final project report for UCSC's participation in the Computational Astrophysics Consortium - Supernovae, Gamma-Ray Bursts and Nucleosynthesis. As an appendix, the report of the entire Consortium is also appended.

  16. 24 CFR 943.124 - What elements must a consortium agreement contain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING AGENCY CONSORTIA AND JOINT VENTURES Consortia § 943.124 What... existence of the consortium and the terms under which a PHA may join or withdraw from the consortium before...

  17. Towards efficient crude oil degradation by a mixed bacterial consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, K.S.M.; Thahira-Rahman, J.; Banat, I.M. [University of Ulster, Coleraine, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom). School of Biological and Environmental Studies; Lakshmanaperumalsamy, P. [Bharathiar Univ., Tamilnadu (India). Dept. of Environmental Sciences

    2002-12-01

    A laboratory study was undertaken to assess the optimal conditions for biodegradation of Bombay High (BH) crude oil. Among 130 oil degrading bacterial cultures isolated from oil contaminated soil samples, Micrococcus sp. GS2-22, Corynebacterium sp. GS5-66, Flavobacterium sp. DS5-73, Bacillus sp. DS6-86 and Pseudomonas sp. DS10-129 were selected for the study based on the efficiency of crude oil utilisation. A mixed bacterial consortium prepared using the above strains was also used. Individual bacterial cultures showed less growth and degradation than did the mixed bacterial consortium. At 1% crude oil concentration, the mixed bacterial consortium degraded a maximum of 78% of BH crude oil. This was followed by 66% by Pseudomonas sp. DS10-129, 59% by Bacillus sp. DS6-86, 49% by Micrococcus sp. GS2-22, 43% by Corynebacterium sp. GS5-66 and 41% by Flavobacterium sp. DS5-73. The percentage of degradation by the mixed bacterial consortium decreased from 78% to 52% as the concentration of crude oil was increased from 1% to 10%. Temperature of 30{sup o}C and pH 7.5 were found to be optima for maximum biodegradation. (Author)

  18. Rio Grande Basin Consortium: Mission, goals, and activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah A. Potter; Deborah M. Finch

    1996-01-01

    The Rio Grande Basin Consortium (RGBC) serves as a networking group and clearinghouse for scientific information pertaining to the Rio Grande Basin. Its membership consists of natural and social scientists from New Mexico’s three research universities, administrators, and resource managers from federal, state, and local governmental agencies, members of community and...

  19. International Arid Lands Consortium's contributions to Madrean Archipelago stewardship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter F. Ffolliott; Jeffery O. Dawson; Itshack Moshe; Timothy E. Fulbright; E. Carter Johnson; Paul Verburg; Muhannad Shatanawi; Donald F. Caccamise; Jim P. M. Chamie

    2005-01-01

    The International Arid Lands Consortium (IALC) was established in 1990 to promote research, education, and training activities related to the development, management, and reclamation of arid and semiarid lands worldwide. Building on a decade of experience, the IALC continues to increase the knowledge base for managers by funding research, development, and demonstration...

  20. The Consortium for Advancing Renewable Energy Technology (CARET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, E. M.; Henderson, D. O.; Buffinger, D. R.; Fuller, C. W.; Uribe, R. M.

    1998-01-01

    The Consortium for Advancing Renewable Energy (CARET) is a research and education program which uses the theme of renewable energy to build a minority scientist pipeline. CARET is also a consortium of four universities and NASA Lewis Research Center working together to promote science education and research to minority students using the theme of renewable energy. The consortium membership includes the HBCUs (Historically Black Colleges and Universities), Fisk, Wilberforce and Central State Universities as well as Kent State University and NASA Lewis Research Center. The various stages of this pipeline provide participating students experiences with a different emphasis. Some emphasize building enthusiasm for the classroom study of science and technology while others emphasize the nature of research in these disciplines. Still others focus on relating a practical application to science and technology. And, of great importance to the success of the program are the interfaces between the various stages. Successfully managing these transitions is a requirement for producing trained scientists, engineers and technologists. Presentations describing the CARET program have been given at this year's HBCU Research Conference at the Ohio Aerospace Institute and as a seminar in the Solar Circle Seminar series of the Photovoltaic and Space Environments Branch at NASA Lewis Research Center. In this report, we will describe the many positive achievements toward the fulfillment of the goals and outcomes of our program. We will begin with a description of the interactions among the consortium members and end with a description of the activities of each of the member institutions .

  1. The Worker Rights Consortium Makes Strides toward Legitimacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Werf, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the rapid growth of the Workers Rights Consortium, a student-originated group with 44 member institutions which opposes sweatshop labor conditions especially in the apparel industry. Notes disagreements about the number of administrators on the board of directors and about the role of industry representives. Compares this group with the…

  2. Effects of the Consortium of Pseudomonas, Bacillus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Johnny

    degrading bacteria were used for the study and analysis was for a period of three weeks at one week interval. The values of ... concluded that the consortium of these bacteria can be used for the decontamination of polycyclic aromatic ... The saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons are transformed into oxygenated products by.

  3. An Appraisal of the Consortium of Tanzania University and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    wemafr

    Abstract. This study investigated factors constraining effective growth of the Consortium of Tanzania. University and Research Libraries (COTUL). A mixed research design was employed to gain a deeper insight into the subject matter. Data was collected using interviews, questionnaires and observations. Fifty-eight (58) ...

  4. Asian Consortium for Computational Materials Science (ACCMS-1)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 26; Issue 1. Issue front cover thumbnail. Volume 26, Issue 1. January 2003, pages 1-205. Proceedings of the first conference of the “Asian Consortium for Computational Materials Science (ACCMS-1)”, Bangalore, 2001. pp 1-2. Foreword · G P Das V Kumar S ...

  5. Academic Library Consortium in Jordan: An Evaluation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mustafa H.; Suleiman, Raid Jameel

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Due to the current financial and managerial difficulties that are encountered by libraries in public universities in Jordan and the geographical diffusion of these academic institutions, the idea of establishing a consortium was proposed by the Council of Higher Education to combine these libraries. This article reviews the reality of…

  6. Effects of the Consortium of Pseudomonas , Bacillus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of the consortium of Pseudomonas, Bacillus and Micrococcus spp on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in crude oil was carried out using standard microbiological methods. Spectrophotometer, gas chromatography and viable count which determined the optical density, the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and ...

  7. A Novel Methylotrophic Bacterial Consortium for Treatment of Industrial Effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hingurao, Krushi; Nerurkar, Anuradha

    2018-01-01

    Considering the importance of methylotrophs in industrial wastewater treatment, focus of the present study was on utilization of a methylotrophic bacterial consortium as a microbial seed for biotreatment of a variety of industrial effluents. For this purpose, a mixed bacterial methylotrophic AC (Ankleshwar CETP) consortium comprising of Bordetella petrii AC1, Bacillus licheniformis AC4, Salmonella subterranea AC5, and Pseudomonas stutzeri AC8 was used. The AC consortium showed efficient biotreatment of four industrial effluents procured from fertilizer, chemical and pesticide industries, and common effluent treatment plant by lowering their chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 950-2000 mg/l to below detection limit in 60-96 h in 6-l batch reactor and 9-15 days in 6-l continuous reactor. The operating variables of wastewater treatment, viz. COD, BOD, pH, MLSS, MLVSS, SVI, and F/M ratio of these effluents, were also maintained in the permissible range in both batch and continuous reactors. Therefore, formation of the AC consortium has led to the development of an efficient microbial seed capable of treating a variety of industrial effluents containing pollutants generated from their respective industries.

  8. Effects of the Consortium of Pseudomonas, Bacillus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BSN

    Abstract. The effect of the consortium of Pseudomonas, Bacillus and Micrococcus spp on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in crude oil was carried out using standard microbiological methods. Spectrophotometer, gas chromatography and viable count which determined the optical density, the polycyclic aromatic ...

  9. Effects of the Consortium of Pseudomonas, Bacillus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of the consortium of Pseudomonas, Bacillus and Micrococcus spp on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in crude oil was carried out using standard microbiological methods. Spectrophotometer, gas chromatography and viable count which determined the optical density, the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and ...

  10. Preface of the Proceedings of the Doctoral Consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinciarelli, A.; Pelachaud, C.; Cowie, R.; Nijholt, Antinus

    2009-01-01

    This volume collects the contributions presented at the ACII 2009 Doctoral Consortium, the event aimed at gathering PhD students with the goal of sharing ideas about the theories behind affective computing; its development; and its application. Published papers have been selected out a large number

  11. Characterization of an autotrophic bioreactor microbial consortium degrading thiocyanate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Mathew Paul; Spurr, Liam Patrick; Gan, Han Ming; Moreau, John William

    2017-07-01

    Thiocyanate (SCN - ) forms as a by-product of cyanidation during gold ore processing and can be degraded by a variety of microorganisms utilizing it as an energy, nitrogen, sulphur and/or carbon source. In complex consortia inhabiting bioreactor systems, a range of metabolisms are sustained by SCN - degradation; however, despite the addition or presence of labile carbon sources in most bioreactor designs to date, autotrophic bacteria have been found to dominate key metabolic functions. In this study, we cultured an autotrophic SCN - -degrading consortium directly from gold mine tailings. In a batch-mode bioreactor experiment, this consortium degraded 22 mM SCN - , accumulating ammonium (NH 4 + ) and sulphate (SO 4 2- ) as the major end products. The consortium consisted of a diverse microbial community comprised of chemolithoautotrophic members, and despite the absence of an added organic carbon substrate, a significant population of heterotrophic bacteria. The role of eukaryotes in bioreactor systems is often poorly understood; however, we found their 18S rRNA genes to be most closely related to sequences from bacterivorous Amoebozoa. Through combined chemical and phylogenetic analyses, we were able to infer roles for key microbial consortium members during SCN - biodegradation. This study provides a basis for understanding the behaviour of a SCN - degrading bioreactor under autotrophic conditions, an anticipated approach to remediating SCN - at contemporary gold mines.

  12. Characteristics of a bioflocculant produced by a consortium of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The characteristics of a bioflocculant produced by a consortium of 2 bacteria belonging to the genera Cobetia and Bacillus was investigated. The extracellular bioflocculant was composed of 66% uronic acid and 31% protein and showed an optimum flocculation (90% flocculating activity) of kaolin suspension at a dosage of ...

  13. Institutional Support : Consortium for Economic and Social Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Consortium pour la recherche économique et sociale (CRES) is an association of a multidisciplinary team of researchers based in Dakar, Sénégal. Its activities are organized under five departments: growth, poverty and equity; local development, regional integration and globalization; human resources economics; the ...

  14. Substrate and/or substrate-driven changes in the abundance of methanogenic archaea cause seasonal variation of methane production potential in species-specific freshwater wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Deyan; Ding, Weixin; Yuan, Junji; Xiang, Jian; Lin, Yongxin

    2014-05-01

    There are large temporal and spatial variations of methane (CH4) emissions from natural wetlands. To understand temporal changes of CH4 production potential (MPP), soil samples were collected from a permanently inundated Carex lasiocarpa marsh and a summer inundated Calamagrostis angustifolia marsh over the period from June to October of 2011. MPP, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration, abundance and community structure of methanogenic archaea were assessed. In the C. lasiocarpa marsh, DOC concentration, MPP and the methanogen population showed similar seasonal variations and maximal values in September. MPP and DOC in the C. angustifolia marsh exhibited seasonal variations and values peaked during August, while the methanogen population decreased with plant growth. Methanogen abundance correlated significantly (P = 0.02) with DOC only for the C. lasiocarpa marsh. During the sampling period, the dominant methanogens were the Methanosaetaceae and Zoige cluster I (ZC-Ι) in the C. angustifolia marsh, and Methanomicrobiales and ZC-Ι in the C. lasiocarpa marsh. MPP correlated significantly (P = 0.04) with DOC and methanogen population in the C. lasiocarpa marsh but only with DOC in the C. angustifolia marsh. Addition of C. lasiocarpa litter enhanced MPP more effectively than addition of C. angustifolia litter, indicating that temporal variation of substrates is controlled by litter deposition in the C. lasiocarpa marsh while living plant matter is more important in the C. angustifolia marsh. This study indicated that there was no apparent shift in the dominant types of methanogen during the growth season in the species-specific freshwater wetlands. Temporal variation of MPP is controlled by substrates and substrate-driven changes in the abundance of methanogenic archaea in the C. lasiocarpa marsh, while MPP depends only on substrate availability derived from root exudates or soil organic matter in the C. angustifolia marsh.

  15. Mitigation of methane emission from Holstein dairy cows: Effects of dietary manipulation on bacterial and methanogen communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    of carbohydrate fermentation and pH on CH4 production and on bacterial community composition, and 2) effects of dietary manipulation (primarily through fat supplementation aiming at reducing enteric CH4 production) on community composition and activity of the rumen microbiota, with particular focus...... on methanogenic archaea. In vitro fermentations revealed that pH and carbohydrate source had only minor effects on the rumen bacterial community composition, but significantly affected volatile fatty acid production patterns. pH significantly affected CH4 emission from rumen fluid, with optimum CH4 production...... for fermenting bacteria; i.e., the production of H2 due to fermentation, subsequently utilized by rumen methanogens. Starch-rich maize silage favoured potentially starch-degrading bacteria, while fibre-rich grass silage favoured potentially hemi- cellulose or cellulose-degrading bacteria. Dietary fat...

  16. High-rate continuous hydrogen production by Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum PSU-2 immobilized on heat-pretreated methanogenic granules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O-Thong, Sompong; Prasertsan, P.; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov

    2008-01-01

    Biohydrogen production from Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum strain PSU-2 was examined in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor and carrier-free upflow anaerobic reactor (UA), both fed with sucrose and operating at 60 degrees C. Heat-pretreated methanogenic granules were used...... as carrier to immobilize T. thermosaccharolyticum strain PSU-2 in UASB reactor operated at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) ranging from 0.75 to 24h and corresponding sucrose loading rate from 58.5 to 2.4 mmol sucrose l(-1)h(-1). In comparison with hydrogen production rate of 12.1 mmol H(2)l(-1)h(-1......) obtained by carrier-free reactor upflow anaerobic (UA) system, a greatly improved hydrogen production rate up to 152 mmol H(2)l(-1)h(-1) was demonstrated by the granular cells in UASB system. The biofilm of T. thermosaccharolyticum strain PSU-2 developed on treated methanogenic granules in UASB reactor...

  17. Methanol induces low temperature resilient methanogens and improves methane generation from domestic wastewater at low to moderate temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Shaswati; Badhe, Neha; De Vrieze, Jo; Biswas, Rima; Nandy, Tapas

    2015-01-01

    Low temperature (methanol is a preferred substrate by methanogens in cold habitats. The study hypothesizes that methanol can induce the growth of low-temperature resilient, methanol utilizing, hydrogenotrophs in UASB reactor. The hypothesis was tested in field conditions to evaluate the impact of seasonal temperature variations on methane yield in the presence and absence of methanol. Results show that 0.04% (v/v) methanol increased methane up to 15 times and its effect was more pronounced at lower temperatures. The qPCR analysis showed the presence of Methanobacteriales along with Methanosetaceae in large numbers. This indicates methanol induced the growth of both the hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic groups through direct and indirect routes, respectively. This study thus demonstrated that methanol can impart resistance in methanogenic biomass to low temperature and can improve performance of UASB reactor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Surpassing the current limitations of high purity H2production in microbial electrolysis cell (MECs): Strategies for inhibiting growth of methanogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadier, Abudukeremu; Kalil, Mohd Sahaid; Chandrasekhar, Kuppam; Mohanakrishna, Gunda; Saratale, Ganesh Dattatraya; Saratale, Rijuta Ganesh; Kumar, Gopalakrishnan; Pugazhendhi, Arivalagan; Sivagurunathan, Periyasamy

    2018-02-01

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) are perceived as a potential and promising innovative biotechnological tool that can convert carbon-rich waste biomass or wastewater into hydrogen (H 2 ) or other value-added chemicals. Undesired methane (CH 4 ) producing H 2 sinks, including methanogens, is a serious challenge faced by MECs to achieve high-rate H 2 production. Methanogens can consume H 2 to produce CH 4 in MECs, which has led to a drop of H 2 production efficiency, H 2 production rate (HPR) and also a low percentage of H 2 in the produced biogas. Organized inference related to the interactions of microbes and potential processes has assisted in understanding approaches and concepts for inhibiting the growth of methanogens and profitable scale up design. Thus, here in we review the current developments and also the improvements constituted for the reduction of microbial H 2 losses to methanogens. Firstly, the greatest challenge in achieving practical applications of MECs; undesirable microorganisms (methanogens) growth and various studied techniques for eliminating and reducing methanogens activities in MECs were discussed. Additionally, this extensive review also considers prospects for stimulating future research that could help to achieve more information and would provide the focus and path towards MECs as well as their possibilities for simultaneously generating H 2 and waste remediation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular Genetic Diversity and Quantitation of Methanogen in Ruminal Fluid of Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis Fed Ration (Wheat Straw and Concentrate Mixture Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available High roughage diet causes more methane emissions; however, the total methanogen abundance is not influenced by roughage proportion. Technologies to reduce methane emissions are lacking, and development of inhibitors and vaccines that mitigate rumen-derived methane by targeting methanogens relies on present knowledge of the methanogens. In this work, we have investigated molecular diversity of rumen methanogens of Surti buffalo. DNA from rumen fluid was extracted, and 16S rRNA encoding genes were amplified using methanogen specific primer to generate 16S rDNA clone libraries. Seventy-six clones were randomly selected and analysed by RFLP resulting in 21 operational taxonomic units (OTUs. BLAST analysis with available sequences in database revealed sequences of 13 OTUs (55 clones showing similarity with Methanomicrobium sp, 3 OTUs (15 clones with Methanobrevibacter sp. The remaining 5 OTUs (6 clones belonged to uncultured archaea. The phylogenetic analysis indicated that methanogenic communities found in the library were clustered in the order of Methanomicrobiales (18 OTUs and Methanobacteriales (3 OTUs. The population of Methanomicrobiales, Methanobacteriales, and Methanococcales were also observed, accounting for 1.94%, 0.72%, and 0.47% of total archaea, respectively.

  20. Diversity and abundance of the rumen and fecal methanogens in Altay sheep native to Xinjiang and the influence of diversity on methane emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C; Zhu, Z P; Liu, Y F; Guo, T J; Dong, H M

    2012-05-01

    This study aims to investigate the influence of diet roughage proportion on the methanogenic communities from the rumen and fecal samples in Altay local sheep native to Xinjiang and better understand the association of methanogenic diversity or abundance with methane emissions of the ruminants. In this study, the high roughage diet was found to cause more methane emissions for either maintenance or ad-lib group, but the total methanogenic abundance was not influenced by roughage proportion and showed no significant difference between groups. Furthermore, the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was conducted to reveal the difference in methanogenic diversity. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the sequences obtained were divided into three groups, affiliated to the genus of Methanobrevibacter, Methanocorpusculum and an unidentified methanogenic-like group. Of these sequences, the predominant diversity from the genus of Methanobrevibacter and the unidentified methanogenic-like archaeons in the rumen was found to be significantly induced by the high roughage diet, implying that the variation of diversity at the species or strain level might have an effect on methane emissions from the rumen. Further analysis showed that five methangenic sequences from the rumen were possibly associated with the differential methane emissions.

  1. Evaluation of methanogenic treatment of TMAH (tetra-methyl ammonium hydroxide) in a full-scale TFT-LCD wastewater treatment process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, T H; Whang, L M; Lei, C N; Chen, C F; Chiang, T Y; Lin, L B; Chen, H W; Liu, P W G; Cheng, S S

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated TMAH biodegradation under methanogenic conditions. Under methanogenic conditions, a sludge from a full-scale UASB treating TFT-LCD wastewater was able to degrade 2,000 mg/L of TMAH within 10 h and attained a specific degradation rate of 19.2 mgTMAH/gVSS-h. Furthermore, several chemicals including some surfactants, DMSO, and sulfate were examined for their potential inhibitory effects on TMAH biodegradation under methanogenic conditions. The results indicated that surfactant S1 (up to 2%) and DMSO (up to 1,000 mg/L) presented negligible inhibitory effects on TMAH degradation, while surfactant S2 (0.2-1%) might inhibit methanogenic reaction without any TMAH degradation for 3-5 h. At sulfate concentrations higher than 300 mg/L, a complete inhibition of methanogenic reaction and TMAH biodegradation was observed. Results from cloning and sequencing of archaeal 16S rRNA gene fragments showed that Methanosarcina barkeri and Methanosarcina mazei were the dominant methanogens in the UASB treating TMAH-containing TFT-LCD wastewater.

  2. Lipid Biomarkers for Methanogens in Hypersaline Cyanobacterial Mats for Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, Linda L.; Embaye, Tsegereda; Summons, Roger E.; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Analyses of sediments from the vicinity of active methane seeps have uncovered a particular suite of lipid biomarker patterns that characterize methane consuming archaea and their syntrophic, sulfate reducing partners. These isoprenoid biomarkers, largely identified by their anomalously light carbon isotopic signatures, have been a topic of intense research activity and are recorded in numerous methane-rich environments from Holocene to Cenozoic. This phenomenon has implications for depleted kerogens at 2.7 Ga on early Earth (Hinrichs 2002). In contrast, the lipid biosignatures of methane producing archaea are not readily identified through distinct isotopic labels and have received comparably little attention in analyses of archaea in environmental samples. Indeed, environmental analyses generally detect only free archaeal lipids, not the intact, polar molecules found in the membrane of living organisms. As part of the Ames NAI, the 'Early Microbial Ecosystem Research Group' (EMERG) is working to understand microbial processes in the hypersaline cyanobacterial mats growing in the salt evaporation ponds of the Exportadora de Sal at Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico. The aim of this study was to develop methods by which we could identify the organisms responsible for methane generation in this environment. While the ester-bound fatty acids, hopanoids and wax esters provide a means to identify most of the bacterial components of these mats, the archaea which Ere evidently present through genomic assays and the fact of intense methane production (Hoehler et al. 200l), have not been identified through their corresponding lipid signatures. Archaeal core lipids present a number of analytical challenges. The core lipids of methanogens comprise C20, C40 and sometimes C25 isoprenoid chains, linked through ether bonds to glycerol. As well as archaeal (C20), sn-2- and sn-3-hydroxyarchaeol are associated particularly with methylotrophic methanogens. Recently, we have

  3. Molecular biology of stress genes in methanogens: potential for bioreactor technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway de Macario, Everly; Macario, Alberto J L

    2003-01-01

    Many agents of physical, chemical, or biological nature, have the potential for causing cell stress. These agents are called stressors and their effects on cells are due to protein denaturation. Cells, microbes, for instance, perform their physiological functions and survive stress only if they have their proteins in the necessary concentrations and shapes. To be functional a protein shape must conform to a specific three-dimensional arrangement, named the native configuration. When a stressor (e.g., temperature elevation or heat shock, decrease in pH, hypersalinity, heavy metals) hits a microbe, it causes proteins to lose their native configuration, which is to say that stressors cause protein denaturation. The cell mounts an anti-stress response: house-keeping genes are down-regulated and stress genes are activated. Among the latter are the genes that produce the Hsp70(DnaK), Hsp60, and small heat protein (sHsp) families of stress proteins. Hsp70(DnaK) is part of the molecular chaperone machine together with Hsp40(DnaJ) and GrpE, and Hsp60 is a component of the chaperonin complex. Both the chaperone machine and the chaperonins play a crucial role in assisting microbial proteins to reach their native, functional configuration and to regain it when it is partially lost due to stress. Proteins that are denatured beyond repair are degraded by proteases so they do not accumulate and become a burden to the cell. All Archaea studied to date possess chaperonins but only some methanogens have the chaperone machine. A recent genome survey indicates that Archaea do not harbor well conserved equivalents of the co-chaperones trigger factor, Hip, Hop, BAG-1, and NAC, although the data suggest that Archaea have proteins related to Hop and to the NAC alpha subunit whose functions remain to be elucidated. Other anti-stress means involve osmolytes, ion traffic, and formation of multicellular structures. All cellular anti-stress mechanisms depend on genes whose products are

  4. 25 CFR 1000.310 - What information must the Tribe's/Consortium's response contain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What information must the Tribe's/Consortium's response... INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Reassumption § 1000.310 What information must the Tribe's/Consortium's response contain? (a) The Tribe's/Consortium's response must indicate the specific measures that...

  5. Thermophilic Anaerobic Degradation of Butyrate by a Butyrate-Utilizing Bacterium in Coculture and Triculture with Methanogenic Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Ahring, Birgitte K.; Westermann, Peter

    1987-01-01

    We studied syntrophic butyrate degradation in thermophilic mixed cultures containing a butyrate-degrading bacterium isolated in coculture with Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum or in triculture with M. thermoautotrophicum and the TAM organism, a thermophilic acetate-utilizing methanogenic bacterium. Butyrate was β-oxidized to acetate with protons as the electron acceptors. Acetate was used concurrently with its production in the triculture. We found a higher butyrate degradation rate in th...

  6. Molecular Characterization of the Archaeal Community in an Amazonian Wetland Soil and Culture-Dependent Isolation of Methanogenic Archaea

    OpenAIRE

    Pazinato, Jeanedy M.; Paulo, Ezio N.; Mendes, Lucas W.; Vazoller, Rosana F.; Tsai, Siu M.

    2010-01-01

    Tropical wetlands are the major natural source of methane released into the atmosphere, producing about 60% of all natural emissions. The great wetland areas of the Amazon basin are the largest source of methane in this region, contributing an estimated 5% of the total emissions from the world’s flooded areas. However, despite the important role that methanogenic archaea play in these environments, there have been few studies on the composition of their archaeal communities. In this survey, f...

  7. Analysis of alkane-dependent methanogenic community derived from production water of a high-temperature petroleum reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mbadinga, Serge Maurice; Li, Kai-Ping; Zhou, Lei; Wang, Li-Ying; Yang, Shi-Zhong; Liu, Jin-Feng; Mu, Bo-Zhong [East China Univ. of Science and Technology, Shanghai (China). State Key Lab. of Bioreactor Engineering and Inst. of Applied Chemistry; Gu, Ji-Dong [Hong Kong Univ. (China). School of Biological Sciences

    2012-10-15

    Microbial assemblage in an n-alkanes-dependent thermophilic methanogenic enrichment cultures derived from production waters of a high-temperature petroleum reservoir was investigated in this study. Substantially higher amounts of methane were generated from the enrichment cultures incubated at 55 C for 528 days with a mixture of long-chain n-alkanes (C{sub 15}-C{sub 20}). Stoichiometric estimation showed that alkanes-dependent methanogenesis accounted for about 19.8% of the total amount of methane expected. Hydrogen was occasionally detected together with methane in the gas phase of the cultures. Chemical analysis of the liquid cultures resulted only in low concentrations of acetate and formate. Phylogenetic analysis of the enrichment revealed the presence of several bacterial taxa related to Firmicutes, Thermodesulfobiaceae, Thermotogaceae, Nitrospiraceae, Dictyoglomaceae, Candidate division OP8 and others without close cultured representatives, and Archaea predominantly related to uncultured members in the order Archaeoglobales and CO{sub 2}-reducing methanogens. Screening of genomic DNA retrieved from the alkanes-amended enrichment cultures also suggested the presence of new alkylsuccinate synthase alpha-subunit (assA) homologues. These findings suggest the presence of poorly characterized (putative) anaerobic n-alkanes degraders in the thermophilic methanogenic enrichment cultures. Our results indicate that methanogenesis of alkanes under thermophilic condition is likely to proceed via syntrophic acetate and/or formate oxidation linked with hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. (orig.)

  8. Identification of metabolically active methanogens in anaerobic digester by DNA Stable-Isotope Probing using 13C-acetate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Gowdaman

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic digestion is gaining enormous attention due to the ability to covert organic wastes into biogas, an alternative sustainable energy. Methanogenic community plays a significant role in biogas production and also for proficient functioning of the anaerobic digester. Therefore, this study was carried out to investigate the methanogen diversity of a food waste anaerobic digester. After endogenous respiration, the digester samples were supplemented with isotopes of acetate to enrich methanogen population, and were analyzed using DNA-SIP (Stable-Isotope Probing. Following separation and fractionation of heavy (13C and light (12C DNA, PCR amplification was carried out using archaeal 16S rRNA gene followed by DGGE analysis. Sequencing of the prominent DGGE bands revealed the dominance of Methanocorpusculum labreanum species belonging to hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales, which can produce methane in the presence of H2/CO2 and requires acetate for its growth. This is the first instance where Methanocorpusculum labreanum is being reported as a dominant species in an anaerobic digester operative on food waste.

  9. Forensic fingerprinting of oil-spill hydrocarbons in a methanogenic environment-Mandan, ND and Bemidji, MN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostettler, F.D.; Wang, Y.; Huang, Y.; Cao, W.; Bekins, B.A.; Rostad, C.E.; Kulpa, C.F.; Laursen, Andrew E.

    2007-01-01

    In recent decades forensic fingerprinting of oil-spill hydrocarbons has emerged as an important tool for correlating oils and for evaluating their source and character. Two long-term hydrocarbon spills, an off-road diesel spill (Mandan, ND) and a crude oil spill (Bemidji, MN) experiencing methanogenic biodegradation were previously shown to be undergoing an unexpected progression of homologous n-alkane and n-alkylated cyclohexane loss. Both exhibited degradative losses proceeding from the high-molecular-weight end of the distributions, along with transitory concentration increases of lower-molecular-weight homologs. Particularly in the case of the diesel fuel spill, these methanogenic degradative patterns can result in series distributions that mimic lower cut refinery fuels or admixture with lower cut fuels. Forensic fingerprinting in this long-term spill must therefore rely on more recalcitrant series, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon or drimane sesquiterpane profiles, to prove if the spilled oil is single-sourced or whether there is verifiable admixture with other extraneous refinery fuels. Degradation processes impacting n-alkanes and n-alkylated ring compounds, which make these compounds unsuitable for fingerprinting, nevertheless are of interest in understanding methanogenic biodegradation. Copyright ?? Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  10. Distinct and diverse anaerobic respiration of methanogenic community in response to MnO2nanoparticles in anaerobic digester sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tian; Qiao, Sen; Yu, Cong; Tian, Yihui; Yang, Yue; Zhou, Jiti

    2017-10-15

    Recently, the influence of metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) on methanogenesis in anaerobic digestion has drawn much attention, however, the changes in NPs and functioning consortia within the methanogenic community are usually not investigated. Therefore, the methanogenesis performance, NPs transformation and methanogenic community development in anaerobic digester sludge under MnO 2 NP supplementation were demonstrated in this study. MnO 2 NPs (400 mg/gVSS) stimulated the methane (CH 4 ) yield by 42% for a final CH 4 proportion of 81.8% of the total gas production. Meanwhile, the coenzyme F 420 and INT-electron transport system activities showed positive correlation with MnO 2 concentration. Microbial Mn reduction and oxidation occurred in conjunction with methanogenesis, resulting in transformation of the shape of the MnO 2 NPs from wire-like to globular particles. Microbial community analysis indicated that the relative abundances of genera Methanobacterium, Methanosaeta, and Methanosarcina were higher in the presence of MnO 2 NPs. Moreover, a new and different crucial synergy within the methanogenic community was formed with low-abundance consortia driving Mn respiration coupled to methanogenesis in anaerobic digestion. To our knowledge, this is the first report on transformation of metal oxides NPs combined with syntrophic community development in studies focusing on methanogenesis in response to NPs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. pKJ1, a naturally occurring conjugative plasmid coding for toluene degradation and resistance to streptomycin and sulfonamides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, K.; Nishi, T.

    1980-08-01

    Pseudomonas sp. TA8 isolated by m-toluate enrichment from an aqueous sample metabolized toluene and m- and p-xylenes via the meta cleavage pathway, and manifested specific resistance to streptomycin and sulfonamides. A variety of experiments revealed that the pKJ1 plasmid of about 150 megadaltons carried by TA8 specified both the toluene and xylene degradative function (the Tol function) and streptomycin/sulfonamide resistance. The deletion of a segment of pKJ1 (about 22 megadaltons) resulted in the loss of the Tol function. pKJ1 was not assigned to Pseudomonas incompatibility group P-1, P-2, P-3, or P-9.

  12. Anaerobic Digestion of Sugarcane Vinasse Through a Methanogenic UASB Reactor Followed by a Packed Bed Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Díaz, A; Pereda-Reyes, I; Oliva-Merencio, D; Lebrero, R; Zaiat, M

    2017-12-01

    The anaerobic treatment of raw vinasse in a combined system consisting in two methanogenic reactors, up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) + anaerobic packed bed reactors (APBR), was evaluated. The organic loading rate (OLR) was varied, and the best condition for the combined system was 12.5 kg COD m -3 day -1 with averages of 0.289 m 3 CH 4  kg COD r -1 for the UASB reactor and 4.4 kg COD m -3 day -1 with 0.207 m 3 CH 4  kg COD r -1 for APBR. The OLR played a major role in the emission of H 2 S conducting to relatively stable quality of biogas emitted from the APBR, with H 2 S concentrations <10 mg L -1 . The importance of the sulphate to COD ratio was demonstrated as a result of the low biogas quality recorded at the lowest ratio. It was possible to develop a proper anaerobic digestion of raw vinasse through the combined system with COD removal efficiency of 86.7% and higher CH 4 and a lower H 2 S content in biogas.

  13. THE EFFECT OF METHANOGENIC INHIBITOR FEED ON PROPIONIC ACID AND LAMB MEAT CHEMICAL QUALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Suryanto

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the effect of medium chain fatty acids (MCFA on propionic acids and lamb meat chemical quality. The treatment given was R1: feed without medium chain fatty acids (MCFA, while R2 dan R3 were the feed contained 1.0% and 1.5% of MCFA, respectively. The twelve heads of lambs yearling weight of 16-17 kg were used as materials. Biological trial was done for three months and then was slaughtered. Before being slaughtered, the animal was taken rumen fluid to be analyzed for propionic acid. The carcass was sampled to be analyzed for chemical composition, cholesterol and fatty acids content. This study showed that methanogenic inhibitor feed with 1.0-1.5% MCFA could be used as sheep feed, and the results: the propionic acid content in rumen increased 29.59 – 36.11%. The cholesterol content decreased 7.14-10.06%. For the meat fatty acids composition, unsaturated fatty acids increased 9.05 – 17.96%. while saturated fatty acid decreased 6.59 – 11.88%.

  14. Quantitative proteomics of nutrient limitation in the hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanococcus maripaludis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrickson Erik L

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methanogenic Archaea play key metabolic roles in anaerobic ecosystems, where they use H2 and other substrates to produce methane. Methanococcus maripaludis is a model for studies of the global response to nutrient limitations. Results We used high-coverage quantitative proteomics to determine the response of M. maripaludis to growth-limiting levels of H2, nitrogen, and phosphate. Six to ten percent of the proteome changed significantly with each nutrient limitation. H2 limitation increased the abundance of a wide variety of proteins involved in methanogenesis. However, one protein involved in methanogenesis decreased: a low-affinity [Fe] hydrogenase, which may dominate over a higher-affinity mechanism when H2 is abundant. Nitrogen limitation increased known nitrogen assimilation proteins. In addition, the increased abundance of molybdate transport proteins suggested they function for nitrogen fixation. An apparent regulon governed by the euryarchaeal nitrogen regulator NrpR is discussed. Phosphate limitation increased the abundance of three different sets of proteins, suggesting that all three function in phosphate transport. Conclusion The global proteomic response of M. maripaludis to each nutrient limitation suggests a wider response than previously appreciated. The results give new insight into the function of several proteins, as well as providing information that should contribute to the formulation of a regulatory network model.

  15. Methanococcus aeolicus sp. nov., a mesophilic, methanogenic archaeon from shallow and deep marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Melissa M; Liu, Yitai; Sieprawska-Lupa, Magdalena; Stetter, Karl O; Whitman, William B; Boone, David R

    2006-07-01

    Three strains of CO(2)-reducing methanogens were isolated from marine sediments. Strain PL-15/H(P) was isolated from marine sediments of the Lipari Islands, near Sicily and the other two strains, Nankai-2 and Nankai-3(T), were isolated from deep marine sediments of the Nankai Trough, about 50 km from the coast of Japan. Analysis of the cellular proteins and 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that these three strains represented a single novel species that formed a deep branch of the mesophilic methanococci. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the three strains were most closely related to Methanothermococcus okinawensis (95 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). However, strains PL-15/H(P), Nankai-2 and Nankai-3(T) grew at temperatures that were more similar to those of recognized species within the genus Methanococcus. Strain Nankai-3(T) grew fastest at 46 degrees C. Results of physiological and biochemical tests allowed the genotypic and phenotypic differentiation of strains PL-15/H(P), Nankai-2 and Nankai-3(T) from closely related species. The name Methanococcus aeolicus sp. nov. is proposed, with strain Nankai-3(T) (=OCM 812(T)=DSM 17508(T)) as the type strain.

  16. Quantitative proteomics of nutrient limitation in the hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanococcus maripaludis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Qiangwei; Wang, Tiansong; Hendrickson, Erik L; Lie, Thomas J; Hackett, Murray; Leigh, John A

    2009-07-23

    Methanogenic Archaea play key metabolic roles in anaerobic ecosystems, where they use H2 and other substrates to produce methane. Methanococcus maripaludis is a model for studies of the global response to nutrient limitations. We used high-coverage quantitative proteomics to determine the response of M. maripaludis to growth-limiting levels of H2, nitrogen, and phosphate. Six to ten percent of the proteome changed significantly with each nutrient limitation. H2 limitation increased the abundance of a wide variety of proteins involved in methanogenesis. However, one protein involved in methanogenesis decreased: a low-affinity [Fe] hydrogenase, which may dominate over a higher-affinity mechanism when H2 is abundant. Nitrogen limitation increased known nitrogen assimilation proteins. In addition, the increased abundance of molybdate transport proteins suggested they function for nitrogen fixation. An apparent regulon governed by the euryarchaeal nitrogen regulator NrpR is discussed. Phosphate limitation increased the abundance of three different sets of proteins, suggesting that all three function in phosphate transport. The global proteomic response of M. maripaludis to each nutrient limitation suggests a wider response than previously appreciated. The results give new insight into the function of several proteins, as well as providing information that should contribute to the formulation of a regulatory network model.

  17. Function and Regulation of glnA in the Methanogenic Archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Kupiec, Rachel; Marx, Christopher J.; Leigh, John A.

    1999-01-01

    The glnA gene in the domains Bacteria and Archaea encodes glutamine synthetase, a universally distributed enzyme that functions in ammonia assimilation and glutamine synthesis. We investigated the regulation and function of glnA in the methanogenic archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis. The deduced amino acid sequence of the gene demonstrated its membership in class GSI-α of glutamine synthetases. The gene appeared to be expressed as a monocistronic operon. glnA mRNA levels and specific activities of glutamine synthetase were regulated similarly by nitrogen. Three transcription start sites were identified, corresponding to two overlapping nitrogen-regulated promoters and one weaker constitutive promoter. An inverted repeat immediately upstream of the regulated transcription start sites mediated repression under noninducing conditions. Thus, mutations that altered the sequence of the inverted repeat resulted in derepression. The inverted repeat had sequence similarity with a repeat that we previously identified as the nif operator of M. maripaludis, suggesting a common mechanism of nitrogen regulation. Efforts to produce a glnA null mutant failed, suggesting that glnA is an essential gene in M. maripaludis. PMID:9864338

  18. Genome-scale analysis of gene function in the hydrogenotrophic methanogenic archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, Felipe; Mrázek, Jan; Whitman, William B

    2013-03-19

    A comprehensive whole-genome analysis of gene function by transposon mutagenesis and deep sequencing methodology has been implemented successfully in a representative of the Archaea domain. Libraries of transposon mutants were generated for the hydrogenotrophic, methanogenic archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis S2 using a derivative of the Tn5 transposon. About 89,000 unique insertions were mapped to the genome, which allowed for the classification of 526 genes or about 30% of the genome as possibly essential or strongly advantageous for growth in rich medium. Many of these genes were homologous to eukaryotic genes that encode fundamental processes in replication, transcription, and translation, providing direct evidence for their importance in Archaea. Some genes classified as possibly essential were unique to the archaeal or methanococcal lineages, such as that encoding DNA polymerase PolD. In contrast, the archaeal homolog to the gene encoding DNA polymerase B was not essential for growth, a conclusion confirmed by construction of an independent deletion mutation. Thus PolD, and not PolB, likely plays a fundamental role in DNA replication in methanococci. Similarly, 121 hypothetical ORFs were classified as possibly essential and likely play fundamental roles in methanococcal information processing or metabolism that are not established outside this group of prokaryotes.

  19. APPLICATION OF RESPIROMETRIC TESTS FOR ASSESSMENT OF METHANOGENIC BACTERIA ACTIVITY IN WASTEWATER SLUDGE PROCESSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Cimochowicz-Rybicka

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Production of a methane-rich gas (‘biogas’ is contemporary popular sludges processing technology which allows to generate thermal and/or electric energy. Formal requirements issued by the European Union to promote so called renewable energy resources made these process more attractive leading to its application in WWTPs which were designed based on different sludge handling processes. Authors (as active design engineers noted that dimensioning sludge digestion chamber is usually based on SRT assessment without any emphasis on sludge characteristics. Bio-mass characteristics and the estimation of its activity with respect to methane production are of great importance, from both scientific and practical points of view, as anaerobic digestion appears to be one of crucial processes in municipal wastewater handling and disposal. The authors propose respirometric tests to estimate a biomass potential to produce ‘a biogas’ and several years’ laboratory and full scale experience proved its usefulness and reliability both as a measurement and a design tool applicable in sludge handling. Dimensioning method proposed by authors, allows to construct and optimize operation of digestion chambers based on a methanogenic activity.

  20. The presence of hydrogenotrophic methanogens in the inoculum improves methane gas production in microbial electrolysis cells.

    KAUST Repository

    Siegert, Michael

    2014-01-01

    High current densities in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) result from the predominance of various Geobacter species on the anode, but it is not known if archaeal communities similarly converge to one specific genus. MECs were examined here on the basis of maximum methane production and current density relative to the inoculum community structure. We used anaerobic digester (AD) sludge dominated by acetoclastic Methanosaeta, and an anaerobic bog sediment where hydrogenotrophic methanogens were detected. Inoculation using solids to medium ratio of 25% (w/v) resulted in the highest methane production rates (0.27 mL mL(-1) cm(-2), gas volume normalized by liquid volume and cathode projected area) and highest peak current densities (0.5 mA cm(-2)) for the bog sample. Methane production was independent of solid to medium ratio when AD sludge was used as the inoculum. 16S rRNA gene community analysis using pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR confirmed the convergence of Archaea to Methanobacterium and Methanobrevibacter, and of Bacteria to Geobacter, despite their absence in AD sludge. Combined with other studies, these findings suggest that Archaea of the hydrogenotrophic genera Methanobacterium and Methanobrevibacter are the most important microorganisms for methane production in MECs and that their presence in the inoculum improves the performance.

  1. Methanosarcina subterranea sp. nov., a methanogenic archaeon isolated from a deep subsurface diatomaceous shale formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Satoru; Ueno, Akio; Naganuma, Takeshi; Kaneko, Katsuhiko

    2015-04-01

    A methanogenic archaeon, strain HC-2(T), was isolated from a deep diatomaceous shale formation. The strain grew on methanol, monomethylamine, dimethylamine, trimethylamine and dimethylsulphide, but not on acetate, H2/CO2, formate, 2-propanol, 2-butanol or cyclopentanol. Cells were Gram-stain-negative, non-motile, and coccus-like, 0.9-1.4 µm in diameter, and occurred singly, in pairs, or as aggregates. The strain grew at 10-40 °C (optimum 35 °C), pH 5.9-7.4 (optimum pH 6.6-6.8) and in 0-0.6 M NaCl (optimum 0.1-0.2 M). The genomic DNA G+C content was 41.5 mol% and the 16S rRNA gene sequence was closely related to those of Methanosarcina lacustris DSM 13486(T) (99.1%) and Methanosarcina siciliae DSM 3028(T) (98.3%). Values for DNA-DNA hybridization with these strains were less than 30%. The phenotypic and phylogenetic features of HC-2(T) indicate that it represents a novel species of the genus Methanosarcina , for which the name Methanosarcina subterranea sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is HC-2(T) ( = DSM 22503(T) = JCM 15540(T) = NBRC 102578(T)). © 2015 IUMS.

  2. Methanogenic biodegradation of creosote contaminants in natural and simulated ground-water ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godsy, E. Michael; Goerlitz, Donald; Grbic-Galic, Dunja

    1992-01-01

    Wastes from a wood preserving plant in Pensacola, Florida have contaminated the near-surface sand-and-gravel aquifer with creosote-derived compounds and pentachlorophenol. Contamination resulted from the discharge of plant waste waters to and subsequent seepage from unlined surface impoundments that were in direct hydraulic contact with the ground water. Two distinct phases resulted when the creosote and water mixed: a denser than water hydrocarbon phase that moved vertically downward, and an organic-rich aqueous phase that moved laterally with the ground-water flow. The aqueous phase is enriched in organic acids, phenolic compounds, single- and double-ring nitrogen, sulfur, and oxygen containing compounds, and single- and double-ring aromatic hydrocarbons. The ground water is devoid of dissolved O2, is 60-70% saturated with CH4 and contains H2S. Field analyses document a greater decrease in concentration of organic fatty acids, benzoic acid, phenol, 2-, 3-, 4-methylphenol, quinoline, isoquinoline, 1(2H)-quinolinone, and 2(1H)-isoquinolinone during downgradient movement in the aquifer than could be explained by dilution and/or dispersion. Laboratory microcosm studies have shown that within the study region, this effect can be attributed to microbial degradation to CH4 and CO2. A small but active methanogenic population was found on sediment materials taken from highly contaminated parts of the aquifer.

  3. Biotransformation of chlorinated aliphatic solvents in the presence of aromatic compounds under methanogenic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, L.N.; Grbic-Galic, D.

    1993-01-01

    Transformation of carbon tetrachloride (CT) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) was studied under methanogenic conditions, in the presence or absence of toluene, ethylbenzene, phenol, and benzoate. Microbial inoculate for the experiments were derived from three groundwater aquifers contaminated by jet fuel or creosote. CT and PCE were reductively dechlorinated in all the examined castes (CT to chloroform [CF]; PCE to trichloroethylene [TCE], trans-1,2-dichloroethylene [DCE], and vinyl chloride [VC]). In the aquifer microcosms, the electron donors used for the reductive transformations were most likely the unidentified organic compounds present on aquifer solids, or storage materials in microorganisms. Alternatively, molecular hydrogen from the anaerobic incubator atmosphere could have been used. The addition of benzoate caused a decrease in rates of dechlorination if benzoate was transformed. Phenol and ethylbenzene were not degraded and did not influence the transformation of CT or PCE. Toluene, in most of the studied cases, had no influence on reductive dechlorination of either CT or PCE. Only in microcosms derived from a JP-4 jet fuel-contaminated aquifer did the anaerobic degradation of toluene occur simultaneously with reductive dechlorination of PCE, suggesting that toluene might possibly have been used as an electron donor for reductive transformation of chlorinated solvents

  4. The dynamics and microbial ecology of a cellulose degrading and methanogenic landfill bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrell, P.C.; Smith, M.; Blackall, L.L. [Queensland Univ., St. Lucia (Australia). School of Molecular and Microbial Sciences; O' Sullivan, C.; Clarke, W.P. [Queensland Univ., St. Lucia (Australia). School of Engineering

    2004-07-01

    The microbiology of cellulose hydrolysis was studied to determine how biodegradation from municipal landfills can be accelerated. Cellulosic compounds are the primary source of municipal solid waste, of which nearly 70 per cent is biodegradable. Cellulosic material can be converted to methane through microbial processes. The first rate-limiting action is hydrolysis, where cellulolytic bacteria attach to the cellulosic solids. Enzymes then reduce the cellulose into glucose which is then converted to hydrogen, carbon dioxide, volatile fatty acids and then methane by methanogenic Archaea. The efficiency of anaerobic digestion can be improved by increasing the rate of hydrolysis, which in turn can lead to the development of an economically viable renewable energy source from landfill gas while minimizing the amount of greenhouse gases released to the atmosphere. In this study, a 1.25 litre steady state anaerobic bioreactor was fed 150 ml of landfill leachate containing a slurry of cellulose powder on a daily basis. The biogas production rate and the quality of the biogases were measured. Specific fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies were conducted on the landfill leachate biomass to determine the types of microorganisms present and the rate of microbial attachment to cellulose. The density and pattern of cell attachment was also studied. It was determined that landfills contain several cellulolytic bacteria belonging to the Clostridium lineage of Firmicutes, which produce a range of end products, including methane. Their presence can enhance methane production from cellulosic wastes. 19 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Mapping Project Connections Over Time in a Heliophysics Education Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, H. B.; Young, C. A.; Mayo, L.

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the goal of the synergies created among the 20+ projects in the Science Mission Directorate Heliophysics Consortium, participants were asked to identify connections before and after the first and second years. Social network analysis shows the changes in the number and nature of the connections. Further data collection and analysis focused on the nature of the connections, how they were developed, and if and how they are sustained. The nature and extent of connections was examined in relationship to the consortium structures and activities. What kinds of community-building activities are effective? Which activities and communication is valued by the projects? When a collaboration is established, does it use the community tools or move off line? These and other questions will be discussed.

  6. Growing Rhizomatically: Disability Studies, the Art Gallery and the Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Anne Lindgren

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this essay, we propose that the Deleuzoguattarian rhizome offers a map and metaphor for the field of disability studies, especially as it develops outside the boundaries of a defined program or curriculum. As an example of rhizomatic growth, we discuss a series of events in the Philadelphia area in fall 2012 that focused on disability studies and disability arts and culture, including an art exhibition entitled What Can A Body Do? and a scholarly residency sponsored by the Greater Philadelphia Women’s Studies Consortium. We suggest that the art gallery offers a generative space for the growth of disability studies, disability aesthetics, and new models of access, and we emphasize the importance of cross-institutional collaboration in the development of disability studies not only as a field but as a field of energy. Keywords: rhizome, Deleuze and Guattari, art gallery, contemporary art, curator, access, audio description, multisensory, collaboration, consortium, disability aesthetics, What Can A Body Do?

  7. A Heme-based Redox Sensor in the Methanogenic Archaeon Methanosarcina acetivorans*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molitor, Bastian; Stassen, Marc; Modi, Anuja; El-Mashtoly, Samir F.; Laurich, Christoph; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Dawson, John H.; Rother, Michael; Frankenberg-Dinkel, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Based on a bioinformatics study, the protein MA4561 from the methanogenic archaeon Methanosarcina acetivorans was originally predicted to be a multidomain phytochrome-like photosensory kinase possibly binding open-chain tetrapyrroles. Although we were able to show that recombinantly produced and purified protein does not bind any known phytochrome chromophores, UV-visible spectroscopy revealed the presence of a heme tetrapyrrole cofactor. In contrast to many other known cytoplasmic heme-containing proteins, the heme was covalently attached via one vinyl side chain to cysteine 656 in the second GAF domain. This GAF domain by itself is sufficient for covalent attachment. Resonance Raman and magnetic circular dichroism data support a model of a six-coordinate heme species with additional features of a five-coordination structure. The heme cofactor is redox-active and able to coordinate various ligands like imidazole, dimethyl sulfide, and carbon monoxide depending on the redox state. Interestingly, the redox state of the heme cofactor has a substantial influence on autophosphorylation activity. Although reduced protein does not autophosphorylate, oxidized protein gives a strong autophosphorylation signal independent from bound external ligands. Based on its genomic localization, MA4561 is most likely a sensor kinase of a two-component system effecting regulation of the Mts system, a set of three homologous corrinoid/methyltransferase fusion protein isoforms involved in methyl sulfide metabolism. Consistent with this prediction, an M. acetivorans mutant devoid of MA4561 constitutively synthesized MtsF. On the basis of our results, we postulate a heme-based redox/dimethyl sulfide sensory function of MA4561 and propose to designate it MsmS (methyl sulfide methyltransferase-associated sensor). PMID:23661702

  8. Intergenomic evolution and metabolic cross-talk between rumen and thermophilic autotrophic methanogenic archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharathi, M; Chellapandi, P

    2017-02-01

    Methanobrevibacter ruminantium M1 (MRU) is a rumen methanogenic archaean that can be able to utilize formate and CO 2 /H 2 as growth substrates. Extensive analysis on the evolutionary genomic contexts considered herein to unravel its intergenomic relationship and metabolic adjustment acquired from the genomic content of Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus ΔH. We demonstrated its intergenomic distance, genome function, synteny homologs and gene families, origin of replication, and methanogenesis to reveal the evolutionary relationships between Methanobrevibacter and Methanothermobacter. Comparison of the phylogenetic and metabolic markers was suggested for its archaeal metabolic core lineage that might have evolved from Methanothermobacter. Orthologous genes involved in its hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis might be acquired from intergenomic ancestry of Methanothermobacter via Methanobacterium formicicum. Formate dehydrogenase (fdhAB) coding gene cluster and carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (cooF) coding gene might have evolved from duplication events within Methanobrevibacter-Methanothermobacter lineage, and fdhCD gene cluster acquired from bacterial origins. Genome-wide metabolic survey found the existence of four novel pathways viz. l-tyrosine catabolism, mevalonate pathway II, acyl-carrier protein metabolism II and glutathione redox reactions II in MRU. Finding of these pathways suggested that MRU has shown a metabolic potential to tolerate molecular oxygen, antimicrobial metabolite biosynthesis and atypical lipid composition in cell wall, which was acquainted by metabolic cross-talk with mammalian bacterial origins. We conclude that coevolution of genomic contents between Methanobrevibacter and Methanothermobacter provides a clue to understand the metabolic adaptation of MRU in the rumen at different environmental niches. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Strategies for the startup of methanogenic inverse fluidized-bed reactors using colonized particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Lassman, A; Sandoval-Ramos, A; Flores-Altamirano, M G; Vallejo-Cantú, N A; Méndez-Contreras, J M

    2010-05-01

    One of the inconveniences in the startup of methanogenic inverse fluidized-bed reactors (IFBRs) is the long period required for biofilm formation and stabilization of the system. Previous researchers have preferred to start up in batch mode to shorten stabilization times. Much less work has been done with continuous-mode startup for the IFBR configuration of reactors. In this study, we prepared two IFBRs with similar characteristics to compare startup times for batch- and continuous-operation modes. The reactors were inoculated with a small quantity of colonized particles and run for a period of 3 months, to establish the optimal startup strategy using synthetic media as a substrate (glucose as a source of carbon). After the startup stage, the continuous- and batch-mode reactors removed more than 80% of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) in 51 and 60 days of operation, respectively; however, at the end of the experiments, the continuous-mode reactor had more biomass attached to the support media than the batch-mode reactor. Both reactors developed fully covered support media, but only the continuous-mode reactor had methane yields close to the theoretical value that is typical of stable reactors. Then, a combined startup strategy was proposed, with industrial wastewater as the substrate, using a sequence of batch cycles followed by continuous operation, which allows stable operation at an organic loading rate of 20 g COD/L x d in 15 days. Using a fraction of colonized support as an inoculum presents advantages, with respect to previously reported strategies.

  10. Integrated biogas upgrading and hydrogen utilization in an anaerobic reactor containing enriched hydrogenotrophic methanogenic culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Gang; Angelidaki, Irini

    2012-11-01

    Biogas produced by anaerobic digestion, is mainly used in a gas motor for heat and electricity production. However, after removal of CO(2) , biogas can be upgraded to natural gas quality, giving more utilization possibilities, such as utilization as autogas, or distant utilization by using the existing natural gas grid. The current study presents a new biological method for biogas upgrading in a separate biogas reactor, containing enriched hydrogenotrophic methanogens and fed with biogas and hydrogen. Both mesophilic- and thermophilic anaerobic cultures were enriched to convert CO(2) to CH(4) by addition of H(2) . Enrichment at thermophilic temperature (55°C) resulted in CO(2) and H(2) bioconversion rate of 320 mL CH(4) /(gVSS h), which was more than 60% higher than that under mesophilic temperature (37°C). Different dominant species were found at mesophilic- and thermophilic-enriched cultures, as revealed by PCR-DGGE. Nonetheless, they all belonged to the order Methanobacteriales, which can mediate hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Biogas upgrading was then tested in a thermophilic anaerobic reactor under various operation conditions. By continuous addition of hydrogen in the biogas reactor, high degree of biogas upgrading was achieved. The produced biogas had a CH(4) content, around 95% at steady-state, at gas (mixture of biogas and hydrogen) injection rate of 6 L/(L day). The increase of gas injection rate to 12 L/(L day) resulted in the decrease of CH(4) content to around 90%. Further study showed that by decreasing the gas-liquid mass transfer by increasing the stirring speed of the mixture the CH(4) content was increased to around 95%. Finally, the CH(4) content around 90% was achieved in this study with the gas injection rate as high as 24 L/(L day). Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. The presence of hydrogenotrophic methanogens in the inoculum improves methane gas production in microbial electrolysis cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eSiegert

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available High current densities in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs result from the predominance of various Geobacter species on the anode. MECs inoculated from different sources often converge in terms of current production and predominance of Geobacter species despite variability in the inoculum community. Relatively less is known about the effects of inoculum source on methane gas production in MECs, and specifically whether archaeal communities similarly converge to one specific genus. MECs were examined here on the basis of maximum methane production and current density relative to the inoculum community structure. We used anaerobic digester (AD sludge dominated by acetoclastic Methanosaeta species, and an anaerobic bog sediment where hydrogenotrophic methanogens were detected. Inoculation using solids to medium ratio of 25% w/v resulted in the highest methane production rates (0.27 mL mL–1 cm–2, gas volume normalized by liquid volume and cathode projected area and highest peak current densities (0.5 mA cm–2 for the bog sample. Methane production was independent of solid to medium ratio when AD sludge was used as the inoculum. 16S rRNA gene community analysis using pyrosequencing and qPCR confirmed the convergence of Archaea to Methanobacterium and Methanobrevibacter, and of Bacteria to Geobacter, despite their absence in AD sludge. Combined with other studies, these findings suggest that Archaea of the hydrogenotrophic genera Methanobacterium and Methanobrevibacter are the most important microorganisms for methane production in MECs and that their presence in the inoculum improves the performance.

  12. Evaluation of support materials for the immobilization of sulfate-reducing bacteria and methanogenic archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, A J; Hirasawa, J S; Varesche, M B; Foresti, E; Zaiat, M

    2006-04-01

    This paper reports on the adhesion of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and methanogenic archaea on polyurethane foam (PU), vegetal carbon (VC), low-density polyethylene (PE) and alumina-based ceramics (CE). Anaerobic differential reactors fed with a sulfate-rich synthetic wastewater were used to evaluate the formation of a biofilm. The PU presented the highest specific biomass concentration throughout the experiment, achieving 872 mg TVS/g support, while 84 mg TVS/g support was the maximum value obtained for the other materials. FISH results showed that bacterial cells rather than archaeal cells were predominant on the biofilms. These cells, detected with EUB338 probe, accounted for 76.2% (+/-1.6%), 79.7% (+/-1.3%), 84.4% (+/-1.4%) and 60.2% (+/-1.0%) in PU, VC, PE and CE, respectively, of the 4'6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI)-stained cells. From these percentages, 44.8% (+/-2.1%), 55.4% (+/-1.2%), 32.7% (+/-1.4%) and 18.1% (+/-1.1%), respectively, represented the SRB group. Archaeal cells, detected with ARC915 probe, accounted for 33.1% (+/-1.6%), 25.4% (+/-1.3%), 22.6% (+/-1.1%) and 41.9% (+/-1.0%) in PU, VC, PE and CE, respectively, of the DAPI-stained cells. Sulfate reduction efficiencies of 39% and 45% and mean chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiencies of 86% and 90% were achieved for PU and VC, respectively. The other two supports, PE and CE, provided mean COD removal efficiencies of 84% and 86%, respectively. However, no sulfate reduction was observed with these supports.

  13. Application of a real-time qPCR method to measure the methanogen concentration during anaerobic digestion as an indicator of biogas production capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traversi, Deborah; Villa, Silvia; Lorenzi, Eugenio; Degan, Raffaella; Gilli, Giorgio

    2012-11-30

    Biogas is an energy source that is produced via the anaerobic digestion of various organic materials, including waste-water sludge and organic urban wastes. Among the microorganisms involved in digestion, methanogens are the major microbiological group responsible for methane production. To study the microbiological equilibrium in an anaerobic reactor, we detected the methanogen concentration during wet digestion processes fed with pre-treated urban organic waste and waste-water sludge. Two different pre-treatments were used in successive experimental digestions: pressure-extrusion and turbo-mixing. Chemical parameters were collected to describe the process and its production. The method used is based on real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) with the functional gene mcrA as target. First, we evaluated the validity of the analyses. Next, we applied this method to 50 digestate samples and then we performed a statistical analysis. A positive and significant correlation between the biogas production rate and methanogen abundance was observed (r = 0.579, p amount and also the higher methanogen presence (F = 41.190, p biogas/kg TVS (F = 7.053; p < 0.05). The applied method is suitable to describe microbiome into the anaerobic reactor, moreover methanogen concentration may have potential for use as a digestion optimisation tool. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Gastrointestinal Bacterial and Methanogenic Archaea Diversity Dynamics Associated with Condensed Tannin-Containing Pine Bark Diet in Goats Using 16S rDNA Amplicon Pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Byeng R; Solaiman, Sandra; Shange, Raymon; Eun, Jong-Su

    2014-01-01

    Eighteen Kiko-cross meat goats (n = 6) were used to collect gastrointestinal (GI) bacteria and methanogenic archaea for diversity measures when fed condensed tannin-containing pine bark (PB). Three dietary treatments were tested: control diet (0% PB and 30% wheat straw (WS); 0.17% condensed tannins (CT) dry matter (DM)); 15% PB and 15% WS (1.6% CT DM), and 30% PB and 0% WS (3.2% CT DM). A 16S rDNA bacterial tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing technique was used to characterize and elucidate changes in GI bacteria and methanogenic archaea diversity among the diets. Proteobacteria was the most dominant phylum in goats with mean relative abundance values ranging from 39.7 (30% PB) to 46.5% (control) and 47.1% (15% PB). Other phyla individually accounted for fewer than 25% of the relative abundance observed. Predominant methanogens were Methanobrevibacter (75, 72, and 49%), Methanosphaera (3.3, 2.3, and 3.4%), and Methanobacteriaceae (1.2, 0.6, and 0.7%) population in control, 15, and 30% PB, respectively. Among methanogens, Methanobrevibacter was linearly decreased (P = 0.05) with increasing PB supplementation. These results indicate that feeding PB selectively altered bacteria and methanogenic archaeal populations in the GI tract of goats.

  15. Gastrointestinal Bacterial and Methanogenic Archaea Diversity Dynamics Associated with Condensed Tannin-Containing Pine Bark Diet in Goats Using 16S rDNA Amplicon Pyrosequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byeng R. Min

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Eighteen Kiko-cross meat goats (n=6 were used to collect gastrointestinal (GI bacteria and methanogenic archaea for diversity measures when fed condensed tannin-containing pine bark (PB. Three dietary treatments were tested: control diet (0% PB and 30% wheat straw (WS; 0.17% condensed tannins (CT dry matter (DM; 15% PB and 15% WS (1.6% CT DM, and 30% PB and 0% WS (3.2% CT DM. A 16S rDNA bacterial tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing technique was used to characterize and elucidate changes in GI bacteria and methanogenic archaea diversity among the diets. Proteobacteria was the most dominant phylum in goats with mean relative abundance values ranging from 39.7 (30% PB to 46.5% (control and 47.1% (15% PB. Other phyla individually accounted for fewer than 25% of the relative abundance observed. Predominant methanogens were Methanobrevibacter (75, 72, and 49%, Methanosphaera (3.3, 2.3, and 3.4%, and Methanobacteriaceae (1.2, 0.6, and 0.7% population in control, 15, and 30% PB, respectively. Among methanogens, Methanobrevibacter was linearly decreased (P=0.05 with increasing PB supplementation. These results indicate that feeding PB selectively altered bacteria and methanogenic archaeal populations in the GI tract of goats.

  16. EFFECTS OF AMARANTHS’ SEEDS ON DEHYDROGENASE ACTIVITY AND GASES EMISSION IN METHANOGENIC BIOREACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor COVALIOV

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of amaranths‘ seeds as the source of squalene on the dehydrogenase activity and efficiency of methane production were investigated in methanogenic bench-scale (5000 ml bioreactors used to treat the mixture of distillery wastes and farmyard manure. The adding of amaranth seeds to the methanogenic bioreactor has an inhibitory effect on the dehydrogenase activity and stimulates the process of methanogenesis. Dehydrogenase activity decreased with the increase of doses of squalene and its trend had a close connection with doses (R2=0.77-0.78. The methane content in the total amount of gases is 65.3-71.3% in a bioreactor with the additive of amaranth seeds in a dose of 50 mg l-1, which is 22.1% higher than in the the control bioreactor without additives. The increase in squalene concentration higher than 0.0005% is not rational because its stimulating effect on the methanogenic process decreases. Anaerobic digestion of alcohol distillery industry wastes with manure is a complex nonlinear time-varying microbiological process. Dehydrogenase activity trends in the experiment are described by the power function for 5 hours observations and by the logarithmic function for 120 hours of observations. Trends of CH4 are described by the polynomial function in all periods of testing. Correlation coefficients are 0.37 and 0.70 for CH4 after 5 and 120 hours of the anaerobic digestion. Dehydrogenase activity is in the close negative connection with the amount of gases, including methane. Correlation analysis between dehydrogenase activity and the release of gases has revealed the moderate and strongly negative link during 24 hours after the start of the experiment.EFECTUL SEMINŢELOR DE AMARANT ASUPRA ACTIVITĂŢII DEHIDROGENAZEI ŞI EMISIEI GAZELOR ÎN BIOREACTOARELE METANOGENEÎn bioreactoare metanogene unite consecutiv, cu volum de 5000 ml, utilizate pentru tratarea amestecului de borhot de la distilarea alcoolului cu gunoi de grajd, a fost

  17. An integrated study reveals diverse methanogens, Thaumarchaeota, and yet-uncultivated archaeal lineages in Armenian hot springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedlund, Brian P; Dodsworth, Jeremy A; Cole, Jessica K; Panosyan, Hovik H

    2013-07-01

    Culture-independent and enrichment techniques, with an emphasis on members of the Archaea, were used to determine the composition and structure of microbial communities inhabiting microbial mats in the source pools of two geothermal springs near the towns of Arzakan and Jermuk in Armenia. Amplification of small-subunit rRNA genes using "universal" primers followed by pyrosequencing (pyrotags) revealed highly diverse microbial communities in both springs, with >99 % of pyrosequences corresponding to members of the domain Bacteria. The spring in Arzakan was colonized by a photosynthetic mat dominated by Cyanobacteria, in addition to Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Spirochaeta and a diversity of other Bacteria. The spring in Jermuk was colonized by phylotypes related to sulfur, iron, and hydrogen chemolithotrophs in the Betaproteobacteria and Epsilonproteobacteria, along with a diversity of other Bacteria. Analysis of near full-length small subunit rRNA genes amplified using Archaea-specific primers showed that both springs are inhabited by a diversity of methanogens, including Methanomicrobiales and Methanosarcinales and relatives of Methanomassiliicoccus luminyensis, close relatives of the ammonia-oxidizing archaeon (AOA) "Candidatus Nitrososphaera gargensis", and the yet-uncultivated Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotal Group and Deep Hydrothermal Vent Crenarchaeota group 1. Methanogenic enrichments confirmed the predicted physiological diversity, revealing methylotrophic, acetoclastic, and hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis at 45 and 55 °C, but not 65 °C. This is one of only a few studies combining cultivation-independent and -dependent approaches to study archaea in moderate-temperature (37-73 °C) terrestrial geothermal environments and suggests important roles for methanogenic archaea and AOA in the carbon and nitrogen biogeochemical cycles in these environments.

  18. Distribution of benthic phototrophs, sulfate reducers, and methanogens in two adjacent saltern evaporation ponds in Eilat, Israel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sørensen, K.; Řeháková, Klára; Zapomělová, Eliška; Oren, A.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 56, 2-3 (2009), s. 275-284 ISSN 0948-3055. [GAP workshop /8./. Eilat, 30.03.2008-08.04.2008] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA206/06/0462; GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB600960703; GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS600170504 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60170517; CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : salterns * microbial community * molecular ecology * phototrohs * sulfate reducers * methanogens Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.743, year: 2009

  19. tRNA-dependent cysteine biosynthetic pathway represents a strategy to increase cysteine contents by preventing it from thermal degradation: thermal adaptation of methanogenic archaea ancestor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Ge; Wang, Wei; Chen, Ling-Ling; Qian, Shao-Song; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2009-10-01

    Although cysteine (Cys) is beneficial to stabilize protein structures, it is not prevalent in thermophiles. For instance, the Cys contents in most thermophilic archaea are only around 0.7%. However, methanogenic archaea, no matter thermophilic or not, contain relatively abundant Cys, which remains elusive for a long time. Recently, Klipcan et al. correlated this intriguing property of methanogenic archaea with their unique tRNA-dependent Cys biosynthetic pathway. But, the deep reasons underlying the correlation are ambiguous. Considering the facts that free Cys is thermally labile and the tRNA-dependent Cys biosynthesis avoids the use of free Cys, we speculate that the unique Cys biosynthetic pathway represents a strategy to increase Cys contents by preventing it from thermal degradation, which may be relevant to the thermal adaptation of methanogenic archaea ancestor.

  20. Kansas Consortium Plug-in Hybrid Medium Duty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2012-03-31

    On September 30, 2008, the US Department of Energy (DoE), issued a cooperative agreement award, DE-FC26-08NT01914, to the Metropolitan Energy Center (MEC), for a project known as “Kansas Consortium Plug-in Hybrid Medium Duty Certification” project. The cooperative agreement was awarded pursuant to H15915 in reference to H. R. 2764 Congressionally Directed Projects. The original agreement provided funding for The Consortium to implement the established project objectives as follows: (1) to understand the current state of the development of a test protocol for PHEV configurations; (2) to work with industry stakeholders to recommend a medium duty vehicle test protocol; (3) to utilize the Phase 1 Eaton PHEV F550 Chassis or other appropriate PHEV configurations to conduct emissions testing; (4) and to make an industry PHEV certification test protocol recommendation for medium duty trucks. Subsequent amendments to the initial agreement were made, the most significant being a revised Scope of Project Objectives (SOPO) that did not address actual field data since it was not available as originally expected. This project was mated by DOE with a parallel project award given to the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) in California. The SCAQMD project involved designing, building and testing of five medium duty plug-in hybrid electric trucks. SCAQMD had contracted with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to manage the project. EPRI provided the required match to the federal grant funds to both the SCAQMD project and the Kansas Consortium project. The rational for linking the two projects was that the data derived from the SCAQMD project could be used to validate the protocols developed by the Kansas Consortium team. At the same time, the consortium team would be a useful resource to SCAQMD in designating their test procedures for emissions and operating parameters and determining vehicle mileage. The years between award of the cooperative

  1. Geodesy and the UNAVCO Consortium: Three Decades of Innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, L. R.; Miller, M. M.; Meertens, C. M.; Mattioli, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    UNAVCO, a non-profit, university consortium that supports geoscience research using geodesy, began with the ingenious recognition that the nascent Global Positioning System constellation (GPS) could be used to investigate earth processes. The consortium purchased one of the first commercially available GPS receivers, Texas Instrument's TI-4100 NAVSTAR Navigator, in 1984 to measure plate deformation. This early work was highlighted in a technology magazine, GPSWorld, in 1990. Over a 30-year period, UNAVCO and the community have helped advance instrument design for mobility, flexibility, efficiency and interoperability, so research could proceed with higher precision and under ever challenging conditions. Other innovations have been made in data collection, processing, analysis, management and archiving. These innovations in tools, methods and data have had broader impacts as they have found greater utility beyond research for timing, precise positioning, safety, communication, navigation, surveying, engineering and recreation. Innovations in research have expanded the utility of geodetic tools beyond the solid earth science through creative analysis of the data and the methods. For example, GPS sounding of the atmosphere is now used for atmospheric and space sciences. GPS reflectrometry, another critical advance, supports soil science, snow science and ecological research. Some research advances have had broader impacts for society by driving innovations in hazards risk reduction, hazards response, resource management, land use planning, surveying, engineering and other uses. Furthermore, the geodetic data is vital for the design of space missions, testing and advancing communications, and testing and dealing with interference and GPS jamming. We will discuss three decades (and counting) of advances by the National Science Foundation's premiere geodetic facility, consortium and some of the many geoscience principal investigators that have driven innovations in

  2. Heavy-Machinery Traffic Impacts Methane Emissions as Well as Methanogen Abundance and Community Structure in Oxic Forest Soils▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Beat; Niklaus, Pascal A.; Kremer, Johann; Lüscher, Peter; Zimmermann, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Temperate forest soils are usually efficient sinks for the greenhouse gas methane, at least in the absence of significant amounts of methanogens. We demonstrate here that trafficking with heavy harvesting machines caused a large reduction in CH4 consumption and even turned well-aerated forest soils into net methane sources. In addition to studying methane fluxes, we investigated the responses of methanogens after trafficking in two different forest sites. Trafficking generated wheel tracks with different impact (low, moderate, severe, and unaffected). We found that machine passes decreased the soils' macropore space and lowered hydraulic conductivities in wheel tracks. Severely compacted soils yielded high methanogenic abundance, as demonstrated by quantitative PCR analyses of methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) genes, whereas these sequences were undetectable in unaffected soils. Even after a year after traffic compression, methanogen abundance in compacted soils did not decline, indicating a stability of methanogens here over time. Compacted wheel tracks exhibited a relatively constant community structure, since we found several persisting mcrA sequence types continuously present at all sampling times. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a rather large methanogen diversity in the compacted soil, and most mcrA gene sequences were mostly similar to known sequences from wetlands. The majority of mcrA gene sequences belonged either to the order Methanosarcinales or Methanomicrobiales, whereas both sites were dominated by members of the families Methanomicrobiaceae Fencluster, with similar sequences obtained from peatland environments. The results show that compacting wet forest soils by heavy machinery causes increases in methane production and release. PMID:21742929

  3. Influence of Martian regolith analogs on the activity and growth of methanogenic archaea, with special regard to long-term desiccation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janosch eSchirmack

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Methanogenic archaea have been studied as model organisms for possible life on Mars for several reasons: they can grow lithoautotrophically by using hydrogen and carbon dioxide as energy and carbon sources, respectively; they are anaerobes; and they evolved at a time when conditions on early Earth are believed to have looked similar to those of early Mars. As Mars is currently dry and cold and as water might be available only at certain time intervals, any organism living on this planet would need to cope with desiccation. On Earth there are several regions with low water availability as well, e.g. permafrost environments, desert soils and salt pans. Here, we present the results of a set of experiments investigating the influence of different Martian regolith analogs on the metabolic activity and growth of three methanogenic strains exposed to culture conditions as well as long-term desiccation. In most cases, concentrations below 1 %wt of regolith in the media resulted in an increase of methane production rates, whereas higher concentrations decreased the rates, thus prolonging the lag phase. Further experiments showed that methanogenic archaea are capable of producing methane when incubated on a water-saturated sedimentary matrix of regolith lacking nutrients. Survival of methanogens under these conditions was analyzed with a 400 day desiccation experiment in the presence of regolith analogs. All tested strains of methanogens survived the desiccation period as it was determined through reincubation on fresh medium and via qPCR following propidium monoazide treatment to identify viable cells. The survival of long-term desiccation and the ability of active metabolism on water-saturated MRAs strengthens the possibility of methanogenic archaea or physiologically similar organisms to exist in environmental niches on Mars. The best results were achieved in presence of a phyllosilicate, which provides insights of possible positive effects in habitats

  4. Succession of methanogenic archaea in rice straw incorporated into a Japanese rice field: estimation by PCR-DGGE and sequence analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuo Sugano

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The succession and phylogenetic profiles of methanogenic archaeal communities associated with rice straw decomposition in rice-field soil were studied by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE analysis followed by 16S rDNA sequencing. Nylon bags containing either leaf sheaths or blades were buried in the plowed layer of a Japanese rice field under drained conditions during the off-crop season and under flooded conditions after transplanting. In addition, rice straw samples that had been buried in the rice field under drained conditions during the off-crop season were temporarily removed during spring plowing and then re-buried in the same rice field under flooded conditions at transplanting. Populations of methanogenic archaea were examined by amplification of the 16S rRNA genes in the DNA extracted from the rice straw samples. No PCR product was produced for samples of leaf sheath or blade prior to burial or after burial under drained conditions, indicating that the methanogen population was very small during decomposition of rice straw under oxic conditions. Many common bands were observed in rice straw samples of leaf sheath and blade during decomposition of rice straw under flooded conditions. Cluster analysis based on DGGE patterns divided methanogenic archaeal communities into two groups before and after the mid-season drainage. Sequence analysis of DGGE bands that were commonly present were closely related to Methanomicrobiales and Rice cluster I. Methanomicrobiales, Rice cluster I and Methanosarcinales were major members before the mid-season drainage, whereas the DGGE bands that characterized methanogenic archaeal communities after the mid-season drainage were closely related to Methanomicrobiales. These results indicate that mid-season drainage affected the methanogenic archaeal communities irrespective of their location on rice straw (sheath and blade and the previous history of decomposition

  5. The IRIS consortium: international cooperation in advanced reactor development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carelli, M.; Petrovic, B.; Miller, K.; Lombardi, C.; Ricotti, M.E.

    2005-01-01

    Besides its many outstanding technical innovations in the design and safety, the most innovative feature of the International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS), is perhaps the international cooperation which carries on its development. IRIS is designed by an international consortium which currently numbers 21 organizations from ten countries across four continents. It includes reactor, fuel and fuel cycle vendors, component manufacturers, laboratories, academia, architect engineers and power producers. The defining organizational characteristics of IRIS is that while Westinghouse has overall lead and responsibility, this lead is of the type of 'primus inter pares' (first among equals) rather than the traditional owner versus suppliers/contractors relationship. All members of the IRIS consortium contribute and expect to have a return, should IRIS be successfully deployed, commensurate to their investment. The nature of such return will be tailored to the type of each organization, because it will of course be of a different nature for say a component manufacturer, university, or architect engineer. One fundamental tenet of the consortium is that all members, regardless of their amount of contribution, have equal access to all information developed within the project. Technical work is thus being coordinated by integrated subgroups and the whole team meets twice a year to perform an overall review of the work, discuss policy and strategy and plan future activities. Personnel from consortium members have performed internships, mostly at Westinghouse locations in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and Windsor, Connecticut, but also at other members, as it has been the case for several graduate students. In fact, more than one hundred students at the various universities have been working on IRIS, most of them conducting graduate theses at the master or doctoral level. The IRIS experience has proved very helpful to the students in successfully landing their employment choice

  6. Protein Interaction Data Curation - The International Molecular Exchange Consortium (IMEx)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orchard, Sandra; Kerrien, Samuel; Abbani, Sara; Aranda, Bruno; Bhate, Jignesh; Bidwell, Shelby; Bridge, Alan; Briganti, Leonardo; Brinkman, Fiona S. L.; Cesareni, Gianni; Chatr-aryamontri, Andrew; Chautard, Emilie; Chen, Carol; Dumousseau, Marine; Goll, Johannes; Hancock, Robert E. W.; Hannick, Linda I.; Jurisica, Igor; Khadake, Jyoti; Lynn, David J.; Mahadevan, Usha; Perfetto, Livia; Raghunath, Arathi; Ricard-Blum, Sylvie; Roechert, Bernd; Salwinski, Lukasz; Stümpflen, Volker; Tyers, Mike; Uetz, Peter; Xenarios, Ioannis; Hermjakob, Henning

    2013-01-01

    The IMEx consortium is an international collaboration between major public interaction data providers to share curation effort and make a non-redundant set of protein interactions available in a single search interface on a common website (www.imexconsortium.org). Common curation rules have been developed and a central registry is used to manage the selection of articles to enter into the dataset. The advantages of such a service to the user, quality control measures adopted and data distribution practices are discussed. PMID:22453911

  7. Decolorization and biodegradation of reactive dyes and dye wastewater by a developed bacterial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saratale, R G; Saratale, G D; Chang, J S; Govindwar, S P

    2010-11-01

    A bacterial consortium (consortium GR) consisting of Proteus vulgaris NCIM-2027 and Micrococcus glutamicus NCIM-2168 could rapidly decolorize and degrade commonly-used sulfonated reactive dye Green HE4BD and many other reactive dyes. Consortium GR shows markedly higher decolorization activity than that of the individual strains. The preferable physicochemical parameters were identified to achieve higher dye degradation and decolorization efficiency. The supplementation of cheap co-substrates (e.g., extracts of agricultural wastes) could enhance the decolorization performance of consortium GR. Extent of mineralization was determined with TOC and COD measurements, showing nearly complete mineralization of Green HE4BD by consortium GR (up to 90% TOC and COD reduction) within 24 h. Oxidoreductive enzymes seemed to be involved in fast decolorization/degradation process with the evidence of enzymes induction in the bacterial consortium. Phytotoxicity and microbial toxicity studies confirm that the biodegraded products of Green HE4BD by consortium GR are non-toxic. Consortium GR also shows significant biodegradation and decolorization activities for mixture of reactive dyes as well as the effluent from actual dye manufacturing industry. This confers the possibility of applying consortium GR for the treatment of industrial wastewaters containing dye pollutants.

  8. Evaluating robustness of a diesel-degrading bacterial consortium isolated from contaminated soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sydow, Mateusz; Owsianiak, Mikolaj; Szczepaniak, Zuzanna

    2016-01-01

    kinetics on individual hydrocarbons. However, despite this low resistance, structural and functional resilience were high, as verified by re-exposing the hydrocarbon-perturbed consortium to diesel fuel. The high resilience is either due to the short exposure time, insufficient for permanent changes...... in consortium structure and function, or the ability of some consortium members to be maintained during exposure on degradation intermediates produced by other members. Thus, the consortium is expected to cope with short-term exposures to narrow carbon feeds, while maintaining its structural and functional...... integrity, which remains an advantage over biodegradation approaches using single species cultures....

  9. Formate-dependent H2 production by the mesophilic methanogen Methanococcus maripaludis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupa, Boguslaw; Hendrickson, Erik L; Leigh, John A; Whitman, William B

    2008-11-01

    Methanococcus maripaludis, an H(2)- and formate-utilizing methanogen, produced H(2) at high rates from formate. The rates and kinetics of H(2) production depended upon the growth conditions, and H(2) availability during growth was a major factor. Specific activities of resting cells grown with formate or H(2) were 0.4 to 1.4 U mg(-1) (dry weight). H(2) production in formate-grown cells followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics, and the concentration of formate required for half-maximal activity (K(f)) was 3.6 mM. In contrast, in H(2)-grown cells this process followed sigmoidal kinetics, and the K(f) was 9 mM. A key enzyme for formate-dependent H(2) production was formate dehydrogenase, Fdh. H(2) production and growth were severely reduced in a mutant containing a deletion of the gene encoding the Fdh1 isozyme, indicating that it was the primary Fdh. In contrast, a mutant containing a deletion of the gene encoding the Fdh2 isozyme possessed near-wild-type activities, indicating that this isozyme did not play a major role. H(2) production by a mutant containing a deletion of the coenzyme F(420)-reducing hydrogenase Fru was also severely reduced, suggesting that the major pathway of H(2) production comprised Fdh1 and Fru. Because a Deltafru-Deltafrc mutant retained 10% of the wild-type activity, an additional pathway is present. Mutants possessing deletions of the gene encoding the F(420)-dependent methylene-H(4)MTP dehydrogenase (Mtd) or the H(2)-forming methylene-H(4)MTP dehydrogenase (Hmd) also possessed reduced activity, which suggested that this second pathway was comprised of Fdh1-Mtd-Hmd. In contrast to H(2) production, the cellular rates of methanogenesis were unaffected in these mutants, which suggested that the observed H(2) production was not a direct intermediate of methanogenesis. In conclusion, high rates of formate-dependent H(2) production demonstrated the potential of M. maripaludis for the microbial production of H(2) from formate.

  10. The impact of road salt runoff on methanogens and other lacustrine prokaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague, E.; Dupuis, D.; Koretsky, C.; Docherty, K. M.

    2017-12-01

    Road salt deicers are widely used in regions that experience icy winters. The resulting saline runoff can negatively impact freshwater lake ecosystems. Saline runoff can cause density stratification, resulting in persistently anoxic hypolimnia. This may result in a shift in the structure of the hypolimnetic prokaryotic community, with potential increases in anaerobic and halotolerant taxa. Specifically, anoxia creates a habitat suitable for the proliferation of obligately anaerobic Archaeal methanogens. As a result, more persistent and expanded anoxic zones due to road salt runoff have the potential to increase hypolimnetic methane concentrations. If a portion of this methane is released to the atmosphere, it could be a currently uncharacterized contributor to atmospheric greenhouse gas emissions. This study examines two urban, eutrophic lakes with significant road salt influx and one rural, eutrophic lake with little road salt influx. All three lakes are located in southwest Michigan. Samples were taken from the water column at every meter at the deepest part of each lake, with a sample from the sediment-water interface, in May, August, and November 2016 and February 2017. The V4 and V5 hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA gene in Bacteria and Archaea were amplified and sequenced using an Illumina MiSeq approach. Abundance of the mcrA gene, a marker for Archaeal methyl coenzyme A reductase, was quantified using qPCR. Water column methane levels, sediment methane production, water surface methane flux and a suite of supporting geochemical parameters were measured to determine changes in redox stratification in each lake and across seasons. Results indicate significant changes in the 16S rRNA-based community associated with depth, season, salinity and lake. Cyanobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Proteobacteria were among the phyla with the highest overall relative abundance. Sediment samples had more copies of the mcrA gene than the water column samples. In most

  11. Shifts of methanogenic communities in response to permafrost thaw results in rising methane emissions and soil property changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shiping; Cui, Hongpeng; Zhu, Youhai; Lu, Zhenquan; Pang, Shouji; Zhang, Shuai; Dong, Hailiang; Su, Xin

    2018-05-01

    Permafrost thaw can bring negative consequences in terms of ecosystems, resulting in permafrost collapse, waterlogging, thermokarst lake development, and species composition changes. Little is known about how permafrost thaw influences microbial community shifts and their activities. Here, we show that the dominant archaeal community shifts from Methanomicrobiales to Methanosarcinales in response to the permafrost thaw, and the increase in methane emission is found to be associated with the methanogenic archaea, which rapidly bloom with nearly tenfold increase in total number. The mcrA gene clone libraries analyses indicate that Methanocellales/Rice Cluster I was predominant both in the original permafrost and in the thawed permafrost. However, only species belonging to Methanosarcinales showed higher transcriptional activities in the thawed permafrost, indicating a shift of methanogens from hydrogenotrophic to partly acetoclastic methane-generating metabolic processes. In addition, data also show the soil texture and features change as a result of microbial reproduction and activity induced by this permafrost thaw. Those data indicate that microbial ecology under warming permafrost has potential impacts on ecosystem and methane emissions.

  12. High-rate continuous hydrogen production by Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum PSU-2 immobilized on heat-pretreated methanogenic granules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O-Thong, Sompong [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Bygningstorvet 115, DK-2800, Kgs Lyngby (Denmark); Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Thaksin University, Patthalung 93110 (Thailand); Prasertsan, Poonsuk [Department of Industrial Biotechnology, Faculty of Agro-Industry, Prince of Songkla University, Hat-Yai, Songkhla 90120 (Thailand); Karakashev, Dimitar; Angelidaki, Irini [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Bygningstorvet 115, DK-2800, Kgs Lyngby (Denmark)

    2008-11-15

    Biohydrogen production from Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum strain PSU-2 was examined in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor and carrier-free upflow anaerobic reactor (UA), both fed with sucrose and operating at 60 C. Heat-pretreated methanogenic granules were used as carrier to immobilize T. thermosaccharolyticum strain PSU-2 in UASB reactor operated at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) ranging from 0.75 to 24 h and corresponding sucrose loading rate from 58.5 to 2.4 mmol sucrose l{sup -1} h{sup -1}. In comparison with hydrogen production rate of 12.1 mmol H{sub 2} l{sup -1} h{sup -1} obtained by carrier-free reactor upflow anaerobic (UA) system, a greatly improved hydrogen production rate up to 152 mmol H{sub 2} l{sup -1} h{sup -1} was demonstrated by the granular cells in UASB system. The biofilm of T. thermosaccharolyticum strain PSU-2 developed on treated methanogenic granules in UASB reactor substantially enhanced biomass retention (3 times), and production of hydrogen (12 times) compared to carrier-free reactor. It appears to be the most preferred process for highly efficient dark fermentative hydrogen production from sugar containing wastewater under thermophilic conditions. (author)

  13. Expansion of Phragmites australis alters methane dynamics and methanogen, methanotroph, and sulfate reducing bacteria communities in tidal marsh in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.; Lee, J.; Kim, H.; Gauhar, M.; Kang, H.

    2016-12-01

    Plant invasion is known to change substantially methane dynamics in tidal marshes. However, the exact mechanisms related to methane dynamics change due to plant invasion have not been fully understood. In Suncheon Bay, South Korea, Phragmites australis has invaded the habitat of native species, Suaeda japonica, and becomes dominant vegetation in this area. We measured methane fluxes, soil biogeochemistry, and microbial communities from both vegetation sites throughout a growing season and conducted a chronosequence analysis in order to illustrate the effect of plant invasion on methane dynamics and microbial communities. For analyzing microbial communities, we collected 1m intact soil cores and conducted functional gene-targeted real-time qPCR, T-RFLP, and PLFA. P. australis invasion significantly increased methane emission in a summer season, accompanied by greater dissolved organic carbon and soil water content. Methanogen, methanotroph, and sulfate reducing bacterial communities were gradually changed along with the invasion periods. In particular, abundances ratio of mcrA/pmoA and mcrA/dsrA had a positive correlation with methane emission, which indicates that P. australis invasion reduces methane oxidation by methanotroph, and competitive inhibition between methanogen and sulfate reducing bacteria. In conclusion, P. australis invasion on S. japonica significantly increased methane emission in tidal marsh by altering the microbial communities in a way that C decomposition would be dominated by methanogenesis.

  14. The transcriptome response of the ruminal methanogen Methanobrevibacter ruminantium strain M1 to the inhibitor lauric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xuan; Stevens, Marc J A; Neuenschwander, Stefan; Schwarm, Angela; Kreuzer, Michael; Bratus-Neuenschwander, Anna; Zeitz, Johanna O

    2018-02-17

    Lauric acid (C 12 ) is a medium-chain fatty acid that inhibits growth and production of the greenhouse gas methane by rumen methanogens such as Methanobrevibacter ruminantium. To understand the inhibitory mechanism of C 12 , a transcriptome analysis was performed in M. ruminantium strain M1 (DSM 1093) using RNA-Seq. Pure cell cultures in the exponential growth phase were treated with 0.4 mg/ml C 12 , dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), for 1 h and transcriptomic changes were compared to DMSO-only treated cells (final DMSO concentration 0.2%). Exposure to C 12 resulted in differential expression of 163 of the 2280 genes in the M1 genome (maximum log 2 -fold change 6.6). Remarkably, C 12 hardly affected the expression of genes involved in methanogenesis. Instead, most affected genes encode cell-surface associated proteins (adhesion-like proteins, membrane-associated transporters and hydrogenases), and proteins involved in detoxification or DNA-repair processes. Enrichment analysis on the genes regulated in the C 12 -treated group showed a significant enrichment for categories 'cell surface' and 'mobile elements' (activated by C 12 ), and for the categories 'regulation' and 'protein fate' (represssed). These results are useful to generate and test specific hypotheses on the mechanism how C 12 affects rumen methanogens.

  15. Reducing methane emissions and the methanogen population in the rumen of Tibetan sheep by dietary supplementation with coconut oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xuezhi; Long, Ruijun; Zhang, Qian; Huang, Xiaodan; Guo, Xusheng; Mi, Jiandui

    2012-10-01

    The objective was to evaluate the effect of dietary coconut oil on methane (CH(4)) emissions and the microbial community in Tibetan sheep. Twelve animals were assigned to receive either a control diet (oaten hay) or a mixture diet containing concentrate (maize meal), in which coconut oil was supplemented at 12 g/day or not for a period of 4 weeks. CH(4) emissions were measured by using the 'tunnel' technique, and microbial communities were examined using quantitative real-time PCR. Daily CH(4) production for the control and forage-to-concentrate ratio of 6:4 was 17.8 and 15.3 g, respectively. Coconut oil was particularly effective at reducing CH(4) emissions from Tibetan sheep. The inclusion of coconut oil for the control decreased CH(4) production (in grams per day) by 61.2%. In addition, there was a positive correlation between the number of methanogens and the daily CH(4) production (R = 0.95, P coconut oil supplemented at 12 g/day decreases the number of methanogens by 77% and a decreases in the ruminal fungal population (85-95%) and Fibrobacter succinogenes (50-98%) but an increase in Ruminococcus flavefaciens (25-70%). The results from our experiment suggest that adding coconut oil to the diet can reduce CH(4) emissions in Tibetan sheep and that these reductions persist for at least the 4-week feeding period.

  16. Methanogenic degradation of toilet-paper cellulose upon sewage treatment in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rong; Nie, Yulun; Kato, Hiroyuki; Wu, Jiang; Utashiro, Tetsuya; Lu, Jianbo; Yue, Shangchao; Jiang, Hongyu; Zhang, Lu; Li, Yu-You

    2017-03-01

    Toilet-paper cellulose with rich but refractory carbon sources, are the main insoluble COD fractions in sewage. An anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) was configured for sewage treatment at room temperature and its performance on methanogenic degradation of toilet paper was highlighted. The results showed, high organic removal (95%), high methane conversion (90%) and low sludge yield (0.08gVSS/gCOD) were achieved in the AnMBR. Toilet-paper cellulose was fully biodegraded without accumulation in the mixed liquor and membrane cake layer. Bioconversion efficiency of toilet paper approached 100% under a high organic loading rate (OLR) of 2.02gCOD/L/d and it could provide around 26% of total methane generation at most of OLRs. Long sludge retention time and co-digestion of insoluble/soluble COD fractions achieving mutualism of functional microorganisms, contributed to biodegradation of toilet-paper cellulose. Therefore the AnMBR successfully implemented simultaneously methanogenic bioconversion of toilet-paper cellulose and soluble COD in sewage at room temperature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Inner-City Energy and Environmental Education Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-11

    The numbers of individuals with adequate education and training to participate effectively in the highly technical aspects of environmental site cleanup are insufficient to meet the increasing demands of industry and government. Young people are particularly sensitive to these issues and want to become better equipped to solve the problems which will confront them during their lives. Educational institutions, on the other hand, have been slow in offering courses and curricula which will allow students to fulfill these interests. This has been in part due to the lack of federal funding to support new academic programs. This Consortium has been organized to initiate focused educational effort to reach inner-city youth with interesting and useful energy and environmental programs which can lead to well-paying and satisfying careers. Successful Consortium programs can be replicated in other parts of the nation. This report describes a pilot program in Washington, DC, Philadelphia, and Baltimore with the goal to attract and retain inner-city youth to pursue careers in energy-related scientific and technical areas, environmental restoration, and waste management.

  18. A programmable Escherichia coli consortium via tunable symbiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alissa Kerner

    Full Text Available Synthetic microbial consortia that can mimic natural systems have the potential to become a powerful biotechnology for various applications. One highly desirable feature of these consortia is that they can be precisely regulated. In this work we designed a programmable, symbiotic circuit that enables continuous tuning of the growth rate and composition of a synthetic consortium. We implemented our general design through the cross-feeding of tryptophan and tyrosine by two E. coli auxotrophs. By regulating the expression of genes related to the export or production of these amino acids, we were able to tune the metabolite exchanges and achieve a wide range of growth rates and strain ratios. In addition, by inverting the relationship of growth/ratio vs. inducer concentrations, we were able to "program" the co-culture for pre-specified attributes with the proper addition of inducing chemicals. This programmable proof-of-concept circuit or its variants can be applied to more complex systems where precise tuning of the consortium would facilitate the optimization of specific objectives, such as increasing the overall efficiency of microbial production of biofuels or pharmaceuticals.

  19. Creating a multi-center rare disease consortium – the Consortium of Eosinophilic Gastrointestinal Disease Researchers (CEGIR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Katherine; Gupta, Sandeep K.; Kantor, Susanna; Kuhl, Jonathan T.; Aceves, Seema S.; Bonis, Peter A.; Capocelli, Kelley E.; Carpenter, Christina; Chehade, Mirna; Collins, Margaret H.; Dellon, Evan S.; Falk, Gary W.; Gopal-Srivastava, Rashmi; Gonsalves, Nirmala; Hirano, Ikuo; King, Eileen C.; Leung, John; Krischer, Jeffrey P.; Mukkada, Vincent A.; Schoepfer, Alain; Spergel, Jonathan M.; Straumann, Alex; Yang, Guang-Yu; Furuta, Glenn T.; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2017-01-01

     Eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders (EGIDs) affect various segments of the gastrointestinal tract. Since these disorders are rare, collaboration is essential to enroll subjects in clinical studies and study the broader population. The Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network (RDCRN), a program of the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), funded the Consortium of Eosinophilic Gastrointestinal Disease Researchers (CEGIR) in 2014 to advance the field of EGIDs. CEGIR facilitates collaboration among various centers, subspecialties, patients, professional organizations and patient-advocacy groups and includes 14 clinical sites. It has successfully initiated two large multi-center clinical studies looking to refine EGID diagnoses and management. Several pilot studies are underway that focus on various aspects of EGIDs including novel therapeutic interventions, diagnostic and monitoring methods, and the role of the microbiome in pathogenesis. CEGIR currently nurtures five physician-scholars through a career training development program and has published more than 40 manuscripts since its inception. This review focuses on CEGIR’s operating model and progress and how it facilitates a framework for exchange of ideas and stimulates research and innovation. This consortium provides a model for progress on other potential clinical areas. PMID:29333363

  20. Consortium de recherche pour le développement de l'agriculture en ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Research Consortium for the Development of Agriculture in Haiti. Even before it was hit by a devastating earthquake in January 2010, Haiti's children suffered some of the worst rates of undernutrition in Latin America and the Caribbean. View moreResearch Consortium for the Development of Agriculture in Haiti ...

  1. Renaissance Educational Consortium Ensuring Individualized Progress in Technology and Science (RECEIPTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caddell, Esther Harte; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes the rationale for, development of, and activities of the Renaissance Educational Consortium Ensuring Individualized Progress in Technology and Science (RECEIPTS). The effort is designed to build a consortium of community resources with a focus on science and technology in order to combat the problems of low academic motivation and…

  2. The creation of the SAVE consortium – Saving Asia's Vultures from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article describes the background to this problem, caused mainly by the veterinary drug diclofenac, and the establishment and structure of the SAVE consortium created to help coordinate the necessary conservation response. The lessons learnt in Asia and the working model of such a consortium are presented, which ...

  3. Northeast Artificial Intelligence Consortium Annual Report. 1988 Artificial Intelligence Applications to Speech Recognition. Volume 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-10-01

    1988 Artificial Intelligence Applications to Speech Recognition Syracuse University Harvey E. Rhody, Thomas R. Ridley, John A. ,les DTIC S ELECTE FEB...Include Security Oiewftction) NORTHEAST ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE CONSORTIUM ANNUAL REPORT - 1988 Artificial Intelligence Applications to Speech...Intelligence Consortium 1988 Annual Report Volume 8 Artificial Intelligence Applications to Speech Recognition Harvey E. Rhody Thomas R. Ridley John A

  4. The Activities of the European Consortium on Nuclear Data Development and Analysis for Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, U., E-mail: ulrich.fischer@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Neutron Physic and Reactor Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), RO-077125 Magurele (Romania); Cabellos, O. [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Kodeli, I. [Jozef Stefan Institute (JSI), Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Koning, A. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 LE Petten (Netherlands); Konobeyev, A.Yu. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Neutron Physic and Reactor Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Leeb, H. [Technische Universitaet Wien, Atominstitut, Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8–10, 1040 Wien (Austria); Rochman, D. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 LE Petten (Netherlands); Pereslavtsev, P. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Neutron Physic and Reactor Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Sauvan, P. [Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, C. Juan del Rosal, 12, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Sublet, J.-C. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Trkov, A. [Jozef Stefan Institute (JSI), Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Dupont, E. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, Paris (France); Leichtle, D.; Izquierdo, J. [Fusion for Energy, Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-06-15

    This paper presents an overview of the activities of the European Consortium on Nuclear Data Development and Analysis for Fusion. The Consortium combines available European expertise to provide services for the generation, maintenance, and validation of nuclear data evaluations and data files relevant for ITER, IFMIF and DEMO, as well as codes and software tools required for related nuclear calculations.

  5. The fungal consortium of Andromeda polifolia in bog habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Filippova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available (1 Andromeda polifolia (bog rosemary is a common plant species in northern circumboreal peatlands. While not a major peat-forming species in most peatlands, it is characterised by a substantial woody below-ground biomass component that contributes directly to the accumulation of organic matter below the moss surface, as well as sclerophyllous leaf litter that contributes to the accumulation of organic matter above the moss surface. Rather little is known about the fungal communities associated with this plant species. Hence, we investigated the fungal consortium of A. polifolia in three distinct vegetation communities of ombrotrophic bogs near Khanty-Mansiysk, West Siberia, Russia, in 2012 and 2013. These vegetation communities were forested bog (Tr = treed, Sphagnum-dominated lawn (Ln, and Eriophorum-Sphagnum-dominated hummock (Er. (2 In total, 37 fungal taxa, belonging to five classes and 16 families, were identified and described morphologically. Seven fungal species were previously known from Andromeda as host. Others are reported for the first time, thus considerably expanding the fungal consortium of this dwarf shrub. Most taxa were saprobic on fallen leaves of A. polifolia found amongst Sphagnum in the bog. Two taxa were parasitic on living plant tissues and one taxon was saprobic on dead twigs. Three taxa, recorded only on A. polifolia leaves and on no other plant species or materials, may be host-specific to this dwarf shrub. (3 A quantitative analysis of the frequency of occurrence of all taxa showed that one taxon (Coccomyces duplicarioides was very abundant, 64 % of the taxa occurred frequently, and 32 % of the taxa occurred infrequently. The mean Shannon diversity index of the community was 2.4. (4 There were no statistical differences in the fungal community composition of A. polifolia in the three vegetation communities investigated in this study. Redundancy analysis suggested that some fungal taxa were positively, and others

  6. Comparison of acetate turnover in methanogenic and sulfate- reducing sediments by radiolabeling and stable isotope labeling and by use of specific inhibitors: Evidence for isotopic exchange

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Graaf, W.; Wellsbury, P.; Parkes, R.J.; Cappenberg, T.E.

    1996-01-01

    Acetate turnover in the methanogenic freshwater anoxic sediments of Lake Vechten, The Netherlands, and in anoxic sediments from the Tamar Estuary, United Kingdom, and the Grosser Jasmunder Bodden, Germany, the latter two dominated by sulfate reduction, was determined, Stable isotopes and

  7. INFLUENCE OF METRONIDAZOLE, CO, CO2, AND METHANOGENS ON THE FERMENTATIVE METABOLISM OF THE ANAEROBIC FUNGUS NEOCALLIMASTIX SP STRAIN L2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MARVINSIKKEMA, FD; REES, E; KRAAK, MN; GOTTSCHAL, JC; PRINS, RA

    The effects of metronidazole, CO, methanogens, and CO, on the fermentation of glucose by the anaerobic fungus Neocallimastix sp. strain L2 were investigated. Both metronidazole and CO caused a shift in the fermentation products from predominantly H-2, acetate, and formate to lactate as the major

  8. Quantitative analysis of previously identified propionate-oxidizing bacteria and methanogens at different temperatures in an UASB reactor containing propionate as a sole carbon source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Qiaoying; Li, Jianzheng; Zhang, Liguo; Jha, Ajay Kumar; Zhang, Yupeng

    2013-12-01

    Propionate degradation is crucial for maintaining the efficiency and stability of an anaerobic reactor. However, there was little information about the effects of ecological factor on propionate-oxidizing bacteria (POB). In current research, quantitative real-time fluorescence polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) of some identified POB and methanogens with a decrease in temperature in an upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor containing propionate as sole carbon source was investigated. The results showed that there were at least four identified POB, including Pelotomaculum schinkii, Pelotomaculum propionicum, Syntrophobacter fumaroxidans, and Syntrophobacter sulfatireducens, observed in this UASB reactor. Among them, P. schinkii was dominated during the whole operational period. Its quantity was 1.2 × 10(4) 16S rRNA gene copies per nanogram of DNA at 35 °C. A decrease in temperature from 35 to 30 °C led to P. schinkii to be increased by 1.8 times and then it was gradually reduced with a decrease in temperature from 30 to 25, 20, and 18 °C stepwise. A decrease in temperature from 35 to 20 °C did not make the amount of methanogens markedly changed, but hydrogenotrophic methanogens (Methanospirillum) and acetotrophic methanogens (Methanosaeta) at 18 °C were increased by an order of magnitude and 1.0 time, respectively, compared with other experimental conditions.

  9. Simultaneous production of acetate and methane from glycerol by selective enrichment of hydrogenotrophic methanogens in extreme-thermophilic (70 °C) mixed culture fermentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Yun; Dai, Kun; Loosdrecht, Mark C.M. van; Zeng, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Simultaneous production of acetate and methane from glycerol was investigated. • Acetate accounted for more than 90% of metabolites in liquid solutions. • The maximum concentration of acetate was above 13 g/L. • 93% of archaea were hydrogenotrophic methanogens. • Thermoanaerobacter was main bacterium and its percentage was 92%. - Abstract: The feasibility of simultaneous production of acetate and methane from glycerol was investigated by selective enrichment of hydrogenotrophic methanogens in an extreme-thermophilic (70 °C) fermentation. Fed-batch experiments showed acetate was produced at the concentration up to 13.0 g/L. A stable operation of the continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) was reached within 100 days. Acetate accounted for more than 90 w/w% of metabolites in the fermentation liquid. The yields of methane and acetate were close to the theoretical yields with 0.74–0.80 mol-methane/mol-glycerol and 0.63–0.70 mol-acetate/mol-glycerol. The obtained microbial community was characterized. Hydrogenotrophic methanogens, mainly Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus formed 93% of the methanogenogenic community. This confirms that a high temperature (70 °C) could effectively select for hydrogenotrophic methanogenic archaea. Thermoanaerobacter spp. was the main bacterium forming 91.5% of the bacterial population. This work demonstrated the conversion of the byproduct of biodiesel production, glycerol, to acetate as a chemical and biogas for energy generation

  10. Comparison of Fecal Methanogenic Archaeal Community Between Erhualian and Landrace Pigs Using Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis and Real-Time PCR Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, Y.; Smidt, H.; Zhu, W.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Erhualian and Landrace breeds are typical genetically obese and lean pigs, respectively. To compare the fecal methanogenic Archaeal community between these two pig breeds, fecal samples from different growth phase pigs were collected and used for PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE)

  11. Discovery of a novel rumen methanogen in the anaerobic fungal culture and its distribution in the rumen as revealed by real-time PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The novel archaea belonging to Rumen Cluster C (RCC), which may play an important role in methane production in the rumen have received increased attention. However, the present information on RCC in the rumen is limited by the unsuccessful isolation of axenic pure RCC from the rumen. In the present study, RCC grown in anaerobic fungal subcultures was identified by the molecular and culture methods. Results A novel RCC species existing in the fungal subcultures was identified and demonstrated by the 16S rRNA gene clone library. Interestingly, the novel RCC species survived in the fungal cultures over all the subculture transferring, even in the 62nd subculture, in contrast to the other methanogens, which disappeared during subcultures. Further work showed that subculture transfer frequency significantly affected the relative abundance of the novel RCC species in the fungal subcultures. The five-day and seven-day transfer frequencies increased the relative abundance of the RCC species (Pculture containing the RCC species was successfully obtained. PCR and sequencing analysis showed that the novel RCC species contained a mcrA gene, which is known to play a crucial role in methanogenesis, and thus could be identified as a methanogen. Conclusion In this study, a novel RCC species was identified as a methanogen and closely associated with anaerobic fungi. This novel approach by using co-culture with anaerobic fungi may provide a feasible way to culture and investigate not yet identified methanogens. PMID:24758319

  12. STRUCTURE OF CONSORTIUM DESTRUCTIVE COMPONENTS IN THE INDUSTRIAL AREA OF KRIVYI RIG BASIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Kachinskaya

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Тhe structural organization and a biological variety of ground mesofauna on consortium level of the organization of ecosystems are considered. The analysis of indicators of the structural organization and a biodiversity of ground mesofauna in consortium Ulmus and Populus in the conditions of territories of industrial mining – metallurgical complex of Krivyi Rig Basin is carried out. It is established that taxonomical structure of ground mesofauna is characterized by insignificant number and quantity of taxonomical groups. Prevalence in morfo-ecological structure of hortobiontes and herpetobiontes testifies about faunae considerable attachment to consortium determinants and influences of a steppe climate on its structure. Prevalence of phytophages and polyphages in trophic structure is caused by combination of determinants specificity of consortium and zone source of fauna formations. The structural organization of ground mesofauna in consortium Ulmus and Populus in the conditions of industrial sites is characterized simplified taxonomical structure with a low biodiversity at all levels. It was suggested that structural and functional organization of destructive components of the block consortium of Ulmus and Populus in the conditions of industrial sites are simplified and determined by biogeochemical patterns of pedogenic and leaf litter layer of consortium and type of anthropogenic impact. Management and sustainable use of consortium under technogenic pressure should be based on the effects of extreme and critical components in the evolution of consortium. These critical points are the type of leading man-made factors and pedogenic and leaf litter biogeochemical conditions of consortium determinants, which results in inhibition of development and simplification of the structural and functional organization of destructive components of the block. The elaboration of measures to restore and maintain that structural and functional organization

  13. Mineralization of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate by a four-member aerobic bacterial consortium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez, L.; Breen, A.; Thomas, N.; Sayler, G.S.; Federle, T.W.

    1991-01-01

    A bacterial consortium capable of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) mineralization under aerobic conditions was isolated from a chemostat inoculated with activated sludge. The consortium, designated KJB, consisted of four members, all of which were gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria that grew in pairs and short chains. Three isolates had biochemical properties characteristic of Pseudomonas spp.; the fourth showed characteristics of the Aeromonas spp. Cell suspensions were grown together in minimal medium with [ 14 C]LAS as the only carbon source. After 13 days of incubation, more than 25% of the [ 14 C]LAS was mineralized to 14 CO 2 by the consortium. Pure bacterial cultures and combinations lacking any one member of the KJB bacterial consortium did not mineralize LAS. Three isolates carried out primary biodegradation of the surfactant, and one did not. This study shows that the four bacteria complemented each other and synergistically mineralized LAS, indicating catabolic cooperation among the four consortium members

  14. Response of Methanogenic Microbial Communities to Desiccation Stress in Flooded and Rain-Fed Paddy Soil from Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Reim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Rice paddies in central Thailand are flooded either by irrigation (irrigated rice or by rain (rain-fed rice. The paddy soils and their microbial communities thus experience permanent or arbitrary submergence, respectively. Since methane production depends on anaerobic conditions, we hypothesized that structure and function of the methanogenic microbial communities are different in irrigated and rain-fed paddies and react differently upon desiccation stress. We determined rates and relative proportions of hydrogenotrophic and aceticlastic methanogenesis before and after short-term drying of soil samples from replicate fields. The methanogenic pathway was determined by analyzing concentrations and δ13C of organic carbon and of CH4 and CO2 produced in the presence and absence of methyl fluoride, an inhibitor of aceticlastic methanogenesis. We also determined the abundance (qPCR of genes and transcripts of bacterial 16S rRNA, archaeal 16S rRNA and methanogenic mcrA (coding for a subunit of the methyl coenzyme M reductase and the composition of these microbial communities by T-RFLP fingerprinting and/or Illumina deep sequencing. The abundances of genes and transcripts were similar in irrigated and rain-fed paddy soil. They also did not change much upon desiccation and rewetting, except the transcripts of mcrA, which increased by more than two orders of magnitude. In parallel, rates of CH4 production also increased, in rain-fed soil more than in irrigated soil. The contribution of hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis increased in rain-fed soil and became similar to that in irrigated soil. However, the relative microbial community composition on higher taxonomic levels was similar between irrigated and rain-fed soil. On the other hand, desiccation and subsequent anaerobic reincubation resulted in systematic changes in the composition of microbial communities for both Archaea and Bacteria. It is noteworthy that differences in the community composition were

  15. CREAT A CONSORTIUM AND DEVELOP PREMIUM CARBON PRODUCTS FROM COAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John M. Andresen

    2003-08-01

    The Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal, with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory and matching funds from industry and academic institutions continued to excel in developing innovative technologies to use coal and coal-derived feedstocks to produce premium carbon product. During Budget Period 5, eleven projects were supported and sub-contracted were awarded to seven organizations. The CPCPC held two meetings and one tutorial at various locations during the year. Budget Period 5 was a time of growth for CPCPC in terms of number of proposals and funding requested from members, projects funded and participation during meetings. Although the membership was stable during the first part of Budget Period 5 an increase in new members was registered during the last months of the performance period.

  16. A marine microbial consortium apparently mediating anaerobic oxidation of methane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boetius, A.; Ravenschlag, K.; Schubert, CJ

    2000-01-01

    microorganisms mediating this reaction have not yet been isolated, and the pathway of anaerobic oxidation of methane is insufficiently understood. Recent data suggest that certain archaea reverse the process of methanogenesis by interaction with sulphate-reducing bacteria(5-7). Here we provide microscopic...... evidence for a structured consortium of archaea and sulphate-reducing bacteria, which we identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization using specific 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes. In this example of a structured archaeal-bacterial symbiosis, the archaea grow in dense aggregates of about 100...... cells and are surrounded by sulphate-reducing bacteria. These aggregates were abundant in gas-hydrate-rich sediments with extremely high rates of methane-based sulphate reduction, and apparently mediate anaerobic oxidation of methane....

  17. Caspian Pipeline Consortium, Bellwether of Russia's Investment climate?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dellecker, A.

    2008-01-01

    The Caspian Pipeline Consortium (CPC), a shipper-owned oil pipeline carrying Caspian oil to Russia's Black Sea port of Novorossyisk, remains to this day the only oil export pipeline on Russian territory that is not under the control of the state company Transneft. Completed in 2001, the CPC was, from the start, the product of a fragile balance of power between states eager to maintain control of hydrocarbon flows and private companies able to finance the necessary infrastructure. Despite its economic success, the future of the CPC currently hinges on a share-holding dispute pitting Russia against private shareholders. This essay places the CPC dossier in the broader context of Russia's investment climate and argues that the dispute's dynamic is an important bellwether of the Russian energy policy. (author)

  18. Collaboration in a Wireless Grid Innovation Testbed by Virtual Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treglia, Joseph; Ramnarine-Rieks, Angela; McKnight, Lee

    This paper describes the formation of the Wireless Grid Innovation Testbed (WGiT) coordinated by a virtual consortium involving academic and non-academic entities. Syracuse University and Virginia Tech are primary university partners with several other academic, government, and corporate partners. Objectives include: 1) coordinating knowledge sharing, 2) defining key parameters for wireless grids network applications, 3) dynamically connecting wired and wireless devices, content and users, 4) linking to VT-CORNET, Virginia Tech Cognitive Radio Network Testbed, 5) forming ad hoc networks or grids of mobile and fixed devices without a dedicated server, 6) deepening understanding of wireless grid application, device, network, user and market behavior through academic, trade and popular publications including online media, 7) identifying policy that may enable evaluated innovations to enter US and international markets and 8) implementation and evaluation of the international virtual collaborative process.

  19. Consortium for Algal Biofuel Commercialization (CAB-COMM) Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayfield, Stephen P. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2015-12-04

    The Consortium for Algal Biofuel Commercialization (CAB-Comm) was established in 2010 to conduct research to enable commercial viability of alternative liquid fuels produced from algal biomass. The main objective of CAB-Comm was to dramatically improve the viability of algae as a source of liquid fuels to meet US energy needs, by addressing several significant barriers to economic viability. To achieve this goal, CAB-Comm took a diverse set of approaches on three key aspects of the algal biofuels value chain: crop protection; nutrient utilization and recycling; and the development of genetic tools. These projects have been undertaken as collaboration between six academic institutions and two industrial partners: University of California, San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography; University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Rutgers University; University of California, Davis; Johns Hopkins University; Sapphire Energy; and Life Technologies.

  20. Assessment of microalgae and nitrifiers activity in a consortium in a continuous operation and the effect of oxygen depletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Vargas

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: The consortium it can be obtained in a single continuous operation, and has a high capacity for nitrogen removal with low oxygen content. The consortium could prove to be a more economical method compared to traditional.