WorldWideScience

Sample records for tokamak jet based

  1. Study of the trace tritium content in deuterium plasmas of the JET tokamak based on neutron emission spectroscopy measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringmar, David

    2001-02-01

    This thesis describes a study of the evolution of the trace tritium content in the JET tokamak. The study is based on measurements of the neutron emission, which were performed with the magnetic proton recoil (MPR) spectrometer. Data analysis procedures used to extract the results are described in some detail. The thesis also describes a simplified theoretical model to calculate the absolute tritium concentration with a comparison to the experimental results. The present study covers the time period 1996-2000 and the evolution of neutron emission spectroscopy (NES) results are compared with information from related diagnostic sources, and used to discuss the important issue of how tritium is retained in the JET tokamak.

  2. A cross-tokamak neural network disruption predictor for the JET and ASDEX Upgrade tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windsor, C. G.; Pautasso, G.; Tichmann, C.; Buttery, R. J.; Hender, T. C.; EFDA Contributors, JET; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2005-05-01

    First results are reported on the prediction of disruptions in one tokamak, based on neural networks trained on another tokamak. The studies use data from the JET and ASDEX Upgrade devices, with a neural network trained on just seven normalized plasma parameters. In this way, a simple single layer perceptron network trained solely on JET correctly anticipated 67% of disruptions on ASDEX Upgrade in advance of 0.01 s before the disruption. The converse test led to a 69% success rate in advance of 0.04 s before the disruption in JET. Only one overall time scaling parameter is allowed between the devices, which can be introduced from theoretical arguments. Disruption prediction performance based on such networks trained and tested on the same device shows even higher success rates (JET, 86%; ASDEX Upgrade, 90%), despite the small number of inputs used and simplicity of the network. It is found that while performance for networks trained and tested on the same device can be improved with more complex networks and many adjustable weights, for cross-machine testing the best approach is a simple single layer perceptron. This offers the basis of a potentially useful technique for large future devices such as ITER, which with further development might help to reduce disruption frequency and minimize the need for a large disruption campaign to train disruption avoidance systems.

  3. A cross-tokamak neural network disruption predictor for the JET and ASDEX Upgrade tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windsor, C.G.; Buttery, R.J.; Hender, T.C.; Pautasso, G.; Tichmann, C.

    2005-01-01

    First results are reported on the prediction of disruptions in one tokamak, based on neural networks trained on another tokamak. The studies use data from the JET and ASDEX Upgrade devices, with a neural network trained on just seven normalized plasma parameters. In this way, a simple single layer perceptron network trained solely on JET correctly anticipated 67% of disruptions on ASDEX Upgrade in advance of 0.01 s before the disruption. The converse test led to a 69% success rate in advance of 0.04 s before the disruption in JET. Only one overall time scaling parameter is allowed between the devices, which can be introduced from theoretical arguments. Disruption prediction performance based on such networks trained and tested on the same device shows even higher success rates (JET, 86%; ASDEX Upgrade, 90%), despite the small number of inputs used and simplicity of the network. It is found that while performance for networks trained and tested on the same device can be improved with more complex networks and many adjustable weights, for cross-machine testing the best approach is a simple single layer perceptron. This offers the basis of a potentially useful technique for large future devices such as ITER, which with further development might help to reduce disruption frequency and minimize the need for a large disruption campaign to train disruption avoidance systems

  4. Conceptual analysis of a tokamak reactor with lithium dust jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuteev, B.V.; Krylov, S.V.; Sergeev, V.Yu.; Skokov, V.G.; Timokhin, V.M.

    2010-01-01

    The steady-state operation of tokamak reactors requires radiating a substantial part of the fusion energy dissipated in plasma to make more uniform the heat loads onto the first wall and to reduce the erosion of the divertor plates. One of the approaches to realize this goal uses injection of lithium dust jet into the scrape-off layer (SOL). A quantitative conceptual analysis of the reactor parameters with lithium dust jet injection is presented here. The effects of the lithium on the core and SOL plasma are considered. The first results of developing the lithium jet injection technology and its application to the T-10 tokamak are also presented.

  5. Liquid gallium jet-plasma interaction studies in ISTTOK tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, R.B.; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.; Sarakovskis, A.; Pereira, T.; Figueiredo, J.; Carvalho, B.; Soares, A.; Duarte, P.; Varandas, C.; Lielausis, O.; Klyukin, A.; Platacis, E.; Tale, I.; Alekseyv, A.

    2009-01-01

    Liquid metals have been pointed out as a suitable solution to solve problems related to the use of solid walls submitted to high power loads allowing, simultaneously, an efficient heat exhaustion process from fusion devices. The most promising candidate materials are lithium and gallium. However, lithium has a short liquid state temperature range when compared with gallium. To explore further this property, ISTTOK tokamak is being used to test the interaction of a free flying liquid gallium jet with the plasma. ISTTOK has been successfully operated with this jet without noticeable discharge degradation and no severe effect on the main plasma parameters or a significant plasma contamination by liquid metal. Additionally the response of an infrared sensor, intended to measure the jet surface temperature increase during its interaction with the plasma, has been studied. The jet power extraction capability is extrapolated from the heat flux profiles measured in ISTTOK plasmas.

  6. TFTR/JET INTOR workshop on plasma transport tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, C.E.

    1985-01-01

    This report summarizes the proceedings of a Workshop on transport models for prediction and analysis of tokamak plasma confinement. Summaries of papers on theory, predictive modeling, and data analysis are included

  7. Deflection of a liquid metal jet/drop in a tokamak environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelekasis, Nikos, E-mail: pel@uth.gr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Thessaly, Volos 38334 (Greece); Benos, Lefteris [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Thessaly, Volos 38334 (Greece); Gomes, Rui [Associação EURATOM/IST, Centro de Fusão Nuclear, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • We model steady flow of a liquid metal jet inside an electromagnetic field in the presence of inertia and capillary forces. • Similar analysis is performed for the motion of a liquid metal spherical drop. • The deflection of the trajectory is predicted as a function of the intensity of the externally imposed magnetic and electric fields. • The analysis is used as a proof of principle study in reference to experimental observations of jet/drop deflection due to j{sup →}×B{sup →} effects in the ISTTOK tokamak. • We discuss the possibility of using liquid metal flows as an alternative approach toward enhancing power exhaust in tokamak facilities. - Abstract: The interaction of a liquid gallium jet with plasma has been investigated in the ISTTOK tokamak. The jet was observed to remain intact during its interaction with plasma, within a certain length beyond which drop formation was observed. Significant deflection of the jet was detected as soon as plasma production was started. Furthermore, a strong dependency of the deflection magnitude on plasma position was observed that could be correlated with plasma potential gradients. As a means to capture and, possibly, quantify this effect, a preliminary magnetohydrodynamic analysis was performed in order to predict the trajectory of a jet that is traveling inside an electromagnetic field. The effect of Lorentz forces, gravity and pressure drop are accounted for in a unidirectional model that assumes a small jet radius in comparison with the trajectory length. The effect of external electric potential gradients on jet deflection was ascertained in conjunction with the importance of electric stresses in modulating the jet speed and radius. Analysis of the results reported in the ISTTOK experiments identifies the process of jet break-up as a capillary instability. The trajectory of the ensuing droplets is modeled and intensification of the deflection process is predicted in the presence of Lorentz

  8. Fusion Energy-Production from a Deuterium-Tritium Plasma in the Jet Tokamak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebut, P. H.; Gibson, A.; Huguet, M.; Adams, J. M.; Alper, B.; Altmann, H.; Andersen, A.; Andrew, P.; Angelone, M.; Aliarshad, S.; Baigger, P.; Bailey, W.; Balet, B.; Barabaschi, P.; Barker, P.; Barnsley, R.; Baronian, M.; Bartlett, D. V.; Baylor, L.; Bell, A. C.; Benali, G.; Bertoldi, P.; Bertolini, E.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bickley, A. J.; Binder, D.; Bindslev, H.; Bonicelli, T.; Booth, S. J.; Bosia, G.; Botman, M.; Boucher, D.; Boucquey, P.; Breger, P.; Brelen, H.; Brinkschulte, H.; Brooks, D.; Brown, A.; Brown, T.; Brusati, M.; Bryan, S.; Brzozowski, J.; Buchse, R.; Budd, T.; Bures, M.; Businaro, T.; Butcher, P.; Buttgereit, H.; Caldwellnichols, C.; Campbell, D. J.; Card, P.; Celentano, G.; Challis, C. D.; Chankin, A. V.; Cherubini, A.; Chiron, D.; Christiansen, J.; Chuilon, P.; Claesen, R.; Clement, S.; Clipsham, E.; Coad, J. P.; Coffey, I. H.; Colton, A.; Comiskey, M.; Conroy, S.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, D.; Cooper, S.; Cordey, J. G.; Core, W.; Corrigan, G.; Corti, S.; Costley, A. E.; Cottrell, G.; Cox, M.; Cripwell, P.; Dacosta, O.; Davies, J.; Davies, N.; de Blank, H.; De Esch, H.; Dekock, L.; Deksnis, E.; Delvart, F.; Dennehinnov, G. B.; Deschamps, G.; Dickson, W. J.; Dietz, K. J.; Dmitrenko, S. L.; Dmitrieva, M.; Dobbing, J.; Doglio, A.; Dolgetta, N.; Dorling, S. E.; Doyle, P. G.; Duchs, D. F.; Duquenoy, H.; Edwards, A.; Ehrenberg, J.; Ekedahl, A.; Elevant, T.; Erents, S.K.; Eriksson, L. G.; Fajemirokun, H.; Falter, H.; Freiling, J.; Freville, F.; Froger, C.; Froissard, P.; Fullard, K.; Gadeberg, M.; Galetsas, A.; Gallagher, T.; Gambier, D.; Garribba, M.; Gaze, P.; Giannella, R.; Gill, R. D.; Girard, A.; Gondhalekar, A.; Goodall, D.; Gormezano, C.; Gottardi, N. A.; Gowers, C.; Green, B. J.; Grievson, B.; Haange, R.; Haigh, A.; Hancock, C. J.; Harbour, P. J.; Hartrampf, T.; Hawkes, N. C.; Haynes, P.; Hemmerich, J. L.; Hender, T.; Hoekzema, J.; Holland, D.; Hone, M.; Horton, L.; How, J.; Huart, M.; Hughes, I.; Hughes, T. P.; Hugon, M.; Huo, Y.; Ida, K.; Ingram, B.; Irving, M.; Jacquinot, J.; Jaeckel, H.; Jaeger, J. F.; Janeschitz, G.; Jankovicz, Z.; Jarvis, O. N.; Jensen, F.; Jones, E. M.; Jones, H. D.; Jones, Lpdf; Jones, S.; Jones, T. T. C.; Junger, J. F.; Junique, F.; Kaye, A.; Keen, B. E.; Keilhacker, M.; Kelly, G. J.; Kerner, W.; Khudoleev, A.; Konig, R.; Konstantellos, A.; Kovanen, M.; Kramer, G.; Kupschus, P.; Lasser, R.; Last, J. R.; Laundy, B.; Laurotaroni, L.; Laveyry, M.; Lawson, K.; Lennholm, M.; Lingertat, J.; Litunovski, R. N.; Loarte, A.; Lobel, R.; Lomas, P.; Loughlin, M.; Lowry, C.; Lupo, J.; Maas, A. C.; Machuzak, J.; Macklin, B.; Maddison, G.; Maggi, C. F.; Magyar, G.; Mandl, W.; Marchese, V.; Marcon, G.; Marcus, F.; Mart, J.; Martin, D.; Martin, E.; Martinsolis, R.; Massmann, P.; Matthews, G.; McBryan, H.; McCracken, G.; McKivitt, J.; Meriguet, P.; Miele, P.; Miller, A.; Mills, J.; Mills, S. F.; Millward, P.; Milverton, P.; Minardi, E.; Mohanti, R.; Mondino, P. L.; Montgomery, D.; Montvai, A.; Morgan, P.; Morsi, H.; Muir, D.; Murphy, G.; Myrnas, R.; Nave, F.; Newbert, G.; Newman, M.; Nielsen, P.; Noll, P.; Obert, W.; Obrien, D.; Orchard, J.; Orourke, J.; Ostrom, R.; Ottaviani, M.; Pain, M.; Paoletti, F.; Papastergiou, S.; Parsons, W.; Pasini, D.; Patel, D.; Peacock, A.; Peacock, N.; Pearce, R. J. M.; Pearson, D.; Peng, J. F.; Desilva, R. P.; Perinic, G.; Perry, C.; Petrov, M.; Pick, M. A.; Plancoulaine, J.; Poffe, J. P.; Pohlchen, R.; Porcelli, F.; Porte, L.; Prentice, R.; Puppin, S.; Putvinskii, S.; Radford, G.; Raimondi, T.; Deandrade, M. C. R.; Reichle, R.; Reid, J.; Richards, S.; Righi, E.; Rimini, F.; Robinson, D.; Rolfe, A.; Ross, R. T.; Rossi, L.; Russ, R.; Rutter, P.; Sack, H. C.; Sadler, G.; Saibene, G.; Salanave, J. L.; Sanazzaro, G.; Santagiustina, A.; Sartori, R.; Sborchia, C.; Schild, P.; Schmid, M.; Schmidt, G.; Schunke, B.; Scott, S. M.; Serio, L.; Sibley, A.; Simonini, R.; Sips, A.C.C.; Smeulders, P.; Smith, R.; Stagg, R.; Stamp, M.; Stangeby, P.; Stankiewicz, R.; Start, D. F.; Steed, C. A.; Stork, D.; Stott, P.E.; Stubberfield, P.; Summers, D.; Summers, H.; Svensson, L.; Tagle, J. A.; Talbot, M.; Tanga, A.; Taroni, A.; Terella, C.; Terrington, A.; Tesini, A.; Thomas, P. R.; Thompson, E.; Thomsen, K.; Tibone, F.; Tiscornia, A.; Trevalion, P.; Tubbing, B.; Vanbelle, P.; Vanderbeken, H.; Vlases, G.; von Hellermann, M.; Wade, T.; Walker, C.; Walton, R.; Ward, D.; Watkins, M. L.; Watkins, N.; Watson, M. J.; Weber, S.; Wesson, J.; Wijnands, T. J.; Wilks, J.; Wilson, D.; Winkel, T.; Wolf, R.; Wong, D.; Woodward, C.; Wu, Y.; Wykes, M.; Young, D.; Young, I. D.; Zannelli, L.; Zolfaghari, A.; Zwingmann, W.

    1992-01-01

    The paper describes a series of experiments in the Joint European Torus (JET), culminating in the first tokamak discharges in deuterium-tritium fuelled mixtures. The experiments were undertaken within limits imposed by restrictions on vessel activation and tritium usage. The objectives were: (i) to

  9. Localized bulk electron heating with ICRF mode conversion in the JET tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantsinen, M.J.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Eester, D. Van

    2004-01-01

    Ion cyclotron resonance frequencies (ICRF) mode conversion has been developed for localized on-axis and off-axis bulk electron heating on the JET tokamak. The fast magnetosonic waves launched from the low-field side ICRF antennas are mode-converted to short-wavelength waves on the high-field side...

  10. Plasma jet source parameter optimisation and experiments on injection into Globus-M spherical tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusev, V.K.; Petrov, Yu.V.; Sakharov, N.V.; Semenov, A.A.; Voronin, A.V.

    2005-01-01

    Results of theoretical and experimental research on the plasma sources and injection of plasma and gas jet produced by the modified source into tokamak Globus-M are presented. An experimental test stand was developed for investigation of intense plasma jet generation. Optimisation of pulsed coaxial accelerator parameters by means of analytical calculations is performed with the aim of achieving the highest flow velocity at limited coaxial electrode length and discharge current. The optimal parameters of power supply to generate a plasma jet with minimal impurity contamination and maximum flow velocity were determined. A comparison of experimental and calculation results is made. Plasma jet parameters are measured, such as: impurity species content, pressure distribution across the jet, flow velocity, plasma density, etc. Experiments on the interaction of a higher kinetic energy plasma jet with the magnetic field and plasma of the Globus-M tokamak were performed. Experimental results on plasma and gas jet injection into different Globus-M discharge phases are presented and discussed. Results are presented on the investigation of plasma jet injection as the source for discharge breakdown, plasma current startup and initial density rise. (author)

  11. First experimental results with the Current Limit Avoidance System at the JET tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Tommasi, G. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CREATE, Università di Napoli Federico II, Via Claudio 21, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Galeani, S. [Dipartimento di Informatica, Sistemi e Produzione, Università di Roma, Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Jachmich, S. [Association EURATOM-Belgian State, Koninklijke Militaire School - Ecole Royale Militaire, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium); Joffrin, E. [IRFM-CEA, Centre de Cadarache, 13108 Saint-paul-lez-Durance (France); Lennholm, M. [EFDA Close Support Unit, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB Abingdon (United Kingdom); European Commission, B-1049 Brussels (Belgium); Lomas, P.J. [Euratom-CCFE, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB Abingdon (United Kingdom); Neto, A.C. [Associazione EURATOM-IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, IST, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Maviglia, F. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CREATE, Via Claudio 21, 80125 Napoli (Italy); McCullen, P. [Euratom-CCFE, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB Abingdon (United Kingdom); Pironti, A. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CREATE, Università di Napoli Federico II, Via Claudio 21, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Rimini, F.G. [Euratom-CCFE, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB Abingdon (United Kingdom); Sips, A.C.C. [European Commission, B-1049 Brussels (Belgium); Varano, G.; Vitelli, R. [Dipartimento di Informatica, Sistemi e Produzione, Università di Roma, Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Zaccarian, L. [CNRS, LAAS, 7 Avenue du Colonel Roche, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Universitè de Toulouse, LAAS, F-31400 Toulouse (France)

    2013-06-15

    The Current Limit Avoidance System (CLA) has been recently deployed at the JET tokamak to avoid current saturations in the poloidal field (PF) coils when the eXtreme Shape Controller is used to control the plasma shape. In order to cope with the current saturation limits, the CLA exploits the redundancy of the PF coils system to automatically obtain almost the same plasma shape using a different combination of currents in the PF coils. In the presence of disturbances it tries to avoid the current saturations by relaxing the constraints on the plasma shape control. The CLA system has been successfully implemented on the JET tokamak and fully commissioned in 2011. This paper presents the first experimental results achieved in 2011–2012 during the restart and the ITER-like wall campaigns at JET.

  12. Evidence of Inward Toroidal Momentum Convection in the JET Tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tala, T.; Zastrow, K.-D.; Ferreira, J.

    2009-01-01

    Experiments have been carried out on the Joint European Torus tokamak to determine the diffusive and convective momentum transport. Torque, injected by neutral beams, was modulated to create a periodic perturbation in the toroidal rotation velocity. Novel transport analysis shows the magnitude an...

  13. ISTTOK tokamak plasmas influence on a liquid gallium jet dynamic behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, R.B.; Silva, C.; Fernandes, H.; Duarte, P.; Nedzelskiy, I.; Lielausis, O.; Klyukin, A.; Platacis, E.

    2011-01-01

    The main concern in using free flowing liquid metals in fusion devices is related to their interaction with magnetic fields. On ISTTOK tokamak, liquid gallium jets are injected deep into the plasma along a vertical direction. The influence of the plasma interaction on the jet has been investigated monitoring the liquid metal behavior using a fast frame camera. A radial shift on its trajectory has been detected and found to depend on the toroidal magnetic field magnitude and principally on the plasma position within the chamber. The analysis performed to understand the dynamics of the jet perturbation by the plasma is presented in this paper. The jet surface temperature increase during this interaction has also been measured, using absolutely calibrated multichannel IR sensors, to evaluate the jet power exhaustion capability.

  14. ISTTOK tokamak plasmas influence on a liquid gallium jet dynamic behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, R.B., E-mail: gomes@ipfn.ist.utl.pt [Associacao EURATOM/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear - Laboratorio Associado, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Silva, C.; Fernandes, H.; Duarte, P.; Nedzelskiy, I. [Associacao EURATOM/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear - Laboratorio Associado, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Lielausis, O.; Klyukin, A.; Platacis, E. [Association EURATOM/University of Latvia, Institute of Solid State Physics, 8 Kengaraga Str., LV-1063 Riga (Latvia)

    2011-08-01

    The main concern in using free flowing liquid metals in fusion devices is related to their interaction with magnetic fields. On ISTTOK tokamak, liquid gallium jets are injected deep into the plasma along a vertical direction. The influence of the plasma interaction on the jet has been investigated monitoring the liquid metal behavior using a fast frame camera. A radial shift on its trajectory has been detected and found to depend on the toroidal magnetic field magnitude and principally on the plasma position within the chamber. The analysis performed to understand the dynamics of the jet perturbation by the plasma is presented in this paper. The jet surface temperature increase during this interaction has also been measured, using absolutely calibrated multichannel IR sensors, to evaluate the jet power exhaustion capability.

  15. Liquid jets for fast plasma termination in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbluth, M.N.; Putvinskij, S.V.; Parks, P.B.

    1997-01-01

    Recent simulations by Putvisnkij et al. (PSI Conference, 1996) have shown that introducing impurities into the plasma in order to mitigate adverse disruption effects in ITER may actually be deleterious because of a potentially unwelcome phenomenon: generation of multi-MeV runaway electrons by the collisional avalanche mechanism (Rosenbluth, M.N., et al., in Fusion Energy 1996 (Proc. 16th Int. Conf. Montreal, 1996) Vol. 2, IAEA, Vienna (in press) Paper FP-26). The injection of a liquid hydrogen jet to deliver a massive density increase is proposed as a means of avoiding runaways, while providing the same beneficial effects as impurities. A discussion of many jet related topics, such as ablation/penetration, jet breakup time and stability, is presented. Owing to an ablation pressure instability, it is predicted that the jet will quickly break up into a regular chain of droplets with dimensions of approximately the size of the jet radius. It is found that while deep penetration in the plasma can easily be achieved, bubble growth and disruptive boiling (flashing) during the propagation in the vacuum gap between the nozzle exit and the plasma are the main processes limiting the jet survival time. Calculations indicate that for ITER reference parameters, the jet can remain coherent in vacuum for a distance ∼ 1 m before disintegrating. On the basis of this present understanding, the prospect for the safe termination of ITER discharges by high density liquid jet injection appears promising. (author). 20 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs

  16. A New Generation of Real-Time Systems in the JET Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Diogo; Neto, Andre C.; Valcarcel, Daniel F.; Felton, Robert; Lopez, Juan M.; Barbalace, Antonio; Boncagni, Luca; Card, Peter; De Tommasi, Gianmaria; Goodyear, Alex; Jachmich, Stefan; Lomas, Peter J.; Maviglia, Francesco; McCullen, Paul; Murari, Andrea; Rainford, Mark; Reux, Cedric; Rimini, Fernanda; Sartori, Filippo; Stephen, Adam V.; Vega, Jesus; Vitelli, Riccardo; Zabeo, Luca; Zastrow, Klaus-Dieter

    2014-04-01

    Recently, a new recipe for developing and deploying real-time systems has become increasingly adopted in the JET tokamak. Powered by the advent of x86 multi-core technology and the reliability of JET's well established Real-Time Data Network (RTDN) to handle all real-time I/O, an official Linux vanilla kernel has been demonstrated to be able to provide real-time performance to user-space applications that are required to meet stringent timing constraints. In particular, a careful rearrangement of the Interrupt ReQuests' (IRQs) affinities together with the kernel's CPU isolation mechanism allows one to obtain either soft or hard real-time behavior depending on the synchronization mechanism adopted. Finally, the Multithreaded Application Real-Time executor (MARTe) framework is used for building applications particularly optimised for exploring multi-core architectures. In the past year, four new systems based on this philosophy have been installed and are now part of JET's routine operation. The focus of the present work is on the configuration aspects that enable these new systems' real-time capability. Details are given about the common real-time configuration of these systems, followed by a brief description of each system together with results regarding their real-time performance. A cycle time jitter analysis of a user-space MARTe based application synchronizing over a network is also presented. The goal is to compare its deterministic performance while running on a vanilla and on a Messaging Real time Grid (MRG) Linux kernel.

  17. Theoretical Considerations for Liquid Jet Injection into Tokamak Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, P. B.; Rosenbluth, M. N.; Sessions, W. D.; Geskin, E.; Jardin, S. C.

    1997-11-01

    The purpose of hydrogen, or helium, liquid jet injection for high-current ITER-like plasmas is to deliver a rapid and massive plasma density increase in order to prevent ``avalanche'' runaway electron formation during disruptions and preemptive plasma terminations. Multiple pellet injection may be too slow for this purpose, and killer impurity pellets can cause runaways and because of their limited penetration range, can generate steep pressure gradients, leading to a core energy quench. After complete jet burnthrough and isobaric cooling, a nearly flat temperature profile of a few hundred eV is established which can provide a pathway for deep penetration of a killer ``stealth" pellet that takes out the thermal and magnetic energy by radiative dissipation. This disruption mitigation blueprint is being studied for ITER using a recently modified jet ablation theory coupled with the TSC plasma simulation code. Also discussed is a LHe or LCH4 jet injection concept for future plasma quench and disruption mitigation experiments in DIII--D.

  18. Fast ions and momentum transport in JET tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmi, A.

    2012-07-01

    Fast ions are an inseparable part of fusion plasmas. They can be generated using electromagnetic waves or injected into plasmas as neutrals to heat the bulk plasma and to drive toroidal rotation and current. In future power plants fusion born fast ions deliver the main heating into the plasma. Understanding and controlling the fast ions is of crucial importance for the operation of a power plant. Furthermore, fast ions provide ways to probe the properties of the thermal plasma and get insight of its confinement properties. In this thesis, numerical code packages are used and developed to simulate JET experiments for a range of physics issues related to fast ions. Namely, the clamping fast ion distribution at high energies with RF heating, fast ion ripple torque generation and the toroidal momentum transport properties using NBI modulation technique are investigated. Through a comparison of numerical simulations and the JET experimental data it is shown that the finite Larmor radius effects in ion cyclotron resonance heating are important and that they can prevent fast ion tail formation beyond certain energy. The identified mechanism could be used for tailoring the fast ion distribution in future experiments. Secondly, ASCOT simulations of NBI ions in a ripple field showed that most of the reduction of the toroidal rotation that has been observed in the JET enhanced ripple experiments could be attributed to fast ion ripple torque. Finally, fast ion torque calculations together with momentum transport analysis have led to the conclusion that momentum transport in not purely diffusive but that a convective component, which increases monotonically in radius, exists in a wide range of JET plasmas. Using parameter scans, the convective transport has been shown to be insensitive to collisionality and q-profile but to increase strongly against density gradient. (orig.)

  19. JET Tokamak, preparation of a safety case for tritium operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyer, Helen, E-mail: helen.boyer@ccfe.ac.uk [CCFE, Culham Science Centre (United Kingdom); Plummer, David; Johnston, Jane [CCFE, Culham Science Centre (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • A safety case incorporating technical and ITER related upgrades. • Hazard analysis reworked to include new modelling assessments. • Fitness for purpose assessment of safety controls. - Abstract: A new Safety Case is required to permit tritium operations on JET during the forthcoming DTE2 campaign. The outputs, benefits and lessons learned associated with the production of this Safety Case are presented. The changes that have occurred to the Safety Case methodology since the last JET tritium Safety Case are reviewed. Consideration is given to the effects of modifications, particularly ITER related changes, made to the JET and the impact these have on the hazard assessments as well as normal operations. Several specialized assessments, including recent MELCOR modelling, have been undertaken to support the production of this Safety Case and the impact of these assessments is outlined. Discussion of the preliminary actions being taken to progress implementation of this Safety Case is provided, highlighting new methods to improve the dissemination of the key Safety Case results to the plant operators. Finally, the work required to complete this Safety Case, before the next tritium campaign, is summarized.

  20. Characterisation, modelling and control of advanced scenarios in the european tokamak jet; Caracterisation, modelisation et controle des scenarios avances dans le tokamak europeen jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tresset, G

    2002-09-26

    The advanced scenarios, developed for less than ten years with the internal transport barriers and the control of current profile, give rise to a 'new deal' for the tokamak as a future thermonuclear controlled fusion reactor. The Joint European Torus (JET) in United Kingdom is presently the most powerful device in terms of fusion power and it has allowed to acquire a great experience in these improved confinement regimes. The reduction of turbulent transport, considered now as closely linked to the shape of current profile optimised for instance by lower hybrid current drive or the self-generated bootstrap current, can be characterised by a dimensionless criterion. Most of useful information related to the transport barriers are thus available. Large database analysis and real time plasma control are envisaged as attractive applications. The so-called 'S'-shaped transport models exhibit some interesting properties in fair agreement with the experiments, while the non-linear multivariate dependencies of thermal diffusivity can be approximated by a neural network, suggesting a new approach for transport investigation and modelling. Finally, the first experimental demonstrations of real time control of internal transport barriers and current profile have been performed on JET. Sophisticated feedback algorithms have been proposed and are being numerically tested to achieve steady-state and efficient plasmas. (author)

  1. Blob/hole formation and zonal-flow generation in the edge plasma of the JET tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, G.S.; Naulin, Volker; Fundamenski, W.

    2009-01-01

    The first experimental evidence showing the connection between blob/hole formation and zonal-flow generation was obtained in the edge plasma of the JET tokamak. Holes as well as blobs are observed to be born in the edge shear layer, where zonal-flows shear off meso-scale coherent structures, lead...

  2. Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meglicki, Z.

    1995-01-01

    We describe in detail the implementation of a weighted differences code, which is used to simulate a tokamak using the Maschke-Perrin solution as an initial condition. The document covers the mainlines of the program and the most important problem-specific functions used in the initialization, static tests, and dynamic evolution of the system. The mathematics of the Maschke-Perrin solution is discussed in parallel with its realisation within the code. The results of static and dynamic tests are presented in sections discussing their implementation.The code can also be obtained by ftp -anonymous from cisr.anu.edu.au Directory /pub/papers/meglicki/src/tokamak. This code is copyrighted. (author). 13 refs

  3. Liquid gallium jet as a limiter in tokamak: design of the stand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lielausis, O.; Platacis, E.; Klukins, A.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Plasma facing surfaces should be considered as the most loaded components of the proposed fusion devices. Load densities (up to 1 GW/m 2 ) would result in unacceptably high levels of thermal stresses and erosion. Solutions have been proposed when plasma is contacting not a solid material but a liquid metal in permanent motion. Usually, because of its low Z-number, lithium is considered as the most compatible with plasma. In the given research gallium is used - an essentially more convenient in practice material, outstanding by its low saturated vapor pressure. On tokamak ISTTOK (Portugal, R=0.46m; a=0.085m; B T =0.45 T; I p =8 kA) it is proposed to replace the existing metallic limiter by a liquid gallium jet. The jet forming nozzle is connected with the constant pressure vessel (at the level 1.3 m) by a 1/4 '' SS tube. For an exact determination of the jets length on the level 0.7 m an electrically controlled flow interrupting valve is installed. The metal is brought up into the pressure vessel by an e.m. pump on permanent magnets. The loop is designed in such a way that the liquid metal remains properly insulated both from the plasma vessel walls as well as from the plasma potential

  4. Tokamak reactor cost model based on STARFIRE/WILDCAT costing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, K. Jr.

    1983-03-01

    A cost model is presented which is useful for survey and comparative studies of tokamak reactors. The model is heavily based on STARFIRE and WILDCAT costing guidelines, philosophies, and procedures and reproduces the costing for these devices quite accurately

  5. Characterisation, modelling and control of advanced scenarios in the european tokamak jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tresset, G.

    2002-01-01

    The advanced scenarios, developed for less than ten years with the internal transport barriers and the control of current profile, give rise to a 'new deal' for the tokamak as a future thermonuclear controlled fusion reactor. The Joint European Torus (JET) in United Kingdom is presently the most powerful device in terms of fusion power and it has allowed to acquire a great experience in these improved confinement regimes. The reduction of turbulent transport, considered now as closely linked to the shape of current profile optimised for instance by lower hybrid current drive or the self-generated bootstrap current, can be characterised by a dimensionless criterion. Most of useful information related to the transport barriers are thus available. Large database analysis and real time plasma control are envisaged as attractive applications. The so-called 'S'-shaped transport models exhibit some interesting properties in fair agreement with the experiments, while the non-linear multivariate dependencies of thermal diffusivity can be approximated by a neural network, suggesting a new approach for transport investigation and modelling. Finally, the first experimental demonstrations of real time control of internal transport barriers and current profile have been performed on JET. Sophisticated feedback algorithms have been proposed and are being numerically tested to achieve steady-state and efficient plasmas. (author)

  6. Studies of Be migration in the JET tokamak using AMS with {sup 10}Be marker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bykov, I. [Division of Fusion Plasma Physics, Royal Institute of Technology KTH (Sweden); Bergsåker, H., E-mail: henricb@kth.se [Division of Fusion Plasma Physics, Royal Institute of Technology KTH (Sweden); Possnert, G. [Tandem Laboratory, Uppsala Universitet, Box 256, Uppsala 75105 (Sweden); Zhou, Y. [Division of Fusion Plasma Physics, Royal Institute of Technology KTH (Sweden); Heinola, K. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 64, 00560 Helsinki (Finland); Pettersson, J. [Department of Chemistry – BMC, Uppsala Universitet, Box 599, 75124 Uppsala (Sweden); Conroy, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala Universitet, Box 516, 75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Likonen, J. [VTT, P.O. Box 1000, 02044 VTT, Espoo (Finland); Petersson, P. [Division of Fusion Plasma Physics, Royal Institute of Technology KTH (Sweden); Widdowson, A. [EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-15

    The JET tokamak is operated with beryllium limiter tiles in the main chamber and tungsten coated carbon fiber composite tiles and solid W tiles in the divertor. One important issue is how wall materials are migrating during plasma operation. To study beryllium redistribution in the main chamber and in the divertor, a {sup 10}Be enriched limiter tile was installed prior to plasma operations in 2011–2012. Methods to take surface samples have been developed, an abrasive method for bulk Be tiles in the main chamber, which permits reuse of the tiles, and leaching with hot HCl to remove all Be deposited at W coated surfaces in the divertor. Quantitative analysis of the total amount of Be in cm{sup 2} sized samples was made with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The {sup 10}Be/{sup 9}Be ratio in the samples was measured with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The experimental setup and methods are described in detail, including sample preparation, measures to eliminate contributions in AMS from the {sup 10}B isobar, possible activation due to plasma generated neutrons and effects of diffusive isotope mixing. For the first time marker concentrations are measured in the divertor deposits. They are in the range 0.4–1.2% of the source concentration, with moderate poloidal variation.

  7. Tokamak transport based on the Braginskii model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weitzner, H.

    1987-01-01

    The two-fluid model of Braginskii is applied to the case of a moderately large tokamak. By estimation of the order of magnitude of the various effects and omission of small terms a somewhat simpler reduced two-fluid Braginskii model is obtained. The model applies on a time scale of order τ e m i /m e , where τ e is the electron-electron collision time, and energy confinement time is of this order. With electron and ion flow velocities no larger than is necessary to obtain the correct equilibrium currents, classical parallel viscosity becomes a dominant dissipative mechanism. The model allows for the slow evolution of equilibrium states. The equilibria, which include static, ideal magnetohydrodynamic equilibria as a special case, are described. Generally the number density, electrostatic potential, and flows are not constant on a flux surface. The procedure for determination of the slow evolution of the equilibrium is sketched. (orig.)

  8. Driftwave-based modeling of poloidal spin-up precursor and step-wise expansion of internal transport barriers in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staebler, G.M.; Waltz, R.E.; Kinsey, J.E.; Bateman, G.; Kritz, A.H.; Onjun, T.; Pankin, A.; Zhu, P.; Horton, W.

    2001-01-01

    The rich phenomenology of internal transport barriers observed in tokamaks includes a poloidal spin-up precursor for balanced injection neutral beam heating and step-wise expansion of the barrier for unbalanced injection. Examples of numerical simulations of these phenomena are presented. Two driftwave-based predictive transport models (GLF23 and Multi-Mode) are used. Both models include the suppression of ion temperature gradient modes as the EB shear approaches the computed maximum linear growth rate. Modeling of discharges with internal transport barriers from the DIII-D, JET and TFTR tokamaks are compared. (author)

  9. Systems for the safe operation of the JET tokamak with tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stork, D.; Ageladarakis, P.; Bell, A.C.

    1999-01-01

    In 1997, the JET device was operated for an extensive campaign with deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas (the DTE1 campaign). A comprehensive network of machine protection systems was necessary so that this experimental campaign could be executed safely without damage to the machine or release of activated material. This network had been developed over many years of JET deuterium plasma operation and therefore the modifications for D-T operation was not a significant problem. The DTE1 campaign was executed successfully and safely and the machine protection systems proved reliable and robust and, in the limited cases where they were required to act, functioned correctly. The machine protection systems at JET are described and their categorisation and development over time are summarised. The management, commissioning and operational experience during DTE1 are discussed and some examples of fault scenarios are described. The experience with protection systems at JET highlights the importance of correct design and philosophy decisions being taken at an early stage. It is shown that this experience will be invaluable data input to the safe operation of future large fusion machines. (orig.)

  10. Sub-millisecond electron density profile measurement at the JET tokamak with the fast lithium beam emission spectroscopy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Réfy, D. I.; Brix, M.; Gomes, R.; Tál, B.; Zoletnik, S.; Dunai, D.; Kocsis, G.; Kálvin, S.; Szabolics, T.; JET Contributors

    2018-04-01

    Diagnostic alkali atom (e.g., lithium) beams are routinely used to diagnose magnetically confined plasmas, namely, to measure the plasma electron density profile in the edge and the scrape off layer region. A light splitting optics system was installed into the observation system of the lithium beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic at the Joint European Torus (JET) tokamak, which allows simultaneous measurement of the beam light emission with a spectrometer and a fast avalanche photodiode (APD) camera. The spectrometer measurement allows density profile reconstruction with ˜10 ms time resolution, absolute position calculation from the Doppler shift, spectral background subtraction as well as relative intensity calibration of the channels for each discharge. The APD system is capable of measuring light intensities on the microsecond time scale. However ˜100 μs integration is needed to have an acceptable signal to noise ratio due to moderate light levels. Fast modulation of the beam up to 30 kHz is implemented which allows background subtraction on the 100 μs time scale. The measurement covers the 0.9 localized modes.

  11. Microinstability-based model for anomalous thermal confinement in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, W.M.

    1986-03-01

    This paper deals with the formulation of microinstability-based thermal transport coefficients (chi/sub j/) for the purpose of modelling anomalous energy confinement properties in tokamak plasmas. Attention is primarily focused on ohmically heated discharges and the associated anomalous electron thermal transport. An appropriate expression for chi/sub e/ is developed which is consistent with reasonable global constraints on the current and electron temperature profiles as well as with the key properties of the kinetic instabilities most likely to be present. Comparisons of confinement scaling trends predicted by this model with the empirical ohmic data base indicate quite favorable agreement. The subject of anomalous ion thermal transport and its implications for high density ohmic discharges and for auxiliary-heated plasmas is also addressed.

  12. Microinstability-based model for anomalous thermal confinement in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, W.M.

    1986-03-01

    This paper deals with the formulation of microinstability-based thermal transport coefficients (chi/sub j/) for the purpose of modelling anomalous energy confinement properties in tokamak plasmas. Attention is primarily focused on ohmically heated discharges and the associated anomalous electron thermal transport. An appropriate expression for chi/sub e/ is developed which is consistent with reasonable global constraints on the current and electron temperature profiles as well as with the key properties of the kinetic instabilities most likely to be present. Comparisons of confinement scaling trends predicted by this model with the empirical ohmic data base indicate quite favorable agreement. The subject of anomalous ion thermal transport and its implications for high density ohmic discharges and for auxiliary-heated plasmas is also addressed

  13. Jet-Based Local Image Descriptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders Boesen Lindbo; Darkner, Sune; Dahl, Anders Lindbjerg

    2012-01-01

    We present a general novel image descriptor based on higherorder differential geometry and investigate the effect of common descriptor choices. Our investigation is twofold in that we develop a jet-based descriptor and perform a comparative evaluation with current state-of-the-art descriptors on ...

  14. Analysis of ELM stability with extended MHD models in JET, JT-60U and future JT-60SA tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiba, N.; Pamela, S.; Honda, M.; Urano, H.; Giroud, C.; Delabie, E.; Frassinetti, L.; Lupelli, I.; Hayashi, N.; Huijsmans, G.; JET Contributors, the; Research Unit, JT-60SA

    2018-01-01

    The stability with respect to a peeling-ballooning mode (PBM) was investigated numerically with extended MHD simulation codes in JET, JT-60U and future JT-60SA plasmas. The MINERVA-DI code was used to analyze the linear stability, including the effects of rotation and ion diamagnetic drift ({ω }* {{i}}), in JET-ILW and JT-60SA plasmas, and the JOREK code was used to simulate nonlinear dynamics with rotation, viscosity and resistivity in JT-60U plasmas. It was validated quantitatively that the ELM trigger condition in JET-ILW plasmas can be reasonably explained by taking into account both the rotation and {ω }* {{i}} effects in the numerical analysis. When deuterium poloidal rotation is evaluated based on neoclassical theory, an increase in the effective charge of plasma destabilizes the PBM because of an acceleration of rotation and a decrease in {ω }* {{i}}. The difference in the amount of ELM energy loss in JT-60U plasmas rotating in opposite directions was reproduced qualitatively with JOREK. By comparing the ELM affected areas with linear eigenfunctions, it was confirmed that the difference in the linear stability property, due not to the rotation direction but to the plasma density profile, is thought to be responsible for changing the ELM energy loss just after the ELM crash. A predictive study to determine the pedestal profiles in JT-60SA was performed by updating the EPED1 model to include the rotation and {ω }* {{i}} effects in the PBM stability analysis. It was shown that the plasma rotation predicted with the neoclassical toroidal viscosity degrades the pedestal performance by about 10% by destabilizing the PBM, but the pressure pedestal height will be high enough to achieve the target parameters required for the ITER-like shape inductive scenario in JT-60SA.

  15. Microcomputer Based System to control the Load of a Capacitor Array in the TJ-1 Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberdi, J.; Asenso, L.; Sanz, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    The power to create the magnetic fields in the TJ-1 Tokamak is provides by an array of 16 capacitor sets. The total capacity of this array is 8. 1F. This work describes a computer system based on the Motorola M-6800 micro- processor which controls the load of the capacitor set and stablished the conditions for the reactor trigger. (Author)

  16. Microcomputer based system to control the load of a capacitor array in the TJ-1 Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberdi Primicia, J.; Asenjo, L.; Sanz, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    The power to create the magnetic field in the TJ-1 TOKAMAK is provide by an array of 16 capacitor sets. The total capacity of this array is 8.1F. This work describes a computer system based on the Motorola M-6800 microprocessor which controls the load of the capacitor set-and establishes the conditions for the reactor trigger. (author)

  17. Flow Channel Influence of a Collision-Based Piezoelectric Jetting Dispenser on Jet Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Zhou

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available To improve the jet performance of a bi-piezoelectric jet dispenser, mathematical and simulation models were established according to the operating principle. In order to improve the accuracy and reliability of the simulation calculation, a viscosity model of the fluid was fitted to a fifth-order function with shear rate based on rheological test data, and the needle displacement model was fitted to a nine-order function with time based on real-time displacement test data. The results show that jet performance is related to the diameter of the nozzle outlet and the cone angle of the nozzle, and the impacts of the flow channel structure were confirmed. The approach of numerical simulation is confirmed by the testing results of droplet volume. It will provide a reliable simulation platform for mechanical collision-based jet dispensing and a theoretical basis for micro jet valve design and improvement.

  18. EDITORIAL: Special section on recent progress on radio frequency heating and current drive studies in the JET tokamak Special section on recent progress on radio frequency heating and current drive studies in the JET tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongena, Jef; Mailloux, Joelle; Mayoral, Marie-Line

    2009-04-01

    This special cluster of papers summarizes the work accomplished during the last three years in the framework of the Task Force Heating at JET, whose mission it is to study the optimisation of heating systems for plasma heating and current drive, launching and deposition questions and the physics of plasma rotation. Good progress and new physics insights have been obtained with the three heating systems available at JET: lower hybrid (LH), ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) and neutral beam injection (NBI). Topics covered in the present issue are the use of edge gas puffing to improve the coupling of LH waves at large distances between the plasma separatrix and the LH launcher. Closely linked with this topic are detailed studies of the changes in LH coupling due to modifications in the scrape-off layer during gas puffing and simultaneous application of ICRH. We revisit the fundamental ICRH heating of D plasmas, include new physics results made possible by recently installed new diagnostic capabilities on JET and point out caveats for ITER when NBI is simultaneously applied. Other topics are the study of the anomalous behaviour of fast ions from NBI, and a study of toroidal rotation induced by ICRH, both again with possible implications for ITER. In finalizing this cluster of articles, thanks are due to all colleagues involved in preparing and executing the JET programme under EFDA in recent years. We want to thank the EFDA leadership for the special privilege of appointing us as Leaders or Deputies of Task Force Heating, a wonderful and hardworking group of colleagues. Thanks also to all other European and non-European scientists who contributed to the JET scientific programme, the Operations team of JET and the colleagues of the Close Support Unit (CSU). Thanks are also due to the Editors, Editorial Board and referees of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion together with the publishing staff of IOP Publishing who have supported and contributed substantially to

  19. Impact of the ITER-like wall on divertor detachment and on the density limit in the JET tokamak

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Huber, A.; Brezinsek, S.; Groth, M.; de Vries, P.C.; Riccardo, V.; van Rooij, G.; Sergienko, G.; Arnoux, G.; Boboc, A.; Bílková, Petra; Calabrò, G.; Clever, M.; Coenen, J.W.; Beurskens, M.N.A.; Eich, E.; Jachmich, S.; Lehnen, M.; Lerche, E.; Marsen, S.; Matthews, G. F.; McCormick, K.; Meigs, A.G.; Mertens, Ph.; Philipps, V.; Rapp, J.; Samm, U.; Stamp, M.; Wischmeier, M.; Wiesen, S.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 438, suppl (2013), S139-S147 ISSN 0022-3115. [International Conference on Plasma-Surface Interactions in Controlled Fusion Devices/20./. Aachen, 21.05.2012-25.05.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/10/2055; GA MŠk(CZ) LG11018 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : plasma * tokamak Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.016, year: 2013 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022311513000305#

  20. Tokamak engineering mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Yuntao; Wu, Weiyue; Du, Shijun

    2014-01-01

    Provides a systematic introduction to tokamaks in engineering mechanics. Includes design guides based on full mechanical analysis, which makes it possible to accurately predict load capacity and temperature increases. Presents comprehensive information on important design factors involving materials. Covers the latest advances in and up-to-date references on tokamak devices. Numerous examples reinforce the understanding of concepts and provide procedures for design. Tokamak Engineering Mechanics offers concise and thorough coverage of engineering mechanics theory and application for tokamaks, and the material is reinforced by numerous examples. Chapter topics include general principles, static mechanics, dynamic mechanics, thermal fluid mechanics and multiphysics structural mechanics of tokamak structure analysis. The theoretical principle of the design and the methods of the analysis for various components and load conditions are presented, while the latest engineering technologies are also introduced. The book will provide readers involved in the study of mechanical/fusion engineering with a general understanding of tokamak engineering mechanics.

  1. Probing the inner jet of M87; from the jet base to HST-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hada Kazuhiro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The giant radio galaxy M87 accompanies one of the nearest Active-Galactic-Nuclei jets showing the intense radiation through radio to TeV gamma-ray. Its proximity and the large mass of the central black hole provide an excellent advantage to probe the sites of jet formation and gamma-ray production. Here we review some of our recent studies for the inner jet of M87 based on the multi-frequency and multi-epoch VLBI observations, especially focusing on the two remarkable regions i.e., the jet base near the black hole and the peculiar feature HST-1. Our multi-frequency observations with the phase-referencing technique revealed the detailed structure of the jet base region regarding the location of the central engine and the collimation profile. In terms of HST-1, the intense multi-epoch VLBI monitoring constrained the accurate kinematic properties and the structural variations in this complicated feature, together with a possible connection to the gamma-ray activities. At the end of this contribution, we briefly describe our new monitoring project for M87 with VERA, which permits a detailed study on the structural evolution in the jet base region.

  2. Overview of erosion–deposition diagnostic tools for the ITER-Like Wall in the JET tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubel, M., E-mail: rubel@kth.se [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Association EURATOM-VR, Stockholm (Sweden); Coad, J.P. [VTT, Association EURATOM-Tekes, 02044 VTT (Finland); Widdowson, A.; Matthews, G.F. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Esser, H.G. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Jülich (Germany); Hirai, T. [ITER Organisation, Cadarache (France); Likonen, J. [VTT, Association EURATOM-Tekes, 02044 VTT (Finland); Linke, J. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Jülich (Germany); Lungu, C.P. [NILPRP, Association EURATOM-MEdC, Bucharest (Romania); Mayer, M. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM Association, Garching (Germany); Pedrick, L. [VTT, Association EURATOM-Tekes, 02044 VTT (Finland); Ruset, C. [NILPRP, Association EURATOM-MEdC, Bucharest (Romania)

    2013-07-15

    This paper presents scientific and technical issues related to the development of erosion–deposition diagnostic tools for JET operated with the ITER-Like Wall: beryllium and tungsten marker tiles and several types of wall probes installed in the main chamber and in the divertor. Markers tiles are the standard limiter and divertor components additionally coated first with a thin sandwich of Ni–Be and Mo–W for, beryllium and tungsten markers, respectively. Both types of markers are embedded in regular arrays of limiter and divertor tiles. Coated W–Be probes are also inserted in the Be-covered Inconel cladding tiles on the central column. Other types of erosion–deposition diagnostic tools are: rotating collectors, deposition traps, louver clips, quartz microbalance and mirrors for the First Mirror Test at JET for ITER. The specific role of these tools is discussed in detail.

  3. Design and development of AXUV-based soft X-ray diagnostic camera for Aditya Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raval, Jayesh V.; Purohit, Shishir; Joisa, Y. Shankara

    2015-01-01

    The hot tokamak plasma emits Soft X-rays (SXR) in accordance with the temperature and density which are important to be studied. A silicon photo diode array (AXUV16ELG, Opto-diode, USA) based prototype SXR diagnostics is designed and developed for ADITYA tokamak for the study of SXR radial intensity profile, internal disruption (Saw-tooth crash), MHD instabilities. The diagnostic is having an array of 16 detector of millimeter dimension in a linear configuration. Absolute Extreme Ultra Violate (AXUV) detector offers compact size, improved time response with considerably good quantum efficiency in the soft X-ray range (200 eV to 10 keV). The diagnostic is designed in competence with the ADITYA tokamak protocol. The diagnostic design geometry allows detector view the plasma through a slot hole (0.5 cm X 0.05 cm), 10 μm Beryllium foil filter window, cutting off energies below 750 eV. The diagnostic was installed on Aditya vacuum vessel at radial port no 7 enabling the diagnostics to view the core plasma. The spatial resolution designed for diagnostic configuration is 1.3 cm at plasma centre. The signal generated from SXR detector is acquired with a dedicated single board computer based data acquisition system at 50 kHz. The diagnostic took observation for the ohmically heated plasma. The data was then processed to construct spatial and temporal profile of SXR intensity for Aditya plasma. This information was complimentary to the Silicon surface barrier detector (SBD) based array for the same plasma discharge. The cross calibration between the two was considerably satisfactory under the assumptions considered. (author)

  4. CORBA-based solution for remote participation in SST-1 tokamak control and operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahajan, Kirti; Ravikiran, M.; Gulati, Hitesh; Dave, H.J.; Kumar, Neeraj; Patel, Kirit; Kumar, Aveg; Raju, D.; Bhandarkar, M.; Chudasama, H.; Kulkarni, S.V.; Saxena, Y.C.

    2006-01-01

    The steady state superconducting tokamak (SST-1) central control system is a distributed heterogeneous process communication system built on socket programming. It consists of machine, experiment and discharge control plus timing and a database. The software controls and monitors SST-1 subsystems: water-cooling, power supplies, cryogenics and vacuum over a local area network (LAN). The SST-1 control room is the place where all the activities like session announcement, machine control, experiment control, discharge control and monitoring are performed. We have realized that, instead of having a single monitoring place, we should have multiple monitoring points and it should be made possible to control the experiment from any PC over the LAN. In order to meet such requirements for remote participation in tokamak operation, we are upgrading the existing software. The upgraded software is based on Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) technology. The software is utilizing CORBA-services such as event service, naming services, interface repository and security services. The inherent features of CORBA make the software, platform and language independent. The software supports a variety of communication paradigms including publish-subscribe, peer-to-peer, and request-reply. Based on this software, one can participate in SST-1 tokamak operation from the LAN, or a wide area network (WAN) connection anywhere on the Internet. Each user can customize plasma parameters and diagnostics data that he wants to monitor, at any time without any change in the software and a copy of these parameters will be available to him. This paper focuses on the publish-subscribe communication paradigm and its application for a machine monitoring system

  5. Real-time control of Tokamak plasmas: from control of physics to physics-based control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felici, F. A. A.

    2011-11-01

    shown effective stabilization of both 3/2 and 2/1 NTMs, and have localized the most effective deposition location. Studies of current-profile driven destabilization of tearing modes in TCV plasmas with significant amounts of ECCD show a great sensitivity to details of the current profile, but failed to identify a stationary region in the parameter space in which NTMs are always destabilized, suggesting that transient effects play a role. The simultaneous control of magnetic and kinetic plasma profiles is another key requirement for advanced tokamak operation. While control of kinetic plasma profiles around an operating point can be handled using standard linear control techniques, the strongly nonlinear physics of the coupled profiles complicates the problem. Since internal magnetic quantities are difficult to measure with sufficient spatial and temporal resolution – even after years of diagnostic development – routine control of tokamak plasma profiles remains a daunting and challenging task. In this thesis, physics understanding of plasma current and energy transport is embedded in the control solution. The new lightweight transport code RAPTOR (RApid Plasma Transport simulatOR) has been derived focusing on simplicity and speed of simulation for real-time control. The partial differential equation for current diffusion is solved in real-time during a plasma shot in the TCV control system using RAPTOR. For the first time, this concept is applied experimentally to the tokamak current density profile problem. The real-time simulation gives a physics-model based estimate of key plasma quantities, to be controlled or monitored in real-time by different control systems. Any available diagnostics can be included into the simulation providing additional constraints and removing measurement uncertainties. The real-time simulation approach holds the advantage that knowledge of the plasma profiles is no longer restricted to those points in space and time where they are

  6. Definition of the basic DEMO tokamak geometry based on systems code studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meszaros, Botond; Bachmann, Christian; Kemp, Richard; Federici, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The definition of the DEMO 2D geometry has been introduced. • A methodology to derive the DEMO radial and vertical builds from the PROCESS systems code results has been defined. • Other 2D and 3D geometrical assumptions required to create a sensible 3D configuration model of DEMO have been defined. - Abstract: This paper describes the methodology that has been developed and applied to derive the principal geometry of the main DEMO tokamak systems, in particular the radial and vertical cross section based on the systems code output parameters, while exact parameters are described elsewhere [1]. This procedure reviews the analysis of the radial and vertical build provided by the system code to verify critical integration interfaces, e.g. missing or too large gaps and/or insufficient thickness of components, and updates these dimensions based on results of more detailed analyses (e.g. neutronics, plasma scenario modelling, etc.) that were carried out outside of the system code in the past years. As well as providing a 3D configuration model of the DEMO tokamak for integrated engineering analysis, the results can also be used to refine the systems code model. This method, subject to continuous refinement, controls the derivation of the main machine parameters and ensures their coherence vis-à-vis a number of agreed controlled physics and engineering assumptions.

  7. Definition of the basic DEMO tokamak geometry based on systems code studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meszaros, Botond, E-mail: botond.meszaros@efda.org [EFDA Power Plant Physics and Technology, Garching (Germany); Bachmann, Christian [EFDA Power Plant Physics and Technology, Garching (Germany); Kemp, Richard [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Federici, Gianfranco [EFDA Power Plant Physics and Technology, Garching (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The definition of the DEMO 2D geometry has been introduced. • A methodology to derive the DEMO radial and vertical builds from the PROCESS systems code results has been defined. • Other 2D and 3D geometrical assumptions required to create a sensible 3D configuration model of DEMO have been defined. - Abstract: This paper describes the methodology that has been developed and applied to derive the principal geometry of the main DEMO tokamak systems, in particular the radial and vertical cross section based on the systems code output parameters, while exact parameters are described elsewhere [1]. This procedure reviews the analysis of the radial and vertical build provided by the system code to verify critical integration interfaces, e.g. missing or too large gaps and/or insufficient thickness of components, and updates these dimensions based on results of more detailed analyses (e.g. neutronics, plasma scenario modelling, etc.) that were carried out outside of the system code in the past years. As well as providing a 3D configuration model of the DEMO tokamak for integrated engineering analysis, the results can also be used to refine the systems code model. This method, subject to continuous refinement, controls the derivation of the main machine parameters and ensures their coherence vis-à-vis a number of agreed controlled physics and engineering assumptions.

  8. PXIe based data acquisition and control system for ECRH systems on SST-1 and Aditya tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Jatinkumar J., E-mail: jatin@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar (India); Shukla, B.K.; Rajanbabu, N.; Patel, H.; Dhorajiya, P.; Purohit, D. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar (India); Mankadiya, K. [Optimized Solutions Pvt. Ltd (India)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Data Aquisition and control system (DAQ). • PXIe hardware–(PXI–PCI bus extension for Instrumention Express). • RHVPS–Regulated High Voltage Power supply. • SST1–Steady state superconducting tokamak. - Abstract: In Steady State Superconducting (SST-1) tokamak, various RF heating sub-systems are used for plasma heating experiments. In SST-1, Two Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) systems have been installed for pre-ionization, heating and current drive experiments. The 42 GHz gyrotron based ECRH system is installed and in operation with SST-1 plasma experiments. The 82.6 GHz gyrotron delivers 200 kW CW power (1000 s) while the 42 GHz gyrotron delivers 500 kW power for 500 ms duration. Each gyrotron system consists of various auxiliary power supplies, the crowbar unit and the water cooling system. The PXIe (PCI bus extension for Instrumentation Express)bus based DAC (Data Acquisition and Control) system has been designed, developed and under implementation for safe and reliable operation of the gyrotron. The Control and Monitoring Software applications have been developed using NI LabView 2014 software with real time support on windows platform.

  9. Modal Decomposition of Synthetic Jet Flow Based on CFD Computation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyhlík Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes results of numerical simulation of synthetic jet flow using modal decomposition. The analyzes are based on the numerical simulation of axisymmetric unsteady laminar flow obtained using ANSYS Fluent CFD code. Three typical laminar regimes are compared from the point of view of modal decomposition. The first regime is without synthetic jet creation with Reynolds number Re = 76 and Stokes number S = 19.7. The second studied regime is defined by Re = 145 and S = 19.7. The third regime of synthetic jet work is regime with Re = 329 and S = 19.7. Modal decomposition of obtained flow fields is done using proper orthogonal decomposition (POD where energetically most important modes are identified. The structure of POD modes is discussed together with classical approach based on phase averaged velocities.

  10. Jet-noise reduction through liquid-base foam injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manson, L.; Burge, H. L.

    1971-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been made of the sound-absorbing properties of liquid-base foams and of their ability to reduce jet noise. Protein, detergent, and polymer foaming agents were used in water solutions. A method of foam generation was developed to permit systematic variation of the foam density. The investigation included measurements of sound-absorption coefficents for both plane normal incidence waves and diffuse sound fields. The intrinsic acoustic properties of foam, e.g., the characteristic impedance and the propagation constant, were also determined. The sound emitted by a 1-in.-diam cold nitrogen jet was measured for subsonic (300 m/sec) and supersonic (422 m/sec) jets, with and without foam injection. Noise reductions up to 10 PNdB were measured.

  11. Improved feature selection based on genetic algorithms for real time disruption prediction on JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratta, G.A., E-mail: garatta@gateme.unsj.edu.ar [GATEME, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de San Juan, Avda. San Martin 1109 (O), 5400 San Juan (Argentina); JET EFDA, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB Abingdon (United Kingdom); Vega, J. [Asociacion EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusion, Avda. Complutense, 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); JET EFDA, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB Abingdon (United Kingdom); Murari, A. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA per la Fusione, Consorzio RFX, 4-35127 Padova (Italy); JET EFDA, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB Abingdon (United Kingdom)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new signal selection methodology to improve disruption prediction is reported. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The approach is based on Genetic Algorithms. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An advanced predictor has been created with the new set of signals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The new system obtains considerably higher prediction rates. - Abstract: The early prediction of disruptions is an important aspect of the research in the field of Tokamak control. A very recent predictor, called 'Advanced Predictor Of Disruptions' (APODIS), developed for the 'Joint European Torus' (JET), implements the real time recognition of incoming disruptions with the best success rate achieved ever and an outstanding stability for long periods following training. In this article, a new methodology to select the set of the signals' parameters in order to maximize the performance of the predictor is reported. The approach is based on 'Genetic Algorithms' (GAs). With the feature selection derived from GAs, a new version of APODIS has been developed. The results are significantly better than the previous version not only in terms of success rates but also in extending the interval before the disruption in which reliable predictions are achieved. Correct disruption predictions with a success rate in excess of 90% have been achieved 200 ms before the time of the disruption. The predictor response is compared with that of JET's Protection System (JPS) and the ADODIS predictor is shown to be far superior. Both systems have been carefully tested with a wide number of discharges to understand their relative merits and the most profitable directions of further improvements.

  12. Improved feature selection based on genetic algorithms for real time disruption prediction on JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rattá, G.A.; Vega, J.; Murari, A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A new signal selection methodology to improve disruption prediction is reported. ► The approach is based on Genetic Algorithms. ► An advanced predictor has been created with the new set of signals. ► The new system obtains considerably higher prediction rates. - Abstract: The early prediction of disruptions is an important aspect of the research in the field of Tokamak control. A very recent predictor, called “Advanced Predictor Of Disruptions” (APODIS), developed for the “Joint European Torus” (JET), implements the real time recognition of incoming disruptions with the best success rate achieved ever and an outstanding stability for long periods following training. In this article, a new methodology to select the set of the signals’ parameters in order to maximize the performance of the predictor is reported. The approach is based on “Genetic Algorithms” (GAs). With the feature selection derived from GAs, a new version of APODIS has been developed. The results are significantly better than the previous version not only in terms of success rates but also in extending the interval before the disruption in which reliable predictions are achieved. Correct disruption predictions with a success rate in excess of 90% have been achieved 200 ms before the time of the disruption. The predictor response is compared with that of JET's Protection System (JPS) and the ADODIS predictor is shown to be far superior. Both systems have been carefully tested with a wide number of discharges to understand their relative merits and the most profitable directions of further improvements.

  13. LES based POD analysis of Jet in Cross Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavar, Dalibor; Meyer, Knud Erik; Jakirlic, S.

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents results of a POD investigation of the LES based numerical simulation of the jet-in-crossflow (JICF) flowfield. LES results are firstly compared to the pointwise LDA measurements. 2D POD analysis is then used as a comparison basis for PIV measurements and LES, and finally 3D POD...

  14. Microinstability-based models for confinement properties and ignition criteria in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, W.M.; Bishop, C.M.; Coppi, B.; Kaye, S.M.; Perkins, F.W.; Redi, M.H.; Rewoldt, G.

    1987-02-01

    This paper reports on results of theoretical studies dealing with: (1) the use of microinstability-based thermal transport models to interpret the anomalous confinement properties observed in key tokamak experiments such as TFTR and (2) the likely consequences of the presence of such instabilities for future ignition devices. Transport code simulations using profile-consistent forms of anomalous thermal diffusivities due to drift-type instabilities have yielded good agreement with the confinement times and temperatures observed in TFTR under a large variety of operating conditions including pellet-fuelling in both ohmic- and neutral-beam-heated discharges. With regard to achieving an optimal ignition margin, the adverse temperature scaling of anomalous losses caused by drift modes leads to the conclusion that it is best to operate at the maximum allowable density while holding the temperature close to the minimum value required for ignition

  15. Continuous tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Y.K.M.

    1978-04-01

    A tokamak configuration is proposed that permits the rapid replacement of a plasma discharge in a ''burn'' chamber by another one in a time scale much shorter than the elementary thermal time constant of the chamber first wall. With respect to the chamber, the effective duty cycle factor can thus be made arbitrarily close to unity minimizing the cyclic thermal stress in the first wall. At least one plasma discharge always exists in the new tokamak configuration, hence, a continuous tokamak. By incorporating adiabatic toroidal compression, configurations of continuous tokamak compressors are introduced. To operate continuous tokamaks, it is necessary to introduce the concept of mixed poloidal field coils, which spatially groups all the poloidal field coils into three sets, all contributing simultaneously to inducing the plasma current and maintaining the proper plasma shape and position. Preliminary numerical calculations of axisymmetric MHD equilibria in continuous tokamaks indicate the feasibility of their continued plasma operation. Advanced concepts of continuous tokamaks to reduce the topological complexity and to allow the burn plasma aspect ratio to decrease for increased beta are then suggested

  16. Conceptual design of a component test facility based on the spherical tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voss, G.M. [EURATOM-UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)], E-mail: garry.voss@ukaea.org.uk; Davis, S. [EURATOM-UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Dnestrovskij, A. [I.V. Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kirk, A.; Knight, P.J.; Loughlin, M.; O' Brien, M.H. [EURATOM-UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Sychugov, D. [Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Tabasso, A. [EURATOM-UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Wilson, H.R. [University of York (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-15

    A small steady state spherical tokamak (ST) offers an attractive system for producing simultaneously the neutron, particle and heat fluxes necessary to effectively test and optimise blanket modules, first wall structures and other components under the required fusion power plant conditions. This component test facility (CTF) would complement and extend the qualification of materials by IFMIF and could operate in association with DEMO thus reducing the risk of delays, and extending the options, during this crucial stage of the development of commercial fusion power. The ST-CTF offers many advantages including low tritium consumption, ease of maintenance and a compact assembly and would operate in a strongly driven mode in which Q {approx} 1. The current drive would be provided by a mix of bootstrap current and neutral beam injection systems. The blanket modules under test are removed and replaced using a casking system and the entire centre column assembly can be relatively easily removed via a hydraulic lift system beneath the tokamak assembly. The single turn toroidal field coil has a water-cooled copper centre rod with multiple return limbs, which requires a low voltage, high current power supply. The poloidal field coils are also water-cooled but use a glass fibre reinforced cyanate ester resin insulation that offers higher radiation resistance and higher operating temperatures than the conventional epoxy resin systems. When operated in L-mode most of the exhaust power is directed to the outer legs of the double null divertor configuration where high power densities and high material erosion rates are developed. A novel divertor target based on the use of a cascading flow of pebbles is one option being developed for this application.

  17. Tokamaks (Second Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stott, Peter

    1998-01-01

    The first edition of John Wesson's book on tokamaks, published in 1987, established itself as essential reading for researchers in the field of magnetic confinement fusion: it was an excellent introduction for students to tokamak physics and also a valuable reference work for the more experienced. The second edition, published in 1997, has been completely rewritten and substantially enlarged (680 pages compared with 300). The new edition maintains the aim of providing a simple introduction to basic tokamak physics, but also includes discussion of the substantial advances in fusion research during the past decade. The new book, like its predecessor, is well written and commendable for its clarity and accuracy. In fact many of the chapters are written by a series of co-authors bringing the benefits of a wide range of expertise but, by careful editing, Wesson has maintained a uniformity of style and presentation. The chapter headings and coverage for the most part remain the same - but are expanded considerably and brought up to date. The most substantial change is that the single concluding chapter in the first edition on 'Experiments' has been replaced by three chapters: 'Tokamak experiments' which deals with some of the earlier key experiments plus a selection of recent small and medium-sized devices, 'Large experiments' which gives an excellent summary of the main results from the four large tokamaks - TFTR, JET, JT60/JT60U and DIII-D, and 'The future' which gives a very short (possibly too short in my opinion) account of reactors and ITER. This is an excellent book, which I strongly recommend should have a place - on the desk rather than in the bookshelf - of researchers in magnetic confinement fusion. (book review)

  18. A MARTe based simulator for the JET Vertical Stabilization system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellizio, Teresa, E-mail: teresa.bellizio@unina.it [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CREATE, University di Napoli Federico II, Via Claudio 21, 80125 Napoli (Italy); De Tommasi, Gianmaria; Risoli, Nicola; Albanese, Raffaele [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CREATE, University di Napoli Federico II, Via Claudio 21, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Neto, Andre [Associacao EURATOM/IST, Inst. de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear - Laboratorio Associado, Instituto Superior, Tecnico, P-1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2011-10-15

    Validation by means of simulation is a crucial step when developing real-time control systems. Modeling and simulation are an essential tool since the early design phase, when the control algorithms are designed and tested. This phase is commonly carried out in off-line environments such as Matlab and Simulink. A MARTe-based simulator has been recently developed to validate the new JET Vertical Stabilization (VS) system. MARTe is the multi-thread framework used at JET to deploy hard real-time control systems. This paper presents the software architecture of the MARTe-based simulator and it shows how this tool has been effectively used to evaluate the effects of Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) on the VS system. By using the simulator it is possible to analyze different plasma configurations, extrapolating the limit of the new vertical amplifier in terms of the energy of the largest rejectable ELM.

  19. Jet observables without jet algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertolini, Daniele; Chan, Tucker; Thaler, Jesse [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2014-04-02

    We introduce a new class of event shapes to characterize the jet-like structure of an event. Like traditional event shapes, our observables are infrared/collinear safe and involve a sum over all hadrons in an event, but like a jet clustering algorithm, they incorporate a jet radius parameter and a transverse momentum cut. Three of the ubiquitous jet-based observables — jet multiplicity, summed scalar transverse momentum, and missing transverse momentum — have event shape counterparts that are closely correlated with their jet-based cousins. Due to their “local” computational structure, these jet-like event shapes could potentially be used for trigger-level event selection at the LHC. Intriguingly, the jet multiplicity event shape typically takes on non-integer values, highlighting the inherent ambiguity in defining jets. By inverting jet multiplicity, we show how to characterize the transverse momentum of the n-th hardest jet without actually finding the constituents of that jet. Since many physics applications do require knowledge about the jet constituents, we also build a hybrid event shape that incorporates (local) jet clustering information. As a straightforward application of our general technique, we derive an event-shape version of jet trimming, allowing event-wide jet grooming without explicit jet identification. Finally, we briefly mention possible applications of our method for jet substructure studies.

  20. Research into controlled fusion in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacek, F.

    1992-01-01

    During the thirty years of tokamak research, physicists have been approaching step by step the reactor breakeven condition defined by the Lawson criterion. JET, the European Community tokamak is probably the first candidate among the world largest tokamaks to reach the ignition threshold and thus to demonstrate the physical feasibility of thermonuclear reaction. The record plasma parameters achieved in JET at H plasma modes due to powerful additional plasma heating and due to substantial reduction of plasma impurities, opened the door to the first experiment with a deuterium-tritium plasma. In the paper, the conditions and results of these tritium experiments are described in detail. The prospects of the world tokamak research and of the participation of Czechoslovak physicists are also discussed. (J.U.) 3 figs., 6 refs

  1. Aqueous biological graphene based formulations for ink-jet printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dybowska-Sarapuk Łucja

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to produce heterophasic graphene nanoplatelets based formulation designed for ink-jet printing and biomedical applications. The compositions should meet two conditions: should be cytocompatible and have the rheological properties that allow to apply it with ink-jet printing technique. In view of the above conditions, the selection of suspensions components, such as binder, solvent and surfactants was performed. In the first stage of the research the homogeneity of the dispersion of nanoplatelets and their sedimentation behaviour in diverse solutions were tested. Subsequently, the cytotoxicity of each ink on human mesenchymal stem cells was examined using the Alamar Blue Test. At the same time the rheology of the resulting suspensions was tested. As a result of these tests the best ink composition was elaborated: water, polyethylene glycol, graphene nanoplatelets and the surfactant from DuPont company.

  2. Study of an optimal configuration of a transmutation reactor based on a low-aspect-ratio tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Bong Guen; Kim, Hoseok

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Optimum configuration of a transmutation reactor based on a low aspect ratio tokamak was found. • Inboard and outboard radial build are determined by plasma physics, engineering and neutronics constraints. • Radial build and equilibrium fuel cycle play a major role in determining the transmutation characteristics. - Abstract: We determine the optimal configuration of a transmutation reactor based on a low-aspect-ratio tokamak. For self-consistent determination of the radial build of the reactor components, we couple a tokamak systems analysis with a radiation transport calculation. The inboard radial build of the reactor components is obtained from plasma physics and engineering constraints, while outboard radial builds are mainly determined by constraints on neutron multiplication, the tritium-breeding ratio, and the power density. We show that the breeding blanket model has an effect on the radial build of a transmutation blanket. A burn cycle has to be determined to keep the fast neutron fluence plasma-facing material below its radiation damage limit. We show that the radial build of the transmutation reactor components and the equilibrium fuel cycle play a major role in determining the transmutation characteristics.

  3. A modularized operator interface framework for Tokamak based on MVC design pattern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Xuan; Zheng, Wei; Zhang, Ming; Zhang, Jing; Zhuang, G.; Ding, T.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Our framework is based on MVC design pattern. • XML is used to cope with minor difference between different applications. • Functions dealing with EPICS and MDSplus have been modularized into reusable modules. • The modularized framework will shorten J-TEXT's software development cycle. - Abstract: Facing various and continually changing experimental needs, the J-TEXT Tokamak experiment requires home-made software applications developed for different sub-systems. Though dealing with different specific problems, these software applications usually share a lot of functionalities in common. With the goal of improving the productivity of research groups, J-TEXT has designed a C# desktop application framework which is mainly focused on operator interface development. Following the Model–View–Controller (MVC) design pattern, the main functionality dealing with Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) or MDSplus has been modularized into reusable modules. Minor difference among applications can be coped with XML configuration files. In this case, developers are able to implement various kinds of operator interface without knowing the implementation details of the bottom functions in Models, mainly focusing on Views and Controllers. This paper presents J-TEXT C# desktop application framework, introducing the technology of fast development of the modularized operator interface. Some experimental applications designed in this framework have been already deployed in J-TEXT, and will be introduced in this paper

  4. Design of Tokamak synchronous data acquisition system based on PXI express

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Rui; Zheng Wei; Zhang Ming; Weng Chuqiao; Zhuang Ge; Ding Tonghai; Yu Kexun

    2014-01-01

    With the development of J-TEXT device, the original data acquisition system can't meet the experiment's requirement on stability, modularity and sampling rate, so a new data acquisition system needs to be built. This paper introduces the design and implementation of the distributed Tokamak synchronous high-speed data acquisition system based on PXI Express. The acquisition unit consists of PXIe case Nl PXIe 1062Q, PXIe controller NI PXIe-8133 and high-speed synchronous data acquisition card Nl PXIe-6368, compatible with the latest standard of ITER CODAC, so it has good mechanical sealing, strong modularity and high sampling rate etc. The system takes a synchronous difference acquisition for diagnosis signal. The data storage adopts MDSplus which is the general database in the nuclear fusion field. The test and experimental results show that the system can work continuously and stably at 2 MSps sampling rate, and meet the requirement of experiment device's operation well. (authors)

  5. A modularized operator interface framework for Tokamak based on MVC design pattern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Xuan; Zheng, Wei [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); College of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhang, Ming, E-mail: zhangming@hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); College of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhang, Jing; Zhuang, G.; Ding, T. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); College of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-05-15

    Highlights: • Our framework is based on MVC design pattern. • XML is used to cope with minor difference between different applications. • Functions dealing with EPICS and MDSplus have been modularized into reusable modules. • The modularized framework will shorten J-TEXT's software development cycle. - Abstract: Facing various and continually changing experimental needs, the J-TEXT Tokamak experiment requires home-made software applications developed for different sub-systems. Though dealing with different specific problems, these software applications usually share a lot of functionalities in common. With the goal of improving the productivity of research groups, J-TEXT has designed a C# desktop application framework which is mainly focused on operator interface development. Following the Model–View–Controller (MVC) design pattern, the main functionality dealing with Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) or MDSplus has been modularized into reusable modules. Minor difference among applications can be coped with XML configuration files. In this case, developers are able to implement various kinds of operator interface without knowing the implementation details of the bottom functions in Models, mainly focusing on Views and Controllers. This paper presents J-TEXT C# desktop application framework, introducing the technology of fast development of the modularized operator interface. Some experimental applications designed in this framework have been already deployed in J-TEXT, and will be introduced in this paper.

  6. Support vector machine-based feature extractor for L/H transitions in JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, S.; Vega, J.; Pereira, A. [Asociacion EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusion, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Murari, A. [Consorzio RFX, Associazione EURATOM ENEA per la Fusione, Padova 4-35127 (Italy); Ramirez, J. M.; Dormido-Canto, S. [Departamento de Informatica y Automatica, UNED, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2010-10-15

    Support vector machines (SVM) are machine learning tools originally developed in the field of artificial intelligence to perform both classification and regression. In this paper, we show how SVM can be used to determine the most relevant quantities to characterize the confinement transition from low to high confinement regimes in tokamak plasmas. A set of 27 signals is used as starting point. The signals are discarded one by one until an optimal number of relevant waveforms is reached, which is the best tradeoff between keeping a limited number of quantities and not loosing essential information. The method has been applied to a database of 749 JET discharges and an additional database of 150 JET discharges has been used to test the results obtained.

  7. Tokamak formation and sustainment by tokamak injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farengo, R.; Jarboe, T.R.

    1991-01-01

    The authors propose here a new helicity injection method for tokamak formation and sustainment that has high efficiency, conserves toroidal symmetry and is inductively driven. The basic idea is to inject a small tokamak (source tokamak) into a larger tokamak (steady tokamak). This current drive scheme eliminates the need for the ohmic heating transformer in the steady tokamak allowing the formation of very small aspect ratio tokamaks (Spherical Tori). Thus, steady state operation and high beta can be realized simultaneously. The method can also be applied to a larger aspect ratio tokamak and used in conjunction with the standard inductive formation technique. In order to allow for translation the ohmic heating coil used to produce the source tokamaks must be fed from one end (as in the CSS device) and the toroidal field coil must link both tokamaks. After formation the source tokamaks are accelerated towards the steady tokamak by a mirror field and the tension of the field lines that wrap around both tokamaks (producing a doublet type configuration). In a tokamak the helicity is proportional to the current. This indicates that (assuming helicity is conserved during the merging process) a steady state situation will result if the helicity supplied by the source tokamaks is equal to the helicity dissipated by the steady tokamak. Assuming that source tokamaks of helicity K s are injected with frequency f, the steady state condition can be written as: fK s = 2V t Ψ t = K t /τ K where V t , Ψ t , K t and τ K are the ohmic loop voltage, toroidal flux, helicity and helicity decay time of the steady tokamak. A simple calculation shows that the DIII-D tokamak could be sustained by injecting source tokamaks with R = 1.20 m, a = 0.23 m and I = 151 kA at a frequency of 120 Hz. 1 ref

  8. Reconnection in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pare, V.K.

    1983-01-01

    Calculations with several different computer codes based on the resistive MHD equations have shown that (m = 1, n = 1) tearing modes in tokamak plasmas grow by magnetic reconnection. The observable behavior predicted by the codes has been confirmed in detail from the waveforms of signals from x-ray detectors and recently by x-ray tomographic imaging

  9. A discrete adaptive near-time optimum control for the plasma vertical position in a Tokamak

    CERN Document Server

    Scibile, L

    2001-01-01

    A nonlinear controller for the plasma vertical position in a Tokamak, based on a discrete-time adaptive near time optimum control algorithm (DANTOC) is designed to stabilize the system and to maximize the state-space region over which stability can be guaranteed. The controller is also robust to the edge localized modes (ELMs) and the 600 Hz noise from the thyristor power supplies that are the primary source of disturbances and measurement noise. The controller is tested in simulation for the JET Tokamak and the results confirm its efficacy in controlling the vertical position for different plasma configurations. The controller is also tested experimentally on a real Tokamak, COMPASS-D, and the results demonstrate the improvement with respect to a simple linear PD controller in the presence of disturbances and measurement noise. The emphasis of the is on the development of the design methodology. (38 refs).

  10. Tokamak COMPASS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řípa, Milan; Křenek, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 1 (2011), s. 32-34 ISSN 1210-4612 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : fusion * tokamak * Compass * Golem * Institute of Plasma Physics AVCR v.v * NBI * diagnostics Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  11. Feasibility of a multi-purpose demonstration neutron source based on a compact superconducting spherical tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillemaut, C., E-mail: christophe.guillemaut@ccfe.ac.uk [Insituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A.P. 70-543, Ciudad Universitaria, 04511 Coyoacán, D.F. (Mexico); Herrera Velázquez, J.J.E. [Insituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A.P. 70-543, Ciudad Universitaria, 04511 Coyoacán, D.F. (Mexico); Suarez, A. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión, Asociación EURATOM-CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-12-15

    Tokamak neutron sources would allow near term applications of fusion such as fusion–fission hybrid reactors, elimination of nuclear wastes, production of radio-isotopes for nuclear medicine, material testing and tritium production. The generation of neutrons with fusion plasmas does not require energetic efficiency; thus, nowadays tokamak technologies would be sufficient for such purposes. This paper presents some key technical details of a compact (∼1.8 m{sup 3} of plasma) superconducting spherical tokamak neutron source (STNS), which aims to demonstrate the capabilities of such a device for the different possible applications already mentioned. The T-11 transport model was implemented in ASTRA for 1.5 D simulations of heat and particle transport in the STNS core plasma. According to the model predictions, total neutron production rates of the order of ∼10{sup 15} s{sup −1} and ∼10{sup 13} s{sup −1} can be achieved with deuterium/tritium and deuterium/deuterium respectively, with 9 MW of heating power, 1.4 T of toroidal magnetic field and 1.5 MA of plasma current. Engineering estimates indicate that such scenario could be maintained during ∼20 s and repeated every ∼5 min. The viability of most of tokamak neutron source applications could be demonstrated with a few of these cycles and around ∼100 cycles would be required in the worst cases.

  12. Plasma Sprayed Tungsten-based Coatings and their Usage in Edge Plasma Region of Tokamaks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějíček, Jiří; Weinzettl, Vladimír; Dufková, Edita; Piffl, Vojtěch; Peřina, Vratislav

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 2 (2006), s. 179-191 ISSN 0001-7043 Grant - others:Evropská unie EFDA Task TW-5-TVM-PSW (EU – Euratom) Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508; CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : plasma sprayed coatings * fusion * plasma facing components * tungsten * tokamak Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  13. Impinging jet-based fluidic diodes for hybrid synthetic jet actuators

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kordík, Jozef; Broučková, Zuzana; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 3 (2015), s. 449-458 ISSN 1343-8875 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP101/12/P556 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : synthetic jet * hybrid synthetic jet * volumetric efficiency Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 0.720, year: 2015 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs12650-014-0251-0

  14. A Key to Improved Ion Core Confinement in the JET Tokamak: Ion Stiffness Mitigation due to Combined Plasma Rotation and Low Magnetic Shear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantica, P.; Challis, C.; Peeters, A.G.

    2011-01-01

    New transport experiments on JET indicate that ion stiffness mitigation in the core of a rotating plasma, as described by Mantica et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 102 175002 (2009)] results from the combined effect of high rotational shear and low magnetic shear. The observations have important implicatio...

  15. Confinement and diffusion in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McWilliams, R.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of electric field fluctuations on confinement and diffusion in tokamak is discussed. Based on the experimentally determined cross-field turbolent diffusion coefficient, D∼3.7*cT e /eB(δn i /n i ) rms which is also derived by a simple theory, the cross-field diffusion time, tp=a 2 /D, is calculated and compared to experimental results from 51 tokamak for standard Ohmic operation

  16. A tokamak with nearly uniform coil stress based on virial theorem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutsui, H.

    2002-01-01

    A novel tokamak concept with a new type of toroidal field (TF) coils and a central solenoid (CS) whose stress is much reduced to a theoretical limit determined by the virial theorem has been devised. Recently, we had developed a tokamak with force-balanced coils (FBCs) which are multi-pole helical hybrid coils combining TF coils and a CS coil. The combination reduces the net electromagnetic force in the direction of major radius. In this work, we have extended the FBC concept using the virial theorem. High-field coils should accordingly have same averaged principal stresses in all directions, whereas conventional FBC reduces stress in the toroidal direction only. Using a shell model, we have obtained the poloidal rotation number of helical coils which satisfy the uniform stress condition, and named the coil as virial-limited coil (VLC). VLC with circular cross section of aspect ratio A=2 reduces maximum stress to 60% compared with that of TF coils. In order to prove the advantage of VLC concept, we have designed a small VLC tokamak Todoroki-II. The plasma discharge in Todoroki-II will be presented. (author)

  17. Canonical profiles in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dnestrovskij, Yu.N.

    2002-01-01

    We consider the problem of the canonical profiles for tokamak plasma with arbitrary cross-section, taking into account two principles: 1) the free plasma energy minimum with the constraint of total current conservation and 2) the profile consistency. We deduce the Euler differential equation for the canonical profile of μ=1/q with two types of the boundary conditions: soft and stiff. The soft conditions correspond to the Kadomtsev solution for the circular cylinder. The stiff conditions describe a fast response of the plasma over the whole cross-section on the edge impact. Using the canonical profile of the current density, we calculate the critical gradients for the temperature, and create the transport model for the electron and ion temperatures and density. We show that, when the aspect ratio is diminished, or when the elongation increases, the canonical profiles become flatten. The similar tendency for the real profiles of the electron temperature was found in analysis of JET and START experiments. The obtained critical gradients were used to analysis of the experiments in tokamaks with moderate and tight aspect ratios. (author)

  18. The physics of an ignited tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troyon, F.

    1990-10-01

    There appears to be a consensus that time has come to embark on the design and construction of the next generation of tokamaks which is at the origin of the ITER initiative. Different proposals have been made based on different appreciation as to the size of the step which can be taken, related to considerations of cost, risk and duration of construction. A class of devices which may be considered the last the very high-field, high density ALCATOR-Frascati line of tokamaks have been proposed for some years specifically for this purpose. Today there remain three such projects: Ignitor, Ignitex and CIT. The technology chosen limits the pulse length to a few seconds. These devices have evolved through the years becoming larger and much more expensive than originally anticipated, increasing the pressure to do more than just a simple demonstration of ignition. There is another class of more ambitious devices which aim at creating long burning plasmas in conditions as close as possible to those of a tokamak reactor in order to address all the plasma physics problems associated with long burn. Three such projects, NET, the european next step after JET, ITER and JIT are good examples of this approach. The ideal would be to design a device with sufficient margin to study burning plasmas over a wide range of parameters. The object of this didactic presentation is to describe the common physics basis of all these projects, compare their expected performance using present knowledge and list the physics problems associated with a burning plasma experiment. The comparison is not meant to be a judgement since the important parameter is the cost/benefit ratio which is a matter of appreciation at this stage. 6 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  19. Preliminary Design of Alborz Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardani, M.; Amrollahi, R.; Saramad, S.

    2012-04-01

    The Alborz tokamak is a D-shape cross section tokamak that is under construction in Amirkabir University of Technology. The most important part of the tokamak design is the design of TF coils. In this paper a refined design of the TF coil system for the Alborz tokamak is presented. This design is based on cooper cable conductor with 5 cm width and 6 mm thickness. The TF coil system is consist of 16 rectangular shape coils, that makes the magnetic field of 0.7 T at the plasma center. The stored energy in total is 160 kJ, and the power supply used in this system is a capacitor bank with capacity of C = 1.32 mF and V max = 14 kV.

  20. Metal shell technology based upon hollow jet instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendall, J.M.; Lee, M.C.; Wang, T.G.

    1982-01-01

    Spherical shells of submillimeter size are sought as ICF targets. Such shells must be dimensionally precise, smooth, of high strength, and composed of a high atomic number material. We describe a technology for the production of shells based upon the hydrodynamic instability of an annular jet of molten metal. We have produced shells in the 0.7--2.0 mm size range using tin as a test material. Specimens exhibit good sphericity, fair concentricity, and excellent finish over most of the surface. Work involving a gold--lead--antimony alloy is in progress. Droplets of this are amorphous and possess superior surface finish. The flow of tin models that of the alloy well; experiments on both metals show that the technique holds considerable promise

  1. Fuzzy jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackey, Lester [Department of Statistics, Stanford University,Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Nachman, Benjamin [Department of Physics, Stanford University,Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University,2575 Sand Hill Rd, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Schwartzman, Ariel [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University,2575 Sand Hill Rd, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Stansbury, Conrad [Department of Physics, Stanford University,Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets. To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets, are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet tagging variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.

  2. The ARIES tokamak reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-10-01

    The ARIES study is a community effort to develop several visions of tokamaks as fusion power reactors. The aims are to determine the potential economics, safety, and environmental features of a range of possible tokamak reactors, and to identify physics and technology areas with the highest leverage for achieving the best tokamak reactor. Three ARIES visions are planned, each having a different degree of extrapolation from the present data base in physics and technology. The ARIES-I design assumes a minimum extrapolation from current tokamak physics (e.g., 1st stability) and incorporates technological advances that can be available in the next 20 to 30 years. ARIES-II is a DT-burning tokamak which would operate at a higher beta in the 2nd MHD stability regime. It employs both potential advances in the physics and expected advances in technology and engineering. ARIES-II will examine the potential of the tokamak and the D 3 He fuel cycle. This report is a collection of 14 papers on the results of the ARIES study which were presented at the IEEE 13th Symposium on Fusion Engineering (October 2-6, 1989, Knoxville, TN). This collection describes the ARIES research effort, with emphasis on the ARIES-I design, summarizing the major results, the key technical issues, and the central conclusions

  3. The ARIES tokamak reactor study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-10-01

    The ARIES study is a community effort to develop several visions of tokamaks as fusion power reactors. The aims are to determine the potential economics, safety, and environmental features of a range of possible tokamak reactors, and to identify physics and technology areas with the highest leverage for achieving the best tokamak reactor. Three ARIES visions are planned, each having a different degree of extrapolation from the present data base in physics and technology. The ARIES-I design assumes a minimum extrapolation from current tokamak physics (e.g., 1st stability) and incorporates technological advances that can be available in the next 20 to 30 years. ARIES-II is a DT-burning tokamak which would operate at a higher beta in the 2nd MHD stability regime. It employs both potential advances in the physics and expected advances in technology and engineering. ARIES-II will examine the potential of the tokamak and the D{sup 3}He fuel cycle. This report is a collection of 14 papers on the results of the ARIES study which were presented at the IEEE 13th Symposium on Fusion Engineering (October 2-6, 1989, Knoxville, TN). This collection describes the ARIES research effort, with emphasis on the ARIES-I design, summarizing the major results, the key technical issues, and the central conclusions.

  4. FPGA based Fuzzy Logic Controller for plasma position control in ADITYA Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suratia, Pooja, E-mail: poojasuratia@yahoo.com [Electrical Engineering Department, Faculty of Technology and Engineering, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Kalabhavan, Vadodara 390001, Gujarat (India); Patel, Jigneshkumar, E-mail: jjp@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428, Gujarat (India); Rajpal, Rachana, E-mail: rachana@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428, Gujarat (India); Kotia, Sorum, E-mail: smkotia-eed@msubaroda.ac.in [Electrical Engineering Department, Faculty of Technology and Engineering, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Kalabhavan, Vadodara 390001, Gujarat (India); Govindarajan, J., E-mail: govindarajan@ipr.res.in [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428, Gujarat (India)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Evaluation and comparison of the working performance of FLC is done with that of PID Controller. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FLC is designed using MATLAB Fuzzy Logic Toolbox, and validated on ADITYA RZIP model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FLC was implemented on a FPGA. The close-loop testing is done by interfacing FPGA to MATLAB/Simulink. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Developed FLC controller is able to maintain the plasma column within required range of {+-}0.05 m and was found to give robust control against various disturbances and faster and smoother response compared to PID Controller. - Abstract: Tokamaks are the most promising devices for obtaining nuclear fusion energy from high-temperature, ionized gas termed as Plasma. The successful operation of tokamak depends on its ability to confine plasma at the geometric center of vacuum vessel with sufficient stability. The quality of plasma discharge in ADITYA Tokamak is strongly related to the radial position of the plasma column in the vacuum vessel. If the plasma column approaches too near to the wall of vacuum vessel, it leads to minor or complete disruption of plasma. Hence the control of plasma position throughout the entire plasma discharge duration is a fundamental requirement. This paper describes Fuzzy Logic Controller (FLC) which is designed for radial plasma position control. This controller is tested and evaluated on the ADITYA RZIP control model. The performance of this FLC was compared with that of Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) Controller and the response was found to be faster and smoother. FLC was implemented on a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) chip with the use of a Very High-Speed Integrated-Circuits Hardware Description-Language (VHDL).

  5. Integral equation based stability analysis of short wavelength drift modes in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, A.; Elia, M.

    2003-01-01

    Linear stability of electron skin-size drift modes in collisionless tokamak discharges has been investigated in terms of electromagnetic, kinetic integral equations in which neither ions nor electrons are assumed to be adiabatic. A slab-like ion temperature gradient mode persists in such a short wavelength regime. However, toroidicity has a strong stabilizing influence on this mode. In the electron branch, the toroidicity induced skin-size drift mode previously predicted in terms of local kinetic analysis has been recovered. The mode is driven by positive magnetic shear and strongly stabilized for negative shear. The corresponding mixing length anomalous thermal diffusivity exhibits favourable isotope dependence. (author)

  6. Microcomputer Based System to control the Load of a Capacitor Array in the TJ-1 Tokamak; Sistema de Control de Carga de Condensadores del TJ-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberdi, J.; Asenso, L.; Sanz, J. A.

    1990-07-01

    The power to create the magnetic fields in the TJ-1 Tokamak is provides by an array of 16 capacitor sets. The total capacity of this array is 8. 1F. This work describes a computer system based on the Motorola M-6800 micro- processor which controls the load of the capacitor set and stablished the conditions for the reactor trigger. (Author)

  7. Tokamaks - Third Edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogister, A L

    2004-01-01

    an introduction to diagnostics for tokamaks. The complexity of fusion plasmas is attested to by the discovery of new phenomena and new operational regimes as machine size and power increased and the diagnostic tools improved over the forty years of research on magnetic confinement. The history of those discoveries in the devices which have been built worldwide after the results obtained on the first tokamaks at the Kurchatov Institute had been confirmed is outlined in chapters 11-12. Particular emphasis is naturally given to the results from the larger tokamaks: ASDEX Upgrade, DIII-D, TFTR, JT-60/JT-60U and JET. Chapter 13 is devoted to the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor and prospects beyond ITER. Examples of operational regimes and of often unexpected phenomena are the linear and saturated ohmic confinement modes, confinement degradation when auxiliary heating is applied, the high energy confinement mode, the formation of internal transport barriers in weak or negative central shear discharges, sawtooth relaxations, disruptions, multifaceted asymmetric radiation from the edge, edge localised modes, etc. The relevant observations are described very thoroughly with the support of numerous selected figures and their physical interpretation, a major topic of the book, is carefully discussed on the basis of simplified but convincing mathematical models. With respect to the previous edition (1997), a few additions have been introduced; those concern plasma rotation (section 3.13), internal transport barriers (4.14), the role of radial electric field shear (4.19), turbulence simulations (4.21), impurity transport (4.22) and neoclassical drive of tearing modes (7.3). It is my personal feeling that some of those additions should have been somewhat more elaborated. A few pages have finally been added concerning the TCV, START, MAST, NSTX and ASDEX Upgrade tokamaks. With this book, John Wesson offers the fusion community a very precious and thorough survey of

  8. The JET cryopump system and its cryolines for neutral injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obert, W.; Duessing, G.; Kuessel, E.; Kupschus, P.; Mayaux, C.; Rebut, P.H.

    1984-01-01

    Two large scale Cryopump Systems each with 40 m 2 pumping area and 8 x 10 6 ls -1 pumping speed for hydrogen have been manufactured for neutral injection on JET, and so far one has been successfully tested. The system is based on a 'serial open structure' cryopump configuration developed by JET. The design of the cryopump system had to comply with stringent design requirements as the cryopump system must operate close to the tokamak and in the direct vicinity of the 40 MW power of the Ni-ion beams. (author)

  9. Spatial Resolution of the ECE for JET Typical Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tribaldos, V. [Ciemat. Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to obtain estimations of the spatial resolution of the electron cyclotron emission (ECE) phenomena for the typical plasmas found in JET tokamak. The analysis of the spatial resolution of the ECE is based on the underlying physical process of emission and a working definition is presented and discussed. In making these estimations a typical JET pulse is being analysed taking into account the magnetic configuration, the density and temperature profiles, obtained with the EFIT code and from the LIDAR diagnostic. Ray tracing simulations are performed for a Maxwellian plasma taking into account the antenna pattern. (Author) 5 refs.

  10. Experimental validation of a Lyapunov-based controller for the plasma safety factor and plasma pressure in the TCV tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavkov, B.; Witrant, E.; Prieur, C.; Maljaars, E.; Felici, F.; Sauter, O.; the TCV-Team

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, model-based closed-loop algorithms are derived for distributed control of the inverse of the safety factor profile and the plasma pressure parameter β of the TCV tokamak. The simultaneous control of the two plasma quantities is performed by combining two different control methods. The control design of the plasma safety factor is based on an infinite-dimensional setting using Lyapunov analysis for partial differential equations, while the control of the plasma pressure parameter is designed using control techniques for single-input and single-output systems. The performance and robustness of the proposed controller is analyzed in simulations using the fast plasma transport simulator RAPTOR. The control is then implemented and tested in experiments in TCV L-mode discharges using the RAPTOR model predicted estimates for the q-profile. The distributed control in TCV is performed using one co-current and one counter-current electron cyclotron heating actuation.

  11. Development of laser-based technology for the routine first wall diagnostic on the tokamak EAST: LIBS and LIAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Z.; Gierse, N.; Li, C.; Liu, P.; Zhao, D.; Sun, L.; Oelmann, J.; Nicolai, D.; Wu, D.; Wu, J.; Mao, H.; Ding, F.; Brezinsek, S.; Liang, Y.; Ding, H.; Luo, G.; Linsmeier, C.; EAST team

    2017-12-01

    A laser based method combined with spectroscopy, such as laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser-induced ablation spectroscopy (LIAS), is a promising technology for plasma-wall interaction studies. In this work, we report the development of in situ laser-based diagnostics (LIBS and LIAS) for the assessment of static and dynamic fuel retention on the first wall without removing the tiles between and during plasma discharges in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). The fuel retention on the first wall was measured after different wall conditioning methods and daily plasma discharges by in situ LIBS. The result indicates that the LIBS can be a useful tool to predict the wall condition in EAST. With the successful commissioning of a refined timing system for LIAS, an in situ approach to investigate fuel retention is proposed.

  12. Tokamak physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haines, M.G.

    1984-01-01

    The physical conditions required for breakeven in thermonuclear fusion are derived, and the early conceptual ideas of magnetic confinement and subsequent development are followed, leading to present-day large scale tokamak experiments. Confinement and diffusion are developed in terms of particle orbits, whilst magnetohydrodynamic stability is discussed from energy considerations. From these ideas are derived the scaling laws that determine the physical size and parameters of this fusion configuration. It becomes clear that additional heating is required. However there are currently several major gaps in our understanding of experiments; the causes of anomalous electron energy loss and the major current disruption, the absence of the 'bootstrap' current and what physics determines the maximum plasma pressure consistent with stability. The understanding of these phenomena is a major challenge to plasma physicists. (author)

  13. Adjoint based sensitivity analysis of a reacting jet in crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sashittal, Palash; Sayadi, Taraneh; Schmid, Peter

    2016-11-01

    With current advances in computational resources, high fidelity simulations of reactive flows are increasingly being used as predictive tools in various industrial applications. In order to capture the combustion process accurately, detailed/reduced chemical mechanisms are employed, which in turn rely on various model parameters. Therefore, it would be of great interest to quantify the sensitivities of the predictions with respect to the introduced models. Due to the high dimensionality of the parameter space, methods such as finite differences which rely on multiple forward simulations prove to be very costly and adjoint based techniques are a suitable alternative. The complex nature of the governing equations, however, renders an efficient strategy in finding the adjoint equations a challenging task. In this study, we employ the modular approach of Fosas de Pando et al. (2012), to build a discrete adjoint framework applied to a reacting jet in crossflow. The developed framework is then used to extract the sensitivity of the integrated heat release with respect to the existing combustion parameters. Analyzing the sensitivities in the three-dimensional domain provides insight towards the specific regions of the flow that are more susceptible to the choice of the model.

  14. Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment: design studies based on superconducting and hybrid toroidal field coils. Design overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flanagan, C.A. (ed.)

    1984-10-01

    This document is a design overview that describes the scoping studies and preconceptual design effort performed in FY 1983 on the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) class of device. These studies focussed on devices with all-superconducting toroidal field (TF) coils and on devices with superconducting TF coils supplemented with copper TF coil inserts located in the bore of the TF coils in the shield region. Each class of device is designed to satisfy the mission of ignition and long pulse equilibrium burn. Typical design parameters are: major radius = 3.75 m, minor radius = 1.0 m, field on axis = 4.5 T, plasma current = 7.0 MA. These designs relay on lower hybrid (LHRH) current rampup and heating to ignition using ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF). A pumped limiter has been assumed for impurity control. The present document is a design overview; a more detailed design description is contained in a companion document.

  15. Overview of JET results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pamela, J.

    2003-01-01

    Scientific and technical activities on JET focus on the issues likely to affect the ITER design and operation. The physics of the ITER reference mode of operation, the ELMy H-mode, has progressed significantly: the extrapolation of ELM size to ITER has been re-evaluated; NTMs have been shown to be metastable in JET, and can be avoided via sawtooth destabilisation by ICRH; α-simulation experiments were carried out by accelerating 4 He beam ions by ICRH, providing a new tool for fast particle and MHD studies with up to 80-90% of plasma heating by fast 4 He ions. With or without impurity seeding, quasi-steady sate high confinement (H 98 =1), high density (n e /n GR = 0.9-1) and high β (β N =2) ELMy H-mode has been achieved by operating near the ITER triangularity (δ∼0.40-0.5) and safety factor (q 95 ∼3), at Z eff ∼1.5-2. In Advanced Tokamak scenarios, internal transport barriers are now characterised in real time with a new criterion ρ* T ; tailoring of the current profile with LHCD provides reliable access to a variety of q profiles, with significantly lowered access power for barrier formation; rational q surfaces appear to be associated with ITB formation; Alfven cascades are observed in RS plasmas, providing an identification of q profile evolution; plasmas with 'current holes' were observed and explained by modelling. Transient high confinement Advanced Tokamak regimes with H89=3.3, β N =2.4 and ITER relevant q<5 are achievable in reversed magnetic shear. Quasistationary internal transport barriers are developed with full non-inductive current drive, including ∼50% bootstrap current. Record duration of ITBs was achieved, up to 11 s, approaching the resistive time. Pressure and current profiles of Advanced Tokamak regimes are controlled by a real time feedback system, in separate experiments. The erosion and co-deposition data base progressed significantly, in particular with a new quartz microbalance diagnostic allowing shot by shot measurements of

  16. PPPL tokamak program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furth, H.P.

    1984-10-01

    The economic prospects of the tokamak are reviewed briefly and found to be favorable - if the size of ignited tokamak plasmas can be kept small and appropriate auxiliary systems can be developed. The main objectives of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory tokamak program are: (1) exploration of the physics of high-temperature toroidal confinement, in TFTR; (2) maximization of the tokamak beta value, in PBX; (3) development of reactor-relevant rf techniques, in PLT

  17. Status of tokamak research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawls, J.M.

    1979-10-01

    An overall review of the tokamak program is given with particular emphasis upon developments over the past five years in the theoretical and experimental elements of the program. A summary of the key operating parameters for the principal tokamaks throughout the world is given. Also discussed are key issues in plasma confinement, plasma heating, and tokamak design

  18. Status of tokamak research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawls, J.M. (ed.)

    1979-10-01

    An overall review of the tokamak program is given with particular emphasis upon developments over the past five years in the theoretical and experimental elements of the program. A summary of the key operating parameters for the principal tokamaks throughout the world is given. Also discussed are key issues in plasma confinement, plasma heating, and tokamak design. (MOW)

  19. New type of discharge-produced plasma source for extreme ultraviolet based on liquid tin jet electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koshelev, K.N.; Krivtsun, V.M.; Ivanov, V.; Yakushev, O.; Chekmarev, A.; Koloshnikov, V.; Snegirev, E.; Medvedev, Viacheslav

    2012-01-01

    A new approach for discharge-produced plasma (DPP) extreme ultraviolet (EUV) sources based on the usage of two liquid metallic alloy jets as discharge electrodes has been proposed and tested. Discharge was ignited using laser ablation of one of the cathode jets. A system with two jet electrodes was

  20. Plasma boundary phenomena in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stangeby, P.C.

    1989-06-01

    The focus of this review is on processes occurring at the edge, and on the connection between boundary plasma - the scrape-off layer (SOL) and the radiating layer - and central plasma processes. Techniques used for edge diagnosis are reviewed and basic experimental information (n e and T e ) is summarized. Simple models of the SOL are summarized, and the most important effects of the boundary plasma - the influence on the fuel particles, impurities, and energy - on tokamak operation dealt with. Methods of manipulating and controlling edge conditions in tokamaks and the experimental data base for the edge during auxiliary heating of tokamaks are reviewed. Fluctuations and asymmetries at the edge are also covered. (9 tabs., 134 figs., 879 refs.)

  1. STARFIRE: a commercial tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-12-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide an interim status report on the STARFIRE project for the period of May to September 1979. The basic objective of the STARFIRE project is to develop a design concept for a commercial tokamak fusion electric power plant based on the deuterium/tritium/lithium fuel cycle. The key technical objective is to develop the best embodiment of the tokamak as a power reactor consistent with credible engineering solutions to design problems. Another key goal of the project is to give careful attention to the safety and environmental features of a commercial fusion reactor

  2. Tokamak Systems Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.; Barrett, R.J.; Brown, T.G.

    1985-03-01

    The FEDC Tokamak Systems Code calculates tokamak performance, cost, and configuration as a function of plasma engineering parameters. This version of the code models experimental tokamaks. It does not currently consider tokamak configurations that generate electrical power or incorporate breeding blankets. The code has a modular (or subroutine) structure to allow independent modeling for each major tokamak component or system. A primary benefit of modularization is that a component module may be updated without disturbing the remainder of the systems code as long as the imput to or output from the module remains unchanged

  3. An Engineering Method of Civil Jet Requirements Validation Based on Requirements Project Principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Gao, Dan; Mao, Xuming

    2018-03-01

    A method of requirements validation is developed and defined to meet the needs of civil jet requirements validation in product development. Based on requirements project principle, this method will not affect the conventional design elements, and can effectively connect the requirements with design. It realizes the modern civil jet development concept, which is “requirement is the origin, design is the basis”. So far, the method has been successfully applied in civil jet aircraft development in China. Taking takeoff field length as an example, the validation process and the validation method of the requirements are detailed introduced in the study, with the hope of providing the experiences to other civil jet product design.

  4. Development of the scintillator-based probe for fast-ion losses in the HL-2A tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y. P.; Liu, Yi; Yuan, G. L.; Song, X. Y.; Yang, J. W.; Li, X.; Chen, W.; Li, Y.; Yan, L. W.; Song, X. M.; Yang, Q. W.; Duan, X. R.; Luo, X. B.; Liu, Y. Q.; Hua, Y.; Isobe, M.

    2014-01-01

    A new scintillator-based lost fast-ion probe (SLIP) has been developed and operated in the HL-2A tokamak [L. W. Yan, X. R. Duan, X. T. Ding, J. Q. Dong, Q. W. Yang, Yi Liu, X. L. Zou, D. Q. Liu, W. M. Xuan, L. Y. Chen, J. Rao, X. M. Song, Y. Huang, W. C. Mao, Q. M. Wang, Q. Li, Z. Cao, B. Li, J. Y. Cao, G. J. Lei, J. H. Zhang, X. D. Li, W. Chen, J. Chen, C. H. Cui, Z. Y. Cui, Z. C. Deng, Y. B. Dong, B. B. Feng, Q. D. Gao, X. Y. Han, W. Y. Hong, M. Huang, X. Q. Ji, Z. H. Kang, D. F. Kong, T. Lan, G. S. Li, H. J. Li, Qing Li, W. Li, Y. G. Li, A. D. Liu, Z. T. Liu, C. W. Luo, X. H. Mao, Y. D. Pan, J. F. Peng, Z. B. Shi, S. D. Song, X. Y. Song, H. J. Sun, A. K. Wang, M. X. Wang, Y. Q. Wang, W. W. Xiao, Y. F. Xie, L. H. Yao, D. L. Yu, B. S. Yuan, K. J. Zhao, G. W. Zhong, J. Zhou, J. C. Yan, C. X. Yu, C. H. Pan, Y. Liu, and the HL-2A Team , Nucl. Fusion 51, 094016 (2011)] to measure the losses of neutral beam ions. The design of the probe is based on the concept of the α-particle detectors on Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) using scintillator plates. The probe is capable of traveling across an equatorial plane port and sweeping the aperture angle rotationally with respect to the axis of the probe shaft by two step motors, in order to optimize the radial position and the collimator angle. The energy and the pitch angle of the lost fast ions can be simultaneously measured if the two-dimensional image of scintillation light intensity due to the impact of the lost fast ions is detected. Measurements of the fast-ion losses using the probe have been performed during HL-2A neutral beam injection discharges. The clear experimental evidence of enhanced losses of beam ions during disruptions has been obtained by means of the SLIP system. A detailed description of the probe system and the first experimental results are reported

  5. Development of the scintillator-based probe for fast-ion losses in the HL-2A tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y. P.; Liu, Yi; Luo, X. B.; Isobe, M.; Yuan, G. L.; Liu, Y. Q.; Hua, Y.; Song, X. Y.; Yang, J. W.; Li, X.; Chen, W.; Li, Y.; Yan, L. W.; Song, X. M.; Yang, Q. W.; Duan, X. R.

    2014-05-01

    A new scintillator-based lost fast-ion probe (SLIP) has been developed and operated in the HL-2A tokamak [L. W. Yan, X. R. Duan, X. T. Ding, J. Q. Dong, Q. W. Yang, Yi Liu, X. L. Zou, D. Q. Liu, W. M. Xuan, L. Y. Chen, J. Rao, X. M. Song, Y. Huang, W. C. Mao, Q. M. Wang, Q. Li, Z. Cao, B. Li, J. Y. Cao, G. J. Lei, J. H. Zhang, X. D. Li, W. Chen, J. Chen, C. H. Cui, Z. Y. Cui, Z. C. Deng, Y. B. Dong, B. B. Feng, Q. D. Gao, X. Y. Han, W. Y. Hong, M. Huang, X. Q. Ji, Z. H. Kang, D. F. Kong, T. Lan, G. S. Li, H. J. Li, Qing Li, W. Li, Y. G. Li, A. D. Liu, Z. T. Liu, C. W. Luo, X. H. Mao, Y. D. Pan, J. F. Peng, Z. B. Shi, S. D. Song, X. Y. Song, H. J. Sun, A. K. Wang, M. X. Wang, Y. Q. Wang, W. W. Xiao, Y. F. Xie, L. H. Yao, D. L. Yu, B. S. Yuan, K. J. Zhao, G. W. Zhong, J. Zhou, J. C. Yan, C. X. Yu, C. H. Pan, Y. Liu, and the HL-2A Team, Nucl. Fusion 51, 094016 (2011)] to measure the losses of neutral beam ions. The design of the probe is based on the concept of the α-particle detectors on Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) using scintillator plates. The probe is capable of traveling across an equatorial plane port and sweeping the aperture angle rotationally with respect to the axis of the probe shaft by two step motors, in order to optimize the radial position and the collimator angle. The energy and the pitch angle of the lost fast ions can be simultaneously measured if the two-dimensional image of scintillation light intensity due to the impact of the lost fast ions is detected. Measurements of the fast-ion losses using the probe have been performed during HL-2A neutral beam injection discharges. The clear experimental evidence of enhanced losses of beam ions during disruptions has been obtained by means of the SLIP system. A detailed description of the probe system and the first experimental results are reported.

  6. Understanding of hysteresis behaviors at the L-H-L transitions in tokamak plasma based on bifurcation concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatthong, B. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkla (Thailand); Onjun, T. [School of Manufacturing Systems and Mechanical Engineering, Sirindhorn International Institute of Technology, Thammasat University, Pathum Thani (Thailand)

    2016-08-15

    The hysteresis behaviour at the L-H-L transitions in tokamak plasma is investigated based on bifurcation concept. The formation of an edge transport barrier (ETB) is modeled via thermal and particle transport equations with the flow shear suppression effect on anomalous transport included. The anomalous transport is modeled based on critical gradients threshold and the flow shear is calculated from the force balance equation, couples the two transport equations leading to a non-linear behaviour. Analytical investigation reveals that the fluxes versus gradients space exhibits bifurcation behaviour with s -curve soft bifurcation type. Apparently, the backward H-L transition occurs at lower values than that of the forward L-H transition, illustrating hysteresis behaviour. The hysteresis properties, i.e. locations of threshold fluxes, gradients and their ratios are analyzed as a function of neoclassical and anomalous transport values and critical gradients. It is found that the minimum heat flux for maintaining H -mode depends on several plasma parameters including the strength of anomalous transport and neoclassical transport. In particular, the hysteresis depth becomes larger when neoclassical transport decreases or anomalous transport increases. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Acute Dermal Irritation Study of Six Jet Fuels in New Zealand White Rabbits: Comparison of Four Bio-Based Jet Fuels with Two Petroleum JP-8 Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    cellulosic jet (HDCJ) fuel made by a company called KiOR, Inc. (Pasadena TX). This pyrolysis -based fuel is made from wood, primarily southern yellow...Columbus MS plant capable of producing 11 million 3 Distribution A: Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. (P.A. Case No. 88ABW-2014-2456...alternative fuel, ReadiJet, refers to a Renewable, Aromatic, Drop-in (abbreviated Readi) fuel produced from plant oils or animal fats through a catalytic

  8. Scintillator based detector for fast-ion losses induced by magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in the ASDEX upgrade tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Muñoz, M; Fahrbach, H-U; Zohm, H

    2009-05-01

    A scintillator based detector for fast-ion losses has been designed and installed on the ASDEX upgrade (AUG) tokamak [A. Herrmann and O. Gruber, Fusion Sci. Technol. 44, 569 (2003)]. The detector resolves in time the energy and pitch angle of fast-ion losses induced by magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) fluctuations. The use of a novel scintillator material with a very short decay time and high quantum efficiency allows to identify the MHD fluctuations responsible for the ion losses through Fourier analysis. A Faraday cup (secondary scintillator plate) has been embedded behind the scintillator plate for an absolute calibration of the detector. The detector is mounted on a manipulator to vary its radial position with respect to the plasma. A thermocouple on the inner side of the graphite protection enables the safety search for the most adequate radial position. To align the scintillator light pattern with the light detectors a system composed by a lens and a vacuum-compatible halogen lamp has been allocated within the detector head. In this paper, the design of the scintillator probe, as well as the new technique used to analyze the data through spectrograms will be described. A last section is devoted to discuss the diagnosis prospects of this method for ITER [M. Shimada et al., Nucl. Fusion 47, S1 (2007)].

  9. Investigation of Toroidal Flow Effects on L-H transition in Tokamak Plasma Based on Bifurcation Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatthong, B.; Picha, R.; Poolyarat, N.; Onjun, T.

    2014-01-01

    This work aims to study effects of toroidal flow on the L-H transition phenomenon in tokamak plasmas using bifurcation concept. Two-field (thermal and particle) transport equations with both neoclassical and turbulent effects included are solved simultaneously. The transport suppression mechanism used in this work is flow shear, which is assumed to affect only the turbulent transport. The flow shear can be calculated from the force balance equation with toroidal flow as a main contributor. The toroidal velocity profile is calculated using three different models. The first model is an empirical model in which the velocity is dependent on local ion temperature. The second model is based on neoclassical toroidal viscosity theory in which the velocity is driven by ion temperature gradient. In the third model, the velocity is dependent on current density flow in plasma. The two transport equations are solved both analytically and numerically using MATLAB to study the criteria for H-mode formation, pedestal width and its dynamics. The results from three toroidal velocity models are compared and analyzed with respect to bifurcation behavior and plasma performance.

  10. CAMAC throughput of a new RISC-based data acquisition computer at the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanderLaan, J.F.; Cummings, J.W.

    1993-10-01

    The amount of experimental data acquired per plasma discharge at DIII-D has continued to grow. The largest shot size in May 1991 was 49 Mbyte; in May 1992, 66 Mbyte; and in April 1993, 80 Mbyte. The increasing load has prompted the installation of a new Motorola 88100-based MODCOMP computer to supplement the existing core of three older MODCOMP data acquisition CPUs. New Kinetic Systems CAMAC serial highway driver hardware runs on the 88100 VME bus. The new operating system is MODCOMP REAL/IX version of AT ampersand T System V UNIX with real-time extensions and networking capabilities; future plans call for installation of additional computers of this type for tokamak and neutral beam control functions. Experiences with the CAMAC hardware and software will be chronicled, including observation of data throughput. The Enhanced Serial Highway crate controller is advertised as twice as fast as the previous crate controller, and computer I/O speeds are expected to also increase data rates

  11. JET Joint Undertaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keen, B.E.; Kupschus, P.

    1984-09-01

    The report is in sections, as follows. (1) Introduction and summary. (2) A brief description of the origins of the JET Project within the EURATOM fusion programme and the objectives and aims of the device. The basic JET design and the overall philosophy of operation are explained and the first six months of operation of the machine are summarised. The Project Team Structure adopted for the Operation Phase is set out. Finally, in order to set JET's progress in context, other large tokamaks throughout the world and their achievements are briefly described. (3) The activities and progress within the Operation and Development Department are set out; particularly relating to its responsibilities for the operation and maintenance of the tokamak and for developing the necessary engineering equipment to enhance the machine to full performance. (4) The activities and progress within the Scientific Department are described; particularly relating to the specification, procurement and operation of diagnostic equipment; definition and execution of the programme; and the interpretation of experimental results. (5) JET's programme plans for the immediate future and a broad outline of the JET Development Plan to 1990 are given. (author)

  12. JET and COMPASS asymmetrical disruptions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gerasimov, S.N.; Abreu, P.; Baruzzo, M.; Drozdov, V.; Dvornova, A.; Havlíček, Josef; Hender, T.C.; Hronová-Bilyková, Olena; Kruezi, U.; Li, X.; Markovič, Tomáš; Pánek, Radomír; Rubinacci, G.; Tsalas, M.; Ventre, S.; Villone, F.; Zakharov, L.E.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 11 (2015), s. 113006-113006 ISSN 0029-5515 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011021 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : tokamak * asymmetrical disruption * JET * COMPASS Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 4.040, year: 2015

  13. Tokamak engineering mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Yuntao; Du, Shijun

    2013-01-01

    Tokamak Engineering Mechanics offers concise and thorough coverage of engineering mechanics theory and application for tokamaks, and the material is reinforced by numerous examples. Chapter topics include general principles, static mechanics, dynamic mechanics, thermal fluid mechanics and multiphysics structural mechanics of tokamak structure analysis. The theoretical principle of the design and the methods of the analysis for various components and load conditions are presented, while the latest engineering technologies are also introduced. The book will provide readers involved in the study

  14. Modelling of tokamak plasmas with internal transport barriers using ion temperature gradient based models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinsey, J.E.; Waltz, R.E.; Staebler, G.M.; St.John, H.

    1999-01-01

    The dynamic formation of an internal transport barrier resulting from an ExB driven bifurcation has been demonstrated in simulations of a DIII-D NCS discharge with an L-mode edge using the GLF23 model. Taking the sources, sinks, equilibrium, and the density profile from a power balance analysis, the thermal and toroidal momentum transport were simultaneously evolved while computing the effects of rotational shear stabilization. As the bifurcation point is approached, the mode growth rate and ExB shear become tangential and the profiles exhibit a dithering behavior. The input power, in particular the toroidal momentum, is sufficient to overcome the ITB threshold and a bifurcation in both the momentum and heat flux is observed. While the ion thermal and momentum transport show an significant improvement in confinement, the electron thermal transport remains anomalous due to the continued presence of the ETG mode. Comparing JET OS discharges to DIII-DNCS discharges, it is found that the ExB shear rate needs to be enhanced by a factor 2.65 in order to obtain profiles consistent with experimental data. Future work will focus on improving the robustness and efficiency of numerical techniques to allow wider application and increased predictive capability needed to conduct power threshold studies of internal transport barriers. (author)

  15. Tokamak confinement scaling laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, J.

    1998-01-01

    The scaling of energy confinement with engineering parameters, such as plasma current and major radius, is important for establishing the size of an ignited fusion device. Tokamaks exhibit a variety of modes of operation with different confinement properties. At present there is no adequate first principles theory to predict tokamak energy confinement and the empirical scaling method is the preferred approach to designing next step tokamaks. This paper reviews a number of robust theoretical concepts, such as dimensional analysis and stability boundaries, which provide a framework for characterising and understanding tokamak confinement and, therefore, generate more confidence in using empirical laws for extrapolation to future devices. (author)

  16. Jet in jet in M87

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sob'yanin, Denis Nikolaevich

    2017-11-01

    New high-resolution Very Long Baseline Interferometer observations of the prominent jet in the M87 radio galaxy show a persistent triple-ridge structure of the transverse 15-GHz profile with a previously unobserved ultra-narrow central ridge. This radio structure can reflect the intrinsic structure of the jet, so that the jet as a whole consists of two embedded coaxial jets. A relativistic magnetohydrodynamic model is considered in which an inner jet is placed inside a hollow outer jet and the electromagnetic fields, pressures and other physical quantities are found. The entire jet is connected to the central engine that plays the role of a unipolar inductor generating voltage between the jets and providing opposite electric currents, and the charge neutrality and current closure together with the electromagnetic fields between the jets can contribute to the jet stabilization. The constant voltage is responsible for the similar widening laws observed for the inner and outer jets. This jet-in-jet structure can indicate simultaneous operation of two different jet-launching mechanisms, one relating to the central supermassive black hole and the other to the surrounding accretion disc. An inferred magnetic field of 80 G at the base is sufficient to provide the observed jet luminosity.

  17. Abrasive slurry jet cutting model based on fuzzy relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, C. H.; Guo, C. W.

    2017-12-01

    The cutting process of pre-mixed abrasive slurry or suspension jet (ASJ) is a complex process affected by many factors, and there is a highly nonlinear relationship between the cutting parameters and cutting quality. In this paper, guided by fuzzy theory, the fuzzy cutting model of ASJ was developed. In the modeling of surface roughness, the upper surface roughness prediction model and the lower surface roughness prediction model were established respectively. The adaptive fuzzy inference system combines the learning mechanism of neural networks and the linguistic reasoning ability of the fuzzy system, membership functions, and fuzzy rules are obtained by adaptive adjustment. Therefore, the modeling process is fast and effective. In this paper, the ANFIS module of MATLAB fuzzy logic toolbox was used to establish the fuzzy cutting model of ASJ, which is found to be quite instrumental to ASJ cutting applications.

  18. Feasibility of Producing and Using Biomass-Based Diesel and Jet Fuel in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milbrandt, A. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kinchin, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); McCormick, R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-12-01

    The study summarizes the best available public data on the production, capacity, cost, market demand, and feedstock availability for the production of biomass-based diesel and jet fuel. It includes an overview of the current conversion processes and current state-of-development for the production of biomass-based jet and diesel fuel, as well as the key companies pursuing this effort. Thediscussion analyzes all this information in the context of meeting the RFS mandate, highlights uncertainties for the future industry development, and key business opportunities.

  19. JET contributions to the workshop on the new phase for JET: the pumped divertor proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-09-01

    Contributions to the Workshop consist of 13 papers on the new phase of operation of JET, including an outline of the objectives of the study of impurity control and the operating domain relative to the next generation of tokamaks. Studies are presented on the pumped divertor proposed for JET, diagnostic measurements required, and the performance expectations in the new configuration. (U.K.)

  20. Probing supersymmetry based on precise jet measurements at the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Goebel, Kristin; Sander, Christian

    Abstract The search for new physics beyond the standard model of particle physics is one of the main goals of the CMS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. Many theories, for instance supersymmetry, involve the possible production of new coloured particles which feature jets as their experimental signature. Thus, it is important to have a good understanding of jet-related properties in order to allow such searches. In the rst part of this thesis, a measurement of the jet transverse-momentum resolution is presented. This is based on the analysis of proton-proton collision data recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of p s = 8 TeV by the CMS experiment. The measurement utilizes the transverse momentum balance of dijet events at particle level. The main focus is on the determination of the data-to-simulation ratio of the jet transverse-momentum resolution which can be used to correct the jet resolution in simulated events to match the one observed in data. This ratio has been determined with a signicantly i...

  1. Jet Joint Undertaking. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    The scientific, technical, experimental and theoretical investigations related to JET tokamak are presented. The JET Joint Undertaking, Volume 2, includes papers presented at: the 15th European Conference on controlled fusion and plasma heating, the 15th Symposium on fusion technology, the 12th IAEA Conference on plasma physics and controlled nuclear fusion research, the 8th Topical Meeting on technology of fusion. Moreover, the following topics, concerning JET, are discussed: experience with wall materials, plasma performance, high power ion cyclotron resonance heating, plasma boundary, results and prospects for fusion, preparation for D-T operation, active gas handling system and remote handling equipment

  2. QCD studies using a cone-based jet finding algorithm for e[sup +]e[sup -] collisions at LEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akers, R.; Alexander, G.; Allison, J.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Astbury, A.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barlow, R.J.; Barnett, S.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Beaudoin, G.; Beck, G.; Beck, G.A.; Becker, J.; Beeston, C.; Behnke, T.; Bell, K.W.; Bella, G.; Bentkowski, P.; Berlich, P.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bock, P.; Boden, B.; Bosch, H.M.; Boutemeur, M.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brown, R.M.; Buijs, A.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlesworth, C.; Charlton, D.G.; Chu, S.L.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clayton, J.C.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooper, M.; Coupland, M.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallavalle, G.M.; Darling, C.; Jong, S. de; Pozo, L.A. del; Deng, H.; Dittmar, M.; Dixit, M.S.; Couto e Silva, E. do; Duchovni, E.; Duboscq, J.E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Dumas, D.J.P.; Elcombe, P.A.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.G.; Fabbri, F.; Fabbro, B.; Fierro, M.; Fin; OPAL Collaboration

    1994-07-01

    We describe a cone-based jet finding algorithm (similar to that used in pp experiments), which we have applied to hadronic events recorded using the OPAL detector at LEP. Comparisons are made between jets defined with the cone algorithm and jets found be the ''JADE'' and ''Durham'' jet finders usually used in e[sup +]e[sup -] experiments. Measured jet rates, as a function of the cone size and as a function of the minimum jet energy, have been compared with O([alpha][sub s][sup 2])QCD calculations, from which two complementary measurements of [alpha][sub s](M[sub Z[sub 0

  3. High Performance Computation of a Jet in Crossflow by Lattice Boltzmann Based Parallel Direct Numerical Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Lei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct numerical simulation (DNS of a round jet in crossflow based on lattice Boltzmann method (LBM is carried out on multi-GPU cluster. Data parallel SIMT (single instruction multiple thread characteristic of GPU matches the parallelism of LBM well, which leads to the high efficiency of GPU on the LBM solver. With present GPU settings (6 Nvidia Tesla K20M, the present DNS simulation can be completed in several hours. A grid system of 1.5 × 108 is adopted and largest jet Reynolds number reaches 3000. The jet-to-free-stream velocity ratio is set as 3.3. The jet is orthogonal to the mainstream flow direction. The validated code shows good agreement with experiments. Vortical structures of CRVP, shear-layer vortices and horseshoe vortices, are presented and analyzed based on velocity fields and vorticity distributions. Turbulent statistical quantities of Reynolds stress are also displayed. Coherent structures are revealed in a very fine resolution based on the second invariant of the velocity gradients.

  4. Status of the COMPASS tokamak and characterization of the first H-mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pánek, R.; Adámek, J.; Aftanas, M.; Bílková, P.; Böhm, P.; Brochard, F.; Cahyna, P.; Cavalier, J.; Dejarnac, R.; Dimitrova, M.; Grover, O.; Harrison, J.; Háček, P.; Havlíček, J.; Havránek, A.; Horáček, J.; Hron, M.; Imríšek, M.; Janky, F.; Kirk, A.; Komm, M.; Kovařík, K.; Krbec, J.; Kripner, L.; Markovič, T.; Mitošinková, K.; Mlynář, J.; Naydenkova, D.; Peterka, M.; Seidl, J.; Stöckel, J.; Štefániková, E.; Tomeš, M.; Urban, J.; Vondráček, P.; Varavin, M.; Varju, J.; Weinzettl, V.; Zajac, J.; the COMPASS Team

    2016-01-01

    This paper summarizes the status of the COMPASS tokamak, its comprehensive diagnostic equipment and plasma scenarios as a baseline for the future studies. The former COMPASS-D tokamak was in operation at UKAEA Culham, UK in 1992-2002. Later, the device was transferred to the Institute of Plasma Physics of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic (IPP AS CR), where it was installed during 2006-2011. Since 2012 the device has been in a full operation with Type-I and Type-III ELMy H-modes as a base scenario. This enables together with the ITER-like plasma shape and flexible NBI heating system (two injectors enabling co- or balanced injection) to perform ITER relevant studies in different parameter range to the other tokamaks (ASDEX-Upgrade, DIII-D, JET) and to contribute to the ITER scallings. In addition to the description of the device, current status and the main diagnostic equipment, the paper focuses on the characterization of the Ohmic as well as NBI-assisted H-modes. Moreover, Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) are categorized based on their frequency dependence on power density flowing across separatrix. The filamentary structure of ELMs is studied and the parallel heat flux in individual filaments is measured by probes on the outer mid-plane and in the divertor. The measurements are supported by observation of ELM and inter-ELM filaments by an ultra-fast camera.

  5. JET Joint Undertaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keen, B.E.

    1986-03-01

    This is an overview summary of the scientific and technical advances at JET during the year 1985, supplemented by appendices of detailed contributions (in preprint form) of eight of the more important JET articles produced during that year. It is aimed not only at specialists and experts but also at a more general scientific community. Thus there is a brief summary of the background to the project, a description of the basic objectives of JET and the principle design features of the machine. The new structure of the Project Team is also explained. Developments and future plans are included. Improvements considered are those which are designed to overcome certain limitations encountered generally on Tokamaks, particularly those concerned with density limits, with plasma MHD behaviour, with impurities and with plasma transport. There is also a complete list of articles, reports and conference papers published in 1985 - there are 167 such items listed. (UK)

  6. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet with high-voltage power supply based on piezoelectric transformer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babij, Michał; Kowalski, Zbigniew W; Nitsch, Karol; Silberring, Jerzy; Gotszalk, Teodor

    2014-05-01

    The dielectric barrier discharge plasma jet, an example of the nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ), generates low-temperature plasmas that are suitable for the atomization of volatile species and can also be served as an ionization source for ambient mass and ion mobility spectrometry. A new design of APPJ for mass spectrometry has been built in our group. In these plasma sources magnetic transformers (MTs) and inductors are typically used in power supplies but they present several drawbacks that are even more evident when dealing with high-voltage normally used in APPJs. To overcome these disadvantages, high frequency generators with the absence of MT are proposed in the literature. However, in the case of miniaturized APPJs these conventional power converters, built of ferromagnetic cores and inductors or by means of LC resonant tank circuits, are not so useful as piezoelectric transformer (PT) based power converters due to bulky components and small efficiency. We made and examined a novel atmospheric pressure plasma jet with PT supplier served as ionization source for ambient mass spectrometry, and especially mobile spectrometry where miniaturization, integration of components, and clean plasma are required. The objective of this paper is to describe the concept, design, and implementation of this miniaturized piezoelectric transformer-based atmospheric pressure plasma jet.

  7. Continuous Jetting of Alginate Microfiber in Atmosphere Based on a Microfluidic Chip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyi Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a method based on a microfluidic chip that produces continuous jetting of alginate microfiber in the atmosphere to facilitate its collection and assembly. Through the analysis of the factors influencing the microfiber jetting, the principle and some microfluidic chip design criteria are discussed. A special nozzle is designed near the chip outlet, and deionized water is introduced into the microchannel through the nozzle to increase the flux and thus to prevent drop formation around the outlet which impedes the continuous jetting of microfiber. The experiments have reported the effectiveness of the proposed structure and shown that the introduction of sheath flow promotes the stability of the flow field in the microchannel and does not affect the morphology of microfiber. Simulations of velocity and pressure distribution in the microchannel are also conducted. Further, the jetting microfibers are collected and assembled into various 3D complex fiber-based macroscopic structures through patterning or reeling. Since the proposed structure is rather simple and can be easily integrated into other complex structures without adding more soft-lithographical steps, microfibers with various morphology and function can be synthesized and collected in a single chip, which can be applied to various fields, such as tissue engineering, biotechnology, and drug discovery.

  8. Modified flapping jet for increased jet spreading using synthetic jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Chiekh, Maher, E-mail: maher.benchiekh@enim.rnu.tn [LESTE, ENIM, University of Monastir, 5000 Monastir (Tunisia); Ferchichi, Mohsen [Royal Military College of Canada, PO Box 17000, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Bera, Jean-Christophe [Centre acoustique, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 69134 Ecully Cedex (France)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: > The interactions of a rectangular turbulent jet and a pair of co-flowing synthetic jets are examined. > One-sided actuation achieves jet vectoring while simultaneous actuations induce jet spreading. > Further spreading is achieved when the synthetic jets are alternately actuated. > The jet flapping improves mixing. > Optimal forcing conditions for jet spreading are discussed. - Abstract: The present paper is an experimental investigation, using a PIV system, on modified rectangular jet flow co-flowing with a pair of synthetic jets placed symmetrically with respect to the geometric centerline of the main flow. The objective was to determine the optimal forcing conditions that would result in jet spreading beyond what would be obtained in a simple flapped jet. The main jet had an exit Re{sub h} = 36,000, based on the slot height, h. The synthetic jets were operated in a periodic manner with a periodic momentum coefficient of about 3.3% and at a frequency of the main jet preferred mode. A short, wide angle diffuser of half angle of about 45{sup o} was attached to the main jet. Generally for the vectored jet, much of the flow features found here resembled those reported in the literature except that the deflection angle in this study increased with downstream distances inside the diffuser and then remained roughly unchanged thereafter. Larger jet spreading was achieved when the main jet was subjected to simultaneous actuation of the synthetic jets but the flow did not achieve the initial jet spreading that was observed in the vectored jet. Further jet spreading was achieved when the synthetic jets were alternately actuated in which each synthetic jet was actuated for a number of cycles before switching. This technique allowed the jet to flap across the flow between transverse positions larger than what would be obtained in a simple flip-flop jet. Under the present flow geometry and Reynolds number, it was found that when the ratio f{sub s}/f{sub al

  9. Comprehensive numerical modelling of tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, R.H.; Cohen, B.I.; Dubois, P.F.

    1991-01-01

    We outline a plan for the development of a comprehensive numerical model of tokamaks. The model would consist of a suite of independent, communicating packages describing the various aspects of tokamak performance (core and edge transport coefficients and profiles, heating, fueling, magnetic configuration, etc.) as well as extensive diagnostics. These codes, which may run on different computers, would be flexibly linked by a user-friendly shell which would allow run-time specification of packages and generation of pre- and post-processing functions, including workstation-based visualization of output. One package in particular, the calculation of core transport coefficients via gyrokinetic particle simulation, will become practical on the scale required for comprehensive modelling only with the advent of teraFLOP computers. Incremental effort at LLNL would be focused on gyrokinetic simulation and development of the shell

  10. Starfire: a commercial tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.C.; Abdou, M.A.; DeFreece, D.A.; Trachsel, C.A.; Graumann, D.; Kokoszenski, J.

    1979-01-01

    The basic objective of the STARFIRE Project is to develop a design concept for a commercial tokamak fusion electric power plant based on the deuterium/tritium/lithium fuel cycle. The key technical objective is to develop the best embodiment of the tokamak as a power reactor consistent with credible engineering solutions to design problems. Another key goal of the project is to give careful attention to the safety and environmental features of a commercial fusion reactor. The STARFIRE Project was initiated in May 1979, with the goal of completing the design study by October 1980. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the major parameters and design features that have been tentatively selected for STARFIRE

  11. Survey of Tokamak experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickerton, R.J.

    1977-01-01

    The survey covers the following topics:- Introduction and history of tokamak research; review of tokamak apparatus, existing and planned; remarks on measurement techniques and their limitations; main results in terms of electron and ion temperatures, plasma density, containment times, etc. Empirical scaling; range of operating densities; impurities, origin, behaviour and control (including divertors); data on fluctuations and instabilities in tokamak plasmas; data on disruptive instabilities; experiments on shaped cross-sections; present experimental evidence on β limits; auxiliary heating; experimental and theoretical problems for the future. (author)

  12. Tokamak ARC damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, J.G.; Gorker, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Tokamak fusion reactors will have large plasma currents of approximately 10 MA with hundreds of megajoules stored in the magnetic fields. When a major plasma instability occurs, the disruption of the plasma current induces voltage in the adjacent conducting structures, giving rise to large transient currents. The induced voltages may be sufficiently high to cause arcing across sector gaps or from one protruding component to another. This report reviews a tokamak arcing scenario and provides guidelines for designing tokamaks to minimize the possibility of arc damage.

  13. Tokamak ARC damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, J.G.; Gorker, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Tokamak fusion reactors will have large plasma currents of approximately 10 MA with hundreds of megajoules stored in the magnetic fields. When a major plasma instability occurs, the disruption of the plasma current induces voltage in the adjacent conducting structures, giving rise to large transient currents. The induced voltages may be sufficiently high to cause arcing across sector gaps or from one protruding component to another. This report reviews a tokamak arcing scenario and provides guidelines for designing tokamaks to minimize the possibility of arc damage

  14. Effects of Current on Behaviors of Saturated Magnetic Island in Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanjanaput, W.; Picha, R.; Promping, J.; Poolyarat, N.; Onjun, T.

    2014-01-01

    Plasma current density gradient is known to be one of crucial parameters triggering neoclassical tearing mode in a tokamak plasma. This kind of instability can lead to a formation of magnetic islands, which results in the reduction of plasma pressure and, consequently the degradation of fusion performance. The ISLAND module, developed for determining multiple saturated island width due to different unstable modes, is used in this work. This calculation is based on a quasi-linear theory approach and can include the effect of the bootstrap cur- rent. Both geometry of tokamak and the operation conditions such as magnetic field strength, current and pressure profile are used as initial inputs. The different unstable modes (called m/n, where m and n are the poloidal and toroidal mode number, respectively) are considered. It is found in this work that the mode m/n =2/1 is found to produce the largest saturated island width in the JET and DIIID tokamaks, which agrees with what observed in those to- kamaks. The saturated width of this mode trends to get larger when the gradient of current between the magnetic axis and the mode rational surface increase. The detailed results will be investigated and discussed.

  15. Enhanced fuel efficiency on tractor-trailers using synthetic jet-based active flow control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amitay, Michael; Menicovich, David; Gallardo, Daniele

    2016-04-01

    The application of piezo-electrically-driven synthetic-jet-based active flow control to reduce drag on tractor-trailers was explored experimentally in wind tunnel testing as well as full-scale road tests. Aerodynamic drag accounts for more than 50% of the usable energy at highway speeds, a problem that applies primarily to trailer trucks. Therefore, a reduction in aerodynamic drag results in large saving of fuel and reduction in CO2 emissions. The active flow control technique that is being used relies on a modular system comprised of distributed, small, highly efficient actuators. These actuators, called synthetic jets, are jets that are synthesized at the edge of an orifice by a periodic motion of a piezoelectric diaphragm(s) mounted on one (or more) walls of a sealed cavity. The synthetic jet is zero net mass flux (ZNMF), but it allows momentum transfer to flow. It is typically driven near diaphragm and/or cavity resonance, and therefore, small electric input [O(10W)] is required. Another advantage of this actuator is that no plumbing is required. The system doesn't require changes to the body of the truck, can be easily reconfigured to various types of vehicles, and consumes small amounts of electrical power from the existing electrical system of the truck. Preliminary wind tunnel results showed up to 18% reduction in fuel consumption, whereas road tests also showed very promising results.

  16. First experiments in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebut, P.H.; Bartlett, D.V.; Baeumel, G.

    1985-01-01

    Results obtained from JET since June 1983 are described which show that this large tokamak behaves in a similar manner to smaller tokamaks, but with correspondingly improved plasma parameters. Long-duration hydrogen and deuterium plasmas (>10 s) have been obtained with electron temperatures reaching >4 keV for power dissipations =1.6), loss of vertical stability occurred, as expected from previous calculations. Forces of several hundred tonnes (at Isub(p)=2.7 MA) were transmitted to the vacuum vessel. Measured confinement times are larger than the corresponding INTOR values. The maximum achievable density is limited by disruptions. Impurity levels determine this limiting density, and the paper concludes with proposals to reduce these. In addition, progress in neutral injection and RF heating is described, as well as preparations for D-T operation. (author)

  17. Superconducting magnets and cryogenics for the steady state superconducting tokamak SST-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxena, Y.C.

    2000-01-01

    SST-1 is a steady state superconducting tokamak for studying the physics of the plasma processes in tokamak under steady state conditions and to learn technologies related to the steady state operation of the tokamak. SST-1 will have superconducting magnets made from NbTi based conductors operating at 4.5 K temperature. The design of the superconducting magnets and the cryogenic system of SST-1 tokamak are described. (author)

  18. Development of 3D ferromagnetic model of tokamak core with strong toroidal asymmetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markovič, Tomáš; Gryaznevich, Mikhail; Ďuran, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Fully 3D model of strongly asymmetric tokamak core, based on boundary integral method approach (i.e. characterization of ferromagnet by its surface) is presented. The model is benchmarked on measurements on tokamak GOLEM, as well as compared to 2D axisymmetric core equivalent for this tokamak, pr...

  19. Dynamic analysis of ITER tokamak. Based on results of vibration test using scaled model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Nobukazu; Kakudate, Satoshi; Nakahira, Masataka

    2005-01-01

    The vibration experiments of the support structures with flexible plates for the ITER major components such as toroidal field coil (TF coil) and vacuum vessel (VV) were performed using small-sized flexible plates aiming to obtain its basic mechanical characteristics such as dependence of the stiffness on the loading angle. The experimental results were compared with the analytical ones in order to estimate an adequate analytical model for ITER support structure with flexible plates. As a result, the bolt connection of the flexible plates on the base plate strongly affected on the stiffness of the flexible plates. After studies of modeling the connection of the bolts, it is found that the analytical results modeling the bolts with finite stiffness only in the axial direction and infinite stiffness in the other directions agree well with the experimental ones. Based on this, numerical analysis regarding the actual support structure of the ITER VV and TF coil was performed. The support structure composed of flexible plates and connection bolts was modeled as a spring composed of only two spring elements simulating the in-plane and out-of-plane stiffness of the support structure with flexible plates including the effect of connection bolts. The stiffness of both spring models for VV and TF coil agree well with that of shell models, simulating actual structures such as flexible plates and connection bolts based on the experimental results. It is therefore found that the spring model with the only two values of stiffness enables to simplify the complicated support structure with flexible plates for the dynamic analysis of the VV and TF coil. Using the proposed spring model, the dynamic analysis of the VV and TF coil for the ITER were performed to estimate the integrity under the design earthquake. As a result, it is found that the maximum relative displacement of 8.6 mm between VV and TF coil is much less than 100 mm, so that the integrity of the VV and TF coil of the

  20. Study of heat fluxes on plasma facing components in a tokamak from measurements of temperature by infrared thermography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daviot, R.

    2010-05-01

    The goal of this thesis is the development of a method of computation of those heat loads from measurements of temperature by infrared thermography. The research was conducted on three issues arising in current tokamaks but also future ones like ITER: the measurement of temperature on reflecting walls, the determination of thermal properties for deposits observed on the surface of tokamak components and the development of a three-dimensional, non-linear computation of heat loads. A comparison of several means of pyrometry, monochromatic, bi-chromatic and photothermal, is performed on an experiment of temperature measurement. We show that this measurement is sensitive to temperature gradients on the observed area. Layers resulting from carbon deposition by the plasma on the surface of components are modeled through a field of equivalent thermal resistance, without thermal inertia. The field of this resistance is determined, for each measurement points, from a comparison of surface temperature from infrared thermographs with the result of a simulation, which is based on a mono-dimensional linear model of components. The spatial distribution of the deposit on the component surface is obtained. Finally, a three-dimensional and non-linear computation of fields of heat fluxes, based on a finite element method, is developed here. Exact geometries of the component are used. The sensitivity of the computed heat fluxes is discussed regarding the accuracy of the temperature measurements. This computation is applied to two-dimensional temperature measurements of the JET tokamak. Several components of this tokamak are modeled, such as tiles of the divertor, upper limiter and inner and outer poloidal limiters. The distribution of heat fluxes on the surface of these components is computed and studied along the two main tokamak directions, poloidal and toroidal. Toroidal symmetry of the heat loads from one tile to another is shown. The influence of measurements spatial resolution

  1. Research using small tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-07-01

    These proceedings of the IAEA-sponsored meeting held in Nice, France 10-11 October, 1988, contain the manuscripts of the 21 reports dealing with research using small tokamaks. The purpose of this meeting was to highlight some of the achievements of small tokamaks and alternative magnetic confinement concepts and assess the suitability of starting new programs, particularly in developing countries. Papers presented were either review papers, or were detailed descriptions of particular experiments or concepts. Refs, figs and tabs

  2. Tokamak simulation code manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Moon Kyoo; Oh, Byung Hoon; Hong, Bong Keun; Lee, Kwang Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-01-01

    The method to use TSC (Tokamak Simulation Code) developed by Princeton plasma physics laboratory is illustrated. In KT-2 tokamak, time dependent simulation of axisymmetric toroidal plasma and vertical stability have to be taken into account in design phase using TSC. In this report physical modelling of TSC are described and examples of application in JAERI and SERI are illustrated, which will be useful when TSC is installed KAERI computer system. (Author) 15 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Tokamak simulation code manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Moon Kyoo; Oh, Byung Hoon; Hong, Bong Keun; Lee, Kwang Won

    1995-01-01

    The method to use TSC (Tokamak Simulation Code) developed by Princeton plasma physics laboratory is illustrated. In KT-2 tokamak, time dependent simulation of axisymmetric toroidal plasma and vertical stability have to be taken into account in design phase using TSC. In this report physical modelling of TSC are described and examples of application in JAERI and SERI are illustrated, which will be useful when TSC is installed KAERI computer system. (Author) 15 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Very forward jet, Mueller Navelet jets and jet gap jet measurements in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Cerci, Salim

    2018-01-01

    The measurements of very forward jet, Mueller-Navelet jets and jet-gap-jet events are presented for different collision energies. The analyses are based on data collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. Jets are defined through the anti-$k_\\mathrm{t}$ clustering algorithm for different cone sizes. Jet production studies provide stringent tests of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and contribute to tune Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and phenomenological models. The measurements are compared to predictions from various Monte Carlo event generators.

  5. Environmental Assessment for Installation of a New Jet Engine Test Cell, Edwards Air Force Base, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Acetal· Ethyle- Formal- Naph- Ethyle- Formal- Tested Power Setting h’"~ lbslhr’ dehyde Acrolein Ben~ene ben~ene dehyde thalene Scyrene Tolueue Xylenes...TIM Fuel Flow Engine!i per setting, .. I, Acetal- Ethyle- Formal- Naph- Ethyle- Formal- Tested Power Settin hours lb lhrl. dehyde Acrolein Benzene...ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR INSTALLATION OF A NEW JET ENGINE TEST CELL EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE, CALIFORNIA September

  6. Modeling of the shear effects on the thermal ion transport in advanced tokamak scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voitsekhovitch, I.; Garbet, X.; Moreau, D.; Bush, C. E.; Litaudon, X.; Budny, R. V.; Gohil, P.; Kinsey, J.; Taylor, T. S.; Stallard, B. W.

    1999-11-01

    Plasma shear effects on thermal ion transport in present advanced tokamak scenarios are analyzed. In order to overcome some limitations encountered from previous shear dependent models [e.g., V. Parail et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 40, 805 (1998), and references therein], a semiempirical model combining the effects of the magnetic and E×B rotation shears is proposed. These shear dependences are based on simple theoretical arguments from turbulence studies. The dominant stabilizing term of our shear correction is the shear in toroidal rotation. The predictive modeling of the formation and evolution of thermal ion internal transport barriers in relevant advanced scenarios of Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [E. J. Synakowski et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 1736 (1997)], Doublet III-D (DIII-D) [B. W. Rice et al., Nucl. Fusion 36, 1271 (1996)] and Joint European Torus (JET) [F. X. Söldner and the JET Team, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 39, B353 (1997)] with our shear correction is presented. A multimachine test of the model performed here provides a basis for predictive simulations of future experiments and for the optimization of advanced scenarios through plasma control.

  7. Tokamak burn cycle study: a data base for comparing long pulse and steady-state power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehst, D.A.; Brooks, J.N.; Cha, Y.; Evans, K. Jr.; Hassanein, A.; Kim, S.; Majumdar, S.; Misra, B.; Stevens, H.C.

    1983-11-01

    Several distinct operating modes (conventional ohmic, noninductive steady state, internal transformer, etc.) have been proposed for tokamaks. Our study focuses on capital costs and lifetime limitations of reactor subsystems in an attempt to quantify sensitivity to pulsed operation. Major problem areas considered include: thermal fatigue on first wall, limiter/divertor; thermal energy storage; fatigue and eddy current heating in toroidal field coils; electric power supply costs; and noninductive driver costs. We assume a high availability and low cost of energy will be mandatory for a commercial fusion reactor, and we characterize improvements in physics (current drive efficiency) and engineering (superior materials) which will help achieve these goals for different burn cycles.

  8. Tokamak burn cycle study: a data base for comparing long pulse and steady-state power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehst, D.A.; Brooks, J.N.; Cha, Y.; Evans, K. Jr.; Hassanein, A.; Kim, S.; Majumdar, S.; Misra, B.; Stevens, H.C.

    1983-11-01

    Several distinct operating modes (conventional ohmic, noninductive steady state, internal transformer, etc.) have been proposed for tokamaks. Our study focuses on capital costs and lifetime limitations of reactor subsystems in an attempt to quantify sensitivity to pulsed operation. Major problem areas considered include: thermal fatigue on first wall, limiter/divertor; thermal energy storage; fatigue and eddy current heating in toroidal field coils; electric power supply costs; and noninductive driver costs. We assume a high availability and low cost of energy will be mandatory for a commercial fusion reactor, and we characterize improvements in physics (current drive efficiency) and engineering (superior materials) which will help achieve these goals for different burn cycles

  9. Joint research using small tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gryaznevich, M.P.; Del Bosco, E.; Malaquias, A.; Mank, G.; Oost, G. van

    2005-01-01

    Small tokamaks have an important role in fusion research. More than 40 small tokamaks are operational. Research on small tokamaks has created a scientific basis for the scaling-up to larger tokamaks. Well-known scientific and engineering schools, which are now determining the main directions of fusion science and technology, have been established through research on small tokamaks. Combined efforts within a network of small and medium size tokamaks will further enhance the contribution of small tokamaks. A new concept of interactive co-ordinated research using small tokamaks in the mainstream fusion science areas, in testing of new diagnostics, materials and technologies as well as in education, training and broadening of the geography of fusion research in the scope of the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project is presented. (author)

  10. Cyclotron radiation as Tokamak diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiedler-Ferrari, N.

    1985-01-01

    A brief introduction to the use of Electron Cyclotron Emission as diagnostics in tokamaks is made. The utilization feasibility of this dignostics in the TBR-1 and TTF2A tokamaks is discussed. (L.C.) [pt

  11. A Novel Bearing Lubricating Device Based on the Piezoelectric Micro-Jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Li

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A novel bearing lubricating device, which is embedded in gyroscope’s bearing system and based on the theory of the piezoelectric micro-jet, was designed for this study. The embedded structure of a bearing lubricating system can make effective use of the limited space of bearing systems without increasing the whole mass of the system. The drop-on-demand (DOD lubrication can be realized by the piezoelectric micro-jet system to implement the long acting lubrication of the bearing system. A mathematical model of inlet boundary conditions was established to carry on the numerical simulation based on CFD. The motion states of the droplets with different voltage excitations were analyzed via numerical simulations, and the injection performances of the piezoelectric micro-jet lubricating device were tested in accordance with past experiments. The influences of different parameters of voltage excitation on injection performance were obtained, and the methods of adjusting the injection performance to meet different requirements are given according to the analyses of the results. The mathematical model and numerical simulation method were confirmed by comparing the results of past simulations and experiments.

  12. Electron cyclotron emission from tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sillen, R.M.J.

    1986-01-01

    Emitted electron radiation can be used as a diagnostic signal to measure the electron temperature of a thermonuclear plasma. This type of diagnostics is well established in tokamak physics. In ch. 2 of this thesis the development, calibration and special design features are treated of a six-channel prototype of a twelve-channel grating spectrometer which is built for JET at Culham for electron cyclotron emission (ECE) measurements. In order to test this prototype measurements have been performed with the T-10 tokamak at the Kurchatov Institute in Moscow. With this prototype nearly half of the temperature profile of the T-10 could be measured. Detailed observations of sawteeth instabilities have been performed. Plasma heating by electron cyclotron resonance heating experiments was studied. A detailed description of these measurements and results is given in ch. 3. Often ECE spectra from tokamaks showed non-thermal features. In order to interprete them a computer code Notec has been developed. This code that calculates the ECE radiation emerging from the plasma for a 3-D configuration, is described in ch. 4. Some preliminary results and applications are presented. (Auth.)

  13. Can better modelling improve tokamak control?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lister, J.B.; Vyas, P.; Ward, D.J.; Albanese, R.; Ambrosino, G.; Ariola, M.; Villone, F.; Coutlis, A.; Limebeer, D.J.N.; Wainwright, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    The control of present day tokamaks usually relies upon primitive modelling and TCV is used to illustrate this. A counter example is provided by the successful implementation of high order SISO controllers on COMPASS-D. Suitable models of tokamaks are required to exploit the potential of modern control techniques. A physics based MIMO model of TCV is presented and validated with experimental closed loop responses. A system identified open loop model is also presented. An enhanced controller based on these models is designed and the performance improvements discussed. (author) 5 figs., 9 refs

  14. Delving into QCD jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, K.

    1980-01-01

    The author discusses, in an introductory fashion, the latest developments in the study of hadronic jets produced in hard processes, based on perturbative QCD. Emphasis is on jet calculus (and its applications and generalizations), and on the appearance of a parton-like consistent, over-all picture of jet evolution in momentum, colour, and real space-time. (Auth.)

  15. Fusion Plasma Theory: Task 3, Auxiliary radiofrequency heating of tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharer, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    The research performed under this grant during the past year has been concentrated on the following several key tokamak ICRF (Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies) coupling, heating and current drive issues: Efficient coupling during the L- to H- mode transition by analysis and computer simulation of ICRF antennas; analysis of ICRF cavity-backed coil antenna coupling to plasma edge profiles including fast and ion Bernstein wave coupling for heating and current drive; benchmarking the codes to compare with current JET, D-IIID and ASDEX experimental results and predictions for advanced tokamaks such as BPX and SSAT (Steady-State Advanced Tokamak); ICRF full-wave field solutions, power conservation, heating analyses and minority ion current drive; and the effects of fusion alpha particle or ion tail populations on the ICRF absorption. Research progress, publications, and conference and workshop presentations are summarized in this report.

  16. Ion temperature profiles in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellermann, M. von; Mandl, W.; Summers, H.P.; Weisen, H.

    1989-01-01

    The results presented in this paper have shown some extreme cases of ion temperature profiles illustrating the different operation modes of the JET tokamak. In the three examples of low-density high temperature, high-density moderates and high-density high-confinement plasmas comparable values of a maximum fusion product n d T i τ E in the order of 10 20 keV m -3 sec are achieved. (author) 1 ref., 7 figs

  17. Introducing minimum Fisher regularisation tomography to AXUV and soft x-ray diagnostic systems of the COMPASS tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mlynar, J.; Weinzettl, V.; Imrisek, M.; Odstrcil, M.; Havlicek, J.; Janky, F.; Alper, B.; Murari, A.

    2012-01-01

    The contribution focuses on plasma tomography via the minimum Fisher regularisation (MFR) algorithm applied on data from the recently commissioned tomographic diagnostics on the COMPASS tokamak. The MFR expertise is based on previous applications at Joint European Torus (JET), as exemplified in a new case study of the plasma position analyses based on JET soft x-ray (SXR) tomographic reconstruction. Subsequent application of the MFR algorithm on COMPASS data from cameras with absolute extreme ultraviolet (AXUV) photodiodes disclosed a peaked radiating region near the limiter. Moreover, its time evolution indicates transient plasma edge cooling following a radial plasma shift. In the SXR data, MFR demonstrated that a high resolution plasma positioning independent of the magnetic diagnostics would be possible provided that a proper calibration of the cameras on an x-ray source is undertaken.

  18. Probing supersymmetry based on precise jet measurements at the CMS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goebel, Kristin

    2015-02-01

    The search for new physics beyond the standard model of particle physics is one of the main goals of the CMS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. Many theories, for instance supersymmetry, involve the possible production of new coloured particles which feature jets as their experimental signature. Thus, it is important to have a good understanding of jet-related properties in order to allow such searches. In the first part of this thesis, a measurement of the jet transverse-momentum resolution is presented. This is based on the analysis of proton-proton collision data recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of √(s)=8 TeV by the CMS experiment. The measurement utilizes the transverse momentum balance of dijet events at particle level. The main focus is on the determination of the data-to-simulation ratio of the jet transverse-momentum resolution which can be used to correct the jet resolution in simulated events to match the one observed in data. This ratio has been determined with a significantly improved precision compared to previous analyses for the pseudorapidity range 0.0≤ vertical stroke η vertical stroke ≤5.0. The second part of the thesis focuses on searches for supersymmetry in final states with several jets, missing transverse momentum and no isolated leptons. A search performed with collision data recorded at √(s)=8 TeV is presented which is mainly sensitive to the production of light-flavour squarks and gluinos as well as the gluino-mediated production of third generation particles. In this analysis, the main challenge arises from a precise determination of background contributions from standard model processes as the analysis is performed in an extreme kinematic phase space. In this thesis, a method to estimate QCD background contributions relying on the jet-p T response is presented and necessary modifications for a correct prediction of high jet multiplicity events are introduced. In the analysis, results consistent with standard model

  19. FAR-TECH's Nanoparticle Plasma Jet System and its Application to Disruptions, Deep Fueling, and Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, J. R.; Bogatu, I. N.; Galkin, S. A.; Kim, J. S.

    2012-10-01

    Hyper-velocity plasma jets have potential applications in tokamaks for disruption mitigation, deep fueling and diagnostics. Pulsed power based solid-state sources and plasma accelerators offer advantages of rapid response and mass delivery at high velocities. Fast response is critical for some disruption mitigation scenario needs, while high velocity is especially important for penetration into tokamak plasma and its confining magnetic field, as in the case of deep fueling. FAR-TECH is developing the capability of producing large-mass hyper-velocity plasma jets. The prototype solid-state source has produced: 1) >8.4 mg of H2 gas only, and 2) >25 mg of H2 and >180 mg of C60 in a H2/C60 gas mixture. Using a coaxial plasma gun coupled to the source, we have successfully demonstrated the acceleration of composite H/C60 plasma jets, with momentum as high as 0.6 g.km/s, and containing an estimated C60 mass of ˜75 mg. We present the status of FAR-TECH's nanoparticle plasma jet system and discuss its application to disruptions, deep fueling, and diagnostics. A new TiH2/C60 solid-state source capable of generating significantly higher quantities of H2 and C60 in <0.5 ms will be discussed.

  20. Statistical analysis of JET disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanga, A.; Johnson, M.F.

    1991-07-01

    In the operation of JET and of any tokamak many discharges are terminated by a major disruption. The disruptive termination of a discharge is usually an unwanted event which may cause damage to the structure of the vessel. In a reactor disruptions are potentially a very serious problem, hence the importance of studying them and devising methods to avoid disruptions. Statistical information has been collected about the disruptions which have occurred at JET over a long span of operations. The analysis is focused on the operational aspects of the disruptions rather than on the underlining physics. (Author)

  1. Pneumatic pellet injector for JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andelfinger, C.; Buechl, K.; Jacobi, D.; Sandmann, W.; Schiedeck, J.; Schilling, H.B.; Weber, G.

    1983-07-01

    Pellet injection is a useful tool for plasma diagnostics of tokamaks. Pellets can be applied for investigation of particle, energy and impurity transport, fueling efficiency and magnetic surfaces. Design, operation and control of a single shot pneumatic pellet gun is described in detail including all supplies, the vacuum system and the diagnostics of the pellet. The arrangement of this injector in the torus hall and the interfaces to the JET system and CODAS are considered. A guide tube system for pellet injection is discussed but it will not be recommended for JET. (orig.)

  2. Active galaxies. A strong magnetic field in the jet base of a supermassive black hole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí-Vidal, Ivan; Muller, Sébastien; Vlemmings, Wouter; Horellou, Cathy; Aalto, Susanne

    2015-04-17

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) host some of the most energetic phenomena in the universe. AGN are thought to be powered by accretion of matter onto a rotating disk that surrounds a supermassive black hole. Jet streams can be boosted in energy near the event horizon of the black hole and then flow outward along the rotation axis of the disk. The mechanism that forms such a jet and guides it over scales from a few light-days up to millions of light-years remains uncertain, but magnetic fields are thought to play a critical role. Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), we have detected a polarization signal (Faraday rotation) related to the strong magnetic field at the jet base of a distant AGN, PKS 1830-211. The amount of Faraday rotation (rotation measure) is proportional to the integral of the magnetic field strength along the line of sight times the density of electrons. The high rotation measures derived suggest magnetic fields of at least tens of Gauss (and possibly considerably higher) on scales of the order of light-days (0.01 parsec) from the black hole. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  3. Rotational Raman-based temperature measurements in a high-velocity, turbulent jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Randy J.; Wernet, Mark P.; Anderson, Robert C.

    2018-01-01

    Spontaneous rotational Raman scattering spectroscopy is used to acquire measurements of the mean and root mean square (rms) temperature fluctuations in turbulent, high-velocity heated jets. Raman spectra in air were obtained across a matrix of radial and axial locations downstream from a 50 mm diameter nozzle operating from subsonic to supersonic conditions over a wide range of temperatures and Mach numbers, in accordance with the Tanna matrix frequently used in jet noise studies. These data were acquired in the hostile, high noise (115 dB) environment of a large scale open air test facility at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). Temperature estimates were determined by performing non-linear least squares fitting of the single shot spectra to the theoretical rotational Stokes spectra of N2 and O2. The laser employed in this study was a high energy, long-pulsed, frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser. One thousand single-shot spectra were acquired at each spatial coordinate. Mean temperature and rms temperature variations were calculated at each measurement location. Excellent agreement between the averaged and single-shot temperatures was observed with an accuracy better than 2.5% for temperature, and rms variations in temperature between  ±2.2% at 296 K and  ±4.5% at 850 K. The mean and normalized rms temperatures measured here were then compared to NASA’s Consensus data set of PIV velocity and turbulence measurements in similar jet flows. The results of this and planned follow-on studies will support NASA GRC’s development of physics-based jet noise prediction, turbulence modeling and aeroacoustic source modeling codes.

  4. Development of key fusion technologies at JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The recent operational phase in JET in which Deuterium-Tritium fuel was used (DTE1) resulted in record breaking fusion performance. In addition to important contributions in plasma physics, the JET Team has also made major advances in demonstrating the viability of some of the key technologies required for the realisation of future fusion power. Two of the most important technological areas which have been successfully demonstrated in JET are the ITER scale tritium processing plant and the exchange of the divertor and maintenance of the interior of JET by totally remote means. The experiment also provided the first data on tritium retention and co-deposition in a diverted tokamak. Of the 35g of tritium injected into the JET torus, about 6g remained in the tokamak. The amount resides mainly on cool surfaces at the inboard divertor side. The precise, safe and timely execution of the remote handling shutdown proved that the design, function, performance and operational methodology of the RH equipment prepared over the years at JET are appropriate for the successful and rapid replacement of components in an activated tokamak environment. (author)

  5. Development of key fusion technologies at JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The recent operational phase in JET in which Deuterium-Tritium fuel was used (DTE1) resulted in record breaking fusion performance. In addition to important contributions in plasma physics, the JET Team has also made major advances in demonstrating the viability of some of the key technologies required for the realisation of future fusion power. Two of the most important technological areas which have been successfully demonstrated in JET are the ITER scale tritium processing plant and the exchange of the divertor and maintenance of the interior of JET by totally remote means. The experiment also provided the first data on tritium retention and co-deposition in a diverted tokamak. Of the 35g of tritium injected into the JET torus, about 6g remained in the tokamak. The amount resides mainly on cool surfaces at the inboard divertor side. The precise, safe and timely execution of the remote handling shutdown proved that the design, function, performance and operational methodology of the RH equipment prepared over the years at JET are appropriate for the successful and rapid replacement of components in an activated tokamak environment. (author)

  6. Advanced statistics for tokamak transport colinearity and tokamak to tokamak variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedel, K.S.

    1989-03-01

    This is a compendium of three separate articles on the statistical analysis of tokamak transport. The first article is an expository introduction to advanced statistics and scaling laws. The second analyzes two important problems of tokamak data---colinearity and tokamak to tokamak variation in detail. The third article generalizes the Swamy random coefficient model to the case of degenerate matrices. Three papers have been processed separately

  7. Progress in Neutron Diagnostics at JET

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mlynář, Jan; Bonheure, G.; Murari, A.; Bertalot, L.; Angelone, M.; Pillon, M.; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Kaellne, J.; Popovichev, S.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 56, suppl.B (2006), B118-B124 ISSN 0011-4626. [Symposium on Plasma Physics and Technology/22nd./. Praha, 26.6.2006-29.6.2006] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : tokamak * JET * fusion * neutrons diagnostics Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.568, year: 2006

  8. Texas Experimental Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootton, A.J.

    1993-04-01

    This progress report covers the period from November 1, 1990 to April 30, 1993. During that period, TEXT was operated as a circular tokamak with a material limiter. It was devoted to the study of basic plasma physics, in particular to study of fluctuations, turbulence, and transport. The purpose is to operate and maintain TEXT Upgrade as a complete facility for applied tokamak physics, specifically to conduct a research program under the following main headings: (1) to elucidate the mechanisms of working gas, impurity, and thermal transport in tokamaks, in particular to understand the role of turbulence; (2) to study physics of the edge plasma, in particular the turbulence; (3) to study the physics or resonant magnetic fields (ergodic magnetic divertors, intra island pumping); and (4) to study the physics of electron cyclotron heating (ECRH). Results of studies in each of these areas are reported

  9. Microwave Tokamak Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    The Microwave Tokamak Experiment, now under construction at the Laboratory, will use microwave heating from a free-electron laser. The intense microwave pulses will be injected into the tokamak to realize several goals, including a demonstration of the effects of localized heat deposition within magnetically confined plasma, a better understanding of energy confinement in tokamaks, and use of the new free-electron laser technology for plasma heating. The experiment, soon to be operational, provides an opportunity to study dense plasmas heated by powers unprecedented in the electron-cyclotron frequency range required by the especially high magnetic fields used with the MTX and needed for reactors. 1 references, 5 figures, 3 tables

  10. Accelerator technology in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kustom, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    This article presents the similarities in the technology required for high energy accelerators and tokamak fusion devices. The tokamak devices and R and D programs described in the text represent only a fraction of the total fusion program. The technological barriers to producing successful, economical tokamak fusion power plants are as many as the plasma physics problems to be overcome. With the present emphasis on energy problems in this country and elsewhere, it is very likely that fusion technology related R and D programs will vigorously continue; and since high energy accelerator technology has so much in common with fusion technology, more scientists from the accelerator community are likely to be attracted to fusion problems

  11. Prototype tokamak fusion reactor based on SiC/SiC composite material focusing on easy maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, S.; Ueda, S.; Kurihara, R.; Kuroda, T.; Miura, H.; Sako, K.; Takase, H.; Seki, Y.; Adachi, J.; Yamazaki, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Mori, S.; Shinya, K.; Murakami, Y.; Senda, I.; Okano, K.; Asaoka, Y.; Yoshida, T.

    2000-01-01

    If the major part of the electric power demand is to be supplied by tokamak fusion power plants, the tokamak reactor must have an ultimate goal, i.e. must be excellent in construction cost, safety aspect and operational availability (maintainability and reliability), simultaneously. On way to the ultimate goal, the approach focusing on the safety and the availability (including reliability and maintainability) issues must be the more promising strategy. The tokamak reactor concept with the very high aspect ratio configuration and the structural material of SiC/SiC composite is compatible with this approach, which is called the DRastically Easy Maintenance (DREAM) approach. This is because SiC/SiC composite is a low activation material and an insulation material, and the high aspect ratio configuration leads to a good accessibility for the maintenance machines. As the intermediate steps along this strategy between the experimental reactor such as international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) and the ultimate goal, a prototype reactor and an initial phase commercial reactor have been investigated. Especially for the prototype reactor, the material and technological immaturities are considered. The major features of the prototype and commercial type reactors are as follows. The fusion powers of the prototype and the commercial type are 1.5 and 5.5 GW, respectively. The major/minor radii for the prototype and the commercial type are of 12/1.5 m and 16/2 m, respectively. The plasma currents for the prototype and the commercial type are 6 and 9.2 MA, respectively. The coolant is helium gas, and the inlet/outlet temperatures of 500/800 and 600/900 deg. C for the prototype and the commercial type, respectively. The thermal efficiencies of 42 and 50% are obtainable in the prototype and the commercial type, respectively. The maximum toroidal field strengths of 18 and 20 tesla are assumed in the prototype and the commercial type, respectively. The thermal

  12. Tokamak Engineering Technology Facility scoping study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stacey, W.M. Jr.; Abdou, M.A.; Bolta, C.C.

    1976-03-01

    A scoping study for a Tokamak Engineering Technology Facility (TETF) is presented. The TETF is a tokamak with R = 3 m and I/sub p/ = 1.4 MA based on the counterstreaming-ion torus mode of operation. The primary purpose of TETF is to demonstrate fusion technologies for the Experimental Power Reactor (EPR), but it will also serve as an engineering and radiation test facility. TETF has several technological systems (e.g., superconducting toroidal-field coil, tritium fuel cycle, impurity control, first wall) that are prototypical of EPR.

  13. ITER Plasma at Electron Cyclotron Frequency Domain: Tokamak Core Plasma Diagnostics Based on the Synergy of Stimulated Raman and Brillouin Scatterings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2012-10-01

    A novel plasma diagnostic method is proposed based on the synergy of stimulated Raman and Brillouin scatterings. A nonlinear plasma mode is excited in a 4-wave coupling,footnotetextV. Alexander STEFAN, Nonlinear Electromagnetic Radiation Plasma Interactions, (S-U-Press, 2008). leading to the appearance of suprathermal electrons and accelerated ions at the plasma edgefootnotetextV. Alexander Stefan, Abstract: D1.00018 : ITER Plasma at Electron Cyclotron Frequency Domain: Stimulated Raman Scattering off Gould-Trivelpiece Modes and Generation of Suprathermal Electrons and Energetic Ions; Bulletin of the American Physical Society APS April Meeting 2011 Volume 56, Number 4. with the parameters directly dependent on the plasma parameters in the core of tokamak. Accordingly, plasma diagnostic in the core region, (ion temperature), can be performed by the diagnostics of suprathermal electrons and accelerated ions at the edge plasma.

  14. ARIES tokamak reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, D.; Embrechts, M.

    1990-07-01

    This is a status report on technical progress relative to the tasks identified for the fifth year of Grant No. FG02-85-ER52118. The ARIES tokamak reactor study is a multi-institutional effort to develop several visions of the tokamak as an attractive fusion reactor with enhanced economic, safety, and environmental features. The ARIES study is being coordinated by UCLA and involves a number of institutions, including RPI. The RPI group has been pursuing the following areas of research in the context of the ARIES-I design effort: MHD equilibrium and stability analyses; plasma-edge modeling and blanket materials issues. Progress in these areas is summarized herein

  15. High beta tokamak instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, G.

    1977-01-01

    Theoretical predictions using the ideal MHD model indicable that large-scale ballooning modes should appear when the average beta is raised about 1 to 2% in present-day tokamak geometries or 5 to 10% in more optimized geometries. The onset of instability is predicted to be sudden and the behavior of ballooning modes to be strikingly different from the saw-tooth and Mirnov oscillations experimentally observed at low beta. Conditions close to the predicted onset were achieved in ORMAK with no noticeable change in plasma behavior. Experiments are planned for the ISX tokamak to test the beta limit. 15 references, 3 figures

  16. Long Pulse Technology Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jernigan, T.C.

    1978-01-01

    The LPTT tokamak is a non-circular tokamak (R = 1.5 m, a = .45 m) proposed by ORNL for extended pulse operation at high β (5%) and reactor level wall power loading (40 w/cm 2 ). The toroidal field coils are superconducting and a super-conducting bundle divertor is proposed for active impurity control. All systems are designed for continuous operation which will provide pulse lengths > 20 seconds with a 6 to 10 weber flux swing. Experimental access and flexibility in operation are primary design goals

  17. Development of ion diagnostic system based on electrostatic probe in the boundary plasma of the JFT-2M tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uehara, Kazuya; Kawakami, Tomohide [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; Amemiya, Hiroshi; Hoethker, K.; Cosler, A.; Bieger, W.

    1995-06-01

    An ion diagnostic system using electrostatic probes for measurements in the JFT-2M tokamak boundary plasma has been developed under the collaboration program between KFA and JAERI. The rotating double probe system, on which the Hoethker double probe and Amemiya asymmetric probe can mounted, are manufactured at KFA workshop while the linear driver to support the rotating double probe, the ion toothbrush probe, the Katsumata probe and the cubic Mach probe are developed at JAERI. This report describes the hardware of this probe system for ion diagnostics in the boundary plasma and preliminary data obtained by means of this system. Furthermore, results on the transport are estimated on the basis of these probe data. (author).

  18. Development of ion diagnostic system based on electrostatic probe in the boundary plasma of the JFT-2M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehara, Kazuya; Kawakami, Tomohide; Amemiya, Hiroshi; Hoethker, K.; Cosler, A.; Bieger, W.

    1995-06-01

    An ion diagnostic system using electrostatic probes for measurements in the JFT-2M tokamak boundary plasma has been developed under the collaboration program between KFA and JAERI. The rotating double probe system, on which the Hoethker double probe and Amemiya asymmetric probe can mounted, are manufactured at KFA workshop while the linear driver to support the rotating double probe, the ion toothbrush probe, the Katsumata probe and the cubic Mach probe are developed at JAERI. This report describes the hardware of this probe system for ion diagnostics in the boundary plasma and preliminary data obtained by means of this system. Furthermore, results on the transport are estimated on the basis of these probe data. (author)

  19. Adjoint-based Sensitivity of Jet Noise to Near-nozzle Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Seung Whan; Vishnampet, Ramanathan; Bodony, Daniel; Freund, Jonathan

    2017-11-01

    Past efforts have used optimal control theory, based on the numerical solution of the adjoint flow equations, to perturb turbulent jets in order to reduce their radiated sound. These efforts have been successful in that sound is reduced, with concomitant changes to the large-scale turbulence structures in the flow. However, they have also been inconclusive, in that the ultimate level of reduction seemed to depend upon the accuracy of the adjoint-based gradient rather than a physical limitation of the flow. The chaotic dynamics of the turbulence can degrade the smoothness of cost functional in the control-parameter space, which is necessary for gradient-based optimization. We introduce a route to overcoming this challenge, in part by leveraging the regularity and accuracy with a dual-consistent, discrete-exact adjoint formulation. We confirm its properties and use it to study the sensitivity and controllability of the acoustic radiation from a simulation of a M = 1.3 turbulent jet, whose statistics matches data. The smoothness of the cost functional over time is quantified by a minimum optimization step size beyond which the gradient cannot have a certain degree of accuracy. Based on this, we achieve a moderate level of sound reduction in the first few optimization steps. This material is based [in part] upon work supported by the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, under Award Number DE-NA0002374.

  20. Core transport properties in JT-60U and JET identity plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Litaudon, X.; Sakamoto, Y.; de Vries, P. C.; Salmi, A.; Tala, T.; Angioni, C.; Benkadda, S.; Beurskens, M. N. A.; Bourdelle, C.; Brix, M.; Crombe, K.; Fujita, T.; Futatani, S.; Garbet, X.; Giroud, C.; Hawkes, N. C.; Hayashi, N.; Hoang, G. T.; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Matsunaga, G.; Nakano, T.; Oyama, N.; Parail, V.; Shinohara, K.; Suzuki, T.; Takechi, M.; Takenaga, H.; Takizuka, T.; Urano, H.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Yoshida, M.

    2011-01-01

    The paper compares the transport properties of a set of dimensionless identity experiments performed between JET and JT-60U in the advanced tokamak regime with internal transport barrier, ITB. These International Tokamak Physics Activity, ITPA, joint experiments were carried out with the same plasma

  1. Destruction of α-synuclein based amyloid fibrils by a low temperature plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakas, Erdinc; Munyanyi, Agatha; Greene, Lesley; Laroussi, Mounir

    2010-10-01

    Amyloid fibrils are ordered beta-sheet aggregates that are associated with a number of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer and Parkinson. At present, there is no cure for these progressive and debilitating diseases. Here we report initial studies that indicate that low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma can break amyloid fibrils into smaller units in vitro. The plasma was generated by the "plasma pencil," a device capable of emitting a long, low temperature plasma plume/jet. This avenue of research may facilitate the development of a plasma-based medical treatment.

  2. Destruction of α-synuclein based amyloid fibrils by a low temperature plasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karakas, Erdinc; Laroussi, Mounir; Munyanyi, Agatha; Greene, Lesley

    2010-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are ordered beta-sheet aggregates that are associated with a number of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer and Parkinson. At present, there is no cure for these progressive and debilitating diseases. Here we report initial studies that indicate that low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma can break amyloid fibrils into smaller units in vitro. The plasma was generated by the 'plasma pencil', a device capable of emitting a long, low temperature plasma plume/jet. This avenue of research may facilitate the development of a plasma-based medical treatment.

  3. The machinability of nickel-based alloys in high-pressure jet assisted (HPJA turning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kramar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to their mechanical, thermal and chemical properties, nickel-based alloys are generally included among materials that are hard to machine. An experimental study has been performed to investigate the capabilities of conventional and high-pressure jet assisted (HPJA turning of hard-to-machine materials, namely Inconel 718. The capabilities of different hard turning procedures are compared by means of chip breakability. The obtained results show that HPJA method offers a significant increase in chip breakability, under the same cutting conditions (cutting speed, feed rate, depth of cut.

  4. Plasma-gun fueling for tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehst, D.A.

    1980-11-01

    In light of the uncertain extrapolation of gas puffing for reactor fueling and certain limitations to pellet injection, the snowplow plasma gun has been studied as a fueling device. Based on current understanding of gun and plasma behavior a design is proposed, and its performance is predicted in a tokamak reactor environment

  5. A new simulation framework based on the Kepler and Scicos open-source software for the design and qualification of tokamak control algorithms: first test case results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barana, Oliviero; Bremond, Sylvain; Ravenel, Nathalie; Moreau, Philippe; Boulbe, Cedric; Mannori, Simone

    2011-01-01

    Plasma control is recognized to be a crucial issue for the achievement of ITER objectives. One of the most challenging tasks for the preparation of the ITER operation will therefore be the design and qualification of a variety of control algorithms. This highlights the need for a simulation platform capable of supporting the design, integration and test of advanced control algorithms on complex physics models. With this aim, a generic multi-purpose 'flight' Simulator (GMFS) is being developed at IRFM (Institut de Recherche sur la Fusion par confinement Magnetique), CEA Cadarache, France. The GMFS is based on Kepler, a free interdisciplinary open-source Java software. Kepler will be used as a simulation platform to test and improve control algorithms before their actual use in the real control system. The physics and engineering codes complementary to the control algorithms will be supplied by the EFDA Integrated Tokamak Modelling Task Force (ITM-TF). The GMFS will be benchmarked, at the beginning, on the Tore Supra Tokamak. In this paper we will report on a test case suitable to demonstrate the feasibility of a part of GMFS, namely the development of workflows where to create and verify ITER plasma boundary feedback control algorithms. lt consists of: a) derivation of a linear plasma response model; b) design of a control diagram under the ScicosLab/Scicos open-source software; c) porting of the diagram under Kepler; d) substitution of the Kepler controller with a controller generated by a special Scicos extension; e) substitution of the simplified static linear model with the free-boundary equilibrium code CEDRES++. The test case demonstrated the feasibility of employing Kepler, ScicosLab/Scicos and other expressly made codes in view of the conception of valuable instruments for the active control of ITER and it can be considered as a first step in this direction. (authors)

  6. Development of an Organosilicon-Based Superhydrophobic/Icephobic Surface Using an Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet =

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadollahi, Siavash

    During the past few decades, plasma-based surface treatment methods have gained a lot of interest in various applications such as thin film deposition, surface etching, surface activation and/or cleaning, etc. Generally, in plasma-based surface treatment methods, high-energy plasma-generated species are utilized to modify the surface structure or the chemical composition of a substrate. Unique physical and chemical characteristics of the plasma along with the high controllability of the process makes plasma treatment approaches very attractive in several industries. Plasma-based treatment methods are currently being used or investigated for a number of practical applications, such as adhesion promotion in auto industry, wound management and cancer treatment in biomedical industry, and coating development in aerospace industry. In this study, a two-step procedure is proposed for the development of superhydrophobic/icephobic coatings based on atmospheric-pressure plasma treatment of aluminum substrates using air and nitrogen plasma. The effects of plasma parameters on various surface properties are studied in order to identify the optimum conditions for maximum coating efficiency against icing and wetting. In the first step, the interactions between air or nitrogen plasma and the aluminum surface are studied. It is shown that by reducing jet-to-substrate distance, air plasma treatment, unlike nitrogen plasma treatment, is capable of creating micro-porous micro-roughened structures on the surface, some of which bear a significant resemblance to the features observed in laser ablation of metals with short and ultra-short laser pulses. The formation of such structures in plasma treatment is attributed to a transportation of energy from the jet to the surface over a very short period of time, in the range of picoseconds to microseconds. This energy transfer is shown to occur through a streamer discharge from the rotating arc source in the jet body to a close proximity of

  7. A new Disruption Mitigation System for deuterium–tritium operation at JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruezi, Uron, E-mail: uron.kruezi@ccfe.ac.uk [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Jachmich, Stefan [Laboratory for Plasma Physic, ERM/KMS, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium); Koslowski, Hans Rudolf [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, IEK-4, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Lehnen, Michael [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS90046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Brezinsek, Sebastijan [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, IEK-4, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Matthews, Guy [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • A Disruption Mitigation System based on massive gas injections has been designed. • The DMS has been installed at the JET-tokamak for routine machine protection. • The DMS is capable of a throughput of up to 4.6 kPa m{sup 3}. • The new DMS is compatible with the deuterium–tritium operation at JET. - Abstract: Disruptions, the fast accidental losses of plasma current and stored energy in tokamaks, represent a significant risk to the mechanical structure as well as the plasma facing components of reactor-scale fusion facilities like ITER. At JET, the tokamak experiment closest to ITER in terms of operating parameters and size, massive gas injection has been established as a disruption mitigation method. As a “last resort” measure it reduces thermal and electromagnetic loads during disruptions which can potentially have a serious impact on the beryllium and tungsten plasma-facing materials of the main chamber and divertor. For the planned deuterium–tritium experiments, a new Disruption Mitigation System (DMS) has been designed and installed and is presented in this article. The new DMS at JET consists of an all metal gate valve compatible with gas injections, a fast high pressure eddy current driven valve, a high voltage power supply and a gas handling system providing six supply lines for pure and mixed noble and flammable gases (Ar, Ne, Kr, D{sub 2}, etc.). The valve throughput varies with the injection pressure and gas type (efficiency – injected/charged gas 50–97%); the maximum injected amount of gas is approximately 4.6 kPa m{sup 3} (at maximum system pressure of 5.0 MPa).

  8. Neutronic analysis of JET external neutron monitor response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snoj, Luka, E-mail: luka.snoj@ijs.si [Reactor Physics Division, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Lengar, Igor; Čufar, Aljaž [Reactor Physics Division, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Syme, Brian; Popovichev, Sergey [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB, United Kingdom (United Kingdom); Batistoni, Paola [ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Conroy, Sean [VR Association, Uppsala University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, PO Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • We model JET tokamak containing JET remote handling system. • We investigate effect of remote handling system on external neutron monitor response. • Remote handling system correction factors are calculated. • Integral correction factors are relatively small, i.e up to 8%. - Abstract: The power output of fusion devices is measured in terms of the neutron yield which relates directly to the fusion yield. JET made a transition from Carbon wall to ITER-Like Wall (Beryllium/Tungsten/Carbon) during 2010–11. Absolutely calibrated measurement of the neutron yield by JET neutron monitors was ensured by direct measurements using a calibrated {sup 252}Cf neutron source (NS) deployed by the in-vessel remote handling system (RHS) inside the JET vacuum vessel. Neutronic calculations were required in order to understand the neutron transport from the source in the vacuum vessel to the fission chamber detectors mounted outside the vessel on the transformer limbs of the tokamak. We developed a simplified computational model of JET and the JET RHS in Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP and analyzed the paths and structures through which neutrons reach the detectors and the effect of the JET RHS on the neutron monitor response. In addition we performed several sensitivity studies of the effect of substantial massive structures blocking the ports on the external neutron monitor response. As the simplified model provided a qualitative picture of the process only, some calculations were repeated using a more detailed full 3D model of the JET tokamak.

  9. Research using small tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This document consists of a collection of papers presented at the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Research Using Small Tokamaks. It contains 22 papers on a wide variety of research aspects, including diagnostics, design, transport, equilibrium, stability, and confinement. Some of these papers are devoted to other concepts (stellarators, compact tori). Refs, figs and tabs

  10. Research using small tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The technical reports contained in this collection of papers on research using small tokamaks fall into four main categories, i.e., (i) experimental work (heating, stability, plasma radial profiles, fluctuations and transport, confinement, ultra-low-q tokamaks, wall physics, a.o.), (ii) diagnostics (beam probes, laser scattering, X-ray tomography, laser interferometry, electron-cyclotron absorption and emission systems), (iii) theory (strong turbulence, effects of heating on stability, plasma beta limits, wave absorption, macrostability, low-q tokamak configurations and bootstrap currents, turbulent heating, stability of vortex flows, nonlinear islands growth, plasma-drift-induced anomalous transport, ergodic divertor design, a.o.), and (iv) new technical facilities (varistors applied to establish constant current and loop voltage in HT-6M), lower-hybrid-current-drive systems for HT-6B and HT-6M, radio-frequency systems for HT-6M ICR heating experimentation, and applications of fiber optics for visible and vacuum ultraviolet radiation detection as applied to tokamaks and reversed-field pinches. A total number of 51 papers are included in the collection. Refs, figs and tabs

  11. 50 years of tokamaks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mlynář, Jan; Řípa, Milan

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 2 (2008), s. 7-7 ISSN 1818-5355 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Tokamak * history Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http://www.efda.org/news_and_events/downloads/efda_newsletter/nl_2008_12.pdf

  12. Adaptive predictors based on probabilistic SVM for real time disruption mitigation on JET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murari, A.; Lungaroni, M.; Peluso, E.; Gaudio, P.; Vega, J.; Dormido-Canto, S.; Baruzzo, M.; Gelfusa, M.; Contributors, JET

    2018-05-01

    Detecting disruptions with sufficient anticipation time is essential to undertake any form of remedial strategy, mitigation or avoidance. Traditional predictors based on machine learning techniques can be very performing, if properly optimised, but do not provide a natural estimate of the quality of their outputs and they typically age very quickly. In this paper a new set of tools, based on probabilistic extensions of support vector machines (SVM), are introduced and applied for the first time to JET data. The probabilistic output constitutes a natural qualification of the prediction quality and provides additional flexibility. An adaptive training strategy ‘from scratch’ has also been devised, which allows preserving the performance even when the experimental conditions change significantly. Large JET databases of disruptions, covering entire campaigns and thousands of discharges, have been analysed, both for the case of the graphite and the ITER Like Wall. Performance significantly better than any previous predictor using adaptive training has been achieved, satisfying even the requirements of the next generation of devices. The adaptive approach to the training has also provided unique information about the evolution of the operational space. The fact that the developed tools give the probability of disruption improves the interpretability of the results, provides an estimate of the predictor quality and gives new insights into the physics. Moreover, the probabilistic treatment permits to insert more easily these classifiers into general decision support and control systems.

  13. Three-dimensional Magnetohydrodynamical Simulations of the Morphology of Head–Tail Radio Galaxies Based on the Magnetic Tower Jet Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gan, Zhaoming; Yuan, Feng [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Li, Hui; Li, Shengtai, E-mail: zmgan@shao.ac.cn, E-mail: fyuan@shao.ac.cn, E-mail: hli@lanl.gov, E-mail: sli@lanl.gov [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2017-04-10

    The distinctive morphology of head–tail radio galaxies reveals strong interactions between the radio jets and their intra-cluster environment, the general consensus on the morphology origin of head–tail sources is that radio jets are bent by violent intra-cluster weather. We demonstrate in this paper that such strong interactions provide a great opportunity to study the jet properties and also the dynamics of the intra-cluster medium (ICM). By three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations, we analyze the detailed bending process of a magnetically dominated jet, based on the magnetic tower jet model. We use stratified atmospheres modulated by wind/shock to mimic the violent intra-cluster weather. Core sloshing is found to be inevitable during the wind-cluster core interaction, which induces significant shear motion and could finally drive ICM turbulence around the jet, making it difficult for the jet to survive. We perform a detailed comparison between the behavior of pure hydrodynamical jets and the magnetic tower jet and find that the jet-lobe morphology could not survive against the violent disruption in all of our pure hydrodynamical jet models. On the other hand, the head–tail morphology is well reproduced by using a magnetic tower jet model bent by wind, in which hydrodynamical instabilities are naturally suppressed and the jet could always keep its integrity under the protection of its internal magnetic fields. Finally, we also check the possibility for jet bending by shock only. We find that shock could not bend the jet significantly, and thus could not be expected to explain the observed long tails in head–tail radio galaxies.

  14. Transient electromagnetic analysis in tokamaks using TYPHOON code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, A.V.; Duke, A.E.; Korolkov, M.D.; Kotov, V.L.; Kukhtin, V.P.; Lamzin, E.A.; Sytchevsky, S.E.

    1996-01-01

    The transient electromagnetic analysis of conducting structures in tokamaks is presented. This analysis is based on a three-dimensional thin conducting shell model. The finite element method has been used to solve the corresponding integrodifferential equation. The code TYPHOON has been developed to calculate transient processes in tokamaks. Calculation tests and the code verification have been carried out. The calculation results of eddy current and force distibution and a.c. losses for different construction elements for both ITER and TEXTOR tokamaks magnetic systems are presented. (orig.)

  15. All-carbon-based field effect transistors fabricated by aerosol jet printing on flexible substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Rui; Shen, Fangping; Ding, Haiyan; Gu, Wen; Zhang, Ting; Lin, Jian; Cui, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    An all-carbon-based field effect transistor (FET) was fabricated on flexible polyethylene terephthalate substrates by the aerosol jet printing method described in this paper. Three different types of homogeneous conductive inks were made and then printed layer-by-layer to form the FET chips. The conducting-reduced graphene oxide was used as electrodes (source and drain) and channel, respectively. Graphene oxide was used as dielectrics while multi-walled carbon nanotubes acted as the gate electrode. The all-carbon-based FET shows a good mobility of 350 cm 2 (V s) –1 at a drain bias of −1 V. This simple and novel method explores a promising way to fabricate all-carbon-based, flexible and low-cost electronic devices. (paper)

  16. Large Aspect Ratio Tokamak Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.; Holmes, J.A.; Houlberg, W.A.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Strickler, D.J.; Brown, T.G.; Wiseman, G.W.

    1980-06-01

    The Large Aspect Ratio Tokamak Study (LARTS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) investigated the potential for producing a viable longburn tokamak reactor by enhancing the volt-second capability of the ohmic heating transformer through the use of high aspect ratio designs. The plasma physics, engineering, and economic implications of high aspect ratio tokamaks were assessed in the context of extended burn operation. Using a one-dimensional transport code plasma startup and burn parameters were addressed. The pulsed electrical power requirements for the poloidal field system, which have a major impact on reactor economics, were minimized by optimizing the startup and shutdown portions of the tokamak cycle. A representative large aspect ratio tokamak with an aspect ratio of 8 was found to achieve a burn time of 3.5 h at capital cost only approx. 25% greater than that of a moderate aspect ratio design tokamak

  17. Degradation of carbon-based materials under ablative conditions produced by a high enthalpy plasma jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Petraconi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A stationary experiment was performed to study the degradation of carbon-based materials by immersion in a plasma jet. In the experiment, graphite and C/C composite were chosen as the target materials, and the reactive plasma jet was generated by an air plasma torch. For macroscopic study of the material degradation, the sample’s mass losses were measured as function of the exposure time under various temperatures on the sample surface. A microscopic analysis was then carried out for the study of microscopic aspects of the erosion of material surface. These experiments showed that the mass loss per unit area is approximately proportional to the exposure time and strongly depends on the temperature of the material surface. The mass erosion rate of graphite was appreciably higher than the C/C composite. The ablation rate in the carbon matrix region in C/C composite was also noticeably higher than that in the fiber region. In addition, the latter varied according to the orientation of fibers relatively to the flow direction. These tests indicated an excellent ablation resistance of the C/C composite, thus being a reliable material for rocket nozzles and heat shielding elements of the protection systems of hypersonic apparatuses from aerodynamic heating.

  18. Arc Jet Testing of Hafnium Diboride Based Ultra High Temperature Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellerby, Don; Beckman, Sarah; Irby, Edward; Squire, Tom; Olejniczak, Joe; Johnson, Sylvia M.; Gusman, Michael; Gasch, Matthew

    2003-01-01

    Hafnium Diboride (HFB,) based materials have shown promise for use in a number of high temperature aerospace applications, including rocket nozzles and as leading edges on hypersonic reentry vehicles. The stability of the materials in relevant environments is key to determining their suitability for a particular application. In this program we have been developing HfB2/SiC materials for use as sharp leading edges. The program as a whole included processing and characterization of the HfBJSiC materials. The specific work discussed here will focus on studies of the materials oxidation behavior in simulated reentry environments through arc jet testing. Four flat face models were tested to examine the influence of heat flux and stagnation pressure on the materials oxidation behavior. The results from arc jet testing of two HfB2/SiC cone models will also be discussed. Each cone model was run multiple times with gradually increasing heat fluxes. Total run times on a single cone model exceeded 80 minutes. For both the flat face and cone models surface temperatures well in excess of 2200 C were measured. Post test microstructural examination of the models and correlations with measured temperatures will be discussed.

  19. Simulation of Acid-Base Reactions in a Microscale Confined Impinging Jet Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Jen; Griffith, Lucas; Olsen, Michael; Fox, Rodney

    2009-11-01

    Numerical simulations were performed of reactive mixing in a microscale confined impinging jets reactor (CIJR). A simple acid-base reaction was modeled and solved for a laminar flow case. Local pH throughout the reactor was determined as a function of hydrogen and hydroxide mixture fraction, and this relationship was used to generate a pH field that could be compared with experimental results. An experimental visualization of the acid-base reaction was performed in the CIJR with phenolphthalein used as a pH indicator. Visualization images of the actual flow were then compared with the predictions of the simulation. Good agreement was observed between the experiment and the simulation. Future work will include adding a turbulence model to the simulation.

  20. Tokamak fusion reactor exhaust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, M.F.A.; Harbour, P.J.; Hotston, E.S.

    1981-08-01

    This report presents a compilation of papers dealing with reactor exhaust which were produced as part of the TIGER Tokamak Installation for Generating Electricity study at Culham. The papers are entitled: (1) Exhaust impurity control and refuelling. (2) Consideration of the physical problems of a self-consistent exhaust and divertor system for a long burn Tokamak. (3) Possible bundle divertors for INTOR and TIGER. (4) Consideration of various magnetic divertor configurations for INTOR and TIGER. (5) A appraisal of divertor experiments. (6) Hybrid divertors on INTOR. (7) Refuelling and the scrape-off layer of INTOR. (8) Simple modelling of the scrape-off layer. (9) Power flow in the scrape-off layer. (10) A model of particle transport within the scrape-off plasma and divertor. (11) Controlled recirculation of exhaust gas from the divertor into the scrape-off plasma. (U.K.)

  1. Tokamaks: from A D Sakharov to the present (the 60-year history of tokamaks)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azizov, E A

    2012-01-01

    The paper is prepared on the basis of the report presented at the session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) at the Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS on 25 May 2011, devoted to the 90-year jubilee of Academician Andrei D Sakharov - the initiator of controlled nuclear fusion research in the USSR. The 60-year history of plasma research work in toroidal devices with a longitudinal magnetic field suggested by Andrei D Sakharov and Igor E Tamm in 1950 for the confinement of fusion plasma and known at present as tokamaks is described in brief. The recent (2006) agreement among Russia, the EU, the USA, Japan, China, the Republic of Korea, and India on the joint construction of the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) in France based on the tokamak concept is discussed. Prospects for using the tokamak as a thermonuclear (14 MeV) neutron source are examined. (conferences and symposia)

  2. The ARIES tokamak fusion reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlit, J.R.; Bathke, C.G.; Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.; Beecraft, W.R.; Hogan, J.T.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Reid, R.L.; Strickler, D.J.; Whitson, J.C.; Blanchard, J.P.; Emmert, G.A.; Santarius, J.F.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.; Wittenberg, L.J.

    1989-01-01

    The ARIES study is a community effort to develop several visions of the tokamak as fusion power reactors. The aims are to determine their potential economics, safety, and environmental features and to identify physics and technology areas with the highest leverage for achieving the best tokamak reactor. Three ARIES visions are planned, each having a different degree of extrapolation from the present data base in physics and technology. The ARIES-I design assumes a minimum extrapolation from current tokamak physics (e.g., 1st stability) and incorporates technological advances that can be available in the next 20 to 30 years. ARIES-II is a DT-burning tokamak in 2nd stability regime and employs both potential advances in the physics and expected advances in technology and engineering; and ARIES-III is a conceptual D 3 He reactor. This paper focuses on the ARIES-I design. Parametric systems studies show that the optimum 1st stability tokamak has relatively low plasma current (∼ 12 MA), high plasma aspect ratio (∼ 4-6), and high magnetic field (∼ 24 T at the coil). ARIES-I is 1,000 MWe (net) reactor with a plasma major radius of 6.5 m, a minor radius of 1.4 m, a neutron wall loading of about 2.8 MW/m 2 , and a mass power density of about 90 kWe/ton. The ARIES-I reactor operates at steady state using ICRF fast waves to drive current in the plasma core and lower-hybrid waves for edge-plasma current drive. The current-drive system supplements a significant (∼ 57%) bootstrap current contribution. The impurity control system is based on high-recycling poloidal divertors. Because of the high field and large Lorentz forces in the toroidal-field magnets, innovative approaches with high-strength materials and support structures are used. 24 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  3. Density limits in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tendler, M.

    1984-06-01

    The energy loss from a tokamak plasma due to neutral hydrogen radiation and recycling is of great importance for the energy balance at the periphery. It is shown that the requirement for thermal equilibrium implies a constraint on the maximum attainable edge density. The relation to other density limits is discussed. The average plasma density is shown to be a strong function of the refuelling deposition profile. (author)

  4. Energy confinement in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugihara, M.; Singer, C.

    1986-08-01

    A straightforward generalization is made of the ohmic heating energy confinement scalings of Pfeiffer and Waltz and Blackwell et. al. The resulting model is systematically calibrated to published data from limiter tokamaks with ohmic, electron cyclotron, and neutral beam heating. With considerably fewer explicitly adjustable free parameters, this model appears to give a better fit to the available data for limiter discharges than the combined ohmic/auxiliary heating model of Goldston

  5. TPX tokamak construction management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knutson, D.; Kungl, D.; Seidel, P.; Halfast, C.

    1995-01-01

    A construction management contract normally involves the acquisition of a construction management firm to assist in the design, planning, budget conformance, and coordination of the construction effort. In addition the construction management firm acts as an agent in the awarding of lower tier contracts. The TPX Tokamak Construction Management (TCM) approach differs in that the construction management firm is also directly responsible for the assembly and installation of the tokamak including the design and fabrication of all tooling required for assembly. The Systems Integration Support (SIS) contractor is responsible for the architect-engineering design of ancillary systems, such as heating and cooling, buildings, modifications and site improvements, and a variety of electrical requirements, including switchyards and >4kV power distribution. The TCM will be responsible for the procurement of materials and the installation of the ancillary systems, which can either be performed directly by the TCM or subcontracted to a lower tier subcontractor. Assurance that the TPX tokamak is properly assembled and ready for operation when turned over to the operations team is the primary focus of the construction management effort. To accomplish this a disciplined constructability program will be instituted. The constructability effort will involve the effective and timely integration of construction expertise into the planning, component design, and field operations. Although individual component design groups will provide liaison during the machine assembly operations, the construction management team is responsible for assembly

  6. Time-resolved spectroscopy in the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project tokamak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Box, F. M. A.; Howard, J.; VandeKolk, E.; Meijer, F. G.

    1997-01-01

    At the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project tokamak spectrometers are used to diagnose the velocity distribution and abundances of impurity ions. Quantities can be measured as a function of time, and the temporal resolution depends on the line emissivity and can be as good as 0.2 ms for the strongest lines.

  7. Study of heat fluxes on plasma facing components in a tokamak from measurements of temperature by infrared thermography; Etude des champs de flux thermique sur les composants faisant face au plasma dans un tokamak a partir de mesures de temperature par thermographie infrarouge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daviot, R.

    2010-05-15

    The goal of this thesis is the development of a method of computation of those heat loads from measurements of temperature by infrared thermography. The research was conducted on three issues arising in current tokamaks but also future ones like ITER: the measurement of temperature on reflecting walls, the determination of thermal properties for deposits observed on the surface of tokamak components and the development of a three-dimensional, non-linear computation of heat loads. A comparison of several means of pyrometry, monochromatic, bi-chromatic and photothermal, is performed on an experiment of temperature measurement. We show that this measurement is sensitive to temperature gradients on the observed area. Layers resulting from carbon deposition by the plasma on the surface of components are modeled through a field of equivalent thermal resistance, without thermal inertia. The field of this resistance is determined, for each measurement points, from a comparison of surface temperature from infrared thermographs with the result of a simulation, which is based on a mono-dimensional linear model of components. The spatial distribution of the deposit on the component surface is obtained. Finally, a three-dimensional and non-linear computation of fields of heat fluxes, based on a finite element method, is developed here. Exact geometries of the component are used. The sensitivity of the computed heat fluxes is discussed regarding the accuracy of the temperature measurements. This computation is applied to two-dimensional temperature measurements of the JET tokamak. Several components of this tokamak are modeled, such as tiles of the divertor, upper limiter and inner and outer poloidal limiters. The distribution of heat fluxes on the surface of these components is computed and studied along the two main tokamak directions, poloidal and toroidal. Toroidal symmetry of the heat loads from one tile to another is shown. The influence of measurements spatial resolution

  8. Tokamak bez královské koruny – centrálního solenoidu

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řípa, Milan

    Březen (2016) Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : fusion * stellarator * Wendelstein * JET * ITER * Coaxial Helicity Injection * reconection * bootstrap * plazoidy Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http://www.3pol.cz/cz/rubriky/jaderna-fyzika-a-energetika/1826-tokamak-bez-kralovske-koruny-centralniho-solenoidu

  9. Comparison of different current transducers used at JET within the range 5–100 kA for plasma control and monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmon, R., E-mail: robjsalmon@gmail.com; Smith, P.; West, A.; Shaw, S.R.; Rendell, D.

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Zero-flux current transducers with sensory windings, Hall-effect DCCTs, Rogowski coils, shunt resistors and Faraday effect current transducers are reviewed. • All technologies have displayed good performance over 30 years of operation. • Faraday-effect current transducers have improved accuracy of the toroidal magnets current measurement on JET to 0.1%. • The improvement in accuracy has improved resolution on JET plasma kinetic profiles. - Abstract: The JET machine uses a variety of current transducers for control and protection of the plasma, the coils and their associated power supplies. This paper reviews the various measuring technologies, within the range 5–100 kA, used on JET to assist with the selection of high-current transducers for future plasma control/tokamak applications; these include Rogowski coils, coaxial shunts, Hall-effect transducers, zero-flux CTs and a Faraday-effect optical transducer. The paper considers reliability, accuracy and usability based on up to 30 years of operational experience of the transducers. Accuracy of the magnet current measurements is important in the control of tokamak plasmas and there has been considerable effort to improve it. Recently a Faraday-effect optical current sensor has been used to measure up to 67 kA in the Toroidal Field (TF) coil circuit. This measurement system has been calibrated at JET to verify its 0.1% accuracy. In addition, the data acquisition system for this measurement is automatically calibrated at the start of each JET pulse. The improved accuracy has been shown to enhance the spatial consistency of kinetic profiles at JET [1]. Due to its portability the JET project intends to employ the same Faraday-effect current transducer to calibrate other high current transducers by temporarily fitting it to other busbars, such as those in the Ohmic Heating network.

  10. Impact of Alternative Jet Fuels on Engine Exhaust Composition During the 2015 ECLIF Ground-Based Measurements Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schripp, Tobias; Anderson, Bruce; Crosbie, Ewan C; Moore, Richard H; Herrmann, Friederike; Oßwald, Patrick; Wahl, Claus; Kapernaum, Manfred; Köhler, Markus; Le Clercq, Patrick; Rauch, Bastian; Eichler, Philipp; Mikoviny, Tomas; Wisthaler, Armin

    2018-04-17

    The application of fuels from renewable sources ("alternative fuels") in aviation is important for the reduction of anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions, but may also attribute to reduced release of particles from jet engines. The present experiment describes ground-based measurements in the framework of the ECLIF (Emission and Climate Impact of Alternative Fuels) campaign using an Airbus A320 (V2527-A5 engines) burning six fuels of chemically different composition. Two reference Jet A-1 with slightly different chemical parameters were applied and further used in combination with a Fischer-Tropsch synthetic paraffinic kerosene (FT-SPK) to prepare three semi synthetic jet fuels (SSJF) of different aromatic content. In addition, one commercially available fully synthetic jet fuel (FSJF) featured the lowest aromatic content of the fuel selection. Neither the release of nitrogen oxide or carbon monoxide was significantly affected by the different fuel composition. The measured particle emission indices showed a reduction up to 50% (number) and 70% (mass) for two alternative jet fuels (FSJF, SSJF2) at low power settings in comparison to the reference fuels. The reduction is less pronounced at higher operating conditions but the release of particle number and particle mass is still significantly lower for the alternative fuels than for both reference fuels. The observed correlation between emitted particle mass and fuel aromatics is not strict. Here, the H/C ratio is a better indicator for soot emission.

  11. Sawtooth driven particle transport in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolas, T.

    2013-01-01

    The radial transport of particles in tokamaks is one of the most stringent issues faced by the magnetic confinement fusion community, because the fusion power is proportional to the square of the pressure, and also because accumulation of heavy impurities in the core leads to important power losses which can lead to a 'radiative collapse'. Sawteeth and the associated periodic redistribution of the core quantities can significantly impact the radial transport of electrons and impurities. In this thesis, we perform numerical simulations of sawteeth using a nonlinear tridimensional magnetohydrodynamic code called XTOR-2F to study the particle transport induced by sawtooth crashes. We show that the code recovers, after the crash, the fine structures of electron density that are observed with fast-sweeping reflectometry on the JET and TS tokamaks. The presence of these structure may indicate a low efficiency of the sawtooth in expelling the impurities from the core. However, applying the same code to impurity profiles, we show that the redistribution is quantitatively similar to that predicted by Kadomtsev's model, which could not be predicted a priori. Hence finally the sawtooth flushing is efficient in expelling impurities from the core. (author) [fr

  12. Carbon deposition and hydrogen retention in tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, Tetsuo

    2006-01-01

    The results of measurements on co-deposition of hydrogen isotopes and wall materials, hydrogen retention, redeposition of carbon and deposition of hydrogen on PMI of JT-60U are described. From above results, selection of plasma facing material and ability of carbon wall is discussed. Selection of plasma facing materials in fusion reactor, characteristics of carbon materials as the plasma facing materials, erosion, transport and deposition of carbon impurity, deposition of tritium in JET, results of PMI in JT-60, application of carbon materials to PFM of ITER, and future problems are stated. Tritium co-deposition in ITER, erosion and transport of carbon in tokamak, distribution of tritium deposition on graphite tile used as bumper limiter of TFTR, and measurement results of deposition of tritium on the Mark-IIA divertor tile and comparison between them are described. (S.Y.)

  13. Runaway electron generation in tokamak disruptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helander, P. [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Andersson, F.; Fulop, T.; Smith, T.H.; Anderson, D.; Lisak, M. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Dept. of Electromagnetics, Goteborg (Sweden); Eriksson, L.G. [Euratom-CEA, Centre d' Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee

    2004-07-01

    The time evolution of the plasma current during a tokamak disruption is calculated by solving the equations for runaway electron production simultaneously with the induction equation for the toroidal electric field. The resistive diffusion time in a post-disruption plasma is typically comparable to the runaway avalanche growth time. Accordingly, the toroidal electric field induced after the thermal quench of a disruption diffuses radially through the plasma at the same time as it accelerates runaway electrons, which in turn back-react on the electric field. When these processes are accounted for in a self-consistent way, it is found that (1) the efficiency and time scale of runaway generation agrees with JET experiments; (2) the runaway current profile typically becomes more peaked than the pre-disruption current profile; and (3) can easily become radially in the shape of filaments. It is also shown that higher runaway electron generation is expected if the thermal quench is sufficiently fast. (authors)

  14. Energetics of turbulent transport processes in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, F.A.; Thyagaraja, A.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of electromagnetic turbulence on electrons and ions under Tokamak conditions is considered using a kinetic description. Taking the magnetic fluctuation spectrum as given, the density fluctuation spectrum is self-consistently calculated taking account of quasi-neutrality. The calculation is valid for arbitrary collisionality and appropriate to low frequencies typical of experiment. In addition to the usual enhancement of the radial electron energy transport, it is found that the turbulent fluctuations can heat the plasma at rates comparable to ordinary ohmic heating under well-defined conditions. Interestingly, electromagnetic turbulence appears to imply only an insignificant correction to the toroidal resistance of the plasma as estimated from Spitzer resistivity. The scalings of anomalous transport, fluctuations and heating with temperature and plasma volume are investigated. The assumption that the magnetic fluctuation spectrum of the turbulence is invariant under a wide range of conditions is shown to result in interesting consequences for JET-like plasmas. (author)

  15. Auxiliary radiofrequency heating of tokamaks, Task 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharer, J.E.

    1991-07-01

    The research performed under this grant during the past three years has been concentrated on the following several key tokamak ICRF (Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies) coupling and heating issues: efficient coupling during the L- to H-mode transition by analysis and computer simulation of ICRF antennas edge plasma profiles; analysis of both dielectric-filled waveguide and coil ICRF antenna coupling to plasma edge profiles; benchmarking the codes to compare with current JET, D-IIID and ASDEX experimental results; ICRF full-wave field solutions, power conservation and heating analyses; and the effects of fusion alpha particle or ion tail populations on the ICRF absorption. Research progress, publications, and conference and workshop presentations are summarized in this report. 15 refs

  16. Magnetic confinement experiment -- 1: Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldston, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    This report reviews presentations made at the 15th IAEA Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion on experimental tokamak physics, particularly on advances in core plasma physics, divertor and edge physics, heating and current drive, and tokamak concept optimization

  17. The density limit in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alladio, F.

    1985-01-01

    A short summary of the present status of experimental observations, theoretical ideas and understanding of the density limit in tokamaks is presented. It is the result of the discussion that was held on this topic at the 4th European Tokamak Workshop in Copenhagen (December 4th to 6th, 1985). 610 refs

  18. Subtask 3.11 - Production of CBTL-Based Jet Fuels from Biomass-Based Feedstocks and Montana Coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Ramesh

    2014-06-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), in partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Accelergy Corporation, an advanced fuels developer with technologies exclusively licensed from Exxon Mobil, undertook Subtask 3.11 to use a recently installed bench-scale direct coal liquefaction (DCL) system capable of converting 45 pounds/hour of pulverized, dried coal to a liquid suitable for upgrading to fuels and/or chemicals. The process involves liquefaction of Rosebud mine coal (Montana coal) coupled with an upgrading scheme to produce a naphthenic fuel. The upgrading comprises catalytic hydrotreating and saturation to produce naphthenic fuel. A synthetic jet fuel was prepared by blending equal volumes of naphthenic fuel with similar aliphatic fuel derived from biomass and 11 volume % of aromatic hydrocarbons. The synthetic fuel was tested using standard ASTM International techniques to determine compliance with JP-8 fuel. The composite fuel thus produced not only meets but exceeds the military aviation fuel-screening criteria. A 500-milliliter synthetic jet fuel sample which met internal screening criteria was submitted to the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) at Wright–Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, Ohio, for evaluation. The sample was confirmed by AFRL to be in compliance with U.S. Air Force-prescribed alternative aviation fuel initial screening criteria. The results show that this fuel meets or exceeds the key specification parameters for JP-8, a petroleum-based jet fuel widely used by the U.S. military. JP-8 specifications include parameters such as freeze point, density, flash point, and others; all of which were met by the EERC fuel sample. The fuel also exceeds the thermal stability specification of JP-8 fuel as determined by the quartz crystalline microbalance (QCM) test also performed at an independent laboratory as well as AFRL. This means that the EERC fuel looks and acts identically to petroleum-derived jet fuel and can be used

  19. Performance of synthetic jet actuators based on hybrid and double-acting principles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trávníček, Zdeněk; Tesař, Václav; Kordík, Jozef

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 3 (2008), s. 221-229 ISSN 1343-8875 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/07/1499; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA200760801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : synthetic jet * impinging jet * actuator Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 0.943, year: 2008

  20. Maximization of integral outlet quantities of an axisymmetric synthetic jet actuator based on a loudspeaker

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kordík, Jozef; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 114, March (2016), č. článku 02152. ISSN 2101-6275. [International Conference on Experimental Fluid Mechanics /10./. Praha, 17.11.2015-20.11.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-08888S Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : synthetic jet * synthetic jet actuator * resonance Subject RIV: JU - Aeronautics, Aerodynamics, Aircrafts

  1. Conversion of waste cooking oil to jet biofuel with nickel-based mesoporous zeolite Y catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Cheng, Jun; Huang, Rui; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2015-12-01

    Three types of zeolites (Meso-Y, SAPO-34, and HY) loaded with nickel were used to convert waste cooking oil to jet biofuel. Mesoporous zeolite Y exhibited a high jet range alkane selectivity of 53% and a proper jet range aromatic hydrocarbon selectivity of 13.4% in liquid fuel products. Reaction temperature was optimized to produce quality jet biofuel. Zeolite Meso-Y exhibited a high jet range alkane yield of 40.5% and a low jet range aromatic hydrocarbon yield of 11.3% from waste cooking oil at 400°C. The reaction pathway for converting waste cooking oil to jet biofuel was proposed. Experimental results showed that waste cooking oil mainly deoxygenated to heptadecane (C17H36) and pentadecane (C15H30) through the decarbonylation pathway for the first 3h. Long chain alkanes cracked into jet range alkanes (C8-C16). Cycloalkanes and aromatic hydrocarbons were produced through cyclization and dehydrogenation pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Mechanistic Based DEM Simulation of Particle Attrition in a Jet Cup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Wei; DeCroix, David; Sun, Xin

    2014-02-01

    The attrition of particles is a major industrial concern in many fluidization systems as it can have undesired effects on the product quality and on the reliable operation of process equipment. Therefore, to accomodate the screening and selection of catalysts for a specific process in fluidized beds, risers, or cyclone applications, their attrition propensity is usually estimated through jet cup attrition testing, where the test material is subjected to high gas velocities in a jet cup. However, this method is far from perfect despite its popularity, largely due to its inconsistency in different testing set-ups. In order to better understand the jet cup testing results as well as their sensitivity to different operating conditions, a coupled computational fluid dynamic (CFD) - discrete element method (DEM) model has been developed in the current study to investigate the particle attrition in a jet cup and its dependence on various factors, e.g. jet velocity, initial particle size, particle density, and apparatus geometry.

  3. Novel cavitation fluid jet polishing process based on negative pressure effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fengjun; Wang, Hui; Tang, Yu; Yin, Shaohui; Huang, Shuai; Zhang, Guanghua

    2018-04-01

    Traditional abrasive fluid jet polishing (FJP) is limited by its high-pressure equipment, unstable material removal rate, and applicability to ultra-smooth surfaces because of the evident air turbulence, fluid expansion, and a large polishing spot in high-pressure FJP. This paper presents a novel cavitation fluid jet polishing (CFJP) method and process based on FJP technology. It can implement high-efficiency polishing on small-scale surfaces in a low-pressure environment. CFJP uses the purposely designed polishing equipment with a sealed chamber, which can generate a cavitation effect in negative pressure environment. Moreover, the collapse of cavitation bubbles can spray out a high-energy microjet and shock wave to enhance the material removal. Its feasibility is verified through researching the flow behavior and the cavitation results of the negative pressure cavitation machining of pure water in reversing suction flow. The mechanism is analyzed through a computational fluid dynamics simulation. Thus, its cavitation and surface removal mechanisms in the vertical CFJP and inclined CFJP are studied. A series of polishing experiments on different materials and polishing parameters are conducted to validate its polishing performance compared with FJP. The maximum removal depth increases, and surface roughness gradually decreases with increasing negative outlet pressures. The surface becomes smooth with the increase of polishing time. The experimental results confirm that the CFJP process can realize a high material removal rate and smooth surface with low energy consumption in the low-pressure environment, together with compatible surface roughness to FJP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Nonlinear gyrokinetic tokamak physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brizard, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    The gyrokinetic reduced description of low-frequency and small-perpendicular-wavelength nonlinear tokamak dynamics is presented in three different versions: the reduced dynamical description of test particles moving in electromagnetic fields; the reduced gyrokinetic description of the self-consistent interaction of particles and fields through the Maxwell-Vlasov equations; and the reduced description of nonlinear fluid motion. The unperturbed tokamak plasma is described in terms of a noncanonical Hamiltonian guiding-center theory. The unperturbed guiding-center tokamak plasma is then perturbed by gyrokinetic electromagnetic fields and consequently the perturbed guiding-center dynamical system acquires new gyrophase dependence. The perturbation analysis that follows makes extensive use of Lie-transform perturbation techniques. Because the electromagnetic perturbations affect both the Hamiltonian and the Poisson-bracket structure, the Phase-space Lagrangian Lie perturbation method is used. The description of the reduced test-particle dynamics is given in terms of a non-canonical Hamiltonian gyrocenter theory. The description of the reduced kinetic dynamics is concerned with the self consistent response of the guiding-center plasma and is described in terms of the nonlinear gyrokinetic Maxwell-Vlasov equations. It is also shown that the gyrokinetic Maxwell-Vlasov system possesses a gyrokinetic energy adiabatic invariant and that, in both the linear and nonlinear (quadratic) approximations, the corresponding energy invariants are exact. The description of the reduced fluid dynamics is concerned with the derivation of a closed set of reduced fluid equations. Three generations of reduced fluid models are presented: the reduced MHD equations; the reduced FLR-MHD equations; and the gyrofluid equations

  5. Neural net prediction of tokamak plasma disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, J.V.; Lin, Z.; Horton, W.; McCool, S.C.

    1994-10-01

    The computation based on neural net algorithms in predicting minor and major disruptions in TEXT tokamak discharges has been performed. Future values of the fluctuating magnetic signal are predicted based on L past values of the magnetic fluctuation signal, measured by a single Mirnov coil. The time step used (= 0.04ms) corresponds to the experimental data sampling rate. Two kinds of approaches are adopted for the task, the contiguous future prediction and the multi-timescale prediction. Results are shown for comparison. Both networks are trained through the back-propagation algorithm with inertial terms. The degree of this success indicates that the magnetic fluctuations associated with tokamak disruptions may be characterized by a relatively low-dimensional dynamical system

  6. Tokamak instrumentation and controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becraft, W. R.; Bettis, E. S.; Houlberg, W. A.; Onega, R. J.; Stone, R. S.

    1979-02-01

    The three areas of study emphasis to date are: (1) Physics implications for controls, (2) Computer simulation, and (3) Shutdown/aborts. This document reports on the FY 78 efforts (the first year of these studies) to address these problems. Transient scenario options for the startup of a tokamak are developed, and the implications for the control system are discussed. This document also presents a hybrid computer simulation (analog and digital) of the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B) which is now being used for corroborative controls investigations. The simulation will be expanded to represent a TNS/ETF machine.

  7. Demonstration tokamak power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdou, M.; Baker, C.; Brooks, J.; Ehst, D.; Mattas, R.; Smith, D.L.; DeFreece, D.; Morgan, G.D.; Trachsel, C.

    1983-01-01

    A conceptual design for a tokamak demonstration power plant (DEMO) was developed. A large part of the study focused on examining the key issues and identifying the R and D needs for: (1) current drive for steady-state operation, (2) impurity control and exhaust, (3) tritium breeding blanket, and (4) reactor configuration and maintenance. Impurity control and exhaust will not be covered in this paper but is discussed in another paper in these proceedings, entitled Key Issues of FED/INTOR Impurity Control System.

  8. Tokamak instrumentation and controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becraft, W.R.; Bettis, E.S.; Houlberg, W.A.; Onega, R.J.; Stone, R.S.

    1979-02-01

    The three areas of study emphasis to date are: (1) Physics implications for controls, (2) Computer simulation, and (3) Shutdown/aborts. This document reports on the FY 78 efforts (the first year of these studies) to address these problems. Transient scenario options for the startup of a tokamak are developed, and the implications for the control system are discussed. This document also presents a hybrid computer simulation (analog and digital) of the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B) which is now being used for corroborative controls investigations. The simulation will be expanded to represent a TNS/ETF machine

  9. The TFR-600 Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    The new step of the Tokamak TFR, TFR 600, is described with its different aspects: physical objectives, modifications of the vacuum chamber and of the poloidal circuit, additionnal heatings. The nominal characteristics are: R=98 cm; a 0 or D 0 at 40 keV (power transmitted to the plasma); - ion cyclotron radiofrequency heating: 600 kW in the bandwidth 55-83 MHz; - and cluster injection: 100 KW at 600 keV (average mass of the H 0 clusters: 100-200 A.MU) [fr

  10. Maximum entropy tokamak configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minardi, E.

    1989-01-01

    The new entropy concept for the collective magnetic equilibria is applied to the description of the states of a tokamak subject to ohmic and auxiliary heating. The condition for the existence of steady state plasma states with vanishing entropy production implies, on one hand, the resilience of specific current density profiles and, on the other, severe restrictions on the scaling of the confinement time with power and current. These restrictions are consistent with Goldston scaling and with the existence of a heat pinch. (author)

  11. Tokamak burn control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sager, G.T.

    1988-06-01

    Research of the fusion plasma thermal instability and its control is reviewed. General models of the thermonuclear plasma are developed. Techniques of stability analysis commonly employed in burn control research are discussed. Methods for controlling the plasma against the thermal instability are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on applications to tokamak confinement concepts. Additional research which extends the results of previous research is suggested. Issues specific to the development of control strategies for mid-term engineering test reactors are identified and addressed. 100 refs., 24 figs., 10 tabs

  12. Physics design of the HL-1M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Qingdi; Shi Bingren; Liu Yukui; Zhang Jinhua; Xue Siwen; Li Fangzhu

    1999-08-01

    Presented is the physics design of the HL-1M tokamak, which is a machine upgraded from the HL-1 tokamak. Based upon the intensive investigations on the controlled nuclear fusion research in the world, the direction for modifying the HL-1 tokamak was determined, i.e. reconstructing the vacuum chamber without the thick copper shell which is used as an outer vacuum vessel in HL-1, reforming the poloidal magnetic field system and upgrading the power supply so as to be suitable for performing experimental study on high power auxiliary heating and non-inductive current drive. The main physics objectives of HL-1M is to carry out investigations on MWs power auxiliary heating and current drive with lower hybrid wave. Besides this, the other physics objectives are as follows: to perform further experimental study on the ohmic heating plasma with higher parameters so that a database for extrapolating to a larger tokamak device could be obtained, and to accumulate experiences for the construction of next tokamak device, HL-2. By using the extrapolation of the HL 1 experiment results, the tokamak scaling law and numerical computation, the physics parameters of ohmic heating and auxiliary heating plasmas are designed in some details

  13. Plasma features and alpha particle transport in low-aspect ratio tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Qiang; Wang Shaojie

    1997-06-01

    The results of the experiment and theory from low-aspect ratio tokamak devices have proved that the MHD stability will be improved. Based on present plasma physics and extrapolation to reduced aspect ratio, the feature of physics of low-aspect ratio tokamak reactor is discussed primarily. Alpha particle confinement and loss in the self-justified low-aspect ratio tokamak reactor parameters and the effect of alpha particle confinement and loss for different aspect ratio are calculated. The results provide a reference for the feasible research of compact tokamak reactor. (9 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.)

  14. Analysis on the severe accidents in KSTAR tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myoung Jae; Cheong, Y. H.; Choi, Y. S.; Cheon, E. J. [PlaGen, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-11-15

    The establishment of regulatory and approval systems for KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) has been demanded as the facility is targeted to be completed in the year of 2005. Such establishment can be achieved by performing adequate and in-depth analyses on safety issues covering radiological and chemical hazard materials, radiation protection, high vacuum, very low temperature, etc. The loss of coolant accidents and the loss of vacuum accident in fusion facilities have been introduced with summary of simulation results that were previously reported for ITER and JET. Computer codes that are actively used for accident simulation research are examined and their main features are briefly described. It can be stated that the safety analysis is indispensable to secure the safety of workers and individual members of the public as well as to establish the regulatory and approval systems for KSTAR tokamak.

  15. The hydrogen laminar jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Sanz, M. [Departamento de Motopropulsion y Termofluidomecanica, ETSI Aeronauticos, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Rosales, M. [Department Ingenieria Termica y de Fluidos, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911, Leganes (Spain); Instituto de Innovacion en Mineria y Metalurgia, Avenida del Valle 738, Santiago (Chile); Sanchez, A.L. [Department Ingenieria Termica y de Fluidos, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911, Leganes (Spain)

    2010-04-15

    Numerical and asymptotic methods are used to investigate the structure of the hydrogen jet discharging into a quiescent air atmosphere. The analysis accounts in particular for the variation of the density and transport properties with composition. The Reynolds number of the flow R{sub j}, based on the initial jet radius a, the density {rho}{sub j} and viscosity {mu}{sub j} of the jet and the characteristic jet velocity u{sub j}, is assumed to take moderately large values, so that the jet remains slender and stable, and can be correspondingly described by numerical integration of the continuity, momentum and species conservation equations written in the boundary-layer approximation. The solution for the velocity and composition in the jet development region of planar and round jets, corresponding to streamwise distances of order R{sub j}a, is computed numerically, along with the solutions that emerge both in the near field and in the far field. The small value of the hydrogen-to-air molecular weight ratio is used to simplify the solution by considering the asymptotic limit of vanishing jet density. The development provides at leading-order explicit analytical expressions for the far-field velocity and hydrogen mass fraction that describe accurately the hydrogen jet near the axis. The information provided can be useful in particular to characterize hydrogen discharge processes from holes and cracks. (author)

  16. Overview of the JET results

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Romanelli, F.; Abhangi, M.; Abreu, P.; Aftanas, Milan; Afzal, M.; Aggarwal, K.M.; Aho-Mantila, L.; Ahonen, E.; Aints, M.; Airila, M.; Albanese, R.; Bílková, Petra; Cahyna, Pavel; Dejarnac, Renaud; Ďuran, Ivan; Fuchs, Vladimír; Horáček, Jan; Imríšek, M.; Janky, Filip; Ješko, Karol; Markovič, Tomáš; Mlynář, Jan; Peterka, Matěj; Petržílka, Václav; Tomeš, Matěj; Vondráček, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 10 (2015), s. 104001 ISSN 0029-5515. [Fusion Energy Conference (FEC)/25./. St Petersburg, 13.10.2014-18.10.2014] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : ITER-like wall * JET * tokamaks * magnetic confinement Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 4.040, year: 2015 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0029-5515/55/10/104001/meta;jsessionid=3FA2A9AC9BDFE6B4A43C77C9CF6C0DF0.c2.iopscience.cld.iop.org

  17. Axisymmetric control in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphreys, D.A.

    1991-02-01

    Vertically elongated tokamak plasmas are intrinsically susceptible to vertical axisymmetric instabilities as a result of the quadrupole field which must be applied to produce the elongation. The present work analyzes the axisymmetric control necessary to stabilize elongated equilibria, with special application to the Alcator C-MOD tokamak. A rigid current-conserving filamentary plasma model is applied to Alcator C-MOD stability analysis, and limitations of the model are addressed. A more physically accurate nonrigid plasma model is developed using a perturbed equilibrium approach to estimate linearized plasma response to conductor current variations. This model includes novel flux conservation and vacuum vessel stabilization effects. It is found that the nonrigid model predicts significantly higher growth rates than predicted by the rigid model applied to the same equilibria. The nonrigid model is then applied to active control system design. Multivariable pole placement techniques are used to determine performance optimized control laws. Formalisms are developed for implementing and improving nominal feedback laws using the C-MOD digital-analog hybrid control system architecture. A proportional-derivative output observer which does not require solution of the nonlinear Ricatti equation is developed to help accomplish this implementation. The nonrigid flux conserving perturbed equilibrium plasma model indicates that equilibria with separatrix elongation of at least κ sep = 1.85 can be stabilized robustly with the present control architecture and conductor/sensor configuration

  18. Topology of tokamak orbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rome, J.A.; Peng, Y.K.M.

    1978-09-01

    Guiding center orbits in noncircular axisymmetric tokamak plasmas are studied in the constants of motion (COM) space of (v, zeta, psi/sub m/). Here, v is the particle speed, zeta is the pitch angle with respect to the parallel equilibrium current, J/sub parallels/, and psi/sub m/ is the maximum value of the poloidal flux function (increasing from the magnetic axis) along the guiding center orbit. Two D-shaped equilibria in a flux-conserving tokamak having β's of 1.3% and 7.7% are used as examples. In this space, each confined orbit corresponds to one and only one point and different types of orbits (e.g., circulating, trapped, stagnation and pinch orbits) are represented by separate regions or surfaces in the space. It is also shown that the existence of an absolute minimum B in the higher β (7.7%) equilibrium results in a dramatically different orbit topology from that of the lower β case. The differences indicate the confinement of additional high energy (v → c, within the guiding center approximation) trapped, co- and countercirculating particles whose orbit psi/sub m/ falls within the absolute B well

  19. ITER tokamak device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doggett, J.; Salpietro, E.; Shatalov, G.

    1991-01-01

    The results of the Conceptual Design Activities for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) are summarized. These activities, carried out between April 1988 and December 1990, produced a consistent set of technical characteristics and preliminary plans for co-ordinated research and development support of ITER; and a conceptual design, a description of design requirements and a preliminary construction schedule and cost estimate. After a description of the design basis, an overview is given of the tokamak device, its auxiliary systems, facility and maintenance. The interrelation and integration of the various subsystems that form the ITER tokamak concept are discussed. The 16 ITER equatorial port allocations, used for nuclear testing, diagnostics, fuelling, maintenance, and heating and current drive, are given, as well as a layout of the reactor building. Finally, brief descriptions are given of the major ITER sub-systems, i.e., (i) magnet systems (toroidal and poloidal field coils and cryogenic systems), (ii) containment structures (vacuum and cryostat vessels, machine gravity supports, attaching locks, passive loops and active coils), (iii) first wall, (iv) divertor plate (design and materials, performance and lifetime, a.o.), (v) blanket/shield system, (vi) maintenance equipment, (vii) current drive and heating, (viii) fuel cycle system, and (ix) diagnostics. 11 refs, figs and tabs

  20. International tokamak reactor conceptual design overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, W.M. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The International Tokamak Reactor (INTOR) Workshop is an unique collaborative effort among Euratom, Japan, the USA and USSR. The Zero-Phase of the INTOR Workshop, which was conducted during 1979, assessed the technical data base that would support the construction of the next major device in the tokamak program to operate in the early 1990s and defined the objectives and characteristics of this device. The INTOR workshop was extended into phase-1, the Definition Phase, in early 1980. The objective of the Phase-1 Workshop was to develop a conceptual design of the INTOR experiment. The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of the work of the Phase-1 INTOR Workshop (January 1980-June 1981, with emphasis upon the conceptual design

  1. Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment maintenance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, A.M.; Watts, K.D.

    1985-01-01

    The recently completed Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) design project was carried out to investigate potential next generation tokamak concepts. An important aspect of this project was the early development and incorporation of remote maintainability throughout the design process. This early coordination and incorporation of maintenance aspects to the design of the device and facilities would assure that the machine could ultimately be maintained and repaired in an efficient and cost effective manner. To meet this end, a rigorously formatted engineering trade study was performed to determine the preferred configuration for the TFCX reactor based primarily on maintenance requirements. The study indicated that the preferred design was one with an external vacuum vessel and torrodial field coils that could be removed via a simple radial motion. The trade study is presented and the preferred TFCX configuration is described

  2. Time-Accurate Simulations of Synthetic Jet-Based Flow Control for An Axisymmetric Spinning Body

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sahu, Jubaraj

    2004-01-01

    .... A time-accurate Navier-Stokes computational technique has been used to obtain numerical solutions for the unsteady jet-interaction flow field for a spinning projectile at a subsonic speed, Mach...

  3. Time-Accurate Simulations of Synthetic Jet-Based Flow Control for An Axisymmetric Spinning Body

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sahu, Jubaraj

    2004-01-01

    This report describes a computational study undertaken to consider the aerodynamic effect of synthetic jets as a means of providing the control authority needed to maneuver a projectile at a low subsonic speed...

  4. Female Reproductive Effects of Exposure to Jet Fuel at U.S. Air Force Bases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lemasters, Grace

    1998-01-01

    .... Jet fuel is composed of aliphatic/aromatic hydrocarbons and traces of metals that have potential adverse effects on health including menstrual disorders, infertility, spontaneous abortions, and fetal effects...

  5. Female Reproductive Effects of Exposure to Jet Fuel at U.S. Air Force Bases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lemasters, Grace

    1997-01-01

    .... Jet fuel is composed of aliphatic/aromatic hydrocarbons and traces of metals that have potential adverse effects on health including menstrual disorders infertility, spontaneous abortions, and fetal effects...

  6. The new phase for JET and its objective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebut, P.-H.; Lallia, P.P.

    1989-01-01

    The pumped divertor proposal would add a new phase to the JET programme dedicated to the studies of impurity control and operating domain for the next generation of Tokamaks. It would aim at focussing operations along the geometry considered for the next step and make the best use of the existing investment on JET in expertise and equipment for the preparation of NET, and later, DEMO. (U.K.)

  7. Turbulent jet in confined counterflow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The mean flowfield of a turbulent jet issuing into a confined, uniform counterflow was investigated computationally. Based on dimensional analysis, the jet penetration length was shown to scale with jet-to-counterflow momentum flux ratio. This scaling and the computational results reproduce the well-known correct ...

  8. Turbulent jet in confined counterflow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The mean flowfield of a turbulent jet issuing into a confined, uniform counterflow was investigated computationally. Based on dimensional analysis, the jet penetration length was shown to scale with jet-to-counterflow momentum flux ratio. This scaling and the computational results reproduce the well-known correct limit of ...

  9. Liquid tin limiter for FTU tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vertkov, A., E-mail: avertkov@yandex.ru [JSC “Red Star”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lyublinski, I. [JSC “Red Star”, Moscow (Russian Federation); NRNU MEPhI, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zharkov, M. [JSC “Red Star”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Mazzitelli, G.; Apicella, M.L.; Iafrati, M. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, C. R. Frascati, Frascati, Rome, Italy, (Italy)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • First steady state operating liquid tin limiter TLL is under study on FTU tokamak. • The cooling system with water spray coolant for TLL has been developed and tested. • High corrosion resistance of W and Mo in molten Sn confirmed up to 1000 °C. • Wetting process with Sn has been developed for Mo and W. - Abstract: The liquid Sn in a matrix of Capillary Porous System (CPS) has a high potential as plasma facing material in steady state operating fusion reactor owing to its physicochemical properties. However, up to now it has no experimental confirmation in tokamak conditions. First steady state operating limiter based on the CPS with liquid Sn installed on FTU tokamak and its experimental study is in progress. Several aspects of the design, structural materials and operation parameters of limiter based on tungsten CPS with liquid Sn are considered. Results of investigation of corrosion resistance of Mo and W in Sn and their wetting process are presented. The heat removal for limiter steady state operation is provided by evaporation of flowing gaswater spray. The effectiveness of such heat removal system is confirmed in modelling tests with power flux up to 5 MW/m2.

  10. JET:Preparing the future in fusion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mlynář, Jan; Ongena, J.; Ďuran, Ivan; Hron, Martin; Pánek, Radomír; Petržílka, Václav; Žáček, František

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 54, suppl.C (2004), C28-C38 ISSN 0011-4626. [Symposium on Plasma Physics and Technology /21st/. Praha, 14.06.2004-17.06.2004] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/04/0360 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : fusion, tokamak, JET EFDA, ITER Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.292, year: 2004

  11. Stream-coordinate structure of oceanic jets based on merged altimeter data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Che; Zhang, Linlin; Yan, Xiaomei

    2011-01-01

    The jet structure of the Southern Ocean front south of Australia is studied in stream-coordinate with a new altimeter product—Absolute Dynamic Topography (ADT) from AVISO. The accuracy of the ADT data is validated with the mooring data from a two-year subantarctic-front experiment. It is demonstrated that the ADT is consistent with in-situ measurements and captures the meso-scale activity of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). Stream-coordinate analysis of ADT surface geostrophic flows finds that ACC jets exhibit large spatio-temporal variability and do not correspond to particular streamfunction values. In the circumpolar scope ACC jets display a transient fragmented pattern controlled by topographic features. The poleward shift of jet in streamfunction space, as revealed by a streamwise correlation method, indicates the presence of meridional fluxes of zonal momentum. Such cross-stream eddy fluxes concentrate the broad ACC baroclinic flow into narrow jets. Combined with a recent discovery of gravest empirical mode (GEM) in the thermohaline fields, the study clarifies the interrelationship among front, jet and streamfunction in the Southern Ocean.

  12. Magneto-hydro-dynamic simulation of Edge-Localised-Modes in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pamela, S.

    2010-01-01

    In order to produce energy from fusion reactions in a tokamak, the plasma must reach temperatures higher than that of our sun. The operation regime called H-mode enables one to acquire a plasma confinement close to fusion conditions. Due to the formation of a transport barrier at the plasma edge, turbulent transport is reduced, and the total plasma pressure increases, resulting in a strong pressure gradient at the edge. If this pressure gradient, localised at the plasma-vacuum boundary, becomes too steep, a magneto-hydro-dynamic instability is triggered and part of the plasma pressure is lost. This instability, hence called Edge-Localised-Mode, provokes large heat fluxes on some of the plasma-facing components of the machine, which could set operational limits for a tokamak the size of ITER. In order to understand this instability, and to determine the non-linear mechanisms behind the ELMs, the JOREK code is used. The work presented in this thesis is based on MHD simulations of ballooning modes (responsible for ELMs) with the JOREK code. At first, simulations are done for standard plasmas, inspired of experimental machines. In particular, the plasma rotation at equilibrium, in the region of the edge pressure gradient, is studied in order to obtain an analysis of the effects that such a rotation can have on the linear stability of ELMs and on their non-linear evolution. Then, as a second step, simulations are applied to plasmas of the experimental tokamaks JET and MAST (England). This permits the direct comparison of simulation results with experimental observations, with the main goal of improving our global understanding of ELMs. Adding to this physics aspect, the confrontation of the JOREK code with diagnostics of JET and MAST brings to a validation of simulations, which should prove that the simulations which were obtained do correspond to ELM instabilities. This first step towards the validation of the code is crucial concerning the simulation of ELMs in ITER

  13. Research using small tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    The technical reports in this document were presented at the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting ''Research on Small Tokamaks'', September 1990, in three sessions, viz., (1) Plasma Modes, Control, and Internal Phenomena, (2) Edge Phenomena, and (3) Advanced Configurations and New Facilities. In Section (1) experiments at controlling low mode number modes, feedback control using external coils, lower-hybrid current drive for the stabilization of sawtooth activity and continuous (1,1) mode, and unmodulated and fast modulated ECRH mode stabilization experiments were reported, as well as the relation to disruptions and transport of low m,n modes and magnetic island growth; static magnetic perturbations by helical windings causing mode locking and sawtooth suppression; island widths and frequency of the m=2 tearing mode; ultra-fast cooling due to pellet injection; and, finally, some papers on advanced diagnostics, i.e., lithium-beam activated charge-exchange spectroscopy, and detection through laser scattering of discrete Alfven waves. In Section (2), experimental edge physics results from a number of machines were presented (positive biasing on HYBTOK II enhancing the radial electric field and improving confinement; lower hybrid current drive on CASTOR improving global particle confinement, good current drive efficiency in HT-6B showing stabilization of sawteeth and Mirnov oscillations), as well as diagnostic developments (multi-chord time resolved soft and ultra-soft X-ray plasma radiation detection on MT-1; measurements on electron capture cross sections in multi-charged ion-atom collisions; development of a diagnostic neutral beam on Phaedrus-T). Theoretical papers discussed the influence of sheared flow and/or active feedback on edge microstability, large edge electric fields, and two-fluid modelling of non-ambipolar scrape-off layers. Section (3) contained (i) a proposal to construct a spherical tokamak ''Proto-Eta'', (ii) an analysis of ultra-low-q and runaway

  14. JUST: Joint Upgraded Spherical Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azizov, E.A.; Dvorkin, N.Ya.; Filatov, O.G.

    1997-01-01

    The main goals, ideas and the programme of JUST, spherical tokamak (ST) for the plasma burn investigation, are presented. The place and prospects of JUST in thermonuclear investigations are discussed. (author)

  15. Alcator C-Mod Tokamak

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Alcator C-Mod at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is operated as a DOE national user facility. Alcator C-Mod is a unique, compact tokamak facility that uses...

  16. Study of runaway electron generation during major disruptions in JET

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Plyusnin, V.V.; Riccardo, V.; Jaspers, R.; Alper, B.; Kiptily, V.G.; Mlynář, Jan; Popovichev, S.; de La Luna, E.; Andersson, F.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 2 (2006), s. 277-284 ISSN 0029-5515 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : JET * tokamak * fusion * dicsruption * runaway electrons * tomography Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.839, year: 2006

  17. First experiments with SST-1 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxena, Y.C.

    2005-01-01

    SST-1, a steady state superconducting tokamak, is undergoing commissioning tests at the Institute for Plasma Research. The objectives of SST-1 include studying the physics of the plasma processes in a tokamak under steady state conditions and learning technologies related to the steady state operation of the tokamak. These studies are expected to contribute to the tokamak physics database for very long pulse operations. Superconducting (SC) magnets are deployed for both the toroidal and poloidal field coils in SST-1. An Ohmic transformer is provided for plasma breakdown and initial current ramp up. SST-1 deploys a fully welded ultra high vacuum vessel. Liquid nitrogen cooled radiation shield are deployed between the vacuum vessel and SC magnets as well as SC magnets and cryostat, to minimize the radiation losses at the SC magnets. The auxiliary current drive is based on 1.0 MW of Lower Hybrid current drive (LHCD) at 3.7 GHz. Auxiliary heating systems include 1 MW of Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency system (ICRF) at 22 MHz to 91 MHz, 0.2 MW of Electron Cyclotron Resonance heating at 84 GHz and a Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) system with peak power of 0.8 MW (at 80 keV) with variable beam energy in range of 10-80 keV. The ICRF system would also be used for initial breakdown and wall conditioning experiments. Detailed commissioning tests on the cryogenic system and experiments on the hydraulic characters and cool down features of single TF coils have been completed prior to the cool down of the entire superconducting system. Results of the single TF magnet cool down, and testing of the magnet system are presented. First experiments related to the breakdown and the current ramp up will subsequently be carried out. (author)

  18. Spherical tokamak development in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, G.O.; Del Bosco, E.; Ferreira, J.G.; Berni, L.A.; Oliveira, R.M.; Andrade, M.C.R.; Shibata, C.S.; Ueda, M.; Barroso, J.J.; Castro, P.J. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Lab. Associado de Plasma; Barbosa, L.F.W. [Universidade do Vale do Paraiba (UNIVAP), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia, Arquitetura e Urbanismo; Patire Junior, H. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Div. de Mecanica Espacial e Controle; The high-power microwave sources group

    2003-12-01

    This paper describes the general characteristics of spherical tokamaks, or spherical tori, with a brief overview of work in this area already performed or in progress at several institutions worldwide. The paper presents also the steps in the development of the ETE (Experimento Tokamak Esferico) project, its research program, technical characteristics and operating conditions as of December, 2002 at the Associated Plasma Laboratory (LAP) of the National Space Research Institute (INPE) in Brazil. (author)

  19. Spherical tokamak development in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, G.O.; Del Bosco, E.; Ferreira, J.G.; Berni, L.A.; Oliveira, R.M.; Andrade, M.C.R.; Shibata, C.S.; Ueda, M.; Barroso, J.J.; Castro, P.J.; Barbosa, L.F.W.; Patire Junior, H.; The high-power microwave sources group

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the general characteristics of spherical tokamaks, or spherical tori, with a brief overview of work in this area already performed or in progress at several institutions worldwide. The paper presents also the steps in the development of the ETE (Experimento Tokamak Esferico) project, its research program, technical characteristics and operating conditions as of December, 2002 at the Associated Plasma Laboratory (LAP) of the National Space Research Institute (INPE) in Brazil. (author)

  20. Spherical tokamak development in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, Gerson Otto; Bosco, Edson Del; Ferreira, Julio Guimaraes

    2003-01-01

    The general characteristics of spherical tokamaks, or spherical tori, with a brief view of work in this area already performed or in progress at several institutions worldwide are described. The paper presents also the steps in the development of the ETE (Experiment Tokamak spheric) project, its research program, technical characteristics and operating conditions as of December, 2002 a the Associated Plasma Laboratory (LAP) of the National Space Research Institute (INPE) in Brazil. (author)

  1. Spherical tokamak development in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, Gerson Otto; Bosco, Edson Del; Ferreira, Julio Guimaraes [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Lab. Associado de Plasma] (and others)

    2003-07-01

    The general characteristics of spherical tokamaks, or spherical tori, with a brief view of work in this area already performed or in progress at several institutions worldwide are described. The paper presents also the steps in the development of the ETE (Experiment Tokamak spheric) project, its research program, technical characteristics and operating conditions as of December, 2002 a the Associated Plasma Laboratory (LAP) of the National Space Research Institute (INPE) in Brazil. (author)

  2. The ETE spherical Tokamak project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, Gerson Otto; Andrade, Maria Celia Ramos de; Barbosa, Luis Filipe Wiltgen

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the general characteristics of spherical tokamaks, with a brief overview of work in the area of spherical torus already performed or in progress at several institutions. The paper presents also the historical development of the ETE (Spherical Tokamak Experiment) project, its research program, technical characteristics and status of construction in September, 1998 at the Associated plasma Laboratory (LAP) of the National Institute for Space Research (INPE) in Brazil. (author)

  3. The ETE spherical Tokamak project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, Gerson Otto; Andrade, Maria Celia Ramos de; Barbosa, Luis Filipe Wiltgen [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Lab. Associado de Plasma] [and others]. E-mail: ludwig@plasma.inpe.br

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes the general characteristics of spherical tokamaks, with a brief overview of work in the area of spherical torus already performed or in progress at several institutions. The paper presents also the historical development of the ETE (Spherical Tokamak Experiment) project, its research program, technical characteristics and status of construction in September, 1998 at the Associated plasma Laboratory (LAP) of the National Institute for Space Research (INPE) in Brazil. (author)

  4. Determination of the centre of gravity of the current distribution in the MT-1 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoletnik, S.; Montvai, A.

    1986-03-01

    A simple software method is described for measuring the plasma current channel position from Mirnov coil signals on the MT-1 tokamak. Plasma equilibrium calculations are not involved. The method was also applied to unstable tokamak discharges, and examples based on the results are presented. (author)

  5. Asymmetric electron cyclotron emission from superthermal electrons in the TFR Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-03-01

    Measurements of electron cyclotron radiation near the fundamental frequency on the high and low magnetic field side of the TFR Tokamak are reported. In the presence of a superthermal electron component the measured intensities are asymmetric. A theoretical explanation based on the combined effects of the electron relativistic mass variation and the 1/R variation of the tokamak magnetic field is discussed

  6. The Compact Ignition Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.

    1987-01-01

    The author discusses his lab's plan for completing the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) conceptual design during calendar year 1987. Around July 1 they froze the subsystem envelopes on the device to continue with the conceptual design. They did this by formalizing a general requirements document. They have been developing the management plan and submitted a version to the DOE July 10. He describes a group of management activities. They released the vacuum vessel Request For Proposals (RFP) on August 5. An RFP to do a major part of the system engineering on the device is being developed. They intend to assemble the device outside of the test cell, then move it into the the test cell, install it there, and bring to the test cell many of the auxiliary facilities from TFTR, for example, power supplies

  7. Plasma turbulence in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldas, Ibere L.; Heller, M.V.A.P.; Brasilio, Z.A. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    1997-12-31

    Full text. In this work we summarize the results from experiments on electrostatic and magnetic fluctuations in tokamak plasmas. Spectral analyses show that these fluctuations are turbulent, having a broad spectrum of wavectors and a broad spectrum of frequencies at each wavector. The electrostatic turbulence induces unexpected anomalous particle transport that deteriorates the plasma confinement. The relationship of these fluctuations to the current state of plasma theory is still unclear. Furthermore, we describe also attempts to control this plasma turbulence with external magnetic perturbations that create chaotic magnetic configurations. Accordingly, the magnetic field lines may become chaotic and then induce a Lagrangian diffusion. Moreover, to discuss nonlinear coupling and intermittency, we present results obtained by using numerical techniques as bi spectral and wavelet analyses. (author)

  8. The Varennes tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, B.C.; Bolton, R.A.; Pacher, H.D.

    1983-01-01

    This article is a progress report on the Varennes Tokamak (TdeV), which is the main element in the Canadian research program on magnetic confinement fusion. The project is led by a group of five institutions: the Hydro-Quebec Research Institute (IREQ), the National Research Council - Energy, the University of Montreal, CANATOM Ltd., and MPB Technologies Inc. The TdeV will cost about 40 million dollars and will be built in a large hall at the IREQ high energy laboratory in Varennes. Operation in a quasi-stationary regime has been adopted as one of the primary research areas for the TdeV. First plasma is expected at the end of 1984 [fr

  9. High Beta Tokamak research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navratil, G.A.; Mauel, M.E.; Ivers, T.H.; Sankar, M.K.V.; Eisner, E.; Gates, D.; Garofalo, A.; Kombargi, R.; Maurer, D.; Nadle, D.; Xiao, Q.

    1993-01-01

    During the past 6 months, experiments have been conducted with the HBT-EP tokamak in order to (1) test and evaluate diagnostic systems, (2) establish basic machine operation, (3) document MHD behavior as a function of global discharge parameters, (4) investigate conditions leading to passive stabilization of MHD instabilities, and (5) quantify the external saddle coil current required for DC mode locking. In addition, the development and installation of new hardware systems has occurred. A prototype saddle coil was installed and tested. A five-position (n,m) = (1,2) external helical saddle coil was attached for mode-locking experiments. And, fabrication of the 32-channel UV tomography and the multipass Thomson scattering diagnostics have begun in preparation for installation later this year

  10. Tokamak hybrid study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenney, F.H.

    1976-09-01

    A report on one year of study of a tokamak hybrid reactor is presented. The plasma is maintained by both D and T beams. To obtain long burn times a poloidal field divertor is required. Both the single null and the double null style of divertor are considered. The blanket consists of a neutron multiplier region containing natural uranium followed by burner regions of molten salt (flibe) loaded with PuF 3 to enhance the energy multiplication. Economic analysis has been applied only recently to a variety of reactor sizes and plasma conditions. Early indications suggest that the most attractive hybrids will have large plasmas of major radius in excess of 8 meters

  11. Tokamak hybrid study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenney, F.H.

    1976-01-01

    A report on one year of study of a tokamak hybrid reactor is given. The plasma is maintained by both D and T beams. To obtain long burn times a poloidal field divertor is required. Both the single null and the double null style of divertor are considered. The blanket consists of a neutron multiplier region containing natural uranium followed by burner regions of molten salt (flibe) loaded with PuF 3 to enhance the energy multiplication. Economic analysis has been applied only recently to a variety of reactor sizes and plasma conditions. Early indications suggest that the most attractive hybrids will have large plasmas of major radius in excess of 8 meters

  12. Synthetic neutron camera and spectrometer in JET based on AFSI-ASCOT simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirén, P.; Varje, J.; Weisen, H.; Koskela, T.; contributors, JET

    2017-09-01

    The ASCOT Fusion Source Integrator (AFSI) has been used to calculate neutron production rates and spectra corresponding to the JET 19-channel neutron camera (KN3) and the time-of-flight spectrometer (TOFOR) as ideal diagnostics, without detector-related effects. AFSI calculates fusion product distributions in 4D, based on Monte Carlo integration from arbitrary reactant distribution functions. The distribution functions were calculated by the ASCOT Monte Carlo particle orbit following code for thermal, NBI and ICRH particle reactions. Fusion cross-sections were defined based on the Bosch-Hale model and both DD and DT reactions have been included. Neutrons generated by AFSI-ASCOT simulations have already been applied as a neutron source of the Serpent neutron transport code in ITER studies. Additionally, AFSI has been selected to be a main tool as the fusion product generator in the complete analysis calculation chain: ASCOT - AFSI - SERPENT (neutron and gamma transport Monte Carlo code) - APROS (system and power plant modelling code), which encompasses the plasma as an energy source, heat deposition in plant structures as well as cooling and balance-of-plant in DEMO applications and other reactor relevant analyses. This conference paper presents the first results and validation of the AFSI DD fusion model for different auxiliary heating scenarios (NBI, ICRH) with very different fast particle distribution functions. Both calculated quantities (production rates and spectra) have been compared with experimental data from KN3 and synthetic spectrometer data from ControlRoom code. No unexplained differences have been observed. In future work, AFSI will be extended for synthetic gamma diagnostics and additionally, AFSI will be used as part of the neutron transport calculation chain to model real diagnostics instead of ideal synthetic diagnostics for quantitative benchmarking.

  13. CPV cells cooling system based on submerged jet impingement: CFD modeling and experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montorfano, Davide; Gaetano, Antonio; Barbato, Maurizio C.; Ambrosetti, Gianluca; Pedretti, Andrea

    2014-09-01

    Concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) cells offer higher efficiencies with regard to the PV ones and allow to strongly reduce the overall solar cell area. However, to operate correctly and exploit their advantages, their temperature has to be kept low and as uniform as possible and the cooling circuit pressure drops need to be limited. In this work an impingement water jet cooling system specifically designed for an industrial HCPV receiver is studied. Through the literature and by means of accurate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations, the nozzle to plate distance, the number of jets and the nozzle pitch, i.e. the distance between adjacent jets, were optimized. Afterwards, extensive experimental tests were performed to validate pressure drops and cooling power simulation results.

  14. Radiation-hardened x-ray imaging for burning-plasma tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Séguin, Fredrick H.; Petrasso, Richard D.; Li, Chi Kang

    1997-01-01

    A special type of vacuum-photodiode detector is being developed for x-ray imaging of plasma in fusion-producing tokamaks such as the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER), where the radiation environment will be too hostile for conventional x-ray detectors. The vacuum photodiode has modest efficiency, but it is intrinsically immune to radiation damage if built in such a manner as to expose only metal components to radiation. A design based on appropriately chosen materials (including high-Z cathodes) and geometries (including a small angle between cathode surface and incident x rays) can provide good signals from the 1-100 keV x rays that are of particular importance for imaging the plasmas in the Joint European Torus (JET) and ITER. It should also provide better rejection of signal distortion and noise due to unwanted detection of neutrons and hard gamma rays than conventional detectors. A prototype design is described, along with performance parameters predicted for JET and ITER. In addition, we show results of laboratory experiments that confirm some of the predicted behaviors of the design.

  15. Physics of the interaction between runaway electrons and the background plasma of the current quench in tokamak disruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reux, Cedric

    2017-10-01

    Runaway electrons are created during disruptions of tokamak plasmas. They can be accelerated in the form of a multi-MA beam at energies up to several 10's of MeV. Prevention or suppression of runaway electrons during disruptions will be essential to ensure a reliable operation of future tokamaks such as ITER. Recent experiments showed that the suppression of an already accelerated beam with massive gas injection was unsuccessful at JET, conversely to smaller tokamaks. This was attributed to a dense, cold background plasma (up to several 1020 m-3 accompanying the runaway beam. The present contribution reports on the latest experimental results obtained at JET showing that some mitigation efficiency can be restored by changing the features of the background plasma. The density, temperature, position of the plasma and the energy of runaways were characterized using a combined analysis of interferometry, soft X-rays, bolometry, magnetics and hard X-rays. It showed that lower density background plasmas were obtained using smaller amounts of gas to trigger the disruption, leading to an improved penetration of the mitigation gas. Based on the observations, a physical model of the creation of the background plasma and its subsequent evolution is proposed. The plasma characteristics during later stages of the disruption are indeed dependent on the way it was initially created. The sustainment of the plasma during the runaway beam phase is then addressed by making a power balance between ohmic heating, power transfer from runaway electrons, radiation and atomic processes. Finally, a model of the interaction of the plasma with the mitigation gas is proposed to explain why massive gas injection of runaway beams works only in specific situations. This aims at pointing out which parameters bear the most importance if this mitigation scheme is to be used on larger devices like ITER. Acknowledgement: This work has been carried out within the framework of the EUROfusion Consortium

  16. An Arduino microcontroller based digitalization of a vertical traversing mechanism used for the analysis of jet flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, S. M. Rakibur; Roshid, S. M. Al Mamun Or; Nishan, Ishtiaque Ahmed

    2017-12-01

    This paper deals with the design of a drive system of traversing mechanism used to position the pitot tube in desired position of the jet flow field. In this system a stepper motor is driven by a `dual H bridge' motor driver and programmed Arduino microcontroller. The stepper motor is made to move in precise steps to obtain desired movement of the traversing mechanism. The jet flow is characterized in three distinct zones - initial zone, transition zone and developed zone. Each zone can be divided into required number of segments based on variation of velocity. By assigning number of segments, step range and number of steps in each segment as inputs, it is possible to collect data in all the flow zones according to our programmed schedule. The system will allow taking a large number of readings automatically.

  17. Determining the prediction limits of models and classifiers with applications for disruption prediction in JET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murari, A.; Peluso, E.; Vega, J.; Gelfusa, M.; Lungaroni, M.; Gaudio, P.; Martínez, F. J.; Contributors, JET

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the many aspects of tokamak physics requires the development of quite sophisticated models. Moreover, in the operation of the devices, prediction of the future evolution of discharges can be of crucial importance, particularly in the case of the prediction of disruptions, which can cause serious damage to various parts of the machine. The determination of the limits of predictability is therefore an important issue for modelling, classifying and forecasting. In all these cases, once a certain level of performance has been reached, the question typically arises as to whether all the information available in the data has been exploited, or whether there are still margins for improvement of the tools being developed. In this paper, a theoretical information approach is proposed to address this issue. The excellent properties of the developed indicator, called the prediction factor (PF), have been proved with the help of a series of numerical tests. Its application to some typical behaviour relating to macroscopic instabilities in tokamaks has shown very positive results. The prediction factor has also been used to assess the performance of disruption predictors running in real time in the JET system, including the one systematically deployed in the feedback loop for mitigation purposes. The main conclusion is that the most advanced predictors basically exploit all the information contained in the locked mode signal on which they are based. Therefore, qualitative improvements in disruption prediction performance in JET would need the processing of additional signals, probably profiles.

  18. Beta limits of a completely bootstrapped tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weening, R.H.; Bondeson, A.

    1992-03-01

    A beta limit is given for a completely bootstrapped tokamak. The beta limit is sensitive to the achievable Troyon factor and depends directly upon the strength of the tokamak bootstrap effect. (author) 16 refs

  19. Bibliography of fusion product physics in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hively, L. M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sigmar, D. J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1989-09-01

    Almost 700 citations have been compiled as the first step in reviewing the recent research on tokamak fusion product effects in tokamaks. The publications are listed alphabetically by the last name of the first author and by subject category.

  20. Onset of a Large Ejective Solar Eruption from a Typical Coronal-jet-base Field Configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Navin Chandra; Magara, Tetsuya; Moon, Yong-Jae [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Gyeonggi-Do, 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L., E-mail: navin@khu.ac.kr, E-mail: njoshi98@gmail.com [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)

    2017-08-10

    Utilizing multiwavelength observations and magnetic field data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory ( SDO )/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), SDO /Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI), the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite ( GOES ), and RHESSI , we investigate a large-scale ejective solar eruption of 2014 December 18 from active region NOAA 12241. This event produced a distinctive “three-ribbon” flare, having two parallel ribbons corresponding to the ribbons of a standard two-ribbon flare, and a larger-scale third quasi-circular ribbon offset from the other two. There are two components to this eruptive event. First, a flux rope forms above a strong-field polarity inversion line and erupts and grows as the parallel ribbons turn on, grow, and spread apart from that polarity inversion line; this evolution is consistent with the mechanism of tether-cutting reconnection for eruptions. Second, the eruption of the arcade that has the erupting flux rope in its core undergoes magnetic reconnection at the null point of a fan dome that envelops the erupting arcade, resulting in formation of the quasi-circular ribbon; this is consistent with the breakout reconnection mechanism for eruptions. We find that the parallel ribbons begin well before (∼12 minutes) the onset of the circular ribbon, indicating that tether-cutting reconnection (or a non-ideal MHD instability) initiated this event, rather than breakout reconnection. The overall setup for this large-scale eruption (diameter of the circular ribbon ∼10{sup 5} km) is analogous to that of coronal jets (base size ∼10{sup 4} km), many of which, according to recent findings, result from eruptions of small-scale “minifilaments.” Thus these findings confirm that eruptions of sheared-core magnetic arcades seated in fan–spine null-point magnetic topology happen on a wide range of size scales on the Sun.

  1. Near-wall plasma in a tokamak thermonuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pistunovich, V.I.

    1991-01-01

    The development of thermonuclear reactor projects such as the national ones GTRT and OTR (USSR), UWMAK-NUMAK and TIBER (USA), NET (Euratom), FER (Japan), as well as the international ones INTOR and JET allows one to determine in detail the problems arising in the creation of a reactor. One of these problems is extracting heat and particles from the reactor and removing thermonuclear reaction ash, which in the case of a DT reactor is helium. The solution of this problem is connected with the investigation of interaction processes of the plasma with the materials from which the reactor is constructed. Progress in studying the interaction of plasma with a material surface has given rise to a new division of plasma physics, which includes not only reactor problems, but also plasma-physical processes occurring in the region between the hot plasma and the first wall. Experiments on tokamaks have shown that the phenomena occurring in the wall plasma and in the hot zone of the tokamak once strongly correlated. In and number of regimes the confinement of the hot plasma is determined by the conditions in the peripheral region. A survey of the near-well plasma problem in a tokamak thermonuclear reactor is given. The results of recent investigations are presented, and the status of the problem as applied to the ITER reactor project is described

  2. Stationary Flowing Liquid Lithium (SFLiLi) systems for tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, Leonid; Gentile, Charles; Roquemore, Lane

    2013-10-01

    The present approach to magnetic fusion which relies on high recycling plasma-wall interaction has exhausted itself at the level of TFTR, JET, JT-60 devices with no realistic path to the burning plasma. Instead, magnetic fusion needs a return to its original idea of insulation of the plasma from the wall, which was the dominant approach in the 1970s and upon implementations has a clear path to the DEMO device with PDT ~= 100 MW and Qelectric > 1 . The SFLiLi systems of this talk is the technology tool for implementation of the guiding idea of magnetic fusion. It utilizes the unique properties of flowing LiLi to pump plasma particles and, thus, insulate plasma from the walls. The necessary flow rate, ~= 1 g3/s, is very small, thus, making the use of lithium practical and consistent with safety requirements. The talk describes how chemical activity of LiLi, which is the major technology challenge of using LiLi in tokamaks, is addressed by SFLiLi systems at the level of already performed (HT-7) experiment, and in ongoing implementations for a prototype of SFLiLi for tokamak divertors and the mid-plane limiter for EAST tokamak (to be tested in the next experimental campaign). This work is supported by US DoE contract No. DE-AC02-09-CH11466.

  3. Simulations of Solar Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-02-01

    Formation of a coronal jet from twisted field lines that have reconnected with the ambient field. The colors show the radial velocity of the plasma. [Adapted from Szente et al. 2017]How do jets emitted from the Suns surface contribute to its corona and to the solar wind? In a recent study, a team of scientists performed complex three-dimensional simulations of coronal jets to answer these questions.Small ExplosionsCoronal jets are relatively small eruptions from the Suns surface, with heights of roughly 100 to 10,000 km, speeds of 10 to 1,000 km/s, and lifetimes of a few minutes to around ten hours. These jets are constantly present theyre emitted even from the quiet Sun, when activity is otherwise low and weve observed them with a fleet of Sun-watching space telescopes spanning the visible, extreme ultraviolet (EUV), and X-ray wavelength bands.A comparison of simulated observations based on the authors model (left panels) to actual EUV and X-ray observations of jets (right panels). [Szente et al. 2017]Due to their ubiquity, we speculate that these jets might contribute to heating the global solar corona (which is significantly hotter than the surface below it, a curiosity known as the coronal heating problem). We can also wonder what role these jets might play in driving the overall solar wind.Launching a JetLed by Judit Szente (University of Michigan), a team of scientists has explored the impact of coronal jets on the global corona and solar wind with a series of numerical simulations. Szente and collaborators used three-dimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations that provide realistic treatment of the solar atmosphere, the solar wind acceleration, and the complexities of heat transfer throughout the corona.In the authors simulations, a jet is initiated as a magnetic dipole rotates at the solar surface, winding up field lines. Magnetic reconnection between the twisted lines and the background field then launches the jet from the dense and hot solar

  4. Analysis of plasma jets produced by a small railgun-based acclelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Maximilian; Sherburne, Michael; Adams, Jacob; Henderson, Brian; Adams, Colin S.

    2017-10-01

    We report results of an experimental effort to characterize temperature, velocity, electron density, and composition of plasma jets generated at the Virginia Tech Center for Space Science and Engineering Research. The linear railgun, which features a 0.5 x 0.32 cm rectangular bore and 10.2 cm long rails, is fed gas from a 700 kPa manifold by a puff valve capable of opening for pulses of several milliseconds. The rails are powered by an LC pulse-forming network (PFN) designed to deliver 100 kA during a pulse of approximately 10 microsecond duration. A modular accelerator design allows rails and insulators fabricated with different materials and geometries to be swapped out with ease. To characterize the resulting plasma jet, a full suite of diagnostics is utilized including a single-chord Mach Zehnder interferometer, photodiode array, spectrometer, image intensified CCD camera, and Rogowski coil. Initial results obtained while charging the PFN to half its design voltage suggest jet velocities of 15-25 km/s are obtained consistently. Results from this device will provide groundwork for the design of future jet sources and experiments to study topics ranging from plasma-material interactions to plasma shocks.

  5. DeepJet: a deep-learned multiclass jet-tagger for slim and fat jets

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Qu, Huilin; Stoye, Markus; Kieseler, Jan; Verzetti, Mauro

    2018-01-01

    We present a customized neural network architecture for both, slim and fat jet tagging. It is based on the idea to keep the concept of physics objects, like particle flow particles, as a core element of the network architecture. The deep learning algorithm works for most of the common jet classes, i.e. b, c, usd and gluon jets for slim jets and W, Z, H, QCD and top classes for fat jets. The developed architecture promising gains in performance as shown in simulation of the CMS collaboration. Currently the tagger is under test in real data in the CMS experiment.

  6. Quark and gluon jet properties in symmetric three-jet events

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; De Bonis, I; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Padilla, C; Palla, Fabrizio; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Farilla, A; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Romano, F; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Bonvicini, G; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Jacobsen, R; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Palazzi, P; Pater, J R; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wildish, T; Witzeling, W; Wotschack, J; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Tanaka, R; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Delfino, M C; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Braun, O; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Colling, D J; Dornan, Peter J; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; San Martin, G; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bowdery, C K; Brodbeck, T J; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Konstantinidis, N P; Nicod, D; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Trabelsi, K; Abt, I; Assmann, R W; Bauer, C; Blum, Walter; Brown, D; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Jakobs, K; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Park, I C; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Betteridge, A P; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Johnson, D L; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Edwards, M; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Beddall, A; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Letho, M; Newton, W M; Rankin, C; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Feigl, E; Grupen, Claus; Lutters, G; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Ragusa, F; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Harton, J L; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Schmitt, M; Scott, I J; Sharma, V; Turk, J; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    Quark and gluon jets with the same energy, 24GeV, are compared in symmetric three-jet configurations from hadronic Z decays observed by the ALEPH detector. Jets are defined using the Durham algorithm. Gluon jets are identified using an anti-tag on b jets, based on either a track impact parameter method or a high transverse momentum lepton tag. The comparison of gluon and mixed flavour quark jets shows that gluon jets have a softer fragmentation function, a larger angular width and a higher particle multiplicity. Evidence is also presented which shows that the corresponding differences between gluon and heavy flavour jets are significantly smaller.

  7. Fusion potential for spherical and compact tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandzelius, Mikael

    2003-02-01

    The tokamak is the most successful fusion experiment today. Despite this, the conventional tokamak has a long way to go before being realized into an economically viable power plant. In this master thesis work, two alternative tokamak configurations to the conventional tokamak has been studied, both of which could be realized to a lower cost. The fusion potential of the spherical and the compact tokamak have been examined with a comparison of the conventional tokamak in mind. The difficulties arising in the two configurations have been treated from a physical point of view concerning the fusion plasma and from a technological standpoint evolving around design, materials and engineering. Both advantages and drawbacks of either configuration have been treated relative to the conventional tokamak. The spherical tokamak shows promising plasma characteristics, notably a high {beta}-value but have troubles with high heat loads and marginal tritium breeding. The compact tokamak operates at a high plasma density and a high magnetic field enabling it to be built considerably smaller than any other tokamak. The most notable down-side being high heat loads and neutron transport problems. With the help of theoretical reactor studies, extrapolating from where we stand today, it is conceivable that the spherical tokamak is closer of being realized of the two. But, as this study shows, the compact tokamak power plant concept offers the most appealing prospect.

  8. Fusion potential for spherical and compact tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandzelius, Mikael

    2003-02-01

    The tokamak is the most successful fusion experiment today. Despite this, the conventional tokamak has a long way to go before being realized into an economically viable power plant. In this master thesis work, two alternative tokamak configurations to the conventional tokamak has been studied, both of which could be realized to a lower cost. The fusion potential of the spherical and the compact tokamak have been examined with a comparison of the conventional tokamak in mind. The difficulties arising in the two configurations have been treated from a physical point of view concerning the fusion plasma and from a technological standpoint evolving around design, materials and engineering. Both advantages and drawbacks of either configuration have been treated relative to the conventional tokamak. The spherical tokamak shows promising plasma characteristics, notably a high β-value but have troubles with high heat loads and marginal tritium breeding. The compact tokamak operates at a high plasma density and a high magnetic field enabling it to be built considerably smaller than any other tokamak. The most notable down-side being high heat loads and neutron transport problems. With the help of theoretical reactor studies, extrapolating from where we stand today, it is conceivable that the spherical tokamak is closer of being realized of the two. But, as this study shows, the compact tokamak power plant concept offers the most appealing prospect

  9. Modeling of noble gas injection into tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, D.Kh.; Yurchenko, E.I.; Lukash, V.E.; Baronova, E.O.; Rozhansky, V.A.; Senichenkov, I.Yu.; Veselova, I.Yu.; Schneider, R.

    2005-01-01

    Noble gas injection for mitigation of the disruption in DIII-D is simulated. The simulation of the first two stages is performed: of the neutral gas jet penetration through the background plasmas, and of the thermal quench. In order to simulate the first stage the 1.5-dimensional numerical code LLP with improved radiation model for noble gas is used. It is demonstrated that the jet remains mainly neutral and thus is able to penetrate to the central region of the tokamak in accordance with experimental observations. Plasma cooling at this stage is provided by the energy exchange with the jet. The radiation is relatively small, and the plasma thermal energy is spent mainly on the jet expansion. The magnetic surfaces in contact with the jet are cooled significantly. The cooling front propagates towards the plasma center. The simulations of the plasma column dynamics in the presence of moving jet is performed by means of the free boundary transport modeling DINA code. It has been shown that the cooling front is accompanied by strongly localized 'shark fin-like' perturbation in toroidal current density profile. After few milliseconds the jet (together with the current perturbation) achieves the region where safety factor is slightly higher than unity and a new type of the non-local kink mode develops. The unstable kink perturbation is non-resonant for any magnetic surface, both inside the plasma column, and in the vacuum space. The mode disturbs mainly the core region. The growth time of the 'shark fin-like' mode is higher than the Alfven time by a factor of 100 for DIII-D parameters. Hence, the simulation describes the DIII-D experimental results, at least, qualitatively. (author)

  10. Economic trends of tokamak power plants independent of physics scaling models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.; Steiner, D.

    1978-01-01

    This study examines the effects of plasma radius, field on axis, plasma impurity level, and aspect ratio on power level and unit capital cost, $/kW/sub e/, of tokamak power plants sized independent of plasma physics scaling models. It is noted that tokamaks sized in this manner are thermally unstable based on trapped particle scaling relationships. It is observed that there is an economic advantage for larger power level tokamaks achieved by physics independent sizing; however, the incentive for increased power levels is less than that for fission reactors. It is further observed that the economic advantage of these larger power level tokamaks is decreased when plasma thermal stability measures are incorporated, such as by increasing the plasma impurity concentration. This trend of economy with size obtained by physics independent sizing is opposite to that observed when the tokamak designs are constrained to obey the trapped particle and empirical scaling relationships

  11. Jet Joint Undertaking. Annual report 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    The Joint European Torus is the largest project in the coordinated fusion programme of the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM). A brief general introduction provides an overview of the planning of the Report. This is followed by a description of JET and the Euratom and International Fusion Programmes, which summarize the main features of the JET apparatus and its experimental programme and explains the position of the Project in the overall Euratom programme. In addition, this relates and compares JET to other large fusion devices throughout the world. The following section reports on the technical status of the machine including: technical changes and achievements during 1989; details of the operational organization of experiments and pulse statistics; and progress on enhancements in machine systems for future operation. This is followed by the results of JET operations in 1990 under various operating conditions, including ohmic heating, radio-frequency (RF) heating, neutral beam (NB) heating and various combined scenarios in different magnetic field configurations; the overall global and local behaviour observed; and the progress towards reactor conditions. In particular, the comparative performance between JET and other tokamaks, in terms of the triple fusion product, shows the substantial achievements made by JET since the start of operations in 1983. The second part of the Report explains the organization and management of the Project and describes the administration of JET. In particular, it sets out the budget situation; contractual arrangements during 1990; and details of the staffing arrangements and complement

  12. Measurement of the effective plasma ion mass in large tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lister, J.B.; Villard, L.; Ridder, G. de

    1997-01-01

    There is not yet a straightforward method for the measurement of the D-T ratio in the centre of a tokamak plasma. One of the simpler measurements put forward in the past is the interpretation of the MHD spectrum in the frequency range of the Global Alfven Eigenmodes (GAE). However, the frequencies of these modes do not only depend on the plasma mass, but are also quite strongly dependent on the details of the current and density profiles, creating a problem of deconvolution of the estimate of the plasma mass from an implicit relationship between several measurable plasma parameters and the detected eigenmode frequencies. This method has been revised to assess its likely precision for the JET tokamak. The low n GAE modes are sometimes too close to the continuum edge to be detectable and the interpretation of the GAE spectrum is rendered less direct than had been hoped. We present a statistical study on the precision with which the D-T ratio could be estimated from the GAE spectrum on JET. (author) 4 figs., 8 refs

  13. Hydrogen and helium recycling in tokamaks with carbon walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrenberg, J.; Coad, P.; De Kock, L.; Erents, S.K.; Gondhalekar, A.; Goodall, D.; Hancock, J.; Harbour, P.; Jones, T.T.C.; McCracken, G.; Morgan, P.; Nicholson, C.; Neill, G.; O'Rourke, J.; Partridge, J.; Pick, M.; Simpson, J.; Sonnenberg, K.; Stevens, A.; Stamp, M.; Stott, P.; Summers, D.; Tagle, T.; Vince, J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a review of hydrogen and helium recycling phenomena in tokamaks with limiters and walls largely made out of carbon (graphite, a-C:H layers). The key points of interest are the plasma fuelling efficiency, the wall pumping phenomena as observed in JET, TFTR, TEXTOR and other machines under various fuelling schemes (gas, neutral beams, pellets), the release of hydrogen/helium from material surfaces during and after plasma discharges and the long term retention (total particle inventory) of hydrogen in graphite or carbonised structures in tokamaks. The effect of a combined hydrogen/helium plasma on recycling is also discussed. It is shown that only part of the above phenomena can be understood in terms of processes between hydrogen/helium and carbon as known from simulation experiments (ion beams, gas discharge facilities) and that others (in particular the JET wall pumping phenomenon) have still to be explained. Possible mechanisms are outlined and discussed by means of global models. (orig.)

  14. Jets in hadronic reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paige, F.E.

    1983-01-01

    Recent experimental data on the properties of jets in hadronic reactions are reviewed and compared with theoretical expectations. Jets are clearly established as the dominant process for high E/sub T/ events in hadronic reactions. The cross section and the other properties of these events are in qualitative and even semiquantitative agreement with expectations based on perturbative QCD. However, we can not yet make precise tests of QCD, primarily because there are substantial uncertainties in the theoretical calculations. 45 references. (WHK)

  15. Advanced tokamak burning plasma experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P.T.; Ramos, J.; Schultz, J.; Nevins, W.N.

    2001-01-01

    A new reduced size ITER-RC superconducting tokamak concept is proposed with the goals of studying burn physics either in an inductively driven standard tokamak (ST) mode of operation, or in a quasi-steady state advanced tokamak (AT) mode sustained by non-inductive means. This is achieved by reducing the radiation shield thickness protecting the superconducting magnet by 0.34 m relative to ITER and limiting the burn mode of operation to pulse lengths as allowed by the TF coil warming up to the current sharing temperature. High gain (Q≅10) burn physics studies in a reversed shear equilibrium, sustained by RF and NB current drive techniques, may be obtained. (author)

  16. Technology issues for decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spampinato, P.T.; Walton, G.R.

    1994-01-01

    The approach for decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor has evolved from a conservative plan based on cutting up and burying all of the systems, to one that considers the impact tritium contamination will have on waste disposal, how large size components may be used as their own shipping containers, and even the possibility of recycling the materials of components such as the toroidal field coils and the tokamak structure. In addition, the project is more carefully assessing the requirements for using remotely operated equipment. Finally, valuable cost database is being developed for future use by the fusion community

  17. Magnetic diagnostic plasma position in the TCA/BR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvao, R.M.O.; Kuznetsov, Yu.K.; Nascimento, I.C.

    1996-01-01

    The cross-section of the plasma column is TCA/BR has a nearly circular plasma shape. This allows implementation of simplified methods of magnetic diagnostics. Although these methods were in may tokamaks and are well described, their accuracies are not clearly defined because the very simplified theoretical model of plasma equilibrium on which they are based differs from the real conditions in tokamaks like TCA/BR. In this paper we present the methods of plasma position diagnostics in TCA/BR from external magnetic measurements with an error analysis. (author). 4 refs., 3 figs

  18. Internal Magnetic Configuration Measured by ECE Imaging on EAST Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Ming; Wen Yizhi; Xie Jinlin; Yu Changxuan; Gao Bingxi; Xu Xiaoyuan; Liu Wandong; Hu Liqun; Sun Youwen; Qian Jinping; Wan Baonian

    2013-01-01

    ECE imaging (electron cyclotron emission imaging) is an important diagnostic which can give 2D imaging of temperature fluctuation in the core of tokamak. A method based on ECE imaging is introduced which can give the information of the position of magnetic axis and the structure of internal magnetic surface for EAST tokamak. The EFIT equilibrium reconstruction is not reliable due to the absence of important core diagnostic at the initial phase for EAST, so the information given by ECE imaging could help to improve the accuracy of EFIT equilibrium reconstruction. (magnetically confined plasma)

  19. Summary discussion: An integrated advanced tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauthoff, N.R.

    1994-01-01

    The tokamak concept improvement workshop addressed a wide range of issues involved in the development of a more attractive tokamak. The agenda for the workshop progressed from a general discussion of the long-range energy context (with the objective being the identification of a set of criteria and ''figures of merit'' for measuring the attractiveness of a tokamak concept) to particular opportunities for the improvement of the tokamak concept. The discussions concluded with a compilation of research program elements leading to an improved tokamak concept

  20. Inkwells for on-demand deposition rate measurement in aerosol-jet based 3D printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yuan; Gutierrez, David; Das, Siddhartha; Hines, D. R.

    2017-09-01

    Aerosol-jet printing (AJP) is an important direct-write printing technology based on additive manufacturing methods. Numerous research groups have utilized AJP for the fabrication of electronic circuits and devices. However, there has not been any real-time or even any on-demand method for quantitatively measuring and/or setting the deposition rate of an AJ ink stream. In this paper, we present a method for measuring the deposition rate of an AJ ink stream by printing into an array of inkwells that were fabricated using photolithography and were characterized using x-ray tomography and optical profilometry. These inkwell arrays were then used to establish a set of deposition rates namely 0.0011, 0.0024, 0.0035, 0.0046 and 0.0059 mm3 s-1 that were subsequently compared with independently-measured deposition rates obtained by printing the ink stream into a weighing pan for a specified time and calculating the resulting deposition rate from the weight of the printed sample. From this comparison, it is observed that, for a human operator, the error in setting a specific deposition rate is less for inkwell fill times greater than 3 s and greater for fill times less than 3 s. This observation indicates that the average volume of an inkwell array should be at least three times the desired deposition rate (V inkwell  >  3R). It was also observed that when the diameter of the inkwell was only slightly larger than the ink stream diameter, the ink uniformly wets the sidewall of the inkwell and results in a well filled inkwell for which the point at which it is just fully filled is easily observable. Finally, the interactions of the ink with both ‘philic’ and ‘phobic’ inkwells were studied illustrating the ability to use inkwells of various materials for setting the desired deposition rates for a variety of AJ printable inks.

  1. A mechanism for Indian Summer Monsoon Intraseasonal Variability based on PV anomalies in the Somali Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Praveen; Joshi, Manoj; Dimri, Ashok; Turner, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    Intraseasonal variability during the Indian summer monsoon is characterized by periods of rainfall interspersed by dry periods, which are known as active and break events respectively. Understanding and predicting such events is important for predicting societally important changes such as water resources. The Somali Jet, lying over the Arabian Sea, is known to be a key regional feature of this circulation. In the present study, we analyse the spatial structure of Somali Jet potential vorticity (PV) anomalies and show that they vary considerably during active and break periods. Analysis of these PV anomalies suggests a mechanism joining sea surface temperatures (SST) anomalies, convection, modification of PV by diabatic heating and mixing in the atmospheric boundary layer, wind stress curl, and ocean upwelling processes. The feedback mechanism is consistent with observed variability in the coupled ocean-atmosphere system on timescales of approximately 20 days.

  2. The spherical tokamak fusion power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, H.R.; Voss, G.; Ahn, J.W.

    2003-01-01

    The design of a 1GW(e) steady state fusion power plant, based on the spherical tokamak concept, has been further iterated towards a fully self-consistent solution taking account of plasma physics, engineering and neutronics constraints. In particular a plausible solution to exhaust handling is proposed and the steam cycle refined to further improve efficiency. The physics design takes full account of confinement, MHD stability and steady state current drive. It is proposed that such a design may offer a fusion power plant which is easy to maintain: an attractive feature for the power plants following ITER. (author)

  3. Front end embedded microprocessors in the JET computer-based control system, past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steed, C.A.; VanderBeken, H.; Browne, M.L.; Fullard, K.; Reed, K.; Tilley, M.; Schmidt, V.

    1987-01-01

    A brief history of the use of Front End Microprocessors in the JET Control and Data Acquisition System (CODAS) is presented. The present expansion in their use from 2 or 3 in 1983 to 27 now, is covered along with the reasoning behind their present usage. Finally, their future planned use in the area of remote handling is discussed and the authors present views on the use of front end processing in future large distributed control systems are presented

  4. Analysis of JET ELMy time series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zvejnieks, G.; Kuzovkov, V.N.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Achievement of the planned operational regime in the next generation tokamaks (such as ITER) still faces principal problems. One of the main challenges is obtaining the control of edge localized modes (ELMs), which should lead to both long plasma pulse times and reasonable divertor life time. In order to control ELMs the hypothesis was proposed by Degeling [1] that ELMs exhibit features of chaotic dynamics and thus a standard chaos control methods might be applicable. However, our findings which are based on the nonlinear autoregressive (NAR) model contradict this hypothesis for JET ELMy time-series. In turn, it means that ELM behavior is of a relaxation or random type. These conclusions coincide with our previous results obtained for ASDEX Upgrade time series [2]. [1] A.W. Degeling, Y.R. Martin, P.E. Bak, J. B.Lister, and X. Llobet, Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43, 1671 (2001). [2] G. Zvejnieks, V.N. Kuzovkov, O. Dumbrajs, A.W. Degeling, W. Suttrop, H. Urano, and H. Zohm, Physics of Plasmas 11, 5658 (2004)

  5. Tokamak SST-1: an over-view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxena, Y.C.

    2002-01-01

    Steady State Tokamak SST-1 is in advanced stage of fabrication at the Institute for Plasma Research. The objectives of SST-1 include studying the physics of the plasma processes in tokamak under steady state conditions and learning technologies related to the steady state operation of the tokamak with superconducting magnets. These studies are expected to contribute to the tokamak physics database for very long pulse operations. The SST-1 tokamak is a large aspect ratio tokamak, configured to run double null diverted plasmas for 1000 s with significant elongation (K) and triangularity (δ). The choice of the parameters is dictated by the physics and technology goals viz. (a) to control and study strongly shaped single and double null divertor plasma, (b) explore advanced tokamak plasma regimes, (c) steady state particle and heat removal from the device, (d) design and operation of large volume superconducting magnets, (e) non-inductive steady state current drive, (f) methods of plasma heating and (g) material technologies

  6. The tokamak hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.L.; Rose, R.P.

    1981-01-01

    At a time when the potential benefits of various energy options are being seriously evaluated in many countries through-out the world, it is both timely and important to evaluate the practical application of fusion reactors for their economical production of nuclear fissile fuels from fertile fuels. The fusion hybrid reactor represents a concept that could assure the availability of adequate fuel supplies for a proven nuclear technology and have the potential of being an electrical energy source as opposed to an energy consumer as are the present fuel enrichment processes. Westinghouse Fusion Power Systems Department, under Contract No. EG-77-C-02-4544 with the Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy, has developed a preliminary conceptual design for an early twenty-first century fusion hybrid reactor called the commercial Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (CTHR). This design was developed as a first generation commercial plant producing fissile fuel to support a significant number of client Light Water Reactor (LWR) Plants. To the depth this study has been performed, no insurmountable technical problems have been identified. The study has provided a basis for reasonable cost estimates of the hybrid plants as well as the hybrid/LWR system busbar electricity costs. This energy system can be optimized to have a net cost of busbar electricity that is equivalent to the conventional LWR plant, yet is not dependent on uranium ore prices or standard enrichment costs, since the fusion hybrid can be fueled by numerous fertile fuel resources. A nearer-term concept is also defined using a beam driven fusion driver in lieu of the longer term ignited operating mode. (orig.)

  7. Tokamak Plasmas : Mirnov coil data analysis for tokamak ADITYA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The spatial and temporal structures of magnetic signal in the tokamak ADITYA is analysed using recently developed singular value decomposition (SVD) technique. The analysis technique is first tested with simulated data and then applied to the ADITYA Mirnov coil data to determine the structure of current peturbation as ...

  8. Tokamak Plasmas: Mirnov coil data analysis for tokamak ADITYA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The spatial and temporal structures of magnetic signal in the tokamak ADITYA is analysed using recently developed singular value decomposition (SVD) technique. The analysis technique is first tested with simulated data and then applied to the ADITYA Mirnov coil data to determine the structure of current peturbation as ...

  9. Boosted Jet Tagging with Jet-Images and Deep Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Kagan Michael; de Oliveira Luke; Mackey Lester; Nachman Benjamin; Schwartzman Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Building on the jet-image based representation of high energy jets, we develop computer vision based techniques for jet tagging through the use of deep neural networks. Jet-images enabled the connection between jet substructure and tagging with the fields of computer vision and image processing. We show how applying such techniques using deep neural networks can improve the performance to identify highly boosted W bosons with respect to state-of-the-art substructure methods. In addition, we e...

  10. Equilibrium reconstruction in the TCA/Br tokamak; Reconstrucao do equilibrio no tokamak TCA/BR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sa, Wanderley Pires de

    1996-12-31

    The accurate and rapid determination of the Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium configuration in tokamaks is a subject for the magnetic confinement of the plasma. With the knowledge of characteristic plasma MHD equilibrium parameters it is possible to control the plasma position during its formation using feed-back techniques. It is also necessary an on-line analysis between successive discharges to program external parameters for the subsequent discharges. In this work it is investigated the MHD equilibrium configuration reconstruction of the TCA/BR tokamak from external magnetic measurements, using a method that is able to fast determine the main parameters of discharge. The thesis has two parts. Firstly it is presented the development of an equilibrium code that solves de Grad-Shafranov equation for the TCA/BR tokamak geometry. Secondly it is presented the MHD equilibrium reconstruction process from external magnetic field and flux measurements using the Function Parametrization FP method. this method. This method is based on the statistical analysis of a database of simulated equilibrium configurations, with the goal of obtaining a simple relationship between the parameters that characterize the equilibrium and the measurements. The results from FP are compared with conventional methods. (author) 68 refs., 31 figs., 16 tabs.

  11. Experimental study of the topological aspect of the ergodic divertor in Tore-supra tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costanzo, L.

    2001-10-01

    The control of power deposition onto plasma facing components in tokamaks is a determining factor for future thermonuclear fusion reactors. Plasma surface interaction can be performed using limiters or divertors. The ergodic divertor installed on Tore Supra is an atypical example of a magnetic divertor. It consists in applying a magnetic perturbation which establishes a particular topology of the plasma in contact with the wall (edge plasma). We carried out dedicated experiments in order to study parallel heat flux which strike the divertor neutralizers. This quantitative and qualitative analysis of heat flux as a function of experimental conditions allows to determine the profiles of power deposition along the neutralizers. The influence of plasma electron density, additional heating, impurities and injected gas was established. An experimental study of the sheath heat transmission factor γ was carried out by correlating measurements made with Langmuir probes and infrared imaging. This study gave rise to a major conclusion: for ohmic discharges with deuterium injection and most of the time with helium, it was experimentally confirmed that γ=7 in agreement with classical sheath theory. However, an increase of this factor with additional power has been shown. Detached plasma, which is an attractive regime in order to reduce the power deposition, requires an optimized control. A new measurement of the detachment onset has been developed. It is based on the variation of heat flux onto the plates derived from infrared measurements. A detachment cartography with the determination of a new 2D 'IR' Degree of Detachment was carried out allowing to locate the zone where the detachment starts. We can apply this concept both to other tokamaks such as JET and ITER. A comparison between the axisymmetric divertor and the ergodic divertor is also presented concerning the power deposition in the two configurations. Low heat flux with the ergodic divertor is a major advantage

  12. Measurement of diabetic wounds with optical coherence tomography-based air-jet indentation system and a material testing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, M-C; Cheung, K-K; Ng, G Y-F; Zheng, Y-P; Cheing, G L-Y

    2015-11-01

    Material testing system is a conventional but destructive method for measuring the biomechanical properties of wound tissues in basic research. The recently developed optical coherence tomography-based air-jet indentation system is a non-destructive method for measuring these properties of soft tissues in a non-contact manner. The aim of the study was to examine the correlation between the biomechanical properties of wound tissues measured by the two systems. Young male Sprague-Dawley rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetic were wounded by a 6 mm biopsy punch on their hind limbs. The biomechanical properties of wound tissues were assessed with the two systems on post-wounding days 3, 7, 10, 14, and 21. Wound sections were stained with picro-sirius red for analysis on the collagen fibres. Data obtained on the different days were charted to obtain the change in biomechanical properties across the time points, and then pooled to examine the correlation between measurements made by the two devices. Qualitative analysis to determine any correlation between indentation stiffness measured by the air-jet indentation system and the orientation of collagen fibres. The indentation stiffness is significantly negatively correlated to the maximum load, maximum tensile stress, and Young's modulus by the material testing system (all p<0.05). The orientation of collagen changes with the indentation stiffness over time. Our findings support the use of optical coherence tomography-based air-jet indentation system to evaluate the biomechanical properties of wounds in a non-contact manner. It is a potential clinical device to examine the biomechanical properties of chronic wounds in vivo in a repeatable manner.

  13. Mathematical modeling plasma transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quiang, Ji

    1995-01-01

    In this work, the author applied a systematic calibration, validation and application procedure based on the methodology of mathematical modeling to international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) ignition studies. The multi-mode plasma transport model used here includes a linear combination of drift wave branch and ballooning branch instabilities with two a priori uncertain constants to account for anomalous plasma transport in tokamaks. A Bayesian parameter estimation method is used including experimental calibration error/model offsets and error bar rescaling factors to determine the two uncertain constants in the transport model with quantitative confidence level estimates for the calibrated parameters, which gives two saturation levels of instabilities. This method is first tested using a gyroBohm multi-mode transport model with a pair of DIII-D discharge experimental data, and then applied to calibrating a nominal multi-mode transport model against a broad database using twelve discharges from seven different tokamaks. The calibrated transport model is then validated on five discharges from JT-60 with no adjustable constants. The results are in a good agreement with experimental data. Finally, the resulting class of multi-mode tokamak plasma transport models is applied to the transport analysis of the ignition probability in a next generation machine, ITER. A reference simulation of basic ITER engineering design activity (EDA) parameters shows that a self-sustained thermonuclear burn with 1.5 GW output power can be achieved provided that impurity control makes radiative losses sufficiently small at an average plasma density of 1.2 X 10 20 /m 3 with 50 MW auxiliary heating. The ignition probability of ITER for the EDA parameters, can be formally as high as 99.9% in the present context. The same probability for concept design activity (CDA) parameters of ITER, which has smaller size and lower current, is only 62.6%

  14. An Operational Model for the Prediction of Jet Blast

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-09

    This paper presents an operational model for the prediction of jet blast. The model was : developed based upon three modules including a jet exhaust model, jet centerline decay : model and aircraft motion model. The final analysis was compared with d...

  15. Tokamak experimental power reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-06-01

    The principal results of a scoping and project definition study for the Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor are presented. Objectives are discussed; a preliminary conceptual design is described; detailed parametric, survey and sensitivity studies are presented; and research and development requirements are outlined. (U.S.)

  16. ECRH Studies on Tokamak Plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-10

    r.I*cru.Dtrtibution uUnliited 300 Unicorn Pork Drive Woburn, Massachusetts 04801 ECRH STUDIES ON TOKAMAK PLASMAS JAYCOR Project No. 6183 Final Report...wavelength polariza- tion field produced by the curvature and field gradient drifts [15]. The growth rate is y = Vs[k/R 2 = [T(eV)/X(cm)J 2 3.3 x 105 sec

  17. TECHNOLOGIES TO OPTIMIZE ADVANCED TOKAMAK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SIMONEN, TC

    2004-01-01

    OAK-B135 Commercial fusion power systems must operate near the limits of the engineering systems and plasma parameters. Achieving these objectives will require real time feedback control of the plasma. This paper describes plasma control systems being used in the national DIII-D advanced tokamak research program.

  18. Prospects for Tokamak Fusion Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, J.; Galambos, J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper first reviews briefly the status and plans for research in magnetic fusion energy and discusses the prospects for the tokamak magnetic configuration to be the basis for a fusion power plant. Good progress has been made in achieving fusion reactor-level, deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas with the production of significant fusion power in the Joint European Torus (up to 2 MW) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (up to 10 MW) tokamaks. Advances on the technologies of heating, fueling, diagnostics, and materials supported these achievements. The successes have led to the initiation of the design phases of two tokamaks, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the US Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX). ITER will demonstrate the controlled ignition and extended bum of D-T plasmas with steady state as an ultimate goal. ITER will further demonstrate technologies essential to a power plant in an integrated system and perform integrated testing of the high heat flux and nuclear components required to use fusion energy for practical purposes. TPX will complement ITER by testing advanced modes of steady-state plasma operation that, coupled with the developments in ITER, will lead to an optimized demonstration power plant

  19. Tokamak impurity-control techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    A brief review is given of the impurity-control functions in tokamaks, their relative merits and disadvantages and some prominent edge-interaction-control techniques, and there is a discussion of a new proposal, the particle scraper, and its potential advantages. (author)

  20. Joint research using small tokamaks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gryaznevich, M.P.; Del Bosco, E.; Malaquias, A.; Mank, G.; Van Oost, G.; He, Yexi; Hegazy, H.; Hirose, A.; Hron, Martin; Kuteev, B.; Ludwig, G.O.; Nascimento, I.C.; Silva, C.; Vorobyev, G.M.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 10 (2005), S245-S254 ISSN 0029-5515. [Fusion Energy Conference contributions. Vilamoura, 1.11.2004-6.11.2004] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : small tokamaks * thermonuclear fusion Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.418, year: 2005

  1. An enhanced tokamak startup model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Rajiv; Artaud, Jean-François

    2017-01-01

    The startup of tokamaks has been examined in the past in varying degree of detail. This phase typically involves the burnthrough of impurities and the subsequent rampup of plasma current. A zero-dimensional (0D) model is most widely used where the time evolution of volume averaged quantities determines the detailed balance between the input and loss of particle and power. But, being a 0D setup, these studies do not take into consideration the co-evolution of plasma size and shape, and instead assume an unchanging minor and major radius. However, it is known that the plasma position and its minor radius can change appreciably as the plasma evolves in time to fill in the entire available volume. In this paper, an enhanced model for the tokamak startup is introduced, which for the first time takes into account the evolution of plasma geometry during this brief but highly dynamic period by including realistic one-dimensional (1D) effects within the broad 0D framework. In addition the effect of runaway electrons (REs) has also been incorporated. The paper demonstrates that the inclusion of plasma cross section evolution in conjunction with REs plays an important role in the formation and development of tokamak startup. The model is benchmarked against experimental results from ADITYA tokamak.

  2. Computer predictions for future Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duechs, D.F.

    1978-01-01

    Proceeding from a reasonable agreement with existing experimental results, this lecture presents radial particle and energy transport computations which extrapolate to large (up to reactor dimensions) future Tokamaks. Special consideration is given to the behavior of alpha-particles, the influence of high-z impurities, and the thermal stability of the plasma

  3. Beryllium plasma-facing components for the ITER-like wall project at JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubel, M J; Sundelin, P [Alfven Laboratory, Royal Institute of Technology, Association Euratom-VR (Sweden); Bailescu, V [Nuclear Fuel Plant, Pitesti (Romania); Coad, J P; Matthews, G F; Pedrick, L; Riccardo, V; Villedieu, E [Culham Science Centre, Euratom-UKAEA Fusion Association, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Hirai, T; Linke, J [IEF-2, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Association Euratom-FZJ, Juelich (Germany); Likonen, J [VTT, Association Euratom-Tekes, 02044 VTT (Finland); Lungu, C P [NILPRP, Association Euratom-MEdC, Bucharest (Romania)], E-mail: rubel@kth.se

    2008-03-15

    ITER-Like Wall Project has been launched at the JET tokamak in order to study a tokamak operation with beryllium components on the main chamber wall and tungsten in the divertor. To perform this first comprehensive test of both materials in a thermonuclear fusion environment, a broad program has been undertaken to develop plasma-facing components and assess their performance under high power loads. The paper provides a concise report on scientific and technical issues in the development of a beryllium first wall at JET.

  4. Emerging Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Schwaller, Pedro; Weiler, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we propose a novel search strategy for new physics at the LHC that utilizes calorimeter jets that (i) are composed dominantly of displaced tracks and (ii) have many different vertices within the jet cone. Such emerging jet signatures are smoking guns for models with a composite dark sector where a parton shower in the dark sector is followed by displaced decays of dark pions back to SM jets. No current LHC searches are sensitive to this type of phenomenology. We perform a detailed simulation for a benchmark signal with two regular and two emerging jets, and present and implement strategies to suppress QCD backgrounds by up to six orders of magnitude. At the 14 TeV LHC, this signature can be probed with mediator masses as large as 1.5 TeV for a range of dark pion lifetimes, and the reach is increased further at the high-luminosity LHC. The emerging jet search is also sensitive to a broad class of long-lived phenomena, and we show this for a supersymmetric model with R-parity violation. Possibilit...

  5. Maintaining persistence and adherence with subcutaneous growth-hormone therapy in children: comparing jet-delivery and needle-based devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spoudeas HA

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Helen A Spoudeas,1 Priti Bajaj,2 Nathan Sommerford3 1London Centre for Paediatric Endocrinology, University College London, London, 2Ferring Pharmaceuticals, London, 3Health Informatics Research, Sciensus Ltd, Brighton, UK Purpose: Persistence and adherence with subcutaneous growth hormone (GH; somatropin therapy in children is widely acknowledged to be suboptimal. This study aimed to investigate how the use of a jet-delivery device, ZomaJet®, impacts on medication-taking behaviors compared to needle-based devices.Materials and methods: A retrospective cohort study of children aged ≤18 years was conducted using a UK-based, nationwide database of GH home-delivery schedules. Data were evaluated for the period between January 2010 and December 2012 for 6,061 children receiving either Zomacton® (somatropin via the ZomaJet jet-delivery device or one of six brands of GH all administered via needle-based devices. Persistence was analyzed for patients with appropriate data, measured as the time interval between first and last home deliveries. An analysis of adherence was conducted only for patients using ZomaJet who had appropriate data, measured by proportion of days covered. Brand switches were identified for all patients.Results: Persistence with GH therapy was significantly longer in patients using ZomaJet compared to needle-based devices (599 days versus 535 days, respectively, n=4,093; P<0.001; this association was observed in both sexes and across age subgroups (≤10 and 11–16 years. The majority (58% of patients using ZomaJet were classed as adherent (n=728. Only 297 patients (5% switched GH brand (n=6,061, and patients tended to use ZomaJet for longer than other devices before switching.Conclusion: It appears important that the choice of a jet-delivery device is offered to children prescribed daily GH therapy. These devices may represent a much-needed effective strategy for maintaining persistence with subcutaneous GH administration in

  6. The Tokar Gap Jet: Regional Circulation, Diurnal Variability, and Moisture Transport Based on Numerical Simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Davis, Shannon R.

    2015-05-14

    The structure, variability, and regional connectivity of the Tokar Gap jet (TGJ) are described using WRF Model analyses and supporting atmospheric datasets from the East African–Red Sea–Arabian Peninsula (EARSAP) region during summer 2008. Sources of the TGJ’s unique quasi-diurnal nature and association with atypically high atmospheric moisture transport are traced back to larger-scale atmospheric dynamics influencing its forcing. These include seasonal shifts in the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ), variability of the monsoon and North African wind regimes, and ties to other orographic flow patterns. Strong modulation of the TGJ by regional processes such as the desert heating cycle, wind convergence at the ITCZ surface front, and the local land–sea breeze cycle are described. Two case studies present the interplay of these influences in detail. The first of these was an “extreme” gap wind event on 12 July, in which horizontal velocities in the Tokar Gap exceeded 26 m s−1 and the flow from the jet extended the full width of the Red Sea basin. This event coincided with development of a large mesoscale convective complex (MCC) and precipitation at the entrance of the Tokar Gap as well as smaller gaps downstream along the Arabian Peninsula. More typical behavior of the TGJ during the 2008 summer is discussed using a second case study on 19 July. Downwind impact of the TGJ is evaluated using Lagrangian model trajectories and analysis of the lateral moisture fluxes (LMFs) during jet events. These results suggest means by which TGJ contributes to large LMFs and has potential bearing upon Sahelian rainfall and MCC development.

  7. Multi-viewpoint imaging based simulations of sensors for APS jet monitoring

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Djakov, B. E.; Oliver, D.H.; Enikov, R.; Vasileva, E.; Chumak, Oleksiy; Hrabovský, Milan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 223, č. 1 (2010), 012008-012008 ISSN 1742-6588. [International Summer School on Vacuum, Electron, and Ion Technologies (VEIT 2009)/16th./. Sunny Beach, 28.09.2009-02.10.2009] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB100430701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : plasma jet * plasma flow fluctuations * image processing Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http://iopscience.iop.org/1742-6596/223/1/012008

  8. Predictive modelling of edge transport phenomena in ELMy H-mode tokamak fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loennroth, J.-S.

    2009-07-01

    This thesis discusses a range of work dealing with edge plasma transport in magnetically confined fusion plasmas by means of predictive transport modelling, a technique in which qualitative predictions and explanations are sought by running transport codes equipped with models for plasma transport and other relevant phenomena. The focus is on high confinement mode (H-mode) tokamak plasmas, which feature improved performance thanks to the formation of an edge transport barrier. H-mode plasmas are generally characterized by the occurrence of edge localized modes (ELMs), periodic eruptions of particles and energy, which limit confinement and may turn out to be seriously damaging in future tokamaks. The thesis introduces schemes and models for qualitative study of the ELM phenomenon in predictive transport modelling. It aims to shed new light on the dynamics of ELMs using these models. It tries to explain various experimental observations related to the performance and ELM-behaviour of H-mode plasmas. Finally, it also tries to establish more generally the potential effects of ripple-induced thermal ion losses on H-mode plasma performance and ELMs. It is demonstrated that the proposed ELM modelling schemes can qualitatively reproduce the experimental dynamics of a number of ELM regimes. Using a theory-motivated ELM model based on a linear instability model, the dynamics of combined ballooning-peeling mode ELMs is studied. It is shown that the ELMs are most often triggered by a ballooning mode instability, which renders the plasma peeling mode unstable, causing the ELM to continue in a peeling mode phase. Understanding the dynamics of ELMs will be a key issue when it comes to controlling and mitigating the ELMs in future large tokamaks. By means of integrated modelling, it is shown that an experimentally observed increase in the ELM frequency and deterioration of plasma confinement triggered by external neutral gas puffing might be due to a transition from the second to

  9. Predictive modelling of edge transport phenomena in ELMy H-mode tokamak fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loennroth, J.-S.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis discusses a range of work dealing with edge plasma transport in magnetically confined fusion plasmas by means of predictive transport modelling, a technique in which qualitative predictions and explanations are sought by running transport codes equipped with models for plasma transport and other relevant phenomena. The focus is on high confinement mode (H-mode) tokamak plasmas, which feature improved performance thanks to the formation of an edge transport barrier. H-mode plasmas are generally characterized by the occurrence of edge localized modes (ELMs), periodic eruptions of particles and energy, which limit confinement and may turn out to be seriously damaging in future tokamaks. The thesis introduces schemes and models for qualitative study of the ELM phenomenon in predictive transport modelling. It aims to shed new light on the dynamics of ELMs using these models. It tries to explain various experimental observations related to the performance and ELM-behaviour of H-mode plasmas. Finally, it also tries to establish more generally the potential effects of ripple-induced thermal ion losses on H-mode plasma performance and ELMs. It is demonstrated that the proposed ELM modelling schemes can qualitatively reproduce the experimental dynamics of a number of ELM regimes. Using a theory-motivated ELM model based on a linear instability model, the dynamics of combined ballooning-peeling mode ELMs is studied. It is shown that the ELMs are most often triggered by a ballooning mode instability, which renders the plasma peeling mode unstable, causing the ELM to continue in a peeling mode phase. Understanding the dynamics of ELMs will be a key issue when it comes to controlling and mitigating the ELMs in future large tokamaks. By means of integrated modelling, it is shown that an experimentally observed increase in the ELM frequency and deterioration of plasma confinement triggered by external neutral gas puffing might be due to a transition from the second to

  10. The Joint European Torus (JET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebut, Paul-Henri

    2017-02-01

    This paper addresses the history of JET, the Tokamak that reached the highest performances and the experiment that so far came closest to the eventual goal of a fusion reactor. The reader must be warned, however, that this document is not a comprehensive study of controlled thermonuclear fusion or even of JET. The next step on this road, the ITER project, is an experimental reactor. Actually, several prototypes will be required before a commercial reactor can be built. The fusion history is far from been finalised. JET is still in operation some 32 years after the first plasma and still has to provide answers to many questions before ITER takes the lead on research. Some physical interpretations of the observed phenomena, although coherent, are still under discussion. This paper also recalls some basic physics concepts necessary to the understanding of confinement: a knowledgeable reader can ignore these background sections. This fascinating story, comprising successes and failures, is imbedded in the complexities of twentieth and the early twenty-first centuries at a time when world globalization is evolving and the future seems loaded with questions. The views here expressed on plasma confinement are solely those of the author. This is especially the case for magnetic turbulence, for which other scientists may have different views.

  11. Advanced statistics for tokamak transport colinearity and tokamak to tokamak variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedel, K.S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper is an expository introduction to advanced statistics and scaling laws and their application to tokamak devices. Topics of discussion are as follows: implicit assumptions in the standard analysis; advanced regression techniques; specialized tools in statistics and their applications in fusion physics; and improved datasets for transport studies

  12. DT experiment on JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Sanae; Itoh, Kimitaka

    1992-01-01

    In November, 1991, at the JET tokamak in Abingdon, the U.K., DT plasma combustion experiment was carried out for the first time in history. The output power by nuclear fusion of 1.7 MW at maximum and the total power output of 2 MJ were attained, and it was proved that the controlled nuclear fusion accompanied by considerable power output can be carried out on the ground as a real thing. One milestone of the dream and target of nuclear fusion reactors was attained. In this paper, the results of the experiment are reported, and their meaning for the research of hereafter is considered. In the experiment this time, 0.24 g of tritium in total was used, including conditioning. The last two shots became the power output experiment of MW class nuclear fusion reaction, in which about 13% of tritium fuel ratio was estimated. The preliminary tritium experiment was divided into six phases, and was carried out for three weeks, aiming at collecting the basic data for the full scale DT experiment. The examination of the research program, the preliminary tritium experiment and the success of the PTE and the new development are described. (K.I.)

  13. Synthetic jets based on micro magneto mechanical systems for aerodynamic flow control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimeno, L; Merlen, A; Talbi, A; Viard, R; Pernod, P; Preobrazhensky, V

    2010-01-01

    A magneto-mechanical micro-actuator providing an axisymmetric synthetic microjet for active flow control was designed, fabricated and characterized. The micro-actuator consists of an enclosed cavity with a small orifice in one face and a high flexible elastomeric (PDMS) membrane in the opposite one. The membrane vibration is achieved using a magnetic actuation chosen for its capacity for providing large out of plane displacements and forces necessary for the performances aimed for. The paper presents first numerical simulations of the flow performed during the design process in order to identify a general jet formation criterion and optimize the device's performances. The fabrication process of this micro-magneto-mechanical system (MMMS) is then briefly described. The full size of the device, including packaging and actuation, does not exceed 1 cm 3 . The evaluation of the performances of the synthetic jet with 600 µm orifice was performed. The results show that the optimum working point is in the frequency range 400–700 Hz which is in accordance with the frequency response of the magnet-membrane mechanical resonator. In this frequency range, the microjet reaches maximum speeds ranging from 25 m s −1 to 55 m s −1 for an electromagnetic power consumption of 500 mW. Finally the axial velocity transient and stream-wise behaviours in the near and far fields are reported and discussed.

  14. A flexible software architecture for tokamak discharge control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferron, J.R.; Penaflor, B.; Walker, M.L.; Moller, J.; Butner, D.

    1995-01-01

    The software structure of the plasma control system in use on the DIII-D tokamak experiment is described. This system implements control functions through software executing in real time on one or more digital computers. The software is organized into a hierarchy that allows new control functions needed to support the DIII-D experimental program to be added easily without affecting previously implemented functions. This also allows the software to be portable in order to create control systems for other applications. The tokamak operator uses an X-windows based interface to specify the time evolution of a tokamak discharge. The interface provides a high level view for the operator that reduces the need for detailed knowledge of the control system operation. There is provision for an asynchronous change to an alternate discharge time evolution in response to an event that is detected in real time. Quality control is enhanced through off-line testing that can make use of software-based tokamak simulators

  15. Dynamical grid method for time dependent simulations of axisymmetric instabilities in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardin, S.C.; Johnson, J.L.; Greene, J.M.; Grimm, R.C.

    1977-07-01

    A natural nonorthogonal time-dependent coordinate transformation based on the magnetic field lines is utilized for the numerical integration of the two-dimensional axisymmetric time-dependent ideal MHD equations in tokamak geometry. The finite-difference grid is treated as a dynamical variable, and its equations of motion are integrated simultaneously with those for the fluid and magnetic field. The method is applicable to tokamak systems of arbitrary pressure and cross section. It is particularly useful for the nearly incompressible ideal MHD modes which are of interest in tokamak stability studies

  16. Effect of de-correlating turbulence on the low frequency decay of jet-surface interaction noise in sub-sonic unheated air jets using a CFD-based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsar, M. Z.; Leib, S. J.; Bozak, R. F.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we extend the Rapid-distortion theory (RDT)-based model derived by Goldstein, Afsar & Leib (J. Fluid Mech., vol. 736, pp. 532-569, 2013) for the sound generated by the interaction of a large-aspect-ratio rectangular jet with the trailing edge of a flat plate to include a more realistic upstream turbulence spectrum that possess a de-correlation (i.e. negative dip) in its space-time structure and use results from three-dimensional Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solutions to determine the mean flow, turbulent kinetic energy and turbulence length & time scales. Since the interaction noise dominates the low-frequency portion of the spectrum, we use an appropriate asymptotic approximation for the Rayleigh equation Green's function, which enters the analysis, based on a two-dimensional mean flow representation for the jet. We use the model to predict jet-surface interaction noise for a range of subsonic acoustic Mach number jets, nozzle aspect ratios, streamwise and transverse trailing-edge locations and compare them with experimental data. The RANS meanflow computations are also compared with flow data for selected cases to assess their validity. We find that finite de-correlation in the turbulence spectrum increases the low-frequency algebraic decay (the low-frequency "roll-off") of the acoustic spectrum with angular frequency to give a model that has a pure dipole frequency scaling. This gives better agreement with noise data compared to Goldstein et al. (2013) for Strouhal numbers less than the peak jet-surface interaction noise. For example, through sensitivity analysis we find that there is a difference of 10 dB at the lowest frequency for which data exists (relative to a model without de-correlation effects included) for the highest acoustic Mach number case. Secondly, our results for the planar flow theory provide a first estimate of the low-frequency amplification due to the jet-surface interaction for moderate aspect ratio nozzles when RANS

  17. Theory of tokamak resistive fishbone modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Bingren; Sui Guofang

    1995-12-01

    A special kind of internal kink mode, the fishbone, can be excited by the energetic particles in tokamak plasmas. Theoretical analyses of fishbone modes based on the ideal MHD framework have predicted that two branches of modes exists. One is the Chen-White branch with ω∼ω-bar dm , corresponding to a higher threshold in β h ; the other is the Coppis branch with ω∼ω *i , and a much lower threshold in β h . The latter mode would put a rather unfavourable restriction on heating efficiency and on plasma confinement. However. It is found that the resistivity effect is essential for this mode. In this paper, a new resistive fishbone mode analysis is carried out. In the (γ mhd ,β H ) space, the stability diagram shows complicate structure, the Coppis branch is replaced by a weakly unstable mode and there is no longer closed stable region. The growth rate of this mode varies with β h , its peak value is still very low compared to other internal modes. The implications of these results to future tokamak experiments are discussed. (8 figs.)

  18. Hybrid top-gate transistors based on ink-jet printed zinc tin oxide and different organic dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykora, Benedikt; von Seggern, Heinz

    2018-01-01

    We report about hybrid top-gate transistors based on ink-jet printed zinc tin oxide (ZTO) and different spin-coated organic dielectrics. Transistors using the polar dielectric poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and the nonpolar polystyrene (PS) were evaluated. By applying PMMA, we were able to process field-effect transistors with a saturation mobility of up to 4.3 cm2 V-1 s-1. This is the highest reported mobility of an ink-jet printed ZTO top-gate transistor using a spin-coated PMMA dielectric. This transistor also exhibits a small threshold voltage of 1.7 V and an on/off-current ratio exceeding 105. The usage of PS as another organic dielectric leads to functional devices with inferior performance, meaning a saturation mobility of 0.2 cm2 V-1 s-1 and a threshold voltage of 9.7 V. The more polar character of the PMMA compared to the PS dielectric leading to a better adhesion on the quite hydrophilic ZTO surface could explain the improved device performance of the ZTO top-gate transistor using PMMA.

  19. Steady State Analytical Equation of Motion of Linear Shaped Charges Jet Based on the Modification of Birkhoff Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seokbin Lim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Birkhoff theory exhibits an analytical steady state liner collapse model of shaped charges followed by jetting process. It also provides the fundamental idea in study of shaped charges and has widened its application in many areas, including a configuration where the detonation front strikes the entire liner surface at the same time providing the α = β (liner apex angle α, and the liner collapse point angle β condition in the literature. Upon consideration of the detonation front propagation along the lateral length of the core charge in LSCs (linear shaped charges, a further modification of the Birkhoff theory motivated by the unique geometrical condition of LSCs and the α = β condition is necessary to correctly describe the jetting behavior of LSCs which is different than that of CSCs (conical shaped charges. Based on such unique geometrical properties of LSCs, the original Birkhoff theory was modified and an analytical steady state LSCs model was built. The analytical model was then compared to the numerical simulation results created from Autodyn™ in terms of M/C ratio and apex angles in three different sized LSCs, and it exhibits favorable results in a limited range.

  20. Numerical analysis of jet impingement heat transfer at high jet Reynolds number and large temperature difference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Vincent; Walther, Jens Honore

    2013-01-01

    Jet impingement heat transfer from a round gas jet to a flat wall was investigated numerically for a ratio of 2 between the jet inlet to wall distance and the jet inlet diameter. The influence of turbulence intensity at the jet inlet and choice of turbulence model on the wall heat transfer...... was investigated at a jet Reynolds number of 1.66 × 105 and a temperature difference between jet inlet and wall of 1600 K. The focus was on the convective heat transfer contribution as thermal radiation was not included in the investigation. A considerable influence of the turbulence intensity at the jet inlet...... to about 100% were observed. Furthermore, the variation in stagnation point heat transfer was examined for jet Reynolds numbers in the range from 1.10 × 105 to 6.64 × 105. Based on the investigations, a correlation is suggested between the stagnation point Nusselt number, the jet Reynolds number...

  1. Quark and gluon jet properties in symmetric three-jet events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskulic, D.; Casper, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Palla, F.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Bonvicini, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Moneta, L.; Oest, T.; Palazzi, P.; Pater, J. R.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wildish, T.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Wäänänen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Delfino, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Braun, O.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Abbaneo, D.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Colling, D. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; San Martin, G.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Etienne, F.; Konstantinidis, N.; Nicod, D.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Trabelsi, K.; Abt, I.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Denis, R. St.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Park, I. C.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Betteridge, A. P.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Cerutti, F.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Johnson, D. L.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Edwards, M.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Beddall, A.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Rankin, C.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Feigl, E.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Minguet-Rodriguez, J.; Rivera, F.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Ragusa, F.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Bellantoni, L.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Greening, T. C.; Harton, J. L.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I. J.; Sharma, V.; Turk, J. D.; Walsh, A. M.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    Quark and gluon jets with the same energy, 24 GeV, are compared in symmetric three-jet configurations from hadronic Z decays observed by the ALEPH detector. Jets are defined using the Durham algorithm. Gluon jets are identified using an anti-tag on b jets, based on a track impact parameter method. The comparison of gluon and mixed flavour quark jets shows that gluon jets have a softer fragmentation function, a larger angular width and a higher particle multiplicity, Evidence is presented which shows that the corresponding differences between gluon and b jets are significantly smaller. In a statistically limited comparison the multiplicity in c jets was found to be comparable with that observed for the jets of mixed quark flavour.

  2. Q-profiles in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gill, R.D.; Edwards, A.W.; Keegan, B.; Lazzaro, E.; O'Rourke, J.; Weller, A.; Zasche, D.

    1989-01-01

    Tokamak q-profiles play a central role in the determination of plasma stability and q(r) towards the plasma centre is particularly important for the sawtooth instability. On JET, q(r) has been determined from magnetic measurements and Faraday rotation. Further information about the position of the q=1 surface has been found from the sawtooth inversion radius, the position of the snake and the resonance effect observed on visible light and X-ray emission during pellet injection. In addition the shear at the q=1 surface has been measured from pellet ablation. This result is supported by the movement of the snake caused by a sawtooth crash. A summary of these data will be made after presenting the new results from pellet ablation. (author) 5 refs., 8 figs

  3. Presheath profiles in simulated tokamak edge plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaBombard, B.; Conn, R.W.; Hirooka, Y.; Lehmer, R.; Leung, W.K.; Nygren, R.E.; Ra, Y.; Tynan, G.

    1988-04-01

    The PISCES plasma surface interaction facility at UCLA generates plasmas with characteristics similar to those found in the edge plasmas of tokamaks. Steady state magnetized plasmas produced by this device are used to study plasma-wall interaction phenomena which are relevant to tokamak devices. We report here progress on some detailed investigations of the presheath region that extends from a wall surface into these /open quotes/simulated tokamak/close quotes/ edge plasma discharges along magnetic field lines

  4. Engineering analysis of new Brazilian Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuszel, A.G.

    1990-01-01

    The engineering basic headlines are described. A project for the construction of a new tokamak is being developed at the Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo. The tokamak named TBR-II will be a medium size tokamak using two high power generators of 15 MW each and concepted as a versatile device for plasma physics research of interest for thermonuclear fusion studies. (Author)

  5. A numerical study of tokamak edge turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Shuanghui; Huang Lin; Qiu Xiaoming

    1993-01-01

    The tokamak edge turbulence which contains resistivity and impurity gradients and impurity radiation driven sources is studied numerically. The effect of ohmic dissipation on the evolution and saturation of this turbulence is investigated. The ohmic effect drops the saturation levels of fluctuations efficiently in high density tokamaks (such as Alcator), indicating that the ohmic effect plays an important role in the evolution of tokamak edge turbulence in high density devices

  6. Microwave Tokamak Experiment: Overview and status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-05-01

    The Microwave Tokamak Experiment, now under construction at the Laboratory, will use microwave heating from a free-electron laser. The intense microwave pulses will be injected into the tokamak to realize several goals, including a demonstration of the effects of localized heat deposition within magnetically confined plasma, a better understanding of energy confinement in tokamaks, and use of the new free-electron laser technology for plasma heating. 3 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Experimental measurement of magnetic field null in the vacuum chamber of KTM tokamak based on matrix of 2D Hall sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapovalov, G.; Chektybayev, B., E-mail: chektybaev@nnc.kz; Sadykov, A.; Skakov, M.; Kupishev, E.

    2016-11-15

    Experimental technique of measurement of magnetic field null region inside of the KTM tokamak vacuum chamber has been developed. Square matrix of 36 2D Hall sensors, which used in the technique, allows carrying out direct measurements of poloidal magnetic field dynamics in the vacuum chamber. To better measuring accuracy, Hall sensor’s matrix was calibrated with commercial Helmholtz coils and in situ measurement of defined magnetic field from poloidal and toroidal coils. Standard KTM Data-Acquisition System has been used to collect data from Hall sensors. Experimental results of measurement of magnetic field null in the vacuum chamber of KTM are shown in the paper. Additionally results of the magnetic field null reconstruction from signals of inductive total flux loops are shown in the paper.

  8. Toroidal and poloidal momentum transport studies in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tala, T [Association EURATOM-Tekes, VTT, PO Box 1000, FIN-02044 VTT (Finland); Crombe, K [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University (Belgium); Vries, P C de [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Oxon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)] (and others)

    2007-12-15

    The present status of understanding of toroidal and poloidal momentum transport in tokamaks is presented in this paper. Similar energy confinement and momentum confinement times, i.e. {tau}{sub E}/{tau}{sub {phi}} {approx} 1 have been reported on several tokamaks. It is more important though, to study the local transport both in the core and edge plasma separately as, for example, in the core plasma, a large scatter in the ratio of the local effective momentum diffusivity to the ion heat diffusivity {chi}{sub {phi}}{sub eff}/{chi}{sub i,eff} among different tokamaks can be found. For example, the value of effective Prandtl number is typically around {chi}{sub {phi}}{sub eff}/{chi}{sub i,eff} {approx} 0.2 on JET while still {tau}{sub E}/{tau}{sub {phi}} {approx} 1 holds. Perturbative NBI modulation experiments on JET have shown, however, that a Prandtl number {chi}{sub {phi}}{sub /}{chi}{sub i} of around 1 is valid if there is an additional, significant inward momentum pinch which is required to explain the amplitude and phase behaviour of the momentum perturbation. The experimental results, i.e. the high Prandtl number and pinch, are in good qualitative and to some extent also in quantitative agreement with linear gyro-kinetic simulations. In contrast to the toroidal momentum transport which is clearly anomalous, the poloidal velocity is usually believed to be neo-classical. However, experimental measurements on JET show that the carbon poloidal velocity can be an order of magnitude above the predicted value by the neo-classical theory within the ITB. These large measured poloidal velocities, employed for example in transport simulations, significantly affect the calculated radial electric field and therefore the E x B flow shear and hence modify and can significantly improve the simulation predictions. Several fluid turbulence codes have been used to identify the mechanism driving the poloidal velocity to such high values. CUTIE and TRB turbulence codes and also

  9. Toroidal and poloidal momentum transport studies in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tala, T.; Crombé, K.; de Vries, P. C.; Ferreira, J.; Mantica, P.; Peeters, A. G.; Andrew, Y.; Budny, R.; Corrigan, G.; Eriksson, A.; Garbet, X.; Giroud, C.; Hua, M.-D.; Nordman, H.; Naulin, V.; Nave, M. F. F.; Parail, V.; Rantamäki, K.; Scott, B. D.; Strand, P.; Tardini, G.; Thyagaraja, A.; Weiland, J.; Zastrow, K.-D.; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2007-12-01

    The present status of understanding of toroidal and poloidal momentum transport in tokamaks is presented in this paper. Similar energy confinement and momentum confinement times, i.e. τE/τphi ≈ 1 have been reported on several tokamaks. It is more important though, to study the local transport both in the core and edge plasma separately as, for example, in the core plasma, a large scatter in the ratio of the local effective momentum diffusivity to the ion heat diffusivity χphieff/χi,eff among different tokamaks can be found. For example, the value of effective Prandtl number is typically around χphieff/χi,eff ≈ 0.2 on JET while still τE/τphi ≈ 1 holds. Perturbative NBI modulation experiments on JET have shown, however, that a Prandtl number χphi/χi of around 1 is valid if there is an additional, significant inward momentum pinch which is required to explain the amplitude and phase behaviour of the momentum perturbation. The experimental results, i.e. the high Prandtl number and pinch, are in good qualitative and to some extent also in quantitative agreement with linear gyro-kinetic simulations. In contrast to the toroidal momentum transport which is clearly anomalous, the poloidal velocity is usually believed to be neo-classical. However, experimental measurements on JET show that the carbon poloidal velocity can be an order of magnitude above the predicted value by the neo-classical theory within the ITB. These large measured poloidal velocities, employed for example in transport simulations, significantly affect the calculated radial electric field and therefore the E × B flow shear and hence modify and can significantly improve the simulation predictions. Several fluid turbulence codes have been used to identify the mechanism driving the poloidal velocity to such high values. CUTIE and TRB turbulence codes and also the Weiland model predict the existence of an anomalous poloidal velocity, peaking in the vicinity of the ITB and driven dominantly

  10. Printing silicone-based hydrophobic barriers on paper for microfluidic assays using low-cost ink jet printers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendra, Vinodh; Sicard, Clémence; Brennan, John D; Brook, Michael A

    2014-12-21

    Paper-based microfluidic devices exhibit many advantages for biological assays. Normally, the assays are restricted to certain areas of the paper by hydrophobic barriers comprised of wax or alkyl ketene dimers (AKD). Neither hydrophobic barrier is able to constrain aqueous solutions of surfactants, which are frequently used in biological assays. We demonstrate that rapidly curing silicone resins can be inkjet printed onto pure cellulose paper using inexpensive thermal ink-jet printers. The Piers-Rubinsztajn (PR) reaction dominates the cure chemistry leading to cellulose fibers that are surface coated with a silicone resin. The resulting barriers are able to resist penetration by surfactant solutions and even by the lower surface energy solvents DMF and DMSO. The utility of the barrier was demonstrated using a coliform assay based on detection of β-galactosidase.

  11. NASA Jet Noise Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Brenda

    2016-01-01

    The presentation highlights NASA's jet noise research for 2016. Jet-noise modeling efforts, jet-surface interactions results, acoustic characteristics of multi-stream jets, and N+2 Supersonic Aircraft system studies are presented.

  12. Optimal diameter of nozzles of synthetic jet actuators based on electrodynamic transducers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kordík, Jozef; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 86, September (2017), s. 281-294 ISSN 0894-1777 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-16596S Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : synthetic jet * volumetric flux * momentum flux Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 2.830, year: 2016 http://ac.els-cdn.com/S0894177717300742/1-s2.0-S0894177717300742-main.pdf?_tid=6ea733c0-355f-11e7-b903-00000aab0f27&acdnat=1494407145_e51e007a0043b8f660576ad000820efd

  13. Surface temperature measurement of plasma facing components in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiel, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    During this PhD, the challenges on the non-intrusive surface temperature measurements of metallic plasma facing components in tokamaks are reported. Indeed, a precise material emissivity value is needed for classical infrared methods and the environment contribution has to be known particularly for low emissivities materials. Although methods have been developed to overcome these issues, they have been implemented solely for dedicated experiments. In any case, none of these methods are suitable for surface temperature measurement in tokamaks.The active pyrometry introduced in this study allows surface temperature measurements independently of reflected flux and emissivities using pulsed and modulated photothermal effect. This method has been validated in laboratory on metallic materials with reflected fluxes for pulsed and modulated modes. This experimental validation is coupled with a surface temperature variation induced by photothermal effect and temporal signal evolvement modelling in order to optimize both the heating source characteristics and the data acquisition and treatment. The experimental results have been used to determine the application range in temperature and detection wavelengths. In this context, the design of an active pyrometry system on tokamak has been completed, based on a bicolor camera for a thermography application in metallic (or low emissivity) environment.The active pyrometry method introduced in this study is a complementary technique of classical infrared methods used for thermography in tokamak environment which allows performing local and 2D surface temperature measurements independently of reflected fluxes and emissivities. (author) [fr

  14. Isotope effects on L-H threshold and confinement in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, C. F.; Weisen, H.; Hillesheim, J. C.; Chankin, A.; Delabie, E.; Horvath, L.; Auriemma, F.; Carvalho, I. S.; Corrigan, G.; Flanagan, J.; Garzotti, L.; Keeling, D.; King, D.; Lerche, E.; Lorenzini, R.; Maslov, M.; Menmuir, S.; Saarelma, S.; Sips, A. C. C.; Solano, E. R.; Belonohy, E.; Casson, F. J.; Challis, C.; Giroud, C.; Parail, V.; Silva, C.; Valisa, M.; Contributors, JET

    2018-01-01

    The dependence of plasma transport and confinement on the main hydrogenic ion isotope mass is of fundamental importance for understanding turbulent transport and, therefore, for accurate extrapolations of confinement from present tokamak experiments, which typically use a single hydrogen isotope, to burning plasmas such as ITER, which will operate in deuterium–tritium mixtures. Knowledge of the dependence of plasma properties and edge transport barrier formation on main ion species is critical in view of the initial, low-activation phase of ITER operations in hydrogen or helium and of its implications on the subsequent operation in deuterium–tritium. The favourable scaling of global energy confinement time with isotope mass, which has been observed in many tokamak experiments, remains largely unexplained theoretically. Moreover, the mass scaling observed in experiments varies depending on the plasma edge conditions. In preparation for upcoming deuterium–tritium experiments in the JET tokamak with the ITER-like Be/W Wall (JET-ILW), a thorough experimental investigation of isotope effects in hydrogen, deuterium and tritium plasmas is being carried out, in order to provide stringent tests of plasma energy, particle and momentum transport models. Recent hydrogen and deuterium isotope experiments in JET-ILW on L-H power threshold, L-mode and H-mode confinement are reviewed and discussed in the context of past and more recent isotope experiments in tokamak plasmas, highlighting common elements as well as contrasting observations that have been reported. The experimental findings are discussed in the context of fundamental aspects of plasma transport models.

  15. Advanced commercial Tokamak optimization studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitley, R.H.; Berwald, D.H.; Gordon, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Our recent studies have concentrated on developing optimal high beta (bean-shaped plasma) commercial tokamak configurations using TRW's Tokamak Reactor Systems Code (TRSC) with special emphasis on lower net electric power reactors that are more easily deployable. A wide range of issues were investigated in the search for the most economic configuration: fusion power, reactor size, wall load, magnet type, inboard blanket and shield thickness, plasma aspect ratio, and operational β value. The costs and configurations of both steady-state and pulsed reactors were also investigated. Optimal small and large reactor concepts were developed and compared by studying the cost of electricity from single units and from multiplexed units. Multiplexed units appear to have advantages because they share some plant equipment and have lower initial capital investment as compared to larger single units

  16. Flux driven turbulence in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbet, X.; Ghendrih, P.; Ottaviani, M.; Sarazin, Y.; Beyer, P.; Benkadda, S.; Waltz, R.E.

    1999-01-01

    This work deals with tokamak plasma turbulence in the case where fluxes are fixed and profiles are allowed to fluctuate. These systems are intermittent. In particular, radially propagating fronts, are usually observed over a broad range of time and spatial scales. The existence of these fronts provide a way to understand the fast transport events sometimes observed in tokamaks. It is also shown that the confinement scaling law can still be of the gyroBohm type in spite of these large scale transport events. Some departure from the gyroBohm prediction is observed at low flux, i.e. when the gradients are close to the instability threshold. Finally, it is found that the diffusivity is not the same for a turbulence calculated at fixed flux than at fixed temperature gradient, with the same time averaged profile. (author)

  17. Runaway beam studies during disruptions at JET-ILW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reux, C.; Plyusnin, V.; Alper, B.; Alves, D.; Bazylev, B.; Belonohy, E.; Brezinsek, S.; Decker, J.; Devaux, S.; Vries, P. de; Fil, A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Runaway electrons (RE) have been obtained at JET-ILW using massive argon injection. • The runaway electron domain entry points are similar between JET-C and JET-ILW. • Inside the runaway electron domain, higher RE currents are observed with JET-ILW. • RE impact has been observed without material melting up to 100 kA RE current. • Heat deposition of 2 ± 1 mm is confirmed by measurements and simulations. - Abstract: Runaway electrons (RE) during disruptions are a concern for future tokamaks including ITER with its metallic wall. Although RE are rare in spontaneous disruptions with the JET ITER-like Wall (JET-ILW), RE beams up to 380 kA were obtained using massive injection (MGI) of argon in JET-ILW divertor discharges. Entry points into the RE domain defined by operational parameters (toroidal field, argon fraction in MGI) are unchanged but higher RE currents have been obtained inside the JET-ILW MGI-generated RE domain when compared to JET-C. This might be due to the influence of the metallic wall on the current quench plasma. Temperatures of 900 °C have been observed following RE impacts on beryllium tiles. Heat deposition depth of ∼2 mm has to be assumed to match the tile cooling time. 3D simulations of the RE energy deposition using the ENDEP/MEMOS codes show that material melting is unlikely with 100 kA RE beams

  18. Runaway beam studies during disruptions at JET-ILW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reux, C., E-mail: cedric.reux@cea.fr [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Plyusnin, V. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Instituto de Plasmas e Fuso Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tcnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); Alper, B. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Alves, D. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Instituto de Plasmas e Fuso Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tcnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa (Portugal); Bazylev, B. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Institut für Hochleistungsimpuls und Mikrowellentechnik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Campus Nord, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Belonohy, E. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); EFDA-CSU, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Brezinsek, S. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Energie-und Klimaforschung-Plasmaphysik, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Decker, J. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Devaux, S. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Vries, P. de [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St Paul Lez Durance (France); Fil, A. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); and others

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Runaway electrons (RE) have been obtained at JET-ILW using massive argon injection. • The runaway electron domain entry points are similar between JET-C and JET-ILW. • Inside the runaway electron domain, higher RE currents are observed with JET-ILW. • RE impact has been observed without material melting up to 100 kA RE current. • Heat deposition of 2 ± 1 mm is confirmed by measurements and simulations. - Abstract: Runaway electrons (RE) during disruptions are a concern for future tokamaks including ITER with its metallic wall. Although RE are rare in spontaneous disruptions with the JET ITER-like Wall (JET-ILW), RE beams up to 380 kA were obtained using massive injection (MGI) of argon in JET-ILW divertor discharges. Entry points into the RE domain defined by operational parameters (toroidal field, argon fraction in MGI) are unchanged but higher RE currents have been obtained inside the JET-ILW MGI-generated RE domain when compared to JET-C. This might be due to the influence of the metallic wall on the current quench plasma. Temperatures of 900 °C have been observed following RE impacts on beryllium tiles. Heat deposition depth of ∼2 mm has to be assumed to match the tile cooling time. 3D simulations of the RE energy deposition using the ENDEP/MEMOS codes show that material melting is unlikely with 100 kA RE beams.

  19. Shear Alfven waves in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kieras, C.E.

    1982-12-01

    Shear Alfven waves in an axisymmetric tokamak are examined within the framework of the linearized ideal MHD equations. Properties of the shear Alfven continuous spectrum are studied both analytically and numerically. Implications of these results in regards to low frequency rf heating of toroidally confined plasmas are discussed. The structure of the spatial singularities associated with these waves is determined. A reduced set of ideal MHD equations is derived to describe these waves in a very low beta plasma

  20. Equilibrium Reconstruction in EAST Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Jinping; Wan Baonian; Shen Biao; Sun Youwen; Liu Dongmei; Xiao Bingjia; Ren Qilong; Gong Xianzu; Li Jiangang; Lao, L. L.; Sabbagh, S. A.

    2009-01-01

    Reconstruction of experimental axisymmetric equilibria is an important part of tokamak data analysis. Fourier expansion is applied to reconstruct the vessel current distribution in EFIT code. Benchmarking and testing calculations are performed to evaluate and validate this algorithm. Two cases for circular and non-circular plasma discharges are presented. Fourier expansion used to fit the eddy current is a robust method and the real time EFIT can be introduced to the plasma control system in the coming campaign. (magnetically confined plasma)

  1. Dipole Map For Divertor Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Halima; Punjabi, Alkesh; Boozer, Allen

    2003-01-01

    Heat flux impinging on the collector plates of divertor tokamaks can be prodigious. Therefore, the problem of spreading the heat flux on plates is a crucial issue for divertor tokamaks such as ITER. Here we use method of maps /1,2/ to investigate this problem. Magnetic field lines in non-axisymmetric divertor tokamaks are a one and a half degree of freedom Hamiltonian system /1-3/. We represent the unperturbed magnetic topology by the Symmetric Simple Map (SSM) /4/ given by yn+1 = yn + 2kxn - 2k2yn (1 - yn), xn+1 = xn - kyn (1 - yn) - 2k2yn+1 (1 - yn+1). The effects of a current carrying coil placed externally across from X-point is represented by Dipole Map (DP) /4,5/ given by x n+1 = x n + 2δs 3 x n+1 (y n - y s + s/[x n+1 2 + (y n - y s + s) 2 ] 2 ), y n+1 = y n + δs 3 x n+1 ((y n - y s + s) 2 - x n+1 2 /[x n+1 2 + (y n - y s + s) 2 ] 2 ) δ is amplitude of high MN magnetic perturbation, s is the distance of coil from last good surface across from X point, and is the y coordinate of last good surface where it crosses the axis joining X point and O point across from X point. We fix k=0.3 and s = (1/2)|y s |. We calculate the increase in width of stochastic layer and area of footprint of field lines on divertor plate as δ is increased. We also calculate how connection length, toroidal and poloidal circuits and their fractal structures, the number, location and density of hot spots change with δ. Finally, we make conclusions about how the heat flux can be possibly controlled and reduced by applying external magnetic perturbation in divertor tokamaks

  2. Relaxed states of tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucinski, M.Y.; Okano, V.

    1993-01-01

    The relaxed states of tokamak plasmas are studied. It is assumed that the plasma relaxes to a quasi-steady state which is characterized by a minimum entropy production rate, compatible with a number of prescribed conditions and pressure balance. A poloidal current arises naturally due to the anisotropic resistivity. The minimum entropy production theory is applied, assuming the pressure equilibrium as fundamental constraint on the final state. (L.C.J.A.)

  3. Detritiation studies for JET decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perevezentsev, A.N.; Bell, A.C.; Williams, J.; Brennan, P.D.

    2007-01-01

    JET is the world largest tokamak and has the capacity of operating with a tritium plasma. Three experimental campaigns, the Preliminary Tritium Experiment (0.1g T 2 ) in 1991, the Trace Tritium Experiment (5g T 2 ) in 2005, and the large experiment, the Deuterium-Tritium Experiment (DTE1) (100g T 2 ) in 1997, were carried out at JET with tritium plasmas. In DTE1 about 35 grams of tritium were fed directly into the vacuum vessel, with about 30% of this tritium being retained inside the vessel. In several years time JET will cease experimental operations and enter a decommissioning phase. In preparation for this the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority, the JET Operator, has been carrying out studies of various detritiation techniques. The materials which have been the subject of these studies include solid materials, such as various metals (Inconel 600 and 625, stainless steel 316L, beryllium, ''oxygen-free'' copper, aluminium bronze), carbon fibre composite tiles, ''carbon'' flakes and dust present in the vacuum vessel and also soft housekeeping materials. Liquid materials include organic liquids, such as vacuum oils and scintillation cocktails, and water. Detritiation of gas streams was also investigated. The purpose of the studies was to select and experimentally prove primary and auxiliary technologies for in-situ detritiation of in-vessel components and ex-situ detritiation of components removed from the vessel. The targets of ex-vessel detritiation were a reduction of the tritium inventory in and the rate of tritium out-gassing from the materials, and conversion, if possible, of intermediate level waste to low level waste and a reduction in volume of waste for disposal. The results of experimental trials and their potential application are presented. (orig.)

  4. Ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations of unmagnetized dense plasma jet injection into a hot strongly magnetized plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Wei; Hsu, Scott C.

    2010-01-01

    We present results from three-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations of unmagnetized dense plasma jet injection into a uniform hot strongly magnetized plasma, with the aim of providing insight into core fueling of a tokamak with parameters relevant for ITER and NSTX (National Spherical Torus Experiment). Unmagnetized dense plasma jet injection is similar to compact toroid injection but with much higher plasma density and total mass, and consequently lower required injection velocit...

  5. Experience and lessons from the JET 4.0 T assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparotto, M.; Bertolini, E.; Buzio, M.; Kaye, A.; Last, J.; Noll, P.; Miele, P.; Papastergiou, S.; Riccardo, V.; Sjoeholm, M.; Walton, R.; Hofmann, F.; Robinson, D.C.; Salpietro, E.; Bettinali, L.; Visca, E.

    2001-01-01

    Raising the JET maximum toroidal field from 3.45 to 4.0 T results in increased forces and stresses in the key machine components during normal operations and disruptions. These forces and stresses have been predicted for 4.0 T operation and compared with allowable values derived from tests on used and spare JET coils. In this assessment significant lessons related to the design, manufacture and operation of key Tokamak components have also been learnt

  6. Erosion of wind turbine blade coatings - Design and analysis of jet-based laboratory equipment for performance evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Shizhong; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Nørkjær, Sten

    2015-01-01

    of up to 22 coating samples that is based on water jet slugs. Our objective is to study the effect of the parameters involved in the rain erosion process and to correlate our experimental results with data obtained with the complex and expensive whirling arm rig, which has become the industry standard...... method of test for rain erosion. Our results showed that water slug velocity and impact frequency are the most influential parameters in the coating erosion rate. Coating defects, often present on the specimens tested, appeared to play an important role in the erosion mechanism. Two particular...... and the potential significance of the presence of a thin water film on the coated surfaces. Our results endorse the complex nature of the rain erosion phenomenon, which is the result of the simultaneous combination of complex mechanisms and as such, it is difficult to reproduce at the laboratory scale....

  7. Ignition probabilities for Compact Ignition Tokamak designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stotler, D.P.; Goldston, R.J.

    1989-09-01

    A global power balance code employing Monte Carlo techniques had been developed to study the ''probability of ignition'' and has been applied to several different configurations of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT). Probability distributions for the critical physics parameters in the code were estimated using existing experimental data. This included a statistical evaluation of the uncertainty in extrapolating the energy confinement time. A substantial probability of ignition is predicted for CIT if peaked density profiles can be achieved or if one of the two higher plasma current configurations is employed. In other cases, values of the energy multiplication factor Q of order 10 are generally obtained. The Ignitor-U and ARIES designs are also examined briefly. Comparisons of our empirically based confinement assumptions with two theory-based transport models yield conflicting results. 41 refs., 11 figs

  8. Jet Quenching via Jet Collimation

    CERN Document Server

    Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Collaboration recently reported strong modifications of dijet properties in heavy ion collisions. In this work, we discuss to what extent these first data constrain already the microscopic mechanism underlying jet quenching. Simple kinematic arguments lead us to identify a frequency collimation mechanism via which the medium efficiently trims away the soft components of the jet parton shower. Through this mechanism, the observed dijet asymmetry can be accomodated with values of $\\hat{q}\\, L$ that lie in the expected order of magnitude.

  9. Runaway beam studies during disruptions at JET-ILW

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Reux, C.; Plyusnin, V.; Alper, B.; Alves, D.; Bazylev, B.; Belonohy, E.; Brezinsek, S.; Decker, J.; Devaux, S.; de Vries, P.; Fil, A.; Gerasimov, S.; Lupelli, I.; Jachmich, S.; Khilkevitch, E.M.; Kiptily, V.; Koslowski, R.; Kruezi, U.; Lehnen, M.; Manzanares, A.; Mlynář, Jan; Nardon, E.; Nilsson, E.; Riccardo, V.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Shevelev, A.E.; Sozzi, C.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 463, August (2015), s. 143-149 ISSN 0022-3115. [PLASMA-SURFACE INTERACTIONS 21: International Conference on Plasma-Surface Interactions in Controlled Fusion Devices. Kanazawa, 26.05.2014-30.05.2014] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : tokamak * JET * runaway electrons * disruptions * ILW Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics OBOR OECD: Nuclear related engineering Impact factor: 2.199, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022311514006850

  10. Jet Tomography versus Holography at RHIC and LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torrieri G.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We compare pQCD based jet tomography to AdS/CFT based jet holography approach to address the heavy quark jet puzzle and discuss future tests at RHIC and LHC that could help decide which paradigm can provide the most consistent quantitative theory to explain modification of jet observabkles in high energy nuclear collisions.

  11. Fusion Plasma Theory: Task 3, Auxiliary radiofrequency heating of tokamaks. Annual report, November 16, 1991--November 15, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharer, J.E.

    1992-12-31

    The research performed under this grant during the past year has been concentrated on the following several key tokamak ICRF (Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies) coupling, heating and current drive issues: Efficient coupling during the L- to H- mode transition by analysis and computer simulation of ICRF antennas; analysis of ICRF cavity-backed coil antenna coupling to plasma edge profiles including fast and ion Bernstein wave coupling for heating and current drive; benchmarking the codes to compare with current JET, D-IIID and ASDEX experimental results and predictions for advanced tokamaks such as BPX and SSAT (Steady-State Advanced Tokamak); ICRF full-wave field solutions, power conservation, heating analyses and minority ion current drive; and the effects of fusion alpha particle or ion tail populations on the ICRF absorption. Research progress, publications, and conference and workshop presentations are summarized in this report.

  12. Experience with high heat flux components in large tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chappuis, P.; Dietz, K.J.; Ulrickson, M.

    1991-01-01

    The large present day tokamaks. i.e.JET, TFTR, JT-60, DIII-D and Tore Supra are machines capable of sustaining plasma currents of several million amperes. Pulse durations range from a few seconds up to a minute. These large machines have been in operation for several years and there exists wide experience with materials for plasma facing components. Bare and coated metals, bare and coated graphites and beryllium were used for walls, limiters and divertors. High heat flux components are mainly radiation cooled, but stationary cooling for long pulse duration is also employed. This paper summarizes the experience gained in the large machines with respect to material selection, component design, problem areas, and plasma performance. 2 tabs., 26 figs., 50 refs

  13. Study of wall conditioning in tokamaks with application to ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kogut, Dmitri

    2014-01-01

    Thesis is devoted to studies of performance and efficiency of wall conditioning techniques in fusion reactors, such as ITER. Conditioning is necessary to control the state of the surface of plasma facing components to ensure plasma initiation and performance. Conditioning and operation of the JET tokamak with ITER-relevant material mix is extensively studied. A 2D model of glow conditioning discharges is developed and validated; it predicts reasonably uniform discharges in ITER. In the nuclear phase of ITER operation conditioning will be needed to control tritium inventory. It is shown here that isotopic exchange is an efficient mean to eliminate tritium from the walls by replacing it with deuterium. Extrapolations for tritium removal are comparable with expected retention per a nominal plasma pulse in ITER. A 1D model of hydrogen isotopic exchange in beryllium is developed and validated. It shows that fluence and temperature of the surface influence efficiency of the isotopic exchange. (author) [fr

  14. Results from deuterium-tritium tokamak confinement experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawryluk, R.J.

    1997-02-01

    Recent scientific and technical progress in magnetic fusion experiments has resulted in the achievement of plasma parameters (density and temperature) which enabled the production of significant bursts of fusion power from deuterium-tritium fuels and the first studies of the physics of burning plasmas. The key scientific issues in the reacting plasma core are plasma confinement, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability, and the confinement and loss of energetic fusion products from the reacting fuel ions. Progress in the development of regimes of operation which have both good confinement and are MHD stable have enabled a broad study of burning plasma physics issues. A review of the technical and scientific results from the deuterium-tritium experiments on the Joint European Torus (JET) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is given with particular emphasis on alpha-particle physics issues.

  15. Results from deuterium-tritium tokamak confinement experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawryluk, R.J.

    1997-02-01

    Recent scientific and technical progress in magnetic fusion experiments has resulted in the achievement of plasma parameters (density and temperature) which enabled the production of significant bursts of fusion power from deuterium-tritium fuels and the first studies of the physics of burning plasmas. The key scientific issues in the reacting plasma core are plasma confinement, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability, and the confinement and loss of energetic fusion products from the reacting fuel ions. Progress in the development of regimes of operation which have both good confinement and are MHD stable have enabled a broad study of burning plasma physics issues. A review of the technical and scientific results from the deuterium-tritium experiments on the Joint European Torus (JET) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is given with particular emphasis on alpha-particle physics issues

  16. A Portable, Air-Jet-Actuator-Based Device for System Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staats, Wayne; Belden, Jesse; Mazumdar, Anirban; Hunter, Ian

    2010-11-01

    System identification (ID) of human and robotic limbs could help in diagnosis of ailments and aid in optimization of control parameters and future redesigns. We present a self-contained actuator, which uses the Coanda effect to rapidly switch the direction of a high speed air jet to create a binary stochastic force input to a limb for system ID. The design of the actuator is approached with the goal of creating a portable device, which could deployed on robot or human limbs for in situ identification. The viability of the device is demonstrated by performing stochastic system ID on an underdamped elastic beam system with fixed inertia and stiffness, and variable damping. The non-parametric impulse response yielded from the stochastic system ID is modeled as a second order system, and the resultant parameters are found to be in excellent agreement with those found using more traditional system ID techniques. The current design could be further miniaturized and developed as a portable, wireless, on-site multi-axis system identification system for less intrusive and more widespread use.

  17. Separation and reconstruction of high pressure water-jet reflective sound signal based on ICA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongtao; Sun, Yuling; Li, Meng; Zhang, Dongsu; Wu, Tianfeng

    2011-12-01

    The impact of high pressure water-jet on the different materials target will produce different reflective mixed sound. In order to reconstruct the reflective sound signals distribution on the linear detecting line accurately and to separate the environment noise effectively, the mixed sound signals acquired by linear mike array were processed by ICA. The basic principle of ICA and algorithm of FASTICA were described in detail. The emulation experiment was designed. The environment noise signal was simulated by using band-limited white noise and the reflective sound signal was simulated by using pulse signal. The reflective sound signal attenuation produced by the different distance transmission was simulated by weighting the sound signal with different contingencies. The mixed sound signals acquired by linear mike array were synthesized by using the above simulated signals and were whitened and separated by ICA. The final results verified that the environment noise separation and the reconstruction of the detecting-line sound distribution can be realized effectively.

  18. Real-time horizontal position control for Aditya-upgrade tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Rohit; Ghosh, Joydeep; Tanna, Rakesh L.

    2015-01-01

    Position of plasma column is required to be controlled in real time for improved operation of any tokamak. A PID based system for real-time horizontal plasma position control has been designed for Aditya Upgrade tokamak. Modelling of transfer functions of actuators, plasma and diagnostic system are carried out for ADITYA-U tokamak. The PID controller is optimized using MATLAB-SIMULINK for horizontal position control. Further feed-forward loop is implemented where disturbance due to density variation is suppressed, which results in improved performance as compared to conventional PID operation. In this paper the detailed design of the whole system for real time control of plasma horizontal position in Aditya Upgrade tokamak is presented. (author)

  19. Development of lab scale fast gas injection system for SST-1 Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathan, F.S.; Banaudha, Moni; Khristi, Yohan; Khan, M.S.; Khan, Ziauddin; Raval, D.C.; Khirwadkar, Samir

    2017-01-01

    The plasma density control plays an important role in Tokamak operation. The factors that influence plasma density in a Tokamak device are working gas injection, pumping, ionization rate and the recycle coefficient representing the wall conditions. Among these factors, gas injection is relatively convenient to be controlled. Hence, the most frequently adopted method to control the plasma density is to control the fast gas injection. This paper describes the design and experimental work carried out towards the development of Fast Gas Injection System for SST-1 Tokamak. Laboratory based test setup was successfully established for Fast Gas Injection System that can feed predefined quantity of gas in a controlled manner into vacuum chamber. Further, this FGIS system will be implemented in SST-1 Tokamak environment with online density feedback signal

  20. Implications of rf current drive theory for next step steady-state tokamak design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, J.H.

    1985-06-01

    Two missions have been identified for a next-step tokamak experiment in the United States. The more ambitious Mission II device would be a superconducting tokamak, capable of doing long-pulse ignition demonstrations, and hopefully capable of also being able to achieve steady-state burn. A few interesting lines of approach have been identified, using a combination of logical design criteria and parametric system scans [SC85]. These include: (1) TIBER: A point-design suggested by Lawrence Livermore, that proposes a machine with the capability of demonstrating ignition, high beta (10%) and high Q (=10), using high frequency, fast-wave current drive. The TIBER topology uses moderate aspect ratio and high triangularity to achieve high beta. (2) JET Scale-up. (3) Magic5: It is argued here that an aspect ratio of 5 is a magic number for a good steady-state current drive experiment. A moderately-sized machine that achieves ignition and is capable of high Q, using either fast wave or slow wave current drive is described. (4) ET-II: The concept of a highly elongated tokamak (ET) was first proposed as a low-cost approach to Mission I, because of the possibility of achieving ohmic ignition with low-stress copper magnets. We propose that its best application is really for commercial tokamaks, using fast-wave current drive, and suggest a Mission II experiment that would be prototypical of such a reactor

  1. Tokamak plasma position dynamics and feedback control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burenko, L.; Bailey, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    The perturbation equations of a tokamak plasma equilibrium position are developed. Solution of the approximated perturbation equations is carried out. A unique, simple, and useful plasma displacement dynamics transfer function of a tokamak is developed. The dominant time constants of the dynamics transfer function are determined in a symbolic form

  2. Mercier criterion for high-β tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvao, R.M.O.

    1984-01-01

    An expression, for the application of the Mercier criterion to numerical studies of diffuse high-β tokamaks (β approximatelly Σ,q approximatelly 1), which contains only leading order contributions in the high-β tokamak approximation is derived. (L.C.) [pt

  3. Magnetic confinement by Tokamak: physical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachon, J.

    1980-01-01

    After describing the Tokamak configuration concept, the author provides an analysis of the principal physical aspects of this type of installation and concludes by estimating that the Tokamak concept is a 'plausible candidate' as a means of producing controlled thermonuclear fusion [fr

  4. The ARIES-I tokamak reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report contains an overview of the Aries-I tokamak reactor study. The following topics are discussed on this tokamak: Systems studies; equilibrium, stability, and transport; summary and conclusions; current drive; impurity control system; tritium systems; magnet engineering; fusion-power-core engineering; power conversion; Aries-I safety design and analysis; design layout and maintenance; and start-up and operations

  5. TGV, hutě a tokamak ITER

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řípa, Milan

    Leden (2017) ISSN 2464-7888 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : fusion * ITER * tokamak * TGV * Pulse Power Electrical Network * Steady State Electrical Network Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) http://www.3pol.cz/cz/rubriky/jaderna-fyzika-a-energetika/1954-tgv-hute-a-tokamak-iter

  6. Engineering Design of KSTAR tokamak main structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Im, K.H.; Cho, S.; Her, N.I.

    2001-01-01

    The main components of the KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) tokamak including vacuum vessel, plasma facing components, cryostat, thermal shield and magnet supporting structure are in the final stage of engineering design. Hundai Heavy Industries (HHI) has been involved in the engineering design of these components. The current configuration and the final engineering design results for the KSTAR main structure are presented. (author)

  7. Toroidal rotation braking with n = 1 magnetic perturbation field on JET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Y; Liang, Y; Koslowski, H R

    2010-01-01

    A strong toroidal rotation braking has been observed in plasmas with application of an n = 1 magnetic perturbation field on the JET tokamak. Calculation results from the momentum transport analysis show that the torque induced by the n = 1 perturbation field has a global profile. The maximal value...

  8. Experimental tests of confinement scale invariance on JET, DIIID, ASDEX Upgrade and CMOD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, J.P.; Cordey, J.G.; Budny, R.

    2001-01-01

    An international collaboration between JET, DIIID, AUG and CMOD has resulted in four sets of Tokamak discharges which are approximately identical as regards a set of dimensionless plasma variables. The data demonstrates some measure of scale invariance of local and global confinement but a more accurate matching of scaled density, power etc. is required to make firmer conclusions. (author)

  9. Ubiquity of non-diffusive momentum transport in JET H-modes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weisen, H.; Camenen, Y.; Salmi, A.; Versloot, T. W.; de Vries, P. C.; Maslov, M.; Tala, T.; Beurskens, M.; Giroud, C.; JET-EFDA Contributors,

    2012-01-01

    A broad survey of the experimental database of neutral beam heated baseline H-modes and hybrid scenarios in the JET tokamak has established the ubiquity of non-diffusive momentum transport mechanisms in rotating plasmas. As a result of their presence, the normalized angular frequency gradient R

  10. Runaway electron beam generation and mitigation during disruptions at JET-ILW

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Reux, C.; Plyusnin, V.; Alper, B.; Alves, D.; Bazylev, B.; Belonohy, E.; Boboc, A.; Brezinsek, S.; Coffey, I.; Decker, J.; Drewelow, P.; Devaux, S.; de Vries, P.C.; Fil, A.; Gerasimov, S.; Giacomelli, L.; Jachmich, S.; Khilkevitch, E.M.; Kiptily, V.; Koslowski, R.; Kruezi, U.; Lehnen, M.; Lupelli, I.; Lomas, P. J.; Manzanares, A.; Martin De Aguilera, A.; Matthews, G.F.; Mlynář, Jan; Nardon, E.; Nilsson, E.; Perez von Thun, C.; Riccardo, V.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Shevelev, A.E.; Sips, G.; Sozzi, C.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 9 (2015), 093013-093013 ISSN 0029-5515 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : runaway electrons * disruptions * tokamak * JET * massive gas injection * disruption mitigation * runaway background plasma Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 4.040, year: 2015 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0029-5515/55/9/093013

  11. Comparing scrape-off layer and divertor physics in JET pure He and D discharges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pitts, R.A.; Andrew, P.; Andrew, Y.; Becoulet, M.; Coffey, I.; Coster, D.; McDonald, D. C.; Eich, T.; Erents, S.K.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Fundamenski, W.; Haas, G.; Hermann, A.; Hidalgo, C.; Hillis, D.; Huber, A.; Ingesson, L. C.; Jachmich, S.; Kallenbach, A.; Korotkov, A.; Lawson, K.; Lomas, P.; Loarer, T.; Loarte, A.; Matthews, G. F.; McCracken, G.; Meigs, A.; Mertens, P.; O' Mullane, M.; Phillipps, V.; Porter, G.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Rapp, J.; Reiter, D.; Riccardo, V.; Saibene, G.; Sartori, R.; Stamp, M. F.; Tsitrone, E.; Wischmeier, W.; Gafert, J.

    2003-01-01

    Though helium plasmas are one option for the low activation phase of ITER, little effort has thus far been devoted to studying them in a large, diverted tokamak. A recent campaign on JET has therefore sought to address some of the important questions related to helium operation (He concentrations

  12. Prospects of the Minimum Fisher Regularisation in the Experimental Analyses of Plasma Particle Transport at JET

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mlynář, Jan; Bonheure, G.; Murari, A.; JET EFDA, Contributors.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 10 (2006), s. 196 ISSN 0003-0503. [Division of Plasma Physics Meeting 2006. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 30.10.2006-3.11.2006] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Tomography * transport * neutrons * fusion * tokamak * JET Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  13. ITER-like current ramps in JET with ILW: experiments, modelling and consequences for ITER

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hogeweij, G.M.D.; Calabrò, G.; Sips, A.C.C.; Maggi, C.F.; De Tommasi, G.M.; Joffrin, E.; Loarte, A.; Maviglia, F.; Mlynář, Jan; Rimini, F.G.; Pütterich, T.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 1 (2015), 013009-013009 ISSN 0029-5515 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : tokamak * ramp-up * JET * ITER Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 4.040, year: 2015 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0029-5515/55/1/013009#metrics

  14. Observations of rotation in JET plasmas with electron heating by ion cyclotron resonance heating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellsten, T.; Johnson, T. J.; Van Eester, D.

    2012-01-01

    The rotation of L-mode plasmas in the JET tokamak heated by waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) damped on electrons, is reported. The plasma in the core is found to rotate in the counter-current direction with a high shear and in the outer part of the plasma with an almost cons...

  15. Wave–particle resonances and redistribution/losses of fast ions in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabais, F.; Borba, D.; Kiptily, V.G.; Pinches, S.D.; Sharapov, S.E.

    2012-01-01

    Enhanced fast ion losses, mostly in the range of energies from around 1.2 to 2.4 MeV, were measured during the activity of tornado modes in the JET tokamak. Tornado modes are TAE localized inside the q = 1 surface, which do not extend to the outer regions of the plasma. Thus, it is necessary to find an explanation on how such modes can lead to the loss of fast ions. In this paper, a mechanism that allows explaining the loss of fast ions triggered by tornado modes is proposed. This mechanism is based on the combined effect of tornado modes and global TAEs over the fast ions (global TAEs were always observed along with the tornado modes in the experiments in which enhanced losses were measured). Tornado modes would trigger the process of loss by resonantly interacting with the fast ions near the centre of the plasma and transporting the ions to a more peripheral region where tornado modes and global TAEs coexist. The TAE would then transport convectively the fast ions, most efficiently through the first bounce resonances (p = 1), all the way to the plasma edge eventually leading to its loss. This mechanism of loss is supported by calculations carried out with the CASTOR-K code. (paper)

  16. Magnetic signature of current carrying edge localized modes filaments on the Joint European Torus tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Migliucci, P.; Naulin, Volker

    2010-01-01

    Fast magnetic pickup coils are used in forward modeling to match parameters in a simple edge localized mode (ELM) filament model. This novel method allows us to determine key parameters for the evolution of the ELM filaments, as effective mode number, radial and toroidal velocities, and average...... current from standard magnetic diagnostics. The method is employed on a number of Joint European Torus (JET) [ F. Romanelli, R. Kamendje, and JET-EFDA Contributors, Nucl. Fusion 49, 104006 (2009) ] pulses. The parameter values obtained are compared to ELM filament characterization from JET and other...... tokamaks, obtained by a range of different diagnostics. It is found that the forward modeling produces key parameters such as the number of filaments and their toroidal velocity in agreement with other observations and in addition allows an estimate of the filament current....

  17. Application of CO2 Snow Jet Cleaning in Conjunction with Laboratory Based Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeling, M.; Burnett, D. S.; Allton, J. H.; Rodriquez, M.; Tripa, C. E.; Veryovkin, I. V.

    2013-01-01

    The Genesis mission was the first mission returning solar material to Earth since the Apollo program [1,2]. Unfortunately the return of the space craft on September 8, 2004 resulted in a crash landing, which shattered the samples into small fragments and exposed them to desert soil and other debris. Thus only small fragments of the original collectors are available, each having different degrees of surface contamination. Thorough surface cleaning is required to allow for subsequent analysis of solar wind material embedded within. An initial cleaning procedure was developed in coordination with Johnson Space Center which focused on removing larger sized particulates and a thin film organic contamination acquired during collection in space [3]. However, many of the samples have additional residues and more rigorous and/or innovative cleaning steps might be necessary. These cleaning steps must affect only the surface to avoid leaching and re-distribution of solar wind material from the bulk of the collectors. To aid in development and identification of the most appropriate cleaning procedures each sample has to be thoroughly inspected before and after each cleaning step. Laboratory based total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry lends itself to this task as it is a non-destructive and surface sensitive analytical method permitting analysis of elements from aluminum onward present at and near the surface of a flat substrate [4]. The suitability of TXRF has been demonstrated for several Genesis solar wind samples before and after various cleaning methods including acid treatment, gas cluster ion beam, and CO2 snow jet [5 - 7]. The latter one is non-invasive and did show some promise on one sample [5]. To investigate the feasibility of CO2 snow jet cleaning further, several flown Genesis samples were selected to be characterized before and after CO2 snow application with sample 61052 being discussed below.

  18. Performance of large-R jets and jet substructure reconstruction with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the application of techniques to study jet substructure. The performance of modified jet algorithms for a variety of jet types and event topologies is investigated. Properties of jets subjected to the mass-drop filtering, trimming and pruning algorithms are found to have a reduced sensitivity to multiple proton-proton interactions and exhibit improved stability at high luminosity. Monte Carlo studies of the signal-background discrimination with jet grooming in new physics searches based on jet invariant mass and jet substructure properties are also presented. The application of jet trimming is shown to improve the robustness of large-R jet measurements, reduce sensitivity to the superfluous effects due to the intense environment of the high luminosity LHC, and improve the physics potential of searches for heavy boosted objects. The analyses presented in this note use the full 2011 ATLAS dataset, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.7 \\pm 0.2 fb−1 .

  19. Taking the lag out of jet lag through model-based schedule design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Dennis A; Forger, Daniel B; Klerman, Elizabeth B

    2009-06-01

    Travel across multiple time zones results in desynchronization of environmental time cues and the sleep-wake schedule from their normal phase relationships with the endogenous circadian system. Circadian misalignment can result in poor neurobehavioral performance, decreased sleep efficiency, and inappropriately timed physiological signals including gastrointestinal activity and hormone release. Frequent and repeated transmeridian travel is associated with long-term cognitive deficits, and rodents experimentally exposed to repeated schedule shifts have increased death rates. One approach to reduce the short-term circadian, sleep-wake, and performance problems is to use mathematical models of the circadian pacemaker to design countermeasures that rapidly shift the circadian pacemaker to align with the new schedule. In this paper, the use of mathematical models to design sleep-wake and countermeasure schedules for improved performance is demonstrated. We present an approach to designing interventions that combines an algorithm for optimal placement of countermeasures with a novel mode of schedule representation. With these methods, rapid circadian resynchrony and the resulting improvement in neurobehavioral performance can be quickly achieved even after moderate to large shifts in the sleep-wake schedule. The key schedule design inputs are endogenous circadian period length, desired sleep-wake schedule, length of intervention, background light level, and countermeasure strength. The new schedule representation facilitates schedule design, simulation studies, and experiment design and significantly decreases the amount of time to design an appropriate intervention. The method presented in this paper has direct implications for designing jet lag, shift-work, and non-24-hour schedules, including scheduling for extreme environments, such as in space, undersea, or in polar regions.

  20. Taking the lag out of jet lag through model-based schedule design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis A Dean

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Travel across multiple time zones results in desynchronization of environmental time cues and the sleep-wake schedule from their normal phase relationships with the endogenous circadian system. Circadian misalignment can result in poor neurobehavioral performance, decreased sleep efficiency, and inappropriately timed physiological signals including gastrointestinal activity and hormone release. Frequent and repeated transmeridian travel is associated with long-term cognitive deficits, and rodents experimentally exposed to repeated schedule shifts have increased death rates. One approach to reduce the short-term circadian, sleep-wake, and performance problems is to use mathematical models of the circadian pacemaker to design countermeasures that rapidly shift the circadian pacemaker to align with the new schedule. In this paper, the use of mathematical models to design sleep-wake and countermeasure schedules for improved performance is demonstrated. We present an approach to designing interventions that combines an algorithm for optimal placement of countermeasures with a novel mode of schedule representation. With these methods, rapid circadian resynchrony and the resulting improvement in neurobehavioral performance can be quickly achieved even after moderate to large shifts in the sleep-wake schedule. The key schedule design inputs are endogenous circadian period length, desired sleep-wake schedule, length of intervention, background light level, and countermeasure strength. The new schedule representation facilitates schedule design, simulation studies, and experiment design and significantly decreases the amount of time to design an appropriate intervention. The method presented in this paper has direct implications for designing jet lag, shift-work, and non-24-hour schedules, including scheduling for extreme environments, such as in space, undersea, or in polar regions.

  1. Design, implementation and test of the XSC extreme shape controller in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albanese, R.; Ambrosino, G.; Ariola, M.; Cenedese, A.; Crisanti, F.; Tommasi, G. De; Mattei, M.; Piccolo, F.; Pironti, A.; Sartori, F.; Villone, F.

    2005-01-01

    A new model-based plasma current and shape controller has been set up and tested on the JET Tokamak with the existing active circuits and control. The installation has been carried out without causing any interference to the plasma operation and without requiring a long commissioning time. Eventually, the new controller was used on really extremely shaped internal transport barrier experiments at high poloidal beta and in the presence of quite large variations of the plasma current density profile (variation range Δβ pol up to 1.5 and Δl i up to 0.5). The extreme shape controller (XSC) controller architecture and philosophy also offer new interesting opportunities, e.g., the separatrix sweeping on the divertor plates without significantly affecting the overall plasma shape, and the possibility of improving the overall tokamak performance via combined control of plasma shape, current and profile. The adopted methodology constitutes also an important test bed for feedback control strategies of ITER relevance

  2. Thermal Response of Tritiated Codeposits from JET and TFTR to Transient Heat Pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, C.H.; Bekrisl, N.; Coad, J.P.; Gentile, C.A.; Hassanein, A.; Reiswig, R.; Willms, S.

    2002-01-01

    High heat flux interactions with plasma-facing components have been studied at microscopic scales. The beam from a continuous wave neodymium laser was scanned at high speed over the surface of graphite and carbon fiber composite tiles that had been retrieved from TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) and JET (Joint European Torus) after D-T plasma operations. The tiles have a surface layer of amorphous hydrogenated carbon that was co-deposited during plasma operations, and laser scanning has released more than 80% of the co-deposited tritium. The temperature rise of the co-deposit was much higher than that of the manufactured material and showed an extended time history. The peak temperature varied dramatically (e.g., 1,436 C compared to >2,300 C), indicating strong variations in the thermal conductivity to the substrate. A digital microscope imaged the co-deposit before, during, and after the interaction with the laser and revealed 100-micron scale hot spots during the interaction. Heat pulse durations of order 100 ms resulted in brittle destruction and material loss from the surface, whilst a duration of =10 ms showed minimal changes to the co-deposit. These results show that reliable predictions for the response of deposition areas to off-normal events such as ELMs (edge-localized modes) and disruptions in next-step devices need to be based on experiments with tokamak generated co-deposits

  3. Plasma detachment in divertor tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, A. W.

    2018-04-01

    Observations of divertor plasma detachment in tokamaks are reviewed. Plasma detachment is characterized in terms of transport and dissipation of power, momentum and particle flux along the open field lines from the midplane to the divertor. Asymmetries in detachment onset and other characteristics between the inboard and outboard divertor plasmas is found to be primarily driven by plasma E× B drifts. The effect of divertor plate geometry and magnetic configuration on divertor detachment is summarized. Control of divertor detachment has progressed with a development of a number of diagnostics to characterize the detached state in real-time. Finally the compatibility of detached divertor operation with high performance core plasmas is examined.

  4. The microwave Tokamak experiment (MTX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassen, K.I.; Cohen, B.I.; Hooper, E.B.; Lang, D.D.; Nevins, W.M.

    1987-01-01

    A new experimental facility is being assembled at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for studying microwave propagation and absorption in high density plasmas. A unique feature of the facility is the free electron laser (FEL) used to generate high peak power microwaves at 250 GHz, at a repetition rate so as to produce up to 2 MW of average power for up to 30 s. Called the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX), the facility will be used for studies of plasma heating, current drive, and confinement

  5. Cluster storage for COMPASS tokamak

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Písačka, Jan; Hron, Martin; Janky, Filip; Pánek, Radomír

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 12 (2012), s. 2238-2241 ISSN 0920-3796. [IAEA Technical Meeting on Control, Data Acquisition, and Remote Participation for Fusion Research/8./. San Francisco, 20.06.2011-24.06.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/11/2470; GA MŠk 7G10072; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011021 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : COMPASS * Tokamak * Codac * Cluster * GlusterFS * Storage Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.842, year: 2012 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fusengdes.2012.09.006

  6. An inkjet vision measurement technique for high-frequency jetting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Kye-Si; Jang, Min-Hyuck; Park, Ha Yeong; Ko, Hyun-Seok

    2014-01-01

    Inkjet technology has been used as manufacturing a tool for printed electronics. To increase the productivity, the jetting frequency needs to be increased. When using high-frequency jetting, the printed pattern quality could be non-uniform since the jetting performance characteristics including the jetting speed and droplet volume could vary significantly with increases in jet frequency. Therefore, high-frequency jetting behavior must be evaluated properly for improvement. However, it is difficult to measure high-frequency jetting behavior using previous vision analysis methods, because subsequent droplets are close or even merged. In this paper, we present vision measurement techniques to evaluate the drop formation of high-frequency jetting. The proposed method is based on tracking target droplets such that subsequent droplets can be excluded in the image analysis by focusing on the target droplet. Finally, a frequency sweeping method for jetting speed and droplet volume is presented to understand the overall jetting frequency effects on jetting performance

  7. Numerical reconstruction of azimuthal balance in the Novillo Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barocio, S.; Avila, R.; Chavez A, E.; Melendez, L.

    2001-01-01

    The calculation of the magneto-hydrodynamic of free bounds axially symmetric allows to predict the field distribution and currents starting from existing forces among them. So, for the case of the Novillo Tokamak a code based in an iterative strategy of finite differences is presented where the limiter creates an empty region outside of the plasma column. It is showed how the balance possess a strong dependence in the profile of current density and some examples of the code application. (Author)

  8. In-vessel maintenance concepts for tokamak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, V.P.; Berger, J.D.; Yount, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Concepts for rail-mounted and guided in-vessel handling machines (IVM) for remote maintenance inside tokamak fusion reactors are described. The IVM designs are based on concepts for tethered remotely operated vehicles and feature the use of multiple manipulator arms for remote handling and remote-controlled TV cameras for remote viewing. The concepts include IVMs for both single or dual rail systems located in the top or bottom of the reactor vessel

  9. A moving finite element model of the tokamak scrapeoff layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, A.H.; Kuprat, A.P.

    1993-01-01

    Most numerical simulations of the tokamak scrapeoff layer use a mapping to flux coordinates and a piecewise equidistributed grid in those coordinates to resolve the multiple length scales and anisotropy characteristic of this problem. We have developed an alternative numerical method using simple cylindrical coordinates with a complex adaptive grid scheme. It is based on an understructured grid of traingles which move adaptively, aligning themselves with the magnetic field and concentrating in regions of sharp gradients

  10. Identifying a new particle with jet substructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Chengcheng; Kim, Doojin; Kim, Minho; Postech, Pohang

    2017-01-01

    Here, we investigate a potential of determining properties of a new heavy resonance of mass O(1)TeV which decays to collimated jets via heavy Standard Model intermediary states, exploiting jet substructure techniques. Employing the Z gauge boson as a concrete example for the intermediary state, we utilize a "merged jet" defined by a large jet size to capture the two quarks from its decay. The use of the merged jet bene ts the identification of a Z-induced jet as a single, reconstructed object without any combinatorial ambiguity. We also find that jet substructure procedures may enhance features in some kinematic observables formed with subjet four-momenta extracted from a merged jet. This observation motivates us to feed subjet momenta into the matrix elements associated with plausible hypotheses on the nature of the heavy resonance, which are further processed to construct a matrix element method (MEM)-based observable. For both moderately and highly boosted Z bosons, we demonstrate that the MEM in combination with jet substructure techniques can be a very powerful tool for identifying its physical properties. Finally, we discuss effects from choosing different jet sizes for merged jets and jet-grooming parameters upon the MEM analyses.

  11. Enthalpy Distributions of Arc Jet Flow Based on Measured Laser Induced Fluorescence, Heat Flux and Stagnation Pressure Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suess, Leonard E.; Milhoan, James D.; Oelke, Lance; Godfrey, Dennis; Larin, Maksim Y.; Scott, Carl D.; Grinstead, Jay H.; DelPapa, Steven

    2011-01-01

    The centerline total enthalpy of arc jet flow is determined using laser induced fluorescence of oxygen and nitrogen atoms. Each component of the energy, kinetic, thermal, and chemical can be determined from LIF measurements. Additionally, enthalpy distributions are inferred from heat flux and pressure probe distribution measurements using an engineering formula. Average enthalpies are determined by integration over the radius of the jet flow, assuming constant mass flux and a mass flux distribution estimated from computational fluid dynamics calculations at similar arc jet conditions. The trends show favorable agreement, but there is an uncertainty that relates to the multiple individual measurements and assumptions inherent in LIF measurements.

  12. Nuclear fusion research at Tokamak Energy Ltd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windridge, Melanie J.; Gryaznevich, Mikhail; Kingham, David

    2017-01-01

    Tokamak Energy's approach is close to the mainstream of nuclear fusion, and chooses a spherical tokamak, which is an economically developed form of Tokamak reactor design, as research subjects together with a high-temperature superconducting magnet. In the theoretical prediction, it is said that spherical tokamak can make tokamak reactor's scale compact compared with ITER or DEMO. The dependence of fusion energy multiplication factor on reactor size is small. According to model studies, it has been found that the center coil can be protected from heat and radiation damage even if the neutron shielding is optimized to 35 cm instead of 1 m. As a small tokamak with a high-temperature superconducting magnet, ST25 HTS, it demonstrated in 2015 continuous operation for more than 24 hours as a world record. Currently, this company is constructing a slightly larger ST40 type, and it is scheduled to start operation in 2017. ST40 is designed to demonstrate that it can realize a high magnetic field with a compact size and aims at attaining 8-10 keV (reaching the nuclear fusion reaction temperature at about 100 million degrees). This company will verify the startup and heating technology by the coalescence of spherical tokamak expected to have plasma current of 2 MA, and will also use 2 MW of neutral particle beam heating. In parallel with ST40, it is promoting a development program for high-temperature superconducting magnet. (A.O.)

  13. Boosted Jet Tagging with Jet-Images and Deep Neural Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagan, Michael; Oliveira, Luke de; Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Building on the jet-image based representation of high energy jets, we develop computer vision based techniques for jet tagging through the use of deep neural networks. Jet-images enabled the connection between jet substructure and tagging with the fields of computer vision and image processing. We show how applying such techniques using deep neural networks can improve the performance to identify highly boosted W bosons with respect to state-of-the-art substructure methods. In addition, we explore new ways to extract and visualize the discriminating features of different classes of jets, adding a new capability to understand the physics within jets and to design more powerful jet tagging methods

  14. Channels in tokamak reactor shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shchipakin, O.L.

    1981-01-01

    The results of calculations of neutron transport through the channels in the tokamak reactor radiation shields, obtained by the Monte Carlo method and by the method of discrete ordinates, are considered. The given data show that the structural materials of the channel and that of the blanket and shields in the regions close to it are subjected to almost the same irradiation as the first wall and therefore they should satisfy the technical requirements. The radiation energy release in the injector channel wall, caused by neutron shooting, substantially depends on the channel dimensions. At the channel large diameter (0.7-10 m) this dependence noticeably decreases. The investigation of the effect of the injector channel cross section form on the neutron flux density through the channel, testifies to weak dependence of shooting radiation intensity on the form of the channel cross section. It is concluded that measures to decrease unfavourable effect of the channels on the safety of the power tokamak reactor operation and maintenance cause substantial changes in reactor design due to which the channel protection must be developed at first stages. The Monte Carlo method is recommended to be used for variant calculations and when calculating the neutron flux functionals in specific points of the system the discrete ordinate method is preferred [ru

  15. CAT-D-T tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.; Blue, T.; Miley, G.H.

    1981-01-01

    The domains of plasma fuel cycles bounded by the D-T and Cat-D, and by the D-T and SCD modes of operation are examined. These domains, referred to as, respectively, the Cat-D-T and SCD-T modes of operation, are characterized by the number (γ) of tritons per fusion neutron available from external (to the plasma) sources. Two external tritium sources are considered - the blankets of the Cat-D-T (SCD-T) reactors and fission reactors supported by the Cat-D-T (SCD-T) driven hybrid reactors. It is found that by using 6 Li for the active material of the control elements of the fission reactors, it is possible to achieve γ values close to unity. Cat-D-T tokamaks could be designed to have smaller size, higher power density, lower magnetic field and even lower plasma temperature than Cat-D tokamaks; the difference becomes significant for γ greater than or equal to .75. The SCD-T mode of operation appears to be even more attractive. Promising applications identified for these Cat-D-T and SCD-T modes of operation include hybrid reactors, fusion synfuel factories and fusion reactors which have difficulty in providing all their tritium needs

  16. Jet mass reconstruction with the ATLAS Detector in early Run 2 data

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    This note presents the details of the ATLAS jet mass reconstruction for groomed large-radius jets. The jet mass scale calibrations are determined from Monte Carlo simulation. An alternative jet mass definition that incorporates tracking information called the track-assisted jet mass is introduced and its performance is compared to the traditional calorimeter-based jet mass definition. Events enriched in boosted $W$, $Z$ boson and top quark jets are used to directly compare the jet mass scale and jet mass resolution between data and simulation. This in-situ technique is also extended to constrain the jet energy scale and resolution.

  17. Conceptual design of a Tokamak hybrid power reactor (THPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, F.; Imamura, Y.; Inoue, M.; Asami, N.; Kasai, M.; Yanagisawa, I.; Ida, T.; Takuma, T.; Yamaji, K.; Akita, S.

    1987-01-01

    A conceptual design of a fusion-fission hybrid tokamak reactor has been carried out to investigate the engineering feasibility and promising scale of a commercial hybrid reactor power plant. A tokamak fusion driver based on the recent plasma scaling law is introduced in this design study. The major parameters and features of the reactor are R=6.06 m, a=1.66 m, Ip=11.8 MA, Pf=668 MW, double null divertor plasma and steady state burning with RF current drive. The fusion power has been determined with medium energy multiplication in the blanket so as to relieve thermal design problems and produce electric power around 1000 MW. Uranium silicide is used for the fast fission blanket material to promise good nuclear performance. The coolant of the blanket is FLIBE and the tritium breeding blanket material is Li 2 O ceramics providing breeding ratio above unity

  18. The recent research progress on the J-TEXT tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z.J.; Zhuang, G.; Gentle, K.W.

    2013-01-01

    The recent research progress on the J-TEXT tokamak is introduced. The interaction between resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) and plasma have been carried out on the J-TEXT tokamak and the results show that the m/n = 2/1 (m and n are the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers, respectively) mode locking is obtained with sufficiently large RMPs while suppression of the m/n = 2/1 tearing mode by moderate magnetic perturbation amplitude is also observed. With a model based on reduced magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations, both the mode locking and mode suppression by RMPs are simulated and the results are in good agreement with the experimental observations. To observe the current profile, a high resolution three-wave far infrared polarimeter/interferometer is set up and the first results indicate it works well. (author)

  19. The simple map for a single-null divertor tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punjabi, A.; Verma, A.; Boozer, A.

    1996-01-01

    We present the simple map for a single-null divertor tokamak. The simple map is an area-preserving map based on the idea that magnetic field lines are a single-degree-of-freedom time-dependent Hamiltonian system, and that the basic features of such systems near the X-point are generic. We obtain the properties of this map and the resulting footprints of field lines on the divertor plate. These include the width of the stochastic layer, the edge safety factor, the area of the footprint and the amount of magnetic flux diverted. We give the safety factor profile, the average and median values of strike angles, lengths and the Liapunov exponents. We describe how the effects of magnetic perturbations can be included in the simple map. We show how the map can be applied to the problem of the determination of heat flux on the divertor plate in tokamaks. (Author)

  20. Magnetohydrodynamic stability of tokamaks

    CERN Document Server

    Zohm, Hartmut

    2014-01-01

    This book bridges the gap between general plasma physics lectures and the real world problems in MHD stability. In order to support the understanding of concepts and their implication, it refers to real world problems such as toroidal mode coupling or nonlinear evolution in a conceptual and phenomenological approach. Detailed mathematical treatment will involve classical linear stability analysis and an outline of more recent concepts such as the ballooning formalism. The book is based on lectures that the author has given to Master and PhD students in Fusion Plasma Physics. Due its strong lin

  1. Plasma position control in TCABR Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvao, R.M.O.; Kuznetsov, Yu. K.; Nascimento, I.C.; Fonseca, A.M.M.; Silva, R.P. da; Ruchko, L.F.; Tuszel, A.G.; Reis, A.P. dos; Sanada, E.K.

    1998-01-01

    The plasma control position in the TCABR tokamak is described. The TCA tokamak was transferred from the Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Lausanne, to the Institute of Physics of University of Sao Paulo, renamed TCABR (α=0.18 m, R = 0.62 m, B = 1 T,I p = 100 kA). The control system was reconstructed using mainly components obtained from the TCA tokamak. A new method of plasma position determination is used in TCABR to improve its accuracy. A more detailed theoretical analysis of the feed forward and feedback control is performed as compared with. (author)

  2. Estimation of Zeff in Novillo Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valencia, R.; Olayo, G.; Cruz, G.; Lopez, R.; Chavez, E.; Melendez, L.; Flores, A.; Gaytan, E.

    1996-01-01

    We estimated the Z eff in the Novillo Tokamak after having applied a HeGDC process through two different methods: anomaly factor and mass spectrometry. The first one gave a Z eff value of 2.07 for a tokamak discharge of 4350 A plasma current and 3 V of loop voltage. By mass spectrometry 30 s after the discharge had finished a Z eff of 4.19 was obtained for the same discharge. By mass spectrometry we observed that the Z eff value is a time function. Furthermore this method is helpful for evaluating the level of impurities after many discharges in Novillo Tokamak. (orig.)

  3. Fast IR diodes thermometer for tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiangbo

    2001-01-01

    A 30 channel fast IR pyrometry array has been constructed for tokamak, which has 0.5 μs time response, 10 mm diameter spatial resolution and 5 degree C temperature resolution. The temperature measuring range is from 250 degree C to 1200 degree C. The two dimensional temperature profiles of the first wall during both major and minor disruptions can be measured with an accuracy of about 1% measuring temperature, which is adequate for tokamak experiments. This gives a very useful tool for the disruption study, especially for the divertor physics and edge heat flux research on tokamak and other magnetic confinement devices

  4. Jet Car Track Site

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Located in Lakehurst, New Jersey, the Jet Car Track Site supports jet cars with J57 engines and has a maximum jet car thrust of 42,000 pounds with a maximum speed of...

  5. Tokamak fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nohara, Kiyohiko

    2009-01-01

    The structural material is one of key issues for the development of reliable superconducting magnets and peripheral equipments of fusion reactors. Standard stainless steels like SUS 304 and 316 steels available at present do not meet requirements. We are developing a new austenitic steel that has proposed target properties named 'JAERI BOX'. Additions of N and V at different amounts were tested to improve strength and fracture toughness of a base alloy SUS316LN at 4.2 K. Mechanical properties of the developed steel were examined. It is found that the charpy absorbed energy and the fracture toughness of the developed steel at 4.2 K are within JAERI BOX. (T.I.)

  6. VH mode accessibility and global H-mode properties in previous and present JET configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, T.T.C.; Ali-Arshad, S.; Bures, M.; Christiansen, J.P.; Esch, H.P.L. de; Fishpool, G.; Jarvis, O.N.; Koenig, R.; Lawson, K.D.; Lomas, P.J.; Marcus, F.B.; Sartori, R.; Schunke, B.; Smeulders, P.; Stork, D.; Taroni, A.; Thomas, P.R.; Thomsen, K. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking

    1994-07-01

    In JET VH modes, there is a distinct confinement transition following the cessation of ELMs, observed in a wide variety of tokamak operating conditions, using both NBI and ICRF heating methods. Important factors which influence VH mode accessibility such as magnetic configuration and vessel conditions have been identified. The new JET pumped divertor configuration has much improved plasma shaping control and power and particle exhaust capability and should permit exploitation of plasmas with VH confinement properties over an even wider range of operating regimes, particularly at high plasma current; first H-modes have been obtained in the 1994 JET operating period and initial results are reported. (authors). 7 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Numerical Simulation of Neoclassical Currents, Parallel Viscosity, and Radial Current Balance in Tokamak Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiviniemi, T.

    2001-01-01

    One of the principal problems en route to a fusion reactor is that of insufficient plasma confinement, which has lead to both theoretical and experimental research into transport processes in the parameter range relevant for fusion energy production. The neoclassical theory of tokamak transport is well-established unlike the theory of turbulence driven anomalous transport in which extensive progress has been made during last few years. So far, anomalous transport has been dominant in experiments, but transport may be reduced to the neoclassical level in advanced tokamak scenarios. This thesis reports a numerical study of neoclassical fluxes, parallel viscosity, and neoclassical radial current balance in tokamaks. Neoclassical parallel viscosity and particle fluxes are simulated over a wide range of collisionalities, using the fully kinetic five-dimensional neoclassical orbit-following Monte Carlo code ASCOT. The qualitative behavior of parallel viscosity derived in earlier analytic models is shown to be incorrect for high poloidal Mach numbers. This is because the poloidal dependence of density was neglected. However, in high Mach number regime, it is the convection and compression terms, rather than the parallel viscosity term, that are shown to dominate the momentum balance. For fluxes, a reasonable agreement between numerical and analytical results is found in the collisional parameter regime. Neoclassical particle fluxes are additionally studied in the banana regime using the three-dimensional Fokker-Planck code DEPORA, which solves the drift-kinetic equation with finite differencing. Limitations of the small inverse aspect ratio approximation adopted in the analytic theory are addressed. Assuming that the anomalous transport is ambipolar, the radial electric field and its shear at the tokamak plasma edge can be solved from the neoclassical radial current balance. This is performed both for JET and ASDEX Upgrade tokamaks using the ASCOT code. It is shown that

  8. Exploring the negative temperature coefficient behavior of acetaldehyde based on detailed intermediate measurements in a jet-stirred reactor

    KAUST Repository

    Tao, Tao

    2018-03-20

    Acetaldehyde is an observed emission species and a key intermediate produced during the combustion and low-temperature oxidation of fossil and bio-derived fuels. Investigations into the low-temperature oxidation chemistry of acetaldehyde are essential to develop a better core mechanism and to better understand auto-ignition and cool flame phenomena. Here, the oxidation of acetaldehyde was studied at low-temperatures (528–946 K) in a jet-stirred reactor (JSR) with the corrected residence time of 2.7 s at 700 Torr. This work describes a detailed set of experimental results that capture the negative temperature coefficient (NTC) behavior in the low-temperature oxidation of acetaldehyde. The mole fractions of 28 species were measured as functions of the temperature by employing a vacuum ultra-violet photoionization molecular-beam mass spectrometer. To explain the observed NTC behavior, an updated mechanism was proposed, which well reproduces the concentration profiles of many observed peroxide intermediates. The kinetic analysis based on the updated mechanism reveals that the NTC behavior of acetaldehyde oxidation is caused by the competition between the O-addition to and the decomposition of the CHCO radical.

  9. 3D Modelling of a Vectored Water Jet-Based Multi-Propeller Propulsion System for a Spherical Underwater Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xichuan Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an improved modelling method for a water jet-based multi-propeller propulsion system. In our previous work, the modelling experiments were only carried out in 2D planes, whose experimental results had poor agreement when we wanted to control the propulsive forces in 3D space directly. This research extends the 2D modelling described in the authors' previous work into 3D space. By doing this, the model could include 3D space information, which is more useful than that of 2D space. The effective propulsive forces and moments in 3D space can be obtained directly by synthesizing the propulsive vectors of propellers. For this purpose, a novel experimental mechanism was developed to achieve the proposed 3D modelling. This mechanism was designed with the mass distribution centred for the robot. By installing a six-axis load-cell sensor at the equivalent mass centre, we obtained the direct propulsive effect of the system for the robot. Also, in this paper, the orientation surface and propulsive surfaces are developed to provide the 3D information of the propulsive system. Experiments for each propeller were first carried out to establish the models. Then, further experiments were carried out with all of the propellers working together to validate the models. Finally, we compared the various experimental results with the simulation data. The utility of this modelling method is discussed at length.

  10. Para-hydrogen and helium cluster size distributions in free jet expansions based on Smoluchowski theory with kernel scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornilov, Oleg; Toennies, J Peter

    2015-02-21

    The size distribution of para-H2 (pH2) clusters produced in free jet expansions at a source temperature of T0 = 29.5 K and pressures of P0 = 0.9-1.96 bars is reported and analyzed according to a cluster growth model based on the Smoluchowski theory with kernel scaling. Good overall agreement is found between the measured and predicted, Nk = A k(a) e(-bk), shape of the distribution. The fit yields values for A and b for values of a derived from simple collision models. The small remaining deviations between measured abundances and theory imply a (pH2)k magic number cluster of k = 13 as has been observed previously by Raman spectroscopy. The predicted linear dependence of b(-(a+1)) on source gas pressure was verified and used to determine the value of the basic effective agglomeration reaction rate constant. A comparison of the corresponding effective growth cross sections σ11 with results from a similar analysis of He cluster size distributions indicates that the latter are much larger by a factor 6-10. An analysis of the three body recombination rates, the geometric sizes and the fact that the He clusters are liquid independent of their size can explain the larger cross sections found for He.

  11. Para-hydrogen and helium cluster size distributions in free jet expansions based on Smoluchowski theory with kernel scaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornilov, Oleg; Toennies, J. Peter [Max-Planck-Institut für Dynamik und Selbstorganisation, Am Fassberg 17, 37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2015-02-21

    The size distribution of para-H{sub 2} (pH{sub 2}) clusters produced in free jet expansions at a source temperature of T{sub 0} = 29.5 K and pressures of P{sub 0} = 0.9–1.96 bars is reported and analyzed according to a cluster growth model based on the Smoluchowski theory with kernel scaling. Good overall agreement is found between the measured and predicted, N{sub k} = A k{sup a} e{sup −bk}, shape of the distribution. The fit yields values for A and b for values of a derived from simple collision models. The small remaining deviations between measured abundances and theory imply a (pH{sub 2}){sub k} magic number cluster of k = 13 as has been observed previously by Raman spectroscopy. The predicted linear dependence of b{sup −(a+1)} on source gas pressure was verified and used to determine the value of the basic effective agglomeration reaction rate constant. A comparison of the corresponding effective growth cross sections σ{sub 11} with results from a similar analysis of He cluster size distributions indicates that the latter are much larger by a factor 6-10. An analysis of the three body recombination rates, the geometric sizes and the fact that the He clusters are liquid independent of their size can explain the larger cross sections found for He.

  12. Tagging and suppression of pileup jets

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The suppression of pileup jets has been a crucial component of many physics analyses using 2012 LHC proton-proton collisions. In ATLAS, tracking information has been used to calculate a variable called the jet-vertex-fraction, which is the fraction of the total mo- mentum of tracks in the jet which is associated to the primary vertex. Imposing a minimum on this variable rejects the majority of pileup jets, but leads to hard-scatter jet efficiencies that depend on the number of reconstructed primary vertices in the event ($N_{Vtx}$). In this note, new track-based variables to suppress pileup jets are developed in such a way that the resulting hard-scatter jet efficiency is stable as a function of $N_{Vtx}$. A multivariate combina- tion of two such variables called the jet-vertex-tagger is constructed. In addition, it is shown that jet-vertex association can be applied to large-R jets, providing a track-based grooming technique that is as powerful as calorimeter-based trimming but based on complementary trackin...

  13. Resolving the Base of the Relativistic Jet in M87 at 6Rsch Resolution with Global mm-VLBI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Young Kim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available M87 is one of the nearest radio galaxies with a central Super-Massive Black Hole (SMBH and a prominent relativistic jet. Due to its close distance to the observer and the large SMBH mass, the source is one of the best laboratories to obtain strong observational constraints on the theoretical models for the formation and evolution of the AGN jets. In this article, we present preliminary results from our ongoing observational study about the innermost jet of M87 at an ultra-high resolution of ∼50 μ as achieved by the Global Millimeter-Very Long Baseline Interferometry Array (GMVA. The data obtained between 2004 and 2015 clearly show limb-brightened jets at extreme resolution and sensitivity. Our preliminary analysis reveals that the innermost jet expands in an edge-brightened cone structure (parabolic shape but with the jet expansion profile slightly different from the outer regions of the jet. Brightness temperatures of the Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI core obtained from cm- to mm-wavelengths show a systematic evolution, which can be interpreted as the evolution as a function of distance from the BH. We also adopt an alternative imaging algorithm, Bi-Spectrum Maximum Entropy Method (BSMEM, to test reliable imaging at higher angular resolution than provided by the standard CLEAN method (i.e., super-resolution. A demonstration with a VLBA 7 mm example data set shows consistent results with a near-in-time 3 mm VLBI image. Application of the method to the 2009 GMVA data yields an image with remarkable fine-scale structures that have been never imaged before. We present a brief interpretation of the complexity in the structure.

  14. Robust Sliding Mode Control for Tokamaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Garrido

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear fusion has arisen as an alternative energy to avoid carbon dioxide emissions, being the tokamak a promising nuclear fusion reactor that uses a magnetic field to confine plasma in the shape of a torus. However, different kinds of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities may affect tokamak plasma equilibrium, causing severe reduction of particle confinement and leading to plasma disruptions. In this sense, numerous efforts and resources have been devoted to seeking solutions for the different plasma control problems so as to avoid energy confinement time decrements in these devices. In particular, since the growth rate of the vertical instability increases with the internal inductance, lowering the internal inductance is a fundamental issue to address for the elongated plasmas employed within the advanced tokamaks currently under development. In this sense, this paper introduces a lumped parameter numerical model of the tokamak in order to design a novel robust sliding mode controller for the internal inductance using the transformer primary coil as actuator.

  15. Theory of incremental turbulent transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Similon, P.L.

    1991-01-01

    The goal of this research is to understand how the various aspect of turbulent transport operate in tokamaks, in the presence of low frequency fluctuations such as drift waves or trapped electron modes

  16. Definition of total bootstrap current in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, D.W.

    1995-01-01

    Alternative definitions of the total bootstrap current are compared. An analogous comparison is given for the ohmic and auxiliary currents. It is argued that different definitions than those usually employed lead to simpler analyses of tokamak operating scenarios

  17. Tokamak research in the Soviet Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strelkov, V.S.

    1981-01-01

    Important milestones on the way to the tokamak fusion reactor are recapitulated. Soviet tokamak research concentrated at the I.V. Kurchatov Institute in Moscow, the A.F. Ioffe Institute in Leningrad and the Physical-Technical Institute in Sukhumi successfully provides necessary scientific and technological data for reactor design. Achievments include, the successful operation of the first tokamak with superconducting windings (T-7) and the gyrotron set for microwave plasma heating in the T-10 tokamak. The following problems have intensively been studied: Various methods of additional plasma heating, heat and particle transport, and impurity control. The efficiency of electron-cyclotron resonance heating was demonstrated. In the Joule heating regime, both the heat conduction and diffusion rates are anomalously high, but the electron heat conduction rate decreases with increasing plasma density. Progress in impurity control makes it possible to obtain a plasma with effective charge approaching unity. (J.U.)

  18. Plasma equilibrium and instabilities in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldas, I.L.; Vannucci, A.

    1985-01-01

    A phenomenological introduction of some of the main theoretical and experimental features on equilibrium and instabilities in tokamaks is presented. In general only macroscopic effects are considered, being the plasma described as a fluid. (L.C.) [pt

  19. The ARIES-I tokamak reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on the Aries-I Tokamak: Design description; systems studies and economics; reactor plasma physics; magnet engineering; fusion-power-ore engineering; and environmental and safety features

  20. Submillimeter wave propagation in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, C.H.; Hutchinson, D.P.; Staats, P.A.; Vander Sluis, K.L.; Mansfield, D.K.; Park, H.; Johnson, L.C.

    1986-01-01

    Propagation of submillimeter waves (smm) in tokamak plasma was investigated both theoretically and experimentally to ensure successful measurements of electron density and plasma current distributions in tokamak devices. Theoretical analyses were carried out to study the polarization of the smm waves in TFTR and ISX-B tokamaks. A multichord smm wave interferometer/polarimeter system was employed to simultaneously measure the line electron density and poloidal field-induced Faraday rotation in the ISX-B tokamak. The experimental study on TFTR is under way. Computer codes were developed and have been used to study the wave propagation and to reconstruct the distributions of plasma current and density from the measured data. The results are compared with other measurements. 5 references, 2 figures

  1. Power and particle exhaust in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stambaugh, R.D.

    1998-01-01

    The status of power and particle exhaust research in tokamaks is reviewed in the light of ITER requirements. There is a sound basis for ITER's nominal design positions; important directions for further research are identified

  2. Structural analysis and optimization of the Tokamak Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rueda, F.; Combescure, D.; Espeche, A.; Maqueda, L.; Pastor, M.; Salgado, S.

    2010-07-01

    Within the tasks previous to the detail civil engineering design of ITER, Fusion for Energy (F4E) is carrying out several activities targeted to the structural design optimization and to facilitate the licensing by the French Regulatory Authority. This paper describes the studies and structural analyses performed on a preliminary version of the Tokamak Complex design. As it is known, the building, with a plan of about 120 x 80 m, will be built with a base isolation system which comprises more than 500 steel reinforced neoprene pads and will provide support to the Tokamak machine, whose mass is more than 23000 tons. The main purpose of these analyses is to assess the structural margins of the current design version, in order to establish potential optimization strategies or either functional or safety improvements, prior to the detail civil engineering design of ITER. A detailed finite element model of the Tokamak Complex, including a fairly precise representation of the seismic isolation system has been created. The analyses have covered potential threats such as seismic action, aircraft impact or internal pressure built-up due to LOCA and LOVA events. Strength checks have been carried out for the main structural elements of the Tokamak Complex, such as the isolation bearing system, shear walls, columns, slabs and beams. Floor response spectra for seismic and aircraft impact events have been also obtained. As a result of these analyses, some proposals for improvement of the design have been made and will be further considered in the final design of the building. In addition, some proposals to complete the level of definition given in the ITER Design Code for Buildings and in the ITER Load Specifications for Buildings with Safety Requirements have also resulted from the studies.

  3. UCLA program in reactor studies: The ARIES tokamak reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The ARIES research program is a multi-institutional effort to develop several visions of tokamak reactors with enhanced economic, safety, and environmental features. The aims are to determine the potential economics, safety, and environmental features of a range of possible tokamak reactors, and to identify physics and technology areas with the highest leverage for achieving the best tokamak reactor. Four ARIES visions are currently planned for the ARIES program. The ARIES-1 design is a DT-burning reactor based on ''modest'' extrapolations from the present tokamak physics database and relies on either existing technology or technology for which trends are already in place, often in programs outside fusion. ARIES-2 and ARIES-4 are DT-burning reactors which will employ potential advances in physics. The ARIES-2 and ARIES-4 designs employ the same plasma core but have two distinct fusion power core designs; ARIES-2 utilize the lithium as the coolant and breeder and vanadium alloys as the structural material while ARIES-4 utilizes helium is the coolant, solid tritium breeders, and SiC composite as the structural material. Lastly, the ARIES-3 is a conceptual D- 3 He reactor. During the period Dec. 1, 1990 to Nov. 31, 1991, most of the ARIES activity has been directed toward completing the technical work for the ARIES-3 design and documenting the results and findings. We have also completed the documentation for the ARIES-1 design and presented the results in various meetings and conferences. During the last quarter, we have initiated the scoping phase for ARIES-2 and ARIES-4 designs

  4. A multimaterial electrohydrodynamic jet (E-jet) printing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutanto, E; Shigeta, K; Kim, Y K; Graf, P G; Hoelzle, D J; Barton, K L; Alleyne, A G; Ferreira, P M; Rogers, J A

    2012-01-01

    Electrohydrodynamic jet (E-jet) printing has emerged as a high-resolution alternative to other forms of direct solution-based fabrication approaches, such as ink-jet printing. This paper discusses the design, integration and operation of a unique E-jet printing platform. The uniqueness lies in the ability to utilize multiple materials in the same overall print-head, thereby enabling increased degrees of heterogeneous integration of different functionalities on a single substrate. By utilizing multiple individual print-heads, with a carrousel indexing among them, increased material flexibility is achieved. The hardware design and system operation for a relatively inexpensive system are developed and presented. Crossover interconnects and multiple fluorescent tagged proteins, demonstrating printed electronics and biological sensing applications, respectively. (paper)

  5. The physics design of the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassen, K.I.; Batchelor, D.B.; Bialek, J.

    1994-01-01

    The physics approaches to improved, steady-state tokamak reactors, as evolved through reactor design studies, ideas based on experimental results, and better theoretical understanding, are the foundation for the mission and physics design of the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). The mission of TPX is to develop the scientific basis for cost-competitive, continuously operating tokamak power plants. We report here the design status of TPX, a device optimized to achieve improved performance through strong plasma shaping, recycling control, and current profile shaping, while operating continuously. The design incorporates poloidal field flexibility for a wide range of operation in normalized beta and internal inductance, a double-null ''Vee'' divertor configuration for power and particle control, internal and external n ≠ 0 coils, as well as passive stabilizers, for control of MHD activity, and remote maintenance for continuous high-power operation in deuterium. Having superconducting poloidal and toroidal coils, the TPX device itself is capable of continuous operation, although initially auxiliary equipment limits the pulse length to 1000 sec

  6. The magnet system of the Tokamak T-15 upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khvostenko, P.P.; Azizov, E.A.; Alfimov, D.E.; Belyakov, V.A.; Bondarchuk, E.N.; Chudnovsky, A.N.; Dokuka, V.N.; Kavin, A.A.; Khayrutdinov, R.R.; Khokhlov, M.V.; Kitaev, B.A.; Krasnov, S.V.; Maximova, I.I.; Labusov, A.N.; Lukash, V.E.; Mineev, A.B.; Muratov, V.P.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • T-15U project is the initial technical base for creating fusion neutron sources. • Magnet system of T-15U will confine the hot plasma in the divertor configuration. • Toroidal magnetic field at the plasma axis is 2 T. • T-15U should begin operations in 2016. - Abstract: Presently, the Tokamak T-15 is being upgraded. The magnet system of the Tokamak T-15 upgrade will obtain and confine the hot plasma in the divertor configuration. Plasma parameters are a major radius of 1.48 m, a minor radius of 0.67 m, an elongation of 1.7–1.9 and a triangularity of 0.3–0.4. The magnet system includes the toroidal winding and the poloidal magnet system. The poloidal magnet system generates the divertor with single null and double null magnetic configurations. The power supply system provides the necessary current scenarios in the windings of the magnet system. All elements of the magnet system will be manufactured by the end of 2015. The Tokamak T-15 upgrade should begin operations in 2016.

  7. The magnet system of the Tokamak T-15 upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khvostenko, P.P., E-mail: ppkhvost@rambler.ru [National Research Centre ‘Kurchatov Institute’, Institute of Tokamak Physics, Kurchatov sq. 1, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Azizov, E.A.; Alfimov, D.E. [National Research Centre ‘Kurchatov Institute’, Institute of Tokamak Physics, Kurchatov sq. 1, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Belyakov, V.A.; Bondarchuk, E.N. [Joint Stock Company “D.V. Efremov Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus”, Metallostroy, 196641 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Chudnovsky, A.N.; Dokuka, V.N. [National Research Centre ‘Kurchatov Institute’, Institute of Tokamak Physics, Kurchatov sq. 1, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kavin, A.A. [Joint Stock Company “D.V. Efremov Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus”, Metallostroy, 196641 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Khayrutdinov, R.R. [National Research Centre ‘Kurchatov Institute’, Institute of Tokamak Physics, Kurchatov sq. 1, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Khokhlov, M.V.; Kitaev, B.A.; Krasnov, S.V.; Maximova, I.I.; Labusov, A.N. [Joint Stock Company “D.V. Efremov Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus”, Metallostroy, 196641 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Lukash, V.E. [National Research Centre ‘Kurchatov Institute’, Institute of Tokamak Physics, Kurchatov sq. 1, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Mineev, A.B.; Muratov, V.P. [Joint Stock Company “D.V. Efremov Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus”, Metallostroy, 196641 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); and others

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • T-15U project is the initial technical base for creating fusion neutron sources. • Magnet system of T-15U will confine the hot plasma in the divertor configuration. • Toroidal magnetic field at the plasma axis is 2 T. • T-15U should begin operations in 2016. - Abstract: Presently, the Tokamak T-15 is being upgraded. The magnet system of the Tokamak T-15 upgrade will obtain and confine the hot plasma in the divertor configuration. Plasma parameters are a major radius of 1.48 m, a minor radius of 0.67 m, an elongation of 1.7–1.9 and a triangularity of 0.3–0.4. The magnet system includes the toroidal winding and the poloidal magnet system. The poloidal magnet system generates the divertor with single null and double null magnetic configurations. The power supply system provides the necessary current scenarios in the windings of the magnet system. All elements of the magnet system will be manufactured by the end of 2015. The Tokamak T-15 upgrade should begin operations in 2016.

  8. Preliminary results of the TBR small tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, I.C.; Fagundes, A.N.; Da Silva, R.P.; Galvao, R.M.O.; Del Bosco, E.; Vuolo, J.H.; Sanada, E.K.; Dellaqua, R.

    1982-01-01

    The paper gives a short description of the TBR - small Brazilian tokamak and the first results obtained for plasma formation and equilibrium. Measured breakdown curves for hydrogen are shown to be confined within analytically calculated limits and to depend strongly on stray vertical magnetic fields. Time profiles of plasma current in equilibrium are shown and compared with the predictions of a simple analytical model for tokamak discharges. Reasonable agreement is obtained taking Zsub(eff) as a free parameter. (author)

  9. The ETE spherical Tokamak project. IAEA report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, Gerson Otto; Del Bosco, E.; Berni, L.A.; Ferreira, J.G.; Oliveira, R.M.; Andrade, M.C.R.; Shibata, C.S.; Barroso, J.J.; Castro, P.J.; Patire Junior, H. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Lab. Associado de Plasma]. E-mail: ludwig@plasma.inpe.br

    2002-07-01

    This paper describes the general characteristics of spherical tokamaks, or spherical tori, with a brief overview of work in this area already performed or in progress at several institutions worldwide. The paper presents also the historical development of the ETE (Spherical Tokamak Experiment) project, its research program, technical characteristics and operating conditions as of October, 2002 at the Associated Plasma Laboratory (LAP) of the National Space Research Institute (INPE) in Brazil. (author)

  10. Jet-calculus approach including coherence effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, L.M.; Migneron, R.; Narayanan, K.S.S.

    1987-01-01

    We show how integrodifferential equations typical of jet calculus can be combined with an averaging procedure to obtain jet-calculus-based results including the Mueller interference graphs. Results in longitudinal-momentum fraction x for physical quantities are higher at intermediate x and lower at large x than with the conventional ''incoherent'' jet calculus. These results resemble those of Marchesini and Webber, who used a Monte Carlo approach based on the same dynamics

  11. New signal processing methods and information technologies for the real time control of JET reactor relevant plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murari, A., E-mail: andrea.murari@igi.cnr.it [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA per la Fusione, Consorzio RFX, 4-35127 Padova (Italy); Vega, J. [Asociacion EURATOM-CIEMAT para Fusion, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Mazon, D. [Association EURATOM-CEA, CEA Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Ratta, G.A. [Asociacion EURATOM-CIEMAT para Fusion, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Gelfusa, M. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA - University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Roma (Italy); Debrie, A. [Arts et Metiers ParisTech Engineering College (ENSAM), 75013 Paris (France); Boulbe, C.; Faugeras, B. [Laboratoire J-A Dieudonne (UMR 66 21), Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice Cedex 02 (France)

    2011-10-15

    A general trend in the experimental programmes of present day Tokamaks, and of JET in particular, is the constant increase in the number of parameters to be controlled in real time, to satisfy the machine protection requirements on the one hand and to improve performance on the other. Since the amount of data collected is also increasing at least at a rate compatible with the Moore law, significant developments are required in the field of real time algorithms particularly for magnetic reconstructions, disruption prediction and image processing. A new real time equilibrium code called EQUINOX, using internal and external measurements of the magnetic fields, has been qualified on JET. It can provide reconstructed accurate equilibria about every 50 ms on a 2 GHz PC. An advanced disruption predictor, based on machine learning tools, has been deployed using inputs selected with a genetic algorithm. Its success rate remains of the order of 94% for up to 170 ms before the occurrence of the disruption. Nonextensive entropies, which are more sensitive to long range correlations, seem to be useful in detecting vibrations in the videos of JET cameras, both visible and infrared.

  12. Chaotic mixing across oceanic jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, P.; Jones, C. K. R. T.; Haller, G.; Pratt, L.

    1996-06-01

    The perspective of geometric dynamical systems is used to study the transport of fluid across oceanic jets. We study the mixing associated with the simplest analytical models for jets, namely, neutral modes superimposed on a base mean flow, where the base flow and the neutral modes are approximately potential vorticity conserving. The base jet plus a single neutral mode is an integrable flow in the appropriate moving frame, and heteroclinic orbits act as impenetrable boundaries separating different regions of phase space. Superimposing more than one neutral mode results in the breakup of these heteroclinic orbits and associated chaotic mixing. Using a cusped jet model we study the case where the perturbation is periodic in time. We present numerical simulations of the Poincaré map along with calculations of the Melnikov integral which characterizes the exchange rate across such boundaries. The analytical and numerical results show that these models explain mixing along the edges of the jet, but do not appear to explain mixing across the body of the jet.

  13. Optimal Control Techniques for ResistiveWall Modes in Tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Mitchell Dobbs Pearson

    Tokamaks can excite kink modes that can lock or nearly lock to the vacuum vessel wall, and whose rotation frequencies and growth rates vary in time but are generally inversely proportional to the magnetic flux diffusion time of the vacuum vessel wall. This magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instability is pressure limiting in tokamaks and is called the Resistive Wall Mode (RWM). Future tokamaks that are expected to operate as fusion reactors will be required to maximize plasma pressure in order to maximize fusion performance. The DIII-D tokamak is equipped with electromagnetic control coils, both inside and outside of its vacuum vessel, which create magnetic fields that are small by comparison to the machine's equilibrium field but are able to dynamically counteract the RWM. Presently for RWM feedback, DIII-D uses its interior control coils using a classical proportional gain only controller to achieve high plasma pressure. Future advanced tokamak designs will not likely have the luxury of interior control coils and a proportional gain algorithm is not expected to be effective with external control coils. The computer code VALEN was designed to calculate the performance of an MHD feedback control system in an arbitrary geometry. VALEN models the perturbed magnetic field from a single MHD instability and its interaction with surrounding conducting structures using a finite element approach. A linear quadratic gaussian (LQG) control, or H 2 optimal control, algorithm based on the VALEN model for RWM feedback was developed for use with DIII-D's external control coil set. The algorithm is implemented on a platform that combines a graphics processing unit (GPU) for real-time control computation with low latency digital input/output control hardware and operates in parallel with the DIII-D Plasma Control System (PCS). Simulations and experiments showed that modern control techniques performed better, using 77% less current, than classical techniques when using coils external to

  14. Rapid wasted-free microfluidic fabrication based on ink-jet approach for microfluidic sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarujareet, Ungkarn; Amarit, Rattasart; Sumriddetchkajorn, Sarun

    2016-11-01

    Realizing that current microfluidic chip fabrication techniques are time consuming and labor intensive as well as always have material leftover after chip fabrication, this research work proposes an innovative approach for rapid microfluidic chip production. The key idea relies on a combination of a widely-used inkjet printing method and a heat-based polymer curing technique with an electronic-mechanical control, thus eliminating the need of masking and molds compared to typical microfluidic fabrication processes. In addition, as the appropriate amount of polymer is utilized during printing, there is much less amount of material wasted. Our inkjet-based microfluidic printer can print out the desired microfluidic chip pattern directly onto a heated glass surface, where the printed polymer is suddenly cured. Our proof-of-concept demonstration for widely-used single-flow channel, Y-junction, and T-junction microfluidic chips shows that the whole microfluidic chip fabrication process requires only 3 steps with a fabrication time of 6 minutes.

  15. Bulk ion heating with ICRF waves in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantsinen, M. J., E-mail: mervi.mantsinen@bsc.es [Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies, Barcelona (Spain); Barcelona Supercomputing Center, Barcelona (Spain); Bilato, R.; Bobkov, V. V.; Kappatou, A.; McDermott, R. M.; Odstrčil, T.; Tardini, G.; Bernert, M.; Dux, R.; Maraschek, M.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Ryter, F.; Stober, J. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Nocente, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Occhialini”, Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola”, CNR, Milano (Italy); Hellsten, T. [Dept. of Fusion Plasma Physics, EES, KTH, Stockholm (Sweden); Mantica, P.; Tardocchi, M. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola”, CNR, Milano (Italy); Nielsen, S. K.; Rasmussen, J.; Stejner, M. [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Physics, Lyngby (Denmark); and others

    2015-12-10

    Heating with ICRF waves is a well-established method on present-day tokamaks and one of the heating systems foreseen for ITER. However, further work is still needed to test and optimize its performance in fusion devices with metallic high-Z plasma facing components (PFCs) in preparation of ITER and DEMO operation. This is of particular importance for the bulk ion heating capabilities of ICRF waves. Efficient bulk ion heating with the standard ITER ICRF scheme, i.e. the second harmonic heating of tritium with or without {sup 3}He minority, was demonstrated in experiments carried out in deuterium-tritium plasmas on JET and TFTR and is confirmed by ICRF modelling. This paper focuses on recent experiments with {sup 3}He minority heating for bulk ion heating on the ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) tokamak with ITER-relevant all-tungsten PFCs. An increase of 80% in the central ion temperature T{sub i} from 3 to 5.5 keV was achieved when 3 MW of ICRF power tuned to the central {sup 3}He ion cyclotron resonance was added to 4.5 MW of deuterium NBI. The radial gradient of the T{sub i} profile reached locally values up to about 50 keV/m and the normalized logarithmic ion temperature gradients R/LT{sub i} of about 20, which are unusually large for AUG plasmas. The large changes in the T{sub i} profiles were accompanied by significant changes in measured plasma toroidal rotation, plasma impurity profiles and MHD activity, which indicate concomitant changes in plasma properties with the application of ICRF waves. When the {sup 3}He concentration was increased above the optimum range for bulk ion heating, a weaker peaking of the ion temperature profile was observed, in line with theoretical expectations.

  16. Investigation of the influence of divertor recycling on global plasma confinement in JET ITER-like wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamain, P.; Joffrin, E.; Bufferand, H.; Jarvinen, A.; Brezinsek, S.; Ciraolo, G.; Delabie, E.; Frassinetti, L.; Giroud, C.; Groth, M.; Lipschultz, B.; Lomas, P.; Marsen, S.; Menmuir, S.; Oberkofler, M.; Stamp, M.; Wiesen, S.; JET-EFDA Contributors,

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The impact of the divertor geometry on global plasma confinement in type I ELMy H-mode has been investigated in the JET tokamak equipped with ITER-Like Wall. Discharges have been performed in which the position of the strike-points was changed while keeping the bulk plasma equilibrium

  17. Remote operation of the vertical plasma stabilization @ the GOLEM tokamak for the plasma physics education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svoboda, V., E-mail: svoboda@fjfi.cvut.cz [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering CTU Prague, CZ-115 19 (Czech Republic); Kocman, J.; Grover, O. [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering CTU Prague, CZ-115 19 (Czech Republic); Krbec, J.; Stöckel, J. [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering CTU Prague, CZ-115 19 (Czech Republic); Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, CZ-182 21 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: * Understandable remote operation of a vertical plasma position control system in the tokamak GOLEM for educational purposes.* Two combinable modes of real-time plasma position control: position based feedback and a pre-defined waveform.* More than 20% plasma life prolongation with plasma position control in feedback mode. - Highlights: • Understandable remote operation of a vertical plasma position control system in the tokamak GOLEM for educational purposes. • Two combinable modes of real-time plasma position control: position based feedback and a pre-defined waveform. • More than 20% plasma life prolongation with plasma position control in feedback mode. - Abstract: The GOLEM tokamak at the Czech Technical University has been established as an educational tokamak device for domestic and foreign students. Remote participation in the scope of several laboratory practices, plasma physics schools and workshops has been successfully performed from abroad. A new enhancement allowing understandable remote control of vertical plasma position in two modes (i) predefined and (ii) feedback control is presented. It allows to drive the current in the stabilization coils in any time-dependent scenario, which can include as a parameter the actual plasma position measured by magnetic diagnostics. Arbitrary movement of the plasma column in a vertical direction, stabilization of the plasma column in the center of the tokamak vessel as well as prolongation/shortening of plasma life according to the remotely defined request are demonstrated.

  18. Simultaneous Multiwavelength Observations of V404 Cygni during its 2015 June Outburst Decay Strengthen the Case for an Extremely Energetic Jet-base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitra, Dipankar; Scarpaci, John F.; Grinberg, Victoria; Reynolds, Mark T.; Markoff, Sera; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Hynes, Robert I.

    2017-12-01

    We present results of multiband optical photometry of the black hole X-ray binary system V404 Cyg obtained using Wheaton College Observatory’s 0.3 m telescope, along with strictly simultaneous INTEGRAL and Swift observations during 2015 June 25.15–26.33 UT, and 2015 June 27.10–27.34 UT. These observations were made during the 2015 June outburst of the source when it was going through an epoch of violent activity in all wavelengths ranging from radio to γ-rays. The multiwavelength variability timescale favors a compact emission region, most likely originating in a jet outflow, for both observing epochs presented in this work. The simultaneous INTEGRAL/Imager on Board the Integral Satellite (IBIS) 20–40 keV light curve obtained during the June 27 observing run correlates very strongly with the optical light curve, with no detectable delay between the optical bands as well as between the optical and hard X-rays. The average slope of the dereddened spectral energy distribution was roughly flat between the {I}C- and V-bands during the June 27 run, even though the optical and X-ray flux varied by >25× during the run, ruling out an irradiation origin for the optical and suggesting that the optically thick to optically thin jet synchrotron break during the observations was at a frequency larger than that of V-band, which is quite extreme for X-ray binaries. These observations suggest that the optical emission originated very close to the base of the jet. A strong {{H}}α emission line, probably originating in a quasi-spherical nebula around the source, also contributes significantly in the R C -band. Our data, in conjunction with contemporaneous data at other wavelengths presented by other groups, strongly suggest that the jet-base was extremely compact and energetic during this phase of the outburst.

  19. Transient gas jets into liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jane Ming-Chin

    experimentally. In particular, a quantitative measure of jet susceptibility to unsteadiness has been established. Steady jets can be achieved in two ways: by being discharged from deLaval nozzles (increasing the exit Mach number) or by being overpressured.The unsteady behavior is modeled as the collapse of a bubble in liquid; comparisons of collapse times show good agreement. A mechanism for the unsteadiness is discussed. It is proposed that the chugging is the response of the jet boundary to a pressure difference between the jet and surrounding liquid, which arises as the result of the rapid expansion of a light fluid into a dense ambient atmosphere. The flow is shown to be similar to the discharge of a gas from a nozzle into a channel of larger cross section. An upper limit to the pressure difference is determined based on estimates of the minimum base pressure for such channel flows; a lower limit is established for the collapse time. All experimental values are within the bounds. The derived values indicate that the pressure differences between the jet and liquid may be more than 90 percent of the ambient pressure.

  20. Particle and energy balances in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tazima, Teruhiko

    1978-06-01

    Computational and experimental studies on particle and energy balances in tokamak plasmas are described. Firstly, concerning the modeling of tokamak plasmas, the particle balance considering diffusion and recycling, and the energy balance considering transport and energy losses due to impurities are discussed. Production mechanisms of gaseous and metallic impurities, which play important role in tokamak plasmas, are also discussed from a viewpoint of plasma-wall interactions. Scaling laws of density, temperature and energy confinement time are shown on the basis of recent data. Secondarily, tokamak plasmas are simulated with the above model, and anomalous diffusion and electron thermal conduction are indicated. Characteristics of a future tokamak plasma are also simulated. Stationary impurity density distributions and related energy losses, such as bremsstrahlung, ionization and excitation, are calculated taking into account diffusion and ionization processes. Edge cooling by oxygen impurities is described quantitatively compared with experiments. Permissible impurity levels of carbon, oxygen and iron in future large tokamaks are estimated. Thirdly, experimental studies on surface cleaning methods of the first wall are described; discharge cleaning in JFT-2, baking effect on the outgassing rates of wall materials, surface treatment of high-temperature molybdenum by oxygen and hydrogen gases, and in-situ coating of molybdenum by a coaxial magnetron sputter method. Lastly, problems in future large tokamaks aiming at break-even or self-ignited plasma are discussed quantitatively, such as trapped particle instabilities, impurities and additional heating. It is predicted that new conceptions will be necessary to overcome the problems and attain the fusion goal. (auth.)

  1. The lund Monte Carlo for jet fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoestrand, T.

    1982-03-01

    We present a Monte Carlo program based on the Lund model for jet fragmentation. Quark, gluon, diquark and hadron jets are considered. Special emphasis is put on the fragmentation of colour singlet jet systems, for which energy, momentum and flavour are conserved explicitly. The model for decays of unstable particles, in particular the weak decay of heavy hadrons, is described. The central part of the paper is a detailed description on how to use the FORTRAN 77 program. (Author)

  2. Transmutation of nuclear waste with a low-aspect-ratio Tokamak neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Bong Guen; Moon, Se Youn

    2014-01-01

    The transmutation characteristics of transuranics (TRUs) in a transmutation reactor based on a LAR (Low-aspect-ratio) tokamak as a neutron source are investigated. The optimum radial build of a transmutation reactor is found by using a coupled analysis of the tokamak systems and the neutron transport. The dependences of the transmutation characteristics on the aspect ratio A in the range of 1.5 to 2.5 and on the fusion power in the range of 150 to 500 MW are investigated. An equilibrium fuel cycle is developed for effective transmutation, and show that with one unit of the transmutation reactor based on the LAR tokamak producing fusion power in the range of a few hundred MWs, up to 3 PWRs (1.0 GWe capacity) can be supported with a burn-up fraction larger than 50%.

  3. Conceptual design report for the SDC barrel and intermediate muon detectors based on a jet-type drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Y.; Funahashi, Y.; Higashi, Y.

    1992-04-01

    We propose a jet-type drift chamber for the barrel and intermediate muon detectors of SDC. The chamber system consists of large multiwire drift chambers having a simple box-type frame structure: 2. 5 x 0.4 m 2 in cross section and maximum 9 m in length. A chamber module consists of double layers of small jet cells. The drift cell is composed of a wire plane, including 3 sense wires, and cathode plates parallel to the wire plane. The two layers in a chamber are staggered to each other by half a cell width. The jet cell is tilted such that its principle axis points to the interaction point. Such an arrangement, together with a constant drift velocity of the jet cell, allows us to design a simple and powerful trigger system for high momentum muons utilizing a drift time sum between a pair of staggered cells. The multi-hit capability will be helpful to distinguish high momentum muon tracks from associated electromagnetic debris as has been demonstrated by the Fermilab beam test T816. The maximum drift time fulfills the SDC requirement. A preliminary FEM analysis of the chamber module verified the excellent structural stiffness. It makes the support structure and the alignment system relatively simple. These features will reduce the total cost as well as ensure a good performance of the chamber system. (J.P.N.)

  4. Comparison of Theory with Rotation Measurements in JET ICRH Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R.V. Budny; C.S. Chang; C. Giroud; R.J. Goldston; D. McCune; J. Ongena; F.W. Perkins; R.B. White; K.-D. Zastrow; and contributors to the EFDA-JET work programme

    2001-01-01

    Plasma rotation appears to improve plasma performance by increasing the E x B flow shearing rate, thus decreasing radial correlations in the microturbulence. Also, plasma rotation can increase the stability to resistive MHD modes. In the Joint European Torus (JET), toroidal rotation rates omega (subscript ''tor'') with high Mach numbers are generally measured in NBI-heated plasmas (since the neutral beams aim in the co-plasma current direction). They are considerably lower with only ICRH (and Ohmic) heating, but still surprisingly large considering that ICRH appears to inject relatively small amounts of angular momentum. Either the applied torques are larger than naively expected, or the anomalous transport of angular momentum is smaller than expected. Since ICRH is one of the main candidates for heating next-step tokamaks, and for creating burning plasmas in future tokamak reactors, this paper attempts to understand ICRH-induced plasma rotation

  5. The JET Project (Design proposal)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This proposal describes a large Tokamak experiment, which aims to study plasma behavior in conditions and dimensions approaching those required in a fusion reactor. The maximum plasma minor radius (a) is 1.25 m and the major radius R 0 is 2.96 m. An important feature is the flexibility to study, for plasma currents in the 1→3 MA range, a wide range of aspect ratios R 0 /a=2.37→5), toroidal magnetic fields (up to 3.6T), minor radii (0.6→1.25 m) and elongation ratios (b/a=1→3.5). The cost of the apparatus, power supplies, plasma heating equipment and specific diagnostics is estimated as 70.1 Muc (March 1975 prices, 1 uc=50 FB). The total construction phase cost including commissioning, buildings and staff is 135 Muc. These figures include an average overall contingency of 30%. The construction time for the project is estimated at 5 years and requires 370 professional man years of effort in the construction organisation with additional effort deployed by the Associated Laboratories in such areas as diagnostics and plasma heating. This design proposal is arranged as follows: The preface gives an introduction to the field of fusion research and relates JET to the European and international programmes. Chapter I is a concise summary of the design proposal, it describes the objectives of research with JET, and gives a brief description of: the apparatus; the cost and construction schedules; the proposed experimental programme and the possible modes of operation of the device. A detailed account of the project is given in the rest of the report of which Chapters IV and VII comprise the engineering design and the staff and cost estimates respectively

  6. The JET project (design proposal)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-03-01

    This proposal describes a large Tokamak experiment, which aims to study plasma behavior in conditions and dimensions approaching those required in a fusion reactor. The maximum plasma minor radius (a) is 1.25m and the major radius (R 0 ) is 2.96m. An important feature is the flexibility to study, for plasma currents in the 1→3MA range, a wide range of aspect ratios (R 0 /a=2.37→5), toroidal magnetic fields (up to 3.6T), minor radii (0.6→1.25m) and elongation ratios (b/a=1→3.5). The cost of the apparatus, power supplies, plasma heating equipment and specific diagnostics is estimated as 70.1Muc (march 1975 prices, 1uc=50FB). The total construction phase cost including commissioning, buildings and staff is 135Muc. These figures include an average overall contingency of 30%. The construction time for the project is estimated at 5 years and requires 370 professional man years of effort in the construction organisation with additional effort deployed by the Associated Laboratories in such areas as diagnostics and plasma heating. This design proposal is arranged as follows: an introduction to the field of fusion research is given and relates JET to the European and international programmes; a concise summary of the design proposal describes the objectives of research with JET, and gives a brief description of the apparatus, the cost and construction schedules, the proposed experimental programme and the possible modes of operation of the device. A detailed account of the engineering design and the staff and cost estimates is presented

  7. The system architecture of the new JET Shape Controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartori, F.; Ambrosino, G.; Ariola, M.; Cenedese, A.; Crisanti, F.; Tommasi, G. De; Cullen, P. Mc; Piccolo, F.; Pironti, A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the installation of the new JET Shape Controller System [M. Garribba, R. Litunovsky, P. Noll, S. Puppin, The new control scheme for the JET plasma position and current control system, in: Proceedings of the 15th SOFE Conference, Massachusetts, 1993, pp. 33-36; F. Sartori, A. Cenedese, Plasma position and current control management at JET, in: Proceedings of the 42nd IEEE Conference on Decision and Control, Maui, 2003] especially focusing on the addition of the Extreme Shape Controller [G. Ambrosino, et al., A new shape controller for extremely shaped plasmas in JET, Fusion Eng. Des. 66-68 (2003) 797-802]. The activity was performed by the JET Operator in co-operation with the ENEA-CREATE design team, and involved both changes in the hardware and system software of JET and tuning of the proposed Extreme Shape Controller (XSC) design to satisfy the practical requirements of tokamak operation. The application of 10 years experience of controller implementation and commissioning combined with a modern and efficient modelling and design methodology has allowed an unprecedented fast and easy commissioning of the new system

  8. Tokamak transmutation of (nuclear) waste (TTW): Parametric studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, E.T.; Krakowski, R.A.; Peng, Y.K.M.

    1994-01-01

    Radioactive waste generated as part of the commercial-power and defense nuclear programs can be either stored or transmuted. The latter treatment requires a capital-intensive neutron source and is reserved for particularly hazardous and long-lived actinide and fission-product waste. A comparative description of fusion-based transmutation is made on the basis of rudimentary estimates of ergonic performance and transmutation capacities versus inventories for both ultra-low-aspect-ratio (spherical torus, ST) and conversional (aspect-ratio) tokamak fusion-power-core drivers. The parametric systems studies reported herein provides a preamble to more-detailed, cost-based systems analyses

  9. Simulations of Turbulence in Tokamak Edge and Effects of Self-Consistent Zonal Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Bruce; Umansky, Maxim

    2013-10-01

    Progress is reported on simulations of electromagnetic drift-resistive ballooning turbulence in the tokamak edge. This extends previous work to include self-consistent zonal flows and their effects. The previous work addressed simulation of L-mode tokamak edge turbulence using the turbulence code BOUT that solves Braginskii-based plasma fluid equations in tokamak edge domain. The calculations use realistic single-null geometry and plasma parameters of the DIII-D tokamak and produce fluctuation amplitudes, fluctuation spectra, and particle and thermal fluxes that compare favorably to experimental data. In the effect of sheared ExB poloidal rotation is included with an imposed static radial electric field fitted to experimental data. In the new work here we include the radial electric field self-consistently driven by the microturbulence, which contributes to the sheared ExB poloidal rotation (zonal flow generation). We present simulations with/without zonal flows for both cylindrical geometry, as in the UCLA Large Plasma Device, and for the DIII-D tokamak L-mode cases in to quantify the influence of self-consistent zonal flows on the microturbulence and the concomitant transport. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  10. Surface processing and ageing behavior of silk fabrics treated with atmospheric-pressure plasma for pigment-based ink-jet printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunming; Wang, Libing; Yu, Miao; Qu, Lijun; Men, Yajing; Zhang, Xiangwu

    2018-03-01

    Pigment inkjet printing has highlighted the advantages of cost-effective, short production cycle and environment-friendly. However, patterns directly printed with pigment inks usually have low color yields and blurry images which are caused by bleeding phenomenon. This work presents an atmospheric-pressure plasma method for improving the pigment-based ink-jet printing performance of silk fabrics. The effects of surface changes induced are discussed, with data derived from morphological study by atomic force microscopy (AFM), chemical analysis using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle measurement. Ink-jet printing experiments were conducted to study the influence of measured changes on anti-bleeding property and color strength of treated and original samples. The ageing experiment indicates that the modified silk fabrics should be printed within 24 h after plasma processing for maximum color yields. This study explores an effective approach for the atmospheric-pressure plasma, which can provide its significant use in improving the surface properties and ink-jet printing performance of fabrics.

  11. Automatic location of disruption times in JET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, R; Vega, J; Murari, A

    2014-11-01

    The loss of stability and confinement in tokamak plasmas can induce critical events known as disruptions. Disruptions produce strong electromagnetic forces and thermal loads which can damage fundamental components of the devices. Determining the disruption time is extremely important for various disruption studies: theoretical models, physics-driven models, or disruption predictors. In JET, during the experimental campaigns with the JET-C (Carbon Fiber Composite) wall, a common criterion to determine the disruption time consisted of locating the time of the thermal quench. However, with the metallic ITER-like wall (JET-ILW), this criterion is usually not valid. Several thermal quenches may occur previous to the current quench but the temperature recovers. Therefore, a new criterion has to be defined. A possibility is to use the start of the current quench as disruption time. This work describes the implementation of an automatic data processing method to estimate the disruption time according to this new definition. This automatic determination allows both reducing human efforts to locate the disruption times and standardizing the estimates (with the benefit of being less vulnerable to human errors).

  12. Analysis of tokamak plasma confinement modes using the fast

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Fourier analysis is a satisfactory technique for detecting plasma confinement modes in tokamaks. The confinement mode of tokamak plasma was analysed using the fast Fourier transformation (FFT). For this purpose, we used the data of Mirnov coils that is one of the identifying tools in the IR-T1 tokamak, with and ...

  13. Edge plasma diagnostics on Tore Supra tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Junji

    1991-01-01

    From 1988 to 1991, the international scientific research 'Diagnosis of peripheral plasma in Tore Supra tokamak' was carried out as a three-year plan receiving the support of the scientific research expense of the Ministry of Education. This is to apply the method of measuring electron density distribution by neutral lithium beam probe spectroscopy to the measurement of the electron density distribution in the peripheral plasma in Tore Supra Tokamak in France. Among many tokamaks in operation doing respective characteristics researches, the Tore Supra generates the toroidal magnetic field by using superconducting coils, and aims at the long time discharge for 30 sec. for the time being, and for 300 sec. in future. In the plasma generators for long time discharge like this, the technology of particle control is a large problem. For this purpose, a divertor was added to the Tore Supra. In order to advance the research on particle control, it is necessary to examine the behavior of plasma in the peripheral part in detail. The measurement of peripheral plasma in tokamaks, beam probe spectroscopy, the Tore Supra tokamak, the progress of the joint research, the problems in the joint research and the perspective of hereafter are reported. (K.I.)

  14. Three novel tokamak plasma regimes in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furth, H.P.

    1985-10-01

    Aside from extending ''standard'' ohmic and neutral beam heating studies to advanced plasma parameters, TFTR has encountered a number of special plasma regimes that have the potential to shed new light on the physics of tokamak confinement and the optimal design of future D-T facilities: (1) High-powered, neutral beam heating at low plasma densities can maintain a highly reactive hot-ion population (with quasi-steady-state beam fueling and current drive) in a tokamak configuration of modest bulk-plasma confinement requirements. (2) Plasma displacement away from limiter contact lends itself to clarification of the role of edge-plasma recycling and radiation cooling within the overall pattern of tokamak heat flow. (3) Noncentral auxiliary heating (with a ''hollow'' power-deposition profile) should serve to raise the central tokamak plasma temperature without deterioration of central region confinement, thus facilitating the study of alpha-heating effects in TFTR. The experimental results of regime (3) support the theory that tokamak profile consistency is related to resistive kink stability and that the global energy confinement time is determined by transport properties of the plasma edge region

  15. Three novel tokamak plasma regimes in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furth, H.P.

    1985-10-01

    Aside from extending ''standard'' ohmic and neutral beam heating studies to advanced plasma parameters, TFTR has encountered a number of special plasma regimes that have the potential to shed new light on the physics of tokamak confinement and the optimal design of future D-T facilities: (1) High-powered, neutral beam heating at low plasma densities can maintain a highly reactive hot-ion population (with quasi-steady-state beam fueling and current drive) in a tokamak configuration of modest bulk-plasma confinement requirements. (2) Plasma displacement away from limiter contact lends itself to clarification of the role of edge-plasma recycling and radiation cooling within the overall pattern of tokamak heat flow. (3) Noncentral auxiliary heating (with a ''hollow'' power-deposition profile) should serve to raise the central tokamak plasma temperature without deterioration of central region confinement, thus facilitating the study of alpha-heating effects in TFTR. The experimental results of regime (3) support the theory that tokamak profile consistency is related to resistive kink stability and that the global energy confinement time is determined by transport properties of the plasma edge region.

  16. Electron thermal transport in tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konings, J.A.

    1994-11-30

    The process of fusion of small nuclei thereby releasing energy, as it occurs continuously in the sun, is essential for the existence of mankind. The same process applied in a controlled way on earth would provide a clean and an abundant energy source, and be the long term solution of the energy problem. Nuclear fusion requires an extremely hot (10{sup 8} K) ionized gas, a plasma, that can only be maintained if it is kept insulated from any material wall. In the so called `tokamak` this is achieved by using magnetic fields. The termal insulation, which is essential if one wants to keep the plasma at the high `fusion` temperature, can be predicted using basic plasma therory. A comparison with experiments in tokamaks, however, showed that the electron enery losses are ten to hundred times larger than this theory predicts. This `anomalous transport` of thermal energy implies that, to reach the condition for nuclear fusion, a fusion reactor must have very large dimensions. This may put the economic feasibility of fusion power in jeopardy. Therefore, in a worldwide collaboration, physicists study tokamak plasmas in an attempt to understand and control the energy losses. From a scientific point of view, the mechanisms driving anomalous transport are one of the challenges in fudamental plasma physics. In Nieuwegein, a tokamak experiment (the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project, RTP) is dedicated to the study of anomalous transport, in an international collaboration with other laboratories. (orig./WL).

  17. Studies of heavy flavored jets with CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Jung, Kurt

    2017-01-01

    The energy loss of jets in heavy-ion collisions is expected to depend on the mass and flavor of the initiating parton. Thus, measurements of jet quenching with identified partons place powerful constraints on the thermodynamic and transport properties of the hot and dense medium. We present recent results of heavy flavor jet spectra and nuclear modification factors of jets associated to charm and bottom quarks in both pPb and PbPb collisions. New measurements to be presented include the dijet asymmetry of pairs of b-jets in PbPb collisions and a finalized c-jet measurement in pPb collisions based on new data collected during the 2015 heavy-ion run period at the LHC.

  18. Tokamak blanket design study, final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-08-01

    A cylindrical module concept was developed, analyzed, and incorporated in a tokamak blanket system that includes piping systems, vacuum boundary sealing, and support structures. The design is based on the use of state-of-the-art structural materials (20% cold-worked type 316 stainless steel), lithium as the breeding material, and pressurized helium as the coolant. The module design consists of nested concentric cylinders (with an outer diameter of 10 cm) and features direct wall cooling by helium flowing between the outer (first-wall) cylinder and the inner (lithium-containing) cylinder. Each cylinder can withstand full coolant pressure, thus enhancing reliability. Results show that stainless steel is a viable material for a first wall subjected to a neutron wall loading of 4 MW/m 2 and a particle heat flux of 1 MW/m 2 . Lifetime analysis shows that the first-wall design meets the goal of operating at 20-min cycles with 95% duty for 100,000 cycles. To reduce system complexity, a larger 20-cm-diam module also was analyzed for incorporation in the blanket assembly. Reliability assessment indicates that it may be possible to double the module in size from 10 to 20 cm in diameter. With a modest increase in coolant pumping power, a blanket assembly comprising 20-cm-diam modules can still achieve 100,000 operating cycles - equivalent to a 3.6-year design lifetime - with only one or two helium coolant leaks into the plasma

  19. Overview of the compact ignition tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flanagan, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    A national team has developed a baseline concept for a Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT). The CIT mission is to achieve ignition and provide experimental capability to study the behavior of burning plasma. The design uses large magnetic fields on axis (about 10 T) and large plasma currents (about 9-10 MA). The magnet structure derives high strength from the use of a copper-Inconel composite plate design in the nose of region of the toroidal field (TF) coil and in the ohmic heating solenoid. Inertial cooling is used;liquid nitrogen temperatures are established at the beginning of each pulse. Capability is provided to operate either with a divertor or limiter based plasma. The design is very compact (1.32-m major radius, 0.43-m plasma radius), has 16 TF coils, and has 16 major horizontal access ports, about 30 cm by 80 cm, located between TF coils. The schedule is for a construction project to be authorized for the period FY 1988-93

  20. Maintainability features of the compact ignition tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spampinato, P.T.; Bushnell, C.W.

    1986-01-01

    The Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is a deuterium-tritium (D-T) device envisaged to be the next experimental reactor in the US Fusion Program. The reactor will initially operate in a nonactivated hydrogen phase for approximately two years. This will permit verification of the integrity of the total system and allow hands-on repair to equipment which has experienced shakedown and early operation failures. Once D-T operations commence, reactor maintenance will require remote handling techniques. An evaluation has been completed to determine what maintenance operations must be performed on the CIT. A maintenance philosophy has been developed which is based upon the use of manipulator systems and robotics in the test cell. Replacement of life-limited equipment will be accomplished using a modular design approach for components, with simple remotely operable interfaces. Examples of operations to be done remotely include: (1) replacing of rf antennae and Faraday shields, (2) uncoupling diagnostic and fueling penetrations, (3) removing of all port covers, and (4) replacing first wall armor tiles, optical mirrors, and vacuum windows

  1. Multiple time scale methods in tokamak magnetohydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardin, S.C.

    1984-01-01

    Several methods are discussed for integrating the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations in tokamak systems on other than the fastest time scale. The dynamical grid method for simulating ideal MHD instabilities utilizes a natural nonorthogonal time-dependent coordinate transformation based on the magnetic field lines. The coordinate transformation is chosen to be free of the fast time scale motion itself, and to yield a relatively simple scalar equation for the total pressure, P = p + B/sup 2//2..mu../sub 0/, which can be integrated implicitly to average over the fast time scale oscillations. Two methods are described for the resistive time scale. The zero-mass method uses a reduced set of two-fluid transport equations obtained by expanding in the inverse magnetic Reynolds number, and in the small ratio of perpendicular to parallel mobilities and thermal conductivities. The momentum equation becomes a constraint equation that forces the pressure and magnetic fields and currents to remain in force balance equilibrium as they evolve. The large mass method artificially scales up the ion mass and viscosity, thereby reducing the severe time scale disparity between wavelike and diffusionlike phenomena, but not changing the resistive time scale behavior. Other methods addressing the intermediate time scales are discussed.

  2. The Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.A.; Sheffield, G.V.; Bushnell, C.

    1985-01-01

    The basic objective of the next major step in the US fusion programme has been defined as the achievement of ignition and long pulse equilibrium burn of a fusion plasma in the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) device. Preconceptual design studies have seen completion of four candidate versions to provide the comparative information needed to narrow down the range of TFCX options before proceeding to the conceptual design phase. All four designs share the same objective and conform to common physics, engineering and costing criteria. The four base options considered differed mainly in the toroidal field coil design, two employing superconducting coils and the other two copper coils. In each case (copper and superconducting), one relatively conventional version was carried as well as a version employing more exotic toroidal field coil design assumptions. Sizes range from R=2.6 m for the smaller of the two copper versions to R=4.08 m for the larger superconducting option. In all cases, the plasma current was about 10 MA and the toroidal field about 4 T. (author)

  3. How much does a tokamak reactor cost?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freidberg, J.; Cerfon, A.; Ballinger, S.; Barber, J.; Dogra, A.; McCarthy, W.; Milanese, L.; Mouratidis, T.; Redman, W.; Sandberg, A.; Segal, D.; Simpson, R.; Sorensen, C.; Zhou, M.

    2017-10-01

    The cost of a fusion reactor is of critical importance to its ultimate acceptability as a commercial source of electricity. While there are general rules of thumb for scaling both overnight cost and levelized cost of electricity the corresponding relations are not very accurate or universally agreed upon. We have carried out a series of scaling studies of tokamak reactor costs based on reasonably sophisticated plasma and engineering models. The analysis is largely analytic, requiring only a simple numerical code, thus allowing a very large number of designs. Importantly, the studies are aimed at plasma physicists rather than fusion engineers. The goals are to assess the pros and cons of steady state burning plasma experiments and reactors. One specific set of results discusses the benefits of higher magnetic fields, now possible because of the recent development of high T rare earth superconductors (REBCO); with this goal in mind, we calculate quantitative expressions, including both scaling and multiplicative constants, for cost and major radius as a function of central magnetic field.

  4. The collaborative tokamak control room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schissel, D.P.

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic fusion experiments keep growing in size and complexity resulting in a concurrent growth in collaborations between experimental sites and laboratories worldwide. In the US, the National Fusion Collaboratory Project is developing a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for all aspects of magnetic fusion energy research by creating a robust, user-friendly collaborative environment and deploying this to the more than 1000 US fusion scientists in 40 institutions who perform magnetic fusion research. This paper reports on one aspect of the project which is the development of the collaborative tokamak control room to enhance both collocated and remote scientific participation in experimental operations. This work includes secured computational services that can be scheduled as required, the ability to rapidly compare experimental data with simulation results, a means to easily share individual results with the group by moving application windows to a shared display, and the ability for remote scientists to be fully engaged in experimental operations through shared audio, video, and applications. The project is funded by the USDOE Office of Science, Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Program and unites fusion and computer science researchers to directly address these challenges

  5. Tokamak disruption heat flux simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langhoff, M.; Hess, G.; Gahl, J.; Ingram, R.

    1990-01-01

    A coaxial plasma gun system, operating in the deflagration mode, has been built and fired at the University of New Mexico. This system, powered by a 100 kJ capacitor bank, was designed to give a variable pulse length of approximately 50-100 us. The gun is intended to deliver to a target an energy deposition density of 1 kJ per cm 2 via impact with a deuterium plasma possessing a highly directed energy. This system should simulate on the target, over an area of approximately 10 cm 2 , the heat flux of a tokamak plasma disruption on plasma facing components. Current diagnostics for the system are rather rudimentary but sufficient for determination of plasma pulse characteristics and energy transfer to target. Electrical measurements include bank voltage measured via resistive voltage dividers, and bank current measured via Rogowski coil. The shape of the plasma, its position relative to the target area, and the final impact area, is determined via open-shutter photography and the use of witness plates. Total energy deposited onto targets will be determined through simple calorimetry and careful target mass measurements. Preliminary results describing the ablation of carbon targets exposed to disruption like heat fluxes will be presented as well as a description of the experimental apparatus

  6. Neoclassical MHD equations for tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callen, J.D.; Shaing, K.C.

    1986-03-01

    The moment equation approach to neoclassical-type processes is used to derive the flows, currents and resistive MHD-like equations for studying equilibria and instabilities in axisymmetric tokamak plasmas operating in the banana-plateau collisionality regime (ν* approx. 1). The resultant ''neoclassical MHD'' equations differ from the usual reduced equations of resistive MHD primarily by the addition of the important viscous relaxation effects within a magnetic flux surface. The primary effects of the parallel (poloidal) viscous relaxation are: (1) Rapid (approx. ν/sub i/) damping of the poloidal ion flow so the residual flow is only toroidal; (2) addition of the bootstrap current contribution to Ohm's laws; and (3) an enhanced (by B 2 /B/sub theta/ 2 ) polarization drift type term and consequent enhancement of the perpendicular dielectric constant due to parallel flow inertia, which causes the equations to depend only on the poloidal magnetic field B/sub theta/. Gyroviscosity (or diamagnetic vfiscosity) effects are included to properly treat the diamagnetic flow effects. The nonlinear form of the neoclassical MHD equations is derived and shown to satisfy an energy conservation equation with dissipation arising from Joule and poloidal viscous heating, and transport due to classical and neoclassical diffusion

  7. Tokamak rotation and charge exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazeltine, R.D.; Rowan, W.L.; Solano, E.R.; Valanju, P.M.

    1991-01-01

    In the absence of momentum input, tokamak toroidal rotation rates are typically small - no larger in particular than poloidal rotation - even when the radial electric field is strong, as near the plasma edge. This circumstance, contradicting conventional neoclassical theory, is commonly attributed to the rotation damping effect of charge exchange, although a detailed comparison between charge-exchange damping theory and experiment is apparently unavailable. Such a comparison is attempted here in the context of recent TEXT experiments, which compare rotation rates, both poloidal and toroidal, in helium and hydrogen discharges. The helium discharges provide useful data because they are nearly free of ion-neutral charge exchange; they have been found to rotate toroidally in reasonable agreement with neoclassical predictions. The hydrogen experiments show much smaller toroidal motion as usual. The theoretical calculation uses the full charge-exchange operator and assumes plateau collisionality, roughly consistent with the experimental conditions. The authors calculate the ion flow as a function of v cx /v c , where v cx is the charge exchange rate and v c the Coulomb collision frequency. The results are in reasonable accord with the observations. 1 ref

  8. Stability analysis of tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourdelle, C.

    2000-10-01

    In a tokamak plasma, the energy transport is mainly turbulent. In order to increase the fusion reactions rate, it is needed to improve the energy confinement. The present work is dedicated to the identification of the key parameters leading to plasmas with a better confined energy in order to guide the future experiments. For this purpose, a numerical code has been developed. It calculates the growth rates characterizing the instabilities onset. The stability analysis is completed by the evaluation of the shearing rate of the rotation due to the radial electric field. When this shearing rate is greater than the growth rate the ion turbulence is fully stabilised. The shearing rate and the growth rate are determined from the density, temperature and security factor profiles of a given plasma. Three types of plasmas have been analysed. In the Radiative Improved modes of TEXTOR, high charge number ions seeding lowers the growth rates. In Tore Supra-high density plasmas, a strong magnetic shear and/or a more efficient ion heating linked to a bifurcation of the toroidal rotation direction (which is not understood) trigger the improvement of the confinement. In other Tore Supra plasmas, locally steep electron pressure gradients have been obtained following magnetic shear reversal. This locally negative magnetic shear has a stabilizing effect. In these three families of plasmas, the growth rates decrease, the confinement improves, the density and temperature profiles are steeper. This steepening induces an increase of the rotation shearing rate, which then maintains the confinement high quality. (author)

  9. Erosion and deposition in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staudenmaier, G.

    1985-01-01

    The flow of metal impurities from the wall and limiter to the plasma, and back towards the wall, is investigated using surface collection probes and subsequent surface analysis in order to understand impuritiy generation and impurity transport. Impurity fluxes and their scrapeoff lengths have been investigated for several years in a large number of tokamaks. The results are summarized and discussed. Erosion exceeding deposition was first observed to occur at limiterlike structures closest to the plasma edge. Recently, a new probe has been developed to measure quantitatively the erosion in ASDEX. Subsequent quantitative surface analysis is performed in situ by electron induced x-ray analysis. Erosion caused either by ions (limiter) or charge exchange neutrals (wall) can be investigated separately. The erosion at the wall is about two orders of magnitude smaller than the erosion at limiterlike structures, which is of the order of one monolayer per discharge. Simultaneous measurements of deposition and erosion have been performed to elucidate net values of deposition and erosion

  10. ATLAS jet and missing-ET reconstruction, calibration, and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berta, Peter; ATLAS Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    The ATLAS experiment has achieved a very high precision on jet and missing transverse energy performance by the use of advanced calorimeter-based topological clustering and local cluster calibration, event-by-event pile-up subtraction methods, and in situ techniques to correct for the residual jet energy response difference between data and simulation. Tracking information is being combined with calorimeter to further improve the jet and missing transverse energy performance. ATLAS has also commissioned several new powerful tools for the analysis and interpretation of hadronic final states at the LHC such as jet substructure, jet mass, quark-gluon discrimination, and jet tagging tools for the identification of boosted heavy particles. An overview of the reconstruction, calibration, and performance of jets, missing transverse energy, jet substructure, and jet tagging at ATLAS is presented.

  11. ATLAS jet and missing-ET reconstruction, calibration, and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Berta, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment has achieved a very high precision on jet and missing transverse energy performance by the use of advanced calorimeter-based topological clustering and local cluster calibration, event-by-event pile-up subtraction methods, and in situ techniques to correct for the residual jet energy response difference between data and simulation. Tracking information is being combined with calorimeter to further improve the jet and missing transverse energy performance. ATLAS has also commissioned several new powerful tools for the analysis and interpretation of hadronic final states at the LHC such as jet substructure, jet mass, quark-gluon discrimination, and jet tagging tools for the identification of boosted heavy particles. An overview of the reconstruction, calibration, and performance of jets, missing transverse energy, jet substructure, and jet tagging at ATLAS is presented.

  12. A tree-ring based reconstruction of North Pacific Jet variability and its influence on Sierra Nevada fire regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trouet, V.; Babst, F.; Betancourt, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    Over the last decade, the northern hemisphere polar jet stream - the fast-flowing, high-altitude westerly air current that flows over mid and northern latitudes - has experienced a more meridional (north-south) and slower wave progression. This anomalous behavior contributed to extreme mid-latitude weather events across the globe, including drought and forest fires in the American Southwest (2012), summer heatwaves in Russia (2010), and floods in central and western Europe (2007). The position of the North Pacific Jet (NPJ) strongly modulates winter hydroclimatology in the Sierra Nevada and the Central Rocky Mountains; moreover, a persistent southerly (northerly) trajectory can offset (reinforce) losses in regional snowpack predicted with greenhouse warming . Snowpack variability has a fundamental impact on water resources and ecosystem disturbances. An increase in wildfire activity in the American West since the mid-1980s, for instance, has been related to decreasing snowpacks and earlier and faster snowmelt. Recent anomalous, high-amplitude, jet stream fluctuations are consistent with model projections forced by greenhouse gases. By weakening the pole-equator temperature gradient, enhanced Arctic warming in particular may cause the jet to slow and extreme weather patterns (e.g., blocking high pressure cells) to persist. Questions exist about the ability of climate models to simulate jet stream dynamics, however, and the instrumental record is still too short to fully evaluate the natural range of jet stream variability. We developed a reconstruction of winter NPJ variability from tree-ring data at two locations where climate is strongly influenced by the latitudinal NPJ position. We combined Blue Oak (Quercus douglasii) data from central California with climate-sensitive tree-ring series from multiple species in the northern Rockies in a nested PCA model that explained up to 41% of the variance in the instrumental NPJ target. The resulting reconstruction (1409

  13. Vector boson tagged jets and jet substructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitev Ivan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In these proceedings, we report on recent results related to vector boson-tagged jet production in heavy ion collisions and the related modification of jet substructure, such as jet shapes and jet momentum sharing distributions. Z0-tagging and γ-tagging of jets provides new opportunities to study parton shower formation and propagation in the quark-gluon plasma and has been argued to provide tight constrains on the energy loss of reconstructed jets. We present theoretical predictions for isolated photon-tagged and electroweak boson-tagged jet production in Pb+Pb collisions at √sNN = 5.02 TeV at the LHC, addressing the modification of their transverse momentum and transverse momentum imbalance distributions. Comparison to recent ATLAS and CMS experimental measurements is performed that can shed light on the medium-induced radiative corrections and energy dissipation due to collisional processes of predominantly quark-initiated jets. The modification of parton splitting functions in the QGP further implies that the substructure of jets in heavy ion collisions may differ significantly from the corresponding substructure in proton-proton collisions. Two such observables and the implication of tagging on their evaluation is also discussed.

  14. Relative merits of size, field, and current on ignited tokamak performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckan, N.A.

    1988-01-01

    A simple global analysis is developed to examine the relative merits of size (L = a or R/sub 0 /), field (B/sub 0 /), and current (I) on ignition regimes of tokamaks under various confinement scaling laws. Scalings of key parameters with L, B/sub 0 /, and I are presented at several operating points, including (a) optimal path to ignition (saddle point), (b) ignition at minimum beta, (c) ignition at 10 keV, and (d) maximum performance at the limits of density and beta. Expressions for the saddle point and the minimum conditions needed for ohmic ignition are derived analytically for any confinement model of the form tau/sub E/ ∼ n/sup x/T/sup y/. For a wide range of confinement models, the ''figure of merit'' parameters and I are found to give a good indication of the relative performance of the devices where q* is the cylindrical safety factor. As an illustration, the results are applied to representative ''CIT'' (as a class of compact, high-field ignition tokamaks) and ''Super-JETs'' [a class of large-size (few x JET), low-field, high-current (≥20-MA) devices.

  15. Activation analysis of the compact ignition tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selcow, E.C.

    1986-01-01

    The US fusion program has completed the conceptual design of a compact tokamak device that achieves ignition. The high neutron wall loadings associated with this compact deuterium-tritium-burning device indicate that radiation-related issues may be significant considerations in the overall system design. Sufficient shielding will be requied for the radiation protection of both reactor components and occupational personnel. A close-in igloo shield has been designed around the periphery of the tokamak structure to permit personnel access into the test cell after shutdown and limit the total activation of the test cell components. This paper describes the conceptual design of the igloo shield system and discusses the major neutronic concerns related to the design of the Compact Ignition Tokamak

  16. Helicity content and tokamak applications of helicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boozer, A.H.

    1986-05-01

    Magnetic helicity is approximately conserved by the turbulence associated with resistive instabilities of plasmas. To generalize the application of the concept of helicity, the helicity content of an arbitrary bounded region of space will be defined. The definition has the virtues that both the helicity content and its time derivative have simple expressions in terms of the poloidal and toroidal magnetic fluxes, the average toroidal loop voltage and the electric potential on the bounding surface, and the volume integral of E-B. The application of the helicity concept to tokamak plasmas is illustrated by a discussion of so-called MHD current drive, an example of a stable tokamak q profile with q less than one in the center, and a discussion of the possibility of a natural steady-state tokamak due to the bootstrap current coupling to tearing instabilities

  17. Effect of impurity radiation on tokamak equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebut, P.H.; Green, B.J.

    1977-01-01

    The energy loss from a tokamak plasma due to the radiation from impurities is of great importance in the overall energy balance. Taking the temperature dependence of this loss for two impurities characteristic of those present in existing tokamak plasmas, the condition for radial power balance is derived. For the impurities considered (oxygen and iron) it is found that the radiation losses are concentrated in a thin outer layer of the plasma and the equilibrium condition places an upper limit on the plasma paraticle number density in this region. This limiting density scales with mean current density in the same manner as is experimentally observed for the peak number density of tokamak plasmas. The stability of such equilibria is also discussed. (author)

  18. Time - resolved thermography at Tokamak T-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunow, C.; Guenther, K.; Lingertat, J.; Chicherov, V.M.; Evstigneev, S.A.; Zvonkov, S.N.

    1987-01-01

    Thermographic experiments were performed at T-10 tokamak to investigate the thermic coupling of plasma and the limiter. The limiter is an internal equipment of the vacuum vessel of tokamak-type fusion devices and the interaction of plasma with limiter results a high thermal load of limiter for short time. In according to improve the limiter design the temperature distribution on the limiter surface was measured by a time-resolved thermographic method. Typical isotherms and temperature increment curves are presented. This measurement can be used as a systematic plasma diagnostic method because the limiter is installed in the tokamak whereas special additional probes often disturb the plasma discharge. (D.Gy.) 3 refs.; 7 figs

  19. Estimation of energy saving thanks to a reduced-model-based approach: Example of bread baking by jet impingement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alamir, M.; Witrant, E.; Della Valle, G.; Rouaud, O.; Josset, Ch.; Boillereaux, L.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a reduced order mechanistic model is proposed for the evolution of temperature and humidity during French bread baking. The model parameters are identified using experimental data. The resulting model is then used to estimate the potential energy saving that can be obtained using jet impingement technology when used to increase the heat transfer efficiency. Results show up to 16% potential energy saving under certain assumptions. - Highlights: ► We developed a mechanistic model of heat and mass transfer in bread including different and multiple energy sources. ► An optimal control system permits to track references trajectories with a minimization of energy consuming. ► The methodology is evaluated with jet impingement technique. ► Results show a significant energy saving of about 17% of energy with reasonable actuator variations

  20. Adaptive high learning rate probabilistic disruption predictors from scratch for the next generation of tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, J.; Murari, A.; Dormido-Canto, S.; Moreno, R.; Pereira, A.; Acero, A.; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2014-12-01

    The development of accurate real-time disruption predictors is a pre-requisite to any mitigation action. Present theoretical models of disruptions do not reliably cope with the disruption issues. This article deals with data-driven predictors and a review of existing machine learning techniques, from both physics and engineering points of view, is provided. All these methods need large training datasets to develop successful predictors. However, ITER or DEMO cannot wait for hundreds of disruptions to have a reliable predictor. So far, the attempts to extrapolate predictors between different tokamaks have not shown satisfactory results. In addition, it is not clear how valid this approach can be between present devices and ITER/DEMO, due to the differences in their respective scales and possibly underlying physics. Therefore, this article analyses the requirements to create adaptive predictors from scratch to learn from the data of an individual machine from the beginning of operation. A particular algorithm based on probabilistic classifiers has been developed and it has been applied to the database of the three first ITER-like wall campaigns of JET (1036 non-disruptive and 201 disruptive discharges). The predictions start from the first disruption and only 12 re-trainings have been necessary as a consequence of missing 12 disruptions only. Almost 10 000 different predictors have been developed (they differ in their features) and after the chronological analysis of the 1237 discharges, the predictors recognize 94% of all disruptions with an average warning time (AWT) of 654 ms. This percentage corresponds to the sum of tardy detections (11%), valid alarms (76%) and premature alarms (7%). The false alarm rate is 4%. If only valid alarms are considered, the AWT is 244 ms and the standard deviation is 205 ms. The average probability interval about the reliability and accuracy of all the individual predictions is 0.811 ± 0.189.