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Sample records for tissues periodontal ligament

  1. Differentiated embryonic chondrocytes 1 expression of periodontal ligament tissue and gingival tissue in the patients with chronic periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shenlin; Shang, Wei; Yue, Haitao; Chen, Ruini; Dong, Zheng; Hu, Jinhua; Mao, Zhao; Yang, Jian

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the DEC1 expression of periodontal ligament tissue and gingival tissue in the patients with chronic periodontitis. 20 non-smoking patients with chronic periodontitis and 20 healthy individuals were enrolled. Periodontal ligament tissue and gingival tissue samples from healthy subjects were collected during teeth extraction for orthodontic reason or the third molar extraction. The parallel samples from patients with chronic periodontitis were obtained during periodontal flap operations or teeth extraction as part of periodontal treatment. The DEC1 expression and the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of both the periodontal ligament tissue and gingival tissue were determined by Western blot, Immunohistochemistry and ALP Detection Kit. The DEC1 expression of periodontal ligament tissue in the patients with chronic periodontitis decreased significantly along with the decreased ALP activity. On the contrary, the DEC1 expression of gingival tissue in the patients with chronic periodontitis increased significantly. Further study found that the DEC1 expression of gingival tissue increased mainly in the suprabasal layer of gingival epithelial cells but decreased in the gingival connective tissue of the patients with chronic periodontitis. The DEC1 expression decreases in the periodontal ligament tissue which is related to the osteogenic capacity, whereas the DEC1 expression increases in the suprabasal layer of gingival epithelial cells which are involved in immune inflammatory response in the patients with chronic periodontitis. The findings provide a new target to explore the pathology and the therapy of periodontitis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Autoradiographic study of 3H-proline incorporation by rat periodontal ligament, gingival connective tissue and dental pulp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameyama, Y.

    1975-01-01

    The rates of 3 H-proline incorporation by the rat periodontal ligament, the gingival connective tissue and the dental pulp were studied by autoradiography. The rate of 3 H-proline incorporation by the periodontal ligament was 2.8 times higher than by the gingival connective tissue and 5 times higher than by the dental pulp. These differences were significant (p 3 H-proline incorporation by the periodontal ligament was significantly different (p 3 H-proline incorporation. The ratio of the rates of 3 H-proline incorporation by the three tissues did not correlate with the ratio of the cellular densities in the same three tissues. (author)

  3. In vitro human periodontal ligament-like tissue formation with porous poly-L-lactide matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Wen; Okada, Masahiro; Sakamoto, Fumito; Okita, Naoya; Inami, Kaoru; Nishiura, Aki; Hashimoto, Yoshiya; Matsumoto, Naoyuki

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to establish an in vitro human periodontal ligament-like tissue (HPdLLT) by three-dimensional culturing of human periodontal ligament fibroblasts (HPdLFs) in a porous poly-L-lactide (PLLA) matrix modified hydrophilically with ammonia solution. After ammonia modification, the surface roughness and culture-medium-soaking-up ability of the PLLA matrix increased, whereas the contact angle of water drops decreased. The thickness, porosity, and pore size of the PLLA matrix were 400 ± 50 μm, 83.3%, and 75–150 μm, respectively. HPdLFs (1 × 10 5 cells) were seeded on the modified PLLA matrix and centrifuged to facilitate seeding into its interior and cultured for 14 days. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation, proliferation assay, picrosirius-red staining, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for type-1 collagen (COL1), periodontal ligament associated protein-1 (PLAP-1), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) mRNA were conducted on days 1, 3, 7, and 14. HPdLFs were observed entirely from the surface to the rear side of the matrix. Cell proliferation analysis, SEM observation, and picrosirius-red staining showed both progressive growth of 3D-cultured HPdLFs and extracellular matrix maturation by the secretion of COL1 and type 3 collagen (COL3) from days 1 to 14. Expressions of COL1, PLAP-1, and FGF-2 mRNA suggested the formation of cellular components and supplementation of extracellular components. Expressions of ALP, COL1, and PLAP-1 mRNA suggested the osteogenic potential of the HPdLLT. The results indicated in vitro HPdLLT formation, and it could be used in future periodontal ligament tissue engineering to achieve optimal periodontal regeneration. - Highlights: • First report on ammonia treated PLLA matrix for in vitro human periodontal ligament-like tissue generation. • Good combination of matrix thickness, pore size, and porosity. • Biodegradable PLLA is also possible to be used in vivo

  4. In vitro human periodontal ligament-like tissue formation with porous poly-L-lactide matrix

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    Liao, Wen [Graduate School of Dentistry, Department of Orthodontics, Osaka Dental University, 8-1 Kuzuha-hanazono-cho, Hirakata-shi, Osaka-fu 573-1121 (Japan); Okada, Masahiro [Department of Biomaterials, Osaka Dental University, 8-1 Kuzuha-hanazono-cho, Hirakata-shi, Osaka-fu 573-1121 (Japan); Sakamoto, Fumito; Okita, Naoya [Graduate School of Dentistry, Department of Orthodontics, Osaka Dental University, 8-1 Kuzuha-hanazono-cho, Hirakata-shi, Osaka-fu 573-1121 (Japan); Inami, Kaoru; Nishiura, Aki [Department of Orthodontics, Osaka Dental University, 8-1 Kuzuha-hanazono-cho, Hirakata-shi, Osaka-fu 573-1121 (Japan); Hashimoto, Yoshiya, E-mail: yoshiya@cc.osaka-dent.ac.jp [Department of Biomaterials, Osaka Dental University, 8-1 Kuzuha-hanazono-cho, Hirakata-shi, Osaka-fu 573-1121 (Japan); Matsumoto, Naoyuki [Department of Orthodontics, Osaka Dental University, 8-1 Kuzuha-hanazono-cho, Hirakata-shi, Osaka-fu 573-1121 (Japan)

    2013-08-01

    This study aimed to establish an in vitro human periodontal ligament-like tissue (HPdLLT) by three-dimensional culturing of human periodontal ligament fibroblasts (HPdLFs) in a porous poly-L-lactide (PLLA) matrix modified hydrophilically with ammonia solution. After ammonia modification, the surface roughness and culture-medium-soaking-up ability of the PLLA matrix increased, whereas the contact angle of water drops decreased. The thickness, porosity, and pore size of the PLLA matrix were 400 ± 50 μm, 83.3%, and 75–150 μm, respectively. HPdLFs (1 × 10{sup 5} cells) were seeded on the modified PLLA matrix and centrifuged to facilitate seeding into its interior and cultured for 14 days. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation, proliferation assay, picrosirius-red staining, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for type-1 collagen (COL1), periodontal ligament associated protein-1 (PLAP-1), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) mRNA were conducted on days 1, 3, 7, and 14. HPdLFs were observed entirely from the surface to the rear side of the matrix. Cell proliferation analysis, SEM observation, and picrosirius-red staining showed both progressive growth of 3D-cultured HPdLFs and extracellular matrix maturation by the secretion of COL1 and type 3 collagen (COL3) from days 1 to 14. Expressions of COL1, PLAP-1, and FGF-2 mRNA suggested the formation of cellular components and supplementation of extracellular components. Expressions of ALP, COL1, and PLAP-1 mRNA suggested the osteogenic potential of the HPdLLT. The results indicated in vitro HPdLLT formation, and it could be used in future periodontal ligament tissue engineering to achieve optimal periodontal regeneration. - Highlights: • First report on ammonia treated PLLA matrix for in vitro human periodontal ligament-like tissue generation. • Good combination of matrix thickness, pore size, and porosity. • Biodegradable PLLA is also possible to be used in vivo.

  5. Role of the epithelial cell rests of Malassez in the development, maintenance and regeneration of periodontal ligament tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jimin; Gronthos, Stan; Bartold, P Mark

    2013-10-01

    Periodontitis is a highly prevalent inflammatory disease that results in damage to the tooth-supporting tissues, potentially leading to tooth loss. Periodontal tissue regeneration is a complex process that involves the collaboration of two hard tissues (cementum and alveolar bone) and two soft tissues (gingiva and periodontal ligament). To date, no periodontal-regenerative procedures provide predictable clinical outcomes. To understand the rational basis of regenerative procedures, a better understanding of the events associated with the formation of periodontal components will help to establish reliable strategies for clinical practice. An important aspect of this is the role of the Hertwig's epithelial root sheath in periodontal development and that of its descendants, the epithelial cell rests of Malassez, in the maintenance of the periodontium. An important structure during tooth root development, the Hertwig's epithelial root sheath is not only a barrier between the dental follicle and dental papilla cells but is also involved in determining the shape, size and number of roots and in the development of dentin and cementum, and may act as a source of mesenchymal progenitor cells for cementoblasts. In adulthood, the epithelial cell rests of Malassez are the only odontogenic epithelial population in the periodontal ligament. Although there is no general agreement on the functions of the epithelial cell rests of Malassez, accumulating evidence suggests that the putative roles of the epithelial cell rests of Malassez in adult periodontal ligament include maintaining periodontal ligament homeostasis to prevent ankylosis and maintain periodontal ligament space, to prevent root resorption, to serve as a target during periodontal ligament innervation and to contribute to cementum repair. Recently, ovine epithelial cell rests of Malassez cells have been shown to harbor clonogenic epithelial stem-cell populations that demonstrate similar properties to mesenchymal stromal

  6. Trophic factors from adipose tissue-derived multi-lineage progenitor cells promote cytodifferentiation of periodontal ligament cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawada, Keigo [Department of Periodontology, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka (Japan); Takedachi, Masahide, E-mail: takedati@dent.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Periodontology, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka (Japan); Yamamoto, Satomi; Morimoto, Chiaki; Ozasa, Masao; Iwayama, Tomoaki [Department of Periodontology, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka (Japan); Lee, Chun Man [Medical Center for Translational Research, Osaka University Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Okura, Hanayuki; Matsuyama, Akifumi [Research on Disease Bioresources, Platform of Therapeutics for Rare Disease, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, Osaka (Japan); Kitamura, Masahiro; Murakami, Shinya [Department of Periodontology, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka (Japan)

    2015-08-14

    Stem and progenitor cells are currently being investigated for their applicability in cell-based therapy for periodontal tissue regeneration. We recently demonstrated that the transplantation of adipose tissue-derived multi-lineage progenitor cells (ADMPCs) enhances periodontal tissue regeneration in beagle dogs. However, the molecular mechanisms by which transplanted ADMPCs induce periodontal tissue regeneration remain to be elucidated. In this study, trophic factors released by ADMPCs were examined for their paracrine effects on human periodontal ligament cell (HPDL) function. ADMPC conditioned medium (ADMPC-CM) up-regulated osteoblastic gene expression, alkaline phosphatase activity and calcified nodule formation in HPDLs, but did not significantly affect their proliferative response. ADMPCs secreted a number of growth factors, including insulin-like growth factor binding protein 6 (IGFBP6), hepatocyte growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor. Among these, IGFBP6 was most highly expressed. Interestingly, the positive effects of ADMPC-CM on HPDL differentiation were significantly suppressed by transfecting ADMPCs with IGFBP6 siRNA. Our results suggest that ADMPCs transplanted into a defect in periodontal tissue release trophic factors that can stimulate the differentiation of HPDLs to mineralized tissue-forming cells, such as osteoblasts and cementoblasts. IGFBP6 may play crucial roles in ADMPC-induced periodontal regeneration. - Highlights: • ADMPC-derived humoral factors stimulate cytodifferentiation of HPDLs. • ADMPCs secret growth factors including IGFBP6, VEGF and HGF. • IGFBP6 is involved in the promotion effect of ADMPC-CM on HPDL cytodifferentiation.

  7. Trophic factors from adipose tissue-derived multi-lineage progenitor cells promote cytodifferentiation of periodontal ligament cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Keigo; Takedachi, Masahide; Yamamoto, Satomi; Morimoto, Chiaki; Ozasa, Masao; Iwayama, Tomoaki; Lee, Chun Man; Okura, Hanayuki; Matsuyama, Akifumi; Kitamura, Masahiro; Murakami, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    Stem and progenitor cells are currently being investigated for their applicability in cell-based therapy for periodontal tissue regeneration. We recently demonstrated that the transplantation of adipose tissue-derived multi-lineage progenitor cells (ADMPCs) enhances periodontal tissue regeneration in beagle dogs. However, the molecular mechanisms by which transplanted ADMPCs induce periodontal tissue regeneration remain to be elucidated. In this study, trophic factors released by ADMPCs were examined for their paracrine effects on human periodontal ligament cell (HPDL) function. ADMPC conditioned medium (ADMPC-CM) up-regulated osteoblastic gene expression, alkaline phosphatase activity and calcified nodule formation in HPDLs, but did not significantly affect their proliferative response. ADMPCs secreted a number of growth factors, including insulin-like growth factor binding protein 6 (IGFBP6), hepatocyte growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor. Among these, IGFBP6 was most highly expressed. Interestingly, the positive effects of ADMPC-CM on HPDL differentiation were significantly suppressed by transfecting ADMPCs with IGFBP6 siRNA. Our results suggest that ADMPCs transplanted into a defect in periodontal tissue release trophic factors that can stimulate the differentiation of HPDLs to mineralized tissue-forming cells, such as osteoblasts and cementoblasts. IGFBP6 may play crucial roles in ADMPC-induced periodontal regeneration. - Highlights: • ADMPC-derived humoral factors stimulate cytodifferentiation of HPDLs. • ADMPCs secret growth factors including IGFBP6, VEGF and HGF. • IGFBP6 is involved in the promotion effect of ADMPC-CM on HPDL cytodifferentiation

  8. Cytokeratin expression of engrafted three-dimensional culture tissues using epithelial cells derived from porcine periodontal ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Rie; Kitajima, Kayoko; Arai, Kyoko; Igarashi, Masaru

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated the differentiation and proliferation of epithelial cells derived from periodontal ligaments after three-dimensional culture using collagen gel with fibroblasts in vitro and in vivo. Epithelial cells and fibroblasts were derived from porcine periodontal ligaments. Epithelial cells were labeled using a fluorescent red membrane marker (PKH-26GL) and were seeded onto collagen gel with fibroblasts, followed by incubation in an air-liquid interface for 7 days. Three-dimensional cultures were grafted onto the backs of nude mice and removed at 1, 7, and 14 days after surgery (in vivo model). Unfixed sections (5 μm) were used to detect the presence of red fluorescent cells. Paraffin sections were analyzed histologically and immunohistochemically. Specimens were compared with three-dimensional culture tissues at 8, 14 and 21 days (in vitro model). Grafted three-dimensional cultures formed a stratified epithelial structure similar to skin in vivo. Epithelial cells were sequenced in basal-layer-like structures at 14 days in vivo. Immunohistochemical findings showed that the expression of cytokeratin was detected in the epithelial layer in in vitro and in vivo models. Ck8 + 18 + 19 was expressed in the upper epithelial layer in the in vitro model at 14 and 21 days, but not in vivo. Involucrin was expressed in the certified layers in vitro at 14 days, but not in vivo. Laminin was detected at the dermo-epidermal junction in vivo at 7 and 14 days, but not in vitro. These results suggest that differentiation of three-dimensional culture tissues differs in vivo and in vitro. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. [Effects of cytosolic bacteria on cyclic GMP-AMP synthase expression in human gingival tissues and periodontal ligament cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaojun, Yang; Yongmei, Tan; Zhihui, Tian; Ting, Zhou; Wanghong, Zhao; Jin, Hou

    2017-04-01

    This work aims to determine the effect of cytosolic bacteria on the expression of cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) in human periodontal ligament cells (hPDLCs) and gingival tissues. The ability of Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) to invade hPDLCs was detected using laser scanning confocal microscope assay at a multiplicity of infection of 10. P. gingivalis-infected cells were sorted by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Then, quantitative real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blot were used to detect cGAS expression in infected cells. Finally, the location and expression of cGAS in inflammatory and normal gingival tissues were investigated by immunohistochemistry. P. gingivalis actively invaded hPDLCs. Moreover, cGAS expression significantly increased in P. gingivalis-infected cells. Although cGAS was expressed in the epithelial and subepithelial cells of both inflamed and normal gingival tissues, cGAS expression significantly increased in inflamed gingival tissues. Cytosolic bacteria can upregulate cGAS expression in infected cells. These data suggest that cGAS may act as pattern-recognition receptors and participate in recognizing cytosolic nucleic acid pathogen-associated molecular patterns.
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  10. Ligament Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Wasim Sardar

    2016-01-01

    Ligaments are commonly injured in the knee joint, and have a poor capacity for healing due to their relative avascularity. Ligament reconstruction is well established for injuries such as anterior cruciate ligament rupture, however the use of autografts and allografts for ligament reconstruction are associated with complications, and outcomes are variable. Ligament tissue engineering using stem cells, growth factors and scaffolds is a novel technique that has the potential to provide an unlim...

  11. Establishment and characterization of novel epithelial-like cell lines derived from human periodontal ligament tissue in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansriratanawong, Kallapat; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Toyomura, Junko; Sato, Soh

    2017-10-01

    In this study, novel human-derived epithelial-like cells (hEPLCs) lines were established from periodontal ligament (PDL) tissues, which were composed of a variety of cell types and exhibited complex cellular activities. To elucidate the putative features distinguishing these from epithelial rest of Malassez (ERM), we characterized hEPLCs based on cell lineage markers and tight junction protein expression. The aim of this study was, therefore, to establish and characterize hEPLCs lines from PDL tissues. The hEPLCs were isolated from PDL of third molar teeth. Cellular morphology and cell organelles were observed thoroughly. The characteristics of epithelial-endothelial-mesenchymal-like cells were compared in several markers by gene expression and immunofluorescence, to ERM and human umbilical-vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The resistance between cellular junctions was assessed by transepithelial electron resistance, and inflammatory cytokines were detected by ELISA after infecting hEPLCs with periodontopathic bacteria. The hEPLCs developed into small epithelial-like cells in pavement appearance similar to ERM. However, gene expression patterns and immunofluorescence results were different from ERM and HUVECs, especially in tight junction markers (Claudin, ZO-1, and Occludins), and endothelial markers (vWF, CD34). The transepithelial electron resistance indicated higher resistance in hEPLCs, as compared to ERM. Periodontopathic bacteria were phagocytosed with upregulation of inflammatory cytokine secretion within 24 h. In conclusion, hEPLCs that were derived using the single cell isolation method formed tight multilayers colonies, as well as strongly expressed tight junction markers in gene expression and immunofluorescence. Novel hEPLCs lines exhibited differently from ERM, which might provide some specific functions such as metabolic exchange and defense mechanism against bacterial invasion in periodontal tissue.

  12. Marker of cemento-periodontal ligament junction associated with periodontal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Ryohko; Wato, Masahiro; Tanaka, Akio

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors promoting formation of the cemento-periodontal ligament junction. Regeneration of the cemento-periodontal ligament junction is an important factor in recovery of the connective tissue attachment to the cementum and it is important to identify all specific substances that promote its formation. To clarify the substances involved in cemento-periodontal ligament junction formation, we produced a monoclonal antibody (mAb) to human cemento-periodontal ligament junction (designated as the anti-TAP mAb) and examined its immunostaining properties and reactive antigen. Hybridomas producing monoclonal antibody against human cemento-periodontal ligament junction antigens were established by fusing P3U1 mouse myeloma cells with spleen cells from BALB/c mice immunized with homogenized human cemento-periodontal ligament junction. The mAb, the anti-TAP mAb for cemento-periodontal ligament junction, was then isolated. The immunoglobulin class and light chain of the mAb were examined using an isotyping kit. Before immunostaining, antigen determination using an enzymatic method or heating was conducted. Human teeth, hard tissue-forming lesions, and animal tissues were immunostained by the anti-TAP mAb. The anti-TAP mAb was positive in human cemento-periodontal ligament junction and predentin but negative in all other human and animal tissues examined. In the cemento-osseous lesions, the anti-TAP mAb was positive in the peripheral area of the cementum and cementum-like hard tissues and not in the bone and bone-like tissues. The anti-TAP mAb showed IgM (kappa) and recognized phosphoprotein. The anti-TAP mAb is potentially useful for developing new agents promoting cementogenesis and periodontal regeneration.

  13. Comparison of Immunological Characteristics of Mesenchymal Stem Cells from the Periodontal Ligament, Umbilical Cord, and Adipose Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Hee Kim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are of therapeutic importance in the fields of regenerative medicine and immunological diseases. Accordingly, studies evaluating MSCs for clinical applications are increasing. In this study, we characterized MSCs from the periodontal ligament, umbilical cord (UC-MSCs, and adipose tissue, which were relatively easy to obtain with limited ethical concerns regarding their acquisition, and compared their immunological characteristics. Among MSCs isolated from the three different tissues, UC-MSCs grew the fastest in vitro. The three types of MSCs were shown to inhibit proliferation of activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs to a similar degree, via the indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and cyclooxygenase-2 pathways. They were also shown to inhibit the proliferation of PBMCs using HLA-G, which was most prominent in UC-MSCs. Unlike the other two types of MSCs, UC-MSCs showed minimal expression of HLA-DR after activation, suggesting that they pose minimal risk of initiating an allogeneic immune response when administered in vivo. These characteristics, the ease of collection, and the minimal ethical concerns regarding their use suggest UC-MSCs to be suitable MSC therapeutic candidates.

  14. Identification of multipotent stem cells from adult dog periodontal ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Jun; Zhao, Yu-Ming; Lin, Bi-Chen; Yang, Jie; Ge, Li-Hong

    2012-08-01

    Periodontal diseases, which are characterized by destruction of the connective tissues responsible for restraining the teeth within the jaw, are the main cause of tooth loss. Periodontal regeneration mediated by human periodontal ligament stem cells (hPDLSCs) may offer an alternative strategy for the treatment of periodontal disease. Dogs are a widely used large-animal model for the study of periodontal-disease progression, tissue regeneration, and dental implants, but little attention has been paid to the identification of the cells involved in this species. This study aimed to characterize stem cells isolated from canine periodontal ligament (cPDLSCs). The cPDLSCs, like hPDLSCs, showed clonogenic capability and expressed the mesenchymal stem cell markers STRO-1, CD146, and CD105, but not CD34. After induction of osteogenesis, cPDLSCs showed calcium accumulation in vitro. Moreover, cPDLSCs also showed both adipogenic and chondrogenic potential. Compared with cell-free controls, more cementum/periodontal ligament-like structures were observed in CB-17/SCID mice into which cPDLSCs had been transplanted. These results suggest that cPDLSCs are clonogenic, highly proliferative, and have multidifferentiation potential, and that they could be used as a new cellular therapeutic approach to facilitate successful and more predictable regeneration of periodontal tissue using a canine model of periodontal disease. © 2012 Eur J Oral Sci.

  15. Gingival and periodontal ligament fibroblasts differ in their inflammatory response to viable Porphyromonas gingivalis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheres, N; Laine, M L; de Vries, T J; Everts, V; van Winkelhoff, A J

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Porphyromonas gingivalis is an oral pathogen strongly associated with destruction of the tooth-supporting tissues in human periodontitis. Gingival fibroblasts (GF) and periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLF) are functionally different cell types in the periodontium that can

  16. Role of integrins in the periodontal ligament: organizers and facilitators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barczyk, Malgorzata; Bolstad, Anne Isine; Gullberg, Donald

    2013-10-01

    The periodontal ligament is the tissue that connects teeth to bone. The periodontal ligament is a fascinating tissue from a cell biologist's point of view, and because of its special properties and stem-cell content it has also come into the limelight in emerging fields of regenerative medicine. An increased range of genetically modified mouse models offer new tools for studying molecular mechanisms of tooth development. However, owing to species-specific organization of the tooth apparatus, the use of genetic animal models to study the role of the periodontal ligament in normal human tooth physiology and tooth pathology is challenging. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Role of periodontal ligament fibroblasts in osteoclastogenesis: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sokos, D.; Everts, V.; de Vries, T.J.

    2015-01-01

    During the last decade it has become clear that periodontal ligament fibroblasts may contribute to the in vitro differentiation of osteoclasts. We surveyed the current findings regarding their osteoclastogenesis potential. Periodontal ligament fibroblasts have the capacity to select and attract

  18. Regeneration of bone and periodontal ligament induced by recombinant amelogenin after periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haze, Amir; Taylor, Angela L; Haegewald, Stefan; Leiser, Yoav; Shay, Boaz; Rosenfeld, Eli; Gruenbaum-Cohen, Yael; Dafni, Leah; Zimmermann, Bernd; Heikinheimo, Kristiina; Gibson, Carolyn W; Fisher, Larry W; Young, Marian F; Blumenfeld, Anat; Bernimoulin, Jean P; Deutsch, Dan

    2009-06-01

    Regeneration of mineralized tissues affected by chronic diseases comprises a major scientific and clinical challenge. Periodontitis, one such prevalent disease, involves destruction of the tooth-supporting tissues, alveolar bone, periodontal-ligament and cementum, often leading to tooth loss. In 1997, it became clear that, in addition to their function in enamel formation, the hydrophobic ectodermal enamel matrix proteins (EMPs) play a role in the regeneration of these periodontal tissues. The epithelial EMPs are a heterogeneous mixture of polypeptides encoded by several genes. It was not clear, however, which of these many EMPs induces the regeneration and what mechanisms are involved. Here we show that a single recombinant human amelogenin protein (rHAM(+)), induced in vivo regeneration of all tooth-supporting tissues after creation of experimental periodontitis in a dog model. To further understand the regeneration process, amelogenin expression was detected in normal and regenerating cells of the alveolar bone (osteocytes, osteoblasts and osteoclasts), periodontal ligament, cementum and in bone marrow stromal cells. Amelogenin expression was highest in areas of high bone turnover and activity. Further studies showed that during the first 2 weeks after application, rHAM(+) induced, directly or indirectly, significant recruitment of mesenchymal progenitor cells, which later differentiated to form the regenerated periodontal tissues. The ability of a single protein to bring about regeneration of all periodontal tissues, in the correct spatio-temporal order, through recruitment of mesenchymal progenitor cells, could pave the way for development of new therapeutic devices for treatment of periodontal, bone and ligament diseases based on rHAM(+).

  19. Progenitor cell populations in the periodontal ligament of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCulloch, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    Stem cells in a variety of renewal tissues exhibit a slow rate of cell proliferation. The periodontal ligament of mouse molars was examined for the presence of slowly cycling progenitor cells to provide evidence for the existence of stem cells in this tissue. A pulse injection of 3 H-thymidine was administered and mice were sacrificed between 1 hour and 14 days after injection. Analysis of radioautographs using percentage of labeled cells and grain counts demonstrated that a population of label-retaining cells within 10 micron of blood vessels traversed the cell cycle more slowly than proliferating cells located greater than 10 micron from blood vessels. These data suggest that there is a slowly dividing population of progenitor cells in paravascular sites in mouse molar periodontal ligament which may be stem cells

  20. Prevotella intermedia stimulates tissue-type plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 expression via multiple signaling pathways in human periodontal ligament cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Su-Min; He, Jian-Jun; Zhang, Ming; Shu, Lei

    2011-06-01

    Prevotella intermedia is an important periodontal pathogen that induces various inflammatory and immune responses. In this study, we investigated the effects of P. intermedia on the plasminogen system in human periodontal ligament (hPDL) cells and explored the signaling pathways involved. Using semi-quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and quantitative real-time RT-qPCR, we demonstrated that P. intermedia challenge increased tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-2 expression in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, but exerted no influence on urokinase-type plasminogen activator and PAI-1mRNA expression in hPDL cells. Prevotella intermedia stimulation also enhanced tPA protein secretion as confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Western blot results revealed that P. intermedia treatment increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 kinase (p38). ERK, JNK and protein kinase C inhibitors significantly attenuated the P. intermedia-induced tPA and PAI-2 expression. Furthermore, p38 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitors markedly decreased PAI-2 expression, whereas they showed no or little inhibition on tPA expression. In contrast, inhibition of protein kinase A greatly enhanced the upregulatory effect of P. intermedia on tPA and PAI-2 expression. Our results suggest that P. intermedia may contribute to periodontal tissue destruction by upregulating tPA and PAI-2 expression in hPDL cells via multiple signaling pathways. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular Characteristics of the Equine Periodontal Ligament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje Pöschke

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The equine periodontal ligament (PDL is a fibrous connective tissue that covers the intra-alveolar parts of the tooth and anchors it to the alveolar bone—it, therefore, provides a similar function to a tendinous structure. While several studies have considered the formation and structure of tendons, there is insufficient information particularly on the molecular composition of the PDL. Especially for the equine PDL, there is limited knowledge concerning the expression of genes commonly regarded as typical for tendon tissue. In this study, the gene expression of, e.g., collagen type 1 alpha 1 (COL1, collagen type 3 alpha 1 (COL3, scleraxis (SCX, and fibrocartilage markers was examined in the functional mature equine PDL compared with immature and mature equine tendon tissue. PDL samples were obtained from incisor, premolar, and molar teeth from seven adult horses. Additionally, tendon samples were collected from four adult horses and five foals at different sampling locations. Analyses of gene expression were performed using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. Significantly higher expression levels of COL1 and 3 were found in the mature equine PDL in comparison with mature tendon, indicating higher rates of collagen production and turnover in the mature equine PDL. The expression levels of SCX, a specific marker for tenogenic-differentiated cells, were on a similar level in functional mature PDL and in mature tendon tissue. Evidence of chondrogenic metaplasia, often found in tendon entheses or in pressurized regions of tendons, was not found in the mature equine PDL. The obtained results justify further experiments focused on the possible use of equine PDL cells for cell-based regenerative therapies.

  2. Effect of storage media on the proliferation of periodontal ligament fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauer, H.C.; Mueller, J.G.; Gross, J.; Horster, M.F.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of storage media, which are routinely used in replantation, upon the proliferative capacity of periodontal ligament fibroblasts, was compared with the effect of a tissue culture medium. The periodontal tissue was obtained from mandibular central incisors of White New Zealand rabbits. The experiments were performed in fibroblasts derived during second subculture. The storage media were physiologic salt solution, Ringer's solution and Rivanol; the tissue culture medium was alpha-minimum essential medium without nucleosides. The incubation period was 1 hour. [ 3 H]-thymidine incorporation and cell counts were taken to indicate changes in the proliferative capacity of the fibroblasts. The tissue culture experiments showed that the proliferative ability of the periodontal ligament fibroblasts was dependent upon the composition of the storage medium. Physiologic salt solution, Ringer's solution and Rivanol were unable to maintain the metabolism of the fibroblasts. alpha-MEM medium, however, was capable of stimulating proliferation of the periodontal ligament fibroblasts

  3. Bone regeneration potential of stem cells derived from periodontal ligament or gingival tissue sources encapsulated in RGD-modified alginate scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshaverinia, Alireza; Chen, Chider; Xu, Xingtian; Akiyama, Kentaro; Ansari, Sahar; Zadeh, Homayoun H; Shi, Songtao

    2014-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) provide an advantageous alternative therapeutic option for bone regeneration in comparison to current treatment modalities. However, delivering MSCs to the defect site while maintaining a high MSC survival rate is still a critical challenge in MSC-mediated bone regeneration. Here, we tested the bone regeneration capacity of periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) and gingival mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs) encapsulated in a novel RGD- (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid tripeptide) coupled alginate microencapsulation system in vitro and in vivo. Five-millimeter-diameter critical-size calvarial defects were created in immunocompromised mice and PDLSCs and GMSCs encapsulated in RGD-modified alginate microspheres were transplanted into the defect sites. New bone formation was assessed using microcomputed tomography and histological analyses 8 weeks after transplantation. Results confirmed that our microencapsulation system significantly enhanced MSC viability and osteogenic differentiation in vitro compared with non-RGD-containing alginate hydrogel microspheres with larger diameters. Results confirmed that PDLSCs were able to repair the calvarial defects by promoting the formation of mineralized tissue, while GMSCs showed significantly lower osteogenic differentiation capability. Further, results revealed that RGD-coupled alginate scaffold facilitated the differentiation of oral MSCs toward an osteoblast lineage in vitro and in vivo, as assessed by expression of osteogenic markers Runx2, ALP, and osteocalcin. In conclusion, these results for the first time demonstrated that MSCs derived from orofacial tissue encapsulated in RGD-modified alginate scaffold show promise for craniofacial bone regeneration. This treatment modality has many potential dental and orthopedic applications.

  4. Tenomodulin expression in the periodontal ligament enhances cellular adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuske Komiyama

    Full Text Available Tenomodulin (Tnmd is a type II transmembrane protein characteristically expressed in dense connective tissues such as tendons and ligaments. Its expression in the periodontal ligament (PDL has also been demonstrated, though the timing and function remain unclear. We investigated the expression of Tnmd during murine tooth eruption and explored its biological functions in vitro. Tnmd expression was related to the time of eruption when occlusal force was transferred to the teeth and surrounding tissues. Tnmd overexpression enhanced cell adhesion in NIH3T3 and human PDL cells. In addition, Tnmd-knockout fibroblasts showed decreased cell adhesion. In the extracellular portions of Tnmd, the BRICHOS domain or CS region was found to be responsible for Tnmd-mediated enhancement of cell adhesion. These results suggest that Tnmd acts on the maturation or maintenance of the PDL by positively regulating cell adhesion via its BRICHOS domain.

  5. Keratinocyte growth factor mRNA expression in periodontal ligament fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, S; Wandall, H H; Grøn, B

    1997-01-01

    Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) is a fibroblast growth factor which mediates epithelial growth and differentiation. KGF is expressed in subepithelial fibroblasts, but generally not in fibroblasts of deep connective tissue, such as fascia and ligaments. Here we demonstrate that KGF mRNA is expres......Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) is a fibroblast growth factor which mediates epithelial growth and differentiation. KGF is expressed in subepithelial fibroblasts, but generally not in fibroblasts of deep connective tissue, such as fascia and ligaments. Here we demonstrate that KGF m......RNA is expressed in periodontal ligament fibroblasts, and that the expression is increased upon serum stimulation. Fibroblasts from human periodontal ligament, from buccal mucosa, from gingiva, and from skin were established from explants. Alkaline phosphatase activity was used as an indicator of the periodontal...

  6. A Nano-indentation Identification Technique for Viscoelastic Constitutive Characteristics of Periodontal Ligaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafi, H.; Shariyat, M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Nano-indentation has recently been employed as a powerful tool for determining the mechanical properties of biological tissues on nano and micro scales. A majority of soft biological tissues such as ligaments and tendons exhibit viscoelastic or time-dependent behaviors. The constitutive characterization of soft tissues is among very important subjects in clinical medicine and especially, biomechanics fields. Periodontal ligament plays an important role in initiating tooth movement when loads are applied to teeth with orthodontic appliances. It is also the most accessible ligament in human body as it can be directly manipulated without any surgical intervention. From a mechanical point of view, this ligament can be considered as a thin interface made by a solid phase, consisting mainly of collagen fibers, which is immersed into a so-called ground substance. However, the viscoelastic constitutive effects of biological tissues are seldom considered rigorous during Nano-indentation tests. Methods In the present paper, a mathematical contact approach is developed to enable determining creep compliance and relaxation modulus of distinct periodontal ligaments, using constant–rate indentation and loading time histories, respectively. An adequate curve-fitting method is presented to determine these characteristics based on the Nano-indentation of rigid Berkovich tips. Generalized Voigt-Kelvin and Wiechert models are used to model constitutive equations of periodontal ligaments, in which the relaxation and creep functions are represented by series of decaying exponential functions of time. Results Time-dependent creep compliance and relaxation function have been obtained for tissue specimens of periodontal ligaments. Conclusion To improve accuracy, relaxation and creep moduli are measured from two tests separately. Stress relaxation effects appear more rapidly than creep in the periodontal ligaments. PMID:27672630

  7. A Nano-indentation Identification Technique for Viscoelastic Constitutive Characteristics of Periodontal Ligaments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashrafi H.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nano-indentation has recently been employed as a powerful tool for determining the mechanical properties of biological tissues on nano and micro scales. A majority of soft biological tissues such as ligaments and tendons exhibit viscoelastic or time-dependent behaviors. The constitutive characterization of soft tissues is among very important subjects in clinical medicine and especially, biomechanics fields. Periodontal ligament plays an important role in initiating tooth movement when loads are applied to teeth with orthodontic appliances. It is also the most accessible ligament in human body as it can be directly manipulated without any surgical intervention. From a mechanical point of view, this ligament can be considered as a thin interface made by a solid phase, consisting mainly of collagen fibers, which is immersed into a so-called ground substance. However, the viscoelastic constitutive effects of biological tissues are seldom considered rigorous during Nano-indentation tests. Methods: In the present paper, a mathematical contact approach is developed to enable determining creep compliance and relaxation modulus of distinct periodontal ligaments, using constant–rate indentation and loading time histories, respectively. An adequate curve-fitting method is presented to determine these characteristics based on the Nano-indentation of rigid Berkovich tips. Generalized Voigt-Kelvin and Wiechert models are used to model constitutive equations of periodontal ligaments, in which the relaxation and creep functions are represented by series of decaying exponential functions of time. Results: Time-dependent creep compliance and relaxation function have been obtained for tissue specimens of periodontal ligaments. Conclusion: To improve accuracy, relaxation and creep moduli are measured from two tests separately. Stress relaxation effects appear more rapidly than creep in the periodontal ligaments.

  8. A Nano-indentation Identification Technique for Viscoelastic Constitutive Characteristics of Periodontal Ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafi, H; Shariyat, M

    2016-06-01

    Nano-indentation has recently been employed as a powerful tool for determining the mechanical properties of biological tissues on nano and micro scales. A majority of soft biological tissues such as ligaments and tendons exhibit viscoelastic or time-dependent behaviors. The constitutive characterization of soft tissues is among very important subjects in clinical medicine and especially, biomechanics fields. Periodontal ligament plays an important role in initiating tooth movement when loads are applied to teeth with orthodontic appliances. It is also the most accessible ligament in human body as it can be directly manipulated without any surgical intervention. From a mechanical point of view, this ligament can be considered as a thin interface made by a solid phase, consisting mainly of collagen fibers, which is immersed into a so-called ground substance. However, the viscoelastic constitutive effects of biological tissues are seldom considered rigorous during Nano-indentation tests. In the present paper, a mathematical contact approach is developed to enable determining creep compliance and relaxation modulus of distinct periodontal ligaments, using constant-rate indentation and loading time histories, respectively. An adequate curve-fitting method is presented to determine these characteristics based on the Nano-indentation of rigid Berkovich tips. Generalized Voigt-Kelvin and Wiechert models are used to model constitutive equations of periodontal ligaments, in which the relaxation and creep functions are represented by series of decaying exponential functions of time. Time-dependent creep compliance and relaxation function have been obtained for tissue specimens of periodontal ligaments. To improve accuracy, relaxation and creep moduli are measured from two tests separately. Stress relaxation effects appear more rapidly than creep in the periodontal ligaments.

  9. Various methods for isolation of multipotent human periodontal ligament cells for regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Ha Le Bao; Doan, Vu Nguyen; Le, Huong Thi Ngoc; Ngo, Lan Thi Quynh

    2014-08-01

    Periodontal ligament (PDL) is a specialized connective tissue that connects cementum and alveolar bone to maintain and support the teeth in situ and preserve tissue homeostasis. Recent studies have revealed the existence of stem cells in human dental tissues including periodontal ligament that play an important role, not only in the maintenance of the periodontium but also in promoting periodontal regeneration. In this study, human periodontal ligament cells (hPDLCs) were isolated by outgrowth and enzymatic dissociation methods. Expression of surface markers on PDLCs as human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was identified by flow cytometry. In addition, proliferation and differentiation capacity of cultured cells to osteoblasts, adipocytes were evaluated. As a result, we successfully cultured cells from the human periodontal ligament tissues. PDLCs express mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) markers such as CD44, CD73, and CD90 and do not express CD34, CD45, and HLA-DR. PDLCs also possess the multipotential to differentiate into various types of cells, such as osteoblast and adipocytes, in vitro. Therefore, these cells have high potential to serve as materials for tissue engineering, especially dental tissue engineering.

  10. Influence of nanotopography on periodontal ligament stem cell functions and cell sheet based periodontal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hui; Li, Bei; Zhao, Lingzhou; Jin, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal regeneration is an important part of regenerative medicine, with great clinical significance; however, the effects of nanotopography on the functions of periodontal ligament (PDL) stem cells (PDLSCs) and on PDLSC sheet based periodontal regeneration have never been explored. Titania nanotubes (NTs) layered on titanium (Ti) provide a good platform to study this. In the current study, the influence of NTs of different tube size on the functions of PDLSCs was observed. Afterward, an ectopic implantation model using a Ti/cell sheets/hydroxyapatite (HA) complex was applied to study the effect of the NTs on cell sheet based periodontal regeneration. The NTs were able to enhance the initial PDLSC adhesion and spread, as well as collagen secretion. With the Ti/cell sheets/HA complex model, it was demonstrated that the PDLSC sheets were capable of regenerating the PDL tissue, when combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC) sheets and HA, without the need for extra soluble chemical cues. Simultaneously, the NTs improved the periodontal regeneration result of the ectopically implanted Ti/cell sheets/HA complex, giving rise to functionally aligned collagen fiber bundles. Specifically, much denser collagen fibers, with abundant blood vessels as well as cementum-like tissue on the Ti surface, which well-resembled the structure of natural PDL, were observed in the NT5 and NT10 sample groups. Our study provides the first evidence that the nanotopographical cues obviously influence the functions of PDLSCs and improve the PDLSC sheet based periodontal regeneration size dependently, which provides new insight to the periodontal regeneration. The Ti/cell sheets/HA complex may constitute a good model to predict the effect of biomaterials on periodontal regeneration.

  11. The influence of root surface distance to alveolar bone and periodontal ligament on periodontal wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montevecchi, Marco; Parrilli, Annapaola; Fini, Milena; Gatto, Maria Rosaria; Muttini, Aurelio; Checchi, Luigi

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this animal study was to perform a 3-dimensional micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) analysis in order to investigate the influence of root surface distance to the alveolar bone and the periodontal ligament on periodontal wound healing after a guided tissue regeneration (GTR) procedure. Three adult Sus scrofa domesticus specimens were used. The study sample included 6 teeth, corresponding to 2 third mandibular incisors from each animal. After coronectomy, a circumferential bone defect was created in each tooth by means of calibrated piezoelectric inserts. The experimental defects had depths of 3 mm, 5 mm, 7 mm, 9 mm, and 11 mm, with a constant width of 2 mm. One tooth with no defect was used as a control. The defects were covered with a bioresorbable membrane and protected with a flap. After 6 months, the animals were euthanised and tissue blocks were harvested and preserved for micro-CT analysis. New alveolar bone was consistently present in all experimental defects. Signs of root resorption were observed in all samples, with the extent of resorption directly correlated to the vertical extent of the defect; the medial third of the root was the most commonly affected area. Signs of ankylosis were recorded in the defects that were 3 mm and 7 mm in depth. Density and other indicators of bone quality decreased with increasing defect depth. After a GTR procedure, the periodontal ligament and the alveolar bone appeared to compete in periodontal wound healing. Moreover, the observed decrease in bone quality indicators suggests that intrabony defects beyond a critical size cannot be regenerated. This finding may be relevant for the clinical application of periodontal regeneration, since it implies that GTR has a dimensional limit.

  12. Effect of F-spondin on cementoblastic differentiation of human periodontal ligament cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, Masae; Kudo, Yasusei; Iizuka, Shinji; Ogawa, Ikuko; Abiko, Yoshimitsu; Miyauchi, Mutsumi; Takata, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    Cementum is a mineralized tissue produced by cementoblasts covering the roots of teeth that provides for the attachment of periodontal ligament to roots and surrounding alveolar bone. To study the mechanism of proliferation and differentiation of cementoblasts is important for understanding periodontal physiology and pathology including periodontal tissue regeneration. However, the detailed mechanism of the proliferation and differentiation of human cementoblasts is still unclear. We previously established human cementoblast-like (HCEM) cell lines. We thought that comparing the transcriptional profiles of HCEM cells and human periodontal ligament (HPL) cells derived from the same teeth could be a good approach to identify genes that influence the nature of cementoblasts. We identified F-spondin as the gene demonstrating the high fold change expression in HCEM cells. Interestingly, F-spondin highly expressing HPL cells showed similar phenotype of cementoblasts, such as up-regulation of mineralized-related genes. Overall, we identified F-spondin as a promoting factor for cementoblastic differentiation

  13. Degenerative alterations of the cementum-periodontal ligament complex and early tooth loss in a young patient with periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruţiu, S A; Buiga, Petronela; Roman, Alexandra; Danciu, Theodora; Mihu, Carmen Mihaela; Mihu, D

    2012-01-01

    Premature exfoliation of primary or permanent teeth in children or adolescents is extremely rare and it can be a manifestation of an underlying systemic disease. This study aims to present the histological aspects associated with early tooth loss in a case of periodontal disease developed without local inflammation and with minimal periodontal pockets and attachment loss. The maxillary left second premolar was extracted together with a gingival collar attached to the root surface. The histological analysis recorded the resorption of the cementum in multiple areas of the entire root surface with the connective tissue of the desmodontium invading the lacunae defects. The connective tissue rich in cells occupied the periodontal ligamentar space and the resorptive areas. No inflammation was obvious in the periodontal ligament connective tissue. This report may warn clinicians about the possibility of the association of cemental abnormalities with early tooth loss.

  14. Review of common conditions associated with periodontal ligament widening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortazavi, Hamed; Baharvand, Maryam [Dept. of Oral Medicine, School of Dentistry, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The aim of this article is to review a group of lesions associated with periodontal ligament (PDL) widening. An electronic search was performed using specialized databases such as Google Scholar, PubMed, PubMed Central, Science Direct, and Scopus to find relevant studies by using keywords such as “periodontium”, “periodontal ligament”, “periodontal ligament space”, “widened periodontal ligament”, and “periodontal ligament widening”. Out of nearly 200 articles, about 60 were broadly relevant to the topic. Ultimately, 47 articles closely related to the topic of interest were reviewed. When the relevant data were compiled, the following 10 entities were identified: occlusal/orthodontic trauma, periodontal disease/periodontitis, pulpo-periapical lesions, osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, progressive systemic sclerosis, radiation-induced bone defect, bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis, and osteomyelitis. Although PDL widening may be encountered by many dentists during their routine daily procedures, the clinician should consider some serious related conditions as well.

  15. Review of common conditions associated with periodontal ligament widening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortazavi, Hamed; Baharvand, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article is to review a group of lesions associated with periodontal ligament (PDL) widening. An electronic search was performed using specialized databases such as Google Scholar, PubMed, PubMed Central, Science Direct, and Scopus to find relevant studies by using keywords such as “periodontium”, “periodontal ligament”, “periodontal ligament space”, “widened periodontal ligament”, and “periodontal ligament widening”. Out of nearly 200 articles, about 60 were broadly relevant to the topic. Ultimately, 47 articles closely related to the topic of interest were reviewed. When the relevant data were compiled, the following 10 entities were identified: occlusal/orthodontic trauma, periodontal disease/periodontitis, pulpo-periapical lesions, osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, progressive systemic sclerosis, radiation-induced bone defect, bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis, and osteomyelitis. Although PDL widening may be encountered by many dentists during their routine daily procedures, the clinician should consider some serious related conditions as well

  16. The intricate anatomy of the periodontal ligament and its development: Lessons for periodontal regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, T.; Bakker, A. D.; Everts, V.; Smit, T. H.

    2017-01-01

    The periodontal ligament (PDL) connects the tooth root and alveolar bone. It is an aligned fibrous network that is interposed between, and anchored to, both mineralized surfaces. Periodontal disease is common and reduces the ability of the PDL to act as a shock absorber, a barrier for pathogens and

  17. Periodontal ligament cellular structures engineered with electrospun poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) nanofibrous membrane scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inanç, Bülend; Arslan, Y Emre; Seker, Sükran; Elçin, A Eser; Elçin, Y Murat

    2009-07-01

    Periodontal tissue engineering is expected to overcome the limitations associated with the existing regenerative techniques for the treatment of periodontal defects involving alveolar bone, cementum, and periodontal ligament. Cell-based tissue engineering approaches involve the utilization of in vitro expanded cells with regenerative capacity and their delivery to the appropriate sites via biomaterial scaffolds. The aim of this study was to establish living periodontal ligament cell-containing structures on electrospun poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanofiber membrane scaffolds, assess their viability and characteristics, and engineer multilayered structures amenable to easy handling. Human periodontal ligament (hPDL) cells were expanded in explant culture and then characterized morphologically and immunohistochemically. PLGA nanofiber membranes were prepared by the electrospinning process; mechanical tensile properties were determined, surface topography, nanofiber size, and porosity status were investigated with SEM. Cells were seeded on the membranes at approximately 50,000 cell/cm(2) and cultured for 21 days either in expansion or in osteogenic induction medium. Cell adhesion and viability were demonstrated using SEM and MTT, respectively, and osteogenic differentiation was determined with IHC and immunohistomorphometric evaluation of osteopontin, osteocalcin, and bone sialoprotein marker expression. At days 3, 6, 9, and 12 additional cell/membrane layers were deposited on the existing ones and multilayered hybrid structures were established. Results indicate the feasibility of periodontal ligament cell-containing tissue-like structures engineering with PDL cells and electrospun nanofiber PLGA scaffolds supporting cell adhesion, viability and osteogenic differentiation properties of cells in hybrid structures amenable to macroscopic handling.

  18. Gap-junction-mediated communication in human periodontal ligament cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, R; Ishihara, Y; Kawanabe, N; Sumiyoshi, K; Yoshikawa, Y; Nakamura, M; Imai, Y; Yanagita, T; Fukushima, H; Kamioka, H; Takano-Yamamoto, T; Yamashiro, T

    2013-07-01

    Periodontal tissue homeostasis depends on a complex cellular network that conveys cell-cell communication. Gap junctions (GJs), one of the intercellular communication systems, are found between adjacent human periodontal ligament (hPDL) cells; however, the functional GJ coupling between hPDL cells has not yet been elucidated. In this study, we investigated functional gap-junction-mediated intercellular communication in isolated primary hPDL cells. SEM images indicated that the cells were in contact with each other via dendritic processes, and also showed high anti-connexin43 (Cx43) immunoreactivity on these processes. Gap-junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) among hPDL cells was assessed by fluorescence recovery after a photobleaching (FRAP) analysis, which exhibited dye coupling between hPDL cells, and was remarkably down-regulated when the cells were treated with a GJ blocker. Additionally, we examined GJs under hypoxic stress. The fluorescence recovery and expression levels of Cx43 decreased time-dependently under the hypoxic condition. Exposure to GJ inhibitor or hypoxia increased RANKL expression, and decreased OPG expression. This study shows that GJIC is responsible for hPDL cells and that its activity is reduced under hypoxia. This is consistent with the possible role of hPDL cells in regulating the biochemical reactions in response to changes in the hypoxic environment.

  19. Acemannan sponges stimulate alveolar bone, cementum and periodontal ligament regeneration in a canine class II furcation defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantarawaratit, P; Sangvanich, P; Banlunara, W; Soontornvipart, K; Thunyakitpisal, P

    2014-04-01

    Periodontal disease is a common infectious disease, found worldwide, causing the destruction of the periodontium. The periodontium is a complex structure composed of both soft and hard tissues, thus an agent applied to regenerate the periodontium must be able to stimulate periodontal ligament, cementum and alveolar bone regeneration. Recent studies demonstrated that acemannan, a polysaccharide extracted from Aloe vera gel, stimulated both soft and hard tissue healing. This study investigated effect of acemannan as a bioactive molecule and scaffold for periodontal tissue regeneration. Primary human periodontal ligament cells were treated with acemannan in vitro. New DNA synthesis, expression of growth/differentiation factor 5 and runt-related transcription factor 2, expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, bone morphogenetic protein-2 and type I collagen, alkaline phosphatase activity, and mineralized nodule formation were determined using [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay, biochemical assay and alizarin red staining, respectively. In our in vivo study, premolar class II furcation defects were made in four mongrel dogs. Acemannan sponges were applied into the defects. Untreated defects were used as a negative control group. The amount of new bone, cementum and periodontal ligament formation were evaluated 30 and 60 d after the operation. Acemannan significantly increased periodontal ligament cell proliferation, upregulation of growth/differentiation factor 5, runt-related transcription factor 2, vascular endothelial growth factor, bone morphogenetic protein 2, type I collagen and alkaline phosphatase activity, and mineral deposition as compared with the untreated control group in vitro. Moreover, acemannan significantly accelerated new alveolar bone, cementum and periodontal ligament formation in class II furcation defects. Our data suggest that acemannan could be a candidate

  20. Dynamic Mechanical and Nanofibrous Topological Combinatory Cues Designed for Periodontal Ligament Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joong-Hyun; Kang, Min Sil; Eltohamy, Mohamed; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Hae-Won

    2016-01-01

    Complete reconstruction of damaged periodontal pockets, particularly regeneration of periodontal ligament (PDL) has been a significant challenge in dentistry. Tissue engineering approach utilizing PDL stem cells and scaffolding matrices offers great opportunity to this, and applying physical and mechanical cues mimicking native tissue conditions are of special importance. Here we approach to regenerate periodontal tissues by engineering PDL cells supported on a nanofibrous scaffold under a mechanical-stressed condition. PDL stem cells isolated from rats were seeded on an electrospun polycaprolactone/gelatin directionally-oriented nanofiber membrane and dynamic mechanical stress was applied to the cell/nanofiber construct, providing nanotopological and mechanical combined cues. Cells recognized the nanofiber orientation, aligning in parallel, and the mechanical stress increased the cell alignment. Importantly, the cells cultured on the oriented nanofiber combined with the mechanical stress produced significantly stimulated PDL specific markers, including periostin and tenascin with simultaneous down-regulation of osteogenesis, demonstrating the roles of topological and mechanical cues in altering phenotypic change in PDL cells. Tissue compatibility of the tissue-engineered constructs was confirmed in rat subcutaneous sites. Furthermore, in vivo regeneration of PDL and alveolar bone tissues was examined under the rat premaxillary periodontal defect models. The cell/nanofiber constructs engineered under mechanical stress showed sound integration into tissue defects and the regenerated bone volume and area were significantly improved. This study provides an effective tissue engineering approach for periodontal regeneration-culturing PDL stem cells with combinatory cues of oriented nanotopology and dynamic mechanical stretch.

  1. Periodontal tissue damage in smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hutojo Djajakusuma

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Dental plaque is the primary etiological factor in periodontal diseases. However, there are many factors that can modify how an individual periodontal tissue will respond to the accumulation of dental plaque. Among such risk factors, there is increasing evidence that smoking tobacco products alters the expression and rate of progression of periodontal diseases. The aim of this study was to find out the loss of periodontal tissue adhesion in smokers by measuring pocket depth using probe, and by measuring alveolar bone damage using Bone Loss Score (BLS radiographic methods on teeth 12, 11, 21, 22, 32, 31, 41, 42. Based on T Test statistical analysis, there were significant differences in pocket depth damage of alveolar bone in smokers and non smokers. In conclusion there were increasing pocket depth and alveolar bone damage in smokers.

  2. Tissue Engineering Strategies in Ligament Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Yilgor, Caglar; Yilgor Huri, Pinar; Huri, Gazi

    2011-01-01

    Ligaments are dense fibrous connective tissues that connect bones to other bones and their injuries are frequently encountered in the clinic. The current clinical approaches in ligament repair and regeneration are limited to autografts, as the gold standard, and allografts. Both of these techniques have their own drawbacks that limit the success in clinical setting; therefore, new strategies are being developed in order to be able to solve the current problems of ligament grafting. Tissue eng...

  3. Human periodontal ligament cell viability in milk and milk substitutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Robert M; Liewehr, Frederick R; West, Leslie A; Patton, William R; McPherson, James C; Runner, Royce R

    2003-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of several milk substitutes compared to whole milk in maintaining the viability of human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells on avulsed teeth. PDL cells were obtained from freshly extracted, healthy third molars and cultured in Eagle's minimal essential media (EMEM). The cells were plated onto 24-well culture plates and allowed to attach for 24 h. EMEM was replaced with refrigerated whole milk (positive control), reconstituted powdered milk, evaporated milk, or one of two baby formulas (Similac or Enfamil). Tap water served as the negative control. Tissue culture plates were incubated with the experimental media at 37 degrees C for 1, 2, 4, or 8 h. Cell viability was determined by a cell proliferation assay (CellTiter 96 AQ Assay), with absorbance read at 450 nM. A two-way ANOVA (p effect on PDL cell viability between any of the materials and whole milk. At 2 h, Enfamil and Similac performed significantly better than whole milk, whereas evaporated milk performed worse. At 4 h, Enfamil performed better than whole milk, whereas all other milk substitutes performed worse. At 8 h, all substitutes performed worse than whole milk. These results suggest that Enfamil, which is supplied in powder form that does not require special storage and has a shelf life of 18 months, is a more effective storage medium for avulsed teeth than pasteurized milk for at least 4 h.

  4. Assessment of Surface Markers Derived from Human Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainab Kadkhoda

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Periodontal tissue regeneration for treatment of periodontal disease has not yet been mastered in tissue engineering. Stem cells, scaffold, and growth factors are the three main basic components of tissue engineering. Periodontal ligament (PDL contains stem cells; however, the number, potency and features of these cells have not yet been understood. This study aimed to isolate and characterize the properties of PDL stem cells. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, samples were isolated from the PDL of extracted teeth of five patients and then stained immunohistochemically for detection of cell surface markers. Cells were then examined by immuno-flow cytometry for mesenchymal markers as well as for osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation.Results: The isolated cell population had fibroblast-like morphology and flow cytometry revealed that the mesenchymal surface markers were (means: CD90 (84.55, CD31 (39.97, CD166 (33.77, CD105 (31.19, CD45 (32/44, CD44 (462.11, CD34 (227.33, CD38 (86.94, CD13 (34.52 and CD73 (50.39. The PDL stem cells also differentiated into osteoblasts and adipocytes in osteogenic and adipogenic media, respectively.Conclusions: PDL stem cells expressed mesenchymal stem cell (MSC markers and differentiated into osteoblasts and adipocytes in osteogenic and adipogenic media, respectively.Keywords: Adipocytes; Antigens; Mesenchymal Stromal Cells; Osteoblasts; Periodontal Ligament

  5. Periodontal ligament, cementum, and alveolar bone in the oldest herbivorous tetrapods, and their evolutionary significance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron R H LeBlanc

    Full Text Available Tooth implantation provides important phylogenetic and functional information about the dentitions of amniotes. Traditionally, only mammals and crocodilians have been considered truly thecodont, because their tooth roots are coated in layers of cementum for anchorage of the periodontal ligament, which is in turn attached to the bone lining the alveolus, the alveolar bone. The histological properties and developmental origins of these three periodontal tissues have been studied extensively in mammals and crocodilians, but the identities of the periodontal tissues in other amniotes remain poorly studied. Early work on dental histology of basal amniotes concluded that most possess a simplified tooth attachment in which the tooth root is ankylosed to a pedestal composed of "bone of attachment", which is in turn fused to the jaw. More recent studies have concluded that stereotypically thecodont tissues are also present in non-mammalian, non-crocodilian amniotes, but these studies were limited to crown groups or secondarily aquatic reptiles. As the sister group to Amniota, and the first tetrapods to exhibit dental occlusion, diadectids are the ideal candidates for studies of dental evolution among terrestrial vertebrates because they can be used to test hypotheses of development and homology in deep time. Our study of Permo-Carboniferous diadectid tetrapod teeth and dental tissues reveal the presence of two types of cementum, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone, and therefore the earliest record of true thecodonty in a tetrapod. These discoveries in a stem amniote allow us to hypothesize that the ability to produce the tissues that characterize thecodonty in mammals and crocodilians is very ancient and plesiomorphic for Amniota. Consequently, all other forms of tooth implantation in crown amniotes are derived arrangements of one or more of these periodontal tissues and not simply ankylosis of teeth to the jaw by plesiomorphically retaining "bone

  6. Functional Role of HSP47 in the Periodontal Ligament Subjected to Occlusal Overload in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimura, Hiroaki; Takaya, Tatsuo; Matsuda, Saeka; Nakano, Keisuke; Muraoka, Rina; Tomida, Mihoko; Okafuji, Norimasa; Fujii, Takeo; Kawakami, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    We carried out an experiment to induce traumatic occlusion in mice periodontal tissue and analyzed the expression of HSP47. Continuous traumatic occlusion resulted to damage and remodeling of periodontal ligament as well as increase in osteoclasts and bone resorption. Four days after traumatic occlusion, osteoclasts did not increase but Howship's lacunae became enlarged. That is, the persistent occlusal overload can destroy collagen fibers in the periodontal ligament. This was evident by the increased in HSP47 expression with the occlusal overload. HSP47 is maintained in fibroblasts for repair of damaged collagen fibers. On the other hand, osteoclasts continue to increase although the load was released. The osteoclasts that appeared on the alveolar bone surface were likely due to sustained activity. The increase in osteoclasts was estimated to occur after load application at day 4. HSP47 continued to increase until day 6 in experiment 2 but then reduced at day 10. Therefore, HSP47 appears after a period of certain activities to repair damaged collagen fibers, and the activity was returned to a state of equilibrium at day 30 with significantly diminished expression. Thus, the results suggest that HSP47 is actively involved in homeostasis of periodontal tissue subjected to occlusal overload.

  7. Effect of the Periodontal Ligament of the Bilateral Support Teeth on the Stress Analysis of Dental Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Yanhua

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to analyze the function of natural teeth’s periodontal ligament and the effects of periodontal ligament on implants by the finite element method (FEM, when static functional loads occur. The finite element analysis models are established, which consist of fragment of mandible, natural teeth, periodontal ligament, and implant. Finite element software Abaqus is used to analyze the stress transfer in models with or without periodontal ligament, and mandibular first molar is implant. The implant obtained the maximum stress value of 87.71MPa when periodontal ligament of natural tooth is absent, but the maximum value reduces to 38.43 MPa with the action of periodontal ligament. It illustrates that periodontal ligament has significant effects on stress transfer. When the finite element model of single natural tooth or dentition with implant is generated, periodontal ligament should be taken into account.

  8. Adipose-Derived-Stem-Cell-Seeded Fibrin Matrices for Periodontal Ligament Engineering: The Need for Dynamic Strain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Thijs; Oostendorp, Corien; Bakker, Astrid D.; van Kuppevelt, Toin H.; Smit, Theo H.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The periodontal ligament (PDL) connects the tooth to the alveolar bone. For PDL regeneration after tissue damage, we propose human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) embedded in fibrin. We showed previously that hASCs in fibrin extensively produce collagen, but in a non-functional,

  9. Experimental study on the effect of x-irradiation in the rat periodontal ligament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Won Pyo; You, Dong Soo

    1980-01-01

    The author studied on the effects of X-ray irradiation to the development of periodontal ligament in gestation rats. They were irradiated in their abdomen with 100, 200 and 300 rads respectively in one shot irradiation with deep radiation therapy equipment(MAXIMAR 250-III). In 7th, 14th, 21th and 28th day after delivery, those new born rats were respectively sacrificed with ether anesthesia and removed of their mandibles. After removal, those mandibles were fixed in 10% neutral buffer formalin, decalcified with 5% trichloroacetic acid for 5 days and embedded with paraffin. Staining was performed with H-E, Van Gieson, Mallory azan, Bielshowsky-Gomori silver stain and Halmi's oxytalan fiber stain. The results were as follows: 1. Before tooth eruption, all the fiber components in dental sac were almost always oriented near the outer enamel epithelial layer. But in irradiated new born rats, those collagen fiber orientation was more irregular than those of control groups, and this phenomenon was more severe in proportion to the amount of irradiation in the gestation period. 2. Before tooth eruption, the connective tissue fibers in periodontal ligament were stained with lighter in the irradiated groups than those of control groups. Oxytalan fibers of irradiated groups were thin and splitting pattern of their fiber morphology to compare with those of control groups. 3. After tooth eruption, the periodontal ligament fibers of irradiated groups were oriented functionally and their morphology was thick, fine and heavy staining. Oxytalan fibers were revealed with oblique parallel arrangement in the periodontal ligament of irradiated groups.

  10. Periodontal tissue regeneration with PRP incorporated gelatin hydrogel sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Dai; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Sato, Soh

    2015-10-20

    Gelatin hydrogels have been designed and prepared for the controlled release of the transforming growth factor (TGF-b1) and the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB). PRP (Platelet rich plasma) contains many growth factors including the PDGF and TGF-b1. The objective of this study was to evaluate the regeneration of periodontal tissue following the controlled release of growth factors in PRP. For the periodontal ligament cells and osteoblast, PRP of different concentrations was added. The assessment of DNA, mitochondrial activity and ALP activity were measured. To evaluate the TGF-β1 release from PRP incorporated gelatin sponge, amounts of TGF-β1 in each supernatant sample were determined by the ELISA. Transplantation experiments to prepare a bone defect in a rat alveolar bone were an implanted gelatin sponge incorporated with different concentration PRP. In DNA assay and MTT assay, after the addition of PRP to the periodontal ligament cells and osteoblast, the cell count and mitochondrial activity had increased the most in the group with the addition of 5  ×  PRP. In the ALP assay, after the addition of PRP to the periodontal ligament cells, the cell activity had increased the most in the group with the addition of 3  ×  PRP. In the transplantation, the size of the bone regenerated in the defect with 3  ×  PRP incorporated gelatin sponge was larger than that of the other group.

  11. Periodontal tissue regeneration with PRP incorporated gelatin hydrogel sponges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Dai; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Sato, Soh

    2015-01-01

    Gelatin hydrogels have been designed and prepared for the controlled release of the transforming growth factor (TGF-b1) and the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB). PRP (Platelet rich plasma) contains many growth factors including the PDGF and TGF-b1. The objective of this study was to evaluate the regeneration of periodontal tissue following the controlled release of growth factors in PRP. For the periodontal ligament cells and osteoblast, PRP of different concentrations was added. The assessment of DNA, mitochondrial activity and ALP activity were measured. To evaluate the TGF-β1 release from PRP incorporated gelatin sponge, amounts of TGF-β1 in each supernatant sample were determined by the ELISA. Transplantation experiments to prepare a bone defect in a rat alveolar bone were an implanted gelatin sponge incorporated with different concentration PRP. In DNA assay and MTT assay, after the addition of PRP to the periodontal ligament cells and osteoblast, the cell count and mitochondrial activity had increased the most in the group with the addition of 5  ×  PRP. In the ALP assay, after the addition of PRP to the periodontal ligament cells, the cell activity had increased the most in the group with the addition of 3  ×  PRP. In the transplantation, the size of the bone regenerated in the defect with 3  ×  PRP incorporated gelatin sponge was larger than that of the other group. (paper)

  12. Periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001059.htm Periodontitis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Periodontitis is inflammation and infection of the ligaments and ...

  13. Functional tissue engineering of ligament healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu Shan-Ling

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ligaments and tendons are dense connective tissues that are important in transmitting forces and facilitate joint articulation in the musculoskeletal system. Their injury frequency is high especially for those that are functional important, like the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL and medial collateral ligament (MCL of the knee as well as the glenohumeral ligaments and the rotator cuff tendons of the shoulder. Because the healing responses are different in these ligaments and tendons after injury, the consequences and treatments are tissue- and site-specific. In this review, we will elaborate on the injuries of the knee ligaments as well as using functional tissue engineering (FTE approaches to improve their healing. Specifically, the ACL of knee has limited capability to heal, and results of non-surgical management of its midsubstance rupture have been poor. Consequently, surgical reconstruction of the ACL is regularly performed to gain knee stability. However, the long-term results are not satisfactory besides the numerous complications accompanied with the surgeries. With the rapid development of FTE, there is a renewed interest in revisiting ACL healing. Approaches such as using growth factors, stem cells and scaffolds have been widely investigated. In this article, the biology of normal and healing ligaments is first reviewed, followed by a discussion on the issues related to the treatment of ACL injuries. Afterwards, current promising FTE methods are presented for the treatment of ligament injuries, including the use of growth factors, gene delivery, and cell therapy with a particular emphasis on the use of ECM bioscaffolds. The challenging areas are listed in the future direction that suggests where collection of energy could be placed in order to restore the injured ligaments and tendons structurally and functionally.

  14. Tissue Engineering Strategies in Ligament Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caglar Yilgor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ligaments are dense fibrous connective tissues that connect bones to other bones and their injuries are frequently encountered in the clinic. The current clinical approaches in ligament repair and regeneration are limited to autografts, as the gold standard, and allografts. Both of these techniques have their own drawbacks that limit the success in clinical setting; therefore, new strategies are being developed in order to be able to solve the current problems of ligament grafting. Tissue engineering is a novel promising technique that aims to solve these problems, by producing viable artificial ligament substitutes in the laboratory conditions with the potential of transplantation to the patients with a high success rate. Direct cell and/or growth factor injection to the defect site is another current approach aiming to enhance the repair process of the native tissue. This review summarizes the current approaches in ligament tissue engineering strategies including the use of scaffolds, their modification techniques, as well as the use of bioreactors to achieve enhanced regeneration rates, while also discussing the advances in growth factor and cell therapy applications towards obtaining enhanced ligament regeneration.

  15. Transplantation of periodontal ligament cell sheets expressing human β‑defensin‑3 promotes anti‑inflammation in a canine model of periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Minwen; Miao, Bo; Zhu, Jianhua; Wang, Haiyan; Zhou, Zengtong

    2017-11-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic oral inflammatory disease caused by microorganisms. Human β‑defensin‑3 (HBD‑3) is an endogenous antimicrobial peptide that inhibits a broad spectrum of microorganisms. Cell sheet technology has been widely applied in tissue and organ reconstructions. In the current study, it was aimed to investigate the anti‑inflammatory effect of periodontal tissue engineered by HBD‑3 gene‑modified periodontal ligament cell (PDLC) sheets, and to identify a suitable method of promoting the regeneration of periodontal tissues. Western blot analysis and antimicrobial tests were used to confirm the expression of HBD‑3. The effect of the cell sheets on anti‑inflammatory activity and bone remodeling in a dog model of periodontitis was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. The results demonstrated that the transfected PDLCs stably expressed HBD‑3. Periodontal pathogens were susceptible to the antimicrobial activity of the cell sheets. In addition, the cell sheets relieved the bone resorption caused by inflammation in the in vivo model. HBD‑3 may potentially be applied in the treatment of periodontitis and may function as osteogenic promoter via its anti‑inflammatory effect.

  16. Transplantation of periodontal ligament cell sheets expressing human β-defensin-3 promotes anti-inflammation in a canine model of periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Minwen; Miao, Bo; Zhu, Jianhua; Wang, Haiyan; Zhou, Zengtong

    2017-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic oral inflammatory disease caused by microorganisms. Human β-defensin-3 (HBD-3) is an endogenous antimicrobial peptide that inhibits a broad spectrum of microorganisms. Cell sheet technology has been widely applied in tissue and organ reconstructions. In the current study, it was aimed to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of periodontal tissue engineered by HBD-3 gene-modified periodontal ligament cell (PDLC) sheets, and to identify a suitable method of promoting the regeneration of periodontal tissues. Western blot analysis and antimicrobial tests were used to confirm the expression of HBD-3. The effect of the cell sheets on anti-inflammatory activity and bone remodeling in a dog model of periodontitis was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. The results demonstrated that the transfected PDLCs stably expressed HBD-3. Periodontal pathogens were susceptible to the antimicrobial activity of the cell sheets. In addition, the cell sheets relieved the bone resorption caused by inflammation in the in vivo model. HBD-3 may potentially be applied in the treatment of periodontitis and may function as osteogenic promoter via its anti-inflammatory effect. PMID:28944821

  17. Allogeneic Transplantation of Periodontal Ligament-Derived Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Sheets in Canine Critical-Size Supra-Alveolar Periodontal Defect Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsumanuma, Yuka; Iwata, Takanori; Kinoshita, Atsuhiro; Washio, Kaoru; Yoshida, Toshiyuki; Yamada, Azusa; Takagi, Ryo; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Izumi, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease that induces the destruction of tooth-supporting tissues, followed by tooth loss. Although several approaches have been applied to periodontal regeneration, complete periodontal regeneration has not been accomplished. Tissue engineering using a combination of cells and scaffolds is considered to be a viable alternative strategy. We have shown that autologous transplantation of periodontal ligament-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cell (PDL-MSC) sheets regenerates periodontal tissue in canine models. However, the indications for autologous cell transplantation in clinical situations are limited. Therefore, this study evaluated the safety and efficacy of allogeneic transplantation of PDL-MSC sheets using a canine horizontal periodontal defect model. Canine PDL-MSCs were labeled with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and were cultured on temperature-responsive dishes. Three-layered cell sheets were transplanted around denuded root surfaces either autologously or allogeneically. A mixture of β-tricalcium phosphate and collagen gel was placed on the bone defects. Eight weeks after transplantation, dogs were euthanized and subjected to microcomputed tomography and histological analyses. RNA and DNA were extracted from the paraffin sections to verify the presence of EGFP at the transplantation site. Inflammatory markers from peripheral blood sera were quantified using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Periodontal regeneration was observed in both the autologous and the allogeneic transplantation groups. The allogeneic transplantation group showed particularly significant regeneration of newly formed cementum, which is critical for the periodontal regeneration. Serum levels of inflammatory markers from peripheral blood sera showed little difference between the autologous and allogeneic groups. EGFP amplicons were detectable in the paraffin sections of the allogeneic group. These results suggest that

  18. LPS from P. gingivalis and Hypoxia Increases Oxidative Stress in Periodontal Ligament Fibroblasts and Contributes to Periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Gölz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is characterized by an accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and plays a key role in the progression of inflammatory diseases. We hypothesize that hypoxic and inflammatory events induce oxidative stress in the periodontal ligament (PDL by activating NOX4. Human primary PDL fibroblasts were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide from Porphyromonas gingivalis (LPS-PG, a periodontal pathogen bacterium under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. By quantitative PCR, immunoblot, immunostaining, and a specific ROS assay we determined the amount of NOX4, ROS, and several redox systems. Healthy and inflamed periodontal tissues were collected to evaluate NOX4 and redox systems by immunohistochemistry. We found significantly increased NOX4 levels after hypoxic or inflammatory stimulation in PDL cells (P<0.001 which was even more pronounced after combination of the stimuli. This was accompanied by a significant upregulation of ROS and catalase (P<0.001. However, prolonged incubation with both stimuli induced a reduction of catalase indicating a collapse of the protective machinery favoring ROS increase and the progression of inflammatory oral diseases. Analysis of inflamed tissues confirmed our hypothesis. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the interplay of NOX4 and redox systems is crucial for ROS formation which plays a pivotal role during oral diseases.

  19. Perkembangan Terkini Membran Guided Tissue Regeneration/Guided Bone Regeneration sebagai Terapi Regenerasi Jaringan Periodontal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy Cahaya

    2015-06-01

    kombinasi prosedur-prosedur di atas, termasuk prosedur bedah restoratif yang berhubungan dengan rehabilitasi oral dengan penempatan dental implan. Pada tingkat selular, regenerasi periodontal adalah proses kompleks yang membutuhkan proliferasi yang terorganisasi, differensiasi dan pengembangan berbagai tipe sel untuk membentuk perlekatan periodontal. Rasionalisasi penggunaan guided tissue regeneration sebagai membran pembatas adalah menahan epitel dan gingiva jaringan pendukung, sebagai barrier membrane mempertahankan ruang dan gigi serta menstabilkan bekuan darah. Pada makalah ini akan dibahas sekilas mengenai 1. Proses penyembuhan terapi periodontal meliputi regenerasi, repair ataupun pembentukan perlekatan baru. 2. Periodontal spesific tissue engineering. 3. Berbagai jenis membran/guided tissue regeneration yang beredar di pasaran dengan keuntungan dan kerugian sekaligus karakteristik masing-masing membran. 4. Perkembangan membran terbaru sebagai terapi regenerasi penyakit periodontal. Tujuan penulisan untuk memberi gambaran masa depan mengenai terapi regenerasi yang menjanjikan sebagai perkembangan terapi penyakit periodontal.   Latest Development of Guided Tissue Regeneration and Guided Bone Regeneration Membrane as Regenerative Therapy on Periodontal Tissue. Periodontitis is a patological state which influences the integrity of periodontal system that could lead to the destruction of the periodontal tissue and end up with tooth loss. Currently, there are so many researches and efforts to regenerate periodontal tissue, not only to stop the process of the disease but also to reconstruct the periodontal tissue. Periodontal regenerative therapy aims at directing the growth of new bone, cementum and periodontal ligament on the affected teeth. Regenerative procedures consist of soft tissue graft, bone graft, roots biomodification, guided tissue regeneration and combination of the procedures, including restorative surgical procedure that is

  20. Periodontics--tissue engineering and the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, Gordon L

    2005-03-01

    Periodontics has a long history of utilizing advances in science to expand and improve periodontal therapies. Recently the American Academy of Periodontology published the findings of the Contemporary Science Workshop, which conducted state-of-the-art evidence-based reviews of current and emerging areas in periodontics. The findings of this workshop provide the basis for an evidence-based approach to periodontal therapy. While the workshop evaluated all areas of periodontics, it is in the area of tissue engineering that the most exciting advances are becoming a reality.

  1. Tissue engineering of ligaments for reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, MaCalus V; Kawakami, Yohei; Murawski, Christopher D; Fu, Freddie H

    2015-05-01

    The use of musculoskeletal bioengineering and regenerative medicine applications in orthopaedic surgery has continued to evolve. The aim of this systematic review was to address tissue-engineering strategies for knee ligament reconstruction. A systematic review of PubMed/Medline using the terms "knee AND ligament" AND "tissue engineering" OR "regenerative medicine" was performed. Two authors performed the search, independently assessed the studies for inclusion, and extracted the data for inclusion in the review. Both preclinical and clinical studies were reviewed, and the articles deemed most relevant were included in this article to provide relevant basic science and recent clinical translational knowledge concerning "tissue-engineering" strategies currently used in knee ligament reconstruction. A total of 224 articles were reviewed in our initial PubMed search. Non-English-language studies were excluded. Clinical and preclinical studies were identified, and those with a focus on knee ligament tissue-engineering strategies including stem cell-based therapies, growth factor administration, hybrid biomaterial, and scaffold development, as well as mechanical stimulation modalities, were reviewed. The body of knowledge surrounding tissue-engineering strategies for ligament reconstruction continues to expand. Presently, various tissue-engineering techniques have some potential advantages, including faster recovery, better ligamentization, and possibly, a reduction of recurrence. Preclinical research of these novel therapies continues to provide promising results. There remains a need for well-designed, high-powered comparative clinical studies to serve as a foundation for successful translation into the clinical setting going forward. Level IV, systematic review of Level IV studies. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Adhesion and Proliferation of Human Periodontal Ligament Cells on Poly(2-methoxyethyl acrylate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Kitakami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human periodontal ligament (PDL cells obtained from extracted teeth are a potential cell source for tissue engineering. We previously reported that poly(2-methoxyethyl acrylate (PMEA is highly biocompatible with human blood cells. In this study, we investigated the adhesion, morphology, and proliferation of PDL cells on PMEA and other types of polymers to design an appropriate scaffold for tissue engineering. PDL cells adhered and proliferated on all investigated polymer surfaces except for poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and poly[(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine-co-(n-butyl methacrylate]. The initial adhesion of the PDL cells on PMEA was comparable with that on polyethylene terephthalate (PET. In addition, the PDL cells on PMEA spread well and exhibited proliferation behavior similar to that observed on PET. In contrast, platelets hardly adhered to PMEA. PMEA is therefore expected to be an excellent scaffold for tissue engineering and for culturing tissue-derived cells in a blood-rich environment.

  3. Vertical periodontal ligament distraction--a new method for aligning ankylosed and displaced canines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmes, Benedict; Drescher, Dieter

    2009-05-01

    In the course of a clinical pilot study we tested the vertical periodontal ligament (V-PDL) distraction as a means of aligning ankylosed upper canines. The objective of this study was to analyze the appropriateness und effectiveness of this method. The ankylosed upper canines of five female patients aged between 16 und 19 years were surgically exposed, luxated, and after a latency period of 5 to 7 days, distracted at a rate of 0.5 mm per day. The installed distractors were borne by the periodontal-mucosa, the periodontal-mucosa and the bone, or by the bone exclusively. We evaluated the distraction distance and time and degree of hard and soft tissue generation present in the region surrounding the distracted teeth. All canines were aligned after a mean distraction period of 43.2 days (+/- 3.6 days). The mean distraction distance was 10.8 mm. Three canines had defects at the cemento-enamel junction, and one canine had to be extracted due to a large defect at the root. Vertical PDL distraction is a minimally-invasive therapy to align ankylosed impacted canines. Even if the long-term prognosis of distracted canines with defects is uncertain, the patient benefits from the vertical PDL distraction because both hard and soft tissues are generated in the vicinity of the distracted canine.

  4. Cytotoxicity evaluation of sodium alendronate on cultured human periodontal ligament fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Vera de Fátima Padrão; Caldeira, Celso L; Marques, Márcia Martins

    2006-12-01

    External root resorption processes are usually associated with dental trauma, mainly avulsion and intrusion. In such cases endodontic therapy aims to prevent this process by using medications that can inhibit osteoclastic activity, such as bisphosphonates. However, these drugs must be biocompatible to the periapical tissues. The aim of this study was to analyze the cytotoxicity of a bisphosphonate (sodium alendronate) on human periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDL cells). Cells were plated in a density of 1 x 10(3) cells per dish. The experimental groups were GI (control) no sodium alendronate, and GII, GIII, and GIV with sodium alendronate at the concentrations of 10(-5), 10(-6), and 10(-7) M, respectively. The experimental times were 1, 6, 12, and 24 h (short-term) for viability and 2, 4, 6, and 8 days (long-term) for cell survival. Data in triplicate were statistically analyzed. Cultures treated with the highest alendronate concentration (GII) showed cell viability percentages significantly lower (P < 0.01) than those of the other groups (GI, GIII, and GIV), at 12 and 24 h. Cell growth on GII and GIII groups was similar. GII presented smaller growth than the other groups (P < 0.05). We concluded that sodium alendronate, on direct contact with human periodontal ligament fibroblasts, is cytotoxic in concentrations higher than of 10(-6) M.

  5. Normalization of periodontal tissues in osteopetrotic mib mutant rats, treated with CSF-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtowicz, A.; Yamauchi, M.; Sotowski, R.; Ostrowski, K.

    1998-01-01

    The osteopetrotic mib mutation in rats causes defects in the skeletal bone tissue in young animals. These defects, i.e. slow bone remodelling, changes in both crystallinity and mineral content, are transient and undergo normalization, even without any treatment in 6-wk-old animals. Treatment with CSF-1 (colony stimulating factor-1) accelerates the normalization process in skeletal bones. The periodontal tissues around the apices of incisors show abnormalities caused by the slow remodelling process of the mandible bone tissue, the deficiency of osteoclasts and their abnormal morphology, as well as the disorganization of periodontal ligament fibres. In contrast to the skeletal tissues, these abnormalities would not undergo spontaneous normalization. Under treatment with colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1), the primitive bone trabeculae of mandible are resorbed and the normalization of the number of osteoclasts and their cytology occurs. The organization of the periodontal ligament fibres is partially restored, resembling the histological structure of the normal one.

  6. Tissue-engineered collateral ligament composite allografts for scapholunate ligament reconstruction: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endress, Ryan; Woon, Colin Y L; Farnebo, Simon J; Behn, Anthony; Bronstein, Joel; Pham, Hung; Yan, Xinrui; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Chang, James

    2012-08-01

    In patients with chronic scapholunate (SL) dissociation or dynamic instability, ligament repair is often not possible, and surgical reconstruction is indicated. The ideal graft ligament would recreate both anatomical and biomechanical properties of the dorsal scapholunate ligament (dorsal SLIL). The finger proximal interphalangeal joint (PIP joint) collateral ligament could possibly be a substitute ligament. We harvested human PIP joint collateral ligaments and SL ligaments from 15 cadaveric limbs. We recorded ligament length, width, and thickness, and measured the biomechanical properties (ultimate load, stiffness, and displacement to failure) of native dorsal SLIL, untreated collateral ligaments, decellularized collateral ligaments, and SL repairs with bone-collateral ligament-bone composite collateral ligament grafts. As proof of concept, we then reseeded decellularized bone-collateral ligament-bone composite grafts with green fluorescent protein-labeled adipo-derived mesenchymal stem cells and evaluated them histologically. There was no difference in ultimate load, stiffness, and displacement to failure among native dorsal SLIL, untreated and decellularized collateral ligaments, and SL repairs with tissue-engineered collateral ligament grafts. With pair-matched untreated and decellularized scaffolds, there was no difference in ultimate load or stiffness. However, decellularized ligaments revealed lower displacement to failure compared with untreated ligaments. There was no difference in displacement between decellularized ligaments and native dorsal SLIL. We successfully decellularized grafts with recently described techniques, and they could be similarly reseeded. Proximal interphalangeal joint collateral ligament-based bone-collateral ligament-bone composite allografts had biomechanical properties similar to those of native dorsal SLIL. Decellularization did not adversely affect material properties. These tissue-engineered grafts may offer surgeons another

  7. Tissue engineered devices for ligament repair, replacement and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-29

    Dec 29, 2009 ... These devices use a wide variety of materials and designs to replicate ligament mechanics and allow for new tissue regeneration. Key words: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), tissue engineering, cells, tensile, stress relaxation, polymer, allograft, xenograft. INTRODUCTION. The anterior cruciate ligament ...

  8. [Experimental study on human periodontal ligament cells transfected with human amelogenin gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guang; Shu, Rong; Sun, Ying; Cheng, Lan; Song, Zhong-Chen; Zhang, Xiu-Li

    2008-02-01

    To construct the recombinant lentiviral vector of human amelogenin gene, infect human periodontal ligament cells with the recombinant lentivirus, and evaluate the feasibility of applying modified PDLCs as seeds for a further periodontal reconstruction. The mature peptide of hAm cDNA was cloned and linked into the vector plasmid, the recombinant plasmid FUAmW was confirmed by double enzyme digestion and sequence analysis. Recombinant lentivirus was prepared from 293T cells by polytheylenimine (PEI)-mediated transient cotransfection. The hPDLCs and 293T cells were infected with the generated lentivirus. The infection efficiency was analysed by detection of green fluorescence protein (GFP) with fluorescent microscope and flow cytometer 72 hours later. The expression of hAm gene was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The sequence of inserted fragment in recombinant plasmid was identical to the hAm sequence reported in Genebank. Green fluorescence was visible under fluorescent microscope, FCM assay showed that positive percentage was 69.46% and 33.99% in 293T and hPDLCs, respectively. The targeted gene was obtained in the experimental groups by RT-PCR. The recombinan lentiviral vector of hAm gene is constructed successfully and it could be transfected into cultured hPDLCs. hAm gene and seed cells may be used for further study in the fields periodontal tissue engineering. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 30672315).

  9. Gene expression in periodontal tissues following treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eisenacher Martin

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In periodontitis, treatment aimed at controlling the periodontal biofilm infection results in a resolution of the clinical and histological signs of inflammation. Although the cell types found in periodontal tissues following treatment have been well described, information on gene expression is limited to few candidate genes. Therefore, the aim of the study was to determine the expression profiles of immune and inflammatory genes in periodontal tissues from sites with severe chronic periodontitis following periodontal therapy in order to identify genes involved in tissue homeostasis. Gingival biopsies from 12 patients with severe chronic periodontitis were taken six to eight weeks following non-surgical periodontal therapy, and from 11 healthy controls. As internal standard, RNA of an immortalized human keratinocyte line (HaCaT was used. Total RNA was subjected to gene expression profiling using a commercially available microarray system focusing on inflammation-related genes. Post-hoc confirmation of selected genes was done by Realtime-PCR. Results Out of the 136 genes analyzed, the 5% most strongly expressed genes compared to healthy controls were Interleukin-12A (IL-12A, Versican (CSPG-2, Matrixmetalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1, Down syndrome critical region protein-1 (DSCR-1, Macrophage inflammatory protein-2β (Cxcl-3, Inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1 (BIRC-1, Cluster of differentiation antigen 38 (CD38, Regulator of G-protein signalling-1 (RGS-1, and Finkel-Biskis-Jinkins murine osteosarcoma virus oncogene (C-FOS; the 5% least strongly expressed genes were Receptor-interacting Serine/Threonine Kinase-2 (RIP-2, Complement component 3 (C3, Prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase-2 (COX-2, Interleukin-8 (IL-8, Endothelin-1 (EDN-1, Plasminogen activator inhibitor type-2 (PAI-2, Matrix-metalloproteinase-14 (MMP-14, and Interferon regulating factor-7 (IRF-7. Conclusion Gene expression profiles found in periodontal tissues following

  10. Bilayered construct for simultaneous regeneration of alveolar bone and periodontal ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivedhitha Sundaram, M; Sowmya, S; Deepthi, S; Bumgardener, Joel D; Jayakumar, R

    2016-05-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease that causes destruction of tooth-supporting tissues and if left untreated leads to tooth loss. Current treatments have shown limited potential for simultaneous regeneration of the tooth-supporting tissues. To recreate the complex architecture of the periodontium, we developed a bilayered construct consisting of poly(caprolactone) (PCL) multiscale electrospun membrane (to mimic and regenerate periodontal ligament, PDL) and a chitosan/2wt % CaSO4 scaffold (to mimic and regenerate alveolar bone). Scanning electron microscopy results showed the porous nature of the scaffold and formation of beadless electrospun multiscale fibers. The fiber diameter of microfiber and nanofibers was in the range of 10 ± 3 µm and 377 ± 3 nm, respectively. The bilayered construct showed better protein adsorption compared to the control. Osteoblastic differentiation of human dental follicle stem cells (hDFCs) on chitosan/2wt % CaSO4 scaffold showed maximum alkaline phosphatase at seventh day followed by a decline thereafter when compared to chitosan control scaffold. Fibroblastic differentiation of hDFCs was confirmed by the expression of PLAP-1 and COL-1 proteins which were more prominent on PCL multiscale membrane in comparison to control membranes. Overall these results show that the developed bilayered construct might serve as a good candidate for the simultaneous regeneration of the alveolar bone and PDL. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Bone repair by periodontal ligament stem cell-seeded nanohydroxyapatite-chitosan scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Shaohua Ge,1 Ning Zhao,1 Lu Wang,1 Meijiao Yu,1 Hong Liu,2 Aimei Song,1 Jing Huang,1 Guancong Wang,2 Pishan Yang11Key Laboratory of Oral Biomedicine of Shandong Province, Department of Periodontology, School of Stomatology, 2Center of Bio and Micro/Nano Functional Materials, State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan, ChinaBackground: A nanohydroxyapatite-coated chitosan scaffold has been developed in recent years, but the effect of this composite scaffold on the viability and differentiation of periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs and bone repair is still unknown. This study explored the behavior of PDLSCs on a new nanohydroxyapatite-coated genipin-chitosan conjunction scaffold (HGCCS in vitro as compared with an uncoated genipin-chitosan framework, and evaluated the effect of PDLSC-seeded HGCCS on bone repair in vivo.Methods: Human PDLSCs were cultured and identified, seeded on a HGCCS and on a genipin-chitosan framework, and assessed by scanning electron microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, MTT, alkaline phosphatase activity, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction at different time intervals. Moreover, PDLSC-seeded scaffolds were used in a rat calvarial defect model, and new bone formation was assessed by hematoxylin and eosin staining at 12 weeks postoperatively.Results: PDLSCs were clonogenic and positive for STRO-1. They had the capacity to undergo osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation in vitro. When seeded on HGCCS, PDLSCs exhibited significantly greater viability, alkaline phosphatase activity, and upregulated the bone-related markers, bone sialoprotein, osteopontin, and osteocalcin to a greater extent compared with PDLSCs seeded on the genipin-chitosan framework. The use of PDLSC-seeded HGCCS promoted calvarial bone repair.Conclusion: This study demonstrates the potential of HGCCS combined with PDLSCs as a promising tool for bone regeneration.Keywords: periodontal ligament, stem

  12. Ligament Tissue Engineering and Its Potential Role in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Yates, E. W.; Rupani, A.; Foley, G. T.; Khan, W. S.; Cartmell, S.; Anand, S. J.

    2011-01-01

    Tissue engineering is an emerging discipline that combines the principle of science and engineering. It offers an unlimited source of natural tissue substitutes and by using appropriate cells, biomimetic scaffolds, and advanced bioreactors, it is possible that tissue engineering could be implemented in the repair and regeneration of tissue such as bone, cartilage, tendon, and ligament. Whilst repair and regeneration of ligament tissue has been demonstrated in animal studies, further research ...

  13. Comparative gene expression analysis of the human periodontal ligament in deciduous and permanent teeth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Je Seon Song

    Full Text Available There are histological and functional differences between human deciduous and permanent periodontal ligament (PDL tissues. The aim of this study was to determine the differences between these two types of tissue at the molecular level by comparing their gene expression patterns. PDL samples were obtained from permanent premolars (n = 38 and anterior deciduous teeth (n = 31 extracted from 40 healthy persons. Comparative cDNA microarray analysis revealed several differences in gene expression between the deciduous and permanent PDL tissues. These findings were verified by qRT-PCR (quantitative reverse-transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis, and the areas where genes are expressed were revealed by immunohistochemical staining. The expressions of 21 genes were up-regulated in deciduous relative to PDL tissues, and those of 30 genes were up-regulated in permanent relative to deciduous PDL tissues. The genes that were up-regulated in deciduous PDL tissues were those involved in the formation of the extracellular matrix (LAMC2, LAMB3, and COMP, tissue development (IGF2BP, MAB21L2, and PAX3, and inflammatory or immune reactions leading to tissue degradation (IL1A, CCL21, and CCL18. The up-regulated genes in permanent PDL tissues were related to tissue degradation (IL6 and ADAMTS18, myocontraction (PDE3B, CASQ2, and MYH10, and neurological responses (FOS, NCAM2, SYT1, SLC22A3, DOCK3, LRRTM1, LRRTM3, PRSS12, and ARPP21. The analysis of differential gene expressions between deciduous and permanent PDL tissues aids our understanding of histological and functional differences between them at the molecular level.

  14. Comparative gene expression analysis of the human periodontal ligament in deciduous and permanent teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Je Seon; Hwang, Dong Hwan; Kim, Seong-Oh; Jeon, Mijeong; Choi, Byung-Jai; Jung, Han-Sung; Moon, Seok Jun; Park, Wonse; Choi, Hyung-Jun

    2013-01-01

    There are histological and functional differences between human deciduous and permanent periodontal ligament (PDL) tissues. The aim of this study was to determine the differences between these two types of tissue at the molecular level by comparing their gene expression patterns. PDL samples were obtained from permanent premolars (n = 38) and anterior deciduous teeth (n = 31) extracted from 40 healthy persons. Comparative cDNA microarray analysis revealed several differences in gene expression between the deciduous and permanent PDL tissues. These findings were verified by qRT-PCR (quantitative reverse-transcription-polymerase chain reaction) analysis, and the areas where genes are expressed were revealed by immunohistochemical staining. The expressions of 21 genes were up-regulated in deciduous relative to PDL tissues, and those of 30 genes were up-regulated in permanent relative to deciduous PDL tissues. The genes that were up-regulated in deciduous PDL tissues were those involved in the formation of the extracellular matrix (LAMC2, LAMB3, and COMP), tissue development (IGF2BP, MAB21L2, and PAX3), and inflammatory or immune reactions leading to tissue degradation (IL1A, CCL21, and CCL18). The up-regulated genes in permanent PDL tissues were related to tissue degradation (IL6 and ADAMTS18), myocontraction (PDE3B, CASQ2, and MYH10), and neurological responses (FOS, NCAM2, SYT1, SLC22A3, DOCK3, LRRTM1, LRRTM3, PRSS12, and ARPP21). The analysis of differential gene expressions between deciduous and permanent PDL tissues aids our understanding of histological and functional differences between them at the molecular level.

  15. A low-level diode laser therapy reduces the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced periodontal ligament cell inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, T H; Chen, C C; Liu, S L; Lu, Y C; Kao, C T

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the cytologic effects of inflammatory periodontal ligament cells in vitro after low-level laser therapy. Human periodontal ligament cells were cultured, exposed to lipopolysaccharide and subjected to low-level laser treatment of 5 J cm −2 or 10 J cm −2 using a 920 nm diode laser. A periodontal ligament cell attachment was observed under a microscope, and the cell viability was quantified by a mitochondrial colorimetric assay. Lipopolysaccharide-treated periodontal ligament cells were irradiated with the low-level laser, and the expression levels of several inflammatory markers, iNOS, TNF-α and IL-1, and pErk kinase, were analyzed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blot. The data were collected and analyzed by one-way analysis of variance; p < 0.05 indicated a statistically significant difference. The low-level laser treatment of periodontal ligament cells increased their ability to attach and survive. After irradiation, the expression levels of iNOS, TNF-α and IL-1 in lipopolysaccharide-exposed periodontal ligament cells decreased over time (p < 0.05). In periodontal ligament cells, low-level diode laser treatment increased the cells’ proliferative ability and decreased the expression of the examined inflammatory mediators. (letters)

  16. Pulp and periodontal tissue repair - regeneration or tissue metaplasia after dental trauma. A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens O

    2012-01-01

    Healing subsequent to dental trauma is known to be very complex, a result explained by the variability of the types of dental trauma (six luxations, nine fracture types, and their combinations). On top of that, at least 16 different cellular systems get involved in more severe trauma types each o...... of tissue replaces the injured). In this study, a review is given of the impact of trauma to various dental tissues such as alveolar bone, periodontal ligament, cementum, Hertvigs epithelial root sheath, and the pulp....... of them with a different potential for healing with repair, i.e. (re-establishment of tissue continuity without functional restitution) and regeneration (where the injured or lost tissue is replaced with new tissue with identical tissue anatomy and function) and finally metaplasia (where a new type...

  17. Electrospun fibrous scaffolds combined with nanoscale hydroxyapatite induce osteogenic differentiation of human periodontal ligament cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu XN

    2014-08-01

    extended gradually with stretched filopodia, indicating an ability to fill the fiber pores. A Cell Counting Kit-8 assay showed that both scaffolds supported cell proliferation. However, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that expression of the bone-related markers, alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin, was upregulated only on the COL/PCL/nHA-SBF scaffold, indicating that this scaffold had the ability to induce osteogenic differentiation of periodontal ligament cells. In this study, COL/PCL/nHA-SBF produced by electrospinning followed by biomimetic mineralization had combined electrospun fibers with nHA in it. This scaffold has good biocompatibility and osteoinductive ability as a result of the characteristics of nHA, so could be innovatively applied to periodontal tissue engineering as a potential scaffold. Keywords: nanoscale hydroxyapatite, electrospinning, periodontal ligament cells 

  18. Combination of platelet-rich plasma within periodontal ligament stem cell sheets enhances cell differentiation and matrix production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiu; Li, Bei; Yuan, Lin; Dong, Zhiwei; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Han; Sun, Jin; Ge, Song; Jin, Yan

    2017-03-01

    The longstanding goal of periodontal therapy is to regenerate periodontal tissues. Although platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been gaining increasing popularity for use in the orofacial region, whether PRP is useful for periodontal regeneration is still unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a mixture of periodontal ligament stem cell (PDLSC) sheets and PRP promoted bone regeneration, one of the most important measurement indices of periodontal tissue regenerative capability in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we evaluated the effects of different doses of PRP on the differentiation of human PDLSCs. Then cell sheet formation, extracellular matrix deposition and osteogenic gene expression in response to different doses of PRP treatment during sheet grafting was investigated. Furthermore, we implanted PDLSC sheets treated with 1% PRP subcutaneously into immunocompromised mice to evaluate their bone-regenerative capability. The results revealed that 1% PRP significantly enhanced the osteogenic differentiation of PDLSCs. Based on the production of extracellular matrix proteins, the results of scanning electron microscopy and the expression of the osteogenic genes ALP, Runx2, Col-1 and OCN, the provision of 1% PRP for PDLSC sheets was the most effective PRP administration mode for cell sheet formation. The results of in vivo transplantation showed that 1% PRP-mediated PDLSC sheets exhibited better periodontal tissue regenerative capability than those obtained without PRP intervention. These data suggest that a suitable concentration of PRP stimulation may enhance extracellular matrix production and positively affect cell behaviour in PDLSC sheets. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Chemically modified tetracyclines stimulate matrix metalloproteinase-s production by periodontal ligament cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bildt, M.M.; Snoek-van Beurden, A.M.P.; Groot, J. de; El, B. van; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Hoff, J.W. van den

    2006-01-01

    Background and Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of chemically modified tetracyclines (CMTs) on the production of gelatinases [matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9] by human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells, and on the activity of recombinant gelatinases.

  20. Effect of thermoplastic appliance thickness on initial stress distribution in periodontal ligament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Shin Liu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A numerical investigation into the initial stress distribution induced within the periodontal ligament by thermoplastic appliances with different thicknesses is performed. Based on the plaster model of a 25-year-old male patient, a finite element model of the maxillary lateral incisors and their supporting structures is constructed. In addition, four finite element models of thermoplastic appliances with different thicknesses in the range of 0.5–1.25 mm are also constructed based on the same plaster model. Finite element analysis simulations are performed to examine the effects of the force delivered by the thermoplastic appliances on the stress response of the periodontal ligament during the elastic recovery process. The results show that the stress induced in the periodontal ligament increases with an increasing appliance thickness. For example, the stress triples from 0.0012 to 0.0038 MPa as the appliance thickness is increased from 0.75 to 1.25 mm. The results presented in this study provide a useful insight into as a result of the compressive and tensile stresses induced by thermoplastic appliances of different thicknesses. Moreover, the results enable the periodontal ligament stress levels produced by thermoplastic appliances of different thicknesses to be reliably estimated.

  1. Loss of proliferation and differentiation capacity of aged human periodontal ligament stem cells and rejuvenation by exposure to the young extrinsic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Wang, Shi; Ma, Dandan; Tang, Liang; Duan, Yinzhong; Jin, Yan

    2009-09-01

    The application of periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) may be effective for periodontal regenerative therapy. As tissue regenerative potential may be negatively regulated by aging, whether aging and its microenvironment modify human PDLSCs remains a question. In this study, we compared the proliferation and differentiation capacity of PDLSCs obtained from young and aged donors. Then, we exposed aged PDLSCs to young periodontal ligament cell-conditioned medium (PLC-CM), and young PDLSCs were exposed to aged PLC-CM. Morphological appearance, colony-forming assay, cell cycle analysis, osteogenic and adipogenic induction media, gene expression of cementoblast phenotype, and in vivo differentiation capacities of PDLSCs were evaluated. PDLSCs obtained from aged donors exhibited decreased proliferation and differentiation capacity when compared with those from young donors. Young PLC-CM enhanced the proliferation and differentiation capacity of PDLSCs from aged donors. Aged PDLSCs induced by young PLC-CM showed enhanced tissue-regenerative capacity to produce cementum/periodontal ligament-like structures, whereas young PDLSCs induced by aged PLC-CM transplants mainly formed connective tissues. To our knowledge, this is the first study to mimic the developmental microenvironment of PDLSCs in vitro, and our data suggest that age influences the proliferation and differentiation potential of human PDLSCs, and that the activity of human PDLSCs can be modulated by the extrinsic microenvironment.

  2. Tissue engineered devices for ligament repair, replacement and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    potential, severe damage warrants surgical intervention including complete replacement. Ligaments are longitudinally arranged, complex tissues; the mechanical properties of ligaments are a direct result of their components and the arrangement of these components in the tissue. It is these mechanics that have made ...

  3. Enhanced compatibility of chemically modified titanium surface with periodontal ligament cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kado, T.; Hidaka, T.; Aita, H.; Endo, K.; Furuichi, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Cell-adhesive molecules were covalently immobilized on a Ti surface. ► Immobilized cell-adhesive molecules maintained native function on the Ti surface. ► Immobilized collagen enhanced adhesion of periodontal ligament cells to the Ti. - Abstract: A simple chemical modification method was developed to immobilize cell-adhesive molecules on a titanium surface to improve its compatibility with human periodontal ligament cells (HPDLCs).The polished titanium disk was immersed in 1% (v/v) p-vinylbenzoic acid solution for 2 h to introduce carboxyl groups onto the surface. After rinsing with distilled deionized water, the titanium disk was dipped into 1.47% 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide solution containing 0.1 mg/ml Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (GRGDS), human plasma fibronectin (pFN), or type I collagen from calf skin (Col) to covalently immobilize the cell-adhesive molecules on the titanium surface via formation of peptide bonds. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses revealed that cell-adhesive molecules were successfully immobilized on the titanium surfaces. The Col-immobilized titanium surface revealed higher values regarding nano rough characteristics than the as-polished titanium surface under scanning probe microscopy. The number of HPDLCs attached to both the pFN- and Col-immobilized titanium surfaces was twice that attached to the as-polished titanium surfaces. The cells were larger with the cellular processes that stretched to a greater extent on the pFN- and Col-immobilized titanium surfaces than on the as-polished titanium surface (p < 0.05). HPDLCs on the Col-immobilized titanium surfaces showed more extensive expression of vinculin at the tips of cell projections and more contiguously along the cell outline than on the as-polished, GRGDS-immobilized and pFN-immobilized titanium surfaces. It was concluded that cell-adhesive molecules successfully immobilized on the titanium surface and improved the compatibility of the surface

  4. Comparison of Gingiva, Dental Pulp, and Periodontal Ligament Cells From the Standpoint of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otabe, Koji; Muneta, Takeshi; Kawashima, Nobuyuki; Suda, Hideaki; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2012-01-01

    The specific properties of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in oral tissues still remain unknown though their existence has been previously reported. We collected gingiva, dental pulp, and periodontal ligament tissues from removed teeth and isolated MSCs. These MSCs were compared in terms of their yields per tooth, surface epitopes, and differentiation potentials by patient-matched analysis. For in vivo calcification analysis, rat gingival and dental pulp cells mounted on β-tricalcium phospateTCP were transplanted into the perivertebral muscle of rats for 6 weeks. Gingival cells and dental pulp cells showed higher yield per tooth than periodontal ligament cells (n=6, ppulp cells expressed MSC markers such as CD44, CD90, and CD166. Gingival and dental pulp cells obtained phenotypes of chondrocytes and adipocytes in vitro. Approximately 60% of the colonies of gingival cells and 40% of the colonies of dental pulp cells were positively stained with alizarin red in vitro, and both gingival and dental pulp cells were calcified in vivo. We clarified properties of MSCs derived from removed teeth. We could obtain a high yield of MSCs with osteogenic potential from gingiva and dental pulp. These results indicate that gingiva and dental pulp are putative cell sources for hard tissue regeneration. PMID:26858852

  5. The role of mechanical loading in ligament tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhardt, Hugh A; Cosgriff-Hernandez, Elizabeth M

    2009-12-01

    Tissue-engineered ligaments have received growing interest as a promising alternative for ligament reconstruction when traditional transplants are unavailable or fail. Mechanical stimulation was recently identified as a critical component in engineering load-bearing tissues. It is well established that living tissue responds to altered loads through endogenous changes in cellular behavior, tissue organization, and bulk mechanical properties. Without the appropriate biomechanical cues, new tissue formation lacks the necessary collagenous organization and alignment for sufficient load-bearing capacity. Therefore, tissue engineers utilize mechanical conditioning to guide tissue remodeling and improve the performance of ligament grafts. This review provides a comparative analysis of the response of ligament and tendon fibroblasts to mechanical loading in current bioreactor studies. The differential effect of mechanical stimulation on cellular processes such as protease production, matrix protein synthesis, and cell proliferation is examined in the context of tissue engineering design.

  6. Impact of nicotine on the interplay between human periodontal ligament cells and CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xin; Liu, Ying-Feng; Wong, Yong; Wu, Li-Zheng; Tan, Ling; Liu, Fen; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2016-09-01

    Periodontitis is a common infectious disease associated with destruction of periodontal ligaments and alveolar bones. CD4(+) T cell-mediated immune response is involved in the progression of periodontitis. Tobacco consumption increases the risk of periodontal disease. However, the impact of nicotine on the interaction between human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells and CD4(+) T cells remains unrevealed. Our study aims to investigate the effect of nicotine on PDL cells and the cocultured CD4(+) T cells. The PDL cell cultures were established by explants from healthy individuals, exposed to nicotine or α-bungarotoxin (α-BTX), and incubated solely or in combination with CD4(+) T cells. Afterwards, cell viability, secreted cytokines, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were evaluated. In monoculture of PDL cells, nicotine dramatically repressed cell viability and increased apoptosis. Meanwhile, α-BTX largely reversed the nicotine-induced apoptosis and increased viability of PDL cells. Compared with the monoculture, MMP-1, MMP-3, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-17, and IL-21 in supernatant of cocultures were markedly elevated after treatment with nicotine. Moreover, α-BTX significantly attenuated nicotine-triggered production of these components either in mono- or co-cultures. In addition, PDL cell-derived CXCL12 following nicotine treatment recruited CD4(+) T cells. Above all, nicotine deteriorated periodontitis partially by promoting PDL cell-CD4(+) T cell-mediated inflammatory response and matrix degradation. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Effects of hydroxyapatite nanostructure on channel surface of porcine acellular dermal matrix scaffold on cell viability and osteogenic differentiation of human periodontal ligament stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge S

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Shaohua Ge,1 Ning Zhao,1 Lu Wang,1 Hong Liu,2 Pishan Yang11Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Oral Biomedicine, Department of Periodontology, Shandong University; 2State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Center of Bio and Micro/Nano Functional Materials, Shandong University, Jinan, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: A new nanostructured hydroxyapatite-coated porcine acellular dermal matrix (HAp-PADM was fabricated by a biomimetic mineralization method. Human periodontal ligament stem cells were seeded on HAp-PADM and the effects of this scaffold on cell shape, cytoskeleton organization, cell viability, and osteogenic differentiation were examined. Periodontal ligament stem cells cultured on HAp-PADM exhibited different cell shape when compared with those on pure PADM. Moreover, HAp-PADM promoted cell viability and alkaline phosphatase activity significantly. Based on quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, the expression of bone-related markers runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2, osteopontin (OPN, and osteocalcin (OCN upregulated in the HAp-PADM scaffold. The enhancement of osteogenic differentiation of periodontal ligament stem cells on the HAp-PADM scaffold was proposed based on the research results. The results of this study highlight the micro-nano, two-level, three-dimensional HAp-PADM composite as a promising scaffold for periodontal tissue engineering.Keywords: hydroxyapatite, scaffold, nanostructure, proliferation, differentiation, tissue engineering

  8. Periodontal ligament stem/progenitor cells with protein-releasing scaffolds for cementum formation and integration on dentin surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hankyu; Tarafder, Solaiman; Fogge, Michael; Kao, Kristy; Lee, Chang H

    2016-11-01

    Purpose/Aim: Cementogenesis is a critical step in periodontal tissue regeneration given the essential role of cementum in anchoring teeth to the alveolar bone. This study is designed to achieve integrated cementum formation on the root surfaces of human teeth using growth factor-releasing scaffolds with periodontal ligament stem/progenitor cells (PDLSCs). Human PDLSCs were sorted by CD146 expression, and characterized using CFU-F assay and induced multi-lineage differentiation. Polycaprolactone scaffolds were fabricated using 3D printing, embedded with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acids) (PLGA) microspheres encapsulating connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), or bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7). After removing cementum on human tooth roots, PDLSC-seeded scaffolds were placed on the exposed dentin surface. After 6-week culture with cementogenic/osteogenic medium, cementum formation and integration were evaluated by histomorphometric analysis, immunofluorescence, and qRT-PCR. Periodontal ligament (PDL) cells sorted by CD146 and single-cell clones show a superior clonogenecity and multipotency as compared with heterogeneous populations. After 6 weeks, all the growth factor-delivered groups showed resurfacing of dentin with a newly formed cementum-like layer as compared with control. BMP-2 and BMP-7 showed de novo formation of tissue layers significantly thicker than all the other groups, whereas CTGF and BMP-7 resulted in significantly improved integration on the dentin surface. The de novo mineralized tissue layer seen in BMP-7-treated samples expressed cementum matrix protein 1 (CEMP1). Consistently, BMP-7 showed a significant increase in CEMP1 mRNA expression. Our findings represent important progress in stem cell-based cementum regeneration as an essential part of periodontium regeneration.

  9. The role of cyclosporine A on the periodontal tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallappa Jayasheela

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: CsA targets the periodontal tissues (gingiva, alveolar bone and cementum in different pattern. Its role in cementogenesis can be utilized for periodontal regeneration, if its local application is testified and verified in the future animal studies.

  10. Mechanical design, analysis, and laboratory testing of a dental implant with axial flexibility similar to natural tooth with periodontal ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pektaş, Ömer; Tönük, Ergin

    2014-11-01

    At the interface between the jawbone and the roots of natural teeth, a thin, elastic, shock-absorbing tissue, called the periodontal ligament, forms a cushion which provides certain flexibility under mechanical loading. The dental restorations supported by implants, however, involve comparatively rigid connections to the jawbone. This causes overloading of the implant while bearing functional loading together with neighboring natural teeth, which leads to high stresses within the implant system and in the jawbone. A dental implant, with resilient components in the upper structure (abutment) in order to mimic the mechanical behavior of the periodontal ligament in the axial direction, was designed, analyzed in silico, and produced for mechanical testing. The aims of the design were avoiding high levels of stress, loosening of the abutment connection screw, and soft tissue irritations. The finite element analysis of the designed implant revealed that the elastic abutment yielded a similar axial mobility with the natural tooth while keeping stress in the implant at safe levels. The in vitro mechanical testing of the prototype resulted in similar axial mobility predicted by the analysis and as that of a typical natural tooth. The abutment screw did not loosen under repeated loading and there was no static or fatigue failure. © IMechE 2014.

  11. Predicting the holistic force-displacement relation of the periodontal ligament: in-vitro experiments and finite element analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Chih-Han; Lei, Yao-Ning; Ho, Yi-Hung; Sung, Yu-Hsing; Lin, Ting-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Background The biomechanical property of the periodontal ligament (PDL) is important in orthodontics and prosthodontics. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of measuring the biomechanical behavior of the periodontal ligament using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Methods A custom-made apparatus measured the force and displacement of a porcine PDL specimen within the micro-CT environment. Synchronized computed tomography (CT) images were used to obtain the deformat...

  12. ET-1 Promotes Differentiation of Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells into Osteoblasts through ETR, MAPK, and Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathways under Inflammatory Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Li; Zhou, Wei; Yang, Nan; Yu, Jifeng; Liu, Hongchen

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is a kind of chronic inflammatory disease that affects the tooth-supporting tissues. ET-1 is related to periodontitis and involved in the regulation of cytokines, but the mechanisms remain unclear. The aim of this study is to investigate how ET-1 affects proinflammatory cytokine expression and differentiation in human periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs). PDLSCs were isolated from the periodontal ligament tissues of periodontitis patients and then treated with ET-1 (1, 10, or 100 nM) for 12 h, 24 h, or 72 h. The osteogenic potential of PDLSCs was tested using ALP staining. TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 levels were evaluated by ELISA and western blot. Runx2, OCN, and COL1 mRNA and western levels were detected by RT-PCR and western blot, respectively. To examine the signaling pathways and molecular mechanisms involved in ET-1-mediated cytokine expression and osteogenic differentiation, ETR pathway, MAPKs pathway, Wnt/β-catenin pathway, and Wnt/Ca2+ pathway were detected by RT-PCR and western blot, respectively. ET-1 promoted differentiation of PDLSCs into osteoblasts by increasing secretion of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in a dose- and time-dependent manner. ET-1 also increased expression of Runx2, OCN, and COL1. ET-1 promotes differentiation of PDLSCs into osteoblasts through ETR, MAPK, and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways under inflammatory microenvironment. PMID:26884650

  13. ET-1 Promotes Differentiation of Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells into Osteoblasts through ETR, MAPK, and Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathways under Inflammatory Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Liang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is a kind of chronic inflammatory disease that affects the tooth-supporting tissues. ET-1 is related to periodontitis and involved in the regulation of cytokines, but the mechanisms remain unclear. The aim of this study is to investigate how ET-1 affects proinflammatory cytokine expression and differentiation in human periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs. PDLSCs were isolated from the periodontal ligament tissues of periodontitis patients and then treated with ET-1 (1, 10, or 100 nM for 12 h, 24 h, or 72 h. The osteogenic potential of PDLSCs was tested using ALP staining. TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 levels were evaluated by ELISA and western blot. Runx2, OCN, and COL1 mRNA and western levels were detected by RT-PCR and western blot, respectively. To examine the signaling pathways and molecular mechanisms involved in ET-1-mediated cytokine expression and osteogenic differentiation, ETR pathway, MAPKs pathway, Wnt/β-catenin pathway, and Wnt/Ca2+ pathway were detected by RT-PCR and western blot, respectively. ET-1 promoted differentiation of PDLSCs into osteoblasts by increasing secretion of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in a dose- and time-dependent manner. ET-1 also increased expression of Runx2, OCN, and COL1. ET-1 promotes differentiation of PDLSCs into osteoblasts through ETR, MAPK, and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways under inflammatory microenvironment.

  14. Proteome of human stem cells from periodontal ligament and dental pulp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrica Eleuterio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many adult tissues contain a population of stem cells with the ability to regenerate structures similar to the microenvironments from which they are derived in vivo and represent a promising therapy for the regeneration of complex tissues in the clinical disorder. Human adult stem cells (SCs including bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs, dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs and periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs have been characterized for their high proliferative potential, expression of characteristic SC-associated markers and for the plasticity to differentiate in different lineage in vitro. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The aim of this study is to define the molecular features of stem cells from oral tissue by comparing the proteomic profiles obtained with 2-DE followed by MALDI-TOF/TOF of ex-vivo cultured human PDLSCs, DPSCs and BMSCs. Our results showed qualitative similarities in the proteome profiles among the SCs examined including some significant quantitative differences. To enrich the knowledge of oral SCs proteome we performed an analysis in narrow range pH 4-7 and 6-9, and we found that DPSCs vs PDLSCs express differentially regulated proteins that are potentially related to growth, regulation and genesis of neuronal cells, suggesting that SCs derived from oral tissue source populations may possess the potential ability of neuronal differentiation which is very consistent with their neural crest origin. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study identifies some differentially expressed proteins by using comparative analysis between DPSCs and PDLSCs and BMSCs and suggests that stem cells from oral tissue could have a different cell lineage potency compared to BMSCs.

  15. Biochemical study of human periodontal ligament: preparation of cell attachment materials induced by pulsed electromagnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K T

    1990-09-01

    The periodontium, especially the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, are tissues constantly subjected to physical stress such as occlusion and mastication. This study was designed to explore the effect of the pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) on the cell attachment and the spread of human periodontal ligament fibroblasts (HPLF) and rat osteoblasts (ROB). PEMF are categorized as one type of mechanical stress. HPLF were obtained by the explantation method described by Saito et al. They were then subcultured in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (D-MEM) and supplemented with 2 mg/ml dialyzed fetal calf serum protein (FCSP), 50 micrograms/ml ascorbic acid and penicillin/streptomycin after trypsinization. ROB were isolated from a two-day-old rat calvaria by the sequential bacterial collagenase digestion method described by Dziak and Brand and were subcultured in D-MEM supplemented with FCSP, ascorbic acid and penicillin/streptomycin. After the confluent HPLF were cultured with serum-free MCDB 107 medium, the quiescent HPLF were exposed with or without PEMF for 24 hr. This was followed by the collection of the control conditioned medium (C-CM) and PEMF exposed conditioned medium (PEMF-CM). The cell attachment assay was performed so that the hydrophobic 24 multiwells were coated with the whole conditioned medium or fractionated conditioned medium by a PO-60K column. After coating, heat inactivated BSA blocked nonspecific sites for cell adhesion, and 3H-TdR labeled HPLF or ROB were cultured on the precoated wells. The activity of cell attachment and spreading was determined by the radioactivity of 3H-TdR using a scintillation counter. The characters of cell attachment factors derived from HPLF were hydrophobic, heat labile and proteolytic enzyme digestible. In addition, the fractionated PEMF-CM enhanced the spreading activity of ROB. PEMF induced the 10 KDa which can enhance the HPLF and ROB spreading. Therefore, the cell attachment and spreading factors secreted by

  16. Bioprinting 3D cell-laden hydrogel microarray for screening human periodontal ligament stem cell response to extracellular matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Yufei; Ji, Yuan; Huang, Guoyou; Zhang, Xiaohui; Xu, Feng; Ling, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease negatively affecting up to 15% of adults worldwide. Periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) hold great promises for periodontal tissue regeneration, where it is necessary to find proper extracellular matrix (ECM) materials (e.g., composition, concentration). In this study, we proposed a bioprinting-based approach to generate nano-liter sized three-dimensional (3D) cell-laden hydrogel array with gradient of ECM components, through controlling the volume ratio of two hydrogels, such as gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) dimethacrylate. The resulting cell-laden array with a gradient of GelMA/PEG composition was used to screen human PDLSC response to ECM. The behavior (e.g., cell viability, spreading) of human PDLSCs in GelMA/PEG array were found to be depended on the volume ratios of GelMA/PEG, with cell viability and spreading area decreased along with increasing the ratio of PEG. The developed approach would be useful for screening cell-biomaterial interaction in 3D and promoting regeneration of functional tissue. (paper)

  17. MicroRNA-214 Suppresses Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells by Targeting ATF4

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    Siqi Yao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is the main cause of adult tooth loss. Stem cell-based tissue engineering has become a promising therapy for periodontitis treatment. To date, human periodontal ligament stem cells (hPDLSCs have been shown to be a favorable source for tissue engineering, but modulatory mechanisms of hPDLSCs remain unclear. Approximately 60% of mammalian genes are the targets of over 2000 miRNAs in multiple human cell types, and miRNAs are able to influence various biological processes in the human body, including bone formation. In this study, we found that after osteogenic induction, miR-214 was significantly decreased in hPDLSCs; therefore, we examined the effects of miR-214 on osteogenic differentiation. Computational miRNA target prediction analyses and luciferase reporter assays revealed that activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4 is a direct target of miR-214. We prepared cells overexpressing miR-214 and found that miR-214 negatively regulates osteogenic differentiation of hPDLSCs. For the target of miR-214, ATF4 protein expression level was decreased after induction. In conclusion, we found that miR-214-ATF4 axis is a novel pathway for regulating hPDLSC osteogenic differentiation.

  18. Development of Tissue-Engineered Ligaments: Elastin Promotes Regeneration of the Rabbit Medial Collateral Ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirukawa, Masaki; Katayama, Shingo; Sato, Tatsuya; Yamada, Masayoshi; Kageyama, Satoshi; Unno, Hironori; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Miura, Yoshihiro; Shiratsuchi, Eri; Hasegawa, Masahiro; Miyamoto, Keiichi; Horiuchi, Takashi

    2017-12-21

    When ligaments are injured, reconstructive surgery is sometimes required to restore function. Methods of reconstructive surgery include transplantation of an artificial ligament and autotransplantation of a tendon. However, these methods have limitations related to the strength of the bone-ligament insertion and biocompatibility of the transplanted tissue after surgery. Therefore, it is necessary to develop new reconstruction methods and pursue the development of artificial ligaments. Elastin is a major component of elastic fibers and ligaments. However, the role of elastin in ligament regeneration has not been described. Here, we developed a rabbit model of a medial collateral ligament (MCL) rupture and treated animal knees with exogenous elastin [100 µg/(0.5 mL·week)] for 6 or 12 weeks. Elastin treatment increased gene expression and protein content of collagen and elastin (gene expression, 6-fold and 42-fold, respectively; protein content, 1.6-fold and 1.9-fold, respectively), and also increased the elastic modulus of MCL increased with elastin treatment (2-fold) compared with the controls. Our data suggest that elastin is involved in the regeneration of damaged ligaments. © 2017 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Electrospun Zein/Gelatin Scaffold-Enhanced Cell Attachment and Growth of Human Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells

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    Fanqiao Yang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is a widespread dental disease affecting 10 to 15% of worldwide adult population, yet the current treatments are far from satisfactory. The human periodontal ligament stem cell is a promising potential seed cell population type in cell-based therapy and tissue regeneration, which require appropriate scaffold to provide a mimic extracellular matrix. Zein, a native protein derived from corn, has an excellent biodegradability, and therefore becomes a hotspot on research and application in the field of biomaterials. However, the high hydrophobicity of zein is unfavorable for cell adhesion and thus greatly limits its use. In this study, we fabricate co-electrospun zein/gelatin fiber scaffolds in order to take full advantages of the two natural materials and electrospun fiber structure. Zein and gelatin in four groups of different mass ratios (100:00, 100:20, 100:34, 100:50, and dissolved the mixtures in 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol, then produced membranes by electrospinning. The results showed that the scaffolds were smooth and homogeneous, as shown in scanning electron micrographs. The diameter of hybrid fibers was increased from 69 ± 22 nm to 950 ± 356 nm, with the proportion of gelatin increase. The cell affinity of zein/gelatin nanofibers was evaluated by using human periodontal ligament stem cells. The data showed that hydrophilicity and cytocompatibility of zein nanofibers were improved by blended gelatin. Taken together, our results indicated that the zein/gelatin co-electrospun fibers had sufficient mechanical properties, satisfied cytocompatibility, and can be utilized as biological scaffolds in the field of tissue regeneration.

  20. Conditioned media from differentiating craniofacial bone marrow stromal cells influence mineralization and proliferation in periodontal ligament stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zhenyu; Feng, Yuan; Liu, Hongwei

    2016-10-01

    Previous reports have mainly focused on the behavioral responses of human periodontal ligament stem cells (hPDLSCs) in interaction with tibia bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). However, there is little study on the biologic features of hPDLSCs under the induction of maxilla BMSCs (M-BMSCs) at different phases of osteogenic differentiation. We hypothesized that M-BMSCs undergoing osteogenic differentiation acted on the proliferation, differentiation, and bone-forming capacity of hPDLSCs. In this paper, primary hPDLSCs and human M-BMSCs (hM-BMSCs) were expanded in vitro. After screening of surface markers for characterization, hPDLSCs were cocultured with different phases of differentiating hM-BMSCs. Cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity were examined, and mineralization-associated markers such as osteocalcin and runt-related transcription factor 2 of hPDLSCs in coculture with uninduced/osteoinduced hM-BMSCs were evaluated. hPDLSCs in hM-BMSCs-conditioned medium (hM-BMSCs-CM) group showed a reduction in proliferation compared with untreated hPDLSCs, while osteoinduced hM-BMSCs for 10 day-conditioned medium (hM-BMSCs-CM-10ds) and osteoinduced hM-BMSCs for 15 day-conditioned medium (hM-BMSCs-CM-15ds) enhance the proliferation of hPDLSCs. hM-BMSCs of separate differentiation stages temporarily inhibited osteogenesis of hPDLSCs in the early days. Upon extending time periods, uninduced/osteoinduced hM-BMSCs markedly enhanced osteogenesis of hPDLSCs to different degrees. The transplantation results showed hM-BMSCs-CM-15ds treatment promoted tissue regeneration to generate cementum/periodontal ligament-like structure characterized by hard-tissue formation. This research supported the notion that hM-BMSCs triggered osteogenesis of hPDLSCs suggesting important implications for periodontal engineering.

  1. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound stimulation facilitates osteogenic differentiation of human periodontal ligament cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Hu

    Full Text Available Human periodontal ligament cells (hPDLCs possess stem cell properties, which play a key role in periodontal regeneration. Physical stimulation at appropriate intensities such as low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS enhances cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of mesechymal stem cells. However, the impacts of LIPUS on osteogenic differentiation of hPDLCs in vitro and its molecular mechanism are unknown. This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of LIPUS on osteogenic differentiation of hPDLCs. HPDLCs were isolated from premolars of adolescents for orthodontic reasons, and exposed to LIPUS at different intensities to determine an optimal LIPUS treatment dosage. Dynamic changes of alkaline phosphatase (ALP activities in the cultured cells and supernatants, and osteocalcin production in the supernatants after treatment were analyzed. Runx2 and integrin β1 mRNA levels were assessed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis after LIPUS stimulation. Blocking antibody against integrinβ1 was used to assess the effects of integrinβ1 inhibitor on LIPUS-induced ALP activity, osteocalcin production as well as calcium deposition. Our data showed that LIPUS at the intensity of 90 mW/cm2 with 20 min/day was more effective. The ALP activities in lysates and supernatants of LIPUS-treated cells started to increase at days 3 and 7, respectively, and peaked at day 11. LIPUS treatment significantly augmented the production of osteocalcin after day 5. LIPUS caused a significant increase in the mRNA expression of Runx2 and integrin β1, while a significant decline when the integrinβ1 inhibitor was used. Moreover, ALP activity, osteocalcin production as well as calcium nodules of cells treated with both daily LIPUS stimulation and integrinβ1 antibody were less than those in the LIPUS-treated group. In conclusion, LIPUS promotes osteogenic differentiation of hPDLCs, which is associated with upregulation of Runx2 and

  2. Cell proliferation and 3H-proline incorporation in periodontal ligament exposed to mechanical stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunz, J.; Plascke, C.; Duncker, M.

    1988-01-01

    In order to study the metabolic processes induced in the periodontal ligament by mechanical influences, a tension spring was implanted in rats between the incisor and the first maxillary molar on the right-hand side, while the left maxilla of these animals as well as non-operated rats served as controls. Under such mechanical stress, there occurred at 3, 10 and 21 days after implantation a significant increase in the 3 H-thymidine labelling index, which was demonstrate histoautoradiographically. A change in cell density was not discovered. Therefore, the increase in S-phase fraction as equally recorded in both pressure and tension zones is regarded as an expression of an enhanced cell turnover. Cell renewal in the periodontal ligament can be modified by inflammatory processes within the gingival region. There is a slight enlargement of the periodontal space in the tension zone. Under experimental conditions, no change occurs in the silver grain number per cell after 3 H-proline administration. The results indicate that, following the impact of orthodontic forces, the reactivity of periodontal cell proliferation as compared to collagen synthesis is enhanced. (author)

  3. Stimulation of interleukin-6 production of periodontal ligament cells by Porphyromonas endodontalis lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, N; Shibata, Y; Kamino, Y; Matsuda, U; Hayakawa, M; Oikawa, T; Takiguchi, H; Izumi, H; Abiko, Y

    1994-12-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6), which is a multifunctional cytokine, has important roles in acute and chronic inflammation and may also be implicated in bone resorption. We examined the IL-6 production in periodontal ligament (PDL) cells which were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from several oral inflammatory pathogens. The LPS from Porphyromonas endodontalis, which was isolated from infected root canals and radicular cyst fluids, was more potent than the LPS from any other periodontal organisms examined. P. endodontalis LPS stimulated IL-6 release from PDL cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Northern blot hybridization analysis revealed that the IL-6 mRNA level in PDL cells was increased by P. endodontalis LPS. These results suggest that stimulation of the IL-6 release of PDL cells by P. endodontalis LPS may have a role in the progression of inflammation and alveolar bone resorption in periodontal and periapical diseases.

  4. Influence of periodontal ligament simulation on bond strength and fracture resistance of roots restored with fiber posts

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    Ana Maria Estivalete MARCHIONATTI

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Considering that periodontal ligament simulation may influence the stress distribution over teeth restored with intraradicular retainers, this study aimed to assess the combined effect of mechanical cycling and periodontal ligament simulation on both the bond strength between fiber posts and root dentin and the fracture resistance of teeth restored using glass fiber posts. Material and Methods: Ninety roots were randomly distributed into 3 groups (n=10 (C-MC: control; P-MC: polyether; AS-MC: addition silicone to test bond strength and 6 groups (n=10 (C: control; P: polyether; AS: addition silicone, without mechanical cycling, and C-MC, P-MC and AS-MC with mechanical cycling to test fracture strength, according to the material used to simulate the periodontal ligament. For the bond strength test, fiber posts were cemented, cores were built, mechanical cycling was applied (2×106 cycles, 88 N, 2.2 Hz, and 45º incline, and the teeth cut into 3 slices (2 mm, which were then subjected to the push-out test at 1 mm/min. For the fracture strength test, fiber posts were cemented, cores were built, and half of the groups received mechanical cycling, followed by the compressive strength (45° to the long axis and 1 mm/min performed on all groups. Results: Periodontal ligament simulation did not affect the bond strength (p=0.244 between post and dentin. Simulation of periodontal ligament (p=0.153 and application of mechanical cycling (p=0.97 did not affect fracture resistance. Conclusions: The materials used to simulate the periodontal ligament did not affect fracture or bond strength, therefore periodontal ligament simulation using the tested materials could be considered optional in the conditions of the study.

  5. Morphometric assessment of periodontal tissues in relation to periodontal disease in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyllar, Michal; Doskarova, Barbora; Paral, Vaclav

    2013-01-01

    Dimensions of periodontal tissues are thought to predispose to the development of periodontal disease in man and dogs. Several studies have suggested that thin gingiva correlates with an increased incidence of periodontal disease. In this study, we hypothesized that the dimensions of periodontal tissues will vary in different breeds of dogs and could possibly correlate with the incidence of periodontal disease. Forty-two jaws of dogs aged up to 5-years were examined post-mortem and gingival and alveolar bone thickness were measured using methods of transgingival probing and digital calipers, respectively. Dogs were divided into three groups based on their body weight. Group I (dogs compared with small and medium-sized breed dogs. Both gingival and alveolar bone dimensions may be predictors for severity of periodontal disease and influence clinical outcome in certain periodontal surgical procedures.

  6. Mesenchymal Stem Cells of Dental Origin for Inducing Tissue Regeneration in Periodontitis: A Mini-Review

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    Beatriz Hernández-Monjaraz

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is a chronic disease that begins with a period of inflammation of the supporting tissues of the teeth table and then progresses, destroying the tissues until loss of the teeth occurs. The restoration of the damaged dental support apparatus is an extremely complex process due to the regeneration of the cementum, the periodontal ligament, and the alveolar bone. Conventional treatment relies on synthetic materials that fill defects and replace lost dental tissue, but these approaches are not substitutes for a real regeneration of tissue. To address this, there are several approaches to tissue engineering for regenerative dentistry, among them, the use of stem cells. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC can be obtained from various sources of adult tissues, such as bone marrow, adipose tissue, skin, and tissues of the orofacial area. MSC of dental origin, such as those found in the bone marrow, have immunosuppressive and immunotolerant properties, multipotency, high proliferation rates, and the capacity for tissue repair. However, they are poorly used as sources of tissue for therapeutic purposes. Their accessibility makes them an attractive source of mesenchymal stem cells, so this review describes the field of dental stem cell research and proposes a potential mechanism involved in periodontal tissue regeneration induced by dental MSC.

  7. Gold Nanoparticles Promote Proliferation of Human Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells and Have Limited Effects on Cells Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs had been widely applied in the practice and advancement of chemistry, biology, and medicine due to facility of synthesis and versatility in surface functionalization. Recent studies had shown that AuNPs can be applied to cells, affecting cellular physiological processes such as proliferation and differentiation. In this study, four diameters of AuNPs (20, 40, 60, and 80 nm were cocultured with human periodontal ligament cells (hPDLCs at six different concentrations. The optimal size and concentration of AuNPs were selected to treat human periodontal ligament stem cells (hPDLSCs to evaluate proliferation. Moreover, the influence of AuNPs on multiple differentiation capacity of hPDLSCs was clarified. The results revealed that AuNPs (60 nm, 56 μM can effectively promote the proliferation of hPDLCs/hPDLSCs in vitro, slightly enhance osteoblastic differentiation, and have no effect on adipogenic differentiation. In addition, the expression of COL-1, Runx2, BSP, and OCN was upregulated in the presence of AuNPs (60 nm, 56 μM. These results indicated that AuNPs (60 nm, 56 μM can effectively promote the proliferation of hPDLCs/hPDLSCs and have no significant effect on the differentiation of hPDLSCs. These results provide an insight on the advantage of implementing of AuNPs on hPDLSCs culture and expose the influence of these materials on periodontal tissue engineering.

  8. Composite cell sheet for periodontal regeneration: crosstalk between different types of MSCs in cell sheet facilitates complex periodontal-like tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Liu, Shiyu; Zhu, Bin; Xu, Qiu; Ding, Yin; Jin, Yan

    2016-11-14

    Tissue-engineering strategies based on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and cell sheets have been widely used for periodontal tissue regeneration. However, given the complexity in periodontal structure, the regeneration methods using a single species of MSC could not fulfill the requirement for periodontal regeneration. We researched the interaction between the periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) and jaw bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (JBMMSCs), and constructed a composite cell sheet comprising both of the above MSCs to regenerate complex periodontium-like structures in nude mice. Our results show that by co-culturing PDLSCs and JBMMSCs, the expressions of bone and extracellular matrix (ECM)-related genes and proteins were significantly improved in both MSCs. Further investigations showed that, compared to the cell sheet using PDLSCs or JBMMSCs, the composite stem cell sheet (CSCS), which comprises these two MSCs, expressed higher levels of bone- and ECM-related genes and proteins, and generated a composite structure more similar to the native periodontal tissue physiologically in vivo. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that the crosstalk between PDLSCs and JBMMSCs in cell sheets facilitate regeneration of complex periodontium-like structures, providing a promising new strategy for physiological and functional regeneration of periodontal tissue.

  9. Growth on elastic silicone substrate elicits a partial myogenic response in periodontal ligament derived stem cells

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    Daniel Pelaez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The processes of cellular differentiation and phenotypic maintenance can be influenced by stimuli from a variety of different factors. One commonly overlooked factor is the mechanical properties of the growth substrate in which stem cells are maintained or differentiated down various lineages. Here we explored the effect that growth on an elastic silicone substrate had on the myogenic expression and cytoskeletal morphology of periodontal ligament derived stem cells. Cells were grown on either collagen I coated tissue culture polystyrene plates or collagen I coated elastic silicone membranes for a period of 4 days without further induction from soluble factors in the culture media. Following the 4-day growth, gene expression and immunohistochemical analysis for key cardiomyogenic markers was performed along with a morphological assessment of cytoskeletal organization. Results show that cells grown on the elastic substrate significantly upregulate key markers associated with contractile activity in muscle tissues. Namely, the myosin light chain polypeptides 2 and 7, as well as the myosin heavy chain polypeptide 7 genes underwent a statistically significant upregulation in the cells grown on elastic silicone membranes. Similarly, the cells on the softer elastic substrate stained positive for both sarcomeric actin and cardiac troponin t proteins following just 4 days of growth on the softer material. Cytoskeletal analysis showed that substrate stiffness had a marked effect on the organization and distribution of filamentous actin fibers within the cell body. Growth on silicone membranes produced flatter and shorter cellular morphologies with filamentous actin fibers projecting anisotropically throughout the cell body. These results demonstrate how crucial the mechanical properties of the growth substrate of cells can be on the ultimate cellular phenotype. These observations highlight the need to further optimize differentiation protocols to enhance

  10. Human periodontal ligament stem cells cultured onto cortico-cancellous scaffold drive bone regenerative process

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    F Diomede

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to test, in vitro and in vivo, a new tissue-engineered construct constituted by porcine cortico-cancellous scaffold (Osteobiol Dual Block (DB and xeno-free ex vivo culture of human Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells (hPDLSCs. hPDLSCs cultured in xeno-free media formulation preserved the stem cells’ morphological features, the expression of stemness and pluripotency markers, and their ability to differentiate into mesenchymal lineage. Transmission electron microscopy analysis suggested that after one week of culture, both noninduced and osteogenic differentiation induced cells joined and grew on DB secreting extracellular matrix (ECM that in osteogenic induced samples was hierarchically assembled in fibrils. Quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR showed the upregulation of key genes involved in the bone differentiation pathway in both differentiated and undifferentiated hPDLSCs cultured with DB (hPDLSCs/DB. Functional studies revealed a significant increased response of calcium transients in the presence of DB, both in undifferentiated and differentiated cells stimulated with calcitonin and parathormone, suggesting that the biomaterial could drive the osteogenic differentiation process of hPDLSCs. These data were confirmed by the increase of gene expression of L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ (VDCCL, subunits α1C and α2D1 in undifferentiated cells in the presence of DB. In vivo implantation of the hPDLSCs/DB living construct in the mouse calvaria evidenced a precocious osteointegration and vascularisation process. Our results suggest consideration of DB as a biocompatible, osteoinductive and osteoconductive biomaterial, making it a promising tool to regulate cell activities in biological environments and for a potential use in the development of new custom-made tissue engineering.

  11. Optimizing the reconstruction filter in cone-beam CT to improve periodontal ligament space visualization: An in vitro study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houno, Yuuki; Kodera, Yoshie [Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Hishikawa, Toshimitsu; Naitoh, Munetaka; Mitani, Akio; Noguchi, Toshihide; Ariji, Eiichiro [Aichi Gakuin University, Nisshin (Japan); Gotoh, Kenichi [Div. of Radiology, Dental Hospital, Aichi Gakuin University, Nisshin (Japan)

    2017-09-15

    Evaluation of alveolar bone is important in the diagnosis of dental diseases. The periodontal ligament space is difficult to clearly depict in cone-beam computed tomography images because the reconstruction filter conditions during image processing cause image blurring, resulting in decreased spatial resolution. We examined different reconstruction filters to assess their ability to improve spatial resolution and allow for a clearer visualization of the periodontal ligament space. Cone-beam computed tomography projections of 2 skull phantoms were reconstructed using 6 reconstruction conditions and then compared using the Thurstone paired comparison method. Physical evaluations, including the modulation transfer function and the Wiener spectrum, as well as an assessment of space visibility, were undertaken using experimental phantoms. Image reconstruction using a modified Shepp-Logan filter resulted in better sensory, physical, and quantitative evaluations. The reconstruction conditions substantially improved the spatial resolution and visualization of the periodontal ligament space. The difference in sensitivity was obtained by altering the reconstruction filter. Modifying the characteristics of a reconstruction filter can generate significant improvement in assessments of the periodontal ligament space. A high-frequency enhancement filter improves the visualization of thin structures and will be useful when accurate assessment of the periodontal ligament space is necessary.

  12. Optimizing the reconstruction filter in cone-beam CT to improve periodontal ligament space visualization: An in vitro study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houno, Yuuki; Kodera, Yoshie; Hishikawa, Toshimitsu; Naitoh, Munetaka; Mitani, Akio; Noguchi, Toshihide; Ariji, Eiichiro; Gotoh, Kenichi

    2017-01-01

    Evaluation of alveolar bone is important in the diagnosis of dental diseases. The periodontal ligament space is difficult to clearly depict in cone-beam computed tomography images because the reconstruction filter conditions during image processing cause image blurring, resulting in decreased spatial resolution. We examined different reconstruction filters to assess their ability to improve spatial resolution and allow for a clearer visualization of the periodontal ligament space. Cone-beam computed tomography projections of 2 skull phantoms were reconstructed using 6 reconstruction conditions and then compared using the Thurstone paired comparison method. Physical evaluations, including the modulation transfer function and the Wiener spectrum, as well as an assessment of space visibility, were undertaken using experimental phantoms. Image reconstruction using a modified Shepp-Logan filter resulted in better sensory, physical, and quantitative evaluations. The reconstruction conditions substantially improved the spatial resolution and visualization of the periodontal ligament space. The difference in sensitivity was obtained by altering the reconstruction filter. Modifying the characteristics of a reconstruction filter can generate significant improvement in assessments of the periodontal ligament space. A high-frequency enhancement filter improves the visualization of thin structures and will be useful when accurate assessment of the periodontal ligament space is necessary

  13. Age estimation using the radiographic visibility of the periodontal ligament in lower third molars in a Portuguese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequeira, Catarina-Dourado; Teixeira, Alexandra; Caldas, Inês-Morais; Afonso, Américo; Pérez-Mongiovi, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    The mineralization of third molars has been used repeatedly as a method of forensic age estimation. However, this procedure is of little use beyond age 18, especially to determinate if an individual is older than 21 years of age; thus, the development of new approaches is essential. The visibility of the periodontal ligament has been suggested for this purpose. The aim of this work was to determine the usefulness of this methodology in a Portuguese population. Periodontal ligament visibility was assessed in the lower third molars, using a sample of 487 orthopantomograms, 228 of which belonging to females and 259 to males, from a Portuguese population aged 17 to 31 years. A classification of four stages based on the visual phenomenon of disappearance of the periodontal ligament of fully mineralized third molars was used. For each stage, median, variance, minimal and maximal age were assessed. The relationship between age and stage of periodontal ligament had a statistical significance for both sexes. In this population, stage 3 can be used to state that a male person is over 21 years-old; for females, another marker should be used. This technique can be useful for determining age over 21, particularly in males. Differences between studies are evident, suggesting that specific population standards should be used when applying this technique. Key words:Forensic sciences, forensic odontology, age estimation, third molar, periodontal ligament.

  14. Enamel matrix derivative enhances tissue formation around scaffolds used for tissue engineering of ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messenger, Michael P; Raïf, El M; Seedhom, Bahaa B; Brookes, Steven J

    2010-02-01

    The following in vitro translational study investigated whether enamel matrix derivative (EMD), an approved biomimetic treatment for periodontal disease (Emdogain) and hard-to-heal wounds (Xelma), enhanced synovial cell colonization and protein synthesis around a scaffold used clinically for in situ tissue engineering of the torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Synovial cells were enzymatically extracted from bovine synovium and dynamically seeded onto polyethylene terephthalate (PET) scaffolds. The cells were cultured in low-serum medium (0.5% FBS) for 4 weeks with either a single administration of EMD at the start of the 4 week period or multiple administrations of EMD at regular intervals throughout the 4 weeks. Samples were harvested and evaluated using the Hoechst DNA assay, BCA protein assay, cresolphthalein complexone calcium assay, SDS-PAGE, ELISA and electron microscopy. A significant increase in cell number (DNA) (p < 0.01), protein content (p < 0.01) and TGFbeta1 synthesis (p < 0.01) was observed with multiple administrations of EMD. Additionally, SDS-PAGE showed an increase in high molecular weight proteins, characteristic of the fibril-forming collagens. Electron microscopy supported these findings, showing that scaffolds treated with multiple administrations of EMD were heavily coated with cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) that enveloped the fibres. Multiple administrations of EMD to synovial cell-seeded scaffolds enhanced the formation of tissue in vitro. Additionally, it was shown that EMD enhanced TGFbeta1 synthesis of synovial cells, suggesting a potential mode of action for EMD's capacity to stimulate tissue regeneration.

  15. Periodontal ligament formation around different types of dental titanium implants. I. The self-tapping screw type implant system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warrer, K; Karring, T; Gotfredsen, K

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if a periodontal ligament can form around self-tapping, screw type titanium dental implants. Implants were inserted in contact with the periodontal ligament of root tips retained in the mandibular jaws of 7 monkeys. In each side of the mandible, 1 premolar......, a periodontal ligament can form on self-tapping, screw type titanium dental implants in areas where a void is present between the surrounding bone and the implant at the time of insertion....... and 2 molars were removed in such a manner that in approximately half the cases, the root tips were retained. Following healing, the experimental areas were examined on radiographs, and sites were selected for the insertion of the implants, so that every second implant would have a close contact...

  16. Platelet lysate supports the in vitro expansion of human periodontal ligament stem cells for cytotherapeutic use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Rui-Xin; Yu, Yang; Yin, Yuan; Zhang, Xi-Yu; Gao, Li-Na; Chen, Fa-Ming

    2017-08-01

    Human platelet lysate (PL) produced under optimal conditions of standardization and safety has been increasingly suggested as the future 'gold standard' supplement to replace fetal bovine serum (FBS) for the ex vivo propagation of mesenchymal stem cells for translational medicine and cell therapy applications. However, the multifaceted effects of PL on tissue-specific stem cells remain largely unexplored. In the present study, we investigated the stem cell behaviours of human periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) in media with or without PL. Our data indicate that human PL, either as an adjuvant for culture media or as a substitute for FBS, supports the proliferation and expansion of human PDLSCs derived from either 'young' or 'old' donors to the same extent as FBS, without interfering with their immunomodulatory capacities. Although PL appears to inhibit the in vitro differentiation of 'young' or 'old' PDLSCs, their decreased osteogenic potential may be restored to similar or higher levels compared with FBS-expanded cells. PL- and FBS-expanded PDLSCs exhibited a similar potential to form mineralized nodules and expressed similar levels of osteogenic genes. Our data indicate that large clinically relevant quantities of PDLSCs may be yielded by the use of human PL; however, further analysis of its precise composition and function will pave the way for determining optimized, defined culture conditions. In addition to the potential increase in patient safety, our findings highlight the need for further research to develop the potential of PL-expanded PDLSCs for clinical use. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Caffeine may enhance orthodontic tooth movement through increasing osteoclastogenesis induced by periodontal ligament cells under compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jianru; Yan, Boxi; Li, Meile; Wang, Yu; Zheng, Wei; Li, Yu; Zhao, Zhihe

    2016-04-01

    Caffeine is the kernel component of coffee and has multiple effects on bone metabolism. Here we aimed to investigate the effects of caffeine intake on orthodontic tooth movement (OTM). (1) In the in vivo study, two groups comprising 15 randomly assigned rats each underwent orthodontic treatment. One group ingested caffeine at 25mg/kg body weight per day and the other, plain water. After 3 weeks, the degree of tooth movement and effect on the periodontium were assessed. (2) In the in vitro study, we established a model mimicking the essential bioprocess of OTM, which contained a periodontal ligament tissue model (PDLtm), and a co-culture system of osteoblasts (OBs) and osteoclast precursors (pre-OCs). After being subjected to static compressive force with or without caffeine administration, the conditioned media from the PDLtm were used for the OB/pre-OC co-cultures to induce osteoclastogenesis. (1) In vivo, the caffeine group displayed a significantly greater rate of tooth movement than the control. The alveolar bone mineral density and bone volume fraction were similar between the two groups; however, immunohistochemical staining showed that the caffeine group had significantly more TRAP(+) osteoclasts and higher RANKL expression in the compressed periodontium. (2) In vitro, caffeine at 0.01mM significantly enhanced the compression-induced expression of RANKL and COX-2, as well as prostaglandin E2 production in the PDLtm. Furthermore, the "caffeine+compression"-conditioned media induced significantly more TRAP(+) OC formation when compared with compression alone. Daily intake of caffeine, at least at some specific dosage, may enhance OTM through increasing osteoclastogenesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Ex Vivo Growth of Bioengineered Ligaments and Other Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Gregory; Kaplan, David L.; Martin, Ivan; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2005-01-01

    A method of growing bioengineered tissues for use in surgical replacement of damaged anterior cruciate ligaments has been invented. An anterior cruciate ligament is one of two ligaments (the other being the posterior cruciate ligament) that cross in the middle of a knee joint and act to prevent the bones in the knee from sliding forward and backward relative to each other. Anterior cruciate ligaments are frequently torn in sports injuries and traffic accidents, resulting in pain and severe limitations on mobility. By making it possible to grow replacement anterior cruciate ligaments that structurally and functionally resemble natural ones more closely than do totally synthetic replacements, the method could create new opportunities for full or nearly full restoration of functionality in injured knees. The method is also adaptable to the growth of bioengineered replacements for other ligaments (e.g., other knee ligaments as well as those in the hands, wrists, and elbows) and to the production of tissues other than ligaments, including cartilage, bones, muscles, and blood vessels. The method is based on the finding that the histomorphological properties of a bioengineered tissue grown in vitro from pluripotent cells within a matrix are affected by the direct application of mechanical force to the matrix during growth generation. This finding provides important new insights into the relationships among mechanical stress, biochemical and cell-immobilization methods, and cell differentiation, and is applicable to the production of the variety of tissues mentioned above. Moreover, this finding can be generalized to nonmechanical (e.g., chemical and electromagnetic) stimuli that are experienced in vivo by tissues of interest and, hence, the method can be modified to incorporate such stimuli in the ex vivo growth of replacements for the various tissues mentioned above. In this method, a three-dimensional matrix made of a suitable material is seeded with pluripotent stem

  19. Ultrastructure of periprosthetic Dacron knee ligament tissue. Two cases of ruptured anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvi, M; Velluti, C; Misasi, M; Bartolozzi, P; Quacci, D; Dell'Orbo, C

    1991-04-01

    Light- and electron-microscopic investigations were performed on two failed Dacron ligaments that had been removed from 2 patients shortly after failure of the implant 2-3 years after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament. Two different cell populations and matrices were correlated with closeness to the Dacron threads. Fibroblasts surrounded by connective tissue with collagen fibrils were located far from the Dacron threads. Roundish cells, appearing to be myofibroblasts surrounded by a more lax connective tissue and elastic fibers, were found close to the Dacron threads. The presence of myofibroblasts and the matrix differentiation could be attributed to the different mechanical forces acting on the Dacron and on the connective tissue because of their different coefficients of elasticity. The sparse occurrence of inflammatory cells in the synovial membrane and in the connective tissue surrounding the Dacron supports the biologic inertness of this artificial material. However, the repair tissue was not structured to resist tension stresses.

  20. A radiographic study estimating age of mandibular third molars by periodontal ligament visibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, M A; Liversidge, H M

    2017-12-01

    Visibility of the periodontal ligament of mandibular third molars (M3) has been suggested as a method to estimate age. To assess the accuracy of this method and compare the visibility of the periodontal ligament in the left M3 with the right M3. The sample was archived panoramic dental radiographs of 163 individuals (75 males, 88 females, age 16-53 years) with mature M3's. Reliability was assessed using Kappa. Accuracy was assessed by subtracting chronological age from estimated age for males and females. Stages were cross-tabulated against age stages younger than and at least 18 and 21 years of age. Stages were compared in the left M3 and right M3. Analysis showed excellent intra-observer reliability. Mean difference between estimated and chronological ages was 7.21 years (SD 5.16) for left M3 and 7.69 (SD 6.08) for right M3 in males and 6.87 (SD 5.83) for left M3 and 8.61 (SD 6.58) for right M3 in females. Minimum ages of stages 0 to 2 were younger than previously reported, despite a small sample of individuals younger than 18. The left and right M3 stage differed in 46% of the 85 individuals with readings from both side and estimated age differed from -10.5 to 12.2 years between left and right. Accuracy of this method was between 6 and 8 years with an error of 5 to 6 years. The number of individuals with mature M3 apices younger than 18 years was small. The stage of visibility of the periodontal ligament differed between left and right in almost half of our sample with both teeth present. Our findings question the use of this method to estimate age or to discriminate between age younger and at least 18 years.

  1. The Role of Bioreactors in Ligament and Tendon Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, James; Wheelton, Andy; Khan, Wasim S; Anand, Sanj

    2016-01-01

    Bioreactors are pivotal to the emerging field of tissue engineering. The formation of neotissue from pluripotent cell lineages potentially offers a source of tissue for clinical use without the significant donor site morbidity associated with many contemporary surgical reconstructive procedures. Modern bioreactor design is becoming increasingly complex to provide a both an expandable source of readily available pluripotent cells and to facilitate their controlled differentiation into a clinically applicable ligament or tendon like neotissue. This review presents the need for such a method, challenges in the processes to engineer neotissue and the current designs and results of modern bioreactors in the pursuit of engineered tendon and ligament.

  2. Periodontal ligament and intraosseous anesthetic injection techniques: alternatives to mandibular nerve blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Paul A; Cuddy, Michael A; Cooke, Matthew R; Sokolowski, Chester J

    2011-09-01

    and Overview. The provision of mandibular anesthesia traditionally has relied on nerve block anesthetic techniques such as the Halsted, the Gow-Gates and the Akinosi-Vazirani methods. The authors present two alternative techniques to provide local anesthesia in mandibular teeth: the periodontal ligament (PDL) injection and the intraosseous (IO) injection. The authors also present indications for and complications associated with these techniques. The PDL injection and the IO injection are effective anesthetic techniques for managing nerve block failures and for providing localized anesthesia in the mandible. Dentists may find these techniques to be useful alternatives to nerve block anesthesia.

  3. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) induce apoptosis of periodontal ligament fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, D.X.; Deng, T.Z.; Lv, J.; Ke, J.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetics have an increased prevalence of periodontitis, and diabetes is one of the causative factors of severe periodontitis. Apoptosis is thought to be involved in this pathogenic relationship. The aim of this study was to investigate apoptosis in human periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts induced by advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE). We examined the roles of apoptosis, AGEs, and RAGE during periodontitis in diabetes mellitus using cultured PDL fibroblasts that were treated by AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA), bovine serum albumin (BSA) alone, or given no treatment (control). Microscopy and real-time quantitative PCR indicated that PDL fibroblasts treated with AGE-BSA were deformed and expressed higher levels of RAGE and caspase 3. Cell viability assays and flow cytometry indicated that AGE-BSA reduced cell viability (69.80±5.50%, P<0.01) and increased apoptosis (11.31±1.73%, P<0.05). Hoechst 33258 staining and terminal-deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick-end labeling revealed that AGE-BSA significantly increased apoptosis of PDL fibroblasts. The results showed that the changes in PDL fibroblasts induced by AGE-BSA may explain how AGE-RAGE participates in and exacerbates periodontium destruction

  4. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE) induce apoptosis of periodontal ligament fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, D.X.; Deng, T.Z.; Lv, J.; Ke, J. [Department of Stomatology, Air Force General Hospital PLA, Haidian District, Beijing (China)

    2014-09-19

    Diabetics have an increased prevalence of periodontitis, and diabetes is one of the causative factors of severe periodontitis. Apoptosis is thought to be involved in this pathogenic relationship. The aim of this study was to investigate apoptosis in human periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts induced by advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and their receptor (RAGE). We examined the roles of apoptosis, AGEs, and RAGE during periodontitis in diabetes mellitus using cultured PDL fibroblasts that were treated by AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA), bovine serum albumin (BSA) alone, or given no treatment (control). Microscopy and real-time quantitative PCR indicated that PDL fibroblasts treated with AGE-BSA were deformed and expressed higher levels of RAGE and caspase 3. Cell viability assays and flow cytometry indicated that AGE-BSA reduced cell viability (69.80±5.50%, P<0.01) and increased apoptosis (11.31±1.73%, P<0.05). Hoechst 33258 staining and terminal-deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick-end labeling revealed that AGE-BSA significantly increased apoptosis of PDL fibroblasts. The results showed that the changes in PDL fibroblasts induced by AGE-BSA may explain how AGE-RAGE participates in and exacerbates periodontium destruction.

  5. Effects of Intermittent Administration of Parathyroid Hormone (1-34 on Bone Differentiation in Stromal Precursor Antigen-1 Positive Human Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxiao Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is the most common cause of tooth loss and bone destruction in adults worldwide. Human periodontal ligament stem cells (hPDLSCs may represent promising new therapeutic biomaterials for tissue engineering applications. Stromal precursor antigen-1 (STRO-1 has been shown to have roles in adherence, proliferation, and multipotency. Parathyroid hormone (PTH has been shown to enhance proliferation in osteoblasts. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to compare the functions of STRO-1(+ and STRO-1(− hPDLSCs and to investigate the effects of PTH on the osteogenic capacity of STRO-1(+ hPDLSCs in order to evaluate their potential applications in the treatment of periodontitis. Our data showed that STRO-1(+ hPDLSCs expressed higher levels of the PTH-1 receptor (PTH1R than STRO-1(− hPDLSCs. In addition, intermittent PTH treatment enhanced the expression of PTH1R and osteogenesis-related genes in STRO-1(+ hPDLSCs. PTH-treated cells also exhibited increased alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralization ability. Therefore, STRO-1(+ hPDLSCs represented a more promising cell resource for biomaterials and tissue engineering applications. Intermittent PTH treatment improved the capacity for STRO-1(+ hPDLSCs to repair damaged tissue and ameliorate the symptoms of periodontitis.

  6. Enhanced periodontal tissue regeneration by periodontal cell implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, N.; Oortgiesen, D.A.W.; Bronckers, A.L.J.J.; Yang, F.; Walboomers, X.F.; Jansen, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Aim Due to a lack of regenerative potential, current treatments for periodontal defects do not always provide satisfactory clinical results. Previously, the implantation of a biomaterial scaffold-cell construct has been suggested as a clinically achievable approach. In this study, it was aimed to

  7. Biomechanical force induces the growth factor production in human periodontal ligament-derived cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichioka, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Toshiro; Yamamoto, Kenta; Honjo, Ken-Ichi; Adachi, Tetsuya; Oseko, Fumishige; Mazda, Osam; Kanamura, Narisato; Kita, Masakazu

    2016-01-01

    Although many reports have been published on the functional roles of periodontal ligament (PDL) cells, the mechanisms involved in the maintenance and homeostasis of PDL have not been determined. We investigated the effects of biomechanical force on growth factor production, phosphorylation of MAPKs, and intracellular transduction pathways for growth factor production in human periodontal ligament (hPDL) cells using MAPK inhibitors. hPDL cells were exposed to mechanical force (6 MPa) using a hydrostatic pressure apparatus. The levels of growth factor mRNA and protein were examined by real-time RT-PCR and ELISA. The phosphorylation of MAPKs was measured using BD™ CBA Flex Set. In addition, MAPKs inhibitors were used to identify specific signal transduction pathways. Application of biomechanical force (equivalent to occlusal force) increased the synthesis of VEGF-A, FGF-2, and NGF. The application of biomechanical force increased the expression levels of phosphorylated ERK and p38, but not of JNK. Furthermore, the levels of VEGF-A and NGF expression were suppressed by ERK or p38 inhibitor. The growth factors induced by biomechanical force may play a role in the mechanisms of homeostasis of PDL.

  8. Effects of platelet rich plasma (PRP) on human gingival fibroblast, osteoblast and periodontal ligament cell behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Eizaburo; Fujioka-Kobayashi, Masako; Sculean, Anton; Chappuis, Vivianne; Buser, Daniel; Schaller, Benoit; Dőri, Ferenc; Miron, Richard J

    2017-06-02

    The use of platelet rich plasma (PRP, GLO) has been used as an adjunct to various regenerative dental procedures. The aim of the present study was to characterize the influence of PRP on human gingival fibroblasts, periodontal ligament (PDL) cells and osteoblast cell behavior in vitro. Human gingival fibroblasts, PDL cells and osteoblasts were cultured with conditioned media from PRP and investigated for cell migration, proliferation and collagen1 (COL1) immunostaining. Furthermore, gingival fibroblasts were tested for genes encoding TGF-β, PDGF and COL1a whereas PDL cells and osteoblasts were additionally tested for alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, alizarin red staining and mRNA levels of osteoblast differentiation markers including Runx2, COL1a2, ALP and osteocalcin (OCN). It was first found that PRP significantly increased cell migration of all cells up to 4 fold. Furthermore, PRP increased cell proliferation at 3 and 5 days of gingival fibroblasts, and at 3 days for PDL cells, whereas no effect was observed on osteoblasts. Gingival fibroblasts cultured with PRP increased TGF-β, PDGF-B and COL1 mRNA levels at 7 days and further increased over 3-fold COL1 staining at 14 days. PDL cells cultured with PRP increased Runx2 mRNA levels but significantly down-regulated OCN mRNA levels at 3 days. No differences in COL1 staining or ALP staining were observed in PDL cells. Furthermore, PRP decreased mineralization of PDL cells at 14 days post seeding as assessed by alizarin red staining. In osteoblasts, PRP increased COL1 staining at 14 days, increased COL1 and ALP at 3 days, as well as increased ALP staining at 14 days. No significant differences were observed for alizarin red staining of osteoblasts following culture with PRP. The results demonstrate that PRP promoted gingival fibroblast migration, proliferation and mRNA expression of pro-wound healing molecules. While PRP induced PDL cells and osteoblast migration and proliferation, it tended to have

  9. Dietary arginine silicate inositol complex inhibits periodontal tissue loss in rats with ligature-induced periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundar, Serkan; Eltas, Abubekir; Hakki, Sema S; Malkoc, Sıddık; Uslu, M Ozay; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Komorowski, James; Ozercan, I Hanifi; Akdemir, Fatih; Sahin, Kazim

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to induce experimental periodontitis in rats previously fed diets containing arginine silicate inositol (ASI) complex and examine the biochemical, immunological, and radiological effects. Fifty two 8-week-old female Sprague Dawley rats were equally divided into four groups. The control group included those fed a standard rat diet with no operation performed during the experiment. The periodontitis, ASI I, and ASI II groups were subjected to experimental periodontitis induction for 11 days after being fed a standard rat diet alone, a diet containing 1.81 g/kg ASI complex, or a diet containing 3.62 g/kg ASI complex, respectively, for 8 weeks. Throughout the 11-day duration of periodontitis induction, all rats were fed standard feed. The rats were euthanized on the eleventh day, and their tissue and blood samples were collected. In the periodontitis group, elevated tissue destruction parameters and reduced tissue formation parameters were found, as compared to the ASI groups. Levels of enzymes, cytokines, and mediators associated with periodontal tissue destruction were lower in rats fed a diet containing ASI complex after experimental periodontitis. These results indicate that ASI complex could be an alternative agent for host modulation.

  10. Anti-inflammatory and anti-osteoclastogenic effects of zinc finger protein A20 overexpression in human periodontal ligament cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, J-Y; Bae, W-J; Yi, J-K; Kim, G-T; Kim, E-C

    2016-08-01

    Although overexpression of the nuclear factor κB inhibitory and ubiquitin-editing enzyme A20 is thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases, its function in periodontal disease remains unknown. The aims of the present study were to evaluate A20 expression in patients with periodontitis and to study the effects of A20 overexpression, using a recombinant adenovirus encoding A20 (Ad-A20), on the inflammatory response and on osteoclastic differentiation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- and nicotine-stimulated human periodontal ligament cells (hPDLCs). The concentration of prostaglandin E2 was measured by radioimmunoassay. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions and western blot analyses were used to measure mRNA and protein levels, respectively. Osteoclastic differentiation was assessed in mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages using conditioned medium from LPS- and nicotine-treated hPDLCs. A20 was upregulated in the gingival tissues and neutrophils from patients with periodontitis and in LPS- and nicotine-exposed hPDLCs. Pretreatment with A20 overexpression by Ad-A20 markedly attenuated LPS- and nicotine-induced production of prostaglandin E2 , as well as expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and proinflammatory cytokines. Moreover, A20 overexpression inhibited the number and size of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-stained osteoclasts, and downregulated osteoclast-specific gene expression. LPS- and nicotine-induced p38 phosphorylation and nuclear factor κB activation were blocked by Ad-A20. Ad-A20 inhibited the effects of nicotine and LPS on the activation of pan-protein kinase C, Akt, GSK-3β and protein kinase Cα. This study is the first to demonstrate that A20 overexpression has anti-inflammatory effects and blocks osteoclastic differentiation in a nicotine- and LPS-stimulated hPDLC model. Thus, A20 overexpression may be a potential therapeutic target in inflammatory bone loss diseases, such as periodontal disease. © 2015 John Wiley

  11. Effect of micro-nano-hybrid structured hydroxyapatite bioceramics on osteogenic and cementogenic differentiation of human periodontal ligament stem cell via Wnt signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Lixia; Liu, Jiaqiang; Zhao, Jinglei; Chang, Jiang; Xia, Lunguo; Jiang, Lingyong; Wang, Xiuhui; Lin, Kaili; Fang, Bing

    2015-01-01

    The surface structure of bioceramic scaffolds is crucial for its bioactivity and osteoinductive ability, and in recent years, human periodontal ligament stem cells have been certified to possess high osteogenic and cementogenic differential ability. In the present study, hydroxyapatite (HA) bioceramics with micro-nano-hybrid surface (mnHA [the hybrid of nanorods and microrods]) were fabricated via hydrothermal reaction of the α-tricalcium phosphate granules as precursors in aqueous solution, and the effects of mnHA on the attachment, proliferation, osteogenic and cementogenic differentiations of human periodontal ligament stem cells as well as the related mechanisms were systematically investigated. The results showed that mnHA bioceramics could promote cell adhesion, proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and expression of osteogenic/cementogenic-related markers including runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), ALP, osteocalcin (OCN), cementum attachment protein (CAP), and cementum protein (CEMP) as compared to the HA bioceramics with flat and dense surface. Moreover, mnHA bioceramics stimulated gene expression of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) and β-catenin, which are the key genes of canonical Wnt signaling. Moreover, the stimulatory effect on ALP activity and osteogenic and cementogenic gene expression, including that of ALP, OCN, CAP, CEMP, and Runx2 of mnHA bioceramics could be repressed by canonical Wnt signaling inhibitor dickkopf1 (Dkk1). The results suggested that the HA bioceramics with mnHA could act as promising grafts for periodontal tissue regeneration. PMID:26648716

  12. Doxycycline reduces the expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 in the periodontal ligament of the rat incisor without altering the eruption process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, J R; Omar, N F; Neves, J D S; Novaes, P D

    2017-06-01

    Doxycycline is an antibiotic agent that inhibits the activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) present in the extracellular matrix. In this study, the rat incisor was submitted to a hypofunctional condition, and the effects of doxycycline (80 mg/kg/d) on the expression and activity of MMP-2, as well as on eruption rate, were determined in the odontogenic region and in the periodontal ligament for 14 d. Rats were distributed into four groups: normofunctional (NF); doxycyline normofunctional (DNF); hypofunctional (HP); and doxycyline hypofunctional (DHP). The left lower incisors of 10 rats were shortened every 2 d, using a high-rotation drill, to produce the HP and DHP groups, after starting doxycycline treatment (80 mg/kg) by gavage. Eruption was measured using a millimeter ocular, from the gingival margin to the top of the tooth in the HP and DHP groups, and also by a mark made in the tooth previously, in the NF and DNF groups. The hemimandibles were removed and the teeth were extracted to collect the periodontal and odontogenic tissues for immunohistochemical analyses and zymography. The eruption rates were higher in the HP and the DHP groups than in the NF and DNF groups, respectively (p matrix of the periodontal ligament during the tooth-eruption process. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Effects of a low level laser on periodontal tissue in hypofunctional teeth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetaka Hayashi

    Full Text Available Malocclusions, such as an open bite and high canines, are often encountered in orthodontic practice. Teeth without occlusal stimuli are known as hypofunctional teeth, and numerous atrophic changes have been reported in the periodontal tissue, including reductions in blood vessels in the periodontal ligament (PDL, heavy root resorption, and reduced bone mineral density (BMD in the alveolar bone. Low Level Laser (LLL has been shown to have a positive effect on bone formation and the vasculature. Although the recovery of hypofunctional teeth remains unclear, LLL is expected to have a positive influence on periodontal tissue in occlusal hypofunction. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the relationship between LLL and periodontal tissue in occlusal hypofunction. Twenty-four male rats aged 5 weeks were randomly divided into control and hypofunctional groups. An anterior metal cap and bite plate were attached to the maxillary and mandibular incisors in the hypofunctional group to simulate occlusal hypofunction in the molars. LLL irradiation was applied to the maxillary first molar through the gingival sulcus in half of the rats. Rats were divided into four groups; control, control+LLL, hypofunctional, and hypofunctional+LLL. Exposure to LLL irradiation was performed for 3 minutes every other day for 2 weeks. Animals were examined by Micro-CT at 5 and 7 weeks and were subsequently sacrificed. Heads were resected and examined histologically and immunohistologically. The hypofunctional group had obvious stricture of the PDL. However, no significant differences were observed in the PDL and alveolar bone between the hypofunctional+LLL and the control groups. In addition, the expression of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-positive cells were higher in the hypofunctional + LLL group than in the hypofunctional group. These results indicated that LLL enhanced the production of bFGF and VEGF in the

  14. Tissue engineering of ligaments: a comparison of bone marrow stromal cells, anterior cruciate ligament, and skin fibroblasts as cell source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eijk, F; Saris, D B F; Riesle, J; Willems, W J; Van Blitterswijk, C A; Verbout, A J; Dhert, W J A

    2004-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery still has important problems to overcome, such as "donor site morbidity" and the limited choice of grafts in revision surgery. Tissue engineering of ligaments may provide a solution for these problems. Little is known about the optimal cell source for tissue engineering of ligaments. The aim of this study is to determine the optimal cell source for tissue engineering of the anterior cruciate ligament. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), ACL, and skin fibroblasts were seeded onto a resorbable suture material [poly(L-lactide/glycolide) multifilaments] at five different seeding densities, and cultured for up to 12 days. All cell types tested attached to the suture material, proliferated, and synthesized extracellular matrix rich in collagen type I. On day 12 the scaffolds seeded with BMSCs showed the highest DNA content (p engineered ligament.

  15. Tissue engineering of ligaments : A comparison of bone marrow stromal cells, anterior cruciate ligament, and skin fibroblasts as cell source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Eijk, F; Riesle, J; Willems, WJ; Van Blitterswijk, CA; Verbout, AJ; Dhert, WJA

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery still has important problems to overcome, such as "donor site morbidity" and the limited choice of grafts in revision surgery. Tissue engineering of ligaments may provide a solution for these problems. Little is known about the optimal cell

  16. Portland cement induces human periodontal ligament cells to differentiate by upregulating miR-146a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Ching Wang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Purpose: Bioaggregates such as Portland cement (PC can be an economical alternative for mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA with additional benefit of less discoloration. MTA has been known to induce differentiations of several dental cells. MicroRNAs are important regulators of biological processes, including differentiation, physiologic homeostasis, and disease progression. This study is to explore how PC enhances the differentiation of periodontal ligament (PDL cells in microRNAs level. Methods: PDL cells were cultured in a regular PC- or MTA-conditioned medium or an osteoinduction medium (OIM. Alizarin red staining was used to evaluate the extent of mineralization. Transfection of microRNA mimics induced exogenous miR-31 and miR-146a expression. The expression of microRNAs and differentiation markers was assayed using reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Results: PC enhanced the mineralization of PDL cells in a dose-dependent manner in the OIM. Exogenous miR-31 and miR-146a expression upregulated alkaline phosphatase (ALP, bone morphogenic protein (BMP, and dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1 expression. However, miR-31 and miR-146a modulates cementum protein 1 (CEMP1 expression in different ways. PC also enhanced ALP and BMP but attenuated CEMP1 in the OIM. Although the OIM or PC treatment upregulated miR-21, miR-29b, and miR-146a, only miR-146a was able to be induced by PC in combination with OIM. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that PC enhances the differentiation of PDL cells, especially osteogenic through miR-146a upregulation. In order to control the ankylosis after regenerative endodontics with the usage of bioaggregates, further investigations to explore these differentiation mechanisms in the miRNA level may be needed. Keywords: Portland cement, Bioaggregate, miR-146a, Osteogenic differentiation, Periodontal ligament (PDL

  17. Synthesis of collagenase-sensitive polyureas for ligament tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhardt, Hugh; Sears, Nick; Touchet, Tyler; Cosgriff-Hernandez, Elizabeth

    2011-08-11

    Recently, poly(ester urethanes) were investigated for use as ligament grafts due to their exceptional mechanical properties and highly tunable structure; however, these grafts are susceptible to hydrolytic degradation that occurs independent of tissue regeneration. To address this limitation, polyureas containing collagen-derived peptides were synthesized which enable cellular release of proteases to dictate degradation rate. It is hypothesized that this cell-responsive design will facilitate load transfer from the biodegradable scaffold to neotissue at a rate that promotes proper tissue orientation and function while maintaining construct integrity. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Assessment of Periodontal Tissue Status in Patients with Generalized Periodontitis and Essential Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T I Vicharenko

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Vascular disorders play a significant role in the development of dystrophic inflammatory process. There is a direct correlation between the degree of damage to blood vessels in the jaw and a depth of the destructive process in periodontal tissue. A certain role is played by endogenous factors, such as: age, vitamin deficiency, diabetes mellitus, essential hypertension and others. Clinical and epidemiological studies using pathological techniques showed significant changes in vascular wall of the artery in the periodontium, the interdental artery in particular.  Atherosclerosis, essential hypertension and periodontal pathology were proven to occur in individuals older than 40 years. The objective of the research was to determine periodontal tissue status in patients with stage II hypertension and generalized periodontitis of II degree of severity. Materials and methods. The study involved 36 patients with stage II hypertension and generalized periodontitis of II degree of severity (the main group. The patients’ age ranged from 35 to 54 years. The control group included 10 patients of corresponding age without generalized periodontitis and somatic pathology. To assess the status of periodontal tissues, we applied the Papillary-Marginal-Attached Index and the Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs. When diagnosing periodontal disease, the classification of M.F. Danilevskyi was used. Results. The analysis of the indicators of the Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs index showed the following results: in patients of the main group, the index was 2.38±0.07 points (p<0.001 pointing out a need for a course of professional oral hygiene. In patients of the control group, the index was 0.5±0.17 points indicating that there was no need for treatment, however, there was a need for improving oral hygiene. The indicators of the Papillary-Marginal-Attached Index in the main group were 55.49±1.96 points pointing out a severe degree of

  19. Effect of micro-nano-hybrid structured hydroxyapatite bioceramics on osteogenic and cementogenic differentiation of human periodontal ligament stem cell via Wnt signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao LX

    2015-11-01

    -related protein 5 (LRP5 and β-catenin, which are the key genes of canonical Wnt signaling. Moreover, the stimulatory effect on ALP activity and osteogenic and cementogenic gene expression, including that of ALP, OCN, CAP, CEMP, and Runx2 of mnHA bioceramics could be repressed by canonical Wnt signaling inhibitor dickkopf1 (Dkk1. The results suggested that the HA bioceramics with mnHA could act as promising grafts for periodontal tissue regeneration.Keywords: surface topography, periodontal ligament stem cells, Wnt signaling pathway, bioceramics, periodontal reconstruction

  20. A histopathologic investigation on the effects of electrical stimulation on periodontal tissue regeneration in experimental bony defects in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaynak, Deniz; Meffert, Roland; Günhan, Meral; Günhan, Omer

    2005-12-01

    One endpoint of periodontal therapy is to regenerate the structure lost due to periodontal disease. In the periodontium, gingival epithelium is regenerated by oral epithelium. Underlying connective tissue, periodontal ligament, bone, and cementum are derived from connective tissue. Primitive connective tissue cells may develop into osteoblasts and cementoblasts, which form bone and cementum. Several procedural advances may support these regenerations; however, the regeneration of alveolar bone does not always occur. Therefore, bone stimulating factors are a main topic for periodontal reconstructive research. The present study was designed to examine histopathologically whether the application of an electrical field could demonstrate enhanced alveolar and cementum regeneration and modify tissue factors. Seven beagle dogs were used for this experiment. Mandibular left and right sides served as control and experimental sides, respectively, and 4-walled intrabony defects were created bilaterally between the third and fourth premolars. The experimental side was treated with a capacitively coupled electrical field (CCEF) (sinusoidal wave, 60 kHz, and 5 V peak-to-peak), applied for 14 hours per day. The following measurements were performed on the microphotographs: 1) the distance from the cemento-enamel junction to the apical notch (CEJ-AN) and from the crest of newly formed bone (alveolar ridge) to the apical notch (AR-AN); 2) the thickness of new cementum in the apical notch region; and 3) the length of junctional epithelium. The following histopathologic parameters were assessed by a semiquantitative subjective method: 1) inflammatory cell infiltration (ICI); 2) cellular activity of the periodontal ligament; 3) number and morphology of osteoclasts; 4) resorption lacunae; and 5) osteoblastic activity. The results showed that the quantity of new bone fill and the mean value of the thickness of the cementum were significantly higher for the experimental side (P 0

  1. Periodontal tissue engineering strategies based on nonoral stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requicha, João Filipe; Viegas, Carlos Alberto; Muñoz, Fernando; Reis, Rui Luís; Gomes, Manuela Estima

    2014-01-01

    Periodontal disease is an inflammatory disease which constitutes an important health problem in humans due to its enormous prevalence and life threatening implications on systemic health. Routine standard periodontal treatments include gingival flaps, root planning, application of growth/differentiation factors or filler materials and guided tissue regeneration. However, these treatments have come short on achieving regeneration ad integrum of the periodontium, mainly due to the presence of tissues from different embryonic origins and their complex interactions along the regenerative process. Tissue engineering (TE) aims to regenerate damaged tissue by providing the repair site with a suitable scaffold seeded with sufficient undifferentiated cells and, thus, constitutes a valuable alternative to current therapies for the treatment of periodontal defects. Stem cells from oral and dental origin are known to have potential to regenerate these tissues. Nevertheless, harvesting cells from these sites implies a significant local tissue morbidity and low cell yield, as compared to other anatomical sources of adult multipotent stem cells. This manuscript reviews studies describing the use of non-oral stem cells in tissue engineering strategies, highlighting the importance and potential of these alternative stem cells sources in the development of advanced therapies for periodontal regeneration. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Gravity loading induces adenosine triphosphate release and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases in human periodontal ligament cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Mai; Arakawa, Toshiya; Okayama, Miki; Shitara, Akiko; Mizoguchi, Itaru; Takuma, Taishin

    2014-11-01

    The periodontal ligament (PDL) receives mechanical stress (MS) from dental occlusion or orthodontic tooth movement. Mechanical stress is thought to be a trigger for remodeling of the PDL and alveolar bone, although its signaling mechanism is still unclear. So we investigated the effect of MS on adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) phosphorylation in PDL cells. Mechanical stress was applied to human PDL cells as centrifugation-mediated gravity loading. Apyrase, Ca(2+)-free medium and purinergic receptor agonists and antagonists were utilized to analyze the contribution of purinergic receptors to ERK phosphorylation. Gravity loading and ATP increased ERK phosphorylation by 5 and 2.5 times, respectively. Gravity loading induced ATP release from PDL cells by tenfold. Apyrase and suramin diminished ERK phosphorylation induced by both gravity loading and ATP. Under Ca(2+)-free conditions the phosphorylation by gravity loading was partially decreased, whereas ATP-induced phosphorylation was unaffected. Receptors P2Y4 and P2Y6 were prominently expressed in the PDL cells. Gravity loading induced ATP release and ERK phosphorylation in PDL fibroblasts, and ATP signaling via P2Y receptors was partially involved in this phosphorylation, which in turn would enhance gene expression for the remodeling of PDL tissue during orthodontic tooth movement. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Differential Expression of Osteo-Modulatory Molecules in Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells in Response to Modified Titanium Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Yeon Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed differential gene expression of signaling molecules involved in osteogenic differentiation of periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs subjected to different titanium (Ti surface types. PDLSCs were cultured on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS, and four types of Ti discs (PT, SLA, hydrophilic PT (pmodPT, and hydrophilic SLA (modSLA with no osteoinductive factor and then osteogenic activity, including alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity, mRNA expression of runt-related gene 2, osterix, FOSB, FRA1, and protein levels of osteopontin and collagen type IA, were examined. The highest osteogenic activity appeared in PDLSCs cultured on SLA, compared with the TCPS and other Ti surfaces. The role of surface properties in affecting signaling molecules to modulate PDLSC behavior was determined by examining the regulation of Wnt pathways. mRNA expression of the canonical Wnt signaling molecules, Wnt3a and β-catenin, was higher on SLA and modSLA than on smooth surfaces, but gene expression of the calcium-dependent Wnt signaling molecules Wnt5a, calmodulin, and NFATc1 was increased significantly on PT and pmodPT. Moreover, integrin α2/β1, sonic hedgehog, and Notch signaling molecules were affected differently by each surface modification. In conclusion, surface roughness and hydrophilicity can affect differential Wnt pathways and signaling molecules, targeting the osteogenic differentiation of PDLSCs.

  4. Osteogenesis differentiation of human periodontal ligament cells by CO2 laser-treatment stimulating macrophages via BMP2 signalling pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, Wen-Hui; Chen, Yi-Jyun; Hung, Chi-Jr; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Kao, Chia-Tze; Shie, Ming-You

    2014-01-01

    Immune reactions play an important role in determining the biostimulation of bone formation, either in new bone formation or inflammatory fibrous tissue encapsulation. Macrophage cell, the important effector cells in the immune reaction, which are indispensable for osteogenesis and their heterogeneity and plasticity, render macrophages a primer target for immune system modulation. However, there are very few studies about the effects of macrophage cells on laser treatment-regulated osteogenesis. In this study, we used CO 2 laser as a model biostimulation to investigate the role of macrophage cells on the CO 2 laser stimulated osteogenesis. Bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) was also significantly up regulated by the CO 2 laser stimulation, indicating that macrophage may participate in the CO 2 laser stimulated osteogenesis. Interestingly, when laser treatment macrophage-conditioned medium were applied to human periodontal ligament cells (hPDLs), the osteogenesis differentiation of hPDLs was significantly enhanced, indicating the important role of macrophages in CO 2 laser-induced osteogenesis. These findings provided valuable insights into the mechanism of CO 2 laser-stimulated osteogenic differentiation, and a strategy to optimize the evaluation system for the in vitro osteogenesis capacity of laser treatment. (paper)

  5. In vitro characterization of self-assembled anterior cruciate ligament cell spheroids for ligament tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, M; Meier, C; Breier, A; Hahner, J; Heinrich, G; Drechsel, N; Meyer, M; Rentsch, C; Garbe, L-A; Ertel, W; Lohan, A; Schulze-Tanzil, G

    2015-03-01

    Tissue engineering of an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) implant with functional enthesis requires site-directed seeding of different cell types on the same scaffold. Therefore, we studied the suitability of self-assembled three-dimensional spheroids generated by lapine ACL ligament fibroblasts for directed scaffold colonization. The spheroids were characterized in vitro during 14 days in static and 7 days in dynamic culture. Size maintenance of self-assembled spheroids, the vitality, the morphology and the expression pattern of the cells were monitored. Additionally, we analyzed the total sulfated glycosaminoglycan, collagen contents and the expression of the ligament components type I collagen, decorin and tenascin C on protein and for COL1A1, DCN and TNMD on gene level in the spheroids. Subsequently, the cell colonization of polylactide-co-caprolactone [P(LA-CL)] and polydioxanone (PDS) polymer scaffolds was assessed in response to a directed, spheroid-based seeding technique. ACL cells were able to self-assemble spheroids and survive over 14 days. The spheroids decreased in size but not in cellularity depending on the culture time and maintained or even increased their differentiation state. The area of P[LA-CL] scaffolds, colonized after 14 days by the cells of one spheroid, was in average 4.57 ± 2.3 mm(2). Scaffolds consisting of the polymer P[LA-CL] were more suitable for colonization by spheroids than PDS embroideries. We conclude that ACL cell spheroids are suitable as site-directed seeding strategy for scaffolds in ACL tissue engineering approaches and recommend the use of freshly assembled spheroids for scaffold colonization, due to their balanced proliferation and differentiation.

  6. Migration of periodontal ligament fibroblasts on nanometric topographical patterns: influence of filopodia and focal adhesions on contact guidance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas W Hamilton

    Full Text Available Considered to be the "holy grail" of dentistry, regeneration of the periodontal ligament in humans remains a major clinical problem. Removal of bacterial biofilms is commonly achieved using EDTA gels or lasers. One side effect of these treatment regimens is the etching of nanotopographies on the surface of the tooth. However, the response of periodontal ligament fibroblasts to such features has received very little attention. Using laser interference lithography, we fabricated precisely defined topographies with continuous or discontinuous nanogrooves to assess the adhesion, spreading and migration of PDL fibroblasts. PDL fibroblasts adhered to and spread on all tested surfaces, with initial spreading and focal adhesion formation slower on discontinuous nanogrooves. Cells had a significantly smaller planar area on both continuous and discontinuous nanogrooves in comparison with cells on non-patterned controls. At 24 h post seeding, cells on both types of nanogrooves were highly elongated parallel to the groove long axis. Time-lapse video microscopy revealed that PDL fibroblast movement was guided on both types of grooves, but migration velocity was not significantly different from cells cultured on non-patterned controls. Analysis of filopodia formation using time-lapse video microscopy and labeling of vinculin and F-actin revealed that on nanogrooves, filopodia were highly aligned at both ends of the cell, but with increasing time filopodia and membrane protrusions developed at the side of the cell perpendicular to the cell long axis. We conclude that periodontal ligament fibroblasts are sensitive to nanotopographical depths of 85-100 µm, which could be utilized in regeneration of the periodontal ligament.

  7. In vitro cytotoxicity of white MTA, MTA Fillapex® and Portland cement on human periodontal ligament fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Patrícia; Nishiyama, Celso Kenji; Modena, Karin Cristina da Silva; Santos, Carlos Ferreira; Sipert, Carla Renata

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the in vitro cytotoxicity of white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), MTA Fillapex® and Portland cement (PC) on human cultured periodontal ligament fibroblasts. Periodontal ligament fibroblast culture was established and the cells were used for cytotoxic tests after the fourth passage. Cell density was set at 1.25 X10 4 cells/well in 96-well plates. Endodontic material extracts were prepared by placing sealer/cement specimens (5x3mm) in 1mL of culture medium for 72 h. The extracts were then serially two-fold diluted and inserted into the cell-seeded wells for 24, 48 and 72 h. MTT assay was employed for analysis of cell viability. Cell supernatants were tested for nitric oxide using the Griess reagent system. MTA presented cytotoxic effect in undiluted extracts at 24 and 72 h. MTA Fillapex® presented the highest cytotoxic levels with important cell viability reduction for pure extracts and at ½ and ¼ dilutions. In this study, PC did not induce alterations in fibroblast viability. Nitric oxide was detected in extract-treated cell supernatants and also in the extracts only, suggesting presence of nitrite in the soluble content of the tested materials. In the present study, MTA Fillapex displayed the highest cytotoxic effect on periodontal ligament fibroblasts followed by white MTA and PC.

  8. A three-dimensional cell culture model to study the mechano-biological behavior in periodontal ligament regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oortgiesen, D.A.W.; Yu, N.; Bronckers, A.L.J.J.; Yang, F.; Walboomers, X.F.; Jansen, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Periodontitis is a disease affecting the supporting structures of the teeth, which can eventually result in tooth loss. A three-dimensional (3D) tissue culture model was developed that may serve to grow a 3D construct that not only transplants into defective periodontal sites, but also allows to

  9. Verification of γ-Amino-Butyric Acid (GABA) Signaling System Components in Periodontal Ligament Cells In Vivo and In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konermann, Anna; Kantarci, Alpdogan; Wilbert, Steven; Van Dyke, Thomas; Jäger, Andreas

    2016-11-01

    CNS key neurotransmitter γ-amino-butyric acid (GABA) and its signaling components are likewise detectable in non-neuronal tissues displaying inter alia immunomodulatory functions. This study aimed at identifying potential glutamate decarboxylase (GAD)65 and GABA receptor expression in periodontal ligament (PDL) cells in vivo and in vitro, with particular regard to inflammation and mechanical loading. Gene expression was analyzed in human PDL cells at rest or in response to IL-1ß (5 ng/ml) or TNFα (5 ng/ml) challenge via qRT-PCR. Western blot determined constitutive receptor expression, and confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy visualized expression changes induced by inflammation. ELISA quantified GAD65 release. Immunocytochemistry was performed for GABA component detection in vitro on mechanically loaded PDL cells, and in vivo on rat upper jaw biopsies with mechanically induced root resorptions. Statistical significance was set at p GABA B1 , GABA B2 , GABA A1 , and GABA A3 were ubiquitously expressed both on gene and protein level. GABA A2 and GAD65 were undetectable in resting cells, but induced by inflammation. GABA B1 exhibited the highest basal gene expression (6.97 % ± 0.16). IL-1ß markedly increased GABA B2 on a transcriptional (57.28-fold ± 12.40) and protein level seen via fluorescence microscopy. TNFα-stimulated PDL cells released GAD65 (3.68 pg/ml ± 0.17 after 24 h, 5.77 pg/ml ± 0.65 after 48 h). Immunocytochemistry revealed GAD65 expression in mechanically loaded PDL cells. In vivo, GABA components were varyingly expressed in an inflammatory periodontal environment. PDL cells differentially express GABA signaling components and secrete GAD65. Inflammation and mechanical loading regulate these neurotransmitter molecules, which are also detectable in vivo and are potentially involved in periodontal pathophysiology.

  10. Periodontal tissue activation by vibration: intermittent stimulation by resonance vibration accelerates experimental tooth movement in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Makoto; Chiba, Mirei; Ohashi, Toshiro; Sato, Masaaki; Shimizu, Yoshiyuki; Igarashi, Kaoru; Mitani, Hideo

    2008-04-01

    Accelerating the speed of orthodontic tooth movement should contribute to the shortening of the treatment period. This would be beneficial because long treatment times are a negative aspect of orthodontic treatment. In this study, we evaluated the effects of mechanical stimulation by resonance vibration on tooth movement, and we showed the cellular and molecular mechanisms of periodontal ligament responses. The maxillary first molars of 6-week-old male Wistar rats were moved to the buccal side by using an expansive spring for 21 days (n = 6, control group), and the amount of tooth movement was measured. Additional vibrational stimulation (60 Hz, 1.0 m/s(2)) was applied to the first molars by using a loading vibration system for 8 minutes on days 0, 7, and 14 during orthodontic tooth movement (n = 6, experimental group). The animals were killed under anesthesia, and each maxilla was dissected. The specimens were fixed, decalcified, and embedded in paraffin. Sections were used for immunohistochemical analysis of receptor activator of NF kappa B ligand (RANKL) expression. The number of osteoclasts in the alveolar bone was counted by using TRAP staining, and the amount of root resorption was measured in sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin. The average resonance frequency of the maxillary first molar was 61.02 +/- 8.38 Hz. Tooth movement in the experimental group was significantly greater than in the control group (P vibration might accelerate orthodontic tooth movement via enhanced RANKL expression in the periodontal ligament without additional damage to periodontal tissues such as root resorption.

  11. Nrf2 Inhibits Periodontal Ligament Stem Cell Apoptosis under Excessive Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanli Liu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to analyze novel mechanisms underlying Nrf2-mediated anti-apoptosis in periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs in the periodontitis oxidative microenvironment. We created an oxidative stress model with H2O2-treated PDLSCs. We used real-time PCR, Western blotting, TUNEL staining, fluorogenic assay and transfer genetics to confirm the degree of oxidative stress and apoptosis as well as the function of nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2. We demonstrated that with upregulated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS and malondialdehyde (MDA, the effect of oxidative stress was obvious under H2O2 treatment. Oxidative molecules were altered after the H2O2 exposure, whereby the signaling of Nrf2 was activated with an increase in its downstream effectors, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, NAD(PH:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1 and γ-glutamyl cysteine synthetase (γ-GCS. Additionally, the apoptosis levels gradually increased with oxidative stress by the upregulation of caspase-9, caspase-3, Bax and c-Fos levels in addition to the downregulation of Bcl-2. However, there was no alterations in levels of caspase-8. The enhanced antioxidant effect could not mitigate the occurrence of apoptosis. Furthermore, Nrf2 overexpression effectively improved the anti-oxidative levels and increased cell proliferation. At the same time, overexpression effectively restrained TUNEL staining and decreased the molecular levels of caspase-9, caspase-3, Bax and c-Fos, but not that of caspase-8. In contrast, silencing the expression of Nrf2 levels had the opposite effect. Collectively, Nrf2 alleviates PDLSCs via its effects on regulating oxidative stress and anti-intrinsic apoptosis by the activation of oxidative enzymes.

  12. β-cryptoxanthin regulates bone resorption related-cytokine production in human periodontal ligament cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishigaki, Masaru; Yamamoto, Toshiro; Ichioka, Hiroaki; Honjo, Ken-Ichi; Yamamoto, Kenta; Oseko, Fumishige; Kita, Masakazu; Mazda, Osam; Kanamura, Narisato

    2013-07-01

    β-cryptoxanthin (β-cry) is a type of carotenoid found in certain fruits and vegetables. Although it has been shown that β-cry inhibits alveolar bone resorption, the molecular mechanisms for this have not yet been clarified. In the present study, we investigated the effects of β-cry on bone resorption related-cytokine production in human periodontal ligament (hPDL) cells. hPDL cells were stimulated with β-cry (1×10(-7)mol/l), mechanical stress (1 or 6MPa), and P. gingivalis. The production of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, osteoprotegerin (OPG), and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) were analyzed by RT-PCR and ELISA. The production of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α was not induced in hPDL cells after stimulation with β-cry, although these cytokines were produced after stimulation with P. gingivalis. On the other hand, IL-6 and IL-8 were produced after exposure to 6MPa of mechanical stress. The production of IL-6 and IL-8 was significantly decreased by the addition of β-cry. Furthermore, β-cry up-regulated the production of OPG, but not RANKL. β-cry inhibited the production of IL-6 and IL-8 induced by mechanical stress and periodontopathogenic bacteria in hPDL cells. Moreover, β-cry up-regulated OPG production. These results suggest that β-cry may prevent bone resorption in periodontitis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human periodontal ligament cells on akermanite and β-TCP bioceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Xia

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of akermanite as compared to β-TCP on attachment, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of human periodontal ligament cells (hPDLCs. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and actin filament labeling were used to reveal attachment and growth of hPDLCs seeded on β-TCP and akermanite ceramic. Cell proliferation was tested by lactic acid production and MTT analysis, while osteogenic differentiation was assayed by alkaline phosphatase (ALP expression and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR analysis on markers of osteopontin (OPN, dentin matrix acidic phosphoprotein-1 (DMP-1, and osteocalcin (OCN, and further detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent analysis (ELISA analysis for OCN expression. Besides, the ions released from akermanite and their effect on hPDLCs was also measured by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES, MTT analysis, ALP expression and real-time PCR analysis. hPDLCs attached well on both ceramics, but showed better spreading on akermanite. hPDLCs proliferated more rapidly on akermanite than β-TCP. Importantly, osteogenic differentiation of hPDLCs was enhanced on akermanite compared to β-TCP. Besides, Ca, Mg and Si ions were released from akermanite, while only Ca ions were released from β-TCP. Moreover, more pronounced proliferation and higher osteogenic gene expression for hPDLCs cultured with akermanite extract were detected as compared to cells cultured on akermanite. Therefore, akermanite ceramic showed an enhanced effect on proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of hPDLCs, which might be attributed to the release of ions containing Ca, Mg and Si from the material. It is suggested that akermanite ceramics may serve as a potential material for periodontal bone regeneration.

  14. Animal experiment of periodontal tissue remodeling in application of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the present study is to observe the remodeling of periodontal tissue in application of miniimplant anchorage for incisor intrusion in dogs. Six adult male beagle dogs were used for the experiment. On the buccal site, a mini-implant was placed at the interalveolar septum between the maxillary second incisor and ...

  15. Novel strategies in tendon and ligament tissue engineering: Advanced biomaterials and regeneration motifs

    OpenAIRE

    Kuo Catherine K; Marturano Joseph E; Tuan Rocky S

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Tendon and ligaments have poor healing capacity and when injured often require surgical intervention. Tissue replacement via autografts and allografts are non-ideal strategies that can lead to future problems. As an alternative, scaffold-based tissue engineering strategies are being pursued. In this review, we describe design considerations and major recent advancements of scaffolds for tendon/ligament engineering. Specifically, we outline native tendon/ligament characteristics criti...

  16. Streptococcus gordonii lipoproteins induce IL-8 in human periodontal ligament cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, A Reum; Ahn, Ki Bum; Kim, Hyun Young; Seo, Ho Seong; Kum, Kee-Yeon; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2017-11-01

    Streptococcus gordonii, a Gram-positive oral bacterium, is a life-threatening pathogen that causes infective endocarditis. It is frequently isolated from the periapical lesions of patients with apical periodontitis and has thus been implicated in inflammatory responses. However, little is known about the virulence factors of S. gordonii responsible for the induction of inflammatory responses in the periapical areas. Here, we investigated the role of S. gordonii cell wall-associated virulence factors on interleukin (IL)-8 induction in human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells using ethanol-inactivated wild-type S. gordonii, a lipoteichoic acid (LTA)-deficient mutant (ΔltaS), and a lipoprotein-deficient mutant (Δlgt). Wild-type S. gordonii induced IL-8 expression at both the protein and mRNA levels in human PDL cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. A transient transfection and reporter gene assay demonstrated that wild-type S. gordonii activated Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). Additionally, IL-8 production induced by wild-type S. gordonii was substantially inhibited by anti-TLR2-neutralizing antibodies. Both wild-type S. gordonii and the ΔltaS mutant induced IL-8 production; however, this response was not observed when cells were stimulated with the Δlgt mutant. Interestingly, lipoproteins purified from S. gordonii induced IL-8 production, whereas purified LTA did not. In addition, purified lipoproteins stimulated TLR2 more potently than LTA. Furthermore, S. gordonii-induced IL-8 expression was specifically inhibited by blocking p38 kinase, while lipoprotein-induced IL-8 expression was inhibited by blocking p38 kinase, ERK, or JNK. Of particular note, exogenous addition of purified S. gordonii lipoproteins enhanced Δlgt-induced IL-8 production in human PDL cells to an extent similar to that induced by the wild-type strain. Collectively, these results suggest that lipoproteins are an important component of S. gordonii for the induction of IL-8 production in human

  17. Use of rat mature adipocyte-derived dedifferentiated fat cells as a cell source for periodontal tissue regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke eAkita

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Lipid-free fibroblast-like cells, known as dedifferentiated fat (DFAT cells, can be generated from mature adipocytes with a large single lipid droplet. DFAT cells can re-establish their active proliferation ability and can transdifferentiate into various cell types under appropriate culture conditions. The first objective of this study was to compare the multilineage differentiation potential of DFAT cells with that of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs on mesenchymal stem cellsWe obtained DFAT cells and ASCs from inbred rats and found that rat DFAT cells possess higher osteogenic differentiation potential than rat ASCs. On the other hand, DFAT cells show similar adipogenic differentiation, and chondrogenic differentiation potential in comparison with ASCs. The second objective of this study was to assess the regenerative potential of DFAT cells combined with novel solid scaffolds composed of PLGA (Poly d, l-lactic-co-glycolic acid on periodontal tissue, and to compare this with the regenerative potential of ASCs combined with PLGA scaffolds. Cultured DFAT cells and ASCs were seeded onto PLGA scaffolds (DFAT/PLGA and ASCs/PLGA and transplanted into periodontal fenestration defects in rat mandible. Micro computed tomography analysis revealed a significantly higher amount of bone regeneration in the DFAT/PLGA group compared with that of ASCs/PLGA and PLGA-alone groups at 2, 3 and 5 weeks after transplantation. Similarly, histomorphometric analysis showed that DFAT/PLGA groups had significantly greater width of cementum, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone than ASCs/PLGA and PLGA-alone groups. In addition, transplanted fluorescent-labeled DFAT cells were observed in the periodontal ligament beside the newly formed bone and cementum. These findings suggest that DFAT cells have a greater potential for enhancing periodontal tissue regeneration than ASCs. Therefore, DFAT cells are a promising cell source for periodontium regeneration.

  18. Treatment of combined endodontic-periodontic lesions using guided tissue regeneration: clinical case and histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezzi, Carlo; Virzì, Mauro; Schupbach, Peter; Broccaioli, Alessandro; Simion, Massimo

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this case report is to histologically evaluate periapical healing after combined endodontic-periodontic treatment. A maxillary left central incisor was treated with conventional endodontic therapy, followed by periodontal surgery. The facial bony defect was filled with a mixture of autologous bone and Bio-Oss. A resorbable membrane was used. Histology showed the presence of new cementum, ligament, and bone around the apex of the treated tooth. This finding was clinically associated with minimal residual probing depth and maximum attachment gain. This histologic report demonstrates the possibility of true regeneration in a case of severe periodontal attachment loss resulting from an endodontic-periodontic lesion.

  19. Long noncoding RNA TUG1 facilitates osteogenic differentiation of periodontal ligament stem cells via interacting with Lin28A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qin; Yang, Shuangyan; Gu, Xiuge; Li, Mengying; Wang, Chunling; Wei, Fulan

    2018-04-19

    Periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) are mesenchymal stem cells derived from dental tissues with multidirectional differentiation potential and excellent self-renewing ability. Recently, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been shown to play important roles in MSC osteogenic differentiation. In this study, we found that taurine upregulated gene 1 (TUG1), an evolutionarily conserved and widely present lncRNA was significantly upregulated in osteogenically induced PDLSCs compared to their undifferentiated counterparts. Further investigation demonstrated that the expression of TUG1 was positively correlated with the osteogenic differentiation of PDLSCs following the induction, as evidenced by the increase in cellular alkaline phosphatase (ALP) level, formation of calcium nodules, and the upregulation of several osteogenic-related gene markers such as ALP, osteocalcin (OCN), and runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2). Conversely, TUG1 knockdown was demonstrated to inhibit the potential of PDLSCs for osteogenic differentiation. Using bioinformatics analysis, we identified lin-28 homolog A (Lin28A) as a potential target of TUG1 during osteogenic differentiation of PDLSCs. Lin28A was found to be significantly downregulated in TUG1-repressed PDLSCs and contained multiple binding sites for lncRNA TUG1. Moreover, suppression of Lin28A was shown to be able to inhibit osteogenic differentiation and decreased the expression of several osteogenic genes. Taken together, these results could help researchers better understand the mechanism that governs the osteogenic differentiation of PDLSCs, and also serve as a stepping stone for the development of novel therapeutic strategies that can be used to regenerate dental tissues.

  20. Investigation of periodontal tissue during a long space flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovyeva, Zoya; Viacheslav, Ilyin; Skedina, Marina

    Previous studies conducted on the International Space Station found that upon completion of the space flight there are significant changes in the local immunity and periodontal microflora of astronauts. Also research in ground-based experiments that simulate space flight factors showed that prolonged hypokinesia antiorthostatic leads to impaired functional indicators of the periodontal vascular system, an unidirectional change from the microbiota and the immune system. That results in the appearance and progressive increase of the parodontial pathogenic bacteria and increase of the content of immunoglobulins in the oral fluid. All these changes are classified as risk factors for the development of inflammatory periodontal diseases in astronauts. However, the studies were unable to determine whether the changes result from a long space flight and the peculiarities of formation the local immunity and periodontal microbiota during the space flight, or they are one of the specific manifestations of the readaptationary post-flight condition of the body. In this regard, the planned research in a long space flight suggests: to use the means of microbial control, which can retain of the anaerobes periodontal microbiota sampling directly in the space flight; to assess the specificity of changes of the periodontal immune status under the influence of the space flight factors, and to assess the state of microcirculation of periodontal tissue in astronauts. A comprehensive study of the reaction of dentition during the space flight will make it possible to study the pathogenesis of changes for developing an adequate prevention aimed at optimizing the state of dentition of the astronauts.

  1. Evaluation of Periodontal Ligament Cell Viability in Three Different Storage Media: An in Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshi Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was undertaken to evaluate the viability of periodontal ligament (PDL cells of avulsed teeth in three different storage media.Materials and Methods: Forty-five premolars extracted for orthodontic therapeutic purposes were randomly and equally divided into three groups based on storage media used [Group I: milk (control; Group II: aloe vera (experimental; Group III: egg white (experimental]. Following extractions, the teeth were placed in one of the three different storage media for 30 minutes, following which the scrapings of the PDL from these teeth were collected in Falcon tubes containing collagenase enzyme in 2.5 mL of phosphate buffered saline. The tubes were subsequently incubated for 30 minutes and centrifuged for five minutes at 800 rpm. The obtained PDL cells were stained with Trypan Blue and were observed under optical microscope. The percentage of viable cells was calculated.Results: Aloe vera showed the highest percentage of viable cells (114.3±8.0, followed by egg white (100.9±6.3 and milk (101.1±7.3.Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, it appears that aloe vera maintains PDL cell viability better than egg white or milk.

  2. Effect of storage in media with different ion strengths and osmolalities on human periodontal ligament cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomloef, L.; Otteskog, P.; Hammarstroem, L.

    1981-01-01

    The viability of the periodontal ligament (PDL) cells is critical for a successful healing of replanted exarticulated teeth. It is mainly dependent on the duration of the extra-alveolar time and the storage medium. Saliva has usually been recommended as the most suitable storage medium, but recent experimental studies indicate that milk is preferable. In the present study the effect on cultured PDL cells of saliva and milk has been compared with some reference media such as tap water or saline by means of a 3 H-uridine leakage test. Storage in milk or saline was found to cause much less 3 H-uridine leakage than storage in saliva or tap water. Cells stored in milk for 60-180 min showed about the same leakage as cells stored in saline or Hanks' balanced salt solution. Osmolality measurements showed that saliva was hypotonic, while the osmolality of milk ranged within physiological limits. When the osmolality of saliva was increased by addition of NaCl the leakage of the stored cells decreased to the level of cells stored in 0.9% NaCl or milk. (author)

  3. Human platelet lysate supports the formation of robust human periodontal ligament cell sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Bei-Min; Wu, Rui-Xin; Bi, Chun-Sheng; He, Xiao-Tao; Yin, Yuan; Chen, Fa-Ming

    2018-04-01

    The use of stem cell-derived sheets has become increasingly common in a wide variety of biomedical applications. Although substantial evidence has demonstrated that human platelet lysate (PL) can be used for therapeutic cell expansion, either as a substitute for or as a supplement to xenogeneic fetal bovine serum (FBS), its impact on cell sheet production remains largely unexplored. In this study, we manufactured periodontal ligament stem cell (PDLSC) sheets in vitro by incubating PDLSCs in sheet-induction media supplemented with various ratios of PL and FBS, i.e. 10% PL without FBS, 7.5% PL + 2.5% FBS, 5% PL + 5% FBS, 2.5% PL + 7.5% FBS or 10% FBS without PL. Cultures with the addition of all the designed supplements led to successful cell sheet production. In addition, all the resultant cellular materials exhibited similar expression profiles of matrix-related genes and proteins, such as collagen I, fibronectin and integrin β1. Interestingly, the cell components within sheets generated by media containing both PL and FBS exhibited improved osteogenic potential. Following in vivo transplantation, all sheets supported significant new bone formation. Our data suggest that robust PDLSC sheets can be produced by applying PL as either an alternative or an adjuvant to FBS. Further examination of the relevant influences of human PL that benefit cell behaviour and matrix production will pave the way towards optimized and standardized conditions for cell sheet production. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Periodontal Ligament Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Increase Proliferation and Glycosaminoglycans Formation of Temporomandibular Joint Derived Fibrochondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianli Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ disorders are common disease in maxillofacial surgery. The aim of this study is to regenerate fibrocartilage with a mixture of TMJ fibrochondrocytes and periodontal ligament derived mesenchymal stem cells (PD-MSCs. Materials and Methods. Fibrochondrocytes and PD-MSC were cocultured (ratio 1 : 1 for 3 weeks. Histology and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs assay were performed to examine the deposition of GAG. Green florescent protein (GFP was used to track PD-MSC. Conditioned medium of PD-MSCs was collected to study the soluble factors. Gene expression of fibrochondrocytes cultured in conditioned medium was tested by quantitative PCR (qPCR. Results. Increased proliferation of TMJ-CH was observed in coculture pellets when compared to monoculture. Enhanced GAG production in cocultures was shown by histology and GAG quantification. Tracing of GFP revealed the fact that PD-MSC disappears after coculture with TMJ-CH for 3 weeks. In addition, conditioned medium of PD-MSC was also shown to increase the proliferation and GAG deposition of TMJ-CH. Meanwhile, results of qPCR demonstrated that conditioned medium enhanced the expression levels of matrix-related genes in TMJ-CH. Conclusions. Results from this study support the mechanism of MSC-chondrocyte interaction, in which MSCs act as secretor of soluble factors that stimulate proliferation and extracellular matrix deposition of chondrocytes.

  5. Braided nanofibrous scaffold for tendon and ligament tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, John G; Handorf, Andrew M; Allee, Tyler J; Li, Wan-Ju

    2013-06-01

    Tendon and ligament (T/L) injuries present an important clinical challenge due to their intrinsically poor healing capacity. Natural healing typically leads to the formation of scar-like tissue possessing inferior mechanical properties. Therefore, tissue engineering has gained considerable attention as a promising alternative for T/L repair. In this study, we fabricated braided nanofibrous scaffolds (BNFSs) as a potential construct for T/L tissue engineering. Scaffolds were fabricated by braiding 3, 4, or 5 aligned bundles of electrospun poly(L-lactic acid) nanofibers, thus introducing an additional degree of flexibility to alter the mechanical properties of individual scaffolds. We observed that the Young's modulus, yield stress, and ultimate stress were all increased in the 3-bundle compared to the 4- and 5-bundle BNFSs. Interestingly, acellular BNFSs mimicked the normal tri-phasic mechanical behavior of native tendon and ligament (T/L) during loading. When cultured on the BNFSs, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) adhered, aligned parallel to the length of the nanofibers, and displayed a concomitant realignment of the actin cytoskeleton. In addition, the BNFSs supported hMSC proliferation and induced an upregulation in the expression of key pluripotency genes. When cultured on BNFSs in the presence of tenogenic growth factors and stimulated with cyclic tensile strain, hMSCs differentiated into the tenogenic lineage, evidenced most notably by the significant upregulation of Scleraxis gene expression. These results demonstrate that BNFSs provide a versatile scaffold capable of supporting both stem cell expansion and differentiation for T/L tissue engineering applications.

  6. Cellularized cylindrical fiber/hydrogel composites for ligament tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, Patrick S; Dimling, Anna F; Plessl, Daniel S; Hahn, Mariah R; Guelcher, Scott A; Dahlgren, Linda A; Goldstein, Aaron S

    2014-01-13

    Electrospun meshes suffer from poor cell infiltration and limited thickness, which restrict their use to thin tissue applications. Herein, we demonstrate two complementary processes to overcome these limitations and achieve elastomeric composites that may be suitable for ligament repair. First, C3H10T1/2 mesenchymal stem cells were incorporated into electrospun meshes using a hybrid electrospinning/electrospraying process. Second, electrospun meshes were rolled and formed into composites with an interpenetrating polyethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogel network. Stiffer composites were formed from poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) meshes, while softer and more elastic composites were formed from poly(ester-urethane urea) (PEUUR) meshes. As-spun PLGA and PEUUR rolled meshes had tensile moduli of 19.2 ± 1.9 and 0.86 ± 0.34 MPa, respectively, which changed to 11.6 ± 4.8 and 1.05 ± 0.39 MPa with the incorporation of a PEG hydrogel phase. In addition, cyclic tensile testing indicated that PEUUR-based composites deformed elastically to at least 10%. Finally, C3H10T1/2 cells incorporated into electrospun meshes survived the addition of the PEG phase and remained viable for up to 5 days. These results indicate that the fabricated cellularized composites are support cyclic mechanical conditioning, and have potential application in ligament repair.

  7. Silk-Fibroin and Graphene Oxide Composites Promote Human Periodontal Ligament Stem Cell Spontaneous Differentiation into Osteo/Cementoblast-Like Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Sánchez, Mar; Aznar-Cervantes, Salvador; Jover, Eva; García-Bernal, David; Oñate-Sánchez, Ricardo E; Hernández-Romero, Diana; Moraleda, Jose M; Collado-González, Mar; Rodríguez-Lozano, Francisco Javier; Cenis, Jose Luis

    2016-11-15

    Graphene represents one of the most interesting additions to the tissue engineering toolbox. Novel graphene-based composites are required to improve the beneficial graphene properties in terms of tridimensional polymeric structure, conferring a higher mechanical strength and favoring the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells. Here, we have demonstrated in a wide range of composite combinations, the successful use of graphene and silk-fibroin constructs for future bioengineering applications in the field of clinical regenerative dentistry using human periodontal ligament stem cells. Our results provide exciting new data for the development of suitable scaffolds that allow good cell engrafting, preservation of cell viability and proliferation, promotion of spontaneous osteoblastic differentiation, and importantly, stimulation of a higher cementum physiological synthesis than using other different available biomaterials.

  8. Development of a Tissue-Engineered Artificial Ligament: Reconstruction of Injured Rabbit Medial Collateral Ligament With Elastin-Collagen and Ligament Cell Composite Artificial Ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirukawa, Masaki; Katayama, Shingo; Sato, Tatsuya; Inoue, Kota; Niwa, Kosuke; Ito, Naoya; Hattori, Tetsuya; Hosoi, Takashi; Unno, Hironori; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Hasegawa, Masahiro; Miyamoto, Keiichi; Horiuchi, Takashi

    2018-04-16

    Ligament reconstruction using a tissue-engineered artificial ligament (TEAL) requires regeneration of the ligament-bone junction such that fixation devices such as screws and end buttons do not have to be used. The objective of this study was to develop a TEAL consisting of elastin-coated polydioxanone (PDS) sutures covered with elastin and collagen fibers preseeded with ligament cells. In a pilot study, a ring-type PDS suture with a 2.5 mm (width) bone insertion was constructed with/without elastin coating (Ela-coat and Non-coat) and implanted into two bone tunnels, diameter 2.4 mm, in the rabbit tibia (6 cases each) to access the effect of elastin on the bond strength. PDS specimens taken together with the tibia at 6 weeks after implantation indicated growth of bone-like hard tissues around bone tunnels accompanied with narrowing of the tunnels in the Ela-coat group and not in the Non-coat group. The drawout load of the Ela-coat group was significantly higher (28.0 ± 15.1 N, n = 4) than that of the Non-coat group (7.6 ± 4.6 N, n = 5). These data can improve the mechanical bulk property of TEAL through extracellular matrix formation. To achieve this TEAL model, 4.5 × 10 6 ligament cells were seeded on elastin and collagen fibers (2.5 cm × 2.5 cm × 80 µm) prior to coil formation around the elastin-coated PDS core sutures having ball-shape ends with a diameter of 2.5 mm. Cell-seeded and cell-free TEALs were implanted across the femur and the tibia through bone tunnels with a diameter of 2.4 mm (6 cases each). There was no incidence of TEAL being pulled in 6 weeks. Regardless of the remarkable degradation of PDS observed in the cell-seeded group, both the elastic modulus and breaking load of the cell-seeded group (n = 3) were comparable to those of the sham-operation group (n = 8) (elastic modulus: 15.4 ± 1.3 MPa and 18.5 ± 5.7 MPa; breaking load: 73.0 ± 23.4 N and 104.8 ± 21.8 N, respectively) and higher than those

  9. Trefoil factors in saliva and gingival tissues of patients with chronic periodontitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaiyarit, Ponlatham; Chayasadom, Anek; Wara-Aswapati, Nawarat

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Trefoil factors (TFFs) are secreted molecules that are involved in cytoprotection against tissue damage and the immune response. TFFs have been detected in saliva and oral tissues, but their clinical significance has never been investigated in patients with chronic periodontitis....... The objective of this study is to determine whether TFF expression in saliva and gingival tissues is associated with periodontal pathology. METHODS: Saliva and gingival tissue samples were collected from 25 non-periodontitis individuals and 25 patients with chronic periodontitis (CP). Enzyme...... observed in patients with CP (P = 0.003 and P periodontal pathology and number of Porphyromonas gingivalis...

  10. The effects of irradiation on the periodontal tissues of rats with the low calcium diet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Mun Cheol; Lee, Sang Rae

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes of periodontal tissues in the irradiated mandibular bone in rats which were fed normal diet and low calcium diet. In order to carry out this experiment, 64 seven-week old Sprague-Dawley strain rats weighing about 150 gms were selected and equally divided into one experimental group of 32 rats and one control group with the remainder. The experimental group and the control group were then subdivided into two groups when the rats reached the age of 10 weeks, 16 rats were allotted for each subdivided group was composed of 16 rats and exposed to irradiation. The two groups were irradiated a single dose of 20 Gy on the only jaw area and irradiated with a cobalt-60 teletherapy unit. The rats in the control and experimental groups were warily dissected by fours on the 3rd, 7th, the 14th, and the 21st day after irradiation. After each dissection, both sides of the dead rat mandibular bodies were removed and fixed with 10% neutral formalin. The specimens sectioned and observed in histopathological, histochemical, and immunocellular chemical methods. The obtained results were as follows: 1. In the mandibles of rats with low calcium diet the increased number of fibroblasts of periodontal ligaments, many small capillaries and irregular arrangement of loose collagen fibers were detected and the partial resorption of dentin and cementum could be found by the microscopic studies. 2. In the group of irradiated rats, deaerated periodontal tissues led to the condition of irregular arrangement of collagen fibers and the decreased number of fibroblasts. But this condition was somewhat restored after 21 days of experiment. 3. Periodontal tissues of the irradiated rat group with low calcium diet were destroyed earlier than those of the irradiated rat group with normal diet. Soon this condition was restored and then high cellularity and dense collagen fibers were observed. 4. Many periodontal cells bearing tumor necrosis factor

  11. Methodical bias for comparison of periodontal ligament injection and local infiltration anesthesia for routine extractions in the maxilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kämmerer PW

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Peer W Kämmerer, Monika Daubländer Department of Oral, Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgery, University Medical Centre Mainz, Mainz, GermanyWe read the article by Al-Shayyab1 with great interest, though we think that there is a methodical bias. Usage of standard dental syringes with 27-gauge needles is not recommended for periodontal ligament (PDL injections as they are very unlikely to achieve the correct pressure needed for successful single tooth anesthesia. In accordance with this, specialized syringes with short 30-gauge needles are commonly used all over the literature.2 The author addresses this in the “Discussion” section and writes that “a standard conventional dental syringe was used in the present study, not a special PDL syringe, since the former is readily available in the clinic and proves equally successful when a standard 27-gauge short needle was used,” citing Malamed from 1982 (a time during which the modern PDL syringes were not developed yet3 and Madan et al who write that “intraligamentary injection technique is equally effective when a standard 27-gauge needle is used”.4 The second assumption refers to the needle only, not the syringe. In addition, this needle issue is not proven by any reference or study. Therefore, one might come to the conclusion that PDL was not carried out correctly. Also, the authors did not evaluate pulp or tissue anesthesia and started the extraction procedure after a latency period of 5 minutes in all cases. In accordance with this, the success rates of the PDL injection cannot be given, but would be of interest.View the original paper by Al-Shayyab and colleagues.

  12. Increased and correlated expression of connective tissue growth factor and transforming growth factor beta 1 in surgically removed periodontal tissues with chronic periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mize, T W; Sundararaj, K P; Leite, R S; Huang, Y

    2015-06-01

    Both gingival tissue destruction and regeneration are associated with chronic periodontitis, although the former overwhelms the latter. Studies have shown that transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), a growth factor largely involved in tissue regeneration and remodeling, is upregulated in chronic periodontitis. However, the gingival expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF or CCN2), a TGF-β1-upregulated gene, in patients with periodontitis remains undetermined. Although both CTGF/CCN2 and TGF-b1 increase the production of extracellular matrix, they have many different biological functions. Therefore, it is important to delineate the impact of periodontitis on gingival CTGF/CCN2 expression. Periodontal tissue specimens were collected from seven individuals without periodontitis (group 1) and from 14 with periodontitis (group 2). The expression of CTGF and TGFβ1 mRNAs were quantified using real-time PCR. Analysis using the nonparametric Mann-Whitney U-test showed that the levels of expression of both CTGF/CCN2 and TGFβ1 mRNAs were significantly increased in individuals with periodontitis compared with individuals without periodontitis. Furthermore, analysis using a nonparametric correlation (Spearman r) test showed a positive correlation between TGFβ1 and CTGF/CCN2 mRNAs. The gingival expression levels of CTGF/CCN2 and TGFβ1 mRNAs in individuals with periodontitis are upregulated and correlated. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Knee Ligament Injury and the Clinical Application of Tissue Engineering Techniques: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Thomas C; Mafi, Reza; Mafi, Pouya; Khan, Wasim S

    2018-02-23

    The incidence of knee ligament injury is increasing and represents a significant cost to healthcare providers. Current interventions include tissue grafts, suture repair and non-surgical management. These techniques have demonstrated good patient outcomes but have been associated graft rejection, infection, long term immobilization and reduced joint function. The limitations of traditional management strategies have prompted research into tissue engineering of knee ligaments. This paper aims to evaluate whether tissue engineering of knee ligaments offers a viable alternative in the clinical management of knee ligament injuries. A search of existing literature was performed using OVID Medline, Embase, AMED, PubMed and Google Scholar, and a manual review of citations identified within these papers. Silk, polymer and extracellular matrix based scaffolds can all improve graft healing and collagen production. Fibroblasts and stem cells demonstrate compatibility with scaffolds, and have been shown to increase organized collagen production. These effects can be augmented using growth factors and extracellular matrix derivatives. Animal studies have shown tissue engineered ligaments can provide the biomechanical characteristics required for effective treatment of knee ligament injuries. There is a growing clinical demand for a tissue engineered alternative to traditional management strategies. Currently, there is limited consensus regarding material selection for use in tissue engineered ligaments. Further research is required to optimize tissue engineered ligament production before clinical application. Controlled clinical trials comparing the use of tissue engineered ligaments and traditional management in patients with knee ligament injury could determine whether they can provide a cost-effective alternative. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. The Adaptive Nature of the Bone-Periodontal Ligament-Cementum Complex in a Ligature-Induced Periodontitis Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Hyun Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The novel aspect of this study involves illustrating significant adaptation of a functionally loaded bone-PDL-cementum complex in a ligature-induced periodontitis rat model. Following 4, 8, and 15 days of ligation, proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and RANKL, a mineral resorption indicator (TRAP, and a cell migration and adhesion molecule for tissue regeneration (fibronectin within the complex were localized and correlated with changes in PDL-space (functional space. At 4 days of ligation, the functional space of the distal complex was widened compared to controls and was positively correlated with an increased expression of TNF-α. At 8 and 15 days, the number of RANKL(+ cells decreased near the mesial alveolar bone crest (ABC but increased at the distal ABC. TRAP(+ cells on both sides of the complex significantly increased at 8 days. A gradual change in fibronectin expression from the distal PDL-secondary cementum interfaces through precementum layers was observed when compared to increased and abrupt changes at the mesial PDL-cementum and PDL-bone interfaces in ligated and control groups. Based on our results, we hypothesize that compromised strain fields can be created in a diseased periodontium, which in response to prolonged function can significantly alter the original bone and apical cementum formations.

  15. Porphyromonas gingivalis GroEL induces osteoclastogenesis of periodontal ligament cells and enhances alveolar bone resorption in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Yen Lin

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis is a major periodontal pathogen that contains a variety of virulence factors. The antibody titer to P. gingivalis GroEL, a homologue of HSP60, is significantly higher in periodontitis patients than in healthy control subjects, suggesting that P. gingivalis GroEL is a potential stimulator of periodontal disease. However, the specific role of GroEL in periodontal disease remains unclear. Here, we investigated the effect of P. gingivalis GroEL on human periodontal ligament (PDL cells in vitro, as well as its effect on alveolar bone resorption in rats in vivo. First, we found that stimulation of PDL cells with recombinant GroEL increased the secretion of the bone resorption-associated cytokines interleukin (IL-6 and IL-8, potentially via NF-κB activation. Furthermore, GroEL could effectively stimulate PDL cell migration, possibly through activation of integrin α1 and α2 mRNA expression as well as cytoskeletal reorganization. Additionally, GroEL may be involved in osteoclastogenesis via receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligand (RANKL activation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP mRNA inhibition in PDL cells. Finally, we inoculated GroEL into rat gingiva, and the results of microcomputed tomography (micro-CT and histomorphometric assays indicated that the administration of GroEL significantly increased inflammation and bone loss. In conclusion, P. gingivalis GroEL may act as a potent virulence factor, contributing to osteoclastogenesis of PDL cells and resulting in periodontal disease with alveolar bone resorption.

  16. The Plastic Nature of the Human Bone-Periodontal Ligament-Tooth Fibrous Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Sunita P.; Kurylo, Michael P.; Grandfield, Kathryn; Hurng, Jonathan; Herber, Ralf-Peter; Ryder, Mark I.; Altoe, Virginia; Aloni, Shaul; Feng, Jian Q. (Jerry); Webb, Samuel; Marshall, Grayson W.; Curtis, Donald; Andrews, Joy C.; Pianetta, Piero

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates bony protrusions within a narrowed periodontal ligament space (PDL-space) of a human bone-PDL-tooth fibrous joint by mapping structural, biochemical, and mechanical heterogeneity. Higher resolution structural characterization was achieved via complementary atomic force microscopy (AFM), nano transmission X-ray microscopy (nano-TXM), and micro tomography (Micro XCT™). Structural heterogeneity was correlated to biochemical and elemental composition, illustrated via histochemistry and microprobe X-ray fluorescence analysis (μ-XRF), and mechanical heterogeneity evaluated by AFM-based nanoindentation. Results demonstrated that the narrowed PDL-space was due to invasion of bundle bone (BB) into PDL-space. Protruded BB had a wider range with higher elastic modulus values (2-8 GPa) compared to lamellar bone (0.8-6 GPa), and increased quantities of Ca, P and Zn as revealed by μ-XRF. Interestingly, the hygroscopic 10-30 μm interface between protruded BB and lamellar bone exhibited higher X-ray attenuation similar to cement lines and lamellae within bone. Localization of the small leucine rich proteoglycan biglycan (BGN) responsible for mineralization was observed at the PDL-bone interface and around the osteocyte lacunae. Based on these results, it can be argued that the LB-BB interface was the original site of PDL attachment, and that the genesis of protruded BB identified as protrusions occurred as a result of shift in strain. We emphasize the importance of bony protrusions within the context of organ function and that additional study is warranted. PMID:24063947

  17. Redefining orthodontic space closure: sequential repetitive loading of the periodontal ligament--a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalha, Anmol S; Kachiwala, Viral Ashok; Govardhan, Singatagere Nagaraj; McLaughlin, Richard P; Khurshaid, Syed Zameer

    2010-01-01

    To assess the rate of tooth movement, anchorage loss, root resorption, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) as a marker for bone remodeling during orthodontic space closure using two different mechanisms. Space closure was completed in 20 patients with extraction of all 4 premolars. Lateral cephalograms and radio-visiographs taken before (T1) and after (T2) space closure were assessed for anchorage loss and root resorption. Alkaline phosphatase levels were measured in 10 patients, which were divided into two groups of five each. Spaces were closed with a screw device in the first group and with active tie-backs in the second. Gingival crevicular fluid samples, collected at intervals, were assayed for alkaline phosphatase spectrophotometrically in each patient. The mean rate of tooth movement was 1.32 ± 0.22 mm/month. The mean amount of anchorage loss in the maxilla and mandible was 1.23 ± 0.60 mm and 1.08 ± 0.65 mm, respectively. Sixty (25%) roots showed no root resorption, while 180 (75%) roots displayed mild to moderate blunting of their apices. Gingival crevicular fluid-alkaline phosphatase level increased significantly from day 7 to day 28 in both groups, but significantly more in the screw retraction group (Pspace closure occurs more rapidly with sequential repetitive loading of the periodontal ligament than with conventional active tie-backs. This observation is in concurrence with a significant increase in the gingival crevicular fluid-alkaline phosphatase level. © 2010 BY QUINTESSENCE PUBLISHING CO, INC.

  18. The Relationship Between Periodontal Disease and Neoplasms of the Oral Cavity: A Review Article

    OpenAIRE

    Nourelahi; Roshannia; Kameli; Hormozi

    2016-01-01

    Context Oral cavity is one of the most common sites for neoplasms with a multifactorial etiology. Tobacco and alcohol are the main risk factors. Periodontal disease is an inflammatory disease affecting periodontal tissues such as gingiva, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone. Periodontal disease is linked to many systemic diseases. Recently a link between periodontal disease and cancer is suggested. The current review article aimed to evaluate the association between periodonta...

  19. Novel chitosan/collagen scaffold containing transforming growth factor-β1 DNA for periodontal tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yufeng; Cheng Xiangrong; Wang Jiawei; Wang Yining; Shi Bin; Huang Cui; Yang Xuechao; Liu Tongjun

    2006-01-01

    The current rapid progression in tissue engineering and local gene delivery system has enhanced our applications to periodontal tissue engineering. In this study, porous chitosan/collagen scaffolds were prepared through a freeze-drying process, and loaded with plasmid and adenoviral vector encoding human transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). These scaffolds were evaluated in vitro by analysis of microscopic structure, porosity, and cytocompatibility. Human periodontal ligament cells (HPLCs) were seeded in this scaffold, and gene transfection could be traced by green fluorescent protein (GFP). The expression of type I and type III collagen was detected with RT-PCR, and then these scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously into athymic mice. Results indicated that the pore diameter of the gene-combined scaffolds was lower than that of pure chitosan/collagen scaffold. The scaffold containing Ad-TGF-β1 exhibited the highest proliferation rate, and the expression of type I and type III collagen up-regulated in Ad-TGF-β1 scaffold. After implanted in vivo, EGFP-transfected HPLCs not only proliferated but also recruited surrounding tissue to grow in the scaffold. This study demonstrated the potential of chitosan/collagen scaffold combined Ad-TGF-β1 as a good substrate candidate in periodontal tissue engineering

  20. * Fabrication and Characterization of Biphasic Silk Fibroin Scaffolds for Tendon/Ligament-to-Bone Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font Tellado, Sònia; Bonani, Walter; Balmayor, Elizabeth R; Foehr, Peter; Motta, Antonella; Migliaresi, Claudio; van Griensven, Martijn

    2017-08-01

    Tissue engineering is an attractive strategy for tendon/ligament-to-bone interface repair. The structure and extracellular matrix composition of the interface are complex and allow for a gradual mechanical stress transfer between tendons/ligaments and bone. Thus, scaffolds mimicking the structural features of the native interface may be able to better support functional tissue regeneration. In this study, we fabricated biphasic silk fibroin scaffolds designed to mimic the gradient in collagen molecule alignment present at the interface. The scaffolds had two different pore alignments: anisotropic at the tendon/ligament side and isotropic at the bone side. Total porosity ranged from 50% to 80% and the majority of pores (80-90%) were ligament, enthesis, and cartilage markers significantly changed depending on pore alignment in each region of the scaffolds. In conclusion, the biphasic scaffolds fabricated in this study show promising features for tendon/ligament-to-bone tissue engineering.

  1. [Application of silk-based tissue engineering scaffold for tendon / ligament regeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yejun; Le, Huihui; Jin, Zhangchu; Chen, Xiao; Yin, Zi; Shen, Weiliang; Ouyang, Hongwei

    2016-03-01

    Tendon/ligament injury is one of the most common impairments in sports medicine. The traditional treatments of damaged tissue repair are unsatisfactory, especially for athletes, due to lack of donor and immune rejection. The strategy of tissue engineering may break through these limitations, and bring new hopes to tendon/ligament repair, even regeneration. Silk is a kind of natural biomaterials, which has good biocompatibility, wide range of mechanical properties and tunable physical structures; so it could be applied as tendon/ligament tissue engineering scaffolds. The silk-based scaffold has robust mechanical properties; combined with other biological ingredients, it could increase the surface area, promote more cell adhesion and improve the biocompatibility. The potential clinical application of silk-based scaffold has been confirmed by in vivo studies on tendon/ligament repairing, such as anterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament, achilles tendon and rotator cuff. To develop novel biomechanically stable and host integrated tissue engineered tendon/ligament needs more further micro and macro studies, combined with product development and clinical application, which will give new hope to patients with tendon/ligament injury.

  2. Root Conditioning and Agents Effect in Regeneration of Periodontal Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadkhoda Z

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis affected root surfaces are hypermineralized and contaminated with cytotoxic and"nother biologically active substances."nThe instrumented surface will inervitably be coverd by a smear layer following root planing with or without flap."nSmear layer is resistant to saline rinsing, but may be removed with agents such as acids (e.g.citric acid, tetracyclines, EDTA, and laser."nLow pH aqueous solutions such as citric acid have been used in surgical periodontal therapy mainly for two reasons, It dissolves smear layer after a relatively short exposure time and it has been claimed to selectively remove root surface associated mineral exposing collagen to varying degrees. A root surface coated with collagen appears to be a preferred surface for fibroblast attachment, a cellular event fundamental to successful periodontal wound healing."nSeveral studies indicate the potential of tetracycline (TTE-HCL in periodontal regeneration. Its acidic pH suggest that it can be used as a demineralization agent and removing the smear layer and exposing collagen matrix of the dentin."nChalating agent (EDTA working at neutral pH appears preferable with respect to preserving the integrity of exposed collagen fibers, early colonization, and wound healing. In addition, etching at neutral pH has been reported preserve adjacent tissue- vitality, while etching at low pH necrotizes the fiap and adjacent periodontium."nClinical and subclinical studies have demonstrated laser waves can remove calculus and bacterial plaque and pocket epithelium and strile the root surface and can expose the dentin collagen and dentinal tublules, and leads to pronounce reducing of probing depth around teeth diseased with periodontitis.

  3. Human Periodontal Ligament- and Gingiva-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Promote Nerve Regeneration When Encapsulated in Alginate/Hyaluronic Acid 3D Scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Sahar; Diniz, Ivana M; Chen, Chider; Sarrion, Patricia; Tamayol, Ali; Wu, Benjamin M; Moshaverinia, Alireza

    2017-12-01

    Repair or regeneration of damaged nerves is still a challenging clinical task in reconstructive surgeries and regenerative medicine. Here, it is demonstrated that periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) and gingival mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs) isolated from adult human periodontal and gingival tissues assume neuronal phenotype in vitro and in vivo via a subcutaneous transplantation model in nude mice. PDLSCs and GMSCs are encapsulated in a 3D scaffold based on alginate and hyaluronic acid hydrogels capable of sustained release of human nerve growth factor (NGF). The elasticity of the hydrogels affects the proliferation and differentiation of encapsulated MSCs within scaffolds. Moreover, it is observed that PDLSCs and GMSCs are stained positive for βIII-tubulin, while exhibiting high levels of gene expression related to neurogenic differentiation (βIII-tubulin and glial fibrillary acidic protein) via quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Western blot analysis shows the importance of elasticity of the matrix and the presence of NGF in the neurogenic differentiation of encapsulated MSCs. In vivo, immunofluorescence staining for neurogenic specific protein markers confirms islands of dense positively stained structures inside transplanted hydrogels. As far as it is known, this study is the first demonstration of the application of PDLSCs and GMSCs as promising cell therapy candidates for nerve regeneration. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. The effects of modeling simplifications on craniofacial finite element models: the alveoli (tooth sockets) and periodontal ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Sarah A; Strait, David S; Dumont, Elizabeth R; Ross, Callum F; Grosse, Ian R

    2011-07-07

    Several finite element models of a primate cranium were used to investigate the biomechanical effects of the tooth sockets and the material behavior of the periodontal ligament (PDL) on stress and strain patterns associated with feeding. For examining the effect of tooth sockets, the unloaded sockets were modeled as devoid of teeth and PDL, filled with teeth and PDLs, or simply filled with cortical bone. The third premolar on the left side of the cranium was loaded and the PDL was treated as an isotropic, linear elastic material using published values for Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio. The remaining models, along with one of the socket models, were used to determine the effect of the PDL's material behavior on stress and strain distributions under static premolar biting and dynamic tooth loading conditions. Two models (one static and the other dynamic) treated the PDL as cortical bone. The other two models treated it as a ligament with isotropic, linear elastic material properties. Two models treated the PDL as a ligament with hyperelastic properties, and the other two as a ligament with viscoelastic properties. Both behaviors were defined using published stress-strain data obtained from in vitro experiments on porcine ligament specimens. Von Mises stress and strain contour plots indicate that the effects of the sockets and PDL material behavior are local. Results from this study suggest that modeling the sockets and the PDL in finite element analyses of skulls is project dependent and can be ignored if values of stress and strain within the alveolar region are not required. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cytotoxicity of newly developed pozzolan cement and other root-end filling materials on human periodontal ligament cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minju Song

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vitro cytotoxicity of the pozzolan cement and other root-end filling materials using human periodontal ligament cell. Materials and Methods Endocem (Maruchi, white ProRoot MTA (Dentsply, white Angelus MTA (Angelus, and Super EBA (Bosworth Co. were tested after set completely in an incubator at 37℃ for 7 days, Endocem was tested in two ways: 1 immediately after mixing (fresh specimens and 2 after setting completely like other experimental materials. The methods for assessment included light microscopic examination, cell counting and WST-1 assay on human periodontal ligament cell. Results In the results of microscopic examination and cell counting, Super EBA showed significantly lower viable cell than any other groups (p < 0.05. As the results of WST-1 assay, compared with untreated control group, there was no significant cell viability of the Endocem group. However, the fresh mixed Endocem group had significantly less cell viability. The cells exposed to ProRoot MTA and Angelus MTA showed the highest viability, whereas the cells exposed to Super EBA displayed the lowest viability (p < 0.05. Conclusions The cytotoxicity of the pozzolan cement (Endocem was comparable with ProRoot MTA and Angelus MTA. Considering the difficult manipulation and long setting time of ProRoot MTA and Angelus MTA, Endocem can be used as the alternative of retrofilling material.

  6. Acute changes in intra-alveolar tooth position and local clearance of 125I from the periodontal ligament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwall, B.; Berg, J.O.; Gazelius, B.; Edwall, L.; Aars, H.

    1987-01-01

    Changes in intra-alveolar tooth position and local 125 I clearance from the periodontal ligament (PDL) were monitored simultaneously in cats. Axial tooth movements, reflecting periodontal ligament volume changes, were measured with an ultrasonic transit time technique. Local blood flow changes in the PDL were studied indirectly by measuring the local clearance of 125 I. Stimulation of the cervical sympathetic trunk caused an intrusive movement of the tooth with a concomitant reduction of the 125 I-clearance. Infusion of noradrenaline induced a similar respone. Stimulation of the inferior alveolar nerve during systemic treatment with phentolamine caused an extrusive movement of the tooth with a concomitant increase in the clearance of the tracer from the PDL. Intra-arterial infusion of the vasodilator substance P mimicked that response. Fization of the tooth to the jaw bone, thus preventing an intrusive movement, did not change the reductions in clearance seen on sympathetic stimulation, indicating that this blood flow reduction was not dependent on tooth movement. A qualitative relation between PDL blood flow (as measured by local 125 I clearance) and PDL volume (as measured by tooth position) in shown. The two variables measured are suggested to reflect two aspects of blood flow in the PDL

  7. Gram-negative periodontal bacteria induce the activation of Toll-like receptors 2 and 4, and cytokine production in human periodontal ligament cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ying; Shu, Rong; Li, Chao-Lun; Zhang, Ming-Zhu

    2010-10-01

    Periodontitis is a bacterially induced chronic inflammatory disease. Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which could recognize microbial pathogens, are important components in the innate and adaptive immune systems. Both qualitatively and quantitatively distinct immune responses might result from different bacteria stimulation and the triggering of different TLRs. This study explores the interaction of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (previously Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans) with TLR2 and TLR4. We studied the gene expression changes of TLR2 and TLR4 and cytokine production (interleukin-1β, -6, -8, -10, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha) in human periodontal ligament cells (HPDLCs) stimulated with heat-killed bacteria or P. gingivalis lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the presence or absence of monoclonal antibodies to TLR2 or TLR4 (anti-TLR2/4 mAb). Both test bacteria and 10 microg/ml P. gingivalis LPS treatment increased the gene expression of TLR2 and TLR4 and cytokine production in HPDLCs. In addition, these upregulations could be blocked by anti-TLR2/4 mAb. However, the expression of TLR4 mRNA in HPDLCs stimulated with 1 microg/ml P. gingivalis LPS was not increased. No differences were found in the cytokine production caused by 1 microg/ml P. gingivalis LPS treatment in the presence or absence of anti-TLR4 mAb. These patterns of gene expression and cytokine production indicate that Gram-negative periodontal bacteria or their LPS might play a role in triggering TLR2 and/or TLR4, and be of importance for the immune responses in periodontitis.

  8. Tissue engineered devices for ligament repair, replacement and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-29

    Dec 29, 2009 ... These devices use a wide variety of materials and designs to replicate ligament ... other during the application of strain, leading to viscous dissipation of stress at low ... low strains without straining the collagen molecules and plastically ..... anterior cruciate ligament: current and future concepts. New York:.

  9. A clinically translatable concept for periodontal ligament engineering around dental implants : The characterization of patient-friendly materials with optimal biomechanical properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, T.

    2017-01-01

    The periodontal ligament (PDL) connects the tooth to the alveolar bone. It functions as a shock absorber, forms a barrier against pathogens, and provides sensory information. These capacities are lost when the PDL is damaged, or when teeth are lost. Replacing missing teeth with dental implants is

  10. Effect of irradiation on the periodontal tissues in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Dong Sin; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae

    2005-01-01

    To observe the histopathological changes in the periodontal tissues of mandibular molars in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats after irradiation. The male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing approximately 250 gm were divided into four groups; control, diabetes, irradiation, and diabetes - irradiation groups. Diabetes mellitus was induced in the rats by injecting streptozotocin. Rats in the control and irradiation groups were injected with citrate buffer only. After 5 days, the head and neck region of the rats in irradiation and diabetes - irradiation groups were irradiated with a single absorbed dose of 10 Gy. All the rats were sacrificed at 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days after irradiation. The specimen including the mandibular molars were sectioned and observed using a histopathological method. In the diabetes group, osteoclastic activity was observed in the alveolar bone and the root throughout the period of experiment. Also, osteoblastic and fibroblastic activities were markedly decreased. In the irradiation group, the osteoclasts were observed in the alveolar bone and the dilated capillaries were increased in the early experimental phases. However, vigorous osteoblastic activity was noted in the late experimental phases. In the diabetes- irradiation group, osteoblastic activity in the alveolar bone and the root was observed in the early experimental phases. However, there were no resorption and osteoblastic activity in the alveolar bone and the root in the late experimental phases, and obvious atrophic change of fibrous tissues was noted. This experiment suggests that osteoblastic activity was caused by irradiation in the late experimental phases, but atrophic change of the periodontal ligament tissues was induced after irradiation in diabetic state.

  11. Periodontal bacteria DNA findings in human cardiac tissue - Is there a link of periodontitis to heart valve disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziebolz, D; Jahn, C; Pegel, J; Semper-Pinnecke, E; Mausberg, R F; Waldmann-Beushausen, R; Schöndube, F A; Danner, B C

    2018-01-15

    The aim of the study was to detect periodontal pathogens DNA in atrial and myocardial tissue, and to investigate periodontal status and their connection to cardiac tissue inflammation. In 30 patients, biopsy samples were taken from the atrium (A) and the ventricle myocardium (M) during aortic valve surgery. The dental examination included the dental and periodontal status (PS) and a collection of a microbiological sample. The detection of 11 periodontal pathogens DNA in oral and heart samples was carried out using PCR. The heart samples were prepared for detecting the LPS-binding protein (LBP), and for inflammation scoring on immunohistochemistry (IHC), comprising macrophages (CD68), LPS-binding protein receptor (CD14), and LBP (big42). 28 (93%) patients showed moderate to severe periodontitis. The periodontal pathogens in the oral samples of all patients revealed a similar distribution (3-93%). To a lesser extent and with a different distribution, these bacteria DNA were also detected in atrium and myocardium (3-27%). The LBP was detected in higher amount in atrium (0.22±0.16) versus myocardium (0.13±0.13, p=0.001). IHC showed a higher inflammation score in atrial than myocardial tissue as well as for CD14, CD68 and for LBP. Additional, periodontal findings showed a significant correlation to CD14 and CD68. The results provide evidence of the occurrence of oral bacteria DNA at the cardiac tissue, with a different impact on atrial and myocardial tissue inflammation. Influence of periodontal findings was identified, but their relevance is not yet distinct. Therefore further clinical investigations with long term implication are warranted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Dental Investigations: Efficiency of Nonsurgical Periodontal Therapy in Moderate Chronic Periodontitis

    OpenAIRE

    Mlachkova Antoaneta M.; Popova Christina L.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Chronic periodontitis is defined as an inflammatory disease of the supporting tissues of teeth caused by microorganisms in the dental biofilm, resulting in progressive destruction of the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone with pocket formation and gingival recession. Treatment of chronic periodontitis aims at arresting the inflammation and stopping the loss of attachment by removal and control of the supra- and subgingival biofilm and establishing a local environment and mic...

  13. Tissue engineered devices for ligament repair, replacement and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-29

    Dec 29, 2009 ... available, and the success rates for long term clinical outcome are 85 - 90% ... Schematic of a stress-strain curve for ligament or tendon displaying the toe, ...... monkey: I. A model for chronic xenograft rejection. Transplantation,.

  14. Distribution of lymphatic tissues and autonomic nerves in supporting ligaments around the cervix uteri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianping; Feng, Lanlan; Lu, Yi; Guo, Dongxia; Xi, Tengteng; Wang, Xiaochun

    2013-05-01

    To investigate the distribution of lymphatic tissues and nerves in the supporting ligaments around the cervix uteri for their tomographical relationship, 9 adult female cadavers were used in this study. Following the incision of all supporting ligaments around the cervix, hematoxylin and esosin (H&E) and immunohistochemical staining of various sections of these ligaments was performed to enable the distribution of lymph tissues and autonomic nerves to be observed. Four lymph nodes were identified in three cadaver specimens. Three lymph nodes were present at a distance of 2.0 cm from the cervix in the cranial side of the cardinal ligaments (CLs), and one lymph node was located at a distance of 4.0 cm from the cervix in the cranial side of the uterosacral ligament (USL). The lymphatic vessels were dispersed in the CLs, scattered in the cervical side of the USLs, and occasionally distributed in the vesicouterine ligaments (VULs). In the CLs, parasympathetic nerves were located at the pelvic lateral wall and went downwards and medially into the cervix, while sympathetic fibers were located in the middle and lower parts of the ligaments. In the USLs, the autonomic nerves, which consisted primarily of sympathetic fibers, went downwards and laterally from the pelvic wall to the cervix. In the VULs, parasympathetic and sympathetic nerves were located in the inner sides of the vesical veins in the deep layers of the ligaments. It is concluded that there are few lymphatic tissues in the supporting ligaments around the cervix uteri, and that nerve‑sparing radical hysterectomy (NSRH) may be a safe method for the treatment of early‑stage cervical cancer.

  15. Mastication and the Postorbital Ligament: Dynamic Strain in Soft Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, Susan W.; Rafferty, Katherine L.; Liu, Zi Jun; Lemme, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Although the FEED database focuses on muscle activity patterns, it is equally suitable for other physiological recording and especially for synthesizing different types of information. The present contribution addresses the interaction between muscle activity and ligamentary stretch during mastication. The postorbital ligament is the thickened edge of a septum dividing the orbital contents from the temporal fossa and is continuous with the temporal fascia. As a tensile element, this fascial complex could support the zygomatic arch against the pull of the masseter muscle. An ossified postorbital bar has evolved repeatedly in mammals, enabling resistance to compression and shear in addition to tension. Although such ossification clearly reinforces the skull against muscle pull, the most accepted explanation is that it helps isolate the orbital contents from contractions of the temporalis muscle. However, it has never been demonstrated that the contraction of jaw muscles deforms the unossified ligament. We examined linear deformation of the postorbital ligament in minipigs, Sus scrofa, along with electromyography of the jaw muscles and an assessment of changes in pressure and shape in the temporalis. During chewing, the ligament elongated (average 0.9%, maximum 2.8%) in synchrony with the contraction of the elevator muscles of the jaw. Although the temporalis bulged outward and created substantial pressure against the braincase, the superficial fibers usually retracted caudally, away from the postorbital ligament. In anesthetized animals, stimulating either the temporalis or the masseter muscle in isolation usually elongated the ligament (average 0.4–0.7%). These results confirm that contraction of the masticatory muscles can potentially distort the orbital contents and further suggest that the postorbital ligament does function as a tension member resisting the pull of the masseter on the zygomatic arch. PMID:21593142

  16. Bioactive nanofibers for fibroblastic differentiation of mesenchymal precursor cells for ligament/tendon tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Sambit; Ang, Lay-Teng; Cho-Hong Goh, James; Toh, Siew-Lok

    2010-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells and precursor cells are ideal candidates for tendon and ligament tissue engineering; however, for the stem cell-based approach to succeed, these cells would be required to proliferate and differentiate into tendon/ligament fibroblasts on the tissue engineering scaffold. Among the various fiber-based scaffolds that have been used in tendon/ligament tissue engineering, hybrid fibrous scaffolds comprising both microfibers and nanofibers have been recently shown to be particularly promising. With the nanofibrous coating presenting a biomimetic surface, the scaffolds can also potentially mimic the natural extracellular matrix in function by acting as a depot for sustained release of growth factors. In this study, we demonstrate that basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) could be successfully incorporated, randomly dispersed within blend-electrospun nanofibers and released in a bioactive form over 1 week. The released bioactive bFGF activated tyrosine phosphorylation signaling within seeded BMSCs. The bFGF-releasing nanofibrous scaffolds facilitated BMSC proliferation, upregulated gene expression of tendon/ligament-specific ECM proteins, increased production and deposition of collagen and tenascin-C, reduced multipotency of the BMSCs and induced tendon/ligament-like fibroblastic differentiation, indicating their potential in tendon/ligament tissue engineering applications. 2009 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Treatment of Angle Class I Malocclusion with Severe Bimaxillary Protrusion using Miniscrew Implants and Periodontal Ligament Distraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K C Prabhat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bimaxillary dentoalveolar protrusion is common in Asian population. In this patient with procumbent upper and lower lips, excessive lip strain, proclined and protruded maxillary and mandibular incisors with vertical growth pattern, an acceptable treatment result, was achieved with 4-first-premolar extractions. This case report is presented with the aim, to describe the treatment approach for bimaxillary dentoalveolar protrusion using miniscrew implants for anchorage in upper arch and periodontal ligament distraction for canine retraction in lower arch and then retraction of incisors into the newly formed bone distal to lateral incisor. Treatment was completed in 18 months. The patient profile was improved, with reduction in lip procumbency, decrease in lip eversion and protrusion, and decrease mentalis strain. Dentally, the interincisal angulation improved significantly because both the maxillary and mandibular incisors were uprighted after space closer.

  18. Guided tissue regeneration for periodontal infra-bony defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needleman, I G; Worthington, H V; Giedrys-Leeper, E; Tucker, R J

    2006-04-19

    Conventional treatment of destructive periodontal (gum) disease arrests the disease but does not usually regain the bone support or connective tissue lost in the disease process. Guided tissue regeneration (GTR) is a surgical procedure that specifically aims to regenerate the periodontal tissues when the disease is advanced and could overcome some of the limitations of conventional therapy. To assess the efficacy of GTR in the treatment of periodontal infra-bony defects measured against conventional surgery (open flap debridement (OFD)) and factors affecting outcomes. We conducted an electronic search of the Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register, MEDLINE and EMBASE up to April 2004. Handsearching included Journal of Periodontology, Journal of Clinical Periodontology, Journal of Periodontal Research and bibliographies of all relevant papers and review articles up to April 2004. In addition, we contacted experts/groups/companies involved in surgical research to find other trials or unpublished material or to clarify ambiguous or missing data and posted requests for data on two periodontal electronic discussion groups. Randomised, controlled trials (RCTs) of at least 12 months duration comparing guided tissue regeneration (with or without graft materials) with open flap debridement for the treatment of periodontal infra-bony defects. Furcation involvements and studies specifically treating aggressive periodontitis were excluded. Screening of possible studies and data extraction was conducted independently. The methodological quality of studies was assessed in duplicate using individual components and agreement determined by Kappa scores. Methodological quality was used in sensitivity analyses to test the robustness of the conclusions. The Cochrane Oral Health Group statistical guidelines were followed and the results expressed as mean differences (MD and 95% CI) for continuous outcomes and risk ratios (RR and 95% CI) for dichotomous outcomes calculated using

  19. Effect of periodontal ligament removal with gauze prior to delayed replantation in rabbit incisors on rate of replacement resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslamani, Manal; Joseph, Bobby; Gabato, Severino; Andersson, Lars

    2018-03-23

    Delayed (dry storage > 60 minutes) replantation results in ankylosis and replacement resorption. It has been suggested to remove the non-viable periodontal ligament before replantation to possibly reduce the rate of replacement resorption. However there has been no study on the rate of replacement resorption after such measures. The aim of this study was to investigate if there was any difference in the rate of replacement resorption by either removing the periodontal ligament (PDL) with gauze or not removing PDL in teeth subjected to delayed replantation followed by healing for 2 or 6 weeks. Maxillary central incisors were extracted in 8 rabbits. In the right central incisors, the necrotic PDL was removed by dry gauze over the root surface. In the left eight extracted teeth PDL was left on the root surface. All extracted teeth were left to dry for 60 minutes. Extra-oral root canal treatment was performed before replantation. The rabbits were sacrificed after 2 weeks and 6 weeks respectively. Histologic processing and evaluation was done. In the 2 weeks group, all teeth showed ankylosis. The cementum was intact, and fusion of the bone and root was generally seen without resorption of the root, whereas in the 6 weeks group regardless of whether PDL had been kept or not, ankylosis and osseous replacement of the dentin was seen. There was no evidence of inflammatory infiltrate in the sections examined. Removal of PDL prior to delayed replantation may result in some initial protection of the cementum during the first few weeks. However, over longer times there seems to be neither protection of the dentin from ankylosis and osseous replacement, nor any influence on the rate of replacement resorption. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Comparison of potentials between stem cells isolated from human anterior cruciate ligament and bone marrow for ligament tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ming-Te; Liu, Chien-Lin; Chen, Tain-Hsiung; Lee, Oscar K

    2010-07-01

    We have previously isolated and identified stem cells from human anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the differences in proliferation, differentiation, and extracellular matrix (ECM) formation abilities between bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) and ACL-derived stem cells (LSCs) from the same donors when cultured with different growth factors, including basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), epidermal growth factor, and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta1). Ligament tissues and bone marrow aspirate were obtained from patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty and ACL reconstruction surgeries. Proliferation, colony formation, and population doubling capacity as well as multilineage differentiation potentials of LSCs and BMSCs were compared. Gene expression and ECM production for ligament engineering were also evaluated. It was found that BMSCs possessed better osteogenic differentiation potential than LSCs, while similar adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation abilities were observed. Proliferation rates of both LSCs and BMSCs were enhanced by bFGF and TGF-beta1. TGF-beta1 treatment significantly increased the expression of type I collagen, type III collagen, fibronectin, and alpha-smooth muscle actin in LSCs, but TGF-beta1 only upregulated type I collagen and tenascin-c in BMSCs. Protein quantification further confirmed the results of differential gene expression and suggested that LSCs and BMSCs increase ECM production upon TGF-beta1 treatment. In summary, in comparison with BMSCs, LSCs proliferate faster and maintain an undifferentiated state with bFGF treatment, whereas under TGF-beta1 treatment, LSCs upregulate major tendinous gene expression and produce a robust amount of ligament ECM protein, making LSCs a potential cell source in future applications of ACL tissue engineering.

  1. A Biofilm Pocket Model to Evaluate Different Non-Surgical Periodontal Treatment Modalities in Terms of Biofilm Removal and Reformation, Surface Alterations and Attachment of Periodontal Ligament Fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias T Hägi

    Full Text Available There is a lack of suitable in vitro models to evaluate various treatment modalities intending to remove subgingival bacterial biofilm. Consequently, the aims of this in vitro-study were: a to establish a pocket model enabling mechanical removal of biofilm and b to evaluate repeated non-surgical periodontal treatment with respect to biofilm removal and reformation, surface alterations, tooth hard-substance-loss, and attachment of periodontal ligament (PDL fibroblasts.Standardized human dentin specimens were colonized by multi-species biofilms for 3.5 days and subsequently placed into artificially created pockets. Non-surgical periodontal treatment was performed as follows: a hand-instrumentation with curettes (CUR, b ultrasonication (US, c subgingival air-polishing using erythritol (EAP and d subgingival air-polishing using erythritol combined with chlorhexidine digluconate (EAP-CHX. The reduction and recolonization of bacterial counts, surface roughness (Ra and Rz, the caused tooth substance-loss (thickness as well as the attachment of PDL fibroblasts were evaluated and statistically analyzed by means of ANOVA with Post-Hoc LSD.After 5 treatments, bacterial reduction in biofilms was highest when applying EAP-CHX (4 log10. The lowest reduction was found after CUR (2 log10. Additionally, substance-loss was the highest when using CUR (128±40 µm in comparison with US (14±12 µm, EAP (6±7 µm and EAP-CHX (11±10 µm. Surface was roughened when using CUR and US. Surfaces exposed to US and to EAP attracted the highest numbers of PDL fibroblasts.The established biofilm model simulating a periodontal pocket combined with interchangeable placements of test specimens with multi-species biofilms enables the evaluation of different non-surgical treatment modalities on biofilm removal and surface alterations. Compared to hand instrumentation the application of ultrasonication and of air-polishing with erythritol prevents from substance-loss and results

  2. Effect of self-ligating bracket appliance on the periodontal tissues in patients with chronic periodontitis after orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu-Qing Yang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the effect of self-ligating bracket appliance on the periodontal tissues in patients with chronic periodontitis after orthodontic treatment. Methods: A total of 56 patients with chronic periodontitis who were admitted in our hospital were included in the study and divided into the observation group and the control group according to different treatment protocols. The patients in the observation group were given self-ligating brackets, while the patients in the control group were given traditional brackets. The periodontal tissues and tooth motility (TM before and after treatment in the two groups were observed and recorded. IL-1 毬 and TNF-毩 levels in the gingival crervicular fluid (GCF before and after treatment in the two groups were detected. Results: PD, CAL, SBI, and PLI after treatment in the two groups were significantly reduced, while GR was significantly elevated when compared with the control group. PD, CAL, SBI, and PLI after treatment in the observation group were significantly lower than those in the control group, while GR was significantly higher than that in the control group. TM after treatment in the two groups was significantly improved, among which the number of 0° TM was significantly increased, while the number of Ⅰ°-Ⅲ°TM was significantly reduced. IL-1β and TNF-α levels in GCF after treatment in the two groups were significantly reduced when compared with before treatment. IL-1β and TNF-α levels in GCF after treatment in the observation group were significantly lower than those in the control group. Conclusions: The self-ligating brackets can effectively improve the periodontal tissues and TM in patients with chronic periodontitis, and reduce the levels of inflammatory cytokines in periodontal tissues, with an accurate efficacy.

  3. Tissue-engineering strategies for the tendon/ligament-to-bone insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lester; Xia, Younan; Galatz, Leesa M; Genin, Guy M; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2012-01-01

    Injuries to connective tissues are painful and disabling and result in costly medical expenses. These injuries often require reattachment of an unmineralized connective tissue to bone. The uninjured tendon/ligament-to-bone insertion (enthesis) is a functionally graded material that exhibits a gradual transition from soft tissue (i.e., tendon or ligament) to hard tissue (i.e., mineralized bone) through a fibrocartilaginous transition region. This transition is believed to facilitate force transmission between the two dissimilar tissues by ameliorating potentially damaging interfacial stress concentrations. The transition region is impaired or lost upon tendon/ligament injury and is not regenerated following surgical repair or natural healing, exposing the tissue to risk of reinjury. The need to regenerate a robust tendon-to-bone insertion has led a number of tissue engineering repair strategies. This review treats the tendon-to-bone insertion site as a tissue structure whose primary role is mechanical and discusses current and emerging strategies for engineering the tendon/ligament-to-bone insertion in this context. The focus lies on strategies for producing mechanical structures that can guide and subsequently sustain a graded tissue structure and the associated cell populations.

  4. Comparison of periodontal ligament injection and inferior alveolar nerve block in mandibular primary molars pulpotomy: a randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghgoo, Roza; Taleghani, Ferial

    2015-05-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve block is a common technique for anesthesia of the primary mandibular molars. A number of disadvantages have been shown to be associated with this technique. Periodontal ligament (PDL) injection could be considered as an alternative to inferior alveolar nerve block. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of PDL injection in the anesthesia of primary molar pulpotomy with mandibular block. This study was performed using a sequential double-blind randomized trial design. 80 children aged 3-7 years old who required pulpotomy in symmetrical mandibular primary molars were selected. The teeth of these children were anesthetized with periodontal injection on one side of the mandible and block on the other. Pulpotomy was performed on each patient during the same appointment. Signs of discomfort, including hand and body tension and eye movement, the verbal complaint and crying (SEM scale), were evaluated by a dental assistant who was blinded to the treatment allocation of the patients. Finally, the data were analyzed using the exact Fisher test and Pearson Chi-squared exact test. Success rate was 88/75 and 91/25 in the PDL injection and nerve block groups, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between the two techniques (P = 0.250). Results showed that PDL injection can be used as an alternative to nerve block in pulpotomy of the mandibular primary molars.

  5. Dental pulp stem cells. Biology and use for periodontal tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashri, Nahid Y; Ajlan, Sumaiah A; Aldahmash, Abdullah M

    2015-12-01

    Inflammatory periodontal disease is a major cause of loss of tooth-supporting structures. Novel approaches for regeneration of periodontal apparatus is an area of intensive research. Periodontal tissue engineering implies the use of appropriate regenerative cells, delivered through a suitable scaffold, and guided through signaling molecules. Dental pulp stem cells have been used in an increasing number of studies in dental tissue engineering. Those cells show mesenchymal (stromal) stem cell-like properties including self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potentials, aside from their relative accessibility and pleasant handling properties. The purpose of this article is to review the biological principles of periodontal tissue engineering, along with the challenges facing the development of a consistent and clinically relevant tissue regeneration platform. This article includes an updated review on dental pulp stem cells and their applications in periodontal regeneration, in combination with different scaffolds and growth factors.

  6. The effectiveness of mangosteen rind extract as additional therapy on chronic periodontitis (Clinical trials)

    OpenAIRE

    Ina Hendiani; Dede Hadidjah; Agus Susanto; Indra Mustika Setia Pribadi

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT   Introduction: Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease that attacks the periodontal tissue comprises the gingiva, periodontal ligament, cementum and alveolar bone caused mainly by plaque bacteriophage or other specific dominant type of bacteria. The purpose of this study was to determine the therapeutic effect of clinical application of mangosteen peel extract gel as adjunctive therapy scaling and root planing in patients with chronic periodontitis. This research was expect...

  7. The Role of a Platelet Lysate-Based Compartmentalized System as a Carrier of Cells and Platelet-Origin Cytokines for Periodontal Tissue Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babo, Pedro S; Cai, Xinjie; Plachokova, Adelina S; Reis, Rui L; Jansen, John A; Gomes, Manuela E; Walboomers, X Frank

    2016-10-01

    Currently available clinical therapies are not capable to regenerate tissues that are lost by periodontitis. Tissue engineering can be applied as a strategy to regenerate reliably the tissues and function of damaged periodontium. A prerequisite for this regeneration is the colonization of the defect with the adequate cell populations. In this study, we proposed a bilayered system composed of (1) a platelet lysate (PL)-based construct produced by crosslinking of PL proteins with genipin (gPL) for the delivery of rat periodontal ligament cells (rat-PDLCs); combined with (2) an injectable composite consisting of calcium phosphate cement incorporated with PL-loaded poly(d, l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres. This system was expected to promote periodontal regeneration by the delivery of adequate progenitor cells and providing a stable system enriched with adequate cytokines and growth factors for the orchestration of tissue regrowth in periodontal defects. The bilayered system was tested in a three-wall intrabony defect in rats and the healing of periodontal tissue was assessed 6 weeks after surgery. Results showed that the bilayered system was able to promote the regrowth of functional periodontal tissues, both with (cells + gPL) and without the loading of PDLCs (gPL). Significant connective tissue attachment (45.0 ± 15.0% and 64.0 ± 15.0% for gPL and cells + gPL group, respectively) and new bone area (33.8 ± 21% and 21.3 ± 3% for gPL and cells + gPL group, respectively) were observed. Nevertheless, rat PDLCs delivered with gPL construct in the defect area were hardly visible 6 weeks after surgery and did not contribute for the regeneration of new periodontal tissue. Overall, our findings show that the bilayered system promotes the stabilization of PL proteins on the root surface and has a positive effect in the repair of periodontal tissues both in quality and in quantity.

  8. Design and characterization of a biodegradable composite scaffold for ligament tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayami, James W S; Surrao, Denver C; Waldman, Stephen D; Amsden, Brian G

    2010-03-15

    Herein we report on the development and characterization of a biodegradable composite scaffold for ligament tissue engineering based on the fundamental morphological features of the native ligament. An aligned fibrous component was used to mimic the fibrous collagen network and a hydrogel component to mimic the proteoglycan-water matrix of the ligament. The composite scaffold was constructed from cell-adherent, base-etched, electrospun poly(epsilon-caprolactone-co-D,L-lactide) (PCLDLLA) fibers embedded in a noncell-adherent photocrosslinked N-methacrylated glycol chitosan (MGC) hydrogel seeded with primary ligament fibroblasts. Base etching improved cellular adhesion to the PCLDLLA material. Cells within the MGC hydrogel remained viable (72 +/- 4%) during the 4-week culture period. Immunohistochemistry staining revealed ligament ECM markers collagen type I, collagen type III, and decorin organizing and accumulating along the PCLDLLA fibers within the composite scaffolds. On the basis of these results, it was determined that the composite scaffold design was a viable alternative to the current approaches used for ligament tissue engineering and merits further study. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Effect of ProRoot MTA, Portland cement, and amalgam on the expression of fibronectin, collagen I, and TGFβ by human periodontal ligament fibroblasts in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayazi, Sara; Ostad, Seyed Nasser; Razmi, Hasan

    2011-01-01

    Today many materials have been introduced for root-end filling materials. One of them is mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) that is mentioned as a gold standard. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the reaction of human periodontal ligament fibroblasts to the root-end filling materials, such as ProRoot MTA, Portland cement, and amalgam. Eight impacted teeth were extracted in aseptic condition. The tissues around the roots were used to obtain fibroblast cells. After cell proliferation, they were cultured in the chamber slides and the extracts of the materials were added to the wells. Immunocytochemical method for measuring the expression of Fibronectin, collagen I and transforming growth factor beta (TGF®) was performed by Olysia Bioreport Imaging Software. The results were analyzed by SPSS 13.0 and Tukey post hoc test with PPortland cement group showed the most expression of collagen significantly and after 1 week, Portland cement and MTA groups had the most expression of collagen but there was no significant difference between these 2 groups. After 1 week, the Portland cement group demonstrated a higher amount of TGF® and fibronectin. The results suggest that Portland cement can be used as a less expensive root filling material with low toxicity. It has better effects than amalgam on the fibroblasts.

  10. MINIMALLY INVASIVE SINGLE FLAP APPROACH WITH CONNECTIVE TISSUE WALL FOR PERIODONTAL REGENERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamen Kotsilkov

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The destructive periodontal diseases are among the most prevalent in the human population. In some cases, bony defects are formed during the disease progression, thus sustaining deep periodontal pockets. The reconstruction of these defects is usually done with the classical techniques of bone substitutes placement and guided tissue regeneration. The clinical and histological data from the recent years, however, demonstrate the relatively low regenerative potential of these techniques. The contemporary approaches for periodontal regeneration rely on minimally invasive surgical protocols, aimed at complete tissue preservation in order to achieve and maintain primary closure and at stimulating the natural regenerative potential of the periodontal tissues. AIM: This presentation demonstrates the application of a new, minimally invasive, single flap surgical technique for periodontal regeneration in a clinical case with periodontitis and a residual deep intrabony defect. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A 37 years old patient presented with chronic generalised periodontitis. The initial therapy led to good control of the periodontal infection with a single residual deep periodontal pocket medially at 11 due to a deep intrabony defect. A single flap approach with an enamel matrix derivate application and a connective tissue wall technique were performed. The proper primary closure was obtained. RESULT: One month after surgery an initial mineralisation process in the defect was detected. At the third month, a complete clinical healing was observed. The radiographic control showed finished bone mineralisation and periodontal space recreation. CONCLUSION: In the limitation of the presented case, the minimally invasive surgical approach led to complete clinical healing and new bone formation, which could be proof for periodontal regeneration.

  11. Biofabrication of soft tissue templates for engineering the bone-ligament interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Ella; Liu, Yurong; Cunniffe, Grainne; Morrissey, David; Carroll, Simon; Mulhall, Kevin; Kelly, Daniel J

    2017-10-01

    Regenerating damaged tissue interfaces remains a significant clinical challenge, requiring recapitulation of the structure, composition, and function of the native enthesis. In the ligament-to-bone interface, this region transitions from ligament to fibrocartilage, to calcified cartilage and then to bone. This gradation in tissue types facilitates the transfer of load between soft and hard structures while minimizing stress concentrations at the interface. Previous attempts to engineer the ligament-bone interface have utilized various scaffold materials with an array of various cell types and/or biological cues. The primary goal of this study was to engineer a multiphased construct mimicking the ligament-bone interface by driving differentiation of a single population of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), seeded within blended fibrin-alginate hydrogels, down an endochondral, fibrocartilaginous, or ligamentous pathway through spatial presentation of growth factors along the length of the construct within a custom-developed, dual-chamber culture system. MSCs within these engineered constructs demonstrated spatially distinct regions of differentiation, adopting either a cartilaginous or ligamentous phenotype depending on their local environment. Furthermore, there was also evidence of spatially defined progression toward an endochondral phenotype when chondrogenically primed MSCs within this construct were additionally exposed to hypertrophic cues. The study demonstrates the feasibility of engineering spatially complex soft tissues within a single MSC laden hydrogel through the defined presentation of biochemical cues. This novel approach represents a new strategy for engineering the ligament-bone interface. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 2400-2411. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Proteomic differences between native and tissue-engineered tendon and ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharaz, Yalda A; Tew, Simon R; Peffers, Mandy; Canty-Laird, Elizabeth G; Comerford, Eithne

    2016-05-01

    Tendons and ligaments (T/Ls) play key roles in the musculoskeletal system, but they are susceptible to traumatic or age-related rupture, leading to severe morbidity as well as increased susceptibility to degenerative joint diseases such as osteoarthritis. Tissue engineering represents an attractive therapeutic approach to treating T/L injury but it is hampered by our poor understanding of the defining characteristics of the two tissues. The present study aimed to determine differences in the proteomic profile between native T/Ls and tissue engineered (TE) T/L constructs. The canine long digital extensor tendon and anterior cruciate ligament were analyzed along with 3D TE fibrin-based constructs created from their cells. Native tendon and ligament differed in their content of key structural proteins, with the ligament being more abundant in fibrocartilaginous proteins. 3D T/L TE constructs contained less extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and had a greater proportion of cellular-associated proteins than native tissue, corresponding to their low collagen and high DNA content. Constructs were able to recapitulate native T/L tissue characteristics particularly with regard to ECM proteins. However, 3D T/L TE constructs had similar ECM and cellular protein compositions indicating that cell source may not be an important factor for T/L tissue engineering. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Advanced tissue engineering scaffold design for regeneration of the complex hierarchical periodontal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Pedro F; Vaquette, Cédryck; Zhang, Qiyi; Reis, Rui L; Ivanovski, Saso; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated the ability of an osteoconductive biphasic scaffold to simultaneously regenerate alveolar bone, periodontal ligament and cementum. A biphasic scaffold was built by attaching a fused deposition modelled bone compartment to a melt electrospun periodontal compartment. The bone compartment was coated with a calcium phosphate (CaP) layer for increasing osteoconductivity, seeded with osteoblasts and cultured in vitro for 6 weeks. The resulting constructs were then complemented with the placement of PDL cell sheets on the periodontal compartment, attached to a dentin block and subcutaneously implanted into athymic rats for 8 weeks. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, alkaline phosphatase and DNA content quantification, confocal laser microscopy, micro computerized tomography and histological analysis were employed to evaluate the scaffold's performance. The in vitro study showed that alkaline phosphatase activity was significantly increased in the CaP-coated samples and they also displayed enhanced mineralization. In the in vivo study, significantly more bone formation was observed in the coated scaffolds. Histological analysis revealed that the large pore size of the periodontal compartment permitted vascularization of the cell sheets, and periodontal attachment was achieved at the dentin interface. This work demonstrates that the combination of cell sheet technology together with an osteoconductive biphasic scaffold could be utilized to address the limitations of current periodontal regeneration techniques. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Treatment of Ligament Constructs with Exercise-conditioned Serum: A Translational Tissue Engineering Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee-Barthel, Ann; Baar, Keith; West, Daniel W D

    2017-06-11

    In vitro experiments are essential to understand biological mechanisms; however, the gap between monolayer tissue culture and human physiology is large, and translation of findings is often poor. Thus, there is ample opportunity for alternative experimental approaches. Here we present an approach in which human cells are isolated from human anterior cruciate ligament tissue remnants, expanded in culture, and used to form engineered ligaments. Exercise alters the biochemical milieu in the blood such that the function of many tissues, organs and bodily processes are improved. In this experiment, ligament construct culture media was supplemented with experimental human serum that has been 'conditioned' by exercise. Thus the intervention is more biologically relevant since an experimental tissue is exposed to the full endogenous biochemical milieu, including binding proteins and adjunct compounds that may be altered in tandem with the activity of an unknown agent of interest. After treatment, engineered ligaments can be analyzed for mechanical function, collagen content, morphology, and cellular biochemistry. Overall, there are four major advantages versus traditional monolayer culture and animal models, of the physiological model of ligament tissue that is presented here. First, ligament constructs are three-dimensional, allowing for mechanical properties (i.e., function) such as ultimate tensile stress, maximal tensile load, and modulus, to be quantified. Second, the enthesis, the interface between boney and sinew elements, can be examined in detail and within functional context. Third, preparing media with post-exercise serum allows for the effects of the exercise-induced biochemical milieu, which is responsible for the wide range of health benefits of exercise, to be investigated in an unbiased manner. Finally, this experimental model advances scientific research in a humane and ethical manner by replacing the use of animals, a core mandate of the National

  15. Class I and II histone deacetylase expression in human chronic periodontitis gingival tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantley, M D; Dharmapatni, A A S S K; Algate, K; Crotti, T N; Bartold, P M; Haynes, D R

    2016-04-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are being considered to treat chronic inflammatory diseases at low doses. Currently HDACi that are more specific are being developed to target particular HDACs; therefore, this study aimed to determine levels and distribution of class I and II HDAC in human gingival samples obtained from patients with chronic periodontitis. Gingival biopsies were obtained from patients with and without (mild inflammation, no bone loss) periodontitis. Total RNA was isolated for real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction to determine expression of HDACs 1-10. Immunohistochemistry was used to determine protein distribution of HDACs 1, 5, 8 and 9. Factor VIII, CD3 and tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) were detected in serial sections to identify blood vessels, lymphocytes, pre-osteoclasts and osteoclasts cells respectively. Tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α) expression was also assessed. mRNA for HDAC 1, 5, 8 and 9 were significantly upregulated in chronic periodontitis gingival tissues compared to non-periodontitis samples (p chronic periodontitis samples (p chronic periodontitis gingival tissues. HDAC 1, 5, 8 and 9 expression was higher in gingival tissues from patients with chronic periodontitis compared to non-periodontitis samples. Results suggest that these HDACs could therefore be targeted with specific acting HDACi. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The suitability of human adipose-derived stem cells for the engineering of ligament tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagan, Michael J; Zuk, Patricia A; Zhao, Ke-Wei; Bluth, Benjamin E; Brinkmann, Elyse J; Wu, Benjamin M; McAllister, David R

    2012-10-01

    Rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is the one of the most common sports-related injuries. With its poor healing capacity, surgical reconstruction using either autografts or allografts is currently required to restore function. However, serious complications are associated with graft reconstructions and the number of such reconstructions has steadily risen over the years, necessitating the search for an alternative approach to ACL repair. Such an approach may likely be tissue engineering. Recent engineering approaches using ligament-derived fibroblasts have been promising, but the slow growth rate of such fibroblasts in vitro may limit their practical application. More promising results are being achieved using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The adipose-derived stem cell (ASC) is often proposed as an alternative choice to the MSC and, as such, may be a suitable stem cell for ligament engineering. However, the use of ASCs in ligament engineering still remains relatively unexplored. Therefore, in this study, the potential use of human ASCs in ligament tissue engineering was initially explored by examining their ability to express several ligament markers under growth factor treatment. ASC populations treated for up to 4 weeks with TGFβ1 or IGF1 did not show any significant and consistent upregulation in the expression of collagen types 1 and 3, tenascin C and scleraxis. While treatment with EGF or bFGF resulted in increased tenascin C expression, increased expression of collagens 1 and 3 were never observed. Therefore, simple in vitro treatment of human ASC populations with growth factors may not stimulate their ligament differentiative potential. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Monitoring sinew contraction during formation of tissue-engineered fibrin-based ligament constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Jennifer Z; Wudebwe, Uchena N G; Wang, Anqi; Woods, Daniel; Grover, Liam M

    2012-08-01

    The ability to study the gross morphological changes occurring during tissue formation is vital to producing tissue-engineered structures of clinically relevant dimensions in vitro. Here, we have used nondestructive methods of digital imaging and optical coherence tomography to monitor the early-stage formation and subsequent maturation of fibrin-based tissue-engineered ligament constructs. In addition, the effect of supplementation with essential promoters of collagen synthesis, ascorbic acid (AA) and proline (P), has been assessed. Contraction of the cell-seeded fibrin gel occurs unevenly within the first 5 days of culture around two fixed anchor points before forming a longitudinal ligament-like construct. AA+P supplementation accelerates gel contraction in the maturation phase of development, producing ligament-like constructs with a higher collagen content and distinct morphology to that of unsupplemented constructs. These studies highlight the importance of being able to control the methods of tissue formation and maturation in vitro to enable the production of tissue-engineered constructs with suitable replacement tissue characteristics for repair of clinical soft-tissue injuries.

  18. Intermittent Hypoxia Influences Alveolar Bone Proper Microstructure via Hypoxia-Inducible Factor and VEGF Expression in Periodontal Ligaments of Growing Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuji Oishi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent hypoxia (IH recapitulates morphological changes in the maxillofacial bones in children with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. Recently, we found that IH increased bone mineral density (BMD in the inter-radicular alveolar bone (reflecting enhanced osteogenesis in the mandibular first molar (M1 region in the growing rats, but the underlying mechanism remains unknown. In this study, we focused on the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF pathway to assess the effect of IH by testing the null hypothesis of no significant differences in the mRNA-expression levels of relevant factors associated with the HIF pathway, between control rats and growing rats with IH. To test the null hypothesis, we investigated how IH enhances mandibular osteogenesis in the alveolar bone proper with respect to HIF-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF in periodontal ligament (PDL tissues. Seven-week-old male Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to IH for 3 weeks. The microstructure and BMD in the alveolar bone proper of the distal root of the mandibular M1 were evaluated using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT. Expression of HIF-1α and VEGF mRNA in PDL tissues were measured, whereas osteogenesis was evaluated by measuring mRNA levels for alkaline phosphatase (ALP and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2. The null hypothesis was rejected: we found an increase in the expression of all of these markers after IH exposure. The results provided the first indication that IH enhanced osteogenesis of the mandibular M1 region in association with PDL angiogenesis during growth via HIF-1α in an animal model.

  19. Assessment of cellular materials generated by co-cultured ‘inflamed’ and healthy periodontal ligament stem cells from patient-matched groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Hao-Ning [State Key Laboratory of Military Stomatology & National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases & Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Department of Periodontology, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Department of Stomatology, The First Affiliated Hospital of the Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100048 (China); Xia, Yu [State Key Laboratory of Military Stomatology & National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases & Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Department of Periodontology, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Department of Stomatology, The 309th Hospital of Chinese People' s Liberation Army, Beijing 100091 (China); Xu, Jie; Tian, Bei-Min; Zhang, Xi-Yu [State Key Laboratory of Military Stomatology & National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases & Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Department of Periodontology, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China); Chen, Fa-Ming, E-mail: cfmsunhh@fmmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Military Stomatology & National Clinical Research Center for Oral Diseases & Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Department of Periodontology, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an (China)

    2016-08-01

    Recently, stem cells derived from the'inflamed’ periodontal ligament (PDL) tissue of periodontally diseased teeth (I-PDLSCs) have been increasingly suggested as a more readily accessible source of cells for regenerative therapies than those derived from healthy PDL tissue (H-PDLSCs). However, substantial evidence indicates that I-PDLSCs exhibit impaired functionalities compared with H-PDLSCs. In this study, patient-matched I-PDLSCs and H-PDLSCs were co-cultured at various ratios. Cellular materials derived from these cultures were investigated regarding their osteogenic potential in vitro and capacity to form new bone following in vivo transplantation. While patient-matched I-PDLSCs and H-PDLSCs could co-exist in co-culture systems, the proportion of I-PDLSCs tended to increase during in vitro incubation. Compared with H-PDLSC monoculture, the presence of I-PDLSCs in the co-cultures appeared to enhance the overall cell proliferation. Although not completely rescued, the osteogenic and regenerative potentials of the cellular materials generated by co-cultured I-PDLSCs and H-PDLSCs were significantly improved compared with those derived from I-PDLSC monocultures. Notably, cells in co-cultures containing either 50% I-PDLSCs plus 50% H-PDLSCs or 25% I-PDLSCs plus 75% H-PDLSCs expressed osteogenesis-related proteins and genes at levels similar to those expressed in H-PDLSC monocultures (P>0.05). Irrespective of the percentage of I-PDLSCs, robust cellular materials were obtained from co-cultures with 50% or more H-PDLSCs, which exhibited equivalent potential to form new bone in vivo compared with sheets generated by H-PDLSC monocultures. These data suggest that the co-culture of I-PDLSCs with patient-matched H-PDLSCs is a practical and effective method for increasing the overall osteogenic and regenerative potentials of resultant cellular materials. - Highlights: • Co-culturing H-PDLSCs with I-PDLSCs led to rapid cell expansion. • H-PDLSCs and I-PDLSCs co

  20. Assessment of cellular materials generated by co-cultured ‘inflamed’ and healthy periodontal ligament stem cells from patient-matched groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Hao-Ning; Xia, Yu; Xu, Jie; Tian, Bei-Min; Zhang, Xi-Yu; Chen, Fa-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Recently, stem cells derived from the'inflamed’ periodontal ligament (PDL) tissue of periodontally diseased teeth (I-PDLSCs) have been increasingly suggested as a more readily accessible source of cells for regenerative therapies than those derived from healthy PDL tissue (H-PDLSCs). However, substantial evidence indicates that I-PDLSCs exhibit impaired functionalities compared with H-PDLSCs. In this study, patient-matched I-PDLSCs and H-PDLSCs were co-cultured at various ratios. Cellular materials derived from these cultures were investigated regarding their osteogenic potential in vitro and capacity to form new bone following in vivo transplantation. While patient-matched I-PDLSCs and H-PDLSCs could co-exist in co-culture systems, the proportion of I-PDLSCs tended to increase during in vitro incubation. Compared with H-PDLSC monoculture, the presence of I-PDLSCs in the co-cultures appeared to enhance the overall cell proliferation. Although not completely rescued, the osteogenic and regenerative potentials of the cellular materials generated by co-cultured I-PDLSCs and H-PDLSCs were significantly improved compared with those derived from I-PDLSC monocultures. Notably, cells in co-cultures containing either 50% I-PDLSCs plus 50% H-PDLSCs or 25% I-PDLSCs plus 75% H-PDLSCs expressed osteogenesis-related proteins and genes at levels similar to those expressed in H-PDLSC monocultures (P>0.05). Irrespective of the percentage of I-PDLSCs, robust cellular materials were obtained from co-cultures with 50% or more H-PDLSCs, which exhibited equivalent potential to form new bone in vivo compared with sheets generated by H-PDLSC monocultures. These data suggest that the co-culture of I-PDLSCs with patient-matched H-PDLSCs is a practical and effective method for increasing the overall osteogenic and regenerative potentials of resultant cellular materials. - Highlights: • Co-culturing H-PDLSCs with I-PDLSCs led to rapid cell expansion. • H-PDLSCs and I-PDLSCs co

  1. Quasi-automatic 3D finite element model generation for individual single-rooted teeth and periodontal ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, R; Schneider, J; Brambs, H-J; Wunderlich, A; Geiger, M; Sander, F G

    2004-02-01

    The paper demonstrates how to generate an individual 3D volume model of a human single-rooted tooth using an automatic workflow. It can be implemented into finite element simulation. In several computational steps, computed tomography data of patients are used to obtain the global coordinates of the tooth's surface. First, the large number of geometric data is processed with several self-developed algorithms for a significant reduction. The most important task is to keep geometrical information of the real tooth. The second main part includes the creation of the volume model for tooth and periodontal ligament (PDL). This is realized with a continuous free form surface of the tooth based on the remaining points. Generating such irregular objects for numerical use in biomechanical research normally requires enormous manual effort and time. The finite element mesh of the tooth, consisting of hexahedral elements, is composed of different materials: dentin, PDL and surrounding alveolar bone. It is capable of simulating tooth movement in a finite element analysis and may give valuable information for a clinical approach without the restrictions of tetrahedral elements. The mesh generator of FE software ANSYS executed the mesh process for hexahedral elements successfully.

  2. Viability of human periodontal ligament fibroblasts in milk, Hank's balanced salt solution and coconut water as storage media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, B D M; Lückemeyer, D D; Reyes-Carmona, J F; Felippe, W T; Simões, C M O; Felippe, M C S

    2011-02-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of various storage media at 5 °C for maintaining the viability of human periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLF). Plates with PDLF were soaked in recently prepared Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS), skimmed milk, whole milk, Save-A-Tooth(®) system's HBSS (Save), natural coconut water, industrialized coconut water or tap water (negative control) at 5 °C for 3, 6, 24, 48, 72, 96 and 120 h. Minimum essential medium (MEM) at 37 °C served as the positive control. PDL cell viability was determined by MTT assay. Data were statistically analysed by Kruskal-Wallis test complemented by the Scheffé test (α=5%). The greatest number of viable cells was observed for MEM. Skimmed and whole milk, followed by natural coconut water and HBSS, were the most effective media in maintaining cell viability (Pmilk had the greatest capacity to maintain PDLF viability when compared with natural coconut water, HBSS, Save, industrialized coconut water and tap water. © 2010 International Endodontic Journal.

  3. Policaprolactone/polyvinylpyrrolidone/siloxane hybrid materials: Synthesis and in vitro delivery of diclofenac and biocompatibility with periodontal ligament fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peña, José A. [Departamento de Química, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá D.C. (Colombia); Gutiérrez, Sandra J., E-mail: s.gutierrez@javeriana.edu.co [Centro de investigaciones Odontológicas, Facultad de Odontología, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá (Colombia); Villamil, Jean C. [Centro de investigaciones Odontológicas, Facultad de Odontología, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá (Colombia); Agudelo, Natalia A. [Instituto de Química, Universidad de Antioquia, Medellin (Colombia); Pérez, León D., E-mail: ldperezp@unal.edu.co [Grupo de Macromoléculas, Departamento de Química, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Carrera 45 No 26–85, edificio 451 of. 449, Bogotá D.C. Colombia (Colombia)

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we report the synthesis of polycaprolactone (PCL) based hybrid materials containing hydrophilic domains composed of N-vinylpyrrolidone (VP), and γ-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS). The hybrid materials were obtained by RAFT copolymerization of N-vinylpyrrolidone and MPS using a pre-formed dixanthate-end-functionalized PCL as macro-chain transfer agent, followed by a post-reaction crosslinking step. The composition of the samples was determined by elemental and thermogravimetric analyses. Differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction indicated that the crystallinity of PCL decreases in the presence of the hydrophilic domains. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed that the samples present an interconnected porous structure on the swelling. Compared to PCL, the hybrid materials presented low water contact angle values and higher elastic modulus. These materials showed controlled release of diclofenac, and biocompatibility with human periodontal ligament fibroblasts. - Highlights: • Synthesis of Policaprolactone/polyvinylpyrrolidone/siloxane hybrid materials • Moderated hydrophilic materials with high swelling resistance • Organic–inorganic hybrid materials were biocompatible.

  4. Platelet-Poor and Platelet-Rich Plasma Stimulate Bone Lineage Differentiation in Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Constanza E; González, Sergio A; Palma, Verónica; Smith, Patricio C

    2016-02-01

    Plasma-derived fractions have been used as an autologous source of growth factors; however, limited knowledge concerning their biologic effects has hampered their clinical application. In this study, the authors analyze the content and specific effect of both platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and platelet-poor plasma (PPP) on osteoblastic differentiation using primary cultures of human periodontal ligament stem cells (HPLSCs). The authors evaluated the growth factor content of PRP and PPP using a proteome profiler array and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. HPLSCs were characterized by flow cytometry and differentiation assays. The effect of PRP and PPP on HPLSC bone differentiation was analyzed by quantifying calcium deposition after 14 and 21 days of treatment. Albeit at different concentrations, the two fractions had similar profiles of growth factors, the most representative being platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) isoforms (PDGF-AA, -BB, and -AB), insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-2, and IGFBP-6. Both formulations exerted a comparable stimulus on osteoblastic differentiation even at low doses (2.5%), increasing calcium deposits in HPLSCs. PRP and PPP showed a similar protein profile and exerted comparable effects on bone differentiation. Further studies are needed to characterize and compare the effects of PPP and PRP on bone healing in vivo.

  5. Effect of the simulated periodontal ligament on cast post-and-core removal using an ultrasonic device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel Brito-Junior

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of simulated periodontal ligament (SPDL on custom cast dowel and core removal by ultrasonic vibration. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty-two human maxillary canines were included in resin cylinders with or without SPDL made from polyether impression material. In order to allow tensile testing, the roots included in resin cylinders with SPDL were fixed to cylinders with two stainless steel wires. Post-holes were prepared by standardizing the length at 8 mm and root canal impressions were made with self-cured resin acrylic. Cast dowel and core sets were fabricated and luted with Panavia F resin cement. Half of the samples were submitted to ultrasonic vibration before the tensile test. Data were analyzed statistically by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc tests (p<0.05. RESULTS: The ultrasonic vibration reduced the tensile strength of the samples directly included in resin cylinders. There was no difference between the values, whether or not ultrasonic vibration was used, when the PDL was simulated. However, the presence of SPDL affected the tensile strength values even when no ultrasonic vibration was applied. CONCLUSION: Simulation of PDL has an effect on both ultrasonic vibration and tensile testing.

  6. [The effect of Toll-like receptor 4 in nicotine suppressing the osteogenic potential of periodontal ligament stem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Yan; Deqin, Yang

    2017-08-01

    Objective To explore the impact of nicotine on proliferation and osteogenic capability of periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs), and the role of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in nicotine, suppressing the osteogenic capability of PDLSCs. Methods PDLSCs were cultured in vitro, and the flow cytometer was used to identify the surface antigen markers of PDLSCs. WST-1 was used to detect the proliferation ability of PDLSCs, which were stimulated by different concentrations of nicotine. Alizarin red staining was used to observe the formation of mineralized nodules after PDLSCs stimulation with different concentrations of nicotine. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot were used to detect the change in osteogenic potential of PDLSCs stimulated by nicotine, after TAK-242, and with the inhibitor of TLR4. Results PDLSCs expressed mesenchymal stem cell-associated markers CD90 and CD105. When the concentration of nicotine was 10⁻⁴ mol·L⁻¹, the PDLSC proliferation could be suppressed after 3 d compared with the control group (Pnicotine suppressed the PDLSCs (PNicotine suppresses the proliferation and osteogenic capability of PDLSCs, which may be regulated by TLR4.

  7. Stress Induced in Periodontal Ligament under Orthodontic Loading (Part II): A Comparison of Linear Versus Non-Linear Fem Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemanth, M; Deoli, Shilpi; Raghuveer, H P; Rani, M S; Hegde, Chatura; Vedavathi, B

    2015-09-01

    Simulation of periodontal ligament (PDL) using non-linear finite element method (FEM) analysis gives better insight into understanding of the biology of tooth movement. The stresses in the PDL were evaluated for intrusion and lingual root torque using non-linear properties. A three-dimensional (3D) FEM model of the maxillary incisors was generated using Solidworks modeling software. Stresses in the PDL were evaluated for intrusive and lingual root torque movements by 3D FEM using ANSYS software. These stresses were compared with linear and non-linear analyses. For intrusive and lingual root torque movements, distribution of stress over the PDL was within the range of optimal stress value as proposed by Lee, but was exceeding the force system given by Proffit as optimum forces for orthodontic tooth movement with linear properties. When same force load was applied in non-linear analysis, stresses were more compared to linear analysis and were beyond the optimal stress range as proposed by Lee for both intrusive and lingual root torque. To get the same stress as linear analysis, iterations were done using non-linear properties and the force level was reduced. This shows that the force level required for non-linear analysis is lesser than that of linear analysis.

  8. Efficiency of Castor Oil as a Storage Medium for Avulsed Teeth in Maintaining the Viability of Periodontal Ligament Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabavizadeh, Mohammadreza; Abbaszadegan, Abbas; Khodabakhsi, Afrooz; Ahzan, Shamseddin; Mehrabani, Davood

    2018-03-01

    Researchers always seek a new storage medium for avulsed teeth. Castor oil is a vegetable oil with several advantages such as antimicrobial and antioxidant properties, low toxicity, and glutathione preservation capability, low cost, and high availability. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the capacity of castor oil as a new storage medium in preserving the viability of periodontal ligament (PDL) cells compared to Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS) and milk. Forty freshly extracted human teeth were divided into 3 experimental and 2 control groups. The experimental teeth were stored dry for 30 min and then immersed for 45 min in one of the following media; castor oil, HBSS, and milk. The positive and negative control groups were exposed to 0 min and 2 h of dry time respectively with no immersion in any storage medium. The teeth were then treated with dispase grade II and collagenase and the number of viable PDL cells were counted. Data were analyzed using Kruskal- Wallis test. The percentage of viable cells treated with castor oil, HBSS and milk counted immediately after removal from these media were 46.93, 51.02 and 55.10 % respectively. The statistical analysis revealed that the value for castor oil was significantly lower than HBSS and milk ( p > 0.05). Within the parameters of this study, it appears that castor oil cannot be served as an ideal medium for storage of avulsed tooth. More investigations under in vivo conditions are required to justify the results of this study.

  9. Proteomic differences between native and tissue?engineered tendon and ligament

    OpenAIRE

    Kharaz, Yalda A.; Tew, Simon R.; Peffers, Mandy; Canty?Laird, Elizabeth G.; Comerford, Eithne

    2016-01-01

    Tendons and ligaments (T/Ls) play key roles in the musculoskeletal system, but they are susceptible to traumatic or age?related rupture, leading to severe morbidity as well as increased susceptibility to degenerative joint diseases such as osteoarthritis. Tissue engineering represents an attractive therapeutic approach to treating T/L injury but it is hampered by our poor understanding of the defining characteristics of the two tissues. The present study aimed to determine differences in the ...

  10. Sources of adult mesenchymal stem cells for ligament and tendon tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhinsa, Baljinder S; Mahapatra, Anant N; Khan, Wasim S

    2015-01-01

    Tendon and ligament injuries are common, and repair slowly with reduced biomechanical properties. With increasing financial demands on the health service and patients to recover from tendon and ligament injuries faster, and with less morbidity, health professionals are exploring new treatment options. Tissue engineering may provide the answer, with its unlimited source of natural cells that in the correct environment may improve repair and regeneration of tendon and ligament tissue. Mesenchymal stem cells have demonstrated the ability to self renew and have multilineage differentiation potential. The use of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells has been reported, however significant in vitro culture expansion is required due to the low yield of cells, which has financial implications. Harvesting of bone marrow cells also has associated morbidity. Several studies have looked at alternative sources for mesenchymal stem cells. Reports in literature from animal studies have been encouraging, however further work is required. This review assesses the potential sources of mesenchymal stem cells for tissue engineering in tendons and ligaments.

  11. Controlled Bioactive Molecules Delivery Strategies for Tendon and Ligament Tissue Engineering using Polymeric Nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiong Teh, Thomas Kok; Hong Goh, James Cho; Toh, Siew Lok

    2015-01-01

    The interest in polymeric nanofibers has escalated over the past decade given its promise as tissue engineering scaffolds that can mimic the nanoscale structure of the native extracellular matrix. With functionalization of the polymeric nanofibers using bioactive molecules, localized signaling moieties can be established for the attached cells, to stimulate desired biological effects and direct cellular or tissue response. The inherently high surface area per unit mass of polymeric nanofibers can enhance cell adhesion, bioactive molecules loading and release efficiencies, and mass transfer properties. In this review article, the application of polymeric nanofibers for controlled bioactive molecules delivery will be discussed, with a focus on tendon and ligament tissue engineering. Various polymeric materials of different mechanical and degradation properties will be presented along with the nanofiber fabrication techniques explored. The bioactive molecules of interest for tendon and ligament tissue engineering, including growth factors and small molecules, will also be reviewed and compared in terms of their nanofiber incorporation strategies and release profiles. This article will also highlight and compare various innovative strategies to control the release of bioactive molecules spatiotemporally and explore an emerging tissue engineering strategy involving controlled multiple bioactive molecules sequential release. Finally, the review article concludes with challenges and future trends in the innovation and development of bioactive molecules delivery using polymeric nanofibers for tendon and ligament tissue engineering.

  12. The attachment of V79 and human periodontal ligament fibroblasts on periodontally involved root surfaces following treatment with EDTA, citric acid, or tetracycline HCL: an SEM in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, R Viswa; Jagetia, Ganesh Chandra; Bhat, K Mahalinga

    2006-02-15

    The present in vitro study has been designed to establish and compare the effects of citric acid, EDTA, and tetracycline HCl on human periodontally diseased roots on the structure, attachment, and orientation of V79 (primary Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts) cells and human periodontal ligament fibroblasts (HPDL). Commercially available V79 cells and HPDL derived from healthy human third molars were used in this study. These fibroblasts were left in solution for seven days in order to attain confluence. Forty single-rooted teeth were obtained from patients diagnosed with periodontitis. The crown part was removed under constant irrigation and the root was split vertically into two equal halves, thus, yielding 80 specimens. Following scaling and root planing, the specimens were washed with phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and kept in 50 microg/ml gentamycin sulphate solution for 24 hours. The root pieces were then treated as follows: citric acid at pH 1, 24% EDTA, or with a 10% solution of tetracycline HCl and were then placed in V79 fibroblast cultures and HPDL cultures. The specimens were harvested after four weeks and were fixed in 2.5% glutaraldehyde in PBS before preparation for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The behavior of V79 cells was similar to that of human periodontal ligament cells on root conditioned surfaces. V79 and HPDL showed a healthy morphology on root surfaces treated with citric acid and EDTA and a relatively unhealthy appearance on root surfaces treated with tetracycline HCl and distilled water (control group). The results suggest the use of citric acid and EDTA as root conditioning agents favorably affects the migration, attachment, and morphology of fibroblasts on human root surfaces, which may play a significant role in periodontal healing and regeneration.

  13. Gene therapy with growth factors for periodontal tissue engineering–A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shipra; Mahendra, Aneet

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of oral and periodontal diseases and associated anomalies accounts for a significant proportion of the healthcare burden, with the manifestations of these conditions being functionally and psychologically debilitating. A challenge faced by periodontal therapy is the predictable regeneration of periodontal tissues lost as a consequence of disease. Growth factors are critical to the development, maturation, maintenance and repair of oral tissues as they establish an extra-cellular environment that is conducive to cell and tissue growth. Tissue engineering principles aim to exploit these properties in the development of biomimetic materials that can provide an appropriate microenvironment for tissue development. The aim of this paper is to review emerging periodontal therapies in the areas of materials science, growth factor biology and cell/gene therapy. Various such materials have been formulated into devices that can be used as vehicles for delivery of cells, growth factors and DNA. Different mechanisms of drug delivery are addressed in the context of novel approaches to reconstruct and engineer oral and tooth supporting structure. Key words: Periodontal disease, gene therapy, regeneration, tissue repair, growth factors, tissue engineering. PMID:22143705

  14. Periodontal tissue destruction caused by an elastic orthodontic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Once this cooperation is lost, possible negative effects may be the consequence. ... that arises when elastic orthodontic spacers are being used in the mouth. Key words: Open-flap curettage, Orthodontic spacer, Periodontal destruction ...

  15. * Hierarchically Structured Electrospun Scaffolds with Chemically Conjugated Growth Factor for Ligament Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauly, Hannah M; Sathy, Binulal N; Olvera, Dinorath; McCarthy, Helen O; Kelly, Daniel J; Popat, Ketul C; Dunne, Nicholas J; Haut Donahue, Tammy Lynn

    2017-08-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the knee is vital for proper joint function and is commonly ruptured during sports injuries or car accidents. Due to a lack of intrinsic healing capacity and drawbacks with allografts and autografts, there is a need for a tissue-engineered ACL replacement. Our group has previously used aligned sheets of electrospun polycaprolactone nanofibers to develop solid cylindrical bundles of longitudinally aligned nanofibers. We have shown that these nanofiber bundles support cell proliferation and elongation and the hierarchical structure and material properties are similar to the native human ACL. It is possible to combine multiple nanofiber bundles to create a scaffold that attempts to mimic the macroscale structure of the ACL. The goal of this work was to develop a hierarchical bioactive scaffold for ligament tissue engineering using connective tissue growth factor (CTGF)-conjugated nanofiber bundles and evaluate the behavior of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on these scaffolds in vitro and in vivo. CTGF was immobilized onto the surface of individual nanofiber bundles or scaffolds consisting of multiple nanofiber bundles. The conjugation efficiency and the release of conjugated CTGF were assessed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, assays, and immunofluorescence staining. Scaffolds were seeded with MSCs and maintained in vitro for 7 days (individual nanofiber bundles), in vitro for 21 days (scaled-up scaffolds of 20 nanofiber bundles), or in vivo for 6 weeks (small scaffolds of 4 nanofiber bundles), and ligament-specific tissue formation was assessed in comparison to non-CTGF-conjugated control scaffolds. Results showed that CTGF conjugation encouraged cell proliferation and ligament-specific tissue formation in vitro and in vivo. The results suggest that hierarchical electrospun nanofiber bundles conjugated with CTGF are a scalable and bioactive scaffold for ACL tissue engineering.

  16. The Significance of SDF-1α-CXCR4 Axis in in vivo Angiogenic Ability of Human Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Yoon-Kyung; Kim, Gee-Hye; Lee, Jae Cheoun; Seo, Byoung-Moo; Joo, Kyeung-Min; Lee, Gene; Nam, Hyun

    2017-06-30

    Periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) are multipotent stem cells derived from periodontium and have mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-like characteristics. Recently, the perivascular region was recognized as the developmental origin of MSCs, which suggests the in vivo angiogenic potential of PDLSCs. In this study, we investigated whether PDLSCs could be a potential source of perivascular cells, which could contribute to in vivo angiogenesis. PDLSCs exhibited typical MSC-like characteristics such as the expression pattern of surface markers (CD29, CD44, CD73, and CD105) and differentiation potentials (osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation). Moreover, PDLSCs expressed perivascular cell markers such as NG2, αsmooth muscle actin, platelet-derived growth factor receptor β, and CD146. We conducted an in vivo Matrigel plug assay to confirm the in vivo angiogenic potential of PDLSCs. We could not observe significant vessel-like structures with PDLSCs alone or human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HU-VECs) alone at day 7 after injection. However, when PDLSCs and HUVECs were co-injected, there were vessel-like structures containing red blood cells in the lumens, which suggested that anastomosis occurred between newly formed vessels and host circulatory system. To block the SDF-1α and CXCR4 axis between PDLSCs and HUVECs, AMD3100, a CXCR4 antagonist, was added into the Matrigel plug. After day 3 and day 7 after injection, there were no significant vessel-like structures. In conclusion, we demonstrated the peri-vascular characteristics of PDLSCs and their contribution to in vivo angiogenesis, which might imply potential application of PDLSCs into the neovascularization of tissue engineering and vascular diseases.

  17. Gene Expression Profiles in Paired Gingival Biopsies from Periodontitis-Affected and Healthy Tissues Revealed by Massively Parallel Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Båge, Tove; Lagervall, Maria; Jansson, Leif; Lundeberg, Joakim; Yucel-Lindberg, Tülay

    2012-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease affecting the soft tissue and bone that surrounds the teeth. Despite extensive research, distinctive genes responsible for the disease have not been identified. The objective of this study was to elucidate transcriptome changes in periodontitis, by investigating gene expression profiles in gingival tissue obtained from periodontitis-affected and healthy gingiva from the same patient, using RNA-sequencing. Gingival biopsies were obtained from a disease-affected and a healthy site from each of 10 individuals diagnosed with periodontitis. Enrichment analysis performed among uniquely expressed genes for the periodontitis-affected and healthy tissues revealed several regulated pathways indicative of inflammation for the periodontitis-affected condition. Hierarchical clustering of the sequenced biopsies demonstrated clustering according to the degree of inflammation, as observed histologically in the biopsies, rather than clustering at the individual level. Among the top 50 upregulated genes in periodontitis-affected tissues, we investigated two genes which have not previously been demonstrated to be involved in periodontitis. These included interferon regulatory factor 4 and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 18, which were also expressed at the protein level in gingival biopsies from patients with periodontitis. In conclusion, this study provides a first step towards a quantitative comprehensive insight into the transcriptome changes in periodontitis. We demonstrate for the first time site-specific local variation in gene expression profiles of periodontitis-affected and healthy tissues obtained from patients with periodontitis, using RNA-seq. Further, we have identified novel genes expressed in periodontitis tissues, which may constitute potential therapeutic targets for future treatment strategies of periodontitis. PMID:23029519

  18. Antibiotic effects against periodontal bacteria in organ cultured tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Masaaki; Haraguchi, Akira; Miura, Mayumi; Hamachi, Takafumi; Fukuda, Takao; Sanui, Terukazu; Takano, Aiko; Nishimura, Fusanori

    2017-02-01

    Mechanical reduction of infectious bacteria by using physical instruments is considered the principal therapeutic strategy for periodontal disease; addition of antibiotics is adjunctive. However, local antibiotic treatment, combined with conventional mechanical debridement, has recently been shown to be more effective in periodontitis subjects with type 2 diabetes. This suggests that some bacteria may invade the inflamed inner gingival epithelium, and mechanical debridement alone will be unable to reduce these bacteria completely. Therefore, we tried to establish infected organ culture models that mimic the inner gingival epithelium and aimed to see the effects of antibiotics in these established models. Mouse dorsal skin epithelia were isolated, and periodontal bacteria were injected into the epithelia. Infected epithelia were incubated with test antibiotics, and colony-forming ability was evaluated. Results indicated that effective antibiotics differed according to injected bacteria and the bacterial combinations tested. Overall, in organ culture model, the combination of amoxicillin or cefdinir and metronidazole compensate for the effects of less effective bacterial combinations on each other. This in vitro study would suggest effective periodontal treatment regimens, especially for severe periodontitis.

  19. Evaluation of goat milk as storage media to preserve viability of human periodontal ligament cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulusoy, Ayça Tuba; Kalyoncuoglu, Elif; Kaya, Senay; Cehreli, Zafer Cavit

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of goat milk as a storage media for maintenance of periodontal ligament (PDL) cell viability of avulsed teeth and compare it with commonly used and/or investigated storage media. PDL cells were obtained from the root surface of healthy premolars and were cultured in Eagle's maintenance medium (EMM). Cell cultures were treated with the following storage media: tap water (negative control); EMM (positive control); Hank's balanced salt solution; ultra high temperature (UHT) long-shelf-life lactose-free cow milk; UHT long-shelf-life whole cow milk; UHT long-shelf-life skimmed cow milk; UHT long-shelf-life soy milk; UHT long-shelf-life goat milk, UHT long-shelf-life follow on milk with probiotic, 20% propolis, and egg white. Culture plates were incubated with experimental media at 20°C for 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 h. PDL cell viability was assessed by tetrazolium salt-based colorimetric (MTT) assay at each test period. One-way anova was used to evaluate the effects of storage solutions at each time point, followed by post hoc Duncan's multiple comparison test (P = 0.05). A dendrogram was constructed to show the arrangement of hierarchical clustering. Goat milk displayed the highest capacity to maintain cell viability at all test intervals (P milk with the probiotic showed the lowest time-dependent PDL cell viability among all test media (P milks, HBSS performed significantly less effectively in maintaining PDL cell viability during the entire test period (P milk can be recommended as a suitable storage medium for avulsed teeth. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Lipopolysaccharide can modify differentiation and immunomodulatory potential of periodontal ligament stem cells via ERK1,2 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukolj, Tamara; Trivanović, Drenka; Djordjević, Ivana Okić; Mojsilović, Slavko; Krstić, Jelena; Obradović, Hristina; Janković, Srdja; Santibanez, Juan Francisco; Jauković, Aleksandra; Bugarski, Diana

    2018-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a pertinent deleterious factor in oral microenvironment for cells which are carriers of regenerative processes. The aim of this study was to investigate the emerging in vitro effects of LPS (Escherichia coli) on human periodontal ligament stem cell (PDLSC) functions and associated signaling pathways. We demonstrated that LPS did not affect immunophenotype, proliferation, viability, and cell cycle of PDLSCs. However, LPS modified lineage commitment of PDLSCs inhibiting osteogenesis by downregulating Runx2, ALP, and Ocn mRNA expression, while stimulating chondrogenesis and adipogenesis by upregulating Sox9 and PPARγ mRNA expression. LPS promoted myofibroblast-like phenotype of PDLSCs, since it significantly enhanced PDLSC contractility, as well as protein and/or gene expression of TGF-β, fibronectin (FN), α-SMA, and NG2. LPS also increased protein and gene expression levels of anti-inflammatory COX-2 and pro-inflammatory IL-6 molecules in PDLSCs. Inhibition of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNCs) transendothelial migration in presence of LPS-treated PDLSCs was accompanied by the reduction of CD29 expression within MNCs. However, LPS treatment did not change the inhibitory effect of PDLSCs on mitogen-stimulated proliferation of CD4 + and the ratio of CD4 + CD25 high /CD4 + CD25 low lymphocytes. LPS-treated PDLSCs did not change the frequency of CD34 + and CD45 + cells, but decreased the frequency of CD33 + and CD14 + myeloid cells within MNCs. Moreover, LPS treatment attenuated the stimulatory effect of PDLSCs on CFC activity of MNCs, predominantly the CFU-GM number. The results indicated that LPS-activated ERK1,2 was at least partly involved in the observed effects on PDLSC differentiation capacity, acquisition of myofibroblastic attributes, and changes of their immunomodulatory features. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Periodontal ligament influence on the stress distribution in a removable partial denture supported by implant: a finite element analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Marcelo Archangelo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The non-homogenous aspect of periodontal ligament (PDL has been examined using finite element analysis (FEA to better simulate PDL behavior. The aim of this study was to assess, by 2-D FEA, the influence of non-homogenous PDL on the stress distribution when the free-end saddle removable partial denture (RPD is partially supported by an osseointegrated implant. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Six finite element (FE models of a partially edentulous mandible were created to represent two types of PDL (non-homogenous and homogenous and two types of RPD (conventional RPD, supported by tooth and fibromucosa; and modified RPD, supported by tooth and implant [10.00x3.75 mm]. Two additional Fe models without RPD were used as control models. The non-homogenous PDL was modeled using beam elements to simulate the crest, horizontal, oblique and apical fibers. The load (50 N was applied in each cusp simultaneously. Regarding boundary conditions the border of alveolar ridge was fixed along the x axis. The FE software (Ansys 10.0 was used to compute the stress fields, and the von Mises stress criterion (svM was applied to analyze the results. RESULTS: The peak of svM in non-homogenous PDL was higher than that for the homogenous condition. The benefits of implants were enhanced for the non-homogenous PDL condition, with drastic svM reduction on the posterior half of the alveolar ridge. The implant did not reduce the stress on the support tooth for both PDL conditions. Conclusion: The PDL modeled in the non-homogeneous form increased the benefits of the osseointegrated implant in comparison with the homogeneous condition. Using the non-homogenous PDL, the presence of osseointegrated implant did not reduce the stress on the supporting tooth.

  2. The chronology of the radiographic visibility of the periodontal ligament and the root pulp in the lower third molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timme, M; Timme, W H; Olze, A; Ottow, C; Ribbecke, S; Pfeiffer, H; Dettmeyer, R; Schmeling, A

    2017-07-01

    Eruption and mineralization of third molars are the main criteria for dental age estimation in living adolescents. As the validation of completion of the 18th year of life appears not to be possible with the forensically necessary probability even if all the third molars of a person are completely mineralized, degenerative dental characteristics might be used for this purpose. In previous publications by Olze et al. (2010a,b) the radiographic visibility of the periodontal ligament and the root pulp in lower third molars were suggested as methods for this purpose. The aim of this study was to validate these characteristics in a large study population with a wide age range. In a material of 2346 orthopantomograms of 1167 female and 1179 male Germans aged from 15 to 70years the radiographic visibility of the root pulp in the lower third molars with completed mineralization were studied according to stage classifications proposed by Olze et al. (2010a,b). 1541 orthopantomograms of 705 females and 836 males with a sufficient quality of the radiograph showed at least one third molar. The suitability of the studied characteristics for age estimation in living individuals could be confirmed. Males and females presenting stage 1 of both characteristics were older than 18years of life. Males and females presenting stage 2 of both characteristics were older than 21years of life. The high number of missing third molars in the studied age group (46-60%) must be considered as a limitation of the methods. In further studies the influence of ethnicity, dietary habits and modern dental health care on the characteristics in question should be investigated. Copyright © 2017 The Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Coconut milk and probiotic milk as storage media to maintain periodontal ligament cell viability: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Divya; Gadicherla, Prahlad; Chandra, Prakash; Anandakrishna, Latha

    2017-06-01

    The viability of periodontal ligament (PDL) cells is a significant determinant of the long-term prognosis of replanted avulsed teeth. A storage medium is often required to maintain the viability of these cells during the extra-alveolar period. Many studies have been carried out to search for the most suitable storage medium for avulsed teeth, but an ideal solution has not yet been found. The purpose of the study was to compare and analyze the ability of coconut milk and probiotic milk to maintain PDL cell viability. In an in vitro setting, 69 caries free human premolars with normal periodontium that had been extracted for orthodontic purposes were randomly divided into two experimental groups on the basis of storage media used (i.e., coconut milk or probiotic milk) and a Hanks' balanced salt solution (HBSS) control group (23 samples per group). Immediately after extraction, the teeth were stored dry for 20 min and then immersed for 30 min in one of the storage media. The teeth were then subjected to collagenase-dispase assay and labeled with 0.5% trypan blue staining solution for determination of cell viability. The number of viable cells was counted under a light microscope and statistically analyzed using anova and post hoc Tukey test (P ≤ 0.05). Statistical analysis demonstrated there was a significant difference (P coconut milk and probiotic milk as well as HBSS in maintaining cell viability. However, there was no significant difference between probiotic milk and HBSS in ability to maintain PDL cell viability (P > 0.05). Coconut milk may not be suitable as an interim transport media due to poor maintenance of cell viability. However, probiotic milk was able to maintain PDL cell viability as well as HBSS. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Human periodontal ligament stem cells secretome from multiple sclerosis patients suppresses NALP3 inflammasome activation in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soundara Rajan, Thangavelu; Giacoppo, Sabrina; Diomede, Francesca; Bramanti, Placido; Trubiani, Oriana; Mazzon, Emanuela

    2017-01-01

    Research in recent years has largely explored the immunomodulatory effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and their secretory products, called “secretome,” in the treatment of neuroinflammatory diseases. Here, we examined whether such immunosuppressive effects might be elicited due to inflammasome inactivation. To this end, we treated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice model of multiple sclerosis (MS) with the conditioned medium or purified exosomes/microvesicles (EMVs) obtained from relapsing-remitting-MS patients human periodontal ligament stem cells (hPDLSCs) and investigated the regulation of NALP3 inflammasome. We noticed enhanced expression of NALP3, Cleaved Caspase 1, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-18 in EAE mouse spinal cord. Conversely, hPDLSCs-conditioned medium and EMVs significantly blocked NALP3 inflammasome activation and provided protection from EAE. Reduction in NALP3, Cleaved Caspase 1, IL-1β, and IL-18 level was noticed in conditioned medium and EMVs-treated EAE mice. Pro-inflammatory Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 and nuclear factor (NF)-κB were elevated in EAE, while hPDLSCs-conditioned medium and EMVs treatment reduced their expression and increased IκB-α expression. Characterization of hPDLSCs-conditioned medium showed substantial level of anti-inflammatory IL-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, and stromal cell–derived factor 1α (SDF-1α). We propose that the immunosuppressive role of hPDLSCs-derived conditioned medium and EMVs in EAE mice may partly attribute to the presence of soluble immunomodulatory factors, NALP3 inflammasome inactivation, and NF-κB reduction. PMID:28764573

  5. Engineering tendon and ligament tissues: present developments towards successful clinical products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Márcia T; Reis, Rui L; Gomes, Manuela E

    2013-09-01

    Musculoskeletal diseases are one of the leading causes of disability worldwide. Among them, tendon and ligament injuries represent an important aspect to consider in both athletes and active working people. Tendon and ligament damage is an important cause of joint instability, and progresses into early onset of osteoarthritis, pain, disability and eventually the need for joint replacement surgery. The social and economical burden associated with these medical conditions presents a compelling argument for greater understanding and expanding research on this issue. The particular physiology of tendons and ligaments (avascular, hypocellular and overall structural mechanical features) makes it difficult for currently available treatments to reach a complete and long-term functional repair of the damaged tissue, especially when complete tear occurs. Despite the effort, the treatment modalities for tendon and ligament are suboptimal, which have led to the development of alternative therapies, such as the delivery of growth factors, development of engineered scaffolds or the application of stem cells, which have been approached in this review. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Human β-defensin 3-combined gold nanoparticles for enhancement of osteogenic differentiation of human periodontal ligament cells in inflammatory microenvironments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou J

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Jing Zhou,1 Yangheng Zhang,1 Lingjun Li,1 Huangmei Fu,2 Wenrong Yang,2 Fuhua Yan1 1Nanjing Stomatological Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of China; 2School of Life and Environmental Science, Centre for Chemistry and Biotechnology, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC, Australia Objective: It is a great challenge to absorb and conduct biophysicochemical interactions at the nano-bio interface. Peptides are emerging as versatile materials whose function can be programmed to perform specific tasks. Peptides combined nanoparticles might be utilized as a new approach of treatment. Human β-defensin 3 (hBD3, possesses both antimicrobial and proregeneration properties. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs have shown promising applications in the field of tissue engineering. However, the coordinating effects of AuNPs and hBD3 on human periodontal ligament cells (hPDLCs remain unknown. In this study, we systematically investigated whether AuNPs and hBD3 would be able to coordinate and enhance the osteogenic differentiation of hPDLCs in inflammatory microenvironments, and the underlying mechanisms was explored. Methods: hPDLCs were stimulated with E. coli-LPS, hBD3 and AuNPs. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP and alizarin red S staining were used to observe the effects of hBD3 and AuNPs on the osteogenic differentiation of hPDLCs. Real-time PCR and western blot were performed to evaluate the osteogenic differentiation and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway related gene and protein expression.Results: In the inflammatory microenvironments stimulated by E. coli-LPS, we found that AuNPs and hBD3 increased the proliferation of hPDLCs slightly. In addition, hBD3-combined AuNPs could significantly enhance ALP activities and mineral deposition in vitro. Meanwhile, we observed that the osteogenic differentiation-related gene and protein expressions of ALP, collagenase-I (COL-1 and runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx-2 were

  7. Poly(Lactic-co-Glycolic Acid: Applications and Future Prospects for Periodontal Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyu Sun

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal tissue regeneration is the ultimate goal of the treatment for periodontitis-affected teeth. The success of regenerative modalities relies heavily on the utilization of appropriate biomaterials with specific properties. Poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA, a synthetic aliphatic polyester, has been actively investigated for periodontal therapy due to its favorable mechanical properties, tunable degradation rates, and high biocompatibility. Despite the attractive characteristics, certain constraints associated with PLGA, in terms of its hydrophobicity and limited bioactivity, have led to the introduction of modification strategies that aimed to improve the biological performance of the polymer. Here, we summarize the features of the polymer and update views on progress of its applications as barrier membranes, bone grafts, and drug delivery carriers, which indicate that PLGA can be a good candidate material in the field of periodontal regenerative medicine.

  8. Blood flow in healed and inflamed periodontal tissues of dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hock, J.M.; Kim, S.

    1987-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine if increased blood flow associated with gingivitis would decrease following resolution of gingival inflammation in dogs with periodontitis; if increased blood flow in inflamed gingiva was associated with changes in the blood flow of alveolar bone, and if blood flow in gingiva and alveolar bone increased if periodontitis was reactivated by ligating teeth. Regional blood flow was measured in dogs with pre-existing periodontitis, using radioisotope-labelled, plastic microspheres. In the first experiment on 4 adult Beagle dogs, teeth in the left jaws were treated to resolve the periodontitis, while teeth in the right jaws were not treated. Gingival and bone blood flow were measured after 12 wk. Blood flow was significantly (p 1 and gingiva with G.I.<2 was significant (p<0.04). Blood flow in bone was not altered by changes in the inflammatory status of the overlying gingiva. The findings suggest that changes in blood flow associated with inflammation are reversible and that blood flow alveolar bone is regulated independently of gingival blood flow. (author)

  9. Blood flow in healed and inflamed periodontal tissues of dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hock, J.M.; Kim, S.

    1987-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine if increased blood flow associated with gingivitis would decrease following resolution of gingival inflammation in dogs with periodontitis; if increased blood flow in inflamed gingiva was associated with changes in the blood flow of alveolar bone, and if blood flow in gingiva and alveolar bone increased if periodontitis was reactivated by ligating teeth. Regional blood flow was measured in dogs with pre-existing periodontitis, using radioisotope-labelled, plastic microspheres. In the first experiment on 4 adult Beagle dogs, teeth in the left jaws were treated to resolve the periodontitis, while teeth in the right jaws were not treated. Gingival and bone blood flow were measured after 12 wk. Blood flow was significantly (p<0.05) lower in non-inflamed healed gingiva (32.1 +- 2.7 ml/min/100 g) than in inflamed gingiva (46.1 +- 5.3 ml/min/100 g). No differences in the blood flow of the alveolar bone underlying inflamed or non-inflamed gingiva were present. In the second experiment, the right mandibular teeth of 5 dogs were treated to resolve periodontitis while teeth in the other quadrants were ligated for 4, 10 or 12 wk. The duration of ligation did not alter blood flow. Gingival blood flow around ligated maxillary and mandibular teeth was comparable and approximately 54% higher than around non-ligated teeth (p<0.03). The difference in blood flow between gingiva with G.I.>1 and gingiva with G.I.<2 was significant (p<0.04). Blood flow in bone was not altered by changes in the inflammatory status of the overlying gingiva. The findings suggest that changes in blood flow associated with inflammation are reversible and that blood flow alveolar bone is regulated independently of gingival blood flow.

  10. Braided and Stacked Electrospun Nanofibrous Scaffolds for Tendon and Ligament Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothrauff, Benjamin B; Lauro, Brian B; Yang, Guang; Debski, Richard E; Musahl, Volker; Tuan, Rocky S

    2017-05-01

    Tendon and ligament injuries are a persistent orthopedic challenge given their poor innate healing capacity. Nonwoven electrospun nanofibrous scaffolds composed of polyesters have been used to mimic the mechanics and topographical cues of native tendons and ligaments. However, nonwoven nanofibers have several limitations that prevent broader clinical application, including poor cell infiltration, as well as tensile and suture-retention strengths that are inferior to native tissues. In this study, multilayered scaffolds of aligned electrospun nanofibers of two designs-stacked or braided-were fabricated. Mechanical properties, including structural and mechanical properties and suture-retention strength, were determined using acellular scaffolds. Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were seeded on scaffolds for up to 28 days, and assays for tenogenic differentiation, histology, and biochemical composition were performed. Braided scaffolds exhibited improved tensile and suture-retention strengths, but reduced moduli. Both scaffold designs supported expression of tenogenic markers, although the effect was greater on braided scaffolds. Conversely, cell infiltration was superior in stacked constructs, resulting in enhanced cell number, total collagen content, and total sulfated glycosaminoglycan content. However, when normalized against cell number, both designs modulated extracellular matrix protein deposition to a similar degree. Taken together, this study demonstrates that multilayered scaffolds of aligned electrospun nanofibers supported tenogenic differentiation of seeded MSCs, but the macroarchitecture is an important consideration for applications of tendon and ligament tissue engineering.

  11. Development of hybrid polymer scaffolds for potential applications in ligament and tendon tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahoo, Sambit [Tissue Repair Lab, Division of Bioengineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117574 (Singapore); Cho-Hong, James Goh [Tissue Repair Lab, Division of Bioengineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117574 (Singapore); Siew-Lok, Toh [Tissue Repair Lab, Division of Bioengineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117574 (Singapore)

    2007-09-15

    Fibre-based scaffolds have been widely used for tendon and ligament tissue engineering. Knitted scaffolds have been proved to favour collagenous matrix deposition which is crucial for tendon/ligament reconstruction. However, such scaffolds have the limitation of being dependent on a gel system for cell seeding, which is unstable in a dynamic environment such as the knee joint. This study developed three types of hybrid scaffolds, based on knitted biodegradable polyester scaffolds, aiming to improve mechanical properties and cell attachment and proliferation on the scaffolds. The hybrid scaffolds were created by coating the knitted scaffolds with a thin film of poly ({epsilon}-caprolactone) (group I), poly (D, L-lactide-co-glycolide) nanofibres (group II) and type 1 collagen (group III). Woven scaffolds were also fabricated and compared with the various hybrid scaffolds in terms of their mechanical properties during in vitro degradation and cell attachment and growth. This study demonstrated that the coating techniques could modulate the mechanical properties and facilitate cell attachment and proliferation in the hybrid scaffold, which could be applied with promise in tissue engineering of tendons/ligaments.

  12. Development of hybrid polymer scaffolds for potential applications in ligament and tendon tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, Sambit; Cho-Hong, James Goh; Siew-Lok, Toh

    2007-01-01

    Fibre-based scaffolds have been widely used for tendon and ligament tissue engineering. Knitted scaffolds have been proved to favour collagenous matrix deposition which is crucial for tendon/ligament reconstruction. However, such scaffolds have the limitation of being dependent on a gel system for cell seeding, which is unstable in a dynamic environment such as the knee joint. This study developed three types of hybrid scaffolds, based on knitted biodegradable polyester scaffolds, aiming to improve mechanical properties and cell attachment and proliferation on the scaffolds. The hybrid scaffolds were created by coating the knitted scaffolds with a thin film of poly (ε-caprolactone) (group I), poly (D, L-lactide-co-glycolide) nanofibres (group II) and type 1 collagen (group III). Woven scaffolds were also fabricated and compared with the various hybrid scaffolds in terms of their mechanical properties during in vitro degradation and cell attachment and growth. This study demonstrated that the coating techniques could modulate the mechanical properties and facilitate cell attachment and proliferation in the hybrid scaffold, which could be applied with promise in tissue engineering of tendons/ligaments

  13. Biomechanical and histologic evaluation of tissue engineered ligaments using chitosan and hyaluronan hybrid polymer fibers: a rabbit medial collateral ligament reconstruction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irie, Toru; Majima, Tokifumi; Sawaguchi, Naohiro; Funakoshi, Tadanao; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro; Minami, Akio

    2011-05-01

    In this study, we used a rabbit medial collateral ligament reconstruction model to evaluate a novel chitosan-based hyaluronan hybrid polymer fiber scaffold for ligament tissue engineering and to examine whether mechanical forces exerted in an in vivo model increased extracellular matrix production by seeded fibroblasts. Scaffolds were used 2 weeks after incubation with fibroblasts obtained from the same rabbit in a cell-seeded scaffold (CSS) group and without cells in a noncell-seeded scaffold (NCSS) group. At 3, 6, and 12 weeks after surgery, the failure loads of the engineered ligaments in the CSS groups were significantly greater than those in the NCSS groups. At 6 weeks after surgery, the reconstructed tissue of the CSS group was positive for type I collagen, whereas that in the NCSS group was negative for type I collagen. At 12 weeks after surgery, the reconstructed tissue stained positive for type I collagen in the CSS group, but negative in the NCSS group. Our results indicate that the scaffold material enhanced the production of type I collagen and led to improved mechanical strength in the engineered ligament in vivo. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Effects of mechanical strain on human mesenchymal stem cells and ligament fibroblasts in a textured poly(L-lactide) scaffold for ligament tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreja, Ludwika; Liedert, Astrid; Schlenker, Heiter; Brenner, Rolf E; Fiedler, Jörg; Friemert, Benedikt; Dürselen, Lutz; Ignatius, Anita

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to prove the effect of cyclic uniaxial intermittent strain on the mRNA expression of ligament-specific marker genes in human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and anterior cruciate ligament-derived fibroblasts (ACL-fibroblasts) seeded onto a novel textured poly(L-lactide) scaffold (PLA scaffold). Cell-seeded scaffolds were mechanically stimulated by cyclic uniaxial stretching. The expression of ligament matrix gene markers: collagen types I and III, fibronectin, tenascin C and decorin, as well as the proteolytic enzymes matrix metalloproteinase MMP-1 and MMP-2 and their tissue specific inhibitors TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 was investigated by analysing the mRNA expression using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and related to the static control. In ACL-fibroblasts seeded on PLA, mechanical load induced up-regulation of collagen types I and III, fibronectin and tenascin C. No effect of mechanical stimulation on the expression of ligament marker genes was found in undifferentiated MSC seeded on PLA. The results indicated that the new textured PLA scaffold could transfer the mechanical load to the ACL-fibroblasts and improved their ligament phenotype. This scaffold might be suitable as a cell-carrying component of ACL prostheses.

  15. Effect of dynamic three-dimensional culture on osteogenic potential of human periodontal ligament-derived mesenchymal stem cells entrapped in alginate microbeads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchiatini, R; Penolazzi, L; Lambertini, E; Angelozzi, M; Morganti, C; Mazzitelli, S; Trombelli, L; Nastruzzi, C; Piva, R

    2015-08-01

    Bioreactors are devices that efficiently create an environment that enables cell cultures to grow in a three-dimensional (3D) context mimicking in vivo conditions. In this study, we investigate the effect of dynamic fluid flow on the osteogenic potential of human mesenchymal stem cells obtained from periodontal ligament and entrapped in alginate microbeads. After proper immunophenotyping, cells were encapsulated in barium alginate, cultured in 3D static or 3D dynamic conditions represented by a bioreactor system. Calcein-AM/propidium iodide staining was used to assess cellular viability. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to analyze the expression of osteogenic markers (Runx2 and COL1). Alizarin Red S staining and the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to assess mineral matrix deposition. Optimal encapsulation procedure, in terms of polymer pumping rate, distance from droplet generator to the gelling bath and atomizing airflow was assessed. Cell viability was not affected by encapsulation in alginate microbeads. Bioreactor cell exposure was effective in anticipating osteogenic differentiation and improving mineral matrix deposition. For the first time human mesenchymal stem cells obtained from periodontal ligaments encapsulated in alginate microbeads were cultured in a bioreactor system. This combination could represent a promising strategy to create a cell-based smart system with enhanced osteogenic potential useful for many different dental applications. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Local application of IGFBP5 protein enhanced periodontal tissue regeneration via increasing the migration, cell proliferation and osteo/dentinogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells in an inflammatory niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Nannan; Zhang, Fengqiu; Li, Guoqing; Zhang, Xiuli; Lin, Xiao; Yang, Haoqing; Wang, Lijun; Cao, Yangyang; Du, Juan; Fan, Zhipeng

    2017-09-29

    Periodontitis is a widespread infectious disease ultimately resulting in tooth loss. The number of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in patients with periodontitis is decreased, and MSC functions are impaired. Rescuing the impaired function of MSCs in periodontitis is the key for treatment, especially in a manner independent of exogenous MSCs. Our previous study found that overexpressed insulin-like growth factor binding protein 5 (IGFBP5) could promote exogenous MSC-mediated periodontal tissue regeneration. Here, we investigate the role of IGFBP5 protein in MSCs and periodontal tissue regeneration independent of exogenous MSCs in an inflammatory niche. TNFα was used to mimic the inflammatory niche. Lentiviral IGFBP5 shRNA was used to silence IGFBP5 and recombinant human IGFBP5 protein (rhIGFBP5) was used to stimulate the periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) and bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs). The effects of IGFBP5 on PDLSCs were evaluated using the scratch-simulated wound migration, Transwell chemotaxis, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, Alizarin red staining, Cell Counting Kit-8, Western blot, Real-time PCR, Co-IP and ChIP assays. The swine model of periodontitis was used to investigate the functions of IGFBP5 for periodontal regeneration and its anti-inflammation effect. We discovered that 0.5 ng/ml rhIGFBP5 protein enhanced the migration, chemotaxis, osteo/dentinogenic differentiation and cell proliferation of MSCs under the inflammatory condition. Moreover, 0.5 ng/ml rhIGFBP5 application could rescue the impaired functions of IGFBP5-silenced-MSCs in the inflammatory niche. Furthermore, local injection of rhIGFBP5 could promote periodontal tissue regeneration and relieve the local inflammation in a minipig model of periodontitis. Mechanistically, we found that BCOR negatively regulated the expression of IGFBP5 in MSCs. BCOR formed a protein complex with histone demethylase KDM6B and raised histone K27 methylation in the IGFBP5 promoter. This study

  17. Preparation of the fast setting and degrading Ca–Si–Mg cement with both odontogenesis and angiogenesis differentiation of human periodontal ligament cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yi-Wen; Hsu, Tuan-Ti; Wang, Kan; Shie, Ming-You

    2016-01-01

    Develop a fast setting and controllable degrading magnesium–calcium silicate cement (Mg–CS) by sol–gel, and establish a mechanism using Mg ions to stimulate human periodontal ligament cells (hPDLs) are two purposes of this study. We have used the diametral tensile strength measurement to obtain the mechanical strength and stability of Mg–CS cement; in addition, the cement degradation properties is realized by measuring the releasing amount of Si and Mg ions in the simulated body fluid. The other cell characteristics of hPDLs, such as proliferation, differentiation and mineralization were examined while hPDLs were cultured on specimen surfaces. This study found out the degradation rate of Mg–CS cements depends on the Mg content in CS. Regarding in vitro bioactivity; the CS cements were covered with abundant clusters of apatite spherulites after immersion of 24 h, while less apatite spherulites were formatted on the Mg-rich cement surfaces. In addition, the authors also explored the effects of Mg ions on the odontogenesis and angiogenesis differentiation of hPDLs in comparison with CS cement. The proliferation, alkaline phosphatase, odontogenesis-related genes (DSPP and DMP-1), and angiogenesis-related protein (vWF and ang-1) secretion of hPDLs were significantly stimulated when the Mg content of the specimen was increased. The results in this study suggest that Mg–CS materials with this modified composition could stimulate hPDLs behavior and can be good bioceramics for bone substitutes and hard tissue regeneration applications as they stimulate odontogenesis/angiogenesis. - Highlights: • The fast setting and degrading Mg–CS cement was synthesized by sol–gel. • Promoted proliferation of hPDLs on Mg–CS specimens • Mg–CS can degrade and release Si and Mg ions into SBF. • Up-regulation of odontogenic and angiogenic of hPDLs • Mg–CS may be good bone substitutes for hard tissue regeneration applications.

  18. Preparation of the fast setting and degrading Ca–Si–Mg cement with both odontogenesis and angiogenesis differentiation of human periodontal ligament cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yi-Wen [Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); 3D Printing Medical Research Center, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Tuan-Ti [Institute of Oral Science, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Wang, Kan [H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Georgia Tech Manufacturing Institute, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Shie, Ming-You, E-mail: eviltacasi@gmail.com [3D Printing Medical Research Center, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung City, Taiwan (China)

    2016-03-01

    Develop a fast setting and controllable degrading magnesium–calcium silicate cement (Mg–CS) by sol–gel, and establish a mechanism using Mg ions to stimulate human periodontal ligament cells (hPDLs) are two purposes of this study. We have used the diametral tensile strength measurement to obtain the mechanical strength and stability of Mg–CS cement; in addition, the cement degradation properties is realized by measuring the releasing amount of Si and Mg ions in the simulated body fluid. The other cell characteristics of hPDLs, such as proliferation, differentiation and mineralization were examined while hPDLs were cultured on specimen surfaces. This study found out the degradation rate of Mg–CS cements depends on the Mg content in CS. Regarding in vitro bioactivity; the CS cements were covered with abundant clusters of apatite spherulites after immersion of 24 h, while less apatite spherulites were formatted on the Mg-rich cement surfaces. In addition, the authors also explored the effects of Mg ions on the odontogenesis and angiogenesis differentiation of hPDLs in comparison with CS cement. The proliferation, alkaline phosphatase, odontogenesis-related genes (DSPP and DMP-1), and angiogenesis-related protein (vWF and ang-1) secretion of hPDLs were significantly stimulated when the Mg content of the specimen was increased. The results in this study suggest that Mg–CS materials with this modified composition could stimulate hPDLs behavior and can be good bioceramics for bone substitutes and hard tissue regeneration applications as they stimulate odontogenesis/angiogenesis. - Highlights: • The fast setting and degrading Mg–CS cement was synthesized by sol–gel. • Promoted proliferation of hPDLs on Mg–CS specimens • Mg–CS can degrade and release Si and Mg ions into SBF. • Up-regulation of odontogenic and angiogenic of hPDLs • Mg–CS may be good bone substitutes for hard tissue regeneration applications.

  19. Secretomes from bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells enhance periodontal tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Takamasa; Katagiri, Wataru; Osugi, Masashi; Sugimura, Yukiko; Hibi, Hideharu; Ueda, Minoru

    2015-04-01

    Periodontal tissue regeneration with the use of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) has been regarded as a future cell-based therapy. However, low survival rates and the potential tumorigenicity of implanted MSCs could undermine the efficacy of cell-based therapy. The use of conditioned media from MSCs (MSC-CM) may be a feasible approach to overcome these limitations. The aim of this study was to confirm the effect of MSC-CM on periodontal regeneration. MSC-CM were collected during their cultivation. The concentrations of the growth factors in MSC-CM were measured with the use of enzyme-linked immunoassay. Rat MSCs (rMSCs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells cultured in MSC-CM were assessed on wound-healing and angiogenesis. The expressions of osteogenetic- and angiogenic-related genes of rMSCs cultured in MSC-CM were quantified by means of real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis. In vivo, periodontal defects were prepared in the rat models and the collagen sponges with MSC-CM were implanted. MSC-CM includes insulin-like growth factor-1, vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor-β1 and hepatocyte growth factor. In vitro, wound-healing and angiogenesis increased significantly in MSC-CM. The levels of expression of osteogenetic- and angiogenic-related genes were significantly upregulated in rMSCs cultured with MSC-CM. In vivo, in the MSC-CM group, 2 weeks after implantation, immunohistochemical analysis showed several CD31-, CD105-or FLK-1-positive cells occurring frequently. At 4 weeks after implantation, regenerated periodontal tissue was observed in MSC-CM groups. The use of MSC-CM may be an alternative therapy for periodontal tissue regeneration because several cytokines included in MSC-CM will contribute to many processes of complicated periodontal tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Ibandronate promotes osteogenic differentiation of periodontal ligament stem cells by regulating the expression of microRNAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Qiang [Department of General Dentistry and Emergency, College of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710032 (China); Zhao, Zhi-Ning [Clinical Laboratory, 451 Hospital of Chinese PLA, Xi' an 710054 (China); Cheng, Jing-Tao [Department of Special Dentistry, College of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710032 (China); Zhang, Bin [Department of Orthodontics, College of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710032 (China); Xu, Jie [Department of Periodontology, College of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710032 (China); Huang, Fei; Zhao, Rui-Ni [Department of General Dentistry and Emergency, College of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710032 (China); Chen, Yong-Jin, E-mail: cyj1229@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of General Dentistry and Emergency, College of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710032 (China)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Ibandronate significantly promote the proliferation of PDLSC cells. {yields} Ibandronate enhanced the expression of ALP, COL-1, OPG, OCN, Runx2. {yields} The expression of a class of miRNAs, e.g., miR-18a, miR-133a, miR-141 and miR-19a, was significantly modified in PDLSC cells cultured with ibandronate. {yields} Ibandronate regulates the expression of diverse bone formation-related genes via miRNAs in PDLSCs. {yields} Ibandronate can suppress the activity of osteoclast while promoting the proliferation of osteoblast by regulating the expression of microRNAs. -- Abstract: Bisphosphonates (BPs) have a profound effect on bone resorption and are widely used to treat osteoclast-mediated bone diseases. They suppress bone resorption by inhibiting the activity of mature osteoclasts and/or the formation of new osteoclasts. Osteoblasts may be an alternative target for BPs. Periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) exhibit osteoblast-like features and are capable of differentiating into osteoblasts or cementoblasts. This study aimed to determine the effects of ibandronate, a nitrogen-containing BP, on the proliferation and the differentiation of PDLSCs and to identify the microRNAs (miRNAs) that mediate these effects. The PDLSCs were treated with ibandronate, and cell proliferation was measured using the MTT (3-dimethylthiazol-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay. The expression of genes and miRNAs involved in osteoblastic differentiation was assayed using quantitative real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Ibandronate promoted the proliferation of PDLSCs and enhanced the expression of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), type I collagen (COL-1), osteoprotegerin (OPG), osteocalcin (OCN), and Runx2. The expression of miRNAs, including miR-18a, miR-133a, miR-141 and miR-19a, was significantly altered in the PDLSCs cultured with ibandronate. In PDLSCs, ibandronate regulates the expression of diverse bone formation

  1. Ibandronate promotes osteogenic differentiation of periodontal ligament stem cells by regulating the expression of microRNAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Qiang; Zhao, Zhi-Ning; Cheng, Jing-Tao; Zhang, Bin; Xu, Jie; Huang, Fei; Zhao, Rui-Ni; Chen, Yong-Jin

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Ibandronate significantly promote the proliferation of PDLSC cells. → Ibandronate enhanced the expression of ALP, COL-1, OPG, OCN, Runx2. → The expression of a class of miRNAs, e.g., miR-18a, miR-133a, miR-141 and miR-19a, was significantly modified in PDLSC cells cultured with ibandronate. → Ibandronate regulates the expression of diverse bone formation-related genes via miRNAs in PDLSCs. → Ibandronate can suppress the activity of osteoclast while promoting the proliferation of osteoblast by regulating the expression of microRNAs. -- Abstract: Bisphosphonates (BPs) have a profound effect on bone resorption and are widely used to treat osteoclast-mediated bone diseases. They suppress bone resorption by inhibiting the activity of mature osteoclasts and/or the formation of new osteoclasts. Osteoblasts may be an alternative target for BPs. Periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) exhibit osteoblast-like features and are capable of differentiating into osteoblasts or cementoblasts. This study aimed to determine the effects of ibandronate, a nitrogen-containing BP, on the proliferation and the differentiation of PDLSCs and to identify the microRNAs (miRNAs) that mediate these effects. The PDLSCs were treated with ibandronate, and cell proliferation was measured using the MTT (3-dimethylthiazol-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay. The expression of genes and miRNAs involved in osteoblastic differentiation was assayed using quantitative real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Ibandronate promoted the proliferation of PDLSCs and enhanced the expression of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), type I collagen (COL-1), osteoprotegerin (OPG), osteocalcin (OCN), and Runx2. The expression of miRNAs, including miR-18a, miR-133a, miR-141 and miR-19a, was significantly altered in the PDLSCs cultured with ibandronate. In PDLSCs, ibandronate regulates the expression of diverse bone formation-related genes via miRNAs. The exact

  2. Histological analysis of effects of 24% EDTA gel for nonsurgical treatment of periodontal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vasconcellos, Luana Marotta Reis; Ricardo, Lucilene Hernandes; Balducci, Ivan; de Vasconcellos, Luis Gustavo Oliveira; Carvalho, Yasmin Rodarte

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate, by means of histological and histomorphometric analysis, the effects of 24% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) gel in periodontal tissue when used in combination with conventional periodontal treatment. Periodontitis was induced in the 2nd upper left permanent molars of 45 male Wistar rats by means of ligature. After 5 weeks, this was removed and debridement was performed. The animals were then randomly divided into 3 groups; group 1: mechanical treatment, group 2: mechanical treatment and EDTA gel application for 2 min, and group 3: mechanical treatment and placebo gel application for 2 min. After the treatment, rinsing was done with 0.9% saline solution for 1 min in all cases, followed by root notching in the deepest part of the pocket. After 4, 10, and 28 days the animals were sacrificed. The averages obtained were evaluated by means of test two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey statistical tests (P 24% EDTA gel did not interfere with periodontal tissue repair when used in combination with conventional periodontal treatment.

  3. Substance P and Calcitonin gene-related peptide expression in human periodontal ligament after root canal preparation with Reciproc Blue, WaveOne Gold, XP EndoShaper and hand files.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caviedes-Bucheli, J; Rios-Osorio, N; Rey-Rojas, M; Laguna-Rivero, F; Azuero-Holguin, M M; Diaz, L E; Curtidor, H; Castaneda-Ramirez, J J; Munoz, H R

    2018-05-17

    To quantify the Substance P (SP) and Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) expression in healthy human periodontal ligament from premolars after root canal preparation with Reciproc Blue, WaveOne Gold, XP EndoShaper and hand files. Fifty human periodontal ligament samples were obtained from healthy mandibular premolars where extraction was indicated for orthodontic reasons. Prior to extraction, 40 of these premolars were equally divided into four groups, and root canals were prepared using four different systems: Reciproc Blue, WaveOne Gold, XP EndoShaper, and a hand instrumentation technique. The remaining 10 healthy premolars were extracted without treatment and served as a negative control group. All periodontal ligament samples were processed, and SP and CGRP were measured by radioimmunoassay. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to establish significant differences between groups and LSD post hoc comparisons were also performed. Greater SP and CGRP values were found in the hand instrumentation group, followed by the XP EndoShaper, WaveOne Gold and the Reciproc groups. The lower SP and CGRP values were for the healthy periodontal ligament group. The Kruskal-Wallis test revealed significant differences between groups (p 0.05). All the root canal preparation techniques tested increased SP and CGRP expression in human periodontal ligament, with hand files and XP EndoShaper instruments being associated with greater neuropeptide release compared to Reciproc Blue and WaveOne Gold files. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Towards an ideal polymer scaffold for tendon/ligament tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Sambit; Ouyang, Hong Wei; Goh, James Cho-Hong; Tay, Tong-Earn; Toh, Siew Lok

    2005-04-01

    Tissue engineering holds promise in treating injured tendons and ligaments by replacing the injured tissues with "engineered tissues" with identical mechanical and functional characteristics. A biocompatible, biodegradable, porous scaffold with optimized architecture, sufficient surface area for cell attachment, growth and proliferation, faborable mechanical properties, and suitable degradation rate is a pre-requisite to achieve success with this aproach. Knitted poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) scaffolds comprising of microfibers of 25 micron diameter were coated with PLGA nanofibers on their surfaces by electrospinning technique. A cell suspension of pig bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) was seeded on the scaffolds by pipetting, and the cell-scaffold constructs were cultured in a CO2 incubator, at 37°C for 1-2 weeks. The "engineered tissues" were then assessed for cell attachment and proliferation, tissue formation, and mechanical properties. Nanofibers, of diameter 300-900 nm, were spread randomly over the knitted scaffold. The reduction in pore-size from about 1 mm (in the knitted scaffold) to a few micrometers (in the nano-microscaffold) allowed cell seeding by direct pipetting, and eliminated the need of a cell-delivery system like fibrin gel. BMSCs were seen to attach and proliferate well on the nano-microscaffold, producing abundant extracellular matrix. Mechanical testing revealed that the cell-seeded nano-microscaffolds possessed slightly higher values of failure load, elastic-region stiffness and toe-region stiffness, than the unseeded scaffolds. The combination of superior mechanical strength and integrity of knitted microfibers, with the large surface area and improved hydrophilicity of the electrospun nanofibers facilitated cell attachment and new tissue formation. This holds promise in tissue engineering of tendon/ligament.

  5. Immunomodulatory Role of Stem Cell from Human Exfoliated Deciduous Teeth on Periodontal Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xianling; Shen, Zongshan; Guan, Meiliang; Huang, Qiting; Chen, Lingling; Qin, Wei; Ge, Xiaohu; Chen, Haijia; Xiao, Yin; Lin, Zhengmei

    2018-03-20

    Periodontitis is initiated by the infection of periodontal bacteria and subsequent tissue inflammation due to immunoreaction, eventually leading to periodontal apparatus loss. Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) have exhibited beneficial characteristics in dental tissue regeneration. However, the immunomodulatory functions of SHEDs have not been elucidated in the context of periodontitis treatment. In this study, we investigated the potential immunomodulatory effects of SHEDs on experimental periodontitis and demonstrated that multi-dose delivery of SHEDs led to periodontal tissue regeneration. SHEDs and monocytes/macrophages were cocultured in transwell systems and SHEDs were found to be capable of promoting monocyte/macrophages conversion to CD206+ M2-like phenotype. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) was employed to assess the survival and distribution of SHEDs after delivery in periodontal tissues in an induced periodontitis model, and BLI revealed that SHEDs survived for approximately 7 days in periodontal tissues with little tissue diffusion. Then, multi-dose SHEDs delivery was applied to treat periodontitis at 7-day intervals. Results showed that muti-dose SHEDs altered the cytokine expression profile in gingival crevicular fluid, reduced gum bleeding, increased new attachment of periodontal ligament and decreased osteoclast differentiation. Micro-computed tomography analysis showed SHEDs administration significantly increased periodontal regeneration and alveolar bone volume, and decreased distance of cementoenamel junction to alveolar bone crest (CEJ-ABC). Furthermore, an increase in the number of CD206+ M2 macrophages was observed in periodontal tissues following the delivery of SHEDs, which aligned well with the promoted conversion to CD206+ M2-like cells from monocytes/macrophages in vitro after stimulation by SHEDs. This study demonstrated in a rat periodontitis model that local delivery of SHEDs attributed to the induction of M2

  6. Embroidered polymer-collagen hybrid scaffold variants for ligament tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, M; Drechsel, N; Meyer, M; Meier, C; Hinüber, C; Breier, A; Hahner, J; Heinrich, G; Rentsch, C; Garbe, L-A; Ertel, W; Schulze-Tanzil, G; Lohan, A

    2014-10-01

    Embroidery techniques and patterns used for scaffold production allow the adaption of biomechanical scaffold properties. The integration of collagen into embroidered polylactide-co-caprolactone [P(LA-CL)] and polydioxanone (PDS) scaffolds could stimulate neo-tissue formation by anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) cells. Therefore, the aim of this study was to test embroidered P(LA-CL) and PDS scaffolds as hybrid scaffolds in combination with collagen hydrogel, sponge or foam for ligament tissue engineering. ACL cells were cultured on embroidered P(LA-CL) and PDS scaffolds without or with collagen supplementation. Cell adherence, vitality, morphology and ECM synthesis were analyzed. Irrespective of thread size, ACL cells seeded on P(LA-CL) scaffolds without collagen adhered and spread over the threads, whereas the cells formed clusters on PDS and larger areas remained cell-free. Using the collagen hydrogel, the scaffold colonization was limited by the gel instability. The collagen sponge layers integrated into the scaffolds were hardly penetrated by the cells. Collagen foams increased scaffold colonization in P(LA-CL) but did not facilitate direct cell-thread contacts in the PDS scaffolds. The results suggest embroidered P(LA-CL) scaffolds as a more promising basis for tissue engineering an ACL substitute than PDS due to superior cell attachment. Supplementation with a collagen foam presents a promising functionalization strategy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of composite films of silk fibroin and graphene oxide on the proliferation, cell viability and mesenchymal phenotype of periodontal ligament stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Lozano, F J; García-Bernal, D; Aznar-Cervantes, S; Ros-Roca, M A; Algueró, M C; Atucha, N M; Lozano-García, A A; Moraleda, J M; Cenis, J L

    2014-12-01

    In regenerative dentistry, stem cell-based therapy often requires a scaffold to deliver cells and/or growth factors to the injured site. Graphene oxide (GO) and silk fibroin (SF) are promising biomaterials for tissue engineering as they are both non toxic and promote cell proliferation. On the other hand, periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) are mesenchymal stem cells readily accessible with a promising use in cell therapy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of composite films of GO, SF and GO combined with fibroin in the mesenchymal phenotype, viability, adhesion and proliferation rate of PDLSCs. PDLSCs obtained from healthy extracted teeth were cultured on GO, SF or combination of GO and SF films up to 10 days. Adhesion level of PDSCs on the different biomaterials were evaluated after 12 h of culture, whereas proliferation rate of cells was assessed using the MTT assay. Level of apoptosis was determined using Annexin-V and 7-AAD and mesenchymal markers expression of PDLSCs were analyzed by flow cytometry. At day 7 of culture, MTT experiments showed a high rate of proliferation of PDLSCs growing on GO films compared to the other tested biomaterials, although it was slightly lower than in plastic (control). However PDLSCs growing in fibroin or GO plus fibroin films showed a discrete proliferation. Importantly, at day 10 of culture it was observed a significant increase in PDLSCs proliferation rate in GO films compared to plastic (P < 0.05), as well as in GO plus fibroin compared to fibroin alone (P < 0.001). Flow cytometry analysis showed that culture of PDLSCs in fibroin, GO or GO plus fibroin films did not significantly alter the level of expression of the mesenchymal markers CD73, CD90 or CD105 up to 168 h, being the cell viability in GO even better than obtained in plastic. Our findings suggest that the combination of human dental stem cells/fibroin/GO based-bioengineered constructs have strong potential for their therapeutic

  8. Interleukin-1beta-induced release of matrix proteins into culture media causes inhibition of mineralization of nodules formed by periodontal ligament cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, H H; Lin, W L; Cho, M I

    1999-05-01

    The mechanism by which interleukin-1beta (IL-1) inhibits the formation of mineralized tissue nodules by periodontal ligament (PDL) cells in vitro was investigated through the processes of morphological analysis, immunoprecipitation, and Northern blot analysis. PDL cells were obtained from a 2-day-old coagulum in tooth socket and cultured in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM) containing 10% fetal bone serum (FBS) and antibiotics. Confluent cells were grown for up to 3 weeks in the presence of ascorbic acid (AA), beta-glycerophosphate (GP), and dexamethasone (Dex), or IL-1. PDL cells cultured in the presence of GP and AA did not differentiate, but those treated with Dex, GP, and AA (Dex group) underwent differentiation, showing four stages (confluent, multilayer, nodule, and mineralization) of disparate morphological characteristics. In contrast, the cells treated with IL-1, Dex, GP, and AA (IL-1 group) did form multilayers but failed to form mineralized nodules. Electron microscopy demonstrated that the Dex-induced mineralized nodules contain multilayers of fibroblastic cells, numerous collagen fibrils, and dense globular as well as fused electron dense patches that are associated with numerous apatite crystals. The nodule-like structures in the IL-1 group were also comprised of multilayered fibroblastic cells, but they contained only a small number of collagen fibrils, and no dense globular or fused patches. Von Kossa staining confirmed the presence of numerous mineralized nodules in the Dex group and their scarceness in the IL-1 group. Northern blot analysis of IL-1-treated cells, however, revealed the presence of mRNAs for type I collagen (Col I), secreted protein, acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC), osteopontin (OPN), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone sialoprotein (BSP), and osteocalcin (OC), whose expression patterns and levels were comparable to those of the Dex group. Immunoprecipitation analysis of OPN and BSP in the cell/matrix layers and the culture

  9. Attachment sites of the coracoclavicular ligaments are characterized by fibrocartilage differentiation: a study on human cadaveric tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockert, B; Braunstein, V; Sprecher, C; Shinohara, Y; Kirchhoff, C; Milz, S

    2012-02-01

    We analyzed the immunohistochemical labeling patterns of the extracellular matrix of the coracoclavicular ligaments (CCL) in order to relate the molecular composition of the attachment sites to their mechanical environment. Ligaments were exposed from 12 fresh-frozen human cadaveric samples (four males, mean age: 48.6 ± 12.1 years). Cryosection of methanol-fixed and decalcified tissue was cut and sections were labeled with a panel of monoclonal antibodies directed against collagens, proteoglycans and proteins of vascular components. Attachment sites of both ligaments showed characteristic fibrocartilaginous labeling of collagen type II, aggrecan and link protein in all samples. Labeling for type II collagen was most conspicuous at the insertion of the coracoid process. Morphometry of adjacent samples revealed a fibrocartilage zone of 10-15% in relationship with the ligament proper, where labeling for type II collagen, aggrecan and link protein was negative. The presence of fibrocartilage at both entheses of the trapezoid and conoid ligament suggests that the CCL complex is subject to shear/compression forces. A variable fibrocartilage differentiation at the entheses of both ligaments may be related to the marked change in loading and insertion angle that the ligaments undergo during shoulder movement. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. PENYEMBUHAN LUKA SETELAH PERAWATAN BEDAH PERIODONTAL (Studi Pustaka

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    Natalina Natalina

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Periodontal therapy for treatment of periodontitis involves the elimination of anatomic defect. There are two primary approaches to eliminating these anatomic defects : resective (gingivectomy, osseous resection, and apically positioned flaps, and regenerative surgery (osseous graft, guided tissue regeneration, resorbable barriers, coronally position flaps. Aims. The dentist know the outcomes after periodontal surgery. References. Periodontal regeneration means healing after periodontal surgery that results in the formation of a new attachment apparatus, consisting of cementum, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone. Periodontal repair implies healing without restoration of the normal attachment apparatus. Histologic evaluation is the only reliable method to determine the true efficacy of periodontal therapies. Discussion. The variables involved in periodontal wound healing to solve how to achieve periodontal regeneration are manipulation of progenitor cell, alteration of pathologically exposed root surfaces, exclusion of gingival epithelium, and wound stabilization. Conclusions. Periodontal surgery usually do not result in periodontal regeneration. Gingival epithelium that proliferates apically can be inhibited by stabilization of the flap margin and regenerative surgery.

  11. Regeneration of the anterior cruciate ligament: Current strategies in tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nau, Thomas; Teuschl, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Recent advancements in the field of musculoskeletal tissue engineering have raised an increasing interest in the regeneration of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). It is the aim of this article to review the current research efforts and highlight promising tissue engineering strategies. The four main components of tissue engineering also apply in several ACL regeneration research efforts. Scaffolds from biological materials, biodegradable polymers and composite materials are used. The main cell sources are mesenchymal stem cells and ACL fibroblasts. In addition, growth factors and mechanical stimuli are applied. So far, the regenerated ACL constructs have been tested in a few animal studies and the results are encouraging. The different strategies, from in vitro ACL regeneration in bioreactor systems to bio-enhanced repair and regeneration, are under constant development. We expect considerable progress in the near future that will result in a realistic option for ACL surgery soon. PMID:25621217

  12. Commensal bacteria-dependent select expression of CXCL2 contributes to periodontal tissue homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenobia, Camille; Luo, Xiao Long; Hashim, Ahmed; Abe, Toshiharu; Jin, Lijian; Chang, Yucheng; Jin, Zhi Chao; Sun, Jian Xun; Hajishengallis, George; Curtis, Mike A; Darveau, Richard P

    2013-08-01

    The oral and intestinal host tissues both carry a heavy microbial burden. Although commensal bacteria contribute to healthy intestinal tissue structure and function, their contribution to oral health is poorly understood. A crucial component of periodontal health is the recruitment of neutrophils to periodontal tissue. To elucidate this process, gingival tissues of specific-pathogen-free and germ-free wild-type mice and CXCR2KO and MyD88KO mice were examined for quantitative analysis of neutrophils and CXCR2 chemoattractants (CXCL1, CXCL2). We show that the recruitment of neutrophils to the gingival tissue does not require commensal bacterial colonization but is entirely dependent on CXCR2 expression. Strikingly, however, commensal bacteria selectively upregulate the expression of CXCL2, but not CXCL1, in a MyD88-dependent way that correlates with increased neutrophil recruitment as compared with germ-free conditions. This is the first evidence that the selective use of chemokine receptor ligands contributes to neutrophil homing to healthy periodontal tissue. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Towards a Tissue-Engineered Ligament: Design and Preliminary Evaluation of a Dedicated Multi-Chamber Tension-Torsion Bioreactor

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    Cédric P. Laurent

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering may constitute a promising alternative to current strategies in ligament repair, providing that suitable scaffolds and culture conditions are proposed. The objective of the present contribution is to present the design and instrumentation of a novel multi-chamber tension-torsion bioreactor dedicated to ligament tissue engineering. A preliminary biological evaluation of a new braided scaffold within this bioreactor under dynamic loading is reported, starting with the development of a dedicated seeding protocol validated from static cultures. The results of these preliminary biological characterizations confirm that the present combination of scaffold, seeding protocol and bioreactor may enable us to head towards a suitable ligament tissue-engineered construct.

  14. Efficiency of nonsurgical periodontal therapy in moderate chronic periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlachkova, Antoaneta M; Popova, Christina L

    2014-01-01

    Chronic periodontitis is defined as an inflammatory disease of the supporting tissues of teeth caused by microorganisms in the dental biofilm, resulting in progressive destruction of the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone with pocket formation and gingival recession. Treatment of chronic periodontitis aims at arresting the inflammation and stopping the loss of attachment by removal and control of the supra- and subgingival biofilm and establishing a local environment and microflora compatible with periodontal health. The AIM of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of non-surgical therapy (scaling and root planning) in the treatment of moderate chronic periodontitis. The study included 30 patients aged between 33 and 75 years, of which 46.7% women and 53.3% men, diagnosed with moderate and, at some sites, severe periodontitis. They were treated with non-surgical periodontal therapy methods (scaling and root planning and curettage if indicated). Additionally, chemical plaque control with rinse water containing chlorhexidine was applied. The diagnostic and reassessment procedures included measuring the periodontal indices of 601 periodontal units before and after the therapy. The indices measured were the papillary bleeding index (PBI), the hygiene index (HI), the probing pocket depth (PPD) and the clinical attachment level (CAL). Significant reduction of plaque and gingival inflammation was found in all treated patients; we also found a statistically significant reduction of periodontal pockets with clinically measured depth 5 mm did not show statistically significant lower incidence rates probably due to the initially small percentage of deep pockets in the patients studied. There was a statistically significant reduction of all sites with attachment loss, the highest significance found at sites where the attachment loss was greater than 5 mm. The results of the study suggest that nonsurgical periodontal therapy is effective in managing the moderate

  15. Bromelain: A potential strategy for the adjuvant treatment of periodontitis

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    Felipe Rodolfo Pereira da Silva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bromelain, a mixture of proteases derived from different parts of pineapple, has been described to have therapeutic benefits in a diversity of inflammatory diseases. Such effects are associated to its proteolytic activity. As one of the most common and multifactorial diseases, periodontitis is a bacterial infection that results from the damage to the integrity of the tissues around the tooth, which includes gingiva, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone. In periodontitis, the recruitment of defense cells occurs, which releases several pro-inflammatory cytokines. At elevated levels, they can potentiate the alveolar bone loss. Studies have been conducted trying to alleviate the damage to the periodontium, however, the regeneration of the periodontal tissues is still limited. The Hypotheses: Based on previous studies showing that bromelain can act by decreasing the periodontal microorganism growth by proteolytically cleaving important cell surface molecules in leucocytes, by reducing neutrophils migration to periodontal sites, by downregulating the inflammation mediator levels, and by decreasing alveolar bone loss in the periodontitis. Evaluation of the Hypothesis: In a first moment, to evaluate this hypothesis, could be used two animal models: the ligature or bacteria inoculation induced periodontitis. If studies using animal models show encouraging results, appropriate clinical trials should be designed to evaluate the effect of bromelain as a complementary treatment for periodontal disease in humans, during the active phase or after the healing phase of mechanical therapy could be tested; to conduct a placebo-controlled study where health and periodontitis patients could be used.

  16. Treatment of periodontal disease with guided tissue regeneration technique using a hydroxyapatite and polycaprolactone membrane

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    L.M.A. Martins

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of a malleable membrane composed of hydroxyapatite (60% and polycaprolactone (40% as treatment of periodontal disease experimentally induced in dogs. A bone defect of standardized dimensions was created between the roots of the third and fourth premolar of 12 dogs for periodontal disease induction. Six dogs had the defect covered by the membrane and six dogs received only standard treatment for periodontal disease, also applied to dogs in the treated group. The animals were clinically monitored during the experiment. Radiographs were taken after surgery and at 60 days after treatment initiation. Clinical attachment level was also assessed in those moments. On the 60th day, dental sample of all animals, containing tooth, defect and periodontal tissues, were harvested, fixed in formalin and analyzed by microtomography and histology. During the experimental period, the animals showed no pain and purulent discharge, however, there was dehiscence in 50% of animals and membrane exposure in five out of six animals in the treated group. Clinical attachment level showed no difference between groups. Radiographs showed radiopacity equal to the alveolar bone in both groups. The microtomography revealed that the control group had higher bone volume in the defect compared to the treated group; however, the furcation was not filled by new alveolar bone in any animal. Histological analysis revealed that junctional epithelium invasion was lighter in the control group. New bone was only observed in the apical edge of the defect in both groups. Although the composite is biocompatible and able to keep the space of the defect, it did not promote periodontal tissue regeneration within 60 days of observation.

  17. [Study of methods of decalcification for making united slices of tooth and affiliated periodontic tissues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Mu, Ya-bing; Miao, Lei-ying; Sun, Hong-chen; Li, Cheng-ku

    2007-03-01

    To study the methods of decalcification for making united slices of tooth and affiliated periodontic tissues. Twenty-one samples containing dog molars and affiliated periodontic tissues were divided into seven mean groups. The pH value of solution, time of decalcification, weight and volume of samples, and content of decalcified calcium were detected. The slices were observed by HE, specific, and immunohistochemical stain. The velocity of decalcification increased with decrease of solution pH. The weight of samples lightened by 37.61%, the volume reduced by 25.97% on average, and calcium decalcified was 174.49 mg per gram humid samples. The EDTA decalcification was slowest, but it was best. Decalcification was fast in Plank-Rycho solution while the section was worst, and faster in the formyl solution containing aluminium chloride than in EDTA, and the section was better. The 50% formyl solution containing aluminium chloride is an ideal decalcifying solution.

  18. Ligament Tissue Engineering Using a Novel Porous Polycaprolactone Fumarate Scaffold and Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Grown in Platelet Lysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Eric R; Bravo, Dalibel; Dadsetan, Mahrokh; Riester, Scott M; Chase, Steven; Westendorf, Jennifer J; Dietz, Allan B; van Wijnen, Andre J; Yaszemski, Michael J; Kakar, Sanjeev

    2015-11-01

    Surgical reconstruction of intra-articular ligament injuries is hampered by the poor regenerative potential of the tissue. We hypothesized that a novel composite polymer "neoligament" seeded with progenitor cells and growth factors would be effective in regenerating native ligamentous tissue. We synthesized a fumarate-derivative of polycaprolactone fumarate (PCLF) to create macro-porous scaffolds to allow cell-cell communication and nutrient flow. Clinical grade human adipose tissue-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (AMSCs) were cultured in 5% human platelet lysate (PL) and seeded on scaffolds using a dynamic bioreactor. Cell growth, viability, and differentiation were examined using metabolic assays and immunostaining for ligament-related markers (e.g., glycosaminoglycans [GAGs], alkaline phosphatase [ALP], collagens, and tenascin-C). AMSCs seeded on three-dimensional (3D) PCLF scaffolds remain viable for at least 2 weeks with proliferating cells filling the pores. AMSC proliferation rates increased in PL compared to fetal bovine serum (FBS) (p ligament and tenogenic growth factor fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2), especially when cultured in the presence of PL (p engineering and ligament regeneration.

  19. Allograft tissue irradiation and failure rate after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashe, Jesse; Parisien, Robert L; Cusano, Antonio; Curry, Emily J; Bedi, Asheesh; Li, Xinning

    2016-06-18

    To evaluate whether anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) allograft irradiation is effective for sterility without compromising graft integrity and increasing failure rate. A literature search was conducted using PubMed, Cochrane, and Google. The following search terms were used: "Gamma irradiation AND anterior cruciate ligament AND allograft" with a return of 30 items. Filters used included: English language, years 1990-2015. There were 6 hits that were not reviewed, as there were only abstracts available. Another 5 hits were discarded, as they did not pertain to the topic of interest. There were 9 more articles that were excluded: Three studies were performed on animals and 6 studies were meta-analyses. Therefore, a total of 10 articles were applicable to review. There is a delicate dosing crossover where gamma irradiation is both effective for sterility without catastrophically compromising the structural integrity of the graft. Of note, low dose irradiation is considered less than 2.0 Mrad, moderate dose is between 2.1-2.4 Mrad, and high dose is greater than or equal to 2.5 Mrad. Based upon the results of the literature search, the optimal threshold for sterilization was found to be sterilization at less than 2.2 Mrad of gamma irradiation with the important caveat of being performed at low temperatures. The graft selection process also must include thorough donor screening and testing as well as harvesting the tissue in a sterile fashion. Utilization of higher dose (≥ 2.5 Mrad) of irradiation causes greater allograft tissue laxity that results in greater graft failure rate clinically in patients after ACL reconstruction. Allograft ACL graft gamma irradiated with less than 2.2 Mrad appears to be a reasonable alternative to autograft for patients above 25 years of age.

  20. Uncovering the molecular networks in periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, Fábio; Oppenheim, Frank G.; Helmerhorst, Eva J.; Amado, Francisco; Gomes, Pedro S.; Vitorino, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a complex immune-inflammatory disease that results from a preestablished infection in gingiva, mainly due to Gram-negative bacteria that colonize deeper in gingival sulcus and latter periodontal pocket. Host inflammatory and immune responses have both protective and destructive roles. Although cytokines, prostaglandins, and proteases struggle against microbial burden, these molecules promote connective tissue loss and alveolar bone resorption, leading to several histopathological changes, namely destruction of periodontal ligament, deepening of periodontal pocket, and bone loss, which can converge to attain tooth loss. Despite the efforts of genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics/peptidomics, and metabolomics, there is no available biomarker for periodontitis diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment evaluation, which could assist on the established clinical evaluation. Nevertheless, some genes, transcripts, proteins and metabolites have already shown a different expression in healthy subjects and in patients. Though, so far, ‘omics approaches only disclosed the host inflammatory response as a consequence of microbial invasion in periodontitis and the diagnosis in periodontitis still relies on clinical parameters, thus a molecular tool for assessing periodontitis lacks in current dental medicine paradigm. Saliva and gingival crevicular fluid have been attracting researchers due to their diagnostic potential, ease, and noninvasive nature of collection. Each one of these fluids has some advantages and disadvantages that are discussed in this review. PMID:24828325

  1. EVALUATION OF PERIODONTAL TISSUES CONDITION IN CHILDREN WITH BLOOD COAGULABILITY PATHOLOGY

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    M. A. Gavrilenko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Actuality of the problem is determined by the high prevalence of inflammatory diseases of periodontal tissues in children with blood pathology (100%. Primary prevention of dental caries and periodontal diseases has the exceptional importance in the dentist’s work with children who have blood coagulability disorders. Prevention of dental diseases of the oral cavity in this category of patients has a number of features because there is the risk of bleeding during both home oral hygiene and professional hygiene. Exogenous prevention (fluoride-containing gels, varnishes, solutions, sealants also has its own peculiarities in these children. On the other hand, the impossibility of preventive measures implementation is the significant factor in the pathogenesis of gingivitis and subsequently periodontitis in children with disorders of blood coagulability. Aim. To examine the status of oral hygiene in children with blood coagulability disorders. To examine the severity of inflammatory and destructive changes in the periodontal tissues in children with disorders of blood coagulability. To investigate timing and frequency of oral hygiene implementation in children with disorders of blood coagulability. To reveal the interrelations between the intensity, prevalence of periodontal tissues disorders in children with blood coagulability pathology and the periods of tooth development, taking into account the influence of risk factors and frequency of oral hygiene. Materials and methods. 120 children between 2 and 18 years old with blood coagulability disorders (hemophilia A, B, thrombocytopenia, thrombocytopathy were examined. Children were divided into following age groups: I – 2-5 years old (40 children, II – 6-10 years old (40 children, III – 11-18 years old (40 children, according to the periods of tooth development, with an equal number of children in groups according to diagnoses. Hygiene index value was determined according to

  2. Evaluation of periodontal tissues condition in children with blood coagulability pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Gavrilenko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Actuality of the problem is determined by the high prevalence of inflammatory diseases of periodontal tissues in children with blood pathology (100%. Primary prevention of dental caries and periodontal diseases has the exceptional importance in the dentist’s work with children who have blood coagulability disorders. Prevention of dental diseases of the oral cavity in this category of patients has a number of features because there is the risk of bleeding during both home oral hygiene and professional hygiene. Exogenous prevention (fluoride-containing gels, varnishes, solutions, sealants also has its own peculiarities in these children. On the other hand, the impossibility of preventive measures implementation is the significant factor in the pathogenesis of gingivitis and subsequently periodontitis in children with disorders of blood coagulability. Aim.To examine the status of oral hygiene in children with blood coagulability disorders.To examine the severity of inflammatory and destructive changes in the periodontal tissues in children with disorders of blood coagulability. To investigate timing and frequency of oral hygiene implementation in children with disorders of blood coagulability. To reveal the interrelations between the intensity, prevalence of periodontal tissues disorders in children with blood coagulability pathology and the periods of tooth development, taking into account the influence of risk factors and frequency of oral hygiene. Materials and methods. 120 children between 2 and 18 years old with blood coagulability disorders (hemophilia A, B, thrombocytopenia, thrombocytopathy were examined. Children were divided into following age groups: I – 2-5 years old (40 children, II – 6-10 years old (40 children, III – 11-18 years old (40 children, according to the periods of tooth development, with an equal number of children in groups according to diagnoses. Hygiene index value was determined according to Fedorov

  3. Impact of Oral Commensal Bacteria on Degradation of Periodontal Connective Tissue in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irie, Koichiro; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Ekuni, Daisuke; Morita, Manabu; Shimazaki, Yoshihiro; Darveau, Richard P

    2015-07-01

    Innate and adaptive immunosurveillance mechanisms in response to the normal commensal bacteria can affect periodontal innate defense status. However, it is still unclear how commensal bacteria contribute to the inflammatory responses of junctional epithelium (JE) and periodontal connective tissue (PCT). The aim of the present study is to investigate the contribution of commensal bacteria on inflammatory responses in JE and PCT in mice. The periodontal tissue of germ-free (GF) and specific-pathogen-free (SPF) mice were compared at age 11 to 12 weeks (n = 6 per group). In this study, the number of neutrophils and expression of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR)-1, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, and MMP-8 within the JE and the PCT are evaluated. The collagen density was also determined in PCT stained with picrosirius red (PSR). PSR staining combined with or without polarized light microscopy has been used to assess the organization and maturation of collagen matrix. In the present findings, the area of JE in SPF mice was significantly greater than that in GF mice (P bacteria induced a low-grade inflammatory state in JE and that such conditions may contribute to degradation of collagen in PCT in mice.

  4. Gene therapy in periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Anirban; Singh, Nidhi; Saluja, Mini

    2013-03-01

    GENES are made of DNA - the code of life. They are made up of two types of base pair from different number of hydrogen bonds AT, GC which can be turned into instruction. Everyone inherits genes from their parents and passes them on in turn to their children. Every person's genes are different, and the changes in sequence determine the inherited differences between each of us. Some changes, usually in a single gene, may cause serious diseases. Gene therapy is 'the use of genes as medicine'. It involves the transfer of a therapeutic or working gene copy into specific cells of an individual in order to repair a faulty gene copy. Thus it may be used to replace a faulty gene, or to introduce a new gene whose function is to cure or to favorably modify the clinical course of a condition. It has a promising era in the field of periodontics. Gene therapy has been used as a mode of tissue engineering in periodontics. The tissue engineering approach reconstructs the natural target tissue by combining four elements namely: Scaffold, signaling molecules, cells and blood supply and thus can help in the reconstruction of damaged periodontium including cementum, gingival, periodontal ligament and bone.

  5. Current Status and Future Development of Cell Transplantation Therapy for Periodontal Tissue Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Toshiyuki; Washio, Kaoru; Iwata, Takanori; Okano, Teruo; Ishikawa, Isao

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that stem cell transplantation can regenerate periodontal tissue, and several clinical trials involving transplantation of stem cells into human patients have already begun or are in preparation. However, stem cell transplantation therapy is a new technology, and the events following transplantation are poorly understood. Several studies have reported side effects and potential risks associated with stem cell transplantation therapy. To protect patients from such risks, governments have placed regulations on stem cell transplantation therapies. It is important for the clinicians to understand the relevant risks and governmental regulations. This paper describes the ongoing clinical studies, basic research, risks, and governmental controls related to stem cell transplantation therapy. Then, one clinical study is introduced as an example of a government-approved periodontal cell transplantation therapy. PMID:22315604

  6. Current Status and Future Development of Cell Transplantation Therapy for Periodontal Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Yoshida

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that stem cell transplantation can regenerate periodontal tissue, and several clinical trials involving transplantation of stem cells into human patients have already begun or are in preparation. However, stem cell transplantation therapy is a new technology, and the events following transplantation are poorly understood. Several studies have reported side effects and potential risks associated with stem cell transplantation therapy. To protect patients from such risks, governments have placed regulations on stem cell transplantation therapies. It is important for the clinicians to understand the relevant risks and governmental regulations. This paper describes the ongoing clinical studies, basic research, risks, and governmental controls related to stem cell transplantation therapy. Then, one clinical study is introduced as an example of a government-approved periodontal cell transplantation therapy.

  7. Proteomic Analysis of Human Tendon and Ligament: Solubilization and Analysis of Insoluble Extracellular Matrix in Connective Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Nori; Taniguchi, Takako; Goda, Yuichiro; Kosaka, Hirofumi; Higashino, Kosaku; Sakai, Toshinori; Katoh, Shinsuke; Yasui, Natsuo; Sairyo, Koichi; Taniguchi, Hisaaki

    2016-12-02

    Connective tissues such as tendon, ligament and cartilage are mostly composed of extracellular matrix (ECM). These tissues are insoluble, mainly due to the highly cross-linked ECM proteins such as collagens. Difficulties obtaining suitable samples for mass spectrometric analysis render the application of modern proteomic technologies difficult. Complete solubilization of them would not only elucidate protein composition of normal tissues but also reveal pathophysiology of pathological tissues. Here we report complete solubilization of human Achilles tendon and yellow ligament, which is achieved by chemical digestion combined with successive protease treatment including elastase. The digestion mixture was subjected to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The low specificity of elastase was overcome by accurate mass analysis achieved using FT-ICR-MS. In addition to the detailed proteome of both tissues, we also quantitatively determine the major protein composition of samples, by measuring peak area of some characteristic peptides detected in tissue samples and in purified proteins. As a result, differences between human Achilles tendon and yellow ligament were elucidated at molecular level.

  8. Protein adsorption capability on polyurethane and modified-polyurethane membrane for periodontal guided tissue regeneration applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheikh, Zeeshan [Matrix Dynamics Group, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Fitzgerald Building, 150 College Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3E2 (Canada); School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Rd, London, E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Khan, Abdul Samad, E-mail: draskhan@ciitlahore.edu.pk [Interdisciplinary Research Centre in Biomedical Materials, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Roohpour, Nima [Oral Care R& D, GSK St., Georges Ave., Weybridge KT13 8PA (United Kingdom); Glogauer, Michael [Matrix Dynamics Group, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Fitzgerald Building, 150 College Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3E2 (Canada); Rehman, Ihtesham u [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Kroto Research Institute, North Campus, University of Sheffield, Broad Lane, Sheffield S3 7HQ (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-01

    Periodontal disease if left untreated can result in creation of defects within the alveolar ridge. Barrier membranes are frequently used with or without bone replacement graft materials for achieving periodontal guided tissue regeneration (GTR). Surface properties of barrier membranes play a vital role in their functionality and clinical success. In this study polyetherurethane (PEU) membranes were synthesized by using 4,4′-methylene-diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI), polytetramethylene oxide (PTMO) and 1,4-butane diol (BDO) as a chain extender via solution polymerization. Hydroxyl terminated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) due to having inherent surface orientation towards air was used for surface modification of PEU on one side of the membranes. This resulting membranes had one surface being PEU and the other being PDMS coated PEU. The prepared membranes were treated with solutions of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in de-ionized water at 37 °C at a pH of 7.2. The surface protein adsorptive potential of PEU membranes was observed using Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), Raman spectroscopy and Confocal Raman spectroscopy. The contact angle measurement, tensile strength and modulus of prepared membranes were also evaluated. PEU membrane (89.86 ± 1.62°) exhibited less hydrophobic behavior than PEU-PDMS (105.87 ± 3.16°). The ultimate tensile strength and elastic modulus of PEU (27 ± 1 MPa and 14 ± 2 MPa) and PEU-PDMS (8 ± 1 MPa and 26 ± 1 MPa) membranes was in required range. The spectral analysis revealed adsorption of BSA proteins on the surface of non PDMS coated PEU surface. The PDMS modified PEU membranes demonstrated a lack of BSA adsorption. The non PDMS coated side of the membrane which adsorbs proteins could potentially be used facing towards the defect attracting growth factors for periodontal tissue regeneration. Whereas, the PDMS coated side could serve as an occlusive barrier for preventing gingival epithelial

  9. Protein adsorption capability on polyurethane and modified-polyurethane membrane for periodontal guided tissue regeneration applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheikh, Zeeshan; Khan, Abdul Samad; Roohpour, Nima; Glogauer, Michael; Rehman, Ihtesham u

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease if left untreated can result in creation of defects within the alveolar ridge. Barrier membranes are frequently used with or without bone replacement graft materials for achieving periodontal guided tissue regeneration (GTR). Surface properties of barrier membranes play a vital role in their functionality and clinical success. In this study polyetherurethane (PEU) membranes were synthesized by using 4,4′-methylene-diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI), polytetramethylene oxide (PTMO) and 1,4-butane diol (BDO) as a chain extender via solution polymerization. Hydroxyl terminated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) due to having inherent surface orientation towards air was used for surface modification of PEU on one side of the membranes. This resulting membranes had one surface being PEU and the other being PDMS coated PEU. The prepared membranes were treated with solutions of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in de-ionized water at 37 °C at a pH of 7.2. The surface protein adsorptive potential of PEU membranes was observed using Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), Raman spectroscopy and Confocal Raman spectroscopy. The contact angle measurement, tensile strength and modulus of prepared membranes were also evaluated. PEU membrane (89.86 ± 1.62°) exhibited less hydrophobic behavior than PEU-PDMS (105.87 ± 3.16°). The ultimate tensile strength and elastic modulus of PEU (27 ± 1 MPa and 14 ± 2 MPa) and PEU-PDMS (8 ± 1 MPa and 26 ± 1 MPa) membranes was in required range. The spectral analysis revealed adsorption of BSA proteins on the surface of non PDMS coated PEU surface. The PDMS modified PEU membranes demonstrated a lack of BSA adsorption. The non PDMS coated side of the membrane which adsorbs proteins could potentially be used facing towards the defect attracting growth factors for periodontal tissue regeneration. Whereas, the PDMS coated side could serve as an occlusive barrier for preventing gingival epithelial

  10. Production of immunoglobulins in gingival tissue explant cultures from juvenile periodontitis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.R.; Falkler, W.A. Jr.; Suzuki, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    B lymphocytes and plasma cells are histologically observed in granulomatous periodontal tissues of juvenile periodontitis (JP) patients. Local immune processes may participate in protective or immunopathologic roles in the pathogenesis of this disease. An in vitro explant culture system was utilized to demonstrate the production of immunoglobulins by diseased JP tissues. Immunodiffusion studies using goat anti-human gamma, alpha, or mu chain serum revealed IgG to be the major immunoglobulin present in 92% of the day 1 supernatant fluids (SF) of the 47 JP gingival tissue explant cultures. IgA was present in 15% of the SF; however, no IgM was detected. Staph Protein A isolated 14C-labeled IgG from the SF, when allowed to react with goat anti-human gamma chain serum, formed lines of precipitation. Positive autoradiographs confirmed the biosynthesis of IgG by the explant cultures. The in vitro gingival tissue explant culture system described provides a useful model for the study of localized immunoglobulins produced by diseased tissues of JP patients

  11. Production of immunoglobulins in gingival tissue explant cultures from juvenile periodontitis patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, E.R.; Falkler, W.A. Jr.; Suzuki, J.B. (Univ. of Maryland Dental School, Baltimore (USA))

    1990-10-01

    B lymphocytes and plasma cells are histologically observed in granulomatous periodontal tissues of juvenile periodontitis (JP) patients. Local immune processes may participate in protective or immunopathologic roles in the pathogenesis of this disease. An in vitro explant culture system was utilized to demonstrate the production of immunoglobulins by diseased JP tissues. Immunodiffusion studies using goat anti-human gamma, alpha, or mu chain serum revealed IgG to be the major immunoglobulin present in 92% of the day 1 supernatant fluids (SF) of the 47 JP gingival tissue explant cultures. IgA was present in 15% of the SF; however, no IgM was detected. Staph Protein A isolated 14C-labeled IgG from the SF, when allowed to react with goat anti-human gamma chain serum, formed lines of precipitation. Positive autoradiographs confirmed the biosynthesis of IgG by the explant cultures. The in vitro gingival tissue explant culture system described provides a useful model for the study of localized immunoglobulins produced by diseased tissues of JP patients.

  12. Tooth movement and changes in periodontal tissue in response to orthodontic force in rats vary depending on the time of day the force is applied.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, K; Igarashi, K; Saeki, S; Shinoda, H; Mitani, H

    2001-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether there are any differences in tooth movement or in the response of periodontal tissue to orthodontic force when the force is applied at different times of the day. One hundred 6-week-old male Wistar rats were divided into one control group without force application and three experimental groups based on the time of day the force was applied to the upper first molars. Animals in the whole-day group received force continuously throughout the experimental period, while animals in the light- and dark-period groups received force only during the light (07:00-19:00) or dark period (19:00-07:00), respectively. Tooth movement was measured using the occlusal view of a precise plaster model with a profile projector. Periodontal tissues were evaluated histologically. The time course of tooth movement varied among the groups. Tooth movement over 21 days in the whole-day and light-period groups was about twice that as in the dark-period group. The formation of new bone on the tension side in the whole-day and light-period groups was more than twice that as in the dark-period group. On the pressure side, more osteoclasts appeared on the alveolar bone in the whole-day and light-period groups than in the dark-period group. The light-period group showed less extensive hyalinization of the periodontal ligament (PDL) than the whole-day group. The area of root resorption on day 21 also varied among the groups. Interference by masticatory forces did not seem to be a principal cause of the decreased tooth movement in the dark-period group. These results indicate that there are considerable variations in tooth movement and in the response of periodontal tissue to orthodontic force when the force is applied at different times of the day in rats. The results suggest that diurnal rhythms in bone metabolism have important implications in orthodontic treatment.

  13. State of oral hygiene and identification of the main risk factors for inflammatory diseases of periodontal tissues in young people.

    OpenAIRE

    Makarenko, M. V.

    2014-01-01

    A high percentage of prevalence of inflammatory periodontal diseases in young age causes urgency of treatment and prevention of inflammatory diseases of periodontal tissue in young age. Therefore, the research purpose was to investigate the hygienic condition and identification of the main risk factors for gingivitis in patients aged 18-30 years. 286 people aged from 18 to 30 years were observed in the study. To assess hygienic condition of the oral cavity and to determine the thickness of pl...

  14. The autoradiographic uptake and turnover of [1-3H] -galactose in mouse periodontal tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonna, E.A.; Wysor, M.S.

    1980-01-01

    In 5-week-old Brookhaven National Laboratory short-lived mice, [ 3 H]-galactose was utilized in all the oral tissues studied. Uptake and turnover of the tracer assessed by autoradiography revealed three uptake peaks. Synchronous fluctuation of total grain counts was repeatedly observed in different periodontal tissues. Acid glycosaminoglycans were strongly labelled and the neutral glycosaminoglycan fraction of the tissues was labelled to a lesser degree. The radiotracer became incorporated during their symthesis. The complex plots derived may represent several metabolic events occurring simultaneously. The uptake of radiotracer in fibrogenic, osteogenic and cementogenic cells was low. Accumulation of matrical output, however, was significant. The matrical output of the cementogenic cells and the osteogenic layer mesial to the alveolar bone was the highest of all the oral tissues studied throughout the 30-day period. (author)

  15. Behaviour of human mesenchymal stem cells on a polyelectrolyte-modified HEMA hydrogel for silk-based ligament tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosetti, M; Boccafoschi, F; Calarco, A; Leigheb, M; Gatti, S; Piffanelli, V; Peluso, G; Cannas, M

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to design a functional bio-engineered material to be used as scaffold for autologous mesenchymal stem cells in ligament tissue engineering. Polyelectrolyte modified HEMA hydrogel (HEMA-co-METAC), applied as coating on silk fibroin fibres, has been formulated in order to take advantage of the biocompatibility of the polyelectrolyte by increasing its mechanical properties with silk fibres. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells behaviour on such reinforced polyelectrolyte has been studied by evaluating cell morphology, cell number, attachment, spreading and proliferation together with collagen matrix production and its mRNA expression. Silk fibroin fibres matrices with HEMA-co-METAC coating exhibited acceptable mechanical behaviour compared to the natural ligament, good human mesenchymal stem cell adhesion and with mRNA expression studies higher levels of collagen types I and III expression when compared to control cells on polystyrene. These data indicate high expression of mRNA for proteins responsible for the functional characteristics of the ligaments and suggest a potential for use of this biomaterial in ligament tissue-engineering applications.

  16. Health of periodontal tissues and resorption status after orthodontic treatment of impacted maxillary canines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oz, A Z; Ciger, S

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the changes of incisor root resorption associated with impacted maxillary canines and health of periodontal tissues around maxillary canines erupted with orthodontic treatment. Twenty patients with a unilateral palatally impacted maxillary canine were included in the study. Cone-beam computed tomography images taken before and after orthodontic treatment were compared with the contralateral canines serving as control teeth. Root resorption was present in 10% of central and 40% of lateral incisors before treatment. After treatment, the incidence of resorption decreased. The thickness of the buccal bone surrounding the impacted canines was similar to that surrounding the contralateral canines, except in the apical area. Periodontal pocket depth and alveolar bone loss were greater for the impacted canine teeth than for the contralateral canines. Incisor root resorption associated with impacted canine teeth showed signs of repair after orthodontic treatment. Slight differences related to periodontal health were found between the previously impacted teeth and contralateral canine teeth.

  17. Human Umbilical Cord MSCs as New Cell Sources for Promoting Periodontal Regeneration in Inflammatory Periodontal Defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Fengqing; Liu, Shiyu; Ming, Leiguo; Tian, Rong; Jin, Fang; Ding, Yin; Zhang, Yongjie; Zhang, Hongmei; Deng, Zhihong; Jin, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Human periodontal ligament stem cells (hPDLSCs) transplantation represents a promising approach for periodontal regeneration; however, the cell source is limited due to the invasive procedure required for cell isolation. As human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) can be harvested inexpensively and inexhaustibly, here we evaluated the regenerative potentials of hUCMSCs as compared with hPDLSCs to determine whether hUCMSCs could be used as new cell sources for periodontal regeneration. Methods The characteristics of hUCMSCs, including multi-differentiation ability and anti-inflammatory capability, were determined by comparison with hPDLSCs. We constructed cell aggregates (CA) using hUCMSCs and hPDLSCs respectively. Then hPDLSCs-CA and hUCMSCs-CA were combined with β-tricalcium phosphate bioceramic (β-TCP) respectively and their regenerative potentials were determined in a rat inflammatory periodontal defect model. Results hPDLSCs showed higher osteogenic differentiation potentials than hUCMSCs. Meanwhile, hUCMSCs showed higher extracellular matrix secretion and anti-inflammatory abilities than hPDLSCs. Similar to hPDLSCs, hUCMSCs were able to contribute to regeneration of both soft and hard periodontal tissues under inflammatory periodontitis condition. There were more newly formed bone and periodontal ligaments in hPDLSCs and hUCMSCs groups than in non-cell treated group. Moreover, no significant differences of regenerative promoting effects between hPDLSCs and hUCMSCs were found. Conclusion : hUCMSCs generated similar promoting effects on periodontal regeneration compared with hPDLSCs, and can be used as new cell sources for periodontal regeneration.

  18. Periodontal regeneration using a bilayered PLGA/calcium phosphate construct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlo Reis, Emily C; Borges, Andréa P B; Araújo, Michel V F; Mendes, Vanessa C; Guan, Limin; Davies, John E

    2011-12-01

    The regeneration of tissues affected by periodontal disease is a complex process; it encompasses the formation of bone, cementum and periodontal ligament. We developed a semi-rigid PLGA (polylactide-co-glycolide acid)/CaP (calcium phosphate) bilayered biomaterial construct to promote periodontal regeneration, which has a continuous outer barrier membrane and an inner topographically complex component. Our experimental model compared periodontal prophylaxis alone with prophylaxis and biomaterial implantation in the treatment of class II furcation defects in dogs. Clinical evaluation, micro-computed tomography, histology and backscattered electron imaging were used for data analysis. Healing occurred uneventfully and bone volumetric values, trabecular number and trabecular thickness were all significantly greater in the treated group; while trabecular separation was significantly greater in the control group. New cementum, bone, and periodontal ligament with Sharpey fibre insertions were only seen in the treated group. Although periodontal regeneration has been reported elsewhere, the advantages of employing our bilayered PLGA + CaP construct are twofold: 1)it did not collapse into the defect; and, 2) its inner side was able to retain the blood clot throughout the buccal defect. The result was greater periodontal regeneration than has previously been reported with traditional flexible membranes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Relationship Between Periodontal Disease and Neoplasms of the Oral Cavity: A Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nourelahi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Context Oral cavity is one of the most common sites for neoplasms with a multifactorial etiology. Tobacco and alcohol are the main risk factors. Periodontal disease is an inflammatory disease affecting periodontal tissues such as gingiva, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone. Periodontal disease is linked to many systemic diseases. Recently a link between periodontal disease and cancer is suggested. The current review article aimed to evaluate the association between periodontal disease and risk of cancer in the oral cavity and some related factors. Evidence Acquisition Evidence suggests that oral cavity cancer is significantly more prevalent in patients with periodontal disease, poor oral hygiene or more missing teeth. Clinically, gingival squamous cell carcinoma (GSCC usually appears as an exophytic mass with a granular, papillary or verrucous surface or presents as an ulcerative lesion. Some reported cases of GSCC mimicking periodontal disease include gingival enlargement with no bone invasion, dentoalveolar abscess, erosive erythematosus lesion with keratotic papules, root exposure and tooth mobility, verrucous leukoplakia, verruciform xanthoma and development of hyperplastic granulation tissue after tooth extraction. Greater burden of oral flora that produce carcinogenic metabolites, human papilloma virus (HPV and other viruses that are residents of periodontal pocket, increased amount of inflammatory mediators and markers and some periodontal pathogens affecting cell cycle leading to mutation and dysplasia are considered as the rational for the relationship between malignant lesions of oral cavity and periodontal disease. Results Cancer of the oral cavity and periodontal disease are related from different aspects. Periodontal disease and tooth loss are considered as independent risk factors for cancer. Gingival squamous cell carcinoma can also mimic periodontal disease leading to misdiagnosis and delayed commencement of appropriate

  20. Dental age estimation: periodontal ligament visibility (PLV)-pattern recognition of a conclusive mandibular maturity marker related to the lower left third molar at the 18-year threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Victoria S; McDonald, Fraser; Andiappan, Manoharan; Roberts, Graham

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the applicability of periodontal ligament visibility (PLV) at the 18-year threshold. This mandibular maturity marker is graded into four separate age related stages, PLV-A, PLV-B, PLV-C, and PLV-D. These are discernible on a dental panoramic tomograph (DPT). The sample comprised a total of 2000 DPTs evenly divided into half yearly age bands from 16.00 to 25.99 years with 50 females and 50 males in each age band. It was found that PLV-A and PLV-B had minimum values below the 18-year threshold. PLV-C and PLV-D in females had minimum values of 18.08 and 18.58 years, respectively. In males, the minimum values for PLV-C was 18.10 years and PLV-D was 18.67 years. It was concluded that the presence of PLV-C or PLV-D indicates that a subject is over 18 years with a very high level of probability.

  1. Stress Distribution Evaluation of the Periodontal Ligament in the Maxillary Canine for Retraction by Different Alveolar Corticotomy Techniques: A Three-dimensional Finite Element Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Ariel Adriano Reyes; Saga, Armando Yukio; de Lima, Key Fonseca; Paese, Victor Nissen; Tanaka, Orlando M

    2016-01-01

    By using the finite element method (FEM), this study aimed to evaluate the effect of different corticotomy formats on the distribution and magnitude of stress on the periodontal ligament (PDL) during retraction of the maxillary canine. A geometric model of the left hemi-jaw was created from computed tomography scan images of a dry human skull and loads were administered during distalization movement of the canine. Three trials were performed: (1) without corticotomy, (2) box-shaped corticotomy and perforations in the cortical bone of the canine (CVC) and (3) CVC and circular-shaped corticotomy in the cortical bone of the edentulous space of the first premolar. There was no difference in stress distribution among the different corticotomy formats. Different corticotomy formats used to accelerate orthodontic tooth movement did not affect stress distribution in the PDL during canine retraction. From a mechanical perspective, the present study showed that the stress distribution on the PDL during canine retraction was similar in all the corticotomy formats. When using the Andrews T2 bracket, the PDL presented the highest levels of stress in the middle third of the PDL, suggesting that the force was near the center of resistance. Also, as bone weakening by corticotomies did not influence stress distribution, the surgical procedure could be simplified to a less aggressive one, focusing more on inflammatory cellular stimulation than on bone resistance. A simpler surgical act could also be performed by most orthodontists in their practices, enhancing postoperative response and reducing patient costs.

  2. Effects of the α-adrenoceptor antagonists phentolamine, phenoxybenzamine, and Idazoxan on sympathetic blood flow control in the periodontal ligament of the cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwall, B.; Gazelius, B.

    1988-01-01

    Blood flow changes in the periodontal ligament (PDL) were measured indirectly by monitoring the local clearance of 125 I - during electric sympathetic nerve stimulation or close intra-arterial infusions of either noradrenaline (NA) or adrenaline (ADR) before and after administration of phentolamine (PA), phenoxybenzamine (PBZ) or Idazoxan (RX). At the doses used in the present study, PA was the only antagonist that significantly reduced the blood flow decrease seen on activation of sympathetic fibers, although PBZ also reduced this response. Idazoxan, however, did not induce the consistent effect on blood flow decreases seen on sympathetic activation. All three α-adrenoceptor antagonists almost abolished the effects of exogenously administered NA and ADR. The results suggest the presence of functional post-junctional adrenoceptors of both the α 1 and α 2 subtypes in the sympathetic regulation of the blood flow in the PDL of the cat. A component of the response elicited by electrical sympathetic stimulation appeared to be resistant to α-adrenoceptor blockade. Administration of guanethidine (which inhibits further release of NA and neuropeptide Y) after PA abolished this residual sympathetic response

  3. PLA-poloxamer/poloxamine copolymers for ligament tissue engineering: sound macromolecular design for degradable scaffolds and MSC differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Adrien; Nottelet, Benjamin; Bony, Claire; Pinese, Coline; Charlot, Benoît; Garric, Xavier; Noël, Danièle; Coudane, Jean

    2015-04-01

    The treatment of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) failures remains a current clinical challenge. The present study aims at providing suitable degradable scaffolds for ligament tissue engineering. First, we focus on the design and the evaluation of poly(lactide)/poloxamer or poly(lactide)/poloxamine multiblock copolymers selected and developed to have suitable degradation and mechanical properties to match ACL repair. In the second part, it is shown that the copolymers can be processed in the form of microfibers and scaffolds consisting of a combination of twisted/braided fibers to further modulate the mechanical properties and prepare scaffold prototypes suitable for ligament application. Finally, after assessment of their cytocompatibility, the polymer scaffolds are associated with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). MSC differentiation toward a ligament fibroblast phenotype is promoted by a dual stimulation including an inductive culture medium and cyclic mechanical loads. RT-qPCR analyses confirm the potential of our scaffolds and MSCs for ACL regeneration with upregulation of some differentiation markers including Scleraxis, Tenascin-C and Tenomodulin.

  4. Ligament Tissue Engineering Using a Novel Porous Polycaprolactone Fumarate Scaffold and Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Grown in Platelet Lysate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Eric R.; Bravo, Dalibel; Dadsetan, Mahrokh; Riester, Scott M.; Chase, Steven; Westendorf, Jennifer J.; Dietz, Allan B.; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Yaszemski, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Surgical reconstruction of intra-articular ligament injuries is hampered by the poor regenerative potential of the tissue. We hypothesized that a novel composite polymer “neoligament” seeded with progenitor cells and growth factors would be effective in regenerating native ligamentous tissue. Methods: We synthesized a fumarate-derivative of polycaprolactone fumarate (PCLF) to create macro-porous scaffolds to allow cell–cell communication and nutrient flow. Clinical grade human adipose tissue-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (AMSCs) were cultured in 5% human platelet lysate (PL) and seeded on scaffolds using a dynamic bioreactor. Cell growth, viability, and differentiation were examined using metabolic assays and immunostaining for ligament-related markers (e.g., glycosaminoglycans [GAGs], alkaline phosphatase [ALP], collagens, and tenascin-C). Results: AMSCs seeded on three-dimensional (3D) PCLF scaffolds remain viable for at least 2 weeks with proliferating cells filling the pores. AMSC proliferation rates increased in PL compared to fetal bovine serum (FBS) (p < 0.05). Cells had a low baseline expression of ALP and GAG, but increased expression of total collagen when induced by the ligament and tenogenic growth factor fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2), especially when cultured in the presence of PL (p < 0.01) instead of FBS (p < 0.05). FGF-2 and PL also significantly increased immunostaining of tenascin-C and collagen at 2 and 4 weeks compared with human fibroblasts. Summary: Our results demonstrate that AMSCs proliferate and eventually produce a collagen-rich extracellular matrix on porous PCLF scaffolds. This novel scaffold has potential in stem cell engineering and ligament regeneration. PMID:26413793

  5. The use of guided tissue regeneration principles in endodontic surgery for induced chronic periodontic-endodontic lesions: a clinical, radiographic, and histologic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britain, Steven K; Arx, Thomas von; Schenk, Robert K; Buser, Daniel; Nummikoski, Pirkka; Cochran, David L

    2005-03-01

    Chronic periodontic-endodontic lesions are not uncommon in clinical practice and their regenerative capacity has long been questioned. However, there are no published studies investigating the application of guided tissue regeneration techniques in combination with endodontic surgery using an induced perio-endo defect model. This study evaluated the clinical, radiographic, and histologic outcomes of three surgical procedures used to treat induced perio-endo lesions. Pulpal necrosis was induced in foxhounds along with surgical removal of radicular buccal bone. After 4 weeks, chronic lesions were clinically and radiographically assessed. Treatment surgery consisted of apicoectomy, root canal instrumentation, and retrofilling with mineral trioxide aggregate. Teeth were then assigned to one of the following treatment groups: open flap debridement only (OFD), OFD with bioabsorbable porcine-derived collagen membrane (BG), or OFD with BG and anorganic bovine bone matrix (BO/BG). Clinical parameters and standardized radiographs were assessed at defect creation; treatment surgery; and at 1, 2, 4, and 6 months. Animals were sacrificed at 6 months and specimens prepared for histometric analysis. Clinical and radiographic conditions improved during the study period. Mean epithelial attachment was similar between all groups. Mean connective tissue attachment for groups OFD, BG, and BO/BG was 3.79 mm, 2.63 mm, and 1.75 mm, respectively, and mean radicular bone height was 2.16 mm, 3.24 mm, and 3.45 mm, respectively. Statistically significant increases in the amount of new cementum were observed in groups BG and BO/BG when compared with OFD (P periodontal ligament, and significant increases in the amount of new cementum when compared to open flap debridement in a canine model.

  6. Biomimetic poly(lactide) based fibrous scaffolds for ligament tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surrao, Denver C; Waldman, Stephen D; Amsden, Brian G

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to fabricate a fibrous scaffold that closely resembled the micro-structural architecture and mechanical properties of collagen fibres found in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). To achieve this aim, fibrous scaffolds were made by electrospinning L-lactide based polymers. L-Lactide was chosen primarily due to its demonstrated biocompatibility, biodegradability and high modulus. The electrospun fibres were collected in tension on a rotating wire mandrel. Upon treating these fibres in a heated aqueous environment, they possessed a crimp-like pattern having a wavelength and amplitude similar to that of native ACL collagen. Of the polymer fibre scaffolds studied, those made from poly(L-lactide-co-D,L-lactide) PLDLA exhibited the highest modulus and were also the most resilient to in vitro hydrolytic degradation, undergoing a slight decrease in modulus compared to the other polymeric fibres over a 6 month period. Bovine fibroblasts seeded on the wavy, crimp-like PLDLA fibres attached, proliferated and deposited extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules on the surface of the fibrous scaffold. In addition, the deposited ECM exhibited bundle formation that resembled the fascicles found in native ACL. These findings demonstrate the importance of replicating the geometric microenvironment in developing effective tissue engineering scaffolds. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Fiber/collagen composites for ligament tissue engineering: influence of elastic moduli of sparse aligned fibers on mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, Patrick S; Verbridge, Scott S; Dahlgren, Linda A; Kakar, Sanjeev; Guelcher, Scott A; Goldstein, Aaron S

    2016-08-01

    Electrospun microfibers are attractive for the engineering of oriented tissues because they present instructive topographic and mechanical cues to cells. However, high-density microfiber networks are too cell-impermeable for most tissue applications. Alternatively, the distribution of sparse microfibers within a three-dimensional hydrogel could present instructive cues to guide cell organization while not inhibiting cell behavior. In this study, thin (∼5 fibers thick) layers of aligned microfibers (0.7 μm) were embedded within collagen hydrogels containing mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), cultured for up to 14 days, and assayed for expression of ligament markers and imaged for cell organization. These microfibers were generated through the electrospinning of polycaprolactone (PCL), poly(ester-urethane) (PEUR), or a 75/25 PEUR/PCL blend to produce microfiber networks with elastic moduli of 31, 15, and 5.6 MPa, respectively. MSCs in composites containing 5.6 MPa fibers exhibited increased expression of the ligament marker scleraxis and the contractile phenotype marker α-smooth muscle actin versus the stiffer fiber composites. Additionally, cells within the 5.6 MPa microfiber composites were more oriented compared to cells within the 15 and 31 MPa microfiber composites. Together, these data indicate that the mechanical properties of microfiber/collagen composites can be tuned for the engineering of ligament and other target tissues. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1894-1901, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Effect of fiber orientation of collagen-based electrospun meshes on human fibroblasts for ligament tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Full, Sean Michael; Delman, Connor; Gluck, Jessica M; Abdmaulen, Raushan; Shemin, Richard J; Heydarkhan-Hagvall, Sepideh

    2015-01-01

    Within the past two decades polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) has gained considerable attention as a biocompatible and biodegradable polymer that is suitable for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In this present study, we have investigated the potential of PLGA, collagen I (ColI), and polyurethane (PU) scaffolds for ligament tissue regeneration. Two different ratios of PLGA (50:50 and 85:15) were used to determine the effects on mechanical tensile properties and cell adhesion. The Young's modulus, tensile stress at yield, and ultimate tensile strain of PLGA(50:50)-ColI-PU scaffolds demonstrated similar tensile properties to that of ligaments found in the knee. Whereas, scaffolds composed of PLGA(85:15)-ColI-PU had lower tensile properties than that of ligaments. Furthermore, we investigated the effect of fiber orientation on mechanical properties and our results indicate that aligned fiber scaffolds demonstrate higher tensile properties than scaffolds with random fiber orientation. Also, human fibroblasts attached and proliferated with no need for additional surface modifications to the presented electrospun scaffolds in both categories. Collectively, our investigation demonstrates the effectiveness of electrospun PLGA scaffolds as a suitable candidate for regenerative medicine, capable of being manipulated and combined with other polymers to create three-dimensional microenvironments with adjustable tensile properties to mimic native tissues. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Mechanical properties and cellular response of novel electrospun nanofibers for ligament tissue engineering: Effects of orientation and geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauly, Hannah M; Kelly, Daniel J; Popat, Ketul C; Trujillo, Nathan A; Dunne, Nicholas J; McCarthy, Helen O; Haut Donahue, Tammy L

    2016-08-01

    Electrospun nanofibers are a promising material for ligamentous tissue engineering, however weak mechanical properties of fibers to date have limited their clinical usage. The goal of this work was to modify electrospun nanofibers to create a robust structure that mimics the complex hierarchy of native tendons and ligaments. The scaffolds that were fabricated in this study consisted of either random or aligned nanofibers in flat sheets or rolled nanofiber bundles that mimic the size scale of fascicle units in primarily tensile load bearing soft musculoskeletal tissues. Altering nanofiber orientation and geometry significantly affected mechanical properties; most notably aligned nanofiber sheets had the greatest modulus; 125% higher than that of random nanofiber sheets; and 45% higher than aligned nanofiber bundles. Modifying aligned nanofiber sheets to form aligned nanofiber bundles also resulted in approximately 107% higher yield stresses and 140% higher yield strains. The mechanical properties of aligned nanofiber bundles were in the range of the mechanical properties of the native ACL: modulus=158±32MPa, yield stress=57±23MPa and yield strain=0.38±0.08. Adipose derived stem cells cultured on all surfaces remained viable and proliferated extensively over a 7 day culture period and cells elongated on nanofiber bundles. The results of the study suggest that aligned nanofiber bundles may be useful for ligament and tendon tissue engineering based on their mechanical properties and ability to support cell adhesion, proliferation, and elongation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. UTILIZATION OF 940 NM WAVELENGTH DIODE LASERS AND THE MORPHO‐HISTOLOGICAL MODIFICATIONS IN PERIODONTAL TISSUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. LUCHIAN

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Non‐conventional techniques represent a more and more frequently employed alternative in medi‐ cine, firstly due to their minimally invasive character. Laser technologies represent forward‐looking methods to which numerous stomatologists resort, mainly because of their multiple applications in periodontology.The scope of the study was to identify the possible morpho‐histological differences on microscopic preparati‐ ons obtained by the two ‐ conventional and non‐conventi‐ onal – laser‐assisted techniques.Materials and method: Gingivectomies have been rea‐ lized on a mandible of freshly sacrificed pig, by the classi‐ cal surgical technique, 10 tissue samples of comparable size being taken over. On the same mandible, in the opposite quadrant, gingivectomies were realized by means of a diode‐type laser with a wavelength of 940 nm, followed by taking over of other 10 tissue samples. All specimens were conserved in a fixing solution and histological cups were obtained for subsequent analysis in the laboratory of pathological anatomy.Results and discussion: Histological evaluation evi‐ denced no significant morpho‐histological differences between the two techniques applied. The clinical advanta‐ ges of the photo‐mecanical interactions provided by laser‐assisted periodontal surgery include mainly reduc‐ tion of bleeding, absence of oedema, a higher confort for the patient (who suffers less pain and a much more rapid healing (by a faster tissular repair.Conclusions: Laser‐assisted technologies may be the‐ refore viewed as extremely useful alternatives in the new periodontal therapies, which recommends their applica‐ tion in periodontal surgery for at least three reasons: they are minimally invasive, they induce minor morpho‐histo‐ logical modifications and the technique of their application is simple to learn.

  11. In vivo evaluation of hybrid patches composed of PLA based copolymers and collagen/chondroitin sulfate for ligament tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinese, Coline; Gagnieu, Christian; Nottelet, Benjamin; Rondot-Couzin, Capucine; Hunger, Sylvie; Coudane, Jean; Garric, Xavier

    2017-10-01

    Biomaterials for soft tissues regeneration should exhibit sufficient mechanical strength, demonstrating a mechanical behavior similar to natural tissues and should also promote tissues ingrowth. This study was aimed at developing new hybrid patches for ligament tissue regeneration by synergistic incorporation of a knitted structure of degradable polymer fibers to provide mechanical strength and of a biomimetic matrix to help injured tissues regeneration. PLA- Pluronic ® (PLA-P) and PLA-Tetronic ® (PLA-T) new copolymers were shaped as knitted patches and were associated with collagen I (Coll) and collagen I/chondroitine-sulfate (Coll CS) 3-dimensional matrices. In vitro study using ligamentocytes showed the beneficial effects of CS on ligamentocytes proliferation. Hybrid patches were then subcutaneously implanted in rats for 4 and 12 weeks. Despite degradation, patches retained strength to answer the mechanical physiological needs. Tissue integration capacity was assessed with histological studies. We showed that copolymers, associated with collagen and chondroitin sulfate sponge, exhibited very good tissue integration and allowed neotissue synthesis after 12 weeks in vivo. To conclude, PLA-P/CollCS and PLA-T/CollCS hybrid patches in terms of structure and composition give good hopes for tendon and ligament regeneration. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 1778-1788, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. A tissue engineering approach to anterior cruciate ligament regeneration using novel shaped capillary channel polymer fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Kristofer D.

    2009-12-01

    Ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are the most frequent of injuries to the knee due to its role in preventing anterior translation of the tibia. It is estimated that as many as 200,000 Americans per year will suffer from a ruptured ACL, resulting in management costs on the order of 5 billion dollars. Without treatment these patients are unable to return to normal activity, as a consequence of the joint instability found within the ACL deficient knee. Over the last thirty years, a variety of non-degradable, synthetic fibers have been evaluated for their use in ACL reconstruction; however, a widely accepted prosthesis has been unattainable due to differences in mechanical properties of the synthetic graft relative to the native tissue. Tissue engineering is an interdisciplinary field charged with the task of developing therapeutic solutions for tissue and organ failure by enhancing the natural wound healing process through the use of cellular transplants, biomaterials, and the delivery of bioactive molecules. The capillary channel polymer (CC-P) fibers used in this research were fabricated by melt extrusion from polyethylene terephthalate and polybutylene terephthalate. These fibers possess aligned micrometer scale surface channels that may serve as physical templates for tissue growth and regeneration. This inherent surface topography offers a unique and industrially viable approach for cellular contact guidance on three dimensional constructs. In this fundamental research the ability of these fiber channels to support the adhesion, alignment, and organization of fibroblasts was demonstrated and found to be superior to round fiber controls. The results demonstrated greater uniformity of seeding and accelerated formation of multi-layered three-dimensional biomass for the CC-P fibers relative to those with a circular cross-section. Furthermore, the CC-P geometry induced nuclear elongation consistent with that observed in native ACL tissue. Through the

  13. Rare Periodontal Ligament Drainage for Periapical Inflammation of an Adjacent Tooth: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongmei Guo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To report a case with an unusual drainage route of periapical inflammation exiting through the gingival sulcus of an adjacent vital tooth and review probable factors determining the diversity of the discharge routes of periapical inflammation. Summary. An 18-year-old male patient presented with periodontal abscess of tooth 46, which was found to be caused by a periapical cyst with an acute abscess of tooth 45. During endodontic surgery, a rarely reported drainage route for periapical inflammation via the gingival sulcus of an adjacent vital tooth was observed for the first time. Complete periodontal healing of the deep pocket of tooth 46 and hiding of the periapical cyst of tooth 45 followed after root canal treatment and periapical surgery with Bio-Oss Collagen implantation on tooth 45. The drainage routes of periapical inflammation are multivariate and the diversity of drainage pathways of periapical inflammation is mainly related to factors such as gravity, barriers against inflammation, and the causative tooth itself.

  14. Modificações no periodonto de ratos diabéticos após a movimentação ortodôntica Periodontal ligament changes after induced dental movement in diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Alberto Sabino Vila Real

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: o objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar as modificações do ligamento periodontal de incisivos de ratos diabéticos submetidos a forças ortodônticas. MÉTODOS: vinte ratos machos Wistar (Rattus norvegicus com 105 dias de idade foram empregados. Os ratos foram divididos em quatro grupos: C - animais normoglicêmicos não submetidos à movimentação dentária; CAO - animais normoglicêmicos submetidos à movimentação dentária; D - animais diabéticos não submetidos à movimentação dentária; DAO - animais diabéticos submetidos à movimentação dentária. Os animais permaneceram com o dispositivo de movimentação dentária por 5 dias. Foram avaliados o número de vasos sangüíneos e a espessura do ligamento periodontal nos terços cervical, médio e apical dos cortes histológicos. RESULTADOS E CONCLUSÕES: no lado de tensão, a movimentação dentária nos animais do grupo CAO resultou em um ligamento periodontal mais espesso (17,64% no terço apical, 39,28% no terço médio e 51,35% na região cervical, quando comparado ao grupo C (p 0,05. Ainda no lado de tensão, foram observadas lacunas de reabsorção nos animais dos grupos CAO, D e DAO. O lado de pressão não foi examinado nesta fase do estudo.AIM: The aim of this study was to evaluate the periodontal ligament changes after induced dental movement of the upper incisor in diabetic rats. METHODS: Twenty Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus with 105 days of age were used. The rats were divided in four groups: C - normoglicemic animals not submitted to dental movement; CAO - normoglicemic animals submitted to dental movement; D - diabetic animals not submitted the dental movement; DAO - diabetic animals submitted to dental movement. The animals had remained with dental movement devices during 5 days. The number of sanguine vessels and the thickness of the periodontal ligament were evaluated at cervical, medium and apical histological cut regions. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: At

  15. Gingival crevicular fluid tissue/blood vessel-type plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 levels in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: effects of nonsurgical periodontal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurgan, Ş; Önder, C; Balcı, N; Fentoğlu, Ö; Eser, F; Balseven, M; Serdar, M A; Tatakis, D N; Günhan, M

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of nonsurgical periodontal therapy on clinical parameters and gingival crevicular fluid levels of tissue/blood vessel-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 (PAI-2) in patients with periodontitis, with or without rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Fifteen patients with RA and chronic periodontitis (RA-P), 15 systemically healthy patients with chronic periodontitis (H-P) and 15 periodontally and systemically healthy volunteers (C) were included in the study. Plaque index, gingival index, probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level, bleeding on probing, gingival crevicular fluid t-PA and PAI-2 levels, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, serum C-reactive protein and disease activity score were evaluated at baseline and 3 mo after mechanical nonsurgical periodontal therapy. All periodontal clinical parameters were significantly higher in the RA-P and H-P groups compared with the C group (p periodontitis groups (p periodontitis and RA, nonsurgical periodontal therapy reduced the pretreatment gingival crevicular fluid t-PA levels, which were significantly correlated with gingival crevicular fluid PAI-2 levels. The significantly higher t-PA and PAI-2 gingival crevicular fluid levels in periodontal patients, regardless of systemic status, suggest that the plasminogen activating system plays a role in the disease process of periodontitis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Ligamentous Injuries and the Risk of Associated Tissue Damage in Acute Ankle Sprains in Athletes: A Cross-sectional MRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemer, Frank W; Jomaah, Nabil; Niu, Jingbo; Almusa, Emad; Roger, Bernard; D'Hooghe, Pieter; Geertsema, Celeste; Tol, Johannes L; Khan, Karim; Guermazi, Ali

    2014-07-01

    Ankle joint injuries are extremely common sports injuries, with the anterior talofibular ligament involved in the majority of ankle sprains. There have been only a few large magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies on associated structural injuries after ankle sprains. To describe the injury pattern in athletes who were referred to MRI for the assessment of an acute ankle sprain and to assess the risk of associated traumatic tissue damage including lateral and syndesmotic ligament involvement. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 261 ankle MRI scans of athletes with acute ankle sprains were evaluated for: lateral and syndesmotic ligament injury; concomitant injuries to the deltoid and spring ligaments and sinus tarsi; peroneal, flexor, and extensor retinacula and tendons; traumatic and nontraumatic osteochondral and osseous changes; and joint effusion. Patients were on average 22.5 years old, and the average time from injury to MRI was 5.7 days. Six exclusive injury patterns were defined based on lateral and syndesmotic ligament involvement. The risk for associated injuries was assessed by logistic regression using ankles with no or only low-grade lateral ligament injuries and no syndesmotic ligament damage as the reference. With regard to the injury pattern, there were 103 ankles (39.5%) with complete anterior talofibular ligament disruption and no syndesmotic injury, and 53 ankles (20.3%) had a syndesmotic injury with or without lateral ligament damage. Acute osteochondral lesions of the lateral talar dome were seen in 20 ankles (7.7%). The percentage of chronic lateral osteochondral lesions was 1.1%. The risk for talar bone contusions increased more than 3-fold for ankles with complete lateral ligament ruptures (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 3.43; 95% CI, 1.72-6.85) but not for ankles with syndesmotic involvement. The risk for associated deltoid ligament injuries increased for ankles with complete lateral ligament injuries (aOR, 4.04; 95% CI, 1

  17. Clinical Evaluation of Periodontal Tissue Status in Prosthodontic Treatment of Patients with Partial Tooth Loss and Generalized Periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kushlyk

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of selection and application of dental prostheses in periodontal disease is especially relevant in case of severe generalized periodontitis, which is accompanied by mobile tooth removal resulting in overloading the periodontium of the remaining teeth as well as the increase in tooth mobility. Therefore, in generalized periodontitis, it is important to apply the method of direct dental prosthetic rehabilitation since, in case of partial tooth loss, it will prevent the development of generalized periodontitis complications. The objective of the research was to improve the effectiveness of combination therapy for patients with generalized periodontitis and partial tooth loss applying the developed method of direct fixed dental prosthetic rehabilitation based on the study of the periodontal status. Materials and methods. The study included 129 patients with general periodontitis, II-III degree and partial tooth loss over the age of 45 years. According to prosthodontic treatment, all the patients were divided into three groups: Group I consisted of 42 (20 women and 22 men patients who immediately after tooth extraction were rehabilitated with the application of direct plastic laminar immediate prosthesis and selective tooth grinding; permanent dental prosthetic rehabilitation was performed 6 weeks after tooth extraction; Group II included 43 (21 women and 22 men patients who underwent traditional permanent dental prosthetic rehabilitation using fixed dental bridges 6 weeks after mobile tooth removal and wound healing; Group III comprised 44 (21 women and 23 men patients who immediately after mobile tooth removal were rehabilitated with the application of direct fixed sectional dental bridge (Ukrainian patent UA 20995. 2007 Feb 15 and selective tooth grinding; permanent dental prosthetic rehabilitation was performed 6 months after tooth extraction. The control group consisted of 26 people with intact dentitions over the age of 45 years

  18. An example of measurement and reporting of periodontal loss of attachment (LOA) in epidemiological studies: smoking and periodontal tissue destruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paidi, S; Pack, A R; Thomson, W M

    1999-12-01

    The measurement and reporting of periodontal disease in epidemiological studies can be complex, with the common indices having well-recognised shortcomings. The aim of this study was to illustrate the use of the periodontal loss of attachment (LOA) approach in investigating the association between cigarette smoking and loss of periodontal attachment in a convenience sample of adults, in order to determine whether or not smoking was a risk indicator for periodontal disease. All participants were given a detailed periodontal clinical examination in two randomly assigned contralateral diagonal quadrants, with LOA measurements made at six sites per tooth. Information was also collected on participants' socio-demographic characteristics, oral hygiene practices, smoking history, and attitudes towards smoking. The 240 participants examined comprised 81 current smokers (CS), 79 former smokers (FS) and 80 nonsmokers (NS). Substantial differences and a gradient in disease existed for LOA among the three groups. CS exhibited the greatest (and NS the least) prevalence, extent, and severity of LOA. CS had more plaque and calculus than either of the other two groups, but the groups did not differ with respect to bleeding on probing. Overall, smoking was associated with the disease outcome, and this persisted after potential confounders were controlled using multivariate analysis. Although the observed differences may have been due to the self-selected nature of the sample, the gradient evident across the three smoking exposure groups suggests that smoking cessation can slow the progression of the disease. The LOA approach appears to be a versatile and informative method for recording, analysing, and presenting data on periodontitis in epidemiological studies.

  19. The use of chitosan/PLA nano-fibers by emulsion eletrospinning for periodontal tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Renze; Xu, Weihong; Xue, Yanxiang; Chen, Luyuan; Ye, Haicheng; Zhong, Enyi; Ye, Zhanchao; Gao, Jie; Yan, Yurong

    2018-04-16

    In this study, nanofibrous scaffolds base on pure polylactic acid (PLA) and chitosan/PLA blends were fabricated by emulsion eletrospinning. By modulating their mechanical and biological properties, cell-compatible and biodegradable scaffolds were developed for periodontal bone regeneration. Pure PLA and different weight ratios of chitosan nano-particle/PLA nano-fibers were fabricated by emulsion eletrospinning. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was performed to observe the morphology of nano-fibers. Mechanical properties of nano-fibers were tested by single fiber strength tester. Hydrophilic/hydrophobic nature of the nano-fibers was observed by stereomicroscope. In vitro degradation was also tested. Cells were seeded on nano-fibers scaffolds. Changes in cell adhesion, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation were tested by MTT assay and Alizarin Red S staining. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was used to evaluate the expression of (Toll-like receptor 4) TLR4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-1β, OPG, RUNX2 mRNA. It is shown that the mean diameter of nano-fibers is about 200 nm. The mean diameter of chitosan nano-particles is about 50 nm. The combination of chitosan nano-particles enhanced the mechanical properties of pure PLA nano-fibers. By adding a certain amount of chitosan nano-particles, it promoted cell adhesion. It also promoted the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) by elevating the expression of osteogenic marker genes such as BSP, Ocn, collagen I, and OPN and enhanced ECM mineralization. Nonetheless, it caused higher expression of inflammatory mediators and TLR4 of human periodontal ligament cells (hPDLCs). The combination of chitosan nano-particles enhanced the mechanical properties of pure PLA nano-fibers and increased its hydrophilicity. Pure PLA nano-fibers scaffold facilitated BMSCs proliferation. Adding an appropriate amount of chitosan nano-particles may promote its properties of cell proliferation

  20. Preparation of biodegradable PLA/PLGA membranes with PGA mesh and their application for periodontal guided tissue regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Jin; Kang, Inn-Kyu [Department of Polymer Science, Kyungpook National University, 1370 Sankyuk-dong, Buk-gu, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Suk Joon [Department of Biology, Sookmyung Women' s University, Hyochangwongil 52, Yongsan-gu, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Yeo, Guw-Dong; Pai, Chaul-Min, E-mail: ikkang@knu.ac.k [Samyang Central R and D Center, 63-2 Hwaam-dong, Yusung-gu, Daejeon 305-717 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    A biodegradable polylactic acid (PLA)/poly(glycolide-co-lactide) copolymer (PLGA) membrane with polyglycolic acid (PGA) mesh was prepared to aid the effective regeneration of defective periodontal tissues. The microporous membrane used in this study consists of biodegradable polymers, and seems to have a structure to provide appropriate properties for periodontal tissue regeneration. Based on the albumin permeation test, it is known that the biodegradable membrane exhibits the suitable permeability of nutrients. The membrane maintained its physical integrity for 6-8 weeks, which could be sufficient to retain space in the periodontal pocket. Cell attachment and cytotoxicity tests were performed with respect to the evaluation of biocompatibility of the membrane. As a result, the membrane did not show any cytotoxicity. The safety and therapeutic efficacies of the biodegradable membranes were confirmed in animal tests.

  1. Application of cell and biomaterial-based tissue engineering methods in the treatment of cartilage, menisci and ligament injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trzeciak, Tomasz; Richter, Magdalena; Suchorska, Wiktoria; Augustyniak, Ewelina; Lach, Michał; Kaczmarek, Małgorzata; Kaczmarczyk, Jacek

    2016-03-01

    Over 20 years ago it was realized that the traditional methods of the treatment of injuries to joint components: cartilage, menisci and ligaments, did not give satisfactory results and so there is a need of employing novel, more effective therapeutic techniques. Recent advances in molecular biology, biotechnology and polymer science have led to both the experimental and clinical application of various cell types, adapting their culture conditions in order to ensure a directed differentiation of the cells into a desired cell type, and employing non-toxic and non-immunogenic biomaterial in the treatment of knee joint injuries. In the present review the current state of knowledge regarding novel cell sources, in vitro conditions of cell culture and major important biomaterials, both natural and synthetic, used in cartilage, meniscus and ligament repair by tissue engineering techniques are described, and the assets and drawbacks of their clinical application are critically evaluated.

  2. State of oral hygiene and identification of the main risk factors for inflammatory diseases of periodontal tissues in young people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makarenko M.V.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A high percentage of prevalence of inflammatory periodontal diseases in young age causes urgency of treatment and prevention of inflammatory diseases of periodontal tissue in young age. Therefore, the research purpose was to investigate the hygienic condition and identification of the main risk factors for gingivitis in patients aged 18-30 years. 286 people aged from 18 to 30 years were observed in the study. To assess hygienic condition of the oral cavity and to determine the thickness of plaque indices OHI-S (simplified oral hygiene index Green Vermilyona and Silness Loe were used. Studies of oral hygiene status suggests that in patients with different etiologies of periodontal tissue inflammation, oral hygienic condition ranged from "satisfactory" to "poor." Therefore the results of study of hygiene and periodontal indices and samples confirmed presence of moderately expressed inflammation in the gums in young adults with chronic catarrhal gingivitis. Most often inflammation in the gums, namely, chronic catarrhal gingivitis was determined in patients with fixed prosthesis designs in the mouth or in violation of the bite, related to the major risk factors for periodontal disease occurring in young adults aged from 18 to 30 years.

  3. Evaluation of a platelet lysate bilayered system for periodontal regeneration in a rat intrabony three-wall periodontal defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babo, Pedro S; Cai, Xinjie; Plachokova, Adelina S; Reis, Rui L; Jansen, John; Gomes, Manuela E; Walboomers, X Frank

    2018-02-01

    With currently available therapies, full regeneration of lost periodontal tissues after periodontitis cannot be achieved. In this study, a combined compartmentalized system was tested, composed of (a) a platelet lysate (PL)-based construct, which was placed along the root aiming to regenerate the root cementum and periodontal ligament, and (b) a calcium phosphate cement composite incorporated with hyaluronic acid microspheres loaded with PL, aiming to promote the regeneration of alveolar bone. This bilayered system was assessed in a 3-wall periodontal defect in Wistar rats. The periodontal healing and the inflammatory response of the materials were scored for a period up to 6 weeks after implantation. Furthermore, histomorphometrical measurements were performed to assess the epithelial downgrowth, the formation of alveolar bone, and the formation of new connective tissue attachment. Our data showed that the stabilization of platelet-origin proteins on the root surface increased the overall periodontal healing score and restricted the formation of long epithelial junctions. Nevertheless, the faster degradation of the cement component with incorporated hyaluronic acid microspheres compromised the stability of the system, which hampered the periodontal regeneration. Overall, in this work, we proved the positive therapeutic effect of the immobilization of a PL-based construct over the root surface in a combined compartmentalized system to assist predictable healing of functional periodontium. Therefore, after optimization of the hard tissue analogue, the system should be further elaborated in (pre)clinical validation studies. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. [Effects of interleukin-18 and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in serum and gingival tissues of rat model with periodontitis exposed to chronic intermittent hypoxia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Wang, Xiaoqin

    2015-08-01

    This study evaluates the expression of interleukin-18 (IL-18) and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-lα in rat periodontitis model exposed to normoxia and chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) environments. The possible correlation between periodontitis and obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) was also investigated. Methods: Thirty-two Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly assigned into four groups: normoxia control, normoxia periodontitis, hypoxia control, and hypoxia periodontitis groups. The periodontitis models were established by ligating the bilateral maxillary second molars and employing high-carbohydrate diets. Rats in hypoxia control and hypoxia periodontitis groups were exposed to CIH treatment mimicking a moderately severe OSAHS condition. All animals were sacrificed after eight weeks, and the clinical periodontal indexes were detected. The levels of IL-18 and HIF-1α in serum and gingival tissues were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The correlation between attachment loss (AL) and the levels of IL-18 and HIF-lα in hypoxia periodontitis group was evaluated. The levels of IL-18 and HIF-lα in hypoxia periodontitis group were significantly higher than that in normoxia periodontitis and hypoxia control groups (Pperiodontal tissues, which is correlated with IL-18 and HIF-lα levels.

  5. Cloning, characterization, and antigen specificity of T-lymphocyte subsets extracted from gingival tissue of chronic adult periodontitis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassenaar, A.; Reinhardus, C.; Thepen, T.; Abraham-Inpijn, L.; Kievits, F.

    1995-01-01

    Chronic periodontitis is characterized by dense infiltrations of B and T lymphocytes within the gingival connective tissue. Distinct anaerobic gram-negative bacteria as well as autoimmunity to collagen have been reported to play a role in the etiology and the pathogenesis of this disease. Here we

  6. The effect of ATM kinase inhibition on the initial response of human dental pulp and periodontal ligament mesenchymal stem cells to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cmielova, Jana; Havelek, Radim; Kohlerova, Renata; Soukup, Tomas; Bruckova, Lenka; Suchanek, Jakub; Vavrova, Jirina; Mokry, Jaroslav; Rezacova, Martina

    2013-07-01

    This study evaluates early changes in human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) isolated from dental pulp and periodontal ligament after γ-irradiation and the effect of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) inhibition. MSC were irradiated with 2 and 20 Gy by (60)Co. For ATM inhibition, specific inhibitor KU55933 was used. DNA damage was measured by Comet assay and γH2AX detection. Cell cycle distribution and proteins responding to DNA damage were analyzed 2-72 h after the irradiation. The irradiation of MSC causes an increase in γH2AX; the phosphorylation was ATM-dependent. Irradiation activates ATM kinase, and the level of p53 protein is increased due to its phosphorylation on serine15. While this phosphorylation of p53 is ATM-dependent in MSC, the increase in p53 was not prevented by ATM inhibition. A similar trend was observed for Chk1 and Chk2. The increase in p21 is greater without ATM inhibition. ATM inhibition also does not fully abrogate the accumulation of irradiated MSC in the G2-phase of the cell-cycle. In irradiated MSC, double-strand breaks are tagged quickly by γH2AX in an ATM-dependent manner. Although phosphorylations of p53(ser15), Chk1(ser345) and Chk2(thr68) are ATM-dependent, the overall amount of these proteins increases when ATM is inhibited. In both types of MSC, ATM-independent mechanisms for cell-cycle arrest in the G2-phase are triggered.

  7. Effects of air polishing and an amino acid buffered hypochlorite solution to dentin surfaces and periodontal ligament cell survival, attachment, and spreading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidlin, Patrick R; Fujioka-Kobayashi, Masako; Mueller, Heinz-Dieter; Sculean, Anton; Lussi, Adrian; Miron, Richard J

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study is to examine morphological changes of dentin surfaces following air polishing or amino acid buffered hypochlorite solution application and to assess their influence on periodontal ligament (PDL) cell survival, attachment, and spreading to dentin discs in vitro. Bovine dentin discs were treated with either (i) Classic, (ii) Plus, or (iii) Perio powder (EMS). Furthermore, Perisolv® a hypochlorite solution buffered with various amino acids was investigated. Untreated dentin discs served as controls. Morphological changes to dentin discs were assessed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Human PDL cells were seeded onto the respectively treated discs, and samples were then investigated for PDL cell survival, attachment, and spreading using a live/dead assay, adhesion assay, and SEM imaging, respectively. Both control and Perisolv®-rinsed dentin discs demonstrated smooth surfaces at low and high magnifications. The Classic powders demonstrated the thickest coating followed by the Powder Plus. The Perio powder demonstrated marked alterations of dentin discs by revealing the potential to open dentinal tubules even before rinsing. Seeding of PDL cells demonstrated an almost 100 % survival rate on all samples demonstrating very high biocompatibility for all materials. Significantly higher PDL cell numbers were observed on samples treated with the Perio powder and the Perisolv® solution (approximately 40 % more cells; p air polishing or application with Perisolv®. Future in vitro and animal testing is necessary to further characterize the beneficial effects of either system in a clinical setting. The use of air polishing or application with Perisolv amino acid buffered hypochlorite solution was effective in treating root surfaces and allowed for near 100 % PDL cell survival, attachment, and spreading onto all root surfaces.

  8. Periodontitis: facts, fallacies and the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slots, Jørgen

    2017-10-01

    This volume of Periodontology 2000 represents the 25th anniversary of the Journal, and uses the occasion to assess important advancements in periodontology over the past quarter-century as well as the hurdles that remain. Periodontitis is defined by pathologic loss of the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone. The disease involves complex dynamic interactions among active herpesviruses, specific bacterial pathogens and destructive immune responses. Periodontal diagnostics is currently based on clinical rather than etiologic criteria, and provides limited therapeutic guidance. Periodontal causative treatment consists of scaling, antiseptic rinses and occasionally systemic antibiotics, and surgical intervention has been de-emphasized, except perhaps for the most advanced types of periodontitis. Plastic surgical therapy includes soft-tissue grafting to cover exposed root surfaces and bone grafting to provide support for implants. Dental implants are used to replace severely diseased or missing teeth, but implant overuse is of concern. The utility of laser treatment for periodontitis remains unresolved. Host modulation and risk-factor modification therapies may benefit select patient groups. Patient self-care is a critical part of periodontal health care, and twice-weekly oral rinsing with 0.10-0.25% sodium hypochlorite constitutes a valuable adjunct to conventional anti-plaque and anti-gingivitis treatments. A link between periodontal herpesviruses and systemic diseases is a strong biological plausibility. In summary, research during the past 25 years has significantly changed our concepts of periodontitis pathobiology and has produced more-effective and less-costly therapeutic options. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Periodontitis contributes to adipose tissue inflammation through the NF-B, JNK and ERK pathways to promote insulin resistance in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanli; Zeng, Jin; Chen, Guoqing; Xie, Xudong; Guo, Weihua; Tian, Weidong

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the mechanism by which periodontitis affects the inflammatory response and systemic insulin resistance in the white adipose and liver tissues in an obese rat model. The obese model was generated by feeding rats a high fat diet. The periodontitis model was induced by ligatures and injection of "red complex", which consisted of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia, for two weeks. When compared with rats without periodontitis, fasting glucose levels and homeostasis model assessment index were significantly increased in rats with periodontitis, suggesting that periodontitis promotes the development of insulin resistance in obese rats. Gene and protein expression analysis in white adipose and liver tissue revealed that experimental periodontitis stimulated the expression of inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factors-alpha, interleukin-1 beta, toll-like receptor 2 and toll-like receptor 4. Signals associated with inflammation and insulin resistance, including nuclear factor- B, c-Jun amino-terminal kinase and extracellular-signal regulated kinase were significantly activated in the white adipose tissue from obese rats with periodontitis compared to obese rats without periodontitis. Taken together, these findings suggest that periodontitis plays an important role in aggravating the development of local white adipose inflammation and systemic insulin resistance in rat models. Copyright © 2016 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of dental restoration with epoxy and bioceramic paste on periodontal tissue damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan-Lin Meng

    2017-01-01

    Objective:To study the effect of dental restoration with epoxy and bioceramic paste on periodontal tissue damage.Methods: Patients with pulpal and periapical diseases who received root canal therapy in our hospital between May 2013 and October 2016 were retrospectively analyzed, and according to the different root canal filling materials they used, they were divided into epoxy group and bioceramic group who used epoxy paste and bioceramic paste as root canal filling materials respectively. Before and after treatment, gingival crevicular fluid was collected respectively to determine the levels of inflammatory factors, oxidative stress products, cell apoptosis molecules and protease-related molecules.Results: 2 weeks after treatment, IL-1β, IL-6, CRP, ROS, MDA, AOPP, Bcl-2, Bax, Cyt-C, caspase-3, Smac, EMMPRIN, MMP-1, MMP-2, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 levels in gingival crevicular fluid of epoxy group were not significantly different from those before treatment; IL-1β, IL-6, CRP, ROS, MDA, AOPP, Bax, Cyt-C, caspase-3, Smac, EMMPRIN, MMP-1 and MMP-2 levels in gingival crevicular fluid of bioceramic group were significantly higher than those before treatment while Bcl-2, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 levels were significantly lower than those before treatment; IL-1β, IL-6, CRP, ROS, MDA, AOPP, Bcl-2, Bax, Cyt-C, caspase-3, Smac, EMMPRIN, MMP-1, MMP-2, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 levels in gingival crevicular fluid were significantly different between two groups of patients after treatment.Conclusion:Epoxy paste for dental restoration causes less damage to periodontal tissue than bioceramic paste.

  11. Effect of dental restoration with epoxy and bioceramic paste on periodontal tissue damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan-Lin Meng

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of dental restoration with epoxy and bioceramic paste on periodontal tissue damage. Methods: Patients with pulpal and periapical diseases who received root canal therapy in our hospital between May 2013 and October 2016 were retrospectively analyzed, and according to the different root canal filling materials they used, they were divided into epoxy group and bioceramic group who used epoxy paste and bioceramic paste as root canal filling materials respectively. Before and after treatment, gingival crevicular fluid was collected respectively to determine the levels of inflammatory factors, oxidative stress products, cell apoptosis molecules and protease-related molecules. Results: 2 weeks after treatment, IL-1β, IL-6, CRP, ROS, MDA, AOPP, Bcl-2, Bax, Cyt-C, caspase-3, Smac, EMMPRIN, MMP-1, MMP-2, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 levels in gingival crevicular fluid of epoxy group were not significantly different from those before treatment; IL-1β, IL-6, CRP, ROS, MDA, AOPP, Bax, Cyt-C, caspase-3, Smac, EMMPRIN, MMP-1 and MMP-2 levels in gingival crevicular fluid of bioceramic group were significantly higher than those before treatment while Bcl-2, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 levels were significantly lower than those before treatment; IL-1β, IL-6, CRP, ROS, MDA, AOPP, Bcl-2, Bax, Cyt-C, caspase-3, Smac, EMMPRIN, MMP-1, MMP-2, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 levels in gingival crevicular fluid were significantly different between two groups of patients after treatment. Conclusion: Epoxy paste for dental restoration causes less damage to periodontal tissue than bioceramic paste.

  12. Dental Investigations: Efficiency of Nonsurgical Periodontal Therapy in Moderate Chronic Periodontitis

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    Mlachkova Antoaneta M.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Chronic periodontitis is defined as an inflammatory disease of the supporting tissues of teeth caused by microorganisms in the dental biofilm, resulting in progressive destruction of the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone with pocket formation and gingival recession. Treatment of chronic periodontitis aims at arresting the inflammation and stopping the loss of attachment by removal and control of the supra- and subgingival biofilm and establishing a local environment and microflora compatible with periodontal health. The AIM of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of non-surgical therapy (scaling and root planning in the treatment of moderate chronic periodontitis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study included 30 patients aged between 33 and 75 years, of which 46.7% women and 53.3% men, diagnosed with moderate and, at some sites, severe periodontitis. They were treated with non-surgical periodontal therapy methods (scaling and root planning and curettage if indicated. Additionally, chemical plaque control with rinse water containing chlorhexidine was applied. The diagnostic and reassessment procedures included measuring the periodontal indices of 601 periodontal units before and after the therapy. The indices measured were the papillary bleeding index (PBI, the hygiene index (HI, the probing pocket depth (PPD and the clinical attachment level (CAL. RESULTS: Significant reduction of plaque and gingival inflammation was found in all treated patients; we also found a statistically significant reduction of periodontal pockets with clinically measured depth ⋋ 5 mm (PD ⋋ 5 mm. Pockets with PD > 5 mm did not show statistically significant lower incidence rates probably due to the initially small percentage of deep pockets in the patients studied. There was a statistically significant reduction of all sites with attachment loss, the highest significance found at sites where the attachment loss was greater than 5 mm. CONCLUSION

  13. Estimation of tissue and crevicular fluid oxidative stress marker in premenopausal, perimenopausal and postmenopausal women with chronic periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Rampalli Viswa; Sailaja, Sistla; Reddy, Aileni Amarender

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate tissue and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) levels of the oxidative stress marker 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) in premenopausal, perimenopausal and postmenopausal women with chronic periodontitis. Oxidative stress has been implicated in the etiopathogenesis of periodontitis and menopause induces oxidative stress. According to Stages of Reproductive Aging Workshop (STRAW) criteria, women diagnosed with periodontitis were subdivided into three groups of 31 participants each 1. Premenopausal 2. Perimenopausal and 3. Postmenopausal. GCF and gingival tissue samples were collected from sites with maximum probing depth. Tissue DNA was extracted from the gingival sample and 8-OHdG in the extracted DNA, and GCF samples were measured using ELISA. There was a highly significant difference in the overall GCF 8-OHdG levels among the three groups with the pairwise difference being highly significant between the premenopausal-postmenopausal groups and perimenopausal-postmenopausal groups. However, no overall significant differences in tissue 8-OHdG levels were found among the three groups. Pairwise, highly significant differences were found between the premenopausal-postmenopausal groups and perimenopausal-postmenopausal groups for tissue 8-OHdG levels. No significant correlations were found between various measure of periodontal disease and GCF/tissue 8-OHdG levels among all the groups. Premenopausal-postmenopausal and perimenopausal-postmenopausal transition resulted in significant increase in tissue and GCF 8-OHdG levels. However, no association was found between stages of reproductive ageing and tissue levels of 8-OHdG. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Estimation of pentraxin-3 levels in the gingival tissues of chronic and aggressive periodontitis participants: an in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmanan, Reema; Jayakumar, N D; Sankari, Malaiappan; Padmalatha, Ogoti; Varghese, Sheeja

    2014-02-01

    Pentraxins are acute-phase proteins that belong to a family of evolutionarily conserved proteins, and they are considered markers of inflammation. Pentraxin-3 (PTX3) is a prototype of the long pentraxin group. It is suggested to play an important role in innate resistance against pathogens, regulation of inflammation, and clearance of apoptotic cells. The aim of this study is to estimate the level of PTX3 in gingival tissues of individuals with chronic (CP) and aggressive (AgP) periodontitis and control participants and further correlate the level of PTX3 with clinical parameters. The study population consisted of 50 participants ranging in age from 20 to 55 years and attending the outpatient section of Department of Periodontics, Saveetha Dental College and Hospital, Chennai, India. The study groups included the following: 1) group A, patients with generalized CP (n = 20); 2) group B (n = 20), patients with generalized AgP (GAgP); and 3) group C (n = 10), healthy controls. Tissue samples from participants were assayed for PTX3 levels using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Gingival tissues from patients with GAgP (8.349 ± 5.076 ng/mL) had a higher mean concentration of PTX3 than tissues from patients with generalized CP (5.068 ± 3.274 ng/mL) and controls (0.251 ± 0.277). The PTX3 levels in the gingival tissues correlated positively with clinical parameters in all the groups. Among the parameters, probing depth was the most significant predictor variable associated with PTX3 in cases with periodontitis. PTX3 concentration in gingival tissues of patients with GAgP was higher than in tissues from patients with CP, and the levels correlated positively with clinical parameters. Hence, tissue PTX3 level can be considered a marker of inflammation in periodontal disease.

  15. Enamel matrix derivative (Emdogain(R)) for periodontal tissue regeneration in intrabony defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Marco; Grusovin, Maria Gabriella; Papanikolaou, Nikolaos; Coulthard, Paul; Worthington, Helen V

    2009-10-07

    Periodontitis is a chronic infective disease of the gums caused by bacteria present in dental plaque. This condition induces the breakdown of the tooth supporting apparatus until teeth are lost. Surgery may be indicated to arrest disease progression and regenerate lost tissues. Several surgical techniques have been developed to regenerate periodontal tissues including guided tissue regeneration (GTR), bone grafting (BG) and the use of enamel matrix derivative (EMD). EMD is an extract of enamel matrix and contains amelogenins of various molecular weights. Amelogenins are involved in the formation of enamel and periodontal attachment formation during tooth development. To test whether EMD is effective, and to compare EMD versus GTR, and various BG procedures for the treatment of intrabony defects. We searched the Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE and EMBASE. Several journals were handsearched. No language restrictions were applied. Authors of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) identified, personal contacts and the manufacturer were contacted to identify unpublished trials. Most recent search: February 2009. RCTs on patients affected by periodontitis having intrabony defects of at least 3 mm treated with EMD compared with open flap debridement, GTR and various BG procedures with at least 1 year follow up. The outcome measures considered were: tooth loss, changes in probing attachment levels (PAL), pocket depths (PPD), gingival recessions (REC), bone levels from the bottom of the defects on intraoral radiographs, aesthetics and adverse events. The following time-points were to be evaluated: 1, 5 and 10 years. Screening of eligible studies, assessment of the methodological quality of the trials and data extraction were conducted in duplicate and independently by two authors. Results were expressed as random-effects models using mean differences for continuous outcomes and risk ratios (RR) for dichotomous outcomes with 95% confidence intervals

  16. Enamel matrix derivative (Emdogain) for periodontal tissue regeneration in intrabony defects. A Cochrane systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Marco; Grusovin, Maria Gabriella; Papanikolaou, Nikolaos; Coulthard, Paul; Worthington, Helen V

    2009-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic infective disease of the gums caused by bacteria present in dental plaque. This condition induces the breakdown of the tooth supporting apparatus until teeth are lost. Surgery may be indicated to arrest disease progression and regenerate lost tissues. Several surgical techniques have been developed to regenerate periodontal tissues including guided tissue regeneration (GTR), bone grafting (BG) and the use of enamel matrix derivative (EMD). EMD is an extract of enamel matrix and contains amelogenins of various molecular weights. Amelogenins are involved in the formation of enamel and periodontal attachment formation during tooth development. To test whether EMD is effective, and to compare EMD versus GTR, and various BG procedures for the treatment of intrabony defects. The Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched. Several dental journals were hand searched. No language restrictions were applied. Authors of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) identified, personal contacts and the manufacturer were contacted to identify unpublished trials. The last electronic search was conducted on 4 February 2009. RCTs on patients affected by periodontitis having intrabony defects of at least 3 mm treated with EMD compared with open flap debridement, GTR and various BG procedures with at least 1 year of follow-up. The outcome measures considered were: tooth loss, changes in probing attachment levels (PAL), pocket depths (PPD), gingival recessions (REC), bone levels from the bottom of the defects on intraoral radiographs, aesthetics and adverse events. The following time points were to be evaluated: 1, 5 and 10 years. Screening of eligible studies, assessment of the methodological quality of the trials and data extraction were conducted in duplicate and independently by at least two authors. Results were expressed as random-effects models using mean differences for continuous outcomes and risk ratios (RR) for

  17. Mechanical behaviour of a fibrous scaffold for ligament tissue engineering: finite elements analysis vs. X-ray tomography imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Cédric P; Latil, Pierre; Durville, Damien; Rahouadj, Rachid; Geindreau, Christian; Orgéas, Laurent; Ganghoffer, Jean-François

    2014-12-01

    The use of biodegradable scaffolds seeded with cells in order to regenerate functional tissue-engineered substitutes offers interesting alternative to common medical approaches for ligament repair. Particularly, finite element (FE) method enables the ability to predict and optimise both the macroscopic behaviour of these scaffolds and the local mechanic signals that control the cell activity. In this study, we investigate the ability of a dedicated FE code to predict the geometrical evolution of a new braided and biodegradable polymer scaffold for ligament tissue engineering by comparing scaffold geometries issued from FE simulations and from X-ray tomographic imaging during a tensile test. Moreover, we compare two types of FE simulations the initial geometries of which are issued either from X-ray imaging or from a computed idealised configuration. We report that the dedicated FE simulations from an idealised reference configuration can be reasonably used in the future to predict the global and local mechanical behaviour of the braided scaffold. A valuable and original dialog between the fields of experimental and numerical characterisation of such fibrous media is thus achieved. In the future, this approach should enable to improve accurate characterisation of local and global behaviour of tissue-engineering scaffolds. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Periodontitis increases rheumatic factor serum levels and citrullinated proteins in gingival tissues and alter cytokine balance in arthritic rats.

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    Mônica G Corrêa

    Full Text Available This study investigated some immunological features by experimental periodontitis (EP and rheumatoid arthritis (RA disease interact in destructive processes in arthritic rats. Rats were assigned to the following groups: EP +RA; RA; EP; and Negative Control. RA was induced by immunizations with type-II collagen and a local immunization with Complete Freund's adjuvant in the paw. Periodontitis was induced by ligating the right first molars. The serum level of rheumatoid factor (RF and anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACCPA were measured before the induction of EP (T1 and at 28 days after (T2 by ELISA assay. ACCPA levels were also measured in the gingival tissue at T2. The specimens were processed for morphometric analysis of bone loss, and the gingival tissue surrounding the first molar was collected for the quantification of interleukin IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-17 and TNF-α using a Luminex/MAGpix assay. Paw edema was analyzed using a plethysmometer. Periodontitis increased the RF and ACCPA levels in the serum and in the gingival tissue, respectively. Besides, the level of paw swelling was increased by EP and remained in progress until the end of the experiment, when EP was associated with RA. Greater values of IL-17 were observed only when RA was present, in spite of PE. It can be concluded that periodontitis increases rheumatic factor serum levels and citrullinated proteins level in gingival tissues and alter cytokine balance in arthritic rats; at the same time, arthritis increases periodontal destruction, confirming the bidirectional interaction between diseases.

  19. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in gingival tissues of chronic periodontitis with and without diabetes: immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaker, Olfat; Ghallab, Noha A; Hamdy, Ebtehal; Sayed, Safinaz

    2013-10-01

    There is few data concerning the pathogenesis and contribution of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the inflammatory reactions of the periodontium in the course of diabetes. This study evaluated the expression of iNOS in the gingival biopsies of periodontitis patients with and without type 2 diabetes. 80 subjects were evaluated in four groups: patients with chronic periodontitis and diabetes, patients with chronic periodontitis, periodontally healthy patients with diabetes, and systemically and periodontally healthy control subjects. Gingival biopsies were subjected to immunohistochemistry as well as reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for determination of iNOS. All diseased gingival tissues had a significant increase in iNOS expression by immunohistochemistry (Pperiodontitis and diabetic patients regarding iNOS(+) cells. Meanwhile, these two groups had significantly increased iNOS(+) cells when compared to periodontitis patients (Pperiodontitis showed significantly higher levels of iNOS mRNA expression compared to samples from periodontitis patients and diabetic patients (Pperiodontitis, periodontitis patients and diabetic patients, the higher mRNA for iNOS observed in diabetes and periodontitis may indicate a possible involvement of this mediator in the periodontal destruction of type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Influence of root embedment material and periodontal ligament simulation on fracture resistance tests Influência do material de inclusão e da simulação do ligamento periodontal nos ensaios de resistência à fratura

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    Carlos José Soares

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the embedment material and periodontal ligament simulation on fracture resistance of bovine teeth. Eighty bovine incisor teeth were randomized into 8 groups (n = 10, embedded in acrylic or polystyrene resin using 4 types of periodontal ligament simulation: 1 - absence of the ligament; 2 - polyether impression material; 3 - polysulfide impression material; 4 - polyurethane elastomeric material. The specimens were stored at 37°C and 100% humidity for 24 hours. Specimens were submitted to tangential load on the palatal surface at 0.5 mm/minute crosshead speed until fracture. The fracture modes were analyzed as follows: 1 - coronal fracture; 2 - cemento-enamel junction fracture; 3 - partial root fracture; 4 - total root fracture. Statistical analyses by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test were applied (p O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a influência do material de inclusão e da simulação de ligamento periodontal na resistência à fratura de dentes bovinos. Oitenta incisivos bovinos foram divididos em 8 grupos (n = 10 e, então, incluídos em cilindros com dois materiais, resina acrílica ou resina de poliestireno, usando-se quatro tipos de simulação do ligamento periodontal: 1 - ausência do ligamento; 2 - material de moldagem à base de poliéter; 3 - material de moldagem à base de polissulfeto; e 4 - material elastomérico à base de poliuretano. As amostras foram armazenadas em 100% de umidade a 37°C por 24 horas e então submetidas a carregamento tangencial na superfície palatina com velocidade de 0,5 mm/minuto até a fratura. Os padrões de fratura foram analisados de acordo com: 1 - fraturas coronais; 2 - fratura da junção esmalte-cemento; 3 - fratura parcial da raiz; 4 - fratura radicular total. A análise estatística empregou análise de variância fatorial e teste de Tukey (p < 0,05. Os resultados mostram que o método de inclusão e a simulação do ligamento periodontal

  1. Assessment of periostin levels in serum and gingival crevicular fluid of patients with periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balli, U; Keles, Z P; Avci, B; Guler, S; Cetinkaya, B O; Keles, G C

    2015-12-01

    Periostin, a secreted adhesion molecule essential for periodontal tissue integrity, is highly expressed in the periodontal ligament and plays a critical role in tooth and bone development. The purpose of this study was to investigate periostin levels in the gingival crevicular fluid and serum of patients with periodontal disease and compare them with those of healthy individuals. Eighty individuals (41 males and 39 females; age range: 25-48 years) were enrolled in the study. Individuals were divided into three groups following clinical and radiographic examinations: the periodontal-healthy group (n = 20), gingivitis group (n = 30) and chronic periodontitis group (n = 30). Gingival crevicular fluid and serum samples were collected and periostin levels were determined using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The total amount and concentration of periostin decreased in gingival crevicular fluid with the progression and severity of the disease from healthy controls to gingivitis and to chronic periodontitis groups and differed significantly (p 0.05). Periostin in gingival crevicular fluid negatively correlated with the gingival index in the periodontal disease groups, whereas it is inversely correlated with the clinical attachment level only in the periodontitis group (p periodontal disease, and negatively correlated with the clinical parameters. Within the limits of the study, the periostin level in gingival crevicular fluid can be considered a reliable marker in the evaluation of periodontal disease susceptibility and activity. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Influence of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells pre-implantation differentiation approach on periodontal regeneration in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xinjie; Yang, Fang; Yan, Xiangzhen; Yang, Wanxun; Yu, Na; Oortgiesen, Daniel A W; Wang, Yining; Jansen, John A; Walboomers, X Frank

    2015-04-01

    The implantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has previously been shown successful to achieve periodontal regeneration. However, the preferred pre-implantation differentiation strategy (e.g. maintenance of stemness, osteogenic or chondrogenic induction) to obtain optimal periodontal regeneration is still unknown. This in vivo study explored which differentiation approach is most suitable for periodontal regeneration. Mesenchymal stem cells were obtained from Fischer rats and seeded onto poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/poly(ɛ-caprolactone) electrospun scaffolds, and then pre-cultured under different in vitro conditions: (i) retention of multilineage differentiation potential; (ii) osteogenic differentiation approach; and (iii) chondrogenic differentiation approach. Subsequently, the cell-scaffold constructs were implanted into experimental periodontal defects of Fischer rats, with empty scaffolds as controls. After 6 weeks of implantation, histomorphometrical analyses were applied to evaluate the regenerated periodontal tissues. The chondrogenic differentiation approach showed regeneration of alveolar bone and ligament tissues. The retention of multilineage differentiation potential supported only ligament regeneration, while the osteogenic differentiation approach boosted alveolar bone regeneration. Chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs before implantation is a useful strategy for regeneration of alveolar bone and periodontal ligament, in the currently used rat model. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Adenovirus-mediated transfer of hepatocyte growth factor gene to human dental pulp stem cells under good manufacturing practice improves their potential for periodontal regeneration in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yu; Liu, Zhenhai; Xie, Yilin; Hu, Jingchao; Wang, Hua; Fan, Zhipeng; Zhang, Chunmei; Wang, Jingsong; Wu, Chu-Tse; Wang, Songlin

    2015-12-15

    Periodontitis is one of the most widespread infectious diseases in humans. We previously promoted significant periodontal tissue regeneration in swine models with the transplantation of autologous periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) and PDLSC sheet. We also promoted periodontal tissue regeneration in a rat model with a local injection of allogeneic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the roles of the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) in periodontal tissue regeneration in swine. In the present study, we transferred an adenovirus that carried HGF gene into human DPSCs (HGF-hDPSCs) under good manufacturing practice (GMP) conditions. These cells were then transplanted into a swine model for periodontal regeneration. Twenty miniature pigs were used to generate periodontitis with bone defect of 5 mm in width, 7 mm in length, and 3 mm in depth. After 12 weeks, clinical, radiological, quantitative and histological assessment of regenerated periodontal tissues was performed to compare periodontal regeneration in swine treated with cell implantation. Our study showed that injecting HGF-hDPSCs into this large animal model could significantly improve periodontal bone regeneration and soft tissue healing. A hDPSC or HGF-hDPSC sheet showed superior periodontal tissue regeneration compared to the injection of dissociated cells. However, the sheets required surgical placement; thus, they were suitable for surgically-managed periodontitis treatments. The adenovirus-mediated transfer of the HGF gene markedly decreased hDPSC apoptosis in a hypoxic environment or in serum-free medium, and it increased blood vessel regeneration. This study indicated that HGF-hDPSCs produced under GMP conditions significantly improved periodontal bone regeneration in swine; thus, this method represents a potential clinical application for periodontal regeneration.

  4. The influence of continuous magnetic field on periodontal tissues under overdentures

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    Brković-Popović Snežana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Last remained teeth with reduced alveolar support do not have long-term prognosis, which is the reason for prolonging the life and thus providing a stable support of overdenture. The data from literature point out that static magnetic field has certain possibilities in resolving such problems. Objective. Having in mind the pathogenetic factors which cause the reduction of the alveolar ridge and periodontal problems in our population, as well as osteoblastic and antiinflamatory activity, the aim of this investigation was to assess the effect of static magnetic field on periodontal tissue under the overdenture. Methods. The investigation involved 38 partially edentulous patients, of both sexes and similar oral status who were bearers of a lower complete overdenture and upper classic complete denture as antagonist restoration. In the base of the lower overdenture the micromagnets were installed in the region of the remained teeth, which had static concentrated field of 60-80 mT power. The evaluation was done after 3, 6 and 12 months using the method of light densitometry. Periodontologic analysis was performed by standard and modified periodontologic tests. Results. In patients with overdentures, after exposure to a magnetic field, the density of bone was not significantly changed, but the use of ANOVA disclosed changes in the observed interval. The tendency of increased density of the alveolar part of the observed region was noted. The region of the corresponding tooth of the contralateral side without magnetic influence showed decreased density of this region in the observed intervals. Plaque index and gingival index were improved under the influence of the magnetic field, while after 6 and 12 months following the magnet insertion statistically significant changes were confirmed. The magnetic devices did not show any influence on the level of the gingival margin and junction epithelium. Conclusion. Static magnetic field is to be

  5. [The influence of continuous magnetic field on periodontal tissues under overdentures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brković-Popović, Snezana; Stamenković, Dragoslav; Stanisić-Sinobad, Darinka; Rakocević, Zoran; Zelić, Obra

    2009-01-01

    Last remained teeth with reduced alveolar support do not have long-term prognosis, which is the reason for prolonging the life and thus providing a stable support of overdenture. The data from literature point out that static magnetic field has certain possibilities in resolving such problems. Having in mind the pathogenetic factors which cause the reduction of the alveolar ridge and periodontal problems in our population, as well as osteoblastic and antiinflamatory activity, the aim of this investigation was to assess the effect of static magnetic field on periodontal tissue under the overdenture. The investigation involved 38 partially edentulous patients, of both sexes and similar oral status who were bearers of a lower complete overdenture and upper classic complete denture as antagonist restoration. In the base of the lower overdenture the micromagnets were installed in the region of the remained teeth, which had static concentrated field of 60-80 mT power. The evaluation was done after 3, 6 and 12 months using the method of light densitometry. Periodontologic analysis was performed by standard and modified periodontologic tests. In patients with overdentures, after exposure to a magnetic field, the density of bone was not significantly changed, but the use of ANOVA disclosed changes in the observed interval. The tendency of increased density of the alveolar part of the observed region was noted. The region of the corresponding tooth of the contralateral side without magnetic influence showed decreased density of this region in the observed intervals. Plaque index and gingival index were improved underthe influence of the magnetic field, while after 6 and 12 months following the magnet insertion statistically significant changes were confirmed. The magnetic devices did not show any influence on the level of the gingival margin and junction epithelium. Static magnetic field is to be considered as a noninvasive procedure which is recommended to patients with

  6. Faktor-Faktor Periodontal yang Harus Dipertimbangkan pada Perawatan dengan Gigi Tiruan Cekat

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    Riemawati A. Lesmana

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of the treatment with fixed restoration especially the crowns and bridges is to maintain the remaining teeth of dentition and the whole masticatory system. This treatment can be successful if periodontal consideration of the abutments and the fixed restoration is given. The periodontal of a tooth are gingiva, periodontal ligament, alveolar bone and cementum. The most common type of periodontal disease is gingivitis that usually caused by bacterial plaque attached to tooth or crown surface. The other disease that involve the tooth supporting tissue is called periodontitis, it can be preceded by long standing chronic gingivitis. Trauma from occlusion presents two predominant clinical features, increasing tooth mobility and widening of the periodontal space. Periodontal pocket is a disease of periodontal attachment unit that is caused by the apical migration of the epithelial attachment. Periodontal atrophy occurs as a result of repeated traumatic that cause reduction in height of periodontium. All gingival and periodontal diseases and trauma from occlusion must be eliminated before restorative procedures are begun. Dental fixed restoration and periodontal health are inseparably interrelated. The adaptation of the margins and the contours of the restoration, the surface smoothness, the embrasure and the pontic of a bridge, have a critical biologic impact on the gingiva and supporting periodontal tissue. Dental fixed restoration therefore play a significant role in maintaining gingival and periodontal health. Plaque control must be maintained regularly and the occlusion must be checked at regular intervals after the fixed prosthesis is inserted. The occlusal relationships change with time as the result of micromovement of the natural dentition and the wear of restorative materials.

  7. Characterization and evaluation of graphene oxide scaffold for periodontal wound healing of class II furcation defects in dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Kohei; Miyaji, Hirofumi; Nishida, Erika; Miyata, Saori; Kato, Akihito; Tateyama, Akito; Furihata, Tomokazu; Shitomi, Kanako; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Sugaya, Tsutomu

    2018-01-01

    The 3-dimensional scaffold plays a key role in volume and quality of repair tissue in periodontal tissue engineering therapy. We fabricated a novel 3D collagen scaffold containing carbon-based 2-dimensional layered material, named graphene oxide (GO). The aim of this study was to characterize and assess GO scaffold for periodontal tissue healing of class II furcation defects in dog. GO scaffolds were prepared by coating the surface of a 3D collagen sponge scaffold with GO dispersion. Scaffolds were characterized using cytotoxicity and tissue reactivity tests. In addition, GO scaffold was implanted into dog class II furcation defects and periodontal healing was investigated at 4 weeks postsurgery. GO scaffold exhibited low cytotoxicity and enhanced cellular ingrowth behavior and rat bone forming ability. In addition, GO scaffold stimulated healing of dog class II furcation defects. Periodontal attachment formation, including alveolar bone, periodontal ligament-like tissue, and cementum-like tissue, was significantly increased by GO scaffold implantation, compared with untreated scaffold. The results suggest that GO scaffold is biocompatible and possesses excellent bone and periodontal tissue formation ability. Therefore, GO scaffold would be beneficial for periodontal tissue engineering therapy.

  8. The role of Toll-like receptor 2 and 4 in gingival tissues of chronic periodontitis subjects with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Promsudthi, A; Poomsawat, S; Limsricharoen, W

    2014-06-01

    Diabetes is one important risk factor of chronic periodontitis. However, the roles of toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR4, which are implicated in the inflammatory process in both chronic periodontitis and diabetes, have not been studied. This study aimed to determine whether TLR2 and TLR4 might be involved in the relationship between chronic periodontitis and diabetes by examining TLR2 and TLR4 expression in gingival tissues from subjects with chronic periodontitis without diabetes (CP) and with diabetes (CP+DM) and from periodontally healthy subjects without diabetes (PH) and with diabetes (PH+DM). Gingival tissues were collected from 23 CP subjects, 21 CP+DM subjects, 22 PH subjects and 20 PH+DM subjects. The expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in gingival tissues was determined using an immunohistochemical method. In gingival epithelium, staining patterns and intensity levels of TLR2 and TLR4 expression were studied. In connective tissues, the percentages of TLR2- and TLR4-positive cells were calculated. The intensity levels and the percentages of positive cells were statistically analyzed. Chronic periodontitis or diabetes showed no significant effect on TLR2 expression in the oral epithelium. However, diabetes increased the expression of TLR2 in sulcular epithelium and changed the pattern of TLR2 expression in gingival epithelium. Chronic periodontitis decreased the expression of TLR4 in gingival epithelium. In connective tissue under sulcular epithelium, CP+DM subjects showed statistically significant higher percentages of TLR2- and TLR4-positive cells compared with PH and PH+DM subjects. Our results suggest that hyperglycemia and chronic periodontitis had effects on TLR2 and TLR4 expression in gingival tissue. The differences in TLR2 and TLR4 expression could contribute to a greater inflammatory response, leading to periodontal disease initiation and progression. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species and Autophagy in Periodontitis and Their Potential Linkage

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    Chengcheng Liu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease that causes damage to periodontal tissues, which include the gingiva, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone. The major cause of periodontal tissue destruction is an inappropriate host response to microorganisms and their products. Specifically, a homeostatic imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS and antioxidant defense systems has been implicated in the pathogenesis of periodontitis. Elevated levels of ROS acting as intracellular signal transducers result in autophagy, which plays a dual role in periodontitis by promoting cell death or blocking apoptosis in infected cells. Autophagy can also regulate ROS generation and scavenging. Investigations are ongoing to elucidate the crosstalk mechanisms between ROS and autophagy. Here, we review the physiological and pathological roles of ROS and autophagy in periodontal tissues. The redox-sensitive pathways related to autophagy, such as mTORC1, Beclin 1, and the Atg12-Atg5 complex, are explored in depth to provide a comprehensive overview of the crosstalk between ROS and autophagy. Based on the current evidence, we suggest that a potential linkage between ROS and autophagy is involved in the pathogenesis of periodontitis.

  10. Surgical retrieval, isolation and in vitro expansion of human anterior cruciate ligament-derived cells for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ashim; Sharif, Kevin; Walters, Megan; Woods, Mia D; Potty, Anish; Main, Benjamin J; El-Amin, Saadiq F

    2014-04-30

    Injury to the ACL is a commonly encountered problem in active individuals. Even partial tears of this intra-articular knee ligament lead to biomechanical deficiencies that impair function and stability. Current options for the treatment of partial ACL tears range from nonoperative, conservative management to multiple surgical options, such as: thermal modification, single-bundle repair, complete reconstruction, and reconstruction of the damaged portion of the native ligament. Few studies, if any, have demonstrated any single method for management to be consistently superior, and in many cases patients continue to demonstrate persistent instability and other comorbidities. The goal of this study is to identify a potential cell source for utilization in the development of a tissue engineered patch that could be implemented in the repair of a partially torn ACL. A novel protocol was developed for the expansion of cells derived from patients undergoing ACL reconstruction. To isolate the cells, minced hACL tissue obtained during ACL reconstruction was digested in a Collagenase solution. Expansion was performed using DMEM/F12 medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) and 1% penicillin/streptomycin (P/S). The cells were then stored at -80 ºC or in liquid nitrogen in a freezing medium consisting of DMSO, FBS and the expansion medium. After thawing, the hACL derived cells were then seeded onto a tissue engineered scaffold, PLAGA (Poly lactic-co-glycolic acid) and control Tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS). After 7 days, SEM was performed to compare cellular adhesion to the PLAGA versus the control TCPS. Cellular morphology was evaluated using immunofluorescence staining. SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope) micrographs demonstrated that cells grew and adhered on both PLAGA and TCPS surfaces and were confluent over the entire surfaces by day 7. Immunofluorescence staining showed normal, non-stressed morphological patterns on both surfaces. This technique is

  11. Caspase 3 activity in isolated fetal rat lung fibroblasts and rat periodontal ligament fibroblasts: cigarette smoke-induced alterations

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    James Elliot Scott

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Cigarette smoking is the leading cause of preventable death in the world. It has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary, oral and systemic diseases. Smoking during pregnancy is clearly a risk factor for the developing fetus and may be a major cause of infant mortality. Moreover, the oral cavity is the first site of exposure to cigarette smoke and may be a possible source for the spread of toxins to other organs of the body. Fibroblasts in general are morphologically heterogeneous connective tissue cells with diverse functions. Apoptosis or programmed cell death is a crucial process during embryogenesis and for the maintenance of homeostasis throughout life. Deregulation of apoptosis has been implicated in abnormal lung development in the fetus and disease progression in adults. Caspases, are proteases which belong to the family of cysteine aspartic acid proteases and are the key components for the downstream amplification of intra-cellular apoptotic signals. Of the 14 caspases known, caspase-3 is the key executioner of apoptosis. Fetal rat lung fibroblasts but not PDL viability is reduced by exposure to CSE. In addition Caspase 3 activity is elevated after CSE exposure in fetal lung fibroblasts but not in PDLs. Expression of caspase 3 is induced in CSE exposed lung fibroblasts but not in PDLs. Caspase 3 was localized to the cytoplasm in both cell types.

  12. Mechanical Actuation Systems for the Phenotype Commitment of Stem Cell-Based Tendon and Ligament Tissue Substitutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govoni, Marco; Muscari, Claudio; Lovecchio, Joseph; Guarnieri, Carlo; Giordano, Emanuele

    2016-04-01

    High tensile forces transmitted by tendons and ligaments make them susceptible to tearing or complete rupture. The present standard reparative technique is the surgical implantation of auto- or allografts, which often undergo failure.Currently, different cell types and biomaterials are used to design tissue engineered substitutes. Mechanical stimulation driven by dedicated devices can precondition these constructs to a remarkable degree, mimicking the local in vivo environment. A large number of dynamic culture instruments have been developed and many appealing results collected. Of the cells that have been used, tendon stem cells are the most promising for a reliable stretch-induced tenogenesis, but their reduced availability represents a serious limitation to upscaled production. Biomaterials used for scaffold fabrication include both biological molecules and synthetic polymers, the latter being improved by nanotechnologies which reproduce the architecture of native tendons. In addition to cell type and scaffold material, other variables which must be defined in mechanostimulation protocols are the amplitude, frequency, duration and direction of the applied strain. The ideal conditions seem to be those producing intermittent tension rather than continuous loading. In any case, all physical parameters must be adapted to the specific response of the cells used and the tensile properties of the scaffold. Tendon/ligament grafts in animals usually have the advantage of mechanical preconditioning, especially when uniaxial cyclic forces are applied to cells engineered into natural or decellularized scaffolds. However, due to the scarcity of in vivo research, standard protocols still need to be defined for clinical applications.

  13. Removable gingival epithesis: esthetic and quick alternative resolution for anterior periodontal tissue replacement

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    Cátia Maria Fonseca Guerral

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The gingiva, part of the masticatory mucosa tissue that covers the alveolar process and surrounds the cervical portion of teeth, has a definitive shape and texture associated with the eruption of teeth. Therefore, it must be included in rehabilitative planning, as the absence of papillae induces problems with esthetics, phonetics and food-impaction. The purpose of the present study was to approach the indications, limitations and techniques for making a removable artificial gingiva made of acrylic resin, by reporting on a clinical case. The patient, a 29-year-old woman, with the sequelae of periodontal disease, presented loss of interdental papilla causing “black holes”. She was dissatisfied with the esthetic appearance of her teeth, and also complained of long teeth and air escaping when she spoke. As treatment, prosthetic reconstruction was proposed, by means of a removable artificial gingiva (gingival epithesis to simulate the presence of interdental papillae, providing better esthetics and phonetics. Gingival epithesis is an easily made, inserted and hygienically cleaned appliance that provides a simple and safe alternative solution for cases in which surgical techniques are limited.

  14. Aligned poly(L-lactic-co-e-caprolactone) electrospun microfibers and knitted structure: a novel composite scaffold for ligament tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquette, Cédryck; Kahn, Cyril; Frochot, Céline; Nouvel, Cécile; Six, Jean-Luc; De Isla, Natalia; Luo, Li-Hua; Cooper-White, Justin; Rahouadj, Rachid; Wang, Xiong

    2010-09-15

    We developed a novel technique involving knitting and electrospinning to fabricate a composite scaffold for ligament tissue engineering. Knitted structures were coated with poly(L-lactic-co-e-caprolactone) (PLCL) and then placed onto a rotating cylinder and a PLCL solution was electrospun onto the structure. Highly aligned 2-microm-diameter microfibers covered the space between the stitches and adhered to the knitted scaffolds. The stress-strain tensile curves exhibited an initial toe region similar to the tensile behavior of ligaments. Composite scaffolds had an elastic modulus (150 +/- 14 MPa) similar to the modulus of human ligaments. Biological evaluation showed that cells proliferated on the composite scaffolds and they spontaneously orientated along the direction of microfiber alignment. The microfiber architecture also induced a high level of extracellular matrix secretion, which was characterized by immunostaining. We found that cells produced collagen type I and type III, two main components found in ligaments. After 14 days of culture, collagen type III started to form a fibrous network. We fabricated a composite scaffold having the mechanical properties of the knitted structure and the morphological properties of the aligned microfibers. It is difficult to seed a highly macroporous structure with cells, however the technique we developed enabled an easy cell seeding due to presence of the microfiber layer. Therefore, these scaffolds presented attractive properties for a future use in bioreactors for ligament tissue engineering. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The Role of a Platelet Lysate-Based Compartmentalized System as a Carrier of Cells and Platelet-Origin Cytokines for Periodontal Tissue Regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babo, P.S.; Cai, X.; Plachokova, A.S.; Reis, R.L.; Jansen, J.A.; Gomes, M.E.; Walboomers, X.F.

    2016-01-01

    Currently available clinical therapies are not capable to regenerate tissues that are lost by periodontitis. Tissue engineering can be applied as a strategy to regenerate reliably the tissues and function of damaged periodontium. A prerequisite for this regeneration is the colonization of the defect

  16. Effects of concomitant use of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 with beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) on the beagle dog 1-wall periodontal defect model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anzai, Jun; Kitamura, Masahiro; Nozaki, Takenori; Nagayasu, Toshie; Terashima, Akio; Asano, Taiji; Murakami, Shinya

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Concomitant use of FGF-2 and β-TCP (an osteo-conductive scaffold) significantly promotes periodontal regeneration in the severe periodontitis model (1-wall defect model) of beagle dog. → FGF-2 enhanced new bone formation via β-TCP at the defects. → In particular, FGF-2 dramatically regenerated new periodontal ligament and cementum formations at the defects, that is one of the most important healing outcomes during the process of periodontal regeneration. → Epithelial downgrowth (undesirable wound healing) was decreased by administration of FGF-2. → This manuscript indicates for the first time that concomitant use of FGF-2 and β-TCP is efficacious in regenerating periodontal tissue following severe destruction of the tissue by progression of periodontitis. -- Abstract: The effects of concomitant use of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) and beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) on periodontal regeneration were investigated in the beagle dog 1-wall periodontal defect model. One-wall periodontal defects were created in the mesial portion of both sides of the mandibular first molars, and 0.3% FGF-2 plus β-TCP or β-TCP alone was administered. Radiographic evaluation was performed at 0, 3, and 6 weeks. At 6 weeks, the periodontium with the defect site was removed and histologically analyzed. Radiographic findings showed that co-administration of FGF-2 significantly increased bone mineral contents of the defect sites compared with β-TCP alone. Histologic analysis revealed that the length of the regenerated periodontal ligament, the cementum, distance to the junctional epithelium, new bone height, and area of newly formed bone were significantly increased in the FGF-2 group. No abnormal inflammatory response or ankylosis was observed in either group. These findings indicate the efficacy of concomitant use of FGF-2 and β-TCP as an osteoconductive material for periodontal regeneration following severe destruction by progressive

  17. Effects of concomitant use of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 with beta-tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP) on the beagle dog 1-wall periodontal defect model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anzai, Jun, E-mail: anzai_jun@kaken.co.jp [Pharmacology Department, Central Research Laboratories, Kaken Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., 14, Shinomiya, Minamigawara-cho, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8042 (Japan); Department of Periodontology, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, 1-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kitamura, Masahiro, E-mail: kitamura@dent.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Periodontology, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, 1-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nozaki, Takenori, E-mail: tnozaki@dent.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Periodontology, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, 1-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nagayasu, Toshie, E-mail: nagayasu_toshie@kaken.co.jp [Pharmacology Department, Central Research Laboratories, Kaken Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., 14, Shinomiya, Minamigawara-cho, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8042 (Japan); Terashima, Akio, E-mail: terashima_akio@kaken.co.jp [Pharmacology Department, Central Research Laboratories, Kaken Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., 14, Shinomiya, Minamigawara-cho, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8042 (Japan); Asano, Taiji, E-mail: asano_taiji@kaken.co.jp [Pharmacology Department, Central Research Laboratories, Kaken Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., 14, Shinomiya, Minamigawara-cho, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8042 (Japan); Murakami, Shinya, E-mail: ipshinya@dent.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Periodontology, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, 1-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} Concomitant use of FGF-2 and {beta}-TCP (an osteo-conductive scaffold) significantly promotes periodontal regeneration in the severe periodontitis model (1-wall defect model) of beagle dog. {yields} FGF-2 enhanced new bone formation via {beta}-TCP at the defects. {yields} In particular, FGF-2 dramatically regenerated new periodontal ligament and cementum formations at the defects, that is one of the most important healing outcomes during the process of periodontal regeneration. {yields} Epithelial downgrowth (undesirable wound healing) was decreased by administration of FGF-2. {yields} This manuscript indicates for the first time that concomitant use of FGF-2 and {beta}-TCP is efficacious in regenerating periodontal tissue following severe destruction of the tissue by progression of periodontitis. -- Abstract: The effects of concomitant use of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) and beta-tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP) on periodontal regeneration were investigated in the beagle dog 1-wall periodontal defect model. One-wall periodontal defects were created in the mesial portion of both sides of the mandibular first molars, and 0.3% FGF-2 plus {beta}-TCP or {beta}-TCP alone was administered. Radiographic evaluation was performed at 0, 3, and 6 weeks. At 6 weeks, the periodontium with the defect site was removed and histologically analyzed. Radiographic findings showed that co-administration of FGF-2 significantly increased bone mineral contents of the defect sites compared with {beta}-TCP alone. Histologic analysis revealed that the length of the regenerated periodontal ligament, the cementum, distance to the junctional epithelium, new bone height, and area of newly formed bone were significantly increased in the FGF-2 group. No abnormal inflammatory response or ankylosis was observed in either group. These findings indicate the efficacy of concomitant use of FGF-2 and {beta}-TCP as an osteoconductive material for periodontal

  18. Tissue Engineering of Necrotic Dental Pulp of Immature Teeth with Apical Periodontitis in Dogs: Radiographic and Histological Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ashiry, Eman A; Alamoudi, Najlaa M; El Ashiry, Mahmoud K; Bastawy, Hagar A; El Derwi, Douaa A; Atta, Hazem M

    2018-05-15

    To evaluate tissue engineering technology to regenerate pulp-dentin like tissues in pulp canals of immature necrotic permanent teeth with apical periodontitis in dogs. The study was performed on 36 teeth in 12 dogs. The experiment was carried out using split mouth design. In each dog 3 teeth were selected for implementing the study procedure. Apical periodontitis was induced in Group A and B teeth. Group (A): immature upper left 2 nd permanent incisors that were transplanted with a construct of autologous dental pulp stem cells with growth factors seeded in a chitosn hydrogel scaffold. Group (B): immature upper right 2 nd permanent incisor that received only growth factors with scaffold. A third tooth in each dog was selected randomly for isolation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). Both groups were closed with a double coronal seal of white MTA (Mineral trioxide aggregate) and glass ionomer cement. Both groups were monitored radiographically for 4 months and histologically after sacrificing the animals. There was no statistically significant difference in radiographic findings between group (A) and group (B) for healing of radiolucencies, while there was statistically significant difference between group (A) and group (B) regarding radicular thickening, root lengthening and apical closure. Histologically, group (A) teeth showed regeneration of pulp-dentin like tissue while group (B) teeth did not show any tissue regeneration. Dental pulp stem cells and growth factors incorporated in chitosan hydrogel are able to regenerate pulp-dentine like tissue and help in complete root maturation of non-vital immature permanent teeth with apical periodontitis in dogs.

  19. Regenerative medicine in dental and oral tissues: Dental pulp mesenchymal stem cell

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    Janti Sudiono

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Regenerative medicine is a new therapeutic modality using cell, stem cell and tissue engineering technologies. Purpose. To describe the regenerative capacity of dental pulp mesenchymal stem cell. Review. In dentistry, stem cell and tissue engineering technologies develop incredibly and attract great interest, due to the capacity to facilitate innovation in dental material and regeneration of dental and oral tissues. Mesenchymal stem cells derived from dental pulp, periodontal ligament and dental follicle, can be isolated, cultured and differentiated into various cells, so that can be useful for regeneration of dental, nerves, periodontal and bone tissues. Tissue engineering is a technology in reconstructive biology, which utilizes mechanical, cellular, or biological mediators to facilitate regeneration or reconstruction of a particular tissue. The multipotency, high proliferation rates and accessibility, make dental pulp as an attractive source of mesenchymal stem cells for tissue regeneration. Revitalized dental pulp and continued root development is the focus of regenerative endodontic while biological techniques that can restore lost alveolar bone, periodontal ligament, and root cementum is the focus of regenerative periodontic. Conclucion. Dentin-derived morphogens such as BMP are known to be involved in the regulation of odontogenesis. The multipotency and angiogenic capacity of DPSCs as the regenerative capacity of human dentin / pulp complex indicated that dental pulp may contain progenitors that are responsible for dentin repair. The human periodontal ligament is a viable alternative source for possible primitive precursors to be used in stem cell therapy.

  20. Effect of Electrothermal Treatment on Nerve Tissue Within the Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex, Scapholunate, and Lunotriquetral Interosseous Ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirolo, Joseph M; Le, Wei; Yao, Jeffrey

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of thermal treatment on neural tissue in the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC), scapholunate interosseous ligament (SLIL), and lunotriquetral interosseous ligament (LTIL). The intact TFCC, SLIL, and LTIL were harvested from cadaveric specimens and treated with a radiofrequency probe as would be performed intraoperatively. Slides were stained using a triple-stain technique for neurotrophin receptor p75, pan-neuronal marker protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5), and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole for neural identification. Five TFCC, 5 SLIL, and 4 LTIL specimens were imaged with fluorescence microscopy. Imaging software was used to measure fluorescence signals and compare thermally treated areas with adjacent untreated areas. A paired t test was used to compare treated versus untreated areas. P < .05 was considered significant. For the TFCC, a mean of 94.9% ± 2.7% of PGP 9.5-positive neural tissue was ablated within a mean area of 11.7 ± 2.5 mm(2) (P = .02). For the SLIL treated from the radiocarpal surface, 97.4% ± 1.0% was ablated to a mean depth of 2.4 ± 0.3 mm from the surface and a mean horizontal spread of 3.4 ± 0.5 mm (P = .01). For the LTIL, 96.0% ± 1.5% was ablated to a mean depth of 1.7 ± 0.7 mm and a mean horizontal spread of 2.6 ± 1.0 mm (P = .02). Differences in the presence of neural tissue between treated areas and adjacent untreated areas were statistically significant for all specimens. Our study confirms elimination of neuronal markers after thermal treatment of the TFCC, SLIL, and LTIL in cadaveric specimens. This effect penetrates below the surface to innervated collagen tissue that is left structurally intact after treatment. Electrothermal treatment as commonly performed to treat symptomatic SLIL, LTIL, and TFCC tears eliminates neuronal tissue in treated areas and may function to relieve pain through a denervation effect. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by

  1. Expression of HMGB1 and HMGN2 in gingival tissues, GCF and PICF of periodontitis patients and peri-implantitis

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    Ping Xie

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available High mobility group chromosomal protein B1 (HMGB1 and N2 (HMGN2, two members of High mobility group (HMG family, play important role in inflammation. The purposes of this study were to investigate the expression of HMGB1 and HMGN2 in periodontistis. The expression of HMGB1 and HMGN2 mRNA in gingival tissues and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF in chronic periodontitis (CP, generalized aggressive periodontitis (G-AgP patients and healthy subjects was detected by real-time PCR. The protein level of HMGB1 and HMGN2 in peri-implant crevicular fluid (PICF, peri-implant crevicular fluid of peri-implantitis (PI-PICF and normal patients was determined by Western blotting. Furthermore, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α and HMGB1 levels in GCF, PI-PICF and healthy-PICF samples from different groups were determined by ELISA. HMGN2 expression was increased in inflamed gingival tissues and GCF from CP and G-ApG groups compared to control group. HMGB1 expression was the highest in the gingival tissues and GCF from CP patients and was accompanied by increased concentrations of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 proinflammaory cytokines. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting that the expression of HMGB1 and HMGN2 was increased in the gingival tissues and GCF in CP and G-AgP and the PICF in PICF. Our data suggest that HMGB1 may be a potential target for the therapy of periodontitis and PI.

  2. Heparin functionalization increases retention of TGF-β2 and GDF5 on biphasic silk fibroin scaffolds for tendon/ligament-to-bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font Tellado, Sònia; Chiera, Silvia; Bonani, Walter; Poh, Patrina S P; Migliaresi, Claudio; Motta, Antonella; Balmayor, Elizabeth R; van Griensven, Martijn

    2018-05-01

    The tendon/ligament-to-bone transition (enthesis) is a highly specialized interphase tissue with structural gradients of extracellular matrix composition, collagen molecule alignment and mineralization. These structural features are essential for enthesis function, but are often not regenerated after injury. Tissue engineering is a promising strategy for enthesis repair. Engineering of complex tissue interphases such as the enthesis is likely to require a combination of biophysical, biological and chemical cues to achieve functional tissue regeneration. In this study, we cultured human primary adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AdMCs) on biphasic silk fibroin scaffolds with integrated anisotropic (tendon/ligament-like) and isotropic (bone/cartilage like) pore alignment. We functionalized those scaffolds with heparin and explored their ability to deliver transforming growth factor β2 (TGF-β2) and growth/differentiation factor 5 (GDF5). Heparin functionalization increased the amount of TGF-β2 and GDF5 remaining attached to the scaffold matrix and resulted in biological effects at low growth factor doses. We analyzed the combined impact of pore alignment and growth factors on AdMSCs. TGF-β2 and pore anisotropy synergistically increased the expression of tendon/ligament markers and collagen I protein content. In addition, the combined delivery of TGF-β2 and GDF5 enhanced the expression of cartilage markers and collagen II protein content on substrates with isotropic porosity, whereas enthesis markers were enhanced in areas of mixed anisotropic/isotropic porosity. Altogether, the data obtained in this study improves current understanding on the combined effects of biological and structural cues on stem cell fate and presents a promising strategy for tendon/ligament-to-bone regeneration. Regeneration of the tendon/ligament-to-bone interphase (enthesis) is of significance in the repair of ruptured tendons/ligaments to bone to improve implant integration and

  3. Regeneração periodontal em cães Periodontal regeneration in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Correna Carlo Reis

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A doença periodontal pode ser definida como a condição inflamatória dos tecidos de suporte do dente em resposta ao acúmulo do biofilme. A consequencia é a formação de graves defeitos ósseos, devido à perda dos tecidos periodontais, levando, em última instância, à perda dos dentes, predisposição a fraturas de mandíbula e formação de comunicações oronasais. O principal tratamento é a prevenção, incluindo a escovação dentária diária e a profilaxia periodontal, procedimento realizado pelo médico veterinário para remoção do biofilme e cálculo dentário acumulados. A recuperação dos tecidos perdidos, ou seja, a regeneração periodontal, é um processo mais complexo, pois envolve a formação de três tecidos intimamente ligados: osso alveolar, ligamento periodontal e cemento. Assim, diversos materiais e técnicas foram e são constantemente desenvolvidos, incluindo membranas para regeneração tecidual guiada e a aplicação de enxertos e biomateriais, amplamente estudados na odontologia humana e já disponíveis para aplicação na rotina clínica veterinária. Adicionalmente, novas possibilidades surgem com a associação dessas técnicas a fatores de crescimento e células-tronco e o desenvolvimento das membranas multifuncionais.Periodontal disease can be defined as the inflammatory condition of the tooth-supportive tissues as a response to biofilm accumulation. The consequence is the formation of severe bone defects due to the loss of periodontal tissues that ultimately lead to tooth loss, predispose to mandible fractures and formation of oronasal communications. The main treatment is prevention, including daily tooth brushing and periodontal prophylaxis, a procedure done by veterinaries to remove retained biofilm and calculus. Recovering lost tissues, i.e. periodontal regeneration, is a more complex process involving the formation of three tissues highly connected: alveolar bone, periodontal ligament and

  4. A new approach to the treatment of true-combined endodontic-periodontic lesions by the guided tissue regeneration technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, C C; Harn, W M; Chen, Y H; Huang, C C; Yuan, K; Huang, P H

    1996-12-01

    Clinicians often have difficulty in the diagnosis and treatment of the combined endodontal and periodontal (endo-perio) lesion. A case of an endo-perio true-combined lesion on a maxillary premolar was first treated with conventional endodontic therapy. Periodontal surgery was then completed, which included scaling and root planing and apical curettage on the tooth. The facial bony defect was then filled with a decalcified freeze-dried bone allograft mixed with tetracycline powder. A non-resorbable Teflon membrane was then used to cover the bone material and the periodontal flap sutured over this. This combined treatment resulted in minimal probing depth (2 mm), maximal clinical attachment gain (8 mm), as well as radiographic evidence of alveolar bone gain. This case report demonstrates that proper diagnosis, followed by removal of etiological factors and utilizing the guided tissue regeneration technique combined with osseous grafting, will restore health and function to a tooth with severe attachment loss caused by an endo-perio lesion.

  5. Chronic stress accelerates ligature-induced periodontitis by suppressing glucocorticoid receptor-α signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Huaixiu; Xu, Minguang; Wang, Feng; Liu, Shisen; Gu, Jing; Lin, Songshan; Zhao, Lisheng

    2016-03-25

    Periodontitis is a common chronic inflammatory disease. Recent studies have shown that chronic stress (CS) might modulate periodontal disease, but there are few models of CS-induced periodontitis, and the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The present study established a rat model of periodontitis associated with CS induced by nylon thread ligatures. The severity of periodontitis was evaluated in this model by radiographic and pathological examination. The inflammatory reaction indicated by the elevated serum levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) and glucocorticoid receptor-α (GR-α) expressions were detected by reverse transcriptase-PCR and western blotting. Open-field tests and serum corticosterone were used to evaluate CS. The results showed that CS induced behavioral changes and increased corticosterone levels of the animals with periodontitis. CS stimulation markedly increased alveolar bone loss, periodontal pocket depth and the number of plaques. It also enhanced the inflammatory reaction. These results suggest that CS accelerated the ligature-induced pathological changes associated with periodontitis. Further analysis of the mechanisms involved showed that GR-α expression was significantly downregulated in periodontal tissues of the animals undergoing CS. Blocking GR-α signaling in lipopolysaccharide and corticosteroid-treated human periodontal ligament fibroblast cells in vitro significantly upregulated the expression of p-Akt (protein kinase B) and TLR4, promoted nuclear factor-κB activity and increased levels of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8. This research suggests that CS might accelerate the pathological progression of periodontitis by a GR-α signaling-mediated inflammatory response and that this may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of periodontal disease, particularly in patients with CS.

  6. Synchrotron radiation analysis of possible correlations between metal status in human cementum and periodontal disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, R.R.; Naftel, S.J.; Nelson, A.J.; Edwards, M.; Mithoowani, H.; Stakiw, J. (UWO); (Saskatchewan)

    2010-03-16

    Periodontitis is a serious disease that affects up to 50% of an adult population. It is a chronic condition involving inflammation of the periodontal ligament and associated tissues leading to eventual tooth loss. Some evidence suggests that trace metals, especially zinc and copper, may be involved in the onset and severity of periodontitis. Thus we have used synchrotron X-ray fluorescence imaging on cross sections of diseased and healthy teeth using a microbeam to explore the distribution of trace metals in cementum and adhering plaque. The comparison between diseased and healthy teeth indicates that there are elevated levels of zinc, copper and nickel in diseased teeth as opposed to healthy teeth. This preliminary correlation between elevated levels of trace metals in the cementum and plaque of diseased teeth suggests that metals may play a role in the progress of periodontitis.

  7. Oral and periodontal manifestations associated with systemic sclerosis: A case series and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadish, Rekha; Mehta, Dhoom Singh; Jagadish, P

    2012-04-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a rare connective tissue disorder with a wide range of oral manifestations. This case series reports significant oral and periodontal changes and also makes an attempt to correlate oral and systemic findings in these patients which enable the clinician for a better diagnosis and evolve a comprehensive treatment plan. Six patients with a known diagnosis of systemic sclerosis were included. After obtaining the patient's informed consent, relevant medical history, oral manifestations including periodontal findings and oral hygiene index simplified index were recorded. In these patients, oral changes included restricted mouth opening and, resorption of the mandible. The periodontal changes observed were gingival recession, absence or minimal gingival bleeding on probing, and widened periodontal ligament space, radiographically. Patients with systemic sclerosis often show wide range of oral manifestations, which is of major concern for the dentist.

  8. Oral and periodontal manifestations associated with systemic sclerosis: A case series and review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha Jagadish

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis is a rare connective tissue disorder with a wide range of oral manifestations. This case series reports significant oral and periodontal changes and also makes an attempt to correlate oral and systemic findings in these patients which enable the clinician for a better diagnosis and evolve a comprehensive treatment plan. Six patients with a known diagnosis of systemic sclerosis were included. After obtaining the patient′s informed consent, relevant medical history, oral manifestations including periodontal findings and oral hygiene index simplified index were recorded. In these patients, oral changes included restricted mouth opening and, resorption of the mandible. The periodontal changes observed were gingival recession, absence or minimal gingival bleeding on probing, and widened periodontal ligament space, radiographically. Patients with systemic sclerosis often show wide range of oral manifestations, which is of major concern for the dentist.

  9. In vitro investigation of a tissue-engineered cell-tendon complex mimicking the transitional architecture at the ligament-bone interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhibing; Zhang, Yuan; Zhu, Jie; Dong, Shiwu; Jiang, Tao; Zhou, Yue; Zhang, Xia

    2015-03-01

    Restoration of the transitional ligament-bone interface is critical for graft-bone integration. We postulated that an allogenic scaffold mimicking the fibrogenic, chondrogenic, and osteogenic transition gradients could physiologically promote ligament-bone incorporation. The aim of this study was to construct and characterize a composite tendon scaffold with a continuous and heterogeneous transition region mimicking a native ligament insertion site. Genetically modified heterogeneous cell populations were seeded within specific regions of decellularized rabbit Achilles tendons to fabricate a stratified scaffold containing three biofunctional regions supporting fibrogenesis, chondrogenesis, and osteogenesis. The observed morphology, architecture, cytocompatibility, and biomechanics of the scaffolds demonstrated their improved bio-physico-chemical properties. The formation of the transitional regions was augmented via enhanced delivery of two transcription factors, sex determining region Y-box 9 and runt-related transcription factor 2, which also triggered early up-regulated expression of cartilage- and bone-relevant markers, according to quantitative PCR and immunoblot analyses. Gradient tissue-specific matrix formation was also confirmed within the predesignated regions via histological staining and immunofluorescence assays. These results suggest that a transitional interface could be replicated on an engineered tendon through stratified tissue integration. The scaffold offers the advantages of a multitissue transition involving controlled cellular interactions and matrix heterogeneity, which can be applied for the regeneration of the ligament-bone interface. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  10. Dose-dependent variations in blood flow evaluation of canine nerve, nerve graft, tendon, and ligament tissue by the radiolabeled-microsphere technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riggi, K.; Wood, M.B.; Ilstrup, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    This study evaluates the dose-dependent accuracy of the radionuclide-labeled microsphere technique for blood flow evaluation in nerve, tendon, and ligament. In eight dogs, blood flows were determined for nerve, nerve graft, tendon, and ligament tissue by simultaneous injection of high- and low-dose microspheres with different radiolabels. The results demonstrated no significant differences in blood flow as measured from the small number of microspheres (less than 400) and the high number (more than 400) for nerve and tendon tissue. For nerve tissue, microsphere counts of 50 to 100, 100 to 200, 200 to 300, and more than 300 produced mean percentage errors of 12.74% (n = 5, SEM = 4.52), 5.45% (n = 13, SEM = 1.22), 10.22% (n = 6, SEM = 4.37), and 17.08% (n = 12, SEM = 3.30), respectively. For tendon tissue, the same microsphere subdivisions had mean percentage errors of 7.47% (n = 4, SEM = 2.66), 3.63% (n = 6, SEM = 1.34), 15.54% (n = 4, SEM = 4.43), and 12.91% (n = 1), respectively. For ligament tissue, percentage errors were consistently higher; microsphere counts of 30 to 100, 100 to 200, and 200 to 300 produced mean errors of 20.14% (n = 4, SEM = 6.38), 18.66% (n = 4, SEM = 6.24), and 25.78% (n = 2, SEM = 1.97), respectively. Although there was no direct relationship between percentage error and number of microspheres retrieved, we suggest that microsphere counts in the range of 100 to 200 should be considered acceptable for nerve and tendon in the canine. Ligament tissue seems to be less well suited to the microsphere technique; however, further study is warranted

  11. The two-way relationship between iatrogenic factor and periodontal tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Oktawati

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Iatrogenic factors refer to anyinadequate medical treatment or diagnostic proceduresconducted inadvertently by practitioners who precipitate adverse injuries or symptoms. The unavoidable consequences of these factors should be corrected promptly, as they may result in erroneous treatment or new injury either on the tooth or the periodontium or both. Periodontal disease has a multifactorial etiology, which results from the interaction of local and systemic factors, intrinsically or extrinsically. Therefore, in most cases of periodontal disease, aninterdisciplinary approach is needed, such as restorative treatment of interproximal cavities that may induced food impacted. In contrary, a periodontal therapy could also act as an iatrogenic factor in the case of dentinal hypersensitivity or gingival recessionthat frequently creates an adverse effect in esthetic. Our discussion here is presented so that dentists could treat carefully and give a lot of attention to potential danger of other consequences of iatrogenic factors.

  12. The effectiveness of mangosteen rind extract as additional therapy on chronic periodontitis (Clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina Hendiani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT   Introduction: Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease that attacks the periodontal tissue comprises the gingiva, periodontal ligament, cementum and alveolar bone caused mainly by plaque bacteriophage or other specific dominant type of bacteria. The purpose of this study was to determine the therapeutic effect of clinical application of mangosteen peel extract gel as adjunctive therapy scaling and root planing in patients with chronic periodontitis. This research was expected to developed new treatment in the field of dentistry, particularly in periodontics, which can be used as supporting material for the treatment of chronic periodontitis. Methods: Quasi-experimental research, split mouth, with as many as 14 chronic periodontitis patients. Mangosteen rind was prepared to be formed into extract gel, dried at room temperature, then the dried samples were macerated by using ethanol, then evaporated and decanted for 3 days until obtained condensed extract. The samples were patients with chronic periodontitis in at least 2 teeth with pockets ≥ 5 mm. Clinical parameters of pocket depth, gingival bleeding, and clinical epithelial attachment level were measured at baseline and 1 month after treatment. Analysis of data using the t-test. Results: The comparison of average gap ratio of pockets depth, gingival index, gingival bleeding and epithelium attachment levels, before and after treatment showed significant differences, such as in the test and control sides. Conclusion: The mangosteen rind gel as adjunctive therapy for scaling and root planing is able to reduce pockets depth, gingival index, and gingival bleeding, and improve clinical epithelial attachment.

  13. Design and characterization of a biodegradable double-layer scaffold aimed at periodontal tissue-engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requicha, João F; Viegas, Carlos A; Hede, Shantesh; Leonor, Isabel B; Reis, Rui L; Gomes, Manuela E

    2016-05-01

    The inefficacy of the currently used therapies in achieving the regeneration ad integrum of the periodontium stimulates the search for alternative approaches, such as tissue-engineering strategies. Therefore, the core objective of this study was to develop a biodegradable double-layer scaffold for periodontal tissue engineering. The design philosophy was based on a double-layered construct obtained from a blend of starch and poly-ε-caprolactone (30:70 wt%; SPCL). A SPCL fibre mesh functionalized with silanol groups to promote osteogenesis was combined with a SPCL solvent casting membrane aiming at acting as a barrier against the migration of gingival epithelium into the periodontal defect. Each layer of the double-layer scaffolds was characterized in terms of morphology, surface chemical composition, degradation behaviour and mechanical properties. Moreover, the behaviour of seeded/cultured canine adipose-derived stem cells (cASCs) was assessed. In general, the developed double-layered scaffolds demonstrated adequate degradation and mechanical behaviour for the target application. Furthermore, the biological assays revealed that both layers of the scaffold allow adhesion and proliferation of the seeded undifferentiated cASCs, and the incorporation of silanol groups into the fibre-mesh layer enhance the expression of a typical osteogenic marker. This study allowed an innovative construct to be developed, combining a three-dimensional (3D) scaffold with osteoconductive properties and with potential to assist periodontal regeneration, carrying new possible solutions to current clinical needs. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Influence of uncontrolled diabetes mellitus on periodontal tissues during orthodontic tooth movement: a systematic review of animal studies

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    Shariq Najeeb

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Diabetes mellitus (DM may adversely affect periodontal tissues during orthodontic tooth movement (OTM. The aim of this review is to systematically analyze and review animal studies investigating the effect of DM on periodontal tissues during OTM. An electronic search was conducted via PubMed/Medline, Google Scholar, Embase, ISI Web of Knowledge, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CONTROL using the keywords “diabetes,” “orthodontics,” and “tooth movement” for studies published between January 2000 and August 2016. After elimination of duplicate items, the primary search resulted in 89 articles. After exclusion of irrelevant articles on the basis of abstract and title, full texts of 25 articles were read to exclude additional irrelevant studies. Seven animal studies were included in this review for qualitative analysis. When compared to healthy animals, more bone resorption and diminished bone remodeling were observed in diabetic animals in all studies. Furthermore, DM decreased the rate of OTM in one study, but in another study, DM accelerated OTM. DM may adversely affect bone remodeling and tooth movement during application of orthodontic forces. However, a number of potential sources of bias and deficiencies in methodology are present in studies investigating the association between OTM and DM. Hence, more long-term and well-designed studies are required before the exact mechanism and impact of DM on outcomes of orthodontic treatment is understood.

  15. A bFGF-releasing silk/PLGA-based biohybrid scaffold for ligament/tendon tissue engineering using mesenchymal progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Sambit; Toh, Siew Lok; Goh, James C H

    2010-04-01

    An ideal scaffold that provides a combination of suitable mechanical properties along with biological signals is required for successful ligament/tendon regeneration in mesenchymal stem cell-based tissue engineering strategies. Among the various fibre-based scaffolds that have been used, hybrid fibrous scaffolds comprising both microfibres and nanofibres have been recently shown to be particularly promising. This study developed a biohybrid fibrous scaffold system by coating bioactive bFGF-releasing ultrafine PLGA fibres over mechanically robust slowly-degrading degummed knitted microfibrous silk scaffolds. On the ECM-like biomimetic architecture of ultrafine fibres, sustained release of bFGF mimicked the ECM in function, initially stimulating mesenchymal progenitor cell (MPC) proliferation, and subsequently, their tenogeneic differentiation. The biohybrid scaffold system not only facilitated MPC attachment and promoted cell proliferation, with cells growing both on ultrafine PLGA fibres and silk microfibres, but also stimulated tenogeneic differentiation of seeded MPCs. Upregulated gene expression of ligament/tendon-specific ECM proteins and increased collagen production likely contributed to enhancing mechanical properties of the constructs, generating a ligament/tendon analogue that has the potential to be used to repair injured ligaments/tendons. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Influence of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on osteogenic tissue regeneration in a periodontal injury model: X-ray image alterations assessed by micro-computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunji; Chai, Zhaowu; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Deng, Feng; Wang, Zhibiao; Song, Jinlin

    2014-08-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate, with micro-computed tomography, the influence of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on wound-healing in periodontal tissues. Periodontal disease with Class II furcation involvement was surgically produced at the bilateral mandibular premolars in 8 adult male beagle dogs. Twenty-four teeth were randomly assigned among 4 groups (G): G1, periodontal flap surgery; G2, periodontal flap surgery+low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS); G3, guided tissue regeneration (GTR) surgery; G4, GTR surgery plus LIPUS. The affected area in the experimental group was exposed to LIPUS. At 6 and 8weeks, the X-ray images of regenerated teeth were referred to micro-CT scanning for 3-D measurement. Bone volume (BV), bone surface (BS), and number of trabeculae (Tb) in G2 and G4 were higher than in G1 and G3 (pperiodontal flap surgery group. LIPUS irradiation increased the number, volume, and area of new alveolar bone trabeculae. LIPUS has the potential to promote the repair of periodontal tissue, and may work effectively if combined with GTR. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Periodontal Bioengineering: A Discourse in Surface Topographies, Progenitor Cells and Molecular Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangaria, Smit J.

    2011-12-01

    Stem/progenitor cells are a population of cells capable of providing replacement cells for a given differentiated cell type. We have applied progenitor cell-based technologies to generate novel tissue-engineered implants that use biomimetic strategies with the ultimate goal of achieving full regeneration of lost periodontal tissues. Mesenchymal periodontal tissues such as cementum, alveolar bone (AB), and periodontal ligament (PDL) are neural crest-derived entities that emerge from the dental follicle (DF) at the onset of tooth root formation. Using a systems biology approach we have identified key differences between these periodontal progenitors on the basis of global gene expression profiles, gene cohort expression levels, and epigenetic modifications, in addition to differences in cellular morphologies. On an epigenetic level, DF progenitors featured high levels of the euchromatin marker H3K4me3, whereas PDL cells, AB osteoblasts, and cementoblasts contained high levels of the transcriptional repressor H3K9me3. Secondly, we have tested the influence of natural extracellular hydroxyapatite matrices on periodontal progenitor differentiation. Dimension and structure of extracellular matrix surfaces have powerful influences on cell shape, adhesion, and gene expression. Here we show that natural tooth root topographies induce integrin-mediated extracellular matrix signaling cascades in tandem with cell elongation and polarization to generate physiological periodontium-like tissues. In this study we replanted surface topography instructed periodontal ligament progenitors (PDLPs) into rat alveolar bone sockets for 8 and 16 weeks, resulting in complete attachment of tooth roots to the surrounding alveolar bone with a periodontal ligament fiber apparatus closely matching physiological controls along the entire root surface. Displacement studies and biochemical analyses confirmed that progenitor-based engineered periodontal tissues were similar to control teeth and

  18. Clinical and histologic evaluation of non-surgical periodontal therapy with enamel matrix derivative: a report of four cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellonig, James T; Valderrama, Pilar; Gregory, Holly J; Cochran, David L

    2009-09-01

    Enamel matrix derivative (EMD) is a composite of proteins that was demonstrated histologically to work as an adjunct to periodontal regenerative surgical therapy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and histologic effects of EMD as an adjunct to scaling and root planing. Four patients with severe chronic periodontitis and scheduled to receive complete dentures were accrued. Probing depth and clinical attachment levels were obtained. Unlimited time was allowed for hand and ultrasonic instrumentation. A notch was placed in the root >or=1 to 2 mm from the apical extent of root planing. EMD was inserted into the pocket, and a periodontal dressing was placed. Patients were seen every 2 weeks for plaque control. At 6 months post-treatment, soft tissue measurements were repeated, and the teeth were removed en bloc and prepared for histomorphologic analysis. Probing depth reduction and clinical attachment level gain were obtained in three-fourths of the specimens. Three of the four specimens analyzed histologically demonstrated new cementum, bone, periodontal ligament, and connective tissue attachment coronal to the notch. In one specimen, the gingival margin had receded below the notch. The results were unexpected and may represent an aberration. However, the substantial reduction in deep probing depths and clinical attachment level gain in three of four specimens, in addition to the histologic findings of new cementum, new bone, a new periodontal ligament, and a new connective tissue attachment, suggest that EMD may be useful as an adjunct to scaling and root planing in single-rooted teeth.

  19. Status and headway of the clinical application of artificial ligaments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianwu Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors first reviewed the history of clinical application of artificial ligaments. Then, the status of clinical application of artificial ligaments was detailed. Some artificial ligaments possessed comparable efficacy to, and fewer postoperative complications than, allografts and autografts in ligament reconstruction, especially for the anterior cruciate ligament. At the end, the authors focused on the development of two types of artificial ligaments: polyethylene glycol terephthalate artificial ligaments and tissue-engineered ligaments. In conclusion, owing to the advancements in surgical techniques, materials processing, and weaving methods, clinical application of some artificial ligaments so far has demonstrated good outcomes and will become a trend in the future.

  20. Emdogain in regenerative periodontal therapy. A review of the literature.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sculean, A.; Windisch, P.; Dori, F.; Keglevich, T.; Molnar, B.; Gera, I.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of regenerative periodontal therapy is the reconstitution of the lost periodontal structures (i.e. the new formation of root cementum, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone). Results from basic research have pointed to the important role of the enamel matrix protein derivative (EMD) in the

  1. [The use of Emdogain in periodontal and osseous regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sculean, A.; Rathe, F.; Junker, R.; Becker, J.; Schwarz, F.; Arweiler, N.B.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of regenerative periodontal therapy is the reconstitution of the lost periodontal structures (i. e. the new formation of root cementum, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone). Results from basic research have pointed to the important role of an enamel matrix protein derivative (EMD) in

  2. Bioreactor Design for Tendon/Ligament Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Tao; Gardiner, Bruce S.; Lin, Zhen; Rubenson, Jonas; Kirk, Thomas B.; Wang, Allan; Xu, Jiake; Smith, David W.; Lloyd, David G.; Zheng, Ming H.

    2012-01-01

    Tendon and ligament injury is a worldwide health problem, but the treatment options remain limited. Tendon and ligament engineering might provide an alternative tissue source for the surgical replacement of injured tendon. A bioreactor provides a controllable environment enabling the systematic study of specific biological, biochemical, and biomechanical requirements to design and manufacture engineered tendon/ligament tissue. Furthermore, the tendon/ligament bioreactor system can provide a s...

  3. Relationship between alcohol consumption and periodontal tissue condition in community-dwelling elderly Japanese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwama, Kana; Yoshihara, Akihiro; Watanabe, Reiko; Stegaroiu, Roxana; Shibata, Satoko; Miyazaki, Hideo

    2018-03-25

    To examine the associations among alcohol consumption level, dietary intake and other lifestyle factors, and periodontal condition, in community-dwelling elderly Japanese of a specific age. The relationship between alcohol consumption level and periodontitis is a controversial issue. Participants were 438 dentate elders aged 73 years from a larger cohort survey of elders in Niigata City, Japan. Data collected from oral examination of each participant, including number of the existing teeth, mean probing pocket depth and mean clinical attachment level (CAL) were used for the analyses. A semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire and a lifestyle habit questionnaire were used to assess food and alcohol consumption, smoking experience, frequency of tooth brushing, interdental brush use, and visits to a dental clinic during the previous year. Blood glucose control was assessed by the glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) level. Body mass index was calculated from height and weight measurements. The relationships between each variable and the individual mean CAL were analysed by univariate and multivariate analyses. According to logistic regression analysis, the mean CAL was significantly associated with the number of existing teeth (odds ratio [OR] = 0.90; P dwelling elderly Japanese (aged 73 years) compared with non-drinking. Our results provide new evidence that high alcohol consumption is associated with an increased risk of periodontal disease and its progression. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Effect of smoking on EA and NOS expression as well as NO and ET-1 content in gingival tissue of patients with chronic periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Feng

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of smoking on EA and NOS expression as well as NO and ET-1 content in gingival tissue of patients with chronic periodontitis. Methods: Patients diagnosed with periodontitis in our hospital between May 2013 and March 2016 were selected to screen 72 cases of smokers and 80 cases of non-smokers who were enrolled in smoking group and non-smoking group respectively, periodontal tissue was collected to detect the expression of EA, NOS and NLRP3 inflammasome, and gingival crevicular fluid was collected to detect the content of ET-1, NO, inflammatory factors and MMPs. Results: EA expression and ET-1 content in gingival tissue of smoking group were significantly higher than those of nonsmoking group while NOS expression and NO content in gingival tissue were significantly lower than those of non-smoking group; NLRP3, ASC, Caspase-1, IL-1β and IL-18 expression in gingival tissue of smoking group were significantly higher than those of nonsmoking group, and IL-1β, IL-18, TNF-α, IFN-γ, MMP1, MMP8 and MMP13 content in gingival crevicular fluid were significantly higher than those of non-smoking group; NLRP3, ASC, Caspase-1, IL-1β and IL-18 expression as well as IL-1β, IL-18, TNF-α, IFN-γ, MMP1, MMP8 and MMP13 content were positively correlated with EA and ET-1, and negatively correlated with NOS and NO. Conclusion: Smoking can cause increased EA and ET-1 as well as decreased NOS and NO in gingival tissue of patients with chronic periodontitis, thus adjusting the expression of NLRP3 inflammasome and MMPs to periodontal tissue inflammation and structure damage.

  5. The application of an enamel matrix protein derivative (Emdogain) in regenerative periodontal therapy: a review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sculean, A.; Schwarz, F.; Becker, J.; Brecx, M.

    2007-01-01

    Regenerative periodontal therapy aims at reconstitution of the lost periodontal structures such as new formation of root cementum, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone. Findings from basic research indicate that enamel matrix protein derivative (EMD) has a key role in periodontal wound healing.

  6. Periodontal tissue reaction to customized nano-hydroxyapatite block scaffold in one-wall intrabony defect: a histologic study in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Seok; Park, Weon-Yeong; Cha, Jae-Kook; Jung, Ui-Won; Kim, Chang-Sung; Lee, Yong-Keun; Choi, Seong-Ho

    2012-04-01

    This study evaluated histologically the tissue responses to and the effects of a customized nano-hydroxyapatite (n-HA) block bone graft on periodontal regeneration in a one-wall periodontal-defect model. A customized block bone for filling in the standardized periodontal defect was fabricated from prefabricated n-HA powders and a polymeric sponge. Bilateral 4×4×5 mm (buccolingual width×mesiodistal width×depth), one-wall, critical-size intrabony periodontal defects were surgically created at the mandibular second and fourth premolars of five Beagle dogs. In each dog, one defect was filled with block-type HA and the other served as a sham-surgery control. The animals were sacrificed following an 8-week healing interval for clinical and histological evaluations. Although the sites that received an n-HA block showed minimal bone formation, the n-HA block was maintained within the defect with its original hexahedral shape. In addition, only a limited inflammatory reaction was observed at sites that received an n-HA block, which might have been due to the high stability of the customized block bone. In the limitation of this study, customized n-HA block could provide a space for periodontal tissue engineering, with minimal inflammation.

  7. The study of morphological changes of periodontal tissue by using different groups of endosealers in conditions of experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makedonova Yu.A.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the nature and duration of the violations of adaptive-compensatory reactions of the periodontium depending on the physico-chemical properties of endosealers is an important part of endodontic treatment. The aim is to reveal the conditions of the experiment peculiarities of morphological changes of periodontal tissue in direct contact with the main filling material for root canal. Material and methods. The traditional method of obturation by modern endosealers was used to seal the root canal of teeth of experimental animal. Results of the study demonstrated the bio-compatibility of new experimental material Real Seal. Conclusion. The data obtained justify a differentiated approach to the choice of the root filling material for teeth with a healthy periodontosis.

  8. Assessment of tissue-specific cortisol activity with regard to degeneration of the suspensory ligaments in horses with pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofberger, Sina C; Gauff, Felicia; Thaller, Denise; Morgan, Ruth; Keen, John A; Licka, Theresia F

    2018-02-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify signs of tissue-specific cortisol activity in samples of suspensory ligament (SL) and neck skin tissue from horses with and without pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID). SAMPLE Suspensory ligament and neck skin tissue samples obtained from 26 euthanized horses with and without PPID. PROCEDURES Tissue samples were collected from 12 horses with and 14 horses without PPID (controls). Two control horses had received treatment with dexamethasone; data from those horses were not used in statistical analyses. The other 12 control horses were classified as old horses (≥ 14 years old) and young horses (≤ 9 years old). Standard histologic staining, staining for proteoglycan accumulation, and immunostaining of SL and neck skin tissue sections for glucocorticoid receptors, insulin, 11β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, and 11β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 were performed. Findings for horses with PPID were compared with findings for young and old horses without PPID. RESULTS Compared with findings for old and young control horses, there were significantly more cells stained for glucocorticoid receptors in SL samples and for 11 β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 in SL and skin tissue samples from horses with PPID. Insulin could not be detected in any of the SL or skin tissue samples. Horses with PPID had evidence of SL degeneration with significantly increased proteoglycan accumulation. Neck skin tissue was found to be significantly thinner in PPID-affected horses than in young control horses. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that tissue-specific dysregulation of cortisol metabolism may contribute to the SL degeneration associated with PPID in horses.

  9. Changes in apolipoprotein B and oxidized low-density lipoprotein levels in gingival crevicular fluids as a result of periodontal tissue conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, M; Kato, R; Moriya, Y; Noguchi, E; Koide, Y; Inoue, S; Itabe, H; Yamamoto, M

    2017-06-01

    Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by bacterial infection that can lead to tooth loss. Gingival crevicular fluid can be collected easily and noninvasively. We previously discovered the presence of apolipoprotein B (apoB), the main constituent of low-density lipoprotein, and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) in the gingival crevicular fluid of healthy subjects. In this study, we investigated whether periodontal conditions affect the levels of apoB and oxLDL in gingival crevicular fluid. The study population comprised 11 patients with chronic periodontitis. A pair of gingival crevicular fluid samples was collected from each patient at a healthy site and at a site with periodontitis (baseline samples). Thereafter, gingival crevicular fluid samples were collected from the same patients again at 4 and 8 wk after scaling and root planing (SRP). The levels of apoB, oxLDL, protein and cytokines in gingival crevicular fluid, in addition to gingival crevicular fluid volume, were measured. At baseline, the levels of apoB and oxLDL in gingival crevicular fluid were higher at the sites with periodontitis than at the healthy sites. The levels of apoB and oxLDL at periodontal sites decreased after SRP. The level of oxLDL in gingival crevicular fluid correlated well with the probing pocket depth. The oxLDL : apoB ratio in gingival crevicular fluid was significantly higher than that in plasma. The levels of apoB and oxLDL in gingival crevicular fluid change according to the periodontal tissue conditions. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Periodontal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanovski, S

    2009-09-01

    The ultimate goal of periodontal therapy is the regeneration of the tissues destroyed as a result of periodontal disease. Currently, two clinical techniques, based on the principles of "guided tissue regeneration" (GTR) or utilization of the biologically active agent "enamel matrix derivative" (EMD), can be used for the regeneration of intrabony and Class II mandibular furcation periodontal defects. In cases where additional support and space-making requirements are necessary, both of these procedures can be combined with a bone replacement graft. There is no evidence that the combined use of GTR and EMD results in superior clinical results compared to the use of each material in isolation. Great variability in clinical outcomes has been reported in relation to the use of both EMD and GTR, and these procedures can be generally considered to be unpredictable. Careful case selection and treatment planning, including consideration of patient, tooth, site and surgical factors, is required in order to optimize the outcomes of treatment. There are limited data available for the clinical effectiveness of other biologically active molecules, such as growth factors and platelet concentrates, and although promising results have been reported, further clinical trials are required in order to confirm their effectiveness. Current active areas of research are centred on tissue engineering and gene therapy strategies which may result in more predictable regenerative outcomes in the future.

  11. Tissues from equine cadaver ligaments up to 72 hours of post-mortem: a promising reservoir of stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikh Alsook, Mohamad Khir; Gabriel, Annick; Piret, Joëlle; Waroux, Olivier; Tonus, Céline; Connan, Delphine; Baise, Etienne; Antoine, Nadine

    2015-12-18

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) harvested from cadaveric tissues represent a promising approach for regenerative medicine. To date, no study has investigated whether viable MSCs could survive in cadaveric tissues from tendon or ligament up to 72 hours of post-mortem. The purpose of the present work was to find out if viable MSCs could survive in cadaveric tissues from adult equine ligaments up to 72 hours of post-mortem, and to assess their ability (i) to remain in an undifferentiated state and (ii) to divide and proliferate in the absence of any specific stimulus. MSCs were isolated from equine cadaver (EC) suspensory ligaments within 48-72 hours of post-mortem. They were evaluated for viability, proliferation, capacity for tri-lineage differentiation, expression of cell surface markers (CD90, CD105, CD73, CD45), pluripotent transcription factor (OCT-4), stage-specific embryonic antigen-1 (SSEA-1), neuron-specific class III beta-tubulin (TUJ-1), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). As well, they were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM). EC-MSCs were successfully isolated and maintained for 20 passages with high cell viability and proliferation. Phase contrast microscopy revealed that cells with fibroblast-like appearance were predominant in the culture. Differentiation assays proved that EC-MSCs are able to differentiate towards mesodermal lineages (osteogenic, adipogenic, chondrogenic). Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that EC-MSCs expressed CD90, CD105, and CD73, while being negative for the leukocyte common antigen CD45. Immunofluorescence analysis showed a high percentage of positive cells for OCT-4 and SSEA-1. Surprisingly, in absence of any stimuli, some adherent cells closely resembling neuronal and glial morphology were also observed. Interestingly, our results revealed that approximately 15 % of the cell populations were TUJ-1 positive, whereas GFAP expression was detected in only a few cells. Furthermore, TEM analysis

  12. Detection of (Leu-7)-positive cells with NK activity in human gingival tissues from patients with periodontitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komiyama, K.; Hirsch, H.Z.; Mestecky, J.; Moro, I.

    1986-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have been identified in peripheral blood, lymphoid tissue and more recently in gut mucosa and may be involved in the regulation of immunoglobulin synthesis. They have assayed gingival tissues obtained from 25 periodontitis patients, for the presence and activity of NK cells. Routine histological techniques demonstrated an inflammatory infiltrate dominated by plasma cells and B lymphocytes. Indirect staining procedures with a biotin-labeled mouse anti-human, Leu-7 antibody revealed the presence of numerous positive cells accompanying the inflammatory cellular infiltrate in perivascular areas. Several specimens demonstrated positive-staining cells in the epithelium as well. Few cells were observed in histologically uninflammed areas. Single cell suspension obtained by collagenase digestion of 5 gingival samples were used in 51 Cr release cytotoxicity assay against K562 cells. Three of the five samples were positive in this assay. The finding of Leu-7-positive cells in areas of intense plasma cell foci but not in uninflammed areas, may support a role for these cells in the regulation of immunoglobulin synthesis in oral mucosal tissues

  13. Detection of (Leu-7)-positive cells with NK activity in human gingival tissues from patients with periodontitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komiyama, K.; Hirsch, H.Z.; Mestecky, J.; Moro, I.

    1986-03-05

    Natural killer (NK) cells have been identified in peripheral blood, lymphoid tissue and more recently in gut mucosa and may be involved in the regulation of immunoglobulin synthesis. They have assayed gingival tissues obtained from 25 periodontitis patients, for the presence and activity of NK cells. Routine histological techniques demonstrated an inflammatory infiltrate dominated by plasma cells and B lymphocytes. Indirect staining procedures with a biotin-labeled mouse anti-human, Leu-7 antibody revealed the presence of numerous positive cells accompanying the inflammatory cellular infiltrate in perivascular areas. Several specimens demonstrated positive-staining cells in the epithelium as well. Few cells were observed in histologically uninflammed areas. Single cell suspension obtained by collagenase digestion of 5 gingival samples were used in /sup 51/Cr release cytotoxicity assay against K562 cells. Three of the five samples were positive in this assay. The finding of Leu-7-positive cells in areas of intense plasma cell foci but not in uninflammed areas, may support a role for these cells in the regulation of immunoglobulin synthesis in oral mucosal tissues.

  14. Ozone therapy in periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, G; Mansi, B

    2012-02-22

    Gingival and Periodontal diseases represent a major concern both in dentistry and medicine. The majority of the contributing factors and causes in the etiology of these diseases are reduced or treated with ozone in all its application forms (gas, water, oil). The beneficial biological effects of ozone, its anti-microbial activity, oxidation of bio-molecules precursors and microbial toxins implicated in periodontal diseases and its healing and tissue regeneration properties, make the use of ozone well indicated in all stages of gingival and periodontal diseases. The primary objective of this article is to provide a general review about the clinical applications of ozone in periodontics. The secondary objective is to summarize the available in vitro and in vivo studies in Periodontics in which ozone has been used. This objective would be of importance to future researchers in terms of what has been tried and what the potentials are for the clinical application of ozone in Periodontics.

  15. Effect of high-frequency near-infrared diode laser irradiation on periodontal tissues during experimental tooth movement in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunji, Hidemi; Kunimatsu, Ryo; Tsuka, Yuji; Yoshimi, Yuki; Sumi, Keisuke; Awada, Tetsuya; Nakajima, Kengo; Kimura, Aya; Hiraki, Tomoka; Hirose, Naoto; Yanoshita, Makoto; Tanimoto, Kotaro

    2018-02-05

    Tooth movement during orthodontic treatment is associated with bone neoplasticity and bone resorption on the tension and pressure sides. Previous clinical studies have suggested that low-power laser irradiation can accelerate tooth movement during orthodontic treatment, although the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we used a high-frequency near-infrared diode laser that generates less heat and examined the histologic changes in periodontal tissue during experimental tooth movement with laser irradiation. A nickel-titanium closed coil was mounted between the maxillary left side first molar and incisor of rats to model experimental tooth movement. The laser-irradiation and the control groups were set, and the amount of movement of the first molar on 7th and 14th days after the start of pulling of the first molar tooth on the maxillary left was measured by three-dimensional analysis of µCT. After tooth movement, tissue samples from the mesial and tension sides were collected, and successive horizontal sections were prepared and examined using hematoxylin-eosin and TRAP staining and immunohistochemical staining for RANKL, OPG, ALP, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Changes in tissue temperature following laser irradiation were also examined. Laser irradiation significantly increased tooth movement compared with non-irradiated controls. Histologic staining of the pressure-side mesial root in laser-irradiated rats revealed enhanced RANKL expression and increased numbers of TRAP-positive cells compared with controls. By contrast, on the tension side, laser irradiation led to increased expression of ALP and PCNA. These data indicate that high-frequency near-infrared diode laser irradiation on the pressure side upregulates RANKL expression and accelerates osteoclast differentiation, facilitating bone resorption, whereas bone formation is induced on the tension side. This study demonstrates that high-frequency near-infrared diode laser

  16. A novel chemically modified curcumin reduces inflammation-mediated connective tissue breakdown in a rat model of diabetes: periodontal and systemic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elburki, M S; Moore, D D; Terezakis, N G; Zhang, Y; Lee, H-M; Johnson, F; Golub, L M

    2017-04-01

    Periodontal disease is the most common chronic inflammatory disease known to mankind (and the major cause of tooth loss in the adult population) and has also been linked to various systemic diseases, particularly diabetes mellitus. Based on the literature linking periodontal disease with diabetes in a "bidirectional manner", the objectives of the current study were to determine: (i) the effect of a model of periodontitis, complicated by diabetes, on mechanisms of tissue breakdown including bone loss; and (ii) the response of the combination of this local and systemic phenotype to a novel pleiotropic matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, chemically modified curcumin (CMC) 2.24. Diabetes was induced in adult male rats by intravenous injection of streptozotocin (nondiabetic rats served as controls), and Escherichia coli endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide) was repeatedly injected into the gingiva to induce periodontitis. CMC 2.24 was administered by oral gavage (30 mg/kg) daily; untreated diabetic rats received vehicle alone. After 3 wk of treatment, the rats were killed, and gingiva, jaws, tibia and skin were collected. The maxillary jaws and tibia were dissected and radiographed. The gingival tissues of each experimental group (n = 6 rats/group) were pooled, extracted, partially purified and, together with individual skin samples, analyzed for matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 by gelatin zymography; MMP-8 was analyzed in gingival and skin tissue extracts, and in serum, by western blotting. The levels of three bone-resorptive cytokines [interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α], were measured in gingival tissue extracts and serum by ELISA. Systemic administration of CMC 2.24 to diabetic rats with endotoxin-induced periodontitis significantly inhibited alveolar bone loss and attenuated the severity of local and systemic inflammation. Moreover, this novel tri-ketonic phenylaminocarbonyl curcumin (CMC 2.24) appeared to reduce the pathologically excessive

  17. The anterior cruciate ligament: a study on its bony and soft tissue anatomy using novel 3D CT technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tampere, Thomas; Van Hoof, Tom; Cromheecke, Michiel; Van der Bracht, Hans; Chahla, Jorge; Verdonk, Peter; Victor, Jan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is twofold: first, to visualize both the tibial and femoral bony insertion surfaces and second, to describe the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) geometrically, using novel 3D CT imaging. In addition, new concepts of best-fit cylinder and central axis are introduced and evaluated. Eight unpaired knees of embalmed cadavers were used in this study. Following the dissection process, the ACL was injected with a contrast medium for CT imaging. The obtained CT images in extension, 45°, 90° and full flexion were segmented and rendered in 3D allowing morphological and morphometric analysis of the ACL. Anatomical footprint centres, femoral and tibial footprint surface area, best-fit ACL-cylinder intersection area, best-fit ACL-cylinder/footprint coverage ratio, best-fit ACL-cylinder central axis projections at the tibial and femoral footprint in the four positions were used to describe the anatomy of the ACL, based on the Bernard, Hertel and Amis grid. Based on these parameters, with the best-fit cylinder representing the bulk of the ACL, a changing fibre-recruitment pattern was seen with a moving position of the central axis from posterior to anterior on the femoral and tibial footprint, going from extension to flexion. Furthermore, the numerical data show an increase in tibial footprint coverage by the best-fit cylinder through the ACL when the knee is progressively flexed, whereas an inverse relationship was seen on the femoral side. This study is the first to describe the detailed anatomy of the human ACL with respect to its course and footprints using a 3D approach. It confirms the large difference and inter-patient variability between the tibial and femoral footprint area with the former being significantly smaller. The best-fit cylinder concept illustrates the recruitment pattern of the native ACL where in extension the postero-lateral fibres are recruited and in flexion rather the antero-medial bundle, which can be valuable information in

  18. Role of genetic in periodontal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Narayanrao Wankhede

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetics is the study and understanding of the phenomena of heredity and variation. A large number of genes are associated with many systemic conditions. Periodontitis is inflammatory condition of periodontium. Periodontium consists of gingiva, periodontal ligament, cementum, and alveolar bone. It is considered being a multifactorial disease. Studies of animals and humans support the concept that a large number of genes' factor may be associated with periodontitis and clearly play a role in the predisposition and progression of periodontal diseases. It has been proven that genetic factors impair inflammatory and immune responses during periodontal diseases. Research on identifying specific genes causing periodontitis may improve and prevent the disease progression. The aim of this article is to focus on genetic risk factors and its influence for the various forms of periodontal disease.

  19. Molecular characterization and function of tenomodulin, a marker of tendons and ligaments that integrate musculoskeletal components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chisa Shukunami, DDS, PhD

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Tendons and ligaments are dense fibrous bands of connective tissue that integrate musculoskeletal components in vertebrates. Tendons connect skeletal muscles to the bone and function as mechanical force transmitters, whereas ligaments bind adjacent bones together to stabilize joints and restrict unwanted joint movement. Fibroblasts residing in tendons and ligaments are called tenocytes and ligamentocytes, respectively. Tenomodulin (Tnmd is a type II transmembrane glycoprotein that is expressed at high levels in tenocytes and ligamentocytes, and is also present in periodontal ligament cells and tendon stem/progenitor cells. Tnmd is related to chondromodulin-1 (Chm1, a cartilage-derived angiogenesis inhibitor, and both Tnmd and Chm1 are expressed in the CD31− avascular mesenchyme. The conserved C-terminal hydrophobic domain of these proteins, which is characterized by the eight Cys residues to form four disulfide bonds, may have an anti-angiogenic function. This review highlights the molecular characterization and function of Tnmd, a specific marker of tendons and ligaments.

  20. Periodontal healing complications following extrusive and lateral luxation in the permanent dentition: a longitudinal cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, Nuno Vibe; Lauridsen, Eva Fejerskov; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the risk of tooth loss and complications in periodontal ligament (PDL) healing following extrusive and lateral luxation in the permanent dentition.......To analyze the risk of tooth loss and complications in periodontal ligament (PDL) healing following extrusive and lateral luxation in the permanent dentition....

  1. Influence of phase I periodontal therapy on levels of matrix metalloproteinase 1 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi S. Ghodpage

    2014-10-01

    Conclusions: We observed that as the extent of periodontal destruction increases, MMP-1 concentration increases and TIMP-1 concentration decreases in GCF. When chronic periodontitis patients were treated by scaling and root planing (SRP, the average MMP-1 concentrations decreased and TIMP-1 concentrations increased in GCF.

  2. THE CONDITION OF PERIODONTAL TISSUES IN PATIENTS WITH MANDIBULAR FRACTURES IN COMBINATION WITH INFLAMMATORY DISEASES OF PERIODONTIUM IN DYNAMICS OF TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.U. Bisultanov

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The immobilization of broken fragments by two-jaw anchor splints in patients with the mandibular fractures in a combination with inflammatory diseases ofperiodontium usually causes the exacerbation and progression of the diseases and growing progressively worsening ofperiodontium status. The intensity of these conditions depends on an initial status ofperiodontal tissue. The posttraumatic suppurative inflammatory complications of the mandibular fractures frequency depending on the initial stage of periodontal disease are marked.

  3. In vivo extracellular matrix protein expression by human periodontal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-08-23

    Aug 23, 2010 ... Extracellular matrix proteins (ECM) are described as molecular regulators of these events. ..... zation and adhesive interaction of cells (Yamada, 1983). .... periodontal ligament fibroblasts after simulation of orthodontic force.

  4. Mechanical Forces Exacerbate Periodontal Defects in Bsp-null Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soenjaya, Y.; Foster, B.L.; Nociti, F.H.; Ao, M.; Holdsworth, D.W.; Hunter, G.K.; Somerman, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is an acidic phosphoprotein with collagen-binding, cell attachment, and hydroxyapatite-nucleating properties. BSP expression in mineralized tissues is upregulated at onset of mineralization. Bsp-null (Bsp-/-) mice exhibit reductions in bone mineral density, bone turnover, osteoclast activation, and impaired bone healing. Furthermore, Bsp-/- mice have marked periodontal tissue breakdown, with a lack of acellular cementum leading to periodontal ligament detachment, extensive alveolar bone and tooth root resorption, and incisor malocclusion. We hypothesized that altered mechanical stress from mastication contributes to periodontal destruction observed in Bsp-/- mice. This hypothesis was tested by comparing Bsp-/- and wild-type mice fed with standard hard pellet diet or soft powder diet. Dentoalveolar tissues were analyzed using histology and micro–computed tomography. By 8 wk of age, Bsp-/- mice exhibited molar and incisor malocclusion regardless of diet. Bsp-/- mice with hard pellet diet exhibited high incidence (30%) of severe incisor malocclusion, 10% lower body weight, 3% reduced femur length, and 30% elevated serum alkaline phosphatase activity compared to wild type. Soft powder diet reduced severe incisor malocclusion incidence to 3% in Bsp-/- mice, supporting the hypothesis that occlusal loading contributed to the malocclusion phenotype. Furthermore, Bsp-/- mice in the soft powder diet group featured normal body weight, long bone length, and serum alkaline phosphatase activity, suggesting that tooth dysfunction and malnutrition contribute to growth and skeletal defects reported in Bsp-/- mice. Bsp-/- incisors also erupt at a slower rate, which likely leads to the observed thickened dentin and enhanced mineralization of dentin and enamel toward the apical end. We propose that the decrease in eruption rate is due to a lack of acellular cementum and associated defective periodontal attachment. These data demonstrate the importance of BSP

  5. Pathogenesis of apical periodontitis and the causes of endodontic failures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, P N R

    2004-11-01

    Apical periodontitis is a sequel to endodontic infection and manifests itself as the host defense response to microbial challenge emanating from the root canal system. It is viewed as a dynamic encounter between microbial factors and host defenses at the interface between infected radicular pulp and periodontal ligament that results in local inflammation, resorption of hard tissues, destruction of other periapical tissues, and eventual formation of various histopathological categories of apical periodontitis, commonly referred to as periapical lesions. The treatment of apical periodontitis, as a disease of root canal infection, consists of eradicating microbes or substantially reducing the microbial load from the root canal and preventing re-infection by orthograde root filling. The treatment has a remarkably high degree of success. Nevertheless, endodontic treatment can fail. Most failures occur when treatment procedures, mostly of a technical nature, have not reached a satisfactory standard for the control and elimination of infection. Even when the highest standards and the most careful procedures are followed, failures still occur. This is because there are root canal regions that cannot be cleaned and obturated with existing equipments, materials, and techniques, and thus, infection can persist. In very rare cases, there are also factors located within the inflamed periapical tissue that can interfere with post-treatment healing of the lesion. The data on the biological causes of endodontic failures are recent and scattered in various journals. This communication is meant to provide a comprehensive overview of the etio-pathogenesis of apical periodontitis and the causes of failed endodontic treatments that can be visualized in radiographs as asymptomatic post-treatment periapical radiolucencies.

  6. The progress of the periodontal syndrome in the rice rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotcher, J.E.; Jee, W.S.S.

    1981-01-01

    Several morphometric and cellular parameters were studied in the rice rat (Oryzomys palustris). When fed a soft, high carbohydrate diet, a severe periodontal disease occurred, with significant alterations in the morphometric and cellular endpoints observed. Weaned animals were placed on a high carbohydrate diet for periods of 6, 12 or 18 weeks. There was a linear rapid loss of bone by 18 weeks, approaching a 75% loss of original bone. Vascular spaces decreased as the remaining connective tissue became fibrotic in character. The percentage of the interdental test site which was destroyed by periodontal disease increased dramatically over the time of the experiment. The numbers of fibroblasts per mm of bone surface increased slightly at the 18 week period; osteoblasts were unchanged at any period. The numbers of osteoclast nuclei rose dramatically by 12 weeks, and these cell nuclei remained at increased levels at 18 weeks. Also, the numbers of inflammatory cells residing at the bone surface increased greatly by 18 weeks time. Finally, the numbers of 3 H-TdR labeled periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts increased significantly at both 12 and 18 weeks time. These cellular changes and their relation to the bone loss due to periodontal disease are discussed. (author)

  7. Monocyte chemotactic protein-3: possible involvement in apical periodontitis chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezerega, A; Osorio, C; Mardones, J; Mundi, V; Dutzan, N; Franco, M; Gamonal, J; Oyarzún, A; Overall, C M; Hernández, M

    2010-10-01

    To study the expression of monocyte chemotactic protein-3 (MCP-3, also known as chemokine CCL-7) in tissue from apical lesions (AL) and to associate MCP-3 expression with symptomatic or asymptomatic apical periodontitis. To determine the expression of MCP-3 in AL, biopsies obtained during tooth extraction procedures were fixed, subjected to routine processing and diagnosed as apical granuloma (AG) (n = 7) or radicular cyst (RC) (n = 5). As controls, apical periodontal ligament (PDL) specimens from healthy premolars extracted for orthodontics reasons were included (n = 7). All specimens were immunostained for MCP-3 and examined under a light microscope. In addition, homogenates from AL (n = 14) and healthy PDL samples (n = 7) were studied through immunowestern blot. Finally, periapical exudates samples were collected from root canals of teeth having diagnosis of symptomatic (n = 14) and asymptomatic apical periodontitis (n = 14) during routine endodontic treatments and analysed by immunowestern blot and densitometry.   MCP-3 was detected in AG and RC and localized mainly to inflammatory leucocytes, whereas no expression was observed in healthy PDLs. MCP-3 was also detected in periapical exudate, and its levels were significantly higher in symptomatic than in asymptomatic apical periodontitis. MCP-3 was expressed in AL and its levels associated with clinical symptoms. MCP-3 might play a role in disease pathogenesis, possibly by stimulating mononuclear chemotaxis. © 2010 International Endodontic Journal.

  8. [Biocybernetic approach to the thermometric methods of blood supply measurements of periodontal tissues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastusiak, J; Zakrzewski, J

    1988-11-01

    Specific biocybernetic approach to the problem of the blood supply determination of paradontium tissues by means of thermometric methods has been presented in the paper. The compartment models of the measuring procedure have been given. Dilutodynamic methology and classification has been applied. Such an approach enables to select appropriate biophysical parameters describing the state of blood supply of paradontium tissues and optimal design of transducers and measuring methods.

  9. Assessment of apical periodontitis by MRI. A feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geibel, M.A. [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery; Schreiber, E.S.; Bracher, A.K.; Rasche, V. [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Internal Medicine II; Hell, E.; Ulrici, J. [Sirona Dental Systems GmbH, Bensheim (Germany). Dental Imaging; Sailer, L.K. [DOC Praxisklinik im Wiley, Neu-Ulm (Germany). MKG; Ozpeynirci, Y. [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2015-04-15

    The purpose of this clinical feasibility study was to evaluate the applicability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the assessment of apical periodontitis in direct comparison with cone beam CT (CBCT). 19 consecutive patients (average age 43 ± 13 years) with 34 lesions in total (13 molars, 14 premolars and 7 front teeth) were enrolled in this feasibility study. Periapical lesions were defined as periapical radiolucencies (CBCT) or structural changes in the spongy bone signal (MRI), which were connected with the apical part of a root and with at least twice the width of the periodontal ligament space. The location and dimension of the lesions were compared between MRI and CBCT. While mainly mineralized tissue components such as teeth and bone were visible with CBCT, complimentary information of the soft tissue components was assessable with MRI. The MRI images provided sufficient diagnostic detail for the assessment of the main structures of interest. Heterogeneous contrast was observed within the lesion, with often a clear enhancement close to the apical foramen and the periodontal gap. No difference for lesion visibility was observed between MRI and CBCT. The lesion dimensions corresponded well, but were slightly but significantly overestimated with MRI. A heterogeneous lesion appearance was observed in several patients. Four patients presented with a well circumscribed hyperintense signal in the vicinity of the apical foramen. The MRI capability of soft tissue characterization may facilitate detailed analysis of periapical lesions. This clinical study confirms the applicability of multi-contrast MRI for the identification of periapical lesions.

  10. Assessment of apical periodontitis by MRI. A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geibel, M.A.; Schreiber, E.S.; Bracher, A.K.; Rasche, V.; Hell, E.; Ulrici, J.; Sailer, L.K.; Ozpeynirci, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this clinical feasibility study was to evaluate the applicability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the assessment of apical periodontitis in direct comparison with cone beam CT (CBCT). 19 consecutive patients (average age 43 ± 13 years) with 34 lesions in total (13 molars, 14 premolars and 7 front teeth) were enrolled in this feasibility study. Periapical lesions were defined as periapical radiolucencies (CBCT) or structural changes in the spongy bone signal (MRI), which were connected with the apical part of a root and with at least twice the width of the periodontal ligament space. The location and dimension of the lesions were compared between MRI and CBCT. While mainly mineralized tissue components such as teeth and bone were visible with CBCT, complimentary information of the soft tissue components was assessable with MRI. The MRI images provided sufficient diagnostic detail for the assessment of the main structures of interest. Heterogeneous contrast was observed within the lesion, with often a clear enhancement close to the apical foramen and the periodontal gap. No difference for lesion visibility was observed between MRI and CBCT. The lesion dimensions corresponded well, but were slightly but significantly overestimated with MRI. A heterogeneous lesion appearance was observed in several patients. Four patients presented with a well circumscribed hyperintense signal in the vicinity of the apical foramen. The MRI capability of soft tissue characterization may facilitate detailed analysis of periapical lesions. This clinical study confirms the applicability of multi-contrast MRI for the identification of periapical lesions.

  11. Fresh and Frozen Tissue-Engineered Three-Dimensional Bone–Ligament–Bone Constructs for Sheep Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair Following a 2-Year Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasudevan Mahalingam

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available njuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL often require surgical reconstruction utilizing tendon grafts to restore knee function and stability. Some current graft options for ACL repair are associated with poor long-term outcomes. Our laboratory has fabricated tissue-engineered bone–ligament–bone (BLB constructs that demonstrate native ligament regeneration and advancement toward native ACL mechanical properties in a sheep ACL reconstruction model. Prior work has shown that freezing BLBs as a method of preservation resulted in similar outcomes compared with fresh BLBs after 6-month implantation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term efficacy of fresh and frozen BLBs. We hypothesized that both fresh and frozen BLBs would show continued regeneration of structural and functional properties toward those of native ACL after a 2-year implantation. Following removal of the native ACL, fresh (n = 2 and frozen (n = 2 BLBs were implanted arthroscopically. After 2 years of recovery, sheep were euthanized and both the experimental and contralateral hindlimbs were removed and radiographs were performed. Explanted knees were initially evaluated for joint laxity and were then further dissected for uniaxial tensile testing of the isolated ACL or BLB. Following mechanical testing, explanted contralateral ACL (C-ACL and BLBs were harvested for histology. Two years post-ACL reconstruction, fresh and frozen BLBs exhibited similar morphological and biomechanical properties as well as more advanced regeneration compared with our 6-month recovery study. These data indicate that an additional 1.5-year regeneration period allows the BLB to continue ligament regeneration in vivo. In addition, freezing the BLBs is a viable option for the preservation of the graft after fabrication.

  12. CT of the pulmonary ligament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godwin, J.D.; Vock, P.; Osborne, D.R.

    1983-01-01

    Most computed tomographic (CT) scans of the chest show the inferior pulmonary ligament and an associated septum in the lower lobe, although CT descriptions of these structures have not been reported. Conventional radiography of the ligament has relied on indirect signs: the position of the lower lobe in the presence of pneumothorax or pleural effusion, soft-tissue peaks along the upper surface of the diaphragm, and the rare traumatic paramediastinal pneumatocele (attributed to air in the ligament). CT clarifies the anatomic relations of the ligament and alterations caused by pleural effusion and pneumothorax. The ligament is probably responsible for some long linear shadows at the lung bases, and CT helps to distinguish these from scars, walls of bullae, and normal structures such as the phrenic nerve and the interlobar fissures

  13. CT of the pulmonary ligament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godwin, J.D.; Vock, P.; Osborne, D.R.

    1983-08-01

    Most computed tomographic (CT) scans of the chest show the inferior pulmonary ligament and an associated septum in the lower lobe, although CT descriptions of these structures have not been reported. Conventional radiography of the ligament has relied on indirect signs: the position of the lower lobe in the presence of pneumothorax or pleural effusion, soft-tissue peaks along the upper surface of the diaphragm, and the rare traumatic paramediastinal pneumatocele (attributed to air in the ligament). CT clarifies the anatomic relations of the ligament and alterations caused by pleural effusion and pneumothorax. The ligament is probably responsible for some long linear shadows at the lung bases, and CT helps to distinguish these from scars, walls of bullae, and normal structures such as the phrenic nerve and the interlobar fissures.

  14. Periodontitis and increase in circulating oxidative stress

    OpenAIRE

    Takaaki Tomofuji; Koichiro Irie; Toshihiro Sanbe; Tetsuji Azuma; Daisuke Ekuni; Naofumi Tamaki; Tatsuo Yamamoto; Manabu Morita

    2009-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are products of normal cellular metabolism. However, excessive production of ROS oxidizes DNA, lipids and proteins, inducing tissue damage. Studies have shown that periodontitis induces excessive ROS production in periodontal tissue. When periodontitis develops, ROS produced in the periodontal lesion diffuse into the blood stream, resulting in the oxidation of blood molecules (circulating oxidative stress). Such oxidation may be detrimental to systemic health. Fo...

  15. Apoptotic factors in physiological and pathological processes of teeth and periodontal tissues – literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orzedala-Koszel Urszula

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is a physiological process that occurs in the human body throughout the entire life span. This process can be seen in the tissues of the stomatognathic system. A disorder in such programmed cell death processes leads to the development of pathological lesions. Among these are inflammation, osteolytic lesions and neoplastic hyperplasia. We put forward that future studies should concentrate on how to use the knowledge of apoptotic processes and their inhibitors in therapeutic processes involving the stomatognathic system.

  16. Periodontal disease and systemic complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Vicente Oppermann

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal diseases comprise a number of infectious and inflammatory conditions brought about by the interaction between supragingival and subgingival biofilms and the host inflammatory response. Periodontal diseases should be considered systemic conditions. This means that they are both modulated by the body's systems and play a role as a risk factor for systemic derangements. The current evidence supports some of these interactions, such as smoking as a risk factor for periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus, as both influenced by and influencing inflammatory changes in the periodontal tissue. Other potential associations are still being researched, such as obesity, hormonal changes, cardiovascular disease, and adverse outcomes in pregnancy. These, and others, still require further investigation before the repercussions of periodontal disease can be fully elucidated. Nevertheless, at the present time, the treatment of periodontal diseases-and, most importantly, their prevention-enables adequate intervention as a means of ensuring periodontal health.

  17. Role of periodontal pathogenic bacteria in RANKL-mediated bone destruction in periodontal disease

    OpenAIRE

    Mikihito Kajiya; Gabriela Giro; Martin A. Taubman; Xiaozhe Han; Marcia P.A. Mayer; Toshihisa Kawai

    2010-01-01

    Accumulated lines of evidence suggest that hyperimmune responses to periodontal bacteria result in the destruction of periodontal connective tissue and alveolar bone. The etiological roles of periodontal bacteria in the onset and progression of periodontal disease (PD) are well documented. However, the mechanism underlying the engagement of periodontal bacteria in RANKL-mediated alveolar bone resorption remains unclear. Therefore, this review article addresses three critical subjects. First, ...

  18. Effect of All-Trans Retinoic Acid (ATRA against expression of Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 in model mice (Rattus norvegicus periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilma Soraya

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Periodontitis is a condition of inflammation of the tooth supporting tissues generally caused by bacteria Phorphyromonas gingivalis (Pg. and is usually characterized by the occurrence of the alveolar bone resorption. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 is an enzyme that plays an important role in inflammatory conditions. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA is a metabolite of vitamin A which plays a role in healing the inflamed tissue and maintain the immune system. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of ATRA on the expression of MMP-2 in mouse models Rattus norvegicus of periodontitis. Methods: Experimental laboratory by using post test only with control group design. This study used 25 male Wistar mice (Rattus norvegicus that divided into 5 groups. Group 1 (G1 is a group of healthy mice, group 2 (G2 is a group of sick mice as induced periodontitis without treatment, group 3 (G3 is a group of periodontitis mice treated with 5 mg/kg dose of ATRA, group 4 (G4 is a group of periodontitis mice treated with 10 mg/kg dose of ATRA, group 5 (G5 is a group of periodontitis mice treated with 20 mg/kg dose of ATRA. Periodontitis induction was induced by Pg. bacteria every 3 days for 28 days and followed by administration of ATRA for 7 days. Expression of MMP-2 from gingival tissues and periodontal ligament was obtained by immunohistochemical methods. Results were analyzed using the Shapiro-Wilk Test and Mann-Whitney Test. Results: The results showed there were significant differences in the positive area of MMP-2 and MMP-2 color intensity (p < 0.05 between groups. Conclusion: ATRA dose of 20 mg/kg is the most effective dose in inhibiting the expression of MMP-2 in mice models of periodontitis when compared with the dose on other groups.

  19. Verification of an interaction model of an ultrasonic oscillatory system with periodontal tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Karpuhin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Verification of an interaction model of an ultrasonic oscillatory system with biological tissues which was developed in COMSOL Multiphysics was carried out. It was shown that calculation results in COMSOL Multiphysics obtained using the “Finer” grid (the ratio of the grid step to a minimum transversal section area of the model ≤ 0.3 mm-1 best of all qualitatively and quantitatively corresponded to practical results. The average relative error of the obtained results in comparison with the experimental ones did not exceed 4.0%. Influence of geometrical parameters (thickness of load on electrical admittance of the ultrasonic oscillatory system interacting with biological tissues was investigated. It was shown that increase in thickness of load within the range from 0 to 95 mm led to decrease in calculated values of natural resonance frequency of longitudinal fluctuations and electrical admittance from 26,58 to 26,35 kHz and from 0,86 to 0,44 mS.

  20. The effect of polystyrene sodium sulfonate grafting on polyethylene terephthalate artificial ligaments on in vitro mineralisation and in vivo bone tissue integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquette, Cédryck; Viateau, Véronique; Guérard, Sandra; Anagnostou, Fani; Manassero, Mathieu; Castner, David G.; Migonney, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of polystyrene sodium sulfonate (PolyNaSS) grafting onto the osseointegration of a polyethylene terephthalate artificial ligament (Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System, LARS™) used for Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL). The performance of grafted and non-grafted ligaments was assessed in vitro by culturing human osteoblasts under osteogenic induction and this demonstrated that the surface modification was capable of up-regulating the secretion of ALP and induced higher level of mineralisation as measured 6 weeks post-seeding by Micro-Computed Tomography. Grafted and non-grafted LARS™ were subsequently implanted in an ovine model for ACL reconstruction and the ligament-to-bone interface was evaluated by histology and biomechanical testing 3 and 12 months post-implantation. The grafted ligaments exhibited more frequent direct ligament-to-bone contact and bone formation in the core of the ligament at the later time point than the nongrafted specimens, the grafting also significantly reduced the fibrous encapsulation of the ligament 12 months post-implantation. However, this improved osseo-integration was not translated into a significant increase in the biomechanical pull-out loads. These results provide evidences that PolyNaSS grafting improved the osseo-integration of the artificial ligament within the bone tunnels. This might positively influence the outcome of the surgical reconstructions, as higher ligament stability is believed to limit micro-movement and therefore permits earlier and enhanced healing. PMID:23790438

  1. Nano/micro hybrid scaffold of PCL or P3HB nanofibers combined with silk fibroin for tendon and ligament tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghashzargar, Elham; Farè, Silvia; Catto, Valentina; Bertoldi, Serena; Semnani, Dariush; Karbasi, Saeed; Tanzi, Maria Cristina

    2015-07-04

    A novel biodegradable nano/micro hybrid structure was obtained by electrospinning P3HB or PCL nanofibers onto a twisted silk fibroin (SF) structure, with the aim of fabricating a suitable scaffold for tendon and ligament tissue engineering. The electrospinning (ES) processing parameters for P3HB and PCL were optimized on 2D samples, and applied to produce two different nano/micro hybrid constructs (SF/ES-PCL and SF/ES-P3HB).Morphological, chemico-physical and mechanical properties of the novel hybrid scaffolds were evaluated by SEM, ATR FT-IR, DSC, tensile and thermodynamic mechanical tests. The results demonstrated that the nanofibers were tightly wrapped around the silk filaments, and the crystallinity of the SF twisted yarns was not influenced by the presence of the electrospun polymers. The slightly higher mechanical properties of the hybrid constructs confirmed an increase of internal forces due to the interaction between nano and micro components. Cell culture tests with L929 fibroblasts, in the presence of the sample eluates or in direct contact with the hybrid structures, showed no cytotoxic effects and a good level of cytocompatibility of the nano/micro hybrid structures in term of cell viability, particularly at day 1. Cell viability onto the nano/micro hybrid structures decreased from the first to the third day of culture when compared with the control culture plastic, but appeared to be higher when compared with the uncoated SF yarns. Although additional in vitro and in vivo tests are needed, the original fabrication method here described appears promising for scaffolds suitable for tendon and ligament tissue engineering.

  2. Electrospun meshes possessing region-wise differences in fiber orientation, diameter, chemistry and mechanical properties for engineering bone-ligament-bone tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samavedi, Satyavrata; Vaidya, Prasad; Gaddam, Prudhvidhar; Whittington, Abby R; Goldstein, Aaron S

    2014-12-01

    Although bone-patellar tendon-bone (B-PT-B) autografts are the gold standard for repair of anterior cruciate ligament ruptures, they suffer from drawbacks such as donor site morbidity and limited supply. Engineered tissues modeled after B-PT-B autografts are promising alternatives because they have the potential to regenerate connective tissue and facilitate osseointegration. Towards the long-term goal of regenerating ligaments and their bony insertions, the objective of this study was to construct 2D meshes and 3D cylindrical composite scaffolds - possessing simultaneous region-wise differences in fiber orientation, diameter, chemistry and mechanical properties - by electrospinning two different polymers from off-set spinnerets. Using a dual drum collector, 2D meshes consisting of an aligned polycaprolactone (PCL) fiber region, randomly oriented poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) fiber region and a transition region (comprised of both PCL and PLGA fibers) were prepared, and region-wise differences were confirmed by microscopy and tensile testing. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) cultured on these meshes exhibited random orientations and low aspect ratios on the random PLGA regions, and high aspect ratios and alignment on the aligned PCL regions. Next, meshes containing an aligned PCL region flanked by two transition regions and two randomly oriented PLGA regions were prepared and processed into 3D cylindrical composite scaffolds using an interpenetrating photo-crosslinkable polyethylene glycol diacrylate hydrogel to recapitulate the shape of B-PT-B autografts. Tensile testing indicated that cylindrical composites were mechanically robust, and eventually failed due to stress concentration in the aligned PCL region. In summary, this study demonstrates a process to fabricate electrospun meshes possessing region-wise differences in properties that can elicit region-dependent cell responses, and be readily processed into scaffolds with the shape of B-PT-B autografts.

  3. Bioengineered anterior cruciate ligament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ivan (Inventor); Altman, Gregory (Inventor); Kaplan, David (Inventor); Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for producing an anterior cruciate ligament ex vivo. The method comprises seeding pluripotent stem cells in a three dimensional matrix, anchoring the seeded matrix by attachment to two anchors, and culturing the cells within the matrix under conditions appropriate for cell growth and regeneration, while subjecting the matrix to one or more mechanical forces via movement of one or both of the attached anchors. Bone marrow stromal cells are preferably used as the pluripotent cells in the method. Suitable matrix materials are materials to which cells can adhere, such as a gel made from collagen type I. Suitable anchor materials are materials to which the matrix can attach, such as Goinopra coral and also demineralized bone. Optimally, the mechanical forces to which the matrix is subjected mimic mechanical stimuli experienced by an anterior cruciate ligament in vivo. This is accomplished by delivering the appropriate combination of tension, compression, torsion, and shear, to the matrix. The bioengineered ligament which is produced by this method is characterized by a cellular orientation and/or matrix crimp pattern in the direction of the applied mechanical forces, and also by the production of collagen type I, collagen type III, and fibronectin proteins along the axis of mechanical load produced by the mechanical forces. Optimally, the ligament produced has fiber bundles which are arranged into a helical organization. The method for producing an anterior cruciate ligament can be adapted to produce a wide range of tissue types ex vivo by adapting the anchor size and attachment sites to reflect the size of the specific type of tissue to be produced, and also adapting the specific combination of forces applied, to mimic the mechanical stimuli experienced in vivo by the specific type of tissue to be produced. The methods of the present invention can be further modified to incorporate other stimuli experienced in vivo by the

  4. Root cementum modulates periodontal regeneration in Class III furcation defects treated by the guided tissue regeneration technique: a histometric study in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Patricia F; Gurgel, Bruno C V; Pimentel, Suzana P; Sallum, Enilson A; Sallum, Antonio W; Casati, Márcio Z; Nociti, Francisco H

    2006-06-01

    Because the possibility of root cementum preservation as an alternative approach for the treatment of periodontal disease has been demonstrated, this study aimed to histometrically evaluate the effect of root cementum on periodontal regeneration. Bilateral Class III furcation defects were created in dogs, and each dog was randomly assigned to receive one of the following treatments: control (group A): scaling and root planing with the removal of root cementum; or test (group B): removal of soft microbial deposits by polishing the root surface with rubber cups and polishing paste, aiming at maximum cementum preservation. Guided tissue regeneration (GTR) was applied to both groups. Four months after treatment, a superior length of new cementum (3.59 +/- 1.67 mm versus 6.20 +/- 2.26 mm; P = 0.008) and new bone (1.86 +/- 1.76 mm versus 4.62 +/- 3.01 mm; P = 0.002) and less soft tissue along the root surface (2.77 +/- 0.79 mm versus 1.10 +/- 1.48 mm; P = 0.020) was observed for group B. Additionally, group B presented a larger area of new bone (P = 0.004) and a smaller area of soft tissue (P = 0.008). Within the limits of this study, root cementum may modulate the healing pattern obtained by guided tissue regeneration in Class III furcation defects.

  5. Bioreactor design for tendon/ligament engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Gardiner, Bruce S; Lin, Zhen; Rubenson, Jonas; Kirk, Thomas B; Wang, Allan; Xu, Jiake; Smith, David W; Lloyd, David G; Zheng, Ming H

    2013-04-01

    Tendon and ligament injury is a worldwide health problem, but the treatment options remain limited. Tendon and ligament engineering might provide an alternative tissue source for the surgical replacement of injured tendon. A bioreactor provides a controllable environment enabling the systematic study of specific biological, biochemical, and biomechanical requirements to design and manufacture engineered tendon/ligament tissue. Furthermore, the tendon/ligament bioreactor system can provide a suitable culture environment, which mimics the dynamics of the in vivo environment for tendon/ligament maturation. For clinical settings, bioreactors also have the advantages of less-contamination risk, high reproducibility of cell propagation by minimizing manual operation, and a consistent end product. In this review, we identify the key components, design preferences, and criteria that are required for the development of an ideal bioreactor for engineering tendons and ligaments.