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Sample records for titanium diboride powder

  1. Preparation of titanium diboride powders from titanium alkoxide and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Titanium diboride powders were prepared through a sol–gel and boron carbide reduction route by using TTIP and B4C as titanium and boron sources. The influence of TTIP concentration, reaction temperature and molar ratio of precursors on the synthesis of titanium diboride was investigated. Three different concentrations ...

  2. Titanium diboride-chromium diboride-yttrium titanium oxide ceramic composition and a process for making the same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holcombe, C.E.; Dykes, N.L.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a ceramic composition. The ceramic composition consists essentially of from about 84 to 96 w/o titanium diboride, from about 1 to 9 w/o chromium diboride, and from about 3 to about 15 w/o yttrium-titanium-oxide. A method of making the ceramic composition is also described. The method of making the ceramic composition comprises the following steps: Step 1 - A consolidated body containing stoichiometric quantities of titanium diboride and chromium diboride is provided. Step 2 - The consolidated body is enclosed in and in contact with a thermally insulated package of yttria granules having a thickness of at least 0.5 inches. Step 3 - The consolidated body enclosed in the thermally insulated package of yttria granules is heated in a microwave oven with microwave energy to a temperature equal to or greater than 1,900 degrees centigrade to sinter and uniformly disperse yttria particles having a size range from about 1 to about 12 microns throughout the consolidated body forming a densified body consisting essentially of titanium diboride, chromium diboride, and yttrium-titanium-oxide. The resulting densified body has enhanced fracture toughness and hardness

  3. Synthesis of titanium diboride reinforced alumina matrix nanocomposite by mechanochemical reaction of Al-TiO{sub 2}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammad Sharifi, E., E-mail: e.mohamadsharifi@ma.iut.ac.i [Department of Materials Engineering, Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials Institute, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karimzadeh, F.; Enayati, M.H. [Department of Materials Engineering, Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials Institute, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-07-23

    In order to produce alumina matrix nanocomposite reinforced by titanium diboride, a mixture of titanium oxide, boron oxide and aluminum powders was subjected to high-energy ball milling. The structural evaluation of powder particles after different milling times was studied by X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that after 60 h of milling the Al/TiO{sub 2}/B{sub 2}O{sub 3} reacted with a self-propagating combustion mode and an alumina matrix nanocomposite containing titanium diboride particulate was formed. In final stage of milling, the crystallite size of alumina and titanium diboride were calculated to be less than 50 nm. No phase change observed after annealing treatment of the synthesized nanocomposite powders. The formation mechanism of this nanocomposite was investigated.

  4. RBS and XRD analysis of silicon doped titanium diboride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mollica, S.; Sood, D.K.; Ghantasala, M.K.; Kothari, R.

    1999-01-01

    Titanium diboride is a newly developed material suitable for protective coatings. Its high temperature oxidation resistance at temperatures of 700 deg C and beyond is limited due to its poor oxidative behaviour. This paper presents a novel approach to improving the coatings' oxidative characteristics at temperatures of 700 deg C by doping with silicon. Titanium diboride films were deposited onto Si(100) wafer substrates using a DC magnetron sputtering system. Films were deposited in two different compositions, one at pure TiB 2 and the other with 20 % Si doping. These samples were vacuum annealed at 700 deg C at 1x10 -6 Torr to investigate the anaerobic behaviour of the material at elevated temperatures and to ensure that they were crystalline. Samples were then oxidised in air at 700 deg C to investigate their oxidation resistance. Annealing the films at 700 deg C in air results in the oxidation of the film as titanium and boron form TiO 2 and B 2 O 3 . Annealing is seen to produce only minor changes in the films. There is some silicon diffusion from the substrate at elevated temperatures, which is related to the porous nature of the deposited film and the high temperature heat treatments. However, silicon doped films showed relatively less oxidation characteristics after annealing in air compared with the pure TiB 2 samples

  5. Titanium diboride coatings and their interaction with the substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierson, H.O.; Randich, E.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of titanium diboride (TiB 2 ) on metallic substrates, using the hydrogen reduction of TiCl 4 and BCl 3 at 1 atmosphere and at temperatures between 850 0 C and 1050 0 C is described. To be coated, the substrate had to meet the following requirements: (1) ability to withstand the deposition temperature without detrimental transformation, (2) chemical inertness to the by-products of the reaction (mostly HCl), (3) reasonable matching of its thermal expansion with that of TiB 2 . The latter requirement may be partially circumvented by using a ductile intermediate coating such as Cu or Ni. Substrates meeting these requirements were W, Ta, Ni, WC, TiC, Kovar and some high chrome steels. Coatings on these substrates were examined by metallographic techniques, scanning electron microscope, x-ray diffraction and electron microprobe. The structures and the degree of interdiffusion were determined. In most cases, intermediate borides of the type M 3 B and M 2 B were formed. The hardness of the coatings was 3330 +- 310 kg/mm 2 (VHN 50 ). Coatings of TiB 2 have already been used successfully on letdown valves in a bench scale coal liquefaction reactor at Sandia Laboratories

  6. Composite materials and bodies including silicon carbide and titanium diboride and methods of forming same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillo, Thomas M.; Chu, Henry S.; Harrison, William M.; Bailey, Derek

    2013-01-22

    Methods of forming composite materials include coating particles of titanium dioxide with a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon, and reacting the titanium dioxide with the substance including boron and the substance including carbon to form titanium diboride. The methods may be used to form ceramic composite bodies and materials, such as, for example, a ceramic composite body or material including silicon carbide and titanium diboride. Such bodies and materials may be used as armor bodies and armor materials. Such methods may include forming a green body and sintering the green body to a desirable final density. Green bodies formed in accordance with such methods may include particles comprising titanium dioxide and a coating at least partially covering exterior surfaces thereof, the coating comprising a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon.

  7. Thermal-shock Resistance of a Ceramic Comprising 60 Percent Boron Carbide and 40 Percent Titanium Diboride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeomans, C M; Hoffman, C A

    1953-01-01

    Thermal-shock resistance of a ceramic comprising 60 percent boron carbide and 40 percent titanium diboride was investigated. The material has thermal shock resistance comparable to that of NBS body 4811C and that of zirconia, but is inferior to beryllia, alumina, and titanium-carbide ceramals. It is not considered suitable for turbine blades.

  8. Preparation of titanium diboride powders from titanium alkoxide and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    1⋅3 to 2⋅5. The results indicated that as the TTIP concentration had an important role in gel formation, the reaction temperature and B4C to TTIP molar ratio showed obvious effects on the formation of TiB2. Pure. TiB2 was prepared using molar composition of Ti : B4C = 1 : 2⋅3 and the optimum synthesis temperature was.

  9. Preparation of titanium diboride powders from titanium alkoxide and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    esting engineering ceramic material which can be used as ballistic armor ... such as metal oxides and ceramics. In the process, reactive metal precursors were initially hydrolyzed, followed by condensation and polymerization reactions. Metal alkoxides are metal- .... bide was studied. Process parameters were optimized to.

  10. Development of microstructure during sintering and aluminium exposure of titanium diboride ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersen, Gunnar

    1997-12-31

    In the production of aluminium, much less energy need be consumed if an inert, wetted cathode is present in the electrolysis cell. Titanium diboride, TiB{sub 2}, is easily wetted and does not readily dissolve in liquid aluminium, but it degrades, probably because aluminium penetrates into it during electrolysis. This degradation is linked to impurities present in the TiB{sub 2} after sintering. This thesis studies the sintering process and how aluminium penetrates into the material. High-purity, high-density TiB{sub 2} compacts were made by hot pressing at 50 MPa in an argon atmosphere at 1790-1960 {sup o}C. Samples were made with different impurity additions. These samples were exposed to liquid aluminium at 980 {sup o}C for 24 hours. All samples were penetrated, but the amount and appearance depended on the sintering aid used. Unlike the other samples, pure TiB{sub 2} was easily penetrated by metallic aluminium because of the open porosity and microcracks of this material. Grain boundary penetration was common among the samples. Differences in penetration behaviour between grain boundaries are probably due to differences in grain boundary energy. But no relation to segregants or boundary misorientation was found. The orientation of grain boundary planes and de-wetting of thin films upon cooling may explain the observed microstructure development. The samples sintered with Ti addition suffered extensive penetration despite their high densities. The grain boundaries of these samples became faceted and contained thicker films of metallic aluminium, presumably because of increased solubility due to iron segregations. All secondary phases present in the grain junctions after sintering, except from the B{sub 4}C phase, reacted with the penetrated aluminium. This did not cause swelling and cracking, as has been suggested by other authors. 101 refs., 48 figs., 7 tabs.

  11. Progress in Titanium Metal Powder Injection Molding

    OpenAIRE

    German, Randall M.

    2013-01-01

    Metal powder injection molding is a shaping technology that has achieved solid scientific underpinnings. It is from this science base that recent progress has occurred in titanium powder injection molding. Much of the progress awaited development of the required particles with specific characteristics of particle size, particle shape, and purity. The production of titanium components by injection molding is stabilized by a good understanding of how each process variable impacts density and im...

  12. Evaluating the Johanson theory for titanium powder

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Chikosha, S

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available . In this study, the Johanson theory was used to determine the rolling parameters of titanium powder. Preliminary results of the nip angle, nip pressures and maximum horizontal pressures of the mill for the powder rolled on a 55mm diameter roll with roll gap sizes...

  13. Importance of Fuel Cell Tests for Stability Assessment—Suitability of Titanium Diboride as an Alternative Support Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Roth

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbon corrosion is a severe issue limiting the long-term stability of carbon-supported catalysts, in particular in the highly dynamic conditions of automotive applications. (Doped oxides have been discussed as suitable alternatives to replace carbon, but often suffer from poor electron conductivity. That is why non-oxide ceramics, such as tungsten carbide and titanium nitride, have been discussed recently. Titanium diboride has also been proposed, due to its promising activity and stability in an aqueous electrochemical cell. In this work, Pt nanoparticles were deposited onto μm-sized TiB2 particles with improved grain size, manufactured into porous gas diffusion electrodes and tested in a realistic polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM fuel cell environment. In contrast to the model studies in an aqueous electrochemical cell, in the presence of oxygen and high potentials at the cathode side of a real fuel cell, TiB2 becomes rapidly oxidized as indicated by intensely colored regions in the membrane-electrode assembly (MEA. Moreover, already the electrode manufacturing process led to the formation of titanium oxides, as shown by X-ray diffraction measurements. This demonstrates that Cyclic Voltammetry (CV measurements in an aqueous electrochemical cell are not sufficient to prove stability of novel materials for fuel cell applications.

  14. Reactive Spark Plasma Sintering and Mechanical Properties of Zirconium Diboride–Titanium Diboride Ultrahigh Temperature Ceramic Solid Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthiselva N. S.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ultrahigh temperature ceramics (UHTCs such as diborides of zirconium, hafnium tantalum and their composites are considered to be the candidate materials for thermal protection systems of hypersonic vehicles due to their exceptional combination of physical, chemical and mechanical properties. A composite of ZrB2-TiB2 is expected to have better properties. In this study, an attempt has been made to fabricate ZrB2-TiB2 ceramics using mechanically activated elemental powders followed by reactive spark plasma sintering (RSPS at 1400 °C. Microstructure and phase analysis was carried out using X-ray diffractometer (XRD and electron microscopy to understand microstructure evolution. Fracture toughness and hardness were evaluated using indentation methods. Nanoindentation was used to measure elastic modulus. Compressive strength of the composites has been reported.

  15. Incoherent x-ray emission of titanium diboride at the boron site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ederer, D.L.; Winarski, R.; Ek, J. van [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    This group has made a study of a large number of transition metal diborides and hexaborides. As an example they would like to consider one of them. This class of compounds are of technical interest because they are quite hard, metallic, and chemically stable, and have high melting points. In addition to the technical importance of the borides, the group is interested in compounds of this type because of the very strong 1s {r_arrow} p* resonance that has been observed and associated with the boron atom.

  16. Titanium surgical implants processed by powder metallurgy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, M.V. de [INT-DMCM, Inst. Nacional de Tecnologia, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pereira, L.C. [Programa de Eng. de Materiais e Metalurgica, UFRJ-COPPE (Brazil); Schwanke, C.M.; Schaeffer, L. [Centro de Tecnologia- LdTM-INT-DMCM, UFRGS, Venezuela, CEP, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2001-07-01

    Due to their low density coupled with excellent corrosion resistance and good mechanical properties, titanium and titanium alloys have been widely used for surgical implants. They have also a relatively low young's modulus, allowing a good load transfer to the bone. The elastic modulus difference between metallic implant material and bone is large, which can lead to a fracture of the implant. To solve this problem, many implants for artificial joint and dental applications have been produced by powder metallurgy routes, obtaining a porous material with an even lower young's modulus than that of the bulk titanium. This porous structure allows bone ingrowth, as the osseous tissue invade the holes of the porous material while growing and adheres to it. Besides, near net shape technologies like powder metallurgy and injection molding techniques, can reduce the components high costs due to machining final steps, also providing a fine, uniform grain structure and lack of texture and segregation. This work outlines the characteristics, properties and some of the powder routes for producing titanium surgical implants and implant porous coatings. (orig.)

  17. Progress in Titanium Metal Powder Injection Molding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, Randall M

    2013-08-20

    Metal powder injection molding is a shaping technology that has achieved solid scientific underpinnings. It is from this science base that recent progress has occurred in titanium powder injection molding. Much of the progress awaited development of the required particles with specific characteristics of particle size, particle shape, and purity. The production of titanium components by injection molding is stabilized by a good understanding of how each process variable impacts density and impurity level. As summarized here, recent research has isolated the four critical success factors in titanium metal powder injection molding (Ti-MIM) that must be simultaneously satisfied-density, purity, alloying, and microstructure. The critical role of density and impurities, and the inability to remove impurities with sintering, compels attention to starting Ti-MIM with high quality alloy powders. This article addresses the four critical success factors to rationalize Ti-MIM processing conditions to the requirements for demanding applications in aerospace and medical fields. Based on extensive research, a baseline process is identified and reported here with attention to linking mechanical properties to the four critical success factors.

  18. Progress in Titanium Metal Powder Injection Molding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randall M. German

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Metal powder injection molding is a shaping technology that has achieved solid scientific underpinnings. It is from this science base that recent progress has occurred in titanium powder injection molding. Much of the progress awaited development of the required particles with specific characteristics of particle size, particle shape, and purity. The production of titanium components by injection molding is stabilized by a good understanding of how each process variable impacts density and impurity level. As summarized here, recent research has isolated the four critical success factors in titanium metal powder injection molding (Ti-MIM that must be simultaneously satisfied—density, purity, alloying, and microstructure. The critical role of density and impurities, and the inability to remove impurities with sintering, compels attention to starting Ti-MIM with high quality alloy powders. This article addresses the four critical success factors to rationalize Ti-MIM processing conditions to the requirements for demanding applications in aerospace and medical fields. Based on extensive research, a baseline process is identified and reported here with attention to linking mechanical properties to the four critical success factors.

  19. Carbon nanotube and in-situ titanium carbide reinforced titanium diboride matrix composites synthesized by reactive spark plasma sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karthiselva, N.S.; Bakshi, Srinivasa R., E-mail: sbakshi@iitm.ac.in

    2016-04-29

    Mechanically milled powder mixtures of Titanium and Boron containing 1, 2, 4 and 6 vol% multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) were consolidated by reactive spark plasma sintering resulting in TiB{sub 2}-TiC-CNT hybrid composites. Addition of CNT was found to affect the reaction rate for TiB{sub 2} formation which results in sudden volume shrinkage. Rod shaped TiC were formed due to reaction between Ti and CNT. TiB{sub 2}-TiC-CNT hybrid composites having more than 96% relative density with nanosized TiB{sub 2} grains were obtained. XRD results revealed TiB{sub 2} and TiC as major and minor phases respectively. Unreacted CNT were observed in SEM and TEM. TiB{sub 2}-TiC-CNT composites showed nanohardness of above 25 GPa and elastic modulus of 520 GPa. Indentation fracture toughness was improved by 55% (3.3±0.1 to 5.11±0.6) by the addition of 4 vol% of CNT. The effect of CNT addition on oxidation and co-efficient of thermal expansion is also presented.

  20. Cryogenic Milling of Titanium Powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Kozlík

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ti Grade 2 was prepared by cryogenic attritor milling in liquid nitrogen and liquid argon. Two types of milling balls were used—stainless steel balls and heavy tungsten carbide balls. The effect of processing parameters on particle size and morphology, contamination of powder and its microhardness was investigated. Milling in liquid nitrogen was not feasible due to excessive contamination by nitrogen. Minor reduction of particle size and significant alterations in particle morphology depended on type of milling balls and application of stearic acid as processing control agent. Heavily deformed ultra-fine grained (UFG internal microstructure of powder particles was observed by the method of “transmission Kikuchi diffraction”.

  1. Laser powder microdeposition of CP2 Titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meacock, C.; Vilar, R.

    2008-01-01

    Laser powder microdeposition (LPMD) uses a finely focused laser beam to generate a minute meltpool on the surface of a metallic substrate into which metallic powder is blown. The laser/powder interaction zone is scanned over the substrate and molten material re-solidifies leaving microscale tracks of deposited material. The ability to deposit material on this scale opens up the possibilities of the alteration of the surface properties of small metallic components, the repair of fine damage such as fractures and wear and the fabrication of small components that require high dimensional accuracy such as dental and maxillofacial implants. In this paper, a novel Laser powder microdeposition system is described whereby the powder is fed via a fine capillary. The system was used to deposit single tracks, thin walls and a solid part of grade 2 commercially pure (CP2) Titanium, a material suitable for the fabrication of dental implants. The geometry of both single tracks and thin walls of CP2 Titanium deposited by LPMD can be controlled by variation of laser power and scanning speed. The process can be used to produce porosity free thin wall structures with widths lower than 450 μm and with a surface roughness lower than 20 μm (Ra)

  2. Caracterisation du composite titanium diboride-carbone avec l'aluminium liquide et le bain cryolithique des cuves d'electrolyse de l'aluminium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionne, Martin

    It is the aluminum industry which is most interested in titanium diboride (TiB2) and TiB2-carbon composites (TCC). The interesting properties of TiB2 were recognized as early as the 50s. In this study, both raw materials (anthracite, pitch and TiB2 powder) and TiB2-carbon composite were characterized. Results on a comparative microscopic evaluation between TiB2-carbon composites and conventional anthracite-based carbon cathode samples after laboratory immersion and electrolysis tests are presented. Inclusions of alumino-silicate and iron oxide types were found in the anthracite aggregates. XRD analysis allowed to differentiate between two types of aggregates: stratified (Lc = 44 nm) and non-stratified (L c = 15 nm). The principal impurity found in the TiB2 powder was TiCN and surface analysis of the particles revealed the presence of a contaminant layer composed of C, N, O and Ti; the thickness of this layer varied from 5 nm to 15 nm. Although pure molten aluminum wets TiB2 after a latent period and penetrates the composite to a depth of about 100 to 200 mum, the TiB 2 shows no evidence of dissolution. Liquid aluminum, in direct contact with carbon, reacts readily to form Al4C3; the carbon from baked pitch is more reactive than the coarser anthracite particles. Molten bath dissolved TiB2 grains preferentially along specific atomic planes. The extent of liquid bath penetration is very low for the anthracite carbon cathode, compared to the composite material which is completely impregnated within minutes. In the case of the composite, a ≈500 mum thick coherent layer of TiB2/Al4C3 composite is formed, the carbon being almost completely reacted in this zone. Following the electrolysis tests, a film of electrolyte containing aluminum nodules and filaments covers the surface of the conventional carbon cathode. In the case of the TiB2-carbon composite, a continuous film of aluminum metal is observed, wetting the surface of the sample. The penetrating aluminum reacts

  3. Sintering of titanium alloy by powder metallurgy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cosme, C.R.M. [Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), DF (Brazil); Henriques, V.A.R.; Cairo, C.A.A.; Taddei, E.B. [Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial (CTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Full text: Titanium alloys are suitable for biomaterial applications, considering its biocompatibility and low elastic modulus compared to steel. Bone resorption in this case can be reduced by load sharing between the implant and natural bone.Starting powders were obtained by hydride method, carried out under positive hydrogen pressure at 500 deg C for titanium and 800 deg C for Nb, Zr and Ta powders. After reaching the nominal temperature, the material was held for 3h, with subsequent cooling to room temperature and milling of the friable hydride. Samples were produce by mixing of initial metallic powders followed by and cold isostatic pressing. Subsequent densification by sintering was performed at temperature range between 900 and 1700 deg C. Characterization was carried out with scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry and microhardness measurements. Microstructural examinations revealed higher amount of &⧣946;-phase for higher sintering temperature and dissolution of Ta and NB particles. In vitro tests revealed low cytotoxicity of sintered samples. (author)

  4. Titanium Metal Powder Production by the Plasma Quench Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. A. Cordes; A. Donaldson

    2000-09-01

    The goals of this project included the scale-up of the titanium hydride production process to a production rate of 50 kg/hr at a purity level of 99+%. This goal was to be achieved by incrementally increasing the production capability of a series of reactor systems. This methodic approach was designed to allow Idaho Titanium Technologies to systematically address the engineering issues associated with plasma system performance, and powder collection system design and performance. With quality powder available, actual fabrication with the titanium hydride was to be pursued. Finally, with a successful titanium production system in place, the production of titanium aluminide was to be pursued by the simultaneously injection of titanium and aluminum precursors into the reactor system. Some significant accomplishments of the project are: A unique and revolutionary torch/reactor capable of withstanding temperatures up to 5000 C with high thermal efficiency has been operated. The dissociation of titanium tetrachloride into titanium powder and HC1 has been demonstrated, and a one-megawatt reactor potentially capable of producing 100 pounds per hour has been built, but not yet operated at the powder level. The removal of residual subchlorides and adsorbed HC1 and the sintering of powder to form solid bodies have been demonstrated. The production system has been operated at production rates up to 40 pounds per hour. Subsequent to the end of the project, Idaho Titanium Technologies demonstrated that titanium hydride powder can indeed be sintered into solid titanium metal at 1500 C without sintering aids.

  5. Characterization and Sintering of Armstrong Process Titanium Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoyan; Nash, Philip; Mangabhai, Damien

    2017-04-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys have a high strength to weight ratio and good corrosion resistance but also need longer time and have a higher cost on machining. Powder metallurgy offers a viable approach to produce near net-shape complex components with little or no machining. The Armstrong titanium powders are produced by direct reduction of TiCl4 vapor with liquid sodium, a process which has a relatively low cost. This paper presents a systematic research on powder characterization, mechanical properties, and sintering behavior and of Armstrong process powder metallurgy, and also discusses the sodium issue, and the advantages and disadvantages of Armstrong process powders.

  6. Design of a reactor system for the synthesis of titanium diboride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsui, M.E.; Epstein, H.A.

    1981-10-01

    TiB 2 , a hard, refractory material, is difficult to produce at a purity required for many potential uses. In this study, a laboratory-scale reactor system was designed to produce 4 g/h of very pure TiB 2 powder from a homogeneous-nucleation gas-phase reaction. The system operates at temperatures up to 1700 K, pressures from 1 torr to 1 atm, and incorporates a novel flame-reactor concept in which the heat of reaction for powder formation is provided by a H 2 -Cl 2 flame. The powder is produced in an alumina reactor 3-3/8-in. -ID x 55-in. long, with a feed preheater, and is collected in low-pressure traps. The system is fully instrumented for study of reaction kinetics and powder morphology. System startup, operating, shutdown, and safety procedures as well as a proposed experimental plan are included. The estimated construction cost of the system is $24,500

  7. Introduction to powder metallurgy processes for titanium manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteban, P. G.; Bolzoni, L.; Ruiz-Navas, E. M.; Gordo, E.

    2011-01-01

    The development of new extraction processes to produce titanium in powder form leads Powder Metallurgy to an advantage position among the manufacturing processes for titanium. The cost reduction of base material, coupled with the economy of the powder metallurgy processes, give titanium industry the chance to diversify its products, which could lead to production volumes able to stabilise the price of the metal. This work reviews some of the Powder Metallurgy techniques for the manufacturing of titanium parts, and describes the two typical approaches for titanium manufacturing: Blending Elemental and Prealloyed Powders. Among others, conventional pressing and sintering are described, which are compared with cold and hot isostatic pressing techniques. Real and potential applications are described. (Author) 71 refs.

  8. Mechanical Properties of Composites with Titanium Diboride Fabricated by Spark Plasma Sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulima I.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Microstructure and mechanical properties of the 316L steel composite reinforced with TiB2 phase were examined. The test materials were obtained by SPS technique from powders. From testing of the mechanical properties it follows that the optimum temperature for the fabrication of 316Lsteel-TiB2 composites by SPS is 1100°C. Studies have also proved that the critical content of TiB2 phase in steel matrix should not exceed 6vol%. Above this level, the plastic properties of the composite become unstable and strongly dependent on the time of sintering.

  9. A study on the role of diboride in the heterogeneous nucleation of aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, O. M.

    2004-01-01

    The intangible role of titanium and aluminium diboride in the nucleation of aluminium was re-examined. Two different techniques, complemented with scanning electron microscopy, allowed determining the stability of the diboride in the presence of titanium tri aluminides and liquid aluminium phases. Through rapid scintillated quenching the high temperature diboride were retained and studied. Then, in a diffusion couple, the reactivity of such diboride was tested in contact with pure titanium tri aluminide. It is proposed that a ternary diboride acts as the main catalytic particle in the crystallization of aluminium alloys with refined grains. (Author) 27 refs

  10. Distinction between magnesium diboride and tetraboride by kelvin probe force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Du-Na; Caron, Arnaud; Park, Hai Woong

    2016-01-01

    We analyze mixtures of magnesium diboride and tetraboride synthesized with magnesium powders of different shapes. To distinguish between magnesium diboride and tetraboride we use the contrast of kelvin probe force microscopy. The microstructural morphology strongly depends on the shape of the magnesium powders used in the reaction between magnesium and magnesium tetraboride to form magnesium diboride. With spherical magnesium powder an equiaxed microstructure of magnesium diboride is formed with residual magnesium tetraboride at the grain boundaries. With plate-like magnesium powders elongated magnesium diboride grains are formed. In this case, residual magnesium tetraboride is found to agglomerate.

  11. Spark plasma sintering of commercial and development titanium alloy powders

    OpenAIRE

    Weston, N.S.; Derguti, F.; Tudball, A.; Jackson, M.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging lower cost titanium metal powder produced via an electrolytic method has been fully consolidated using spark plasma sintering (SPS) generating microstructures comparable to those observed in Ti–6Al–4V PM product. This is the first time powder from an alternative titanium extraction method has been processed via SPS and it is benchmarked with commercial alloys (CP–Ti, Ti–6Al–4V, and Ti–5Al–5V–5Mo–3Cr). The effect of powder feedstock size, morphology, and alloy chemistry on the consoli...

  12. Cold Spraying of Armstrong Process Titanium Powder for Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, D.; Fernández, R.; Delloro, F.; Jodoin, B.

    2017-04-01

    Titanium parts are ideally suited for aerospace applications due to their unique combination of high specific strength and excellent corrosion resistance. However, titanium as bulk material is expensive and challenging/costly to machine. Production of complex titanium parts through additive manufacturing looks promising, but there are still many barriers to overcome before reaching mainstream commercialization. The cold gas dynamic spraying process offers the potential for additive manufacturing of large titanium parts due to its reduced reactive environment, its simplicity to operate, and the high deposition rates it offers. A few challenges are to be addressed before the additive manufacturing potential of titanium by cold gas dynamic spraying can be reached. In particular, it is known that titanium is easy to deposit by cold gas dynamic spraying, but the deposits produced are usually porous when nitrogen is used as the carrier gas. In this work, a method to manufacture low-porosity titanium components at high deposition efficiencies is revealed. The components are produced by combining low-pressure cold spray using nitrogen as the carrier gas with low-cost titanium powder produced using the Armstrong process. The microstructure and mechanical properties of additive manufactured titanium components are investigated.

  13. Rapid PMR determination of hydrogen in titanium hydride and dehydrogenated titanium powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Il'enko, V.S.; Demidenko, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance (PMR) enables determining hydrogen quantitatively in titanium hydride and dehydrogenated titanium powders without destroying the specimen and is also more informative than high-temperature extraction methods. PMR provides data on the electron-nuclear interactions and the activation energies for hydrogen diffusion while also providing conclusions on the forms and positives of the hydrogen in the lattice and the binding to the metal atoms. The authors have developed a rapid method for determining hydrogen in titanium hydride and dehydrogenated titanium powders which reduces the analysis time and improves the metrological characteristics. The authors use a YaMR-5535 spectrometer working at 40 MHz upgraded for use with hydrogen in solids. The authors used specimens of mass about 2 g ground to 0.1 mm powder

  14. Titanium Powder Sintering in a Graphite Furnace and Mechanical Properties of Sintered Parts

    OpenAIRE

    Changzhou Yu; Peng Cao; Mark Ian Jones

    2017-01-01

    Recent accreditation of titanium powder products for commercial aircraft applications marks a milestone in titanium powder metallurgy. Currently, powder metallurgical titanium production primarily relies on vacuum sintering. This work reported on the feasibility of powder sintering in a non-vacuum furnace and the tensile properties of the as-sintered Ti. Specifically, we investigated atmospheric sintering of commercially pure (C.P.) titanium in a graphite furnace backfilled with argon and stu...

  15. Evaluating the Johanson theory for titanium powder

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Chikosha, S

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Direct powder rolling (DPR)/roll compaction has been labelled a complex and sample sensitive process. As such the design of the instrument and the determination of the optimal processing conditions for a given feed are very challenging...

  16. Production of titanium alloys for medical implants by powder metallurgy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriques, V.A.R. [Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais, Faculdade de Engenharia Quimica de Lorena, Lorena SP (Brazil); Silva, C.R.M. da [Div. de Materiais, CTA-IAE-AMR, Sao Jose dos Campos SP (Brazil)

    2001-07-01

    Titanium alloys are expected to be much more widely used for implant materials in the medical and dental fields because of their superior biocompatibility, corrosion resistance and specific strength compared with other metallic implant materials. Vanadium free alloys like Ti-6Al-7Nb and Ti-5Al-2,5Fe have been recently developed for biomedical use. More recently vanadium and aluminum free alloys composed of non-toxic elements like Nb, Ta, Zr and so on with lower modulus have been started to be developed. The {beta} type alloys like Ti-15Mo are now the main target for medical materials. A blended elemental titanium powder metallurgy process has been developed to offer low cost products. The process employs hydride-dehydride (HDH) powders and near-net shape techniques. In this work, the influence of the processing parameters and chemical composition of the elementary powders on the final microstructure was investigated. The alloys were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Vickers microhardness measurements, chemical analysis and density. The results indicate that the samples presented high densification, homogeneous chemical composition and coherent microstructures. The process parameters were defined aiming to reduce the interstitial pick-up (O, N) and to avoid the grain growth. (orig.)

  17. Analysis of the cold compaction behavior of titanium powders: a comprehensive inter-model comparison study of compaction equations

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Machaka, R

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A brief background to compaction equations and their application to titanium powder is presented. The behavior and mechanisms of densification in selected titanium powders is critically analyzed by means of a comprehensive inter-model comparison...

  18. Introduction to powder metallurgy processes for titanium manufacturing; Introduccion al procesado pulvimetalurgico del titanio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esteban, P. G.; Bolzoni, L.; Ruiz-Navas, E. M.; Gordo, E.

    2011-07-01

    The development of new extraction processes to produce titanium in powder form leads Powder Metallurgy to an advantage position among the manufacturing processes for titanium. The cost reduction of base material, coupled with the economy of the powder metallurgy processes, give titanium industry the chance to diversify its products, which could lead to production volumes able to stabilise the price of the metal. This work reviews some of the Powder Metallurgy techniques for the manufacturing of titanium parts, and describes the two typical approaches for titanium manufacturing: Blending Elemental and Prealloyed Powders. Among others, conventional pressing and sintering are described, which are compared with cold and hot isostatic pressing techniques. Real and potential applications are described. (Author) 71 refs.

  19. Effects of Admixed Titanium on Densification of 316L Stainless Steel Powder during Sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslam Muhammad

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Effects of admixed titanium on powder water atomized (PWA and powder gas atomized (PGA 316L stainless steel (SS have been investigated in terms of densification. PGA and PWA powders, having different shapes and sizes, were cold pressed and sintered in argon atmosphere at 1300°C. The admixed titanium compacts of PGA and PWA have shown significant effect on densification through formation of intermetallic compound and reducing porosity during sintering process. PWA, having particle size 8 μm, blended with 1wt% titanium has exhibited higher sintered density and shrinkage as compared to gas atomized powder compacts. Improved densification of titanium blended PGA and PWA 316L SS at sintering temperature 1300°C is probably due to enhanced diffusion kinetics resulting from stresses induced by concentration gradient in powder compacts.

  20. Titanium nitride deposition in titanium implant alloys produced by powder metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriques, V.A.R.; Cairo, C.A.A.; Faria, J.; Lemos, T.G.; Galvani, E.T.

    2009-01-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN) is an extremely hard material, often used as a coating on titanium alloy, steel, carbide, and aluminum components to improve wear resistance. Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition (EB-PVD) is a form of deposition in which a target anode is bombarded with an electron beam given off by a charged tungsten filament under high vacuum, producing a thin film in a substrate. In this work are presented results of TiN deposition in targets and substrates of Ti (C.P.) and Ti- 13 Nb- 13 Zr obtained by powder metallurgy. Samples were produced by mixing of hydride metallic powders followed by uniaxial and cold isostatic pressing with subsequent densification by sintering between 900°C up to 1400 °C, in vacuum. The deposition was carried out under nitrogen atmosphere. Sintered samples were characterized for phase composition, microstructure and microhardness by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Vickers indentation, respectively. It was shown that the samples were sintered to high densities and presented homogeneous microstructure, with ideal characteristics for an adequate deposition and adherence. The film layer presented a continuous structure with 15μm. (author)

  1. Microstructures and Tensile Mechanical Properties of Titanium Rods Made by Powder Compact Extrusion of a Titanium Hydride Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yifeng; Yao, Xun; Liang, Jiamiao; Zhang, Deliang

    2016-04-01

    Nearly fully dense titanium with good mechanical properties was fabricated rapidly by induction heating, holding, and hot extrusion of the TiH2 powder compacts. The dehydrogenation and consolidation processes took less than 15 minutes in total. The microstructures, contents of interstitial elements (H, O), tensile mechanical properties, and fracture behaviors of titanium samples made with different holding and extrusion temperatures [1273 K, 1373 K, and 1473 K (1000 °C, 1100 °C, and 1200 °C)] were investigated. The results showed that the hydrogen content in the extruded rods was around 0.09 wt pct when the holding and extrusion temperature was 1373 K or 1473 K (1100 °C or 1200 °C), with almost all of the TiH2 phase being transformed into Ti phase during the heating, holding, and extrusion process steps. The extruded Ti samples had a lamellar structure consisting of fine α lamellae with random orientations in different lamellar colonies and the relative density of all the extruded samples exceeded 99.5 pct. The residual TiH2 phase can reduce the ductility of extruded rods. The sample extruded at 1373 K (1100 °C) has the best elongation to fracture of 21.0 pct, and its average yield strength and ultimate tensile strength reached 536.8 and 691.8 MPa, respectively.

  2. Titanium dental copings prepared by a powder metallurgy method: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Mikael; Andersson, Matts; Carlström, Elis

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the Procera pressed-powder method can be used to fabricate titanium copings. Commercially pure titanium powder was used to prepare the copings. The powder was pressed onto an enlarged tooth preparation die of aluminum using cold isostatic pressing. The outer shape of the coping was formed using a Procera milling machine, and the copings were vacuum sintered. Titanium copings could be prepared using this method. The density of the sintered copings reached 97% to 99%+ of theoretic density, and the copings showed ductile behavior after sintering. Enlarging the tooth preparation die to compensate for the sintering shrinkage could optimize the final size of the copings. Ductile and dense titanium dental copings can be produced with powder-metal processing using cold isostatic pressing, followed by milling and sintering to final shape. The forming technique has, if properly optimized, a potential of becoming a more cost-efficient production method than spark erosion.

  3. Production of a low young modulus titanium alloy by powder metallurgy

    OpenAIRE

    Santos,Dalcy Roberto dos; Henriques,Vinicius André Rodrigues; Cairo,Carlos Alberto Alves; Pereira,Marcelo dos Santos

    2005-01-01

    Titanium alloys have several advantages over ferrous and non-ferrous metallic materials, such as high strengthto-weight ratio and excellent corrosion resistance. A blended elemental titanium powder metallurgy process has been developed to offer low cost commercial products. The process employs hydride-dehydride (HDH) powders as raw material. In this work, results of the Ti-35Nb alloy sintering are presented. This alloy due to its lower modulus of elasticity and high biocompatibility is a prom...

  4. Advances in the Systems and Processes for the Production of Gamma Titanium Aluminide Bars and Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haun, Robert E.

    2017-12-01

    A historical look at the melt processing of gamma titanium aluminides is presented first, followed by recent advances in melting equipment design by Retech to produce 50-mm and 100-mm-diameter ingots up to 1000 mm long. Equipment design for the economical production of gamma titanium aluminide powder is then discussed. The focus in industry has shifted away from basic research to cost-effective production of these titanium alloys for aerospace and automotive engine applications.

  5. Titanium Powder Sintering in a Graphite Furnace and Mechanical Properties of Sintered Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changzhou Yu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent accreditation of titanium powder products for commercial aircraft applications marks a milestone in titanium powder metallurgy. Currently, powder metallurgical titanium production primarily relies on vacuum sintering. This work reported on the feasibility of powder sintering in a non-vacuum furnace and the tensile properties of the as-sintered Ti. Specifically, we investigated atmospheric sintering of commercially pure (C.P. titanium in a graphite furnace backfilled with argon and studied the effects of common contaminants (C, O, N on sintering densification of titanium. It is found that on the surface of the as-sintered titanium, a severely contaminated porous scale was formed and identified as titanium oxycarbonitride. Despite the porous surface, the sintered density in the sample interiors increased with increasing sintering temperature and holding time. Tensile specimens cut from different positions within a large sintered cylinder reveal different tensile properties, strongly dependent on the impurity level mainly carbon and oxygen. Depending on where the specimen is taken from the sintered compact, ultimate tensile strength varied from 300 to 580 MPa. An average tensile elongation of 5% to 7% was observed. Largely depending on the interstitial contents, the fracture modes from typical brittle intergranular fracture to typical ductile fracture.

  6. Quantifying the properties of low-cost powder metallurgy titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolzoni, L.; Ruiz-Navas, E.M.; Gordo, E.

    2017-01-01

    The extensive industrial employment of titanium is hindered by its high production costs where reduction of these costs can be achieved using cheap alloying elements and appropriate alternative processing techniques. In this work the feasibility of the production of low-cost titanium alloys is addressed by adding steel to pure titanium and processing the alloys by powder metallurgy. In particular, a spherical 4140 LCH steel powder commonly used in metal injection moulding is blended with irregular hydride-dehydride Ti. The new low-cost alloys are cold uniaxially pressed and sintered under high vacuum and show comparable properties to other wrought-equivalent and powder metallurgy titanium alloys. Differential thermal analysis and X-ray diffraction analyses confirm that Ti can tolerate the employment of iron as primary alloying element without forming detrimental TiFe-based intermetallic phases. Thus, the newly designed α+β alloys could be used for cheaper non-critical components.

  7. Enery Efficient Press and Sinter of Titanium Powder for Low-Cost Components in Vehicle Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Zwitter; Phillip Nash; Xiaoyan Xu; Chadwick Johnson

    2011-03-31

    This is the final technical report for the Department of Energy NETL project NT01931 Energy Efficient Press and Sinter of Titanium Powder for Low-Cost Components in Vehicle Applications. Titanium has been identified as one of the key materials with the required strength that can reduce the weight of automotive components and thereby reduce fuel consumption. Working with newly developed sources of titanium powder, Webster-Hoff will develop the processing technology to manufacture low cost vehicle components using the single press/single sinter techniques developed for iron based powder metallurgy today. Working with an automotive or truck manufacturer, Webster-Hoff will demonstrate the feasibility of manufacturing a press and sinter titanium component for a vehicle application. The project objective is two-fold, to develop the technology for manufacturing press and sinter titanium components, and to demonstrate the feasibility of producing a titanium component for a vehicle application. The lowest cost method for converting metal powder into a net shape part is the Powder Metallurgy Press and Sinter Process. The method involves compaction of the metal powder in a tool (usually a die and punches, upper and lower) at a high pressure (up to 60 TSI or 827 MPa) to form a green compact with the net shape of the final component. The powder in the green compact is held together by the compression bonds between the powder particles. The sinter process then converts the green compact to a metallurgically bonded net shape part through the process of solid state diffusion. The goal of this project is to expand the understanding and application of press and sinter technology to Titanium Powder applications, developing techniques to manufacture net shape Titanium components via the press and sinter process. In addition, working with a vehicle manufacturer, demonstrate the feasibility of producing a titanium component for a vehicle. This is not a research program, but rather a

  8. Processing of Elemental Titanium by Powder Metallurgy Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Bolzoni, Leandro; Ruiz Navas, Elisa María; Gordo Odériz, Elena

    2013-01-01

    [Poster] 6th International Light Metals Technology Conference (LMT2013), 24-26 July, Windsord (UK) Titanium is characterised by an outstanding combination of properties like high strength, low density, good corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. Nonetheless, widespread employment of titanium at the industrial level, especially in the automotive industry, has not been achieved yet because of its high extraction and production costs. Consequently, titanium finds applications mainly in hi...

  9. Near-Net Shape Fabrication Using Low-Cost Titanium Alloy Powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. David M. Bowden; Dr. William H. Peter

    2012-03-31

    The use of titanium in commercial aircraft production has risen steadily over the last half century. The aerospace industry currently accounts for 58% of the domestic titanium market. The Kroll process, which has been used for over 50 years to produce titanium metal from its mineral form, consumes large quantities of energy. And, methods used to convert the titanium sponge output of the Kroll process into useful mill products also require significant energy resources. These traditional approaches result in product forms that are very expensive, have long lead times of up to a year or more, and require costly operations to fabricate finished parts. Given the increasing role of titanium in commercial aircraft, new titanium technologies are needed to create a more sustainable manufacturing strategy that consumes less energy, requires less material, and significantly reduces material and fabrication costs. A number of emerging processes are under development which could lead to a breakthrough in extraction technology. Several of these processes produce titanium alloy powder as a product. The availability of low-cost titanium powders may in turn enable a more efficient approach to the manufacture of titanium components using powder metallurgical processing. The objective of this project was to define energy-efficient strategies for manufacturing large-scale titanium structures using these low-cost powders as the starting material. Strategies include approaches to powder consolidation to achieve fully dense mill products, and joining technologies such as friction and laser welding to combine those mill products into near net shape (NNS) preforms for machining. The near net shape approach reduces material and machining requirements providing for improved affordability of titanium structures. Energy and cost modeling was used to define those approaches that offer the largest energy savings together with the economic benefits needed to drive implementation. Technical

  10. Consolidation of titanium hydride powders during the production of titanium PM parts: The effect of die wall lubricants

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Machio, Christopher N

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available 90 (2016) 757–766 Consolidation of titanium hydride powders during the production of titanium PM parts: The effect of die wall lubricants C. Machio ⁎, R. Machaka, H.K. Chikwanda CSIR Materials Science and Manufacturing, Light Metals, PO Box... stream_source_info Machio_2016_ABSTRACT.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 1664 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Machio_2016_ABSTRACT.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Materials and Design...

  11. Influence of concentration in phosphoric acid treatment of titanium oxide and their powder properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Onoda

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Titanium oxide that has the photocatalytic activity is used as a white pigment for cosmetics. A certain degree of sebum on the skin is decomposed by the ultraviolet radiation in sunlight. In this work, titanium oxide was shaken with various concentrations of phosphoric acid to synthesize a novel white pigment for cosmetics. Their chemical composition, powder properties, photocatalytic activity, color phase, and smoothness were studied. The obtained materials indicated XRD peaks of titanium oxide; however, these peak intensities became weak by phosphoric acid treatment. The photocatalytic activity of the obtained powders became weak by phosphoric acid treatment to protect the sebum on the skin. The high concentration of phosphoric acid was suitable to obtain a novel white pigment in the phosphoric acid treatment of titanium oxide.

  12. Heat-Resistance of the Powder Cobalt Alloys Reinforced by Niobium or Titanium Carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherepova, T.S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of heat-resistance of powder cobalt alloys at 1100 °C were investigated. These alloys were developed for the protection of workers banding shelves GTE blades from wear. The alloys were prepared by hot pressing powders of cobalt, chromium, aluminum, iron and niobium or titanium carbides. The values of heat resistance alloys containing carbides between 30 and 70% (vol. depend on the type made of carbide alloys: alloys with titanium carbide superior in heat-resistant alloy of niobium carbide. The most significant factor affecting on the heat-resistant alloys, is porosity: with its increase the parameters decline regardless of the type and content of carbide. The optimum composition of powder heat resisting alloys of titanium carbide with a melting point above 1300 °C were determined for use in the aircraft engine.

  13. Production of titanium alloys for advanced aerospace systems by powder metallurgy

    OpenAIRE

    Henriques, Vinicius André Rodrigues; Campos, Pedro Paulo de; Cairo, Carlos Alberto Alves; Bressiani, José Carlos

    2005-01-01

    Titanium alloys parts are ideally suited for advanced aerospace systems because of their unique combination of high specific strength at both room temperature and moderately elevated temperature, in addition to excellent corrosion resistance. Despite these features, use of titanium alloys in engines and airframes is limited by cost. The alloys processing by powder metallurgy eases the obtainment of parts with complex geometry. In this work, results of the Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-13Nb-13Zr alloys pro...

  14. Production of titanium alloy powders by vacuum fusion-centrifugation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decours, Jacques; Devillard, Jacques; Sainfort, G.

    1975-01-01

    This work presents a method of preparing powdered TA6V and TA6Z5D alloys by fusion-centrifugation under electron bombardment. An industrial capacity apparatus for the production of metallic powders is described and the characteristics of the powders obtained are presented. Solid parts were shaped by sintering and drawing at temperatures between 850 and 1100 deg C. The structure and mechanical properties of the cold densified products before and after heat treatment are compared [fr

  15. In-Flight Formation of Nano-Crystalline Titanium Dioxide Powder in a Plasma Jet and Its Characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ananthapadmanabhan, P. V.; Thiyagarajan, T. K.; Sreekumar, K. P.; Vijay, M.; Selvarajan, V.; Yu, Jiaguo; Liu, Shengwei

    2010-01-01

    Nanocrystalline titanium dioxide powder was synthesized by in-flight oxidation of titanium dihydride (TiH 2 ) powder in a thermal plasma jet. TiH 2 powder was injected into the thermal plasma jet and allowed to react with oxygen injected downstream the jet. Characterization of the powder by various analytical tools indicated that the powder consisted of nano-sized titanium dioxide particles consisting predominantly of the anatase phase. It is suggested that the thermo-chemistry of the oxidation process contributes significantly to the formation of nano-sized titania. The large energy released during the oxidation process dissociates the TiO 2 particles into TiO (g) and titanium vapour, which recombine downstream with oxygen and form nano particles of TiO 2 .

  16. Porous titanium scaffolds fabricated using a rapid prototyping and powder metallurgy technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Garrett E; Pandit, Abhay S; Apatsidis, Dimitrios P

    2008-09-01

    One of the main issues in orthopaedic implant design is the fabrication of scaffolds that closely mimic the biomechanical properties of the surrounding bone. This research reports on a multi-stage rapid prototyping technique that was successfully developed to produce porous titanium scaffolds with fully interconnected pore networks and reproducible porosity and pore size. The scaffolds' porous characteristics were governed by a sacrificial wax template, fabricated using a commercial 3D-printer. Powder metallurgy processes were employed to generate the titanium scaffolds by filling around the wax template with titanium slurry. In the attempt to optimise the powder metallurgy technique, variations in slurry concentration, compaction pressure and sintering temperature were investigated. By altering the wax design template, pore sizes ranging from 200 to 400 microm were achieved. Scaffolds with porosities of 66.8 +/- 3.6% revealed compression strengths of 104.4+/-22.5 MPa in the axial direction and 23.5 +/- 9.6 MPa in the transverse direction demonstrating their anisotropic nature. Scaffold topography was characterised using scanning electron microscopy and microcomputed tomography. Three-dimensional reconstruction enabled the main architectural parameters such as pore size, interconnecting porosity, level of anisotropy and level of structural disorder to be determined. The titanium scaffolds were compared to their intended designs, as governed by their sacrificial wax templates. Although discrepancies in architectural parameters existed between the intended and the actual scaffolds, overall the results indicate that the porous titanium scaffolds have the properties to be potentially employed in orthopaedic applications.

  17. Superhard Rhenium/Tungsten Diboride Solid Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Andrew T; Turner, Christopher L; Lei, Jialin; Mohammadi, Reza; Tolbert, Sarah H; Kaner, Richard B

    2016-11-02

    Rhenium diboride (ReB 2 ), containing corrugated layers of covalently bonded boron, is a superhard metallic compound with a microhardness reaching as high as 40.5 GPa (under an applied load of 0.49 N). Tungsten diboride (WB 2 ), which takes a structural hybrid between that of ReB 2 and AlB 2 , where half of the boron layers are planar (as in AlB 2 ) and half are corrugated (as in ReB 2 ), has been shown not to be superhard. Here, we demonstrate that the ReB 2 -type structure can be maintained for solid solutions of tungsten in ReB 2 with tungsten content up to a surprisingly large limit of nearly 50 atom %. The lattice parameters for the solid solutions linearly increase along both the a- and c-axes with increasing tungsten content, as evaluated by powder X-ray and neutron diffraction. From micro- and nanoindentation hardness testing, all of the compositions within the range of 0-48 atom % W are superhard, and the bulk modulus of the 48 atom % solid solution is nearly identical to that of pure ReB 2 . These results further indicate that ReB 2 -structured compounds are superhard, as has been predicted from first-principles calculations, and may warrant further studies into additional solid solutions or ternary compounds taking this structure type.

  18. Structure and properties of titanium surface layers after electron beam alloying with powder mixtures containing carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenivtseva, O.G.; Bataev, I.A.; Golkovskii, M.G.; Bataev, A.A.; Samoilenko, V.V.; Plotnikova, N.V.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Wear resistant coatings up to 2 mm thick were clad on titanium by an electron beam in air. • The microhardness of the alloys was increased from 2 to 8 GPa due to the formation of TiC particles. • Alloying of titanium increased the abrasive wear resistance of the alloy by a factor of 9.3. - Abstract: The structure and tribological properties of commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti) samples after non-vacuum electron beam surface alloying with carbon were studied. Two types of powders were used to introduce carbon in surface layer of cp-Ti: titanium carbide (TiC) and mixture of pure titanium and graphite (“Ti + C”). Single layer and multilayer coatings were studied. Application of electron beam for alloying provided cladding rate of 4.5 m 2 /h. The thickness of the clad coatings was 1.6–2.0 mm. The main phases received after “Ti + C” powder cladding were α-titanium, TiC, and retained graphite. In the samples obtained by cladding of TiC, graphite was not observed. A factor determining the microhardness and tribological properties of the cladded layer was the volume fraction of TiC. Maximum coating microhardness of 8 GPa was obtained by cladding of single layer of TiC powder or two layers of the “Ti + C” mixture. Two types of tests were carried out to evaluate the wear resistance of the samples. In friction tests against loose abrasive particles, the wear rate of the best samples was 9.3 times lower than that of cp-Ti. In wear tests using fixed abrasive particles, the relative wear resistance of the best samples was 2.3 times higher than that of cp-Ti.

  19. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Binary Titanium Borides: First-Principles and Experimental Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urszula D. Wdowik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibrational dynamics of binary titanium borides is studied from first-principles. Polarized and unpolarized Raman spectra of TiB, TiB2, and Ti3B4 are reported along with the experimental spectra of commercial powder and bulk TiB2 containing less than 1 wt.% of impurity phases. The X-ray diffraction spectroscopy, applied for phase composition examination of both bulk and powder materials, identifies only the TiB2 phase. The simulated Raman spectra together with literature data support interpretation and refinement of experimental spectra which reveal components arising from titanium dioxide (TiO2 and amorphous boron carbide (B4C impurity phases as well as graphitic carbon. These contaminations are the by-products of synthesis, consolidation, and sintering aids employed to fabricate powder and bulk titanium diboride.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of nanocomposite powders of calcium phosphate/titanium oxide for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delima, S.A.; Camargo, N.H.A.; Souza, J.C.P.; Gemelli, E.

    2009-01-01

    The nanostructured bioceramics of calcium phosphate are current themes of research and they are becoming important as bone matrix in regeneration of tissues in orthopedic and dental applications. Nanocomposite powders of calcium phosphate, reinforced with nanometric particles of titanium oxide, silica oxide and alumina oxid ealpha, are being widely studied because they offer new microstructures, nanostructures and interconnected microporosity with high superficial area of micropores that contribute to osteointegration and osteoinduction processes. This study is about the synthesis of nanocomposites powders of calcium phosphate reinforced with 1%, 2%, 3% and 5% in volume of titanium oxide and its characterization through the techniques of X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA), Thermogravimetry (TG) and Dilatometry. (author)

  1. Microporous Titanium through Metal Injection Moulding of Coarse Powder and Surface Modification by Plasma Oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Shbeh, Mohammed; Yerokhin, Aleksey; Goodall, Russell

    2017-01-01

    Titanium is one of the most attractive materials for biomedical applications due to having excellent biocompatibility accompanied by good corrosion resistance. One popular processing technique for Ti is Metal Injection Moulding (MIM). However, there are several issues associated with the use of this technique, such as the high cost of the fine powder used, the high level of contamination and consequent alteration to material properties, as well as the large volume shrinkage that occurs during...

  2. Direct metal laser deposition of titanium powder Ti-6Al-4V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykovskiy, D. P.; Petrovskiy, V. N.; Sergeev, K. L.; Osintsev, A. V.; Dzhumaev, P. S.; Polskiy, V. I.

    2017-12-01

    The paper presents the results of mechanical properties study of the material produced by direct metal laser deposition of VT6 titanium powder. The properties were determined by the results of stretching at tensile testing machine, as well as compared with the properties of the same rolled material. These results show that obtained samples have properties on the level or even higher than that ones of the samples obtained from the rolled material in a certain range of technological regimes.

  3. Forming of titanium and titanium alloy miniature-cylinders by electrical-field activated powder sintering and forming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulkipli Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As demands on miniature products increase significantly, a rapid process and production system for high-throughput, highly flexible and cost-efficient volume production of miniaturised components made from a wide range of materials is needed. A novel and electrical-field-activated sintering and forming process shows the potential to produce solid parts from powder material without any binder. Using titanium (Ti and titanium alloy (90Ti10Sn powder material, several processing parameters have been investigated, such as pressure, heating rate, heating temperature and holding time, which helped to contribute to the optimum result. In this study, using graphite dies, graphite punches and tungsten carbide punches, solid samples were produced, having a cylinder shape of Ø4.00 mm × 4.00 mm. Several properties of the solid Ti and 90Ti10Sn samples, such as density, hardness and the microstructures, were examined, and these showed that good results have been obtained.

  4. An investigation of adhesive/adherend and fiber/matrix interactions. Part A: Surface characterization of titanium dioxide, titantium and titanium 6% Al to 4% V powders: Interaction with water, hydrogen chloride and polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardane, R. V.; Wightman, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    The titanium dioxide surface is discussed. Polymer adhesive are also discussed. Titanium powders are considered. Characterization techniques are also considered. Interactions with polymers, water vapor, and HCl are reported. Adsorbents are characterized.

  5. Zirconium diboride nanofiber generation via microwave arc heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldridge, Tyson; Gupta, Mool C

    2008-07-09

    Ultrahigh temperature zirconium diboride nanofibers were produced by microwave arc heating using micron-sized raw powder. While microwave heating the ZrB(2) powder, the development of local arcing led to rapid heating and solidification of the samples, along with the creation of nanofibers. The morphology of these high aspect ratio nanofibers was characterized using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and selected area electron diffraction showed the composition to contain zirconium, boron, nitrogen, aluminum and oxygen as well as the crystallographic orientation. ZrB(2) nanofiber applications include aerospace and other harsh environments.

  6. Production of a low young modulus titanium alloy by powder metallurgy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalcy Roberto dos Santos

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Titanium alloys have several advantages over ferrous and non-ferrous metallic materials, such as high strengthto-weight ratio and excellent corrosion resistance. A blended elemental titanium powder metallurgy process has been developed to offer low cost commercial products. The process employs hydride-dehydride (HDH powders as raw material. In this work, results of the Ti-35Nb alloy sintering are presented. This alloy due to its lower modulus of elasticity and high biocompatibility is a promising candidate for aerospace and medical use. Samples were produced by mixing of initial metallic powders followed by uniaxial and cold isostatic pressing with subsequent densification by isochronal sintering between 900 up to 1600 °C, in vacuum. Sintering behavior was studied by means of microscopy and density. Sintered samples were characterized for phase composition, microstructure and microhardness by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Vickers indentation, respectively. Samples sintered at high temperatures display a fine plate-like alpha structure and intergranular beta. A few remaining pores are still found and density above 90% for specimens sintered in temperatures over 1500 °C is reached.

  7. Magnesium Diboride Current Leads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panek, John

    2010-01-01

    A recently discovered superconductor, magnesium diboride (MgB2), can be used to fabricate conducting leads used in cryogenic applications. Dis covered to be superconducting in 2001, MgB2 has the advantage of remaining superconducting at higher temperatures than the previously used material, NbTi. The purpose of these leads is to provide 2 A of electricity to motors located in a 1.3 K environment. The providing environment is a relatively warm 17 K. Requirements for these leads are to survive temperature fluctuations in the 5 K and 11 K heat sinks, and not conduct excessive heat into the 1.3 K environment. Test data showed that each lead in the assembly could conduct 5 A at 4 K, which, when scaled to 17 K, still provided more than the required 2 A. The lead assembly consists of 12 steelclad MgB2 wires, a tensioned Kevlar support, a thermal heat sink interface at 4 K, and base plates. The wires are soldered to heavy copper leads at the 17 K end, and to thin copper-clad NbTi leads at the 1.3 K end. The leads were designed, fabricated, and tested at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe - Institut foer Technische Physik before inclusion in Goddard's XRS (X-Ray Spectrometer) instrument onboard the Astro-E2 spacecraft. A key factor is that MgB2 remains superconducting up to 30 K, which means that it does not introduce joule heating as a resistive wire would. Because the required temperature ranges are 1.3-17 K, this provides a large margin of safety. Previous designs lost superconductivity at around 8 K. The disadvantage to MgB2 is that it is a brittle ceramic, and making thin wires from it is challenging. The solution was to encase the leads in thin steel tubes for strength. Previous designs were so brittle as to risk instrument survival. MgB2 leads can be used in any cryogenic application where small currents need to be conducted at below 30 K. Because previous designs would superconduct only at up to 8 K, this new design would be ideal for the 8-30 K range.

  8. Discrete element modeling of powder consolidation and the formation of titanium-matrix composites from powder-fiber monotapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Kenneth James

    A three year research effort is completed with the development of the Discrete Element Consolidation Analyzer (DECA) for process modeling the formation of titanium composites from powder-fiber monotapes. The primary goal of the DECA process model is to provide a statistically realistic analysis of the various physical processes necessary to achieve higher quality composites from the powder-fiber technique. Over the course of this effort, research and code development was conducted in three distinct stages. The first stage focused on the simulation of initial geometry of the powder and fibers as well as the evolution of tape configuration during the pre-consolidation processing steps. The second stage developed the mechanics of the discrete element powder consolidation and the material characterization methods necessary to model the viscoplastic response of the powder to transient thermal and mechanical boundary conditions. The final stage incorporated the presence of fibers to evaluate the interaction mechanics and possible fibers damage resulting from discrete powder-fiber contacts. As a conclusion to the research, DECA model predictions of density versus time for various consolidation profiles are directly compared to actual consolidation test results and a DECA prescribed process profile is used to fabricate a 6sp{''} × 6sp{''} composite panel of Ti-6242/SCS-6. In completing this research, the discrete element modeling technique has proven to be a powerful tool for the analysis and simulation of metal powder consolidation as well as the consolidation of metal matrix composites. The DECA code orchestrates the use of particle kinetics, some simple aspects of gas dynamics, elasticity, plasticity, creep and various innovative material characterization methods to produce a seamless analysis for powder metallurgy processing of composites. Through the application of the DECA capability, many aspects of the processing stages have been elucidated for further

  9. Production of titanium alloys for advanced aerospace systems by powder metallurgy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius André Rodrigues Henriques

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Titanium alloys parts are ideally suited for advanced aerospace systems because of their unique combination of high specific strength at both room temperature and moderately elevated temperature, in addition to excellent corrosion resistance. Despite these features, use of titanium alloys in engines and airframes is limited by cost. The alloys processing by powder metallurgy eases the obtainment of parts with complex geometry. In this work, results of the Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-13Nb-13Zr alloys production are presented. Samples were produced by mixing of initial metallic powders followed by uniaxial and cold isostatic pressing with subsequent densification by sintering between 900 up to 1500 °C, in vacuum. Sintered samples were characterized for phase composition, microstructure and microhardness by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Vickers indentation, respectively. It was shown that the samples were sintered to high densities and presented homogeneous microstructure from the elements dissolution with low interstitial pick-up.

  10. In situ Investigation of Titanium Powder Microwave Sintering by Synchrotron Radiation Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, synchrotron radiation computed tomography was applied to investigate the mechanisms of titanium powder microwave sintering in situ. On the basis of reconstructed images, we observed that the sintering described in this study differs from conventional sintering in terms of particle smoothing, rounding, and short-term growth. Contacted particles were also isolated. The kinetic curves of sintering neck growth and particle surface area were obtained and compared with those of other microwave-sintered metals to examine the interaction mechanisms between mass and microwave fields. Results show that sintering neck growth accelerated from the intermediate period; however, this finding is inconsistent with that of aluminum powder microwave sintering described in previous work. The free surface areas of the particles were also quantitatively analyzed. In addition to the eddy current loss in metal particles, other heating mechanisms, including dielectric loss, interfacial polarization effect, and local plasma-activated sintering, contributed to sintering neck growth. Thermal and non-thermal effects possibly accelerated the sintering neck growth of titanium. This study provides a useful reference of further research on interaction mechanisms between mass and microwave fields during microwave sintering.

  11. Fatigue behavior of highly porous titanium produced by powder metallurgy with temporary space holders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özbilen, Sedat; Liebert, Daniela; Beck, Tilmann; Bram, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Porous titanium cylinders were produced with a constant amount of temporary space holder (70 vol.%). Different interstitial contents were achieved by varying the starting powders (HDH vs. gas atomized) and manufacturing method (cold compaction without organic binders vs. warm compaction of MIM feedstocks). Interstitial contents (O, C, and N) as a function of manufacturing were measured by chemical analysis. Samples contained 0.34-0.58 wt.% oxygen, which was found to have the greatest effect on mechanical properties. Quasi-static mechanical tests under compression at low strain rate were used for reference and to define parameters for cyclic compression tests. Not unexpectedly, increased oxygen content increased the yield strength of the porous titanium. Cyclic compression fatigue tests were conducted using sinusoidal loading in a servo-hydraulic testing machine. Increased oxygen content was concomitant with embrittlement of the titanium matrix, resulting in significant reduction of compression cycles before failure. For samples with 0.34 wt.% oxygen, R, σ(min) and σ(max) were varied systematically to estimate the fatigue limit (~4 million cycles). Microstructural changes induced by cyclic loading were then characterized by optical microscopy, SEM and EBSD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of Particle Morphology on Critical Conditions for Shock-Initiated Reactions in Titanium-Silicon Powder Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, David; Jette, Francois; Goroshin, Samuel; Higgins, Andrew; Lee, Julian

    2009-06-01

    The effect of titanium particle morphology on the shock sensitivity of titanium-silicon powder mixtures has been investigated experimentally. The powder mixtures were tested in a planar recovery capsule, with the shock loading produced by a high explosive Tetryl booster charge placed on top of the capsule and a PMMA attenuator. Reactions were not observed for stoichiometric mixtures of large (75 -- 106 μm), spherical Ti particles with fine (effects which lowered the temperature for the onset of exothermic reaction of the shocked sample by about 80^oC.

  13. Microporous Titanium through Metal Injection Moulding of Coarse Powder and Surface Modification by Plasma Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Menhal Shbeh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Titanium is one of the most attractive materials for biomedical applications due to having excellent biocompatibility accompanied by good corrosion resistance. One popular processing technique for Ti is Metal Injection Moulding (MIM. However, there are several issues associated with the use of this technique, such as the high cost of the fine powder used, the high level of contamination and consequent alteration to material properties, as well as the large volume shrinkage that occurs during sintering. In this study, the use of a relatively coarse Ti powder with a mean particle size of 75 μm to process Ti parts with the potential for biomedical applications by MIM will be examined, compared to a commercial Ti feedstock, and subsequently coated using Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO. The results show that samples produced with the coarse powder shrink 35% less and have a relative density 14% less with an average pore size three-times larger than that of the commercial feedstock. This helps increase the potential competitiveness of MIM in the production of biomedical parts, as it reduces cost, shrinkage and results in more intentionally-induced micropores, such as are desired for biomedical implants. PEO treatment of the samples yields a thick rough coating comprised of a mixture of rutile and anatase with interconnected microporous channels and openings resembling the mouth of a volcanic crater.

  14. Temperature dependence and P/Ti ratio in phosphoric acid treatment of titanium dioxide and powder properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoda, H; Matsukura, A

    2015-02-01

    Titanium dioxide has photocatalytic activity and is used as a white pigment for cosmetics. A certain degree of sebum on the skin is decomposed by the ultraviolet radiation in sunlight. In this work, titanium dioxide was shaken with phosphoric acid to synthesize a white pigment for cosmetics. Titanium dioxide was treated with 0.1 mol/L of phosphoric acid at various P/Ti molar ratios, and then shaken in hot water for 1 h. The chemical composition, powder properties, photocatalytic activity, colour phase, and smoothness of the obtained powder were studied. The obtained materials indicated XRD peaks of titanium dioxide, however the peaks diminished subsequent to phosphoric acid treatment. The samples included small particles with sub-micrometer size. The photocatalytic activity of the obtained powders decreased, decomposing less sebum on the skin. Samples prepared at high P/Ti ratio with high shaking temperature indicated low whiteness in in L*a*b* colour space. The shaking and heating temperature and P/Ti ratio had influence on the smoothness of the obtained materials. Phosphoric acid treatment of titanium dioxide is an effective method to inhibit photocatalytic activity for a white pigment. © 2014 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  15. The effects of attrition and ball milling on the properties of magnesium diboride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dancer, C E J; Crossley, A; Todd, R I; Grovenor, C R M [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Prabhakaran, D, E-mail: claire.dancer@materials.ox.ac.u [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-15

    Commercially produced magnesium diboride powder was modified by attrition milling and ball milling in propan-2-ol for various durations. These powders were characterized by means of particle size distribution measurements using laser diffraction, impurity analysis using x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy, and were then used to produce magnesium diboride samples through pressureless heat treatment at peak temperatures up to 1100 {sup 0}C. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Vickers hardness measurements, and density measurements using the Archimedes method were used to characterize the properties of the samples, and a determination of their superconducting properties using the magnetization method was carried out. Magnesium diboride produced from powder milled under certain conditions had a higher J{sub c,mag} than samples produced from as-purchased powder, but the relationship between the milling duration or energy and the superconducting performance is a complex one, affected by both the particle size and the impurity content of the starting powder.

  16. Radiometric Testing of Magnesium Diboride Array (MDA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective is to develop a 2-Dimensional Far Infra-Red Magnesium Diboride Array (2D FIR MDA) to use in NASA's future planetary exploration instruments. The array...

  17. Microwave-induced combustion synthesis of aluminum oxide-titanium carbide powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atong, Duangduen

    2000-11-01

    Microwave heating offers many potential advantages, including synthesizing of material. This advantage results from the unique features of microwave heating which include its internal volumetric heating and subsequent inverted temperature profile. Fundamental knowledge of how reaction parameters influence microwave-ignition behavior is needed in order to provide information required for synthesizing the desired products. This study was performed to synthesize Al2O3-TiC powders by using microwave heating. The important reaction parameters were identified using the Plackett-Burman design including amount of excess Al and Al2O3, particle size of C and Al2O 3, and heating method. The effect of these reaction parameters on the ignition behavior and characteristics of the resulting powders was then evaluated by the central composite design. The combustion synthesis of Al2O3-TiC powders using microwave heating (MH) and microwave hybrid heating (MHH) was successfully achieved. The MHH-ignited sample required a longer time to reach ignition temperature and thus resulted in a lower combustion temperature. The results showed no significant difference in characteristics of powders ignition time and temperature, while decreasing the combustion temperature. An increased particle size of Al2O3 lowered the ignition time and temperature. The density of product decreased with increasing amounts of Al. Addition of excess Al2O3 to reactants resulted in decreasing the agglomeration size. The empirical models relating these important parameters and their interactions to the responses were then developed. The mechanism governing the combustion reaction of Al2O 3-TiC powders under microwave and conventional heating was also investigated. The results suggested that reaction mechanisms using these two methods were similar. The reaction proceeded in a three-stage process where the aluminum melted, then the melting Al reacted with the titania, and finally the titanium reacted with the carbon

  18. The Synthesis of Titanium Dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) Powder for Cold Spray Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salim, N Tjitra [Venture Business Laboratory, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi (Japan); Yamada, M; Fukumoto, M [Mechanical Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi (Japan); Nakano, H, E-mail: noviana@isf.me.tut.ac.jp [Cooperative Research Facility Centre, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi (Japan)

    2011-10-29

    Titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) has attracted numerous attentions due to its high photocatalytic property. TiO{sub 2} as photocatalyst is best to be coated over large area substrate (walls, windows, etc.). In this case, cold spray process is the most suitable technique, not only because its simplicity and efficiency for large area deposition, but also because it is a low temperature process that would retain the high photocatalytic anatase phase of TiO{sub 2} in the coating. However, cold spraying of hard ceramic materials, such as TiO{sub 2}, is widely known to be difficult. In this study, we are reporting a novel synthesis method of TiO{sub 2} powder for cold spray via the hydrolysis of titanyl sulphate (TiOSO{sub 4}) with addition of ammonium sulphate ((NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}). It is a relatively simple synthesis method that can obtain pure anatase structure even without high temperature treatment, although post treatments, such as hydrothermal and calcination further increase the crystallinity and change the morphology of synthesised TiO{sub 2}. It is believed that the synergetic effect of post treatments and adsorption of NH{sub 4}{sup +} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} ions on the surface of TiO{sub 2} causes the alteration in morphology of TiO{sub 2} powder. Finally, the cold spray spot test shows that the TiO{sub 2} powders can be cold sprayed. This is a remarkable finding as the difficulty of cold spraying TiO{sub 2} is widely known.

  19. Titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Laurel G.; Bedinger, George M.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Titanium is a mineral commodity that is essential to the smooth functioning of modern industrial economies. Most of the titanium produced is refined into titanium dioxide, which has a high refractive index and is thus able to impart a durable white color to paint, paper, plastic, rubber, and wallboard. Because of their high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance, titanium metal and titanium metal alloys are used in the aerospace industry as well as for welding rod coatings, biological implants, and consumer goods.Ilmenite and rutile are currently the principal titanium-bearing ore minerals, although other minerals, including anatase, perovskite, and titanomagnetite, could have economic importance in the future. Ilmenite is currently being mined from two large magmatic deposits hosted in rocks of Proterozoic-age anorthosite plutonic suites. Most rutile and nearly one-half of the ilmenite produced are from heavy-mineral alluvial, fluvial, and eolian deposits. Titanium-bearing minerals occur in diverse geologic settings, but many of the known deposits are currently subeconomic for titanium because of complications related to the mineralogy or because of the presence of trace contaminants that can compromise the pigment production process.Global production of titanium minerals is currently dominated by Australia, Canada, Norway, and South Africa; additional amounts are produced in Brazil, India, Madagascar, Mozambique, Sierra Leone, and Sri Lanka. The United States accounts for about 4 percent of the total world production of titanium minerals and is heavily dependent on imports of titanium mineral concentrates to meet its domestic needs.Titanium occurs only in silicate or oxide minerals and never in sulfide minerals. Environmental considerations for titanium mining are related to waste rock disposal and the impact of trace constituents on water quality. Because titanium is generally inert in the environment, human health risks from titanium and titanium

  20. Selective Laser Sintering And Melting Of Pristine Titanium And Titanium Ti6Al4V Alloy Powders And Selection Of Chemical Environment For Etching Of Such Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobrzański L.A.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigations described in this article is to present a selective laser sintering and melting technology to fabricate metallic scaffolds made of pristine titanium and titanium Ti6Al4V alloy powders. Titanium scaffolds with different properties and structure were manufactured with this technique using appropriate conditions, notably laser power and laser beam size. The purpose of such elements is to replace the missing pieces of bones, mainly cranial and facial bones in the implantation treatment process. All the samples for the investigations were designed in CAD/CAM (3D MARCARM ENGINEERING AutoFab (Software for Manufacturing Applications software suitably integrated with an SLS/SLM system. Cube-shaped test samples dimensioned 10×10×10 mm were designed for the investigations using a hexagon-shaped base cell. The so designed 3D models were transferred to the machine software and the actual rapid manufacturing process was commenced. The samples produced according to the laser sintering technology were subjected to chemical processing consisting of etching the scaffolds’ surface in different chemical mediums. Etching was carried out to remove the loosely bound powder from the surface of scaffolds, which might detach from their surface during implantation treatment and travel elsewhere in an organism. The scaffolds created were subjected to micro- and spectroscopic examinations

  1. [Determination of major expansion properties of refractory die material compatible with slip casting core of sintered titanium powder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Y; Kuang, X; Liao, Y; Wang, H

    1999-02-01

    To determinate major expansion properties of refractory die material. The setting expansion ratio of refractory die material for slip casting core of sintered titanium powder at room temperature was performed, as well as thermal expansion ratio from room temperature to 800 degrees C. The maximum setting expansion ratio in 2 hours reached 0.3407%; The final setting expansion ratio in 24 hours was 0.3117%; The mean thermal expansion coefficient was mainly in range of 8 x 10(-6)-11 x 10(-6)/degree C; The expansion property seemed very stable after sintering repeatedly and the small shrinkage after sintering could be compensated with the die spacer and setting expansion. The expansion properties of the refractory die material that we synthesized can fulfil the application requirements of slip casting core of sintered titanium powder.

  2. Kinetics of thermal decomposition of titanium hydride powder using in situ high-temperature X-ray diffraction (HTXRD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Ricardo Zschommler Sandim

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The thermal decomposition of titanium hydride powder (delta-phase to titanium (alpha-phase was investigated by means of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and high-temperature X-ray diffraction (HTXRD in high vacuum. The delta-to-alpha phase transformation was followed in situ by HTXRD at temperatures varying from room temperature up to 1000 °C. The transformation was also analyzed as a function of time at isothermal conditions from 450 to 650 °C. The results of TGA show that the decomposition of the titanium hydride becomes significant at about 450 °C. Above 500 °C the decomposition is completed in times shorter than 50 minutes. The apparent activation energy for hydrogen desorption was found to be 63 ± 6 kJ.mol-1.

  3. Study on titanium-magnesium composites with bicontinuous structure fabricated by powder metallurgy and ultrasonic infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, S; Huang, L J; An, Q; Geng, L; Wang, X J; Wang, S

    2018-02-14

    Titanium-magnesium (Ti-Mg) composites with bicontinuous structure have been successfully fabricated by powder metallurgy and ultrasonic infiltration for biomaterial potential. In the composites, Ti phase is distributed continuously by sintering necks, while Mg phase is also continuous, distributing at the interconnected pores surrounding the Ti phase. The results showed that the fabricated Ti-Mg composites exhibited low modulus and high strength, which are very suitable for load bearing biomedical materials. The composites with 100 µm and 230 µm particle sizes exhibited Young's modulus of 37.6 GPa and 23.4 GPa, 500.7 MPa and 340 MPa of compressive strength and 631.5 MPa and 375.2 MPa of bending strength, respectively. Moreover, both of the modulus and strength of the composites increase with decreasing of Ti particle sizes. In vitro study has been done for the preliminary evaluation of the Ti-Mg composites. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The effect of thermal pre-treatment of titanium hydride (TiH2) powder in argon condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franciska P., L.; Erryani, Aprilia; Annur, Dhyah; Kartika, Ika

    2018-04-01

    Titanium hydride (TiH2) powders are used to enhance the foaming process in the formation of a highly porous metallic material with a cellular structure. But, the low temperature of hydrogen release is one of its problems. The present study, different thermal pre-treatment temperatures were employed to investigate the decomposition behavior of TiH2 to retard or delay a hydrogen gas release process during foaming. As a foaming agent, TiH2 was subjected to various heat treatments prior at 450 and 500°C during 2 hours in argon condition. To study the formation mechanism, the thermal behavior of titanium hydride and hydrogen release are investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The morphology of pre-treated titanium hydride powders were examined using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) while unsure mapping and elemental composition of the pre-treated powders processed by Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). To study the phase formation was characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). In accordance with the results, an increase in pre-treatment temperature of TiH2 to higher degrees are changing the process of releasing hydrogen from titanium hydride powder. DTA/TGA results showed that thermal pre-treatment TiH2 at 450°C, released the hydrogen gas at 560°C in heat treatment when foaming process. Meanwhile, thermal pre-treatment in TiH2 at 500°C, released the hydrogen gas at 670°C when foaming process. There is plenty of direct evidence for the existence of oxide layers that showed by EDS analysis obtained in SEM. As oxygen is a light element and qualitative proof shows that the higher pre-treatment temperature produces more and thicker oxygen layers on the surface of the TiH2 powder particles. It might the thickness of oxide layer are different from different pre-treatment temperatures, which leading to the differences in the decomposition temperature. But from SEM result that oxidation of the powder does not

  5. Alloying and microstructural changes in platinum–titanium milled and annealed powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maweja, Kasonde; Phasha, M.J.; Yamabe-Mitarai, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: (a) SE-SEM micrographs of PtTi martensite formed in powder milled for short time annealed at 1500 °C and quenched in helium gas flow (b) BSE-SEM of structure formed after slow cooling. Highlights: ► A disordered metastable FCC Pt(Ti) solid solution was formed after longer milling period. ► HCP Ti crystals were first deformed and then the atoms were dissolved in strained FCC Pt lattices. ► Longer milling time suppressed the occurrence of martensitic transformation after annealing. ► Martensite phase was formed in products that went through a short milling time then annealed and quenched. ► The width of the martensite features formed was smaller at higher cooling rates. - Abstract: Equiatomic platinum–titanium powder mixtures were processed by high energy ball milling under argon atmosphere and sintered under vacuum. Evolution of the crystal structures and microstructures of the products formed were investigated by XRD and SEM techniques, respectively. The HCP crystals of Ti were first deformed and then a disordered metastable FCC Pt(Ti) solid solution was formed during milling due to semi-coherency of FCC lattices. A nanostructured Pt(Ti) product was formed after long milling time, which contained 44–47 at.% Ti and 53–56 at.% Pt. An ordered PtTi intermetallic was formed by annealing the metastable Pt(Ti) at temperature above 1300 °C. The crystal structure and microstructure of the TiPt phase depended on the milling time, annealing temperature and the cooling rate. The B19 PtTi plate martensite was formed after annealing at 1500 °C and quenching at a cooling rate of 23 °C/min to 200 °C/min for short time milled products. The width of martensite features was smaller at high cooling rate. In PtTi products milled for longer time, no martensitic transformation was observed on cooling the annealed samples. Small amounts of Pt 5 Ti 3 were formed in the powders milled for 16 h or more, followed by annealing at 1500 °C and furnace

  6. Influence of pH-control in phosphoric acid treatment of titanium oxide and their powder properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onoda, Hiroaki; Matsukura, Aki

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The photocatalytic activity was suppressed by phosphoric acid treatment. • The obtained pigment had small particles with sub-micrometer size. • By phosphoric acid treatment, the smoothness of samples improved. - Abstract: Titanium oxide that has the photocatalytic activity is used as a white pigment for cosmetics. A certain degree of sebum on the skin is decomposed by the ultraviolet radiation in sunlight. In this work, titanium oxide was shaken with phosphoric acid at various pH to synthesize a novel white pigment for cosmetics. Their chemical composition, powder properties, photocatalytic activity, color phase, and smoothness were studied. The obtained materials indicated XRD peaks of titanium oxide, however, these peak intensity became weak by phosphoric acid treatment. These samples without heating and heated at 100 °C included the small particles with sub-micrometer size. The photocatalytic activity of the obtained powders became weak by phosphoric acid treatment at pH 4 and 5 to protect the sebum on the skin

  7. Influence of pH-control in phosphoric acid treatment of titanium oxide and their powder properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onoda, Hiroaki, E-mail: onoda@kpu.ac.jp; Matsukura, Aki

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • The photocatalytic activity was suppressed by phosphoric acid treatment. • The obtained pigment had small particles with sub-micrometer size. • By phosphoric acid treatment, the smoothness of samples improved. - Abstract: Titanium oxide that has the photocatalytic activity is used as a white pigment for cosmetics. A certain degree of sebum on the skin is decomposed by the ultraviolet radiation in sunlight. In this work, titanium oxide was shaken with phosphoric acid at various pH to synthesize a novel white pigment for cosmetics. Their chemical composition, powder properties, photocatalytic activity, color phase, and smoothness were studied. The obtained materials indicated XRD peaks of titanium oxide, however, these peak intensity became weak by phosphoric acid treatment. These samples without heating and heated at 100 °C included the small particles with sub-micrometer size. The photocatalytic activity of the obtained powders became weak by phosphoric acid treatment at pH 4 and 5 to protect the sebum on the skin.

  8. Challenges of Using Elemental Nickel and Titanium Powders for the Fabrication of Monolithic NiTi Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farvizi M.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to its interesting properties and wide applications in different industries, fabrication of monolithic NiTi with cost-effective methods is an important and attractive issue. One of the economic ways to fabricate NiTi is employing elemental nickel and titanium powders. In this study, effects of using elemental powders as a precursor on the microstructure and mechanical properties of HIP-consolidated NiTi samples will be explored. The result of XRD analysis showed that after HIP process an interwoven structure which consists of NiTi2, Ni3Ti and B2-B19′ NiTi evolves. The formation of NiTi2/Ni3Ti intermetallics is thermodynamically favored which affects different aspects of this alloy: (i it alters martensitic transformation temperatures; (ii restricts essential properties of this alloy such as PE and SME, (iii increases hardness, and (iv yields to premature fracture at small strains during tensile tests.

  9. Fabrication and properties of dense ex situ magnesium diboride bulk material synthesized using spark plasma sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dancer, C E J; Todd, R I; Grovenor, C R M [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Prabhakaran, D [Department of Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Basoglu, M; Yanmaz, E [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Karadeniz Technical University, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Yan, H; Reece, M, E-mail: claire.dancer@linacre.oxon.or [Department of Materials, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-15

    High density ex situ magnesium diboride bulks were synthesized from commercial MgB{sub 2} powder using spark plasma sintering under a range of applied uniaxial pressures between 16 and 80 MPa. The microstructure was characterized using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, polarized optical microscopy, Vickers hardness measurements, and density measurements using the Archimedes method. By combining these data with those for other bulk samples we have developed a correlation curve for the hardness and density for magnesium diboride for relative densities of 60-100%. The superconducting properties were determined using magnetization measurements. Comparison to samples of significantly higher porosity indicates a positive correlation between magnetization critical current density and bulk density for magnesium diboride bulks up to around 90% density. Above this level other microstructural processes such as grain growth begin to influence the critical current density, suggesting that full elimination of porosity is not necessary to obtain high critical current density. We conclude that the best superconducting properties are likely to be obtained with a combination of small grain size and minimal porosity.

  10. Large-scale synthesis of aluminum diboride nanowires by Ni(NO3)2 catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Q. H.; Zhao, Y. M.; Huang, J.; Ouyang, L. S.; Kuang, Q.

    2012-05-01

    Large-scale aluminum diboride (AlB2) nanowires have been successfully fabricated for the first time using the facile catalysis method with aluminum (Al) powders and boron trichloride (BCl3) gas mixed with hydrogen and argon and Ni(NO3)2 as the catalyst. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) were used to characterize the morphologies and structures of the samples. Our results show that the AlB2 nanowires are single crystal.

  11. Effect of compacting pressure, powder degassing and thermobaric treatment on densification and properties of nanocrystalline titanium nitride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei V. Kapylou

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of compacting pressure, powder degassing and high pressure sintering temperature and time on the densification and properties of nanocrystalline titanium nitride have been investigated. For this reason, TiN powder with a mean particle size of 55 nm was pressed in the range of compacting pressure from 0.2 to 1.0 GPa and sintered under static pressure of 3.5 GPa in the temperature range of 900–1600°C for 45–120 s. Some of green bodies were degassed in vacuum before sintering. It was shown that samples compacted in the pressure range of 0.2–0.6 GPa have the highest density after the thermobaric treatment. The maximum density (about 97.3 %TD was obtained with degassed samples. Microhardness and microstructure investigations have shown that recrystallization of the TiN nanopowder begins at the sintering temperatures of 1100–1200°C and sintering time less than one minute. The maximum microhardness obtained was 23.2±1.0 GPa and themaximum Young modulus was 370 GPa.

  12. Synthesis and Explosive Consolidation of Titanium, Aluminium, Boron and Carbon Containing Powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikhradze, Mikheil; Oniashvili, George; Chikhradze, Nikoloz; D. S Marquis, Fernand

    2016-10-01

    The development of modern technologies in the field of materials science has increased the interest towards the bulk materials with improved physical, chemical and mechanical properties. Composites, fabricated in Ti-Al-B-C systems are characterized by unique physical and mechanical properties. They are attractive for aerospace, power engineering, machine and chemical applications. The technologies to fabricate ultrafine grained powder and bulk materials in Ti-Al-B-C system are described in the paper. It includes results of theoretical and experimental investigation for selection of powders composition and determination of thermodynamic conditions for bland preparation, as well as optimal technological parameters for mechanical alloying and adiabatic compaction. The crystalline coarse Ti, Al, C powders and amorphous B were used as precursors and blends with different compositions of Ti-Al, Ti-Al-C, Ti-B-C and Ti-Al-B were prepared. Preliminary determination/selection of blend compositions was made on the basis of phase diagrams. The powders were mixed according to the selected ratios of components to produce the blend. Blends were processed in “Fritsch” Planetary premium line ball mill for mechanical alloying, syntheses of new phases, amorphization and ultrafine powder production. The blends processing time was variable: 1 to 20 hours. The optimal technological regimes of nano blend preparation were determined experimentally. Ball milled nano blends were placed in metallic tube and loaded by shock waves for realization of consolidation in adiabatic regime. The structure and properties of the obtained ultrafine grained materials depending on the processing parameters are investigated and discussed. For consolidation of the mixture, explosive compaction technology is applied at room temperatures. The prepared mixtures were located in low carbon steel tube and blast energies were used for explosive consolidation compositions. The relationship of ball milling

  13. Synthesis of Bulk Superconducting Magnesium Diboride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margie Olbinado

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Bulk polycrystalline superconducting magnesium diboride, MgB2, samples were successfully prepared via a one-step sintering program at 750°C, in pre Argon with a pressure of 1atm. Both electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements confirmed the superconductivity of the material at 39K, with a transition width of 5K. The polycrystalline nature, granular morphology, and composition of the sintered bulk material were confirmed using X-ray diffractometry (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX.

  14. Data on processing of Ti-25Nb-25Zr β-titanium alloys via powder metallurgy route: Methodology, microstructure and mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, D; Dirras, G; Hocini, A; Tingaud, D; Ameyama, K; Langlois, P; Vrel, D; Trzaska, Z

    2018-04-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled "Cyclic Shear behavior of conventional and harmonic structure-designed Ti-25Nb-25Zr β-titanium alloy: Back-stress hardening and twinning inhibition" (Dirras et al., 2017) [1]. The datasheet describes the methods used to fabricate two β-titanium alloys having conventional microstructure and so-called harmonic structure (HS) design via a powder metallurgy route, namely the spark plasma sintering (SPS) route. The data show the as-processed unconsolidated powder microstructures as well as the post-SPS ones. The data illustrate the mechanical response under cyclic shear loading of consolidated alloy specimens. The data show how electron back scattering diffraction(EBSD) method is used to clearly identify induced deformation features in the case of the conventional alloy.

  15. Obtenção de titânio metálico com porosidade controlada por metalurgia do pó Porous titanium production and porosity control by powder metallurgy (P/M)

    OpenAIRE

    Neila de Almeida Braga; Neidenêi Gomes Ferreira; Carlos Alberto Alves Cairo

    2007-01-01

    Titanium is an attractive material for structural and biomedical applications because of its excellent corrosion resistance, biocompatibility and high strength-to-weight ratio. The high reactivity of titanium in the liquid phase makes it difficult to produce it by fusion. Powder metallurgy has been shown to be an adequate technique to obtain titanium samples at low temperatures and solid-phase consolidation. The production of compacts with different porosities obtained by uniaxial pressing an...

  16. Human alveolar bone cell proliferation, expression of osteoblastic phenotype, and matrix mineralization on porous titanium produced by powder metallurgy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Adalberto Luiz; Crippa, Grasiele Edilaine; de Oliveira, Paulo Tambasco; Taba, Mario; Lefebvre, Louis-Philippe; Beloti, Marcio Mateus

    2009-05-01

    This study aimed at investigating the influence of the porous titanium (Ti) structure on the osteogenic cell behaviour. Porous Ti discs were fabricated by the powder metallurgy process with the pore size typically between 50 and 400 microm and a porosity of 60%. Osteogenic cells obtained from human alveolar bone were cultured until subconfluence and subcultured on dense Ti (control) and porous Ti for periods of up to 17 days. Cultures grown on porous Ti exhibited increased cell proliferation and total protein content, and lower levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity than on dense Ti. In general, gene expression of osteoblastic markers-runt-related transcription factor 2, collagen type I, alkaline phosphatase, bone morphogenetic protein-7, and osteocalcin was lower at day 7 and higher at day 17 in cultures grown on porous Ti compared with dense Ti, a finding consistent with the enhanced growth rate for such cultures. The amount of mineralized matrix was greater on porous Ti compared with the dense one. These results indicate that the porous Ti is an appropriate substrate for osteogenic cell adhesion, proliferation, and production of a mineralized matrix. Because of the three-dimensional environment it provides, porous Ti should be considered an advantageous substrate for promoting desirable implant surface-bone interactions.

  17. Tuning the Superconducting Properties of Magnesium Diboride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theoderich Wilke, Rudeger Heinrich [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This work is presented in the following order: A review of the relevant physics and discussion of theoretical predictions for a two gap superconducting compound is given in chapter 2. Chapter 3 provides a review of the basic properties of MgB2. Details of sample synthesis and characterization are given in chapter 4. Chapter 5 presents normal state and superconducting properties of Mg(B1-xCx)2 wires. Attempts to increase critical current densities in filaments via titanium additions are discussed in chapter 6. In chapters 7 and 8 alternative methods for synthesizing doped MgB2 powders are explored. In chapter 7 we synthesize Mg(B1-xCx)2 up to x=0.069 using a mixture of Mg, B, and the binary compound B4C. Chapter 8 explores an alternative method, plasma spray synthesis, to produce nanometer sized doped boron powders for powder-in-tube applications. The effects of neutron irradiation on pure MgB2 wires is discussed in chapter 9. This is followed by a study of the effects of neutron irradiation on Mg(B.962C.038)2 wires, presented in chapter 10. I will summarize the results of all of these studies in chapter 11 and discuss future directions for research in understanding the physics behind this novel material as well as its development for practical applications. In this thesis I have presented the results of investigations into the changes in the superconducting properties of MgB2 as a function of carbon doping and neutron irradiation. The goal has been to understand the physics underlying this unique two-gap superconductor as different types of perturbations are made to the system. Such knowledge not only contributes to our understanding of two-gap superconductivity, but could potentially lead to the development of superconducting MgB2 wires for the use in power applications near 20 K.

  18. Obtenção de titânio metálico com porosidade controlada por metalurgia do pó Porous titanium production and porosity control by powder metallurgy (P/M

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neila de Almeida Braga

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Titanium is an attractive material for structural and biomedical applications because of its excellent corrosion resistance, biocompatibility and high strength-to-weight ratio. The high reactivity of titanium in the liquid phase makes it difficult to produce it by fusion. Powder metallurgy has been shown to be an adequate technique to obtain titanium samples at low temperatures and solid-phase consolidation. The production of compacts with different porosities obtained by uniaxial pressing and vacuum sintering is briefly reviewed. Powder particle size control has been shown to be very important for porosity control. Sample characterization was made using scanning electron microscopy (SEM images.

  19. Fabrication of a Spherical Titanium Powder by Combined Combustion Synthesis and DC Plasma Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi S.H.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Combustion synthesis is capable of producing many types of refractory and ceramic materials, as well as metals, with a relatively lower cost and shorter time frame than other solid state synthetic techniques. TiO2 with Mg as reductant were dry mixed and hand compacted into a 60 mm diameter mold and then combusted under an Ar atmosphere. Depending on the reaction parameters (Mg concentration 2 ≤ α ≤ 4, the thermocouples registered temperatures between 1160°C and 1710°C · 3 mol of Mg gave the optimum results with combustion temperature (Tc and combustion velocity (Uc values of 1372°C and 0.26 cm/s respectively. Furthermore, this ratio also had the lowest oxygen concentration in this study (0.8 wt%. After combustion, DC plasma treatment was carried out to spheroidize the Ti powder for use in 3D printing. The characterization of the final product was performed using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and N/O analysis.

  20. Cold Consolidation of Ball-Milled Titanium Powders Using High-Pressure Torsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edalati, Kaveh; Horita, Zenji; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Ameyama, Kei

    2010-12-01

    Pure Ti (99.5 pct) powders after processing with ball milling (BM) were consolidated to disc-shaped samples with 10-mm diameter and 0.8-mm thickness at room temperature using high-pressure torsion (HPT). A relative density as high as 99.9 pct, high bending and tensile strengths of 2.55 to 3.45 and 1.35 GPa, respectively, and a moderate ductility of 8 pct with an ultrafine grained structure are achieved after cold consolidation with HPT, which exceed those of hot consolidation methods. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis showed that a phase transformation occurs from α phase to ω phase during HPT under a pressure of 6 GPa as in bulk pure Ti, whereas no phase transformation is detected after processing with BM alone. It was confirmed that the strength and ductility are improved by a combined application of BM and HPT when compared with other severe plastic deformation methods applied to Ti and Ti-6 pct Al-4 pct V, so that no alloying elements are required for the achievement of a comparable strength and ductility.

  1. Magnesium diboride: An effective light-to-heat conversion material in solid-state

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Saju K.; John, Daughty; Bijoy, N.; Chathanathodi, Raghu; Anappara, Aji A.

    2017-07-01

    We report herein a giant light-to-heat transduction observed in bulk magnesium diboride (MgB2) on exposure to incoherent, continuous wave, broadband light-sources. The heat-flow from the sample was accurately determined using photocalorimetry, to register an ultrahigh value of 45 W/g upon irradiation with a low-pressure mercury vapour lamp (λ ˜ 250-450 nm; irradiance ˜800 mW/cm2) with a photo-to-thermal conversion efficiency of about 83% (with an error of ±1.86%). As a practical application, light-induced heat was used to generate electrical power using a thermoelectric generator (open voltage ˜125 mV, when illuminated by a solar simulator). The bulk MgB2 powder was found to be photo-stable under different irradiation conditions, and the photothermal effect was found to be highly reproducible.

  2. Sustained release vancomycin-coated titanium alloy using a novel electrostatic dry powder coating technique may be a potential strategy to reduce implant-related infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jing; Yang, Yi; Lu, Junren; Wang, Chenzhong; Xie, Youtao; Zheng, Xuebin; Yao, Zhenjun; Zhang, Chi

    2017-07-24

    In order to tackle the implant-related infection, a novel way was developed in this study to coat vancomycin particles mixed with controlled release coating materials onto the surface of titanium alloy by using an electrostatic dry powder coating technique. To characterize this sustained release antibacterial coating, surface morphology, in vitro and in vivo drug release were sequentially evaluated. In vitro cytotoxicity was tested by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay and cytological changes were observed by inverted microscope. The antibacterial properties against MRSA, including a bacterial growth inhibition assay and a colony-counting test by spread plate method were performed. Results indicated that the vancomycin-coated sample was biocompatible for Human osteoblast cell line MG-63 and displayed effective antibacterial ability against MRSA. The coating film was revealed uniform by scanning electron microscopy. Both the in vitro and in vivo drug release kinetics showed an initially high release rate, followed by an extended period of sustained drug release over 7 days. These results suggest that with good biocompatibility and antibacterial ability, the sustained release antibacterial coating of titanium alloy using our novel electrostatic dry powder coating process may provide a promising candidate for the treatment of orthopedic implant-related infection.

  3. A new titanium based alloy Ti–27Nb–13Zr produced by powder metallurgy with biomimetic coating for use as a biomaterial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, Marcio W.D., E-mail: mwdmendes@ipen.com; Ágreda, Carola G.; Bressiani, Ana H.A.; Bressiani, José C.

    2016-06-01

    Titanium alloys are widely used in biomedical applications due to their excellent properties such as high strength, good corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. Titanium alloys with alloying elements such as Nb and Zr are biocompatible and have Young's modulus close to that of human bone. To increase the bioactivity of titanium alloy surfaces is used chemical treatment with NaOH followed by immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). The purpose of this study was to produce the alloy Ti–27Nb–13Zr with low Young's modulus by powder metallurgy using powders produced by the HDH process. The formation of biomimetic coatings on samples immersed in SBF for 3, 7, 11 and 15 days was evaluated. Characterization of the coating was performed by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and scanning electron microscope. The microstructure and composition of the alloy were determined using SEM and XRD, while the mechanical properties were evaluated by determining the elastic modulus and the Vickers microhardness. The sintered alloys were composed of α and β phases, equiaxed grains and with density around 97.8% of its theoretical density. The Vickers microhardness and elasticity modulus of the alloy were determined and their values indicate that this alloy can be used as a biomaterial. Analysis of the coating revealed the presence of calcium phosphate layers on samples immersed for > 3 days in the SBF solution. - Highlights: • The alloy is classified as α + β and the milling time influences the formation of these phases. • Dissolution of Nb is related to the mechanical properties of the alloy. • It's possible to form apatite on all samples immersed in SBF from 3 days. • The alloy can be used in orthopedic applications or in dental applications.

  4. Study of the microstructural and mechanical properties of titanium-niobium-zirconium based alloys processed with hydrogen and powder metallurgy for use in dental implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duvaizem, Jose Helio

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen has been used as pulverization agent in alloys based on rare earth and transition metals due to its extremely high diffusion rate even on low temperatures. Such materials are used on hydrogen storage dispositives, generation of electricity or magnetic fields, and are produced by a process which the first step is the transformation of the alloy in fine powder by miling. Besides those, hydrogenium is also being used to obtain alloys based on titanium - niobium - zirconium in the pulverization. Powder metallurgy is utilized on the production of these alloys, making it possible to obtain structures with porous surface as result, requirement for its application as biomaterials. Other advantages of powder metallurgy usage include better surface finish and better microstructural homogeneity. In this work samples were prepared in the Ti-13Nb-13Zr composition. The hydrogenation was performed at 700 degree C, 600 degree C, and 500 degree C for titanium, niobium and zirconium respectively. After hydrogenation, the milling stage was carried out on high energy planetary ball milling with 200rpm during 90 minutes, and also in conventional ball milling for 30 hours. Samples were pressed in uniaxial press, followed by isostatic cold press, and then sintered at 1150 degree C for 7-13 hours. Microstructural properties of the samples were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and x-ray diffraction. Mechanical and structural properties determined were density, microhardness and moduli of elasticity. The sample sintered at 1150 degree C for 7h, hydrogenated using 10.000 mbar and produced by milling on high energy planetary ball milling presented the best mechanical properties and microstructural homogeneity. (author)

  5. Magnesium Diboride Superconducting Coils for Electric Propulsion Systems for Large Aircraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The recent development of magnesium diboride superconducting wires makes possible the potential to have much lighter weight superconducting coils for heavy aircraft...

  6. Magnesium Diboride Superconducting Coils for Electric Propulsion Systems for Large Aircraft, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The recent development of magnesium diboride superconducting wires makes possible the potential to have much lighter weight superconducting coils for heavy aircraft...

  7. Aqueous Synthesis of Technetium-Doped Titanium Dioxide by Direct Oxidation of Titanium Powder, a Precursor for Ceramic Nuclear Waste Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukens, Wayne W. [Chemical; Saslow, Sarah A. [Earth

    2017-11-17

    Technetium-99 (Tc) is a problematic fission product that complicates the long-term disposal of nuclear waste due to its long half-life, high fission yield, and the environmental mobility of pertechnetate, its stable form in aerobic environments. One approach to preventing Tc contamination is through incorporation into durable waste forms based on weathering-resistant minerals such as rutile (titanium dioxide). Here, the incorporation of technetium into titanium dioxide by means of simple, aqueous chemistry is presented. X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy indicate that Tc(IV) replaces Ti(IV) within the structure. Rather than being incorporated as isolated Tc(IV) ions, Tc is present as pairs of edge-sharing Tc(IV) octahedra similar to molecular Tc(IV) complexes such as [(H2EDTA)TcIV](u-O)2. Technetium-doped TiO2 was suspended in deionized water under aerobic conditions, and the Tc leached under these conditions was followed for 8 months. The normalized release rate of Tc (LRTc) from the TiO2 particles is low (3×10-6 g m-2 d-1), which illustrates the potential utility of TiO2 as waste form. However, the small size of the as-prepared TiO2 nanoparticles results in estimated retention of Tc for 104 years, which is only a fraction of the half-life of Tc (2×10-5 years).

  8. Effect of dielectric fluid with surfactant and graphite powder on Electrical Discharge Machining of titanium alloy using Taguchi method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murahari Kolli

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, Taguchi method was employed to optimize the surfactant and graphite powder concentration in dielectric fluid for the machining of Ti-6Al-4V using Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM. The process parameters such as discharge current, surfactant concentration and powder concentration were changed to explore their effects on Material Removal Rate (MRR, Surface Roughness (SR, Tool wear rate (TWR and Recast Layer Thickness (RLT. Detailed analysis of structural features of machined surface was carried out using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM to observe the influence of surfactant and graphite powder on the machining process. It was observed from the experimental results that the graphite powder and surfactant added dielectric fluid significantly improved the MRR, reduces the SR, TWR and RLT at various conditions. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA and F-test of experimental data values related to the important process parameters of EDM revealed that discharge current and surfactant concentration has more percentage of contribution on the MRR and TWR whereas the SR, and RLT were found to be affected greatly by the discharge current and graphite powder concentration.

  9. Electronic structure of magnesium diboride and related compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paduani, C. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, UFSC, Florianopolis, CEP 88040-900, SC (Brazil)

    2003-11-01

    The electronic structure of AlB{sub 2}-type diborides and related compounds has been investigated in first-principles calculations with the molecular cluster discrete variational method. For MgB{sub 2} was studied the effect of the lattice relaxation on the total density of states at the Fermi energy (N({epsilon}{sub F})). The results indicated that a contraction of about 2% in the lattice spacings a and c can lead to a slight increase of N({epsilon}{sub F}) for boron. In the MB{sub 2} diborides, M=Al, Ti, V, Cr, Zr, Nb, Mo and Ta, the largest contributions to N({epsilon}{sub F}) is observed for Cr, Mo and Nb. TiB{sub 2} possess the highest chemical stability in the series. The electronic specific heat coefficient {gamma} also is calculated for the diborides. The method is employed to obtain the partial B2p contribution to the total DOS at the Fermi level with the introduction of a monolayer of solute atoms as a substitution for Mg atoms of Na, Al, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Zr, Nb, Mo and Ta in layered superstructures.. /M/B{sub 2}/Mg/B{sub 2}/.. A stronger covalent bonding between boron atoms is identified in these cases. (copyright 2003 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Electronic structure of magnesium diboride and related compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paduani, C.

    2003-01-01

    The electronic structure of AlB 2 -type diborides and related compounds has been investigated in first-principles calculations with the molecular cluster discrete variational method. For MgB 2 was studied the effect of the lattice relaxation on the total density of states at the Fermi energy (N(ε F )). The results indicated that a contraction of about 2% in the lattice spacings a and c can lead to a slight increase of N(ε F ) for boron. In the MB 2 diborides, M=Al, Ti, V, Cr, Zr, Nb, Mo and Ta, the largest contributions to N(ε F ) is observed for Cr, Mo and Nb. TiB 2 possess the highest chemical stability in the series. The electronic specific heat coefficient γ also is calculated for the diborides. The method is employed to obtain the partial B2p contribution to the total DOS at the Fermi level with the introduction of a monolayer of solute atoms as a substitution for Mg atoms of Na, Al, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Zr, Nb, Mo and Ta in layered superstructures.. /M/B 2 /Mg/B 2 /.. A stronger covalent bonding between boron atoms is identified in these cases. (copyright 2003 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Preparation and characterization of functional fabrics from bamboo charcoal/silver and titanium dioxide/silver composite powders and evaluation of their antibacterial efficacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Fu-Chu, E-mail: yfc580629@yahoo.com.tw [Army Command Headquarters, MND, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Wu, Kuo-Hui [Department of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, Chung Cheng Institute of Technology, NDU, No. 190, Sanyuan 1st Street, Tahsi, Taoyuan 335, Taiwan (China); Huang, Jen-Wei [Department of Physics, Chinese Military Academy, Fengshan, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Horng, Deng-Nan; Liang, Chia-Feng [Department of Chemistry, Chinese Military Academy, Fengshan, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Hu, Ming-Kuan [School of Pharmacy, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2012-07-01

    Bamboo charcoal supporting silver (BC/Ag) and titanium dioxide supporting silver (TiO{sub 2}/Ag) were prepared by activation and chemical reduction. The BC/Ag and TiO{sub 2}/Ag composites were characterized by silver particle size and distribution and antibacterial properties. The pore and surface properties were studied in terms of BET volumetric measurement with nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The antibacterial effects of the BC/Ag and TiO{sub 2}/Ag composite powders were assessed from the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs), and an excellent antibacterial performance was discovered. Moreover, these composite powders were deposited via immersion coating onto fabrics (nonwoven and carbon fibers) to improve the antibacterial efficacy and to act as a biologically-protective material. The antibacterial activities of the fabrics supported by BC/Ag and TiO{sub 2}/Ag were studied in zone of inhibition and plate counting tests against Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus ME/GM/TC Resistant, Bacillus subtilis, Candida albicans, Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosae (CTZ and EM and GM) Res. Clin. Isol., Escherichia coli Juhl, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The results showed that fabric-BC/Ag and fabric-TiO{sub 2}/Ag possess a strong antibacterial activity and an inhibitory effect on the growth of these bacteria and are therefore believed to have great potential for use as antibacterial fabrics.

  12. [Determination of normal temperature properties of refractory die material compatible with slip casting core of sintered titanium powder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, X; Liao, Y; Chao, Y; Wang, H

    1999-05-01

    The refractory die is the precondition for developing slip casting core of sintered powder. This study is to determine the normal temperature properties of the refractory die material compatible with slip casting core. to mix the die material at five different ratios (8/1, 7.5/1, 7/1, 6.5/1, and 6/1) and measure their solidification time with self-manufactured Vicker's needle; to prepare five cylindrical specimens (phi 10 x 15 mm) in different drying time for determining their compressive strength, and then to let another five specimens fire at 1000 degrees C four times for measuring the residual compressive strength at room temperature. The setting time was 16.25 minutes (7.5/1), and the lower the powder-liquid ratio, the longer the setting time. The normal compressive strength was 25.32 MPa (drying 24 hours), while the longer the drying time, the higher the compressive strength achieved (P die material meet the demand of slip casting core of sintered powder.

  13. Synthesis of nanocrystalline TiB2 powder from TiO2, B2O3 and Mg ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Titanium diboride; thermodynamic calculations; microwave processing; combustion synthesis. 1. Introduction ... The last method (SHS) named also as combustion syn- ... Internal heat gener- ation during microwave heating brings about a uniform heat distribution in the samples, resulting in a more homogeneous product.

  14. Producing Zirconium Diboride Components with Complex, Near-Net Shape Geometries by Aqueous Room-Temperature Injection Molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesner, Valerie L.; Youngblood, Jeffrey; Trice, Rodney

    2014-01-01

    Room-temperature injection molding is proposed as a novel, low-cost and more energy efficient manufacturing process capable of forming complex-shaped zirconium diboride (ZrB2) parts. This innovative processing method utilized aqueous suspensions with high powder loading and a minimal amount (5 vol.) of water-soluble polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), which was used as a viscosity modifier. Rheological characterization was performed to evaluate the room-temperature flow properties of ZrB2-PVP suspensions. ZrB2 specimens were fabricated with high green body strength and were machinable prior to binder removal despite their low polymer content. After binder burnout and pressureless sintering, the bulk density and microstructure of specimens were characterized using Archimedes technique and scanning electron microscopy. X-Ray Diffraction was used to determine the phase compositions present in sintered specimens. Ultimate strength of sintered specimens will be determined using ASTM C1323-10 compressive C-ring test.

  15. Exploring the behavior of molybdenum diboride (MoB2): A high pressure x-ray diffraction study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Pingping; Peng, Fang; Yin, Shuai; Liu, Fangming; Wang, Qiming; Zhu, Xuhui; Wang, Pei; He, Duanwei; Liu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Investigation of the equation of state of molybdenum diboride (MoB 2 ) has been performed to 24.1 GPa using synchrotron radiation angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction techniques (ADXRD) in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) at room temperature. Rietveld refinement of the X-ray powder diffraction data reveals that the rhombohedral structure MoB 2 is stable up to 24.1 GPa. The ADXRD data yield a bulk modulus K 0  = 314(11) GPa with a pressure derivative K 0 ′  = 6.4(1.5). The experimental data are discussed and compared to the results of first-principles calculations. In addition, the compressibility of the unit cell axes (a and c axes) of MoB 2 demonstrates an anisotropic property with pressure increasing

  16. Replacing Chlorine with Hydrogen Chloride as a Possible Reactant for Synthesis of Titanium Carbide Derived Carbon Powders for High-Technology Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallo, Indrek; Thomberg, Thomas; Jänes, Alar; Lust, Enn

    2013-01-01

    Micro- and mesoporous carbide-derived carbons were synthesized from titanium carbide (TiC) powder via gas phase reaction by using different reactants (Cl 2 and HCl) within the temperature range from 700 to 1100 °C. Analysis of XRD results show that TiC-derived carbons (TiC-CDC) consist mainly of graphitic crystallites. The first-order Raman spectra showed the graphite-like absorption peaks at ∼1577 cm 1 and the disorder-induced peaks at ∼1338 cm- 1 . The energy-related properties of supercapacitors based on 1 M (C 2 H 5 ) 3 CH 3 NBF 4 in acetonitrile and carbide-derived carbons (TiC-CDC (Cl 2 ) and TiC-CDC (HCl)) as electrode materials were also investigated using cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, galvanostatic charge/discharge and constant power methods. The Ragone plots for carbide-derived carbons prepared by using different reactants (Cl 2 , HCl) are quite similar and at high power loads TiC-CDC (Cl 2 ) material synthesized at 900 °C, i.e. materials with optimal porous structure, deliver higher power at constant energy

  17. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Injection Molding of Ti-6Al-4V Powders for High-Performance Titanium Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Dongguo; Kang, Tae Gon; Han, Jun Sae; Park, Seong Jin; Chung, Seong Taek; Kwon, Young-Sam

    2018-02-01

    Both experimental and numerical analysis of powder injection molding (PIM) of Ti-6Al-4V alloy were performed to prepare a defect-free high-performance Ti-6Al-4V part with low carbon/oxygen contents. The prepared feedstock was characterized with specific experiments to identify its viscosity, pressure-volume-temperature and thermal properties to simulate its injection molding process. A finite-element-based numerical scheme was employed to simulate the thermomechanical process during the injection molding. In addition, the injection molding, debinding, sintering and hot isostatic pressing processes were performed in sequence to prepare the PIMed parts. With optimized processing conditions, the PIMed Ti-6Al-4V part exhibits excellent physical and mechanical properties, showing a final density of 99.8%, tensile strength of 973 MPa and elongation of 16%.

  18. FINE-FILAMENT MAGNESIUM DIBORIDE SUPERCONDUCTOR WIRE FOR TURBOELECTRIC PROPULSION SYSTEMS, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The availability of low AC loss magnesium diboride (MgB2) superconducting wires enables much lighter weight superconducting stator coils than with any other metal or...

  19. Controlling fundamentals in high-energy high-rate pulsed power materials processing of powdered tungsten, titanium aluminides, and copper-graphite composites. Final technical report, 1 Jun 87-31 Aug 90

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persad, C.; Marcus, H.L.; Bourell, D.L.; Eliezer, Z.; Weldon, W.F.

    1990-10-01

    This study was conducted to determine the controlling fundamentals in the high-energy high-rate (1 MJ in 1s) processing of metal powders. This processing utilizes a large electrical current pulse to heat a pressurized powder mass. The current pulse was provided by a homopolar generator. Simple short cylindrical shapes were consolidated so as to minimize tooling costs. Powders were subjected to current densities of 5 kA/cm2 to 25 kA/cm2 under applied pressures ranging from 70 MPa to 500 MPa. Disks with diameters of 25 mm to 70 mm, and thicknesses of 1 mm to 10 mm were consolidated. Densities of 75% to 99% of theoretical values were obtained in powder consolidates of tungsten, titanium aluminides, copper-graphite, and other metal-ceramic composites. Extensive microstructural characterization was performed to follow the changes occuring in the shape and microstructure of the various powders. The processing science has at its foundation the control of the duration of elevated temperature exposure during powder consolidation.

  20. Fabrication of Chemically Doped, High Upper Critical Field Magnesium Diboride Superconducting Wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marzik, James V.

    2005-01-01

    Controlled chemical doping of magnesium diboride (MgB2) has been shown to substantially improve its superconducting properties to the levels required for high field magnets, but the doping is difficult to accomplish through the usual route of solid state reaction and diffusion. Further, superconducting cables of MgB2 are difficult to fabricate because of the friable nature of the material. In this Phase I STTR project, doped and undoped boron fibers were made by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Several >100m long batches of doped and undoped fiber were made by CVD codeposition of boron plus dopants. Bundles of these fibers infiltrated with liquid magnesium and subsequently converted to MgB2 to form Mg-MgB2 metal matrix composites. In a parallel path, doped boron nano-sized powder was produced by a plasma synthesis technique, reacted with magnesium to produce doped MgB2 superconducting ceramic bodies. The doped powder was also fabricated into superconducting wires several meters long. The doped boron fibers and powders made in this program were fabricated into fiber-metal composites and powder-metal composites by a liquid metal infiltration technique. The kinetics of the reaction between boron fiber and magnesium metal was investigated in fiber-metal composites. It was found that the presence of dopants had significantly slowed the reaction between magnesium and boron. The superconducting properties were measured for MgB2 fibers and MgB2 powders made by liquid metal infiltration. Properties of MgB2 products (Jc, Hc2) from Phase I are among the highest reported to date for MgB2 bulk superconductors. Chemically doped MgB2 superconducting magnets can perform at least as well as NbTi and NbSn3 in high magnetic fields and still offer an improvement over the latter two in terms of operating temperature. These characteristics make doped MgB2 an effective material for high magnetic field applications, such as magnetic confined fusion, and medical MRI devices. Developing

  1. Fabrication of Chemically Doped, High Upper Critical Field Magnesium Diboride Superconducting Wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marzik, James, V.

    2005-10-13

    Controlled chemical doping of magnesium diboride (MgB2) has been shown to substantially improve its superconducting properties to the levels required for high field magnets, but the doping is difficult to accomplish through the usual route of solid state reaction and diffusion. Further, superconducting cables of MgB2 are difficult to fabricate because of the friable nature of the material. In this Phase I STTR project, doped and undoped boron fibers were made by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Several >100m long batches of doped and undoped fiber were made by CVD codeposition of boron plus dopants. Bundles of these fibers infiltrated with liquid magnesium and subsequently converted to MgB2 to form Mg-MgB2 metal matrix composites. In a parallel path, doped boron nano-sized powder was produced by a plasma synthesis technique, reacted with magnesium to produce doped MgB2 superconducting ceramic bodies. The doped powder was also fabricated into superconducting wires several meters long. The doped boron fibers and powders made in this program were fabricated into fiber-metal composites and powder-metal composites by a liquid metal infiltration technique. The kinetics of the reaction between boron fiber and magnesium metal was investigated in fiber-metal composites. It was found that the presence of dopants had significantly slowed the reaction between magnesium and boron. The superconducting properties were measured for MgB2 fibers and MgB2 powders made by liquid metal infiltration. Properties of MgB2 products (Jc, Hc2) from Phase I are among the highest reported to date for MgB2 bulk superconductors. Chemically doped MgB2 superconducting magnets can perform at least as well as NbTi and NbSn3 in high magnetic fields and still offer an improvement over the latter two in terms of operating temperature. These characteristics make doped MgB2 an effective material for high magnetic field applications, such as magnetic confined fusion, and medical MRI devices. Developing

  2. Production of titanium tetrachloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perillo, P.M.; Botbol, O.

    1990-01-01

    This report presents a summary of results from theoperation of a laboratory scale for the production in batches of approximately 100 gs of titanium tetrachloride by chlorination with chloroform and carbon tetrachloride between 340 deg C and 540 deg C. Chlorination agent vapors were passed through a quartz column reacting with titanium oxide powder agglomerated in little spheres. Obtained titanium tetrachloride was condensed in a condenser, taken in a ballon and then purified by fractional distillation. Optimun temperature for chloroform was 400 deg C with 74 % yield and for carbon tetrachloride was 500 deg C with 69 % yield. (Author) [es

  3. Method for producing titanium aluminide weld rod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Jeffrey S.; Turner, Paul C.; Argetsinger, Edward R.

    1995-01-01

    A process for producing titanium aluminide weld rod comprising: attaching one end of a metal tube to a vacuum line; placing a means between said vacuum line and a junction of the metal tube to prevent powder from entering the vacuum line; inducing a vacuum within the tube; placing a mixture of titanium and aluminum powder in the tube and employing means to impact the powder in the tube to a filled tube; heating the tube in the vacuum at a temperature sufficient to initiate a high-temperature synthesis (SHS) reaction between the titanium and aluminum; and lowering the temperature to ambient temperature to obtain a intermetallic titanium aluminide alloy weld rod.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of nano silicon and titanium nitride ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... nano titanium nitride was synthesized by using liquid titanium tetrachloride as the precursor. The synthesized nano silicon and titanium nitride powders were characterized by XRD, XPS, TEM, SEM and BET. The characterization techniques indicated that the synthesized powders were indeed crystalline nanomaterials.

  5. Enhanced Performance Near Net Shape Titanium Alloys by Thermohydrogen Processing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Froes, F

    2001-01-01

    ...), powder metallurgy and cast titanium alloys. Fundamental results have been obtained which can now be used to develop optimum THP steps to refine the microstructure and improve the mechanical properties of titanium alloys...

  6. Stability of electroplated titanium diboride coatings in high-temperature corrosive media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rybakova, N.; Souto, M. [ECHEM Centre of Competence in Applied Electrochemistry, Viktor Kaplan-Strasse 2, A-2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Martinz, H.-P. [Plansee SE, 6600 Reutte (Austria); Andriyko, Y.; Artner, W.; Godinho, Jose [ECHEM Centre of Competence in Applied Electrochemistry, Viktor Kaplan-Strasse 2, A-2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Nauer, G.E. [ECHEM Centre of Competence in Applied Electrochemistry, Viktor Kaplan-Strasse 2, A-2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); University of Vienna, Faculty of Chemistry, Waehringer Strasse 42, A-1090 Wien (Austria)], E-mail: gerhard.nauer@echem.at

    2009-06-15

    The corrosion behaviour of molybdenum and steel materials, protected by electrochemically plated TiB{sub 2} coatings, in contact with liquid aluminium alloys and liquid glass in air has been studied. The corrosion performance tests followed by characterization of the treated samples by optical microscopy, SEM, elemental EDX analysis, have shown high corrosion resistance of the coatings to the liquid metal. However, the coating was not stable in contact with molten glass in an oxidative atmosphere at temperatures higher as 750-800 deg. C. Dissolution of the corrosion products in the melt facilitates the destruction of the coating.

  7. [Determination of high temperature compressive strength and refractory degree of die material compatible with slip casting core of sintered titanium powder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, X; Liao, Y; Chao, Y; Meng, Y

    1999-05-01

    The refractory die is the precondition for developing slip casting core of sintered powder. This study is to determine the high temperature properties of the refractory die material compatible with slip casting core. To prepare three cylindrical specimens (phi 10 x 15 mm) and determine their compressive strength at 1000 degrees C: to make four specimens in flat-topped cone for determining the practical refractory degree by decreasing the pressing temperatures in a sequence of 1420, 1400, 1350 and 1100 degrees C. The compressive strength of this material was 17.8 MPa at 1000 degrees C. Its practical refractory degree was higher than 1100 degrees C. The high temperature properties of the refractory die material that we developed meet the demand of slip casting core of sintered powder.

  8. Hybrid type I-type II superconducting behavior in magnesium diboride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunchur, M.N.; Saracila, G.; Arcos, D.A.; Cui, Y.; Pogrebnyakov, A.; Orgiani, P.; Xi, X.X.

    2006-01-01

    In traditional type-II superconductors, an applied magnetic field depresses the transition temperature and introduces magnetic flux vortices that cause resistive losses accompanied by a broadening of the transition. High-field high-pulsed-current measurements have revealed a new hybrid behavior in disordered magnesium diboride films: The superconductivity survives high magnetic fields by entering a mixed state with vortices (like a type II superconductor) but holds its vortices nearly motionless and avoids dissipation (like a type I superconductor). A study of this phenomenon in magnesium diboride films with varying degrees of scattering indicate that the hybrid type I-type II behavior arises from the two-band nature of the superconductivity and the different degrees of influence that disorder exerts on its different bands. (author)

  9. Enthalpies of Formation of Transition Metal Diborides: A First Principles Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Colinet

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The enthalpies of formation of transition metals diborides in various structures have been obtained from density functional theory (DFT calculations in order to determine the ground state at T = 0 K and p = 0. The evolution of the enthalpies of formation along the 3D, 4D, and 5D series has been correlated to the considered crystal structures. In the whole, the calculated values of the enthalpies of formation of the diborides in their ground state are in good agreement with the experimental ones when available. The calculated values of the lattice parameters at T = 0 K of the ground state agree well with the experimental values. The total and partial electronic densities of states have been computed. Special features of the transition metal electronic partial density of states have been evidenced and correlated to the local environment of the atoms.

  10. Synthesis of Silver-Doped Titanium TiO2 Powder-Coated Surfaces and Its Ability to Inactivate Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus subtilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saman Khan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hard, nonporous environmental surfaces in daily life are now receiving due recognition for their role in reducing the spread of several nosocomial infections. In this work, we established the photokilling effects of 1% silver-doped titanium dioxide TiO2. The nanoparticles synthesized by liquid impregnation method were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The Ag-TiO2 nanoparticle coatings that have been applied on glass and venetian blind surfaces were effective in generating a loss of viability of two bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus subtilis after two hours of illumination under normal light in the visible spectrum. Such surfaces can be applicable to medical and other facilities where the potential for infection should be controlled.

  11. Titanium ; dream new material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Tae; Kim Seung Eon; Heoon, Yong Taek; Jung, Hui Won

    2001-11-01

    The contents of this book are history of Titanium, present situation of Titanium industry, property of Titanium alloy, types of it, development of new alloy of Titanium smelting of Titanium, cast of Titanium and heat treatment of Titanium, Titanium alloy for plane, car parts, biological health care, and sport leisure and daily life, prospect, and Titanium industrial development of Titanium in China.

  12. In situ elaboration of a binary Ti–26Nb alloy by selective laser melting of elemental titanium and niobium mixed powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, M. [Laboratoire d' Etude des Microstructures et de Mécanique des Matériaux LEM3 (UMR CNRS 7239), Université de Lorraine, Ile de Saulcy, F-57045 Metz (France); Joguet, D. [Laboratoire d' Etudes et de Recherches sur les Matériaux, les Procédés et les Surfaces LERMPS, Université de Technologie de Belfort Montbéliard, Sevenans, 90010 Belfort (France); Robin, G. [Laboratoire d' Etude des Microstructures et de Mécanique des Matériaux LEM3 (UMR CNRS 7239), Université de Lorraine, Ile de Saulcy, F-57045 Metz (France); Peltier, L. [Laboratoire d' Etude des Microstructures et de Mécanique des Matériaux LEM3 (UMR CNRS 7239), Ecole Nationale Supérieure d' Arts et Métiers, F-57078 Metz (France); Laheurte, P. [Laboratoire d' Etude des Microstructures et de Mécanique des Matériaux LEM3 (UMR CNRS 7239), Université de Lorraine, Ile de Saulcy, F-57045 Metz (France)

    2016-05-01

    Ti–Nb alloys are excellent candidates for biomedical applications such as implantology and joint replacement because of their very low elastic modulus, their excellent biocompatibility and their high strength. A low elastic modulus, close to that of the cortical bone minimizes the stress shielding effect that appears subsequent to the insertion of an implant. The objective of this study is to investigate the microstructural and mechanical properties of a Ti–Nb alloy elaborated by selective laser melting on powder bed of a mixture of Ti and Nb elemental powders (26 at.%). The influence of operating parameters on porosity of manufactured samples and on efficacy of dissolving Nb particles in Ti was studied. The results obtained by optical microscopy, SEM analysis and X-ray microtomography show that the laser energy has a significant effect on the compactness and homogeneity of the manufactured parts. Homogeneous and compact samples were obtained for high energy levels. Microstructure of these samples has been further characterized. Their mechanical properties were assessed by ultrasonic measures and the Young's modulus found is close to that of classically elaborated Ti–26Nb ingot. - Highlights: • Biomimetic implants can be provided from additive manufacturing with Ti–Nb. • We made parts in a Ti–Nb alloy elaborated in situ from a mixture of elemental powders. • Process parameters have a significant impact on homogeneity and compactness. • Non-columnar elongated beta-grains are stacked with an orientation {001}<100 >. • Low Young's modulus is achieved by this texture.

  13. Thermoexpanded graphite modification by titanium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semko, L.S.; Gorbik, P.P.; Chujko, O.O.; Kruchek, Ya.Yi.; Dzyubenko, L.S.; Orans'ka, O.Yi.

    2006-01-01

    A method of the synthesis of thermoexpanded graphite (TEG) powders coated by titanium dioxide is developed. The conversion of n-buthylorthotitanate into TiO 2 on the TEG surface is investigated. The optimal parameters of the synthesis and the structure of titanium dioxide clusters on the TEG surface are determined

  14. In situ elaboration of a binary Ti-26Nb alloy by selective laser melting of elemental titanium and niobium mixed powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, M; Joguet, D; Robin, G; Peltier, L; Laheurte, P

    2016-05-01

    Ti-Nb alloys are excellent candidates for biomedical applications such as implantology and joint replacement because of their very low elastic modulus, their excellent biocompatibility and their high strength. A low elastic modulus, close to that of the cortical bone minimizes the stress shielding effect that appears subsequent to the insertion of an implant. The objective of this study is to investigate the microstructural and mechanical properties of a Ti-Nb alloy elaborated by selective laser melting on powder bed of a mixture of Ti and Nb elemental powders (26 at.%). The influence of operating parameters on porosity of manufactured samples and on efficacy of dissolving Nb particles in Ti was studied. The results obtained by optical microscopy, SEM analysis and X-ray microtomography show that the laser energy has a significant effect on the compactness and homogeneity of the manufactured parts. Homogeneous and compact samples were obtained for high energy levels. Microstructure of these samples has been further characterized. Their mechanical properties were assessed by ultrasonic measures and the Young's modulus found is close to that of classically elaborated Ti-26 Nbingot. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of nano silicon and titanium nitride ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Synthesis and characterization of nano silicon and titanium nitride powders using atmospheric microwave plasma technique ... nucleation of silicon vapour produced by the radial injection of silicon tetrachloride vapour and nano titanium nitride was synthesized by using liquid titanium tetrachloride as the precursor.

  16. Effect of Platinum Group Metal Doping in Magnesium Diboride Wires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grivel, Jean-Claude; Alexiou, Aikaterini; Namazkar, Shahla

    2016-01-01

    The effect of some platinum group metals(PGM = Rh, Pd, and Pt) on the microstructure and critical current density of Cu/Nb-sheathed MgB2 wires has been studied using Mg1-x PGMxB2 powders with low doping levels. It was found that Pt and Pd do not enter the MgB2 lattice and have only limited influe...

  17. Stability and the Electronic Structure of XB2 (X = Pt, Ir, Pd, Rh, Os Diborides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popoola A.I.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available First-principle calculations have been performed to investigate the structural and electronic properties of platinum group metal diborides in the stoichiometry XB2 (X = Pt, Ir, Pd, Rh, Os. All investigated compounds have shown to belong to the orthorhombic Pmmn space group rather than the C2/m previously predicted in some of the compositions. Compressibility will reduce with boron addition in Pt, Pd and Rh, but will increase with boron addition into Ir and Os. The electronic density of states show that all the compounds are metals, with PtB2, PdB2 and OsB2 being potentially incompressible and superhard materials.

  18. The inclusions of Mg-B (MgB12?) as potential pinning centres in high-pressure-high-temperature-synthesized or sintered magnesium diboride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prikhna, T A; Gawalek, W; Savchuk, Ya M; Habisreuther, T; Wendt, M; Sergienko, N V; Moshchil, V E; Nagorny, P; Schmidt, Ch; Dellith, J; Dittrich, U; Litzkendorf, D; Melnikov, V S; Sverdun, V B

    2007-01-01

    A systematic study of the structure and superconductive characteristics of high-pressure-high-temperature (2 GPa, 700-1000 deg. C )-synthesized and sintered MgB 2 without additions from different initial powders was performed. Among various secondary phases Mg-B inclusions with a stoichiometry close to MgB 12 were identified. With an increasing amount of these inclusions the critical current density increased. So these inclusions can be feasible pinning centres in MgB 2 . The highest j c values in zero field were 1300 kA cm -2 at 10 K, 780 kA cm -2 at 20 K and 62 kA cm -2 at 35 K and in 1 T field were 1200 kA cm -2 at 10 K, 515 kA cm -2 at 20 K and 0.1 kA cm -2 at 35 K for high-pressure-synthesized magnesium diboride and the field of irreversibility at 20 K reached 8 T. The average grain sizes calculated from x-ray examinations in materials having high j c were 15-37 nm

  19. Titanium 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Titanium is the ninth most abundant element in the earth's crust and can be found in nearly all rocks and sediments. It is a lithophile element with a strong affinity for oxygen and is not found as a pure metal in nature. Titanium was first isolated as a pure metal in 1910, but it was not until 1948 that the metal was produced commercially using the Kroll process (named after its developer, William Kroll) to reduce titanium tetrachloride with magnesium to produce titanium metal.

  20. Titanium by design: TRIP titanium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Jamie

    Motivated by the prospect of lower cost Ti production processes, new directions in Ti alloy design were explored for naval and automotive applications. Building on the experience of the Steel Research Group at Northwestern University, an analogous design process was taken with titanium. As a new project, essential kinetic databases and models were developed for the design process and used to create a prototype design. Diffusion kinetic models were developed to predict the change in phase compositions and microstructure during heat treatment. Combining a mobility database created in this research with a licensed thermodynamic database, ThermoCalc and DICTRA software was used to model kinetic compositional changes in titanium alloys. Experimental diffusion couples were created and compared to DICTRA simulations to refine mobility parameters in the titanium mobility database. The software and database were able to predict homogenization times and the beta→alpha plate thickening kinetics during cooling in the near-alpha Ti5111 alloy. The results of these models were compared to LEAP microanalysis and found to be in reasonable agreement. Powder metallurgy was explored using SPS at GM R&D to reduce the cost of titanium alloys. Fully dense Ti5111 alloys were produced and achieved similar microstructures to wrought Ti5111. High levels of oxygen in these alloys increased the strength while reducing the ductility. Preliminary Ti5111+Y alloys were created, where yttrium additions successfully gettered excess oxygen to create oxides. However, undesirable large oxides formed, indicating more research is needed into the homogeneous distribution of the yttrium powder to create finer oxides. Principles established in steels were used to optimize the beta phase transformation stability for martensite transformation toughening in titanium alloys. The Olson-Cohen kinetic model is calibrated to shear strains in titanium. A frictional work database is established for common alloying

  1. Study of electronic structure and Compton profiles of transition metal diborides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Samir; Heda, N. L.; Kumar, Kishor; Ahuja, B. L.

    2017-08-01

    We report Compton profiles (CPs) of transition metal diborides (MB2; M= Ti and Zr) using a 740 GBq 137Cs Compton spectrometer measured at an intermediate resolution of 0.34 a.u. To validate the experimental momentum densities, we have employed the linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) method to compute the theoretical CPs along with the energy bands, density of states (DOS) and Mulliken's population response. The LCAO computations have been performed in the frame work of density functional theory (DFT) and hybridization of Hartree-Fock and DFT (namely B3LYP and PBE0). For both the diborides, the CPs based on revised Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof exchange and correlation functions (DFT-PBESol) lead to a better agreement with the experimental momentum densities than other reported approximations. Energy bands, DOS and real space analysis of CPs confirm a metallic-like character of both the borides. Further, a comparison of DFT-PBESol and experimental data on equal-valence-electron-density scale shows more ionicity in ZrB2 than that in TiB2, which is also supported by the Mulliken's population based charge transfer data.

  2. Structure, elastic stiffness, and hardness of Os 1- xRu xB 2 solid solution transition-metal diborides

    KAUST Repository

    Kanoun, Mohammed

    2012-05-31

    On the basis of recent experiments, the solid solution transition-metal diborides were proposed to be new ultra-incompressible hard materials. We investigate using density functional theory based methods the structural and mechanical properties, electronic structure, and hardness of Os 1-xRu xB 2 solid solutions. A difference in chemical bonding occurs between OsB 2 and RuB 2 diborides, leading to significantly different elastic properties: a large bulk, shear moduli, and hardness for Os-rich diborides and relatively small bulk, shear moduli, and hardness for Ru-rich diborides. The electronic structure and bonding characterization are also analyzed as a function of Ru-dopant concentration in the OsB 2 lattice. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  3. Enhancement of surface integrity of titanium alloy with copper by means of laser metal deposition process

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Erinosho, MF

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The laser metal deposition process possesses the combination of metallic powder and laser beam respectively. However, these combinations create an adhesive bonding that permanently solidifies the laser-enhanced-deposited powders. Titanium alloys (Ti...

  4. Magnesium diboride on inner wall of copper tube: A test case for superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenura K. Withanage

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Superconductor magnesium diboride is considered one of the viable materials to substitute bulk niobium for superconducting radio frequency cavities. Utilizing a MgB_{2} coating on the inner wall of a copper cavity will allow operation at higher temperatures (20–25 K than Nb cavities due to the high transition temperature of MgB_{2} (39 K and the high thermal conductivity of Cu. In this paper, we present results of MgB_{2} coating on Cu tubes with similar dimensions to a 3 GHz cavity, as the first step towards coating the actual cavity, using the hybrid physical chemical vapor deposition technique. The results show successful coating of a uniform MgB_{2} layer on the inner wall of the Cu tubes with T_{c} as high as 37 K.

  5. Determination of residual stresses in roll compacted titanium strips

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mothosi, KL

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available induced during roll compaction of titanium strips were measured for strips of different densities. The different densities were achieved by rolling two different particle size (100 and 325 mesh) titanium powders varying the roll gap (0.1, 0.3 and 0.5 mm...

  6. Titanium-induced synthesis of benzofurans | Jumbam | Bulletin of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ketoesters derived from the acylation of o-hydroxyacetophenone with aliphatic as well as aromatic acid chlorides undergo intramolecular cyclization in the presence of low-valent titanium to afford benzofurans in good yields. The reduction of titanium trichloride with dry zinc powder in refluxing THF takes place in the ...

  7. Physical and chemical characterization of titanium-alginate samples for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morani, L.M.; Ribeiro, A.A.; Oliveira, M.V. de; Dantas, F.M.L., E-mail: marize.varella@int.gov.b [Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia (INT), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Leao, M.H.M.R. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (EQ/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Escola de Quimica

    2010-07-01

    The sol-gel technique combined with powder metallurgy may be an alternative to produce titanium parts for bioengineering, with the advantage of eliminating the powder compaction step, which may introduce defects. The present work introduces a system consisted of titanium powder and sodium alginate suspension, which undergoes reticulation in contact with a calcium salt solution, obtaining titanium/calcium alginate hydrogel with granule morphology. The characterization of the raw materials and granules of calcium alginate and titanium/calcium alginate was performed by x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. The granules topography was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy/EDS. Titanium and sodium alginate chemical composition were adequate for use as raw materials, showing that the methodology used is suitable for processing titanium samples for further consolidation by sintering, in order to produce titanium parts. (author)

  8. Sinterable powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanghi, J.S.; Kasprzyk, M.R.

    1979-01-01

    A description is given of sinterable powders and methods of producing sintered products using such powders. The powders consist of (a) a particulate ceramic material, e.g. SiC, having specified particle size and surface area; (b) a carbon source material, e.g. sugar or a phenol-formaldehyde resin; and (c) a residue from a solution of H 3 BO 3 , B 2 O 3 , or mixtures of these as sintering aid. (U.K.)

  9. Study of the microstructural and mechanical properties of titanium-niobium-zirconium based alloys processed with hydrogen and powder metallurgy for use in dental implants; Estudo das propriedades mecanicas e microestruturais de ligas a base de titanio-niobiozirconio processados com hidrogenio e metalurgia do po para utilizacao em implantes dentarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duvaizem, Jose Helio

    2009-07-01

    Hydrogen has been used as pulverization agent in alloys based on rare earth and transition metals due to its extremely high diffusion rate even on low temperatures. Such materials are used on hydrogen storage dispositives, generation of electricity or magnetic fields, and are produced by a process which the first step is the transformation of the alloy in fine powder by miling. Besides those, hydrogenium is also being used to obtain alloys based on titanium - niobium - zirconium in the pulverization. Powder metallurgy is utilized on the production of these alloys, making it possible to obtain structures with porous surface as result, requirement for its application as biomaterials. Other advantages of powder metallurgy usage include better surface finish and better microstructural homogeneity. In this work samples were prepared in the Ti-13Nb-13Zr composition. The hydrogenation was performed at 700 degree C, 600 degree C, and 500 degree C for titanium, niobium and zirconium respectively. After hydrogenation, the milling stage was carried out on high energy planetary ball milling with 200rpm during 90 minutes, and also in conventional ball milling for 30 hours. Samples were pressed in uniaxial press, followed by isostatic cold press, and then sintered at 1150 degree C for 7-13 hours. Microstructural properties of the samples were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and x-ray diffraction. Mechanical and structural properties determined were density, microhardness and moduli of elasticity. The sample sintered at 1150 degree C for 7h, hydrogenated using 10.000 mbar and produced by milling on high energy planetary ball milling presented the best mechanical properties and microstructural homogeneity. (author)

  10. PRODUCTION OF WELDMENTS FROM SINTERED TITANIUM ALLOYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. YE. Kapustyan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Limited application of details from powder titanium alloys is connected with the difficulties in obtaining of long-length blanks, details of complex shape and large size. We can solve these problems by applying the welding production technology. For this it is necessary to conduct a research of the structure and mechanical properties of welded joints of sintered titanium alloys produced by flash welding. Methodology. Titanium industrial powders, type PT5-1 were used as original substance. Forming of blanks, whose chemical composition corresponded to BT1-0 alloy, was carried out using the powder metallurgy method. Compounds were obtained by flash welding without preheating. Microstructural investigations and mechanical tests were carried out. To compare the results investigations of BT1-0 cast alloy were conducted. Findings. Samples of welded joints of sintered titanium blanks from VT1-0 alloy using the flash butt welding method were obtained. During welding the microstructure of basic metal consisting of grains of an a-phase, with sizes 40...70 mkm, is transformed for the seam weld and HAZ into the lamellar structure of an a-phase. The remaining pores in seam weld were practically absent; in the HAZ their size was up to 2 mkm, with 30 mkm in the basic metal. Attainable level of mechanical properties of the welded joint in sintered titanium alloys is comparable to the basic metal. Originality. Structure qualitative changes and attainable property complex of compounds of sintered titanium alloys, formed as a result of flash butt welding were found out. Practical value. The principal possibility of high-quality compounds obtaining of sintered titanium alloys by flash welding is shown. This gives a basis for wider application of sintered titanium alloys due to long-length blanks production that are correspond to deformable strand semi finished product.

  11. Production of titanium carbide from ilmenite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutham Niyomwas

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The production of titanium carbide (TiC powders from ilmenite ore (FeTiO3 powder by means of carbothermal reduction synthesis coupled with hydrochloric acid (HCl leaching process was investigated. A mixture of FeTiO3 and carbon powders was reacted at 1500oC for 1 hr under flowing argon gas. Subsequently, synthesized product of Fe-TiC powders were leached by 10% HCl solutions for 24 hrs to get final product of TiC powders. The powders were characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy. The product particles were agglomerated in the stage after the leaching process, and the size of this agglomerate was 12.8 μm with a crystallite size of 28.8 nm..

  12. (YSZ) powders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Keywords. YSZ powder; dispersion behaviour; grindability. 1. Introduction. During the synthesis of oxide powders by solution based techniques (e.g. solution combustion, decomposition of metal nitrates, precipitation etc), agglomerates of fine crystallites of the precursors or oxides form and their size vary up to many microns.

  13. Electrowinning molten titanium from titanium dioxide

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Vuuren, DS

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The value chain of titanium products shows that the difference between the cost of titanium ingot and titanium dioxide is about $9/kg titanium. In contrast, the price of aluminium, which is produced in a similar way, is only about $1.7/kg...

  14. Effect of process control agent (PCA) on the characteristics of mechanically alloyed Ti-Mg powders [Journal article

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Machio, Christopher N

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available the milling media. The fracturing process exposes new surfaces over which atomic diffusion occurs, leading to alloying. Mechanical alloying has been applied to titanium (Ti) and magnesium (Mg) powders in order to produce Ti-Mg alloy powders. Ti-Mg alloys.... The powder mixture was made from elemental titanium powder (~99.5% purity) and elemental magnesium powder (~99.5% purity). The sizes of the powder particles were less than 45 ?m for Ti and less than 75 ?m for Mg. The particles of the Ti powder were...

  15. Arc Jet Testing of Hafnium Diboride Based Ultra High Temperature Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellerby, Don; Beckman, Sarah; Irby, Edward; Squire, Tom; Olejniczak, Joe; Johnson, Sylvia M.; Gusman, Michael; Gasch, Matthew

    2003-01-01

    Hafnium Diboride (HFB,) based materials have shown promise for use in a number of high temperature aerospace applications, including rocket nozzles and as leading edges on hypersonic reentry vehicles. The stability of the materials in relevant environments is key to determining their suitability for a particular application. In this program we have been developing HfB2/SiC materials for use as sharp leading edges. The program as a whole included processing and characterization of the HfBJSiC materials. The specific work discussed here will focus on studies of the materials oxidation behavior in simulated reentry environments through arc jet testing. Four flat face models were tested to examine the influence of heat flux and stagnation pressure on the materials oxidation behavior. The results from arc jet testing of two HfB2/SiC cone models will also be discussed. Each cone model was run multiple times with gradually increasing heat fluxes. Total run times on a single cone model exceeded 80 minutes. For both the flat face and cone models surface temperatures well in excess of 2200 C were measured. Post test microstructural examination of the models and correlations with measured temperatures will be discussed.

  16. The road to magnesium diboride thin films, Josephson junctions and SQUIDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinkman, Alexander; Mijatovic, Dragana; Hilgenkamp, Hans; Rijnders, Guus; Oomen, Ingrid; Veldhuis, Dick; Roesthuis, Frank; Rogalla, Horst; Blank, Dave H A

    2003-01-01

    The remarkably high critical temperature at which magnesium diboride (MgB 2 ) undergoes transition to the superconducting state, T c ∼ 40 K, has aroused great interest and has encouraged many groups to explore the properties and application potential of this novel superconductor. For many electronic applications and further basic studies, the availability of superconducting thin films is of great importance. Several groups have succeeded in fabricating superconducting MgB 2 films. An overview of the deposition techniques for MgB 2 thin film growth will be given, with a special focus on the in situ two-step process. Although, meanwhile, many problems to obtain suitable films have been solved, such as oxygen impurities and magnesium volatility, the question of how single-phase epitaxial films can be grown still remains. The possibility of growing single-crystalline epitaxial films will be discussed from the deposition conditions' point of view as well as substrate choice. Necessary conditions are discussed and possible routes are reviewed. The applicability of MgB 2 in superconducting electronic devices depends on the possibility of making well-controlled, i.e., reproducible and stable, Josephson junctions. The first attempts to make MgB 2 -MgO-MgB 2 ramp-type junctions and SQUIDs from MgB 2 nanobridges are discussed

  17. Nickel and titanium nanoboride composite coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efimova, K A; Galevsky, G V; Rudneva, V V; Kozyrev, N A; Orshanskaya, E G

    2015-01-01

    Electrodeposition conditions, structural-physical and mechanical properties (microhardness, cohesion with a base, wear resistance, corrosion currents) of electroplated composite coatings on the base of nickel with nano and micro-powders of titanium boride are investigated. It has been found out that electro-crystallization of nickel with boride nanoparticles is the cause of coating formation with structural fragments of small sizes, low porosity and improved physical and mechanical properties. Titanium nano-boride is a component of composite coating, as well as an effective modifier of nickel matrix. Nano-boride of the electrolyte improves efficiency of the latter due to increased permissible upper limit of the cathodic current density. (paper)

  18. Powder Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Michael

    The importance of x-ray powder diffraction as an analytical tool for phase identification of materials was first pointed out by Debye and Scherrer1,2 in Germany and, quite independently, by Hull3,4 in the United States of America. Three distinct periods of evolution lead to ubiquitous application in many fields of science and technology. In the, first period, until the- mid-1940's. applications were and developed covering broad categories of materials including inorganic materials, minerals, cerarffics, metals, alloys, organic materials and polymers. During this formative period, the concept of quantitative phase analysis was demonstrated5. In the second period there followed the blossoming of technology and commercial instruments became widely used. The history is well summarized by Parrish6 and by Langford and Loudr7. By 1980 there were probably 10000 powder diffractometers in routine use, making it the most widely used of all x-ray crystallographic instruments. In the third, present, period data bases became firmly established and sophisticated pattern fitting and recognition software made many aspects of powder diffraction analysis routine. High resolution, tunable powder diffractometers were developed at sources of synchrotron radiation8-10. The tunability of the spectrum made it possible to exploit all the subtleties of x-ray spectroscopy in diffraction experiments11.

  19. Powder diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, M.

    1995-12-31

    the importance of x-ray powder diffraction as an analytical tool for phase identification of materials was first pointed out by Debye and Scherrer in Germany and, quite independently, by Hull in the US. Three distinct periods of evolution lead to ubiquitous application in many fields of science and technology. In the first period, until the mid-1940`s, applications were and developed covering broad categories of materials including inorganic materials, minerals, ceramics, metals, alloys, organic materials and polymers. During this formative period, the concept of quantitative phase analysis was demonstrated. In the second period there followed the blossoming of technology and commercial instruments became widely used. The history is well summarized by Parrish and by Langford and Loueer. By 1980 there were probably 10,000 powder diffractometers in routine use, making it the most widely used of all x-ray crystallographic instruments. In the third, present, period data bases became firmly established and sophisticated pattern fitting and recognition software made many aspects of powder diffraction analysis routine. High resolution, tunable powder diffractometers were developed at sources of synchrotron radiation. The tunability of the spectrum made it possible to exploit all the subtleties of x-ray spectroscopy in diffraction experiments.

  20. Powder diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, M.

    1995-01-01

    The importance of x-ray powder diffraction as an analytical tool for phase identification of materials was first pointed out by Debye and Scherrer in Germany and, quite independently, by Hull in the US. Three distinct periods of evolution lead to ubiquitous application in many fields of science and technology. In the first period, until the mid-1940's, applications were and developed covering broad categories of materials including inorganic materials, minerals, ceramics, metals, alloys, organic materials and polymers. During this formative period, the concept of quantitative phase analysis was demonstrated. In the second period there followed the blossoming of technology and commercial instruments became widely used. The history is well summarized by Parrish and by Langford and Loueer. By 1980 there were probably 10,000 powder diffractometers in routine use, making it the most widely used of all x-ray crystallographic instruments. In the third, present, period data bases became firmly established and sophisticated pattern fitting and recognition software made many aspects of powder diffraction analysis routine. High resolution, tunable powder diffractometers were developed at sources of synchrotron radiation. The tunability of the spectrum made it possible to exploit all the subtleties of x-ray spectroscopy in diffraction experiments

  1. Titanium(III, IV-Containing Catalytic Systems for Production of Ultrahigh Molecular Weight Polyethylene Nascent Reactor Powders, Suitable for Solventless Processing—Impact of Oxidation States of Transition Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav A. Tuskaev

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic systems containing TiCl4 or TiCl3, THF, organomagnesium (n-Bu2Mg and organoaluminum compounds capable of producing ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE were developed. The resulting polymers were characterized by a molecular weight in the range of (1.8–7.8 × 106 Da and desirable morphology, suitable for modern methods of polymer processing—the solvent-free solid-state processing of superhigh-strength (tensile strength up to 2.1 GPa and high-modulus (elastic modulus up to 125 GPa oriented films and film tapes. The impacts of a THF additive, the oxidation state of the titanium atom, and the composition and nature of the nontransition organometallic compounds on the formation of catalytic systems for UHMWPE production were evaluated. The results indicate the suitability of individual titanium chloride tetrahydrofuran complex application for the formation of THF-containing catalytic systems. This approach also results in a significant increase in the system catalytic activity and mechanical properties of UHMWPE. The catalysts based on Ti(III were inferior to systems containing Ti(IV in productivity but were markedly superior in the mechanical properties of UHMWPE.

  2. Comparison of porosity measurement techniques for porous titanium scaffolds evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, M.V.; Ribeiro, A.A.; Moreira, A.C.; Moraes, A.M.C.; Appoloni, C.R.; Pereira, L.C.

    2009-01-01

    Porous titanium has been used for grafts and implant coatings as it allows the mechanical interlocking of the pores and bone. Evaluation of porous scaffolds for bone regeneration is essential for their manufacture. Porosity, pore size, pore shape and pore homogeneity are parameters that influence strongly the mechanical strength and biological functionality. In this study, porous titanium samples were manufactured by powder metallurgy by using pure titanium powders mixed with a pore former. The quantification of the porosity parameters was assessed in this work by geometric method and gamma-ray transmission, the non-destructive techniques and metallographic images processing, a destructive technique. Qualitative evaluation of pore morphology and surface topography were performed by scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy. The results obtained and the effectiveness of the techniques used were compared in order to select those most suitable for characterization of porous titanium scaffolds. (author)

  3. Review of the Methods for Production of Spherical Ti and Ti Alloy Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Pei; Fang, Zhigang Zak; Zhang, Ying; Xia, Yang

    2017-10-01

    Spherical titanium alloy powder is an important raw material for near-net-shape fabrication via a powder metallurgy (PM) manufacturing route, as well as feedstock for powder injection molding, and additive manufacturing (AM). Nevertheless, the cost of Ti powder including spherical Ti alloy has been a major hurdle that prevented PM Ti from being adopted for a wide range of applications. Especially with the increasing importance of powder-bed based AM technologies, the demand for spherical Ti powder has brought renewed attention on properties and cost, as well as on powder-producing processes. The performance of Ti components manufactured from powder has a strong dependence on the quality of powder, and it is therefore crucial to understand the properties and production methods of powder. This article aims to provide a cursory review of the basic techniques of commercial and emerging methods for making spherical Ti powder. The advantages as well as limitations of different methods are discussed.

  4. Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia due to titanium nanoparticles in paint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tong-Hong; Ko, Fu-Chang; Chang, Junn-Liang; Wu, Kuo-An

    2012-02-01

    We present a case of a 58-year-old man who experienced Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia after a 3-month exposure to polyester powder paint. Mineralogical analysis by transmission electron microscopy of a pulmonary sample and the polyester powder paint he was exposed to showed the presence of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in both. We suggest that exposure to titanium dioxide nanoparticles should be added to the etiology of Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia. Copyright © 2012 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Structural and magnetic properties of mechanochemically synthesized nanocrystalline titanium monoxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barudžija Tanja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nano-sized titanium monoxide (TiO powder was prepared by mechanochemical synthesis. A mixture of commercial Ti and TiO2 (rutile powders with the molar ratio of 1:1 was milled in a planetary ball mill for 5, 10, 20, 30 and 60 min under argon atmosphere. The final single-phase titanium monoxide sample was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, magnetic measurements using a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer (SQUID and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. The temperature dependency of the magnetic susceptibility is characterized by significant contribution of Pauli paramagnetism due to conduction electrons.

  6. Comparative sinterability of combustion synthesized and commercial titanium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manley, B.W.

    1984-11-01

    The influence of various parameters on the sinterability of combustion synthesized titanium carbide was investigaged. Titanium carbide powders, prepared by the combustion synthesis process, were sintered in the temperature range 1150 to 1600 0 C. Incomplete combustion and high oxygen contents were found to be the cause of reduced shrinkage during sintering of the combustion syntheized powders when compared to the shrinkage of commercial TiC. Free carbon was shown to inhibit shrinkage. The activation energy for sintering was found to depend on stoichiometry (C/Ti). With decreasing C/Ti, the rate of sintering increased. 29 references, 16 figures, 13 tables

  7. Powder technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agueda, Horacio

    1989-01-01

    Powder technology is experiencing nowadays a great development and has broad application in different fields: nuclear energy, medicine, new energy sources, industrial and home artifacts, etc. Ceramic materials are of daily use as tableware and also in the building industry (bricks, tiles, etc.). However, in machine construction its utilization is not so common. The same happens with metals: powder metallurgy is employed less than traditional metal forming techniques. Both cases deal with powder technology and the forming techniques as far as the final consolidation through sintering processes are very similar. There are many different methods and techniques in the forming stage: cold-pressing, slip casting, injection molding, extrusion molding, isostatic pressing, hot-pressing (which involves also the final consolidation step), etc. This variety allows to obtain almost any desired form no matter how complex it could be. Some applications are very specific as in the case of UO 2 pellets (used as nuclear fuels) but with the same technique and other materials, it is possible to manufacture a great number of different products. This work shows the characteristics and behaviour of two magnetic ceramic materials (ferrites) fabricated in the laboratory of the Applied Research Division of the Bariloche Atomic Center for different purposes. Other materials and products made with the same method are also mentioned. Likewise, densities and shrinkage obtained by different methods of forming (cold-pressing, injection molding, slip casting and extrusion molding) using high-purity alumina (99.5% Al 2 O 3 ). Finally, different applications of such methods are given. (Author) [es

  8. Optical properties of d.c. magneto sputtered tantalum and titanium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    production (Sandrock 1999). Before that several metal powders including titanium, zirconium, niobium and tantalum were commonly processed by the well known hydride–dehydride (HDH) technique (German 1984). There are many different allotropic forms for titanium hydrides (Numakura et al 1984; Woo et al 1985) such ...

  9. Porous Structure Characterization in Titanium Coating for Surgical Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V. Oliveira

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Powder metallurgy techniques have been used to produce controlled porous structures, such as the porous coatings applied for dental and orthopedic surgical implants, which allow bony tissue ingrowth within the implant surface improving fixation. This work presents the processing and characterization of titanium porous coatings of different porosity levels, processed through powder metallurgy techniques. Pure titanium sponge powders were used for coating and Ti-6Al7Nb powder metallurgy rods were used as substrates. Characterization was made through quantitative metallographic image analysis using optical light microscope for coating porosity data and SEM analysis for evaluation of the coating/substrate interface integrity. The results allowed optimization of the processing parameters in order to obtain porous coatings that meet the requirements for use as implants.

  10. Phase stability, physical properties of rhenium diboride under high pressure and the effect of metallic bonding on its hardness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Ming-Min; Kuang, Xiao-Yu; Wang, Zhen-Hua; Shao, Peng; Ding, Li-Ping; Huang, Xiao-Fen

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •The transition pressure P t between the ReB 2 –ReB 2 and MoB 2 –ReB 2 phases is firstly determinate. •The single-bonded B–B feather remains in ReB 2 compounds. •A semiempirical method to evaluate the hardness of crystals with partial metallic bond is presented. •The large hardness (39.1 GPa) of ReB 2 –ReB 2 indicate that it is a superhard material. •The zigzag interconnected B–Re and B–B covalent bonds underlie the ultraincompressibilities. -- Abstract: Using first-principles calculations, the elastic constants, thermodynamic property and structural phase transition of rhenium diboride under pressure are investigated by means of the pseudopotential plane-waves method, as well as the effect of metallic bond on its hardness. Eight candidate structures of known transition-metal compounds are chosen to probe for rhenium diboride ReB 2 . The calculated lattice parameters are consistent with the experimental and theoretical values. Based on the third order Birch–Murnaghan equation of states, the transition pressure P t between the ReB 2 –ReB 2 and MoB 2 –ReB 2 phases is firstly determinate. Elastic constants, shear modulus, Young’s modulus, Poisson’s ratio and Debye temperature are derived. The single-bonded B–B feather remains in ReB 2 compounds. Furthermore, according to Mulliken overlap population analysis, a semiempirical method to evaluate the hardness of multicomponent crystals with partial metallic bond is presented. Both strong covalency and a zigzag topology of interconnected bonds underlie the ultraincompressibilities. In addition, the superior performance and large hardness (39.1 GPa) of ReB 2 –ReB 2 indicate that it is a superhard material

  11. Titanium hermetic seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brow, Richard K.; Watkins, Randall D.

    1995-01-01

    Titanium is prenitrided by being heated in a nitrogen environment under conditions which give rise to the formation of a titanium-nitride surface layer on the titanium. Titanium thus prenitrided may be used in electrical components which are hermetically sealed using silicate glasses and standard glass sealing techniques. According to the method of the invention, alkali volatilization and formation of deleterious interfacial silicide are inhibited.

  12. Titanium and titanium alloys: fundamentals and applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leyens, C; Peters, M

    2003-01-01

    ... number of titanium alloys have paved the way for light metals to vastly expand into many industrial applications. Titanium and its alloys stand out primarily due to their high specific strength and excellent corrosion resistance, at just half the weight of steels and Ni-based superalloys. This explains their early success in the aerospace and the...

  13. Effect of sintering temperatures on titanium matrix composites reinforced by ceramic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, F.; Amigo, V.; Busquets, D.; Klyatskina, E. [Mechanical and Materials Engineering Department. Polytechnical University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    Titanium and titanium composites have a potential use in aerospace and biotechnology industries, and nowadays in others like sports and fashion ones. In this work composite materials, based on titanium matrix reinforced with ceramic particles, have been developed. PM route is used to obtain compact and sintered samples. TiN and TiAl powders, are milled with Ti powder in different volumetric percentages in a ball mill. These mixtures are pressed in a uniaxial press and sintered in a vacuum furnace at different temperatures between 1180 to 1220 deg. C. Porosity of samples is analysed, before and after the sintering process, by Archimedes technique and by image analysis. Mechanical properties and the reinforcement particles influence in the titanium matrix are studied by flexion test in green and sintered states, and by hardness and microhardness tests. Complimentarily, a microstructural analysis is carried out by optical and electron microscopy, and the reactivity between the reinforce particles and titanium matrix are studied. (authors)

  14. Kinetic study of synthesis of Titanium carbide by methano thermal reduction of Titanium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alizadeh, R.; Ostrovski, O.

    2011-01-01

    Reduction of the Titanium dioxide, TiO 2 , by methane was investigated in this work. The thermodynamic of reaction was examined and found favorable. The reaction of titanium dioxide with methane was carried out in the temperature range 1150 d egree C to 1450 d egree C at atmospheric pressure with industrial high porosity pellets prepared from titanium dioxide powder. The evolved gas analyzing method was used for determination of the extent of reduction rate. The gas products of the reaction are mostly CO and trace amount of CO 2 and H 2 O. The synthesized product powder was characterized by X-ray diffraction for elucidating solid phase compositions. The effect of varying temperature was studied during the reduction. The conversion-time data have been interpreted by using the grain model. For first order reaction with respect to methane concentration, the activation energy of titanium dioxide reduction by methane is found to be 51.4 kcal/g mole. No detailed investigation of kinetic and mechanism of the reaction was reported in literatures.

  15. Titanium Aluminium Nitride and Titanium Boride Multilayer Coatings Designed to Combat Tool Wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Rao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The lifetimes and the premature wear of machining tools impact on manufacturing efficiencies and productivities. A significant proportion of machining tool damage can be attributed to component wear. Here, titanium aluminium nitride (TiAlN multi-layered with titanium diboride (TiB2 prepared by PVD (Physical Vapour Deposition sputtering onto H-13 substrates are studied as potential wear-resistant coatings for forging die applications. The TiB2 content has been altered and two-sets of coating systems with a bilayer thickness either less than or greater than 1 μm are investigated by tribological and microstructural analysis. XRD analysis of the multilayers reveals the coatings to be predominately dominated by the TiAlN (200 peak, with additional peaks of TiN (200 and Ti (101 at a TiB2 content of 9%. Progressive loads increasing to 100 N enabled the friction coefficients and the coating failure at a critical load to be determined. Friction coefficients of around 0.2 have been measured in a coating containing 9% TiB2 at critical loads of approximately 70 N. Bi-directional wear tests reveal that bilayers with thicknesses greater than 1 μm have frictional coefficients that are approximately 50% lower than those where the bilayer is less than 1 μm. This is due to the greater ability of thicker bilayers to uniformly distribute the stress within the layers. There are two observed frictional coefficient regimes corresponding to a lower and higher rate of material loss. At the lower regime, with TiB2 contents below 20%, material loss occurs mainly via delamination between the layers, whilst at compositions above this, material loss occurs via a break-up of material into finer particles that in combination with the higher loads results in greater material loss. The measured wear scar volumes for the TiAlN/TiB2 multilayer coatings are approximately three times lower than those measured on the substrate, thus validating the increased wear resistance offered

  16. B11 NMR in the layered diborides OsB2 and RuB2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, B. J.; Zong, X.; Singh, Y.; Niazi, A.; Johnston, D. C.

    2007-10-01

    B11 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements have been performed on B11 enriched OsB2 and RuB2 polycrystalline powder samples in an external field of 4.7T and in the temperature range, 4.2Kpowder patterns that are typical for a nonaxial symmetry. The Knight shifts K in both samples are very small and constant in temperature. The nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate T1-1 follows a Korringa law in the whole temperature range investigated with T1T=600 and 680sK for OsB2 and RuB2 , respectively. The experimental results indicate that a p character dominates the conduction electron wave function at the B site with a negligibly small s character in both compounds.

  17. Resin-Powder Dispenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standfield, Clarence E.

    1994-01-01

    Resin-powder dispenser used at NASA's Langley Research Center for processing of composite-material prepregs. Dispenser evenly distributes powder (resin polymer and other matrix materials in powder form) onto wet uncured prepregs. Provides versatility in distribution of solid resin in prepreg operation. Used wherever there is requirement for even, continuous distribution of small amount of powder.

  18. Candida albicans biofilm on titanium: effect of peroxidase precoating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ahariz

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Mohamed Ahariz1, Philippe Courtois1,21Laboratory of Experimental Hormonology, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, 2UER de Biologie Médicale, Haute Ecole Francisco Ferrer, Brussels, BelgiumAbstract: The present study aimed to document Candida albicans biofilm development on titanium and its modulation by a peroxidase-precoated material which can generate antimicrobials, such as hypoiodite or hypothiocyanite, from hydrogen peroxide, iodide, or thiocyanate. For this purpose, titanium (powder or foil was suspended in Sabouraud liquid medium inoculated with C. albicans ATCC10231. After continuous stirring for 2–21 days at room temperature, the supernatant was monitored by turbidimetry at 600 nm and titanium washed three times in sterile Sabouraud broth. Using the tetrazolium salt MTT-formazan assay, the titanium-adherent fungal biomass was measured as 7.50 ± 0.60 × 106 blastoconidia per gram of titanium powder (n = 30 and 0.50 ± 0.04 × 106 blastoconidia per cm² of titanium foil (n = 12. The presence of yeast on the surface of titanium was confirmed by microscopy both on fresh preparations and after calcofluor white staining. However, in the presence of peroxidase systems (lactoperoxidase with substrates such as hydrogen peroxide donor, iodide, or thiocyanate, Candida growth in both planktonic and attached phases appeared to be inhibited. Moreover, this study demonstrates the possible partition of peroxidase systems between titanium material (peroxidase-precoated and liquid environment (containing peroxidase substrates to limit C. albicans biofilm formation.Keywords: adhesion, material, oral, yeast

  19. Effects of titanium brush on machined and sand-blasted/acid-etched titanium disc using confocal microscopy and contact profilometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun-Beom; Jeon, Yongpyo; Ko, Youngkyung

    2015-02-01

    Mechanical techniques, including scaling with metal, plastic, or ultrasonic instruments, rubber cup polishing, air-powder abrasive system and brushing with a conventional or a rotating brush, have been used for the debridement of dental implants. Recently, rotating brushes with titanium bristles (titanium brush) have been introduced for the debridement of implant surface when peri-implant osseous defects occur. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a titanium brush on machined (MA) and sand-blasted and acid-etched (SA) titanium surfaces using scanning electron microscopy, confocal microscopy and profilometry. Moreover, correlations between the two quantitative evaluation methods (confocal microscopy and contact profilometry) were assessed. Both MA and SA discs were treated with rotating titanium brush at 300 rpm under irrigation for a total of 40 s. Roughness measurements were taken with confocal microscopy and surface profilometry. Then, the MA and SA surfaces were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy to determine the changes of the surface properties. Untreated MA surface demonstrated uniform roughness with circumferential machining marks, and scratch lines over the original surfaces were observed after treatment with the titanium brush. Similarly, the titanium brush produced noticeable changes on the SA titanium surfaces. However, this treatment with titanium brush did not significantly change the roughness parameters, including the arithmetic mean height of the surface (Sa) and the maximum height of the surface (Sz), in both MA and SA surfaces. Correlations between two evaluation methods showed a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.98 with linear regression R(2) of 0.96. This study showed that the treatment with the titanium brush did not significantly change the roughness parameters, including Sa and Sz, in both MA and SA surfaces. Correlations between confocal microscopy and surface profilometry showed high correlation with a

  20. Electrostatic Assembly Preparation of High-Toughness Zirconium Diboride-Based Ceramic Composites with Enhanced Thermal Shock Resistance Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baoxi; Zhang, Xinghong; Hong, Changqing; Qiu, Yunfeng; Zhang, Jia; Han, Jiecai; Hu, PingAn

    2016-05-11

    The central problem of using ceramic as a structural material is its brittleness, which associated with rigid covalent or ionic bonds. Whiskers or fibers of strong ceramics such as silicon carbide (SiC) or silicon nitride (Si3N4) are widely embedded in a ceramic matrix to improve the strength and toughness. The incorporation of these insulating fillers can impede the thermal flow in ceramic matrix, thus decrease its thermal shock resistance that is required in some practical applications. Here we demonstrate that the toughness and thermal shock resistance of zirconium diboride (ZrB2)/SiC composites can be improved simultaneously by introducing graphene into composites via electrostatic assembly and subsequent sintering treatment. The incorporated graphene creates weak interfaces of grain boundaries (GBs) and optimal thermal conductance paths inside composites. In comparison to pristine ZrB2-SiC composites, the toughness of (2.0%) ZrB2-SiC/graphene composites exhibited a 61% increasing (from 4.3 to 6.93 MPa·m(1/2)) after spark plasma sintering (SPS); the retained strength after thermal shock increased as high as 74.8% at 400 °C and 304.4% at 500 °C. Present work presents an important guideline for producing high-toughness ceramic-based composites with enhanced thermal shock properties.

  1. Laser ignition of high-energy materials containing AlB2 and AlB12 powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korotkikh Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Boron-containing substances are known to have high gravimetric and volumetric heats of oxidation in comparison with any metals that make them promising for using in high-energy materials. This work is aimed to study ignition characteristics of ammonium perchlorate and nitrate-based composite solid propellants containing aluminium borides by means of radiative heating by CO2-laser. It was found that the effect upon laser ignition (ignitability at full replacement of ASD-4 aluminum powder by aluminium diboride and dodecaboride is close. The ignition time of HEM is reduced by 2.0–2.5 times compared with ASD-4 HEM sample in the heat flux density range of 90–200 W/cm2.

  2. Classification of titanium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macias B, L.R.; Garcia C, R.M.; Maya M, M.E.; Ita T, A. De; Palacios G, J.

    2002-01-01

    In this work the X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (Sem) and the X-ray Dispersive Energy Spectroscopy techniques are used with the purpose to achieve a complete identification of phases and mixture of phases of a crystalline material as titanium dioxide. The problem for solving consists of being able to distinguish a sample of titanium dioxide being different than a titanium dioxide pigment. A standard sample of titanium dioxide with NIST certificate is used, which indicates a purity of 99.74% for the TiO 2 . The following way is recommended to proceed: a)To make an analysis by means of X-ray diffraction technique to the sample of titanium dioxide pigment and on the standard of titanium dioxide waiting not find differences. b) To make a chemical analysis by the X-ray Dispersive Energy Spectroscopy via in a microscope, taking advantage of the high vacuum since it is oxygen which is analysed and if it is concluded that the aluminium oxide appears in a greater proportion to 1% it is established that is a titanium dioxide pigment, but if it is lesser then it will be only titanium dioxide. This type of analysis is an application of the nuclear techniques useful for the tariff classification of merchandise which is considered as of difficult recognition. (Author)

  3. Opportunities in the electrowinning of molten titanium from titanium dioxide

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Vuuren, DS

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The value chain of titanium products shows that the difference between the cost of titanium ingot and titanium dioxide is about $9/kg titanium. In contrast, the price of aluminum, which is produced in a similar way, is only about $1.7/kg...

  4. Effects of high power ultrasonic vibration on the cold compaction of titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fartashvand, Vahid; Abdullah, Amir; Ali Sadough Vanini, Seyed

    2017-05-01

    Titanium has widely been used in chemical and aerospace industries. In order to overcome the drawbacks of cold compaction of titanium, the process was assisted by an ultrasonic vibration system. For this purpose, a uniaxial ultrasonic assisted cold powder compaction system was designed and fabricated. The process variables were powder size, compaction pressure and initial powder compact thickness. Density, friction force, ejection force and spring back of the fabricated samples were measured and studied. The density was observed to improve under the action of ultrasonic vibration. Fine size powders showed better results of consolidation while using ultrasonic vibration. Under the ultrasonic action, it is thought that the friction forces between the die walls and the particles and those friction forces among the powder particles are reduced. Spring back and ejection force didn't considerably change when using ultrasonic vibration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Erosion-resistant composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, C.B.; Tennery, V.J.; Curlee, R.M.

    A highly erosion-resistant composite material is formed of chemical vapor-deposited titanium diboride on a sintered titanium diboride-nickel substrate. This material may be suitable for use in cutting tools, coal liquefaction systems, etc.

  6. Magnesium-titanium alloys for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Ilona

    Magnesium has been identified as a promising biodegradable implant material because it does not cause systemic toxicity and can reduce stress shielding. However, it corrodes too quickly in the body. Titanium, which is already used ubiquitously for implants, was chosen as the alloying element because of its proven biocompatibility and corrosion resistance in physiological environments. Thus, alloying magnesium with titanium is expected to improve the corrosion resistance of magnesium. Mg-Ti alloys with a titanium content ranging from 5 to 35 at.-% were successfully synthesized by mechanical alloying. Spark plasma sintering was identified as a processing route to consolidate the alloy powders made by ball-milling into bulk material without destroying the alloy structure. This is an important finding as this metastable Mg-Ti alloy can only be heated up to max. 200C° for a limited time without reaching the stable state of separated magnesium and titanium. The superior corrosion behavior of Mg 80-Ti20 alloy in a simulated physiological environment was shown through hydrogen evolution tests, where the corrosion rate was drastically reduced compared to pure magnesium and electrochemical measurements revealed an increased potential and resistance compared to pure magnesium. Cytotoxicity tests on murine pre-osteoblastic cells in vitro confirmed that supernatants made from Mg-Ti alloy were no more cytotoxic than supernatants prepared with pure magnesium. Mg and Mg-Ti alloys can also be used to make novel polymer-metal composites, e.g., with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) to avoid the polymer's detrimental pH drop during degradation and alter its degradation pattern. Thus, Mg-Ti alloys can be fabricated and consolidated while achieving improved corrosion resistance and maintaining cytocompatibility. This work opens up the possibility of using Mg-Ti alloys for fracture fixation implants and other biomedical applications. KEYWORDS: Magnesium, titanium, corrosion

  7. Machined Titanium Heat-Pipe Wick Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, John H.; Minnerly, Kenneth G.; Gernert, Nelson J.

    2009-01-01

    Wick structures fabricated by machining of titanium porous material are essential components of lightweight titanium/ water heat pipes of a type now being developed for operation at temperatures up to 530 K in high-radiation environments. In the fabrication of some prior heat pipes, wicks have been made by extruding axial grooves into aluminum unfortunately, titanium cannot be extruded. In the fabrication of some other prior heat pipes, wicks have been made by in-situ sintering of metal powders shaped by the use of forming mandrels that are subsequently removed, but in the specific application that gave rise to the present fabrication method, the required dimensions and shapes of the heat-pipe structures would make it very difficult if not impossible to remove the mandrels due to the length and the small diameter. In the present method, a wick is made from one or more sections that are fabricated separately and assembled outside the tube that constitutes the outer heat pipe wall. The starting wick material is a slab of porous titanium material. This material is machined in its original flat configuration to form axial grooves. In addition, interlocking features are machined at the mating ends of short wick sections that are to be assembled to make a full-length continuous wick structure. Once the sections have been thus assembled, the resulting full-length flat wick structure is rolled into a cylindrical shape and inserted in the heatpipe tube (see figure). This wick-structure fabrication method is not limited to titanium/water heat pipes: It could be extended to other heat pipe materials and working fluids in which the wicks could be made from materials that could be pre-formed into porous slabs.

  8. Surface quality analysis of die steels in powder-mixed electrical discharge machining using titan powder in fine machining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banh Tien Long

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Improving the quality of surface molds after electrical discharge machining is still being considered by many researchers. Powder-mixed dielectric in electrical discharge machining showed that it is one of the processing methods with high efficiency. This article reports on the results of surface quality of mold steels after powder-mixed electrical discharge machining using titanium powder in fine machining. The process parameters such as electrode material, workpiece material, electrode polarity, pulse on-time, pulse off-time, current, and titanium powder concentration were considered in the research. These materials are most commonly used with die-sinking electrical discharge machining in the manufacture of molds and has been selected as the subject of research: workpiece materials were SKD61, SKT4, and SKD11 mold steels, and electrode materials were copper and graphite. Taguchi’s method is used to design experiments. The influence of the parameters on surface roughness was evaluated through the average value and ratio (S/N. Results showed that the parameters such as electrical current, electrode material, pulse on-time, electrode polarity, and interaction between the electrode materials with concentration powder mostly influence surface roughness and surface roughness at optimal parameters SRopt = 1.73 ± 0.39 µm. Analysis of the surface layer after powder-mixed electrical discharge machining using titanium powder in optimal conditions has shown that the white layer with more uniform thickness and increased hardness (≈861.0 HV, and amount and size of microscopic cracks, is reduced. This significantly leads to the increase in the quality of the surface layer.

  9. Aluminum powder metallurgy processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flumerfelt, J.F.

    1999-02-12

    The objective of this dissertation is to explore the hypothesis that there is a strong linkage between gas atomization processing conditions, as-atomized aluminum powder characteristics, and the consolidation methodology required to make components from aluminum powder. The hypothesis was tested with pure aluminum powders produced by commercial air atomization, commercial inert gas atomization, and gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS). A comparison of the GARS aluminum powders with the commercial aluminum powders showed the former to exhibit superior powder characteristics. The powders were compared in terms of size and shape, bulk chemistry, surface oxide chemistry and structure, and oxide film thickness. Minimum explosive concentration measurements assessed the dependence of explosibility hazard on surface area, oxide film thickness, and gas atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization oxidation of aluminum powder. An Al-Ti-Y GARS alloy exposed in ambient air at different temperatures revealed the effect of reactive alloy elements on post-atomization powder oxidation. The pure aluminum powders were consolidated by two different routes, a conventional consolidation process for fabricating aerospace components with aluminum powder and a proposed alternative. The consolidation procedures were compared by evaluating the consolidated microstructures and the corresponding mechanical properties. A low temperature solid state sintering experiment demonstrated that tap densified GARS aluminum powders can form sintering necks between contacting powder particles, unlike the total resistance to sintering of commercial air atomization aluminum powder.

  10. Machinability of Titanium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mustafizur; Wong, Yoke San; Zareena, A. Rahmath

    Titanium and its alloys find wide application in many industries because of their excellent and unique combination of high strength-to-weight ratio and high resistance to corrosion. The machinability of titanium and its alloys is impaired by its high chemical reactivity, low modulus of elasticity and low thermal conductivity. A number of literatures on machining of titanium alloys with conventional tools and advanced cutting tool materials is reviewed. The results obtained from the study on high speed machining of Ti-6Al-4V alloys with cubic boron nitride (CBN), binderless cubic boron nitride (BCBN) and polycrystalline diamond (PCD) are also summarized.

  11. Compositions Comprising Nickel-Titanium, Methods Manufacture Thereof and Articles Comprising the Same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glennon, Glenn N. (Inventor); DellaCorte, Christopher (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Disclosing herein is a method for manufacturing nickel-titanium compositions. The method includes disposing a powdered composition in a mold; the powdered composition comprising nickel and titanium; the titanium being present in an amount of about 38 to about 42 wt % and the nickel being present in an amount of about 58 to about 62 wt %; sintering the powdered composition to produce a sintered preform; compacting the preform; machining the preform to form an article; heat treating the article; the annealing being conducted at a temperature of about 1650.degree. F. to about 1900.degree. F. at a pressure of about 3 Torr to about 5 Kg-f/cm.sup.2 for a time period of about 10 minutes to about 5 hours; and quenching the article.

  12. A process for the fabrication of ceramic fibre reinforced titanium aluminide

    OpenAIRE

    Horsfall, Ian; Cundy, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes initial work on a novel process for the production of titanium aluminide matrix composites reinforced with short alumina fibers. The processing route involves an adaption of existing metal matrix composite (MMC) fabrication technology used to produce hybrid particulate/short fiber composites. A preform is produced which contains alumina fibers and titanium metal powder with a fiber content of around 10% by volume and approximately 50% porosity. This preform is then infilt...

  13. Reactive Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) of Nitride Reinforced Titanium Alloy Composites (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-15

    their wear and fatigue resistance, hard coatings for dental implants and dental surgery tools, tribological orthopedic devices, gears, valves, pumps...SPS) of blended titanium and vanadium elemen- tal powders, leading to a new class of nitride reinforced titanium alloy composites. The resulting micro ...for structural [15] aerospace [2–5], marine [16], automotive, biomedical (such as in dental and orthopedic as bone implants) [1–6,8–12,15–20], and

  14. Comparative in vitro biocompatibility of nickel-titanium, pure nickel, pure titanium, and stainless steel: genotoxicity and atomic absorption evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assad, M; Lemieux, N; Rivard, C H; Yahia, L H

    1999-01-01

    The genotoxicity level of nickel-titanium (NiTi) was compared to that of its pure constituents, pure nickel (Ni) and pure titanium (Ti) powders, and also to 316L stainless steel (316L SS) as clinical reference material. In order to do so, a dynamic in vitro semiphysiological extraction was performed with all metals using agitation and ISO requirements. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were then cultured in the presence of all material extracts, and their comparative genotoxicity levels were assessed using electron microscopy-in situ end-labeling (EM-ISEL) coupled to immunogold staining. Cellular chromatin exposition to pure Ni and 316L SS demonstrated a significantly stronger gold binding than exposition to NiTi, pure Ti, or the untreated control. In parallel, graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) was also performed on all extraction media. The release of Ni atoms took the following decreasing distribution for the different resulting semiphysiological solutions: pure Ni, 316L SS, NiTi, Ti, and controls. Ti elements were detected after elution of pure titanium only. Both pure titanium and nickel-titanium specimens obtained a relative in vitro biocompatibility. Therefore, this quantitative in vitro study provides optimistic results for the eventual use of nickel-titanium alloys as surgical implant materials.

  15. An Insoluble Titanium-Lead Anode for Sulfate Electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferdman, Alla

    2005-05-11

    The project is devoted to the development of novel insoluble anodes for copper electrowinning and electrolytic manganese dioxide (EMD) production. The anodes are made of titanium-lead composite material produced by techniques of powder metallurgy, compaction of titanium powder, sintering and subsequent lead infiltration. The titanium-lead anode combines beneficial electrochemical behavior of a lead anode with high mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of a titanium anode. In the titanium-lead anode, the titanium stabilizes the lead, preventing it from spalling, and the lead sheathes the titanium, protecting it from passivation. Interconnections between manufacturing process, structure, composition and properties of the titanium-lead composite material were investigated. The material containing 20-30 vol.% of lead had optimal combination of mechanical and electrochemical properties. Optimal process parameters to manufacture the anodes were identified. Prototypes having optimized composition and structure were produced for testing in operating conditions of copper electrowinning and EMD production. Bench-scale, mini-pilot scale and pilot scale tests were performed. The test anodes were of both a plate design and a flow-through cylindrical design. The cylindrical anodes were composed of cylinders containing titanium inner rods and fitting over titanium-lead bushings. The cylindrical design allows the electrolyte to flow through the anode, which enhances diffusion of the electrolyte reactants. The cylindrical anodes demonstrate higher mass transport capabilities and increased electrical efficiency compared to the plate anodes. Copper electrowinning represents the primary target market for the titanium-lead anode. A full-size cylindrical anode performance in copper electrowinning conditions was monitored over a year. The test anode to cathode voltage was stable in the 1.8 to 2.0 volt range. Copper cathode morphology was very smooth and uniform. There was no

  16. Obtainment of TiO2 powders solar cells photo electrodes dye sensitized

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forbeck, Guilherme; Folgueras, Marilena V.; Chinelatto, Adilson L.

    2012-01-01

    Titanium dioxide in its polymorphic anatase phase, presents interesting properties for solar cells photo electrodes dye sensitized such as the forbidden energy band, high refractive index and high constant dielectric. In this study, powders of nanometric titanium dioxide were produced with predominantly the anatase phase and high surface area. We used the sol-gel method, and titanium tetraisopropoxide as a precursor, which was hydrolyzed in nitric acid solution. The obtained powder was heated to 450 ° C, varying the time for each lot (0, 20 or 120 minutes). The powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and surface area analysis. For all lots nanosized crystallites predominated. It was observed that in the batch with 120min heating an increase rutile content. The TiO 2 with 20min heating showed high surface area, greater than that of TiO 2 as taken reference

  17. Simple, Green, and High-Yield Production of Boron-Based Nanostructures with Diverse Morphologies by Dissolution and Recrystallization of Layered Magnesium Diboride Crystals in Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunda, Harini; Das, Saroj Kumar; Jasuja, Kabeer

    2018-01-03

    Layered metal diborides that contain metal atoms sandwiched between boron honeycomb planes offer a rich opportunity to access graphenic forms of boron. We recently demonstrated that magnesium diboride (MgB 2 ) could be exfoliated by ultrasonication in water to yield boron-based nanosheets. However, knowledge of the fate of metal boride crystals in aqueous phases is still in its incipient stages. This work presents our preliminary findings on the discovery that MgB 2 crystals can undergo dissolution in water under ambient conditions to result in precursors (prenucleation clusters) that, upon aging, undergo nonclassical crystallization preferentially growing in lateral directions by two-dimensional (2D) oriented attachment. We show that this recrystallization can be utilized as an avenue to obtain a high yield (≈92 %) of boron-based nanostructures, including nanodots, nanograins, nanoflakes, and nanosheets. These nanostructures comprise boron honeycomb planes chemically modified with hydride and oxy functional groups, which results in an overall negative charge on their surfaces. This ability of MgB 2 crystals to yield prenucleation clusters that can self-seed to form nanostructures comprising chemically modified boron honeycomb planes presents a new facet to the physicochemical interaction of MgB 2 with water. These findings also open newer avenues to obtain boron-based nanostructures with tunable morphologies by varying the chemical milieu during recrystallization. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Spherical rhenium metal powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonhardt, T.; Moore, N.; Hamister, M.

    2001-01-01

    The development of a high-density, spherical rhenium powder (SReP) possessing excellent flow characteristics has enabled the use of advanced processing techniques for the manufacture of rhenium components. The techniques that were investigated were vacuum plasma spraying (VPS), direct-hot isostatic pressing (D-HIP), and various other traditional powder metallurgy processing methods of forming rhenium powder into near-net shaped components. The principal disadvantages of standard rhenium metal powder (RMP) for advanced consolidation applications include: poor flow characteristics; high oxygen content; and low and varying packing densities. SReP will lower costs, reduce processing times, and improve yields when manufacturing powder metallurgy rhenium components. The results of the powder characterization of spherical rhenium powder and the consolidation of the SReP are further discussed. (author)

  19. Influence of small particles inclusion on selective laser melting of Ti-6Al-4V powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Haijun; Dilip, J. J. S.; Yang, Li; Teng, Chong; Stucker, Brent

    2017-12-01

    The particle size distribution and powder morphology of metallic powders have an important effect on powder bed fusion based additive manufacturing processes, such as selective laser melting (SLM). The process development and parameter optimization require a fundamental understanding of the influence of powder on SLM. This study introduces a pre-alloyed titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V powder, which has a certain amount of small particles, for SLM. The influence of small particle inclusion is investigated through microscopy of surface topography, elemental and microstructural analysis, and mechanical testing, compared to the Ti-6Al-4V powder provided by SLM machine vendor. It is found that the small particles inclusion in Ti-6Al-4V powder has a noticeable effect on extra laser energy absorption, which may develop imperfections and deteriorate the SLM fatigue performance.

  20. Titanium oxide fever

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Jonge, D.; Visser, J.

    2012-01-01

    One measure to improve air quality is to apply photo-catalytic substances that capture NOx onto the road surface or onto baffle boards alongside the roads. The effect of titanium oxide containing clinkers with coating was discussed in the report 'Demonstration project of air-purifying pavement in Hengelo, The Netherlands' that was published in May 2011. This article examines the way in which the effectiveness of this study was determined. Can titanium oxide containing clinkers and coatings indeed capture NOx?. [nl

  1. Machining of titanium alloys

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a collection of examples illustrating the resent research advances in the machining of titanium alloys. These materials have excellent strength and fracture toughness as well as low density and good corrosion resistance; however, machinability is still poor due to their low thermal conductivity and high chemical reactivity with cutting tool materials. This book presents solutions to enhance machinability in titanium-based alloys and serves as a useful reference to professionals and researchers in aerospace, automotive and biomedical fields.

  2. Titanium allergy: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Goutam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Titanium has gained immense popularity and has successfully established itself as the material of choice for dental implants. In both medical and dental fields, titanium and its alloys have demonstrated success as biomedical devices. Owing to its high resistance to corrosion in a physiological environment and the excellent biocompatibility that gives it a passive, stable oxide film, titanium is considered the material of choice for intraosseous use. There are certain studies which show titanium as an allergen but the resources to diagnose titanium sensivity are very limited. Attention is needed towards the development of new and precise method for early diagnosis of titanium allergy and also to find out the alternative biomaterial which can be used in place of titanium. A review of available articles from the Medline and PubMed database was done to find literature available regarding titanium allergy, its diagnosis and new alternative material for titanium.

  3. Titanium allergy: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goutam, Manish; Giriyapura, Chandu; Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Gupta, Siddharth

    2014-11-01

    Titanium has gained immense popularity and has successfully established itself as the material of choice for dental implants. In both medical and dental fields, titanium and its alloys have demonstrated success as biomedical devices. Owing to its high resistance to corrosion in a physiological environment and the excellent biocompatibility that gives it a passive, stable oxide film, titanium is considered the material of choice for intraosseous use. There are certain studies which show titanium as an allergen but the resources to diagnose titanium sensivity are very limited. Attention is needed towards the development of new and precise method for early diagnosis of titanium allergy and also to find out the alternative biomaterial which can be used in place of titanium. A review of available articles from the Medline and PubMed database was done to find literature available regarding titanium allergy, its diagnosis and new alternative material for titanium.

  4. Improved Processing of Titanium Alloys by Metal Injection Moulding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidambe, A T; Figueroa, I A; Todd, I; Hamilton, H

    2011-01-01

    The commercially pure (CP-Ti) and Ti6Al4V (Ti-64) powders with powder size of sub 45-micron were mixed with a water soluble binder consisting of a major fraction of Polyethylene Glycol (PEG), a minor fraction of Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and some stearic acid as surfactant. The pelletised mix was injection-moulded into standard tensile bar specimens and then subjected solvent debinding by water leaching and thermal debinding in an argon atmosphere. The titanium compacts were then subjected to sintering studies using the Taguchi method. The results of the oxygen impurity levels of the sintered parts are presented in this paper. Titanium parts conforming to Grade 2 requirements were achieved for CP-Ti whilst those conforming to Grade 5 were achieved for Ti-64.

  5. Preparation and antibacterial properties of titanium-doped ZnO from different zinc salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tong; Hao, Han; Hao, Wen-ting; Yi, Shu-min; Li, Xue-peng; Li, Jian-rong

    2014-02-01

    To research the relationship of micro-structures and antibacterial properties of the titanium-doped ZnO powders and probe their antibacterial mechanism, titanium-doped ZnO powders with different shapes and sizes were prepared from different zinc salts by alcohothermal method. The ZnO powders were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and selected area electron diffraction (SAED), and the antibacterial activities of titanium-doped ZnO powders on Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus were evaluated. Furthermore, the tested strains were characterized by SEM, and the electrical conductance variation trend of the bacterial suspension was characterized. The results indicate that the morphologies of the powders are different due to preparation from different zinc salts. The XRD results manifest that the samples synthesized from zinc acetate, zinc nitrate, and zinc chloride are zincite ZnO, and the sample synthesized from zinc sulfate is the mixture of ZnO, ZnTiO3, and ZnSO4 · 3Zn (OH)2 crystal. UV-vis spectra show that the absorption edges of the titanium-doped ZnO powders are red shifted to more than 400 nm which are prepared from zinc acetate, zinc nitrate, and zinc chloride. The antibacterial activity of titanium-doped ZnO powders synthesized from zinc chloride is optimal, and its minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) are lower than 0.25 g L-1. Likewise, when the bacteria are treated by ZnO powders synthesized from zinc chloride, the bacterial cells are damaged most seriously, and the electrical conductance increment of bacterial suspension is slightly high. It can be inferred that the antibacterial properties of the titanium-doped ZnO powders are relevant to the microstructure, particle size, and the crystal. The powders can damage the cell

  6. Superficial characterization of titanium league when submitted to abrasive blasting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, L.Y.; Leite, I.V.; Szesz, E.M.; Siqueira, C.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Commercially pure titanium and some of its alloys exhibit a good biocompatibility. These characteristics are frequently used in the manufacture of orthopedic and dental implants. It is possible to modify its surface making it the bioactive using various methods, such as deposition of hydroxyapatite by plasma spray and increasing the roughness of the surface by abrasive blasting. This work is to modify the surface of titanium alloy Ti6Al4V ELI (ASTM F136: 02a) for abrasive blasting and study the morphology, crystallographic phases and the mechanical characteristics of the surface obtained. For such purpose, SEM images, diffraction of X-rays and tests of risk produced by nanoindenter. The sandblasting was done using alumina powder and blasting time of 6s. The morphology of the surfaces of Ti6Al4V ELI changed after sandblasting with increased roughness. It is possible to conclude that after sandblasting the titanium surface do not have a ductile behavior. (author)

  7. Mechanical Properties of Titanium Foam for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashef, Sadaf; Lin, Jianguo; Hodgson, Peter D.; Yan, Wenyi

    Understanding the mechanical behaviour of pure titanium (Ti) foam is crucial for the design and development of Ti foam-based load-bearing implants. In this work, pure titanium foam is fabricated by a powder metallurgical process using the space-holder technique with a spacer size of 500 to 800 µm. Experimental data from static compression testing on the Ti foam are presented. The application of theoretical formulae to predict Young's modulus and yield strength of titanium foams is also discussed. A foam with 63% porosity, 87 ± 5 MPa yield strength, and 6.5 ± 1.3 GPa Young's modulus is found to be appropriate for a number of dental and orthopaedic applications.

  8. Preparation of titanium dioxide nanostructures facilitated by poly-L-lysine peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Perez, Carlos A. [Instituto de Ingenieria y Tecnologia, Universidad Autonoma de Ciudad Juarez, Avenida del Charro 450 Norte Cd. Juarez, Chih. Mex. C.P. 32310 (Mexico)]. E-mail: camartin@uacj.mx; Garcia-Casillas, Perla E. [Instituto de Ingenieria y Tecnologia, Universidad Autonoma de Ciudad Juarez, Avenida del Charro 450 Norte Cd. Juarez, Chih. Mex. C.P. 32310 (Mexico); Camacho-Montes, Hector [Instituto de Ingenieria y Tecnologia, Universidad Autonoma de Ciudad Juarez, Avenida del Charro 450 Norte Cd. Juarez, Chih. Mex. C.P. 32310 (Mexico); Monreal-Romero, Humberto A. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S.C. Miguel de Cervantes 120 Chihuahua, Chih. Mex. C.P. 31109 (Mexico); Martinez-Villafane, Alberto [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S.C. Miguel de Cervantes 120 Chihuahua, Chih. Mex. C.P. 31109 (Mexico); Chacon-Nava, Jose [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S.C. Miguel de Cervantes 120 Chihuahua, Chih. Mex. C.P. 31109 (Mexico)

    2007-05-31

    In this work, we have synthesized titanium dioxide by sol-gel process using titanium isopropoxide as precursor; the shapes obtained were nanorods ranging in size from 20 to 40 nm in presence of poly-L-lysine (PLL) peptide. The resulting materials were calcinated in order to obtain a crystalline phase; afterwards the powders were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show that the synthesis of titanium dioxide nanostructures can be achieved in presence of poly-L-lysine.

  9. Impact of trace elements on biocompatibility of titanium scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabetrasekh, R; Tiainen, H; Reseland, J E; Lyngstadaas, S P; Haugen, H J [Department for Biomaterials, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Oslo, PO Box 1109 Blindern, 0317 Oslo (Norway); Will, J [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Glass and Ceramics, University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Henkestr. 91, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Ellingsen, J E, E-mail: h.j.haugen@odont.uio.n [Faculty of Dentistry, Oral Research Laboratory, University of Oslo, PO Box 1109 Blindern, 0317 Oslo (Norway)

    2010-02-15

    A titanium oxide scaffold has recently been reported with high compressive strength (>2 MPa) which may allow its use in bone. However, would it be possible to enhance the scaffolds' performance by selecting a titanium oxide raw material without elemental contamination? Elements in implant surfaces have been reported to provoke implant failure. Thus, this study aims to compare different commercial titanium dioxide powders in order to choose the appropriate powder for scaffold making. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis identified the trace elements, mainly Al, Si, C, Ca and P. Cellular response was measured by cytotoxic effect, cell growth and cytokine secretion from murine preosteoblasts (MC3T3-E1) in vitro. The XPS data showed that traces of carbon-based molecules, silicon, nitrogen and aluminium in the powder were greatly reduced after cleaning in 1 M NaOH. As a result, reduction in cytotoxicity and inflammatory response was observed. Carbon contamination seemed to have a minor effect on the cellular response. Strong correlations were found between Al and Si contamination levels and the inflammatory response and cytotoxic effect. Thus, it is suggested that the concentration of these elements should be reduced in order to enhance the scaffolds' biocompatibility.

  10. Microstructure and Aging of Powder-Metallurgy Al Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, L. B.

    1987-01-01

    Report describes experimental study of thermal responses and aging behaviors of three new aluminum alloys. Alloys produced from rapidly solidified powders and contain 3.20 to 5.15 percent copper, 0.24 to 1.73 percent magnesium, 0.08 to 0.92 percent iron, and smaller amounts of manganese, nickel, titanium, silicon, and zinc. Peak hardness achieved at lower aging temperatures than with standard ingot-metallurgy alloys. Alloys of interest for automobile, aircraft, and aerospace applications.

  11. Granulation of fine powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Fong

    2016-08-09

    A mixture of fine powder including thorium oxide was converted to granulated powder by forming a first-green-body and heat treating the first-green-body at a high temperature to strengthen the first-green-body followed by granulation by crushing or milling the heat-treated first-green-body. The granulated powder was achieved by screening through a combination of sieves to achieve the desired granule size distribution. The granulated powder relies on the thermal bonding to maintain its shape and structure. The granulated powder contains no organic binder and can be stored in a radioactive or other extreme environment. The granulated powder was pressed and sintered to form a dense compact with a higher density and more uniform pore size distribution.

  12. Operation whey powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, E.

    1987-01-01

    The odyssey of the contaminated whey powder finally has come to an end, and the 5000 tonnes of whey now are designated for decontamination by means of an ion exchange technique. The article throws light upon the political and economic reasons that sent the whey powder off on a chaotic journey. It is worth mentioning in this context that the natural radioactivity of inorganic fertilizers is much higher than that of the whey powder in question. (HP) [de

  13. Surface treatment of titanium by a polydimethylsiloxane coating on bond strength of resin to titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung, Christie Ying Kei; Liu, Dan; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the in vitro effect of titanium surface treatment by a polydimethylsiloxane coating on the shear bond strength of a resin composite cement to titanium. The titanium samples (40×30mm) were divided into 4 groups (n=12). A control group was surface treated by sandblasting using 110µm silica-coated alumina powder at a constant pressure of 300kPa for 15s/1cm(2). For other three test groups, a polydimethylsiloxane silicone grease was applied onto the surface. The samples were subjected to thermal treatment in air at temperatures of 800°C, 1000°C, and 1100°C for 2h. A silane coupling agent was then applied and a resin composite stub was bonded using a polyethylene mold. The samples were submitted to three different storage conditions: dry storage, water storage in deionized water at 37°C for 30 days and thermo-cycled for 6000 cycles between 5.0 and 55.0°C. The shear bond strengths of all test groups were determined using a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD (psurface morphology of titanium and elemental composition were examined with SEM and EDAX. The results showed that there was a significant difference for different surface treatments (psurface after thermal treatment of the coating. Surface treatment of titanium with a polydimethylsiloxane coating at 1000°C and 1100°C curing provides sufficient resin bonding for clinical services. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Neutron powder diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, W.I.F.

    1990-01-01

    Neutron powder diffraction is a powerful technique that provides a detailed description of moderately complex crystal structures. This is nowhere more apparent than in the area of high temperature superconductors where neutron powder diffraction has provided precise structural and magnetic information, not only under ambient conditions but also at high and low temperatures and high pressures. Outside superconductor research, the variety of materials studied by neutron powder diffraction is equally impressive including zeolites, fast ionic conductors, permanent magnets and materials undergoing phase transitions. Recent advances that include high resolution studies and real-time crystallography are presented. Future possibilities of neutron powder diffraction are discussed

  15. Pharmaceutical powder compaction technology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Çelik, Metin

    2011-01-01

    ... through the compaction formulation process and application. Compaction of powder constituents both active ingredient and excipients is examined to ensure consistent and reproducible disintegration and dispersion profiles...

  16. Factors affecting the grain-refinement of aluminum using titanium and boron additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, G.P.; Pearson, J.

    1976-01-01

    The development of grain-refining techniques for the casting of aluminum, and the results achieved using additions of ternary Al--Ti--B master-alloys, are briefly described. A test procedure is given for assessing the relative effectiveness of these master-alloys, and the results are related to the various kinds of alloy treated, including those with constituents which poison the grain-refining agent. The equilibrium conditions which affect the behavior of the constituents of the grain-refined alloys are examined quantitatively from a thermodynamic viewpoint. One theory about the mechanism of nucleation of aluminum on titanium diboride is examined and found inapplicable. New data on the solubility of TiB 2 , ZrB 2 , TiC, ZrC, Cr 3 C 2 , and CrB 2 in liquid aluminum are presented graphically. Practical aspects of alloy behavior in grain-refining practice are analyzed and discussed on the basis of the quantitative data

  17. Titanium metal: extraction to application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambogi, Joseph (USGS, Reston, VA); Gerdemann, Stephen J.

    2002-09-01

    In 1998, approximately 57,000 tons of titanium metal was consumed in the form of mill products (1). Only about 5% of the 4 million tons of titanium minerals consumed each year is used to produce titanium metal, with the remainder primarily used to produce titanium dioxide pigment. Titanium metal production is primarily based on the direct chlorination of rutile to produce titanium tetrachloride, which is then reduced to metal using the Kroll magnesium reduction process. The use of titanium is tied to its high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance. Aerospace is the largest application for titanium. In this paper, we discuss all aspects of the titanium industry from ore deposits through extraction to present and future applications. The methods of both primary (mining of ore, extraction, and purification) and secondary (forming and machining) operations will be analyzed. The chemical and physical properties of titanium metal will be briefly examined. Present and future applications for titanium will be discussed. Finally, the economics of titanium metal production also are analyzed as well as the advantages and disadvantages of various alternative extraction methods.

  18. Industrial experience with titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, B.M.; Shoesmith, D.W.

    1997-09-01

    Titanium is a reference material for the construction of waste containers in the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. It has been in industrial service for over 30 a, often in severe corrosion environments, but it is still considered a relatively exotic material with limited operating history. This has arisen because of the aerospace applications of this material and the misconception that the high strength-to-weight ratio dominates the choice of this material. In fact, the advantage of titanium lies in its high reliability and excellent corrosion resistance. It has a proven record in seawater heat exchanger service and a demonstrated excellent reliability even in polluted water. For many reasons it is the technically correct choice of material for marine applications. In this report we review the industrial service history of titanium, particularly in hot saline environments, and demonstrate that it is a viable waste container material, based upon this industrial service history and operating experience. (author)

  19. Surface modification of titanium and titanium alloys by ion implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautray, Tapash R; Narayanan, R; Kwon, Tae-Yub; Kim, Kyo-Han

    2010-05-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys are widely used in biomedical devices and components, especially as hard tissue replacements as well as in cardiac and cardiovascular applications, because of their desirable properties, such as relatively low modulus, good fatigue strength, formability, machinability, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. However, titanium and its alloys cannot meet all of the clinical requirements. Therefore, to improve the biological, chemical, and mechanical properties, surface modification is often performed. In view of this, the current review casts new light on surface modification of titanium and titanium alloys by ion beam implantation. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The effect of stainless steel, cobalt-chromium, titanium alloy, and titanium on the respiratory burst activity of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, A; Tsukayama, D T; Wicklund, B H; Bechtold, J E; Merritt, K; Peterson, P K; Gustilo, R B

    1992-07-01

    Although infection is a serious complication associated with the use of orthopedic prosthetic implants, the impact of the metal used in these devices on host defense is poorly understood. The authors investigated the effect of stainless steel, titanium, titanium alloy, and cobalt-chromium alloy on the respiratory burst of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), a vital component of bactericidal activity. In the presence of stainless steel powder or supernatants obtained from the incubation of stainless steel in buffer, superoxide production by PMN was significantly impaired. Titanium, titanium alloy, and cobalt-chrome alloy had no significant effect on superoxide production. Nickel and chromium, the only metal ions detectable in the stainless steel supernatant, did not impair superoxide production when tested at concentrations similar to those found in the supernatant. Inhibition of PMN superoxide production may play a role in the establishment and persistence of stainless steel device-related infections.

  1. Titanium production for aerospace applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius A. R. Henriques

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Titanium parts are ideally suited for advanced aerospace systems because of their unique combination of high specific strength at both room temperature and moderately elevated temperature, in addition to excellent general corrosion resistance. The objective of this work is to present a review of titanium metallurgy focused on aerospace applications, including developments in the Brazilian production of titanium aimed at aerospace applications. The article includes an account of the evolution of titanium research in the Brazilian Institute (IAE/CTA and the current state-of-art of titanium production in Brazil.

  2. Modyfication of photocatalytic properties of titanium dioxide by mechanochemical method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dulian Piotr

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a simple way to improve the photocatalytic properties of titanium dioxide using mechanochemical method. The TiO2 (Anatase powders was subjected to high-energy ball milling in dry environment and in methanol. It has been shown that it is possible to induce the phase transformation from Anatase to Rutile and produce a material with a higher photocatalytic activity in the UV light. Physicochemical characteristics of the products were based on the following methods and techniques: X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, IR and UV-Vis (DR spectroscopy, measurements of specific surface area (BET. The photocatalytic activity of the powders was measured in the decomposition reaction of methyl orange in water.

  3. Measurement of loose powder density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhtar, S.; Ali, A.; Haider, A.; Farooque, M.

    2011-01-01

    Powder metallurgy is a conventional technique for making engineering articles from powders. Main objective is to produce final products with the highest possible uniform density, which depends on the initial loose powder characteristics. Producing, handling, characterizing and compacting materials in loose powder form are part of the manufacturing processes. Density of loose metallic or ceramic powder is an important parameter for die design. Loose powder density is required for calculating the exact mass of powder to fill the die cavity for producing intended green density of the powder compact. To fulfill this requirement of powder metallurgical processing, a loose powder density meter as per ASTM standards is designed and fabricated for measurement of density. The density of free flowing metallic powders can be determined using Hall flow meter funnel and density cup of 25 cm/sup 3/ volume. Density of metal powders like cobalt, manganese, spherical bronze and pure iron is measured and results are obtained with 99.9% accuracy. (author)

  4. Titanium and zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinard Legry, G.

    1994-01-01

    Titanium and zirconium pure and base alloys are protected by an oxide film with anionic vacancies which gives a very good resistance to corrosion in oxidizing medium, in some ph ranges. Results of pitting and crevice corrosion are given for Cl - , Br - , I - ions concentration with temperature and ph dependence, also with oxygenated ions effect. (A.B.). 32 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Studies on pore morphology of titanium and its oxide by small angle ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and its oxide by small angle neutron scattering. P K TRIPATHY1 ... Titanium metal bodies have been prepared from the sintered powder com- pacts of TiO2 ... XRD of the sintered pellet was first recorded prior to the reduction. Again XRD of the as-reduced metal was recorded after the reduction was over. Then, the sintered.

  6. Photoluminescence and hydrogen gas-sensing properties of titanium dioxide nanostructures synthesized by hydrothermal treatments

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sikhwivhilu, LM

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanostructures were synthesized by microwave-assisted and conventionally heated hydrothermal treatment of TiO2 powder. The tubular structures were converted to a rodlike shape by sintering the samples at various temperatures...

  7. Parameters optimization, microstructure and micro-hardness of silicon carbide laser deposited on titanium alloy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Adebiyia, DI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available detailed study of the optimization characteristic of SiC laser deposited on titanium alloy. In addition, Al and Ti powders are blended with SiC prior to laser coating to minimize heat build up and avoid tendency to cracking. The microstructure, phase...

  8. OIL SOLUTIONS POWDER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technical product bulletin: aka OIL SOLUTIONS POWDER, SPILL GREEN LS, this miscellaneous oil spill control agent used in cleanups initially behaves like a synthetic sorbent, then as a solidifier as the molecular microencapsulating process occurs.

  9. Magnetically responsive enzyme powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospiskova, Kristyna; Safarik, Ivo

    2015-04-01

    Powdered enzymes were transformed into their insoluble magnetic derivatives retaining their catalytic activity. Enzyme powders (e.g., trypsin and lipase) were suspended in various liquid media not allowing their solubilization (e.g., saturated ammonium sulfate and highly concentrated polyethylene glycol solutions, ethanol, methanol, 2-propanol) and subsequently cross-linked with glutaraldehyde. Magnetic modification was successfully performed at low temperature in a freezer (-20 °C) using magnetic iron oxides nano- and microparticles prepared by microwave-assisted synthesis from ferrous sulfate. Magnetized cross-linked enzyme powders were stable at least for two months in water suspension without leakage of fixed magnetic particles. Operational stability of magnetically responsive enzymes during eight repeated reaction cycles was generally without loss of enzyme activity. Separation of magnetically modified cross-linked powdered enzymes from reaction mixtures was significantly simplified due to their magnetic properties.

  10. Microstructure/processing relationships in high-energy high-rate consolidated powder composites of Nb-stabilized Ti3Al+TiAl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persad, C.; Lee, B.; Hou, C.; Eliezer, Z.; Marcus, H.L.

    1989-01-01

    A new approach to powder processing is employed in forming titanium aluminide composites. The processing consists of internal heating of a customized powder blend by a fast electrical discharge of a homopolar generator. The high-energy high-rate '1MJ in 1s' pulse permits rapid heating of an electrically conducting powder mixture in a cold wall die. This short time at temperature approach offers the opportunity to control phase transformations and the degree of microstructural coarsening not readily possible with standard powder-processing approaches. This paper describes the consolidation results of titanium aluminide-based powder-composite materials. The focus of this study was the definition of microstructure/processing relationships for each of the composite constituents, first as monoliths and then in composite forms. Non-equilibrium phases present in rapidly solidified TiAl powders are transformed to metastable intermediates en route to the equilibrium gamma phase.

  11. Titanium compacts produced by the pulvimetallurgical hydride-dehydride method for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreiro, M M; Grana, D R; Kokubu, G A; Luppo, M I; Mintzer, S; Vigna, G

    2010-04-01

    Titanium powder production by the hydride-dehydride method has been developed as a non-expensive process. In this work, commercially pure grade two Ti specimens were hydrogenated. The hydrided material was milled in a planetary mill. The hydrided titanium powder was dehydrided and then sieved to obtain a particle size between 37 and 125 microm in order to compare it with a commercial powder produced by chemical reduction with a particle size lower than 150 microm. Cylindrical green compacts were obtained by uniaxial pressing of the powders at 343 MPa and sintering in vacuum. The powders and the density of sintered compacts were characterized, the oxygen content was measured and in vivo tests were performed in the tibia bones of Wistar rats in order to evaluate their biocompatibility. No differences were observed between the materials which were produced either with powders obtained by the hydride-dehydride method or with commercial powders produced by chemical reduction regarding modifications in compactation, sintering and biological behaviour.

  12. Titanium compacts produced by the pulvimetallurgical hydride-dehydride method for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreiro, M M [Materiales Dentales, Facultad de OdontologIa, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Marcelo T de Alvear 2142 (1122), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Grana, D R; Kokubu, G A [PatologIa I. Escuela de OdontologIa, Facultad de Medicina. Asociacion Odontologica Argentina-Universidad del Salvador, Tucuman 1845 (1050) Buenos Aires (Argentina); Luppo, M I; Mintzer, S; Vigna, G, E-mail: mbarreiro@mater.odon.uba.a, E-mail: dgrana@usal.edu.a, E-mail: luppo@cnea.gov.a, E-mail: vigna@cnea.gov.a [Departamento Materiales, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Gral Paz 1499 (B1650KNA), San MartIn, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2010-04-15

    Titanium powder production by the hydride-dehydride method has been developed as a non-expensive process. In this work, commercially pure grade two Ti specimens were hydrogenated. The hydrided material was milled in a planetary mill. The hydrided titanium powder was dehydrided and then sieved to obtain a particle size between 37 and 125{mu}m in order to compare it with a commercial powder produced by chemical reduction with a particle size lower than 150{mu}m. Cylindrical green compacts were obtained by uniaxial pressing of the powders at 343 MPa and sintering in vacuum. The powders and the density of sintered compacts were characterized, the oxygen content was measured and in vivo tests were performed in the tibia bones of Wistar rats in order to evaluate their biocompatibility. No differences were observed between the materials which were produced either with powders obtained by the hydride-dehydride method or with commercial powders produced by chemical reduction regarding modifications in compactation, sintering and biological behaviour.

  13. Magnetically responsive enzyme powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pospiskova, Kristyna; Safarik, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    Powdered enzymes were transformed into their insoluble magnetic derivatives retaining their catalytic activity. Enzyme powders (e.g., trypsin and lipase) were suspended in various liquid media not allowing their solubilization (e.g., saturated ammonium sulfate and highly concentrated polyethylene glycol solutions, ethanol, methanol, 2-propanol) and subsequently cross-linked with glutaraldehyde. Magnetic modification was successfully performed at low temperature in a freezer (−20 °C) using magnetic iron oxides nano- and microparticles prepared by microwave-assisted synthesis from ferrous sulfate. Magnetized cross-linked enzyme powders were stable at least for two months in water suspension without leakage of fixed magnetic particles. Operational stability of magnetically responsive enzymes during eight repeated reaction cycles was generally without loss of enzyme activity. Separation of magnetically modified cross-linked powdered enzymes from reaction mixtures was significantly simplified due to their magnetic properties. - Highlights: • Cross-linked enzyme powders were prepared in various liquid media. • Insoluble enzymes were magnetized using iron oxides particles. • Magnetic iron oxides particles were prepared by microwave-assisted synthesis. • Magnetic modification was performed under low (freezing) temperature. • Cross-linked powdered trypsin and lipase can be used repeatedly for reaction

  14. Characteristics of Inconel Powders for Powder-Bed Additive Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quy Bau Nguyen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the flow characteristics and behaviors of virgin and recycled Inconel powder for powder-bed additive manufacturing (AM were studied using different powder characterization techniques. The results revealed that the particle size distribution (PSD for the selective laser melting (SLM process is typically in the range from 15 μm to 63 μm. The flow rate of virgin Inconel powder is around 28 s·(50 g−1. In addition, the packing density was found to be 60%. The rheological test results indicate that the virgin powder has reasonably good flowability compared with the recycled powder. The inter-relation between the powder characteristics is discussed herein. A propeller was successfully printed using the powder. The results suggest that Inconel powder is suitable for AM and can be a good reference for researchers who attempt to produce AM powders.

  15. Microstructure and mechanical properties of a novel β titanium metallic composite by selective laser melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrancken, B.; Thijs, L.; Kruth, J.-P.; Van Humbeeck, J.

    2014-01-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is an additive manufacturing process in which functional, complex parts are produced by selectively melting consecutive layers of powder with a laser beam. This flexibility enables the exploration of a wide spectrum of possibilities in creating novel alloys or even metal–metal composites with unique microstructures. In this research, Ti6Al4V-ELI powder was mixed with 10 wt.% Mo powder. In contrast to the fully α′ microstructure of Ti6Al4V after SLM, the novel microstructure consists of a β titanium matrix with randomly dispersed pure Mo particles, as observed by light optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Most importantly, the solidification mechanism changes from planar to cellular mode. Microstructures after heat treatment indicate that the β phase is metastable and locate the β transus at ∼900 °C, and tensile properties are equal to or better than conventional β titanium alloys

  16. Titanium Honeycomb Panel Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, W. Lance; Thompson, Randolph C.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal-mechanical tests were performed on a titanium honeycomb sandwich panel to experimentally validate the hypersonic wing panel concept and compare test data with analysis. Details of the test article, test fixture development, instrumentation, and test results are presented. After extensive testing to 900 deg. F, non-destructive evaluation of the panel has not detected any significant structural degradation caused by the applied thermal-mechanical loads.

  17. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-07-29

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100} orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  18. Advances in titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seagle, S.R.; Wood, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    As described above, new developments in the aerospace market are focusing on higher temperature alloys for jet engine components and higher strength/toughness alloys for airframe applications. Conventional alloys for engines have reached their maximum useful temperature of about 1000 F (540 C) because of oxidation resistance requirements. IMI 834 and Ti-1100 advanced alloys show some improvement, however, the major improvement appears to be in gamma titanium aluminides which could extend the maximum usage temperature to about 1500 F (815 C). This puts titanium alloys in a competitive position to replace nickel-base superalloys. Advanced airframe alloys such as Ti-6-22-22S, Beta C TM , Ti-15-333 and Ti-10-2-3 with higher strength than conventional Ti-6-4 are being utilized in significantly greater quantities, both in military and commercial applications. These alloys offer improved strength with little or no sacrifice in toughness and improved formability, in some cases. Advanced industrial alloys are being developed for improved corrosion resistance in more reducing and higher temperature environments such as those encountered in sour gas wells. Efforts are focused on small precious metal additions to optimize corrosion performance for specific applications at a modest increase in cost. As these applications develop, the usage of titanium alloys for industrial markets should steadily increase to approach that for aerospace applications. (orig.)

  19. Titanium fasteners. [for aircraft industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Titanium fasteners are used in large quantities throughout the aircraft industry. Most of this usage is in aluminum structure; where titanium structure exists, titanium fasteners are logically used as well. Titanium fasteners offer potential weight savings to the designer at a cost of approximately $30 per pound of weight saved. Proper and least cost usage must take into consideration type of fastener per application, galvanic couples and installation characteristics of protective coatings, cosmetic appearance, paint adhesion, installation forces and methods available and fatigue performance required.

  20. Titanium: light, strong, and white

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Laurel; Bedinger, George

    2013-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) is a strong silver-gray metal that is highly resistant to corrosion and is chemically inert. It is as strong as steel but 45 percent lighter, and it is twice as strong as aluminum but only 60 percent heavier. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has a very high refractive index, which means that it has high light-scattering ability. As a result, TiO2 imparts whiteness, opacity, and brightness to many products. ...Because of the unique physical properties of titanium metal and the whiteness provided by TiO2, titanium is now used widely in modern industrial societies.

  1. Towards a new titanium sector: Aerospace

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Du Preez, W

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Sector: Aerospace 4th Biennial Conference Presented by: Dr Willie du Preez Director: Titanium Centre of Competence Date: 9 October 2012 Outline ? Why Titanium? ? The Opportunity for South Africa ? The SA Titanium Industry Strategy ? Primary...747 B777 A380 A350 B787 Materials used in Modern Aircraft: Composites vs Titanium ? CSIR 2012 Slide 6 Source: Engineering News Online, American Institute of Aeronautics & Astronautics Aluminium Composite Steel Titanium Others Titanium...

  2. Biological response of tissues with macrophagic activity to titanium dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmedo, Daniel G; Tasat, Deborah R; Evelson, Pablo; Guglielmotti, María B; Cabrini, Rómulo L

    2008-03-15

    The titanium dioxide layer is composed mainly of anatase and rutile. This layer is prone to break, releasing particles to the milieu. Therefore, corrosion may cause implant failure and body contamination. We have previously shown that commercial anatase-titanium dioxide (TiO(2)-anatase) is deposited in organs with macrophagic activity, transported in the blood by phagocytic-mononuclear cells, and induces an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, we evaluated the effects of rutile-titanium dioxide (TiO(2)-rutile). Male Wistar rats were injected i.p. with a suspension of TiO(2)-rutile powder at a dose of 1.60 g/100 g b.w. Six months postinjection, the presence of Ti was assessed in serum, blood cells, liver, spleen, and lung. Titanium was found in phagocytic mononuclear cells, serum, and in the parenchyma of all the organs tested. TiO(2)-rutile generated a rise in the percentage of reactive cells, which was smaller than that observed when TiO(2)-anatase was employed in a previous study. Although TiO(2)-rutile provoked an augmentation of ROS, it failed to induce damage to membrane lipids, possibly due to an adaptive response. The present study reveals that TiO(2)-rutile is less bioreactive than TiO(2)-anatase. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Surface modification of pharmaceutical powders

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Qi

    2017-01-01

    This thesis describes a body of work to investigate a mechanical dry powder coating approach aiming to modify the surface properties of fine pharmaceutical powders. Powders were coated with magnesium stearate (MgSt) in order to improve their bulk powder properties such as flowability, fluidization and aerosolization. The flow characteristics of a cohesive milled lactose monohydrate powder (Pharmatose® 450M, VMD around 20 μm) were substantially improved by processing with 1% w/w magn...

  4. Development of new metal matrix composite electrodes for electrical discharge machining through powder metallurgy process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mathalai Sundaram

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Electrical discharge machining (EDM is one of the widely used nontraditional machining methods to produce die cavities by the erosive effect of electrical discharges. This method is popular due to the fact that a relatively soft electrically conductive tool electrode can machine hard work piece. Copper electrode is normally used for machining process. Electrode wear rate is the major drawback for EDM researchers. This research focus on fabrication of metal matrix composite (MMC electrode by mixing copper powder with titanium carbide (TiC and Tungsten carbide (WC powder through powder metallurgy process, Copper powder is the major amount of mixing proportion with TiC and WC. However, this paper focus on the early stage of the project where powder metallurgy route was used to determine suitable mixing time, compaction pressure and sintering and compacting process in producing EDM electrode. The newly prepared composite electrodes in different composition are tested in EDM for OHNS steel.

  5. Chemical changes of titanium and titanium dioxide under electron bombardment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romins Brasca

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The electron induced effect on the first stages of the titanium (Ti0 oxidation and titanium dioxide (Ti4+ chemical reduction processes has been studied by means of Auger electron spectroscopy. Using factor analysis we found that both processes are characterized by the appearance of an intermediate Ti oxidation state, Ti2O3 (Ti3+.

  6. Plasmonic Titanium Nitride Nanostructures via Nitridation of Nanopatterned Titanium Dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Zemlyanov, Dmitry; Kim, Jongbum

    2017-01-01

    Plasmonic titanium nitride nanostructures are obtained via nitridation of titanium dioxide. Nanoparticles acquired a cubic shape with sharper edges following the rock-salt crystalline structure of TiN. Lattice constant of the resulting TiN nanoparticles matched well with the tabulated data. Energy...

  7. Interaction of titanium and vanadium with carbon dioxide in heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlasyuk, R.Z.; Kurovskii, V.Y.; Lyapunov, A.P.; Radomysel'skii, I.D.

    1986-01-01

    To obtain prediction data on the change in properties of titaniumand vanadium-base powder metallurgy materials operating in a carbon dioxide atmosphere, and also to clarify the mechanism of their interaction with the gas in this work, gravimetric investigations of specimens heated at temperatures of 300-1000 C and an x-ray diffraction analysis of their surface were made and the composition of the gas in the heating chamber was studied. The results of the investigations indicate a similarity between the mechanisms of interaction of titanium and vanadium with carbon dioxide including the formation of oxides on the surface of the metal with subsequent carbidization at temperatures above 800 C. On the basis of the data obtained, it may be concluded that the operating temperature limits of titanium- or vanadium-base materials in carbon dioxide must not exceed 400 and 600 C, respectively

  8. Effects of Initial Powder Compact Thickness, Lubrication, and Particle Morphology on the Cold Compaction Behavior of Ti Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Jia; Gabbitas, Brian; Zhang, Deliang; Yang, Fei

    2015-08-01

    This work investigates the compaction behavior of hydride-dehydride CP-Ti powder from green density/compaction pressure curves. These were obtained through a modification of selected processing conditions, such as variation in compact thickness, the use of internal lubrication, and additions of plasma rotating electrode process powder. A modified Cooper-Eaton equation, which treats the compaction process to be a combination of particle rearrangement (PR) and plastic deformation (PD) mechanisms, was used to simulate the curves. A comparison with aluminum and iron compaction is also carried out in this study. The research indicated that the cold compaction of titanium powder can be separated into two stages: a PR stage (stage I), which occurs at a compacting pressure in the range of 0 to 200 MPa, followed by a further PR stage initiated by PD, when the compaction pressure is in the range of 200 to 1000 MPa. The existence of stage II is due to the low plastic deformability of titanium and low density achieved at the end of stage I.

  9. The effect of electrolytes on the aggregation kinetics of titanium dioxide nanoparticle aggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih Yanghsin; Zhuang Chengming; Tso Chihping; Lin Chenghan

    2012-01-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are receiving increasing attention due to their increased industrial production and potential hazardous effect. The process of aggregation plays a key role in the fate of NPs in the environment and the resultant health risk. The aggregation of commercial titanium dioxide NP powder (25 nm) was investigated with various environmentally relevant solution chemistries containing different concentrations of monovalent (Na + , K + ) and divalent (Ca 2+ ) electrolytes. Titanium dioxide particle size increased with the increase in ion concentration. The stability of titanium dioxide also depended on the ionic composition. Titanium dioxide aggregated to a higher degree in the presence of divalent cations than monovalent ones. The attachment efficiency of NPs was constructed through aggregation kinetics data, from which the critical coagulation concentrations for the various electrolytes are determined (80, 19, and 1 meq/L for Na + , K + , and Ca 2+ , respectively). Our results suggest that titanium dioxide NP powders are relatively unstable in water and could easily be removed by adding multivalent cations so hazardous potentials decrease in aquatic environment.

  10. The structure and properties of fluoroplastic modified with titanium nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baronin, G. S.; Buznik, V. M.; Dmitriev, O. S.; Zavrazhina, C. V.; Mishchenko, S. V.; Zavrazhin, D. O.; Khudyakov, V. V.

    2017-12-01

    The results of studying the structure and properties of a mixture of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and fillers, which are composites of ultrafine polytetrafluoroethylene and titanium (TiFP) nanoparticles, are presented. These composites are obtained with pyrolytic redistribution of a powdered PTFE - (NH4)2TiF6 mixture. It has been found that the composite properties depend on the type and concentration of the inorganic filler and the composite production technology. The created composites exceed the original PTFE in a number of characteristics (deflection temperature, thermal conductivity and durability).

  11. Magnetically responsive enzyme powders

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pospišková, K.; Šafařík, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 380, APR 2015 (2015), s. 197-200 ISSN 0304-8853 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13021 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : enzyme powders * cross-linking * magnetic modification * magnetic separation * magnetic iron oxides particles * microwave-assisted synthesis Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.357, year: 2015

  12. Laser cladding with powder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, M.F.; Schneider, Marcel Fredrik

    1998-01-01

    This thesis is directed to laser cladding with powder and a CO2 laser as heat source. The laser beam intensity profile turned out to be an important pa6 Summary rameter in laser cladding. A numerical model was developed that allows the prediction of the surface temperature distribution that is

  13. Synthesis and characterization of a ferrous compound material obtained by combustion of ferroboron and ferrotitanium mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bejar, M.A; Fuenzalida, J.L

    2008-01-01

    A ferrous compound material was synthesized in this work, by the air auto-combustion of mixtures of powdered ferroboron and ferrotitanium, compacted under pressures of 79 and 93 MPa and preheated to a temperature of about 1000 o C. The synthesized compounds were characterized by XRD analysis, and macro and micro-hardness tests. The formation of titanium diboride was found in all the synthesized test pieces (au)

  14. Formation of microspheres under the action of femtosecond laser radiation on titanium samples in hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochuev, D. A.; Khorkov, K. S.; Ivashchenko, A. V.; Prokoshev, V. G.; Arakelian, S. M.

    2018-01-01

    This work describes the original method of laser synthesis of microspheres which contain titanium carbide. The formation of microspheres is carried out by the action of femtosecond laser radiation on the surface of titanium in the reaction medium - the ultimate hydrocarbon. The resulting microspheres have a high surface smoothness, a narrow particle size distribution, an average size of 1-3 μm. They can be used in applications of additive engineering, powder metallurgy as the main raw material, or as an alloying additive.

  15. Ion Implantation Studies of Titanium Metal Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    this peak for both titanium and vanadium . It cannot be associated with an inter-band excitation of any of the oxygen states since it appears in the...Half inch diameter polycrystalline rods of titanium monoxide (TiO), titanium dioxide (TiO 2 and titanium sesquioxide (Ti2 03 ) were obtained from

  16. Powder X-ray diffraction study af alkali alanates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Thao; Mosegaard Arnbjerg, Lene; Jensen, Torben René

    Powder X-ray diffraction study of alkali alanates Thao Cao, Lene Arnbjerg, Torben R. Jensen. Center for Materials Crystallography (CMC), Center for Energy Materials (CEM), iNANO and Department of Chemistry, Aarhus University, DK-8000, Denmark. Abstract: To meet the energy demand in the future...... for mobile applications, new materials with high gravimetric and volumetric storage capacity of hydrogen have to be developed. Alkali alanates are promising for hydrogen storage materials. Sodium alanate stores hydrogen reversibly at moderate conditions when catalysed with, e.g. titanium, whereas potassium...

  17. The photocatalytic and cytotoxic effects of titanium dioxide particles used in sunscreen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampaul, Ashti

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles are used in sunscreens to reflect UV radiation from the skin. However, titanium dioxide as anatase and rutile crystal forms is a well-known photocatalyst. The nanoparticles are surface coated with inert inorganic oxides such as silica and alumina or organics such as organosilanes or silicone polymers and more recently, have been doped with manganese oxide. These modifications to the titanium dioxide particles are purported to prevent the production of harmful reactive oxygen species. A range of sunscreens was tested with crystal form and modification type identified via XRD, Raman Spectroscopy, XPS and SSNMR. The particle modification and crystal form determined whether the particles were inert or rapidly degraded methylene blue dye, and killed or protected cultured human epithelium cells. Novel solid state Electron Paramagnetic Resonance analysis showed that the greatest amount of superoxide anions was formed during UVA irradiation of the mixed anatase and rutile crystal forms coated with an organosilane. These particles also degraded methylene blue at a similar rate to Degussa P25, a standard uncoated titanium dioxide powder and produced an increase in UVA induced apoptosis of human keratinocytes. Double Stranded Breaks were observed extensively in cells exposed to UVA irradiated mixed anatase and rutile titanium dioxide with organosilane. A new apoptotic-like cell death mechanism may have been recognised during the UVA irradiation of animal and human cells in the presence of titanium dioxide. This research concludes that mixed anatase and rutile crystal forms of titanium dioxide coated with organosilane or dimethicone may not be safe to use in sunscreen lotions. A less harmful alternative for sunscreen formulations is the manganese doped rutile particles or the alumina coated rutile powders, both of which exhibited a protective effect on cultured epithelial cells.

  18. ELASTO-PLASTIC DEFORMATION OF COMPOSITE POWDERS WITH LAYERED CARBON AND CARBIDE-FORMING ELEMENT COATING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Kovalevsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Coating structure formation under magnetron spraying of titanium and carbon cathodes and combined cathodes, namely cobalt (EP 131 – nickel, tungsten – carbon have been investigated under conditions of carbide separate synthesis within the temperature range of 650–1200 °C. Usage of cobalt and nickel particles as matrix material leads to their rapid thermal expansion under heating during sintering process in the dilatometer. Subsequent plastic deformation of sintered samples provides obtaining a composite powder material that is a composite with framing structure of cobalt, titanium and tungsten carbides in the coatings.

  19. Maternal inhalation of surface-coated nanosized titanium dioxide (UV-Titan) in C57BL/6 mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, Petra; Halappanavar, Sabina; Hougaard, Karin Sorig

    2013-01-01

    We investigated effects of maternal pulmonary exposure to titanium dioxide (UV-Titan) on prenatally exposed offspring. Time-mated mice (C57BL/6BomTac) were inhalation exposed (1 h/day to 42 mg UV-Titan/m(3) aerosolised powder or filtered air) during gestation days (GDs) 8-18. We evaluated DNA...

  20. Synthesis of Uranium nitride powders using metal uranium powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jae Ho; Kim, Dong Joo; Oh, Jang Soo; Rhee, Young Woo; Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Keon Sik

    2012-01-01

    Uranium nitride (UN) is a potential fuel material for advanced nuclear reactors because of their high fuel density, high thermal conductivity, high melting temperature, and considerable breeding capability in LWRs. Uranium nitride powders can be fabricated by a carbothermic reduction of the oxide powders, or the nitriding of metal uranium. The carbothermic reduction has an advantage in the production of fine powders. However it has many drawbacks such as an inevitable engagement of impurities, process burden, and difficulties in reusing of expensive N 15 gas. Manufacturing concerns issued in the carbothermic reduction process can be solved by changing the starting materials from oxide powder to metals. However, in nitriding process of metal, it is difficult to obtain fine nitride powders because metal uranium is usually fabricated in the form of bulk ingots. In this study, a simple reaction method was tested to fabricate uranium nitride powders directly from uranium metal powders. We fabricated uranium metal spherical powder and flake using a centrifugal atomization method. The nitride powders were obtained by thermal treating those metal particles under nitrogen containing gas. We investigated the phase and morphology evolutions of powders during the nitriding process. A phase analysis of nitride powders was also a part of the present work

  1. Dense and porous titanium substrates with a biomimetic calcium phosphate coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, A.A., E-mail: aantunesr@yahoo.com.br [Powder Technology Laboratory, Materials Processing and Characterization Division, National Institute of Technology, No. 82 Venezuela Avenue, Room 602, 20081-312 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Balestra, R.M. [Powder Technology Laboratory, Materials Processing and Characterization Division, National Institute of Technology, No. 82 Venezuela Avenue, Room 602, 20081-312 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rocha, M.N. [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Program, COPPE, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, P.O. Box 68505, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Peripolli, S.B. [Materials Metrology Division, National Institute of Metrology, Normalization and Quality, No. 50 Nossa Senhora das Gracas Street, Building 3, 25250-020 Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil); Andrade, M.C. [Polytechnic Institute of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro State University, s/n, Alberto Rangel Street, 28630-050 Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil); Pereira, L.C. [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Program, COPPE, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, P.O. Box 68505, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Oliveira, M.V. [Powder Technology Laboratory, Materials Processing and Characterization Division, National Institute of Technology, No. 82 Venezuela Avenue, Room 602, 20081-312 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A biomimetic coating method with simplified solution is proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Titanium substrates are submitted to chemical and heat treatments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Titanium substrates are coated with biocompatible calcium phosphate phases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The simplified solution shows potential to be applied as a coating technique. - Abstract: The present work studied a biomimetic method using a simplified solution (SS) with calcium and phosphorus ions for coating titanium substrates, in order to improve their bioactivity. Commercially pure titanium dense sheet, microporous and macroporous titanium samples, both produced by powder metallurgy, were treated in NaOH solution followed by heat-treating and immersed in SS for 7, 14 or 21 days. The samples characterization was performed by quantitative metallographic analysis, confocal scanning optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and low angle X-ray diffraction. The results showed coatings with calcium phosphate precipitation in all samples, with globular or plate-like morphology, typical of hydroxyapatite and octacalcium phosphate, respectively, indicating that the solution (SS) has potential for coating titanium substrates. In addition, the different surfaces of substrates had an effect on the formed calcium phosphate phase and thickness of coatings, depending on the substrate type and imersion time in the simplified solution.

  2. Surface chemical state of Ti powders and its alloys: Effect of storage conditions and alloy composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hryha, Eduard, E-mail: hryha@chalmers.se [Department of Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, Rännvägen 2A, SE - 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Shvab, Ruslan [Department of Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, Rännvägen 2A, SE - 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Bram, Martin; Bitzer, Martin [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Materials Synthesis and Processing (IEK-1), D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Nyborg, Lars [Department of Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, Rännvägen 2A, SE - 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Powder particles of Ti, NiTi and Ti6Al4V are covered by homogeneous Ti-oxide layer. • Thickness of the Ti-oxide layer is in the range of 2.9 to 4.2 nm in as-atomized state. • Exposure to the air results in immediate oxide thickness increase of up to 30%. • Oxide thickness increase of only 15% during storage for 8 years. • High passivation of the Ti, NiTi and Ti6Al4V powder surface by Ti-oxide layer. - Abstract: High affinity of titanium to oxygen in combination with the high surface area of the powder results in tremendous powder reactivity and almost inevitable presence of passivation oxide film on the powder surface. Oxide film is formed during the short exposure of the powder to the environment at even a trace amount of oxygen. Hence, surface state of the powder determines its usefulness for powder metallurgy processing. Present study is focused on the evaluation of the surface oxide state of the Ti, NiTi and Ti6Al4V powders in as-atomized state and after storage under air or Ar for up to eight years. Powder surface oxide state was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HR SEM). Results indicate that powder in as-atomized state is covered by homogeneous Ti-oxide layer with the thickness of ∼2.9 nm for Ti, ∼3.2 nm and ∼4.2 nm in case of Ti6Al4V and NiTi powders, respectively. Exposure to the air results in oxide growth of about 30% in case of Ti and only about 10% in case of NiTi and Ti6Al4V. After the storage under the dry air for two years oxide growth of only about 3-4% was detected in case of both, Ti and NiTi powders. NiTi powder, stored under the dry air for eight years, indicates oxide thickness of about 5.3 nm, which is about 30% thicker in comparison with the as-atomized powder. Oxide thickness increase of only ∼15% during the storage for eight years in comparison with the powder, shortly exposed to the air after manufacturing, was detected. Results indicate a

  3. Synthesis and characterization on titanium dioxide prepared by precipitation and hydrothermal treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Andre V.P. dos; Yoshito, Walter K.; Lazar, Dolores R.R.; Ussui, Valter

    2012-01-01

    Surface properties of titanium dioxide (titania) are outstanding among ceramic materials and enables uses as catalysts, photoelectrochemical devices, solar cells and others. In many of these applications, it is necessary to keep the anatase phase, that is stable only in low temperatures (<400 deg C). In the present work, the influence of hydrothermal treatment on physical characteristics and crystal structure of titania powders synthesized by precipitation was investigated. Characterizations of obtained powders were carried out by X-ray diffraction, surface area analysis by N2 gas sorption (BET) and microstructure of powders and ceramics were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. As prepared powders were formed as cylindrical pellets by uniaxial pressing and sintered at 1500 deg C for 01 hour. Results showed that anatase phase without formation of rutile phase can be formed in hydrothermally treated samples . Rutile phase is predominant in calcined and/or sintered samples (author)

  4. Dispersing powders in liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, RD

    1988-01-01

    This book provides powder technologists with laboratory procedures for selecting dispersing agents and preparing stable dispersions that can then be used in particle size characterization instruments. Its broader goal is to introduce industrial chemists and engineers to the phenomena, terminology, physical principles, and chemical considerations involved in preparing and handling dispersions on a commercial scale. The book introduces novices to: - industrial problems due to improper degree of dispersion; - the nomenclature used in describing particles; - the basic physica

  5. Powder crystallography of useful materials using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaduk, J.A.; Faber, J.; Pei, S.

    1994-01-01

    Synchrotron powder diffraction can, alone or in combination with other techniques, be used to answer real crystallographic questions. The high resolution and signal/background facilitate the ab initio solution of moderately-complex crystal structures from powder data, as illustrated by acentric structure of hydrated sodium aluminate, NaAlO 2 ·5/4H 2 O. Multiple-wavelength and resonant scattering studies can yield information not merely on the average crystal structure, but on local distortions from the average (the hydrogenation catalyst Cu 2 Al 6 B 4 O 17 ). Synchrotron radiation can place stringent requirements on the sample, as illustrated by studies of optical materials having the BaY 2 F 8 structure. Synchrotron powder diffraction studies of molecular sieve catalysts have proved useful in characterizing the framework composition (titanium MFI), extra framework species (cations and extra framework Al in FAU), and in characterizing crystallite size and strain. The authors have also applied synchrotron powder diffraction to the structural characterization of organic and coordination compounds

  6. Studying properties of carbonaceous reducers and process of forming primary titanium slags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. K. Balgabekov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available When smelting a rich titanium slag the most suitable are low-ash reducers, and the studies revealed the suitability for this purpose of special coke and coal. An important property of a reducer is its specific resistance. Therefore there were carried out studies for measuring electric resistance of briquettes consisting of ilmenite concentrate and different carbonaceous reducers. It is recommended to jointly smelt the briquetted and powdered burden (the amount of the powdered burden varies form 20 tо 50 %, this leads to the increase of technical-economic indicators of the process.

  7. Low cost titanium--myth or reality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, Paul C.; Hartman, Alan D.; Hansen, Jeffrey S.; Gerdemann, Stephen J.

    2001-01-01

    In 1998, approximately 57,000 tons of titanium metal was consumed in the form of mill products (1). Only about 5% of the 4 million tons of titanium minerals consumed each year is used to produce titanium metal, with the remainder primarily used to produce titanium dioxide pigment. Titanium metal production is primarily based on the direct chlorination of rutile to produce titanium tetrachloride, which is then reduced to metal using the Kroll magnesium reduction process. The use of titanium is tied to its high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance. Aerospace is the largest application for titanium, and titanium cost has prevented its use in non-aerospace applications including the automotive and heavy vehicle industries.

  8. Formation of nanocrystalline TiC from titanium and different carbon sources by mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia Haoling [Key Lab of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Jingshi Road 73, Jinan 250061, Shandong (China); Zhang Zhonghua [Key Lab of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Jingshi Road 73, Jinan 250061, Shandong (China)], E-mail: zh_zhang@sdu.edu.cn; Qi Zhen [Key Lab of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Jingshi Road 73, Jinan 250061, Shandong (China); Liu Guodong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jingshi Road 73, Jinan 250061 (China); Bian Xiufang [Key Lab of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Jingshi Road 73, Jinan 250061, Shandong (China)

    2009-03-20

    In this paper, the formation of nanocrystalline TiC from titanium powders and different carbon resources by mechanical alloying (MA) has been investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The experimental results show that nanocrystalline TiC can be synthesized from Ti powders and different carbon resources (activated carbon, carbon fibres or carbon nanotubes) by MA at room temperature. Titanium and different carbon resources have a significant effect on the Ti-C reaction and the formation of TiC during MA. Moreover, the formation of nanocrystalline TiC is governed by a gradual diffusion reaction mechanism during MA, regardless of different carbon resources.

  9. Consolidation of titanium matrix composites to maximum density by different hot pressing techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montealegre Melendez, I.; Neubauer, E.; Danninger, H.

    2010-01-01

    In this present work, TiMMCs were manufactured through conventional and inductive hot pressing techniques. The starting materials were two titanium based powders as metal matrices, and two types of reinforcements, carbon nanofibres and nano-micro-boron particles. After several manufacturing runs with varying parameters, especially, optimized hot pressing parameters, the titanium compacts were characterized. Density and hardness measurements, chemical analyses and microstructural studies were conducted. The two objectives of this work were achieved. On one hand the influence, in the properties of TiMMCs, of the starting materials as matrix powder and reinforcements was determined. Higher content of impurities from the starting materials affected the hardness and the microstructure of the composites, independently of the manufacturing process. On another hand, the study of variations of the manufacturing process as temperature of consolidation and soaking time was reported. Higher densification was obtained at higher consolidation temperature; however, reaction between the matrix and the carbonaceous reinforcement was detected.

  10. Development of the Fray-Farthing-Chen Cambridge Process: Towards the Sustainable Production of Titanium and Its Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Di; Dolganov, Aleksei; Ma, Mingchan; Bhattacharya, Biyash; Bishop, Matthew T.; Chen, George Z.

    2018-02-01

    The Kroll process has been employed for titanium extraction since the 1950s. It is a labour and energy intensive multi-step semi-batch process. The post-extraction processes for making the raw titanium into alloys and products are also excessive, including multiple remelting steps. Invented in the late 1990s, the Fray-Farthing-Chen (FFC) Cambridge process extracts titanium from solid oxides at lower energy consumption via electrochemical reduction in molten salts. Its ability to produce alloys and powders, while retaining the cathode shape also promises energy and material efficient manufacturing. Focusing on titanium and its alloys, this article reviews the recent development of the FFC-Cambridge process in two aspects, (1) resource and process sustainability and (2) advanced post-extraction processing.

  11. Structure, composition and morphology of bioactive titanate layer on porous titanium surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinshan; Wang, Xiaohua; Hu, Rui; Kou, Hongchao

    2014-07-01

    A bioactive coating was produced on pore surfaces of porous titanium samples by an amendatory alkali-heat treatment method. Porous titanium was prepared by powder metallurgy and its porosity and average size were 45% and 135 μm, respectively. Coating morphology, coating structure and phase constituents were examined by SEM, XPS and XRD. It was found that a micro-network structure with sizes of bone-like carbonate-hydroxylapatite showing a good biocompatibility was detected on the coating surface. And the redundant Ca advanced the bioactivity of the coating. Thus, the present modification is expected to allow the use of the bioactive porous titanium as artificial bones even under load-bearing conditions.

  12. Fast and Straightforward Synthesis of Luminescent Titanium(IV Dioxide Quantum Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Václav Štengl

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The nucleus of titania was prepared by reaction of solution titanium oxosulphate with hydrazine hydrate. These titania nuclei were used for titania quantum dots synthesis by a simple and fast method. The prepared titanium(IV dioxide quantum dots were characterized by measurement of X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, atomic force microscopy (AFM, high-resolution electron microscopy (HRTEM, and selected area electron diffraction (SAED. The optical properties were determined by photoluminescence (PL spectra. The prepared titanium(IV dioxide quantum dots have the narrow range of UV excitation (365–400 nm and also a close range of emission maxima (450–500 nm.

  13. Powder-based synthesis of nanocrystalline material components for structural application. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilyuschenko, A.F.; Ivashko, V.S.; Okovity, V.A. [Powder Metallurgy Research Inst., Minsk (Belarus)] [and others

    1998-12-01

    Hydroxiapate spray coatings and substrates for implant production as well as multilayered metal ceramic coatings from nanocrystalline materials are a subject of the investigation. The work aims at the improvement of quality of said objects. This study has investigated the processes of hydroxiapatite powder production. Sizes, shapes and relief of initial HA powder surface are analyzed using SEM and TEM. Modes of HA plasma spraying on a substrate from titanium and associated compositions of traditional and nanocrystalline structure are optimized. The quality of the sprayed samples are studied using X-ray phase analysis and metallographic analysis. The results of investigations of bioceramic coating spraying on titanium are theoretically generalized, taking into account obtained experimental data. The results of investigations of ion-beam technology are presented for spraying multilayered coatings consisting of alternating metal-ceramic layers of nanocrystalline structure.

  14. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles: Synthesis, X-Ray Line Analysis and Chemical Composition Study

    OpenAIRE

    Chenari,Hossein Mahmoudi; Seibel,Christoph; Hauschild,Dirk; Reinert,Friedrich; Abdollahian,Hossein

    2016-01-01

    TiO$_{2}$ nanoparticleshave been synthesized by the sol-gel method using titanium alkoxide and isopropanolas a precursor. The structural properties and chemical composition of the TiO$_{2}$ nanoparticles were studied usingX-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.The X-ray powder diffraction pattern confirms that the particles are mainly composed of the anatase phase with the preferential orientation along [101] direction.The physical parameters suc...

  15. Synthesis and Antibacterial Activity of Rutile-TiO2 ‎Nano Powder Prepared by Hydrothermal Process ‎

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashed T. Rasheed ‎

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Rutile titanium dioxide (r-TiO2 Nano powder has been synthesized by hydrothermal method in autoclave. The reaction took place between titanium tetrachloride (TiCI4 and mixture solution consisted of deionized water and ethanol, in the ratio (3:7 respectively. The product has been dried and annealed at 400°C. The structure, morphology and the particle size of the Nano powder were investigated by X-ray Diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, Atomic Force Microscope (AFM, FT-IR and UV/visible spectroscopy measurements. The effect of r-TiO2 on gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli (E. coli and gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aurous (S. aureus has been studied. This study showed that rutile TiO2 Nano powder has efficient antibacterial activity, and can use as an antibacterial agent for different purposes

  16. Diffraction. Powder, amorphous, liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sosnowska, I.M.

    1999-01-01

    Neutron powder diffraction is a unique tool to observe all possible diffraction effects appearing in crystal. High-resolution neutron diffractometers have to be used in this study. Analysis of the magnetic structure of polycrystalline materials requires the use of high-resolution neutron diffraction in the range of large interplanar distances. As distinguished from the double axis diffractometers (DAS), which show high resolution only at small interplanar distances, TOF (time-of-flight) diffractometry offers the best resolution at large interplanar distances. (K.A.)

  17. Characteristics of Inconel Powders for Powder-Bed Additive Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Quy Bau Nguyen; Mui Ling Sharon Nai; Zhiguang Zhu; Chen-Nan Sun; Jun Wei; Wei Zhou

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the flow characteristics and behaviors of virgin and recycled Inconel powder for powder-bed additive manufacturing (AM) were studied using different powder characterization techniques. The results revealed that the particle size distribution (PSD) for the selective laser melting (SLM) process is typically in the range from 15 μm to 63 μm. The flow rate of virgin Inconel powder is around 28 s·(50 g)−1. In addition, the packing density was found to be 60%. The rheological test re...

  18. Titanium nano-composites synthesis by laser pyrolysis; Synthese de nanocomposites a base de titane par pyrolyse laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maskrot, H. [CEA Saclay, Service des Photons, Atomes et Molecules, Lab. Francis Perrin (CEA-CNRS URA 2453), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2004-07-01

    In this work, Ti/C/O nano-powders have been obtained by using a titanium iso-prop-oxide aerosol as precursor and a hydrocarbon gas as a sensitizer. A production velocity in the range of 10-20 g/h and a titanium yield superior to 80% have been obtained. The main TiO{sub 2} crystalline phase was always the anatase. The measured specific surface areas are in the range 65-115 m{sup 2}/g with grain sizes of 12 to 40 nm. These sizes are inferior to those of the Degussa powder P25 (45 m{sup 2}/g) which is often cited as reference in catalysis. According to the sensitizer concentration and the laser power, the colours of the powders have changed from light grey to black, corresponding to the different free carbon amounts (3{>=}C{>=}12 % weight). Metal/Ti/C/O nano-composites have been obtained in adding a metal precursor (for instance platinum acetylacetonate) in the liquid precursor. The preliminary catalytic tests lead to an encouraging catalytic activity. Ti/Si/C/O nano-particles have been prepared too with a production rate near 20 g/h. The Si/Ti ratio in the powder (0.1{<=}Si/Ti{<=}0.9) is controlled in adjusting the mixture of the precursors. A substoichiometric secondary phase of titanium oxide leading to SiO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2-x} composites has been identified in these powders. In conclusion, the laser pyrolysis allows to synthesize titanium nano-powders with production rates and sizes at least also attracting than those found in the literature. A quantification of the catalytic activity of the different obtained materials is in study. (O.M.)

  19. Biocompatible porous titanium scaffolds produced using a novel space holder technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunhui; Frith, Jessica Ellen; Dehghan-Manshadi, Ali; Kent, Damon; Bermingham, Michael; Dargusch, Matthew

    2018-02-05

    We describe a new fabrication strategy for production of porous titanium scaffolds for skeletal implants which provides a promising new approach to repair and remodel damaged bone tissue. The new strategy involves powder sintering of titanium powder, employing pharmaceutical sugar pellets as temporary space holders, to facilitate production of porous scaffolds with structures optimized for mechanical performance and osseointegration of implants. The spherical sugar pellets, with controlled size fractions and excellent biocompatibility, are easily removed by dissolution prior to sintering providing an ideal space holder material for controlled synthesis of titanium scaffolds with desired porosities and pore sizes. The scaffolds contain pores with high degrees of sphericity and interconnectivity which impart excellent mechanical properties and superior biocompatibility to the structures. Scaffolds with 40% porosity and a pore size range of 300-425 µm exhibited an effective Young's modulus of 16.4 ± 3.5 GPa and strength of 176 ± 6 MPa, which closely mimics the properties of human bone, and were also able to support cell adhesion, viability and spreading in cell culture tests. Porous titanium scaffolds manufactured by this approach have excellent potential for hard tissue engineering applications. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Influence of Powder Characteristics on Formation of Porosity in Additive Manufacturing of Ti-6Al-4V Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iebba, Maurizio; Astarita, Antonello; Mistretta, Daniela; Colonna, Ivano; Liberini, Mariacira; Scherillo, Fabio; Pirozzi, Carmine; Borrelli, Rosario; Franchitti, Stefania; Squillace, Antonino

    2017-08-01

    This paper aims to study the genesis of defects in titanium components made through two different additive manufacturing technologies: selective laser melting and electron beam melting. In particular, we focussed on the influence of the powders used on the formation of porosities and cavities in the manufactured components. A detailed experimental campaign was carried out to characterize the components made through the two additive manufacturing techniques aforementioned and the powders used in the process. It was found that some defects of the final components can be attributed to internal porosities of the powders used in the manufacturing process. These internal porosities are a consequence of the gas atomization process used for the production of the powders themselves. Therefore, the importance of using tailored powders, free from porosities, in order to manufacture components with high mechanical properties is highlighted.

  1. Titanium nanostructures for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, M; Gongadze, E; Perutkova, Š; A Iglič; Mazare, A; Schmuki, P; Kralj-Iglič, V; Milošev, I; Mozetič, M

    2015-01-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys exhibit a unique combination of strength and biocompatibility, which enables their use in medical applications and accounts for their extensive use as implant materials in the last 50 years. Currently, a large amount of research is being carried out in order to determine the optimal surface topography for use in bioapplications, and thus the emphasis is on nanotechnology for biomedical applications. It was recently shown that titanium implants with rough surface topography and free energy increase osteoblast adhesion, maturation and subsequent bone formation. Furthermore, the adhesion of different cell lines to the surface of titanium implants is influenced by the surface characteristics of titanium; namely topography, charge distribution and chemistry. The present review article focuses on the specific nanotopography of titanium, i.e. titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) nanotubes, using a simple electrochemical anodisation method of the metallic substrate and other processes such as the hydrothermal or sol-gel template. One key advantage of using TiO 2 nanotubes in cell interactions is based on the fact that TiO 2 nanotube morphology is correlated with cell adhesion, spreading, growth and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, which were shown to be maximally induced on smaller diameter nanotubes (15 nm), but hindered on larger diameter (100 nm) tubes, leading to cell death and apoptosis. Research has supported the significance of nanotopography (TiO 2 nanotube diameter) in cell adhesion and cell growth, and suggests that the mechanics of focal adhesion formation are similar among different cell types. As such, the present review will focus on perhaps the most spectacular and surprising one-dimensional structures and their unique biomedical applications for increased osseointegration, protein interaction and antibacterial properties. (topical review)

  2. Titanium nanostructures for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, M.; Mazare, A.; Gongadze, E.; Perutkova, Š.; Kralj-Iglič, V.; Milošev, I.; Schmuki, P.; Iglič, A.; Mozetič, M.

    2015-02-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys exhibit a unique combination of strength and biocompatibility, which enables their use in medical applications and accounts for their extensive use as implant materials in the last 50 years. Currently, a large amount of research is being carried out in order to determine the optimal surface topography for use in bioapplications, and thus the emphasis is on nanotechnology for biomedical applications. It was recently shown that titanium implants with rough surface topography and free energy increase osteoblast adhesion, maturation and subsequent bone formation. Furthermore, the adhesion of different cell lines to the surface of titanium implants is influenced by the surface characteristics of titanium; namely topography, charge distribution and chemistry. The present review article focuses on the specific nanotopography of titanium, i.e. titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes, using a simple electrochemical anodisation method of the metallic substrate and other processes such as the hydrothermal or sol-gel template. One key advantage of using TiO2 nanotubes in cell interactions is based on the fact that TiO2 nanotube morphology is correlated with cell adhesion, spreading, growth and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, which were shown to be maximally induced on smaller diameter nanotubes (15 nm), but hindered on larger diameter (100 nm) tubes, leading to cell death and apoptosis. Research has supported the significance of nanotopography (TiO2 nanotube diameter) in cell adhesion and cell growth, and suggests that the mechanics of focal adhesion formation are similar among different cell types. As such, the present review will focus on perhaps the most spectacular and surprising one-dimensional structures and their unique biomedical applications for increased osseointegration, protein interaction and antibacterial properties.

  3. Towards Production of Additive Manufacturing Grade Metallic Powders on the Battlefield

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    indigenous manufacturing, cold spray technology, manufacturing at the point of need, battle damage repair 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...empty brass cartridge casings, medical waste, used batteries, used steel belted off-road tires, etc. [2]). Such an effort should be focused to offer a...this process could produce metallic powder of the following alloys: titanium, high strength steel , tungsten, nickel-base alloys, tool steels

  4. Determination of Crystallite Size Distribution Histogram in Nanocrystalline Anatase Powders by XRD

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matěj, Z.; Matějová, Lenka; Novotný, F.; Drahokoupil, Jan; Kužel, R.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 1, - (2011), s. 87-92 [European Powder Diffraction Conference EPDIC 12 /12./. Darmstadt, 27.08.2010-30.08.2010] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN400720701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504; CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : titanium dioxide * crystallite size * crystallite size distribution Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry http://www.oldenbourg-link.com/ toc /zkpr/current

  5. Mechanical properties and biocompatibility of porous titanium scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunhui; Frith, Jessica Ellen; Dehghan-Manshadi, Ali; Attar, Hooyar; Kent, Damon; Soro, Nicolas Dominique Mathieu; Bermingham, Michael J; Dargusch, Matthew S

    2017-11-01

    Synthetic scaffolds are a highly promising new approach to replace both autografts and allografts to repair and remodel damaged bone tissue. Biocompatible porous titanium scaffold was manufactured through a powder metallurgy approach. Magnesium powder was used as space holder material which was compacted with titanium powder and removed during sintering. Evaluation of the porosity and mechanical properties showed a high level of compatibility with human cortical bone. Interconnectivity between pores is higher than 95% for porosity as low as 30%. The elastic moduli are 44.2GPa, 24.7GPa and 15.4GPa for 30%, 40% and 50% porosity samples which match well to that of natural bone (4-30GPa). The yield strengths for 30% and 40% porosity samples of 221.7MPa and 117MPa are superior to that of human cortical bone (130-180MPa). In-vitro cell culture tests on the scaffold samples using Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hMSCs) demonstrated their biocompatibility and indicated osseointegration potential. The scaffolds allowed cells to adhere and spread both on the surface and inside the pore structures. With increasing levels of porosity/interconnectivity, improved cell proliferation is obtained within the pores. It is concluded that samples with 30% porosity exhibit the best biocompatibility. The results suggest that porous titanium scaffolds generated using this manufacturing route have excellent potential for hard tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Parametric Powder Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, William I. F.; Evans, John S. O.

    The rapidity with which powder diffraction data may be collected, not only at neutron and X-ray synchrotron facilities but also in the laboratory, means that the collection of a single diffraction pattern is now the exception rather than the rule. Many experiments involve the collection of hundreds and perhaps many thousands of datasets where a parameter such as temperature or pressure is varied or where time is the variable and life-cycle, synthesis or decomposition processes are monitored or three-dimensional space is scanned and the three-dimensional internal structure of an object is elucidated. In this paper, the origins of parametric diffraction are discussed and the techniques and challenges of parametric powder diffraction analysis are presented. The first parametric measurements were performed around 50 years ago with the development of a modified Guinier camera but it was the automation afforded by neutron diffraction combined with increases in computer speed and memory that established parametric diffraction on a strong footing initially at the ILL, Grenoble in France. The theoretical parameterisation of quantities such as lattice constants and atomic displacement parameters will be discussed and selected examples of parametric diffraction over the past 20 years will be reviewed that highlight the power of the technique.

  7. Titanium photocatalyst against human pathogenic microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kussovski, V.; Stefchev, P.; Kirilov, R.

    2011-01-01

    The conventional methods of disinfection are not effective in the longer term. They are time and staff intensive and use aggressive chemicals. Photocatalytic oxidation on surfaces coated with titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) might offer a possible alternative. The antimicrobial activity of TiO 2 powder P25 and thin films of TiO 2 on glass slides against representative strains of microorganisms associated with hospital-acquired infections (Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans) was investigated in vitro. High efficiency has been found in the case of the studied bacterial strains, particularly for the P. aeruginosa. It was shown that it is possible to disinfect surfaces coated with TiO 2 and stimulated by UV-A light. The reduction efficiencies for P. aeruginosa, S. aureus and C. albicans were 3.19, 2.32 and 1.22. In all cases sublethal UV-A doses provoked an important lethality in the presence of TiO 2 . (authors)

  8. Biocompatibility of Advanced Manufactured Titanium Implants—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred T. Sidambe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Titanium (Ti and its alloys may be processed via advanced powder manufacturing routes such as additive layer manufacturing (or 3D printing or metal injection moulding. This field is receiving increased attention from various manufacturing sectors including the medical devices sector. It is possible that advanced manufacturing techniques could replace the machining or casting of metal alloys in the manufacture of devices because of associated advantages that include design flexibility, reduced processing costs, reduced waste, and the opportunity to more easily manufacture complex or custom-shaped implants. The emerging advanced manufacturing approaches of metal injection moulding and additive layer manufacturing are receiving particular attention from the implant fabrication industry because they could overcome some of the difficulties associated with traditional implant fabrication techniques such as titanium casting. Using advanced manufacturing, it is also possible to produce more complex porous structures with improved mechanical performance, potentially matching the modulus of elasticity of local bone. While the economic and engineering potential of advanced manufacturing for the manufacture of musculo-skeletal implants is therefore clear, the impact on the biocompatibility of the materials has been less investigated. In this review, the capabilities of advanced powder manufacturing routes in producing components that are suitable for biomedical implant applications are assessed with emphasis placed on surface finishes and porous structures. Given that biocompatibility and host bone response are critical determinants of clinical performance, published studies of in vitro and in vivo research have been considered carefully. The review concludes with a future outlook on advanced Ti production for biomedical implants using powder metallurgy.

  9. Biocompatibility of Advanced Manufactured Titanium Implants-A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidambe, Alfred T

    2014-12-19

    Titanium (Ti) and its alloys may be processed via advanced powder manufacturing routes such as additive layer manufacturing (or 3D printing) or metal injection moulding. This field is receiving increased attention from various manufacturing sectors including the medical devices sector. It is possible that advanced manufacturing techniques could replace the machining or casting of metal alloys in the manufacture of devices because of associated advantages that include design flexibility, reduced processing costs, reduced waste, and the opportunity to more easily manufacture complex or custom-shaped implants. The emerging advanced manufacturing approaches of metal injection moulding and additive layer manufacturing are receiving particular attention from the implant fabrication industry because they could overcome some of the difficulties associated with traditional implant fabrication techniques such as titanium casting. Using advanced manufacturing, it is also possible to produce more complex porous structures with improved mechanical performance, potentially matching the modulus of elasticity of local bone. While the economic and engineering potential of advanced manufacturing for the manufacture of musculo-skeletal implants is therefore clear, the impact on the biocompatibility of the materials has been less investigated. In this review, the capabilities of advanced powder manufacturing routes in producing components that are suitable for biomedical implant applications are assessed with emphasis placed on surface finishes and porous structures. Given that biocompatibility and host bone response are critical determinants of clinical performance, published studies of in vitro and in vivo research have been considered carefully. The review concludes with a future outlook on advanced Ti production for biomedical implants using powder metallurgy.

  10. Biocompatibility of Advanced Manufactured Titanium Implants—A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidambe, Alfred T.

    2014-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) and its alloys may be processed via advanced powder manufacturing routes such as additive layer manufacturing (or 3D printing) or metal injection moulding. This field is receiving increased attention from various manufacturing sectors including the medical devices sector. It is possible that advanced manufacturing techniques could replace the machining or casting of metal alloys in the manufacture of devices because of associated advantages that include design flexibility, reduced processing costs, reduced waste, and the opportunity to more easily manufacture complex or custom-shaped implants. The emerging advanced manufacturing approaches of metal injection moulding and additive layer manufacturing are receiving particular attention from the implant fabrication industry because they could overcome some of the difficulties associated with traditional implant fabrication techniques such as titanium casting. Using advanced manufacturing, it is also possible to produce more complex porous structures with improved mechanical performance, potentially matching the modulus of elasticity of local bone. While the economic and engineering potential of advanced manufacturing for the manufacture of musculo-skeletal implants is therefore clear, the impact on the biocompatibility of the materials has been less investigated. In this review, the capabilities of advanced powder manufacturing routes in producing components that are suitable for biomedical implant applications are assessed with emphasis placed on surface finishes and porous structures. Given that biocompatibility and host bone response are critical determinants of clinical performance, published studies of in vitro and in vivo research have been considered carefully. The review concludes with a future outlook on advanced Ti production for biomedical implants using powder metallurgy. PMID:28788296

  11. Structure of organometallic compounds obtained by plasma of titanium isopropoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arreola R, M. L.

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a study on the synthesis and characterization of organometallic compounds of titanium oxide obtained from glow discharges of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) and water on glass and polyethylene. The objective is the synthesis of titanium oxide particles which can be fixed on different supports for use in further studies of contaminants degradation in effluent streams. The synthesis was carried out by plasma in a glass tubular reactor of 750 cm 3 and 15 cm length at 10 -1 mbar with power between 100 and 150 W during 2, 3 and 4 h. The precursors were TTIP and water vapor. TTIP is an organometallic compound composed of a central atom of Ti surrounded by 4 O atoms, which in turn are connected with chains of 3 C (propane s). The objective is the use of plasma collisions to separate the organic and inorganic phases of TTIP, so that both structure independently in a single material. The result was the formation of white titanium oxide powder composed with agglomerates of spherical particles with average diameter between 160 and 452 nm adhered to small films. The agglomerates have a tendency to change from film to particles with the energy applied to the synthesis. The study of the chemical structure showed a great presence of O 2 -Ti-O 2 (Ti surrounded by O) which can be found in most titanium oxides. Other chemical groups belonging to the organic phase were C=C=C, C=C=O and C 2 -C-Ch appearing from the dehydrogenation of TTIP, which can be a possible precursor of this reactions kind. The structural superficial analyses showed that the atomic composition varies according to type of substrate used. The greatest content of Ti was obtained on glass substrates. However, the synthesis conditions had not evident effect in the participation of chemical states found in the inorganic phase. The crystalline studies indicated that the material is amorphous, although the de convoluted X-ray spectra showed that the synthesized titanium oxides on glass tend to

  12. Plasmonic titanium nitride nanostructures for perfect absorbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Li, Wen-Wei; Kinsey, Nathaniel

    2013-01-01

    We propose a metamaterial based perfect absorber in the visible region, and investigate the performance of titanium nitride as an alternative plasmonic material. Numerical and experimental results reveal that titanium nitride performs better than gold as a plasmonic absorbing material...

  13. Printing of Titanium implant prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiria, Florencia Edith; Shyan, John Yong Ming; Lim, Poon Nian; Wen, Francis Goh Chung; Yeo, Jin Fei; Cao, Tong

    2010-01-01

    Dental implant plays an important role as a conduit of force and stress to flow from the tooth to the related bone. In the load sharing between an implant and its related bone, the amount of stress carried by each of them directly related to their stiffness or modulus. Hence, it is a crucial issue for the implant to have matching mechanical properties, in particular modulus, between the implant and its related bone. Titanium is a metallic material that has good biocompatibility and corrosion resistance. Whilst the modulus of the bulk material is still higher than that of bone, it is the lowest among all other commonly used metallic implant materials, such as stainless steel or cobalt alloy. Hence it is potential to further reduce the modulus of pure Titanium by engineering its processing method to obtain porous structure. In this project, porous Titanium implant prototype is fabricated using 3-dimensional printing. This technique allows the flexibility of design customization, which is beneficial for implant fabrication as tailoring of implant size and shape helps to ensure the implant would fit nicely to the patient. The fabricated Titanium prototype had a modulus of 4.8-13.2 GPa, which is in the range of natural bone modulus. The compressive strength achieved was between 167 to 455 MPa. Subsequent cell culture study indicated that the porous Titanium prototype had good biocompatibility and is suitable for bone cell attachment and proliferation.

  14. Application of porous titanium in prosthesis production using a moldless process: Evaluation of physical and mechanical properties with various particle sizes, shapes, and mixing ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prananingrum, Widyasri; Tomotake, Yoritoki; Naito, Yoshihito; Bae, Jiyoung; Sekine, Kazumitsu; Hamada, Kenichi; Ichikawa, Tetsuo

    2016-08-01

    The prosthetic applications of titanium have been challenging because titanium does not possess suitable properties for the conventional casting method using the lost wax technique. We have developed a production method for biomedical application of porous titanium using a moldless process. This study aimed to evaluate the physical and mechanical properties of porous titanium using various particle sizes, shapes, and mixing ratio of titanium powder to wax binder for use in prosthesis production. CP Ti powders with different particle sizes, shapes, and mixing ratios were divided into five groups. A 90:10wt% mixture of titanium powder and wax binder was prepared manually at 70°C. After debinding at 380°C, the specimen was sintered in Ar at 1100°C without a mold for 1h. The linear shrinkage ratio of sintered specimens ranged from 2.5% to 14.2%. The linear shrinkage ratio increased with decreasing particle size. While the linear shrinkage ratio of Groups 3, 4, and 5 were approximately 2%, Group 1 showed the highest shrinkage of all. The bending strength ranged from 106 to 428MPa under the influence of porosity. Groups 1 and 2 presented low porosity followed by higher strength. The shear bond strength ranged from 32 to 100MPa. The shear bond strength was also particle-size dependent. The decrease in the porosity increased the linear shrinkage ratio and bending strength. Shrinkage and mechanical strength required for prostheses were dependent on the particle size and shape of titanium powders. These findings suggested that this production method can be applied to the prosthetic framework by selecting the material design. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Anodic growth of titanium dioxide nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of producing nanostructures of titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) by anodisation of titanium (Ti) in an electrochemical cell, comprising the steps of: immersing a non-conducting substrate coated with a layer of titanium, defined as the anode, in an electrolyte solution...... an electrical contact to the layer of titanium on the anode, where the electrical contact is made in the electrolyte solution...

  16. Uranium fluorides analysis. Titanium spectrophotometric determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    Titanium determination in uranium hexafluoride in the range 0.7 to 100 microgrammes after transformation of uranium fluoride in sulfate. Titanium is separated by extraction with N-benzoylphenylhydroxylamine, reextracted by hydrochloric-hydrofluoric acid. The complex titanium-N-benzoylphenylhydroxylamine is extracted by chloroform. Spectrophotometric determination at 400 nm [fr

  17. 21 CFR 73.1575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.1575 Section 73.1575 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. (1) The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements...

  18. 40 CFR 180.1195 - Titanium dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Titanium dioxide. 180.1195 Section 180.1195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS... Titanium dioxide. Titanium dioxide is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance for residues in or on...

  19. 21 CFR 73.2575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.2575 Section 73.2575 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive titanium dioxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements...

  20. 21 CFR 73.575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.575 Section 73.575 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive titanium dioxide is synthetically prepared TiO2, free from admixture with other substances. (2) Color...

  1. 21 CFR 73.3126 - Titanium dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.3126 Section 73.3126 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3126 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive titanium dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 13463-67-7), Color Index No. 77891, shall...

  2. Adaptive mesh refinement in titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colella, Phillip; Wen, Tong

    2005-01-21

    In this paper, we evaluate Titanium's usability as a high-level parallel programming language through a case study, where we implement a subset of Chombo's functionality in Titanium. Chombo is a software package applying the Adaptive Mesh Refinement methodology to numerical Partial Differential Equations at the production level. In Chombo, the library approach is used to parallel programming (C++ and Fortran, with MPI), whereas Titanium is a Java dialect designed for high-performance scientific computing. The performance of our implementation is studied and compared with that of Chombo in solving Poisson's equation based on two grid configurations from a real application. Also provided are the counts of lines of code from both sides.

  3. Effect of gold sputtering on the adhesion of porcelain to cast and machined titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khung, Rathanak; Suansuwan, Napa Sukjai

    2013-07-01

    The bond strength of porcelain to titanium is insufficient to provide a clinically acceptable alternative to existing alloys for metal ceramic restorations. The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of gold coating on the adhesion of porcelain to titanium. Forty titanium plates (25 × 8 × 1 mm) were prepared by casting and machining procedures to make 2 groups of each type (n=10). All plates were subjected to airborne-particle abrasion with alumina powder. One of each of the cast and machined groups was gold sputtered. A layer of porcelain was built up onto the titanium plates of all groups with a conventional technique. A precrack was created at the center of the specimen. Specimens were then subjected to a 4-point bending test with a universal testing machine. The load recorded from the test was used to determine adhesion in terms of the strain energy release rate (G value). The data were analyzed with ANOVA and post hoc testing (α=.05). The interfacial area of the tested specimen was then examined with scanning electron microscopy. The G values of the gold-sputtered groups were significantly higher than those of the uncoated groups for both cast and machined groups (Ptitanium was significantly improved when titanium was sputter coated with gold in both the cast and machined groups. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Withdrawn. Duplicate: Effect of gold sputtering on the adhesion of porcelain to cast and machined titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khung, Rathanak; Suansuwan, Napa Sukjai

    2013-08-01

    The bond strength of porcelain to titanium is insufficient to provide a clinically acceptable alternative to existing alloys for metal ceramic restorations. The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of gold coating on the adhesion of porcelain to titanium. Forty titanium plates (25 × 8 × 1 mm) were prepared by casting and machining procedures to make 2 groups of each type (n=10). All plates were subjected to airborne-particle abrasion with alumina powder. One of each of the cast and machined groups was gold sputtered. A layer of porcelain was built up onto the titanium plates of all groups with a conventional technique. A precrack was created at the center of the specimen. Specimens were then subjected to a 4-point bending test with a universal testing machine. The load recorded from the test was used to determine adhesion in terms of the strain energy release rate (G value). The data were analyzed with ANOVA and post hoc testing (α=.05). The interfacial area of the tested specimen was then examined with scanning electron microscopy. The G values of the gold-sputtered groups were significantly higher than those of the uncoated groups for both cast and machined groups (Ptitanium was significantly improved when titanium was sputter coated with gold in both the cast and machined groups. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Synthesis and electrochemical evaluation of an amorphous titanium dioxide derived from a solid state precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Christopher D.; McIntyre, Toni; Simmons, Sade; LaDuca, Holly; Breitzer, Jonathan G.; Lopez, Carmen M.; Jansen, Andrew N.; Vaughey, J. T.

    Titanium oxides are an important class of lithium-ion battery electrodes owing to their good capacity and stability within the cell environment. Although most Ti(IV) oxides are poor electronic conductors, new methods developed to synthesize nanometer scale primary particles have achieved the higher rate capability needed for modern commercial applications. In this report, the anionic water stable titanium oxalate anion [TiO(C 2O 4) 2] 2- was isolated in high yield as the insoluble DABCO (1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane) salt. Powder X-ray diffraction studies show that the titanium dioxide material isolated after annealing in air is initially amorphous, converts to N-doped anatase above 400 °C, then to rutile above 600 °C. Electrochemical studies indicate that the amorphous titanium dioxide phase within a carbon matrix has a stable cycling capacity of ∼350 mAh g -1. On crystallizing at 400 °C to a carbon-coated anatase the capacity drops to 210 mAh g -1, and finally upon carbon burn-off to 50 mAh g -1. Mixtures of the amorphous titanium dioxide and Li 4Ti 5O 12 showed a similar electrochemical profile and capacity to Li 4Ti 5O 12 but with the addition of a sloping region to the end of the discharge curve that could be advantageous for determining state-of-charge in systems using Li 4Ti 5O 12.

  6. Influence of Alkali Treatment on Anodized Titanium Alloys in Wollastonite Suspension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Kazek-Kęsik

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The surface modification of titanium alloys is an effective method to improve their biocompatibility and tailor the material to the desired profile of implant functionality. In this work, technologically-advanced titanium alloys—Ti-15Mo, Ti-13Nb-13Zr and Ti-6Al-7Nb—were anodized in suspensions, followed by treatment in alkali solutions, with wollastonite deposition from the powder phase suspended in solution. The anodized samples were immersed in NaOH or KOH solution with various concentrations with a different set of temperatures and exposure times. Based on their morphologies (observed by scanning electron microscope, the selected samples were investigated by Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. Titaniate compounds were formed on the previously anodized titanium surfaces. The surface wettability significantly decreased, mainly on the modified Ti-15Mo alloy surface. Titanium alloy compounds had an influence on the results of the titanium alloys’ surface modification, which caused the surfaces to exhibit differential physical properties. In this paper, we present the influence of the anodization procedure on alkali treatment effects and the properties of obtained hybrid coatings.

  7. Comparison of high‐intensity sound and mechanical vibration for cleaning porous titanium cylinders fabricated using selective laser melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiffert, Gary; Sutcliffe, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Orthopedic components, such as the acetabular cup in total hip joint replacement, can be fabricated using porous metals, such as titanium, and a number of processes, such as selective laser melting. The issue of how to effectively remove loose powder from the pores (residual powder) of such components has not been addressed in the literature. In this work, we investigated the feasibility of two processes, acoustic cleaning using high‐intensity sound inside acoustic horns and mechanical vibration, to remove residual titanium powder from selective laser melting‐fabricated cylinders. With acoustic cleaning, the amount of residual powder removed was not influenced by either the fundamental frequency of the horn used (75 vs. 230 Hz) or, for a given horn, the number of soundings (between 1 and 20). With mechanical vibration, the amount of residual powder removed was not influenced by the application time (10 vs. 20 s). Acoustic cleaning was found to be more reliable and effective in removal of residual powder than cleaning with mechanical vibration. It is concluded that acoustic cleaning using high‐intensity sound has significant potential for use in the final preparation stages of porous metal orthopedic components. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 117–123, 2017. PMID:26426906

  8. Comparison of high-intensity sound and mechanical vibration for cleaning porous titanium cylinders fabricated using selective laser melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiffert, Gary; Hopkins, Carl; Sutcliffe, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Orthopedic components, such as the acetabular cup in total hip joint replacement, can be fabricated using porous metals, such as titanium, and a number of processes, such as selective laser melting. The issue of how to effectively remove loose powder from the pores (residual powder) of such components has not been addressed in the literature. In this work, we investigated the feasibility of two processes, acoustic cleaning using high-intensity sound inside acoustic horns and mechanical vibration, to remove residual titanium powder from selective laser melting-fabricated cylinders. With acoustic cleaning, the amount of residual powder removed was not influenced by either the fundamental frequency of the horn used (75 vs. 230 Hz) or, for a given horn, the number of soundings (between 1 and 20). With mechanical vibration, the amount of residual powder removed was not influenced by the application time (10 vs. 20 s). Acoustic cleaning was found to be more reliable and effective in removal of residual powder than cleaning with mechanical vibration. It is concluded that acoustic cleaning using high-intensity sound has significant potential for use in the final preparation stages of porous metal orthopedic components. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 117-123, 2017. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Nuclear fuel powder transfer device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komono, Akira

    1998-01-01

    A pair of parallel rails are laid between a receiving portion to a molding portion of a nuclear fuel powder transfer device. The rails are disposed to the upper portion of a plurality of parallel support columns at the same height. A powder container is disposed while being tilted in the inside of the vessel main body of a transfer device, and rotational shafts equipped with wheels are secured to right and left external walls. A nuclear powder to be mixed, together with additives, is supplied to the powder container of the transfer device. The transfer device engaged with the rails on the receiving side is transferred toward the molding portion. The wheels are rotated along the rails, and the rotational shafts, the vessel main body and the powder container are rotated. The nuclear powder in the tilted powder container disposed is rotated right and left and up and down by the rotation, and the powder is mixed satisfactory when it reaches the molding portion. (I.N.)

  10. Synthesis of TiO2 nano-powders prepared from purified sulphate leach liquor of red mud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsakiridis, P E; Oustadakis, P; Katsiapi, A; Perraki, M; Agatzini-Leonardou, S

    2011-10-30

    The research work presented in this paper is focused on the development of a purification process of red mud sulphate leach liquor for the recovery of titanium oxide (TiO(2)) nano-powders in the form of anatase. Initially, titanium was extracted over iron and aluminium from the leach liquor by solvent extraction using Cyanex 272 in toluene, at pH: 0.3 and T: 25°C, with 40% extractant concentration. Stripping of the loaded, with titanium, organic phase was carried out by diluted HCl (3 mol/L) at ambient temperature. Finally, the recovery of titanium nano-powder, in the form of anatase, was performed by chemical precipitation at pH: 6 and T: 95°C, using 10 wt% MgO pulp as neutralizing agent. The produced precipitates were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and thermogravimetric/differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA). Their morphological characteristics and microstructure were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). High grade titanium white precipitate, in the form of anatase, was obtained. Iron concentration in the precipitate did not exceed 0.3%, whereas no aluminium was detected. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A Ceramic Armor Material Database

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Holmquist, T

    1999-01-01

    .... The data include nine different ceramic materials. The ceramics are Silicon Carbide, Boron Carbide, Titanium Diboride, Aluminum Nitride, Silicon Nitride, Aluminum Oxide (85% pure), Aluminum Oxide (high purity...

  12. Non-Oxide Structural Ceramics - Alloy Design for Improved Sinterability and Mechanical Performance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, I

    1998-01-01

    Research on non-oxide structure ceramics including silicon nitride, silicon carbide and titanium diboride has been conducted Multiphase silicon nitride composites with melilite and other high nitrogen...

  13. Processing and properties of Titanium alloy based materials with tailored porosity and composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezas-Villa, Jose Luis; Olmos, Luis; Lemus-Ruiz, Jose; Bouvard, Didier; Chavez, Jorge; Jimenez, Omar; Manuel Solorio, Victor

    2017-06-01

    This paper deals with powder processing of Ti6Al4V titanium alloy based materials with tailored porosity and composition. Ti6Al4V powder was mixed either with salt particles acting as space holder, so as to provide two-scale porosity, or with hard TiN particles that significantly modified the microstructure of the material and increased its hardness. Finally an original three-layer component was produced. Sample microstructure was observed by SEM and micro-tomography with special interest in pore size and shape, inclusion distribution and connectivity. Compression tests provided elastic modulus and yield stress as functions of density. These materials are representative of bone implants subjected to complex biological and mechanical conditions. These results thus open avenues for processing personalized implants by powder metallurgy.

  14. In vitro behavior of human osteoblast-like cells (SaOS2) cultured on surface modified titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Xiaobo [Centre for Material and Fibre Innovation, Institute for Technology Research and Innovation, Deakin University, Waurn Ponds, Victoria 3217 (Australia); CAST CRC, Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Wellington Road, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Li Yuncang; Hodgson, Peter D. [Centre for Material and Fibre Innovation, Institute for Technology Research and Innovation, Deakin University, Waurn Ponds, Victoria 3217 (Australia); Wen Cuie, E-mail: cwen@swin.edu.au [IRIS, Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Sciences, Swinburne University of Technology, ATC Building Burwood Road, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia)

    2011-10-10

    In this study, titanium (Ti) and titanium-zirconium (TiZr) alloy samples fabricated through powder metallurgy were surface modified by alkali-heat treatment and calcium (Ca)-ion-deposition. The alteration of the surface morphology and the chemistry of the Ti and TiZr after surface modification were examined. The bioactivity of the Ti and TiZr alloys after the surface modification was demonstrated. Subsequently, the cytocompatibility of the surface modified Ti and TiZr was evaluated via in vitro cell culture using human osteoblast-like cells (SaOS2). The cellular attachment, adhesion and proliferation after cell culture for 14 days were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and MTT assay. The relationship between surface morphology and chemical composition of the surface modified Ti and TiZr and cellular responses was investigated. Results indicated that the surface-modified Ti and TiZr alloys exhibited excellent in vitro cytocompatibility together with satisfactory bioactivity. Since osteoblast adhesion and proliferation are essential prerequisites for a successful implant in vivo, these results provide evidence that Ti and TiZr alloys after appropriate surface modification are promising biomaterials for hard tissue replacement. Highlights: {yields} Titanium (Ti) and titanium-zirconium (TiZr) alloy for load-bearing implant applications. {yields} Implant applications. {yields} Alkali-heat treatment and calcium (Ca)-ion-deposition as surface modification methods. {yields} Surface modified Ti and TiZr exhibited excellent biocompatibility and bioactivity.

  15. Lactobacillusassisted synthesis of titanium nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jha Anal

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractAn eco-friendlylactobacillussp. (microbe assisted synthesis of titanium nanoparticles is reported. The synthesis is performed at room temperature. X-ray and transmission electron microscopy analyses are performed to ascertain the formation of Ti nanoparticles. Individual nanoparticles as well as a number of aggregates almost spherical in shape having a size of 40–60 nm are found.

  16. Study of the behaviour under neutron irradiation of hafnium diboride; Etude du comportement sous irradiation neutronique du diborure d`hafnium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheminant-Coatanlem, P

    1998-12-31

    Owing to its good neutron cross section and to its high melting point, hafnium diboride is a potential candidate for a use as neutron absorbing material in control rod of pressurized water reactor of the next generation. The main causes of damage under neutron irradiation in this ceramic are due to the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li reaction that introduces in the crystal structure new atoms and point defects. The materials under consideration are the stoichiometric HfB{sub 2} compound and the HfB{sub 2} + 10 vol. % Hf compound. They are been irradiated with neutrons at several fluences and temperatures. Electron irradiations, helium and lithium implantations have been carried out in order to simulate the creation of point defects and/or fission products. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy have been used to determine damage mechanisms in HfB{sub 2}. At a low temperature (<500 deg C), irradiation defects precipitate in dislocation loops of both nature, interstitial and vacancy. Those loops have a particular organisation in the HfB{sub 2} lattice: vacancy loops are lying in the basal plane and interstitial loops in planes perpendicular to basal planes. This induces anisotropic deformation of grains that originates internal stress development. These stresses are associated with the dislocation staking and consequently with the cavity formation at grain boundaries. At a higher temperature (>700 deg C), the same dislocation loops are observed. But, in addition, the irradiation defects diffuse to grain boundaries where helium bubbles are formed. The damage caused by this latter mechanism becomes predominant. The HfB{sub 2} + 10 vol. % Hf materials is more resistant under neutron irradiation than the HfB{sub 2} pellets that display a very damaged surface. This result is explained by the fact that, on the one band, the HfB{sub 2} + 10 vol. % Hf pellets have a higher toughness than the HfB{sub 2} pellets and, on the other hand, the HfB{sub 2} + 10 vol. % Hf

  17. Preparation of superconductor precursor powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Raghunath; Blaugher, Richard D.

    1995-01-01

    A process for the preparation of a precursor metallic powder composition for use in the subsequent formation of a superconductor. The process comprises the steps of providing an electrodeposition bath comprising an electrolyte medium and a cathode substrate electrode, and providing to the bath one or more soluble salts of one or more respective metals, such as nitrate salts of thallium, barium, calcium, and copper, which are capable of exhibiting superconductor properties upon subsequent appropriate treatment. The bath is continually energized to cause the metallic particles formed at the electrode to drop as a powder from the electrode into the bath, and this powder, which is a precursor powder for superconductor production, is recovered from the bath for subsequent treatment. The process permits direct inclusion of thallium in the preparation of the precursor powder, and yields an amorphous product mixed on an atomic scale to thereby impart inherent high reactivity. Superconductors which can be formed from the precursor powder include pellet and powder-in-tube products.

  18. (TECTONA GRANDIS LEAF POWDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yash Mishra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the adsorption potential of Teak (Tectona grandis leaf powder (TLP toremove Methylene blue (MB and Malachite Green (MG dye molecules from aqueoussolution was investigated. Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate the influenceof operational parameters such as, pH (2−9, adsorbent dosage (1−7 g/L, contact time(15−150 minutes and initial dye concentration (20−120 mg/L at stirring speed of 150rpm for the adsorption of MB and MG on TLP. Maximum removal efficiency of 98.4%and 95.1% was achieved for MB and MG dye, respectively. The experimentalequilibrium data were analysed using Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isothermmodels and it was found that, it fitted well to the Freundlich isotherm model. Thesurface structure and morphology of the adsorbent was characterized using scanningelectron microscopy (SEM and the presence of functional groups and its interactionwith the dye molecules were analysed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy(FTIR. Based on the investigation, it has been demonstrated that the teak leaf powderhas good potential for effective adsorption of methylene blue and malachite green dye.

  19. Properties and Applications of High Emissivity Composite Films Based on Far-Infrared Ceramic Powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yabo Xiong

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Polymer matrix composite materials that can emit radiation in the far-infrared region of the spectrum are receiving increasing attention due to their ability to significantly influence biological processes. This study reports on the far-infrared emissivity property of composite films based on far-infrared ceramic powder. X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and X-ray powder diffractometry were used to evaluate the physical properties of the ceramic powder. The ceramic powder was found to be rich in aluminum oxide, titanium oxide, and silicon oxide, which demonstrate high far-infrared emissivity. In addition, the micromorphology, mechanical performance, dynamic mechanical properties, and far-infrared emissivity of the composite were analyzed to evaluate their suitability for strawberry storage. The mechanical properties of the far-infrared radiation ceramic (cFIR composite films were not significantly influenced (p ≥ 0.05 by the addition of the ceramic powder. However, the dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA properties of the cFIR composite films, including a reduction in damping and shock absorption performance, were significant influenced by the addition of the ceramic powder. Moreover, the cFIR composite films showed high far-infrared emissivity, which has the capability of prolonging the storage life of strawberries. This research demonstrates that cFIR composite films are promising for future applications.

  20. High resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy characterization of a milled oxide dispersion strengthened steel powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loyer-Prost, M., E-mail: marie.loyer-prost@cea.fr [DEN-Service de Recherches de Métallurgie Physique, CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Merot, J.-S. [Laboratoire d’Etudes des Microstructures – UMR 104, CNRS/ONERA, BP72-29, Avenue de la Division Leclerc, 92 322, Châtillon (France); Ribis, J. [DEN-Service de Recherches de Métallurgie Appliquée, CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Le Bouar, Y. [Laboratoire d’Etudes des Microstructures – UMR 104, CNRS/ONERA, BP72-29, Avenue de la Division Leclerc, 92 322, Châtillon (France); Chaffron, L. [DEN-Service de Recherches de Métallurgie Appliquée, CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Legendre, F. [DEN-Service de la Corrosion et du Comportement des Matériaux dans leur Environnement, CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2016-10-15

    Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) steels are promising materials for generation IV fuel claddings as their dense nano-oxide dispersion provides good creep and irradiation resistance. Even if they have been studied for years, the formation mechanism of these nano-oxides is still unclear. Here we report for the first time a High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy and Energy Filtered Transmission Electron Microscopy characterization of an ODS milled powder. It provides clear evidence of the presence of small crystalline nanoclusters (NCs) enriched in titanium directly after milling. Small NCs (<5 nm) have a crystalline structure and seem partly coherent with the matrix. They have an interplanar spacing close to the (011) {sub bcc} iron structure. They coexist with larger crystalline spherical precipitates of 15–20 nm in size. Their crystalline structure may be metastable as they are not consistent with any Y-Ti-O or Ti-O structure. Such detailed observations in the as-milled grain powder confirm a mechanism of Y, Ti, O dissolution in the ferritic matrix followed by a NC precipitation during the mechanical alloying process of ODS materials. - Highlights: • We observed an ODS ball-milled powder by high resolution transmission microscopy. • The ODS ball-milled powder exhibits a lamellar microstructure. • Small crystalline nanoclusters were detected in the milled ODS powder. • The nanoclusters in the ODS milled powder are enriched in titanium. • Larger NCs of 15–20 nm in size are, at least, partly coherent with the matrix.

  1. Stress-Corrosion Cracking and Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of Ti-6Al-4V Plates Consolidated from Low Cost Powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imam, M. Ashraf; Pao, Peter S.; Bayles, Robert A.

    Titanium is highly desirable for a wide range of applications because of its combination of high strength, low density and outstanding corrosion characteristics. However, the cost of titanium, produced by conventional technology, is high compared to steel and aluminum, which is a result of high extraction and processing costs. New approaches are being investigated maintaining required quality while lowering the cost of finished products. Ti alloy powder, Ti-6Al-4V, manufactured by a low cost hydride-process and consolidated into flat products (sheet, plate), were studied. The results of the study were compared with the properties obtained from plates of Armstrong Titanium consolidated powder. To remove the prior history of consolidation, the plates are beta annealed and the test results are compared with "as received" condition. The mechanism of the fatigue crack growth rate difference, fracture toughness, and stress-corrosion cracking resistance in terms of the respective Ti-6Al-4V microstructure differences will be discussed.

  2. Q4 Titanium 6-4 Material Properties Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Kenneth; Nettles, Mindy

    2015-01-01

    This task involves development and characterization of selective laser melting (SLM) parameters for additive manufacturing of titanium-6%aluminum-4%vanadium (Ti-6Al-4V or Ti64). SLM is a relatively new manufacturing technology that fabricates complex metal components by fusing thin layers of powder with a high-powered laser beam, utilizing a 3D computer design to direct the energy and form the shape without traditional tools, dies, or molds. There are several metal SLM technologies and materials on the market today, and various efforts to quantify the mechanical properties, however, nothing consolidated or formal to date. Meanwhile, SLM material fatigue properties of Ti64 are currently highly sought after by NASA propulsion designers for rotating turbomachinery components.

  3. Obtainment of TiO{sub 2} powders solar cells photo electrodes dye sensitized; Obtencao de pos de TiO{sub 2} para fotoeletrodos de celulas solares sensibilizados por corante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forbeck, Guilherme; Folgueras, Marilena V., E-mail: guilhermeforbeck@hotmail.com [Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina (PGCE/UDESC), SC (Brazil). Programa de Pos Graduacao em Ciencia e Engenharia de Materiais; Chinelatto, Adilson L. [Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa (UEPG), PR (Brazil). Programa de Mestrado em Engenharia e Ciencia dos Materiais

    2012-07-01

    Titanium dioxide in its polymorphic anatase phase, presents interesting properties for solar cells photo electrodes dye sensitized such as the forbidden energy band, high refractive index and high constant dielectric. In this study, powders of nanometric titanium dioxide were produced with predominantly the anatase phase and high surface area. We used the sol-gel method, and titanium tetraisopropoxide as a precursor, which was hydrolyzed in nitric acid solution. The obtained powder was heated to 450 ° C, varying the time for each lot (0, 20 or 120 minutes). The powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and surface area analysis. For all lots nanosized crystallites predominated. It was observed that in the batch with 120min heating an increase rutile content. The TiO{sub 2} with 20min heating showed high surface area, greater than that of TiO{sub 2} as taken reference.

  4. Neutron Powder Diffraction in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tellgren, R.

    1986-01-01

    Neutron powder diffraction in Sweden has developed around the research reactor R2 in Studsvik. The article describes this facility and presents a historical review of research results obtained. It also gives some ideas of plans for future development

  5. Rotary powder feed through apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Gary K.; Less, Richard M.

    2001-01-01

    A device for increasing the uniformity of solids within a solids fabrication system, such as a direct light fabrication (DLF) system in which gas entrained powders are passed through the focal point of a moving high-power light which fuses the particles in the powder to a surface being built up in layers. The invention provides a feed through interface wherein gas entrained powders input from stationary input lines are coupled to a rotating head of the fabrication system. The invention eliminates the need to provide additional slack in the feed lines to accommodate head rotation, and therefore reduces feed line bending movements which induce non-uniform feeding of gas entrained powder to a rotating head.

  6. Phonons from neutron powder diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, D. A.; Louca, D.; Röder, H.

    1999-09-01

    The spherically averaged structure function S(\\|q\\|) obtained from pulsed neutron powder diffraction contains both elastic and inelastic scattering via an integral over energy. The Fourier transformation of S(\\|q\\|) to real space, as is done in the pair density function (PDF) analysis, regularizes the data, i.e., it accentuates the diffuse scattering. We present a technique which enables the extraction of off-center (\\|q\\|≠0) phonon information from powder diffraction experiments by comparing the experimental PDF with theoretical calculations based on standard interatomic potentials and the crystal symmetry. This procedure [dynamics from powder diffraction] has been successfully implemented as demonstrated here for two systems, a simple metal fcc Ni and an ionic crystal CaF2. Although computationally intensive, this data analysis allows for a phonon based modeling of the PDF, and additionally provides off-center phonon information from neutron powder diffraction.

  7. Dry and coating of powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, M.; Alguacil, F. J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a review on the mixing and coating of powders by dry processes. The reviews surveys fundamental works on mixture characterization (mixing index definitions and sampling techniques), mixing mechanisms and models, segregation with especial emphasis on free-surface segregation, mixing of cohesive powders and interparticle forces, ordered mixing (dry coating) including mechanism, model and applications and mixing equipment selection. (Author) 180 refs

  8. Powder collection apparatus/method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, I.E.; Terpstra, R.L.; Moore, J.A.

    1994-01-11

    Device for separating and collecting ultrafine atomized powder from the gas stream of a gas atomizing apparatus comprises a housing having an interior wall oriented at an angle relative to horizontal so as to form a downwardly converging, conical expansion chamber, an inlet conduit communicated to the expansion chamber proximate an upper region thereof for receiving the gas stream, and an outlet proximate a lower region of the expansion chamber. The inlet conduit is oriented at a compound inclined angle (with respect to horizontal) selected to promote separation and collection of powder from the gas stream in the expansion chamber. The compound angle comprises a first entrance angle that is greater than the angle of repose of the powder on the housing interior wall such that any powder accumulation in the inlet conduit tends to flow down the wall toward the outlet. The second angle is selected generally equal to the angle of the housing interior wall measured from the same horizontal plane so as to direct the gas stream into the expansion chamber generally tangent to the housing interior wall to establish a downward swirling gas stream flow in the expansion chamber. A powder collection container is communicated to the outlet of the expansion chamber to collect the powder for further processing. 4 figures.

  9. Antimicrobial titanium/silver PVD coatings on titanium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thull Roger

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biofilm formation and deep infection of endoprostheses is a recurrent complication in implant surgery. Post-operative infections may be overcome by adjusting antimicrobial properties of the implant surface prior to implantation. In this work we described the development of an antimicrobial titanium/silver hard coating via the physical vapor deposition (PVD process. Methods Coatings with a thickness of approximately 2 μm were deposited on titanium surfaces by simultaneous vaporisation of both metals in an inert argon atmosphere with a silver content of approximately 0.7 – 9% as indicated by energy dispersive X-ray analysis. On these surfaces microorganisms and eukaryotic culture cells were grown. Results The coatings released sufficient silver ions (0.5–2.3 ppb when immersed in PBS and showed significant antimicrobial potency against Staphylococcus epidermis and Klebsiella pneumoniae strains. At the same time, no cytotoxic effects of the coatings on osteoblast and epithelial cells were found. Conclusion Due to similar mechanical performance when compared to pure titanium, the TiAg coatings should be suitable to provide antimicrobial activity on load-bearing implant surfaces.

  10. Modifying ability of titanium-based pelleted master alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazhin, V. Yu.; Savchenkov, S. A.; Kosov, Ya. I.

    2017-05-01

    The problem of enhancing the quality of pressed titanium master alloys is discussed to increase the rate and degree of dissolution of their components and to ensure the formation of a fine-grained structure in aluminum alloys. A technology of producing a pelleted titanium master alloy for effective correction of the chemical composition of an aluminum alloy in casting is developed and tested. Incoming inspection of the component composition and the flux distribution in the volume of pressed pellets of various manufacturers is performed. The rate of dissolution of pressed powder master alloys in the aluminum melt is studied, and their modifying ability is estimated after studying the microstructures of cast blanks. Molasses is used as a binder in a pelleted master alloy. As a result, we achieved a uniform flux distribution over the pellet volume and the formation of uniform pores after annealing as compared pelleted master alloys of other manufacturers. The fabricated alloying briquettes have higher strength characteristics and their dissolution rate in the aluminum melt is higher than those of analogs by 15-20%.

  11. Physical and Mechanical Properties of W-Ni-Fe-Co Metal Foam Modified by Titanium Tungsten Carbide Alloying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishchenko, A. N.; Tabachenko, A. N.; Afanas'eva, S. A.; Belov, N. N.; Biryukov, Yu. A.; Burkin, V. V.; D'yachkovskii, A. S.; Rogaev, K. S.; Skosyrskii, A. B.; Yugov, N. T.

    2018-02-01

    The paper studies physical and mechanical properties of tungsten-nickel-iron-cobalt metal foam alloyed with titanium tungsten carbide. Test specimens are obtained by the liquid phase sintering of powder materials, including those containing tungsten nanopowders. High porosity metal foams are prepared through varying the porosity of powder specimens and the content of filling material. The penetration capability of cylinder projectiles made of new alloys is explored in this paper. It is shown that their penetration depth exceeds that of the prototype with relevant weight and size, made of tungsten-nickel-iron alloy, other factors being equal.

  12. Method of manufacturing mixed stock powders for nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, Satoshi.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To alleviate the limit of the present reactor operating conditions by uniformly mixing an additive to the main content as an uranium dioxide or mixture of the uranium dioxide with plutonium dioxide. Method: A mixed stock powder is obtained by adding an additive of at least two of aluminium oxide, beryllium oxide, calcium oxide, magnesium oxide, silicon oxide, sodium oxide, potassium oxide, phosphorus oxide, titanium oxide and iron oxide to suspension having ammonia water as dispersion medium to start the deposition of precipitation at a step of precipitating ammonium diuranate or plutionium hydroxide of a main content of uranium dioxide or mixture of uranium dioxide and plutonium dioxide and deposited precipitate is calcinated and reduced. (Yoshihara, H.)

  13. Powder metallurgical high performance materials. Proceedings. Volume 4: late papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneringer, G.; Roedhammer, P.; Wildner, H.

    2001-01-01

    This is the fourth volume (late papers) of the 15th International Plansee seminar 2001 which general theme was 'Powder metallurgical high performance materials'. The seminar looked beyond the refractory metals and cemented carbides, which remain as its focus, to novel classes of materials, such as intermetallic compounds, with potential for high temperature applications. This volume 4 contains papers dealing with high performance P/M metals (ITER and fusion reactors, solid targets, materials microstructure, novel alloys, etc.), P/M hard materials ( production and characterization, tungsten carbides, titanium carbides, microstructural design, coatings composition and performance, etc.) and general topics. From 37 papers 24 correspond to INIS subject scope and they were indexed separately. (nevyjel)

  14. Single crowns with CAD/CAM-fabricated copings from titanium: 6-year clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hey, Jeremias; Beuer, Florian; Bensel, Tobias; Boeckler, Arne F

    2014-08-01

    Computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) titanium ceramic restorations were developed with the potential for replacing expensive, high noble metal ceramic restorations. However, little information exists about the clinical performance of CAD/CAM titanium ceramic single crowns. The purpose of this study was to evaluate CAD/CAM titanium ceramic single crowns after 6 years in function. A total of 41 crowns were fabricated for 21 patients. The titanium copings were CAD/CAM milled (Everest CAD/CAM system), with an even thickness of 0.5 mm and veneered with low-fusing porcelain (Vita Titanium Porcelain) in the powder-build-up technique. All the crowns were cemented with zinc phosphate. The participants were recalled at 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, and 72 months after cementation to document any mechanical and biologic complications and to measure the periodontal parameters, such as probing depth, bleeding on probing, and the plaque index. The success and survival rates were calculated according to the Kaplan-Meier analysis. After 6 years of clinical service, 12 mechanical complications and 1 biologic complication were found, which resulted in a success rate of 67.8%. The cumulative survival rate of the crowns was 91.3% after 6 years. At the end of the follow-up period, the probing depth was 3.21 mm, the percentile of surface with bleeding on probing was 25, and the plaque index was 0.37. No secondary caries or decementation was detected during the 6-year observation period. The clinical performance of the CAD/CAM titanium-ceramic crowns after 6 years was poor because of veneering porcelain problems. Recent CAD software with tools to design proper copings might improve the clinical success. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Structure and shear in a cohesive powder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, R.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Handling of powders and granular materials is of great importance to industry. However, the knowledge of many powder related processes in industry is poor. In this work, the flow behaviour of powder has been investigated with an advanced tester: the Flexible Wall Biaxial Tester. Flow of powder

  16. Plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition of titanium aluminum carbonitride/amorphous-carbon nanocomposite thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Jiann; Hon, Min Hsiung

    2002-01-01

    A new nanocomposite, titanium aluminum carbonitride/amorphous-carbon thin film was prepared by radio-frequency (rf) plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition using titanium tetrachloride, aluminum trichloride, methane, and nitrogen as reactants. Hydrogen was used as carrier gases. A substrate temperature of 500 °C and an rf power of 100 W were used in all depositions. The films were characterized by x-ray powder diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The results show that nanograins of titanium aluminum carbonitride were embedded in an amorphous-carbon matrix. The nanograins had a (200) preferred orientation with columnar cross-section morphology. Mechanical properties were analyzed by nanoindentation and hardness was demonstrated to increase via this microstructure design approach. The effects of microstructure on mechanical properties were also determined.

  17. Plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition of titanium aluminum carbonitride/amorphous-carbon nanocomposite thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shieh Jiann; Hon, M.H.

    2002-01-01

    A new nanocomposite, titanium aluminum carbonitride/amorphous-carbon thin film was prepared by radio-frequency (rf) plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition using titanium tetrachloride, aluminum trichloride, methane, and nitrogen as reactants. Hydrogen was used as carrier gases. A substrate temperature of 500 deg. C and an rf power of 100 W were used in all depositions. The films were characterized by x-ray powder diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The results show that nanograins of titanium aluminum carbonitride were embedded in an amorphous-carbon matrix. The nanograins had a (200) preferred orientation with columnar cross-section morphology. Mechanical properties were analyzed by nanoindentation and hardness was demonstrated to increase via this microstructure design approach. The effects of microstructure on mechanical properties were also determined

  18. Titanium: the innovators metal. Historical case studies tracing titanium process and product innovation [Conference paper

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oosthuizen, SJ

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available at the development of a proprietary low cost titanium metal production process, and the continued development and commercialisation of technologies to compete cost effectively in international titanium markets4. Considering that the national strategy... of primary importance in the establishment of markets for titanium? c) Can it be reasoned that South African strategy for titanium beneficiation should include efforts to develop and support innovation and entrepreneurship in this field? Findings...

  19. Titanium - ceramic restoration: How to improve the binding between titanium and ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Laksono

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Titanium alloys has been used as an alternative to nickel-chromium alloys for metal-ceramic restorations because of its good biocompatibility and mechanical properties. This indicated that it was possible to design coping according to standards established for metal-ceramics. However, titanium is chemically reacting strongly with gaseous elements which causes problems when ceramics are fused to titanium. Purpose: To provide information about improving the bonding between titanium and ceramic. Review: Titanium has two crystal modifications, the close-packed hexagonal (α structure, up to 880° C, and above this temperature the bodycentered cubic (β structure. The principal problems is the extensive dissolution of oxygen resulting in thick, oxygen-rich titanium layers called α-case that harms the bonding of ceramic to titanium and the great mismatch in the coefficient of thermal expansion of conventional ultra-low fusing ceramic. Methods have been developed for fusing ceramic to titanium like processing methods, the used of ultra-low fusing titanium ceramic, bonding agent, and protocol for ceramic bonding to titanium. Conclusion: Titanium and titanium alloys, based on their physical and chemical properties suitable for titanium-ceramic restorations, but careful selection of processing methods, ceramic materials, laboratory skill and strict protocol for ceramic bonding to titanium are necessary to improve the bonding between titanium and ceramic.Latar Belakang: Logam campur titanium telah dipakai sebagai salah satu bahan alternatif untuk logam nikel-krom pada pembuatan restorasi keramik taut logam karena mempunyai biokompatibilitas dan sifat mekanik yang baik. Hal ini menunjukkan bahwa logam titanium dapat dipakai untuk pembuatan koping logam berdasarkan standar yang dipakai untuk pembuatan restorasi keramik taut logam. Meskipun, secara kimiawi logam titanium bereaksi dengan elemen-elemen gas yang menyebabkan masalah pada perlekatan

  20. Selective recovery of titanium dioxide from low grade sources

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Vuuren, DS

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available There are a number of readily available, large reserves of titanium dioxide bearing minerals from which the titanium dioxide cannot currently be economically recovered via current commercial recovery processes due to: The grade of titanium dioxide...

  1. Clinical bending of nickel titanium wires

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen Chain; Priyank Seth; Namrata Rastogi; Kenneth Tan; Mayank Gupta; Richa Singh

    2015-01-01

    Since the evolution and the involvement of Nickel Titanium wires in the field of Orthodontics. The treatment plan has evolved with the use of low force Nickel Titanium wires. Because of their high springback, low stiffness, they are the key initial wires in leveling and alignment but have poor formability. Since poor formability limits its ability to create variable arch forms thus; limits the form of treatment. We have devised a method to bend the Nickel Titanium wires to help in our invento...

  2. Production of titanium from ilmenite: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohli, R.

    1981-12-01

    The general principles for beneficiation of titanium ores are reviewed and the specific processes used in individual units in various countries are discussed. This is followed by a critical evaluation of various current and potential reduction methods for the production of titanium metal from the processed concentrates. Finally, the report outlines a research program for the development of a commercially viable alternative method for the production of titanium metal.

  3. Titanium metal obtention by fused salts electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perillo, P.M.; Ares, Osvaldo; Botbol, Jose.

    1989-01-01

    Potassium fluorotitanate dissolved in fused sodium chloride or potassium chloride may be electrolyzed under an inert gas atmosphere. Solid electrolysis products are formed on the cathode which contains titanium metal, sodium chloride, lower fluorotitanates and small quantities of alkali metal fluorotitanate. The extraction of titanium from the electrolysis products may be carried out by aqueous leaching (removal of chloride salts of alkali metals and a certain amount of fluorotitanates). Titanium metal obtained is relatively pure. (Author)

  4. On the Methods to Measure Powder Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Geoffrey; Morton, David A V; Larson, Ian

    2015-01-01

    The flow of powders can often play a critical role in the manufacturing of pharmaceutical products. Many of these processes require good, consistent and predictable flow of powders to ensure continuous production of pharmaceutical dosages and to ensure their quality. Therefore, the flow of powders is of paramount importance to the pharmaceutical industry and thus the measuring and evaluating of powder flow is of utmost importance. At present, there are numerous methods in which the flow of powders can be measured. However, due to the complex and environment-dependent nature of powders, no one method exists that is capable of providing a complete picture of the behaviour of powders under dynamic conditions. Some of the most commonly applied methods to measure the flow of powders include: density indices, such as the Carr index and Hausner ratio, powder avalanching, the angle of repose (AOR), flow through an orifice, powder rheometry and shear cell testing.

  5. Machinability evaluation of titanium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Masafumi; Okuno, Osamu

    2004-03-01

    In the present study, the machinability of titanium, Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-6A1-7Nb, and free-cutting brass was evaluated using a milling machine. The metals were slotted with square end mills under four cutting conditions. The cutting force and the rotational speed of the spindle were measured. The cutting forces for Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6Al-7Nb were higher and that for brass was lower than that for titanium. The rotational speed of the spindle was barely affected by cutting. The cross sections of the Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6Al-7Nb chips were more clearly serrated than those of titanium, which is an indication of difficult-to-cut metals. There was no marked difference in the surface roughness of the cut surfaces among the metals. Cutting force and the appearance of the metal chips were found to be useful as indices of machinability and will aid in the development of new alloys for dental CAD/CAM and the selection of suitable machining conditions.

  6. Cranioplasty with individual titanium implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishinov, S.; Stupak, V.; Sadovoy, M.; Mamonova, E.; Koporushko, N.; Larkin, V.; Novokshonov, A.; Dolzhenko, D.; Panchenko, A.; Desyatykh, I.; Krasovsky, I.

    2017-09-01

    Cranioplasty is the second procedure in the history of neurosurgery after trepanation, and it is still relevant despite the development of civilization and progress in medicine. Each cranioplasty operation is unique because there are no two patients with identical defects of the skull bones. The development of Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) technique opened up the possibility of direct implant printing of titanium, a biocompatible metal used in medicine. This eliminates the need for producing any intermediate products to create the desired implant. We have produced 8 patient-specific titanium implants using this technique for patients who underwent different decompressive cranioectomies associated with bone tumors. Follow-up duration ranged from 6 to 12 months. We observed no implant-related reactions or complications. In all cases of reconstructive neurosurgery we achieved good clinical and aesthetic results. The analysis of the literature and our own experience in three-dimensional modeling, prototyping, and printing suggests that direct laser sintering of titanium is the optimal method to produce biocompatible surgical implants.

  7. Effect of the quality of powder materials on the properties of the wear-resistant coatings on the rotor blades in an aviation gas-turbine engine compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraimov, N. V.; Ryabenko, B. V.; Kryukov, M. A.

    2015-06-01

    The physicomechanical properties, the structures of a wear-resistant WC-Co coating on a VT3-1 titanium alloy and the powder materials used for their deposition by gas-detonation method are studied. The VK-25M coatings are found to inherit the chemical and phase compositions of the powders. The properties of the coating are substantially dependent on the shape, the sizes, and the ratio of carbide WC granules in commercial powder materials. A high content of coarse lamellar WC fractions is accompanied by an increase in the hardness and a decrease in the ductility and the fracture toughness of the coatings. The tensile stresses in the VK-25M coating on the VT3-1 titanium alloy and the fracture toughness decrease as the coating thickness increases or annealing is applied.

  8. The effect of structural changes on magnetic permeability of amorphous powder Ni80Co20

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maričić A.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The structural changes of Ni80Co20 amorphous powder were tested during heating. The alloy was obtained by electrolysis from ammonia solution sulfate of cobalt and nickel on the titanium cathode. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC method was used to detect that the crystallization process of powder occurred in two stages with crystallization peaks temperatures of the first stage at 690 K and of the second stage at 790 K. The effect of structural relaxation and crystallization of powder on magnetic properties was predicted by measurement of the relative magnetic permeability change in isothermal and nonisothermal conditions. On the basis of the time change of relative magnetic permeability at a defined temperature in the temperature range of the first and second crystallization peak on the thermogram, the kinetics of crystallization was defined. It was predicted, that in the initial time interval, in the range of the first crystallization peak, the rate of crystallization is determined by the rate of nucleation of the amorphous part of the powder. However, in the second time interval, the crystallization rate is determined by the rate of diffusion. In the range of the second peak, in the beginning the rate of crystal growth is determined by activation energy of the atom pass from smaller to bigger crystal grain. In second time interval, the rate of crystal grain growth is determined by the diffusion rate of atoms to the location of integration into bigger crystal grains. For all processes which determine the rate of crystallization in temperature ranges of both crystallization peaks, the Arrhenius temperature dependence of rate for those processes is obtained. The relative magnetic permeability of crystallized powder at 873 K, is smaller for about 30 % than the relative magnetic permeability of fresh powder at room temperature. However, structurally relaxed powder at 573 K has an about 22 % larger magnetic permeability than the same fresh

  9. Titanium alloys Russian aircraft and aerospace applications

    CERN Document Server

    Moiseyev, Valentin N

    2005-01-01

    This text offers previously elusive information on state-of-the-art Russian metallurgic technology of titanium alloys. It details their physical, mechanical, and technological properties, as well as treatments and applications in various branches of modern industry, particularly aircraft and aerospace construction. Titanium Alloys: Russian Aircraft and Aerospace Applications addresses all facets of titanium alloys in aerospace and aviation technology, including specific applications, fundamentals, composition, and properties of commercial alloys. It is useful for all students and researchers interested in the investigation and applications of titanium.

  10. Appcelerator Titanium patterns and best practices

    CERN Document Server

    Pollentine, Boydlee

    2013-01-01

    The book takes a step-by-step approach to help you understand CommonJS and Titanium architecture patterns, with easy to follow samples and plenty of in-depth explanations If you're an existing Titanium developer or perhaps a new developer looking to start off your Titanium applications "the right way", then this book is for you. With easy to follow examples and a full step-by-step account of architecting a sample application using CommonJS and MVC, along with chapters on new features such as ACS, you'll be implementing enterprise grade Titanium solutions in no time. You should have some JavaSc

  11. Titanium Matrix Composite Pressure Vessel, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For over 15 years, FMW Composite Systems has developed Metal Matrix Composite manufacturing methodologies for fabricating silicon-carbide-fiber-reinforced titanium...

  12. Titanium Matrix Composite Pressure Vessel Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For over 15 years, FMW Composite Systems has developed Metal Matrix Composite manufacturing methodologies for fabricating silicon-carbide-fiber-reinforced titanium...

  13. Development of a Reproducible Powder Characterization Method using a Powder Rheometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Søren Vinter; Allesø, Morten; Garnæs, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a powder rheometer was used to measure flow characteristics of two pharmaceutical model powders. Precise measurements were obtained for one of the model powders whereas the results were less precise for the second powder. In conclusion, further work is needed to increase...... the mechanistic understanding of powder rheological measurements....

  14. Influence of titanium precursor on photoluminescent emission of micro-cube-shaped CaTiO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzo, Tatiana Martelli, E-mail: tatimazzo@gmail.com [Departamento de Ciências do Mar, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Avenida Almameda Saldanha da Gama, 89, Ponta da Praia, CEP 11030-400 Santos, SP (Brazil); Santilli do Nascimento Libanori, Gabriela [Departamento de Ciências do Mar, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Avenida Almameda Saldanha da Gama, 89, Ponta da Praia, CEP 11030-400 Santos, SP (Brazil); Moreira, Mario Lucio [Instituto de Física e Matemática, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, P.O. Box 354, Campus do Capão do Leão, 96001-970 Pelotas, RS (Brazil); Avansi Jr, Waldir [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Jardim Guanabara, 13565-905 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Mastelaro, Valmor Roberto [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Trabalhador São Carlense, 400, Arnold Schimidt, 13566-590 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Varela, José Arana; Longo, Elson [INCTMN/LIEC, Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual Paulista, P.O. Box 355, R. Francisco Degni, 55, Bairro Quitandinha, 14801-907 Araraquara, SP (Brazil)

    2015-09-15

    For this research, we studied the influence of titanium tetrachloride (TC) and titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTP) precursors on CaTiO{sub 3} (CTO) synthesis by employing a microwave-assisted hydrothermal (MAH) method regarding their respective short-, medium- and long-range features to determine if the use of different titanium precursors enhances the structural evolution of the material. The growth mechanism for the formation of the micro-cube-shaped CTO is proposed to obtain nanoparticle aggregation of self-assembly nanoplates. The disorder coupled to the oxygen vacancies of [TiO{sub 5}]–[TiO{sub 6}] in complex clusters in the CTO 1 powder and twists in bonding between the [TiO{sub 6}]–[TiO{sub 6}] complex clusters in the CTO 2 powder were mainly responsible for photoluminescent (PL) emission. - Highlights: • Different titanium precursors enhance the structural evolution of the material. • [TiO{sub 5}]–[TiO{sub 6}] and twists in bonding [TiO{sub 6}]–[TiO{sub 6}] were responsible for PL emission. • Micro-cube shaped was formed by nanoparticle aggregation of self-assembly nanoplates.

  15. Trial production of titanium orthodontic brackets fabricated by metal injection molding (MIM) with sintering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguchi, T; Ito, M; Obata, A; Koh, Y; Yamagishi, T; Oshida, Y

    1996-07-01

    Safety and esthetics are two indispensable factors to consider when fabricating orthodontic brackets. However, these factors are not easily achieved when conventional techniques (including forging and casting) are used in the mass production of titanium brackets, albeit the brackets exhibit excellent biocompatibility. In the present study, orthodontic brackets were manufactured by metal powder injection molding with sintering. Brackets with three different base designs were made and subjected to compression shear tests for evaluation of their bonding strength to enamel substrate. The shapes given to the dimple of the base were spherical, oval, and grooved. The maximum shear forces for each type were 11.1 kgf, 7.6 kgf, and 18.5 kgf, respectively. The bonding strengths of the titanium bracket were equivalent to those obtained with conventional stainless steel brackets. Moreover, uniform distribution of Vickers hardness values (average, 240 +/- 40 Hv) measured at three locations indicated that the titanium bracket was uniformly sintered. Accordingly, titanium brackets thus fabricated exhibit a potential for clinical application.

  16. Intermetallic Nickel-Titanium Alloys for Oil-Lubricated Bearing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaCorte, C.; Pepper, S. V.; Noebe, R.; Hull, D. R.; Glennon, G.

    2009-01-01

    An intermetallic nickel-titanium alloy, NITINOL 60 (60NiTi), containing 60 wt% nickel and 40 wt% titanium, is shown to be a promising candidate material for oil-lubricated rolling and sliding contact applications such as bearings and gears. NiTi alloys are well known and normally exploited for their shape memory behavior. When properly processed, however, NITINOL 60 exhibits excellent dimensional stability and useful structural properties. Processed via high temperature, high-pressure powder metallurgy techniques or other means, NITINOL 60 offers a broad combination of physical properties that make it unique among bearing materials. NITINOL 60 is hard, electrically conductive, highly corrosion resistant, less dense than steel, readily machined prior to final heat treatment, nongalling and nonmagnetic. No other bearing alloy, metallic or ceramic encompasses all of these attributes. Further, NITINOL 60 has shown remarkable tribological performance when compared to other aerospace bearing alloys under oil-lubricated conditions. Spiral orbit tribometer (SOT) tests were conducted in vacuum using NITINOL 60 balls loaded between rotating 440C stainless steel disks, lubricated with synthetic hydrocarbon oil. Under conditions considered representative of precision bearings, the performance (life and friction) equaled or exceeded that observed with silicon nitride or titanium carbide coated 440C bearing balls. Based upon this preliminary data, it appears that NITINOL 60, despite its high titanium content, is a promising candidate alloy for advanced mechanical systems requiring superior and intrinsic corrosion resistance, electrical conductivity and nonmagnetic behavior under lubricated contacting conditions.

  17. Direct Metal Laser Sintering Titanium Dental Implants: A Review of the Current Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mangano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem. Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS is a technology that allows fabrication of complex-shaped objects from powder-based materials, according to a three-dimensional (3D computer model. With DMLS, it is possible to fabricate titanium dental implants with an inherently porous surface, a key property required of implantation devices. Objective. The aim of this review was to evaluate the evidence for the reliability of DMLS titanium dental implants and their clinical and histologic/histomorphometric outcomes, as well as their mechanical properties. Materials and Methods. Electronic database searches were performed. Inclusion criteria were clinical and radiographic studies, histologic/histomorphometric studies in humans and animals, mechanical evaluations, and in vitro cell culture studies on DMLS titanium implants. Meta-analysis could be performed only for randomized controlled trials (RCTs; to evaluate the methodological quality of observational human studies, the Newcastle-Ottawa scale (NOS was used. Results. Twenty-seven studies were included in this review. No RCTs were found, and meta-analysis could not be performed. The outcomes of observational human studies were assessed using the NOS: these studies showed medium methodological quality. Conclusions. Several studies have demonstrated the potential for the use of DMLS titanium implants. However, further studies that demonstrate the benefits of DMLS implants over conventional implants are needed.

  18. The influence of structural changes on electrical and magnetic characteristics of amorphous powder of the nixmoy alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribić-Zelenović Lenka

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Nickel and molybdenum alloy powder was electrodeposited on a titanium cathode from a NiSO4⋅7H2O and (NH46 Mo7O24⋅4H2O ammonium solution. The desired chemical composition, structure, size and shape of particles in the powder samples were achieved by an appropriate choice of electrolysis parameters (current density, composition and temperature of the solution, cathode material and electrolysis duration. Metal coatings form in the current density range 15 mA cm-2powders form. The chemical composition of powder samples depends on the current density of electrodeposition. The molybdenum content in the powder increases with the increase of current density (in the low current density range, while in the higher current density range the molybdenum content in the alloy decreases with the increase of the current density of deposition. Smaller sized particles form at higher current density. X-ray analysis, differential scanning calorimetric and measurements of the temperature dependence of electric resistance and magnetic permeability of the powder samples were all used to establish a predominantly amorphous structure of the powder samples formed at the current density of j≥70mA cm-2. The crystalline particle content in the powder samples increases with the decrease of the current density of deposition. Powder heating causes structural changes. The process of thermal stabilization of nickel and molybdenum amorphous powders takes place in the temperature interval from 463K to 573K and causes a decrease in electrical resistance and increase in magnetic permeability. The crystallization temperature depends on the value of current density of powder electrodeposition. Powder formed at j=180 mA cm-2 begins to crystallize at 573K, while the powder deposited at j=50 mA cm-2 begins to crystallize at 673K. Crystallization of the powder causes a decrease in electric resistivity and magnetic

  19. Effect of Liquid Feed-Stock Composition on the Morphology of Titanium Dioxide Films Deposited by Thermal Plasma Spray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adán, C; Marugán, J; van Grieken, R; Chien, K; Pershin, L; Coyle, T; Mostaghimi, J

    2015-09-01

    Titanium dioxide coatings were deposited on the surface of titanium foils by Thermal Plasma Spray (TPS) process. Three different TiO2 coatings were prepared using the commercial TiO2-P25 nanopowder and titanium isopropoxide precursor solution as feed-stocks. Structure and morphology of the TiO2-P25 powder and the plasma sprayed coatings were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms, UV-visible spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). XRD and Raman results indicate that the TiO2 coatings were composed of an anatase/rutile mixture that is conditioned by the suspension composition used to be sprayed. Coatings prepared from TiO2-P25 nanoparticles in water suspension (NW-P25) and titanium isopropoxide solution suspension (NSP-P25) are incorporated into the coatings without phase transformation and their anatase/rutile ratio percentage remains very similar to the starting TiO2-P25 powder. On the contrary, when titanium isopropoxide solution is used for spraying (SP), the amount of rutile increases in the final TiO2 coating. SEM analysis also reveals different microstructure morphology, coating thickness, density and porosity of the three TiO2 films that depend significantly on the type of feed-stock employed. Interestingly, we have observed the role of titanium isopropoxide in the formation of more porous and cohesive layers of TiO2. The NSP-P25 coating, prepared with a mix of titanium isopropoxide solution based on TiO2 nanoparticles, presents higher deposition efficiencies and higher coating thickness than the film prepared with nanoparticles suspended in water (NW-P25) or with titanium isopropoxide solutions (SP). This is due to the precursor solution is acting as the cement between TiO2 nanoparticles, improving the cohesive strength of the coating. In sum, NSP-P25 and NW-P25 coatings display a good photocatalytic potential, based on their light absorption properties and mechanical stability. Band gap of

  20. Point Defects in 3D and 1D Nanomaterials: The Model Case of Titanium Dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knauth, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Titanium dioxide is one of the most important oxides for applications in energy and environment, such as solar cells, photocatalysis, lithium-ion batteries. In recent years, new forms of titanium dioxide with unusual structure and/or morphology have been developed, including nanocrystals, nanotubes or nanowires. We have studied in detail the point defect chemistry in nanocrystalline TiO 2 powders and ceramics. There can be a change from predominant Frenkel to Schottky disorder, depending on the experimental conditions, e.g. temperature and oxygen partial pressure. We have also studied the local environment of various dopants with similar ion radius, but different ion charge (Zn 2+ , Y 3+ , Sn 4+ , Zr 4+ , Nb 5+ ) in TiO 2 nanopowders and nanoceramics by Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) Spectroscopy. Interfacial segregation of acceptors was demonstrated, but donors and isovalent ions do not segregate. An electrostatic 'space charge' segregation model is applied, which explains well the observed phenomena.

  1. Laser Powder Cladding of Ti-6Al-4V α/β Alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sayed Ali, Samar Reda; Hussein, Abdel Hamid Ahmed; Nofal, Adel Abdel Menam Saleh; Hasseb Elnaby, Salah Elden Ibrahim; Elgazzar, Haytham Abdelrafea; Sabour, Hassan Abdel

    2017-10-15

    Laser cladding process was performed on a commercial Ti-6Al-4V (α + β) titanium alloy by means of tungsten carbide-nickel based alloy powder blend. Nd:YAG laser with a 2.2-KW continuous wave was used with coaxial jet nozzle coupled with a standard powder feeding system. Four-track deposition of a blended powder consisting of 60 wt % tungsten carbide (WC) and 40 wt % NiCrBSi was successfully made on the alloy. The high content of the hard WC particles is intended to enhance the abrasion resistance of the titanium alloy. The goal was to create a uniform distribution of hard WC particles that is crack-free and nonporous to enhance the wear resistance of such alloy. This was achieved by changing the laser cladding parameters to reach the optimum conditions for favorable mechanical properties. The laser cladding samples were subjected to thorough microstructure examinations, microhardness and abrasion tests. Phase identification was obtained by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The obtained results revealed that the best clad layers were achieved at a specific heat input value of 59.5 J·mm -2 . An increase by more than three folds in the microhardness values of the clad layers was achieved and the wear resistance was improved by values reaching 400 times.

  2. Laser Powder Cladding of Ti-6Al-4V α/β Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samar Reda Al-Sayed Ali

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Laser cladding process was performed on a commercial Ti-6Al-4V (α + β titanium alloy by means of tungsten carbide-nickel based alloy powder blend. Nd:YAG laser with a 2.2-KW continuous wave was used with coaxial jet nozzle coupled with a standard powder feeding system. Four-track deposition of a blended powder consisting of 60 wt % tungsten carbide (WC and 40 wt % NiCrBSi was successfully made on the alloy. The high content of the hard WC particles is intended to enhance the abrasion resistance of the titanium alloy. The goal was to create a uniform distribution of hard WC particles that is crack-free and nonporous to enhance the wear resistance of such alloy. This was achieved by changing the laser cladding parameters to reach the optimum conditions for favorable mechanical properties. The laser cladding samples were subjected to thorough microstructure examinations, microhardness and abrasion tests. Phase identification was obtained by X-ray diffraction (XRD. The obtained results revealed that the best clad layers were achieved at a specific heat input value of 59.5 J·mm−2. An increase by more than three folds in the microhardness values of the clad layers was achieved and the wear resistance was improved by values reaching 400 times.

  3. Tailoring the thermal conductivity of the powder bed in Electron Beam Melting (EBM) Additive Manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C J; Tammas-Williams, S; Hernandez-Nava, E; Todd, I

    2017-09-05

    Metallic powder bed additive manufacturing is capable of producing complex, functional parts by repeatedly depositing thin layers of powder particles atop of each other whilst selectively melting the corresponding part cross-section into each layer. A weakness with this approach arises when melting overhanging features, which have no prior melted material directly beneath them. This is due to the lower thermal conductivity of the powder relative to solid material, which as a result leads to an accumulation of heat and thus distortion. The Electron Beam Melting (EBM) process alleviates this to some extent as the powder must first be sintered (by the beam itself) before it is melted, which results in the added benefit of increasing the thermal conductivity. This study thus sought to investigate to what extent the thermal conductivity of local regions in a titanium Ti-6Al-4V powder bed could be varied by imparting more energy from the beam. Thermal diffusivity and density measurements were taken of the resulting sintered samples, which ranged from being loosely to very well consolidated. It was found that the calculated thermal conductivity at two temperatures, 40 and 730 °C, was more than doubled over the range of input energies explored.

  4. Compaction of Ceramic Microspheres, Spherical Molybdenum Powder and Other Materials to 3 GPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, S R; Bonner, B P; Ryerson, F J; Hart, M M

    2006-01-01

    Pressure-volume relationships were measured at room temperature for eight granular materials and one specimen of epoxy foam. The granular materials included hollow ceramic microspheres, spherical molybdenum powder, Ottawa sand, aluminum, copper, titanium and silicon carbide powders and glassy carbon spheres. Measurements were made to 0.9 GPa in a liquid medium press for all of the granular materials and to 3 GPa in a solid medium press for the ceramic microspheres and molybdenum powder. A single specimen of epoxy foam was compressed to 30 MPa in the liquid medium press. Bulk moduli were calculated as a function of pressure for the ceramic microspheres, the molybdenum powder and three other granular materials. The energy expended in compacting the granular materials was determined by numerically integrating pressure-volume curves. More energy was expended per unit volume in compacting the molybdenum powder to 1 GPa than for the other materials, but compaction of the ceramic microspheres required more energy per gram due to their very low initial density. The merge pressure, the pressure at which all porosity is removed, was estimated for each material by plotting porosity against pressure on a semi-log plot. The pressure-volume curves were then extrapolated to the predicted merge pressures and numerically integrated to estimate the energy required to reach full density for each material. The results suggest that the glassy carbon spheres and the ceramic microspheres would require more energy than the other materials to attain full density

  5. Low temperature study of nonstoichiometric titanium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashmetov, M.Yu.

    2005-05-01

    By low temperature neutron diffraction method was studied structure in nonstoichiometric titanium carbide from room temperature up to 12K. It is found of low temperature phase in titanium carbide- TiC 0.71 . It is established region and borders of this phase. It is determined change of unit cell parameter. (author)

  6. Corrosion comparisons between zirconium and titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yau Telin

    1992-01-01

    Zirconium and titanium are regarded as sister metals with excellent resistance to many corrosives. While these metals exhibit some similar corrosion properties, this paper discusses several major differences. The differences are found in chloride-free acids, acidic chloride solutions, salt solutions, alkaline solutions and organics. They are caused by the differences between the protective oxide films of zirconium and titanium. (orig.) [de

  7. Mineral resource of the month: titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambogi, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Titanium is hip - at least when it comes to airplanes and jewelry. Known for its high strength-to weight ratio and its resistance to corrosion, titanium and its alloys can also be found in everything from knee replacements to eyeglass frames to baseball bats to fighter planes.

  8. Appcelerator Titanium business application development cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Bahrenberg, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Presented in easy to follow, step by step recipes, this guide is designed to lead you through the most important aspects of application design.Titanium developers who already have a basic knowledge of working with Appcelerator Titanium but want to further develop their knowledge for use with business applications

  9. Forming a single layer of a composite powder based on the Ti-Nb system via selective laser melting (SLM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saprykin, A. A.; Sharkeev, Yu P.; Ibragimov, E. A.; Babakova, E. V.; Dudikhin, D. V.

    2016-07-01

    Alloys based on the titanium-niobium system are widely used in implant production. It is conditional, first of all, on the low modulus of elasticity and bio-inert properties of an alloy. These alloys are especially important for tooth replacement and orthopedic surgery. At present alloys based on the titanium-niobium system are produced mainly using conventional metallurgical methods. The further subtractive manufacturing an end product results in a lot of wastes, increasing, therefore, its cost. The alternative of these processes is additive manufacturing. Selective laser melting is a technology, which makes it possible to synthesize products of metal powders and their blends. The point of this technology is laser melting a layer of a powdered material; then a sintered layer is coated with the next layer of powder etc. Complex products and working prototypes are made on the base of this technology. The authors of this paper address to the issue of applying selective laser melting in order to synthesize a binary alloy of a composite powder based on the titanium-niobium system. A set of 10x10 mm samples is made in various process conditions. The samples are made by an experimental selective laser synthesis machine «VARISKAF-100MB». The machine provides adjustment of the following process variables: laser emission power, scanning rate and pitch, temperature of powder pre-heating, thickness of the layer to be sprinkled, and diameter of laser spot focusing. All samples are made in the preliminary vacuumized shielding atmosphere of argon. The porosity and thickness of the sintered layer related to the laser emission power are shown at various scanning rates. It is revealed that scanning rate and laser emission power are adjustable process variables, having the greatest effect on forming the sintered layer.

  10. Mechanical properties of biomedical titanium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niinomi, M. [Toyohashi Univ. of Technol. (Japan). Sch. of Production Syst. Eng.

    1998-03-15

    Titanium alloys are expected to be much more widely used for implant materials in the medical and dental fields because of their superior biocompatibility, bioaffinity, corrosion resistance and specific strength compared with other metallic implant materials. Pure titanium and Ti-6Al-4V, in particular, Ti-6Al-4V ELI have been, however, mainly used for implant materials among various titanium alloys to date. V free alloys like Ti-6Al-7Nb and Ti-5Al-2.5Fe have been recently developed for biomedical use. More recently V and Al free alloys have been developed. Titanium alloys composed of non-toxic elements like Nb, Ta, Zr and so on with lower modulus have been started to be developed mainly in the USA. The {beta} type alloys are now the main target for medical materials. The mechanical properties of the titanium alloys developed for implant materials to date are described in this paper. (orig.) 17 refs.

  11. Welding and Joining of Titanium Aluminides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jian; Qi, Junlei; Song, Xiaoguo; Feng, Jicai

    2014-01-01

    Welding and joining of titanium aluminides is the key to making them more attractive in industrial fields. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of recent progress in welding and joining of titanium aluminides, as well as to introduce current research and application. The possible methods available for titanium aluminides involve brazing, diffusion bonding, fusion welding, friction welding and reactive joining. Of the numerous methods, solid-state diffusion bonding and vacuum brazing have been most heavily investigated for producing reliable joints. The current state of understanding and development of every welding and joining method for titanium aluminides is addressed respectively. The focus is on the fundamental understanding of microstructure characteristics and processing–microstructure–property relationships in the welding and joining of titanium aluminides to themselves and to other materials. PMID:28788113

  12. Stress-corrosion cracking of titanium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, M. J.; Feeney, J. A.; Beck, T. R.

    1973-01-01

    In the light of research material published up to May 1970, the current understanding of the experimental variables involved in the stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of titanium and its alloys is reviewed. Following a brief summary of the metallurgy and electrochemistry of titanium alloys, the mechanical, electrochemical, and metallurgical parameters influencing SCC behavior are explored with emphasis on crack growth kinetics. Macro- and microfeatures of fractures are examined, and it is shown that many transgranular SCC failures exhibit morphological and crystallographic features similar to mechanical cleavage failures. Current SCC models are reviewed with respect to their ability to explain the observed SCC behavior of titanium and its alloys. Possible methods for eliminating or minimizing stress corrosion hazards in titanium or titanium alloy components are described.

  13. The present status of dental titanium casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Toru; Ohkubo, Chikahiro; Watanabe, Ikuya; Okuno, Osamu; Takada, Yukyo

    1998-09-01

    Experimentation in all aspects of titanium casting at universities and industries throughout the world for the last 20 years has made titanium and titanium-alloy casting nearly feasible for fabricating sound cast dental prostheses, including crowns, inlays, and partial and complete dentures. Titanium casting in dentistry has now almost reached the stage where it can seriously be considered as a new method to compete with dental casting using conventional noble and base-metal alloys. More than anything else, the strength of titanium’s appeal lies in its excellent biocompatibility, coupled with its comparatively low price and abundant supply. Research efforts to overcome some problems associated with this method, including studies on the development of new titanium alloys suitable for dental use, will continue at many research sites internationally.

  14. Welding and Joining of Titanium Aluminides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Cao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Welding and joining of titanium aluminides is the key to making them more attractive in industrial fields. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of recent progress in welding and joining of titanium aluminides, as well as to introduce current research and application. The possible methods available for titanium aluminides involve brazing, diffusion bonding, fusion welding, friction welding and reactive joining. Of the numerous methods, solid-state diffusion bonding and vacuum brazing have been most heavily investigated for producing reliable joints. The current state of understanding and development of every welding and joining method for titanium aluminides is addressed respectively. The focus is on the fundamental understanding of microstructure characteristics and processing–microstructure–property relationships in the welding and joining of titanium aluminides to themselves and to other materials.

  15. The effect of lanthanum boride on the sintering, sintered microstructure and mechanical properties of titanium and titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Y.F.; Luo, S.D.; Qian, M.

    2014-01-01

    An addition of ≤0.5 wt% lanthanum boride (LaB 6 ) to powder metallurgy commercially pure Ti (CP-Ti), Ti–6Al–4V and Ti–10V–2Fe–3Al (all in wt%) resulted in improved sintered density, substantial microstructural refinement, and noticeably increased tensile elongation. The addition of LaB 6 led to scavenging of both oxygen (O) and chlorine (Cl) from the titanium powder during sintering, evidenced by the formation of La 2 O 3 and LaCl x O y . The pinning effect of La 2 O 3 , LaCl x O y and TiB inhibited prior-β grain growth and resulted in subsequent smaller α-laths. The formation of nearly equiaxed α-Ti phase is partially attributed to the nucleation effect of α-Ti on TiB. The improved sintered density was caused by B from LaB 6 rather than La, while excessive formation of La 2 O 3 and TiB with an addition of >0.5 wt% LaB 6 resulted in a noticeable decrease in sintered density. The improved tensile elongation with an addition of ≤0.5 wt% LaB 6 was mainly attributed to the scavenging of oxygen by LaB 6 , partially assisted by the improved sintered density. However, an addition of >0.5 wt% LaB 6 led to the formation of large La 2 O 3 aggregates and more brittle TiB whiskers and therefore decreased tensile elongation. Balanced scavenging of O is thus important. The optimal addition of LaB 6 was 0.5 wt% but this may change depending on the powder size of the LaB 6 to be used

  16. Antimicrobial Double-Layer Coating Prepared from Pure or Doped-Titanium Dioxide and Binders

    OpenAIRE

    Ran Li; Tony Z. Jin; Zengshe Liu; LinShu Liu

    2018-01-01

    Fruit and vegetable containers with microbe-free surfaces can be made by coating with titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles or nonmetal (C, N, B, F) doped-TiO2 particles, using wear resistant polymers, such as zein, and paint, as the binders and to form a continuous binding phase. The doped-TiO2 powders absorb visible light radiation, and thus possess a higher antibacterial effect than non-modified TiO2 particles in environmental conditions. The study also presents a double-layer coating to use l...

  17. Electrical characterization of zirconia-niobium and zirconia-titanium composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, S.T. dos.

    1993-01-01

    Zirconia-niobium and zirconia-titanium composites were made by powder mixing, cold pressing, and vacuum sintering at 1600 0 C. The metallic particles were added in the proportion of 0-50% by volume. Electrical resistivity measurements were performed by the two probes and the four probes d.c. method as a function of metallic particle concentration. Electrical resistivity of these composites decreased sharply in the region of 30-40 vol% Nb or Ti, in agreement with the percolation theory. Tests in an induction furnace were performed to check the self-heating response of these composites. (author). 33 refs, 40 figs, 11 tabs

  18. Mask materials for powder blasting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensink, H.; Jansen, Henricus V.; Berenschot, Johan W.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    Powder blasting, or abrasive jet machining (AJM), is a technique in which a particle jet is directed towards a target for mechanical material removal. It is a fast, cheap and accurate directional etch technique for brittle materials such as glass, silicon and ceramics. The particle jet (which

  19. Advanced composites take a powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holty, D.W. (Custom Composite Materials, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States))

    1993-06-01

    To a professional chemist with more than 25 years of industrial experience, the world of advanced composites is a fascinating new venue. Here resins and fibers come together in a completely synergistic partnership, achieving marvels of strength and light weight that make advanced composite materials virtually the only solution for challenging applications. In the late 1980s, Professor John Muzzy of the Georgia Institute of Technology, was intrigued by the physical properties of thermoplastics, and he developed a new way to bring the thermoplastic resins together with high-performance fibers. As part of the work Muzzy did with Lockheed and NASA he demonstrated that electrostatic powder coating was an attractive new method for combining thermoplastic resins with reinforcing fibers. Presentation of this work by Lockheed at a government-industry conference led to a new project for Muzzy, sponsored by NASA Langley. Powder prepregging proved to be the attractive alternative that NASA was looking for. While working on powder prepregging with LaRC-TPI, Muzzy and his colleagues developed methods for exposing all of the fibers to the powder to improve the distribution of the resin on the tow, a continuous bundle of filaments. Optimal resin distribution was achieved by spreading the moving tow. A very flexible towpreg was produced by maintaining the spread tow through the powder coating chamber and into the oven, where the resin particles were fused to the individual filaments. Muzzy's invention has enabled Custom Composite Materials, Inc. to offer resin/fiber combinations based on thermoplastic resins such as nylon and polypropylene. Beyond the expected advantages over epoxy thermoset systems, they are beginning to exploit a fundamental property of thermoplastic resins: viscoelasticity, which can be defined as the resistance to flow as a function of applied stress. Thermoplastics have a much higher viscoelasticity than thermosets.

  20. Adsorption of hydrogen in titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez R, T.

    1995-01-01

    In this work the absorption of hydrogen in titanium plates using a constant volume system has been realized. The changes of temperature and pressure were used to monitor the progress of the absorption. A stainless steel vacuum chamber with volume of 4,333 cm 3 was used. A titanium sample of 45 x 5.4 x 0.3 cm was located in the center of the chamber. The sample was heated by an electrical source connected to the system. The sample was preconditioned with a vacuum-thermal treatment at 10 -6 mbar and 800 Centigrade degrees for several days. Absorption was observed at room temperature and also at higher temperatures. The room temperature absorption was in the pressure range of 1.0 x 10 3 to 2.5 x 10 3 mbar, and other absorptions were from 180 to 630 Centigrade degrees at 3.5 x 10 -1 to 1.3 x 10 3 mbar. It was found that the gas absorbed was function of the vacuum-thermal pre-conditioned treatment, pressure and temperature. When the first absorption was developed, additional absorptions were realized in short time. We measured the electrical resistivity of the sample in the experiments but we could not see important changes due to the absorption. (Author)

  1. Microplastic deformation of TiB/sub 2/ particles during vibrocrushing and pressing in high pressure chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordan' yan, S.S.; Kravchik, A.E.; Ponomarenko, V.A.; Chunov, V.D. (Leningradskij Tekhnologicheskij Inst. (USSR))

    1984-04-01

    The character of plastic strain in titanium diboride particles is described. It is shown that during titanium diboride vibrocrushing unlike that of carbide there is practically no microplastic deformation that is observed only when TiB/sub 2/ particles are squeezed in high-pressure chambers at pressures not less than 3GPa.

  2. A Novel Porous Diamond - Titanium Biomaterial: Structure, Microstructure, Physico-Mechanical Properties and Biocompatibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZULMIRA A.S. GUIMARÃES

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT With the aim of introducing permanent prostheses with main properties equivalent to cortical human bone, Ti-diamond composites were processed through powder metallurgy. Grade 1 titanium and mixtures of Ti powder with 2%, 5% and 10 wt% diamond were compacted at 100MPa, and then sintered at 1250°C/2hr/10-6mbar. Sintered samples were studied in the point of view of their microstructures, structures, yield strength and elastic modulus. The results showed that the best addition of diamonds was 2 wt%, which led to a uniform porosity, yield strength of 370MPa and elastic modulus of 13.9 GPa. Samples of Ti and Ti-2% diamond were subjected to in vitro cytotoxicity test, using cultures of VERO cells, and it resulted in a biocompatible and nontoxic composite material.

  3. A Novel Porous Diamond - Titanium Biomaterial: Structure, Microstructure, Physico-Mechanical Properties and Biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Zulmira A S; Damatta, Renato A; Guimarães, Renan S; Filgueira, Marcello

    2017-01-01

    With the aim of introducing permanent prostheses with main properties equivalent to cortical human bone, Ti-diamond composites were processed through powder metallurgy. Grade 1 titanium and mixtures of Ti powder with 2%, 5% and 10 wt% diamond were compacted at 100MPa, and then sintered at 1250°C/2hr/10-6mbar. Sintered samples were studied in the point of view of their microstructures, structures, yield strength and elastic modulus. The results showed that the best addition of diamonds was 2 wt%, which led to a uniform porosity, yield strength of 370MPa and elastic modulus of 13.9 GPa. Samples of Ti and Ti-2% diamond were subjected to in vitro cytotoxicity test, using cultures of VERO cells, and it resulted in a biocompatible and nontoxic composite material.

  4. Analysis of powdered tungsten carbide hard-metal precursors and cemented compact tungsten carbides using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novotny, K. [Laboratory of Atomic Spectrochemistry, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: codl@sci.muni.cz; Stankova, A. [Laboratory of Atomic Spectrochemistry, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Haekkaenen, H.; Korppi-Tommola, J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. BOX 35, FIN-40014 (Finland); Otruba, V.; Kanicky, V. [Laboratory of Atomic Spectrochemistry, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2007-12-15

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied to the direct analysis of powdered tungsten carbide hard-metal precursors and cemented tungsten carbides. The aim of this work was to examine the possibility of quantitative determination of the niobium, titanium, tantalum and cobalt. The investigated samples were in the form of pellets, pressed with and without binder (powdered silver) and in the form of cemented tungsten carbides. The pellets were prepared by pressing the powdered material in a hydraulic press. Cemented tungsten carbides were embedded in resin for easier manipulation. Several lasers and detection systems were utilized. The Nd:YAG laser working at a basic wavelength of 1064 nm and fourth-harmonic frequency of 266 nm with a gated photomultiplier or ICCD detector HORIBA JY was used for the determination of niobium which was chosen as a model element. Different types of surrounding gases (air, He, Ar) were investigated for analysis. The ICCD detector DICAM PRO with Mechelle 7500 spectrometer with ArF laser (193 nm) and KrF laser (248 nm) were employed for the determination of niobium, titanium, tantalum and cobalt in samples under air atmosphere. Good calibration curves were obtained for Nb, Ti, and Ta (coefficients of determination r{sup 2} > 0.96). Acceptable calibration curves were acquired for the determination of cobalt (coefficient of determination r{sup 2} = 0.7994) but only for the cemented samples. In the case of powdered carbide precursors, the calibration for cobalt was found to be problematic.

  5. Effect of process control agent on the porous structure and mechanical properties of a biomedical Ti-Sn-Nb alloy produced by powder metallurgy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, A; Hodgson, P D; Wen, C E

    2010-04-01

    The influence of different amounts and types of process control agent (PCA), i.e., stearic acid and ethylene bis-stearamide, on the porous structure and mechanical properties of a biomedical Ti-16Sn-4Nb (wt.%) alloy was investigated. Alloy synthesis was performed on elemental metal powders using high-energy ball milling for 5h. Results indicated that varying the PCA content during ball milling led to a drastic change in morphology and particle-size distribution of the ball-milled powders. Porous titanium alloy samples sintered from the powders ball milled with the addition of various amounts of PCA also revealed different pore morphology and porosity. The Vickers hardness of the sintered titanium alloy samples exhibited a considerable increase with increasing PCA content. Moreover, the addition of larger amounts of PCA in the powder mixture resulted in a significant increase in the elastic modulus and peak stress for the sintered porous titanium alloy samples under compression. It should also be mentioned that the addition of PCA introduced contamination (mainly carbon and oxygen) into the sintered porous product. Crown Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Characteristics and Manufacture of Spherical Smokeless Powders

    OpenAIRE

    Botelho, Fernanda Diniz; Galante, Erick Braga Ferrão; Mendes, Álvaro José Boareto

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Smokeless propellants have been studied and manufactured for many decades. They can exist in various physical forms and also can have different properties according to the use of each propellant. One important form of smokeless powders is the ball powder, which has spherical grains. The manufacture process of the ball powder has many advantages over the usual way to manufacture a smokeless powder. For example, unstable and even deteriorated nitrocellulose, after being stabilized aga...

  7. Solidification and Microstructural Characterization on Atomized Powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şadi KARAGÖZ

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Powders produced by atomization techniques are commonly used in many industrial applications due to their many advantages such as homogeneous microstructure, low contamination and production of desired size range. In this study, the solidification of some ferrous and non-ferrous based alloy powders were considered and microstrucural characterization of all powder was carried out.

  8. 21 CFR 73.2645 - Aluminum powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.2645 Section 73.2645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive aluminum powder shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements of...

  9. 21 CFR 73.1645 - Aluminum powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum powder. 73.1645 Section 73.1645 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1645 Aluminum powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive aluminum powder shall be composed of finely divided particles of aluminum prepared from virgin aluminum. It...

  10. Influence of Starting Powders on Hydroxyapatite Coatings Fabricated by Room Temperature Spraying Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Dong Seok; Lee, Jong Kook; Hwang, Kyu Hong; Hahn, Byung Dong; Yoon, Seog Young

    2015-08-01

    Three types of raw materials were used for the fabrication of hydroxyapatite coatings by using the room temperature spraying method and their influence on the microstructure and in vitro characteristics were investigated. Starting hydroxyapatite powders for coatings on titanium substrate were prepared by a heat treatment at 1100 °C for 2 h of bovine bone, bone ash, and commercial hydroxyapatite powders. The phase compositions and Ca/P ratios of the three hydroxyapatite coatings were similar to those of the raw materials without decomposition or formation of a new phase. All hydroxyapatite coatings showed a honeycomb structure, but their surface microstructures revealed different features in regards to surface morphology and roughness, based on the staring materials. All coatings consisted of nano-sized grains and had dense microstructure. Inferred from in vitro experiments in pure water, all coatings have a good dissolution-resistance and biostability in water.

  11. Numerical and Experimental Study of Ti6Al4V Components Manufactured Using Powder Bed Fusion Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Jonas; Mindt, Hans-Wilfried; Düchting, Jan; Schleifenbaum, Johannes Henrich; Megahed, Mustafa

    2017-12-01

    Powder bed fusion additive manufacturing of titanium alloys is an interesting manufacturing route for many applications requiring high material strength combined with geometric complexity. Managing powder bed fusion challenges, including porosity, surface finish, distortions and residual stresses of as-built material, is the key to bringing the advantages of this process to production main stream. This paper discusses the application of experimental and numerical analysis towards optimizing the manufacturing process of a demonstration component. Powder characterization including assessment of the reusability, assessment of material consolidation and process window optimization is pursued prior to applying the identified optima to study the distortion and residual stresses of the demonstrator. Comparisons of numerical predictions with measurements show good correlations along the complete numerical chain.

  12. [Impact of directly compressed auxiliary materials on powder property of fermented cordyceps powder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Hua; Yue, Guo-Chao; Guan, Yong-Mei; Yang, Ming; Zhu, Wei-Feng

    2014-01-01

    To investigate such physical indexes as hygroscopicity, angle of repose, bulk density, fillibility of compression of mixed powder of directly compressed auxiliary materials and fermented cordyceps powder by using micromeritic study methods. The results showed that spray-dried lactose Flowlac100 and microcrystalline cellulose Avicel PH102 had better effect in liquidity and compressibility on fermented cordyceps powder than pregelatinized starch. The study on the impact of directly compressed auxiliary materials on the powder property of fermented cordyceps powder had guiding significant to the research of fermented cordyceps powder tablets, and could provide basis for the development of fermented cordyceps powder tablets.

  13. Isothermal deformation of gamma titanium aluminide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Singh, J.P.; Tuval, E.; Weiss, I.

    1996-01-01

    Gamma titanium aluminide has received considerable attention in recent years from the automotive industry as a potential material for making rotating and reciprocating components to produce a quieter and more efficient engine. The objectives of this study were to identify processing routes for the manufacture of automobile valves from gamma titanium aluminide. The issues considered were microstructure and composition of the material, and processing parameters such as deformation rates, temperatures, and total deformation. This paper examines isothermal deformation of gamma titanium aluminide in order to develop a processing window for this type of material

  14. Clinical bending of nickel titanium wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Chain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the evolution and the involvement of Nickel Titanium wires in the field of Orthodontics. The treatment plan has evolved with the use of low force Nickel Titanium wires. Because of their high springback, low stiffness, they are the key initial wires in leveling and alignment but have poor formability. Since poor formability limits its ability to create variable arch forms thus; limits the form of treatment. We have devised a method to bend the Nickel Titanium wires to help in our inventory but also customized the wire according to the treatment.

  15. Titanium exposure and yellow nail syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ataya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Yellow nail syndrome is a rare disease of unclear etiology. We describe a patient who develops yellow nail syndrome, with primary nail and sinus manifestations, shortly after amalgam dental implants. A study of the patient's nail shedding showed elevated nail titanium levels. The patient had her dental implants removed and had complete resolution of her sinus symptoms with no change in her nail findings. Since the patient's nail findings did not resolve we do not believe titanium exposure is a cause of her yellow nail syndrome but perhaps a possible relationship exists between titanium exposure and yellow nail syndrome that requires further studies.

  16. Current assisted superplastic forming of titanium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Guofeng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current assisted superplastic forming combines electric heating technology and superplastic forming technology, and can overcome some shortcomings of traditional superplastic forming effectively, such as slow heating rate, large energy loss, low production efficiency, etc. Since formability of titanium alloy at room temperature is poor, current assisted superplastic forming is suitable for titanium alloy. This paper mainly introduces the application of current assisted superplastic forming in the field of titanium alloy, including forming technology of double-hemisphere structure and bellows.

  17. Stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statler, G. R.; Spretnak, J. W.; Beck, F. H.; Fontana, M. G.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen on the properties of metals, including titanium and its alloys, was investigated. The basic theories of stress corrosion of titanium alloys are reviewed along with the literature concerned with the effect of absorbed hydrogen on the mechanical properties of metals. Finally, the basic modes of metal fracture and their importance to this study is considered. The experimental work was designed to determine the effects of hydrogen concentration on the critical strain at which plastic instability along pure shear directions occurs. The materials used were titanium alloys Ti-8Al-lMo-lV and Ti-5Al-2.5Sn.

  18. Titanium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fage, Simon W; Muris, Joris; Jakobsen, Stig S

    2016-01-01

    most of the studies reviewed have important limitations, Ti seems not to penetrate a competent skin barrier, either as pure Ti, alloy, or as Ti oxide NPs. However, there are some indications of Ti penetration through the oral mucosa. We conclude that patch testing with the available Ti preparations...... evaluation. Reports on clinical allergy and adverse events have rarely been published. Whether this is because of unawareness of possible adverse reactions to this specific metal, difficulties in detection methods, or the metal actually being relatively safe to use, is still unresolved....

  19. Low-valent pentafulvene titanium dinitrogen complex as a precursor for cationic titanium complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scherer, Axel; Haase, Detlev; Saak, Wolfgang; Beckhaus, Ruediger; Meetsma, Auke; Bouwkamp, Marco W.; Beckhaus, Rüdiger

    2009-01-01

    Treatment of titanium dinitrogen complex [Cp*(eta(6)-C(5)H(4)=C(10)H(14))Ti](2)(mu-N(2)) (1) with ferrocenium borate, [Cp(2)Fe][BPh(4)], in THF results in oxidation of the titanium center, affording the titanium(IV) pentafulvene compound [Cp*(eta(6)-C(5)H(4)=C(10)H(14))Ti(THF)][BPh(4)] (2).

  20. Gentamicin-Eluting Titanium Dioxide Nanotubes Grown on the Ultrafine-Grained Titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemati, Sima Hashemi; Hadjizadeh, Afra

    2017-08-01

    Titanium (Ti)-based materials is the most appropriate choices for the applications as orthopedic and dental implants. In this regard, ultrafine-grained (UFG) titanium with an enhanced mechanical properties and surface energy has attracted more attention. Titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) nanotubes grown on the titanium could enhance bone bonding, cellular response and are good reservoirs for loading drugs and antibacterial agents. This article investigates gentamicin loading into and release from the TiO 2 nanotubes, grown on the UFG compared to coarse-grained (CG) titanium substrate surfaces. Equal Channel Angular Pressing (ECAP) was employed to produce the UFG structure titanium. TiO 2 nanotubes were grown by the anodizing technique on both UFG and CG titanium substrate surfaces. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging confirmed TiO 2 nanotube growth on the surface. The UV-vis spectroscopy analysis results show that the amount of gentamicin load-release in the anodized UFG titanium sample is higher than that of CG one which can be explained in terms of thicker TiO 2 nanotube arrays layer formed on UFG sample. Moreover, the anodized UFG titanium samples released the drug in a longer time than CG (1 day for the UFG titanium vs. 3 h for the CG one). Regarding wettability analysis, anodized UFG titanium sample showed more enhanced hydrophilicity than CG counterpart. Therefore, the significantly smaller grain size of pure titanium provided by the ECAP technique coupled with appropriate subsequent anodization treatment not only offers a good combination of biocompatibility and adequate mechanical properties but also it provides a delayed release condition for gentamicin.

  1. Melt-drop technique for the production of high-purity metal powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldinger, F.; Linck, E.; Claussen, N.

    1977-01-01

    The production of high-purity powders of metals and alloys such as beryllium, titanium alloys, or superalloys is a problem. Oxidation of these materials cannot be avoided. Oxidation occurs in inert gases and even in reducing atmospheres when any gas impurities are present. Therefore, the powder production of these materials has to be performed either in high vacuum or at least in a static atmosphere of inert gas purified immediately before coming into contact with the disintegrating material. These requirements are very well met by the melt-drop technique presented in this paper, especially for coarse powders which must not necessarily be cold-workable. This is true, for example, for superalloys where high-temperature applications require large grain sizes; or in titanium alloys because the final microstructure will be achieved by a thermomechanical treatment. In the case of beryllium and beryllium alloys, where grain sizes <5 μm are desired, further milling is necessary. But the melt-drop technique offers a simple and clean method directly from the purifying process of vacuum melting. In melt-drop processes a liquid metal flows through a nozzle at the bottom of a crucible or the melt is just poured through a sieve. The theory of disintegration of a liquid jet into droplets, dates back to the 19th century. More recent investigations attempted to produce uniformly sized droplets by applying a capillary wave of given wave length to the jet. But this has been done only with non-metallic materials. Evidence is presented to prove the theory and show that this concept is applicable to the production of metal powders with controlled particle size

  2. Polycapillary optics for powder diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huapeng; MacDonald, Carolyn A.; Gibson, Walter M.; Chik, John; Parsegian, Adrian; Ponomarev, Igor Y.

    2001-12-01

    In this paper, we describe a low power system using Polycapillary collimating and focusing optics that were designed to collect Cu Ka radiation from an Oxford Ultra-Bright micro-focus source for X-ray powder diffraction measurements. The characterizations of the source and polycapillary optics are presented. A collimator with two apertures was used to block high energy X-rays. An optic alignment system was designed to optimize coupling between the optics and the source, taking into account the maximum radiation direction from the source. Several powder sample data sets were collected with this system and their qualities are compared with data sets from the same samples taken with an Enraf-Nonius FR590 sealed-tube source system. Discussion is also presented for further improving the performance of this low power system.

  3. Powder Diffraction in Zeolite Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Allen W.

    This tutorial discusses the fundamental principles of X-ray diffraction and its applications in zeolite science. The early sections review the physics of diffraction, crystal symmetry, and reciprocal space. We discuss how the intensity of diffracted radiation is affected both by geometric effects involving detection (the Lorentz-polarization factor) and by the arrangement of atoms within the crystal (the structure factor). The differences between powder diffraction and single-crystal diffraction are then described, and differences between X-ray and neutron diffraction are also discussed. Later sections describe the effects of symmetry, lattice substitution, crystallite size, residual strain, preferred orientation, and X-ray absorption. Special emphasis is placed on the proper application of the Scherrer analysis in reporting crystalize size. The principles of structure solution from direct methods and Patterson methods are then introduced, and a description of Rietveld analysis is given. Finally the effects of stacking disorder on a powder diffraction pattern are presented.

  4. Synthesis of TiO{sub 2} nano-powders prepared from purified sulphate leach liquor of red mud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsakiridis, P.E., E-mail: ptsakiri@central.ntua.gr [School of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens (Greece); Oustadakis, P.; Katsiapi, A.; Perraki, M.; Agatzini-Leonardou, S. [School of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens (Greece)

    2011-10-30

    Highlights: {yields} Ti can be recovered from red mud leach liquor by 40% Cyanex 272 in toluene. {yields} 3 stages are required for Ti extraction at pH = 0.3, T = 25 {sup o}C and A/O = 1.5. {yields} Ti can be stripped from loaded Cyanex 272 with diluted HCl at 25 {sup o}C. {yields} TiO{sub 2} is precipitated as anatase at pH = 6 and T = 95 {sup o}C, using MgO pulp. {yields} Fe in the precipitate did not exceed 0.3%, whereas no Al was detected. - Abstract: The research work presented in this paper is focused on the development of a purification process of red mud sulphate leach liquor for the recovery of titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}) nano-powders in the form of anatase. Initially, titanium was extracted over iron and aluminium from the leach liquor by solvent extraction using Cyanex 272 in toluene, at pH: 0.3 and T: 25 {sup o}C, with 40% extractant concentration. Stripping of the loaded, with titanium, organic phase was carried out by diluted HCl (3 mol/L) at ambient temperature. Finally, the recovery of titanium nano-powder, in the form of anatase, was performed by chemical precipitation at pH: 6 and T: 95 {sup o}C, using 10 wt% MgO pulp as neutralizing agent. The produced precipitates were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and thermogravimetric/differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA). Their morphological characteristics and microstructure were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). High grade titanium white precipitate, in the form of anatase, was obtained. Iron concentration in the precipitate did not exceed 0.3%, whereas no aluminium was detected.

  5. Manufacture of uranium dioxide powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, M.

    1976-01-01

    Uranium dioxide powder is prepared by the AUC (ammonium uranyl carbonate) method. Supplementing the known process steps, the AUC, after separation from the mother liquor, is washed with an ammonium hydrogen carbonate or an NH 4 OH solution and is subsequently post-treated with a liquid which reduces the surface tension of the residual water in an AUC. Such a liquid is, for instance, alcohol

  6. Synthesis and characterization on titanium dioxide prepared by precipitation and hydrothermal treatment; Sintese e caracterizacao de dioxido de titanio preparado por precipitacao e tratamento hidrotermico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Andre V.P. dos; Yoshito, Walter K.; Lazar, Dolores R.R.; Ussui, Valter, E-mail: vussui@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Surface properties of titanium dioxide (titania) are outstanding among ceramic materials and enables uses as catalysts, photoelectrochemical devices, solar cells and others. In many of these applications, it is necessary to keep the anatase phase, that is stable only in low temperatures (<400 deg C). In the present work, the influence of hydrothermal treatment on physical characteristics and crystal structure of titania powders synthesized by precipitation was investigated. Characterizations of obtained powders were carried out by X-ray diffraction, surface area analysis by N2 gas sorption (BET) and microstructure of powders and ceramics were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. As prepared powders were formed as cylindrical pellets by uniaxial pressing and sintered at 1500 deg C for 01 hour. Results showed that anatase phase without formation of rutile phase can be formed in hydrothermally treated samples . Rutile phase is predominant in calcined and/or sintered samples (author)

  7. Terahertz dielectric measurements of household powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Usman A.; Afsar, Mohammed N.

    2007-09-01

    The dielectric properties of common household powders from 0.6 to 1.2 THz are presented in this paper. Terahertz Dispersive Fourier Transform Spectroscopy was used to yield the dielectric properties of powders as a continuous function of frequency. Tests were conducted using a polarized interferometer and two cryogenically-cooled high frequency detectors. Dielectric spectroscopy was utilized to provide high-resolution and precise information on the dielectric spectra of powders including the powder's unique resonance signature. This signature can be employed to detect the presence of a hoax or harmful powder within a baggage or mail package.

  8. [Advances in studies on bear bile powder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chao-fan; Gao, Guo-jian; Liu, Ying

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, a detailed analysis was made on relevant literatures about bear bile powder in terms of chemical component, pharmacological effect and clinical efficacy, indicating bear bile powder's significant pharmacological effects and clinical application in treating various diseases. Due to the complex composition, bear bile powder is relatively toxic. Therefore, efforts shall be made to study bear bile powder's pharmacological effects, clinical application, chemical composition and toxic side-effects, with the aim to provide a scientific basis for widespread reasonable clinical application of bear bile powder.

  9. Dynamic compaction of ceramic powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cline, C.F.

    1982-06-10

    Dynamic consolidation is a technique for densifying powder ensembles to near theoretical with or without external application of heat. The technique itself is simple: the confined powder, initially at a green density of approx. 50% encounters a high pressure shock wave which exceeds the yield strength and densifies as the wave proceeds through the compact. The time scales and pressure range from 1-10's of microseconds and 10-100's of kilobars (10 Kb = 1 GPa). The short time scale of the pressure pulse during the compaction stage inhibits kinetic processes which have longer time constants. The pressure pulse can be delivered to the green compact by a number of techniques, i.e. high explosive, projectile. The methods differ in the degree that one can control the amplitude, duration, and nature of the pressure pulse. The lecture compares powders compacted by explosive and light gas guns and when possible characterize their resulting structures and properties, using AlN as example. 14 figures.

  10. Synthesis of Titanium Oxycarbide from Titanium Slag by Methane-Containing Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Jie; Fatollahi-Fard, Farzin; Pistorius, Petrus Christiaan; Chou, Kuo-Chih

    2018-02-01

    In this study, reaction steps of a process for synthesis of titanium oxycarbide from titanium slag were demonstrated. This process involves the reduction of titanium slag by a methane-hydrogen-argon mixture at 1473 K (1200 °C) and the leaching of the reduced products by hydrofluoric acid near room temperature to remove the main impurity (Fe3Si). Some iron was formed by disproportionation of the main M3O5 phase before gaseous reduction started. Upon reduction, more iron formed first, followed by reduction of titanium dioxide to suboxides and eventually oxycarbide.

  11. Effect of plasma nitriding and titanium nitride coating on the corrosion resistance of titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianli; Bai, Shizhu; Li, Fang; Li, Dongmei; Zhang, Jing; Tian, Min; Zhang, Qian; Tong, Yu; Zhang, Zichuan; Wang, Guowei; Guo, Tianwen; Ma, Chufan

    2016-09-01

    The passive film on the surface of titanium can be destroyed by immersion in a fluoridated acidic medium. Coating with titanium nitride (TiN) may improve the corrosion resistance of titanium. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of duplex treatment with plasma nitriding and TiN coating on the corrosion resistance of cast titanium. Cast titanium was treated with plasma nitriding and TiN coating. The corrosion resistance of the duplex-treated titanium in fluoride-containing artificial saliva was then investigated through electrochemical and immersion tests. The corroded surface was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive spectroscopy surface scan analysis. The data were analyzed using ANOVA (α=.05) RESULTS: Duplex treatment generated a dense and uniform TiN film with a thickness of 4.5 μm. Compared with untreated titanium, the duplex-treated titanium displayed higher corrosion potential (Ecorr) values (Pcorrosion current density (Icorr) values (Pcorrosion resistance of cast titanium in a fluoride-containing environment. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Titanium Aluminide Casting Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bünck, Matthias; Stoyanov, Todor; Schievenbusch, Jan; Michels, Heiner; Gußfeld, Alexander

    2017-12-01

    Titanium aluminide alloys have been successfully introduced into civil aircraft engine technology in recent years, and a significant order volume increase is expected in the near future. Due to its beneficial buy-to-fly ratio, investment casting bears the highest potential for cost reduction of all competing production technologies for TiAl-LPTB. However, highest mechanical properties can be achieved by TiAl forging. In view of this, Access e.V. has developed technologies for the production of TiAl investment cast parts and TiAl die cast billets for forging purposes. While these parts meet the highest requirements, establishing series production and further optimizing resource and economic efficiency are present challenges. In order to meet these goals, Access has recently been certified according to aircraft standards, aiming at qualifying parts for production on technology readiness level 6. The present work gives an overview of the phases of development and certification.

  13. Neutron scattering and models: Titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, A.B.

    1997-07-01

    Differential neutron elastic-scattering cross sections of elemental titanium were measured from 4.5 {r_arrow} 10.0 MeV in incident energy increments of {approx} 0.5 MeV. At each energy the measurements were made at forty or more scattering angles distributed between {approx} 17 and 160{degree}. Concurrently, differential neutron inelastic-scattering cross sections were measured for observed excitations of 0.975 {+-} 0.034, 1.497 {+-} 0.033, 2.322 {+-} 0.058, 3.252 {+-} 0.043, 3.700 {+-} 0.093, 4.317 {+-} 0.075 and 4.795 {+-} 0.100 MeV. All of the observed inelastically-scattered neutron groups were composites of contributions from several isotopes and/or levels. The experimental results were used to develop energy-average optical, statistical and coupled-channels models.

  14. Erbium diffusion in titanium dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Basse

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The diffusivity of erbium in the anatase phase of titanium dioxide (TiO2 has been studied for various temperatures ranging from 800 °C to 1, 000 °C. Samples of TiO2, with a 10 nm thick buried layer containing 0.5 at% erbium, were fabricated by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering and subsequently heat treated. The erbium concentration profiles were measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry, allowing for determination of the temperature-dependent diffusion coefficients. These were found to follow an Arrhenius law with an activation energy of ( 2.1 ± 0.2 eV. X-ray diffraction revealed that the TiO2 films consisted of polycrystalline grains of size ≈ 100 nm.

  15. Hafnium- and Titanium-Coated Tungsten Powders for Kinetic Energy Penetrators, Phase 1, SBIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-01

    the kinetics of its formation would be rather slow at the temperatures of interest due to the refractory nature of both hafnium and tungsten. With...0015/3). 6. T.B. Massalski, Binary Alloy Phase Diagrams (ASM, Metals Park, OH, 1986). 7. D.T. Vier, "Thermal and Other Properties of Refractories ...produces a strain rate of 1 x 105 in the test sample. This strain rate deposits )a. 3e she.r sb’ain energy in the test sample. ABAQUS , a finite

  16. Ceramic material suitable for repair of a space vehicle component in a microgravity and vacuum environment, method of making same, and method of repairing a space vehicle component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedell, James A. (Inventor); Easler, Timothy E. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A precursor of a ceramic adhesive suitable for use in a vacuum, thermal, and microgravity environment. The precursor of the ceramic adhesive includes a silicon-based, preceramic polymer and at least one ceramic powder selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide, aluminum nitride, boron carbide, boron oxide, boron nitride, hafnium boride, hafnium carbide, hafnium oxide, lithium aluminate, molybdenum silicide, niobium carbide, niobium nitride, silicon boride, silicon carbide, silicon oxide, silicon nitride, tin oxide, tantalum boride, tantalum carbide, tantalum oxide, tantalum nitride, titanium boride, titanium carbide, titanium oxide, titanium nitride, yttrium oxide, zirconium diboride, zirconium carbide, zirconium oxide, and zirconium silicate. Methods of forming the ceramic adhesive and of repairing a substrate in a vacuum and microgravity environment are also disclosed, as is a substrate repaired with the ceramic adhesive.

  17. Toughened and corrosion- and wear-resistant composite structures and fabrication methods thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seals, Roland D.; Ripley, Edward B.; Hallman, Russell L.

    2017-06-20

    Composite structures having a reinforced material interjoined with a substrate, wherein the reinforced material comprises a compound selected from the group consisting of titanium monoboride, titanium diboride, and combinations thereof.

  18. Photocatalytic Activity in CH3CN Related to the Surface Properties of TiO2 Powders Prepared by Sol-Gel Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Bettoni

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Some TiO2 powders, prepared from titanium(IVtetraisopropoxide by the sol-gel method and thermally treated between 100 and 1000∘C, have been characterized by X-ray powder diffraction and by nitrogen adsorption and desorption at 77 K to calculate the BET-specific surface area, from which the micropore volume and the external surface area can be derived. The photocatalytic activity (ka of the above powders has been evaluated considering the TiO2-sensitized photo-oxidation of 4-methoxybenzyl alcohol in CH3CN as the test reaction. The decrease of ka have been related to the decrease of the BET surface area, the micropore volume, and the external surface area of the TiO2 powders, but a satisfactory linear correlation is observed only for the last superficial parameter.

  19. Characterization of dense lead lanthanum titanate ceramics prepared from powders synthesized by the oxidant peroxo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, Alexandre H.; Souza, Flavio L.; Chiquito, Adenilson J.; Longo, Elson; Leite, Edson R.; Camargo, Emerson R.

    2010-01-01

    Nanosized powders of lead lanthanum titanate (Pb 1-x La x TiO 3 ) were synthesized by means of the oxidant-peroxo method (OPM). Lanthanum was added from 5 to 30% in mol through the dissolution of lanthanum oxide in nitric acid, followed by the addition of lead nitrate to prepare a solution of lead and lanthanum nitrates, which was dripped into an aqueous solution of titanium peroxo complexes, forming a reactive amorphous precipitate that could be crystallized by heat treatment. Crystallized powders were characterized by FT-Raman spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction, showing that tetragonal perovskite structure is obtained for samples up to 25% of lanthanum and cubic perovskite for samples with 30% of lanthanum. Powders containing 25 and 30% in mol of lanthanum were calcined at 700 deg. C for 2 h, and in order to determine the relative dielectric permittivity and the phase transition behaviour from ferroelectric-to-paraelectric, ceramic pellets were prepared and sintered at 1100 or 1150 deg. C for 2 h and subjected to electrical characterization. It was possible to observe that sample containing 25% in mol of La presented a normal behaviour for the phase transition, whereas the sample containing 30% in mol of La presented a diffuse phase transition and relaxor behaviour.

  20. Evaluation of microstructure and phase relations in a powder processed Ti-44Al-12Nb alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, S.G.; Reddy, R.G.; Wu, J.; Holthus, J.

    1995-01-01

    Titanium aluminides based on the ordered face-centered tetragonal γTiAl phase possess attractive properties, such as low density, high melting point, good elevated temperature strength, modulus retention, and oxidation resistance, making these alloys potential high-temperature structural materials. These alloys can be processed by both ingot metallurgy and powder metallurgy routes. In the present study, three variations of the powder metallurgy route were studied to process a Ti-44Al-12Nb (at.%) alloy: (a) cold pressing followed by reaction sintering (CP process); (b) cold pressing, vacuum hot pressing, and then sintering (HP process); and (c) arc melting, hydride-dehydride process to make the alloy powder, cold isostatic pressing, and then sintering (AM process). Microstructural and phase relations were studied by x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with an energy-dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The phases identified were Ti 3 Al and TiAl; an additional Nb 2 Al phase was observed in the HP sample. The microstructures of CP and HP processed samples are porous and chemically inhomogeneous whereas the AM processed sample revealed fine equiaxed microstructure. This refinement of the microstructure is attributed to the fine, homogeneous powder produced by the hydride-dehydride process and the high compaction pressures

  1. Titanium Heat Pipe Thermal Plane, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thermacore Inc. proposes an innovative titanium heat pipe thermal plane for passive thermal control of individual cells within a fuel cell stack. The proposed...

  2. Corrosion resistance of titanium alloys for dentistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laskawiec, J.; Michalik, R.

    2001-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys belong to biomaterials which the application scope in medicine increases. Some properties of the alloys, such as high mechanical strength, low density, low Young's modulus, high corrosion resistance and good biotolerance decide about it. The main areas of the application of titanium and its alloys are: orthopedics and traumatology, cardiosurgery, faciomaxillary surgery and dentistry. The results of investigations concerning the corrosion resistance of the technical titanium and Ti6Al14V alloy and comparatively a cobalt alloy of the Vitallium type in the artificial saliva is presented in the work. Significantly better corrosion resistance of titanium and the Ti6Al14V than the Co-Cr-Mo alloy was found. (author)

  3. Titanium nitride nanoparticles for therapeutic applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Kildishev, Alexander V.; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Titanium nitride nanoparticles exhibit plasmonic resonances in the biological transparency window where high absorption efficiencies can be obtained with small dimensions. Both lithographic and colloidal samples are examined from the perspective of nanoparticle thermal therapy. © 2014 OSA....

  4. Titanium Nanocomposite: Lightweight Multifunction Structural Material

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to research and develop lightweight metal matrix nanocomposites (MMnC) using a Titanium (Ti) metal matrix. Ti MMnC will crosscut the advancement of both...

  5. Titanium Heat Pipe Thermal Plane, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the Phase II program is to complete the development of the titanium heat pipe thermal plane and establish all necessary steps for production of this...

  6. Titanium Brazing for Structures and Survivability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Doherty, Kevin J; Tice, Jason R; Szewczyk, Steven T; Glide, Gary A

    2007-01-01

    Titanium is a candidate as a structural material for all new tactical and armored ground vehicles, because of its high strength-to-weight ratio, excellent corrosion resistance, and inherent ballistic resistance...

  7. The effect of temperature on structural changes of NI55CO45 amorphous powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spasojević M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Cobalt and nickel alloy powders were obtained by electrochemical deposition on a titanium cathode from an ammonium solution of cobalt and nickel sulfate. Powders of a specific chemical structure and composition, particle shape and size were obtained by an appropriate choice of electrolysis parameters, current density, deposit growth rate and solution temperature and composition. Within the current density range of 5 - 450 mAcm-2, the current density did not significantly affect the chemical composition of the powders, but had a significant effect on the particle structure, shape and size. Crystal particles formed at a current density lower than 30 mAcm-2. Amorphous powders were obtained at a current density higher than 50 mAcm-2. Structural changes of the obtained amorphous powder of 55mol.% Ni, 45 mol.% Co, pressed under the pressure of 100 MPa, were investigated by measuring the temperature dependence of electrical resistance in isothermal and non-isothermal conditions varying from room temperature to 750°C. The process of thermal stabilization of defects that appeared during pressing occurred within the temperature range of 200-390˚C. The DSC method was used to determine that the powder crystallization process occurred in two stages with peak temperatures of the exothermal maximum in the first and second stage of T1 = 438˚C and T2 = 573˚C, respectively. A distinct correlation between the change of electrical resistance and the crystallization process was established. The reduction of electrical resistively occurs during each crystallization stage.

  8. Interfacial reactions between titanium and borate glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brow, R.K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Saha, S.K.; Goldstein, J.I. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science

    1992-12-31

    Interfacial reactions between melts of several borate glasses and titanium have been investigated by analytical scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A thin titanium boride interfacial layer is detected by XPS after short (30 minutes) thermal treatments. ASEM analyses after longer thermal treatments (8--120 hours) reveal boron-rich interfacial layers and boride precipitates in the Ti side of the interface.

  9. Free Form Low Cost Fabrication Using Titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-29

    better than that of austenitic or ferritic stainless. Alloys can have ultimate strengths comparable to iron base superalloys , such as A286, or cobalt ...nickel-base superalloys . "* The tensile strength as an alloy of titanium can be comparable to that of lower-strength marterisitic stainless and is...approximately four times that of stainless steel, is comparable to that of superalloys . "* Titanium is exceptionally corrosion resistant. It often exceeds the

  10. Amorphouslike diffraction pattern in solid metallic titanium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Y.; Fang, Y.Z.; Kikegawa, T.

    2005-01-01

    Amorphouslike diffraction patterns of solid elemental titanium have been detected under high pressure and high temperature using in situ energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction and a multianvil press. The onset pressure and the temperature of formation of amorphous titanium is found to be close...... for preparing single-element bulk amorphous metals. The results reported may open a new way to preparing single-element bulk amorphous metals with a high thermal stability....

  11. Backscatter radiation at tissue-titanium interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosengren, B.; Wulff, L.; Carlsson, E.; Carlsson, J.; Strid, K.G.; Montelius, A.

    1993-01-01

    The induced secondary electrons from a metal surface by diagnostic X-rays are thought to contribute to cell damage near the tissue-metal boundaries of metal implants. Titanium implants are becoming increasingly more popular for tissue reconstructions and it is rather often desirable to take radiographs of the operated area. In this study we compared the biological effects of radiation on cultured mammalian test cells grown on titanium plates with the radiation effects on cells that were grown on plastic control plates. In order to study the acute radiation effects on cell growth it was necessary to work with rather high radiation doses (0.7-5 Gy). Photon energies, suitable for diagnostic radiography in odontology, 65 kV, were applied. We found that the cells grown on titanium plates were, in terms of the applied dose in the surrounding culture medium, more sensitive to the irradiations than the cells growing on plastic plates. The survival curve for the cells on titanium had a steeper slope, showed no shoulder in the low-dose region and looked like curves normally obtained for high LET radiation. It was not possible to resolve to what degree the titanium-dependent changes were due to an increased dose near the titanium surface or to a change in the radiobiological effectiveness. Although there was a significant decrease in cellular survival near the metal, postoperative intraoral radiography after titanium implantations need not be excluded. The maximal doses given in odontological X-ray examinations are less than 1 mGy and, if the results in this study are applied, the biological effects near the titanium implant will correspond to biological effects in soft tissue of doses less than 20 mGy which is lower than the doses that give acute effects. The risk of acute healing disturbances are significant only at much higher radiation doses. (orig.)

  12. Reverse freeze casting: a new method for fabricating highly porous titanium scaffolds with aligned large pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yook, Se-Won; Jung, Hyun-Do; Park, Chang-Hoon; Shin, Kwan-Ha; Koh, Young-Hag; Estrin, Yuri; Kim, Hyoun-Ee

    2012-07-01

    Highly porous titanium with aligned large pores up to 500 μm in size, which is suitable for scaffold applications, was successfully fabricated using the reverse freeze casting method. In this process we have newly developed, the Ti powders migrated spontaneously along the pre-aligned camphene boundaries at a temperature of 45.5°C and formed a titanium-camphene mixture with an aligned structure; this was followed by freeze drying and sintering. As the casting time increased from 24 to 48 h, the initial columnar structures turned into lamellar structures, with the porosity decreasing from 69 to 51%. This reduction in porosity caused the compressive yield strength to increase from 121 to 302 MPa, with an elastic modulus of the samples being in the range of 2-5 GPa. In addition, it was demonstrated that reverse freeze casting can also be successfully applied to various other raw powders, suggesting that the method developed in this work opens up new avenues for the production of a range of porous metallic and ceramic scaffolds with highly aligned pores. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles: synthesis, X-Ray line analysis and chemical composition study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chenari, Hossein Mahmoudi, E-mail: mahmoudi_hossein@guilan.ac.ir, E-mail: h.mahmoudiph@gmail.com [University of Guilan, Rasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Seibel, Christoph; Hauschild, Dirk; Reinert, Friedrich [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology - KIT, Gemeinschaftslabor für Nanoanalytik, Karlsruhe (Germany); Abdollahian, Hossein [Nanotechnology Research Center of Urmia University, Urmia, (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles have been synthesized by the sol-gel method using titanium alkoxide and isopropanol as a precursor. The structural properties and chemical composition of the TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were studied using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.The X-ray powder diffraction pattern confirms that the particles are mainly composed of the anatase phase with the preferential orientation along [101] direction. The physical parameters such as strain, stress and energy density were investigated from the Williamson- Hall (W-H) plot assuming a uniform deformation model (UDM), and uniform deformation energy density model (UDEDM). The W-H analysis shows an anisotropic nature of the strain in nano powders. The scanning electron microscopy image shows clear TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles with particle sizes varying from 60 to 80nm. The results of mean particle size of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles show an inter correlation with the W-H analysis and SEM results. Our X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra show that nearly a complete amount of titanium has reacted to TiO{sub 2}. (author)

  14. Surface defects in PMD-EDM of titanium alloy, Ti-6246

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharif, S.; Rival; Noordin, M.Y.

    2007-01-01

    Titanium alloys which are categorized as lightweight materials, poses greater strength and toughness are usually known to create major challenges during machining. Electrical discharge machining (EDM) which is very prominent amongst the non-conventional machining methods is expected to be used quite extensively in machining titanium alloys. EDM process is known to cause surface damaged layers which consists of three types of surfaces; spattered, recast and heat affected zone. This project was undertaken to study the machining performance of EDM and powder mixed dielectric-electrical discharge machining (PMD E DM) in machining Ti-6246 with respect to the surface integrity of machined surface by using copper tungsten (CuW) electrode. The machining parameters considered are voltage (V), current (I), pulse on time(T on ), interval time (T off ) and concentration of the SiC powder (C) in dielectric fluid. The respected responses investigated include surface alteration and overcut. It was found that PMD-EDM process produced less damaging effect on the surface layer of the machined surface and widened the overcut. (author)

  15. Deposition and Characterization of the Titanium-Based Coating by a Multi-Chamber Detonation Sprayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arseenko M.Yu.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work introduces some of the aspects of the deposition of titanium-based coating (80-120 μm thick on aluminium samples using a multi-chamber detonation sprayer (MCDS. The characteristic feature of MCDS is that the powder is accelerated by using combustion products that are formed in MCDS chambers and are converged before entering the nozzle, where they interact with the two-phase gas-powder cloud. The microstructures and properties of the coating were characterized with the use of scanning electronic microscopes (SEM, optical microscope (OM, X-ray Diffraction (XRD techniques, and Vickers hardness tester with a 50 g test load. Wear tests were carried out using a computer controlled pin-on-disc type tribometer. It was established that MCDS has provided the conditions for formation of a dense titanium-based coating with a porosity of less than 1.0%, microhardness 810±250 HV0.05 and a specific wear rate of 2.077∙10-4 mm3(m∙N-1.

  16. Influence of polyetheretherketone coatings on the Ti-13Nb-13Zr titanium alloy's bio-tribological properties and corrosion resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sak, Anita; Moskalewicz, Tomasz; Zimowski, Sławomir; Cieniek, Łukasz; Dubiel, Beata; Radziszewska, Agnieszka; Kot, Marcin; Łukaszczyk, Alicja

    2016-06-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) coatings of 70-90μm thick were electrophoretically deposited from a suspension of PEEK powder in ethanol on near-β Ti-13Nb-13Zr titanium alloy. In order to produce good quality coatings, the composition of the suspension (pH) and optimized deposition parameters (applied voltage and time) were experimentally selected. The as-deposited coatings exhibited the uniform distribution of PEEK powders on the substrate. The subsequent annealing at a temperature above the PEEK melting point enabled homogeneous, semi-crystalline coatings with spherulitic morphology to be produced. A micro-scratch test showed that the coatings exhibited very good adhesion to the titanium alloy substrate. Coating delamination was not observed even up to a maximal load of 30N. The PEEK coatings significantly improved the tribological properties of the Ti-13Nb-13Zr alloy. The coefficient of friction was reduced from 0.55 for an uncoated alloy to 0.40 and 0.12 for a coated alloy in a dry sliding and sliding in Ringer's solution, respectively. The PEEK coatings exhibited excellent wear resistance in both contact conditions. Their wear rate was more than 200 times smaller compared with the wear rate of the uncoated Ti-13Nb-13Zr alloy. The obtained results indicate that electrophoretically deposited PEEK coatings on the near-β titanium alloy exhibit very useful properties for their prospective tribological applications in medicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A neutron diffraction study of oxygen and nitrogen ordering in a kinetically stable orthorhombic iron doped titanium oxynitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, On Ying; Parkin, Ivan P.; Hyett, Geoffrey

    2012-06-01

    The synthesis of a polycrystalline powder sample of iron doped orthorhombic titanium oxynitride, Ti2.92Fe0.01O4.02N0.98, on the scale of 0.7 g has been achieved. This was conducted by the unusual route of delamination from a steel substrate of a thin film deposited using atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition. The structure of the titanium oxynitride is presented, determined from a combined analysis of X-ray and neutron powder diffraction data. The use of neutron diffraction allows the position of the oxygen and nitrogen ions in the material to be reported unambiguously for the first time. In this study Ti2.92Fe0.01O4.02N0.98 is found to crystallise in the Cmcm space group, iso-structural pseudobrookite, with lattice parameters a=3.81080(6) Å, b=9.6253(2) Å, and c=9.8859(2) Å, and contains partial oxygen-nitrogen ordering. Of the three anion sites in this structure one is exclusively occupied by oxygen, while the remaining two sites are occupied by oxygen and nitrogen in a disordered manner. Testing indicates that this iron doped titanium oxynitride is a metastable phase that decomposes above 700 °C into TiN and TiO2, the thermodynamic products.

  18. Tin- and titanium-doped gamma-Fe2O3 (maghemite)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helgason, O.; Greneche, J.M.; Berry, F.J.

    2001-01-01

    2.5% and 8% tin- and 8% titanium-doped gamma -Fe2O3 have been synthesized and examined by x-ray powder diffraction, EXAFS, electron microscopy and by Fe-57- and Sn-119-Mossbauer spectroscopy. The Sn- and Ti-K-edge EXAFS show that both tin and titanium adopt octahedral sites in the spinel related...... gamma -Fe2O3 structure. However, whereas tin substitutes for iron on one of the fully occupied sites, titanium adopts the octahedral site, which is only partially occupied. The Fe-57-Mossbauer spectra recorded in the presence of a longitudinal magnetic field of 2-8 T confirm that the tetravalent ions...... adopt the octahedral sites. The canting angles for both sublattices in gamma -Fe2O3 were determined from the in-field Mossbauer spectra. The Sn-119-Mossbauer spectra showed that the maximum hyperfine field sensed by the Sn4+ ions in gamma -Fe2O3 is about 2/3 of that observed in tin-doped Fe3O4...

  19. Titanium Carbide Nanofibers-Reinforced Aluminum Compacts, a New Strategy to Enhance Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil Abdelrazek Khalil

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available TiC nanofibers reinforced Al matrix composites were produced by High Frequency Induction Heat Sintering (HFIHS.The titanium carbide nanofibers with an average diameter of 90 nm are first prepared by electrospinning technique and high temperature calcination process. A composite solution containing polyacrylonitrile and titanium isopropoxide is first electrospun into the nanofibers, which are subsequently stabilized and then calcined to produce the desired TiC nanofibers. The X-ray diffraction pattern and transmission electron microscopy results show that the main phase of the as-synthesized nanofibers is titanium carbide. The TiC nanofibers is then mixed with the aluminum powders and introduced into high frequency induction heat sintering (HFIHS to produce composites of TiC nanofibers reinforced aluminum matrix. The potential application of the TiC nanofibers reinforced aluminum matrix composites was systematically investigated. 99.5% relative density and around 85 HV (833 MPa Vickers hardness of the Al reinforced with 5 wt % TiC nanofiber has been obtained. Furthermore, the sample of Al contains 5 wt % TiC, has the highest value of compression and yield strength of about 415 and 350 MPa, respectively. The ductility of the Al/5 wt % TiC showed increasing with increasing the TiC contents.

  20. Removal of cationic and anionic dyes by immobilised titanium dioxide loaded activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Sook Keng; Zukarnain Zainal; Abdul Halim Abdullah

    2008-01-01

    Combination of adsorption and photodegradation processes induces strong beneficial effects in dye removals. Adding high adsorption capacity activated carbon to photoactive titanium dioxide is an attractive solution due to their potential in removing dyes of diverse chemical characteristics. Recently, immobilisation has been an acceptable approach to overcome the drawbacks encountered with powder suspensions. The present study involves the removals of Victoria Blue R (VBR), a cationic dye and Indigo Carmine (IC), an anionic using approximately one gram of immobilised titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ), activated carbon (AC) and mixture titanium dioxide/ activated carbon (TiO 2 / AC) from 200 mL solution at the concentration of 20 ppm under UV illumination for 4 hours. Comparisons were made in terms of their removal efficiency by applying first-order kinetics model. Immobilised TiO 2 showed total removal of IC in 40 minutes whereas only 44 % of VBR was removed in 2 hours. On the other hand, in the case of immobilised AC, about 87 % of VBR and 6 % of IC were removed in 2 hours. The results obtained using immobilised TiO 2 / AC proved the prominence of this immobilised sample in dealing with VBR and IC by achieving 95 % and 62 % removal respectively in 2 hours. (author)

  1. Hydrocarbon Deposition Attenuates Osteoblast Activity on Titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, R.; Ueno, T.; Migita, S.; Tsutsumi, Y.; Doi, H.; Ogawa, T.; Hanawa, T.; Wakabayashi, N.

    2014-01-01

    Although the reported percentage of bone-implant contact is far lower than 100%, the cause of such low levels of bone formation has rarely been investigated. This study tested the negative biological effect of hydrocarbon deposition onto titanium surfaces, which has been reported to be inevitable. Osteogenic MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured on titanium disks on which the carbon concentration was experimentally regulated to achieve carbon/titanium (C/Ti) ratios of 0.3, 0.7, and 1.0. Initial cellular activities such as cell attachment and cell spreading were concentration-dependently suppressed by the amount of carbon on the titanium surface. The osteoblastic functions of alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium mineralization were also reduced by more than 40% on the C/Ti (1.0) surface. These results indicate that osteoblast activity is influenced by the degree of hydrocarbon contamination on titanium implants and suggest that hydrocarbon decomposition before implant placement may increase the biocompatibility of titanium. PMID:24868012

  2. Superficial characterization of titanium league when submitted to abrasive blasting; Caracterizacao superficial de titanio liga ao ser submetido a tratamento de jateamento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, L.Y.; Leite, I.V.; Szesz, E.M.; Siqueira, C.J.M., E-mail: lsuzuki@neoortho.com.b [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Commercially pure titanium and some of its alloys exhibit a good biocompatibility. These characteristics are frequently used in the manufacture of orthopedic and dental implants. It is possible to modify its surface making it the bioactive using various methods, such as deposition of hydroxyapatite by plasma spray and increasing the roughness of the surface by abrasive blasting. This work is to modify the surface of titanium alloy Ti6Al4V ELI (ASTM F136: 02a) for abrasive blasting and study the morphology, crystallographic phases and the mechanical characteristics of the surface obtained. For such purpose, SEM images, diffraction of X-rays and tests of risk produced by nanoindenter. The sandblasting was done using alumina powder and blasting time of 6s. The morphology of the surfaces of Ti6Al4V ELI changed after sandblasting with increased roughness. It is possible to conclude that after sandblasting the titanium surface do not have a ductile behavior. (author)

  3. Mean-square displacement of atomic complex in titanium carbonitrides TiCxNy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khidirov, I.; Sultanova, S.Kh.; Mukhtarova, N.N.; Tokhtashev, B.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The atomic mean-square displacement (MSD) is one of important characteristics of solids, and one can use it for determination of a number of other characteristics of substances. In this work the MSD of atomic complex were determined for a number of compositions of the cubic titanium carbonitrides TiC x N y using the neutron powder diffraction data. The error of MSD determination was less than 3 %. When determining intensity of diffraction maximum a correction for the thermal diffusion dispersion (TDD) was included in the neutron diffraction patterns. The contribution of TDD in the intensity of diffraction maxima was found to be less than the experiment error (no more than 1,5 %). Such small value of the TDD correction is explained by refractory of materials. The values of MSD in titanium carbonitrides for a number of compositions, determined by the neutron powder diffraction measurements, are given. It is shown, that the dependence of MSD on the concentration (C+N)/Ti has a complex character. With decrease of the total content of metalloids MSD decreases at first, reaching a minimum about concentration (C+N)/Ti≅0.80, and then increases. MSD consists of dynamic and static distortions, where the static distortions in the compounds with variable composition increase with increasing of deviation from stoichiometry. The above anomaly in the dependence of MSD on the total concentration of metalloids, apparently, point to prevalence of dynamic distortions over static ones and to complex character of concentration dependence of interatomic interactions in the titanium carbonitrides. This work was supported by the Supporting Fund for Fundamental Researches of Uzbekistan Academy of Sciences (Grant No. 6-04)

  4. The effect of titanium surface treatment on the interfacial strength of titanium – Thermoplastic composite joints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, Yibo; de Rooij, Matthijn; Grouve, Wouter; Akkerman, Remko

    2017-01-01

    Co-consolidated titanium – carbon fibre reinforced thermoplastic composite hybrid joints show potential for application in aerospace structures. The strength of the interface between the titanium and the thermoplastic composite is crucial for the strength of the entire hybrid joint. Application of a

  5. Artefacts in multimodal imaging of titanium, zirconium and binary titanium-zirconium alloy dental implants: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, Ralf; Schöllchen, Maximilian; Gauer, Tobias; Aarabi, Ghazal; Assaf, Alexandre T; Rendenbach, Carsten; Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta; Semmusch, Jan; Sedlacik, Jan; Heiland, Max; Fiehler, Jens; Siemonsen, Susanne

    2017-02-01

    To analyze and evaluate imaging artefacts induced by zirconium, titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy dental implants. Zirconium, titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy implants were embedded in gelatin and MRI, CT and CBCT were performed. Standard protocols were used for each modality. For MRI, line-distance profiles were plotted to quantify the accuracy of size determination. For CT and CBCT, six shells surrounding the implant were defined every 0.5 cm from the implant surface and histogram parameters were determined for each shell. While titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy induced extensive signal voids in MRI owing to strong susceptibility, zirconium implants were clearly definable with only minor distortion artefacts. For titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy, the MR signal was attenuated up to 14.1 mm from the implant. In CT, titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy resulted in less streak artefacts in comparison with zirconium. In CBCT, titanium-zirconium alloy induced more severe artefacts than zirconium and titanium. MRI allows for an excellent image contrast and limited artefacts in patients with zirconium implants. CT and CBCT examinations are less affected by artefacts from titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy implants compared with MRI. The knowledge about differences of artefacts through different implant materials and image modalities might help support clinical decisions for the choice of implant material or imaging device in the clinical setting.

  6. PIXE analysis of powdered milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallak, A.B.

    1983-01-01

    An accelerator-based study, using proton-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) was performed on four full-cream and four half-cream brands of powdered milk commonly consumed in Jordan. The elements detected in the samples are S, Cl, K, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, Br and Rb. The significance of some of these elements is discussed from the viewpoint of nutrition and also their effect on milk processing and dairy technology. The standard reference milk sample, A-11, which is distributed by IAEA was also examined, and the results for trace elements detected are compared with the values certified by IAEA. (author)

  7. Will nonaerospace applications for titanium ever grow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katrak, Firoze E.; Servi, I. S.; Agarwal, J. C.

    1991-07-01

    Confronted with the currently attractive aerospace markets, titanium producers could choose to minimize their promotional effort in the nonaerospace sector. In such a case, primary producers would continue to give some support to a few nonaerospace market segments but would minimize product and market development in most other areas. Such a modus operandi is quite likely, in which case the 1990s may turn out to be as disappointing for the industrial application of titanium as were the 1980s. Such a trend is not desirable for titanium producers for two reasons: the military aerospace market is likely to shrink in the future,8 and the titanium content of commercial jet engines will decline.9 Thus, titanium producers need to adopt a strategy to increase nonaerospace applications. Such a strategy must accomplish at least the following: • Commit to reducing titanium mill product costs. • Convince potential users that titanium (sponge and) mill products will be available at a sustained cost much below the current cost. No radically new technologies are necessaryzzto meet the target sponge costs (i.e., the current processes can meet cost targets with plant and practice changes). • Begin developing new alloys specifically tailored to nonaerospace applications and lower-cost mill products. If and when new alloys become available, the potential growth in nonaerospace uses would be greater than the 1-10-100 rule, which applies to existing commercially pure titanium. • Work toward reducing value-added component costs by achieving cost reductions in secondary fabrication for selected niche applications. • Offer application engineering and technical support services, including the establishment of training centers (e.g., for field welding). • Develop estimates of cost effectiveness in target applications that will convince the users. If a strategy incorporating these elements is not adopted by titanium producers because of the short-term strength of aerospace demand

  8. Peri-implant bone formation and surface characteristics of rough surface zirconia implants manufactured by powder injection molding technique in rabbit tibiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Seok; Chung, Shin-Hye; Shon, Won-Jun

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate osseointegration in rabbit tibiae and to investigate surface characteristics of novel zirconia implants made by powder injection molding (PIM) technique, using molds with and without roughened inner surfaces. A total of 20 rabbits received three types of external hex implants with identical geometry on the tibiae: machined titanium implants, PIM zirconia implants without mold etching, and PIM zirconia implants with mold etching. Surface characteristics of the three types of implant were evaluated. Removal torque tests and histomorphometric analyses were performed. The roughness of PIM zirconia implants was higher than that of machined titanium implants. The PIM zirconia implants exhibited significantly higher bone-implant contact and removal torque values than the machined titanium implants (P mold showed significantly higher removal torque values than PIM zirconia implants without using roughened mold (P mold etching technique can produce substantially rough surfaces on zirconia implants. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. The Equilibrium Between Titanium Ions and Titanium Metal in NaCl-KCl Equimolar Molten Salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiuyu; Song, Jianxun; Hu, Guojing; Zhu, Xiaobo; Hou, Jungang; Jiao, Shuqiang; Zhu, Hongmin

    2013-08-01

    The equilibrium between metallic titanium and titanium ions, 3Ti2+ ⇌ 2Ti3+ + Ti, in NaCl-KCl equimolar molten salt was reevaluated. At a fixed temperature and an initial concentration of titanium chloride, the equilibrium was achieved by adding an excess amount of sponge titanium in assistant with bubbling of argon into the molten salt. The significance of this work is that the accurate concentrations of titanium ions have been obtained based on a reliable approach for taking samples. Furthermore, the equilibrium constant {{K}}_{{C}} = (x_{{{{Ti}}^{{ 3 { + }}} }}^{{eql}} )3 /(x_{{{{Ti}}^{{ 2 { + }}} }}^{{eql}} )2 was calculated through the best-fitting method under the consideration of the TiOCl dissolution. Indeed, the final results have disclosed that the stable value of KC could be achieved based on all modifications.

  10. Creating nanoshell on the surface of titanium hydride bead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAVLENKO Vyacheslav Ivanovich

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents data on the modification of titanium hydride bead by creating titanium nanoshell on its surface by ion-plasma vacuum magnetron sputtering. To apply titanium nanoshell on the titanium hydride bead vacuum coating plant of multifunctional nanocomposite coatings QVADRA 500 located in the center of high technology was used. Analysis of the micrographs of the original surface of titanium hydride bead showed that the microstructure of the surface is flat, smooth, in addition the analysis of the microstructure of material surface showed the presence of small porosity, roughness, mainly cavities, as well as shallow longitudinal cracks. The presence of oxide film in titanium hydride prevents the free release of hydrogen and fills some micro-cracks on the surface. Differential thermal analysis of both samples was conducted to determine the thermal stability of the initial titanium hydride bead and bead with applied titanium nanoshell. Hydrogen thermal desorption spectra of the samples of the initial titanium hydride bead and bead with applied titanium nanoshell show different thermal stability of compared materials in the temperature range from 550 to 860о C. Titanium nanoshells applied in this way allows increasing the heat resistance of titanium hydride bead – the temperature of starting decomposition is 695о C and temperature when decomposition finishes is more than 1000о C. Modified in this way titanium hydride bead can be used as a filler in the radiation protective materials used in the construction or upgrading biological protection of nuclear power plants.

  11. Isostatic pressing of metal powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cytermann, R.; Auguin, B.; Defresne, A.; Gilles, P.

    1975-01-01

    The process of powders compaction is of great technical importance for the attainment of sintered bodies of high density and strength, or of bodies with controlled porosity. For this purpose, different carbonyl nickel and carbonyl iron powders were isostatically compacted at pressures from 50 to 1300 MN/m 2 (0.5-13kbars). The density of compacts was determined by stereology (quantitative microscopic analysis) and weighing. The two methods were found to be in very good agreement and permit to correlate the density of the compact with the applied pressure, while differentiating the stages of compaction (particle rearrangement, local and homogeneous plastic flow) and showing off the influence of material properties (particle size distribution, particle sphape, ability of the particles to deform, yield stress required for deformation, etc...) The way from one stage to the other was corroborated by scanning electron microscope observation and X-rays diffraction. Electrical resistance and tensile strength measurements were also carried out and permitted to correlate these parameters and the applied pressure [fr

  12. Smart particle production, characterization and powder forensics

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Powdered food ingredients are common yet important in our daily life. The most well-known method to produce these powdered products is via spray drying. Nowadays, it is possible to customize the spray dried products with desired nutrition/physiochemical properties according to the requirements and demands of the consumer market. Powders resulting from different processes (or different process conditions) vary significantly in composition and the functional behaviours. This renders traditional...

  13. In-house characterization of protein powder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Christian Grundahl; Nielsen, Ole Faurskov; Ståhl, Kenny

    2010-01-01

    X-ray powder diffraction patterns of lysozyme and insulin were recorded on a standard in-house powder diffractometer. The experimental powder diffraction patterns were compared with patterns calculated from Protein Data Bank coordinate data. Good agreement was obtained by including straightforward...... to include calculated H-atom positions did not improve the overall fit and was abandoned. The method devised was shown to be a quick and convenient tool for distinguishing precipitates and polymorphs of proteins....

  14. Magnetic finishing of titanium sheet. Jiki wo riyoshita chitanban no kyomen kenma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansai, M.; Sudo, T.; Nakagawa, T. (The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Institute of Industrial Science); Endo, H. (Daido Steel Co. Ltd., Nagoya (Japan))

    1992-02-01

    The result of an experiment is reported, in which a pure titanium thin sheet made of non-magnetic material is finished magnetically using newly developed magnetic abrasives. The apparatus consists of a milling machine, an electric magnet, an iron core, and magnetic abrasives. A sheet steel or a permanent magnet is placed underneath a thin titanium sheet, whereas magnetic abrasives attracted to the magnet are absorbed from below, and given a processing pressure to grind the titanium sheet. The magnetic abrasives, which use carbonyl iron powder and SiC whiskers that had shown good result in a preliminary experiment as the raw materials, were developed by using a mechanical alloying process. What have been derived in the experiment include the relationship of the sheet thickness with the magnetic flux density (in a positive correlation with the grinding amount), the relationship of the rotation of the milling machine with the surface roughness, and the relationship in the change of the grinding amounts and the magnetic flux density due to difference in the grinding patterns. As a result of the experiment, it was clarified that a titanium plate surface having a roughness of 1{mu}m R{sub max} could be reduced to 0.3{mu}m R{sub max}. A reduction to 0.1{mu}m R{sub max} would be possible if the magnetic abrasives are devised properly, and the method would be applicable to curved surfaces and deformed pipes if the magnet is given different arrangements. 5 refs., 8 figs.

  15. [Design and fabrication of the custom-made titanium condyle by selective laser melting technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianyu; Luo, Chongdai; Zhang, Chunyu; Zhang, Gong; Qiu, Weiqian; Zhang, Zhiguang

    2014-10-01

    To design and fabricate the custom-made titanium mandibular condyle by the reverse engineering technology combined with selective laser melting (SLM) technology and to explore the mechanical properties of the SLM-processed samples and the application of the custom-made condyle in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) reconstruction. The three-dimensional model of the mandibular condyle was obtained from a series of CT databases. The custom-made condyle model was designed by the reverse engineering software. The mandibular condyle was made of titanium powder with a particle size of 20-65 µm as the basic material and the processing was carried out in an argon atmosphere by the SLM machine. The yield strength, ultimate strength, bending strength, hardness, surface morphology and roughness were tested and analyzed. The finite element analysis (FEA) was used to analyze the stress distribution. The complex geometry and the surface of the custom-made condyle can be reproduced precisely by the SLM. The mechanical results showed that the yield strength, ultimate strength, bending strength and hardness were (559±14) MPa, (659±32) MPa, (1 067±42) MPa, and (212±4)HV, respectively. The surface roughness was reduced by sandblast treatment. The custom-made titanium condyle can be fabricated by SLM technology which is time-saving and highly digitized. The mechanical properties of the SLM sample can meet the requirements of surgical implant material in the clinic. The possibility of fabricating custom-made titanium mandibular condyle combined with the FEA opens new interesting perspectives for TMJ reconstruction.

  16. CVD carbon powders modified by ball milling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazmierczak Tomasz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon powders produced using a plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD methods are an interesting subject of research. One of the most interesting methods of synthesizing these powders is using radio frequency plasma. This method, originally used in deposition of carbon films containing different sp2/sp3 ratios, also makes possible to produce carbon structures in the form of powder. Results of research related to the mechanical modification of these powders have been presented. The powders were modified using a planetary ball mill with varying parameters, such as milling speed, time, ball/powder mass ratio and additional liquids. Changes in morphology and particle sizes were measured using scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Phase composition was analyzed using Raman spectroscopy. The influence of individual parameters on the modification outcome was estimated using statistical method. The research proved that the size of obtained powders is mostly influenced by the milling speed and the amount of balls. Powders tend to form conglomerates sized up to hundreds of micrometers. Additionally, it is possible to obtain nanopowders with the size around 100 nm. Furthermore, application of additional liquid, i.e. water in the process reduces the graphitization of the powder, which takes place during dry milling.

  17. Preparation techniques for ceramic waste form powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hash, M.C.; Pereira, C.; Lewis, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    The electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuels result in a chloride waste salt requiring geologic disposal. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is developing ceramic waste forms which can incorporate this waste. Currently, zeolite- or sodalite-glass composites are produced by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) techniques. Powder preparations include dehydration of the raw zeolite powders, hot blending of these zeolite powders and secondary additives. Various approaches are being pursued to achieve adequate mixing, and the resulting powders have been HIPed and characterized for leach resistance, phase equilibria, and physical integrity

  18. Atom probe tomography analysis of WC powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weidow, Jonathan, E-mail: jonathan.weidow@chalmers.se [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg (Sweden); Institute of Chemical Technologies and Analytics, Vienna University of Technology, Getreidemarkt 9/164, A-1060 Wien (Austria)

    2013-09-15

    A tantalum doped tungsten carbide powder, (W,Ta)C, was prepared with the purpose to maximise the amount of Ta in the hexagonal mixed crystal carbide. Atom probe tomography (APT) was considered to be the best technique to quantitatively measure the amount of Ta within this carbide. As the carbide powder consisted in the form of very small particles (<1 μm), a method to produce APT specimens of such a powder was developed. The powder was at first embedded in copper and a FIB-SEM workstation was used to make an in-situ lift-out from a selected powder particle. The powder particle was then deposited on a post made from a WC-Co based cemented carbide specimen. With the use of a laser assisted atom probe, it was shown that the method is working and the Ta content of the (W,Ta)C could be measured quantitatively. - Highlights: ► Method for producing atom probe tomography specimens of powders was developed. ► Method was successfully implemented on (W,Ta)C powder. ► Method can possibly be implemented on completely other powders.

  19. Post Processing and Biological Evaluation of the Titanium Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocki, Bartłomiej; Idaszek, Joanna; Szlązak, Karol; Strzelczyk, Karolina; Brynk, Tomasz; Kurzydłowski, Krzysztof J; Święszkowski, Wojciech

    2016-03-15

    Nowadays, post-surgical or post-accidental bone loss can be substituted by custom-made scaffolds fabricated by additive manufacturing (AM) methods from metallic powders. However, the partially melted powder particles must be removed in a post-process chemical treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the chemical polishing with various acid baths on novel scaffolds' morphology, porosity and mechanical properties. In the first stage, Magics software (Materialise NV, Leuven, Belgium) was used to design a porous scaffolds with pore size equal to (A) 200 µm, (B) 500 µm and (C) 200 + 500 µm, and diamond cell structure. The scaffolds were fabricated from commercially pure titanium powder (CP Ti) using a SLM50 3D printing machine (Realizer GmbH, Borchen, Germany). The selective laser melting (SLM) process was optimized and the laser beam energy density in range of 91-151 J/mm³ was applied to receive 3D structures with fully dense struts. To remove not fully melted titanium particles the scaffolds were chemically polished using various HF and HF-HNO₃ acid solutions. Based on scaffolds mass loss and scanning electron (SEM) observations, baths which provided most uniform surface cleaning were proposed for each porosity. The pore and strut size after chemical treatments was calculated based on the micro-computed tomography (µ-CT) and SEM images. The mechanical tests showed that the treated scaffolds had Young's modulus close to that of compact bone. Additionally, the effect of pore size of chemically polished scaffolds on cell retention, proliferation and differentiation was studied using human mesenchymal stem cells. Small pores yielded higher cell retention within the scaffolds, which then affected their growth. This shows that in vitro cell performance can be controlled to certain extent by varying pore sizes.

  20. Post Processing and Biological Evaluation of the Titanium Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartłomiej Wysocki

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, post-surgical or post-accidental bone loss can be substituted by custom-made scaffolds fabricated by additive manufacturing (AM methods from metallic powders. However, the partially melted powder particles must be removed in a post-process chemical treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the chemical polishing with various acid baths on novel scaffolds’ morphology, porosity and mechanical properties. In the first stage, Magics software (Materialise NV, Leuven, Belgium was used to design a porous scaffolds with pore size equal to (A 200 µm, (B 500 µm and (C 200 + 500 µm, and diamond cell structure. The scaffolds were fabricated from commercially pure titanium powder (CP Ti using a SLM50 3D printing machine (Realizer GmbH, Borchen, Germany. The selective laser melting (SLM process was optimized and the laser beam energy density in range of 91–151 J/mm3 was applied to receive 3D structures with fully dense struts. To remove not fully melted titanium particles the scaffolds were chemically polished using various HF and HF-HNO3 acid solutions. Based on scaffolds mass loss and scanning electron (SEM observations, baths which provided most uniform surface cleaning were proposed for each porosity. The pore and strut size after chemical treatments was calculated based on the micro-computed tomography (µ-CT and SEM images. The mechanical tests showed that the treated scaffolds had Young’s modulus close to that of compact bone. Additionally, the effect of pore size of chemically polished scaffolds on cell retention, proliferation and differentiation was studied using human mesenchymal stem cells. Small pores yielded higher cell retention within the scaffolds, which then affected their growth. This shows that in vitro cell performance can be controlled to certain extent by varying pore sizes.

  1. MTA-enriched nanocomposite TiO(2)-polymeric powder coatings support human mesenchymal cell attachment and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wen; Mozumder, Mohammad Sayem; Zhang, Hui; Zhu, Jesse; Perinpanayagam, Hiran

    2012-10-01

    The objective of the study described in this paper was the development of novel polymer/ceramic nanocomposite coatings for implants through the application of ultrafine powder coating technology. Polyester resins were combined with µm-sized TiO(2) (25%) as the biocompatibility agent, nTiO(2) (0.5%) as the flow additive and mineral trioxide aggregates (ProRoot® MTA, 5%) as bioactive ceramics. Ultrafine powders were prepared and applied to titanium to create continuous polymeric powder coatings (PPCs) through the application of electrostatic ultrafine powder coating technology. Energy dispersive x-ray analysis confirmed that MTA had been incorporated into the PPCs, and elemental mapping showed that it had formed small clusters that were evenly distributed across the surface. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed continuous and smooth, but highly textured surface coatings that contrasted with the scalloped appearance of commercially pure titanium (cpTi) controls. Atomic force microscopy revealed intricate nano-topographies with an abundance of submicron-sized pits and nano-projections, evenly dispersed across their surfaces. Inverted fluorescence microscopy, SEM and cell counts showed that human embryonic palatal mesenchymal cells attached and spread out onto PPC and MTA-enriched PPCs within 24 h. Mitochondrial enzyme activity measured viable and metabolically active cells on all of the surfaces. After 72 h of growth, cell counts and metabolic activity were significantly higher (P nanocomposites that were created with ultrafine powder coating technology were continuous, homogenous and nano-rough coatings that enhanced human mesenchymal cell attachment and growth.

  2. Fatigue Behavior of a Functionally-Graded Titanium Matrix Composite

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cunningham, Scott R

    2005-01-01

    Functionally-graded Titanium Matrix Composites are an attempt to utilize the high-strength properties of a titanium matrix composite with a monolithic alloy having the more practical machining qualities...

  3. Contact Stress Design Parameters for Titanium Bearings, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In response to NASA 2015 SBIR Topic H4.02, Air-Lock proposes to define the maximum allowable contact stress for Titanium bearings. The modulus of Titanium is lower...

  4. Handbook of International Alloy Compositions and Designations. Volume 1. Titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-11-01

    Institute Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial , Madrid, Spain, plus the proposed Spanish designations for titanium alloys. Swedish References 31. Titanium...JISC, JIS: Japanese Industria Standards Committee, Agency of Industiial Science and Technology, Ministry of international Trade and Industry, 3

  5. Lifetime of titanium filament at constant current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, T.S.; Lanni, C.

    1981-01-01

    Titanium Sublimation Pump (TSP) represents the most efficient and the least expensive method to produce Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) in storage rings. In ISABELLE, a proton storage accelerator under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory, for example, TSP provides a pumping speed for hydrogen of > 2 x 10 6 l/s. Due to the finite life of titanium filaments, new filaments have to be switched in before the end of filament burn out, to ensure smooth operation of the accelerator. Therefore, several operational modes that can be used to activate the TSP were studied. The constant current mode is a convenient way of maintaining constant evaporating rate by increasing the power input while the filament diameter decreases as titanium evaporates. The filaments used in this experiment were standard Varian 916-0024 filaments made of Ti 85%, Mo 15% alloy. During their lifetime at a constant current of 48 amperes, the evaporation rate rose to a maximum at about 10% of their life and then flattened out to a constant value, 0.25 g/hr. The maximum evaporation rate occurs coincidently with the recrystallization of 74% Ti 26% Mo 2 from microstructure crystalline at higher titanium concentration to macrostructure crystalline at lower titanium concentration. As the macrocrystal grows, the slip plane develops at the grain boundary resulting in high resistance at the slip plane which will eventually cause the filament burn out due to local heating

  6. Composition and structure-property relationships of chromium-diboride/molybdenum-disulphide PVD nanocomposite hard coatings deposited by pulsed magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audronis, M.; Leyland, A.; Matthews, A. [The University of Sheffield, Department of Engineering Materials, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Kelly, P.J. [Manchester Metropolitan University, Surface Engineering Group, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2008-04-15

    The composition and structure-property relationships of physical vapour deposited coatings containing mixtures of CrB{sub 2} and MoS{sub 2} are reported. The coatings were produced by pulsed magnetron sputtering of loosely-packed powder targets formed from a blend of chromium and boron powders, alloyed with 12.8, 18.9 and 24.0 atom percent MoS{sub 2}. Results of coating characterisation (by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy and nanoindentation measurement of hardness and elastic modulus) revealed that increasing amounts of MoS{sub 2} produced the following effects: frustration of crystallisation and phase separation; a decrease in average grain sizes (from {proportional_to}5.5 to {proportional_to}4.3 nm) and a decrease in coating hardness (from {proportional_to}15 to {proportional_to}10 GPa). Scratch testing also showed that the load-bearing capability of coatings was altered; coatings possessing an intermediate concentration of MoS{sub 2} exhibited the best behaviour with no failure observed in mechanical testing, due to an optimal nanocomposite structure. The corrosion resistance (investigated by potentiodynamic polarisation tests) however tended to improve as more MoS{sub 2} was introduced. An investigation of the effects of generating an amorphous structure by adding Ti and C into Cr-B-MoS{sub 2} coatings revealed improved corrosion behaviour, which significantly exceeded that of uncoated stainless steel and CrB{sub 2}-coated samples. (orig.)

  7. Sintering by SPS of ultrafine TiCxN1-x powders obtained using mechanically induced self sustaining reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borrell, A.; Fernandez, A.; Torrecillas, R.; Cordoba, J. M.; Aviles, M. A.; Gotor, F. J.

    2010-01-01

    In this work high purity and nanometer character titanium carbonitride TiC x N 1 -x powders were obtained by mechanically induced self sustaining reaction (MSR) in a high-energy planetary ball mill, from a mixture of titanium with graphite or carbon nano fiber (CNFs) in a nitrogen atmosphere. A promising method for developing these materials is the coupling of the MSR with SPS sintering technique. The product is sintered at 1400 degree centigrade and 1700 degree centigrade, obtaining a completely dense monolithic ceramic (>99% t.d). In this work, the influence of SPS treatment and carbon precursor on material microstructures was studied and the main mechanical properties of the end material were evaluated. (Author) 21 refs.

  8. Real time observation of the hydrothermal crystallization of barium titanate using in situ neutron powder diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, R I; Millange, F; Smith, R I; Hansen, T C; O'Hare, D

    2001-12-19

    The hydrothermal crystallization of barium titanate, BaTiO3, has been studied in situ by time-resolved powder neutron diffraction methods using the recently developed Oxford/ISIS hydrothermal cell. This technique has allowed the formation of the ferroelectric ceramic to be followed in a noninvasive manner in real time and under genuine reaction conditions. In a first set of experiments, Ba(OD)2-8D2O was reacted with two different titanium sources, either crystalline TiO2 (anatase) or amorphous TiO2-H2O in D2O, at 100-140 degrees C and the reaction studied using the POLARIS time-of-flight neutron powder diffractometer, at the ISIS Facility. In a second series of experiments, the reaction between barium chloride and crystalline TiO2 (anatase) in NaOD/D2O was studied at temperatures between 100 and 200 degrees C and at different deuterioxide concentrations using the constant-wavelength D20 neutron powder diffractometer at the Institut Laue Langevin. Quantitative growth and decay curves were determined from analysis of the integrated intensities of Bragg reflections of starting materials and product phases. In both sets of experiments the rapid dissolution of the barium source was observed, followed by dissolution of the titanium source before the onset of crystallization of barium titanate. Using a nucleation-growth model we are able to simulate the growth curve of barium titanate at three temperatures. Our results indicate the predominance of a homogeneous dissolution-precipitation mechanism for the hydrothermal formation of barium titanate, rather than other possible mechanisms that have been discussed in the literature. Analysis of the line widths of the Bragg reflections in the neutron diffraction data indicates that the particle size of the BaTiO3 product phase prepared from the amorphous TiO2-H2O is smaller than that prepared from crystalline TiO2 (anatase).

  9. The Use of Titanium in the Friction of Artificial Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheykin, S.Ye.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of using titanium in the friction of artificial joints is studying. Tribological characteristics of the friction pair titanium-hirulen is researching. The technology of diamond-abrasive machining, polishing and gas thermal nitridation spherical heads of pure titanium implants for hip person are developed. It is proved the increases of titanium head hardness achieved by pre-grinding the surface layer structure after cold plastic deformation.

  10. The effect of impurities elements on titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) MIM sintered part properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, M. Azmirruddin; Jabir, M.; Johari, N.; Ibrahim, R.; Hamidi, N.

    2017-12-01

    The titanium alloys (Ti-6Al-4V) compact were fabricated by Metal Injection Molding (MIM). However, the real challenge of MIM processing for titanium alloy is its affinity to be contaminated by interstitial light elements such as oxygen and carbon which could degrade the mechanical properties of sintered titanium alloy such as its tensile strength and ductility. The sintering temperature effect on carbon and oxygen content that affects its physical and mechanical properties of the sintered titanium alloy was studied. The titanium MIM brown specimen was sintered at four different sintering temperatures which are 1100 °C, 1150 °C, 1200 °C and 1250 °C for 4 hours under furnace control atmosphere. The experimental result indicated that the specimen which has been made from 100% gas atomized powder have a relative density of 92.2 % - 97.6 %, the range of porosity percent around 2.38 %-3.84 %. Ultimate tensile strength of 873.11 MPa - 1007.19 MPa and ductility percent in range of 1.89 %-3.46 %. The titanium alloy MIM specimen which was sintered at 1150 °C contained 0.145 % of carbon and 0.143 % of oxygen possess the highest value of density and tensile strength, with value of 4.344 gcm-3 and 1007.2 MPa respectively. Meanwhile, the titanium alloy MIM specimen which was sintered at 1200 °C contains 0.130 % of carbon and 0.127 % of oxygen, has the highest percentage of ductility with 3.46 %. The carbon content level increased as the sintering temperature increased due to decomposition of high molecule weight of residue binder system which could not be eliminated during solvent extraction debinding process and sintered at low temperature. Contrarily, the oxygen content level indicates a decrease as the sintering temperature increased. Briefly, the sintering temperature could influence the physical and mechanical properties of titanium alloy MIM sintered specimen as it influences the oxygen and carbon content level in the alloys.

  11. 77 FR 28252 - Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Change of Sponsor; Griseofulvin Powder; Levamisole...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-14

    ... Sponsor; Griseofulvin Powder; Levamisole Hydrochloride Powder; Oxytetracycline Powder AGENCY: Food and... applications (ANADAs) for griseofulvin powder, levamisole hydrochloride soluble powder, and oxytetracycline..., ANADA 200-391 for Griseofulvin Powder, ANADAs 200-146 and 200-247 for Oxytetracycline Hydrochloride...

  12. Advances in powder diffraction crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magneli, A.

    1986-01-01

    This is the first conference to be arranged within the framework of an agreement on scientific exchange and co-operation between l Academie des Sciences de l Institut de France and the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. The responsibility for the scientific program of the conference has been shared between members of the two Academies. The contributions include glimpses of the historical background and broad reviews of the present status of development and of recent work in powder crystallography. Reports are given on a number of studies, basic as well as applied in character, currently conducted in the two countries in a large variety of fields. Prospects of further developments in the area are also presented

  13. Reflection measurements for luminescent powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon, R. E.

    2018-04-01

    Luminescent materials are useful in applications varying from lighting and display technologies to document security features and medical research, amongst many others. Measurement of the excitation range is an important consideration, and absorption bands are often determined from a decrease in the measured diffuse reflectance of the material using a ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere. Such a system may provide questionable results when used to measure the reflectance of a luminescence material, which is demonstrated for a Tb doped silica phosphor, because the system cannot differentiate between the reflected light and luminescence. It is shown that more reliable results are achieved for this phosphor by measuring the reflectance using a synchronous zero-offset scan in a fluorescence spectrometer equipped with an integrating sphere. This method is therefore recommended instead of traditional reflectance measurements using a UV-vis spectrophotometer for luminescent powders.

  14. New detectors for powders diagrams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Convert, P.

    1975-01-01

    During the last few years, all the classical neutron diffractometers for powders have used one or maybe a few counters. So, it takes a long time to obtain a diagram which causes many disadvantages: 1) very long experiments: one or two days (or flux on the sample about 10 6 n/cm 2 /a); 2) necessity of big samples: many cm 3 ; 3) necessity of having the whole diagram before changing anything in the experiment: magnetic field, temperature, quality of the sample; 4) necessity of having collimators of a few times ten minutes to obtain correct statistics in the diagram. Because of these disadvantages, several attempts have been made to speed up the experimental procedure such as using more counters, the detection of neutrons on a resistive wire, etc. In Grenoble, new position-sensitive detectors have been constructed using a digital technique

  15. Colloidal Plasmonic Titanium Nitride Nanoparticles: Properties and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Suslov, Sergey; Kildishev, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    Optical properties of colloidal plasmonic titanium nitride nanoparticles are examined with an eye on their photothermal and photocatalytic applications via transmission electron microscopy and optical transmittance measurements. Single crystal titanium nitride cubic nanoparticles with an average...... degree of freedom for surface functionalization. The titanium oxide shell surrounding the plasmonic core can create new opportunities for photocatalytic applications....

  16. Applications of Titanium Dioxide Photocatalysis to Construction Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Ohama, Yoshihiko

    2011-01-01

    Titanium dioxide photocatalysis is based on the semiconducting nature of its anatase crystal type. Construction materials with titanium photocatalyst show performances of air purification, self-cleaning, water purification, antibacterial action. This book describes principles of titanium dioxide photocatalysis, its applications to cementitious and noncementitious materials, as well as an overview of standardization of testing methods.

  17. Effects of thickness on electronic structure of titanium thin films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effects of thickness on the electronic structure of e-beam evaporated thin titanium films were studied using near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) technique at titanium 2,3 edge in total electron yield (TEY) mode and transmission yield mode. Thickness dependence of 2,3 branching ratio (BR) of titanium was ...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10021 - Magnesium potassium titanium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Magnesium potassium titanium oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10021 Magnesium potassium titanium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and... titanium oxide (PMN P-01-764; CAS No. 39290-90-9) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10031 - Lithium potassium titanium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lithium potassium titanium oxide. 721... Substances § 721.10031 Lithium potassium titanium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as lithium potassium titanium oxide (PMN P-02...

  20. Method for synthesis of titanium dioxide nanotubes using ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Jun; Luo, Huimin; Dai, Sheng

    2013-11-19

    The invention is directed to a method for producing titanium dioxide nanotubes, the method comprising anodizing titanium metal in contact with an electrolytic medium containing an ionic liquid. The invention is also directed to the resulting titanium dioxide nanotubes, as well as devices incorporating the nanotubes, such as photovoltaic devices, hydrogen generation devices, and hydrogen detection devices.

  1. Array of titanium dioxide nanostructures for solar energy utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xiaofeng; Parans Paranthaman, Mariappan; Chi, Miaofang; Ivanov, Ilia N; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2014-12-30

    An array of titanium dioxide nanostructures for solar energy utilization includes a plurality of nanotubes, each nanotube including an outer layer coaxial with an inner layer, where the inner layer comprises p-type titanium dioxide and the outer layer comprises n-type titanium dioxide. An interface between the inner layer and the outer layer defines a p-n junction.

  2. Development and application of titanium alloy casting technology in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAN Hai

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The development and research of casting titanium alloy and its casting technology, especially its application in aeronautical industry in China are presented. The technology of moulding, melting and casting of titanium alloy, casting quality control are introduced. The existing problem and development trend in titanium alloy casting technology are also discussed.

  3. Enhancing osseointegration using surface-modified titanium implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y.; Oh, N.; Liu, Y.; Chen, W.; Oh, S.; Appleford, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, K.; Park, S.; Bumgardner, J.; Haggard, W.; Ong, J.

    2006-07-01

    Osseointegrated dental implants are used to replace missing teeth. The success of implants is due to osseointegration or the direct contact of the implant surface and bone without a fibrous connective tissue interface. This review discusses the enhancement of osseointegration by means of anodized microporous titanium surfaces, functionally macroporous graded titanium coatings, nanoscale titanium surfaces, and different bioactive factors.

  4. Reaction of titanium polonides with carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abakumov, A.S.; Malyshev, M.L.; Reznikova, N.F.

    1987-01-01

    It has been ascertained that heating titanium and tantalum in carbon dioxide to temperatures of 500 or 800 0 C alters the composition of the gas phase, causing the advent of carbon monoxide and lowering the oxygen content. Investigation of the thermal stability of titanium polonides in a carbon dioxide medium has shown that titanium mono- and hemipolonides are decomposed at temperatures below 350 0 C. The temperature dependence of the vapor pressure of polonium produced in the decomposition of these polonides in a carbon dioxide medium have been determined by a radiotensimetric method. The enthalpy of the process, calculated from this relationship, is close to the enthalpy of vaporization of elementary polonium in vacuo

  5. Surface treatment for inducing nanotopography on titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, S.V. de; Ribeiro, A.A.; Oliveira, M.V. de

    2014-01-01

    The titanium implant surface plays extremely important role in the biological response. Therefore, the objective of this research was to study the titanium surface nanotopography modified by chemical treatment, in order to improve its bioactivity. Commercially pure titanium samples, ASTM F67 grade 2, were immersed in H 2 SO 4 /H 2 O 2 solution for 2 or 4 hours. The samples were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy, Scanning Confocal Optical Microscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy. The results revealed nanostructured surfaces with TiO 2 layer, average roughness of 0.86 ± 0.06 μm and 1.07 ± 0.05 μm for 2 or 4 hours, respectively and nanopores with 18 ± 6.82 nm average diameter. (author)

  6. Stainless Steel to Titanium Bimetallic Transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaluzny, J. A. [Fermilab; Grimm, C. [Fermilab; Passarelli, D. [Fermilab

    2015-01-01

    In order to use stainless steel piping in an LCLS-II (Linac Coherent Light Source Upgrade) cryomodule, stainless steel to titanium bimetallic transitions are needed to connect the stainless steel piping to the titanium cavity helium vessel. Explosion bonded stainless steel to titanium transition pieces and bimetallic transition material samples have been tested. A sample transition tube was subjected to tests and x-ray examinations between tests. Samples of the bonded joint material were impact and tensile tested at room temperature as well as liquid helium temperature. The joint has been used successfully in horizontal tests of LCLS-II cavity helium vessels and is planned to be used in LCLS-II cryomodules. Results of material sample and transition tube tests will be presented.

  7. Protons in hydrated protein powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Careri, G.; Bruni, F.; Consolini, G.

    1995-01-01

    Previous work from this laboratory has shown that hydrated lysozyme powders exhibit a dielectric behaviour, due to proton conductivity, explainable within the frame of percolation theory. Long range proton displacement appears only above the critical hydration for percolation, when the 2-dimensional motion takes place on fluctuating clusters of hydrogen-bonded water molecules adsorbed on the protein surface. The emergence of biological function, enzyme catalysis, was found to coincide with the critical hydration for percolation. More recently, we have evaluated the protonic conductivity of hydrated lysozyme powders, from room down to liquid N 2 temperature. In the high temperature limit a classical isotopic effect can be detected, and the conductivity follows the familiar Arrhenius law for thermally activated hopping. In the low temperature region the conductivity shows a temperature dependence in agreement with prediction by the theory of dissipative quantum tunneling. Below room temperature the static dielectric constant, and the dielectric relaxation time for charge transport showed an increase likely to be identified with the formation of a polaronic-solitonic species as predicted by the theory of proton transport in water chains, a species which displays a larger effective mass and a larger dipole moment that the usual hydrated protonic defects. The purpose of this paper is twofold. In the first section we present a tutorial report of some previous experimental results on proton displacement in slightly hydrated biological systems at room temperature, to show that in these systems the emergence of biological systems at room temperature, to show that in these systems the emergence of biological function coincides with the onset of percolative pathways in the water molecules network adsorbed on the surface of biomolecules. In the second section, we report on preliminary data on the dielectric relaxation of hydrated lysozyme below room temperature, to suggest

  8. Obtaining zircaloy powder through hydriding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupim, Ivaldete da Silva; Moreira, Joao M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Zirconium alloys are good options for the metal matrix in dispersion fuels for power reactors due to their low thermal neutron absorption cross-section, good corrosion resistance, good mechanical strength and high thermal conductivity. A necessary step for obtaining such fuels is producing Zr alloy powder for the metal matrix composite material. This article presents results from the Zircaloy-4 hydrogenation tests with the purpose to embrittle the alloy as a first step for comminuting. Several hydrogenation tests were performed and studied through thermogravimetric analysis. They included H 2 pressures of 25 and 50 kPa and temperatures ranging between from 20 to 670 deg C. X-ray diffraction analysis showed in the hydrogenated samples the predominant presence of ZrH 2 and some ZrO 2 . Some kinetics parameters for the Zircaloy-4 hydrogenation reaction were obtained: the time required to reach the equilibrium state at the dwell temperature was about 100 minutes; the hydrogenation rate during the heating process from 20 to 670 deg C was about 21 mg/h, and at constant temperature of 670 deg C, the hydride rate was about 1.15 mg/h. The hydrogenation rate is largest during the heating process and most of it occurs during this period. After hydrogenated, the samples could easily be comminuted indicating that this is a possible technology to obtain Zircaloy powder. The results show that only few minutes of hydrogenation are necessary to reach the hydride levels required for comminuting the Zircaloy. The final hydride stoichiometry was between 2.7 and 2.8 H for each Zr atom in the sample (author)

  9. Laser induced single spot oxidation of titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jwad, Tahseen, E-mail: taj355@bham.ac.uk; Deng, Sunan; Butt, Haider; Dimov, S.

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • A new high resolution laser induced oxidation (colouring) method is proposed (single spot oxidation). • The method is applied to control oxide films thicknesses and hence colours on titanium substrates in micro-scale. • The method enable imprinting high resolution coloured image on Ti substrate. • Optical and morphological periodic surface structures are also produced by an array of oxide spots using the proposed method. • Colour coding of two colours into one field is presented. - Abstract: Titanium oxides have a wide range of applications in industry, and they can be formed on pure titanium using different methods. Laser-induced oxidation is one of the most reliable methods due to its controllability and selectivity. Colour marking is one of the main applications of the oxidation process. However, the colourizing process based on laser scanning strategies is limited by the relative large processing area in comparison to the beam size. Single spot oxidation of titanium substrates is proposed in this research in order to increase the resolution of the processed area and also to address the requirements of potential new applications. The method is applied to produce oxide films with different thicknesses and hence colours on titanium substrates. High resolution colour image is imprinted on a sheet of pure titanium by converting its pixels’ colours into laser parameter settings. Optical and morphological periodic surface structures are also produced by an array of oxide spots and then analysed. Two colours have been coded into one field and the dependencies of the reflected colours on incident and azimuthal angles of the light are discussed. The findings are of interest to a range of application areas, as they can be used to imprint optical devices such as diffusers and Fresnel lenses on metallic surfaces as well as for colour marking.

  10. Laser induced single spot oxidation of titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jwad, Tahseen; Deng, Sunan; Butt, Haider; Dimov, S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new high resolution laser induced oxidation (colouring) method is proposed (single spot oxidation). • The method is applied to control oxide films thicknesses and hence colours on titanium substrates in micro-scale. • The method enable imprinting high resolution coloured image on Ti substrate. • Optical and morphological periodic surface structures are also produced by an array of oxide spots using the proposed method. • Colour coding of two colours into one field is presented. - Abstract: Titanium oxides have a wide range of applications in industry, and they can be formed on pure titanium using different methods. Laser-induced oxidation is one of the most reliable methods due to its controllability and selectivity. Colour marking is one of the main applications of the oxidation process. However, the colourizing process based on laser scanning strategies is limited by the relative large processing area in comparison to the beam size. Single spot oxidation of titanium substrates is proposed in this research in order to increase the resolution of the processed area and also to address the requirements of potential new applications. The method is applied to produce oxide films with different thicknesses and hence colours on titanium substrates. High resolution colour image is imprinted on a sheet of pure titanium by converting its pixels’ colours into laser parameter settings. Optical and morphological periodic surface structures are also produced by an array of oxide spots and then analysed. Two colours have been coded into one field and the dependencies of the reflected colours on incident and azimuthal angles of the light are discussed. The findings are of interest to a range of application areas, as they can be used to imprint optical devices such as diffusers and Fresnel lenses on metallic surfaces as well as for colour marking.

  11. Whey powder sterilization by ionizing irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todorovic, M.; Salatic, Z.; Markov, S.

    1988-01-01

    Whey powder was sterilized by gamma waves application. As a source of irridiation isotope 60Co was used in Institute of Nuclear sciences B oris Kidrich , Vincha-Belgrade (Yugoslavia). The applied doses were: a, b, c, d, and e Kgy. The dose d was radappertization. After whey powder irradiation no adverse changes of organoleptic properties were noticed

  12. Preparation of silver powder through glycerol process

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    High purity fine silver powder with uniform particle morphology was prepared through glycerol process. The process involves reduction of silver nitrate by glycerol under atmospheric conditions at a temperature below 175°C. Glycerol, in this process, acts as a solvent as well as a reducing agent. The powders prepared ...

  13. 21 CFR 73.1646 - Bronze powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... percent. Maximum particle size 45µ (95 percent minimum). Aluminum, zinc, tin, and copper content shall be based on the weight of the dried powder after being thoroughly washed with ether. (c) Uses and restrictions. Bronze powder may be safely used in color externally applied drugs, including those intended for...

  14. Preparation of silver powder through glycerol process

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. High purity fine silver powder with uniform particle morphology was prepared through glycerol process. The process involves reduction of silver nitrate by glycerol under atmospheric conditions at a tem- perature below 175°C. Glycerol, in this process, acts as a solvent as well as a reducing agent. The powders.

  15. Solving Crystal Structures from Powder Diffraction Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, A. Nørlund; Lehmann, M. S.; Nielsen, Mogens

    1985-01-01

    High resolution powder data from both neutron and X-ray (synchrotron) sources have been used to estimate the possibility of direct structure determination from powder data. Two known structures were resolved by direct methods with neutron and X-ray data. With synchrotron X-ray data, the measured ...

  16. Antibacterial activity of some powdered herbal preparations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antibacterial activity of some powdered herbal preparations marketed in Kaduna metropolis. D Abba, H.I Inabo, S.E Yakubu, OS Olonitola. Abstract. The aim of the study was to investigate the phytochemical components and the antibacterial activities of some powdered herbal medicinal preparations sourced from identified ...

  17. CLAY SOIL STABILISATION USING POWDERED GLASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. OLUFOWOBI

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper assesses the stabilizing effect of powdered glass on clay soil. Broken waste glass was collected and ground into powder form suitable for addition to the clay soil in varying proportions namely 1%, 2%, 5%, 10% and 15% along with 15% cement (base by weight of the soil sample throughout. Consequently, the moisture content, specific gravity, particle size distribution and Atterberg limits tests were carried out to classify the soil using the ASSHTO classification system. Based on the results, the soil sample obtained corresponded to Group A-6 soils identified as ‘fair to poor’ soil type in terms of use as drainage and subgrade material. This justified stabilisation of the soil. Thereafter, compaction, California bearing ratio (CBR and direct shear tests were carried out on the soil with and without the addition of the powdered glass. The results showed improvement in the maximum dry density values on addition of the powdered glass and with corresponding gradual increase up to 5% glass powder content after which it started to decrease at 10% and 15% powdered glass content. The highest CBR values of 14.90% and 112.91% were obtained at 5% glass powder content and 5mm penetration for both the unsoaked and soaked treated samples respectively. The maximum cohesion and angle of internal friction values of 17.0 and 15.0 respectively were obtained at 10% glass powder content.

  18. Hydrothermal synthesis of fine oxide powders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Inorganic powders are among the most important factors in many fields of materials such as ceramics, catalysts, medicines, food, etc. There are many papers and books related to powders preparation by many authors (Veale. 1972; Kato and Yamaguchi 1983; Vincenzini 1983;. Brinker et al 1984; Johnson Jr. 1987; Messing ...

  19. Jetting formation of the explosively loaded powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Kun; Yu, Qiqi

    2017-10-01

    The formation of jet-like structures is widely reported in the explosive dispersal of powders surrounding high explosive charges. The jetting of powder beds initiates upon the shock wave reaches the outer edge of the charge. Opposed to the interface instability theory, a hollow sphere based bulk fragmentation model is established to account for the jetting of powders. A two-phase process, namely the nucleation and free expansion of hollow spheres, corresponds to the unloading process of the powder compact caused by the rarefaction waves which governs the fragmentation of the powders. The separation between adjacent hollow spheres dictates the size of the particle clusters, which would evolve into particle jets in later times. The predicted breakup time and the size of particle jets agree well with the experimental results. The increased moisture content in powders results in an increased number of particle jets. This moisture effect can be understood in light of the varied energy distribution due to the incompressibility of the interstitial liquids trapped inside the inter-grain pores. The portion of shock energy which is not consumed in the shock compaction of the wet powders would be dissipated through the viscous shear flows during the unloading of the wet powder compact. The excessive viscous energy requires to activate more localized shear flows, accordingly leading to an increased number of particle jets.

  20. Computational modelling for dry-powder inhalers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kröger, Ralf; Woolhouse, Robert; Becker, Michael; Wachtel, Herbert; de Boer, Anne; Horner, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a simulation tool used for modelling powder flow through inhalers to allow optimisation both of device design and drug powder. Here, Ralf Kröger, Consulting Senior CFD Engineer, ANSYS Germany GmbH; Marc Horner, Lead Technical Services Engineer, Healthcare,