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Sample records for titanium-containing dental orthodontic

  1. Corrosion resistance of titanium-containing dental orthodontic wires in fluoride-containing artificial saliva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, T.-H.; Wang, C.-C.; Huang, T.-K.; Chen, L.-K.; Chou, M.-Y.; Huang, H.-H.

    2009-01-01

    This study was to investigate the corrosion resistance of different Ti-containing dental orthodontic wires (including Ni-Ti, Ni-Ti-Cu, Ti-Mo-Zr-Sn, and Ti-Nb alloys) in acidic fluoride-containing artificial saliva using cyclic potentiodynamic polarization curve measurements. Different NaF concentrations (0%, 0.2%, and 0.5%), simulating the fluoride contents in commercial toothpastes, were added to the artificial saliva. Surface characterization was analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectrometry. Cyclic potentiodynamic polarization curves showed that the presence of fluoride ions, especially 0.5% NaF, was detrimental to the protective ability of the TiO 2 -based film on the Ti-containing wires. This might lead to a decrease in the corrosion resistance of the tested alloys, i.e. an increase in the corrosion rate and anodic current density and a decrease in the passive film breakdown potential. Among the tested Ti-containing wires, the Ni-Ti and Ni-Ti-Cu wires containing mainly TiO 2 on surface film were more susceptible to fluoride-enhanced corrosion, while the Ti-Mo-Zr-Sn and Ti-Nb wires containing MoO 3 /ZrO 2 /SnO and Nb 2 O 5 , respectively, along with TiO 2 on surface film were pitting corrosion resistant and showed a lower susceptibility to fluoride-enhanced corrosion. The difference in corrosion resistance of the tested commercial Ti-containing dental orthodontic wires was significantly dependent on the passive film characteristics on wires' surface.

  2. Corrosion resistance of titanium-containing dental orthodontic wires in fluoride-containing artificial saliva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, T.-H. [Institute of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Wang, C.-C. [Department of Dental Laboratory Technology, Min-Hwei College of Health Care Management, Tainan County 736, Taiwan (China); Huang, T.-K. [College of Dental Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Chen, L.-K. [Department of Dentistry, Taipei City Hospital, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Chou, M.-Y. [Institute of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Huang, H.-H., E-mail: hhhuang@ym.edu.t [Department of Dentistry, Taipei City Hospital, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Institute of Oral Biology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China)

    2009-11-20

    This study was to investigate the corrosion resistance of different Ti-containing dental orthodontic wires (including Ni-Ti, Ni-Ti-Cu, Ti-Mo-Zr-Sn, and Ti-Nb alloys) in acidic fluoride-containing artificial saliva using cyclic potentiodynamic polarization curve measurements. Different NaF concentrations (0%, 0.2%, and 0.5%), simulating the fluoride contents in commercial toothpastes, were added to the artificial saliva. Surface characterization was analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectrometry. Cyclic potentiodynamic polarization curves showed that the presence of fluoride ions, especially 0.5% NaF, was detrimental to the protective ability of the TiO{sub 2}-based film on the Ti-containing wires. This might lead to a decrease in the corrosion resistance of the tested alloys, i.e. an increase in the corrosion rate and anodic current density and a decrease in the passive film breakdown potential. Among the tested Ti-containing wires, the Ni-Ti and Ni-Ti-Cu wires containing mainly TiO{sub 2} on surface film were more susceptible to fluoride-enhanced corrosion, while the Ti-Mo-Zr-Sn and Ti-Nb wires containing MoO{sub 3}/ZrO{sub 2}/SnO and Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}, respectively, along with TiO{sub 2} on surface film were pitting corrosion resistant and showed a lower susceptibility to fluoride-enhanced corrosion. The difference in corrosion resistance of the tested commercial Ti-containing dental orthodontic wires was significantly dependent on the passive film characteristics on wires' surface.

  3. Dental students perception of orthodontic treatment

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    Baswaraj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The relationship between physical appearance and perception of an esthetic deviation, and the impact of such deviation on self-esteem and body image are important issues in determining the benefits of orthodontic treatment. Aim: To assess dental students′ perception of orthodontic treatment. Materials and Methods: A total of 230 undergraduate dental students of Government Dental College and Research Institute, Bangalore, Karnataka formed the study group. Each classroom of the participants was visited, and self-administered questionnaire was given. An analysis of variance was done between the groups to test for statistical difference. Categorical variables were evaluated using a Chi-square test with the level of significance of P < 0.001. Results: About 75% of the students were aware of their dental esthetics. About 75% of females were satisfied with the attractiveness of their teeth when compared to 69% in males. House surgeons had more positive attitude compared to the 1 st year students. Conclusion: The dental students had good knowledge about the orthodontic treatment and had a positive attitude toward it. Females had very good knowledge, satisfaction and positive attitude compared to the males regarding dental esthetics and treatment. House surgeons were much more aware, very much satisfied and had a more positive attitude than 1 st year students.

  4. Dental root periapical resorption caused by orthodontic treatment

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    Pinandi Sri Pudyani

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Dental root resorption especially in maxillary incisive region almost always happens simultaneously with orthodontic treatment, and it gained researchers attention, in particular after the use of periapical radiography. However, the fundamental etiology of dental root resorption is still dubious. Multifactoral causes are mentioned, among others are hormonal, nutritition, trauma, dental root form and dental root structure anomalies, genetic, while from treatment side are duration, types, strength scale and dental movement types. Based on these findings, orthodontic treatment was proven to cause dental root resorption in maxillary incisive teeth.

  5. Orthodontic management of a dental concrescence: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Nicky David; Hosni, Sara; Morris, Tim

    2017-09-01

    Dental concrescence is a rare dental abnormality resulting in the joining of two teeth at the level of the cementum. This is the first reported case of the orthodontic management of a dental concrescence and the options for patient treatment are discussed. In this case, a compromised occlusal result was accepted with restorative masking of the affected teeth.

  6. Prevalence of dental anomalies in Saudi orthodontic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jabaa, Aljazi H; Aldrees, Abdullah M

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of dental anomalies and study the association of these anomalies with different types of malocclusion in a random sample of Saudi orthodontic patients. Six hundred and two randomly selected pretreatment records including orthopantomographs (OPG), and study models were evaluated. The molar relationship was determined using pretreatment study models, and OPG were examined to investigate the prevalence of dental anomalies among the sample. The most common types of the investigated anomalies were: impaction followed by hypodontia, microdontia, macrodontia, ectopic eruption and supernumerary. No statistical significant correlations were observed between sex and dental anomalies. Dental anomalies were more commonly found in class I followed by asymmetric molar relation, then class II and finally class III molar relation. No malocclusion group had a statistically significant relation with any individual dental anomaly. The prevalence of dental anomalies among Saudi orthodontic patients was higher than the general population. Although, orthodontic patients have been reported to have high rates of dental anomalies, orthodontists often fail to consider this. If not detected, dental anomalies can complicate dental and orthodontic treatment; therefore, their presence should be carefully investigated during orthodontic diagnosis and considered during treatment planning.

  7. American Association of Dental Schools Curricular Guidelines for Orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Guidelines reviewed and approved by the American Association of Dental Schools and sent to the Council on Dental Education in June 1979 are outlined. Educational goals and objectives and sequence of instruction (including growth and development, preclinical orthodontics, and clinical experience) are discussed. (MLW)

  8. Perceptions of orthodontic case complexity among orthodontists, general practitioners, orthodontic residents, and dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Elizabeth M; English, Jeryl D; Johnson, Cleverick D; Swearingen, Elizabeth B; Akyalcin, Sercan

    2017-02-01

    Our aims were to assess the perceptions of orthodontic case complexity among orthodontists, general dentists, orthodontic residents, and dental students and to compare their perceptions with the American Board of Orthodontics Discrepancy Index (DI). Orthodontists, general dentists, orthodontic residents, and dental students (n = 343) participated in a Web-based survey. Pretreatment orthodontic records of 29 cases with varying DI scores were obtained. Respondents were asked to evaluate case complexity on a 100-point visual analog scale. Additional information was collected on participants' orthodontic education and orthodontic treatment preferences. Pearson correlation coefficients were used to assess the relationship between the average complexity score and the DI score. Repeated measures analysis with linear mixed models was used to assess the association between the average complexity score and the DI score and whether the association between the 2 scores varied by level of difficulty or panel group. The level of significance for all analyses was set at P clear aligners. DI score was significantly associated with complexity perceptions (P = 0.0168). Associations between average complexity and DI score varied significantly by provider group (P = 0.0033), with orthodontists and residents showing the strongest associations. When the DI score was greater than 15, orthodontists and residents perceived cases as more complex than did the other provider groups. Orthodontists and orthodontic residents had better judgments for evaluating orthodontic case complexity. The high correlation between orthodontic professionals' perceptions and DI scores suggested that additional orthodontic education and training have an influence on the ability to recognize case complexity. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. General characteristics of dental morbidity in children against orthodontic treatment

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    Kovach I.V.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A wide spread of orthodontic treatment showed a fairly high risk of complications developed from the use of various devices. The aim of our study was to determine the general characteristics of dental morbidity in children with orthodontic treatment. According to the survey the most common pathologies in children with orthodontic problems are dental caries (87,8-92,9% and chronic catarrhal gingivitis (81.2-84.1%. The prevalence of different types of diseases of the mucous membrane and soft tissues of the oral cavity in children surveyed was 30.5-32.9%. Non-caries lesions of dental hard tissues occurred in 39.5-40.9% of the children surveyed, local enamel hypoplasia was observed in 42.9%, systemic enamel hypoplasia made up 17.8%, signs of hypersensitivity of enamel were found in 9.6%, and the wedge defects – in two children.

  10. Prevalence and distribution of dental anomalies in orthodontic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montasser, Mona A; Taha, Mahasen

    2012-01-01

    To study the prevalence and distribution of dental anomalies in a sample of orthodontic patients. The dental casts, intraoral photographs, and lateral panoramic and cephalometric radiographs of 509 Egyptian orthodontic patients were studied. Patients were examined for dental anomalies in number, size, shape, position, and structure. The prevalence of each dental anomaly was calculated and compared between sexes. Of the total study sample, 32.6% of the patients had at least one dental anomaly other than agenesis of third molars; 32.1% of females and 33.5% of males had at least one dental anomaly other than agenesis of third molars. The most commonly detected dental anomalies were impaction (12.8%) and ectopic eruption (10.8%). The total prevalence of hypodontia (excluding third molars) and hyperdontia was 2.4% and 2.8%, respectively, with similiar distributions in females and males. Gemination and accessory roots were reported in this study; each of these anomalies was detected in 0.2% of patients. In addition to genetic and racial factors, environmental factors could have more important influence on the prevalence of dental anomalies in every population. Impaction, ectopic eruption, hyperdontia, hypodontia, and microdontia were the most common dental anomalies, while fusion and dentinogenesis imperfecta were absent.

  11. Iatrogenic orthodontic dental trauma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gencay, Koray; Tuna, Elif Bahar; Yaman, Duygu; Ozgen, Mehmet; Demirel, Korkud

    2013-01-01

    Iatrogenic trauma can be defined as any adverse condition in a patient resulting from treatment by a physician or dentist. Orthodontic treatment carries with it the risks of tissue damage and treatment failure. The aim of this article is to present traumatic oral tissue lesions resulting from iatrogenic orthodontic origin with a 2-year follow-up period based on orthodontic intervention followed by periodontal surgery. The management of traumatic injuries is dependent on the severity of the involvement of the periodontal tissues. While, in most cases, the elimination of the offending agent and symptomatic therapy is sufficient, in severe cases, or when the injury resulted in permanent defects, periodontal/regenerative therapy may be necessary. The dentist must be aware of these risks in order to help the patient make a fully informed choice whether to proceed with orthodontic treatment. The skill, experience, and up-to-date knowledge of dentists are the main factors to prevent possible iatrogenic traumas.

  12. Finishing procedures in Orthodontics: dental dimensions and proportions (microesthetics

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    Roberto Carlos Bodart Brandão

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of the present article is to describe procedures that can be performed to achieve excellence in orthodontic treatment finishing. The content is limited to microesthetics, which comprises the concept of ideal dental dimensions and proportions (white esthetics and its correlation with the periodontium (pink esthetics. Standards of normality are described both in their real dimensions (dental height and width, and in those effectively perceived by the observer, the virtual dimensions. METHODS: The best scientific evidence was sought in the literature to support the clinical procedures that must guide the professional to obtain maximum esthetic quality on their treatments. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate what the other specialties in Dentistry expect from Orthodontics and, specially, what they have to offer. Clinical cases will be used to illustrate the dental movement that might maximize treatment outcome and to confront the ideal standards with the current state of the art. CONCLUSION: Treatment quality is directly related to the amount of procedures implemented by the orthodontist, associated with concepts and resources from Periodontics and Dental Prosthesis. Microesthetics cannot be seen in isolation, but rather as the key to establish a pleasant smile (miniesthetics in addition to a harmonious face (macroesthetics and a human being with high self-esteem (hyper-esthetics.

  13. Dental Hygiene and Orthodontics: Effect of Ultrasonic Instrumentation on Bonding Efficacy of Different Lingual Orthodontic Brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribante, Andrea; Sfondrini, Maria Francesca; Collesano, Vittorio; Tovt, Gaia; Bernardinelli, Luisa; Gandini, Paola

    2017-01-01

    Dental hygienists are often faced with patients wearing lingual orthodontic therapy, as ultrasonic instrumentation (UI) is crucial for oral health. As the application of external forces can lead to premature bonding failure, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of UI on shear bond strength (SBS) and on adhesive remnant index (ARI) of different lingual orthodontic brackets. 200 bovine incisors were divided into 10 groups. Four different lingual (STB, Ormco; TTR, Rocky Mountain Orthodontics; Idea, Leone; 2D, Forestadent) and vestibular control (Victory, 3M) brackets were bonded. UI was performed in half of specimens, whereas the other half did not receive any treatment. All groups were tested with a universal testing machine. SBS and ARI values were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed (significance: P = 0.05). TTR, Idea, and 2D lingual brackets significantly lowered SBS after UI, whereas for other braces no effect was recorded. Appliances with lower mesh area significantly reduced their adhesion capacity after UI. Moreover groups subjected to UI showed higher ARI scores than controls. UI lowered SBS of lingual appliances of small dimensions so particular care should be posed avoiding prolonged instrumentation around bracket base during plaque removal. Moreover, UI influenced also ARI scores.

  14. [Conservative treatment of upper anterior dental discrepancy during orthodontic therapy].

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    Messina, G; Verzì, P; Pappalardo, S

    1999-06-01

    The orthodontic therapeutic sequence used in cases with dento-dental discrepancy for reduced mesiodistal size and congenital absent lateral upper incisors, is described. The importance of correct conoid tooth replacement in the programmed space between the other teeth and its restorative treatment in order to obtain the best biomechanical control is stressed. The contemporaneous presence of the form and volume anomaly of the 12th and the missing 22nd due to agenesia demanded an interdisciplinary approach. For the restoration of the conoid tooth the authors used a microhybrid composite for the alloy properties with the grain size of the inorganic particles. In fact this type of composite responds well to mechanical stress and has a high shining capacity and good aesthetical rendering. Meanwhile the temporary dental prothesis solution of the 22nd in this case has suggested the application of the artificial element on the superior Hawley holding plaque.

  15. Relationship between dental anomalies and orthodontic root resorption of upper incisors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Parys, K.; Aartman, I.H.A.; Kuitert, R.; Zentner, A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the potential relationship between the occurrence of orthodontic root resorption and presence of dental anomalies such as tooth agenesis and pipette-shaped roots. Dental anomalies and root resorption were assessed on dental panoramic tomographs (DPT) of 88

  16. Clarifications, guidelines and questions about the dental bleaching "associated" with orthodontic treatment

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    Alberto Consolaro

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available With regard to the best moment for carrying out or recommending dental bleaching to orthodontic patients, some explanations and orientations are given in order to answers the following questions: 1 Why orthodontic treatment completion is considered the best opportunity for carrying out the procedure? 2 Why dental bleaching should not be performed immediately before orthodontic treatment? 3 If that would be possible at any special case, what would that be? 4 Why dental bleaching should not be performed during orthodontic treatment? 5 If that would be possible at any special case, what would that be? This article highlights why it is essential to protect both the mucosa and the cervical region, regardless of the moment when dental bleaching is performed, whether associated with orthodontic treatment or not. The "how", "why" and "if" of whether or not it is convenient to perform dental bleaching before orthodontic treatment are still a matter of clinical suggestion, as it is a procedure that is under analysis, empirical knowledge waiting for scientific proof or disproof! Although tooth enamel has adamantine fluid flowing within it, providing a specific metabolism that is peculiar to its own and which could scientifically explain and base the option of carrying out teeth whitening before and during orthodontic treatment, we must still be very careful.

  17. Psychosocial impact of dental esthetics regulates motivation to seek orthodontic treatment.

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    Lin, Feiou; Ren, Manman; Yao, Linjie; He, Yan; Guo, Jing; Ye, Qingsong

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychosocial impact of dental esthetics for adults seeking orthodontic treatment. The Chinese version of the Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire (PIDAQ) was administered to 393 adults, aged 18 to 30 years. The participants were divided into 2 groups: an intervention group (received orthodontic treatment) and a control group (rejected orthodontic treatment). Baseline malocclusion severity was assessed using the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN). The Wilcoxon signed rank test showed no statistically significant difference between the groups for the dental health component (DHC) of the IOTN (P = 0.134). Total and subscale PIDAQ scores of the intervention group were higher than those of the control group and differed significantly in each group among the 4 IOTN-DHC grades; self-confidence scores in the control group (F = 1.802; P >0.05) were the exception. Correlations between the PIDAQ scores and the IOTN-DHC grades were strong in each group. DHC grades, psychological impact, social impact, and aesthetic concern had significant impacts on patients accepting orthodontic treatment. The psychosocial impact of dental esthetics played an important role in the decision-making process of adults seeking orthodontic treatment. Importantly, participants with low self-awareness of the potential psychosocial impact rejected orthodontic treatment, despite the need for severe normative treatment. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Orthodontic treatment need among young Saudis attending public versus private dental practices in Riyadh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jobair, Asma M; Baidas, Laila F; Al-Hamid, Anfal A; Al-Qahtani, Sara G; Al-Najjar, Amani T; Al-Kawari, Huda M

    2016-01-01

    To assess and compare the severity of malocclusion and orthodontic treatment need among young Saudis receiving free treatment at public dental practices versus those paying for treatment at private practices. This retrospective study evaluated the records of 300 patients (179 females, 121 males; age 13-21 years) treated at orthodontic clinics from 2013 through 2015. The public sample was selected from orthodontic clinics at the College of Dentistry, King Saud University (KSU); the private sample was selected from five private orthodontic clinics in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The records were examined for the severity of malocclusion and for orthodontic treatment need using the Dental Health Component of the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need. The prevalence of each occlusal discrepancy and the Dental Health Component grade were recorded. The severity of malocclusion and orthodontic treatment need were compared between practice types, age groups, and sexes with the chi-square test. Displacement, increased overjet, and Class II and III malocclusion were the most common orthodontic problems in this study. Patients attending public clinics at KSU generally had more severe malocclusion than the patients attending private clinics. Seventy-seven percent of orthodontically treated patients at KSU clinics were in great need of treatment, compared with 58.5% of patients treated at private clinics ( P =0.003). Among the patients with great treatment need, approximately 62% of male patients and 70% of patients ≤16 years of age were treated at KSU clinics, compared with 38% and 48%, respectively, treated at private clinics ( P orthodontic treatment at public clinics at KSU had more severe malocclusion with greater need of orthodontic treatment than the patients paying for treatment at private clinics.

  19. Which Factors Affect Dental Esthetics and Smile Attractiveness in Orthodontically Treated Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heravi, Farzin; Rashed, Roozbeh; Zarrabi, Mohammad Javad; Setayesh, Yasin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to find the factors that affect dental esthetics and smile attractiveness in orthodontically treated patients according to laypeople’s judgment, and to determine whether there is any relationship between dental and smile esthetics. Materials and Methods: Using the Q-sort technique, 60 laypersons (30 males, 30 females) rated dental and smile photographs of 48 orthodontically treated patients based on their degree of attractiveness. Dental and smile parameters of each rated image were measured by Smile Analyzer software. The Student’s t-test and chi-square test were used to compare dental and smile parameters between attractive and unattractive images. The logistic regression was used to assess which variables predicted dental and smile esthetics in treated individuals. Results: The philtral to commissural height ratio and gingival display were significantly different in attractive and unattractive smiles (P=0.003 and P=0.02, respectively). None of the dental variables were found to be a determinant of dental esthetics at the end of the orthodontic treatment (P>0.05). According to the judgment of all raters (female and male) and the male raters’ judgment, smile attractiveness could be predicted by philtral to commissural height ratio and buccal corridor ratio (Pesthetics and smile attractiveness in orthodontically treated patients (P>0.05). Conclusion: The philtral to commissural height ratio and buccal corridor ratio can be considered as predictors of smile attractiveness in orthodontically treated patients. Achieving dental esthetics at the end of orthodontic treatment does not guarantee smile attractiveness. PMID:26877739

  20. Knowledge of Orthodontics as a Dental Specialty: A Preliminary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    % correctly answered that orthodontics involves malocclusion and its management. Concerning the treatment procedures used in orthodontic clinics, 54.1% of them selected rearrangement of teeth. When asked to identify the appliances used in ...

  1. Factors affecting dental biofilm in patients wearing fixed orthodontic appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Li; Chieng, Joyce; Wong, Connie; Benic, Gareth; Farella, Mauro

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the amount and the distribution of biofilm in patients wearing fixed appliances and its relation with age, gender, frequency of tooth brushing, and patient motivation. The sample comprised 52 patients (15.5 ± 3.6 years old, 30 females and 22 males) wearing fixed orthodontic appliances. Dental biofilm was assessed using a modified plaque index (PI). A questionnaire was used to collect patient's information, including gender, age, treatment motivation, and frequency of tooth brushing. Gingival (PI score = 0.9 ± 0.7), mesial (0.8 ± 0.6), and distal (0.8 ± 0.5) areas accumulated more biofilm than occlusal areas (0.3 ± 0.3) (P appliances have the highest biofilm accumulation on the maxillary lateral incisors and maxillary canines, particularly in the gingival area and areas behind arch wires. Less biofilm was observed in female and adult patients and in those who were self-motivated and brushed their teeth more often.

  2. Fixed orthodontic appliances in the management of severe dental trauma in mixed dentition: a case report.

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    Ebrahim, Fouad-Hassan; Kulkarni, Gajanan

    2013-01-01

    We describe a case of complex trauma to the early mixed dentition in which tooth avulsion, intrusion, extrusion and lateral luxation were managed effectively using a fixed, non-rigid orthodontic splint after treatment with a traditional wire-composite splint had failed. The use of orthodontic brackets and flexible wires provided several advantages, such as the ability to splint severely malpositioned teeth; easy assessment without removing the splint; slow, gentle repositioning of traumatized teeth; and gradual reestablishment of the arch form allowing for ease of future prosthodontic rehabilitation. Therefore, orthodontic appliances should be considered as a viable option for managing complex dental trauma.

  3. The impact of dental appearance and anxiety on self-esteem in adult orthodontic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Maroto, M; Santos-Puerta, N; González Olmo, M J; Peñacoba-Puente, C

    2015-08-01

    To analyse the relationship between different dimensions of dental appearance impact and self-esteem in adult patients undergoing orthodontic treatment, with special attention to the possible mediating role of anxiety. A quasi-experimental design was used with a matched control group (without orthodontic treatment). In each group (experimental and control), there were 85 patients. The impact of dental appearance was measured using the Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire (PIDAQ). State anxiety was assessed with the State Anxiety Inventory (STAI-S) and self-esteem with Rosenberg's self-esteem scale. In both groups (experimental and control), self-esteem correlates negatively, ranging between 0.26 and 0.43, with all dimensions of dental appearance impact (except for the positive dental self-confidence dimension, where all correlations were positive). Anxiety correlates positively, ranges between 0.35 and 0.44, with social impact, psychological impact and aesthetic concern, although it maintains no significant correlations with dental self-confidence. Nevertheless, in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment, anxiety plays a mediating role between dental impact dimensions and self-esteem, whilst for the control group anxiety only plays a mediator role between psychological impact and self-esteem. Anxiety plays a fundamental role in the effect of perceived dental impact on self-esteem in adult patients undergoing orthodontic treatment. These results have important practical implications for the design of bio-psycho-social intervention programs that contemplate cognitive-affective variables as an essential part of orthodontic treatment in adults. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Expressed needs associated with orthodontic treatment in a private dental college, Mathura

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    Gaurav Agarwal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The primary goal for most of the patients who seek orthodontic treatment is a discernible improvement in some aspect of their dento-facial appearance. Orthodontic therapy makes people look better and feel better about themselves and perhaps influences their ability for social interaction. Hence, this study was conducted to assess expressed needs and barriers associated with orthodontic treatment. Objectives: To know main motivational factor behind seeking orthodontic treatment and to correlate these factors with other variables such as age, gender, and socioeconomic status. Materials and Methods: The study included 200 orthodontic patients between 12 and 25 years visiting a private dental college, Mathura during July 2014 to September 2014. Structured proforma consisting of closed ended questions was used for assessing social demographic characteristics, factors and the barriers, which were associated with orthodontic treatment. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 22. Results: This study comprised of 120 females. Self-confidence (48% was the main motivating for undergoing treatment among the subjects. Social interaction (44% was the most common area of improvement expected by the patients after orthodontic treatment. Financial constraints were the main barrier for seeking treatment found among 30% patients. Conclusion: Patients seek orthodontic treatment mainly to enhance facial esthetics, self-confidence and social acceptability. The mismatch of need and desire for treatment is a problem for orthodontists.

  5. Three-dimensional dental arch changes of patients submitted to orthodontic-surgical treatment for correction of Class II malocclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Peixoto,Adriano Porto; Pinto,Ary dos Santos; Garib,Daniela Gamba; Gonçalves,João Roberto

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This study assessed the three-dimensional changes in the dental arch of patients submitted to orthodontic-surgical treatment for correction of Class II malocclusions at three different periods. METHODS: Landmarks previously identified on upper and lower dental casts were digitized on a three-dimensional digitizer MicroScribe-3DX and stored in Excel worksheets in order to assess the width, length and depth of patient's dental arches. RESULTS: During orthodontic preparation, the m...

  6. An evaluation of willingness to pay for orthodontic treatments in patients of Shiraz Dental School Clinic

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    Vahid Moshkelgosha DDS, MSc 1

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM:Estimation of need and demand for orthodontic treatment is important for both healthprofessionals and health policymakers. Need assessment is traditionally done using experts’ opinions;however, patient-centered evaluation can provide a bigger picture ofpatient’s esthetic and psychological needs. The willingness to pay(WTP technique is a potentially valid tool for assessing the patient views on their needs and for market research inhealthcare.The aim of this study was to evaluate the need anddemand for orthodontic treatment with a patient-centeredapproach using economic analysis.METHODS:A cross-sectional study was designed. Two hundred people attending Shiraz Dental School Clinic wereinterviewed. Their views on the importance and costs of orthodontic treatments and the maximum amountthat theywould pay for such treatments were obtained along with their demographic and socioeconomic factors. Their WTP wasused to elicit values for orthodontic treatment using contingent valuation method (CVM and econometric techniques.RESULTS:The response rate was 95%. Although 53.5% of respondents felt they needed orthodontic treatment, only33.7% had expressed their need, and just 17.5% hadactually gone for such treatment. The main reason for not takingthe treatment was its cost (56.5%. More than 60% of respondents viewed orthodontics as only a luxurytreatment and70% considered beauty and elegant smile as the most, or one of the most, benefit(s of orthodontic treatments. WTPresults showed that orthodontic services have highdemand elasticity. Assuming fixed monthly income of8 millionRials, 61% of subjects were ready to pay 20 millionRials for a course of orthodontic treatment.CONCLUSIONS:The result showed that esthetics and high cost of treatment were respectively the most intriguing andthemain inhibiting factors for getting orthodontic treatment. Economic evaluation showed a high elastic estimation fororthodontic treatment.

  7. Dental pulp stone formation during orthodontic treatment: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-06-21

    Jun 21, 2015 ... the presence of dental pulp stone, gender, age, tooth type and arches. Results: Dental pulp ... primary and permanent dentition.[1] Dental pulp stones .... interpretation provided training to familiarize the other observer with the ...

  8. Relationship between dental anomalies and orthodontic root resorption of upper incisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Parys, Katrien; Aartman, Irene H A; Kuitert, Reinder; Zentner, Andrej

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the potential relationship between the occurrence of orthodontic root resorption and presence of dental anomalies such as tooth agenesis and pipette-shaped roots. Dental anomalies and root resorption were assessed on dental panoramic tomographs (DPT) of 88 subjects, 27 males and 61 females, mean age 28.4 (SD = 11.3 years), selected from orthodontic patients on the basis of the following exclusion criteria: previous fixed appliance treatment, bad quality of the DPTs and no visibility of the periodontal ligament of every tooth, and younger than 15 years of age at the onset of treatment with fixed edgewise appliance lasting at least 18 months. A pipette-shaped root was identified as defined by a drawing. Tooth agenesis was assessed on DPTs and from subjects' dental history. Root resorption was calculated as the difference between the root length before and after treatment, with and without a correction factor (crown length post-treatment/crown length pre-treatment). If one of the four upper incisors showed root resorption of ≥2.3 mm with both formulas, the patient was scored as having root resorption. Chi-square tests indicated that there was no relationship between orthodontic root resorption and agenesis (P = 0.885) nor between orthodontic root resorption and pipette-shaped roots (P = 0.800). There was no relationship between having one of the anomalies and root resorption either (P = 0.750). In the present study, it was not possible to confirm on DPTs a relationship between orthodontic root resorption and dental anomalies, such as agenesis and pipette-shaped roots.

  9. Maxillary hypoplasia in the cleft patient: contribution of orthodontic dental space closure to orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Justine C; Slack, Ginger C; Walker, Ryann; Graves, Lindsay; Yen, Sandra; Woo, Jessica; Ambaram, Rishal; Martz, Martin G; Kawamoto, Henry K; Bradley, James P

    2014-02-01

    Cleft lip and palate surgery in the developing child is known to be associated with maxillary hypoplasia. However, the effects of nonsurgical manipulations on maxillary growth have not been well investigated. The authors present the contribution of orthodontic dental space closure with canine substitution to maxillary hypoplasia and the need for orthognathic surgery. Cleft lip/palate and cleft palate patients older than 15 years of age were reviewed for dental anomalies, orthodontic canine substitution, and Le Fort I advancement. Skeletal relationships of the maxilla to the skull base (SNA), mandible (ANB), and facial height were determined on lateral cephalograms. Logistic regression analyses were performed to estimate odds ratios. Ninety-five patients were reviewed (mean age, 18.1 years). In 65 patients with congenitally missing teeth, 55 percent with patent dental spaces required Le Fort I advancement. In contrast, 89 percent who underwent canine substitution required Le Fort I advancement (p = 0.004). Canine substitution is associated with a statistically significant increase in maxillary retrognathia when compared with dental space preservation on lateral cephalograms (mean SNA, 75.2 and 79.0, respectively; p = 0.006). Adjusting for missing dentition, logistic regression analyses demonstrated that canine substitution is an independent predictor for orthognathic surgery (OR, 6.47) and maxillary retrusion defined by SNA orthodontic cleft closure using canine substitution with maxillary hypoplasia and subsequent Le Fort I advancement, and suggest systematic criteria for management of cleft-related dental agenesis. Therapeutic, III.

  10. Dental anomalies in an orthodontic patient population with maxillary lateral incisor agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citak, Mehmet; Cakici, Elif Bahar; Benkli, Yasin Atakan; Cakici, Fatih; Bektas, Bircan; Buyuk, Suleyman Kutalmış

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of dental anomalies in a subpopulation of orthodontic patients with agenesis of maxillary lateral incisors (MLI). The material of the present study included the records of the 1964 orthodontic patients. Panoramic radiographs and dental casts were used to analyze other associated eight dental anomalies, including agenesis of other teeth, dens invaginatus, dens evaginatus, peg shaped MLI, taurodontism, pulp stone, root dilaceration and maxillary canine impaction. Out of the 1964 patients examined, 90 were found to have agenesis of MLI, representing a prevalence of 4.6%. The most commonly found associated-anomalies were agenesis of other teeth (23.3%), peg-shaped MLIs (15.6%), taurodontism (42.2%), and dilacerated teeth (18.9%). Permanent tooth agenesis, taurodontism, peg-shaped maxillary lateral incisor, and root dilacerations are frequently associated with maxillary lateral incisor agenesis.

  11. 3-dimensional orthodontics visualization system with dental study models and orthopantomograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Ong, S. H.; Foong, K. W. C.; Dhar, T.

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a system that provides 3-dimensional visualization of orthodontic treatments. Dental plaster models and corresponding orthopantomogram (dental panoramic tomogram) are first digitized and fed into the system. A semi-auto segmentation technique is applied to the plaster models to detect the dental arches, tooth interstices and gum margins, which are used to extract individual crown models. 3-dimensional representation of roots, generated by deforming generic tooth models with orthopantomogram using radial basis functions, is attached to corresponding crowns to enable visualization of complete teeth. An optional algorithm to close the gaps between deformed roots and actual crowns by using multi-quadratic radial basis functions is also presented, which is capable of generating smooth mesh representation of complete 3-dimensional teeth. User interface is carefully designed to achieve a flexible system with as much user friendliness as possible. Manual calibration and correction is possible throughout the data processing steps to compensate occasional misbehaviors of automatic procedures. By allowing the users to move and re-arrange individual teeth (with their roots) on a full dentition, this orthodontic visualization system provides an easy and accurate way of simulation and planning of orthodontic treatment. Its capability of presenting 3-dimensional root information with only study models and orthopantomogram is especially useful for patients who do not undergo CT scanning, which is not a routine procedure in most orthodontic cases.

  12. Lingual mandibular osteonecrosis after dental impressions for orthodontic study models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerruto, Carmen; Ugolini, Alessandro; Cozzani, Mauro

    2018-03-01

    A 43-year-old man sought orthodontic treatment to close anterior diastemas. During the impression procedure for routine documentation, the orthodontic assistant exerted excessive pressure on the metallic tray; 2 days later, the patient reported the detachment of a small piece of mucosa overlying the mylohyoid crest and was referred to a maxillofacial surgeon with a diagnosis of lingual mandibular osteonecrosis. The etiology of bony osteonecrosis is discussed, together with the anatomic variations that can be present in the basal bone and that must be carefully checked before an impression is taken. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. 21 CFR 872.5410 - Orthodontic appliance and accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 872.5410 Orthodontic appliance and... device includes the preformed orthodontic band, orthodontic band material, orthodontic elastic band...

  14. [Evidence-based quality assessment of 10-year orthodontic clinical trials in 4 major dental journals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan-nan; Lei, Fei-fei; Cao, Yan-li; Fu, Min-kui

    2010-02-01

    To assess the quality of orthodontic clinical trials published in 4 major dental journals in the past 10 years and establish the reference standard for orthodontic clinical trials and quality control of dental journals. All the clinical trials published in Chinese Journal of Stomatology, West China Journal of Stomatology, Journal of Practice Stomatology and Chinese Journal of Orthodontics from 1999 to 2008 were searched. The demographic information of the papers was extracted and the quality of the clinical trials according to the consolidated standards of reporting trials (CONSORT) was assessed. Four hundred and ninety-four clinical trials were retrieved, and 21.3% (105/494) of them were supported by grants. For the study design, only 26.1% (129/494) were prospective studies, and 3.8% (19/494) were randomized clinical trials. It was hard to evaluate precisely due to the lack of information about the details of the study designs. For the randomized clinical trials, the lack of details for randomization, allocation concealment, blinding and intention to treat compromised the quality. The general quality of clinical trials in orthodontics is poor. It needs to be improved both in the clinical study design and the paper writing.

  15. Association of Dental Anomalies with Different Types of Malocclusions in Pretreatment Orthodontic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwijendra, K S; Parikh, Vishal; George, Soja Sara; Kukkunuru, Gururam Tej; Chowdary, Gali Nagarjuna

    2015-06-01

    The study is planned to correlate the existence of dental anomalies with different types of malocclusion as the occurrence of anomalies is common in malocclusion. The present study was conducted among 430 patients with different types of malocclusion as 161 patients having Class I, 203 with Class II, and 66 with Class III malocclusion. The age of the patients ranged from 12 to 15 years. Diagnosis was done on the basis of history, clinical, cephalometric, radiographs, and dental cast examination. The level of significance was set at P = 0.05. Most common anomaly was rotation of teeth (18.80%), followed by hypodontia (10.90%), and least occurring was gemination, fusion, talon's cusp, and dilacerations. 31.4% showed one dental anomaly, whereas 11.9% exhibited two or more dental anomalies. The highest mean value of all the dental anomalies was seen with severe cases of malocclusion and also significant differences were observed according to gender. The present study investigated various dental anomalies in relation to malocclusion. It was found that 31.4% showed one dental anomaly, whereas 11.9% exhibited two or more dental anomalies. Hence, careful prior investigation of dental anomalies is necessary for better orthodontic treatment planning to reduce the complications.

  16. Perception of children and mothers regarding dental aesthetics and orthodontic treatment need: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Emerson Tavares; da Silva, Beatriz Feitosa; Maia, Fabiana Barros Marinho; Forte, Franklin Delano Soares; Sampaio, Fábio Correia

    2016-12-01

    The normative orthodontic treatment need, established by dental professionals during the dental appointment, becomes ineffective when it does not evaluate all the factors that influence the decision-making process, including individuals' perception and satisfaction with their dental appearance. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the perception of children and their mothers as regards orthodontic treatment need and satisfaction with dental aesthetics and test if these variables are associated with the objective orthodontic treatment needs, assessed by the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI). A cross-sectional study was conducted on 308 children aged 12 years, and their mothers were randomly selected by cluster sampling (primary schools). The variables "orthodontic treatment need," "satisfaction with chewing," and "dental appearance" were assessed by means of a questionnaire. The questions were answered individually at school or home, in cases of children or mothers, respectively. DAI was assessed to make an objective clinical assessment. The variables were dichotomized and statistically analyzed by the chi-square and Fisher's exact tests, contingency coefficient C, and logistic regression. The results of the clinical evaluation (DAI) were statistically associated with the perception of orthodontic treatment need and satisfaction with dental appearance in children (p ≤ 0.01). However, no association was observed with regard to satisfaction with chewing and DAI (p = 0.10). The children's perception of orthodontic treatment need and satisfaction with the appearance of their teeth was statistically associated (p ≤ 0.01) with their mothers' perception. Maxillary overjet, maxillary and mandibular misalignment, and dental crowding were associated with the orthodontic treatment need by children and their mothers, with p value -0.05 and 5 % level of significance. Maxillary overjet was a significant predictor for the perception of orthodontic

  17. [The microbiological aspects of orthodontic treatment of children with dental maxillary anomalies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnokov, V A; Chesnokova, M G; Leontiev, V K; Mironov, A Yu; Lomiashvili, L M; Kriga, A S

    2015-03-01

    The issues of pre-nosologic diagnostic and effectiveness of treatment of diseases of oral cavity is an actual issue in dentistry. The long- duration orthodontic treatment of patients with dentoalveolar anomalies using non-removable devices is followed by such negative consequences as development demineralization of enamel and caries registered during treatment and after remove ofdevices. The level of quantitative content of oral streptococci was analyzed and dental status in children with dentoalveolar anomalies was evaluated during treatment with non-removable devices was evaluated. The caries and inflammation of periodontium of oral cavity were most often detected in children with high level of content of streptococci. In different periods of study the firm tendency of increasing of concentration of Streptococcus mutans and S. sanguis of dental plaque of oral cavity is established. The established index indicators of dental status of patients testify intensity of caries damage, level of poor hygiene of oral cavity, development of average degree of severity of inflammation process of periodontium. The obtained results substantiate involvement ofstreptococci, associates of microbiota of dental plaque of oral cavity in children, in process of development of caries. The characteristics of micro-ecology of dental plaque to evaluate cariesgenic situation that can be used as a basis for constructing diagnostic algorithm under monitoring of patients with dentoalveolar anomalies with purpose of forthcoming planning and implementation of effective orthodontic treatment.

  18. Tooth replacements in young adults with severe hypodontia: Orthodontic space closure, dental implants, and tooth-supported fixed dental prostheses. A follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvaring, Christina L; Øgaard, Bjørn; Birkeland, Kari

    2016-10-01

    Children with severe hypodontia have a substantial impairment of their dental health starting early in life. The purpose of this study was to describe types and locations of substitutes for missing teeth in patients with severe hypodontia and to compare the crown and soft tissue morphologies of orthodontic space closure, dental implants, and tooth-supported fixed dental prostheses for replacing teeth in the anterior region. Fifty patients missing 6 or more teeth and aged 18 years or older (mean age, 25.6 years) took part in a follow-up study. The patients were examined clinically with panoramic radiographs and clinical photographs. Crown and soft tissue variables (mucosal discoloration, crown morphology, color, and papilla index) were compared for orthodontic space closure, dental implant fixtures, and fixed dental prostheses. Dental implants, orthodontic space closure, and retaining deciduous teeth were the most commonly prescribed treatments. Persisting deciduous teeth showed a good survival rate at the follow-up examination. Mucosal discoloration was seen only for implant fixtures and was evident for almost all fixtures in the anterior mandible and two thirds of those in the anterior maxilla. The papilla index scored poorer for both implant fixtures and fixed dental prostheses compared with orthodontic space closure. Dental implants in the anterior region proved to be an inadequate treatment modality in patients with severe hypodontia because of pronounced mucosal discoloration. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Spectrophotometric evaluation of dental bleaching under orthodontic bracket in enamel and dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correr, Americo-Bortolazzo; Rastelli, Alessandra-Nara-Souza; Lima, Débora-Alves-Nunes-Leite; Consani, Rafael-Leonardo-Xediek

    2014-01-01

    Aware of the diffusion capacity of bleaching in the dental tissues, many orthodontists are subjecting their patients to dental bleaching during orthodontic treatment for esthetic purposes or to anticipate the exchange of esthetic restorations after the orthodontic treatment. For this purpose specific products have been developed in pre-loaded whitening trays designed to fit over and around brackets and wires, with clinical efficacy proven. Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate, through spectrophotometric reflectance, the effectiveness of dental bleaching under orthodontic bracket. Material and Methods: Thirty-two bovine incisors crown blocks of 8 mm x 8 mm height lengths were used. Staining of tooth blocks with black tea was performed for six days. They were distributed randomly into 4 groups (1-home bleaching with bracket, 2- home bleaching without bracket, 3- office bleaching with bracket, 4 office bleaching without bracket). The color evaluation was performed (CIE L * a * b *) using color reflectance spectrophotometer. Metal brackets were bonded in groups 1 and 3. The groups 1 and 2 samples were subjected to the carbamide peroxide at 15%, 4 hours daily for 21 days. Groups 3 and 4 were subjected to 3 in-office bleaching treatment sessions, hydrogen peroxide 38%. After removal of the brackets, the second color evaluation was performed in tooth block, difference between the area under the bracket and around it, and after 7 days to verified color stability. Data analysis was performed using the paired t-test and two-way variance analysis and Tukey’s. Results: The home bleaching technique proved to be more effective compared to the office bleaching. There was a significant difference between the margin and center color values of the specimens that were subjected to bracket bonding. Conclusions: The bracket bond presence affected the effectiveness of both the home and office bleaching treatments. Key words:Tooth bleaching, spectrophotometry

  20. Orthodontic evolution: an update for the general dental practitioner. Part 1: recent advances, treatment need and demand, and benefits of treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuinness, Niall J P

    2008-01-01

    Like all specialties of dentistry, orthodontics has undergone considerable development and improvement in treatment techniques over the past four decades. The two articles in this series aim to inform the general dental practitioner about these developments, together with an update on orthodontics' relationship to dental health, TMJ dysfunction and other aspects.

  1. Factors influencing the choice of going to a dental quack practice for orthodontic treatment among the citizen of Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhyar Dyni Zakyah

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Braces is the treatment of choice for malocclusion. However, in recent years malocclusion no longer serves as the reason behind the orthodontic treatment. Many people use it for the fashion purposes and some of them got it from a dental quack. The purpose of this study was to understand factors that influenced citizen of Bandung to go to dental quack practice for orthodontics treatment. Methods: Cross-sectional study with purposive sampling technique consisting of 30 samples. Inclusion criteria were subject wearing metal braces from dental quack, live within area of Bandung, and willing to participate in the study. Exclusion criteria was subjects that refused to participate in the study. Results: The study showed that 73% of the subjects use the treatment for aligning teeth over getting along with the trend or the perception of beauty from using colorful bracket rubber. 63% chose a dental quack because of the suggestions from friends who had done it before them. Low income combined with the need for orthodontics treatment and inadequate information about dental braces influencing subjects choice to go to a dental quack. The study showed that socioeconomic environment highly influenced the decision to wear braces from a dental quack. Conclusion: The low price factor was the main reason for dental quack braces highly demanded. Common people need to be educated to get proper treatment for malocclusion and to go for improper provider of dental treatment.

  2. Unmet dental and orthodontic need of children with special healthcare needs in West Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, R C; Wiener, M A

    2012-01-01

    Of children aged 0-17 years in the USA, an estimated 11 203 616 (15.1%; 95% CI: 14.8, 15.3) are Children with Special Health Care Needs (CSHCN). The state of West Virginia, the heart of Appalachia, has a land mass which is 97.65% rural with previously identified high overall dental need and oral health disparities. It is home to an estimated 70 609 CSHCN, or 18.5% (95% CI: 17.0, 19.9) of the state's children in 2009-2010. The purpose of this study was to determine the parent/guardian's perceived unmet dental care need of CSHCN in West Virginia. Data from the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs was used to determine prevalence. A telephone survey of 59 941 parents/guardians of CSHCN (1149 from West Virginia) for the dental interview was conducted in 2009-2010. Nationwide, 26.7% (25.9, 27.5) of parents/guardians reported their CSHCN had dental care or orthodontia needs other than preventive care. In West Virginia, the perceived dental care or orthodontia needs other than preventive dental care need was 26.5% (22.2, 30.0). Unmet national dental care need other than preventive dental care was 5.4% (5.0, 5.9) and in West Virginia 5.0% (2.4, 7.5). CSHCN have significant unmet dental needs. Parents/guardians in West Virginia reported similar unmet need compared with national reporting. Policies to address the health care of CSHCN should include dental needs. The clinical implications are that CSHCN have a variety of needs, including orthodontia. The benefits of orthodontic referrals should be considered in treatment planning options for CSHCN.

  3. Three-dimensional dental arch changes of patients submitted to orthodontic-surgical treatment for correction of Class II malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Porto Peixoto

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This study assessed the three-dimensional changes in the dental arch of patients submitted to orthodontic-surgical treatment for correction of Class II malocclusions at three different periods. METHODS: Landmarks previously identified on upper and lower dental casts were digitized on a three-dimensional digitizer MicroScribe-3DX and stored in Excel worksheets in order to assess the width, length and depth of patient's dental arches. RESULTS: During orthodontic preparation, the maxillary and mandibular transverse dimensions measured at the premolar regions were increased and maintained throughout the follow-up period. Intercanine width was increased only in the upper arch during orthodontic preparation. Maxillary arch length was reduced during orthodontic finalization, only. Upper and lower arch depths were stable in the study periods. Differences between centroid and gingival changes suggested that upper and lower arch premolars buccaly proclined during the pre-surgical period. CONCLUSIONS: Maxillary and mandibular dental arches presented transverse expansion at premolar regions during preoperative orthodontic preparation, with a tendency towards buccal tipping. The transverse dimensions were not altered after surgery. No sagittal or vertical changes were observed during the follow-up periods.

  4. Three-dimensional dental arch changes of patients submitted to orthodontic-surgical treatment for correction of Class II malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Adriano Porto; dos Santos Pinto, Ary; Garib, Daniela Gamba; Gonçalves, João Roberto

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the three-dimensional changes in the dental arch of patients submitted to orthodontic-surgical treatment for correction of Class II malocclusions at three different periods. Landmarks previously identified on upper and lower dental casts were digitized on a three-dimensional digitizer MicroScribe-3DX and stored in Excel worksheets in order to assess the width, length and depth of patient's dental arches. During orthodontic preparation, the maxillary and mandibular transverse dimensions measured at the premolar regions were increased and maintained throughout the follow-up period. Intercanine width was increased only in the upper arch during orthodontic preparation. Maxillary arch length was reduced during orthodontic finalization, only. Upper and lower arch depths were stable in the study periods. Differences between changes in centroid and gingival points suggested that upper and lower premolars buccaly proclined during the pre-surgical period. Maxillary and mandibular dental arches presented transverse expansion at premolar regions during preoperative orthodontic preparation, with a tendency towards buccal tipping. The transverse dimensions were not altered after surgery. No sagittal or vertical changes were observed during the follow-up periods.

  5. Evaluation of dental plaque control in patients wearing fixed orthodontic appliances: a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ousehal, Lahcen; Lazrak, Laila; Es-Said, Rabia; Hamdoune, Hind; Elquars, Farid; Khadija, Amine

    2011-03-01

    Multibracket orthodontic appliances increase dental plaque retention and make teethbrushing more difficult for patients. As a result, advice from the orthodontist on oral hygiene along with patient motivation regarding teethbrushing are particularly important. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of electric toothbrushes with that of manual brushing associated with mouth-rinses comprising chlorhexidine (0.12%) and 0% alcohol. To this end, 84 patients receiving current orthodontic treatment were randomly selected from patients treated at the Dento-Facial Orthopedics department in the Casablanca Dental Consultation and Treatment Center. Selected patients were divided into three groups: Group 1: manual teethbrushing; Group 2: electric teethbrushing; Group 3: manual brushing combined with mouth rinse. Oral hygiene was assessed using the Loe-Silness plaque and gingival indices. Measurements were made before and 4 weeks after the observation period. Results were subjected to statistical comparison in order to determine the group showing greatest improvement and to deduce the best means of controlling bacterial plaque. The electric toothbrush and the chlorhexidine mouth rinse appear to control dental plaque more effectively than manual teethbrushing alone. Following this study, patients receiving multibracket treatment were invited to combine manual brushing with short clinical mouth-rinsing sessions or to use an electric toothbrush. Copyright © 2011 CEO. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. The Cardiff dental study: a 20-year critical evaluation of the psychological health gain from orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenealy, Pamela M; Kingdon, Anne; Richmond, Stephen; Shaw, William C

    2007-02-01

    Despite the widespread belief that orthodontics improves psychological well-being and self-esteem, there is little objective evidence to support this (Kenealy et al., 1989a; Shaw, O'Brien, Richmond, & Brook, 1991). A 20 year follow-up study compared the dental and psychosocial status of individuals who received, or did not receive, orthodontics as teenagers. A prospective longitudinal cohort design with four studies of the effect of orthodontic treatment. Secondary analysis of outcome data incorporated orthodontic need at baseline and treatment received in a 2 x 2 factorial design. A multidisciplinary research programme studied a cohort of 1,018, 11-12 year old participants in 1981. Extensive assessment of dental health and psychosocial well-being was conducted; facial and dental photographs and plaster casts of dentition were obtained and rated for attractiveness and pre-treatment need. No recommendations about orthodontic treatment were made, and an observational approach was adopted. At the third follow-up 337 (30-31 year olds) were re-examined in 2001. Participants with a prior need for orthodontic treatment as children who obtained treatment demonstrated better tooth alignment and satisfaction. However when self-esteem at baseline was controlled for, orthodontics had little positive impact on psychological health and quality of life in adulthood. Lack of orthodontic treatment where there was a prior need did not lead to psychological difficulties in later life. Dental status alone was a weak predictor of self-esteem at outcome explaining 8% of the variance. Self-esteem in adulthood was more strongly predicted (65% of the variance) by psychological variables at outcome: perception of quality of life, life satisfaction, self-efficacy, depression, social anxiety, emotional health, and by self-perception of attractiveness. Longitudinal analysis revealed that the observed effect of orthodontic treatment on self esteem at outcome was accounted for by self esteem at

  7. Psychological well-being, dental esthetics, and psychosocial impacts in adolescent orthodontic patients: A prospective longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiao; Wang, Yun-Ji; Deng, Feng; Liu, Pang-Li; Wu, Yan

    2018-01-01

    We examined the role of adolescent orthodontic patients' psychological well-being attributes (self-esteem, general body image, and positive and negative affects) and the clinical indicators of dental esthetics (orthodontists' ratings on the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need-Aesthetic Component [IOTN-AC]), and their changes from pretreatment to posttreatment as predictors of the psychosocial impact of dental esthetics. In this prospective longitudinal study, 1090 adolescent orthodontic patients seeking treatment at the Stomatological Hospital of Chongqing Medical University in China (mean age, 14.25 years; SD, 2.03 years) were assessed before treatment, and 68.99% (n = 752) were assessed after treatment. All subjects completed a questionnaire measuring psychological well-being attributes and 3 components of the Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics (perceptive, cognitive-affective, and social-functional). Clinical indicators of dental esthetics were measured by 3 orthodontists using the IOTN-AC. Substantial enhancement from pretreatment to posttreatment was found in all 3 Psychosocial Impacts of Dental Aesthetics components, confirming the positive effects of orthodontic treatment on oral health-related quality of life. Psychosocial impact of dental esthetics at baseline and improvement from pretreatment to posttreatment were found to be predicted by the patients' psychological well-being attributes (self-esteem, general body image, and negative affect) and the clinical indicators (orthodontists' rating on the IOTN-AC) at baseline, as well as their pretreatment to posttreatment change. Psychological well-being attributes had comparable or greater contribution to the Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics at baseline as well as greater improvement after treatment than the clinical indicators. These biopsychological models explained 29% to 43% of the variances in psychosocial impacts of dental esthetics outcome at baseline and about 33% of the variance in

  8. Orthodontic treatment need of 9, 12 and 15 year-old children according to the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need and the Dental Aesthetic Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boronat-Catalá, Montserrat; Bellot-Arcís, Carlos; Montiel-Company, José María; Catalá-Pizarro, Montserrat; Almerich-Silla, José Manuel

    2016-06-01

    To assess the differences in occlusal features in three cohorts at 9, 12 and 15 years of age, and compare orthodontic treatment need measured by the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI) and Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN). Cross-sectional study. School of Dentistry, University of Valencia. A total of 1086 children: 321 aged 9, 397 aged 12 and 368 aged 15. Children were examined to measure their orthodontic treatment need according to IOTN and DAI. The main outcome measure was orthodontic treatment need according to the DAI and IOTN indices. Overbite and inter-incisal diastema were the occlusal features that presented significant differences between the three groups, diminishing with age. Treatment need according to the IOTN was 15.4% at 9 years, 20.9% at 12 years and 12.8% at 15 years. Treatment need according to DAI was 44.8% at 9 years, 21.7% at 12 years and 14.1% at 15 years. The diagnostic agreement between the two indices on the treatment need by age group was very low at 9 years (Kappa 0.18) and moderate at 12 and 15 years (Kappa 0.451 and 0.405, respectively). Orthodontic treatment need is greater in the mixed dentition and falls slightly as the child grows. The greatest variation in results between 9 and 15 years were found in relation to the DAI, which is consequently not recommended for use in the mixed dentition.

  9. Patterns of third-molar agenesis and associated dental anomalies in an orthodontic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celikoglu, Mevlut; Bayram, Mehmet; Nur, Metin

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of dental anomalies in orthodontic patients with different patterns of third-molar agenesis, comparing them with patients without third-molar agenesis. A sample of 374 patients with agenesis of at least 1 third molar was divided into 4 groups according to the third-molar agenesis pattern, and a control group of 98 patients without third-molar agenesis was randomly selected from the patient archives. Panoramic radiographs and cast models were used to determine the associated dental anomalies, such as hypodontia, hyperdontia, impaction, dilaceration, microdontia, ectopic eruption, transposition, and transmigration. The Pearson chi-square and Fisher exact tests were used to determine the differences in the distribution of the associated dental anomalies among the groups. The prevalence of agenesis of other teeth (11.2%, n = 42) was significantly greater in our study sample (groups 1-4) than in the control group (group 5) (4.1%, n = 4; P dental anomalies in patients with agenesis of 3 and 4 third molars compared with the control group. Permanent tooth agenesis, microdontia of maxillary lateral incisors, and total dental anomalies are more frequently associated with agenesis of 4 third molars than with the presence of third molars. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Optimizing Maxillary Aesthetics of a Severe Compromised Tooth through Orthodontic Movement and Dental Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Scaf de Molon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of severe compromised tooth in the maxillary anterior area still poses great challenge to the clinicians. Several treatment modalities have been proposed to restore the function and aesthetics in teeth with advanced periodontal disease. The present study aims to report a case of traumatic injury of a left-maxillary central incisor with ridge preservation, orthodontic movement, and implant therapy. A 45-year-old woman underwent the proposed treatment for her left central incisor: basic periodontal therapy, xenogenous bone graft, and guided bone regeneration (GBR. Six months after the graft procedure, orthodontic movement by means of alignment and leveling was made and a coronal displacement of the gingival margin and vertical bone apposition could be observed after 13 months of active movement. Afterwards, a dental implant was placed followed by a connective tissue graft and immediate provisionalization of the crown. In conclusion, orthodontic movement was effective to improve the gingival tissue and alveolar bone prior to implant placement favoring the aesthetic results. Six years postoperatively, the results revealed height and width alveolar bone gain indicating that the treatment proposed was able to restore all the functional and aesthetic parameters.

  11. Novel Dental Cement to Combat Biofilms and Reduce Acids for Orthodontic Applications to Avoid Enamel Demineralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Zhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic treatments often lead to biofilm buildup and white spot lesions due to enamel demineralization. The objectives of this study were to develop a novel bioactive orthodontic cement to prevent white spot lesions, and to determine the effects of cement compositions on biofilm growth and acid production. 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC, nanoparticles of silver (NAg, and dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM were incorporated into a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGI. Enamel shear bond strength (SBS was determined. Protein adsorption was determined using a micro bicinchoninic acid method. A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model with human saliva as inoculum was used to investigate metabolic activity, colony-forming units (CFU and lactic acid production. Incorporating 3% of MPC, 1.5% of DMAHDM, and 0.1% of NAg into RMGI, and immersing in distilled water at 37 °C for 30 days, did not decrease the SBS, compared to control (p > 0.1. RMGI with 3% MPC + 1.5% DMAHDM + 0.1% NAg had protein amount that was 1/10 that of control. RMGI with triple agents (MPC + DMAHDM + NAg had much stronger antibacterial property than using a single agent or double agents (p < 0.05. Biofilm CFU on RMGI with triple agents was reduced by more than 3 orders of magnitude, compared to commercial control. Biofilm metabolic activity and acid production were also greatly reduced. In conclusion, adding MPC + DMAHDM + NAg in RMGI substantially inhibited biofilm viability and acid production, without compromising the orthodontic bracket bond strength to enamel. The novel bioactive cement is promising for orthodontic applications to hinder biofilms and plaque buildup and enamel demineralization.

  12. Annual Report on Children's Health Care: Dental and Orthodontic Utilization and Expenditures for Children, 2010-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdahl, Terceira; Hudson, Julie; Simpson, Lisa; McCormick, Marie C

    2016-01-01

    To examine general dental and orthodontic utilization and expenditures by health insurance status, public health insurance eligibility, and sociodemographic characteristics among children aged 0 to 17 years using data from 2010-2012. Nationally representative data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (2010-2012) provided data on insurance status, public health insurance eligibility, and visits to dental providers for both general dental care and orthodontic care. Overall, 41.9% of US children reported an annual dental office-based visit for general (nonorthodontic) dental care. Fewer Hispanic (34.7%) and non-Latino black children (34.8%) received dental care compared to non-Hispanic whites (47.3%) and Asians (40.3%). Children living in families with the lowest income were also the least likely to have a visit (32.9%) compared to children in the highest-income families (54.7%). Among children eligible for public coverage, Medicaid-eligible children had the lowest percentage of preventive dental visits (29.2%). Socioeconomic and racial/ethnic disparities in use and expenditures for orthodontic care are much greater than those for general and preventive dental care. Average expenditures for orthodontic care were $1,823, of which 56% ($1,023) was paid out of pocket by families. Our findings provide a baseline assessment for examining trends in the future, especially as coverage patterns for children may change as the Affordable Care Act is implemented and the future of the State Child Health Insurance Program remains uncertain beyond 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Regular nicotine intake increased tooth movement velocity, osteoclastogenesis and orthodontically induced dental root resorptions in a rat model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschneck, Christian; Maurer, Michael; Wolf, Michael; Reicheneder, Claudia; Proff, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Orthodontic forces have been reported to significantly increase nicotine-induced periodontal bone loss. At present, however, it is unknown, which further (side) effects can be expected during orthodontic treatment at a nicotine exposure corresponding to that of an average European smoker. 63 male Fischer344 rats were randomized in three consecutive experiments of 21 animals each (A/B/C) to 3 experimental groups (7 rats, 1/2/3): (A) cone-beam-computed tomography (CBCT); (B) histology/serology; (C) reverse-transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR)/cotinine serology—(1) control; (2) orthodontic tooth movement (OTM) of the first and second upper left molar (NiTi closed coil spring, 0.25 N); (3) OTM with 1.89 mg·kg−1 per day s.c. of L(−)-nicotine. After 14 days of OTM, serum cotinine and IL-6 concentration as well as orthodontically induced inflammatory root resorption (OIIRR), osteoclast activity (histology), orthodontic tooth movement velocity (CBCT, within 14 and 28 days of OTM) and relative gene expression of known inflammatory and osteoclast markers were quantified in the dental-periodontal tissue (RT–qPCR). Animals exposed to nicotine showed significantly heightened serum cotinine and IL-6 levels corresponding to those of regular European smokers. Both the extent of root resorption, osteoclast activity, orthodontic tooth movement and gene expression of inflammatory and osteoclast markers were significantly increased compared to controls with and without OTM under the influence of nicotine. We conclude that apart from increased periodontal bone loss, a progression of dental root resorption and accelerated orthodontic tooth movement are to be anticipated during orthodontic therapy, if nicotine consumption is present. Thus patients should be informed about these risks and the necessity of nicotine abstinence during treatment. PMID:28960194

  14. Insertion torque recordings for the diagnosis of contact between orthodontic mini implants and dental roots: protocol for a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meursinge Reynders, R.; Ladu, L.; Ronchi, L.; Di Girolama, N.; de Lange, J.; Roberts, N.; Plüddemann, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hitting a dental root during the insertion of orthodontic mini-implants (OMIs) is a common adverse effect of this intervention. This condition can permanently damage these structures and can cause implant instability. Increased torque levels (index test) recorded during the insertion of

  15. Insertion torque recordings for the diagnosis of contact between orthodontic mini-implants and dental roots: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meursinge Reynders, Reint; Ladu, Luisa; Ronchi, Laura; Di Girolamo, Nicola; de Lange, Jan; Roberts, Nia; Plüddemann, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Most orthodontic mini-implants (OMIs) are inserted between dental roots. The prevalence of contacting these structures is high. Such contacts can cause permanent root damage and implant instability. Increased torque levels during implant insertion (the index test) could be a more accurate and

  16. Effect of moisture on dental enamel in the interaction of two orthodontic bonding systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoz, André Pinheiro de Magalhães; de Oliveira, Derly Tescaro Narcizo; Gimenez, Carla Maria Melleiro; Briso, André Luiz Fraga; Bertoz, Francisco Antonio; Santos, Eduardo César Almada

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) the remaining adhesive interface after debonding orthodontic attachments bonded to bovine teeth with the use of hydrophilic and hydrophobic primers under different dental substrate moisture conditions. Twenty mandibular incisors were divided into four groups (n = 5). In Group I, bracket bonding was performed with Transbond MIP hydrophilic primer and Transbond XT adhesive paste applied to moist substrate, and in Group II a bonding system comprising Transbond XT hydrophobic primer and adhesive paste was applied to moist substrate. Brackets were bonded to the specimens in Groups III and IV using the same adhesive systems, but on dry dental enamel. The images were qualitatively assessed by SEM. The absence of moisture in etched enamel enabled better interaction between bonding materials and the adamantine structure. The hydrophobic primer achieved the worst micromechanical interlocking results when applied to a moist dental structure, whereas the hydrophilic system proved versatile, yielding acceptable results in moist conditions and excellent interaction in the absence of contamination. The authors assert that the best condition for the application of primers to dental enamel occurs in the absence of moisture.

  17. Betel leaf toothpastes inhibit dental plaque formation on fixed orthodontic patients

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    Rizka Amelia Mayasari

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brackets, archwires, ligatures, and other fixed orthodontic appliance components complicate the use of conventional oral-hygiene measures. This often results in significant plaque accumulation around the bracket bases. The addition of betel leaf extract in toothpaste is expected to inhibit the growth of dental plaque. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of betel leaf toothpaste in inhibiting plaque formation on the fixed orthodontic patients. Methods: This study was done on dental student of Airlangga University aged 18–24 years, have been wearing fixed orthodontic appliances for 1–2 years, have no systemic diseases. The samples were divided into two groups, consisting of 20 samples. First group of samples brushed their teeth with betel group of samples brushed their teeth with betel brushed their teeth with betel leaf toothpaste and the second using placebo. The subjects were instructed to brush their teeth using Scrub method until reaching zero (0 scor of orthodontic plaque index (OPI. Plaque scores were taken again 4 hours after brushing. The statistical analysis was done by using paired t test. Results: The average of accumulated plaque on group that use betel leaf toothpaste was 25.54 and placebo was 41.09. The result showed that there was significant difference in plaque accumulation between the group with betel leaf toothpaste and placebo 4 hours after brushing (p = 0.001. Conclusion: In conclusion, betel leaf toothpaste is effective in inhibiting the dental plaque formation on the fixed orthodontic patients. Latar belakang: Bracket, kawat busur, kawat ligatur dan komponen peranti ortodonti cekat yang lain mempersulit pembersihan gigi secara konvensional. Hal ini sering menyebabkan terjadinya akumulasi plak di sekitar dasar braket. Penambahan ekstrak daun sirih yang mempunyai efek bakterisid pada pasta gigi diharapkan dapat menghambat pertumbuhan plak. Tujuan: Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk

  18. Digital dental surface registration with laser scanner for orthodontics set-up planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaniz-Raya, Mariano L.; Albalat, Salvador E.; Grau Colomer, Vincente; Monserrat, Carlos A.

    1997-05-01

    We present an optical measuring system based on laser structured light suitable for its diary use in orthodontics clinics that fit four main requirements: (1) to avoid use of stone models, (2) to automatically discriminate geometric points belonging to teeth and gum, (3) to automatically calculate diagnostic parameters used by orthodontists, (4) to make use of low cost and easy to use technology for future commercial use. Proposed technique is based in the use of hydrocolloids mould used by orthodontists for stone model obtention. These mould of the inside of patient's mouth are composed of very fluent materials like alginate or hydrocolloids that reveal fine details of dental anatomy. Alginate mould are both very easy to obtain and very low costly. Once captured, alginate moulds are digitized by mean of a newly developed and patented 3D dental scanner. Developed scanner is based in the optical triangulation method based in the projection of a laser line on the alginate mould surface. Line deformation gives uncalibrated shape information. Relative linear movements of the mould with respect to the sensor head gives more sections thus obtaining a full 3D uncalibrated dentition model. Developed device makes use of redundant CCD in the sensor head and servocontrolled linear axis for mould movement. Last step is calibration to get a real and precise X, Y, Z image. All the process is done automatically. The scanner has been specially adapted for 3D dental anatomy capturing in order to fulfill specific requirements such as: scanning time, accuracy, security and correct acquisition of 'hidden points' in alginate mould. Measurement realized on phantoms with known geometry quite similar to dental anatomy present errors less than 0,1 mm. Scanning of global dental anatomy is 2 minutes, and generation of 3D graphics of dental cast takes approximately 30 seconds in a Pentium-based PC.

  19. Dental CT and orthodontic implants: imaging technique and assessment of available bone volume in the hard palate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gahleitner, Andre E-mail: andre.gahleitner@univie.ac.at; Podesser, Birgit; Schick, Susanne; Watzek, Georg; Imhof, Herwig

    2004-09-01

    Purpose: Palatal implants (PI) have been introduced for orthodontic treatment of dental and skeletal dysgnathia. Due to the restricted amount of bone in this region, precise preoperative anatomic information is necessary. The aim of this study was to determine whether dental CT could serve as a tool to locate the optimal size and position for orthodontic implant placement. Materials and methods: In 32 patients, where palatal implant placement was planned, axial CT scans of the maxillary bone were acquired. Using a standard dental software package (Easy Vision dental software package 2.1, Philips; Best, The Netherlands), paracoronal views were reconstructed and measurements of palatal bone height in 3 mm increments, dorsally from the incisive canal, were performed in the median and both paramedian regions. Results: The overall mean bone height was 5.01 mm (S.D. 2.60), ranging from 0 to 16.9 mm. The maximum palatal bone height was 6.17 mm (S.D. 2.81) at 6 mm dorsally from the incisive canal. Due to the lack of adequate bone (less than 4 mm), implant placement was not performed in 3 cases (7%). In the remaining 39 cases (93.0%), primary implant stability was achieved and complications, such as perforation of the palate, could be avoided. Conclusion: The results demonstrate that dental CT promises to be a valuable tool in evaluating the potential and optimal size and site for orthodontic implant placement.

  20. Dental CT and orthodontic implants: imaging technique and assessment of available bone volume in the hard palate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gahleitner, Andre; Podesser, Birgit; Schick, Susanne; Watzek, Georg; Imhof, Herwig

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Palatal implants (PI) have been introduced for orthodontic treatment of dental and skeletal dysgnathia. Due to the restricted amount of bone in this region, precise preoperative anatomic information is necessary. The aim of this study was to determine whether dental CT could serve as a tool to locate the optimal size and position for orthodontic implant placement. Materials and methods: In 32 patients, where palatal implant placement was planned, axial CT scans of the maxillary bone were acquired. Using a standard dental software package (Easy Vision dental software package 2.1, Philips; Best, The Netherlands), paracoronal views were reconstructed and measurements of palatal bone height in 3 mm increments, dorsally from the incisive canal, were performed in the median and both paramedian regions. Results: The overall mean bone height was 5.01 mm (S.D. 2.60), ranging from 0 to 16.9 mm. The maximum palatal bone height was 6.17 mm (S.D. 2.81) at 6 mm dorsally from the incisive canal. Due to the lack of adequate bone (less than 4 mm), implant placement was not performed in 3 cases (7%). In the remaining 39 cases (93.0%), primary implant stability was achieved and complications, such as perforation of the palate, could be avoided. Conclusion: The results demonstrate that dental CT promises to be a valuable tool in evaluating the potential and optimal size and site for orthodontic implant placement

  1. The effect of orthodontic bonding materials on dental plaque accumulation and composition in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawi, H; Evans, R D; Wilson, M; Ready, D; Noar, J H; Pratten, J

    2003-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the accumulation and composition of microcosm dental plaque on different orthodontic bonding materials using an in vitro model. Microcosm plaques were grown on discs of a range of bonding materials in a constant depth film fermentor. The biofilms were derived from human saliva and supplied with artificial saliva as a source of nutrients. The number of viable bacteria in the biofilms was determined and the streptococci present were identified to species level. The results showed that there was no significant difference in bacterial accumulation between different bonding materials, however, biofilms grown on materials which were fluoride releasing, did not contain Streptococcus mutans. This in vitro study has shown that the use of fluoride-releasing bonding materials may support the growth of supragingival plaque, which does not contain S. mutans.

  2. Thermotransduction and heat stress in dental structures during orthodontic debonding : Effectiveness of various cooling strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kley, Philipp; Frentzen, Matthias; Küpper, Katharina; Braun, Andreas; Kecsmar, Susann; Jäger, Andreas; Wolf, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies have indicated possible thermal damage to pulpal tissue during orthodontic debonding. This study aimed to analyze the thermal loads acting upon dental structures and their transfer to the pulp during orthodontic debonding. Specific goals were to analyze temperature changes in local dental tissues, thermotransduction to the pulp cavity, and the effectiveness of common cooling strategies and of simulated intrapulpal circulation. Metal brackets were bonded to five extracted human molars and subsequently removed. While a carbide bur was applied to debond the residual composite from the tooth surface, various cooling strategies (no/air/water cooling) were employed with or without simulated intrapulpal circulation, accompanied by temperature measurements with a thermographic infrared camera on the enamel surface and with measuring probes in the pulp cavity. Appropriate evaluation software was used to calculate the enamel-to-pulp temperature gradients and for statistical analysis. Significant differences in temperature rise and heat development over time, both on the enamel surfaces and in the pulp cavities were found. The mean temperature rises associated with no/air/water cooling were 90.7/46.6/9.2 °C on the enamel surface versus 9/8/4.6 °C inside the pulp. However, thermotransduction from enamel to pulp remained below 10 % of the surface measurements in all groups. Simulated intrapulpal microcirculation was found to significantly reduce intrapulpal temperature levels. During debonding of residual bracket adhesives, provided that a carbide bur is properly used, our data indicate a low risk of reaching critical intrapulpal temperatures even in the absence of dedicated cooling and no risk if the instrumentation is accompanied by air or water cooling.

  3. Type and location of findings in dental panoramic tomographs in 7-12-year-old orthodontic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakbaznejad Esmaeili, Elmira; Ekholm, Marja; Haukka, Jari; Waltimo-Sirén, Janna

    2016-01-01

    The Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority in Finland has paid attention to the large numbers of dental panoramic tomographs (DPTs), particularly in 7-12-year-old children. The majority of these radiographs are taken for orthodontic reasons. Because of the high radiosensitivity of children, the size of the irradiated field should be carefully chosen to yield the necessary diagnostic information at the lowest possible dose. The purpose of the present study was, therefore, to assess the outcome of DPTs within this age group in terms of type and location of pathological findings. It was also hypothesized that DPTs of orthodontic patients rarely display unrestored caries. Four hundred and forty-one DPTs, taken of 7-12-year-old children in 2010-2014, were randomly sampled. The 413 of them (94%) that had been taken for orthodontic reasons were analysed. All pathologic findings were restricted to the tooth-bearing area and there was no pathology in the bone structure or any incidental findings in the region of temporomandibular joint. Unlike hypothesized, 27% of the orthodontic DPTs showed caries in deciduous teeth and 16% in permanent teeth. A sub-sample of 229 DPTs, analysed for developmental dental and occlusal problems, most commonly displayed crowding (50%), positional anomalies and local problems with tooth eruption (32%), as well as hyperodontia (15%). Inclusion of only the actual area of interest in the image field should be considered case-specifically as a means to reduce the radiation dose.

  4. The correlation between pain perception among patients with six different orthodontic archwires and the degree of dental crowding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Evgenija

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Forces generated in orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances create tension and compression zones in the periodontal ligament resulting in a painful experience for patients. In the first phase of orthodontic treatment, when leveling of teeth is needed, nickel-titanium (NiTi archwires can be completely engaged in brackets, even in the cases of extreme crowding, exerting small forces. There is a great individual variation in the pain perception related to the application of orthodontic forces. Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate the pain perception among patients with dental crowding after insertion of six different NiTi orthodontic archwires as a part of fixed appliances in the first stage of orthodontic treatment. Methods. The study was conducted on a sample of 189 orthodontic patients receiving one of six different either superelastic or heat activated NiTi archwires, in the first phase of orthodontic treatment. Pain perception was evaluated in groups of patients with different degree of crowding. The modified McGill Pain Questionnaire with Visual Analogue Scale was used to evaluate the quality and intensity of pain. Statistical analysis was performed using simple descriptive statistics, and Pearson`s chi-square test with statistical significance of p<0.05. Results. Majority of patients reported pain as discomfort or pressure of moderate intensity caused by chewing or biting, started within 12 hours, carried on for 3-4 days, and decreased over time without self-medication. Conclusion. No correlation was found between pain perception among patients with different types of NiTi archwires and the degree of crowding.

  5. Prevalence of mesiodens in orthodontic patients with deciduous and mixed dentition and its association with other dental anomalies

    OpenAIRE

    Lara,Tulio Silva; Lancia,Melissa; Silva Filho,Omar Gabriel da; Garib,Daniela Gamba; Ozawa,Terumi Okada

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of mesiodens in deciduous and mixed dentitions and its association with other dental anomalies. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Panoramic radiographs of 1,995 orthodontic patients were analyzed retrospectively, obtaining a final sample of 30 patients with mesiodens. The following aspects were analyzed: gender ; number of mesiodens; proportion between erupted and non-erupted mesiodens; initial position of the supernumerary tooth; related complications; treatment pl...

  6. Tooth angulation and dental arch perimeter-the effect of orthodontic bracket prescription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Luana F; Cecim, Rodolpho L; Machado, Sissy M; Normando, David

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of upper incisors and canine angulations introduced by different bracket prescriptions on dental arch perimeter. Cone beam computerized tomography scans collected using I-Cat (Imaging Sciences International, Hatfield, PA, USA) were selected conveniently from a database of routine exams of a clinical radiology center. Crown and radicular measurements of upper incisors and canines were made and exported to the Autocad 2011 software to create a virtual dental model. The virtual teeth were positioned with an angulation of zero; thereafter, a reference value for the perimeter of the arch was measured. Furthermore, teeth angulations were applied according to the standards of the Edgewise bracket system and the Straight-wire systems: MBT, Capelozza, Andrews, and Roth. The largest linear distances for tooth crown (anterior arch perimeter) and root (radicular distance) were obtained for each bracket prescription. The anterior perimeter for well-aligned incisors and canines without angulation was used as reference (crown: 47.34mm; root: 39.13mm). An increase in the arch perimeter was obtained for all bracket prescriptions evaluated, which ranged from 0.28 and 3.19mm in the Edgewise technique, for the crown and root measurements, respectively, to 1.09 and 11.28mm for the Roth prescription. Bracket prescriptions with greater angulation led to an increased use of space within the dental arch, mainly in the radicular region. The consequence of this radicular angular displacement will need to be further investigated. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. The prevalence of dental anomalies in orthodontic patients at the State University of New York at Buffalo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amiri, Athari; Tabbaa, Sawsan; Preston, Charles Brian; Al-Jewair, Thikriat

    2013-05-01

    To determine the prevalence of permanent tooth anomalies in patients attending the graduate orthodontic clinic at the State University of New York at Buffalo. Charts of 496 subjects (310 females and 186 males) met the inclusion criteria for this study. The mean ages were 16 years and 3 months for the combined gender sample that received orthodontic treatment in the graduate orthodontic clinic between 2007 and 2010. Full pretreatment records (intraoral photographs, digital study models, lateral cephalograms and panoramic radiographs) were used for the assessment. Charts were examined for these anomalies: agenesis, supernumerary, impaction and delayed tooth eruption. Subjects were categorized by gender and ethnicity. The percentages of the anomalies were assessed according to type of malocclusion, gender, race, location, tooth class and region in the dental arches. Sixty-four subjects (12.9%) had at least one occurrence of delayed eruption and impaction (DEI), followed by 47 subjects (9.5%) who had at least one occurrence of agenesis, and seven (1.4%) had a supernumerary condition. Approximately 80% of the subjects had no dental anomalies. The presence of more than one anomaly was observed in 61 subjects. Twelve subjects (2.4%) had both agenesis and DEI. Agenesis tended to be more common in class II malocclusions (p=0.012). The prevalence of permanent tooth anomalies was (20.4%). The percentage occurrence of DEI was the highest (12.9%) followed by dental agenesis (9.5%) and supernumerary teeth (1.4%) in the orthodontic patients at the State University of New York at Buffalo.

  8. Multimodality Treatment for Rehabilitation of Adult Orthodontic Patient with Complicated Dental Condition and Jaw Relation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Cheng Liaw

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available A 50-year-old man with severe malocclusion requested comprehensive oral rehabilitation. He presented with retrognathic mandible, anterior deep bite and a gummy smile in the premaxilla, and tenting occlusal plane with severe buccal crossbite of the left maxillary posterior teeth. Inappropriate fixed prostheses spanned the maxilla and the mandible with a class II jaw relationship. A detailed analysis indicated the need for orthodontic treatment, orthognathic surgery, bone graft at the deficient alveolar ridge for implant surgery and a revision of all prostheses. Over a 2-year-period of management, the patient received anterior osteotomy for intrusion of lower anterior teeth, bilateral sagittal splitting osteotomy for mandible advancement and posterior osteotomy for inward upward repositioning of posterior teeth of the left maxilla to correct major jaw deformities. The deficient alveolar ridge in the premaxilla was augmented by autogenous bone graft harvested during the orthognathic surgery. He sequentially had mini-plate and dental implant as anchorage assisting teeth alignment in the mandible. Two 3-fixture-supported implant prostheses were delivered in the premaxilla and the mandible. The improvement in cosmesis, stability and function through treatment and a 2-year clinical follow-up were considered satisfactory.

  9. Mechanical equilibrium of forces and moments applied on orthodontic brackets of a dental arch: Correlation with literature data on two and three adjacent teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Delphine; Bolender, Yves; Rémond, Yves; George, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Although orthodontics have greatly improved over the years, understanding of its associated biomechanics remains incomplete and is mainly based on two dimensional (2D) mechanical equilibrium and long-time clinical experience. Little experimental information exists in three dimensions (3D) about the forces and moments developed on orthodontic brackets over more than two or three adjacent teeth. We define here a simplified methodology to quantify 3D forces and moments applied on orthodontic brackets fixed on a dental arch and validate our methodology using existing results from the literature by means of simplified hypotheses.

  10. A combined prosthodontic and orthodontic treatment approach in a case of growth inhibition induced by dental implants: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Elena; Wegener, Joachim; Wagner, Wilfried; Hornikel, Sandra; Wehrbein, Heinrich

    2012-01-01

    Functional and esthetic results can improve significantly when a combined prosthodontic-orthodontic treatment approach is employed in cases requiring extensive oral rehabilitation. The patient presented in this case report was treated in his late teens with dental implants as a replacement for his maxillary incisors. Ten years later, the entire maxillary anterior segment was in infraocclusion compared to the rest of the dentition and lip line. Since prosthodontic follow-up treatment alone could not achieve an optimal functional and esthetic outcome, the patient was treated orthodontically prior to renewing the restoration. A fixed appliance was used to intrude the mandibular anterior teeth as well as vertically align the infrapositioned maxillary lateral incisors.

  11. Dental Extrusion with Orthodontic Miniscrew Anchorage: A Case Report Describing a Modified Method

    OpenAIRE

    Horliana, Ricardo Fidos; Horliana, Anna Carolina Ratto Tempestini; Wuo, Alexandre do Vale; Perez, Fl?vio Eduardo Guillin; Abr?o, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the skeletal anchorage through miniscrews has expanded the treatment options in orthodontics (Yamaguchi et al., 2012). We hereby present a modified method for tooth extrusion for cases where crown-lengthening surgery is contraindicated for aesthetic reasons. This modified method uses three orthodontic appliances: a mini-implant, an orthodontic wire, and a bracket. The aim of this case report was to increase the length of the clinical crown of a fractured tooth (tooth 23) by m...

  12. Dental extrusion with orthodontic miniscrew anchorage: a case report describing a modified method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horliana, Ricardo Fidos; Horliana, Anna Carolina Ratto Tempestini; Wuo, Alexandre do Vale; Perez, Flávio Eduardo Guillin; Abrão, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the skeletal anchorage through miniscrews has expanded the treatment options in orthodontics (Yamaguchi et al., 2012). We hereby present a modified method for tooth extrusion for cases where crown-lengthening surgery is contraindicated for aesthetic reasons. This modified method uses three orthodontic appliances: a mini-implant, an orthodontic wire, and a bracket. The aim of this case report was to increase the length of the clinical crown of a fractured tooth (tooth 23) by means of an orthodontic extrusion with the modified method of Roth and Diedrich.

  13. Prevalence of mesiodens in orthodontic patients with deciduous and mixed dentition and its association with other dental anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulio Silva Lara

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of mesiodens in deciduous and mixed dentitions and its association with other dental anomalies. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Panoramic radiographs of 1,995 orthodontic patients were analyzed retrospectively, obtaining a final sample of 30 patients with mesiodens. The following aspects were analyzed: gender ; number of mesiodens; proportion between erupted and non-erupted mesiodens; initial position of the supernumerary tooth; related complications; treatment plan accomplished; and associated dental anomalies. The frequency of dental anomalies in the sample was compared to reference values for the general population using the chi-square test (c², with a significance level set at 5%. RESULTS: The prevalence of mesiodens was 1.5% more common among males (1.5:1. Most of the mesiodens were non-erupted (75% and in a vertical position, facing the oral cavity. Extraction of the mesiodens was the most common treatment. The main complications associated with mesiodens were: delayed eruption of permanent incisors (34.28% and midline diastema (28.57%. From all the dental anomalies analyzed, only the prevalence of maxillary lateral incisor agenesis was higher in comparison to the general population. CONCLUSION: There was a low prevalence of mesiodens (1.5% in deciduous and mixed dentition and the condition was not associated with other dental anomalies, except for the maxillary lateral incisor agenesis.

  14. Prevalence of mesiodens in orthodontic patients with deciduous and mixed dentition and its association with other dental anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Tulio Silva; Lancia, Melissa; da Silva Filho, Omar Gabriel; Garib, Daniela Gamba; Ozawa, Terumi Okada

    2013-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of mesiodens in deciduous and mixed dentitions and its association with other dental anomalies. Panoramic radiographs of 1,995 orthodontic patients were analyzed retrospectively, obtaining a final sample of 30 patients with mesiodens. The following aspects were analyzed: gender; number of mesiodens; proportion between erupted and non-erupted mesiodens; initial position of the supernumerary tooth; related complications; treatment plan accomplished; and associated dental anomalies. The frequency of dental anomalies in the sample was compared to reference values for the general population using the chi-square test, with a significance level set at 5%. The prevalence of mesiodens was 1.5% more common among males (1.5:1). Most of the mesiodens were non-erupted (75%) and in a vertical position, facing the oral cavity. Extraction of the mesiodens was the most common treatment. The main complications associated with mesiodens were: delayed eruption of permanent incisors (34.28%) and midline diastema (28.57%). From all the dental anomalies analyzed, only the prevalence of maxillary lateral incisor agenesis was higher in comparison to the general population. There was a low prevalence of mesiodens (1.5%) in deciduous and mixed dentition and the condition was not associated with other dental anomalies, except for the maxillary lateral incisor agenesis.

  15. Effectiveness of an audience response system on orthodontic knowledge retention of undergraduate dental students--a randomised control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Nicholas; Popat, Hashmat; Richmond, Stephen; Farnell, Damian J J

    2015-01-01

    To determine the effect of an audience response system (ARS) on knowledge retention of dental students and to gauge student perceptions of using the ARS. Randomised control study. School of Dentistry, Cardiff University. Seventy four second-year dental students were stratified by gender and randomised anonymously to one of two groups. One group received a lecture on orthodontic terminology and diagnosis in a traditional didactic format and the other received the same lecture integrated with ARS slides. Students completed an assessment of multiple-choice questions (MCQs) scored out of 20, before and immediately after the lecture. Students were also asked to complete a self-reported questionnaire on their perceptions of ARS. Both groups had statistically significant increases in MCQ scores post-lecture (ARS mean increase 3.6 SD2.0, 95% CI 2.2-3.5 and Didactic mean increase 2.9 SD2.3, 95% CI 2.8-4.3). A mixed-design analysis of variance showed that ARS led to an improved MCQ score (by 0.8 or 25%) compared to the didactic group, although this effect was not significant (P = 0.15). The effect of gender at baseline (P = 0.49), post-lecture (P = 0.73) and increase in MCQ score split by group (P = 0.46) was also not significant. Students reported that the ARS was easy to use, helped them engage with the lecture and encouraged them to work harder. The ARS did not lead to a significant increase in short-term orthodontic knowledge recall of students compared with didactic teaching. However, the use of ARS within orthodontic teaching could make lectures more interactive and engaging.

  16. Insertion torque recordings for the diagnosis of contact between orthodontic mini-implants and dental roots: protocol for a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meursinge Reynders, Reint; Ladu, Luisa; Ronchi, Laura; Di Girolamo, Nicola; de Lange, Jan; Roberts, Nia; Plüddemann, Annette

    2015-01-01

    Hitting a dental root during the insertion of orthodontic mini-implants (OMIs) is a common adverse effect of this intervention. This condition can permanently damage these structures and can cause implant instability. Increased torque levels (index test) recorded during the insertion of OMIs may

  17. [A new method to orthodontically correct dental occlusal plane canting: wave-shaped arch].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, X; Hu, X X; Ma, N; Chen, X H

    2017-02-18

    To introduce a technique of second order wave-shaped arch wire to orthodontically treat dental occlusal plane canting (DOPC) with left-right interactive anchorage, and to test its clinical efficacy. Among the permanent dentition malocclusion patients who showed no obvious facial asymmetry, we screened for patients who showed anterior occlusal plane canting (AOPC) after routine orthodontic examination, treatment planning, MBT fixed appliance installation and serial arch wires alignment. Each patient had been clinically appraised in frontal view by 2 orthodontists and the patient him/herself; if all 3 agreed that the AOPC was obvious, the patient was included. By this means, we included 37 patients, including 10 males and 27 females; the average age was (21.9±5.2) years. To correct AOPC, opposite direction equal curvature second order rocking-chair curve was bent on each side of 0.46 mm×0.56 mm stainless steel edgewise wire. With reference to normal occlusal plane, a curve toward the occlusal surface was made to extrude under-erupted teeth on one side while a curve toward the gingiva was made to intrude over-erupted teeth on the other side, so that the arch wire was made into a wave shape in vertical dimension. Before and after application of wave-shaped arch wire, frontal facial photographs were taken when the patient's mouth was open slightly with lips retracted to show anterior occlusal plane (AOP) clearly. An AOP was constructed by connecting the center of the slot in the medial edge of canine bracket on each side in the photograph. The angles between the bipupillary plane(BPP) and the constructed AOP were measured in ImageJ1-48v software and the angle differences before and after treatment were compared with paired Wilcoxon test in SPSS 10.0 software. The wave-shaped arch could correct AOPC effectively in 3 to 10 months time with an average of 5.5±1.7 months; the angles between AOP and BBP before treatment ranged from 2.90° to 6.12° with a median of 4.01

  18. Alignment Strategy for Constricted Maxillary Dental Arch in Patients With Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate Using Fixed Orthodontic Appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoon-Hee; Park, Sumin; Baek, Seung-Hak

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the alignment pattern of the constricted maxillary dental arch by fixed orthodontic treatment (FOT) in the well-aligned and constricted arches of unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) patients. 19 UCLP patients were divided into Group 1 (well-aligned arch, n = 9) and Group 2 (constricted arch, n = 10). After the cephalometric and maxillary dental arch variables before (T1) and after FOT (T2) were measured, statistical analysis was performed. There were no significant differences in the surgical timing of cheiloplasty, palatoplasty, and secondary alveolar bone grafting and in the surgical method of cheiloplasty between the 2 groups. However, Group 2 had a higher percentage of palatoplasty method, which could leave the denuded bone for secondary healing than Group 1 (P dental arch compared to Group 1 at the T1 stage (inter-second premolar width, greater segment angle [GSA], and lesser segment angle [LSA], all P dental arch shape, different strategy is necessary to obtain proper alignment by FOT.

  19. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of the growth of dental plaque on the surfaces of removable orthodontic aligners after the use of different cleaning methods

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    Levrini L

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Luca Levrini, Francesca Novara, Silvia Margherini, Camilla Tenconi, Mario Raspanti Department of Surgical and Morphological Sciences, Dental Hygiene School, Research Centre Cranio Facial Disease and Medicine, University of Insubria, Varese, Italy Background: Advances in orthodontics are leading to the use of minimally invasive technologies, such as transparent removable aligners, and are able to meet high demands in terms of performance and esthetics. However, the most correct method of cleaning these appliances, in order to minimize the effects of microbial colonization, remains to be determined. Purpose: The aim of the present study was to identify the most effective method of cleaning removable orthodontic aligners, analyzing the growth of dental plaque as observed under scanning electron microscopy. Methods: Twelve subjects were selected for the study. All were free from caries and periodontal disease and were candidates for orthodontic therapy with invisible orthodontic aligners. The trial had a duration of 6 weeks, divided into three 2-week stages, during which three sets of aligners were used. In each stage, the subjects were asked to use a different method of cleaning their aligners: 1 running water (control condition; 2 effervescent tablets containing sodium carbonate and sulfate crystals followed by brushing with a toothbrush; and 3 brushing alone (with a toothbrush and toothpaste. At the end of each 2-week stage, the surfaces of the aligners were analyzed under scanning electron microscopy. Results: The best results were obtained with brushing combined with the use of sodium carbonate and sulfate crystals; brushing alone gave slightly inferior results. Conclusion: On the basis of previous literature results relating to devices in resin, studies evaluating the reliability of domestic ultrasonic baths for domestic use should be encouraged. At present, pending the availability of experimental evidence, it can be suggested that dental

  20. Medical emergencies in a dental office: inhalation and ingestion of orthodontic objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilder, Leon; Hazan-Molina, Hagai; Aizenbud, Dror

    2011-01-01

    The authors reviewed the literature regarding inhalation and ingestion of orthodontic appliances and suggest ways to manage and prevent these events. The authors conducted literature searches of free text and Medical Subject Headings terms by using PubMed and Embase databases and selected appropriate studies. They analyzed retrieved articles according to several parameters: inhalation or ingestion event, number of cases, patient's sex and age, type of orthodontic appliance, in-office event or out-of-office event, and medical treatment. The authors found a total of 2,279 articles in their preliminary search. Eighteen reports of 24 cases from this search met all of the search criteria (that is, clinical studies, case reports or reviews limited to English, Hebrew or Arabic on any form of aspiration or inhalation of orthodontic appliances). Most cases (67 percent) involved ingested objects, and of those cases, the majority (57 percent) occurred in female patients. Most cases (85 percent) occurred outside the orthodontist's office. Seventeen patients (71 percent) had been treated with a fixed orthodontic appliance. In 60 percent of cases, the maxilla was involved. With one exception, no severe complications were reported (only seven patients were examined in a hospital emergency department), and patients were discharged uneventfully from the orthodontic office or emergency department. Orthodontists and team members should participate in medical emergency management courses that emphasize the use of guidelines in cases of inhalation or ingestion of orthodontic objects. Each orthodontist's office should develop written emergency protocols for out-of-office events and present them to patients and their parents at the start of treatment.

  1. [Markers of dental children`s health in the application of therapeutic orthodontic equipment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Пачевська, Аліса В; Білошицька, Аліна В

    Treatment of teeth anomalies using removable and non-removable orthodontic devices in children leads to complications such as caries, gingivitis, periodontitis, oral mucosa hyperplasia. Etiopathogenetical of these diseases can be associated with biochemical changes in the composition of saliva. To determine the activity of lysozyme and amylase in oral fluid in children when using a fixed and removable orthodontic devices. Amylase and lysozyme were studied in oral fluid. Analyzed the biochemical composition of the freshly samples of oral fluid that was obtained in the control, experimental group 1 and 2 (children ages 7-18 years, which were used medical non-removable and removable orthodontic devices). Saliva was collected at the beginning of the therapeutic use of orthodontic devices (the first day of treatment), on 3 and 6 months of treatment. Assessment of lysozyme activity was carried nephelometric method on the ability of lysozyme to dissolve indicator organism Micrococcus lysodeicticus. To construct a calibration graph using dry lysozyme company Sigma. Salivary amylase activity was determined by hydrolysis of starch. The results were subjected to statistical analysis by standard methods. Data processed using software packages applied statistical analysis Statistica 6.0, Microsoft Excel, 2003. The use of a fixed and removable orthodontic equipment led to a decrease in saliva amylase, major changes are observed on the 6th month of treatment. The activity of lysozyme in saliva decreased the mostin patients with a permanent equipment. Major changes were also recorded on the 6th month of treatment. Complications of orthodontic treatment teeth anomalies in children (caries, gingivitis, periodontitis) caused by changes in the biochemical composition of saliva. For the prevention of the emergence and development of these complications is necessary to control the level of amylase and lysozyme in the mouth.

  2. [Preprosthetic orthodontic treatments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prahl-Andersen, B.; Prahl, C.; Baat, C. de; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of a preprosthetic orthodontic treatment is to position the teeth in such a way that a treatment with (fixed) dental prostheses is made possible or simplified or to affect the result of this treatment positively. Conceivable preprosthetic orthodontic treatments are: correcting primary

  3. Dental student’s perception to Aesthetic Component of IOTN and demand for orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wees Kaolinni

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aims of orthodontic treatment are to achieve the best interdigitation in centric occlusion in relation with good facial aesthetic and to get a pleasant dento-facial looked with good function as well. Nowadays, people who are seeking orthodontic treatment to fulfill those need come to orthodontist, mostly for aesthetic reason, for good teeth arrangement that will be more aesthetically favorable. However, not all people with malocclusion seek the orthodontic treatment due to the fact, they do not realize that they have orthodontic problem. On the other hand, some other feel they need orthodontic treatment but they can not afford it. Purpose: To determine the knowledge of malocclusion and demand for orthodontic treatment in related to Aesthetic Component (AC IOTN. Methods: The samples were 107 college students of Faculty of Dentistry Airlangga University divided into two as 1st and 7th semester group. Both of the groups were given questionnaire about their knowledge of malocclusion and demand of orthodontic treatment. Then, they were asked to examine themselves using AC IOTN, then researcher and orthodontist examine them. Results: There was a significant difference on knowledge of malocclusion between both groups, no significant difference on demand of orthodontic treatment between both groups, and no correlation between demand and AC IOTN in both groups. There was a significant difference in AC IOTN score examined by respondent, researcher and orthodontist. Conclusion: Knowledge of malocclusion was not the only factor that determines demand of orthodontic treatment.Latar belakang: Tujuan perawatan ortodonti adalah untuk mendapatkan hubungan interdigitasi yang baik berhubungan dengan penampilan estetik wajah untuk mendapatkan fungsi dan penampilan dento-fasial yang baik. Saat ini, banyak orang mencari perawatan ortodonti untuk memenuhi kebutuhan fungsi dan penampilan. Tujuannya adalah susunan gigi yang rata yang lebih dapat diterima

  4. Retrospective study to determine the change in referral pattern to St George's Hospital Orthodontic Department before and after the 2006 NHS Dental Contract changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izadi, Maryam; Gill, Daljit S; Naini, Farhad B

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the possible effects of the 2006 National Health Service General Dental Services contract changes on the referral pattern to the orthodontic department at St George's Hospital, South West London. This study was carried out on a retrospective basis. The notes of consecutive patients referred between 1st May and 30th September in 2005 and 2008 were assessed, and the patient's Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN) and the source of referral noted. The total numbers of referrals increased from 260 in 2005 to 405 in 2008. The number of referrals from general dental practitioners decreased slightly from 165 to 156, as did the numbers of referrals from other sources, such as tertiary referrals. The number of referrals made by specialist practitioners increased from 41 in 2005 to 207 in 2008, representing an increase from 16% to 51% of overall referrals. Overall, the number of patients being referred with an IOTN dental health component grade of 5 increased from 27% to 55%. The increase in referrals from specialist practitioners may be partly due to the changes brought to the commissioning of orthodontic services for specialist practitioners. Overall, the number of cases being referred with IOTN grades 4 and 5 remains high at St George's Hospital, indicating that appropriate referrals are being made.

  5. Antimicrobial Effect of Nano-Zinc Oxide and Nano-Chitosan Particles in Dental Composite Used in Orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AmirHossein Mirhashemi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Incidence of  white  spots due  to  demineralization of  enamel  and  gingival problems  is  an  unacceptable  result  of  orthodontic  treatment.  Plaque  accumulation  and bacterial biofilm growth are responsible for these phenomena. The resin-based dental composites used as bonding agents in orthodontics play a major role in mentioned problems. As recent researches assert the antimicrobial effects of chitosan (CS and zinc oxide (ZnO nanoparticles  (NPs,  it  seems  that  adding  these  nanoparticles  to  the  composite  can  be beneficial in reducing the number and function of microorganisms. The aim of this study was to  evaluate  the  antimicrobial  effects  of  ZnO-NP  and  CS-NP-containing  orthodontic composite.Methods: Antibacterial effectiveness of ZnO-NPs and CS-NPs was assessed in four groups against Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguis and Lactobacillus acidophilus grown both planktonic and as a biofilm on composites. One group as the unmodified control group and  three  groups  consisting  of  three  different  concentrations of  ZnO-NPs  and  CS-NPs mixture: 1%, 5% and 10% (1:1 w/w. 108 CFU/ml microorganism suspensions were provided with spectrophotometer. Biofilm formation was quantified by viable counts. Disc agar diffusion (DAD test was carried out to determine antimicrobial effects of nanoparticles by measuring the inhibition diameter on brain heart infusion agar plates. Finally,viable counts of microorganisms on days 3, 15 and 30 were collected for the antimicrobial effects of eluted components from composite discs.Results: In biofilm formation test, a reduction in bacterial counts was observed with 10% nanoparticle-containing composites compared with their unmodified counterpart. In the DAD test only 10% nanoparticle-containing specimens showed statistically significant inhibition. The only noticeable datain eluted component test was on day 30 for 10

  6. Interactive effects of periodontitis and orthodontic tooth movement on dental root resorption, tooth movement velocity and alveolar bone loss in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschneck, Christian; Fanghänel, Jochen; Wahlmann, Ulrich; Wolf, Michael; Roldán, J Camilo; Proff, Peter

    2017-03-01

    Many adult orthodontic patients suffer from chronic periodontitis with recurrent episodes of active periodontal inflammation. As their number is steadily increasing, orthodontists are more and more frequently challenged by respective treatment considerations. However, little is currently known regarding interactive effects on undesired dental root resorption (DRR), tooth movement velocity, periodontal bone loss and the underlying cellular and tissue reactions. A total of 63 male Fischer344 rats were used in three consecutive experiments employing 21 animals each (A/B/C), randomly assigned to 3 experimental groups (n=7, 1/2/3), respectively: (A) CBCT; (B) histology/serology; (C) RT-qPCR-(1) control; (2) orthodontic tooth movement (OTM) of the first/second upper left molars (NiTi coil spring, 0.25N); (3) OTM with experimentally induced periodontitis (cervical silk ligature). After 14days of OTM, we quantified blood leukocyte level, DRR, osteoclast activity and relative gene expression of inflammatory and osteoclast marker genes within the dental-periodontal tissue as well as tooth movement velocity and periodontal bone loss after 14 and 28 days. The experimentally induced periodontal bone loss was significantly increased by concurrent orthodontic force application. Periodontal inflammation during OTM on the other hand significantly augmented the extent of DRR, relative expression of inflammatory/osteoclast marker genes, blood leukocyte level and periodontal osteoclast activity. In addition, contrary to previous studies, we observed a significant increase in tooth movement velocity. Although accelerated tooth movement would be favourable for orthodontic treatment, our results suggest that orthodontic interventions should only be performed after successful systematic periodontal therapy and paused in case of recurrent active inflammation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of the growth of dental plaque on the surfaces of removable orthodontic aligners after the use of different cleaning methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levrini, Luca; Novara, Francesca; Margherini, Silvia; Tenconi, Camilla; Raspanti, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Advances in orthodontics are leading to the use of minimally invasive technologies, such as transparent removable aligners, and are able to meet high demands in terms of performance and esthetics. However, the most correct method of cleaning these appliances, in order to minimize the effects of microbial colonization, remains to be determined. The aim of the present study was to identify the most effective method of cleaning removable orthodontic aligners, analyzing the growth of dental plaque as observed under scanning electron microscopy. Twelve subjects were selected for the study. All were free from caries and periodontal disease and were candidates for orthodontic therapy with invisible orthodontic aligners. The trial had a duration of 6 weeks, divided into three 2-week stages, during which three sets of aligners were used. In each stage, the subjects were asked to use a different method of cleaning their aligners: 1) running water (control condition); 2) effervescent tablets containing sodium carbonate and sulfate crystals followed by brushing with a toothbrush; and 3) brushing alone (with a toothbrush and toothpaste). At the end of each 2-week stage, the surfaces of the aligners were analyzed under scanning electron microscopy. The best results were obtained with brushing combined with the use of sodium carbonate and sulfate crystals; brushing alone gave slightly inferior results. On the basis of previous literature results relating to devices in resin, studies evaluating the reliability of domestic ultrasonic baths for domestic use should be encouraged. At present, pending the availability of experimental evidence, it can be suggested that dental hygienists should strongly advise patients wearing orthodontic aligners to clean them using a combination of brushing and commercially available tablets for cleaning oral appliances.

  8. Caries preventive efficiency of therapeutic complex accomponying orthodontic treatment of children with initial dental caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denga A.E.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of orthodontic non-removable appliance in orthodontic treatment inter¬feres with the process of teeth mineralization, worsens level of oral cavity hygiene, stimulates development of caries process. The situation is complicated when a patient has an initial tooth decay. The aim of this study was to determine genetic characteristics of children with initial caries and clinical evaluation of effectiveness of the developed caries preventive therapeutic complex accompanying treatment of jaw facial anomalies (JFA. 47 children aged 12-14 with initial tooth decay participated in the examination. Complex diagnostics, including molecular genetic studies was carried out. Therapeutic complex for children, of the main group included remineralizing, adaptogenic, biogenic agents, which increase non-specific resistance, as well as infiltration ICON therapy before fixing braces. Caries preventive complex accompanying JFA treatment in children with primary tooth decay developed with regard to revealed genetic disorders of amelogenesis, 2-nd of phase detoxification, collagen formation, functional responses in the oral cavity, state of hard tissues of teeth and periodontal tissues enabled to preserve existing carious process, normalize periodontal and hygienic indices at all stages of treatment.

  9. The effect of using an audience response system on learning, motivation and information retention in the orthodontic teaching of undergraduate dental students: a cross-over trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaliwal, Harmeet Kaur; Allen, Mark; Kang, Jing; Bates, Claire; Hodge, Trevor

    2015-06-01

    New methods of teaching and learning are constantly being sought in the adult learning environment. Audience Response Systems (ARS) have been used in many different learning environments, especially in the field of medical education. The objective of this investigation was to ascertain the effect of ARS use in undergraduate teaching in a UK dental school. A cross-over clustered randomized educational trial. Leeds Dental Institute. Year 4 undergraduate dental students in orthodontics. Students at Leeds Dental Institute were taught two different topics within the curriculum to test the use of ARS in a cross-over trial. A questionnaire was delivered to the test (ARS) and control (non-ARS) groups. The response rate to the questionnaires was 89·5% (test group) and 82·9% (control group). The ARS enabled students to perform better as shown by knowledge retention (P = 0·013). Students found the seminar more interesting (P = 0·013), easier to concentrate (P = 0·025) and easier to participate in (P = 0·020) when ARS was used. When ARS was used, students were more able to answer questions (P<0·0001), were more likely to prepare for the seminar (P<0·0001) and significantly preferred using ARS (P<0·0001). ARS was found to significantly improve student concentration and participation in small group seminar teaching and significantly improved knowledge retention. ARS may be useful in facilitating orthodontic teaching in the future.

  10. Periodontic and orthodontic treatment in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Marianne M A; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2002-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an update of the interrelationship between periodontics and orthodontics in adults. Specific areas reviewed are the reaction of periodontal tissue to orthodontic forces, the influence of tooth movement on the periodontium, the effect of circumferential supracrestal fiberotomy in preventing orthodontic relapse, the effect of orthodontic treatment on the periodontium, microbiology associated with orthodontic bands, and mucogingival and esthetic considerations. In addition, the relationship between orthodontics and implants (eg, using dental implants for orthodontic anchorage) is discussed.

  11. Dental anomalies: prevalence and associations between them in a large sample of non-orthodontic subjects, a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laganà, G; Venza, N; Borzabadi-Farahani, A; Fabi, F; Danesi, C; Cozza, P

    2017-03-11

    To analyze the prevalence and associations between dental anomalies detectable on panoramic radiographs in a sample of non-orthodontic growing subjects. For this cross-sectional study, digital panoramic radiographs of 5005 subjects were initially screened from a single radiographic center in Rome. Inclusion criteria were: subjects who were aged 8-12 years, Caucasian, and had good diagnostic quality radiographs. Syndromic subjects, those with craniofacial malformation, or orthodontic patients were excluded and this led to a sample of 4706 subjects [mean (SD) age = 9.6 (1.2) years, 2366 males and 2340 females]. Sample was subsequently divided into four subgroups (8, 9, 10, and 11-12 year-old groups). Two operators examined panoramic radiographs to observe the presence of common dental anomalies. The prevalence and associations between dental anomalies were also investigated. The overall prevalence of dental anomalies was 20.9%. Approximately, 17.9% showed only one anomaly, 2.7% two anomalies, while only 0.3% had more than two anomalies. The most frequent anomalies were the displacement of maxillary canine (7.5%), hypodontia (7.1%), impacted teeth (3.9%), tooth ankylosis (2.8%), and tooth transposition (1.4%). The lower right second premolar was the most frequent missing teeth; 3.7% had only one tooth agenesis, and 0.08% had six or more missing tooth (Oligodontia). Mesiodens was the most common type of supernumerary tooth (0.66%). Two subjects had taurodontic tooth (0.04%). Tooth transpositions and displacement of maxillary canine were seen in 1.4 and 7.5%, retrospectively (approximately 69 and 58% were in the 8 and 9 year-old groups, retrospectively). Significant associations were detected between the different dental anomalies (P dental anomalies and provide further evidences to support common etiological factors.

  12. Association of Dental Anomalies with Different Types of Malocclusions in Pretreatment Orthodontic Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Dwijendra, K S; Parikh, Vishal; George, Soja Sara; Kukkunuru, Gururam Tej; Chowdary, Gali Nagarjuna

    2015-01-01

    Background: The study is planned to correlate the existence of dental anomalies with different types of malocclusion as the occurrence of anomalies is common in malocclusion. Materials and Methods: The present study was conducted among 430 patients with different types of malocclusion as 161 patients having Class I, 203 with Class II, and 66 with Class III malocclusion. The age of the patients ranged from 12 to 15 years. Diagnosis was done on the basis of history, clinical, cephalometric, rad...

  13. Difference between manual and digital measurements of dental arches of orthodontic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Gayosso, Sandra Isabel; Lara-Carrillo, Edith; López-González, Saraí; Medina-Solís, Carlo Eduardo; Scougall-Vilchis, Rogelio José; Hernández-Martínez, César Tadeo; Colomé-Ruiz, Gabriel Eduardo; Escoffié-Ramirez, Mauricio

    2018-06-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the differences between the measurements performed manually to those obtained using a digital model scanner of patients with orthodontic treatment.A cross-sectional study was performed in a sample of 30 study models from patients with permanent dentition who attended a university clinic between January 2010 and December 2015. For the digital measurement, a Maestro 3D Ortho Studio scanner (Italy) was used and Mitutoyo electronic Vernier calipers (Kawasaki, Japan) were used for manual measurement. The outcome variables were the measurements for maxillary intercanine width, mandibular intercanine width, maxillary intermolar width, mandibular intermolar width, overjet, overbite, maxillary arch perimeter, mandibular arch perimeter, and palate height. The independent variables, besides age and sex, were a series of arc characteristics. The Student t test, paired Student t test, and Pearson correlation in SPSS version 19 were used for the analysis.Of the models, 60% were from women. Two of nine measurements for pre-treatment and 6 of 9 measurements for post-treatment showed a difference. The variables that were different between the manual and digital measurements in the pre-treatment were maxillary intermolar width and palate height (P manually and digitally showed certain similarities for both vertical and transverse measurements. There are many advantages offered to the orthodontist, such as easy storage; savings in time and space; facilitating the reproducibility of information; and conferring the security of not deteriorating over time. Its main disadvantage is the cost.

  14. Comparison of changes in the transverse dental axis between patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion and facial asymmetry treated by orthognathic surgery with and without presurgical orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Han-Sol; Choi, Sung-Hwan; Cha, Jung-Yul; Lee, Kee-Joon; Yu, Hyung-Seog

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate transverse skeletal and dental changes, including those in the buccolingual dental axis, between patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion and facial asymmetry after bilateral intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy with and without presurgical orthodontic treatment. This retrospective study included 29 patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion and facial asymmetry including menton deviation > 4 mm from the midsagittal plane. To evaluate changes in transverse skeletal and dental variables (i.e., buccolingual inclination of the upper and lower canines and first molars), the data for 16 patients who underwent conventional orthognathic surgery (CS) were compared with those for 13 patients who underwent preorthodontic orthognathic surgery (POGS), using three-dimensional computed tomography at initial examination, 1 month before surgery, and at 7 days and 1 year after surgery. The 1-year postsurgical examination revealed no significant changes in the postoperative transverse dental axis in the CS group. In the POGS group, the upper first molar inclined lingually on both sides (deviated side, -1.8° ± 2.8°, p = 0.044; nondeviated side, -3.7° ± 3.3°, p = 0.001) and the lower canine inclined lingually on the nondeviated side (4.0° ± 5.4°, p = 0.022) during postsurgical orthodontic treatment. There were no significant differences in the skeletal and dental variables between the two groups at 1 year after surgery. POGS may be a clinically acceptable alternative to CS as a treatment to achieve stable transverse axes of the dentition in both arches in patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion and facial asymmetry.

  15. Assessment of malocclusion severity and orthodontic treatment needs in 12-15-year-old school children of Namakkal District, Tamil Nadu, using Dental Aesthetic Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagalakshmi, S; James, S; Rahila, C; Balachandar, K; Satish, R

    2017-01-01

    The present study was aimed to assess the severity of malocclusion and orthodontic treatment needs among 12-15-year-old schoolchildren in rural area of Namakkal district, Tamil Nadu, India, using the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI). A cross-sectional study was conducted among a sample of 1078 schoolchildren (12-15 years of age) who were selected by two-stage cluster sampling technique. Severity of malocclusion and orthodontic treatment needs were assessed according to the DAI using a specially designed survey pro forma with the aid of the WHO's Oral Health Survey: Basic Methods. Based on the distribution of data, analysis of variance and unpaired student t-test were used. Out of the total of 1078 children examined, 528 (49%) were males and 550 (57%) were females. The results indicate that 82.74% of the schoolchildren were found with little or no malocclusion requiring no orthodontic treatment. The gender-wise distribution of DAI score among children aged 12 years had significant difference between males (20.43 ± 3.67) and females (21.62 ± 4.335) (P = 0.015) and children aged 15 years also showed highly significant difference among gender (P = 0.000). Malocclusion not only impacts the appearance of the person but also affects the self-esteem and psychological well-being. This is the first step in understanding the treatment need so that further steps can be taken in preventive and interceptive care.

  16. 21 CFR 872.5500 - Extraoral orthodontic headgear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Extraoral orthodontic headgear. 872.5500 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 872.5500 Extraoral orthodontic headgear. (a) Identification. An extraoral orthodontic headgear is a device intended for use with an orthodontic appliance to...

  17. Dental and skeletal changes in mild to moderate Class II malocclusions treated by either a Twin-block or Xbow appliance followed by full fixed orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehsani, Sayeh; Nebbe, Brian; Normando, David; Lagravere, Manuel O; Flores-Mir, Carlos

    2015-11-01

    To compare the short-term skeletal and dental effects of two-phase orthodontic treatment including either a Twin-block or an XBow appliance. This was a retrospective clinical trial of 50 consecutive Class II cases treated in a private practice with either a Twin-block (25) or XBow (25) appliance followed by full fixed orthodontic treatment. To factor out growth, an untreated Class II control group (25) was considered. A MANOVA of treatment/observation changes followed by univariate pairwise comparisons showed that the maxilla moved forward less in the treatment groups than in the control group. As for mandibular changes, the corpus length increase was larger in the Twin-block group by 3.9 mm. Dentally, mesial movement of mandibular molars was greater in both treatment groups. Although no distalization of maxillary molars was found in either treatment group, restriction of mesial movement of these teeth was seen in both treatment groups. Both treatment groups demonstrated increased mandibular incisor proclination with larger increases for the XBow group by 3.3°. The Wits value was decreased by 1.6 mm more in the Twin-block group. No sex-related differences were observed. Class II correction using an XBow or Twin-block followed by fixed appliances occurs through a relatively similar combination of dental and skeletal effects. An increase in mandibular incisor inclination for the XBow group and an increased corpus length for the Twin-block group were notable exceptions. No overall treatment length differences were seen.

  18. Assessment of malocclusion severity and orthodontic treatment needs in 12–15-year-old school children of Namakkal District, Tamil Nadu, using Dental Aesthetic Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Nagalakshmi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The present study was aimed to assess the severity of malocclusion and orthodontic treatment needs among 12–15-year-old schoolchildren in rural area of Namakkal district, Tamil Nadu, India, using the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among a sample of 1078 schoolchildren (12–15 years of age who were selected by two-stage cluster sampling technique. Severity of malocclusion and orthodontic treatment needs were assessed according to the DAI using a specially designed survey pro forma with the aid of the WHO's Oral Health Survey: Basic Methods. Based on the distribution of data, analysis of variance and unpaired student t-test were used. Results: Out of the total of 1078 children examined, 528 (49% were males and 550 (57% were females. The results indicate that 82.74% of the schoolchildren were found with little or no malocclusion requiring no orthodontic treatment. The gender-wise distribution of DAI score among children aged 12 years had significant difference between males (20.43 ± 3.67 and females (21.62 ± 4.335 (P = 0.015 and children aged 15 years also showed highly significant difference among gender (P = 0.000. Conclusion: Malocclusion not only impacts the appearance of the person but also affects the self-esteem and psychological well-being. This is the first step in understanding the treatment need so that further steps can be taken in preventive and interceptive care.

  19. Correlations between the changes in patients' dental-facial morphology at the end of the orthodontic treatment and the psychological variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaida, Ligia; Pirte, Adriana; Corega, Claudia; Slăvescu, D; Muţiu, Gabriela

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to assess the impact that the improvement of patients' dental-facial morphology has at the end of the orthodontic treatment upon the following psychological variables: self-esteem, current self-related thoughts as well as upon the variables of social self-esteem and performance. The number of patients included in the study was of 168 (82 children and 86 adolescents) who carried out the orthodontic treatment. At the end of the active treatment, we applied to all patients the assessment instruments for the level of self- esteem and self-related current thoughts: the Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale and the Heatherton & Polivy Current Thoughts Scale. As far as the patients in the study are concerned, the improvement of their facial aspect at the end of the treatment showed a significantly positive correlation with the variables of global self-esteem, self-related current thoughts, social self-esteem and performance, with the exception of the girls in children study group who showed no correlations between physical aspect and the performance variable.

  20. Dentistry's oldest specialty: orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Raymond

    2009-01-01

    The American Association of Orthodontists (AAO) has 15,500 members worldwide and is the oldest and largest of the recognized dental specialties. A strategic planning process has identified six key challenges, and this article describes the progress that is being made in the areas of (a) consumer education, (b) volunteer leadership development, (c) recruitment and retention of orthodontic educators, (d) relationships with ADA and other healthcare organizations, (e) the AAO's role in international orthodontics, and (f) advocacy. The AAO is working for freedom of choice in dental healthcare providers; fee-for-service dental care; orthodontic insurance coverage as a benefit of employment, with direct reimbursement as the preferred plan; self-referred access to specialists; private and public funding that promote quality orthodontic care; and the retention of tax deductibility of dental healthcare benefits, including orthodontic care.

  1. The Effect of Awareness of American Board of Orthodontics Criteria on Treatment Outcomes in a Postgraduate Dental Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Rahime Burcu Nur; Nalbantgil, Didem; Ozdemir, Fulya

    2016-09-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the posttreatment outcomes in a postgraduate orthodontic clinic following a course on American Board of Orthodontics Cast and Radiograph Evaluation (ABO-CRE); to compare the outcomes of postgraduate students who took the course before and after finishing treatment of their cases; and to assess if the need for orthodontic treatment as determined by the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN) at the beginning of treatment affected students' final scores. A course on ABO-CRE was given to second- (group A), third- (group B), and fourth- (group C) year postgraduate students at Yeditepe University, Istanbul, Turkey, in 2012. Pre- and posttreatment plaster models of 253 cases (group A) were treated by students in 2011-12. An additional 251 (group B, 2012-13) and 341 (group C, 2013-14) cases were evaluated in the first and second years after the course, respectively. The models were graded retrospectively using the ABO-CRE and IOTN. The results showed that the total mean scores on the posttreatment plaster models were significantly higher in the pre-course group than the first- and second-year post-course group (porthodontic treatment. Increasing awareness by giving information about the ABO-CRE significantly improved the posttreatment success of these postgraduate students. After the course, treatment outcomes in the following year were better than two years later, suggesting it may be useful to teach the course annually to refresh students' knowledge.

  2. Evaluation of Subgingival Dental Plaque Microbiota Changes In Fixed Orthodontic Patients with Syber Green Real Time PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Sargolzaie

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the most common problems we confront in orthodontic therapy is periodontal diseases. Initial factor which causes these diseases is colonization of anaerobic microorganisms in subgingival plaque. Technically, local environmental changes related to orthodontic band and brackets may influence the bacterial species in periodontal plaque. However, it seems necessary to assess variations in subgingival plaque caused by orthodontic appliances. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in subgingival microbiota and clinical parameters before and after bracket placement. Methods: Clinical parameters including probing depth (PD, plaque index (PI, clinical attachment level (CAL, bleeding on probing (BOP and gingival index (GI were recorded and subgingival microbial samples were collected in 30 people aged between 13 and 25. As a control group, 15 persons getting matched as to their age and sex with no need to orthodontic treatment were opted using specific primers, SYBER Green Real-Time PCR was carried out in order to determine bacterial flora in stored samples. All mentioned procedures were reassessed in experimental group and in control group three months after band and bracket bonding. A descriptive analysis was conducted, and paired t test and Wilcoxon test were used for differences between groups (P

  3. Insertion torque recordings for the diagnosis of contact between orthodontic mini-implants and dental roots: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meursinge Reynders, Reint; Ladu, Luisa; Ronchi, Laura; Di Girolamo, Nicola; de Lange, Jan; Roberts, Nia; Plüddemann, Annette

    2016-03-31

    Most orthodontic mini-implants (OMIs) are inserted between dental roots. The prevalence of contacting these structures is high. Such contacts can cause permanent root damage and implant instability. Increased torque levels during implant insertion (the index test) could be a more accurate and immediate measure for diagnosing implant-root contact (the target condition) than radiographs (the reference standard) and could ultimately lead to a reduction or elimination of X-ray exposure. To address this issue, we asked three questions: (1) whether OMIs with root contact had higher insertion torque values than those without, (2) what is the accuracy of the index test compared with the reference standard to diagnose the target condition and what are the adverse effects of the index test, and (3) whether intermediate torque values have clinical diagnostic utility. Methods were conducted according to our published protocol, which was based on the PRISMA-P 2015 statement. We applied broad spectrum eligibility criteria that included randomized and non-randomized studies on clinical, animal, and cadaver models. Not including such models would be unethical because it could slow down knowledge creation on the adverse effects of implant insertion. We conducted searches in more than 40 electronic databases including MEDLINE and 10 journals were hand-searched. Grey literature and reference lists were also searched. All research procedures were conducted independently by three reviewers. Authors of selected studies were contacted to obtain additional information. Outcomes on the three different research models were analysed separately. Systematic error was assessed with the Cochrane 'Risk of bias tool' for non-randomized studies. One clinical, two animal, and two cadaver studies fulfilled the eligibility criteria of the first research question. All studies and subgroups demonstrated higher insertion torque values for OMIs with the target condition than those without. Mean

  4. Clear aligners in orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, T

    2017-03-01

    Since the introduction of the Tooth Positioner (TP Orthodontics) in 1944, removable appliances analogous to clear aligners have been employed for mild to moderate orthodontic tooth movements. Clear aligner therapy has been a part of orthodontic practice for decades, but has, particularly since the introduction of Invisalign appliances (Align Technology) in 1998, become an increasingly common addition to the orthodontic armamentarium. An internet search reveals at least 27 different clear aligner products currently on offer for orthodontic treatment. The present paper will highlight the increasing popularity of clear aligner appliances, as well as the clinical scope and the limitations of aligner therapy in general. Further, the paper will outline the differences between the various types of clear aligner products currently available. © 2017 Australian Dental Association.

  5. 21 CFR 872.5470 - Orthodontic plastic bracket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Orthodontic plastic bracket. 872.5470 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 872.5470 Orthodontic plastic bracket. (a) Identification. An orthodontic plastic bracket is a plastic device intended to be bonded to a tooth to apply...

  6. An update on periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships

    OpenAIRE

    Dannan, Aous

    2010-01-01

    Talking about periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships is related primarily to the 1960s, where a generalized increase in salivary bacterial counts, especially Lactobacillus, had been shown after orthodontic band placement. The purpose of this article is to provide the dental practitioner with basic understanding of the interrelationship between periodontics and orthodontics by means of representing classical studies, and, to give an update on this topic by demonstrating the most recent opi...

  7. Review Article: A Review Of Adult Orthodontics – Role Of The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adjunctive and comprehensive orthodontic treatments are the main types of orthodontic therapy recommended for adult malocclusion. The orthodontic therapy and refer to the specialist appropriately. KEY WORDS: Review, Adult Orthodontics, General Dental Practitioner. Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice Vol.7(1) 2004: ...

  8. An update on periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannan, Aous

    2010-01-01

    Talking about periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships is related primarily to the 1960s, where a generalized increase in salivary bacterial counts, especially Lactobacillus, had been shown after orthodontic band placement. The purpose of this article is to provide the dental practitioner with basic understanding of the interrelationship between periodontics and orthodontics by means of representing classical studies, and, to give an update on this topic by demonstrating the most recent opinions concerning periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships. Specific areas reviewed are the ability of orthodontic treatment to afford some degree of protection against periodontal breakdown, short-term and long-term effects of orthodontic treatment on the periodontium, and some mucogingival considerations. Topics considering orthodontic treatment in periodontally compromised patients were not included in this review. While past studies have shown that orthodontic treatment can positively affect the periodontal health, recent reviews indicate an absence of reliable evidence for the positive effects of orthodontic therapy on patients' periodontal status. Periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships are still controversial issues. However, a standard language between the periodontist and the orthodontist must always be established to eliminate the existing communications barrier, and to improve the outcomes of the whole treatment.

  9. An update on periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dannan Aous

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Talking about periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships is related primarily to the 1960s, where a generalized increase in salivary bacterial counts, especially Lactobacillus, had been shown after orthodontic band placement. The purpose of this article is to provide the dental practitioner with basic understanding of the interrelationship between periodontics and orthodontics by means of representing classical studies, and, to give an update on this topic by demonstrating the most recent opinions concerning periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships. Specific areas reviewed are the ability of orthodontic treatment to afford some degree of protection against periodontal breakdown, short-term and long-term effects of orthodontic treatment on the periodontium, and some mucogingival considerations. Topics considering orthodontic treatment in periodontally compromised patients were not included in this review. While past studies have shown that orthodontic treatment can positively affect the periodontal health, recent reviews indicate an absence of reliable evidence for the positive effects of orthodontic therapy on patients′ periodontal status. Periodontic-orthodontic interrelationships are still controversial issues. However, a standard language between the periodontist and the orthodontist must always be established to eliminate the existing communications barrier, and to improve the outcomes of the whole treatment.

  10. Orthodontics at a Pivotal Point of Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jeremy J.

    2014-01-01

    The profession of orthodontics is projected to face a multitude of challenges. Do cyclic forces accelerate the rate of tooth movement and hence the speed of orthodontic treatment? Would bioengineered cementum and dentine be a solution to root resorption? What would orthodontics be like when bioengineered periodontal ligament and alveolar bone become clinical practice, or one day, entire teeth are bioengineered? Would it be possible to selectively differentiate stem cells into osteoblasts or osteoclasts by either static or cyclic forces? What is the new demand on orthodontic expertise with increasingly automated appliances? What will be the impact of the next generation of dental implants or rapid prototyped crowns on orthodontics? A century ago, Edward Angle’s practice of fixed appliances, along with other seminal contributions, such as functional appliances, established the profession of orthodontics. Today, the biophysical principles of orthodontics remain largely unchanged from Angle’s era, despite incremental refinements of brackets and wires. The paucity of fundamental innovations in orthodontics for decades presents intrinsic risks for the profession. This review will identify challenges for contemporary orthodontics and delineate strategies for the profession to evolve in an era of unprecedented scientific and technological advances, and serve as a call to action for the orthodontic profession. PMID:25018618

  11. Orthodontic scars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Reddy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic therapy apart from its benefits also has potential risks and limitations in terms of tissue damage. Fortunately, in orthodontics, risks are minimal and infrequent However, all potential risks and limitations should be considered and addressed when making the decision to undergo orthodontic treatment. Orthodontic treatment carries with it the risk of various types of soft and hard tissue damages (e.g. decalcification of enamel, lacerations, ulcerations, temporomandibular joint disorders, etc-, apart from treatment failure in itself. If correcting a malocclusion is to be of benefit, the advantages offered should outweigh any possible damage- All preventive procedures should be considered during and after orthodontic treatment to restore the normal health of soft and hard tissues. Hence, the orthodontist should be vigilant and prudent enough in assessing and monitoring every aspect of these tissues at any given stage and time in order to achieve a healthy and successful final result.

  12. The prevalence of malocclusion and orthodontic treatment needs in school going children of Nalagarh, Himachal Pradesh, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarabjeet Singh

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: There seems a discrepancy in the proportion of children needing orthodontic treatment on esthetic and dental health grounds. This study provides baseline data on the need and demand for orthodontic treatment among the sample which is important for planning public orthodontic and dental services.

  13. Insertion torque recordings for the diagnosis of contact between orthodontic mini-implants and dental roots: protocol for a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meursinge Reynders, Reint; Ladu, Luisa; Ronchi, Laura; Di Girolamo, Nicola; de Lange, Jan; Roberts, Nia; Plüddemann, Annette

    2015-04-02

    Hitting a dental root during the insertion of orthodontic mini-implants (OMIs) is a common adverse effect of this intervention. This condition can permanently damage these structures and can cause implant instability. Increased torque levels (index test) recorded during the insertion of OMIs may provide a more accurate and immediate diagnosis of implant-root contact (target condition) than radiographic imaging (reference standard). An accurate index test could reduce or eliminate X-ray exposure. These issues, the common use of OMIs, the high prevalence of the target condition, and because most OMIs are placed between roots warrant a systematic review. We will assess 1) the diagnostic accuracy and the adverse effects of the index test, 2) whether OMIs with root contact have higher insertion torque values than those without, and 3) whether intermediate torque values have clinical diagnostic utility. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic review and Meta-Analysis Protocols (PRISMA-P) 2015 statement was used as a the guideline for reporting this protocol. Inserting implants deliberately into dental roots of human participants would not be approved by ethical review boards and adverse effects of interventions are generally underreported. We will therefore apply broad spectrum eligibility criteria, which will include clinical, animal and cadaver models. Not including these models could slow down knowledge translation. Both randomized and non-randomized research studies will be included. Comparisons of interest and subgroups are pre-specified. We will conduct searches in MEDLINE and more than 40 other electronic databases. We will search the grey literature and reference lists and hand-search ten journals. All methodological procedures will be conducted by three reviewers. Study selection, data extraction and analyses, and protocols for contacting authors and resolving conflicts between reviewers are described. Designed specific risk of bias tools will be tailored

  14. SURGICAL ORTHODONTICS: LITERATURE REVIEW AND CASE REPORT

    OpenAIRE

    Piyush HEDA; Babita RAGHUWANSHI; Amit PRAKASH; Kishore SONAWANE

    2013-01-01

    Orthognathic surgery is a surgical procedure largely practiced throughout the world for the correction of various maxillofacial deformities. The procedure for correcting a particular deformity will be done after proper evaluation, which includes cephalometric, dental model analysis and photographs. The patient undergoes pre-surgical orthodontic correction for dental compensation, after which surgery is planned. During the last few decades, the profession has witnessed ...

  15. Orthodontic treatment in patients with aggressive periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Cássio Volponi; Saraiva, Luciana; Bauer, Flávio Paim Falcão; Kimura, Rui Yoshio; Souto, Maria Luisa Silveira; Bernardo, Carlos Cheque; Pannuti, Cláudio Mendes; Romito, Giuseppe Alexandre; Pustiglioni, Francisco Emílio

    2018-04-01

    Aggressive periodontitis (AP) is a condition that promotes breakdown of the periodontal tissues in a short time. In severe cases, pathologic migration of teeth and tooth loss can occur, producing esthetic and functional problems for the patient. Orthodontic treatment may be recommended to restore esthetics and masticatory function. We assessed the effects of orthodontic movement in the periodontal tissues of treated patients with AP. Ten subjects (ages 25.0 ± 5.22 years) with AP received periodontal treatment followed by orthodontic treatment. Maintenance sessions were performed monthly under a strict dental biofilm control. They were compared with 10 periodontally healthy subjects (ages 22.9 ± 5.23 years) who received orthodontic treatment. Probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level, bleeding on probing, and dental plaque index were measured at baseline, after orthodontic treatment, and after 4 months. Statistical analysis showed improvement in all clinical parameters between baseline and 4 months after orthodontic treatment: probing pocket depth (0.29 mm), clinical attachment level (0.38 mm), bleeding on probing (4.0%), and dental plaque index (11%). The periodontal parameters of the AP patients remained stable during orthodontic treatment under strict biofilm control. Copyright © 2018 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Laser Applications in Orthodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Somayeh; Torkan, Sepideh

    2013-01-01

    A laser is a collimated single wavelength of light which delivers a concentrated source of energy. Soon after different types of lasers were invented, investigators began to examine the effects of different wavelengths of laser energy on oral tissues, routine dental procedures and experimental applications. Orthodontists, along with other specialist in different fields of dentistry, can now benefit from several different advantages that lasers provide during the treatment process, from the beginning of the treatment, when separators are placed, to the time of resin residues removal from the tooth surface at the end of orthodontic treatment. This article outlines some of the most common usages of laser beam in orthodontics and also provides a comparison between laser and other conventional method that were the standard of care prior to the advent of laser in this field. PMID:25606324

  17. Orthodontic exposure of multiple lmpactions: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munda-Lacson, Maridin C; Venugopal, Adith

    2014-01-01

    There are rare cases of impacted permanent central incisors with dilacerations, a dental deformity characterized by pronounced angulations of the longitudinal tooth axis. Impaction of maxillary canines is an orthodontic anomaly that causes facial and dentoalveolar system problems, both functional and esthetic. A combination of surgery and orthodontics is important in bringing impacted teeth to their ideal position in the dental arch. This is a case report of a 10-year-old patient with impacted and dilacerated right central incisor and impacted left maxillary canine, following surgical exposure and appropriate orthodontic traction, the impacted teeth were surgically exposed and aligned into the dental arch.

  18. Myths and realities in orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, P S; Springate, S D; Chate, R A C

    2015-02-16

    Comprehensive orthodontic treatment typically comprises an initial phase of alignment over a period of four to six months, followed by vertical, transverse and antero-posterior corrections, space closure, finishing and detailing to enhance dental and facial aesthetics and function. Each course of treatment involves a series of decisions and alternatives relating to objectives, appliance design and treatment mechanics. In recent years there has been increasing interest in short-term approaches to treatment with more limited objectives and the avoidance of phases traditionally considered integral to successful treatment. In this review the veracity of accepted truths in orthodontics are discussed; specifically, the importance of initial molar relationship, final incisor relationship, the merits of orthodontic extractions, anticipated treatment times, the value of modern fixed appliance systems, the importance of torque expression and the relative merits of bonded retainers and inter-proximal reduction are considered.

  19. Oral health: orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martonffy, Andrea Ildiko

    2015-01-01

    Improper tooth alignment due to crowding, malocclusion, and missing teeth can cause difficulties with eating and speech, and premature wear. It is estimated that more than 20% of children would benefit from orthodontic treatment to correct these conditions, many of which will persist into adulthood if not corrected. Orthodontic care is gaining popularity among adults for similar concerns, as well as for correction of cosmetic issues. The psychological effects of malocclusion should not be ignored. The American Association of Orthodontists recommends that all children undergo evaluation at the first recognition of an orthodontic condition and no later than age 7 years. Some children will need early treatment to help eliminate developing conditions and improve the foundations of the bite, which can ease later treatment in adolescence. For others, treatment in adolescence without early treatment is recommended. Standard cemented braces or clear, removable aligners may be used, depending on the patient's corrective needs. Average treatment time is approximately 2 years; this may be shortened by the use of accelerative techniques. Routine preventive dental care should be continued during the treatment period. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  20. High-intensity laser application in Orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Franzotti Sant’Anna

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: In dental practice, low-level laser therapy (LLLT and high-intensity laser therapy (HILT are mainly used for dental surgery and biostimulation therapy. Within the Orthodontic specialty, while LLLT has been widely used to treat pain associated with orthodontic movement, accelerate bone regeneration after rapid maxillary expansion, and enhance orthodontic tooth movement, HILT, in turn, has been seen as an alternative for addressing soft tissue complications associated to orthodontic treatment. Objective: The aim of this study is to discuss HILT applications in orthodontic treatment. Methods: This study describes the use of HILT in surgical treatments such as gingivectomy, ulotomy, ulectomy, fiberotomy, labial and lingual frenectomies, as well as hard tissue and other dental restorative materials applications. Conclusion: Despite the many applications for lasers in Orthodontics, they are still underused by Brazilian practitioners. However, it is quite likely that this demand will increase over the next years - following the trend in the USA, where laser therapies are more widely used.

  1. Frequency and distribution of developmental anomalies in the permanent teeth of a Turkish orthodontic patient population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Kazanci

    2011-06-01

    Conclusion: The prevalence of developmental dental anomalies was higher in females than males. Impacted teeth were the most common developmental dental anomaly in this Turkish orthodontic population, followed by hypodontia.

  2. The management of traumatic ankylosis during orthodontics: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNamara, T G

    2000-01-01

    Dental ankylosis may be a significant complication in orthodontic clinical practice. This case report describes the management of a malocclusion, complicated by an ankylosed maxillary central incisor, which arose during orthodontic treatment, following an acute traumatic injury. The use of the ankylosed incisor in successfully managing the significant Class II division 1 malocclusion is described.

  3. ORTHODONTIC DEVICES VS. ALLERGIC REACTIONS IN CHILDREN AND YOUNG ADULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Sodor

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Scope. The scope of the study was to evaluate the adverse reactions upon the intra- and extraoral tissues, produced by the insertion of orthodontic devices, on a populational group of Romania, for determining the frequencies of the allergic reactions and for comparing them with the sex, age, urban/rural background, malocclusion, orthodontic device, oral hygiene prior to and during the orthodontic treatment. Materials and method. The observation sheets of 621 patients (255 boys and 366 girls with ages between 6 and 29 years, from the Orthodontics Clinics of the Policlinics of the “Sf. Spiridon” Urgency Hospital and from a private orthodontic consulting room of Iaşi, have been statistically evaluated with the SPSS 17.0 for Windows program. Results. Pearson correlation and linear regression evidenced the relations between the adverse reactions produced during the orthodontic treatment, on one side, and the age, dental hygiene and types of orthodontic devices, on the other. The results obtained put into evidence significant relations between the adolescent age and the allergy to nickel manifested in antecedents, between the scarce oral hygiene of the patients prior to the orthodontic treatment and gingival enlargement, between the scarce oral hygiene of the patients during the orthodontic treatment and the localized or generalized gingivitis and the bleedings and gingival overgrowths, between the mobile orthodontic devices and the allergic reactions to acrylic resins (p and t = 0.000. Relevant connections have been also evidenced between the fixed orthodontic devices and the allergic reactions to the polymeric biomaterials from the orthodontic devices (p = 0.005 and t = 0.034. Conclusions. Statistical evaluation of the adverse effects induced by orthodontic devices may be used for stating the development of allergic reactions to the substances entering the composition of orthodontic devices, with reference to the cytotoxicology and

  4. the orthodontic management of an adult with sickle cell disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-09-01

    Sep 1, 2015 ... a patient with Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) needs ortho- dontic treatment ... Orthodontic Management. 215. Measures ... under strict control by the Dental Hygienists to avoid ... Ghana. Pediatrics 2008; 121 (suppl 2): 120-121. 2.

  5. Plaque, caries level and oral hygiene habits in young patients receiving orthodontic treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martignon, S; Ekstrand, K R; Lemos, M I

    2010-01-01

    To assess plaque, caries, and oral hygiene habits amongst patients receiving fixed-orthodontic treatment at the Dental-Clinic, Universidad-El-Bosque, Bogotá, Colombia.......To assess plaque, caries, and oral hygiene habits amongst patients receiving fixed-orthodontic treatment at the Dental-Clinic, Universidad-El-Bosque, Bogotá, Colombia....

  6. Differences of protein profile before and after orthodontic treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasri, Farah Amirah Mohd; Wahab, Rohaya Megat Abdul; Karsani, Saiful Anuar; Ariffin, Shahrul Hisham Zainal

    2016-11-01

    Mechanical forces in orthodontic treatment used to treat malocclusion can cause inflamed gingival tissue and the process of tooth movement may resorb dental root. Root resorption is an iatrogenic effect of orthodontic treatment but it can be monitored using protein biomarker. This study aims to investigate the differences of protein profile before and after orthodontic treatment using different staining methods. Human gingival crevicular fluid and saliva were collected from orthodontic patients before and after treatment. Protein profile were observed using SDS-PAGE. Our study shows down regulation of proteins after 3 months of treatment. Hence, there are potential values from this study to aid in investigation for specific biomarkers for root resorption.

  7. Surgical orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohl, Alexis M; Vitkus, Lauren

    2017-08-01

    The article reviews some commonly used orthodontic treatments as well as new strategies to assist in the correction of malocclusion. Many techniques are used in conjunction with surgical intervention and are a necessary compliment to orthognathic surgery. Basic knowledge of these practices will aid in the surgeon's ability to adequately treat the patient. Many orthodontists and surgeons are eliminating presurgical orthodontics to adopt a strategy of 'surgery first' orthodontics in orthognathic surgery. This has the benefit of immediate improvement in facial aesthetics and shorter treatment times. The advent of virtual surgical planning has helped facilitate the development of this new paradigm by making surgical planning faster and easier. Furthermore, using intraoperative surgical navigation is improving overall precision and outcomes. A variety of surgical and nonsurgical treatments may be employed in the treatment of malocclusion. It is important to be familiar with all options available and tailor the patient's treatment plan accordingly. Surgery-first orthodontics, intraoperative surgical navigation, virtual surgical planning, and 3D printing are evolving new techniques that are producing shorter treatment times and subsequently improving patient satisfaction without sacrificing long-term stability.

  8. An application of the Health Action Process Approach model to oral hygiene behaviour and dental plaque in adolescents with fixed orthodontic appliances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheerman, J.F.M.; Empelen, P. van; Loveren, C. van; Pakpour, A.H.; Meijel, B. van; Gholami, M.; Mierzaie, Z.; Braak, M.C.T. van; Verrips, G.H.W.

    2017-01-01

    Background. The Health Action Process Approach (HAPA) model addresses health behaviours, but it has never been applied to model adolescents’ oral hygiene behaviour during fixed orthodontic treatment. Aim. This study aimed to apply the HAPA model to explain adolescents’ oral hygiene behaviour and

  9. Dental Health and Orthodontic Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a famous toothpaste commercial of yesteryear. Dr. Jim Steiner, director of pediatric dentistry at Children’s Hospital in ... can be painted onto permanent teeth. As Dr. Steiner explains, “Fluoride protects the areas between the teeth. ...

  10. [Orthodontic treatment of Class III patients with mandibular asymmetry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yin-Zhong; Huo, Na; Chen, Lei; Chen, Xue-Peng; Lin, Yang

    2008-12-01

    To investigate the treatment outcome of Class III patients with dental, functional and mild skeletal mandibular asymmetry. Thirty-five patients (14 males and 21 females) with dental, functional and mild skeletal mandibular asymmetry were selected. The age range of the patients was 7 - 22 years with a mean age of 16.5 years. Dental mandibular asymmetry was treated with expansion of maxillary arch to help the mandible returning to normal position. Functional mandibular asymmetry was treated with activator or asymmetrical protraction and Class III elastics. Mild skeletal mandibular asymmetry was treated with camouflage treatment. Good occlusal relationships were achieved and facial esthetics was greatly improved after orthodontic treatment in patients with dental and functional mandibular asymmetry. However, patients with skeletal mandibular asymmetry should be treated with both extraction and genioplasty. Orthodontic treatment was suitable for patients with dental and functional mandibular asymmetry, while combined orthodontics and surgery could get good results in patients with skeletal mandibular asymmetry.

  11. Effect of drugs on orthodontic tooth movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Sarah Aulia Amrullah

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic tooth movement is basically a biological response to mechanical forces given to the teeth in orthodontic treatment, which involving the periodontal tissue and alveolar bone, resulting in the release of numerous substances from the dental tissues and surrounding structure. Remodeling changes in periodontal tissues are considered to be essential in effecting orthodontic tooth movement which is the base of orthodontic correction. Molecules produced in various diseased tissues or drugs and nutrients consumed regularly by patients, can influence mechanically stressed periodontal tissue through the circulation and interact with target cell combination of which may be inhibitory, additive or synergize. Medications might have an important influence on the rate of tooth movement, and information on their consumption is essential to adequately discuss treatment planning with patients. Therefore it is imperative to the practitioners being in medical profession, must pay close attention to the drug consumption history of every patient before and during the course of treatment.

  12. Surgically facilitated orthodontic treatment : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogeveen, Eelke J.; Jansma, Johan; Ren, Yijin

    INTRODUCTION: Corticotomy and dental distraction have been proposed as effective and safe methods to shorten orthodontic treatment duration in adolescent and adult patients. A systematic review was performed to evaluate the evidence supporting these claims. METHODS: PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane

  13. Craniofacial orthodontics and postgraduate orthodontic training in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The least clinical experience was recorded in pre-bone graft orthodontics (7.4%) and orthodontic preparation for orthognathic surgery (5.5%). Some of the challenges highlighted by the residents were low patients turn out for orthodontic care and the absence of multidisciplinary treatment for craniofacial patients in their ...

  14. [Effect of body image in adolescent orthodontic treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minghui, Peng; Jing, Kang; Xiao, Deng

    2017-10-01

    This study was designed to probe the psychological factors adolescent orthodontic patients, the role of body image and self-esteem in the whole process of orthodontic treatment and the impact on the efficacy and satisfaction of orthodontic. Five hundred and twenty-eight patients were selected in this study. The Aesthetic Component of the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN-AC) , Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (SES), Negative Physical Self-General (NPS-G) and other body analysis scale study after orthodontic lasted 18-24 months were used to investigate the role of body image in adolescent orthodontic treatment. Esthetic evaluation of patients teeth after correction had been significantly improved, patient self-evaluation difference IOTN-AC doctor evaluation, Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire-tooth confidence, aesthetic concerns, psychological impact and social function were significantly improved. The improvement of the dental aesthetics component (T2 when doctors evaluate IOTN-AC) was positively correlated with the evaluation of the efficacy, and was significantly negatively correlated with the negative emotions of patients at baseline. Negative body image-dental dissatisfied-cognitive component and the affective component, the overall negative body image and negative emotions can predict patient satisfaction with treatment efficacy. Orthodontic treatment not only improves the self-aesthetic evaluation of adolescent patients, but also has a positive effect on the mental health of adolescent patients.

  15. Adhesives for orthodontic bracket bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Déborah Daniella Diniz Fonseca

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The advent of acid etching, introduced by Buonocore in 1955, brought the possibility of bonding between the bracket base and enamel, contributing to more esthetic and conservative orthodontics. This direct bracket bonding technique has brought benefits such as reduced cost and time in performing the treatment, as well as making it easier to perform oral hygiene. The aim of this study was to conduct a survey of published studies on orthodontic bracket bonding to dental enamel. It was verified that resin composites and glass ionomer are the most studied and researched materials for this purpose. Resin-modified glass ionomer, with its biocompatibility, capacity of releasing fluoride and no need for acid etching on the tooth structure, has become increasingly popular among dentists. However, due to the esthetic and mechanical properties of light polymerizable resin composite, it continues to be one of the adhesives of choice in the bracket bonding technique and its use is widely disseminated.

  16. Long-term surgical-orthodontic management of hemimandibular hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Samuel C; Goonewardene, Mithran S

    2016-05-01

    Hemimandibular hyperplasia (HH), also known as hemimandibular hypertrophy, is characterised by excessive unilateral three-dimensional growth of the mandible after birth. Vertical unilateral elongation of the mandible becomes clinically evident as a rare form of vertical facial asymmetry. Aberrant growth of the facial skeleton affects the developing dentition and the dental compensatory mechanism is usually unable to maintain optimal occlusal relationships. The resulting malocclusion is effectively managed by combined surgical-orthodontic care to address the facial, skeletal and dental problems that confront clinicians. Orthodontists are advised to assess patients with HH during the post-treatment retention stage for continuing mandibular growth and assess the stability of treatment outcomes with long-term follow-up and records as required. To present a case of hemimandibular hyperplasia treated successfully by combined surgical-orthodontic care and evaluated for stability over a seven-year follow-up period. Surgical-orthodontic management was accomplished in four stages: 1) pre-surgical orthodontic; 21 surgical; 3) post-surgical orthodontic; and 4) post-treatment orthodontic retention. Complete orthodontic records, including extra- and intra-oral photographs, study models, and cephalograms plus panoramic radiographs were taken at the pretreatment, post-treatment, and seven-year orthodontic retention time-points. Facial, skeletal and dental goals were achieved in the three planes of space and the long-term stability of the treatment results was shown during a post-treatment orthodontic retention period of seven years. Hemimandibular hyperplasia is a true growth anomaly which may be managed effectively. Clinicians may expect successful long-term correction and stability by utilising a comprehensive surgical-orthodontic treatment approach.

  17. Myofunctional orthodontic for growth child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harun Achmad

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Normal growth and development is a concern for every parent! If your child’s teeth are not straight, facial growth and development could also be affected. Current orthodontic treatment can damage teeth, restrict jaw growth and usually is not a stable result. Most importantly, braces and extractions do not address the real causes of crooked teeth and quite often once they are removed, the teeth crowd up again. Studies have shown that teeth will have a tendency to change their positions after treatment hence the potential need for lifetime retainers with traditional orthodontics. Our orthodontic treatment uses myofunctional techniques to address the poor oral habits (known as myofunctional habits that are the real, underlying causes of crooked teeth and uses light, intermittent forces to align the teeth. Myofunctional orthodontic techniques have been practiced by Orthodontists and Dentists around the world for over 25 years. This is done through the use of a series of removable dental appliances that are worn for just 1-2 hours each day and overnight while sleeping. In traditional adult orthodontic treatment, certain factors can contribute to less stable results and likely long term or permanent retainers being required if poor oral habits have not been corrected. Orofacial Myofunctional therapy is a profound process used to address the improper function of the tongue and facial muscles used at rest. Treatment may help address the symptoms of a a wide variety of health issues, ranging from opening airways, to treating headaches, Temporomandibular Joint Disorders (TMD, and poor digestion just to name a few. Myofunctional therapy is the “neuromuscular re-education or re-patterning of the oral and facial muscles”. The therapy includes facial and tongue exercises and techniques that modify the poor habits that affect proper tongue position, improved breathing, chewing, and swallowing.

  18. A discerning approach to simple aesthetic orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noar, J H; Sharma, S; Roberts-Harry, D; Qureshi, T

    2015-02-16

    There is currently considerable interest from general dental practitioners (GDPs) in the use of simple orthodontics to treat adult malocclusions. There is controversy in this, particularly in relation to 'quick fixes', simple orthodontics and 'straight teeth in six months' as opposed to more conventional treatment where the whole malocclusion is treated. This article will present a case for the use of simple aesthetic adult orthodontics in a measured and planned way. It will discuss the processes, planning and the importance of consent. It will also highlight how digital technology is used to preview, consent and execute an aesthetic result. Many of the recent systems emerging, have been as a result of the demand and supply of cosmetic dentistry. This, to a degree, has not helped since the implication of a 'quick-fix' is associated with this field. There has also been discussion on what the limits of GDP orthodontics should be. There is variability in how GDPs approach orthodontics, their experience, skill and ability to treat to an acceptable standard. Short courses may be one way of delivering orthodontic training but some of these courses are not regulated and the amount of internal mentoring is variable. This article highlights some of the systems in use, and potential upsides and downsides of this approach.

  19. Children's orthodontic utilization in the United States: Socioeconomic and surveillance considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laniado, Nadia; Oliva, Stephanie; Matthews, Gregory J

    2017-11-01

    There has been no epidemiologic study of malocclusion prevalence and treatment need in the United States since the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, conducted from 1988 to 1991. In this descriptive study, the authors sought to estimate orthodontic treatment prevalence by examining a nationally representative survey to assess current pediatric dental and orthodontic utilization. The 2009 and 2013 Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys were used to categorize and compare all types of pediatric dental and orthodontic procedures in children and adolescents up to 20 years old. Descriptive variables included dental insurance, poverty level, and racial/ethnic background. Visits for orthodontic procedures constituted the third largest treatment category (14.5%) and were greatest among the uninsured and higher income populations. Children with public insurance had the fewest orthodontic visits (9.4%). Racial/ethnic disparities were most pronounced among orthodontic visits, with black and Hispanic children receiving the fewest orthodontic procedures (8.89% and 10.56%, respectively). Orthodontic treatment prevalence data suggest that significant disparities exist in orthodontic utilization based on race/ethnicity, poverty level, and insurance status. To establish the burden of malocclusion, describe populations in greatest need of interventions, and craft appropriate programs and policies, an active orthodontic surveillance system is essential. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Are claims made in orthodontic journal advertisements evidence-supported?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livas, Christos; Kouskoura, Thaleia; Ren, Yijin; Katsaros, Christos; Pandis, Nikolaos

    2015-03-01

    To examine the supporting evidence of advertisements published in six leading orthodontic journals. The 2012-2013 printed issues of American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Australian Orthodontic Journal, Journal of Orthodontics, European Journal of Orthodontics, Journal of Clinical Orthodontics, and Journal of Orofacial Orthopedics were screened for advertisements implying superior performance compared with competitor products. Advertisements were classified according to type of product, availability, and currency of supporting references. A total of 99 unique advertisements claiming clinical benefit or superiority were identified. The overwhelming majority of the identified advertisements promoted appliance products (62.6%), orthodontic materials (14.1%), and dental operatory equipment, including imaging systems (12.1%). Advertisements were found to provide references or not regardless of the product type. Half of the advertisements referred to at least one peer-reviewed publication, whereas unpublished studies were cited by 25% of the advertisements. Most of the referenced articles were published within the past 5 years. The scientific background of advertisements in the orthodontic literature appears limited. While surveillance of journal advertising needs to be regulated, clinicians are urged to critically appraise the claims being made in orthodontic print advertisements by consulting the associated existing evidence.

  1. USE OF ORTHODONTIC TREATMENT NEEDS INDICES FOR ORAL HEALTH SURVEY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakas, Enita; Tiro, Alisa; Vrazalica, Lejla Redzepagic; Hadzihasanovic, Dzana; Dzemidzic, Vildana

    2016-04-01

    The aim of our study is to compare incidence of orthodontic malocclusion based on occlusal indices and Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN), and to evaluate the most commonly used method among the dentists for orthodontic treatment in Sarajevo. The sample consisted of 110 (31 female and 79 male)subjects older than 16 years with complete permanent dentition. Subjects were examined according to Occlusal Index (Angle classification of malocclusion, overjet, overbite, dental arch crowding and tooth rotation) and IOTN index. We conduct survey regarding which indexes are used in deciding on orthodontic treatment need, among primary health care and Orthodontist. The present study show differences between the presence of malocclusion and treatment need as assessed by these two used indices. Based on the survey that we conduct all primary health care doctors use Occlusal Index to decide need for orthodontic treatment, more than 95% of orthodontic specialist use Occlusal Index for treatment need estimation. When measuring and grading treatment needs we should rely on Index of orthodontic treatment need. In such high demand for orthodontic treatment need it is necessary to establish need for the orthodontic treatment as fundamental, so that individuals with greatest treatment need can be assigned priority.

  2. Fibrotic encapsulation of orthodontic appliance in palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthu, Jananni; Muthanandam, Sivaramakrishnan; Umapathy, Gubernath; Kannan, Anitha Logaranjani

    2017-01-01

    Iatrogenic trauma though not serious is very common in dental practice. Orthodontic treatment can inflict such injuries as they are prolonged over a long period of time. Ill-fabricated orthodontic appliances, such as wires and brackets, or the patients' habits such as application of constant pressure over the appliance can traumatize the adjacent oral soft tissues. In rare cases, these appliances can get embedded into the mucosa and gingival tissues. This case report describes one such case of iatrogenic trauma to the palatal mucosa due to entrapment of a tongue spike appliance and its surgical management.

  3. Quality assessment of orthodontic radiography in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakbaznejad Esmaeili, Elmira; Ekholm, Marja; Haukka, Jari; Waltimo-Sirén, Janna

    2016-02-01

    Numbers of dental panoramic tomographs (DPTs) and lateral cephalometric radiographs (LCRs) outweigh other radiographic examinations in 7- to 12-year-old Finns. Orthodontists and general practitioners (GPs) involved in orthodontics hold therefore the highest responsibility of the exposure of children to ionising radiation with its risks. Against this background, lack of reports on the quality of orthodontic radiography is surprising. The purpose of our study was to shed some light and draw the awareness of the orthodontic community on the subject by analyzing the quality of orthodontic radiography in Oral Healthcare Department of City of Helsinki, in the capital of Finland. We analyzed randomly selected 241 patient files with DPTs and 118 patient files with LCRs of 7- to 12-year-olds for the indications of radiography, quality of referrals, status of interpretation, and number of failed radiographs. The majority of DPTs (95%) and all LCRs had been ordered for orthodontic reasons. Of the DPTs, 60% were ordered by GPs, and of the LCRs, 64% by orthodontists. The referrals were adequate for most DPTs (78%) and LCRs (73%), orthodontists being responsible for the majority of inadequate referrals. Of the DPTs, 80% had been interpreted. Of the LCRs, 65% lacked interpretation, but 67% had been analysed cephalometrically. Failed radiographs, leading to repeated exposure, were found in 2-3%. The quality assessment revealed that orthodontic radiography may not completely fulfill the criteria of good practice. Our results stress further need of continuing education in radiation protection among both orthodontists and GPs involved in orthodontics. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Eastern Health Board Regional Orthodontic Service: an initial audit.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dowling, P A

    1997-01-01

    This initial audit of 600 recently assessed Eastern Health Board orthodontic patients suggests that a large number of them (47 per cent) requires referral for routine restorative and preventive dental care. Closer links are needed with general dental practitioners and community dental surgeons to resolve these needs. The trend for a high referral of females and Class 11 Division 1 malocclusion type correlated well with studies in other countries.

  5. The Role of Hypoxia in Orthodontic Tooth Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Niklas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic forces are known to have various effects on the alveolar process, such as cell deformation, inflammation, and circulatory disturbances. Each of these conditions affecting cell differentiation, cell repair, and cell migration, is driven by numerous molecular and inflammatory mediators. As a result, bone remodeling is induced, facilitating orthodontic tooth movement. However, orthodontic forces not only have cellular effects but also induce vascular changes. Orthodontic forces are known to occlude periodontal ligament vessels on the pressure side of the dental root, decreasing the blood perfusion of the tissue. This condition is accompanied by hypoxia, which is known to either affect cell proliferation or induce apoptosis, depending on the oxygen gradient. Because upregulated tissue proliferation rates are often accompanied by angiogenesis, hypoxia may be assumed to fundamentally contribute to bone remodeling processes during orthodontic treatment.

  6. Novel orthodontic cement containing dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate with strong antibacterial capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaodong; Zhang, Ning; Xu, Hockin H K; Weir, Michael D; Melo, Mary Anne S; Bai, Yuxing; Zhang, Ke

    2017-09-26

    Orthodontic treatments increase the incidence of white spot lesions. The objectives of this study were to develop an antibacterial orthodontic cement to inhibit demineralization, and to evaluate its enamel shear bond strength and anti-biofilm properties. Novel antibacterial monomer dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM) was synthesized and incorporated into Transbond XT at 0, 1.5 and 3% by mass. Anti-biofilm activity was assessed using a human dental plaque microcosm biofilm model. Shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index were also tested. Biofilm activity precipitously dropped when contacting orthodontic cement with DMAHDM. Orthodontic cement containing 3% DMAHDM significantly reduced biofilm metabolic activity and lactic acid production (p0.1). By incorporating DMAHDM into Transbond XT for the first time, the modified orthodontic cement obtained a strong antibacterial capability without compromising the enamel bond strength.

  7. Effect of TiO2 nanoparticles incorporation on antibacterial properties and shear bond strength of dental composite used in Orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Sodagar

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Plaque accumulation and bond failure are drawbacks of orthodontic treatment, which requires composite for bonding of brackets. As the antimicrobial properties of TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs have been proven, the aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial and mechanical properties of composite resins modified by the addition of TiO2 NPs. Methods: Orthodontics composite containing 0%, 1%, 5% and 10% NPs were prepared. 180 composite disks were prepared for elution test, disk agar diffusion test and biofilm inhibition test to collect the counts of microorganisms on three days, measure the inhibition diameter and quantify the viable counts of colonies consequently. For shear bond strength (SBS test, 48 intact bovine incisors were divided into four groups. Composites containing 0%, 1%, 5% and 10% NPs were used for bonding of bracket. The bracket/tooth SBS was measured by using an universal testing machine. Results: All concentration of TiO2 NPs had a significant effect on creation and extension of inhibition zone. For S. mutans and S. sanguinis, all concentration of TiO2 NPs caused reduction of the colony counts. Composite containing 10% TiO2 NPs had significant effect on reduction of colony counts for S. mutans and S. sanguinis in all three days. The highest mean shear bond strength belonged to the control group, while the lowest value was seen in 10% NPs composite. Conclusions: Incorporating TiO2 nanoparticles into composite resins confer antibacterial properties to adhesives, while the mean shear bond of composite containing 1% and 5% NPs still in an acceptable range.

  8. Prototype of a new tip developed to be coupled to dental light-curing units for optimizing bonding of orthodontic brackets and accessories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Luiz Mota Júnior

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: development of a new device to be coupled to light-curing units for bonding orthodontic brackets and accessories, and test its efficacy in an in vitro mechanical trial. The inner surface of the device is mirrored and is based on physical concepts of light refraction and reflection. The main advantage of such device is the reduced clinical time needed for bonding and the low possibility of contamination during the process. METHODS: One hundred and twenty specimens were used for testing the shear bond strength of brackets bonded with the device. The Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI was also determined. The sample was divided into 2 groups. In group 1 a halogen light-curing unit was used while in group 2 a led light-curing unit was used. Each group was then subdivided. In subgroups H1 and L1, a conventional light guide rod was used while in subgroups H2 and L2 bonding was performed with the mirrored device coupled to the tip of the guide light rod. RESULTS: The values obtained for the shear bond strength and the ARI in the subgroups were compared. Results showed that there was no statistically significant difference for the shear strength (p > 0.05 and the ARI (p > 0.05 between the subgroups. CONCLUSION: The tests of mechanical trials and the ARI analysis showed that the new device fulfilled the requirements for bonding orthodontic accessories, and that the time for bonding was reduced to half, being necessary only one light exposure.

  9. Paresthesia during orthodontic treatment: case report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monini, André da Costa; Martins, Renato Parsekian; Martins, Isabela Parsekian; Martins, Lídia Parsekian

    2011-10-01

    Paresthesia of the lower lip is uncommon during orthodontic treatment. In the present case, paresthesia occurred during orthodontic leveling of an extruded mandibular left second molar. It was decided to remove this tooth from the appliance and allow it to relapse. A reanatomization was then performed by grinding. The causes and treatment options of this rare disorder are reviewed and discussed. The main cause of paresthesia during orthodontic treatment may be associated with contact between the dental roots and inferior alveolar nerve, which may be well observed on tomography scans. Treatment usually involves tooth movement in the opposite direction of the cause of the disorder.

  10. Perception of orthodontic treatment need among Swedish children, adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Firas Nafi; Lindsten, Rune; Bågesund, Mats

    2017-08-01

    Perceptions of orthodontic treatment need and perceptions of dental aesthetics was investigated among subjects ages 10, 15 and 19. A total of 489 subjects completed a questionnaire after inspecting 10 photographs in the Aesthetic Component scale of the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need to (i) reveal the lower limit for orthodontic treatment need and (ii) rate their dental aesthetics by selecting the most similar photo. The mean lower limit for orthodontic treatment need was significantly higher (and closer to literature-based standards) among subjects, age 10 (4.2 ± 1.5), than among subjects, age 15 (3.6 ± 1.2) (p = .0009), and subjects, age 19 (3.5 ± 1.2) (p = .00002). Among subjects ages 15 and 19, the lower limit for orthodontic treatment need was lower in groups with (i) self-perceived orthodontic treatment need (p = .002 and .001, respectively) and (ii) previous orthodontic treatment (p = .005 and .035, respectively). Self-perceived orthodontic treatment need was present in more than one-third of subjects, age 19, who had previously received orthodontic treatment. Subjects of foreign origin reported that their dental aesthetics were worse (p = .002) and those same subjects, age 19, set the lower limit for orthodontic treatment lower (p = .047) than Swedes, age 19. The lower limit for orthodontic treatment need among subjects, age 10, was higher - compared to subjects, ages 15 and 19 - and closer to literature-based standards. Subjects with self-perceived orthodontic treatment need, subjects with previous orthodontic treatment, and subjects age 19 of foreign origin, have higher aesthetic demands.

  11. Kinetics of salivary pH after acidic beverage intake by patients undergoing orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turssi, Cecilia P; Silva, Carolina S; Bridi, Enrico C; Amaral, Flavia Lb; Franca, Fabiana Mg; Basting, Roberta T

    2015-01-01

    The saliva of patients undergoing orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances can potentially present a delay in the diluting, clearing, and buffering of dietary acids due to an increased number of retention areas. The aim of this clinical trial was to compare salivary pH kinetics of patients with and without orthodontic treatment, following the intake of an acidic beverage. Twenty participants undergoing orthodontic treatment and 20 control counterparts had their saliva assessed for flow rate, pH, and buffering capacity. There was no significant difference between salivary parameters in participants with or without an orthodontic appliance. Salivary pH recovery following acidic beverage intake was slower in the orthodontic subjects compared to controls. Patients with fixed orthodontic appliances, therefore, seem to be at higher risk of dental erosion, suggesting that dietary advice and preventive care need to be implemented during orthodontic treatment.

  12. Adhesives for fixed orthodontic bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millett, Declan T; Glenny, Anne-Marie; Mattick, Rye Cr; Hickman, Joy; Mandall, Nicky A

    2016-10-25

    Orthodontic treatment involves using fixed or removable appliances (dental braces) to correct the positions of teeth. It has been shown that the quality of treatment result obtained with fixed appliances is much better than with removable appliances. Fixed appliances are, therefore, favoured by most orthodontists for treatment. The success of a fixed orthodontic appliance depends on the metal attachments (brackets and bands) being attached securely to the teeth so that they do not become loose during treatment. Brackets are usually attached to the front and side teeth, whereas bands (metal rings that go round the teeth) are more commonly used on the back teeth (molars). A number of adhesives are available to attach bands to teeth and it is important to understand which group of adhesives bond most reliably, as well as reducing or preventing dental decay during the treatment period. To evaluate the effectiveness of the adhesives used to attach bands to teeth during fixed appliance treatment, in terms of:(1) how often the bands come off during treatment; and(2) whether they protect the banded teeth against decay during fixed appliance treatment. The following electronic databases were searched: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (searched 2 June 2016), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 5) in the Cochrane Library (searched 2 June 2016), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 2 June 2016) and EMBASE Ovid (1980 to 2 June 2016). We searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. Randomised and controlled clinical trials (RCTs and CCTs) (including split-mouth studies) of adhesives used to attach orthodontic bands to molar teeth were selected. Patients with full arch fixed orthodontic appliance(s) who had bands attached to molars were included. All review authors

  13. [The prehistory of orthodontics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Julien

    2015-06-01

    Orthodontics came into being in 1728. Previously, practitioners were at a loss when confronted with crooked teeth. A Latin philosopher had an ingenious flash of orthodontic inspiration. Other authors were content to either extract the malposed teeth or to modify their shape. However, interest in an approach to preventive orthodontics had now begun. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2015.

  14. Treatment outcomes in 4 modes of orthodontic practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulton, Donald; Vlaskalic, Vicki; Baumrind, Sheldon

    2005-03-01

    This study is a continuation of a previously published report on the outcome of orthodontic treatment provided in offices representing different modes of practice. The sample consisted of duplicate pretreatment (T1) and posttreatment (T2) dental casts of 348 patients from traditional private orthodontic practices (5 offices, 134 patients), company-owned practices (5 offices, 107 patients), offices associated with practice-management organizations (2 offices, 60 patients), and general dental practices (2 offices, 47 patients). Methods were used to obtain random, representative samples from each office, starting with lists of patients who were treated consecutively with full fixed orthodontic appliances. The dental casts were measured by 2 independent judges who used the unweighted PAR score. Good interjudge agreement was shown on the initial casts, but the agreement was not as strong on the final casts. The measurements showed that treatment outcomes were generally satisfactory, although some significant differences between offices and management modes were shown.

  15. ASSESSMENT OF ROOT RESORPTION DEGREE OF INCISORS AFTER ORTHODONTIC TREATMENT IN ADULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Luchian

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The main iatrogenic effects associated with orthodontic treatment refer to: influence of orthodontic rings on the periodontal tissue; gum retractions; the effect of the orthodontic treatment on dental root (root resorption; the effect of the orthodontic treatment on alveolar bone height; mobility and pain associated with orthodontic treatment. AIM of the study: To assess the degree of root resorption of incisors, after orthodontic treatment, on a group of 48 adults with dental-maxillary abnormalities. Materials and method: The study included 48 young adult patients, 35 women and 13 men aged 18 to 30 years, who had received fixed orthodontic treatment. To assess the degree of root resorption (changes at root level and apical contour length, apical radiographies were taken in the maxillary incisors and jaw both at the beginning and end of the orthodontic treatment. Results: Out of the 239 incisors examined at the beginning of orthodontic treatment, 163 showed code 0, meaning 88.1%, and 50 showed a slight squash apex (code 1, respectively 10.9%. Only 1% of all incisors assessed presented mild and severe root resorption. Conclusions: The results of the study show that, generally, an adult orthodontic treatment, applied for functional and aesthetic objectives, may have clinically acceptable iatrogenic effects.

  16. Patients knowledge about side effects of orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Amalia

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Disharmonious of dental arrangement can possibly create problems for the patient, such as the masticatory function, esthetical, psychosocial, and also the increased risk of trauma and periodontal disease. These are reasons for a patient to seek orthodontic treatment. The aim of this study was to know the patient’s knowledge about the side effects possibility that they receive during orthodontic treatment. The side effects include pain experience during orthodontic treatment, the possibility of soft tissue damage, email demineralization, loss of tooth vitality, periodontal problem, root resorption, temporomandibular joint disorders, and relapse. A cross-sectional study was conducted in patients who registered at Orthodontic Department, Faculty of Dentistry, Universitas Indonesia on March-June 2009. The participants of this study were 100 patients, consist of 86 women and 14 men respectively. Twenty-seven questions about the side-effects of orthodontic treatment were used to obtain the patient’s knowledge and the result was categorized into 3 groups, good, average and poor. The result of the study showed that patient’s knowledge about the side effect of pain experience during orthodontic treatment was average and the patient’s knowledge about the possibility of soft tissue damage due to orthodontic treatment was good. However, the patient’s knowledge about the possibility of email demineralization, loss of tooth vitality, periodontal problem, root resorption, temporomandibular joint disorders and relapse due to orthodontic treatment was low.

  17. Periodontal Intervention in Speedy Orthodontics-A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Amitabh; Sharma, Ashish; Garg, Aarti; Kumar, Surubhi

    2016-01-01

    The use of orthodontic treatment in adult patients is becoming more common and these patients have more specific objectives and concerns related to facial and dental aesthetics, specially regarding duration of treatment. Dentists are on the lookout for techniques for increased efficiency in orthodontic treatment. Alveolar Corticotomy-assisted orthodontic treatment is a recent orthodontic technique that is recently gaining wide acceptance and is recorded as effective means of accelerating orthodontic treatment. A 17-year-old female patient was undergoing orthodontic treatment for the past one year but during her space closure, a visual examination confirmed a buccal thickening that was encountered in the buccal plate between premolars and canine. Periodontal intervention involved elective alveolar decortication in the form of dots performed around the teeth that were to be moved. This was carried out to induce a state of increased tissue turnover and a transient osteopenia, which further helps in faster rate of orthodontic tooth movement. Its main advantages are reduction of treatment time and post-orthodontic stability. PMID:26894189

  18. Highly cited orthodontic articles from 2000 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevezanos, Panagiotis; Tsolakis, Apostolos I; Christou, Panagiotis

    2018-01-01

    Identification of highly cited articles based on the h-index and its properties is important for the evaluation of the past, present, and future of any research discipline. In this study, we aimed to identify the h-classic articles in orthodontics. One search on the Web of Science identified all articles from 2000 to 2015 in the 89 journals indexed by the 2015 InCites Journal Citation Reports in the scientific area "dentistry, oral surgery, and medicine." A second search was performed in the Web of Science using all mesh terms related to orthodontics. Then, we applied the h-classic method to select the recent articles with the greatest scientific impact in orthodontics. Eighty articles were considered as h-classic articles. They were published in 20 of the 89 dental journals of the 2015 InCites Journal Citation Reports list. Only 36 articles appeared in orthodontic journals: 23 in the American Journal of Orthodontics & Dentofacial Orthopedics (28.8%), 7 in The Angle Orthodontist (8.8%), and 6 in European Journal of Orthodontics (7.5%). Thirty-eight articles originated from Europe, 28 from the Americas, and 14 from the Middle East and Asia. More than half of fundamental orthodontic research is published in nonorthodontic journals showing that our field is currently limited, and interactions with other research fields should be sought to increase orthodontic research importance and appeal. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cone Beam Computed Tomographic imaging in orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarfe, W C; Azevedo, B; Toghyani, S; Farman, A G

    2017-03-01

    Over the last 15 years, cone beam computed tomographic (CBCT) imaging has emerged as an important supplemental radiographic technique for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning, especially in situations which require an understanding of the complex anatomic relationships and surrounding structures of the maxillofacial skeleton. CBCT imaging provides unique features and advantages to enhance orthodontic practice over conventional extraoral radiographic imaging. While it is the responsibility of each practitioner to make a decision, in tandem with the patient/family, consensus-derived, evidence-based clinical guidelines are available to assist the clinician in the decision-making process. Specific recommendations provide selection guidance based on variables such as phase of treatment, clinically-assessed treatment difficulty, the presence of dental and/or skeletal modifying conditions, and pathology. CBCT imaging in orthodontics should always be considered wisely as children have conservatively, on average, a three to five times greater radiation risk compared with adults for the same exposure. The purpose of this paper is to provide an understanding of the operation of CBCT equipment as it relates to image quality and dose, highlight the benefits of the technique in orthodontic practice, and provide guidance on appropriate clinical use with respect to radiation dose and relative risk, particularly for the paediatric patient. © 2017 Australian Dental Association.

  20. Caries risk and orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opsahl Vital, Sibylle; Haignere-Rubinstein, Claire; Lasfargues, Jean-Jacques; Chaussain, Catherine

    2010-03-01

    It is now established that orthodontic treatment increases the risk of carious lesions, with consequent harm to the patient and a high risk of compromising treatment outcome. This risk is related to the appliances, which increase the number of sites where plaque can accumulate as well as to changes in the bacterial flora and the age of the patient. A thorough evaluation of the risk of caries is therefore needed before any appliance is put in place and further evaluations should then be performed regularly throughout the course of treatment. In addition, preventive measures should be taken, involving first and foremost educating and motivating patients regarding the need for good oral hygiene. Prevention also implies adequate usage of the various sources of local fluoride administration, notably the application of fluoride-rich varnish. Other prophylactic measures such as using chlorhexidine varnish and sealing dental grooves are also recommended. Finally, the orthodontist can reduce to a minimum the use of items likely to retain dental plaque such as bands and elastomeric ties. The aim of this article is to suggest a specific diagnostic approach and to present the scientifically validated prevention measures, which need to be applied throughout orthodontic treatment. Copyright 2010 CEO. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Orthodontics in the "Art" of Aesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Mayuri

    2015-01-01

    Aesthetics in dentistry has of late become an awakening/actor among patients and often serves as a major reason for seeking dental treatment and care. Ever since the introduction of orthodontics as a separate specialty branch in dentistry, a variety of techniques have evolved, and methods developed both in the type of devices/instruments used and treatments planned. The discipline of orthodontic aesthetics involves micro and macro aesthetics, gingival, and facial aesthetics. This article helps focus on the artistic part of the orthodontic science. It brings out various important factors involved in customizing aesthetic orthodontic treatment planning according to the individual needs of the patient. Through this kind of treatment planning not only are the functional and biological needs of the patient met, they also provide a stable and durable results. Less invasive treatment planning makes it easier for the patient to select future treatment options as new technologies keep evolving. The review was selected by typing aesthetic orthodontics in the Google search engine, Pubmed, and Pubmed Central. Literature review of articles reflecting history, different analysis, factors responsible, and the latest technique was conducted.

  2. Combined Orthodontic and Surgical Approach in the Correction of a Class III Skeletal Malocclusion with Mandibular Prognathism and Vertical Maxillary Excess Using Bimaxillary Osteotomy

    OpenAIRE

    George Jose Cherackal; Eapen Thomas; Akhilesh Prathap

    2013-01-01

    For patients whose orthodontic problems are so severe that neither growth modification nor camouflage offers a solution, surgery to realign the jaws or reposition dentoalveolar segments is the only possible treatment. Surgery is not a substitute for orthodontics in these patients. Instead, it must be properly coordinated with orthodontics and other dental treatments to achieve good overall results. Dramatic progress in recent years has made it possible for combined surgical orthodontic treatm...

  3. A Rare Case of Apical Root Resorption during Orthodontic Treatment of Patient with Multiple Aplasia

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, Chintan M; Mahida, Khyati; Agrawal, Charu C; Bothra, Jitendrakumar; Mashru, Ketan

    2015-01-01

    External apical root resorption is an adverse effect of orthodontic treatment. It reduces the length of root and breaks the integrity of teeth and dental arch. Orthodontics is the only dental specialty that clinically uses the inflammatory process to correct the mal-aligned teeth. Hence, it is necessary to know the risk factors of root resorption and do everything to reduce the rate of root resorption. Hence, all predisposing factors which are systemic as well as local should be considered be...

  4. Integrating orthodontics for the optimal smile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorita, Frank K

    2008-08-01

    With the rapid and complex advancements in materials and technology in dentistry today, it has become difficult for the dental practitioner to stay current in one field, let alone more than one. In order to increase patient benefits and decrease the dentist's frustration, today's dental practice requires an interdisciplinary approach that integrates the knowledge, skills, and experience of all the disciplines of dentistry and its associated fields. This article highlights the advantage of an interdisciplinary treatment approach and how knowledge of basic orthodontic techniques can help in producing a more comprehensive treatment plan.

  5. The human capital crisis in orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Marc Bernard

    2012-01-01

    The economics of dental practice are changing. The author reflects on the loss of a long-term, highly effective, and dedicated assistant in an orthodontic practice. Changes in technology, numbers of dentists, expected benefit levels, and a competitive workplace environment are combining to put pressures on the traditional model of oral health care. Whatever the solution turns out to be, the profession should take the lead in actively developing alternatives, and these will necessarily involve development of human capital in the dental practice.

  6. Patients' expectations of orthodontic treatment: part 2--findings from a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, M S; Newton, J T

    2007-03-01

    To describe patients' and their parents' expectations of orthodontic treatment. A questionnaire survey of 100 patients and their primary care-givers attending a new patient orthodontic consultant clinic, at a teaching hospital. GKT Orthodontic Department, King's College Dental Hospital, London, UK. The sample consisted of 100 participants who completed the questionnaire, including 50 patients aged 12-14 years who had been referred to the orthodontic department for treatment. One parent of each patient was also invited to participate. Participants completed a valid questionnaire measure of orthodontic expectations that was tested for reliability and validity. Descriptive analysis of the responses was undertaken, and comparisons of children's and parents' expectations, in addition to ethnicity, were made. Patients and parents have similar expectations of treatment, with the exception of expectations of duration of orthodontic treatment (Pexpectations of the initial orthodontic assessment visit, the likelihood of wearing headgear, the impact of orthodontic treatment on diet, and the reaction of peers to treatment (Pexpectations regarding the initial visit, headgear and dietary restrictions (Pparents share similar expectations of orthodontic treatment for most aspects of care, although parents are more realistic in their estimation of the duration of treatment and the initial visit. The expectations of patients differ from those of their parents with regard to dietary and drink restrictions in relation to orthodontic treatment. Ethnicity significantly influences expectations of orthodontic treatment, and this may relate to differences in the patients' and their parents' assessed outcome of care.

  7. Use of miniplates as a method for orthodontic anchorage: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peres, Fernando Gianzanti; Padovan, Luis Eduardo Marques; Kluppel, Leandro Eduardo; Albuquerque, Gustavo Calvalcanti; Souza, Paulo Cesar Ulson de; Claudino, Marcela

    2016-01-01

    Temporary anchorage devices (TADs) have been developed to be used as direct adjuncts in orthodontic treatment and have facilitated treatment of more complex orthodontic cases, including patients with dental impaction. This clinical case reports the applicability of TADs in the orthodontic treatment of a patient with impacted mandibular second molars. Surgical and orthodontic procedures related to the use of miniplates were also discussed in this study. The use of temporary anchorage devices, such as miniplates, can be suggested as an alternative to treat patients with impacted mandibular second molars.

  8. Orthodontic and surgical approach to the treatment of bilaterally impacted maxillary canines: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertan Erdinc, Aslihan M

    2008-01-01

    Impaction of maxillary canines is a common orthodontic anomaly that causes facial and dentoalveolar system problems, both functional and esthetic. A combination of surgery and orthodontics is important in bringing impacted canines to their ideal position in the dental arch. In this case report of a 14-year-old patient with impacted right and left maxillary canines, the crowns of these teeth were surgically exposed, brackets were bonded, and light orthodontic forces were delivered for 2 years to align the teeth in the dental arch.

  9. A Rare Case of Apical Root Resorption during Orthodontic Treatment of Patient with Multiple Aplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Chintan M; Mahida, Khyati; Agrawal, Charu C; Bothra, Jitendrakumar; Mashru, Ketan

    2015-07-01

    External apical root resorption is an adverse effect of orthodontic treatment. It reduces the length of root and breaks the integrity of teeth and dental arch. Orthodontics is the only dental specialty that clinically uses the inflammatory process to correct the mal-aligned teeth. Hence, it is necessary to know the risk factors of root resorption and do everything to reduce the rate of root resorption. Hence, all predisposing factors which are systemic as well as local should be considered before treatment begins. This case report describes the incidence of root resorption following orthodontic treatment and the teeth affected in the patient with multiple aplasia.

  10. Application of orthodontic treatment for the periodontal and restorative goals in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Kamioka

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available There are increasing number of adult patients who started orthodontic treatment in the last decade. As for the patient with the age of 40 years or older in our clinic, it increases 4 times as much as ten years ago. It seems that orthodontic treatment for the elderly person gradually recognized in our society. At the same time, it is considered as one of the factors that the introduction from a dentist increased to facilitate their dental procedures necessary to control dental disease, restore function, and/or enhance appearance. Therefore, in this lecture, I would like to think about how we can make use of orthodontic treatment for adults to have ideal periodontal and restorative goals. In addition, the benefits and risks of adjunctive orthodontic treatment and comprehensive orthodontic treatment would be discussed with the presenting case reports.

  11. Preparation and characterization of antibacterial orthodontic resin containing silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Jin; Heo, Min; Lee, Donghyun; Han, Seungheui; Moon, Ji-Hoi; Lim, Ho-Nam; Kwon, Il Keun

    2018-02-01

    In this study, we developed a hybrid dental resin containing silver nanoparticle (AgNPs) to eliminate periodontal disease causing bacteria such as streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) and streptococcus sobrinus (S. sobrinus). The silver nanoparticles enables the resin to prevent oral pathogen growth during orthodontic therapy. First, AgNPs were directly synthesized in dimethylformamide (DMF) solvent with a capping agent. Second, pure orthodontic primer was mixed with the synthesized AgNPs solvent-slurry followed by photocuring. The resultant material was characterized by physicochemical characterization. Finally, an in vitro antimicrobial test was carried out. The results showed that the AgNPs were fully synthesized and clearly embedded in dental resin. In the bacterial test, the dental resin containing AgNPs showed potent antimicrobial activity against two kinds of bacteria. In conclusion, our methodology may allow for the generation of a wide range of dental resin and composite products which inhibit periodontitis causing bacteria.

  12. Early orthognathic surgery with three-dimensional image simulation during presurgical orthodontics in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Moon-Key; Park, Sun-Yeon; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Park, Wonse; Lee, Sang-Hwy

    2011-03-01

    To correct dentofacial deformities, three-dimensional skeletal analysis and computerized orthognathic surgery simulation are used to facilitate accurate diagnoses and surgical plans. Computed tomography imaging of dental occlusion can inform three-dimensional facial analyses and orthognathic surgical simulations. Furthermore, three-dimensional laser scans of a cast model of the predetermined postoperative dental occlusion can be used to increase the accuracy of the preoperative surgical simulation. In this study, we prepared cast models of planned postoperative dental occlusions from 12 patients diagnosed with skeletal class III malocclusions with mandibular prognathism and facial asymmetry that had planned to undergo bimaxillary orthognathic surgery during preoperative orthodontic treatment. The data from three-dimensional laser scans of the cast models were used in three-dimensional surgical simulations. Early orthognathic surgeries were performed based on three-dimensional image simulations using the cast images in several presurgical orthodontic states in which teeth alignment, leveling, and space closure were incomplete. After postoperative orthodontic treatments, intraoral examinations revealed that no patient had a posterior open bite or space. The two-dimensional and three-dimensional skeletal analyses showed that no mandibular deviations occurred between the immediate and final postoperative states of orthodontic treatment. These results showed that early orthognathic surgery with three-dimensional computerized simulations based on cast models of predetermined postoperative dental occlusions could provide early correction of facial deformities and improved efficacy of preoperative orthodontic treatment. This approach can reduce the decompensation treatment period of the presurgical orthodontics and contribute to efficient postoperative orthodontic treatments.

  13. Orthodontic Elastic Embedded in Gingiva for 7 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Tandon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental materials especially orthodontic elastics often get embedded in gingival tissues due to iatrogenic factors. If retained for a long time, inflammatory response starts as asymptomatic crestal bone loss and may progress to severe periodontal abscess. Unsupported orthodontic elastics used for diastema closure may result in exfoliation of teeth, while elastic separators may get embedded in interdental gingiva if banding is performed without removing it. These cases of negligence are detrimental for survival of affected teeth. This paper highlights a case of orthodontic elastic embedded in interproximal gingiva of a 23-year-old healthy female for 7 years after completion of fixed orthodontic treatment. Surprisingly, there was no clinical sign of inflammation around elastic band and it was removed easily without any local anaesthesia. However, mild crestal bone loss was observed on periapical radiograph. The gingiva healed completely after sub gingival debridement.

  14. Can we close large prosthetic space with orthodontics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesko, Mauro Elias; Skupien, Jovito Adiel; Valentini, Fernanda; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    For years, the treatment for the replacement of a missing tooth was a fixed dental prosthesis. Currently, implants are indicated to replace missing teeth due to high clinical success and with the advantage of not performing preparations in the adjacent tooth. Another option for space closure is the use of orthodontics associated to miniscrews for anchorage allowing better control of the orthodontic biomechanics and especially making possible closure of larger prosthetic spaces. Thus, this article describes two cases with indications and discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of using orthodontics for prosthetic spaces closure. The cases herein presented show that it is possible to close an space when there are available teeth in the adjacent area. It can be concluded that when a malocclusion is present there will be a strong trend to indicate space closure by orthodontic movement as it preserves natural teeth and seems a more physiological approach.

  15. Allergy and orthodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthi, Sunitha; Padmanabhan, Sridevi; Chitharanjan, Arun B.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the current literature on allergy in orthodontics and to identify the predisposing factors and the implications of the allergic reaction in the management of patients during orthodontic treatment. A computerized literature search was conducted in PubMed for articles published on allergy in relation to orthodontics. The MeSH term used was allergy and orthodontics. Allergic response to alloys in orthodontics, particularly nickel, has been extensively studied and several case reports of nickel-induced contact dermatitis have been documented. Current evidence suggests that the most common allergic reaction reported in orthodontics is related to nickel in orthodontic appliances and allergic response is more common in women due to a previous sensitizing exposure from nickel in jewellery. Studies have implicated allergy in the etiology of hypo-dontia. It has also been considered as a high-risk factor for development of extensive root resorption during the course of orthodontic treatment. This review discusses the relationship and implications of allergy in orthodontics. PMID:24987632

  16. The orthodontic-periodontic interrelationship in integrated treatment challenges: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkantidis, N; Christou, P; Topouzelis, N

    2010-05-01

    Orthodontic treatment aims at providing an acceptable functional and aesthetic occlusion with appropriate tooth movements. These movements are strongly related to interactions of teeth with their supportive periodontal tissues. In recent years, because of the increased number of adult patients seeking orthodontic treatment, orthodontists frequently face patients with periodontal problems. Aesthetic considerations, like uneven gingival margins or functional problems resulting from inflammatory periodontal diseases should be considered in orthodontic treatment planning. Furthermore, in cases with severe periodontitis, orthodontics may improve the possibilities of saving and restoring a deteriorated dentition. In modern clinical practice, the contribution of the orthodontist, the periodontist and the general dentist is essential for optimized treatment outcomes. The purpose of this systematic review is to highlight the relationship between orthodontics and periodontics in clinical practice and to improve the level of cooperation between dental practitioners. Potentials and limitations that derive from the interdisciplinary approach of complex orthodontic-periodontal clinical problems are discussed.

  17. Orthodontic applications of a superelastic shape-memory alloy model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glendenning, R.W.; Enlow, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    During orthodontic treatment, dental appliances (braces) made of shape memory alloys have the potential to provide nearly uniform low level stresses to dentitions during tooth movement over a large range of tooth displacement. In this paper we model superelastic behaviour of dental appliances using the finite element method and constitutive equations developed by F. Auricchio et al. Results of the mathematical model for 3-point bending and several promising 'closing loop' designs are compared with laboratory results for the same configurations. (orig.)

  18. Partial pulp necrosis caused by excessive orthodontic force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Young Kim

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available As the dental pulp is encased with a rigid, noncompliant shell, changes in pulpal blood flow or vascular tissue pressure can have serious implication for the health of pulp. Numerous studies have demonstrated that orthodontic force application may influence both blood flow and cellular metabolism, leading degenerative and/or inflammatory responses in the dental pulp. The aim of this case report is to present a case about tooth with chronic periapical abscess which showed normal vital responses. Excessive orthodontic force is thought to be the prime cause of partial pulp necrosis. Owing to remaining vital tissue, wrong dianosis can be made, and tooth falsely diagnosed as vital may be left untreated, causing the necrotic tissue to destroy the supporting tissuses. Clinician should be able to utilize various diagnostic tools for the precise diagnosis, and be aware of the endodontic-orthodontic inter-relationship.

  19. Orthodontic treatment of an unerupted mandibular canine tooth in a patient with mixed dentition: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Dinoi, Maria Teresa; Marchetti, Enrico; Garagiola, Umberto; Caruso, Silvia; Mummolo, Stefano; Marzo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this case report was to describe the surgical?orthodontic treatment of an unerupted mandibular canine tooth in a 9-year-old girl. Case presentation A 9-year-old white girl presented with an unerupted right mandibular canine tooth. Combined surgical?orthodontic treatment was performed to correct dental impaction and to achieve good aesthetic and functional results. Conclusion Orthodontic treatment achieved all of the required objectives.

  20. Orthodontic treatment of an unerupted mandibular canine tooth in a patient with mixed dentition: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinoi, Maria Teresa; Marchetti, Enrico; Garagiola, Umberto; Caruso, Silvia; Mummolo, Stefano; Marzo, Giuseppe

    2016-06-10

    The aim of this case report was to describe the surgical-orthodontic treatment of an unerupted mandibular canine tooth in a 9-year-old girl. A 9-year-old white girl presented with an unerupted right mandibular canine tooth. Combined surgical-orthodontic treatment was performed to correct dental impaction and to achieve good aesthetic and functional results. Orthodontic treatment achieved all of the required objectives.

  1. A Case-Based Learning Model in Orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Francoise E.; Hendricson, William D.

    1994-01-01

    A case-based, student-centered instructional model designed to mimic orthodontic problem solving and decision making in dental general practice is described. Small groups of students analyze case data, then record and discuss their diagnoses and treatments. Students and instructors rated the seminars positively, and students reported improved…

  2. Orthodontic treatment considerations in Down syndrome patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sianiwati Goenharto

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Down syndrome is an easily recognized congenital disease anomaly, a common autosomal chromosomal anomaly with high prevalence of malocclusion. Orthodontic treatment demand should be high but it seems difficult to be done because of specific condition of disability. Purpose: The purpose of this literature review was to discribe the orthodontic problems found in Down syndrome patients and several consideration that shoud be done to treat them. Reviews: Many studies report the high prevalence of malocclusion among people with Down syndrome. There is a greater frequency of clas III relationship, crossbite, crowding and also open bite. Several problems might appear in the treatment because of dental, medical, mental, and behavioural factor. Conclusion: It is concluded that orthodonic treatment can be performed in Down syndrome patient, although several difficulties may appear. Good consideration in mental, behavior, medical and also dental condition will influence whether the treatment will success or not. Special care and facilities will support the orthodontic treatment.Latar belakang: Sindroma Down adalah suatu kelainan congenital yang mudah dikenali, merupakan kelaian kromosom autosomal yang cukup banyak terjadi, dengan prevalensi maloklusi cukup tinggi. Seharusnya permintaan akan perawatan ortodonti juga tinggi meskipun tampaknya sulit dilakukan karena adanya kondisi ketidakmampuan/cacat yang spesifik. Tujuan: Tujuan studi pustaka ini adalah untuk menggambarkan problem perawatan ortodonti pada penderita sindroma Down dan pertimbangan apa yang sebaiknya diambil untuk mengatasi masalah tersebut. Tinjauan pustaka: Banyak penelitian melaporkan tentang prevalensi maloklusi yang tinggi pada penderita sindroma Down. Maloklusi yang sering dijumpai adalah relasi klas III, gigitan silang, berdesakan dan juga gigitan terbuka. Problem dapat terjadi saat perawatan ortodonti karena adanya faktor dental, medis, mental dan tingkah laku penderita

  3. Orthodontic Consideration in Patients with Beta-Thalassemia Major: Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einy, Shmuel; Hazan-Molina, Hagai; Ben-Barak, Ayelet; Aizenbud, Dror

    Beta Thalassemia (βT) patients present a unique facial appearance and specific craniofacial, jaw and dental patterns. Although this anomaly often requires orthodontic management, βT patients have received scant attention in the orthodontic and dental literature over the past 50 years. The aim of this article is to review the characteristic craniofacial and dental manifestation pattern of βT patients and to emphasize their preferred orthodontic management protocol by presenting a βT orthodontic treated patient. A 10 year old patient presented with a complaint of severe esthetic and functional disorders due to her diagnosis of βT. We initiated orthodontic treatment including a combined orthopedic and functional treatment modality to improve facial appearance. Maxillary restraint and increased mandibular size during treatment along with an increase in the vertical dimension were achieved. The patient presented with Angle class I molar relationship, with reduction of the excessive overjet and deep overbite. Orthodontic treatment comprised of maxillary orthopedic treatment directed especially toward premaxilla with light forces, and mandibular modification by functional appliance along with fixed orthodontic treatment is recommended in βT patients.

  4. Interdisciplinary Treatment of an Adult Patient Using an Adjunctive Orthodontic Approach. Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rugina Roxana

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this case presentation is to outline some of the advantages that an adjunct orthodontic treatment can offer in a comprehensive oral rehabilitation of an adult patient. Adjunctive orthodontic treatment is usually limited to a dental arch or to a group of teeth within an arch. The purpose of dental movements in this case will be to position the teeth in a way that makes the restoration or replacement of damaged or missing teeth as easy as possible and with minimal dental tissue sacrifice. In addition, the improved position of the teeth will create a healthier periodontal environment that is easier to maintain over time.

  5. American Board of Orthodontics: Time for change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chun-Hsi; Tadlock, Larry P; Barone, Nicholas; Pangrazio-Kulbersh, Valmy; Sabott, David G; Foley, Patrick F; Trulove, Timothy S; Park, Jae Hyun; Dugoni, Steven A

    2018-03-01

    The American Board of Orthodontics (ABO) works to certify orthodontists in a fair, reliable, and valid manner. The process must examine an orthodontist's knowledge, abilities, and critical thinking skills to ensure that each certified orthodontist has the expertise to provide the highest level of patient care. Many medical specialty boards and 4 American Dental Association specialty boards use scenario-based testing for board certification. Changing to a scenario-based clinical examination will allow the ABO to test more orthodontists. The new process will not result in an easier examination; standards will not be lowered. It will offer an improved testing method that will be fair, valid, and reliable for the specialty of orthodontics while increasing accessibility and complementing residency curricula. The ABO's written examination will remain as it is. Copyright © 2018 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Quality of life and psychosocial outcomes after fixed orthodontic treatment: a 17-year observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrow, Peter; Brennan, David; Spencer, A John

    2011-12-01

    There is little evidence to suggest that orthodontic treatment can prevent or reduce the likelihood of dental caries or of periodontal disease or dental trauma and temporomandibular disorders, but there is a modest association between the presence of malocclusion/orthodontic treatment need and quality of life. However, little is known of the long-term outcomes of orthodontic treatment. This study reports on the longitudinal follow-up of quality of life and psychosocial outcomes of orthodontic treatment among a cohort of adults who were examined as adolescents in 1988/1989. Children who were examined in 1988/1989 were invited to a follow-up in 2005/2006. Respondents completed a questionnaire, which collected information on quality of life, receipt of orthodontic treatment and psychosocial factors, and were invited for a clinical examination. Oral health conditions including occlusal status using the Dental Aesthetic Index were recorded. Analysis of variance and multiple linear regression were used to examine the relationship between the measured factors. There was no statistically significant association between occlusal status at adolescence and quality of life at adulthood. Those individuals who had orthodontic treatment but did not need orthodontic treatment had higher self-esteem (23.1, SD 5.2) and were more satisfied with life (18.5, SD 3.7) than other treatment groups (self-esteem range, 20.0-22.7; life satisfaction range, 16.4-18.1), anovaP life, P life. Orthodontic treatment was negatively associated with psychosocial factors (life satisfaction; fixed orthodontic treatment (FOT) β = -0.91, P = 0.02 and self-esteem; FOT β = -1.39, P life and psychosocial factors. Receipt of fixed orthodontic treatment does not appear to be associated with oral health-related quality of life but appears to be negatively associated with self-esteem and satisfaction with life. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. Cellular and Molecular Changes in Orthodontic Tooth Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainal Ariffin, Shahrul Hisham; Yamamoto, Zulham; Zainol Abidin, lntan Zarina; Megat Abdul Wahab, Rohaya; Zainal Ariffin, Zaidah

    2011-01-01

    Tooth movement induced by orthodontic treatment can cause sequential reactions involving the periodontal tissue and alveolar bone, resulting in the release of numerous substances from the dental tissues and surrounding structures. To better understand the biological processes involved in orthodontic treatment, improve treatment, and reduce adverse side effects, several of these substances have been proposed as biomarkers. Potential biological markers can be collected from different tissue samples, and suitable sampling is important to accurately reflect biological processes. This paper covers the tissue changes that are involved during orthodontic tooth movement such as at compression region (involving osteoblasts), tension region (involving osteoclasts), dental root, and pulp tissues. Besides, the involvement of stem cells and their development towards osteoblasts and osteoclasts during orthodontic treatment have also been explained. Several possible biomarkers representing these biological changes during specific phenomenon, that is, bone remodelling (formation and resorption), inflammation, and root resorption have also been proposed. The knowledge of these biomarkers could be used in accelerating orthodontic treatment. PMID:22125437

  8. Implants for orthodontic anchorage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaowen; Sun, Yannan; Zhang, Yimei; Cai, Ting; Sun, Feng; Lin, Jiuxiang

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Implantanchorage continues to receive much attention as an important orthodontic anchorage. Since the development of orthodontic implants, the scope of applications has continued to increase. Although multiple reviews detailing implants have been published, no comprehensive evaluations have been performed. Thus, the purpose of this study was to comprehensively evaluate the effects of implants based on data published in review articles. An electronic search of the Cochrane Library, Medline, Embase, Ebsco and Sicencedirect for reviews with “orthodontic” and “systematic review or meta analysis” in the title, abstract, keywords, or full text was performed. A subsequent manual search was then performed to identify reviews concerning orthodontic implants. A manual search of the orthodontic journals American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (AJODO), European Journal of Orthodontics (EJO), and Angle Othodontist was also performed. Such systematic reviews that evaluated the efficacy and safety of orthodontic implants were used to indicate success rates and molar movements. A total of 23 reviews were included in the analysis. The quality of each review was assessed using a measurement tool for Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR), and the review chosen to summarize outcomes had a quality score of >6. Most reviews were less than moderate quality. Success rates of implants ranged in a broad scope, and movement of the maxillary first molar was superior with implants compared with traditional anchorage. PMID:29595673

  9. The indications of polyethylene in the orthodontic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigore Adelina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES AND BACKGROUND Our study aims to find multiple applications of the PETG foils in the orthodontic field and to evaluate the efficiency of aligner foils regarding strain values among different thickness categories. MATERIALS AND METHODS In office set-ups were fabricated for different orthodontic malocclusions. PETG foils, multi-layer foils, Clear Aligner expansion screws and acrylic components were used for the manufacturing of invisible appliances. Foil thickness and heat behavior, strain values, using special strain gauges and esthetics were taken into account. A 4 week recall was scheduled in order to observe the treatment progress regarding PETG appliances. Measurements were performed to determine to optimal foil thickness. RESULTS Dental alignment and expansion were observed in all cases. Regarding behavior to heat, the 1 mm foil presented only a small reduction in thickness compared to other foils and the strain values seem to be higher for the thinner aligners. CONCLUSIONS The orthodontic appliances made out of polyethylene provide good results due to rigidity and dimensional stability. We are still conducting continuous research in this area in order to obtain further data. Graphical abstract: The thermoplastic aligner with a Clear Aligner screw for dental expansion (an in-office set-up was used for the manufacturing of the aligner REFERENCES 1.Thukral R., Gupta A. Invisalign: Invisible Orthodontic Treatment- A Review. Journal of Advanced Medical and Dental Sciences Research. 2015;3:42-44 2. Hyo WA. A new type of clear orthodontic retainer incorporating multi-layer hybrid materials. Korean J Orthod. 2015;45: 268–272. 3. Szuhanek C, Grigore A, Fleser T. The applications of thermoplastic materials in the fabrication of orthodontic aligners. Materiale plastic. 2015;52:385- 387.

  10. Adult orthodontics: a quality assessment of Internet information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMorrow, Siobhán Mary; Millett, Declan T

    2016-09-01

    This study evaluated the quality, reliability and readability of information on the Internet on adult orthodontics. A quality assessment of adult orthodontic websites. Postgraduate Orthodontic Unit, Cork University Dental School and Hospital, Cork, Ireland. An Internet search using three search engines (Google, Yahoo and Bing) was conducted using the terms ('adult orthodontics' and 'adult braces'). The first 50 websites from each engine and under each search term were screened and exclusion criteria applied. Included websites were then assessed for quality using four methods: the HON seal, JAMA benchmarks, the DISCERN instrument and the LIDA tool. Readability of included websites was assessed using the Flesch Reading Ease Score (FRES). Only 13 websites met the inclusion criteria. Most were of US origin (n = 8; 61%). The authors of the websites were dentists (n = 5; 39%), professional organizations (n = 2; 15%), past patients (n = 2; 15%) and unspecified (n = 4; 31%). Only 1 website displayed the HON seal and three websites contained all JAMA benchmarks. The mean overall score for DISCERN was 3.9/5 and the mean total LIDA score was 115/144. The average FRES score was 63.1/100. The number of informative websites on adult orthodontics is low and these are of moderate quality. More accurate, high-quality Internet resources are required on adult orthodontics. Recommendations are made as to how this may be achieved.

  11. Orthodontic treatment in patients with reduced periodontal insertion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Labayle Couhat Carraro

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to conduct a literature review to investigate orthodontic treatment in periodontal patients. Periodontal disease causes loss of attachment that results in pathological dental migration Periodontal disease can affect young persons and adults, with a higher incidence in adults, so that the number of adults seeking orthodontic treatment has increased significantly. The periodontal disease must be controlled before the orthodontic treatment begins, and during the treatment it is important to keep the patient motivated as regards control of oral hygiene, with periodical reviews by the periodontist. With regard to assembly of the fixed appliance, special care is required not to place the accessories close to the gingival margin, in addition to using light forces porportional to the amount of periodontal attachment, and kept within the biological limits of movement. Correction of the poorly positioned teeth and controlled orthodontic movement can favor remodeling of the alveolar process in all directions. After orthodontic treatment it is important plan containment individually. Integrated orthodontic-periodontal teamwork is essential for reestablishing a healthy periodontium and satisfactory occlusion.

  12. Condition-specific Quality of Life Assessment at Each Stage of Class III Surgical Orthodontic Treatment -A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachiki, Chie; Nishii, Yasushi; Takaki, Takashi; Sueishi, Kenji

    2018-01-01

    Surgical orthodontic treatment has been reported to improve oral health-related quality of life (OHRQL). Such treatment comprises three stages: pre-surgical orthodontic treatment; orthognathic surgery; and post-surgical orthodontic treatment. Most studies have focused on change in OHRQL between before and after surgery. However, it is also necessary to evaluate OHRQL at the pre-surgical orthodontic treatment stage, as it may be negatively affected by dental decompensation compared with at pre-treatment. The purpose of this prospective study was to investigate the influence of surgical orthodontic treatment on QOL by assessing change in condition-specific QOL at each stage of treatment in skeletal class III cases. Twenty skeletal class III patients requiring surgical orthodontic treatment were enrolled in the study. Each patient completed the Orthognathic Quality of Life Questionnaire (OQLQ), which was developed for patients with dentofacial deformity. Its items are grouped into 4 domains: "social aspects of dentofacial deformity"; "facial esthetics"; "oral function"; and "awareness of dentofacial esthetics". The questionnaire was completed at the pre-treatment, pre-surgical orthodontic treatment, and post-surgical orthodontic treatment stages. The results revealed a significant worsening in scores between at pre-treatment and pre-surgical orthodontic treatment in the domains of facial esthetics and oral function (ppre-surgical orthodontic and post-surgical orthodontic treatment in all domains except awareness of dentofacial esthetics (ppre-surgical orthodontic treatment stage. Significant correlations were also observed between improvement in upper and lower lip difference, soft tissue pogonion protrusion, and ANB angle and improvement in OQLQ scores at the post-surgical orthodontic treatment stage. These results indicate that morphologic change influences OHRQL in patients undergoing surgical orthodontic treatment not only after surgery, but also during pre

  13. Objectification of Orthodontic Treatment Needs: Does the Classification of Malocclusions or a History of Orthodontic Treatment Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozanecka, Anna; Sarul, Michał; Kawala, Beata; Antoszewska-Smith, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Orthodontic classifications make it possible to give an accurate diagnosis but do not indicate an objective orthodontic treatment need. In order to evaluate the need for treatment, it is necessary to use such indicators as the IOTN. The aim of the study was to find (i) relationships between individual diagnosis and objective recommendations for treatment and (ii) an answer to the question whether and which occlusal anomalies play an important role in the objectification of treatment needs. Two hundred three 18-year-old adolescents (104 girls, 99 boys) were examined. In order to recognize occlusal anomalies, the classifications proposed by Orlik-Grzybowska and Ackerman-Proffit were used. The occlusal anomalies were divided into three categories: belonging to both classifications, typical of OrlikGrzybowska classification and typical of Ackerman-Proffit classification. In order to determine the objective need for orthodontic treatment, the Dental Health Component (DHC) of the IOTN was used. The occurrence of the following malocclusions covered by both classifications, namely abnormal overjet, crossbite and Angle's class, had a statistically significant (p 3). As for the classification by Orlik-Grzybowska, dental malpositions and canine class significantly affected the need for orthodontic treatment, while in the case of the Ackerman-Proffit scheme, it was asymmetry and crowding. There was no statistically significant correlation between past orthodontic treatment and current orthodontic treatment need. IOTN may be affected by a greater number of occlusal anomalies than it was assumed. Orthodontic treatment received in the past slightly reduces the need for treatment in 18-year-olds.

  14. Comprehensive dental management in a Hallermann–Streiff ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-09-24

    Sep 24, 2014 ... During the follow‑up period, rapidly progressive root resorption was ... progressive root resorption was detected in the primary maxillary anterior ... dental literature shows that orthodontic/orthognathic, surgical, prosthetic ...

  15. Gender equality in orthodontic literature and leadership in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragstrem, Kristina G; Yuan, Judy Chia-Chun; Lee, Damian J; Sukotjo, Cortino; Galang, Maria Therese

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate gender equality in orthodontics by reviewing the authorship in three orthodontic journals in addition to the involvement of women in leadership roles within orthodontic organizations and academia in the United States. Three journals representing orthodontics were selected to analyze the author demographics for the years 1986, 1990, 1995, 2000, 2005, and 2008. Inclusion criteria were at least one first or last author with a dental degree whose primary affiliation was in the United States. Female leadership was assessed in three orthodontic organizations as well as orthodontic program directorship. Overall, the percentage of female first authors increased significantly from 0% to 18% in the years studied (P = .004). The change of the percentage of female last authors was not statistically significant (P = .719). The participation of women in leadership roles within orthodontic organizations and in orthodontic program director positions has been limited. Within the limitations of this study, it was concluded that women are underrepresented in orthodontic authorship and leadership.

  16. Orthodontic mechanics using mini-implant measured by FBG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trannin, Pamela G.; Milczewski, Maura S.; de Oliveira, Walmir; Guariza Filho, Odilon; Lopes, Stephani C. P. S.; Kalinowski, Hypolito J.

    2015-07-01

    The magnitude of the force generated during orthodontic mechanics anchored in mini-implant in a maxilla model was analyzed. Data was collected during the insertion of the mini-implant and at the moment of applying forces to the structure of the maxilla and dentition. To obtain quantitative results, the Fibre Bragg Gratings (FBG) were inserted in an elastomeric material reproducing a maxilla model. It was observed levels of forces of approximately 3,78N next to the root of first premolar by the insertion of the mini-implant and different levels of the force to different orthodontic mechanics applied on the dental system.

  17. Orthodontic treatment need in a Spanish young adult population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel-Company, José M.; Manzanera-Pastor, David; Almerich-Silla, José M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Orthodontic treatment need has often been assessed in child populations, but few studies employing internationally-recognized indices have been conducted in adult or young adult populations. The aim of this study was to determine the orthodontic treatment need of a young adult population in Spain by means of the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI), the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN) and the need perceived by the patients. Study design: A cross-sectional epidemiological study was conducted in a broad, representative sample of 671 adults aged between 35 and 44 years using health centers in the Valencia Region of Spain, following the recommendations of the World Health Organization (WHO). Results: Orthodontic treatment was required by 31.3% of the sample according to the DAI and 19.2% according to the IOTN (DHC). The orthodontic treatment need perceived by the patients was 21.1%. On relating treatment need to different variables, significant differences in patient perception were encountered by gender, as women perceived a greater need (23.9%) than men (14.4%). Significant differences in previous orthodontic treatment history were found between middle/high (15%) and low (9%) social class and between secondary/tertiary (14%) and primary (3.3%) education. Conclusions: There was no agreement between the treatment need assessed objectively by the indices and that perceived by the patient, or between the indices themselves. The decision to undergo orthodontic treatment can depend on socioeconomic and psychological factors and on values and principles that do not easily lend themselves to objective measurement. Key words:Orthodontics, epidemiology, adult, malocclusion. PMID:22322504

  18. Assessment of psychosocial impact of dental aesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Munizeh; Fida, Mubassar

    2008-09-01

    To assess the psychosocial impact of dental aesthetics using the 'Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire' (PIDAQ) and self-rated Aesthetic Component (AC) of the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN). Cross-sectional study. Dental Section, the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from August to September 2006. Adults with no prior orthodontic treatment were asked to complete a modified version of the 'Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire' (PIDAQ). A total of four variables including 'Dental Self-confidence', 'Social impact', 'Psychological impact' and 'Perceived orthodontic treatment need' were assessed by a series of statements, whereas dental aesthetics were assessed by the respondents using the IOTN Aesthetic Component (self-rated IOTN-AC). Kruskal-Walli's test was applied to determine significance. The respondents were 120 adults (70 females and 50 males; mean age 25.8 years), all four of the above-mentioned variables measuring psychosocial impact showed positive and significant correlations with the perceived severity of malocclusion as depicted by the Aesthetic Component (AC) of Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN), with p-value of less than 0.01 for all variables. The results indicate the strong psychosocial impact of altered dental aesthetics on the emotional state of an individual. The association between self-rated IOTN-AC grading with psychosocial well-being stands established, indicating that the perceived aesthetics of malocclusion may be as significant a factor in determining treatment need as the degree of malocclusion.

  19. The prevalence of malocclusion and orthodontic treatment needs in school going children of Nalagarh, Himachal Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sarabjeet; Sharma, Abhishek; Sandhu, Navreet; Mehta, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of malocclusion and orthodontic treatment need in 13-18-year-old schoolchildren of Nalagarh, Himachal Pradesh, India using the Index of Orthodontic Treatment need (IOTN) and to analyze the treatment needs between males and females and correlation between the esthetic component (AC) and dental health component (DHC) of IOTN. The sample comprised 2000 school children (1125 females and 875 males) who had not undergone orthodontic treatment. No radiographs, study casts, were used; IOTN was calculated from clinical examination. DHC results showed that little need for orthodontic treatment was found in 31.6% and moderate need in 30.85%. A great need was estimated at 37.55%. Severe contact point displacement of more than 4 mm was the most common occlusal feature in the definite treatment need group, followed by increased overjet, impeded eruption of teeth, and anterior or posterior cross bite. AC results showed that little need for orthodontic treatment was in 86.15%, moderate need in 8.90%, and great need in 4.95%. Index does not consider midline discrepancy, soft tissue abnormalities, and AC does not include Class III and Class II div 2 malocclusion photographs. There seems a discrepancy in the proportion of children needing orthodontic treatment on esthetic and dental health grounds. This study provides baseline data on the need and demand for orthodontic treatment among the sample which is important for planning public orthodontic and dental services.

  20. Dental Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirtoft, Ingegerd

    1983-12-01

    Ten years have passed since the first articles appeared in this new field. The qualities of the laser light together with the need of contactless 3-D measurements for different dental purposes seemed to be extremely promising, but still just a few scientists have used the method and mostly for laboratory studies. For some reason there has been a preponderance for orthodontic measurements. This seems to be a bit peculiar from holographic view compared with measurements for engineering purposes, which usually are made on metals. So naturally holography can become a clinical tool for measurements in the field of fixed bridges, removable partial dentures and implants. One of the problems is that the need for holography in dental research must be fulfilled in collaboration with physicists. Only a two-way communication during an entire experiment can balance both technical and odontological demands and thus give practical and clinical important results. The need for an easy way of handling the evaluation to get all required information is another problem and of course the holographic equipment must be converted to a box easy to handle for everyone. At last the position of dental holography today is going to be carefully examined together with an attempt to look into the hopefully exciting and not to utopic future for this research field.

  1. An orthodontic oral appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marklund, Marie; Legrell, Per Erik

    2010-11-01

    This pilot study was performed to test the hypothesis that an orthodontic oral appliance (OA) that is designed to work against the backwardly directed forces on the upper incisors may counteract the reduction in overjet from these devices. Thirty patients with normal bites, good oral health, and milder sleep apnea were randomized to treatment with either OAs or orthodontic OAs. Bite changes were evaluated on plaster casts and radiographs and by questionnaires after a mean of 2.4 years in 19 frequent users. Four of nine patients in the orthodontic OA group increased their overjet by > or =0.4 mm, while none of the 10 patients in the OA group experienced that effect. Only the orthodontic OA increases the overjet; this design may therefore be beneficial to patients at risk of negative effects on their bite during OA treatment.

  2. Conservative reconstruction of the smile by orthodontic, bleaching, and restorative procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundfeld, Renato Herman; Machado, Lucas Silveira; de Oliveira, Fernanda Garcia; Santos, Eduardo Almada; Lugato, Isabel Cristina Prado Torres; Sundfeld Neto, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The following is a clinical case report of a patient whose chief complaint was the presence of generalized spacing in the maxillary anterior segment following orthodontic treatment. After meticulous clinical analyses and discussions of the clinical procedures to be adopted, dental bleaching was performed in both arches with 10% hydrogen peroxide (Opalescence Trèswhite Supreme 10% Hydrogen Peroxide - Ultradent Products, Inc., South Jordan, USA) after the conclusion and stabilization of orthodontic treatment. Then, the orthodontic appliance was removed and the diastemas in the maxillary anterior teeth were closed with Amelogen Plus (Ultradent Products, Inc., South Jordan, USA) resin composite. It was observed that the association of orthodontic, bleaching, and restorative procedures was capable of restoring dental shape, function, and esthetics, allowing the patient to smile without hesitation. PMID:22229015

  3. Laser diagnostics in orthodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhkova, Anastasia V.; Lebedeva, Nina G.; Sedykh, Alexey V.; Ulyanov, Sergey S.; Lepilin, Alexander V.; Kharish, Natalia A.

    2003-10-01

    The results of statistical analysis of Doppler spectra of intensity fluctuations of light, scattered from mucose membrane of oral cavity of healthy volunteers and patients, abused by the orthodontic diseases, are presented. Analysis of Doppler spectra, obtained from tooth pulp of patients, is carried out. New approach to monitoring of blood microcirculation in orthodontics is suggested. Influence of own noise of measuring system on formation of the speckle-interferometric signal is studied.

  4. [Orthodontic treatment need in school-age children in the Leningrad region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnenko, N M; Bagnenko, A S; Grebnev, G A; Madai, D Y

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiology of dentoalveolar anomalies is undoubtedly important, but in terms of the organization of orthodontic care, greater interest are data on the needs in this type of treatment. In a situation of limited manpower and resources for the provision of orthodontic care information about needs in orthodontic treatment allows you to define a group of patients with the primary need for orthodontic treatment, and to identify priorities to optimize the organization of orthodontic care in the region. Such data can be obtained by using the Dental Aesthetics Index (DAI) and Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN). The aim of the study was to analyze the epidemiology of various forms of dentoalveolar anomalies school-age children of Kirishi district of Leningrad region, as well as their needs in orthodontic treatment in accordance with objective evaluation indices. The study involved 734 pupils of Kirishi lyceum №1 of Leningrad region. Analysis of the prevalence of dentoalveolar anomalies, as well as needs in the orthodontic treatment was conducted in three age groups: I mixed dentition period (6-9 years), II mixed dentition period (10-13 years), and permanent dentition (14-17). To determine the needs in the orthodontic treatment were used two most common international index (DAI and IOTN). In Kirishi district of Leningrad region dentoalveolar anomalies were found in 88.8% of children of school age, which is in accordance with the indices and IOTN DAI needs in orthodontic treatment is 38.8% and 54.5%, respectively. In order to reduce unnecessarily high load volume medical institutions orthodontic profile, optimize utilization of financial resources, as well as reducing social tension it is recommended to introduce the practice of doctors-orthodontists methodology for determining the needs in orthodontic treatment by objective indices.

  5. Indicadores de maduración esquelética y dental en pacientes de ortodoncia con menarquía Indicators of skeletal and dental maturation in orthodontics patients presenting menarche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladia Toledo Mayarí

    2012-03-01

    and the second left mandibular premolars. A descriptive and cross-sectional study was conducted in 30 female patients with menarche admitted in the Orthodontics Clinic of the Stomatology Faculty of La Habana from April, 2004 to September, 2006. Each patient undergoes a lateral teleradiography of skull, radiography of the left hand and a panoramic of periapical radiography of the left mandibular hemiarcade. In each case the Taner-Whitehouse 2 (TW2, Grave and Brown, Hassel and Farman and Demirjian methods were assessed. Following variables were studied: age at menarche appearance, bone age, chronologic age, skeletal maturation stages, the maturation stages of cervical vertebrae, calcification stages of the canine and the second left mandibular premolar. The age mean of the menarche's appearance in our sample was of 12.00 years with a SD of 1.00 year. Means of bone age were higher than those of chronologic age in all age groups. The 30 study patients were in skeletal maturation stages higher then 4, in maturation stages of cervical vertebrae higher than 1, in H stage of calcification of left mandibular canine and in stages higher than E for the second left mandibular premolar. In all determined methods most of patients with menarche were in more advances maturation stages.

  6. Oral health with fixed appliances orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konta, Brigitte

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic treatment represents an important fraction in dental interventions. According to other medical methods the question for scientific evidence for the effectiveness of these treatments arises. The question of the effectiveness is connected with the question what is understood as an effect. In principle, the effect of the intervention is understood on the basis of the occlusion or dental health, what disregards further functions of oral health. The generalization to oral health is therefore a necessary consideration in science now. If one appreciates this further development, then there is no one single randomised study available which examines the long-term effect of the orthodontic intervention or for the effects on the oral health. The question, whether the application of a fixed appliance in an orthodontic treatment causes a long-term improvement in oral health, cannot be answered at the present time. The scientific status is the definition of oral health at present. Also the question, whether in the long run the dental health can be improved by fixed appliances cannot be answered with a quality usually achieved by evidence-based medicine. Whether correction of a dental malposition is an effective prerequisite for the preservation of the natural teeth, cannot be answered. There is no generalizing study with sufficient scientific background for Europe or Germany to this topic. The risk for caries cannot be quantified. Caries is identified as a central topic in general but due to numerous factors influencing the risk it is not quantified. The question of the indications is completely open from the scientific literature. For the question of the therapy need or therapy priority some indexes were developed, which lead to a quantification. These indices however are fundamentally criticised by recent research in their meaning and the empirical relevance. There is an impression that there exists a big gap between the practical application

  7. Dentoalveolar Segmental Osteotomy Combined with Orthodontic Treatment for an Impacted and Ankylosed Upper Canine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aludden, Hanna Cecilia; Jensen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Ankylosis is the abnormal adhesion of alveolar bone to dentin or cementum and commonly seen after traumatic dental injuries. Treatment of impacted and ankylosed teeth solely by orthodontics alignment may be challenging. Consequently, several treatment alternatives have been proposed for the manag....... A dentoalveolar segmental osteotomy with immediate repositioning of an upper canine was performed. One year after final orthodontic treatment a satisfying occlusal and esthetic treatment outcome was obtained....

  8. Surgical, Orthodontic and Prosthodontic Rehabilitation of a Patient with Follicular Ameloblastoma: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailer, Herman F.; Tarawneh, Fadi; Fourkas, Panagiotis; Antoniades, Dimitrios Z.; Athanasiou, Athanasios E.

    2010-01-01

    This case report describes the combined surgical, orthodontic and prosthodontic rehabilitation of an adult female patient with a previous history of follicular ameloblastoma, which was treated through partial mandibulectomy and an immediate replacement of missing bone with an autologous calvarial bone graft. Orthodontic treatment was undertaken in order to restore occlusal disturbances and obtain sufficient space for two dental implants and an optimum prosthodontic rehabilitation. PMID:20396452

  9. An orthodontic bracket embedded in the medial pterygoid surface: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmott, Sheryl E; Ikeagwuani, Okechukwu; McLeod, Niall M H

    2016-03-01

    There is a potential risk that orthodontic brackets can become dislodged into the aerodigestive tract. This case illustrates the management of an orthodontic bracket, which became embedded in the deep tissues of the oropharynx. We aim to highlight the potential risk misplaced dental instruments and materials pose, including that they may become embedded in the soft tissues of the throat and suggest that that this possibility should be considered when they cannot be localized.

  10. Anterior mandibular apical base augmentation in the surgical orthodontic treatment of mandibular retrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusati, R; Giannì, A B

    2005-12-01

    The authors describe a surgical technique alternative to traditional pre-surgical orthodontics in order to increase the apical base in mandibular retrusion (class II, division I). This subapical osteotomy, optimizing inferior incisal axis without dental extractions and a long orthodontic treatment, associated to genioplasty permits to obtain an ideal labio-dento-mental morphology. This procedure avoids in some cases the need of a mandibular advancement and, if necessary, it reduces his entity with obvious advantages.

  11. Management of impacted all canines with surgical exposure and alignment by orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radha Katiyar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Canine impaction is a dental problem very often encountered in orthodontic practice. After the third molar, the canine is the most frequently impacted tooth. Bringing the impacted canine into a normal position is important for functional occlusion and the final esthetics of the orthodontic treatment. This article illustrates a peculiar case, in which all four permanent canines maintained their unerupted status at age of 16 years. All four impacted canines were surgically exposed, attachment bonded, traction given with K-9 spring and ideally positioned with fixed orthodontic mechanotherapy.

  12. Combined orthodontic-restorative management of maxillary central incisors lost following traumatic injury: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Padhraig S; Seehra, Jadbinder; Dibiase, Andrew T

    2011-01-01

    A history of traumatic dental injury to the maxillary central incisors during preadolescence or adolescence is common and may result in premature loss. Treatment options include prosthetic implant replacement, autotransplantation, and orthodontic space closure with direct composite recontouring. This case report describes the treatment of an adolescent girl who presented with a crowded Class I malocclusion complicated by a history of trauma to the maxillary central incisors. The treatment plan consisted of orthodontic space closure following loss of both maxillary central incisors and mandibular premolars. This case highlights that orthodontic space closure can be a valuable treatment option in selected Class I crowded and Class II uncrowded malocclusions, producing predictable and efficient results.

  13. Orthodontic treatment for oral rehabilitation after multiple maxillofacial bone fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yoshiki; Ogino, Tomoko Kuroiwa; Hirashita, Ayao

    2008-09-01

    We present the orthodontic treatment of a patient with occlusal dysfunction after plastic surgery for multiple maxillofacial bone fractures caused by a traffic accident. The patient had mandibular deviation to the right because of inappropriate repositioning and fixation of the fractured bone and complete avulsion of both mandibular central incisors. The bilateral mandibular incisors, canines, and premolars were also suspected of partial avulsion or alveolar bone fracture. Several tests, including percussion and dental computed tomography, were performed on these teeth to rule out ankylosis and confirm tooth movement. Camouflage orthodontic treatment was carried out with expansion of the maxillary arch, alignment of both arches, and space closure between the mandibular lateral incisors to improve the occlusion. Good occlusion and interdigitation were obtained. Orthodontic treatment is useful for the rehabilitation of occlusal dysfunction caused by multiple maxillofacial bone fractures.

  14. [Orthodontic and oral surgery therapy in cleidocranial dysplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaton, Gergely; Tarján, Ildikó; Balaton, Péter; Barabási, Zoltán; Gyulai Gál, Szabolcs; Nagy, Katalin; Vajó, Zoltán

    2007-02-01

    A cleidocranial dysplasia is an autosomal dominant inherited condition consisting of generalized skeletal disorder. Associated dental signs are present in 93,5%; failure of tooth eruption with multiple supernumerary teeth, dilaceration of roots, crown germination, microdontia, high arched palate, midface hypoplasia, high gonion angle. The molecular- genetic analysis revealed a missense mutation in the CBFA1 gene located on chromosome 6p21, which is considered to be etiological factor for CCD. Orthodontic and oral surgery therapy of a 13 year-old child with CCD was performed due to aesthetic and functional problems. The supernumerary germs were removed and the teeth were aligned with orthodontic appliances. Temporary functional rehabilitation was solved with partial denture. The presented case and the literature data support the importance of early diagnosis of CCD. The good collaboration of the orthodontic and maxillo-facial surgery specialists help achieve the correct rehabilitation of the patient.

  15. [Orthodontic treatment of patients medicated with bisphosphonates-a clinical case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Elena; d'Hoedt, Bernd; Scheller, Herbert; Jacobs, Collin; Walter, Christian; Wehrbein, Heinrich

    2013-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BP) are an established medication, e.g., for the prevention/therapy of osteoporosis. The effects of the changed bone metabolism for orthodontic treatments are unknown. A 66-year-old woman underwent a total oral rehabilitation. The therapy included (1) tooth extractions, (2) periodontal treatment, (3) insertion of dental implants, (4) provisional implant restorations, (5) orthodontic treatment, and (6) definite implant restorations. The orthodontic tooth movements were in- and retrusion of the upper frontal teeth, intrusion of the lower front teeth, using the dental implants as skeletal anchorage. After implant insertion and one month before beginning the orthodontic treatment, osteoporosis was diagnosed in this patient and, without notification to our facility, BP treatment was initiated by her general practitioner (alendronate oral, 70 mg/week), with an overall duration of intake of 7 months. After 13 months, the orthodontic treatment was successfully accomplished; however enlarged periodontal gaps, sclerotic bone areas, and mild apical root resorptions of the upper frontal teeth were found in this patient. Currently, there are no recommendations for orthodontic patients undergoing BP therapy. Orthodontic tooth movement in this low-risk patient with a short duration of intake and a low-dose BP medication was possible. Because of the reduced bone metabolism and the higher amount of side effects, the treatment should be performed with extremely light forces and frequent monitoring.

  16. Digital workflows in contemporary orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars R Christensen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Digital workflows are now increasingly possible in orthodontic practice. Workflows designed to improve the customization of orthodontic appliances are now available through laboratories and orthodontic manufacturing facilities in many parts of the world. These now have the potential to improve certain aspects of patient care.

  17. SURGICAL ORTHODONTICS: LITERATURE REVIEW AND CASE REPORT

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    Piyush HEDA

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Orthognathic surgery is a surgical procedure largely practiced throughout the world for the correction of various maxillofacial deformities. The procedure for correcting a particular deformity will be done after proper evaluation, which includes cephalometric, dental model analysis and photographs. The patient undergoes pre-surgical orthodontic correction for dental compensation, after which surgery is planned. During the last few decades, the profession has witnessed intense interest for the treatment of facial deformities, being widely practiced throughout the world. Orthognathic surgery has become an acceptable treatment plan for patients with various maxillofacial deformities, giving pleasing results. The present study reports the successful treatment method of Class II division 1 malocclusion through orthognathic surgery.

  18. OBJECTIVE AND SUBJECTIVE EVALUATION OF ADOLESCENT'S ORTHODONTIC TREATMENT NEEDS AND THEIR IMPACT ON SELF-ESTEEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anshika; Mathur, Anmol; Batra, Manu; Makkar, Diljot Kaur; Aggarwal, Vikram Pal; Goyal, Nikita; Kaur, Puneet

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the presence of association between objective and subjective evaluation of orthodontic treatment needs in adolescents and their impact on their self-esteem. Cross-sectional study with adolescents aged 10-17 years old in Sri Ganganagar city, Rajasthan, India. The objective index of orthodontic treatment need (IOTN) dental health component (DHC) and the subjective aesthetic component (AC) were used to determine the normative and the self-perception need for orthodontic treatment, respectively. The selected students were further examined for dental trauma, tooth loss, and dental caries. Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale was applied for self-esteem level determination. Linear regression analysis was executed to test the individual association of different independent clinical variables with self-esteem scores. Among 1,140 studied adolescents, the prevalence of dental normative orthodontic treatment need was in 56.9% of individuals, whereas 53.3% of individuals considered themselves as needy for the treatment. Multivariate analyses revealed that out of all dental disorders, DHC followed by AC of IOTN had maximum impact on the self-esteem of the adolescence. Dissatisfaction with dental appearance is a strong predictor for low self-esteem in adolescence.

  19. Quality Assurance in Custom Dental Devices: A Technologist's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Anthony

    2017-12-01

    Manufacturing of custom-made dental devices such as removable dentures, fixed prosthodontics and orthodontics are subject to the requirements of the Medical Devices Directive (MDD). Many dental laboratories often enhance these requirements by implementing quality assurance procedures that then provide enhanced consistency. this paper provides a dental technologist's view of some of the systems currently being used in dental laboratories to provide a quality assured product and associated issues.

  20. Temporomandibular disorders and orthodontic treatment need in orthodontically untreated children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Špalj, Stjepan; Šlaj, Martina; Athanasiou, Athanasios E; Žak, Irena; Šimunović, Martina; Šlaj, Mladen

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the association between signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and orthodontic treatment need in orthodontically untreated children and adolescents. One thousand five hundred and ninety-seven subjects aged 11-19 years, without previous orthodontic history, from sixteen randomly selected public schools in Zagreb, Croatia, were examined. Malocclusion characteristics were assessed by using the criteria proposed by Bjork et al., the Dental Aesthetic Index, and the Aesthetic Component of Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need. Data on TMD signs/symptoms and parafunctional behaviour were obtained by means of questionnaire and clinical examination, respectively. Multiple logistic regression models were used for analysis. Twenty-two percent of children and young adolescents had one or more signs of TMD, ranging from 17% in age of 11 years up to 24% in age of 19. There was poor correlation between presence of TMD and orthodontic treatment need. Multiple logistic regression models showed that Class III, crowding and spacing were related to mandibular deflection on opening. Ectopic eruption was related to TMJ clicking, and severely tipped teeth with reduced mouth opening. Headaches presented a positive relationship with reverse overjet and severe rotations, and tooth wear with crowding, spacing and lateral openbite. Age, female gender and parafunctional habits were related to several TMD signs. Although logistic regression models were statistically significant (p < 0.05) malocclusions, parafunctional behaviours, age and gender accounted for less than 20% of the variability in TMD signs/symptoms. TMD signs and symptoms seemed to be poorly related to malocclusions or treatment needs.

  1. Study on the perception of orthodontic treatment according to age: A questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoonji

    2017-07-01

    This questionnaire study aimed to estimate the overall frequencies of positive perception towards orthodontic treatment among adults categorized according to age, sex, and area of living, and to identify barriers or negative perceptions preventing them from receiving orthodontic treatment. The participants included 598 adults aged over 20 years (230 men and 368 women) who visited the Dental Hospital of Seoul St. Mary's Hospital. The participants' opinions regarding their consideration of receiving orthodontic treatment were recorded using a specially designed questionnaire. The overall rate of positive perception towards orthodontic treatment was 48.5%. Compared to adults in their 20s (63.2%), those in their 40s and 50s had a lower percentage of interest in orthodontic treatment (46.2% and 45.1%, respectively; p orthodontic treatment. The middle-aged had a relatively high percentage of interest (above 45%) in orthodontic treatment. However, demographic characteristics were not significantly associated with the positive interest. These results highlight the need for educating the middle-aged about the limitations and possibilities of orthodontic treatment to increase its acceptance.

  2. Efficient free-form surface representation with application in orthodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamany, Sameh M.; El-Bialy, Ahmed M.

    1999-03-01

    Orthodontics is the branch of dentistry concerned with the study of growth of the craniofacial complex. The detection and correction of malocclusion and other dental abnormalities is one of the most important and critical phases of orthodontic diagnosis. This paper introduces a system that can assist in automatic orthodontics diagnosis. The system can be used to classify skeletal and dental malocclusion from a limited number of measurements. This system is not intended to deal with several cases but is aimed at cases more likely to be encountered in epidemiological studies. Prior to the measurement of the orthodontics parameters, the position of the teeth in the jaw model must be detected. A new free-form surface representation is adopted for the efficient and accurate segmentation and separation of teeth from a scanned jaw model. THe new representation encodes the curvature and surface normal information into a 2D image. Image segmentation tools are then sued to extract structures of high/low curvature. By iteratively removing these structures, individual teeth surfaces are obtained.

  3. Cytokines and VEGF Induction in Orthodontic Movement in Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Di Domenico

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontics is a branch of dentistry that aims at the resolution of dental malocclusions. The specialist carries out the treatment using intraoral or extraoral orthodontic appliances that require forces of a given load level to obtain a tooth movement in a certain direction in dental arches. Orthodontic tooth movement is dependent on efficient remodeling of periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, correlated with several biological and mechanical responses of the tissues surrounding the teeth. A periodontal ligament placed under pressure will result in bone resorption whereas a periodontal ligament under tension results in bone formation. In the primary stage of the application of orthodontic forces, an acute inflammation occurs in periodontium. Several proinflammatory cytokines are produced by immune-competent cells migrating by means of dilated capillaries. In this paper we summarize, also through the utilization of animal models, the role of some of these molecules, namely, interleukin-1β and vascular endothelial growth factor, that are some proliferation markers of osteoclasts and osteoblasts, and the macrophage colony stimulating factor.

  4. Satisfaction with Dental Appearance and Attitude toward improving Dental Esthetics among Patients attending a Dental Teaching Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghaireh, Ghada A; Alzraikat, Hanan; Taha, Nessrin A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the factors influencing the satisfaction of dental appearance and attitude toward treatments to improve dental esthetics among patients attending a dental teaching center. A questionnaire was used to collect data of four background variables among 450 patients attended a dental teaching center in the city of Irbid in Jordan. The questionnaire enclosed self-reported questions about the appearance of anterior teeth, received esthetic treatment and desired treatment for improving esthetics. Descriptive, multiple logistic regression and Chi-square tests were used for data analysis (p ≤ 0.05). The 450 participants consisted of (66.2%) male and (33.8%) female. Of these, 69.3% were satisfied with their dental appearance and 58.0% with the color of their teeth. Esthetic restorations were the most received treatment (39.8%) and whitening of teeth was the most desired treatment (55.3%). The patients' satisfaction with dental appearance was influenced by teeth color, crowding and receiving whitening (p < 0.05. r = 0.561, r(2) = 0.315). The most desired esthetic treatments influenced by the satisfaction with dental appearance were esthetic restorations and orthodontics (p < 0.05. r = 0.223, r(2) = 0.05). Significantly more female reported having esthetic restorations and orthodontics (p = 0.008, 0.000) and desired to have orthodontic, crowns or veneers and esthetic restorations (p = 0.000, 0.015, 0.028). Satisfaction with dental appearance was affected by teeth color, feeling teeth are crowded, desire for esthetic restorations and orthodontic treatment. A high percentage of patients were not satisfied with the color of their teeth. Recognizing the factors that affect patients' satisfaction with their present dental appearance and attitude toward treatments to improve dental esthetic can guide clinicians to strategies to improve esthetics.

  5. Extraction protocols for orthodontic treatment: A retrospective study

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    Vaishnevi N Thirunavukkarasu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Various extraction protocols have been followed for successful orthodontic treatment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extraction protocols in patients who had previously undergone orthodontic treatment and also who had reported for continuing orthodontic treatment from other clinics. Materials and Methods: One hundred thirty eight patients who registered for orthodontic treatment at the Faculty of Dentistry were divided into 10 extraction protocols based on the Orthodontic treatment protocol given by Janson et al. and were evaluated for statistical significance. Results: The descriptive statistics of the study revealed a total of 40 (29% patients in protocol 1, 43 (31.2% in protocol 2, 18 (13% in protocol 3, 16 (11.6% in protocol 5, and 12 (8.7% in Type 3 category of protocol 9. The Type 3 category in protocol 9 was statistically significant compared to other studies. Midline shift and collapse of the arch form were noticed in these individuals. Conclusion: Extraction of permanent teeth such as canine and lateral incisors without rational reasons could have devastating consequences on the entire occlusion. The percentage of cases wherein extraction of permanent teeth in the crowded region was adopted as a treatment option instead of orthodontic treatment is still prevalent in dental practice. The shortage of orthodontists in Malaysia, the long waiting period, and lack of subjective need for orthodontic treatment at an earlier age group were the reasons for the patient's to choose extraction of the mal-aligned teeth such as the maxillary canine or maxillary lateral incisors.

  6. Comparison of two different debonding techniques in orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoli, Luca; Migliau, Guido; Besharat, Laith Konstantinos; Di Carlo, Stefano; Pompa, Giorgio; Di Giorgio, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate whether and how the adhesive bond failure site varied in relation to the material used for the orthodontic bonding and debonding technique applied. Two different methods of orthodontic debonding were included in our survey; cutters for orthodontics and debonding plier. Three different materials for the adhesion of the bracket: composite light curing, self-curing composite and glass ionomer cement. The remaining amount of adhesive on the tooth surface is an important parameter that gives information on how the location of the posting site varied during the debonding. 60 dental elements, maxillary and mandibular, previously extracted for orthodontic reasons, as well as periodontal, were included in our research. We investigated a possible significant correlation between different variables (debonding technique and materials for membership) and the ARI index. The use of orthodontic cutters or debonding pliers does not affect the adhesive bond failure site and both techniques have a tendency to leave a significant amount of adhesive on the surface enamel. In the resin-reinforced glass ionomer cements, detachment occurs at the interface enamel-adhesive and this pattern of detachment increases the risk of the enamel damage during debonding. In both types of composite resins (photopolymerizable or self-curing), the detachment occurs at the interface bracketing adhesive. In this case the amount of remaining adhesive material on the tooth must be removed with further methods, which in addition, increase the risk of iatrogenic injury as well as the working hours.

  7. Orthodontics-surgical combination therapy for Class III skeletal malocclusion

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    M S Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The correction of skeletal Class III malocclusion with severe mandibular prognathism in an adult individual requires surgical and Othodontic combination therapy. The inter disciplinary approach is the treatment of choice in most of the skeletal malocclusions. A case report of an adult individual with Class III malocclusion, having mandibular excess in sagittal and vertical plane and treated with orthodontics,, bilateral sagittal split osteotomy and Le - Forte I osteotomy for the correction of skeletal, dental and soft tissue discrepancies is herewith presented. The surgical-orthodontic combination therapy has resulted in near-normal skeletal, dental and soft tissue relationship, with marked improvement in the facial esthetics in turn, has helped the patient to improve the self-confidence level.

  8. Factors associated with the desire for orthodontic treatment among Brazilian adolescents and their parents

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    Filogônio Cintia B

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the period of adolescence physical appearance takes on significant importance in the construction of personal identity, including one's relationship with one's own body. A variety of social, cultural, psychological and personal factors influences the self-perception of dental appearance and the decision to undergo orthodontic treatment. Adolescents who seek orthodontic treatment are concerned with improving their appearance and social acceptance. The aim of the present study was to determine factors associated to the desire for orthodontic treatment among Brazilian adolescents and their parents. Methods The sample consisted of 403 subjects aged 14 to 18 years, selected randomly from a population of 182,291 schoolchildren in the same age group. The outcome variable "desire for orthodontic treatment" was assessed through a questionnaire. Self-perception of dental aesthetics was assessed using the Oral Aesthetic Subjective Impact Scale (OASIS and the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI was used for clinical assessment. Statistical analysis involved the chi-square test as well as both simple and multiple logistic regression analyses. Results The majority (78% of the Brazilian adolescents desired orthodontic treatment and 69% of the parents reported that their children were not in orthodontic treatment due to the high costs involved. There was significant association (p ≤ 0.05 between the desire for orthodontic treatment and most types of malocclusion. However, there was no significant association between the desire for orthodontic treatment and the variables gender and age. Conclusions The following were considered factors associated to the desire for treatment: upper anterior crowding ≥ 2 mm and parents' perception of their child's need for treatment.

  9. Factors associated with the desire for orthodontic treatment among Brazilian adolescents and their parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background In the period of adolescence physical appearance takes on significant importance in the construction of personal identity, including one's relationship with one's own body. A variety of social, cultural, psychological and personal factors influences the self-perception of dental appearance and the decision to undergo orthodontic treatment. Adolescents who seek orthodontic treatment are concerned with improving their appearance and social acceptance. The aim of the present study was to determine factors associated to the desire for orthodontic treatment among Brazilian adolescents and their parents. Methods The sample consisted of 403 subjects aged 14 to 18 years, selected randomly from a population of 182,291 schoolchildren in the same age group. The outcome variable "desire for orthodontic treatment" was assessed through a questionnaire. Self-perception of dental aesthetics was assessed using the Oral Aesthetic Subjective Impact Scale (OASIS) and the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI) was used for clinical assessment. Statistical analysis involved the chi-square test as well as both simple and multiple logistic regression analyses. Results The majority (78%) of the Brazilian adolescents desired orthodontic treatment and 69% of the parents reported that their children were not in orthodontic treatment due to the high costs involved. There was significant association (p ≤ 0.05) between the desire for orthodontic treatment and most types of malocclusion. However, there was no significant association between the desire for orthodontic treatment and the variables gender and age. Conclusions The following were considered factors associated to the desire for treatment: upper anterior crowding ≥ 2 mm and parents' perception of their child's need for treatment. PMID:20021649

  10. Normative and self-perceived orthodontic treatment need in Nigerian school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayi, Emmanuel Olubusayo

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the normative and self-perceived need for orthodontic treatment in Nigerian children, and to evaluate distribution of orthodontic treatment need according to gender and age. The sample consisted of 441 randomly selected school children, aged 11-18 years in Benin City, Nigeria. The subjects were further sub-grouped according to gender (229 males and 212 females) and age (246 11-13 years old and 195 14-18 years old). The Dental health Component (DHC) and Aesthetic Component (AC) of Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN) were used to assess orthodontic treatment need normatively. Self-perceived need was evaluated by asking the subjects to rate their dental aesthetics on the Aesthetic Component scale of IOTN. Chi-square tests were used to evaluate gender and age differences in distribution of treatment need. A definite need for orthodontic treatment was found among 21.5% (grades 4-5 of DHC) and 6.3% (grades 8-10 of AC) of the subjects; 3.9% of the subjects perceived a definite need for orthodontic treatment (grades 8-10 of AC). There were no statistically significant gender and age differences in distribution of orthodontic treatment need among the subjects (p > 0.05). The study revealed a need for orthodontic treatment in slightly more than one fifth (21.5%) of this sample of Nigerian children. The sample population has a lower need on aesthetic grounds and their normative and self-perceived orthodontic treatment needs were not influenced by gender and age.

  11. Some comments on clinical studies in orthodontics and their applications to orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, S

    1999-06-01

    This article indicates the origins and background of the current series of National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research-funded, university-based clinical studies of orthodontic treatment. It suggests that future studies should be less focused on refining our estimates of mean changes during treatment and concentrate research on the systematic analysis of individual differences among patients' responses to treatment, and study how skilled clinicians make in-course corrections in response to unexpected changes in treatment conditions. Finally, some suggestions are made concerning optimization of decision making in the presence of uncertainty.

  12. The Rise of Indian Orthodontics: A Historical Perspective

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    Meha Verma Teja

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the evolution of dentistry and in particular orthodontics, in India. We have come a long way since dental education was first introduced to us Indians, the wave of change brought about by the most esteemed and respectable pioneers of our profession, have led us to form a strong dental community in this world of tough competition. This article also presents the work of the great achievers of orthodontia, who have helped us raise the level of ′Indian Orthodontics′ and have enabled us to soar to greater heights.

  13. Orthodontic applications of a superelastic shape-memory alloy model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glendenning, R.W.; Enlow, R.L. [Otago Univ., Dunedin (New Zealand). Dept. of Math. and Stat.; Hood, J.A.A. [Dept. of Oral Sciences and Orthodontics, Univ. of Otago, Dunedin (New Zealand)

    2000-07-01

    During orthodontic treatment, dental appliances (braces) made of shape memory alloys have the potential to provide nearly uniform low level stresses to dentitions during tooth movement over a large range of tooth displacement. In this paper we model superelastic behaviour of dental appliances using the finite element method and constitutive equations developed by F. Auricchio et al. Results of the mathematical model for 3-point bending and several promising 'closing loop' designs are compared with laboratory results for the same configurations. (orig.)

  14. Combined Orthodontic and Surgical Approach in the Correction of a Class III Skeletal Malocclusion with Mandibular Prognathism and Vertical Maxillary Excess Using Bimaxillary Osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose Cherackal, George; Thomas, Eapen; Prathap, Akhilesh

    2013-01-01

    For patients whose orthodontic problems are so severe that neither growth modification nor camouflage offers a solution, surgery to realign the jaws or reposition dentoalveolar segments is the only possible treatment. Surgery is not a substitute for orthodontics in these patients. Instead, it must be properly coordinated with orthodontics and other dental treatments to achieve good overall results. Dramatic progress in recent years has made it possible for combined surgical orthodontic treatment to be carried out successfully for patients with a severe dentofacial problem of any type. This case report provides an overview of the current treatment methodology in managing a combination of asymmetrical mandibular prognathism and vertical maxillary excess.

  15. Combined Orthodontic and Surgical Approach in the Correction of a Class III Skeletal Malocclusion with Mandibular Prognathism and Vertical Maxillary Excess Using Bimaxillary Osteotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Jose Cherackal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For patients whose orthodontic problems are so severe that neither growth modification nor camouflage offers a solution, surgery to realign the jaws or reposition dentoalveolar segments is the only possible treatment. Surgery is not a substitute for orthodontics in these patients. Instead, it must be properly coordinated with orthodontics and other dental treatments to achieve good overall results. Dramatic progress in recent years has made it possible for combined surgical orthodontic treatment to be carried out successfully for patients with a severe dentofacial problem of any type. This case report provides an overview of the current treatment methodology in managing a combination of asymmetrical mandibular prognathism and vertical maxillary excess.

  16. Periodontally accelerated osteogenic orthodontics

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    Shailesh Mohanlal Bhandari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report demonstrates an orthodontic method that offers short treatment time and the ability to simultaneously reshape and increase the buccolingual thickness of the supporting alveolar bone. A 23-year-old female with Angle′s Class I moderately to severely crowded malocclusion with periodontal pocket with 31 and reduced thickness of the buccal cortical plate of lower anteriors, requested shortened orthodontic treatment time. This surgery technique included buccal full-thickness flaps, selective partial decortication of the cortical plates, concomitant bone grafting/augmentation, and primary flap closure. Following the surgery, orthodontic adjustments were made approximately every 2 weeks. From bracketing to debracketing, the case was completed in approximately 7 months and 3 weeks. Posttreatment evaluation of patient revealed good results. Preexisting thin labial bony cortical plate with lower anteriors was covered. This finding suggests credence to the incorporation of the bone augmentation procedure into the corticotomy surgery because this made it possible to complete the orthodontic treatment with a more intact periodontium. The rapid expansive tooth movements with no significant apical root resorption may be attributed to the osteoclastic or catabolic phase of the regional acceleratory phenomenon.

  17. Cephalometry in orthodontic practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theunissen, J.J.W.; Terlingen, P.J.A.M.

    1980-01-01

    Cephalometry is applied in orthodontic practice to: - obtain information on the growth of the skull - assist diagnosis of the relationship between the jaws and abnormalities in dentition - evaluate the results of treatment. The course of the diagnostic procedure with the aid of the Ricketts analysis and evaluation of the treatment results using five superimpositions is demonstrated by means of two examples. (Auth.)

  18. Orthodontic-periodontal interactions: Orthodontic extrusion in interdisciplinary regenerative treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolone, Maria Giacinta; Kaitsas, Roberto

    2018-06-01

    Orthodontics is a periodontal treatment. "Guided orthodontic regeneration" (GOR) procedures use orthodontic movements in perio-restorative patients. The GOR technique includes a guided orthodontic "soft tissue" regeneration (GOTR) and a guided orthodontic "bone" regeneration (GOBR) with a plastic soft tissue approach and a regenerating reality. The increased amount of soft tissue gained with orthodontic movement can be used for subsequent periodontal regenerative techniques. The increased amount of bone can as well improve primary implant stability and, eventually, simplify a GTR technique to regenerate soft tissues, to restore tooth with external resorption in aesthetic zone or to extract a tooth to create new hard-soft tissue for adjacent teeth. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  19. Aesthetic orthodontic archwires: Progress in their knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Rongo, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In orthodontics, is quickly increasing the demand for treatments with a very low aesthetic impact in the social life. More and more adult patients want satisfy their necessity to have a beautiful smile, with “invisible” appliances. Numerous are the opportunities to perform an aesthetic orthodontic treatment such as lingual orthodontics, clear aligners or clear labial orthodontics. Aesthetic orthodontic archwires are a component of clear labial orthodontics together with aestheti...

  20. Surgical-orthodontic treatment of patients suffering from severe periodontal disorders - a clinical case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halimi, Abdelali; Zaoui, Fatima

    2013-09-01

    Orthodontic or, more precisely, surgico-orthodontic treatment of patients suffering from periodontal disorders generally requires a multidisciplinary approach by a qualified dental team. Periodontal bone healing is an essential factor for successful orthodontic treatment in a compromised periodontal situation. We report on the case of an adult patient suffering from severe chronic periodontitis; he was a hyperdivergent skeletal Class III with dento-alveolar compensation, esthetic problems and a significant lack of dental material. A multidisciplinary approach was adopted. First of all, periodontal treatment was undertaken (root scaling and planing) accompanied by appropriate medical treatment and a bone graft to strengthen the area of the lower incisors. After that, surgical and orthodontic treatment to correct the malocclusion was begun. The difficulty lay in the significant absence of dental material to ensure proper intercuspation. A surgical repositioning splint was constructed on an articulator to ensure adequate mandibular retraction after maxillary advancement surgery. After treatment, the missing teeth were replaced by a prosthesis. Following treatment, the periodontal bone resorption was stabilized; the bone deficit was improved and the malocclusion had been corrected; the missing teeth were replaced by appropriate dentures. Short- and medium-term follow-up confirmed the stability of the results obtained, which will be discussed. The right combination of properly managed orthodontic, periodontal and prosthetic treatment can contribute to effective elimination of chronic periodontitis, even at an advanced stage in an adult patient, while at the same time improving esthetic and functional parameters. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  1. Orthodontic movement of teeth with short root anomaly: should it be avoided, faced or ignored?

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    Jose Valladares Neto

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Short Root Anomaly (SRA is an uncommon disease and a challenge for orthodontic treatment as it tends to increase the risk of root resorption. OBJECTIVE: Assess the current status of the diagnosis, etiology and orthodontic management of teeth with SRA, and present case reports. METHOD: A literature review was carried out in PubMed, SciELO, LILACS, Scopus and Web of Science databases. RESULTS: A differential diagnosis of SRA should be conducted for teeth with incomplete root formation, external apical root resorption, dentin dysplasia type I and post dental trauma root hypoplasia. SRA is genetically determined and orthodontic movement requires changes in clinical and radiographic management in order to restrict damage. CONCLUSION: Orthodontic movement of teeth with SRA is contraindicated in extreme cases, only. Caution at all stages could minimize attachment loss and lead to long-term stability.

  2. Tooth loss caused by displaced elastic during simple preprosthetic orthodontic treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dianiskova, Simona; Calzolari, Chiara; Migliorati, Marco; Silvestrini-Biavati, Armando; Isola, Gaetano; Savoldi, Fabio; Dalessandri, Domenico; Paganelli, Corrado

    2016-01-01

    The use of elastics to close a diastema or correct tooth malpositions can create unintended consequences if not properly controlled. The American Association of Orthodontists recently issued a consumer alert, warning of “a substantial risk for irreparable damage” from a new trend called “do-it-yourself” orthodontics, consisting of patients autonomously using elastics to correct tooth position. The elastics can work their way below the gums and around the roots of the teeth, causing damage to the periodontium and even resulting in tooth loss. The cost of implants to replace these teeth would well exceed the cost of proper orthodontic care. This damage could also occur in a dental office, when a general dentist tries to perform a simplified orthodontic correction of a minor tooth malposition. The present case report describes a case of tooth loss caused by a displaced intraoral elastic, which occurred during a simple preprosthetic orthodontic treatment. PMID:27672645

  3. Prosthetic considerations for orthodontic implant site development in the adult patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst, Alexandra I; Nkenke, Emeka; Blatz, Markus B; Geiselhöringer, Hans; Holst, Stefan

    2009-11-01

    Proper site development is a key factor for long-term clinical success of dental implants. Whereas surgical and restorative techniques have been refined to ensure predictable functional and esthetic outcome, individual clinical prerequisites do not always allow proper placement of implants when prosthetic and material properties are considered. Orthodontic tooth movement may be a viable and nonsurgical site development treatment option. With the introduction and advancements of minimal invasive and less visible orthodontic appliances, a growing number of adult patients are willing to obtain orthodontic treatment. The spectrum of modern appliances is broad and ranges from clear aligners to lingual brackets. Skeletal anchorage devices such as orthodontic mini-implants often eliminate unpopular external anchorage devices (ie, headgear) in adult patients, This article discusses the selection of an appropriate pretreatment approach by taking patient-specific criteria into account.

  4. Effect of fixed orthodontic appliances on salivary microbial parameters at 6 months: a controlled observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine MARET

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the microbial changes in children with fixed orthodontic appliances compared with a control group of children without orthodontic treatment. Material and Methods: Ninety-five children, aged between 12 and 16 years, participated in this study. Forty-eight subjects were fitted with fixed orthodontic appliances and forty-seven were free of any such appliances. The follow-up was 6 months for all children. The association between orthodontic appliances and high levels of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus spp was assessed with logistic regression models, taking age, sex, pH and buffer capacity into account. Results: Differences at baseline between the two groups were not statistically significant. We found that wearing a fixed orthodontic appliance was associated with high levels of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus spp (adjusted OR: 6.65, 95% CI [1.98-22.37]; 9.49, 95% CI [2.57-35.07], respectively, independently of other variables. Conclusion: The originality of the present epidemiological study was to evaluate the evolution of salivary microbial parameters in a population of children with fixed orthodontic appliances. Our results show an increase of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus spp values during the follow-up. The whole dental workforce should be aware that preventive measures are of paramount importance during orthodontic treatment.

  5. Effect of fluoride mouthwash on tensile strength of stainless steel orthodontic archwires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatimah, D. I.; Anggani, H. S.; Ismah, N.

    2017-08-01

    Patients with orthodontic treatment are commonly recommended to use a fluoride mouthwash for maintaining their oral hygiene and preventing dental caries. However, fluoride may affect the characteristics of stainless steel orthodontic archwires used during treatment. The effect of fluoride mouthwash on the tensile strength of stainless steel orthodontic archwires is still unknown. The purpose of this study is to know the effect of fluoride mouthwash on the tensile strength of stainless steel orthodontic archwires. Examine the tensile strength of 0.016 inch stainless steel orthodontic archwires after immersion in 0.05%, 100 ml fluoride mouthwash for 30, 60, and 90 min. There is no statistically significant difference in the tensile strength of stainless steel orthodontic archwires after immersed in fluoride mouthwash. The p-values on immersion fluoride mouthwash for 30, 60, and 90 min consecutively are 0.790; 0.742; and 0.085 (p > 0.05). The use of fluoride mouthwash did not have an effect on the tensile strength of stainless Steel orthodontic archwires.

  6. Optimal management of orthodontic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topolski, Francielle; Moro, Alexandre; Correr, Gisele Maria; Schimim, Sasha Cristina

    2018-01-01

    Pain is an undesirable side effect of orthodontic tooth movement, which causes many patients to give up orthodontic treatment or avoid it altogether. The aim of this study was to investigate, through an analysis of the scientific literature, the best method for managing orthodontic pain. The methodological aspects involved careful definition of keywords and diligent search in databases of scientific articles published in the English language, without any restriction of publication date. We recovered 1281 articles. After the filtering and classification of these articles, 56 randomized clinical trials were selected. Of these, 19 evaluated the effects of different types of drugs for the control of orthodontic pain, 16 evaluated the effects of low-level laser therapy on orthodontic pain, and 21 evaluated other methods of pain control. Drugs reported as effective in orthodontic pain control included ibuprofen, paracetamol, naproxen sodium, aspirin, etoricoxib, meloxicam, piroxicam, and tenoxicam. Most studies report favorable outcomes in terms of alleviation of orthodontic pain with the use of low-level laser therapy. Nevertheless, we noticed that there is no consensus, both for the drug and for laser therapy, on the doses and clinical protocols most appropriate for orthodontic pain management. Alternative methods for orthodontic pain control can also broaden the clinician's range of options in the search for better patient care.

  7. The prevalence of malocclusion and orthodontic treatment needs in school going children of Nalagarh, Himachal Pradesh, India

    OpenAIRE

    Sarabjeet Singh; Abhishek Sharma; Navreet Sandhu; Kavita Mehta

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of malocclusion and orthodontic treatment need in 13–18-year-old schoolchildren of Nalagarh, Himachal Pradesh, India using the Index of Orthodontic Treatment need (IOTN) and to analyze the treatment needs between males and females and correlation between the esthetic component (AC) and dental health component (DHC) of IOTN. Subjects and Methods: The sample comprised 2000 school children (1125 females and 875 males) who had no...

  8. Craniofacial orthodontics and postgraduate orthodontic training in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isiekwe, G I; Oguchi, C O; daCosta, O O; Utomi, I L

    2016-01-01

    Craniofacial orthodontics has been shown to be a critical component of the care of patients with craniofacial anomalies such as cleft lip and palate. Thus, the purpose of this study was to assess the perceptions and clinical experience in cleft and craniofacial care, of orthodontic residents in Nigeria. Questionnaires were sent out to orthodontic residents in the six Postgraduate Orthodontic Training Centers in the country at that time. The questionnaires were self-administered and covered areas in beliefs in cleft care and the clinical experience and challenges faced by the residents in the provision of craniofacial orthodontic care at their various institutions. Thirty-three respondents returned completed questionnaires, with a response rate of 97%. All the respondents believed that residents should be involved in cleft and craniofacial care. Postnatal counseling was the clinical procedure in which the residents reported the highest level of clinical experience (47.4%). The least clinical experience was recorded in pre-bone graft orthodontics (7.4%) and orthodontic preparation for orthognathic surgery (5.5%). Some of the challenges highlighted by the residents were low patients turn out for orthodontic care and the absence of multidisciplinary treatment for craniofacial patients in their centers. Orthodontic residents in Nigeria believe that they should be involved in the management of patients with craniofacial anomalies and cleft lip and palate. However, majority of the residents have limited clinical experience in the management of these patients. A lot more needs to be done, to expose orthodontic residents in training, to all aspects of the orthodontic and multidisciplinary team care required for the cleft/craniofacial patient.

  9. Orthodontic treatment of the transposition of a maxillary canine and a first premolar: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teresa, Dinoi Maria; Stefano, Mummolo; Annalisa, Monaco; Enrico, Marchetti; Vincenzo, Campanella; Giuseppe, Marzo

    2015-03-01

    Transposition is an anomaly of tooth position, the most frequent of which involves the canine and the first maxillary premolar. We describe the orthodontic treatment of a unilateral transposition of an upper canine and an upper right first premolar in the permanent dentition. A 12-year-old Caucasian boy presented with transposition of his upper right canine and upper right first premolar. He had combined surgical-orthodontic treatment to correct the transposition and to obtain a Class I relationship between the molar and canine. This treatment resolved the dental crowding and achieved good functional and aesthetic results. In transposition, the choice of the most suitable treatment depends on the occlusion, level of dental crowding, aesthetics, position of the radicular apices, and the specific needs of the patient. In this case, orthodontic alignment of the transposed teeth into their physiological position achieved all of our objectives and our patient was satisfied with the aesthetic results obtained.

  10. Orthodontic treatment for a patient with hereditary angiodema: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldon, Kate; Barber, Sophy Kathleen; Spencer, Richard James

    2015-05-01

    Hereditary angiodema (HAE), also known as C1 esterase inhibitor deficiency, causes sufferers to experience episodic subcutaneous and submucosal oedema. These episodes can be triggered by dental treatment and manifest as life-threatening oedematous swelling in the head and neck region. This case report reviews an adolescent with hereditary angiodema whose malocclusion required orthodontic intervention. Due to her complex and unpredictable reaction to dental treatment, various options were explored before determining the appropriate care pathway for this patient. Trial placement of a sectional fixed appliance tested the tissue reaction prior to comprehensive treatment including extractions and fixed orthodontic appliances. This report demonstrates successful interdisciplinary management facilitating orthodontic care in a patient with HAE. © 2014 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Effect of saliva contamination on cementation of orthodontic brackets using different adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robaski, Aliden-Willian; Pamato, Saulo; Tomás-de Oliveira, Marcelo; Pereira, Jefferson-Ricardo

    2017-07-01

    The enamel condition and the quality of surface are points that need to be considered for achieving optimal efficiency in the treatment with orthodontic brackets. The aim of this study was to assess the immediate bond strength of metallic brackets cemented to dental. Forty human premolars were double-sectioned, placed in PVC matrices and randomly divided into 10 groups (n=8). They received artificial saliva contamination before or after the application of adhesive systems, except for the control groups. The metallic brackets were cemented using two orthodontic cements (Transbond™ Plus Color Change, 3M Unitek e Transbond™ XT Light, 3M Unitek). The specimens were subjected to mechanical shear bond strength testing and classified according to the fracture pattern. The results were analyzed using a two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test for multiple comparisons ( p brackets cemented on the dental enamel. Key words: Bonding, orthodontic brackets, shear bond strength, saliva, adhesive systems.

  12. Conventional Vs Digital Impressions: Acceptability, Treatment Comfort and Stress Among Young Orthodontic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangano, Alessandro; Beretta, Matteo; Luongo, Giuseppe; Mangano, Carlo; Mangano, Francesco

    2018-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare patients' acceptability, comfort and stress with conventional and digital impressions. Thirty young orthodontic patients (15 males and 15 females) who had no previous experience of impressions were enrolled in this study. Conventional impressions for orthodontic study models of the dental arches were taken using an alginate impression material (Hydrogum ® , Zhermack Spa, Badia Polesine, Rovigo, Italy). Fifteen days later, digital impressions of both arches were acquired using an intraoral scanner (CS3600 ® , Carestream Dental, Rochester, NY, USA). Immediately after impression taking, patients' acceptability, comfort and stress were measured using two questionnaires and the State anxiety scale. Data showed no difference in terms of anxiety and stress; however, patients preferred the use of digital impressions systems instead of conventional impression techniques. Alginate impressions resulted as fast as digital impressions. Digital impressions resulted the most accepted and comfortable impression technique in young orthodontic patients, when compared to conventional techniques.

  13. Dental Amalgam

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam Dental Amalgam Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Dental amalgam is a dental filling material which is ...

  14. Craniofacial orthodontics and postgraduate orthodontic training in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-06-21

    Jun 21, 2015 ... Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice • May-Jun 2016 • Vol 19 • Issue 3 ... Teaching Hospital, Idi‑araba, Lagos, 1Department of Child Dental Health, Bayero University, Aminu Kano ... of international donor organizations. ..... Mossey P, Little J. Addressing the challenges of cleft lip and palate research in. India.

  15. Influence of Cervitec gel on periodontal health of patients wearing fixed orthodontic appliances

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    Burcu Özdemir

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: The present data suggested that brushing with Cervitec gel once a day has the potential to reduce bacterial accumulation around teeth and fixed appliances in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment. However, within the limits of this study, Cervitec seems to have no significant effect on total bacteria, P.g., and T.d. levels of subgingival dental plaque.

  16. Orthodontic Management of Congenitally Missing Maxillary Lateral Incisors: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Paduano, Sergio; Cioffi, Iacopo; Rongo, Roberto; Cupo, Antonello; Bucci, Rosaria; Valletta, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes the orthodontic treatment of a woman, aged 15 years, with permanent dentition, brachyfacial typology, with congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors. Multibracket straightwire fixed appliance was used to open the space for dental implant placement, and treat the impaired occlusion. The missing lateral incisors were substituted with oral implants.

  17. Multi-disciplinary approach for enhancing orthodontic esthetics – case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalia A

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ajit Kalia, Nasim Mirdehghan, Sonali Khandekar, Wasu Patil Department of Orthodontics, MA Rangoonwala Dental College, Pune, IndiaBackground: In contemporary dental care, an increasing number of adult patients are now seeking orthodontic treatment with the primary motive of improvement in appearance and achievement of esthetic smile. Proper recognition of the dental and facial defects at the outset of treatment is the most important key to esthetic success and is essential in satisfying the patient's needs. By following the rules of Golden proportion smiles can be made attractive, harmonious, symmetrical, and proportionate. Methodology: Consisted of 22-year-old girl who came for treatment of crowding in maxillary and mandibular arches, abnormal overjet and overbite and had unaesthetic peg lateral.Results: Non-extraction therapy was carried out since the patient had good soft tissue drape, alignment was achieved by expanding the arches and moving teeth in ideal axial inclination. Esthetic smile was attained using composite buildup of upper right peg lateral and minor adjunctive surgery (full thickness periodontal graft on lower right central incisor.Conclusion: The present case report orchestrates interrelationship between various branches of dentistry and orthodontics. It exhibits how multidisciplinary approach can be used to achieve ideal dental esthetics in a 22-year-old girl who was successfully treated for peg shaped lateral incisor, gingival recession, and unaesthetic smile. Keywords: adult orthodontics, peg lateral, gingival recession, golden proportion

  18. Revisiting the stability of mini-implants used for orthodontic anchorage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Chen Jane Yao

    2015-11-01

    Conclusion: This study revealed that once the dental surgeon becomes familiar with the procedure, the stability of orthodontic mini-implants depends on the type of mini-implant, age of the patient, implantation site, and the healing time of the mini-implant. Miniplates are a more feasible anchorage system when miniscrews fail repeatedly.

  19. malocclusion and orthodontic treatment need of 15-74 year old Dutch adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgersdijk, R.; Truin, G.J.; Frankenmolen, F.; Kalsbeek, H.; Hof, M. van 't; Mulder, J.

    1991-01-01

    In 1986 a nationwide dental survey was performed in the Netherlands. This article describes the prevalence of dentofacial anomalies in the age group 15-74 yr, as well as the subjective and objective need for orthodontic treatment. The main findings were: severe crowding in the mandible was found in

  20. Orthodontic Management of Congenitally Missing Maxillary Lateral Incisors: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Paduano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes the orthodontic treatment of a woman, aged 15 years, with permanent dentition, brachyfacial typology, with congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors. Multibracket straightwire fixed appliance was used to open the space for dental implant placement, and treat the impaired occlusion. The missing lateral incisors were substituted with oral implants.

  1. Development and evaluation of a patient decision aid for young people and parents considering fixed orthodontic appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshman, Zoe; Eddaiki, Abdussalam; Bekker, Hilary L; Benson, Philip E

    2016-12-01

    To develop and evaluate a child-centred patient decision aid for young people, and their parents, supporting shared decision making about fixed orthodontic appliance treatment with dental health professionals, namely the Fixed Appliance Decision Aid (FADA). The studies were undertaken in a UK teaching dental hospital orthodontic department in 2013-2014. The development phase involved an interview study with: (a) 10 patients (12-16 years old), and their parents, receiving orthodontic care to investigate treatment decision making and inform the content of the FADA and (b) 23 stakeholders critiquing the draft decision aid's content, structure and utility. The evaluation phase employed a pre-/post-test study design, with 30 patients (12-16 years old) and 30 parents. Outcomes included the Decisional Conflict Scale; measures of orthodontic treatment expectations and knowledge. Qualitative analysis identified two informational needs: effectiveness of treatment on orthodontic outcomes and treatment consequences for patients' lives. Quantitative analysis found decisional conflict reduced in both patients (mean difference -12.3, SD 15.3, 95% CI 6.6-17.9; p orthodontic treatment increased; expectations about care were unchanged. Using the FADA may enable dental professionals to support patients and their parents, decisions about fixed appliance treatments more effectively, ensuring young people's preferences are integrated into care planning.

  2. Authorship characteristics of orthodontic randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses in non-orthodontic journals with impact factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqaydi, Ahlam R; Kanavakis, Georgios; Naser-Ud-Din, Shazia; Athanasiou, Athanasios E

    2017-12-08

    This study was conducted to explore authorship characteristics and publication trends of all orthodontic randomized controlled trials (RCTs), systematic reviews (SRs), and meta-analyses (MAs) published in non-orthodontic journals with impact factor (IF). Appropriate research strategies were developed to search for all articles published until December 2015, without restrictions regarding language or publication status. The initial search generated 4524 results, but after application of the inclusion criteria, the final number of articles was reduced to 274 (SRs: 152; MAs: 36; and RCTs: 86). Various authorship characteristics were recorded for each article. Frequency distributions for all parameters were explored with Pearson chi-square for independence at the 0.05 level of significance. More than half of the included publications were SRs (55.5 per cent), followed by RCTs (31.4 per cent) and MAs (13.1 per cent); one hundred seventy-eight (65 per cent) appeared in dental journals and 96 (35 per cent) were published in non-dental journals. The last decade was significantly more productive than the period before 2006, with 236 (86.1 per cent) articles published between 2006 and 2015. European countries produced 51.5 per cent of the total number of publications, followed by Asia (18.6 per cent) and North America (USA and Canada; 16.8 per cent). Studies published in journals without IF were not included. Level-1 evidence orthodontic literature published in non-orthodontic journals has significantly increased during 2006-15. This indicates a larger interest of other specialty journals in orthodontic related studies and a trend for orthodontic authors to publish their work in journals with impact in broader fields of dentistry and medicine. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  3. Optimal management of orthodontic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Topolski F

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Francielle Topolski,1 Alexandre Moro,1,2 Gisele Maria Correr,3 Sasha Cristina Schimim1 1Department of Orthodontics, Positivo University, Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil; 2Department of Orthodontics, Federal University of Paraná, Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil; 3Department of Restorative Dentistry, Positivo University, Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil Abstract: Pain is an undesirable side effect of orthodontic tooth movement, which causes many patients to give up orthodontic treatment or avoid it altogether. The aim of this study was to investigate, through an analysis of the scientific literature, the best method for managing orthodontic pain. The methodological aspects involved careful definition of keywords and diligent search in databases of scientific articles published in the English language, without any restriction of publication date. We recovered 1281 articles. After the filtering and classification of these articles, 56 randomized clinical trials were selected. Of these, 19 evaluated the effects of different types of drugs for the control of orthodontic pain, 16 evaluated the effects of low-level laser therapy on orthodontic pain, and 21 evaluated other methods of pain control. Drugs reported as effective in orthodontic pain control included ibuprofen, paracetamol, naproxen sodium, aspirin, etoricoxib, meloxicam, piroxicam, and tenoxicam. Most studies report favorable outcomes in terms of alleviation of orthodontic pain with the use of low-level laser therapy. Nevertheless, we noticed that there is no consensus, both for the drug and for laser therapy, on the doses and clinical protocols most appropriate for orthodontic pain management. Alternative methods for orthodontic pain control can also broaden the clinician’s range of options in the search for better patient care. Keywords: tooth movement, pain control, drug therapy, laser therapy

  4. Scope of practice and supervision of orthodontic therapists in the United Kingdom: Part 2: a national cross-sectional survey of orthodontic therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Farooq; Dugdale, Charlotte; Malik, Ovais; Waring, David

    2018-03-01

    Orthodontic therapists (OTs) are the most recent addition to the orthodontic clinical team. The General Dental Council (GDC) and the British Orthodontic Society have formulated guidance and guidelines relating to their scope of practice and level of supervision, however there has been no contemporary UK-based research investigating practice and supervision of OTs. The aim of this study was to investigate the scope of practice and level of supervision of OTs working in the UK. Ethical approval was received from the University of Manchester Research Ethics Committee. An anonymous postal questionnaire was dispatched using postal details acquired through the British Orthodontic Societies mailing list. Three mailings of the questionnaire were conducted. A 74% response rate was achieved. OTs routinely conducted 16 of the 20 procedures from their scope of practice. Uncommon procedures included fitting headgear (24%), lingual appliances (27%), inserting or removing temporary anchorage devices (20%), and taking facebow record (18%). A total of 62% of OTs took patient consent for treatment. 59% were supervised through a written prescription with no direct supervision. OTs were directly supervised for only a quarter of their clinical practice. Orthodontists viewing frequency for OTs varied significantly, and was found to be the following: every 2-4 visits (36%), every other visit (35%), and every visit (26%). OTs mostly carried out the scope of practice as permitted by the GDC. Procedures uncommon to routine orthodontic practice were also uncommon to Orthodontic therapist clinical practice. OTs work mostly through written prescription with no direct supervision.

  5. Genotoxicity of corrosion eluates obtained from orthodontic brackets in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelieri, Fernanda; Marcondes, Joao Paulo C; de Almeida, Danielle Cristina; Salvadori, Daisy M F; Ribeiro, Daniel A

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether corrosion eluates obtained from commercially available orthodontic brackets are able to induce genetic damage in vitro. Genotoxicity was assessed by the single cell gel (comet) assay using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The following orthodontic metallic brackets were used: Morelli (Sorocaba, Brazil); Abzil (São José do Rio Preto, Brazil); Dentaurum (Pforzheim, Germany); and 3M Unitek (Puchheim, Germany). Each dental bracket was submitted to a corrosion process in a solution containing equal amounts of acetic acid and sodium chloride at 0.1 M concentration for 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, 35, and 70 days. CHO cells were exposed to eluates for 30 minutes at 37°C. The negative control was treated with the same solution used for corrosion process for 30 minutes at 37°C. Independent positive control was performed with methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) (Sigma Aldrich, St. Louis, Mo) at 1 ug/mL for 1 hour. None of the eluates was found to exhibit genotoxicity, regardless of the different commercial brands of orthodontic appliance used. In summary, our results indicate corrosion eluates obtained from orthodontic brackets do not induce genetic damage as assessed by single cell gel (comet) assay. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Prevention and treatment of white spot lesions in orthodontic patients

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    Maryam Khoroushi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Decalcification of enamel, appearing as white spot lesions (WSLs, around fixed orthodontic appliances is a major challenge during and after fixed orthodontic treatment by considering the fact that the goal of orthodontic treatment is to enhance facial and dental esthetic appearance. Banded or bonded teeth exhibit a significantly higher rate of WSLs compared to the controls with no braces as fixed appliances and the bonding materials promote retention of biofilms. These lesions are managed in the first step by establishing good oral hygiene habits and prophylaxis with topical fluorides, including high-fluoride toothpastes, fluoride mouthwashes, gels, varnishes, fluoride-containing bonding materials, and elastic ligatures. Recently, other materials and methods have been recommended, including the application of casein phosphopeptides-amorphous calcium phosphate, antiseptics, probiotics, polyols, sealants, laser, tooth bleaching agents, resin infiltration, and microabrasion. This article reviews the currently used methods to manage enamel demineralization during and after orthodontic treatment and the risk factors and preventive measures based on the latest evidence.

  7. Orthodontic treatment in cherubism: an overview and a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abela, Stefan; Cameron, Malcolm; Bister, Dirk

    2014-11-01

    Cherubism is a rare hereditary disease that frequently manifests as a painless enlargement of the mandible and/or maxilla. The disease usually progresses rapidly during the first and second decades of life but it is self-limiting and often regresses. Although few orthodontic case reports describing cherubic patients exist, the timing and extent of surgical intervention is controversial. This present paper aims to review the treatment literature and provide a case report of a patient who underwent orthodontic/surgical management. The patient presented with severe cherubism in her late teenage years; her main complaint was poor facial and dental appearance. Multiple teeth were missing and those present demonstrated significant preoperative root resorption. Treatment consisted of orthodontic alignment of the upper anterior teeth and a recontouring osteotomy. Confirmed by the patient, the combination approach led to a significant improvement in facial aesthetics and better self-esteem. Tooth movement through the osseous lesions was uneventful and no further root resoption was observed. Orthodontic treatment may be undertaken in those affected by Cherubism even with pre-existing idiopathic root resorption, but patients need to be appropriately informed and consented.

  8. Prevalence of orthodontic treatment need in southern Italian schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perillo, Letizia; Masucci, Caterina; Ferro, Fabrizia; Apicella, Davide; Baccetti, Tiziano

    2010-02-01

    The present survey was performed to determine orthodontic treatment need in a large sample (n = 703) of 12-year-old schoolchildren from the southern part of Italy. The sample comprised 331 males (47 per cent) and 372 females (53 per cent), all orthodontically untreated. Two examiners, who had been previously trained in the use of occlusal indices, screened all the schoolchildren. The prevalence rates for the Dental Health Component (DHC) of the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN) as well as for occlusal features (Angle Class, overjet, overbite, crowding, posterior crossbite) were calculated for the total sample. The IOTN grades were statistically compared in the two genders using the chi-square test. The findings indicated that this southern Italian school population showed a rather low prevalence rate for objective need for treatment (grades 4 and 5; 27.3 per cent of the total sample). This prevalence rate is generally lower than those reported in northern and central European countries (Sweden, Germany, and UK) but slightly greater than those in France. No significant differences in the DHC grades of the IOTN were found between genders. Among the occlusal features diagnosed in the subjects examined, a high prevalence rate was found for crowding (45.9 per cent). Moreover, posterior crossbites and Class III malocclusions, which would presumably have benefited from early orthodontic intervention, were still present in 14.2 and 4.3 per cent of the students, respectively.

  9. Apicotomy as Treatment for Failure of Orthodontic Traction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Berni Osório

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to present a case report that demonstrated primary failure in a tooth traction that was subsequently treated with apicotomy technique. Case Report. A 10-year-old girl had an impacted upper right canine with increased pericoronal space, which was apparent on a radiographic image. The right maxillary sinus showed an opacity suggesting sinusitis. The presumptive diagnosis was dentigerous cyst associated with maxillary sinus infection. The plan for treatment included treatment of the sinus infection and cystic lesion and orthodontic traction of the canine after surgical exposure and bonding of an orthodontic appliance. The surgical procedure, canine position, root dilaceration, and probably apical ankylosis acted in the primary failure of the orthodontic traction. Surgical apical cut of the displaced teeth was performed, and tooth position in the dental arch was possible, with a positive response to the pulp vitality test. Conclusion. Apicotomy is an effective technique to treat severe canine displacement and primary orthodontic traction failure of palatally displaced canines.

  10. Orthodontic Research Output from Iran in International and National Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badri, Samareh; Akhoundi, Mohammad Sadegh Ahmad; Fard, Mohammad JavadKharrazi; Momeni, Nafiseh; Hedayati, Zohreh; Vakili, Vajihe

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The number of scientific papers is a conventional metric to measure a country’s research performance in a particular area. The aim of this survey was to demonstrate statistical information about orthodontic research published in international and national journals. Materials and Methods: Pubmed as an international and IranMedex and SID as national databases were searched between1997 and 2012. The keyword searching method was used in English and Persian. Abstracts were reviewed and unrelated articles were omitted. Data were obtained and transferred to Microsoft Excel to survey the scintometric indicators. Results: According to the defined criteria, a total of 733 papers were found showing a considerable increase. Five hundred papers (68.2%) were published in domestic journals, and 233 (31.8%) were published in PubMed indexed journals. Most of the orthodontic articles originated from Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences (22.9%). The Journal of Dental School, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences published most of the national papers (27.8%) and the Australian Orthodontic Journal published the majority of international papers (9.9%) In terms of study design, 52.5% of the articles were observational and 39.4% were interventional. Conclusion: Orthodontic research production in Iran has made significant strides in the recent years and researchers should focus on the quality of the study in this field in order to apply research production in evidence base dentistry. PMID:24910678

  11. OBJECTIVE AND SUBJECTIVE EVALUATION OF ADOLESCENT’S ORTHODONTIC TREATMENT NEEDS AND THEIR IMPACT ON SELF-ESTEEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anshika; Mathur, Anmol; Batra, Manu; Makkar, Diljot Kaur; Aggarwal, Vikram Pal; Goyal, Nikita; Kaur, Puneet

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To investigate the presence of association between objective and subjective evaluation of orthodontic treatment needs in adolescents and their impact on their self-esteem. Methods: Cross-sectional study with adolescents aged 10-17 years old in Sri Ganganagar city, Rajasthan, India. The objective index of orthodontic treatment need (IOTN) dental health component (DHC) and the subjective aesthetic component (AC) were used to determine the normative and the self-perception need for orthodontic treatment, respectively. The selected students were further examined for dental trauma, tooth loss, and dental caries. Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale was applied for self-esteem level determination. Linear regression analysis was executed to test the individual association of different independent clinical variables with self-esteem scores. Results: Among 1,140 studied adolescents, the prevalence of dental normative orthodontic treatment need was in 56.9% of individuals, whereas 53.3% of individuals considered themselves as needy for the treatment. Multivariate analyses revealed that out of all dental disorders, DHC followed by AC of IOTN had maximum impact on the self-esteem of the adolescence. Conclusions: Dissatisfaction with dental appearance is a strong predictor for low self-esteem in adolescence. PMID:28977320

  12. Corrosion of weldments in orthodontic appliances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, S.M.; Riesgo, O.; Duffo, G.S.

    1997-01-01

    The study of corrosion-related problems of dental materials has undergone a considerable development in recent years in order to avoid the use of materials with insufficient corrosion resistance in patients mouth. The subject of the present work was to study a particular type of corrosion: galvanic corrosion. One of the most common case of galvanic couples in patients mouth are the orthodontic appliances. The materials studied in the present work were stainless steel strips and silver-copper wires, isolated and welded between them. The electrochemical tests were performed in a NaCl 0.1M and Lactic Acid 0.1 M solution (pH2.3), and after test, the specimens were observed using the optical and scanning electron microscope. The results show that when stainless steel is coupled with a silver solder, the last is the anode of the galvanic couple. As a consequence of this, the silver solder undergone a severe attack. Stainless steel orthodontic appliances with silver solder are feasibly destroyed due to a severe attack on the filler metal disjoining the welded parts. (author) 9 refs

  13. The Validity of Subjects in Korean Dental Technicians' Licensing Examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woong-chul Kim

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available This study prepared a basic framework for the development and improvement of Korean Dental Technicians' Licensing Examination, based on actual test questions. A peer review was conducted to ensure relevance to current practices in dental technology. For the statistical analysis, 1000 dental laboratory technicians were selected; specialists in dental laboratory technology (laboratory owners, educators, etc. were involved in creating valid and reliable questions. Results indicated that examination subjects should be divided into three categories: basic dental laboratory theory, dental laboratory specialties, and a practical examination. To ensure relevance to current practice, there should be less emphasis on basic dental laboratory theory, including health-related laws, and more emphasis on dental laboratory specialties. Introduction to dental anatomy should be separated from oral anatomy and tooth morphology; and fixed prosthodontics should be separated from crown and bridge technology and dental ceramics technology. Removable orthodontic appliance technology should be renamed 'orthodontic laboratory technology'. There should be less questions related to health related law, oral anatomy, dental hygiene, dental materials science and inlay, while the distribution ratio of questions related to tooth morphology should be maintained. There should be a decrease in the distribution ratio of questions related to crown and bridge technology, dental ceramics technology, complete dentures and removable partial dentures technology, and orthodontic laboratory technology. In the practical examination, the current multiple choice test should be replaced with tooth carving using wax or plaster. In dental laboratory specialties, subjects related to contemporary dental laboratory technology should be included in the test items.

  14. Emergencies in Orthodontics. Part 2: Management of Removable Appliances, Functional Appliances and other Adjuncts to Orthodontic Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowsing, Paul; Murray, Alison; Sandler, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    In the second of two papers, management of orthodontic emergencies involving appliances other than Fixed appliances will be detailed. Problems relating to removable appliances, as well as other orthodontic adjuncts, will be discussed. Unfortunately, orthodontic appliance breakage does occur, despite the clinicians giving clear and concise instructions to the patients and their parents at fitting. If general dental practitioners have a practical knowledge of how to diagnose problems and to provide appropriate advice or timely 'emergency' treatment, this will significantly reduce the inconvenience for all parties concerned. It should also ensure that treatment progresses in the most efficient and comfortable manner for their patients. In specific situations the early, accurate identification of the problem and instigation of its appropriate management can avoid more serious consequences. Clinical Relevance: Appropriate handling of an orthodontic 'emergency' by the dentist can, on many occasions, provide immediate relief to the patient. This will, in turn, allow treatment to continue in the right direction, thus allowing more efficient and effective use of valuable resources.

  15. Lingual orthodontic education: An insight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surya Kanta Das

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite increasing demand for lingual orthodontics, the technique is not very popular among the orthodontists in general. Lingual orthodontics differs from the conventional labial technique in all aspects. Lack of comprehensive training in this field is a major obstacle in popularizing this science of invisible orthodontics. At present, short-term courses and part-time degree programs are the means to learn this technique and the demand for more comprehensive lingual orthodontic education is on a rise among orthodontists. Lingual orthodontics as a super specialty discipline with full-time residency program can be a step forward. This will groom orthodontists to acquire the finest skills to finish lingual cases but also help to the science to grow with dedicated research work.

  16. Computer-Based Oral Hygiene Instruction versus Verbal Method in Fixed Orthodontic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshkelgosha, V.; Mehrvarz, Sh.; Saki, M.; Golkari, A.

    2017-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Fixed orthodontic appliances in the oral cavity make tooth cleaning procedures more complicated. Objectives: This study aimed to compare the efficacy of computerized oral hygiene instruction with verbal technique among fixed orthodontic patients referred to the evening clinic of Orthodontics of Shiraz Dental School. Materials and Methods: A single-blind study was performed in Orthodontic Department of Shiraz, Islamic Republic of Iran, from January to May 2015 following the demonstrated exclusion and inclusion criteria. The sample size was considered 60 patients with 30 subjects in each group. Bleeding on probing and plaque indices and dental knowledge were assessed in the subjects to determine pre-intervention status. A questionnaire was designed for dental knowledge evaluation. The patients were randomly assigned into the computerized and verbal groups. Three weeks after the oral hygiene instruction, indices of bleeding on probing and plaque index and the dental knowledge were evaluated to investigate post-intervention outcome. The two groups were compared by chi-square and student t tests. The pre- and post-intervention scores in each group were compared using paired t-test. Results: In the computerized group, the mean score for plaque index and bleeding on probing index was significantly decreased while dental health knowledge was significantly increased after oral hygiene instruction, in contrast to the verbal group. Conclusions: Within the limitations of the current study, computerized oral hygiene instruction is proposed to be more effective in providing optimal oral health status compared to the conventional method in fixed orthodontic patients. PMID:28959765

  17. Visualisation of dental images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Md Saion Salikin; Azuhar Ripin; Wan Hazlinda Ismail; Asmaliza Hashim; Norriza Mohd Isa; Suriany Sarmid

    2005-01-01

    Since the invention and the discovery of x-rays, physicians, surgeons and life scientists have been using images to diagnose and subsequently treat diseases. X-ray is also widely used in many imaging techniques to better understand basics anatomy, physiology and biology as well as testing and analytical work in physical science. In dentistry, x-ray technique has been employed to get a panoramic view of the whole teeth of a particular patient. A panoramic dental radiograph is very useful in dentistry for diagnostic purpose, denture preparation, as well as for orthodontic. Image visualisation is an important aspect especially for the dentists to analyse and proceed with a particulate dental treatment. In this project panoramic dental image obtained by using a standard phantom is visualised by using Interactive Data Language (IDL) software. A panoramic dental x-ray machine, Cranex3, is used to get a panoramic radiograph, which is subsequently digitized, by using Vidar digitizer (Sierra Plus). The 2D digitized image is enhance and apply other visualising techniques such as surface rendering and volume rendering technique using Interactive Data Language (IDL) software as a first step in 3D visualisation. In this paper, visualising of panoramic dental radiograph by using IDL is discussed in brief. (Author)

  18. Root Resorption with Orthodontic Mechanics: Pertinent Areas Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, V

    2017-03-01

    Root resorption can occur at any time during orthodontic treatment and lead to a compromise in the prognosis of the tooth and the stability of the treatment results. Recent research has focused more on the cause and effect relationship as well as preventive or treatment options to combat this unwelcome event. Investigations have highlighted the genetic as well as molecular aspects of the process and enabled clinicians to determine which patients might be susceptible. A proper medical history, an assessment of predisposing factors, a radiographic evaluation for alterations in root morphology and careful planning and execution of orthodontic mechanics may reduce the incidence of root resorption. The current review is aimed at providing clinicians and academics with an insight into the process of root resorption, the methods of identification during its early stages and intervention at the right time to reduce its severity. © 2017 Australian Dental Association.

  19. Understanding the shape-memory alloys used in orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Daniel J; Peres, Rafael V; Mendes, Alvaro M; Elias, Carlos N

    2011-01-01

    Nickel-titanium (NiTi) shape-memory alloys (SMAs) have been used in the manufacture of orthodontic wires due to their shape memory properties, super-elasticity, high ductility, and resistance to corrosion. SMAs have greater strength and lower modulus of elasticity when compared with stainless steel alloys. The pseudoelastic behavior of NiTi wires means that on unloading they return to their original shape by delivering light continuous forces over a wider range of deformation which is claimed to allow dental displacements. The aim of this paper is to discuss the physical, metallurgical, and mechanical properties of NiTi used in Orthodontics in order to analyze the shape memory properties, super-elasticity, and thermomechanical characteristics of SMA.

  20. Removable orthodontic appliances: new perspectives on capabilities and efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid Zafarmand, A; Mahdi Zafarmand, M

    2013-06-01

    Removable appliances are a dependable choice for many patients but like all orthodontic appliances, they have some limitations in use. Patient selection and appropriate appliance design are two key factors for success. Many patients, especially adults, prefer intra-oral appliances to extra-oral devices. Sometimes a removable intra-oral appliance can solve a dental problem in a shorter period of time compared to fixed treatment, and this has also been repeatedly seen in molar distalisation. From the interceptive perspective, the appliance can prevent or alleviate an impending crowding for erupting permanent incisors. This article describes 5 patients with different orthodontic problems: impending crowding for erupting upper canine with 2 approaches, provision of space for upper cuspids, resolution of chronic attrition of anterior teeth, relief of space shortage for upper canines eruption, and reduction of excess overjet. All subjects were treated with removable appliances of various designs.

  1. Are claims made in orthodontic journal advertisements evidence-supported?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Livas, Christos; Kouskoura, Thaleia; Ren, Yijin; Katsaros, Christos; Pandis, Nikolaos

    Objective: To examine the supporting evidence of advertisements published in six leading orthodontic journals. Materials and Methods: The 2012-2013 printed issues of American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Australian Orthodontic Journal, Journal of Orthodontics, European

  2. Creation of 3D Multi-Body Orthodontic Models by Using Independent Imaging Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Viviano Razionale

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In the field of dental health care, plaster models combined with 2D radiographs are widely used in clinical practice for orthodontic diagnoses. However, complex malocclusions can be better analyzed by exploiting 3D digital dental models, which allow virtual simulations and treatment planning processes. In this paper, dental data captured by independent imaging sensors are fused to create multi-body orthodontic models composed of teeth, oral soft tissues and alveolar bone structures. The methodology is based on integrating Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT and surface structured light scanning. The optical scanner is used to reconstruct tooth crowns and soft tissues (visible surfaces through the digitalization of both patients’ mouth impressions and plaster casts. These data are also used to guide the segmentation of internal dental tissues by processing CBCT data sets. The 3D individual dental tissues obtained by the optical scanner and the CBCT sensor are fused within multi-body orthodontic models without human supervisions to identify target anatomical structures. The final multi-body models represent valuable virtual platforms to clinical diagnostic and treatment planning.

  3. Current advances in orthodontic pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Hu; Wang, Yan; Jian, Fan; Liao, Li-Na; Yang, Xin; Lai, Wen-Li

    2016-01-01

    Orthodontic pain is an inflammatory pain that is initiated by orthodontic force-induced vascular occlusion followed by a cascade of inflammatory responses, including vascular changes, the recruitment of inflammatory and immune cells, and the release of neurogenic and pro-inflammatory mediators. Ultimately, endogenous analgesic mechanisms check the inflammatory response and the sensation of pain subsides. The orthodontic pain signal, once received by periodontal sensory endings, reaches the sensory cortex for pain perception through three-order neurons: the trigeminal neuron at the trigeminal ganglia, the trigeminal nucleus caudalis at the medulla oblongata and the ventroposterior nucleus at the thalamus. Many brain areas participate in the emotion, cognition and memory of orthodontic pain, including the insular cortex, amygdala, hippocampus, locus coeruleus and hypothalamus. A built-in analgesic neural pathway—periaqueductal grey and dorsal raphe—has an important role in alleviating orthodontic pain. Currently, several treatment modalities have been applied for the relief of orthodontic pain, including pharmacological, mechanical and behavioural approaches and low-level laser therapy. The effectiveness of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for pain relief has been validated, but its effects on tooth movement are controversial. However, more studies are needed to verify the effectiveness of other modalities. Furthermore, gene therapy is a novel, viable and promising modality for alleviating orthodontic pain in the future. PMID:27341389

  4. Comparing esthetic smile perceptions among laypersons with and without orthodontic treatment experience and dentists

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Seong-Mu; Choi, Sun-Young; Chung, Young-Wook; Jang, Tae-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine whether orthodontic treatment experience affects the individual's perception of smile esthetics and to evaluate differences among orthodontically treated laypersons, non-treated laypersons, and dentists by using computerized image alterations. Methods A photograph of a woman's smile was digitally altered using a software image editing program. The alterations involved gingival margin height, crown width and length, incisal plane canting, and dental midline of the maxillary anterior teeth. Three groups of raters (orthodontically treated laypersons, non-treated laypersons, and dentists) evaluated the original and altered images using a visual analog scale. Results The threshold for detecting changes in maxillary central incisor gingival margin height among laypersons was 1.5 mm; the threshold of dentists, who were more perceptive, was 1.0 mm. For maxillary lateral incisor crown width and height, the threshold of all three groups was 3.0 mm. Canting of the incisal plane was perceived when the canting was 3.0 mm among non-treated laypersons, 2.0 mm among treated laypersons, and 1.0 mm among dentists. Non-treated laypersons could not perceive dental midline shifts; however, treated laypersons and dentists perceived them when the shift was ≥ 3.0 mm. Conclusions Laypersons with and without orthodontic treatment experience and dentists have different perceptions of smile esthetics. Orthodontically treated laypersons were more critical than non-treated laypersons regarding incisal plane canting and dental midline shifts. Based on these findings, it is suggested that orthodontic treatment experience improved the esthetic perceptions of laypersons. PMID:25473645

  5. Nanosilver coated orthodontic brackets: in vivo antibacterial properties and ion release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metin-Gürsoy, Gamze; Taner, Lale; Akca, Gülçin

    2017-02-01

    Silver nanoparticles are currently utilized in the fields of dentistry. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial properties and ion release of nanosilver coated orthodontic brackets compared to conventional brackets. Nanosilver coating process was applied to standard orthodontic brackets placed on the mandibular incisors of Wistar Albino rats in the study group and conventional brackets in the control group. Dental plaque, mucosal vestibular smears, saliva, and blood samples were collected from rats at various days. The amounts of nanosilver ions in blood and saliva were measured and microbiological evaluation was made for Streptococcus mutans. For testing cariogenicity, all rats were sacrificed at the end of 75 days under anaesthesia. Teeth were stained using a caries indicator, then the caries ratio was assessed. Nanosilver coated orthodontic bracket favoured the inhibition of S.mutans on Day 30 and reduction of caries on the smooth surfaces. The nanosilver amounts in the saliva and serum samples were significantly higher in the study group on Day 7. It is suggested that nanosilver coated orthodontic brackets, as an antibacterial agent without patient compliance, could be helpful for the prevention of white spot lesions during fixed orthodontic treatment. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Psychosocial predictors of affect in adult patients undergoing orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñacoba, Cecilia; González, M José; Santos, Noelia; Romero, Martín

    2014-02-01

    In this paper we propose to study the role of psychosocial variables in affect in adult patients undergoing orthodontic treatment, considering that affect is a key variable in treatment adherence. Seventy-four patients (average age 33,24 ± 10,56) with metal multibracket-fixed orthodontic treatment were included. Patients were assessed twice. The first stage, at the beginning of treatment, included assessment of dental impact (Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire), trait anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory), self-esteem (Rosenberg's self-esteem scale), and self-efficacy (General Self-efficacy Scale). In the second stage, 6 months later, positive and negative affect towards treatment was assessed using the Positive and Negative Affect Scale. Dental social impact differentiates between patients with high and low negative affect, while self-efficacy differentiates between patients with high and low positive affect. Trait anxiety and self-esteem differentiate between both types of affect (positive and negative). Trait anxiety and self-esteem (when trait anxiety weight is controlled) are significant predictor variables of affective balance. These results have important practical implications, because it seems essential to adopt a bio-psychosocial model incorporating assessment methods focusing on day-to-day changes in mood and well-being.

  7. Multi-disciplinary approach for enhancing orthodontic esthetics - case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalia, Ajit; Mirdehghan, Nasim; Khandekar, Sonali; Patil, Wasu

    2015-01-01

    In contemporary dental care, an increasing number of adult patients are now seeking orthodontic treatment with the primary motive of improvement in appearance and achievement of esthetic smile. Proper recognition of the dental and facial defects at the outset of treatment is the most important key to esthetic success and is essential in satisfying the patient's needs. By following the rules of Golden proportion smiles can be made attractive, harmonious, symmetrical, and proportionate. Consisted of 22-year-old girl who came for treatment of crowding in maxillary and mandibular arches, abnormal overjet and overbite and had unesthetic peg lateral. Non-extraction therapy was carried out since the patient had good soft tissue drape, alignment was achieved by expanding the arches and moving teeth in ideal axial inclination. Esthetic smile was attained using composite buildup of upper right peg lateral and minor adjunctive surgery (full thickness periodontal graft) on lower right central incisor. The present case report orchestrates interrelationship between various branches of dentistry and orthodontics. It exhibits how multidisciplinary approach can be used to achieve ideal dental esthetics in a 22-year-old girl who was successfully treated for peg shaped lateral incisor, gingival recession, and unesthetic smile.

  8. Assessment of motivation and psychological characteristics of adult orthodontic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabari, Sona; Moles, David R; Cunningham, Susan J

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, the demand for adult orthodontic treatment has grown rapidly; yet there is a paucity of information on this subgroup of patients. It is well known that understanding the psychological characteristics and motives of any patient is fundamental and that these factors might affect patient satisfaction and adherence with treatment. There is therefore a need for clinicians to improve their understanding of this subgroup to enhance the patient's experience of treatment delivery and to increase the potential for a successful treatment outcome. The aim of this study was to develop a measure for the assessment of motivating factors and psychological characteristics of adults seeking orthodontic treatment. This study involved the qualitative development of a valid patient-centered questionnaire to assess motivating factors for adults seeking orthodontic treatment. This was achieved through semi-structured in-depth interviews; key themes were identified and used to construct a questionnaire assessing motivation for treatment. This was then combined with 3 previously validated questionnaires to measure self-esteem, anxiety or depression, and body image and facial body image. The questionnaire was distributed to 172 adult orthodontic patients at different stages of treatment in a large teaching hospital in the United Kingdom. In addition, the self-esteem, body image, and facial body image scores were compared with data on orthognathic patients from the same hospital and with data from members of the general public. Desire to straighten the teeth and improve the smile were the key motivating factors for the adult group studied. Other motives included to improve the bite, improve facial appearance, and close (dental) spacing. With respect to the psychological characteristics of self-esteem, body image, and facial body image, the adult orthodontic group was comparable with the general public. However, differences were noted when comparing data from the adult

  9. A study in vitro on radiation effects by Er:YAG laser combined with the fluorine therapy in the acid resistance of the dental enamel submitted to orthodontical brackets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshiyasu, Roseli Y.A.

    2001-01-01

    Several researches have been demonstrating an increase in the resistance acid of the enamel surface when irradiated by some lasers types as Nd:YAG, C0 2 , Er:YAG, and others, mainly when combined with the fluoride therapy after the irradiation of the laser. This study in vitro used the laser of Er:YAG which density of energy of 8.1 J/cm 2 on the enamel about of orthodontical brackets of teeth extracted pre-molars. These teeth were then submitted to a rich way in S. mutans for twenty one days. The cases were analyzed: (1) enamel surface without any treatment, (2) enamel surface without any irradiation laser, but with therapy with acidulated phosphate fluoride, (3) enamel surface irradiated with laser of Er:YAG and (4) enamel surface irradiated by laser of Er:YAG and with application of acidulated phosphate fluoride. The results were analyzed through optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The morphologic changes observed to the scanning electron microscopy suggest increase in the acid resistance of the enamel surface. However, to the optical microscopy, it was still possible to visualize undesirable white stains in the surface of the enamel. (author)

  10. Frequency of dentofacial asymmetries: a cross-sectional study on orthodontic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhateja, Nita Kumari; Fida, Mubassar; Shaikh, Attiya

    2014-01-01

    Correction of orthodontic asymmetries is crucial to achieve functional occlusion, aesthetics and stability of post orthodontic treatment results. To date valid frequency data of dentofacial asymmetries in Pakistani orthodontic patients do not exist to document orthodontic treatment need. The objectives of this study were to determine frequency of dento-facial asymmetries, severity of dental asymmetries and to determine difference in frequency of dentofacial asymmetries in mixed and permanent dentition. The sample of this cross-sectional study comprised of 280 patients (177 females and 103 males) with no history of previous orthodontic treatment having no craniofacial anomalies. Dento-facial asymmetries were assessed from pre-treatment records of patients. Descriptive statistics were used to determine frequency of dentofacial asymmetries and severity of dental asymmetries. Chi-square test was used to determine difference in frequency of dentofacial asymmetries in mixed and permanent dentition. Seventy eight percent (219) of patients had noncoincident midlines, 67.5% (189) had mandibular midline asymmetry, 43.2% (122) had molar asymmetry, 15.7% (44) had mandibular arch asymmetry, 14.3% (40) had maxillary midline asymmetry, 13.6% (38) had maxillary arch asymmetry, 6.1% (17) had nose deviation, and 12.1% (34) had facial asymmetry and chin deviation. In most patients dental midlines were deviated from one another and from facial midline by ¼ lower incisor widths, while molar asymmetry was found in most patients by ¼ cusp width. Mandibular arch asymmetry was more frequent in permanent than mixed dentition (p = 0.054). Non-coincident dental midline is most commonly seen. Nose deviation is least commonly observed. Mandibular arch asymmetry is more frequent in permanent than mixed dentition.

  11. Expression and Function of Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Pulp Tissue of Teeth under Orthodontic Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulan Wei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic force may lead to cell damage, circulatory disturbances, and vascular changes of the dental pulp, which make a hypoxic environment in pulp. In order to maintain the homeostasis of dental pulp, hypoxia will inevitably induce the defensive reaction. However, this is a complex process and is regulated by numerous factors. In this study, we established an experimental animal model of orthodontic tooth movement to investigate the effects of mechanical force on the expression of VEGF and HIF-1α in dental pulp. Histological analysis of dental pulp and expressions of HIF-1α and VEGF proteins in dental pulp were examined. The results showed that inflammation and vascular changes happened in dental pulp tissue in different periods. Additionally, there were significant changes in the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF proteins under orthodontic force. After application of mechanical load, expression of HIF-1α and VEGF was markedly positive in 1, 3, 7 d, and 2 w groups, and then it weakened in 4 w group. These findings suggested that the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF was enhanced by mechanical force. HIF-1α and VEGF may play an important role in retaining the homeostasis of dental pulp during orthodontic tooth movement.

  12. Social perceptions of adults wearing orthodontic appliances: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremiah, H G; Bister, D; Newton, J T

    2011-10-01

    This study ascertained the influence of orthodontic appliances on subjective ratings for social competence (SC), intellectual ability (IA), psychological adjustment (PA), and attractiveness in young adult orthodontic patients. A cross-sectional analytical questionnaire study was conducted with 130 undergraduates from the UK. Each participant was asked to look at a single, randomly assigned colour photograph of a young adult female and then asked to make judgements concerning her personal characteristics. Five modified photographs of the same young adult female were used: (1) no appliance, (2) stainless steel fixed orthodontic appliance, (3) ceramic fixed orthodontic appliance, (4) gold fixed orthodontic appliance, and (5) clear colourless aligner. Likert scales with higher scores indicating more positive ratings were used. The results were analysed using chi-square test, one-way univariate analysis of variance, and post hoc Tukey-B and Kruskal-Wallis tests. The results showed that greater perceived IA was associated with the appearance of no appliance (mean values: 7.56) rather than steel (6.67) or ceramic appliances (6.65) but similar to the gold (7.35) and aligner (7.08) appliances. No significant differences between the different orthodontic appliance appearances were found for SC and PA. A trend existed where the no appliance image (resembling a lingual appliance) or clear aligner was considered more attractive than the visible buccal fixed appliances. In the absence of other information, the judgements an individual young adult makes concerning the personal characteristics of a young adult are influenced by dental appearance and orthodontic appliance design. This may influence orthodontic appliance choice.

  13. Orthodontic treatment for posterior crossbites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostino, Paola; Ugolini, Alessandro; Signori, Alessio; Silvestrini-Biavati, Armando; Harrison, Jayne E; Riley, Philip

    2014-08-08

    A posterior crossbite occurs when the top back teeth bite inside the bottom back teeth. When it affects one side of the mouth, the lower jaw may have to move to one side to allow the back teeth to meet together. Several treatments have been recommended to correct this problem. Some treatments widen the upper teeth while others are directed at treating the cause of the posterior crossbite (e.g. breathing problems or sucking habits). Most treatments have been used at each stage of dental development. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2001. To assess the effects of orthodontic treatment for posterior crossbites. We searched the following electronic databases: the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (to 21 January 2014), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2014, Issue 1), MEDLINE via OVID (1946 to 21 January 2014), and EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 21 January 2014). We searched the US National Institutes of Health Trials Register and the World Health Organization (WHO) Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials. We placed no restrictions on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of orthodontic treatment for posterior crossbites in children and adults. Two review authors, independently and in duplicate, screened the results of the electronic searches, and extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of the included studies. We attempted to contact the first named authors of the included studies for missing data and for clarification. We used risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to summarise dichotomous (event) data, and mean differences (MD) with 95% CIs to summarise continuous data. We performed meta-analyses using fixed-effect models (we would have used random-effects models if we had included four or more studies in a meta-analysis) when comparisons and outcomes were sufficiently similar. We

  14. Special considerations for orthodontic treatment in patients with root resorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haru S. Anggani

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Orthodontic treatment needs good consideration especially when there are unfavorable conditions for orthodontic treatment, such as periodontal diseases or tooth with root resorption. Root resorption should not become worse due to orthodontic treatment., All risk factors should be eliminated before orthodontic treatment is started. Otherwise, the goal of orthodontic treatment could be difficult to achieve because of poor dental and or oral health. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to learn more about mechanical factors that could worsen the root resorption that has already been there or even provoke root resorption to develop during orthodontic treatment. Reviews: Resorption of dental root surface is the condition in which cementum is depraved and the damage could also include dentin of dental root. It can occur either physiologically or pathologically due to some causes. The occurrence of the root resorption is suspected because of the biological factor, the tooth condition, the supportive tissue and the mechanical factors. Panoramic x-ray which routinely used to support diagnose in orthodontic cases, can detect root resorption in general, although sometimes periapical x-ray with parallel technique is needed to enhance the diagnosis. Before starting a treatment, the risk factors that suspected as the causes of root resorption should be eliminated, thus the mechanical treatment can be calculated. Conclusion: Orthodontic treatment in patient with root resorption should not escalate the root resorption which already occurs. The treatment should be done effectively by using optimal forces. Giving discontinued forces and avoiding intrusion and torque movements could reduce the risk factors of root resorption.Latar belakang: Keadaan gigi dan jaringan pendukung yang kurang menguntungkan bagi perawatan ortodontik hendaknya membutuhkan perhatian ekstra para klinisi. Kondisi tersebut misalnya adanya penyakit periodontal ataupun adanya

  15. Orthodontic space closure versus prosthetic replacement of missing upper lateral incisors in patients with bilateral cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterkamp, Barbara C M; Dijkstra, Pieter U; Remmelink, Hendrik J; van Oort, Robert P; Sandham, Andrew

    2010-11-01

    To compare dental aesthetics and function of orthodontic space closure versus prosthetic replacement of upper lateral incisors in patients with bilateral cleft lip and palate. The predominant mode of prosthetic replacement was resin-bonded bridges. The retrospective study group consisted of 17 patients treated with orthodontic space closure (13 men, four women; median age, 27.1 years; interquartile range, 20.6 to 33.3 years) and 10 patients treated with prosthetic replacement (five men, five women; median age, 27.7 years; interquartile range, 20.9 to 39.7 years). Dental aesthetics were evaluated by the patients and by a professional panel. Mandibular function was evaluated by means of the mandibular function impairment questionnaire. The level of mandibular impairment was calculated using the Function Impairment Rating Scale. With respect to dental aesthetics, no significant differences between patients treated with orthodontic space closure and prosthetic replacement were found. With respect to function, the level of mandibular impairment was significantly higher in patients treated with prosthetic replacement compared with patients treated with orthodontic space closure, as indicated by high scores on specific masticatory functions. Orthodontic space closure and prosthetic replacement in bilateral cleft lip and palate patients produce similar results in terms of aesthetics. In terms of function, prosthetic replacement results in significantly more impairment of specific masticatory functions.

  16. How Do Patients and Parents Decide for Orthodontic Treatment-Effects of Malocclusion, Personal Expectations, Education and Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncer, C; Canigur Bavbek, N; Balos Tuncer, B; Ayhan Bani, A; Çelik, B

    2015-01-01

    To examine patients' and parents' perceptions and expectations from orthodontic treatment. 491 patients (274 female, 217 male) aged 14-22 years, and 399 parents (245 female, 154 male) completed a questionnaire about preferences, needs and expectations about orthodontic treatment, and scored the present problem. Continuous variables were compared by Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests, whereas Chi-square test was used for categorical variables. Patients'(77.1%) and parents'(84.6%), decision about orthodontic treatments were influenced by suggestion of dentists. Patients who decided to attend to clinic by themselves were higher than parents (p=0.006). Dental aesthetics was the determinant factor for treatment demand for patients(61.0%) and parents(57.3%). Improvement in oral functions was more important for Class III patients than Class I patients (p=0.040). Adult patients/parents with higher education gave more importance to oral functions as well as dental aesthetics (p=0.031). There was no difference among Angle classifications regarding orthodontic problem scores. Parents found media sources valuable (p=0.018) but majority expected dentists for information about orthodontic treatments. Education degree of adult patients/parents effected this decision(p=0.002). Desire to have better dental aesthetics was the primary motivating factor for all participants. Clinicians should consider concerns of Class III patients about oral functions during treatment planning.

  17. Radiographic signs and diagnosis of dental disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellows, J.

    1993-01-01

    Dental radiographs are critical for the complete assessment and treatment of dental diseases. Dental radiography is commonly used to evaluate congenital dental defects, periodontal disease, orthodontic manipulations, oral tumors, endodontic treatments, oral trauma, and any situation where an abnormality is suspected. Although standard radiographic equipment and film can be used to produce dental radiographs, dental X-ray equipment and film provide superior quality images and greater convenience of animal patient positioning. An understanding of normal dental radiographic anatomy is important when interpreting dental radiographs. Stage III periodontitis is the earliest stage of periodontal disease at which radiographic abnormalities become apparent. Bone loss associated with periodontal disease can be classified as either horizontal or vertical. Periapical radiolucencies can represent granulomas, cysts, or abscesses, whereas periapical radiodensities may represent sclerotic bone or condensing osteitis. Lytic lesions of the bone of the jaw often represent oral neoplasms. Neoplasms also can displace or disrupt teeth in the dental arch. Resorptive lesions can be external or internal and appear as radiolucent areas involving the external surface of the root or the pulp cavity, respectively. Feline dental resorptive lesions, also known as odontoclastic resorptions, are a specific form of dental resorptive lesions unique to cats

  18. Quick response codes in Orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moidin Shakil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quick response (QR code codes are two-dimensional barcodes, which encodes for a large amount of information. QR codes in Orthodontics are an innovative approach in which patient details, radiographic interpretation, and treatment plan can be encoded. Implementing QR code in Orthodontics will save time, reduces paperwork, and minimizes manual efforts in storage and retrieval of patient information during subsequent stages of treatment.

  19. Effects of chlorhexidine (gel) application on bacterial levels and orthodontic brackets during orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bazi, Samar M; Abbassy, Mona A; Bakry, Ahmed S; Merdad, Leena A; Hassan, Ali H

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of applying 0.50% chlorhexidine (CHX) gel using the dental drug delivery system (3DS) on salivary Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) and on the surface topography of metal and ceramic orthodontic brackets. The study involved 20 orthodontic patients with high levels of salivary S. mutans. The patients were treated with professional mechanical tooth cleaning followed by application of 0.50% CHX using individual trays (3DS). Salivary S. mutans levels were repeatedly measured 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks post-treatment. In vitro study utilized forty ceramic and metallic brackets that were immersed in 0.50% CHX gel for 10 min, whereas another untreated forty brackets served as controls. The frictional resistances of stainless steel wires to the brackets before and after CHX treatment were recorded using a universal testing machine. Scanning electron microscopy was used to compare changes in the surface topography of brackets. Statistical analyses were used to determine the effect of CHX on bacterial count and to evaluate the effect of CHX on frictional resistance. According to the results of this study, S. mutans levels were reduced significantly (P brackets before or after application of CHX. (J Oral Sci 58, 35-42, 2016).

  20. Antibacterial Activity of Orthodontic Cement Containing Quaternary Ammonium Polyethylenimine Nanoparticles Adjacent to Orthodontic Brackets

    OpenAIRE

    Eldad Sharon; Revital Sharabi; Adi Eden; Asher Zabrovsky; Gilad Ben-Gal; Esi Sharon; Yoav Pietrokovski; Yael Houri-Haddad; Nurit Beyth

    2018-01-01

    Enamel demineralization is a common problem found in patients using orthodontic devices, such as orthodontic braces. It was found that Streptoccocus mutans growth increases adjacent to orthodontic devices, which may result in caries development. Incorporated antibacterial quaternary ammonium polyethylenimine (QPEI) nanoparticles were previously shown to be highly efficacious against various bacteria. Combining antibacterial materials in orthodontic cement may be advantageous to prevent bacter...

  1. Factors influencing subjective orthodontic treatment need and culture-related differences among Chinese natives and foreign inhabitants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao-Ting, Li; Tang, Yin; Huang, Xue-Lian; Wan, Hua; Chen, Yang-Xi

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this survey was to compare Chinese natives and foreign inhabitants in Chengdu, China, with respect to: (1) attitudes towards dental appearance, (2) subjective orthodontic treatment need, and (3) the main factors influencing orthodontic treatment need. A total of 522 subjects, including 227 foreign inhabitants and 295 Chinese natives in Chengdu participated in the survey. A simple random sampling method was adopted and a face-to-face interview was conducted at some public sites using a questionnaire. Data was entered by two persons synchronously using Epidata 3.0, and SPSS 13.0 was used to analyze these data. 89.0% of foreign inhabitants were satisfied with their teeth compared to only 46.8% of Chinese natives. Females were more dissatisfied with their teeth than males. Chinese natives put improving appearance as the top priority (55.9%) for seeking orthodontic treatment; however, in foreign inhabitants, the main reason for seeking treatment was to improve masticatory function (44.1%), followed by "to be pretty" (35.2%). The importance of well-aligned teeth and self-perception of psychosocial impact of malocclusion were the same two main factors influencing subjective orthodontic treatment need (P different (P differences in orthodontic treatment motives between the two target groups. (3) There were differences in subjective orthodontic treatment needs between foreign inhabitants and Chinese natives. However, the prominent influential factors were almost the same. There may be benefit to understanding subjective orthodontic needs of different races.

  2. Orthodontic correction of Class III malocclusion in a young patient with the use of a simple fixed appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Anterior crossbites are one of the most common orthodontic problems we observe in growing children. The first step in treating an anterior crossbite is to determine whether the crossbite is dental or skeletal in nature. To determine a precise diagnosis, a thorough clinical, radiographic and model analysis is required. This article shows the treatment of Class III malocclusion by correcting anterior dental crossbite with the use of a simple fixed appliance.

  3. Prospective Evaluation of Psychosocial Impact after One Year of Orthodontic Treatment Using PIDAQ Adapted for Indian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Kanika; Tripathi, Tulika; Rai, Priyank; Sharma, Nandini; Kanase, Anup

    2017-08-01

    The impact of dental appearance, malocclusion and treatment for the same on psychological and functional well-being has drawn increasing attention over the past decade. Various psychometric instruments alongside normative indices have been used to predict orthodontic concerns. Evaluating the patients' experience during the orthodontic treatment can help us understand the true benefits and advantages of orthodontic therapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the change in the psychosocial impact of malocclusion using the Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire (PIDAQ) adapted for the Indian population after one year of fixed orthodontic treatment. This interventional study was conducted on 93 patients requiring fixed orthodontic treatment. Brazilian, Chinese, Spanish, Nepali and Moroccan versions of the PIDAQ have been published but the questionnaire is not available in Hindi. In the present study, the original PIDAQ was translated into Hindi language to adapt it for the Indian population and was validated by back translation and pretest. All the subjects answered the Hindi version of the questionnaire at pretreatment (T1) and at one year of orthodontic treatment (T2). Additionally, the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN) was applied to measure the severity and self-perception of malocclusion. The data were analysed using paired t-test, Wilcoxon signed rank test and Kruskal-Wallis test. Significant reduction was found in the total PIDAQ score and each factor's score (porthodontic treatment. There was a positive association of the psychosocial impact of malocclusion with the IOTN-AC (IOTN-Aesthetic Component). Adolescent females were found to be most concerned with their dentofacial appearance. Results showed significant improvement in the psychosocial impact of malocclusion with a reduction in the self-perceived needs of patients with orthodontic treatment. The psychometric instrument used may be recommended as an Oral Health Related

  4. [Orthodontics--periodontics: yesterday and today; a review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Christoph; Kasaj, Adrian; Willershausen, Brita

    2009-01-01

    The dental disciplines of orthodontics and periodontics keep a variety of contact points. The development of new treatment options in periodontics and orthodontics, e.g., guided tissue regeneration or orthodontic implants for temporary skeletal anchorage, offer new ways in treatment of periodontally affected patients. The present work is a review of studies and treatment plans in the past thirty years and scrutinises their topicality and evidence. The performance of a systematic review of literature led to a low number of resulting articles. For this reason and their heterogeneity it was not possible to perform a quantifying review. Our results lead to the conclusion that this certain scope of interdisciplinary therapy has further demand for studies with high quality standards and evidence.

  5. Corrosion of orthodontic brackets in different spices: in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, T P

    2014-01-01

    Moist environment in the mouth varies and causes variable amounts of corrosion of dental materials. This is of concern particularly when metallic implants, metallic fillings, orthodontic appliances are placed in the hostile electrolytic environment in the human mouth. Components of diet rich in salt and spices are important factors influencing the corrosion of metallic appliances placed in the oral cavity. To study in vitro corrosion of orthodontic metallic brackets immersed in solutions of salt and spices in artificial saliva. Orthodontic brackets were used for corrosion studies in artificial saliva, salt, and spices using electrochemical technique and surface analysis. Electrochemical studies using different parameters were done in solutions of artificial saliva containing salt and spices. Photomicrographs from the optical microscope were also obtained. RESULTS of corrosion studies have clearly demonstrated that certain spices such as turmeric and coriander are effective in reducing corrosion, whereas salt and red chili have been found to enhance it. Surface analysis of small pits present on the surface of the as-received bracket will initiate corrosion which leads to more pitting.

  6. New therapeutic modalities to modulate orthodontic tooth movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildeu Andrade Jr

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Modulation of orthodontic tooth movement (OTM is desirable not only to patients because it shortens treatment time, but also to orthodontists, since treatment duration is associated with increased risk of gingival inflammation, decalcification, dental caries, and root resorption. The increased focus on the biological basis of tooth movement has rendered Orthodontics a more comprehensive specialty that incorporates facets of all fields of medicine. Current knowledge raises the possibility of using new therapeutic modalities for modulation of OTM, such as corticotomy, laser therapy, vibration (low-intensity pulsed ultrasound, local injections of biomodulators and gene therapy; with the latter being applicable in the near future. They are intended to enhance or inhibit recruitment, differentiation and/or activation of bone cells, accelerate or reduce OTM, increase stability of orthodontic results, as well as assist with the prevention of root resorption. This article summarizes recent studies on each one of these therapeutic modalities, provides readers with information about how they affect OTM and points out future clinical perspectives.

  7. Efficacy of protection by latex gloves during orthodontic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, G M; Zentner, A; Balan, R; Sergl, H G

    2000-01-01

    The wearing of gloves during orthodontic or dental treatment is generally indicated for reasons of hygiene and protection against infection. This study was aimed at determining the extent and localization of perforations caused by the various orthodontic treatment techniques and interrupting the infection barrier. The impermeability was tested by means of a water retention test according to European standard EN 455, Part 1, performed on 1600 Centramed (Centramed, Koblenz), Tekmedic and SafeEx non-sterile disposable latex gloves (both by Safe Med, Switzerland) and Safe Gan latex gloves with an additional acrylate coating (also by Safe Med). The perforation rate in unused gloves was between 0.5% and 7.5%, rising on average to 11% with increasing use. 36% of the total number of lesions resulted from handling removable appliances, and 57% from handling fixed appliances, especially when replacing arch wires and elastics. Most lesions were in the thumb, index finger and palm region. Only 18% of the defects were noticed by the dentists themselves. The gloves worn by beginners in their first year of postgraduate orthodontic training had about twice as many defects as those worn by qualified orthodontists. When patients with an increased risk of infection are to be treated, additional hand disinfection measures should be taken and 2 pairs of gloves worn in view of the relatively unreliable protection offered by commercially available latex gloves.

  8. [Mechanics analysis of fracture of orthodontic wires].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yeping; Sun, Xiaoye; Zhang, Longqi

    2003-03-01

    Fracture problem of orthodontic wires was discussed in this paper. The calculation formulae of bending stress and tensile stress were obtained. All main factors that affect bending stress and tensile stress of orthodontic wires were analyzed and discussed. It was concluded that the main causes of fracture of orthodontic wires were fatigue and static disruption. Some improving proposals for preventing fracture of orthodontic wires were put forward.

  9. Three-dimensional deformation of orthodontic brackets

    OpenAIRE

    Melenka, Garrett W; Nobes, David S; Major, Paul W; Carey, Jason P

    2013-01-01

    Braces are used by orthodontists to correct the misalignment of teeth in the mouth. Archwire rotation is a particular procedure used to correct tooth inclination. Wire rotation can result in deformation to the orthodontic brackets, and an orthodontic torque simulator has been designed to examine this wire?bracket interaction. An optical technique has been employed to measure the deformation due to size and geometric constraints of the orthodontic brackets. Images of orthodontic brackets are c...

  10. Orthodontic Space Closure Versus Prosthetic Replacement of Missing Upper Lateral Incisors in Patients With Bilateral Cleft Lip and Palate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterkamp, Barbara C. M.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Remmelink, Hendrik J.; van Oort, Robert P.; Sandham, John

    2010-01-01

    Objective To compare dental aesthetics and function of orthodontic space closure versus prosthetic replacement of upper lateral incisors in patients with bilateral cleft lip and palate The predominant mode of prosthetic replacement was resin-bonded bridges Patients and Methods The retrospective

  11. Treating dental crowding with mandibular incisor extraction in an Angle Class I patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gislana Braga Machado

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mandibular dental crowding often encourages patients to seek orthodontic treatment. The orthodontist should decide between protrusion of incisors or decrease in dental volume so as to achieve proper alignment and leveling. The present study reports the treatment of an Angle Class I malocclusion adolescent female brachyfacial patient with severe mandibular dental crowding, increased curve of Spee and deep overbite. The patient was treated with extraction of a mandibular incisor. This case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (BBO as a requirement for the title of certified by the BBO.

  12. ALGORITHM FOR TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH MESIAL OCCLUSION USING PROPRIETARY ORTHODONTIC DEVICE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flis, P; Filonenko, V; Doroshenko, N

    2017-10-01

    Early elimination of dentoalveolar apparatus orthodontic disorders is the dominant concept in the treatment technique. to present a sagittal anomalies treatment algorithm, of Class III particularly, in the transitional bite period by the proposed design of individual orthodontic devices with a movable ramp. The treatment algorithm consisted of several blocks: the motivation, the etiological factors establishment, the plan and treatment tactics creation basing on careful diagnosis, the stages of the active period of treatment and the patient management in the retention period. Anthropometric measurements of the maxilla and mandible models were performed to determine the degree of dental arches development. The length of the dental arches was determined on the models by the Nance method in combination with the Huckaba method and the sagital dimensions by the Mirgasizov's method. The leading role in the patients examination was taken by lateral cephalograms analyzing using the Sassouni Plus method. The proposed construction of an orthodontic appliance consists of a plastic base, a vestibular arc, retaining clasps and a ramp, which is connected with a base with two torsion springs. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed construction, an example of the patient Y. treatment of at the age of 6 years 9 months is presented. After the treatment, positive morphological, functional and aesthetic changes were established. The usage of proposed orthodontic appliance with movable ramp allows to start orthodontic treatment at early age, increases its effectiveness and reduce the number of complications. The expediency of stage-by-stage treatment is approved by a positive results of such method. To achieve stable results, it is important to individualize their prognosis even at the planning stage of orthodontic treatment.

  13. Orthodontic-orthognathic interventions in orthognathic surgical cases: "Paper surgery" and "model surgery" concepts in surgical orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayan H Gandedkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thorough planning and execution is the key for successful treatment of dentofacial deformity involving surgical orthodontics. Presurgical planning (paper surgery and model surgery are the most essential prerequisites of orthognathic surgery, and orthodontist is the one who carries out this procedure by evaluating diagnostic aids such as crucial clinical findings and radiographic assessments. However, literature pertaining to step-by-step orthognathic surgical guidelines is limited. Hence, this article makes an attempt to provide an insight and nuances involved in the planning and execution. The diagnostic information revealed from clinical findings and radiographic assessments is integrated in the "paper surgery" to establish "surgical-plan." Furthermore, the "paper surgery" is emulated in "model surgery" such that surgical bite-wafers are created, which aid surgeon to preview the final outcome and make surgical movements that are deemed essential for the desired skeletal and dental outcomes. Skeletal complexities are corrected by performing "paper surgery" and an occlusion is set up during "model surgery" for the fabrication of surgical bite-wafers. Further, orthodontics is carried out for the proper settling and finishing of occlusion. Article describes the nuances involved in the treatment of Class III skeletal deformity individuals treated with orthognathic surgical approach and illustrates orthodontic-orthognathic step-by-step procedures from "treatment planning" to "execution" for successful management of aforementioned dentofacial deformity.

  14. Orthodontic camouflage versus orthodontic-orthognathic surgical treatment in class II malocclusion: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raposo, R; Peleteiro, B; Paço, M; Pinho, T

    2018-04-01

    This systematic review was performed to compare dental, skeletal, and aesthetic outcomes between orthodontic camouflage and surgical-orthodontic treatment, in patients with a skeletal class II malocclusion and a retrognathic mandible who have already finished their growth period. A literature search was conducted, and a modified Downs and Black checklist was used to assess methodological quality. The meta-analysis was conducted using the DerSimonian-Laird random-effects method to obtain summary estimates of the standardized mean differences and corresponding 95% confidence intervals. Nine articles were included in the qualitative synthesis and seven in the meta-analysis. The difference between treatments was not statistically significant regarding SNA angle, linear measurement of the lower lip to Ricketts' aesthetic line, convexity of the skeletal profile, or the soft tissue profile excluding the nose. In contrast, surgical-orthodontic treatment was more effective with regard to ANB, SNB, and ML/NSL angles and the soft tissue profile including the nose. Different treatment effects on overjet and overbite were found according to the severity of the initial values. These results should be interpreted with caution, due to the limited number of studies included and because they were non-randomized clinical trials. Further studies with larger sample sizes and similar pre-treatment conditions are needed. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Peripheral Mechanisms of Dental Pain: The Role of Substance P

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Sacerdote

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Current evidence supports the central role of neuropeptides in the molecular mechanisms underlying dental pain. In particular, substance P, a neuropeptide produced in neuron cell bodies localised in dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia, contributes to the transmission and maintenance of noxious stimuli and inflammatory processes. The major role of substance P in the onset of dental pain and inflammation is increasingly being recognised. Well-grounded experimental and clinical observations have documented an increase in substance P concentration in patients affected by caries, pulpitis, or granulomas and in those undergoing standard orthodontic or orthodontic/dental care procedures. This paper focuses on the role of substance P in the induction and maintenance of inflammation and dental pain, in order to define future lines of research for the evaluation of therapeutic strategies aimed at modulating the complex effects of this mediator in oral tissues.

  16. Dental responsibility loadings and the relative value of dental services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teusner, D N; Ju, X; Brennan, D S

    2017-09-01

    To estimate responsibility loadings for a comprehensive list of dental services, providing a standardized unit of clinical work effort. Dentists (n = 2500) randomly sampled from the Australian Dental Association membership (2011) were randomly assigned to one of 25 panels. Panels were surveyed by questionnaires eliciting responsibility loadings for eight common dental services (core items) and approximately 12 other items unique to that questionnaire. In total, loadings were elicited for 299 items listed in the Australian Dental Schedule 9th Edition. Data were weighted to reflect the age and sex distribution of the workforce. To assess reliability, regression models assessed differences in core item loadings by panel assignment. Estimated loadings were described by reporting the median and mean. Response rate was 37%. Panel composition did not vary by practitioner characteristics. Core item loadings did not vary by panel assignment. Oral surgery and endodontic service areas had the highest proportion (91%) of services with median loadings ≥1.5, followed by prosthodontics (78%), periodontics (76%), orthodontics (63%), restorative (62%) and diagnostic services (31%). Preventive services had median loadings ≤1.25. Dental responsibility loadings estimated by this study can be applied in the development of relative value scales. © 2017 Australian Dental Association.

  17. Corticotomy-assisted orthodontic treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Ali H.; Al-Saeed, Samar H.; Al-Maghlouth, Basma A.; Bahammam, Maha A.; Linjawi, Amal I.; El-Bialy, Tarek H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To systematically review the literature to assess the quality of evidence related to corticotomy-assisted orthodontic treatment (CAOT) as adjunctive treatment in orthodontics. Methods: The study was conducted in the Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia between 2013 and 2014. Various electronic databases were searched and abstracts were retrieved. Defined inclusion criteria were then applied to the obtained original articles for further evaluation by 2 examiners independently. The criteria of selection included human, or animal studies, which assessed some aspects of CAOT and/or the biological principles behind it. Case reports and series were excluded. The quality of the studies was evaluated by the methodological score for clinical trials developed. Results: Fourteen articles were retrieved initially, but only 12 articles were finally selected for the study. The CAOT was found to accelerate tooth movement by 2-2.5 folds when compared with conventional orthodontic tooth movement. The CAOT was found safe on periodontal health and exhibits no or little risk of root resorption. A localized turnover of alveolar spongiosa and the absence of a hyalinized zone was the acceptable biological explanation of CAOT. There is no evidence to support that CAOT enhances the movement of ankylosed teeth, closing old extraction sites, post-orthodontic stability, or transverse expansion. Conclusions: Corticotomy-assisted orthodontic treatment should be considered with caution. Long term randomized clinical trials are still needed. PMID:26108582

  18. [Root resorption and orthodontic treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebbar, M; Bourzgui, F

    2011-09-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the prevalence of root resorption during and at the end of orthodontic treatment and to assess its relationship with age, sex and treatment with or without extractions. Our study included 82 patients (51 women and 31 men) aged between 6 and 38 years, who received orthodontic treatment. Evaluation of root resorption was performed on panoramics at the beginning and at the end of orthodontic treatment. All the teeth were observed. The degree of root resorption was increased respectively by the standards in four ordinal levels (4). Data analysis was performed by Epi Info 6.0. Root resorption was present in all the teeth and maxillary incisors are the most affected. The correlation between age and root resorption was significant (p = 0.008). Women were more affected by resorption (P = 0.002). Patients treated with extraction showed more root resorption (p = 0.12). Our results suggest that orthodontic treatment is involved in the development of root resorption. The most often teeth resorbed are maxillary incisors. Age, sex and orthodontic extractions can be considered as risk factors for root resorption.

  19. Efficacy of fluoride varnish for preventing white spot lesions and gingivitis during orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances-a prospective randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschneck, Christian; Christl, Jan-Joachim; Reicheneder, Claudia; Proff, Peter

    2016-12-01

    The development of white spot lesions around orthodontic brackets and gingivitis is a common problem during orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances. This prospective randomized double-blind controlled clinical trial investigated the preventive efficacy of a one-time application of two commonly used fluoride varnishes in patients with low to moderate caries risk. Ninety adolescent orthodontic patients with a low to moderate caries risk were prospectively randomized to three groups of 30 patients each: (1) standardized dental hygiene with fluoride toothpaste and one-time application of placebo varnish (control) or (2) of elmex® fluid or (3) of Fluor Protector S on all dental surfaces at the start of fixed therapy. The extent of enamel demineralization and gingivitis was determined with the ICDAS and the gingivitis index (GI) at baseline and after 4, 12, and 20 weeks. Each treatment group showed a significant increase of the ICDAS index, but not of the GI over the course of time with no significant intergroup differences detectable. A one-time application of fluoride varnish at the start of orthodontic treatment did not provide any additional preventive advantage over sufficient dental hygiene with fluoride toothpaste with regard to formation of white spots and gingivitis in patients with a low to moderate caries risk. In dental practice, patients often receive an application of fluoride varnish at the start of orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances. However, the efficacy of this procedure is still unclear.

  20. Adult orthodontics in the Republic of Ireland: specialist orthodontists' opinions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMorrow, Siobhán Mary; Millett, Declan T

    2017-12-01

    To report the opinions of specialist orthodontists regarding the profile, characteristics and treatment of adults currently undergoing orthodontic treatment in the Republic of Ireland (ROI) Design/setting: A national cross-sectional questionnaire study in the ROI. A pilot-tested questionnaire was distributed to 122 specialist orthodontists in the ROI. Questions addressed general and treatment information for current adult orthodontic patients. Those whose treatment involved orthognathic surgery were not excluded. A response of 83% was obtained. Ninety-five per cent of specialists reported treating adults, most of whom were self-referred and were typically professional, female and aged 25-35 years. The overall ratio quoted of professionals to non-professionals was almost 3:2. For 50% of specialists, males were estimated to account for 20-40% of their adult cases and for 23%, this increased to an estimated 40-60%. Class II division 1 malocclusion and skeletal II were considered the most common dentofacial characteristics. Occlusal features encountered in decreasing frequency were generalised crowding, increased overjet, deep overbite, late lower incisor crowding, spacing and impacted teeth. Fifteen per cent reported that at least 10% of their adult cases required orthodontics with maxillofacial surgery but 8% reported that this was at least 50%. Treatment challenges commonly acknowledged were overbite reduction, anchorage management, 'black triangles' and overjet reduction. Tooth whitening was reckoned to be used by 19% of specialists. Aesthetic upper and stainless steel lower brackets were indicated to be used most often whereas only 19% used clear aligners and 10% used lingual appliances often. The profile and characteristics of adults currently undergoing orthodontic treatment in the ROI were diverse. Higher estimates were quoted for self- than for general dental practitioner-referral. A high percentage of treatment was reported to be undertaken for non

  1. Distraction osteogenesis of ankylosed front teeth with subsequent orthodontic fine adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huck, Lothar; Korbmacher, Heike; Niemeyer, Karsten; Kahl-Nieke, Bärbel

    2006-07-01

    Conventional therapeutic approaches to correct ankylosed anterior teeth in infraposition require compromises involving esthetics and function. The combined approach of distraction and early orthodontic fine adjustment, not yet established as a routine, promises better results concerning the bone conditions and gingival development. Both female patients had suffered a trauma to the front teeth during early mixed dentition resulting in ankylosed central incisors in infraposition. At the ages of 14 years and 2 months and 15 years and 2 months, respectively, we carried out segment distraction by means of a bone-supported internal distractor followed by orthodontic fine adjustment after having shortened the consolidation phase. Both ankylosed front teeth could be successfully aligned, leading to an increase in bone and harmonization of the gingival margin in the dental arch. At ten and 14 months after the conclusion of treatment, we observed only few deviations in the dental situation compared to posttherapeutic findings. From a functional and esthetic point of view, therapy involving combined orthodontics and surgery is superior to conventional therapy. Orthodontic fine adjustment should be considered as a continuation of the distraction procedure.

  2. Risk factors for tobacco susceptibility in an orthodontic population: An exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jashinsky, Jared Michael; Liles, Sandy; Schmitz, Katy; Ding, Ding; Hovell, Melbourne

    2017-08-01

    Tobacco use is related to increased periodontal disease, tooth loss, and decreased success of orthodontic appliances, and it may inhibit orthodontic tooth movement. Most smokers start during adolescence. Since most cessation attempts fail, prevention appears necessary. A cross-sectional sample of orthodontic patients reported hypothesized risk factors for smoking and susceptibility to tobacco use initiation. Exploratory analyses regressed susceptibility to tobacco initiation on each hypothesized predictor variable in a separate logistic model that included a standard set of covariates. Significant odds ratios (OR) were found for the presence of a smoker in the home (OR, 2.168; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.144-4.107), a friend having no-smoking rules in his or her home and car (OR, 0.337; 95% CI, 0.128-0.886), having been offered a cigarette (OR, 4.526; 95% CI, 1.190-17.207), and exposure to tobacco advertisements (OR, 1.910; 95% CI, 1.044-3.496). Peer, family, and environmental factors appear to increase children's susceptibility to smoking in orthodontic populations. Attention to such factors could help dental clinicians to more effectively identify susceptible young patients in need of antismoking advice. Prospective and experimental studies are required to confirm the role that dental clinicians might play in youth smoking prevention. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effectiveness of probiotics in the prevention of carious lesions during treatment with fixed orthodontic appliances.

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    Paula Contreras

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The difficulty experienced by patients with fixed orthodontic appliances in maintaining adequate oral hygiene poses a risk for dental caries. The use of probiotics has been proposed as a means of prevention. The following systematic review aims to determine the effectiveness of probiotics in the prevention of dental caries during treatment with fixed orthodontic appliances. This review was carried out according to the PRISMA guidelines. A comprehensive electronic search was conducted in the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, PubMed and Google Scholar Beta databases. The inclusion criteria included randomized controlled clinical trials involving the use of probiotics, caries and patients under fixed orthodontic treatment. The methodological quality of the articles was evaluated according to risk of bias. Of the five included studies, three reported significant differences compared to the control group. Of the others, one article reported significant decrease in the final count of microorganisms compared to the beginning of treatment. Only one study reported no differences of any kind. It was estimated that the eligible studies were of moderate methodological quality and had an unclear risk of bias, without affecting key domains for the research. It is concluded that the daily consumption of probiotics can be effective in the prevention of carious lesions in patients under fixed orthodontic treatment. However, this should be interpreted with caution and corroborated by clinical trials of better methodological quality.

  4. Orthodontic parotitis: a rare complication from an orthodontic appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Eileen; Cobb, Alistair R M

    2012-12-01

    A case is presented of a 14-year-old female undergoing orthodontic fixed appliance treatment who presented with right facial swelling in the parotid region. An initial diagnosis of acute infective parotitis was made by her primary care clinician. However, after clinical examination and ultrasonographic imaging, a diagnosis of salivary stasis secondary to inflammatory occlusion of Stensen's ductal orifice was made. The ductal orifice had been traumatized by the adjacent orthodontic appliance. This has not been described before in the literature. The differential diagnosis of parotid enlargement in children is discussed.

  5. Role of Orthodontics in Forensic Odontology- A Social Responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Giridhar; Reddy, Vinay P; Sharma, Meenakshi; Aggarwal, Monika

    2016-04-01

    Orthodontics like any other specialty has much to offer law enforcement in the detection and solution of crime or in civil proceedings. Forensic odontology often requires an interdisciplinary approach towards dentistry for the purpose of proper diagnosis of cases. In cases where the forensic odontologist has to establish a person's identity, an orthodontist can be of great help at times. Teeth, with their anatomic/physiologic variations and therapy such as orthodontic treatment, restorations and prosthesis may record information that remains throughout life and beyond. The teeth may also be used as weapons for defense or offense and as such may leave information about the identity of the biter at the time of crime. Forensic odontology also plays an important role in the recognition of crime and abuse among people of all ages. Orthodontists like all other dental professionals can play a major role by maintaining proper dental records and thus providing important or vital information or clues to the legal authorities in order to help them in their search.

  6. Treatment outcomes in 3 modes of orthodontic practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulton, Donald R; Baumrind, Sheldon; Vlaskalic, Vicki

    2002-02-01

    This study examined differences in pretreatment severity and treatment outcome among orthodontic patients treated in 3 different practice-management modes. Samples of pretreatment (T1) and end of treatment (T2) study casts were selected from traditional private practices (TPP, 3 offices, 81 cases), a dental corporation (COMP, 2 offices, 53 cases), and a dental management service organization (DMSO, 1 office, 36 cases). Orthodontic specialists had treated all patients. Cases were initially selected on a consecutive start basis. From each practice, the first 30 cases satisfying the study criteria were included in the sample. The T1 and T2 study casts were evaluated with the PAR and HLD indexes. The PAR and HLD indexes showed a high level of agreement on T1 cast scores but not on the T2 casts. Mean T1 scores were highest in the COMP cases, followed by the DMSO and the TPP cases. T2 scores were lowest in the TPP cases, followed by the DMSO and the COMP cases. The percentage of PAR score reduction showed that, in all 3 modes, patients were treated to a high standard.

  7. Orthodontic treatment plan changed by 3D images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yordanova, G.; Stanimirov, P.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical application of CBCT is most often enforced in dental phenomenon of impacted teeth, hyperodontia, transposition, ankyloses or root resorption and other pathologies in the maxillofacial area. The goal, we put ourselves, is to show how the information from 3D images changes the protocol of the orthodontic treatment. The material, we presented six our clinical cases and the change in the plan of the treatment, which has used after analyzing the information carried on the three planes of CBCT. These cases are casuistic in the orthodontic practice and require individual approach to each of them during their analysis and decision taken. The discussion made by us is in line with reveal of the impacted teeth, where we need to evaluate their vertical depth and mediodistal ratios with the bond structures. At patients with hyperodontia, the assessment is of outmost importance to decide which of the teeth to be extracted and which one to be arranged into the dental arch. The conclusion we make is that diagnostic information is essential for decisions about treatment plan. The exact graphs will lead to better treatment plan and more predictable results. (authors) Key words: CBCT. IMPACTED CANINES. HYPERODONTIA. TRANSPOSITION

  8. Need for orthodontic treatment among Brazilian adolescents: evaluation based on public health

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    Carolina Vieira de Freitas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify the prevalence and the severity of malocclusions and to analyze factors associated with the need for orthodontic treatment of Brazilian adolescents. METHODS: This exploratory, cross-sectional study was carried out based on secondary data from the national epidemiological survey on oral health in Brazil (2002-2003. Socio-demographic conditions, self-perception, and the existence and degree of malocclusion, using the Dental Aesthetic Index, were evaluated in 16,833 adolescent Brazilians selected by probabilistic sample by conglomerates. The dependent variable need orthodontic treatment was estimated from the severity of malocclusion. The magnitude and direction of the association in bivariate and multivariate analyzes from a Robust Poisson regression was estimated. RESULTS: The majority of the adolescents needed orthodontic treatment (53.2%. In the multivariate analysis, the prevalence of the need for orthodontic treatment was larger among females, non-whites, those that perceived a need for treatment, and those that perceived their appearance as normal, bad, or very bad. The need for orthodontic treatment was smaller among those that lived in the Northeast and Central West macro-regions compared to those living in Southeast Brazil and it was also smaller among those that perceived their chewing to be normal or their oral health to be bad or very bad. CONCLUSIONS: There was a high prevalence of orthodontic treatment need among adolescents in Brazil and this need was associated with demographic and subjective issues. The high prevalence of orthodontic needs in adolescents is a challenge to the goals of Brazil's universal public health system.

  9. Assessment of the Effect of Orthodontic Treatment on the Periodontal Health of Endodontically Restored Tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalaluddin, Md; Goyal, Vinod; Naqvi, Zuber A; Gupta, Bhaskar; Asnani, Mohil M; Sonigra, Hitesh M

    2017-07-01

    Intorduction: Patients usually undergo orthodontic treatment for achieving ideal interocclusal relationship between the dental tissue and bony tissue along with improving the speech, mastication, and facial esthetic appearance. Literature quotes paucity in the studies evaluating the effect of orthodontic treatment on the periodontal health of endodontically treated teeth. Hence, we planned the present study to assess the effect of orthodontic treatment on the periodontal health of endodonti-cally restored tooth. The present study included assessment of 80 patients who underwent orthodontic treatment. All the patients were divided broadly into two study groups: groups I and II. Group I included patients with the absence of endodontically treated teeth, while group II included patients which maxillary central incisors were resorted endodontically. Examination of the periodontal health of the patients was done using the community periodontal index of treatment need (CPITN) around the selected teeth. All the values were recorded during the preorthodontic time, postorthodontic time, and after the first 6 months of starting of the orthodontic treatment. All the results were recorded separately and analyzed. In the groups I and II, 28 and 25 patients respectively, had score of 1, while 10 patients in group I and 12 patients in group II had score of 2. Nonsignificant results were obtained while comparing the CPITN score in between the two study groups when measured at the pre-, intra-, and postortho time. In patients undergoing orthodontic treatment, having endodontically resorted teeth, no difference exists in relation to the periodontal health. Orthodontic treatment can be safely carried in patients with endodontically restored teeth.

  10. Gingival Crevicular Fluid Turnover Markers in Premenopausal vs Postmenopausal Women receiving Orthodontic Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitra, Anusha; Rani, B Jhansi; Agarkar, Sanket S; Parihar, Anuj S; Vynath, Gopinath P; Grover, Shekhar

    2017-10-01

    Orthodontic treatment is one of the commonly used dental treatments. Orthodontic forces act on the bone by modulating the biomolecules, chiefly the osteoprotegerin (OPG), osteopontin (OPN), receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B (RANK), and RANK ligand (RANKL) (OPG ligand). Hormonal changes are known to cause marked alteration in the levels of these biomolecules. Hence, we planned this study to evaluate the response of bone biomarkers in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) in postmenopausal women undergoing fixed orthodontic therapy. This study included assessment of 50 subjects who underwent orthodontic treatment from June 2012 to July 2016. All the patients were divided into two study groups with 25 patients in each group: premenopausal group and postmenopausal group. Similar orthodontic wires were used for controlling the forces applied in subjects of both the study groups and their GCF levels of RANKL, and OPN was assessed at baseline and 24 hours after the activation of orthodontic forces. All the results were compiled, assessed, and analyzed by Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software version 16.0. Chi-square test, Student's t-test, and Mann-Whitney U test were used for the assessment of the level of significance. The mean values of RANKL and OPN in the premenopausal and postmenopausal groups were found to be 241.52 and 317.15 pg/μL respectively. The mean values of RANKL at baseline in the premenopausal and postmenopausal groups were found to be 7.15 and 3.84 pg/μL respectively. Nonsignificant results were obtained while comparing mean OPN and RANKL level alteration in between the two study groups. The mean alterations in the GCF levels of bone biomarkers are similar for both premenopausal and postmeno-pausal women. For women with either premenopausal or postmenopausal status, orthodontic treatment appears to be equally safer.

  11. Apical root resorption due to orthodontic treatment detected by cone beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Iury O; Alencar, Ana H G; Valladares-Neto, José; Estrela, Carlos

    2013-03-01

    To determine the frequency of apical root resorption (ARR) due to orthodontic treatment using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in a sample of 1256 roots from 30 patients. All patients had Class I malocclusion with crowding. Of the 30 patients evaluated, 11 were boys and 19 were girls; their mean age was 13 years (11 to 16 years). Orthodontic treatment followed the nonextraction treatment. CBCT images were obtained before and after orthodontic treatment, and ARR was determined using Axial Guided Navigation of CBCT images. All patients had ARR. No statistically significant association was found between resorption frequency, gender, and age. ARR was detected using CBCT in 46% of all roots that underwent orthodontic treatment. CBCT was effective for detecting in vivo even minimal degrees of ARR due to orthodontic treatment and allowed three-dimensional evaluation of dental roots and visualization of palatine roots of maxillary molars. The highest frequencies and the most significant ARR occurred in incisors and distal roots of first maxillary and mandibular molars.

  12. [Pre- and post-surgical orthodontic treatment of mandibular asymmetry and prognathism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Song; Chen, Yang-xi; Hu, Jing

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the pre- and post surgical orthodontic treatment of mandibular asymmetry and prognathism in our hospital, and to summarize some helpful experiences for future clinical work. The data were derived from 21 adults aged from 19 - 28 years who had severe mandibular asymmetry and prognathism. The ANB angle of all patients is from -3 degrees to -8 degrees. The value of wits of all patients is from -7 mm to -14 mm. The deviation of chin point of all patients is from 3 mm to 7 mm. The duration of pre- and post-surgical orthodontic treatment was 10-20 months (mean 18 months) and 5-10 months (mean 7.5 months), respectively. The keys in pre-surgical orthodontic treatment include (1) three dimensional dental decompensation; (2) arch form and transverse discrepancy correction; (3) model surgery and the splint making. The main objective of post surgical orthodontic treatment is to detail the occlusion. Pre- and post surgical orthodontic treatment is essential for the orthognathic treatment of patients with mandibular asymmetry and prognathism.

  13. A Clinical Assessment of Corticotomy Facilitated Orthodontics in the Retraction of Maxillary Anterior Segment

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    Chagam Manjunatha Reddy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Corticotomy facilitated orthodontics has been practising for longer periods, but a novel approach of a periapical incision to make horizontal cuts 5 mm above the apex of the maxillary anteriors along with vertical cuts requires a detailed investigation. The purpose of this study was to assess the outcome of skeletal cases with spacing in the anteriors using a novel method of modified surgical approach utilizing the corticotomy facilitated orthodontics. Patients for this study were randomly selected from a very intensive screening in the Department of Orthodontics, Saveetha Dental College and Hospital, Chennai, out of which seven patients were selected for this procedure. The patients were subjected for corticotomy procedure under local anesthesia after the leveling and aligning stage (0.019" × 0.025" stainless steel wire, and the retraction was continued still the space was closed. AutoCAD and palatal rugae assessment programs were used to assess the orthodontic tooth movement. The results of the study demonstrated that when compared to conventional orthodontics alone, the corticotomy facilitated approach produced faster tooth movements in all the seven patients reducing the overall treatment time by 60%. The use of this modified technique of labial, palatal and apical cuts could be beneficial for adult patients with difficult surgical access from the lingual side.

  14. Influence of quality of life, self-perception, and self-esteem on orthodontic treatment need.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Patrícia R; Meneghim, Marcelo de C; Ambrosano, Glaucia M B; Filho, Mario Vedovello; Vedovello, Silvia A S

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to assess the relationship between normative and perceived orthodontic treatment need associated with quality of life, self-esteem, and self-perception. The sample included 248 schoolchildren aged 12 years. The normative aspect of orthodontic treatment was assessed by the Dental Health Component and the Aesthetic Component of the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need. The subjects were further evaluated for their oral health-related quality of life, self-esteem, and self-perception of oral esthetics. The Aesthetic Component of the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need was considered as the response variable, and generalized linear models estimated by the GENMOD procedure (release 9.3, 2010; SAS Institute, Cary, NC). Model 1 was estimated with only the intercept, providing the basis for evaluating the reduction in variance in the other models studied; then the variables were tested sequentially, considering P ≤0.05 as the criterion for remaining in the model. In the model, self-perception and self-esteem were statistically significant in relation to the perceived need for treatment. The normative need was significantly associated with the outcome variable and was not influenced by independent variables. The normative need for orthodontics treatment was not overestimated by the perceived need, and the perceived need was not influenced by sex and the impact on quality of life. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison of stress, burnout and its association among postgraduate orthodontic and undergraduate students in India

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    VenkateshNettam

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim and Objectives: Stress and burnout are the wave of the present decade and dentists and dental specialists are found repeatedly on top of the charts of the more stressed occupation; however, the prevalence among orthodontic postgraduates in India has not been well researched. The present study aimed to investigate the stress and burnout levels of postgraduate students of orthodontics in India. Materials and Methods: A descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted to evaluate stress and burnout in postgraduate students of orthodontics in India. A stratified randomized sampling method, with stratification as North, East, West, South, and central population was employed. A questionnaire format formulated by the International Stress Management Association, including Maslach burnout inventory was filled by each of these individuals. Results: A total of 284 individuals showed significance for stress and personal accomplishment (PA (P < 0.05 whereas statistically insignificant for genders. There is statistically significance for geographical distribution to depersonalization and PA. The Pearson's correlation is positive for stress and components of burnout in postgraduates and is negative for undergraduates. Conclusion: This study was the first of its kind to explore stress, burnout, and its association among orthodontic postgraduate students and undergraduates in the country. There are significant levels of stress and burnout in both undergraduates and postgraduates. There is a statistically significant positive correlation to the components of burnout found in postgraduates. These findings may help orthodontic community in planning, management, and prevention of stress and burnout.

  16. Periodontal probing of an impacted tooth recovered through a surgical-orthodontic approach: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinoi, Maria Teresa; Lacarbonara, Mariano; Dimartino, Salvatore; Monaco, Annalisa; Marzo, Giuseppe

    2014-01-27

    The aim of this work was to assess the periodontal support of a central upper incisor recovered through a surgical-orthodontic approach compared to the spontaneously erupted contralateral incisor. This case study describes an 8-year-old Caucasian female with an impacted upper right central incisor. Surgical-orthodontic treatment was performed to reset the impacted dental element in the arch. Periodontal probing was performed of all sites (mesio-buccal, central-buccal, disto-buccal, mesio-palatal, central-palatal and disto-palatal) of the recovered impacted tooth and the contralateral tooth. The results were compared to determine whether the treated element showed signs of periodontal injury. Most of the probing results on both her right and left incisors gave values of approximately 3mm, which were not considered pathological. Both dental elements had adequate and physiological osseous attachments.

  17. Orthodontic treatment with preadjusted appliances and low-friction ligatures: experimental evidence and clinical observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccetti, Tiziano; Franchi, Lorenzo; Fortini, Arturo

    2008-01-01

    To describe the features of low-friction ligatures during the leveling and aligning phase of fixed appliance therapy with preadjusted brackets. Experimental in vitro and in vivo studies were carried out to test the performance of the low-friction system with regard to leveling and aligning of the dental arches, as well as to increasing the transverse dimension of the maxillary arch. The outcomes of experimental testing showed that the combination of the low-friction ligatures with the superelastic nickel-titanium wires produced a significantly smaller amount of binding at the bracket/archwire/ligature unit when compared to conventional elastomeric ligatures. The biomechanical consequences of the use of low-friction ligatures were shorter duration of orthodontic treatment during the leveling and aligning phase, concurrent dentoalveolar expansion of the dental arch, and the possibility of using biologically adequate orthodontic forces.

  18. Orthodontic Protocol Using Mini-Implant for Class II Treatment in Patient with Special Needs

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    Fernando Pedrin Carvalho Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Improving facial and dental appearance and social interaction are the main factors for special needs (SN patients to seek orthodontic treatment. The cooperation of SN patients and their parents is crucial for treatment success. Objective. To show through a case report the satisfactory results, both functional and esthetic, in patients with intellectual disability, congenital nystagmus, and severe scoliosis. Materials Used. Pendulum device with mini-implants as anchorage unit. Results. Improvement of facial and dental esthetics, correction of Class II malocclusion, and no root resorption shown in the radiographic follow-up. Conclusion. Knowing the limitations of SN patients, having a trained team, motivating and counting on the cooperation of parents and patients, and employing quick and low-cost orthodontic therapy have been shown to be the essential factors for treatment success.

  19. The World of Orthodontic apps.

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    Gaurav Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The usage of the portable electronic devices such as the smartphones and handheld tablets has increased over the years, and this is true in the health-care industry also. This is because of the development of various patient management softwares. The use of apps to manage, educate, and inform patient is not uncommon among orthodontists nowadays. The aim of this article was to review the various apps available on the Google Play Store and iOS Apple Store for orthodontists and patients. Four smartphones using orthodontically relevant keywords such as orthodontics, orthodontists, and braces were searched and reviewed in detail. Out of the 354 orthodontically relevant apps available in both Android and Apple operating systems, the apps could be categorized as orthodontist-related apps or patient-related apps. Under these categories they could be further classified as practice managements apps, patient education apps, model analysis apps, tooth material calculators, patient reminder apps, etc.

  20. Metal Hypersensitivity in Orthodontic Patients

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    Sandhya Maheshwari Sanjeev K

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic treatment of individuals with metal hypersensitivity is a matter of concern for the orthodontist. Orthodontic appliances contain metals like Nickel, Cobalt and Chromium etc. Metals may cause allergic reactions and are known as allergens. Reaction to these metals is due to biodegradation of metals in the oral cavity. This may lead to the formation of corrosion products and their exposure to the patient. Nickel is the most common metal to cause hypersensitivity reaction. Chromium ranks second among the metals, known to trigger allergic reactions. The adverse biological reactions to these metals may include hypersensitivity, dermatitis and asthma. In addition, a significant carcinogenic and mutagenic potential has been demonstrated. The orthodontist must be familiar with the best possible alternative treatment modalities to provide the safest, most effective care possible in these cases. The present article focuses on the issue of metal hypersensitivity and its management in orthodontic

  1. Orthodontics is temporomandibular disorder-neutral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredini, Daniele; Stellini, Edoardo; Gracco, Antonio; Lombardo, Luca; Nardini, Luca Guarda; Siciliani, Giuseppe

    2016-07-01

    To assess if subjects with a clinical diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) have a similar prevalence of orthodontic history as a population of TMD-free individuals and to assess if those subjects who have a history of ideal orthodontics have fewer symptoms than those with a history of nonideal orthodontics. Two groups of age- and sex-matched individuals belonging to either a study ("TMD") or a control group were recruited. Subjects who underwent orthodontic treatment were classified as having a history of ideal or nonideal orthodontics based on the current presence of normal values in five reference occlusal features. The correlation with a history of orthodontic treatment was not clinically significant for any of the TMD diagnoses (ie, muscle pain, joint pain, disc displacement, arthrosis), with Phi (Φ) coefficient values within the -0.120 to 0.058 range. Within the subset of patients with a history of orthodontics, the correlation of ideal or nonideal orthodontic treatment with TMD diagnoses was, in general, not clinically relevant or was weakly relevant. Findings confirmed the substantial absence of clinically significant effects of orthodontics as far as TMD is concerned. The very low correlation values of a negative or positive history of ideal or nonideal orthodontics with the different TMD diagnoses suggest that orthodontic treatment could not have a true role for TMD.

  2. Digital models: How can dental arch form be verified chairside?

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    Alana Tavares

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Plaster dental casts are routinely used during clinical practice to access maxillary dental arch form and assist on fabrication of individualized orthodontic archwires. Recently introduced, digital model technology may offer a limitation for the obtainment of a dental physical record. In this context, a tool for dental arch form assessment for chairside use is necessary when employing digital models. In this regard, paper print of the dental arch seems thus to be useful. Methods: In the present study, 37 lower arch models were used. Intercanine and intermolar widths and dental arch length measurements were performed and compared using plaster dental casts, digital models and paper print image of the models. Ortho Insight 3D scanner was employed for model digitalization. Results: No statistically significant differences were noted regarding the measurements performed on the plaster or digital models (p> 0.05. Paper print images, however, showed subestimated values for intercanine and intermolar widths and overestimated values for dental arch length. Despite being statistically significant (p< 0.001, the differences were considered clinically negligible. Conclusion: The present study suggests that paper print images obtained from digital models are clinically accurate and can be used as a tool for dental arch form assessment for fabrication of individualized orthodontic archwires.

  3. Digital models: How can dental arch form be verified chairside?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Alana; Braga, Emanuel; de Araújo, Telma Martins

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Plaster dental casts are routinely used during clinical practice to access maxillary dental arch form and assist on fabrication of individualized orthodontic archwires. Recently introduced, digital model technology may offer a limitation for the obtainment of a dental physical record. In this context, a tool for dental arch form assessment for chairside use is necessary when employing digital models. In this regard, paper print of the dental arch seems thus to be useful. Methods: In the present study, 37 lower arch models were used. Intercanine and intermolar widths and dental arch length measurements were performed and compared using plaster dental casts, digital models and paper print image of the models. Ortho Insight 3D scanner was employed for model digitalization. Results: No statistically significant differences were noted regarding the measurements performed on the plaster or digital models (p> 0.05). Paper print images, however, showed subestimated values for intercanine and intermolar widths and overestimated values for dental arch length. Despite being statistically significant (p< 0.001), the differences were considered clinically negligible. Conclusion: The present study suggests that paper print images obtained from digital models are clinically accurate and can be used as a tool for dental arch form assessment for fabrication of individualized orthodontic archwires. PMID:29364382

  4. Periodontal status of Pakistani orthodontic patients

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    Yousuf MOOSA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the periodontal status of orthodontic patients and non-orthodontic patients, aged 15–28 years, of both genders. The cross-sectional study included 100 orthodontic and 100 non-orthodontic patients evaluated using a Community Periodontal Index for Treatment Need (CPITN probe on the index teeth. A questionnaire was distributed to the participants to assess and evaluate the use of oral hygiene aids. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 17, and various comparisons were performed using the chi-square test. The study revealed that there was a statistically significant association in CPITN scores between the orthodontic and non-orthodontic patients (p < 0.01. The study showed that patients undergoing orthodontic treatment have increased plaque accumulation and probing depth resulting in periodontal tissue destruction. Proper oral hygiene practices and interdental aids should be employed to control plaque.

  5. Anxiety, Stress and Coping Patterns in Children in Dental Settings

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    Nadica Pop-Jordanova

    2018-04-01

    CONCLUSION: This study confirmed that moderate stress level and anxiety are present in both groups of patients (orthodontic and dental. Obtained scores are depending on gender and age. As more used coping patterns in both groups are developing self-reliance and optimism; avoiding problems and engaging in demanding activity. Some strategies for managing this problem are discussed.

  6. Validity of the Demirjian method for dental age estimation for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-02-04

    Feb 4, 2015 ... Conclusions: It is appropriate to use the Demirjian method in southern Turkish children; however, a revision is needed in some ... Departments of Pediatric Dentistry and 1Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Akdeniz, Antalya, Turkey .... agenesis excluded from the study because dental anomalies.

  7. Conceitos de genética e hereditariedade aplicados à compreensão das reabsorções dentárias durante a movimentação ortodôntica Genetics and heredity concepts applied to the comprehension of dental resorptions during orthodontic movement

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    Alberto Consolaro

    2004-05-01

    and create needs. A current example of such situation is the assumption that a certain phenomenon or disease is genetic or inherited. One must be especially careful avoiding overstatement. Situations such as the outcomes of clinical procedures, collateral and iatrogenic effects and may be thought of as genetic, but almost never based on experimental studies. When new knowledge is broadly widespread and not deeply understood it possesses a temporary magical power of seduction and use. Therefore, some have tried to implicate the primary cause of dental resorption in orthodontics to genetics and heritability11,10,16. Genetics and heritability along with molecular biology consist of the new outbreak of knowledge and technology mankind is going through, which requires renewing or recycling of concepts. Despite the availability of new information, everyday life and survival needs are overlapped and even the most conscious clinician, perfectly aware of updating in his work, has no time to acquire new concepts from fragmented or multifaceted literature. For that reason, we have proposed to ground, in a simple and clear way, the elemental concepts of genetics, heritability, and molecular biology mechanisms. We might sometimes bare academic heresy in favor of comprehension. For those familiar with the subject some information might seem too basic, however we have tried to reach the clinician specially related to the orthodontic and facial orthopedic practice.

  8. Multidisciplinary management including periodontics, orthodontics, implants, and prosthetics for an adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, Teresa; Neves, Manuel; Alves, Célia

    2012-08-01

    This article describes the complex dental treatment of an adult patient with multiple missing teeth, mild chronic periodontitis, and a malocclusion with a cant of the occlusal plane. After periodontal treatment, titanium implants and a miniscrew were placed to correct the occlusal plane canting with orthodontic treatment. Prosthodontic treatment was completed by using osseointegrated implants to replace the missing teeth. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Orthodontic Treatment in Adult Patient with Reduced Periodontium: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintcovsk, Ricardo Lima; Knop, Luegya Amorim Henriques; Pinto, Ary Santos; Gandini, Luiz Gonzaga; Martins, Lídia Parsekian

    2015-01-01

    Patients presenting reduced periodontium represent a major concern for orthodontists. The purpose of this article is to present the clinical case of an adult patient who presented sequel of periodontal disease (diastemas) compromising her dental aesthetics. She was subjected to an orthodontic treatment with the application of light forces distant from the teeth with reduced periodontium. A periodontal support therapy was successfully implemented. The final stage of the treatment indicated satisfactory occlusal and periodontal characteristics.

  10. Shear bond strength of precoated orthodontic brackets: an in vivo study

    OpenAIRE

    Hassan, Ali H

    2010-01-01

    Ali H HassanDepartment of Preventive Dental Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi ArabiaObjective: To evaluate the shear bond strength of precoated orthodontic brackets bonded with self-etching primer relative to that of noncoated conventionally-bonded brackets at two different time intervals.Methods: Twenty-one subjects were selected for randomized split-mouth bonding of two types of brackets to the maxillary arch. Half of the teeth had precoated brackets b...

  11. Electrophoretic Deposition as a New Bioactive Glass Coating Process for Orthodontic Stainless Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Kyotaro Kawaguchi; Masahiro Iijima; Kazuhiko Endo; Itaru Mizoguchi

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the surface modification of orthodontic stainless steel using electrophoretic deposition (EPD) of bioactive glass (BG). The BG coatings were characterized by spectrophotometry, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, and X-ray diffraction. The frictional properties were investigated using a progressive load scratch test. The remineralization ability of the etched dental enamel was studied according to the time-dependent mechanical proper...

  12. Prospective evaluation of the psychosocial impact of the first 6 months of orthodontic treatment with fixed appliance among young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Renata França; Ramos-Jorge, Joana; Marques, Leandro Silva; de Paiva, Saul Martins; Melgaço, Camilo Aquino; Pazzini, Camila Alessandra

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the psychosocial impact of the first 6 months of orthodontic treatment with a fixed appliance among young adults and compare the results with those of a control group of patients awaiting treatment for malocclusion. A study was conducted with a sample of 120 patients on a waiting list for orthodontic treatment at a university. The participants were allocated to an experimental group submitted to treatment and a control group awaiting treatment. The groups were matched for sex and age. All participants were instructed to answer the Brazilian version of the Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire (PIDAQ) at baseline and after 6 months. Statistical analysis involved the Wilcoxon test for the total PIDAQ score and the score of each subscale. All patients participated until the end of the study. Significant differences between baseline and the 6-month evaluation were found for the total PIDAQ score as well as the dental self-confidence and social impact subscales in both groups. No differences between baseline and the 6-month evaluation were found regarding the psychological impact or esthetic concern subscales in the control group. The patients in the experimental group reported greater esthetic impact 6 months after beginning treatment (P orthodontic treatment seem to improve psychosocial impact. The first 6 months of orthodontic treatment seem to improve the psychosocial impact of malocclusion. The patients analyzed in the present study reported a greater esthetic impact and less psychological impact after 6 months of using an orthodontic appliance.

  13. Critical evaluation of incidence and prevalence of white spot lesions during fixed orthodontic appliance treatment: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararaj, Dhinahar; Venkatachalapathy, Sudhakar; Tandon, Akshay; Pereira, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Development of dental caries, specifically, white spot lesions (WSLs), continues to be a well-recognized and troubling side effect of orthodontic fixed appliance therapy, despite vast improvement in preventive dental techniques and procedures. The aim of this meta-analysis is to evaluate, determine, and summarize the incidence and prevalence rates of WSLs during orthodontic treatment that have been published in the literature. According to predetermined criteria, databases were searched for appropriate studies. References of the selected articles and relevant reviews were searched for any missed publications. In the 14 studies evaluated for WSLs, the incidence of new carious lesions formed during orthodontic treatment in patients was 45.8% and the prevalence of lesions in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment was 68.4%. The incidence and prevalence rates of WSLs in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment are quite high and significant. This widespread problem of WSL development is an alarming challenge and warrants significant attention from both patients and providers, which should result in greatly increased emphasis on effective caries prevention.

  14. Orthodontic cement with protein-repellent and antibacterial properties and the release of calcium and phosphate ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Weir, Michael D; Chen, Chen; Melo, Mary A S; Bai, Yuxing; Xu, Hockin H K

    2016-07-01

    White spot lesions often occur in orthodontic treatments. The objective of this study was to develop a novel resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGI) as an orthodontic cement with protein-repellent, antibacterial and remineralization capabilities. Protein-repellent 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC), antibacterial dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM), nanoparticles of silver (NAg), and nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP) were incorporated into a RMGI. Enamel shear bond strength (SBS) was determined. Calcium (Ca) and phosphate (P) ion releases were measured. Protein adsorption onto specimens was determined by a micro bicinchoninic acid method. A dental plaque microcosm biofilm model was tested. Increasing the NACP filler level increased the Ca and P ion release. Decreasing the solution pH increased the ion release. Incorporating MPC into RMGI reduced protein adsorption, which was an order of magnitude less than that of commercial controls. Adding DMAHDM and NAg into RMGI yielded a strong antibacterial function, greatly reducing biofilm viability and acid production. Biofilm CFU counts on the multifunctional orthodontic cement were 3 orders of magnitude less than that of commercial control (p0.1). A novel multifunctional orthodontic cement was developed with strong antibacterial and protein-repellent capabilities for preventing enamel demineralization. The new cement is promising to prevent white spot lesions in orthodontic treatments. The method of incorporating four bioactive agents may have wide applicability to the development of other bioactive dental materials to inhibit caries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Importance of orthodontic movement in interdisciplinary treatment for restoring esthetics and functional occlusion

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    Carlos Henrique Guimarães

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes interdisciplinary treatment conducted in adult patients, 49-year-old, with periodontal problems, losses and dental inclination, occlusal trauma, localized bone loss, and necessity of rehabilitation with dental implants. Alignment and leveling of the teeth, the molars uprighting with cantilever, and space closure were performed the treatment was facilitated by periodic periodontal control. The resultant occlusion was stable throughout a 5-year retention period. In conclusion, interdisciplinary treatment combined with periodontics, orthodontics, implantodontist, and restorative dentistry was useful for improving the patient′s oral health, function, and esthetics.

  16. Prevention and management of accidental foreign body ingestion and aspiration in orthodontic practice

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    Umesan UK

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Uday Kumar Umesan,1 Kui Lay Chua,1 Priya Balakrishnan21National Dental Centre, 2Kg Kiarong, Bandar Seri Begawan, Brunei DarussalamAbstract: Among the myriad emergencies that could arise in the dental clinical setting there are a few that occur occasionally despite being entirely preventable. Ingestion or aspiration of dental materials, appliances, or instruments comprises this category. Regardless of incidence, foreign body ingestion or aspiration episodes are recognized as potential complications in the specialty of orthodontics. Despite their infrequent occurrence, the morbidity from a single incident and the amount of specialty medical care that may be needed to manage such incidents is too high to ignore. There is also the associated risk of malpractice litigation given the fact that these incidents are preventable. At present, no clear guidelines exist regarding prevention of this emergency in practice. This article attempts to review relevant literature and aims to formulate certain recommendations based on best available evidence to minimize the incidence of such events, while also suggesting guidelines toward making their management more effective. A flow chart outlining management options and strategies to aid the clinician in the event of such an emergency is also presented.Keywords: foreign bodies, ingestion, orthodontics, respiratory aspiration, orthodontic appliances

  17. Minimally invasive corticotomy in orthodontics using a three-dimensional printed CAD/CAM surgical guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassetta, M; Giansanti, M; Di Mambro, A; Calasso, S; Barbato, E

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an innovative, minimally invasive, flapless corticotomy procedure in orthodontics. The STROBE guidelines were followed. Ten patients with severe dental crowding and a class I molar relationship were selected to receive orthodontic treatment with clear aligners and corticotomy-facilitated orthodontics. The mean age of these patients was 21 years (range 17-28, standard deviation 6.08 years); the male to female ratio was 2:1. The main outcome was a reduction in the total treatment time to correct dental crowding. The secondary outcomes were periodontal index changes, the degree of root resorption, and patient perceptions of the method used, assessed using the short-form Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14). The occurrence of early surgical complications or unexpected events was also recorded. All patients completed the treatment to correct dental crowding. The average treatment time was reduced by two-thirds. The procedure did not significantly modify the periodontal indices or oral health-related quality of life. No early surgical complications or unexpected events were observed. In short, the results indicate that this new procedure is safe and accelerates tooth movement without periodontal complications or discomfort. However, the efficacy of this procedure must be confirmed in controlled clinical trials. Copyright © 2016 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Assessment of skeletal maturation with permanent mandibular second molar calcification stages among a group of Nepalese orthodontic patients

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    Giri J

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Jamal Giri,1 Basanta Kumar Shrestha,2 Rajiv Yadav,2 Tika Ram Ghimire21Department of Orthodontics, BP Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, 2Department of Dentistry, Institute of Medicine, Kathmandu, Nepal Background: Assessment of growth status of a patient is a key component in orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning for growing patients with skeletal discrepancy. Skeletal maturation based on hand-wrist radiograph and cervical vertebral maturation (CVM are commonly used methods of growth assessment. Studies have shown that stages of dental calcification can also be used to assess skeletal maturation status of an individual, whereas other studies have suggested that the relationship between dental calcification and skeletal maturation should be interpreted with caution owing to racial variation. Objective: To evaluate the relationship between permanent mandibular second molar calcification stages and skeletal maturity assessed by CVM among a group of Nepalese orthodontic patients. Materials and methods: One hundred and sixty-eight digital radiographs (84 orthopantomograms and 84 lateral cephalograms were obtained from the records of 84 patients who sought orthodontic treatment in Orthodontic and Dentofacial Orthopaedic Unit, Department of Dentistry, Institute of Medicine, Kathmandu. Two parameters were used in this study, namely, CVM stages from lateral cephalogram and Demirjian index (DI stages from orthopantomogram. The evaluation of digital radiographs was carried out on a computer screen with a resolution of 1,280×800 pixels. The association between DI stages of permanent mandibular second molar and CVM stages was assessed. Results: A statistically significant association was found between DI and CVM stages for both male and female subjects with Pearson's contingency coefficient value of 0.751 and 0.766 for male and female subjects, respectively. Conclusion: Skeletal maturation can be reliably assessed with dental calcification

  19. Patients' and parents' expectations of orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiemstra, Renske; Bos, Annemieke; Hoogstraten, Johan

    2009-12-01

    To investigate the expectations of children and their primary care-givers towards orthodontic treatment and to compare the results with those of a UK sample. A questionnaire survey of children and their primary care-givers attending for their first consultation. The Department of Orthodontics at the Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), the Netherlands. A total of 168 subjects (84 patients and 84 parents) completed the questionnaire. The children were aged 10 to 14 years. The responses of the children and parents and differences between boys and girls were examined using parametric statistical methods. The data from the Dutch sample were compared with a similar UK sample. Patients and parents shared similar expectations of orthodontic treatment, with the exception of expectations of having a brace fitted at the first appointment, orthodontic treatment involving headgear, any problems with orthodontic treatment, duration of orthodontic treatment and concerning reactions from the public. Among the child participants, boys and girls only differed in their expectations of orthodontic treatment involving jaw surgery. Differences between Dutch and English participants were found regarding the first visit, type of orthodontic treatment, reactions from the public, and pain and problems with orthodontic treatment. Since the expectations of patients and their parents differ on several aspects, effective communication between the orthodontist, patient and parent is considered to be essential. Our hypothesis that Dutch patients' and parents' expectations of orthodontic treatment differ from the expectations of English patients and parents was supported.

  20. Orthodontic management of bilateral maxillary canine-first premolar transposition and bilateral agenesis of maxillary lateral incisors: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Palma, Elena; Di Giuseppe, Biagio; Tepedino, Michele; Chimenti, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Maxillary canine-first premolar transposition (Mx.C.P1) is an uncommon dental positional anomaly that may create many orthodontic problems from both esthetic and functional points of view. In this report we show the orthodontic management of a case of Mx.C.P1 associated with bilateral maxillary lateral incisor agenesis and unilateral mandibular second premolar agenesis The patient was treated with a multibracket appliance and the extraction of the lower premolar. treatment was completed without the need for any prosthetic replacement.

  1. Interceptive Correction of Anterior Crossbite Using Short-Span Wire-Fixed Orthodontic Appliance: A Report of Three Cases

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    S. Nagarajan M. P. Sockalingam

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterior crossbite is relatively a common presentation in the mixed dentition stage. If left untreated, it can lead to a host of problems and may complicate future orthodontic treatment. One of the major difficulties in performing anterior crossbite correction in young children is treatment compliance. In most cases, poor compliance is due to the unacceptability of the removable appliance used. This article describes three cases of successful correction of anterior crossbite of patients in mixed dentition using short-span wire-fixed orthodontic appliances. This sectional appliance provides an alternative method of correcting anterior crossbite of dental origin and offers many advantages compared to the use of removable appliances.

  2. Adhesives for fixed orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandall, N A; Millett, D T; Mattick, C R; Hickman, J; Macfarlane, T V; Worthington, H V

    2003-01-01

    Bonding of orthodontic brackets to teeth is important to enable effective and efficient treatment with fixed appliances. The problem is bracket failure during treatment which increases operator chairside time and lengthens treatment time. A prolonged treatment is likely to increase the oral health risks of orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances one of which is irreversible enamel decalcification. To evaluate the effectiveness of different orthodontic adhesives for bonding. Electronic databases: the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE and EMBASE. Date of most recent searches: August 2002 (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 2, 2002). Trials were selected if they met the following criteria: randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) comparing two different adhesive groups. Participants were patients with fixed orthodontic appliances. The interventions were adhesives that bonded stainless steel brackets to all teeth except the molars. The primary outcome was debond or bracket failure. Data were recorded on decalcification as a secondary outcome, if present. Information regarding methods, participants, interventions, outcome measures and results were extracted in duplicate by pairs of reviewers (Nicky Mandall (NM) and Rye Mattick (CRM); Declan Millett (DTM) and Joy Hickman (JH2)). Since the data were not presented in a form that was amenable to meta-analysis, the results of the review are presented in narrative form only. Three trials satisfied the inclusion criteria. A chemical cured composite was compared with a light cure composite (one trial), a conventional glass ionomer cement (one trial) and a polyacid-modified resin composite (compomer) (one trial). The quality of the trial reports was generally poor. It is difficult to draw any conclusions from this review, however, suggestions are made for methods of improving future research involving

  3. Orthodontics Align Crooked Teeth and Boost Self-Esteem

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... desktop! more... Orthodontics Align Crooked Teeth and Boost Self- esteem Article Chapters Orthodontics Align Crooked Teeth and Boost Self- esteem print full article print this chapter email this ...

  4. Awareness of orthodontists regarding oral hygiene performance during active orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin-Broner, Y; Levin, L; Ashkenazi, M

    2012-09-01

    The aim of the present study was orthodontist's awareness for maintenance of several home and professional prevention measures during active orthodontic treatment according to patients' report. A structured questionnaire was distributed to 122 patients undergoing active orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances. Patients were treated by 38 different orthodontists. The questionnaire accessed information regarding instructions patients received from their orthodontist concerning maintenance of their oral hygiene during orthodontic treatment. Most of the patients (94%) reported that their orthodontists informed them at least once about the importance of tooth-brushing, and 74.5% received instructions for correct performance of tooth brushing or alternatively were referred to dental hygienist. However, only 24.5% of the patients reported that their orthodontist instructed them to use the correct fluoride concentration in their toothpaste, to use daily fluoride mouthwash (31.5%) and to brush their teeth once a week with high concentration of fluoride gel (Elmex gel; 10.2%). Only 13.8% received application of high concentration of fluoride gel or varnish at the dental office, and 52% of the patients reported that their orthodontist verified that they attend regular check-ups by their dentist. A significant positive correlation was found between explaining the patients the importance of tooth brushing and the following variables: instructing them on how to brush their teeth correctly (p<0.0001), explaining them which type of toothbrush is recommended for orthodontic patients (p=0.002), recommending to perform daily fluoride oral rinse (p=0.036) and referring them to periodic check-ups (p=0.024). Orthodontists should increase their awareness and commitment for instructing their patient on how to maintain good oral hygiene in order to prevent caries and periodontal disease during orthodontic treatment.

  5. In vitro assessment of photocatalytic titanium oxide surface modified stainless steel orthodontic brackets for antiadherent and antibacterial properties against Lactobacillus acidophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Alok Girish; Shetty, Pradeep Chandra; Ramachandra, C S; Bhat, N Sham; Laxmikanth, S M

    2011-11-01

    To assess the antiadherent and antibacterial properties of surface modified stainless steel orthodontic brackets with photocatalytic titanium oxide (TiO(2)) against Lactobacillus acidophilus. This study was done on 120 specimens of stainless steel preadjusted edgewise appliance (PEA) orthodontic brackets. The specimens were divided into four test groups. Each group consisted of 30 specimens. Groups containing uncoated brackets acted as a control group for their respective experimental group containing coated brackets. Surface modification of brackets was carried out by the radiofrequency (RF) magnetron sputtering method with photocatalytic TiO(2). Brackets then were subjected to microbiological tests for assessment of the antiadherent and antibacterial properties of photocatalytic TiO(2) coating against L acidophilus. Orthodontic brackets coated with photocatalytic TiO(2) showed an antiadherent effect against L acidophilus compared with uncoated brackets. The bacterial mass that was bound to the TiO(2)-coated brackets was less when compared with the uncoated brackets. Furthermore, TiO(2)-coated brackets had a bactericidal effect on L acidophilus, which causes dental caries. Surface modification of orthodontic brackets with photocatalytic TiO(2) can be used to prevent the accumulation of dental plaque and the development of dental caries during orthodontic treatment.

  6. Influence of metal dental materials on MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchihashi, Toshio; Chiba, Michiko; Yoshizawa, Satoshi; Sasaki, Sadayuki; Maki, Toshio; Kitagawa, Matsuo; Suzuki, Takeshi [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan). Main Hospital; Nakata, Minoru; Fujita, Isao

    1998-11-01

    Differences in magnetic susceptibility produce artifacts and signal loss in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study was undertaken to compare the degree of artifacts on MRI caused by metallic dental materials. The influence on MRI of six types of dental alloys, a dental implant, orthodontic appliance, and magnetic attachment was investigated. Among the dental metals, nickel-chromium alloy and cobalt-chromium alloy, which have ferromagnetism, caused significant metal artifacts. Gold-platinum alloy, gold-silver-palladium alloy, silver alloy, and amalgam alloy produced slight metal artifacts. The orthodontic appliance mainly consisted of iron, and the keeper for its magnetic attachment was made of stainless steel. For these reasons, marked metal artifacts and signal loss could be seen in both of them owing to their ferromagnetism. These results suggest that orthodontic appliances and magnetic attachments impair evaluation of the GRE and EPI techniques. It is therefore preferable to use predominantly diamagnetic or paramagnetic dental materials for MRI of the head and neck. Removable keepers should be used more widely to prevent metal artifacts and enhance safety on MRI. (author)

  7. Influence of metal dental materials on MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchihashi, Toshio; Chiba, Michiko; Yoshizawa, Satoshi; Sasaki, Sadayuki; Maki, Toshio; Kitagawa, Matsuo; Suzuki, Takeshi; Nakata, Minoru; Fujita, Isao

    1998-01-01

    Differences in magnetic susceptibility produce artifacts and signal loss in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study was undertaken to compare the degree of artifacts on MRI caused by metallic dental materials. The influence on MRI of six types of dental alloys, a dental implant, orthodontic appliance, and magnetic attachment was investigated. Among the dental metals, nickel-chromium alloy and cobalt-chromium alloy, which have ferromagnetism, caused significant metal artifacts. Gold-platinum alloy, gold-silver-palladium alloy, silver alloy, and amalgam alloy produced slight metal artifacts. The orthodontic appliance mainly consisted of iron, and the keeper for its magnetic attachment was made of stainless steel. For these reasons, marked metal artifacts and signal loss could be seen in both of them owing to their ferromagnetism. These results suggest that orthodontic appliances and magnetic attachments impair evaluation of the GRE and EPI techniques. It is therefore preferable to use predominantly diamagnetic or paramagnetic dental materials for MRI of the head and neck. Removable keepers should be used more widely to prevent metal artifacts and enhance safety on MRI. (author)

  8. Dose Evaluation and Quality Criteria in Dental Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gori, C.; Rossi, F.; Stecco, A.; Villari, N.; Zatelli, G.

    2000-01-01

    Radioprotection in dental radiology is of particular interest in the framework of the Revised Medical Exposure Directive for the great number of examinations involving the adult as well as the paediatric population (Article 9: Special Practice). The present study is intended to find the quality criteria of orthodontic imaging and for evaluating the dose absorbed within the dental and maxillary volume in connection with radiological examinations performed with either spiral CT, dental panoramic tomography or teleradiography. The X ray dose to organs sited in the body, neck, ocular and intracranial area was measured using lithium fluoride dosemeters, positioned in a Rando phantom. Quality criteria have been established by an expert radiologist considering the diagnostic information obtained in the images. The dosimetric data obtained were comparable with other authors', although with some differences due to technical characteristics. These result data are useful for choosing the patient's diagnostic path, considering the radiobiological risk associated with increasing orthodontic imaging. (author)

  9. Prevalence of fimA genotypes of Porphyromonas gingivalis in adolescent orthodontic patients.

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    Shuang Pan

    Full Text Available The placement of fixed orthodontic appliances may alter the composition of oral microbiota and has the potential risk of periodontal complication. Porphyromonas gingivalis fimbriae play a critical role in colonization of P. gingivalis in subgingival regions. In this study, we investigated the association between the prevalence of P. gingivalis-specific fimA genotypes and periodontal health status in adolescent orthodontic patients, to identify the pathogencity of P. gingivalis during orthodontic therapy.Sixty-one adolescent orthodontic patients were enrolled in the case group, while the control group consisted of 56 periodontally healthy adolescents. At baseline (T0, clinical parameter (gingival index was tested, and subgingival plaque samples were obtained from the lower incisors. The incidences of P. gingivalis and fimA genotypes were detected by polymerase chain reaction. All parameters were reassessed after 1 month (T1, 2 months (T2, 3 months (T3, and 6 months (T4 in the case group and then compared with those of the controls.Both microbiological and clinical parameters from orthodontic patients started to increase after placement of fixed appliances. Maximum values were reached at 3 months after placement and followed by their decreases at six months. However, the microbiological and clinical parameters in the case group were significantly higher than those of the control group. The GI of fimA II, IV-positive samples was significantly higher than that of negative samples.P. gingivalis carrying fimA II or IV was closely related to orthodontic gingivitis. In addition, proper oral hygiene control could lead to little increase in dental plaque accumulation, and exert a beneficial effect to periodontal tissues.

  10. Enhanced M1/M2 macrophage ratio promotes orthodontic root resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, D; Kou, X; Luo, Q; Yang, R; Liu, D; Wang, X; Song, Y; Cao, H; Zeng, M; Gan, Y; Zhou, Y

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical force-induced orthodontic root resorption is a major clinical challenge in orthodontic treatment. Macrophages play an important role in orthodontic root resorption, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we examined the mechanism by which the ratio of M1 to M2 macrophage polarization affects root resorption during orthodontic tooth movement. Root resorption occurred when nickel-titanium coil springs were applied on the upper first molars of rats for 3 to 14 d. Positively stained odontoclasts or osteoclasts with tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase were found in resorption areas. Meanwhile, M1-like macrophages positive for CD68 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) persistently accumulated on the compression side of periodontal tissues. In addition, the expressions of the M1 activator interferon-γ and the M1-associated pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were upregulated on the compression side of periodontal tissues. When the coil springs were removed at the 14th day after orthodontic force application, root resorption was partially rescued. The number of CD68(+)CD163(+) M2-like macrophages gradually increased on the compression side of periodontal tissues. The levels of M2 activator interleukin (IL)-4 and the M2-associated anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 also increased. Systemic injection of the TNF-α inhibitor etanercept or IL-4 attenuated the severity of root resorption and decreased the ratio of M1 to M2 macrophages. These data imply that the balance between M1 and M2 macrophages affects orthodontic root resorption. Root resorption was aggravated by an enhanced M1/M2 ratio but was partially rescued by a reduced M1/M2 ratio. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2014.

  11. Records needed for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning: a systematic review.

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    Robine J Rischen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Traditionally, dental models, facial and intra-oral photographs and a set of two-dimensional radiographs are used for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning. As evidence is lacking, the discussion is ongoing which specific records are needed for the process of making an orthodontic treatment plan. OBJECTIVE: To estimate the contribution and importance of different diagnostic records for making an orthodontic diagnosis and treatment plan. DATA SOURCES: An electronic search in PubMed (1948-July 2012, EMBASE Excerpta Medica (1980-July 2012, CINAHL (1982-July 2012, Web of Science (1945-July 2012, Scopus (1996-July 2012, and Cochrane Library (1993-July 2012 was performed. Additionally, a hand search of the reference lists of included studies was performed to identify potentially eligible studies. There was no language restriction. STUDY SELECTION: The patient, intervention, comparator, outcome (pico question formulated for this study was as follows: for patients who need orthodontic treatment (P, will the use of record set X (I compared with record set Y (C change the treatment plan (O? Only primary publications were included. DATA EXTRACTION: Independent extraction of data and quality assessment was performed by two observers. RESULTS: Of the 1041 publications retrieved, 17 met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 4 studies were of high quality. Because of the limited number of high quality studies and the differences in study designs, patient characteristics, and reference standard or index test, a meta-analysis was not possible. CONCLUSION: Cephalograms are not routinely needed for orthodontic treatment planning in Class II malocclusions, digital models can be used to replace plaster casts, and cone-beam computed tomography radiographs can be indicated for impacted canines. Based on the findings of this review, the minimum record set required for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning could not be defined. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

  12. Evaluation of the orthodontic treatment need in a paediatric sample from Southern Italy and its importance among paediatricians for improving oral health in pediatric dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ierardo, Gaetano; Corridore, Denise; Di Carlo, Gabriele; Di Giorgio, Gianni; Leonardi, Emanuele; Campus, Guglielmo-Giuseppe; Vozza, Iole; Polimeni, Antonella; Bossù, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    Background Data from epidemiological studies investigating the prevalence and severity of malocclusions in children are of great relevance to public health programs aimed at orthodontic prevention. Previous epidemiological studies focused mainly on the adolescence age group and reported a prevalence of malocclusion with a high variability, going from 32% to 93%. Aim of our study was to assess the need for orthodontic treatment in a paediatric sample from Southern Italy in order to improve awareness among paediatricians about oral health preventive strategies in pediatric dentistry. Material and Methods The study used the IOTN-DHC index to evaluate the need for orthodontic treatment for several malocclusions (overjet, reverse overjet, overbite, openbite, crossbite) in a sample of 579 children in the 2-9 years age range. Results The most frequently altered occlusal parameter was the overbite (prevalence: 24.5%), while the occlusal anomaly that most frequently presented a need for orthodontic treatment was the crossbite (8.8%). The overall prevalence of need for orthodontic treatment was of 19.3%, while 49% of the sample showed one or more altered occlusal parameters. No statistically significant difference was found between males and females. Conclusions Results from this study support the idea that the establishment of a malocclusion is a gradual process starting at an early age. Effective orthodontic prevention programs should therefore include preschool children being aware paediatricians of the importance of early first dental visit. Key words:Orthodontic treatment, malocclusion, oral health, pediatric dentistry. PMID:28936290

  13. Versatile Auxiliary Orthodontic Spring for Orthodontic Correction of Impacted Teeth

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    Pavankumar Janardan Vibhute

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Malocclusion such as impacted tooth is not uncommon. Many approaches with various auxiliary springs have been reported in literature till date for correction of such malocclusions. They had biomechanical, retentive and stability drawbacks inherent in their designs. This article presents the innovative approach for orthodontic correction of impacted tooth, especially with light force appliance, i.e. Begg′s appliance, where round wires in round molar tubes are used throughout treatment. A versatile auxiliary orthodontic spring (VAOS is fabricated in the 0.018 inch Australian stainless steel round wire, which may be anchored on round molar buccal tube, and desirable force vector may be applied in any of the three dimensions. Fabrication and its clinical application are discussed.

  14. Occlusal features and need for orthodontic treatment in persons with osteogenesis imperfecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binh, Ho Duy; Nguyen, Khac Minh; Maasalu, Katre; Kõks, Sulev; Märtson, Aare; Saag, Mare; Jagomägi, Triin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to (a) analyse dental occlusion and determine the need for orthodontic treatment of persons with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) in comparison with the healthy population and (b) investigate the associations between OI and malocclusion. A case‐control study included 26 OI persons and 400 healthy participants (control group). Occlusal features and the need for orthodontic treatment were defined according to Dental Health Component‐Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need and Dental Aesthetic Index. Results showed that Angle Class I, II, and III relationship was found in 23.1%, 3.8%, and 73.1% of OI group, and in the control group, it was 67%, 17.5%, and 15.5%, respectively. OI group had significantly higher prevalence of reverse overjet >1 mm (76.9%), missing teeth (42.3%), posterior crossbite (34.6%), and open bite >2 mm (19.2%) compared to the control group (8.5%, 2.2%, 6.2%, and 3.5%, respectively). OI group had less incisal segment crowding and more incisal segment spacing than the control group (p  1 mm (OR = 13.3, 95% CI = 3.9–44.7, p < .001), Angle Class III malocclusion (OR = 8.0, 95% CI = 2.0–30.8, p = .003), and missing teeth (OR = 4.7, 95% CI = 1.0–22.4, p = .049). In conclusion, there is the high probability of malocclusion in OI persons. Persons with OI require early orthodontic treatment because of significant correlation of OI disease with Angle Class III malocclusion, reverse overjet, and missing teeth. PMID:29744175

  15. Prevalence of orthodontic treatment need in permanent dentition of Iranian population: A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslamipour, Faezeh; Afshari, Zohreh; Najimi, Arash

    2018-01-01

    Malocclusion is a common oral health problem and can affect the psychosocial well-being in the long term. Therefore, in the recent decades, demand for orthodontic treatment to correct malocclusion has greatly increased worldwide. This systematic review and meta-analysis was undertaken to assess existing evidence on the prevalence of orthodontic treatment need in Iran. National and international databases were searched for articles on the prevalence of orthodontic treatment need using index of orthodontic treatment need (IOTN) and dental aesthetic index (DAI). The required data were completed by hand-searching. After applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria, the quality of articles was checked by a professional checklist. Data extraction and meta-analysis were performed. A random effects model was employed, and publication bias was checked. From a total of 443 articles that reported orthodontic treatment need in Iran, 24 articles were included in the meta-analysis process. Meta-analysis was performed on components of IOTN and DAI. The pooled prevalence of orthodontic treatment need based on Dental Health Component and Aesthetic Component of IOTN and DAI was 23.8% (19.5%-28.7%), 4.8% (3.3%-7%), and 16.1% (12.3%-20.8%). The results were found to be heterogeneous ( P orthodontic treatment need was not high in the Iranian population. Considering the differing prevalence of orthodontic treatment need based on normative index and self-perceived index, it is essential to improve the people's awareness of malocclusion and its side effects on their oral and general health.

  16. A novel titanium-containing catalyst for PET bottle flake%新型钛系催化剂合成瓶用聚酯切片的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    关震宇; 熊金根; 周文乐

    2016-01-01

    采用均一的液相新型钛系催化剂STiC-B1,在2 L间歇式聚合反应釜中制备钛系瓶用聚对苯二甲酸乙二醇酯( PET)切片;考察了催化剂中主要成分对 PET 切片色相及乙醛含量的影响,以及不同催化体系的PET切片的结晶性能及热性能;并进行了工业化应用评价。结果表明:在相同的聚合工艺条件下,STiC-B1钛用量为5μg/g(相对于PET)时的催化活性及其所得PET切片乙醛含量与乙二醇锑锑用量为180μg/g时相当;钛系PET切片结晶速度较锑系PET切片的慢,较慢的结晶速度可避免PET切片降温时出现结晶过快,从而有利于吹瓶;工业化应用表明钛系PET瓶片质量指标基本达到锑系PET瓶片的水平,其瓶坯乙醛含量低于锑系PET瓶坯的乙醛含量。%A bottle-grade titanium-containing polyethylene terephthalate ( PET) chip was prepared by using a novel uniform liq-uid-phase titanium-containing catalyst STiC-B1 on a two-liter batch polymerization reactor .The effects of the main components in the catalyst on the hue and acetaldehyde content of PET chip were investigated .The crystallization behavior and thermal proper-ties of PET chips were studied with different catalyst systems .The industrial application was evaluated .The results showed that STiC-B1 and ethylene glycol antimony provided the equal catalytic activity and the same acetaldehyde content of PET chips when the titanium content was 5 μg/g or the antimony content was 180μg/g based on PET;the crystallization rate of titanium-contai-ning PET chips was lower than that of antimony-containing PET chips , which avoided the extremely rapid crystallization behavior while cooling and thus helped the bottle blowing .And the industrial application showed that the titanium-containing catalyst pro-vided the close quality index of PET bottle flake and the lower acetaldehyde content of bottle blank as compared with antimony -containing catalyst .

  17. Comprehensive surgical. Orthodontic treatment of class III malocclusion in cleft patient involving minimally invasive surgery Case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojkovic, Goran; Stojkovic, Miodrag; Stojkovic, Jasna; Nikolic, Dejan; Stajcic, Zoran

    2016-12-19

    Surgical and orthodontic treatment of a teenage cleft patient. Authors describe the case of a 13 year old female cleft patient presented with class III malocclusion RESULT: The patient underwent comprehensive surgical secondary bone grafting and orthodontic treatment. Stable skeletal and occlusal class I relationship was achived and maintained in the post treatment observation period till the age of 16. Although several authors suggests primary gingivoperiosteoplasty, other advocates that such early intervention can cause later restrictions in maxillary growth. For alveolar reconstruction, maxillary growth and dental age were the main considerations in determining the timing of surgical intervention. This case showed that borderline cases of complex dentoalveolar and skeletal anomaly in cleft patients could be successfully treated with comprehensive secondary bone grafting and orthodontic treatment thus avoiding the need for orthognatic surgery. Alveolar bone grafting, Cleft, Malocclusion.

  18. Incidence of risk and complications associated with orthodontic therapeutic extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Narendar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Extraction in orthodontics are carried out in the cases where there is space deficiency to align the teeth. The elective extraction of first or second premolars has been discussed in the literature for more than 50 years. In the 1940s and 1950s Nance, Dewel and Carey reviewed this as a useful option, and in the 1970s Logan and other leading orthodontists favoured the extraction as choice. It is not always the elective extraction of premolar is a smooth drive for the surgeon as well as to patient. Sometimes the elective extraction of premolar result in complications, which might be due to both anatomical and surgical factors. Methodology: The study sample consisted of 100 patients referred for one or more orthodontic extractions to the department of oral and maxillofacial surgery were included in this retrospective study at the vivekanandha dental college for women tiruchengode between November 2014 and May 2016. All referrals were from the department of orthodontics. A survey was carried out to record the intraoperative risks and correlated with its morbidity as when occured. All intraoperative morbities were managed appropriately as required. Result and Conclusion: Between November 2014 and May 2016, 100 patients had one or more premolar teeth removed by the oral surgeons. The sample size was 100 patients who had a total of 334 premolars removed. The sample's mean age was 11.4+\\- 8.4 years, and 57.0% were male. The average number of teeth extracted per patient was 2.34 +\\- 1.46, and 73.8% had complete root development. More than 93.4% of subjects had normal root and bone morphology, whereas 35.65% had variations in root forms and bone texture. The intra-operative and post operative complication rates were 7.4% and 1.9%, respectively. Complications were generally minor (91.9% and were managed nonoperatively on an outpatient basis. There were no case of oral antral communication.

  19. Incidence of Risk and Complications Associated with Orthodontic Therapeutic Extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narendar, Ramesh; Balakrishnan, Gowri; Kavin, Thangavelu; Venkataraman, Sivasubramanian; Altaf, Syed Khalid; Gokulanathan, Subramaniam

    2017-11-01

    Extraction in orthodontics are carried out in the cases where there is space deficiency to align the teeth. The elective extraction of first or second premolars has been discussed in the literature for more than 50 years. In the 1940s and 1950s Nance, Dewel and Carey reviewed this as a useful option, and in the 1970s Logan and other leading orthodontists favoured the extraction as choice. It is not always the elective extraction of premolar is a smooth drive for the surgeon as well as to patient. Sometimes the elective extraction of premolar result in complications, which might be due to both anatomical and surgical factors. The study sample consisted of 100 patients referred for one or more orthodontic extractions to the department of oral and maxillofacial surgery were included in this retrospective study at the vivekanandha dental college for women tiruchengode between November 2014 and May 2016. All referrals were from the department of orthodontics. A survey was carried out to record the intraoperative risks and correlated with its morbidity as when occured. All intraoperative morbities were managed appropriately as required. Between November 2014 and May 2016, 100 patients had one or more premolar teeth removed by the oral surgeons. The sample size was 100 patients who had a total of 334 premolars removed. The sample's mean age was 11.4+\\- 8.4 years, and 57.0% were male. The average number of teeth extracted per patient was 2.34 +\\- 1.46, and 73.8% had complete root development. More than 93.4% of subjects had normal root and bone morphology, whereas 35.65% had variations in root forms and bone texture. The intra-operative and post operative complication rates were 7.4% and 1.9%, respectively. Complications were generally minor (91.9%) and were managed nonoperatively on an outpatient basis. There were no case of oral antral communication.

  20. Extraction of Maxillary Central Incisors: An Orthodontic-Restorative Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayati, Zohreh; Zare, Maryam; Bahramnia, Fateme

    2014-01-01

    Malformed central incisors with poor prognosis could be candidates for extraction especially in crowded dental arches. This case report refers to a 12-year-old boy who suffered from malformed upper central incisors associated with severe attrition. Upper lateral incisors were positioned palatally and canines were rotated and positioned in the high buccal area. The patient had class II malocclusion and space deficiency in both dental arches. Due to incisal wear and malformed short maxillary central incisors and the need for root canal therapy with a major crown build-up, these teeth were extracted. The maxillary lateral incisors were substituted. Thus the maxillary canines were substituted for lateral incisors and the first premolars were substituted for canines. In the lower dental arch the first bicuspids were extracted. Composite resin build-up was performed on the maxillary lateral incisors and canines. This allowed for the crowding and the malocclusion to be corrected. Subsequent gingivectomy improved the patient's gingival margins and smile esthetics one month after orthodontic therapy. PMID:25400954

  1. Deep bite malocclusion: exploration of the skeletal and dental factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhateja, N.K.; Fida, M.; Shaikh, A.

    2016-01-01

    Correction of deep bite is crucial for maintenance of dental hard and soft tissue structures and for prevention of temporomandibular joint disorders. Exploration of underlying skeletal and dental factors is essential for efficient and individualized treatment planning. To date etiological factors of dental and skeletal deep bite have not been explored in Pakistani orthodontic patients. The objectives of this study were to explore frequencies of dental and skeletal etiological factors in deep bite patients and to determine correlations amongst dental and skeletal etiological factors of deep bite. Methods: The study included a total of 113 subjects (males=35; females=78) with no craniofacial syndromes or prior orthodontic treatment. Pre-treatment orthodontic records were used to evaluate various dental and skeletal parameters. Descriptive statistics of each parameter were calculated. The various study parameters were correlated using Pearson's Correlation. Results: Deep curve of Spee was most frequently seen factor of dental deep bite (72.6%), followed by increased coronal length of upper incisors (28.3%), retroclined upper incisors (17.7%), retroclined lower incisors (8%) and increased coronal length of lower incisors (5.3%). Decreased gonial angle was most commonly found factor of skeletal deep bite (43.4%), followed by decreased mandibular plane angle (27.4%) and maxillary plane's clockwise rotation (26.5%). Frankfort mandibular plane angle and gonial angle showed a strong positive correlation (r=0.66, p=0.000). Conclusions: Reduced gonial angle is most frequently seen skeletal factor, signifying the importance of angulation and growth of ramus in development of deep bite. Deep curve of Spee is most frequently seen dental etiological component in deep bite subjects, hence signifying the importance of intruding the lower anterior teeth. (author)

  2. Association between gingivitis and anterior gingival enlargement in subjects undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanatta, Fabricio Batistin; Ardenghi, Thiago Machado; Antoniazzi, Raquel Pippi; Pinto, Tatiana Militz Perrone; Rösing, Cassiano Kuchenbecker

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the association among gingival enlargement (GE), periodontal conditions and socio-demographic characteristics in subjects undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment. Methods A sample of 330 patients undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment for at least 6 months were examined by a single calibrated examiner for plaque and gingival indexes, probing pocket depth, clinical attachment loss and gingival enlargement. Socio-economic background, orthodontic treatment duration and use of dental floss were assessed by oral interviews. Associations were assessed by means of unadjusted and adjusted Poisson's regression models. Results The presence of gingival bleeding (RR 1.01; 95% CI 1.00-1.01) and excess resin around brackets (RR 1.02; 95% CI 1.02-1.03) were associated with an increase in GE. No associations were found between socio-demographic characteristics and GE. Conclusion Proximal anterior gingival bleeding and excess resin around brackets are associated with higher levels of anterior gingival enlargement in subjects under orthodontic treatment. PMID:25162567

  3. Expectations of orthodontic treatment in adults: the conduct in orthodontist/patient relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Alves de Souza

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The high demand for orthodontic treatment, evidenced over the last few decades, has been justified mainly by the greater importance given to facial esthetics, influencing individual's self esteem. However, the professional frequently does not meet all the patient's expectations, for not establishing good communication and not knowing about the critical points during orthodontic treatment. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to elucidate patients' desires and doubts regarding orthodontic treatment, by means of a survey applied to 60 adult patients. RESULTS: The analysis of results revealed that most individuals (38.3 % noticed treatment success after its conclusion. Occlusion deviation was pointed out by 66.7 % as the main reason for seeking treatment, and esthetics ranked as second (with 48.3 %. Treatment time was considered within the prediction by 46.7% of the interviewees and the results were judged as very good by 43.3 %. The social relations of most participants were not affected by treatment (73.3 %. Also, 58.3 % of the interviewees reported pain as the main complaint and 53.3 % found it difficult to use dental floss. Most participants saw the orthodontist as a professional who was concerned about their health (76.7 %, and believed that he/she was more able to treat them (96.6 % when compared with the general practitioner. CONCLUSION: The orthodontist/ patient relationship enables an understanding of the expectations regarding orthodontic treatment, resulting in greater motivation and cooperation, leading to a successful outcome.

  4. Normative and subjective need for orthodontic treatment within different age groups in a population in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur Yilmaz, R B; Oktay, I; Ilhan, D; Fişekçioğlu, E; Özdemir, Fulya

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate and compare the normative and subjective need for orthodontic treatment within different age groups in Turkey. One thousand and sixteen patients from seven different demographic regions of Turkey (Marmara, Black Sea, East Anatolia, Southeastern Anatolia, Mediterranean, Aegean, and Central Anatolia Region) (mean age ± SD: 12.80 ± 3.57 years) were randomly selected and divided into six age groups (7-8,9-10,11-12,13-14,15-16, and 17-18 year-olds) and categorized according to the dental health component (DHC) of the index for orthodontic treatment need (IOTN). Additionally, the patients were asked to indicate the photograph that was most similar to their own dentition from the 10-point scale of the aesthetic component of IOTN. The DHC of IOTN was not significantly different between the six age groups (P > 0.05). However, no/slight need (aesthetic component 1-4) for orthodontic treatment according to AC of IOTN was significantly higher in 13-14,15-16, and 17-18 age groups than 7-8, 9-10, and 11-12 age groups (P age groups (P > 0.05). The normative need distribution was homogeneous within all the age groups according to DHC. However, the subjective need for orthodontic treatment was higher in the younger age groups.

  5. Load-Deflection and Friction Properties of PEEK Wires as Alternative Orthodontic Wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Yoshifumi; Hayakawa, Tohru; Nakamura, Yoshiki

    2017-08-09

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is now attracting attention as an alternative to metal alloys in the dental field. In the present study, we evaluated the load-deflection characteristics of PEEK wires in addition to their frictional properties. Three types of PEEK wires are used: two sizes of rectangular shape, 0.016 × 0.022 in² and 0.019 × 0.025 in² (19-25PEEK), and rounded shape, diameter 0.016 in (16PEEK). As a control, Ni-Ti orthodontic wire, diameter 0.016 in, was used. The three-point bending properties were evaluated in a modified three-point bending system for orthodontics. The static friction between the orthodontic wire and the bracket was also measured. The load-deflection curves were similar among Ni-Ti and PEEK wires, except for 16PEEK with slot-lid ligation. The bending force of 19-25PEEK wire was comparable with that of Ni-Ti wire. 19-25PEEK showed the highest load at the deflection of 1500 μm ( p 0.05). No significant difference was seen in static friction between all three PEEK wires and Ni-Ti wire ( p > 0.05). It is suggested that 19-25PEEK will be applicable for orthodontic treatment with the use of slot-lid ligation.

  6. Severe root resorption resulting from orthodontic treatment: prevalence and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maués, Caroline Pelagio Raick; do Nascimento, Rizomar Ramos; Vilella, Oswaldo de Vasconcellos

    2015-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of severe external root resorption and its potential risk factors resulting from orthodontic treatment. A randomly selected sample was used. It comprised conventional periapical radiographs taken in the same radiology center for maxillary and mandibular incisors before and after active orthodontic treatment of 129 patients, males and females, treated by means of the Standard Edgewise technique. Two examiners measured and defined root resorption according to the index proposed by Levander et al. The degree of external apical root resorption was registered defining resorption in four degrees of severity. To assess intra and inter-rater reproducibility, kappa coefficient was used. Chi-square test was used to assess the relationship between the amount of root resorption and patient's sex, dental arch (maxillary or mandibular), treatment with or without extractions, treatment duration, root apex stage (open or closed), root shape, as well as overjet and overbite at treatment onset. Maxillary central incisors had the highest percentage of severe root resorption, followed by maxillary lateral incisors and mandibular lateral incisors. Out of 959 teeth, 28 (2.9%) presented severe root resorption. The following risk factors were observed: anterior maxillary teeth, overjet greater than or equal to 5 mm at treatment onset, treatment with extractions, prolonged therapy, and degree of apex formation at treatment onset. This study showed that care must be taken in orthodontic treatment involving extractions, great retraction of maxillary incisors, prolonged therapy, and/or completely formed apex at orthodontic treatment onset.

  7. Effect of LED-mediated-photobiomodulation therapy on orthodontic tooth movement and root resorption in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekizer, Abdullah; Uysal, Tancan; Güray, Enis; Akkuş, Derya

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this experimental study was to evaluate the effects of light-emitting diode-mediated-photobiomodulation therapy (LPT), on the rate of orthodontic tooth movement (TM) and orthodontically induced root resorption, in rats. Twenty male 12-week-old Wistar rats were separated into two groups (control and LPT) and 50 cN of force was applied between maxillary left molar and incisor with a coil spring. In the treatment group, LPT was applied with an energy density of 20 mW/cm(2) over a period of 10 consecutive days directly over the movement of the first molar teeth area. The distance between the teeth was measured with a digital caliper on days 0 (T0), 10 (T1), and 21 (T2) on dental cast models. The surface area of root resorption lacunae was measured histomorphometrically using digital photomicrographs. Mann-Whitney U and Wilcoxon tests were used for statistical evaluation at p root resorption, expressed as a percentage, showed that the average relative root resorption affecting the maxillary molars on the TM side was 0.098 ± 0.066 in the LPT group and 0.494 ± 0.224 in the control group. Statistically significant inhibition of root resorption with LPT was determined (p orthodontic tooth movement and inhibitory effects on orthodontically induced resorptive activity.

  8. Severe root resorption resulting from orthodontic treatment: Prevalence and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Pelagio Raick Maués

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of severe external root resorption and its potential risk factors resulting from orthodontic treatment. METHODS: A randomly selected sample was used. It comprised conventional periapical radiographs taken in the same radiology center for maxillary and mandibular incisors before and after active orthodontic treatment of 129 patients, males and females, treated by means of the Standard Edgewise technique. Two examiners measured and defined root resorption according to the index proposed by Levander et al. The degree of external apical root resorption was registered defining resorption in four degrees of severity. To assess intra and inter-rater reproducibility, kappa coefficient was used. Chi-square test was used to assess the relationship between the amount of root resorption and patient's sex, dental arch (maxillary or mandibular, treatment with or without extractions, treatment duration, root apex stage (open or closed, root shape, as well as overjet and overbite at treatment onset. RESULTS: Maxillary central incisors had the highest percentage of severe root resorption, followed by maxillary lateral incisors and mandibular lateral incisors. Out of 959 teeth, 28 (2.9% presented severe root resorption. The following risk factors were observed: anterior maxillary teeth, overjet greater than or equal to 5 mm at treatment onset, treatment with extractions, prolonged therapy, and degree of apex formation at treatment onset. CONCLUSION: This study showed that care must be taken in orthodontic treatment involving extractions, great retraction of maxillary incisors, prolonged therapy, and/or completely formed apex at orthodontic treatment onset.

  9. External apical root resorption concurrent with orthodontic forces: the genetic influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto-Nieto, Nuria; Solano, Jose Enrique; Yañez-Vico, Rosa

    2017-05-01

    Root resorption is a pathological process of multifactorial origin related to the permanent loss of dental root structure in response to a mechanical, inflammatory, autoimmune or infectious stimulus. External apical root resorption (EARR) is a frequent clinical complication secondary to orthodontic tooth movement; apart from variables related to treatment, environmental factors and/or interindividual genetic variations can confer susceptibility or resistance to its occurrence. In this context, genetic predisposition has been described as an etiological factor, together with mechanical factors derived from orthodontic treatment. In recent years, international research groups have determined the degree of influence of some genetic biomarkers in defining increased/reduced susceptibility to postorthodontic EARR. The influences of the IL1 gene cluster (IL1B, IL1A, IL1RN, IL6), P2RX7, CASP1, OPG (TNFRSF11B), RANK (TNFRSF11A), Osteopontin (OPN), TNFα, the vitamin D receptor (TaqI), TNSALP and IRAK1 have been analyzed. The objective of the present review study was to compile and analyze the latest information about the genetic background predisposing to EARR during orthodontic treatment. Genetics-based studies along with other basic science research in the field might help to clarify the exact nature of EARR, the influence of genetic inheritance and possibly lead to the prevention or even eradication of this phenomenon during orthodontic treatment.

  10. [Autotransplantation of a maxillary incisor and orthodontic care: a case study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charpentier, Valentine; Makaremi, Masrour; Brondeau, François de

    2017-12-01

    Severely impacted teeth with atypical root anatomy do not respond well to orthodontic traction after surgical exposure. Consequently, they are often removed, but replacing them with dental prostheses can prove difficult in patients who are still growing. Thus, autotransplantation seems to be the only way to preserve a natural tooth and the alveolar bone. An upper central incisor impacted in the region of the nasal cavities with an open apex was diagnosed in an 8.5-year-old female patient. The tooth displayed a curved root pressed against the maxillary cortical bone preventing orthodontic traction treatment. Through this clinical case involving autotransplantation of a maxillary incisor report and a review of the literature, this article explores the indications and exposes the different stages of this orthodontic-surgical protocol. In this case, autotransplantation enabled restoration of maxillary arch continuity. After two years of orthodontic treatment, the bone reconstruction of the extraction site was very satisfactory. The benefits of this technique and the precautions to be taken are discussed as well as the various protocols. The increasing success rate of this surgical procedure makes it possible to consider it as a protocol for the future. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2017.

  11. Implant site development by orthodontic forced eruption of nontreatable teeth: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokn, Amir Reza; Saffarpour, Anna; Sadrimanesh, Rouzbeh; Iranparvar, Kaveh; Saffarpour, Aida; Mahmoudzadeh, Majid; Soolari, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Loss of bone and soft tissue attachment are common sequelae of periodontitis that may jeopardize the aesthetic outcome and compromise the functional and aesthetic outcomes of treatment. The following case report describes one of the most predictable techniques of vertical ridge augmentation, which is orthodontic extrusion or forced eruption of hopeless teeth. A 34-year-old woman who presented with severe attachment loss and deep pockets was diagnosed with generalized aggressive periodontitis. The mobile maxillary incisors were consequently extracted and were replaced with dental implants. However, prior to extraction, orthodontic extrusion of the hopeless incisors was performed to correct vertical ridge defects. Following extrusion and extraction of the maxillary incisors, to prevent soft tissue collapse and to preserve the papillae during socket healing, the crowns of the extracted teeth were used as pontics on a removable partial provisional denture. After 8 weeks, the implants were placed, and an immediate functional restoration was delivered. After 4 months of healing, a fixed definitive partial prosthesis was fabricated and delivered. After periodontal treatment, over a 2-year period, the progression of aggressive periodontitis was controlled. The mean vertical movement of marginal bone was 3.6 mm. The use of the crowns of extracted teeth appears to be an effective method to maintain papillae. Orthodontic extrusion is a predictable method for the correction of vertical ridge defects. Orthodontic treatment does not aggravate or hasten the progression of aggressive periodontitis.

  12. Class III orthognathic surgical cases facilitated by accelerated osteogenic orthodontics: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, JiaQi; Xu, Li; Liang, Cheng; Jiang, JiuHui

    2015-11-01

    To describe a multidisciplinary treatment approach that includes corticotomy, orthodontic force and orthognathic surgery for the management of skeletal Class III surgical cases. The main advantage of the combined techniques is a reduction in treatment time for young adult patients. Accelerated Osteogenic Orthodontics (AOO) was delivered to three young adult patients during their pre-surgical orthodontic treatment. After aligning and levelling the dental arches, a piezosurgical corticotomy was performed to the buccal aspect of the alveolar bone. Bone graft materials were used to cover the decorticated area and soft tissue flaps were replaced. The mean time for extraction space closure was 5.4 ± 1.3 months and the mean time for pre-surgical orthodontic treatment was 12.0 ± 0.9 months. The average total treatment time was 20.4 ± 2.4 months. A pre-existing bony fenestration in the buccal cortex adjacent to the right lateral incisor root apex of Case 1 was corrected. The facial aesthetics of three patients improved following multidisciplinary treatment. This approach may be an efficient method for the orthognathic patient who desires a reduced treatment time, but further clinical research is required.

  13. In vitro evaluation of microleakage under orthodontic brackets bonded with different adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atash, Ramin; Fneiche, Ali; Cetik, Sibel; Bahrami, Babak; Balon-Perin, Alain; Orellana, Maria; Glineur, Régine

    2017-01-01

    Adhesives systems have a drawback when utilized for bonding orthodontic brackets: they shrink during photopolymerization creating microleakage. The aim of this study was to assess the stability of different orthodontic adhesives around brackets and enamel. Sixty noncarious mandibular premolars extracted for orthodontic reasons were randomly divided into six groups of adhesives used for bonding brackets to dental enamel: NeoBond ® Light Cure Adhesive Kit, Transbond™ Plus Self-Etching, Victory V-Slot APC PLUS ® + Transbond™ MIP, Rely-A-Bond ® Kit, Light Cure Orthodontic Adhesive Kit (OptiBond ® ), and Transbond™ MIP. Following bonding, all teeth underwent 2500 cycles of thermal cycling in baths ranging from 5°C to 55°C before being immersed in 2% methylene blue for 24 h. All samples were examined under a binocular microscope to assess the degree of microleakage at the "bracket-adhesive" and "adhesive-enamel" interfaces in the gingival and occlusal regions of the bracket. A significant difference was found at the "occlusal bracket-adhesive" interface. The highest microleakage values were found in the occlusal region, although no significant. Microleakage was observed in all groups. Group 2 had the highest microleakage values whereas Group 6 had the lowest values.

  14. Orthodontic treatment in periodontal patients: a case report with 7 years follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derton, Nicola; Derton, Roberto; Perini, Alessandro; Gracco, Antonio; Fornaciari, Paolo Andrea

    2011-03-01

    Tooth flaring of the anterior segment is often unesthetic and therefore a primary reason for combined orthodontic and periodontal treatment in adult patients with periodontal disease. Thus, a multidisciplinary approach is frequently chosen for these patients by a qualified dental team. A clinical case of an adult patient suffering from chronic periodontitis with horizontal bone loss in the anterior segment and consequent flaring of the anterior teeth is described. A combined approach was chosen, initially to improve and stabilize the periodontal situation via multiple scaling and root planning sessions with additional pharmacological therapy and, finally by orthodontic treatment, to resolve the malocclusion. At the end of treatment, bone resorbtion was stabilized, the vertical bone defect was improved and incisor flaring was absent. Follow-up at 7 years post-treatment confirmed the stability of the orthodontic and esthetic results. The correct combination of orthodontic and periodontal treatment may contribute efficaciously to eliminate the effects of chronic periodontitis in adult patients, as well as improving esthetic parameters. Copyright © 2011 CEO. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. About Dental Amalgam Fillings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam About Dental Amalgam Fillings Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... should I have my fillings removed? What is dental amalgam? Dental amalgam is a dental filling material ...

  16. Dental cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001055.htm Dental cavities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Dental cavities are holes (or structural damage) in the ...

  17. Dental sealants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000779.htm Dental sealants To use the sharing features on this ... case a sealant needs to be replaced. How Dental Sealants are Applied Your dentist applies sealants on ...

  18. Surgical Orthodontic Treatment of an Impacted Canine in the Presence of Dens Invaginatus and Follicular Cyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canevello, Carola; Laffi, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. “Dens invaginatus” is a dental anomaly which originates from the invagination of the ameloblastic epithelium into the lingual surface of the dental crown during the odontogenesis. It can cause early pulpal necrosis, abscesses, retention or dislocation of contiguous elements, cysts, and internal resorptions. It normally affects the upper lateral incisors. In the following study the authors will discuss the etiology, the physiopathology, and the surgical-orthodontic management of a rare case of impacted canine associated with dens invaginatus and follicular cyst, with the aim of highlighting the importance of taking any therapeutic decision based on the data available in the literature. Case Report. The present study describes a combined surgical-orthodontic treatment of an impacted canine associated with a lateral incisor (2.2) suffering from type III dens invaginatus with radicular cyst, in a 15-year-old patient. Discussion. When treating a dens invaginatus there are different therapeutic solutions: they depend on the gravity of the anomaly and on the association with the retention of a permanent tooth. The aesthetic and functional restoration becomes extremely important when performing a surgical-orthodontic repositioning. PMID:24963421

  19. Orthodontic treatment for a mandibular prognathic girl of short stature under growth hormone therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Yun Pan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This report presents a case of a 12-year-old girl with maxillary deficiency, mandibular prognathism, and facial asymmetry, undergoing growth hormone (GH therapy due to idiopathic short stature. Children of short stature with or without GH deficiency have a deviating craniofacial morphology with overall smaller dimensions; facial retrognathism, especially mandibular retrognathism; and increased facial convexity. However, a complete opposite craniofacial pattern was presented in our case of a skeletal Class III girl with idiopathic short stature. The orthodontic treatment goal was to inhibit or change the direction of mandibular growth and stimulate the maxillary growth of the girl during a course of GH therapy. Maxillary protraction and mandibular retraction were achieved using occipitomental anchorage (OMA orthopedic appliance in the first stage of treatment. In the second stage, the patient was treated with a fixed orthodontic appliance using a modified multiple-loop edgewise archwire technique of asymmetric mechanics and an active retainer of vertical chin-cup. The treatment led to an acceptable facial profile and obvious facial asymmetry improvement. Class I dental occlusion and coincident dental midline were also achieved. A 3½-year follow-up of the girl at age 18 showed a stable result of the orthodontic and dentofacial orthopedic treatment. Our case shows that the OMA orthopedic appliance of maxillary protraction combined with mandibular retraction is effective for correcting skeletal Class III malocclusion with midface deficiency and mandibular prognathism in growing children with idiopathic short stature undergoing GH therapy.

  20. Surgical-orthodontic treatment of Class III malocclusion with agenesis of lateral incisor and unerupted canine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Boaventura Vieira

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Orthodontic-surgical treatment was performed in patient with skeletal Class III malocclusion due to exceeding mandibular growth. Patient also presented upper and lower dental protrusion, overjet of -3.0 mm, overbite of -1.0 mm, congenital absence of tooth #22, teeth #13 and supernumerary impaction, tooth #12 with conoid shape and partly erupted in supraversion, prolonged retention of tooth #53, tendency to vertical growth of the face and facial asymmetry. The discrepancy on the upper arch was -2.0 mm and -5.0 mm on the lower arch. METHODS: The pre-surgical orthodontic treatment was performed with extractions of the teeth #35 and #45. On the upper arch, teeth #53, #12 and supernumerary were extracted to accomplish the traction of the impacted canine. The spaces of the lower extractions were closed with mesialization of posterior segment. After aligning and leveling the teeth, extractions spaces closure and correct positioning of teeth on the bone bases, the correct intercuspation of the dental arch, with molars and canines in Angle's Class I, coincident midline, normal overjet and overbite and ideal torques, were evaluated through study models. The patient was submitted to orthognathic surgery and then the post-surgical orthodontic treatment was finished. RESULTS: The Class III malocclusion was treated establishing occlusal and facial normal standards.

  1. Conventional Vs Digital Impressions: Acceptability, Treatment Comfort and Stress Among Young Orthodontic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangano, Alessandro; Beretta, Matteo; Luongo, Giuseppe; Mangano, Carlo; Mangano, Francesco

    2018-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the present study was to compare patients’ acceptability, comfort and stress with conventional and digital impressions. Materials and Methods: Thirty young orthodontic patients (15 males and 15 females) who had no previous experience of impressions were enrolled in this study. Conventional impressions for orthodontic study models of the dental arches were taken using an alginate impression material (Hydrogum®, Zhermack Spa, Badia Polesine, Rovigo, Italy). Fifteen days later, digital impressions of both arches were acquired using an intraoral scanner (CS3600®, Carestream Dental, Rochester, NY, USA). Immediately after impression taking, patients’ acceptability, comfort and stress were measured using two questionnaires and the State anxiety scale. Results: Data showed no difference in terms of anxiety and stress; however, patients preferred the use of digital impressions systems instead of conventional impression techniques. Alginate impressions resulted as fast as digital impressions. Conclusions: Digital impressions resulted the most accepted and comfortable impression technique in young orthodontic patients, when compared to conventional techniques. PMID:29492177

  2. Introducing Scenario Based Learning interactive to postgraduates in UQ Orthodontic Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naser-ud-Din, S

    2015-08-01

    E-learning has gained momentum in health sciences and seems to have great potential in specialist dental education. Higher acceptability by learners is particularly associated with the surge of smart devices. Currently, there are limited number of e-learning modules available for dental education, particularly in Orthodontics. Scenario Based Learning interactive (SBLi(®)) software was used for the first time in Orthodontics Postgraduate training at the University of Queensland. Nine interactive modules were created embedded with clinical procedure videos, web-links, evidence-based literature, along with opportunity for self-assessment and evaluation. Qualitative data were collected before and after the administration of the SBLi(®) for Orthodontics. The purpose of this data was to investigate learning styles and the acceptance of e-modules as part of postgraduate training. Advantages of the package included high acceptance rate, greater confidence in the application of clinical skills covered in the modules and reduced contact time particularly with limited academic staff. E-modules demonstrated high compatibility with the learning styles of the participants and were considered engaging. It seems apparent that e-learning is most effective in a blended learning environment, supplemented with the traditional classroom approach, rather than as a sole mechanism for postgraduate training. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Orthodontic Camouflage: A Treatment Option – A Clinical Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzini, William Ubilla; Torres, Fátima Mazzini

    2017-01-01

    Orthodontic camouflage provides an alternative treatment for angle III malocclusion since patients with limited economic resources cannot opt for orthognathic surgery, it being clear that correction will be achieved at the dental level and not at the bone complex. Objective: To determine an alternative treatment for patients who do not have the possibility of having orthognathic surgery. Clinical case: A 13-year-old female patient, dolico facial biotype with slightly concave profile, with Class III Skeletal by mandibular prognathism, anterior crossbite, anterior diastema, and large mandibular body, molar class, and canine III. Alexander technique brackets were placed; premolar extraction was not planned. Once the case was completed, the correction of the anterior crossbite was achieved, thanks to the use of the spaces that existed at the beginning of the treatment and also that a correct distalization of canines and retraction of the lower anterior segment were performed. PMID:29326524

  4. Orthodontic management of an impacted maxillary incisor due to odontoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul S Baldawa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontomas are a heterogeneous group of jaw bone lesions, classified as odontogenic tumors which usually include well-diversified dental tissues. Odontomas are the most common type of odontogenic tumors and generally they are asymptomatic. Two types of odontomas are described: compound and complex based on either the appearance of well-organized tooth-like structures (compound odontomas or on a mass of disorganized odontogenic tissues (complex odontomas. Compound odontomas have a predilection for the anterior maxilla, whereas complex odontomas have a predilection for the posterior mandible. Odontomas frequently interfere with eruption of teeth leading to their impaction. This is a case report of a 14-year-old girl with an unerupted maxillary right central incisor due to a complex composite odontoma a rare occurrence in anterior maxilla. Surgical excision of the odontoma and orthodontic treatment to get the impacted maxillary right central incisor into alignment is discussed.

  5. Orthodontic Camouflage: A Treatment Option - A Clinical Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzini, William Ubilla; Torres, Fátima Mazzini

    2017-01-01

    Orthodontic camouflage provides an alternative treatment for angle III malocclusion since patients with limited economic resources cannot opt for orthognathic surgery, it being clear that correction will be achieved at the dental level and not at the bone complex. To determine an alternative treatment for patients who do not have the possibility of having orthognathic surgery. A 13-year-old female patient, dolico facial biotype with slightly concave profile, with Class III Skeletal by mandibular prognathism, anterior crossbite, anterior diastema, and large mandibular body, molar class, and canine III. Alexander technique brackets were placed; premolar extraction was not planned. Once the case was completed, the correction of the anterior crossbite was achieved, thanks to the use of the spaces that existed at the beginning of the treatment and also that a correct distalization of canines and retraction of the lower anterior segment were performed.

  6. Adhesives for fixed orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandall, Nicky A; Hickman, Joy; Macfarlane, Tatiana V; Mattick, Rye Cr; Millett, Declan T; Worthington, Helen V

    2018-04-09

    Bonding of orthodontic brackets to teeth is important to enable effective and efficient treatment with fixed appliances. The problem is bracket failure during treatment which increases operator chairside time and lengthens treatment time. A prolonged treatment is likely to increase the oral health risks of orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances one of which is irreversible enamel decalcification. This is an update of the Cochrane Review first published in 2003. A new full search was conducted on 26 September 2017 but no new studies were identified. We have only updated the search methods section in this new version. The conclusions of this Cochrane Review remain the same. To evaluate the effects of different orthodontic adhesives for bonding. Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 26 September 2017), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2017, Issue 8) in the Cochrane Library (searched 26 September 2017), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 26 September 2017), and Embase Ovid (1980 to 26 September 2017). The US National Institutes of Health Ongoing Trials Register (ClinicalTrials.gov) and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform were searched for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. Trials were selected if they met the following criteria: randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) comparing two different adhesive groups. Participants were patients with fixed orthodontic appliances. The interventions were adhesives that bonded stainless steel brackets to all teeth except the molars. The primary outcome was debond or bracket failure. Data were recorded on decalcification as a secondary outcome, if present. Information regarding methods, participants, interventions, outcome measures and results were extracted in

  7. Dental Anomalies in a Brazilian Cleft Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, Jamile; Mariano, Lorena C; Canguçu, Daiane; Coutinho, Thaynara S L; Hoshi, Ryuichi; Medrado, Alena Peixoto; Martelli-Junior, Hercílio; Coletta, Ricardo D; Reis, Silvia R A

    2016-11-01

      The aim of this study was to radiographically investigate the prevalence of dental anomalies outside the cleft area in a group of Brazilian patients with nonsyndromic cleft lip and/or palate (NSCL/P).   A retrospective analysis of 207 panoramic radiographs of patients with NSCL/P aged 12 to 45 years without history of tooth extraction and orthodontic treatment was performed.   Dental anomalies were found in 75.4% of the patients, and tooth agenesis (29.2%) and supernumerary tooth (2.6%) were the most common anomalies. The risk of agenesis was higher among the individuals with cleft palate (CP) compared with individuals with cleft lip (CL) and cleft lip and palate (CLP) (agenesis: CP versus CL: odds ratio 6.27, 95% confidence interval 2.21-17.8, P = .0003; CP versus CLP: odds ratio 2.94; 95% confidence interval 1.27-6.81, P = .01). The frequency of dental agenesis was higher in patients with unilateral complete CLP (agenesis: P dental agenesis (P dental anomalies in patients with NSCL/P was higher than that reported in overall population. This study found preferential associations between dental anomalies and specific extensions of NSCL/P, suggesting that dental agenesis and ectopic tooth may be part of oral cleft subphenotypes.

  8. [Radiodiagnostic methods for dental anomalities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternovoĭ, S K; Serova, N S; Ivanova, D V

    2012-01-01

    To determine the capacities of radiologic studies in the examination of patients with dental anomalies. One hundred and twenty patients with dental anomalies were examined. Conventional X-ray and high-technology radiology techniques (multislice spiral computed tomography (MSSCT) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)) were used. Orthopantomography is the most common method for radiologic examination of patients with dental anomalies. However, X-ray procedures do not provide complete information on the position and status of an abnormal tooth, which is required to define further patient management tactics. While planning the management, MSSCT and CBCT were performed in 56 (46.7%) and 64 (53.3%) patients, respectively. In addition, 72 (60.0%) patients in whom orthodontic treatment had been recommended at the first stage underwent MSSCT or CBCT following 7 months. CBCT showed that 4 (3.3%) patients had dental ankylosis previously undiagnosed by MSSCT. The high-technology radiology techniques could assess the position of a tooth in relation to its important anatomic structures and identify the comorbidity that keeps from being treated. MSSCT and CBCT can make in full measure the topical diagnosis of abnormal teeth and hence choose an optimal algorithm for comprehensive treatment of patients.

  9. Age effect on orthodontic tooth movement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ren, Yijin

    2003-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effect of age on the efficiency of orthodontic tooth movement based on critical literature reviews, studies on a standardized orthodontic animal model and a non-invasive clinical investigation. A systematic review was performed on the optimum force for

  10. Pomegranate juice (Punica granatum as an ideal mouthrinse for fixed orthodontic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haryono Utomo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prevention of caries as well as periodontal disease is mandatory during orthodontic treatment. Nevertheless, the use of antiseptic mouthrinse is contraindicated for prolonged use. Pomegranate juice is a polyphenol-rich juice with high antioxidant capacity as well as antimicrobial properties. It has been shown to exert beneficial characteristics for orthodontic patients such as antioxidant and anti inflammatory effects. Moreover, it contained fluoride and phosphorous which are cariostatic. Previous study in fixed orthodontic patients revealed that rinsing with this juice showed reduced dental plaque and superior compared with chlorhexidine. If it has unwanted effect by reducing pro-inflammatory reaction that also needed in orthodontic movement is not clearly understood. Purpose: The aim of the present review was to discuss the beneficial and unwanted effect of pomegranate juice mouthrinse towards orthodontic treatment. Reviews: Pomegranate has antimicrobial activity, its methanolic skin extract is the most potent followed by seed juice. Nevertheless, seed juice is not only tastier, easier to make but also has mild antimicrobial potency which is beneficial for long-term use. Healthy periodontal tissue is preferable for orthodontic movement since it resulted in less unwanted bone resorption. Conclusion: Regarding its beneficial effect and safety of pomegranate juice if use daily mouthrinse in fixed orthodontic patients, it could be proposed as an ideal long term use mouthrinse for fixed orthodontic patients. However, further researches should be done to verify this concept.Latar belakang: Pencegahan karies dan penyakit periodontal sangat penting dalam perawatan ortodontik. Walaupun demikian, penggunaan obat kumur antiseptik jangka panjang merupakan kontraindikasi. Jus buah delima sangat kaya akan polifenol dengan kemampuan antioksidan yang tinggi disertai kemampuan antimikroba. Beberapa penelitian telah menunjukkan dampak menguntungkan

  11. Dental negligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, C S

    2000-02-01

    Medical and dental errors and negligence are again in the spotlight in recent news report. Dead because of doctor's bad handwriting Prescribing drug overdoses Germ-infested soap pumps--infections in hospitals This articles explains dental negligence including dental duty of care and the standard of care expected of dentists in relation to the Bolam principle.

  12. Orthodontic treatment with skeletal anchorage system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arya Brahmanta

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Correction of class I malocclusion with bimaxillary dental protrusion and unilateral free end right upper ridge in adult patient is one of difficult biomechanical case in orthodontics. Due to this case that needs proper anchorage for upper incisor retraction with missing teeth in the right posterior segment. Purpose: The aim of this study to find an effective therapy for correction of bimaxillary protrusion with unilateral free and ridge. Case: A female patient, 36 year old complaining for the difficulty of lip closure due to severe bimaxillary protrusion with incompetence lip. Case management: Firstly correction of the maxillary and mandibular incisor proclination were done by extraction of the mandibular first premolar, the maxillary second premolar on left side and finally placement of miniplates implant in the zygomatic process on right side as an absolut anchorage. Conclusion: Skeletal anchorage system (SAS can be considered as an effective therapy for corection of bimaxillary protrusion with unilateral free end ridge.Latar belakang: Koreksi dari maloklusi klas I dari penderita dewasa yang disertai protrusi bimaksiler dengan kehilangan gigi posterior pada regio kanan atas merupakan salah satu kasus sulit untuk dikerjakan terutama berhubungan dengan biomekanik pergerakan giginya dalam perawatan ortodonti. Tujuan: Tujuan dari penulisan artikel ini adalah untuk menemukan terapi yang efektif untuk perbaikan protrusi bimaksiler dan kehilangan gigi posterior pada satu sisi. Kasus: Seorang penderita wanita usia 35 tahun datang dengan keluhan utama kesulitan untuk menutup mulut oleh karena gigi rahang atas dan rahang bawahnya maju dan bibirnya tidak kompeten. Tatalaksana kasus: Koreksi pada gigi insisivus rahang atas dan insisivus rahang bawah yang protrusi dilakukan dengan melakukan pencabutan terlebih dahulu pada gigi premolar pertama dirahang bawah sisi kanan dan sisi kiri serta pencabutan pada gigi premolar kedua di rahang atas sisi

  13. A Surgery-first approach in surgical-orthodontic treatment of mandibular prognathism--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chung-Chih; Chen, Po-Hsun; Liou, Eric J W; Huang, Chiung-Shing; Chen, Yu-Ray

    2010-01-01

    The conventional approach in orthodontic surgery treatment of dentofacial anomalies requires a varied period of pre-surgical orthodontic treatment. This presurgical period is considered to be important for adequate surgical treatment and stable results. This period is usually long bothersome for patients because dental decompensation is required and there is consequent deterioration of aesthetics and function, especially in cases of skeletal Class III occlusion. At Chang Gung Craniofacial Center, a surgery-first approach (SFA), i.e. minimal pre-surgical orthodontics, is one of the treatment choices for Class III patients. In this report, we present a 19-year-old man with mandibular prognathism, an anterior open bite and severe dental crowding treated with SFA. The patient received orthognathic surgery a week after bracing of the teeth. The operation and recovery were uneventful as well as the following orthodontic treatment. The total treatment time was only four months, much shorter than with the conventional approach. The patient benefitted from immediate improvement of the facial profile after surgery, and a much shorter total treatment, and the results were not compromised. We believe in selected cases, SFA is a good and effective treatment alternative.

  14. Oxidative Stress Evaluation in Patients Treated with Orthodontic Self-ligating Multibracket Appliances: An in Vivo Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portelli, Marco; Militi, Angela; Cervino, Gabriele; Lauritano, Floriana; Sambataro, Sergio; Mainardi, Alberto; Nucera, Riccardo

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a pathologic event induced by a prevalence of oxidant agents on the antioxidant ones, with a consequent alteration of oxide-reducing balance. Freeradicals produce damages both in cellular and extra-cellular components; phospholipid membranes, proteins, mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, are the target of the oxidative stress, that can finally cause cellular death due to apoptosis. Orthodontic appliances such as brackets, wires, resins and soldering have some components that can be considered as potential allergen, carcinogenic, cytotoxic and gene mutation factors. The primary aim of this research is to evaluate oxidative stress in the saliva of patients treated with multibracket self-ligating vestibular orthodontic appliances; the secondary purpose is to investigate the influence of orthodontic multibracket therapy on oral hygiene and the consequent effect on oxidative stress. Salivary specimens has been collected in a sample of 23 patients were enrolled (12 Female, 11 Male) between 12 and 16 years of age (mean age 14.2). For each patient has been collected a salivary specimen at the following time points; before orthodontic bonding (T1), five weeks (T2) and ten weeks (T3) after orthodontic appliance bonding. Samples has been analysed with a photometer due to SAT Test (Salivary Antioxidant Test). Data obtained show a mean of 2971 mEq/l of anti-oxidant agents before orthodontic treatment, and after five weeks from the bonding the mean was decreased to 2909 mEq/l, instead at ten weeks was increased to 3332 mEq/l. Repeated measures ANOVA did not reveal statistically significant differences between the time points ( P = 0.1697). The study did not reveal any correlation between the level of dental hygiene and that of oxidative stress (Pearson Correlation Coefficient R = 0). Orthodontic treatment with multibrackets vestibular metallic appliance seems to be not able to affect oxidative stress during the first ten weeks of therapy.

  15. Influência do complexo flúor-xilitol no controle da placa dentária e do sangramento gengival em pacientes herbiátricos com aparelho ortodôntico fixo Influence of fluorine-xylitol complex in the dental plaque and gingival bleeding control in herbiatric patients with fixed orthodontic brace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabíola Elias

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar os efeitos de um dentifrício contendo flúor/xilitol na redução da adesão da placa à estrutura dentária, bem como no índice de sangramento gengival, em portadores de aparelho ortodôntico fixo. METODOLOGIA: foram avaliados 22 jovens, com idade entre 14 e 17 anos. Após a quantificação inicial dos índices, os jovens receberam instruções de escovação e começaram a utilizar somente os dentifrícios da pesquisa. Houve uma divisão aleatória da amostra em dois grupos (A e B. Na primeira semana todos utilizaram um dentifrício padrão e a partir da segunda semana os jovens do grupo A receberam um dentifrício contendo flúor, enquanto os do grupo B receberam um dentifrício contendo o complexo flúor-xilitol, que utilizaram durante vinte e oito dias, quando foram novamente avaliados (T1. Para a segunda fase (T2 houve inversão dos dentifrícios. RESULTADOS: foram comparados os resultados intra-grupo e nos dois grupos houve redução estatisticamente significante entre as fases inicial e T1, inicial e T2 e entre T1 e T2. Já na comparação entre os grupos não houve diferença estatisticamente significante entre eles, embora o dentifrício contendo flúor/xilitol tenha proporcionado uma porcentagem de redução do índice de sangramento gengival maior que o dentifrício contendo apenas o fluoreto de sódio, principalmente entre as fases inicial e T2, onde a redução no grupo A foi de 90,13% e no grupo B foi de 78,84%. CONCLUSÃO: a utilização de dentifrícios contendo flúor e xilitol, associada à instrução e motivação, parece ser um recurso bastante promissor para a manutenção da saúde bucal nos pacientes ortodônticos.AIM: to evaluate the effects of a dentifrice containing fluorine/xylitol in the reduction of the adhesion of the plaque to the dental structure, as well as in the gingival bleeding index in patients who had orthodontic braces. METHODS: 22 teenagers, in between 14 and 17 years old were

  16. Impact of pediatric obstructive sleep apnea on the development of Class II hyperdivergent patients receiving orthodontic treatment: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tingting; Ngan, Peter; Hua, Fang; Zheng, Jie; Zhou, Shunquan; Zhang, Man; Xiong, Hui; He, Hong

    2018-05-22

    To conduct a pilot study to determine if the presence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) influences the orthodontic treatment outcome of Class II hyperdivergent patients receiving comprehensive orthodontic treatment. Patients between the ages of 12 and 14 who received orthodontic treatment at the Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, China, were included in this study. Patients were divided into two groups: the OSA group and the control group, based on the outcome of pretreatment polysomnography findings and lateral cephalometric radiograph examination. Patients in the control group were matched with the OSA group for age, sex, ethnicity, weight, and height. Cephalometric measurements were used to record the skeletal and dental changes from before to after treatment. Data were analyzed using the t-test. Twenty three OSA patients and 23 control patients were included. After comprehensive orthodontic treatment, the mandibular plane angle (SN-GoMe), articular angle (SArGo), sum of Jarabak angles (SUM) and the lower gonial angle (NGoMe) were found to increase significantly in the OSA group but remained unchanged or decreased slightly in the control group ( P orthodontic treatment outcome of these patients.

  17. Cone beam CT in orthodontics: the current picture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makdissi, Jimmy

    2013-03-01

    The introduction of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) technology to dentistry and orthodontics revolutionized the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of orthodontic patients. This review article discusses the use of CBCT in diagnosis and treatment planning in orthodontics. The steps required to install and operate a CBCT facility within the orthodontic practice as well as the challenges are highlighted. The available guidelines in relation to the clinical applications of CBCT in orthodontics are explored. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  18. An evaluation of self-esteem and quality of life in orthodontic patients: effects of crowding and protrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Min-Ho

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of dental crowding and lip protrusion on self-esteem and quality of life (QOL) in female orthodontic patients with Class I malocclusion. The study sample consisted of 201 patients (mean age 22.6 ± 3.0 years) who sought orthodontic treatment. All the patients were evaluated before treatment in terms of their degree of dental crowding and lip protrusion. Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale and the Orthognathic Quality of Life Questionnaire (OQLQ) were used to determine self-esteem and QOL and to evaluate whether these values were related to malocclusion severity. The results indicated that severe crowding and severe protrusion can result in lower self-esteem and poorer QOL (P self-esteem and QOL scores than severe crowding or protrusion patients.

  19. [New protocol combining orthodontics and implant therapy for partially edentulous adult patients. Part I: Description of the Decker protocol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davarpanah, K; Decker, A; Sache, M P; Deffrennes, D; Demurashvili, G; Szmukler-Moncler, S

    2014-12-01

    The treatment of adult malocclusion is usually complex and pluridisciplinary. Its prognosis is not reliable. We present a new clinical protocol to improve the management and final result. We use a specific software (Simplant®, OMS®, Materialise Dental) and its accessory modules. It allows visualization of the expected final clinical result of the orthodontic treatment. Combined with guided-surgery, it allows placing implants at the beginning of treatment in a position that is compatible with the final position. The implants serve as absolute anchorage for dental motions during the orthodontic step; it is also used to support the final prosthesis. The treatment is thus optimized and its prognosis is improved. Finally, the reversed surgical sequences shorten the treatment thus promoting the compliance of patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Orthodontic treatment need for adolescents in the Campania region: the malocclusion impact on self-concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perillo, Letizia; Esposito, Maria; Caprioglio, Alberto; Attanasio, Stefania; Santini, Annamaria Chiara; Carotenuto, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Dental malocclusions can be considered not only as an oral health problem, because they are linked to quality of life perception. Many factors related to malocclusion have strong influences on the perception of facial esthetics (eg, anterior tooth alignment, tooth shape and position, lip thickness, symmetric gingival or tooth contour, lip profile, and overjet). Many reports have shown that the perception of facial esthetics can influence psychological development from early childhood to adulthood. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of dental malocclusion on self-esteem in a sample of adolescents. The study population was composed of 516 orthodontically untreated subjects (256 males) mean ages 13.75±1.977 years recruited from schools in the Campania region of Italy between January 2011 and July 2011. To evaluate the self-esteem grade in our population, all subjects filled out the Multidimensional Self Concept Scale questionnaire and attended an orthodontic clinical evaluation to estimate dental occlusal aspects. Pearson's analysis shows the relationship in our sample between some occlusal characteristics (crossbite and dental crowding) and aspects of self-concept evaluation (social, competence, academic, physical, and global score) of the Multidimensional Self Concept Scale questionnaire. Moreover, logistic regression analysis shows the potential role of dental crowding (odds ratio 5.359; 95% confidence interval 3.492-8.225) and crossbite (odds ratio 6.153; 95% confidence interval 3.545-10.678) as risk factors for development of global self-concept score abnormalities. Our findings confirm the relationship between psychosocial well-being, self-esteem, and dental malocclusion among adolescents.

  1. Minimally invasive corticotomy in orthodontics: a new technique using a CAD/CAM surgical template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassetta, M; Pandolfi, S; Giansanti, M

    2015-07-01

    Accelerating orthodontic tooth movement is a topical issue. Despite the different techniques described in the literature, the corticotomy is the only effective and safe means of accelerating orthodontic tooth movement. Although effective, the corticotomy presents significant postoperative discomfort. The aggressive nature of these particular methods, related to the elevation of mucoperiosteal flaps and to the length of the surgery, has resulted in reluctance to proceed with this technique among both patients and the dental community. To overcome the disadvantages of the corticotomy, this technical note describes an innovative, minimally invasive, flapless procedure combining piezoelectric surgical cortical micro-incisions with the use of a 3D Printed CAD/CAM surgical guide. Copyright © 2015 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Orthodontic management of excessive incisor display of an adult bilateral cleft lip and palate patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Om Prakash Kharbanda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This report entails successful orthodontic treatment of a case of postsurgical malocclusion, short upper lip, and excessive incisor display in an adult patient with bilateral cleft lip and palate. The patient underwent cleft lip repair at an early age of 2 years followed by palatoplasty at the age of 6 years and alveoloplasty at an age of 26 years. He reported with irregular teeth, inability to close lips, excessive visibility of upper incisors associated with short upper lip and difficulty in speech. He was treated with maxillary arch expansion, arch alignment, and intrusion of the incisors followed by prosthetic replacement of the missing right and left lateral incisors. Subsequently, he underwent nose and lip revision surgery at the age of 32 years. The orthodontic procedures and prosthetic rehabilitation have resulted in a near normal dental occlusion with significant improvement in esthetics and psychosocial benefits to the individual. These benefits were further enhanced by nose and lip revision surgery.

  3. Applying orthodontic tooth extrusion in a patient treated with bisphosphonate and irradiation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Hiromitsu; Imai, Yuko; Yoneda, Masahiro; Hirofuji, Takao

    2017-01-01

    Bisphosphonates and irradiation are useful medical treatments, but can often cause oral complications such as medication-related oral necrosis of the jaw (MRONJ) and osteoradionecrosis (ORN) during oral surgery, including tooth extraction. Therefore, we should take all risks into consideration carefully before choosing dental treatment for patients with a medical history of such therapies. A 55-year-old woman who underwent cord blood transplantation to treat extranodal natural killer T (NK/T) cell lymphoma (nasal type IVB) had a medical history of bisphosphonate and irradiation treatments. We treated her residual tooth root by applying orthodontic extrusion to avoid extraction and successfully restored the tooth. Application of an orthodontic tooth extrusion technique for conservative treatment of a residual tooth is a useful means of avoiding MRONJ or ORN in patients who have a medical history of bisphosphonate and irradiation treatments. © 2016 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Orthodontic-surgical management of a case of severe mandibular deficiency due to condylar ankylosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sridevi Padmanabhan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dentofacial deformities involve deviations from the normal facial proportions and dental relationships and can range from mild to being severe enough to be severely handicapping.The term handicapping malocclusions though not a term commonly used, involves a fortunately small section (2-4% of patients who can suffer from esthetic,psychological and functional problems. Craniofacial Orthodontics is the area of orthodontics that treats patients with congenital and acquired deformities of the integument and it′s underlying musculoskeletal system within the craniofacial area and associated structures.This case report of a young woman with severe mandibular deficiency and facial asymmetry due to condylar ankylosis highlights the importance of team work in rehabilitation of such severe craniofacial deformities.

  5. [Stability of orthodontic correction: preconditions of relapses caused by occlusal forces].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishkin, K M; Arsenina, O I; Shishkin, M K; Popova, N V

    The aim of the study was to determine the prognostic criteria of orthodontic treatment success in a group of patients with crowded teeth position and a neutral occlusion. The study included 150 patients (123 female and 27 male) with the average follow-up of 10.02±2.88 years and average retention phase of 6.15±2.98 years. Teeth positions, dental arches form, occlusal contacts and periodontal status were studied. Dentition changes after orthodontic correction should be considered as a result of adaptive compensatory balance. The resultant force acting on teeth and the direction of it determine displacement of teeth. The leading relapse precontidion induced by the occlusal forces was the interference of the canines, mandible deviation and asymmetry, muscle tone disorders.

  6. Effect of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus reuteri on white spot lesion development in orthodontic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gizani, Sotiria; Petsi, Georgia; Twetman, Svante

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: The purpose of the study is to evaluate the effect of daily intake of lozenges containing probiotic bacteria on white spot lesion (WSL) formation as well as on salivary lactobacilli (LB) and mutans streptococci (MS) counts, in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment...... and randomly allocated to a test or placebo group. Subjects in the test group were instructed to take one probiotic lozenge containing two strains of Lactobacillus reuteri once daily. An identical lozenge without active bacteria was used in the placebo group. Dental plaque, WSL, and salivary MS and LB levels....../CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Daily intake of probiotic lozenges did not seem to affect the development of WSL during orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances....

  7. Orthodontic treatment of relapse using the preinserted endosseous dental implants

    OpenAIRE

    El, Hakan; Kan, Hilal; Adiloglu, İlgar; Aktas, Güliz; Kocadereli, İlken

    2011-01-01

    In contemporary dentistry, endosseous implants are widely used to replace missing teeth with a survival rate of 90-95%. They have been accepted in the literature as a very good alternative to conventional prosthetic restoratio...

  8. Knowledge of Orthodontics as a Dental Specialty: A Preliminary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hanumantp

    and physical appearance.[12] This is important because research suggests that there is a relationship between physical ... smiles of models and public figures in popular media and are ... to enhance the appearance is often the major factor motivating .... and the high social premium placed on well-aligned teeth and.

  9. Accuracy in tooth positioning with a fully customized lingual orthodontic appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauer, Dan; Proffit, William R

    2011-09-01

    To understand orthodontic tooth movement, a method of quantification of tooth position discrepancies in 3 dimensions is needed. Brackets and wires now can be fabricated by CAD/CAM technology on a setup made at the beginning of treatment, so that treatment should produce a reasonably precise duplicate of the setup. The extent of discrepancies between the planned and actual tooth movements can be quantified by registration of the setup and final models. The goal of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of a CAD/CAM lingual orthodontic technique. Dental casts of 94 consecutive patients from 1 practice, representing a broad range of orthodontic problems, were scanned to create digital models, and then the setup and final models for each patient were registered individually for the maxillary and mandibular dental arches. Individual tooth discrepancies between the setup and actual outcome were computed and expressed in terms of a six-degrees-of-freedom rectangular coordinate system. Discrepancies in position and rotation between the setup and outcome were small for all teeth (generally less than 1 mm and 4°) except for the second molars, where some larger discrepancies were observed. Faciolingual expansion in the posterior teeth was greater in the setup than in the final models, especially at the second molars. Linear mixed models showed that age, type of tooth, jaw, initial crowding, time in slot-filling wire, use of elastics, days in treatment, interproximal reduction, and rebonding, were all influences on the final differences, but, for most of these factors, the influence was small, explaining only a small amount of the discrepancy between the planned and the actual outcomes. These fully customized lingual orthodontic appliances were accurate in achieving the goals planned at the initial setup, except for the full amount of planned expansion and the inclination at the second molars. This methodology is the first step toward understanding and measuring tooth

  10. Malocclusion and early orthodontic treatment requirements in the mixed dentitions of a population of Nigerian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    daCosta, Oluranti Olatokunbo; Aikins, Elfleda Angelina; Isiekwe, Gerald Ikenna; Adediran, Virginia Efunyemi

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to establish the prevalence of dental features that indicate a need for early intervention and to ascertain the prevalence of different methods of early treatment among a population of Nigerian children in mixed dentition. Occlusal relationships were evaluated in 101 children in mixed dentition between the ages of 6 and 12 years who presented at the Orthodontic Unit, Department of Child Dental Health, Lagos University Teaching Hospital over a 2 years period. The need for different modes of early orthodontic treatment was also recorded. Anterior tooth rotations (61.4%) and increased overjet (44.6%) were the most prevalent occlusal anomalies. Others included deep bite (31.7%), reverse overjet (13.9%), and anterior open bite (14.8%). Severe maxillary spacing and crowding were exhibited in 12.0% and 5.0%, respectively. About a third (35.7%) of the subjects presented with crossbite while lip incompetence was observed in 43.6% of the subjects. About 44% of the subjects also presented with various oral habits with digit (15.8%) and lip sucking (9.9%) being the most prevalent. Subjects were recommended for treatment with 2 by 4 fixed orthodontic appliances (22.3%), habit breakers (20.7%), removable orthodontic appliances (16.5%), and extractions (15.7%). Increased overjet and anterior tooth rotation were the majority of occlusal anomalies seen, which are not only esthetically displeasing but may also cause an increased susceptibility to trauma to these teeth. Treatment options varied from extractions only to the use of appliance therapy.

  11. [Presurgical orthodontics for facial asymmetry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labarrère, H

    2003-03-01

    As with the treatment of all facial deformities, orthodontic pre-surgical preparation for facial asymmetry should aim at correcting severe occlusal discrepancies not solely on the basis of a narrow occlusal analysis but also in a way that will not disturb the proposed surgical protocol. In addition, facial asymmetries require specific adjustments, difficult to derive and to apply because of their inherent atypical morphological orientation of both alveolar and basal bony support. Three treated cases illustrate different solutions to problems posed by pathological torque: this torque must be considered with respect to proposed surgical changes, within the framework of their limitations and their possible contra-indications.

  12. [A call for qualitative research in Orthodontics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yitschaky, O; Hofnung, T; Zini, A

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative research is an umbrella term for an array of attitudes and strategies for conducting inquiries that are aimed at discerning how human beings understand, experience, and interpret the social world. It is employed in many different academic disciplines most particularly in the social sciences and humanities, however recently more and more qualitative research is being conducted under the medical sciences including dentistry and orthodontics. This is due to its nature of in-depth investigation, which can provide answers to questions that cannot be satisfactorily answered using quantitative methods alone. The aims of this article are to discuss the characteristics of qualitative research, to review the orthodontic English literature, and to highlight the advantages of qualitative research in orthodontics. The literature review yielded several important conclusions regarding qualitative research in orthodontics: 1. most of the qualitative research done in orthodontics chose to use semi structured in-depth interviews for data collection; 2. qualitative research highlights aspects that are very important, and sometimes crucial to everyday practice and long term treatment; 3. there is a lack of qualitative studies in the field of orthodontics. Taking into account the nature of the orthodontic treatment, which is a prolonged one, demanding of a good orthodontist-patient rapport, and a wide perspective on behalf of the clinician, filling the gap in the discipline through conducting more qualitative studies aimed at understanding the point of view of the patient, as well as that of the clinician, may be beneficial for the improvement of the treatment.

  13. Orthodontic Treatment Consideration in Diabetic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almadih, Ahmed; Al-Zayer, Maryam; Dabel, Sukainh; Alkhalaf, Ahmed; Al Mayyad, Ali; Bardisi, Wajdi; Alshammari, Shouq; Alsihati, Zainab

    2018-02-01

    Although orthodontic treatment is commonly indicated for young healthy individuals, recent trends showed an increase in number of older individuals undergoing orthodontic interventions. The increased age resulted in a proportionate increase in the prevalence of systemic diseases facing dentists during orthodontic procedures, especially diabetes mellitus. This necessitates that dentists should be aware of the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and its early signs particularly in teeth and oral cavity. It is also essential for them to understand the implications of diabetes on orthodontic treatment and the measures to be considered during managing those patients. In this review, we focused on the impact of diabetes mellitus on orthodontic treatment. We also summarized the data from previous studies that had explained the measures required to be taken into consideration during managing those patients. We included both human and animal studies to review in depth the pathophysiological mechanisms by which diabetes affects orthodontic treatment outcome. In conclusion, this review emphasizes the need to carefully identify early signs and symptoms of diabetes mellitus in patients demanding orthodontic treatment and to understand the considerations to be adopted before and during treating these patients.

  14. Comparison between probiotic lozenges and drinks towards periodontal status improvement of orthodontic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasia Melita Kohar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fixed orthodontic appliances may interfere with daily oral hygiene procedure, causing more abundant plaque accumulation, therefore increasing the risk of periodontal disease. Probiotic methods represent a breakthrough approach in maintaining oral health and preventing periodontal disease. Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the effect between probiotic lozenges containing Lactobacillus reuteri and probiotic drinks containing Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota towards periodontal status of orthodontic patients. Method: Fixed orthodontic patients (n=30 from Faculty of Dentistry, Trisakti University Dental Hospital were included in this clinical trial. Periodontal status consisting of Plaque Index (PlI, Interdental Hygiene Index (HYG, and Papillary Bleeding Index (PBI were then recorded from each patient. All patients received the phase one of periodontal treatment, as well as plaque control instruction. The subjects (n=10/gp were randomly assigned to one of three groups; control group; probiotic lozenges group (Biogaia®; and probiotic drinks group (Yakult®. For 14 days, the probiotic groups were instructed to use the probiotic. Periodontal index improvement (PlI, HYG, and PBI was found in all groups after 14 days research periode. These indices were then analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis analysis test. Result: It was found that L. reuteri and L. casei strain Shirota may improve periodontal status in fixed orthodontic patients. The best results were obtained from probiotic lozenges group. However, the results were not statistically significant (p>0.05. Conclusion: It was concluded that probiotics consumption containing L. reuteri and L. casei strain Shirota may slightly improve periodontal status in fixed orthodontic patients.

  15. Factors influencing orthodontic treatment time for non-surgical Class III malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia Monteiro Bichara

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT To improve orthodontic treatment efficiency, orthodontists must know which variables could interfere with orthodontic treatment time. Objective: To identify variables and their effect size on orthodontic treatment time of Class III malocclusion. Material and Methods: Forty-five Class III malocclusion cases were selected from 2008 patients’ records. Clinical charts, cephalometric radiographs, and pre and posttreatment dental casts were evaluated. Age, sex, PAR index at T1 and T2, overjet, missing teeth, extractions, number of treatment phases, missed appointments, appliance breakages, and cephalometric variables SNA, SNB, ANB, Wits, SnGoGn, CoA, CoGn, IMPA, 1.PP were investigated by multiple linear regression analysis and stepwise method at p2 (patients who missed more than 2 appointments, to detect the influence of this data on treatment time and the quality of the treatment (PAR T2. Results: Average treatment time was 30.27 months. Multiple regression analysis showed that missed appointment (R2=0.4345 and appliance breakages (R2=0.0596 are the only variables able to significantly predict treatment duration. Treatment time for patients who missed more than 2 appointments was nearly one year longer. However, no significant influence on PAR T2 was observed for those patients. Conclusion: Orthodontic treatment duration in Class III patients is mainly influenced by factors related to patient compliance. Patients who missed more appointments did not show worse orthodontic finishing, but longer treatment. No occlusal, cephalometric, or demographic variable obtained before treatment was able to give some significant prediction about treatment time in Class III patients.

  16. A pilot clinical study of Class III surgical patients facilitated by improved accelerated osteogenic orthodontic treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, JiaQi; Jiang, Jiu-Hui; Xu, Li; Liang, Cheng; Bai, YunYang; Zou, Wei

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate if the improved accelerated osteogenic orthodontics (IAOO) procedure could speed Class III surgical patients' preoperative orthodontic treatment duration and, if yes, to what extent. This study was also designed to determine whether or not an IAOO procedure affects the tooth-moving pattern during extraction space closure. The samples in this study consisted of 24 Class III surgical patients. Twelve skeletal Class III surgery patients served as an experimental group (group 1) and the others as a control group (group 2). Before treatment, the maxillary first premolars were removed. For group 1, after the maxillary dental arch was aligned and leveled (T2), IAOO procedures were performed in the maxillary alveolar bone. Except for this IAOO procedure in group 1, all 24 patients experienced similar combined orthodontic and orthognathic treatment. Study casts of the maxillary dentitions were made before orthodontic treatment (T1) and after extraction space closure (T3). All of the casts were laser scanned, and the amount of movement of the maxillary central incisor, canine, and first molar, as well as arch widths, were digitally measured and analyzed by using the three-dimensional model superimposition method. The time durations T3-T2 were significantly reduced in group 1 by 8.65 ± 2.67 months and for T3-T1 were reduced by 6.39 ± 2.00 months (P teeth movement in the sagittal, vertical, and transverse dimensions between the two groups (P > .05). The IAOO can reduce the surgical orthodontic treatment time for the skeletal Class III surgical patient by more than half a year on average. The IAOO procedures do not save anchorage.

  17. An Analytical Study on an Orthodontic Index: Index of Complexity, Outcome and Need (ICON)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torkan, Sepide; Pakshir, Hamid Reza; Fattahi, Hamid Reza; Oshagh, Morteza; Momeni Danaei, Shahla; Salehi, Parisa; Hedayati, Zohreh

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem The validity of the Index of Complexity, Outcome and Need (ICON) which is an orthodontic index developed and introduced in 2000 should be studied in different ethnic groups. Purpose The aim of this study was to perform an analysis on the ICON and to verify whether this index is valid for assessing both the need and complexity of orthodontic treatment in Iran. Materials and Method Five orthodontists were asked to score pre-treatment diagnostic records of 100 patients with a uniform distribution of different types of malocclusions determined by Dental Health Component of the Index of Treatment Need. A calibrated examiner also assessed the need for orthodontic treatment and complexity of the cases based on the ICON index as well as the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN). 10 days later, 25% of the cases were re-scored by the panel of experts and the calibrated orthodontist. Results The weighted kappa revealed the inter-examiner reliability of the experts to be 0.63 and 0.51 for the need and complexity components, respectively. ROC curve was used to assess the validity of the index. A new cut-off point was adjusted at 35 in lieu of 43 as the suggested cut-off point. This cut-off point showed the highest level of sensitivity and specificity in our society for orthodontic treatment need (0.77 and 0.78, respectively), but it failed to define definite ranges for the complexity of treatment. Conclusion ICON is a valid index in assessing the need for treatment in Iran when the cut-off point is adjusted to 35. As for complexity of treatment, the index is not validated for our society. It seems that ICON is a well-suited substitute for the IOTN index. PMID:26331142

  18. High potential of adhesion to biotic and abiotic surfaces by opportunistic Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from orthodontic appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merghni, Abderrahmen; Ben Nejma, Mouna; Dallel, Ines; Tobji, Samir; Ben Amor, Adel; Janel, Sébastien; Lafont, Frank; Aouni, Mahjoub; Mastouri, Maha

    2016-02-01

    Orthodontic and other oral appliances act as reservoir of opportunistic pathogens that can easily become resistant to antibiotics and cause systemic infections. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from healthy patients with orthodontic appliances, to adhere to biotic (HeLa cells) and abiotic surfaces (polystyrene and dental alloy). Adhesive ability to polystyrene was tested by crystal violet staining and quantitative biofilm production on dental alloy surfaces was evaluated by MTT reduction assay. In addition, the presence of icaA and icaD genes was achieved by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Qualitative biofilm production revealed that 70.6% of strains were slime producers. The metabolic activity of S. aureus biofilms on dental alloy surfaces was high and did not differ between tested strains. Moreover, all the isolates were adhesive to HeLa cells and 94% of them harbor icaA and icaD genes. Considerable adhesion and internalization capacity to the epithelial HeLa cells and strong biofilm production abilities together, with a high genotypic expression of icaA/icaD genes are an important equipment of S. aureus to colonize orthodontic appliances and eventually to disseminate towards other body areas. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Estimation of changes in nickel and chromium content in nickel-titanium and stainless steel orthodontic wires used during orthodontic treatment: An analytical and scanning electron microscopic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana Kararia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The biocompatibility of orthodontic dental alloys has been investigated over the past 20 years, but the results have been inconclusive. The study compares standard 3 M Unitek nickel-titanium (NiTi and stainless steel archwires with locally available JJ orthodontics wires. Scanning electron microscope (SEM study of surface changes and complexometric titration to study compositional change was performed. Materials and Methods: Ten archwires each of group 1-3 M 0.016" NiTi, group 2-JJ 0.016" NiTi, group 3-3 M 0.019" FNx010.025" SS and group 4-JJ SS contributed a 10 mm piece of wire for analysis prior to insertion in the patient and 6 weeks post insertion. SEM images were recorded at Χ2000, Χ4000 and Χ6000 magnification. The same samples were subjected to complexiometric titration using ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid to gauge the actual change in the composition. Observations and Results: The SEM images of all the archwires showed marked changes with deep scratches and grooves and dark pitting corrosion areas post intraoral use. 3M wires showed an uniform criss-cross pattern in as received wires indicating a coating which was absent after intraoral use. There was a significant release of Nickel and Chromium from both group 3 and 4. Group 2 wires released ions significantly more than group 1 (P = 0.0. Conclusion: Extensive and stringent trials are required before certifying any product to be used in Orthodontics.

  20. Numerical simulation of the force generated by a superelastic NiTi orthodontic archwire during tooth alignment phase: comparison between different constitutive models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannoun, M.; Laroussi Hellara, M.; Bouby, C.; Ben Zineb, T.; Bouraoui, T.

    2018-04-01

    Nickel Titanium (NiTi) Superelastic (SE) Shape Memory Alloys (SMAs) are widely considered for applications that need high reversible strain or high recovery forces. In particular, the SE SMAs present a high interest for biomedical applications such as endodontic and orthodontic apparatus. They are available in a large variety of archwires exerting continuum forces to ensure the dental displacement. The purpose of this study is to report the clinical implications of NiTi SE wires for dental treatment in a given configuration. Three main constitutive models of the literature (Lagoudas and Boyd 1996 Int. J. Plast. 12 805–842, Auricchio and Petrini 2004 Int. J. Numer. Meth. Engng. 61 807–836 and Chemisky et al 2011 Mech. Mater. 68 361–376) are considered for the finite element (FE) numerical simulations of the SMA archwires response. Tensile tests had been carried out in order to identify the material parameters of these constitutive models. The FE numerical study allowed to predict the dental displacement and its corresponding orthodontic force level exerted by the wire in similar conditions to those in the oral environment. This work allows to predict the orthodontic generated load by a NiTi SE archwire with a 0.64 × 0.46 mm2 rectangular cross section under prescribed thermomechanical conditions. The effect of the temperature and the alveolar bone stiffness on the orthodontic load level and the tooth displacement degree has been investigated. The performed numerical simulations demonstrate that the orthodontic load is sensitive to the displacement magnitude, to the tooth stiffness and to the temperature variations. The obtained forces applied continuously and at a constant level are within the acceptable orthodontic force level range. Some directives are therefore provided to help orthodontists to select the optimal archwire.

  1. The Relationship between Patient, Parent and Orthodontic Treatment Need and Demand in 17-Year-Old Studentsresiding in Abade/Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hosseinzadeh Nik

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The planning of orthodontic treatment within a public health system requires information on the orthodontic treatment needs of the population. The aims of this study were to assess the student, parent and clinician normative need and demand for orthodon-tic treatment in a sample of Iranian students using the IOTN and to compare the treatment need levels according to sex and socio-economic status of the students and parents in ur-ban and rural areas.Material and Methods: A sample of 427, 17-year-old students was selected randomly from schools in Abade. A questionnaire of family socioeconomic status was proposed to the parents. All the students were examined according to the Aesthetic and Dental Health components (AC and DHC of Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need. Students' and par-ents' perceived need was also assessed using AC.Results: According to DHC classification, 18.7% of the students were in the "no need";35.6% in the "border line" and 45.7% in the "definite need" groups. The same categories for students assessed by the dentist were 66%, 30.2% and 3.7% respectively. AC assess-ment by students and parents entitled even more studentsin "no need" category. Sex and family income were the major factors in predicting orthodontic treatment demand (P<0.05.Conclusion: Orthodontic demand was highly related to the AC score and this component is of more value in predicting students demand instead of DHC.

  2. Antibacterial Activity of Orthodontic Cement Containing Quaternary Ammonium Polyethylenimine Nanoparticles Adjacent to Orthodontic Brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Eldad; Sharabi, Revital; Eden, Adi; Zabrovsky, Asher; Ben-Gal, Gilad; Sharon, Esi; Pietrokovski, Yoav; Houri-Haddad, Yael; Beyth, Nurit

    2018-03-27

    Enamel demineralization is a common problem found in patients using orthodontic devices, such as orthodontic braces. It was found that Streptoccocus mutans growth increases adjacent to orthodontic devices, which may result in caries development. Incorporated antibacterial quaternary ammonium polyethylenimine (QPEI) nanoparticles were previously shown to be highly efficacious against various bacteria. Combining antibacterial materials in orthodontic cement may be advantageous to prevent bacterial outgrowth adjacent to orthodontic brackets. The aim was to evaluate the efficiency of orthodontic cement containing QPEI nanoparticles in reducing S. mutans and Lactobacillus casei outgrowth adjacent to orthodontic brackets. Orthodontic brackets were bonded to the buccal surfaces of extracted lower incisors. The antibacterial effect on S. mutans and L. casei outgrowth of Neobond bracket adhesive orthodontic cement with and without QPEI nanoparticles was compared. The antibacterial effect was evaluated using crystal violet staining and bacterial count (CFU/mL). The teeth in the experimental group, with the QPEI nanoparticles cement, showed significantly lower optical density (OD) values and CFU counts of S. mutans and L. casei than the teeth in the control group ( p brackets.

  3. The evolution of cephalometric diagnosis in Orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Barbosa Guerra da Silva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Although the development of CT have represented a landmark in diagnostic imaging, its use in Dentistry turned out very discretely over the years. With the appearance of programs for analysis of three-dimensional images, specific for Orthodontics and Orthognathic surgery, a new reality is being built. OBJECTIVE: The authors of this study aim to inform the orthodontic society of fundamentals about digital cephalometric radiographic image and computed tomography, discussing about: Field of view (FOV, radiation doses, demands for the use in Orthodontics and radiographic simulations.

  4. [Application of holistic integrative medicine in orthodontics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L

    2017-08-09

    Holistic integrative medicine (HIM) is a new medical knowledge system, which is formed based on the theory of HIM. HIM treats people as a whole by combining the results of basic medical research, clinical practice and clinical research during the treatment process. The concept of HIM runs through the education and treatment of orthodontics. HIM is the trending norm of both modern medicine and orthodontics. This review is about the concept of HIM and the advantages and disadvantages of specialization. Moreover, this review also discusses the vital role of HIM in orthodontic treatment and development.

  5. Treatment of Severe Maxillary Hypoplasia With Combined Orthodontics and Distraction Osteogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchese, Alessandra; Albertini, Paolo; Asperio, Paolo; Manuelli, Maurizio; Gastaldi, Giorgio

    2018-01-05

    Distraction osteogenesis (DO) is a technique that allows the generation of new bone in a gap between 2 vascularized bone surfaces in response to the application of graduated tensile stress across the bone gap.Distraction osteogenesis has become a routine treatment of choice to correct skeletal deformities and severe bone defects in the craniofacial complex over the past decade. Distraction osteogenesis has been successfully chosen in lengthening the maxilla and the mandible; in the maxilla and recently in the mandible, the jawbones have been distracted and widened transversely to relieve severe anterior dental crowding and transverse discrepancies between the dental arches.Distraction osteogenesis for maxillary advancement started in 1993 and is now widely used, especially in patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion caused by maxillary hypoplasia.The aim of this study was to present the efficiency of combined orthodontic and DO in the severe maxillary hypoplasia.A 35-year-old Italian man presented to our clinical practice with the chief complaint of esthetic and functionally problems because of skeletal Class III malocclusion with anterior crossbite.Considering that the severity of the skeletal discrepancy is remarkable but compensated by the DO potential, the combined orthodontic and DO treatment was considered adequate, like less invasive and equally effective.It was obtained a good alignment with the upper and lower arch dental alveolar maxillary advancement that allowed to correct the sagittal relationships.The patient was satisfied for the treatment results and had considerable improvement in his self-esteem.

  6. Semi-automatic registration of 3D orthodontics models from photographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destrez, Raphaël.; Treuillet, Sylvie; Lucas, Yves; Albouy-Kissi, Benjamin

    2013-03-01

    In orthodontics, a common practice used to diagnose and plan the treatment is the dental cast. After digitization by a CT-scan or a laser scanner, the obtained 3D surface models can feed orthodontics numerical tools for computer-aided diagnosis and treatment planning. One of the pre-processing critical steps is the 3D registration of dental arches to obtain the occlusion of these numerical models. For this task, we propose a vision based method to automatically compute the registration based on photos of patient mouth. From a set of matched singular points between two photos and the dental 3D models, the rigid transformation to apply to the mandible to be in contact with the maxillary may be computed by minimizing the reprojection errors. During a precedent study, we established the feasibility of this visual registration approach with a manual selection of singular points. This paper addresses the issue of automatic point detection. Based on a priori knowledge, histogram thresholding and edge detection are used to extract specific points in 2D images. Concurrently, curvatures information detects 3D corresponding points. To improve the quality of the final registration, we also introduce a combined optimization of the projection matrix with the 2D/3D point positions. These new developments are evaluated on real data by considering the reprojection errors and the deviation angles after registration in respect to the manual reference occlusion realized by a specialist.

  7. Orthodontic treatment of a patient with cleidocranial dysplasia: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zi-Jian; Wang, Jun-Yan; Gao, Ming-Fei; Wu, Da-Lei; Chang, Xin

    2016-08-01

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is a rare autosomal dominant condition that affects ossification. The dental abnormalities associated with CCD present an obstacle to orthodontic treatment planning. Early diagnosis is crucial to provide the patient with different treatment modalities that will suit the particular patient. In the present case, combined surgical and orthodontic treatment were performed to guide multiple impacted teeth. A single nucleotide missense variation was identified in exon 3 of runt-related transcription factor 2 ( RUNX2 ) in this patient. The current results suggest a correlation between dental alterations and mutations in the runt domain of RUNX2 in CCD patients. Further clinical and genetic studies may required to confirm the association between phenotypes and genotypes in CCD and to identify other factors that may influence the clinical features of this disease. Patients with cleidocranial dysplasia require a team approach which demands good communication and cooperation from the patient. Timing of the intervention is critical, and numerous surgeries may be required. The patient in the present case report was treated by a team of practitioners, which involved several dental specialties to achieve an optimal result.

  8. Two-unit cantilevered resin-bonded fixed partial denture as a substitute for a prosthodontic-orthodontic treatment plan: a 5-year case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emami, Elham; St-Georges, Annie; de Grandmont, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    In this case report, we describe the successful long-term treatment of a patient with dental agenesis. The initial treatment plan included an orthodontic phase to provide adequate space for replacing missing lateral incisors with implants. However, because of some complications encountered after 2 years of orthodontic treatment, a revised treatment plan was considered to achieve functional and esthetic goals. The patient was completely satisfied 5 years after being treated with two 2-unit cantilevered resin-bonded fixed partial dentures supported by the cuspids. This conservative treatment plan was cost-effective without having any significant biological cost.

  9. Patients' expectations of orthodontic treatment: part 1 - development of a questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, M S; Newton, J T

    2006-12-01

    The development of a questionnaire to measure patients' and their parents' expectations before orthodontic treatment, and to test the reliability and validity of this measure. A two-stage methodology, with open-ended interviews to identify themes and concepts followed by development and testing of the questionnaire. GKT Orthodontic Department, King's College Dental Hospital. The sample consisted of 140 participants, 70 patients aged 12-14 years, who had been referred to the orthodontic department for treatment. One parent of each patient was also recruited. The study was in two phases. In the first phase 30 participants (15 new patients and their 15 parents) participated in open-ended interviews, which were analysed qualitatively. Information from these interviews was used to construct a questionnaire. During the second phase, the questionnaire was piloted on 10 participants, five new consecutive patients and their parents. The questionnaire was then distributed to 174 subjects (87 new patients and their 87 parents). Seventy-eight subjects (39 new patients and their 39 parents) completed the questionnaire before their orthodontic consultation. Another 96 subjects (48 new patients and their 48 parents) were invited to complete the questionnaire prior to and at their orthodontic consultation. Test-retest analysis was conducted on 22 participants (11 patients and their 11 parents), who completed the questionnaire previous to and at their orthodontic consultation, and contributed to the psychometric validation of this questionnaire. A questionnaire was devized using the key themes and concepts identified in the open-ended interviews. As a result, 10 questions, some with sub-questions were constructed using a visual analogue scale as the response format. The questionnaire developed had good face validity. Internal consistency of the questionnaire using Cronbach's alpha, produced an overall inter-item reliability > 0.7 along with item-total correlations > 0.3 in over 50

  10. [Exploring a new method for superimposition of pre-treatment and post-treatment mandibular digital dental casts in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, F F; Liu, Y; Xu, T M; Chen, G

    2018-04-18

    To explore a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT)-independent method for mandibular digital dental cast superimposition to evaluate three-dimensional (3D) mandibular tooth movement after orthodontic treatment in adults, and to evaluate the accuracy of this method. Fifteen post-extraction orthodontic treatment adults from the Department of Orthodontics, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology were included. All the patients had four first premolars extracted, and were treated with straight wire appliance. The pre- and post-treatment plaster dental casts and craniofacial CBCT scans were obtained. The plaster dental casts were transferred to digital dental casts by 3D laser scanning, and lateral cephalograms were created from the craniofacial CBCT scans by orthogonal projection. The lateral cephalogram-based mandibular digital dental cast superimposition was achieved by sequential maxillary dental cast superimposition registered on the palatal stable region, occlusal transfer, and adjustment of mandibular rotation and translation obtained from lateral cephalogram superimposition. The accuracy of the lateral cephalogram-based mandibular digital dental cast superimposition method was evaluated with the CBCT-based mandibular digital dental cast superimposition method as the standard reference. After mandibular digital dental cast superimposition using both methods, 3D coordinate system was established, and 3D displacements of the lower bilateral first molars, canines and central incisors were measured. Differences between the two superimposition methods in tooth displacement measurements were assessed using the paired t-test with the level of statistical significance set at Pdigital dental cast superimposition methods in 3D displacements of the lower first molars, and sagittal and vertical displacements of the canines and central incisors; transverse displacements of the canines and central incisors differed by (0.3±0.5) mm with statistical significance

  11. A qualitative study of the influence of poor dental aesthetics on the lives of young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josefsson, Eva; Lindsten, Rune; Hallberg, Lillemor R-M

    2010-01-01

    Although many countries offer some publicly funded orthodontic treatment for children, not all conditions receive treatment and some adolescents enter adulthood with persisting poor dental aesthetics or malocclusions. The aim of this study was to generate a theory highlighting the main concerns of young adults, either native-born or of immigrant background, with poor dental aesthetics and the measures they adopt to manage their condition in everyday life. A qualitative method, classic grounded theory, was applied in order to generate a substantive theory highlighting the main concerns and managing mechanisms of 13 strategically selected 19- and 20-year-olds with poor dental aesthetics. Open interviews were conducted with each participant, the topics covering different aspects of social and dental conditions. A core category and three conceptual categories were generated. The core category was labelled "Being under the pressure of social norms" and was related to categories explaining three different ways in which these young adults handle their main concern: (1) avoiding showing their teeth; (2) minimizing the importance of appearance; and (3) seeking orthodontic treatment. The theory offers the potential for improved understanding of young adults who, despite poor dental aesthetics, are managing well with life, and also of those who have not adjusted well. In early adolescence it may be problematic to make decisions about orthodontic treatment. Undisclosed dental fear can be an important barrier. Some of the young adults in the present study would probably benefit from treatment.

  12. Effect of dental arch convexity and type of archwire on frictional forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fourie, Zacharias; Ozcan, Mutlu; Sandham, John

    Introduction: Friction measurements in orthodontics are often derived from models by using brackets placed on flat models with various straight wires. Dental arches are convex in some areas. The objectives of this study were to compare the frictional forces generated in conventional flat and convex

  13. Full 3-dimensional digital workflow for multicomponent dental appliances: A proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, W Joerd; Vissink, Arjan; Ren, Yijin

    2016-04-01

    The authors used a 3-dimensional (3D) printer and a bending robot to produce a multicomponent dental appliance to assess whether 3D digital models of the dentition are applicable for a full digital workflow. The authors scanned a volunteer's dentition with an intraoral scanner (Lava Chairside Oral Scanner C.O.S., 3M). A digital impression was used to design 2 multicomponent orthodontic appliances. Biocompatible acrylic baseplates were produced with the aid of a 3D printer. The metal springs and clasps were produced by a bending robot. The fit of the 2 appliances was assessed by 2 experienced orthodontists. The authors assessed both orthodontic appliances with the volunteer's dentition and found the fit to be excellent. Clinicians can fully produce a multicomponent dental appliance consisting of both an acrylic baseplate and other parts, such as clasps, springs, or screws, using a digital workflow process without the need for a physical model of the patient's dentition. Plaster models can be superfluous for orthodontic treatment as digital models can be used in all phases of a full digital workflow in orthodontics. The arduous task of making a multicomponent dental appliance that involves bending wires can possibly be replaced by a computer, design software, a 3D printer, and a bending robot. Copyright © 2016 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Multidimensional Scaling for Orthodontic Root Resorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Teodora Preoteasa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates the risk factors for the severity of orthodontic root resorption. The multidimensional scaling (MDS visualization method is used to investigate the experimental data from patients who received orthodontic treatment at the Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Faculty of Dentistry, “Carol Davila” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, during a period of 4 years. The clusters emerging in the MDS plots reveal features and properties not easily captured by classical statistical tools. The results support the adoption of MDS for tackling the dentistry information and overcoming noise embedded into the data. The method introduced in this paper is rapid, efficient, and very useful for treating the risk factors for the severity of orthodontic root resorption.

  15. Comparison of Arch Width Changes Following Orthodontic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-11-21

    Nov 21, 2015 ... Materials and Methods: The study was conducted with pre- and post-treatment digital models from ... or posterior arch width following orthodontic treatment ..... premolar extraction cases show significant arch width increases in ...

  16. ORTHODONTIC MANAGEMENT IN CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adit ARORA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Special needs individuals are children or adults pre‐ vented by a physical or mental condition permitting their full participation to the normal range of activities of their age groups. They usually exhibit high orthodontic treat‐ ment needs because of an increased prevalence and seve‐ rity of malocclusions. These conditions often require a coordinated craniofacial orthodontic and surgical treat‐ ment in a team setting, to achieve optimal outcome. Ort‐ hodontic treatments for patients born with facial differences tend to be more complex than ordinary ortho‐ dontics. This multidisciplinary treatment often starts from birth and extends up to the late teen years. The young patient may require treatment by multiple specialists, including a craniofacial surgeon, pediatrician, geneticist, neurosurgeon, ENT, speech and language therapist, pedi‐ atric dentist, oral surgeon and prosthodontist. The objec‐ tive of this paper is to summarize protocols of orthodontic treatment and to present various orthodontic management protocols regarding the children with special needs.

  17. Extra-oral Appliances in Orthodontic Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almuzian, Mohammed; Alharbi, Fahad; McIntyre, Grant

    2016-01-01

    Extra-oral appliances are used in orthodontics to apply forces to the jaws, dentition or both and the popularity of these appliances is cyclical. Although the use of retraction headgear for the management of Class II malocclusion has declined over the last 20 years with the refinement of non-compliance approaches, including temporary anchorage devices, headgear still has a useful role in orthodontics. The use of protraction headgear has increased as more evidence of its effectiveness for the treatment of Class lIl malocclusion has become available. This paper describes the mechanics and contemporary uses of headgear in orthodontics for primary care dentists and specialist orthodontists. CPD/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Extra-oral appliances have specific uses in orthodontic biomechanics. Clinicians using retraction headgear and protraction headgear should be familiar with their clinical indications, the potential problems and how these can be avoided.

  18. Positional changes of maxillary central incisors following orthodontic treatment using single-crown implants as fixed reference markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahem, E B; Holm, B; Sonnesen, L; Worsaae, N; Gotfredsen, K

    2017-12-01

    This follow-up study (1) compares tooth displacement of central incisors in patients with and without pre-implant orthodontic treatment and (2) investigates whether sex, age, or orthodontic retention have an effect on tooth displacement after the insertion of single-crown implants. Fifty-seven patients - thirty-seven with (test group) and twenty without pre-implant orthodontic treatment (control group) - were rehabilitated with 89 single-crown implants in the upper maxilla. Clinical and radiographic data, clinical photographs, and dental casts were collected during baseline examinations after prosthetic rehabilitation and at the final follow-up examination at least 5 years later. A total of 114 dental casts were digitalized and aligned using a software program to measure changes in the positions of the central incisors. After a follow-up period of at least five years, 87% of the central incisors measured in the test group were displaced >0.25 mm vertically compared with 70% in the control group. Seventy-eight percent of the test group teeth had moved >0.25 mm horizontally compared with 55% in the control group. These differences were not significant, and there were no significant correlations with patient age or sex. The majority of patients had minor vertical (60%) or horizontal (67%) tooth displacement of the central incisors (0.25-0.75 mm) after a minimum follow-up period of 5 years. This study found no significant differences in tooth displacement comparing patients with and without pre-implant orthodontic treatment. No significant effect of sex, age, orthodontic retention, or implant location was observed on tooth displacement. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposite material for dental application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Yuan Tai

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The microhardness of the bracket-like blocks made by our new material is superior to the commercially available brackets, even after thermocycling. Our results indicate that the evaluated liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposite materials are of an appropriate quality for application in dental core and post systems and in various restorations. By applying technology to refine manufacturing processes, these new materials could also be used to fabricate esthetic brackets for orthodontic treatment.

  20. Surgical and orthodontic management of fused maxillary central and lateral incisors in early mixed dentition stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamurthy, Suresh; Satish, Ramaswamy; Priya, Kalidass

    2014-01-01

    Fusion is one of the developmental dental anomalies in which two adjacent teeth are joined at the crown level forming a single tooth with an enlarged crown. Fusion causes some clinical problems such as unaesthetic appearance, pain, caries, and malocclusion. The management of fusion often needs multidisciplinary approach to give best possible esthetic and functional outcome. This paper reports a case of 9-year-old boy with fused maxillary left central and lateral incisors who was treated with 2 × 4 fixed orthodontic appliances after surgical separation of fused teeth.

  1. Surgical and Orthodontic Management of Fused Maxillary Central and Lateral Incisors in Early Mixed Dentition Stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Ramamurthy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fusion is one of the developmental dental anomalies in which two adjacent teeth are joined at the crown level forming a single tooth with an enlarged crown. Fusion causes some clinical problems such as unaesthetic appearance, pain, caries, and malocclusion. The management of fusion often needs multidisciplinary approach to give best possible esthetic and functional outcome. This paper reports a case of 9-year-old boy with fused maxillary left central and lateral incisors who was treated with 2×4 fixed orthodontic appliances after surgical separation of fused teeth.

  2. Orthodontic-surgical treatment of four impacted canines in an adult patient: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlović, Jasna; Tabaković, Saša Z; Simić, Sanja; Vujačić, Amila; Vukićević, Vladanka

    2016-07-01

    Full impaction of canines, in both jaws, is a rare phenomenon. It is usually coupled with the persistence of deciduous canines, or any other irregularity in the dental arch. Panoramic radiograph of a 24-year-old female patient showed bilateral canine impaction in both jaws. Due to vestibular, apical and medial position of canines in the upper jaw, the surgical approach implied the apically positioned flap technique. The position of impacted mandibular canines was vertical with more coronal position relative to the upper canines, thus requiring a closed eruption technique. Inadequate position of impacted canines in the bone fully justifies the use of orthodontic-surgical treatment.

  3. "The Dreaded Black Triangle" - Orthodontics : The Choice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Janardhanam

    2010-01-01

    The black triangle that resulted due to orthodontic treatment in a 15 year old female patient had been alleviated by using both orthodontic and periodontic means. This report explains the various treatment modalities that can be adopted to avoid embarrassing post-treatment results. Several methods of managing patients with gingival diastemas exist, but the interdisciplinary aspects of treatment must be emphasized to achieve best results. The orthodontist can play a significant role in helping to manage these cases.

  4. Surgery preceding orthodontics in bimaxillary cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Saravana Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthognathic surgery is performed to alter the shape of the jaws to increase the facial esthetic and improve the occlusions. Surgery prior orthodontics reduces the total length of the treatment of the patients, followed by orthodontics treatment. Advantages is positive outcome in short period of time. Surgical procedure includes Anterior Maxillary osteotomy and Anterior subapical mandibular osteotomy. Complication includes haemorrhage, paraesthesia, malunion of bone, etc.

  5. Current clinical research in orthodontics: a perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, Sheldon

    2006-10-01

    This essay explores briefly the approach of the Craniofacial Research Instrumentation Laboratory to the systematic and rigorous investigation of the usual outcome of orthodontic treatment in the practices of experienced clinicians. CRIL's goal is to produce a shareable electronic database of reliable, valid, and representative data on clinical practice as an aid in the production of an improved environment for truly evidence-based orthodontic treatment.

  6. Right wire in orthodontics: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Hashim

    2015-01-01

    Quality of orthodontic wire such as stiffness, hardness, resiliency, elasticity and working range are important determinants of the effectivenes of tooth movement. Commonly used types of orthodontic arch wire:1) stainless steel(ss) wire, 2) conventional nickel- titanium (NiTi)alloy wire,3) improved super elastic NiTi- alloy wire( also called low hysteresis(LH)wire), and titanium molybdenum alloy(TMA) wire.

  7. [Apical resorption in pre-surgical orthodontics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piasente, M; Merlini, C; Amelotti, C; Antonioli, M; Roghi, M

    1991-07-15

    Apical root resorption is a frequent phenomenon observed in pre-surgical orthodontic; the reason is double: we deal with adult patients and we often move the teeth in the opposite direction compared to the position obtained in previous inefficacious orthodontic treatments. Notwithstanding the amount of apical root resorption we couldn't record an hyper-mobility of the teeth and a long term evaluation of occlusal stability didn't show any significant change.

  8. Orthodontic Tooth Movement with Clear Aligners

    OpenAIRE

    Drake, Carl T.; McGorray, Susan P.; Dolce, Calogero; Nair, Madhu; Wheeler, Timothy T.

    2012-01-01

    Clear aligners provide a convenient model to measure orthodontic tooth movement (OTM). We examined the role of in vivo aligner material fatigue and subject-specific factors in tooth movement. Fifteen subjects seeking orthodontic treatment at the University of Florida were enrolled. Results were compared with data previously collected from 37 subjects enrolled in a similar protocol. Subjects were followed prospectively for eight weeks. An upper central incisor was programmed to move 0.5 mm. ev...

  9. Social media use by orthodontic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henzell, M; Knight, A; Antoun, J S; Farella, M

    2013-12-01

    Internet-based social media sites have recently surged in popularity and are often used to share thoughts and seek support about health issues. The aim of this study was to investigate how orthodontic patients use Internet-based social media sites to share their treatment-related experiences and attitudes towards braces. A secondary objective was to investigate whether an online or mobile application would be considered helpful in improving co-operation with the use of orthodontic appliances. Patients visiting the orthodontic clinic at the University of Otago were asked to participate in a cross-sectional survey that sought details of their Internet-based social media use and their thoughts about the development of a reminder application. The sample comprised 130 orthodontic patients, with a mean age of 17.2 (SD 6.9) and a nearly equal sex distribution (52.3% were female). Internet-based social media sites were used by 80.8%, with Facebook being the most popular. Some 13.3% of the sample had posted comments about braces on these social media sites. Only 6.7% had considered obtaining information about orthodontic treatment from Internet-based social media sites, with the majority (81%) preferring to seek this information directly from their orthodontist. Nearly two-thirds of those who had difficulty remembering to wear their orthodontic appliances reported that a reminder application on their phone would be beneficial. A large proportion of orthodontic patients use Internet-based social media sites, although only a few currently use them to post about treatment-related topics. Social media sites may provide a useful channel of communication for patients seeking support. Further research is needed to evaluate the use of phone reminder applications in orthodontics.

  10. Patients’ acceptance of corticotomy-assisted orthodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawawi, Khalid H

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study patients’ acceptance of corticotomy-assisted orthodontics as a treatment option. Methods Adult patients seeking orthodontic treatment were asked to complete two sets of questionnaires; the first set included questions about age, sex, and level of education and general questions about orthodontic treatment; and the second set was related to the corticotomy-assisted orthodontics. Before answering the corticotomy questions, a brief description of the clinical procedure was explained and photographs of an actual procedure were shown. Results A total of 150 subjects were approached and 129 (86%) agreed to answer the questionnaires (72 male and 57 female patients). Of these, only 3.1% did hear about corticotomy and 7.8% selected corticotomy instead of extraction. Fear from the surgery (53.2%) was the most frequent reason for not selecting corticotomy followed by fear from pain (36.9%). The acceptance of corticotomy between males and females was similar. No relationship was found between the level of education and prior knowledge of the procedure, P=0.857. Prior knowledge about corticotomy was not a factor in selecting it as a treatment option (P=0.556) to reduce the treatment time (P=0.427). Conclusion The acceptance of corticotomy-assisted orthodontics as a treatment option was low. Fear from the surgery was the main reason for not selecting it. The acceptance of corticotomy-assisted orthodontics was not related to patient’s level of education or sex. PMID:26316719

  11. Three-dimensional deformation of orthodontic brackets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melenka, Garrett W; Nobes, David S; Major, Paul W

    2013-01-01

    Braces are used by orthodontists to correct the misalignment of teeth in the mouth. Archwire rotation is a particular procedure used to correct tooth inclination. Wire rotation can result in deformation to the orthodontic brackets, and an orthodontic torque simulator has been designed to examine this wire–bracket interaction. An optical technique has been employed to measure the deformation due to size and geometric constraints of the orthodontic brackets. Images of orthodontic brackets are collected using a stereo microscope and two charge-coupled device cameras, and deformation of orthodontic brackets is measured using a three-dimensional digital image correlation technique. The three-dimensional deformation of orthodontic brackets will be evaluated. The repeatability of the three-dimensional digital image correlation measurement method was evaluated by performing 30 archwire rotation tests using the same bracket and archwire. Finally, five Damon 3MX and five In-Ovation R self-ligating brackets will be compared using this technique to demonstrate the effect of archwire rotation on bracket design. PMID:23762201

  12. Three-dimensional deformation of orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melenka, Garrett W; Nobes, David S; Major, Paul W; Carey, Jason P

    2013-01-01

    Braces are used by orthodontists to correct the misalignment of teeth in the mouth. Archwire rotation is a particular procedure used to correct tooth inclination. Wire rotation can result in deformation to the orthodontic brackets, and an orthodontic torque simulator has been designed to examine this wire-bracket interaction. An optical technique has been employed to measure the deformation due to size and geometric constraints of the orthodontic brackets. Images of orthodontic brackets are collected using a stereo microscope and two charge-coupled device cameras, and deformation of orthodontic brackets is measured using a three-dimensional digital image correlation technique. The three-dimensional deformation of orthodontic brackets will be evaluated. The repeatability of the three-dimensional digital image correlation measurement method was evaluated by performing 30 archwire rotation tests using the same bracket and archwire. Finally, five Damon 3MX and five In-Ovation R self-ligating brackets will be compared using this technique to demonstrate the effect of archwire rotation on bracket design.

  13. Orthodontic management of a periodontally compromised dentition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant K Zaveri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Malocclusion superimposed with severe periodontitis may present a great challenge to clinicians while providing orthodontic treatment due the episodic and site-specific nature of the disease with risk of rapid tissue breakdown. However, orthodontic treatment in such situation may contribute significantly to the overall rehabilitation both functionally and esthetically. In this article, a case report outlines a combined periodontic-orthodontic management of compromised dentition. A 37-year-old female patient with significant medical history was treated for Class II Division 1 type of malocclusion associated with spaced upper and lower anterior teeth, deep overbite, and increased overjet, superimposed with chronic generalized periodontitis and bone loss. Treatment was completed using temporary anchorage devices assisted strategically applied force and modified tandem retraction biomechanics amidst management of acute inflammatory episodes during and mucogingival complication after treatment. Affected areas healed very well after post-orthodontic periodontal treatment with minimal pocket depth, and bleeding on probing, and a healthy zone of attached gingiva at the follow up visits. The orthodontic results lead to improvement in patient's facial profile, lip posture, and correction of protrusion which addressed her main concern. One year follow-up shows good orthodontic and periodontic stability. The report highlights the importance of identifying “at risk” individuals and continuous monitoring of disease status during treatment. Despite all precautionary measures, a flare-up during the treatment can be anticipated.

  14. A study to assess the quality of information in referral letters to the orthodontic department at Kingston Hospital, Surrey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izadi, Maryam; Gill, Daljit S; Naini, Farhad B

    2010-04-01

    To assess the quality of information included in referral letters sent to the orthodontic department at Kingston Hospital, Surrey, UK. Referral letters sent by both general dental practitioners (GDPs) and specialist orthodontists were analysed retrospectively in order to ascertain the percentage meeting the inclusion criteria as suggested by Mossey (2006) and the British Orthodontic Society (2008) for the quality of information included in an ideal orthodontic referral letter. Thirty-five consecutive letters sent between May and September 2005 and 206 letters sent in the same period in 2008 were collected by hand and analysed against the inclusion criteria. The numbers of referral letters received from GDPs, specialist orthodontists, and others sources were also determined. Most of the referrals sent in 2005 and 2008 included 40-50% of the referral inclusion points. This was despite an almost twofold increase in the number of referral letters received from specialist orthodontic practitioners in 2008. The majority of the letters, from both GDPs and specialists, did not include details of the oral hygiene or caries status of the patient, or an indication of their motivation towards treatment. None of the referral letters included a plaque score. The main weaknesses in the quality of information provided in referral letters were that in more than 80% of the letters there was no mention of the patient's medical history and no comment on caries status, the standard of oral hygiene, patient motivation for treatment, or an Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need score. The quality of information included in referral letters sent to Kingston Hospital orthodontic department needs to be improved.

  15. NECESSITY FACTORS AND PREDICTORS OF DENTAL CROWDING TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgeta ZEGAN

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to identify the significant necessity and predictive factors of dental crowding treatment, on 422 subjects (165 boys and 257 girls from the North-East part of Romania. Correlations have been established between dental crowding and age, dentition, Angle class of malocclusions, the etiological factors, types and modalities of treatments, and types of orthodontic appliances employed (p0.05. The necessity and predictive factors of the treatment were adequate with age, dentition, severity of crowding and Angle class of malocclusion.

  16. Backscattering from dental restorations and splint materials during therapeutic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farman, A.G.; Sharma, S.; George, D.I.; Wilson, D.; Dodd, D.; Figa, R.; Haskell, B.

    1985-01-01

    Models were constructed to simulate as closely as possible the human oral cavity. Radiation absorbed doses were determined for controls and various test situations involving the presence of dental restorative and splint materials during cobalt-60 irradiation of the models. Adjacent gold full crowns and adjacent solid dental silver amalgam cores both increased the dose to the interproximal gingivae by 20%. Use of orthodontic full bands for splinting the jaws increased the dose to the buccal tissues by an average of 10%. Augmentation of dose through backscatter radiation was determined to be only slight for intracoronal amalgam fillings and stainless steel or plastic bracket splints

  17. Audit of the Health Service Executive orthodontic referral pathway between 2009 and 2011 in the Dublin Mid-Leinster region.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wolstencroft, Simon

    2014-03-21

    An audit was undertaken in 2009 to determine the success of the new national orthodontic referral protocol introduced to the Health Service Executive (HSE) in 2007 and operated in the Dublin Mid-Leinster HSE region. It was repeated in 2011 to determine if the HSE austerity measures have had a bearing on the orthodontic service performance in the Dublin Mid-Leinster HSE region. The audit also measured the success of referring practitioners in identifying the correct Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN) classification of the patient. In the 2011 audit, the figures were broken down to identify the occlusal variables that caused dental practitioners most difficulties in identification. The audit demonstrates a good referral to assessment timeframe in 2009 (85-80% compliance for IOTN 5 and 4 within three to six months, respectively), which deteriorates significantly in 2011 (26-4% for IOTN 5 and 4 within three to six months, respectively). The ability of dentists to identify the correct IOTN classification was better in 2009 (60% correct) compared to 2011 (51% correct), but both figures fell below the audit standard of 75% of referrals with correct IOTN classifications. The IOTN occlusal dental health components most readily identified by referring practitioners and meeting audit standards were 5a (overjet >9mm), 5i (impacted teeth) and 5h (extensive hypodontia). The remaining occlusal dental health components in the HSE IOTN fell below the audit standard. The audit clearly identifies a requirement for a continued educational effort to maintain the HSE IOTN skill base in primary care, and a need for additional resources to manage the demand for orthodontic assessments.

  18. Perceived information needs in respect of orthodontics amongst 11-12-year-old girls: a study through health visitor sessions in schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibian, M; Gelbier, S; Munday, B A

    2003-09-01

    The aims of this study were: to explore: (i) the knowledge and views regarding orthodontics of a group of 11-12-year-old girls attending a school in Southeast London and (ii) the terms that they used to obtain the information. The study used Dental Health Education sessions to investigate the aims of the study. Eight DHE sessions at a secondary school for girls were tape recorded. In order to raise the issue of orthodontics and trigger the formation of questions during health education session, a worksheet containing true/false questions, a crossword puzzle regarding orthodontics and some open ended questions was designed and sent to students. They were required to read and complete the worksheet before each session. They were not required to return the completed worksheets to the investigators but did return them to their teachers. The sessions were tape recorded and supplemented by notes taken at the sessions by the investigator. A total of eight DHE sessions, attended by 14 girls each, were tape-recorded. Each tape recording was immediately transcribed verbatim. The next stage was to organize the data and to single out the orthodontic questions and discussions and categorize them. A total of 117 girls aged 11-12-year-old comprised the study group: 77% were white and 23% black children. After reading the transcripts several times, certain themes on orthodontics emerged. The results showed that children questioned different aspects of orthodontics. Nine themes emerged from their questions and discussions. They wanted to know why orthodontic treatment was carried out and when was the right time to start treatment. They were very keen to find out the differences between different orthodontic appliances. The psychosocial impacts of wearing an orthodontic appliance, i.e., experience of pain as well as the need for extraction of some permanent teeth as part of the treatment were of concern. They asked some questions on the need for repair, adjustment and taking care of

  19. The spectrum of Apert syndrome: phenotype, particularities in orthodontic treatment, and characteristics of orthognathic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehmer Ulrike

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the PubMed accessible literature, information on the characteristics of interdisciplinary orthodontic and surgical treatment of patients with Apert syndrome is rare. The aim of the present article is threefold: (1 to show the spectrum of the phenotype, in order (2 to elucidate the scope of hindrances to orthodontic treatment, and (3 to demonstrate the problems of surgery and interdisciplinary approach. Children and adolescents who were born in 1985 or later, who were diagnosed with Apert syndrome, and who sought consultation or treatment at the Departments of Orthodontics or Craniomaxillofacial Surgery at the Dental School of the University Hospital of Münster (n = 22; 9 male, 13 female were screened. Exemplarily, three of these patients (2 male, 1 female, seeking interdisciplinary (both orthodontic and surgical treatment are presented. Orthodontic treatment before surgery was performed by one experienced orthodontist (AH, and orthognathic surgery was performed by one experienced surgeon (UJ, who diagnosed the syndrome according to the criteria listed in OMIM™. In the sagittal plane, the patients suffered from a mild to a very severe Angle Class III malocclusion, which was sometimes compensated by the inclination of the lower incisors; in the vertical dimension from an open bite; and transversally from a single tooth in crossbite to a circular crossbite. All patients showed dentitio tarda, some impaction, partial eruption, idopathic root resorption, transposition or other aberrations in the position of the tooth germs, and severe crowding, with sometimes parallel molar tooth buds in each quarter of the upper jaw. Because of the severity of malocclusion, orthodontic treatment needed to be performed with fixed appliances, and mainly with superelastic wires. The therapy was hampered with respect to positioning of bands and brackets because of incomplete tooth eruption, dense gingiva, and mucopolysaccharide ridges. Some teeth did not

  20. Normative and Subjective Need for Orthodontic Treatment within ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-30

    Jan 30, 2018 ... orthodontic treatment within different age groups in Turkey. Methods: One ... Professionals usually classify the normative need for. Original Article ..... orthodontic services among adolescents in the United States. Am. J Orthod ...

  1. Piezosurgery®-assisted periodontally accelerated osteogenic orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Vilas Pakhare

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontally accelerated osteogenic orthodontic procedure has become useful adjunct to reduce orthodontic treatment time as compared with conventional orthodontics. This case demonstrates the use of Piezosurgery® to facilitate rapid tooth movement with relatively shorter treatment time. A 23-year-old male with Angles Class I malocclusion having spaced anterior teeth and protrusion requested orthodontic treatment with reduced time period. Before surgery, presurgical orthodontic treatment was done to do initial alignment of the teeth. This was followed by piezosurgical corticotomy and final space closure was achieved by active orthodontic tooth movement. The total treatment time required to complete the orthodontic treatment was 5 months. 1-year follow-up revealed no evidence of any adverse periodontal effects or relapse. Thus, Piezosurgery®-assisted corticotomy may prove to be a noble and effective treatment approach to decrease the orthodontic treatment time.

  2. Piezosurgery®-assisted periodontally accelerated osteogenic orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhare, Vikas Vilas; Khandait, Chinmay Harishchandra; Shrivastav, Sunita Satish; Dhadse, Prasad Vijayrao; Baliga, Vidya Sudhindhra; Seegavadi, Vasudevan Dwarkanathan

    2017-01-01

    Periodontally accelerated osteogenic orthodontic procedure has become useful adjunct to reduce orthodontic treatment time as compared with conventional orthodontics. This case demonstrates the use of Piezosurgery ® to facilitate rapid tooth movement with relatively shorter treatment time. A 23-year-old male with Angles Class I malocclusion having spaced anterior teeth and protrusion requested orthodontic treatment with reduced time period. Before surgery, presurgical orthodontic treatment was done to do initial alignment of the teeth. This was followed by piezosurgical corticotomy and final space closure was achieved by active orthodontic tooth movement. The total treatment time required to complete the orthodontic treatment was 5 months. 1-year follow-up revealed no evidence of any adverse periodontal effects or relapse. Thus, Piezosurgery ® -assisted corticotomy may prove to be a noble and effective treatment approach to decrease the orthodontic treatment time.

  3. Periodontal tissue destruction caused by an elastic orthodontic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Once this cooperation is lost, possible negative effects may be the consequence. ... that arises when elastic orthodontic spacers are being used in the mouth. Key words: Open-flap curettage, Orthodontic spacer, Periodontal destruction ...

  4. O primeiro estudo sobre hereditariedade relacionada com as reabsorções dentárias em Ortodontia: uma análise crítica do trabalho de Newman The first study about heredity related to dental resorptions in Orthodontics: a critical analysis of Newman´s work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Consolaro

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Na literatura pertinente à relação entre reabsorções dentárias em Ortodontia e hereditariedade destacam-se quatro artigos: Newman21, Harris, Kineret, Tolley16, Al-Qawasmi et al.¹ e de Al-Qawasmi et al². O trabalho de Newman21 possui o mérito do pioneirismo, mas apesar disto não conseguiu provar ou mostrar fortes evidências da relação entre reabsorções dentárias e hereditariedade. As falhas metodológicas e o pequeno número de gerações e famílias pesquisadas não permitiram afirmações conclusivas, como reconhece explicitamente o próprio autor. A principal falha está na amostra, constituída por raízes curtas sem preocupar-se com a causa das mesmas, incluindo-se raízes curtas próprias do desenvolvimento dentário. Também não houve critério definido para diagnosticar o que é uma raiz curta, foi um critério muito subjetivo. No final nota-se um pequeno número de famílias e gerações, pois foram analisados pais e filhos em apenas 17 heredogramas. Durante o trabalho não houve preocupação com a padronização do tipo de discrepâncias faciais e dentárias, do tipo de má oclusão, da morfologia radicular ou da crista óssea, do tipo de diagnóstico e plano de tratamento, nem tampouco da técnica e dos operadores dos tratamentos ortodônticos. No final considerou-se como causa de maior reabsorção de dentes com raízes curtas, após o tratamento ortodôntico, um potencial de reabsorção ao qual atribui-se um caráter genético, mas sem qualquer fundamentação nos resultados. Hoje, sabe-se que as raízes curtas quando movimentadas apresentam maior índice de reabsorção, pois concentram mais forças no ligamento periodontal, com maior possibilidade lesão na camada cementoblástica e conseqüente reabsorção radicular8, 9, 14,15, 23.Four articles stand out when analyzing literature concerning root resorption in Orthodontics and heritability: Newman21, Harris, Kineret, Tolley16 and Al-Qawasmi et al.¹ e Al

  5. Immunohistochemical Evaluation of Osteocalcin Expression with Application of LIPUS During Relapse Phase of Orthodontic Therapy

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    Kasem A. Abeas

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available There are many biomarkers (proteins representing the biological modifications during bone resorption and formation phenomena, one of the most important proteins is the osteocalcin ,which is the most abundant non collagenous matrix protein in bone and dentine, that used as a clinical marker for bone turnover. Osteocalcin is expressed solely by highly differentiated osteoblasts and is incorporated into the bony matrix, and thought to play a role in the body's metabolic regulation and is pro-osteoblastic, or bone-building, by nature. Low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS is a medical technology used to enhance bone healing, bone growth, bone formation and maturation in different medical situations. Material and method: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of the LIPUS application on the osteocalcin expression and its role in accelerating the bone formation during relapse phase of orthodontic tooth movement. Fourteen male New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into two groups: control and experimental (orthodontically treated(alone in the former plus LIPUS therapy during relapse phase in the latter group. Results: The result almost showed strong immunoreaction for osteocalcin expressed by dental cells and their progenitors in experimental group in the coronal, middle, and apical levels which play essential role in enhancing and accelerating the bone formation and regeneration via increasing the osteogenic cells activity that illustrates a benefit in orthodontic treatment.

  6. Effect of intervention using a messaging app on compliance and duration of treatment in orthodontic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue; Xu, Zhen-Rui; Tang, Na; Ye, Cui; Zhu, Xiao-Ling; Zhou, Ting; Zhao, Zhi-He

    2016-11-01

    This study aims to determine the effectiveness of a messaging app (WeChat) in improving patients' compliance and reducing the duration of orthodontic treatment (DOT). A randomized controlled trial was performed in a dental hospital and a clinic from August 2012 to May 2015. Orthodontic patients were included at the beginning of treatment. Patients with multiphase treatment or braceless technique were excluded. Participants were randomized to WeChat group (received regular reminders and educational messages) or control group (received conventional management) and were followed up until the treatment was completed. Primary outcome measure was DOT. Others were late and failed attendance, bracket bond failure, and oral hygiene condition. One hundred twelve patients in each group participated and completed the trial. DOT in WeChat group were 7.3 weeks shorter (P = 0.007). There were less failed attendance (3.1 vs. 10.9 %, P bond failure (11.8 vs. 16.1 %, P duration and bracket bond failure, and improving the attendance in orthodontic patients. DOT can be reduced by improving patient's compliance. The messaging app is useful for outpatient education and management.

  7. Prevention of enamel demineralization during orthodontic treatment: an in vitro comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichu, Yashodhan M; Kamat, Nandini; Chandra, Pavan Kumar; Kapoor, Aditi; Razmus, Thomas; Aravind, N K S

    2013-01-01

    Enamel demineralization is considered to be the most prevalent and significant iatrogenic effect associated with fixed orthodontic treatment and can seriously jeopardize both tooth longevity and dental esthetics. This in vitro study was undertaken to compare the effectiveness of four different commercially available surface treatment medicaments for the inhibition of enamel demineralization. Seventy-five intact maxillary premolars extracted from patients undergoing orthodontic treatment were divided into five equal groups and were subjected to one of the following protocols: no treatment (control group) or treatment with one of the following four medicaments: fluoride varnish (Fluor Protector [FP]), casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (GC Tooth Mousse [TM]), calcium sodium phosphosilicate (SHY-NM), and casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate with fluoride (GC Tooth Mousse Plus [TMP]). All the teeth were subjected to ten Cate demineralization solution?for 96 hours and subsequently evaluated under polarized light microscopy to obtain the mean depths of enamel demineralization. One-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni comparison tests were used to obtain statistically significant differences between the five different groups at P < .05. All four surface treatment medicaments provided statistically significant reduction in the depths of enamel demineralization as compared with the control group. FP provided the greatest protection of enamel surface in terms of reduction of lesion depth, followed by TMP, SHY-NM, and TM. The use of these commercially available medicaments could prove to be beneficial for patients undergoing orthodontic treatment and who are at a risk for developing enamel decalcification.

  8. Release of metal ions from fixed orthodontic appliance: an in vitro study in continuous flow system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulewicz, Marcin; Chojnacka, Katarzyna; Wołowiec, Paulina

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the release of metal ions from fixed orthodontic appliances. A new system for in vitro testing of dental materials was constructed and consisted of a thermostatic glass reactor that enabled immersion of the studied material. Experimental conditions reflected the human oral cavity, with a temperature of 37°C and a saliva flow rate of 0.5mL/min. The simulated fixed orthodontic appliance made of stainless steel was evaluated. Sampling was performed at several time points during the 28-day study, and the metal ion concentration was determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. The total mass of released metal ions from the appliance during 4 weeks of the experiment was as follows nickel 18.7 μg, chromium 5.47 μg, copper 31.3 μg. The estimated doses of nickel, chromium, and copper determined by extrapolation of experimental data released during the treatment period were far below the toxic dose to humans. This shows that orthodontic treatment might not be a significant source of exposure to these metal ions.

  9. T-scan III system diagnostic tool for digital occlusal analysis in orthodontics - a modern approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trpevska, Vesna; Kovacevska, Gordana; Benedeti, Alberto; Jordanov, Bozidar

    2014-01-01

    This systematic literature review was performed to establish the mechanism, methodology, characteristics, clinical application and opportunities of the T-Scan III System as a diagnostic tool for digital occlusal analysis in different fields of dentistry, precisely in orthodontics. Searching of electronic databases, using MEDLINE and PubMed, hand searching of relevant key journals, and screening of reference lists of included studies with no language restriction was performed. Publications providing statistically examined data were included for systematic review. Twenty potentially relevant Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) were identified. Only ten met the inclusion criteria. The literature demonstrates that using digital occlusal analysis with T-Scan III System in orthodontics has significant advantage with regard to the capability of measuring occlusal parameters in static positions and during dynamic of the mandible. Within the scope of this systematic review, there is evidence to support that T-Scan system is rapid and accurate in identifying the distribution of the tooth contacts and it shows great promise as a clinical diagnostic screening device for occlusion and for improving the occlusion after various dental treatments. Additional clinical studies are required to advance the indication filed of this system. Importance of using digital occlusal T-Scan analysis in orthodontics deserves further investigation.

  10. Gingival response in orthodontic patients: Comparative study between self-ligating and conventional brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folco, Alejandra A; Benítez-Rogé, Sandra C; Iglesias, Marina; Calabrese, Diana; Pelizardi, Cristina; Rosa, Alcira; Brusca, Marisa I; Hecht, Pedro; Mateu, María E

    2014-01-01

    Orthodontic brackets contribute to the accumulation of bacterial plaque on tooth surfaces because they hinder oral hygiene. In contrast to conventional brackets, self-ligating brackets do not require additional parts to support the arches, thus improving dental hygiene. The aim of this study was to compare the gingival response in orthodontic patients wearing self-ligating or conventional brackets. A sample of 22 patients aged 16 to 30 years was divided into two groups: Group A, treated with selfligating brackets (Damon system) and Group B, treated with conventional brackets (Roth technique). The following were assessed during the treatment: Plaque Index (PI), Gingival Index (GI) and Probing Depth (PD), and sub-gingival samples were taken from teeth 14/24 for microbiological observation. No statistically significant difference was found between Groups A and B; p>0.05 (sign-ranked) or between PI, GI and PD at the different times (Friedman's Analysis of Variance), even though the indices were found to increase at 14 days, particularly for self-ligating brackets. The quantity and quality of microorganisms present were compatible with health on days 0, 28 and 56. As from day 14 there is a predominance of microbiota compatible with gingivitis in both groups. In the samples studied, orthodontic treatment increases bacterial plaque and inflammatory gingival response, but gingival-periodontal health can be maintained with adequate basic therapy. Self-ligating and conventional brackets produced similar gingival response.

  11. Assessing the effects of hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrighetto, Augusto Ricardo; de Leão Withers, Eduardo Henrique; Grando, Karlos Giovani; Ambrosio, Aldrieli Regina; Shimizu, Roberto Hideo; Melo, Ana Cláudia

    2016-01-01

    Tooth bleaching is, today, one of the most widespread cosmetic treatments in dental practice,  so it is important to determine whether it can interfere with orthodontic bonding or not. The aim of this study was to assess the in vitro effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets. Forty-five upper bicuspids were divided into three groups (n = 15). In the control Group (C), the brackets were bonded without previous bleaching treatment. Group 1 (G1) was treated with 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent 24 h before bracket bonding. Group 2 was also bleached, and the brackets were bonded after 30 days. The shear bond strength of the brackets was measured using an EMIC machine, and the results were analyzed by ANOVA. There were no statistically significant differences between the three groups (P > 0.05), with Group C showing a mean bond strength of 9.72 ± 2.63 MPa, G1 of 8.09 ± 2.63 MPa, and G2 of 11.15 ± 4.42 MPa. It was possible to conclude that 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent does not affect the shear strength of orthodontic brackets bonded 24 h and 30 days after bleaching.

  12. Missing upper incisors: a retrospective study of orthodontic space closure versus implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamilian, Abdolreza; Perillo, Letizia; Rosa, Marco

    2015-02-25

    The aim of this retrospective study was to compare the esthetic, periodontal, and functional outcomes of orthodontic space closure versus implant substitution in patients with missing maxillary incisors 5 years after completion of treatment. The study group consisted of ten patients treated with orthodontic space closure (six males, four females, mean age 19 ± 2.1 years at the completion of treatment) and ten patients treated with implant insertion (five males, five females, mean age 20 ± 1.4 years at the time of implant insertion). Tooth mobility, plaque index, probing depth, infraocclusion, open gingival embrasure (black triangle), and temporomandibular joint function were recorded at the 5.6 years follow-up. Self-perceived dental esthetic appearance was also evaluated through a visual analog scale (VAS) questionnaire. T-test was used to evaluate the data. All patients were equally satisfied with the appearance of their teeth 5.6 ± 0.4 years after the completion of treatment. No statistically significant differences were found in relation to the VAS scores of the subjects (P Orthodontic space closure and implant of missing maxillary incisors produced similar, well-accepted esthetic results. None of the treatments impaired temporomandibular joint function. Nevertheless, infraocclusion was evident in implant patients. Space closure patients also showed better periodontal health in comparison with implant patients.

  13. Effect of titanium dioxide nanoparticle addition into orthodontic adhesive resin on enamel microhardness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriani, A.; Krisnawati; Purwanegara, M. K.

    2017-08-01

    White spots are an early sign of enamel demineralization, which may lead to development of dental caries. Enamel demineralization can be determined by examining the microhardness number of the enamel. Addition of antibacterial agents such as TiO2 nanoparticles into the orthodontic adhesive (TiO2 nanocomposite) is expected to prevent enamel demineralization. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of TiO2 nanocomposites in maintaining enamel microhardness around orthodontic brackets. The bracket was bonded to the premolar using Transbond XT (group 1), 1% TiO2 nanocomposites (group 2), and 2% TiO2 nanocomposites (group 3). Group 4 was the control group, and it was not given any treatment prior to the microhardness test. The samples of groups 1, 2, and 3 were soaked in BHI solution containing Streptococcus mutans, and then stored in an incubator at 37°C for 30 days. Demineralizations were determined on cross-sectioned tooth 100μm and 200μm cervical to the bracket by the Vickers microhardness test. The microhardness values were significantly different between every group, with the highest value obtained for control group, followed by the 2% TiO2 nanocomposite group, 1% TiO2 nanocomposite group, and then the Transbond XT group. The results of this study reveal that 2% TiO2 nanocomposites have the ability to maintain enamel microhardness around the orthodontic bracket.

  14. Electrophoretic Deposition as a New Bioactive Glass Coating Process for Orthodontic Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyotaro Kawaguchi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the surface modification of orthodontic stainless steel using electrophoretic deposition (EPD of bioactive glass (BG. The BG coatings were characterized by spectrophotometry, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, and X-ray diffraction. The frictional properties were investigated using a progressive load scratch test. The remineralization ability of the etched dental enamel was studied according to the time-dependent mechanical properties of the enamel using a nano-indentation test. The EPD process using alternating current produced higher values in both reflectance and lightness. Additionally, the BG coating was thinner than that prepared using direct current, and was completely amorphous. All of the BG coatings displayed good interfacial adhesion, and Si and O were the major components. Most BG-coated specimens produced slightly higher frictional forces compared with non-coated specimens. The hardness and elastic modulus of etched enamel specimens immersed with most BG-coated specimens recovered significantly with increasing immersion time compared with the non-coated specimen, and significant acid-neutralization was observed for the BG-coated specimens. The surface modification technique using EPD and BG coating on orthodontic stainless steel may assist the development of new non-cytotoxic orthodontic metallic appliances having satisfactory appearance and remineralization ability.

  15. Patients' and parents' concerns and decisions about orthodontic treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Kazanc?, Fatih; Aydo?an, Cihan; Alkan, ?zer

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients' and parents' expectations are important in orthodontic treatment decision making. The literature generally demonstrates the perceived benefits of orthodontic treatment, but patients' and their parents' concerns about orthodontic treatment have not been investigated comprehensively. The aim of this study was to identify patients' and parents' concerns about orthodontic treatment and compare them according to sex, age, and treatment demand level. Methods One hundred and eigh...

  16. In-Office Bleaching During Orthodontic Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Mauricio Neves; Dutra, Hélio; Morais, Alexandre; Sgura, Ricardo; Devito-Moraes, André Guaraci

    2017-04-01

    To demonstrate that it is possible to pursue teeth whitening treatment protocols during orthodontic treatment with no esthetic loss. Many patients undergoing orthodontic treatment desire to have a straight and well aligned dentition, but also whiter teeth. For many years, it was believed that carrying out a whitening treatment with positioned orthodontic brackets in place would result in localized spots on the enamel labial surfaces of teeth. However, a deeper understanding of the bleaching process suggests that the oxidation caused by products, which results from hydrogen peroxide decomposition, are able to diffuse peripherally into the tooth structure and reach even that under the cemented brackets. Two in-office-bleaching