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Sample records for tissue-equivalent anthropomorphic phantom

  1. SU-E-J-210: Characterizing Tissue Equivalent Materials for the Development of a Dual MRI-CT Heterogeneous Anthropomorphic Phantom Designed Specifically for MRI Guided Radiotherapy Systems

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    Steinmann, A; Stafford, R; Yung, J; Followill, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: MRI guided radiotherapy (MRIgRT) is an emerging technology which will eventually require a proficient quality auditing system. Due to different principles in which MR and CT acquire images, there is a need for a multi-imaging-modality, end-to-end QA phantom for MRIgRT. The purpose of this study is to identify lung, soft tissue, and tumor equivalent substitutes that share similar human-like CT and MR properties (i.e. Hounsfield units and relaxation times). Methods: Materials of interested such as common CT QA phantom materials, and other proprietary gels/silicones from Polytek, SmoothOn, and CompositeOne were first scanned on a GE 1.5T Signa HDxT MR. Materials that could be seen on both T1-weighted and T2-weighted images were then scanned on a GE Lightspeed RT16 CT simulator and a GE Discovery 750HD CT scanner and their HU values were then measured. The materials with matching HU values of lung (−500 to −700HU), muscle (+40HU) and soft tissue (+100 to +300HU) were further scanned on GE 1.5T Signa HDx to measure their T1 and T2 relaxation times from varying parameters of TI and TE. Results: Materials that could be visualized on T1-weighted and T2-weighted images from a 1.5T MR unit and had an appropriate average CT number, −650, −685, 46,169, and 168 HUs were: compressed cork saturated with water, Polytek Platsil™ Gel-00 combined with mini styrofoam balls, radiotherapy bolus material, SmoothOn Dragon-Skin™ and SmoothOn Ecoflex™, respectively. Conclusion: Post processing analysis is currently being performed to accurately map T1 and T2 values for each material tested. From previous MR visualization and CT examinations it is expected that Dragon-Skin™, Ecoflex™ and bolus will have values consistent with tissue and tumor substitutes. We also expect compressed cork statured with water, and Polytek™-styrofoam combination to have approximate T1 and T2 values suitable for lung-equivalent materials.

  2. SU-E-J-210: Characterizing Tissue Equivalent Materials for the Development of a Dual MRI-CT Heterogeneous Anthropomorphic Phantom Designed Specifically for MRI Guided Radiotherapy Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinmann, A; Stafford, R; Yung, J; Followill, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: MRI guided radiotherapy (MRIgRT) is an emerging technology which will eventually require a proficient quality auditing system. Due to different principles in which MR and CT acquire images, there is a need for a multi-imaging-modality, end-to-end QA phantom for MRIgRT. The purpose of this study is to identify lung, soft tissue, and tumor equivalent substitutes that share similar human-like CT and MR properties (i.e. Hounsfield units and relaxation times). Methods: Materials of interested such as common CT QA phantom materials, and other proprietary gels/silicones from Polytek, SmoothOn, and CompositeOne were first scanned on a GE 1.5T Signa HDxT MR. Materials that could be seen on both T1-weighted and T2-weighted images were then scanned on a GE Lightspeed RT16 CT simulator and a GE Discovery 750HD CT scanner and their HU values were then measured. The materials with matching HU values of lung (−500 to −700HU), muscle (+40HU) and soft tissue (+100 to +300HU) were further scanned on GE 1.5T Signa HDx to measure their T1 and T2 relaxation times from varying parameters of TI and TE. Results: Materials that could be visualized on T1-weighted and T2-weighted images from a 1.5T MR unit and had an appropriate average CT number, −650, −685, 46,169, and 168 HUs were: compressed cork saturated with water, Polytek Platsil™ Gel-00 combined with mini styrofoam balls, radiotherapy bolus material, SmoothOn Dragon-Skin™ and SmoothOn Ecoflex™, respectively. Conclusion: Post processing analysis is currently being performed to accurately map T1 and T2 values for each material tested. From previous MR visualization and CT examinations it is expected that Dragon-Skin™, Ecoflex™ and bolus will have values consistent with tissue and tumor substitutes. We also expect compressed cork statured with water, and Polytek™-styrofoam combination to have approximate T1 and T2 values suitable for lung-equivalent materials

  3. Neutron measurements with a tissue-equivalent phantom

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    Smith, J W [Health Physics Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Harwell (United Kingdom)

    1962-03-15

    This Appendix 3E of the dosimetry experiment at the R-B reactor describes the apparatus used and presents the obtained results. The phantom used was a 1/4-inch thick polythene container, 60 cm high, of elliptical cross-section, with a major axis of 36 cm and a minor axis of 20 cm. This was filled with an approximately tissue-equivalent liquid. A light but rigid internal framework of Perspex supported a series of small detectors through the phantom. The detectors used in the first high-level run at Vinca, to measure flux above 0.5 MeV, were 0.5-cm wide track plates wrapped in cadmium foil. Each track plate was a sandwich of two Ilford El 50 - mu emulsions, with glass backing, separated by a 250-mu polythene radiator, and was oriented at an angle of 45 deg to the front surface of the phantom. Under these conditions the response is constant with neutron energy between 0.5 MeV and 8 MeV at 1.26 X 10 sup - sup 3 tracks/neutron to within +- 15%. The detectors used in the second high-level run were gold foils (260 mg/cm sup 2 thick) for determination of the show neutron distribution. Previous experiments with 0.13 MeV, 2.5 MeV, 14 MeV and Po-Be neutrons have shown that the shape of the curve through a phantom obtained from these gold foils is the same as that given by either manganese foils or sodium samples despite the difference in resonance integrals. From the relaxation length of the neutron flux in the phantom, as measured by the track plates, the mean energy of the neutrons with energies greater than 0.5 MeV may be found by comparison with the relaxation lengths obtained by irradiation of the phantom with monoenergetic neutrons. The results of these experiments are given. Track plate results from the Vinca experiment are shown. It can be seen that the backscattered fast flux is about one-third of the incident fast flux and that the energy indicated by the shape of the curve is considerably lower than the energy of the direct neutrons. It seems possible that the high

  4. Neutron measurements with a tissue-equivalent phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J W [Health Physics Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Harwell (United Kingdom)

    1962-03-01

    This Appendix 3E of the dosimetry experiment at the R-B reactor describes the apparatus used and presents the obtained results. The phantom used was a 1/4-inch thick polythene container, 60 cm high, of elliptical cross-section, with a major axis of 36 cm and a minor axis of 20 cm. This was filled with an approximately tissue-equivalent liquid. A light but rigid internal framework of Perspex supported a series of small detectors through the phantom. The detectors used in the first high-level run at Vinca, to measure flux above 0.5 MeV, were 0.5-cm wide track plates wrapped in cadmium foil. Each track plate was a sandwich of two Ilford El 50 - {mu} emulsions, with glass backing, separated by a 250-{mu} polythene radiator, and was oriented at an angle of 45 deg to the front surface of the phantom. Under these conditions the response is constant with neutron energy between 0.5 MeV and 8 MeV at 1.26 X 10{sup -3} tracks/neutron to within {+-} 15%. The detectors used in the second high-level run were gold foils (260 mg/cm{sup 2} thick) for determination of the show neutron distribution. Previous experiments with 0.13 MeV, 2.5 MeV, 14 MeV and Po-Be neutrons have shown that the shape of the curve through a phantom obtained from these gold foils is the same as that given by either manganese foils or sodium samples despite the difference in resonance integrals. From the relaxation length of the neutron flux in the phantom, as measured by the track plates, the mean energy of the neutrons with energies greater than 0.5 MeV may be found by comparison with the relaxation lengths obtained by irradiation of the phantom with monoenergetic neutrons. The results of these experiments are given. Track plate results from the Vinca experiment are shown. It can be seen that the backscattered fast flux is about one-third of the incident fast flux and that the energy indicated by the shape of the curve is considerably lower than the energy of the direct neutrons. It seems possible that the

  5. Anthropomorphic phantom materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, D.R.; Constantinou, C.

    1982-01-01

    The need, terminology and history of tissue substitutes are outlined. Radiation properties of real tissues are described and simulation procedures are outlined. Recent tissue substitutes are described and charted, as are calculated radiation classifications. Manufacturing procedures and quality control are presented. Recent phantom studies are reviewed and a discussion recorded. Elemental compositions of the recommended tissue substitutes are charted with elemental composition given for each tissue substitute

  6. OSL Based Anthropomorphic Phantom and Real-Time Organ Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hintenlang, David E.

    2009-01-01

    The overall objective of this project was the development of a dosimetry system that provides the direct measurement of organ doses in real-time with a sensitivity that makes it an effective tool for applications in a wide variety of health physics applications. The system included the development of a real-time readout system for fiber optic coupled (FOC) dosimeters that is integrated with a state-of-art anthropomorphic phantom to provide instantaneous measures of organ doses throughout the phantom. The small size of the FOC detectors and optical fibers allow the sensitive volume of the detector to be located at organ centroids (or multiple locations distributed through the organ) within a tissue equivalent, anthropomorphic phantom without perturbing the tissue equivalent features of the phantom. The developed phantom/dosimetry system can be used in any environment where personnel may be exposed to gamma or x-ray radiations to provide the most accurate determinations of organ and effective doses possible to date

  7. OSL Based Anthropomorphic Phantom and Real-Time Organ Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David E. Hintenlang, Ph.D

    2009-02-10

    The overall objective of this project was the development of a dosimetry system that provides the direct measurement of organ does in real-time with a sensitivity that makes it an effective tool for applications in a wide variety of health physics applications. The system included the development of a real-time readout system for fiber optic coupled (FOC) dosimeters that is integrated with a state-of-art anthropomorphic phantom to provide instantaneous measures of organ doses throughout the phantom. The small size of the FOC detectors and optical fibers allow the sensitive volume of the detector to be located at organ centroids (or multiple locations distributed through the organ) within a tissue equivalent, anthropomorphic phantom without perturbing the tissue equivalent features of the phantom. The developed phantom/dosimetry system can be used in any environment where personnel may be exposed to gamma or x-ray radiations to provide the most accurate determinations of organ and effective doses possible to date.

  8. Characterization of tissue-equivalent materials for use in construction of physical phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Edvan V. de; Oliveira, Alex C.H. de; Vieira, Jose W.; Lima, Fernando R.A.

    2013-01-01

    Phantoms are physical or computational models used to simulate the transport of ionizing radiation, their interactions with human body tissues and evaluate the deposition of energy. Depending on the application, you can build phantoms of various types and features. The physical phantoms are made of materials with behavior similar to human tissues exposed to ionizing radiation, the so-called tissue-equivalent materials. The characterization of various tissue-equivalent materials is important for the choice of materials to be used is appropriate, seeking a better cost-benefit ratio. The main objective of this work is to produce tables containing the main characteristics of tissue-equivalent materials. These tables were produced in Microsoft Office Excel. Among the main features of tissue-equivalent materials that were added to the tables, are density, chemical composition, physical state, chemical stability and solubility. The main importance of this work is to contribute to the construction of high-quality physical phantoms and avoid the waste of materials

  9. TH-AB-209-12: Tissue Equivalent Phantom with Excised Human Tissue for Assessing Clinical Capabilities of Coherent Scatter Imaging Applications

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    Albanese, K; Morris, R; Spencer, J [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Greenberg, J [Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Kapadia, A [Carl E Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Previously we reported the development of anthropomorphic tissue-equivalent scatter phantoms of the human breast. Here we present the first results from the scatter imaging of the tissue equivalent breast phantoms for breast cancer diagnosis. Methods: A breast phantom was designed to assess the capability of coded aperture coherent x-ray scatter imaging to classify different types of breast tissue (adipose, fibroglandular, tumor). The phantom geometry was obtained from a prone breast geometry scanned on a dedicated breast CT system. The phantom was 3D printed using the segmented DICOM breast CT data. The 3D breast phantom was filled with lard (as a surrogate for adipose tissue) and scanned in different geometries alongside excised human breast tissues (obtained from lumpectomy and mastectomy procedures). The raw data were reconstructed using a model-based reconstruction algorithm and yielded the location and form factor (i.e., momentum transfer (q) spectrum) of the materials that were imaged. The measured material form factors were then compared to the ground truth measurements acquired by x-ray diffraction (XRD) imaging. Results: Our scatter imaging system was able to define the location and composition of the various materials and tissues within the phantom. Cancerous breast tissue was detected and classified through automated spectral matching and an 86% correlation threshold. The total scan time for the sample was approximately 10 minutes and approaches workflow times for clinical use in intra-operative or other diagnostic tasks. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the first results from an anthropomorphic tissue equivalent scatter phantom to characterize a coherent scatter imaging system. The functionality of the system shows promise in applications such as intra-operative margin detection or virtual biopsy in the diagnosis of breast cancer. Future work includes using additional patient-derived tissues (e.g., human fat), and modeling additional organs

  10. Tissue Equivalent Phantom Design for Characterization of a Coherent Scatter X-ray Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, Kathryn Elizabeth

    Scatter in medical imaging is typically cast off as image-related noise that detracts from meaningful diagnosis. It is therefore typically rejected or removed from medical images. However, it has been found that every material, including cancerous tissue, has a unique X-ray coherent scatter signature that can be used to identify the material or tissue. Such scatter-based tissue-identification provides the advantage of locating and identifying particular materials over conventional anatomical imaging through X-ray radiography. A coded aperture X-ray coherent scatter spectral imaging system has been developed in our group to classify different tissue types based on their unique scatter signatures. Previous experiments using our prototype have demonstrated that the depth-resolved coherent scatter spectral imaging system (CACSSI) can discriminate healthy and cancerous tissue present in the path of a non-destructive x-ray beam. A key to the successful optimization of CACSSI as a clinical imaging method is to obtain anatomically accurate phantoms of the human body. This thesis describes the development and fabrication of 3D printed anatomical scatter phantoms of the breast and lung. The purpose of this work is to accurately model different breast geometries using a tissue equivalent phantom, and to classify these tissues in a coherent x-ray scatter imaging system. Tissue-equivalent anatomical phantoms were designed to assess the capability of the CACSSI system to classify different types of breast tissue (adipose, fibroglandular, malignant). These phantoms were 3D printed based on DICOM data obtained from CT scans of prone breasts. The phantoms were tested through comparison of measured scatter signatures with those of adipose and fibroglandular tissue from literature. Tumors in the phantom were modeled using a variety of biological tissue including actual surgically excised benign and malignant tissue specimens. Lung based phantoms have also been printed for future

  11. Tissue-equivalent torso phantom for calibration of transuranic-nuclide counting facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, R.V.; Anderson, A.L.; Dean, P.N.; Fisher, J.C.; Sundbeck, C.W.

    1986-01-01

    Several tissue-equivalent human-torso phantoms have been constructed for the calibration of counting systems used for in-vivo measurement of transuranic radionuclides. The phantoms contain a simulated human rib cage (in some cases, real bone) and removable model organs, and they include tissue-equivalent chest plates that can be placed over the torso to simulate people with a wide range of statures. The organs included are the lungs, liver, and tracheobronchial lymph nodes. Polyurethane with varying concentrations of added calcium was used to simulate the linear photon-attenuation properties of various human tissues, including lean muscle, adipose-muscle mixtures, cartilage, and bone. Foamed polyurethane was used to simulate lung tissue. Organs have been loaded with highly pure 238 Pu, 239 Pu, 241 Am, and other radionuclides of interest. The validity of the phantom as a calibration standard has been checked in separate intercomparison studies using human subjects whose lungs contained a plutonium simulant. The resulting phantom calibration factors generally compared to within +-20% of the average calibration factors obtained for the human subjects

  12. A statistically defined anthropomorphic software breast phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, Beverly A.; Reiser, Ingrid; Nishikawa, Robert M.; Bakic, Predrag R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Digital anthropomorphic breast phantoms have emerged in the past decade because of recent advances in 3D breast x-ray imaging techniques. Computer phantoms in the literature have incorporated power-law noise to represent glandular tissue and branching structures to represent linear components such as ducts. When power-law noise is added to those phantoms in one piece, the simulated fibroglandular tissue is distributed randomly throughout the breast, resulting in dense tissue placement that may not be observed in a real breast. The authors describe a method for enhancing an existing digital anthropomorphic breast phantom by adding binarized power-law noise to a limited area of the breast. Methods: Phantoms with (0.5 mm) 3 voxel size were generated using software developed by Bakic et al. Between 0% and 40% of adipose compartments in each phantom were replaced with binarized power-law noise (β = 3.0) ranging from 0.1 to 0.6 volumetric glandular fraction. The phantoms were compressed to 7.5 cm thickness, then blurred using a 3 × 3 boxcar kernel and up-sampled to (0.1 mm) 3 voxel size using trilinear interpolation. Following interpolation, the phantoms were adjusted for volumetric glandular fraction using global thresholding. Monoenergetic phantom projections were created, including quantum noise and simulated detector blur. Texture was quantified in the simulated projections using power-spectrum analysis to estimate the power-law exponent β from 25.6 × 25.6 mm 2 regions of interest. Results: Phantoms were generated with total volumetric glandular fraction ranging from 3% to 24%. Values for β (averaged per projection view) were found to be between 2.67 and 3.73. Thus, the range of textures of the simulated breasts covers the textures observed in clinical images. Conclusions: Using these new techniques, digital anthropomorphic breast phantoms can be generated with a variety of glandular fractions and patterns. β values for this new phantom are comparable

  13. Microdosimetry of 14.7 MeV neutrons in tissue equivalent phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amols, H.I.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation has been made of energy deposition in tissue by neutrons. A one-half inch diameter Rossi type proportional counter was used to simulate a one-micron sphere of tissue. Event-size spectra were taken in air, and at various positions in a large volume of tissue equivalent fluid. From the raw spectra, LET distributions were determined, as well as dose fractions for protons, alphas, and heavy ions, and dose average and track-average LET values. The shape of the D(L) vs. LET curve is found to undergo significant change in the phantom due to moderation of the neutron beam. In addition, previous calculations of LET spectra in air are shown to be in error, and theoretical RBE and OER values, based on data from this experiment are in better agreement with biological results. A two-step theoretical calculation has also been carried out. An original Monte Carlo computer code was used to calculate neutron fluences in phantom (1), which were converted to LET distributions via standard algorithms (2). Agreement with experiment is very good, both in air and in phantom. Edge effects, backscatter effects, and effects of phantom size were also studied

  14. Experimental evaluation of the thermal properties of two tissue equivalent phantom materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craciunescu, O I; Howle, L E; Clegg, S T

    1999-01-01

    Tissue equivalent radio frequency (RF) phantoms provide a means for measuring the power deposition of various hyperthermia therapy applicators. Temperature measurements made in phantoms are used to verify the accuracy of various numerical approaches for computing the power and/or temperature distributions. For the numerical simulations to be accurate, the electrical and thermal properties of the materials that form the phantom should be accurately characterized. This paper reports on the experimentally measured thermal properties of two commonly used phantom materials, i.e. a rigid material with the electrical properties of human fat, and a low concentration polymer gel with the electrical properties of human muscle. Particularities of the two samples required the design of alternative measuring techniques for the specific heat and thermal conductivity. For the specific heat, a calorimeter method is used. For the thermal diffusivity, a method derived from the standard guarded comparative-longitudinal heat flow technique was used for both materials. For the 'muscle'-like material, the thermal conductivity, density and specific heat at constant pressure were measured as: k = 0.31 +/- 0.001 W(mK)(-1), p = 1026 +/- 7 kgm(-3), and c(p) = 4584 +/- 107 J(kgK)(-1). For the 'fat'-like material, the literature reports on the density and specific heat such that only the thermal conductivity was measured as k = 0.55 W(mK)(-1).

  15. Characterisation of an anthropomorphic chest phantom for dose measurements in radiology beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, L. M. S.; Cerqueira, R. A. D.; Santos, W. S.; Pereira, A. J. S.; Rodrigues, T. M. A.; Carvalho Júnior, A. B.; Maia, A. F.

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to characterise an anthropomorphic chest phantom for dosimetric measurements of conventional radiology beams. This phantom was developed by a previous research project at the Federal University of Sergipe for image quality control tests. As the phantom consists of tissue-equivalent material, it is possible to characterise it for dosimetric studies. For comparison, a geometric chest phantom, consisting of PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) with dimensions of 30×30×15 cm³ was used. Measurements of incident air kerma (Ki) and entrance surface dose (ESD) were performed using ionisation chambers. From the results, backscatter factors (BSFs) of the two phantoms were determined and compared with values estimated by CALDose_X software, based on a Monte Carlo simulation. For the technical parameters evaluated in this study, the ESD and BSF values obtained experimentally showed a good similarity between the two phantoms, with minimum and maximum difference of 0.2% and 7.0%, respectively, and showed good agreement with the results published in the literature. Organ doses and effective doses for the anthropomorphic phantom were also estimated by the determination of conversion coefficients (CCs) using the visual Monte Carlo (VMC) code. Therefore, the results of this study prove that the anthropomorphic thorax phantom proposed is a good tool to use in dosimetry and can be used for risk evaluation of X-ray diagnostic procedures.

  16. Development of thyroid anthropomorphic phantoms for use in nuclear medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira, R. A. D.; Maia, A. F.

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop thyroid anthropomorphic phantoms to be used in control tests of medical images in scintillation cameras. The main difference among the phantoms was the neck shape: in the first, called OSCT, it was geometrically shaped, while in the second, called OSAP, it was anthropomorphically shaped. In both phantoms, thyroid gland prototypes, which were made of acrylic and anthropomorphically shaped, were constructed to allow the simulation of a healthy thyroid and of thyroids with hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. Images of these thyroid anthropomorphic phantoms were obtained using iodine 131 with an activity of 8.695 MBq. The iodine 131 was chosen because it is widely used in studies of thyroid scintigraphy. The images obtained proved the effectiveness of the phantoms to simulate normal or abnormal thyroids function. These phantoms can be used in medical imaging quality control programs and, also in the training of professionals involved in the analysis of images in nuclear medicine centers.

  17. Development of thyroid anthropomorphic phantoms for use in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerqueira, R.A.D.; Maia, A.F.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop thyroid anthropomorphic phantoms to be used in control tests of medical images in scintillation cameras. The main difference among the phantoms was the neck shape: in the first, called OSCT, it was geometrically shaped, while in the second, called OSAP, it was anthropomorphically shaped. In both phantoms, thyroid gland prototypes, which were made of acrylic and anthropomorphically shaped, were constructed to allow the simulation of a healthy thyroid and of thyroids with hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. Images of these thyroid anthropomorphic phantoms were obtained using iodine 131 with an activity of 8.695 MBq. The iodine 131 was chosen because it is widely used in studies of thyroid scintigraphy. The images obtained proved the effectiveness of the phantoms to simulate normal or abnormal thyroids function. These phantoms can be used in medical imaging quality control programs and, also in the training of professionals involved in the analysis of images in nuclear medicine centers. - Highlights: ► Two thyroid phantoms were developed (OSCT and OSAP) with different types of acrylics. ► Thyroid glands were represented anthropomorphically in the both phantoms. ► Different prototypes of thyroid were built of simulate healthy or unhealthy glands. ► Images indicate that anthropomorphic phantoms correctly simulate the thyroid gland

  18. Fabrication of a tissue-equivalent torso phantom for intercalibration of in-vivo transuranic-nuclide counting facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, R.V.; Dean, P.N.; Anderson, A.L.; Fisher, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    A tissue-equivalent human-torso phantom has been constructed for calibration of the counting systems used for in-vivo measurement of transuranic nuclides. The phantom contains a human male rib cage, removable model organs, and includes tissue-equivalent chest plates that can be placed over the torso to simulate people with a wide range of statures. The organs included are lungs, heart, liver, kidneys, spleen, and tracheo-bronchial lymph nodes. Polyurethane with different concentrations of calcium carbonate was used to simulate the linear photon-attenuation properties of various human tissues--lean muscle, adipose-muscle mixtures, and cartilage. Foamed polyurethane with calcium carbonate simulates lung tissue. Transuranic isotopes can be incorporated uniformly in the phantom's lungs and other polyurethane-based organs by dissolution of the nitrate form in acetone with lanthanum nitrate carrier. Organs have now been labelled with highly pure 238 Pu, 239 Pu, and 241 Am for calibration measurements. This phantom is the first of three that will be used in a U.S. Department of Energy program of intercomparisons involving more than ten laboratories. The results of the intercomparison will allow participating laboratories to prepare sets of transmission curves that can be used to predict the performance of their counting systems for a wide range of subject builds and organ depositions. The intercomparison will also provide valuable information on the relative performance of a variety of detector systems and counting techniques

  19. Calculation of dose distribution for 252Cf fission neutron source in tissue equivalent phantoms using Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Gang; Guo Yong; Luo Yisheng; Zhang Wenzhong

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To provide useful parameters for neutron radiotherapy, the author presents results of a Monte Carlo simulation study investigating the dosimetric characteristics of linear 252 Cf fission neutron sources. Methods: A 252 Cf fission source and tissue equivalent phantom were modeled. The dose of neutron and gamma radiations were calculated using Monte Carlo Code. Results: The dose of neutron and gamma at several positions for 252 Cf in the phantom made of equivalent materials to water, blood, muscle, skin, bone and lung were calculated. Conclusion: The results by Monte Carlo methods were compared with the data by measurement and references. According to the calculation, the method using water phantom to simulate local tissues such as muscle, blood and skin is reasonable for the calculation and measurements of dose distribution for 252 Cf

  20. Development of a physical 3D anthropomorphic breast phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carton, Ann-Katherine; Bakic, Predrag; Ullberg, Christer; Derand, Helen; Maidment, Andrew D. A. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, 1 Silverstein Building, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-4206 (United States); XCounter AB, Svaerdvaegen 11, SE-182 33 Danderyd (Sweden); Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, 1 Silverstein Building, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-4206 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: Develop a technique to fabricate a 3D anthropomorphic breast phantom with known ground truth for image quality assessment of 2D and 3D breast x-ray imaging systems. Methods: The phantom design is based on an existing computer model that can generate breast voxel phantoms of varying composition, size, and shape. The physical phantom is produced in two steps. First, the portion of the voxel phantom consisting of the glandular tissue, skin, and Cooper's ligaments is separated into sections. These sections are then fabricated by high-resolution rapid prototyping using a single material with 50% glandular equivalence. The remaining adipose compartments are then filled using an epoxy-based resin (EBR) with 100% adipose equivalence. The phantom sections are stacked to form the physical anthropomorphic phantom. Results: The authors fabricated a prototype phantom corresponding to a 450 ml breast with 45% dense tissue, deformed to a 5 cm compressed thickness. Both the rapid prototype (RP) and EBR phantom materials are radiographically uniform. The coefficient of variation (CoV) of the relative attenuation between RP and EBR phantom samples was <1% and the CoV of the signal intensity within RP and EBR phantom samples was <1.5% on average. Digital mammography and reconstructed digital breast tomosynthesis images of the authors' phantom were reviewed by two radiologists; they reported that the images are similar in appearance to clinical images, noting there are still artifacts from air bubbles in the EBR. Conclusions: The authors have developed a technique to produce 3D anthropomorphic breast phantoms with known ground truth, yielding highly realistic x-ray images. Such phantoms may serve both qualitative and quantitative performance assessments for 2D and 3D breast x-ray imaging systems.

  1. Determination of tissue equivalent materials of a physical 8-year-old phantom for use in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhlaghi, Parisa; Miri Hakimabad, Hashem; Rafat Motavalli, Laleh

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the methodology applied to select suitable tissue equivalent materials of an 8-year phantom for use in computed tomography (CT) examinations. To find the appropriate tissue substitutes, first physical properties (physical density, electronic density, effective atomic number, mass attenuation coefficient and CT number) of different materials were studied. Results showed that, the physical properties of water and polyurethane (as soft tissue), B-100 and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) (as bone) and polyurethane foam (as lung) agree more with those of original tissues. Then in the next step, the absorbed doses in the location of 25 thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) as well as dose distribution in one slice of phantom were calculated for original and these proposed materials by Monte Carlo simulation at different tube voltages. The comparisons suggested that at tube voltages of 80 and 100 kVp using B-100 as bone, water as soft tissue and polyurethane foam as lung is suitable for dosimetric study in pediatric CT examinations. In addition, it was concluded that by considering just the mass attenuation coefficient of different materials, the appropriate tissue equivalent substitutes in each desired X-ray energy range could be found. - Highlights: • A methodology to select tissue equivalent materials for use in CT was proposed. • Physical properties of different materials were studied. • TLDs dose and dose distribution were calculated for original and proposed materials. • B-100 as bone, and water as soft tissue are best substitute materials at 80 kVp. • Mass attenuation coefficient is determinant for selecting best tissue substitutes

  2. A new Monte Carlo program for calculations of dose distributions within tissue equivalent phantoms irradiated from π--meson beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przybilla, G.

    1980-11-01

    The present paper reports on the structure and first results from a new Monte Carlo programme for calculations of energy distributions within tissue equivalent phantoms irradiated from π - -beams. Each pion or generated secondary particle is transported until to the complete loss of its kinetic energy taking into account pion processes like multiple Coulomb scattering, pion reactions in flight and absorption of stopped pions. The code uses mainly data from experiments, and physical models have been added only in cases of lacking data. Depth dose curves for a pensil beam of 170 MeV/c within a water phantom are discussed as a function of various parameters. Isodose contours are plotted resulting from a convolution of an extended beam profile and the dose distribution of a pencil beams. (orig.) [de

  3. Construction of cardiac anthropomorphic phantom for simulation of radiological exams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandeira, C.K.; Vieira Neto, H.; Vieira, M.P.M.M.

    2017-01-01

    Phantoms are simulating objects of structures of the human body and can be applied in the quality control and calibration of radiological equipment. The aim of the work is the development of a cardiac anthropomorphic phantom to assist in the elaboration of protocols of dynamic studies that demonstrate the blood circulation inside the cardiac chambers. For the construction of the phantom was used latex, applied in layers on an anatomical model of heart, having been constructed the cardiac chambers and atrioventricular valves. Cardiac chambers were connected to the cannulas for fluid injection and simulation of the circulatory system. The constructed phantom presents anthropomorphic characteristics and allows the circulation of the fluid without reflux, but the thickness of the catheters used does not yet allow flows of greater order of magnitude. This phantom has the potential to be used in the dynamic simulation of cardiac exams, contributing to the elaboration and adequacy of computed tomography protocols

  4. Optical coherence tomography detection of shear wave propagation in inhomogeneous tissue equivalent phantoms and ex-vivo carotid artery samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razani, Marjan; Luk, Timothy W.H.; Mariampillai, Adrian; Siegler, Peter; Kiehl, Tim-Rasmus; Kolios, Michael C.; Yang, Victor X.D.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we explored the potential of measuring shear wave propagation using optical coherence elastography (OCE) in an inhomogeneous phantom and carotid artery samples based on a swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. Shear waves were generated using a piezoelectric transducer transmitting sine-wave bursts of 400 μs duration, applying acoustic radiation force (ARF) to inhomogeneous phantoms and carotid artery samples, synchronized with a swept-source OCT (SS-OCT) imaging system. The phantoms were composed of gelatin and titanium dioxide whereas the carotid artery samples were embedded in gel. Differential OCT phase maps, measured with and without the ARF, detected the microscopic displacement generated by shear wave propagation in these phantoms and samples of different stiffness. We present the technique for calculating tissue mechanical properties by propagating shear waves in inhomogeneous tissue equivalent phantoms and carotid artery samples using the ARF of an ultrasound transducer, and measuring the shear wave speed and its associated properties in the different layers with OCT phase maps. This method lays the foundation for future in-vitro and in-vivo studies of mechanical property measurements of biological tissues such as vascular tissues, where normal and pathological structures may exhibit significant contrast in the shear modulus. PMID:24688822

  5. MOSFET dosimeter depth-dose measurements in heterogeneous tissue-equivalent phantoms at diagnostic x-ray energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, A.K.; Pazik, F.D.; Hintenlang, D.E.; Bolch, W.E.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to explore the use of the TN-1002RD metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeter for measuring tissue depth dose at diagnostic photon energies in both homogeneous and heterogeneous tissue-equivalent materials. Three cylindrical phantoms were constructed and utilized as a prelude to more complex measurements within tomographic physical phantoms of pediatric patients. Each cylindrical phantom was constructed as a stack of seven 5-cm-diameter and 1-cm-thick discs of materials radiographically representative of either soft tissue (S), bone (B), or lung tissue (L) at diagnostic photon energies. In addition to a homogeneous phantom of soft tissue (SSSSSSS), two heterogeneous phantoms were constructed: SSBBSSS and SBLLBSS. MOSFET dosimeters were then positioned at the interface of each disc, and the phantoms were then irradiated at 66 kVp and 200 mAs. Measured values of absorbed dose at depth were then compared to predicated values of point tissue dose as determined via Monte Carlo radiation transport modeling. At depths exceeding 2 cm, experimental results matched the computed values of dose with high accuracy regardless of the dosimeter orientation (epoxy bubble facing toward or away from the x-ray beam). Discrepancies were noted, however, between measured and calculated point doses near the surface of the phantom (surface to 2 cm depth) when the dosimeters were oriented with the epoxy bubble facing the x-ray beam. These discrepancies were largely eliminated when the dosimeters were placed with the flat side facing the x-ray beam. It is therefore recommended that the MOSFET dosimeters be oriented with their flat sides facing the beam when they are used at shallow depths or on the surface of either phantoms or patients

  6. Effective dose measurement at workplaces within an instrumented anthropomorphic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villagrasa, C.; Darreon, J.; Martin-Burtat, N.; Clairand, I.; Colin, J.; Fontbonne, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    The Laboratory of Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry of the IRSN (France) is developing an instrumented anthropomorphic phantom in order to measure the effective dose for photon fields at workplaces. This anthropomorphic phantom will be equipped with small active detectors located inside at chosen positions. The aim of this paper is to present the development of these new detectors showing the results of the characterisation of the prototype under metrological conditions. New evaluations of the effective dose for standard and non-homogenous irradiation configurations taking into account the real constraints of the project have been done validating the feasibility and utility of the instrument. (authors)

  7. Characterization of paraffin based breast tissue equivalent phantom using a CdTe detector pulse height analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubukcu, Solen; Yücel, Haluk

    2016-12-01

    In this study, paraffin was selected as a base material and mixed with different amounts of CaSO 4 ·2H 2 O and H 3 BO 3 compounds in order to mimic breast tissue. Slab phantoms were produced with suitable mixture ratios of the additives in the melted paraffin. Subsequently, these were characterized in terms of first half-value layer (HVL) in the mammographic X-ray range using a pulse-height spectroscopic analysis with a CdTe detector. Irradiations were performed in the energy range of 23-35 kV p under broad beam conditions from Mo/Mo and Mo/Rh target/filter combinations. X-ray spectra were acquired with a CdTe detector without and with phantom material interposition in increments of 1 cm thickness and then evaluated to obtain the transmission data. The net integral areas of the spectra for the slabs were used to plot the transmission curves and these curves were fitted to the Archer model function. The results obtained for the slabs were compared with those of standard mammographic phantoms such as CIRS BR series phantoms and polymethylmethacrylate plates (PMMA). From the evaluated transmission curves, the mass attenuation coefficients and HVLs of some mixtures are close to those of the commercially available standard mammography phantoms. Results indicated that when a suitable proportion of H 3 BO 3 and CaSO 4 ·2H 2 O is added to the paraffin, the resulting material may be a good candidate for a breast tissue equivalent phantom.

  8. A simple method to evaluate the composition of tissue-equivalent phantom materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geske, G.

    1977-01-01

    A description is given of a method to calculate the composition of phantom materials with given density and radiation-physical parameters mixed of components, of which are known their chemical composition and their effective specific volumes. By an example of a simple composition with three components the method is illustrated. The results of this example and some experimental details that must be considered are discussed. (orig.) [de

  9. Computational anthropomorphic phantoms for radiation protection dosimetry: evolution and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choonsik; Lee, Jaiki

    2006-01-01

    Computational anthropomorphic phantoms are computer models of human anatomy used in the calculation of radiation dose distribution in the human body upon exposure to a radiation source. Depending on the manner to represent human anatomy, they are categorized into two classes: stylized and tomographic phantoms. Stylized phantoms, which have mainly been developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), describe human anatomy by using simple mathematical equations of analytical geometry. Several improved stylized phantoms such as male and female adults, pediatric series, and enhanced organ models have been developed following the first hermaphrodite adult stylized phantom, Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD)-5 phantom. Although stylized phantoms have significantly contributed to dosimetry calculation, they provide only approximations of the true anatomical features of the human body and the resulting organ dose distribution. An alternative class of computational phantom, the tomographic phantom, is based upon three-dimensional imaging techniques such as Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging and Computed Tomography (CT). The tomographic phantoms represent the human anatomy with a large number of voxels that are assigned tissue type and organ identity. To date, a total of around 30 tomographic phantoms including male and female adults, pediatric phantoms, and even a pregnant female, have been developed and utilized for realistic radiation dosimetry calculation. They are based on MRI/CT images or sectional color photos from patients, volunteers or cadavers. Several investigators have compared tomographic phantoms with stylized phantoms, and demonstrated the superiority of tomographic phantoms in terms of realistic anatomy and dosimetry calculation. This paper summarizes the history and current status of both stylized and tomographic phantoms, including Korean computational phantoms. Advantages, limitations, and future prospects are also discussed

  10. MO-F-CAMPUS-T-01: IROC Houston QA Center’s Anthropomorphic Proton Phantom Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lujano, C; Hernandez, N; Keith, T; Nguyen, T; Taylor, P; Molineu, A; Followill, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the proton phantoms that IROC Houston uses to approve and credential proton institutions to participate in NCI-sponsored clinical trials. Methods: Photon phantoms cannot necessarily be used for proton measurements because protons react differently than photons in some plastics. As such plastics that are tissue equivalent for protons were identified. Another required alteration is to ensure that the film dosimeters are housed in the phantom with no air gap to avoid proton streaming. Proton-equivalent plastics/materials used include RMI Solid Water, Techron HPV, blue water, RANDO soft tissue material, balsa wood, compressed cork and polyethylene. Institutions wishing to be approved or credentialed request a phantom and are prioritized for delivery. At the institution, the phantom is imaged, a treatment plan is developed, positioned on the treatment couch and the treatment is delivered. The phantom is returned and the measured dose distributions are compared to the institution’s electronically submitted treatment plan dosimetry data. Results: IROC Houston has developed an extensive proton phantom approval/credentialing program consisting of five different phantoms designs: head, prostate, lung, liver and spine. The phantoms are made with proton equivalent plastics that have HU and relative stopping powers similar (within 5%) of human tissues. They also have imageable targets, avoidance structures, and heterogeneities. TLD and radiochromic film are contained in the target structures. There have been 13 head, 33 prostate, 18 lung, 2 liver and 16 spine irradiations with either passive scatter, or scanned proton beams. The pass rates have been: 100%, 69.7%, 72.2%, 50%, and 81.3%, respectively. Conclusion: IROC Houston has responded to the recent surge in proton facilities by developing a family of anthropomorphic phantoms that are able to be used for remote audits of proton beams. Work supported by PHS grant CA10953 and CA081647

  11. MO-F-CAMPUS-T-01: IROC Houston QA Center’s Anthropomorphic Proton Phantom Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lujano, C; Hernandez, N; Keith, T; Nguyen, T; Taylor, P; Molineu, A; Followill, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To describe the proton phantoms that IROC Houston uses to approve and credential proton institutions to participate in NCI-sponsored clinical trials. Methods: Photon phantoms cannot necessarily be used for proton measurements because protons react differently than photons in some plastics. As such plastics that are tissue equivalent for protons were identified. Another required alteration is to ensure that the film dosimeters are housed in the phantom with no air gap to avoid proton streaming. Proton-equivalent plastics/materials used include RMI Solid Water, Techron HPV, blue water, RANDO soft tissue material, balsa wood, compressed cork and polyethylene. Institutions wishing to be approved or credentialed request a phantom and are prioritized for delivery. At the institution, the phantom is imaged, a treatment plan is developed, positioned on the treatment couch and the treatment is delivered. The phantom is returned and the measured dose distributions are compared to the institution’s electronically submitted treatment plan dosimetry data. Results: IROC Houston has developed an extensive proton phantom approval/credentialing program consisting of five different phantoms designs: head, prostate, lung, liver and spine. The phantoms are made with proton equivalent plastics that have HU and relative stopping powers similar (within 5%) of human tissues. They also have imageable targets, avoidance structures, and heterogeneities. TLD and radiochromic film are contained in the target structures. There have been 13 head, 33 prostate, 18 lung, 2 liver and 16 spine irradiations with either passive scatter, or scanned proton beams. The pass rates have been: 100%, 69.7%, 72.2%, 50%, and 81.3%, respectively. Conclusion: IROC Houston has responded to the recent surge in proton facilities by developing a family of anthropomorphic phantoms that are able to be used for remote audits of proton beams. Work supported by PHS grant CA10953 and CA081647.

  12. Characterization of tissue-equivalent materials for use in construction of physical phantoms; Caracterizacao de materiais tecido-equivalentes para uso em construcao de fantomas fisicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Edvan V. de, E-mail: edvanmsn@hotmail.com [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (IFFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Oliveira, Alex C.H. de, E-mail: oliveira_ach@yahoo.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Vieira, Jose W., E-mail: jose.wilson59@uol.com.br [Escola Politecnica de Pernambuco (UPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Lima, Fernando R.A., E-mail: falima@cenen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Phantoms are physical or computational models used to simulate the transport of ionizing radiation, their interactions with human body tissues and evaluate the deposition of energy. Depending on the application, you can build phantoms of various types and features. The physical phantoms are made of materials with behavior similar to human tissues exposed to ionizing radiation, the so-called tissue-equivalent materials. The characterization of various tissue-equivalent materials is important for the choice of materials to be used is appropriate, seeking a better cost-benefit ratio. The main objective of this work is to produce tables containing the main characteristics of tissue-equivalent materials. These tables were produced in Microsoft Office Excel. Among the main features of tissue-equivalent materials that were added to the tables, are density, chemical composition, physical state, chemical stability and solubility. The main importance of this work is to contribute to the construction of high-quality physical phantoms and avoid the waste of materials.

  13. TU-H-CAMPUS-IeP2-05: Breast and Soft Tissue-Equivalent 3D Printed Phantoms for Imaging and Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hintenlang, D; Terracino, B [University Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The study has the goal to demonstrate that breast and soft tissue-equivalent phantoms for dosimetry applications in the diagnostic energy range can be fabricated using common 3D printing methods. Methods: 3D printing provides the opportunity to rapidly prototype uniquely designed objects from a variety of materials. Common 3D printers are usually limited to printing objects based on thermoplastic materials such as PLA, or ABS. The most commonly available plastic is PLA, which has a density significantly greater than soft tissue. We utilized a popular 3D printer to demonstrate that tissue specific phantom materials can be generated through the careful selection of 3D printing parameters. A series of stepwedges were designed and printed using a Makerbot Replicator2 3D printing system. The print file provides custom adjustment of the infill density, orientation and position of the object on the printer stage, selection of infill patterns, and other control parameters. The x-ray attenuation and uniformity of fabricated phantoms were evaluated and compared to common tissue-equivalent phantom materials, acrylic and BR12. X-ray exposure measurements were made using narrow beam geometry on a clinical mammography unit at 28 kVp on the series of phantoms. The 3D printed phantoms were imaged at 28 kVp to visualize the internal structure and uniformity in different planes of the phantoms. Results: By utilizing specific in-fill density and patterns we are able to produce a phantom closely matching the attenuation characteristics of BR12 at 28 kVp. The in-fill patterns used are heterogeneous, so a judicious selection of fill pattern and the orientation of the fill pattern must be made in order to obtain homogenous attenuation along the intended direction of beam propagation. Conclusions: By careful manipulation of the printing parameters, breast and soft tissue-equivalent phantoms appropriate for use at imaging energies can be fabricated using 3D printing techniques.

  14. TU-H-CAMPUS-IeP2-05: Breast and Soft Tissue-Equivalent 3D Printed Phantoms for Imaging and Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hintenlang, D; Terracino, B

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The study has the goal to demonstrate that breast and soft tissue-equivalent phantoms for dosimetry applications in the diagnostic energy range can be fabricated using common 3D printing methods. Methods: 3D printing provides the opportunity to rapidly prototype uniquely designed objects from a variety of materials. Common 3D printers are usually limited to printing objects based on thermoplastic materials such as PLA, or ABS. The most commonly available plastic is PLA, which has a density significantly greater than soft tissue. We utilized a popular 3D printer to demonstrate that tissue specific phantom materials can be generated through the careful selection of 3D printing parameters. A series of stepwedges were designed and printed using a Makerbot Replicator2 3D printing system. The print file provides custom adjustment of the infill density, orientation and position of the object on the printer stage, selection of infill patterns, and other control parameters. The x-ray attenuation and uniformity of fabricated phantoms were evaluated and compared to common tissue-equivalent phantom materials, acrylic and BR12. X-ray exposure measurements were made using narrow beam geometry on a clinical mammography unit at 28 kVp on the series of phantoms. The 3D printed phantoms were imaged at 28 kVp to visualize the internal structure and uniformity in different planes of the phantoms. Results: By utilizing specific in-fill density and patterns we are able to produce a phantom closely matching the attenuation characteristics of BR12 at 28 kVp. The in-fill patterns used are heterogeneous, so a judicious selection of fill pattern and the orientation of the fill pattern must be made in order to obtain homogenous attenuation along the intended direction of beam propagation. Conclusions: By careful manipulation of the printing parameters, breast and soft tissue-equivalent phantoms appropriate for use at imaging energies can be fabricated using 3D printing techniques.

  15. Comparison of average glandular dose in screen-film and digital mammography using breast tissue-equivalent phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Gwi Soon; Kim, Jung Min; Kim, You Hyun; Choi, Jong Hak; Kim, Chang Kyun

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, mammography system is changed rapidly from conventional screen-film system to digital system for application to screening and diagnosis. Digital mammography system provides several advantages over screen-film mammography system. According to the information provided by the manufacturer, digital mammography system offers radiation dose reduction in comparison with screen-film mammography system, because of digital detector, particularly direct digital detector has higher x-ray absorption efficiency than screen-film combination or imaging plate (IP). We measured average glandular doses (ADG) in screen-film mammography (SFM) system with slow screen-film combination, computed mammography (CM) system, indirect digital mammography (IDM) system and direct digital mammography (DDM) system using breast tissue-equivalent phantom (glandularity 30%, 50% and 70%). The results were shown as follows: AGD values for DDM system were highest than those for other systems. Although automatic exposure control (AEC) mode was selected, the curve of the AGD values against thickness or glandularity increased significantly for the SFM system with the uniform target/filter (Mo/Mo) combination. Therefore, the AGD values for the high energy examinations were highest in the SFM system, and those for the low energy examinations were highest in the DDM system. But the curve of the AGD values against thickness and glandularity increased gently for CM system with the automatic selection of the target/filter combination (from Mo/Mo to Mo/Rh or from Mo/Rh to Rh/Rh), and the AGD values were lowest. Consequently, the parameters in mammography for each exposure besides detection efficiency play an important role in order to estimate a patient radiation dose

  16. CT images of an anthropomorphic and anthropometric male pelvis phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matos, Andrea S.D. de; Campos, Tarcisio P.R. de, E-mail: campos@nuclear.ufmg.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares

    2009-07-01

    Actually, among of the most often neoplasm types are the cancer of prostate, bladder and intestine. The incidence of the intestine neoplasm in Brazil is at fourth among the most frequent tumors of the male sex, barely close to the stomach, lung and prostate incidences. Phantoms are objects used as simulators for investigating ionizing radiation transport on humans, especially during radiation therapy or radiological diagnostic. The purpose of this work is the achievement of a set of computerized tomography (CT) images of a male pelvis phantom, with anthropomorphic and anthropometric features. It investigates and analyses the set of phantom CT images in according to a correspondent human pelvis one. The reason to develop a pelvis phantom is the needs of reproducing well established spatial dose distribution in radiation therapy, especially during calibration and protocol setup for various pelvis neoplasms. It aims to produce dose optimization on radiation therapy, improving health tissue protection and keeping control tumor dose. A male pelvis phantom with similar shape made of equivalent tissues was built for simulating the ionizing radiation transport to the human body. At the phantom, pelvis organs were reproduced including the bladder, the intestine, the prostate, the muscular and greasy tissue, as well as the bone tissue and the skin. A set of CT images was carried out in axial thin sections of 2mm thickness. As results, the constituent tissues had a tomography response on Hounsfield scale similar to values found on the human pelvis. Each tissue has its respective Hounsfield value, demonstrated here. The CT images also show that the organs have equivalent anthropometric measures and anthropomorphic features of the radiological human anatomy. The anatomical physical arrangement of the organs is also similar to of the pelvis human male, having the scales of gray and numerical scale of Hounsfield compatible with the scale of the human tissue. The phantom presents

  17. CT images of an anthropomorphic and anthropometric male pelvis phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos, Andrea S.D. de; Campos, Tarcisio P.R. de

    2009-01-01

    Actually, among of the most often neoplasm types are the cancer of prostate, bladder and intestine. The incidence of the intestine neoplasm in Brazil is at fourth among the most frequent tumors of the male sex, barely close to the stomach, lung and prostate incidences. Phantoms are objects used as simulators for investigating ionizing radiation transport on humans, especially during radiation therapy or radiological diagnostic. The purpose of this work is the achievement of a set of computerized tomography (CT) images of a male pelvis phantom, with anthropomorphic and anthropometric features. It investigates and analyses the set of phantom CT images in according to a correspondent human pelvis one. The reason to develop a pelvis phantom is the needs of reproducing well established spatial dose distribution in radiation therapy, especially during calibration and protocol setup for various pelvis neoplasms. It aims to produce dose optimization on radiation therapy, improving health tissue protection and keeping control tumor dose. A male pelvis phantom with similar shape made of equivalent tissues was built for simulating the ionizing radiation transport to the human body. At the phantom, pelvis organs were reproduced including the bladder, the intestine, the prostate, the muscular and greasy tissue, as well as the bone tissue and the skin. A set of CT images was carried out in axial thin sections of 2mm thickness. As results, the constituent tissues had a tomography response on Hounsfield scale similar to values found on the human pelvis. Each tissue has its respective Hounsfield value, demonstrated here. The CT images also show that the organs have equivalent anthropometric measures and anthropomorphic features of the radiological human anatomy. The anatomical physical arrangement of the organs is also similar to of the pelvis human male, having the scales of gray and numerical scale of Hounsfield compatible with the scale of the human tissue. The phantom presents

  18. Advances in development of young-pediatric anthropometric and anthropomorphic head and neck phantoms for dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Larissa; Campos, Tarcisio P.R.

    2005-01-01

    The neck malign cancer in pediatric population differs significantly than adult cancer. The pediatric primary malign tumors result in the neck and head fence 5% . The malign cervical tumors, generally, are rabdomyossarcoms and lymphomas. The least frequent malign cancer includes metastasis, scammous cells and thyroid cancer. The larynx cancer treatment is surgery, preferentially. However, lesions with little infiltration, that do not compromise the vocals cords mobile, do not infiltrate cartilage, and do not compromise neither the anterior comissure neither the arytenoid, can be controlled with exclusive radiotherapy. The traditional dose for sub-clinical disease in larynx cancer, neck and head region, has been 50 to 60 Gy to standard fraction of 2 Gy/day, five times for week. When the treatment is consummated with exclusive radiotherapy in primary tumor. The dose must be higher, diversifying from 66 (for small tumors T1) to 70 Gy (for higher tumors, that T2 or T3). Phantoms are simulators utilized for dose prediction in patient simulating radiation interactions with matter. Also it is applied for radio diagnosis equipment calibration and quality control of medical image. Many kind of phantoms are developed, handmade and commercialized, with matters and forms most varied, holding distinct purpose, in senses of establishing double check parameters for reducing planning and calibration errors. This study addresses the development of a object for simulating young-pediatric anthropometric and anthropomorphic head and neck, called phantom, for dosimetric studies. The methodology will be based on the preparation of a phantom respecting the anatomic standards and its tissue equivalent composition. The hope is that phantom can be used in the scientific researches of radiation protocols applied to young-pediatric patient. (author)

  19. Synthesized interstitial lung texture for use in anthropomorphic computational phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becchetti, Marc F.; Solomon, Justin B.; Segars, W. Paul; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-04-01

    A realistic model of the anatomical texture from the pulmonary interstitium was developed with the goal of extending the capability of anthropomorphic computational phantoms (e.g., XCAT, Duke University), allowing for more accurate image quality assessment. Contrast-enhanced, high dose, thorax images for a healthy patient from a clinical CT system (Discovery CT750HD, GE healthcare) with thin (0.625 mm) slices and filtered back- projection (FBP) were used to inform the model. The interstitium which gives rise to the texture was defined using 24 volumes of interest (VOIs). These VOIs were selected manually to avoid vasculature, bronchi, and bronchioles. A small scale Hessian-based line filter was applied to minimize the amount of partial-volumed supernumerary vessels and bronchioles within the VOIs. The texture in the VOIs was characterized using 8 Haralick and 13 gray-level run length features. A clustered lumpy background (CLB) model with added noise and blurring to match CT system was optimized to resemble the texture in the VOIs using a genetic algorithm with the Mahalanobis distance as a similarity metric between the texture features. The most similar CLB model was then used to generate the interstitial texture to fill the lung. The optimization improved the similarity by 45%. This will substantially enhance the capabilities of anthropomorphic computational phantoms, allowing for more realistic CT simulations.

  20. SU-F-T-292: Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core (IROC) Houston QA Center’s Anthropomorphic Phantom Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehrens, H; Lewis, B; Lujano, C; Nguyen, T; Hernandez, N; Alvarez, P; Molineu, A; Followill, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the results of IROC Houston’s international and domestic end-to-end QA phantom irradiations. Methods: IROC Houston has anthropomorphic lung, liver, head and neck, prostate, SRS and spine phantoms that are used for credentialing and quality assurance purposes. The phantoms include structures that closely mimic targets and organs at risk and are made from tissue equivalent materials: high impact polystyrene, solid water, cork and acrylic. Motion tables are used to mimic breathing motion for some lung and liver phantoms. Dose is measured with TLD and radiochromic film in various planes within the target of the phantoms. Results: The most common phantom requested is the head and neck followed by the lung phantom. The head and neck phantom was sent to 800 domestic and 148 international sites between 2011 and 2015, with average pass rates of 89% and 92%, respectively. During the past five years, a general upward trend exists regarding demand for the lung phantom for both international and domestic sites with international sites more than tripling from 5 (2011) to 16 (2015) and domestic sites doubling from 66 (2011) to 152 (2015). The pass rate for lung phantoms has been consistent from year to year despite this large increase in the number of phantoms irradiated with an average pass rate of 85% (domestic) and 95% (international) sites. The percentage of lung phantoms used in combination with motions tables increased from 38% to 79% over the 5 year time span. Conclusion: The number of domestic and international sites irradiating the head and neck and lung phantoms continues to increase and the pass rates remained constant. These end-to-end QA tests continue to be a crucial part of clinical trial credentialing and institution quality assurance. This investigation was supported by IROC grant CA180803 awarded by the NCI.

  1. SU-F-T-292: Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core (IROC) Houston QA Center’s Anthropomorphic Phantom Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehrens, H; Lewis, B; Lujano, C; Nguyen, T; Hernandez, N; Alvarez, P; Molineu, A; Followill, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To describe the results of IROC Houston’s international and domestic end-to-end QA phantom irradiations. Methods: IROC Houston has anthropomorphic lung, liver, head and neck, prostate, SRS and spine phantoms that are used for credentialing and quality assurance purposes. The phantoms include structures that closely mimic targets and organs at risk and are made from tissue equivalent materials: high impact polystyrene, solid water, cork and acrylic. Motion tables are used to mimic breathing motion for some lung and liver phantoms. Dose is measured with TLD and radiochromic film in various planes within the target of the phantoms. Results: The most common phantom requested is the head and neck followed by the lung phantom. The head and neck phantom was sent to 800 domestic and 148 international sites between 2011 and 2015, with average pass rates of 89% and 92%, respectively. During the past five years, a general upward trend exists regarding demand for the lung phantom for both international and domestic sites with international sites more than tripling from 5 (2011) to 16 (2015) and domestic sites doubling from 66 (2011) to 152 (2015). The pass rate for lung phantoms has been consistent from year to year despite this large increase in the number of phantoms irradiated with an average pass rate of 85% (domestic) and 95% (international) sites. The percentage of lung phantoms used in combination with motions tables increased from 38% to 79% over the 5 year time span. Conclusion: The number of domestic and international sites irradiating the head and neck and lung phantoms continues to increase and the pass rates remained constant. These end-to-end QA tests continue to be a crucial part of clinical trial credentialing and institution quality assurance. This investigation was supported by IROC grant CA180803 awarded by the NCI.

  2. Design and fabrication of a realistic anthropomorphic heterogeneous head phantom for MR purposes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sossena Wood

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to design an anthropomorphic heterogeneous head phantom that can be used for MRI and other electromagnetic applications.An eight compartment, physical anthropomorphic head phantom was developed from a 3T MRI dataset of a healthy male. The designed phantom was successfully built and preliminarily evaluated through an application that involves electromagnetic-tissue interactions: MRI (due to it being an available resource. The developed phantom was filled with media possessing electromagnetic constitutive parameters that correspond to biological tissues at ~297 MHz. A preliminary comparison between an in-vivo human volunteer (based on whom the anthropomorphic head phantom was created and various phantoms types, one being the anthropomorphic heterogeneous head phantom, were performed using a 7 Tesla human MRI scanner.Echo planar imaging was performed and minimal ghosting and fluctuations were observed using the proposed anthropomorphic phantom. The magnetic field distributions (during MRI experiments at 7 Tesla and the scattering parameter (measured using a network analyzer were most comparable between the anthropomorphic heterogeneous head phantom and an in-vivo human volunteer.The developed anthropomorphic heterogeneous head phantom can be used as a resource to various researchers in applications that involve electromagnetic-biological tissue interactions such as MRI.

  3. Development and implementation of an anthropomorphic pediatric spine phantom for the assessment of craniospinal irradiation procedures in proton therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana J Lewis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To design an anthropomorphic pediatric spine phantom for use in the evaluation of proton therapy facilities for clinical trial participation by the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core (IROC Houston QA Center (formerly RPC.Methods: This phantom was designed to perform an end-to-end audit of the proton spine treatment process, including simulation, dose calculation by the treatment planning system (TPS, and proton treatment delivery. The design incorporated materials simulating the thoracic spinal column of a pediatric patient, along with two thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD-100 capsules and radiochromic film embedded in the phantom for dose evaluation. Fourteen potential materials were tested to determine relative proton stopping power (RSP and Hounsfield unit (HU values. Each material was CT scanned at 120 kVp, and the RSP was obtained from depth ionization scans using the Zebra multi-layer ion chamber (MLIC at two energies: 160 MeV and 250 MeV. To determine tissue equivalency, the measured RSP for each material was compared to the RSP calculated by the Eclipse TPS for a given HU.Results: The materials selected as bone, tissue, and cartilage substitutes were Techron HPV Bearing Grade (Boedeker Plastics, Inc., solid water, and blue water, respectively. The RSP values did not differ by more than 1.8% between the two energies. The measured RSP for each selected material agreed with the RSP calculated by the Eclipse TPS within 1.2%.Conclusion: An anthropomorphic pediatric proton spine phantom was designed to evaluate proton therapy delivery. The inclusion of multiple tissue substitutes increases heterogeneity and the level of difficulty for institutions to successfully treat the phantom. The following attributes will be evaluated: absolute dose agreement, distal range, field width, junction match and right/left dose profile alignment. The phantom will be tested at several institutions using a 5% dose agreement criterion, and a 5%/3mm gamma

  4. Monte Carlo Simulations for Homeland Security Using Anthropomorphic Phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, Kimberly A.

    2008-01-01

    A radiological dispersion device (RDD) is a device which deliberately releases radioactive material for the purpose of causing terror or harm. In the event that a dirty bomb is detonated, there may be airborne radioactive material that can be inhaled as well as settle on an individuals leading to external contamination. Monte Carlo calculations were performed to simulate healthcare workers in the operating room or trauma room at a hospital. The Monte Carlo Neutral Particle transport code MCNP5 was used for the modeling. The human body was modeled using Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD-V) anthropomorphic phantoms originally developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under the specifications of International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) Publication 23 and later altered at Georgia Tech (17). This study considered two possible contamination scenarios: uniform external contamination with no internal contamination and inhaled radioactive material without any external contamination. For both scenarios, the patients isotopes considered were 60 Co, 137 Cs, 131 I, 192 Ir, and 241 Am. For the externally contaminated patient, a uniform volume source two millimeters thick was placed around the skin of each anthropomorphic phantom to simulate a uniform source on the surface of the body. For the internally contaminated patients, the Dose and Risk Calculation software, DCAL, was used to determine the distribution of the isotopes in the internal organs. For both of the scenarios, the healthcare provider was placed 20-cm from the middle of the torso of the contaminated patient. The amount of energy deposited to the tissues and organs of the healthcare provider due to the internally and externally contaminated patients and in the patient in the case of external contamination was determined. The effective dose rate was calculated using the masses of the tissues and organ and tissue weighting factors from ICRP Publication 60. The effective dose rate for the

  5. Feasibility of salvage interstitial microwave thermal therapy for prostate carcinoma following failed brachytherapy: studies in a tissue equivalent phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCann, Claire; Kumaradas, J Carl; Gertner, Mark R; Davidson, Sean R H; Dolan, Alfred M; Sherar, Michael D

    2003-01-01

    Thermal therapy is an experimental treatment to destroy solid tumours by heating them to temperatures ranging from 55 deg C to 90 deg C, inducing thermal coagulation and necrosis of the tumour. We are investigating the feasibility of interstitial microwave thermal therapy as a salvage treatment for prostate cancer patients with local recurrence following failed brachytherapy. Due to the electrical and thermal conductivity of the brachytherapy seeds, we hypothesized that the seeds could scatter the microwave energy and cause unpredictable heating. To investigate this, a 915 MHz helical antenna was inserted into a muscle-equivalent phantom with and without brachytherapy seeds. Following a 10 W, 5 s input to the antenna, the temperature rise was used to calculate absorbed power, also referred to as specific absorption rate (SAR). Plane wave models based on Maxwell's equations were also used to characterize the electromagnetic scattering effect of the seeds. In addition, the phantom was heated with 8 W for 5 min to quantify the effect of the seeds on the temperature distribution during extended heating. SAR measurements indicated that the seeds had no significant effect on the shape and size of the SAR pattern of the antenna. However, the plane wave simulations indicated that the seeds could scatter the microwave energy resulting in hot spots at the seed edges. Lack of experimental evidence of these hot spots was probably due to the complex polarization of the microwaves emitted by the helical antenna. Extended heating experiments also demonstrated that the seeds had no significant effect on the temperature distributions and rates of temperature rise measured in the phantom. The results indicate that brachytherapy seeds are not a technical impediment to interstitial microwave thermal therapy as a salvage treatment following failed brachytherapy

  6. Voxel anthropomorphic phantoms: review of models used for ionising radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemosquet, A.; Carlan, L. de; Clairand, I.

    2003-01-01

    Computational anthropomorphic phantoms have been used since the 1970's for dosimetric calculations. Realistic geometries are required for this operation, resulting in the development of ever more accurate phantoms. Voxel phantoms, consisting of a set of small-volume elements, appeared towards the end of the 1980's, and significantly improved on the original mathematical models. Voxel phantoms are models of the human body, obtained using computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance images (MRI). These phantoms are an extremely accurate representation of the human anatomy. This article provides a review of the literature available on the development of these phantoms and their applications in ionising radiation dosimetry. The bibliographical study has shown that there is a wide range of phantoms, covering various characteristics of the general population in terms of sex, age or morphology, and that they are used in applications relating to all aspects of ionising radiation. (author)

  7. Radiation dose evaluation of dental cone beam computed tomography using an anthropomorphic adult head phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jay; Shih, Cheng-Ting; Ho, Chang-hung; Liu, Yan-Lin; Chang, Yuan-Jen; Min Chao, Max; Hsu, Jui-Ting

    2014-11-01

    Dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) provides high-resolution tomographic images and has been gradually used in clinical practice. Thus, it is important to examine the amount of radiation dose resulting from dental CBCT examinations. In this study, we developed an in-house anthropomorphic adult head phantom to evaluate the level of effective dose. The anthropomorphic phantom was made of acrylic and filled with plaster to replace the bony tissue. The contour of the head was extracted from a set of adult computed tomography (CT) images. Different combinations of the scanning parameters of CBCT were applied. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used to measure the absorbed doses at 19 locations in the head and neck regions. The effective doses measured using the proposed phantom at 65, 75, and 85 kVp in the D-mode were 72.23, 100.31, and 134.29 μSv, respectively. In the I-mode, the effective doses were 108.24, 190.99, and 246.48 μSv, respectively. The maximum percent error between the doses measured by the proposed phantom and the Rando phantom was l4.90%. Therefore, the proposed anthropomorphic adult head phantom is applicable for assessing the radiation dose resulting from clinical dental CBCT.

  8. Construction of a anthropomorphic phantom for dose measurement in hands in brachytherapy procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papp, Cinthia M.

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to show the differences between the dose value measured by dosimeter endpoint and the values measured in different points inside the hand during brachytherapy procedures. For this, the procedures involved in the handling of sources were analyzed and the simulated using an anthropomorphic phantom hand

  9. Design, manufacture, and evaluation of an anthropomorphic pelvic phantom purpose-built for radiotherapy dosimetric intercomparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, K. M.; Ebert, M. A.; Kron, T.; Howlett, S. J.; Cornes, D.; Hamilton, C. S.; Denham, J. W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Waratah, New South Wales 2298, Australia and School of Physics, University of Newcastle, New South Wales 2308 (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Western Australia, Australia and School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Victoria 8006 (Australia); Australiasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine, Sydney, New South Wales 2020 (Australia); Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group, Calvary Mater Newcastle, New South Wales 2298 (Australia); Heidelberg Repatriation Hospital, Victoria 3081 (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Waratah, New South Wales 2298, Australia and School of Medicine and Population Health, University of Newcastle, New South Wales 2308 (Australia)

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: An anthropomorphic pelvic phantom was designed and constructed to meet specific criteria for multicenter radiotherapy dosimetric intercomparison. Methods: Three dimensional external and organ outlines were generated from a computed tomography image set of a male pelvis, forming the basis of design for an anatomically realistic phantom. Clinically relevant points of interest were selected throughout the dataset where point-dose values could be measured with thermoluminescence dosimeters and a small-volume ionization chamber. Following testing, three materials were selected and the phantom was manufactured using modern prototyping techniques into five separate coronal slices. Time lines and resource requirements for the phantom design and manufacture were recorded. The ability of the phantom to mimic the entire treatment chain was tested. Results: The phantom CT images indicated that organ densities and geometries were comparable to those of the original patient. The phantom proved simple to load for dosimetry and rapid to assemble. Due to heat release during manufacture, small air gaps and density heterogeneities were present throughout the phantom. The overall cost for production of the prototype phantom was comparable to other commercial anthropomorphic phantoms. The phantom was shown to be suitable for use as a ''patient'' to mimic the entire treatment chain for typical external beam radiotherapy for prostate and rectal cancer. Conclusions: The phantom constructed for the present study incorporates all characteristics necessary for accurate Level III intercomparison studies. Following use in an extensive Level III dosimetric comparison over a large time scale and geographic area, the phantom retained mechanical stability and did not show signs of radiation-induced degradation.

  10. Design, development, and implementation of the Radiological Physics Center's pelvis and thorax anthropomorphic quality assurance phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Followill, David S.; Radford Evans, DeeAnn; Cherry, Christopher; Molineu, Andrea; Fisher, Gary; Hanson, William F.; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.

    2007-01-01

    The Radiological Physics Center (RPC) developed two heterogeneous anthropomorphic quality assurance phantoms for use in verifying the accuracy of radiation delivery: one for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to the pelvis and the other for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to the thorax. The purpose of this study was to describe the design and development of these two phantoms and to demonstrate the reproducibility of measurements generated with them. The phantoms were built to simulate actual patient anatomy. They are lightweight and water-fillable, and they contain imageable targets and organs at risk of radiation exposure that are of similar densities to their human counterparts. Dosimetry inserts accommodate radiochromic film for relative dosimetry and thermoluminesent dosimetry capsules for absolute dosimetry. As a part of the commissioning process, each phantom was imaged, treatment plans were developed, and radiation was delivered at least three times. Under these controlled irradiation conditions, the reproducibility of dose delivery to the target TLD in the pelvis and thorax phantoms was 3% and 0.5%, respectively. The reproducibility of radiation-field localization was less than 2.5 mm for both phantoms. Using these anthropomorphic phantoms, pelvic IMRT and thoracic SBRT radiation treatments can be verified with a high level of precision. These phantoms can be used to effectively credential institutions for participation in specific NCI-sponsored clinical trials

  11. Skin Dosimetry in Breast Teletherapy on a Phantom Anthropomorphic and Anthropometric Phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista Nogueira, Luciana; Lemos Silva, Hugo Leonardo; Donato da Silva, Sabrina; Passos Ribeiro Campos, Tarcisio

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the breast teletherapy dosimetry. The goal is to evaluate and compare absorbed doses in equivalent skin tissue, TE-skin, of an anthropomorphic and anthropometric breast phantom submitted to breast radiotherapy. The methodology involved the reproduction of a set of tomographic images of the phantom; the elaboration of conformational radiotherapy planning in the SOMAVISION and CadPlan (TPS) software; and the synthetic breast irradiation by parallel opposed fields in 3D conformal teletherapy at 6 MV linear accelerator Clinac-2100 C from VARIAN with prescribed dose (PD) of 180 cGy to the target volume (PTV), referent to the glandular tissue. Radiochromic films EBT2 were selected as dosimeters. Two independent calibration processes of films with solid water Gammex 457 plates and water filled box were produced. Curves of optical density (OD) versus absorbed dose were produced. Dosimeters were positioned in the external region of the breast phantom in contact with TE-skin, area of 4.0 cm 2 each. The irradiation process was prepared in duplicate to check the reproducibility of the technique. The radiochromic films were scanned and their response in RGB (Red, Green, Blue) analyzed by the ImageJ software. The optical density was obtained and converted to dose based on the calibration curves. Thus, the spatial dose distribution in the skin was reproduced. The absorbed doses measured on the radiochromic films in TE-skin showed values between upper and lower quadrants at 9 o'clock in the range of 54% of PD, between the upper and lower quadrants 3 o'clock in the range of 72% and 6 o'clock at the lower quadrant in the range of 68 % of PD. The values are ±64% (p <0.05) according to the TPS. It is concluded that the depth dose measured in solid water plates or water box reproduce equivalent dose values for both calibration processes of the radiochromic films. It was observed that the skin received doses ranging from 50% to 78% of the prescribed

  12. Skin Dosimetry in Breast Teletherapy on a Phantom Anthropomorphic and Anthropometric Phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batista Nogueira, Luciana [Anatomy and Imaging Department, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Lemos Silva, Hugo Leonardo [Santa Casa Hospital, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Donato da Silva, Sabrina; Passos Ribeiro Campos, Tarcisio [Nuclear Engineering Department, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This paper addresses the breast teletherapy dosimetry. The goal is to evaluate and compare absorbed doses in equivalent skin tissue, TE-skin, of an anthropomorphic and anthropometric breast phantom submitted to breast radiotherapy. The methodology involved the reproduction of a set of tomographic images of the phantom; the elaboration of conformational radiotherapy planning in the SOMAVISION and CadPlan (TPS) software; and the synthetic breast irradiation by parallel opposed fields in 3D conformal teletherapy at 6 MV linear accelerator Clinac-2100 C from VARIAN with prescribed dose (PD) of 180 cGy to the target volume (PTV), referent to the glandular tissue. Radiochromic films EBT2 were selected as dosimeters. Two independent calibration processes of films with solid water Gammex 457 plates and water filled box were produced. Curves of optical density (OD) versus absorbed dose were produced. Dosimeters were positioned in the external region of the breast phantom in contact with TE-skin, area of 4.0 cm{sup 2} each. The irradiation process was prepared in duplicate to check the reproducibility of the technique. The radiochromic films were scanned and their response in RGB (Red, Green, Blue) analyzed by the ImageJ software. The optical density was obtained and converted to dose based on the calibration curves. Thus, the spatial dose distribution in the skin was reproduced. The absorbed doses measured on the radiochromic films in TE-skin showed values between upper and lower quadrants at 9 o'clock in the range of 54% of PD, between the upper and lower quadrants 3 o'clock in the range of 72% and 6 o'clock at the lower quadrant in the range of 68 % of PD. The values are ±64% (p <0.05) according to the TPS. It is concluded that the depth dose measured in solid water plates or water box reproduce equivalent dose values for both calibration processes of the radiochromic films. It was observed that the skin received doses ranging from 50% to 78% of the

  13. The Role of Anthropomorphic Phantoms in Diagnostic Ultrasound Imaging for Disease Characterization (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, L. M.; King, D. M.; Browne, J. E.

    2009-04-01

    An anthropomorhic phantom is an object that can mimic a region of the human anatomy. Anthropomorphic phantoms have a variety of roles in diagnostic ultrasound. These roles include quality assurance testing of ultrasound machines, calibration and testing of new imaging techniques, training of sonographers, and-most importantly-use as a tool to obtain a better understanding of disease progression in the relevant anatomy. To be anthropomorphic a phantom must accurately mimic the body in terms of its ultrasonic and mechanical properties, as well as anatomically. The acoustic properties are speed of sound, attenuation, and backscatter. The mechanical properties are elasticity and density. Phantoms are constructed from tissue-mimicking materials (TMMs). TMMs are prepared from a variety of ingredients, such as gelatine, agar, safflower oil, and glass beads. These ingredients are then boiled and cooled under controlled conditions to produce a solid TMM. To determine if the TMM has the correct acoustic properties, acoustic measurements are performed using a scanning acoustic macroscope. Mechanical measurements are also performed to test the elasticity and density properties. TMMs with the correct properties are subsequently put through a series of moulding procedures to produce the anthropomorphic phantom.

  14. The Role of Anthropomorphic Phantoms in Diagnostic Ultrasound Imaging for Disease Characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannon, L. M.; King, D. M.; Browne, J. E.

    2009-01-01

    An anthropomorhic phantom is an object that can mimic a region of the human anatomy. Anthropomorphic phantoms have a variety of roles in diagnostic ultrasound. These roles include quality assurance testing of ultrasound machines, calibration and testing of new imaging techniques, training of sonographers, and--most importantly--use as a tool to obtain a better understanding of disease progression in the relevant anatomy. To be anthropomorphic a phantom must accurately mimic the body in terms of its ultrasonic and mechanical properties, as well as anatomically. The acoustic properties are speed of sound, attenuation, and backscatter. The mechanical properties are elasticity and density. Phantoms are constructed from tissue-mimicking materials (TMMs). TMMs are prepared from a variety of ingredients, such as gelatine, agar, safflower oil, and glass beads. These ingredients are then boiled and cooled under controlled conditions to produce a solid TMM. To determine if the TMM has the correct acoustic properties, acoustic measurements are performed using a scanning acoustic macroscope. Mechanical measurements are also performed to test the elasticity and density properties. TMMs with the correct properties are subsequently put through a series of moulding procedures to produce the anthropomorphic phantom.

  15. SU-E-CAMPUS-T-03: Development and Implementation of An Anthropomorphic Pediatric Spine Phantom for the Assessment of Craniospinal Irradiation Procedures in Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, D; Summers, P; Followill, D; Sahoo, N; Mahajan, A; Stingo, F; Kry, S [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To design an anthropomorphic pediatric spine phantom for use in the evaluation of proton therapy facilities for clinical trial participation by the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core (IROC) Houston QA Center (formerly RPC). Methods: This phantom was designed to perform an end-to-end audit of the proton spine treatment process, including simulation, dose calculation by the treatment planning system (TPS), and proton treatment delivery. The design incorporated materials simulating the thoracic spinal column of a pediatric patient, along with two thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD)-100 capsules and radiochromic film embedded in the phantom for dose evaluation. Fourteen potential materials were tested to determine relative proton stopping power (RSP) and Hounsfield unit (HU) values. Each material was CT scanned at 120kVp, and the RSP was obtained from depth ionization scans using the Zebra multilayer ion chamber (MLIC) at two energies: 160 MeV and 250 MeV. To determine tissue equivalency, the measured RSP for each material was compared to the RSP calculated by the Eclipse TPS for a given HU. Results: The materials selected as bone, tissue, and cartilage substitutes were Techron HPV Bearing Grade (Boedeker Plastics, Inc.), solid water, and blue water, respectively. The RSP values did not differ by more than 1.8% between the two energies. The measured RSP for each selected material agreed with the RSP calculated by the Eclipse TPS within 1.2%. Conclusion: An anthropomorphic pediatric proton spine phantom was designed to evaluate proton therapy delivery. The inclusion of multiple tissue substitutes increases heterogeneity and the level of difficulty for institutions to successfully treat the phantom. The following attributes will be evaluated: absolute dose agreement, distal range, field width, junction match and right/left dose profile alignment. The phantom will be tested at several institutions using a 5% dose agreement criterion, and a 5%/3mm gamma analysis

  16. SU-E-CAMPUS-T-03: Development and Implementation of An Anthropomorphic Pediatric Spine Phantom for the Assessment of Craniospinal Irradiation Procedures in Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, D; Summers, P; Followill, D; Sahoo, N; Mahajan, A; Stingo, F; Kry, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To design an anthropomorphic pediatric spine phantom for use in the evaluation of proton therapy facilities for clinical trial participation by the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core (IROC) Houston QA Center (formerly RPC). Methods: This phantom was designed to perform an end-to-end audit of the proton spine treatment process, including simulation, dose calculation by the treatment planning system (TPS), and proton treatment delivery. The design incorporated materials simulating the thoracic spinal column of a pediatric patient, along with two thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD)-100 capsules and radiochromic film embedded in the phantom for dose evaluation. Fourteen potential materials were tested to determine relative proton stopping power (RSP) and Hounsfield unit (HU) values. Each material was CT scanned at 120kVp, and the RSP was obtained from depth ionization scans using the Zebra multilayer ion chamber (MLIC) at two energies: 160 MeV and 250 MeV. To determine tissue equivalency, the measured RSP for each material was compared to the RSP calculated by the Eclipse TPS for a given HU. Results: The materials selected as bone, tissue, and cartilage substitutes were Techron HPV Bearing Grade (Boedeker Plastics, Inc.), solid water, and blue water, respectively. The RSP values did not differ by more than 1.8% between the two energies. The measured RSP for each selected material agreed with the RSP calculated by the Eclipse TPS within 1.2%. Conclusion: An anthropomorphic pediatric proton spine phantom was designed to evaluate proton therapy delivery. The inclusion of multiple tissue substitutes increases heterogeneity and the level of difficulty for institutions to successfully treat the phantom. The following attributes will be evaluated: absolute dose agreement, distal range, field width, junction match and right/left dose profile alignment. The phantom will be tested at several institutions using a 5% dose agreement criterion, and a 5%/3mm gamma analysis

  17. Performance of an automatic dose control system for CT. Anthropomorphic phantom studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosch, D.; Stumpp, P.; Kahn, T. [Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Nagel, H.D. [Wissenschaft und Technik fuer die Radiologie, Dr. HD Nagel, Buchholz (Germany)

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: To assess the performance and to provide more detailed insight into characteristics and limitations of devices for automatic dose control (ADC) in CT. Materials and Methods: A comprehensive study on DoseRight 2.0, the ADC system provided by Philips for its Brilliance CT scanners, was conducted with assorted tests using an anthropomorphic phantom that allowed simulation of the operation of the system under almost realistic conditions. The scan protocol settings for the neck, chest and abdomen with pelvis were identical to those applied in the clinical routine. Results: Using the appropriate ADC functionalities, dose reductions equal 40 % for the neck, 20 % for the chest and 10 % for the abdomen with pelvis. Larger dose reductions can be expected for average patients, since their attenuating properties differ significantly from the anthropomorphic phantom. Adverse effects due to increased image noise were only moderate as a consequence of the 'adequate noise system' design and the complementary use of adaptive filtration. The results of specific tests also provided deeper insight into the operation of the ADC system that helps to identify the causes of suspected malfunctions and to prevent potential pitfalls. Conclusion: Tests with anthropomorphic phantoms allow verification of the characteristics of devices for ADC in CT under almost realistic conditions. However, differences in phantom shape and material composition require supplementary patient studies on representative patient groups. (orig.)

  18. SU-E-T-124: Anthropomorphic Phantoms for Confirmation of Linear Accelerator Based Small Animal Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perks, J; Benedict, S [UC Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lucero, S [UC Davis, Davis, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To document the support of radiobiological small animal research by a modern radiation oncology facility. This study confirms that a standard, human use linear accelerator can cover the range of experiments called for by researchers performing animal irradiation. A number of representative, anthropomorphic murine phantoms were made. The phantoms confirmed the small field photon and electron beams dosimetry validated the use of the linear accelerator for rodents. Methods: Laser scanning a model, CAD design and 3D printing produced the phantoms. The phantoms were weighed and CT scanned to judge their compatibility to real animals. Phantoms were produced to specifically mimic lung, gut, brain, and othotopic lesion irradiations. Each phantom was irradiated with the same protocol as prescribed to the live animals. Delivered dose was measured with small field ion chambers, MOS/FETs or TLDs. Results: The density of the phantom material compared to density range across the real mice showed that the printed material would yield sufficiently accurate measurements when irradiated. The whole body, lung and gut irradiations were measured within 2% of prescribed doses with A1SL ion chamber. MOSFET measurements of electron irradiations for the orthotopic lesions allowed refinement of the measured small field output factor to better than 2% and validated the immunology experiment of irradiating one lesion and sparing another. Conclusion: Linacs are still useful tools in small animal bio-radiation research. This work demonstrated a strong role for the clinical accelerator in small animal research, facilitating standard whole body dosing as well as conformal treatments down to 1cm field. The accuracy of measured dose, was always within 5%. The electron irradiations of the phantom brain and flank tumors needed adjustment; the anthropomorphic phantoms allowed refinement of the initial output factor measurements for these fields which were made in a large block of solid water.

  19. NURBS-based 3-d anthropomorphic computational phantoms for radiation dosimetry applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choonsik; Lodwick, Daniel; Lee, Choonik; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2007-01-01

    Computational anthropomorphic phantoms are computer models used in the evaluation of absorbed dose distributions within the human body. Currently, two classes of the computational phantoms have been developed and widely utilised for dosimetry calculation: (1) stylized (equation-based) and (2) voxel (image-based) phantoms describing human anatomy through the use of mathematical surface equations and 3-D voxel matrices, respectively. However, stylized phantoms have limitations in defining realistic organ contours and positioning as compared to voxel phantoms, which are themselves based on medical images of human subjects. In turn, voxel phantoms that have been developed through medical image segmentation have limitations in describing organs that are presented in low contrast within either magnetic resonance or computed tomography image. The present paper reviews the advantages and disadvantages of these existing classes of computational phantoms and introduces a hybrid approach to a computational phantom construction based on non-uniform rational B-Spline (NURBS) surface animation technology that takes advantage of the most desirable features of the former two phantom types. (authors)

  20. Analysis of translational errors in frame-based and frameless cranial radiosurgery using an anthropomorphic phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Taynna Vernalha Rocha [Faculdades Pequeno Principe (FPP), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Cordova Junior, Arno Lotar; Almeida, Cristiane Maria; Piedade, Pedro Argolo; Silva, Cintia Mara da, E-mail: taynnavra@gmail.com [Centro de Radioterapia Sao Sebastiao, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Brincas, Gabriela R. Baseggio [Centro de Diagnostico Medico Imagem, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Marins, Priscila; Soboll, Danyel Scheidegger [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2016-03-15

    Objective: To evaluate three-dimensional translational setup errors and residual errors in image-guided radiosurgery, comparing frameless and frame-based techniques, using an anthropomorphic phantom. Materials and Methods: We initially used specific phantoms for the calibration and quality control of the image-guided system. For the hidden target test, we used an Alderson Radiation Therapy (ART)-210 anthropomorphic head phantom, into which we inserted four 5- mm metal balls to simulate target treatment volumes. Computed tomography images were the taken with the head phantom properly positioned for frameless and frame-based radiosurgery. Results: For the frameless technique, the mean error magnitude was 0.22 ± 0.04 mm for setup errors and 0.14 ± 0.02 mm for residual errors, the combined uncertainty being 0.28 mm and 0.16 mm, respectively. For the frame-based technique, the mean error magnitude was 0.73 ± 0.14 mm for setup errors and 0.31 ± 0.04 mm for residual errors, the combined uncertainty being 1.15 mm and 0.63 mm, respectively. Conclusion: The mean values, standard deviations, and combined uncertainties showed no evidence of a significant differences between the two techniques when the head phantom ART-210 was used. (author)

  1. Development and liver of phantom anthropomorphic application for use in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, M.G.; Silva, L.F.; Ferreira, F. C.L.; Cunha, C.J.; Paschoal, C.M.M.

    2015-01-01

    The use of artificial ionizing radiation has also been employed in several areas, namely: medicine, agriculture, industry, ink curing etc. However, the use of radiation for medical purposes of diagnosis or therapy is being treated with more attention due to its increased use and the use of simulators object for quality control and training of professionals. The phantoms and are used to aid radiographic procedures, they may simulate a part of the body, both in its form as mass, density, and attenuation. The objective of this work was the development and application of liver anthropomorphic phantom for use in diagnostic radiology and training professionals. The construction of the liver anthropomorphic phantom was through literature and it was noticed that the use of phantoms are relatively low. For the construction of the mold of the phantom was used an adult human liver with early cirrhosis that was preserved in formalin for teaching demonstrations in Prof. Human Anatomy Museum collection Osvaldo Cruz of milk from the Federal University of Sergipe. With this work, we emphasize the need for the control program and quality assurance in radiology doctor to ensure image quality and low exposure of patients and professionals, since the radiological examinations are extremely important, because its contribution decisively in medical diagnosis. (authors)

  2. Anthropomorphic thorax phantom for cardio-respiratory motion simulation in tomographic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolwin, Konstantin; Czekalla, Björn; Frohwein, Lynn J.; Büther, Florian; Schäfers, Klaus P.

    2018-02-01

    Patient motion during medical imaging using techniques such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), or single emission computed tomography (SPECT) is well known to degrade images, leading to blurring effects or severe artifacts. Motion correction methods try to overcome these degrading effects. However, they need to be validated under realistic conditions. In this work, a sophisticated anthropomorphic thorax phantom is presented that combines several aspects of a simulator for cardio-respiratory motion. The phantom allows us to simulate various types of cardio-respiratory motions inside a human-like thorax, including features such as inflatable lungs, beating left ventricular myocardium, respiration-induced motion of the left ventricle, moving lung lesions, and moving coronary artery plaques. The phantom is constructed to be MR-compatible. This means that we can not only perform studies in PET, SPECT and CT, but also inside an MRI system. The technical features of the anthropomorphic thorax phantom Wilhelm are presented with regard to simulating motion effects in hybrid emission tomography and radiotherapy. This is supplemented by a study on the detectability of small coronary plaque lesions in PET/CT under the influence of cardio-respiratory motion, and a study on the accuracy of left ventricular blood volumes.

  3. ANTHROPOMORPHIC PHANTOMS FOR ASSESSMENT OF STRAIN IMAGING METHODS INVOLVING SALINE-INFUSED SONOHYSTEROGRAPHY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, Maritza A.; Madsen, Ernest L.; Frank, Gary R.; Jiang, Jingfeng; Shi, Hairong; Hall, Timothy J.; Varghese, Tomy

    2008-01-01

    Two anthropomorphic uterine phantoms were developed which allow assessment and comparison of strain imaging systems adapted for use with saline-infused sonohysterography (SIS). Tissue-mimicking (TM) materials consist of dispersions of safflower oil in gelatin. TM fibroids are stiffer than the TM myometrium/cervix and TM polyps are softer. The first uterine phantom has 3-mm diameter TM fibroids randomly distributed in TM myometrium. The second uterine phantom has a 5-mm and an 8-mm spherical TM fibroid in addition to a 5-mm spherical and a 12.5-mm long (medicine-capsule-shaped) TM endometrial polyp protruding into the endometrial cavity; also, a 10-mm spherical TM fibroid projects from the serosal surface. Strain images using the first phantom show the stiffer 3-mm TM fibroids in the myometrium. Results from the second uterine phantom show that, as expected, parts of inclusions projecting into the uterine cavity will appear very stiff, whether they are stiff or soft. Results from both phantoms show that even though there is a five-fold difference in the Young’s moduli values, there is not a significant difference in the strain in the transition from the TM myometrium to the TM fat. These phantoms allow for realistic comparison and evolution of SIS strain imaging techniques and can aid clinical personnel to develop skills for SIS strain imaging. PMID:18514999

  4. Development and application of anthropomorphic voxel phantom of the head for in vivo measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrba, T

    2007-01-01

    The in vivo measurement of the activity deposited in the skeleton is a very useful source of information on human internal contaminations with transuranic elements, e.g. americium 241, especially for long time periods after intake. Measurements are performed on the skull or the larger joints such as the knee or elbow. The paper deals with the construction of an anthropomorphic numerical phantom based on CT scans, its potential for calibration and the estimation of the uncertainties of the detection system. The density of bones, activity distribution and position of the detectors were changed in individual simulations in order to estimate their effects on the result of the measurement. The results from simulations with the numerical phantom were compared with the results of physical phantoms.

  5. Novel anthropomorphic hip phantom corrects systemic interscanner differences in proximal femoral vBMD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonaretti, S; Saeed, I; Burghardt, A J; Lang, T; Carpenter, R D; Yu, L; Bruesewitz, M; Khosla, S

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) is increasingly used in osteoporosis studies to assess volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD), bone quality and strength. However, QCT is confronted by technical issues in the clinical research setting, such as potentially confounding effects of body size on vBMD measurements and lack of standard approaches to scanner cross-calibration, which affects measurements of vBMD in multicenter settings. In this study, we addressed systematic inter-scanner differences and subject-dependent body size errors using a novel anthropomorphic hip phantom, containing a calibration hip to estimate correction equations, and a contralateral test hip to assess the quality of the correction. We scanned this phantom on four different scanners and we applied phantom-derived corrections to in vivo images of 16 postmenopausal women scanned on two scanners. From the phantom study, we found that vBMD decreased with increasing phantom size in three of four scanners and that inter-scanner variations increased with increasing phantom size. In the in vivo study, we observed that inter-scanner corrections reduced systematic inter-scanner mean vBMD differences but that the inter-scanner precision error was still larger than expected from known intra-scanner precision measurements. In conclusion, inter-scanner corrections and body size influence should be considered when measuring vBMD from QCT images. (paper)

  6. Construction of an Anthropomorphic Phantom for Use in Evaluating Pediatric Airway Digital Tomosynthesis Protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Kasraie

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Interpretation of radiolucent foreign bodies (FBs is a common task charged to pediatric radiologists. The use of a motion compensated technique to decrease breathing motion on images would greatly decrease overall exposure to ionizing radiation and increase access to treatment yielding a great impact on clinical care. This study reports on the methodology and materials used to construct an in-house anthropomorphic phantom for investigating image quality in digital tomosynthesis protocols for volumetric imaging of the pediatric airway. Availability and cost of possible substitute materials were considered and simplifying assumptions were made. Two different modular phantoms were assembled in coronal slab layers using materials designed to approximate a one- and three-year-old thorax at diagnostic photon energies for use with digital tomosynthesis protocols such as those offered on GE’s VolumeRAD application. Exposures were made using both phantoms with inserted food particles inside an oscillating airway. The goal of the phantom is to help evaluate (1 whether the currently used protocol is sufficient to image the airway despite breathing motion and (2 whether it is not, to find the optimal protocol by testing various commercially available protocols using this phantom. The affordable construction of the pediatric sized phantom aimed at optimizing GE’s VolumeRAD protocol for airway foreign body imaging is demonstrated in this study which can be used to test VolumeRAD’s ability to image the airways with and without a low-density foreign body within the airways.

  7. TU-G-BRD-05: Results From Multi-Institutional Measurements with An Anthropomorphic Spine Phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molineu, A; Hernandez, N; Alvarez, P; Followill, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the results from an anthropomorphic spine phantom used for credentialing institutions for National Cancer Institute (NCI) sponsored clinical trial. Methods: An anthropomorphic phantom that contains left and right lungs, a heart, an esophagus, spinal cord, bony material and a PTV was sent to institutions wishing to be credentialed for NCI trials. The PTV holds 4 TLD and radiochromic film in the axial and sagittal planes. The heart holds one TLD. Institutions created IMRT plans to cover ≥90% of the PTV with 6 Gy and limit the cord dose to <0.35cc receiving 3.75 Gy and <1.2cc receiving 2.63 Gy. They were instructed to treat the phantom as they would a patient, including making plan specific IMRT/SBRT QA measurements before treatment. The TLD results in the PTV were required to be within ±7% of the plan dose. A gamma calculation was performed using the film results and the submitted DICOM plan. ≥85% of the analyzed region was required to pass a 5%/3 mm criteria. Results: 176 institutions irradiated the spine phantom for a total of 255 results. The pass rate was 73% (187 irradiations) overall. 44 irradiations failed only the gamma criteria, 2 failed only the dose criteria and 22 failed both. The most used planning systems were Eclipse (116) and Pinnacle (52) and they had pass rates of 76% and 71%, respectively. The AAA algorithm had a pass rate of 77% while superposition type algorithms had a 71% pass rate. The average TLD measurement to institution calculation ratio was 0.99 (0.04 std dev.). The average percent pixels passing the gamma criteria for films was 89% (12% std dev.) Conclusion: Results show that this phantom is an important part of credentialing and that we have room for improvement in IMRT/SBRT spine treatments. This work was supported by PHS CA180803 and CA037422 awarded by NCI, DHHS

  8. Development of a patient-specific two-compartment anthropomorphic breast phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prionas, Nicolas D; Burkett, George W; McKenney, Sarah E; Chen, Lin; Boone, John M; Stern, Robin L

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a technique for the construction of a two-compartment anthropomorphic breast phantom specific to an individual patient's pendant breast anatomy. Three-dimensional breast images were acquired on a prototype dedicated breast computed tomography (bCT) scanner as part of an ongoing IRB-approved clinical trial of bCT. The images from the breast of a patient were segmented into adipose and glandular tissue regions and divided into 1.59 mm thick breast sections to correspond to the thickness of polyethylene stock. A computer-controlled water-jet cutting machine was used to cut the outer breast edge and the internal regions corresponding to glandular tissue from the polyethylene. The stack of polyethylene breast segments was encased in a thermoplastic ‘skin’ and filled with water. Water-filled spaces modeled glandular tissue structures and the surrounding polyethylene modeled the adipose tissue compartment. Utility of the phantom was demonstrated by inserting 200 µm microcalcifications as well as by measuring point dose deposition during bCT scanning. Affine registration of the original patient images with bCT images of the phantom showed similar tissue distribution. Linear profiles through the registered images demonstrated a mean coefficient of determination (r 2 ) between grayscale profiles of 0.881. The exponent of the power law describing the anatomical noise power spectrum was identical in the coronal images of the patient's breast and the phantom. Microcalcifications were visualized in the phantom at bCT scanning. The real-time air kerma rate was measured during bCT scanning and fluctuated with breast anatomy. On average, point dose deposition was 7.1% greater than the mean glandular dose. A technique to generate a two-compartment anthropomorphic breast phantom from bCT images has been demonstrated. The phantom is the first, to our knowledge, to accurately model the uncompressed pendant breast and the glandular tissue

  9. Measurement of Patient Dose from Computed Tomography Using Physical Anthropomorphic Phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Ki Won; Lee, Jae Ki; Kim, Jong Kyung

    2005-01-01

    The computed tomography (CT) provides a high quality in images of human body but contributes relatively high patient dose compared with the conventional X-ray examination. Furthermore, the frequency of CT examination has been increasing in Korea for the last decade owing to the national health insurance benefits. Increasing concerns about high patient dose from CT have stimulated a great deal of researches on dose assessment, which many of these are based on the Monte Carlo simulation. But in this study, absorbed doses and effective dose of patient undergoing CT examination were determined experimentally using anthropomorphic physical phantom and the measured results are compared with those from Monte Carlo calculation

  10. Characterization of MOSFET dosimeters for low-dose measurements in maxillofacial anthropomorphic phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivisto, Juha H; Wolff, Jan E; Kiljunen, Timo; Schulze, Dirk; Kortesniemi, Mika

    2015-07-08

    The aims of this study were to characterize reinforced metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters to assess the measurement uncertainty, single exposure low-dose limit with acceptable accuracy, and the number of exposures required to attain the corresponding limit of the thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The second aim was to characterize MOSFET dosimeter sensitivities for two dental photon energy ranges, dose dependency, dose rate dependency, and accumulated dose dependency. A further aim was to compare the performance of MOSFETs with those of TLDs in an anthropomorphic phantom head using a dentomaxillofacial CBCT device. The uncertainty was assessed by exposing 20 MOSFETs and a Barracuda MPD reference dosimeter. The MOSFET dosimeter sensitivities were evaluated for two photon energy ranges (50-90 kVp) using a constant dose and polymethylmethacrylate backscatter material. MOSFET and TLD comparative point-dose measurements were performed on an anthropomorphic phantom that was exposed with a clinical CBCT protocol. The MOSFET single exposure low dose limit (25% uncertainty, k = 2) was 1.69 mGy. An averaging of eight MOSFET exposures was required to attain the corresponding TLD (0.3 mGy) low-dose limit. The sensitivity was 3.09 ± 0.13 mV/mGy independently of the photon energy used. The MOSFET dosimeters did not present dose or dose rate sensitivity but, however, presented a 1% decrease of sensitivity per 1000 mV for accumulated threshold voltages between 8300 mV and 17500 mV. The point doses in an anthropomorphic phantom ranged for MOSFETs between 0.24 mGy and 2.29 mGy and for TLDs between 0.25 and 2.09 mGy, respectively. The mean difference was -8%. The MOSFET dosimeters presented statistically insignificant energy dependency. By averaging multiple exposures, the MOSFET dosimeters can achieve a TLD-comparable low-dose limit and constitute a feasible method for diagnostic dosimetry using anthropomorphic phantoms. However, for single in

  11. Characterization of MOSFET dosimeters for low‐dose measurements in maxillofacial anthropomorphic phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Jan E.; Kiljunen, Timo; Schulze, Dirk; Kortesniemi, Mika

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to characterize reinforced metal‐oxide‐semiconductor field‐effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters to assess the measurement uncertainty, single exposure low‐dose limit with acceptable accuracy, and the number of exposures required to attain the corresponding limit of the thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The second aim was to characterize MOSFET dosimeter sensitivities for two dental photon energy ranges, dose dependency, dose rate dependency, and accumulated dose dependency. A further aim was to compare the performance of MOSFETs with those of TLDs in an anthropomorphic phantom head using a dentomaxillofacial CBCT device. The uncertainty was assessed by exposing 20 MOSFETs and a Barracuda MPD reference dosimeter. The MOSFET dosimeter sensitivities were evaluated for two photon energy ranges (50–90 kVp) using a constant dose and polymethylmethacrylate backscatter material. MOSFET and TLD comparative point‐dose measurements were performed on an anthropomorphic phantom that was exposed with a clinical CBCT protocol. The MOSFET single exposure low dose limit (25% uncertainty, k=2) was 1.69 mGy. An averaging of eight MOSFET exposures was required to attain the corresponding TLD (0.3 mGy) low‐dose limit. The sensitivity was 3.09±0.13 mV/mGy independently of the photon energy used. The MOSFET dosimeters did not present dose or dose rate sensitivity but, however, presented a 1% decrease of sensitivity per 1000 mV for accumulated threshold voltages between 8300 mV and 17500 mV. The point doses in an anthropomorphic phantom ranged for MOSFETs between 0.24 mGy and 2.29 mGy and for TLDs between 0.25 and 2.09 mGy, respectively. The mean difference was −8%. The MOSFET dosimeters presented statistically insignificant energy dependency. By averaging multiple exposures, the MOSFET dosimeters can achieve a TLD‐comparable low‐dose limit and constitute a feasible method for diagnostic dosimetry using anthropomorphic phantoms. However

  12. SU-G-TeP2-12: IROCHouston and MDAPL SRS Anthropomorphic Phantom Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molineu, A; Kry, S; Alvarez, P; Hernandez, N; Nguyen, T; Followill, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report the results of SRS phantom irradiations Methods: Anthropomorphic SRS head phantoms were sent to institutions participating in NCI sponsored SRS clinical trials and institutions interested in verifying SRS treatment delivery. The phantom shell was purchased from Phantom Laboratory and altered to house dosimetry and imaging inserts. The imaging insert has 1.9 cm diameter spherical target. The dosimetry insert holds two TLD capsules and radiochromic film in the coronal and sagittal planes through the center of the target. Institutions were asked to image, plan and treat the phantom as they would an SRS patient. GammaKnife, CyberKnife and c-arm accelerator institutions were asked to cover the target with 15 Gy, 20 Gy and 25 Gy, respectively. Following these guidelines and typical planning protocols for these three types of machines gives roughly 30 Gy to the center of the target for all units. Submission of the DICOM digital data set was required for analysis. Criteria of 5% for TLD results and 85% of pixels passing 5%/3mm gamma analysis were applied beginning in 2013. Results: The phantom was analyzed 269 times between the beginning of 2013 to present. The pass rate is 81%. Nineteen of the irradiation results failed only the TLD criteria, 19 failed only the film criteria and 12 failed both. Irradiations included 32 CyberKnife 23 GammaKnife, 3 TomoTherapy and 211 c-arm units. Planning systems included Eclipse, Ergo, GammaPlan, Hi-Art, iPlan, Monaco, MultiPlan, Pinnacle, RayStation, XiO and XKnife. Irradiations that were not accompanied with DICOM data were not included in this analysis. Conclusion: The phantom is a valuable end-to-end test used to independently verify the accuracy of SRS treatment delivery. This investigation was supported by IROC grant CA180803 awarded by the NCI.

  13. Validation of dose planning calculations for boron neutron capture therapy using cylindrical and anthropomorphic phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koivunoro, Hanna; Seppaelae, Tiina; Uusi-Simola, Jouni; Merimaa, Katja; Savolainen, Sauli [Department of Physics, POB 64, FI-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Kotiluoto, Petri; Seren, Tom; Auterinen, Iiro [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo, POB 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Kortesniemi, Mika, E-mail: hanna.koivunoro@helsinki.f [HUS Helsinki Medical Imaging Center, University of Helsinki, POB 340, FI-00029 HUS (Finland)

    2010-06-21

    In this paper, the accuracy of dose planning calculations for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of brain and head and neck cancer was studied at the FiR 1 epithermal neutron beam. A cylindrical water phantom and an anthropomorphic head phantom were applied with two beam aperture-to-surface distances (ASD). The calculations using the simulation environment for radiation application (SERA) treatment planning system were compared to neutron activation measurements with Au and Mn foils, photon dose measurements with an ionization chamber and the reference simulations with the MCNP5 code. Photon dose calculations using SERA differ from the ionization chamber measurements by 2-13% (disagreement increased along the depth in the phantom), but are in agreement with the MCNP5 calculations within 2%. The {sup 55}Mn(n,{gamma}) and {sup 197}Au(n,{gamma}) reaction rates calculated using SERA agree within 10% and 8%, respectively, with the measurements and within 5% with the MCNP5 calculations at depths >0.5 cm from the phantom surface. The {sup 55}Mn(n,{gamma}) reaction rate represents the nitrogen and boron depth dose within 1%. Discrepancy in the SERA fast neutron dose calculation (of up to 37%) is corrected if the biased fast neutron dose calculation option is not applied. Reduced voxel cell size ({<=}0.5 cm) improves the SERA calculation accuracy on the phantom surface. Despite the slight overestimation of the epithermal neutrons and underestimation of the thermal neutrons in the beam model, neutron calculation accuracy with the SERA system is sufficient for reliable BNCT treatment planning with the two studied treatment distances. The discrepancy between measured and calculated photon dose remains unsatisfactorily high for depths >6 cm from the phantom surface. Increasing discrepancy along the phantom depth is expected to be caused by the inaccurately determined effective point of the ionization chamber.

  14. Dosimetric reproduction of a left-breast 3DCRT field-in-field radiation therapy planning in an anthropomorphic and anthropometric phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, Luciana B., E-mail: lucibn19@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: jonymarques@uol.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Anatomia e Imagem; Barsanelli, Cristiane; Geraldo, Jony M., E-mail: cbarsanelli@yahoo.com.br [Hospital Luxemburgo, Instituto Mário Penna, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Aquino, Jean Carlos; Campos, Tarcísio P. Ribeiro, E-mail: jeancarlosaquino@outlook.com, E-mail: tprcampos@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UGMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    The proposal of this study was to reproduce the dosimetry established in a treatment planning system (TPS) following a 3D conformational radiation therapy (3DCRT) protocol of two parallel-opposite fields applied to the left-breast in a thorax phantom, with the use of the field-in-field technique. Computed tomography (CT) images of the anthropomorphic and anthropometric phantom of the thorax with mobile breasts were generated. This phantom was developed by the NRI / UFMG research group. The generated images were transferred to the planning system XiO version-5 for the elaboration of the breast tele therapeutic planning with 2 Gy per fraction, in 25 fractions, with prescribed dose of 50 Gy. A set of ten EBT2 radiochromic films were irradiated at different doses. The values of RGB (Red, Green, Blue) of the radiochromic films were obtained by scanning and data transformed in optical density (OD), whose values were used to construct the calibration curve. EBT2 radiochromic films were positioned outside and inside of the thorax phantom: internally in the right and left lungs, on the face of the heart, in the glandular breast tissue-equivalent (TE) and in the left breast skin. After phantom radiation at the linear accelerator 6 MV Elekta Precise reproducing the 3DCRT, the radiochromic films were digitized after 24 h of exposure. The measurements of the intensities of the films in RGB were measured in the software ImageJ, transformed in optical density and converted in bidimensional dose distributions, applying the calibration curve. The experimental dosimetric data were analyzed and compared with values generated in the TPS. In addition, graphics and dose-volume histograms (DVH) were developed. The dose measurements in the glandular-TE in breast did not present statistically significant differences in relation to values at equivalent positions generated in the TPS. The organs at risk received doses below the reference values, according to TPS. It was verified the

  15. Dosimetric reproduction of a left-breast 3DCRT field-in-field radiation therapy planning in an anthropomorphic and anthropometric phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, Luciana B.; Aquino, Jean Carlos; Campos, Tarcísio P. Ribeiro

    2017-01-01

    The proposal of this study was to reproduce the dosimetry established in a treatment planning system (TPS) following a 3D conformational radiation therapy (3DCRT) protocol of two parallel-opposite fields applied to the left-breast in a thorax phantom, with the use of the field-in-field technique. Computed tomography (CT) images of the anthropomorphic and anthropometric phantom of the thorax with mobile breasts were generated. This phantom was developed by the NRI / UFMG research group. The generated images were transferred to the planning system XiO version-5 for the elaboration of the breast tele therapeutic planning with 2 Gy per fraction, in 25 fractions, with prescribed dose of 50 Gy. A set of ten EBT2 radiochromic films were irradiated at different doses. The values of RGB (Red, Green, Blue) of the radiochromic films were obtained by scanning and data transformed in optical density (OD), whose values were used to construct the calibration curve. EBT2 radiochromic films were positioned outside and inside of the thorax phantom: internally in the right and left lungs, on the face of the heart, in the glandular breast tissue-equivalent (TE) and in the left breast skin. After phantom radiation at the linear accelerator 6 MV Elekta Precise reproducing the 3DCRT, the radiochromic films were digitized after 24 h of exposure. The measurements of the intensities of the films in RGB were measured in the software ImageJ, transformed in optical density and converted in bidimensional dose distributions, applying the calibration curve. The experimental dosimetric data were analyzed and compared with values generated in the TPS. In addition, graphics and dose-volume histograms (DVH) were developed. The dose measurements in the glandular-TE in breast did not present statistically significant differences in relation to values at equivalent positions generated in the TPS. The organs at risk received doses below the reference values, according to TPS. It was verified the

  16. Computational voxel phantom, associated to anthropometric and anthropomorphic real phantom for dosimetry in human male pelvis radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Cleuza Helena Teixeira; Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de

    2005-01-01

    This paper addresses a computational model of voxels through MCNP5 Code and the experimental development of an anthropometric and anthropomorphic phantom for dosimetry in human male pelvis brachytherapy focusing prostatic tumors. For elaboration of the computational model of the human male pelvis, anatomical section images from the Visible Man Project were applied. Such selected and digital images were associated to a numeric representation, one for each section. Such computational representation of the anatomical sections was transformed into a bi-dimensional mesh of equivalent tissue. The group of bidimensional meshes was concatenated forming the three-dimensional model of voxels to be used by the MCNP5 code. In association to the anatomical information, data from the density and chemical composition of the basic elements, representatives of the organs and involved tissues, were setup in a material database for the MCNP-5. The model will be applied for dosimetric evaluations in situations of irradiation of the human masculine pelvis. Such 3D model of voxel is associated to the code of transport of particles MCNP5, allowing future simulations. It was also developed the construction of human masculine pelvis phantom, based on anthropometric and anthropomorphic dates and in the use of representative equivalent tissues of the skin, fatty, muscular and glandular tissue, as well as the bony structure.This part of work was developed in stages, being built the bony cast first, later the muscular structures and internal organs. They were then jointly mounted and inserted in the skin cast. The representative component of the fatty tissue was incorporate and accomplished the final retouchings in the skin. The final result represents the development of two important essential tools for elaboration of computational and experimental dosimetry. Thus, it is possible its use in calibrations of pre-existent protocols in radiotherapy, as well as for tests of new protocols, besides

  17. Development and implementation of an anthropomorphic pediatric spine phantom for the assessment of craniospinal irradiation procedures in proton therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Dana J Lewis; Paige A Summers; David S Followill; Narayan Sahoo; Anita Mahajan; Francesco C Stingo; Stephen F Kry

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To design an anthropomorphic pediatric spine phantom for use in the evaluation of proton therapy facilities for clinical trial participation by the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core (IROC) Houston QA Center (formerly RPC).Methods: This phantom was designed to perform an end-to-end audit of the proton spine treatment process, including simulation, dose calculation by the treatment planning system (TPS), and proton treatment delivery. The design incorporated materials simulating the ...

  18. Inter- and intrascanner variability of pulmonary nodule volumetry on low-dose 64-row CT : an anthropomorphic phantom study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, X.; Willemink, M. J.; Zhao, Y.; de Jong, P. A.; van Ooijen, P. M. A.; Oudkerk, M.; Greuter, M. J. W.; Vliegenthart, R.

    Objective: To assess inter- and intrascanner variability in volumetry of solid pulmonary nodules in an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom using low-dose CT. Methods: Five spherical solid artificial nodules [diameters 3, 5, 8, 10 and 12mm; CT density 1100 Hounsfield units (HU)] were randomly placed

  19. Simulating effects of brain atrophy in longitudinal PET imaging with an anthropomorphic brain phantom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonasson, L S; Axelsson, J; Riklund, K

    2017-01-01

    In longitudinal positron emission tomography (PET), the presence of volumetric changes over time can lead to an overestimation or underestimation of the true changes in the quantified PET signal due to the partial volume effect (PVE) introduced by the limited spatial resolution of existing PET...... cameras and reconstruction algorithms. Here, a 3D-printed anthropomorphic brain phantom with attachable striata in three sizes was designed to enable controlled volumetric changes. Using a method to eliminate the non-radioactive plastic wall, and manipulating BP levels by adding different number of events...... from list-mode acquisitions, we investigated the artificial volume dependence of BP due to PVE, and potential bias arising from varying BP. Comparing multiple reconstruction algorithms we found that a high-resolution ordered-subsets maximization algorithm with spatially variant point-spread function...

  20. A method to acquire CT organ dose map using OSL dosimeters and ATOM anthropomorphic phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Da; Li, Xinhua; Liu, Bob [Division of Diagnostic Imaging Physics and Webster Center for Advanced Research and Education in Radiation, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Gao, Yiming; Xu, X. George [Nuclear Engineering Program, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To present the design and procedure of an experimental method for acquiring densely sampled organ dose map for CT applications, based on optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters “nanoDots” and standard ATOM anthropomorphic phantoms; and to provide the results of applying the method—a dose data set with good statistics for the comparison with Monte Carlo simulation result in the future.Methods: A standard ATOM phantom has densely located holes (in 3 × 3 cm or 1.5 × 1.5 cm grids), which are too small (5 mm in diameter) to host many types of dosimeters, including the nanoDots. The authors modified the conventional way in which nanoDots are used, by removing the OSL disks from the holders before inserting them inside a standard ATOM phantom for dose measurements. The authors solved three technical difficulties introduced by this modification: (1) energy dependent dose calibration for raw OSL readings; (2) influence of the brief background exposure of OSL disks to dimmed room light; (3) correct pairing between the dose readings and measurement locations. The authors acquired 100 dose measurements at various positions in the phantom, which was scanned using a clinical chest protocol with both angular and z-axis tube current modulations.Results: Dose calibration was performed according to the beam qualities inside the phantom as determined from an established Monte Carlo model of the scanner. The influence of the brief exposure to dimmed room light was evaluated and deemed negligible. Pairing between the OSL readings and measurement locations was ensured by the experimental design. The organ doses measured for a routine adult chest scan protocol ranged from 9.4 to 18.8 mGy, depending on the composition, location, and surrounding anatomy of the organs. The dose distribution across different slices of the phantom strongly depended on the z-axis mA modulation. In the same slice, doses to the soft tissues other than the spinal cord demonstrated

  1. A method to acquire CT organ dose map using OSL dosimeters and ATOM anthropomorphic phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Da; Li, Xinhua; Liu, Bob; Gao, Yiming; Xu, X. George

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To present the design and procedure of an experimental method for acquiring densely sampled organ dose map for CT applications, based on optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters “nanoDots” and standard ATOM anthropomorphic phantoms; and to provide the results of applying the method—a dose data set with good statistics for the comparison with Monte Carlo simulation result in the future.Methods: A standard ATOM phantom has densely located holes (in 3 × 3 cm or 1.5 × 1.5 cm grids), which are too small (5 mm in diameter) to host many types of dosimeters, including the nanoDots. The authors modified the conventional way in which nanoDots are used, by removing the OSL disks from the holders before inserting them inside a standard ATOM phantom for dose measurements. The authors solved three technical difficulties introduced by this modification: (1) energy dependent dose calibration for raw OSL readings; (2) influence of the brief background exposure of OSL disks to dimmed room light; (3) correct pairing between the dose readings and measurement locations. The authors acquired 100 dose measurements at various positions in the phantom, which was scanned using a clinical chest protocol with both angular and z-axis tube current modulations.Results: Dose calibration was performed according to the beam qualities inside the phantom as determined from an established Monte Carlo model of the scanner. The influence of the brief exposure to dimmed room light was evaluated and deemed negligible. Pairing between the OSL readings and measurement locations was ensured by the experimental design. The organ doses measured for a routine adult chest scan protocol ranged from 9.4 to 18.8 mGy, depending on the composition, location, and surrounding anatomy of the organs. The dose distribution across different slices of the phantom strongly depended on the z-axis mA modulation. In the same slice, doses to the soft tissues other than the spinal cord demonstrated

  2. Design and manufacturing of anthropomorphic thyroid-neck phantom for use in nuclear medicine centres in Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermosilla, A.; Diaz Londono, G.; Garcia, M.; Ruiz, F.; Andrade, P.; Perez, A.

    2014-01-01

    Anthropomorphic phantoms are used in nuclear medicine for imaging quality control, calibration of gamma spectrometry system for the study of internal contamination with radionuclides and for internal dosimetric studies. These are constructed of materials that have radiation attenuation coefficients similar to those of the different organs and tissues of the human body. The material usually used for the manufacture of phantoms is polymethyl methacrylate. Other materials used for this purpose are polyethylene, polystyrene and epoxy resin. This project presents the design and manufacture of an anthropomorphic thyroid-neck phantom that includes the cervical spine, trachea and oesophagus, using a polyester resin (ρ 1.1 g cm -3 ). Its linear and mass attenuation coefficients were experimentally determined and simulated by means of XCOM software, finding that this material reproduces the soft tissue ICRU-44 in a range of energies between 80 keV and 11 MeV, with less than a 5 % difference. (authors)

  3. Evaluation of the usefulness of a MOSFET detector in an anthropomorphic phantom for 6-MV photon beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Ryosuke; Hirano, Eriko; Kitou, Satoshi; Goka, Tomonori; Matsubara, Kana; Kameoka, Satoru; Matsuura, Taeko; Ariji, Takaki; Nishio, Teiji; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Ogino, Takashi

    2010-07-01

    In order to evaluate the usefulness of a metal oxide-silicon field-effect transistor (MOSFET) detector as a in vivo dosimeter, we performed in vivo dosimetry using the MOSFET detector with an anthropomorphic phantom. We used the RANDO phantom as an anthropomorphic phantom, and dose measurements were carried out in the abdominal, thoracic, and head and neck regions for simple square field sizes of 10 x 10, 5 x 5, and 3 x 3 cm(2) with a 6-MV photon beam. The dose measured by the MOSFET detector was verified by the dose calculations of the superposition (SP) algorithm in the XiO radiotherapy treatment-planning system. In most cases, the measured doses agreed with the results of the SP algorithm within +/-3%. Our results demonstrated the utility of the MOSFET detector for in vivo dosimetry even in the presence of clinical tissue inhomogeneities.

  4. SU-E-I-94: Automated Image Quality Assessment of Radiographic Systems Using An Anthropomorphic Phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, J; Wilson, J; Zhang, Y; Samei, E; Ravin, Carl E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In a large, academic medical center, consistent radiographic imaging performance is difficult to routinely monitor and maintain, especially for a fleet consisting of multiple vendors, models, software versions, and numerous imaging protocols. Thus, an automated image quality control methodology has been implemented using routine image quality assessment with a physical, stylized anthropomorphic chest phantom. Methods: The “Duke” Phantom (Digital Phantom 07-646, Supertech, Elkhart, IN) was imaged twice on each of 13 radiographic units from a variety of vendors at 13 primary care clinics. The first acquisition used the clinical PA chest protocol to acquire the post-processed “FOR PRESENTATION” image. The second image was acquired without an antiscatter grid followed by collection of the “FOR PROCESSING” image. Manual CNR measurements were made from the largest and thickest contrast-detail inserts in the lung, heart, and abdominal regions of the phantom in each image. An automated image registration algorithm was used to estimate the CNR of the same insert using similar ROIs. Automated measurements were then compared to the manual measurements. Results: Automatic and manual CNR measurements obtained from “FOR PRESENTATION” images had average percent differences of 0.42%±5.18%, −3.44%±4.85%, and 1.04%±3.15% in the lung, heart, and abdominal regions, respectively; measurements obtained from “FOR PROCESSING” images had average percent differences of -0.63%±6.66%, −0.97%±3.92%, and −0.53%±4.18%, respectively. The maximum absolute difference in CNR was 15.78%, 10.89%, and 8.73% in the respective regions. In addition to CNR assessment of the largest and thickest contrast-detail inserts, the automated method also provided CNR estimates for all 75 contrast-detail inserts in each phantom image. Conclusion: Automated analysis of a radiographic phantom has been shown to be a fast, robust, and objective means for assessing radiographic

  5. Estimating effective dose to pediatric patients undergoing interventional radiology procedures using anthropomorphic phantoms and MOSFET dosimeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miksys, Nelson; Gordon, Christopher L; Thomas, Karen; Connolly, Bairbre L

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the effective doses received by pediatric patients during interventional radiology procedures and to present those doses in "look-up tables" standardized according to minute of fluoroscopy and frame of digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Organ doses were measured with metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters inserted within three anthropomorphic phantoms, representing children at ages 1, 5, and 10 years, at locations corresponding to radiosensitive organs. The phantoms were exposed to mock interventional radiology procedures of the head, chest, and abdomen using posteroanterior and lateral geometries, varying magnification, and fluoroscopy or DSA exposures. Effective doses were calculated from organ doses recorded by the MOSFET dosimeters and are presented in look-up tables according to the different age groups. The largest effective dose burden for fluoroscopy was recorded for posteroanterior and lateral abdominal procedures (0.2-1.1 mSv/min of fluoroscopy), whereas procedures of the head resulted in the lowest effective doses (0.02-0.08 mSv/min of fluoroscopy). DSA exposures of the abdomen imparted higher doses (0.02-0.07 mSv/DSA frame) than did those involving the head and chest. Patient doses during interventional procedures vary significantly depending on the type of procedure. User-friendly look-up tables may provide a helpful tool for health care providers in estimating effective doses for an individual procedure.

  6. Calcium scoring with dual-energy CT in men and women: an anthropomorphic phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qin; Liu, Songtao; Myers, Kyle; Gavrielides, Marios A.; Zeng, Rongping; Sahiner, Berkman; Petrick, Nicholas

    2016-03-01

    This work aimed to quantify and compare the potential impact of gender differences on coronary artery calcium scoring with dual-energy CT. An anthropomorphic thorax phantom with four synthetic heart vessels (diameter 3-4.5 mm: female/male left main and left circumflex artery) were scanned with and without female breast plates. Ten repeat scans were acquired in both single- and dual-energy modes and reconstructed at six reconstruction settings: two slice thicknesses (3 mm, 0.6 mm) and three reconstruction algorithms (FBP, IR3, IR5). Agatston and calcium volume scores were estimated from the reconstructed data using a segmentation-based approach. Total calcium score (summation of four vessels), and male/female calcium scores (summation of male/female vessels scanned in phantom without/with breast plates) were calculated accordingly. Both Agatston and calcium volume scores were found comparable between single- and dual-energy scans (Pearson r= 0.99, pwomen and men in calcium scoring, and for standardizing imaging protocols for improved gender-specific calcium scoring.

  7. Characterization of a computed tomography iterative reconstruction algorithm by image quality evaluations with an anthropomorphic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rampado, O.; Bossi, L.; Garabello, D.; Davini, O.; Ropolo, R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to investigate the consequences on dose and image quality of the choices of different combinations of NI and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) percentage, the image quality parameters of GE CT equipment. Methods: An anthropomorphic phantom was used to simulate the chest and upper abdomen of a standard weight patient. Images were acquired with tube current modulation and different values of noise index, in the range 10–22 for a slice thickness of 5 mm and a tube voltage of 120 kV. For each selected noise index, several image series were reconstructed using different percentages of ASIR (0, 40, 50, 60, 70, 100). Quantitative noise was assessed at different phantom locations. Computed tomography dose index (CTDI) and dose length products (DLP) were recorded. Three radiologists reviewed the images in a blinded and randomized manner and assessed the subjective image quality by comparing the image series with the one acquired with the reference protocol (noise index 14, ASIR 40%). The perceived noise, contrast, edge sharpness and overall quality were graded on a scale from −2 (much worse) to +2 (much better). Results: A repeatable trend of noise reduction versus the percentage of ASIR was observed for different noise levels and phantom locations. The different combinations of noise index and percentage of ASIR to obtain a desired dose reduction were assessed. The subjective image quality evaluation evidenced a possible dose reduction between 24 and 40% as a consequence of an increment of ASIR percentage to 50 or 70%, respectively. Conclusion: These results highlighted that the same patient dose reduction can be obtained with several combinations of noise index and percentages of ASIR, providing a model with which to choose these acquisition parameters in future optimization studies, with the aim of reducing patient dose by maintaining image quality in diagnostic levels.

  8. Characterization of a computed tomography iterative reconstruction algorithm by image quality evaluations with an anthropomorphic phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rampado, O., E-mail: orampado@molinette.piemonte.it [S.C. Fisica Sanitaria, San Giovanni Battista Hospital of Turin, Corso Bramante 88, Torino 10126 (Italy); Bossi, L., E-mail: laura-bossi@hotmail.it [S.C. Fisica Sanitaria, San Giovanni Battista Hospital of Turin, Corso Bramante 88, Torino 10126 (Italy); Garabello, D., E-mail: dgarabello@molinette.piemonte.it [S.C. Radiodiagnostica DEA, San Giovanni Battista Hospital of Turin, Corso Bramante 88, Torino 10126 (Italy); Davini, O., E-mail: odavini@molinette.piemonte.it [S.C. Radiodiagnostica DEA, San Giovanni Battista Hospital of Turin, Corso Bramante 88, Torino 10126 (Italy); Ropolo, R., E-mail: rropolo@molinette.piemonte.it [S.C. Fisica Sanitaria, San Giovanni Battista Hospital of Turin, Corso Bramante 88, Torino 10126 (Italy)

    2012-11-15

    Objective: This study aims to investigate the consequences on dose and image quality of the choices of different combinations of NI and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) percentage, the image quality parameters of GE CT equipment. Methods: An anthropomorphic phantom was used to simulate the chest and upper abdomen of a standard weight patient. Images were acquired with tube current modulation and different values of noise index, in the range 10-22 for a slice thickness of 5 mm and a tube voltage of 120 kV. For each selected noise index, several image series were reconstructed using different percentages of ASIR (0, 40, 50, 60, 70, 100). Quantitative noise was assessed at different phantom locations. Computed tomography dose index (CTDI) and dose length products (DLP) were recorded. Three radiologists reviewed the images in a blinded and randomized manner and assessed the subjective image quality by comparing the image series with the one acquired with the reference protocol (noise index 14, ASIR 40%). The perceived noise, contrast, edge sharpness and overall quality were graded on a scale from -2 (much worse) to +2 (much better). Results: A repeatable trend of noise reduction versus the percentage of ASIR was observed for different noise levels and phantom locations. The different combinations of noise index and percentage of ASIR to obtain a desired dose reduction were assessed. The subjective image quality evaluation evidenced a possible dose reduction between 24 and 40% as a consequence of an increment of ASIR percentage to 50 or 70%, respectively. Conclusion: These results highlighted that the same patient dose reduction can be obtained with several combinations of noise index and percentages of ASIR, providing a model with which to choose these acquisition parameters in future optimization studies, with the aim of reducing patient dose by maintaining image quality in diagnostic levels.

  9. An anthropomorphic phantom for quality assurance and training in gynaecological brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Carlos Eduardo de; Rodriguez, Miguel; Vianello, Elizabeth; Ferreira, Ivaldo Humberto; Sibata, Claudio

    2002-01-01

    Background and purpose: An anthropomorphic water filled polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom designed to serve as a Quality Assurance (QA) tool and a training aid in brachytherapy of gynaecological tumours is investigated and presented. Several dosimetric parameters associated with the dose rate calculation can be verified with the aid of this phantom such as the source positioning, its imaging reconstruction from radiographs and the accuracy of the algorithm used for manual or computer dose rate calculation. Material and methods: The phantom walls and the internal structure are 5 mm thick and consist of PMMA, in the form of the abdomen taken from a female Alderson Phantom Marker points representing the organs of interest were determined from computed tomography scans of a patient of similar size. Three PMMA inserts designed to hold a Farmer type ionization chamber of 0.6 cm 3 were positioned at the points to represent the bladder, rectum and point A. The formalism proposed by the IAEA TRS-277 dosimetry protocol was used for the conversion of readings of the ionization chamber to dose rate values with a modification to take into account the dose rate gradient in the detector. Five 137 Cs sources were used and the dose rate was evaluated by measurements and Monte Carlo simulations using the PENELOPE code. Four different treatment planning systems with different algorithms and source reconstruction techniques were also used in this investigation and compared with the manual dose rate calculations made using Karen and Breitman's tables. Results: The dose rate calculations performed with Monte Carlo and the four treatment planning systems are in good agreement with the experimental results as well as with the manual calculations when the colpostat shielding and the tandem attenuation are taken into account. The comparison between experiment and calculations by the four treatment planning systems shows a maximum variation of 5.1% between the calculated and measured

  10. Anthropomorphic chest phantom imaging – The potential for dose creep in computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, W.K.; Hogg, P.; Tootell, A.; Manning, D.; Thomas, N.; Kane, T.; Kelly, J.; McKenzie, M.; Kitching, J.

    2013-01-01

    For film-based radiography the operator had to be exact in the selection of acquisition parameters or the image could easily become under- or over-exposed. By contrast, digital technology allows for a much greater tolerance of acquisition factor selection which would still give an image of acceptable diagnostic quality. In turn this greater tolerance allows for the operator to increase effective dose for little or no penalty in image quality. The purpose of this article is to determine how image quality and lesion visibility vary with effective dose (E) in order to identify how much overexposure could be tolerated within the radiograph. Using an anthropomorphic chest phantom with ground glass lesions we determined how perceptual image quality and E varied over a wide range of acquisition conditions. Perceptual image quality comprised of image quality and lesion visibility. E was calculated using Monte Carlo method; image quality was determined using a two alternative forced choice (2AFC) method and the quality criteria were partly informed from European guidelines. Five clinicians with significant experience in image reading scored the images for quality (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.869). Image quality and lesion visibility had a close correlation (R 2 > 0.8). The tolerance for over-exposure, whilst still acquiring an image of acceptable quality, increases with decreasing kV and increasing source to image distance (SID). The maximum over-exposure factor (ratio of maximum E to minimum E that produce images of acceptable quality) possible was 139 (at 125 cm and 60 kV). Given the phantom had characteristics similar to the human thorax we propose that that potential for overexposure in a human whilst still obtaining an image of acceptable perceptual image quality is very high. Further research into overexposure tolerance and dose creep should be undertaken

  11. Radiation exposure of lens, thyroid gland and testis in anthropomorphic phantom during CT examination and its protective measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Suhua; Weng Zhigen; Wu Caifa

    1995-01-01

    The SMN-I anthropomorphic phantom was used to simulate patients and to estimate the radiation exposure of lens, thyroid gland and testes during CT examination according to hospital routine managements. The results show that the X-ray radiation doses received by the organs mentioned above are different in good and no protection shelter. Therefore, during CT examination it's of great significance to take a good protective shelter for organs which are near the CT scanning areas

  12. Optimising radiographic bitewing examination to adult and juvenile patients through the use of anthropomorphic phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dauer, L. T.; Branets, I.; Stabulas-Savage, J.; Quinn, B.; Miodownik, D.; Dauer, Z. L.; Colosi, D.; Hershkowitz, D.; Goren, A.

    2014-01-01

    Four anthropomorphic phantoms (an adult male, an adult female, a 10-y-old child and a 5-y-old child) were exposed to bitewing radiographs at film and digital settings using both rectangular and round collimation. Optically stimulated dosemeters were used. For children, average organ doses were <40 μGy and the organs with the highest doses were the salivary glands, parotid, oral mucosa, skin and extrathoracic airway. For adults, average organ doses were <200 μGy. Highest adult doses were to the salivary glands, oral mucosa and skin. Effective doses ranged from 1.5 to 1.8 μSv for children and from 2.6 to 3.6 μSv for adults when optimised technique factors were employed, including digital receptors, rectangular collimation, size-appropriate exposure times and proper clinical judgment. Optimised doses were a fraction of the natural daily background exposure. Therefore, predictions of hypothetical cancer incidence or detriment in patient populations exposed to such low doses are highly speculative and should be discouraged. (authors)

  13. Optimization of a protocol for myocardial perfusion scintigraphy by using an anthropomorphic phantom*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Susie Medeiros Oliveira; Glavam, Adriana Pereira; Kubo, Tadeu Takao Almodovar; de Sá, Lidia Vasconcellos

    2014-01-01

    Objective To develop a study aiming at optimizing myocardial perfusion imaging. Materials and Methods Imaging of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom with a GE SPECT Ventri gamma camera, with varied activities and acquisition times, in order to evaluate the influence of these parameters on the quality of the reconstructed medical images. The 99mTc-sestamibi radiotracer was utilized, and then the images were clinically evaluated on the basis of data such as summed stress score, and on the technical image quality and perfusion. The software ImageJ was utilized in the data quantification. Results The results demonstrated that for the standard acquisition time utilized in the procedure (15 seconds per angle), the injected activity could be reduced by 33.34%. Additionally, even if the standard scan time is reduced by 53.34% (7 seconds per angle), the standard injected activity could still be reduced by 16.67%, without impairing the image quality and the diagnostic reliability. Conclusion The described method and respective results provide a basis for the development of a clinical trial of patients in an optimized protocol. PMID:25741088

  14. Dose profile study in head CT scans using a male anthropomorphic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Alvaro M.L.; Santana, Priscila do C.; Mourao, Arnaldo P.

    2017-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) test is an efficient and non-invasive method to obtain data about internal structures of the human body. CT scans contribute with the highest absorbed doses in population due X-ray beam attenuation and it has raised concern in radiosensitive tissues. Techniques for the optimization of CT scanning protocols in diagnostic services have been developing with the objective of decreasing the absorbed dose in the patient, aiming image quality within acceptable parameters for diagnosis by noise control. Routine head scans were performed using GE CT scan of 64 channels programmed with automatic exposure control and voltages of 80, 100 and 120 kV attaching the noise index in approximately 0.5%, using the tool of smart mA. An anthropomorphic adult male phantom was used and radiochromic film strips were placed to measure the absorbed dose deposited in areas such as the lens, thyroid and pituitary for study of dose deposited in these important areas containing high radiosensitive tissues. Different head scans were performed using optimized values of mA.s for the different voltages. The absorbed dose measured by the film strips were in the range of the 0.58 and 44.36 mGy. The analysis of noise in the images is within the acceptable levels for diagnosis, and the optimized protocol happens with the voltage of 100 kV. The use of other voltage values can allow obtain better protocols for head scans. (author)

  15. Optimization of a protocol for myocardial perfusion scintigraphy by using an anthropomorphic phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Susie Medeiros Oliveira; Sa, Lidia Vasconcellos de, E-mail: susie@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Glavam, Adriana Pereira; Kubo, Tadeu Takao Almodovar [Clinica de Diagnostico Por Imagem (CDPI/DASA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-07-15

    Objective: to develop a study aiming at optimizing myocardial perfusion imaging. Materials and Methods: imaging of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom with a GE SPECT Ventri gamma camera, with varied activities and acquisition times, in order to evaluate the influence of these parameters on the quality of the reconstructed medical images. The {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi radiotracer was utilized, and then the images were clinically evaluated on the basis of data such as summed stress score, and on the technical image quality and perfusion. The software ImageJ was utilized in the data quantification. Results: the results demonstrated that for the standard acquisition time utilized in the procedure (15 seconds per angle), the injected activity could be reduced by 33.34%. Additionally, even if the standard scan time is reduced by 53.34% (7 seconds per angle), the standard injected activity could still be reduced by 16.67%, without impairing the image quality and the diagnostic reliability. Conclusion: the described method and respective results provide a basis for the development of a clinical trial of patients in an optimized protocol. (author)

  16. Dose evaluation in occupationally exposed workers through dosimeters ring and wrist type with an anthropomorphic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palma, R.; Gastelo, E.; Paucar, R.; Tolentino, D.; Herrera, J.; Armas, D.

    2014-08-01

    In the Nuclear Medicine service of the Clinica San Pablo (Peru), the occupationally exposed workers carried out the preparation and administration of radiopharmaceuticals to patients, so it is vital to measure the equivalent dose to the hands during the procedures in order to optimize the exposure to the ionizing radiation and execute the Radiological Safety Regulation (D.S. No. 009-97-Em) and the standard IR 002.2012 of radiation protection and safety in nuclear medicine. In this paper was designed and built a hand anthropomorphic phantom made of paraffin following the description given for the standard man, later were placed dosimeters ring and wrist type UD-807 model, Panasonic brand. Then we proceeded to irradiate using vial containers of Tc-99 and I-131. The obtained results showed the difference between the equivalent dose obtained among the ring and wrist dosimeter also getting a dose of 153 mSv /year when working with 99m Tc and of 61 mSv /year when working with iodine-131. Was also demonstrated that the ring dosimeter shows the average dose received in the hand with less dispersion. It was found that under the national regulation on Requirements of Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety in Medicine article 63, indicates that higher doses of 150 mSv /year the occupationally exposed workers should have hand dosimetry. Finally the individual dose limit of 500 mSv /year in extremities can be overcome if adequate radiation protection standards do not apply. (author)

  17. In vivo proton dosimetry using a MOSFET detector in an anthropomorphic phantom with tissue inhomogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Ryosuke; Hotta, Kenji; Matsubara, Kana; Nishioka, Shie; Matsuura, Taeko; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko

    2012-03-08

    When in vivo proton dosimetry is performed with a metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) detector, the response of the detector depends strongly on the linear energy transfer. The present study reports a practical method to correct the MOSFET response for linear energy transfer dependence by using a simplified Monte Carlo dose calculation method (SMC). A depth-output curve for a mono-energetic proton beam in polyethylene was measured with the MOSFET detector. This curve was used to calculate MOSFET output distributions with the SMC (SMC(MOSFET)). The SMC(MOSFET) output value at an arbitrary point was compared with the value obtained by the conventional SMC(PPIC), which calculates proton dose distributions by using the depth-dose curve determined by a parallel-plate ionization chamber (PPIC). The ratio of the two values was used to calculate the correction factor of the MOSFET response at an arbitrary point. The dose obtained by the MOSFET detector was determined from the product of the correction factor and the MOSFET raw dose. When in vivo proton dosimetry was performed with the MOSFET detector in an anthropomorphic phantom, the corrected MOSFET doses agreed with the SMC(PPIC) results within the measurement error. To our knowledge, this is the first report of successful in vivo proton dosimetry with a MOSFET detector.

  18. Dose profile study in head CT scans using a male anthropomorphic phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, Alvaro M.L.; Santana, Priscila do C.; Mourao, Arnaldo P., E-mail: amlgphys@gmail.com, E-mail: pridili@gmail.com, E-mail: apratabhz@gmail.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Centro Federal de Educação Tecnológica de Minas Gerais (CEFET-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) test is an efficient and non-invasive method to obtain data about internal structures of the human body. CT scans contribute with the highest absorbed doses in population due X-ray beam attenuation and it has raised concern in radiosensitive tissues. Techniques for the optimization of CT scanning protocols in diagnostic services have been developing with the objective of decreasing the absorbed dose in the patient, aiming image quality within acceptable parameters for diagnosis by noise control. Routine head scans were performed using GE CT scan of 64 channels programmed with automatic exposure control and voltages of 80, 100 and 120 kV attaching the noise index in approximately 0.5%, using the tool of smart mA. An anthropomorphic adult male phantom was used and radiochromic film strips were placed to measure the absorbed dose deposited in areas such as the lens, thyroid and pituitary for study of dose deposited in these important areas containing high radiosensitive tissues. Different head scans were performed using optimized values of mA.s for the different voltages. The absorbed dose measured by the film strips were in the range of the 0.58 and 44.36 mGy. The analysis of noise in the images is within the acceptable levels for diagnosis, and the optimized protocol happens with the voltage of 100 kV. The use of other voltage values can allow obtain better protocols for head scans. (author)

  19. Simulating effects of brain atrophy in longitudinal PET imaging with an anthropomorphic brain phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonasson, L. S.; Axelsson, J.; Riklund, K.; Boraxbekk, C. J.

    2017-07-01

    In longitudinal positron emission tomography (PET), the presence of volumetric changes over time can lead to an overestimation or underestimation of the true changes in the quantified PET signal due to the partial volume effect (PVE) introduced by the limited spatial resolution of existing PET cameras and reconstruction algorithms. Here, a 3D-printed anthropomorphic brain phantom with attachable striata in three sizes was designed to enable controlled volumetric changes. Using a method to eliminate the non-radioactive plastic wall, and manipulating BP levels by adding different number of events from list-mode acquisitions, we investigated the artificial volume dependence of BP due to PVE, and potential bias arising from varying BP. Comparing multiple reconstruction algorithms we found that a high-resolution ordered-subsets maximization algorithm with spatially variant point-spread function resolution modeling provided the most accurate data. For striatum, the BP changed by 0.08% for every 1% volume change, but for smaller volumes such as the posterior caudate the artificial change in BP was as high as 0.7% per 1% volume change. A simple gross correction for striatal volume is unsatisfactory, as the amplitude of the PVE on the BP differs depending on where in the striatum the change occurred. Therefore, to correctly interpret age-related longitudinal changes in the BP, we must account for volumetric changes also within a structure, rather than across the whole volume. The present 3D-printing technology, combined with the wall removal method, can be implemented to gain knowledge about the predictable bias introduced by the PVE differences in uptake regions of varying shape.

  20. NOTE: On the need to revise the arm structure in stylized anthropomorphic phantoms in lateral photon irradiation geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choonsik; Lee, Choonik; Lee, Jai-Ki

    2006-11-01

    Distributions of radiation absorbed dose within human anatomy have been estimated through Monte Carlo radiation transport techniques implemented for two different classes of computational anthropomorphic phantoms: (1) mathematical equation-based stylized phantoms and (2) tomographic image-based voxel phantoms. Voxel phantoms constructed from tomographic images of real human anatomy have been actively developed since the late 1980s to overcome the anatomical approximations necessary with stylized phantoms, which themselves have been utilized since the mid 1960s. However, revisions of stylized phantoms have also been pursued in parallel to the development of voxel phantoms since voxel phantoms (1) are initially restricted to the individual-specific anatomy of the person originally imaged, (2) must be restructured on an organ-by-organ basis to conform to reference individual anatomy and (3) cannot easily represent very fine anatomical structures and tissue layers that are thinner than the voxel dimensions of the overall phantom. Although efforts have been made to improve the anatomic realism of stylized phantoms, most of these efforts have been limited to attempts to alter internal organ structures. Aside from the internal organs, the exterior shapes, and especially the arm structures, of stylized phantoms are also far from realistic descriptions of human anatomy, and may cause dosimetry errors in the calculation of organ-absorbed doses for external irradiation scenarios. The present study was intended to highlight the need to revise the existing arm structure within stylized phantoms by comparing organ doses of stylized adult phantoms with those from three adult voxel phantoms in the lateral photon irradiation geometry. The representative stylized phantom, the adult phantom of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) series and two adult male voxel phantoms, KTMAN-2 and VOXTISS8, were employed for Monte Carlo dose calculation, and data from another voxel phantom, VIP

  1. On the need to revise the arm structure in stylized anthropomorphic phantoms in lateral photon irradiation geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choonsik; Lee, Choonik; Lee, Jai-Ki

    2006-01-01

    Distributions of radiation absorbed dose within human anatomy have been estimated through Monte Carlo radiation transport techniques implemented for two different classes of computational anthropomorphic phantoms: (1) mathematical equation-based stylized phantoms and (2) tomographic image-based voxel phantoms. Voxel phantoms constructed from tomographic images of real human anatomy have been actively developed since the late 1980s to overcome the anatomical approximations necessary with stylized phantoms, which themselves have been utilized since the mid 1960s. However, revisions of stylized phantoms have also been pursued in parallel to the development of voxel phantoms since voxel phantoms (1) are initially restricted to the individual-specific anatomy of the person originally imaged, (2) must be restructured on an organ-by-organ basis to conform to reference individual anatomy and (3) cannot easily represent very fine anatomical structures and tissue layers that are thinner than the voxel dimensions of the overall phantom. Although efforts have been made to improve the anatomic realism of stylized phantoms, most of these efforts have been limited to attempts to alter internal organ structures. Aside from the internal organs, the exterior shapes, and especially the arm structures, of stylized phantoms are also far from realistic descriptions of human anatomy, and may cause dosimetry errors in the calculation of organ-absorbed doses for external irradiation scenarios. The present study was intended to highlight the need to revise the existing arm structure within stylized phantoms by comparing organ doses of stylized adult phantoms with those from three adult voxel phantoms in the lateral photon irradiation geometry. The representative stylized phantom, the adult phantom of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) series and two adult male voxel phantoms, KTMAN-2 and VOXTISS8, were employed for Monte Carlo dose calculation, and data from another voxel phantom, VIP

  2. An anthropomorphic multimodality (CT/MRI) head phantom prototype for end-to-end tests in ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallas, Raya R.; Huenemohr, Nora; Runz, Armin; Niebuhr, Nina I.; Greilich, Steffen; Jaekel, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    With the increasing complexity of external beam therapy ''end-to-end'' tests are intended to cover every step from therapy planning through to follow-up in order to fulfill the higher demands on quality assurance. As magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important part of the treatment process, established phantoms such as the Alderson head cannot fully be used for those tests and novel phantoms have to be developed. Here, we present a feasibility study of a customizable multimodality head phantom. It is initially intended for ion radiotherapy but may also be used in photon therapy. As basis for the anthropomorphic head shape we have used a set of patient computed tomography (CT) images. The phantom recipient consisting of epoxy resin was produced by using a 3D printer. It includes a nasal air cavity, a cranial bone surrogate (based on dipotassium phosphate), a brain surrogate (based on agarose gel), and a surrogate for cerebrospinal fluid (based on distilled water). Furthermore, a volume filled with normoxic dosimetric gel mimicked a tumor. The entire workflow of a proton therapy could be successfully applied to the phantom. CT measurements revealed CT numbers agreeing with reference values for all surrogates in the range from 2 HU to 978 HU (120 kV). MRI showed the desired contrasts between the different phantom materials especially in T2-weighted images (except for the bone surrogate). T2-weighted readout of the polymerization gel dosimeter allowed approximate range verification.

  3. An anthropomorphic multimodality (CT/MRI) head phantom prototype for end-to-end tests in ion radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallas, Raya R.; Huenemohr, Nora; Runz, Armin; Niebuhr, Nina I.; Greilich, Steffen [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). Div. of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology; National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany). Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO); Jaekel, Oliver [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). Div. of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology; National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany). Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO); Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    With the increasing complexity of external beam therapy ''end-to-end'' tests are intended to cover every step from therapy planning through to follow-up in order to fulfill the higher demands on quality assurance. As magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important part of the treatment process, established phantoms such as the Alderson head cannot fully be used for those tests and novel phantoms have to be developed. Here, we present a feasibility study of a customizable multimodality head phantom. It is initially intended for ion radiotherapy but may also be used in photon therapy. As basis for the anthropomorphic head shape we have used a set of patient computed tomography (CT) images. The phantom recipient consisting of epoxy resin was produced by using a 3D printer. It includes a nasal air cavity, a cranial bone surrogate (based on dipotassium phosphate), a brain surrogate (based on agarose gel), and a surrogate for cerebrospinal fluid (based on distilled water). Furthermore, a volume filled with normoxic dosimetric gel mimicked a tumor. The entire workflow of a proton therapy could be successfully applied to the phantom. CT measurements revealed CT numbers agreeing with reference values for all surrogates in the range from 2 HU to 978 HU (120 kV). MRI showed the desired contrasts between the different phantom materials especially in T2-weighted images (except for the bone surrogate). T2-weighted readout of the polymerization gel dosimeter allowed approximate range verification.

  4. An anthropomorphic multimodality (CT/MRI) head phantom prototype for end-to-end tests in ion radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallas, Raya R; Hünemohr, Nora; Runz, Armin; Niebuhr, Nina I; Jäkel, Oliver; Greilich, Steffen

    2015-12-01

    With the increasing complexity of external beam therapy "end-to-end" tests are intended to cover every step from therapy planning through to follow-up in order to fulfill the higher demands on quality assurance. As magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important part of the treatment process, established phantoms such as the Alderson head cannot fully be used for those tests and novel phantoms have to be developed. Here, we present a feasibility study of a customizable multimodality head phantom. It is initially intended for ion radiotherapy but may also be used in photon therapy. As basis for the anthropomorphic head shape we have used a set of patient computed tomography (CT) images. The phantom recipient consisting of epoxy resin was produced by using a 3D printer. It includes a nasal air cavity, a cranial bone surrogate (based on dipotassium phosphate), a brain surrogate (based on agarose gel), and a surrogate for cerebrospinal fluid (based on distilled water). Furthermore, a volume filled with normoxic dosimetric gel mimicked a tumor. The entire workflow of a proton therapy could be successfully applied to the phantom. CT measurements revealed CT numbers agreeing with reference values for all surrogates in the range from 2 HU to 978 HU (120 kV). MRI showed the desired contrasts between the different phantom materials especially in T2-weighted images (except for the bone surrogate). T2-weighted readout of the polymerization gel dosimeter allowed approximate range verification. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  5. COMPARISON OF RESPONSE OF PASSIVE DOSIMETRY SYSTEMS IN SCANNING PROTON RADIOTHERAPY-A STUDY USING PAEDIATRIC ANTHROPOMORPHIC PHANTOMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneževic, Ž; Ambrozova, I; Domingo, C; De Saint-Hubert, M; Majer, M; Martínez-Rovira, I; Miljanic, S; Mojzeszek, N; Porwol, P; Ploc, O; Romero-Expósito, M; Stolarczyk, L; Trinkl, S; Harrison, R M; Olko, P

    2017-11-18

    Proton beam therapy has advantages in comparison to conventional photon radiotherapy due to the physical properties of proton beams (e.g. sharp distal fall off, adjustable range and modulation). In proton therapy, there is the possibility of sparing healthy tissue close to the target volume. This is especially important when tumours are located next to critical organs and while treating cancer in paediatric patients. On the other hand, the interactions of protons with matter result in the production of secondary radiation, mostly neutrons and gamma radiation, which deposit their energy at a distance from the target. The aim of this study was to compare the response of different passive dosimetry systems in mixed radiation field induced by proton pencil beam inside anthropomorphic phantoms representing 5 and 10 years old children. Doses were measured in different organs with thermoluminescent (MTS-7, MTS-6 and MCP-N), radiophotoluminescent (GD-352 M and GD-302M), bubble and poly-allyl-diglycol carbonate (PADC) track detectors. Results show that RPL detectors are the less sensitive for neutrons than LiF TLDs and can be applied for in-phantom dosimetry of gamma component. Neutron doses determined using track detectors, bubble detectors and pairs of MTS-7/MTS-6 are consistent within the uncertainty range. This is the first study dealing with measurements on child anthropomorphic phantoms irradiated by a pencil scanning beam technique. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. The measurement of organic radiation dose of multi-slice CT scanning by using the Chinese anthropomorphic chest phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Gang; Zeng Yongming; Luo Tianyou; Zhao Feng; Zhang Zhiwei; Yu Renqiang; Peng Shengkun

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Using the Chinese anthropomorphic chest phantom to measure the absorbed dose of various tissues and organs under different noise index, and to assess the radiation dose of MSCT chest scanning with the effective dose (ED). Methods: The equivalence of the Chinese anthropomorphic chest phantom (CDP-1 C) and the adult chest on CT sectional anatomy and X-ray attenuation was demonstrated. The absorbed doses of various tissues and organs under different noise index were measured by laying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) inside the phantom, and the corresponding dose-length products (DLP) were recorded. Both of them were later converted into ED and comparison was conducted to analyze the dose levels of chest CT scanning with automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) under different noise index. Student t-test was applied using SPSS 12.0 statistical software. Results: The Phantom was similar to the human body on CT sectional anatomy. The average CT value of phantom are - 788.04 HU in lung, 45.64 HU in heart, 65.84 HU in liver, 254.32 HU in spine and the deviations are 0.10%, 3.04%, 4.49% and 4.36% respectively compared to humans. The difference of average CT value of liver was statistically significant (t=-8.705, P 0.05). As the noise index increased from 8.5 to 22.5, the DLP decreased from 393.57 mGy · cm to 78.75 mGy · cm and the organs dose declined. For example, the average absorbed dose decreased from 22.38 mGy to 3.66 mGy in lung. Compared to ED calculating by absorbed dose, the ED calculating by DLP was lower. The ED values of the two methods were 6.69 mSv and 8.77 mSv when the noise index was set at 8.5. Conclusions: Application of the Chinese anthropomorphic chest phantom to carry out CT dose assessment is more accurate. The noise index should be set more than 8.5 during the chest CT scanning based on ATCM technique. (authors)

  7. Use of VAP3D software in the construction of pathological anthropomorphic phantoms for dosimetric evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Lindeval Fernandes de; Lima, Fernando R.A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper performs a new type of dosimetric evaluation, where it was used a phantom of pathological voxels (representative phantom of sick person). The software VAP3D (Visualization and Analysis of Phantoms 3D) were used for, from a healthy phantom (phantom representative of healthy person), to introduce three dimensional regions to simulate tumors. It was used the Monte Carlo ESGnrc code to simulate the X ray photon transport, his interaction with matter and evaluation of absorbed dose in organs and tissues from thorax region of the healthy phantom and his pathological version. This is a computer model of typical exposure for programming the treatments in radiodiagnostic

  8. Dosimetric study of a brachytherapy treatment of esophagus with Brazilian 192Ir sources using an anthropomorphic phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Lucio P.; Santos, William S.; Gorski, Ronan; Perini, Ana P.; Maia, Ana F.; Caldas, Linda V. E.; Orengo, Gilberto

    2014-11-01

    Several radioisotopes are produced at Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares for the use in medical treatments, including the activation of 192Ir sources. These sources are suitable for brachytherapy treatments, due to their low or high activity, depending on the concentration of 192Ir, easiness to manufacture, small size, stable daughter products and the possibility of re-utilization. They may be used for the treatment of prostate, cervix, head and neck, skin, breast, gallbladder, uterus, vagina, lung, rectum, and eye cancer treatment. In this work, the use of some 192Ir sources was studied for the treatment of esophagus cancer, especially the dose determination of important structures, such as those on the mediastinum. This was carried out utilizing a FASH anthropomorphic phantom and the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code to transport the radiation through matter. It was possible to observe that the doses at lungs, breast, esophagus, thyroid and heart were the highest, which was expected due to their proximity to the source. Therefore, the data are useful to assess the representative dose specific to brachytherapy treatments on the esophagus for radiation protection purposes. The use of brachytherapy sources was studied for the treatment of esophagus cancer. FASH anthropomorphic phantom and MCNP5 Monte Carlo code were employed. The doses at lungs, breast, esophagus, thyroid and heart were the highest. The data is useful to assess the representative doses of treatments on the esophagus.

  9. Digital anthropomorphic phantoms of non-rigid human respiratory and voluntary body motion for investigating motion correction in emission imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Könik, Arda; Johnson, Karen L; Dasari, Paul; Pretorius, P H; Dey, Joyoni; King, Michael A; Connolly, Caitlin M; Segars, Paul W; Lindsay, Clifford

    2014-01-01

    The development of methods for correcting patient motion in emission tomography has been receiving increased attention. Often the performance of these methods is evaluated through simulations using digital anthropomorphic phantoms, such as the commonly used extended cardiac torso (XCAT) phantom, which models both respiratory and cardiac motion based on human studies. However, non-rigid body motion, which is frequently seen in clinical studies, is not present in the standard XCAT phantom. In addition, respiratory motion in the standard phantom is limited to a single generic trend. In this work, to obtain a more realistic representation of motion, we developed a series of individual-specific XCAT phantoms, modeling non-rigid respiratory and non-rigid body motions derived from the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisitions of volunteers. Acquisitions were performed in the sagittal orientation using the Navigator methodology. Baseline (no motion) acquisitions at end-expiration were obtained at the beginning of each imaging session for each volunteer. For the body motion studies, MRI was again acquired only at end-expiration for five body motion poses (shoulder stretch, shoulder twist, lateral bend, side roll, and axial slide). For the respiratory motion studies, an MRI was acquired during free/regular breathing. The magnetic resonance slices were then retrospectively sorted into 14 amplitude-binned respiratory states, end-expiration, end-inspiration, six intermediary states during inspiration, and six during expiration using the recorded Navigator signal. XCAT phantoms were then generated based on these MRI data by interactive alignment of the organ contours of the XCAT with the MRI slices using a graphical user interface. Thus far we have created five body motion and five respiratory motion XCAT phantoms from the MRI acquisitions of six healthy volunteers (three males and three females). Non-rigid motion exhibited by the volunteers was reflected in both respiratory

  10. Digital anthropomorphic phantoms of non-rigid human respiratory and voluntary body motion for investigating motion correction in emission imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Könik, Arda; Connolly, Caitlin M.; Johnson, Karen L.; Dasari, Paul; Segars, Paul W.; Pretorius, P. H.; Lindsay, Clifford; Dey, Joyoni; King, Michael A.

    2014-07-01

    The development of methods for correcting patient motion in emission tomography has been receiving increased attention. Often the performance of these methods is evaluated through simulations using digital anthropomorphic phantoms, such as the commonly used extended cardiac torso (XCAT) phantom, which models both respiratory and cardiac motion based on human studies. However, non-rigid body motion, which is frequently seen in clinical studies, is not present in the standard XCAT phantom. In addition, respiratory motion in the standard phantom is limited to a single generic trend. In this work, to obtain a more realistic representation of motion, we developed a series of individual-specific XCAT phantoms, modeling non-rigid respiratory and non-rigid body motions derived from the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisitions of volunteers. Acquisitions were performed in the sagittal orientation using the Navigator methodology. Baseline (no motion) acquisitions at end-expiration were obtained at the beginning of each imaging session for each volunteer. For the body motion studies, MRI was again acquired only at end-expiration for five body motion poses (shoulder stretch, shoulder twist, lateral bend, side roll, and axial slide). For the respiratory motion studies, an MRI was acquired during free/regular breathing. The magnetic resonance slices were then retrospectively sorted into 14 amplitude-binned respiratory states, end-expiration, end-inspiration, six intermediary states during inspiration, and six during expiration using the recorded Navigator signal. XCAT phantoms were then generated based on these MRI data by interactive alignment of the organ contours of the XCAT with the MRI slices using a graphical user interface. Thus far we have created five body motion and five respiratory motion XCAT phantoms from the MRI acquisitions of six healthy volunteers (three males and three females). Non-rigid motion exhibited by the volunteers was reflected in both respiratory

  11. Tomographic anthropomorphic models. Pt. 4. Organ doses for adults due to idealized external photon exposures

    CERN Document Server

    Zankl, M; Petoussi-Henss, N; Regulla, D

    2002-01-01

    The present report contains extensive tables and figures of conversion coefficients of organ and tissue equivalent dose, normalised to air kerma free in air for voxel anthropomorphic phantoms and for standard geometries of external photon radiation, estimated with Monte Carlo techniques. Four realistic adult voxel phantoms were used for the calculations, based on computed tomographic data of real people: three male phantoms, two of them being of average size, one representing a big man, and one female phantom of a tall and somewhat over weighted woman.

  12. Tomographic anthropomorphic models. Pt. 4. Organ doses for adults due to idealized external photon exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zankl, M.; Petoussi-Henss, N.; Fill, U.; Regulla, D.

    2002-01-01

    The present report contains extensive tables and figures of conversion coefficients of organ and tissue equivalent dose, normalised to air kerma free in air for voxel anthropomorphic phantoms and for standard geometries of external photon radiation, estimated with Monte Carlo techniques. Four realistic adult voxel phantoms were used for the calculations, based on computed tomographic data of real people: three male phantoms, two of them being of average size, one representing a big man, and one female phantom of a tall and somewhat over weighted woman. (orig.)

  13. Design of a multimodal ({sup 1}H/{sup 23}Na MR/CT) anthropomorphic thorax phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, Wiebke; Lietzmann, Florian; Schad, Lothar R.; Zoellner, Frank G. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine

    2017-08-01

    This work proposes a modular, anthropomorphic MR and CT thorax phantom that enables the comparison of experimental studies for quantitative evaluation of deformable, multimodal image registration algorithms and realistic multi-nuclear MR imaging techniques. A human thorax phantom was developed with insertable modules representing lung, liver, ribs and additional tracking spheres. The quality of human tissue mimicking characteristics was evaluated for {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MR as well as CT imaging. The position of landmarks in the lung lobes was tracked during CT image acquisition at several positions during breathing cycles. {sup 1}H MR measurements of the liver were repeated after seven months to determine long term stability. The modules possess HU, T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} values comparable to human tissues (lung module: -756 ± 148 HU, artificial ribs: 218 ± 56 HU (low CaCO{sub 3} concentration) and 339 ± 121 (high CaCO{sub 3} concentration), liver module: T{sub 1} = 790 ± 28 ms, T{sub 2} = 65 ± 1 ms). Motion analysis showed that the landmarks in the lung lobes follow a 3D trajectory similar to human breathing motion. The tracking spheres are well detectable in both CT and MRI. The parameters of the tracking spheres can be adjusted in the following ranges to result in a distinct signal: HU values from 150 to 900 HU, T{sub 1} relaxation time from 550 ms to 2000 ms, T{sub 2} relaxation time from 40 ms to 200 ms. The presented anthropomorphic multimodal thorax phantom fulfills the demands of a simple, inexpensive system with interchangeable components. In future, the modular design allows for complementing the present set up with additional modules focusing on specific research targets such as perfusion studies, {sup 23}Na MR quantification experiments and an increasing level of complexity for motion studies.

  14. Inter- and intrascanner variability of pulmonary nodule volumetry on low-dose 64-row CT: an anthropomorphic phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, X; Willemink, M J; Zhao, Y; de Jong, P A; van Ooijen, P M A; Oudkerk, M; Greuter, M J W

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess inter- and intrascanner variability in volumetry of solid pulmonary nodules in an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom using low-dose CT. Methods: Five spherical solid artificial nodules [diameters 3, 5, 8, 10 and 12 mm; CT density +100 Hounsfield units (HU)] were randomly placed inside an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom in different combinations. The phantom was examined on two 64-row multidetector CT (64-MDCT) systems (CT-A and CT-B) from different vendors with a low-dose protocol. Each CT examination was performed three times. The CT examinations were evaluated twice by independent blinded observers. Nodule volume was semi-automatically measured by dedicated software. Interscanner variability was evaluated by Bland–Altman analysis and expressed as 95% confidence interval (CI) of relative differences. Intrascanner variability was expressed as 95% CI of relative variation from the mean. Results: No significant difference in CT-derived volume was found between CT-A and CT-B, except for the 3-mm nodules (pvolumetry of artificial pulmonary nodules between 5 mm and 12 mm in diameter. Inter- and intrascanner variability decreases at a larger nodule size to a maximum of 4.9% for ≥8 mm nodules. Advances in knowledge: The commonly accepted cut-off of 25% to determine nodule growth has the potential to be reduced for ≥8 mm nodules. This offers the possibility of reducing the interval for repeated CT scans in lung cancer screenings. PMID:23884758

  15. Location of radiosensitive organs, measurement of absorbed dose to radiosensitive organs and use of bismuth shields in paediatric anthropomorphic phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inkoom, S.

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate: firstly, (i) location of radiosensitive organs in the interior of four (4) paediatric anthropomorphic phantoms, and, secondly, (ii) effectiveness of single and double bismuth thyroid shields, distance between shield and phantom surface, during paediatric multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) using fixed tube current (FTC) and automatic exposure control (AEC) on dose reduction and image quality. Four (4) paediatric anthropomorphic phantoms representing the equivalent of a newborn, 1-, 5-, and 10-y-old child underwent head, thorax and abdomen computed tomography (CT) scans. CT and magnetic resonance imaging scans of all children aged 0-16 y-old performed during a 5-y-period at the University Hospital of Heraklion, Crete, Greece were reviewed, and five hundred and three (503) were found to be eligible for normal anatomy. Anterior-posterior and lateral dimensions of twelve (12) of the above children closely matched that of the phantoms' thoracic and abdominal region in each four (4) phantoms. The mid-sagittal plane (MSP) and mid-coronal plane (MCP) were drawn on selected matching axial images of patients and phantoms. Multiple points outlining large radiosensitive organs and centres of small organs in patient images were identified at each slice level and their orthogonal distances from the MSP and MCP were measured. The outlines and centres of all radiosensitive organs were reproduced using the coordinates of each organ on the corresponding phantom's transverse images. The four (4) phantoms were also subjected to routine head and neck, neck and thorax CT scans on a 16-slice CT system. Each phantom was first scanned with both FTC and AEC for with and without bismuth shields. Each scan was repeated ten (10) times to increase thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) signal and reduce measurement statistical error. For neck CT, the effect of using single and double thickness of bismuth shields and 1-3 cm cotton spacers

  16. Adult phantoms as function of body mass, height and posture by using caucasian anthropomorphic statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, Richard; Cassola, Vagner Ferreira; Lira, Carlos Alberto Brayner de Oliveira; Khoury, Helen Jamil; Milian, Felix Mas

    2011-01-01

    The CALLDose X 4.0 computer program uses conversion coefficients for the MASH and FASH adult phantoms on the vertical and supine postures, representing the standard man and woman according to ICRP 90 and are called 'basic phantoms'. For improving the representation of real patients in the CALLDose X , this paper developed adults phantoms as function of mass and height by using anthropometric data from nine of them prevailing caucasian countries

  17. Anthropomorphic Phantoms for Confirmation of Linear Accelerator-Based Small Animal Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perks, Julian R; Lucero, Steven; Monjazeb, Arta M; Li, Jian Jian

    2015-03-01

    Three dimensional (3D) scanning and printing technology is utilized to create phantom models of mice in order to assess the accuracy of ionizing radiation dosing from a clinical, human-based linear accelerator. Phantoms are designed to simulate a range of research questions, including irradiation of lung tumors and primary subcutaneous or orthotopic tumors for immunotherapy experimentation. The phantoms are used to measure the accuracy of dose delivery and then refine it to within 1% of the prescribed dose.

  18. Positioning of the detectors inside an anthropomorphic phantom in order to measure the effective dose at workplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furstoss, C.; Menard, S.

    2006-01-01

    Passive and active dosimeters worn on the trunk by the workers exposed to radiation fields at their workplaces measure the personal dose equivalent Hp(10), which was introduced by ICRP 60 to provide an appropriate estimate of the protection quantity: the effective dose E. However, the angular and energy distributions of the radiation fields encountered at workplaces can generate an over or an under-estimation of E because of the response of the dosimeters or/and because of the definition of H p(10) itself. That is why the Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (I.R.S.N.) is evaluating the possibility of the measurement of the effective dose E using an instrumented anthropomorphic phantom. The determination of the effective dose E in mixed neutron/photon fields requires to identify the nature and the energy distribution of the incident fields in order to apply the right radiation weighting factor to the mean absorbed doses. So electronic detectors will have to be placed on the surface and inside the phantom in order to identify the nature of the radiation field and to measure the mean absorbed dose within the organs. The positions and the technical characteristics of the detectors are determined by simulating the spatial distributions of the energy losses within organs and tissues of the phantom. The simulations are carried out with the Monte Carlo code M.C.N.P.X. using mesh tallies (virtual grid superimposed to the phantom geometry) and a mathematical model of an anthropomorphic phantom based on the specifications of Cristy and Eckerman. The processing of the first numerical results corresponding to photon irradiations in standard configurations (A.P., P.A. and L.A.T.) shows that for the following organs: the lungs, the liver, the small intestine and the brain, just one detector is enough and that this detector is not necessarily located at the center of the organ. On the other hand, the determination of the energy deposited in the red bone marrow

  19. Accuracy of lung nodule volumetry in low-dose CT with iterative reconstruction: an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doo, K W; Kang, E-Y; Yong, H S; Woo, O H; Lee, K Y; Oh, Y-W

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess accuracy of lung nodule volumetry in low-dose CT with application of iterative reconstruction (IR) according to nodule size, nodule density and CT tube currents, using artificial lung nodules within an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom. Eight artificial nodules (four diameters: 5, 8, 10 and 12 mm; two CT densities: -630 HU that represents ground-glass nodule and +100 HU that represents solid nodule) were randomly placed inside a thoracic phantom. Scans were performed with tube current-time product to 10, 20, 30 and 50 mAs. Images were reconstructed with IR and filtered back projection (FBP). We compared volume estimates to a reference standard and calculated the absolute percentage error (APE). The APE of all nodules was significantly lower when IR was used than with FBP (7.5 ± 4.7% compared with 9.0 ±6.9%; p volumetry in low-dose CT by application of IR showed reliable accuracy in a phantom study. Lung nodule volumetry can be reliably applicable to all lung nodules including small, ground-glass nodules even in ultra-low-dose CT with application of IR. IR significantly improved the accuracy of lung nodule volumetry compared with FBP particularly for ground-glass (-630 HU) nodules. Volumetry in low-dose CT can be utilized in patient with lung nodule work-up, and IR has benefit for small, ground-glass lung nodules in low-dose CT.

  20. Sensitivity and accuracy of volumetry of pulmonary nodules on low-dose 16- and 64-row multi-detector CT : an anthropomorphic phantom study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, X.; Zhao, Yingru; Snijder, R.A.; van Ooijen, P.M.; de Jong, P.A.; Oudkerk, M.; de Bock, G.H.; Vliegenthart, R.; Greuter, M.J.

    To assess the sensitivity of detection and accuracy of volumetry by manual and semi-automated quantification of artificial pulmonary nodules in an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom on low-dose CT. Fifteen artificial spherical nodules (diameter 3, 5, 8, 10 and 12 mm; CT densities -800, -630 and +100

  1. CT head-scan dosimetry in an anthropomorphic phantom and associated measurement of ACR accreditation-phantom imaging metrics under clinically representative scan conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunner, Claudia C.; Stern, Stanley H.; Chakrabarti, Kish [U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States); Minniti, Ronaldo [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Parry, Marie I. [Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, 8901 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20889 (United States); Skopec, Marlene [National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To measure radiation absorbed dose and its distribution in an anthropomorphic head phantom under clinically representative scan conditions in three widely used computed tomography (CT) scanners, and to relate those dose values to metrics such as high-contrast resolution, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the American College of Radiology CT accreditation phantom.Methods: By inserting optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) in the head of an anthropomorphic phantom specially developed for CT dosimetry (University of Florida, Gainesville), we measured dose with three commonly used scanners (GE Discovery CT750 HD, Siemens Definition, Philips Brilliance 64) at two different clinical sites (Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, National Institutes of Health). The scanners were set to operate with the same data-acquisition and image-reconstruction protocols as used clinically for typical head scans, respective of the practices of each facility for each scanner. We also analyzed images of the ACR CT accreditation phantom with the corresponding protocols. While the Siemens Definition and the Philips Brilliance protocols utilized only conventional, filtered back-projection (FBP) image-reconstruction methods, the GE Discovery also employed its particular version of an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) algorithm that can be blended in desired proportions with the FBP algorithm. We did an objective image-metrics analysis evaluating the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and CNR for images reconstructed with FBP. For images reconstructed with ASIR, we only analyzed the CNR, since MTF and NPS results are expected to depend on the object for iterative reconstruction algorithms.Results: The OSLD measurements showed that the Siemens Definition and the Philips Brilliance scanners (located at two different clinical facilities) yield average absorbed doses in tissue of 42.6 and 43.1 m

  2. Effect of titanium dental implants on proton therapy delivered for head tumors: experimental validation using an anthropomorphic head phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oancea, C.; Shipulin, K.; Mytsin, G.; Molokanov, A.; Niculae, D.; Ambrožová, I.; Davídková, M.

    2017-03-01

    A dosimetric experiment was performed at the Medico-Technical Complex in the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, to investigate the effects of metallic dental implants in the treatment of head and neck tumours with proton therapy. The goal of the study was to evaluate the 2D dose distributions of different clinical treatment plans measured in an anthropomorphic phantom, and compare them to predictions from a treatment planning system. The anthropomorphic phantom was sliced into horizontal segments. Two grade 4 Titanium implants were inserted between 2 slices, corresponding to a maxillary area. GafChromic EBT2 films were placed between the segments containing the implants to measure the 2D delivered dose. Two different targets were designed: the first target includes the dental implants in the isocentre, and in the second target, the proton beam is delivered through the implants, which are located at the entrance region of the Bragg curve. The experimental results were compared to the treatment plans made using our custom 3D Treatment Planning System, named RayTreat. To quantitatively determine differences in the isodose distributions (measured and calculated), the gamma index (3 mm, 3%) was calculated for each target for the matrix value in the region of high isodose (> 90%): for the experimental setup, which includes the implants in the SOBP region, the result obtained was 84.3%. When the implants were localised in the entrance region of the Bragg curve, the result obtained was 86.4%. In conclusion, the uncertainties introduced by the clinically planned dose distribution are beyond reasonable limits. The linear energy transfer spectra in close proximity to the implants were investigated using solid state nuclear track detectors (TED). Scattered particles outside the target were detected.

  3. Effect of titanium dental implants on proton therapy delivered for head tumors: experimental validation using an anthropomorphic head phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oancea, C.; Shipulin, K.; Mytsin, G.; Molokanov, A.; Niculae, D.; Ambrožová, I.; Davídková, M.

    2017-01-01

    A dosimetric experiment was performed at the Medico-Technical Complex in the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, to investigate the effects of metallic dental implants in the treatment of head and neck tumours with proton therapy. The goal of the study was to evaluate the 2D dose distributions of different clinical treatment plans measured in an anthropomorphic phantom, and compare them to predictions from a treatment planning system. The anthropomorphic phantom was sliced into horizontal segments. Two grade 4 Titanium implants were inserted between 2 slices, corresponding to a maxillary area. GafChromic EBT2 films were placed between the segments containing the implants to measure the 2D delivered dose. Two different targets were designed: the first target includes the dental implants in the isocentre, and in the second target, the proton beam is delivered through the implants, which are located at the entrance region of the Bragg curve. The experimental results were compared to the treatment plans made using our custom 3D Treatment Planning System, named RayTreat. To quantitatively determine differences in the isodose distributions (measured and calculated), the gamma index (3 mm, 3%) was calculated for each target for the matrix value in the region of high isodose (> 90%): for the experimental setup, which includes the implants in the SOBP region, the result obtained was 84.3%. When the implants were localised in the entrance region of the Bragg curve, the result obtained was 86.4%. In conclusion, the uncertainties introduced by the clinically planned dose distribution are beyond reasonable limits. The linear energy transfer spectra in close proximity to the implants were investigated using solid state nuclear track detectors (TED). Scattered particles outside the target were detected.

  4. Development of an Anthropomorphic Breast Phantom for Combined PET, B-Mode Ultrasound and Elastographic Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Dang, J; Lecoq, P; Tavernier, S; Lasaygues, P; Mensah, S; Zhang, D C; Auffray, E; Frisch, B; Varela, J; Wan, M X; Felix, N

    2011-01-01

    International audience; Combining the advantages of different imaging modalities leads to improved clinical results. For example, ultrasound provides good real-time structural information without any radiation and PET provides sensitive functional information. For the ongoing ClearPEM-Sonic project combining ultrasound and PET for breast imaging, we developed a dual-modality PET/Ultrasound (US) phantom. The phantom reproduces the acoustic and elastic properties of human breast tissue and allo...

  5. Results From the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Houston's Anthropomorphic Phantoms Used for Proton Therapy Clinical Trial Credentialing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Paige A., E-mail: pataylor@mdanderson.org; Kry, Stephen F.; Alvarez, Paola; Keith, Tyler; Lujano, Carrie; Hernandez, Nadia; Followill, David S.

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to summarize the findings of anthropomorphic proton phantom irradiations analyzed by the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Houston QA Center (IROC Houston). Methods and Materials: A total of 103 phantoms were irradiated by proton therapy centers participating in clinical trials. The anthropomorphic phantoms simulated heterogeneous anatomy of a head, liver, lung, prostate, and spine. Treatment plans included those for scattered, uniform scanning, and pencil beam scanning beam delivery modalities using 5 different treatment planning systems. For every phantom irradiation, point doses and planar doses were measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) and film, respectively. Differences between measured and planned doses were studied as a function of phantom, beam delivery modality, motion, repeat attempt, treatment planning system, and date of irradiation. Results: The phantom pass rate (overall, 79%) was high for simple phantoms and lower for phantoms that introduced higher levels of difficulty, such as motion, multiple targets, or increased heterogeneity. All treatment planning systems overestimated dose to the target, compared to TLD measurements. Errors in range calculation resulted in several failed phantoms. There was no correlation between treatment planning system and pass rate. The pass rates for each individual phantom are not improving over time, but when individual institutions received feedback about failed phantom irradiations, pass rates did improve. Conclusions: The proton phantom pass rates are not as high as desired and emphasize potential deficiencies in proton therapy planning and/or delivery. There are many areas for improvement with the proton phantom irradiations, such as treatment planning system dose agreement, range calculations, accounting for motion, and irradiation of multiple targets.

  6. Using 3D printing techniques to create an anthropomorphic thorax phantom for medical imaging purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazelaar, Colien; van Eijnatten, Maureen; Dahele, Max; Wolff, Jan; Forouzanfar, Tymour; Slotman, Ben; Verbakel, Wilko F A R

    2018-01-01

    Imaging phantoms are widely used for testing and optimization of imaging devices without the need to expose humans to irradiation. However, commercially available phantoms are commonly manufactured in simple, generic forms and sizes and therefore do not resemble the clinical situation for many patients. Using 3D printing techniques, we created a life-size phantom based on a clinical CT scan of the thorax from a patient with lung cancer. It was assembled from bony structures printed in gypsum, lung structures consisting of airways, blood vessels >1 mm, and outer lung surface, three lung tumors printed in nylon, and soft tissues represented by silicone (poured into a 3D-printed mold). Kilovoltage x-ray and CT images of the phantom closely resemble those of the real patient in terms of size, shapes, and structures. Surface comparison using 3D models obtained from the phantom and the 3D models used for printing showed mean differences 3D printing and molding techniques. The phantom closely resembles a real patient in terms of spatial accuracy and is currently being used to evaluate x-ray-based imaging quality and positional verification techniques for radiotherapy. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  7. Tissue equivalence in neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nutton, D.H.; Harris, S.J.

    1980-01-01

    A brief review is presented of the essential features of neutron tissue equivalence for radiotherapy and gives the results of a computation of relative absorbed dose for 14 MeV neutrons, using various tissue models. It is concluded that for the Bragg-Gray equation for ionometric dosimetry it is not sufficient to define the value of W to high accuracy and that it is essential that, for dosimetric measurements to be applicable to real body tissue to an accuracy of better than several per cent, a correction to the total absorbed dose must be made according to the test and tissue atomic composition, although variations in patient anatomy and other radiotherapy parameters will often limit the benefits of such detailed dosimetry. (U.K.)

  8. Development of an Anthropomorphic Breast Phantom for Combined PET, B-Mode Ultrasound and Elastographic Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Jun; Frisch, Benjamin; Lasaygues, Philippe; Zhang, Dachun; Tavernier, Stefaan; Felix, Nicolas; Lecoq, Paul; Auffray, Etiennette; Varela, Joao; Mensah, Serge; Wan, Mingxi

    2011-06-01

    Combining the advantages of different imaging modalities leads to improved clinical results. For example, ultrasound provides good real-time structural information without any radiation and PET provides sensitive functional information. For the ongoing ClearPEM-Sonic project combining ultrasound and PET for breast imaging, we developed a dual-modality PET/Ultrasound (US) phantom. The phantom reproduces the acoustic and elastic properties of human breast tissue and allows labeling the different tissues in the phantom with different concentrations of FDG. The phantom was imaged with a whole-body PET/CT and with the Supersonic Imagine Aixplorer system. This system allows both B-mode US and shear wave elastographic imaging. US elastography is a new imaging method for displaying the tissue elasticity distribution. It was shown to be useful in breast imaging. We also tested the phantom with static elastography. A 6D magnetic positioning system allows fusing the images obtained with the two modalities. ClearPEM-Sonic is a project of the Crystal Clear Collaboration and the European Centre for Research on Medical Imaging (CERIMED).

  9. Development of an Anthropomorphic Breast Phantom for Combined PET, B-Mode Ultrasound and Elastographic Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Dang, J; Tavernier, S; Lasaygues, P; Mensah, S; Zhang, D C; Auffray, E; Frisch, B; Varela, J; Wan, M X; Felix, N

    2011-01-01

    Combining the advantages of different imaging modalities leads to improved clinical results. For example, ultrasound provides good real-time structural information without any radiation and PET provides sensitive functional information. For the ongoing ClearPEM-Sonic project combining ultrasound and PET for breast imaging, we developed a dual-modality PET/Ultrasound (US) phantom. The phantom reproduces the acoustic and elastic properties of human breast tissue and allows labeling the different tissues in the phantom with different concentrations of FDG. The phantom was imaged with a whole-body PET/CT and with the Supersonic Imagine Aixplorer system. This system allows both B-mode US and shear wave elastographic imaging. US elastography is a new imaging method for displaying the tissue elasticity distribution. It was shown to be useful in breast imaging. We also tested the phantom with static elastography. A 6D magnetic positioning system allows fusing the images obtained with the two modalities. ClearPEM-Soni...

  10. A Simulation Study on Patient Setup Errors in External Beam Radiotherapy Using an Anthropomorphic 4D Phantom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payam Samadi Miandoab

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Patient set-up optimization is required in radiotherapy to fill the accuracy gap between personalized treatment planning and uncertainties in the irradiation set-up. In this study, we aimed to develop a new method based on neural network to estimate patient geometrical setup using 4-dimensional (4D XCAT anthropomorphic phantom. Materials and Methods To access 4D modeling of motion of dynamic organs, a phantom employs non-uniform rational B-splines (NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso method with spline-based model to generate 4D computed tomography (CT images. First, to generate all the possible roto-translation positions, the 4D CT images were imported to Medical Image Data Examiner (AMIDE. Then, for automatic, real time verification of geometrical setup, an artificial neural network (ANN was proposed to estimate patient displacement, using training sets. Moreover, three external motion markers were synchronized with a patient couch position as reference points. In addition, the technique was validated through simulated activities by using reference 4D CT data acquired from five patients. Results The results indicated that patient geometrical set-up is highly depended on the comprehensiveness of training set. By using ANN model, the average patient setup error in XCAT phantom was reduced from 17.26 mm to 0.50 mm. In addition, in the five real patients, these average errors were decreased from 18.26 mm to 1.48 mm various breathing phases ranging from inhalation to exhalation were taken into account for patient setup. Uncertainty error assessment and different setup errors were obtained from each respiration phase. Conclusion This study proposed a new method for alignment of patient setup error using ANN model. Additionally, our correlation model (ANN could estimate true patient position with less error.

  11. Numerical absorbed dose distributions inside principal organs of a mathematical anthropomorphic phantom irradiated by monoenergetic photon fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furstoss, C.; Menard, S.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Personnel can be exposed to photon or mixed (neutrons and photons) radiations at workplaces for various activities (nuclear fuel cycle, medical sector, research... ). The passive and active personal dosimeters worn on the trunk evaluate the personal dose equivalent Hp(10), defined by ICRP 601 to be an estimator of the effective dose E. However, the angular and energy distributions of the radiations encountered could generate an over or under-estimation of the protection quantity E because of the response of the dosimeters or/and because of the definition of Hp(10) itself. The Institute of Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) is evaluating the possibility of the measurement of the effective dose E using an instrumented anthropomorphic phantom at workplaces. Such an instrument would allow the control of the suitability of the radiological protection instrumentation used at workplaces for radiation fields which can appreciably differ from the reference ISO radiation fields used to calibrate dosimeters. The objectives of this study are to determine key positions for the future detectors inside and on the phantom, as well as their needed technical characteristics. The simulations of the organ absorbed dose distributions performed using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX2 and the MIRD phantom3 model will allow the determination of the detector locations. This paper will present the first numerical results obtained for monoenergetic parallel photon fields. The effective doses E calculated in an energy range from 15 keV to 10 MeV will be presented and compared with the results of M. Zankl et al., published in the GSF report Bericht 8/974. (author)

  12. Patient specific 3D printed phantom for IMRT quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehler, Eric D; Higgins, Patrick D; Dusenbery, Kathryn E; Barney, Brett M

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of a patient specific phantom for patient specific dosimetric verification. Using the head and neck region of an anthropomorphic phantom as a substitute for an actual patient, a soft-tissue equivalent model was constructed with the use of a 3D printer. Calculated and measured dose in the anthropomorphic phantom and the 3D printed phantom was compared for a parallel-opposed head and neck field geometry to establish tissue equivalence. A nine-field IMRT plan was constructed and dose verification measurements were performed for the 3D printed phantom as well as traditional standard phantoms. The maximum difference in calculated dose was 1.8% for the parallel-opposed configuration. Passing rates of various dosimetric parameters were compared for the IMRT plan measurements; the 3D printed phantom results showed greater disagreement at superficial depths than other methods. A custom phantom was created using a 3D printer. It was determined that the use of patient specific phantoms to perform dosimetric verification and estimate the dose in the patient is feasible. In addition, end-to-end testing on a per-patient basis was possible with the 3D printed phantom. Further refinement of the phantom construction process is needed for routine use. (paper)

  13. Sensitivity and accuracy of volumetry of pulmonary nodules on low-dose 16- and 64-row multi-detector CT: an anthropomorphic phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Xueqian; Zhao, Yingru; Ooijen, Peter M.A. van; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Radiology, EB44, P.O. Box 30.001, Groningen (Netherlands); University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging-North East Netherlands, Department of Radiology, Groningen (Netherlands); Snijder, Roland A.; Greuter, Marcel J.W. [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Radiology, EB44, P.O. Box 30.001, Groningen (Netherlands); Jong, Pim A. de [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Oudkerk, Matthijs [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging-North East Netherlands, Department of Radiology, Groningen (Netherlands); Bock, Geertruida H. de [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Epidemiology, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2013-01-15

    To assess the sensitivity of detection and accuracy of volumetry by manual and semi-automated quantification of artificial pulmonary nodules in an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom on low-dose CT. Fifteen artificial spherical nodules (diameter 3, 5, 8, 10 and 12 mm; CT densities -800, -630 and +100 HU) were randomly placed inside an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom. The phantom was examined on 16- and 64-row multidetector CT with a low-dose protocol. Two independent blinded observers screened for pulmonary nodules. Nodule diameter was measured manually, and volume calculated. For solid nodules (+100 HU), diameter and volume were also evaluated by semi-automated software. Differences in observed volumes between the manual and semi-automated method were evaluated by a t-test. Sensitivity was 100 % for all nodules of >5 mm and larger, 60-80 % for solid and 0-20 % for non-solid 3-mm nodules. No false-positive nodules but high inter-observer reliability and inter-technique correlation were found. Volume was underestimated manually by 24.1 {+-} 14.0 % for nodules of any density, and 26.4 {+-} 15.5 % for solid nodules, compared with 7.6 {+-} 8.5 % (P < 0.01) semi-automatically. In an anthropomorphic phantom study, the sensitivity of detection is 100 % for nodules of >5 mm in diameter. Semi-automated volumetry yielded more accurate nodule volumes than manual measurements. (orig.)

  14. Activation rate uniformity in a bilateral IVNAA facility for two anthropomorphic phantoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miri Hakimabad Hashem

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation rate uniformity is the first property which is considered in the design of a prompt γ-ray in vivo neutron activation analysis facility. Preliminary studies on the activation rate distribution in the body can be done by use of Monte Carlo codes, such as the MCNP. In this paper, different bilateral configurations of an IVNAA system are considered in order to improve the activation rate uniformity in a water phantom measuring 32 cm x 100 cm x 16 cm. In the best case, uniformity parameters are U = 1.003 and R = 1.67, with the mean activation rate of 1.85×10-6 cm-3. In more accurate calculations, the water phantom is replaced by a body model. The model in question is a 5 year-old ORNL phantom filled with just soft tissue. For uniformity studies, the internal organs are not simulated. Finally, uniformity parameters in this case are U = 1.005 and R = 12.2.

  15. Evaluation of organ doses and specific k effective dose of 64-slice CT thorax examination using an adult anthropomorphic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashim, S.; Karim, M.K.A.; Bakar, K.A.; Sabarudin, A.; Chin, A.W; Saripan, M.I.; Bradley, D.A.

    2016-01-01

    The magnitude of radiation dose in computed tomography (CT) depends on the scan acquisition parameters, investigated herein using an anthropomorphic phantom (RANDO®) and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD). Specific interest was in the organ doses resulting from CT thorax examination, the specific k coefficient for effective dose estimation for particular protocols also being determined. For measurement of doses representing five main organs (thyroid, lung, liver, esophagus and skin), TLD-100 (LiF:Mg, Ti) were inserted into selected holes in a phantom slab. Five CT thorax protocols were investigated, one routine (R1) and four that were modified protocols (R2 to R5). Organ doses were ranked from greatest to least, found to lie in the order: thyroid>skin>lung>liver>breast. The greatest dose, for thyroid at 25 mGy, was that in use of R1 while the lowest, at 8.8 mGy, was in breast tissue using R3. Effective dose (E) was estimated using three standard methods: the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP)-103 recommendation (E103), the computational phantom CT-EXPO (E(CTEXPO)) method, and the dose-length product (DLP) based approach. E103 k factors were constant for all protocols, ~8% less than that of the universal k factor. Due to inconsistency in tube potential and pitch factor the k factors from CTEXPO were found to vary between 0.015 and 0.010 for protocols R3 and R5. With considerable variation between scan acquisition parameters and organ doses, optimization of practice is necessary in order to reduce patient organ dose. - Highlights: • Using TLD-100 dosimeters and a RANDO phantom 5 CT thorax protocol organ doses were assessed. • The specific k coefficient for effective dose estimation of protocols differed with approach. • Organ dose was observed to decrease in the order: thyroid>skin>lung>liver>breast. • E103 k factors were constant for all protocols, lower by ~8% compared to the universal k factor.

  16. Evaluation of effective dose in an anthropomorphic phantom in radiological emergencies situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Livia K. da; Ribeiro, Rosane M.; Santos, Denison de S.

    2013-01-01

    This work aims to implement the code of Monte Carlo Geant4 in a male and female phantom, ADAM and EVA, to be able to evaluate the dose in individuals who have been exposed externally to ionizing radiation sources so that in the future be made a review within the limits of validity of the terms contained in TECDOC-1162, published by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), which recommends formulas for the effective dose assessment in individuals who have been exposed to external radiation sources in various geometric configurations and for various radionuclides

  17. Measurement of entrance surface dose on an anthropomorphic thorax phantom using a miniature fiber-optic dosimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Wook Jae; Shin, Sang Hun; Jeon, Dayeong; Hong, Seunghan; Sim, Hyeok In; Kim, Seon Geun; Jang, Kyoung Won; Cho, Seunghyun; Youn, Won Sik; Lee, Bongsoo

    2014-04-01

    A miniature fiber-optic dosimeter (FOD) system was fabricated using a plastic scintillating fiber, a plastic optical fiber, and a multi-pixel photon counter to measure real-time entrance surface dose (ESD) during radiation diagnosis. Under varying exposure parameters of a digital radiography (DR) system, we measured the scintillating light related to the ESD using the sensing probe of the FOD, which was placed at the center of the beam field on an anthropomorphic thorax phantom. Also, we obtained DR images using a flat panel detector of the DR system to evaluate the effects of the dosimeter on image artifacts during posteroanterior (PA) chest radiography. From the experimental results, the scintillation output signals of the FOD were similar to the ESDs including backscatter simultaneously obtained using a semiconductor dosimeter. We demonstrated that the proposed miniature FOD can be used to measure real-time ESDs with minimization of DR image artifacts in the X-ray energy range of diagnostic radiology.

  18. Radiation Pattern Measurement of a Low-Profile Wearable Antenna Using an Optical Fibre and a Solid Anthropomorphic Phantom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Hong Loh

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study into radiation pattern measurements of an electrically small dielectric resonator antenna (DRA operating between 2.4 and 2.5 GHz in the industrial, scientific and medical (ISM radio band for body-centric wireless communication applications. To eliminate the distortion of the radiation pattern associated with the unwanted radiation from a metallic coaxial cable feeding the antenna we have replaced it with a fibre optic feed and an electro-optical (EO transducer. The optical signal is then converted back to RF using an Opto-Electric Field Sensor (OEFS system. To ensure traceable measurements of the radiation pattern performance of the wearable antenna a generic head and torso solid anthropomorphic phantom model has been employed. Furthermore, to illustrate the benefits of the method, numerical simulations of the co-polar and cross-polar H-plane radiation patterns at 2.4, 2.45, and 2.5 GHz are compared with the measured results obtained using: (i an optical fibre; and (ii a metallic coaxial cable.

  19. Measurement of Entrance Surface Dose on an Anthropomorphic Thorax Phantom Using a Miniature Fiber-Optic Dosimeter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wook Jae Yoo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A miniature fiber-optic dosimeter (FOD system was fabricated using a plastic scintillating fiber, a plastic optical fiber, and a multi-pixel photon counter to measure real-time entrance surface dose (ESD during radiation diagnosis. Under varying exposure parameters of a digital radiography (DR system, we measured the scintillating light related to the ESD using the sensing probe of the FOD, which was placed at the center of the beam field on an anthropomorphic thorax phantom. Also, we obtained DR images using a flat panel detector of the DR system to evaluate the effects of the dosimeter on image artifacts during posteroanterior (PA chest radiography. From the experimental results, the scintillation output signals of the FOD were similar to the ESDs including backscatter simultaneously obtained using a semiconductor dosimeter. We demonstrated that the proposed miniature FOD can be used to measure real-time ESDs with minimization of DR image artifacts in the X-ray energy range of diagnostic radiology.

  20. Simulating the spectrum of neutrons produced by a radiation beam of high voltage inside an anthropomorphic phantom; Simulacion de espectro de nuetrones producido por un haz de radioterapia de alto voltaje en el interior de un manique antropomorfico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Soto, X.; Amgarou, K.; Langares, J. I.; Munez, J. L.; Mendez, R.; Exposito, M. R.; Gomez, F.; Domingo, C.; Sanche-Doblado, F.

    2011-07-01

    Our project aims to provide a universal method to estimate the dose deposited by neutrons in patients, using an anthropomorphic phantom. Both the detector response as relative biological effectiveness have a strong dependence on the energy spectrum of those, for this reason, a series of simulations were performed to calculate the spectrum of the neutron fluence in 16 representative points within the anthropomorphic phantom Standard for a full course of radiotherapy.

  1. Experience of development and testing of a new model of an anthropomorphic radiodosimetric phantom of the human body ARDF-10 'Roman'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruhov, R.E.; Finkel, F.V.

    2013-01-01

    In 2006-2010 by the commission of the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority in Finland applied scientific research and development of a new model of an anthropomorphic radio dosimetric phantom of the human body (the Phantom) were performed, after the development of the production technology and initial testing in 2010-2012 the first serial copy of the Phantom under the name ARDF-10 ROMAN was produced. The main application of the new model of the Phantom ARDF-10 ROMAN: - increase of the precision of calibration and implementation of the periodic monitoring of Whole body counters (WBC) equipment, standardization of measurement procedure for inter-laboratory comparisons of the incorporated activity. - metrological support of the development and implementation of new methods for human radiation spectrometry: identification of radionuclide content of incorporated activity in the human body; measurements of the activity of incorporated technogenic and natural radionuclides in the whole body and in the lungs; measurements of 90 Sr content in the bone tissue. Study of the mechanisms of the intake, distribution, accumulation and excretion of the radionuclides in the human body, such as: daughter products of 222 Rn decay in the respiratory tract, 241 Am, other transuranic elements; isotopes of iodine in the thyroid gland; radiopharmaceuticals administered to patients for diagnostic and medicinal purposes. Obtaining estimates of spatial-temporal distribution of individual internal exposure dose of a human. The result of the work of recent years has been the creation of hygienic safe standard sample of an anthropomorphic radio dosimetric phantom of the human body ARDF-10 ROMAN, consisting of 4 anthropometric models of body parts, which are independent assembly units (head phantom, neck phantom, torso phantom, knee phantom). Phantom models are made from simulators of bone, soft (muscle) and lungs biological tissue. The Phantom contains 28 separate elements. To the first

  2. Evaluation of patient doses from upper gastrointestinal tract examinations based on the dosimetry in an anthropomorphic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirofuji, Yoshiaki; Aoyama, Takahiko; Koyama, Shuji; Kawaura, Chiyo

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate organ dose and effective dose to patients from examinations of the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Absorbed doses of various tissues and organs were measured using novel photodiode dosimeters installed in an anthropomorphic phantom representing a standard Japanese adult body. The organ dose and the effective dose were assessed from the absorbed doses according to the definitions seen in the publications of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Dose measurements were performed for each projection of the upper GI tract examination in seven procedures at four hospitals and in a mobile coach, and organ and effective doses were assessed for each procedure. Organ doses obtained in the observation areas such as the stomach, esophagus and colon were in the order of several to more than 60 mGy, though they decreased to less than 1 mGy for tissues and organs distant from the observation areas. Organ doses and effective doses differed largely according to tube voltage, filtration and tube current or mAs value of the x-ray generator used, and by examination protocol, number of images, fluoroscopy time, and imaging units such as screen/film, computed radiography, digital radiography and flat panel detector. The number of images and the fluoroscopy time were 7 and 1.5 min for the examination in the mobile coach, and 18-22 and 2-6 min in the hospitals. Evaluated effective dose for the examination in the mobile coach was 2.9 mSv, and that in the hospitals ranged from 4.0-13.4 mSv at a ratio of more than three. (author)

  3. TU-F-CAMPUS-I-02: Validation of a CT X-Ray Source Characterization Technique for Dose Computation Using An Anthropomorphic Thorax Phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommerville, M; Tambasco, M [San Diego State University, San Diego, CA (United States); Poirier, Y [CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To experimentally validate a rotational kV x-ray source characterization technique by computing CT dose in an anthropomorphic thorax phantom using an in-house dose computation algorithm (kVDoseCalc). Methods: The lateral variation in incident energy spectra of a GE Optima big bore CT scanner was found by measuring the HVL along the internal, full bow-tie filter axis. The HVL and kVp were used to generate the x-ray spectra using Spektr software, while beam fluence was derived by dividing the integral product of the spectra and in-air mass-energy absorption coefficients by in-air dose measurements along the bow-tie filter axis. Beams produced by the GE Optima scanner were modeled at 80 and 140 kVp tube settings. kVDoseCalc calculates dose by solving the linear Boltzmann transport equation using a combination of deterministic and stochastic methods. Relative doses in an anthropomorphic thorax phantom (E2E SBRT Phantom) irradiated by the GE Optima scanner were measured using a (0.015 cc) PTW Freiburg ionization chamber, and compared to computations from kVDoseCalc. Results: The agreement in relative dose between dose computation and measurement for points of interest (POIs) within the primary path of the beam was within experimental uncertainty for both energies, however points outside the primary beam were not. The average absolute percent difference for POIs within the primary path of the beam was 1.37% and 5.16% for 80 and 140 kVp, respectively. The minimum and maximum absolute percent difference for both energies and all POIs within the primary path of the beam was 0.151% and 6.41%, respectively. Conclusion: The CT x-ray source characterization technique based on HVL measurements and kVp can be used to accurately compute CT dose in an anthropomorphic thorax phantom.

  4. Computation of a voxelized anthropomorphic phantom from Computer Tomography slices and 3D dose distribution calculation utilizing the MCNP5 Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abella, V.; Miro, R.; Juste, B.; Verdu, G.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The purpose of this work is to obtain the voxelization of a series of tomography slices in order to provide a voxelized human phantom throughout a MatLab algorithm, and the consequent simulation of the irradiation of such phantom with the photon beam generated in a Theratron 780 (MDS Nordion) 60 Co radiotherapy unit, using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle), version 5. The project provides as results dose mapping calculations inside the voxelized anthropomorphic phantom. Prior works have validated the cobalt therapy model utilizing a simple heterogeneous water cube-shaped phantom. The reference phantom model utilized in this work is the Zubal phantom, which consists of a group of pre-segmented CT slices of a human body. The CT slices are to be input into the Matlab program which computes the voxelization by means of two-dimensional pixel and material identification on each slice, and three-dimensional interpolation, in order to depict the phantom geometry via small cubic cells. Each slice is divided in squares with the size of the desired voxelization, and then the program searches for the pixel intensity with a predefined material at each square, making a subsequent three-dimensional interpolation. At the end of this process, the program produces a voxelized phantom in which each voxel defines the mixture of the different materials that compose it. In the case of the Zubal phantom, the voxels result in pure organ materials due to the fact that the phantom is presegmented. The output of this code follows the MCNP input deck format and is integrated in a full input model including the 60 Co radiotherapy unit. Dose rates are calculated using the MCNP5 tool FMESH, superimposed mesh tally. This feature allows to tally particles on an independent mesh over the problem geometry, and to obtain the length estimation of the particle flux, in units of particles/cm 2 (tally F4). Furthermore, the particle flux is transformed into dose by

  5. Fabrication of an anthropomorphous phantom equipped with sensors to assess the efficient dose at workstations submitted to photonic fields: experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darreon, J.

    2009-12-01

    The efficient dose is a reference value in radioprotection. It allows the harmfulness of ionizing radiations received by organs and tissues to be assessed. It is used on a legal basis but is not directly measurable. This research thesis reports a practical feasibility study of an anthropomorphous dummy or phantom equipped with sensors to assess the efficient dose from selective measurements. A first part deals with the dose measurement system, i.e. the sensors which will be embedded in the phantom. The second part, based on a simulation performed with a Monte Carlo code, reports the study of the efficient dose assessment accuracies for different irradiation configurations which could be obtained with this measurement instrument. The author shows that the estimation accuracy can be improved by modifying the sensor locations with respect to doses deposited in future reference phantoms of the International Commission on Radiological Protection

  6. SU-F-T-168: Development and Implementation of An Anthropomorphic Head & Neck Phantom for the Assessment of Proton Therapy Treatment Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branco, D; Taylor, P; Frank, S; Li, H; Zhang, X; Mehrens, H; Guindani, M; Followill, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To design a Head and Neck (H&N) anthropomorphic QA phantom that the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Houston (IROC-H) can use to verify the quality of intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) H&N treatments for institutions participating in NCI clinical trials. Methods: The phantom was created to serve as a remote auditing tool for IROC-H to evaluate an institution’s IMPT planning and delivery abilities. The design was based on the composition, size, and geometry of a generalized oropharyngeal tumor and contains critical structures (parotids and spinal cord). Radiochromic film in the axial and sagittal planes and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD)-100 capsules were embedded in the phantom and used to perform the dose delivery evaluation. A CT simulation was used to create a passive scatter and a spot scanning treatment plan with typical clinical constraints for H&N cancer. The IMPT plan was approved by a radiation oncologist and the phantom was irradiated multiple times. The measured dose distribution using a 7%/4mm gamma analysis (85% of pixels passing) and point doses were compared with the treatment planning system calculations. Results: The designed phantom could not achieve the target dose prescription and organ at risk dose constraints with the passive scatter treatment plan. The target prescription dose could be met but not the parotid dose constraint. The average TLD point dose ratio in the target was 0.975, well within the 5% acceptance criterion. The dose distribution analysis using various acceptance criteria, 5%/4mm, 5%/3mm, 7%/4mm and 7%/5mm, had average pixel passing rates of 85.9%, 81.8%, 89.6% and 91.6%, and respectively. Conclusion: An anthropomorphic IMPT H&N phantom was designed that can assess the dose delivery of proton sites wishing to participate in clinical trials using a 5% TLD dose and 7%/4mm gamma analysis acceptance criteria.

  7. Design and development of an anthropomorphic phantom equipped with detectors in order to evaluate the effective dose E at workplaces: feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furstoss, Ch.

    2006-11-01

    My PhD study aims to determine the feasibility to design and develop, for photon fields, an anthropomorphic phantom equipped with detectors in order to evaluate the effective dose E at workplaces. First of all, the energy losses within the organs are calculated using the M.C.N.P.X. Monte Carlo code, in order to determine the detection positions within the different organs. Then, to decrease the number of detection positions, the organ contribution to the effective dose is studied. Finally, the characteristics of the detectors to insert and the characteristics of the phantom to use are deduced. The results show that 24 or 23 detection positions, according to the wT values (publication 60 or new recommendations of the ICRP), give a E estimation with an uncertainty of ±15 % from 50 keV to 4 MeV. Moreover, the interest of such an instrument is underlined while comparing the E estimation by the personal dose equivalent Hp to the E estimation by the instrumented phantom when the phantom is irradiated by point sources (worker in front of a glove box for example). Last, after the detector and phantom characteristic determination, two types of detectors and one type of phantom are selected. However, for the detectors mainly, developments are necessary. Follow up this study, the characterization and the adaptation of the detectors to the project would be interesting. Furthermore, the study to mixed photon-neutrons would be required the needs of the radiological protection community. (author)

  8. Sensitivity and accuracy of volumetry of pulmonary nodules on low-dose 16- and 64-row multi-detector CT: an anthropomorphic phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Xueqian; Zhao, Yingru; Ooijen, Peter M.A. van; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Snijder, Roland A.; Greuter, Marcel J.W.; Jong, Pim A. de; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Bock, Geertruida H. de

    2013-01-01

    To assess the sensitivity of detection and accuracy of volumetry by manual and semi-automated quantification of artificial pulmonary nodules in an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom on low-dose CT. Fifteen artificial spherical nodules (diameter 3, 5, 8, 10 and 12 mm; CT densities -800, -630 and +100 HU) were randomly placed inside an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom. The phantom was examined on 16- and 64-row multidetector CT with a low-dose protocol. Two independent blinded observers screened for pulmonary nodules. Nodule diameter was measured manually, and volume calculated. For solid nodules (+100 HU), diameter and volume were also evaluated by semi-automated software. Differences in observed volumes between the manual and semi-automated method were evaluated by a t-test. Sensitivity was 100 % for all nodules of >5 mm and larger, 60-80 % for solid and 0-20 % for non-solid 3-mm nodules. No false-positive nodules but high inter-observer reliability and inter-technique correlation were found. Volume was underestimated manually by 24.1 ± 14.0 % for nodules of any density, and 26.4 ± 15.5 % for solid nodules, compared with 7.6 ± 8.5 % (P 5 mm in diameter. Semi-automated volumetry yielded more accurate nodule volumes than manual measurements. (orig.)

  9. Performance of two commercial electron beam algorithms over regions close to the lung-mediastinum interface, against Monte Carlo simulation and point dosimetry in virtual and anthropomorphic phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojala, J; Hyödynmaa, S; Barańczyk, R; Góra, E; Waligórski, M P R

    2014-03-01

    Electron radiotherapy is applied to treat the chest wall close to the mediastinum. The performance of the GGPB and eMC algorithms implemented in the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) was studied in this region for 9 and 16 MeV beams, against Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, point dosimetry in a water phantom and dose distributions calculated in virtual phantoms. For the 16 MeV beam, the accuracy of these algorithms was also compared over the lung-mediastinum interface region of an anthropomorphic phantom, against MC calculations and thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD). In the phantom with a lung-equivalent slab the results were generally congruent, the eMC results for the 9 MeV beam slightly overestimating the lung dose, and the GGPB results for the 16 MeV beam underestimating the lung dose. Over the lung-mediastinum interface, for 9 and 16 MeV beams, the GGPB code underestimated the lung dose and overestimated the dose in water close to the lung, compared to the congruent eMC and MC results. In the anthropomorphic phantom, results of TLD measurements and MC and eMC calculations agreed, while the GGPB code underestimated the lung dose. Good agreement between TLD measurements and MC calculations attests to the accuracy of "full" MC simulations as a reference for benchmarking TPS codes. Application of the GGPB code in chest wall radiotherapy may result in significant underestimation of the lung dose and overestimation of dose to the mediastinum, affecting plan optimization over volumes close to the lung-mediastinum interface, such as the lung or heart. Copyright © 2013 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. ROC evaluation of SPECT myocardial lesion detectability with and without single iteration non-uniform Chang attenuation compensation using an anthropomorphic female phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, S.; Jaszczak, R.J.; Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC; Gilland, D.R.; Turkington, T.G.; Coleman, R.E.; Tsui, B.M.W.; Metz, C.E.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate lesion detectability with and without nonuniform attenuation compensation (AC) in myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging in women using an anthropomorphic phantom and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) methodology. Breast attenuation causes artifacts in reconstructed images and may increase the difficulty of diagnosis of myocardial perfusion imaging in women. The null hypothesis tested using the ROC study was that nonuniform AC does not change the lesion detectability in myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging in women. The authors used a filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction algorithm and Chang's single iteration method for AC. In conclusion, with the proposed myocardial defect model nuclear medicine physicians demonstrated no significant difference for the detection of the anterior wall defect; however, a greater accuracy for the detection of the inferior wall defect was observed without nonuniform AC than with it. Medical physicists did not demonstrate any statistically significant difference in defect detection accuracy with or without nonuniform AC in the female phantom

  11. Second generation anthropomorphic physical phantom for mammography and DBT: Incorporating voxelized 3D printing and inkjet printing of iodinated lesion inserts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikaria, Dhiraj; Musinsky, Stephanie; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Solomon, Justin; Diao, Andrew; Gehm, Michael E.; Samei, Ehsan; Glick, Stephen J.; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2016-03-01

    Physical phantoms are needed for the evaluation and optimization of new digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) systems. Previously, we developed an anthropomorphic phantom based on human subject breast CT data and fabricated using commercial 3D printing. We now present three key advancements: voxelized 3D printing, photopolymer material doping, and 2D inkjet printing of lesion inserts. First, we bypassed the printer's control software in order to print in voxelized form instead of conventional STL surfaces, thus improving resolution and allowing dithering to mix the two photopolymer materials into arbitrary proportions. We demonstrated ability to print details as small as 150μm, and dithering to combine VeroWhitePlus and TangoPlus in 10% increments. Second, to address the limited attenuation difference among commercial photopolymers, we evaluated a beta sample from Stratasys with increased TiO2 doping concentration up to 2.5%, which corresponded to 98% breast density. By spanning 36% to 98% breast density, this doubles our previous contrast. Third, using inkjet printers modified to print with iopamidol, we created 2D lesion patterns on paper that can be sandwiched into the phantom. Inkjet printing has advantages of being inexpensive and easy, and more contrast can be delivered through overprinting. Printing resolution was maintained at 210 μm horizontally and 330 μm vertically even after 10 overprints. Contrast increased linearly with overprinting at 0.7% per overprint. Together, these three new features provide the basis for creating a new anthropomorphic physical breast phantom with improved resolution and contrast, as well as the ability to insert 2D lesions for task-based assessment of performance.

  12. Construction of cardiac anthropomorphic phantom for simulation of radiological exams; Construção de fantoma antropomórfico cardíaco para simulação de exames radiológicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandeira, C.K.; Vieira Neto, H., E-mail: cbandeira@alunos.utfpr.edu.br, E-mail: hvieir@utfpr.edu.br [Universidade Tecnológica Federal do Paraná (UTFPR), Curitiba (Brazil). Programa de Pós-Graduação em Engenharia Elétrica e Informática Industrial; Vieira, M.P.M.M., E-mail: michele.vieira@ifpr.edu.br [Instituto Federal do Paraná (IFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Curso Técnico em Radiologia

    2017-07-01

    Phantoms are simulating objects of structures of the human body and can be applied in the quality control and calibration of radiological equipment. The aim of the work is the development of a cardiac anthropomorphic phantom to assist in the elaboration of protocols of dynamic studies that demonstrate the blood circulation inside the cardiac chambers. For the construction of the phantom was used latex, applied in layers on an anatomical model of heart, having been constructed the cardiac chambers and atrioventricular valves. Cardiac chambers were connected to the cannulas for fluid injection and simulation of the circulatory system. The constructed phantom presents anthropomorphic characteristics and allows the circulation of the fluid without reflux, but the thickness of the catheters used does not yet allow flows of greater order of magnitude. This phantom has the potential to be used in the dynamic simulation of cardiac exams, contributing to the elaboration and adequacy of computed tomography protocols.

  13. Effects of tube potential and scatter rejection on image quality and effective dose in digital chest X-ray examination: An anthropomorphic phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, D.J., E-mail: daniel.shaw@christie.nhs.uk [Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Leeds Teaching Hospitals, Leeds General Infirmary, Great George Street, Leeds LS1 3EX (United Kingdom); Crawshaw, I. [Diagnostic X-ray Department, York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, The York Hospital, Wigginton Road, York YO31 8HE (United Kingdom); Rimmer, S. D. [Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Leeds Teaching Hospitals, Leeds General Infirmary, Great George Street, Leeds LS1 3EX (United Kingdom)

    2013-11-15

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of tube potential and scatter rejection techniques on image quality of digital posteroanterior (PA) chest radiographs. Methods: An anthropomorphic phantom was imaged using a range of tube potentials (81–125 kV{sub p}) without scatter rejection, with an anti-scatter grid, and using a 10 cm air gap. Images were anonymised and randomised before being evaluated using a visual graded analysis (VGA) method. Results: The effects of tube potential on image quality were found to be negligible (p > 0.63) for the flat panel detector (FPD). Decreased image quality (p = 0.031) was noted for 125 kV{sub p} relative to 109 kV{sub p}, though no difference was noted for any of the other potentials (p > 0.398) for computed radiography (CR). Both scatter rejection techniques improved image quality (p < 0.01). For FPD imaging the anti-scatter grid offered slightly improved image quality relative to the air gap (p = 0.038) but this was not seen for CR (p = 0.404). Conclusions: For FPD chest imaging of the anthropomorphic phantom there was no dependence of image quality on tube potential. Scatter rejection improved image quality, with the anti-scatter grid giving greater improvements than an air-gap, but at the expense of increased effective dose. CR imaging of the chest phantom demonstrated negligible dependence on tube potential except at 125 kV{sub p}. Scatter rejection improved image quality, but with no difference found between techniques. The air-gap resulted in a smaller increase in effective dose than the anti-scatter grid and would be the preferred scatter rejection technique.

  14. Whole-Body Single-Bed Time-of-Flight RPC-PET: Simulation of Axial and Planar Sensitivities With NEMA and Anthropomorphic Phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Paulo; Reis, João; Couceiro, Miguel; Blanco, Alberto; Ferreira, Nuno C.; Marques, Rui Ferreira; Martins, Paulo; Fonte, Paulo

    2012-06-01

    A single-bed, whole-body positron emission tomograph based on resistive plate chambers has been proposed (RPC-PET). An RPC-PET system with an axial field-of-view (AFOV) of 2.4 m has been shown in simulation to have higher system sensitivity using the NEMA NU2-1994 protocol than commercial PET scanners. However, that protocol does not correlate directly with lesion detectability. The latter is better correlated with the planar (slice) sensitivity, obtained with a NEMA NU2-2001 line-source phantom. After validation with published data for the GE Advance, Siemens TruePoint and TrueV, we study by simulation their axial sensitivity profiles, comparing results with RPC-PET. Planar sensitivities indicate that RPC-PET is expected to outperform 16-cm (22-cm) AFOV scanners by a factor 5.8 (3.0) for 70-cm-long scans. For 1.5-m scans (head to mid-legs), the sensitivity gain increases to 11.7 (6.7). Yet, PET systems with large AFOV provide larger coverage but also larger attenuation in the object. We studied these competing effects with both spherical- and line-sources immersed in a 27-cm-diameter water cylinder. For 1.5-m-long scans, the planar sensitivity drops one order of magnitude in all scanners, with RPC-PET outperforming 16-cm (22-cm) AFOV scanners by a factor 9.2 (5.3) without considering the TOF benefit. A gain in the effective sensitivity is expected with TOF iterative reconstruction. Finally, object scatter in an anthropomorphic phantom is similar for RPC-PET and modern, scintillator-based scanners, although RPC-PET benefits further if its TOF information is utilized to exclude scatter events occurring outside the anthropomorphic phantom.

  15. Measurement of californium-252 gamma photons depth dose distribution in tissue equivalent material. Vol. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fadel, M A; El-Fiki, M A; Eissa, H M; Abdel-Hafez, A; Naguib, S H [National Institute of Standards, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    Phantom of tissue equivalent material with and without bone was used measuring depth dose distribution of gamma-rays from californium-252 source. The source was positioned at center of perspex walled phantom. Depth dose measurements were recorded for X, Y and Z planes at different distances from source. TLD 700 was used for measuring the dose distribution. Results indicate that implantation of bone in tissue equivalent medium cause changes in the gamma depth dose distribution which varies according to variation in bone geometry. 9 figs.

  16. Effect of reconstruction methods and x-ray tube current–time product on nodule detection in an anthropomorphic thorax phantom: A crossed-modality JAFROC observer study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, J. D., E-mail: j.d.thompson@salford.ac.uk [Directorate of Radiography, University of Salford, Frederick Road Campus, Salford, Greater Manchester M6 6PU, United Kingdom and Department of Radiology, Furness General Hospital, University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust, Dalton Lane, Barrow-in-Furness LA14 4LF (United Kingdom); Chakraborty, D. P. [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, FARP Building, Room 212, 3362 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Szczepura, K.; Tootell, A. K. [Directorate of Radiography, University of Salford, Frederick Road Campus, Salford, Greater Manchester M6 6PU (United Kingdom); Vamvakas, I. [Department of Radiology, Christie Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, 550 Wilmslow Road, Manchester M20 4BX (United Kingdom); Manning, D. J. [Faculty of Health and Medicine, Lancaster Medical School, Furness College, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YG (United Kingdom); Hogg, P. [Directorate of Radiography, University of Salford, Frederick Road Campus, Salford, Greater Manchester M6 6PU, United Kingdom and Department of Radiography, Karolinksa Institute, Solnavägen 1, Solna 171 77 (Sweden)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate nodule detection in an anthropomorphic chest phantom in computed tomography (CT) images reconstructed with adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D (AIDR{sup 3D}) and filtered back projection (FBP) over a range of tube current–time product (mAs). Methods: Two phantoms were used in this study: (i) an anthropomorphic chest phantom was loaded with spherical simulated nodules of 5, 8, 10, and 12 mm in diameter and +100, −630, and −800 Hounsfield units electron density; this would generate CT images for the observer study; (ii) a whole-body dosimetry verification phantom was used to ultimately estimate effective dose and risk according to the model of the BEIR VII committee. Both phantoms were scanned over a mAs range (10, 20, 30, and 40), while all other acquisition parameters remained constant. Images were reconstructed with both AIDR{sup 3D} and FBP. For the observer study, 34 normal cases (no nodules) and 34 abnormal cases (containing 1–3 nodules, mean 1.35 ± 0.54) were chosen. Eleven observers evaluated images from all mAs and reconstruction methods under the free-response paradigm. A crossed-modality jackknife alternative free-response operating characteristic (JAFROC) analysis method was developed for data analysis, averaging data over the two factors influencing nodule detection in this study: mAs and image reconstruction (AIDR{sup 3D} or FBP). A Bonferroni correction was applied and the threshold for declaring significance was set at 0.025 to maintain the overall probability of Type I error at α = 0.05. Contrast-to-noise (CNR) was also measured for all nodules and evaluated by a linear least squares analysis. Results: For random-reader fixed-case crossed-modality JAFROC analysis, there was no significant difference in nodule detection between AIDR{sup 3D} and FBP when data were averaged over mAs [F(1, 10) = 0.08, p = 0.789]. However, when data were averaged over reconstruction methods, a significant difference was seen between

  17. Effect of imaging parameters of spiral CT scanning on image quality for the dental implants. Visual evaluation using a semi-anthropomorphic mandible phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Yasuhiko; Indou, Hiroko; Honda Eiichi

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of parameters of spiral CT scanning on the image quality required for the planning of dental implants operations. A semi-anthropomorphic mandible phantom which has artificial mandibular canals and teeth roots was used as a standard object for imaging. Spiral CT scans for the phantom settled in water phantom with diameters of 20 and 16 cm were performed. Visibility of the artificial mandibular canal made of a Teflon tube and gaps between tooth apex and canal in the mandibular phantom was evaluated for various combinations of the slice thickness, tables speeds, angles to the canal, and x-ray tube currents. Teeth roots were made of PVC (poly vinyl chloride). The artificial mandibular canal was clearly observed on the images of 1 mm slice thickness. At the same table speed of 2 mm /rotation, the images of thin slice (1 mm) were superior to that of thick slice (2 mm). The gap between teeth apex and canal was erroneously diagnosed on the images with table speeds of 3 mm/rotation. Horizontal scanning in parallel to the canal result in poor image quality for observation of mandibular canals because of the partial volume effect. A relatively high x-ray tube current (125 mA) at thin slice (1 mm) scanning was required for scanning the mandibular phantom in 20 cm water vessel. Spiral scanning with slice thickness of 1 mm and table speeds of 1 of 2 mm/rotation seemed to be suitable for dental implants. The result of this study suggested that diagnosis from two independent spiral scans with a different angle to the object was more accurate and more efficient than single spiral scanning. (author)

  18. SU-E-I-74: Image-Matching Technique of Computed Tomography Images for Personal Identification: A Preliminary Study Using Anthropomorphic Chest Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsunobu, Y; Shiotsuki, K [Department of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Morishita, J [Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, JP (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Fingerprints, dental impressions, and DNA are used to identify unidentified bodies in forensic medicine. Cranial Computed tomography (CT) images and/or dental radiographs are also used for identification. Radiological identification is important, particularly in the absence of comparative fingerprints, dental impressions, and DNA samples. The development of an automated radiological identification system for unidentified bodies is desirable. We investigated the potential usefulness of bone structure for matching chest CT images. Methods: CT images of three anthropomorphic chest phantoms were obtained on different days in various settings. One of the phantoms was assumed to be an unidentified body. The bone image and the bone image with soft tissue (BST image) were extracted from the CT images. To examine the usefulness of the bone image and/or the BST image, the similarities between the two-dimensional (2D) or threedimensional (3D) images of the same and different phantoms were evaluated in terms of the normalized cross-correlation value (NCC). Results: For the 2D and 3D BST images, the NCCs obtained from the same phantom assumed to be an unidentified body (2D, 0.99; 3D, 0.93) were higher than those for the different phantoms (2D, 0.95 and 0.91; 3D, 0.89 and 0.80). The NCCs for the same phantom (2D, 0.95; 3D, 0.88) were greater compared to those of the different phantoms (2D, 0.61 and 0.25; 3D, 0.23 and 0.10) for the bone image. The difference in the NCCs between the same and different phantoms tended to be larger for the bone images than for the BST images. These findings suggest that the image-matching technique is more useful when utilizing the bone image than when utilizing the BST image to identify different people. Conclusion: This preliminary study indicated that evaluating the similarity of bone structure in 2D and 3D images is potentially useful for identifying of an unidentified body.

  19. SU-E-I-74: Image-Matching Technique of Computed Tomography Images for Personal Identification: A Preliminary Study Using Anthropomorphic Chest Phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsunobu, Y; Shiotsuki, K; Morishita, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Fingerprints, dental impressions, and DNA are used to identify unidentified bodies in forensic medicine. Cranial Computed tomography (CT) images and/or dental radiographs are also used for identification. Radiological identification is important, particularly in the absence of comparative fingerprints, dental impressions, and DNA samples. The development of an automated radiological identification system for unidentified bodies is desirable. We investigated the potential usefulness of bone structure for matching chest CT images. Methods: CT images of three anthropomorphic chest phantoms were obtained on different days in various settings. One of the phantoms was assumed to be an unidentified body. The bone image and the bone image with soft tissue (BST image) were extracted from the CT images. To examine the usefulness of the bone image and/or the BST image, the similarities between the two-dimensional (2D) or threedimensional (3D) images of the same and different phantoms were evaluated in terms of the normalized cross-correlation value (NCC). Results: For the 2D and 3D BST images, the NCCs obtained from the same phantom assumed to be an unidentified body (2D, 0.99; 3D, 0.93) were higher than those for the different phantoms (2D, 0.95 and 0.91; 3D, 0.89 and 0.80). The NCCs for the same phantom (2D, 0.95; 3D, 0.88) were greater compared to those of the different phantoms (2D, 0.61 and 0.25; 3D, 0.23 and 0.10) for the bone image. The difference in the NCCs between the same and different phantoms tended to be larger for the bone images than for the BST images. These findings suggest that the image-matching technique is more useful when utilizing the bone image than when utilizing the BST image to identify different people. Conclusion: This preliminary study indicated that evaluating the similarity of bone structure in 2D and 3D images is potentially useful for identifying of an unidentified body

  20. Effects of exposure equalization on image signal-to-noise ratios in digital mammography: A simulation study with an anthropomorphic breast phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Xinming; Lai Chaojen; Whitman, Gary J.; Geiser, William R.; Shen Youtao; Yi Ying; Shaw, Chris C. [Department of Imaging Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030-4009 (United States); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030-4009 (United States); Department of Imaging Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030-4009 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: The scan equalization digital mammography (SEDM) technique combines slot scanning and exposure equalization to improve low-contrast performance of digital mammography in dense tissue areas. In this study, full-field digital mammography (FFDM) images of an anthropomorphic breast phantom acquired with an anti-scatter grid at various exposure levels were superimposed to simulate SEDM images and investigate the improvement of low-contrast performance as quantified by primary signal-to-noise ratios (PSNRs). Methods: We imaged an anthropomorphic breast phantom (Gammex 169 ''Rachel,'' Gammex RMI, Middleton, WI) at various exposure levels using a FFDM system (Senographe 2000D, GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI). The exposure equalization factors were computed based on a standard FFDM image acquired in the automatic exposure control (AEC) mode. The equalized image was simulated and constructed by superimposing a selected set of FFDM images acquired at 2, 1, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16, and 1/32 times of exposure levels to the standard AEC timed technique (125 mAs) using the equalization factors computed for each region. Finally, the equalized image was renormalized regionally with the exposure equalization factors to result in an appearance similar to that with standard digital mammography. Two sets of FFDM images were acquired to allow for two identically, but independently, formed equalized images to be subtracted from each other to estimate the noise levels. Similarly, two identically but independently acquired standard FFDM images were subtracted to estimate the noise levels. Corrections were applied to remove the excess system noise accumulated during image superimposition in forming the equalized image. PSNRs over the compressed area of breast phantom were computed and used to quantitatively study the effects of exposure equalization on low-contrast performance in digital mammography. Results: We found that the highest achievable PSNR improvement

  1. Effects of exposure equalization on image signal-to-noise ratios in digital mammography: A simulation study with an anthropomorphic breast phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xinming; Lai Chaojen; Whitman, Gary J.; Geiser, William R.; Shen Youtao; Yi Ying; Shaw, Chris C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The scan equalization digital mammography (SEDM) technique combines slot scanning and exposure equalization to improve low-contrast performance of digital mammography in dense tissue areas. In this study, full-field digital mammography (FFDM) images of an anthropomorphic breast phantom acquired with an anti-scatter grid at various exposure levels were superimposed to simulate SEDM images and investigate the improvement of low-contrast performance as quantified by primary signal-to-noise ratios (PSNRs). Methods: We imaged an anthropomorphic breast phantom (Gammex 169 ''Rachel,'' Gammex RMI, Middleton, WI) at various exposure levels using a FFDM system (Senographe 2000D, GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI). The exposure equalization factors were computed based on a standard FFDM image acquired in the automatic exposure control (AEC) mode. The equalized image was simulated and constructed by superimposing a selected set of FFDM images acquired at 2, 1, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16, and 1/32 times of exposure levels to the standard AEC timed technique (125 mAs) using the equalization factors computed for each region. Finally, the equalized image was renormalized regionally with the exposure equalization factors to result in an appearance similar to that with standard digital mammography. Two sets of FFDM images were acquired to allow for two identically, but independently, formed equalized images to be subtracted from each other to estimate the noise levels. Similarly, two identically but independently acquired standard FFDM images were subtracted to estimate the noise levels. Corrections were applied to remove the excess system noise accumulated during image superimposition in forming the equalized image. PSNRs over the compressed area of breast phantom were computed and used to quantitatively study the effects of exposure equalization on low-contrast performance in digital mammography. Results: We found that the highest achievable PSNR improvement factor was 1.89 for

  2. Determination of dose correction factor for energy and directional dependence of the MOSFET dosimeter in an anthropomorphic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Sung Koo; Choi, Sang Hyoun; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Na, Seong Ho

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, the MOSFET dosimeter has been widely used in various medical applications such as dose verification in radiation therapeutic and diagnostic applications. The MOSFET dosimeter is, however, mainly made of silicon and shows some energy dependence for low energy photons. Therefore, the MOSFET dosimeter tends to overestimate the dose for low energy scattered photons in a phantom. This study determines the correction factors to compensate these dependences of the MOSFET dosimeter in ATOM phantom. For this, we first constructed a computational model of the ATOM phantom based on the 3D CT image data of the phantom. The voxel phantom was then implemented in a Monte Carlo simulation code and used to calculate the energy spectrum of the photon field at each of the MOSFET dosimeter locations in the phantom. Finally, the correction factors were calculated based on the energy spectrum of the photon field at the dosimeter locations and the pre-determined energy and directional dependence of the MOSFET dosimeter. Our result for 60 Co and 137 Cs photon fields shows that the correction factors are distributed within the range of 0.89 and 0.97 considering all the MOSFET dosimeter locations in the phantom

  3. Study on motion artifacts in coronary arteries with an anthropomorphic moving heart phantom on an ECG-gated multidetector computed tomography unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greuter, Marcel J.W.; Dorgelo, Joost; Tukker, Wim G.J.; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2005-01-01

    Acquisition time plays a key role in the quality of cardiac multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and is directly related to the rotation time of the scanner. The purpose of this study is to examine the influence of heart rate and a multisector reconstruction algorithm on the image quality of coronary arteries of an anthropomorphic adjustable moving heart phantom on an ECG-gated MDCT unit. The heart phantom and a coronary artery phantom were used on a MDCT unit with a rotation time of 500 ms. The movement of the heart was determined by analysis of the images taken at different phases. The results indicate that the movement of the coronary arteries on the heart phantom is comparable to that in a clinical setting. The influence of the heart rate on image quality and artifacts was determined by analysis of several heart rates between 40 and 80 bpm where the movement of the heart was synchronized using a retrospective ECG-gated acquisition protocol. The resulting reformatted volume rendering images of the moving heart and the coronary arteries were qualitatively compared as a result of the heart rate. The evaluation was performed on three independent series by two independent radiologists for the image quality of the coronary arteries and the presence of artifacts. The evaluation shows that at heart rates above 50 bpm the influence of motion artifacts in the coronary arteries becomes apparent. In addition the influence of a dedicated multisector reconstruction technique on image quality was determined. The results show that the image quality of the coronary arteries is not only related to the heart rate and that the influence of the multisector reconstruction technique becomes significant above 70 bpm. Therefore, this study proves that from the actual acquisition time per heart cycle one cannot determine an actual acquisition time, but only a mathematical acquisition time. (orig.)

  4. Comparison of chest radiography, chest digital tomosynthesis and low dose MDCT to detect small ground-glass opacity nodules: an anthropomorphic chest phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doo, Kyung Won; Kang, Eun-Young; Yong, Hwan Seok; Ham, Soo-Youn; Lee, Ki Yeol; Choo, Ji Yung

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of chest radiography (CXR), chest digital tomosynthesis (DT) and low dose multidetector computed tomography (LDCT) for the detection of small pulmonary ground-glass opacity (GGO) nodules, using an anthropomorphic chest phantom. Artificial pulmonary nodules were placed in a phantom and a total of 40 samples of different nodule settings underwent CXR, DT and LDCT. The images were randomly read by three experienced chest radiologists. Free-response receiver-operating characteristics (FROC) were used. The figures of merit for the FROC curves averaged for the three observers were 0.41, 0.37 and 0.76 for CXR, DT and LDCT, respectively. FROC analyses revealed significantly better performance of LDCT over CXR or DT for the detection of GGO nodules (P < 0.05). The difference in detectability between CXR and DT was not statistically significant (P = 0.73). The diagnostic performance of DT for the detection of pulmonary small GGO nodules was not significantly different from that of CXR, but LDCT performed significantly better than both CXR and DT. DT is not a suitable alternative to CT for small GGO nodule detection, and LDCT remains the method of choice for this purpose. (orig.)

  5. Comparison of chest radiography, chest digital tomosynthesis and low dose MDCT to detect small ground-glass opacity nodules: an anthropomorphic chest phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doo, Kyung Won; Kang, Eun-Young; Yong, Hwan Seok [Korea University Guro Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ham, Soo-Youn [Korea University Anam Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ki Yeol; Choo, Ji Yung [Korea University Ansan Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of chest radiography (CXR), chest digital tomosynthesis (DT) and low dose multidetector computed tomography (LDCT) for the detection of small pulmonary ground-glass opacity (GGO) nodules, using an anthropomorphic chest phantom. Artificial pulmonary nodules were placed in a phantom and a total of 40 samples of different nodule settings underwent CXR, DT and LDCT. The images were randomly read by three experienced chest radiologists. Free-response receiver-operating characteristics (FROC) were used. The figures of merit for the FROC curves averaged for the three observers were 0.41, 0.37 and 0.76 for CXR, DT and LDCT, respectively. FROC analyses revealed significantly better performance of LDCT over CXR or DT for the detection of GGO nodules (P < 0.05). The difference in detectability between CXR and DT was not statistically significant (P = 0.73). The diagnostic performance of DT for the detection of pulmonary small GGO nodules was not significantly different from that of CXR, but LDCT performed significantly better than both CXR and DT. DT is not a suitable alternative to CT for small GGO nodule detection, and LDCT remains the method of choice for this purpose. (orig.)

  6. Computational voxel phantom, associated to anthropometric and anthropomorphic real phantom for dosimetry in human male pelvis radiotherapy; Fantoma computacional de voxel, associado a fantoma real antropomorfico antropometrico, para dosimetria em radioterapia de pelve masculina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Cleuza Helena Teixeira; Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares]. E-mail: campos@nuclear.ufmg.br

    2005-07-01

    This paper addresses a computational model of voxels through MCNP5 Code and the experimental development of an anthropometric and anthropomorphic phantom for dosimetry in human male pelvis brachytherapy focusing prostatic tumors. For elaboration of the computational model of the human male pelvis, anatomical section images from the Visible Man Project were applied. Such selected and digital images were associated to a numeric representation, one for each section. Such computational representation of the anatomical sections was transformed into a bi-dimensional mesh of equivalent tissue. The group of bidimensional meshes was concatenated forming the three-dimensional model of voxels to be used by the MCNP5 code. In association to the anatomical information, data from the density and chemical composition of the basic elements, representatives of the organs and involved tissues, were setup in a material database for the MCNP-5. The model will be applied for dosimetric evaluations in situations of irradiation of the human masculine pelvis. Such 3D model of voxel is associated to the code of transport of particles MCNP5, allowing future simulations. It was also developed the construction of human masculine pelvis phantom, based on anthropometric and anthropomorphic dates and in the use of representative equivalent tissues of the skin, fatty, muscular and glandular tissue, as well as the bony structure.This part of work was developed in stages, being built the bony cast first, later the muscular structures and internal organs. They were then jointly mounted and inserted in the skin cast. The representative component of the fatty tissue was incorporate and accomplished the final retouchings in the skin. The final result represents the development of two important essential tools for elaboration of computational and experimental dosimetry. Thus, it is possible its use in calibrations of pre-existent protocols in radiotherapy, as well as for tests of new protocols, besides

  7. SU-E-I-81: Assessment of CT Radiation Dose and Image Quality for An Automated Tube Potential Selection Algorithm Using Adult Anthropomorphic and ACR Phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, U; Erdi, Y; Wang, W

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of General Electrics (GE) automated tube potential algorithm, kV assist (kVa) on radiation dose and image quality, with an emphasis on optimizing protocols based on noise texture. Methods: Radiation dose was assessed by inserting optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLs) throughout the body of an adult anthropomorphic phantom (CIRS). The baseline protocol was: 120 kVp, Auto mA (180 to 380 mA), noise index (NI) = 14, adaptive iterative statistical reconstruction (ASiR) of 20%, 0.8s rotation time. Image quality was evaluated by calculating the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and noise power spectrum (NPS) from the ACR CT accreditation phantom. CNRs were calculated according to the steps described in ACR CT phantom testing document. NPS was determined by taking the 3D FFT of the uniformity section of the ACR phantom. NPS and CNR were evaluated with and without kVa and for all available adaptive iterative statistical reconstruction (ASiR) settings, ranging from 0 to 100%. Each NPS was also evaluated for its peak frequency difference (PFD) with respect to the baseline protocol. Results: The CNR for the adult male was found to decrease from CNR = 0.912 ± 0.045 for the baseline protocol without kVa to a CNR = 0.756 ± 0.049 with kVa activated. When compared against the baseline protocol, the PFD at ASiR of 40% yielded a decrease in noise magnitude as realized by the increase in CNR = 0.903 ± 0.023. The difference in the central liver dose with and without kVa was found to be 0.07%. Conclusion: Dose reduction was insignificant in the adult phantom. As determined by NPS analysis, ASiR of 40% produced images with similar noise texture to the baseline protocol. However, the CNR at ASiR of 40% with kVa fails to meet the current ACR CNR passing requirement of 1.0

  8. SU-E-I-81: Assessment of CT Radiation Dose and Image Quality for An Automated Tube Potential Selection Algorithm Using Adult Anthropomorphic and ACR Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmood, U; Erdi, Y; Wang, W [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, NY, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of General Electrics (GE) automated tube potential algorithm, kV assist (kVa) on radiation dose and image quality, with an emphasis on optimizing protocols based on noise texture. Methods: Radiation dose was assessed by inserting optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLs) throughout the body of an adult anthropomorphic phantom (CIRS). The baseline protocol was: 120 kVp, Auto mA (180 to 380 mA), noise index (NI) = 14, adaptive iterative statistical reconstruction (ASiR) of 20%, 0.8s rotation time. Image quality was evaluated by calculating the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and noise power spectrum (NPS) from the ACR CT accreditation phantom. CNRs were calculated according to the steps described in ACR CT phantom testing document. NPS was determined by taking the 3D FFT of the uniformity section of the ACR phantom. NPS and CNR were evaluated with and without kVa and for all available adaptive iterative statistical reconstruction (ASiR) settings, ranging from 0 to 100%. Each NPS was also evaluated for its peak frequency difference (PFD) with respect to the baseline protocol. Results: The CNR for the adult male was found to decrease from CNR = 0.912 ± 0.045 for the baseline protocol without kVa to a CNR = 0.756 ± 0.049 with kVa activated. When compared against the baseline protocol, the PFD at ASiR of 40% yielded a decrease in noise magnitude as realized by the increase in CNR = 0.903 ± 0.023. The difference in the central liver dose with and without kVa was found to be 0.07%. Conclusion: Dose reduction was insignificant in the adult phantom. As determined by NPS analysis, ASiR of 40% produced images with similar noise texture to the baseline protocol. However, the CNR at ASiR of 40% with kVa fails to meet the current ACR CNR passing requirement of 1.0.

  9. SU-E-I-89: Assessment of CT Radiation Dose and Image Quality for An Automated Tube Potential Selection Algorithm Using Pediatric Anthropomorphic and ACR Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmood, U; Erdi, Y; Wang, W [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, NY, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of General Electrics automated tube potential algorithm, kV assist (kVa) on radiation dose and image quality, with an emphasis on optimizing protocols based on noise texture. Methods: Radiation dose was assessed by inserting optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLs) throughout the body of a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom (CIRS). The baseline protocol was: 120 kVp, 80 mA, 0.7s rotation time. Image quality was assessed by calculating the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and noise power spectrum (NPS) from the ACR CT accreditation phantom. CNRs were calculated according to the steps described in ACR CT phantom testing document. NPS was determined by taking the 3D FFT of the uniformity section of the ACR phantom. NPS and CNR were evaluated with and without kVa and for all available adaptive iterative statistical reconstruction (ASiR) settings, ranging from 0 to 100%. Each NPS was also evaluated for its peak frequency difference (PFD) with respect to the baseline protocol. Results: For the baseline protocol, CNR was found to decrease from 0.460 ± 0.182 to 0.420 ± 0.057 when kVa was activated. When compared against the baseline protocol, the PFD at ASiR of 40% yielded a decrease in noise magnitude as realized by the increase in CNR = 0.620 ± 0.040. The liver dose decreased by 30% with kVa activation. Conclusion: Application of kVa reduces the liver dose up to 30%. However, reduction in image quality for abdominal scans occurs when using the automated tube voltage selection feature at the baseline protocol. As demonstrated by the CNR and NPS analysis, the texture and magnitude of the noise in reconstructed images at ASiR 40% was found to be the same as our baseline images. We have demonstrated that 30% dose reduction is possible when using 40% ASiR with kVa in pediatric patients.

  10. SU-E-I-89: Assessment of CT Radiation Dose and Image Quality for An Automated Tube Potential Selection Algorithm Using Pediatric Anthropomorphic and ACR Phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, U; Erdi, Y; Wang, W

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of General Electrics automated tube potential algorithm, kV assist (kVa) on radiation dose and image quality, with an emphasis on optimizing protocols based on noise texture. Methods: Radiation dose was assessed by inserting optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLs) throughout the body of a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom (CIRS). The baseline protocol was: 120 kVp, 80 mA, 0.7s rotation time. Image quality was assessed by calculating the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and noise power spectrum (NPS) from the ACR CT accreditation phantom. CNRs were calculated according to the steps described in ACR CT phantom testing document. NPS was determined by taking the 3D FFT of the uniformity section of the ACR phantom. NPS and CNR were evaluated with and without kVa and for all available adaptive iterative statistical reconstruction (ASiR) settings, ranging from 0 to 100%. Each NPS was also evaluated for its peak frequency difference (PFD) with respect to the baseline protocol. Results: For the baseline protocol, CNR was found to decrease from 0.460 ± 0.182 to 0.420 ± 0.057 when kVa was activated. When compared against the baseline protocol, the PFD at ASiR of 40% yielded a decrease in noise magnitude as realized by the increase in CNR = 0.620 ± 0.040. The liver dose decreased by 30% with kVa activation. Conclusion: Application of kVa reduces the liver dose up to 30%. However, reduction in image quality for abdominal scans occurs when using the automated tube voltage selection feature at the baseline protocol. As demonstrated by the CNR and NPS analysis, the texture and magnitude of the noise in reconstructed images at ASiR 40% was found to be the same as our baseline images. We have demonstrated that 30% dose reduction is possible when using 40% ASiR with kVa in pediatric patients

  11. SU-E-T-792: Validation of a Secondary TPS for IROC-H Recalculation of Anthropomorphic Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerns, J; Howell, R; Followill, D; Melancon, A; Stingo, F; Kry, S [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To validate a secondary treatment planning system (sTPS) for use by the Imaging & Radiation Oncology Core-Houston (IROC-H). The TPS will recalculate phantom irradiations submitted by institutions to IROC-H and compare plan results of the institution to the sTPS. Methods: In-field dosimetric data was collected by IROC-H for numerous linacs at 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV. The data was aggregated and used to define reference linac classes; each class was then modeled in the sTPS (Mobius3D) by matching the in-field characteristics. Fields used to collect IROC-H data were recreated and recalculated using Mobius3D. The same dosimetric points were measured in the recalculation and compared to the initial collection data. Additionally, a 6MV Monte Carlo beam configuration was used to compare penumbrae in the Mobius3D models. Finally, a handful of IROC-H head and neck phantoms were recalculated using Mobius3D. Results: Recalculation and quantification of differences between reference data and Mobius3D values resulted in a relative matching score of 12.45 (0 is a perfect match) for the default 6MV Mobius3D beam configuration. By adjusting beam configuration options, iterations resulted in scores of 8.45, 6.32, and 3.52, showing that customization could have a dramatic effect on beam configuration. After in-field optimization, penumbra was compared between Monte Carlo and Mobius3D for the reference fields. For open jaw fields, FWHM field widths and penumbra widths were different by <0.6 and <1mm respectively; for MLC open fields the penumbra widths were up to 1.5mm different. Phantom recalculations showed good agreement, having an average of 0.6% error per beam. Conclusion: A secondary TPS has been validated for simple irradiation geometries using reference data collected by IROC-H. The beam was customized to the reference data iteratively and resulted in a good match. This system can provide independent recalculation of phantom plans based on independent reference data.

  12. Poster - 44: Development and implementation of a comprehensive end-to-end testing methodology for linac-based frameless SRS QA using a modified commercial stereotactic anthropomorphic phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Derek; Mutanga, Theodore [University of Toronto, Carlo Fidani Peel Regional Cancer Center (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: An end-to-end testing methodology was designed to evaluate the overall SRS treatment fidelity, incorporating all steps in the linac-based frameless radiosurgery treatment delivery process. The study details our commissioning experience of the Steev (CIRS, Norfolk, VA) stereotactic anthropomorphic head phantom including modification, test design, and baseline measurements. Methods: Repeated MR and CT scans were performed with interchanging inserts. MR-CT fusion accuracy was evaluated and the insert spatial coincidence was verified on CT. Five non-coplanar arcs delivered a prescription dose to a 15 mm spherical CTV with 2 mm PTV margin. Following setup, CBCT-based shifts were applied as per protocol. Sequential measurements were performed by interchanging inserts without disturbing the setup. Spatial and dosimetric accuracy was assessed by a combination of CBCT hidden target, radiochromic film, and ion chamber measurements. To facilitate film registration, the film insert was modified in-house by etching marks. Results: MR fusion error and insert spatial coincidences were within 0.3 mm. Both CBCT and film measurements showed spatial displacements of 1.0 mm in similar directions. Both coronal and sagittal films reported 2.3 % higher target dose relative to the treatment plan. The corrected ion chamber measurement was similarly greater by 1.0 %. The 3 %/2 mm gamma pass rate was 99% for both films Conclusions: A comprehensive end-to-end testing methodology was implemented for our SRS QA program. The Steev phantom enabled realistic evaluation of the entire treatment process. Overall spatial and dosimetric accuracy of the delivery were 1 mm and 3 % respectively.

  13. Effects of tube potential and scatter rejection on image quality and effective dose in digital chest X-ray examination: An anthropomorphic phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, D.J.; Crawshaw, I.; Rimmer, S.D.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of tube potential and scatter rejection techniques on image quality of digital posteroanterior (PA) chest radiographs. Methods: An anthropomorphic phantom was imaged using a range of tube potentials (81–125 kV p ) without scatter rejection, with an anti-scatter grid, and using a 10 cm air gap. Images were anonymised and randomised before being evaluated using a visual graded analysis (VGA) method. Results: The effects of tube potential on image quality were found to be negligible (p > 0.63) for the flat panel detector (FPD). Decreased image quality (p = 0.031) was noted for 125 kV p relative to 109 kV p , though no difference was noted for any of the other potentials (p > 0.398) for computed radiography (CR). Both scatter rejection techniques improved image quality (p p . Scatter rejection improved image quality, but with no difference found between techniques. The air-gap resulted in a smaller increase in effective dose than the anti-scatter grid and would be the preferred scatter rejection technique

  14. Quantifying the effects of iodine contrast media on standardised uptake values of FDG PET/CT images: an anthropomorphic phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Razak, Hairil Rashmizal; Nordin, Abdul Jalil; Ackerly, Trevor; Van Every, Bruce; Martin, Ruth; Geso, Moshi

    2011-09-01

    This study aimed to quantify the amount of change in Standardised Uptake Values (SUVs) of PET/CT images by simulating the set-up as closely as possible to the actual patient scanning. The experiments were conducted using an anthropomorphic phantom, which contained an amount of radioactivity in the form of Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in a primary plastic test tube and one litre saline bags, including the insertion of bony structures and another two test tubes containing different concentrations of iodine contrast media. Standard scanning protocols were employed for the PET/CT image acquisition. The highest absolute differences in the SUVmax and SUVmean values of the saline bags were found to be about 0.2 and 0.4, respectively. The primary test tube showed the largest change of 1.5 in both SUVs; SUV max and SUVmean. However, none of these changes were found to be statistically significant. The clinical literature also contains no evidence to suggest that the changes of this magnitude would change the final diagnosis. Based on these preliminary data, we propose that iodine contrast media can be used during the CT scan of PET/CT imaging, without significantly affecting the diagnostic quality of this integrated imaging modality.

  15. Quality assurance in RapidArc with Alderson anthropomorphic phantom using radiochromic film in comparison to MATLAB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Paulo L.; Silva, Leonardo P.; Santos, Maira R.; Trindade, Cassia; Martins, Lais P.; Batista, Delano V.S.; Alves, Victor G.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presented the quality control for RapidArc using an Alderson human body phantom and radiochromic film as an alternative system to approve the treatment plan for brain tumor. Thus, it was comprised the dose distributions provided by the treatment planning system with those measured by the film radiochromic. The gamma index (Γ) analysis, to verify the acceptability of the dose distribution, was 95% of approved points, with the mostly non-compliance points in regions near the PTV’s edges. These non-compliance points may be associated to transmission blades aspects, because the regions near the edges present significant losses compared to the central areas. Also, MATLAB has proved an effective tool for that measurements and it can be used in quality assurance programs. (author)

  16. MO-E-17A-02: Incorporation of Contrast Medium Dynamics in Anthropomorphic Phantoms: The Advent of 5D XCAT Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahbaee, P [NC State University, Raleigh, NC (United States); Samei, E [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Segars, W [Duke University, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a unique method to incorporate the dynamics of contrast-medium propagation into the anthropomorphic phantom, to generate a five-dimensional (5D) patient model for multimodality imaging studies. Methods: A compartmental model of blood circulation network within the body was embodied into an extended cardiac-torso (4D-XCAT) patient model. To do so, a computational physiologic model of the human cardiovascular system was developed which includes a series of compartments representing heart, vessels, and organs. Patient-specific cardiac output and blood volume were used as inputs influenced by the weight, height, age, and gender of the patient's model. For a given injection protocol and given XCAT model, the contrast-medium transmission within the body was described by a series of mass balance differential equations, the solutions to which provided the contrast enhancement-time curves for each organ; thereby defining the tissue materials including the contrastmedium within the XCAT model. A library of time-dependent organ materials was then defined. Each organ in each voxelized 4D-XCAT phantom was assigned to a corresponding time-varying material to create the 5D-XCAT phantom in which the fifth dimension is blood/contrast-medium within the temporal domain. Results: The model effectively predicts the time-varying concentration behavior of various contrast-medium administration in each organ for different patient models as function of patient size (weight/height) and different injection protocol factors (injection rate and pattern, iodine concentration or volume). The contrast enhanced XCAT patient models was developed based on the concentration of iodine as a function of time after injection. Conclusion: Majority of medical imaging systems take advantage of contrast-medium administration in terms of better image quality, the effect of which was ignored in previous optimization studies. The study enables a comprehensive optimization of contrast

  17. Design construction and testing of a human abdomen phantom (anthropomorphic) for in-vivo dosimetry in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addison, E.C.K.; Andam, A.B.; Nani, E.K.; Dogbe, R.

    2007-01-01

    Using direct measurement, we investigated entrance surface doses of patients for routine radiographs in attempt to develop evaluation methods of patient dose in order to establish the guidance level in Ghana. To date, patient doses have been evaluated by calculation based on radiographic conditions, or model experiments using phantoms, also based on several assumptions. Direct measurement of patient dose is difficult to perform in many patients due to its time requirement, level of expertise required and difficulty in providing an explanation of the procedure to the patient. However, such direct measurement is essential since it incorporates all aspects of radiography from the radiographic equipment used, to the actual conditions of each patient without assumption. In this study, we examined the need for introducing the guidance level, controversial points in the calculation method for patient dose evaluation, evaluation accuracy required for introducing the guidance level, and necessity for a standardized method. The variation between measured and calculated doses range between -4.8 to +29.3 per cent. Computational technique is a wide ranging and cost effective method od conducting representative patient dose estimations in plain radiography. (au)

  18. Evaluation of a new system for chest tomosynthesis: aspects of image quality of different protocols determined using an anthropomorphic phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundin, A; Aspelin, P; Båth, M; Nyrén, S

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the image quality obtained with the different protocols in a new chest digital tomosynthesis (DTS) system. Methods: A chest phantom was imaged with chest X-ray equipment with DTS. 10 protocols were used, and for each protocol, nine acquisitions were performed. Four observers visually rated the quality of the reconstructed section images according to pre-defined quality criteria in four different classes. The data were analysed with visual grading characteristics (VGC) analysis, using the vendor-recommended protocol [12-s acquisition time, source-to-image distance (SID) 180 cm] as reference, and the area under the VGC curve (AUCVGC) was determined for each protocol and class of criteria. Results: Protocols with a smaller swing angle resulted in a lower image quality for the classes of criteria “disturbance” and “homogeneity in nodule” but a higher image quality for the class “structure”. The class “demarcation” showed little dependency on the swing angle. All protocols but one (6.3 s, SID 130 cm) obtained an AUCVGC significantly <0.5 (indicating lower quality than reference) for at least one class of criteria. Conclusion: The study indicates that the DTS protocol with 6.3 s yields image quality similar to that obtained with the vendor-recommended protocol (12 s) but with the clinically important advantage for patients with respiratory impairment of a shorter acquisition time. Advances in knowledge: The study demonstrates that the image quality may be strongly affected by the choice of protocol and that the vendor-recommended protocol may not be optimal. PMID:26118300

  19. Effective dose estimation for pediatric upper gastrointestinal examinations using an anthropomorphic phantom set and metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emigh, Brent; Gordon, Christopher L; Connolly, Bairbre L; Falkiner, Michelle; Thomas, Karen E

    2013-09-01

    There is a need for updated radiation dose estimates in pediatric fluoroscopy given the routine use of new dose-saving technologies and increased radiation safety awareness in pediatric imaging. To estimate effective doses for standardized pediatric upper gastrointestinal (UGI) examinations at our institute using direct dose measurement, as well as provide dose-area product (DAP) to effective dose conversion factors to be used for the estimation of UGI effective doses for boys and girls up to 10 years of age at other centers. Metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters were placed within four anthropomorphic phantoms representing children ≤10 years of age and exposed to mock UGI examinations using exposures much greater than used clinically to minimize measurement error. Measured effective dose was calculated using ICRP 103 weights and scaled to our institution's standardized clinical UGI (3.6-min fluoroscopy, four spot exposures and four examination beam projections) as determined from patient logs. Results were compared to Monte Carlo simulations and related to fluoroscope-displayed DAP. Measured effective doses for standardized pediatric UGI examinations in our institute ranged from 0.35 to 0.79 mSv in girls and were 3-8% lower for boys. Simulation-derived and measured effective doses were in agreement (percentage differences  0.18). DAP-to-effective dose conversion factors ranged from 6.5 ×10(-4) mSv per Gy-cm(2) to 4.3 × 10(-3) mSv per Gy-cm(2) for girls and were similarly lower for boys. Using modern fluoroscopy equipment, the effective dose associated with the UGI examination in children ≤10 years at our institute is MOSFETs, which were shown to agree with Monte Carlo simulated doses.

  20. Characterization of the secondary neutron field produced during treatment of an anthropomorphic phantom with x-rays, protons and carbon ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Tessa, C.; Berger, T.; Kaderka, R.; Schardt, D.; Burmeister, S.; Labrenz, J.; Reitz, G.; Durante, M.

    2014-04-01

    Short- and long-term side effects following the treatment of cancer with radiation are strongly related to the amount of dose deposited to the healthy tissue surrounding the tumor. The characterization of the radiation field outside the planned target volume is the first step for estimating health risks, such as developing a secondary radioinduced malignancy. In ion and high-energy photon treatments, the major contribution to the dose deposited in the far-out-of-field region is given by neutrons, which are produced by nuclear interaction of the primary radiation with the beam line components and the patient’s body. Measurements of the secondary neutron field and its contribution to the absorbed dose and equivalent dose for different radiotherapy technologies are presented in this work. An anthropomorphic RANDO phantom was irradiated with a treatment plan designed for a simulated 5 × 2 × 5 cm3 cancer volume located in the center of the head. The experiment was repeated with 25 MV IMRT (intensity modulated radiation therapy) photons and charged particles (protons and carbon ions) delivered with both passive modulation and spot scanning in different facilities. The measurements were performed with active (silicon-scintillation) and passive (bubble, thermoluminescence 6LiF:Mg, Ti (TLD-600) and 7LiF:Mg, Ti (TLD-700)) detectors to investigate the production of neutral particles both inside and outside the phantom. These techniques provided the whole energy spectrum (E ⩽ 20 MeV) and corresponding absorbed dose and dose equivalent of photo neutrons produced by x-rays, the fluence of thermal neutrons for all irradiation types and the absorbed dose deposited by neutrons with 0.8 energy x-rays, the contribution of secondary neutrons to the dose equivalent is of the same order of magnitude as the primary radiation. In carbon therapy delivered with raster scanning, the absorbed dose deposited by neutrons in the energy region between 0.8 and 10 MeV is almost two orders of

  1. Relationships of clinical protocols and reconstruction kernels with image quality and radiation dose in a 128-slice CT scanner: Study with an anthropomorphic and water phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Jijo; Krauss, B.; Banckwitz, R.; Maentele, W.; Bauer, R.W.; Vogl, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    Research highlights: ► Clinical protocol, reconstruction kernel, reconstructed slice thickness, phantom diameter or the density of material it contains directly affects the image quality of DSCT. ► Dual energy protocol shows the lowest DLP compared to all other protocols examined. ► Dual-energy fused images show excellent image quality and the noise is same as that of single- or high-pitch mode protocol images. ► Advanced CT technology improves image quality and considerably reduce radiation dose. ► An important finding is the comparatively higher DLP of the dual-source high-pitch protocol compared to other single- or dual-energy protocols. - Abstract: Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the relationship of scanning parameters (clinical protocols), reconstruction kernels and slice thickness with image quality and radiation dose in a DSCT. Materials and methods: The chest of an anthropomorphic phantom was scanned on a DSCT scanner (Siemens Somatom Definition flash) using different clinical protocols, including single- and dual-energy modes. Four scan protocols were investigated: 1) single-source 120 kV, 110 mA s, 2) single-source 100 kV, 180 mA s, 3) high-pitch 120 kV, 130 mA s and 4) dual-energy with 100/Sn140 kV, eff.mA s 89, 76. The automatic exposure control was switched off for all the scans and the CTDIvol selected was in between 7.12 and 7.37 mGy. The raw data were reconstructed using the reconstruction kernels B31f, B80f and B70f, and slice thicknesses were 1.0 mm and 5.0 mm. Finally, the same parameters and procedures were used for the scanning of water phantom. Friedman test and Wilcoxon-Matched-Pair test were used for statistical analysis. Results: The DLP based on the given CTDIvol values showed significantly lower exposure for protocol 4, when compared to protocol 1 (percent difference 5.18%), protocol 2 (percent diff. 4.51%), and protocol 3 (percent diff. 8.81%). The highest change in Hounsfield Units was observed with dual

  2. Preparation of A-150 tissue-equivalent plastic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saion, E.B.; Shaari, A.H.; Watt, D.E.

    1992-01-01

    A-150 tissue-equivalent (TE) plastic is widely used as a wall material for tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPCS) used in experimental microdosimetry. The objective of this note is to give a technical account of how A-150 TE plastic film can be fabricated in the laboratory from commercially available A-150 TE plastic. (author)

  3. SU-F-T-517: Determining the Tissue Equivalence of a Brass Mesh Bolus in a Reconstructed Chest Wall Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shekel, E; Epstein, D; Levin, D [Dept of radiotherapy, Assuta Medical Centers, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the tissue equivalence of a brass mesh bolus (RPD) in the setting of a reconstructed chest wall irradiation Methods: We measured breast skin dose delivered by a tangential field plan on an anthropomorphic phantom using Mosfet and nanoDot (Landauer) dosimeters in five different locations on the breast. We also measured skin dose using no bolus, 5mm and 10 mm superflab bolus. In the Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian, Palo Alto, CA) we calculated skin dose for different bolus thicknesses, ranging from 0 to 10 mm, in order to evaluate which calculation best matches the brass mesh measurements, as the brass mesh cannot be simulated due to artefacts.Finally, we measured depth dose behavior with the brass mesh bolus to verify that the bolus does not affect the dose to the breast itself beyond the build-up region. Results: Mosfet and nanoDot measurements were consistent with each other.As expected, skin dose measurements with no bolus had the least agreement with Eclipse calculation, while measurements for 5 and 10 mm agreed well with the calculation despite the difficulty in conforming superflab bolus to the breast contour. For the brass mesh the best agreement was for 3 mm bolus Eclipse calculation. For Mosfets, the average measurement was 90.8% of the expected dose, and for nanoDots 88.33% compared to 83.34%, 88.64% and 93.94% (2,3 and 5 mm bolus calculation respectively).The brass mesh bolus increased skin dose by approximately 25% but there was no dose increase beyond the build-up region. Conclusion: Brass mesh bolus is most equivalent to a 3 mm bolus, and does not affect the dose beyond the build-up region. The brass mesh cannot be directly calculated in Eclipse, hence a 3mm bolus calculation is a good reflection of the dose response to the brass mesh bolus.

  4. Design and development of an anthropomorphic phantom equipped with detectors in order to evaluate the effective dose E at workplaces: feasibility study; Conception et developpement d'un fantome anthropomorphe equipe de detecteurs dans le but d'evaluer la dose efficace a un poste de travail: etude de faisabilite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furstoss, Ch

    2006-11-15

    My PhD study aims to determine the feasibility to design and develop, for photon fields, an anthropomorphic phantom equipped with detectors in order to evaluate the effective dose E at workplaces. First of all, the energy losses within the organs are calculated using the M.C.N.P.X. Monte Carlo code, in order to determine the detection positions within the different organs. Then, to decrease the number of detection positions, the organ contribution to the effective dose is studied. Finally, the characteristics of the detectors to insert and the characteristics of the phantom to use are deduced. The results show that 24 or 23 detection positions, according to the wT values (publication 60 or new recommendations of the ICRP), give a E estimation with an uncertainty of {+-}15 % from 50 keV to 4 MeV. Moreover, the interest of such an instrument is underlined while comparing the E estimation by the personal dose equivalent Hp to the E estimation by the instrumented phantom when the phantom is irradiated by point sources (worker in front of a glove box for example). Last, after the detector and phantom characteristic determination, two types of detectors and one type of phantom are selected. However, for the detectors mainly, developments are necessary. Follow up this study, the characterization and the adaptation of the detectors to the project would be interesting. Furthermore, the study to mixed photon-neutrons would be required the needs of the radiological protection community. (author)

  5. Experimental and computational development of a natural breast phantom for dosimetry studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, Luciana B.; Campos, Tarcisio P.R.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the experimental and computational development of a natural breast phantom, anthropomorphic and anthropometric for studies in dosimetry of brachytherapy and teletherapy of breast. The natural breast phantom developed corresponding to fibroadipose breasts of women aged 30 to 50 years, presenting radiographically medium density. The experimental breast phantom was constituted of three tissue-equivalents (TE's): glandular TE, adipose TE and skin TE. These TE's were developed according to chemical composition of human breast and present radiological response to exposure. Completed the construction of experimental breast phantom this was mounted on a thorax phantom previously developed by the research group NRI/UFMG. Then the computational breast phantom was constructed by performing a computed tomography (CT) by axial slices of the chest phantom. Through the images generated by CT a computational model of voxels of the thorax phantom was developed by SISCODES computational program, being the computational breast phantom represented by the same TE's of the experimental breast phantom. The images generated by CT allowed evaluating the radiological equivalence of the tissues. The breast phantom is being used in studies of experimental dosimetry both in brachytherapy as in teletherapy of breast. Dosimetry studies by MCNP-5 code using the computational model of the phantom breast are in progress. (author)

  6. Effective dose estimation for pediatric upper gastrointestinal examinations using an anthropomorphic phantom set and metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emigh, Brent; Gordon, Christopher L.; Falkiner, Michelle; Thomas, Karen E.; Connolly, Bairbre L.

    2013-01-01

    There is a need for updated radiation dose estimates in pediatric fluoroscopy given the routine use of new dose-saving technologies and increased radiation safety awareness in pediatric imaging. To estimate effective doses for standardized pediatric upper gastrointestinal (UGI) examinations at our institute using direct dose measurement, as well as provide dose-area product (DAP) to effective dose conversion factors to be used for the estimation of UGI effective doses for boys and girls up to 10 years of age at other centers. Metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters were placed within four anthropomorphic phantoms representing children ≤10 years of age and exposed to mock UGI examinations using exposures much greater than used clinically to minimize measurement error. Measured effective dose was calculated using ICRP 103 weights and scaled to our institution's standardized clinical UGI (3.6-min fluoroscopy, four spot exposures and four examination beam projections) as determined from patient logs. Results were compared to Monte Carlo simulations and related to fluoroscope-displayed DAP. Measured effective doses for standardized pediatric UGI examinations in our institute ranged from 0.35 to 0.79 mSv in girls and were 3-8% lower for boys. Simulation-derived and measured effective doses were in agreement (percentage differences 0.18). DAP-to-effective dose conversion factors ranged from 6.5 x 10 -4 mSv per Gy-cm 2 to 4.3 x 10 -3 mSv per Gy-cm 2 for girls and were similarly lower for boys. Using modern fluoroscopy equipment, the effective dose associated with the UGI examination in children ≤10 years at our institute is < 1 mSv. Estimations of effective dose associated with pediatric UGI examinations can be made for children up to the age of 10 using the DAP-normalized conversion factors provided in this study. These estimates can be further refined to reflect individual hospital examination protocols through the use of direct organ

  7. A quantitative comparison of noise reduction across five commercial (hybrid and model-based) iterative reconstruction techniques: an anthropomorphic phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, Manuel; Fuentes, Jorge M; Hayano, Koichi; Kambadakone, Avinash R; Uyeda, Jennifer W; Sahani, Dushyant V

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE. The objective of our study was to compare the performance of three hybrid iterative reconstruction techniques (IRTs) (ASiR, iDose4, SAFIRE) and their respective strengths for image noise reduction on low-dose CT examinations using filtered back projection (FBP) as the standard reference. Also, we compared the performance of these three hybrid IRTs with two model-based IRTs (Veo and IMR) for image noise reduction on low-dose examinations. MATERIALS AND METHODS. An anthropomorphic abdomen phantom was scanned at 100 and 120 kVp and different tube current-exposure time products (25-100 mAs) on three CT systems (for ASiR and Veo, Discovery CT750 HD; for iDose4 and IMR, Brilliance iCT; and for SAFIRE, Somatom Definition Flash). Images were reconstructed using FBP and using IRTs at various strengths. Nine noise measurements (mean ROI size, 423 mm(2)) on extracolonic fat for the different strengths of IRTs were recorded and compared with FBP using ANOVA. Radiation dose, which was measured as the volume CT dose index and dose-length product, was also compared. RESULTS. There were no significant differences in radiation dose and image noise among the scanners when FBP was used (p > 0.05). Gradual image noise reduction was observed with each increasing increment of hybrid IRT strength, with a maximum noise suppression of approximately 50% (48.2-53.9%). Similar noise reduction was achieved on the scanners by applying specific hybrid IRT strengths. Maximum noise reduction was higher on model-based IRTs (68.3-81.1%) than hybrid IRTs (48.2-53.9%) (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION. When constant scanning parameters are used, radiation dose and image noise on FBP are similar for CT scanners made by different manufacturers. Significant image noise reduction is achieved on low-dose CT examinations rendered with IRTs. The image noise on various scanners can be matched by applying specific hybrid IRT strengths. Model-based IRTs attain substantially higher noise reduction than hybrid

  8. SU-E-T-87: Comparison Study of Dose Reconstruction From Cylindrical Diode Array Measurements, with TLD Measurements and Treatment Planning System Calculations in Anthropomorphic Head and Neck and Lung Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benhabib, S; Cardan, R; Huang, M; Brezovich, I; Popple, R [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Faught, A; Followill, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess dose calculated by the 3DVH software (Sun Nuclear Systems, Melbourne, FL) against TLD measurements and treatment planning system calculations in anthropomorphic phantoms. Methods: The IROC Houston (RPC) head and neck (HN) and lung phantoms were scanned and plans were generated using Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems, Milpitas, CA) following IROC Houston procedures. For the H and N phantom, 6 MV VMAT and 9-field dynamic MLC (DMLC) plans were created. For the lung phantom 6 MV VMAT and 15 MV 9-field dynamic MLC (DMLC) plans were created. The plans were delivered to the phantoms and to an ArcCHECK (Sun Nuclear Systems, Melbourne, FL). The head and neck phantom contained 8 TLDs located at PTV1 (4), PTV2 (2), and OAR Cord (2). The lung phantom contained 4 TLDs, 2 in the PTV, 1 in the cord, and 1 in the heart. Daily outputs were recorded before each measurement for correction. 3DVH dose reconstruction software was used to project the calculated dose to patient anatomy. Results: For the HN phantom, the maximum difference between 3DVH and TLDs was -3.4% and between 3DVH and Eclipse was 1.2%. For the lung plan the maximum difference between 3DVH and TLDs was 4.3%, except for the spinal cord for which 3DVH overestimated the TLD dose by 12%. The maximum difference between 3DVH and Eclipse was 0.3%. 3DVH agreed well with Eclipse because the dose reconstruction algorithm uses the diode measurements to perturb the dose calculated by the treatment planning system; therefore, if there is a problem in the modeling or heterogeneity correction, it will be carried through to 3DVH. Conclusion: 3DVH agreed well with Eclipse and TLD measurements. Comparison of 3DVH with film measurements is ongoing. Work supported by PHS grant CA10953 and CA81647 (NCI, DHHS)

  9. Initial implementation of the conversion from the energy-subtracted CT number to electron density in tissue inhomogeneity corrections: An anthropomorphic phantom study of radiotherapy treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukihara, Masayoshi [Division of Radiological Technology, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Niigata University, Niigata 951-8518 (Japan); Noto, Yoshiyuki [Department of Radiology, Niigata University Medical and Dental Hospital, Niigata 951-8520 (Japan); Sasamoto, Ryuta; Hayakawa, Takahide; Saito, Masatoshi, E-mail: masaito@clg.niigata-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiological Technology, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Niigata University, Niigata 951-8518 (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To achieve accurate tissue inhomogeneity corrections in radiotherapy treatment planning, the authors had previously proposed a novel conversion of the energy-subtracted computed tomography (CT) number to an electron density (ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion), which provides a single linear relationship between ΔHU and ρ{sub e} over a wide range of ρ{sub e}. The purpose of this study is to present an initial implementation of the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion method for a treatment planning system (TPS). In this paper, two example radiotherapy plans are used to evaluate the reliability of dose calculations in the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion method. Methods: CT images were acquired using a clinical dual-source CT (DSCT) scanner operated in the dual-energy mode with two tube potential pairs and an additional tin (Sn) filter for the high-kV tube (80–140 kV/Sn and 100–140 kV/Sn). Single-energy CT using the same DSCT scanner was also performed at 120 kV to compare the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion method with a conventional conversion from a CT number to ρ{sub e} (Hounsfield units, HU–ρ{sub e} conversion). Lookup tables for ρ{sub e} calibration were obtained from the CT image acquisitions for tissue substitutes in an electron density phantom (EDP). To investigate the beam-hardening effect on dosimetric uncertainties, two EDPs with different sizes (a body EDP and a head EDP) were used for the ρ{sub e} calibration. Each acquired lookup table was applied to two radiotherapy plans designed using the XiO TPS with the superposition algorithm for an anthropomorphic phantom. The first radiotherapy plan was for an oral cavity tumor and the second was for a lung tumor. Results: In both treatment plans, the performance of the ΔHU–ρ{sub e} conversion was superior to that of the conventional HU–ρ{sub e} conversion in terms of the reliability of dose calculations. Especially, for the oral tumor plan, which dealt with dentition and bony structures, treatment

  10. Characterization and validation of the thorax phantom Lungman for dose assessment in chest radiography optimization studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Pérez, Sunay; Marshall, Nicholas William; Struelens, Lara; Bosmans, Hilde

    2018-01-01

    This work concerns the validation of the Kyoto-Kagaku thorax anthropomorphic phantom Lungman for use in chest radiography optimization. The equivalence in terms of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) was established for the lung and mediastinum regions of the phantom. Patient chest examination data acquired under automatic exposure control were collated over a 2-year period for a standard x-ray room. Parameters surveyed included exposure index, air kerma area product, and exposure time, which were compared with Lungman values. Finally, a voxel model was developed by segmenting computed tomography images of the phantom and implemented in PENELOPE/penEasy Monte Carlo code to compare phantom tissue-equivalent materials with materials from ICRP Publication 89 in terms of organ dose. PMMA equivalence varied depending on tube voltage, from 9.5 to 10.0 cm and from 13.5 to 13.7 cm, for the lungs and mediastinum regions, respectively. For the survey, close agreement was found between the phantom and the patients' median values (deviations lay between 8% and 14%). Differences in lung doses, an important organ for optimization in chest radiography, were below 13% when comparing the use of phantom tissue-equivalent materials versus ICRP materials. The study confirms the value of the Lungman for chest optimization studies.

  11. Polyurethane as a base for a family of tissue equivalent materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, R.V.

    1980-01-01

    Recent experience gained in the selection of tissue equivalent materials for the construction of whole body counting phantoms has shown that commercially available polyurethane can be used as a base for a variety of tissue equivalent materials. Tissues simulated include lung, adipose, muscle, cartilage and rib bone. When selecting tissue equivalent materials it is important to understand what tissue properties must be simulated. Materials that simply simulate the linear attenuation of low energy photons for example, are not very likely to simulate neutron interaction properties accurately. With this in mind, we have developed more than one simulation composition for a given tissue, depending on the purpose to which the simulant is to be applied. Simple simulation of linear attenuation can be achieved by addition of carefully measured amounts of higher Z material, such as calcium carbonate to the polyurethane. However, the simulation necessary for medical scanning purposes, or for use in mixed radiation fields requires more complex formulations to yield proper material density, hydrogen and nitrogen content, electron density, and effective atomic number. Though polyurethane has limitations for simulation of tissues that differ markedly from its inherent composition (such as compacted bone), it is safe and easily used in modestly equipped laboratories. The simulants are durable and generally flexible. They can also be easily cast in irregular shapes to simulate specific organ geometries. (author)

  12. Construction of Korean female voxel phantom and its application to dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Choon Ik

    2001-08-15

    A Korean female voxel phantom was constructed to overcome the limitations of anatomical description of the existing MRD-type mathematical anthropomorphic phantom and the example dose calculations were carried out for the radiation protection by using it. This whole body voxel phantom was based on the MRIs of the Korean adult female who falls into the reference Korean female group. The cross sectional human pictures from VHP of NLM was adopted for the modification and compensation of the missing MRIs of Korean adult female that include legs below upper thighs. From the gastrointestinal and respiratory organ which make obscure organ edges because of their continuing motion, the general anatomical knowledge were applied for the segmentation process. The Korean female whole body voxel phantom named in HYWOMAN is composed of 1,392,400 voxels that have width x length x height of 4mm x 4mm x 8mm for each with the total of 20 organs identified. With MDNP4B code the tissue equivalent doses were calculated for the four different energies of 0.4, 0.8, 2 and 8 MeV broad parallel gamma beam in AP, PA, LLAT and RLAT directions. The tissue equivalent doses were compared with those of ORNL adult female phantom under the same irradiation conditions. Despite of the small organ differences there could be found the considerable differences in tissue equivalent doses for some organs including thyroid, esophagus, kidneys and spleen. The cause of these discrepancies were proved to be the position of the organs in the phantom and the consequent shielding effects. With the methodology of this study, Korean reference male and female age-grouped voxel phantoms can be constructed and consequently the dosimetry system for typical Korean people is to be established.

  13. Construction of Korean female voxel phantom and its application to dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choon Ik

    2001-08-01

    A Korean female voxel phantom was constructed to overcome the limitations of anatomical description of the existing MRD-type mathematical anthropomorphic phantom and the example dose calculations were carried out for the radiation protection by using it. This whole body voxel phantom was based on the MRIs of the Korean adult female who falls into the reference Korean female group. The cross sectional human pictures from VHP of NLM was adopted for the modification and compensation of the missing MRIs of Korean adult female that include legs below upper thighs. From the gastrointestinal and respiratory organ which make obscure organ edges because of their continuing motion, the general anatomical knowledge were applied for the segmentation process. The Korean female whole body voxel phantom named in HYWOMAN is composed of 1,392,400 voxels that have width x length x height of 4mm x 4mm x 8mm for each with the total of 20 organs identified. With MDNP4B code the tissue equivalent doses were calculated for the four different energies of 0.4, 0.8, 2 and 8 MeV broad parallel gamma beam in AP, PA, LLAT and RLAT directions. The tissue equivalent doses were compared with those of ORNL adult female phantom under the same irradiation conditions. Despite of the small organ differences there could be found the considerable differences in tissue equivalent doses for some organs including thyroid, esophagus, kidneys and spleen. The cause of these discrepancies were proved to be the position of the organs in the phantom and the consequent shielding effects. With the methodology of this study, Korean reference male and female age-grouped voxel phantoms can be constructed and consequently the dosimetry system for typical Korean people is to be established

  14. Dose distribution around ion track in tissue equivalent material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wenzhong; Guo Yong; Luo Yisheng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the energy deposition micro-specialty of ions in body-tissue or tissue equivalent material (TEM). Methods: The water vapor was determined as the tissue equivalent material, based on the analysis to the body-tissue, and Monte Carlo method was used to simulate the behavior of proton in the tissue equivalent material. Some features of the energy deposition micro-specialty of ion in tissue equivalent material were obtained through the analysis to the data from calculation. Results: The ion will give the energy by the way of excitation and ionization in material, then the secondary electrons will be generated in the progress of ionization, these electron will finished ions energy deposition progress. When ions deposited their energy, large amount energy will be in the core of tracks, and secondary electrons will devote its' energy around ion track, the ion dose distribution is then formed in TEM. Conclusions: To know biological effects of radiation , the research to dose distribution of ions is of importance(significance). (authors)

  15. Ultra-high pitch chest computed tomography at 70 kVp tube voltage in an anthropomorphic pediatric phantom and non-sedated pediatric patients: Initial experience with 3rd generation dual-source CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagelstein, Claudia; Henzler, Thomas; Haubenreisser, Holger; Meyer, Mathias; Sudarski, Sonja; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Neff, K Wolfgang; Weis, Meike

    2016-12-01

    Minimizing radiation dose while at the same time preserving image quality is of particular importance in pediatric chest CT. Very recently, CT imaging with a tube voltage of 70 kVp has become clinically available. However, image noise is inversely proportional to the tube voltage. We aimed to investigate radiation dose and image quality of pediatric chest CT performed at 70 kVp in an anthropomorphic pediatric phantom as well as in clinical patients. An anthropomorphic pediatric phantom, which resembles a one-year-old child in physiognomy, was scanned on the 3 rd generation dual-source CT (DSCT) system at 70 kVp and 80 kVp and a fixed ultra low tube-current of 8 mAs to solely evaluate the impact of lowering tube voltage. After the phantom measurements, 18 pediatric patients (mean 29.5 months; range 1-91 months; 21 examinations) underwent 3.2 high-pitch chest CT on the same DSCT system at 70 kVp tube voltage without any sedation. Radiation dose and presence of motion artifacts was compared to a retrospectively identified patient cohort examined at 80 kVp on a 16-slice single-source-CT (SSCT; n=15; 14/15 with sedation; mean 30.7 months; range 0-96 months; pitch=1.5) or on a 2 nd generation DSCT without any sedation (n=6; mean 32.8 months; range 4-61 months; pitch=3.2). Radiation dose in the phantom scans was reduced by approximately 40% when using a tube voltage of 70 kVp instead of 80 kVp. In the pediatric patient group examined at 70 kVp age-specific effective dose (ED; mean 0.5±0.2 mSv) was significantly lower when compared to the retrospective cohort scanned at 80 kVp on the 16-slice-SSCT (mean ED: 1.0±0.3 mSv; pCT examinations showed any motion artifacts whereas 13/15 examinations of the retrospective patient cohort scanned at 80 kVp with a pitch of 1.5 showed motion artifacts. 3.2 high-pitch chest CT performed with 70 kVp significantly reduces radiation dose when compared to 80 kVp while at the same time provides good image quality without any motion artifacts

  16. Development of realistic physical breast phantoms matched to virtual breast phantoms based on human subject data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiarashi, Nooshin; Nolte, Adam C.; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Ghate, Sujata V.; Segars, William P.; Nolte, Loren W.; Samei, Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Physical phantoms are essential for the development, optimization, and evaluation of x-ray breast imaging systems. Recognizing the major effect of anatomy on image quality and clinical performance, such phantoms should ideally reflect the three-dimensional structure of the human breast. Currently, there is no commercially available three-dimensional physical breast phantom that is anthropomorphic. The authors present the development of a new suite of physical breast phantoms based on human data. Methods: The phantoms were designed to match the extended cardiac-torso virtual breast phantoms that were based on dedicated breast computed tomography images of human subjects. The phantoms were fabricated by high-resolution multimaterial additive manufacturing (3D printing) technology. The glandular equivalency of the photopolymer materials was measured relative to breast tissue-equivalent plastic materials. Based on the current state-of-the-art in the technology and available materials, two variations were fabricated. The first was a dual-material phantom, the Doublet. Fibroglandular tissue and skin were represented by the most radiographically dense material available; adipose tissue was represented by the least radiographically dense material. The second variation, the Singlet, was fabricated with a single material to represent fibroglandular tissue and skin. It was subsequently filled with adipose-equivalent materials including oil, beeswax, and permanent urethane-based polymer. Simulated microcalcification clusters were further included in the phantoms via crushed eggshells. The phantoms were imaged and characterized visually and quantitatively. Results: The mammographic projections and tomosynthesis reconstructed images of the fabricated phantoms yielded realistic breast background. The mammograms of the phantoms demonstrated close correlation with simulated mammographic projection images of the corresponding virtual phantoms. Furthermore, power

  17. Development of realistic physical breast phantoms matched to virtual breast phantoms based on human subject data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiarashi, Nooshin [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Nolte, Adam C. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Ghate, Sujata V. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Segars, William P. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Nolte, Loren W. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Samei, Ehsan [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); and others

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Physical phantoms are essential for the development, optimization, and evaluation of x-ray breast imaging systems. Recognizing the major effect of anatomy on image quality and clinical performance, such phantoms should ideally reflect the three-dimensional structure of the human breast. Currently, there is no commercially available three-dimensional physical breast phantom that is anthropomorphic. The authors present the development of a new suite of physical breast phantoms based on human data. Methods: The phantoms were designed to match the extended cardiac-torso virtual breast phantoms that were based on dedicated breast computed tomography images of human subjects. The phantoms were fabricated by high-resolution multimaterial additive manufacturing (3D printing) technology. The glandular equivalency of the photopolymer materials was measured relative to breast tissue-equivalent plastic materials. Based on the current state-of-the-art in the technology and available materials, two variations were fabricated. The first was a dual-material phantom, the Doublet. Fibroglandular tissue and skin were represented by the most radiographically dense material available; adipose tissue was represented by the least radiographically dense material. The second variation, the Singlet, was fabricated with a single material to represent fibroglandular tissue and skin. It was subsequently filled with adipose-equivalent materials including oil, beeswax, and permanent urethane-based polymer. Simulated microcalcification clusters were further included in the phantoms via crushed eggshells. The phantoms were imaged and characterized visually and quantitatively. Results: The mammographic projections and tomosynthesis reconstructed images of the fabricated phantoms yielded realistic breast background. The mammograms of the phantoms demonstrated close correlation with simulated mammographic projection images of the corresponding virtual phantoms. Furthermore, power

  18. SU-F-BRE-04: Construction of 3D Printed Patient Specific Phantoms for Dosimetric Verification Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehler, E; Higgins, P; Dusenbery, K

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To validate a method to create per patient phantoms for dosimetric verification measurements. Methods: Using a RANDO phantom as a substitute for an actual patient, a model of the external features of the head and neck region of the phantom was created. A phantom was used instead of a human for two reasons: to allow for dosimetric measurements that would not be possible in-vivo and to avoid patient privacy issues. Using acrylonitrile butadiene styrene thermoplastic as the building material, a hollow replica was created using the 3D printer filled with a custom tissue equivalent mixture of paraffin wax, magnesium oxide, and calcium carbonate. A traditional parallel-opposed head and neck plan was constructed. Measurements were performed with thermoluminescent dosimeters in both the RANDO phantom and in the 3D printed phantom. Calculated and measured dose was compared at 17 points phantoms including regions in high and low dose regions and at the field edges. On-board cone beam CT was used to localize both phantoms within 1mm and 1° prior to radiation. Results: The maximum difference in calculated dose between phantoms was 1.8% of the planned dose (180 cGy). The mean difference between calculated and measured dose in the anthropomorphic phantom and the 3D printed phantom was 1.9% ± 2.8% and −0.1% ± 4.9%, respectively. The difference between measured and calculated dose was determined in the RANDO and 3D printed phantoms. The differences between measured and calculated dose in each respective phantom was within 2% for 12 of 17 points. The overlap of the RANDO and 3D printed phantom was 0.956 (Jaccard Index). Conclusion: A custom phantom was created using a 3D printer. Dosimetric calculations and measurements showed good agreement between the dose in the RANDO phantom (patient substitute) and the 3D printed phantom

  19. SU-F-BRE-04: Construction of 3D Printed Patient Specific Phantoms for Dosimetric Verification Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehler, E; Higgins, P; Dusenbery, K [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To validate a method to create per patient phantoms for dosimetric verification measurements. Methods: Using a RANDO phantom as a substitute for an actual patient, a model of the external features of the head and neck region of the phantom was created. A phantom was used instead of a human for two reasons: to allow for dosimetric measurements that would not be possible in-vivo and to avoid patient privacy issues. Using acrylonitrile butadiene styrene thermoplastic as the building material, a hollow replica was created using the 3D printer filled with a custom tissue equivalent mixture of paraffin wax, magnesium oxide, and calcium carbonate. A traditional parallel-opposed head and neck plan was constructed. Measurements were performed with thermoluminescent dosimeters in both the RANDO phantom and in the 3D printed phantom. Calculated and measured dose was compared at 17 points phantoms including regions in high and low dose regions and at the field edges. On-board cone beam CT was used to localize both phantoms within 1mm and 1° prior to radiation. Results: The maximum difference in calculated dose between phantoms was 1.8% of the planned dose (180 cGy). The mean difference between calculated and measured dose in the anthropomorphic phantom and the 3D printed phantom was 1.9% ± 2.8% and −0.1% ± 4.9%, respectively. The difference between measured and calculated dose was determined in the RANDO and 3D printed phantoms. The differences between measured and calculated dose in each respective phantom was within 2% for 12 of 17 points. The overlap of the RANDO and 3D printed phantom was 0.956 (Jaccard Index). Conclusion: A custom phantom was created using a 3D printer. Dosimetric calculations and measurements showed good agreement between the dose in the RANDO phantom (patient substitute) and the 3D printed phantom.

  20. Dynamic 99mTc-MAG3 renography: images for quality control obtained by combining pharmacokinetic modelling, an anthropomorphic computer phantom and Monte Carlo simulated scintillation camera imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brolin, Gustav; Sjögreen Gleisner, Katarina; Ljungberg, Michael

    2013-05-01

    In dynamic renal scintigraphy, the main interest is the radiopharmaceutical redistribution as a function of time. Quality control (QC) of renal procedures often relies on phantom experiments to compare image-based results with the measurement setup. A phantom with a realistic anatomy and time-varying activity distribution is therefore desirable. This work describes a pharmacokinetic (PK) compartment model for 99mTc-MAG3, used for defining a dynamic whole-body activity distribution within a digital phantom (XCAT) for accurate Monte Carlo (MC)-based images for QC. Each phantom structure is assigned a time-activity curve provided by the PK model, employing parameter values consistent with MAG3 pharmacokinetics. This approach ensures that the total amount of tracer in the phantom is preserved between time points, and it allows for modifications of the pharmacokinetics in a controlled fashion. By adjusting parameter values in the PK model, different clinically realistic scenarios can be mimicked, regarding, e.g., the relative renal uptake and renal transit time. Using the MC code SIMIND, a complete set of renography images including effects of photon attenuation, scattering, limited spatial resolution and noise, are simulated. The obtained image data can be used to evaluate quantitative techniques and computer software in clinical renography.

  1. Positron range in tissue-equivalent materials: experimental microPET studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alva-Sánchez, H.; Quintana-Bautista, C.; Martínez-Dávalos, A.; Ávila-Rodríguez, M. A.; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, M.

    2016-09-01

    In this work an experimental investigation was carried out to study the effect that positron range has over positron emission tomography (PET) scans through measurements of the line spread function (LSF) in tissue-equivalent materials. Line-sources consisted of thin capillary tubes filled with 18F, 13N or 68Ga water-solution inserted along the axis of symmetry of cylindrical phantoms constructed with the tissue-equivalent materials: lung (inhale and exhale), adipose tissue, solid water, trabecular and cortical bone. PET scans were performed with a commercial small-animal PET scanner and image reconstruction was carried out with filtered-backprojection. Line-source distributions were analyzed using radial profiles taken on axial slices from which the spatial resolution was determined through the full-width at half-maximum, tenth-maximum, twentieth-maximum and fiftieth-maximum. A double-Gaussian model of the LSFs was used to fit experimental data which can be incorporated into iterative reconstruction methods. In addition, the maximum activity concentration in the line-sources was determined from reconstructed images and compared to the known values for each case. The experimental data indicates that positron range in different materials has a strong effect on both spatial resolution and activity concentration quantification in PET scans. Consequently, extra care should be taken when computing standard-uptake values in PET scans, in particular when the radiopharmaceutical is taken up by different tissues in the body, and more even so with high-energy positron emitters.

  2. SU-F-BRE-08: Feasibility of 3D Printed Patient Specific Phantoms for IMRT/IGRT QA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehler, E; Higgins, P; Dusenbery, K

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Test the feasibility of 3D printed, per-patient phantoms for IMRT QA to analyze the treatment delivery quality within the patient geometry. Methods: Using the head and neck region of an anthropomorphic phantom as a substitute for an actual patient, a soft-tissue equivalent model was constructed with the use of a 3D printer. A nine-field IMRT plan was constructed and dose verification measurements were performed for the 3D printed phantom. During the delivery of the IMRT QA on to the 3D printed phantom, the same patient positioning indexing system was used on the phantom and image guidance (cone beam CT) was used to localize the phantom, serving as a test of the IGRT system as well. The 3D printed phantom was designed to accommodate four radiochromic film planes (two axial, one coronal and one sagittal) and an ionization chamber measurement. As a frame of comparison, the IMRT QA was also performed on traditional phantoms. Dosimetric tolerance levels such as 3mm / 3% Gamma Index as well as 3% and 5% dose difference were considered. All detector systems were calibrated against a NIST traceable ionization chamber. Results: Comparison of results 3D printed patient phantom with the standard IMRT QA systems showed similar passing rates for the 3D printed phantom and the standard phantoms. However, the locations of the failing regions did not necessarily correlate. The 3D printed phantom was localized within 1 mm and 1° using on-board cone beam CT. Conclusion: A custom phantom was created using a 3D printer. It was determined that the use of patient specific phantoms to perform dosimetric verification and estimate the dose in the patient is feasible. In addition, end-to-end testing on a per-patient basis was possible with the 3D printed phantom. Further refinement of the phantom construction process is needed for routine clinical use

  3. SU-F-BRE-08: Feasibility of 3D Printed Patient Specific Phantoms for IMRT/IGRT QA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehler, E; Higgins, P; Dusenbery, K [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Test the feasibility of 3D printed, per-patient phantoms for IMRT QA to analyze the treatment delivery quality within the patient geometry. Methods: Using the head and neck region of an anthropomorphic phantom as a substitute for an actual patient, a soft-tissue equivalent model was constructed with the use of a 3D printer. A nine-field IMRT plan was constructed and dose verification measurements were performed for the 3D printed phantom. During the delivery of the IMRT QA on to the 3D printed phantom, the same patient positioning indexing system was used on the phantom and image guidance (cone beam CT) was used to localize the phantom, serving as a test of the IGRT system as well. The 3D printed phantom was designed to accommodate four radiochromic film planes (two axial, one coronal and one sagittal) and an ionization chamber measurement. As a frame of comparison, the IMRT QA was also performed on traditional phantoms. Dosimetric tolerance levels such as 3mm / 3% Gamma Index as well as 3% and 5% dose difference were considered. All detector systems were calibrated against a NIST traceable ionization chamber. Results: Comparison of results 3D printed patient phantom with the standard IMRT QA systems showed similar passing rates for the 3D printed phantom and the standard phantoms. However, the locations of the failing regions did not necessarily correlate. The 3D printed phantom was localized within 1 mm and 1° using on-board cone beam CT. Conclusion: A custom phantom was created using a 3D printer. It was determined that the use of patient specific phantoms to perform dosimetric verification and estimate the dose in the patient is feasible. In addition, end-to-end testing on a per-patient basis was possible with the 3D printed phantom. Further refinement of the phantom construction process is needed for routine clinical use.

  4. Neutron dosimetry using proportional counters with tissue equivalent walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerviller, H. de

    1965-01-01

    The author reminds the calculation method of the neutron absorbed dose in a material and deduce of it the conditions what this material have to fill to be equivalent to biological tissues. Various proportional counters are mode with walls in new tissue equivalent material and filled with various gases. The multiplication factor and neutron energy response of these counters are investigated and compared with those obtained with ethylene lined polyethylene counters. The conditions of working of such proportional counters for neutron dosimetry in energy range 10 -2 to 15 MeV are specified. (author) [fr

  5. SU-F-T-181: Proton Therapy Tissue-Equivalence of 3D Printed Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, P; Craft, D; Followill, D; Howell, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This work investigated the proton tissue-equivalence of various 3D printed materials. Methods: Three 3D printers were used to create 5 cm cubic phantoms made of different plastics with varying percentages of infill. White resin, polylactic acid (PLA), and NinjaFlex plastics were used. The infills ranged from 15% to 100%. Each phantom was scanned with a CT scanner to obtain the HU value. The relative linear stopping power (RLSP) was then determined using a multi-layer ion chamber in a 200 MeV proton beam. The RLSP was measured both parallel and perpendicular to the print direction for each material. Results: The HU values of the materials ranged from lung-equivalent (−820 HU σ160) when using a low infill, to soft-tissue-equivalent 159 (σ12). The RLSP of the materials depended on the orientation of the beam relative to the print direction. When the proton beam was parallel to the print direction, the RLSP was generally higher than the RLSP in the perpendicular orientation, by up to 45%. This difference was smaller (less than 6%) for the materials with 100% infill. For low infill cubes irradiated parallel to the print direction, the SOBP curve showed extreme degradation of the beam in the distal region. The materials with 15–25% infill had wide-ranging agreement with a clinical HU-RLSP conversion curve, with some measurements falling within 1% of the curve and others deviating up to 45%. The materials with 100% infill all fell within 7% of the curve. Conclusion: While some materials tested fall within 1% of a clinical HU-RLSP curve, caution should be taken when using 3D printed materials with proton therapy, as the orientation of the beam relative to the print direction can result in a large change in RLSP. Further investigation is needed to measure how the infill pattern affects the material RLSP. This work was supported by PHS grant CA180803.

  6. Assessment of doses caused by electrons in thin layers of tissue-equivalent materials, using MCNP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heide, Bernd

    2013-10-01

    Absorbed doses caused by electron irradiation were calculated with Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP) for thin layers of tissue-equivalent materials. The layers were so thin that the calculation of energy deposition was on the border of the scope of MCNP. Therefore, in this article application of three different methods of calculation of energy deposition is discussed. This was done by means of two scenarios: in the first one, electrons were emitted from the centre of a sphere of water and also recorded in that sphere; and in the second, an irradiation with the PTB Secondary Standard BSS2 was modelled, where electrons were emitted from an (90)Sr/(90)Y area source and recorded inside a cuboid phantom made of tissue-equivalent material. The speed and accuracy of the different methods were of interest. While a significant difference in accuracy was visible for one method in the first scenario, the difference in accuracy of the three methods was insignificant for the second one. Considerable differences in speed were found for both scenarios. In order to demonstrate the need for calculating the dose in thin small zones, a third scenario was constructed and simulated as well. The third scenario was nearly equal to the second one, but a pike of lead was assumed to be inside the phantom in addition. A dose enhancement (caused by the pike of lead) of ∼113 % was recorded for a thin hollow cylinder at a depth of 0.007 cm, which the basal-skin layer is referred to in particular. Dose enhancements between 68 and 88 % were found for a slab with a radius of 0.09 cm for all depths. All dose enhancements were hardly noticeable for a slab with a cross-sectional area of 1 cm(2), which is usually applied to operational radiation protection.

  7. SU-F-T-181: Proton Therapy Tissue-Equivalence of 3D Printed Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, P; Craft, D; Followill, D; Howell, R [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: This work investigated the proton tissue-equivalence of various 3D printed materials. Methods: Three 3D printers were used to create 5 cm cubic phantoms made of different plastics with varying percentages of infill. White resin, polylactic acid (PLA), and NinjaFlex plastics were used. The infills ranged from 15% to 100%. Each phantom was scanned with a CT scanner to obtain the HU value. The relative linear stopping power (RLSP) was then determined using a multi-layer ion chamber in a 200 MeV proton beam. The RLSP was measured both parallel and perpendicular to the print direction for each material. Results: The HU values of the materials ranged from lung-equivalent (−820 HU σ160) when using a low infill, to soft-tissue-equivalent 159 (σ12). The RLSP of the materials depended on the orientation of the beam relative to the print direction. When the proton beam was parallel to the print direction, the RLSP was generally higher than the RLSP in the perpendicular orientation, by up to 45%. This difference was smaller (less than 6%) for the materials with 100% infill. For low infill cubes irradiated parallel to the print direction, the SOBP curve showed extreme degradation of the beam in the distal region. The materials with 15–25% infill had wide-ranging agreement with a clinical HU-RLSP conversion curve, with some measurements falling within 1% of the curve and others deviating up to 45%. The materials with 100% infill all fell within 7% of the curve. Conclusion: While some materials tested fall within 1% of a clinical HU-RLSP curve, caution should be taken when using 3D printed materials with proton therapy, as the orientation of the beam relative to the print direction can result in a large change in RLSP. Further investigation is needed to measure how the infill pattern affects the material RLSP. This work was supported by PHS grant CA180803.

  8. Tissue Equivalents Based on Cell-Seeded Biodegradable Microfluidic Constructs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L. Tao

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the principal challenges in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine is the formation of functional microvascular networks capable of sustaining tissue constructs. Complex tissues and vital organs require a means to support oxygen and nutrient transport during the development of constructs both prior to and after host integration, and current approaches have not demonstrated robust solutions to this challenge. Here, we present a technology platform encompassing the design, construction, cell seeding and functional evaluation of tissue equivalents for wound healing and other clinical applications. These tissue equivalents are comprised of biodegradable microfluidic scaffolds lined with microvascular cells and designed to replicate microenvironmental cues necessary to generate and sustain cell populations to replace dermal and/or epidermal tissues lost due to trauma or disease. Initial results demonstrate that these biodegradable microfluidic devices promote cell adherence and support basic cell functions. These systems represent a promising pathway towards highly integrated three-dimensional engineered tissue constructs for a wide range of clinical applications.

  9. Ultra-high pitch chest computed tomography at 70 kVp tube voltage in an anthropomorphic pediatric phantom and non-sedated pediatric patients. Initial experience with 3{sup rd} generation dual-source CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagelstein, Claudia; Henzler, Thomas; Haubenreisser, Holger; Meyer, Mathias; Sudarski, Sonja; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Neff, K. Wolfgang; Weis, Meike [Univ. Medical Center Mannheim (Germany). Inst. of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine

    2016-07-01

    Minimizing radiation dose while at the same time preserving image quality is of particular importance in pediatric chest CT. Very recently, CT imaging with a tube voltage of 70 kVp has become clinically available. However, image noise is inversely proportional to the tube voltage. We aimed to investigate radiation dose and image quality of pediatric chest CT performed at 70 kVp in an anthropomorphic pediatric phantom as well as in clinical patients. An anthropomorphic pediatric phantom, which resembles a one-year-old child in physiognomy, was scanned on the 3{sup rd} generation dual-source CT (DSCT) system at 70 kVp and 80 kVp and a fixed ultra low tube-current of 8 mAs to solely evaluate the impact of lowering tube voltage. After the phantom measurements, 18 pediatric patients (mean 29.5 months; range 1-91 months; 21 examinations) underwent 3.2 high-pitch chest CT on the same DSCT system at 70 kVp tube voltage without any sedation. Radiation dose and presence of motion artifacts was compared to a retrospectively identified patient cohort examined at 80 kVp on a 16-slice single-source-CT (SSCT; n = 15; 14/15 with sedation; mean 30.7 months; range 0-96 months; pitch = 1.5) or on a 2{sup nd} generation DSCT without any sedation (n = 6; mean 32.8 months; range 4-61 months; pitch = 3.2). Radiation dose in the phantom scans was reduced by approximately 40% when using a tube voltage of 70 kVp instead of 80 kVp. In the pediatric patient group examined at 70 kVp age-specific effective dose (ED; mean 0.5 ± 0.2 mSv) was significantly lower when compared to the retrospective cohort scanned at 80 kVp on the 16-slice-SSCT (mean ED: 1.0 ± 0.3 mSv; p < 0.0001) and also considerably lower when compared to the cohort scanned at 80 kVp on the 2{sup nd} generation DSCT (mean ED: 0.9 ± 0.5 mSv). None of the prospective, sedation-free CT examinations showed any motion artifacts whereas 13/15 examinations of the retrospective patient cohort scanned at 80 kVp with a pitch of 1

  10. Dose evaluation in occupationally exposed workers through dosimeters ring and wrist type with an anthropomorphic phantom; Evaluacion de la dosis en trabajadores ocupacionalmente expuestos a traves de dosimetros tipo anillo y de muneca con un fantoma antropomorfico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palma, R.; Gastelo, E. [Univesidad Nacional Pedro Ruiz Gallo, Huamachuco, Lambayeque (Peru); Paucar, R.; Tolentino, D.; Herrera, J. [Complejo Hospitalario San Pablo, Lima (Peru); Armas, D., E-mail: fispalma@hotmail.com [Consorcio Proxtronics del Pacifico S. A. C., Cal. Manuela Estacio Mza. D1-2 Lote 13, San Miguel, Lima (Peru)

    2014-08-15

    In the Nuclear Medicine service of the Clinica San Pablo (Peru), the occupationally exposed workers carried out the preparation and administration of radiopharmaceuticals to patients, so it is vital to measure the equivalent dose to the hands during the procedures in order to optimize the exposure to the ionizing radiation and execute the Radiological Safety Regulation (D.S. No. 009-97-Em) and the standard IR 002.2012 of radiation protection and safety in nuclear medicine. In this paper was designed and built a hand anthropomorphic phantom made of paraffin following the description given for the standard man, later were placed dosimeters ring and wrist type UD-807 model, Panasonic brand. Then we proceeded to irradiate using vial containers of Tc-99 and I-131. The obtained results showed the difference between the equivalent dose obtained among the ring and wrist dosimeter also getting a dose of 153 mSv /year when working with {sup 99m}Tc and of 61 mSv /year when working with iodine-131. Was also demonstrated that the ring dosimeter shows the average dose received in the hand with less dispersion. It was found that under the national regulation on Requirements of Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety in Medicine article 63, indicates that higher doses of 150 mSv /year the occupationally exposed workers should have hand dosimetry. Finally the individual dose limit of 500 mSv /year in extremities can be overcome if adequate radiation protection standards do not apply. (author)

  11. Determination of dose equivalent with tissue-equivalent proportional counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietze, G.; Schuhmacher, H.; Menzel, H.G.

    1989-01-01

    Low pressure tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPC) are instruments based on the cavity chamber principle and provide spectral information on the energy loss of single charged particles crossing the cavity. Hence such detectors measure absorbed dose or kerma and are able to provide estimates on radiation quality. During recent years TEPC based instruments have been developed for radiation protection applications in photon and neutron fields. This was mainly based on the expectation that the energy dependence of their dose equivalent response is smaller than that of other instruments in use. Recently, such instruments have been investigated by intercomparison measurements in various neutron and photon fields. Although their principles of measurements are more closely related to the definition of dose equivalent quantities than those of other existing dosemeters, there are distinct differences and limitations with respect to the irradiation geometry and the determination of the quality factor. The application of such instruments for measuring ambient dose equivalent is discussed. (author)

  12. Advanced Radiation DOSimetry phantom (ARDOS): a versatile breathing phantom for 4D radiation therapy and medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostiukhina, Natalia; Georg, Dietmar; Rollet, Sofia; Kuess, Peter; Sipaj, Andrej; Andrzejewski, Piotr; Furtado, Hugo; Rausch, Ivo; Lechner, Wolfgang; Steiner, Elisabeth; Kertész, Hunor; Knäusl, Barbara

    2017-10-01

    A novel breathing phantom was designed for being used in conventional and ion-beam radiotherapy as well as for medical imaging. Accurate dose delivery and patient safety are aimed to be verified for four-dimensional (4D) treatment techniques compensating for breathing-induced tumor motion. The phantom includes anthropomorphic components representing an average human thorax. It consists of real tissue equivalent materials to fulfill the requirements for dosimetric experiments and imaging purposes. The different parts of the torso (lungs, chest wall, and ribs) and the tumor can move independently. Simple regular movements, as well as more advanced patient-specific breathing cycles are feasible while a reproducible setup can be guaranteed. The phantom provides the flexibility to use different types of dosimetric devices and was designed in a way that it is robust, transportable and easy to handle. Tolerance levels and the reliability of the phantom setup were determined in combination with tests on motion accuracy and reproducibility by using infrared optical tracking technology. Different imaging was performed including positron emission tomography imaging, 4D computed tomography as well as real-time in-room imaging. The initial dosimetric benchmarking studies were performed in a photon beam where dose parameters are predictable and the dosimetric procedures well established.

  13. Advanced Radiation DOSimetry phantom (ARDOS): a versatile breathing phantom for 4D radiation therapy and medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostiukhina, Natalia; Georg, Dietmar; Rollet, Sofia; Kuess, Peter; Sipaj, Andrej; Andrzejewski, Piotr; Furtado, Hugo; Rausch, Ivo; Lechner, Wolfgang; Steiner, Elisabeth; Kertész, Hunor; Knäusl, Barbara

    2017-10-04

    A novel breathing phantom was designed for being used in conventional and ion-beam radiotherapy as well as for medical imaging. Accurate dose delivery and patient safety are aimed to be verified for four-dimensional (4D) treatment techniques compensating for breathing-induced tumor motion. The phantom includes anthropomorphic components representing an average human thorax. It consists of real tissue equivalent materials to fulfill the requirements for dosimetric experiments and imaging purposes. The different parts of the torso (lungs, chest wall, and ribs) and the tumor can move independently. Simple regular movements, as well as more advanced patient-specific breathing cycles are feasible while a reproducible setup can be guaranteed. The phantom provides the flexibility to use different types of dosimetric devices and was designed in a way that it is robust, transportable and easy to handle. Tolerance levels and the reliability of the phantom setup were determined in combination with tests on motion accuracy and reproducibility by using infrared optical tracking technology. Different imaging was performed including positron emission tomography imaging, 4D computed tomography as well as real-time in-room imaging. The initial dosimetric benchmarking studies were performed in a photon beam where dose parameters are predictable and the dosimetric procedures well established.

  14. Detection of ultraviolet radiation using tissue equivalent radiochromic gel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bero, M A; Abukassem, I

    2009-01-01

    Ferrous Xylenol-orange Gelatin gel (FXG) is known to be sensitive to ionising radiation such as γ and X-rays. The effect of ionising radiation is to produce an increase in the absorption over a wide region of the visible spectrum, which is proportional to the absorbed dose. This study demonstrates that FXG gel is sensitive to ultraviolet radiation and therefore it could functions as UV detector. Short exposure to UV radiation produces linear increase in absorption measured at 550nm, however high doses of UV cause the ion indicator colour to fad away in a manner proportional to the incident UV energy. Light absorbance increase at the rate of 1.1% per minute of irradiation was monitored. The exposure level at which the detector has linear response is comparable to the natural summer UV radiation. Evaluating the UV ability to pass through tissue equivalent gel materials shows that most of the UV gets absorbed in the first 5mm of the gel materials, which demonstrate the damaging effects of this radiation type on human skin and eyes. It was concluded that FXG gel dosimeter has the potential to offer a simple, passive ultraviolet radiation detector with sensitivity suitable to measure and visualises the natural sunlight UV exposure directly by watching the materials colour changes.

  15. Detection of ultraviolet radiation using tissue equivalent radiochromic gel materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bero, M. A.; Abukassem, I.

    2009-05-01

    Ferrous Xylenol-orange Gelatin gel (FXG) is known to be sensitive to ionising radiation such as γ and X-rays. The effect of ionising radiation is to produce an increase in the absorption over a wide region of the visible spectrum, which is proportional to the absorbed dose. This study demonstrates that FXG gel is sensitive to ultraviolet radiation and therefore it could functions as UV detector. Short exposure to UV radiation produces linear increase in absorption measured at 550nm, however high doses of UV cause the ion indicator colour to fad away in a manner proportional to the incident UV energy. Light absorbance increase at the rate of 1.1% per minute of irradiation was monitored. The exposure level at which the detector has linear response is comparable to the natural summer UV radiation. Evaluating the UV ability to pass through tissue equivalent gel materials shows that most of the UV gets absorbed in the first 5mm of the gel materials, which demonstrate the damaging effects of this radiation type on human skin and eyes. It was concluded that FXG gel dosimeter has the potential to offer a simple, passive ultraviolet radiation detector with sensitivity suitable to measure and visualises the natural sunlight UV exposure directly by watching the materials colour changes.

  16. 10 kVp rule – An anthropomorphic pelvis phantom imaging study using a CR system: Impact on image quality and effective dose using AEC and manual mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lança, Luís; Franco, Loris; Ahmed, Abdulfatah; Harderwijk, Marloes; Marti, Chloe; Nasir, Sadeeda; Ndlovu, Junior; Oliveira, Miguel; Santiago, Ana Rita; Hogg, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to investigate the influence of tube potential (kVp) variation in relation to perceptual image quality and effective dose (E) for pelvis using automatic exposure control (AEC) and non-AEC in a Computed Radiography (CR) system. Methods and materials: To determine the effects of using AEC and non-AEC by applying the 10 kVp rule in two experiments using an anthropomorphic pelvis phantom. Images were acquired using 10 kVp increments (60–120 kVp) for both experiments. The first experiment, based on seven AEC combinations, produced 49 images. The mean mAs from each kVp increment were used as a baseline for the second experiment producing 35 images. A total of 84 images were produced and a panel of 5 experienced observers participated for the image scoring using the two alternative forced choice (2AFC) visual grading software. PCXMC software was used to estimate E. Results: A decrease in perceptual image quality as the kVp increases was observed both in non-AEC and AEC experiments, however no significant statistical differences (p > 0.05) were found. Image quality scores from all observers at 10 kVp increments for all mAs values using non-AEC mode demonstrates a better score up to 90 kVp. E results show a statistically significant decrease (p = 0.000) on the 75th quartile from 0.37 mSv at 60 kVp to 0.13 mSv at 120 kVp when applying the 10 kVp rule in non-AEC mode. Conclusion: Using the 10 kVp rule, no significant reduction in perceptual image quality is observed when increasing kVp whilst a marked and significant E reduction is observed

  17. Frequency of occurrence of various nuclear reactions when fast neutrons (greater than or equal to 50 MeV) pass through tissue-equivalent material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.

    1975-07-01

    Calculated results are presented for the frequency with which various partial nuclear-reaction cross sections are utilized when fast neutrons (less than or equal to 50 MeV) are transported through a tissue-equivalent phantom to obtain an indication of which cross sections are of most importance for radiotherapy applications and are therefore in need of experimental verification. (6 tables) (U.S.)

  18. Tomographic anthropomorphic models. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veit, R.; Zankl, M.; Petoussi, N.; Mannweiler, E.; Drexler, G.; Williams, G.

    1989-01-01

    The first generation of heterogenoeous anthropomorphic mathematical models to be used in dose calculations was the MIRD-5 adult phantom, followed by the pediatric MIRD-type phantoms and by the GSF sex-specific phantoms ADAM and EVA. A new generation of realistic anthropomorphic models is now introduced. The organs and tissues of these models consist of a well defined number of volume elements (voxels), derived from computer tomographic (CT) data; consequently, these models were named voxel or tomographic models. So far two voxel models of real patients are available: one of an 8 week old baby and of a 7 year old child. For simplicity, the model of the baby will be referred to as BABY and that of the child as CHILD. In chapter 1 a brief literature review is given on the existing mathematical models and their applications. The reasons that lead to the construction of the new CT models is discussed. In chapter 2 the technique is described which allows to convert any physical object into computer files to be used for dose calculations. The technique which produces three dimensional reconstructions of high resolution is discussed. In chapter 3 the main characteristics of the models of the baby and child are given. Tables of organ masses and volumes are presented together with three dimensional images of some organs and tissues. A special mention is given to the assessment of bone marrow distribution. Chapter 4 gives a short description of the Monte Carlo code used in conjunction with the models to calculate organ and tissue doses resulting from photon exposures. Some technical details concerning the computer files which describe the models are also given. (orig./HP)

  19. Nonlinear ultrasound propagation through layered liquid and tissue-equivalent media: computational and experimental results at high frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Ross; Cherin, Emmanuel; Lam, Toby Y J; Tavakkoli, Jahangir; Zemp, Roger J; Foster, F Stuart

    2006-01-01

    Nonlinear propagation has been demonstrated to have a significant impact on ultrasound imaging. An efficient computational algorithm is presented to simulate nonlinear ultrasound propagation through layered liquid and tissue-equivalent media. Results are compared with hydrophone measurements. This study was undertaken to investigate the role of nonlinear propagation in high frequency ultrasound micro-imaging. The acoustic field of a focused transducer (20 MHz centre frequency, f-number 2.5) was simulated for layered media consisting of water and tissue-mimicking phantom, for several wide-bandwidth source pulses. The simulation model accounted for the effects of diffraction, attenuation and nonlinearity, with transmission and refraction at layer boundaries. The parameter of nonlinearity, B/A, of the water and tissue-mimicking phantom were assumed to be 5.2 and 7.4, respectively. The experimentally measured phantom B/A value found using a finite-amplitude insert-substitution method was shown to be 7.4 ± 0.6. Relative amounts of measured second and third harmonic pressures as a function of the fundamental pressures at the focus were in good agreement with simulations. Agreement within 3% was found between measurements and simulations of the beam widths of the fundamental and second harmonic signals following propagation through the tissue phantom. The results demonstrate significant nonlinear propagation effects for high frequency imaging beams

  20. Use of VAP3D software in the construction of pathological anthropomorphic phantoms for dosimetric evaluations; Uso do software VAP3D na construcao de fantomas antropomorficos patologicos para avaliacoes dosimetricas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Lindeval Fernandes de [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEM/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica; Vieira, Jose Wilson [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Lima, Fernando R.A., E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.b [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    This paper performs a new type of dosimetric evaluation, where it was used a phantom of pathological voxels (representative phantom of sick person). The software VAP3D (Visualization and Analysis of Phantoms 3D) were used for, from a healthy phantom (phantom representative of healthy person), to introduce three dimensional regions to simulate tumors. It was used the Monte Carlo ESGnrc code to simulate the X ray photon transport, his interaction with matter and evaluation of absorbed dose in organs and tissues from thorax region of the healthy phantom and his pathological version. This is a computer model of typical exposure for programming the treatments in radiodiagnostic

  1. Construction of a self-supporting tissue-equivalent dividing wall and operational characteristics of a coaxial double-cylindrical tissue-equivalent proportional counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saion, E.B.; Watt, D.E.

    1994-01-01

    An additional feature incorporated in a coaxial double-cylindrical tissue-equivalent proportional counter, is the presence of a common tissue-equivalent dividing wall between the inner and outer counters of thickness equivalent to the corresponding maximum range of protons at the energy of interest. By appropriate use of an anti-coincidence arrangement with the outer counter, the inner counter could be used to discriminate microdosimetric spectra of neutrons at the desired low energy range from those of the faster neutrons. The construction of an A-150 self-supporting tissue-equivalent dividing wall and an anti-coincidence unit are described. Some operational characteristic tests have been performed to determine the operation of the new microdosimeter. (author)

  2. Design of a head phantom produced on a 3D rapid prototyping printer and comparison with a RANDO and 3M lucite head phantom in eye dosimetry applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homolka, Peter; Figl, Michael; Wartak, Andreas; Glanzer, Mathias; Dünkelmeyer, Martina; Hojreh, Azadeh; Hummel, Johann

    2017-04-21

    An anthropomorphic head phantom including eye inserts allowing placement of TLDs 3 mm below the cornea has been produced on a 3D printer using a photo-cured acrylic resin to best allow tissue equivalence. Thus H p (3) can be determined in radiological and interventional photon radiation fields. Eye doses and doses to the forehead have been compared to an Alderson RANDO head and a 3M Lucite skull phantom in terms of surface dose per incident air kerma for frontal irradiation since the commercial phantoms do not allow placement of TLDs 3 mm below the corneal surface. A comparison of dose reduction factors (DRFs) of a common lead glasses model has also been performed. Eye dose per incident air kerma were comparable between all three phantoms (printed phantom: 1.40, standard error (SE) 0.04; RANDO: 1.36, SE 0.03; 3M: 1.37, SE 0.03). Doses to the forehead were identical to eye surface doses for the printed phantom and the RANDO head (ratio 1.00 SE 0.04, and 0.99 SE 0.03, respectively). In the 3M Lucite skull phantom dose on the forehead was 15% lower than dose to the eyes attributable to phantom properties. DRF of a sport frame style leaded glasses model with 0.75 mm lead equivalence measured were 6.8 SE 0.5, 9.3 SE 0.4 and 10.5 SE 0.5 for the RANDO head, the printed phantom, and the 3M Lucite head phantom, respectively, for frontal irradiation. A comparison of doses measured in 3 mm depth and on the surface of the eyes in the printed phantom revealed no difference larger than standard errors from TLD dosimetry. 3D printing offers an interesting opportunity for phantom design with increasing potential as printers allowing combinations of tissue substitutes will become available. Variations between phantoms may provide a useful indication of uncertainty budgets when using phantom measurements to estimate individual personnel doses.

  3. Specification and tests of three prototypes from tissue-equivalent ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, D.L.; Cardoso, D.O.; Pereira, O.S.; Nobre Filho, L.S.; Cabral, T.S.

    1992-01-01

    Three prototypes of tissue-equivalent ionization chamber are specified and tested. The results obtained by these prototypes are presented, aiming the determination of operation parameters, defined by IEC 395 standard. (C.G.C.)

  4. Study on the neutron dosimetric characteristics of Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunomiya, T.; Kim, E.; Kurosawa, T.; Taniguchi, S.; Nakamura, T. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center; Tsujimura, N.; Momose, T.; Shinohara, K. [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Environment and Safety Division, Tokai Works, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-03-01

    The neutron dosimetric characteristics of TEPC (Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter) has been investigated under a cooperative study between Tohoku University and JNC since 1997. This TEPC is a spherical, large volume, single-wire proportional counter (the model LETSW-5, manufactured by Far West Technology, Inc.) and filled with a tissue equivalent gas in a spherical detector of the A-150 tissue equivalent plastic. The TEPC can measure the spectra of absorbed dose in LET and easily estimate the tissue equivalent dose to neutron. This report summarizes the dosimetric characteristics of TEPC to the monoenergetic neutrons with energy from 8 keV to 15 MeV. It is found that TEPC can estimate the ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), with an accuracy from 0.9 to 2 to the neutron above 0.25 MeV and TEPC has a good counting efficiency enough to measure neutron doses with low dose rate at the stray neutron fields. (author)

  5. Adult phantoms as function of body mass, height and posture by using caucasian anthropomorphic statistics; Fantomas adultos em funcao da massa corporal, da altura e da postura usando estatisticas antropometricas caucasianas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, Richard; Cassola, Vagner Ferreira; Lira, Carlos Alberto Brayner de Oliveira; Khoury, Helen Jamil, E-mail: rkramer@uol.com.b, E-mail: vagner.cassola@gmail.co [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear; Milian, Felix Mas, E-mail: felix_mas_milian@yahoo.co [Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz (UESC), Ilheus, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologia

    2011-10-26

    The CALLDose{sub X} 4.0 computer program uses conversion coefficients for the MASH and FASH adult phantoms on the vertical and supine postures, representing the standard man and woman according to ICRP 90 and are called 'basic phantoms'. For improving the representation of real patients in the CALLDose{sub X}, this paper developed adults phantoms as function of mass and height by using anthropometric data from nine of them prevailing caucasian countries

  6. Organ dose evaluation for CT scans based on in-phantom measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Haikuan; Zhuo Weihai; Chen Bo; Yi Yanling; Li Dehong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the organ doses and their distributions in different projections of CT scans. Methods: The CT values were measured and the linear absorption coefficients were derived for the main organs of the anthropomorphic phantom to compare with the normal values of human beings. The radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeters were set into various tissues or organs of the phantom for mimic measurements of the organ doses undergoing the head, chest, abdomen and pelvis CT scans, respectively. Results: The tissue equivalence of the phantom used in this study was good. The brain had the largest organ dose undergoing the head CT scan. The organ doses in thyroid, breast, lung and oesophagus were relatively large in performing the chest CT scan, while the liver, stomach, colon and lung had relatively hrge organ doses in abdomen CT practice. The doses in bone surface and colon exceeded by 50 mGy in a single pelvis CT scan. Conclusions: The organ doses and their distributions largely vary with different projections of CT scans. The organ doses of colon, bone marrow,gonads and bladder are fairly large in performing pelvis CT scan, which should be paid attention in the practice. (authors)

  7. Evaluation of a tissue equivalent ionization chamber in X-ray beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perini, Ana Paula; Neves, Lucio Pereira; Santos, William de Souza; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: aperini@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Frimaio, Audrew [Seal Technology Ind. Com. Ltda, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Costa, Paulo R. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP/IF), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2014-07-01

    Tissue equivalent materials present a variety of uses, including routine quality assurance and quality control programs in both diagnostic and therapeutic physics. They are frequently used in research facilities to measure doses delivered to patients undergoing various clinical procedures. This work presents the development and evaluation of a tissue equivalent ionization chamber, with a sensitive volume of 2.3 cm{sup 3}, for routine use in X-rays beams. This ionization chamber was developed at the Calibration Laboratory/IPEN. The new tissue equivalent material was developed at the Physics Institute of the University of Sao Paulo. In order to evaluate the dosimetric performance of the new ionization chamber, several tests described by international standards were undertaken, and all results were within the recommended limits. (author)

  8. Evaluation of a tissue equivalent ionization chamber in X-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perini, Ana Paula; Neves, Lucio Pereira; Santos, William de Souza; Caldas, Linda V.E.; Frimaio, Audrew; Costa, Paulo R.

    2014-01-01

    Tissue equivalent materials present a variety of uses, including routine quality assurance and quality control programs in both diagnostic and therapeutic physics. They are frequently used in research facilities to measure doses delivered to patients undergoing various clinical procedures. This work presents the development and evaluation of a tissue equivalent ionization chamber, with a sensitive volume of 2.3 cm 3 , for routine use in X-rays beams. This ionization chamber was developed at the Calibration Laboratory/IPEN. The new tissue equivalent material was developed at the Physics Institute of the University of Sao Paulo. In order to evaluate the dosimetric performance of the new ionization chamber, several tests described by international standards were undertaken, and all results were within the recommended limits. (author)

  9. Tissue equivalent detector measurements on Mir space station. Comparison with other data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bottollier-Depois, J.F. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Dept. de Protection de la Sante de l`Homme et de Dosimetrie; Siegrist, M. [Centre National d`Etudes Spatiales (CNES), 31 - Toulouse (France); Duvivier, E.; Almarcha, B. [STEEL Technologies, Mazeres sur Salat (France); Dachev, T.P.; Semkova, J.V. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria). Central Lab. of Solar Energy and New Energy Sources; Petrov, V.M.; Bengin, V.; Koslova, S.B. [Institute of Biomedical Problems, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    The measurement of the dose received by the cosmonauts, due to cosmic radiations, during a space mission is an important parameter to estimate the radiological risk. Tissue equivalent measurements of radiation environment inside the MIR space station were performed continuously since July 1992. Interesting results about radiation measurements show (a) the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) crossing, (c) the increase of radiation near the poles and (d) the effects of solar eruptions. These data are compared with solid state detector (SSD) and other tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) results. (authors). 4 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Tissue equivalent detector measurements on Mir space station. Comparison with other data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottollier-Depois, J.F.; Duvivier, E.; Almarcha, B.; Dachev, T.P.; Semkova, J.V.

    1995-01-01

    The measurement of the dose received by the cosmonauts, due to cosmic radiations, during a space mission is an important parameter to estimate the radiological risk. Tissue equivalent measurements of radiation environment inside the MIR space station were performed continuously since July 1992. Interesting results about radiation measurements show (a) the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) crossing, (c) the increase of radiation near the poles and (d) the effects of solar eruptions. These data are compared with solid state detector (SSD) and other tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) results. (authors). 4 refs., 7 figs

  11. Experimental research on specific activity of 24Na using Chinese reference man phantom irradiated by 252Cf neutrons source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yuexing; Yang Yifang; Lu Yongjie; Zhang Jianguo; Xing Hongchuan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the specific activity of '2 4 Na per unit neutron fluence, A B/Φ ,in blood produced for Chinese reference man irradiated by 252 Cf neutron source,and to analyze the effects of scattering neutrons from ground,wall,and ceiling in irradiation site on it.Methods: A 252 Cf neutron source of 3×10 8 n/s and the anthropomorphic phantom were used for experiments. The phantom was made from 4 mm thick of outer covering by perspex and the liquid tissue-equivalent substitute in it. The data of phantom dimensions fit into Chinese reference man.The weight ratios of H, N, O and C in substitute equal from source to long axis of phantom were 1.1, 2.1, 3.1 and 4.1 m, respectively. Both the neutron source and the position of xiphisternum of the phantom were 1.6 m above the floor. Results: The average specific activity of 24 Na per unit neutron fluence was related to the irradiation-distances, d, and its maximum value, A B/ΦM , deduced by experimental data was about 1.85×10 -7 Bq·cm 2 ·g -1 . Conclusions: The A B/ΦM corresponds to that of phantom irradiated by plane-parallel beams, and the value is about more 3% than that by BOMAB phantom reported in literature. It has shown that floor-(wall-)scattered neutrons in irradiation site have significant contribution to the specific activity of 24 Na, but they contributed relatively little to the induced neutron doses. Consequently,using the specific activity of 24 Na for assessing accidental neutron doses received by an individual, the contribution of scattered neutrons in accident site will lead dose to be overestimated, and need to be correct. (authors)

  12. Evaluation of tissue-equivalent materials to be used as human brain tissue substitute in dosimetry for diagnostic radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, C.C., E-mail: cassio.c.ferreira@gmail.co [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Postal Code 353, Sergipe-SE 49100-000 (Brazil); Ximenes Filho, R.E.M., E-mail: raimundoximenes@hotmail.co [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Postal Code 353, Sergipe-SE 49100-000 (Brazil); Vieira, J.W., E-mail: jwvieira@br.inter.ne [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Pernambuco (CEFET-PE), Av. Professor Luiz Freire, 500 Curado, CEP 50740-540, Recife (Brazil); Escola Politecnica de Pernambuco, Universidade de Pernambuco (EPP/UPE), Rua Benfica, 455, Madalena, CEP 50720-001, Recife (Brazil); Tomal, A., E-mail: alessandratomal@pg.ffclrp.usp.b [Departamento de Fisica e Matematica, FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto-SP 14040-90 (Brazil); Poletti, M.E., E-mail: poletti@ffclrp.usp.b [Departamento de Fisica e Matematica, FFCLRP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto-SP 14040-90 (Brazil); Garcia, C.A.B., E-mail: cgarcia@ufs.b [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Postal Code 353, Sergipe-SE 49100-000 (Brazil); Maia, A.F., E-mail: afmaia@ufs.b [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Postal Code 353, Sergipe-SE 49100-000 (Brazil)

    2010-08-15

    Tissue-equivalent materials to be used as substitutes for human brain tissue in dosimetry for diagnostic radiology have been investigated in terms of calculated total mass attenuation coefficient ({mu}/{rho}), calculated mass energy-absorption coefficient ({mu}{sub en}/{rho}) and absorbed dose. Measured linear attenuation coefficients ({mu}) have been used for benchmarking the calculated total mass attenuation coefficient ({mu}/{rho}). The materials examined were bolus, nylon (registered) , orange articulation wax, red articulation wax, PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate), bees wax, paraffin I, paraffin II, pitch and water. The results show that water is the best substitute for brain among the materials investigated. The average percentage differences between the calculated {mu}/{rho} and {mu}{sub en}/{rho} coefficients for water and those for brain were 1.0% and 2.5%, respectively. Absorbed doses determined by Monte Carlo methods confirm water as being the best brain substitute to be used in dosimetry for diagnostic radiology, showing maximum difference of 0.01%. Additionally this study showed that PMMA, a material often used for the manufacturing of head phantoms for computed tomography, cannot be considered to be a suitable substitute for human brain tissue in dosimetry.

  13. Absorbed dose measurement by using tissue equivalent ionization chamber (pair ionization chamber) in the Yayoi reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasuga, N.; Okamura, K.; Terakado, T.; Mabuchi, Y.; Nakagawa, T.; Sukegawa, Toshio; Aizawa, C.; Saito, I.; Oka, Yoshiaki

    1998-01-01

    Each dose rate of neutron and gamma ray in the thermal column of the Yayoi reactor, in which an epithermal neutron field will be used for the boron neutron capture therapy, was measured by using a tissue equivalent ionization chamber and a graphite chamber. The tissue equivalent ionization chamber has some response to both neutron and gamma ray, but the graphite chamber has a few response to the neutron, so called pair ionization chamber method. The epithermal neutron fluxes of the thermal column were calculated by ANISN (one dimensional neutron-gamma transport code). A measured value for gamma dose rate by the pair ionization chamber agrees relevantly with a calculated result. For neutron dose rate, however, the measured value was too much small in comparison with the calculated result. The discrepancy between the measured value and the calculated result for neutron dose rate is discussed in detail in the report. (M. Suetake)

  14. Gas electron multiplier (GEM) operation with tissue-equivalent gases at various pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farahmand, M.; Bos, A.J.J.; Eijk, C.W.E. van

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the operation of two different Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) structures in both methane and propane based Tissue-Equivalent (TE) gases at different pressures varying from 0.1 to 1 atm. This work was motivated to explore the possibility of using a GEM for a new type of Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter. In methane based TE gas, a maximum safe GEM gain of 1.5x10 3 has been reached while in propane based TE gas this is 6x10 3 . These maxima have been reached at different gas pressures depending on GEM structure and TE gas. Furthermore, we observed a decrease of the GEM gain in time before it becomes stable. Charge up/polarisation effects can explain this

  15. Polyurethane as a base for a family of tissue equivalent materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, R.V.

    1980-01-01

    Polyurethane was used as a base material for a wide variety of tissue simulating applications. The technique in fabrication is similar to that of epoxy, however, the end products are generally more flexible for use in applications where flexibility is valuable. The material can be fabricated with relatively small laboratory equipment. The use of polyurethane provides the dosimetrist with the capability of making specific, accurate, on-the-spot tissue equivalent formulations to meet situations which require immediate calibration and response

  16. SU-D-BRC-04: Development of Proton Tissue Equivalent Materials for Calibration and Dosimetry Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olguin, E [Gainesville, FL (United States); Flampouri, S [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Lipnharski, I [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Bolch, W [University Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop new proton tissue equivalent materials (PTEM), urethane and fiberglass based, for proton therapy calibration and dosimetry studies. Existing tissue equivalent plastics are applicable only for x-rays because they focus on matching mass attenuation coefficients. This study aims to create new plastics that match mass stopping powers for proton therapy applications instead. Methods: New PTEMs were constructed using urethane and fiberglass resin materials for soft, fat, bone, and lung tissue. The stoichiometric analysis method was first used to determine the elemental composition of each unknown constituent. New initial formulae were then developed for each of the 4 PTEMs using the new elemental compositions and various additives. Samples of each plastic were then created and exposed to a well defined proton beam at the UF Health Proton Therapy Institute (UFHPTI) to validate its mass stopping power. Results: The stoichiometric analysis method revealed the elemental composition of the 3 components used in creating the PTEMs. These urethane and fiberglass based resins were combined with additives such as calcium carbonate, aluminum hydroxide, and phenolic micro spheres to achieve the desired mass stopping powers and densities. Validation at the UFHPTI revealed adjustments had to be made to the formulae, but the plastics eventually had the desired properties after a few iterations. The mass stopping power, density, and Hounsfield Unit of each of the 4 PTEMs were within acceptable tolerances. Conclusion: Four proton tissue equivalent plastics were developed: soft, fat, bone, and lung tissue. These plastics match each of the corresponding tissue’s mass stopping power, density, and Hounsfield Unit, meaning they are truly tissue equivalent for proton therapy applications. They can now be used to calibrate proton therapy treatment planning systems, improve range uncertainties, validate proton therapy Monte Carlo simulations, and assess in-field and out

  17. Fabrication of a set of realistic torso phantoms for calibration of transuranic nuclide lung counting facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, R.V.; Anderson, A.L.; Sundbeck, C.W.; Alderson, S.W.

    1983-01-01

    A set of 16 tissue equivalent torso phantoms has been fabricated for use by major laboratories involved in counting transuranic nuclides in the lung. These phantoms, which have bone equivalent plastic rib cages, duplicate the performance of the DOE Realistic Phantom set. The new phantoms (and their successors) provide the user laboratories with a highly realistic calibration tool. Moreover, use of these phantoms will allow participating laboratories to intercompare calibration information, both on formal and informal bases. 3 refs., 2 figs

  18. Quality assurance in RapidArc with Alderson anthropomorphic phantom using radiochromic film in comparison to MATLAB; Controle de qualidade em RapidArc com simulador de corpo humano antropomorfico Alderson utilizando filme radiocromico em comparacao ao MATLAB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Paulo L.; Silva, Leonardo P.; Santos, Maira R.; Trindade, Cassia; Martins, Lais P.; Batista, Delano V.S., E-mail: Paulo8_lgarcia@hotmail.com [Instituto Nacional de Cancer (INCA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Alves, Victor G. [Instituto Nacional de Cancer (SQRIS/INCA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Qualidade em Radiacoes Ionizantes

    2012-12-15

    This paper presented the quality control for RapidArc using an Alderson human body phantom and radiochromic film as an alternative system to approve the treatment plan for brain tumor. Thus, it was comprised the dose distributions provided by the treatment planning system with those measured by the film radiochromic. The gamma index (Γ) analysis, to verify the acceptability of the dose distribution, was 95% of approved points, with the mostly non-compliance points in regions near the PTV’s edges. These non-compliance points may be associated to transmission blades aspects, because the regions near the edges present significant losses compared to the central areas. Also, MATLAB has proved an effective tool for that measurements and it can be used in quality assurance programs. (author)

  19. Changes of Dielectric Properties induced by Fast neutrons in Tissue Equivalent Plastic A-150

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.S.

    2000-01-01

    Tissue equivalent plastic A-150 (TEP A-150) samples are exposed to fast neutrons. Dielectric studies for TEP A-150 are carried out in the frequency range from 40 Hz to 4 MHz in the temperature range 295-343 K. The obtained data revealed that, both the dielectric properties and conductivity sigma ac (omega) of TEP A-150 are altered when irradiated by a relatively high fast neutron dose (15 Sv). The values of dielectric constant and conductivity are increased for the irradiated samples to about 24% than the blank samples

  20. Radiation protection instruments based on tissue equivalent proportional counters: Part II of an international intercomparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberts, W.G.; Dietz, E.; Guldbakke, S.; Kluge, H.; Schumacher, H.

    1988-04-01

    This report describes the irradiation conditions and procedures of Part II of an international intercomparison of tissue-equivalent proportional counters used for radiation protection measurements. The irradiations took place in monoenergetic reference neutron fields produced by the research reactor and accelerator facilities of the PTB Braunschweig in the range from thermal neutrons to 14.8 MeV. In addition measurements were performed in 60 Co and D 2 O-moderated 252 Cf radiation fields. Prototype instruments from 7 European groups were investigated. The results of the measurements are summarized and compared with the reference data of the irradiations. (orig.) [de

  1. Use of tissue equivalent proportional counters to characterize radiation quality on the space shuttle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braby, L.A.; Conroy, T.J.; Elegy, D.C.; Brackenbush, L.W.

    1992-04-01

    Tissue equivalent proportional counters (TEPC) are essentially cavity ionization chambers operating at low pressure and with gas gain. A small, battery powered, TEPC spectrometer, which records lineal energy spectra at one minute intervals, has been used on several space shuttle missions. The data it has collected clearly show the South Atlantic anomaly and indicate a mean quality factor somewhat higher than expected. An improved type of instrument has been developed with sufficient memory to record spectra at 10 second intervals, and with increased resolution for low LET events. This type of instrument will be used on most future space shuttle flights and in some international experiments

  2. Development of modified voxel phantoms for the numerical dosimetric reconstruction of radiological accidents involving external sources: implementation in SESAME tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courageot, Estelle; Sayah, Rima; Huet, Christelle

    2010-05-07

    Estimating the dose distribution in a victim's body is a relevant indicator in assessing biological damage from exposure in the event of a radiological accident caused by an external source. When the dose distribution is evaluated with a numerical anthropomorphic model, the posture and morphology of the victim have to be reproduced as realistically as possible. Several years ago, IRSN developed a specific software application, called the simulation of external source accident with medical images (SESAME), for the dosimetric reconstruction of radiological accidents by numerical simulation. This tool combines voxel geometry and the MCNP(X) Monte Carlo computer code for radiation-material interaction. This note presents a new functionality in this software that enables the modelling of a victim's posture and morphology based on non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) surfaces. The procedure for constructing the modified voxel phantoms is described, along with a numerical validation of this new functionality using a voxel phantom of the RANDO tissue-equivalent physical model.

  3. Measurement of the first Townsend ionization coefficient in a methane-based tissue-equivalent gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petri, A.R. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares, Cidade Universitária, 05508-000 São Paulo (Brazil); Gonçalves, J.A.C. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares, Cidade Universitária, 05508-000 São Paulo (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Pontifícia Universidade Católica de São Paulo, 01303-050 São Paulo (Brazil); Mangiarotti, A. [Instituto de Física - Universidade de São Paulo, Cidade Universitária, 05508-080 São Paulo (Brazil); Botelho, S. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares, Cidade Universitária, 05508-000 São Paulo (Brazil); Bueno, C.C., E-mail: ccbueno@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares, Cidade Universitária, 05508-000 São Paulo (Brazil)

    2017-03-21

    Tissue-equivalent gases (TEGs), often made of a hydrocarbon, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide, have been employed in microdosimetry for decades. However, data on the first Townsend ionization coefficient (α) in such mixtures are scarce, regardless of the chosen hydrocarbon. In this context, measurements of α in a methane-based tissue-equivalent gas (CH{sub 4} – 64.4%, CO{sub 2} – 32.4%, and N{sub 2} – 3.2%) were performed in a uniform field configuration for density-normalized electric fields (E/N) up to 290 Td. The setup adopted in our previous works was improved for operating at low pressures. The modifications introduced in the apparatus and the experimental technique were validated by comparing our results of the first Townsend ionization coefficient in nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and methane with those from the literature and Magboltz simulations. The behavior of α in the methane-based TEG was consistent with that observed for pure methane. All the experimental results are included in tabular form in the .

  4. MCNP modelling of the wall effects observed in tissue-equivalent proportional counters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, J L; Townsend, L W

    2002-01-01

    Tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPCs) utilise tissue-equivalent materials to depict homogeneous microscopic volumes of human tissue. Although both the walls and gas simulate the same medium, they respond to radiation differently. Density differences between the two materials cause distortions, or wall effects, in measurements, with the most dominant effect caused by delta rays. This study uses a Monte Carlo transport code, MCNP, to simulate the transport of secondary electrons within a TEPC. The Rudd model, a singly differential cross section with no dependence on electron direction, is used to describe the energy spectrum obtained by the impact of two iron beams on water. Based on the models used in this study, a wall-less TEPC had a higher lineal energy (keV.micron-1) as a function of impact parameter than a solid-wall TEPC for the iron beams under consideration. An important conclusion of this study is that MCNP has the ability to model the wall effects observed in TEPCs.

  5. Dose of radiation enhancement, using silver nanoparticles in a human tissue equivalent gel dosimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Muhammad; Waheed, Muhammad Mohsin; Anjum, Muhammad Naeem

    2016-01-01

    To quantify the radiation dose enhancement in a human tissue-equivalent polymer gel impregnated with silver nanoparticles. The case-control study was conducted at the Bahawalpur Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Oncology, Bahawalpur, Pakistan, in January 2014. Silver nanoparticles used in this study were prepared by wet chemical method. Polymer gel was prepared by known quantity of gelatine, methacrylic acid, ascorbic acid, copper sulphate pentahydrate, hydroquinone and water. Different concentrations of silver nanoparticles were added to the gel during its cooling process. The gel was cooled in six plastic vials of 50ml each. Two vials were used as a control sample while four vials were impregnated with silver nanoparticles. After 22 hours, the vials were irradiated with gamma rays by aCobalt-60 unit. Radiation enhancement was assessed by taking magnetic resonance images of the vials. The images were analysed using Image J software. The dose enhancement factor was 24.17% and 40.49% for 5Gy and 10Gy dose respectively. The dose enhancement factor for the gel impregnated with 0.10mM silver nanoparticles was 32.88% and 51.98% for 5Gy and 10Gy dose respectively. The impregnation of a tissue-equivalent gel with silver nanoparticles resulted in dose enhancement and this effect was magnified up to a certain level with the increase in concentration of silver nanoparticles.

  6. Bio-fabrication and physiological self-release of tissue equivalents using smart peptide amphiphile templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, Ricardo M; Hamley, Ian W; Connon, Che J

    2015-10-01

    In this study we applied a smart biomaterial formed from a self-assembling, multi-functional synthetic peptide amphiphile (PA) to coat substrates with various surface chemistries. The combination of PA coating and alignment-inducing functionalised substrates provided a template to instruct human corneal stromal fibroblasts to adhere, become aligned and then bio-fabricate a highly-ordered, multi-layered, three-dimensional tissue by depositing an aligned, native-like extracellular matrix. The newly-formed corneal tissue equivalent was subsequently able to eliminate the adhesive properties of the template and govern its own complete release via the action of endogenous proteases. Tissues recovered through this method were structurally stable, easily handled, and carrier-free. Furthermore, topographical and mechanical analysis by atomic force microscopy showed that tissue equivalents formed on the alignment-inducing PA template had highly-ordered, compact collagen deposition, with a two-fold higher elastic modulus compared to the less compact tissues produced on the non-alignment template, the PA-coated glass. We suggest that this technology represents a new paradigm in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, whereby all processes for the bio-fabrication and subsequent self-release of natural, bio-prosthetic human tissues depend solely on simple template-tissue feedback interactions.

  7. Test of tissue-equivalent scintillation detector for dose measurement of megavoltage beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geso, M.; Ackerly, T.; Clift, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The measurement of depth doses and profiles for a stereotactic radiotherapy beam presents special problems associated with the small beam size compared to the dosimeter's active detection area. In this work a locally fabricated organic plastic scintillator detector has been used to measure the depth dose and profile of a stereotactic radiotherapy beam. The 6MV beam is 1.25 cm diameter at isocentre, typical of small field stereotactic radiosurgery. The detector is a water/tissue equivalent plastic scintillator that is accompanied by Cerenkov subtraction detector. In this particular application, a negligible amount of Cerenkov light was detected. A photodiode and an electronic circuit is used instead of a photomultiplier for signal amplification. Comparison with data using a diode detector and a small size ionization chamber, indicate that the organic plastic scintillator detector is a valid detector for stereotactic radiosurgery dosimetry. The tissue equivalence of the organic scintillator also holds the promise of accurate dosimetry in the build up region. Depth doses measured using our plastic scintillator agree to within about 1% with those obtained using commercially available silicon diodes. Beam profiles obtained using plastic scintillator presents correct field width to within 0.35 mm, however some artifacts are visible in the profiles. These artifacts are about 5% discrepancy which has been shown not to be a significant factor in stereotactic radiotherapy dosimetry. Copyright (2000) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  8. Calculation of W for low energy electrons in tissue-equivalent gas. [<10 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dayashankar, [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Div. of Radiation Protection

    1977-11-01

    The mean energy expended per ion pair formed (W-value) in the tissue-equivalent gas for incident electrons of energy up to 10 keV has been calculated in the continuous slowing-down approximation. The effect of secondary and tertiary electrons has been considered by utilizing recent measurements of Opal et al., (1971, J. Chem. Phys., 55,4100) on the energy spectra of low-energy secondary electrons and the Mott formula for the spectra of high-energy secondaries. The results, which are provisional in nature due to the limitations on the accuracy of the input cross-section data and the neglect of the discrete nature of energy loss process, are compared with the available measurements.

  9. Development and Characterization of Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter for Radiation Monitoring in International Space Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uk-Won Nam

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC can measure the Linear Energy Transfer (LET spectrum and calculate the equivalent dose for the complicated radiation field in space. In this paper, we developed and characterized a TEPC for radiation monitoring in International Space Station (ISS. The prototype TEPC which can simulate a 2 μm of the site diameter for micro-dosimetry has been tested with a standard alpha source (241Am, 5.5 MeV. Also, the calibration of the TEPC was performed by the 252Cf neutron standard source in Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS. The determined calibration factor was kf = 3.59×10-7 mSv/R.

  10. Development of a drift tissue equivalent proportional counter for radiation protection personnel dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordy, J.M.

    1992-04-01

    A new multicellular geometry for proportional counter has been developed. It is made of several drift regions which are some holes drilled in the cathode in front of anodes wires. The present work is made of 3 parts: 1) A theoretical evaluation of the multicellular counter characteristics: the sensitivity increases by a factor 15 vs the Tinelli Merlin-Gerin counter; the chord length distribution study shows the possibility to use a Dirac function for the dosimetry calculations; a tissue equivalent gas mixture based on argon and propane is designed. 2) The production of a monocellular prototype made of a hole and a needle shaped anode. 3) An experimental study of the prototype electrical characteristics and a computation of the electrical field in the counter. The focalization and the electron drift into the hole, the proportional operating mode are shown. Irradiations in front of photon and neutron sources verify these results

  11. Dose determination algorithms for a nearly tissue equivalent multi-element thermoluminescent dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moscovitch, M.; Chamberlain, J.; Velbeck, K.J.

    1988-01-01

    In a continuing effort to develop dosimetric systems that will enable reliable interpretation of dosimeter readings in terms of the absorbed dose or dose-equivalent, a new multi-element TL dosimeter assembly for Beta and Gamma dose monitoring has been designed. The radiation-sensitive volumes are four LiF-TLD elements, each covered by its own unique filter. For media-matching, care has been taken to employ nearly tissue equivalent filters of thicknesses of 1000 mg/cm 2 and 300 mg/cm 2 for deep dose and dose to the lens-of-the-eye measurements respectively. Only one metal filter (Cu) is employed to provide low energy photon discrimination. A Thin TL element (0.09 mm thick) is located behind an open window designed to improve the energy under-response to low energy beta rays and to provide closer estimate of the shallow dose equivalent. The deep and shallow dose equivalents are derived from the correlation of the response of the various TL elements to the above quantities through computations based on previously defined relationships obtained from experimental results. The theoretical formalization for the dose calculation algorithms is described in detail, and provides a useful methodology which can be applied to different tissue-equivalent dosimeter assemblies. Experimental data has been obtained by performing irradiation according to the specifications established by DOELAP, using 27 types of pure and mixed radiation fields including Cs-137 gamma rays, low energy photons down to 20 keV, Sr/Y-90, Uranium, and Tl-204 beta particles

  12. NOTE: Development of modified voxel phantoms for the numerical dosimetric reconstruction of radiological accidents involving external sources: implementation in SESAME tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courageot, Estelle; Sayah, Rima; Huet, Christelle

    2010-05-01

    Estimating the dose distribution in a victim's body is a relevant indicator in assessing biological damage from exposure in the event of a radiological accident caused by an external source. When the dose distribution is evaluated with a numerical anthropomorphic model, the posture and morphology of the victim have to be reproduced as realistically as possible. Several years ago, IRSN developed a specific software application, called the simulation of external source accident with medical images (SESAME), for the dosimetric reconstruction of radiological accidents by numerical simulation. This tool combines voxel geometry and the MCNP(X) Monte Carlo computer code for radiation-material interaction. This note presents a new functionality in this software that enables the modelling of a victim's posture and morphology based on non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) surfaces. The procedure for constructing the modified voxel phantoms is described, along with a numerical validation of this new functionality using a voxel phantom of the RANDO tissue-equivalent physical model.

  13. Dosimetry with tissue-equivalent ionisation chambers in fast neutron fields for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoetelief, J.; Broerse, J.J.

    1983-01-01

    The use of calibrated tissue-equivalent (TE) ionisation chambers is commonly considered to be the most practical method for total absorbed dose determinations in mixed neutron-photon fields for biomedical applications. The total absorbed dose can be derived from the charge produced within the cavity of an ionisation chamber employing a number of physical parameters. To arrive at the charge produced in the cavity several correction factors have to be introduced which are related to the operational characteristics of the chambers. Information on the operational characteristics of four TE ionisation chambers is presented in relation to ion collection, density and composition of gas in the cavity, wall thickness and effective point of measurement. In addition, some recent results from an ionisation chamber operated at high gas pressures are presented. The total absorbed doses derived from TE ionisation chambers show agreement within the uncertainty limits with results from other independent dosimetry methods, i.e., differential fluence measurements and a TE calorimeter. Conscientious experimentation and a common data base can provide dosimetry results with TE ionisation chambers with variations of less than +-2%. (author)

  14. Simulated Response of a Tissue-equivalent Proportional Counter on the Surface of Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northum, Jeremy D; Guetersloh, Stephen B; Braby, Leslie A; Ford, John R

    2015-10-01

    Uncertainties persist regarding the assessment of the carcinogenic risk associated with galactic cosmic ray (GCR) exposure during a mission to Mars. The GCR spectrum peaks in the range of 300(-1) MeV n to 700 MeV n(-1) and is comprised of elemental ions from H to Ni. While Fe ions represent only 0.03% of the GCR spectrum in terms of particle abundance, they are responsible for nearly 30% of the dose equivalent in free space. Because of this, radiation biology studies focusing on understanding the biological effects of GCR exposure generally use Fe ions. Acting as a thin shield, the Martian atmosphere alters the GCR spectrum in a manner that significantly reduces the importance of Fe ions. Additionally, albedo particles emanating from the regolith complicate the radiation environment. The present study uses the Monte Carlo code FLUKA to simulate the response of a tissue-equivalent proportional counter on the surface of Mars to produce dosimetry quantities and microdosimetry distributions. The dose equivalent rate on the surface of Mars was found to be 0.18 Sv y(-1) with an average quality factor of 2.9 and a dose mean lineal energy of 18.4 keV μm(-1). Additionally, albedo neutrons were found to account for 25% of the dose equivalent. It is anticipated that these data will provide relevant starting points for use in future risk assessment and mission planning studies.

  15. Simulation analysis of radiation fields inside phantoms for neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Daiki; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Endo, Akira; Ohmachi, Y.; Miyahara, N.

    2007-01-01

    Radiation fields inside phantoms have been calculated for neutron irradiation. Particle and heavy-ion transport code system PHITS was employed for the calculation. Energy and size dependences of neutron dose were analyzed using tissue equivalent spheres of different size. A voxel phantom of mouse was developed based on CT images of an 8-week-old male C3H/HeNs mouse. Deposition energy inside the mouse was calculated for 2- and 10-MeV neutron irradiation. (author)

  16. Monte Carlo Simulations for Homeland Security Using Anthropomorphic Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, Kimberly A. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    A radiological dispersion device (RDD) is a device which deliberately releases radioactive material for the purpose of causing terror or harm. In the event that a dirty bomb is detonated, there may be airborne radioactive material that can be inhaled as well as settle on an individuals leading to external contamination.

  17. Performance tests and comparison of microdosimetric measurements with four tissue-equivalent proportional counters in scanning proton therapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Farah, J.; De Saint-Hubert, M.; Mojzeszek, N.; Chiriotti, S.; Gryzinski, M.; Ploc, Ondřej; Trompier, F.; Turek, Karel; Vanhavere, F.; Olko, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 96, JAN (2017), s. 42-52 ISSN 1350-4487 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 662287 - CONCERT Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : tissue-equivalent proportional counters * microdosimetry * proton therapy * stray neutrons and prothons Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics OBOR OECD: Nuclear related engineering Impact factor: 1.442, year: 2016

  18. Depth Dose Distribution Study within a Phantom Torso after Irradiation with a Simulated Solar Particle Event at NSRL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Thomas; Matthiae, Daniel; Koerner, Christine; George, Kerry; Rhone, Jordan; Cucinotta, Francis; Reitz, Guenther

    2010-01-01

    The adequate knowledge of the radiation environment and the doses incurred during a space mission is essential for estimating an astronaut's health risk. The space radiation environment is complex and variable, and exposures inside the spacecraft and the astronaut's body are compounded by the interactions of the primary particles with the atoms of the structural materials and with the body itself Astronauts' radiation exposures are measured by means of personal dosimetry, but there remains substantial uncertainty associated with the computational extrapolation of skin dose to organ dose, which can lead to over- or underestimation of the health risk. Comparisons of models to data showed that the astronaut's Effective dose (E) can be predicted to within about a +10% accuracy using space radiation transport models for galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and trapped radiation behind shielding. However for solar particle event (SPE) with steep energy spectra and for extra-vehicular activities on the surface of the moon where only tissue shielding is present, transport models predict that there are large differences in model assumptions in projecting organ doses. Therefore experimental verification of SPE induced organ doses may be crucial for the design of lunar missions. In the research experiment "Depth dose distribution study within a phantom torso" at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL, Brookhaven, USA the large 1972 SPE spectrum was simulated using seven different proton energies from 50 up to 450 MeV. A phantom torso constructed of natural bones and realistic distributions of human tissue equivalent materials, which is comparable to the torso of the MATROSHKA phantom currently on the ISS, was equipped with a comprehensive set of thermoluminescence detectors and human cells. The detectors are applied to assess the depth dose distribution and radiation transport codes (e.g. GEANT4) are used to assess the radiation field and interactions of the radiation field

  19. Development of pathological anthropomorphic models using 3D modelling techniques for numerical dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Kleber Souza Silva; Barbosa, Antonio Konrado de Santana; Vieira, Jose Wilson; Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade

    2011-01-01

    Computational exposure models can be used to estimate human body absorbed dose in a series of situations such as X-Ray exams for diagnosis, accidents and medical treatments. These models are fundamentally composed of an anthropomorphic simulator (phantom), an algorithm that simulates a radioactive source and a Monte Carlo Code. The accuracy of data obtained in the simulation is strongly connected to the adequacy of such simulation to the real situation. The phantoms are one of the key factors for the researcher manipulation. They are generally developed in supine position and its anatomy is patronized by compiled data from international institutions such as ICRP or ICRU. Several pathologies modify the structure of organs and body tissues. In order to measure how significant these alterations are, an anthropomorphic model was developed for this study: patient mastectomies. This model was developed using voxel phantom FASH and then coupled with EGSnrc Monte Carlo code

  20. Symbol phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Hongo, Syozo; Takeshita, Hiroshi

    1990-01-01

    We have developed Japanese phantoms in two procedures for computation of organ doses exposed to internal and/or external radiation sources. One method is to make mathematical phantoms on the basis of ORNL mathematical phantoms. Parameters to specify organs of Japanese mathematical phantom are determined by interpolations of the ORNL data, which define the organs of Caucasian males and females of various ages, i.e. new born, 1, 5, 10, 15 years and adult, with survey data for Japanese physiques. Another procedure is to build 'symbol phantoms' for the Japanese public. The concept and its method of the symbol phantom enables us to make a phantom for an individual when we have all of his transversal section images obtained by a medical imaging device like MRI, and thus we may achieve more realistic phantoms for Japanese public than the mathematical phantoms. Both studies are in progress in NIRS. (author)

  1. ICRU activity in the field of phantoms in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wambersie, A.

    1992-01-01

    The ICRU Report on 'Phantoms and Computational Models in Radiation Therapy, Diagnosis and Protection' is presented. Different types of phantoms may be defined. They may be broadly categorized according to their primary function: dosimetry, calibration and imaging. Within each functional category, there are 3 types or designs of phantoms: body phantoms (anthropomorphic), standard phantoms and reference phantoms (used in the definition and specification of certain radiation quantities). In radiological imaging, anthropomorphic body phantoms are used for measuring the absorbed dose distribution resulting from imaging procedures. Standard phantoms have simple reproducible geometry and are used for comparing measurements under standard conditions of exposure. Imaging phantoms are useful for evaluating a given imaging system; they contain different types of test pieces. The report contains a major section on human anatomy, from fetus to adult with the variations due to ethnic origin. Tolerance levels for the phantoms (composition, dimensions) are proposed and quality assurance programs are outlined. The report contains extensive appendices; human anatomical data and full specification of over 80 phantoms and computational models. ICRU Report 46 on 'Photon, electron, proton and neutron interaction data for body tissues' is closely related to the field of phantoms. It is a logical continuation on ICRU Report 44 (1989) on 'Tissue substitutes in radiation dosimetry and measurements' and contains the interaction data for more than 100 tissues, from fetal to adult, including some diseased tissues

  2. Joint use of developed collagen-containing complexes and cell cultures in creating new tissue equivalents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Kulakova

    2016-01-01

    .Conclusion. Thus it was experimentally confirmed that the physical characteristics of the developed integrated module satisfy the requirements for the materials for cultivation of cells. The absence of cytotoxicity on the model of a culture of dermal human fibroblasts allows to make a conclusion about a possibility of its use as the basis of cell-tissue equivalent. Preliminary results indicate the advisability of further experiments in vivo aimed at improving complex collagen-containing materials, the development of different ways of their application and clinical evaluation of the effectiveness in the treatment of wounds of various genesis.

  3. Operation of gas electron multiplier (GEM) with propane gas at low pressure and comparison with tissue-equivalent gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Nardo, L., E-mail: laura.denardo@unipd.it [University of Padova, Physics and Astronomy Department and PD-INFN, via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Farahmand, M., E-mail: majid.farahmand@rivm.nl [Centre for Environmental Safety and Security, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), PO Box 1, NL-3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands)

    2016-05-21

    A Tissue-Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC), based on a single GEM foil of standard geometry, has been tested with pure propane gas at low pressure, in order to simulate a tissue site of about 1 µm equivalent size. In this work, the performance of GEM with propane gas at a pressure of 21 and 28 kPa will be presented. The effective gas gain was measured in various conditions using a {sup 244}Cm alpha source. The dependence of effective gain on the electric field strength along the GEM channel and in the drift and induction region was investigated. A maximum effective gain of about 5×10{sup 3} has been reached. Results obtained in pure propane gas are compared with gas gain measurements in gas mixtures commonly employed in microdosimetry, that is propane and methane based Tissue-Equivalent gas mixtures.

  4. Comparison of different phantoms used in digital diagnostic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bor, Dogan, E-mail: bor@eng.ankara.edu.tr [Ankara University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Engineering Physics. Tandogan, 06100 Ankara (Turkey); Unal, Elif, E-mail: elf.unall@gmail.com [Radat Dosimetry Laboratory Services, 06830, Golbasi, Ankara (Turkey); Uslu, Anil, E-mail: m.aniluslu@gmail.com [Radat Dosimetry Laboratory Services, 06830, Golbasi, Ankara (Turkey)

    2015-09-21

    The organs of extremity, chest, skull and lumbar were physically simulated using uniform PMMA slabs with different thicknesses alone and using these slabs together with aluminum plates and air gaps (ANSI Phantoms). The variation of entrance surface air kerma and scatter fraction with X-ray beam qualities was investigated for these phantoms and the results were compared with those measured from anthropomorphic phantoms. A flat panel digital radiographic system was used for all the experiments. Considerable variations of entrance surface air kermas were found for the same organs of different designs, and highest doses were measured for the PMMA slabs. A low contrast test tool and a contrast detail test object (CDRAD) were used together with each organ simulation of PMMA slabs and ANSI phantoms in order to test the clinical image qualities. Digital images of these phantom combinations and anthropomorphic phantoms were acquired in raw and clinically processed formats. Variation of image quality with kVp and post processing was evaluated using the numerical metrics of these test tools and measured contrast values from the anthropomorphic phantoms. Our results indicated that design of some phantoms may not be efficient enough to reveal the expected performance of the post processing algorithms.

  5. The analysis for energy distribution and biological effects of the clusters from electrons in the tissue equivalent material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wenzhong; Guo Yong; Luo Yisheng; Wang Yong

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study energy distribution of the clusters from electrons in the tissue equivalent material, and discuss the important aspects of these clusters on inducing biological effects. Methods: Based on the physical mechanism for electrons interacting with tissue equivalent material, the Monte Carlo (MC) method was used. The electron tracks were lively simulated on an event-by-event (ionization, excitation, elastic scattering, Auger electron emission) basis in the material. The relevant conclusions were drawn from the statistic analysis of these events. Results: The electrons will deposit their energy in the form (30%) of cluster in passing through tissue equivalent material, and most clusters (80%) have the energy amount of more than 50 eV. The cluster density depends on its diameter and energy of electrons, and the deposited energy in the cluster depends on the type and energy of radiation. Conclusion: The deposited energy in cluster is the most important factor in inducing all sort of lesions on DNA molecules in tissue cells

  6. Effective atomic numbers, electron densities, and tissue equivalence of some gases and mixtures for dosimetry of radiation detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Vishwanath P.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Total mass attenuation coefficients, µm, effective atomic number, Zeff, and effective electron density, Neff, of different gases - carbon dioxide, methane, acetylene, propane, butane, and pentane used in radiation detectors, have been calculated for the photon energy of 1 keV to 100 GeV. Each gas has constant Zeff values between 0.10 to 10 MeV photon energies; however, these values are way far away from ICRU tissue. Carbon dioxide gas shows the closest tissue equivalence in the entire photon energy spectrum. Relative tissue equivalences of the mixtures of gases with respect to ICRU tissue are in the range of 0.998-1.041 for air, argon (4.5% + methane (95.5%, argon (0.5% + carbon dioxide (99.5%, and nitrogen (5% + methane (7% + carbon dioxide (88%. The gas composition of xenon (0.5% + carbon dioxide (99.5% shows 1.605 times higher tissue equivalence compared to the ICRU tissue. The investigated photon interaction parameters are useful for exposure and energy absorption buildup factors calculation and design, and fabrication of gaseous detectors for ambient radiation measurement by the Geiger-Muller detector, ionization chambers and proportional counters.

  7. Distributions of neutron and gamma doses in phantom under a mixed field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beraud-Sudreau, E.

    1982-06-01

    A calculation program, based on Monte Carlo method, allowed to estimate the absorbed doses relatives to the reactor primary radiation, in a water cubic phantom and in cylindrical phantoms modelized from tissue compositions. This calculation is a theoretical approach of gamma and neutron dose gradient study in an animal phantom. PIN junction dosimetric characteristics have been studied experimentally. Air and water phantom radiation doses measured by PIN junction and lithium 7 fluoride, in reactor field have been compared to doses given by dosimetry classical techniques as tissue equivalent plastic and aluminium ionization chambers. Dosimeter responses have been employed to evaluate neutron and gamma doses in plastinaut (tissue equivalent plastic) and animal (piglet). Dose repartition in the piglet bone medulla has been also determined. This work has been completed by comparisons with Doerschell, Dousset and Brown results and by neutron dose calculations; the dose distribution related to lineic energy transfer in Auxier phantom has been also calculated [fr

  8. Spherical phantom for research of radiation situation in outer space. Design-structural special features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kartsev, I.S.; Eremenko, V.G.; Petrov, V.I.; Polenov, B.V.; Yudin, V.N.; Akatov, Yu.A.; Petrov, V.M.; Shurshakov, V.A.

    2005-01-01

    The design-structural features of the updated spherical phantom applied within the frameworks of the space experiment Matreshka-R at the Russian segment of International space station during ISS-8 and ISS-9 expeditions are described. The replacement of 48 polyethylene containers with TLD and STD assemblies by 16 cases installed from external side of the phantom and 4 tissue-equivalent caps of the central disk by 4 cases with detector assemblies is carried out. The updated tissue-equivalent phantom contains the active dosemeter based on 5 MOS detectors. The phantom cover is made from the non-flammable material NT-7. The basic characteristics of the flight specimen of the phantom are presented. The results of its on-Earth testing and real space flights are analyzed [ru

  9. Errors in estimating neutron quality factor using lineal energy distributions measured in tissue-equivalent proportional counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borak, T.B.; Stinchcomb, T.G.

    1982-01-01

    Neutron dose equivalent is obtained from quality factors which are defined in terms of LET. It is possible to estimate the dose averaged quality factor, antiQ, directly from distributions in lineal energy, y, that are measured in tissue-equivalent proportional counters. This eliminates a mathematical transformation of the absorbed dose from D(y) to D(L). We evaluate the inherent error in computing Q from D(y) rather than D(L) for neutron spectra below 4 MeV. The effects of neutron energy and simulated tissue diameters within a gas cavity are examined in detail. (author)

  10. Characterization of MOSFET dosimeter angular dependence in three rotational axes measured free-in-air and in soft-tissue equivalent material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koivisto, Juha; Kiljunen, Timo; Wolff, Jan; Kortesniemi, Mika

    2013-01-01

    When performing dose measurements on an X-ray device with multiple angles of irradiation, it is necessary to take the angular dependence of metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters into account. The objective of this study was to investigate the angular sensitivity dependence of MOSFET dosimeters in three rotational axes measured free-in-air and in soft-tissue equivalent material using dental photon energy. Free-in-air dose measurements were performed with three MOSFET dosimeters attached to a carbon fibre holder. Soft tissue measurements were performed with three MOSFET dosimeters placed in a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom. All measurements were made in the isocenter of a dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanner using 5° angular increments in the three rotational axes: axial, normal-to-axial and tangent-to-axial. The measurements were referenced to a RADCAL 1015 dosimeter. The angular sensitivity free-in-air (1 SD) was 3.7 ± 0.5 mV/mGy for axial, 3.8 ± 0.6 mV/mGy for normal-to-axial and 3.6 ± 0.6 mV/mGy for tangent-to-axial rotation. The angular sensitivity in the PMMA phantom was 3.1 ± 0.1 mV/mGy for axial, 3.3 ± 0.2 mV/mGy for normal-to-axial and 3.4 ± 0.2 mV/mGy for tangent-to-axial rotation. The angular sensitivity variations are considerably smaller in PMMA due to the smoothing effect of the scattered radiation. The largest decreases from the isotropic response were observed free-in-air at 90° (distal tip) and 270° (wire base) in the normal-to-axial and tangent-to-axial rotations, respectively. MOSFET dosimeters provide us with a versatile dosimetric method for dental radiology. However, due to the observed variation in angular sensitivity, MOSFET dosimeters should always be calibrated in the actual clinical settings for the beam geometry and angular range of the CBCT exposure. (author)

  11. Characterization of MOSFET dosimeter angular dependence in three rotational axes measured free-in-air and in soft-tissue equivalent material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivisto, Juha; Kiljunen, Timo; Wolff, Jan; Kortesniemi, Mika

    2013-09-01

    When performing dose measurements on an X-ray device with multiple angles of irradiation, it is necessary to take the angular dependence of metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters into account. The objective of this study was to investigate the angular sensitivity dependence of MOSFET dosimeters in three rotational axes measured free-in-air and in soft-tissue equivalent material using dental photon energy. Free-in-air dose measurements were performed with three MOSFET dosimeters attached to a carbon fibre holder. Soft tissue measurements were performed with three MOSFET dosimeters placed in a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom. All measurements were made in the isocenter of a dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanner using 5º angular increments in the three rotational axes: axial, normal-to-axial and tangent-to-axial. The measurements were referenced to a RADCAL 1015 dosimeter. The angular sensitivity free-in-air (1 SD) was 3.7 ± 0.5 mV/mGy for axial, 3.8 ± 0.6 mV/mGy for normal-to-axial and 3.6 ± 0.6 mV/mGy for tangent-to-axial rotation. The angular sensitivity in the PMMA phantom was 3.1 ± 0.1 mV/mGy for axial, 3.3 ± 0.2 mV/mGy for normal-to-axial and 3.4 ± 0.2 mV/mGy for tangent-to-axial rotation. The angular sensitivity variations are considerably smaller in PMMA due to the smoothing effect of the scattered radiation. The largest decreases from the isotropic response were observed free-in-air at 90° (distal tip) and 270° (wire base) in the normal-to-axial and tangent-to-axial rotations, respectively. MOSFET dosimeters provide us with a versatile dosimetric method for dental radiology. However, due to the observed variation in angular sensitivity, MOSFET dosimeters should always be calibrated in the actual clinical settings for the beam geometry and angular range of the CBCT exposure.

  12. Effect of chest wall radiotherapy in different manners using tissue equivalent bolus on skin and lung of cavia cobayas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Wei; Qu Yaqin; Song Xiangfu; Liu Shixin; Jia Xiaojing; Guo He; Yang Lei

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To probe the influence of electron beam radiotherapy in different manners using different tissue equivalent boluses on skin and lung. Methods: Adult female cavia cobayas were randomly divided into four groups as control group, half-time with bolus group, half-time with bolus group and without bolus group. Acute-irradiation animal models were established using electron beam in different manners with or without 0.5 cm tissue equivalent bolus. Pathological changes in lung, hair vesicle and fibroblast cell count were analyzed 40 clays after irradiation. Results: The radiation dermatitis in the group with bolus was slighter than that of the group without bolus, but the radiation pneumonia was reverse. With bolus, the radiation dermatitis of haft-time group was slighter than that of full-time group. The injury repair of half-time group was more active than full-time group. Conclusions: The treatment of haft-time bolus could protect lung without serious skin complications. (authors)

  13. Creating an anthropomorphic digital MR phantom—an extensible tool for comparing and evaluating quantitative imaging algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosca, Ryan J; Jackson, Edward F

    2016-01-01

    Assessing and mitigating the various sources of bias and variance associated with image quantification algorithms is essential to the use of such algorithms in clinical research and practice. Assessment is usually accomplished with grid-based digital reference objects (DRO) or, more recently, digital anthropomorphic phantoms based on normal human anatomy. Publicly available digital anthropomorphic phantoms can provide a basis for generating realistic model-based DROs that incorporate the heterogeneity commonly found in pathology. Using a publicly available vascular input function (VIF) and digital anthropomorphic phantom of a normal human brain, a methodology was developed to generate a DRO based on the general kinetic model (GKM) that represented realistic and heterogeneously enhancing pathology. GKM parameters were estimated from a deidentified clinical dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI exam. This clinical imaging volume was co-registered with a discrete tissue model, and model parameters estimated from clinical images were used to synthesize a DCE-MRI exam that consisted of normal brain tissues and a heterogeneously enhancing brain tumor. An example application of spatial smoothing was used to illustrate potential applications in assessing quantitative imaging algorithms. A voxel-wise Bland–Altman analysis demonstrated negligible differences between the parameters estimated with and without spatial smoothing (using a small radius Gaussian kernel). In this work, we reported an extensible methodology for generating model-based anthropomorphic DROs containing normal and pathological tissue that can be used to assess quantitative imaging algorithms. (paper)

  14. Reminders of Social Connection Can Attenuate Anthropomorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartz, Jennifer A; Tchalova, Kristina; Fenerci, Can

    2016-12-01

    It is a fundamental human need to secure and sustain a sense of social belonging. Previous research has shown that individuals who are lonely are more likely than people who are not lonely to attribute humanlike traits (e.g., free will) to nonhuman agents (e.g., an alarm clock that makes people get up by moving away from the sleeper), presumably in an attempt to fulfill unmet needs for belongingness. We directly replicated the association between loneliness and anthropomorphism in a larger sample ( N = 178); furthermore, we showed that reminding people of a close, supportive relationship reduces their tendency to anthropomorphize. This finding provides support for the idea that the need for belonging has causal effects on anthropomorphism. Last, we showed that attachment anxiety-characterized by intense desire for and preoccupation with closeness, fear of abandonment, and hypervigilance to social cues-was a stronger predictor of anthropomorphism than loneliness was. This finding helps clarify the mechanisms underlying anthropomorphism and supports the idea that anthropomorphism is a motivated process reflecting the active search for potential sources of connection.

  15. Comparison of the ANSI, RSD, KKH, and BRMD thyroid-neck phantoms for 125I thyroid monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, G H; Olender, G; Vlahovich, S; Hauck, B M; Meyerhof, D P

    1996-03-01

    The Human Monitoring Laboratory, which acts as the Canadian National Calibration Reference Centre for In Vivo Monitoring, has determined the performance characteristics of four thyroid phantoms for 125I thyroid monitoring. The phantoms were a phantom built to the specifications of the American National Standards Institute Standard N44.3; the phantom available from Radiology Support Devices; the phantom available from Kyoto Kagaku Hyohon; the phantom manufactured by the Human Monitoring Laboratory and known as the BRMD phantom. The counting efficiencies of the phantoms for 125I were measured at different phantom-to-detector distances. The anthropomorphic characteristics of the phantoms have been compared with the average man parameters. It was concluded that the BRMD, American National Standards Institute, and Radiology Support Devices phantoms have the same performance characteristics when the neck-to-detector distances are greater than 12 cm and all phantoms are essentially equivalent at 30 cm or more. The Kyoto Kagaku Hyohon phantom showed lower counting efficiencies at phantom-to-detector distances less than 30 cm. This was attributed to the design of the phantom. This study has also shown that the phantom need not be highly anthropomorphic provided the calibration is not performed at short neck-detector distances. Indeed, it might be possible to use t simple point source of 125I placed behind a 1.5 cm block of lucite at neck detector distances of 12 cm or more.

  16. Development of realistic chest phantom for calibration of in-vivo plutonium counting facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirotani, Takashi

    1987-06-01

    We have developed realistic chest phantom with removable model organs. The phantom is a torso and is terminated just above the femoral region. Tissue equivalent materials used in the phantom have been made of polyurethane with different amounts of ester of phosphoric acid, in order to simulate human soft tissues such as muscle, muscle-adipose mixtures and cartilage. Lung simulant has been made of foamed polyurethane. Capsulized small sources can be inserted into the holes, drilled in each sliced section of the model organ. Counting efficiencies, obtained with a pair of 12 cm diameter phoswich detectors set above the phantom chest, are 0.195 cpm/nCi for Pu-239 and 44.07 cpm/nCi for Am-241, respectively. The results agree well with efficiencies obtained with IAEA-Phantom. We conclude that the phantom can be used as a standard phantom for the calibration of Pu chest counting equipment. (author)

  17. Bases for calibration of whole body counters using anthropomorphic physical simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, Bernardo Maranhao

    1998-01-01

    The quantification of radionuclides in the human body can be carried out through in vivo measurements performed in facilities generically called whole body counters. The calibration of such units is usually done by using physical anthropomorphic phantoms, which can be defined as artificial structures with geometrical characteristics and attenuation properties similar to the living tissues. This work presents the development of the phantoms necessary to the monitoring of the internal contamination by the radionuclides manipulated in Brazil. It also presents the procedures for the calibration of the detectors used for the in vivo measurements. The developed phantoms are applied in the determination of radionuclides deposited in specific organs, such as Th-232 and Am-241 in the lungs and skull, isotopes of iodine in the thyroid and photon emitters in the energy range from 100 to 3000 keV in the whole body. (author)

  18. Influence of dose reduction and iterative reconstruction on CT calcium scores : a multi-manufacturer dynamic phantom study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werf, N R; Willemink, M J; Willems, T P; Greuter, M J W; Leiner, T

    To evaluate the influence of dose reduction in combination with iterative reconstruction (IR) on coronary calcium scores (CCS) in a dynamic phantom on state-of-the-art CT systems from different manufacturers. Calcified inserts in an anthropomorphic chest phantom were translated at 20 mm/s

  19. Critical study of some soft-tissue equivalent material. Sensitivity to neutrons of 1 keV to 14 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerviler, H. de; Pages, L.; Tardy-Joubert, Ph.

    1965-01-01

    Authors have studied the elastic and inelastic reactions on various elements contribution to kerma in standard soft tissue and as a function of neutron energy from 1 keV to 14 MeV the ratio of kerma in tissue equivalent material to kerma in soft tissue. The results of calculations are made for materials without hydrogen in view to state exactly their neutron sensitivity and for the following hydrogenous materials: Rossi and Failla plastic, MixD, pure polyethylene and a new CEA tissue equivalent (a magnesium fluoride and polyethylene compound). Results for γ-rays are given. (authors) [fr

  20. Phantom Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Because this is yet another version of tangled sensory wires, the result can be pain. A number of other factors are believed to contribute to phantom pain, including damaged nerve endings, scar tissue at the site of the amputation and the physical memory of pre-amputation pain in the affected area. ...

  1. Measurement of the tissue to A-150 tissue equivalent plastic kerma ratio at two p(66)Be neutron therapy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langen, K M; Binns, P J; Schreuder, A N; Lennox, A J; Deluca, P M Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The ICRU tissue to A-150 tissue equivalent plastic kerma ratio is needed for neutron therapy dosimetry. The current ICRU protocol for neutron dosimetry recommends using a common conversion factor of 0.95 at all high-energy neutron therapy facilities. In an effort to determine facility specific ICRU tissue to A-150 plastic kerma ratios, an experimental approach was pursued. Four low pressure proportional counters that differed in wall materials (i.e. A-150, carbon, zirconium and zirconium-oxide) were used as dosimeters and integral kerma ratios were determined directly in the clinical beam. Measurements were performed at two p(66)Be facilities: iThemba LABS near Cape Town and Fermilab near Chicago. At the iThemba facility the clinical neutron beam is routinely filtered by a flattening and hardening filter combination. The influence of beam filtration on the kerma ratio was evaluated. Using two recent gas-to-wall dose conversion factor (r m,g value) evaluations a mean ICRU tissue to A-150 plastic kerma ratio of 0.93 ± 0.05 was determined for the clinical beam at iThemba LABS. The respective value for the Fermilab beam is 0.95 ± 0.05. The experimentally determined ICRU tissue to A-150 plastic kerma ratios for the two clinical beams are in agreement with theoretical evaluations. Beam filtration reduces the kerma ratio by 3 ± 2%

  2. The performance of low pressure tissue-equivalent chambers and a new method for parameterising the dose equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisen, Y.

    1986-01-01

    The performance of Rossi-type spherical tissue-equivalent chambers with equivalent diameters between 0.5 μm and 2 μm was tested experimentally using monoenergetic and polyenergetic neutron sources in the energy region of 10 keV to 14.5 MeV. In agreement with theoretical predictions both chambers failed to provide LET information at low neutron energies. A dose equivalent algorithm was derived that utilises the event distribution but does not attempt to correlate event size with LET. The algorithm was predicted theoretically and confirmed by experiment. The algorithm that was developed determines the neutron dose equivalent, from the data of the 0.5 μm chamber, to better than +-20% over the energy range of 30 keV to 14.5 MeV. The same algorithm also determines the dose equivalent from the data of the 2 μm chamber to better than +-20% over the energy range of 60 keV to 14.5 MeV. The efficiency of the chambers is 33 counts per μSv, or equivalently about 10 counts s -1 per mSv.h -1 . This efficiency enables the measurement of dose equivalent rates above 1 mSv.h -1 for an integration period of 3 s. Integrated dose equivalents can be measured as low as 1 μSv. (author)

  3. Thermoluminescence and radioluminescence properties of tissue equivalent Cu-doped Li2B4O7 for radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz Z, E.; Furetta, C.; Marcazzo, J.; Santiago, M.; Guarneros, C.; Pacio, M.; Palomino, R.

    2015-10-01

    Thermoluminescence (Tl) and radioluminescence (Rl) properties of lithium tetraborate (Li 2 B 4 O 7 ) doped with different concentration of copper (0.25, 0.5, 1 wt %) under gamma and beta irradiation has been investigated. The feasibility of using this borate in radiation dosimetry at low doses has been evaluated. Tissue equivalent Li 2 B 4 O 7 was prepared by solid state reaction using mixing stoichiometric compositions of lithium carbonate (Li 2 CO 3 ) and boric acid (H 3 BO 3 ) and a solution of CuCl 2 as dopant. The glow curve, of the most efficient copper doped borate (Li 2 B 4 O 7 :Cu 0.5 wt %), shows a main stable peak centered at 225 degrees C and a second low temperature peak centered at 80 degrees C. The low temperature peak disappears completely after 24 hours of storage in darkness and at room temperature or after an annealing at 120 degrees C for 10 seconds. The main peak of the Li 2 B 4 O 7 :Cu remains constant. The Tl response of Li 2 B 4 O 7 :Cu shows good linearity in the analyzed dose range. The stability and repeatability of Rl signals of the borate have been studied and the Li 2 B 4 O 7 :Cu (0.5 wt %) shown the higher Rl emission and a stable and repetitive response. Results show that Li 2 B 4 O 7 :Cu has prospects to be used in gamma and beta radiation dosimetry. (Author)

  4. On Seeing Human: A Three-Factor Theory of Anthropomorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epley, Nicholas; Waytz, Adam; Cacioppo, John T.

    2007-01-01

    Anthropomorphism describes the tendency to imbue the real or imagined behavior of nonhuman agents with humanlike characteristics, motivations, intentions, or emotions. Although surprisingly common, anthropomorphism is not invariant. This article describes a theory to explain when people are likely to anthropomorphize and when they are not, focused…

  5. Evolution of the Deep-space Galactic Cosmic Ray Lineal Energy Transfer Spectrum through Tissue Equivalent Plastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, A. W.; Kasper, J. C.; Spence, H. E.; Golightly, M. J.; Schwadron, N. A.; Mazur, J. E.; Blake, J. B.; Looper, M. D.; Townsend, L.; Zeitlin, C. J.

    2011-12-01

    The Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation is an energetic particle telescope that resides on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft, currently in a 50 km circular lunar polar orbit. The telescope consists of 6 silicon semi-conductor detectors placed in pairs that surround two pieces of Tissue Equivalent Plastic (TEP), which serve to absorb energy from particles as they transit through the instrument. Particles with energies greater than 12 MeV/nucleon can penetrate the outermost shield and be measured by the instrument. The primary measurement made by the instrument is of the Linear Energy Transfer (LET) of energetic particles as they transit through the telescope. CRaTER measures the LET spectrum with unprecedented energy resolution and has done so during a period of historically low solar activity that led to record high intensities of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR). These LET spectra are used to study changes in the properties of the incoming particles, and to make detailed measurements of the radiation doses human explorers will experience in deep space on missions to the moon, to asteroids, or to Mars. We present LET spectra accumulated during 2009 and 2010. We show how the LET spectrum evolves through the instrument as the GCR interact with the TEP. Due to the importance of these measurements for human effects, our extensive absolute calibration procedures are presented. Of particular note is a significant reduction in the flux of particles with LET greater than 10 keV/um for detectors that lie deeper within the telescope stack, due to the attenuation of high LET particles within the TEP. By measuring this attenuation we can estimate the depth in human tissue where the highest LET particles that are most likely to cause genetic damage pose the greatest threat to humans in space.

  6. Measurement of characteristic prompt gamma rays emitted from oxygen and carbon in tissue-equivalent samples during proton beam irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polf, Jerimy C; Panthi, Rajesh; Mackin, Dennis S; McCleskey, Matt; Saastamoinen, Antti; Roeder, Brian T; Beddar, Sam

    2013-09-07

    The purpose of this work was to characterize how prompt gamma (PG) emission from tissue changes as a function of carbon and oxygen concentration, and to assess the feasibility of determining elemental concentration in tissues irradiated with proton beams. For this study, four tissue-equivalent water-sucrose samples with differing densities and concentrations of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen were irradiated with a 48 MeV proton pencil beam. The PG spectrum emitted from each sample was measured using a high-purity germanium detector, and the absolute detection efficiency of the detector, average beam current, and delivered dose distribution were also measured. Changes to the total PG emission from (12)C (4.44 MeV) and (16)O (6.13 MeV) per incident proton and per Gray of absorbed dose were characterized as a function of carbon and oxygen concentration in the sample. The intensity of the 4.44 MeV PG emission per incident proton was found to be nearly constant for all samples regardless of their carbon concentration. However, we found that the 6.13 MeV PG emission increased linearly with the total amount (in grams) of oxygen irradiated in the sample. From the measured PG data, we determined that 1.64 × 10(7) oxygen PGs were emitted per gram of oxygen irradiated per Gray of absorbed dose delivered with a 48 MeV proton beam. These results indicate that the 6.13 MeV PG emission from (16)O is proportional to the concentration of oxygen in tissue irradiated with proton beams, showing that it is possible to determine the concentration of oxygen within tissues irradiated with proton beams by measuring (16)O PG emission.

  7. Realisation and qualification of a tissue equivalent proportional counter with a multi-cellular geometry for the individual neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoflack, Ch.

    1999-01-01

    The present day dosimetry means for radiations with a strong ionization density cannot fulfill the future radioprotection regulations which will require an individual dosimetry with active dosemeters. The aim of this work is the study and development of an individual dosemeter based on a tissue equivalent proportional counter and with a multi-cellular geometry allowing to reach a sensibility equivalent to environmental dosemeters. A pressure regulation bench has been added to the detector in order to reduce the degassing of the detector parts and to reach a sufficient service life for the implementation of the characterization tests. The hole counter system has been adopted for the first prototypes in order to reduce the sensibility of the wires multiplication system with respect to mechanical vibrations. Tests performed with an internal alpha source have shown that a better electrical efficiency can be reached when more severe mechanical limits are adopted during the construction. The dose equivalent response of the prototype for mono-energy neutrons of 144 keV to 2.5 MeV is analyzed experimentally and by simulation. During experiments with normal incidence neutrons, the prototype fulfills the requirements of the CEI N O 1323 standard for energies comprised between 400 keV and 2.5 MeV, while the simulation indicates a satisfactory response up to 200 keV. A preliminary study of the behaviour of the detector with respect to the neutrons incidence indicates that the multi-cellular geometry is efficient for large angles (the sensibility of the prototype is increased by a factor 3). Finally, simulation studies have to be made to optimize the electrical operation and the geometry of the next prototype. (J.S.)

  8. Use of realistic anthropomorphic models for calculation of radiation dose in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stabin, Michael G.; Emmons, Mary A.; Fernald, Michael J.; Brill, A.B.; Segars, W.Paul

    2008-01-01

    Anthropomorphic phantoms based on simple geometric structures have been used in radiation dose calculations for many years. We have now developed a series of anatomically realistic phantoms representing adults and children using body models based on non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS), with organ and body masses based on the reference values given in ICRP Publication 89. Age-dependent models were scaled and shaped to represent the reference individuals described in ICRP 89 (male and female adults, newborns, 1-, 5-, 10- and 15-year-olds), using a software tool developed in Visual C++. Voxel-based versions of these models were used with GEANT4 radiation transport codes for calculation of specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) for internal sources of photons and electrons, using standard starting energy values. Organ masses in the models were within a few % of ICRP reference masses, and physicians reviewed the models for anatomical realism. Development of individual phantoms was much faster than manual segmentation of medical images, and resulted in a very uniform standardized phantom series. SAFs were calculated on the Vanderbilt multi node computing network (ACCRE). Photon and electron SAFs were calculated for all organs in all models, and were compared to values from similar phantoms developed by others. Agreement was very good in most cases; some differences were seen, due to differences in organ mass and geometry. This realistic phantom series represents a possible replacement for the Cristy/Eckerman series of the 1980's. Both phantom sets will be included in the next release of the OLINDA/EXM personal computer code, and the new phantoms will be made generally available to the research community for other uses. Calculated radiation doses for diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals will be compared with previous values. (author)

  9. Development of pathological anthropomorphic models using 3D modelling techniques for numerical dosimetry; Desenvolvimento de modelos antropomorficos patologicos usando tecnicas de modelagem 3D para dosimetria numerica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Kleber Souza Silva [Faculdade Integrada de Pernambuco (FACIPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Barbosa, Antonio Konrado de Santana; Vieira, Jose Wilson [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade, E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.b [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    Computational exposure models can be used to estimate human body absorbed dose in a series of situations such as X-Ray exams for diagnosis, accidents and medical treatments. These models are fundamentally composed of an anthropomorphic simulator (phantom), an algorithm that simulates a radioactive source and a Monte Carlo Code. The accuracy of data obtained in the simulation is strongly connected to the adequacy of such simulation to the real situation. The phantoms are one of the key factors for the researcher manipulation. They are generally developed in supine position and its anatomy is patronized by compiled data from international institutions such as ICRP or ICRU. Several pathologies modify the structure of organs and body tissues. In order to measure how significant these alterations are, an anthropomorphic model was developed for this study: patient mastectomies. This model was developed using voxel phantom FASH and then coupled with EGSnrc Monte Carlo code

  10. [The model of geometrical human body phantom for calculating tissue doses in the service module of the International Space Station].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarenko, V A; Mitrikas, V G

    2007-01-01

    The model of a geometrical human body phantom developed for calculating the shielding functions of representative points of the body organs and systems is similar to the anthropomorphic phantom. This form of phantom can be integrated with the shielding model of the ISS Russian orbital segment to make analysis of radiation loading of crewmembers in different compartments of the vehicle. Calculation of doses absorbed by the body systems in terms of the representative points makes it clear that doses essentially depend on the phantom spatial orientation (eye direction). It also enables the absorbed dose evaluation from the shielding functions as the mean of the representative points and phantom orientation.

  11. Revisiting the Effect of Anthropomorphizing a Social Cause Campaign.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa A Williams

    Full Text Available Recent research suggests that anthropomorphism can be harnessed as a tool to boost intentions to comply with social cause campaigns. Drawing on the human tendency to extend moral concern to entities portrayed as humanlike, it has been argued that adding personified features to a social campaign elevates anticipated guilt at failing to comply, and this subsequently boosts intentions to comply with that campaign. The present research aimed to extend extant research by disentangling the effects of emotional and non-emotional anthropomorphism, and differentiating amongst other emotional mechanisms of the anthropomorphism-compliance effect (namely, anticipated pride and anticipated regret. Experiment 1 (N = 294 compared the effectiveness of positive, negative, and emotionally-neutral anthropomorphized campaign posters for boosting campaign compliance intentions against non-anthropomorphized posters. We also measured potential mechanisms including anticipated guilt, regret, and pride. Results failed to support the anthropomorphism-compliance effect, and no changes in anticipated emotion according to anthropomorphism emerged. Experiments 2 (N = 150 and 3 (N = 196 represented further tests of the anthropomorphism-compliance effect. Despite high statistical power and efforts to closely replicate the conditions under which the anthropomorphism-compliance effect had been previously observed, no differences in compliance intention or anticipated emotion according to anthropomorphism emerged. A meta-analysis of the effects of anthropomorphism on compliance and anticipated emotion across the three experiments revealed effect size estimates that did not differ significantly from zero. The results of these three experiments suggest that the anthropomorphism-compliance effect is fragile and perhaps subject to contextual and idiographic influences. Thus, this research provides important insight and impetus for future research on the applied and theoretical

  12. Revisiting the Effect of Anthropomorphizing a Social Cause Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lisa A; Masser, Barbara; Sun, Jessie

    2015-01-01

    Recent research suggests that anthropomorphism can be harnessed as a tool to boost intentions to comply with social cause campaigns. Drawing on the human tendency to extend moral concern to entities portrayed as humanlike, it has been argued that adding personified features to a social campaign elevates anticipated guilt at failing to comply, and this subsequently boosts intentions to comply with that campaign. The present research aimed to extend extant research by disentangling the effects of emotional and non-emotional anthropomorphism, and differentiating amongst other emotional mechanisms of the anthropomorphism-compliance effect (namely, anticipated pride and anticipated regret). Experiment 1 (N = 294) compared the effectiveness of positive, negative, and emotionally-neutral anthropomorphized campaign posters for boosting campaign compliance intentions against non-anthropomorphized posters. We also measured potential mechanisms including anticipated guilt, regret, and pride. Results failed to support the anthropomorphism-compliance effect, and no changes in anticipated emotion according to anthropomorphism emerged. Experiments 2 (N = 150) and 3 (N = 196) represented further tests of the anthropomorphism-compliance effect. Despite high statistical power and efforts to closely replicate the conditions under which the anthropomorphism-compliance effect had been previously observed, no differences in compliance intention or anticipated emotion according to anthropomorphism emerged. A meta-analysis of the effects of anthropomorphism on compliance and anticipated emotion across the three experiments revealed effect size estimates that did not differ significantly from zero. The results of these three experiments suggest that the anthropomorphism-compliance effect is fragile and perhaps subject to contextual and idiographic influences. Thus, this research provides important insight and impetus for future research on the applied and theoretical utility of

  13. Preliminary studies on fragmentation in tissue-equivalent material produced by 55 MeV/u 40Ar17+ ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang Bingrong; Wei Zengquan; Duan Limin; Zhang Baoguo; Li Songlin; Yin Xu; Zhu Yongtai; Li Wenjian; Li Qiang; Yuan Shibin

    2002-01-01

    By using a 55 MeV/u 40 Ar 17+ beam produced by HIRFL, the distribution of fragments in 1.5 mm lucite on three different directions were measured at the radiobiology terminal. Feasibilities of the phoswich detector composed of fast plastic scintillator and CsI(Tl) detectors for determination of angular distribution of fragments in tissue-equivalent materials were investigated. The results obtained were satisfactory

  14. Bioassay Phantoms Using Medical Images and Computer Aided Manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, X. Geroge

    2011-01-01

    A radiation bioassay program relies on a set of standard human phantoms to calibrate and assess radioactivity levels inside a human body for radiation protection and nuclear medicine imaging purposes. However, the methodologies in the development and application of anthropomorphic phantoms, both physical and computational, had mostly remained the same for the past 40 years. We herein propose a 3-year research project to develop medical image-based physical and computational phantoms specifically for radiation bioassay applications involving internally deposited radionuclides. The broad, long-term objective of this research was to set the foundation for a systematic paradigm shift away from the anatomically crude phantoms in existence today to realistic and ultimately individual-specific bioassay methodologies. This long-term objective is expected to impact all areas of radiation bioassay involving nuclear power plants, U.S. DOE laboratories, and nuclear medicine clinics.

  15. Controlling human corneal stromal stem cell contraction to mediate rapid cell and matrix organization of real architecture for 3-dimensional tissue equivalents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhey, Dev; Phillips, James B; Daniels, Julie T; Kureshi, Alvena K

    2018-02-01

    The architecture of the human corneal stroma consists of a highly organized extracellular matrix (ECM) interspersed with keratocytes. Their progenitor cells; corneal stromal stem cells (CSSC) are located at the periphery, in the limbal stroma. A highly organized corneal ECM is critical for effective transmission of light but this structure may be compromised during injury or disease, resulting in loss of vision. Re-creating normal organization in engineered tissue equivalents for transplantation often involves lengthy culture times that are inappropriate for clinical use or utilisation of synthetic substrates that bring complications such as corneal melting. CSSC have great therapeutic potential owing to their ability to reorganize a disorganized matrix, restoring transparency in scarred corneas. We examined CSSC contractile behavior to assess whether this property could be exploited to rapidly generate cell and ECM organization in Real Architecture For 3D Tissues (RAFT) tissue equivalents (TE) for transplantation. Free-floating collagen gels were characterized to assess contractile behavior of CSSC and establish optimum cell density and culture times. To mediate cell and collagen organization, tethered collagen gels seeded with CSSC were cultured and subsequently stabilized with the RAFT process. We demonstrated rapid creation of biomimetic RAFT TE with tunable structural properties. These displayed three distinct regions of varying degrees of cellular and collagen organization. Interestingly, increased organization coincided with a dramatic loss of PAX6 expression in CSSC, indicating rapid differentiation into keratocytes. The organized RAFT TE system could be a useful bioengineering tool to rapidly create an organized ECM while simultaneously controlling cell phenotype. For the first time, we have demonstrated that human CSSC exhibit the phenomenon of cellular self-alignment in tethered collagen gels. We found this mediated rapid co-alignment of collagen fibrils

  16. SU-G-206-05: A Comparison of Head Phantoms Used for Dose Determination in Imaging Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Z; Vijayan, S; Kilian-Meneghin, J; Rudin, S; Bednarek, D [Toshiba Stroke and Vascular Research Center, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To determine similarities and differences between various head phantoms that might be used for dose measurements in diagnostic imaging procedures. Methods: We chose four frequently used anthropomorphic head phantoms (SK-150, PBU-50, RS-240T and Alderson Rando), a computational patient phantom (Zubal) and the CTDI head phantom for comparison in our study. We did a CT scan of the head phantoms using the same protocol and compared their dimensions and CT numbers. The scan data was used to calculate dose values for each of the phantoms using EGSnrc Monte Carlo software. An .egsphant file was constructed to describe these phantoms using a Visual C++ program for DOSXYZnrc/EGSnrc simulation. The lens dose was calculated for a simulated CBCT scan using DOSXYZnrc/EGSnrc and the calculated doses were validated with measurements using Gafchromic film and an ionization chamber. Similar calculations and measurements were made for PA radiography to investigate the attenuation and backscatter differences between these phantoms. We used the Zubal phantom as the standard for comparison since it was developed based on a CT scan of a patient. Results: The lens dose for the Alderson Rando phantom is around 9% different than the Zubal phantom, while the lens dose for the PBU-50 phantom was about 50% higher, possibly because its skull thickness and the density of bone and soft tissue are lower than anthropometric values. The lens dose for the CTDI phantom is about 500% higher because of its totally different structure. The entrance dose profiles are similar for the five anthropomorphic phantoms, while that for the CTDI phantom was distinctly different. Conclusion: The CTDI and PBU-50 head phantoms have substantially larger lens dose estimates in CBCT. The other four head phantoms have similar entrance dose with backscatter hence should be preferred for dose measurement in imaging procedures of the head. Partial support from NIH Grant R01-EB002873 and Toshiba Medical Systems

  17. Anthropomorphic reasoning about neuromorphic AGI safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jilk, David J.; Herd, Seth J.; Read, Stephen J.; O'Reilly, Randall C.

    2017-11-01

    One candidate approach to creating artificial general intelligence (AGI) is to imitate the essential computations of human cognition. This process is sometimes called 'reverse-engineering the brain' and the end product called 'neuromorphic.' We argue that, unlike with other approaches to AGI, anthropomorphic reasoning about behaviour and safety concerns is appropriate and crucial in a neuromorphic context. Using such reasoning, we offer some initial ideas to make neuromorphic AGI safer. In particular, we explore how basic drives that promote social interaction may be essential to the development of cognitive capabilities as well as serving as a focal point for human-friendly outcomes.

  18. Status and Trends of the Anthropomorphic Robotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Hurs

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a number of current developments in the field of anthropomorphic robotics, namely robotic exoskeletons, android platform with copying control systems, android platform with autonomous control systems, avatars, and androids. Highlights the key subsystems of the robotic platform such as sensitization tools, tools of self-diagnostics, security and prioritization, a power subsystem, and computer system. Identifies the most important subsystem of a “future soldier” to represent an equipage as a multifunctional active exoskeleton, completed with the necessary equipment.The paper shows the main problems the developers of anthropomorphic robotics face. For example, many degrees of the human body freedom curb a creation of the actuating mechanisms of robots, which fit the human anatomy as much as possible. For the human sizes the specific characteristics of traditional types of actuators, such as electromechanical, electro-hydraulic and electro-pneumatic are worse than those of the human muscles. Clearly, the greatest prospects in this area are associated with artificial muscles. There is also no so far a solution for the problem of creating the feedbacks in all kinds of senses to ensure that an operator has a feeling that he is in the place of the robot. There is much tension around the issue of creating a perfect remote control system that allows the operator to obtain unambiguous signals to control the robot. There is currently no completely autonomous control system with elements of artificial intelligence. Particular attention is paid to the problems of creating power sources that can provide affordable autonomy for mobile robotic systems. The most, presently, promising power sources are mentioned.The paper considers some development aspects of the control system, which is capable to run in a copier, supervisory, combined and offline modes. Presents the most important functions of the robot sensory system. Shows some aspects

  19. Anthropomorphic Networks as Representatives of Global Consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergii Yahodzinskyi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available There has been analyzed a phenomenon of global consciousness, and its cultural and historical, civilizational dimensions have been substantiated. There has been demonstrated that the concept of planetary consciousness, global thinking, noosphere was described for the first time in the philosophy of cosmism. However, in modern conditions ideas of representatives of the naturalistic philosophical direction of cosmism have not lost their heuristic potential. They can be reconsidered in a new fashion within the context of emerging anthropomorphic (human dimension networks. There has been proved that global consciousness is a component of the social and cultural potential of global information networks defining vectors to prospects of humanity progress in the 21st century. Relying on methodology of the structural and functional analysis, the author arrives at a conclusion about global networks obtaining the status of representatives of global consciousness. This is the area of networks where all relevant information is concentrated – from statistical data to scientific and technical information. Access to these data is limited by human abilities and is realized in the form of discrete requests with using heuristic algorithms of information procession. A suggestion is introduced considering the fact that modern society being a self-organized system seeks to gain stable condition. Anthropomorphic networks are means of decreasing social entropy, which is growing as a result of any kind of human intervention into social processes. Thus, for the first time a human is challenged by their intellect, ability to create, discover and control.

  20. Phantom position dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorson, M.R.; Endres, G.W.R.

    1981-01-01

    Sensitivity of the Hanford dosimeter response to its position relative to the phantom and the neutron source has always been recognized. A thorough investigation was performed to quantify dosimeter response according to: (a) dosimeter position on phantom, (b) dosimeter distance from phantom, and (c) angular relationship of dosimeter relative to neutron source and phantom. Results were obtained for neutron irradiation at several different energies

  1. Anthropomorphism in Decorative Pictures: Benefit or Harm for Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Sascha; Nebel, Steve; Beege, Maik; Rey, Günter Daniel

    2018-01-01

    When people attribute human characteristics to nonhuman objects they are amenable to anthropomorphism. For example, human faces or the insertion of personalized labels are found to trigger anthropomorphism. Two studies examine the effects of these features when included in decorative pictures in multimedia learning materials. In a first…

  2. Monte Carlo simulation of a mammographic test phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, R. A.; Dance, D. R.; Pachoud, M.; Carlsson, G. A.; Sandborg, M.; Ullman, G.

    2005-01-01

    A test phantom, including a wide range of mammographic tissue equivalent materials and test details, was imaged on a digital mammographic system. In order to quantify the effect of scatter on the contrast obtained for the test details, calculations of the scatter-to-primary ratio (S/P) have been made using a Monte Carlo simulation of the digital mammographic imaging chain, grid and test phantom. The results show that the S/P values corresponding to the imaging conditions used were in the range 0.084-0.126. Calculated and measured pixel values in different regions of the image were compared as a validation of the model and showed excellent agreement. The results indicate the potential of Monte Carlo methods in the image quality-patient dose process optimisation, especially in the assessment of imaging conditions not available on standard mammographic units. (authors)

  3. Humanizing machines: Anthropomorphization of slot machines increases gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Paolo; Sacchi, Simona; Brambilla, Marco

    2015-12-01

    Do people gamble more on slot machines if they think that they are playing against humanlike minds rather than mathematical algorithms? Research has shown that people have a strong cognitive tendency to imbue humanlike mental states to nonhuman entities (i.e., anthropomorphism). The present research tested whether anthropomorphizing slot machines would increase gambling. Four studies manipulated slot machine anthropomorphization and found that exposing people to an anthropomorphized description of a slot machine increased gambling behavior and reduced gambling outcomes. Such findings emerged using tasks that focused on gambling behavior (Studies 1 to 3) as well as in experimental paradigms that included gambling outcomes (Studies 2 to 4). We found that gambling outcomes decrease because participants primed with the anthropomorphic slot machine gambled more (Study 4). Furthermore, we found that high-arousal positive emotions (e.g., feeling excited) played a role in the effect of anthropomorphism on gambling behavior (Studies 3 and 4). Our research indicates that the psychological process of gambling-machine anthropomorphism can be advantageous for the gaming industry; however, this may come at great expense for gamblers' (and their families') economic resources and psychological well-being. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Reconstruction of voxel phantoms for skin dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antunes, Paula Cristina Guimaraes

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a therapeutic modality that utilizes ionizing radiation for the destruction of neoplastic human cells. One of the requirements for this treatment methodology success lays on the appropriate use of planning systems, which performs, among other information, the patient's dose distribution estimate. Nowadays, transport codes have been providing huge subsidies to these planning systems, once it enables specific and accurate patient organ and tissue dosimetry. The model utilized by these codes to describe the human anatomy in a realistic way is known as voxel phantoms, which are represented by discrete volume elements (voxels) directly associated to tomographic data. Nowadays, voxel phantoms doable of being inserted and processed by the transport code MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) presents a 3-4 mm image resolution; however, such resolution limits some thin body structure discrimination, such as skin. In this context, this work proposes a calculus routine that discriminates this region with thickness and localization in the voxel phantoms similar to the real, leading to an accurate dosimetric skin dose assessment by the MCNP code. Moreover, this methodology consists in manipulating the voxel phantoms volume elements by segmenting and subdividing it in different skin thickness. In addition to validate the skin dose calculated data, a set of experimental evaluations with thermoluminescent dosimeters were performed in an anthropomorphic phantom. Due to significant differences observed on the dose distribution of several skin representations, it was found that is important to discriminate the skin thickness similar to the real. The presented methodology is useful to obtain an accurate skin dosimetric evaluation for several radiotherapy procedures, with particular interest on the electron beam radiotherapy, in which highlights the whole body irradiation therapy (TSET), a procedure under implementation at the Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da

  5. Monte Carlo simulations of adult and pediatric computed tomography exams: Validation studies of organ doses with physical phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, Daniel J.; Lee, Choonsik; Tien, Christopher; Fisher, Ryan; Hoerner, Matthew R.; Hintenlang, David; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To validate the accuracy of a Monte Carlo source model of the Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 CT scanner using organ doses measured in physical anthropomorphic phantoms. Methods: The x-ray output of the Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 multidetector CT scanner was simulated within the Monte Carlo radiation transport code, MCNPX version 2.6. The resulting source model was able to perform various simulated axial and helical computed tomographic (CT) scans of varying scan parameters, including beam energy, filtration, pitch, and beam collimation. Two custom-built anthropomorphic phantoms were used to take dose measurements on the CT scanner: an adult male and a 9-month-old. The adult male is a physical replica of University of Florida reference adult male hybrid computational phantom, while the 9-month-old is a replica of University of Florida Series B 9-month-old voxel computational phantom. Each phantom underwent a series of axial and helical CT scans, during which organ doses were measured using fiber-optic coupled plastic scintillator dosimeters developed at University of Florida. The physical setup was reproduced and simulated in MCNPX using the CT source model and the computational phantoms upon which the anthropomorphic phantoms were constructed. Average organ doses were then calculated based upon these MCNPX results. Results: For all CT scans, good agreement was seen between measured and simulated organ doses. For the adult male, the percent differences were within 16% for axial scans, and within 18% for helical scans. For the 9-month-old, the percent differences were all within 15% for both the axial and helical scans. These results are comparable to previously published validation studies using GE scanners and commercially available anthropomorphic phantoms. Conclusions: Overall results of this study show that the Monte Carlo source model can be used to accurately and reliably calculate organ doses for patients undergoing a variety of axial or helical CT

  6. Preliminary Study on Hybrid Computational Phantom for Radiation Dosimetry Based on Subdivision Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Jong Hwi; Choi, Sang Hyoun; Cho, Sung Koo; Kim, Chan Hyeong

    2007-01-01

    The anthropomorphic computational phantoms are classified into two groups. One group is the stylized phantoms, or MIRD phantoms, which are based on mathematical representations of the anatomical structures. The shapes and positions of the organs and tissues in these phantoms can be adjusted by changing the coefficients of the equations in use. The other group is the voxel phantoms, which are based on tomographic images of a real person such as CT, MR and serially sectioned color slice images from a cadaver. Obviously, the voxel phantoms represent the anatomical structures of a human body much more realistically than the stylized phantoms. A realistic representation of anatomical structure is very important for an accurate calculation of radiation dose in the human body. Consequently, the ICRP recently has decided to use the voxel phantoms for the forthcoming update of the dose conversion coefficients. However, the voxel phantoms also have some limitations: (1) The topology and dimensions of the organs and tissues in a voxel model are extremely difficult to change, and (2) The thin organs, such as oral mucosa and skin, cannot be realistically modeled unless the voxel resolution is prohibitively high. Recently, a new approach has been implemented by several investigators. The investigators converted their voxel phantoms to hybrid computational phantoms based on NURBS (Non-Uniform Rational B-Splines) surface, which is smooth and deformable. It is claimed that these new phantoms have the flexibility of the stylized phantom along with the realistic representations of the anatomical structures. The topology and dimensions of the anatomical structures can be easily changed as necessary. Thin organs can be modeled without affecting computational speed or memory requirement. The hybrid phantoms can be also used for 4-D Monte Carlo simulations. In this preliminary study, the external shape of a voxel phantom (i.e., skin), HDRK-Man, was converted to a hybrid computational

  7. Computer tomographic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lonn, A.H.R.; Jacobsen, D.R.; Zech, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    A reference phantom for computer tomography employs a flexible member with means for urging the flexible member into contact along the curved surface of the lumbar region of a human patient. In one embodiment, the reference phantom is pre-curved in an arc greater than required. Pressure from the weight of a patient laying upon the reference phantom is effective for straightening out the curvature sufficiently to achieve substantial contact along the lumbar region. The curvature of the reference phantom may be additionally distorted by a resilient pad between the resilient phantom and a table for urging it into contact with the lumbar region. In a second embodiment of the invention, a flexible reference phantom is disposed in a slot in the top of a resilient cushion. The resilient cushion and reference phantom may be enclosed in a flexible container. A partially curved reference phantom in a slot in a resilient cushion is also contemplated. (author)

  8. Evolution of dosimetric phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    In this oration evolution of the dosimetric phantoms for radiation protection and for medical use is briefly reviewed. Some details of the development of Indian Reference Phantom for internal dose estimation are also presented

  9. Research article – Optimisation of paediatrics computed radiographyfor full spine curvature measurements using a phantom: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, Seraphine; Reis, Cláudia; Ndlovu, Junior; Serrenho, Catarina; Akhtar, Ifrah; Garcia, José Antonio; Linde, Daniël; Thorskog, Martine; Franco, Loris; Hogg, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Optimise a set of exposure factors, with the lowest effective dose, to delineate spinal curvature with the modified Cobb method in a full spine using computed radiography (CR) for a 5-year-old paediatric anthropomorphic phantom. Methods: Images were acquired by varying a set of parameters:

  10. Anthropomorphic Robot Design and User Interaction Associated with Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Stephen R.

    2016-01-01

    Though in its original concept a robot was conceived to have some human-like shape, most robots now in use have specific industrial purposes and do not closely resemble humans. Nevertheless, robots that resemble human form in some way have continued to be introduced. They are called anthropomorphic robots. The fact that the user interface to all robots is now highly mediated means that the form of the user interface is not necessarily connected to the robots form, human or otherwise. Consequently, the unique way the design of anthropomorphic robots affects their user interaction is through their general appearance and the way they move. These robots human-like appearance acts as a kind of generalized predictor that gives its operators, and those with whom they may directly work, the expectation that they will behave to some extent like a human. This expectation is especially prominent for interactions with social robots, which are built to enhance it. Often interaction with them may be mainly cognitive because they are not necessarily kinematically intricate enough for complex physical interaction. Their body movement, for example, may be limited to simple wheeled locomotion. An anthropomorphic robot with human form, however, can be kinematically complex and designed, for example, to reproduce the details of human limb, torso, and head movement. Because of the mediated nature of robot control, there remains in general no necessary connection between the specific form of user interface and the anthropomorphic form of the robot. But their anthropomorphic kinematics and dynamics imply that the impact of their design shows up in the way the robot moves. The central finding of this report is that the control of this motion is a basic design element through which the anthropomorphic form can affect user interaction. In particular, designers of anthropomorphic robots can take advantage of the inherent human-like movement to 1) improve the users direct manual control over

  11. Membership function used to construction of a hand homogeneous phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavan, Ana Luiza Menegatti; Alvarez, Matheus; Alves, Allan Felipe Fattori; Rosa, Maria Eugenia Dela; Miranda, Jose Ricardo de Arruda

    2014-01-01

    Fractures and dislocations of the hand are some injuries most frequently encountered in trauma of the musculoskeletal system. In evaluating these lesions, in addition to physical examination, radiography, in at least two incidents, is the investigation of choice, and rarely is necessary the help of other images to establish the diagnosis and treatment. The image quality of X-ray examination is therefore essential. In this study, a homogeneous phantom hand was developed to be used in the optimization of images from hand using computed radiography system process. In this procedure were quantified thicknesses of different tissues that constitute an anthropomorphic phantom hand. To perform the classification and quantification of tissue was applied membership functions for histograms of CT scans. The same procedure was adopted for retrospective examinations of 30 patients of the Hospital das Clinicas, Botucatu Medicine School, UNESP (HCFMB-UNESP). The results showed agreement between the thicknesses of tissues that make up the anthropomorphic phantom and sampling of patients, presenting variations between 12.63% and 6.48% for soft tissue and bone, respectively. (author)

  12. Seeing More Than Human: Autism and Anthropomorphic Theory of Mind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gray Atherton

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Theory of mind (ToM is defined as the process of taking another’s perspective. Anthropomorphism can be seen as the extension of ToM to non-human entities. This review examines the literature concerning ToM and anthropomorphism in relation to individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD, specifically addressing the questions of how and why those on the spectrum both show an increased interest for anthropomorphism and may even show improved ToM abilities when judging the mental states of anthropomorphic characters. This review highlights that while individuals with ASD traditionally show deficits on a wide range of ToM tests, such as recognizing facial emotions, such ToM deficits may be ameliorated if the stimuli presented is cartoon or animal-like rather than in human form. Individuals with ASD show a greater interest in anthropomorphic characters and process the features of these characters using methods typically reserved for human stimuli. Personal accounts of individuals with ASD also suggest they may identify more closely with animals than other humans. It is shown how the social motivations hypothesized to underlie the anthropomorphizing of non-human targets may lead those on the spectrum to seek social connections and therefore gain ToM experience and expertise amongst unlikely sources.

  13. Embodied neurofeedback with an anthropomorphic robotic hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Niclas; Emkes, Reiner; Thorne, Jeremy D; Debener, Stefan

    2016-11-21

    Neurofeedback-guided motor imagery training (NF-MIT) has been suggested as a promising therapy for stroke-induced motor impairment. Whereas much NF-MIT research has aimed at signal processing optimization, the type of sensory feedback given to the participant has received less attention. Often the feedback signal is highly abstract and not inherently coupled to the mental act performed. In this study, we asked whether an embodied feedback signal is more efficient for neurofeedback operation than a non-embodiable feedback signal. Inspired by the rubber hand illusion, demonstrating that an artificial hand can be incorporated into one's own body scheme, we used an anthropomorphic robotic hand to visually guide the participants' motor imagery act and to deliver neurofeedback. Using two experimental manipulations, we investigated how a participant's neurofeedback performance and subjective experience were influenced by the embodiability of the robotic hand, and by the neurofeedback signal's validity. As pertains to embodiment, we found a promoting effect of robotic-hand embodiment in subjective, behavioral, electrophysiological and electrodermal measures. Regarding neurofeedback signal validity, we found some differences between real and sham neurofeedback in terms of subjective and electrodermal measures, but not in terms of behavioral and electrophysiological measures. This study motivates the further development of embodied feedback signals for NF-MIT.

  14. Embodied neurofeedback with an anthropomorphic robotic hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Niclas; Emkes, Reiner; Thorne, Jeremy D.; Debener, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Neurofeedback-guided motor imagery training (NF-MIT) has been suggested as a promising therapy for stroke-induced motor impairment. Whereas much NF-MIT research has aimed at signal processing optimization, the type of sensory feedback given to the participant has received less attention. Often the feedback signal is highly abstract and not inherently coupled to the mental act performed. In this study, we asked whether an embodied feedback signal is more efficient for neurofeedback operation than a non-embodiable feedback signal. Inspired by the rubber hand illusion, demonstrating that an artificial hand can be incorporated into one’s own body scheme, we used an anthropomorphic robotic hand to visually guide the participants’ motor imagery act and to deliver neurofeedback. Using two experimental manipulations, we investigated how a participant’s neurofeedback performance and subjective experience were influenced by the embodiability of the robotic hand, and by the neurofeedback signal’s validity. As pertains to embodiment, we found a promoting effect of robotic-hand embodiment in subjective, behavioral, electrophysiological and electrodermal measures. Regarding neurofeedback signal validity, we found some differences between real and sham neurofeedback in terms of subjective and electrodermal measures, but not in terms of behavioral and electrophysiological measures. This study motivates the further development of embodied feedback signals for NF-MIT. PMID:27869190

  15. An anthropomorphic phantom study of visualisation of surgical clips for partial breast irradiation (PBI) setup verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Carys W.; Nichol, Alan M.; Park, Julie E.; Hui, Jason F.; Giddings, Alison A.; Grahame, Sheri; Otto, Karl

    2009-01-01

    Surgical clips were investigated for partial breast image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Small titanium clips were insufficiently well visualised. Medium tantalum clips were best for megavoltage IGRT and small tantalum clips were best for floor mounted kilovoltage IGRT (ExacTrac TM ). Both small tantalum and medium titanium clips were suitable for isocentric kilovoltage IGRT

  16. Characterization of materials for use in anthropomorphic phantoms produced by 3D printing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solc, J.; Burianova, L.; Vrba, T.

    2018-01-01

    This poster describes the characterization of materials suitable for 3D printing with an emphasis on the determination of photon flux fluctuation factor. Samples of different materials (ABS, HiPS, NYLON, PET, PLA, PVA, PMMA, Polycarbonate, etc.) were obtained from several commercial companies for which the density, Linear Attenuation (LA) and Hounsfield Units (HU) were determined. LA was obtained for photon energies of 59.5 keV, 121.8 and 344.5 keV using collimated volumes of radionuclide sources Am-241 and Eu-152. These energies cover the energy range of CT scanners and the most widely used therapeutic radionuclide I-131. The mean HU was determined from DICOM images obtained on the Philips Brilliance CT Big Bore radiotherapy simulator. Material parameters were compared to water and soft and fat tissues. The results show that the properties of 3D print samples are strongly dependent both on the printer type and its settings, as well as on the print thread. (authors)

  17. Evaluation of the effective dose in an anthropomorphic phantom in radiation emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, L.K.; Santos, D.S.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to perform a modeling of the human anatomy using Voxel models applied to Monte Carlo code and the Visual Monte Carlo software, simulating irradiation of the human body, so you can make the dose assessment in individuals who have been exposed to any external ionizing radiation source. Making the future, an assessment of both results with limits of validity of TECDOC-1162 expressions of the IAEA in case of point source

  18. Characterization of MOSFET dosimeters for low-dose measurements in maxillofacial anthropomorphic phantoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koivisto, J.H.; Wolff, J.E.; Kiljunen, T.; Schulze, D.; Kortesniemi, M.

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to characterize reinforced metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters to assess the measurement uncertainty, single exposure low-dose limit with acceptable accuracy, and the number of exposures required to attain the corresponding limit of the

  19. An anthropomorphic phantom study of visualisation of surgical clips for partial breast irradiation (PBI) setup verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Carys W; Nichol, Alan M; Park, Julie E; Hui, Jason F; Giddings, Alison A; Grahame, Sheri; Otto, Karl

    2009-01-01

    Surgical clips were investigated for partial breast image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Small titanium clips were insufficiently well visualised. Medium tantalum clips were best for megavoltage IGRT and small tantalum clips were best for floor mounted kilovoltage IGRT (ExacTrac). Both small tantalum and medium titanium clips were suitable for isocentric kilovoltage IGRT.

  20. Measurement of neutron and gamma absorbed doses in phantoms exposed to mixed fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beraud-Sudreau, E.; Lemaire, G.; Maas, J.

    1985-01-01

    In order to study the dosimetric characteristics of PIN junctions, the absorbed doses measured by junctions and FLi7 in air and water phantoms were compared with the doses measured by classical neutron dosimetry in mixed fields. The validity of the experimental responses of PIN junctions being thus checked and established, neutron and gamma dose distributions in tissue equivalent plastic phantoms (plastinaut) and mammals (piglets) were evaluated as well as the absorbed dose distributions in the pig bone-marrow producing areas. By using correlatively a Monte-Carlo calculation method and applying some simplifying assumptions, the absorbed doses were derived from the spectrum of SILENE's neutrons at various depths inside a cubic water phantom and the results were compared with some from the literature [fr

  1. Methodology for the construction of a physical phantom for quality control of images in digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Tayline T.; Vieira, Jose Wilson; Oliveira, Alex Cristovao H. de; Lima, Fernando R. de Andrade

    2013-01-01

    The advancement of technology in recent years has provided the production of increasingly sophisticated devices, aiming to acquire medical images with high technical level and also facilitate the operational readiness of the equipment. In order to ensure the most accurate diagnosis with minimum dose without exposing patients to obtain data and verify the performance of a radiographic system for quality control purposes we use the so-called phantoms. Phantoms are physical or computational models used to simulate the transport of ionizing radiation, their interactions in the tissues of the human body and evaluate the deposition of energy. Besides, they are made from materials with behavior similar to human tissues when exposed to ionizing radiation - the so-called tissue-equivalent materials. This paper describes the construction of a physical phantom that allows the execution of the main acceptance tests of the quality control protocols in digital radiography

  2. Computational hybrid anthropometric paediatric phantom library for internal radiation dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Tianwu; Kuster, Niels; Zaidi, Habib

    2017-04-01

    Hybrid computational phantoms combine voxel-based and simplified equation-based modelling approaches to provide unique advantages and more realism for the construction of anthropomorphic models. In this work, a methodology and C++ code are developed to generate hybrid computational phantoms covering statistical distributions of body morphometry in the paediatric population. The paediatric phantoms of the Virtual Population Series (IT’IS Foundation, Switzerland) were modified to match target anthropometric parameters, including body mass, body length, standing height and sitting height/stature ratio, determined from reference databases of the National Centre for Health Statistics and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The phantoms were selected as representative anchor phantoms for the newborn, 1, 2, 5, 10 and 15 years-old children, and were subsequently remodelled to create 1100 female and male phantoms with 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th and 90th body morphometries. Evaluation was performed qualitatively using 3D visualization and quantitatively by analysing internal organ masses. Overall, the newly generated phantoms appear very reasonable and representative of the main characteristics of the paediatric population at various ages and for different genders, body sizes and sitting stature ratios. The mass of internal organs increases with height and body mass. The comparison of organ masses of the heart, kidney, liver, lung and spleen with published autopsy and ICRP reference data for children demonstrated that they follow the same trend when correlated with age. The constructed hybrid computational phantom library opens up the prospect of comprehensive radiation dosimetry calculations and risk assessment for the paediatric population of different age groups and diverse anthropometric parameters.

  3. Construction of an analytic-realistic phantom for adaptation of the radiographic techniques in any conventional X-ray equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pina, D.R.; Ghilardi Netto, T.; Trad, C.S.; Brochi, M.A. Corte; Duarte, S.B.; Pina, S.R.

    2001-01-01

    In the present work we construct a homogeneous phantom, for calibrating the X-ray beam. Each homogeneous phantom was used in the time-scale sensitometric method for obtaining a radiographic technique which is able to produce in the film, an optical density around 1,0 higher than the density of base plus fog. These radiographic techniques were applied in a anthropomorphic phantom (Rando) and its images were analyzed by specialists in radiology. They identified the best image and then a ideal radiographic technique for a standard patient with smaller doses, at any conventional X-ray equipment. (author)

  4. Application of a sitting MIRD phantom for effective dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsher, R. H.; Van Riper, K. A.

    2005-01-01

    In typical realistic scenarios, dose factors due to 60 Co contaminated steel, used in consumer products, cannot be approximated by standard exposure geometries. It is then necessary to calculate the effective dose using an appropriate anthropomorphic phantom. MCNP calculations were performed using a MIRD human model in two settings. In the first, a male office worker is sitting in a chair containing contaminated steel, surrounded by contaminated furniture. In the second, a male driver is seated inside an automobile, the steel of which is uniformly contaminated. To accurately calculate the dose to lower body organs, especially the gonads, it was essential to modify the MIRD model to simulate two sitting postures: chair and driving position. The phantom modifications are described, and the results of the calculations are presented. In the case of the automobile scenarios, results are compared to those obtained using an isotropic fluence-to-dose conversion function. (authors)

  5. Study on quantities of radiation protection in medical X-rays radiation field with polyhedron phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Shuyu; Dai Guangfu; Zhang Liangan

    1997-01-01

    The author have studied tissue-equivalent material with the elemental composition recommended by report No.44 of ICRU. Three different calibration phantoms in shape have been prepared with the tissue-equivalent material in order to study the influence of the angular dependence factor R(d,α) in the radiation field of X-rays on the calibration of individual dose equivalent Hp(d). The requirement of mono-genous radiation field to calibrate several dosimeters on one phantom at the same time can be met by application of dodecahedron phantom, which is difficult on ICRU sphere. Angular dependence factor R(d,α) of 0 degree∼90 degree and conversion coefficients between individual dose equivalent Hp(0.07, α) and the exposure of radiation of different energies and different angles have been established by taking advantage of the dodecahedron. Besides, the authors have studied the variation relation between the individual dose equivalent Hp (10,α) and Hp(0.07,α) in the medical X-rays radiation field

  6. A methodology to develop computational phantoms with adjustable posture for WBC calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira Fonseca, T. C.; Bogaerts, R.; Hunt, John; Vanhavere, F.

    2014-11-01

    A Whole Body Counter (WBC) is a facility to routinely assess the internal contamination of exposed workers, especially in the case of radiation release accidents. The calibration of the counting device is usually done by using anthropomorphic physical phantoms representing the human body. Due to such a challenge of constructing representative physical phantoms a virtual calibration has been introduced. The use of computational phantoms and the Monte Carlo method to simulate radiation transport have been demonstrated to be a worthy alternative. In this study we introduce a methodology developed for the creation of realistic computational voxel phantoms with adjustable posture for WBC calibration. The methodology makes use of different software packages to enable the creation and modification of computational voxel phantoms. This allows voxel phantoms to be developed on demand for the calibration of different WBC configurations. This in turn helps to study the major source of uncertainty associated with the in vivo measurement routine which is the difference between the calibration phantoms and the real persons being counted. The use of realistic computational phantoms also helps the optimization of the counting measurement. Open source codes such as MakeHuman and Blender software packages have been used for the creation and modelling of 3D humanoid characters based on polygonal mesh surfaces. Also, a home-made software was developed whose goal is to convert the binary 3D voxel grid into a MCNPX input file. This paper summarizes the development of a library of phantoms of the human body that uses two basic phantoms called MaMP and FeMP (Male and Female Mesh Phantoms) to create a set of male and female phantoms that vary both in height and in weight. Two sets of MaMP and FeMP phantoms were developed and used for efficiency calibration of two different WBC set-ups: the Doel NPP WBC laboratory and AGM laboratory of SCK-CEN in Mol, Belgium.

  7. A methodology to develop computational phantoms with adjustable posture for WBC calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, T C Ferreira; Vanhavere, F; Bogaerts, R; Hunt, John

    2014-01-01

    A Whole Body Counter (WBC) is a facility to routinely assess the internal contamination of exposed workers, especially in the case of radiation release accidents. The calibration of the counting device is usually done by using anthropomorphic physical phantoms representing the human body. Due to such a challenge of constructing representative physical phantoms a virtual calibration has been introduced. The use of computational phantoms and the Monte Carlo method to simulate radiation transport have been demonstrated to be a worthy alternative. In this study we introduce a methodology developed for the creation of realistic computational voxel phantoms with adjustable posture for WBC calibration. The methodology makes use of different software packages to enable the creation and modification of computational voxel phantoms. This allows voxel phantoms to be developed on demand for the calibration of different WBC configurations. This in turn helps to study the major source of uncertainty associated with the in vivo measurement routine which is the difference between the calibration phantoms and the real persons being counted. The use of realistic computational phantoms also helps the optimization of the counting measurement. Open source codes such as MakeHuman and Blender software packages have been used for the creation and modelling of 3D humanoid characters based on polygonal mesh surfaces. Also, a home-made software was developed whose goal is to convert the binary 3D voxel grid into a MCNPX input file. This paper summarizes the development of a library of phantoms of the human body that uses two basic phantoms called MaMP and FeMP (Male and Female Mesh Phantoms) to create a set of male and female phantoms that vary both in height and in weight. Two sets of MaMP and FeMP phantoms were developed and used for efficiency calibration of two different WBC set-ups: the Doel NPP WBC laboratory and AGM laboratory of SCK-CEN in Mol, Belgium. (paper)

  8. Social Cognition Unbound: Insights Into Anthropomorphism and Dehumanization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waytz, Adam; Epley, Nicholas; Cacioppo, John T

    2010-02-01

    People conceive of wrathful gods, fickle computers, and selfish genes, attributing human characteristics to a variety of supernatural, technological, and biological agents. This tendency to anthropomorphize nonhuman agents figures prominently in domains ranging from religion to marketing to computer science. Perceiving an agent to be humanlike has important implications for whether the agent is capable of social influence, accountable for its actions, and worthy of moral care and consideration. Three primary factors-elicited agent knowledge, sociality motivation, and effectance motivation-appear to account for a significant amount of variability in anthropomorphism. Identifying these factors that lead people to see nonhuman agents as humanlike also sheds light on the inverse process of dehumanization, whereby people treat human agents as animals or objects. Understanding anthropomorphism can contribute to a more expansive view of social cognition that applies social psychological theory to a wide variety of both human and nonhuman agents.

  9. The response of a spherical tissue-equivalent proportional counter to 56-Fe particles from 200-1000 MeV/nucleon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gersey, Bradford B.; Borak, Thomas B.; Guetersloh, Stephen B.; Zeitlin, Cary J.; Miller, J.; Heilbronn, L.; Murakami, T.; Iwata, Y.

    2001-09-04

    The radiation environment aboard the space shuttle and the International Space Station includes high-Z and high-energy (HZE) particles that are part of the galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) spectrum. Iron-56 is considered to be one of the most biologically important parts of the GCR spectrum. Tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPC) are used as active dosimeters on manned space flights. These TEPC's are further used to determine average quality factor for each space mission. A TEPC simulating a 1 micron diameter sphere of tissue was exposed as part of a particle spectrometer to iron-56 at energies from 200-1000 MeV/nucleon. The response of TEPC in terms of frequency-averaged lineal energy, dose-averaged lineal energy, as well as energy deposited at different impact parameters through detector was determined for six different incident energies of iron-56 in this energy range. Calculations determined that charged particle equilibrium was achieved for each of the six experiments. Energy depositions at different impact parameters were calculated using a radial dose distribution model and the results compared to experimental data.

  10. The UF family of reference hybrid phantoms for computational radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choonsik; Lodwick, Daniel; Hurtado, Jorge; Pafundi, Deanna; Williams, Jonathan L; Bolch, Wesley E

    2010-01-01

    Computational human phantoms are computer models used to obtain dose distributions within the human body exposed to internal or external radiation sources. In addition, they are increasingly used to develop detector efficiencies for in vivo whole-body counters. Two classes of computational human phantoms have been widely utilized for dosimetry calculation: stylized and voxel phantoms that describe human anatomy through mathematical surface equations and 3D voxel matrices, respectively. Stylized phantoms are flexible in that changes to organ position and shape are possible given avoidance of region overlap, while voxel phantoms are typically fixed to a given patient anatomy, yet can be proportionally scaled to match individuals of larger or smaller stature, but of equivalent organ anatomy. Voxel phantoms provide much better anatomical realism as compared to stylized phantoms which are intrinsically limited by mathematical surface equations. To address the drawbacks of these phantoms, hybrid phantoms based on non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) surfaces have been introduced wherein anthropomorphic flexibility and anatomic realism are both preserved. Researchers at the University of Florida have introduced a series of hybrid phantoms representing the ICRP Publication 89 reference newborn, 15 year, and adult male and female. In this study, six additional phantoms are added to the UF family of hybrid phantoms-those of the reference 1 year, 5 year and 10 year child. Head and torso CT images of patients whose ages were close to the targeted ages were obtained under approved protocols. Major organs and tissues were segmented from these images using an image processing software, 3D-DOCTOR(TM). NURBS and polygon mesh surfaces were then used to model individual organs and tissues after importing the segmented organ models to the 3D NURBS modeling software, Rhinoceros(TM). The phantoms were matched to four reference datasets: (1) standard anthropometric data, (2) reference

  11. Anthropomorphism in Human-Robot Co-evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, Luisa; Dumouchel, Paul

    2018-01-01

    Social robotics entertains a particular relationship with anthropomorphism, which it neither sees as a cognitive error, nor as a sign of immaturity. Rather it considers that this common human tendency, which is hypothesized to have evolved because it favored cooperation among early humans, can be used today to facilitate social interactions between humans and a new type of cooperative and interactive agents - social robots. This approach leads social robotics to focus research on the engineering of robots that activate anthropomorphic projections in users. The objective is to give robots "social presence" and "social behaviors" that are sufficiently credible for human users to engage in comfortable and potentially long-lasting relations with these machines. This choice of 'applied anthropomorphism' as a research methodology exposes the artifacts produced by social robotics to ethical condemnation: social robots are judged to be a "cheating" technology, as they generate in users the illusion of reciprocal social and affective relations. This article takes position in this debate, not only developing a series of arguments relevant to philosophy of mind, cognitive sciences, and robotic AI, but also asking what social robotics can teach us about anthropomorphism. On this basis, we propose a theoretical perspective that characterizes anthropomorphism as a basic mechanism of interaction, and rebuts the ethical reflections that a priori condemns "anthropomorphism-based" social robots. To address the relevant ethical issues, we promote a critical experimentally based ethical approach to social robotics, "synthetic ethics," which aims at allowing humans to use social robots for two main goals: self-knowledge and moral growth.

  12. Perturbation correction for alanine dosimeters in different phantom materials in high-energy photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Voigts-Rhetz, P; Anton, M; Vorwerk, H; Zink, K

    2016-02-07

    In modern radiotherapy the verification of complex treatments plans is often performed in inhomogeneous or even anthropomorphic phantoms. For dose verification small detectors are necessary and therefore alanine detectors are most suitable. Though the response of alanine for a wide range of clinical photon energies in water is well know, the knowledge about the influence of the surrounding phantom material on the response of alanine is sparse. Therefore we investigated the influence of twenty different surrounding/phantom materials for alanine dosimeters in clinical photon fields via Monte Carlo simulations. The relative electron density of the used materials was in the range [Formula: see text] up to 1.69, covering almost all materials appearing in inhomogeneous or anthropomorphic phantoms used in radiotherapy. The investigations were performed for three different clinical photon spectra ranging from 6 to 25 MV-X and Co-60 and as a result a perturbation correction [Formula: see text] depending on the environmental material was established. The Monte Carlo simulation show, that there is only a small dependence of [Formula: see text] on the phantom material and the photon energy, which is below  ±0.6%. The results confirm the good suitability of alanine detectors for in-vivo dosimetry.

  13. Phantom cosmologies and fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chimento, Luis P; Forte, Monica; Devecchi, Fernando P; Kremer, Gilberto M

    2008-01-01

    Form invariance transformations can be used for constructing phantom cosmologies starting with conventional cosmological models. In this work we reconsider the scalar field case and extend the discussion to fermionic fields, where the 'phantomization' process exhibits a new class of possible accelerated regimes. As an application we analyze the cosmological constant group for a fermionic seed fluid

  14. 21. Phantom pain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolff, A.P.; Vanduynhoven, E.; Kleef, M. van; Huygen, F.; Pope, J.E.; Mekhail, N.

    2011-01-01

    Phantom pain is pain caused by elimination or interruption of sensory nerve impulses by destroying or injuring the sensory nerve fibers after amputation or deafferentation. The reported incidence of phantom limb pain after trauma, injury or peripheral vascular diseases is 60% to 80%. Over half the

  15. Design and fabrication of a multipurpose thyroid phantom for medical dosimetry and calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naderi, Simin Mehdizadeh; Sina, Sedigheh; Karimipoorfard, Mehrnoosh; Lotfalizadeh, Fatemeh; Moradi, Hamed; Faghihi, Reza; Entezarmahdi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    A multipurpose anthropomorphic neck phantom was designed and fabricated for use in medical applications. The designed neck phantom is composed of seven elliptic cylindrical slices with a semi-major axis of 14 cm and a semi-minor axis of 12.5 cm, each having the thickness of 2 cm. The thyroid gland, bony part of the neck, and the windpipe were also built inside the neck phantom. For the purpose of medical dosimetry, some holes were drilled inside the phantom to accommodate the thermoluminescence dosemeters with different shapes and dimensions. For testing the quality of images in nuclear medicine, the thyroid gland was built separately to accommodate the radioactive iodine. Finally, the nuclear medicine images were obtained by inserting 131 I in both male and female thyroid parts. (authors)

  16. Algorithms of walking and stability for an anthropomorphic robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirazetdinov, R. T.; Devaev, V. M.; Nikitina, D. V.; Fadeev, A. Y.; Kamalov, A. R.

    2017-09-01

    Autonomous movement of an anthropomorphic robot is considered as a superposition of a set of typical elements of movement - so-called patterns, each of which can be considered as an agent of some multi-agent system [ 1 ]. To control the AP-601 robot, an information and communication infrastructure has been created that represents some multi-agent system that allows the development of algorithms for individual patterns of moving and run them in the system as a set of independently executed and interacting agents. The algorithms of lateral movement of the anthropomorphic robot AP-601 series with active stability due to the stability pattern are presented.

  17. Three-dimensional absorbed dose determinations by N.M.R. analysis of phantom-dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambarini, G.; Birattari, C.; Fumagalli, M.L.; Vai, A.; Monti, D.; Salvadori, P.; Facchielli, L.; Sichirollo, A.E.

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of a tissue-equivalent phantom is a promising technique for three-dimensional determination of absorbed dose from ionizing radiation. A reliable method of determining the spatial distribution of absorbed dose is indispensable for the planning of treatment in the presently developed radiotherapy techniques aimed at obtaining high energy selectively delivered to cancerous tissues, with low dose delivered to the surrounding healthy tissue. Aqueous gels infused with the Fricke dosemeter (i.e. with a ferrous sulphate solution), as proposed in 1984 by Gore et al., have shown interesting characteristics and, in spite of some drawbacks that cause a few limitations to their utilisation, they have shown the feasibility of three-dimensional dose determinations by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging. Fricke-infused agarose gels with various compositions have been analysed, considering the requirements of the new radiotherapy techniques, in particular Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (B.N.C.T.) and proton therapy. Special attention was paid to obtain good tissue equivalence for every radiation type of interest. In particular, the tissue equivalence for thermal neutrons, which is a not simple problem, has also been satisfactorily attained. The responses of gel-dosemeters having the various chosen compositions have been analysed, by mean of NMR instrumentation. Spectrophotometric measurements have also been performed, to verify the consistence of the results. (author)

  18. MO-FG-209-05: Towards a Feature-Based Anthropomorphic Model Observer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avanaki, A.

    2016-01-01

    This symposium will review recent advances in the simulation methods for evaluation of novel breast imaging systems – the subject of AAPM Task Group TG234. Our focus will be on the various approaches to development and validation of software anthropomorphic phantoms and their use in the statistical assessment of novel imaging systems using such phantoms along with computational models for the x-ray image formation process. Due to the dynamic development and complex design of modern medical imaging systems, the simulation of anatomical structures, image acquisition modalities, and the image perception and analysis offers substantial benefits of reduced cost, duration, and radiation exposure, as well as the known ground-truth and wide variability in simulated anatomies. For these reasons, Virtual Clinical Trials (VCTs) have been increasingly accepted as a viable tool for preclinical assessment of x-ray and other breast imaging methods. Activities of TG234 have encompassed the optimization of protocols for simulation studies, including phantom specifications, the simulated data representation, models of the imaging process, and statistical assessment of simulated images. The symposium will discuss the state-of-the-science of VCTs for novel breast imaging systems, emphasizing recent developments and future directions. Presentations will discuss virtual phantoms for intermodality breast imaging performance comparisons, extension of the breast anatomy simulation to the cellular level, optimized integration of the simulated imaging chain, and the novel directions in the observer models design. Learning Objectives: Review novel results in developing and applying virtual phantoms for inter-modality breast imaging performance comparisons; Discuss the efforts to extend the computer simulation of breast anatomy and pathology to the cellular level; Summarize the state of the science in optimized integration of modules in the simulated imaging chain; Compare novel directions

  19. MO-FG-209-05: Towards a Feature-Based Anthropomorphic Model Observer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avanaki, A.

    2016-06-15

    This symposium will review recent advances in the simulation methods for evaluation of novel breast imaging systems – the subject of AAPM Task Group TG234. Our focus will be on the various approaches to development and validation of software anthropomorphic phantoms and their use in the statistical assessment of novel imaging systems using such phantoms along with computational models for the x-ray image formation process. Due to the dynamic development and complex design of modern medical imaging systems, the simulation of anatomical structures, image acquisition modalities, and the image perception and analysis offers substantial benefits of reduced cost, duration, and radiation exposure, as well as the known ground-truth and wide variability in simulated anatomies. For these reasons, Virtual Clinical Trials (VCTs) have been increasingly accepted as a viable tool for preclinical assessment of x-ray and other breast imaging methods. Activities of TG234 have encompassed the optimization of protocols for simulation studies, including phantom specifications, the simulated data representation, models of the imaging process, and statistical assessment of simulated images. The symposium will discuss the state-of-the-science of VCTs for novel breast imaging systems, emphasizing recent developments and future directions. Presentations will discuss virtual phantoms for intermodality breast imaging performance comparisons, extension of the breast anatomy simulation to the cellular level, optimized integration of the simulated imaging chain, and the novel directions in the observer models design. Learning Objectives: Review novel results in developing and applying virtual phantoms for inter-modality breast imaging performance comparisons; Discuss the efforts to extend the computer simulation of breast anatomy and pathology to the cellular level; Summarize the state of the science in optimized integration of modules in the simulated imaging chain; Compare novel directions

  20. Development of an organ-specific insert phantom generated using a 3D printer for investigations of cardiac computed tomography protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Kamarul A; McEntee, Mark F; Reed, Warren; Kench, Peter L

    2018-04-30

    An ideal organ-specific insert phantom should be able to simulate the anatomical features with appropriate appearances in the resultant computed tomography (CT) images. This study investigated a 3D printing technology to develop a novel and cost-effective cardiac insert phantom derived from volumetric CT image datasets of anthropomorphic chest phantom. Cardiac insert volumes were segmented from CT image datasets, derived from an anthropomorphic chest phantom of Lungman N-01 (Kyoto Kagaku, Japan). These segmented datasets were converted to a virtual 3D-isosurface of heart-shaped shell, while two other removable inserts were included using computer-aided design (CAD) software program. This newly designed cardiac insert phantom was later printed by using a fused deposition modelling (FDM) process via a Creatbot DM Plus 3D printer. Then, several selected filling materials, such as contrast media, oil, water and jelly, were loaded into designated spaces in the 3D-printed phantom. The 3D-printed cardiac insert phantom was positioned within the anthropomorphic chest phantom and 30 repeated CT acquisitions performed using a multi-detector scanner at 120-kVp tube potential. Attenuation (Hounsfield Unit, HU) values were measured and compared to the image datasets of real-patient and Catphan ® 500 phantom. The output of the 3D-printed cardiac insert phantom was a solid acrylic plastic material, which was strong, light in weight and cost-effective. HU values of the filling materials were comparable to the image datasets of real-patient and Catphan ® 500 phantom. A novel and cost-effective cardiac insert phantom for anthropomorphic chest phantom was developed using volumetric CT image datasets with a 3D printer. Hence, this suggested the printing methodology could be applied to generate other phantoms for CT imaging studies. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australian Society of Medical

  1. Thermoluminescence and radioluminescence properties of tissue equivalent Cu-doped Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} for radiation dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz Z, E.; Furetta, C. [UNAM, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Apdo. Postal 70543, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Marcazzo, J.; Santiago, M. [Instituto de Fisica Arroyo Seco / UNICEN, Gral. Pinto 399, 7000 Tandil, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Guarneros, C. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Altamira Km 14.5, 896000 Altamira, Tamaulipas (Mexico); Pacio, M. [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Instituto de Ciencias, Centro de Investigacion en Dispositivos Semiconductores, Av. 14 Sur, 72570 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Palomino, R., E-mail: ecruz@nucleares.unam.mx [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas, Av. San Claudio y 18 Sur, 72570 Puebla Pue. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Thermoluminescence (Tl) and radioluminescence (Rl) properties of lithium tetraborate (Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}) doped with different concentration of copper (0.25, 0.5, 1 wt %) under gamma and beta irradiation has been investigated. The feasibility of using this borate in radiation dosimetry at low doses has been evaluated. Tissue equivalent Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} was prepared by solid state reaction using mixing stoichiometric compositions of lithium carbonate (Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) and boric acid (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}) and a solution of CuCl{sub 2} as dopant. The glow curve, of the most efficient copper doped borate (Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}:Cu 0.5 wt %), shows a main stable peak centered at 225 degrees C and a second low temperature peak centered at 80 degrees C. The low temperature peak disappears completely after 24 hours of storage in darkness and at room temperature or after an annealing at 120 degrees C for 10 seconds. The main peak of the Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}:Cu remains constant. The Tl response of Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}:Cu shows good linearity in the analyzed dose range. The stability and repeatability of Rl signals of the borate have been studied and the Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}:Cu (0.5 wt %) shown the higher Rl emission and a stable and repetitive response. Results show that Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}:Cu has prospects to be used in gamma and beta radiation dosimetry. (Author)

  2. A comparison of methods to evaluate gray scale response of tomosynthesis systems using a software breast phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Maria A. Z.; Bakic, Predrag R.; Schiabel, Homero; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2017-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has been shown to be an effective imaging tool for breast cancer diagnosis as it provides three-dimensional images of the breast with minimal tissue overlap. The quality of the reconstructed image depends on many factors that can be assessed using uniform or realistic phantoms. In this paper, we created four models of phantoms using an anthropomorphic software breast phantom and compared four methods to evaluate the gray scale response in terms of the contrast, noise and detectability of adipose and glandular tissues binarized according to phantom ground truth. For each method, circular regions of interest (ROIs) were selected with various sizes, quantity and positions inside a square area in the phantom. We also estimated the percent density of the simulated breast and the capability of distinguishing both tissues by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results shows a sensitivity of the methods to the ROI size, placement and to the slices considered.

  3. Orthodox representations of God and implicit anthropomorphic reasoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Malevich

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of theological incorrectness is primarily the result of the coexistence of two parallel levels of religious representations constituting a continuum of cognitive complexity. This article presents results of the replication experiment based on the classical study by J. L. Barrett and F. Keil (1996 aimed at diff erentiating levels of implicit anthropomorphic and explicit non-anthropomorphic reasoning about God. The data which were obtained in the experiment and based on the Russian Orthodox sample of Theology students have confi rmed the cross-cultural universality and stability of the phenomenon of theological incorrectness described by J. L. Barrett and now widely accepted in the cognitive religious science. In a real-thinking mode aimed at rapid solutions to problems, complicated and cognitively cumbersome theological concepts do undergo systematic deformation and optimisation and acquire anthropomorphic properties corresponding to our default ontological assumptions. Such a tacit deformation seems to be independent from theological representations and occurs even in the presence of explicitly held non-anthropomorphic concepts of God.

  4. Phantom dosimetry at 15 MV conformal radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Larissa; Campos, Tarcisio P.R.; Dias, Humberto G.

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of this work was to evaluate the spatial dose distribution into a tumor simulator inside a head phantom exposed to a 15MV 3D conformal radiation therapy in order to validate internal doses. A head and neck phantom developed by the Ionizing Radiation Research Group (NRI) was used on the experiments. Therapy Radiation planning (TPS) was performed based on those CT images, satisfying a 200 cGy prescribed dose split in three irradiation fields. The TPS assumed 97% of prescribed dose cover the prescribed treatment volume (PTV). Radiochromic films in a solid water phantom provided dose response as a function of optical density. Spatial dosimetric distribution was generated by radiochromic film samples inserted into tumor simulator and brain. The spatial dose profiles held 70 to 120% of the prescribed dose. In spite of the stratified profile, as opposed to the smooth dose profile from TPS, the tumor internal doses were within a 5% deviation from 214.4 cGy evaluated by TPS. 83.2% of the points with a gamma value of less than 1 (3%/3mm) for TPS and experimental values, respectively. At the tumor, a few dark spots in the film caused the appearance of outlier points in 13-15% of dose deviation percentage. As final conclusion, such dosimeter choice and the physical anthropomorphic and anthropometric phantom provided an efficient method for validating radiotherapy protocols. (author)

  5. Phantom dosimetry at 15 MV conformal radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Larissa; Campos, Tarcisio P.R.

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of this work was to evaluate the spatial dose distribution into a tumor simulator inside a head phantom exposed to a 15MV 3D conformal radiation therapy in order to validate internal doses. A head and neck phantom developed by the Ionizing Radiation Research Group (NRI) was used on the experiments. Therapy Radiation planning (TPS) was performed based on those CT images, satisfying a 200 cGy prescribed dose split in three irradiation fields. The TPS assumed 97% of prescribed dose cover the prescribed treatment volume (PTV). Radiochromic films in a solid water phantom provided dose response as a function of optical density. Spatial dosimetric distribution was generated by radiochromic film samples inserted into tumor simulator and brain. The spatial dose profiles held 70 to 120% of the prescribed dose. In spite of the stratified profile, as opposed to the smooth dose profile from TPS, the tumor internal doses were within a 5% deviation from 214.4 cGy evaluated by TPS. 83.2% of the points with a gamma value of less than 1 (3%/3mm) for TPS and experimental values, respectively. At the tumor, a few dark spots in the film caused the appearance of outlier points in 13-15% of dose deviation percentage. As final conclusion, such dosimeter choice and the physical anthropomorphic and anthropometric phantom provided an efficient method for validating radiotherapy protocols. (author)

  6. Introduction of a stack-phantom for PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonsson, C.; Schnell, P.O.; Jacobsson, H.; Engelin, L.; Danielsson, A.M.; Johansson, L.; Larsson, S.A.; Pagani, M.; Stone-Elander, S.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: We have previously developed a new flexible phantom system for SPECT, i.e. 'the stack phantom' (Eur. J. Nucl. Med. 27, No.2, 131-139, 2000). The unique feature of this phantom system is that it allows studies with, as well as without major degrading impacts from photon attenuation and Compton scattering. The specific aim of this work was to further develop the system with special reference to PET. Material and methods: The principle of the phantom concept is discrete sampling of 3D objects by a series of equidistant 2D planes. The 2D planes are a digitised set of 2D sections, representing the radioactivity distribution in the object of interest. Using a grey scale related to the radioactivity concentration, selected images are printed by radioactive ink on thin paper sheets and stacked into the 3D structure with low-density or with tissue equivalent material in between. Using positron emitting radionuclides, the paper sheets alone may not be sufficiently thick to avoid annihilation losses due to escaping positrons. In order to investigate the amount of additional material needed, a spot of radioactivity ( 18 F) was printed out and subsequently covered by adding thin plastic films (0.055mm) on both sides of the paper. Short PET scans (ECAT 921) were performed and the count-rate was registered after each additional layer of plastic cover. A first prototype, a cylindrical cold-spot phantom was constructed on the basis of these results. Nine identical sheets were printed out and first mounted in between 4 mm plates of polystyrene (density 1.04 g/cm 3 ). After a PET-scan, the paper sheets were re-mounted in between a low-density material (Divinycell, H30, density 0.03 g/cm 3 ) before repeating the PET scan. Results: For 18 F, the number of registered annihilation photons increased with increasing number of plastic sheets from 70% for the pure paper sheet to about 100% with 0.5 mm plastic cover on each side. PET of the low-density stacked cold spot phantom

  7. Investigation of radio frequency heating of dental implants made of titanium in 1.5 tesla and 3.0 tesla magnetic resonance procedure. Measurement of the temperature by using tissue-equivalent phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ideta, Takahiro; Yamazaki, Masaru; Kudou, Sadahiro; Higashida, Mitsuji; Nakazawa, Masami; Mori, Shintarou; Kaneda, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) implants are increasingly being used for dental parts. There is no problem with the attraction of a static magnetic field for Ti in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), since Ti is paramagnetic. However, there is a risk of radio frequency (RF) heat generation within Ti. 3.0 T-MRI scanners are becoming increasingly common. The specific absorption rate (SAR) of 3.0 T-MRI is quadruple that of SAR compared with 1.5 T-MRI due to its being proportional to the square of the strength of a static magnetic field. The effect of heat generation in 3.0 T-MRI can thus be greater than in 1.5 T-MRI. So, using 1.5 T and 3.0 T-MRI scanners, we measured the temperature of several Ti implants using the same scanning parameters during MRI scanning. Our measurements showed the rise in temperature of the Ti implants to be a maximum of 0.4degC. In this study, however, Ti in a human mouth was not directly measured, so we need to attempt to perform MRI carefully on patients with Ti implants. (author)

  8. Anthropomorphism in Human–Robot Co-evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Damiano

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Social robotics entertains a particular relationship with anthropomorphism, which it neither sees as a cognitive error, nor as a sign of immaturity. Rather it considers that this common human tendency, which is hypothesized to have evolved because it favored cooperation among early humans, can be used today to facilitate social interactions between humans and a new type of cooperative and interactive agents – social robots. This approach leads social robotics to focus research on the engineering of robots that activate anthropomorphic projections in users. The objective is to give robots “social presence” and “social behaviors” that are sufficiently credible for human users to engage in comfortable and potentially long-lasting relations with these machines. This choice of ‘applied anthropomorphism’ as a research methodology exposes the artifacts produced by social robotics to ethical condemnation: social robots are judged to be a “cheating” technology, as they generate in users the illusion of reciprocal social and affective relations. This article takes position in this debate, not only developing a series of arguments relevant to philosophy of mind, cognitive sciences, and robotic AI, but also asking what social robotics can teach us about anthropomorphism. On this basis, we propose a theoretical perspective that characterizes anthropomorphism as a basic mechanism of interaction, and rebuts the ethical reflections that a priori condemns “anthropomorphism-based” social robots. To address the relevant ethical issues, we promote a critical experimentally based ethical approach to social robotics, “synthetic ethics,” which aims at allowing humans to use social robots for two main goals: self-knowledge and moral growth.

  9. Anthropomorphism in Human–Robot Co-evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, Luisa; Dumouchel, Paul

    2018-01-01

    Social robotics entertains a particular relationship with anthropomorphism, which it neither sees as a cognitive error, nor as a sign of immaturity. Rather it considers that this common human tendency, which is hypothesized to have evolved because it favored cooperation among early humans, can be used today to facilitate social interactions between humans and a new type of cooperative and interactive agents – social robots. This approach leads social robotics to focus research on the engineering of robots that activate anthropomorphic projections in users. The objective is to give robots “social presence” and “social behaviors” that are sufficiently credible for human users to engage in comfortable and potentially long-lasting relations with these machines. This choice of ‘applied anthropomorphism’ as a research methodology exposes the artifacts produced by social robotics to ethical condemnation: social robots are judged to be a “cheating” technology, as they generate in users the illusion of reciprocal social and affective relations. This article takes position in this debate, not only developing a series of arguments relevant to philosophy of mind, cognitive sciences, and robotic AI, but also asking what social robotics can teach us about anthropomorphism. On this basis, we propose a theoretical perspective that characterizes anthropomorphism as a basic mechanism of interaction, and rebuts the ethical reflections that a priori condemns “anthropomorphism-based” social robots. To address the relevant ethical issues, we promote a critical experimentally based ethical approach to social robotics, “synthetic ethics,” which aims at allowing humans to use social robots for two main goals: self-knowledge and moral growth. PMID:29632507

  10. Three-dimensional printer-generated patient-specific phantom for artificial in vivo dosimetry in radiotherapy quality assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamomae, Takeshi; Shimizu, Hidetoshi; Nakaya, Takayoshi; Okudaira, Kuniyasu; Aoyama, Takahiro; Oguchi, Hiroshi; Komori, Masataka; Kawamura, Mariko; Ohtakara, Kazuhiro; Monzen, Hajime; Itoh, Yoshiyuki; Naganawa, Shinji

    2017-12-01

    Pretreatment intensity-modulated radiotherapy quality assurance is performed using simple rectangular or cylindrical phantoms; thus, the dosimetric errors caused by complex patient-specific anatomy are absent in the evaluation objects. In this study, we construct a system for generating patient-specific three-dimensional (3D)-printed phantoms for radiotherapy dosimetry. An anthropomorphic head phantom containing the bone and hollow of the paranasal sinus is scanned by computed tomography (CT). Based on surface rendering data, a patient-specific phantom is formed using a fused-deposition-modeling-based 3D printer, with a polylactic acid filament as the printing material. Radiophotoluminescence glass dosimeters can be inserted in the 3D-printed phantom. The phantom shape, CT value, and absorbed doses are compared between the actual and 3D-printed phantoms. The shape difference between the actual and printed phantoms is less than 1 mm except in the bottom surface region. The average CT value of the infill region in the 3D-printed phantom is -6 ± 18 Hounsfield units (HU) and that of the vertical shell region is 126 ± 18 HU. When the same plans were irradiated, the dose differences were generally less than 2%. These results demonstrate the feasibility of the 3D-printed phantom for artificial in vivo dosimetry in radiotherapy quality assurance. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Response of human limbal epithelial cells to wounding on 3D RAFT tissue equivalents: effect of airlifting and human limbal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massie, Isobel; Levis, Hannah J; Daniels, Julie T

    2014-10-01

    Limbal epithelial stem cell deficiency can cause blindness but may be treated by human limbal epithelial cell (hLE) transplantation, normally on human amniotic membrane. Clinical outcomes using amnion can be unreliable and so we have developed an alternative tissue equivalent (TE), RAFT (Real Architecture for 3D Tissue), which supports hLE expansion, and stratification when airlifted. Human limbal fibroblasts (hLF) may be incorporated into RAFT TEs, where they support overlying hLE and improve phenotype. However, the impact of neither airlifting nor hLF on hLE function has been investigated. hLE on RAFT TEs (±hLF and airlifting) were wounded using heptanol and re-epithelialisation (fluorescein diacetate staining), and percentage putative stem cell marker p63α and proliferative marker Ki67 expression (wholemount immunohistochemistry), measured. Airlifted, hLF- RAFT TEs were unable to close the wound and p63α expression was 7 ± 0.2% after wounding. Conversely, non-airlifted, hLF- RAFT TEs closed the wound within 9 days and p63α expression was higher at 22 ± 5% (p < 0.01). hLE on both hLF- and hLF+ RAFT TEs (non-airlifted) closed the wound and p63α expression was 26 ± 8% and 36 ± 3% respectively (ns). Ki67 expression by hLE increased from 1.3 ± 0.5% before wounding to 7.89 ± 2.53% post-wounding for hLF- RAFT TEs (p < 0.01), and 0.8 ± 0.08% to 17.68 ± 10.88% for hLF+ RAFT TEs (p < 0.05), suggesting that re-epithelialisation was a result of proliferation. These data suggest that neither airlifting nor hLF are necessarily required to maintain a functional epithelium on RAFT TEs, thus simplifying and shortening the production process. This is important when working towards clinical application of regenerative medicine products. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Limbal Fibroblasts Maintain Normal Phenotype in 3D RAFT Tissue Equivalents Suggesting Potential for Safe Clinical Use in Treatment of Ocular Surface Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massie, Isobel; Dale, Sarah B; Daniels, Julie T

    2015-06-01

    Limbal epithelial stem cell deficiency can cause blindness, but transplantation of these cells on a carrier such as human amniotic membrane can restore vision. Unfortunately, clinical graft manufacture using amnion can be inconsistent. Therefore, we have developed an alternative substrate, Real Architecture for 3D Tissue (RAFT), which supports human limbal epithelial cells (hLE) expansion. Epithelial organization is improved when human limbal fibroblasts (hLF) are incorporated into RAFT tissue equivalent (TE). However, hLF have the potential to transdifferentiate into a pro-scarring cell type, which would be incompatible with therapeutic transplantation. The aim of this work was to assess the scarring phenotype of hLF in RAFT TEs in hLE+ and hLE- RAFT TEs and in nonairlifted and airlifted RAFT TEs. Diseased fibroblasts (dFib) isolated from the fibrotic conjunctivae of ocular mucous membrane pemphigoid (Oc-MMP) patients were used as a pro-scarring positive control against which hLF were compared using surrogate scarring parameters: matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, de novo collagen synthesis, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression, and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) secretion. Normal hLF and dFib maintained different phenotypes in RAFT TE. MMP-2 and -9 activity, de novo collagen synthesis, and α-SMA expression were all increased in dFib cf. normal hLF RAFT TEs, although TGF-β1 secretion did not differ between normal hLF and dFib RAFT TEs. Normal hLF do not progress toward a scarring-like phenotype during culture in RAFT TEs and, therefore, may be safe to include in therapeutic RAFT TE, where they can support hLE, although in vivo work is required to confirm this. dFib RAFT TEs (used in this study as a positive control) may be useful toward the development of an ex vivo disease model of Oc-MMP.

  13. Reflective terahertz (THz) imaging: system calibration using hydration phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajwa, Neha; Garritano, James; Lee, Yoon Kyung; Tewari, Priyamvada; Sung, Shijun; Maccabi, Ashkan; Nowroozi, Bryan; Babakhanian, Meghedi; Sanghvi, Sajan; Singh, Rahul; Grundfest, Warren; Taylor, Zachary

    2013-02-01

    Terahertz (THz) hydration sensing continues to gain traction in the medical imaging community due to its unparalleled sensitivity to tissue water content. Rapid and accurate detection of fluid shifts following induction of thermal skin burns as well as remote corneal hydration sensing have been previously demonstrated in vivo using reflective, pulsed THz imaging. The hydration contrast sensing capabilities of this technology were recently confirmed in a parallel 7 Tesla Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging study, in which burn areas are associated with increases in local mobile water content. Successful clinical translation of THz sensing, however, still requires quantitative assessments of system performance measurements, specifically hydration concentration sensitivity, with tissue substitutes. This research aims to calibrate the sensitivity of a novel, reflective THz system to tissue water content through the use of hydration phantoms for quantitative comparisons of THz hydration imagery.Gelatin phantoms were identified as an appropriate tissue-mimicking model for reflective THz applications, and gel composition, comprising mixtures of water and protein, was varied between 83% to 95% hydration, a physiologically relevant range. A comparison of four series of gelatin phantom studies demonstrated a positive linear relationship between THz reflectivity and water concentration, with statistically significant hydration sensitivities (p hydration). The THz-phantom interaction is simulated with a three-layer model using the Transfer Matrix Method with agreement in hydration trends. Having demonstrated the ability to accurately and noninvasively measure water content in tissue equivalent targets with high sensitivity, reflective THz imaging is explored as a potential tool for early detection and intervention of corneal pathologies.

  14. Development of deformable moving lung phantom to simulate respiratory motion in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jina; Lee, Youngkyu; Shin, Hunjoo; Ji, Sanghoon; Park, Sungkwang; Kim, Jinyoung; Jang, Hongseok; Kang, Youngnam

    2016-01-01

    Radiation treatment requires high accuracy to protect healthy organs and destroy the tumor. However, tumors located near the diaphragm constantly move during treatment. Respiration-gated radiotherapy has significant potential for the improvement of the irradiation of tumor sites affected by respiratory motion, such as lung and liver tumors. To measure and minimize the effects of respiratory motion, a realistic deformable phantom is required for use as a gold standard. The purpose of this study was to develop and study the characteristics of a deformable moving lung (DML) phantom, such as simulation, tissue equivalence, and rate of deformation. The rate of change of the lung volume, target deformation, and respiratory signals were measured in this study; they were accurately measured using a realistic deformable phantom. The measured volume difference was 31%, which closely corresponds to the average difference in human respiration, and the target movement was − 30 to + 32 mm. The measured signals accurately described human respiratory signals. This DML phantom would be useful for the estimation of deformable image registration and in respiration-gated radiotherapy. This study shows that the developed DML phantom can exactly simulate the patient's respiratory signal and it acts as a deformable 4-dimensional simulation of a patient's lung with sufficient volume change.

  15. Dose evaluation of three-dimensional small animal phantom with film dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Su Chul; Park, Seung Woo

    2017-01-01

    The weight of small animal dosimetry has been continuously increased in pre-clinical studies using radiation in small animals. In this study, three-dimensional(3D) small animal phantom was fabricated using 3D printer which has been continuously used and studied in the various fields. The absorbed dose of 3D animal phantom was evaluated by film dosimetry. Previously, the response of film was obtained from the materials used for production of 3D small animal phantom and compared with the bolus used as the tissue equivalent material in the radiotherapy. When irradiated with gamma rays from 0.5 Gy to 6 Gy, it was confirmed that there was a small difference of less than 1% except 0.5 Gy dose. And when small animal phantom was irradiated with 5 Gy, the difference between the irradiated dose and calculated dose from film was within 2%. Based on this study, it would be possible to increase the reliability of dose in pre-clinical studies using irradiation in small animals by evaluating dose of 3D small animal phantom

  16. Dose evaluation of three-dimensional small animal phantom with film dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Su Chul [Div. of Medical Radiation Equipment, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seung Woo [Radilogcial and Medico-Oncological Sciences, University of Sciences and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The weight of small animal dosimetry has been continuously increased in pre-clinical studies using radiation in small animals. In this study, three-dimensional(3D) small animal phantom was fabricated using 3D printer which has been continuously used and studied in the various fields. The absorbed dose of 3D animal phantom was evaluated by film dosimetry. Previously, the response of film was obtained from the materials used for production of 3D small animal phantom and compared with the bolus used as the tissue equivalent material in the radiotherapy. When irradiated with gamma rays from 0.5 Gy to 6 Gy, it was confirmed that there was a small difference of less than 1% except 0.5 Gy dose. And when small animal phantom was irradiated with 5 Gy, the difference between the irradiated dose and calculated dose from film was within 2%. Based on this study, it would be possible to increase the reliability of dose in pre-clinical studies using irradiation in small animals by evaluating dose of 3D small animal phantom.

  17. Development of deformable moving lung phantom to simulate respiratory motion in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jina [Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Youngkyu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 137-701, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Hunjoo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Inchoen St. Mary' s Hospital College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Incheon 403-720 (Korea, Republic of); Ji, Sanghoon [Field Robot R& D Group, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Ansan 426-910 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sungkwang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jinyoung [Department of Radiation Oncology, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University, Busan 612-896 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Hongseok [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 137-701, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Youngnam, E-mail: ynkang33@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 137-701, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-01

    Radiation treatment requires high accuracy to protect healthy organs and destroy the tumor. However, tumors located near the diaphragm constantly move during treatment. Respiration-gated radiotherapy has significant potential for the improvement of the irradiation of tumor sites affected by respiratory motion, such as lung and liver tumors. To measure and minimize the effects of respiratory motion, a realistic deformable phantom is required for use as a gold standard. The purpose of this study was to develop and study the characteristics of a deformable moving lung (DML) phantom, such as simulation, tissue equivalence, and rate of deformation. The rate of change of the lung volume, target deformation, and respiratory signals were measured in this study; they were accurately measured using a realistic deformable phantom. The measured volume difference was 31%, which closely corresponds to the average difference in human respiration, and the target movement was − 30 to + 32 mm. The measured signals accurately described human respiratory signals. This DML phantom would be useful for the estimation of deformable image registration and in respiration-gated radiotherapy. This study shows that the developed DML phantom can exactly simulate the patient's respiratory signal and it acts as a deformable 4-dimensional simulation of a patient's lung with sufficient volume change.

  18. Dose characteristics and LET spectra on and inside the spherical phantom onboard of ISS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jadrnickova, I.; Brabcova, K.; Mrazova, Z.; Spurny, F.; Shurshakov, V.A.; Kartsev, I.S.; Tolochek, R.V.

    2010-01-01

    To estimate the radiation risk of spacecraft crew during the mission, it is necessary to measure dose distribution at various compartments, on and inside the human body that can be simulated using various phantoms. Due to some convenient characteristics (especially small weight and dimensions), passive detectors are used to measure dosimetric quantities onboard spacecraft. This contribution deals with the measurement of dosimetric characteristics and spectra of linear energy transfer (LET) onboard the International Space Station (ISS) during two experiments with tissue-equivalent spherical Russian phantom MATROSHKA-R realized in years 2006 and 2008. To obtain LET spectra, total absorbed doses, and dose equivalents, we used combination of plastic nuclear track detectors and thermoluminescence detectors. The detectors were placed at various locations on the surface of the MATROSHKA-R phantom; some detectors were also inserted inside this phantom. The variation of dosimetric quantities obtained during both missions is discussed. The dose characteristics vary with the position of the detectors on or inside the phantom; the absorbed dose and dose equivalent can differ almost twice.

  19. Evolution of prehension ability in an anthropomorphic neurorobotic arm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Massera

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we show how a simulated anthropomorphic robotic arm controlled by an artificial neural network can develop effective reaching and grasping behaviour through a trial and error process in which the free parameters encode the control rules which regulate the fine-grained interaction between the robot and the environment and variations of the free parameters are retained or discarded on the basis of their effects at the level of the global behaviour exhibited by the robot situated in the environment. The obtained results demonstrate how the proposed methodology allows the robot to produce effective behaviours thanks to its ability to exploit the morphological properties of the robot's body (i.e. its anthropomorphic shape, the elastic properties of its muscle-like actuators and the compliance of its actuated joints and the properties which arise from the physical interaction between the robot and the environment mediated by appropriate control rules.

  20. JUNGIAN GENDER IN ANIMAL ANIMATION FROM ANTHROPOMORPHISM PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yustin Sartika

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Bear is usually depicted as a strong, brawny and blood-curdling animal. On the contrary, Pooh Bear is the fun-loving and caring main character while Masha Bear can handle all house works. Their characteristics can be related to Jungian gender theory which states that man is bisexual having both feminine and masculine sides. A focus on anima animus is established through qualitative research analysis of bear characters' actions and the characters around within the plots of Winnie-the-Pooh and Masha and the Bear. Masha and the Bear is adapted from the real story in Russia. The use of anthropomorphic storytelling in those animations can bridge the conceptual and moral gulf which separate human from animal. By using anthropomorphism perspective, this research is aimed to find the feminine and masculine stereotype of Pooh and Bear characters. Anthropomorphism is divided into the animation of physical and psychological qualities. The result shows that small bright yellow body on a short red t-shirt makes Pooh look more lovable. Another woman stereotype is portrayed from the name given, Winnie, and his most favorite honey. Masha Bear‘s physical qualities are quite identical to a real bear. Beyond his strong and brawny body, he is a spick-and-span bear. He is a merciful bear who becomes a caregiver for Masha, the parentless girl. Anthropomorphism creates great empathy in humans. This empathy can be combined with a simplified narrative to provoke genuine feeling from audiences. It draws attention to feminine and masculine stereotype of human to identify in animal animation.

  1. Stability Study of Anthropomorphic Robot Antares under External Load Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodyakov, A. S.; Pavlyuk, N. A.; Budkov, V. Yu; Prakapovich, R. A.

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents the study of the behavior of the major structural elements of the lower limbs of anthropomorphic robot Antares under the influence of different types of loads (torsion, fracture). We have determined the required values for actuators torques for motion of the robot in space. The maximum values of torques are 5 Nm and 5.2 Nm respectively, and are able to withstand the upper and lower leg structures.

  2. Modeling and control of an anthropomorphic robotic hand

    OpenAIRE

    Bensalah, Choukri

    2016-01-01

    Mención Europea en el título de doctor This thesis presents methods and tools for enabling the successful use of robotic hands. For highly dexterous and/or anthropomorphic robotic hands, these methods have to share some common goals, such as overcoming the potential complexity of the mechanical design and the ability of performing accurate tasks with low and efficient computational cost. A prerequisite for dexterity is to increase the workspace of the robotic hand. For th...

  3. Effects of body habitus on internal radiation dose calculations using the 5-year-old anthropomorphic male models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Tianwu; Kuster, Niels; Zaidi, Habib

    2017-08-01

    Computational phantoms are commonly used in internal radiation dosimetry to assess the amount and distribution pattern of energy deposited in various parts of the human body from different internal radiation sources. Radiation dose assessments are commonly performed on predetermined reference computational phantoms while the argument for individualized patient-specific radiation dosimetry exists. This study aims to evaluate the influence of body habitus on internal dosimetry and to quantify the uncertainties in dose estimation correlated with the use of fixed reference models. The 5-year-old IT’IS male phantom was modified to match target anthropometric parameters, including body weight, body height and sitting height/stature ratio (SSR), determined from reference databases, thus enabling the creation of 125 5-year-old habitus-dependent male phantoms with 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th and 90th percentile body morphometries. We evaluated the absorbed fractions and the mean absorbed dose to the target region per unit cumulative activity in the source region (S-values) of F-18 in 46 source regions for the generated 125 anthropomorphic 5-year-old hybrid male phantoms using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended general purpose Monte Carlo transport code and calculated the absorbed dose and effective dose of five 18F-labelled radiotracers for children of various habitus. For most organs, the S-value of F-18 presents stronger statistical correlations with body weight, standing height and sitting height than BMI and SSR. The self-absorbed fraction and self-absorbed S-values of F-18 and the absorbed dose and effective dose of 18F-labelled radiotracers present with the strongest statistical correlations with body weight. For 18F-Amino acids, 18F-Brain receptor substances, 18F-FDG, 18F-L-DOPA and 18F-FBPA, the mean absolute effective dose differences between phantoms of different habitus and fixed reference models are 11.4%, 11.3%, 10.8%, 13.3% and 11.4%, respectively. Total body

  4. A software to edit voxel phantoms and to calculate conversion coefficients for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, J.W.; Stosic, B.; Lima, F.R.A.; Kramer, R.; Santos, A.M.; Lima, V.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    The MAX and FAX phantoms have been developed based on a male and female, respectively, adult body from ICRP and coupled to the Monte Carlo code (EGS4). These phantoms permit the calculating of the equivalent dose in organs and tissues of the human body for the radiation protection purposes . In the constructing of these anthropomorphic models, the software developed called FANTOMAS, which performs tasks as file format conversion, filtering 2D and 3D images, exchange of identifying numbers of organs, body mass adjustments based in volume, resampling of 2D and 3D images, resize images, preview consecutive slices of the phantom, running computational models of exposure FANTOMA/EGS4 and viewing graphics of conversion factors between equivalent dose and a measurable dosimetric quantity. This paper presents the main abilities of FANTOMAS and uses the MAX and/or FAX to exemplify some procedures

  5. Effect of compensating filters on the isodose charts of rat and guinea-pig phantoms irradiated with ''fission-neutrons''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zar' and, P

    1976-01-01

    Isodose charts were calculated for rat and guinea-pig phantoms exposed to a modified fission spectrum with a most probable energy of 1.3 MeV. Infinite tissue equivalent cylinders (r = 2.5 and 3.3 cm) and a plane source emitting neutrons according to a cosine distribution were assumed and an albedo code was used. Combined effect of (tissue-equivalent or polyethylene) compensating filters (or simply filters) and a bilateral irradiation or rotation was studied. Bilateral irradiation and the use of a filter resulted in a uniform irradiation of a rat phantom (Dmax/Dmin less than 1.15), while a uniform irradiation of a guinea-pig phantom could be obtained by the combined use of filters and rotation. If rotation is possible a Dmax/Dmin less than 1.05 ratio can be achieved. Filters + rotation should be used in all circumstances when geometrical restrictions do not prevent the installation of a rotation equipment. In this case bilateral irradiation + compensating filters are advisable. Unilateral irradiation of small laboratory animals (mouse, rat, guinea-pig) should be avoided.

  6. A fully automatic, threshold-based segmentation method for the estimation of the Metabolic Tumor Volume from PET images: validation on 3D printed anthropomorphic oncological lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallivanone, F.; Interlenghi, M.; Canervari, C.; Castiglioni, I.

    2016-01-01

    18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a standard functional diagnostic technique to in vivo image cancer. Different quantitative paramters can be extracted from PET images and used as in vivo cancer biomarkers. Between PET biomarkers Metabolic Tumor Volume (MTV) has gained an important role in particular considering the development of patient-personalized radiotherapy treatment for non-homogeneous dose delivery. Different imaging processing methods have been developed to define MTV. The different proposed PET segmentation strategies were validated in ideal condition (e.g. in spherical objects with uniform radioactivity concentration), while the majority of cancer lesions doesn't fulfill these requirements. In this context, this work has a twofold objective: 1) to implement and optimize a fully automatic, threshold-based segmentation method for the estimation of MTV, feasible in clinical practice 2) to develop a strategy to obtain anthropomorphic phantoms, including non-spherical and non-uniform objects, miming realistic oncological patient conditions. The developed PET segmentation algorithm combines an automatic threshold-based algorithm for the definition of MTV and a k-means clustering algorithm for the estimation of the background. The method is based on parameters always available in clinical studies and was calibrated using NEMA IQ Phantom. Validation of the method was performed both in ideal (e.g. in spherical objects with uniform radioactivity concentration) and non-ideal (e.g. in non-spherical objects with a non-uniform radioactivity concentration) conditions. The strategy to obtain a phantom with synthetic realistic lesions (e.g. with irregular shape and a non-homogeneous uptake) consisted into the combined use of standard anthropomorphic phantoms commercially and irregular molds generated using 3D printer technology and filled with a radioactive chromatic alginate. The proposed segmentation algorithm was feasible in a

  7. Computational high-resolution heart phantoms for medical imaging and dosimetry simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu Songxiang; Kyprianou, Iacovos [Center for Devices and Radiological Health, US Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD (United States); Gupta, Rajiv, E-mail: songxiang.gu@fda.hhs.gov, E-mail: rgupta1@partners.org, E-mail: iacovos.kyprianou@fda.hhs.gov [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-09-21

    Cardiovascular disease in general and coronary artery disease (CAD) in particular, are the leading cause of death worldwide. They are principally diagnosed using either invasive percutaneous transluminal coronary angiograms or non-invasive computed tomography angiograms (CTA). Minimally invasive therapies for CAD such as angioplasty and stenting are rendered under fluoroscopic guidance. Both invasive and non-invasive imaging modalities employ ionizing radiation and there is concern for deterministic and stochastic effects of radiation. Accurate simulation to optimize image quality with minimal radiation dose requires detailed, gender-specific anthropomorphic phantoms with anatomically correct heart and associated vasculature. Such phantoms are currently unavailable. This paper describes an open source heart phantom development platform based on a graphical user interface. Using this platform, we have developed seven high-resolution cardiac/coronary artery phantoms for imaging and dosimetry from seven high-quality CTA datasets. To extract a phantom from a coronary CTA, the relationship between the intensity distribution of the myocardium, the ventricles and the coronary arteries is identified via histogram analysis of the CTA images. By further refining the segmentation using anatomy-specific criteria such as vesselness, connectivity criteria required by the coronary tree and image operations such as active contours, we are able to capture excellent detail within our phantoms. For example, in one of the female heart phantoms, as many as 100 coronary artery branches could be identified. Triangular meshes are fitted to segmented high-resolution CTA data. We have also developed a visualization tool for adding stenotic lesions to the coronaries. The male and female heart phantoms generated so far have been cross-registered and entered in the mesh-based Virtual Family of phantoms with matched age/gender information. Any phantom in this family, along with user

  8. Computational high-resolution heart phantoms for medical imaging and dosimetry simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Songxiang; Kyprianou, Iacovos; Gupta, Rajiv

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease in general and coronary artery disease (CAD) in particular, are the leading cause of death worldwide. They are principally diagnosed using either invasive percutaneous transluminal coronary angiograms or non-invasive computed tomography angiograms (CTA). Minimally invasive therapies for CAD such as angioplasty and stenting are rendered under fluoroscopic guidance. Both invasive and non-invasive imaging modalities employ ionizing radiation and there is concern for deterministic and stochastic effects of radiation. Accurate simulation to optimize image quality with minimal radiation dose requires detailed, gender-specific anthropomorphic phantoms with anatomically correct heart and associated vasculature. Such phantoms are currently unavailable. This paper describes an open source heart phantom development platform based on a graphical user interface. Using this platform, we have developed seven high-resolution cardiac/coronary artery phantoms for imaging and dosimetry from seven high-quality CTA datasets. To extract a phantom from a coronary CTA, the relationship between the intensity distribution of the myocardium, the ventricles and the coronary arteries is identified via histogram analysis of the CTA images. By further refining the segmentation using anatomy-specific criteria such as vesselness, connectivity criteria required by the coronary tree and image operations such as active contours, we are able to capture excellent detail within our phantoms. For example, in one of the female heart phantoms, as many as 100 coronary artery branches could be identified. Triangular meshes are fitted to segmented high-resolution CTA data. We have also developed a visualization tool for adding stenotic lesions to the coronaries. The male and female heart phantoms generated so far have been cross-registered and entered in the mesh-based Virtual Family of phantoms with matched age/gender information. Any phantom in this family, along with user

  9. Estimation of internal dose from radiocesium and phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchiyama, Masafumi; Nakamura, Yuji

    1994-01-01

    A complicated model describing the movement of a radionuclide in both the natural environment and socioeconomical systems is usually used to estimate the internal dose to the public in terms of collective dose, taking demographic data into account. The result can be certified for reliability in some compartments of the model. One of the compartments is the body content. In the case of radiocesium, the individual body burden can be measured using a whole-body counter. The measurement must be calibrated with a phantom. The public is composed of individuals of various ages. Accordingly, the whole-body counter should be calibrated with a set of phantoms approximating individuals of different body sizes. Relationships between counting efficiency and body size were analyzed on 137 Cs 134 Cs or 40 K incorporated into the whole-body using a set of phantoms. Four sizes covering average Japanese physiques from infant to adult male, were chosen to prepare an anthropomorphic phantom system. The distribution of 137 Cs in aquatic solution was homogeneous through the phantom. A whole-body counter at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, was used at a rate of 5 cm per minute in a scanning mode. The measurements were carried out in an iron room. Relations were analyzed between counting efficiency and some anthropometric parameters. The best fit was given by a linear equation of both reciprocals of height in cm and weight in kg, with a correlation coefficient of 1.00 for 137 Cs. The result indicates that radioactivity of 137 Cs can be determined for individuals with different anthropometric parameters using the whole-body counter system. This means that effective equivalent doses for individuals can be computed accurately from the measurements. Further, an estimate on the body content from an dose estimation model using measurements of radioactivity in environmental substances can be evaluated by comparing the body burden measured. (J.P.N.)

  10. Phantom evaluation of a cardiac SPECT/VCT system that uses a common set of solid-state detectors for both emission and transmission scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Chuanyong; Conwell, Richard; Kindem, Joel; Babla, Hetal; Gurley, Mike; De Los Santos, Romer; Old, Rex; Weatherhead, Randy; Arram, Samia; Maddahi, Jamshid

    2010-06-01

    We developed a cardiac SPECT system (X-ACT) with low dose volume CT transmission-based attenuation correction (AC). Three solid-state detectors are configured to form a triple-head system for emission scans and reconfigured to form a 69-cm field-of-view detector arc for transmission scans. A near mono-energetic transmission line source is produced from the collimated fluorescence x-ray emitted from a lead target when the target is illuminated by a narrow polychromatic x-ray beam from an x-ray tube. Transmission scans can be completed in 1 min with insignificant patient dose (deep dose equivalent used phantom studies to evaluate (1) the accuracy of the reconstructed attenuation maps, (2) the effect of AC on image uniformity, and (3) the effect of AC on defect contrast (DC). The phantoms we used included an ACR phantom, an anthropomorphic phantom with a uniform cardiac insert, and an anthropomorphic phantom with two defects in the cardiac insert. The reconstructed attenuation coefficient of water at 140 keV was .150 +/- .003/cm in the uniform region of the ACR phantom, .151 +/- .003/cm and .151 +/- .002/cm in the liver and cardiac regions of the anthropomorphic phantom. The ACR phantom images with AC showed correction of the bowing effect due to attenuation in the images without AC (NC). The 17-segment scores of the images of the uniform cardiac insert were 78.3 +/- 6.5 before and 87.9 +/- 3.3 after AC (average +/- standard deviation). The inferior-to-anterior wall ratio and the septal-to-lateral wall ratio were .99 and 1.16 before and 1.02 and 1.00 after AC. The DC of the two defects was .528 and .156 before and .628 and .173 after AC. The X-ACT system generated accurate attenuation maps with 1-minute transmission scans. AC improved image quality and uniformity over NC.

  11. CT dose reduction using Automatic Exposure Control and iterative reconstruction: A chest paediatric phantoms study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greffier, Joël; Pereira, Fabricio; Macri, Francesco; Beregi, Jean-Paul; Larbi, Ahmed

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the impact of Automatic Exposure Control (AEC) on radiation dose and image quality in paediatric chest scans (MDCT), with or without iterative reconstruction (IR). Three anthropomorphic phantoms representing children aged one, five and 10-year-old were explored using AEC system (CARE Dose 4D) with five modulation strength options. For each phantom, six acquisitions were carried out: one with fixed mAs (without AEC) and five each with different modulation strength. Raw data were reconstructed with Filtered Back Projection (FBP) and with two distinct levels of IR using soft and strong kernels. Dose reduction and image quality indices (Noise, SNR, CNR) were measured in lung and soft tissues. Noise Power Spectrum (NPS) was evaluated with a Catphan 600 phantom. The use of AEC produced a significant dose reduction (p<0.01) for all anthropomorphic sizes employed. According to the modulation strength applied, dose delivered was reduced from 43% to 91%. This pattern led to significantly increased noise (p<0.01) and reduced SNR and CNR (p<0.01). However, IR was able to improve these indices. The use of AEC/IR preserved image quality indices with a lower dose delivered. Doses were reduced from 39% to 58% for the one-year-old phantom, from 46% to 63% for the five-year-old phantom, and from 58% to 74% for the 10-year-old phantom. In addition, AEC/IR changed the patterns of NPS curves in amplitude and in spatial frequency. In chest paediatric MDCT, the use of AEC with IR allows one to obtain a significant dose reduction while maintaining constant image quality indices. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Dose calculation on voxels phantoms using the GEANT4 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Maximiano C.; Santos, Denison S.; Queiroz Filho, Pedro P.; Begalli, Marcia

    2009-01-01

    This work implemented an anthropomorphic phantom of voxels on the structure of Monte Carlo GEANT4, for utilization by professionals from the radioprotection, external dosimetry and medical physics. This phantom allows the source displacement that can be isotropic punctual, plain beam, linear or radioactive gas, in order to obtain diverse irradiation geometries. In them, the radioactive sources exposure is simulated viewing the determination of effective dose or the dose in each organ of the human body. The Zubal head and body trunk phantom was used, and we can differentiate the organs and tissues by the chemical constitution in soft tissue, lung tissue, bone tissue, water and air. The calculation method was validated through the comparison with other well established method, the Visual Monte Carlo (VMC). Besides, a comparison was done with the international recommendation for the evaluation of dose by exposure to punctual sources, described in the document TECDOC - 1162- Generic Procedures for Assessment and Response During a Radiological Emergency, where analytical expressions for this calculation are given. Considerations are made on the validity limits of these expressions for various irradiation geometries, including linear sources, immersion into clouds and contaminated soils

  13. DEEP code to calculate dose equivalents in human phantom for external photon exposure by Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro

    1991-01-01

    The present report describes a computer code DEEP which calculates the organ dose equivalents and the effective dose equivalent for external photon exposure by the Monte Carlo method. MORSE-CG, Monte Carlo radiation transport code, is incorporated into the DEEP code to simulate photon transport phenomena in and around a human body. The code treats an anthropomorphic phantom represented by mathematical formulae and user has a choice for the phantom sex: male, female and unisex. The phantom can wear personal dosimeters on it and user can specify their location and dimension. This document includes instruction and sample problem for the code as well as the general description of dose calculation, human phantom and computer code. (author)

  14. The Phantom Menace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vium, Christian

    2013-01-01

    as a phantom menace, which asserts itself through a form of omnipresent fear, nurtured by an inherent opaqueness. As this fundamental fear progressively permeates the nomadic landscape, it engenders a recasting of mobile strategies among the nomadic pastoralist groups who inhabit the interstitial desert spaces....

  15. Phantom crash confirms models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    To test computer models of how a nuclear reactor's containment building would fare if an airplane crashed into it, the Muto Institute in Tokyo sponsored a 3.2 million dollar project at Sandia National Laboratory to slam an F-4 Phantom jet into a 500 ton concrete wall. The results showed that the computer calculations were accurate

  16. Are anthropomorphic persuasive appeals effective? The role of the recipient's motivations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Kim-Pong

    2015-03-01

    Anthropomorphic persuasive appeals are prevalent. However, their effectiveness has not been well studied. The present research addresses this issue with two experiments in the context of environmental persuasion. It shows that anthropomorphic messages, relative to non-anthropomorphic ones, appear to motivate more conservation behaviour and elicit more favourable message responses only among recipients who have a strong need for effectance or social connection. Among recipients whose such need is weak, anthropomorphic appeals seem to backfire. These findings extend the research on motivation and persuasion and add evidence to the motivational bases of anthropomorphism. In addition, joining some recent studies, the present research highlights the implications of anthropomorphism of nature for environmental conservation efforts, and offers some practical suggestions for environmental persuasion. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  17. FASH and MASH: female and male adult human phantoms based on polygon mesh surfaces: II. Dosimetric calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, R; Cassola, V F; Khoury, H J [Department of Nuclear Energy, Federal University of Pernambuco, Avenida Prof. Luiz Freire, 1000, CEP 50740-540, Recife (Brazil); Vieira, J W [Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology of Pernambuco, Recife (Brazil); De Melo Lima, V J [Department of Anatomy, Federal University of Pernambuco, Recife (Brazil); Robson Brown, K [Imaging Laboratory, Department of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of Bristol, Bristol (United Kingdom)], E-mail: rkramer@uol.com.br

    2010-01-07

    Female and male adult human phantoms, called FASH (Female Adult meSH) and MASH (Male Adult meSH), have been developed in the first part of this study using 3D animation software and anatomical atlases to replace the image-based FAX06 and the MAX06 voxel phantoms. 3D modelling methods allow for phantom development independent from medical images of patients, volunteers or cadavers. The second part of this study investigates the dosimetric implications for organ and tissue equivalent doses due to the anatomical differences between the new and the old phantoms. These differences are mainly caused by the supine position of human bodies during scanning in order to acquire digital images for voxel phantom development. Compared to an upright standing person, in image-based voxel phantoms organs are often coronally shifted towards the head and sometimes the sagittal diameter of the trunk is reduced by a gravitational change of the fat distribution. In addition, volumes of adipose and muscle tissue shielding internal organs are sometimes too small, because adaptation of organ volumes to ICRP-based organ masses often occurs at the expense of general soft tissues, such as adipose, muscle or unspecified soft tissue. These effects have dosimetric consequences, especially for partial body exposure, such as in x-ray diagnosis, but also for whole body external exposure and for internal exposure. Using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code, internal and external exposure to photons and electrons has been simulated with both pairs of phantoms. The results show differences between organ and tissue equivalent doses for the upright standing FASH/MASH and the image-based supine FAX06/MAX06 phantoms of up to 80% for external exposure and up to 100% for internal exposure. Similar differences were found for external exposure between FASH/MASH and REGINA/REX, the reference voxel phantoms of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Comparison of effective doses for external photon

  18. FASH and MASH: female and male adult human phantoms based on polygon mesh surfaces: II. Dosimetric calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, R.; Cassola, V. F.; Khoury, H. J.; Vieira, J. W.; de Melo Lima, V. J.; Robson Brown, K.

    2010-01-01

    Female and male adult human phantoms, called FASH (Female Adult meSH) and MASH (Male Adult meSH), have been developed in the first part of this study using 3D animation software and anatomical atlases to replace the image-based FAX06 and the MAX06 voxel phantoms. 3D modelling methods allow for phantom development independent from medical images of patients, volunteers or cadavers. The second part of this study investigates the dosimetric implications for organ and tissue equivalent doses due to the anatomical differences between the new and the old phantoms. These differences are mainly caused by the supine position of human bodies during scanning in order to acquire digital images for voxel phantom development. Compared to an upright standing person, in image-based voxel phantoms organs are often coronally shifted towards the head and sometimes the sagittal diameter of the trunk is reduced by a gravitational change of the fat distribution. In addition, volumes of adipose and muscle tissue shielding internal organs are sometimes too small, because adaptation of organ volumes to ICRP-based organ masses often occurs at the expense of general soft tissues, such as adipose, muscle or unspecified soft tissue. These effects have dosimetric consequences, especially for partial body exposure, such as in x-ray diagnosis, but also for whole body external exposure and for internal exposure. Using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code, internal and external exposure to photons and electrons has been simulated with both pairs of phantoms. The results show differences between organ and tissue equivalent doses for the upright standing FASH/MASH and the image-based supine FAX06/MAX06 phantoms of up to 80% for external exposure and up to 100% for internal exposure. Similar differences were found for external exposure between FASH/MASH and REGINA/REX, the reference voxel phantoms of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Comparison of effective doses for external photon

  19. Scatter correction method for x-ray CT using primary modulation: Phantom studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Hewei; Fahrig, Rebecca; Bennett, N. Robert; Sun Mingshan; Star-Lack, Josh; Zhu Lei

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Scatter correction is a major challenge in x-ray imaging using large area detectors. Recently, the authors proposed a promising scatter correction method for x-ray computed tomography (CT) using primary modulation. Proof of concept was previously illustrated by Monte Carlo simulations and physical experiments on a small phantom with a simple geometry. In this work, the authors provide a quantitative evaluation of the primary modulation technique and demonstrate its performance in applications where scatter correction is more challenging. Methods: The authors first analyze the potential errors of the estimated scatter in the primary modulation method. On two tabletop CT systems, the method is investigated using three phantoms: A Catphan(c)600 phantom, an anthropomorphic chest phantom, and the Catphan(c)600 phantom with two annuli. Two different primary modulators are also designed to show the impact of the modulator parameters on the scatter correction efficiency. The first is an aluminum modulator with a weak modulation and a low modulation frequency, and the second is a copper modulator with a strong modulation and a high modulation frequency. Results: On the Catphan(c)600 phantom in the first study, the method reduces the error of the CT number in the selected regions of interest (ROIs) from 371.4 to 21.9 Hounsfield units (HU); the contrast to noise ratio also increases from 10.9 to 19.2. On the anthropomorphic chest phantom in the second study, which represents a more difficult case due to the high scatter signals and object heterogeneity, the method reduces the error of the CT number from 327 to 19 HU in the selected ROIs and from 31.4% to 5.7% on the overall average. The third study is to investigate the impact of object size on the efficiency of our method. The scatter-to-primary ratio estimation error on the Catphan(c)600 phantom without any annulus (20 cm in diameter) is at the level of 0.04, it rises to 0.07 and 0.1 on the phantom with an

  20. Hybrid computational phantoms of the male and female newborn patient: NURBS-based whole-body models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choonsik; Lodwick, Daniel; Hasenauer, Deanna; Williams, Jonathan L; Lee, Choonik; Bolch, Wesley E

    2007-01-01

    Anthropomorphic computational phantoms are computer models of the human body for use in the evaluation of dose distributions resulting from either internal or external radiation sources. Currently, two classes of computational phantoms have been developed and widely utilized for organ dose assessment: (1) stylized phantoms and (2) voxel phantoms which describe the human anatomy via mathematical surface equations or 3D voxel matrices, respectively. Although stylized phantoms based on mathematical equations can be very flexible in regard to making changes in organ position and geometrical shape, they are limited in their ability to fully capture the anatomic complexities of human internal anatomy. In turn, voxel phantoms have been developed through image-based segmentation and correspondingly provide much better anatomical realism in comparison to simpler stylized phantoms. However, they themselves are limited in defining organs presented in low contrast within either magnetic resonance or computed tomography images-the two major sources in voxel phantom construction. By definition, voxel phantoms are typically constructed via segmentation of transaxial images, and thus while fine anatomic features are seen in this viewing plane, slice-to-slice discontinuities become apparent in viewing the anatomy of voxel phantoms in the sagittal or coronal planes. This study introduces the concept of a hybrid computational newborn phantom that takes full advantage of the best features of both its stylized and voxel counterparts: flexibility in phantom alterations and anatomic realism. Non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) surfaces, a mathematical modeling tool traditionally applied to graphical animation studies, was adopted to replace the limited mathematical surface equations of stylized phantoms. A previously developed whole-body voxel phantom of the newborn female was utilized as a realistic anatomical framework for hybrid phantom construction. The construction of a hybrid

  1. 3D dose distribution calculation in a voxelized human phantom by means of Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abella, V.; Miro, R.; Juste, B.; Verdu, G.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is to provide the reconstruction of a real human voxelized phantom by means of a MatLab program and the simulation of the irradiation of such phantom with the photon beam generated in a Theratron 780 (MDS Nordion) 60 Co radiotherapy unit, by using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle), version 5. The project results in 3D dose mapping calculations inside the voxelized antropomorphic head phantom. The program provides the voxelization by first processing the CT slices; the process follows a two-dimensional pixel and material identification algorithm on each slice and three-dimensional interpolation in order to describe the phantom geometry via small cubic cells, resulting in an MCNP input deck format output. Dose rates are calculated by using the MCNP5 tool FMESH, superimposed mesh tally, which gives the track length estimation of the particle flux in units of particles/cm 2 . Furthermore, the particle flux is converted into dose by using the conversion coefficients extracted from the NIST Physical Reference Data. The voxelization using a three-dimensional interpolation technique in combination with the use of the FMESH tool of the MCNP Monte Carlo code offers an optimal simulation which results in 3D dose mapping calculations inside anthropomorphic phantoms. This tool is very useful in radiation treatment assessments, in which voxelized phantoms are widely utilized.

  2. How gestures affect students: A comparative experiment using class presentations conducted by an anthropomorphic agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirakawa, Tomohiro; Sato, Hiroshi; Imao, Tomoya

    2017-07-01

    Recently, a variety of user interfaces have been developed based on human-robot and human-agent interaction, and anthropomorphic agents are used as one type of interface. However, the use of anthropomorphic agents is applied mainly to the medical and cognitive sciences, and there are few studies of their application to other fields. Therefore, we used an anthropomorphic agent of MMD in a virtual lecture to analyze the effect of gestures on students and search for ways to apply anthropomorphic agents to the field of educational technology.

  3. SU-E-T-89: Comprehensive Quality Assurance Phantom for the Small Animal Radiation Research Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jermoumi, M; Ngwa, W [University of Massachusetts Lowell, MA (United States); Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Korideck, H; Zygmanski, P; Berbeco, R; Makrigiorgos, G; Cormack, R [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Use of Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP) systems for conducting state-of-the-art image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) research on small animals has become more common over the past years. The purpose of this work is to develop and test the suitability and performance of a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) phantom for the SARRP. Methods: A QA phantom was developed for carrying out daily, monthly and annual QA tasks including imaging, dosimetry and treatment planning system (TPS) performance evaluation of the SARRP. The QA phantom consists of nine (60×60×5 mm3) KV-energy tissue equivalent solid water slabs that can be employed for annual dosimetry QA with film. Three of the top slabs are replaceable with ones incorporating Mosfets or OSLDs arranged in a quincunx pattern, or a slab drilled to accommodate an ion chamber insert. These top slabs are designed to facilitate routine daily and monthly QA tasks such as output constancy, isocenter congruency test, treatment planning system (TPS) QA, etc. One slab is designed with inserts for image QA. A prototype of the phantom was applied to test the performance of the imaging, planning and treatment delivery systems. Results: Output constancy test results showed daily variations within 3%. For isocenter congruency test, the phantom could be used to detect 0.3 mm deviations of the CBCT isocenter from the radiation isocenter. Using the Mosfet in phantom as target, the difference between TPS calculations and measurements was within 5%. Image-quality parameters could also be assessed in terms of geometric accuracy, CT number accuracy, linearity, noise and image uniformity, etc. Conclusion: The developed phantom can be employed as a simple tool for comprehensive performance evaluation of the SARRP. The study provides a reference for development of a comprehensive quality assurance program for the SARRP, with proposed tolerances and frequency of required tests.

  4. SU-E-T-89: Comprehensive Quality Assurance Phantom for the Small Animal Radiation Research Platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jermoumi, M; Ngwa, W; Korideck, H; Zygmanski, P; Berbeco, R; Makrigiorgos, G; Cormack, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Use of Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP) systems for conducting state-of-the-art image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) research on small animals has become more common over the past years. The purpose of this work is to develop and test the suitability and performance of a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) phantom for the SARRP. Methods: A QA phantom was developed for carrying out daily, monthly and annual QA tasks including imaging, dosimetry and treatment planning system (TPS) performance evaluation of the SARRP. The QA phantom consists of nine (60×60×5 mm3) KV-energy tissue equivalent solid water slabs that can be employed for annual dosimetry QA with film. Three of the top slabs are replaceable with ones incorporating Mosfets or OSLDs arranged in a quincunx pattern, or a slab drilled to accommodate an ion chamber insert. These top slabs are designed to facilitate routine daily and monthly QA tasks such as output constancy, isocenter congruency test, treatment planning system (TPS) QA, etc. One slab is designed with inserts for image QA. A prototype of the phantom was applied to test the performance of the imaging, planning and treatment delivery systems. Results: Output constancy test results showed daily variations within 3%. For isocenter congruency test, the phantom could be used to detect 0.3 mm deviations of the CBCT isocenter from the radiation isocenter. Using the Mosfet in phantom as target, the difference between TPS calculations and measurements was within 5%. Image-quality parameters could also be assessed in terms of geometric accuracy, CT number accuracy, linearity, noise and image uniformity, etc. Conclusion: The developed phantom can be employed as a simple tool for comprehensive performance evaluation of the SARRP. The study provides a reference for development of a comprehensive quality assurance program for the SARRP, with proposed tolerances and frequency of required tests

  5. A 4D digital phantom for patient-specific simulation of brain CT perfusion protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Boom, Rieneke; Manniesing, Rashindra; Oei, Marcel T H; van der Woude, Willem-Jan; Smit, Ewoud J; Laue, Hendrik O A; van Ginneken, Bram; Prokop, Mathias

    2014-07-01

    Optimizing CT brain perfusion protocols is a challenge because of the complex interaction between image acquisition, calculation of perfusion data, and patient hemodynamics. Several digital phantoms have been developed to avoid unnecessary patient exposure or suboptimum choice of parameters. The authors expand this idea by using realistic noise patterns and measured tissue attenuation curves representing patient-specific hemodynamics. The purpose of this work is to validate that this approach can realistically simulate mean perfusion values and noise on perfusion data for individual patients. The proposed 4D digital phantom consists of three major components: (1) a definition of the spatial structure of various brain tissues within the phantom, (2) measured tissue attenuation curves, and (3) measured noise patterns. Tissue attenuation curves were measured in patient data using regions of interest in gray matter and white matter. By assigning the tissue attenuation curves to the corresponding tissue curves within the phantom, patient-specific CTP acquisitions were retrospectively simulated. Noise patterns were acquired by repeatedly scanning an anthropomorphic skull phantom at various exposure settings. The authors selected 20 consecutive patients that were scanned for suspected ischemic stroke and constructed patient-specific 4D digital phantoms using the individual patients' hemodynamics. The perfusion maps of the patient data were compared with the digital phantom data. Agreement between phantom- and patient-derived data was determined for mean perfusion values and for standard deviation in de perfusion data using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and a linear fit. ICCs ranged between 0.92 and 0.99 for mean perfusion values. ICCs for the standard deviation in perfusion maps were between 0.86 and 0.93. Linear fitting yielded slope values between 0.90 and 1.06. A patient-specific 4D digital phantom allows for realistic simulation of mean values and

  6. Development of a high resolution voxelised head phantom for medical physics applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacometti, V; Guatelli, S; Bazalova-Carter, M; Rosenfeld, A B; Schulte, R W

    2017-01-01

    Computational anthropomorphic phantoms have become an important investigation tool for medical imaging and dosimetry for radiotherapy and radiation protection. The development of computational phantoms with realistic anatomical features contribute significantly to the development of novel methods in medical physics. For many applications, it is desirable that such computational phantoms have a real-world physical counterpart in order to verify the obtained results. In this work, we report the development of a voxelised phantom, the HIGH_RES_HEAD, modelling a paediatric head based on the commercial phantom 715-HN (CIRS). HIGH_RES_HEAD is unique for its anatomical details and high spatial resolution (0.18×0.18mm 2 pixel size). The development of such a phantom was required to investigate the performance of a new proton computed tomography (pCT) system, in terms of detector technology and image reconstruction algorithms. The HIGH_RES_HEAD was used in an ad-hoc Geant4 simulation modelling the pCT system. The simulation application was previously validated with respect to experimental results. When compared to a standard spatial resolution voxelised phantom of the same paediatric head, it was shown that in pCT reconstruction studies, the use of the HIGH_RES_HEAD translates into a reduction from 2% to 0.7% of the average relative stopping power difference between experimental and simulated results thus improving the overall quality of the head phantom simulation. The HIGH_RES_HEAD can also be used for other medical physics applications such as treatment planning studies. A second version of the voxelised phantom was created that contains a prototypic base of skull tumour and surrounding organs at risk. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Experience with the Alderson Rando phantom. [17-MeV electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somerwil, A; Kleffens, H.J. Van [Rotterdams Radio Therapeutisch Instituut (Netherlands)

    1977-04-01

    The dose delivered to the spinal cord is of particular interest in electron beam therapy of medulloblastoma. Lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimetry has been used in an assessment of the dose distributions from a 17 MeV electron beam in an Alderson Rando Phantom (Alderson, S.W., Lanzl, L.H., Rollins, M., and Spira, J., 1962, American J. of Roentgenology, Radium Therapy and Nuclear Medicine, vol. 87, 185). Measurements were also made on three autopsy specimens immersed in water. There were substantial differences between the two sets of results. The density of the bony part of the phantom seemed to be markedly lower than that of the water; radiographs of various parts of the phantom confirmed that large areas of low density existed. The manufacturers have stated that in order to simulate true in vivo conditions, an artificial skeleton would have to be introduced into the tissue-like material of the phantom, and that the real skeletons now used appear to be unsuitable for electron beam dosimetry. It is therefore doubtful whether this electron beam dosimetry justifies the expense associated with the insertion of these unsatisfactory skeletons into the soft tissue-equivalent material.

  8. Solid water phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arguiropulo, M.Y.; Ghilardi Neto, T.; Pela, C.A.; Ghilardi, A.J.P.

    1992-01-01

    A phantom were developed for simulating water, based in plastics. The material was evaluated for different energies, and the measures of relative transmission showed that the transmission and the water were inside of 0,6% for gamma rays. The results of this new material were presented, showing that it could be used in photon beam calibration with energies on radiotherapy range. (C.G.C.)

  9. Phantom pain after eye amputation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Marie L R; Prause, Jan U; Toft, Peter B

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the quality of phantom pain, its intensity and frequency following eye amputation. Possible triggers and relievers of phantom pain are investigated. Methods: The hospital database was searched using surgery codes for patients who received ocular evisceration, enucleation...... was conducted by a trained interviewer. Results: Of the 173 patients in the study, 39 experienced phantom pain. The median age of patients who had experienced phantom pain was 45 years (range: 19–88). Follow-up time from eye amputation to participation in the investigation was 4 years (range: 2–46). Phantom...... scale, ranging from 0 to 100, was 36 (range: 1–89). One-third of the patients experienced phantom pain every day. Chilliness, windy weather and psychological stress/fatigue were the most commonly reported triggers for pain. Conclusions: Phantom pain after eye amputation is relatively common. The pain...

  10. Technical Note: Radiological properties of tissue surrogates used in a multimodality deformable pelvic phantom for MR-guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niebuhr, Nina I.; Johnen, Wibke; Güldaglar, Timur; Runz, Armin; Echner, Gernot; Mann, Philipp; Möhler, Christian; Pfaffenberger, Asja; Greilich, Steffen; Jäkel, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Phantom surrogates were developed to allow multimodal [computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and teletherapy] and anthropomorphic tissue simulation as well as materials and methods to construct deformable organ shapes and anthropomorphic bone models. Methods: Agarose gels of variable concentrations and loadings were investigated to simulate various soft tissue types. Oils, fats, and Vaseline were investigated as surrogates for adipose tissue and bone marrow. Anthropomorphic shapes of bone and organs were realized using 3D-printing techniques based on segmentations of patient CT-scans. All materials were characterized in dual energy CT and MRI to adapt CT numbers, electron density, effective atomic number, as well as T1- and T2-relaxation times to patient and literature values. Results: Soft tissue simulation could be achieved with agarose gels in combination with a gadolinium-based contrast agent and NaF to simulate muscle, prostate, and tumor tissues. Vegetable oils were shown to be a good representation for adipose tissue in all modalities. Inner bone was realized using a mixture of Vaseline and K_2HPO_4, resulting in both a fatty bone marrow signal in MRI and inhomogeneous areas of low and high attenuation in CT. The high attenuation of outer bone was additionally adapted by applying gypsum bandages to the 3D-printed hollow bone case with values up to 1200 HU. Deformable hollow organs were manufactured using silicone. Signal loss in the MR images based on the conductivity of the gels needs to be further investigated. Conclusions: The presented surrogates and techniques allow the customized construction of multimodality, anthropomorphic, and deformable phantoms as exemplarily shown for a pelvic phantom, which is intended to study adaptive treatment scenarios in MR-guided radiation therapy

  11. Technical Note: Radiological properties of tissue surrogates used in a multimodality deformable pelvic phantom for MR-guided radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niebuhr, Nina I., E-mail: n.niebuhr@dkfz.de; Johnen, Wibke; Güldaglar, Timur; Runz, Armin; Echner, Gernot; Mann, Philipp; Möhler, Christian; Pfaffenberger, Asja; Greilich, Steffen [Division of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120, Germany and Heidelberg Institute for Radiation Oncology (HIRO), National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Jäkel, Oliver [Division of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Heidelberg Institute for Radiation Oncology (HIRO), National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Department of Medical Physics, Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Im Neuenheimer Feld 450, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    Purpose: Phantom surrogates were developed to allow multimodal [computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and teletherapy] and anthropomorphic tissue simulation as well as materials and methods to construct deformable organ shapes and anthropomorphic bone models. Methods: Agarose gels of variable concentrations and loadings were investigated to simulate various soft tissue types. Oils, fats, and Vaseline were investigated as surrogates for adipose tissue and bone marrow. Anthropomorphic shapes of bone and organs were realized using 3D-printing techniques based on segmentations of patient CT-scans. All materials were characterized in dual energy CT and MRI to adapt CT numbers, electron density, effective atomic number, as well as T1- and T2-relaxation times to patient and literature values. Results: Soft tissue simulation could be achieved with agarose gels in combination with a gadolinium-based contrast agent and NaF to simulate muscle, prostate, and tumor tissues. Vegetable oils were shown to be a good representation for adipose tissue in all modalities. Inner bone was realized using a mixture of Vaseline and K{sub 2}HPO{sub 4}, resulting in both a fatty bone marrow signal in MRI and inhomogeneous areas of low and high attenuation in CT. The high attenuation of outer bone was additionally adapted by applying gypsum bandages to the 3D-printed hollow bone case with values up to 1200 HU. Deformable hollow organs were manufactured using silicone. Signal loss in the MR images based on the conductivity of the gels needs to be further investigated. Conclusions: The presented surrogates and techniques allow the customized construction of multimodality, anthropomorphic, and deformable phantoms as exemplarily shown for a pelvic phantom, which is intended to study adaptive treatment scenarios in MR-guided radiation therapy.

  12. WE-F-16A-05: Use of 3D-Printers to Create a Tissue Equivalent 3D-Bolus for External Beam Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burleson, S; Baker, J; Hsia, A; Xu, Z [Stony Brook Medicine, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this project is to demonstrate that a non-expensive 3D-printer can be used to manufacture a 3D-bolus for external beam therapy. The printed bolus then can be modeled in our treatment planning system to ensure accurate dose delivery to the patient. Methods: We developed a simple method to manufacture a patient-specific custom 3Dbolus. The bolus is designed using Eclipse Treatment Planning System, contoured onto the patients CT images. The bolus file is exported from Eclipse to 3D-printer software, and then printed using a 3D printer. Various tests were completed to determine the properties of the printing material. Percent depth dose curves in this material were measured with electron and photon beams for comparison to other materials. In order to test the validity of the 3D printed bolus for treatment planning, a custom bolus was printed and tested on the Rando phantom using film for a dose plane comparison. We compared the dose plane measured on the film to the same dose plane exported from our treatment planning system using Film QA software. The gamma-dose distribution tool was used in our film analysis. Results: We compared point measurements throughout the dose plane and were able to achieve greater than 95% passing rate at 3% dose difference and 3 mm distance to agreement, which is our departments acceptable gamma pixel parameters. Conclusion: The printed 3D bolus has proven to be accurately modeled in our treatment planning system, it is more conformal to the patient surface and more durable than other bolus currently used (wax, superflab etc.). It is also more convenient and less costly than comparable bolus from milling machine companies.

  13. WE-F-16A-05: Use of 3D-Printers to Create a Tissue Equivalent 3D-Bolus for External Beam Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burleson, S; Baker, J; Hsia, A; Xu, Z

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this project is to demonstrate that a non-expensive 3D-printer can be used to manufacture a 3D-bolus for external beam therapy. The printed bolus then can be modeled in our treatment planning system to ensure accurate dose delivery to the patient. Methods: We developed a simple method to manufacture a patient-specific custom 3Dbolus. The bolus is designed using Eclipse Treatment Planning System, contoured onto the patients CT images. The bolus file is exported from Eclipse to 3D-printer software, and then printed using a 3D printer. Various tests were completed to determine the properties of the printing material. Percent depth dose curves in this material were measured with electron and photon beams for comparison to other materials. In order to test the validity of the 3D printed bolus for treatment planning, a custom bolus was printed and tested on the Rando phantom using film for a dose plane comparison. We compared the dose plane measured on the film to the same dose plane exported from our treatment planning system using Film QA software. The gamma-dose distribution tool was used in our film analysis. Results: We compared point measurements throughout the dose plane and were able to achieve greater than 95% passing rate at 3% dose difference and 3 mm distance to agreement, which is our departments acceptable gamma pixel parameters. Conclusion: The printed 3D bolus has proven to be accurately modeled in our treatment planning system, it is more conformal to the patient surface and more durable than other bolus currently used (wax, superflab etc.). It is also more convenient and less costly than comparable bolus from milling machine companies

  14. 3D printed phantoms mimicking cortical bone for the assessment of ultrashort echo time magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Robba; Manton, David; Jameson, Michael G; Josan, Sonal; Barton, Michael B; Holloway, Lois C; Liney, Gary P

    2018-02-01

    Human cortical bone has a rapid T2∗ decay, and it can be visualized using ultrashort echo time (UTE) techniques in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These sequences operate at the limits of gradient and transmit-receive signal performance. Development of multicompartment anthropomorphic phantoms that can mimic human cortical bone can assist with quality assurance and optimization of UTE sequences. The aims of this study were to (a) characterize the MRI signal properties of a photopolymer resin that can be 3D printed, (b) develop multicompartment phantoms based on the resin, and (c) demonstrate the feasibility of using these phantoms to mimic human anatomy in the assessment of UTE sequences. A photopolymer resin (Prismlab China Ltd, Shanghai, China) was imaged on a 3 Tesla MRI system (Siemens Skyra) to characterize its MRI properties with emphasis on T2∗ signal and longevity. Two anthropomorphic phantoms, using the 3D printed resin to simulate skeletal anatomy, were developed and imaged using UTE sequences. A skull phantom was developed and used to assess the feasibility of using the resin to develop a complex model with realistic morphological human characteristics. A tibia model was also developed to assess the suitability of the resin at mimicking a simple multicompartment anatomical model and imaged using a three-dimensional UTE sequence (PETRA). Image quality measurements of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast factor were calculated and these were compared to in vivo values. The T2∗ and T 1 (mean ± standard deviation) of the photopolymer resin was found to be 411 ± 19 μs and 74.39 ± 13.88 ms, respectively, and demonstrated no statistically significant change during 4 months of monitoring. The resin had a similar T2∗ decay to human cortical bone; however, had lower T 1 properties. The bone water concentration of the resin was 59% relative to an external water reference phantom, and this was higher than in vivo values reported for human cortical

  15. Design and Fabrication of Kidney Phantoms for Internal Radiation Dosimetry Using 3D Printing Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran-Gia, Johannes; Schlögl, Susanne; Lassmann, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Currently, the validation of multimodal quantitative imaging and absorbed dose measurements is impeded by the lack of suitable, commercially available anthropomorphic phantoms of variable sizes and shapes. To demonstrate the potential of 3-dimensional (3D) printing techniques for quantitative SPECT/CT imaging, a set of kidney dosimetry phantoms and their spherical counterparts was designed and manufactured with a fused-deposition-modeling 3D printer. Nuclide-dependent SPECT/CT calibration factors were determined to assess the accuracy of quantitative imaging for internal renal dosimetry. A set of 4 single-compartment kidney phantoms with filling volumes between 8 and 123 mL was designed on the basis of the outer kidney dimensions provided by MIRD pamphlet 19. After the phantoms had been printed, SPECT/CT acquisitions of 3 radionuclides ( 99m Tc, 177 Lu, and 131 I) were obtained and calibration constants determined for each radionuclide-volume combination. A set of additionally manufactured spheres matching the kidney volumes was also examined to assess the influence of phantom shape and size on the calibration constants. A set of refillable, waterproof, and chemically stable kidneys and spheres was successfully manufactured. Average calibration factors for 99m Tc, 177 Lu, and 131 I were obtained in a large source measured in air. For the largest phantom (122.9 mL), the volumes of interest had to be enlarged by 1.2 mm for 99m Tc, 2.5 mm for 177 Lu, and 4.9 mm for 131 I in all directions to obtain calibration factors comparable to the reference. Although partial-volume effects were observed for decreasing phantom volumes (percentage difference of up to 9.8% for the smallest volume [8.6 mL]), the difference between corresponding sphere-kidney pairs was small (3D printing is a promising prototyping technique for geometry-specific calibration of SPECT/CT systems. Although the underlying radionuclide and the related collimator have a major influence on the calibration

  16. Comparison study of reconstruction algorithms for prototype digital breast tomosynthesis using various breast phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ye-seul; Park, Hye-suk; Lee, Haeng-Hwa; Choi, Young-Wook; Choi, Jae-Gu; Kim, Hak Hee; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-02-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a recently developed system for three-dimensional imaging that offers the potential to reduce the false positives of mammography by preventing tissue overlap. Many qualitative evaluations of digital breast tomosynthesis were previously performed by using a phantom with an unrealistic model and with heterogeneous background and noise, which is not representative of real breasts. The purpose of the present work was to compare reconstruction algorithms for DBT by using various breast phantoms; validation was also performed by using patient images. DBT was performed by using a prototype unit that was optimized for very low exposures and rapid readout. Three algorithms were compared: a back-projection (BP) algorithm, a filtered BP (FBP) algorithm, and an iterative expectation maximization (EM) algorithm. To compare the algorithms, three types of breast phantoms (homogeneous background phantom, heterogeneous background phantom, and anthropomorphic breast phantom) were evaluated, and clinical images were also reconstructed by using the different reconstruction algorithms. The in-plane image quality was evaluated based on the line profile and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and out-of-plane artifacts were evaluated by means of the artifact spread function (ASF). Parenchymal texture features of contrast and homogeneity were computed based on reconstructed images of an anthropomorphic breast phantom. The clinical images were studied to validate the effect of reconstruction algorithms. The results showed that the CNRs of masses reconstructed by using the EM algorithm were slightly higher than those obtained by using the BP algorithm, whereas the FBP algorithm yielded much lower CNR due to its high fluctuations of background noise. The FBP algorithm provides the best conspicuity for larger calcifications by enhancing their contrast and sharpness more than the other algorithms; however, in the case of small-size and low

  17. Leap Motion Device Used to Control a Real Anthropomorphic Gripper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionel Staretu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents for the first time the use of the Leap Motion device to control an anthropomorphic gripper with five fingers. First, a description of the Leap Motion device is presented, highlighting its main functional characteristics, followed by testing of its use for capturing the movements of a human hand's fingers in different configurations. Next, the HandCommander soft module and the Interface Controller application are described. The HandCommander is a software module created to facilitate interaction between a human hand and the GraspIT virtual environment, and the Interface Controller application is required to send motion data to the virtual environment and to test the communication protocol. For the test, a prototype of an anthropomorphic gripper with five fingers was made, including a proper hardware system of command and control, which is briefly presented in this paper. Following the creation of the prototype, the command system performance test was conducted under real conditions, evaluating the recognition efficiency of the objects to be gripped and the efficiency of the command and control strategies for the gripping process. The gripping test is exemplified by the gripping of an object, such as a screw spanner. It was found that the command system, both in terms of capturing human hand gestures with the Leap Motion device and effective object gripping, is operational. Suggestive figures are presented as examples.

  18. Analysis of Inverse Kinamtics of an Anthropomorphic Robotic hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod Kumar Parida

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new method for solving the inverse kinematics of the fingers of an anthropomorphic hand is proposed. Solution of inverse kinematic equations is a complex problem, the complexity comes from the nonlinearity of joint space and Cartesian space mapping and having multiple solutions.This is a typical problem in robotics that needs to be solved to control the fingers of an anthropomorphic robotic hand to perform tasks it is designated to do. With more complex structures operating in a 3-dimensional space deducing a mathematical soluation for the inverse kinematics may prove challenging. In this paper, using the ability of ANFIS (Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System to learn from training data, it is possible to create ANFIS network, an implementation of a representative fuzzy inference system using ANFIS structure, with limited mathematical representation of the system. The main advantages of this method with respect to the other methods are implementation is easy, very fast and shorter computation time and better response with acceptable error.

  19. Using Animals to Teach Children Biology: Exploring the Use of Biological Explanations in Children's Anthropomorphic Storybooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerdts, Megan; Van De Walle, Gretchen; LoBue, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Research Findings: Anthropomorphism--the attribution of human characteristics to nonhuman entities--has long been a staple of children's media. However, children's experiences with anthropomorphic media may interfere with biological reasoning instead encouraging an anthropocentric view of the natural world. To date, little research has addressed…

  20. The ultimatum game as measurement tool for anthropomorphism in human-robot interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torta, E.; Dijk, van E.T.; Ruijten, P.A.M.; Cuijpers, R.H.; Herrmann, G.; Pearson, M.J.; Lenz, A.; et al., xx

    2013-01-01

    Anthropomorphism is the tendency to attribute human characteristics to non–human entities. This paper presents exploratory work to evaluate how human responses during the ultimatum game vary according to the level of anthropomorphism of the opponent, which was either a human, a humanoid robot or a

  1. Anthropomorphically Speaking: On Communication between Teachers and Children in Early Childhood Biology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thulin, Susanne; Pramling, Niklas

    2009-01-01

    In this study a particular kind of figurative language, so-called anthropomorphic speech, is analysed in the context of science activities in a preschool setting. Anthropomorphism means speaking about something non-human in human terms. Can any systematic pattern be seen with regard to when such speech is used? Do children and/or teachers…

  2. Do storybooks with anthropomorphized animal characters promote prosocial behaviors in young children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Nicole E; Lee, Kang; Ganea, Patricia A

    2018-05-01

    For millennia, adults have told children stories not only to entertain but also to impart important moral lessons to promote prosocial behaviors. Many such stories contain anthropomorphized animals because it is believed that children learn from anthropomorphic stories as effectively, if not better than, from stories with human characters, and thus are more inclined to act according to the moral lessons of the stories. Here we experimentally tested this belief by reading preschoolers a sharing story with either human characters or anthropomorphized animal characters. Reading the human story significantly increased preschoolers' altruistic giving but reading the anthropomorphic story or a control story decreased it. Thus, contrary to the common belief, realistic stories, not anthropomorphic ones, are better for promoting young children's prosocial behavior. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Contrast reference values in panoramic radiographic images using an arch-form phantom stand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jae Myung; Lee, Che Na; Kim, Jo Eun; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Yi, Won Jin; Heo, Min Suk; Choi, Soon Chul; Lee, Sam Sun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate appropriate contrast reference values (CRVs) by comparing the contrast in phantom and clinical images. Phantom contrast was measured using two methods: (1) counting the number of visible pits of different depths in an aluminum plate, and (2) obtaining the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for 5 tissue-equivalent materials (porcelain, aluminum, polytetrafluoroethylene [PTFE], polyoxymethylene [POM], and polymethylmethacrylate [PMMA]). Four panoramic radiographs of the contrast phantom, embedded in the 4 different regions of the arch-form stand, and 1 real skull phantom image were obtained, post-processed, and compared. The clinical image quality evaluation chart was used to obtain the cut-off values of the phantom CRV corresponding to the criterion of being adequate for diagnosis. The CRVs were obtained using 4 aluminum pits in the incisor and premolar region, 5 aluminum pits in the molar region, and 2 aluminum pits in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) region. The CRVs obtained based on the CNR measured in the anterior region were: porcelain, 13.95; aluminum, 9.68; PTFE, 6.71; and POM, 1.79. The corresponding values in the premolar region were: porcelain, 14.22; aluminum, 8.82; PTFE, 5.95; and POM, 2.30. In the molar region, the following values were obtained: porcelain, 7.40; aluminum, 3.68; PTFE, 1.27; and POM, - 0.18. The CRVs for the TMJ region were: porcelain, 3.60; aluminum, 2.04; PTFE, 0.48; and POM, - 0.43. CRVs were determined for each part of the jaw using the CNR value and the number of pits observed in phantom images

  4. Contrast reference values in panoramic radiographic images using an arch-form phantom stand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jae Myung [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Che Na; Kim, Jo Eun; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Yi, Won Jin; Heo, Min Suk; Choi, Soon Chul; Lee, Sam Sun [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology and Dental Research Institute, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate appropriate contrast reference values (CRVs) by comparing the contrast in phantom and clinical images. Phantom contrast was measured using two methods: (1) counting the number of visible pits of different depths in an aluminum plate, and (2) obtaining the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for 5 tissue-equivalent materials (porcelain, aluminum, polytetrafluoroethylene [PTFE], polyoxymethylene [POM], and polymethylmethacrylate [PMMA]). Four panoramic radiographs of the contrast phantom, embedded in the 4 different regions of the arch-form stand, and 1 real skull phantom image were obtained, post-processed, and compared. The clinical image quality evaluation chart was used to obtain the cut-off values of the phantom CRV corresponding to the criterion of being adequate for diagnosis. The CRVs were obtained using 4 aluminum pits in the incisor and premolar region, 5 aluminum pits in the molar region, and 2 aluminum pits in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) region. The CRVs obtained based on the CNR measured in the anterior region were: porcelain, 13.95; aluminum, 9.68; PTFE, 6.71; and POM, 1.79. The corresponding values in the premolar region were: porcelain, 14.22; aluminum, 8.82; PTFE, 5.95; and POM, 2.30. In the molar region, the following values were obtained: porcelain, 7.40; aluminum, 3.68; PTFE, 1.27; and POM, - 0.18. The CRVs for the TMJ region were: porcelain, 3.60; aluminum, 2.04; PTFE, 0.48; and POM, - 0.43. CRVs were determined for each part of the jaw using the CNR value and the number of pits observed in phantom images.

  5. Benchmark experiments of dose distributions in phantom placed behind iron and concrete shields at the TIARA facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakane, Yoshihiro; Sakamoto, Yukio; Tsuda, Shuichi

    2004-01-01

    To verify the calculation methods used for the evaluations of neutron dose at the radiation shielding design of the high-intensity proton accelerator facility (J-PARC), dose distributions in a plastic phantom of 30x30x30 cm 3 slab placed behind iron and concrete test shields were measured by using a tissue equivalent proportional counter for 65-MeV quasi-monoenergetic neutrons generated from the 7 Li(p,n) reactions with 68-MeV protons at the TIARA facility. Dose distributions in the phantom were calculated by using the MCNPX and the NMTC/JAM-MCNP codes with the flux-to-dose conversion coefficients prepared for the shielding design of the facility. The comparison results show the calculated results were in good agreement with the measured ones within 20%. (author)

  6. PID - 3D: a software to develop mathematical human phantoms for use in computational dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima Filho, Jose de Melo; Vieira, Jose Wilson; Lima, Vanildo Junior de Melo; Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade

    2009-01-01

    The PID-3D software, written in Visual C++, contains tools developed for building and editing of three-dimensional geometric figures formed of voxels (volume pixels). These tools were projected to be used, together with those already developed by the Grupo de Dosimetria Numerica (GDN/CNPq), such as the FANTOMAS and DIP software, in computational dosimetry of ionizing radiation. The main objective of this paper is to develop various voxel-based geometric solids to build voxel phantoms (meaning models), anthropomorphic or not. The domain of this technique of development of geometric solids is important for the GDN/CNPq, because it allows the use of just one Monte Carlo code to simulate the transportation, interaction and deposition of radiation in tomographic and mathematical phantoms. Building a particular geometric solid the user needs to inform to the PID-3D software, the location and the size of the parallelepiped that involves it. Each built solid can be saved in a binary file of the type SGI (file containing the size and the numeric values that constitutes the 3D matrix that represents the solid, commonly used by GDN/CNPq). The final mathematical phantom is built starting from these SGI files and the SGI file resulting constitutes a voxel phantom. With this approach the software's user does not have to manipulate the equations and inequalities of the solids that represent the organs and tissues of the phantom. The 3D-PID software, associated with the FANTOMAS and DIP software are tools produced by GDN/CNPq, providing a new technique for building of 3D scenes in dosimetric evaluations using voxel phantoms. To validate the PID-3D software one built, step by step, a phantom similar to the MIRD-5 stylized phantom. (author)

  7. Phantom breast syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Phantom breast syndrome is a type of condition in which patients have a sensation of residual breast tissue and can include both non-painful sensations as well as phantom breast pain. The incidence varies in different studies, ranging from approximately 30% to as high as 80% of patients after mastectomy. It seriously affects quality of life through the combined impact of physical disability and emotional distress. The breast cancer incidence rate in India as well as Western countries has risen in recent years while survival rates have improved; this has effectively increased the number of women for whom post-treatment quality of life is important. In this context, chronic pain following treatment for breast cancer surgery is a significantly under-recognized and under-treated problem. Various types of chronic neuropathic pain may arise following breast cancer surgery due to surgical trauma. The cause of these syndromes is damage to various nerves during surgery. There are a number of assumed factors causing or perpetuating persistent neuropathic pain after breast cancer surgery. Most well-established risk factors for developing phantom breast pain and other related neuropathic pain syndromes are severe acute postoperative pain and greater postoperative use of analgesics. Based upon current evidence, the goals of prophylactic strategies could first target optimal peri-operative pain control and minimizing damage to nerves during surgery. There is some evidence that chronic pain and sensory abnormalities do decrease over time. The main group of oral medications studied includes anti-depressants, anticonvulsants, opioids, N-methyl-D-asparate receptor antagonists, mexilitine, topical lidocaine, cannabinoids, topical capsaicin and glysine antagonists. Neuromodulation techniques such as motor cortex stimulation, spinal cord stimulation, and intrathecal drug therapies have been used to treat various neuropathic pain syndromes.

  8. Application of a simple phantom in assessing the effects of dose reduction on image quality in chest radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egbe, N.O.; Heaton, B.; Sharp, P.F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Firstly, to evaluate a commercial chest phantom incorporating a quasi anthropomorphic insert by comparing exposure measurements on the phantom with those of actual patients and, secondly, to assess the value of the phantom for image quality and dose optimisation. Methods: In the first part of the study entrance surface doses (ESD), Beam transmission (BT), and optical density (OD) were obtained for 77 chest radiography patients and compared with measurements made from exposures of the phantom using the respective patient exposure factors from chest examination. Differences were assessed with a student t-test, while the Pearson's linear correlation coefficient was used to test for any linear relationship. The second part assessed the applicability of the phantom to image quality studies by investigating the effect, on the clarity and detectability of lung lesions made from gelatine, of reducing patient dose below current dose levels. Clarity of linear objects of different dimensions was also studied. Lesion detectability and clarity was assessed by four observers. The possibility of extending dose reduction below current dose levels (D ref ) was assessed from comparison of doses that produced statistically significant differences in image quality from D ref . Results: Results show that, with the exception of entrance doses and beam transmission through the diaphragm (P > 0.05), differences in OD and beam transmission between patients and phantom were statistically significant (P ref produced significant changes in both clarity and detectability. Conclusion: Within limits posed by the observed differences, the phantom can be applied to image quality studies in diagnostic radiology.

  9. OEDIPE: a new graphical user interface for fast construction of numerical phantoms and MCNP calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, D; de Carlan, L; Pierrat, N; Broggio, D; Lamart, S

    2007-01-01

    Although great efforts have been made to improve the physical phantoms used to calibrate in vivo measurement systems, these phantoms represent a single average counting geometry and usually contain a uniform distribution of the radionuclide over the tissue substitute. As a matter of fact, significant corrections must be made to phantom-based calibration factors in order to obtain absolute calibration efficiencies applicable to a given individual. The importance of these corrections is particularly crucial when considering in vivo measurements of low energy photons emitted by radionuclides deposited in the lung such as actinides. Thus, it was desirable to develop a method for calibrating in vivo measurement systems that is more sensitive to these types of variability. Previous works have demonstrated the possibility of such a calibration using the Monte Carlo technique. Our research programme extended such investigations to the reconstruction of numerical anthropomorphic phantoms based on personal physiological data obtained by computed tomography. New procedures based on a new graphical user interface (GUI) for development of computational phantoms for Monte Carlo calculations and data analysis are being developed to take advantage of recent progress in image-processing codes. This paper presents the principal features of this new GUI. Results of calculations and comparison with experimental data are also presented and discussed in this work.

  10. A new test phantom with different breast tissue compositions for image quality assessment in conventional and digital mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pachoud, Marc; Lepori, D; Valley, Jean-Francois; Verdun, Francis R

    2004-01-01

    Our objective is to describe a new test phantom that permits the objective assessment of image quality in conventional and digital mammography for different types of breast tissue. A test phantom, designed to represent a compressed breast, was made from tissue equivalent materials. Three separate regions, with different breast tissue compositions, are used to evaluate low and high contrast resolution, spatial resolution and image noise. The phantom was imaged over a range of kV using a Contour 2000 (Bennett) mammography unit with a Kodak MinR 2190-MinR L screen-film combination and a Senograph 2000D (General Electric) digital mammography unit. Objective image quality assessments for different breast tissue compositions were performed using the phantom for conventional and digital mammography. For a similar mean glandular dose (MGD), the digital system gives a significantly higher contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) than the screen-film system for 100% glandular tissue. In conclusion, in mammography, a range of exposure conditions is used for imaging because of the different breast tissue compositions encountered clinically. Ideally, the patient dose-image quality relationship should be optimized over the range of exposure conditions. The test phantom presented in this work permits image quality parameters to be evaluated objectively for three different types of breast tissue. Thus, it is a useful tool for optimizing the patient dose-image quality relationship

  11. Using Anthropomorphism and Fictional Story Development to Enhance Student Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari A. Brossard Stoos

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Understanding mechanisms of human disease can be very challenging for students with a basic background in anatomy and biology, and it can be nearly impossible for students without any prior exposure to these basic sciences.  We have designed an approach for understanding human disease for learners of various science backgrounds.  By using fictional character associations with disease processes, we have anthropomorphized disease components to make the mechanisms accessible to students with little to no science background, while still appealing and exciting to students with significant science backgrounds.  By assisting students in the creation of fictional characters to represent disease processes, we have increased student understanding, engagement, enjoyment, and retention of course content.

  12. Application of the high-temperature ratio method for evaluation of the depth distribution of dose equivalent in a water-filled phantom on board space station Mir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, T.; Hajek, M.; Schoener, W.; Fugger, M.; Vana, N.; Akatov, Y.; Shurshakov, V.; Arkhangelsky, V.; Kartashov, D.

    2002-01-01

    A water-filled tissue equivalent phantom with a diameter of 35 cm was developed at the Institute for Biomedical Problems, Moscow, Russia. It contains four channels perpendicular to each other, where dosemeters can be exposed at different depths. Between May 1997 and February 1999 the phantom was installed at three different locations on board the Mir space station. Thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs) were exposed at various depths inside the phantom either parallel or perpendicular to the hull of the spacecraft. The high-temperature ratio (HTR) method was used for the evaluation of the TLDs. The method was developed at the Atominstitute of the Austrian Universities, Vienna, Austria, and has already been used for measurements in mixed radiation fields on earth and in space with great success. It uses the changes of peak height ratios in LiF:Mg,Ti glow curves in dependence on the linear energy transfer (LET), and therefore allows determination of an 'averaged' LET as well as measurement of the absorbed dose. A mean quality factor and, subsequently, the dose equivalent can be calculated according to the Q(LET ( ) relationship proposed by the ICRP. The small size of the LiF dosemeters means that the HTR method can be used to determine the gradient of absorbed dose and dose equivalent inside the tissue equivalent body. (author)

  13. Effect of titanium dental implants on proton therapy delivered for head tumors: experimental validation using an anthropomorphic head phantom

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Oancea, Cristina; Shipulin, K.; Mytsin, G. V.; Molokanov, A. G.; Niculae, D.; Ambrožová, Iva; Davídková, Marie

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 12, MAR (2017), č. článku C03082. ISSN 1748-0221 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG14004 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : dosimetry concepts and apparatus * instrumentation for hadron therapy * microdosimetry and nanodosimetry * particle tracking detectors (solid-state detectors) Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders OBOR OECD: Nuclear physics Impact factor: 1.220, year: 2016

  14. Dose reduction during CT scanning in an anthropomorphic phantom by the use of a male gonad shield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, R; Halson, P; Sampson, M

    1999-05-01

    Shielding the radiosensitive gonads during X-ray exposure has been advocated for plain film radiography for many years. In the UK, gonad shields are not widely employed in routine CT scanning, possibly owing to a perceived difficulty in protecting the gonads from a multidirectional X-ray source. The increasing numbers of CT scanners in the UK, with the large doses they deliver to patients, make potential dose reduction methods an important issue. This study measures the dose reduction achievable by shielding the male gonads with a lead wrap-around protection device. The reductions in dose when shielded both from direct radiation and from indirect radiation scattered from local tissues were studied. The use of the device resulted in a statistically significant reduction in the absorbed testicular dose from both direct and scattered radiation, with no increase in the dose measured in surrounding tissues. In three clinically relevant experimental protocols where the testes were not irradiated directly, the testicular absorbed dose from indirect scatter was reduced by 77-93% of the corresponding non-shielded figure. In these three experiments, image quality was unaltered by the use of the shield. A larger dose reduction was obtained when the shield was used to protect the testes from direct irradiation. However, this was achieved at the expense of considerable image degradation from streak artefact that would effectively prevent the clinical use of the device in this setting.

  15. MO-B-BRD-01: Creation of 3D Printed Phantoms for Clinical Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehler, E.

    2015-01-01

    is used to 3D print individualized physical models of patient’s unique anatomy for aid in planning complex and challenging surgical procedures. Methods, techniques and imaging requirements for 3D printing anatomic models from imaging data will be discussed. Specific applications currently being used in the radiology clinic will be detailed. Standardized phantoms for radiation therapy are abundant. However, custom phantom designs can be advantageous for both clinical tasks and research. 3D printing is a useful method of custom fabrication that allows one to construct custom objects relatively quickly. Possibilities for custom radiotherapy phantoms range from 3D printing a hollow shell and filling the shell with tissue equivalent materials to fully printing the entire phantom with materials that are tissue equivalent as well as suitable for 3D printing. A range of materials available for use in radiotherapy phantoms and in the case of phantoms for dosimetric measurements, this choice is critical. The necessary steps required will be discussed including: modalities of 3D model generation, 3D model requirements for 3D printing, generation of machine instructions from the 3D model, and 3D printing techniques, choice of phantoms material, and troubleshooting techniques for each step in the process. Case examples of 3D printed phantoms will be shown. Learning Objectives: Understand the types of 3D modeling software required to design your device, the file formats required for data transfer from design software to 3D printer, and general troubleshooting techniques for each step of the process. Learn the differences between materials and design for photons vs. electrons vs. protons. Understand the importance of material choice and design geometries for your custom phantoms. Learn specific steps of quality assurance and quality control for 3D printed beam filters and compensators for proton therapy. Learn of special 3D printing applications for imaging. Cunha: Research

  16. MO-B-BRD-01: Creation of 3D Printed Phantoms for Clinical Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehler, E. [University of Minnesota (United States)

    2015-06-15

    is used to 3D print individualized physical models of patient’s unique anatomy for aid in planning complex and challenging surgical procedures. Methods, techniques and imaging requirements for 3D printing anatomic models from imaging data will be discussed. Specific applications currently being used in the radiology clinic will be detailed. Standardized phantoms for radiation therapy are abundant. However, custom phantom designs can be advantageous for both clinical tasks and research. 3D printing is a useful method of custom fabrication that allows one to construct custom objects relatively quickly. Possibilities for custom radiotherapy phantoms range from 3D printing a hollow shell and filling the shell with tissue equivalent materials to fully printing the entire phantom with materials that are tissue equivalent as well as suitable for 3D printing. A range of materials available for use in radiotherapy phantoms and in the case of phantoms for dosimetric measurements, this choice is critical. The necessary steps required will be discussed including: modalities of 3D model generation, 3D model requirements for 3D printing, generation of machine instructions from the 3D model, and 3D printing techniques, choice of phantoms material, and troubleshooting techniques for each step in the process. Case examples of 3D printed phantoms will be shown. Learning Objectives: Understand the types of 3D modeling software required to design your device, the file formats required for data transfer from design software to 3D printer, and general troubleshooting techniques for each step of the process. Learn the differences between materials and design for photons vs. electrons vs. protons. Understand the importance of material choice and design geometries for your custom phantoms. Learn specific steps of quality assurance and quality control for 3D printed beam filters and compensators for proton therapy. Learn of special 3D printing applications for imaging. Cunha: Research

  17. Computational modeling of the mathematical phantoms of the Brazilian woman to internal dosimetry calculations and for comparison of the absorbed fractions with specific reference women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ximenes, Edmir; Guimaraes, Maria Ines C. C.

    2008-01-01

    The theme of this work is the study of the concept of mathematical dummy - also called phantoms - used in internal dosimetry and radiation protection, from the perspective of computer simulations. In this work he developed the mathematical phantom of the Brazilian woman, to be used as the basis of calculations of Specific Absorbed Fractions (AEDs) in the body's organs and skeleton by virtue of goals with regarding the diagnosis or therapy in nuclear medicine. The phantom now developed is similar, in form, to Snyder phantom making it more realistic for the anthropomorphic conditions of Brazilian women. For so we used the Monte Carlo method of formalism, through computer modeling. As a contribution to the objectives of this study, it was developed and implemented the computer system cFAE - consultation Fraction Specific Absorbed, which makes it versatile for the user's query researcher

  18. Experimental verification of internal dosimetry calculations: Construction of a heterogeneous phantom based on human organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauridsen, B.; Hedemann Jensen, P.

    1987-01-01

    The basic dosimetric quantity in ICRP-publication no. 30 is the aborbed fraction AF(T<-S). This parameter is the fraction of energy absorbed in a target organ T per emission of radiation from activity deposited in the source organ S. Based upon this fraction it is possible to calculate the Specific Effective Energy SEE(T<-S). From this, the committed effective dose equivalent from an intake of radioactive material can be found, and thus the annual limit of intake for given radionuclides can be determined. A male phantom has been constructed with the aim of measuring the Specific Effective Energy SEE(T<-S) in various target organs. Impressions-of real human organs have been used to produce vacuum forms. Tissue equivalent plastic sheets were sucked into the vacuum forms producing a shell with a shape identical to the original organ. Each organ has been made of two shells. The same procedure has been used for the body. Thin tubes through the organs make it possible to place TL dose meters in a matrix so the dose distribution can be measured. The phantom has been supplied with lungs, liver, kidneys, spleen, stomach, bladder, pancreas, and thyroid gland. To select a suitable body liquid for the phantom, laboratory experiments have been made with different liquids and different radionuclides. In these experiments the change in dose rate due to changes in density and composition of the liquid was determined. Preliminary results of the experiments are presented. (orig.)

  19. NOTE: An innovative phantom for quantitative and qualitative investigation of advanced x-ray imaging technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarot, C. B.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Haycocks, T.; Moseley, D. J.; Jaffray, D. A.

    2005-11-01

    Development, characterization, and quality assurance of advanced x-ray imaging technologies require phantoms that are quantitative and well suited to such modalities. This note reports on the design, construction, and use of an innovative phantom developed for advanced imaging technologies (e.g., multi-detector CT and the numerous applications of flat-panel detectors in dual-energy imaging, tomosynthesis, and cone-beam CT) in diagnostic and image-guided procedures. The design addresses shortcomings of existing phantoms by incorporating criteria satisfied by no other single phantom: (1) inserts are fully 3D—spherically symmetric rather than cylindrical; (2) modules are quantitative, presenting objects of known size and contrast for quality assurance and image quality investigation; (3) features are incorporated in ideal and semi-realistic (anthropomorphic) contexts; and (4) the phantom allows devices to be inserted and manipulated in an accessible module (right lung). The phantom consists of five primary modules: (1) head, featuring contrast-detail spheres approximate to brain lesions; (2) left lung, featuring contrast-detail spheres approximate to lung modules; (3) right lung, an accessible hull in which devices may be placed and manipulated; (4) liver, featuring conrast-detail spheres approximate to metastases; and (5) abdomen/pelvis, featuring simulated kidneys, colon, rectum, bladder, and prostate. The phantom represents a two-fold evolution in design philosophy—from 2D (cylindrically symmetric) to fully 3D, and from exclusively qualitative or quantitative to a design accommodating quantitative study within an anatomical context. It has proven a valuable tool in investigations throughout our institution, including low-dose CT, dual-energy radiography, and cone-beam CT for image-guided radiation therapy and surgery.

  20. An innovative phantom for quantitative and qualitative investigation of advanced x-ray imaging technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiarot, C B; Siewerdsen, J H; Haycocks, T; Moseley, D J; Jaffray, D A

    2005-01-01

    Development, characterization, and quality assurance of advanced x-ray imaging technologies require phantoms that are quantitative and well suited to such modalities. This note reports on the design, construction, and use of an innovative phantom developed for advanced imaging technologies (e.g., multi-detector CT and the numerous applications of flat-panel detectors in dual-energy imaging, tomosynthesis, and cone-beam CT) in diagnostic and image-guided procedures. The design addresses shortcomings of existing phantoms by incorporating criteria satisfied by no other single phantom: (1) inserts are fully 3D-spherically symmetric rather than cylindrical; (2) modules are quantitative, presenting objects of known size and contrast for quality assurance and image quality investigation; (3) features are incorporated in ideal and semi-realistic (anthropomorphic) contexts; and (4) the phantom allows devices to be inserted and manipulated in an accessible module (right lung). The phantom consists of five primary modules: (1) head, featuring contrast-detail spheres approximate to brain lesions; (2) left lung, featuring contrast-detail spheres approximate to lung modules; (3) right lung, an accessible hull in which devices may be placed and manipulated; (4) liver, featuring conrast-detail spheres approximate to metastases; and (5) abdomen/pelvis, featuring simulated kidneys, colon, rectum, bladder, and prostate. The phantom represents a two-fold evolution in design philosophy-from 2D (cylindrically symmetric) to fully 3D, and from exclusively qualitative or quantitative to a design accommodating quantitative study within an anatomical context. It has proven a valuable tool in investigations throughout our institution, including low-dose CT, dual-energy radiography, and cone-beam CT for image-guided radiation therapy and surgery. (note)

  1. Realistic phantoms to characterize dosimetry in pediatric CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carver, Diana E.; Kost, Susan D.; Fraser, Nicholas D.; Pickens, David R.; Price, Ronald R.; Stabin, Michael G. [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Nashville, TN (United States); Segars, W.P. [Duke University, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Durham, NC (United States)

    2017-05-15

    The estimation of organ doses and effective doses for children receiving CT examinations is of high interest. Newer, more realistic anthropomorphic body models can provide information on individual organ doses and improved estimates of effective dose. Previously developed body models representing 50th-percentile individuals at reference ages (newborn, 1, 5, 10 and 15 years) were modified to represent 10th, 25th, 75th and 90th height percentiles for both genders and an expanded range of ages (3, 8 and 13 years). We calculated doses for 80 pediatric reference phantoms from simulated chest-abdomen-pelvis exams on a model of a Philips Brilliance 64 CT scanner. Individual organ and effective doses were normalized to dose-length product (DLP) and fit as a function of body diameter. We calculated organ and effective doses for 80 reference phantoms and plotted them against body diameter. The data were well fit with an exponential function. We found DLP-normalized organ dose to correlate strongly with body diameter (R{sup 2}>0.95 for most organs). Similarly, we found a very strong correlation with body diameter for DLP-normalized effective dose (R{sup 2}>0.99). Our results were compared to other studies and we found average agreement of approximately 10%. We provide organ and effective doses for a total of 80 reference phantoms representing normal-stature children ranging in age and body size. This information will be valuable in replacing the types of vendor-reported doses available. These data will also permit the recording and tracking of individual patient doses. Moreover, this comprehensive dose database will facilitate patient matching and the ability to predict patient-individualized dose prior to examination. (orig.)

  2. The role of phantom and treatment head generated bremsstrahlung in high-energy electron beam dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorcini, B.B.; Hyoedynmaa, S.; Brahme, A.

    1996-01-01

    An analytical expression has been derived for the phantom generated bremsstrahlung photons in plane-parallel monoenergetic electron beams normally incident on material of any atomic number (Be, H 2 O, Al, Cu and U). The expression is suitable for the energy range from 1 to 50 MeV and it is solely based on known scattering power and radiative and collision stopping power data for the material at the incident electron energy. The depth dose distribution due to the bremsstrahlung generated by the electrons in the phantom is derived by convolving the bremsstrahlung energy fluence produced in the phantom with a simple analytical energy deposition kernel. The kernel accounts for both electrons and photons set in motion by the bremsstrahlung photons. The energy loss by the primary electrons, the build-up of the electron fluence and the generation, attenuation and absorption of bremsstrahlung photons are all taken into account in the analytical formula. The longitudinal energy deposition kernel is derived analytically and it is consistent with both the classical biexponential relation describing the photon depth dose distribution and the exponential attenuation of the primary photons. For comparison Monte Carlo calculated energy deposition distributions using ITS3 code were used. Good agreement was found between the results with the analytical expression and the Monte Carlo calculation. For tissue equivalent materials, the maximum total energy deposition differs by less than 0.2% from Monte Carlo calculated dose distributions. The result can be used to estimate the depth dependence of phantom generated bremsstrahlung in different materials in therapeutic electron beams and the bremsstrahlung production in different electron absorbers such as scattering foils, transmission monitors and photon and electron collimators. By subtracting the phantom generated bremsstrahlung from the total bremsstrahlung background the photon contamination generated in the treatment head can be

  3. Measurement of dose distribution in the spherical phantom onboard the ISS-KIBO module -MATROSHKA-R in KIBO-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodaira, Satoshi; Kawashima, Hajime; Kurano, Mieko; Uchihori, Yukio; Nikolaev, Igor; Ambrozova, Iva; Kitamura, Hisashi; Kartsev, Ivan; Tolochek, Raisa; Shurshakov, Vyacheslav

    The measurement of dose equivalent and effective dose during manned space missions on the International Space Station (ISS) is important for evaluating the risk to astronaut health and safety when exposed to space radiation. The dosimetric quantities are constantly changing and strongly depend on the level of solar activity and the various spacecraft- and orbit-dependent parameters such as the shielding distribution in the ISS module, location of the spacecraft within its orbit relative to the Earth, the attitude (orientation) and altitude. Consequently, the continuous monitoring of dosimetric quantities is required to record and evaluate the personal radiation dose for crew members during spaceflight. The dose distributions in the phantom body and on its surface give crucial information to estimate the dose equivalent in the human body and effective dose in manned space mission. We have measured the absorbed dose and dose equivalent rates using passive dosimeters installed in the spherical phantom in Japanese Experiment Module (“KIBO”) of the ISS in the framework of Matroshka-R space experiment. The exposure duration was 114 days from May 21 to September 12, 2012. The phantom consists of tissue-equivalent material covered with a poncho jacket with 32 pockets on its surface and 20 container rods inside of the phantom. The phantom diameter is 35 cm and the mass is 32 kg. The passive dosimeters consisted of a combination of luminescent detectors of Al _{2}O _{3};C OSL and CaSO _{4}:Dy TLD and CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors. As one of preliminary results, the dose distribution on the phantom surface measured with OSL detectors installed in the jacket pockets is found to be ranging from 340 muGy/day to 260 muGy/day. In this talk, we will present the detail dose distributions, and variations of LET spectra and quality factor obtained outside and inside of the spherical phantom installed in the ISS-KIBO.

  4. SU-D-209-06: Study On the Dose Conversion Coefficients in Pediatric Radiography with the Development of Children Voxel Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Q [Institute of Radiation Medicine Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Shanghai General Hospital, Shanghai, Shanghai (China); Zhuo, W; Liu, H [Institute of Radiation Medicine Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Liu, Y; Chen, T [Shanghai General Hospital, Shanghai, Shanghai (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Conversion coefficients of organ dose normalized to entrance skin dose (ESD) are widely used to evaluate the organ doses directly using ESD without time-consuming dose measurement, this work aims to investigate the dose conversion coefficients in pediatric chest and abdomen radiography with the development of 5 years and 10 years old children voxel phantoms. Methods: After segmentation of organs and tissues from CT slice images of ATOM tissue-equivalent phantoms, a 5-year-old and a 10-year-old children computational voxel phantoms were developed for Monte Carlo simulation. The organ doses and the entrance skin dose for pediatric chest postero-anterior projection and abdominal antero-posterior projection were simulated at the same time, and then the organ dose conversion coefficients were calculated.To verify the simulated results, dose measurement was carried out with ATOM tissue-equivalent phantoms for 5 year chest radiography. Results: Simulated results and experimental results matched very well with each other, the result differences of all the organs covered in radiation field were below 16% for 5-year-old child in chest projection. I showed that the conversion coefficients of organs covered in the radiation field were much larger than organs out of the field for all the study cases, for example, the conversion coefficients of stomach, liver intestines, and pancreas are larger for abdomen radiography while conversion coefficients of lungs are larger for chest radiography. Conclusion: The voxel children phantoms were helpful to evaluate the radiation doses more accurately and efficiently. Radiation field was the essential factor that affects the organ dose, use reasonably small field should be encouraged for radiation protection. This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China(11475047)

  5. SU-D-209-06: Study On the Dose Conversion Coefficients in Pediatric Radiography with the Development of Children Voxel Phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Q; Zhuo, W; Liu, H; Liu, Y; Chen, T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Conversion coefficients of organ dose normalized to entrance skin dose (ESD) are widely used to evaluate the organ doses directly using ESD without time-consuming dose measurement, this work aims to investigate the dose conversion coefficients in pediatric chest and abdomen radiography with the development of 5 years and 10 years old children voxel phantoms. Methods: After segmentation of organs and tissues from CT slice images of ATOM tissue-equivalent phantoms, a 5-year-old and a 10-year-old children computational voxel phantoms were developed for Monte Carlo simulation. The organ doses and the entrance skin dose for pediatric chest postero-anterior projection and abdominal antero-posterior projection were simulated at the same time, and then the organ dose conversion coefficients were calculated.To verify the simulated results, dose measurement was carried out with ATOM tissue-equivalent phantoms for 5 year chest radiography. Results: Simulated results and experimental results matched very well with each other, the result differences of all the organs covered in radiation field were below 16% for 5-year-old child in chest projection. I showed that the conversion coefficients of organs covered in the radiation field were much larger than organs out of the field for all the study cases, for example, the conversion coefficients of stomach, liver intestines, and pancreas are larger for abdomen radiography while conversion coefficients of lungs are larger for chest radiography. Conclusion: The voxel children phantoms were helpful to evaluate the radiation doses more accurately and efficiently. Radiation field was the essential factor that affects the organ dose, use reasonably small field should be encouraged for radiation protection. This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China(11475047)

  6. Do Young Chinese Children Gain Anthropomorphism after Exposure to Personified Touch-Screen and Board Games?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Hsueh, Yeh; Wang, Fuxing; Bai, Xuejun; Liu, Tao; Zhou, Li

    2017-01-01

    Research shows that preschoolers are likely to anthropomorphize not only animals, but also inanimate toy after being exposed to books that personify these objects. Can such an effect also arise through young children's use of touch-screen games? The present study is the first to examine whether playing a touch-screen personified train game affects young children's anthropomorphism of real trains. Seventy-nine 4- and 6-year-old children were randomly assigned to play either a touch-screen game or a board game of Thomas the Tank Engine for 10 min. They completed the Individual Differences in Anthropomorphism Questionnaire-Child Form (IDAQ-CF) (two subscales: Technology/Inanimate Nature, Animate Nature) and an additional four items about the anthropomorphism of real trains, before (T1) and after (T2) the game. Overall results showed that children manifested a small but statistically significant increase in anthropomorphizing of real trains after their exposure to both games, claiming that real trains were like humans. Interestingly, 4-year-old children in the board game group tended to anthropomorphize real trains more than those in the touch-screen group, whereas the reverse was true for the 6-year-old children. The results suggest that touch-screen games may delay the decline of children's anthropomorphism during the cognitive and socio-emotional transition that occurs in children aged 5-7. These findings have implications for future research on how touch-screen games increase children's anthropomorphism of the real world, and more generally, for evaluation of the influence of the growing use of touch-screen games on young children's learning.

  7. Digital tomosynthesis for verifying spine position during radiotherapy: a phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurney-Champion, Oliver J; Dahele, Max; Slotman, Ben J; Verbakel, Wilko F A R; Mostafavi, Hassan

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring the stability of patient position is essential during high-precision radiotherapy such as spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). We evaluated the combination of digital tomosynthesis (DTS) and triangulation for spine position detection, using non-clinical DTS software and an anthropomorphic pelvic phantom that includes a bone-like spine structure. Kilovoltage cone beam CT projection images over 2–16° gantry rotation were used to generate single slice DTS images. Each DTS slice was registered to a digitally reconstructed DTS derived from the planning CT scan to determine 2D shifts between actual phantom and treatment plan position. Two or more DTS registrations, central axes 4–22° apart, were triangulated to determine the 3D phantom position. Using sequentially generated DTS images, the phantom position can be updated every degree with a small latency of DTS and triangulation angle. The precision of position determination was investigated as function of DTS and triangulation angle. To mimic the scenario of spine SBRT, the effect on the standard deviation of megavoltage radiation delivery during kV image acquisition was tested. In addition, the ability of the system to detect different types of movement was investigated for a variety of small sudden and gradual movements during kV image acquisition. (paper)

  8. Poly(vinyl alcohol) cryogel phantoms for use in ultrasound and MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surry, K J M; Austin, H J B; Fenster, A; Peters, T M

    2004-01-01

    Poly(vinyl alcohol) cryogel, PVA-C, is presented as a tissue-mimicking material, suitable for application in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and ultrasound imaging. A 10% by weight poly(vinyl alcohol) in water solution was used to form PVA-C, which is solidified through a freeze-thaw process. The number of freeze-thaw cycles affects the properties of the material. The ultrasound and MR imaging characteristics were investigated using cylindrical samples of PVA-C. The speed of sound was found to range from 1520 to 1540 m s -1 , and the attenuation coefficients were in the range of 0.075-0.28 dB (cm MHz) -1 . T1 and T2 relaxation values were found to be 718-1034 ms and 108-175 ms, respectively. We also present applications of this material in an anthropomorphic brain phantom, a multi-volume stenosed vessel phantom and breast biopsy phantoms. Some suggestions are made for how best to handle this material in the phantom design and development process

  9. Decision support aids with anthropomorphic characteristics influence trust and performance in younger and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Richard; Fink, Nicole; Price, Margaux; Bass, Brock; Sturre, Lindsay

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the use of deliberately anthropomorphic automation on younger and older adults' trust, dependence and performance on a diabetes decision-making task. Research with anthropomorphic interface agents has shown mixed effects in judgments of preferences but has rarely examined effects on performance. Meanwhile, research in automation has shown some forms of anthropomorphism (e.g. etiquette) have effects on trust and dependence on automation. Participants answered diabetes questions with no-aid, a non-anthropomorphic aid or an anthropomorphised aid. Trust and dependence in the aid was measured. A minimally anthropomorphic aide primarily affected younger adults' trust in the aid. Dependence, however, for both age groups was influenced by the anthropomorphic aid. Automation that deliberately embodies person-like characteristics can influence trust and dependence on reasonably reliable automation. However, further research is necessary to better understand the specific aspects of the aid that affect different age groups. Automation that embodies human-like characteristics may be useful in situations where there is under-utilisation of reasonably reliable aids by enhancing trust and dependence in that aid. Practitioner Summary: The design of decision-support aids on consumer devices (e.g. smartphones) may influence the level of trust that users place in that system and their amount of use. This study is the first step in articulating how the design of aids may influence user's trust and use of such systems.

  10. Impaired spontaneous anthropomorphizing despite intact perception and social knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberlein, Andrea S.; Adolphs, Ralph

    2004-01-01

    Humans spontaneously imbue the world with social meaning: we see not only emotions and intentional behaviors in humans and other animals, but also anger in the movements of thunderstorms and willful sabotage in crashing computers. Converging evidence supports a role for the amygdala, a collection of nuclei in the temporal lobe, in processing emotionally and socially relevant information. Here, we report that a patient with bilateral amygdala damage described a film of animated shapes (normally seen as full of social content) in entirely asocial, geometric terms, despite otherwise normal visual perception. Control tasks showed that the impairment did not result from a global inability to describe social stimuli or a bias in language use, nor was a similar impairment observed in eight comparison subjects with damage to orbitofrontal cortex. This finding extends the role of the amygdala to the social attributions we make even to stimuli that are not explicitly social and, in so doing, suggests that the human capacity for anthropomorphizing draws on some of the same neural systems as do basic emotional responses. PMID:15123799

  11. Atypical Odontalgia (Phantom Tooth Pain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... atypical facial pain,