WorldWideScience

Sample records for tissue geometry patterns

  1. Geometry-induced protein pattern formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalmeier, Dominik; Halatek, Jacob; Frey, Erwin

    2016-01-19

    Protein patterns are known to adapt to cell shape and serve as spatial templates that choreograph downstream processes like cell polarity or cell division. However, how can pattern-forming proteins sense and respond to the geometry of a cell, and what mechanistic principles underlie pattern formation? Current models invoke mechanisms based on dynamic instabilities arising from nonlinear interactions between proteins but neglect the influence of the spatial geometry itself. Here, we show that patterns can emerge as a direct result of adaptation to cell geometry, in the absence of dynamical instability. We present a generic reaction module that allows protein densities robustly to adapt to the symmetry of the spatial geometry. The key component is an NTPase protein that cycles between nucleotide-dependent membrane-bound and cytosolic states. For elongated cells, we find that the protein dynamics generically leads to a bipolar pattern, which vanishes as the geometry becomes spherically symmetrical. We show that such a reaction module facilitates universal adaptation to cell geometry by sensing the local ratio of membrane area to cytosolic volume. This sensing mechanism is controlled by the membrane affinities of the different states. We apply the theory to explain AtMinD bipolar patterns in [Formula: see text] EcMinDE Escherichia coli. Due to its generic nature, the mechanism could also serve as a hitherto-unrecognized spatial template in many other bacterial systems. Moreover, the robustness of the mechanism enables self-organized optimization of protein patterns by evolutionary processes. Finally, the proposed module can be used to establish geometry-sensitive protein gradients in synthetic biological systems.

  2. Geometry Modeling Program Implementation of Human Hip Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Mo-nan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:Aiming to design a simulate software of human tissue modeling and analysis,Visual Studio 2010 is selected as a development tool to develop a 3 D reconstruction software of human tissue with language C++.It can be used alone. It also can be a module of the virtual surgery systems. The system includes medical image segmentation modules and 3 D reconstruction modules,and can realize the model visualization. This software system has been used to reconstruct hip muscles,femur and hip bone accurately. The results show these geometry models can simulate the structure of hip tissues.

  3. Geometry Modeling Program Implementation of Human Hip Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Monan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to design a simulate software of human tissue modeling and analysis,Visual Studio 2010 is selected as a development tool to develop a 3 D reconstruction software of human tissue with language C++.It can be used alone. It also can be a module of the virtual surgery systems. The system includes medical image segmentation modules and 3 D reconstruction modules,and can realize the model visualization. This software system has been used to reconstruct hip muscles,femur and hip bone accurately. The results show these geometry models can simulate the structure of hip tissues.

  4. Geometry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . In the previous article we looked at the origins of synthetic and analytic geometry. More practical minded people, the builders and navigators, were studying two other aspects of geometry- trigonometry and integral calculus. These are actually ...

  5. Numerical optimization of writer geometries for bit patterned magnetic recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, A.; Oezelt, H.; Bance, S.; Fischbacher, J.; Gusenbauer, M.; Reichel, F.; Exl, L.; Schrefl, T.; Schabes, M. E.

    2014-05-01

    A fully-automated pole-tip shape optimization tool, involving write head geometry construction, meshing, micromagnetic simulation, and evaluation, is presented. Optimizations have been performed for three different writing schemes (centered, staggered, and shingled) for an underlying bit patterned media with an areal density of 2.12 Tdots/in.2. Optimizations were performed for a single-phase media with 10 nm thickness and a mag spacing of 8 nm. From the computed write field and its gradient and the minimum energy barrier during writing for islands on the adjacent track, the overall write error rate is computed. The overall write errors are 0.7, 0.08, and 2.8×10-5 for centered writing, staggered writing, and shingled writing.

  6. Patterned wafer geometry grouping for improved overlay control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Honggoo; Han, Sangjun; Woo, Jaeson; Park, Junbeom; Song, Changrock; Anis, Fatima; Vukkadala, Pradeep; Jeon, Sanghuck; Choi, DongSub; Huang, Kevin; Heo, Hoyoung; Smith, Mark D.; Robinson, John C.

    2017-03-01

    Process-induced overlay errors from outside the litho cell have become a significant contributor to the overlay error budget including non-uniform wafer stress. Previous studies have shown the correlation between process-induced stress and overlay and the opportunity for improvement in process control, including the use of patterned wafer geometry (PWG) metrology to reduce stress-induced overlay signatures. Key challenges of volume semiconductor manufacturing are how to improve not only the magnitude of these signatures, but also the wafer to wafer variability. This work involves a novel technique of using PWG metrology to provide improved litho-control by wafer-level grouping based on incoming process induced overlay, relevant for both 3D NAND and DRAM. Examples shown in this study are from 19 nm DRAM manufacturing.

  7. Euclidean Geometry Codes, minimum weight words and decodable error-patterns using bit-flipping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høholdt, Tom; Justesen, Jørn; Jonsson, Bergtor

    2005-01-01

    We determine the number of minimum wigth words in a class of Euclidean Geometry codes and link the performance of the bit-flipping decoding algorithm to the geometry of the error patterns.......We determine the number of minimum wigth words in a class of Euclidean Geometry codes and link the performance of the bit-flipping decoding algorithm to the geometry of the error patterns....

  8. Influence of tissue preservation methods on arterial geometry and echogenicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhjelm, Jens Erik; Vogt, Katja; Jespersen, Søren Kragh

    1997-01-01

    Thoracic porcine aortas from 5 pigs were investigated with 7,5-MHz ultrasound in vitro at low and high transmural pressure before and after the following tissue preservation methods were applied: 1, Storage in frozen condition(-12 degrees C) for 24 h followed by thawing; 2, fixation in formalin...

  9. Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Pedoe, Dan

    1988-01-01

    ""A lucid and masterly survey."" - Mathematics Gazette Professor Pedoe is widely known as a fine teacher and a fine geometer. His abilities in both areas are clearly evident in this self-contained, well-written, and lucid introduction to the scope and methods of elementary geometry. It covers the geometry usually included in undergraduate courses in mathematics, except for the theory of convex sets. Based on a course given by the author for several years at the University of Minnesota, the main purpose of the book is to increase geometrical, and therefore mathematical, understanding and to he

  10. Geometri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byg din egen boomerang, kast den, se den flyve, forstå hvorfor og hvordan den vender tilbage, og grib den. Det handler om opdriften på vingerne når du flyver, men det handler også og allermest om den mærkværdige gyroskop-effekt, du bruger til at holde balancen, når du kører på cykel. Vi vil bruge...... matematik, geometri, og fysik til at forstå, hvad det er, der foregår....

  11. Spatial pattern of cell geometry and cell-division orientation in zebrafish lens epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Mochizuki

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cell proliferation is a key regulator of tissue morphogenesis. We examined cell proliferation and cell division in zebrafish lens epithelium by visualizing cell-cycle phases and nuclear positions, using fluorescent-labeled geminin and histone proteins. Proliferation was low in the anterior region of lens epithelium and higher in the marginal zone anterior to the equator, suggesting that the proliferation zone, called the germinative zone, is formed in zebrafish lens. Interestingly, cell-division orientation was biased longitudinally in the anterior region, shifted from longitudinal to circumferential along the anterior–posterior axis of lens sphere, and was biased circumferentially in the peripheral region. These data suggest that cell-division orientation is spatially regulated in zebrafish lens epithelium. The Hertwig rule indicates that cells tend to divide along their long axes. Orientation of long axes and cell division were biased similarly in zebrafish lens epithelium, suggesting that cell geometry correlates with cell-division orientation. A cell adhesion molecule, E-cadherin, is expressed in lens epithelium. In a zebrafish e-cadherin mutant, the long axes and cell-division orientation were shifted more longitudinally. These data suggest that E-cadherin is required for the spatial pattern of cell geometry and cell-division orientation in zebrafish lens epithelium.

  12. Patterns of left ventricular geometry in hypertensive patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Systemic hypertension is associated with different left ventricular geometric adaptations, which are matched to systemic hemodynamics and ventricular load. Four geometric patterns have been described. The prevalence of these left ventricular geometric patterns in hypertension has been reported in other places but, the ...

  13. Effects of valve geometry and tissue anisotropy on the radial stretch and coaptation area of tissue-engineered heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loerakker, S; Argento, G; Oomens, C W J; Baaijens, F P T

    2013-07-26

    Tissue engineering represents a promising technique to overcome the limitations of the current valve replacements, since it allows for creating living autologous heart valves that have the potential to grow and remodel. However, also this approach still faces a number of challenges. One particular problem is regurgitation, caused by cell-mediated tissue retraction or the mismatch in geometrical and material properties between tissue-engineered heart valves (TEHVs) and their native counterparts. The goal of the present study was to assess the influence of valve geometry and tissue anisotropy on the deformation profile and closed configuration of TEHVs. To achieve this aim, a range of finite element models incorporating different valve shapes was developed, and the constitutive behavior of the tissue was modeled using an established computational framework, where the degree of anisotropy was varied between values representative of TEHVs and native valves. The results of this study suggest that valve geometry and tissue anisotropy are both important to maximize the radial strains and thereby the coaptation area. Additionally, the minimum degree of anisotropy that is required to obtain positive radial strains was shown to depend on the valve shape and the pressure to which the valves are exposed. Exposure to pulmonary diastolic pressure only yielded positive radial strains if the anisotropy was comparable to the native situation, whereas considerably less anisotropy was required if the valves were exposed to aortic diastolic pressure. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Precise pattern replication of polymer blends into nonuniform geometries via reducing interfacial tension between two polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Liang; Wei, Ming; Shang, Yingrui; Kazmer, David; Barry, Carol; Mead, Joey

    2012-07-10

    Patterned polymer structures with different functionalities have many potential applications. Directed assembly of polymer blends using chemically functionalized patterns during spin-coating has been used to fabricate the patterned polymer structures. For bridging the gap between laboratorial experiments and manufacturing of nanodevices, the polymer blends structures are required to be precisely patterned into nonuniform geometries in a high-rate process, which still is a challenge. In this Article, we demonstrated for the first time that by decreasing the interfacial tension between two polymers polystyrene and poly(acrylic acid) via adding a compatibilizer (polystyrene-b-poly(acrylic acid) ), a polystyrene/poly(acrylic acid) blend was precisely patterned into nonuniform geometries in a high-rate fashion. The patterned nonuniform geometries included angled lines with angles varied from 30° to 150°, T-junctions, square arrays, circle arrays, and arbitrary letter-shaped geometries. The reduction in the interfacial tension improved the line edge roughness and the patterning efficiency of the patterned polymer blends. In addition, the commensurability between characteristic length and pattern periodicity for well-ordered morphologies was also expanded with decreasing interfacial tension. This approach can be easily extended to other functional polymers in a blend and facilitate the applications of patterned polymer structures in biosensors, organic thin-film electronics, and polymer solar cells.

  15. Terahertz pulse imaging in reflection geometry of human skin cancer and skin tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodward, Ruth M; Cole, Bryan E; Wallace, Vincent P; Pye, Richard J; Arnone, Donald D; Linfield, Edmund H; Pepper, Michael

    2002-01-01

    We demonstrate the application of terahertz pulse imaging (TPI) in reflection geometry for the study of skin tissue and related cancers both in vitro and in vivo. The sensitivity of terahertz radiation to polar molecules, such as water, makes TPI suitable for studying the hydration levels in the skin and the determination of the lateral spread of skin cancer pre-operatively. By studying the terahertz pulse shape in the time domain we have been able to differentiate between diseased and normal tissue for the study of basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Basal cell carcinoma has shown a positive terahertz contrast, and inflammation and scar tissue a negative terahertz contrast compared to normal tissue. In vivo measurements on the stratum corneum have enabled visualization of the stratum corneum-epidermis interface and the study of skin hydration levels. These results demonstrate the potential of terahertz pulse imaging for the study of skin tissue and its related disorders, both in vitro and in vivo

  16. Improved Geometry of Decellularized Tissue Engineered Heart Valves to Prevent Leaflet Retraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Bart; Loerakker, Sandra; Fioretta, Emanuela S; Bax, Dave J P; Driessen-Mol, Anita; Hoerstrup, Simon P; Baaijens, Frank P T

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies on decellularized tissue engineered heart valves (DTEHVs) showed rapid host cell repopulation and increased valvular insufficiency developing over time, associated with leaflet shortening. A possible explanation for this result was found using computational simulations, which revealed radial leaflet compression in the original valvular geometry when subjected to physiological pressure conditions. Therefore, an improved geometry was suggested to enable radial leaflet extension to counteract for host cell mediated retraction. In this study, we propose a solution to impose this new geometry by using a constraining bioreactor insert during culture. Human cell based DTEHVs (n = 5) were produced as such, resulting in an enlarged coaptation area and profound belly curvature. Extracellular matrix was homogeneously distributed, with circumferential collagen alignment in the coaptation region and global tissue anisotropy. Based on in vitro functionality experiments, these DTEHVs showed competent hydrodynamic functionality under physiological pulmonary conditions and were fatigue resistant, with stable functionality up to 16 weeks in vivo simulation. Based on implemented mechanical data, our computational models revealed a considerable decrease in radial tissue compression with the obtained geometrical adjustments. Therefore, these improved DTEHV are expected to be less prone to host cell mediated leaflet retraction and will remain competent after implantation.

  17. Invited Article: Plasmonic growth of patterned metamaterials with fractal geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki Takeyasu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale metallic three-dimensional (3D structures composed of sub-wavelength fine details, called metamaterials, have attracted optical scientists and materials scientists because of their unconventional and extraordinary optical properties that are not seen in nature. However, existing nano-fabrication technologies including two-photon fabrication, e-beam, focused ion-beam, and probe microscopy are not necessarily suitable for fabricating such large-scale 3D metallic nanostructures. In this article, we propose a different method of fabricating metamaterials, which is based on a bottom-up approach. We mimicked the generation of wood forest under the sunlight and rain in nature. In our method, a silver nano-forest is grown from the silver seeds (nanoparticles placed on the glass substrate in silver-ion solution. The metallic nano-forest is formed only in the area where ultraviolet light is illuminated. The local temperature increases at nano-seeds and tips of nano-trees and their branches due to the plasmonic heating as a result of UV light excitation of localized mode of surface plasmon polaritons. We have made experiments of growth of metallic nano-forest patterned by the light distribution. The experimental results show a beautiful nano-forest made of silver with self-similarity. Fractal dimension and spectral response of the grown structure are discussed. The structures exhibit a broad spectral response from ultraviolet to infrared, which was used for surface-enhanced Raman detection of molecules.

  18. Geometry Design Optimization of Functionally Graded Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering: A Mechanobiological Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Boccaccio

    Full Text Available Functionally Graded Scaffolds (FGSs are porous biomaterials where porosity changes in space with a specific gradient. In spite of their wide use in bone tissue engineering, possible models that relate the scaffold gradient to the mechanical and biological requirements for the regeneration of the bony tissue are currently missing. In this study we attempt to bridge the gap by developing a mechanobiology-based optimization algorithm aimed to determine the optimal graded porosity distribution in FGSs. The algorithm combines the parametric finite element model of a FGS, a computational mechano-regulation model and a numerical optimization routine. For assigned boundary and loading conditions, the algorithm builds iteratively different scaffold geometry configurations with different porosity distributions until the best microstructure geometry is reached, i.e. the geometry that allows the amount of bone formation to be maximized. We tested different porosity distribution laws, loading conditions and scaffold Young's modulus values. For each combination of these variables, the explicit equation of the porosity distribution law-i.e the law that describes the pore dimensions in function of the spatial coordinates-was determined that allows the highest amounts of bone to be generated. The results show that the loading conditions affect significantly the optimal porosity distribution. For a pure compression loading, it was found that the pore dimensions are almost constant throughout the entire scaffold and using a FGS allows the formation of amounts of bone slightly larger than those obtainable with a homogeneous porosity scaffold. For a pure shear loading, instead, FGSs allow to significantly increase the bone formation compared to a homogeneous porosity scaffolds. Although experimental data is still necessary to properly relate the mechanical/biological environment to the scaffold microstructure, this model represents an important step towards

  19. Integrative Inferences on Pattern Geometries of Grapes Grown under Water Stress and Their Resulting Wines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fushing Hsieh

    Full Text Available Multiple datasets of two consecutive vintages of replicated grape and wines from six different deficit irrigation regimes are characterized and compared. The process consists of four temporal-ordered signature phases: harvest field data, juice composition, wine composition before bottling and bottled wine. A new computing paradigm and an integrative inferential platform are developed for discovering phase-to-phase pattern geometries for such characterization and comparison purposes. Each phase is manifested by a distinct set of features, which are measurable upon phase-specific entities subject to the common set of irrigation regimes. Throughout the four phases, this compilation of data from irrigation regimes with subsamples is termed a space of media-nodes, on which measurements of phase-specific features were recoded. All of these collectively constitute a bipartite network of data, which is then normalized and binary coded. For these serial bipartite networks, we first quantify patterns that characterize individual phases by means of a new computing paradigm called "Data Mechanics". This computational technique extracts a coupling geometry which captures and reveals interacting dependence among and between media-nodes and feature-nodes in forms of hierarchical block sub-matrices. As one of the principal discoveries, the holistic year-factor persistently surfaces as the most inferential factor in classifying all media-nodes throughout all phases. This could be deemed either surprising in its over-arching dominance or obvious based on popular belief. We formulate and test pattern-based hypotheses that confirm such fundamental patterns. We also attempt to elucidate the driving force underlying the phase-evolution in winemaking via a newly developed partial coupling geometry, which is designed to integrate two coupling geometries. Such partial coupling geometries are confirmed to bear causal and predictive implications. All pattern inferences

  20. Geometry-driven cell organization determines tissue growths in scaffold pores: consequences for fibronectin organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Joly

    Full Text Available To heal tissue defects, cells have to bridge gaps and generate new extracellular matrix (ECM. Macroporous scaffolds are frequently used to support the process of defect filling and thus foster tissue regeneration. Such biomaterials contain micro-voids (pores that the cells fill with their own ECM over time. There is only limited knowledge on how pore geometry influences cell organization and matrix production, even though it is highly relevant for scaffold design. This study hypothesized that 1 a simple geometric description predicts cellular organization during pore filling at the cell level and that 2 pore closure results in a reorganization of ECM. Scaffolds with a broad distribution of pore sizes (macroporous starPEG-heparin cryogel were used as a model system and seeded with primary fibroblasts. The strategies of cells to fill pores could be explained by a simple geometrical model considering cells as tensioned chords. The model matched qualitatively as well as quantitatively by means of cell number vs. open cross-sectional area for all pore sizes. The correlation between ECM location and cell position was higher when the pores were not filled with tissue (Pearson's coefficient ρ = 0.45±0.01 and reduced once the pores were closed (ρ = 0.26±0.04 indicating a reorganization of the cell/ECM network. Scaffold pore size directed the time required for pore closure and furthermore impacted the organization of the fibronectin matrix. Understanding how cells fill micro-voids will help to design biomaterial scaffolds that support the endogenous healing process and thus allow a fast filling of tissue defects.

  1. Controlling the influence of elastic eigenmodes on nanomagnet dynamics through pattern geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, C.; Yahagi, Y.; Dhuey, S.; Cabrini, S.; Schmidt, H.

    2017-03-01

    The effect of the nanoscale array geometry on the interaction between optically generated surface acoustic waves (SAWs) and nanomagnet dynamics is investigated using Time-Resolved Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect Microscopy (TR-MOKE). It is demonstrated that altering the nanomagnet geometry from a periodic to a randomized aperiodic pattern effectively removes the magneto-elastic effect of SAWs on the magnetization dynamics. The efficiency of this method depends on the extent of any residual spatial correlations and is quantified by spatial Fourier analysis of the two structures. Randomization allows observation and extraction of intrinsic magnetic parameters such as spin wave frequencies and damping to be resolvable using all-optical methods, enabling the conclusion that the fabrication process does not affect the damping.

  2. Controlling the influence of elastic eigenmodes on nanomagnet dynamics through pattern geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berk, C., E-mail: crberk@soe.ucsc.edu [School of Engineering, University of California Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Yahagi, Y. [School of Engineering, University of California Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Dhuey, S.; Cabrini, S. [Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Schmidt, H. [School of Engineering, University of California Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2017-03-15

    The effect of the nanoscale array geometry on the interaction between optically generated surface acoustic waves (SAWs) and nanomagnet dynamics is investigated using Time-Resolved Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect Microscopy (TR-MOKE). It is demonstrated that altering the nanomagnet geometry from a periodic to a randomized aperiodic pattern effectively removes the magneto-elastic effect of SAWs on the magnetization dynamics. The efficiency of this method depends on the extent of any residual spatial correlations and is quantified by spatial Fourier analysis of the two structures. Randomization allows observation and extraction of intrinsic magnetic parameters such as spin wave frequencies and damping to be resolvable using all-optical methods, enabling the conclusion that the fabrication process does not affect the damping.

  3. Controlling the influence of elastic eigenmodes on nanomagnet dynamics through pattern geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berk, C.; Yahagi, Y.; Dhuey, S.; Cabrini, S.; Schmidt, H.

    2017-01-01

    The effect of the nanoscale array geometry on the interaction between optically generated surface acoustic waves (SAWs) and nanomagnet dynamics is investigated using Time-Resolved Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect Microscopy (TR-MOKE). It is demonstrated that altering the nanomagnet geometry from a periodic to a randomized aperiodic pattern effectively removes the magneto-elastic effect of SAWs on the magnetization dynamics. The efficiency of this method depends on the extent of any residual spatial correlations and is quantified by spatial Fourier analysis of the two structures. Randomization allows observation and extraction of intrinsic magnetic parameters such as spin wave frequencies and damping to be resolvable using all-optical methods, enabling the conclusion that the fabrication process does not affect the damping.

  4. Beyond Turing: mechanochemical pattern formation in biological tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercker, Moritz; Brinkmann, Felix; Marciniak-Czochra, Anna; Richter, Thomas

    2016-05-04

    During embryogenesis, chemical (morphogen) and mechanical patterns develop within tissues in a self-organized way. More than 60 years ago, Turing proposed his famous reaction-diffusion model for such processes, assuming chemical interactions as the main driving force in tissue patterning. However, experimental identification of corresponding molecular candidates is still incomplete. Recent results suggest that beside morphogens, also tissue mechanics play a significant role in these patterning processes. Combining continuous finite strain with discrete cellular tissue models, we present and numerically investigate mechanochemical processes, in which morphogen dynamics and tissue mechanics are coupled by feedback loops. We consider three different mechanical cues involved in such feedbacks: strain, stress, and compression. Based on experimental results, for each case, we present a feedback loop spontaneously creating robust mechanochemical patterns. In contrast to Turing-type models, simple mechanochemical interaction terms are sufficient to create de novo patterns. Our results emphasize mechanochemical processes as possible candidates controlling different steps of embryogenesis. To motivate further experimental research discovering related mechanisms in living tissues, we also present predictive in silicio experiments. Reviewer 1 - Marek Kimmel; Reviewer 2 - Konstantin Doubrovinski (nominated by Ned Wingreen); Reviewer 3 - Jun Allard (nominated by William Hlavacek).

  5. Hypothetical way of pollen aperture patterning. 2. Formation of polycolpate patterns and pseudoaperture geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozhidaev

    2000-05-01

    Deviant forms of polycolpate pollen, differing from the typical pattern in the number and arrangement of apertures, are found to be similar in distantly related dicotyledon taxa. The range of variation of common and deviant aperture patterns may be arranged as a continuous series, which may be described as a gradual and geometrically regular transformation of the deviant form with a meridional circular colpus to one of the common polycolpate conditions. Similar series have been observed in the taxa with colporate and pseudocolpate pollen. All possible spatial isomers and their mirror symmetrical variants of the deviant polycolpate and polypseudocolpate pollen have been predicted in terms of the suggested regularities of aperture multiplication. Some of them have been identified in the samples studied.

  6. Mechanical constraints imposed by 3D cellular geometry and arrangement modulate growth patterns in the Arabidopsis embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassel, George W; Stamm, Petra; Mosca, Gabriella; Barbier de Reuille, Pierre; Gibbs, Daniel J; Winter, Robin; Janka, Ales; Holdsworth, Michael J; Smith, Richard S

    2014-06-10

    Morphogenesis occurs in 3D space over time and is guided by coordinated gene expression programs. Here we use postembryonic development in Arabidopsis plants to investigate the genetic control of growth. We demonstrate that gene expression driving the production of the growth-stimulating hormone gibberellic acid and downstream growth factors is first induced within the radicle tip of the embryo. The center of cell expansion is, however, spatially displaced from the center of gene expression. Because the rapidly growing cells have very different geometry from that of those at the tip, we hypothesized that mechanical factors may contribute to this growth displacement. To this end we developed 3D finite-element method models of growing custom-designed digital embryos at cellular resolution. We used this framework to conceptualize how cell size, shape, and topology influence tissue growth and to explore the interplay of geometrical and genetic inputs into growth distribution. Our simulations showed that mechanical constraints are sufficient to explain the disconnect between the experimentally observed spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression and early postembryonic growth. The center of cell expansion is the position where genetic and mechanical facilitators of growth converge. We have thus uncovered a mechanism whereby 3D cellular geometry helps direct where genetically specified growth takes place.

  7. Facial soft tissue analysis among various vertical facial patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeelani, W.; Fida, M.; Shaikh, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The emergence of soft tissue paradigm in orthodontics has made various soft tissue parameters an integral part of the orthodontic problem list. The purpose of this study was to determine and compare various facial soft tissue parameters on lateral cephalograms among patients with short, average and long facial patterns. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on the lateral cephalograms of 180 adult subjects divided into three equal groups, i.e., short, average and long face according to the vertical facial pattern. Incisal display at rest, nose height, upper and lower lip lengths, degree of lip procumbency and the nasolabial angle were measured for each individual. The gender differences for these soft tissue parameters were determined using Mann-Whitney U test while the comparison among different facial patterns was performed using Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: Significant differences in the incisal display at rest, total nasal height, lip procumbency, the nasolabial angle and the upper and lower lip lengths were found among the three vertical facial patterns. A significant positive correlation of nose and lip dimensions was found with the underlying skeletal pattern. Similarly, the incisal display at rest, upper and lower lip procumbency and the nasolabial angle were significantly correlated with the lower anterior facial height. Conclusion: Short facial pattern is associated with minimal incisal display, recumbent upper and lower lips and acute nasolabial angle while the long facial pattern is associated with excessive incisal display, procumbent upper and lower lips and obtuse nasolabial angle. (author)

  8. Tunable geometry of bacterial inclusion bodies as substrate materials for tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GarcIa-Fruitos, Elena; Seras-Franzoso, JoaquIn; Vazquez, Esther; Villaverde, Antonio [CIBER en BioingenierIa, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina, Bellaterra, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Institut de Biotecnologia i de Biomedicina and Departament de Genetica i de Microbiologia, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Cerdanyola del Valles), Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-05-21

    A spectrum of materials for biomedical applications is produced in bacteria, and some of them, such as metals or polyhydroxyalkanoates, are straightforwardly obtained as particulate entities. We have explored the biofabrication process of bacterial inclusion bodies, particulate proteinaceous materials (ranging from 50 to 500 nm in diameter) recently recognized as suitable for surface topographical modification and tissue engineering. Inclusion bodies have been widely described as spherical or pseudo-spherical particles with only minor morphological variability, mostly restricted to their size. Here we have identified a cellular gene in Escherichia coli (clpP) that controls the in vivo fabrication process of inclusion bodies. In the absence of the encoded protease, the dynamics of protein deposition is perturbed, resulting in unusual tear-shaped particles with enhanced surface-volume ratios. This fact modifies the ability of inclusion bodies to promote mammalian cell attachment and differentiation upon surface decoration. The implications of the genetic control of inclusion body geometry are discussed in the context of their biological fabrication and regarding the biomedical potential of these protein clusters in regenerative medicine.

  9. Tunable geometry of bacterial inclusion bodies as substrate materials for tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Fruitós, Elena; Seras-Franzoso, Joaquín; Vazquez, Esther; Villaverde, Antonio

    2010-05-01

    A spectrum of materials for biomedical applications is produced in bacteria, and some of them, such as metals or polyhydroxyalkanoates, are straightforwardly obtained as particulate entities. We have explored the biofabrication process of bacterial inclusion bodies, particulate proteinaceous materials (ranging from 50 to 500 nm in diameter) recently recognized as suitable for surface topographical modification and tissue engineering. Inclusion bodies have been widely described as spherical or pseudo-spherical particles with only minor morphological variability, mostly restricted to their size. Here we have identified a cellular gene in Escherichia coli (clpP) that controls the in vivo fabrication process of inclusion bodies. In the absence of the encoded protease, the dynamics of protein deposition is perturbed, resulting in unusual tear-shaped particles with enhanced surface-volume ratios. This fact modifies the ability of inclusion bodies to promote mammalian cell attachment and differentiation upon surface decoration. The implications of the genetic control of inclusion body geometry are discussed in the context of their biological fabrication and regarding the biomedical potential of these protein clusters in regenerative medicine.

  10. Tunable geometry of bacterial inclusion bodies as substrate materials for tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GarcIa-Fruitos, Elena; Seras-Franzoso, JoaquIn; Vazquez, Esther; Villaverde, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    A spectrum of materials for biomedical applications is produced in bacteria, and some of them, such as metals or polyhydroxyalkanoates, are straightforwardly obtained as particulate entities. We have explored the biofabrication process of bacterial inclusion bodies, particulate proteinaceous materials (ranging from 50 to 500 nm in diameter) recently recognized as suitable for surface topographical modification and tissue engineering. Inclusion bodies have been widely described as spherical or pseudo-spherical particles with only minor morphological variability, mostly restricted to their size. Here we have identified a cellular gene in Escherichia coli (clpP) that controls the in vivo fabrication process of inclusion bodies. In the absence of the encoded protease, the dynamics of protein deposition is perturbed, resulting in unusual tear-shaped particles with enhanced surface-volume ratios. This fact modifies the ability of inclusion bodies to promote mammalian cell attachment and differentiation upon surface decoration. The implications of the genetic control of inclusion body geometry are discussed in the context of their biological fabrication and regarding the biomedical potential of these protein clusters in regenerative medicine.

  11. Adipose tissue fatty acid patterns and changes in anthropometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahm, Christina Catherine; Gorst-Rasmussen, Anders; Jakobsen, Marianne Uhre

    2011-01-01

    Diets rich in n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA), but low in n-6 LC-PUFA and 18:1 trans-fatty acids (TFA), may lower the risk of overweight and obesity. These fatty acids have often been investigated individually. We explored associations between global patterns in adipose tissu...... fatty acids and changes in anthropometry....

  12. Cell Patterning for Liver Tissue Engineering via Dielectrophoretic Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Nurlina Wan Yahya

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Liver transplantation is the most common treatment for patients with end-stage liver failure. However, liver transplantation is greatly limited by a shortage of donors. Liver tissue engineering may offer an alternative by providing an implantable engineered liver. Currently, diverse types of engineering approaches for in vitro liver cell culture are available, including scaffold-based methods, microfluidic platforms, and micropatterning techniques. Active cell patterning via dielectrophoretic (DEP force showed some advantages over other methods, including high speed, ease of handling, high precision and being label-free. This article summarizes liver function and regenerative mechanisms for better understanding in developing engineered liver. We then review recent advances in liver tissue engineering techniques and focus on DEP-based cell patterning, including microelectrode design and patterning configuration.

  13. Detecting tissue optical and mechanical properties with an ultrasound modulated optical imaging system in reflection detection geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yi; Li, Sinan; Eckersley, Robert J; Elson, Daniel S; Tang, Meng-Xing

    2015-01-01

    Tissue optical and mechanical properties are correlated to tissue pathologic changes. This manuscript describes a dual-mode ultrasound modulated optical imaging system capable of sensing local optical and mechanical properties in reflection geometry. The optical characterisation was achieved by the acoustic radiation force assisted ultrasound modulated optical tomography (ARF-UOT) with laser speckle contrast detection. Shear waves generated by the ARF were also tracked optically by the same system and the shear wave speed was used for the elasticity measurement. Tissue mimicking phantoms with multiple inclusions buried at 11 mm depth were experimentally scanned with the dual-mode system. The inclusions, with higher optical absorption and/or higher stiffness than background, were identified based on the dual results and their stiffnesses were quantified. The system characterises both optical and mechanical properties of the inclusions compared with the ARF-UOT or the elasticity measurement alone. Moreover, by detecting the backward scattered light in reflection detection geometry, the system is more suitable for clinical applications compared with transmission geometry.

  14. Adipose tissue Fatty Acid patterns and changes in antrhropometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahm, Christina Catherine; Gorst-Rasmussen, Anders; Jakobsen, Marianne Uhre

    2011-01-01

    in adipose tissue fatty acids and changes in anthropometry. Methods 34 fatty acid species from adipose tissue biopsies were determined in a random sample of 1100 men and women from a Danish cohort study. We used sex-specific principal component analysis and multiple linear regression to investigate......Introduction Diets rich in n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA), but low in n-6 LC-PUFA and 18:1 trans-fatty acids (TFA), may lower the risk of overweight and obesity. These fatty acids have often been investigated individually. We explored associations between global patterns...

  15. [The influence of probe geometry on the sensitivity of tissue oximeter using near infra-red spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, F; Ding, H; Lin, F

    2000-08-01

    Based on the modified Lambert-Beer law under scattering media, near infra-red spectroscopy tissue oximeter measures the changes of absorber concentrations (such as oxy-hemoglobin, deoxy-hemoglobin, cytochrome aa3). This is made possible by recording the optical density change under different physiological status. This paper describes the average penetration depth, average photon path-length and spatial sensitive profile in multi-layered tissue model using Monte-Carlo method. The result shows the probe geometry of the sensor, which is the separation between the light source and the detector, has a great influence on the sensitivity of measurement. Increasing this separation properly allows the improvement of the sensitivity of measurement and the increase of the probability of looking at oxygenation deep under the surface tissue. But this improvement is limited by the decrease of signal-noise ratio. Optimum probe spacing should be estimated for special tissue structure.

  16. Diverse splicing patterns of exonized Alu elements in human tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Lin

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Exonization of Alu elements is a major mechanism for birth of new exons in primate genomes. Prior analyses of expressed sequence tags show that almost all Alu-derived exons are alternatively spliced, and the vast majority of these exons have low transcript inclusion levels. In this work, we provide genomic and experimental evidence for diverse splicing patterns of exonized Alu elements in human tissues. Using Exon array data of 330 Alu-derived exons in 11 human tissues and detailed RT-PCR analyses of 38 exons, we show that some Alu-derived exons are constitutively spliced in a broad range of human tissues, and some display strong tissue-specific switch in their transcript inclusion levels. Most of such exons are derived from ancient Alu elements in the genome. In SEPN1, mutations of which are linked to a form of congenital muscular dystrophy, the muscle-specific inclusion of an Alu-derived exon may be important for regulating SEPN1 activity in muscle. Realtime qPCR analysis of this SEPN1 exon in macaque and chimpanzee tissues indicates human-specific increase in its transcript inclusion level and muscle specificity after the divergence of humans and chimpanzees. Our results imply that some Alu exonization events may have acquired adaptive benefits during the evolution of primate transcriptomes.

  17. Influence of overlying tissue and probe geometry on the sensitivity of a near-infrared tissue oximeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, W; Haishu, D; Fenghua, T; Jun, Z; Qing, X; Xianwu, T

    2001-02-01

    In this paper, the influences of overlying tissue and detecting distance between the source and the detector on the measurement of a tissue oximeter were discussed. The signal-noise-ratio of the detector was also examined. A semi-infinite multi-layer Monte Carlo model was induced to simulate the migration of the photons in the skin, adipose and muscle. The thickness of the adipose layer and the separation between the source and the detector in the muscle were changed to simulate the clinical application. Partial pathlength was introduced as a characteristic parameter to evaluate the sensitivity of the oximeter. A two-wavelength (700 and 830 nm) tissue oximeter was developed to verify the results of the simulation. The Monte Carlo simulation results showed that the sensitivity of the near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) oximeter declined greatly with increasing overlying tissue thickness. Increasing the distance between the light source and the detector improved the sensitivity. However, in order to achieve a sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratio, it was necessary to limit this distance. The results of a bicycle ergometer exercise verified the above results and showed that, for a special adipose thickness (AT), there may be a reasonable range of the emitter-detector separation.

  18. 3D geometry-based quantification of colocalizations in multichannel 3D microscopy images of human soft tissue tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörz, Stefan; Sander, Petra; Pfannmöller, Martin; Rieker, Ralf J; Joos, Stefan; Mechtersheimer, Gunhild; Boukamp, Petra; Lichter, Peter; Rohr, Karl

    2010-08-01

    We introduce a new model-based approach for automatic quantification of colocalizations in multichannel 3D microscopy images. The approach uses different 3D parametric intensity models in conjunction with a model fitting scheme to localize and quantify subcellular structures with high accuracy. The central idea is to determine colocalizations between different channels based on the estimated geometry of the subcellular structures as well as to differentiate between different types of colocalizations. A statistical analysis was performed to assess the significance of the determined colocalizations. This approach was used to successfully analyze about 500 three-channel 3D microscopy images of human soft tissue tumors and controls.

  19. Proton tissue dose for the blood forming organ in human geometry: Isotropic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, G. S.; Wilson, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    A computer program is described which calculates doses averaged within five major segments of the blood forming organ in the human body taking into account selfshielding of the detailed body geometry and nuclear star effects for proton radiation of arbitrary energy spectrum (energy less than 1 GeV) and isotropic angular distribution. The dose calculation includes the first term of an asymptotic series expansion of transport theory which is known to converge rapidly for most points in the human body. The result is always a conservative estimate of dose and is given as physical dose (rad) and dose equivalent (rem).

  20. Linking microscopic spatial patterns of tissue destruction in emphysema to macroscopic decline in stiffness using a 3D computational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Majumdar, Arnab; Suki, Béla

    2011-04-01

    Pulmonary emphysema is a connective tissue disease characterized by the progressive destruction of alveolar walls leading to airspace enlargement and decreased elastic recoil of the lung. However, the relationship between microscopic tissue structure and decline in stiffness of the lung is not well understood. In this study, we developed a 3D computational model of lung tissue in which a pre-strained cuboidal block of tissue was represented by a tessellation of space filling polyhedra, with each polyhedral unit-cell representing an alveolus. Destruction of alveolar walls was mimicked by eliminating faces that separate two polyhedral either randomly or in a spatially correlated manner, in which the highest force bearing walls were removed at each step. Simulations were carried out to establish a link between the geometries that emerged and the rate of decline in bulk modulus of the tissue block. The spatially correlated process set up by the force-based destruction lead to a significantly faster rate of decline in bulk modulus accompanied by highly heterogeneous structures than the random destruction pattern. Using the Karhunen-Loève transformation, an estimator of the change in bulk modulus from the first four moments of airspace cell volumes was setup. Simulations were then obtained for tissue destruction with different idealized alveolar geometry, levels of pre-strain, linear and nonlinear elasticity assumptions for alveolar walls and also mixed destruction patterns where both random and force-based destruction occurs simultaneously. In all these cases, the change in bulk modulus from cell volumes was accurately estimated. We conclude that microscopic structural changes in emphysema and the associated decline in tissue stiffness are linked by the spatial pattern of the destruction process.

  1. Linking microscopic spatial patterns of tissue destruction in emphysema to macroscopic decline in stiffness using a 3D computational model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harikrishnan Parameswaran

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary emphysema is a connective tissue disease characterized by the progressive destruction of alveolar walls leading to airspace enlargement and decreased elastic recoil of the lung. However, the relationship between microscopic tissue structure and decline in stiffness of the lung is not well understood. In this study, we developed a 3D computational model of lung tissue in which a pre-strained cuboidal block of tissue was represented by a tessellation of space filling polyhedra, with each polyhedral unit-cell representing an alveolus. Destruction of alveolar walls was mimicked by eliminating faces that separate two polyhedral either randomly or in a spatially correlated manner, in which the highest force bearing walls were removed at each step. Simulations were carried out to establish a link between the geometries that emerged and the rate of decline in bulk modulus of the tissue block. The spatially correlated process set up by the force-based destruction lead to a significantly faster rate of decline in bulk modulus accompanied by highly heterogeneous structures than the random destruction pattern. Using the Karhunen-Loève transformation, an estimator of the change in bulk modulus from the first four moments of airspace cell volumes was setup. Simulations were then obtained for tissue destruction with different idealized alveolar geometry, levels of pre-strain, linear and nonlinear elasticity assumptions for alveolar walls and also mixed destruction patterns where both random and force-based destruction occurs simultaneously. In all these cases, the change in bulk modulus from cell volumes was accurately estimated. We conclude that microscopic structural changes in emphysema and the associated decline in tissue stiffness are linked by the spatial pattern of the destruction process.

  2. Relationship between 578-nm (copper vapor) laser beam geometry and heat distribution within biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyasov, Ildar K.; Prikhodko, Constantin V.; Nevorotin, Alexey J.

    1995-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation model and the thermoindicative tissue phantom were applied for evaluation of a depth of tissue necrosis (DTN) as a result of quasi-cw copper vapor laser (578 nm) irradiation. It has been shown that incident light focusing angle is essential for DTN. In particular, there was a significant rise in DTN parallel to elevation of this angle up to +20 degree(s)C and +5 degree(s)C for both the MC simulation and tissue phantom models, respectively, with no further increase in the necrosis depth above these angles. It is to be noted that the relationship between focusing angles and DTN values was apparently stronger for the real target compared to the MC-derived hypothetical one. To what extent these date are applicable for medical practice can be evaluated in animal models which would simulate laser-assisted therapy for PWS or related dermatologic lesions with converged 578 nm laser beams.

  3. The Influence of Bioreactor Geometry and the Mechanical Environment on Engineered Tissues

    KAUST Repository

    Osborne, J. M.

    2010-01-01

    A three phase model for the growth of a tissue construct within a perfusion bioreactor is examined. The cell population (and attendant extracellular matrix), culture medium, and porous scaffold are treated as distinct phases. The bioreactor system is represented by a two-dimensional channel containing a cell-seeded rigid porous scaffold (tissue construct), which is perfused with a culture medium. Through the prescription of appropriate functional forms for cell proliferation and extracellular matrix deposition rates, the model is used to compare the influence of cell density-, pressure-, and culture medium shear stress-regulated growth on the composition of the engineered tissue. The governing equations are derived in O\\'Dea et al. "A Three Phase Model for Tissue Construct Growth in a Perfusion Bioreactor," Math. Med. Biol., in which the long-wavelength limit was exploited to aid analysis; here, finite element methods are used to construct two-dimensional solutions to the governing equations and to investigate thoroughly their behavior. Comparison of the total tissue yield and averaged pressures, velocities, and shear stress demonstrates that quantitative agreement between the two-dimensional and long-wavelength approximation solutions is obtained for channel aspect ratios of order 10 -2 and that much of the qualitative behavior of the model is captured in the long-wavelength limit, even for relatively large channel aspect ratios. However, we demonstrate that in order to capture accurately the effect of mechanotransduction mechanisms on tissue construct growth, spatial effects in at least two dimensions must be included due to the inherent spatial variation of mechanical stimuli relevant to perfusion bioreactors, most notably, fluid shear stress, a feature not captured in the long-wavelength limit. Copyright © 2010 by ASME.

  4. Three-Dimensional Geometry of Collagenous Tissues by Second Harmonic Polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, Karen; Stoller, Patrick; Knoesen, André

    2017-06-01

    Collagen is a biological macromolecule capable of second harmonic generation, allowing label-free detection in tissues; in addition, molecular orientation can be determined from the polarization dependence of the second harmonic signal. Previously we reported that in-plane orientation of collagen fibrils could be determined by modulating the polarization angle of the laser during scanning. We have now extended this method so that out-of-plane orientation angles can be determined at the same time, allowing visualization of the 3-dimensional structure of collagenous tissues. This approach offers advantages compared with other methods for determining out-of-plane orientation. First, the orientation angles are directly calculated from the polarimetry data obtained in a single scan, while other reported methods require data from multiple scans, use of iterative optimization methods, application of fitting algorithms, or extensive post-optical processing. Second, our method does not require highly specialized instrumentation, and thus can be adapted for use in almost any nonlinear optical microscopy setup. It is suitable for both basic and clinical applications. We present three-dimensional images of structurally complex collagenous tissues that illustrate the power of such 3-dimensional analyses to reveal the architecture of biological structures.

  5. Tissue modulus calculated from beam theory is biased by bone size and geometry: implications for the use of three-point bending tests to determine bone tissue modulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lenthe, G Harry; Voide, Romain; Boyd, Steven K; Müller, Ralph

    2008-10-01

    Current practice to determine bone tissue modulus of murine cortical bone is to estimate it from three-point bending tests, using Euler-Bernoulli beam theory. However, murine femora are not perfect beams; hence, results can be inaccurate. Our aim was to assess the accuracy of beam theory, which we tested for two commonly used inbred strains of mice, C57BL/6 (B6) and C3H/He (C3H). We measured the three-dimensional structure of male and female B6 and C3H femora (N=20/group) by means of micro-computed tomography. For each femur five micro-finite element (micro-FE) models were created that simulated three-point bending tests with varying distances between the supports. Tissue modulus was calculated from beam theory using micro-FE results. The accuracy of beam theory was assessed by comparing the beam theory-derived moduli with the modulus as used in the micro-FE analyses. An additional set of fresh-frozen femora (10 B6 and 12 C3H) was biomechanically tested and subjected to the same micro-FE analyses. These combined experimental-computational analyses enabled an unbiased assessment of specimen-specific tissue modulus. We found that by using beam theory, tissue modulus was underestimated for all femora. Femoral geometry and size had strong effects on beam theory-derived tissue moduli. Owing to their relatively thin cortex, underestimation was markedly higher for B6 than for C3H. Underestimation was dependent on support width in a strain-specific manner. From our combined experimental-computational approach we calculated tissue moduli of 12.0+/-1.3 GPa and 13.4+/-2.1 GPa for B6 and C3H, respectively. We conclude that tissue moduli in murine femora are strongly underestimated when calculated from beam theory. Using image-based micro-FE analyses we could precisely quantify this underestimation. We showed that previously reported murine inbred strain-specific differences in tissue modulus are largely an effect of geometric differences, not accounted for by beam theory. We

  6. Combining displacement field and grip force information to determine mechanical properties of planar tissue with complicated geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Tina M; Hadi, Mohammad F; Claeson, Amy A; Nuckley, David J; Barocas, Victor H

    2014-11-01

    Performing planar biaxial testing and using nominal stress-strain curves for soft-tissue characterization is most suitable when (1) the test produces homogeneous strain fields, (2) fibers are aligned with the coordinate axes, and (3) strains are measured far from boundaries. Some tissue types [such as lamellae of the annulus fibrosus (AF)] may not allow for these conditions to be met due to their natural geometry and constitution. The objective of this work was to develop and test a method utilizing a surface displacement field, grip force-stretch data, and finite-element (FE) modeling to facilitate analysis of such complex samples. We evaluated the method by regressing a simple structural model to simulated and experimental data. Three different tissues with different characteristics were used: Superficial pectoralis major (SPM) (anisotropic, aligned with axes), facet capsular ligament (FCL) (anisotropic, aligned with axes, bone attached), and a lamella from the AF (anisotropic, aligned off-axis, bone attached). We found that the surface displacement field or the grip force-stretch data information alone is insufficient to determine a unique parameter set. Utilizing both data types provided tight confidence regions (CRs) of the regressed parameters and low parameter sensitivity to initial guess. This combined fitting approach provided robust characterization of tissues with varying fiber orientations and boundaries and is applicable to tissues that are poorly suited to standard biaxial testing. The structural model, a set of C++ finite-element routines, and a Matlab routine to do the fitting based on a set of force/displacement data is provided in the on-line supplementary material.

  7. Mechanical properties and cellular response of novel electrospun nanofibers for ligament tissue engineering: Effects of orientation and geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauly, Hannah M; Kelly, Daniel J; Popat, Ketul C; Trujillo, Nathan A; Dunne, Nicholas J; McCarthy, Helen O; Haut Donahue, Tammy L

    2016-08-01

    Electrospun nanofibers are a promising material for ligamentous tissue engineering, however weak mechanical properties of fibers to date have limited their clinical usage. The goal of this work was to modify electrospun nanofibers to create a robust structure that mimics the complex hierarchy of native tendons and ligaments. The scaffolds that were fabricated in this study consisted of either random or aligned nanofibers in flat sheets or rolled nanofiber bundles that mimic the size scale of fascicle units in primarily tensile load bearing soft musculoskeletal tissues. Altering nanofiber orientation and geometry significantly affected mechanical properties; most notably aligned nanofiber sheets had the greatest modulus; 125% higher than that of random nanofiber sheets; and 45% higher than aligned nanofiber bundles. Modifying aligned nanofiber sheets to form aligned nanofiber bundles also resulted in approximately 107% higher yield stresses and 140% higher yield strains. The mechanical properties of aligned nanofiber bundles were in the range of the mechanical properties of the native ACL: modulus=158±32MPa, yield stress=57±23MPa and yield strain=0.38±0.08. Adipose derived stem cells cultured on all surfaces remained viable and proliferated extensively over a 7 day culture period and cells elongated on nanofiber bundles. The results of the study suggest that aligned nanofiber bundles may be useful for ligament and tendon tissue engineering based on their mechanical properties and ability to support cell adhesion, proliferation, and elongation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Clinical patterns of soft-tissue sarcoma in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, R; Arnáiz, S; Montero, M; Tellado, M; País, E; Ríos, J; Vela, D

    2001-01-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas are rare mesenchymal neoplasms that constitute less than 10% of all pediatric malignancies. Half of these are rhabdomyosarcomas, the remaining 50% have a varied and heterogenous histologic and clinical patterns (fibrosarcoma, synovial cell sarcoma, extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma, angiosarcoma, liposarcoma, leiomyosarcoma, ...). The purpose of this work is to evaluate our clinical experience with soft tissue sarcomas in uncommon sites over the past 10 years in order to delimitate the prognostic factors in survival and modalities of treatment. Between 1989 and 1998, 10 patients were diagnosed with soft tissue sarcomas in uncommon sites and treated by us over a total number of 139 pediatric neoplasms (7.19%). Data on these patients were obtained from careful review of medical records. Variables investigated included histologic findings, tumor size, age at presentation, primary site, clinical group, radiologic test performed, surgical treatment, radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy, complications and survival rates. Charts were registered in database Access. Statistical analysis was performed by the SPSS 8.0 statistical program. The following histologic types of these 10 tumors were identified: 1 hemangiopericytoma in oral cavity, 2 extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma, 1 botryoid rhabdomyosarcoma of the bladder, 1 mediastinal fibrosarcoma, 1 retroperitoneal rhabdomyosarcoma, 1 paratesticular rhabdomyosarcoma, 1 cervical condrosarcoma, 1 alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma and 1 deltoid rhabdomyosarcoma. 50% were rhabdomyosarcomas and the remaining 50% have a variated sarcomatous histologic pattern with a difficult classification. The mean age at diagnosis was 7 years (4.6 years accounted for rhabdomyosarcoma alone). Surgery with complete excision were performed only in six cases. Adjuvant chemotherapy with IVA was followed by radiotherapy only in four patients. All the children classified in clinical groups II, III or IV needed 2nd. line regimens of chemotherapy

  9. Geometry-based control of instability patterns in cellular soft matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janbaz, Shahram; Weinans, Harrie; Zadpoor, Amir A.

    2016-01-01

    Recent research has shown the potential of rationally designed geometrical features for controlling the functionality of advanced materials. Of particular recent interest has been the use of geometry for controlling the buckling behaviour of soft materials under compression. However, the effects of

  10. Multiple patterns of diblock copolymer confined in irregular geometries with soft surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Sun, Min-Na; Zhang, Jin-Jun; Pan, Jun-Xing; Guo, Yu-Qi; Wang, Bao-Feng; Wu, Hai-Shun

    2015-12-01

    The different confinement shapes can induce the formation of various interesting and novel morphologies, which might inspire potential applications of materials. In this paper, we study the directed self-assembly of diblock copolymer confined in irregular geometries with a soft surface by using self-consistent field theory. Two types of confinement geometries are considered, namely, one is the concave pore with one groove and the other is the concave pore with two grooves. We obtain more novel and different structures which could not be produced in other two-dimensional (2D) confinements. Comparing these new structures with those obtained in regular square confinement, we find that the range of ordered lamellae is enlarged and the range of disordered structure is narrowed down under the concave pore confinement. We also compare the different structures obtained under the two types of confinement geometries, the results show that the effect of confinement would increase, which might induce the diblock copolymer to form novel structures. We construct the phase diagram as a function of the fraction of B block and the ratio of h/L of the groove. The simulation reveals that the wetting effect of brushes and the shape of confinement geometries play important roles in determining the morphologies of the system. Our results improve the applications in the directed self-assembly of diblock copolymer for fabricating the irregular structures. Project supported by the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20121404110004), the Research Foundation for Excellent Talents of Shanxi Provincial Department of Human Resources and Social Security, China, and the Scientific and Technological Innovation Programs of Higher Education Institutions in Shanxi Province, China.

  11. Beautiful geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Maor, Eli

    2014-01-01

    If you've ever thought that mathematics and art don't mix, this stunning visual history of geometry will change your mind. As much a work of art as a book about mathematics, Beautiful Geometry presents more than sixty exquisite color plates illustrating a wide range of geometric patterns and theorems, accompanied by brief accounts of the fascinating history and people behind each. With artwork by Swiss artist Eugen Jost and text by acclaimed math historian Eli Maor, this unique celebration of geometry covers numerous subjects, from straightedge-and-compass constructions to intriguing configur

  12. Impact of Thermal Plumes Generated by Occupant Simulators with Different Complexity of Body Geometry on Airflow Pattern in Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zukowska, Daria; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Popiolek, Zbigniew

    2008-01-01

    The impact of thermal plumes generated by human body simulators with different geometry on the airflow pattern in a full scale room with displacement ventilation (supply air temperature 21.6°C, total flow rate 80 L/s) was studied when two seated occupants were simulated first by two thermal...... manikins resembling accurately human body shape and then by two heated cylinders. The manikins and the cylinders had the same surface area of 1.63 m2 and the same heat generation of 73 W. CO2 supplied from the top of the heat sources was used for simulating bio-effluents. CO2 concentration was measured...

  13. Fingerprint pattern classification approach based on the coordinate geometry of singularities

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Msiza, IS

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The problem of Automatic Fingerprint Pattern Classification (AFPC) has been studied by many fingerprint biometric practitioners. It is an important concept because, in instances where a relatively large database is being queried for the purposes...

  14. The natural history of left ventricular geometry in the community: clinical correlates and prognostic significance of change in LV geometric pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieb, Wolfgang; Gona, Philimon; Larson, Martin G; Aragam, Jayashri; Zile, Michael R; Cheng, Susan; Benjamin, Emelia J; Vasan, Ramachandran S

    2014-09-01

    This study sought to evaluate pattern and clinical correlates of change in left ventricular (LV) geometry over a 4-year period in the community; it also assessed whether the pattern of change in LV geometry over 4 years predicts incident cardiovascular disease (CVD), including myocardial infarction, heart failure, and cardiovascular death, during an additional subsequent follow-up period. It is unclear how LV geometric patterns change over time and whether changes in LV geometry have prognostic significance. This study evaluated 4,492 observations (2,604 unique Framingham Heart Study participants attending consecutive examinations) to categorize LV geometry at baseline and after 4 years. Four groups were defined on the basis of the sex-specific distributions of left ventricular mass (LVM) and relative wall thickness (RWT) (normal: LVM and RWT geometry or concentric remodeling progressed infrequently (4% to 8%) to eccentric or concentric hypertrophy. Change from eccentric to concentric hypertrophy was uncommon (8%). Among participants with concentric hypertrophy, 19% developed eccentric hypertrophy within the 4-year period. Among participants with abnormal LV geometry at baseline, a significant proportion (29% to 53%) reverted to normal geometry within 4 years. Higher blood pressure, greater body mass index (BMI), advancing age, and male sex were key correlates of developing an abnormal geometry. Development of an abnormal LV geometric pattern over 4 years was associated with increased CVD risk (140 events) during a subsequent median follow-up of 12 years (adjusted-hazards ratio: 1.59; 95% confidence interval: 1.04 to 2.43). The longitudinal observations in the community suggest that dynamic changes in LV geometric pattern over time are common. Higher blood pressure and greater BMI are modifiable factors associated with the development of abnormal LV geometry, and such progression portends an adverse prognosis. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology

  15. Correlations between anterior wall motion velocity of ascending aorta measured by quantitative tissue velocity image and left ventricular geometry as well as left heart function in hypertension patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chunyue; Liu, Yan; Li, Zuojia; Lin, Jianying; Chen, Ru; Zhang, Tieshan; Hu, Ying; Cheng, Guanxun

    2018-04-01

    This study aimed to analyze the correlations between anterior wall motion velocity of ascending aorta measured by quantitative tissue velocity image (QTVI) technique and left ventricular geometry as well as left heart function to evaluate its value of clinical application. One hundred ten hypertension patients and 35 healthy controls were included, divided into left ventricular concentric remodeling group and left ventricular hypertrophy group. The QTVI technique was used to obtain the velocity curve of anterior wall of ascending aorta, the peak systolic velocity (Vs), peak velocity of early diastolic motion (Ve) and peak velocity of late diastolic motion (Va). The single-plane Simpson method was utilized to measure the left ventricular ejection fraction (EF). The QTVI method was used to obtain the index of left ventricular diastolic function (Em/Am). Compared to control group, both Vs and Ve values significantly reduced in hypertension group (Pvelocity of ascending aorta could be indicator for the geometric patterns and function of left ventricle, which may provide a simple and comprehensive method for clinical assessment of hypertensive heart disease.

  16. Patterning of Cells on Bioresist for Tissue Engineering Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Umar, Yusif; Thiyagarajan, Muthiah; Halberstadt, Craig; Gonsalves, Kenneth E

    2005-01-01

    .... The field of tissue engineering hinges on developing degradable polymeric scaffolds that promote cell proliferation and expression of desired physiological behaviors through careful control of the polymer surface...

  17. Pattern of left ventricular geometry in hypertension: a study of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hypertension is a leading cause of cardioxasular morbidity and mortality in Nigeria. The main aim of this study was to deterine the prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy and left ventricular geometric patterns among hypertensives in Kano, Nigeria. Methods: The study was cross-sectional in design, and ...

  18. Pattern matching and adaptive image segmentation applied to plant reproduction by tissue culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez Rueda, Martin G.; Hahn, Federico

    1999-03-01

    This paper shows the results obtained in a system vision applied to plant reproduction by tissue culture using adaptive image segmentation and pattern matching algorithms, this analysis improves the number of tissue obtained and minimize errors, the image features of tissue are considered join to statistical analysis to determine the best match and results. Tests make on potato plants are used to present comparative results with original images processed with adaptive segmentation algorithm and non adaptive algorithms and pattern matching.

  19. MR imaging tissue characterization by means of pattern recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranade, S.S.; Lindon, J.C.; Livingston, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of trace metal profiles as factors influencing tissue relaxation times, with the aim of better tissue discrimination and predictability of the neoplastic state. Proton spin-lattice relaxation times and trace metal contents of iron, copper, zinc, and magnesium were estimated from surgically resected, histopathologically diagnosed neoplasms from 10 body sites. Computer-based analysis with dimension reduction, mapping techniques, and supervised learning methods were used

  20. Spinning geometry = Twisted geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freidel, Laurent; Ziprick, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that the SU(2)-gauge invariant phase space of loop gravity can be represented in terms of twisted geometries. These are piecewise-linear-flat geometries obtained by gluing together polyhedra, but the resulting geometries are not continuous across the faces. Here we show that this phase space can also be represented by continuous, piecewise-flat three-geometries called spinning geometries. These are composed of metric-flat three-cells glued together consistently. The geometry of each cell and the manner in which they are glued is compatible with the choice of fluxes and holonomies. We first remark that the fluxes provide each edge with an angular momentum. By studying the piecewise-flat geometries which minimize edge lengths, we show that these angular momenta can be literally interpreted as the spin of the edges: the geometries of all edges are necessarily helices. We also show that the compatibility of the gluing maps with the holonomy data results in the same conclusion. This shows that a spinning geometry represents a way to glue together the three-cells of a twisted geometry to form a continuous geometry which represents a point in the loop gravity phase space. (paper)

  1. KP solitons and the Grassmannians combinatorics and geometry of two-dimensional wave patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Kodama, Yuji

    2017-01-01

    This is the first book to treat combinatorial and geometric aspects of two-dimensional solitons. Based on recent research by the author and his collaborators, the book presents new developments focused on an interplay between the theory of solitons and the combinatorics of finite-dimensional Grassmannians, in particular, the totally nonnegative (TNN) parts of the Grassmannians. The book begins with a brief introduction to the theory of the Kadomtsev–Petviashvili (KP) equation and its soliton solutions, called the KP solitons. Owing to the nonlinearity in the KP equation, the KP solitons form very complex but interesting web-like patterns in two dimensions. These patterns are referred to as soliton graphs. The main aim of the book is to investigate the detailed structure of the soliton graphs and to classify these graphs. It turns out that the problem has an intimate connection with the study of the TNN part of the Grassmannians. The book also provides an elementary introduction to the recent development of ...

  2. Effects of tissue inhomogeneities on dose patterns in cylinders irradiated by negative pion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamm, R.N.; Wright, H.A.; Turner, J.E.

    1975-10-01

    Effects of the presence of inhomogeneities in tissue irradiated by negative pion beams are investigated. Soft-tissue targets are considered with embedded regions of bone and cavities of air. The absorbed dose is calculated as a function of position in the targets for parallel and converging beams and for two parallel beams that enter the target from opposite sides. Isodose contours are calculated and displayed in each case. While these studies show expected trends, they indicate that specific calculations are needed for other beam parameters and target geometries. The contributions of neutrons to the dose contours can be seen from several calculations made both with and without neutrons

  3. Proteomic analysis of lysine acetylation sites in rat tissues reveals organ specificity and subcellular patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, Alicia; Hansen, Kasper Lage; Weinert, Brian Tate

    2012-01-01

    that the subcellular acetylation distribution is tissue-type dependent and that acetylation targets tissue-specific pathways involved in fundamental physiological processes. We compare lysine acetylation patterns for rat as well as human skeletal muscle biopsies and demonstrate its general involvement in muscle...

  4. Computational model-informed design and bioprinting of cell-patterned constructs for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlier, Aurélie; Skvortsov, Gözde Akdeniz; Hafezi, Forough; Ferraris, Eleonora; Patterson, Jennifer; Koç, Bahattin; Van Oosterwyck, Hans

    2016-05-17

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting is a rapidly advancing tissue engineering technology that holds great promise for the regeneration of several tissues, including bone. However, to generate a successful 3D bone tissue engineering construct, additional complexities should be taken into account such as nutrient and oxygen delivery, which is often insufficient after implantation in large bone defects. We propose that a well-designed tissue engineering construct, that is, an implant with a specific spatial pattern of cells in a matrix, will improve the healing outcome. By using a computational model of bone regeneration we show that particular cell patterns in tissue engineering constructs are able to enhance bone regeneration compared to uniform ones. We successfully bioprinted one of the most promising cell-gradient patterns by using cell-laden hydrogels with varying cell densities and observed a high cell viability for three days following the bioprinting process. In summary, we present a novel strategy for the biofabrication of bone tissue engineering constructs by designing cell-gradient patterns based on a computational model of bone regeneration, and successfully bioprinting the chosen design. This integrated approach may increase the success rate of implanted tissue engineering constructs for critical size bone defects and also can find a wider application in the biofabrication of other types of tissue engineering constructs.

  5. High-frequency background modulation fringe patterns based on a fringe-wavelength geometry-constraint model for 3D surface-shape measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinran; Kofman, Jonathan

    2017-07-10

    A new fringe projection method for surface-shape measurement was developed using four high-frequency phase-shifted background modulation fringe patterns. The pattern frequency is determined using a new fringe-wavelength geometry-constraint model that allows only two corresponding-point candidates in the measurement volume. The correct corresponding point is selected with high reliability using a binary pattern computed from intensity background encoded in the fringe patterns. Equations of geometry-constraint parameters permit parameter calculation prior to measurement, thus reducing measurement computational cost. Experiments demonstrated the ability of the method to perform 3D shape measurement for a surface with geometric discontinuity, and for spatially isolated objects.

  6. Histopathological approach to patterns of interstitial pneumonia in patient with connective tissue disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Andrew G; Colby, Thomas V; Wells, Athol U

    2002-03-01

    It is well established that some patients with connective tissue disorders will suffer from pulmonary disease at some stage in their disease progression. This article concentrates on the interstitial pneumonias, seen in association with most types of connective tissue disorder, particularly in the ligh of non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) being recognised as a distinct histological pattern. Most published articles on this subject precede recognition of NSIP and, as such, the relative incidence of patterns of interstitial pneumonia, as defined by the International Consensus Classification Committee for Interstitial Lung Disease (ICCILD), as well as the clinical and prognostic significance of these patterns is undergoing further scrutiny. In this review, the recognised histological patterns, namely usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP), non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), organising pneumonia (OP), reactive pulmonary lymphoid hyperplasia, desquamative interstitial pneumonia (DIP) and respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease (RBILD) are reviewed systematically in relation to the various subgroups of connective tissue disorders. As yet, there are few published studies, but current evidence suggests that many cases previously classified as fibrosing alveolitis are likely to show a pattern of NSIP rather than UIP, particularly in relation to systemic sclerosis. The histological pattern of usual interstitial pneumonia, the most frequently seen pattern in biopsies from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis/cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis, appears to be comparatively rare. Furthermore, any biopsy showing a combination of histological patterns, a pattern of non-specific interstitial pneumonia or a pattern of lymphoid interstitial pneumonia/follicular bronchiolitis should be thoroughly investigated for a background connective tissue disorder, if previously unsuspected. Finally, the recently published

  7. Geometry and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Walter J

    2006-01-01

    Meyer''s Geometry and Its Applications, Second Edition, combines traditional geometry with current ideas to present a modern approach that is grounded in real-world applications. It balances the deductive approach with discovery learning, and introduces axiomatic, Euclidean geometry, non-Euclidean geometry, and transformational geometry. The text integrates applications and examples throughout and includes historical notes in many chapters. The Second Edition of Geometry and Its Applications is a significant text for any college or university that focuses on geometry''s usefulness in other disciplines. It is especially appropriate for engineering and science majors, as well as future mathematics teachers.* Realistic applications integrated throughout the text, including (but not limited to): - Symmetries of artistic patterns- Physics- Robotics- Computer vision- Computer graphics- Stability of architectural structures- Molecular biology- Medicine- Pattern recognition* Historical notes included in many chapters...

  8. Liver-cell patterning lab chip: mimicking the morphology of liver lobule tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chen-Ta; Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Chen, Rong-Jhe; Chin, Chung-Kuang; Gong, Song-En; Chang, Hwan-You; Peng, Hwei-Ling; Hsu, Long; Yew, Tri-Rung; Chang, Shau-Feng; Liu, Cheng-Hsien

    2013-09-21

    A lobule-mimetic cell-patterning technique for on-chip reconstruction of centimetre-scale liver tissue of heterogeneous hepatic and endothelial cells via an enhanced field-induced dielectrophoresis (DEP) trap is demonstrated and reported. By mimicking the basic morphology of liver tissue, the classic hepatic lobule, the lobule-mimetic-stellate-electrodes array was designed for cell patterning. Through DEP manipulation, well-defined and enhanced spatial electric field gradients were created for in-parallel manipulation of massive individual cells. With this liver-cell patterning labchip design, the original randomly distributed hepatic and endothelial cells inside the microfluidic chamber can be manipulated separately and aligned into the desired pattern that mimicks the morphology of liver lobule tissue. Experimental results showed that both hepatic and endothelial cells were orderly guided, snared, and aligned along the field-induced orientation to form the lobule-mimetic pattern. About 95% cell viability of hepatic and endothelial cells was also observed after cell-patterning demonstration via a fluorescent assay technique. The liver function of CYP450-1A1 enzyme activity showed an 80% enhancement for our engineered liver tissue (HepG2+HUVECs) compared to the non-patterned pure HepG2 for two-day culturing.

  9. Liver but not adipose tissue is responsive to the pattern of enteral feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Yolanda F; Lundblad, Tammy M; Ford, Eric A; House, Lawrence M; McGuinness, Owen P

    2014-02-01

    Nutritional support is an important aspect of medical care, providing calories to patients with compromised nutrient intake. Metabolism has a diurnal pattern, responding to the light cycle and food intake, which in turn can drive changes in liver and adipose tissue metabolism. In this study, we assessed the response of liver and white adipose tissue (WAT) to different feeding patterns under nutritional support (total enteral nutrition or TEN). Mice received continuous isocaloric TEN for 10 days or equal calories of chow once a day (Ch). TEN was given either at a constant (CN, same infusion rate during 24 h) or variable rate (VN, 80% of calories fed at night, 20% at day). Hepatic lipogenesis and carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP) expression increased in parallel with the diurnal feeding pattern. Relative to Ch, both patterns of enteral feeding increased adiposity. This increase was not associated with enhanced lipogenic gene expression in WAT; moreover, lipogenesis was unaffected by the feeding pattern. Surprisingly, leptin and adiponectin expression increased. Moreover, nutritional support markedly increased hepatic and adipose FGF21 expression in CN and VN, despite being considered a fasting hormone. In summary, liver but not WAT, respond to the pattern of feeding. While hepatic lipid metabolism adapts to the pattern of nutrient availability, WAT does not. Moreover, sustained delivery of nutrients in an isocaloric diet can cause adiposity without the proinflammatory state observed in hypercaloric feeding. Thus, the liver but not adipose tissue is responsive to the pattern of feeding behavior.

  10. Stromal Cells in Dense Collagen Promote Cardiomyocyte and Microvascular Patterning in Engineered Human Heart Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Meredith A; Tran, Dominic; Coulombe, Kareen L K; Razumova, Maria; Regnier, Michael; Murry, Charles E; Zheng, Ying

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering is a strategy to replace damaged contractile tissue and model cardiac diseases to discover therapies. Current cardiac and vascular engineering approaches independently create aligned contractile tissue or perfusable vasculature, but a combined vascularized cardiac tissue remains to be achieved. Here, we sought to incorporate a patterned microvasculature into engineered heart tissue, which balances the competing demands from cardiomyocytes to contract the matrix versus the vascular lumens that need structural support. Low-density collagen hydrogels (1.25 mg/mL) permit human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) to form a dense contractile tissue but cannot support a patterned microvasculature. Conversely, high collagen concentrations (density ≥6 mg/mL) support a patterned microvasculature, but the hESC-CMs lack cell-cell contact, limiting their electrical communication, structural maturation, and tissue-level contractile function. When cocultured with matrix remodeling stromal cells, however, hESC-CMs structurally mature and form anisotropic constructs in high-density collagen. Remodeling requires the stromal cells to be in proximity with hESC-CMs. In addition, cocultured cardiac constructs in dense collagen generate measurable active contractions (on the order of 0.1 mN/mm(2)) and can be paced up to 2 Hz. Patterned microvascular networks in these high-density cocultured cardiac constructs remain patent through 2 weeks of culture, and hESC-CMs show electrical synchronization. The ability to maintain microstructural control within engineered heart tissue enables generation of more complex features, such as cellular alignment and a vasculature. Successful incorporation of these features paves the way for the use of large scale engineered tissues for myocardial regeneration and cardiac disease modeling.

  11. Patterned Anchorage to the Apical Extracellular Matrix Defines Tissue Shape in the Developing Appendages of Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Robert P.; Matamoro-Vidal, Alexis; Ribeiro, Paulo S.; Tapon, Nic; Houle, David; Salazar-Ciudad, Isaac; Thompson, Barry J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary How tissues acquire their characteristic shape is a fundamental unresolved question in biology. While genes have been characterized that control local mechanical forces to elongate epithelial tissues, genes controlling global forces in epithelia have yet to be identified. Here, we describe a genetic pathway that shapes appendages in Drosophila by defining the pattern of global tensile forces in the tissue. In the appendages, shape arises from tension generated by cell constriction and localized anchorage of the epithelium to the cuticle via the apical extracellular-matrix protein Dumpy (Dp). Altering Dp expression in the developing wing results in predictable changes in wing shape that can be simulated by a computational model that incorporates only tissue contraction and localized anchorage. Three other wing shape genes, narrow, tapered, and lanceolate, encode components of a pathway that modulates Dp distribution in the wing to refine the global force pattern and thus wing shape. PMID:26190146

  12. Adipose tissue fatty acid patterns and changes in anthropometry: a cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Catherine Dahm

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Diets rich in n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA, but low in n-6 LC-PUFA and 18:1 trans-fatty acids (TFA, may lower the risk of overweight and obesity. These fatty acids have often been investigated individually. We explored associations between global patterns in adipose tissue fatty acids and changes in anthropometry. METHODS: 34 fatty acid species from adipose tissue biopsies were determined in a random sample of 1100 men and women from a Danish cohort study. We used sex-specific principal component analysis and multiple linear regression to investigate the associations of adipose tissue fatty acid patterns with changes in weight, waist circumference (WC, and WC controlled for changes in body mass index (WC(BMI, adjusting for confounders. RESULTS: 7 principal components were extracted for each sex, explaining 77.6% and 78.3% of fatty acid variation in men and women, respectively. Fatty acid patterns with high levels of TFA tended to be positively associated with changes in weight and WC for both sexes. Patterns with high levels of n-6 LC-PUFA tended to be negatively associated with changes in weight and WC in men, and positively associated in women. Associations with patterns with high levels of n-3 LC-PUFA were dependent on the context of the rest of the fatty acid pattern. CONCLUSIONS: Adipose tissue fatty acid patterns with high levels of TFA may be linked to weight gain, but patterns with high n-3 LC-PUFA did not appear to be linked to weight loss. Associations depended on characteristics of the rest of the pattern.

  13. Preoperative Factors Associated with Infiltrative Histologic Growth Patterns in Extremity Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Woong Park

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Soft tissue sarcoma (STS with an infiltrative histologic growth pattern, when compared to STS with an expansile pattern, may pose difficulties in local control. Preoperative assessment of the presence of infiltrative histologic growth pattern would be helpful in deciding treatment strategies. A review of 144 patients who underwent surgery for extremity STS was performed. Microscopically, the histologic growth pattern was defined as infiltrative if the penetration of the tumor cells into the surrounding tissue was observed. Possible clinicopathologic factors that might be associated with infiltrative histologic growth pattern were investigated with regard to patient demographics, tumor characteristics, and MRI findings. Of the 144 tumors, 71 (49% showed infiltrative histologic growth pattern. On multivariate analysis, histological subtypes other than liposarcoma (OR = 4.57, p=0.02 and infiltrative border on MRI (OR = 2.48, p=0.01 were independent factors associated with infiltrative histologic growth pattern. Predictive index based on these two factors showed a significant improved accuracy (ROC-AUC = 0.647 for predicting infiltrative histologic growth pattern compared to either factor alone. Our data suggests that liposarcoma histology and tumor border on MRI can predict histologic growth pattern in extremity STS.

  14. Systematic analysis of gene expression patterns associated with postmortem interval in human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yizhang; Wang, Likun; Yin, Yuxin; Yang, Ence

    2017-07-14

    Postmortem mRNA degradation is considered to be the major concern in gene expression research utilizing human postmortem tissues. A key factor in this process is the postmortem interval (PMI), which is defined as the interval between death and sample collection. However, global patterns of postmortem mRNA degradation at individual gene levels across diverse human tissues remain largely unknown. In this study, we performed a systematic analysis of alteration of gene expression associated with PMI in human tissues. From the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) database, we evaluated gene expression levels of 2,016 high-quality postmortem samples from 316 donors of European descent, with PMI ranging from 1 to 27 hours. We found that PMI-related mRNA degradation is tissue-specific, gene-specific, and even genotype-dependent, thus drawing a more comprehensive picture of PMI-associated gene expression across diverse human tissues. Additionally, we also identified 266 differentially variable (DV) genes, such as DEFB4B and IFNG, whose expression is significantly dispersed between short PMI (S-PMI) and long PMI (L-PMI) groups. In summary, our analyses provide a comprehensive profile of PMI-associated gene expression, which will help interpret gene expression patterns in the evaluation of postmortem tissues.

  15. A study of tooth brushing pattern and its effects on dental tissues in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of non carious cervical lesion was 3% and these lesions were found in males only. Conclusion: The pattern of tooth brushing was correct in 51.7% of the respondents as reported. However the effect on dental tissues though present is not exaggerated when compared to other studies done in other parts of ...

  16. Automated classification of immunostaining patterns in breast tissue from the human protein Atlas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issac Niwas Swamidoss

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Human Protein Atlas (HPA is an effort to map the location of all human proteins (http://www.proteinatlas.org/. It contains a large number of histological images of sections from human tissue. Tissue micro arrays (TMA are imaged by a slide scanning microscope, and each image represents a thin slice of a tissue core with a dark brown antibody specific stain and a blue counter stain. When generating antibodies for protein profiling of the human proteome, an important step in the quality control is to compare staining patterns of different antibodies directed towards the same protein. This comparison is an ultimate control that the antibody recognizes the right protein. In this paper, we propose and evaluate different approaches for classifying sub-cellular antibody staining patterns in breast tissue samples. Materials and Methods: The proposed methods include the computation of various features including gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM features, complex wavelet co-occurrence matrix (CWCM features, and weighted neighbor distance using compound hierarchy of algorithms representing morphology (WND-CHARM-inspired features. The extracted features are used into two different multivariate classifiers (support vector machine (SVM and linear discriminant analysis (LDA classifier. Before extracting features, we use color deconvolution to separate different tissue components, such as the brownly stained positive regions and the blue cellular regions, in the immuno-stained TMA images of breast tissue. Results: We present classification results based on combinations of feature measurements. The proposed complex wavelet features and the WND-CHARM features have accuracy similar to that of a human expert. Conclusions: Both human experts and the proposed automated methods have difficulties discriminating between nuclear and cytoplasmic staining patterns. This is to a large extent due to mixed staining of nucleus and cytoplasm. Methods for

  17. Comparisons of Soft Tissue Thickness Measurements in Adult Patients With Various Vertical Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neslihan Seyhan Cezairli

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purposes of this study were to evaluate to study soft tissue facial profile among the different vertical patterns using the Holdaway analysis and the soft tissue thickness measurements. Materials and Methods: The study sample consisted of 90 patients divided into 3 groups: low angle group (30 patients; mean age, 20.38±3.76 years, normal angle group (30 patients; mean age, 19.36±2.83 years and high angle group (30 patients; mean age, 19.44±2.14 years. The study sample, comprised a total of 90 patients (54 women and 36 men divided into low-angle, normal-angle and high angle groups based on vertical growth pattern using the SN/GoGn angle (high-angle group >37°; low-angle group <27°; and control group or normal angle group 27-37°. Facial soft-tissue thickness and Holdaway measurements were analyzed on each radiograph with Image J programme. One-way analysis of variance and post-hoc test (Tukey were used to compare Holdaway measurements and soft tissue thicknesses among the three groups. Results: Significant differences among vertical patterns were observed for the ‘gnathion’, ‘menton’, ‘stomion’ and ‘inferior sulcus to H line’ when both genders were combined. These measurements were thinner in the high-angle group. Significant differences among vertical patterns were observed for ‘gnathion’ and ‘lower lip to H line’ in women; for ‘stomion’ and ‘nose prominence’ in men when examined separately. Conclusion: Facial soft tissue measurements except some for in high angle group were thinner than in low angle group. All soft tissue measurements were greater except for gnathion in low angle group in men than in women.

  18. Tissue Restricted Splice Junctions Originate Not Only from Tissue-Specific Gene Loci, but Gene Loci with a Broad Pattern of Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S Hestand

    Full Text Available Cellular mechanisms that achieve protein diversity in eukaryotes are multifaceted, including transcriptional components such as RNA splicing. Through alternative splicing, a single protein-coding gene can generate multiple mRNA transcripts and protein isoforms, some of which are tissue-specific. We have conducted qualitative and quantitative analyses of the Bodymap 2.0 messenger RNA-sequencing data from 16 human tissue samples and identified 209,363 splice junctions. Of these, 22,231 (10.6% were not previously annotated and 21,650 (10.3% were expressed in a tissue-restricted pattern. Tissue-restricted alternative splicing was found to be widespread, with approximately 65% of expressed multi-exon genes containing at least one tissue-specific splice junction. Interestingly, we observed many tissue-specific splice junctions not only in genes expressed in one or a few tissues, but also from gene loci with a broad pattern of expression.

  19. CHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF MUELLER MATRIX PATTERNS FOR POLARIZATION SCATTERING MODEL OF BIOLOGICAL TISSUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E DU

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We developed a model to describe polarized photon scattering in biological tissues. In this model, tissues are simplified to a mixture of scatterers and surrounding medium. There are two types of scatterers in the model: solid spheres and infinitely long solid cylinders. Variables related to the scatterers include: the densities and sizes of the spheres and cylinders, the orientation and angular distribution of cylinders. Variables related to the surrounding medium include: the refractive index, absorption coefficient and birefringence. In this paper, as a development we introduce an optical activity effect to the model. By comparing experiments and Monte Carlo simulations, we analyze the backscattering Mueller matrix patterns of several tissue-like media, and summarize the different effects coming from anisotropic scattering and optical properties. In addition, we propose a possible method to extract the optical activity values for tissues. Both the experimental and simulated results show that, by analyzing the Mueller matrix patterns, the microstructure and optical properties of the medium can be obtained. The characteristic features of Mueller matrix patterns are potentially powerful tools for studying the contrast mechanisms of polarization imaging for medical diagnosis.

  20. Interdependencies of aortic arch secondary flow patterns, geometry, and age analysed by 4-dimensional phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging at 3 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frydrychowicz, Alex [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Clinic for Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Luebeck (Germany); Berger, Alexander; Russe, Maximilian F.; Bock, Jelena [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics, Freiburg (Germany); Munoz del Rio, Alejandro [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Departments of Radiology and Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); Harloff, Andreas [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, Freiburg (Germany); Markl, Michael [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics, Freiburg (Germany); Northwestern University, Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2012-05-15

    It was the aim to analyse the impact of age, aortic arch geometry, and size on secondary flow patterns such as helix and vortex flow derived from flow-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (4D PC-MRI). 62 subjects (age range = 20-80 years) without circumscribed pathologies of the thoracic aorta (ascending aortic (AAo) diameter: 3.2 {+-} 0.6 cm [range 2.2-5.1]) were examined by 4D PC-MRI after IRB-approval and written informed consent. Blood flow visualisation based on streamlines and time-resolved 3D particle traces was performed. Aortic diameter, shape (gothic, crook-shaped, cubic), angle, and age were correlated with existence and extent of secondary flow patterns (helicity, vortices); statistical modelling was performed. Helical flow was the typical pattern in standard crook-shaped aortic arches. With altered shapes and increasing age, helicity was less common. AAo diameter and age had the highest correlation (r = 0.69 and 0.68, respectively) with number of detected vortices. None of the other arch geometric or demographic variables (for all, P {>=} 0.177) improved statistical modelling. Substantially different secondary flow patterns can be observed in the normal thoracic aorta. Age and the AAo diameter were the parameters correlating best with presence and amount of vortices. Findings underline the importance of age- and geometry-matched control groups for haemodynamic studies. (orig.)

  1. Interdependencies of aortic arch secondary flow patterns, geometry, and age analysed by 4-dimensional phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging at 3 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frydrychowicz, Alex; Berger, Alexander; Russe, Maximilian F.; Bock, Jelena; Munoz del Rio, Alejandro; Harloff, Andreas; Markl, Michael

    2012-01-01

    It was the aim to analyse the impact of age, aortic arch geometry, and size on secondary flow patterns such as helix and vortex flow derived from flow-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (4D PC-MRI). 62 subjects (age range = 20-80 years) without circumscribed pathologies of the thoracic aorta (ascending aortic (AAo) diameter: 3.2 ± 0.6 cm [range 2.2-5.1]) were examined by 4D PC-MRI after IRB-approval and written informed consent. Blood flow visualisation based on streamlines and time-resolved 3D particle traces was performed. Aortic diameter, shape (gothic, crook-shaped, cubic), angle, and age were correlated with existence and extent of secondary flow patterns (helicity, vortices); statistical modelling was performed. Helical flow was the typical pattern in standard crook-shaped aortic arches. With altered shapes and increasing age, helicity was less common. AAo diameter and age had the highest correlation (r = 0.69 and 0.68, respectively) with number of detected vortices. None of the other arch geometric or demographic variables (for all, P ≥ 0.177) improved statistical modelling. Substantially different secondary flow patterns can be observed in the normal thoracic aorta. Age and the AAo diameter were the parameters correlating best with presence and amount of vortices. Findings underline the importance of age- and geometry-matched control groups for haemodynamic studies. (orig.)

  2. [Fuzzing pattern recognition study on Raman spectrum of tumor peripheral tissue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lei; Zhao, Yuan-li; Ge, Xiang-hong; Zhang, Xiao-dong; Hao, Zhi-fang; Lü, Jing

    2006-06-01

    On the basis of some theories about fuzzing pattern recognition, the present article studied the data preprocessing of the Raman spectrum of tumor peripheral tissue, and feature extraction and selection. According to these features the authors improved the leaning towards the bigger membership function of trapezoidal distribution. The authors built the membership function of Raman spectrum of tumor peripheral tissue which belongs to malignant tumor on the basis of 40 specimens, and designed the classifier. The test of other 40 specimens showed that the discrimination of malignant tumor is 82.4%, while that of beginning tumor is 73.9%.

  3. Tissue-specific and ubiquitous expression patterns from alternative promoters of human genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Jacox

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptome diversity provides the key to cellular identity. One important contribution to expression diversity is the use of alternative promoters, which creates mRNA isoforms by expanding the choice of transcription initiation sites of a gene. The proximity of the basal promoter to the transcription initiation site enables prediction of a promoter's location based on the gene annotations. We show that annotation of alternative promoters regulating expression of transcripts with distinct first exons enables a novel methodology to quantify expression levels and tissue specificity of mRNA isoforms.The use of distinct alternative first exons in 3,296 genes was examined using exon-microarray data from 11 human tissues. Comparing two transcripts from each gene we found that the activity of alternative promoters (i.e., P1 and P2 was not correlated through tissue specificity or level of expression. Furthermore neither P1 nor P2 conferred any bias for tissue-specific or ubiquitous expression. Genes associated with specific diseases produced transcripts whose limited expression patterns were consistent with the tissue affected in disease. Notably, genes that were historically designated as tissue-specific or housekeeping had alternative isoforms that showed differential expression. Furthermore, only a small number of alternative promoters showed expression exclusive to a single tissue indicating that "tissue preference" provides a better description of promoter activity than tissue specificity. When compared to gene expression data in public databases, as few as 22% of the genes had detailed information for more than one isoform, whereas the remainder collapsed the expression patterns from individual transcripts into one profile.We describe a computational pipeline that uses microarray data to assess the level of expression and breadth of tissue profiles for transcripts with distinct first exons regulated by alternative promoters. We conclude that

  4. Age-Dependent Changes in Geometry, Tissue Composition and Mechanical Properties of Fetal to Adult Cryopreserved Human Heart Valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geemen, Daphne; Soares, Ana L F; Oomen, Pim J A; Driessen-Mol, Anita; Janssen-van den Broek, Marloes W J T; van den Bogaerdt, Antoon J; Bogers, Ad J J C; Goumans, Marie-José T H; Baaijens, Frank P T; Bouten, Carlijn V C

    2016-01-01

    There is limited information about age-specific structural and functional properties of human heart valves, while this information is key to the development and evaluation of living valve replacements for pediatric and adolescent patients. Here, we present an extended data set of structure-function properties of cryopreserved human pulmonary and aortic heart valves, providing age-specific information for living valve replacements. Tissue composition, morphology, mechanical properties, and maturation of leaflets from 16 pairs of structurally unaffected aortic and pulmonary valves of human donors (fetal-53 years) were analyzed. Interestingly, no major differences were observed between the aortic and pulmonary valves. Valve annulus and leaflet dimensions increase throughout life. The typical three-layered leaflet structure is present before birth, but becomes more distinct with age. After birth, cell numbers decrease rapidly, while remaining cells obtain a quiescent phenotype and reside in the ventricularis and spongiosa. With age and maturation-but more pronounced in aortic valves-the matrix shows an increasing amount of collagen and collagen cross-links and a reduction in glycosaminoglycans. These matrix changes correlate with increasing leaflet stiffness with age. Our data provide a new and comprehensive overview of the changes of structure-function properties of fetal to adult human semilunar heart valves that can be used to evaluate and optimize future therapies, such as tissue engineering of heart valves. Changing hemodynamic conditions with age can explain initial changes in matrix composition and consequent mechanical properties, but cannot explain the ongoing changes in valve dimensions and matrix composition at older age.

  5. Age-Dependent Changes in Geometry, Tissue Composition and Mechanical Properties of Fetal to Adult Cryopreserved Human Heart Valves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daphne van Geemen

    Full Text Available There is limited information about age-specific structural and functional properties of human heart valves, while this information is key to the development and evaluation of living valve replacements for pediatric and adolescent patients. Here, we present an extended data set of structure-function properties of cryopreserved human pulmonary and aortic heart valves, providing age-specific information for living valve replacements. Tissue composition, morphology, mechanical properties, and maturation of leaflets from 16 pairs of structurally unaffected aortic and pulmonary valves of human donors (fetal-53 years were analyzed. Interestingly, no major differences were observed between the aortic and pulmonary valves. Valve annulus and leaflet dimensions increase throughout life. The typical three-layered leaflet structure is present before birth, but becomes more distinct with age. After birth, cell numbers decrease rapidly, while remaining cells obtain a quiescent phenotype and reside in the ventricularis and spongiosa. With age and maturation-but more pronounced in aortic valves-the matrix shows an increasing amount of collagen and collagen cross-links and a reduction in glycosaminoglycans. These matrix changes correlate with increasing leaflet stiffness with age. Our data provide a new and comprehensive overview of the changes of structure-function properties of fetal to adult human semilunar heart valves that can be used to evaluate and optimize future therapies, such as tissue engineering of heart valves. Changing hemodynamic conditions with age can explain initial changes in matrix composition and consequent mechanical properties, but cannot explain the ongoing changes in valve dimensions and matrix composition at older age.

  6. Age-Dependent Changes in Geometry, Tissue Composition and Mechanical Properties of Fetal to Adult Cryopreserved Human Heart Valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geemen, Daphne; Soares, Ana L. F.; Oomen, Pim J. A.; Driessen-Mol, Anita; Janssen-van den Broek, Marloes W. J. T.; van den Bogaerdt, Antoon J.; Bogers, Ad J. J. C.; Goumans, Marie-José T. H.; Baaijens, Frank P. T.; Bouten, Carlijn V. C.

    2016-01-01

    There is limited information about age-specific structural and functional properties of human heart valves, while this information is key to the development and evaluation of living valve replacements for pediatric and adolescent patients. Here, we present an extended data set of structure-function properties of cryopreserved human pulmonary and aortic heart valves, providing age-specific information for living valve replacements. Tissue composition, morphology, mechanical properties, and maturation of leaflets from 16 pairs of structurally unaffected aortic and pulmonary valves of human donors (fetal-53 years) were analyzed. Interestingly, no major differences were observed between the aortic and pulmonary valves. Valve annulus and leaflet dimensions increase throughout life. The typical three-layered leaflet structure is present before birth, but becomes more distinct with age. After birth, cell numbers decrease rapidly, while remaining cells obtain a quiescent phenotype and reside in the ventricularis and spongiosa. With age and maturation–but more pronounced in aortic valves–the matrix shows an increasing amount of collagen and collagen cross-links and a reduction in glycosaminoglycans. These matrix changes correlate with increasing leaflet stiffness with age. Our data provide a new and comprehensive overview of the changes of structure-function properties of fetal to adult human semilunar heart valves that can be used to evaluate and optimize future therapies, such as tissue engineering of heart valves. Changing hemodynamic conditions with age can explain initial changes in matrix composition and consequent mechanical properties, but cannot explain the ongoing changes in valve dimensions and matrix composition at older age. PMID:26867221

  7. Wavelet-based feature extraction applied to small-angle x-ray scattering patterns from breast tissue: a tool for differentiating between tissue types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falzon, G; Pearson, S; Murison, R; Hall, C; Siu, K; Evans, A; Rogers, K; Lewis, R

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on the application of wavelet decomposition to small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) patterns from human breast tissue produced by a synchrotron source. The pixel intensities of SAXS patterns of normal, benign and malignant tissue types were transformed into wavelet coefficients. Statistical analysis found significant differences between the wavelet coefficients describing the patterns produced by different tissue types. These differences were then correlated with position in the image and have been linked to the supra-molecular structural changes that occur in breast tissue in the presence of disease. Specifically, results indicate that there are significant differences between healthy and diseased tissues in the wavelet coefficients that describe the peaks produced by the axial d-spacing of collagen. These differences suggest that a useful classification tool could be based upon the spectral information within the axial peaks

  8. Algebraic Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Holme, Audun

    1988-01-01

    This volume presents selected papers resulting from the meeting at Sundance on enumerative algebraic geometry. The papers are original research articles and concentrate on the underlying geometry of the subject.

  9. Twistor geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to give a detailed exposition of the relation between the geometry of twistor space and the geometry of Minkowski space. The paper has a didactical purpose; no use has been made of differential geometry and cohomology.

  10. Protein and Glycoprotein Patterns Related to Morphogenesis in Mammillaria gracillis Pfeiff. Tissue Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Balen

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available As plants with Crassulacean Acid Metabolism (CAM, cacti are highly affected by artificial environmental conditions in tissue culture. Plants of Mammillaria gracillis Pfeiff. (Cactaceae propagated in vitro produced callus spontaneously. This habituated callus regenerated normal and hyperhydric shoots without the addition of growth regulators. In order to compare habituated callus with the tumorous one, cactus cells were transformed with two strains of Agrobacterium tumefaciens: the wild strain B6S3 (tumour line TW and the rooty mutant GV3101 (tumour line TR. Gene expression in cactus plants, habituated callus, regenerated shoots and two tumour lines was analysed at the level of cellular and extracellular protein and glycoprotein profiles. Proteins were separated by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and 2-D PAGE electrophoresis and silver stained. Concavalin A-peroxidase staining detected glycoproteins with D-manose in their glycan component on protein blots. Developmentally specific protein patterns of Mammillaria gracillis tissue lines were detected. The 2-D PAGE electrophoresis revealed some tissue specific protein groups. The cellular glycoprotein of 42 kDa detected by ConA was highly expressed in undifferentiated tissues (habituated callus, TW and TR tumours and in hyperhydric regenerants. Tumours produced extracellular proteins of 33, 23 and 22 kDa. The N glycosylation of cellular and extracellular proteins was related to specific developmental stage of cactus tissue.

  11. Effect of menopause on gene expression pattern in bone tissue of nonosteoporotic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kósa, János P; Balla, Bernadett; Speer, Gábor; Kiss, János; Borsy, Adrienn; Podani, János; Takács, István; Lazáry, Aron; Nagy, Zsolt; Bácsi, Krisztián; Orosz, László; Lakatos, Péter

    2009-01-01

    Menopausal changes influence the growth, differentiation, and metabolism of bone tissue. Hormonal deficiency at the time of menopause results in marked increases in bone resorption and formation, leading to rapid bone loss. The aim of our investigation was to determine genes characterized by significantly changed mRNA expression rates in postmenopausal versus premenopausal nonosteoporotic bone tissue and to describe the interrelationships among these genes using multivariate data analysis. Ten bone tissue samples from postmenopausal nonosteoporotic women and seven bone tissue samples from premenopausal nonosteoporotic women were examined. The expression differences of 118 selected genes were analyzed in a TaqMan probe-based quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction system. The Mann-Whitney U test indicated significant differences in the expression of 29 genes of postmenopausal and premenopausal nonosteoporotic women. Twenty-eight genes, including extracellular matrix molecules and digesting enzymes, genes belonging to the transforming growth factor-beta/bone morphogenic protein pathway, transcription factors, growth factors, and other candidate genes, were significantly up-regulated in postmenopausal women compared with premenopausal women. Only one gene (ENO1) showed down-regulation after menopause. Based on the multiple mRNA expression profiles of 118 genes, postmenopausal and premenopausal states could be differentiated by enhanced postmenopausal gene expression levels using principal components analysis. Canonical variates analysis demonstrated that postmenopausal and premenopausal nonosteoporotic bone tissues can be distinguished by expression analysis of genes controlled via estrogen receptor-alpha and genes coding for extracellular matrix molecules. The menopausal state of bone tissue has been unambiguously defined by its complex gene transcription pattern. Significant differences observed in the gene expression profiles of estrogen

  12. Identification of tissue-specific cell death using methylation patterns of circulating DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann-Werman, Roni; Neiman, Daniel; Zemmour, Hai; Moss, Joshua; Magenheim, Judith; Vaknin-Dembinsky, Adi; Rubertsson, Sten; Nellgård, Bengt; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Spalding, Kirsty; Haller, Michael J; Wasserfall, Clive H; Schatz, Desmond A; Greenbaum, Carla J; Dorrell, Craig; Grompe, Markus; Zick, Aviad; Hubert, Ayala; Maoz, Myriam; Fendrich, Volker; Bartsch, Detlef K; Golan, Talia; Ben Sasson, Shmuel A; Zamir, Gideon; Razin, Aharon; Cedar, Howard; Shapiro, A M James; Glaser, Benjamin; Shemer, Ruth; Dor, Yuval

    2016-03-29

    Minimally invasive detection of cell death could prove an invaluable resource in many physiologic and pathologic situations. Cell-free circulating DNA (cfDNA) released from dying cells is emerging as a diagnostic tool for monitoring cancer dynamics and graft failure. However, existing methods rely on differences in DNA sequences in source tissues, so that cell death cannot be identified in tissues with a normal genome. We developed a method of detecting tissue-specific cell death in humans based on tissue-specific methylation patterns in cfDNA. We interrogated tissue-specific methylome databases to identify cell type-specific DNA methylation signatures and developed a method to detect these signatures in mixed DNA samples. We isolated cfDNA from plasma or serum of donors, treated the cfDNA with bisulfite, PCR-amplified the cfDNA, and sequenced it to quantify cfDNA carrying the methylation markers of the cell type of interest. Pancreatic β-cell DNA was identified in the circulation of patients with recently diagnosed type-1 diabetes and islet-graft recipients; oligodendrocyte DNA was identified in patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis; neuronal/glial DNA was identified in patients after traumatic brain injury or cardiac arrest; and exocrine pancreas DNA was identified in patients with pancreatic cancer or pancreatitis. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates that the tissue origins of cfDNA and thus the rate of death of specific cell types can be determined in humans. The approach can be adapted to identify cfDNA derived from any cell type in the body, offering a minimally invasive window for diagnosing and monitoring a broad spectrum of human pathologies as well as providing a better understanding of normal tissue dynamics.

  13. Undifferentiated connective tissue disease and interstitial lung disease: Trying to define patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, María Laura; Paulin, Francisco; Toledo, Heidegger Mateos; Fernández, Martín Eduardo; Caro, Fabián Matías; Rojas-Serrano, Jorge; Mejía, Mayra Edith

    To identify clinical or immunological features in patients with undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD) associated interstitial lung disease (ILD), in order to group them and recognize different functional and high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) behavior. Retrospective cohort study. Patients meeting Kinder criteria for UCTD were included. We defined the following predictive variables: 'highly specific' connective tissue disease (CTD) manifestations (Raynaud's phenomenon, dry eyes or arthritis), high antinuclear antibody (ANA) titer (above 1: 320), and 'specific' ANA staining patterns (centromere, cytoplasmic and nucleolar patterns). We evaluated the following outcomes: change in the percentage of the predicted forced vital capacity (FVC%) during the follow-up period, and HRCT pattern. Sixty-six patients were included. Twenty-nine (43.94%) showed at least one 'highly specific' CTD manifestation, 16 (28.57%) had a 'specific' ANA staining pattern and 29 (43.94%) high ANA titer. Patients with 'highly specific' CTD manifestations were younger (mean [SD] 52 years [14.58] vs 62.08 years [9.46], P<.001), were more likely men (10.34% vs 48.65%, P<.001) and showed a smaller decline of the FVC% (median [interquartile range] 1% [-1 to 10] vs -6% [-16 to -4], P<.006). In the multivariate analysis, the presence of highly specific manifestations was associated with improvement in the FVC% (B coefficient of 13.25 [95% confidence interval, 2.41 to 24.09]). No association was observed in relation to the HRCT pattern. The presence of 'highly specific' CTD manifestations was associated with female sex, younger age and better functional behavior. These findings highlight the impact of the clinical features in the outcome of patients with UCTD ILD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  14. A Cancer-Indicative microRNA Pattern in Normal Prostate Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Schlomm

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the levels of selected micro-RNAs in normal prostate tissue to assess their potential to indicate tumor foci elsewhere in the prostate. Histologically normal prostate tissue samples from 31 prostate cancer patients and two cancer negative control groups with either unsuspicious or elevated prostate specific antigen (PSA levels (14 and 17 individuals, respectively were analyzed. Based on the expression analysis of 157 microRNAs in a pool of prostate tissue samples and information from data bases/literature, we selected eight microRNAs for quantification by real-time polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCRs. Selected miRNAs were analyzed in histologically tumor-free biopsy samples from patients and healthy controls. We identified seven microRNAs (miR-124a, miR-146a & b, miR-185, miR-16 and let-7a & b, which displayed significant differential expression in normal prostate tissue from men with prostate cancer compared to both cancer negative control groups. Four microRNAs (miR-185, miR-16 and let-7a and let-7b remained to significantly discriminate normal tissues from prostate cancer patients from those of the cancer negative control group with elevated PSA levels. The transcript levels of these microRNAs were highly indicative for the presence of cancer in the prostates, independently of the PSA level. Our results suggest a microRNA-pattern in histologically normal prostate tissue, indicating prostate cancer elsewhere in the organ.

  15. Early embryonic chromosome instability results in stable mosaic pattern in human tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasmik Mkrtchyan

    Full Text Available The discovery of copy number variations (CNV in the human genome opened new perspectives on the study of the genetic causes of inherited disorders and the aetiology of common diseases. Here, a single-cell-level investigation of CNV in different human tissues led us to uncover the phenomenon of mitotically derived genomic mosaicism, which is stable in different cell types of one individual. The CNV mosaic ratios were different between the 10 individuals studied. However, they were stable in the T lymphocytes, immortalized B lymphoblastoid cells, and skin fibroblasts analyzed in each individual. Because these cell types have a common origin in the connective tissues, we suggest that mitotic changes in CNV regions may happen early during embryonic development and occur only once, after which the stable mosaic ratio is maintained throughout the differentiated tissues. This concept is further supported by a unique study of immortalized B lymphoblastoid cell lines obtained with 20 year difference from two subjects. We provide the first evidence of somatic mosaicism for CNV, with stable variation ratios in different cell types of one individual leading to the hypothesis of early embryonic chromosome instability resulting in stable mosaic pattern in human tissues. This concept has the potential to open new perspectives in personalized genetic diagnostics and can explain genetic phenomena like diminished penetrance in autosomal dominant diseases. We propose that further genomic studies should focus on the single-cell level, to better understand the aetiology of aging and diseases mediated by somatic mutations.

  16. Wnt/Yes-Associated Protein Interactions During Neural Tissue Patterning of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejoy, Julie; Song, Liqing; Zhou, Yi; Li, Yan

    2018-04-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have special ability to self-assemble into neural spheroids or mini-brain-like structures. During the self-assembly process, Wnt signaling plays an important role in regional patterning and establishing positional identity of hiPSC-derived neural progenitors. Recently, the role of Wnt signaling in regulating Yes-associated protein (YAP) expression (nuclear or cytoplasmic), the pivotal regulator during organ growth and tissue generation, has attracted increasing interests. However, the interactions between Wnt and YAP expression for neural lineage commitment of hiPSCs remain poorly explored. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of Wnt signaling and YAP expression on the cellular population in three-dimensional (3D) neural spheroids derived from hiPSCs. In this study, Wnt signaling was activated using CHIR99021 for 3D neural spheroids derived from human iPSK3 cells through embryoid body formation. Our results indicate that Wnt activation induces nuclear localization of YAP and upregulates the expression of HOXB4, the marker for hindbrain/spinal cord. By contrast, the cells exhibit more rostral forebrain neural identity (expression of TBR1) without Wnt activation. Cytochalasin D was then used to induce cytoplasmic YAP and the results showed the decreased HOXB4 expression. In addition, the incorporation of microparticles in the neural spheroids was investigated for the perturbation of neural patterning. This study may indicate the bidirectional interactions of Wnt signaling and YAP expression during neural tissue patterning, which have the significance in neurological disease modeling, drug screening, and neural tissue regeneration.

  17. Hydrogen oxidation mechanisms on Ni/yttria stabilized zirconia anodes: Separation of reaction pathways by geometry variation of pattern electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doppler, M. C.; Fleig, J.; Bram, M.; Opitz, A. K.

    2018-03-01

    Nickel/yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrodes are affecting the overall performance of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) in general and strongly contribute to the cell resistance in case of novel metal supported SOFCs in particular. The electrochemical fuel conversion mechanisms in these electrodes are, however, still only partly understood. In this study, micro-structured Ni thin film electrodes on YSZ with 15 different geometries are utilized to investigate reaction pathways for the hydrogen electro-oxidation at Ni/YSZ anodes. From electrodes with constant area but varying triple phase boundary (TPB) length a contribution to the electro-catalytic activity is found that does not depend on the TPB length. This additional activity could clearly be attributed to a yet unknown reaction pathway scaling with the electrode area. It is shown that this area related pathway has significantly different electrochemical behavior compared to the TPB pathway regarding its thermal activation, sulfur poisoning behavior, and H2/H2O partial pressure dependence. Moreover, possible reaction mechanisms of this reaction pathway are discussed, identifying either a pathway based on hydrogen diffusion through Ni with water release at the TPB or a path with oxygen diffusion through Ni to be a very likely explanation for the experimental results.

  18. Molecular geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Rodger, Alison

    1995-01-01

    Molecular Geometry discusses topics relevant to the arrangement of atoms. The book is comprised of seven chapters that tackle several areas of molecular geometry. Chapter 1 reviews the definition and determination of molecular geometry, while Chapter 2 discusses the unified view of stereochemistry and stereochemical changes. Chapter 3 covers the geometry of molecules of second row atoms, and Chapter 4 deals with the main group elements beyond the second row. The book also talks about the complexes of transition metals and f-block elements, and then covers the organometallic compounds and trans

  19. Optical geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, I.; Trautman, A.

    1988-01-01

    The geometry of classical physics is Lorentzian; but weaker geometries are often more appropriate: null geodesics and electromagnetic fields, for example, are well known to be objects of conformal geometry. To deal with a single null congruence, or with the radiative electromagnetic fields associated with it, even less is needed: flag geometry for the first, optical geometry, with which this paper is chiefly concerned, for the second. The authors establish a natural one-to-one correspondence between optical geometries, considered locally, and three-dimensional Cauchy-Riemann structures. A number of Lorentzian geometries are shown to be equivalent from the optical point of view. For example the Goedel universe, the Taub-NUT metric and Hauser's twisting null solution have an optical geometry isomorphic to the one underlying the Robinson congruence in Minkowski space. The authors present general results on the problem of lifting a CR structure to a Lorentz manifold and, in particular, to Minkowski space; and exhibit the relevance of the deviation form to this problem

  20. Proteomic Analysis of Lysine Acetylation Sites in Rat Tissues Reveals Organ Specificity and Subcellular Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Lundby

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Lysine acetylation is a major posttranslational modification involved in a broad array of physiological functions. Here, we provide an organ-wide map of lysine acetylation sites from 16 rat tissues analyzed by high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry. We quantify 15,474 modification sites on 4,541 proteins and provide the data set as a web-based database. We demonstrate that lysine acetylation displays site-specific sequence motifs that diverge between cellular compartments, with a significant fraction of nuclear sites conforming to the consensus motifs G-AcK and AcK-P. Our data set reveals that the subcellular acetylation distribution is tissue-type dependent and that acetylation targets tissue-specific pathways involved in fundamental physiological processes. We compare lysine acetylation patterns for rat as well as human skeletal muscle biopsies and demonstrate its general involvement in muscle contraction. Furthermore, we illustrate that acetylation of fructose-bisphosphate aldolase and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase serves as a cellular mechanism to switch off enzymatic activity.

  1. Tissue-specific concentrations and patterns of perfluoroalkyl carboxylates and sulfonates in East Greenland polar bears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaves, Alana K; Letcher, Robert J; Sonne, Christian; Dietz, Rune; Born, Erik W

    2012-11-06

    Several perfluoroalkyl carboxylates (PFCAs) and perfluoroalkyl sulfonates (PFSAs) of varying chain length are bioaccumulative in biota. However, wildlife reports have focused on liver and with very little examination of other tissues, and thus there is a limited understanding of their distribution and potential effects in the mammalian body. In the present study, the comparative accumulation of C(6) to C(15) PFCAs, C(4), C(6), C(8) and C(10) PFSAs, and select precursors were examined in the liver, blood, muscle, adipose, and brain of 20 polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from Scoresby Sound, Central East Greenland. Overall, PFSA and PFCA concentrations were highest in liver followed by blood > brain > muscle ≈ adipose. Liver and blood samples contained proportionally more of the shorter/medium chain length (C(6) to C(11)) PFCAs, whereas adipose and brain samples were dominated by longer chain (C(13) to C(15)) PFCAs. PFCAs with lower lipophilicities accumulated more in the liver, whereas the brain accumulated PFCAs with higher lipophilicities. The concentration ratios (±SE) between perfluorooctane sulfonate and its precursor perfluorooctane sulfonamide varied among tissues from 9 (±1):1 (muscle) to 36 (±7):1 (liver). PFCA and PFSA patterns in polar bears indicate that the pharmacokinetics of these compounds are to some extent tissue-specific, and are the result of several factors that may include differing protein interactions throughout the body.

  2. Fractal Dimension of the Hydrographic Pattern of Three Large Rivers in the Mediterranean Morphoclimatic System: Geomorphologic Interpretation of Russian (USA), Ebro (Spain) and Volturno (Italy) Fluvial Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donadio, Carlo; Magdaleno, Fernando; Mazzarella, Adriano; Mathias Kondolf, G.

    2015-07-01

    By applying fractal geometry analysis to the drainage network of three large watercourses in America and Europe, we have calculated for the first time their fractal dimension. The aim is to interpret the geomorphologic characteristics to better understand the morphoevolutionary processes of these fluvial morphotypes; to identify and discriminate geomorphic phenomena responsible for any difference or convergence of a fractal dimension; to classify hydrographic patterns, and finally to compare the fractal degree with some geomorphic-quantitative indexes. The analyzed catchment of Russian (California, USA), Ebro (Spain), and Volturno (Italy) rivers are situated in Mediterranean-climate regions sensu Köppen, but with different geologic context and tectonic styles. Results show fractal dimensions ranging from 1.08 to 1.50. According to the geological setting and geomorphic indexes of these basins, the lower fractal degree indicates a prevailing tectonics, active or not, while the higher degree indicates the stronger erosion processes on inherited landscapes.

  3. CMEIAS JFrad: a digital computing tool to discriminate the fractal geometry of landscape architectures and spatial patterns of individual cells in microbial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhou; Card, Kyle J; Dazzo, Frank B

    2015-04-01

    Image analysis of fractal geometry can be used to gain deeper insights into complex ecophysiological patterns and processes occurring within natural microbial biofilm landscapes, including the scale-dependent heterogeneities of their spatial architecture, biomass, and cell-cell interactions, all driven by the colonization behavior of optimal spatial positioning of organisms to maximize their efficiency in utilization of allocated nutrient resources. Here, we introduce CMEIAS JFrad, a new computing technology that analyzes the fractal geometry of complex biofilm architectures in digital landscape images. The software uniquely features a data-mining opportunity based on a comprehensive collection of 11 different mathematical methods to compute fractal dimension that are implemented into a wizard design to maximize ease-of-use for semi-automatic analysis of single images or fully automatic analysis of multiple images in a batch process. As examples of application, quantitative analyses of fractal dimension were used to optimize the important variable settings of brightness threshold and minimum object size in order to discriminate the complex architecture of freshwater microbial biofilms at multiple spatial scales, and also to differentiate the spatial patterns of individual bacterial cells that influence their cooperative interactions, resource use, and apportionment in situ. Version 1.0 of JFrad is implemented into a software package containing the program files, user manual, and tutorial images that will be freely available at http://cme.msu.edu/cmeias/. This improvement in computational image informatics will strengthen microscopy-based approaches to analyze the dynamic landscape ecology of microbial biofilm populations and communities in situ at spatial resolutions that range from single cells to microcolonies.

  4. Human gestation-associated tissues express functional cytosolic nucleic acid sensing pattern recognition receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, A H; Menzies, G E; Scott, L M; Spencer-Harty, S; Davies, L B; Smith, R A; Jones, R H; Thornton, C A

    2017-07-01

    The role of viral infections in adverse pregnancy outcomes has gained interest in recent years. Innate immune pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) and their signalling pathways, that yield a cytokine output in response to pathogenic stimuli, have been postulated to link infection at the maternal-fetal interface and adverse pregnancy outcomes. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression and functional response of nucleic acid ligand responsive Toll-like receptors (TLR-3, -7, -8 and -9), and retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RIG-I)-like receptors [RIG-I, melanoma differentiation-associated protein 5 (MDA5) and Laboratory of Genetics and Physiology 2(LGP2)] in human term gestation-associated tissues (placenta, choriodecidua and amnion) using an explant model. Immunohistochemistry revealed that these PRRs were expressed by the term placenta, choriodecidua and amnion. A statistically significant increase in interleukin (IL)-6 and/or IL-8 production in response to specific agonists for TLR-3 (Poly(I:C); low and high molecular weight), TLR-7 (imiquimod), TLR-8 (ssRNA40) and RIG-I/MDA5 (Poly(I:C)LyoVec) was observed; there was no response to a TLR-9 (ODN21798) agonist. A hierarchical clustering approach was used to compare the response of each tissue type to the ligands studied and revealed that the placenta and choriodecidua generate a more similar IL-8 response, while the choriodecidua and amnion generate a more similar IL-6 response to nucleic acid ligands. These findings demonstrate that responsiveness via TLR-3, TLR-7, TLR-8 and RIG-1/MDA5 is a broad feature of human term gestation-associated tissues with differential responses by tissue that might underpin adverse obstetric outcomes. © 2017 British Society for Immunology.

  5. Architectural geometry

    KAUST Repository

    Pottmann, Helmut

    2014-11-26

    Around 2005 it became apparent in the geometry processing community that freeform architecture contains many problems of a geometric nature to be solved, and many opportunities for optimization which however require geometric understanding. This area of research, which has been called architectural geometry, meanwhile contains a great wealth of individual contributions which are relevant in various fields. For mathematicians, the relation to discrete differential geometry is significant, in particular the integrable system viewpoint. Besides, new application contexts have become available for quite some old-established concepts. Regarding graphics and geometry processing, architectural geometry yields interesting new questions but also new objects, e.g. replacing meshes by other combinatorial arrangements. Numerical optimization plays a major role but in itself would be powerless without geometric understanding. Summing up, architectural geometry has become a rewarding field of study. We here survey the main directions which have been pursued, we show real projects where geometric considerations have played a role, and we outline open problems which we think are significant for the future development of both theory and practice of architectural geometry.

  6. Projective geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Faulkner, Thomas Ewan

    1952-01-01

    This text explores the methods of the projective geometry of the plane. Some knowledge of the elements of metrical and analytical geometry is assumed; a rigorous first chapter serves to prepare readers. Following an introduction to the methods of the symbolic notation, the text advances to a consideration of the theory of one-to-one correspondence. It derives the projective properties of the conic and discusses the representation of these properties by the general equation of the second degree. A study of the relationship between Euclidean and projective geometry concludes the presentation. Nu

  7. Model fitting in two dimensions to small angle diffraction patterns from soft tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, S J; Rogers, K D; Hall, C J

    2006-01-01

    In our research programme small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) is used to provide information on the axial arrangement of collagen molecules as well as data about the state of other components of the extra cellular matrix (ECM) in human tissues. Derivation of parameters to describe and simplify the data is required for much of the SAXS patterns analysis. A method is presented here to achieve function fitting to collagen diffraction peaks along with a representation of the underlying diffuse scatter. A simple model was used which proved reliable in fitting a variety of 2D diffraction patterns. The logarithm of the scatter intensity over the area of the scatter image was taken to reduce the range and improve fitting accuracy. Our model was then used to fit the log data. The model consisted of a radial exponential diffuse scatter component added to a specified number of Gaussian peaks. In 2D the peak model is toroidal, each component being rotated about a common specified centre. Initial search parameters from a 1D averaged sector were supplied to the iterative 2D fitting routine. With the aid of data weighting and basic wavelet filtering, successful and reliable fitting of a specified 2D model to real data is achievable. The process is easily automated. Multiple SAXS patterns can be fitted without operator intervention. As described the model is simple enough to converge rapidly and yet allows image data to be parameterized to a form suitable for extracting the requisite information. The fitting method is flexible enough to be extended to achieve a more comprehensive and complex pattern fitting in two dimensions if this turns out to be necessary. It is our intention to implement orientation distribution functions in the near future by including an angular scaling factor

  8. Information geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Ay, Nihat; Lê, Hông Vân; Schwachhöfer, Lorenz

    2017-01-01

    The book provides a comprehensive introduction and a novel mathematical foundation of the field of information geometry with complete proofs and detailed background material on measure theory, Riemannian geometry and Banach space theory. Parametrised measure models are defined as fundamental geometric objects, which can be both finite or infinite dimensional. Based on these models, canonical tensor fields are introduced and further studied, including the Fisher metric and the Amari-Chentsov tensor, and embeddings of statistical manifolds are investigated. This novel foundation then leads to application highlights, such as generalizations and extensions of the classical uniqueness result of Chentsov or the Cramér-Rao inequality. Additionally, several new application fields of information geometry are highlighted, for instance hierarchical and graphical models, complexity theory, population genetics, or Markov Chain Monte Carlo. The book will be of interest to mathematicians who are interested in geometry, inf...

  9. Algebraic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Lefschetz, Solomon

    2005-01-01

    An introduction to algebraic geometry and a bridge between its analytical-topological and algebraical aspects, this text for advanced undergraduate students is particularly relevant to those more familiar with analysis than algebra. 1953 edition.

  10. Mammalian tissues defective in nonsense-mediated mRNA decay display highly aberrant splicing patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weischenfeldt, Joachim Lütken; Waage, Johannes Eichler; Tian, Geng

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) affects the outcome of alternative splicing by degrading mRNA isoforms with premature termination codons. Splicing regulators constitute important NMD targets; however, the extent to which loss of NMD causes extensive deregulation...... of alternative splicing has not previously been assayed in a global, unbiased manner. Here, we combine mouse genetics and RNA-seq to provide the first in vivo analysis of the global impact of NMD on splicing patterns in two primary mouse tissues ablated for the NMD factor UPF2. RESULTS: We developed...... importance, the latter events are associated with high intronic conservation. CONCLUSIONS: Our data demonstrate that NMD regulates alternative splicing outcomes through an intricate web of splicing regulators and that its loss leads to the deregulation of a panoply of splicing events, providing novel...

  11. Changes in brain tissue and behavior patterns induced by single short-term fasting in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Hisatomi

    Full Text Available In humans, emaciation from long-term dietary deficiencies, such as anorexia, reportedly increases physical activity and brain atrophy. However, the effects of single short-term fasting on brain tissue or behavioral activity patterns remain unclear. To clarify the impact of malnutrition on brain function, we conducted a single short-term fasting study as an anorexia model using male adult mice and determined if changes occurred in migratory behavior as an expression of brain function and in brain tissue structure. Sixteen-week-old C57BL/6J male mice were divided into either the fasted group or the control group. Experiments were conducted in a fixed indoor environment. We examined the effects of fasting on the number of nerve cells, structural changes in the myelin and axon density, and brain atrophy. For behavior observation, the amount of food and water consumed, ingestion time, and the pattern of movement were measured using a time-recording system. The fasted mice showed a significant increase in physical activity and their rhythm of movement was disturbed. Since the brain was in an abnormal state after fasting, mice that were normally active during the night became active regardless of day or night and performed strenuous exercise at a high frequency. The brain weight did not change by a fast, and brain atrophy was not observed. Although no textural change was apparent by fasting, the neuronal neogenesis in the subventricular zone and hippocampus was inhibited, causing disorder of the brain function. A clear association between the suppression of encephalic neuropoiesis and overactivity was not established. However, it is interesting that the results of this study suggest that single short-term fasting has an effect on encephalic neuropoiesis.

  12. Pattern, severity, and management of cranio-maxillofacial soft-tissue injuries in Port Harcourt, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olayemi, Akinbami Babatunde; Adeniyi, Akadiri Oladimeji; Samuel, Udeabor; Emeka, Obiechina Ambrose

    2013-01-01

    Background: The pattern of craniofacial soft-tissue injuries occurring either in isolation or in association with fractures vary in different societies and is multiply influenced. The effects are enormous because of the prominence of the face; therefore, the purpose of this study was to document any changing pattern, severity and management of these craniofacial injuries in our center. Patients and Method: Cranio-maxillofacial region was classified into upper, middle and lower face. The cause, type, and site of the injuries were documented. Gunshot injuries were further categorized as penetrating, perforating or avulsions. Further, classification of injuries into mild, moderate, and severe was carried out based on multiple factors. Result: A total of 126 patients with soft-tissue injuries presented to our hospital out of which 85 (67.5%) were males and 41 (32.5) were females. The age range of the patients was between 10 months and 90 years with a mean ± SD of 26.4 ± 15.5 years. Road traffic accident was the most common etiology of which vehicular accidents constituted 50 (54.9%) and the motorcycle was 2 (2.2%). Assault contributed 16 (17.6%) while cases due to gun shots were 13 (14.3%). A total of 19 (15.1%) patients had associated head injuries, 11 (8.7%) patients had craniofacial fractures involving any of the bones while 3 (2.4%) patients had limb fractures and 2 (1.6%) patients had rib fractures. There were 51 (41.8%) cases classified as mild injuries, 37 (30.3%) cases as moderate injuries and 24 (19.7%) cases as severe injuries. Total of 126 cases managed, 121 (96.0%) received primary closure of the wounds while 5 (4.0%) received delayed closure under general anesthesia. PMID:24339654

  13. Pattern, severity, and management of cranio-maxillofacial soft-tissue injuries in Port Harcourt, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinbami Babatunde Olayemi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The pattern of craniofacial soft-tissue injuries occurring either in isolation or in association with fractures vary in different societies and is multiply influenced. The effects are enormous because of the prominence of the face; therefore, the purpose of this study was to document any changing pattern, severity and management of these craniofacial injuries in our center. Patients and Method: Cranio-maxillofacial region was classified into upper, middle and lower face. The cause, type, and site of the injuries were documented. Gunshot injuries were further categorized as penetrating, perforating or avulsions. Further, classification of injuries into mild, moderate, and severe was carried out based on multiple factors. Result: A total of 126 patients with soft-tissue injuries presented to our hospital out of which 85 (67.5% were males and 41 (32.5 were females. The age range of the patients was between 10 months and 90 years with a mean ± SD of 26.4 ± 15.5 years. Road traffic accident was the most common etiology of which vehicular accidents constituted 50 (54.9% and the motorcycle was 2 (2.2%. Assault contributed 16 (17.6% while cases due to gun shots were 13 (14.3%. A total of 19 (15.1% patients had associated head injuries, 11 (8.7% patients had craniofacial fractures involving any of the bones while 3 (2.4% patients had limb fractures and 2 (1.6% patients had rib fractures. There were 51 (41.8% cases classified as mild injuries, 37 (30.3% cases as moderate injuries and 24 (19.7% cases as severe injuries. Total of 126 cases managed, 121 (96.0% received primary closure of the wounds while 5 (4.0% received delayed closure under general anesthesia.

  14. Pattern of Bone Generation after Irradiation in Vascularized Tissue Engineered Constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eweida, Ahmad; Fathi, Ibrahim; Eltawila, Ahmed M; Elsherif, Ahmad M; Elkerm, Yasser; Harhaus, Leila; Kneser, Ulrich; Sakr, Mahmoud F

    2018-02-01

     Regenerative medicine modalities provide promising alternatives to conventional reconstruction techniques but are still deficient after malignant tumor excision or irradiation due to defective vascularization.  We investigated the pattern of bone formation in axially vascularized tissue engineering constructs (AVTECs) after irradiation in a study that mimics the clinical scenario after head and neck cancer. Heterotopic bone generation was induced in a subcutaneously implanted AVTEC in the thigh of six male New Zealand rabbits. The tissue construct was made up of Nanobone (Artoss GmbH; Rostock, Germany) granules mixed with autogenous bone marrow and 80 μL of bone morphogenic protein-2 at a concentration of 1.5 μg/μL. An arteriovenous loop was created microsurgically between the saphenous vessels and implanted in the core of the construct to induce axial vascularization. The constructs were subjected to external beam irradiation on postoperative day 20 with a single dose of 15 Gy. The constructs were removed 20 days after irradiation and subjected to histological and immunohistochemical analysis for vascularization, bone formation, apoptosis, and cellular proliferation.  The vascularized constructs showed homogenous vascularization and bone formation both in their central and peripheral regions. Although vascularity, proliferation, and apoptosis were similar between central and peripheral regions of the constructs, significantly more bone was formed in the central regions of the constructs.  The study shows for the first time the pattern of bone formation in AVTECs after irradiation using doses comparable to those applied after head and neck cancer. Axial vascularization probably enhances the osteoinductive properties in the central regions of AVTECs after irradiation. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  15. Reprimo tissue-specific expression pattern is conserved between zebrafish and human.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo J Figueroa

    Full Text Available Reprimo (RPRM, a member of the RPRM gene family, is a tumor-suppressor gene involved in the regulation of the p53-mediated cell cycle arrest at G2/M. RPRM has been associated with malignant tumor progression and proposed as a potential biomarker for early cancer detection. However, the expression and role of RPRM, as well as its family, are poorly understood and their physiology is as yet unstudied. In this scenario, a model system like the zebrafish could serve to dissect the role of the RPRM family members in vivo. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that RPRM and RPRML have been differentially retained by most species throughout vertebrate evolution, yet RPRM3 has been retained only in a small group of distantly related species, including zebrafish. Herein, we characterized the spatiotemporal expression of RPRM (present in zebrafish as an infraclass duplication rprma/rprmb, RPRML and RPRM3 in the zebrafish. By whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH, we demonstrate that rprm (rprma/rprmb and rprml show a similar spatiotemporal expression profile during zebrafish development. At early developmental stages rprmb is expressed in somites. After one day post-fertilization, rprm (rprma/rprmb and rprml are expressed in the notochord, brain, blood vessels and digestive tube. On the other hand, rprm3 shows the most unique expression profile, being expressed only in the central nervous system (CNS. We assessed the expression patterns of RPRM gene transcripts in adult zebrafish and human RPRM protein product in tissue samples by RT-qPCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC staining, respectively. Strikingly, tissue-specific expression patterns of the RPRM transcripts and protein are conserved between zebrafish and humans. We propose the zebrafish as a powerful tool to elucidate the both physiological and pathological roles of the RPRM gene family.

  16. Changes in brain tissue and behavior patterns induced by single short-term fasting in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisatomi, Yuko; Asakura, Kyo; Kugino, Kenji; Kurokawa, Mamoru; Asakura, Tomiko; Nakata, Keiko

    2013-01-01

    In humans, emaciation from long-term dietary deficiencies, such as anorexia, reportedly increases physical activity and brain atrophy. However, the effects of single short-term fasting on brain tissue or behavioral activity patterns remain unclear. To clarify the impact of malnutrition on brain function, we conducted a single short-term fasting study as an anorexia model using male adult mice and determined if changes occurred in migratory behavior as an expression of brain function and in brain tissue structure. Sixteen-week-old C57BL/6J male mice were divided into either the fasted group or the control group. Experiments were conducted in a fixed indoor environment. We examined the effects of fasting on the number of nerve cells, structural changes in the myelin and axon density, and brain atrophy. For behavior observation, the amount of food and water consumed, ingestion time, and the pattern of movement were measured using a time-recording system. The fasted mice showed a significant increase in physical activity and their rhythm of movement was disturbed. Since the brain was in an abnormal state after fasting, mice that were normally active during the night became active regardless of day or night and performed strenuous exercise at a high frequency. The brain weight did not change by a fast, and brain atrophy was not observed. Although no textural change was apparent by fasting, the neuronal neogenesis in the subventricular zone and hippocampus was inhibited, causing disorder of the brain function. A clear association between the suppression of encephalic neuropoiesis and overactivity was not established. However, it is interesting that the results of this study suggest that single short-term fasting has an effect on encephalic neuropoiesis.

  17. Integrated local binary pattern texture features for classification of breast tissue imaged by optical coherence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Sunhua; Lee, Hsiang-Chieh; Huang, Xiaolei; Xu, Ting; Xu, Tao; Zeng, Xianxu; Zhang, Zhan; Sheikine, Yuri; Connolly, James L; Fujimoto, James G; Zhou, Chao

    2017-05-01

    This paper proposes a texture analysis technique that can effectively classify different types of human breast tissue imaged by Optical Coherence Microscopy (OCM). OCM is an emerging imaging modality for rapid tissue screening and has the potential to provide high resolution microscopic images that approach those of histology. OCM images, acquired without tissue staining, however, pose unique challenges to image analysis and pattern classification. We examined multiple types of texture features and found Local Binary Pattern (LBP) features to perform better in classifying tissues imaged by OCM. In order to improve classification accuracy, we propose novel variants of LBP features, namely average LBP (ALBP) and block based LBP (BLBP). Compared with the classic LBP feature, ALBP and BLBP features provide an enhanced encoding of the texture structure in a local neighborhood by looking at intensity differences among neighboring pixels and among certain blocks of pixels in the neighborhood. Fourty-six freshly excised human breast tissue samples, including 27 benign (e.g. fibroadenoma, fibrocystic disease and usual ductal hyperplasia) and 19 breast carcinoma (e.g. invasive ductal carcinoma, ductal carcinoma in situ and lobular carcinoma in situ) were imaged with large field OCM with an imaging area of 10 × 10 mm 2 (10, 000 × 10, 000 pixels) for each sample. Corresponding H&E histology was obtained for each sample and used to provide ground truth diagnosis. 4310 small OCM image blocks (500 × 500 pixels) each paired with corresponding H&E histology was extracted from large-field OCM images and labeled with one of the five different classes: adipose tissue (n = 347), fibrous stroma (n = 2,065), breast lobules (n = 199), carcinomas (pooled from all sub-types, n = 1,127), and background (regions outside of the specimens, n = 572). Our experiments show that by integrating a selected set of LBP and the two new variant (ALBP and BLBP) features at multiple scales, the

  18. Tissue distribution patterns of solubilized metals from internalized tungsten alloy in the F344 rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernieda B. Vergara

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Because of its unique physical and chemical properties, tungsten has been increasingly utilized in a variety of civilian and military applications. This expanded use also raises the risk of human exposure through internalization by various routes. In most cases the toxicological and carcinogenic properties of these tungsten-based compounds are not known nor are the dissolution biokinetics and ultimate fate of the associated metals. Using a laboratory rodent model system designed to assess the health effects of embedded metals, and a tungsten alloy comprised of tungsten (91.1%, nickel (6.0%, and cobalt (2.9%, we investigated the tissue distribution patterns of the metals over a six month period. Despite its perceived insolubility, tungsten rapidly solubilized from the implanted metal fragments, as did nickel and cobalt. All three metals distributed systemically over time with extremely elevated levels of all three metals found in kidney, liver, and spleen. Unexpectedly, tungsten was found to cross the blood-brain and blood-testis barriers and localize in those tissues. These results, along with recent reports suggesting that tungsten is a tumor promoter, raises serious concerns as to the long-term health effects of exposure to tungsten and tungsten-based compounds.

  19. Tissue expression pattern of ABCG transporter indicates functional roles in reproduction of Toxocara canis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yong-Li; Ma, Guang-Xu; Luo, Yong-Fang; Kuang, Ce-Yan; Jiang, Ai-Yun; Li, Guo-Qing; Zhou, Rong-Qiong

    2018-03-01

    Toxocara canis is a zoonotic parasite with worldwide distribution. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are integral membrane proteins which involve in a range of biological processes in various organisms. In present study, the full-length coding sequence of abcg-5 gene of T. canis (Tc-abcg-5) was cloned and characterized. A 633 aa polypeptide containing two conserved Walker A and Walker B motifs was predicted from a continuous 1902 nt open reading frame. Quantitative real-time PCR was employed to determine the transcriptional levels of Tc-abcg-5 gene in adult male and female worms, which indicated high mRNA level of Tc-abcg-5 in the reproductive tract of adult female T. canis. Tc-abcg-5 was expressed to produce rabbit polyclonal antiserum against recombinant TcABCG5. Indirect-fluorescence immunohistochemical assays were carried out to detect the tissue distribution of TcABCG5, which showed predominant distribution of TcABCG5 in the uterus (especially in the germ cells) of adult female T. canis. Tissue transcription and expression pattern of Tc-abcg-5 indicated that Tc-abcg-5 might play essential roles in the reproduction of this parasitic nematode.

  20. The fractal geometry of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losa, Gabriele A

    2009-01-01

    The extension of the concepts of Fractal Geometry (Mandelbrot [1983]) toward the life sciences has led to significant progress in understanding complex functional properties and architectural / morphological / structural features characterising cells and tissues during ontogenesis and both normal and pathological development processes. It has even been argued that fractal geometry could provide a coherent description of the design principles underlying living organisms (Weibel [1991]). Fractals fulfil a certain number of theoretical and methodological criteria including a high level of organization, shape irregularity, functional and morphological self-similarity, scale invariance, iterative pathways and a peculiar non-integer fractal dimension [FD]. Whereas mathematical objects are deterministic invariant or self-similar over an unlimited range of scales, biological components are statistically self-similar only within a fractal domain defined by upper and lower limits, called scaling window, in which the relationship between the scale of observation and the measured size or length of the object can be established (Losa and Nonnenmacher [1996]). Selected examples will contribute to depict complex biological shapes and structures as fractal entities, and also to show why the application of the fractal principle is valuable for measuring dimensional, geometrical and functional parameters of cells, tissues and organs occurring within the vegetal and animal realms. If the criteria for a strict description of natural fractals are met, then it follows that a Fractal Geometry of Life may be envisaged and all natural objects and biological systems exhibiting self-similar patterns and scaling properties may be considered as belonging to the new subdiscipline of "fractalomics".

  1. Geometry Revealed

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, Marcel

    2010-01-01

    Both classical geometry and modern differential geometry have been active subjects of research throughout the 20th century and lie at the heart of many recent advances in mathematics and physics. The underlying motivating concept for the present book is that it offers readers the elements of a modern geometric culture by means of a whole series of visually appealing unsolved (or recently solved) problems that require the creation of concepts and tools of varying abstraction. Starting with such natural, classical objects as lines, planes, circles, spheres, polygons, polyhedra, curves, surfaces,

  2. Vector geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, Gilbert de B

    2011-01-01

    This brief undergraduate-level text by a prominent Cambridge-educated mathematician explores the relationship between algebra and geometry. An elementary course in plane geometry is the sole requirement for Gilbert de B. Robinson's text, which is the result of several years of teaching and learning the most effective methods from discussions with students. Topics include lines and planes, determinants and linear equations, matrices, groups and linear transformations, and vectors and vector spaces. Additional subjects range from conics and quadrics to homogeneous coordinates and projective geom

  3. Analytic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Burdette, A C

    1971-01-01

    Analytic Geometry covers several fundamental aspects of analytic geometry needed for advanced subjects, including calculus.This book is composed of 12 chapters that review the principles, concepts, and analytic proofs of geometric theorems, families of lines, the normal equation of the line, and related matters. Other chapters highlight the application of graphing, foci, directrices, eccentricity, and conic-related topics. The remaining chapters deal with the concept polar and rectangular coordinates, surfaces and curves, and planes.This book will prove useful to undergraduate trigonometric st

  4. Patterns of hybrid loss of imprinting reveal tissue- and cluster-specific regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher D Wiley

    Full Text Available Crosses between natural populations of two species of deer mice, Peromyscus maniculatus (BW, and P. polionotus (PO, produce parent-of-origin effects on growth and development. BW females mated to PO males (bwxpo produce growth-retarded but otherwise healthy offspring. In contrast, PO females mated to BW males (POxBW produce overgrown and severely defective offspring. The hybrid phenotypes are pronounced in the placenta and include POxBW conceptuses which lack embryonic structures. Evidence to date links variation in control of genomic imprinting with the hybrid defects, particularly in the POxBW offspring. Establishment of genomic imprinting is typically mediated by gametic DNA methylation at sites known as gDMRs. However, imprinted gene clusters vary in their regulation by gDMR sequences.Here we further assess imprinted gene expression and DNA methylation at different cluster types in order to discern patterns. These data reveal POxBW misexpression at the Kcnq1ot1 and Peg3 clusters, both of which lose ICR methylation in placental tissues. In contrast, some embryonic transcripts (Peg10, Kcnq1ot1 reactivated the silenced allele with little or no loss of DNA methylation. Hybrid brains also display different patterns of imprinting perturbations. Several cluster pairs thought to use analogous regulatory mechanisms are differentially affected in the hybrids.These data reinforce the hypothesis that placental and somatic gene regulation differs significantly, as does that between imprinted gene clusters and between species. That such epigenetic regulatory variation exists in recently diverged species suggests a role in reproductive isolation, and that this variation is likely to be adaptive.

  5. Molecular Geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desseyn, H. O.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Compares linear-nonlinear and planar-nonplanar geometry through the valence-shell electron pairs repulsion (V.S.E.P.R.), Mulliken-Walsh, and electrostatic force theories. Indicates that although the V.S.E.P.R. theory has more advantages for elementary courses, an explanation of the best features of the different theories offers students a better…

  6. Geometry VI

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 8. Geometry VI - Space-the Final Frontier. Kapil H Paranjape. Series Article Volume 1 Issue 8 August 1996 pp 28-33. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/001/08/0028-0033 ...

  7. Geometry -----------~--------------RESONANCE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mathematicians were at war with one another because Euclid's axioms for geometry were not entirely acceptable to all. Archi- medes, Pasch and others introduced further axioms as they thought that Euclid had missed a few, while other mathematicians were bothered by the non-elementary nature of the parallel axiom.

  8. Differential selective constraints shaping codon usage pattern of housekeeping and tissue-specific homologous genes of rice and arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Pamela; Basak, Surajit; Ghosh, Tapash Chandra

    2008-12-01

    Intra-genomic variation between housekeeping and tissue-specific genes has always been a study of interest in higher eukaryotes. To-date, however, no such investigation has been done in plants. Availability of whole genome expression data for both rice and Arabidopsis has made it possible to examine the evolutionary forces in shaping codon usage pattern in both housekeeping and tissue-specific genes in plants. In the present work, we have taken 4065 rice-Arabidopsis homologous gene pairs to study evolutionary forces responsible for codon usage divergence between housekeeping and tissue-specific genes. In both rice and Arabidopsis, it is mutational bias that regulates error minimization in highly expressed genes of both housekeeping and tissue-specific genes. Our results show that, in comparison to tissue-specific genes, housekeeping genes are under strong selective constraint in plants. However, in tissue-specific genes, lowly expressed genes are under stronger selective constraint compared with highly expressed genes. We demonstrated that constraint acting on mRNA secondary structure is responsible for modulating codon usage variations in rice tissue-specific genes. Thus, different evolutionary forces must underline the evolution of synonymous codon usage of highly expressed genes of housekeeping and tissue-specific genes in rice and Arabidopsis.

  9. Lectures on discrete geometry

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Discrete geometry investigates combinatorial properties of configurations of geometric objects. To a working mathematician or computer scientist, it offers sophisticated results and techniques of great diversity and it is a foundation for fields such as computational geometry or combinatorial optimization. This book is primarily a textbook introduction to various areas of discrete geometry. In each area, it explains several key results and methods, in an accessible and concrete manner. It also contains more advanced material in separate sections and thus it can serve as a collection of surveys in several narrower subfields. The main topics include: basics on convex sets, convex polytopes, and hyperplane arrangements; combinatorial complexity of geometric configurations; intersection patterns and transversals of convex sets; geometric Ramsey-type results; polyhedral combinatorics and high-dimensional convexity; and lastly, embeddings of finite metric spaces into normed spaces. Jiri Matousek is Professor of Com...

  10. Special geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strominger, A.

    1990-01-01

    A special manifold is an allowed target manifold for the vector multiplets of D=4, N=2 supergravity. These manifolds are of interest for string theory because the moduli spaces of Calabi-Yau threefolds and c=9, (2,2) conformal field theories are special. Previous work has given a local, coordinate-dependent characterization of special geometry. A global description of special geometries is given herein, and their properties are studied. A special manifold M of complex dimension n is characterized by the existence of a holomorphic Sp(2n+2,R)xGL(1,C) vector bundle over M with a nowhere-vanishing holomorphic section Ω. The Kaehler potential on M is the logarithm of the Sp(2n+2,R) invariant norm of Ω. (orig.)

  11. Geometrie coniugate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Paris

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Lo studio degli ingranaggi si basa sulle geometrie coniugate in cui due curve o due superfici si mantengono costantemente in contatto pur se in movimento reciproco. La teoria geometrica degli ingranaggi fino alla fine del XIX secolo era uno dei molteplici rami nelle applicazioni della Geometria Descrittiva. Lo studio si basa sulla conoscenza delle principali proprietà delle curve piane e gobbe e delle loro derivate. La specificità del tema è che queste geometrie nel momento in cui si devono relazionare con le loro coniugate, devono rispettare dei vincoli che altrimenti non avrebbero. Si vuole evidenziare attraverso casi concreti il ruolo della geometria descrittiva nel passaggio dal teorico al pratico riproponendo in chiave informatica, temi e procedure di indagine spesso passati in secondo piano se non addirittura dimenticati.

  12. Riemannian geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Petersen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Intended for a one year course, this text serves as a single source, introducing readers to the important techniques and theorems, while also containing enough background on advanced topics to appeal to those students wishing to specialize in Riemannian geometry. This is one of the few Works to combine both the geometric parts of Riemannian geometry and the analytic aspects of the theory. The book will appeal to a readership that have a basic knowledge of standard manifold theory, including tensors, forms, and Lie groups. Important revisions to the third edition include: a substantial addition of unique and enriching exercises scattered throughout the text; inclusion of an increased number of coordinate calculations of connection and curvature; addition of general formulas for curvature on Lie Groups and submersions; integration of variational calculus into the text allowing for an early treatment of the Sphere theorem using a proof by Berger; incorporation of several recent results about manifolds with posit...

  13. Correlation-maximizing surrogate gene space for visual mining of gene expression patterns in developing barley endosperm tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usadel Björn

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Micro- and macroarray technologies help acquire thousands of gene expression patterns covering important biological processes during plant ontogeny. Particularly, faithful visualization methods are beneficial for revealing interesting gene expression patterns and functional relationships of coexpressed genes. Such screening helps to gain deeper insights into regulatory behavior and cellular responses, as will be discussed for expression data of developing barley endosperm tissue. For that purpose, high-throughput multidimensional scaling (HiT-MDS, a recent method for similarity-preserving data embedding, is substantially refined and used for (a assessing the quality and reliability of centroid gene expression patterns, and for (b derivation of functional relationships of coexpressed genes of endosperm tissue during barley grain development (0–26 days after flowering. Results Temporal expression profiles of 4824 genes at 14 time points are faithfully embedded into two-dimensional displays. Thereby, similar shapes of coexpressed genes get closely grouped by a correlation-based similarity measure. As a main result, by using power transformation of correlation terms, a characteristic cloud of points with bipolar sandglass shape is obtained that is inherently connected to expression patterns of pre-storage, intermediate and storage phase of endosperm development. Conclusion The new HiT-MDS-2 method helps to create global views of expression patterns and to validate centroids obtained from clustering programs. Furthermore, functional gene annotation for developing endosperm barley tissue is successfully mapped to the visualization, making easy localization of major centroids of enriched functional categories possible.

  14. Gain-of-function mutations in Aqp3a influence zebrafish pigment pattern formation through the tissue environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskova, Anastasia; Chauvigné, Francois; Maischein, Hans-Martin; Ammelburg, Moritz; Cerdà, Joan; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane; Irion, Uwe

    2017-06-01

    The development of the pigmentation pattern in zebrafish is a tightly regulated process that depends on both the self-organizing properties of pigment cells and extrinsic cues from other tissues. Many of the known mutations that alter the pattern act cell-autonomously in pigment cells, and our knowledge about external regulators is limited. Here, we describe novel zebrafish mau mutants, which encompass several dominant missense mutations in Aquaporin 3a (Aqp3a) that lead to broken stripes and short fins. A loss-of-function aqp3a allele, generated by CRISPR-Cas9, has no phenotypic consequences, demonstrating that Aqp3a is dispensable for normal development. Strikingly, the pigment cells from dominant mau mutants are capable of forming a wild-type pattern when developing in a wild-type environment, but the surrounding tissues in the mutants influence pigment cell behaviour and interfere with the patterning process. The mutated amino acid residues in the dominant alleles line the pore surface of Aqp3a and influence pore permeability. These results demonstrate an important effect of the tissue environment on pigment cell behaviour and, thereby, on pattern formation. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. General Geometry and Geometry of Electromagnetism

    OpenAIRE

    Shahverdiyev, Shervgi S.

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that Electromagnetism creates geometry different from Riemannian geometry. General geometry including Riemannian geometry as a special case is constructed. It is proven that the most simplest special case of General Geometry is geometry underlying Electromagnetism. Action for electromagnetic field and Maxwell equations are derived from curvature function of geometry underlying Electromagnetism. And it is shown that equation of motion for a particle interacting with electromagnetic...

  16. Structural organization and expression pattern of the canine RPGRIP1 isoforms in retinal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Tatyana; Zangerl, Barbara; Goldstein, Orly; Acland, Gregory M; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2011-05-06

    To examine the structure and expression of RPGRIP1 in dog retina. Determination of the structural analysis and expression pattern of canine RPGRIP1 (cRPGRIP1) was based on cDNA amplification. Absolute quantification of the expression level of cRPGRIP1 splice variants was determined by qRT-PCR. Regulatory structures were examined by computational analysis of comparative genomics. cRPGRIP1 encompasses 25 exons that harbor a 3627-bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a 1209-amino-acid (aa)-predicted protein. In addition to the main transcript, five full-length and several partial cRPGRIP1 isoforms were identified revealing four alternative 3'-terminal exons--24, 19a, 19c, and 19d--three of which could potentially produce C-terminally truncated proteins that lack the RPGR-interacting domain. A complex organization of the 5'-UTR for the cRPGRIP1 splice products have been described, with a common promoter driving multiple isoforms, including four full-length transcripts using the 3'-terminal exon 24. In addition, a potential alternative internal promoter was revealed to initiate at least two cRPGRIP1 splice variants sharing the same 3'-terminal exon 19c. Transcription initiation sites were highly supported by conserved arrangements of cis-elements predicted in a bioinformatic analysis of orthologous RPGRIP1 promoter regions. The use of alternative transcription start and termination sites results in substantial heterogeneity of cRPGRIP1 transcripts, many of which are likely to have tissue-specific expression. The identified exon-intron structure of cRPGRIP1 isoforms provides a basis for evaluating the gene defects underlying inherited retinal disorders in dogs.

  17. Diagnosis of Breast Cancer Tissues Using 785 nm Miniature Raman Spectrometer and Pattern Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingbo Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available For achieving the development of a portable, low-cost and in vivo cancer diagnosis instrument, a laser 785 nm miniature Raman spectrometer was used to acquire the Raman spectra for breast cancer detection in this paper. However, because of the low spectral signal-to-noise ratio, it is difficult to achieve high discrimination accuracy by using the miniature Raman spectrometer. Therefore, a pattern recognition method of the adaptive net analyte signal (NAS weight k-local hyperplane (ANWKH is proposed to increase the classification accuracy. ANWKH is an extension and improvement of K-local hyperplane distance nearest-neighbor (HKNN, and combines the advantages of the adaptive weight k-local hyperplane (AWKH and the net analyte signal (NAS. In this algorithm, NAS was first used to eliminate the influence caused by other non-target factors. Then, the distance between the test set samples and hyperplane was calculated with consideration of the feature weights. The HKNN only works well for small values of the nearest-neighbor. However, the accuracy decreases with increasing values of the nearest-neighbor. The method presented in this paper can resolve the basic shortcoming by using the feature weights. The original spectra are projected into the vertical subspace without the objective factors. NAS was employed to obtain the spectra without irrelevant information. NAS can improve the classification accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of breast cancer early diagnosis. Experimental results of Raman spectra detection in vitro of breast tissues showed that the proposed algorithm can obtain high classification accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity. This paper demonstrates that the ANWKH algorithm is feasible for early clinical diagnosis of breast cancer in the future.

  18. Recurrence patterns after resection of soft tissue sarcomas of the chest wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Robert R; Sima, Camelia S; Moraco, Nicole H; Rusch, Valerie W; Huang, James

    2013-10-01

    Soft tissue sarcoma (STS) of the chest wall is uncommon, and our knowledge is limited to small, single institutional case series. Although some series have examined prognostic factors for survival with this rare set of neoplasms, our knowledge of the patterns of relapse is limited. We performed a retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database of consecutive patients treated for STS of the chest wall. Predictors of survival and recurrence were analyzed using Cox and competing-risk regression analyses. From 1989 to 2011, 192 patients underwent resection for STS of the chest wall. The most common histopathologic type was desmoid (33 [17%]), followed by undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma (32 [16%]), liposarcoma (22 [11%]), and myxofibrosarcoma (22 [11%]). The median follow-up was 50.9 months. The 5- and 10-year survival rates were 73% and 61%, respectively. Recurrences occurred in 45 patients (23%): 17 developed local recurrences, and 28 developed distant recurrences. Among the patients who developed recurrences, the median time to event was 11.6 months for local recurrences and 13.5 months for distant recurrences. The most common histologic type among recurrences was undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma (n = 12), and the most common site of distant recurrences was lung (n = 18). The primary treatment modality for both local and distant recurrences was surgical resection; median survival after recurrence was 19.4 months. Recurrences of STS are common after surgical resection. Although local or distant recurrences can occur soon after surgery, both can often be treated with resection, producing reasonable outcomes. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Use of diffusion magnetic resonance imaging to correlate the developmental changes in grape berry tissue structure with water diffusion patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Ryan J; Stait-Gardner, Timothy; Clarke, Simon J; Rogiers, Suzy Y; Bobek, Gabriele; Price, William S

    2014-01-01

    Over the course of grape berry development, the tissues of the berry undergo numerous morphological transformations in response to processes such as water and solute accumulation and cell division, growth and senescence. These transformations are expected to produce changes to the diffusion of water through these tissues detectable using diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To assess this non-invasive technique diffusion was examined over the course of grape berry development, and in plant tissues with contrasting oil content. In this study, the fruit of Vitis vinfera L. cv. Semillon at seven different stages of berry development, from four weeks post-anthesis to over-ripe, were imaged using diffusion tensor and transverse relaxation MRI acquisition protocols. Variations in diffusive motion between these stages of development were then linked to known events in the morphological development of the grape berry. Within the inner mesocarp of the berry, preferential directions of diffusion became increasingly apparent as immature berries increased in size and then declined as berries progressed through the ripening and senescence phases. Transverse relaxation images showed radial striation patterns throughout the sub-tissue, initiating at the septum and vascular systems located at the centre of the berry, and terminating at the boundary between the inner and outer mesocarp. This study confirms that these radial patterns are due to bands of cells of alternating width that extend across the inner mesocarp. Preferential directions of diffusion were also noted in young grape seed nucelli prior to their dehydration. These observations point towards a strong association between patterns of diffusion within grape berries and the underlying tissue structures across berry development. A diffusion tensor image of a post-harvest olive demonstrated that the technique is applicable to tissues with high oil content. This study demonstrates that diffusion MRI is a powerful and

  20. Physiologically Distributed Loading Patterns Drive the Formation of Zonally Organized Collagen Structures in Tissue-Engineered Meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puetzer, Jennifer L; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2016-07-01

    The meniscus is a dense fibrocartilage tissue that withstands the complex loads of the knee via a unique organization of collagen fibers. Attempts to condition engineered menisci with compression or tensile loading alone have failed to reproduce complex structure on the microscale or anatomic scale. Here we show that axial loading of anatomically shaped tissue-engineered meniscus constructs produced spatial distributions of local strain similar to those seen in the meniscus when the knee is loaded at full extension. Such loading drove formation of tissue with large organized collagen fibers, levels of mechanical anisotropy, and compressive moduli that match native tissue. Loading accelerated the development of native-sized and aligned circumferential and radial collagen fibers. These loading patterns contained both tensile and compressive components that enhanced the major biochemical and functional properties of the meniscus, with loading significantly improved glycosaminoglycan (GAG) accumulation 200-250%, collagen accumulation 40-55%, equilibrium modulus 1000-1800%, and tensile moduli 500-1200% (radial and circumferential). Furthermore, this study demonstrates local changes in mechanical environment drive heterogeneous tissue development and organization within individual constructs, highlighting the importance of recapitulating native loading environments. Loaded menisci developed cartilage-like tissue with rounded cells, a dense collagen matrix, and increased GAG accumulation in the more compressively loaded horns, and fibrous collagen-rich tissue in the more tensile loaded outer 2/3, similar to native menisci. Loaded constructs reached a level of organization not seen in any previous engineered menisci and demonstrate great promise as meniscal replacements.

  1. A genome-wide study of DNA methylation patterns and gene expression levels in multiple human and chimpanzee tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athma A Pai

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The modification of DNA by methylation is an important epigenetic mechanism that affects the spatial and temporal regulation of gene expression. Methylation patterns have been described in many contexts within and across a range of species. However, the extent to which changes in methylation might underlie inter-species differences in gene regulation, in particular between humans and other primates, has not yet been studied. To this end, we studied DNA methylation patterns in livers, hearts, and kidneys from multiple humans and chimpanzees, using tissue samples for which genome-wide gene expression data were also available. Using the multi-species gene expression and methylation data for 7,723 genes, we were able to study the role of promoter DNA methylation in the evolution of gene regulation across tissues and species. We found that inter-tissue methylation patterns are often conserved between humans and chimpanzees. However, we also found a large number of gene expression differences between species that might be explained, at least in part, by corresponding differences in methylation levels. In particular, we estimate that, in the tissues we studied, inter-species differences in promoter methylation might underlie as much as 12%-18% of differences in gene expression levels between humans and chimpanzees.

  2. Differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Ciarlet, Philippe G

    2007-01-01

    This book gives the basic notions of differential geometry, such as the metric tensor, the Riemann curvature tensor, the fundamental forms of a surface, covariant derivatives, and the fundamental theorem of surface theory in a selfcontained and accessible manner. Although the field is often considered a classical one, it has recently been rejuvenated, thanks to the manifold applications where it plays an essential role. The book presents some important applications to shells, such as the theory of linearly and nonlinearly elastic shells, the implementation of numerical methods for shells, and

  3. Seasonal patterns in δ2 H values of multiple tissues from Andean birds provide insights into elevational migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas, Mariana; Newsome, Seth D; Blake, John G

    2016-12-01

    Elevational migration is a widespread phenomenon in tropical avifauna but it is difficult to identify using traditional approaches. Hydrogen isotope (δ 2 H) values of precipitation decrease with elevation so δ 2 H analysis of multiple bird tissues with different isotopic incorporation rates may be a reliable method for characterizing seasonal elevational migration. Here we compare δ 2 H values in metabolically inert (feathers and claws) and metabolically active (whole blood) tissues to examine whether an upslope migration occurs prior to the breeding season in the Yungas Manakin (Chiroxiphia boliviana). We compare results from C. boliviana with data from a known elevational migrant, the Streak-necked Flycatcher (Mionectes striaticollis). Opposite to our expectations, tissue δ 2 H values increased over time, largely reflecting seasonal patterns in precipitation δ 2 H rather than elevational effects; linear mixed-effects models with strongest support included ordinal date, tissue type, and elevation. This seasonal increase in precipitation δ 2 H is a general phenomenon in both tropical and temperate mountain ranges. We use these data to propose a hypothetical framework that predicts different patterns in tissue δ 2 H values collected in different seasons from residents and elevational migrants. This framework can serve as a reference for future studies that assess elevational migration in birds and other animals. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  4. The Pattern of Adipose Tissue Accumulation during Early Infancy Provides an Environment for the Development of Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libraty, Daniel H; Wang, Pengyan; Guo, Zhiru; Bigcas, Venelle; Brion, Job D; Capeding, Rosario Z

    2015-12-01

    Dengue is the most prevalent arthropod-borne viral illness in humans with half of the world's population at risk. During early infancy, severe dengue can develop after a primary dengue virus infection. There has been a clinical observation that severe dengue during the first year of life is seen only in chubby infants. We examined the associations between the development of severe dengue and adipose tissue accumulation patterns during the first year of life in a prospective observational clinical study of infants and dengue virus infections. We found that adipose tissue contains two potential targets for dengue virus infection and production- adipocytes and adipose tissue macrophages. During the first year of life, total body adiposity and visceral adipose tissue stores were at their highest levels in early infancy. Early infancy was also characterized by a relative decrease in alternatively activated (anti-inflammatory) macrophages, and a relative increase in circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines. The data has been used to propose a model where the adipose tissue accumulation pattern and pro-inflammatory environment during early infancy provide the conditions for the potential development of severe dengue in immune-susceptible infants.

  5. Characterization of cross-tissue genetic-epigenetic effects and their patterns in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Dongdong; Chen, Jiayu; Perrone-Bizzozero, Nora; Bustillo, Juan R; Du, Yuhui; Calhoun, Vince D; Liu, Jingyu

    2018-02-26

    One of the major challenges in current psychiatric epigenetic studies is the tissue specificity of epigenetic changes since access to brain samples is limited. Peripheral tissues have been studied as surrogates but the knowledge of cross-tissue genetic-epigenetic characteristics remains largely unknown. In this work, we conducted a comprehensive investigation of genetic influence on DNA methylation across brain and peripheral tissues with the aim to characterize cross-tissue genetic-epigenetic effects and their roles in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders. Genome-wide methylation quantitative trait loci (meQTLs) from brain prefrontal cortex, whole blood, and saliva were identified separately and compared. Focusing on cis-acting effects, we tested the enrichment of cross-tissue meQTLs among cross-tissue expression QTLs and genetic risk loci of various diseases, including major psychiatric disorders. CpGs targeted by cross-tissue meQTLs were also tested for genomic distribution and functional enrichment as well as their contribution to methylation correlation across tissues. Finally, a consensus co-methylation network analysis on the cross-tissue meQTL targeted CpGs was performed on data of the three tissues collected from schizophrenia patients and controls. We found a significant overlap of cis meQTLs (45-73 %) and targeted CpG sites (31-68 %) among tissues. The majority of cross-tissue meQTLs showed consistent signs of cis-acting effects across tissues. They were significantly enriched in genetic risk loci of various diseases, especially schizophrenia, and also enriched in cross-tissue expression QTLs. Compared to CpG sites not targeted by any meQTLs, cross-tissue targeted CpGs were more distributed in CpG island shores and enhancer regions, and more likely had strong correlation with methylation levels across tissues. The targeted CpGs were also annotated to genes enriched in multiple psychiatric disorders and neurodevelopment-related pathways. Finally

  6. Effects of chronic severe pulmonary regurgitation and percutaneous valve repair on right ventricular geometry and contractility assessed by tissue Doppler echocardiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, Jesper; Iversen, Kasper K; Vejlstrup, Niels G

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary regurgitation (PR) following repair of right ventricular (RV) outflow obstruction is related to slowly progressive RV dilatation and heart failure and will eventually require surgical intervention, but optimal timing of pulmonary valve replacement is challenging. Tissue Doppler based...

  7. Experimental research of ZrO{sub 2}/BCP/PCL scaffold with complex pore pattern for bone tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sa, Min Woo; Shin, Hae Ri; Kim, Jong Young [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Recently, synthetic biopolymers and bioceramics such as poly (-caprolactone)(PCL), hydroxyapatite, tricalcium phosphate, biphasic calcium phosphate(BCP), and zirconia have been used as substrates to generate various tissues or organs in tissue engineering. Thus, the purpose of this study was the characterization of ZrO{sub 2}/BCP/PCL(ZBP) scaffold for bone tissue regeneration. Based on the result of single-line test, blended 3D ZBP scaffolds with fully interconnected pores and new complex pore pattern of -type and staggered-type were successfully fabricated using a polymer deposition system. Furthermore, the effect of ZBP scaffold on mechanical property was analyzed. In addition, in vitro cell interaction of ZBP scaffold on MG63 cells was evaluated using a cell counting kit-8(CCK-8) assay.

  8. An anisotropically and heterogeneously aligned patterned electrospun scaffold with tailored mechanical property and improved bioactivity for vascular tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, He; Li, Haiyan; Ke, Qinfei; Chang, Jiang

    2015-04-29

    The development of vascular scaffolds with controlled mechanical properties and stimulatory effects on biological activities of endothelial cells still remains a significant challenge to vascular tissue engineering. In this work, we reported an innovative approach to prepare a new type of vascular scaffolds with anisotropically and heterogeneously aligned patterns using electrospinning technique with unique wire spring templates, and further investigated the structural effects of the patterned electrospun scaffolds on mechanical properties and angiogenic differentiation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Results showed that anisotropically aligned patterned nanofibrous structure was obtained by depositing nanofibers on template in a structurally different manner, one part of nanofibers densely deposited on the embossments of wire spring and formed cylindrical-like structures in the transverse direction, while others loosely suspended and aligned along the longitudinal direction, forming a three-dimensional porous microstructure. We further found that such structures could efficiently control the mechanical properties of electrospun vascular scaffolds in both longitudinal and transverse directions by altering the interval distances between the embossments of patterned scaffolds. When HUVECs were cultured on scaffolds with different microstructures, the patterned scaffolds distinctively promoted adhesion of HUVECs at early stage and proliferation during the culture period. Most importantly, cells experienced a large shape change associated with cell cytoskeleton and nuclei remodeling, leading to a stimulatory effect on angiogenesis differentiation of HUVECs by the patterned microstructures of electrospun scaffolds, and the scaffolds with larger distances of intervals showed a higher stimulatory effect. These results suggest that electrospun scaffolds with the anisotropically and heterogeneously aligned patterns, which could efficiently control the

  9. Proteomic patterns analysis with multivariate calculations as a promising tool for prompt differentiation of early stage lung tissue with cancer and unchanged tissue material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grodzki Tomasz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung cancer diagnosis in tissue material with commonly used histological techniques is sometimes inconvenient and in a number of cases leads to ambiguous conclusions. Frequently advanced immunostaining techniques have to be employed, yet they are both time consuming and limited. In this study a proteomic approach is presented which may help provide unambiguous pathologic diagnosis of tissue material. Methods Lung tissue material found to be pathologically changed was prepared to isolate proteome with fast and non selective procedure. Isolated peptides and proteins in ranging from 3.5 to 20 kDa were analysed directly using high resolution mass spectrometer (MALDI-TOF/TOF with sinapic acid as a matrix. Recorded complex spectra of a single run were then analyzed with multivariate statistical analysis algorithms (principle component analysis, classification methods. In the applied protocol we focused on obtaining the spectra richest in protein signals constituting a pattern of change within the sample containing detailed information about its protein composition. Advanced statistical methods were to indicate differences between examined groups. Results Obtained results indicate changes in proteome profiles of changed tissues in comparison to physiologically unchanged material (control group which were reflected in the result of principle component analysis (PCA. Points representing spectra of control group were located in different areas of multidimensional space and were less diffused in comparison to cancer tissues. Three different classification algorithms showed recognition capability of 100% regarding classification of examined material into an appropriate group. Conclusion The application of the presented protocol and method enabled finding pathological changes in tissue material regardless of localization and size of abnormalities in the sample volume. Proteomic profile as a complex, rich in signals spectrum of proteins

  10. A texture based pattern recognition approach to distinguish melanoma from non-melanoma cells in histopathological tissue microarray sections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elton Rexhepaj

    Full Text Available AIMS: Immunohistochemistry is a routine practice in clinical cancer diagnostics and also an established technology for tissue-based research regarding biomarker discovery efforts. Tedious manual assessment of immunohistochemically stained tissue needs to be fully automated to take full advantage of the potential for high throughput analyses enabled by tissue microarrays and digital pathology. Such automated tools also need to be reproducible for different experimental conditions and biomarker targets. In this study we present a novel supervised melanoma specific pattern recognition approach that is fully automated and quantitative. METHODS AND RESULTS: Melanoma samples were immunostained for the melanocyte specific target, Melan-A. Images representing immunostained melanoma tissue were then digitally processed to segment regions of interest, highlighting Melan-A positive and negative areas. Color deconvolution was applied to each region of interest to separate the channel containing the immunohistochemistry signal from the hematoxylin counterstaining channel. A support vector machine melanoma classification model was learned from a discovery melanoma patient cohort (n = 264 and subsequently validated on an independent cohort of melanoma patient tissue sample images (n = 157. CONCLUSION: Here we propose a novel method that takes advantage of utilizing an immuhistochemical marker highlighting melanocytes to fully automate the learning of a general melanoma cell classification model. The presented method can be applied on any protein of interest and thus provides a tool for quantification of immunohistochemistry-based protein expression in melanoma.

  11. Multifunctional surfaces with biomimetic nanofibres and drug-eluting micro-patterns for infection control and bone tissue formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XN Chen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available For long-term orthopaedic implants, the creation of a surface that is repulsive to bacteria while adhesive to tissue cells represents a promising strategy to control infection. To obtain such multifunctional surfaces, two possible approaches were explored to incorporate a model antibiotic, rifampicin (Rf, into the osteogenic polycaprolactone (PCL/chitosan (CHS biomimetic nanofibre meshes by (1 blending Rf into the electrospinning solutions and then electrospinning into nanofibres (i.e., Rf-incorporating fibres, or (2 depositing Rf-containing poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA micro-patterns onto the PCL/chitosan nanofibre meshes via ink-jet printing (i.e., Rf-eluting micro-pattern/fibre. Rapid release of Rf from both meshes was measured even though a relatively slower release rate was obtained from the Rf-eluting micro-pattern ones. Antibacterial assay with Staphylococcus epidermidis showed that both mesh surfaces could effectively kill bacteria and prevent biofilm formation. However, only Rf-eluting micro-pattern meshes favoured the attachment, spreading and metabolic activity of preosteoblasts in the cell culture study. Furthermore, the Rf-eluting micro-pattern meshes could better support the osteogenic differentiation of preosteoblasts by up-regulating the gene expression of bone markers (type I collagen and alkaline phosphatase. Clearly, compared to Rf-incorporating nanofibre meshes, Rf-eluting micro-patterns could effectively prevent biofilm formation without sacrificing the osteogenic properties of PCL/chitosan nanofibre surfaces. This finding provides an innovative avenue to design multifunctional surfaces for enhancing bone tissue formation while controlling infection.

  12. Enhancer of the rudimentary gene homologue (ERH expression pattern in sporadic human breast cancer and normal breast tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knüchel Ruth

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human gene ERH (Enhancer of the Rudimentary gene Homologue has previously been identified by in silico analysis of four million ESTs as a gene differentially expressed in breast cancer. The biological function of ERH protein has not been fully elucidated, however functions in cell cycle progression, pyrimidine metabolism a possible interaction with p21(Cip1/Waf1 via the Ciz1 zinc finger protein have been suggested. The aim of the present study was a systematic characterization of ERH expression in human breast cancer in order to evaluate possible clinical applications of this molecule. Methods The expression pattern of ERH was analyzed using multiple tissue northern blots (MTN on a panel of 16 normal human tissues and two sets of malignant/normal breast and ovarian tissue samples. ERH expression was further analyzed in breast cancer and normal breast tissues and in tumorigenic as well as non-tumorigenic breast cancer cell lines, using quantitative RT-PCR and non-radioisotopic in situ hybridization (ISH. Results Among normal human tissues, ERH expression was most abundant in testis, heart, ovary, prostate, and liver. In the two MTN sets of malignant/normal breast and ovarian tissue,ERH was clearly more abundantly expressed in all tumours than in normal tissue samples. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses showed that ERH expression was significantly more abundant in tumorigenic than in non-tumorigenic breast cancer cell lines (4.5-fold; p = 0.05, two-tailed Mann-Whitney U-test; the same trend was noted in a set of 25 primary invasive breast cancers and 16 normal breast tissue samples (2.5-fold; p = 0.1. These findings were further confirmed by non-radioisotopic ISH in human breast cancer and normal breast tissue. Conclusion ERH expression is clearly up-regulated in malignant as compared with benign breast cells both in primary human breast cancer and in cell models of breast cancer. Since similar results were obtained for ovarian

  13. Microcontact printing of substrate-bound protein patterns for cell and tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Martin; Bastmeyer, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Patterned distributions of signalling molecules play fundamental roles during embryonic development. Several attempts have been made to reproduce these patterns in vitro. In order to study substrate-bound or membrane proteins, microcontact printing (μCP) is a suitable method for tethering molecules on various surfaces. Here, we describe three μCP variants to produce patterns down to feature sizes of about 300 nm, which are highly variable with respect to shape, protein spacing, and density. Briefly, the desired pattern is etched into a silicon master, which is then used as a master for the printing process. Each variant offers certain advantages and the method of choice depends on the desired protein and the biological question.

  14. Tissue distribution and deposition pattern of a cellulosic parenchyma-specific protein from cassava roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrônio A.S. Souza

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available A protein with a molecular mass of 22kDa was purified from the cellulosic parenchyma of cassava roots. The amino acid composition of the protein was determined and antibodies generated against the purified protein were used to show that the concentration of the protein remains unchanged during root "tuber" formation. By using a tissue printing technique, as well as western blot, it was shown that the cellulosic parenchyma was the only root tissue in which the protein was deposited.

  15. Linear and branched perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) isomer patterns differ among several tissues and blood of polar bears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaves, Alana K; Letcher, Robert J

    2013-09-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is a globally distributed persistent organic pollutant that has been found to bioaccumulate and biomagnify in aquatic food webs. Although principally in its linear isomeric configuration, 21-35% of the PFOS manufactured via electrochemical fluorination is produced as a branched structural isomer. PFOS isomer patterns were investigated in multiple tissues of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from East Greenland. The liver (n = 9), blood (n = 19), brain (n = 16), muscle (n = 5), and adipose (n = 5) were analyzed for linear PFOS (n-PFOS), as well as multiple mono- and di-trifluoromethyl-substituted branched isomers. n-PFOS accounted for 93.0 ± 0.5% of Σ-PFOS isomer concentrations in the liver, whereas the proportion was significantly lower (pblood (85.4 ± 0.5%). Branched isomers were quantifiable in the liver and blood, but not in the brain, muscle, or adipose. In both the liver and blood, 6-perfluoromethylheptane sulfonate (P6MHpS) was the dominant branched isomer (2.61 ± 0.10%, and 3.26 ± 0.13% of Σ-PFOS concentrations, respectively). No di-trifluoromethyl-substituted isomers were detectable in any of the tissues analyzed. These tissue-specific isomer patterns suggest isomer-specific pharmacokinetics, perhaps due to differences in protein affinities, and thus differences in protein interactions, as well transport, absorption, and/or metabolism in the body. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterizing genes with distinct methylation patterns in the context of protein-protein interaction network: application to human brain tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongsheng; Xu, Juan; Chen, Hong; Zhao, Zheng; Li, Shengli; Bai, Jing; Wu, Aiwei; Jiang, Chunjie; Wang, Yuan; Su, Bin; Li, Xia

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation is an essential epigenetic mechanism involved in transcriptional control. However, how genes with different methylation patterns are assembled in the protein-protein interaction network (PPIN) remains a mystery. In the present study, we systematically dissected the characterization of genes with different methylation patterns in the PPIN. A negative association was detected between the methylation levels in the brain tissues and topological centralities. By focusing on two classes of genes with considerably different methylation levels in the brain tissues, namely the low methylated genes (LMGs) and high methylated genes (HMGs), we found that their organizing principles in the PPIN are distinct. The LMGs tend to be the center of the PPIN, and attacking them causes a more deleterious effect on the network integrity. Furthermore, the LMGs express their functions in a modular pattern and substantial differences in functions are observed between the two types of genes. The LMGs are enriched in the basic biological functions, such as binding activity and regulation of transcription. More importantly, cancer genes, especially recessive cancer genes, essential genes, and aging-related genes were all found more often in the LMGs. Additionally, our analysis presented that the intra-classes communications are enhanced, but inter-classes communications are repressed. Finally, a functional complementation was revealed between methylation and miRNA regulation in the human genome. We have elucidated the assembling principles of genes with different methylation levels in the context of the PPIN, providing key insights into the complex epigenetic regulation mechanisms.

  17. Subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow in the forefoot during 24 hours. Labeling pattern and reproducibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelnes, Rolf; Bülow, J; Tønnesen, K H

    1987-01-01

    (range: 3-90 days). The patients were studied under two different conditions. Firstly, during the day in the erect position, awake (sitting, standing and quiet walking) and secondly, during night hours in the supine position, asleep. The coefficient of variation of nocturnal adipose tissue blood flow......Wash-out of 133xenon from a local depot in the subcutaneous adipose tissue in the forefoot was measured continuously during 24 hours on subsequent recordings in 51 feet (normal circulation: 10, intermittent claudication: 22 and ischaemic nocturnal rest pain: 19) with a mean time interval of 26 days...... was calculated to 10%, and for the ratio of blood flow from day to night to 5%. The method is thus considered apt as a monitor in the treatment of peripheral vascular disease, for example, surgery and medical therapy. As predominant source of error is the formation of oedema....

  18. Two-dimensional patterning of thin coatings for the control of tissue outgrowth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thissen, H.; Johnson, G.; Hartley, P.G.

    2006-01-01

    by deposition of thin acetaldehyde and allylamine plasma polymer coatings on silicon wafer and FEP substrates, followed by grafting of a protein resistant layer of poly(ethylene oxide). Spatially controlled patterning of the surface chemistry was achieved by masking during plasma polymerization. XPS and AFM...

  19. Integral geometry and holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czech, Bartłomiej; Lamprou, Lampros; McCandlish, Samuel [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, Stanford University,Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Sully, James [Theory Group, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory,Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2015-10-27

    We present a mathematical framework which underlies the connection between information theory and the bulk spacetime in the AdS{sub 3}/CFT{sub 2} correspondence. A key concept is kinematic space: an auxiliary Lorentzian geometry whose metric is defined in terms of conditional mutual informations and which organizes the entanglement pattern of a CFT state. When the field theory has a holographic dual obeying the Ryu-Takayanagi proposal, kinematic space has a direct geometric meaning: it is the space of bulk geodesics studied in integral geometry. Lengths of bulk curves are computed by kinematic volumes, giving a precise entropic interpretation of the length of any bulk curve. We explain how basic geometric concepts — points, distances and angles — are reflected in kinematic space, allowing one to reconstruct a large class of spatial bulk geometries from boundary entanglement entropies. In this way, kinematic space translates between information theoretic and geometric descriptions of a CFT state. As an example, we discuss in detail the static slice of AdS{sub 3} whose kinematic space is two-dimensional de Sitter space.

  20. Subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow in the forefoot during 24 hours. Labeling pattern and reproducibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelnes, Rolf; Bülow, J; Tønnesen, K H

    1987-01-01

    (range: 3-90 days). The patients were studied under two different conditions. Firstly, during the day in the erect position, awake (sitting, standing and quiet walking) and secondly, during night hours in the supine position, asleep. The coefficient of variation of nocturnal adipose tissue blood flow...... was calculated to 10%, and for the ratio of blood flow from day to night to 5%. The method is thus considered apt as a monitor in the treatment of peripheral vascular disease, for example, surgery and medical therapy. As predominant source of error is the formation of oedema....

  1. Markov chain-based promoter structure modeling for tissue-specific expression pattern prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbon, Alexis; Miyamoto, Yuki; Takimoto, Noriko; Kusakabe, Takehiro; Nakai, Kenta

    2008-02-29

    Transcriptional regulation is the first level of regulation of gene expression and is therefore a major topic in computational biology. Genes with similar expression patterns can be assumed to be co-regulated at the transcriptional level by promoter sequences with a similar structure. Current approaches for modeling shared regulatory features tend to focus mainly on clustering of cis-regulatory sites. Here we introduce a Markov chain-based promoter structure model that uses both shared motifs and shared features from an input set of promoter sequences to predict candidate genes with similar expression. The model uses positional preference, order, and orientation of motifs. The trained model is used to score a genomic set of promoter sequences: high-scoring promoters are assumed to have a structure similar to the input sequences and are thus expected to drive similar expression patterns. We applied our model on two datasets in Caenorhabditis elegans and in Ciona intestinalis. Both computational and experimental verifications indicate that this model is capable of predicting candidate promoters driving similar expression patterns as the input-regulatory sequences. This model can be useful for finding promising candidate genes for wet-lab experiments and for increasing our understanding of transcriptional regulation.

  2. Determination of Soft Tissue Breakpoint Based on Its Temperature Enhancement Pattern: In Vivo and In Vitro Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austerlitz, C; Gkigkitzis, I; Barros, A L S; Melo, J; Haranas, I; Campos, D

    2017-01-01

    The breakpoint of fresh commercial meats and in vivo mice has been assessed using tissue temperature enhancement pattern. A 1 cm length and 0.1 cm diameter gold rod was implanted in fresh chicken breast, beef, fish, and in vivo Mus musculus white mice and was insonated with ultrasound. The temperature enhancement of gold rods was measured with a needle type thermistor over a temperature range from 35 to 50 °C. From these results the breakpoints were determined by plotting the gold rod temperature versus ultrasound exposure duration using the interception point of two curves fitted by a linear regression equations of thermal response above and below 43 °C. The linear correlation coefficients for all fitted curves lie within 0.985 and 0.997. The breakpoints were found to be 42.1 ± 1.1, 42.3 ± 0.9, 42.6 ± 0.8 and 43.5 ± 0.6 for fish, chicken breast, beef and in vivo Mus musculus white mice, respectively. The interception of the thermal response curves above and below 43 °C. Soft tissue temperature enhancement pattern has demonstrated to be a fast method to determine breakpoint. It denotes the temperature where cells may start to be destroyed and may be used to spot the startup point in dosimetry of hyperthermia cancer therapy.

  3. Differential Temporal Evolution Patterns in Brain Temperature in Different Ischemic Tissues in a Monkey Model of Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihua Sun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain temperature is elevated in acute ischemic stroke, especially in the ischemic penumbra (IP. We attempted to investigate the dynamic evolution of brain temperature in different ischemic regions in a monkey model of middle cerebral artery occlusion. The brain temperature of different ischemic regions was measured with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS, and the evolution processes of brain temperature were compared among different ischemic regions. We found that the normal (baseline brain temperature of the monkey brain was 37.16°C. In the artery occlusion stage, the mean brain temperature of ischemic tissue was 1.16°C higher than the baseline; however, this increase was region dependent, with 1.72°C in the IP, 1.08°C in the infarct core, and 0.62°C in the oligemic region. After recanalization, the brain temperature of the infarct core showed a pattern of an initial decrease accompanied by a subsequent increase. However, the brain temperature of the IP and oligemic region showed a monotonously and slowly decreased pattern. Our study suggests that in vivo measurement of brain temperature could help to identify whether ischemic tissue survives.

  4. Complex analysis and geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Alessandro

    1993-01-01

    The papers in this wide-ranging collection report on the results of investigations from a number of linked disciplines, including complex algebraic geometry, complex analytic geometry of manifolds and spaces, and complex differential geometry.

  5. Non-Riemannian geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Eisenhart, Luther Pfahler

    2005-01-01

    This concise text by a prominent mathematician deals chiefly with manifolds dominated by the geometry of paths. Topics include asymmetric and symmetric connections, the projective geometry of paths, and the geometry of sub-spaces. 1927 edition.

  6. Geometry of the Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurevich, L.Eh.; Gliner, Eh.B.

    1978-01-01

    Problems of investigating the Universe space-time geometry are described on a popular level. Immediate space-time geometries, corresponding to three cosmologic models are considered. Space-time geometry of a closed model is the spherical Riemann geonetry, of an open model - is the Lobachevskij geometry; and of a plane model - is the Euclidean geometry. The Universe real geometry in the contemporary epoch of development is based on the data testifying to the fact that the Universe is infinitely expanding

  7. 3D-printed gelatin scaffolds of differing pore geometry modulate hepatocyte function and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Phillip L; Green, Richard M; Shah, Ramille N

    2018-03-15

    Three dimensional (3D) printing is highly amenable to the fabrication of tissue-engineered organs of a repetitive microstructure such as the liver. The creation of uniform and geometrically repetitive tissue scaffolds can also allow for the control over cellular aggregation and nutrient diffusion. However, the effect of differing geometries, while controlling for pore size, has yet to be investigated in the context of hepatocyte function. In this study, we show the ability to precisely control pore geometry of 3D-printed gelatin scaffolds. An undifferentiated hepatocyte cell line (HUH7) demonstrated high viability and proliferation when seeded on 3D-printed scaffolds of two different geometries. However, hepatocyte specific functions (albumin secretion, CYP activity, and bile transport) increases in more interconnected 3D-printed gelatin cultures compared to a less interconnected geometry and to 2D controls. Additionally, we also illustrate the disparity between gene expression and protein function in simple 2D culture modes, and that recreation of a physiologically mimetic 3D environment is necessary to induce both expression and function of cultured hepatocytes. Three dimensional (3D) printing provides tissue engineers the ability spatially pattern cells and materials in precise geometries, however the biological effects of scaffold geometry on soft tissues such as the liver have not been rigorously investigated. In this manuscript, we describe a method to 3D print gelatin into well-defined repetitive geometries that show clear differences in biological effects on seeded hepatocytes. We show that a relatively simple and widely used biomaterial, such as gelatin, can significantly modulate biological processes when fabricated into specific 3D geometries. Furthermore, this study expands upon past research into hepatocyte aggregation by demonstrating how it can be manipulated to enhance protein function, and how function and expression may not precisely correlate in

  8. Regulation of cell behavior and tissue patterning by bioelectrical signals: challenges and opportunities for biomedical engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Michael; Stevenson, Claire G

    2012-01-01

    Achieving control over cell behavior and pattern formation requires molecular-level understanding of regulatory mechanisms. Alongside transcriptional networks and biochemical gradients, there functions an important system of cellular communication and control: transmembrane voltage gradients (V(mem)). Bioelectrical signals encoded in spatiotemporal changes of V(mem) control cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Moreover, endogenous bioelectrical gradients serve as instructive cues mediating anatomical polarity and other organ-level aspects of morphogenesis. In the past decade, significant advances in molecular physiology have enabled the development of new genetic and biophysical tools for the investigation and functional manipulation of bioelectric cues. Recent data implicate V(mem) as a crucial epigenetic regulator of patterning events in embryogenesis, regeneration, and cancer. We review new conceptual and methodological developments in this fascinating field. Bioelectricity offers a novel way of quantitatively understanding regulation of growth and form in vivo, and it reveals tractable, powerful control points that will enable truly transformative applications in bioengineering, regenerative medicine, and synthetic biology.

  9. The design of and chronic tissue response to a composite nerve electrode with patterned stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeberg, M. J.; Stone, M. A.; Triolo, R. J.; Tyler, D. J.

    2017-06-01

    Objective. As neural interfaces demonstrate success in chronic applications, a novel class of reshaping electrodes with patterned regions of stiffness will enable application to a widening range of anatomical locations. Patterning stiff regions and flexible regions of the electrode enables nerve reshaping while accommodating anatomical constraints of various implant locations ranging from peripheral nerves to spinal and autonomic plexi. Approach. Introduced is a new composite electrode enabling patterning of regions of various electrode mechanical properties. The initial demonstration of the composite’s capability is the composite flat interface nerve electrode (C-FINE). The C-FINE is constructed from a sandwich of patterned PEEK within layers of pliable silicone. The shape of the PEEK provides a desired pattern of stiffness: stiff across the width of the nerve to reshape the nerve, but flexible along its length to allow for bending with the nerve. This is particularly important in anatomical locations near joints or organs, and in constrained compartments. We tested pressure and volume design constraints in vitro to verify that the C-FINE can attain a safe cuff-to-nerve ratio (CNR) without impeding intraneural blood flow. We measured nerve function as well as nerve and axonal morphology following 3 month implantation of the C-FINE without wires on feline peripheral nerves in anatomically constrained areas near mobile joints and major blood vessels in both the hind and fore limbs. Main Results. In vitro inflation tests showed effective CNRs (1.93  ±  0.06) that exceeded the industry safety standard of 1.5 at an internal pressure of 20 mmHg. This is less than the 30 mmHg shown to induce loss of conduction or compromise blood flow. Implanted cats showed no changes in physiology or electrophysiology. Behavioral signs were normal suggesting healthy nerves. Motor nerve conduction velocity and compound motor action potential did not change significantly

  10. A comparison of genome-wide DNA methylation patterns between different vascular tissues from patients with coronary heart disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria S Nazarenko

    Full Text Available Epigenetic mechanisms of gene regulation in context of cardiovascular diseases are of considerable interest. So far, our current knowledge of the DNA methylation profiles for atherosclerosis affected and healthy human vascular tissues is still limited. Using the Illumina Infinium Human Methylation27 BeadChip, we performed a genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation in right coronary artery in the area of advanced atherosclerotic plaques, atherosclerotic-resistant internal mammary arteries, and great saphenous veins obtained from same patients with coronary heart disease. The resulting DNA methylation patterns were markedly different between all the vascular tissues. The genes hypomethylated in athero-prone arteries to compare with atherosclerotic-resistant arteries were predominately involved in regulation of inflammation and immune processes, as well as development. The great saphenous veins exhibited an increase of the DNA methylation age in comparison to the internal mammary arteries. Gene ontology analysis for genes harboring hypermethylated CpG-sites in veins revealed the enrichment for biological processes associated with the development. Four CpG-sites located within the MIR10B gene sequence and about 1 kb upstream of the HOXD4 gene were also confirmed as hypomethylated in the independent dataset of the right coronary arteries in the area of advanced atherosclerotic plaques in comparison with the other vascular tissues. The DNA methylation differences observed in vascular tissues of patients with coronary heart disease can provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying the development of pathology and explanation for the difference in graft patency after coronary artery bypass grafting surgery.

  11. Learners engaging with transformation geometry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Grade 12, learners would have been exposed to both visual and analytical strategies. The visual approach is one ... movement), dynamic imagery, memory images and pattern imagery. She found that concrete .... the visual and analytic modes of thinking when working with transformation geometry? We hope then to set out ...

  12. Metabolite profiling of red and blue potatoes revealed cultivar and tissue specific patterns for anthocyanins and other polyphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oertel, Anne; Matros, Andrea; Hartmann, Anja; Arapitsas, Panagiotis; Dehmer, Klaus J; Martens, Stefan; Mock, Hans-Peter

    2017-08-01

    cultivars. Mainly hydroxylation and methylation patterns of the B-ring of dihydroflavonols, leading to the formation of specific anthocyanidin backbones, can be assigned to a distinct coloring of the potato cultivars and tuber tissues. However, basically the same glycosylation and acylation reactions occur regardless of the main anthocyanidin precursor present in the respective red and blue/purple tissue. Thus, the different anthocyanin profiles in red and blue potato cultivars likely relate to superior regulation of the expression and activities of hydroxylases and methyltransferases rather than to differences for downstream glycosyl- and acyltransferases. In this regard, the characterized potato cultivars represent a valuable resource for the molecular analysis of the genetic background and the regulation of anthocyanin side chain modification.

  13. A six months exercise intervention influences the genome-wide DNA methylation pattern in human adipose tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Rönn

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic mechanisms are implicated in gene regulation and the development of different diseases. The epigenome differs between cell types and has until now only been characterized for a few human tissues. Environmental factors potentially alter the epigenome. Here we describe the genome-wide pattern of DNA methylation in human adipose tissue from 23 healthy men, with a previous low level of physical activity, before and after a six months exercise intervention. We also investigate the differences in adipose tissue DNA methylation between 31 individuals with or without a family history of type 2 diabetes. DNA methylation was analyzed using Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip, an array containing 485,577 probes covering 99% RefSeq genes. Global DNA methylation changed and 17,975 individual CpG sites in 7,663 unique genes showed altered levels of DNA methylation after the exercise intervention (q<0.05. Differential mRNA expression was present in 1/3 of gene regions with altered DNA methylation, including RALBP1, HDAC4 and NCOR2 (q<0.05. Using a luciferase assay, we could show that increased DNA methylation in vitro of the RALBP1 promoter suppressed the transcriptional activity (p = 0.03. Moreover, 18 obesity and 21 type 2 diabetes candidate genes had CpG sites with differences in adipose tissue DNA methylation in response to exercise (q<0.05, including TCF7L2 (6 CpG sites and KCNQ1 (10 CpG sites. A simultaneous change in mRNA expression was seen for 6 of those genes. To understand if genes that exhibit differential DNA methylation and mRNA expression in human adipose tissue in vivo affect adipocyte metabolism, we silenced Hdac4 and Ncor2 respectively in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, which resulted in increased lipogenesis both in the basal and insulin stimulated state. In conclusion, exercise induces genome-wide changes in DNA methylation in human adipose tissue, potentially affecting adipocyte metabolism.

  14. Molecular analysis of patterning of conduction tissues in the developing human heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizarov, Aleksander; Devalla, Harsha D; Anderson, Robert H; Passier, Robert; Christoffels, Vincent M; Moorman, Antoon F M

    2011-08-01

    Recent studies in experimental animals have revealed some molecular mechanisms underlying the differentiation of the myocardium making up the conduction system. To date, lack of gene expression data for the developing human conduction system has precluded valid extrapolations from experimental studies to the human situation. We performed immunohistochemical analyses of the expression of key transcription factors, such as ISL1, TBX3, TBX18, and NKX2-5, ion channel HCN4, and connexins in the human embryonic heart. We supplemented our molecular analyses with 3-dimensional reconstructions of myocardial TBX3 expression. TBX3 is expressed in the developing conduction system and in the right venous valve, atrioventricular ring bundles, and retro-aortic nodal region. TBX3-positive myocardium, with exception of the top of the ventricular septum, is devoid of fast-conducting connexin40 and connexin43 and hence identifies slowly conducting pathways. In the early embryonic heart, we found wide expression of the pacemaker channel HCN4 at the venous pole, including the atrial chambers. HCN4 expression becomes confined during later developmental stages to the components of the conduction system. Patterns of expression of transcription factors, known from experimental studies to regulate the development of the sinus node and atrioventricular conduction system, are similar in the human and mouse developing hearts. Our findings point to the comparability of mechanisms governing the development of the cardiac conduction patterning in human and mouse, which provide a molecular basis for understanding the functioning of the human developing heart before formation of a discrete conduction system.

  15. Examination of the Pattern of Growth of Cerebral Tissue Volumes From Hospital Discharge to Early Childhood in Very Preterm Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monson, Brian B; Anderson, Peter J; Matthews, Lillian G; Neil, Jeffrey J; Kapur, Kush; Cheong, Jeanie L Y; Doyle, Lex W; Thompson, Deanne K; Inder, Terrie E

    2016-08-01

    Smaller cerebral volumes at hospital discharge in very preterm (VPT) infants are associated with poor neurobehavioral outcomes. Brain growth from the newborn period to middle childhood has not been explored because longitudinal data have been lacking. To examine the pattern of growth of cerebral tissue volumes from hospital discharge to childhood in VPT infants and to determine perinatal risk factors for impaired brain growth and associations with neurobehavioral outcomes at 7 years. Prospective cohort study of VPT infants (childhood and outcomes in VPT infants. Low brain volumes observed in VPT infants are exaggerated at 7 years. Low brain volume in infancy is associated with long-term functional outcomes, emphasizing the persisting influence of early brain development on subsequent growth and outcomes.

  16. Investigation of the soluble metals in tissue as biological response pattern to environmental pollutants (Gammarus fossarum example).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipović Marijić, Vlatka; Dragun, Zrinka; Sertić Perić, Mirela; Matoničkin Kepčija, Renata; Gulin, Vesna; Velki, Mirna; Ečimović, Sandra; Hackenberger, Branimir K; Erk, Marijana

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, Gammarus fossarum was used to investigate the bioaccumulation and toxic effects of aquatic pollutants in the real environmental conditions. The novelty of the study is the evaluation of soluble tissue metal concentrations in gammarids as indicators in early assessment of metal exposure. In the Sutla River, industrially/rurally/agriculturally influenced catchment in North-Western Croatia, physico-chemical water properties pointed to disturbed ecological status, which was reflected on population scale as more than 50 times lower gammarid density compared to the reference location, Črnomerec Stream. Significantly higher levels of soluble toxic metals (Al, As, Cd, Pb, Sb, Sn, Sr) were observed in gammarids from the Sutla River compared to the reference site and reflected the data on higher total dissolved metal levels in the river water at that site. The soluble metal estimates were supplemented with the common multibiomarker approach, which showed significant biological responses for decreased acetylcholinesterase activity and increased total soluble protein concentrations, confirming stressed environmental conditions for biota in the Sutla River. Biomarker of metal exposure, metallothionein, was not induced and therefore, toxic effect of metals was not confirmed on molecular level. Comparable between-site pattern of soluble toxic metals in gammarids and total dissolved metal levels in water suggests that prior to biomarker response and observed toxic impact, soluble metals in tissue might be used as early warning signs of metal impact in the aquatic environment and improve the assessment of water quality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The expression pattern of the 70-kDa heat shock protein Hspa2 in mouse tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vydra, Natalia; Winiarski, Boleslaw; Rak-Raszewska, Aleksandra; Piglowski, Wojciech; Mazurek, Agnieszka; Scieglinska, Dorota; Widlak, Wieslawa

    2009-09-01

    The highest expression level of a 70-kDa heat shock protein family member Hspa2 is detected specifically in meiotic and post-meiotic male germ cells, which is reflected by original name of this protein, i.e., testis-specific Hsp70. However, this chaperon protein could be also detected in certain somatic tissues. Here, the extra-testicular expression pattern of mouse Hspa2 was analyzed. We found expression of Hspa2 in various epithelial cells including lining of bronchioles and oviduct, columnar epithelium of endometrium, epithelial reticular cells of thymus, transitional epithelium of the urinary bladder, or ependymal cells covering walls of the ventricular system of the brain. Surprisingly, Hspa2 was a putative secretory protein in intestine, endometrial glands and subcommissural organ. Hspa2 was detected in central and peripheral nervous system: in neuron's bodies and fiber tracts, in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles, in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, in enteric ganglia of the gastrointestinal tract. Hspa2 was also expressed in smooth muscles and at low level in immune system (in germinal centers associated with B-lymphocyte production). In addition to somatic tissues listed above, Hspa2 was detected in oocytes arrested at diplotene of the first meiotic division.

  18. Quilt Blocks: Writing in the Geometry Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Michelle; Thomas, Timothy G.

    2005-01-01

    The introduction of quilt pattern consisting of many quilt blocks formed by congruent triangles, for writing by the students in the geometry classrooms, is studied. It is found that the students enjoyed this method and writing also helped in understanding the geometric concepts expanding their vocabulary in geometry.

  19. The flux-based PIN allocation mechanism can generate either canalyzed or diffuse distribution patterns depending on geometry and boundary conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Luke Walker

    Full Text Available Growth and morphogenesis in plants require controlled transport of the plant hormone auxin. An important participant is the auxin effluxing protein PIN, whose polarized subcellular localization allows it to effectively transport auxin large distances through tissues. The flux-based model, in which auxin flux through a wall stimulates PIN allocation to that wall, is a dominant contender among models determining where and in what quantity PIN is allocated to cell walls. In this paper we characterise the behaviour of flux-based PIN allocation models in various tissues of the shoot apical meristem. Arguing from both mathematical analysis and computer simulations, we describe the natural behaviours of this class of models under various circumstances. In particular, we demonstrate the important dichotomy between sink- and source- driven systems, and show that both diffuse and canalized PIN distributions can be generated simultaneously in the same tissue, without model hybridization or variation of PIN-related parameters. This work is performed in the context of the shoot apical and floral meristems and is applicable to the construction of a unified PIN allocation model.

  20. Fabrication and characterization of a novel microparticle with gyrus-patterned surface and growth factor delivery for cartilage tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Sha; Wang Yijuan; Liang Tang; Jin Fang; Liu Shouxin; Jin Yan

    2009-01-01

    Microparticles can serve as substrates for cell amplification and deliver the expanded cells to the site of the defect. It was hypothesized that a novel microparticle combined of sustained and localized delivery of proliferative growth factors and gyrus-patterned surface would influence the cell behaviours of adherence and expansion on the microparticle in the present study. To test the hypothesis, gelatin particles with diameter ranging from 280 to 350 μm were fabricated and were modified by cryogenic freeze-drying treatment and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) incorporation. The results of in vitro chondrocyte culture illustrated that cells could proliferate more obviously on the microparticles with bFGF addition, but no correlation between attachment rate and bFGF was observed. On the other hand, microparticles with gyrus-patterned surface demonstrated the highest cell attachment rate and higher rate of cell growth, in particular on bFGF combined ones. It seems to be a promising candidate as a chondrocyte microparticle and could be the potential application in cartilage tissue engineering.

  1. Activation and Regulation of the Pattern Recognition Receptors in Obesity-Induced Adipose Tissue Inflammation and Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoshi Takatsu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Obesity-associated chronic tissue inflammation is a key contributing factor to type 2 diabetes mellitus, and a number of studies have clearly demonstrated that the immune system and metabolism are highly integrated. Recent advances in deciphering the various immune cells and signaling networks that link the immune and metabolic systems have contributed to our understanding of the pathogenesis of obesity-associated inflammation. Other recent studies have suggested that pattern recognition receptors in the innate immune system recognize various kinds of endogenous and exogenous ligands, and have a crucial role in initiating or promoting obesity-associated chronic inflammation. Importantly, these mediators act on insulin target cells or on insulin-producing cells impairing insulin sensitivity and its secretion. Here, we discuss how various pattern recognition receptors in the immune system underlie the etiology of obesity-associated inflammation and insulin resistance, with a particular focus on the TLR (Toll-like receptor family protein Radioprotective 105 (RP105/myeloid differentiation protein-1 (MD-1.

  2. Unusual Signal Patterns of Break-apart FISH Probes Used in the Diagnosis of Soft Tissue Sarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Gergő; Mihály, Dóra; Sápi, Zoltán

    2017-10-01

    Break-apart FISH probes are the most popular and reliable type of FISH probes used to confirm certain pathological diagnoses. The interpretation is usually easy, however, in some instances it is not so unequivocal. Our aim was to reveal and elucidate the problems occurring in the process of evaluation of the break-apart probe results. Altogether 301 soft tissue sarcomas with confirmed molecular tests using break-apart probes were assessed to reveal the frequency and type of unusual signal pattern. Among 89 synovial sarcoma (SS18) 11%, 12 alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (FOXO1) 50%, 53 myxoid liposarcoma (DDIT3) 7.5%, 6 low grade fibromyxoid sarcoma (FUS) 67%, 93 Ewing sarcoma (EWSR1) 3%, 12 clear cell sarcoma (EWSR1) 8%, 5 desmoplastic small round cell tumor (EWSR1) 0%, 9 extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma (EWSR1) 0%, 2 myoepithelial carcinoma (EWSR1) 50%, 14 dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (COL1A1) 86% and 6 nodular fasciitis (USP6) 17% atypical break-apart signals were detected. Despite the unusual signal pattern type, the fusion genes were detected using either metaphase FISH, interphase FISH with translocation/TriCheck probe or RT-PCR methods. Although the interpretation problems in the process to evaluate the break-apart probe results is well known from sporadic case reports, a systemic overview to detect their frequency has not been performed so far. In our work we highlighted the relative frequency of this problem and pinpointed those signal-patterns which, despite their unusual appearance, can still confirm the diagnosis.

  3. DEPENDENCE OF THE SPECKLE-PATTERNS SIZE AND THEIR CONTRAST ON THE BIOPHYSICAL AND STRUCTURAL PARAMETERS OF BIOLOGICAL TISSUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. D. Abramovich

    2017-01-01

    ׳ size in the layers of tissue varies from a share of micrometer to millimeter. The established dependence makes it possible to determine the depth of penetration of light into the biotissue based on the dimensions of speckles. Calculation of the contrast of the speckle structure of scattered light in visible spectral range at different depths in the biotissue made it possible to establish the dependence of the contrast value of the interference pattern on the degree of oxygenation of the blood and the volume concentration of capillaries in the dermis.

  4. Real Algebraic Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Mahé, Louis; Roy, Marie-Françoise

    1992-01-01

    Ten years after the first Rennes international meeting on real algebraic geometry, the second one looked at the developments in the subject during the intervening decade - see the 6 survey papers listed below. Further contributions from the participants on recent research covered real algebra and geometry, topology of real algebraic varieties and 16thHilbert problem, classical algebraic geometry, techniques in real algebraic geometry, algorithms in real algebraic geometry, semialgebraic geometry, real analytic geometry. CONTENTS: Survey papers: M. Knebusch: Semialgebraic topology in the last ten years.- R. Parimala: Algebraic and topological invariants of real algebraic varieties.- Polotovskii, G.M.: On the classification of decomposing plane algebraic curves.- Scheiderer, C.: Real algebra and its applications to geometry in the last ten years: some major developments and results.- Shustin, E.L.: Topology of real plane algebraic curves.- Silhol, R.: Moduli problems in real algebraic geometry. Further contribu...

  5. Association of Dietary Patterns With Risk of Colorectal Cancer Subtypes Classified by Fusobacterium nucleatum in Tumor Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Raaj S; Nishihara, Reiko; Cao, Yin; Song, Mingyang; Mima, Kosuke; Qian, Zhi Rong; Nowak, Jonathan A; Kosumi, Keisuke; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Masugi, Yohei; Bullman, Susan; Drew, David A; Kostic, Aleksandar D; Fung, Teresa T; Garrett, Wendy S; Huttenhower, Curtis; Wu, Kana; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Zhang, Xuehong; Willett, Walter C; Giovannucci, Edward L; Fuchs, Charles S; Chan, Andrew T; Ogino, Shuji

    2017-07-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum appears to play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis through suppression of the hosts' immune response to tumor. Evidence also suggests that diet influences intestinal F nucleatum. However, the role of F nucleatum in mediating the relationship between diet and the risk of colorectal cancer is unknown. To test the hypothesis that the associations of prudent diets (rich in whole grains and dietary fiber) and Western diets (rich in red and processed meat, refined grains, and desserts) with colorectal cancer risk may differ according to the presence of F nucleatum in tumor tissue. A prospective cohort study was conducted using data from the Nurses' Health Study (June 1, 1980, to June 1, 2012) and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (June 1, 1986, to June 1, 2012) on a total of 121 700 US female nurses and 51 529 US male health professionals aged 30 to 55 years and 40 to 75 years, respectively (both predominantly white individuals), at enrollment. Data analysis was performed from March 15, 2015, to August 10, 2016. Prudent and Western diets. Incidence of colorectal carcinoma subclassified by F nucleatum status in tumor tissue, determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Of the 173 229 individuals considered for the study, 137 217 were included in the analysis, 47 449 were male (34.6%), and mean (SD) baseline age for men was 54.0 (9.8) years and for women, 46.3 (7.2) years. A total of 1019 incident colon and rectal cancer cases with available F nucleatum data were documented over 26 to 32 years of follow-up, encompassing 3 643 562 person-years. The association of prudent diet with colorectal cancer significantly differed by tissue F nucleatum status (P = .01 for heterogeneity); prudent diet score was associated with a lower risk of F nucleatum-positive cancers (P = .003 for trend; multivariable hazard ratio of 0.43; 95% CI, 0.25-0.72, for the highest vs the lowest prudent score quartile) but not with F nucleatum

  6. Mechanical Model of Geometric Cell and Topological Algorithm for Cell Dynamics from Single-Cell to Formation of Monolayered Tissues with Pattern

    KAUST Repository

    Kachalo, Sëma

    2015-05-14

    Geometric and mechanical properties of individual cells and interactions among neighboring cells are the basis of formation of tissue patterns. Understanding the complex interplay of cells is essential for gaining insight into embryogenesis, tissue development, and other emerging behavior. Here we describe a cell model and an efficient geometric algorithm for studying the dynamic process of tissue formation in 2D (e.g. epithelial tissues). Our approach improves upon previous methods by incorporating properties of individual cells as well as detailed description of the dynamic growth process, with all topological changes accounted for. Cell size, shape, and division plane orientation are modeled realistically. In addition, cell birth, cell growth, cell shrinkage, cell death, cell division, cell collision, and cell rearrangements are now fully accounted for. Different models of cell-cell interactions, such as lateral inhibition during the process of growth, can be studied in detail. Cellular pattern formation for monolayered tissues from arbitrary initial conditions, including that of a single cell, can also be studied in detail. Computational efficiency is achieved through the employment of a special data structure that ensures access to neighboring cells in constant time, without additional space requirement. We have successfully generated tissues consisting of more than 20,000 cells starting from 2 cells within 1 hour. We show that our model can be used to study embryogenesis, tissue fusion, and cell apoptosis. We give detailed study of the classical developmental process of bristle formation on the epidermis of D. melanogaster and the fundamental problem of homeostatic size control in epithelial tissues. Simulation results reveal significant roles of solubility of secreted factors in both the bristle formation and the homeostatic control of tissue size. Our method can be used to study broad problems in monolayered tissue formation. Our software is publicly

  7. Mechanical model of geometric cell and topological algorithm for cell dynamics from single-cell to formation of monolayered tissues with pattern.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sëma Kachalo

    Full Text Available Geometric and mechanical properties of individual cells and interactions among neighboring cells are the basis of formation of tissue patterns. Understanding the complex interplay of cells is essential for gaining insight into embryogenesis, tissue development, and other emerging behavior. Here we describe a cell model and an efficient geometric algorithm for studying the dynamic process of tissue formation in 2D (e.g. epithelial tissues. Our approach improves upon previous methods by incorporating properties of individual cells as well as detailed description of the dynamic growth process, with all topological changes accounted for. Cell size, shape, and division plane orientation are modeled realistically. In addition, cell birth, cell growth, cell shrinkage, cell death, cell division, cell collision, and cell rearrangements are now fully accounted for. Different models of cell-cell interactions, such as lateral inhibition during the process of growth, can be studied in detail. Cellular pattern formation for monolayered tissues from arbitrary initial conditions, including that of a single cell, can also be studied in detail. Computational efficiency is achieved through the employment of a special data structure that ensures access to neighboring cells in constant time, without additional space requirement. We have successfully generated tissues consisting of more than 20,000 cells starting from 2 cells within 1 hour. We show that our model can be used to study embryogenesis, tissue fusion, and cell apoptosis. We give detailed study of the classical developmental process of bristle formation on the epidermis of D. melanogaster and the fundamental problem of homeostatic size control in epithelial tissues. Simulation results reveal significant roles of solubility of secreted factors in both the bristle formation and the homeostatic control of tissue size. Our method can be used to study broad problems in monolayered tissue formation. Our software

  8. Differential N-glycan patterns identified in lung adenocarcinoma by N-glycan profiling of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoning; Deng, Zaian; Huang, Chuncui; Zhu, Tong; Lou, Jiatao; Wang, Lin; Li, Yan

    2018-02-10

    N-glycan profiling is a powerful approach for analyzing the functional relationship between N-glycosylation and cancer. Current methods rely on either serum or fresh tissue samples; however, N-glycan patterns may differ between serum and tissue, as the proteins of serum originate from a variety of tissues. Furthermore, fresh tissue samples are difficult to ship and store. Here, we used a profiling method based on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sections from lung adenocarcinoma patients. We found that our method was highly reproducible. We identified 58 N-glycan compositions from lung adenocarcinoma FFPE samples, 51 of which were further used for MS n -based structure prediction. We show that high mannose type N-glycans are upregulated, while sialylated N-glycans are downregulated in our FFPE lung adenocarcinoma samples, compared to the control samples. Our receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis shows that high mannose type and sialylated N-glycans are useful discriminators to distinguish between lung adenocarcinoma and control tissue. Together, our results indicate that expression levels of specific N-glycans correlate well with lung adenocarcinoma, and strongly suggest that our FFPE-based method will be useful for N-glycan profiling of cancer tissues. Glycosylation is one of the most important post-translational protein modifications, and is associated with several physiopathological processes, including carcinogenesis. In this study, we tested the feasibility of using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sections to identify changes in N-glycan patterns and identified the differentially expressed N-glycans of lung adenocarcinoma. Our study shows that the FFPE-based N-glycan profiling method is useful for clinical diagnosis as well as identification of potential biomarkers, and our data expand current knowledge of differential N-glycan patterns of lung adenocarcinoma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Fashioning reversed axial pattern forearm tissues in different challenging conditions of the forearm territory as a reliable substitute for free tissue transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shazly, M

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic tissue defects, chronic ulcerations, burn contractures and post-oncological excisions are the main problems affecting the hand and forearm areas. This work addresses the question of whether reversed axial island flaps from the forearm area could be applicable to any form of soft tissue defects in the territory of the forearm, and whether they could be considered reliable substitutes for free tissue transfer. Thirteen patients who sought surgical treatment for soft tissue defects of the hand, wrist, and distal forearm regions were included in this evaluation report. The patients complained of four different etiologies, and their resultant tissue defects were managed by reversed radial forearm flap in eight cases and by the ulnar variety of the reversed forearm flap in another five cases. Selection of the flap option depended on the site of the pathology, size and thickness of the resultant defect, special needs of the defect, vascular limitations, and the like-tissue reconstruction objective. All flaps survived well with no complications. Both donor and recipient sites healed successfully. The selected flaps were ideal in their specific application. Harvesting reversed forearm flaps does not require high surgical skills or special equipment, venous congestion is less significant than with free flaps, and the patients do not need intensive immediate postoperative care and supervision. This is an easy and reliable technique requiring short operating time, and initiation of early physiotherapy is permitted, making forearm flaps reliable substitutes for free flap applications with all the associated complications.

  10. Geometry essentials for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Ryan, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Just the critical concepts you need to score high in geometry This practical, friendly guide focuses on critical concepts taught in a typical geometry course, from the properties of triangles, parallelograms, circles, and cylinders, to the skills and strategies you need to write geometry proofs. Geometry Essentials For Dummies is perfect for cramming or doing homework, or as a reference for parents helping kids study for exams. Get down to the basics - get a handle on the basics of geometry, from lines, segments, and angles, to vertices, altitudes, and diagonals Conque

  11. Introduction to projective geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Wylie, C R

    2008-01-01

    This lucid introductory text offers both an analytic and an axiomatic approach to plane projective geometry. The analytic treatment builds and expands upon students' familiarity with elementary plane analytic geometry and provides a well-motivated approach to projective geometry. Subsequent chapters explore Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry as specializations of the projective plane, revealing the existence of an infinite number of geometries, each Euclidean in nature but characterized by a different set of distance- and angle-measurement formulas. Outstanding pedagogical features include w

  12. BnDGAT1s Function Similarly in Oil Deposition and Are Expressed with Uniform Patterns in Tissues of Brassica napus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuizhu Zhao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available As an allotetraploid oilcrop, Brassica napus contains four duplicated Acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1 genes, which catalyze one of the rate-limiting steps in triacylglycerol (TAG biosynthesis in plants. While all four BnDGAT1s have been expressed functionally in yeast, their expression patterns in different germplasms and tissues and also consequent contribution to seed oil accumulation in planta remain to be elucidated. In this study, the coding regions of the four BnDGAT1s were expressed in an Arabidopsis dgat1 mutant. All four BnDGAT1s showed similar effects on oil content and fatty acid composition, a result which is different from that observed in previous studies of their expression in yeast. Expression patterns of BnDGAT1s were analyzed in developing seeds of 34 B. napus inbred lines and in different tissues of 14 lines. Different expression patterns were observed for the four BnDGAT1s, which suggests that they express independently or randomly in different germplasm sources. Higher expression of BnDGAT1s was correlated with higher seed oil content lines. Tissue-specific analyses showed that the BnDGAT1s were expressed in a uniform pattern in different tissues. Our results suggest that it is important to maintain expression of the four BnDGAT1s for maximum return on oil content.

  13. Bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) lymphoma of the lung showing mosaic pattern of inhomogeneous attenuation on thin-section CT: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, In Jae; Kim, Sung Hwan; Koo, Soo Hyun; Kim, Hyun Beom; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Lee, Kwan Seop; Lee, Yul; Jang, Kee Taek; Kim, Duck Hwan

    2000-01-01

    The authors present a case of histologically proven bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) lymphoma of the lung in a patient with primary Sjogren's syndrome that manifested on thin-section CT scan as a mosaic pattern of inhomogeneous attenuation due to mixed small airway and infiltrative abnormalities

  14. Tissue-specific roles of the pattern recognition receptors NLRP3, NLRX1 and TLR9 in sterile inflammatory kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, P.J.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, the role of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) in sterile inflammatory kidney disease is investigated in models of either ischemia reperfusion (IR)-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) or diet-associated chronic kidney disease (CKD). Leukocytes infiltrate the kidney upon tissue damage

  15. Distribution of invasive and native riparian woody plants across the western USA in relation to climate, river flow, floodplain geometry and patterns of introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan McShane,; Daniel Auerbach,; Friedman, Jonathan M.; Auble, Gregor T.; Shafroth, Patrick B.; Michael Merigliano,; Scott, Michael L.; N. Leroy Poff,

    2015-01-01

    Management of riparian plant invasions across the landscape requires understanding the combined influence of climate, hydrology, geologic constraints and patterns of introduction. We measured abundance of nine riparian woody taxa at 456 stream gages across the western USA. We constructed conditional inference recursive binary partitioning models to discriminate the influence of eleven environmental variables on plant occurrence and abundance, focusing on the two most abundant non-native taxa, Tamarix spp. and Elaeagnus angustifolia, and their native competitor Populus deltoides. River reaches in this study were distributed along a composite gradient from cooler, wetter higher-elevation reaches with higher stream power and earlier snowmelt flood peaks to warmer, drier lower-elevation reaches with lower power and later peaks. Plant distributions were strongly related to climate, hydrologic and geomorphic factors, and introduction history. The strongest associations were with temperature and then precipitation. Among hydrologic and geomorphic variables, stream power, peak flow timing and 10-yr flood magnitude had stronger associations than did peak flow predictability, low-flow magnitude, mean annual flow and channel confinement. Nearby intentional planting of Elaeagnus was the best predictor of its occurrence, but planting of Tamarix was rare. Higher temperatures were associated with greater abundance of Tamarix relative to P. deltoides, and greater abundance of P. deltoides relative toElaeagnus. Populus deltoides abundance was more strongly related to peak flow timing than was that of Elaeagnus or Tamarix. Higher stream power and larger 10-yr floods were associated with greater abundance of P. deltoides and Tamarix relative to Elaeagnus. Therefore, increases in temperature could increase abundance of Tamarix and decrease that of Elaeagnus relative to P. deltoides, changes in peak flow timing caused by climate change or dam operations could

  16. The transtensional offshore portion of the northern San Andreas fault: Fault zone geometry, late Pleistocene to Holocene sediment deposition, shallow deformation patterns, and asymmetric basin growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeson, Jeffrey W.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Goldfinger, Chris

    2017-01-01

    We mapped an ~120 km offshore portion of the northern San Andreas fault (SAF) between Point Arena and Point Delgada using closely spaced seismic reflection profiles (1605 km), high-resolution multibeam bathymetry (~1600 km2), and marine magnetic data. This new data set documents SAF location and continuity, associated tectonic geomorphology, shallow stratigraphy, and deformation. Variable deformation patterns in the generally narrow (∼1 km wide) fault zone are largely associated with fault trend and with transtensional and transpressional fault bends.We divide this unique transtensional portion of the offshore SAF into six sections along and adjacent to the SAF based on fault trend, deformation styles, seismic stratigraphy, and seafloor bathymetry. In the southern region of the study area, the SAF includes a 10-km-long zone characterized by two active parallel fault strands. Slip transfer and long-term straightening of the fault trace in this zone are likely leading to transfer of a slice of the Pacific plate to the North American plate. The SAF in the northern region of the survey area passes through two sharp fault bends (∼9°, right stepping, and ∼8°, left stepping), resulting in both an asymmetric lazy Z–shape sedimentary basin (Noyo basin) and an uplifted rocky shoal (Tolo Bank). Seismic stratigraphic sequences and unconformities within the Noyo basin correlate with the previous 4 major Quaternary sea-level lowstands and record basin tilting of ∼0.6°/100 k.y. Migration of the basin depocenter indicates a lateral slip rate on the SAF of 10–19 mm/yr for the past 350 k.y.Data collected west of the SAF on the south flank of Cape Mendocino are inconsistent with the presence of an offshore fault strand that connects the SAF with the Mendocino Triple Junction. Instead, we suggest that the SAF previously mapped onshore at Point Delgada continues onshore northward and transitions to the King Range thrust.

  17. Chicken pleiotrophin: regulation of tissue specific expression by estrogen in the oviduct and distinct expression pattern in the ovarian carcinomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Young Lee

    Full Text Available Pleiotrophin (PTN is a developmentally-regulated growth factor which is widely distributed in various tissues and also detected in many kinds of carcinomas. However, little is known about the PTN gene in chickens. In the present study, we found chicken PTN to be highly conserved with respect to mammalian PTN genes (91-92.6% and its mRNA was most abundant in brain, heart and oviduct. This study focused on the PTN gene in the oviduct where it was detected in the glandular (GE and luminal (LE epithelial cells. Treatment of young chicks with diethylstilbesterol induced PTN mRNA and protein in GE and LE, but not in other cell types of the oviduct. Further, several microRNAs, specifically miR-499 and miR-1709 were discovered to influence PTN expression via its 3'-UTR which suggests that post-transcriptional regulation influences PTN expression in chickens. We also compared expression patterns and CpG methylation status of the PTN gene in normal and cancerous ovaries from chickens. Our results indicated that PTN is most abundant in the GE of adenocarcinoma of cancerous, but not normal ovaries of hens. Bisulfite sequencing revealed that 30- and 40% of -1311 and -1339 CpG sites are demethylated in ovarian cancer cells, respectively. Collectively, these results indicate that chicken PTN is a novel estrogen-induced gene expressed mainly in the oviductal epithelia implicating PTN regulation of oviduct development and egg formation, and also suggest that PTN is a biomarker for epithelial ovarian carcinoma that could be used for diagnosis and monitoring effects of therapies for the disease.

  18. Signature geometry and quantum engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samociuk, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    As the operating frequency of electromagnetic based devices increase, physical design geometry is playing an ever more important role. Evidence is considered in support of a relationship between the dimensionality of primitive geometric forms, such as transistors, and corresponding electromagnetic coupling efficiency. The industry of electronics is defined as the construction of devices by the patterning of primitive forms to physical materials. Examples are given to show the evolution of these primitives, down to nano scales, are requiring exacting geometry and three dimensional content. Consideration of microwave monolithic integrated circuits,(MMIC), photonics and metamaterials,(MM), support this trend and also add new requirements of strict geometric periodicity and multiplicity. Signature geometries,(SG), are characterized by distinctive attributes and examples are given. The transcendent form transcode algorithm, (TTA) is introduced as a multi dimensional SG and its use in designing photonic integrated circuits and metamaterials is discussed . A creative commons licensed research database, TRANSFORM, containing TTA geometries in OASIS file formats is described. An experimental methodology for using the database is given. Multidimensional SG and extraction of three dimensional cross sections as primitive forms is discussed as a foundation for quantum engineering and the exploitation of phenomena other than the electromagnetic.

  19. The Geometry Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Bárány, Imre; Vilcu, Costin

    2016-01-01

    This volume presents easy-to-understand yet surprising properties obtained using topological, geometric and graph theoretic tools in the areas covered by the Geometry Conference that took place in Mulhouse, France from September 7–11, 2014 in honour of Tudor Zamfirescu on the occasion of his 70th anniversary. The contributions address subjects in convexity and discrete geometry, in distance geometry or with geometrical flavor in combinatorics, graph theory or non-linear analysis. Written by top experts, these papers highlight the close connections between these fields, as well as ties to other domains of geometry and their reciprocal influence. They offer an overview on recent developments in geometry and its border with discrete mathematics, and provide answers to several open questions. The volume addresses a large audience in mathematics, including researchers and graduate students interested in geometry and geometrical problems.

  20. Euclidean geometry and transformations

    CERN Document Server

    Dodge, Clayton W

    1972-01-01

    This introduction to Euclidean geometry emphasizes transformations, particularly isometries and similarities. Suitable for undergraduate courses, it includes numerous examples, many with detailed answers. 1972 edition.

  1. The virtual geometry model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrivnacova, I; Viren, B

    2008-01-01

    The Virtual Geometry Model (VGM) was introduced at CHEP in 2004 [1], where its concept, based on the abstract interfaces to geometry objects, has been presented. Since then, it has undergone a design evolution to pure abstract interfaces, it has been consolidated and completed with more advanced features. Currently it is used in Geant4 VMC for the support of TGeo geometry definition with Geant4 native geometry navigation and recently it has been used in the validation of the G4Root tool. The implementation of the VGM for a concrete geometry model represents a small layer between the VGM and the particular native geometry. In addition to the implementations for Geant4 and Root TGeo geometry models, there is now added the third one for AGDD, which together with the existing XML exporter makes the VGM the most advanced tool for exchanging geometry formats providing 9 ways of conversions between Geant4, TGeo, AGDD and GDML models. In this presentation we will give the overview and the present status of the tool, we will review the supported features and point to possible limits in converting geometry models

  2. Revolutions of Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    O'Leary, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Guides readers through the development of geometry and basic proof writing using a historical approach to the topic. In an effort to fully appreciate the logic and structure of geometric proofs, Revolutions of Geometry places proofs into the context of geometry's history, helping readers to understand that proof writing is crucial to the job of a mathematician. Written for students and educators of mathematics alike, the book guides readers through the rich history and influential works, from ancient times to the present, behind the development of geometry. As a result, readers are successfull

  3. Fundamental concepts of geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Meserve, Bruce E

    1983-01-01

    Demonstrates relationships between different types of geometry. Provides excellent overview of the foundations and historical evolution of geometrical concepts. Exercises (no solutions). Includes 98 illustrations.

  4. Algorithms in Algebraic Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Dickenstein, Alicia; Sommese, Andrew J

    2008-01-01

    In the last decade, there has been a burgeoning of activity in the design and implementation of algorithms for algebraic geometric computation. Some of these algorithms were originally designed for abstract algebraic geometry, but now are of interest for use in applications and some of these algorithms were originally designed for applications, but now are of interest for use in abstract algebraic geometry. The workshop on Algorithms in Algebraic Geometry that was held in the framework of the IMA Annual Program Year in Applications of Algebraic Geometry by the Institute for Mathematics and Its

  5. Subchondral insufficiency fracture of the knee: A recognizable associated soft tissue edema pattern and a similar distribution among men and women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmot, Andrew S.; Ruutiainen, Alexander T.; Bakhru, Prashant T.; Schweitzer, Mark E.; Shabshin, Nogah

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Almost all MRI studies of SIFK demonstrate posterior soft tissue edema. • The posterior soft tissue edema has a recognizable pattern. • The incidence of SIFK is equally distributed among makes and females. • Meniscus extrusion is associated with SIFK progresses. - Abstract: Objective: Primary: to describe the presence and pattern of soft tissue edema in subchondral insufficiency fractures of the knee (SIFK). Secondary: to investigate the gender distribution and identify factors associated with disease progression. Methods: MR images of 74 SIFKs in 74 patients were retrospectively reviewed for soft tissue edema presence and location, meniscal tears and extrusion and synovitis. The clinical records were reviewed for age, gender, and BMI. Follow up examinations were reviewed to assess for progression. Data were analyzed for gender distribution and for association between each imaging finding as a predictor of SIFK location and progression. Results: Soft tissue edema was present in 89% (66/74) of SIFK. It was located around the MCL in 78% (58/74), posterior to and abutting on the posterior distal femur in 68% (50/74), around to the tibia in only 18% (13/74), but when present it strongly predicted the presence of a medial tibial plateau SIFK (p = 5.6 ×

  6. Subchondral insufficiency fracture of the knee: A recognizable associated soft tissue edema pattern and a similar distribution among men and women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilmot, Andrew S., E-mail: wilmotas@upmc.edu [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Department of Radiology, UPMC Department of Radiology, 200 Lothrop Street, UPMC Montefiore, Room NE 595, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Ruutiainen, Alexander T., E-mail: aruutiainen@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Michael J. Crescenz VA Medical Center in Philadelphia, 3900 Woodland Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Bakhru, Prashant T., E-mail: ptbakhru@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Princeton Radiology Associates, Kendall Park, NJ 08824 (United States); Schweitzer, Mark E., E-mail: Mark.Schweitzer@stonybrookmedicine.edu [Stonybrook “University Medical Center, Stonybrook, NY (United States); Shabshin, Nogah, E-mail: shabshin@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Department of Radiology, HaEmek Medical Center, Afula (Israel)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Almost all MRI studies of SIFK demonstrate posterior soft tissue edema. • The posterior soft tissue edema has a recognizable pattern. • The incidence of SIFK is equally distributed among makes and females. • Meniscus extrusion is associated with SIFK progresses. - Abstract: Objective: Primary: to describe the presence and pattern of soft tissue edema in subchondral insufficiency fractures of the knee (SIFK). Secondary: to investigate the gender distribution and identify factors associated with disease progression. Methods: MR images of 74 SIFKs in 74 patients were retrospectively reviewed for soft tissue edema presence and location, meniscal tears and extrusion and synovitis. The clinical records were reviewed for age, gender, and BMI. Follow up examinations were reviewed to assess for progression. Data were analyzed for gender distribution and for association between each imaging finding as a predictor of SIFK location and progression. Results: Soft tissue edema was present in 89% (66/74) of SIFK. It was located around the MCL in 78% (58/74), posterior to and abutting on the posterior distal femur in 68% (50/74), around to the tibia in only 18% (13/74), but when present it strongly predicted the presence of a medial tibial plateau SIFK (p = 5.6 ×.

  7. KEMAJUAN BELAJAR SISWA PADA GEOMETRI TRANSFORMASI MENGGUNAKAN AKTIVITAS REFLEKSI GEOMETRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irkham Ulil Albab

    2014-10-01

    , observations, and field notes. The findings of the study showed that this instructional design could stimulate students to provide reflection characteristics and other transformation geometry informally, to classify them in the transformation isometry in the second level, and to find the reflection supporting line in the more formal level. In addition, the reflection supporting line was used by the students to draw the reflection image and the mirroring pattern and to understand the rotation and translation shapes as a combination of reflection at the highest level. Keyword: geometric transformation, rotation, translation, and HLT

  8. Thousands of exon skipping events differentiate among splicing patterns in sixteen human tissues [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2dl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Florea

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing is widely recognized for its roles in regulating genes and creating gene diversity. However, despite many efforts, the repertoire of gene splicing variation is still incompletely characterized, even in humans. Here we describe a new computational system, ASprofile, and its application to RNA-seq data from Illumina’s Human Body Map project (>2.5 billion reads.  Using the system, we identified putative alternative splicing events in 16 different human tissues, which provide a dynamic picture of splicing variation across the tissues. We detected 26,989 potential exon skipping events representing differences in splicing patterns among the tissues. A large proportion of the events (>60% were novel, involving new exons (~3000, new introns (~16000, or both. When tracing these events across the sixteen tissues, only a small number (4-7% appeared to be differentially expressed (‘switched’ between two tissues, while 30-45% showed little variation, and the remaining 50-65% were not present in one or both tissues compared.  Novel exon skipping events appeared to be slightly less variable than known events, but were more tissue-specific. Our study represents the first effort to build a comprehensive catalog of alternative splicing in normal human tissues from RNA-seq data, while providing insights into the role of alternative splicing in shaping tissue transcriptome differences. The catalog of events and the ASprofile software are freely available from the Zenodo repository (http://zenodo.org/record/7068; doi:10.5281/zenodo.7068 and from our web site http://ccb.jhu.edu/software/ASprofile.

  9. Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma with initial supradiaphragmatic presentation: natural history and patterns of disease progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Zhongxing; Ha, Chul S.; McLaughlin, Peter; Manning, John T.; Hess, Mark; Cabanillas, Fernando; Cox, James D.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma commonly presents in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Supradiaphragmatic MALT lymphoma is less common and its natural history is not well defined. This study was conducted to understand the natural history, to determine the frequency of synchronous disease in the GI tract, and to understand the patterns of disease progression after treatment for supradiaphragmatic MALT lymphoma. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 39 patients who presented with supradiaphragmatic MALT lymphoma between 1991 and 1997. Results: The median age of patients was 58 years (range, 25-90 years) with 16 male and 23 female patients. The most common primary site was salivary gland followed by ocular adnexa, lung, oral cavity, and others. Sixteen patients underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy and biopsy (EGD + Bx) and 4 were found to have gastric involvement. Ann Arbor stages were the following: IEA, 17; IIEA, 5, IIEB, 1; and IVA, 16. The initial treatments were: involved field radiation therapy (n = 10), chemotherapy (n = 14), combination of radiation therapy and chemotherapy (n = 9), observation after biopsy (n = 4), antibiotics only (n = 1), and patient refusal of further intervention (n = 1). Seven patients received antibiotics as a part of the initial treatment. Every patient except for 1 was alive at a median follow-up of 39.5 months (range, 3-83 months). Thirty-six patients achieved complete response (CR) to the initial treatment. The actuarial 5-year progression-free survival rate was 83%. Progression of the disease occurred in 4 patients, with 2 in the stomach. Salvage attempts were made to 4 and were successful in 3. Of the 2 patients who relapsed in the stomach, 1 had negative EGD + Bx at the time of initial diagnosis. An EGD + Bx was not done in the second patient. Conclusion: Supradiaphragmatic MALT lymphoma appears to have a favorable prognosis. However, routine evaluation of the stomach

  10. Want to Play Geometry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Matthew L.; Bomer, Megan A.; Powell, Nancy Norem

    2009-01-01

    Students enter the geometry classroom with a strong concept of fairness and a sense of what it means to "play by the rules," yet many students have difficulty understanding the postulates, or rules, of geometry and their implications. Although they may never have articulated the properties of an axiomatic system, they have gained a practical…

  11. Foundations of algebraic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Weil, A

    1946-01-01

    This classic is one of the cornerstones of modern algebraic geometry. At the same time, it is entirely self-contained, assuming no knowledge whatsoever of algebraic geometry, and no knowledge of modern algebra beyond the simplest facts about abstract fields and their extensions, and the bare rudiments of the theory of ideals.

  12. Supersymmetric Sigma Model Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulf Lindström

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This is a review of how sigma models formulated in Superspace have become important tools for understanding geometry. Topics included are: The (hyperkähler reduction; projective superspace; the generalized Legendre construction; generalized Kähler geometry and constructions of hyperkähler metrics on Hermitian symmetric spaces.

  13. Geometry of multihadron production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1994-10-01

    This summary talk only reviews a small sample of topics featured at this symposium: Introduction; The Geometry and Geography of Phase space; Space-Time Geometry and HBT; Multiplicities, Intermittency, Correlations; Disoriented Chiral Condensate; Deep Inelastic Scattering at HERA; and Other Contributions

  14. Designs and finite geometries

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Designs and Finite Geometries brings together in one place important contributions and up-to-date research results in this important area of mathematics. Designs and Finite Geometries serves as an excellent reference, providing insight into some of the most important research issues in the field.

  15. A Lorentzian quantum geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grotz, Andreas

    2011-10-07

    In this thesis, a formulation of a Lorentzian quantum geometry based on the framework of causal fermion systems is proposed. After giving the general definition of causal fermion systems, we deduce space-time as a topological space with an underlying causal structure. Restricting attention to systems of spin dimension two, we derive the objects of our quantum geometry: the spin space, the tangent space endowed with a Lorentzian metric, connection and curvature. In order to get the correspondence to classical differential geometry, we construct examples of causal fermion systems by regularizing Dirac sea configurations in Minkowski space and on a globally hyperbolic Lorentzian manifold. When removing the regularization, the objects of our quantum geometry reduce to the common objects of spin geometry on Lorentzian manifolds, up to higher order curvature corrections.

  16. The prevalence, pattern and clinical presentation of developmental dental hard-tissue anomalies in children with primary and mix dentition from Ile-Ife, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Temilola, Dada Oluwaseyi; Folayan, Morenike Oluwatoyin; Fatusi, Olawunmi; Chukwumah, Nneka Maureen; Onyejaka, Nneka; Oziegbe, Elizabeth; Oyedele, Titus; Kolawole, Kikelomo Adebanke; Agbaje, Hakeem

    2014-01-01

    Background The study of dental anomalies is important because it generates information that is important for both the anthropological and clinical management of patients. The objective of this study is to determine the prevalence and pattern of presentation of dental hard-tissue developmental anomalies in the mix dentition of children residing in Ile-Ife, a suburban region of Nigeria. Methods Information on age, sex and socioeconomic status was collected from 1,036 children aged four months t...

  17. Tissue-Mimicking Geometrical Constraints Stimulate Tissue-Like Constitution and Activity of Mouse Neonatal and Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiac Myocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Götz Pilarczyk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work addresses the question of to what extent a geometrical support acts as a physiological determining template in the setup of artificial cardiac tissue. Surface patterns with alternating concave to convex transitions of cell size dimensions were used to organize and orientate human-induced pluripotent stem cell (hIPSC-derived cardiac myocytes and mouse neonatal cardiac myocytes. The shape of the cells, as well as the organization of the contractile apparatus recapitulates the anisotropic line pattern geometry being derived from tissue geometry motives. The intracellular organization of the contractile apparatus and the cell coupling via gap junctions of cell assemblies growing in a random or organized pattern were examined. Cell spatial and temporal coordinated excitation and contraction has been compared on plain and patterned substrates. While the α-actinin cytoskeletal organization is comparable to terminally-developed native ventricular tissue, connexin-43 expression does not recapitulate gap junction distribution of heart muscle tissue. However, coordinated contractions could be observed. The results of tissue-like cell ensemble organization open new insights into geometry-dependent cell organization, the cultivation of artificial heart tissue from stem cells and the anisotropy-dependent activity of therapeutic compounds.

  18. Geometry on the space of geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christodoulakis, T.; Zanelli, J.

    1988-06-01

    We discuss the geometric structure of the configuration space of pure gravity. This is an infinite dimensional manifold, M, where each point represents one spatial geometry g ij (x). The metric on M is dictated by geometrodynamics, and from it, the Christoffel symbols and Riemann tensor can be found. A ''free geometry'' tracing a geodesic on the manifold describes the time evolution of space in the strong gravity limit. In a regularization previously introduced by the authors, it is found that M does not have the same dimensionality, D, everywhere, and that D is not a scalar, although it is covariantly constant. In this regularization, it is seen that the path integral measure can be absorbed in a renormalization of the cosmological constant. (author). 19 refs

  19. Magnetism in curved geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streubel, Robert

    Deterministically bending and twisting two-dimensional structures in the three-dimensional (3D) space provide means to modify conventional or to launch novel functionalities by tailoring curvature and 3D shape. The recent developments of 3D curved magnetic geometries, ranging from theoretical predictions over fabrication to characterization using integral means as well as advanced magnetic tomography, will be reviewed. Theoretical works predict a curvature-induced effective anisotropy and effective Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction resulting in a vast of novel effects including magnetochiral effects (chirality symmetry breaking) and topologically induced magnetization patterning. The remarkable development of nanotechnology, e.g. preparation of high-quality extended thin films, nanowires and frameworks via chemical and physical deposition as well as 3D nano printing, has granted first insights into the fundamental properties of 3D shaped magnetic objects. Optimizing magnetic and structural properties of these novel 3D architectures demands new investigation methods, particularly those based on vector tomographic imaging. Magnetic neutron tomography and electron-based 3D imaging, such as electron holography and vector field electron tomography, are well-established techniques to investigate macroscopic and nanoscopic samples, respectively. At the mesoscale, the curved objects can be investigated using the novel method of magnetic X-ray tomography. In spite of experimental challenges to address the appealing theoretical predictions of curvature-induced effects, those 3D magnetic architectures have already proven their application potential for life sciences, targeted delivery, realization of 3D spin-wave filters, and magneto-encephalography devices, to name just a few. DOE BES MSED (DE-AC02-05-CH11231).

  20. A pilot study using Tissue Velocity Ultrasound Imaging (TVI to assess muscle activity pattern in patients with chronic trapezius myalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brodin Lars-Åke

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Different research techniques indicate alterations in muscle tissue and in neuromuscular control of aching muscles in patients with chronic localized pain. Ultrasound can be used for analysis of muscle tissue dynamics in clinical practice. Aim This study introduces a new muscle tissue sensitive ultrasound technique in order to provide a new methodology for providing a description of local muscle changes. This method is applied to investigate trapezius muscle tissue response – especially with respect to specific regional deformation and deformation rates – during concentric shoulder elevation in patients with chronic trapezius myalgia and healthy controls before and after pain provocation. Methods Patients with trapezius myalgia and healthy controls were analyzed using an ultrasound system equipped with tissue velocity imaging (TVI. The patients performed a standardized 3-cm concentric shoulder elevation before and after pain provocation/exercise at a standardized elevation tempo (30 bpm. A standardized region of interest (ROI, an ellipsis with a size that captures the upper and lower fascia of the trapezius muscle (4 cm width at rest, was placed in the first frame of the loop registration of the elevation. The ROI was re-anchored frame by frame following the same anatomical landmark in the basal fascia during all frames of the concentric phase. In cardiac measurement, tissue velocities are measured in the axial projection towards and against the probe where red colour represents shortening and red lengthening. In the case of measuring the trapezius muscle, tissue deformation measurements are made orthogonally, thus, indirectly. Based on the assumption of muscle volume incompressibility, blue represents tissue contraction and red relaxation. Within the ROI, two variables were calculated as a function of time: deformation and deformation rate. Hereafter, max, mean, and quadratic mean values (RMS of each variable were

  1. Magnetoelectrostatic thruster physical geometry tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, W. D.

    1981-01-01

    Inert gas tests are conducted with several magnetoelectrostatic containment discharge chamber geometries. The configurations tested include three discharge chamber lengths; three boundary magnet patterns; two different flux density magnet materials; hemispherical and conical shaped thrusters having different surface-to-volume ratios; and two and three grid ion optics. Argon mass utilizations of 60 to 79% are attained at 210 to 280 eV/ion in different test configurations. Short hemi thruster configurations are found to produce 70 to 92% xenon mass utilization at 185 to 220 eV/ion.

  2. Non-Euclidean geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Kulczycki, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    This accessible approach features two varieties of proofs: stereometric and planimetric, as well as elementary proofs that employ only the simplest properties of the plane. A short history of geometry precedes a systematic exposition of the principles of non-Euclidean geometry.Starting with fundamental assumptions, the author examines the theorems of Hjelmslev, mapping a plane into a circle, the angle of parallelism and area of a polygon, regular polygons, straight lines and planes in space, and the horosphere. Further development of the theory covers hyperbolic functions, the geometry of suff

  3. Complex and symplectic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Medori, Costantino; Tomassini, Adriano

    2017-01-01

    This book arises from the INdAM Meeting "Complex and Symplectic Geometry", which was held in Cortona in June 2016. Several leading specialists, including young researchers, in the field of complex and symplectic geometry, present the state of the art of their research on topics such as the cohomology of complex manifolds; analytic techniques in Kähler and non-Kähler geometry; almost-complex and symplectic structures; special structures on complex manifolds; and deformations of complex objects. The work is intended for researchers in these areas.

  4. Polyhedral patterns

    KAUST Repository

    Jiang, Caigui

    2015-10-27

    We study the design and optimization of polyhedral patterns, which are patterns of planar polygonal faces on freeform surfaces. Working with polyhedral patterns is desirable in architectural geometry and industrial design. However, the classical tiling patterns on the plane must take on various shapes in order to faithfully and feasibly approximate curved surfaces. We define and analyze the deformations these tiles must undertake to account for curvature, and discover the symmetries that remain invariant under such deformations. We propose a novel method to regularize polyhedral patterns while maintaining these symmetries into a plethora of aesthetic and feasible patterns.

  5. Differential patterns of serum concentration and adipose tissue expression of chemerin in obesity: adipose depot specificity and gender dimorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfadda, Assim A; Sallam, Reem M; Chishti, Muhammad Azhar; Moustafa, Amr S; Fatma, Sumbul; Alomaim, Waleed S; Al-Naami, Mohammed Y; Bassas, Abdulelah F; Chrousos, George P; Jo, Hyunsun

    2012-06-01

    Chemerin, a recognized chemoattractant, is expressed in adipose tissue and plays a role in adipocytes differentiation and metabolism. Gender- and adipose tissue-specific differences in human chemerin expression have not been well characterized. Therefore, these differences were assessed in the present study. The body mass index (BMI) and the circulating levels of chemerin and other inflammatory, adiposity and insulin resistance markers were assessed in female and male adults of varying degree of obesity. Chemerin mRNA expression was also measured in paired subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue samples obtained from a subset of the study subjects. Serum chemerin concentrations correlated positively with BMI and serum leptin levels and negatively with high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol levels. No correlation was found between serum chemerin concentrations and fasting glucose, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, triglycerides, insulin, C-reactive protein or adiponectin. Similarly, no relation was observed with the homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) values. Gender- and adipose tissue-specific differences were observed in chemerin mRNA expression levels, with expression significantly higher in women than men and in subcutaneous than visceral adipose tissue. Interestingly, we found a significant negative correlation between circulating chemerin levels and chemerin mRNA expression in subcutaneous fat. Among the subjects studied, circulating chemerin levels were associated with obesity markers but not with markers of insulin resistance. At the tissue level, fat depot-specific differential regulation of chemerin mRNA expression might contribute to the distinctive roles of subcutaneous vs. visceral adipose tissue in human obesity.

  6. The geometry of geodesics

    CERN Document Server

    Busemann, Herbert

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive approach to qualitative problems in intrinsic differential geometry, this text examines Desarguesian spaces, perpendiculars and parallels, covering spaces, the influence of the sign of the curvature on geodesics, more. 1955 edition. Includes 66 figures.

  7. Introduction to tropical geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Maclagan, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Tropical geometry is a combinatorial shadow of algebraic geometry, offering new polyhedral tools to compute invariants of algebraic varieties. It is based on tropical algebra, where the sum of two numbers is their minimum and the product is their sum. This turns polynomials into piecewise-linear functions, and their zero sets into polyhedral complexes. These tropical varieties retain a surprising amount of information about their classical counterparts. Tropical geometry is a young subject that has undergone a rapid development since the beginning of the 21st century. While establishing itself as an area in its own right, deep connections have been made to many branches of pure and applied mathematics. This book offers a self-contained introduction to tropical geometry, suitable as a course text for beginning graduate students. Proofs are provided for the main results, such as the Fundamental Theorem and the Structure Theorem. Numerous examples and explicit computations illustrate the main concepts. Each of t...

  8. Invitation to geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Melzak, Z A

    2008-01-01

    Intended for students of many different backgrounds with only a modest knowledge of mathematics, this text features self-contained chapters that can be adapted to several types of geometry courses. 1983 edition.

  9. Rudiments of algebraic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Jenner, WE

    2017-01-01

    Aimed at advanced undergraduate students of mathematics, this concise text covers the basics of algebraic geometry. Topics include affine spaces, projective spaces, rational curves, algebraic sets with group structure, more. 1963 edition.

  10. Complex algebraic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Kollár, János

    1997-01-01

    This volume contains the lectures presented at the third Regional Geometry Institute at Park City in 1993. The lectures provide an introduction to the subject, complex algebraic geometry, making the book suitable as a text for second- and third-year graduate students. The book deals with topics in algebraic geometry where one can reach the level of current research while starting with the basics. Topics covered include the theory of surfaces from the viewpoint of recent higher-dimensional developments, providing an excellent introduction to more advanced topics such as the minimal model program. Also included is an introduction to Hodge theory and intersection homology based on the simple topological ideas of Lefschetz and an overview of the recent interactions between algebraic geometry and theoretical physics, which involve mirror symmetry and string theory.

  11. Geometry and Combinatorics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kokkendorff, Simon Lyngby

    2002-01-01

    The subject of this Ph.D.-thesis is somewhere in between continuous and discrete geometry. Chapter 2 treats the geometry of finite point sets in semi-Riemannian hyperquadrics,using a matrix whose entries are a trigonometric function of relative distances in a given point set. The distance...... to the geometry of a simplex in a semi-Riemannian hyperquadric. In chapter 3 we study which finite metric spaces that are realizable in a hyperbolic space in the limit where curvature goes to -∞. We show that such spaces are the so called leaf spaces, the set of degree 1 vertices of weighted trees. We also...... establish results on the limiting geometry of such an isometrically realized leaf space simplex in hyperbolic space, when curvature goes to -∞. Chapter 4 discusses negative type of metric spaces. We give a measure theoretic treatment of this concept and related invariants. The theory developed...

  12. Lectures on Symplectic Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Ana Cannas

    2001-01-01

    The goal of these notes is to provide a fast introduction to symplectic geometry for graduate students with some knowledge of differential geometry, de Rham theory and classical Lie groups. This text addresses symplectomorphisms, local forms, contact manifolds, compatible almost complex structures, Kaehler manifolds, hamiltonian mechanics, moment maps, symplectic reduction and symplectic toric manifolds. It contains guided problems, called homework, designed to complement the exposition or extend the reader's understanding. There are by now excellent references on symplectic geometry, a subset of which is in the bibliography of this book. However, the most efficient introduction to a subject is often a short elementary treatment, and these notes attempt to serve that purpose. This text provides a taste of areas of current research and will prepare the reader to explore recent papers and extensive books on symplectic geometry where the pace is much faster. For this reprint numerous corrections and cl...

  13. Implosions and hypertoric geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dancer, A.; Kirwan, F.; Swann, A.

    2013-01-01

    The geometry of the universal hyperkahler implosion for SU (n) is explored. In particular, we show that the universal hyperkahler implosion naturally contains a hypertoric variety described in terms of quivers. Furthermore, we discuss a gauge theoretic approach to hyperkahler implosion.......The geometry of the universal hyperkahler implosion for SU (n) is explored. In particular, we show that the universal hyperkahler implosion naturally contains a hypertoric variety described in terms of quivers. Furthermore, we discuss a gauge theoretic approach to hyperkahler implosion....

  14. Intermediate algebra & analytic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Gondin, William R

    1967-01-01

    Intermediate Algebra & Analytic Geometry Made Simple focuses on the principles, processes, calculations, and methodologies involved in intermediate algebra and analytic geometry. The publication first offers information on linear equations in two unknowns and variables, functions, and graphs. Discussions focus on graphic interpretations, explicit and implicit functions, first quadrant graphs, variables and functions, determinate and indeterminate systems, independent and dependent equations, and defective and redundant systems. The text then examines quadratic equations in one variable, system

  15. Soft tissue myoepithelial carcinoma metastatic to the cecum: highlighting an unusual metastatic pattern and the need for diagnostic awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Despoina Mourtzoukou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Myoepithelial neoplasms of the soft tissues are a rare, heterogeneous group of tumors for which classification continues to evolve. While well defined within salivary glands, they can also arise in viscera and soft tissues, where diagnosis is challenging due to the lack of clinical and pathological familiarity. We present the case of a 36 year old man with myoepithelial carcinoma arising as a primary tumor within the soft tissues of the neck, which metastasized to the cecum, causing intussusception. This spindle cell neoplasm showed the classic S100 protein, smooth muscle actin and pancytokeratin-positive immunoprofile. Metastasis of myoepithelial carcinoma to the cecum has not been previously described, and coupled with the spindle cell morphology, may cause significant diagnostic difficulty in the absence of clinical familiarity, particularly as there is morphologic overlap with spindle cell neoplasms arising more commonly in gastrointestinal sites, including gastrointestinal stromal tumor, leiomyosarcoma and sarcomatoid carcinoma.

  16. CMS Geometry Through 2020

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, I.; Brownson, E.; Eulisse, G.; Jones, C. D.; Lange, D. J.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.

    2014-06-01

    CMS faces real challenges with upgrade of the CMS detector through 2020 and beyond. One of the challenges, from the software point of view, is managing upgrade simulations with the same software release as the 2013 scenario. We present the CMS geometry description software model, its integration with the CMS event setup and core software. The CMS geometry configuration and selection is implemented in Python. The tools collect the Python configuration fragments into a script used in CMS workflow. This flexible and automated geometry configuration allows choosing either transient or persistent version of the same scenario and specific version of the same scenario. We describe how the geometries are integrated and validated, and how we define and handle different geometry scenarios in simulation and reconstruction. We discuss how to transparently manage multiple incompatible geometries in the same software release. Several examples are shown based on current implementation assuring consistent choice of scenario conditions. The consequences and implications for multiple/different code algorithms are discussed.

  17. Introduction to combinatorial geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, T.A.; Emmett, M.B.

    1985-01-01

    The combinatorial geometry package as used in many three-dimensional multimedia Monte Carlo radiation transport codes, such as HETC, MORSE, and EGS, is becoming the preferred way to describe simple and complicated systems. Just about any system can be modeled using the package with relatively few input statements. This can be contrasted against the older style geometry packages in which the required input statements could be large even for relatively simple systems. However, with advancements come some difficulties. The users of combinatorial geometry must be able to visualize more, and, in some instances, all of the system at a time. Errors can be introduced into the modeling which, though slight, and at times hard to detect, can have devastating effects on the calculated results. As with all modeling packages, the best way to learn the combinatorial geometry is to use it, first on a simple system then on more complicated systems. The basic technique for the description of the geometry consists of defining the location and shape of the various zones in terms of the intersections and unions of geometric bodies. The geometric bodies which are generally included in most combinatorial geometry packages are: (1) box, (2) right parallelepiped, (3) sphere, (4) right circular cylinder, (5) right elliptic cylinder, (6) ellipsoid, (7) truncated right cone, (8) right angle wedge, and (9) arbitrary polyhedron. The data necessary to describe each of these bodies are given. As can be easily noted, there are some subsets included for simplicity

  18. CMS geometry through 2020

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborne, I; Brownson, E; Eulisse, G; Jones, C D; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Lange, D J

    2014-01-01

    CMS faces real challenges with upgrade of the CMS detector through 2020 and beyond. One of the challenges, from the software point of view, is managing upgrade simulations with the same software release as the 2013 scenario. We present the CMS geometry description software model, its integration with the CMS event setup and core software. The CMS geometry configuration and selection is implemented in Python. The tools collect the Python configuration fragments into a script used in CMS workflow. This flexible and automated geometry configuration allows choosing either transient or persistent version of the same scenario and specific version of the same scenario. We describe how the geometries are integrated and validated, and how we define and handle different geometry scenarios in simulation and reconstruction. We discuss how to transparently manage multiple incompatible geometries in the same software release. Several examples are shown based on current implementation assuring consistent choice of scenario conditions. The consequences and implications for multiple/different code algorithms are discussed.

  19. Evolutionary Algorithm Geometry Optimization of Optical Antennas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón Díaz de León-Zapata

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Printed circuit antennas have been used for the detection of electromagnetic radiation at a wide range of frequencies that go from radio frequencies (RF up to optical frequencies. The design of printed antennas at optical frequencies has been done by using design rules derived from the radio frequency domain which do not take into account the dispersion of material parameters at optical frequencies. This can make traditional RF antenna design not suitable for optical antenna design. This work presents the results of using a genetic algorithm (GA for obtaining an optimized geometry (unconventional geometries that may be used as optical regime antennas to capture electromagnetic waves. The radiation patterns and optical properties of the GA generated geometries were compared with the conventional dipole geometry. The characterizations were conducted via finite element method (FEM computational simulations.

  20. Tissue bioaccumulation patterns, xenobiotic biotransformation and steroid hormone levels in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) fed a diet containing perfluoroactane sulfonic or perfluorooctane carboxylic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Anne S; Letcher, Robert J; Cangialosi, Maria V; Chu, Shaogang; Arukwe, Augustine

    2011-05-01

    In the present study, groups of juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) were fed gelatine capsules containing fish-food spiked with PFOA or PFOS (0.2 mg kg(-1) fish) and solvent (methanol). The capsules were given at days 0, 3 and 6. Blood, liver and whole kidney samples were collected prior to exposure (no solvent control), and at days 2, 5, 8 and 14 after exposure (Note: that day 14 after exposure is equal to 7d recovery period). We report on the differences in the tissue bioaccumulation patterns of PFOS and PFOA, in addition to tissue and compound differences in modulation pattern of biotransformation enzyme genes. We observed that the level of PFOS and PFOA increased in the blood, liver and kidney during the exposure period. Different PFOS and PFOA bioaccumulation patterns were observed in the kidney and liver during exposure- and after the recovery periods. Particularly, after the recovery period, PFOA levels in the kidney and liver tissues were almost at the control level. On the contrary, PFOS maintained an increase with tissue-specific differences, showing a higher bioaccumulation potential (also in the blood), compared with PFOA. While PFOS and PFOA produced an apparent time-dependent increase in kidney CYP3A, CYP1A1 and GST expression, similar effects were only temporary in the liver, significantly increasing at sampling day 2. PFOA and PFOS exposure resulted in significant decreases in plasma estrone, testosterone and cortisol levels at sampling day 2, and their effects differed with 17α-methyltestostrerone showing significant decrease by PFOA (also for cholesterol) and increase by PFOS. PFOA significantly increased estrone and testosterone, and no effects were observed for cortisol, 17α-methyltestosterone and cholesterol at sampling day 5. Overall, the changes in plasma steroid hormone levels parallel changes in CYP3A mRNA levels. Given that there are no known studies that have demonstrated such tissue differences in bioaccumulation patterns with

  1. Expression patterns of porcine Toll-like receptors family set of genes (TLR1-10) in gut-associated lymphoid tissues alter with age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Muhammad Jasim; Kaewmala, Kanokwan; Tesfaye, Dawit; Tholen, Ernst; Looft, Christian; Hoelker, Michael; Schellander, Karl; Cinar, Mehmet Ulas

    2013-08-01

    The aim was to study the expression pattern of the porcine TLR family (TLR1-10) genes in gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) of varying ages. A total of nine clinically healthy pigs of three ages group (1 day, 2 months and 5 months old) were selected for this experiment (three pigs in each group). Tissues from intestinal mucosa in stomach, duodenum, jejunum and ileum and mesenteric lymph node (MLN) were used. mRNA expression of TLRs (1-10) was detectable in all tissues and TLR3 showed the highest mRNA abundance among TLRs. TLR3 expression in stomach, and TLR1 and TLR6 expression in MLN were higher in adult than newborn pigs. The western blot results of TLR2, 3 and 9 in some cases, did not coincide with the mRNA expression results. The protein localization of TLR2, 3 and 9 showed that TLR expressing cells were abundant in the lamina propria, Peyer's patches in intestine, and around and within the lymphoid follicles in the MLN. This expressions study sheds the first light on the expression patterns of all TLR genes in GALT at different ages of pigs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Maize MID-COMPLEMENTING ACTIVITY homolog CELL NUMBER REGULATOR13/NARROW ODD DWARF, coordinates organ growth and tissue patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organogenesis occurs from cell division, expansion and differentiation. How these cellular processes are coordinated remains elusive. The maize leaf provides an excellent system to study cellular differentiation because it has several different tissues and cell types. The narrow odd dwarf (nod) mut...

  3. DNA methylation patterns in human tissues of uniparental origin using a zinc-Finger gene (ZNF127) from the Angelman/Prader-Willi region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mowery-Rushton, P.A.; Surti, U.; Locker, J. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [and others

    1996-01-11

    In order to further our understanding of the epigenetic modification of DNA and its role in imprinting, we examined DNA methylation patterns of human tissues of uniparental origin. We used complete hydatidiform moles (CHM), which are totally androgenetic conceptions, to examine the paternal methylation pattern in the absence of a maternal contribution and we used ovarian teratomas to represent the maternal counterpart. We carried out an analysis of DNA methylation of a gene which has been shown to contain sites which are differentially methylated in a parent-specific fashion. The gene, ZNF127, is located on chromosome 15q11-q13 in the region associated with Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes. The parent-of-origin DNA methylation has been postulated to reflect the presence of an imprint and recent studies have confirmed that ZNF127 is differentially expressed only from the paternal chromosome. We identified a unique pattern of hyper- and hypomethylated sites in androgenetic conceptions which was nearly identical to the paternal pattern found in sperm. This may represent the paternal germ-line methylation imprint. We also studied partial hydatidiform moles, non-molar triploid conceptions, normal chorionic villi, and somatic tissue. These all demonstrated a modified DNA methylation pattern characteristic of normal chorionic villi with only limited findings of the imprint. Our results suggest that human androgenetic conceptions may provide an excellent model to analyze epigenetic DNA modifications, such as methylation, in imprinted genes. The paternal allele-specific methylation imprint will also be useful clinically to confirm the androgenetic nature of suspected molar conceptions in which parental blood samples may not be available. 55 refs., 3 figs.

  4. The absence of HLA class I expression in non-small cell lung cancer correlates with the tumor tissue structure and the pattern of T cell infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perea, Francisco; Bernal, Mónica; Sánchez-Palencia, Abel; Carretero, Javier; Torres, Cristina; Bayarri, Clara; Gómez-Morales, Mercedes; Garrido, Federico; Ruiz-Cabello, Francisco

    2017-02-15

    We wanted to analyze whether tumor HLA class I (HLA-I) expression influences the pattern of the immune cell infiltration and stromal cell reaction in the tumor microenvironment. Tumor tissues obtained from 57 patients diagnosed with lung carcinomas were analyzed for HLA expression and leukocyte infiltration. 28 patients out of the 57 were completely negative for HLA-I expression (49.1%) or showed a selective HLA-A locus downregulation (three patients, 5.2%). In 26 out of 57 tumors (47.8%) we detected a positive HLA-I expression but with a percentage of HLA-I negative cells between 10 and 25%. The HLA-I negative phenotype was produced by a combination of HLA haplotype loss and a transcriptional downregulation of β2-microglobulin (β2-m) and LMP2 and LMP7 antigen presentation machinery genes. The analysis and localization of different immune cell populations revealed the presence of two major and reproducible patterns. One pattern, which we designated "immune-permissive tumor microenvironment (TME)," was characterized by positive tumor HLA-I expression, intratumoral infiltration with cytotoxic T-CD8+ cells, M1-inflammatory type macrophages, and a diffuse pattern of FAP+ cancer-associated fibroblasts. In contrast, another pattern defined as "non-immune-permissive TME" was found in HLA-I negative tumors with strong stromal-matrix interaction, T-CD8+ cells surrounding tumor nests, a dense layer of FAP+ fibroblasts and M2/repair-type macrophages. In conclusion, this study revealed marked differences between HLA class I-positive and negative tumors related to tissue structure, the composition of leukocyte infiltration and stromal response in the tumor microenvironment. © 2016 UICC.

  5. Nitrogen content of Letharia vulpina tissue from forests of the Sierra Nevada, California: geographic patterns and relationships to ammonia estimates and climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovan, Sarah; Carlberg, Tom

    2007-06-01

    Nitrogen (N) pollution is a growing concern in forests of the greater Sierra Nevada, which lie downwind of the highly populated and agricultural Central Valley. Nitrogen content of Letharia vulpina tissue was analyzed from 38 sites using total Kjeldahl analysis to provide a preliminary assessment of N deposition patterns. Collections were co-located with plots where epiphytic macrolichen communities are used for estimating ammonia (NH(3)) deposition. Tissue N ranged from 0.6% to 2.11% with the highest values occurring in the southwestern Sierra Nevada (range: 1.38 to 2.11). Tissue N at 17 plots was elevated, as defined by a threshold concentration of 1.03%. Stepwise regression was used to determine the best predictors of tissue N from among a variety of environmental variables. The best model consisted only of longitude (r(2) = 0.64), which was reflected in the geographic distribution of tissue values: the southwestern Sierra Nevada, the high Sierras near the Tahoe Basin, and the Modoc Plateau, are three apparent N hotspots arranged along the tilted north-south axis of the study area. Withholding longitude and latitude, the best regression model suggested that NH(3) estimates and annual number of wetdays interactively affect N accumulation (r(2) = 0.61; % N approximately NH(3) + wetdays + (NH(3) x wetdays)). We did not expect perfect correspondence between tissue values and NH(3) estimates since other N pollutants also accumulate in the lichen thallus. Additionally, other factors potentially affecting N content, such as growth rate and leaching, were not given full account.

  6. Comparison of two techniques of harvesting connective tissue and its effects on healing pattern at palate and recession coverage at recipient site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Nymphea; Khasa, Meenakshi; Gugnani, Shalini; Malik, Rajvir; Bali, Deepika

    2016-01-01

    To compare the healing pattern in palate following harvestation of connective tissue graft by two different techniques and to compare the recession coverage at the recipient sites. 30 recession sites with Miller's class I and II recession in 16 patients were recruited for this study. Sites were randomly divided into 2 treatment groups. Group I used Unigraft Knife to harvest the connective tissue whereas in group II patients Langer & Langer techniques was used to harvest the connective tissue graft from the palate. Healing was evaluated at the donor site using- wound size(WS), immediate bleeding (iB) and delayed bleeding (dB), complete wound epithelialization (CE), sensibility disorders (S) and post operative pain (PP) at baseline, 1(st), 4(th), and 12(th) week postoperatively. Recession coverage was assessed by measuring Clinical Attachment Level (CAL), vertical recession (VR), width of keratinized gingiva (KT). On comparison between Group I and II, a statistically significant larger wound size was observed in Group I. CWE was higher in Group II. A non significant difference was observed when SD, and delayed bleeding were compared at all time intervals. A non-significant difference was observed in the clinical parameters at the recipient site. When evaluating the WS and CWE, the Langer and Langer technique was found to be better than the Unigraft knife technique for harvesting the connective tissue graft, whereas both the techniques were found to be effective in root coverage procedure outcomes.

  7. Antibody-based screening of cell wall matrix glycans in ferns reveals taxon, tissue and cell-type specific distribution patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leroux, Olivier; Sørensen, Iben; Marcus, Susan E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: While it is kno3wn that complex tissues with specialized functions emerged during land plant evolution, it is not clear how cell wall polymers and their structural variants are associated with specific tissues or cell types. Moreover, due to the economic importance of many flowering...... epitopes display complex spatio-temporal and phylogenetic distribution patterns that are likely to relate to the evolution of land plant body plans....... plants, ferns have been largely neglected in cell wall comparative studies. Results: To explore fern cell wall diversity sets of monoclonal antibodies directed to matrix glycans of angiosperm cell walls have been used in glycan microarray and in situ analyses with 76 fern species and four species...

  8. Sources of hyperbolic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Stillwell, John

    1996-01-01

    This book presents, for the first time in English, the papers of Beltrami, Klein, and Poincaré that brought hyperbolic geometry into the mainstream of mathematics. A recognition of Beltrami comparable to that given the pioneering works of Bolyai and Lobachevsky seems long overdue-not only because Beltrami rescued hyperbolic geometry from oblivion by proving it to be logically consistent, but because he gave it a concrete meaning (a model) that made hyperbolic geometry part of ordinary mathematics. The models subsequently discovered by Klein and Poincaré brought hyperbolic geometry even further down to earth and paved the way for the current explosion of activity in low-dimensional geometry and topology. By placing the works of these three mathematicians side by side and providing commentaries, this book gives the student, historian, or professional geometer a bird's-eye view of one of the great episodes in mathematics. The unified setting and historical context reveal the insights of Beltrami, Klein, and Po...

  9. A functional genomics screen identifies an Importin-α homolog as a regulator of stem cell function and tissue patterning during planarian regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, Amy; Henderson, Jordana M; Cowles, Martis W; Ross, Kelly G; Hagen, Matthew; Anderson, Christa; Szeterlak, Claudia J; Zayas, Ricardo M

    2015-10-12

    Planarians are renowned for their regenerative capacity and are an attractive model for the study of adult stem cells and tissue regeneration. In an effort to better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying planarian regeneration, we performed a functional genomics screen aimed at identifying genes involved in this process in Schmidtea mediterranea. We used microarrays to detect changes in gene expression in regenerating and non-regenerating tissues in planarians regenerating one side of the head and followed this with high-throughput screening by in situ hybridization and RNAi to characterize the expression patterns and function of the differentially expressed genes. Along with five previously characterized genes (Smed-cycD, Smed-morf41/mrg-1, Smed-pdss2/dlp1, Smed-slbp, and Smed-tph), we identified 20 additional genes necessary for stem cell maintenance (Smed-sart3, Smed-smarcc-1, Smed-espl1, Smed-rrm2b-1, Smed-rrm2b-2, Smed-dkc1, Smed-emg1, Smed-lig1, Smed-prim2, Smed-mcm7, and a novel sequence) or general regenerative capability (Smed-rbap46/48-2, Smed-mcm2, Smed-ptbp1, and Smed-fen-1) or that caused tissue-specific defects upon knockdown (Smed-ddc, Smed-gas8, Smed-pgbd4, and Smed-b9d2). We also found that a homolog of the nuclear transport factor Importin-α plays a role in stem cell function and tissue patterning, suggesting that controlled nuclear import of proteins is important for regeneration. Through this work, we described the roles of several previously uncharacterized genes in planarian regeneration and implicated nuclear import in this process. We have additionally created an online database to house our in situ and RNAi data to make it accessible to the planarian research community.

  10. Students Discovering Spherical Geometry Using Dynamic Geometry Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guven, Bulent; Karatas, Ilhan

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic geometry software (DGS) such as Cabri and Geometers' Sketchpad has been regularly used worldwide for teaching and learning Euclidean geometry for a long time. The DGS with its inductive nature allows students to learn Euclidean geometry via explorations. However, with respect to non-Euclidean geometries, do we need to introduce them to…

  11. Tissue distribution, subcellular localization and endocrine disruption patterns induced by Cr and Mn in the crab Ucides cordatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, Jose Dias; Ramos da Silva, Miguel; Bastos da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Araujo de Lima, Silene Maria; Malm, Olaf; Allodi, Silvana

    2005-01-01

    The essential trace elements Cr and Mn are toxic at high concentrations and information about low concentration is insufficient in the literature. In polluted mangroves, the crab Ucides cordatus can represent a useful tool to assess information on the potential impact of trace elements like Cr and Mn on the environment, since this species is comestible and thus, commercially negotiated. Therefore, U. cordatus crabs were exposed in vivo to different concentrations of Cr and Mn solved in seawater and had their tissue distribution and subcellular deposits evaluated. The gill, hepatopancreas and muscle concentrations were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy and the results showed that Cr and Mn presented the highest values in the gills rather than in the hepatopancreas and muscular tissue. Electron microscopy and analytical X-ray microanalysis revealed Cr precipitates on the gill surface, co-localized with epiphyte bacteria. In addition, since Cr and Mn did not equally accumulate in most of the tissues studied, glycemic rate of animals, which received injections of extracts of eyestalks of the contaminated crabs, were measured in order to evaluate whether the studied concentrations of Cr and Mn could produce any metabolic alteration. The results indicated that extracts of the eyestalks of crabs submitted to Cr and Mn salts and injected into normal crabs markedly influenced crustacean hyperglycemic hormone synthesis and/or release. The results are discussed with respect to sensitivity of the employed methods and the possible significance of the concentrations of Cr and Mn in the organisms

  12. A prognostic model for soft tissue sarcoma of the extremities and trunk wall based on size, vascular invasion, necrosis, and growth pattern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carneiro, Ana; Bendahl, Par-Ola; Engellau, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    ), was established and compared with other clinically applied systems. RESULTS:: Size, vascular invasion, necrosis, and peripheral tumor growth pattern provided independent prognostic information with hazard ratios of 2.2-2.6 for development of metastases in multivariate analysis. When these factors were combined......BACKGROUND:: In soft tissue sarcoma, better distinction of high-risk and low-risk patients is needed to individualize treatment and improve survival. Prognostic systems used in clinical practice identify high-risk patients based on various factors, including age, tumor size and depth, histological...

  13. Geometry and Cloaking Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, T.; Nacher, J. C.

    2011-09-01

    Recently, the application of geometry and conformal mappings to artificial materials (metamaterials) has attracted the attention in various research communities. These materials, characterized by a unique man-made structure, have unusual optical properties, which materials found in nature do not exhibit. By applying the geometry and conformal mappings theory to metamaterial science, it may be possible to realize so-called "Harry Potter cloaking device". Although such a device is still in the science fiction realm, several works have shown that by using such metamaterials it may be possible to control the direction of the electromagnetic field at will. We could then make an object hidden inside of a cloaking device. Here, we will explain how to design invisibility device using differential geometry and conformal mappings.

  14. Complex differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Fangyang

    2002-01-01

    The theory of complex manifolds overlaps with several branches of mathematics, including differential geometry, algebraic geometry, several complex variables, global analysis, topology, algebraic number theory, and mathematical physics. Complex manifolds provide a rich class of geometric objects, for example the (common) zero locus of any generic set of complex polynomials is always a complex manifold. Yet complex manifolds behave differently than generic smooth manifolds; they are more coherent and fragile. The rich yet restrictive character of complex manifolds makes them a special and interesting object of study. This book is a self-contained graduate textbook that discusses the differential geometric aspects of complex manifolds. The first part contains standard materials from general topology, differentiable manifolds, and basic Riemannian geometry. The second part discusses complex manifolds and analytic varieties, sheaves and holomorphic vector bundles, and gives a brief account of the surface classifi...

  15. Geometry of hypersurfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Cecil, Thomas E

    2015-01-01

    This exposition provides the state-of-the art on the differential geometry of hypersurfaces in real, complex, and quaternionic space forms. Special emphasis is placed on isoparametric and Dupin hypersurfaces in real space forms as well as Hopf hypersurfaces in complex space forms. The book is accessible to a reader who has completed a one-year graduate course in differential geometry. The text, including open problems and an extensive list of references, is an excellent resource for researchers in this area. Geometry of Hypersurfaces begins with the basic theory of submanifolds in real space forms. Topics include shape operators, principal curvatures and foliations, tubes and parallel hypersurfaces, curvature spheres and focal submanifolds. The focus then turns to the theory of isoparametric hypersurfaces in spheres. Important examples and classification results are given, including the construction of isoparametric hypersurfaces based on representations of Clifford algebras. An in-depth treatment of Dupin hy...

  16. Geometry and symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Yale, Paul B

    2012-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the geometry of Euclidean, affine, and projective spaces with special emphasis on the important groups of symmetries of these spaces. The two major objectives of the text are to introduce the main ideas of affine and projective spaces and to develop facility in handling transformations and groups of transformations. Since there are many good texts on affine and projective planes, the author has concentrated on the n-dimensional cases.Designed to be used in advanced undergraduate mathematics or physics courses, the book focuses on ""practical geometry,"" emphasi

  17. Small and intermediate conductance Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels confer distinctive patterns of distribution in human tissues and differential cellular localisation in the colon and corpus cavernosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mao Xiang; Gorman, Shelby A; Benson, Bill; Singh, Kuljit; Hieble, J Paul; Michel, Martin C; Tate, Simon N; Trezise, Derek J

    2004-06-01

    The SK/IK family of small and intermediate conductance calcium-activated potassium channels contains four members, SK1, SK2, SK3 and IK1, and is important for the regulation of a variety of neuronal and non-neuronal functions. In this study we have analysed the distribution of these channels in human tissues and their cellular localisation in samples of colon and corpus cavernosum. SK1 mRNA was detected almost exclusively in neuronal tissues. SK2 mRNA distribution was restricted but more widespread than SK1, and was detected in adrenal gland, brain, prostate, bladder, liver and heart. SK3 mRNA was detected in almost every tissue examined. It was highly expressed in brain and in smooth muscle-rich tissues including the clitoris and the corpus cavernosum, and expression in the corpus cavernosum was upregulated up to 5-fold in patients undergoing sex-change operations. IK1 mRNA was present in surface-rich, secretory and inflammatory cell-rich tissues, highest in the trachea, prostate, placenta and salivary glands. In detailed immunohistochemical studies of the colon and the corpus cavernosum, SK1-like immunoreactivity was observed in the enteric neurons. SK3-like immunoreactivity was observed strongly in smooth muscle and vascular endothelium. IK1-like immunoreactivity was mainly observed in inflammatory cells and enteric neurons of the colon, but absent in corpus cavernosum. These distinctive patterns of distribution suggest that these channels are likely to have different biological functions and could be specifically targeted for a number of human diseases, such as irritable bowel syndrome, hypertension and erectile dysfunction.

  18. Patterns of water use and the tissue water relations in the dioecious shrub, Salix arctica: the physiological basis for habitat partitioning between the sexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, T E; Bliss, L C

    1989-05-01

    Within the high arctic of Canada, Salix arctica, a dioecious, dwarf willow exhibits significant spatial segregation of the sexes. The overall sex ratio is female-biased and female plants are especially common in wet, higher nutrient, but lower soil temperature habitats. In contrast, male plants predominate in more xeric and lower nutrient habitats with higher soil temperatures that can be drought prone. Associated with the sex-specific habitat differences were differences in the seasonal and diurnal patterns of water use as measured by stomatal conductance to water vapor and the bulk tissue water relations of each gender. Within the wet habitats, female plants maintained higher rates of stomatal conductance (g) than males when soil and root temperatures were low (point and a lower bulk tissue elastic modulus (higher tissue elasticity) than female plants. Males also demonstrated a greater ability to osmotically adjust on a diurnal basis than females. These properties allowed male plants to maintain higher tissue turgor pressures at lower tissue water contents and Ψsoil over the course of the day. The sex-specific distributional and ecophysiological characteristics were also correlated with greater total plant growth and higher fecundity of females in wet habitats, and males in xeric habitats respectively. The intersexual differences in physiology persisted in all habitats. These results and those obtained from growth chamber studies suggest that sex-specific differences have an underlying genetic basis. From these data we conjecture that selection maintaining the intersexual differences may be related to different costs associated with reproduction that can be most easily met through physiological specialization and spatial segregation of the sexes among habitats of differing conditions.

  19. Serum estradiol levels associated with specific gene expression patterns in normal breast tissue and in breast carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristensen Vessela N

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High serum levels of estradiol are associated with increased risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. Little is known about the gene expression in normal breast tissue in relation to levels of circulating serum estradiol. Methods We compared whole genome expression data of breast tissue samples with serum hormone levels using data from 79 healthy women and 64 breast cancer patients. Significance analysis of microarrays (SAM was used to identify differentially expressed genes and multivariate linear regression was used to identify independent associations. Results Six genes (SCGB3A1, RSPO1, TLN2, SLITRK4, DCLK1, PTGS1 were found differentially expressed according to serum estradiol levels (FDR = 0. Three of these independently predicted estradiol levels in a multivariate model, as SCGB3A1 (HIN1 and TLN2 were up-regulated and PTGS1 (COX1 was down-regulated in breast samples from women with high serum estradiol. Serum estradiol, but none of the differentially expressed genes were significantly associated with mammographic density, another strong breast cancer risk factor. In breast carcinomas, expression of GREB1 and AREG was associated with serum estradiol in all cancers and in the subgroup of estrogen receptor positive cases. Conclusions We have identified genes associated with serum estradiol levels in normal breast tissue and in breast carcinomas. SCGB3A1 is a suggested tumor suppressor gene that inhibits cell growth and invasion and is methylated and down-regulated in many epithelial cancers. Our findings indicate this gene as an important inhibitor of breast cell proliferation in healthy women with high estradiol levels. In the breast, this gene is expressed in luminal cells only and is methylated in non-BRCA-related breast cancers. The possibility of a carcinogenic contribution of silencing of this gene for luminal, but not basal-like cancers should be further explored. PTGS1 induces prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 production which

  20. Serum estradiol levels associated with specific gene expression patterns in normal breast tissue and in breast carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haakensen, Vilde D; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Helland, Åslaug; Bjøro, Trine; Lüders, Torben; Riis, Margit; Bukholm, Ida K; Kristensen, Vessela N; Troester, Melissa A; Homen, Marit M; Ursin, Giske

    2011-01-01

    High serum levels of estradiol are associated with increased risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. Little is known about the gene expression in normal breast tissue in relation to levels of circulating serum estradiol. We compared whole genome expression data of breast tissue samples with serum hormone levels using data from 79 healthy women and 64 breast cancer patients. Significance analysis of microarrays (SAM) was used to identify differentially expressed genes and multivariate linear regression was used to identify independent associations. Six genes (SCGB3A1, RSPO1, TLN2, SLITRK4, DCLK1, PTGS1) were found differentially expressed according to serum estradiol levels (FDR = 0). Three of these independently predicted estradiol levels in a multivariate model, as SCGB3A1 (HIN1) and TLN2 were up-regulated and PTGS1 (COX1) was down-regulated in breast samples from women with high serum estradiol. Serum estradiol, but none of the differentially expressed genes were significantly associated with mammographic density, another strong breast cancer risk factor. In breast carcinomas, expression of GREB1 and AREG was associated with serum estradiol in all cancers and in the subgroup of estrogen receptor positive cases. We have identified genes associated with serum estradiol levels in normal breast tissue and in breast carcinomas. SCGB3A1 is a suggested tumor suppressor gene that inhibits cell growth and invasion and is methylated and down-regulated in many epithelial cancers. Our findings indicate this gene as an important inhibitor of breast cell proliferation in healthy women with high estradiol levels. In the breast, this gene is expressed in luminal cells only and is methylated in non-BRCA-related breast cancers. The possibility of a carcinogenic contribution of silencing of this gene for luminal, but not basal-like cancers should be further explored. PTGS1 induces prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production which in turn stimulates aromatase expression and hence increases the

  1. Tissue Doppler echocardiography reveals distinct patterns of impaired myocardial velocities in different degrees of coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Soren; Mogelvang, Rasmus; Olsen, Niels Thue

    2010-01-01

    Aim To determine how the left ventricular wall motion assessed by echocardiographic Tissue Doppler Imaging (TDI) is affected by increasing severity of coronary artery disease (CAD) among patients with stable angina pectoris and preserved ejection fraction. METHODS AND RESULTS: This study comprises...... global estimates. Each patient with significant coronary disease was matched with a control of the same age, sex, body mass index, and status regarding diabetes and hypertension. Global systolic and diastolic performance by TDI (in terms of global s' and E/e') were negatively correlated to the number...

  2. Gravity is Geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKeown, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    Clarifies two concepts of gravity--those of a fictitious force and those of how space and time may have geometry. Reviews the position of Newton's theory of gravity in the context of special relativity and considers why gravity (as distinct from electromagnetics) lends itself to Einstein's revolutionary interpretation. (JN)

  3. Implosions and hypertoric geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dancer, A.; Kirwan, F.; Swann, A.

    2013-01-01

    The geometry of the universal hyperkahler implosion for SU (n) is explored. In particular, we show that the universal hyperkahler implosion naturally contains a hypertoric variety described in terms of quivers. Furthermore, we discuss a gauge theoretic approach to hyperkahler implosion....

  4. History of analytic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Boyer, Carl B

    2012-01-01

    Designed as an integrated survey of the development of analytic geometry, this study presents the concepts and contributions from before the Alexandrian Age through the eras of the great French mathematicians Fermat and Descartes, and on through Newton and Euler to the "Golden Age," from 1789 to 1850.

  5. Geometry Euclid and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Hartshorne, Robin

    2000-01-01

    In recent years, I have been teaching a junior-senior-level course on the classi­ cal geometries. This book has grown out of that teaching experience. I assume only high-school geometry and some abstract algebra. The course begins in Chapter 1 with a critical examination of Euclid's Elements. Students are expected to read concurrently Books I-IV of Euclid's text, which must be obtained sepa­ rately. The remainder of the book is an exploration of questions that arise natu­ rally from this reading, together with their modern answers. To shore up the foundations we use Hilbert's axioms. The Cartesian plane over a field provides an analytic model of the theory, and conversely, we see that one can introduce coordinates into an abstract geometry. The theory of area is analyzed by cutting figures into triangles. The algebra of field extensions provides a method for deciding which geometrical constructions are possible. The investigation of the parallel postulate leads to the various non-Euclidean geometries. And ...

  6. Origami, Geometry and Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wares, Arsalan; Elstak, Iwan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the mathematics that emanates from the construction of an origami box. We first construct a simple origami box from a rectangular sheet and then discuss some of the mathematical questions that arise in the context of geometry and algebra. The activity can be used as a context for illustrating how algebra…

  7. Light, Matter, and Geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jeppe Revall

    2008-01-01

    , whether the shape of the material should be coupled to the appearance model or not, etc. A generalised concept of shape and geometry is presented to provide a framework for handling these many degrees of freedom. Constraints between input and output parameters are modelled as multidimensional shapes...

  8. Diophantine geometry an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Hindry, Marc

    2000-01-01

    This is an introduction to diophantine geometry at the advanced graduate level. The book contains a proof of the Mordell conjecture which will make it quite attractive to graduate students and professional mathematicians. In each part of the book, the reader will find numerous exercises.

  9. Metrics for Probabilistic Geometries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosi, Alessandra; Hauberg, Søren; Vellido, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the geometrical structure of probabilistic generative dimensionality reduction models using the tools of Riemannian geometry. We explicitly define a distribution over the natural metric given by the models. We provide the necessary algorithms to compute expected metric tensors where...

  10. Towards relativistic quantum geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridao, Luis Santiago [Instituto de Investigaciones Físicas de Mar del Plata (IFIMAR), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Mar del Plata (Argentina); Bellini, Mauricio, E-mail: mbellini@mdp.edu.ar [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Funes 3350, C.P. 7600, Mar del Plata (Argentina); Instituto de Investigaciones Físicas de Mar del Plata (IFIMAR), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Mar del Plata (Argentina)

    2015-12-17

    We obtain a gauge-invariant relativistic quantum geometry by using a Weylian-like manifold with a geometric scalar field which provides a gauge-invariant relativistic quantum theory in which the algebra of the Weylian-like field depends on observers. An example for a Reissner–Nordström black-hole is studied.

  11. Non-euclidean geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Coxeter, HSM

    1965-01-01

    This textbook introduces non-Euclidean geometry, and the third edition adds a new chapter, including a description of the two families of 'mid-lines' between two given lines and an elementary derivation of the basic formulae of spherical trigonometry and hyperbolic trigonometry, and other new material.

  12. Fractal geometry of music.

    OpenAIRE

    Hsü, K J; Hsü, A J

    1990-01-01

    Music critics have compared Bach's music to the precision of mathematics. What "mathematics" and what "precision" are the questions for a curious scientist. The purpose of this short note is to suggest that the mathematics is, at least in part, Mandelbrot's fractal geometry and the precision is the deviation from a log-log linear plot.

  13. Listening to Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Brett D.; Barger, Rita

    2009-01-01

    The many connections between music and mathematics are well known. The length of a plucked string determines its tone, the time signature of a piece of music is a ratio, and note durations are measured in fractions. One connection commonly overlooked is that between music and geometry--specifically, geometric transformations, including…

  14. Geometry and physics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atiyah, M.; Dijkgraaf, R.; Hitchin, N.

    2010-01-01

    We review the remarkably fruitful interactions between mathematics and quantum physics in the past decades, pointing out some general trends and highlighting several examples, such as the counting of curves in algebraic geometry, invariants of knots and four-dimensional topology.

  15. The Helen of Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, John

    2010-01-01

    The cycloid has been called the Helen of Geometry, not only because of its beautiful properties but also because of the quarrels it provoked between famous mathematicians of the 17th century. This article surveys the history of the cycloid and its importance in the development of the calculus.

  16. Sliding vane geometry turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Harold Huimin; Zhang, Jizhong; Hu, Liangjun; Hanna, Dave R

    2014-12-30

    Various systems and methods are described for a variable geometry turbine. In one example, a turbine nozzle comprises a central axis and a nozzle vane. The nozzle vane includes a stationary vane and a sliding vane. The sliding vane is positioned to slide in a direction substantially tangent to an inner circumference of the turbine nozzle and in contact with the stationary vane.

  17. Towards a Nano Geometry?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Booss-Bavnbek, Bernhelm

    2011-01-01

    This paper applies I.M. Gelfand's distinction between adequate and non-adequate use of mathematical language in different contexts to the newly opened window of model-based measurements of intracellular dynamics. The specifics of geometry and dynamics on the mesoscale of cell physiology are elabo...

  18. Soft tissue artifact evaluation of the cervical spine in motion patterns of flexion and lateral bending: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiajia Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Soft tissue artifact (STA is increasingly becoming a focus of research as the skin marker method is widely employed in motion capture technique. At present, medical imaging methods provide reliable ways to investigate the cervical STA. Among these approaches, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a highly preferred tool because of its low radiation. Methods. In the study, the 3D spatial location of vertebral landmarks and corresponding skin markers of the spinous processes of the second (C2, fifth (C5, and sixth (C6 cervical levels during flexion and lateral bending were investigated. A series of static postures were scanned using MRI. Skin deformation was obtained by the Mimics software. Results. Results shows that during flexion, the maximum skin deformation occurs at C6, in the superior–inferior (Z direction. Upon lateral bending, the maximum skin displacement occurs at C2 level, in the left–right (Y direction. The result presents variability of soft tissue in the terms of direction and magnitude, which is consistent with the prevailing opinion. Discussion. The results testified variability of cervical STA. Future studies involving large ranges of subject classification, such as age, sex, height, gravity, and etc. should be performed to completely verify the existing hypothesis on human cervical skin deformation.

  19. Different expression patterns of PRRSV mediator genes in the lung tissues of PRRSV resistant and susceptible pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chenglan; Xing, Feng; Xing, Jinyi; Jiang, Yunliang; Zhou, Enmin

    2013-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) has caused severe economic loss in most swine-producing countries. The resistance to PRRS virus (PRRSV) infection varies among pig breeds and lines. In this study, we found that the Chinese Dapulian pigs (DPL) were more resistant to PRRSV than commercial Duroc×Landrace×Yorkshire (DLY) crossbred pigs in that lower rectal temperature and lower PRRSV copy number in the serum were detected in the former. Analysis of the mRNA expression of five PRRSV mediator genes (SIGLEC1, NMMHC-IIA, CD163, VIM and HSPG2) in the lung tissues indicated differences in expression between DLY and DPL pigs. In uninfected porcine lung tissues, the levels of SIGLEC1, NMMHC-IIA, CD163 and VIM genes were significantly higher in DLY than in DPL pigs (PDPL pigs compared to uninfected ones (PDPL and DLY pigs. Thus, the different expression of PRRSV mediator genes is likely related to pig resistance to PRRSV. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Aggressive Angioimmunoblastic T Cell Lymphomas (AITL) with Soft Tissue Extranodal Mass Varied Histopathological Patterns with Peripheral Blood, Bone Marrow, and Splenic Involvement and Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Tanushri; Dutta, Rajat; Pramanik, S

    2018-03-01

    Angioimmunoblastic T cell lymphoma (AITL) is a peripheral T cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma with an aggressive fatal course and it has varied clinical presentation with an uncommon presentation when they present as soft tissue masses or when there is spill in the peripheral blood or there are composite lymphomas that are rare presentations. Common presentations include lymphadenopathy, fever and systemic symptoms, hemolytic anemias, skin rashes, and rheumatoid arthritis. The classical histopathology is absence of follicles in lymph nodes with presence of high endothelial venules and the tumor cells of small to medium-sized lymphocytes with pale cytoplasm mixed with reactive T cells. On immunohistochemistry, the cells are positive for CD3, CD4, CD10, BCL2, and CXCL13. In this observational study, the clinicopathologic presentation and the immunohistochemical profile of five cases who initially presented with a soft tissue mass which is an extremely rare presentation of this rare type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that was diagnosed at our center with peripheral blood and bone marrow involvement and the clinicopathologic presentation, immunohistochemical profile, and response to treatment on follow-up are correlated with the literature review. One case had a fulminant and aggressive course and was fatal within 2 months of diagnosis. The rest of the four cases are on regular chemotherapy and follow-up. Our five cases had presented with soft tissue masses, two in the axillary regio,n two in the hand, and one in the scapular region with an extranodal presentation, and there was associated lymphadenopathy which developed subsequently with classic histomorphology and immunohistochemical findings. The age range was 46-54 years and all five cases were males. Three cases were with anemia (hemoglobin range 6.5-8.0 mg/dl) and all five cases were having peripheral blood plasmacytosis. Histopathology was classic with paracortical involvement with polymorphous population of cells with

  1. Properties and application of a multichannel integrated circuit for low-artifact, patterned electrical stimulation of neural tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hottowy, Paweł; Skoczeń, Andrzej; Gunning, Deborah E.; Kachiguine, Sergei; Mathieson, Keith; Sher, Alexander; Wiącek, Piotr; Litke, Alan M.; Dąbrowski, Władysław

    2012-12-01

    Objective. Modern multielectrode array (MEA) systems can record the neuronal activity from thousands of electrodes, but their ability to provide spatio-temporal patterns of electrical stimulation is very limited. Furthermore, the stimulus-related artifacts significantly limit the ability to record the neuronal responses to the stimulation. To address these issues, we designed a multichannel integrated circuit for a patterned MEA-based electrical stimulation and evaluated its performance in experiments with isolated mouse and rat retina. Approach. The Stimchip includes 64 independent stimulation channels. Each channel comprises an internal digital-to-analogue converter that can be configured as a current or voltage source. The shape of the stimulation waveform is defined independently for each channel by the real-time data stream. In addition, each channel is equipped with circuitry for reduction of the stimulus artifact. Main results. Using a high-density MEA stimulation/recording system, we effectively stimulated individual retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and recorded the neuronal responses with minimal distortion, even on the stimulating electrodes. We independently stimulated a population of RGCs in rat retina, and using a complex spatio-temporal pattern of electrical stimulation pulses, we replicated visually evoked spiking activity of a subset of these cells with high fidelity. Significance. Compared with current state-of-the-art MEA systems, the Stimchip is able to stimulate neuronal cells with much more complex sequences of electrical pulses and with significantly reduced artifacts. This opens up new possibilities for studies of neuronal responses to electrical stimulation, both in the context of neuroscience research and in the development of neuroprosthetic devices.

  2. Differential expression pattern of extracellular matrix molecules during chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow and adipose tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlhorn, A T; Niemeyer, P; Kaiser, S

    2006-01-01

    Adipose-derived adult stem cells (ADASCs) or bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) are considered as alternative cell sources for cell-based cartilage repair due to their ability to produce cartilage-specific matrix. This article addresses the differential expression pattern...... chondroinduction. TGF-beta1 induces alternative splicing of the alpha(1)-procollagen type II transcript in BMSCs, but not in ADASCs. These findings may direct the development of a cell-specific culture environment either to prevent hypertrophy in BMSCs or to promote chondrogenic maturation in ADASCs....

  3. The prevalence, pattern and clinical presentation of developmental dental hard-tissue anomalies in children with primary and mix dentition from Ile-Ife, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temilola, Dada Oluwaseyi; Folayan, Morenike Oluwatoyin; Fatusi, Olawunmi; Chukwumah, Nneka Maureen; Onyejaka, Nneka; Oziegbe, Elizabeth; Oyedele, Titus; Kolawole, Kikelomo Adebanke; Agbaje, Hakeem

    2014-10-16

    The study of dental anomalies is important because it generates information that is important for both the anthropological and clinical management of patients. The objective of this study is to determine the prevalence and pattern of presentation of dental hard-tissue developmental anomalies in the mix dentition of children residing in Ile-Ife, a suburban region of Nigeria. Information on age, sex and socioeconomic status was collected from 1,036 children aged four months to 12 years through a household survey. Clinical examination was conducted to assess the presence of dental anomalies. Associations between age, sex, socioeconomic status, prevalence, and pattern of presentation of the developmental hard-tissue dental anomalies were determined. Two hundred and seventy six (26.6%) children had dental anomalies. Of these, 23.8% had one anomaly, 2.5% had two anomalies, and 0.3% had more than two anomalies. Of the children with anomalies, 49.3%were male, 50.7%were female, and 47.8%, 28.6% and 23.6% were children from low, middle and high socioeconomic classes, respectively. More anomalies were seen in permanent than primary dentition. Anomalies of tooth structure were most prevalent (16.1%); anomalies which affect tooth number were least prevalent (1.3%). Dens evaginatus, peg-shaped lateral, macrodontia, and talon cusp were more prevalent in the permanent dentition, and dens evaginatus peg-shaped lateral and macrodontia were more prevalent in the maxilla. There were significantly more macrodontia anomalies in males and in children of high socioeconomic status. This large survey of dental hard-tissue anomalies found in the primary dentition and mixed dentition of children in Nigeria provides anthropological and clinical data that may aid the detection and management of dental problems of children in Nigeria.

  4. Perfusion pattern and time of vascularisation with CEUS increase accuracy in differentiating between benign and malignant tumours in 216 musculoskeletal soft tissue masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Marchi, Armanda, E-mail: armanda.demarchi@tiscali.it [Department of Imaging, Azienda Ospedaliera Città della Salute e della Scienza, CTO Hospital, Via Zuretti 29, 10126 Torino (Italy); Prever, Elena Brach del, E-mail: elena.brach@unito.it [Department of OrthopaedicOncology and ReconstructiveSurgery, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Città della Salute e della Scienza, CTO Hospital, Via Zuretti 29, 10126 Torino (Italy); Cavallo, Franco, E-mail: franco.cavallo@unito.it [Department of Public health and Paediatrics, University of Turin, Via Santena 5-bis, 10126 Torino (Italy); Pozza, Simona, E-mail: simona.pozza@tin.it [Department of Imaging, Azienda Ospedaliera Città della Salute e della Scienza, CTO Hospital, Via Zuretti 29, 10126 Torino (Italy); Linari, Alessandra, E-mail: linaralessandra@libero.it [Department of Pathology, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Città della Salute e della Scienza, Regina Margherita Hospital, Piazza Polonia, 10126 Torino (Italy); Lombardo, Paolo, E-mail: pao.lombardo82@gmail.com [Department of DiagnosticImaging and Radiotherapy of the University of Turin, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, Via Genova 3, 10126 Torino (Italy); Comandone, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.comandone@gradenigo.it [Department of Oncology, Gradenigo Hospital, Corso Regina Margherita, 8/10.10153 Torino (Italy); Piana, Raimondo, E-mail: raimondo.piana@libero.it [Department of OrthopaedicOncology and ReconstructiveSurgery, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Città della Salute e della Scienza, CTO Hospital, Via Zuretti 29, 10126 Torino (Italy); Faletti, Carlo [Department of Imaging, Azienda Ospedaliera Città della Salute e della Scienza, CTO Hospital, Via Zuretti 29, 10126 Torino (Italy)

    2015-01-15

    Introduction: Musculoskeletal Soft Tissue Tumours (STT) are frequent heterogeneous lesions. Guidelines consider a mass larger than 5 cm and deep with respect to the deep fascia potentially malignant. Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) can detect both vascularity and tumour neoangiogenesis. We hypothesised that perfusion patterns and vascularisation time could improve the accuracy of CEUS in discriminating malignant tumours from benign lesions. Materials and methods: 216 STT were studied: 40% benign lesions, 60% malignant tumours, 56% in the lower limbs. Seven CEUS perfusion patterns and three types of vascularisation (arterial-venous uptake, absence of uptake) were applied. Accuracy was evaluated by comparing imaging with the histological diagnosis. Univariate and multivariate analysis, Chi-square test and t-test for independent variables were applied; significance was set at p < 0.05 level, 95% computed CI. Results: CEUS pattern 6 (inhomogeneous perfusion), arterial uptake and location in the lower limb were associated with high risk of malignancy. CEUS pattern has PPV 77%, rapidity of vascularisation PPV 69%; location in the limbs is the most sensitive indicator, but NPV 52%, PPV 65%. The combination of CEUS-pattern and vascularisation has 74% PPV, 60% NPV, 70% sensitivity. No correlation with size and location in relation to the deep fascia was found. Conclusion: US with CEUS qualitative analysis could be an accurate technique to identify potentially malignant STT, for which second line imaging and biopsy are indicated in Referral Centers. Intense inhomogeneous enhancement with avascular areas and rapid vascularisation time could be useful in discriminating benign from malignant SST, overall when the lower limbs are involved.

  5. Age-related methylation patterning of housekeeping genes and tissue-specific genes is distinct between the stomach antrum and body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seung-Jin; Lee, Hwa-Jeong; Oh, Jung-Hwan; Jung, Sung-Hoon; Min, Ki-Ouk; Choi, Sang-Wook; Rhyu, Mun-Gan

    2013-06-01

    The methylation-variable sites around CpG islands are frequently overmethylated in Helicobacter pylori-infected stomachs. Age-related patterns of the overmethylation changes were compared between the fast-growing antrum cells and the slow-growing body cells. A total of 316 H. pylori-positive tissues and 380 H. pylori-negative tissues were obtained by endoscopic biopsy. The methylation-variable sites of ten housekeeping genes and nine tissue-specific genes were semiquantitatively analyzed, based on the ten-level classification of methylation-specific PCR intensity. The overmethylated genes were scored when their methylation levels were higher than an intermediate level of each gene common in the H. pylori-negative mucosa. The age-dependent methylation level of the inactive APC gene observed similarly in the antrum and the body was used as an age standard of methylation variation in a biopsy tissue. The overmethylation of housekeeping genes and stomach-specific genes rapidly increased to a high plateau frequency in the young-aged APC methylation cases (mean age: 43 years) in the H. pylori-positive antrum. In the H. pylori-positive body, most of the overmethylated housekeeping genes slowly increased to a peak frequency in the middle-aged APC methylation cases (mean age: 53 years). The housekeeping gene pairs showed high correlations (Spearman's correlation coefficient > 0.4) in both the antrum and the body. The overmethylation of housekeeping genes rapidly and slowly increased to a high frequency in concordance with a rapid and slow growth of epithelial cells in the H. pylori-infected stomach.

  6. [Estimation of Time-Dependent microRNA Expression Patterns in Brain Tissue, Leukocytes, and Blood Plasma of Rats under Photochemically Induced Focal Cerebral Ischemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusar, V A; Timofeeva, A V; Zhanin, I S; Shram, S I; Pinelis, V G

    2017-01-01

    miRNA expression over different time periods (24 and 48 h) using the quantitative RT-PCR and deep sequencing has been evaluated in a model of photochemically induced thrombosis. A combination of two approaches allowed us to determine the miRNA expression patterns caused by ischemia. Nine miRNAs, including let-7f-5p, miR-221-3p, miR-21-5p, miR-30c-5p, miR-30a-3p, miR-223-3p, miR-23a-3p, miR-22-5p, and miR-99a-5p, were differentially expressed in brain tissue and leukocytes of rats 48 h after onset of ischemia. In addition, six miRNAs were differentially expressed in the brain tissue and blood plasma of rats 24 h after exposure, among which miR-145-3p and miR-375-3p were downregulated and miR-19a-3p, miR-92a-3p, miR-188-5p, and miR-532-5p were upregulated. In our opinion, miR-188-5p and miR-532-5p may be considered to be new potential markers of ischemic injury. The level of miRNA expression tended to increase 48 h after the onset of ischemia in brain tissue and leukocytes, which reflects not only the local response in brain tissue due to inflammation, vascular endothelial dysfunction, and disorders of the permeability of the blood-brain barrier, but also the systemic response of the organism to multifactor molecular processes induced by ischemic injury.

  7. Postmortem mRNA expression patterns in left ventricular myocardial tissues and their implications for forensic diagnosis of sudden cardiac death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Gi Hoon; Park, Seong Hwan; Kim, Yunmi; Kim, Ji Yeon; Kim, Jin Wook; Chung, Sooyoung; Kim, Yu-Hoon; Kim, Hyun; Hwang, Juck-Joon; Seo, Joong-Seok

    2014-03-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD), which is primarily caused by lethal heart disorders resulting in structural and arrhythmogenic abnormalities, is one of the prevalent modes of death in most developed countries. Myocardial ischemia, mainly due to coronary artery disease, is the most common type of heart disease leading to SCD. However, postmortem diagnosis of SCD is frequently complicated by obscure histological evidence. Here, we show that certain mRNA species, namely those encoding hemoglobin A1/2 and B (Hba1/2 and Hbb, respectively) as well as pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (Pdk4), exhibit distinct postmortem expression patterns in the left ventricular free wall of SCD subjects when compared with their expression patterns in the corresponding tissues from control subjects with non-cardiac causes of death. Hba1/2 and Hbb mRNA expression levels were higher in ischemic SCD cases with acute myocardial infarction or ischemic heart disease without recent infarction, and even in cardiac death subjects without apparent pathological signs of heart injuries, than control subjects. By contrast, Pdk4 mRNA was expressed at lower levels in SCD subjects. In conclusion, we found that altered myocardial Hba1/2, Hbb, and Pdk4 mRNA expression patterns can be employed as molecular signatures of fatal cardiac dysfunction to forensically implicate SCD as the primary cause of death.

  8. Anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies and EEG pattern in celiac patients on prolonged gluten-free diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Berio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Authors investigate the relationship between serum anti-tTG antibodies and EEG pattern in 12 celiac patients of various age on gluten-free diet for 1-10 years. In a group of 6 patients with good compliance with the diet, anti-tTG antibodies were normal in all and EEG in 5; in another group of 6 patients with poor compliance with the diet, serum anti-tTG antibodies were raised in all; EEG abnormalities of various gravity were reported in 5 patients. The concomitance of raised anti-tTG antibodies and EEG abnormalities is stressed, as possible expression of an immune-inflammatory reaction persistent in Central Nervous System.

  9. Transformational plane geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Umble, Ronald N

    2014-01-01

    Axioms of Euclidean Plane Geometry The Existence and Incidence Postulates The Distance and Ruler Postulates The Plane Separation Postulate The Protractor Postulate The Side-Angle-Side Postulate and the Euclidean Parallel Postulate Theorems of Euclidean Plane Geometry The Exterior Angle Theorem Triangle Congruence Theorems The Alternate Interior Angles Theorem and the Angle Sum Theorem Similar Triangles Introduction to Transformations, Isometries, and Similarities Transformations Isometries and SimilaritiesAppendix: Proof of Surjectivity Translations, Rotations, and Reflections Translations Rotations Reflections Appendix: Geometer's Sketchpad Commands Required by Exploratory Activities Compositions of Translations, Rotations, and Reflections The Three Points Theorem Rotations as Compositions of Two Reflections Translations as Compositions of Two Halfturns or Two Reflections The Angle Addition Theorem Glide Reflections Classification of Isometries The Fundamental Theorem and Congruence Classification of Isometr...

  10. Multivariate calculus and geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Dineen, Seán

    2014-01-01

    Multivariate calculus can be understood best by combining geometric insight, intuitive arguments, detailed explanations and mathematical reasoning. This textbook has successfully followed this programme. It additionally provides a solid description of the basic concepts, via familiar examples, which are then tested in technically demanding situations. In this new edition the introductory chapter and two of the chapters on the geometry of surfaces have been revised. Some exercises have been replaced and others provided with expanded solutions. Familiarity with partial derivatives and a course in linear algebra are essential prerequisites for readers of this book. Multivariate Calculus and Geometry is aimed primarily at higher level undergraduates in the mathematical sciences. The inclusion of many practical examples involving problems of several variables will appeal to mathematics, science and engineering students.

  11. Algebra, Arithmetic, and Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Tschinkel, Yuri

    2009-01-01

    The two volumes of "Algebra, Arithmetic, and Geometry: In Honor of Y.I. Manin" are composed of invited expository articles and extensions detailing Manin's contributions to the subjects, and are in celebration of his 70th birthday. The well-respected and distinguished contributors include: Behrend, Berkovich, Bost, Bressler, Calaque, Carlson, Chambert-Loir, Colombo, Connes, Consani, Dabrowski, Deninger, Dolgachev, Donaldson, Ekedahl, Elsenhans, Enriques, Etingof, Fock, Friedlander, Geemen, Getzler, Goncharov, Harris, Iskovskikh, Jahnel, Kaledin, Kapranov, Katz, Kaufmann, Kollar, Kont

  12. Complex geometries in wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamke, Martin; Ramsgaard Thomsen, Mette; Riiber Nielsen, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    The versatility of wood constructions and traditional wood joints for the production of non standard elements was in focus of a design based research. Herein we established a seamless process from digital design to fabrication. A first research phase centered on the development of a robust...... parametric model and a generic design language a later explored the possibilities to construct complex shaped geometries with self registering joints on modern wood crafting machines. The research was carried out as collaboration with industrial partners....

  13. Complex geometries in wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamke, Martin; Ramsgaard Thomsen, Mette; Riiber Nielsen, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    The versatility of wood constructions and traditional wood joints for the production of non standard elements was in focus of a design based research. Herein we established a seamless process from digital design to fabrication. A first research phase centered on the development of a robust parame...... parametric model and a generic design language a later explored the possibilities to construct complex shaped geometries with self registering joints on modern wood crafting machines. The research was carried out as collaboration with industrial partners....

  14. Role of antigen in migration patterns of T cell subsets arising from gut-associated lymphoid tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunkley, M.L.; Husband, A.J.

    1989-01-01

    Studies of the migration of antigen-specific regulatory T cell subsets responding to gut immunization were undertaken to clarify their migratory potential and the role of antigen in their localization. In initial experiments, lymphocytes collected from the thoracic duct of rats after immunization of Peyer's patches (PP) with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), were enriched for T helper (Th) cells and labelled with the fluorochrome H33342. In other experiments, a higher frequency of antigen-specific T cells was achieved by short-term culture of the enriched Th cells in the presence of KLH and the blast cells labelled with 3H-thymidine. The distribution of both populations was determined after injection into immunized and unimmunized syngeneic recipients. Whereas the uncultured population (predominantly small Th cells) localized almost exclusively in follicular lymphoid tissues, the cells expanded by secondary culture (predominantly Th blasts) appeared in the gut lamina propria (LP) initially, then in PP and mesenteric lymph nodes. The Th blasts in the LP were almost always seen in close proximity to the gut epithelium. However, the migration of neither population appeared to be influenced significantly by antigen, in contrast to previous findings with regard to IgA-committed B cells. The initial subepithelial location of Th blasts in the gut LP and their subsequent appearance in PP may provide a mechanism by which antigen presented by epithelial cells could influence B cell differentiation in PP through modulation of signals expressed by these T cells

  15. Role of antigen in migration patterns of T cell subsets arising from gut-associated lymphoid tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunkley, M.L.; Husband, A.J. (Univ. of Newcastle, N.S.W. (Australia))

    1989-07-01

    Studies of the migration of antigen-specific regulatory T cell subsets responding to gut immunization were undertaken to clarify their migratory potential and the role of antigen in their localization. In initial experiments, lymphocytes collected from the thoracic duct of rats after immunization of Peyer's patches (PP) with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), were enriched for T helper (Th) cells and labelled with the fluorochrome H33342. In other experiments, a higher frequency of antigen-specific T cells was achieved by short-term culture of the enriched Th cells in the presence of KLH and the blast cells labelled with 3H-thymidine. The distribution of both populations was determined after injection into immunized and unimmunized syngeneic recipients. Whereas the uncultured population (predominantly small Th cells) localized almost exclusively in follicular lymphoid tissues, the cells expanded by secondary culture (predominantly Th blasts) appeared in the gut lamina propria (LP) initially, then in PP and mesenteric lymph nodes. The Th blasts in the LP were almost always seen in close proximity to the gut epithelium. However, the migration of neither population appeared to be influenced significantly by antigen, in contrast to previous findings with regard to IgA-committed B cells. The initial subepithelial location of Th blasts in the gut LP and their subsequent appearance in PP may provide a mechanism by which antigen presented by epithelial cells could influence B cell differentiation in PP through modulation of signals expressed by these T cells.

  16. Introducing geometry concept based on history of Islamic geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maarif, S.; Wahyudin; Raditya, A.; Perbowo, K. S.

    2018-01-01

    Geometry is one of the areas of mathematics interesting to discuss. Geometry also has a long history in mathematical developments. Therefore, it is important integrated historical development of geometry in the classroom to increase’ knowledge of how mathematicians earlier finding and constructing a geometric concept. Introduction geometrical concept can be started by introducing the Muslim mathematician who invented these concepts so that students can understand in detail how a concept of geometry can be found. However, the history of mathematics development, especially history of Islamic geometry today is less popular in the world of education in Indonesia. There are several concepts discovered by Muslim mathematicians that should be appreciated by the students in learning geometry. Great ideas of mathematicians Muslim can be used as study materials to supplement religious character values taught by Muslim mathematicians. Additionally, by integrating the history of geometry in teaching geometry are expected to improve motivation and geometrical understanding concept.

  17. Integral geometry and valuations

    CERN Document Server

    Solanes, Gil

    2014-01-01

    Valuations are finitely additive functionals on the space of convex bodies. Their study has become a central subject in convexity theory, with fundamental applications to integral geometry. In the last years there has been significant progress in the theory of valuations, which in turn has led to important achievements in integral geometry. This book originated from two courses delivered by the authors at the CRM and provides a self-contained introduction to these topics, covering most of the recent advances. The first part, by Semyon Alesker, is devoted to the theory of convex valuations, with emphasis on the latest developments. A special focus is put on the new fundamental structures of the space of valuations discovered after Alesker's irreducibility theorem. Moreover, the author describes the newly developed theory of valuations on manifolds. In the second part, Joseph H. G. Fu gives a modern introduction to integral geometry in the sense of Blaschke and Santaló, based on the notions and tools presented...

  18. Decreasing Incidence of Skin and Soft Tissue Infections With a Seasonal Pattern at an Academic Medical Center, 2006-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Ethan; Daum, Robert S; David, Michael Z

    2016-10-01

    Background.  The incidence of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) in the United States increased sharply after 2000 with the emergence of USA300 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus . We examined trends in SSTI incidence in 2006-2014 at the University of Chicago Medicine (UCM). Methods.  Data were obtained for patient encounters at UCM with an International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision -coded SSTI diagnosis between January 1, 2006 and March 31, 2014. Incidence density was calculated per 1000 encounters by quarter and year. Encounters were stratified by inpatient, outpatient clinic and emergency department (ED) encounters and by age group, gender, and race. Poisson regression was used to assess change over time. Results.  In 2006-2014, data were collected for 38 201 SSTI-associated encounters among 31 869 subjects. Among all patients treated at UCM, there was a decrease of 1% per year in the incidence of SSTIs during 2006-2013, with an overall decrease of 16%. There was a significant decrease in SSTI-related encounters among inpatients (rate ratio [RR] = 0.97; 95% confidence interval [CI], .96-.98), ED patients (RR = 0.98; 95% CI, .97-.98), adults (RR = 0.98; 95% CI, .97-.98), children (RR = 0.96; 95% CI, .95-.97), and African Americans (RR = 0.99; 95% CI, .98-.99). There was an annual seasonal trend, with the peak incidence occurring during the late summer. Conclusions.  The incidence of SSTIs at UCM decreased in children and adults with seasonal variation, peaking during the summer months. This suggests a reversal of the massive increase in SSTI incidence in the United States after 2000.

  19. Biochemical and physiological modifications in tissues of Sardina pilchardus: spatial and temporal patterns as a baseline for biomonitoring studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Silva Nunes

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sardina pilchardus is a marine species common in the North Atlantic Ocean, and is subjected to diffuse anthropogenic chemical contamination and seasonal fluctuations in biotic and abiotic parameters that may alter its physiology and condition. Biological material is easily available through commercial fisheries, which could facilitate its use as a bioindicator species. The aim of the present work was to address its potential inclusion in biomonitoring studies, considering a combinatory approach through the use of enzymatic biomarkers and somatic indices, by assessing spatial and temporal patterns in a metapopulation along the west coast of Portugal. Our results showed significant variability of the biochemical and physiological profile of the fish, mainly concordant between sampling sites. Large differences for most markers were found across periods of the year, showing the importance of seasonality, which was mostly related to the reproductive cycle. Hence, environmental scientists should acknowledge seasonality as a strong driving force for physiological adaptations, influencing biochemical markers that are normally used to identify effects of chemical contamination. The here-obtained set of data suggests that S. pilchardus may be successfully included in oceanic biomonitoring studies, when one considers that the contribution of seasonal factors may exceed the influence of eventual anthropogenic contamination.

  20. Expression patterns of platypus defensin and related venom genes across a range of tissue types reveal the possibility of broader functions for OvDLPs than previously suspected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, Camilla M; Papenfuss, Anthony T; Kuchel, Philip W; Belov, Katherine

    2008-09-15

    The platypus, as an egg-laying mammal, displays an unusual mixture of reptilian and mammalian characteristics. It is also venomous, and further investigations into its little-studied venom may lead to the development of novel pharmaceuticals and drug targets and provide insights into the origins of mammalian venom. Here we investigate the expression patterns of antimicrobial genes called defensins, and also the venom peptides called defensin-like peptides (OvDLPs). We show, in the first expression study on any platypus venom gene, that the OvDLPs are expressed in a greater range of tissues than would be expected for genes with specific venom function, and thus that they may have a wider role than previously suspected.

  1. Introductory non-Euclidean geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, Henry Parker

    1963-01-01

    This fine and versatile introduction begins with the theorems common to Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry, and then it addresses the specific differences that constitute elliptic and hyperbolic geometry. 1901 edition.

  2. Pattern recognition analysis of proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of brain tissue extracts from rats anesthetized with propofol or isoflurane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Kawaguchi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: General anesthesia is routinely used as a surgical procedure and its safety has been endorsed by clinical outcomes; however, its effects at the molecular level have not been elucidated. General anesthetics influence glucose metabolism in the brain. However, the effects of anesthetics on brain metabolites other than those related to glucose have not been well characterized. We used a pattern recognition analysis of proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra to visualize the changes in holistic brain metabolic phenotypes in response to the widely used intravenous anesthetic propofol and the volatile anesthetic isoflurane. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Rats were randomized into five groups (n = 7 each group. Propofol and isoflurane were administered to two groups each, for 2 or 6 h. The control group received no anesthesia. Brains were removed directly after anesthesia. Hydrophilic compounds were extracted from excised whole brains and measured by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. All spectral data were processed and analyzed by principal component analysis for comparison of the metabolite profiles. Data were visualized by plotting principal component (PC scores. In the plots, each point represents an individual sample. The propofol and isoflurane groups were clustered separately on the plots, and this separation was especially pronounced when comparing the 6-h groups. The PC scores of the propofol group were clearly distinct from those of the control group, particularly in the 6-h group, whereas the difference in PC scores was more subtle in the isoflurane group and control groups. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results of the present study showed that propofol and isoflurane exerted differential effects on holistic brain metabolism under anesthesia.

  3. Matter in toy dynamical geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konopka, Tomasz

    2009-01-01

    One of the objectives of theories describing quantum dynamical geometry is to compute expectation values of geometrical observables. The results of such computations can be affected by whether or not matter is taken into account. It is thus important to understand to what extent and to what effect matter can affect dynamical geometries. Using a simple model, it is shown that matter can effectively mold a geometry into an isotropic configuration. Implications for 'atomistic' models of quantum geometry are briefly discussed.

  4. Geometry of Quantum States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hook, D W [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College of Science Technology and Medicine, University of London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2BW (United Kingdom)

    2008-01-11

    A geometric framework for quantum mechanics arose during the mid 1970s when authors such as Cantoni explored the notion of generalized transition probabilities, and Kibble promoted the idea that the space of pure quantum states provides a natural quantum mechanical analogue for classical phase space. This central idea can be seen easily since the projection of Schroedinger's equation from a Hilbert space into the space of pure spaces is a set of Hamilton's equations. Over the intervening years considerable work has been carried out by a variety of authors and a mature description of quantum mechanics in geometric terms has emerged with many applications. This current offering would seem ideally placed to review the last thirty years of progress and relate this to the most recent work in quantum entanglement. Bengtsson and Zyczkowski's beautifully illustrated volume, Geometry of Quantum States (referred to as GQS from now on) attempts to cover considerable ground in its 466 pages. Its topics range from colour theory in Chapter 1 to quantum entanglement in Chapter 15-to say that this is a whirlwind tour is, perhaps, no understatement. The use of the work 'introduction' in the subtitle of GQS, might suggest to the reader that this work be viewed as a textbook and I think that this interpretation would be incorrect. The authors have chosen to present a survey of different topics with the specific aim to introduce entanglement in geometric terms-the book is not intended as a pedagogical introduction to the geometric approach to quantum mechanics. Each of the fifteen chapters is a short, and mostly self-contained, essay on a particular aspect or application of geometry in the context of quantum mechanics with entanglement being addressed specifically in the final chapter. The chapters fall into three classifications: those concerned with the mathematical background, those which discuss quantum theory and the foundational aspects of the geometric

  5. Teaching of Geometry in Bulgaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankov, Kiril

    2013-01-01

    Geometry plays an important role in the school mathematics curriculum all around the world. Teaching of geometry varies a lot (Hoyls, Foxman, & Kuchemann, 2001). Many countries revise the objectives, the content, and the approaches to the geometry in school. Studies of the processes show that there are not common trends of these changes…

  6. Graded geometry and Poisson reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Cattaneo, A S; Zambon, M

    2009-01-01

    The main result of [2] extends the Marsden-Ratiu reduction theorem [4] in Poisson geometry, and is proven by means of graded geometry. In this note we provide the background material about graded geometry necessary for the proof in [2]. Further, we provide an alternative algebraic proof for the main result. ©2009 American Institute of Physics

  7. Functional integration over geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mottola, E.

    1995-01-01

    The geometric construction of the functional integral over coset spaces M/G is reviewed. The inner product on the cotangent space of infinitesimal deformations of M defines an invariant distance and volume form, or functional integration measure on the full configuration space. Then, by a simple change of coordinates parameterizing the gauge fiber G, the functional measure on the coset space M/G is deduced. This change of integration variables leads to a Jacobian which is entirely equivalent to the Faddeev--Popov determinant of the more traditional gauge fixed approach in non-abelian gauge theory. If the general construction is applied to the case where G is the group of coordinate reparameterizations of spacetime, the continuum functional integral over geometries, i.e. metrics modulo coordinate reparameterizations may be defined. The invariant functional integration measure is used to derive the trace anomaly and effective action for the conformal part of the metric in two and four dimensional spacetime. In two dimensions this approach generates the Polyakov--Liouville action of closed bosonic non-critical string theory. In four dimensions the corresponding effective action leads to novel conclusions on the importance of quantum effects in gravity in the far infrared, and in particular, a dramatic modification of the classical Einstein theory at cosmological distance scales, signaled first by the quantum instability of classical de Sitter spacetime. Finite volume scaling relations for the functional integral of quantum gravity in two and four dimensions are derived, and comparison with the discretized dynamical triangulation approach to the integration over geometries are discussed. Outstanding unsolved problems in both the continuum definition and the simplicial approach to the functional integral over geometries are highlighted

  8. Models of molecular geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Ronald J; Robinson, Edward A

    2005-05-01

    Although the structure of almost any molecule can now be obtained by ab initio calculations chemists still look for simple answers to the question "What determines the geometry of a given molecule?" For this purpose they make use of various models such as the VSEPR model and qualitative quantum mechanical models such as those based on the valence bond theory. The present state of such models, and the support for them provided by recently developed methods for analyzing calculated electron densities, are reviewed and discussed in this tutorial review.

  9. Geometry and trigonometry

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This stimulating volume offers a broad collection of the principles of geometry and trigonometry and contains colorful diagrams to bring mathematical principles to life. Subjects are enriched by references to famous mathematicians and their ideas, and the stories are presented in a very comprehensible way. Readers investigate the relationships of points, lines, surfaces, and solids. They study construction methods for drawing figures, a wealth of facts about these figures, and above all, methods to prove the facts. They learn about triangle measure for circular motion, sine and cosine, tangent

  10. Local analytic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Abhyankar, Shreeram Shankar

    1964-01-01

    This book provides, for use in a graduate course or for self-study by graduate students, a well-motivated treatment of several topics, especially the following: (1) algebraic treatment of several complex variables; (2) geometric approach to algebraic geometry via analytic sets; (3) survey of local algebra; (4) survey of sheaf theory. The book has been written in the spirit of Weierstrass. Power series play the dominant role. The treatment, being algebraic, is not restricted to complex numbers, but remains valid over any complete-valued field. This makes it applicable to situations arising from

  11. From geometry to topology

    CERN Document Server

    Flegg, H Graham

    2001-01-01

    This excellent introduction to topology eases first-year math students and general readers into the subject by surveying its concepts in a descriptive and intuitive way, attempting to build a bridge from the familiar concepts of geometry to the formalized study of topology. The first three chapters focus on congruence classes defined by transformations in real Euclidean space. As the number of permitted transformations increases, these classes become larger, and their common topological properties become intuitively clear. Chapters 4-12 give a largely intuitive presentation of selected topics.

  12. Elementary algebraic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Kendig, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Designed to make learning introductory algebraic geometry as easy as possible, this text is intended for advanced undergraduates and graduate students who have taken a one-year course in algebra and are familiar with complex analysis. This newly updated second edition enhances the original treatment's extensive use of concrete examples and exercises with numerous figures that have been specially redrawn in Adobe Illustrator. An introductory chapter that focuses on examples of curves is followed by a more rigorous and careful look at plane curves. Subsequent chapters explore commutative ring th

  13. Geometry of numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Gruber, Peter M

    1987-01-01

    This volume contains a fairly complete picture of the geometry of numbers, including relations to other branches of mathematics such as analytic number theory, diophantine approximation, coding and numerical analysis. It deals with convex or non-convex bodies and lattices in euclidean space, etc.This second edition was prepared jointly by P.M. Gruber and the author of the first edition. The authors have retained the existing text (with minor corrections) while adding to each chapter supplementary sections on the more recent developments. While this method may have drawbacks, it has the definit

  14. Geometry I essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, The Editors of

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Geometry I includes methods of proof, points, lines, planes, angles, congruent angles and line segments, triangles, parallelism, quadrilaterals, geometric inequalities, and geometric

  15. Kinematic geometry of gearing

    CERN Document Server

    Dooner, David B

    2012-01-01

    Building on the first edition published in 1995 this new edition of Kinematic Geometry of Gearing has been extensively revised and updated with new and original material. This includes the methodology for general tooth forms, radius of torsure', cylinder of osculation, and cylindroid of torsure; the author has also completely reworked the '3 laws of gearing', the first law re-written to better parallel the existing 'Law of Gearing" as pioneered by Leonard Euler, expanded from Euler's original law to encompass non-circular gears and hypoid gears, the 2nd law of gearing describing a unique relat

  16. Definition of treatment geometry in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaltonen, P.

    1996-01-01

    When accurate systems for quality assurance and treatment optimization are employed, a precise system for fixation and dosimetric and portal verification are as important as a continued and standardized code of practice for dosimetry and patient follow-up, including registration of tumour responses and acute and late normal tissue reactions. To improve the accuracy of existing dose response relations in order to improve future therapy the treatment geometry and dose delivery concepts have to be accurately defined and uniformly employed. A Nordic working group was set up in 1991 (by Nordic Association of Clinica Physics) to standardize the concepts and quantities used during the whole radiotherapy process in the Nordic countries. Now the group is finalizing its report ''Specification of Dose Delivery in Radiation Therapy''. The report emphasizes that the treatment geometry shall be consistent with the geometry used during the diagnostic work up. The patient fixation is of importance early in the diagnostic phase to ensure that the same reference points and patients position will be used both during the diagnostic work up, simulation and treatment execution. Reference Coordinate System of the patient is a concept based on defined anatomic reference points. This Patient Reference System is a local system which has validity for the tissues, organs and volumes defined during radiotherapy. The reference points of the Patient Reference System should in turn be used for beam set-up. The treatment geometry is then defined by using different concepts describing tissues which are mobile in the Patient Reference System, and finally, volumes which are fixed in this coordinate system. A Set-up Margin has to be considered for movements of the volumes defined in the Reference Coordinate System of the Patient in relation to the radiation beam. The Set-up Margin is dependent on the treatment technique and it is needed in the treatment planning procedure to ensure that the prescribed

  17. Geometry of Graph Edit Distance Spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Brijnesh J.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we study the geometry of graph spaces endowed with a special class of graph edit distances. The focus is on geometrical results useful for statistical pattern recognition. The main result is the Graph Representation Theorem. It states that a graph is a point in some geometrical space, called orbit space. Orbit spaces are well investigated and easier to explore than the original graph space. We derive a number of geometrical results from the orbit space representation, translate ...

  18. Treatment patterns, resource utilization, and outcomes among hospitalized patients with methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureuscomplicated skin and soft tissue infections in Lebanon and Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matar, Madonna J; Moghnieh, Rima; Alothman, Adel F; Althaqafi, Abdulhakeem O; Alenazi, Thamer H; Farahat, Fayssal M; Corman, Shelby; Solem, Caitlyn T; Raghubir, Nirvana; Macahilig, Cynthia; Haider, Seema; Stephens, Jennifer M

    2017-01-01

    To describe treatment patterns and medical resource use for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) complicated skin and soft tissue infections (cSSTI) in Saudi Arabia and Lebanon in terms of drug selection against the infecting pathogen as well as hospital resource utilization and clinical outcomes among patients with these infections. This retrospective chart review study evaluated 2011-2012 data from five hospitals in Saudi Arabia and Lebanon. Patients were included if they had been discharged with a diagnosis of MRSA cSSTI, which was culture-proven or suspected based on clinical criteria. Hospital data were abstracted for a random sample of patients with each infection type to capture demographics, treatment patterns, hospital resource utilization, and clinical outcomes. Statistical analysis was descriptive. Data were abstracted from medical records of 87 patients with MRSA cSSTI; mean age 52.4±25.9 years and 61% male. Only 64% of patients received an MRSA active initial therapy, with 56% of first-line regimens containing older beta-lactams. The mean total length of stay was 26.3 days, with the majority (19.1 days) spent in general wards. Surgical procedures included incision and drainage (22% of patients), debridement (14%), and amputation (5%). Mechanical ventilation was required by 9% of patients, with a mean duration of 18 days per patient. Hemodialysis was required by four patients (5%), two of whom were reported to have moderate to severe renal disease on admission, for a mean of 5.5 days. Inpatient mortality was 8%. Thirty-nine percent were prescribed at least one antibiotic at discharge, with the most commonly prescribed discharge antibiotics being clindamycin (44%), ciprofloxacin (18%), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (12%), and linezolid (9%). This Middle Eastern real-world study of resource use and treatment patterns in MRSA cSSTI indicates that management of this condition could be further optimized in terms of drug selection and resource

  19. Parity-Breaking Bifurcation and Global Oscillation in Patterns of Ion Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonetti, Marc; Nuebler, Johannes; Homble, Fabrice

    2006-06-01

    Stationary spatiotemporal pattern formation emerging from the electric activity of biological membranes is widespread in cells and tissues. A known key instability comes from the self-aggregation of membrane channels. In a two-dimensional geometry, we show that the primary pattern undergoes four secondary instabilities: Eckhaus-like, period-halving, drift instabilities, and a global oscillation. The stability diagram is determined. The parity-breaking (drift) bifurcation of channel density is characterized analytically and numerically.

  20. Geometry through history Euclidean, hyperbolic, and projective geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Dillon, Meighan I

    2018-01-01

    Presented as an engaging discourse, this textbook invites readers to delve into the historical origins and uses of geometry. The narrative traces the influence of Euclid’s system of geometry, as developed in his classic text The Elements, through the Arabic period, the modern era in the West, and up to twentieth century mathematics. Axioms and proof methods used by mathematicians from those periods are explored alongside the problems in Euclidean geometry that lead to their work. Students cultivate skills applicable to much of modern mathematics through sections that integrate concepts like projective and hyperbolic geometry with representative proof-based exercises. For its sophisticated account of ancient to modern geometries, this text assumes only a year of college mathematics as it builds towards its conclusion with algebraic curves and quaternions. Euclid’s work has affected geometry for thousands of years, so this text has something to offer to anyone who wants to broaden their appreciation for the...

  1. Geometry through history euclidean, hyperbolic, and projective geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Dillon, Meighan I

    2018-01-01

    Presented as an engaging discourse, this textbook invites readers to delve into the historical origins and uses of geometry. The narrative traces the influence of Euclid’s system of geometry, as developed in his classic text The Elements, through the Arabic period, the modern era in the West, and up to twentieth century mathematics. Axioms and proof methods used by mathematicians from those periods are explored alongside the problems in Euclidean geometry that lead to their work. Students cultivate skills applicable to much of modern mathematics through sections that integrate concepts like projective and hyperbolic geometry with representative proof-based exercises. For its sophisticated account of ancient to modern geometries, this text assumes only a year of college mathematics as it builds towards its conclusion with algebraic curves and quaternions. Euclid’s work has affected geometry for thousands of years, so this text has something to offer to anyone who wants to broaden their appreciation for the...

  2. Real algebraic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Bochnak, Jacek; Roy, Marie-Françoise

    1998-01-01

    This book is a systematic treatment of real algebraic geometry, a subject that has strong interrelation with other areas of mathematics: singularity theory, differential topology, quadratic forms, commutative algebra, model theory, complexity theory etc. The careful and clearly written account covers both basic concepts and up-to-date research topics. It may be used as text for a graduate course. The present edition is a substantially revised and expanded English version of the book "Géometrie algébrique réelle" originally published in French, in 1987, as Volume 12 of ERGEBNISSE. Since the publication of the French version the theory has made advances in several directions. Many of these are included in this English version. Thus the English book may be regarded as a completely new treatment of the subject.

  3. On organizing principles of discrete differential geometry. Geometry of spheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobenko, Alexander I; Suris, Yury B

    2007-01-01

    Discrete differential geometry aims to develop discrete equivalents of the geometric notions and methods of classical differential geometry. This survey contains a discussion of the following two fundamental discretization principles: the transformation group principle (smooth geometric objects and their discretizations are invariant with respect to the same transformation group) and the consistency principle (discretizations of smooth parametrized geometries can be extended to multidimensional consistent nets). The main concrete geometric problem treated here is discretization of curvature-line parametrized surfaces in Lie geometry. Systematic use of the discretization principles leads to a discretization of curvature-line parametrization which unifies circular and conical nets.

  4. Higher geometry an introduction to advanced methods in analytic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Woods, Frederick S

    2005-01-01

    For students of mathematics with a sound background in analytic geometry and some knowledge of determinants, this volume has long been among the best available expositions of advanced work on projective and algebraic geometry. Developed from Professor Woods' lectures at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, it bridges the gap between intermediate studies in the field and highly specialized works.With exceptional thoroughness, it presents the most important general concepts and methods of advanced algebraic geometry (as distinguished from differential geometry). It offers a thorough study

  5. A retrospective chart review of drug treatment patterns and clinical outcomes among patients with metastatic or recurrent soft tissue sarcoma refractory to one or more prior chemotherapy treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Michael J; Amodu, Leo Ismaila; Duh, Mei Sheng; Korves, Caroline; Solleza, Franco; Manson, Stephanie C; Diaz, José; Neary, Maureen P; Demetri, George D

    2015-03-25

    Limited clinical data on real-world practice patterns are available for patients with metastatic/relapsed soft tissue sarcomas (STS). The primary objective of this study was to evaluate treatment patterns in patients with metastatic/relapsed STS following failure of prior chemotherapy by examining data collected from 2000 to 2011 from a major tertiary academic cancer center in the United States. Medical records, including community-based referral records, from a tertiary cancer center for adult patients with metastatic/relapsed STS with confirmed disease progression who commenced second-line treatment between January 1, 2000 and February 4, 2011, and with at least 3 months of follow-up data following second-line treatment initiation, were retrospectively reviewed. Overall survival, time to progression, and clinician-reported tumor response were collected. A total of 99 patients (leiomyosarcoma, n = 48; synovial cell sarcoma, n = 7; liposarcoma, n = 5; or other histological subtypes, n = 39) received an average of four lines of treatment (maximum of 10). No consistent or dominant regimens were used in each treatment line beyond the second line. Median second-line treatment duration was 4.1 months (95% confidence interval, 3.0-5.0). Overall, 72 of 99 patients (73%) discontinued second-line treatment due to progressive disease. Median progression-free survival from initiation of second-line treatment varied across regimens from 2.0 to 6.6 months (overall median, 5.4 months). Wide variations in treatment were evident, with no single standard of care for patients with metastatic/relapsed STS. Most patients discontinued second-line treatment due to progressive disease, often receiving additional systemic therapy with other drugs. These data suggest a high unmet need for more efficacious treatment options and improved data collection to guide practice among patients with relapsed/refractory STS.

  6. Vascular tissue engineering by computer-aided laser micromachining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doraiswamy, Anand; Narayan, Roger J

    2010-04-28

    Many conventional technologies for fabricating tissue engineering scaffolds are not suitable for fabricating scaffolds with patient-specific attributes. For example, many conventional technologies for fabricating tissue engineering scaffolds do not provide control over overall scaffold geometry or over cell position within the scaffold. In this study, the use of computer-aided laser micromachining to create scaffolds for vascular tissue networks was investigated. Computer-aided laser micromachining was used to construct patterned surfaces in agarose or in silicon, which were used for differential adherence and growth of cells into vascular tissue networks. Concentric three-ring structures were fabricated on agarose hydrogel substrates, in which the inner ring contained human aortic endothelial cells, the middle ring contained HA587 human elastin and the outer ring contained human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells. Basement membrane matrix containing vascular endothelial growth factor and heparin was to promote proliferation of human aortic endothelial cells within the vascular tissue networks. Computer-aided laser micromachining provides a unique approach to fabricate small-diameter blood vessels for bypass surgery as well as other artificial tissues with complex geometries.

  7. Impact of age, BMI and HbA1c levels on the genome-wide DNA methylation and mRNA expression patterns in human adipose tissue and identification of epigenetic biomarkers in blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rönn, Tina; Volkov, Petr; Gillberg, Linn

    2015-01-01

    Increased age, BMI and HbA1c levels are risk factors for several non-communicable diseases. However, the impact of these factors on the genome-wide DNA methylation pattern in human adipose tissue remains unknown. We analyzed the DNA methylation of ∼480 000 sites in human adipose tissue from 96...... males and 94 females and related methylation to age, BMI and HbA1c. We also compared epigenetic signatures in adipose tissue and blood. Age was significantly associated with both altered DNA methylation and expression of 1050 genes (e.g. FHL2, NOX4 and PLG). Interestingly, many reported epigenetic...... biomarkers of aging in blood, including ELOVL2, FHL2, KLF14 and GLRA1, also showed significant correlations between adipose tissue DNA methylation and age in our study. The most significant association between age and adipose tissue DNA methylation was found upstream of ELOVL2. We identified 2825 genes (e...

  8. Geodesics in supersymmetric microstate geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eperon, Felicity C

    2017-01-01

    It has been argued that supersymmetric microstate geometries are classically unstable. One argument for instability involves considering the motion of a massive particle near the ergosurface of such a spacetime. It is shown that the instability can be triggered by a particle that starts arbitrarily far from the ergosurface. Another argument for instability is related to the phenomenon of stable trapping of null geodesics in these geometries. Such trapping is studied in detail for the most symmetrical microstate geometries. It is found that there are several distinct types of trapped null geodesic, both prograde and retrograde. Several important differences between geodesics in microstate geometries and black hole geometries are noted. The Penrose process for energy extraction in these geometries is discussed. (paper)

  9. An introduction to incidence geometry

    CERN Document Server

    De Bruyn, Bart

    2016-01-01

    This book gives an introduction to the field of Incidence Geometry by discussing the basic families of point-line geometries and introducing some of the mathematical techniques that are essential for their study. The families of geometries covered in this book include among others the generalized polygons, near polygons, polar spaces, dual polar spaces and designs. Also the various relationships between these geometries are investigated. Ovals and ovoids of projective spaces are studied and some applications to particular geometries will be given. A separate chapter introduces the necessary mathematical tools and techniques from graph theory. This chapter itself can be regarded as a self-contained introduction to strongly regular and distance-regular graphs. This book is essentially self-contained, only assuming the knowledge of basic notions from (linear) algebra and projective and affine geometry. Almost all theorems are accompanied with proofs and a list of exercises with full solutions is given at the end...

  10. Self-designing parametric geometries

    OpenAIRE

    Sobester, Andras

    2015-01-01

    The thesis of this paper is that script-based geometry modelling offers the possibility of building `self-designing' intelligence into parametric airframe geometries. We show how sophisticated heuristics (such as optimizers and complex decision structures) can be readily integrated into the parametric geometry model itself using a script-driven modelling architecture. The result is an opportunity for optimization with the scope of conceptual design and the fidelity of preliminary design. Addi...

  11. Quantum roots in geometry : II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanas, M.I.

    2006-01-01

    The present work is a review of a series of papers, published in the last ten. years, comprising an attempt to find a suitable avenue from geometry to quantum. It shows clearly that, any non-symmetric geometry admits some built-in quantum features. These features disappear completely once the geometry becomes symmetric (torsion-less). It is shown that, torsion of space-time plays an important role in both geometry and physics. It interacts with the spin of the moving particle and with its charge. The first interaction, Spin-Torsion Interaction, has been used to overcome the discrepancy in the results of the COW-experiment. The second interaction, Charge-Torsion Interaction, is similar to the Aharonov-Bohm effect. As a byproduct, a new version of Absolute Parallelism (AP) geometry, the Parameterized Absolute Parallelism (PAP) geometry, has been established and developed. This version can be used to construct field theories that admit some quantum features. Riemannian geometry and conventional AP-geometry are special cases of PAP-geometry

  12. Initiation to global Finslerian geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Akbar-Zadeh, Hassan

    2006-01-01

    After a brief description of the evolution of thinking on Finslerian geometry starting from Riemann, Finsler, Berwald and Elie Cartan, the book gives a clear and precise treatment of this geometry. The first three chapters develop the basic notions and methods, introduced by the author, to reach the global problems in Finslerian Geometry. The next five chapters are independent of each other, and deal with among others the geometry of generalized Einstein manifolds, the classification of Finslerian manifolds of constant sectional curvatures. They also give a treatment of isometric, affine, p

  13. Planetary Image Geometry Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deen, Robert C.; Pariser, Oleg

    2010-01-01

    The Planetary Image Geometry (PIG) library is a multi-mission library used for projecting images (EDRs, or Experiment Data Records) and managing their geometry for in-situ missions. A collection of models describes cameras and their articulation, allowing application programs such as mosaickers, terrain generators, and pointing correction tools to be written in a multi-mission manner, without any knowledge of parameters specific to the supported missions. Camera model objects allow transformation of image coordinates to and from view vectors in XYZ space. Pointing models, specific to each mission, describe how to orient the camera models based on telemetry or other information. Surface models describe the surface in general terms. Coordinate system objects manage the various coordinate systems involved in most missions. File objects manage access to metadata (labels, including telemetry information) in the input EDRs and RDRs (Reduced Data Records). Label models manage metadata information in output files. Site objects keep track of different locations where the spacecraft might be at a given time. Radiometry models allow correction of radiometry for an image. Mission objects contain basic mission parameters. Pointing adjustment ("nav") files allow pointing to be corrected. The object-oriented structure (C++) makes it easy to subclass just the pieces of the library that are truly mission-specific. Typically, this involves just the pointing model and coordinate systems, and parts of the file model. Once the library was developed (initially for Mars Polar Lander, MPL), adding new missions ranged from two days to a few months, resulting in significant cost savings as compared to rewriting all the application programs for each mission. Currently supported missions include Mars Pathfinder (MPF), MPL, Mars Exploration Rover (MER), Phoenix, and Mars Science Lab (MSL). Applications based on this library create the majority of operational image RDRs for those missions. A

  14. Utilization pattern and survival outcomes of adjuvant therapies in high-grade nonretroperitoneal abdominal soft tissue sarcoma: A population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, William Ross; Chokshi, Ravi; Jabbour, Salma K; DeLaney, Thomas F; Mahmoud, Omar

    2018-02-01

    Nonretroperitoneal abdominal soft tissue sarcoma (NRA-STS) is a rare disease with limited data supporting its management. Our study aimed to reveal the utilization patterns of adjuvant therapy and its potential survival benefits using the National Cancer Data Base. The analysis included patients with resected high-grade NRA-STS. Chi-square analysis was used to evaluate distribution of patient and tumor-related factors within treatment groups. The Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards model were utilized to evaluate overall survival according to treatment approach. Multivariate analysis was used to determine the impact of these factors on patients' outcome. Matched propensity score analysis was implemented to control for imbalance of confounding variables. At median follow-up of 49 months, 5-year overall survival improved from 46% without adjuvant radiation therapy to 52% (P = 0.009) with radiotherapy delivery with a 30% reduction in hazard of death (95% confidence interval = 0.58-0.84). On multivariate analysis, age <50, tumor <8 cm, negative margins and radiotherapy delivery were significant predictors of improved survival. Chemotherapy was not associated with significant survival improvement (Hazard Ratios [HR]: 0.89, P = 0.28). Adjuvant radiotherapy was associated with improved survival in high-grade NRA-STS. Chemotherapy was not associated with a survival improvement; however, further studies are needed to refine treatment strategies. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  15. Matrix Information Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Bhatia, Rajendra

    2013-01-01

    This book is an outcome of the Indo-French Workshop on Matrix Information Geometries (MIG): Applications in Sensor and Cognitive Systems Engineering, which was held in Ecole Polytechnique and Thales Research and Technology Center, Palaiseau, France, in February 23-25, 2011. The workshop was generously funded by the Indo-French Centre for the Promotion of Advanced Research (IFCPAR).  During the event, 22 renowned invited french or indian speakers gave lectures on their areas of expertise within the field of matrix analysis or processing. From these talks, a total of 17 original contribution or state-of-the-art chapters have been assembled in this volume. All articles were thoroughly peer-reviewed and improved, according to the suggestions of the international referees. The 17 contributions presented  are organized in three parts: (1) State-of-the-art surveys & original matrix theory work, (2) Advanced matrix theory for radar processing, and (3) Matrix-based signal processing applications.  

  16. Color From Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Guijosa, A

    1999-01-01

    This thesis explores some aspects of the recently uncovered connection between gauge theories and gravity, known as the AdS/CFT, or bulk-boundary, correspondence. This is a remarkable statement of equivalence between string or M-theory on certain backgrounds and field theories living on the boundaries of the corresponding spacetimes. Under the duality between four-dimensional N = 4 SU(N) superYang-Mills (SYM) and Type IIB string theory on AdS5 × S5, a baryon is mapped onto N fundamental strings terminating on a wrapped D5-brane. We examine the structure and energetics of this system from the vantage point of the fivebrane worldvolume action, making use of the Born-Infeld string approach. We construct supersymmetric fivebrane embeddings which correspond to gauge theory configurations with n external quarks, 0 ≤ n ≤ N. The extension of these solutions to the full asymptotically flat geometry of N D3-branes provides a detailed description of the creation of strings as the fivebrane is...

  17. Positive geometries and canonical forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Bai, Yuntao; Lam, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    Recent years have seen a surprising connection between the physics of scattering amplitudes and a class of mathematical objects — the positive Grassmannian, positive loop Grassmannians, tree and loop Amplituhedra — which have been loosely referred to as "positive geometries". The connection between the geometry and physics is provided by a unique differential form canonically determined by the property of having logarithmic singularities (only) on all the boundaries of the space, with residues on each boundary given by the canonical form on that boundary. The structures seen in the physical setting of the Amplituhedron are both rigid and rich enough to motivate an investigation of the notions of "positive geometries" and their associated "canonical forms" as objects of study in their own right, in a more general mathematical setting. In this paper we take the first steps in this direction. We begin by giving a precise definition of positive geometries and canonical forms, and introduce two general methods for finding forms for more complicated positive geometries from simpler ones — via "triangulation" on the one hand, and "push-forward" maps between geometries on the other. We present numerous examples of positive geometries in projective spaces, Grassmannians, and toric, cluster and flag varieties, both for the simplest "simplex-like" geometries and the richer "polytope-like" ones. We also illustrate a number of strategies for computing canonical forms for large classes of positive geometries, ranging from a direct determination exploiting knowledge of zeros and poles, to the use of the general triangulation and push-forward methods, to the representation of the form as volume integrals over dual geometries and contour integrals over auxiliary spaces. These methods yield interesting representations for the canonical forms of wide classes of positive geometries, ranging from the simplest Amplituhedra to new expressions for the volume of arbitrary convex

  18. Surrogate Modeling for Geometry Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rojas Larrazabal, Marielba de la Caridad; Abraham, Yonas; Holzwarth, Natalie

    2009-01-01

    A new approach for optimizing the nuclear geometry of an atomic system is described. Instead of the original expensive objective function (energy functional), a small number of simpler surrogates is used.......A new approach for optimizing the nuclear geometry of an atomic system is described. Instead of the original expensive objective function (energy functional), a small number of simpler surrogates is used....

  19. Enumerative Geometry of Hyperplane Arrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(SI 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Paul, Thomas Joseph 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS! ESl ...Smith and Bernd Sturmfels. Teaching the geometry of schemes. In Computations in algebraic geometry with Macaulay 2, volume 8 of Algorithms Comput

  20. Spatial geometry and special relativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneubil, Fabiana Botelho

    2016-01-01

    In this work, it is shown the interplay of relative and absolute entities, which are present in both spatial geometry and special relativity. In order to strengthen the understanding of special relativity, we discuss firstly an instance of geometry and the existence of both frame-dependent and fr...

  1. Molecular motion in restricted geometries

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecular dynamics in restricted geometries is known to exhibit anomalous behaviour. Diffusion, translational or rotational, of molecules is altered significantly on confinement in restricted geometries. Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) offers a unique possibility of studying molecular motion in such systems. Both time ...

  2. Conformal Lorentz geometry revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teleman, Kostake

    1996-02-01

    . We also show that Mach's principle on inertial motions receives an explanation in our theory by considering the particular geodesic paths, for which one of the partners of an interacting pair is fixed and sent to infinity. In fact we study a dynamical system (W,L) which presents some formal and topological similarities with a system of two particles interacting gravitationally. (W,L) is the only conformally invariant relativistic two-point dynamical system. At the end we show that W can be naturally regarded as the base of a principal GL(2,C)-bundle which comes with a natural connection. We study this bundle from differential geometric point of view. Physical interpretations will be discussed in a future paper. This text is an improvement of a previous version, which was submitted under the title ``Hypertwistor Geometry.'' [See, K. Teleman, ``Hypertwistor Geometry (abstract),'' 14th International Conference on General Relativity and Gravitation, Florence, Italy, 1995.] The change of the title and many other improvements are due to the valuable comments of the referee, who also suggested the author to avoid hazardous interpretations.

  3. Shaping tissues by balancing active forces and geometric constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foolen, Jasper; Yamashita, Tadahiro; Kollmannsberger, Philip

    2016-02-01

    The self-organization of cells into complex tissues during growth and regeneration is a combination of physical-mechanical events and biochemical signal processing. Cells actively generate forces at all stages in this process, and according to the laws of mechanics, these forces result in stress fields defined by the geometric boundary conditions of the cell and tissue. The unique ability of cells to translate such force patterns into biochemical information and vice versa sets biological tissues apart from any other material. In this topical review, we summarize the current knowledge and open questions of how forces and geometry act together on scales from the single cell to tissues and organisms, and how their interaction determines biological shape and structure. Starting with a planar surface as the simplest type of geometric constraint, we review literature on how forces during cell spreading and adhesion together with geometric constraints impact cell shape, stress patterns, and the resulting biological response. We then move on to include cell-cell interactions and the role of forces in monolayers and in collective cell migration, and introduce curvature at the transition from flat cell sheets to three-dimensional (3D) tissues. Fibrous 3D environments, as cells experience them in the body, introduce new mechanical boundary conditions and change cell behaviour compared to flat surfaces. Starting from early work on force transmission and collagen remodelling, we discuss recent discoveries on the interaction with geometric constraints and the resulting structure formation and network organization in 3D. Recent literature on two physiological scenarios—embryonic development and bone—is reviewed to demonstrate the role of the force-geometry balance in living organisms. Furthermore, the role of mechanics in pathological scenarios such as cancer is discussed. We conclude by highlighting common physical principles guiding cell mechanics, tissue patterning and

  4. Optical geometry across the horizon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonsson, Rickard

    2006-01-01

    In a recent paper (Jonsson and Westman 2006 Class. Quantum Grav. 23 61), a generalization of optical geometry, assuming a non-shearing reference congruence, is discussed. Here we illustrate that this formalism can be applied to (a finite four-volume) of any spherically symmetric spacetime. In particular we apply the formalism, using a non-static reference congruence, to do optical geometry across the horizon of a static black hole. While the resulting geometry in principle is time dependent, we can choose the reference congruence in such a manner that an embedding of the geometry always looks the same. Relative to the embedded geometry the reference points are then moving. We discuss the motion of photons, inertial forces and gyroscope precession in this framework

  5. Adult soft tissue sarcomas of the head and neck treated by radiation and surgery or radiation alone: patterns of failure and prognostic factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willers, Henning; Hug, Eugen G.; Spiro, Ira J.; Efird, Jimmy T.; Rosenberg, Andrew E.; Wang, C. C.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze our experience treating soft tissue sarcomas of the head and neck in adults, and to identify patterns of failure and prognostic factors. Methods and Materials: The records of 57 patients with Stage M0 disease treated by radiation with or without surgery between 1972 and 1993 were reviewed. Median follow-up time was 4.3 years (range, 1.1-16.8 years). A group of potential prognostic factors was evaluated, including age at diagnosis, sex, initial tumor presentation (primary vs. recurrent), grade, T-stage, direct tumor extension, tumor depth, duration of treatment, and radiation dose. Results: The subset of angiosarcomas (11 out of 57 patients) had a considerably adverse effect on treatment outcome for the total group of sarcomas, with actuarial 5-year overall survival (OS), locoregional control (LRC), and freedom from distant metastasis (FDM) rates being 31%, 24%, and 42%, respectively. In contrast, for the remaining 46 patients with other histopathological tumor types, OS, LRC, and FDM rates were significantly higher (74%, 69%, and 83%, respectively). For this group of significant prognostic factors identified by uni- and multivariate analysis included tumor grade as a predictor of OS and T-stage as a predictor of LRC (p ≤ 0.050). Those patients who experienced a locoregional recurrence were at a significantly increased risk of dying (p = 0.004 in a multivariate model). All 17 patients without direct tumor extension to neurovascular structures, bone, contiguous organs, or skin remained free from distant failure. In contrast, 27% of 29 patients with direct extension had developed distant metastases at 5 years. In multivariate analysis, the absence of direct extension was a positive predictor of FDM (p = 0.007) and of OS (p = 0.034). Conclusions: 1) Angiosarcomas of the head and neck have a considerably poorer prognosis than other soft tissue sarcomas of this site. 2) In addition to tumor grade and size, direct tumor extension may be a useful

  6. Three-dimensional lithographically-defined organotypic tissue arrays for quantitative analysis of morphogenesis and neoplastic progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Celeste M.; Inman, Jamie L.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2008-02-13

    Here we describe a simple micromolding method to construct three-dimensional arrays of organotypic epithelial tissue structures that approximate in vivo histology. An elastomeric stamp containing an array of posts of defined geometry and spacing is used to mold microscale cavities into the surface of type I collagen gels. Epithelial cells are seeded into the cavities and covered with a second layer of collagen. The cells reorganize into hollow tissues corresponding to the geometry of the cavities. Patterned tissue arrays can be produced in 3-4 h and will undergo morphogenesis over the following one to three days. The protocol can easily be adapted to study a variety of tissues and aspects of normal and neoplastic development.

  7. Local amino acid sequence patterns dominate the heterogeneous phenotype for the collagen connective tissue disease Osteogenesis Imperfecta resulting from Gly mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jianxi; Yang, Zhangfu; Sun, Xiuxia; Addabbo, Rayna; Baum, Jean

    2015-10-01

    Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI), a hereditary connective tissue disease in collagen that arises from a single Gly → X mutation in the collagen chain, varies widely in phenotype from perinatal lethal to mild. It is unclear why there is such a large variation in the severity of the disease considering the repeating (Gly-X-Y)n sequence and the uniform rod-like structure of collagen. We systematically evaluate the effect of local (Gly-X-Y)n sequence around the mutation site on OI phenotype using integrated bio-statistical approaches, including odds ratio analysis and decision tree modeling. We show that different Gly → X mutations have different local sequence patterns that are correlated with lethal and nonlethal phenotypes providing a mechanism for understanding the sensitivity of local context in defining lethal and non-lethal OI. A number of important trends about which factors are related to OI phenotypes are revealed by the bio-statistical analyses; most striking is the complementary relationship between the placement of Pro residues and small residues and their correlation to OI phenotype. When Pro is present or small flexible residues are absent nearby a mutation site, the OI case tends to be lethal; when Pro is present or small flexible residues are absent further away from the mutation site, the OI case tends to be nonlethal. The analysis also reveals the dominant role of local sequence around mutation sites in the Major Ligand Binding Regions that are primarily responsible for collagen binding to its receptors and shows that non-lethal mutations are highly predicted by local sequence considerations alone whereas lethal mutations are not as easily predicted and may be a result of more complex interactions. Understanding the sequence determinants of OI mutations will enhance genetic counseling and help establish which steps in the collagen hierarchy to target for drug therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The first nationwide surveillance of antibacterial susceptibility patterns of pathogens isolated from skin and soft-tissue infections in dermatology departments in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shinichi; Ohnishi, Takamitsu; Yuasa, Akira; Kiyota, Hiroshi; Iwata, Satoshi; Kaku, Mitsuo; Watanabe, Akira; Sato, Junko; Hanaki, Hideaki; Manabe, Motomu; Suzuki, Tamio; Otsuka, Fujio; Aihara, Michiko; Iozumi, Ken; Tamaki, Takeshi; Funada, Yuichi; Shinozaki, Mikio; Kobayashi, Motoko; Okuda, Masaru; Kikyo, Go; Kikuchi, Kumi; Okada, Yoshitane; Takeshima, Masanori; Kaneko, Osamu; Ogawa, Natsuki; Ito, Rie; Okuyama, Ryuhei; Shimada, Shinji; Shimizu, Tadamichi; Hatta, Naohito; Manabu, Maeda; Tsutsui, Kiyohiro; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Miyachi, Yoshiki; Asada, Hideo; Furukawa, Fukumi; Kurokawa, Ichiro; Iwatsuki, Keiji; Hide, Michihiro; Muto, Masahiko; Yamamoto, Osamu; Niihara, Hiroyuki; Takagaki, Kenji; Kubota, Yasuo; Sayama, Koji; Sano, Shigetoshi; Furue, Masutaka; Kanekura, Takuro

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the trends of antimicrobial resistance in pathogens isolated from skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTI) at dermatology departments in Japan, a Japanese surveillance committee conducted the first nationwide survey in 2013. Three main organisms were collected from SSTI at 30 dermatology departments in medical centers and 10 dermatology clinics. A total of 860 strains - 579 of Staphylococcus aureus, 240 of coagulase-negative Staphylococci, and 41 of Streptococcus pyogenes - were collected and shipped to a central laboratory for antimicrobial susceptibility testing. The patient profiles were also studied. Among all 579 strains of S. aureus, 141 (24.4%) were methicillin-resistant (MRSA). Among 97 Staphylococcus epidermidis strains, 54 (55.7%) were methicillin-resistant (MRSE). MRSA and MRSE were more frequently isolated from inpatients than from outpatients. Furthermore, these methicillin-resistant strains were also isolated more frequently from patients with histories of taking antibiotics within 4 weeks and hospitalization within 1 year compared to those without. However, there were no significant differences in MIC values and susceptibility patterns of the MRSA strains between patients with a history of hospitalization within 1 year and those without. Therefore, most of the isolated MRSA cases at dermatology departments are not healthcare-acquired, but community-acquired MRSA. S. pyogenes strains were susceptible to most antibiotics except macrolides. The information in this study is not only important in terms of local public health but will also contribute to an understanding of epidemic clones of pathogens from SSTI. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The geometry description markup language

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chytracek, R.

    2001-01-01

    Currently, a lot of effort is being put on designing complex detectors. A number of simulation and reconstruction frameworks and applications have been developed with the aim to make this job easier. A very important role in this activity is played by the geometry description of the detector apparatus layout and its working environment. However, no real common approach to represent geometry data is available and such data can be found in various forms starting from custom semi-structured text files, source code (C/C++/FORTRAN), to XML and database solutions. The XML (Extensible Markup Language) has proven to provide an interesting approach for describing detector geometries, with several different but incompatible XML-based solutions existing. Therefore, interoperability and geometry data exchange among different frameworks is not possible at present. The author introduces a markup language for geometry descriptions. Its aim is to define a common approach for sharing and exchanging of geometry description data. Its requirements and design have been driven by experience and user feedback from existing projects which have their geometry description in XML

  10. Treatment patterns, resource utilization, and outcomes among hospitalized patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus complicated skin and soft tissue infections in Lebanon and Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matar MJ

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Madonna J Matar,1 Rima Moghnieh,2 Adel F Alothman,3 Abdulhakeem O Althaqafi,4 Thamer H Alenazi,3 Fayssal M Farahat,4 Shelby Corman,5 Caitlyn T Solem,5 Nirvana Raghubir,6 Cynthia Macahilig,7 Seema Haider,8 Jennifer M Stephens5 1Department of Infectious Diseases, Notre Dame des Secours University Hospital, Jbeil, Lebanon; 2Department of Internal Medicine, Makassed General Hospital, Beirut, Lebanon; 3College of Medicine, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 4King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, Infection Prevention and Control, King AbdulAziz Medical City, King Saud bin AbdulAziz University for Health Sciences, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 5Pharmerit International, Real-World Evidence/Data Analytics, Bethesda, MD, 6Pfizer, New York, NY, 7Medical Data Analytics, Parsippany, NJ, 8Pfizer, Groton, CT, USA Objectives: To describe treatment patterns and medical resource use for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA complicated skin and soft tissue infections (cSSTI in Saudi Arabia and Lebanon in terms of drug selection against the infecting pathogen as well as hospital resource utilization and clinical outcomes among patients with these infections. Methods: This retrospective chart review study evaluated 2011–2012 data from five hospitals in Saudi Arabia and Lebanon. Patients were included if they had been discharged with a diagnosis of MRSA cSSTI, which was culture-proven or suspected based on clinical criteria. Hospital data were abstracted for a random sample of patients with each infection type to capture demographics, treatment patterns, hospital resource utilization, and clinical outcomes. Statistical analysis was descriptive. Results: Data were abstracted from medical records of 87 patients with MRSA cSSTI; mean age 52.4±25.9 years and 61% male. Only 64% of patients received an MRSA active initial therapy, with 56% of first

  11. Differential geometry and symmetric spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Helgason, Sigurdur

    2001-01-01

    Sigurdur Helgason's Differential Geometry and Symmetric Spaces was quickly recognized as a remarkable and important book. For many years, it was the standard text both for Riemannian geometry and for the analysis and geometry of symmetric spaces. Several generations of mathematicians relied on it for its clarity and careful attention to detail. Although much has happened in the field since the publication of this book, as demonstrated by Helgason's own three-volume expansion of the original work, this single volume is still an excellent overview of the subjects. For instance, even though there

  12. Differential geometry curves, surfaces, manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Kühnel, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    This carefully written book is an introduction to the beautiful ideas and results of differential geometry. The first half covers the geometry of curves and surfaces, which provide much of the motivation and intuition for the general theory. The second part studies the geometry of general manifolds, with particular emphasis on connections and curvature. The text is illustrated with many figures and examples. The prerequisites are undergraduate analysis and linear algebra. This new edition provides many advancements, including more figures and exercises, and-as a new feature-a good number of so

  13. Head First 2D Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Fallow), Stray

    2009-01-01

    Having trouble with geometry? Do Pi, The Pythagorean Theorem, and angle calculations just make your head spin? Relax. With Head First 2D Geometry, you'll master everything from triangles, quads and polygons to the time-saving secrets of similar and congruent angles -- and it'll be quick, painless, and fun. Through entertaining stories and practical examples from the world around you, this book takes you beyond boring problems. You'll actually use what you learn to make real-life decisions, like using angles and parallel lines to crack a mysterious CSI case. Put geometry to work for you, and

  14. A first course in geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Walsh, Edward T

    2014-01-01

    This introductory text is designed to help undergraduate students develop a solid foundation in geometry. Early chapters progress slowly, cultivating the necessary understanding and self-confidence for the more rapid development that follows. The extensive treatment can be easily adapted to accommodate shorter courses. Starting with the language of mathematics as expressed in the algebra of logic and sets, the text covers geometric sets of points, separation and angles, triangles, parallel lines, similarity, polygons and area, circles, space geometry, and coordinate geometry. Each chapter incl

  15. Quantum Geometry in the Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, Craig

    2013-03-24

    Standard particle theory is based on quantized matter embedded in a classical geometry. Here, a complementary model is proposed, based on classical matter -- massive bodies, without quantum properties -- embedded in a quantum geometry. It does not describe elementary particles, but may be a better, fully consistent quantum description for position states in laboratory-scale systems. Gravitational theory suggests that the geometrical quantum system has an information density of about one qubit per Planck length squared. If so, the model here predicts that the quantum uncertainty of geometry creates a new form of noise in the position of massive bodies, detectable by interferometers.

  16. Cell geometry dictates TNFα-induced genome response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Aninda; Venkatachalapathy, Saradha; Ratna, Prasuna; Wang, Yejun; Jokhun, Doorgesh Sharma; Shivashankar, G V

    2017-05-16

    Cells in physiology integrate local soluble and mechanical signals to regulate genomic programs. Whereas the individual roles of these signals are well studied, the cellular responses to the combined chemical and physical signals are less explored. Here, we investigated the cross-talk between cellular geometry and TNFα signaling. We stabilized NIH 3T3 fibroblasts into rectangular anisotropic or circular isotropic geometries and stimulated them with TNFα and analyzed nuclear translocation of transcription regulators -NFκB (p65) and MKL and downstream gene-expression patterns. We found that TNFα induces geometry-dependent actin depolymerization, which enhances IκB degradation, p65 nuclear translocation, nuclear exit of MKL, and sequestration of p65 at the RNA-polymerase-II foci. Further, global transcription profile of cells under matrix-TNFα interplay reveals a geometry-dependent gene-expression pattern. At a functional level, we find cell geometry affects TNFα-induced cell proliferation. Our results provide compelling evidence that fibroblasts, depending on their geometries, elicit distinct cellular responses for the same cytokine.

  17. An introduction to differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Willmore, T J

    2012-01-01

    This text employs vector methods to explore the classical theory of curves and surfaces. Topics include basic theory of tensor algebra, tensor calculus, calculus of differential forms, and elements of Riemannian geometry. 1959 edition.

  18. Hyperbolic Metamaterials with Complex Geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavrinenko, Andrei; Andryieuski, Andrei; Zhukovsky, Sergei

    2016-01-01

    We investigate new geometries of hyperbolic metamaterialssuch as highly corrugated structures, nanoparticle monolayer assemblies, super-structured or vertically arranged multilayersand nanopillars. All structures retain basic propertiesof hyperbolic metamaterials, but have functionality improved...

  19. Advances in discrete differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This is one of the first books on a newly emerging field of discrete differential geometry and an excellent way to access this exciting area. It surveys the fascinating connections between discrete models in differential geometry and complex analysis, integrable systems and applications in computer graphics. The authors take a closer look at discrete models in differential geometry and dynamical systems. Their curves are polygonal, surfaces are made from triangles and quadrilaterals, and time is discrete. Nevertheless, the difference between the corresponding smooth curves, surfaces and classical dynamical systems with continuous time can hardly be seen. This is the paradigm of structure-preserving discretizations. Current advances in this field are stimulated to a large extent by its relevance for computer graphics and mathematical physics. This book is written by specialists working together on a common research project. It is about differential geometry and dynamical systems, smooth and discrete theories, ...

  20. An Error Analysis of Structured Light Scanning of Biological Tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Sebastian Hoppe Nesgaard; Wilm, Jakob; Aanæs, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an error analysis and correction model for four structured light methods applied to three common types of biological tissue; skin, fat and muscle. Despite its many advantages, structured light is based on the assumption of direct reflection at the object surface only....... This assumption is violated by most biological material e.g. human skin, which exhibits subsurface scattering. In this study, we find that in general, structured light scans of biological tissue deviate significantly from the ground truth. We show that a large portion of this error can be predicted with a simple......, statistical linear model based on the scan geometry. As such, scans can be corrected without introducing any specially designed pattern strategy or hardware. We can effectively reduce the error in a structured light scanner applied to biological tissue by as much as factor of two or three....

  1. Effect of inhomogeneous activity distributions and airway geometry on cellular doses in radon lung dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szoke, Istvan; Balashazy, Imre; Farkas, Arpad; Hofmann, Werner

    2007-01-01

    The human tracheobronchial system has a very complex structure including cylindrical airway ducts connected by airway bifurcation units. The deposition of the inhaled aerosols within the airways exhibits a very inhomogeneous pattern. The formation of deposition hot spots near the carinal ridge has been confirmed by experimental and computational fluid and particle dynamics (CFPD) methods. In spite of these observations, current radon lung dosimetry models apply infinitely long cylinders as models of the airway system and assume uniform deposition of the inhaled radon progenies along the airway walls. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of airway geometry and non-uniform activity distributions within bronchial bifurcations on cellular dose distributions. In order to answer these questions, the nuclear doses of the bronchial epithelium were calculated in three different irradiation situations. (1) First, CFPD methods were applied to calculate the distribution of the deposited alpha-emitting nuclides in a numerically constructed idealized airway bifurcation. (2) Second, the deposited radionuclides were randomly distributed along the surface of the above-mentioned geometry. (3) Finally, calculations were made in cylindrical geometries corresponding to the parent and daughter branches of the bifurcation geometry assuming random nuclide activity distribution. In all three models, the same 218 Po and 214 Po surface activities per tissue volumes were assumed. Two conclusions can be drawn from this analysis: (i) average nuclear doses are very similar in all three cases (minor differences can be attributed to differences in the linear energy transfer (LET) spectra) and (ii) dose distributions are significantly different in all three cases, with the highest doses at the carinal ridge in case 3. (authors)

  2. [Quantitative evaluation of printing accuracy and tissue surface adaptation of mandibular complete denture polylactic acid pattern fabricated by fused deposition modeling technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, K H; Wang, Y; Chen, H; Zhao, Y J; Zhou, Y S; Sun, Y C

    2017-06-09

    Objective: To quantitatively evaluate the adaptation of polylactic acid (PLA) pattern of mandibular complete denture fabricated by fused deposition modeling (FDM) technology. Methods: A mandibular complete denture digital model was designed through a complete denture design software based on a pair of standard maxillomandibular edentulous plaster model and their occlusion bases. Ten PLA mandibular complete dentures were printed with a FDM machine. The dentures were scanned with and without the plaster model using a three-dimensional (3D) scanner. In Geomagic software, the scanning data of printed dentures were registered to its computer aided design (CAD) data, and the printing error was analyzed using the multipoint registration command. For quantitatively evaluating the adaptation of the denture, the data of plaster model and PLA denture were registered to the whole data of denture located in the plaster model using the best-fit alignment command, the 3D deviation of the plaster model and tissue surface of the denture represent the space between them. The overall area was separated into three parts: primary stress-bearing area, secondary stress-bearing area and border seal area, and the average deviations of these three parts were measured. The values were analyzed using analysis of variance. Results: Compared with the CAD data, the printing error was (0.013±0.004) mm. The overall 3D deviation between PLA denture and plaster model was (0.164±0.033) mm, in which the primary stress-bearing area was (0.165± 0.045) mm, the secondary stress-bearing area was (0.153 ± 0.027) mm, the border seal area was (0.186 ± 0.043) mm. These showed a good fit in the majority parts of the FDM denture to the plaster model. No statistically significant difference was observed between the three areas ( F =1.857, P =0.175>0.05). Conclusions: Combined with the 3D scanning, CAD and FDM technology, a FDM 3D printing process of complete denture for injection moulding can be established

  3. Cell growth and differentiation on feeder layers is predicted to be influenced by bioreactor geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, C A; Palsson, B Ø

    1996-06-05

    Tissue function is comprised of a complex interplay between biological and physicochemical rate processes. The design of bioreactors for tissue engineering must account for these processes simultaneously in order to obtain a bioreactor that provides a uniform environment for tissue growth and development. In the present study we consider the effects of fluid flow and mass transfer on the growth of a tissue in a parallel-plate bioreactor configuration. The parenchymal cells grow on a preformed stromal (feeder) layer that secretes a growth factor that stimulates parenchymal stem cell replication and differentiation. The biological dynamics are described by a unilineage model that describes the replication and differentiation of the tissue stem cell. The physicochemical rates are described by the Navier-Stokes and convective-diffusion equations. The model equations are solved by a finite element method. Two dimensionless groups govern the behavior of the solution. One is the Graetz number (Gz) that describes the relative rates of convection and diffusion, and the other a new dimensionless ratio (designated by P) that describes the interplay of the growth factor production, diffusion, and stimulation. Four geometries (slab, gondola, diamond, and radial shapes) for the parallel-plate bioreactor are analyzed. The uniformity of cell growth is measured by a two-dimensional coefficient of variance. The concentration distribution of the stroma-derived growth factor was computed first based on fluid flow and bioreactor geometry. Then the concomitant cell density distribution was obtained by integrating the calculated growth factor concentration with the parenchymal cell growth and unilineage differentiation process. The spatiotemporal cell growth patterns in four different bioreactor configurations were investigated under a variety of combinations of Gz (10(-1), 10(0), and 10(1)) and P(10(-2), 10(-1), 10(0), 10(1), and 10(2)). The results indicate high cell density and

  4. Impact of age, BMI and HbA1c levels on the genome-wide DNA methylation and mRNA expression patterns in human adipose tissue and identification of epigenetic biomarkers in blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönn, Tina; Volkov, Petr; Gillberg, Linn; Kokosar, Milana; Perfilyev, Alexander; Jacobsen, Anna Louisa; Jørgensen, Sine W; Brøns, Charlotte; Jansson, Per-Anders; Eriksson, Karl-Fredrik; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Groop, Leif; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Vaag, Allan; Nilsson, Emma; Ling, Charlotte

    2015-07-01

    Increased age, BMI and HbA1c levels are risk factors for several non-communicable diseases. However, the impact of these factors on the genome-wide DNA methylation pattern in human adipose tissue remains unknown. We analyzed the DNA methylation of ∼480 000 sites in human adipose tissue from 96 males and 94 females and related methylation to age, BMI and HbA1c. We also compared epigenetic signatures in adipose tissue and blood. Age was significantly associated with both altered DNA methylation and expression of 1050 genes (e.g. FHL2, NOX4 and PLG). Interestingly, many reported epigenetic biomarkers of aging in blood, including ELOVL2, FHL2, KLF14 and GLRA1, also showed significant correlations between adipose tissue DNA methylation and age in our study. The most significant association between age and adipose tissue DNA methylation was found upstream of ELOVL2. We identified 2825 genes (e.g. FTO, ITIH5, CCL18, MTCH2, IRS1 and SPP1) where both DNA methylation and expression correlated with BMI. Methylation at previously reported HIF3A sites correlated significantly with BMI in females only. HbA1c (range 28-46 mmol/mol) correlated significantly with the methylation of 711 sites, annotated to, for example, RAB37, TICAM1 and HLA-DPB1. Pathway analyses demonstrated that methylation levels associated with age and BMI are overrepresented among genes involved in cancer, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Our results highlight the impact of age, BMI and HbA1c on epigenetic variation of candidate genes for obesity, type 2 diabetes and cancer in human adipose tissue. Importantly, we demonstrate that epigenetic biomarkers in blood can mirror age-related epigenetic signatures in target tissues for metabolic diseases such as adipose tissue. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Empirical fractal geometry analysis of some speculative financial bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redelico, Francisco O.; Proto, Araceli N.

    2012-11-01

    Empirical evidence of a multifractal signature during increasing of a financial bubble leading to a crash is presented. The April 2000 crash in the NASDAQ composite index and a time series from the discrete Chakrabarti-Stinchcombe model for earthquakes are analyzed using a geometric approach and some common patterns are identified. These patterns can be related the geometry of the rising period of a financial bubbles with the non-concave entropy problem.

  6. A Comment on Molecular Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomba, Frank J.

    1999-12-01

    A method of determining the correct molecular geometry of simple molecules and ions with one central atom is proposed. While the usual method of determining the molecular geometry involves first drawing the Lewis structure, this method can be used without doing so. In fact, the Lewis structure need not be drawn at all. The Lewis structure may be drawn as the final step, with the geometry of the simple molecule or ion already established. In the case of diatomic molecules, any atom may be used as the central atom. When hydrogen is present in a multiatom molecule or ion, this method "naturally" eliminates choosing hydrogen; but, any other atom may be used as the central atom to determine the correct geometry. The Lewis structure can then be used to determine the formal charges on the atoms. In this way there is a check on the selection of the central atom, should the correct Lewis structure be desired. Thus, it assumes that one is familiar with both Lewis structures and the valence shell electron pair repulsion (VSEPR) approach to bonding. The approach suggested in this paper will give rapid and accurate molecular geometries, and it is fun !!!

  7. A functional genomics screen identifies an Importin-α homolog as a regulator of stem cell function and tissue patterning during planarian regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Hubert, Amy; Henderson, Jordana M.; Cowles, Martis W.; Ross, Kelly G.; Hagen, Matthew; Anderson, Christa; Szeterlak, Claudia J.; Zayas, Ricardo M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Planarians are renowned for their regenerative capacity and are an attractive model for the study of adult stem cells and tissue regeneration. In an effort to better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying planarian regeneration, we performed a functional genomics screen aimed at identifying genes involved in this process in Schmidtea mediterranea. Methods We used microarrays to detect changes in gene expression in regenerating and non-regenerating tissues in planarians rege...

  8. Electrodynamics and Spacetime Geometry: Foundations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Francisco; Lobo, Francisco S. N.

    2017-02-01

    We explore the intimate connection between spacetime geometry and electrodynamics. This link is already implicit in the constitutive relations between the field strengths and excitations, which are an essential part of the axiomatic structure of electromagnetism, clearly formulated via integration theory and differential forms. We review the foundations of classical electromagnetism based on charge and magnetic flux conservation, the Lorentz force and the constitutive relations. These relations introduce the conformal part of the metric and allow the study of electrodynamics for specific spacetime geometries. At the foundational level, we discuss the possibility of generalizing the vacuum constitutive relations, by relaxing the fixed conditions of homogeneity and isotropy, and by assuming that the symmetry properties of the electro-vacuum follow the spacetime isometries. The implications of this extension are briefly discussed in the context of the intimate connection between electromagnetism and the geometry (and causal structure) of spacetime.

  9. Euclidean geometry and its subgeometries

    CERN Document Server

    Specht, Edward John; Calkins, Keith G; Rhoads, Donald H

    2015-01-01

    In this monograph, the authors present a modern development of Euclidean geometry from independent axioms, using up-to-date language and providing detailed proofs. The axioms for incidence, betweenness, and plane separation are close to those of Hilbert. This is the only axiomatic treatment of Euclidean geometry that uses axioms not involving metric notions and that explores congruence and isometries by means of reflection mappings. The authors present thirteen axioms in sequence, proving as many theorems as possible at each stage and, in the process, building up subgeometries, most notably the Pasch and neutral geometries. Standard topics such as the congruence theorems for triangles, embedding the real numbers in a line, and coordinatization of the plane are included, as well as theorems of Pythagoras, Desargues, Pappas, Menelaus, and Ceva. The final chapter covers consistency and independence of axioms, as well as independence of definition properties. There are over 300 exercises; solutions to many of the...

  10. Flux compactifications and generalized geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grana, Mariana

    2006-01-01

    Following the lectures given at CERN Winter School 2006, we present a pedagogical overview of flux compactifications and generalized geometries, concentrating on closed string fluxes in type II theories. We start by reviewing the supersymmetric flux configurations with maximally symmetric four-dimensional spaces. We then discuss the no-go theorems (and their evasion) for compactifications with fluxes. We analyse the resulting four-dimensional effective theories for Calabi-Yau and Calabi-Yau orientifold compactifications, concentrating on the flux-induced superpotentials. We discuss the generic mechanism of moduli stabilization and illustrate with two examples: the conifold in IIB and a T 6 /(Z 3 x Z 3 ) torus in IIA. We finish by studying the effective action and flux vacua for generalized geometries in the context of generalized complex geometry

  11. Guide to Computational Geometry Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas; Gravesen, Jens; Anton, François

    Optical scanning is rapidly becoming ubiquitous. From industrial laser scanners to medical CT, MR and 3D ultrasound scanners, numerous organizations now have easy access to optical acquisition devices that provide huge volumes of image data. However, the raw geometry data acquired must first...... be processed before it is useful. This Guide to Computational Geometry Processing reviews the algorithms for processing geometric data, with a practical focus on important techniques not covered by traditional courses on computer vision and computer graphics. This is balanced with an introduction...... Provides additional material at a supplementary website Includes self-study exercises throughout the text Graduate students will find this text a valuable, hands-on guide to developing key skills in geometry processing. The book will also serve as a useful reference for professionals wishing to improve...

  12. Geometry, topology, and string theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varadarajan, Uday [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    A variety of scenarios are considered which shed light upon the uses and limitations of classical geometric and topological notions in string theory. The primary focus is on situations in which D-brane or string probes of a given classical space-time see the geometry quite differently than one might naively expect. In particular, situations in which extra dimensions, non-commutative geometries as well as other non-local structures emerge are explored in detail. Further, a preliminary exploration of such issues in Lorentzian space-times with non-trivial causal structures within string theory is initiated.

  13. Stochastic geometry and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chiu, Sung Nok; Kendall, Wilfrid S; Mecke, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    An extensive update to a classic text Stochastic geometry and spatial statistics play a fundamental role in many modern branches of physics, materials sciences, engineering, biology and environmental sciences. They offer successful models for the description of random two- and three-dimensional micro and macro structures and statistical methods for their analysis. The previous edition of this book has served as the key reference in its field for over 18 years and is regarded as the best treatment of the subject of stochastic geometry, both as a subject with vital a

  14. Introduction to topology and geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Stahl, Saul

    2014-01-01

    An easily accessible introduction to over three centuries of innovations in geometry Praise for the First Edition ". . . a welcome alternative to compartmentalized treatments bound to the old thinking. This clearly written, well-illustrated book supplies sufficient background to be self-contained." -CHOICE This fully revised new edition offers the most comprehensive coverage of modern geometry currently available at an introductory level. The book strikes a welcome balance between academic rigor and accessibility, providing a complete and cohesive picture of the science with an unparallele

  15. Graphical debugging of combinational geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, T.J.; Smith, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    A graphical debugger for combinatorial geometry being developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is described. The prototype debugger consists of two parts: a FORTRAN-based ''view'' generator and a Microsoft Windows application for displaying the geometry. Options and features of both modules are discussed. Examples illustrating the various options available are presented. The potential for utilizing the images produced using the debugger as a visualization tool for the output of the radiation transport codes is discussed as is the future direction of the development

  16. Combinatorial geometry in the plane

    CERN Document Server

    Hadwiger, Hugo; Klee, Victor

    2014-01-01

    Geared toward advanced undergraduates familiar with analysis and college geometry, this concise book discusses theorems on topics restricted to the plane such as convexity, coverings, and graphs. In addition to helping students cultivate rigorous thought, the text encourages the development of mathematical intuition and clarifies the nature of mathematical research.The two-part treatment begins with specific topics including integral distances, covering problems, point set geometry and convexity, simple paradoxes involving point sets, and pure combinatorics, among other subjects. The second pa

  17. Modern differential geometry for physicists

    CERN Document Server

    Isham, C J

    1989-01-01

    These notes are the content of an introductory course on modern, coordinate-free differential geometry which is taken by the first-year theoretical physics PhD students, or by students attending the one-year MSc course "Fundamental Fields and Forces" at Imperial College. The book is concerned entirely with mathematics proper, although the emphasis and detailed topics have been chosen with an eye to the way in which differential geometry is applied these days to modern theoretical physics. This includes not only the traditional area of general relativity but also the theory of Yang-Mills fields

  18. Algebraic geometry and theta functions

    CERN Document Server

    Coble, Arthur B

    1929-01-01

    This book is the result of extending and deepening all questions from algebraic geometry that are connected to the central problem of this book: the determination of the tritangent planes of a space curve of order six and genus four, which the author treated in his Colloquium Lecture in 1928 at Amherst. The first two chapters recall fundamental ideas of algebraic geometry and theta functions in such fashion as will be most helpful in later applications. In order to clearly present the state of the central problem, the author first presents the better-known cases of genus two (Chapter III) and

  19. Geometry, topology, and string theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varadarajan, Uday

    2003-01-01

    A variety of scenarios are considered which shed light upon the uses and limitations of classical geometric and topological notions in string theory. The primary focus is on situations in which D-brane or string probes of a given classical space-time see the geometry quite differently than one might naively expect. In particular, situations in which extra dimensions, non-commutative geometries as well as other non-local structures emerge are explored in detail. Further, a preliminary exploration of such issues in Lorentzian space-times with non-trivial causal structures within string theory is initiated

  20. Intestinal intraepithelial lymphocyte cytometric pattern is more accurate than subepithelial deposits of anti-tissue transglutaminase IgA for the diagnosis of celiac disease in lymphocytic enteritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Fernández-Bañares

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & AIMS: An increase in CD3+TCRγδ+ and a decrease in CD3- intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL is a characteristic flow cytometric pattern of celiac disease (CD with atrophy. The aim was to evaluate the usefulness of both CD IEL cytometric pattern and anti-TG2 IgA subepithelial deposit analysis (CD IF pattern for diagnosing lymphocytic enteritis due to CD. METHODS: Two-hundred and five patients (144 females who underwent duodenal biopsy for clinical suspicion of CD and positive celiac genetics were prospectively included. Fifty had villous atrophy, 70 lymphocytic enteritis, and 85 normal histology. Eight patients with non-celiac atrophy and 15 with lymphocytic enteritis secondary to Helicobacter pylori acted as control group. Duodenal biopsies were obtained to assess both CD IEL flow cytometric (complete or incomplete and IF patterns. RESULTS: Sensitivity of IF, and complete and incomplete cytometric patterns for CD diagnosis in patients with positive serology (Marsh 1+3 was 92%, 85 and 97% respectively, but only the complete cytometric pattern had 100% specificity. Twelve seropositive and 8 seronegative Marsh 1 patients had a CD diagnosis at inclusion or after gluten free-diet, respectively. CD cytometric pattern showed a better diagnostic performance than both IF pattern and serology for CD diagnosis in lymphocytic enteritis at baseline (95% vs 60% vs 60%, p = 0.039. CONCLUSIONS: Analysis of the IEL flow cytometric pattern is a fast, accurate method for identifying CD in the initial diagnostic biopsy of patients presenting with lymphocytic enteritis, even in seronegative patients, and seems to be better than anti-TG2 intestinal deposits.

  1. Molecular cloning, genomic organization, chromosome mapping, tissues expression pattern and identification of a novel splicing variant of porcine CIDEb gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, YanHua, E-mail: liyanhua.1982@aliyun.com [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Child Development and Disorders, Chongqing Key Laboratory of Translational Medical Research in Cognitive Development and Learning and Memory Disorders, China International Science and Technology Cooperation base of Child development and Critical Disorders, Children’s Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400014 (China); Li, AiHua [Chongqing Cancer Institute & Hospital & Cancer Center, Chongqing 404100 (China); Yang, Z.Q. [Key Laboratory of Agricultural Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction of Ministry of Education, College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2016-09-09

    Cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor-α-like effector b (CIDEb) is a member of the CIDE family of apoptosis-inducing factors, CIDEa and CIDEc have been reported to be Lipid droplets (LDs)-associated proteins that promote atypical LD fusion in adipocytes, and responsible for liver steatosis under fasting and obese conditions, whereas CIDEb promotes lipid storage under normal diet conditions [1], and promotes the formation of triacylglyceride-enriched VLDL particles in hepatocytes [2]. Here, we report the gene cloning, chromosome mapping, tissue distribution, genetic expression analysis, and identification of a novel splicing variant of the porcine CIDEb gene. Sequence analysis shows that the open reading frame of the normal porcine CIDEb isoform covers 660bp and encodes a 219-amino acid polypeptide, whereas its alternative splicing variant encodes a 142-amino acid polypeptide truncated at the fourth exon and comprised of the CIDE-N domain and part of the CIDE-C domain. The deduced amino acid sequence of normal porcine CIDEb shows an 85.8% similarity to the human protein and 80.0% to the mouse protein. The CIDEb genomic sequence spans approximately 6KB comprised of five exons and four introns. Radiation hybrid mapping demonstrated that porcine CIDEb is located at chromosome 7q21 and at a distance of 57cR from the most significantly linked marker, S0334, regions that are syntenic with the corresponding region in the human genome. Tissue expression analysis indicated that normal CIDEb mRNA is ubiquitously expressed in many porcine tissues. It was highly expressed in white adipose tissue and was observed at relatively high levels in the liver, lung, small intestine, lymphatic tissue and brain. The normal version of CIDEb was the predominant form in all tested tissues, whereas the splicing variant was expressed at low levels in all examined tissues except the lymphatic tissue. Furthermore, genetic expression analysis indicated that CIDEb mRNA levels were

  2. Molecular cloning, genomic organization, chromosome mapping, tissues expression pattern and identification of a novel splicing variant of porcine CIDEb gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, YanHua; Li, AiHua; Yang, Z.Q.

    2016-01-01

    Cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor-α-like effector b (CIDEb) is a member of the CIDE family of apoptosis-inducing factors, CIDEa and CIDEc have been reported to be Lipid droplets (LDs)-associated proteins that promote atypical LD fusion in adipocytes, and responsible for liver steatosis under fasting and obese conditions, whereas CIDEb promotes lipid storage under normal diet conditions [1], and promotes the formation of triacylglyceride-enriched VLDL particles in hepatocytes [2]. Here, we report the gene cloning, chromosome mapping, tissue distribution, genetic expression analysis, and identification of a novel splicing variant of the porcine CIDEb gene. Sequence analysis shows that the open reading frame of the normal porcine CIDEb isoform covers 660bp and encodes a 219-amino acid polypeptide, whereas its alternative splicing variant encodes a 142-amino acid polypeptide truncated at the fourth exon and comprised of the CIDE-N domain and part of the CIDE-C domain. The deduced amino acid sequence of normal porcine CIDEb shows an 85.8% similarity to the human protein and 80.0% to the mouse protein. The CIDEb genomic sequence spans approximately 6KB comprised of five exons and four introns. Radiation hybrid mapping demonstrated that porcine CIDEb is located at chromosome 7q21 and at a distance of 57cR from the most significantly linked marker, S0334, regions that are syntenic with the corresponding region in the human genome. Tissue expression analysis indicated that normal CIDEb mRNA is ubiquitously expressed in many porcine tissues. It was highly expressed in white adipose tissue and was observed at relatively high levels in the liver, lung, small intestine, lymphatic tissue and brain. The normal version of CIDEb was the predominant form in all tested tissues, whereas the splicing variant was expressed at low levels in all examined tissues except the lymphatic tissue. Furthermore, genetic expression analysis indicated that CIDEb mRNA levels were

  3. Teaching Activity-Based Taxicab Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ada, Tuba

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed on the process of teaching taxicab geometry, a non-Euclidean geometry that is easy to understand and similar to Euclidean geometry with its axiomatic structure. In this regard, several teaching activities were designed such as measuring taxicab distance, defining a taxicab circle, finding a geometric locus in taxicab geometry, and…

  4. Tropine forming tropinone reductase gene from Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha: biochemical characteristics of the recombinant enzyme and novel physiological overtones of tissue-wide gene expression patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar Kushwaha

    Full Text Available Withania somnifera is one of the most reputed medicinal plants of Indian systems of medicine synthesizing diverse types of secondary metabolites such as withanolides, alkaloids, withanamides etc. Present study comprises cloning and E. coli over-expression of a tropinone reductase gene (WsTR-I from W. somnifera, and elucidation of biochemical characteristics and physiological role of tropinone reductase enzyme in tropane alkaloid biosynthesis in aerial tissues of the plant. The recombinant enzyme was demonstrated to catalyze NADPH-dependent tropinone to tropine conversion step in tropane metabolism, through TLC, GC and GC-MS-MS analyses of the reaction product. The functionally active homodimeric ~60 kDa enzyme catalyzed the reaction in reversible manner at optimum pH 6.7. Catalytic kinetics of the enzyme favoured its forward reaction (tropine formation. Comparative 3-D models of landscape of the enzyme active site contours and tropinone binding site were also developed. Tissue-wide and ontogenic stage-wise assessment of WsTR-I transcript levels revealed constitutive expression of the gene with relatively lower abundance in berries and young leaves. The tissue profiles of WsTR-I expression matched those of tropine levels. The data suggest that, in W. somnifera, aerial tissues as well possess tropane alkaloid biosynthetic competence. In vivo feeding of U-[(14C]-sucrose to orphan shoot (twigs and [(14C]-chasing revealed substantial radiolabel incorporation in tropinone and tropine, confirming the de novo synthesizing ability of the aerial tissues. This inherent independent ability heralds a conceptual novelty in the backdrop of classical view that these tissues acquire the alkaloids through transportation from roots rather than synthesis. The TR-I gene expression was found to be up-regulated on exposure to signal molecules (methyl jasmonate and salicylic acid and on mechanical injury. The enzyme's catalytic and structural properties as well as gene

  5. Tropine Forming Tropinone Reductase Gene from Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha): Biochemical Characteristics of the Recombinant Enzyme and Novel Physiological Overtones of Tissue-Wide Gene Expression Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushwaha, Amit Kumar; Sangwan, Neelam Singh; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar; Negi, Arvind Singh; Misra, Laxminarain; Sangwan, Rajender Singh

    2013-01-01

    Withania somnifera is one of the most reputed medicinal plants of Indian systems of medicine synthesizing diverse types of secondary metabolites such as withanolides, alkaloids, withanamides etc. Present study comprises cloning and E. coli over-expression of a tropinone reductase gene (WsTR-I) from W. somnifera, and elucidation of biochemical characteristics and physiological role of tropinone reductase enzyme in tropane alkaloid biosynthesis in aerial tissues of the plant. The recombinant enzyme was demonstrated to catalyze NADPH-dependent tropinone to tropine conversion step in tropane metabolism, through TLC, GC and GC-MS-MS analyses of the reaction product. The functionally active homodimeric ∼60 kDa enzyme catalyzed the reaction in reversible manner at optimum pH 6.7. Catalytic kinetics of the enzyme favoured its forward reaction (tropine formation). Comparative 3-D models of landscape of the enzyme active site contours and tropinone binding site were also developed. Tissue-wide and ontogenic stage-wise assessment of WsTR-I transcript levels revealed constitutive expression of the gene with relatively lower abundance in berries and young leaves. The tissue profiles of WsTR-I expression matched those of tropine levels. The data suggest that, in W. somnifera, aerial tissues as well possess tropane alkaloid biosynthetic competence. In vivo feeding of U-[14C]-sucrose to orphan shoot (twigs) and [14C]-chasing revealed substantial radiolabel incorporation in tropinone and tropine, confirming the de novo synthesizing ability of the aerial tissues. This inherent independent ability heralds a conceptual novelty in the backdrop of classical view that these tissues acquire the alkaloids through transportation from roots rather than synthesis. The TR-I gene expression was found to be up-regulated on exposure to signal molecules (methyl jasmonate and salicylic acid) and on mechanical injury. The enzyme's catalytic and structural properties as well as gene expression

  6. Axiomatic characterization of physical geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, H.J.

    1979-01-01

    This book deals with the foundations of a theory which can be considered as the most ancient part of physics, namely Euclidean geometry. It may be viewed as a partial realization of a program set up by G. Ludwig who suggested to formulate geometry explicity as a theory of possible operations with practically rigid bodies, using as basic concepts 'region', 'inclusion' and 'transport'. After an introduction to the problems, in which we sketch also the historical development, we develop a pre-theory with respect to the geometry with the aim to give an interpretation of the above-mentioned basic geometrical concepts in terms of notions which are closely related to experimental situations. The passage from a pure topological analysis of physical space to the differential geometrical view is made in the next section where we use the prerequisites established in the previous chapter to apply the Tits/Freudenthal solution of the Helmholtz-Lie problem. The main theorem of this book is stated in the last section by a characterization of Euclidean geometry. It turns out that two additional postulates are necessary whose empirical meaning we stress by referring to the axiom of dimension. The book might be of interest to scientist working in the field of axiomatics. Unfamiliar readers will be required to have a sound knowledge of topology and group theory. (HJ) 891 HJ/HJ 892 MB

  7. Algebraic Methods in Plane Geometry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 13; Issue 10. Algebraic Methods in Plane Geometry - The Use of Conic Sections. Shailesh A Shirali. General Article Volume 13 Issue 10 October 2008 pp 916-928. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  8. Multivariable calculus and differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Walschap, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    This text is a modern in-depth study of the subject that includes all the material needed from linear algebra. It then goes on to investigate topics in differential geometry, such as manifolds in Euclidean space, curvature, and the generalization of the fundamental theorem of calculus known as Stokes' theorem.

  9. Stochastic Modelling of River Geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Schaarup-Jensen, K.

    1996-01-01

    Numerical hydrodynamic river models are used in a large number of applications to estimate critical events for rivers. These estimates are subject to a number of uncertainties. In this paper, the problem to evaluate these estimates using probabilistic methods is considered. Stochastic models for ...... for river geometries are formulated and a coupling between hydraulic computational methods and numerical reliability methods is presented....

  10. GEOMETRY AND COMPLEXITY IN ARCHITECTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RUSU Maria Ana

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available As Constantin Brancuși (1876-1956 said „Simplicity is complexity itself“, simplicity and regularity through the use of basic geometric forms has always played a central role in architectural design, during the 20th century. A diachronic perspective, shows as the use of geometry and mathematics to describe built form provided a common basis for communication between the processes of design, fabrication and stability. Classic ways of representing geometry, based on descriptive methods, favor precise language of bidimensionality easy to represent in a rectangular coordinate system. In recent years, the importance of geometry has been re-emphasized by significant advances in the digital age, where computers are increasingly used in design, fabrication and construction to explore the art of the possible. Contemporary architecture transcend the limitations of Euclidean geometry and create new forms that are emerging through the convergence of complex systems, computational design and robotic fabrication devices, but which can also achieve higher levels of performance. Freeform architectural shapes and structures play an increasingly important role in 21st century architectural design. Through a series of examples, the paper relates to contemporary architectural explorations of complex, curvilinear surfaces in the digital age and discusses how it has required rethinking the mode in which we traditionally operate as architects. The analysis creates the possibility of comparisons between original and current design.

  11. Exploring Bundling Theory with Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckalbar, John C.

    2006-01-01

    The author shows how instructors might successfully introduce students in principles and intermediate microeconomic theory classes to the topic of bundling (i.e., the selling of two or more goods as a package, rather than separately). It is surprising how much students can learn using only the tools of high school geometry. To be specific, one can…

  12. Generative CAI in Analytical Geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uttal, William R.; And Others

    A generative computer-assisted instruction system is being developed to tutor students in analytical geometry. The basis of this development is the thesis that a generative teaching system can be developed by establishing and then stimulating a simplified, explicit model of the human tutor. The goal attempted is that of a computer environment…

  13. Stochastic Modelling of River Geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Schaarup-Jensen, K.

    1996-01-01

    Numerical hydrodynamic river models are used in a large number of applications to estimate critical events for rivers. These estimates are subject to a number of uncertainties. In this paper, the problem to evaluate these estimates using probabilistic methods is considered. Stochastic models...... for river geometries are formulated and a coupling between hydraulic computational methods and numerical reliability methods is presented....

  14. Geometry of Cuts and Metrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Deza; M. Laurent (Monique)

    1997-01-01

    htmlabstractCuts and metrics are well-known objects that arise - independently, but with many deep and fascinating connections - in diverse fields: in graph theory, combinatorial optimization, geometry of numbers, combinatorial matrix theory, statistical physics, VLSI design etc. This book offers a

  15. Analogical Reasoning in Geometry Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdas, Ioana

    2015-01-01

    The analogical reasoning isn't used only in mathematics but also in everyday life. In this article we approach the analogical reasoning in Geometry Education. The novelty of this article is a classification of geometrical analogies by reasoning type and their exemplification. Our classification includes: analogies for understanding and setting a…

  16. Matter in toy dynamical geometries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konopka, T.J.

    2009-01-01

    One of the objectives of theories describing quantum dynamical geometry is to compute expectation values of geometrical observables. The results of such computations can be affected by whether or not matter is taken into account. It is thus important to understand to what extent and to what effect

  17. Complex Numbers and Plane Geometry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 13; Issue 1. Complex Numbers and Plane Geometry. Anant R Shastri. General Article Volume 13 Issue 1 January 2008 pp 35-53. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/013/01/0035-0053. Keywords.

  18. General Relativity: Geometry Meets Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Dietrick E.

    1975-01-01

    Observing the relationship of general relativity and the geometry of space-time, the author questions whether the rest of physics has geometrical explanations. As a partial answer he discusses current research on subatomic particles employing geometric transformations, and cites the existence of geometrical definitions of physical quantities such…

  19. Proof patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, Mark

    2015-01-01

    This innovative textbook introduces a new pattern-based approach to learning proof methods in the mathematical sciences. Readers will discover techniques that will enable them to learn new proofs across different areas of pure mathematics with ease. The patterns in proofs from diverse fields such as algebra, analysis, topology and number theory are explored. Specific topics examined include game theory, combinatorics, and Euclidean geometry, enabling a broad familiarity. The author, an experienced lecturer and researcher renowned for his innovative view and intuitive style, illuminates a wide range of techniques and examples from duplicating the cube to triangulating polygons to the infinitude of primes to the fundamental theorem of algebra. Intended as a companion for undergraduate students, this text is an essential addition to every aspiring mathematician’s toolkit.

  20. Engineering systems for the generation of patterned co-cultures for controlling cell-cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaji, Hirokazu; Camci-Unal, Gulden; Langer, Robert; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2011-03-01

    Inside the body, cells lie in direct contact or in close proximity to other cell types in a tightly controlled architecture that often regulates the resulting tissue function. Therefore, tissue engineering constructs that aim to reproduce the architecture and the geometry of tissues will benefit from methods of controlling cell-cell interactions with microscale resolution. We discuss the use of microfabrication technologies for generating patterned co-cultures. In addition, we categorize patterned co-culture systems by cell type and discuss the implications of regulating cell-cell interactions in the resulting biological function of the tissues. Patterned co-cultures are a useful tool for fabricating tissue engineered constructs and for studying cell-cell interactions in vitro, because they can be used to control the degree of homotypic and heterotypic cell-cell contact. In addition, this approach can be manipulated to elucidate important factors involved in cell-matrix interactions. Patterned co-culture strategies hold significant potential to develop biomimetic structures for tissue engineering. It is expected that they would create opportunities to develop artificial tissues in the future. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Nanotechnologies - Emerging Applications in Biomedicine. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Geometry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Limit: (of a sequence) A point such that the points of the sequence eventually approach it to within any previously specified distance. Some of the Greek mathematicians were quite confused! For example, let us take an empty cup and put it under a tap. Assume that it is half full in a minute. It is then 3/4-th full in another half.

  2. Geometry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Huygens, Leibnitz and Newton. (independently) formulated the notion of curvature of a curve. (This was developed by Serret-Frenet into a multiplicity of invariants for curves in higher dimensions. We will concentrate on the curvature defined by Huygens et al). A line then becomes a curve of curvature zero. It is always ...

  3. Geometry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    As in art, understanding is enhanced by doing. Readers are encour- aged to attempt the exercises scattered in the text. The Origin (s). Origin: the starting point of a .... role to play In modem mathematics. Address {or correspondence. Kapil H Paranjape,. Indian Statistical Institute,. 8th Mile, Mysore Road,. Bangalore 560 059 ...

  4. Geometry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the previous article the author examined curves and surfaces. One might hope to continue by analogy in many dimensions. The concept of working in many dimensions is so bewildering (yet today so matter-of-course) that it needed the genius ofBemhard Riemann to show us exactly how it can be done. In just one lecture ...

  5. miRNA expression patterns in normal breast tissue and invasive breast cancers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 germ-line mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Shoko; Vesuna, Farhad; Raman, Venu; van Diest, Paul J.; van der Groep, Petra

    2015-01-01

    miRNA deregulation has been found to promote carcinogenesis. Little is known about miRNA deregulation in hereditary breast tumors as no miRNA expression profiling studies have been performed in normal breast tissue of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. miRNA profiles of 17 BRCA1- and 9

  6. Distinct expression patterns of the E3 ligase SIAH-1 and its partner Kid/KIF22 in normal tissues and in the breast tumoral processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mourah Samia

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract SIAH proteins are the human members of an highly conserved family of E3 ubiquitin ligases. Several data suggest that SIAH proteins may have a role in tumor suppression and apoptosis. Previously, we reported that SIAH-1 induces the degradation of Kid (KIF22, a chromokinesin protein implicated in the normal progression of mitosis and meiosis, by the ubiquitin proteasome pathway. In human breast cancer cells stably transfected with SIAH-1, Kid/KIF22 protein level was markedly reduced whereas, the Kid/KIF22 mRNA level was increased. This interaction has been further elucidated through analyzing SIAH and Kid/KIF22 expression in both paired normal and tumor tissues and cell lines. It was observed that SIAH-1 protein is widely expressed in different normal tissues, and in cells lines but showing some differences in western blotting profiles. Immunofluorescence microscopy shows that the intracellular distribution of SIAH-1 and Kid/KIF22 appears to be modified in human tumor tissues compared to normal controls. When mRNA expression of SIAH-1 and Kid/KIF22 was analyzed by real-time PCR in normal and cancer breast tissues from the same patient, a large variation in the number of mRNA copies was detected between the different samples. In most cases, SIAH-1 mRNA is decreased in tumor tissues compared to their normal counterparts. Interestingly, in all breast tumor tissues analyzed, variations in the Kid/KIF22 mRNA levels mirrored those seen with SIAH-1 mRNAs. This concerted variation of SIAH-1 and Kid/KIF22 messengers suggests the existence of an additional level of control than the previously described protein-protein interaction and protein stability regulation. Our observations also underline the need to re-evaluate the results of gene expression obtained by qRT-PCR and relate it to the protein expression and cellular localization when matched normal and tumoral tissues are analyzed.

  7. Monoclonal antibodies to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 reveal differential expression patterns in cancer and low antigen expression in normal tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bujak, Emil; Pretto, Francesca; Ritz, Danilo; Gualandi, Laura; Wulhfard, Sarah; Neri, Dario

    2014-01-01

    There is a considerable interest for the discovery and characterization of tumor-associated antigens, which may facilitate antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies. Thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 are homologous secreted proteins, which have previously been reported to be overexpressed during remodeling typical for wound healing and tumor progression and to possibly play a functional role in cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis. To our knowledge, a complete immunohistochemical characterization of thrombospondins levels in normal rodent tissues has not been reported so far. Using antibody phage technology, we have generated and characterized monoclonal antibodies specific to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2, two antigens which share 62% aminoacid identity. An immunofluorescence analysis revealed that both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues, except for a weak staining of heart tissue by antibodies specific to thrombospondin-1. The analysis also showed that thrombospondin-1 was strongly expressed in 5/7 human tumors xenografted in nude mice, while it was only barely detectable in 3/8 murine tumors grafted in immunocompetent mice. By contrast, a high-affinity antibody to thrombospondin-2 revealed a much lower level of expression of this antigen in cancer specimens. Our analysis resolves ambiguities related to conflicting reports on thrombosponding expression in health and disease. Based on our findings, thrombospondin-1 (and not thrombospondin-2) may be considered as a target for antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies, in consideration of its low expression in normal tissues and its upregulation in cancer. - Highlights: • High affinity monoclonal antibodies to murine and human TSP1 and 2 were raised. • Both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues. • Strong positivity of human tumor xenografts for TSP1 was detected. • Study revealed much lower level of TSP2 expression in cancer specimens

  8. Monoclonal antibodies to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 reveal differential expression patterns in cancer and low antigen expression in normal tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bujak, Emil [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zürich), Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 2, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Pretto, Francesca; Ritz, Danilo; Gualandi, Laura; Wulhfard, Sarah [Philochem AG, Libernstrasse 3, CH-8112 Otelfingen (Switzerland); Neri, Dario, E-mail: neri@pharma.ethz.ch [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zürich), Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 2, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-09-10

    There is a considerable interest for the discovery and characterization of tumor-associated antigens, which may facilitate antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies. Thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 are homologous secreted proteins, which have previously been reported to be overexpressed during remodeling typical for wound healing and tumor progression and to possibly play a functional role in cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis. To our knowledge, a complete immunohistochemical characterization of thrombospondins levels in normal rodent tissues has not been reported so far. Using antibody phage technology, we have generated and characterized monoclonal antibodies specific to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2, two antigens which share 62% aminoacid identity. An immunofluorescence analysis revealed that both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues, except for a weak staining of heart tissue by antibodies specific to thrombospondin-1. The analysis also showed that thrombospondin-1 was strongly expressed in 5/7 human tumors xenografted in nude mice, while it was only barely detectable in 3/8 murine tumors grafted in immunocompetent mice. By contrast, a high-affinity antibody to thrombospondin-2 revealed a much lower level of expression of this antigen in cancer specimens. Our analysis resolves ambiguities related to conflicting reports on thrombosponding expression in health and disease. Based on our findings, thrombospondin-1 (and not thrombospondin-2) may be considered as a target for antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies, in consideration of its low expression in normal tissues and its upregulation in cancer. - Highlights: • High affinity monoclonal antibodies to murine and human TSP1 and 2 were raised. • Both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues. • Strong positivity of human tumor xenografts for TSP1 was detected. • Study revealed much lower level of TSP2 expression in cancer specimens

  9. Didactical Design Enrichment of Angle in Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiadi, D. R.; Suryadi, D.; Mulyana, E.

    2017-09-01

    The underlying problem of this research is the lack of student’s competencies in understanding the concept of angle in geometry as the results of the teaching and learning pattern that only to receive the topic rather than to construct the topic and has not paid attention to the learning trajectory. The purpose of this research is to develop the didactical design of angle in space learning activity. The used research method is a method of qualitative research in the form of a didactical design research through three phases of analysis i.e. didactical situation analysis, metapedadidactical analysis, and retrospective analysis, which conducted in students from 10th grade at one of private schools in Bandung. Based on the results of research and discussion, the didactical design that has been made, is capable to change student’s learning habit and quite capable to develop student’s competencies although not optimal.

  10. Modelling reveals endogenous osmotic adaptation of storage tissue water potential as an important driver determining different stem diameter variation patterns in the mangrove species Avicennia marina and Rhizophora stylosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandegehuchte, Maurits W; Guyot, Adrien; Hubeau, Michiel; De Swaef, Tom; Lockington, David A; Steppe, Kathy

    2014-09-01

    Stem diameter variations are mainly determined by the radial water transport between xylem and storage tissues. This radial transport results from the water potential difference between these tissues, which is influenced by both hydraulic and carbon related processes. Measurements have shown that when subjected to the same environmental conditions, the co-occurring mangrove species Avicennia marina and Rhizophora stylosa unexpectedly show a totally different pattern in daily stem diameter variation. Using in situ measurements of stem diameter variation, stem water potential and sap flow, a mechanistic flow and storage model based on the cohesion-tension theory was applied to assess the differences in osmotic storage water potential between Avicennia marina and Rhizophora stylosa. Both species, subjected to the same environmental conditions, showed a resembling daily pattern in simulated osmotic storage water potential. However, the osmotic storage water potential of R. stylosa started to decrease slightly after that of A. marina in the morning and increased again slightly later in the evening. This small shift in osmotic storage water potential likely underlaid the marked differences in daily stem diameter variation pattern between the two species. The results show that in addition to environmental dynamics, endogenous changes in the osmotic storage water potential must be taken into account in order to accurately predict stem diameter variations, and hence growth.

  11. Coordinate geometry method for capturing and evaluating crown preparation geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiu, Janine; Waddell, J Neil; Al-Amleh, Basil; Jansen van Vuuren, Wendy-Ann; Swain, Michael V

    2014-09-01

    A validated universal method requiring no human input is needed to capture and evaluate preparation geometries in a manner that can be used to see the correlation of different parameters. The purpose of this study was to present a method of capturing and evaluating crown preparation geometry. One manually machined acrylic resin block and 9 randomly selected preparations for ceramic complete crowns prepared by general dentists were selected and prepared. The specimens were scanned (3D scanner; Nobel Biocare), and buccolingual and mesiodistal cross section images were collected. The images were imported into digitizing software (Engauge Digitizer 4.1) to convert the outlines into x and y coordinates. Six points were chosen by using a set of algorithms, and the resulting parameters were calculated. The acrylic resin block was milled with a 12 degree total occlusal convergence (TOC) instrument producing a 12.83 degree TOC. For the other specimens, average TOC values ranged from 18 degrees to 52 degrees. The mean average margin width was 0.70 mm, and the mean average base dimension was 6.23 mm. The surface area/volume ratio, resistance length, and limiting taper were also calculated. The method described provides a basis for accurately evaluating preparation geometry without human input. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Reconstruction of Human Monte Carlo Geometry from Segmented Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kai; Cheng, Mengyun; Fan, Yanchang; Wang, Wen; Long, Pengcheng; Wu, Yican

    2014-06-01

    Human computational phantoms have been used extensively for scientific experimental analysis and experimental simulation. This article presented a method for human geometry reconstruction from a series of segmented images of a Chinese visible human dataset. The phantom geometry could actually describe detailed structure of an organ and could be converted into the input file of the Monte Carlo codes for dose calculation. A whole-body computational phantom of Chinese adult female has been established by FDS Team which is named Rad-HUMAN with about 28.8 billion voxel number. For being processed conveniently, different organs on images were segmented with different RGB colors and the voxels were assigned with positions of the dataset. For refinement, the positions were first sampled. Secondly, the large sums of voxels inside the organ were three-dimensional adjacent, however, there were not thoroughly mergence methods to reduce the cell amounts for the description of the organ. In this study, the voxels on the organ surface were taken into consideration of the mergence which could produce fewer cells for the organs. At the same time, an indexed based sorting algorithm was put forward for enhancing the mergence speed. Finally, the Rad-HUMAN which included a total of 46 organs and tissues was described by the cuboids into the Monte Carlo Monte Carlo Geometry for the simulation. The Monte Carlo geometry was constructed directly from the segmented images and the voxels was merged exhaustively. Each organ geometry model was constructed without ambiguity and self-crossing, its geometry information could represent the accuracy appearance and precise interior structure of the organs. The constructed geometry largely retaining the original shape of organs could easily be described into different Monte Carlo codes input file such as MCNP. Its universal property was testified and high-performance was experimentally verified

  13. Comprehensive regional and temporal gene expression profiling of the rat brain during the first 24 h after experimental stroke identifies dynamic ischemia-induced gene expression patterns, and reveals a biphasic activation of genes in surviving tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rickhag, Karl Mattias; Wieloch, Tadeusz; Gidö, Gunilla

    2006-01-01

    middle cerebral artery occlusion in the rat. K-means cluster analysis revealed two distinct biphasic gene expression patterns that contained 44 genes (including 18 immediate early genes), involved in cell signaling and plasticity (i.e. MAP2K7, Sprouty2, Irs-2, Homer1, GPRC5B, Grasp). The first gene...... induction phase occurred at 0-3 h of reperfusion, and the second at 9-15 h, and was validated by in situ hybridization. Four gene clusters displayed a progressive increase in expression over time and included 50 genes linked to cell motility, lipid synthesis and trafficking (i.e. ApoD, NPC1, G3P...... tissue, concomitant with a progressive and persistent activation of cell proliferation signifying tissue regeneration, which provide the means for cell survival and postischemic brain plasticity....

  14. Fractal geometry and computer graphics

    CERN Document Server

    Sakas, Georgios; Peitgen, Heinz-Otto; Englert, Gabriele

    1992-01-01

    Fractal geometry has become popular in the last 15 years, its applications can be found in technology, science, or even arts. Fractal methods and formalism are seen today as a general, abstract, but nevertheless practical instrument for the description of nature in a wide sense. But it was Computer Graphics which made possible the increasing popularity of fractals several years ago, and long after their mathematical formulation. The two disciplines are tightly linked. The book contains the scientificcontributions presented in an international workshop in the "Computer Graphics Center" in Darmstadt, Germany. The target of the workshop was to present the wide spectrum of interrelationships and interactions between Fractal Geometry and Computer Graphics. The topics vary from fundamentals and new theoretical results to various applications and systems development. All contributions are original, unpublished papers.The presentations have been discussed in two working groups; the discussion results, together with a...

  15. Groups and Geometries : Siena Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Kantor, William; Lunardon, Guglielmo; Pasini, Antonio; Tamburini, Maria

    1998-01-01

    On September 1-7, 1996 a conference on Groups and Geometries took place in lovely Siena, Italy. It brought together experts and interested mathematicians from numerous countries. The scientific program centered around invited exposi­ tory lectures; there also were shorter research announcements, including talks by younger researchers. The conference concerned a broad range of topics in group theory and geometry, with emphasis on recent results and open problems. Special attention was drawn to the interplay between group-theoretic methods and geometric and combinatorial ones. Expanded versions of many of the talks appear in these Proceedings. This volume is intended to provide a stimulating collection of themes for a broad range of algebraists and geometers. Among those themes, represented within the conference or these Proceedings, are aspects of the following: 1. the classification of finite simple groups, 2. the structure and properties of groups of Lie type over finite and algebraically closed fields of f...

  16. Code subspaces for LLM geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenstein, David; Miller, Alexandra

    2018-03-01

    We consider effective field theory around classical background geometries with a gauge theory dual, specifically those in the class of LLM geometries. These are dual to half-BPS states of N= 4 SYM. We find that the language of code subspaces is natural for discussing the set of nearby states, which are built by acting with effective fields on these backgrounds. This work extends our previous work by going beyond the strict infinite N limit. We further discuss how one can extract the topology of the state beyond N→∞ and find that, as before, uncertainty and entanglement entropy calculations provide a useful tool to do so. Finally, we discuss obstructions to writing down a globally defined metric operator. We find that the answer depends on the choice of reference state that one starts with. Therefore, within this setup, there is ambiguity in trying to write an operator that describes the metric globally.

  17. Differential geometry and mathematical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rudolph, Gerd

    Starting from an undergraduate level, this book systematically develops the basics of • Calculus on manifolds, vector bundles, vector fields and differential forms, • Lie groups and Lie group actions, • Linear symplectic algebra and symplectic geometry, • Hamiltonian systems, symmetries and reduction, integrable systems and Hamilton-Jacobi theory. The topics listed under the first item are relevant for virtually all areas of mathematical physics. The second and third items constitute the link between abstract calculus and the theory of Hamiltonian systems. The last item provides an introduction to various aspects of this theory, including Morse families, the Maslov class and caustics. The book guides the reader from elementary differential geometry to advanced topics in the theory of Hamiltonian systems with the aim of making current research literature accessible. The style is that of a mathematical textbook,with full proofs given in the text or as exercises. The material is illustrated by numerous d...

  18. Grassmannian geometry of scattering amplitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Cachazo, Freddy; Goncharov, Alexander; Postnikov, Alexander; Trnka, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    Outlining a revolutionary reformulation of the foundations of perturbative quantum field theory, this book is a self-contained and authoritative analysis of the application of this new formulation to the case of planar, maximally supersymmetric Yang–Mills theory. The book begins by deriving connections between scattering amplitudes and Grassmannian geometry from first principles before introducing novel physical and mathematical ideas in a systematic manner accessible to both physicists and mathematicians. The principle players in this process are on-shell functions which are closely related to certain sub-strata of Grassmannian manifolds called positroids - in terms of which the classification of on-shell functions and their relations becomes combinatorially manifest. This is an essential introduction to the geometry and combinatorics of the positroid stratification of the Grassmannian and an ideal text for advanced students and researchers working in the areas of field theory, high energy physics, and the...

  19. Foliation theory in algebraic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    McKernan, James; Pereira, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Featuring a blend of original research papers and comprehensive surveys from an international team of leading researchers in the thriving fields of foliation theory, holomorphic foliations, and birational geometry, this book presents the proceedings of the conference "Foliation Theory in Algebraic Geometry," hosted by the Simons Foundation in New York City in September 2013.  Topics covered include: Fano and del Pezzo foliations; the cone theorem and rank one foliations; the structure of symmetric differentials on a smooth complex surface and a local structure theorem for closed symmetric differentials of rank two; an overview of lifting symmetric differentials from varieties with canonical singularities and the applications to the classification of AT bundles on singular varieties; an overview of the powerful theory of the variety of minimal rational tangents introduced by Hwang and Mok; recent examples of varieties which are hyperbolic and yet the Green-Griffiths locus is the whole of X; and a classificati...

  20. Hyperbolic geometry for colour metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farup, Ivar

    2014-05-19

    It is well established from both colour difference and colour order perpectives that the colour space cannot be Euclidean. In spite of this, most colour spaces still in use today are Euclidean, and the best Euclidean colour metrics are performing comparably to state-of-the-art non-Euclidean metrics. In this paper, it is shown that a transformation from Euclidean to hyperbolic geometry (i.e., constant negative curvature) for the chromatic plane can significantly improve the performance of Euclidean colour metrics to the point where they are statistically significantly better than state-of-the-art non-Euclidean metrics on standard data sets. The resulting hyperbolic geometry nicely models both qualitatively and quantitatively the hue super-importance phenomenon observed in colour order systems.

  1. Euclidean distance geometry an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Liberti, Leo

    2017-01-01

    This textbook, the first of its kind, presents the fundamentals of distance geometry:  theory, useful methodologies for obtaining solutions, and real world applications. Concise proofs are given and step-by-step algorithms for solving fundamental problems efficiently and precisely are presented in Mathematica®, enabling the reader to experiment with concepts and methods as they are introduced. Descriptive graphics, examples, and problems, accompany the real gems of the text, namely the applications in visualization of graphs, localization of sensor networks, protein conformation from distance data, clock synchronization protocols, robotics, and control of unmanned underwater vehicles, to name several.  Aimed at intermediate undergraduates, beginning graduate students, researchers, and practitioners, the reader with a basic knowledge of linear algebra will gain an understanding of the basic theories of distance geometry and why they work in real life.

  2. Congener-specific levels and patterns of polychlorinated biphenyls in edible fish tissue from the central Red Sea coast of Saudi Arabia

    KAUST Repository

    Batang, Zenon B.

    2016-08-01

    All 209 congeners of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in edible fish tissue from the central Red Sea coast (Jeddah region) of Saudi Arabia were analyzed by isotope dilution high-resolution gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. The upper-bound total PCB (ΣPCB) levels in nine commonly consumed fish species from three areas were 0.2–82.5 ng/g wet weight (17–8450 ng/g lipid weight), which were at the lower end of reported global range and far below international tolerance limits (500–3000 ng/g ww). Dioxin-like congeners contributed up to 12.8% (mean 6.5%) to ΣPCB in tissue samples, with the total PCB toxic equivalencies (TEQs) at a tolerable range (0.05–2.6 pg TEQ/g ww or 2–238 pg TEQ/g lw) for all species. PCB profiles were dominated by moderately chlorinated homologs, mainly hexachlorobiphenyls, but less chlorinated congeners were also consistently elevated, notably in Siganus rivulatus (Area III) and Mugil cephalus (Area I). It remains to be ascertained if the latter were breakdown products or due to fresh inputs. The top congeners based on dominance by both occurrence and abundance were identified as potential markers of ΣPCB in fish tissue, which can be used for future selective biomonitoring in case of reasonable constraints on full congener approach.

  3. Holographic thermalization in noncommutative geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Xiong Zeng

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Gravitational collapse of a shell of dust in noncommutative geometry is probed by the renormalized geodesic length, which is dual to probe the thermalization by the two-point correlation function in the dual conformal field theory. We find that the larger the noncommutative parameter is, the longer the thermalization time is, which implies that the large noncommutative parameter delays the thermalization process. We also investigate how the noncommutative parameter affects the thermalization velocity and thermalization acceleration.

  4. Needle decompositions in Riemannian geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Klartag, Bo'az

    2017-01-01

    The localization technique from convex geometry is generalized to the setting of Riemannian manifolds whose Ricci curvature is bounded from below. In a nutshell, the author's method is based on the following observation: When the Ricci curvature is non-negative, log-concave measures are obtained when conditioning the Riemannian volume measure with respect to a geodesic foliation that is orthogonal to the level sets of a Lipschitz function. The Monge mass transfer problem plays an important role in the author's analysis.

  5. Systematics of IIB spinorial geometry

    OpenAIRE

    Gran, U.; Gutowski, J.; Papadopoulos, G.; Roest, D.

    2005-01-01

    We reduce the classification of all supersymmetric backgrounds of IIB supergravity to the evaluation of the Killing spinor equations and their integrability conditions, which contain the field equations, on five types of spinors. This extends the work of [hep-th/0503046] to IIB supergravity. We give the expressions of the Killing spinor equations on all five types of spinors. In this way, the Killing spinor equations become a linear system for the fluxes, geometry and spacetime derivatives of...

  6. Needle decompositions in riemannian geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Klartag, Bo'az

    2017-01-01

    The localization technique from convex geometry is generalized to the setting of Riemannian manifolds whose Ricci curvature is bounded from below. In a nutshell, the author's method is based on the following observation: When the Ricci curvature is non-negative, log-concave measures are obtained when conditioning the Riemannian volume measure with respect to a geodesic foliation that is orthogonal to the level sets of a Lipschitz function. The Monge mass transfer problem plays an important role in the author's analysis.

  7. Turtle geometry the Python way

    OpenAIRE

    Battle, S.

    2014-01-01

    An introduction to coding using Python’s on-screen ‘turtle’ that can be commanded with a few simple instructions including forward, backward, left and right. The turtle leaves a trace that can be used to draw geometric figures. This workshop is aimed at beginners of all ages. The aim is to learn a smattering of programming and a little bit of geometry in a fun way.

  8. Topics in modern differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Verstraelen, Leopold

    2017-01-01

    A variety of introductory articles is provided on a wide range of topics, including variational problems on curves and surfaces with anisotropic curvature. Experts in the fields of Riemannian, Lorentzian and contact geometry present state-of-the-art reviews of their topics. The contributions are written on a graduate level and contain extended bibliographies. The ten chapters are the result of various doctoral courses which were held in 2009 and 2010 at universities in Leuven, Serbia, Romania and Spain.

  9. KAMPUNG SENI ISLAM DI MAKASSAR DENGAN PENDEKATAN ARSITEKTUR ISLAM GEOMETRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaumil Maghfirah Asaf

    2015-06-01

    work produced. So it can be recognized by both local and international. The approach used in the building of Islamic Art Village is Islamic architecture geometry. Geometry is a branch of mathematics that studies of point, line, plane and space objects along with their properties, the measurements, and the relationship between each other. Islamic architectural design more use patterns in the form of lines, circles and other geometric patterns arranged to form a unity which implies spiritual and aesthetic value or beauty of a high level. Islamic art looks association complex geometry, between forms, ornaments, and façade Key Word: Village Islamic Art, Islamic architecture geometry

  10. Pattern of tissue deposition, gain and body composition of Nellore, F1 Simmental × Nellore and F1 Angus × Nellore steers fed at maintenance or ad libitum with two levels of concentrate in the diet

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Ivanna Moraes de; Paulino, Pedro Veiga Rodrigues; Marcondes, Marcos Inácio; Valadares Filho, Sebastião de Campos; Detmann, Edenio; Cavali, Jucilene; Duarte, Marcio de Souza; Mezzomo, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Sixty 18-month-old steers (20 Nellore, 20 F1 Simmental × Nellore and 20 F1 Angus × Nellore with average body weight of 265.6±6.4 kg; 325.3±4.7 kg and 324.6±6.0 kg, respectively) were used. The effects of feeding regime and genetic group on physical carcass composition, empty body composition, composition of the gain, as well as the pattern of tissue deposition were evaluated in this trial. The interaction between genetic group and feeding regime was not significant for any variable evaluated....

  11. Geometry success in 20 minutes a day

    CERN Document Server

    LLC, LearningExpress

    2014-01-01

    Whether you're new to geometry or just looking for a refresher, Geometry Success in 20 Minutes a Day offers a 20-step lesson plan that provides quick and thorough instruction in practical, critical skills. Stripped of unnecessary math jargon but bursting with geometry essentials, Geometry Success in 20 Minutes a Day: Covers all vital geometry skills, from the basic building blocks of geometry to ratio, proportion, and similarity to trigonometry and beyond Provides hundreds of practice exercises in test format Applies geometr

  12. Algebraic Geometry and Number Theory Summer School

    CERN Document Server

    Sarıoğlu, Celal; Soulé, Christophe; Zeytin, Ayberk

    2017-01-01

    This lecture notes volume presents significant contributions from the “Algebraic Geometry and Number Theory” Summer School, held at Galatasaray University, Istanbul, June 2-13, 2014. It addresses subjects ranging from Arakelov geometry and Iwasawa theory to classical projective geometry, birational geometry and equivariant cohomology. Its main aim is to introduce these contemporary research topics to graduate students who plan to specialize in the area of algebraic geometry and/or number theory. All contributions combine main concepts and techniques with motivating examples and illustrative problems for the covered subjects. Naturally, the book will also be of interest to researchers working in algebraic geometry, number theory and related fields.

  13. Number theory III Diophantine geometry

    CERN Document Server

    1991-01-01

    From the reviews of the first printing of this book, published as Volume 60 of the Encyclopaedia of Mathematical Sciences: "Between number theory and geometry there have been several stimulating influences, and this book records of these enterprises. This author, who has been at the centre of such research for many years, is one of the best guides a reader can hope for. The book is full of beautiful results, open questions, stimulating conjectures and suggestions where to look for future developments. This volume bears witness of the broad scope of knowledge of the author, and the influence of several people who have commented on the manuscript before publication ... Although in the series of number theory, this volume is on diophantine geometry, and the reader will notice that algebraic geometry is present in every chapter. ... The style of the book is clear. Ideas are well explained, and the author helps the reader to pass by several technicalities. Reading and rereading this book I noticed that the topics ...

  14. Introduction to geometry and relativity

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a lucid introduction to both modern differential geometry and relativity for advanced undergraduates and first-year graduate students of applied mathematics and physical sciences. This book meets an overwhelming need for a book on modern differential geometry and relativity that is student-friendly, and which is also suitable for self-study. The book presumes a minimal level of mathematical maturity so that any student who has completed the standard Calculus sequence should be able to read and understand the book. The key features of the book are: Detailed solutions are provided to the Exercises in each chapter; Many of the missing steps that are often omitted from standard mathematical derivations have been provided to make the book easier to read and understand; A detailed introduction to Electrodynamics is provided so that the book is accessible to students who have not had a formal course in this area; In its treatment of modern differential geometry, the book employs both a modern, c...

  15. Aspects of differential geometry II

    CERN Document Server

    Gilkey, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Differential Geometry is a wide field. We have chosen to concentrate upon certain aspects that are appropriate for an introduction to the subject; we have not attempted an encyclopedic treatment. Book II deals with more advanced material than Book I and is aimed at the graduate level. Chapter 4 deals with additional topics in Riemannian geometry. Properties of real analytic curves given by a single ODE and of surfaces given by a pair of ODEs are studied, and the volume of geodesic balls is treated. An introduction to both holomorphic and Kähler geometry is given. In Chapter 5, the basic properties of de Rham cohomology are discussed, the Hodge Decomposition Theorem, Poincaré duality, and the Künneth formula are proved, and a brief introduction to the theory of characteristic classes is given. In Chapter 6, Lie groups and Lie algebras are dealt with. The exponential map, the classical groups, and geodesics in the context of a bi-invariant metric are discussed. The de Rham cohomology of compact Lie groups an...

  16. Riemannian geometry and geometric analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Jost, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    This established reference work continues to provide its readers with a gateway to some of the most interesting developments in contemporary geometry. It offers insight into a wide range of topics, including fundamental concepts of Riemannian geometry, such as geodesics, connections and curvature; the basic models and tools of geometric analysis, such as harmonic functions, forms, mappings, eigenvalues, the Dirac operator and the heat flow method; as well as the most important variational principles of theoretical physics, such as Yang-Mills, Ginzburg-Landau or the nonlinear sigma model of quantum field theory. The present volume connects all these topics in a systematic geometric framework. At the same time, it equips the reader with the working tools of the field and enables her or him to delve into geometric research.  The 7th edition has been systematically reorganized and updated. Almost no page has been left unchanged. It also includes new material, for instance on symplectic geometry, as well as the B...

  17. Computational geometry for reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, F.B.; Bischoff, F.G.

    1988-01-01

    Monte Carlo codes for simulating particle transport involve three basic computational sections: a geometry package for locating particles and computing distances to regional boundaries, a physics package for analyzing interactions between particles and problem materials, and an editing package for determining event statistics and overall results. This paper describes the computational geometry methods in RACER, a vectorized Monte Carlo code used for reactor physics analysis, so that comparisons may be made with techniques used in other codes. The principal applications for RACER are eigenvalue calculations and power distributions associated with reactor core physics analysis. Successive batches of neutrons are run until convergence and acceptable confidence intervals are obtained, with typical problems involving >10 6 histories. As such, the development of computational geometry methods has emphasized two basic needs: a flexible but compact geometric representation that permits accurate modeling of reactor core details and efficient geometric computation to permit very large numbers of histories to be run. The current geometric capabilities meet these needs effectively, supporting a variety of very large and demanding applications

  18. Influence of vascular endothelial growth factor stimulation and serum deprivation on gene activation patterns of human adipose tissue-derived stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tratwal, Josefine; Mathiasen, Anders Bruun; Juhl, Morten

    2015-01-01

    stimulation is usually performed under serum deprivation. Potential regenerative molecular mechanisms are numerous and the role of contributing factors is uncertain. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of in vitro serum deprivation and VEGF stimulation on gene expression patterns......: Compared to ASCs in complete medium, 190 and 108 genes were significantly altered by serum deprivation and serum deprivation combined with VEGF, respectively. No significant differences in gene expression patterns between serum-deprived ASCs and serum-deprived ASCs combined with VEGF stimulation were found......, matricellular proteins and matrix metalloproteinases in concert, diverge from direct pro-angiogenic paracrine mechanisms as a primary consequence of the used protocol. In vitro serum starvation (with or without VEGF present) appears to favour cardioprotection, extracellular matrix remodelling and blood vessel...

  19. [Echocardiographic study of left ventricular geometry in spontaneously hypertensive rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, Eduardo M; Pinilla, Oscar A; Carranza, Verónica B

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze by echocardiogram left ventricular (LV) geometry in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Echocardiographic study, systolic blood pressure and heart rate were obtained in 114 male, 4-month old rats, 73 SHR and 41 Wistar (W). Left ventricular mass index (LVMI), relative wall thickness (RWT), stroke volume, and mid ventricular shortening were calculated with echocardiographic parameters. Normal LV was defined considering the mean plus 2 SD of LVMI and RWT in W. Patterns of abnormal LV geometry were: LV concentric remodeling, LVMI 0.71; eccentric, left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), LVMI > 2.06 mg/g - RWT 2.06 mg/g - RWT > 0.71. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) and cardiac output (CO) were used to obtain total peripheral resistance (TPR). twelve % of SHR had normal LV geometry; 18% LV concentric remodeling; 33% concentric LVH and 37% eccentric LVH. LV concentric remodeling showed the smallest CO and highest TPR of any group. Eccentric LVH presented similar SBP as the other SHR groups and high CO with lower TPR. Our findings in SHR exhibit different patterns of LV geometry like in humans. These results strengthen the similarities between SHR and human essential hypertension.

  20. Unique gene expression and MR T2 relaxometry patterns define chronic murine dextran sodium sulphate colitis as a model for connective tissue changes in human Crohn's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Breynaert

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Chronically relapsing inflammation, tissue remodeling and fibrosis are hallmarks of inflammatory bowel diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in connective tissue in a chronic murine model resulting from repeated cycles of dextran sodium sulphate (DSS ingestion, to mimic the relapsing nature of the human disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS: C57BL/6 mice were exposed to DSS in drinking water for 1 week, followed by a recovery phase of 2 weeks. This cycle of exposure was repeated for up to 3 times (9 weeks in total. Colonic inflammation, fibrosis, extracellular matrix proteins and colonic gene expression were studied. In vivo MRI T 2 relaxometry was studied as a potential non-invasive imaging tool to evaluate bowel wall inflammation and fibrosis. RESULTS: Repeated cycles of DSS resulted in a relapsing and remitting disease course, which induced a chronic segmental, transmural colitis after 2 and 3 cycles of DSS with clear induction of fibrosis and remodeling of the muscular layer. Tenascin expression mirrored its expression in Crohn's colitis. Microarray data identified a gene expression profile different in chronic colitis from that in acute colitis. Additional recovery was associated with upregulation of unique genes, in particular keratins, pointing to activation of molecular pathways for healing and repair. In vivo MRI T2 relaxometry of the colon showed a clear shift towards higher T2 values in the acute stage and a gradual regression of T2 values with increasing cycles of DSS. CONCLUSIONS: Repeated cycles of DSS exposure induce fibrosis and connective tissue changes with typical features, as occurring in Crohn's disease. Colonic gene expression analysis revealed unique expression profiles in chronic colitis compared to acute colitis and after additional recovery, pointing to potential new targets to intervene with the induction of fibrosis. In vivo T2 relaxometry is a promising non-invasive assessment of

  1. Control of lysosomal biogenesis and Notch-dependent tissue patterning by components of the TFEB-V-ATPase axis in Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tognon, Emiliana; Kobia, Francis; Busi, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    , we show that Mitf, the single TFEB and MITF ortholog in Drosophila, controls expression of vacuolar-type H+-ATPase pump (V-ATPase) subunits. Remarkably, we also find that expression of Vha16-1 and Vha13, encoding 2 key components of V-ATPase, is patterned in the wing imaginal disc. In particular, Vha....... Our data suggest that lysosomal-associated functions regulated by the TFEB-V-ATPase axis might play a conserved role in shaping cell fate....

  2. The expression pattern of long non-coding RNA PVT1 in tumor tissues and in extracellular vesicles of colorectal cancer correlates with cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kai; Yao, Jie; Yu, Qiang; Li, Zijian; Huang, Hu; Cheng, Jianguo; Wang, Zhigang; Zhu, Yunfeng

    2017-04-01

    The plasmacytoma variant translocation 1 gene (PVT1) is a large non-coding locus at adjacent of c-Myc, and long non-coding RNA PVT1 is now recognized as a cancerous gene co-amplified with c-Myc in various cancers. But the expression and functional role of PVT1 in colorectal cancer are still unelucidated. In addition, all the reported long non-coding RNAs so far are discovered in either cells or tissues, but no research about long non-coding RNAs detection in extracellular vesicles has been reported yet. In the present study, we firstly investigated the expression of PVT1 in colorectal cancer specimens and its correlation with the expression of c-Myc and other related genes by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Then, we isolated the extracellular vesicles from colorectal cancer cells culturing medium by differential centrifugation and detected the PVT1 expression in extracellular vesicles by using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The PVT1 targeting siRNA was transfected into SW480 and SW620 cells, and 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium assay and flow cytometry were used to evaluate the cell proliferation and apoptosis. The results showed that the PVT1 expression in tumor tissues was higher than that in normal tissues, which was significantly correlated with the expression of c-Myc and three c-Myc regulating genes FUBP1, EZH2, and NPM1 and also correlated with the expression of two other PVT1-associated transcript factors nuclear factor-κB and myocyte-specific enhancer factor 2A. Here, we reported for the first time that PVT1 as a long non-coding RNA was successfully detected in extracellular vesicles excluded from SW620 and SW480 cells, and the expression level of PVT1 was higher in extracellular vesicles from the more aggressive cell SW620 than from SW480. The results also showed that by down-regulating the PVT1 expression, the c-Myc expression was suppressed, the cell proliferation was inhibited, and

  3. Femoral articular geometry and patellofemoral stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranpour, Farhad; Merican, Azhar M; Teo, Seow Hui; Cobb, Justin P; Amis, Andrew A

    2017-06-01

    Patellofemoral instability is a major cause of anterior knee pain. The aim of this study was to examine how the medial and lateral stability of the patellofemoral joint in the normal knee changes with knee flexion and measure its relationship to differences in femoral trochlear geometry. Twelve fresh-frozen cadaveric knees were used. Five components of the quadriceps and the iliotibial band were loaded physiologically with 175N and 30N, respectively. The force required to displace the patella 10mm laterally and medially at 0°, 20°, 30°, 60° and 90° knee flexion was measured. Patellofemoral contact points at these knee flexion angles were marked. The trochlea cartilage geometry at these flexion angles was visualized by Computed Tomography imaging of the femora in air with no overlying tissue. The sulcus, medial and lateral facet angles were measured. The facet angles were measured relative to the posterior condylar datum. The lateral facet slope decreased progressively with flexion from 23°±3° (mean±S.D.) at 0° to 17±5° at 90°. While the medial facet angle increased progressively from 8°±8° to 36°±9° between 0° and 90°. Patellar lateral stability varied from 96±22N at 0°, to 77±23N at 20°, then to 101±27N at 90° knee flexion. Medial stability varied from 74±20N at 0° to 170±21N at 90°. There were significant correlations between the sulcus angle and the medial facet angle with medial stability (r=0.78, pgeometry with knee flexion to patellofemoral stability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Geometry in the Early Years: A Commentary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dindyal, Jaguthsing

    2015-01-01

    The primary goal of this paper is to provide a commentary on the teaching and learning of geometry in the early years of schooling with the set of papers in this issue as a guiding factor. It is structured around issues about geometry education of young learners, such as: what should we teach in geometry and why; representation of geometrical…

  5. Blow-Ups in Generalized Complex Geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Leer Duran, J.L.

    2016-01-01

    Generalized complex geometry is a theory that unifies complex geometry and symplectic geometry into one single framework. It was introduced by Hitchin and Gualtieri around 2002. In this thesis we address the following question: given a generalized complex manifold together with a submanifold, does

  6. Global affine differential geometry of hypersurfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Li, An-Min; Zhao, Guosong; Hu, Zejun

    2015-01-01

    This book draws a colorful and widespread picture of global affine hypersurface theory up to the most recent state. Moreover, the recent development revealed that affine differential geometry- as differential geometry in general- has an exciting intersection area with other fields of interest, like partial differential equations, global analysis, convex geometry and Riemann surfaces.

  7. Students' Misconceptions and Errors in Transformation Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ada, Tuba; Kurtulus, Aytac

    2010-01-01

    This study analyses the students' performances in two-dimensional transformation geometry and explores the mistakes made by the students taking the analytic geometry course given by researchers. An examination was given to students of Education Faculties who have taken the analytic geometry course at Eskisehir Osmangazi University in Turkey. The…

  8. "WGL," a Web Laboratory for Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaresma, Pedro; Santos, Vanda; Maric, Milena

    2018-01-01

    The role of information and communication technologies (ICT) in education is nowadays well recognised. The "Web Geometry Laboratory," is an e-learning, collaborative and adaptive, Web environment for geometry, integrating a well known dynamic geometry system. In a collaborative session, teachers and students, engaged in solving…

  9. Patterns of left ventricular geometry and the transition to congestive heart failure with preserved versus depressed ejection fraction (Patrones de geometría ventricular izquierda y la transición a la insuficiencia cardíaca congestiva con fracción de eyección conservada versus deprimida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José H. Donis Hernández

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract (english Analysis of cross-sectional and follow up clinical studies, of hypertensive patients with the different left ventricular geometric patterns, provide plausible explanations for the transition from hypertensive heart disease to the two distinct phenotypes of systolic and diastolic congestive heart failure. According to the LIFE study treated-uncomplicated patients, with normal ventricular geometry (12%, concentric remodeling (11 % and concentric hypertrophy (34 %, may evolve to the eccentric hypertrophy pattern. Patients with the eccentric hypertrophy pattern have selective sympathetic activation and progressive enlargement of the left ventricular cavity with thinning of its walls. This pattern goes on to a stage of systolic dysfunction with diminished ejection fraction and enhanced degradation of the collagen matrix. On the other hand, patients with the concentric hypertrophy pattern have predominant activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and progressive shrinking of the left ventricular cavity with thickening of its walls. This pattern usually precedes the stage of diastolic heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, impairment of relaxation and increased deposition of collagen in the myocardial interstitium. Thus, ventricular remodeling preceding diastolic heart failure is opposite to that of hypertensive patients who go on to develop systolic heart failure. Resumen (español El análisis de los estudios transversales y longitudinales, de pacientes hipertensos con diferentes patrones de geometría ventricular izquierda, permite postular posibles mecanismos fisiopatológicos para explicar la transición de la cardiopatía hipertensiva hacia los dos fenotipos conocidos de insuficiencia cardiaca. De acuerdo con el estudio LIFE, los pacientes hipertensos no complicados, con patrones de geometría ventricular normal (12 %, remodelado concéntrico (11 % e hipertrofia concéntrica (34 %, pueden evolucionar hacia

  10. Classical An-W-geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gervais, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    By analyzing the extrinsic geometry of two dimensional surfaces chirally embedded in C P n (the C P n W-surface), we give exact treatments in various aspects of the classical W-geometry in the conformal gauge: First, the basis of tangent and normal vectors are defined at regular points of the surface, such that their infinitesimal displacements are given by connections which coincide with the vector potentials of the (conformal) A n -Toda Lax pair. Since the latter is known to be intrinsically related with the W symmetries, this gives the geometrical meaning of the A n W-Algebra. Second, W-surfaces are put in one-to-one correspondence with solutions of the conformally-reduced WZNW model, which is such that the Toda fields give the Cartan part in the Gauss decomposition of its solutions. Third, the additional variables of the Toda hierarchy are used as coordinates of C P n . This allows us to show that W-transformations may be extended as particular diffeomorphisms of this target-space. Higher-dimensional generalizations of the WZNW equations are derived and related with the Zakharov-Shabat equations of the Toda hierarchy. Fourth, singular points are studied from a global viewpoint, using our earlier observation that W-surfaces may be regarded as instantons. The global indices of the W-geometry, which are written in terms of the Toda fields, are shown to be the instanton numbers for associated mappings of W-surfaces into the Grassmannians. The relation with the singularities of W-surface is derived by combining the Toda equations with the Gauss-Bonnet theorem. (orig.)

  11. Stochastic geometry for image analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Descombes, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    This book develops the stochastic geometry framework for image analysis purpose. Two main frameworks are  described: marked point process and random closed sets models. We derive the main issues for defining an appropriate model. The algorithms for sampling and optimizing the models as well as for estimating parameters are reviewed.  Numerous applications, covering remote sensing images, biological and medical imaging, are detailed.  This book provides all the necessary tools for developing an image analysis application based on modern stochastic modeling.

  12. Geometry of physical dispersion relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raetzel, Dennis; Rivera, Sergio; Schuller, Frederic P.

    2011-01-01

    To serve as a dispersion relation, a cotangent bundle function must satisfy three simple algebraic properties. These conditions are derived from the inescapable physical requirements that local matter field dynamics must be predictive and allow for an observer-independent notion of positive energy. Possible modifications of the standard relativistic dispersion relation are thereby severely restricted. For instance, the dispersion relations associated with popular deformations of Maxwell theory by Gambini-Pullin or Myers-Pospelov are not admissible. Dispersion relations passing the simple algebraic checks derived here correspond to physically admissible Finslerian refinements of Lorentzian geometry.

  13. COMPUTATIONAL GEOMETRY: THE CONVEXHULL PROBLEM

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiz Lizama, Edgar; Raffo Lecca, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work is to show fundamental concepts of computational geometry and one solution for the convex hull problem, using the Graham algorithm. The authors use the Java language programming in order to implement the solution. El artículo tiene por objetivo presentar los conceptos fundamentales de la geometría computacional y mostrar una solución al problema del cerco convexo, utilizando el algoritmo de Graham. Para la implementación de la solución, los autores usan el lengua...

  14. Moduli spaces in algebraic geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goettsche, L.

    2000-01-01

    This volume of the new series of lecture notes of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics contains the lecture notes of the School on Algebraic Geometry which took place at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics from 26 July to 13 August 1999. The school consisted of 2 weeks of lecture courses and one week of conference. The topic of the school was moduli spaces. More specifically the lectures were divided into three subtopics: principal bundles on Riemann surfaces, moduli spaces of vector bundles and sheaves on projective varieties, and moduli spaces of curves

  15. Porous media geometry and transports

    CERN Document Server

    Adler, Pierre

    1992-01-01

    The goal of ""Porous Media: Geometry and Transports"" is to provide the basis of a rational and modern approach to porous media. This book emphasizes several geometrical structures (spatially periodic, fractal, and random to reconstructed) and the three major single-phase transports (diffusion, convection, and Taylor dispersion).""Porous Media"" serves various purposes. For students it introduces basic information on structure and transports. Engineers will find this book useful as a readily accessible assemblage of al the major experimental results pertaining to single-phase tr

  16. Projective differential geometry of submanifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Akivis, M A

    1993-01-01

    In this book, the general theory of submanifolds in a multidimensional projective space is constructed. The topics dealt with include osculating spaces and fundamental forms of different orders, asymptotic and conjugate lines, submanifolds on the Grassmannians, different aspects of the normalization problems for submanifolds (with special emphasis given to a connection in the normal bundle) and the problem of algebraizability for different kinds of submanifolds, the geometry of hypersurfaces and hyperbands, etc. A series of special types of submanifolds with special projective structures are s

  17. Tsallis Entropy for Geometry Simplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Chover

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study and a comparison of the use of different information-theoretic measures for polygonal mesh simplification. Generalized measures from Information Theory such as Havrda–Charvát–Tsallis entropy and mutual information have been applied. These measures have been used in the error metric of a surfaces implification algorithm. We demonstrate that these measures are useful for simplifying three-dimensional polygonal meshes. We have also compared these metrics with the error metrics used in a geometry-based method and in an image-driven method. Quantitative results are presented in the comparison using the root-mean-square error (RMSE.

  18. Number Theory, Analysis and Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Goldfeld, Dorian; Jones, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Serge Lang was an iconic figure in mathematics, both for his own important work and for the indelible impact he left on the field of mathematics, on his students, and on his colleagues. Over the course of his career, Lang traversed a tremendous amount of mathematical ground. As he moved from subject to subject, he found analogies that led to important questions in such areas as number theory, arithmetic geometry, and the theory of negatively curved spaces. Lang's conjectures will keep many mathematicians occupied far into the future. In the spirit of Lang's vast contribution to mathematics, th

  19. Symplectic geometry of constrained optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrachev, Andrey A.; Beschastnyi, Ivan Yu.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we discuss geometric structures related to the Lagrange multipliers rule. The practical goal is to explain how to compute or estimate the Morse index of the second variation. Symplectic geometry allows one to effectively do it even for very degenerate problems with complicated constraints. The main geometric and analytic tool is an appropriately rearranged Maslov index. We try to emphasize the geometric framework and omit analytic routine. Proofs are often replaced with informal explanations, but a well-trained mathematician will easily rewrite them in a conventional way. We believe that Vladimir Arnold would approve of such an attitude.

  20. Projective geometry and projective metrics

    CERN Document Server

    Busemann, Herbert

    2005-01-01

    The basic results and methods of projective and non-Euclidean geometry are indispensable for the geometer, and this book--different in content, methods, and point of view from traditional texts--attempts to emphasize that fact. Results of special theorems are discussed in detail only when they are needed to develop a feeling for the subject or when they illustrate a general method. On the other hand, an unusual amount of space is devoted to the discussion of the fundamental concepts of distance, motion, area, and perpendicularity.Topics include the projective plane, polarities and conic sectio

  1. Clustering in Hilbert simplex geometry

    KAUST Repository

    Nielsen, Frank

    2017-04-03

    Clustering categorical distributions in the probability simplex is a fundamental primitive often met in applications dealing with histograms or mixtures of multinomials. Traditionally, the differential-geometric structure of the probability simplex has been used either by (i) setting the Riemannian metric tensor to the Fisher information matrix of the categorical distributions, or (ii) defining the information-geometric structure induced by a smooth dissimilarity measure, called a divergence. In this paper, we introduce a novel computationally-friendly non-Riemannian framework for modeling the probability simplex: Hilbert simplex geometry. We discuss the pros and cons of those three statistical modelings, and compare them experimentally for clustering tasks.

  2. Measurement of extrapolation curves for the secondary pattern of beta radiation Nr. 86 calibrated in rapidity of absorbed dose for tissue equivalent by the Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez R, J.T.

    1988-10-01

    The following report has as objective to present the obtained results of measuring - with a camera of extrapolation of variable electrodes (CE) - the dose speed absorbed in equivalent fabric given by the group of sources of the secondary pattern of radiation Beta Nr. 86, (PSB), and to compare this results with those presented by the calibration certificates that accompany the PSB extended by the primary laboratory Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt, (PTB), of the R.F.A. as well as the uncertainties associated to the measure process. (Author)

  3. Patterns of Local Recurrence and Dose Fractionation of Adjuvant Radiation Therapy in 462 Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcoma of Extremity and Trunk Wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jebsen, Nina L., E-mail: nina.louise.jebsen@helse-bergen.no [Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Engellau, Jacob [Department of Oncology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund (Sweden); Engström, Katarina [Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Bauer, Henrik C. [Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Section for Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Monge, Odd R. [Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Muren, Ludvig P. [Department of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Department of Medical Physics, Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Eide, Geir E. [Centre for Clinical Research, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Trovik, Clement S. [Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Bruland, Øyvind S. [Department of Oncology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To study the impact of dose fractionation of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) on local recurrence (LR) and the relation of LR to radiation fields. Methods and Materials: LR rates were analyzed in 462 adult patients with soft tissue sarcoma who underwent surgical excision and adjuvant RT at five Scandinavian sarcoma centers from 1998 to 2009. Medical records were reviewed for dose fractionation parameters and to determine the location of the LR relative to the radiation portals. Results: Fifty-five of 462 patients developed a LR (11.9%). Negative prognostic factors included intralesional surgical margin (hazard ratio [HR]: 7.83, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.08-20.0), high malignancy grade (HR: 5.82, 95% CI: 1.31-25.8), age at diagnosis (HR per 10 years: 1.27, 95% CI: 1.03-1.56), and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor histological subtype (HR: 6.66, 95% CI: 2.56-17.3). RT dose was tailored to margin status. No correlation between RT dose and LR rate was found in multiple Cox regression analysis. The majority (65%) of LRs occurred within the primary RT volume. Conclusions: No significant dose–response effect of adjuvant RT was demonstrated. Interestingly, patients given 45-Gy accelerated RT (1.8 Gy twice daily/2.5 weeks) had the best local outcome. A total dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions seemed adequate following wide margin surgery. The risk of LR was associated with histopathologic subtype, which should be included in the treatment algorithm of adjuvant RT in soft tissue sarcoma.

  4. Degradation pattern of porous CaCO3 and hydroxyapatite microspheres in vitro and in vivo for potential application in bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Qiwei; Li, Wenhua; Su, Xiuping; Li, Geng; Zhou, Ying; Kundu, Subhas C; Yao, Juming; Cai, Yurong

    2016-07-01

    Despite superior clinical handling, excellent biocompatibility, biodegradation property of calcium phosphate needs to be improved to coincide with the rate of new bone formation. In this study, spherical CaCO3 are fabricated in the presence of the silk sericin and then transformed into porous hydroxyapatite (HAP) microspheres via hydrothermal method. The degradation behavior of obtained CaCO3, HAP and their mixture is first investigated in vitro. The result demonstrates that the weight loss of HAP microspheres are almost 24.3% after immersing in pH 7.40 Tris-HCl buffer solution for 12 weeks, which is far slower than that of spherical CaCO3 (97.5%). The degradation speed of the mixtures depends on the proportion of CaCO3 and HAP. The mixture with higher content of CaCO3 possesses a quicker degradation speed. The obtained CaCO3 and HAP microspheres are injected into subcutaneous tissue of ICR mice with the assistance of sodium alginate. The result in vivo also shows an obvious difference of degradation speed between the obtained CaCO3 and HAP microspheres, implying it is feasible to modulate the degradation property of the mixture through changing the proportion of CaCO3 and HAP The good cytocompatibility of the two kinds of microspheres is proved and a mild inflammation response is observed only at early stage of implantation. The job offers a simple method to modify the degradation properties of biomaterial for potential use in bone tissue engineering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Duplicated Gephyrin Genes Showing Distinct Tissue Distribution and Alternative Splicing Patterns Mediate Molybdenum Cofactor Biosynthesis, Glycine Receptor Clustering, and Escape Behavior in Zebrafish*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, Kazutoyo; Ramsden, Sarah L.; Keib, Natalie; Schwarz, Günter; Harvey, Robert J.; Hirata, Hiromi

    2011-01-01

    Gephyrin mediates the postsynaptic clustering of glycine receptors (GlyRs) and GABAA receptors at inhibitory synapses and molybdenum-dependent enzyme (molybdoenzyme) activity in non-neuronal tissues. Gephyrin knock-out mice show a phenotype resembling both defective glycinergic transmission and molybdenum cofactor (Moco) deficiency and die within 1 day of birth due to starvation and dyspnea resulting from deficits in motor and respiratory networks, respectively. To address whether gephyrin function is conserved among vertebrates and whether gephyrin deficiency affects molybdoenzyme activity and motor development, we cloned and characterized zebrafish gephyrin genes. We report here that zebrafish have two gephyrin genes, gphna and gphnb. The former is expressed in all tissues and has both C3 and C4 cassette exons, and the latter is expressed predominantly in the brain and spinal cord and harbors only C4 cassette exons. We confirmed that all of the gphna and gphnb splicing isoforms have Moco synthetic activity. Antisense morpholino knockdown of either gphna or gphnb alone did not disturb synaptic clusters of GlyRs in the spinal cord and did not affect touch-evoked escape behaviors. However, on knockdown of both gphna and gphnb, embryos showed impairments in GlyR clustering in the spinal cord and, as a consequence, demonstrated touch-evoked startle response behavior by contracting antagonistic muscles simultaneously, instead of displaying early coiling and late swimming behaviors, which are executed by side-to-side muscle contractions. These data indicate that duplicated gephyrin genes mediate Moco biosynthesis and control postsynaptic clustering of GlyRs, thereby mediating key escape behaviors in zebrafish. PMID:20843816

  6. Micro- and nanotechnology in cardiovascular tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Boyang; Xiao Yun; Hsieh, Anne; Thavandiran, Nimalan; Radisic, Milica

    2011-01-01

    While in nature the formation of complex tissues is gradually shaped by the long journey of development, in tissue engineering constructing complex tissues relies heavily on our ability to directly manipulate and control the micro-cellular environment in vitro. Not surprisingly, advancements in both microfabrication and nanofabrication have powered the field of tissue engineering in many aspects. Focusing on cardiac tissue engineering, this paper highlights the applications of fabrication techniques in various aspects of tissue engineering research: (1) cell responses to micro- and nanopatterned topographical cues, (2) cell responses to patterned biochemical cues, (3) controlled 3D scaffolds, (4) patterned tissue vascularization and (5) electromechanical regulation of tissue assembly and function.

  7. Mapping of Mechanical Strains and Stresses around Quiescent Engineered Three-Dimensional Epithelial Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjorevski, Nikolce; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how physical signals guide biological processes requires qualitative and quantitative knowledge of the mechanical forces generated and sensed by cells in a physiologically realistic three-dimensional (3D) context. Here, we used computational modeling and engineered epithelial tissues of precise geometry to define the experimental parameters that are required to measure directly the mechanical stress profile of 3D tissues embedded within native type I collagen. We found that to calculate the stresses accurately in these settings, we had to account for mechanical heterogeneities within the matrix, which we visualized and quantified using confocal reflectance and atomic force microscopy. Using this technique, we were able to obtain traction forces at the epithelium-matrix interface, and to resolve and quantify patterns of mechanical stress throughout the surrounding matrix. We discovered that whereas single cells generate tension by contracting and pulling on the matrix, the contraction of multicellular tissues can also push against the matrix, causing emergent compression. Furthermore, tissue geometry defines the spatial distribution of mechanical stress across the epithelium, which communicates mechanically over distances spanning hundreds of micrometers. Spatially resolved mechanical maps can provide insight into the types and magnitudes of physical parameters that are sensed and interpreted by multicellular tissues during normal and pathological processes. PMID:22828342

  8. Foundations of arithmetic differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Buium, Alexandru

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this book is to introduce and develop an arithmetic analogue of classical differential geometry. In this new geometry the ring of integers plays the role of a ring of functions on an infinite dimensional manifold. The role of coordinate functions on this manifold is played by the prime numbers. The role of partial derivatives of functions with respect to the coordinates is played by the Fermat quotients of integers with respect to the primes. The role of metrics is played by symmetric matrices with integer coefficients. The role of connections (respectively curvature) attached to metrics is played by certain adelic (respectively global) objects attached to the corresponding matrices. One of the main conclusions of the theory is that the spectrum of the integers is "intrinsically curved"; the study of this curvature is then the main task of the theory. The book follows, and builds upon, a series of recent research papers. A significant part of the material has never been published before.

  9. Weyl gravity and Cartan geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attard, J.; François, J.; Lazzarini, S.

    2016-04-01

    We point out that the Cartan geometry known as the second-order conformal structure provides a natural differential geometric framework underlying gauge theories of conformal gravity. We are concerned with two theories: the first one is the associated Yang-Mills-like Lagrangian, while the second, inspired by [1], is a slightly more general one that relaxes the conformal Cartan geometry. The corresponding gauge symmetry is treated within the Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin language. We show that the Weyl gauge potential is a spurious degree of freedom, analogous to a Stueckelberg field, that can be eliminated through the dressing field method. We derive sets of field equations for both the studied Lagrangians. For the second one, they constrain the gauge field to be the "normal conformal Cartan connection.''Finally, we provide in a Lagrangian framework a justification of the identification, in dimension 4, of the Bach tensor with the Yang-Mills current of the normal conformal Cartan connection, as proved in [2].

  10. An invitation to web geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Vitório Pereira, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    This book takes an in-depth look at abelian relations of codimension one webs in the complex analytic setting. In its classical form, web geometry consists in the study of webs up to local diffeomorphisms. A significant part of the theory revolves around the concept of abelian relation, a particular kind of functional relation among the first integrals of the foliations of a web. Two main focuses of the book include how many abelian relations can a web carry and which  webs are carrying the maximal possible number of abelian relations. The book offers complete proofs of both Chern’s bound and Trépreau’s algebraization theorem, including all the necessary prerequisites that go beyond elementary complex analysis or basic algebraic geometry. Most of the examples known up to date of non-algebraizable planar webs of maximal rank are discussed in detail. A historical account of the algebraization problem for maximal rank webs of codimension one is also presented.

  11. Computational geometry algorithms and applications

    CERN Document Server

    de Berg, Mark; Overmars, Mark; Schwarzkopf, Otfried

    1997-01-01

    Computational geometry emerged from the field of algorithms design and anal­ ysis in the late 1970s. It has grown into a recognized discipline with its own journals, conferences, and a large community of active researchers. The suc­ cess of the field as a research discipline can on the one hand be explained from the beauty of the problems studied and the solutions obtained, and, on the other hand, by the many application domains--computer graphics, geographic in­ formation systems (GIS), robotics, and others-in which geometric algorithms play a fundamental role. For many geometric problems the early algorithmic solutions were either slow or difficult to understand and implement. In recent years a number of new algorithmic techniques have been developed that improved and simplified many of the previous approaches. In this textbook we have tried to make these modem algorithmic solutions accessible to a large audience. The book has been written as a textbook for a course in computational geometry, but it can ...

  12. Fuzzy Logic for Incidence Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a mathematical framework for approximate geometric reasoning with extended objects in the context of Geography, in which all entities and their relationships are described by human language. These entities could be labelled by commonly used names of landmarks, water areas, and so forth. Unlike single points that are given in Cartesian coordinates, these geographic entities are extended in space and often loosely defined, but people easily perform spatial reasoning with extended geographic objects “as if they were points.” Unfortunately, up to date, geographic information systems (GIS) miss the capability of geometric reasoning with extended objects. The aim of the paper is to present a mathematical apparatus for approximate geometric reasoning with extended objects that is usable in GIS. In the paper we discuss the fuzzy logic (Aliev and Tserkovny, 2011) as a reasoning system for geometry of extended objects, as well as a basis for fuzzification of the axioms of incidence geometry. The same fuzzy logic was used for fuzzification of Euclid's first postulate. Fuzzy equivalence relation “extended lines sameness” is introduced. For its approximation we also utilize a fuzzy conditional inference, which is based on proposed fuzzy “degree of indiscernibility” and “discernibility measure” of extended points. PMID:27689133

  13. Pattern of tissue deposition, gain and body composition of Nellore, F1 Simmental × Nellore and F1 Angus × Nellore steers fed at maintenance or ad libitum with two levels of concentrate in the diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanna Moraes de Oliveira

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Sixty 18-month-old steers (20 Nellore, 20 F1 Simmental × Nellore and 20 F1 Angus × Nellore with average body weight of 265.6±6.4 kg; 325.3±4.7 kg and 324.6±6.0 kg, respectively were used. The effects of feeding regime and genetic group on physical carcass composition, empty body composition, composition of the gain, as well as the pattern of tissue deposition were evaluated in this trial. The interaction between genetic group and feeding regime was not significant for any variable evaluated. Animals fed at the maintenance level produced carcass with larger proportions of bones and muscle than the animals fed ad libitum and Nellore animals had larger muscle portion and smaller adipose tissue portion on the carcass than the crossbred animals. Nellore animals and those fed at maintenance had smaller amount of total fat in the carcass than the crossbred animals and those fed ad libitum, respectively. Fat was deposited more pronouncedly in the intermuscular depot, followed by the visceral depot. The rate of deposition of the carcass tissues was smaller in the Nellore animals and in the animals fed the diet with concentrate allowance equivalent to 1% body weight (except for subcutaneous fat tissue, when compared with the crossbred animals and those fed the diet with 2% BW on concentrate, respectively. The rate of fat deposition on the visceral depot was larger in the F1 Angus × Nellore animals and on those fed the 2% of BW of concentrate diet when compared with F1 Simmental × Nellore animals and those fed the diet with the lowest concentrate allowance (1% BW.

  14. Geometry, Allometry and Biomechanics of Fern Leaf Petioles: Their Significance for the Evolution of Functional and Ecological Diversity Within the Pteridaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer N. Mahley

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Herbaceous plants rely on a combination of turgor, ground tissues and geometry for mechanical support of leaves and stems. Unlike most angiosperms however, ferns employ a sub-dermal layer of fibers, known as a hypodermal sterome, for support of their leaves. The sterome is nearly ubiquitous in ferns, but nothing is known about its role in leaf biomechanics. The goal of this research was to characterize sterome attributes in ferns that experience a broad range of mechanical stresses, as imposed by their aquatic, xeric, epiphytic, and terrestrial niches. Members of the Pteridaceae meet this criteria well. The anatomical and functional morphometrics along with published values of tissue moduli were used to model petiole flexural rigidity and susceptibility to buckling in 20 species of the Pteridaceae. Strong allometric relationships were observed between sterome thickness and leaf size, with the sterome contributing over 97% to petiole flexural rigidity. Surprisingly, the small-statured cheilanthoid ferns allocated the highest fraction of their petiole to the sterome, while large leaves exploited aspects of geometry (second moment of area to achieve bending resistance. This pattern also revealed an economy of function in which increasing sterome thickness was associated with decreasing fiber cell reinforcement, and fiber wall fraction. Lastly, strong petioles were associated with durable leaves, as approximated by specific leaf area. This study reveals meaningful patterns in fern leaf biomechanics that align with species leaf size, sterome attributes and life-history strategy.

  15. Tissue-specific patterns of gene expression in the epithelium and stroma of normal colon in healthy individuals in an aspirin intervention trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma S. Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Regular aspirin use reduces colon adenoma and carcinoma incidence. UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT are involved in aspirin metabolism and clearance, and variant alleles in UGT1A6 have been shown to alter salicylic acid metabolism and risk of colon neoplasia. In a randomized, cross-over, placebo-controlled trial of 44 healthy men and women, homozygous for UGT1A6*1 or UGT1A6*2, we explored differences between global epithelial and stromal expression, using Affymetrix U133+2.0 microarrays and tested effects of 60-day aspirin supplementation (325 mg/d on epithelial and stromal gene expression and colon prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 levels. We conducted a comprehensive study of differential gene expression between normal human colonic epithelium and stroma from healthy individuals. Although no statistically significant differences in gene expression were observed in response to aspirin or UGT1A6 genotype, we have identified the genes uniquely and reproducibly expressed in each tissue type and have analyzed the biologic processes they represent. Here we describe in detail how the data, deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO – accession number GSE71571 – was generated including the basic analysis as contained in the manuscript published in BMC Medical Genetics with the PMID 25927723 (Thomas et al., 2015 [9].

  16. Blood Group Substances as Potential Therapeutic Agents for the Prevention and Treatment of Infection with Noroviruses Proving Novel Binding Patterns in Human Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazawa, Shin; Yokobori, Takehiko; Ueta, Gen; Ide, Munenori; Altan, Bolag; Thongprachum, Aksara; Nishimura, Toyo; Nakajima, Tamiko; Kominato, Yoshihiko; Asao, Takayuki; Saniabadi, Abby R.; Furukawa, Kiyoshi; Kuwano, Hiroyuki; Le Pendu, Jacques; Ushijima, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Blood group-related glycans determining ABO and Lewis blood groups are known to function as attachment factors for most of the norovirus (NoV) strains. To identify binding specificity of each NoV, recombinant norovirus-like particles (VLPs) and human saliva samples with different ABO, Lewis phenotypes and secretor status have been commonly applied. When binding specificities of VLPs prepared from 16 different genotypes of NoVs in GI and GII genogroups were characterized in samples of human gastric mucosa compared to human saliva based on blood group phenotypes, considerable differences were observed for several strains. Novel binding specificities determined by an ELISA using preparations from human gastric mucosa were also ascertained by immunohistochemical analyses using human jejunal mucosa, widely believed to be susceptible to NoV infection. Further, A, B and O(H) blood group substances prepared from porcine and squid tissues were found to be effective for preventing ABO blood group-specific binding of VLPs to both saliva and mucosa samples. Therefore, these blood group substances might have potential for the prevention and treatment of NoV infection. PMID:24558470

  17. Utility of Tissue Transglutaminase Immunohistochemistry in Pediatric Duodenal Biopsies: Patterns of Expression and Role in Celiac Disease—A Clinicopathologic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeeda Almarzooqi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue transglutaminase (tTG is a ubiquitous multifunctional protein. It has roles in various cellular processes. tTG is a major target of autoantibodies in celiac disease, and its expression by immunohistochemistry in pediatric celiac disease has not been fully examined. We studied tTG expression in 78 pediatric duodenal biopsies by utilizing an antibody to transglutaminase 2. Serum tTG was positive in all celiac cases evaluated. Serum antiserum endomysial antibody (EMA and tTG were negative in all control subjects and in inflammatory bowel disease and eosinophilic gastroenteritis. There was a statistically significant difference between cases of celiac disease and normal controls in terms of tTG immunohistochemical staining in duodenal biopsies surface epithelium ( value = 0.0012. There was no significant statistical difference in terms of staining of the villous surface or crypt between the cases of celiac disease and cases with IBD ( value = 0.5970 and 0.5227, resp.. There was no detected correlation between serum tTG values and immunohistochemical positivity on duodenal biopsy in cases of celiac disease ( value = 1. There was no relationship between Marsh classification and positivity of villous surface for tTG ( value = 0.4955. We conclude that tTG has limited utility in diagnosis of celiac disease in pediatric duodenal biopsies.

  18. Differential geometry based multiscale models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Guo-Wei

    2010-08-01

    Large chemical and biological systems such as fuel cells, ion channels, molecular motors, and viruses are of great importance to the scientific community and public health. Typically, these complex systems in conjunction with their aquatic environment pose a fabulous challenge to theoretical description, simulation, and prediction. In this work, we propose a differential geometry based multiscale paradigm to model complex macromolecular systems, and to put macroscopic and microscopic descriptions on an equal footing. In our approach, the differential geometry theory of surfaces and geometric measure theory are employed as a natural means to couple the macroscopic continuum mechanical description of the aquatic environment with the microscopic discrete atomistic description of the macromolecule. Multiscale free energy functionals, or multiscale action functionals are constructed as a unified framework to derive the governing equations for the dynamics of different scales and different descriptions. Two types of aqueous macromolecular complexes, ones that are near equilibrium and others that are far from equilibrium, are considered in our formulations. We show that generalized Navier-Stokes equations for the fluid dynamics, generalized Poisson equations or generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equations for electrostatic interactions, and Newton's equation for the molecular dynamics can be derived by the least action principle. These equations are coupled through the continuum-discrete interface whose dynamics is governed by potential driven geometric flows. Comparison is given to classical descriptions of the fluid and electrostatic interactions without geometric flow based micro-macro interfaces. The detailed balance of forces is emphasized in the present work. We further extend the proposed multiscale paradigm to micro-macro analysis of electrohydrodynamics, electrophoresis, fuel cells, and ion channels. We derive generalized Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations that are

  19. Differential Geometry Based Multiscale Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Guo-Wei

    2010-01-01

    Large chemical and biological systems such as fuel cells, ion channels, molecular motors, and viruses are of great importance to the scientific community and public health. Typically, these complex systems in conjunction with their aquatic environment pose a fabulous challenge to theoretical description, simulation, and prediction. In this work, we propose a differential geometry based multiscale paradigm to model complex macromolecular systems, and to put macroscopic and microscopic descriptions on an equal footing. In our approach, the differential geometry theory of surfaces and geometric measure theory are employed as a natural means to couple the macroscopic continuum mechanical description of the aquatic environment with the microscopic discrete atom-istic description of the macromolecule. Multiscale free energy functionals, or multiscale action functionals are constructed as a unified framework to derive the governing equations for the dynamics of different scales and different descriptions. Two types of aqueous macromolecular complexes, ones that are near equilibrium and others that are far from equilibrium, are considered in our formulations. We show that generalized Navier–Stokes equations for the fluid dynamics, generalized Poisson equations or generalized Poisson–Boltzmann equations for electrostatic interactions, and Newton's equation for the molecular dynamics can be derived by the least action principle. These equations are coupled through the continuum-discrete interface whose dynamics is governed by potential driven geometric flows. Comparison is given to classical descriptions of the fluid and electrostatic interactions without geometric flow based micro-macro interfaces. The detailed balance of forces is emphasized in the present work. We further extend the proposed multiscale paradigm to micro-macro analysis of electrohydrodynamics, electrophoresis, fuel cells, and ion channels. We derive generalized Poisson–Nernst–Planck equations that

  20. Some Progress in Conformal Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Yung A. Chang

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This is a survey paper of our current research on the theory of partial differential equations in conformal geometry. Our intention is to describe some of our current works in a rather brief and expository fashion. We are not giving a comprehensive survey on the subject and references cited here are not intended to be complete. We introduce a bubble tree structure to study the degeneration of a class of Yamabe metrics on Bach flat manifolds satisfying some global conformal bounds on compact manifolds of dimension 4. As applications, we establish a gap theorem, a finiteness theorem for diffeomorphism type for this class, and diameter bound of the $sigma_2$-metrics in a class of conformal 4-manifolds. For conformally compact Einstein metrics we introduce an eigenfunction compactification. As a consequence we obtain some topological constraints in terms of renormalized volumes.

  1. Introduction to global variational geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Krupka, Demeter

    2015-01-01

    The book is devoted to recent research in the global variational theory on smooth manifolds. Its main objective is an extension of the classical variational calculus on Euclidean spaces to (topologically nontrivial) finite-dimensional smooth manifolds; to this purpose the methods of global analysis of differential forms are used. Emphasis is placed on the foundations of the theory of variational functionals on fibered manifolds - relevant geometric structures for variational principles in geometry, physical field theory and higher-order fibered mechanics. The book chapters include: - foundations of jet bundles and analysis of differential forms and vector fields on jet bundles, - the theory of higher-order integral variational functionals for sections of a fibred space, the (global) first variational formula in infinitesimal and integral forms- extremal conditions and the discussion of Noether symmetries and generalizations,- the inverse problems of the calculus of variations of Helmholtz type- variational se...

  2. Applied geometry and discrete mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Sturm; Gritzmann, Peter; Sturmfels, Bernd

    1991-01-01

    This volume, published jointly with the Association for Computing Machinery, comprises a collection of research articles celebrating the occasion of Victor Klee's sixty-fifth birthday in September 1990. During his long career, Klee has made contributions to a wide variety of areas, such as discrete and computational geometry, convexity, combinatorics, graph theory, functional analysis, mathematical programming and optimization, and theoretical computer science. In addition, Klee made important contributions to mathematics education, mathematical methods in economics and the decision sciences, applications of discrete mathematics in the biological and social sciences, and the transfer of knowledge from applied mathematics to industry. In honor of Klee's achievements, this volume presents more than forty papers on topics related to Klee's research. While the majority of the papers are research articles, a number of survey articles are also included. Mirroring the breadth of Klee's mathematical contributions, th...

  3. Integrable systems, geometry, and topology

    CERN Document Server

    Terng, Chuu-Lian

    2006-01-01

    The articles in this volume are based on lectures from a program on integrable systems and differential geometry held at Taiwan's National Center for Theoretical Sciences. As is well-known, for many soliton equations, the solutions have interpretations as differential geometric objects, and thereby techniques of soliton equations have been successfully applied to the study of geometric problems. The article by Burstall gives a beautiful exposition on isothermic surfaces and their relations to integrable systems, and the two articles by Guest give an introduction to quantum cohomology, carry out explicit computations of the quantum cohomology of flag manifolds and Hirzebruch surfaces, and give a survey of Givental's quantum differential equations. The article by Heintze, Liu, and Olmos is on the theory of isoparametric submanifolds in an arbitrary Riemannian manifold, which is related to the n-wave equation when the ambient manifold is Euclidean. Mukai-Hidano and Ohnita present a survey on the moduli space of ...

  4. Conformal geometry and quasiregular mappings

    CERN Document Server

    Vuorinen, Matti

    1988-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the theory of spatial quasiregular mappings intended for the uninitiated reader. At the same time the book also addresses specialists in classical analysis and, in particular, geometric function theory. The text leads the reader to the frontier of current research and covers some most recent developments in the subject, previously scatterd through the literature. A major role in this monograph is played by certain conformal invariants which are solutions of extremal problems related to extremal lengths of curve families. These invariants are then applied to prove sharp distortion theorems for quasiregular mappings. One of these extremal problems of conformal geometry generalizes a classical two-dimensional problem of O. Teichmüller. The novel feature of the exposition is the way in which conformal invariants are applied and the sharp results obtained should be of considerable interest even in the two-dimensional particular case. This book combines the features of a textbook an...

  5. Symplectic and Poisson Geometry in Interaction with Analysis, Algebra and Topology & Symplectic Geometry, Noncommutative Geometry and Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Eliashberg, Yakov; Maeda, Yoshiaki; Symplectic, Poisson, and Noncommutative geometry

    2014-01-01

    Symplectic geometry originated in physics, but it has flourished as an independent subject in mathematics, together with its offspring, symplectic topology. Symplectic methods have even been applied back to mathematical physics. Noncommutative geometry has developed an alternative mathematical quantization scheme based on a geometric approach to operator algebras. Deformation quantization, a blend of symplectic methods and noncommutative geometry, approaches quantum mechanics from a more algebraic viewpoint, as it addresses quantization as a deformation of Poisson structures. This volume contains seven chapters based on lectures given by invited speakers at two May 2010 workshops held at the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute: Symplectic and Poisson Geometry in Interaction with Analysis, Algebra and Topology (honoring Alan Weinstein, one of the key figures in the field) and Symplectic Geometry, Noncommutative Geometry and Physics. The chapters include presentations of previously unpublished results and ...

  6. Expression of a gymnosperm PIN homologous gene correlates with auxin immunolocalization pattern at cotyledon formation and in demarcation of the procambium during Picea abies somatic embryo development and in seedling tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palovaara, Joakim; Hallberg, Henrik; Stasolla, Claudio; Luit, Bert; Hakman, Inger

    2010-04-01

    In seed plants, the body organization is established during embryogenesis and is uniform across gymnosperms and angiosperms, despite differences during early embryogeny. Evidence from angiosperms implicates the plant hormone auxin and its polar transport, mainly established by the PIN family of auxin efflux transporters, in the patterning of embryos. Here, PaPIN1 from Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst.), a gene widely expressed in conifer tissues and organs, was characterized and its expression and localization patterns were determined with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization during somatic embryo development and in seedlings. PaPIN1 shares the predicted structure of other PIN proteins, but its central hydrophilic loop is longer than most PINs. In phylogenetic analyses, PaPIN1 clusters with Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. PIN3, PIN4 and PIN7, but its expression pattern also suggests similarity to PIN1. The PaPIN1 expression signal was high in the protoderm of pre-cotyledonary embryos, but not if embryos were pre-treated with the auxin transport inhibitor N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA). This, together with a high auxin immunolocalization signal in this cell layer, suggests a role of PaPIN1 during cotyledon formation. At later stages, high PaPIN1 expression was observed in differentiating procambium, running from the tip of incipient cotyledons down through the embryo axis and to the root apical meristem (RAM), although the mode of RAM specification in conifer embryos differs from that of most angiosperms. Also, the PaPIN1 in situ signal was high in seedling root tips including root cap columella cells. The results thus suggest that PaPIN1 provides an ancient function associated with auxin transport and embryo pattern formation prior to the separation of angiosperms and gymnosperms, in spite of some morphological differences.

  7. Geometry of discrete quantum computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Andrew J.; Ortiz, Gerardo; Sabry, Amr; Tai, Yu-Tsung

    2013-05-01

    Conventional quantum computing entails a geometry based on the description of an n-qubit state using 2n infinite precision complex numbers denoting a vector in a Hilbert space. Such numbers are in general uncomputable using any real-world resources, and, if we have the idea of physical law as some kind of computational algorithm of the universe, we would be compelled to alter our descriptions of physics to be consistent with computable numbers. Our purpose here is to examine the geometric implications of using finite fields Fp and finite complexified fields \\mathbf {F}_{p^2} (based on primes p congruent to 3 (mod4)) as the basis for computations in a theory of discrete quantum computing, which would therefore become a computable theory. Because the states of a discrete n-qubit system are in principle enumerable, we are able to determine the proportions of entangled and unentangled states. In particular, we extend the Hopf fibration that defines the irreducible state space of conventional continuous n-qubit theories (which is the complex projective space \\mathbf {CP}^{2^{n}-1}) to an analogous discrete geometry in which the Hopf circle for any n is found to be a discrete set of p + 1 points. The tally of unit-length n-qubit states is given, and reduced via the generalized Hopf fibration to \\mathbf {DCP}^{2^{n}-1}, the discrete analogue of the complex projective space, which has p^{2^{n}-1} (p-1)\\,\\prod _{k=1}^{n-1} ( p^{2^{k}}+1) irreducible states. Using a measure of entanglement, the purity, we explore the entanglement features of discrete quantum states and find that the n-qubit states based on the complexified field \\mathbf {F}_{p^2} have pn(p - 1)n unentangled states (the product of the tally for a single qubit) with purity 1, and they have pn + 1(p - 1)(p + 1)n - 1 maximally entangled states with purity zero.

  8. Long-Term Outcome and Patterns of Failure in Primary Ocular Adnexal Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma Treated With Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Naoki [Division of Radiation Oncology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Hyogo (Japan); Sasaki, Ryohei, E-mail: rsasaki@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Division of Radiation Oncology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Hyogo (Japan); Nishimura, Hideki; Yoshida, Kenji; Miyawaki, Daisuke; Nakayama, Masao; Uehara, Kazuyuki; Okamoto, Yoshiaki; Ejima, Yasuo [Division of Radiation Oncology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Hyogo (Japan); Azumi, Atsushi [Division of Ophthalmology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Hyogo (Japan); Matsui, Toshimitsu [Division of Hematology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Hyogo (Japan); Sugimura, Kazuro [Division of Radiation Oncology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Hyogo (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term treatment outcome and disease behavior of primary ocular adnexal MALT (mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue) lymphoma (POAML) after treatment with radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Seventy-eight patients (42 male, 36 female) diagnosed with stage I POAML between 1991 and 2010 at Kobe University Hospital were included. The median age was 60 years (range, 22-85 years). The median radiation dose administered was 30.6 Gy. Rituximab-based targeted therapy and/or chemotherapy was performed in 20 patients (25.6%). Local control (LC), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS) rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median follow-up duration was 66 months. Major tumor sites were conjunctiva in 37 patients (47.4%), orbita in 29 (37.2%), and lacrimal glands in 12 (15.4%). The 5- and 10-year OS rates were 98.1% and 95.3%, respectively. The 5- and 10-year LC rates were both 100%, and the 5- and 10-year RFS rates were 88.5% and 75.9%, respectively. Patients treated with a combination of radiotherapy and targeted therapy and/or chemotherapy had a trend for a better RFS compared with those treated with radiotherapy alone (p = 0.114). None developed greater than Grade 2 acute morbidity. There were 14 patients who experienced Grade 2 morbidities (cataract: 14; retinal disorders: 7; dry eye: 3), 23 patients who had Grade 3 morbidities (cataract: 23; dry eye: 1), and 1 patient who had Grade 4 glaucoma. Conclusions: Radiotherapy for POAML was shown to be highly effective and safe for LC and OS on the basis of long-term observation. The absence of systemic relapse in patients with combined-modality treatment suggests that lower doses of radiation combined with targeted therapy may be worth further study.

  9. Long-Term Outcome and Patterns of Failure in Primary Ocular Adnexal Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma Treated With Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Naoki; Sasaki, Ryohei; Nishimura, Hideki; Yoshida, Kenji; Miyawaki, Daisuke; Nakayama, Masao; Uehara, Kazuyuki; Okamoto, Yoshiaki; Ejima, Yasuo; Azumi, Atsushi; Matsui, Toshimitsu; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term treatment outcome and disease behavior of primary ocular adnexal MALT (mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue) lymphoma (POAML) after treatment with radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Seventy-eight patients (42 male, 36 female) diagnosed with stage I POAML between 1991 and 2010 at Kobe University Hospital were included. The median age was 60 years (range, 22–85 years). The median radiation dose administered was 30.6 Gy. Rituximab-based targeted therapy and/or chemotherapy was performed in 20 patients (25.6%). Local control (LC), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS) rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median follow-up duration was 66 months. Major tumor sites were conjunctiva in 37 patients (47.4%), orbita in 29 (37.2%), and lacrimal glands in 12 (15.4%). The 5- and 10-year OS rates were 98.1% and 95.3%, respectively. The 5- and 10-year LC rates were both 100%, and the 5- and 10-year RFS rates were 88.5% and 75.9%, respectively. Patients treated with a combination of radiotherapy and targeted therapy and/or chemotherapy had a trend for a better RFS compared with those treated with radiotherapy alone (p = 0.114). None developed greater than Grade 2 acute morbidity. There were 14 patients who experienced Grade 2 morbidities (cataract: 14; retinal disorders: 7; dry eye: 3), 23 patients who had Grade 3 morbidities (cataract: 23; dry eye: 1), and 1 patient who had Grade 4 glaucoma. Conclusions: Radiotherapy for POAML was shown to be highly effective and safe for LC and OS on the basis of long-term observation. The absence of systemic relapse in patients with combined-modality treatment suggests that lower doses of radiation combined with targeted therapy may be worth further study.

  10. Identification of fasciclin-like arabinogalactan proteins in textile hemp (Cannabis sativa L.): in silico analyses and gene expression patterns in different tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerriero, Gea; Mangeot-Peter, Lauralie; Legay, Sylvain; Behr, Marc; Lutts, Stanley; Siddiqui, Khawar Sohail; Hausman, Jean-Francois

    2017-09-20

    The fasciclin-like arabinogalactan proteins (FLAs) belong to the arabinogalactan protein (AGP) superfamily and are known to play different physiological roles in plants. This class of proteins was shown to participate in plant growth, development, defense against abiotic stresses and, notably, cell wall biosynthesis. Although some studies are available on the characterization of FLA genes from different species, both woody and herbaceous, no detailed information is available on the FLA family of textile hemp (Cannabis sativa L.), an economically important fibre crop. By searching the Cannabis genome and EST databases, 23 CsaFLAs have been here identified which are divided into four phylogenetic groups. A real-time qPCR analysis performed on stem tissues (isolated bast fibres and shivs sampled at three heights), hypocotyls (6-9-12-15-17-20 days-old), whole seedlings, roots, leaves and female/male flowers of the monoecious fibre variety Santhica 27, indicates that the identified FLA genes are differentially expressed. Interestingly, some hemp FLAs are expressed during early phases of fibre growth (elongation), while others are more expressed in the middle and base of the stem and thus potentially involved in secondary cell wall formation (fibre thickening). The bioinformatic analysis of the promoter regions shows that the FLAs upregulated in the younger regions of the stem share a conserved motif related to flowering control and regulation of photoperiod perception. The promoters of the FLA genes expressed at higher levels in the older stem regions, instead, share a motif putatively recognized by MYB3, a transcriptional repressor belonging to the MYB family subgroup S4. These results point to the existence of a transcriptional network fine-tuning the expression of FLA genes in the older and younger regions of the stem, as well as in the bast fibres/shivs of textile hemp. In summary, our study paves the way for future analyses on the biological functions of FLAs in

  11. Identification of Differential Gene Expression Patterns after Acute Exposure to High and Low Doses of Low-LET Ionizing Radiation in a Reconstituted Human Skin Tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tilton, Susan C.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Hays, Spencer; Taylor, Ronald C.; Stenoien, David L.

    2016-11-01

    Our goal here was to identify dose and temporal dependent radiation responses in a complex tissue, reconstituted human skin. Direct sequencing of RNA (RNA-seq) was used to quantify altered transcripts following exposure to 0.1, 2 and 10 Gy of ionizing radiation at 3 and 8 hours. These doses include a low dose in the range of some medical diagnostic procedures (0.1 Gy), a dose typically received during radiotherapy (2.0 Gy) and a lethal dose (10 Gy). These doses could be received after an intentional or accidental radiation exposure and biomarkers are needed to rapidly and accurately triage exposed individuals. A total of 1701 genes were deemed to be significantly affected by high dose radiation exposure with the majority of genes affected at 10 Gy. A group of 29 genes including GDF15, BBC3, PPM1D, FDXR, GADD45A, MDM2, CDKN1A, TP53INP1, CYCSP27, SESN1, SESN2, PCNA, and AEN were similarly altered at both 2 and 10 Gy, but not 0.1 Gy, at multiple time points. A much larger group of up regulated genes, including those involved in inflammatory responses, was significantly altered only after a 10 Gy exposure. At high doses, down regulated genes were associated with cell cycle regulation and exhibited an apparent linear response between 2 and 10 Gy. While only a handful of genes were significantly affected by 0.1 Gy exposure using stringent statistical filters, groups of related genes regulating cell cycle progression and inflammatory responses consistently exhibited opposite trends in their regulation compared to the high dose exposures. Differential regulation of PLK1 signaling at low and high doses was confirmed using qRT-PCR. These results indicate that some alterations in gene expression are qualitatively different at low and high doses of radiation in this model system.

  12. Driver mutations among never smoking female lung cancer tissues in China identify unique EGFR and KRAS mutation pattern associated with household coal burning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosgood, H Dean; Pao, William; Rothman, Nathaniel; Hu, Wei; Pan, Yumei Helen; Kuchinsky, Kyle; Jones, Kirk D; Xu, Jun; Vermeulen, Roel; Simko, Jeff; Lan, Qing

    2013-11-01

    Lung cancer in never smokers, which has been partially attributed to household solid fuel use (i.e., coal), is etiologically and clinically different from lung cancer attributed to tobacco smoking. To explore the spectrum of driver mutations among lung cancer tissues from never smokers, specifically in a population where high lung cancer rates have been attributed to indoor air pollution from domestic coal use, multiplexed assays were used to detect >40 point mutations, insertions, and deletions (EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, HER2, NRAS, PIK3CA, MEK1, AKT1, and PTEN) among the lung tumors of confirmed never smoking females from Xuanwei, China [32 adenocarcinomas (ADCs), 7 squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), 1 adenosquamous carcinoma (ADSC)]. EGFR mutations were detected in 35% of tumors. 46% of these involved EGFR exon 18 G719X, while 14% were exon 21 L858R mutations. KRAS mutations, all of which were G12C_34G>T, were observed in 15% of tumors. EGFR and KRAS mutations were mutually exclusive, and no mutations were observed in the other tested genes. Most point mutations were transversions and were also found in tumors from patients who used coal in their homes. Our high mutation frequencies in EGFR exon 18 and KRAS and low mutation frequency in EGFR exon 21 are strikingly divergent from those in other smoking and never smoking populations from Asia. Given that our subjects live in a region where coal is typically burned indoors, our findings provide new insights into the pathogenesis of lung cancer among never smoking females exposed to indoor air pollution from coal. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Solar Proton Transport within an ICRU Sphere Surrounded by a Complex Shield: Combinatorial Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John W.; Slaba, Tony C.; Badavi, Francis F.; Reddell, Brandon D.; Bahadori, Amir A.

    2015-01-01

    The 3DHZETRN code, with improved neutron and light ion (Z (is) less than 2) transport procedures, was recently developed and compared to Monte Carlo (MC) simulations using simplified spherical geometries. It was shown that 3DHZETRN agrees with the MC codes to the extent they agree with each other. In the present report, the 3DHZETRN code is extended to enable analysis in general combinatorial geometry. A more complex shielding structure with internal parts surrounding a tissue sphere is considered and compared against MC simulations. It is shown that even in the more complex geometry, 3DHZETRN agrees well with the MC codes and maintains a high degree of computational efficiency.

  14. Combined NanoSIMS and synchrotron X-ray fluorescence reveal distinct cellular and subcellular distribution patterns of trace elements in rice tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Katie L; Chen, Yi; van de Meene, Allison M L; Hughes, Louise; Liu, Wenju; Geraki, Tina; Mosselmans, Fred; McGrath, Steve P; Grovenor, Chris; Zhao, Fang-Jie

    2014-01-01

    The cellular and subcellular distributions of trace elements can provide important clues to understanding how the elements are transported and stored in plant cells, but mapping their distributions is a challenging task. The distributions of arsenic, iron, zinc, manganese and copper, as well as physiologically related macro-elements, were mapped in the node, internode and leaf sheath of rice (Oryza sativa) using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (S-XRF) and high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS). Although copper and silicon generally showed cell wall localization, arsenic, iron and zinc were strongly localized in the vacuoles of specific cell types. Arsenic was highly localized in the companion cell vacuoles of the phloem in all vascular bundles, showing a strong co-localization with sulfur, consistent with As(III)-thiol complexation. Within the node, zinc was localized in the vacuoles of the parenchyma cell bridge bordering the enlarged and diffuse vascular bundles, whereas iron and manganese were localized in the fundamental parenchyma cells, with iron being strongly co-localized with phosphorus in the vacuoles. The highly heterogeneous and contrasting distribution patterns of these elements imply different transport activities and/or storage capacities among different cell types. Sequestration of arsenic in companion cell vacuoles may explain the limited phloem mobility of arsenite. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  15. Immunohistochemical localization of smooth muscle myosin in human spleen, lymph node, and other lymphoid tissues. Unique staining patterns in splenic white pulp and sinuses, lymphoid follicles, and certain vasculature, with ultrastructural correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkus, G. S.; Warhol, M. J.; O'Connor, E. M.; Etheridge, C. L.; Fujiwara, K.

    1986-01-01

    The anatomic distribution of smooth muscle myosin, a contractile protein, was determined in a variety of lymphoid tissues (spleen, lymph nodes, tonsils) with the use of highly specific rabbit antibodies to human uterine smooth muscle myosin and an indirect immunoperoxidase technique. In the spleen, in addition to the anticipated immunoreactivity in the walls of arteries, veins, splenic capsule, and trabeculas, other staining patterns were observed. Smooth muscle myosin-containing cells which comprised the adventitia of the trabecular arteries appeared continuous with myosin-containing reticular cells of the white pulp. The latter cells assumed a circumferential pattern within the periarteriolar lymphoid sheaths, then blended delicately with the red pulp at the marginal zone. Ultrastructurally, immunogold techniques demonstrated that smooth muscle myosin in these cells was localized to cytoplasmic filaments. Within the red pulp, a different and distinct staining pattern was observed for the splenic sinuses. Short, regular, orderly, and repetitive bands of immunoreactivity, aligned parallel to the long axis of the sinus, extended between contiguous ring fibers. By immunoelectron microscopy these structures corresponded to distinct bundles of filaments in the endothelial lining cells of the splenic sinuses. Factor VIII associated antigen was also identified in the splenic lining cells in cryostat and paraffin sections, and ultrastructurally. Within the red pulp of the spleen, the sheaths of sheathed capillaries also revealed strong immunoreactivity for smooth muscle myosin. Other sites of immunohistochemical localization of smooth muscle myosin included dendritic reticulum cells present in reactive follicles and in nodular non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Certain vascular structures, specifically sinus lining cells and Schweigger-Seidel capillary sheaths of the spleen and postcapillary venules of lymph nodes and tonsils, coexpressed smooth muscle myosin and Factor VIII

  16. Extreme ultraviolet multilayer defect analysis and geometry reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dongbo; Evanschitzky, Peter; Erdmann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a method for the characterization of multilayer defects from extreme ultraviolet (EUV) projection images at different focus positions. The transport-of-intensity equation is applied to retrieve the phase distribution of the reflected light in the vicinity of the defect. The defect-induced intensity and phase modifications and their dependency from defect geometry parameters are analyzed by several selected optical properties of multilayer defect. To reconstruct the defect geometry parameters from the intensity and phase of a defect, a principal component analysis (PCA) is employed to parameterize the intensity and phase distributions into principal component coefficients. In order to construct the base functions of the PCA, a combination of a reference multilayer defect and appropriate pupil filters is introduced to obtain the designed sets of intensity and phase distributions. Finally, an artificial neural network is applied to correlate the principal component coefficients of the intensity and the phase of the defect with the defect geometry parameters and to reconstruct the unknown defect geometry parameters. The performance of the proposed approach is evaluated both for mask blank defects and for defects in the vicinity of an absorber pattern.

  17. Mechanical modulation of nascent stem cell lineage commitment in tissue engineering scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Min Jae; Dean, David; Knothe Tate, Melissa L

    2013-07-01

    Taking inspiration from tissue morphogenesis in utero, this study tests the concept of using tissue engineering scaffolds as delivery devices to modulate emergent structure-function relationships at early stages of tissue genesis. We report on the use of a combined computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling, advanced manufacturing methods, and experimental fluid mechanics (micro-piv and strain mapping) for the prospective design of tissue engineering scaffold geometries that deliver spatially resolved mechanical cues to stem cells seeded within. When subjected to a constant magnitude global flow regime, the local scaffold geometry dictates the magnitudes of mechanical stresses and strains experienced by a given cell, and in a spatially resolved fashion, similar to patterning during morphogenesis. In addition, early markers of mesenchymal stem cell lineage commitment relate significantly to the local mechanical environment of the cell. Finally, by plotting the range of stress-strain states for all data corresponding to nascent cell lineage commitment (95% CI), we begin to "map the mechanome", defining stress-strain states most conducive to targeted cell fates. In sum, we provide a library of reference mechanical cues that can be delivered to cells seeded on tissue engineering scaffolds to guide target tissue phenotypes in a temporally and spatially resolved manner. Knowledge of these effects allows for prospective scaffold design optimization using virtual models prior to prototyping and clinical implementation. Finally, this approach enables the development of next generation scaffolds cum delivery devices for genesis of complex tissues with heterogenous properties, e.g., organs, joints or interface tissues such as growth plates. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Automorphisms in Birational and Affine Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Ciliberto, Ciro; Flenner, Hubert; McKernan, James; Prokhorov, Yuri; Zaidenberg, Mikhail

    2014-01-01

    The main focus of this volume is on the problem of describing the automorphism groups of affine and projective varieties, a classical subject in algebraic geometry where, in both cases, the automorphism group is often infinite dimensional. The collection covers a wide range of topics and is intended for researchers in the fields of classical algebraic geometry and birational geometry (Cremona groups) as well as affine geometry with an emphasis on algebraic group actions and automorphism groups. It presents original research and surveys and provides a valuable overview of the current state of the art in these topics. Bringing together specialists from projective, birational algebraic geometry and affine and complex algebraic geometry, including Mori theory and algebraic group actions, this book is the result of ensuing talks and discussions from the conference “Groups of Automorphisms in Birational and Affine Geometry” held in October 2012, at the CIRM, Levico Terme, Italy. The talks at the conference high...

  19. Connections between algebra, combinatorics, and geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Sather-Wagstaff, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Commutative algebra, combinatorics, and algebraic geometry are thriving areas of mathematical research with a rich history of interaction. Connections Between Algebra, Combinatorics, and Geometry contains lecture notes, along with exercises and solutions, from the Workshop on Connections Between Algebra and Geometry held at the University of Regina from May 29-June 1, 2012. It also contains research and survey papers from academics invited to participate in the companion Special Session on Interactions Between Algebraic Geometry and Commutative Algebra, which was part of the CMS Summer Meeting at the University of Regina held June 2–3, 2012, and the meeting Further Connections Between Algebra and Geometry, which was held at the North Dakota State University, February 23, 2013. This volume highlights three mini-courses in the areas of commutative algebra and algebraic geometry: differential graded commutative algebra, secant varieties, and fat points and symbolic powers. It will serve as a useful resou...

  20. Second International workshop Geometry and Symbolic Computation

    CERN Document Server

    Walczak, Paweł; Geometry and its Applications

    2014-01-01

    This volume has been divided into two parts: Geometry and Applications. The geometry portion of the book relates primarily to geometric flows, laminations, integral formulae, geometry of vector fields on Lie groups, and osculation; the articles in the applications portion concern some particular problems of the theory of dynamical systems, including mathematical problems of liquid flows and a study of cycles for non-dynamical systems. This Work is based on the second international workshop entitled "Geometry and Symbolic Computations," held on May 15-18, 2013 at the University of Haifa and is dedicated to modeling (using symbolic calculations) in differential geometry and its applications in fields such as computer science, tomography, and mechanics. It is intended to create a forum for students and researchers in pure and applied geometry to promote discussion of modern state-of-the-art in geometric modeling using symbolic programs such as Maple™ and Mathematica®, as well as presentation of new results. ...