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Sample records for tip4p-qdp-lj predicts critical

  1. Properties of water along the liquid-vapor coexistence curve via molecular dynamics simulations using the polarizable TIP4P-QDP-LJ water model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Brad A; Patel, Sandeep

    2009-08-28

    We present an extension of the TIP4P-QDP model, TIP4P-QDP-LJ, that is designed to couple changes in repulsive and dispersive nonbond interactions to changes in polarizability. Polarizability is intimately related to the dispersion component of classical force field models of interactions, and we explore the effect of incorporating this connection explicitly on properties along the liquid-vapor coexistence curve of pure water. Parametrized to reproduce condensed-phase liquid water properties at 298 K, the TIP4P-QDP-LJ model predicts density, enthalpy of vaporization, self-diffusion constant, and the dielectric constant at ambient conditions to about the same accuracy as TIP4P-QDP but shows remarkable improvement in reproducing the liquid-vapor coexistence curve. TIP4P-QDP-LJ predicts critical constants of T(c)=623 K, rho(c)=0.351 g/cm(3), and P(c)=250.9 atm, which are in good agreement with experimental values of T(c)=647.1 K, rho(c)=0.322 g/cm(3), and P(c)=218 atm, respectively. Applying a scaling factor correction (obtained by fitting the experimental vapor-liquid equilibrium data to the law of rectilinear diameters using a three-term Wegner expansion) the model predicts critical constants (T(c)=631 K and rho(c)=0.308 g/cm(3)). Dependence of enthalpy of vaporization, self-diffusion constant, surface tension, and dielectric constant on temperature are shown to reproduce experimental trends. We also explore the interfacial potential drop across the liquid-vapor interface for the temperatures studied. The interfacial potential demonstrates little temperature dependence at lower temperatures (300-450 K) and significantly enhanced (exponential) dependence at elevated temperatures. Terms arising from the decomposition of the interfacial potential into dipole and quadrupole contributions are shown to monotonically approach zero as the temperature approaches the critical temperature. Results of this study suggest that self-consistently treating the coupling of phase

  2. Nuclear criticality predictability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, J.B.

    1999-01-01

    As a result of lots of efforts, a large portion of the tedious and redundant research and processing of critical experiment data has been eliminated. The necessary step in criticality safety analyses of validating computer codes with benchmark critical data is greatly streamlined, and valuable criticality safety experimental data is preserved. Criticality safety personnel in 31 different countries are now using the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments'. Much has been accomplished by the work of the ICSBEP. However, evaluation and documentation represents only one element of a successful Nuclear Criticality Safety Predictability Program and this element only exists as a separate entity, because this work was not completed in conjunction with the experimentation process. I believe; however, that the work of the ICSBEP has also served to unify the other elements of nuclear criticality predictability. All elements are interrelated, but for a time it seemed that communications between these elements was not adequate. The ICSBEP has highlighted gaps in data, has retrieved lost data, has helped to identify errors in cross section processing codes, and has helped bring the international criticality safety community together in a common cause as true friends and colleagues. It has been a privilege to associate with those who work so diligently to make the project a success. (J.P.N.)

  3. Prediction, Regression and Critical Realism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Næss, Petter

    2004-01-01

    This paper considers the possibility of prediction in land use planning, and the use of statistical research methods in analyses of relationships between urban form and travel behaviour. Influential writers within the tradition of critical realism reject the possibility of predicting social...... phenomena. This position is fundamentally problematic to public planning. Without at least some ability to predict the likely consequences of different proposals, the justification for public sector intervention into market mechanisms will be frail. Statistical methods like regression analyses are commonly...... seen as necessary in order to identify aggregate level effects of policy measures, but are questioned by many advocates of critical realist ontology. Using research into the relationship between urban structure and travel as an example, the paper discusses relevant research methods and the kinds...

  4. Evaluating predictions of critical oxygen desaturation events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElMoaqet, Hisham; Tilbury, Dawn M; Ramachandran, Satya Krishna

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach for evaluating predictions of oxygen saturation levels in blood ( SpO 2 ). A performance metric based on a threshold is proposed to evaluate  SpO 2 predictions based on whether or not they are able to capture critical desaturations in the  SpO 2 time series of patients. We use linear auto-regressive models built using historical  SpO 2 data to predict critical desaturation events with the proposed metric. In 20 s prediction intervals, 88%–94% of the critical events were captured with positive predictive values (PPVs) between 90% and 99%. Increasing the prediction horizon to 60 s, 46%–71% of the critical events were detected with PPVs between 81% and 97%. In both prediction horizons, more than 97% of the non-critical events were correctly classified. The overall classification capabilities for the developed predictive models were also investigated. The area under ROC curves for 60 s predictions from the developed models are between 0.86 and 0.98. Furthermore, we investigate the effect of including pulse rate (PR) dynamics in the models and predictions. We show no improvement in the percentage of the predicted critical desaturations if PR dynamics are incorporated into the  SpO 2 predictive models (p-value = 0.814). We also show that including the PR dynamics does not improve the earliest time at which critical  SpO 2 levels are predicted (p-value = 0.986). Our results indicate oxygen in blood is an effective input to the PR rather than vice versa. We demonstrate that the combination of predictive models with frequent pulse oximetry measurements can be used as a warning of critical oxygen desaturations that may have adverse effects on the health of patients. (paper)

  5. System Predicts Critical Runway Performance Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millen, Ernest W.; Person, Lee H., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Runway-navigation-monitor (RNM) and critical-distances-process electronic equipment designed to provide pilot with timely and reliable predictive navigation information relating to takeoff, landing and runway-turnoff operations. Enables pilot to make critical decisions about runway maneuvers with high confidence during emergencies. Utilizes ground-referenced position data only to drive purely navigational monitor system independent of statuses of systems in aircraft.

  6. Prediction of critical heat flux using ANFIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaferanlouei, Salman, E-mail: zaferanlouei@gmail.co [Nuclear Engineering and Physics Department, Faculty of Nuclear Engineering, Center of Excellence in Nuclear Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), 424 Hafez Avenue, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rostamifard, Dariush; Setayeshi, Saeed [Nuclear Engineering and Physics Department, Faculty of Nuclear Engineering, Center of Excellence in Nuclear Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), 424 Hafez Avenue, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    The prediction of Critical Heat Flux (CHF) is essential for water cooled nuclear reactors since it is an important parameter for the economic efficiency and safety of nuclear power plants. Therefore, in this study using Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS), a new flexible tool is developed to predict CHF. The process of training and testing in this model is done by using a set of available published field data. The CHF values predicted by the ANFIS model are acceptable compared with the other prediction methods. We improve the ANN model that is proposed by to avoid overfitting. The obtained new ANN test errors are compared with ANFIS model test errors, subsequently. It is found that the ANFIS model with root mean square (RMS) test errors of 4.79%, 5.04% and 11.39%, in fixed inlet conditions and local conditions and fixed outlet conditions, respectively, has superior performance in predicting the CHF than the test error obtained from MLP Neural Network in fixed inlet and outlet conditions, however, ANFIS also has acceptable result to predict CHF in fixed local conditions.

  7. Prediction of critical heat flux using ANFIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaferanlouei, Salman; Rostamifard, Dariush; Setayeshi, Saeed

    2010-01-01

    The prediction of Critical Heat Flux (CHF) is essential for water cooled nuclear reactors since it is an important parameter for the economic efficiency and safety of nuclear power plants. Therefore, in this study using Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS), a new flexible tool is developed to predict CHF. The process of training and testing in this model is done by using a set of available published field data. The CHF values predicted by the ANFIS model are acceptable compared with the other prediction methods. We improve the ANN model that is proposed by to avoid overfitting. The obtained new ANN test errors are compared with ANFIS model test errors, subsequently. It is found that the ANFIS model with root mean square (RMS) test errors of 4.79%, 5.04% and 11.39%, in fixed inlet conditions and local conditions and fixed outlet conditions, respectively, has superior performance in predicting the CHF than the test error obtained from MLP Neural Network in fixed inlet and outlet conditions, however, ANFIS also has acceptable result to predict CHF in fixed local conditions.

  8. Predicting recovery from acute kidney injury in critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Itenov, Theis S; Berthelsen, Rasmus Ehrenfried; Jensen, Jens-Ulrik

    2018-01-01

    these patients. DESIGN: Observational study with development and validation of a risk prediction model. SETTING: Nine academic ICUs in Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: Development cohort of critically ill patients with AKI at ICU admission from the Procalcitonin and Survival Study cohort (n = 568), validation cohort.......1%. CONCLUSION: We constructed and validated a simple model that can predict the chance of recovery from AKI in critically ill patients....

  9. Uncertainty Estimates in Cold Critical Eigenvalue Predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karve, Atul A.; Moore, Brian R.; Mills, Vernon W.; Marrotte, Gary N.

    2005-01-01

    A recent cycle of a General Electric boiling water reactor performed two beginning-of-cycle local cold criticals. The eigenvalues estimated by the core simulator were 0.99826 and 1.00610. The large spread in them (= 0.00784) is a source of concern, and it is studied here. An analysis process is developed using statistical techniques, where first a transfer function relating the core observable Y (eigenvalue) to various factors (X's) is established. Engineering judgment is used to recognize the best candidates for X's. They are identified as power-weighted assembly k ∞ 's of selected assemblies around the withdrawn rods. These are a small subset of many X's that could potentially influence Y. However, the intention here is not to do a comprehensive study by accounting for all the X's. Rather, the scope is to demonstrate that the process developed is reasonable and to show its applicability to performing detailed studies. Variability in X's is obtained by perturbing nodal k ∞ 's since they directly influence the buckling term in the quasi-two-group diffusion equation model of the core simulator. Any perturbations introduced in them are bounded by standard well-established uncertainties. The resulting perturbations in the X's may not necessarily be directly correlated to physical attributes, but they encompass numerous biases and uncertainties credited to input and modeling uncertainties. The 'vital few' from the 'unimportant many' X's are determined, and then they are subgrouped according to assembly type, location, exposure, and control rod insertion. The goal is to study how the subgroups influence Y in order to have a better understanding of the variability observed in it

  10. Prediction of critical thinking disposition based on mentoring among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results of study showed that there was a significantly positive correlation between Mentoring and Critical thinking disposition among faculty members. The findings showed that 67% of variance of critical thinking disposition was defined by predictive variables. The faculty members evaluated themselves in all mentoring ...

  11. Predictions of the marviken subcooled critical mass flux using the critical flow scaling parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Choon Kyung; Chun, Se Young; Cho, Seok; Yang, Sun Ku; Chung, Moon Ki [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    A total of 386 critical flow data points from 19 runs of 27 runs in the Marviken Test were selected and compared with the predictions by the correlations based on the critical flow scaling parameters. The results show that the critical mass flux in the very large diameter pipe can be also characterized by two scaling parameters such as discharge coefficient and dimensionless subcooling (C{sub d,ref} and {Delta}{Tau}{sup *} {sub sub}). The agreement between the measured data and the predictions are excellent. 8 refs., 8 figs. 1 tab. (Author)

  12. Predictions of the marviken subcooled critical mass flux using the critical flow scaling parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Choon Kyung; Chun, Se Young; Cho, Seok; Yang, Sun Ku; Chung, Moon Ki [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    A total of 386 critical flow data points from 19 runs of 27 runs in the Marviken Test were selected and compared with the predictions by the correlations based on the critical flow scaling parameters. The results show that the critical mass flux in the very large diameter pipe can be also characterized by two scaling parameters such as discharge coefficient and dimensionless subcooling (C{sub d,ref} and {Delta}{Tau}{sup *} {sub sub}). The agreement between the measured data and the predictions are excellent. 8 refs., 8 figs. 1 tab. (Author)

  13. Advances in criticality predictions for EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, R.W.; Imel, G.R.

    1994-01-01

    Improvements to startup criticality predictions for the EBR-II reactor have been made. More exact calculational models, methods and data are now used, and better procedures for obtaining experimental data that enter into the prediction are in place. Accuracy improved by more than a factor of two and the largest ECP error observed since the changes is only 18 cents. An experimental method using subcritical counts is also being implemented

  14. Consideration of critical heat flux margin prediction by subcooled or low quality critical heat flux correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hejzlar, P.; Todreas, N.E.

    1996-01-01

    The accurate prediction of the critical heat flux (CHF) margin which is a key design parameter in a variety of cooling and heating systems is of high importance. These margins are, for the low quality region, typically expressed in terms of critical heat flux ratios using the direct substitution method. Using a simple example of a heated tube, it is shown that CHF correlations of a certain type often used to predict CHF margins, expressed in this manner, may yield different results, strongly dependent on the correlation in use. It is argued that the application of the heat balance method to such correlations, which leads to expressing the CHF margins in terms of the critical power ratio, may be more appropriate. (orig.)

  15. Critical Features of Fragment Libraries for Protein Structure Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevizani, Raphael; Custódio, Fábio Lima; Dos Santos, Karina Baptista; Dardenne, Laurent Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    The use of fragment libraries is a popular approach among protein structure prediction methods and has proven to substantially improve the quality of predicted structures. However, some vital aspects of a fragment library that influence the accuracy of modeling a native structure remain to be determined. This study investigates some of these features. Particularly, we analyze the effect of using secondary structure prediction guiding fragments selection, different fragments sizes and the effect of structural clustering of fragments within libraries. To have a clearer view of how these factors affect protein structure prediction, we isolated the process of model building by fragment assembly from some common limitations associated with prediction methods, e.g., imprecise energy functions and optimization algorithms, by employing an exact structure-based objective function under a greedy algorithm. Our results indicate that shorter fragments reproduce the native structure more accurately than the longer. Libraries composed of multiple fragment lengths generate even better structures, where longer fragments show to be more useful at the beginning of the simulations. The use of many different fragment sizes shows little improvement when compared to predictions carried out with libraries that comprise only three different fragment sizes. Models obtained from libraries built using only sequence similarity are, on average, better than those built with a secondary structure prediction bias. However, we found that the use of secondary structure prediction allows greater reduction of the search space, which is invaluable for prediction methods. The results of this study can be critical guidelines for the use of fragment libraries in protein structure prediction.

  16. Safety-critical Java on a time-predictable processor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Stephan E.; Schoeberl, Martin; Puffitsch, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    For real-time systems the whole execution stack needs to be time-predictable and analyzable for the worst-case execution time (WCET). This paper presents a time-predictable platform for safety-critical Java. The platform consists of (1) the Patmos processor, which is a time-predictable processor......; (2) a C compiler for Patmos with support for WCET analysis; (3) the HVM, which is a Java-to-C compiler; (4) the HVM-SCJ implementation which supports SCJ Level 0, 1, and 2 (for both single and multicore platforms); and (5) a WCET analysis tool. We show that real-time Java programs translated to C...... and compiled to a Patmos binary can be analyzed by the AbsInt aiT WCET analysis tool. To the best of our knowledge the presented system is the second WCET analyzable real-time Java system; and the first one on top of a RISC processor....

  17. Prediction of critical heat flux in vertical pipe flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, S.; Healzer, J.M.; Abdollahian, D.

    1981-01-01

    A previously developed semi-empirical model for adiabatic two-phase annular flow ix extended to predict the critical heat flux (CHF) in a vertical pipe. The model exhibits a sharply declining curve of CHF versus steam quality (X) at low X, and is relatively independent of the heat flux distribution. In this region, vaporization of the liquid film controls. At high X, net deposition upon the liquid film becomes important and CHF versus X flattens considerably. In this zone, CHF is dependent upon the heat flux distribution. Model predictions are compared to test data and an empirical correlation. The agreement is generally good if one employs previously reported mass transfer coefficients. (orig.)

  18. Prediction is difficult, preparation is critical and possible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zilli, Romano; Dalton, Luke; Ooms, Wim

    at the level of the source of infection, transmission pathways, and the outcomes. Changes to such challenges and uncertainties are inevitable and foresight in identifying strategies is required for us to prepare for a sustainable future. The EU-funded Global Network on Infectious Diseases of Animals...... and technological needs, including research capacity and support structures to prevent, control or mitigate animal health and zoonotic challenges for 2030 and beyond. While our ability to predict the future is often limited, being prepared to engage with whatever may happen is critical. Methods: Foresight workshops...... to give an overall list in which transnational data sharing, knowledge transfer, public-private partnerships, vaccinology/immunology, vector control, antimicrobial resistance, socioeconomics, genetics/bioinformatics and utilisation of big data rated highly. Conclusion: The outputs of the STAR...

  19. Saturated properties prediction in critical region by a quartic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A diverse substance library containing extensive PVT data for 77 pure components was used to critically evaluate the performance of a quartic equation of state and other four famous cubic equations of state in critical region. The quartic EOS studied in this work was found to significantly superior to the others in both vapor ...

  20. Critical evidence for the prediction error theory in associative learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terao, Kanta; Matsumoto, Yukihisa; Mizunami, Makoto

    2015-03-10

    In associative learning in mammals, it is widely accepted that the discrepancy, or error, between actual and predicted reward determines whether learning occurs. Complete evidence for the prediction error theory, however, has not been obtained in any learning systems: Prediction error theory stems from the finding of a blocking phenomenon, but blocking can also be accounted for by other theories, such as the attentional theory. We demonstrated blocking in classical conditioning in crickets and obtained evidence to reject the attentional theory. To obtain further evidence supporting the prediction error theory and rejecting alternative theories, we constructed a neural model to match the prediction error theory, by modifying our previous model of learning in crickets, and we tested a prediction from the model: the model predicts that pharmacological intervention of octopaminergic transmission during appetitive conditioning impairs learning but not formation of reward prediction itself, and it thus predicts no learning in subsequent training. We observed such an "auto-blocking", which could be accounted for by the prediction error theory but not by other competitive theories to account for blocking. This study unambiguously demonstrates validity of the prediction error theory in associative learning.

  1. Predictive information processing in music cognition. A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrmeier, Martin A; Koelsch, Stefan

    2012-02-01

    Expectation and prediction constitute central mechanisms in the perception and cognition of music, which have been explored in theoretical and empirical accounts. We review the scope and limits of theoretical accounts of musical prediction with respect to feature-based and temporal prediction. While the concept of prediction is unproblematic for basic single-stream features such as melody, it is not straight-forward for polyphonic structures or higher-order features such as formal predictions. Behavioural results based on explicit and implicit (priming) paradigms provide evidence of priming in various domains that may reflect predictive behaviour. Computational learning models, including symbolic (fragment-based), probabilistic/graphical, or connectionist approaches, provide well-specified predictive models of specific features and feature combinations. While models match some experimental results, full-fledged music prediction cannot yet be modelled. Neuroscientific results regarding the early right-anterior negativity (ERAN) and mismatch negativity (MMN) reflect expectancy violations on different levels of processing complexity, and provide some neural evidence for different predictive mechanisms. At present, the combinations of neural and computational modelling methodologies are at early stages and require further research. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Criticality predicts maximum irregularity in recurrent networks of excitatory nodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya Karimipanah

    Full Text Available A rigorous understanding of brain dynamics and function requires a conceptual bridge between multiple levels of organization, including neural spiking and network-level population activity. Mounting evidence suggests that neural networks of cerebral cortex operate at a critical regime, which is defined as a transition point between two phases of short lasting and chaotic activity. However, despite the fact that criticality brings about certain functional advantages for information processing, its supporting evidence is still far from conclusive, as it has been mostly based on power law scaling of size and durations of cascades of activity. Moreover, to what degree such hypothesis could explain some fundamental features of neural activity is still largely unknown. One of the most prevalent features of cortical activity in vivo is known to be spike irregularity of spike trains, which is measured in terms of the coefficient of variation (CV larger than one. Here, using a minimal computational model of excitatory nodes, we show that irregular spiking (CV > 1 naturally emerges in a recurrent network operating at criticality. More importantly, we show that even at the presence of other sources of spike irregularity, being at criticality maximizes the mean coefficient of variation of neurons, thereby maximizing their spike irregularity. Furthermore, we also show that such a maximized irregularity results in maximum correlation between neuronal firing rates and their corresponding spike irregularity (measured in terms of CV. On the one hand, using a model in the universality class of directed percolation, we propose new hallmarks of criticality at single-unit level, which could be applicable to any network of excitable nodes. On the other hand, given the controversy of the neural criticality hypothesis, we discuss the limitation of this approach to neural systems and to what degree they support the criticality hypothesis in real neural networks. Finally

  3. Prediction Approach of Critical Node Based on Multiple Attribute Decision Making for Opportunistic Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qifan Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Predicting critical nodes of Opportunistic Sensor Network (OSN can help us not only to improve network performance but also to decrease the cost in network maintenance. However, existing ways of predicting critical nodes in static network are not suitable for OSN. In this paper, the conceptions of critical nodes, region contribution, and cut-vertex in multiregion OSN are defined. We propose an approach to predict critical node for OSN, which is based on multiple attribute decision making (MADM. It takes RC to present the dependence of regions on Ferry nodes. TOPSIS algorithm is employed to find out Ferry node with maximum comprehensive contribution, which is a critical node. The experimental results show that, in different scenarios, this approach can predict the critical nodes of OSN better.

  4. Saturated properties prediction in critical region by a quartic equation of state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Wang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A diverse substance library containing extensive PVT data for 77 pure components was used to critically evaluate the performance of a quartic equation of state and other four famous cubic equations of state in critical region. The quartic EOS studied in this work was found to significantly superior to the others in both vapor pressure prediction and saturated volume prediction in vicinity of critical point.

  5. Causal explanation, intentionality, and prediction: Evaluating the Criticism of "Deductivism"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Carsten Allan

    2001-01-01

    In a number of influential contributions, Tony Lawson has attacked a view of science that he refers to as deductivism, and criticized economists for implicitly using it in their research. Lawson argues that deductivism is simply the covering-law model, also known as the causal model of scientific...... critisizes the use of universal laws in social science, especially in economics. This view cannot be as easily dismissed as his general criticism of causal explanation. We argue that a number of arguments often used against the existence of (correct) universal laws in the social sciences can be put...... into question. First, it is argued that entities need not be identical, or even remotely alike, to be applicable to the same law. What is necessary is that they have common properties, e.g. mass in physics, and that the law relates to that property (section 6). Second, one might take the so-called model...

  6. Factors predicting labor induction success: a critical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Joan M G

    2006-09-01

    Because of the risk of failed induction of labor, a variety of maternal and fetal factors as well as screening tests have been suggested to predict labor induction success. Certain characteristics of the woman (including parity, age, weight, height and body mass index), and of the fetus (including birth weight and gestational age) are associated with the success of labor induction; with parous, young women who are taller and lower weight having a higher rate of induction success. Fetuses with a lower birth weight or increased gestational age are also associated with increased induction success. The condition of the cervix at the start of induction is an important predictor, with the modified Bishop score being a widely used scoring system. The most important element of the Bishop score is dilatation. Other predictors, including transvaginal ultrasound (TVUS) and biochemical markers [including fetal fibronectin (fFN)] have been suggested. Meta-analyses of studies identified from MEDLINE, PubMed, and EMBASE and published from 1990 to October 2005 were performed evaluating the use of TVUS and fFN in predicting labor induction success in women at term with singleton gestations. Both TVUS and Bishop score predicted successful induction [likelihood ratio (LR)=1.82, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.51-2.20 and LR=2.10, 95%CI=1.67-2.64, respectively]. As well, fFN and Bishop score predicted successful induction (LR=1.49, 95%CI=1.20-1.85, and LR=2.62, 95%CI=1.88-3.64, respectively). Although TVUS and fFN predicted successful labor induction, neither has been shown to be superior to Bishop score. Further research is needed to evaluate these potential predictors and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1), another potential biochemical marker.

  7. Prediction of Critical Heat Flux under Rolling Motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Jinseok; Lee, Yeongun; Park, Gooncherl [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The aim to this paper may be summarized as follows: identify the flow regime compare with existing void-quality relationship and void fraction at OAF derived from the vapor superficial velocity obtained by the churn-to annular flow criterion, develop and evaluate the correlation for accurate prediction of CHF ratio under rolling motion. Experimentally measured CHF results from the previous study were not well-predicted by existing CHF correlations developed for wide range of pressure under rolling motion in vertical tube. Specifically, existing correlations do not account for the dynamic motion parameter, such as tangential and centrifugal force. This study reviewed some existing correlation and experimental studies related to reduction and enhancement of CHF and heat transfer and flow behavior under heaving and rolling motion, and developed a CHF ratio correlation for upward flow vertical tube under rolling motion. Based upon dimensionless groups, equations and interpolation factor, an empirical CHF correlation has been developed which is consistent with experimental data for uniformly heated tubes internally cooled by R-134 under rolling motion. Flow regime was determined through the prediction method for annular flow. Non-dimensional number and function were decided by CHF mechanism of each region. Interaction of LFD and DNB regions is taken into account by means of power interpolation which is reflected void fraction at OAF. The suggested correlation predicted the CHF Ratio with reasonable accuracy, showing an average error of -0.59 and 2.51% for RMS. Rolling motion can affect bubble motion and liquid film behavior complexly by combination of tangential and centrifugal forces and mass flow than heaving motion. Through a search of literature and a comparison of previous CHF ratio results, this work can contribute to the study of boiling heat transfer and CHF for the purpose of enhancement or reduction the CHF of dynamic motion system, such as marine reactor.

  8. System for prediction and determination of the sub critic multiplication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Aquilino S.; Pereira, Valmir; Silva, Fernando C. da

    1997-01-01

    It is presented a concept of a system which may be used to calculate and anticipate the subcritical multiplication of a PWR nuclear power plant. The system is divided into two different modules. The first module allows the theoretical prediction of the subcritical multiplication factor through the solution of the multigroup diffusion equation. The second module determines this factor based on the data acquired from the neutron detectors of a NPP external nuclear detection system. (author). 3 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Detecting, anticipating, and predicting critical transitions in spatially extended systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwasniok, Frank

    2018-03-01

    A data-driven linear framework for detecting, anticipating, and predicting incipient bifurcations in spatially extended systems based on principal oscillation pattern (POP) analysis is discussed. The dynamics are assumed to be governed by a system of linear stochastic differential equations which is estimated from the data. The principal modes of the system together with corresponding decay or growth rates and oscillation frequencies are extracted as the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the system matrix. The method can be applied to stationary datasets to identify the least stable modes and assess the proximity to instability; it can also be applied to nonstationary datasets using a sliding window approach to track the changing eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the system. As a further step, a genuinely nonstationary POP analysis is introduced. Here, the system matrix of the linear stochastic model is time-dependent, allowing for extrapolation and prediction of instabilities beyond the learning data window. The methods are demonstrated and explored using the one-dimensional Swift-Hohenberg equation as an example, focusing on the dynamics of stochastic fluctuations around the homogeneous stable state prior to the first bifurcation. The POP-based techniques are able to extract and track the least stable eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the system; the nonstationary POP analysis successfully predicts the timing of the first instability and the unstable mode well beyond the learning data window.

  10. Safety prediction for basic components of safety critical software based on static testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, H.S.; Seong, P.H.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a safety prediction method, with which we can predict the risk of software components based on static testing results at the early development stage. The predictive model combines the major factor with the quality factor for the components, both of which are calculated based on the measures proposed in this work. The application to a safety-critical software system demonstrates the feasibility of the safety prediction method. (authors)

  11. Safety prediction for basic components of safety-critical software based on static testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, H.S.; Seong, P.H.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a safety prediction method, with which we can predict the risk of software components based on static testing results at the early development stage. The predictive model combines the major factor with the quality factor for the components, which are calculated based on the measures proposed in this work. The application to a safety-critical software system demonstrates the feasibility of the safety prediction method. (authors)

  12. Predictive maintenance of critical equipment in industrial processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemian, Hashem M.

    This dissertation is an account of present and past research and development (R&D) efforts conducted by the author to develop and implement new technology for predictive maintenance and equipment condition monitoring in industrial processes. In particular, this dissertation presents the design of an integrated condition-monitoring system that incorporates the results of three current R&D projects with a combined funding of $2.8 million awarded to the author by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This system will improve the state of the art in equipment condition monitoring and has applications in numerous industries including chemical and petrochemical plants, aviation and aerospace, electric power production and distribution, and a variety of manufacturing processes. The work that is presented in this dissertation is unique in that it introduces a new class of condition-monitoring methods that depend predominantly on the normal output of existing process sensors. It also describes current R&D efforts to develop data acquisition systems and data analysis algorithms and software packages that use the output of these sensors to determine the condition and health of industrial processes and their equipment. For example, the output of a pressure sensor in an operating plant can be used not only to indicate the pressure, but also to verify the calibration and response time of the sensor itself and identify anomalies in the process such as blockages, voids, and leaks that can interfere with accurate measurement of process parameters or disturb the plant's operation, safety, or reliability. Today, process data are typically collected at a rate of one sample per second (1 Hz) or slower. If this sampling rate is increased to 100 samples per second or higher, much more information can be extracted from the normal output of a process sensor and then used for condition monitoring, equipment performance measurements, and predictive maintenance. A fast analog-to-digital (A

  13. Prediction of Oil Critical Rate in Vertical Wells using Meyer-Gardner ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF HORSFALL

    2018-04-14

    Apr 14, 2018 ... Department of Petroleum and Gas Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Delta State University, Abraka, Delta State, ..... impermeable barrier, extending radially from the ... useful aid to field engineers for predicting critical rate.

  14. Prediction model to predict critical weight loss in patients with head and neck cancer during (chemo)radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langius, Jacqueline A E; Twisk, Jos; Kampman, Martine; Doornaert, Patricia; Kramer, Mark H H; Weijs, Peter J M; Leemans, C René

    2016-01-01

    Patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) frequently encounter weight loss with multiple negative outcomes as a consequence. Adequate treatment is best achieved by early identification of patients at risk for critical weight loss. The objective of this study was to detect predictive factors for critical weight loss in patients with HNC receiving (chemo)radiotherapy ((C)RT). In this cohort study, 910 patients with HNC were included receiving RT (±surgery/concurrent chemotherapy) with curative intent. Body weight was measured at the start and end of (C)RT. Logistic regression and classification and regression tree (CART) analyses were used to analyse predictive factors for critical weight loss (defined as >5%) during (C)RT. Possible predictors included gender, age, WHO performance status, tumour location, TNM classification, treatment modality, RT technique (three-dimensional conformal RT (3D-RT) vs intensity-modulated RT (IMRT)), total dose on the primary tumour and RT on the elective or macroscopic lymph nodes. At the end of (C)RT, mean weight loss was 5.1±4.9%. Fifty percent of patients had critical weight loss during (C)RT. The main predictors for critical weight loss during (C)RT by both logistic and CART analyses were RT on the lymph nodes, higher RT dose on the primary tumour, receiving 3D-RT instead of IMRT, and younger age. Critical weight loss during (C)RT was prevalent in half of HNC patients. To predict critical weight loss, a practical prediction tree for adequate nutritional advice was developed, including the risk factors RT to the neck, higher RT dose, 3D-RT, and younger age. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Adverse Condition and Critical Event Prediction in Cranfield Multiphase Flow Facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egedorf, Søren; Shaker, Hamid Reza

    2017-01-01

    , or even to the environment. To cope with these, adverse condition and critical event prediction plays an important role. Adverse Condition and Critical Event Prediction Toolbox (ACCEPT) is a tool which has been recently developed by NASA to allow for a timely prediction of an adverse event, with low false...... alarm and missed detection rates. While ACCEPT has shown to be an effective tool in some applications, its performance has not yet been evaluated on practical well-known benchmark examples. In this paper, ACCEPT is used for adverse condition and critical event prediction in a multiphase flow facility....... Cranfield multiphase flow facility is known to be an interesting benchmark which has been used to evaluate different methods from statistical process monitoring. In order to allow for the data from the flow facility to be used in ACCEPT, methods such as Kernel Density Estimation (KDE), PCA-and CVA...

  16. Critical power prediction by CATHARE2 of the OECD/NRC BFBT benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutsanych, Sergii, E-mail: s.lutsanych@ing.unipi.it [San Piero a Grado Nuclear Research Group (GRNSPG), University of Pisa, Via Livornese 1291, 56122, San Piero a Grado, Pisa (Italy); Sabotinov, Luben, E-mail: luben.sabotinov@irsn.fr [Institut for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), 31 avenue de la Division Leclerc, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); D’Auria, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.dauria@dimnp.unipi.it [San Piero a Grado Nuclear Research Group (GRNSPG), University of Pisa, Via Livornese 1291, 56122, San Piero a Grado, Pisa (Italy)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • We used CATHARE code to calculate the critical power exercises of the OECD/NRC BFBT benchmark. • We considered both steady-state and transient critical power tests of the benchmark. • We used both the 1D and 3D features of the CATHARE code to simulate the experiments. • Acceptable prediction of the critical power and its location in the bundle is obtained using appropriate modelling. - Abstract: This paper presents an application of the French best estimate thermal-hydraulic code CATHARE 2 to calculate the critical power and departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) exercises of the International OECD/NRC BWR Fuel Bundle Test (BFBT) benchmark. The assessment activity is performed comparing the code calculation results with available in the framework of the benchmark experimental data from Japanese Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC). Two-phase flow calculations on prediction of the critical power have been carried out both in steady state and transient cases, using one-dimensional and three-dimensional modelling. Results of the steady-state critical power tests calculation have shown the ability of CATHARE code to predict reasonably the critical power and its location, using appropriate modelling.

  17. Role of Personality Traits, Learning Styles and Metacognition in Predicting Critical Thinking of Undergraduate Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soliemanifar O

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of personality traits, learning styles and metacognition in predicting critical thinking. Instrument & Methods: In this descriptive correlative study, 240 students (130 girls and 110 boys of Ahvaz Shahid Chamran University were selected by multi-stage random sampling method. The instruments for collecting data were NEO Five-Factor Inventory, learning style inventory of Kolb (LSI, metacognitive assessment inventory (MAI of Schraw & Dennison (1994 and California Critical Thinking Skills Test (CCTST. The data were analyzed using Pearson correlation coefficient, stepwise regression analysis and Canonical correlation analysis.  Findings: Openness to experiment (b=0.41, conscientiousness (b=0.28, abstract conceptualization (b=0.39, active experimentation (b=0.22, reflective observation (b=0.12, knowledge of cognition (b=0.47 and regulation of cognition (b=0.29 were effective in predicting critical thinking. Openness to experiment and conscientiousness (r2=0.25, active experimentation, abstract conceptualization and reflective observation learning styles (r2=0.21 and knowledge and regulation of cognition metacognitions (r2=0.3 had an important role in explaining critical thinking. The linear combination of critical thinking skills (evaluation, analysis, inference was predictable by a linear combination of dispositional-cognitive factors (openness, conscientiousness, abstract conceptualization, active experimentation, knowledge of cognition and regulation of cognition. Conclusion: Personality traits, learning styles and metacognition, as dispositional-cognitive factors, play a significant role in students' critical thinking.

  18. Prediction calculation of HTR-10 fuel loading for the first criticality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing Xingqing; Yang Yongwei; Gu Yuxiang; Shan Wenzhi

    2001-01-01

    The 10 MW high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTR-10) was built at Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, and the first criticality was attained in Dec. 2000. The high temperature gas cooled reactor physics simulation code VSOP was used for the prediction of the fuel loading for HTR-10 first criticality. The number of fuel element and graphite element was predicted to provide reference for the first criticality experiment. The prediction calculations toke into account the factors including the double heterogeneity of the fuel element, buckling feedback for the spectrum calculation, the effect of the mixture of the graphite and the fuel element, and the correction of the diffusion coefficients near the upper cavity based on the transport theory. The effects of impurities in the fuel and the graphite element in the core and those in the reflector graphite on the reactivity of the reactor were considered in detail. The first criticality experiment showed that the predicted values and the experiment results were in good agreement with little relative error less than 1%, which means the prediction was successful

  19. Critical exponents predicted by grouping of Feynman diagrams in φ4 model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaupuzs, J.

    2001-01-01

    Different perturbation theory treatments of the Ginzburg-Landau phase transition model are discussed. This includes a criticism of the perturbative renormalization group (RG) approach and a proposal of a novel method providing critical exponents consistent with the known exact solutions in two dimensions. The usual perturbation theory is reorganized by appropriate grouping of Feynman diagrams of φ 4 model with O(n) symmetry. As a result, equations for calculation of the two-point correlation function are obtained which allow to predict possible exact values of critical exponents in two and three dimensions by proving relevant scaling properties of the asymptotic solution at (and near) the criticality. The new values of critical exponents are discussed and compared to the results of numerical simulations and experiments. (orig.)

  20. Method of critical power prediction based on film flow model coupled with subchannel analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomiyama, Akio; Yokomizo, Osamu; Yoshimoto, Yuichiro; Sugawara, Satoshi.

    1988-01-01

    A new method was developed to predict critical powers for a wide variety of BWR fuel bundle designs. This method couples subchannel analysis with a liquid film flow model, instead of taking the conventional way which couples subchannel analysis with critical heat flux correlations. Flow and quality distributions in a bundle are estimated by the subchannel analysis. Using these distributions, film flow rates along fuel rods are then calculated with the film flow model. Dryout is assumed to occur where one of the film flows disappears. This method is expected to give much better adaptability to variations in geometry, heat flux, flow rate and quality distributions than the conventional methods. In order to verify the method, critical power data under BWR conditions were analyzed. Measured and calculated critical powers agreed to within ±7%. Furthermore critical power data for a tight-latticed bundle obtained by LeTourneau et al. were compared with critical powers calculated by the present method and two conventional methods, CISE correlation and subchannel analysis coupled with the CISE correlation. It was confirmed that the present method can predict critical powers more accurately than the conventional methods. (author)

  1. Critically Tapered Wedges and Critical State Soil Mechanics: Porosity-based Pressure Prediction in the Nankai Accretionary Prism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemings, P. B.; Saffer, D. M.

    2016-12-01

    We predict pore pressure from porosity measurements at ODP Sites 1174 and 808 in the Nankai Accretionary prism, offshore Japan. For a range of friction angles (5-30 degrees), we estimate that the pore pressure ratio (λ*) ranges from 0.5 to 0.8: the pore pressure supports 50% to 80% of the overburden. Higher friction angles result in higher pressures. For the majority of the scenarios, pressures within the prism parallel the lithostat and are greater than the pressures beneath it. Our results support previous qualitative interpretations at Nankai and elsewhere suggesting that lower porosity above the décollement than below reflects higher mean effective stress there. By coupling a critical state soil model (Modified Cam Clay), which describes porosity as a function of mean and deviator stress, with a stress model that considers the difference in stress states above and below the décollement, we quantitatively show that the prism porosities record significant overpressure despite their lower porosity. As the soil is consumed by the advancing prism, changes in both mean and shear stress drive overpressure generation. Even in the extreme case where only change in mean stress is considered (a vertical end cap model), significant overpressures are generated. The high pressures we predict require an effective friction coefficient (µb') at the décollement of 0.023-0.038. Assuming that the pore pressure at the décollement lies between the values we report for the wedge and the underthrusting sediments, these effective friction coefficients correspond to intrinsic friction coefficients of µb= 0.08-0.38 (f = 4.6 - 21°). These values are comparable to friction coefficients of 0.1-0.4 reported for clay-dominated fault zones in a wide range of settings. By coupling the critical wedge model with an appropriate constitutive model, we present a systematic approach to predict pressure in thrust systems.

  2. Predicting critical heat flux in slug flow regime of uniformly heated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Numerical computation code (PWR-DNBP) has been developed to predict Critical Heat Flux (CHF) of forced convective flow of water in a vertical heated channel. The code was based on the liquid sub-layer model, with the assumption that CHF occurred when the liquid film thickness between the heated surface and vapour ...

  3. ACCEPT: Introduction of the Adverse Condition and Critical Event Prediction Toolbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Rodney A.; Santanu, Das; Janakiraman, Vijay Manikandan; Hosein, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The prediction of anomalies or adverse events is a challenging task, and there are a variety of methods which can be used to address the problem. In this paper, we introduce a generic framework developed in MATLAB (sup registered mark) called ACCEPT (Adverse Condition and Critical Event Prediction Toolbox). ACCEPT is an architectural framework designed to compare and contrast the performance of a variety of machine learning and early warning algorithms, and tests the capability of these algorithms to robustly predict the onset of adverse events in any time-series data generating systems or processes.

  4. Prediction of critical flow rates through power-operated relief valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdollahian, D.; Singh, A.

    1983-01-01

    Existing single-phase and two-phase critical flow models are used to predict the flow rates through the power-operated relief valves tested in the EPRI Safety and Relief Valve test program. For liquid upstream conditions, Homogeneous Equilibrium Model, Moody, Henry-Fauske and Burnell two-phase critical flow models are used for comparison with data. Under steam upstream conditions, the flow rates are predicted either by the single-phase isentropic equations or the Homogeneous Equilibrium Model, depending on the thermodynamic condition of the fluid at the choking plane. The results of the comparisons are used to specify discharge coefficients for different valves under steam and liquid upstream conditions and evaluate the existing approximate critical flow relations for a wide range of subcooled water and steam conditions

  5. Predicting the unpredictable: Critical analysis and practical implications of predictive anticipatory activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia eMossbridge

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A recent meta-analysis of experiments from seven independent laboratories (n=26 published since 1978 indicates that the human body can apparently detect randomly delivered stimuli occurring 1-10 seconds in the future (Mossbridge, Tressoldi, & Utts, 2012. The key observation in these studies is that human physiology appears to be able to distinguish between unpredictable dichotomous future stimuli, such as emotional vs. neutral images or sound vs. silence. This phenomenon has been called presentiment (as in feeling the future. In this paper we call it predictive anticipatory activity or PAA. The phenomenon is predictive because it can distinguish between upcoming stimuli; it is anticipatory because the physiological changes occur before a future event; and it is an activity because it involves changes in the cardiopulmonary, skin, and/or nervous systems. PAA is an unconscious phenomenon that seems to be a time-reversed reflection of the usual physiological response to a stimulus. It appears to resemble precognition (consciously knowing something is going to happen before it does, but PAA specifically refers to unconscious physiological reactions as opposed to conscious premonitions. Though it is possible that PAA underlies the conscious experience of precognition, experiments testing this idea have not produced clear results. The first part of this paper reviews the evidence for PAA and examines the two most difficult challenges for obtaining valid evidence for it: expectation bias and multiple analyses. The second part speculates on possible mechanisms and the theoretical implications of PAA for understanding physiology and consciousness. The third part examines potential practical applications.

  6. Prediction model of critical weight loss in cancer patients during particle therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhihong; Zhu, Yu; Zhang, Lijuan; Wang, Ziying; Wan, Hongwei

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the predictors of critical weight loss in cancer patients receiving particle therapy, and build a prediction model based on its predictive factors. Patients receiving particle therapy were enroled between June 2015 and June 2016. Body weight was measured at the start and end of particle therapy. Association between critical weight loss (defined as >5%) during particle therapy and patients' demographic, clinical characteristic, pre-therapeutic nutrition risk screening (NRS 2002) and BMI were evaluated by logistic regression and decision tree analysis. Finally, 375 cancer patients receiving particle therapy were included. Mean weight loss was 0.55 kg, and 11.5% of patients experienced critical weight loss during particle therapy. The main predictors of critical weight loss during particle therapy were head and neck tumour location, total radiation dose ≥70 Gy on the primary tumour, and without post-surgery, as indicated by both logistic regression and decision tree analysis. Prediction model that includes tumour locations, total radiation dose and post-surgery had a good predictive ability, with the area under receiver operating characteristic curve 0.79 (95% CI: 0.71-0.88) and 0.78 (95% CI: 0.69-0.86) for decision tree and logistic regression model, respectively. Cancer patients with head and neck tumour location, total radiation dose ≥70 Gy and without post-surgery were at higher risk of critical weight loss during particle therapy, and early intensive nutrition counselling or intervention should be target at this population. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. A Critical Plane-energy Model for Multiaxial Fatigue Life Prediction of Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Haoyang

    A new critical plane-energy model is proposed in this thesis for multiaxial fatigue life prediction of homogeneous and heterogeneous materials. Brief review of existing methods, especially on the critical plane-based and energy-based methods, are given first. Special focus is on one critical plane approach which has been shown to work for both brittle and ductile metals. The key idea is to automatically change the critical plane orientation with respect to different materials and stress states. One potential drawback of the developed model is that it needs an empirical calibration parameter for non-proportional multiaxial loadings since only the strain terms are used and the out-of-phase hardening cannot be considered. The energy-based model using the critical plane concept is proposed with help of the Mroz-Garud hardening rule to explicitly include the effect of non-proportional hardening under fatigue cyclic loadings. Thus, the empirical calibration for non-proportional loading is not needed since the out-of-phase hardening is naturally included in the stress calculation. The model predictions are compared with experimental data from open literature and it is shown the proposed model can work for both proportional and non-proportional loadings without the empirical calibration. Next, the model is extended for the fatigue analysis of heterogeneous materials integrating with finite element method. Fatigue crack initiation of representative volume of heterogeneous materials is analyzed using the developed critical plane-energy model and special focus is on the microstructure effect on the multiaxial fatigue life predictions. Several conclusions and future work is drawn based on the proposed study.

  8. Classification and prediction of the critical heat flux using fuzzy theory and artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Sang Ki; Chang, Soon Heung

    1994-01-01

    A new method to predict the critical heat flux (CHF) is proposed, based on the fuzzy clustering and artificial neural network. The fuzzy clustering classifies the experimental CHF data into a few data clusters (data groups) according to the data characteristics. After classification of the experimental data, the characteristics of the resulting clusters are discussed with emphasis on the distribution of the experimental conditions and physical mechanism. The CHF data in each group are trained in an artificial neural network to predict the CHF. The artificial neural network adjusts the weight so as to minimize the prediction error within the corresponding cluster. Application of the proposed method to the KAIST CHF data bank shows good prediction capability of the CHF, better than other existing methods. ((orig.))

  9. Prediction of critical heat flux by a new local condition hypothesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Im, J. H.; Jun, K. D.; Sim, J. W.; Deng, Zhijian

    1998-01-01

    Critical Heat Flux(CHF) was predicted for uniformly heated vertical round tube by a new local condition hypothesis which incorporates a local true steam quality. This model successfully overcame the difficulties in predicted the subcooled and quality CHF by the thermodynamic equilibrium quality. The local true steam quality is a dependent variable of the thermodynamic equilibrium quality at the exit and the quality at the Onset of Significant Vaporization(OSV). The exit thermodynamic equilibrium quality was obtained from the heat balance, and the quality at OSV was obtained from the Saha-Zuber correlation. In the past CHF has been predicted by the experimental correlation based on local or non-local condition hypothesis. This preliminary study showed that all the available world data on uniform CHF could be predicted by the model based on the local condition hypothesis

  10. A Simple Predictive Method of Critical Flicker Detection for Human Healthy Precaution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goh Zai Peng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Interharmonics and flickers have an interrelationship between each other. Based on International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC flicker standard, the critical flicker frequency for a human eye is located at 8.8 Hz. Additionally, eye strains, headaches, and in the worst case seizures may happen due to the critical flicker. Therefore, this paper introduces a worthwhile research gap on the investigation of interrelationship between the amplitudes of the interharmonics and the critical flicker for 50 Hz power system. Consequently, the significant findings obtained in this paper are the amplitudes of two particular interharmonics are able to detect the critical flicker. In this paper, the aforementioned amplitudes are detected by adaptive linear neuron (ADALINE. After that, the critical flicker is detected by substituting the aforesaid amplitudes to the formulas that have been generated in this paper accordingly. Simulation and experimental works are conducted and the accuracy of the proposed algorithm which utilizes ADALINE is similar, as compared to typical Fluke power analyzer. In a nutshell, this simple predictive method for critical flicker detection has strong potential to be applied in any human crowded places (such as offices, shopping complexes, and stadiums for human healthy precaution purpose due to its simplicity.

  11. Critical heat flux predictions for the Sandia Annular Core Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, D.V.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1994-08-01

    This study provides best estimate predictions of the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) and the Critical Heat Flux Ratio (CHFR) to support the proposed upgrade of the Annual Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) from its present value of 2 MWt to 4 MWt. These predictions are based on the University of New Mexico (UNM) - CHF correlation, originally developed for uniformly heated vertical annuli. The UNM-CHF correlation is applicable to low-flow and low-pressure conditions, which are typical of those in the ACRR. The three hypotheses that examined the effect of the nonuniform axial heat flux distribution in the ACRR core are (1) the local conditions hypotheses, (2) the total power hypothesis, and (3) the global conditions hypothesis. These hypotheses, in conjunction with the UNM-CHF correlation, are used to estimate the CHF and CHFR in the ACRR. Because the total power hypothesis predictions of power per rod at CHF are approximately 15%-20% lower than those corresponding to saturation exit conditions, it can be concluded that the total power hypothesis considerably underestimates the CHF for nonuniformly heated geometries. This conclusion is in agreement with previous experimental results. The global conditions hypothesis, which is more conservative and more accurate of the other two, provides the most reliable predictions of CHF/CHFR for the ACRR. The global conditions hypothesis predictions of CHFR varied between 2.1 and 3.9, with the higher value corresponding to the lower water inlet temperature of 20 degrees C

  12. Predicting critical transitions in dynamical systems from time series using nonstationary probability density modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwasniok, Frank

    2013-11-01

    A time series analysis method for predicting the probability density of a dynamical system is proposed. A nonstationary parametric model of the probability density is estimated from data within a maximum likelihood framework and then extrapolated to forecast the future probability density and explore the system for critical transitions or tipping points. A full systematic account of parameter uncertainty is taken. The technique is generic, independent of the underlying dynamics of the system. The method is verified on simulated data and then applied to prediction of Arctic sea-ice extent.

  13. The effect of virtual mass on the prediction of critical flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, L.; Lahey, R.T.; Drew, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    By observing the results in Fig. 4 and Fig. 5 we can see that virtual mass effects are important in predicting critical flow. However, as seen in Fig. 7a, in which all three flows are predicted to be critical (Δ=0), it is difficult to distinguish one set of conditions from the other by just considering the pressure profile. Clearly more detailed data, such as the throat void fraction, is needed for discrimination between these calculations. Moreover, since the calculated critical flows have been found to be sensitive to initial mass flux, and void fraction, careful measurements of those parameters are needed before accurate virtual mass parameters can be determined from these data. It can be concluded that the existing Moby Dick data is inadequate to allow one to deduce accurate values of the virtual mass parameters C/sub VM/ and λ. Nevertheless, more careful experiments of this type are uniquely suited for the determination of these important parameters. It appears that the use of a nine equation model, such as that discussed herein, coupled with more detailed accurate critical flow data is an effective means of determining the parameters in interfacial momentum transfer models, such as virtual mass effects, which are only important during strong spatial accelerations. Indeed, there are few other methods available which can be used for such determinations

  14. Evaluation of Accuracy of Calculational Prediction of Criticality Based on ICSBEP Handbook Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovko, Yury; Rozhikhin, Yevgeniy; Tsibulya, Anatoly; Koscheev, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    Experiments with plutonium, low enriched uranium and uranium-233 from the ICSBEP Handbook are being considered in this paper. Among these experiments it was selected only those, which seem to be the most relevant to the evaluation of uncertainty of critical mass of mixtures of plutonium or low enriched uranium or uranium-233 with light water. All selected experiments were examined and covariance matrices of criticality uncertainties were developed along with some uncertainties were revised. Statistical analysis of these experiments was performed and some contradictions were discovered and eliminated. Evaluation of accuracy of prediction of criticality calculations was performed using the internally consistent set of experiments with plutonium, low enriched uranium and uranium-233 remained after the statistical analyses. The application objects for the evaluation of calculational prediction of criticality were water-reflected spherical systems of homogeneous aqueous mixtures of plutonium or low enriched uranium or uranium-233 of different concentrations which are simplified models of apparatus of external fuel cycle. It is shows that the procedure allows to considerably reduce uncertainty in k eff caused by the uncertainties in neutron cross-sections. Also it is shows that the results are practically independent of initial covariance matrices of nuclear data uncertainties. (authors)

  15. A New Energy-Critical Plane Damage Parameter for Multiaxial Fatigue Life Prediction of Turbine Blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-Yong Yu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available As one of fracture critical components of an aircraft engine, accurate life prediction of a turbine blade to disk attachment is significant for ensuring the engine structural integrity and reliability. Fatigue failure of a turbine blade is often caused under multiaxial cyclic loadings at high temperatures. In this paper, considering different failure types, a new energy-critical plane damage parameter is proposed for multiaxial fatigue life prediction, and no extra fitted material constants will be needed for practical applications. Moreover, three multiaxial models with maximum damage parameters on the critical plane are evaluated under tension-compression and tension-torsion loadings. Experimental data of GH4169 under proportional and non-proportional fatigue loadings and a case study of a turbine disk-blade contact system are introduced for model validation. Results show that model predictions by Wang-Brown (WB and Fatemi-Socie (FS models with maximum damage parameters are conservative and acceptable. For the turbine disk-blade contact system, both of the proposed damage parameters and Smith-Watson-Topper (SWT model show reasonably acceptable correlations with its field number of flight cycles. However, life estimations of the turbine blade reveal that the definition of the maximum damage parameter is not reasonable for the WB model but effective for both the FS and SWT models.

  16. Prediction of critical illness in elderly outpatients using elder risk assessment: a population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biehl M

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Michelle Biehl,1 Paul Y Takahashi,2 Stephen S Cha,3 Rajeev Chaudhry,2 Ognjen Gajic,1 Bjorg Thorsteinsdottir2 1Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, 2Division of Primary Care Internal Medicine, 3Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Rationale: Identifying patients at high risk of critical illness is necessary for the development and testing of strategies to prevent critical illness. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between high elder risk assessment (ERA score and critical illness requiring intensive care and to see if the ERA can be used as a prediction tool to identify elderly patients at the primary care visit who are at high risk of critical illness. Methods: A population-based historical cohort study was conducted in elderly patients (age >65 years identified at the time of primary care visit in Rochester, MN, USA. Predictors including age, previous hospital days, and comorbid health conditions were identified from routine administrative data available in the electronic medical record. The main outcome was critical illness, defined as sepsis, need for mechanical ventilation, or death within 2 years of initial visit. Patients with an ERA score of 16 were considered to be at high risk. The discrimination of the ERA score was assessed using area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. Results: Of the 13,457 eligible patients, 9,872 gave consent for medical record review and had full information on intensive care unit utilization. The mean age was 75.8 years (standard deviation ±7.6 years, and 58% were female, 94% were Caucasian, 62% were married, and 13% were living in nursing homes. In the overall group, 417 patients (4.2% suffered from critical illness. In the 1,134 patients with ERA >16, 154 (14% suffered from critical illness. An ERA score ≥16 predicted critical illness (odds ratio 6.35; 95% confidence interval 3.51–11.48. The area under the

  17. A formal approach for the prediction of the critical heat flux in subcooled water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombardi, C. [Polytechnic of Milan (Italy)

    1995-09-01

    The critical heat flux (CHF) in subcooled water at high mass fluxes are not yet satisfactory correlated. For this scope a formal approach is here followed, which is based on an extension of the parameters and the correlation used for the dryout prediction for medium high quality mixtures. The obtained correlation, in spite of its simplicity and its explicit form, yields satisfactory predictions, also when applied to more conventional CHF data at low-medium mass fluxes and high pressures. Further improvements are possible, if a more complete data bank will be available. The main and general open item is the definition of a criterion, depending only on independent parameters, such as mass flux, pressure, inlet subcooling and geometry, to predict whether the heat transfer crisis will result as a DNB or a dryout phenomenon.

  18. A formal approach for the prediction of the critical heat flux in subcooled water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombardi, C.

    1995-01-01

    The critical heat flux (CHF) in subcooled water at high mass fluxes are not yet satisfactory correlated. For this scope a formal approach is here followed, which is based on an extension of the parameters and the correlation used for the dryout prediction for medium high quality mixtures. The obtained correlation, in spite of its simplicity and its explicit form, yields satisfactory predictions, also when applied to more conventional CHF data at low-medium mass fluxes and high pressures. Further improvements are possible, if a more complete data bank will be available. The main and general open item is the definition of a criterion, depending only on independent parameters, such as mass flux, pressure, inlet subcooling and geometry, to predict whether the heat transfer crisis will result as a DNB or a dryout phenomenon

  19. Assessment of ASSERT-PV for prediction of critical heat flux in CANDU bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Y.F.; Cheng, Z.; Waddington, G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Assessment of the new Canadian subchannel code ASSERT-PV 3.2 for CHF prediction. • CANDU 28-, 37- and 43-element bundle CHF experiments. • Prediction improvement of ASSERT-PV 3.2 over previous code versions. • Sensitivity study of the effect of CHF model options. - Abstract: Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has developed the subchannel thermalhydraulics code ASSERT-PV for the Canadian nuclear industry. The recently released ASSERT-PV 3.2 provides enhanced models for improved predictions of flow distribution, critical heat flux (CHF), and post-dryout (PDO) heat transfer in horizontal CANDU fuel channels. This paper presents results of an assessment of the new code version against five full-scale CANDU bundle experiments conducted in 1990s and in 2009 by Stern Laboratories (SL), using 28-, 37- and 43-element (CANFLEX) bundles. A total of 15 CHF test series with varying pressure-tube creep and/or bearing-pad height were analyzed. The SL experiments encompassed the bundle geometries and range of flow conditions for the intended ASSERT-PV applications for CANDU reactors. Code predictions of channel dryout power and axial and radial CHF locations were compared against measurements from the SL CHF tests to quantify the code prediction accuracy. The prediction statistics using the recommended model set of ASSERT-PV 3.2 were compared to those from previous code versions. Furthermore, the sensitivity studies evaluated the contribution of each CHF model change or enhancement to the improvement in CHF prediction. Overall, the assessment demonstrated significant improvement in prediction of channel dryout power and axial and radial CHF locations in horizontal fuel channels containing CANDU bundles

  20. General correlation for prediction of critical heat flux ratio in water cooled channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pernica, R.; Cizek, J.

    1995-09-01

    The paper present the general empirical Critical Heat Flux Ration (CHFR) correlation which is valid for vertical water upflow through tubes, internally heated concentric annuli and rod bundles geometries with both wide and very tight square and triangular rods lattices. The proposed general PG correlation directly predicts the CHFR, it comprises axial and radial non-uniform heating, and is valid in a wider range of thermal hydraulic conditions than previously published critical heat flux correlations. The PG correlation has been developed using the critical heat flux Czech data bank which includes more than 9500 experimental data on tubes, 7600 data on rod bundles and 713 data on internally heated concentric annuli. Accuracy of the CHFR prediction, statistically assessed by the constant dryout conditions approach, is characterized by the mean value nearing 1.00 and the standard deviation less than 0.06. Moverover, a subchannel form of the PG correlations is statistically verified on Westinghouse and Combustion Engineering rod bundle data bases, i.e. more than 7000 experimental CHF points of Columbia University data bank were used.

  1. Prediction of chronic critical illness in a general intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio H. Loss

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the incidence, costs, and mortality associated with chronic critical illness (CCI, and to identify clinical predictors of CCI in a general intensive care unit. METHODS: This was a prospective observational cohort study. All patients receiving supportive treatment for over 20 days were considered chronically critically ill and eligible for the study. After applying the exclusion criteria, 453 patients were analyzed. RESULTS: There was an 11% incidence of CCI. Total length of hospital stay, costs, and mortality were significantly higher among patients with CCI. Mechanical ventilation, sepsis, Glasgow score < 15, inadequate calorie intake, and higher body mass index were independent predictors for cci in the multivariate logistic regression model. CONCLUSIONS: CCI affects a distinctive population in intensive care units with higher mortality, costs, and prolonged hospitalization. Factors identifiable at the time of admission or during the first week in the intensive care unit can be used to predict CCI.

  2. Scalable Predictive Analysis in Critically Ill Patients Using a Visual Open Data Analysis Platform.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Van Poucke

    Full Text Available With the accumulation of large amounts of health related data, predictive analytics could stimulate the transformation of reactive medicine towards Predictive, Preventive and Personalized (PPPM Medicine, ultimately affecting both cost and quality of care. However, high-dimensionality and high-complexity of the data involved, prevents data-driven methods from easy translation into clinically relevant models. Additionally, the application of cutting edge predictive methods and data manipulation require substantial programming skills, limiting its direct exploitation by medical domain experts. This leaves a gap between potential and actual data usage. In this study, the authors address this problem by focusing on open, visual environments, suited to be applied by the medical community. Moreover, we review code free applications of big data technologies. As a showcase, a framework was developed for the meaningful use of data from critical care patients by integrating the MIMIC-II database in a data mining environment (RapidMiner supporting scalable predictive analytics using visual tools (RapidMiner's Radoop extension. Guided by the CRoss-Industry Standard Process for Data Mining (CRISP-DM, the ETL process (Extract, Transform, Load was initiated by retrieving data from the MIMIC-II tables of interest. As use case, correlation of platelet count and ICU survival was quantitatively assessed. Using visual tools for ETL on Hadoop and predictive modeling in RapidMiner, we developed robust processes for automatic building, parameter optimization and evaluation of various predictive models, under different feature selection schemes. Because these processes can be easily adopted in other projects, this environment is attractive for scalable predictive analytics in health research.

  3. Scalable Predictive Analysis in Critically Ill Patients Using a Visual Open Data Analysis Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Poucke, Sven; Zhang, Zhongheng; Schmitz, Martin; Vukicevic, Milan; Laenen, Margot Vander; Celi, Leo Anthony; De Deyne, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    With the accumulation of large amounts of health related data, predictive analytics could stimulate the transformation of reactive medicine towards Predictive, Preventive and Personalized (PPPM) Medicine, ultimately affecting both cost and quality of care. However, high-dimensionality and high-complexity of the data involved, prevents data-driven methods from easy translation into clinically relevant models. Additionally, the application of cutting edge predictive methods and data manipulation require substantial programming skills, limiting its direct exploitation by medical domain experts. This leaves a gap between potential and actual data usage. In this study, the authors address this problem by focusing on open, visual environments, suited to be applied by the medical community. Moreover, we review code free applications of big data technologies. As a showcase, a framework was developed for the meaningful use of data from critical care patients by integrating the MIMIC-II database in a data mining environment (RapidMiner) supporting scalable predictive analytics using visual tools (RapidMiner's Radoop extension). Guided by the CRoss-Industry Standard Process for Data Mining (CRISP-DM), the ETL process (Extract, Transform, Load) was initiated by retrieving data from the MIMIC-II tables of interest. As use case, correlation of platelet count and ICU survival was quantitatively assessed. Using visual tools for ETL on Hadoop and predictive modeling in RapidMiner, we developed robust processes for automatic building, parameter optimization and evaluation of various predictive models, under different feature selection schemes. Because these processes can be easily adopted in other projects, this environment is attractive for scalable predictive analytics in health research.

  4. Prediction of the Critical Curvature for LX-17 with the Time of Arrival Data from DNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Jin [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fried, Laurence E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Moss, William C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-01-10

    We extract the detonation shock front velocity, curvature and acceleration from time of arrival data measured at grid points from direct numerical simulations of a 50mm rate-stick lit by a disk-source, with the ignition and growth reaction model and a JWL equation of state calibrated for LX-17. We compute the quasi-steady (D, κ) relation based on the extracted properties and predicted the critical curvatures of LX-17. We also proposed an explicit formula that contains the failure turning point, obtained from optimization for the (D, κ) relation of LX-17.

  5. A theoretical prediction of critical heat flux in saturated pool boiling during power transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasamehmetoglu, K.O.; Nelson, R.A.; Gunnerson, F.S.

    1987-01-01

    Understanding and predicting critical heat flux (CHF) behavior during steady-state and transient conditions is of fundamental interest in the design, operation, and safety of boiling and two-phase flow devices. Presented within this paper are the results of a comprehensive theoretical study specifically conducted to model transient CHF behavior in saturated pool boiling. Thermal energy conduction within a heating element and its influence on the CHF are also discussed. The resultant theory provides new insight into the basic physics of the CHF phenomenon and indicates favorable agreement with the experimental data from cylindrical heaters with small radii. However, the flat-ribbon heater data compared poorly with the present theory, although the general trend was predicted. Finally, various factors that affect the discrepency between the data and the theory are listed

  6. Critical assessment of methods of protein structure prediction (CASP)-round IX

    KAUST Repository

    Moult, John; Fidelis, Krzysztof; Kryshtafovych, Andriy; Tramontano, Anna

    2011-01-01

    This article is an introduction to the special issue of the journal PROTEINS, dedicated to the ninth Critical Assessment of Structure Prediction (CASP) experiment to assess the state of the art in protein structure modeling. The article describes the conduct of the experiment, the categories of prediction included, and outlines the evaluation and assessment procedures. Methods for modeling protein structure continue to advance, although at a more modest pace than in the early CASP experiments. CASP developments of note are indications of improvement in model accuracy for some classes of target, an improved ability to choose the most accurate of a set of generated models, and evidence of improvement in accuracy for short "new fold" models. In addition, a new analysis of regions of models not derivable from the most obvious template structure has revealed better performance than expected.

  7. Prediction of critical heat flux in fuel assemblies using a CHF table method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Tae Hyun; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Bang, Je Geon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Won Pil; Chang, Soon Heung [Korea Advance Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    A CHF table method has been assessed in this study for rod bundle CHF predictions. At the conceptual design stage for a new reactor, a general critical heat flux (CHF) prediction method with a wide applicable range and reasonable accuracy is essential to the thermal-hydraulic design and safety analysis. In many aspects, a CHF table method (i.e., the use of a round tube CHF table with appropriate bundle correction factors) can be a promising way to fulfill this need. So the assessment of the CHF table method has been performed with the bundle CHF data relevant to pressurized water reactors (PWRs). For comparison purposes, W-3R and EPRI-1 were also applied to the same data base. Data analysis has been conducted with the subchannel code COBRA-IV-I. The CHF table method shows the best predictions based on the direct substitution method. Improvements of the bundle correction factors, especially for the spacer grid and cold wall effects, are desirable for better predictions. Though the present assessment is somewhat limited in both fuel geometries and operating conditions, the CHF table method clearly shows potential to be a general CHF predictor. 8 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs. (Author)

  8. Prediction of critical heat flux in fuel assemblies using a CHF table method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Tae Hyun; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Bang, Je Geon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Won Pil; Chang, Soon Heung [Korea Advance Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    A CHF table method has been assessed in this study for rod bundle CHF predictions. At the conceptual design stage for a new reactor, a general critical heat flux (CHF) prediction method with a wide applicable range and reasonable accuracy is essential to the thermal-hydraulic design and safety analysis. In many aspects, a CHF table method (i.e., the use of a round tube CHF table with appropriate bundle correction factors) can be a promising way to fulfill this need. So the assessment of the CHF table method has been performed with the bundle CHF data relevant to pressurized water reactors (PWRs). For comparison purposes, W-3R and EPRI-1 were also applied to the same data base. Data analysis has been conducted with the subchannel code COBRA-IV-I. The CHF table method shows the best predictions based on the direct substitution method. Improvements of the bundle correction factors, especially for the spacer grid and cold wall effects, are desirable for better predictions. Though the present assessment is somewhat limited in both fuel geometries and operating conditions, the CHF table method clearly shows potential to be a general CHF predictor. 8 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs. (Author)

  9. Specifications, Pre-Experimental Predictions, and Test Plate Characterization Information for the Prometheus Critical Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ML Zerkle; ME Meyers; SM Tarves; JJ Powers

    2006-01-01

    This report provides specifications, pre-experimental predictions, and test plate characterization information for a series of molybdenum (Mo), niobium (Nb), rhenium (Re), tantalum (Ta), and baseline critical experiments that were developed by the Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) for the Prometheus space reactor development project. In March 2004, the Naval Reactors program was assigned the responsibility to develop, design, deliver, and operationally support civilian space nuclear reactors for NASA's Project Prometheus. The NRPCT was formed to perform this work and consisted of engineers and scientists from the Naval Reactors (NR) Program prime contractors: Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory, Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL), and Bechtel Plant Machinery Inc (BPMI). The NRPCT developed a series of clean benchmark critical experiments to address fundamental uncertainties in the neutron cross section data for Mo, Nb, Re, and Ta in fast, intermediate, and mixed neutron energy spectra. These experiments were to be performed by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) using the Planet vertical lift critical assembly machine and were designed with a simple, geometrically clean, cylindrical configuration consisting of alternating layers of test, moderator/reflector, and fuel materials. Based on reprioritization of missions and funding within NASA, Naval Reactors and NASA discontinued their collaboration on Project Prometheus in September 2005. One critical experiment and eighteen subcritical handstacking experiments were completed prior to the termination of work in September 2005. Information on the Prometheus critical experiments and the test plates produced for these experiments are expected to be of value to future space reactor development programs and to integral experiments designed to address the fundamental neutron cross section uncertainties for these refractory metals. This information is being provided as an orderly closeout of NRPCT work on Project

  10. Brittle Creep Failure, Critical Behavior, and Time-to-Failure Prediction of Concrete under Uniaxial Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingchong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the time-dependent brittle deformation behavior of concrete as a main building material is fundamental for the lifetime prediction and engineering design. Herein, we present the experimental measures of brittle creep failure, critical behavior, and the dependence of time-to-failure, on the secondary creep rate of concrete under sustained uniaxial compression. A complete evolution process of creep failure is achieved. Three typical creep stages are observed, including the primary (decelerating, secondary (steady state creep regime, and tertiary creep (accelerating creep stages. The time-to-failure shows sample-specificity although all samples exhibit a similar creep process. All specimens exhibit a critical power-law behavior with an exponent of −0.51 ± 0.06, approximately equal to the theoretical value of −1/2. All samples have a long-term secondary stage characterized by a constant strain rate that dominates the lifetime of a sample. The average creep rate expressed by the total creep strain over the lifetime (tf-t0 for each specimen shows a power-law dependence on the secondary creep rate with an exponent of −1. This could provide a clue to the prediction of the time-to-failure of concrete, based on the monitoring of the creep behavior at the steady stage.

  11. Prediction of safety critical software operational reliability from test reliability using testing environment factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Hoan Sung; Seong, Poong Hyun

    1999-01-01

    It has been a critical issue to predict the safety critical software reliability in nuclear engineering area. For many years, many researches have focused on the quantification of software reliability and there have been many models developed to quantify software reliability. Most software reliability models estimate the reliability with the failure data collected during the test assuming that the test environments well represent the operation profile. User's interest is however on the operational reliability rather than on the test reliability. The experiences show that the operational reliability is higher than the test reliability. With the assumption that the difference in reliability results from the change of environment, from testing to operation, testing environment factors comprising the aging factor and the coverage factor are developed in this paper and used to predict the ultimate operational reliability with the failure data in testing phase. It is by incorporating test environments applied beyond the operational profile into testing environment factors. The application results show that the proposed method can estimate the operational reliability accurately. (Author). 14 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig

  12. Predicting Plant-Accessible Water in the Critical Zone: Mountain Ecosystems in a Mediterranean Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klos, P. Z.; Goulden, M.; Riebe, C. S.; Tague, C.; O'Geen, A. T.; Flinchum, B. A.; Safeeq, M.; Conklin, M. H.; Hart, S. C.; Asefaw Berhe, A.; Hartsough, P. C.; Holbrook, S.; Bales, R. C.

    2017-12-01

    Enhanced understanding of subsurface water storage, and the below-ground architecture and processes that create it, will advance our ability to predict how the impacts of climate change - including drought, forest mortality, wildland fire, and strained water security - will take form in the decades to come. Previous research has examined the importance of plant-accessible water in soil, but in upland landscapes within Mediterranean climates the soil is often only the upper extent of subsurface water storage. We draw insights from both this previous research and a case study of the Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory to: define attributes of subsurface storage, review observed patterns in its distribution, highlight nested methods for its estimation across scales, and showcase the fundamental processes controlling its formation. We observe that forest ecosystems at our sites subsist on lasting plant-accessible stores of subsurface water during the summer dry period and during multi-year droughts. This indicates that trees in these forest ecosystems are rooted deeply in the weathered, highly porous saprolite, which reaches up to 10-20 m beneath the surface. This confirms the importance of large volumes of subsurface water in supporting ecosystem resistance to climate and landscape change across a range of spatiotemporal scales. This research enhances the ability to predict the extent of deep subsurface storage across landscapes; aiding in the advancement of both critical zone science and the management of natural resources emanating from similar mountain ecosystems worldwide.

  13. Critical groups vs. representative person: dose calculations due to predicted releases from USEXA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, N.L.D., E-mail: nelson.luiz@ctmsp.mar.mil.br [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha (CTM/SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rochedo, E.R.R., E-mail: elainerochedo@gmail.com [Instituto de Radiprotecao e Dosimetria (lRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Mazzilli, B.P., E-mail: mazzilli@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The critical group cf Centro Experimental Aramar (CEA) site was previously defined based 00 the effluents releases to the environment resulting from the facilities already operational at CEA. In this work, effective doses are calculated to members of the critical group considering the predicted potential uranium releases from the Uranium Hexafluoride Production Plant (USEXA). Basically, this work studies the behavior of the resulting doses related to the type of habit data used in the analysis and two distinct situations are considered: (a) the utilization of average values obtained from official institutions (IBGE, IEA-SP, CNEN, IAEA) and from the literature; and (b) the utilization of the 95{sup tb} percentile of the values derived from distributions fit to the obtained habit data. The first option corresponds to the way that data was used for the definition of the critical group of CEA done in former assessments, while the second one corresponds to the use of data in deterministic assessments, as recommended by ICRP to estimate doses to the so--called 'representative person' . (author)

  14. Critical groups vs. representative person: dose calculations due to predicted releases from USEXA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, N.L.D.; Rochedo, E.R.R.; Mazzilli, B.P.

    2013-01-01

    The critical group cf Centro Experimental Aramar (CEA) site was previously defined based 00 the effluents releases to the environment resulting from the facilities already operational at CEA. In this work, effective doses are calculated to members of the critical group considering the predicted potential uranium releases from the Uranium Hexafluoride Production Plant (USEXA). Basically, this work studies the behavior of the resulting doses related to the type of habit data used in the analysis and two distinct situations are considered: (a) the utilization of average values obtained from official institutions (IBGE, IEA-SP, CNEN, IAEA) and from the literature; and (b) the utilization of the 95 tb percentile of the values derived from distributions fit to the obtained habit data. The first option corresponds to the way that data was used for the definition of the critical group of CEA done in former assessments, while the second one corresponds to the use of data in deterministic assessments, as recommended by ICRP to estimate doses to the so--called 'representative person' . (author)

  15. A Dynamic Hydrology-Critical Zone Framework for Rainfall-triggered Landslide Hazard Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dialynas, Y. G.; Foufoula-Georgiou, E.; Dietrich, W. E.; Bras, R. L.

    2017-12-01

    Watershed-scale coupled hydrologic-stability models are still in their early stages, and are characterized by important limitations: (a) either they assume steady-state or quasi-dynamic watershed hydrology, or (b) they simulate landslide occurrence based on a simple one-dimensional stability criterion. Here we develop a three-dimensional landslide prediction framework, based on a coupled hydrologic-slope stability model and incorporation of the influence of deep critical zone processes (i.e., flow through weathered bedrock and exfiltration to the colluvium) for more accurate prediction of the timing, location, and extent of landslides. Specifically, a watershed-scale slope stability model that systematically accounts for the contribution of driving and resisting forces in three-dimensional hillslope segments was coupled with a spatially-explicit and physically-based hydrologic model. The landslide prediction framework considers critical zone processes and structure, and explicitly accounts for the spatial heterogeneity of surface and subsurface properties that control slope stability, including soil and weathered bedrock hydrological and mechanical characteristics, vegetation, and slope morphology. To test performance, the model was applied in landslide-prone sites in the US, the hydrology of which has been extensively studied. Results showed that both rainfall infiltration in the soil and groundwater exfiltration exert a strong control on the timing and magnitude of landslide occurrence. We demonstrate the extent to which three-dimensional slope destabilizing factors, which are modulated by dynamic hydrologic conditions in the soil-bedrock column, control landslide initiation at the watershed scale.

  16. A Critical Analysis and Validation of the Accuracy of Wave Overtopping Prediction Formulae for OWECs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gallach-Sánchez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of wave energy devices is growing in recent years. One type of device is the overtopping wave energy converter (OWEC, for which the knowledge of the wave overtopping rates is a basic and crucial aspect in their design. In particular, the most interesting range to study is for OWECs with steep slopes to vertical walls, and with very small freeboards and zero freeboards where the overtopping rate is maximized, and which can be generalized as steep low-crested structures. Recently, wave overtopping prediction formulae have been published for this type of structures, although their accuracy has not been fully assessed, as the overtopping data available in this range is scarce. We performed a critical analysis of the overtopping prediction formulae for steep low-crested structures and the validation of the accuracy of these formulae, based on new overtopping data for steep low-crested structures obtained at Ghent University. This paper summarizes the existing knowledge about average wave overtopping, describes the physical model tests performed, analyses the results and compares them to existing prediction formulae. The new dataset extends the wave overtopping data towards vertical walls and zero freeboard structures. In general, the new dataset validated the more recent overtopping formulae focused on steep slopes with small freeboards, although the formulae are underpredicting the average overtopping rates for very small and zero relative crest freeboards.

  17. Predicting fatigue and psychophysiological test performance from speech for safety critical environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Richard Baykaner

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Automatic systems for estimating operator fatigue have application in safety-critical environments. A system which could estimate level of fatigue from speech would have application in domains where operators engage in regular verbal communication as part of their duties. Previous studies on the prediction of fatigue from speech have been limited because of their reliance on subjective ratings and because they lack comparison to other methods for assessing fatigue. In this paper we present an analysis of voice recordings and psychophysiological test scores collected from seven aerospace personnel during a training task in which they remained awake for 60 hours. We show that voice features and test scores are affected by both the total time spent awake and the time position within each subject’s circadian cycle. However, we show that time spent awake and time of day information are poor predictors of the test results; while voice features can give good predictions of the psychophysiological test scores and sleep latency. Mean absolute errors of prediction are possible within about 17.5% for sleep latency and 5-12% for test scores. We discuss the implications for the use of voice as a means to monitor the effects of fatigue on cognitive performance in practical applications.

  18. Prediction of Critical Power and W' in Hypoxia: Application to Work-Balance Modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Nathan E; Nichols, David S; Skiba, Philip F; Racinais, Sebastien; Périard, Julien D

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Develop a prediction equation for critical power (CP) and work above CP (W') in hypoxia for use in the work-balance ([Formula: see text]) model. Methods: Nine trained male cyclists completed cycling time trials (TT; 12, 7, and 3 min) to determine CP and W' at five altitudes (250, 1,250, 2,250, 3,250, and 4,250 m). Least squares regression was used to predict CP and W' at altitude. A high-intensity intermittent test (HIIT) was performed at 250 and 2,250 m. Actual and predicted CP and W' were used to compute W' during HIIT using differential ([Formula: see text]) and integral ([Formula: see text]) forms of the [Formula: see text] model. Results: CP decreased at altitude ( P equations for CP and W' developed in this study are suitable for use with the [Formula: see text] model in acute hypoxia. This enables the application of [Formula: see text] modelling to training prescription and competition analysis at altitude.

  19. Critical assessment of methods of protein structure prediction (CASP) - round x

    KAUST Repository

    Moult, John; Fidelis, Krzysztof; Kryshtafovych, Andriy; Schwede, Torsten; Tramontano, Anna

    2013-01-01

    This article is an introduction to the special issue of the journal PROTEINS, dedicated to the tenth Critical Assessment of Structure Prediction (CASP) experiment to assess the state of the art in protein structure modeling. The article describes the conduct of the experiment, the categories of prediction included, and outlines the evaluation and assessment procedures. The 10 CASP experiments span almost 20 years of progress in the field of protein structure modeling, and there have been enormous advances in methods and model accuracy in that period. Notable in this round is the first sustained improvement of models with refinement methods, using molecular dynamics. For the first time, we tested the ability of modeling methods to make use of sparse experimental three-dimensional contact information, such as may be obtained from new experimental techniques, with encouraging results. On the other hand, new contact prediction methods, though holding considerable promise, have yet to make an impact in CASP testing. The nature of CASP targets has been changing in recent CASPs, reflecting shifts in experimental structural biology, with more irregular structures, more multi-domain and multi-subunit structures, and less standard versions of known folds. When allowance is made for these factors, we continue to see steady progress in the overall accuracy of models, particularly resulting from improvement of non-template regions.

  20. Critical assessment of methods of protein structure prediction (CASP) - round x

    KAUST Repository

    Moult, John

    2013-12-17

    This article is an introduction to the special issue of the journal PROTEINS, dedicated to the tenth Critical Assessment of Structure Prediction (CASP) experiment to assess the state of the art in protein structure modeling. The article describes the conduct of the experiment, the categories of prediction included, and outlines the evaluation and assessment procedures. The 10 CASP experiments span almost 20 years of progress in the field of protein structure modeling, and there have been enormous advances in methods and model accuracy in that period. Notable in this round is the first sustained improvement of models with refinement methods, using molecular dynamics. For the first time, we tested the ability of modeling methods to make use of sparse experimental three-dimensional contact information, such as may be obtained from new experimental techniques, with encouraging results. On the other hand, new contact prediction methods, though holding considerable promise, have yet to make an impact in CASP testing. The nature of CASP targets has been changing in recent CASPs, reflecting shifts in experimental structural biology, with more irregular structures, more multi-domain and multi-subunit structures, and less standard versions of known folds. When allowance is made for these factors, we continue to see steady progress in the overall accuracy of models, particularly resulting from improvement of non-template regions.

  1. Ventromedial Frontal Cortex Is Critical for Guiding Attention to Reward-Predictive Visual Features in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Avinash R; Fellows, Lesley K

    2015-09-16

    Adaptively interacting with our environment requires extracting information that will allow us to successfully predict reward. This can be a challenge, particularly when there are many candidate cues, and when rewards are probabilistic. Recent work has demonstrated that visual attention is allocated to stimulus features that have been associated with reward on previous trials. The ventromedial frontal lobe (VMF) has been implicated in learning in dynamic environments of this kind, but the mechanism by which this region influences this process is not clear. Here, we hypothesized that the VMF plays a critical role in guiding attention to reward-predictive stimulus features based on feedback. We tested the effects of VMF damage in human subjects on a visual search task in which subjects were primed to attend to task-irrelevant colors associated with different levels of reward, incidental to the search task. Consistent with previous work, we found that distractors had a greater influence on reaction time when they appeared in colors associated with high reward in the previous trial compared with colors associated with low reward in healthy control subjects and patients with prefrontal damage sparing the VMF. However, this reward modulation of attentional priming was absent in patients with VMF damage. Thus, an intact VMF is necessary for directing attention based on experience with cue-reward associations. We suggest that this region plays a role in selecting reward-predictive cues to facilitate future learning. There has been a swell of interest recently in the ventromedial frontal cortex (VMF), a brain region critical to associative learning. However, the underlying mechanism by which this region guides learning is not well understood. Here, we tested the effects of damage to this region in humans on a task in which rewards were linked incidentally to visual features, resulting in trial-by-trial attentional priming. Controls and subjects with prefrontal damage

  2. A theoretical prediction of critical heat flux in subcooled pool boiling during power transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasamehmetoglu, K.O.; Nelson, R.A.; Gunnerson, F.S.

    1988-01-01

    Understanding and predicting critical heat flux (CHF) behavior during steady-state and transient conditions are of fundamenatal interest in the design, operation, safety of boiling and two-phase flow devices. This paper discusses the results of a comprehensive theoretical study made specifically to model transient CHF behavior in subcooled pool boiling. This study is based upon a simplified steady-state CHF model in terms of the vapor mass growth period. The results obtained from this theory indicate favorable agreement with the experimental data from cylindrical heaters with small radii. The statistical nature of the vapor mass behavior in transient boiling also is considered and upper and lower limits for the current theory are established. Various factors that affect the discrepancy between the data and the theory are discussed

  3. Importance of critical micellar concentration for the prediction of solubility enhancement in biorelevant media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottaviani, G; Wendelspiess, S; Alvarez-Sánchez, R

    2015-04-06

    This study evaluated if the intrinsic surface properties of compounds are related to the solubility enhancement (SE) typically observed in biorelevant media like fasted state simulated intestinal fluids (FaSSIF). The solubility of 51 chemically diverse compounds was measured in FaSSIF and in phosphate buffer and the surface activity parameters were determined. This study showed that the compound critical micellar concentration parameter (CMC) correlates strongly with the solubility enhancement (SE) observed in FaSSIF compared to phosphate buffer. Thus, the intrinsic capacity of molecules to form micelles is also a determinant for each compound's affinity to the micelles of biorelevant surfactants. CMC correlated better with SE than lipophilicity (logD), especially over the logD range typically covered by drugs (2 < logD < 4). CMC can become useful to guide drug discovery scientists to better diagnose, improve, and predict solubility in biorelevant media, thereby enhancing oral bioavailability of drug candidates.

  4. [Establishment of comprehensive prediction model of acute gastrointestinal injury classification of critically ill patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Wang, Jianrong; Liu, Weiwei; Zhang, Guangliang

    2018-03-25

    To develop the comprehensive prediction model of acute gastrointestinal injury (AGI) grades of critically ill patients. From April 2015 to November 2015, the binary channel gastrointestinal sounds (GIS) monitor system which has been developed and verified by the research group was used to gather and analyze the GIS of 60 consecutive critically ill patients who were admitted in Critical Care Medicine of Chinese PLA General Hospital. Also, the AGI grades (Grande I(-IIII(, the higher the level, the heavier the gastrointestinal dysfunction) were evaluated. Meanwhile, the clinical data and physiological and biochemical indexes of included patients were collected and recorded daily, including illness severity score (APACHE II( score, consisting of the acute physiology score, age grade and chronic health evaluation), sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA score, including respiration, coagulation, liver, cardioascular, central nervous system and kidney) and Glasgow coma scale (GCS); body mass index, blood lactate and glucose, and treatment details (including mechanical ventilation, sedatives, vasoactive drugs, enteral nutrition, etc.) Then principal component analysis was performed on the significantly correlated GIS (five indexes of gastrointestinal sounds were found to be negatively correlated with AGI grades, which included the number, percentage of time, mean power, maximum power and maximum time of GIS wave from the channel located at the stomach) and clinical factors after standardization. The top 5 post-normalized main components were selected for back-propagation (BP) neural network training, to establish comprehensive AGI grades models of critically ill patients based on the neural network model. The 60 patients aged 19 to 98 (mean 54.6) years and included 42 males (70.0%). There were 22 cases of multiple fractures, 15 cases of severe infection, 7 cases of cervical vertebral fracture, 7 cases of aortic repair, 5 cases of post-toxicosis and 4 cases of cerebral

  5. Infarct volume predicts critical care needs in stroke patients treated with intravenous thrombolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faigle, Roland; Marsh, Elisabeth B.; Llinas, Rafael H.; Urrutia, Victor C. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Wozniak, Amy W. [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Biostatistics, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-10-26

    Patients receiving intravenous thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (IVT) for ischemic stroke are monitored in an intensive care unit (ICU) or a comparable unit capable of ICU interventions due to the high frequency of standardized neurological exams and vital sign checks. The present study evaluates quantitative infarct volume on early post-IVT MRI as a predictor of critical care needs and aims to identify patients who may not require resource intense monitoring. We identified 46 patients who underwent MRI within 6 h of IVT. Infarct volume was measured using semiautomated software. Logistic regression and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis were used to determine factors associated with ICU needs. Infarct volume was an independent predictor of ICU need after adjusting for age, sex, race, systolic blood pressure, NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS), and coronary artery disease (odds ratio 1.031 per cm{sup 3} increase in volume, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.004-1.058, p = 0.024). The ROC curve with infarct volume alone achieved an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.766 (95 % CI 0.605-0.927), while the AUC was 0.906 (95 % CI 0.814-0.998) after adjusting for race, systolic blood pressure, and NIHSS. Maximum Youden index calculations identified an optimal infarct volume cut point of 6.8 cm{sup 3} (sensitivity 75.0 %, specificity 76.7 %). Infarct volume greater than 3 cm{sup 3} predicted need for critical care interventions with 81.3 % sensitivity and 66.7 % specificity. Infarct volume may predict needs for ICU monitoring and interventions in stroke patients treated with IVT. (orig.)

  6. Infarct volume predicts critical care needs in stroke patients treated with intravenous thrombolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faigle, Roland; Marsh, Elisabeth B.; Llinas, Rafael H.; Urrutia, Victor C.; Wozniak, Amy W.

    2015-01-01

    Patients receiving intravenous thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (IVT) for ischemic stroke are monitored in an intensive care unit (ICU) or a comparable unit capable of ICU interventions due to the high frequency of standardized neurological exams and vital sign checks. The present study evaluates quantitative infarct volume on early post-IVT MRI as a predictor of critical care needs and aims to identify patients who may not require resource intense monitoring. We identified 46 patients who underwent MRI within 6 h of IVT. Infarct volume was measured using semiautomated software. Logistic regression and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis were used to determine factors associated with ICU needs. Infarct volume was an independent predictor of ICU need after adjusting for age, sex, race, systolic blood pressure, NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS), and coronary artery disease (odds ratio 1.031 per cm 3 increase in volume, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.004-1.058, p = 0.024). The ROC curve with infarct volume alone achieved an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.766 (95 % CI 0.605-0.927), while the AUC was 0.906 (95 % CI 0.814-0.998) after adjusting for race, systolic blood pressure, and NIHSS. Maximum Youden index calculations identified an optimal infarct volume cut point of 6.8 cm 3 (sensitivity 75.0 %, specificity 76.7 %). Infarct volume greater than 3 cm 3 predicted need for critical care interventions with 81.3 % sensitivity and 66.7 % specificity. Infarct volume may predict needs for ICU monitoring and interventions in stroke patients treated with IVT. (orig.)

  7. A review of critical heat flux prediction technique and its application in CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jee Won; Roh, Gyu Hong

    1997-09-01

    The CHF prediction method being used for CANDU reactor have been critically reviewed. The AECL's CHF prediction totally depends on the look-up table which has been developed from many CHF databank. These databanks include not only the water-cooled bundle-CHF data but also the freon-cooled bundle-CHF data. The CHF look-up tables have been developed by smoothing and interpolating (with some extrapolations) the experimental data to construct a practically useful CHF table. Therefore, the table look-up method has advantages of accuracy, consistency in a wide range of thermal-hydraulic parameters. It seems, however, that since the existing look-up table is constructed by many steps of modification of the original experimental data (e.g., the look-up table is constructed not only using the horizontal flow data but also the vertical flow data), one should be very careful when one try to generate a look-up table for other fuel geometries. In other words, a reliable look-up table can be constructed by performing experiments for new fuel geometry. Finally, it should be noted that the modifications to the original experimental data has simple form with many modification parameters for taking into account of different geometrical effects. This report presents the backbone and the validity of AECL CHF look-up table. (author). 22 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs

  8. Particle swarm optimization-based least squares support vector regression for critical heat flux prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, B.T.; Zhao, F.Y.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► CHF data are collected from the published literature. ► Less training data are used to train the LSSVR model. ► PSO is adopted to optimize the key parameters to improve the model precision. ► The reliability of LSSVR is proved through parametric trends analysis. - Abstract: In view of practical importance of critical heat flux (CHF) for design and safety of nuclear reactors, accurate prediction of CHF is of utmost significance. This paper presents a novel approach using least squares support vector regression (LSSVR) and particle swarm optimization (PSO) to predict CHF. Two available published datasets are used to train and test the proposed algorithm, in which PSO is employed to search for the best parameters involved in LSSVR model. The CHF values obtained by the LSSVR model are compared with the corresponding experimental values and those of a previous method, adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system (ANFIS). This comparison is also carried out in the investigation of parametric trends of CHF. It is found that the proposed method can achieve the desired performance and yields a more satisfactory fit with experimental results than ANFIS. Therefore, LSSVR method is likely to be suitable for other parameters processing such as CHF

  9. Same admissions tools, different outcomes: a critical perspective on predictive validity in three undergraduate medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Daniel; Friedman, Tim; Pearce, Jacob

    2013-12-27

    Admission to medical school is one of the most highly competitive entry points in higher education. Considerable investment is made by universities to develop selection processes that aim to identify the most appropriate candidates for their medical programs. This paper explores data from three undergraduate medical schools to offer a critical perspective of predictive validity in medical admissions. This study examined 650 undergraduate medical students from three Australian universities as they progressed through the initial years of medical school (accounting for approximately 25 per cent of all commencing undergraduate medical students in Australia in 2006 and 2007). Admissions criteria (aptitude test score based on UMAT, school result and interview score) were correlated with GPA over four years of study. Standard regression of each of the three admissions variables on GPA, for each institution at each year level was also conducted. Overall, the data found positive correlations between performance in medical school, school achievement and UMAT, but not interview. However, there were substantial differences between schools, across year levels, and within sections of UMAT exposed. Despite this, each admission variable was shown to add towards explaining course performance, net of other variables. The findings suggest the strength of multiple admissions tools in predicting outcomes of medical students. However, they also highlight the large differences in outcomes achieved by different schools, thus emphasising the pitfalls of generalising results from predictive validity studies without recognising the diverse ways in which they are designed and the variation in the institutional contexts in which they are administered. The assumption that high-positive correlations are desirable (or even expected) in these studies is also problematised.

  10. Burnout and posttraumatic stress in paediatric critical care personnel: Prediction from resilience and coping styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Rey, Rocío; Palacios, Alba; Alonso-Tapia, Jesús; Pérez, Elena; Álvarez, Elena; Coca, Ana; Mencía, Santiago; Marcos, Ana; Mayordomo-Colunga, Juan; Fernández, Francisco; Gómez, Fernando; Cruz, Jaime; Ordóñez, Olga; Llorente, Ana

    2018-03-28

    Our aims were (1) to explore the prevalence of burnout syndrome (BOS) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a sample of Spanish staff working in the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) and compare these rates with a sample of general paediatric staff and (2) to explore how resilience, coping strategies, and professional and demographic variables influence BOS and PTSD. This is a multicentre, cross-sectional study. Data were collected in the PICU and in other paediatric wards of nine hospitals. Participants consisted of 298 PICU staff members (57 physicians, 177 nurses, and 64 nursing assistants) and 189 professionals working in non-critical paediatric units (53 physicians, 104 nurses, and 32 nursing assistants). They completed the Brief Resilience Scale, the Coping Strategies Questionnaire for healthcare providers, the Maslach Burnout Inventory, and the Trauma Screening Questionnaire. Fifty-six percent of PICU working staff reported burnout in at least one dimension (36.20% scored over the cut-off for emotional exhaustion, 27.20% for depersonalisation, and 20.10% for low personal accomplishment), and 20.1% reported PTSD. There were no differences in burnout and PTSD scores between PICU and non-PICU staff members, either among physicians, nurses, or nursing assistants. Higher burnout and PTSD rates emerged after the death of a child and/or conflicts with patients/families or colleagues. Around 30% of the variance in BOS and PTSD is predicted by a frequent usage of the emotion-focused coping style and an infrequent usage of the problem-focused coping style. Interventions to prevent and treat distress among paediatric staff members are needed and should be focused on: (i) promoting active emotional processing of traumatic events and encouraging positive thinking; (ii) developing a sense of detached concern; (iii) improving the ability to solve interpersonal conflicts, and (iv) providing adequate training in end-of-life care. Copyright © 2018 Australian

  11. Reduced functional measure of cardiovascular reserve predicts admission to critical care unit following kidney transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M S Ting

    Full Text Available There is currently no effective preoperative assessment for patients undergoing kidney transplantation that is able to identify those at high perioperative risk requiring admission to critical care unit (CCU. We sought to determine if functional measures of cardiovascular reserve, in particular the anaerobic threshold (VO₂AT could identify these patients.Adult patients were assessed within 4 weeks prior to kidney transplantation in a University hospital with a 37-bed CCU, between April 2010 and June 2012. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET, echocardiography and arterial applanation tonometry were performed.There were 70 participants (age 41.7±14.5 years, 60% male, 91.4% living donor kidney recipients, 23.4% were desensitized. 14 patients (20% required escalation of care from the ward to CCU following transplantation. Reduced anaerobic threshold (VO₂AT was the most significant predictor, independently (OR = 0.43; 95% CI 0.27-0.68; p<0.001 and in the multivariate logistic regression analysis (adjusted OR = 0.26; 95% CI 0.12-0.59; p = 0.001. The area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve was 0.93, based on a risk prediction model that incorporated VO₂AT, body mass index and desensitization status. Neither echocardiographic nor measures of aortic compliance were significantly associated with CCU admission.To our knowledge, this is the first prospective observational study to demonstrate the usefulness of CPET as a preoperative risk stratification tool for patients undergoing kidney transplantation. The study suggests that VO₂AT has the potential to predict perioperative morbidity in kidney transplant recipients.

  12. Comparison of mortality prediction models and validation of SAPS II in critically ill burns patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantet, O; Faouzi, M; Brusselaers, N; Vernay, A; Berger, M M

    2016-06-30

    Specific burn outcome prediction scores such as the Abbreviated Burn Severity Index (ABSI), Ryan, Belgian Outcome of Burn Injury (BOBI) and revised Baux scores have been extensively studied. Validation studies of the critical care score SAPS II (Simplified Acute Physiology Score) have included burns patients but not addressed them as a cohort. The study aimed at comparing their performance in a Swiss burns intensive care unit (ICU) and to observe whether they were affected by a standardized definition of inhalation injury. We conducted a retrospective cohort study, including all consecutive ICU burn admissions (n=492) between 1996 and 2013: 5 epochs were defined by protocol changes. As required for SAPS II calculation, stays burned (TBSA) and inhalation injury (systematic standardized diagnosis since 2006). Study epochs were compared (χ2 test, ANOVA). Score performance was assessed by receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. SAPS II performed well (AUC 0.89), particularly in burns burns <40% TBSA. Ryan and BOBI scores were least accurate, as they heavily weight inhalation injury.

  13. Prediction of critical heat flux in narrow rectangular channels using an artificial neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Lei; Yan Xiao; Huang Yanping; Xiao Zejun; Yu Jiyang

    2011-01-01

    The concept of Critical heat flux (CHF) and its importance are introduced and the meaning to research CHF in narrow rectangular channels independently is emphasized. This paper is the first effort to predict CHF in NRCs using aritificial neural network. The mathematical structure of the artificial neural network and the error back-propagation algorithm are introduced. To predict CHF, the four dimensionless groups are inputted to the neural network and the output is the dimensionless CHF. As the hidden nodes increased, the training error decreases while the testing error decreases firstly and then transition occurs. Based on this, the hidden nodes are set as 5 and the trained network predicts all of the training and testing data points with RMS=0.0016 and μ=1.0003, which is better than several well-known existing correlations. Based on the trained network, the effect of several parameters on CHF are simulated and discussed. CHF increases almost linearly as the inlet subcooling increases. And larger mass flux enhances the effect of the inlet subcooling. CHF increases with the mass flux increasing. And the effect seems to be a little stronger for relatively low system pressure. CHF decreases almost linearly as the system pressure increases for the fixed inlet condition. The slope of the curve also increases with higher mass flux. This observation is limited to the ranges of the experimental database. CHF decreases as the heated length is increased and the gradients of the curves become very sharp for relatively short channel. CHF increases slightly with the diameter increasing with the variance of the gap limited within 1 to 3 mm. For relatively low mass flux, the effect of the equivalent diameter on CHF is insignificant. As the width of the channel is large enough, the effect of the gap is quite the same as that of the equivalent diameter. A BPNN is successfully trained based on near 500 CHF data points in NRCs, which has much better performances than the

  14. A new risk prediction model for critical care: the Intensive Care National Audit & Research Centre (ICNARC) model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, David A; Parry, Gareth J; Carpenter, James R; Short, Alasdair; Rowan, Kathy

    2007-04-01

    To develop a new model to improve risk prediction for admissions to adult critical care units in the UK. Prospective cohort study. The setting was 163 adult, general critical care units in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland, December 1995 to August 2003. Patients were 216,626 critical care admissions. None. The performance of different approaches to modeling physiologic measurements was evaluated, and the best methods were selected to produce a new physiology score. This physiology score was combined with other information relating to the critical care admission-age, diagnostic category, source of admission, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation before admission-to develop a risk prediction model. Modeling interactions between diagnostic category and physiology score enabled the inclusion of groups of admissions that are frequently excluded from risk prediction models. The new model showed good discrimination (mean c index 0.870) and fit (mean Shapiro's R 0.665, mean Brier's score 0.132) in 200 repeated validation samples and performed well when compared with recalibrated versions of existing published risk prediction models in the cohort of patients eligible for all models. The hypothesis of perfect fit was rejected for all models, including the Intensive Care National Audit & Research Centre (ICNARC) model, as is to be expected in such a large cohort. The ICNARC model demonstrated better discrimination and overall fit than existing risk prediction models, even following recalibration of these models. We recommend it be used to replace previously published models for risk adjustment in the UK.

  15. Soft-Cliff Retreat, Self-Organized Critical Phenomena in the Limit of Predictability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Carlos; Godoy, Clara; Castedo, Ricardo

    2015-03-01

    The coastal erosion along the world's coastlines is a natural process that occurs through the actions of marine and subaerial physico-chemical phenomena, waves, tides, and currents. The development of cliff erosion predictive models is limited due to the complex interactions between environmental processes and material properties over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. As a result of this erosive action, gravity driven mass movements occur and the coastline moves inland. Like other studied earth natural and synthetically modelled phenomena characterized as self-organized critical (SOC), the recession of the cliff has a seemingly random, sporadic behavior, with a wide range of yearly recession rate values probabilistically distributed by a power-law. Usually, SOC systems are defined by a number of scaling features in the size distribution of its parameters and on its spatial and/or temporal pattern. Particularly, some previous studies of derived parameters from slope movements catalogues, have allowed detecting certain SOC features in this phenomenon, which also shares the recession of cliffs. Due to the complexity of the phenomenon and, as for other natural processes, there is no definitive model of recession of coastal cliffs. In this work, various analysis techniques have been applied to identify SOC features in the distribution and pattern to a particular case: the Holderness shoreline. This coast is a great case study to use when examining coastal processes and the structures associated with them. It is one of World's fastest eroding coastlines (2 m/yr in average, max observed 22 m/yr). Cliffs, ranging from 2 m up to 35 m in height, and made up of glacial tills, mainly compose this coast. It is this soft boulder clay that is being rapidly eroded and where coastline recession measurements have been recorded by the Cliff Erosion Monitoring Program (East Riding of Yorkshire Council, UK). The original database has been filtered by grouping contiguous

  16. Predicting critical temperatures of iron(II) spin crossover materials: Density functional theory plus U approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yachao, E-mail: yczhang@nano.gznc.edu.cn [Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory of Computational Nano-Material Science, Guizhou Normal College, Guiyang 550018, Guizhou (China)

    2014-12-07

    A first-principles study of critical temperatures (T{sub c}) of spin crossover (SCO) materials requires accurate description of the strongly correlated 3d electrons as well as much computational effort. This task is still a challenge for the widely used local density or generalized gradient approximations (LDA/GGA) and hybrid functionals. One remedy, termed density functional theory plus U (DFT+U) approach, introduces a Hubbard U term to deal with the localized electrons at marginal computational cost, while treats the delocalized electrons with LDA/GGA. Here, we employ the DFT+U approach to investigate the T{sub c} of a pair of iron(II) SCO molecular crystals (α and β phase), where identical constituent molecules are packed in different ways. We first calculate the adiabatic high spin-low spin energy splitting ΔE{sub HL} and molecular vibrational frequencies in both spin states, then obtain the temperature dependent enthalpy and entropy changes (ΔH and ΔS), and finally extract T{sub c} by exploiting the ΔH/T − T and ΔS − T relationships. The results are in agreement with experiment. Analysis of geometries and electronic structures shows that the local ligand field in the α phase is slightly weakened by the H-bondings involving the ligand atoms and the specific crystal packing style. We find that this effect is largely responsible for the difference in T{sub c} of the two phases. This study shows the applicability of the DFT+U approach for predicting T{sub c} of SCO materials, and provides a clear insight into the subtle influence of the crystal packing effects on SCO behavior.

  17. Prediction of sodium critical heat flux (CHF) in annular channel using grey systems theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Tao; Su Guanghui; Zhang Weizhong; Qiu Suizheng; Jia Dounan

    2001-01-01

    Using grey systems theory and experimental data obtained from sodium boiling test loop in China, the grey mutual analysis of some parameters influencing sodium CHF is carried out, and the CHF values are predicted by GM(1, 1) model. The GM(1, h) model is established for CHF prediction, and the predicted CHF values are good agreement with the experimental data

  18. Quantitative research on critical thinking and predicting nursing students' NCLEX-RN performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Elizabeth M

    2010-07-01

    The concept of critical thinking has been influential in several disciplines. Both education and nursing in general have been attempting to define, teach, and measure this concept for decades. Nurse educators realize that critical thinking is the cornerstone of the objectives and goals for nursing students. The purpose of this article is to review and analyze quantitative research findings relevant to the measurement of critical thinking abilities and skills in undergraduate nursing students and the usefulness of critical thinking as a predictor of National Council Licensure Examination-Registered Nurse (NCLEX-RN) performance. The specific issues that this integrative review examined include assessment and analysis of the theoretical and operational definitions of critical thinking, theoretical frameworks used to guide the studies, instruments used to evaluate critical thinking skills and abilities, and the role of critical thinking as a predictor of NCLEX-RN outcomes. A list of key assumptions related to critical thinking was formulated. The limitations and gaps in the literature were identified, as well as the types of future research needed in this arena. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Investigating Predictive Role of Critical Thinking on Metacognition with Structural Equation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Serhat

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationships between critical thinking and metacognition. The sample of study consists of 390 university students who were enrolled in different programs at Sakarya University, in Turkey. In this study, the Critical Thinking Disposition Scale and Metacognitive Thinking Scale were used. The relationships…

  20. Simple motor tasks independently predict extubation failure in critically ill neurological patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutchak, Fernanda Machado; Rieder, Marcelo de Mello; Victorino, Josué Almeida; Meneguzzi, Carla; Poersch, Karla; Forgiarini, Luiz Alberto; Bianchin, Marino Muxfeldt

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of simple motor tasks such as hand grasping and tongue protrusion as predictors of extubation failure in critically ill neurological patients. This was a prospective cohort study conducted in the neurological ICU of a tertiary care hospital in the city of Porto Alegre, Brazil. Adult patients who had been intubated for neurological reasons and were eligible for weaning were included in the study. The ability of patients to perform simple motor tasks such as hand grasping and tongue protrusion was evaluated as a predictor of extubation failure. Data regarding duration of mechanical ventilation, length of ICU stay, length of hospital stay, mortality, and incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia were collected. A total of 132 intubated patients who had been receiving mechanical ventilation for at least 24 h and who passed a spontaneous breathing trial were included in the analysis. Logistic regression showed that patient inability to grasp the hand of the examiner (relative risk = 1.57; 95% CI: 1.01-2.44; p commands is predictive of extubation failure in critically ill neurological patients. Hand grasping and tongue protrusion on command might be quick and easy bedside tests to identify neurocritical care patients who are candidates for extubation. Avaliar a utilidade de tarefas motoras simples, tais como preensão de mão e protrusão da língua, para predizer extubação malsucedida em pacientes neurológicos críticos. Estudo prospectivo de coorte realizado na UTI neurológica de um hospital terciário em Porto Alegre (RS). Pacientes adultos que haviam sido intubados por motivos neurológicos e que eram candidatos ao desmame foram incluídos no estudo. O estudo avaliou se a capacidade dos pacientes de realizar tarefas motoras simples como apertar as mãos do examinador e pôr a língua para fora seria um preditor de extubação malsucedida. Foram coletados dados referentes ao tempo de ventilação mecânica, tempo de internação na

  1. Constructing an everywhere and locally relevant predictive model of the West-African critical zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hector, B.; Cohard, J. M.; Pellarin, T.; Maxwell, R. M.; Cappelaere, B.; Demarty, J.; Grippa, M.; Kergoat, L.; Lebel, T.; Mamadou, O.; Mougin, E.; Panthou, G.; Peugeot, C.; Vandervaere, J. P.; Vischel, T.; Vouillamoz, J. M.

    2017-12-01

    Considering water resources and hydrologic hazards, West Africa is among the most vulnerable regions to face both climatic (e.g. with the observed intensification of precipitation) and anthropogenic changes. With +3% of demographic rate, the region experiences rapid land use changes and increased pressure on surface and groundwater resources with observed consequences on the hydrological cycle (water table rise result of the sahelian paradox, increase in flood occurrence, etc.) Managing large hydrosystems (such as transboundary aquifers or rivers basins as the Niger river) requires anticipation of such changes. However, the region significantly lacks observations, for constructing and validating critical zone (CZ) models able to predict future hydrologic regime, but also comprises hydrosystems which encompass strong environmental gradients (e.g. geological, climatic, ecological) with highly different dominating hydrological processes. We address these issues by constructing a high resolution (1 km²) regional scale physically-based model using ParFlow-CLM which allows modeling a wide range of processes without prior knowledge on their relative dominance. Our approach combines multiple scale modeling from local to meso and regional scales within the same theoretical framework. Local and meso-scale models are evaluated thanks to the rich AMMA-CATCH CZ observation database which covers 3 supersites with contrasted environments in Benin (Lat.: 9.8°N), Niger (Lat.: 13.3°N) and Mali (Lat.: 15.3°N). At the regional scale the lack of relevant map of soil hydrodynamic parameters is addressed using remote sensing data assimilation. Our first results show the model's ability to reproduce the known dominant hydrological processes (runoff generation, ET, groundwater recharge…) across the major West-African regions and allow us to conduct virtual experiments to explore the impact of global changes on the hydrosystems. This approach is a first step toward the construction of

  2. Early lactate clearance for predicting active bleeding in critically ill patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Tomoki; Hagiwara, Akiyoshi; Uemura, Tatsuki; Yahagi, Naoki; Kimura, Akio

    2016-08-01

    Not all patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) require emergency endoscopy. Lactate clearance has been suggested as a parameter for predicting patient outcomes in various critical care settings. This study investigates whether lactate clearance can predict active bleeding in critically ill patients with UGIB. This single-center, retrospective, observational study included critically ill patients with UGIB who met all of the following criteria: admission to the emergency department (ED) from April 2011 to August 2014; had blood samples for lactate evaluation at least twice during the ED stay; and had emergency endoscopy within 6 h of ED presentation. The main outcome was active bleeding detected with emergency endoscopy. Classification and regression tree (CART) analyses were performed using variables associated with active bleeding to derive a prediction rule for active bleeding in critically ill UGIB patients. A total of 154 patients with UGIB were analyzed, and 31.2 % (48/154) had active bleeding. In the univariate analysis, lactate clearance was significantly lower in patients with active bleeding than in those without active bleeding (13 vs. 29 %, P bleeding is derived, and includes three variables: lactate clearance; platelet count; and systolic blood pressure at ED presentation. The rule has 97.9 % (95 % CI 90.2-99.6 %) sensitivity with 32.1 % (28.6-32.9 %) specificity. Lactate clearance may be associated with active bleeding in critically ill patients with UGIB, and may be clinically useful as a component of a prediction rule for active bleeding.

  3. Thermal hydraulic test for reactor safety system - Critical heat flux experiment and development of prediction models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Soon Heung; Baek, Won Pil; Yang, Soo Hyung; No, Chang Hyun [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    To acquire CHF data through the experiments and develop prediction models, research was conducted. Final objectives of research are as follows: 1) Production of tube CHF data for low and middle pressure and mass flux and Flow Boiling Visualization. 2) Modification and suggestion of tube CHF prediction models. 3) Development of fuel bundle CHF prediction methodology base on tube CHF prediction models. The major results of research are as follows: 1) Production of the CHF data for low and middle pressure and mass flux. - Acquisition of CHF data (764) for low and middle pressure and flow conditions - Analysis of CHF trends based on the CHF data - Assessment of existing CHF prediction methods with the CHF data 2) Modification and suggestion of tube CHF prediction models. - Development of a unified CHF model applicable for a wide parametric range - Development of a threshold length correlation - Improvement of CHF look-up table using the threshold length correlation 3) Development of fuel bundle CHF prediction methodology base on tube CHF prediction models. - Development of bundle CHF prediction methodology using correction factor. 11 refs., 134 figs., 25 tabs. (Author)

  4. A critical pressure based panel method for prediction of unsteady loading of marine propellers under cavitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, P.; Bose, N.; Colbourne, B.

    2002-01-01

    A simple numerical procedure is established and implemented into a time domain panel method to predict hydrodynamic performance of marine propellers with sheet cavitation. This paper describes the numerical formulations and procedures to construct this integration. Predicted hydrodynamic loads were compared with both a previous numerical model and experimental measurements for a propeller in steady flow. The current method gives a substantial improvement in thrust and torque coefficient prediction over a previous numerical method at low cavitation numbers of less than 2.0, where severe cavitation occurs. Predicted pressure coefficient distributions are also presented. (author)

  5. A dry-spot model for the prediction of critical heat flux in water boiling in bubbly flow regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Sang Jun; No, Hee Cheon

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a prediction of critical heat flux (CHF) in bubbly flow regime using dry-spot model proposed recently by authors for pool and flow boiling CHF and existing correlations for forced convective heat transfer coefficient, active site density and bubble departure diameter in nucleate boiling region. Without any empirical constants always present in earlier models, comparisons of the model predictions with experimental data for upward flow of water in vertical, uniformly-heated round tubes are performed and show a good agreement. The parametric trends of CHF have been explored with respect to variation in pressure, tube diameter and length, mass flux and inlet subcooling

  6. Evaluation of cloud prediction and determination of critical relative humidity for a mesoscale numerical weather prediction model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seaman, N.L.; Guo, Z.; Ackerman, T.P. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Predictions of cloud occurrence and vertical location from the Pennsylvannia State University/National Center for Atmospheric Research nonhydrostatic mesoscale model (MM5) were evaluated statistically using cloud observations obtained at Coffeyville, Kansas, as part of the Second International satellite Cloud Climatology Project Regional Experiment campaign. Seventeen cases were selected for simulation during a November-December 1991 field study. MM5 was used to produce two sets of 36-km simulations, one with and one without four-dimensional data assimilation (FDDA), and a set of 12-km simulations without FDDA, but nested within the 36-km FDDA runs.

  7. Critical velocity and anaerobic paddling capacity determined by different mathematical models and number of predictive trials in canoe slalom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messias, Leonardo H D; Ferrari, Homero G; Reis, Ivan G M; Scariot, Pedro P M; Manchado-Gobatto, Fúlvia B

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze if different combinations of trials as well as mathematical models can modify the aerobic and anaerobic estimates from critical velocity protocol applied in canoe slalom. Fourteen male elite slalom kayakers from Brazilian canoe slalom team (K1) were evaluated. Athletes were submitted to four predictive trials of 150, 300, 450 and 600 meters in a lake and the time to complete each trial was recorded. Critical velocity (CV-aerobic parameter) and anaerobic paddling capacity (APC-anaerobic parameter) were obtained by three mathematical models (Linear1=distance-time; Linear 2=velocity-1/time and Non-Linear = time-velocity). Linear 1 was chosen for comparison of predictive trials combinations. Standard combination (SC) was considered as the four trials (150, 300, 450 and 600 m). High fits of regression were obtained from all mathematical models (range - R² = 0.96-1.00). Repeated measures ANOVA pointed out differences of all mathematical models for CV (p = 0.006) and APC (p = 0.016) as well as R² (p = 0.033). Estimates obtained from the first (1) and the fourth (4) predictive trials (150 m = lowest; and 600 m = highest, respectively) were similar and highly correlated (r=0.98 for CV and r = 0.96 for APC) with the SC. In summary, methodological aspects must be considered in critical velocity application in canoe slalom, since different combinations of trials as well as mathematical models resulted in different aerobic and anaerobic estimates. Key pointsGreat attention must be given for methodological concerns regarding critical velocity protocol applied on canoe slalom, since different estimates were obtained depending on the mathematical model and the predictive trials used.Linear 1 showed the best fits of regression. Furthermore, to the best of our knowledge and considering practical applications, this model is the easiest one to calculate the estimates from critical velocity protocol. Considering this, the abyss between science

  8. Modified Augmented Renal Clearance Score Predicts Rapid Piperacillin and Tazobactam Clearance in Critically Ill Surgery and Trauma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-24

    collision; VAP , ventilator-associated pneumonia. TABLE 2. PK Parameter Estimates for Free Piperacillin and Tazobactam in Patients Stratified by ARC Score...SOFA score are typically generated during routine care of the most severely ill patients . Positive screening test results (high ARC scores) can be...Modified Augmented Renal Clearance score predicts rapid piperacillin and tazobactam clearance in critically ill surgery and trauma patients Kevin S

  9. Influence of the external neutron sources in the criticality prediction using 1/M curve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Valmir [COPPE/UFRJ, Programa de Engenharia Nuclear, Caixa Postal 68509, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Carvalho da Silva, Fernando [COPPE/UFRJ, Programa de Engenharia Nuclear, Caixa Postal 68509, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Martinez, Aquilino Senra [COPPE/UFRJ, Programa de Engenharia Nuclear, Caixa Postal 68509, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)]. E-mail: aquilino@lmp.ufrj.br

    2005-11-15

    The influence of external neutron sources in the process to obtain the criticality condition is estimated. To reach this objective, the three-dimensional neutron diffusion equation in two groups of energy is solved, for a subcritical PWR reactor core with external neutron sources. The results are compared with the solution of the corresponding problem without external neutron sources, that is an eigenvalue problem. The method developed for this purposes it makes use of both the nodal method (for calculation of the neutron flux) and the finite differences method (for calculation of the adjoint flux). A coarse mesh finite difference method was developed for the adjoint flux calculation, which uses the output of the nodal expansion method. The results regarding the influence of the external neutron source presence for attaining criticality have shown that far from criticality it is necessary to calculate the reactivity values of the system.

  10. Influence of the external neutron sources in the criticality prediction using 1/M curve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Valmir; Carvalho da Silva, Fernando; Martinez, Aquilino Senra

    2005-01-01

    The influence of external neutron sources in the process to obtain the criticality condition is estimated. To reach this objective, the three-dimensional neutron diffusion equation in two groups of energy is solved, for a subcritical PWR reactor core with external neutron sources. The results are compared with the solution of the corresponding problem without external neutron sources, that is an eigenvalue problem. The method developed for this purposes it makes use of both the nodal method (for calculation of the neutron flux) and the finite differences method (for calculation of the adjoint flux). A coarse mesh finite difference method was developed for the adjoint flux calculation, which uses the output of the nodal expansion method. The results regarding the influence of the external neutron source presence for attaining criticality have shown that far from criticality it is necessary to calculate the reactivity values of the system

  11. Numerical prediction of a dip effect in the critical current density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Khawaja, U.; Benkraouda, M.; Obaidat, I.M.

    2007-01-01

    We have conducted extensive series of molecular dynamic simulations on the properties of the critical current density in systems with periodic square arrays of pinning sites. The density of the pinning sites was kept fixed while the density of vortices, pinning strength, and temperature were varied several times. At zero temperature, we have observed a substantial dip in the critical current density that occurs only at a fixed value of the vortex density and for specific values of pinning strength. We have found that the occurrence of the dip depends mainly on the initial positions of the vortices with respect to the positions of the pinning sites. At the dip, we have found that the interstitial vortices form moving channels leading to the observed drop in the critical current density

  12. Early Prediction of Sepsis Incidence in Critically Ill Patients Using Specific Genetic Polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Vlad Laurentiu; Ercisli, Muhammed Furkan; Rogobete, Alexandru Florin; Boia, Eugen S; Horhat, Razvan; Nitu, Razvan; Diaconu, Mircea M; Pirtea, Laurentiu; Ciuca, Ioana; Horhat, Delia; Horhat, Florin George; Licker, Monica; Popovici, Sonia Elena; Tanasescu, Sonia; Tataru, Calin

    2017-06-01

    Several diagnostic methods for the evaluation and monitoring were used to find out the pro-inflammatory status, as well as incidence of sepsis in critically ill patients. One such recent method is based on investigating the genetic polymorphisms and determining the molecular and genetic links between them, as well as other sepsis-associated pathophysiologies. Identification of genetic polymorphisms in critical patients with sepsis can become a revolutionary method for evaluating and monitoring these patients. Similarly, the complications, as well as the high costs associated with the management of patients with sepsis, can be significantly reduced by early initiation of intensive care.

  13. prediction of shear resistance factor in flat slabs design using critical

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    The provisions of the American, Canadian, European and. Model codes, regarding the ... is the applied shear stress. W1 .... perimeter implies a smaller stress while a smaller critical .... should be compared with values provided in this work to validate ... [1] American Concrete Institute : Building code requirement for structural ...

  14. A critical discussion on the applicability of Compound Topographic Index (CTI) for predicting ephemeral gully erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casalí, Javier; Chahor, Youssef; Giménez, Rafael; Campo-Bescós, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    The so-called Compound Topographic Index (CTI) can be calculated for each grid cell in a DEM and be used to identify potential locations for ephemeral gullies (e. g.) based on land topography (CTI = A.S.PLANC, where A is upstream drainage area, S is local slope and PLANC is planform curvature, a measure of the landscape convergence) (Parker et al., 2007). It can be shown that CTI represents stream power per unit bed area and it considers the major parameters controlling the pattern and intensity of concentrated surface runoff in the field (Parker et al., 2007). However, other key variables controlling e.g. erosion (e. g. e.) such as soil characteristics, land-use and management, are not had into consideration. The critical CTI value (CTIc) "represents the intensity of concentrated overland flow necessary to initiate erosion and channelised flow under a given set of circumstances" (Parker et al., 2007). AnnAGNPS (Annualized Agriculture Non-Point Source) pollution model is an important management tool developed by (USDA) and uses CTI to locate potential ephemeral gullies. Then, and depending on rainfall characteristics of the period simulated by AnnAGNPS, potential e. g. can become "actual", and be simulated by the model accordingly. This paper presents preliminary results and a number of considerations after evaluating the CTI tool in Navarre. CTIc values found are similar to those cited by other authors, and the e. g. networks that on average occur in the area have been located reasonably well. After our experience we believe that it is necessary to distinguish between the CTIc corresponding to the location of headcuts whose migrations originate the e. g. (CTIc1); and the CTIc necessary to represent the location of the gully networks in the watershed (CTIc2), where gully headcuts are located in the upstream end of the gullies. Most scientists only consider one CTIc value, although, from our point of view, the two situations are different. CTIc1 would represent the

  15. Prediction of the critical heat flux for saturated upward flow boiling water in vertical narrow rectangular channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Gil Sik; Chang, Soon Heung; Jeong, Yong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    A study, on the theoretical method to predict the critical heat flux (CHF) of saturated upward flow boiling water in vertical narrow rectangular channels, has been conducted. For the assessment of this CHF prediction method, 608 experimental data were selected from the previous researches, in which the heated sections were uniformly heated from both wide surfaces under the high pressure condition over 41 bar. For this purpose, representative previous liquid film dryout (LFD) models for circular channels were reviewed by using 6058 points from the KAIST CHF data bank. This shows that it is reasonable to define the initial condition of quality and entrainment fraction at onset of annular flow (OAF) as the transition to annular flow regime and the equilibrium value, respectively, and the prediction error of the LFD model is dependent on the accuracy of the constitutive equations of droplet deposition and entrainment. In the modified Levy model, the CHF data are predicted with standard deviation (SD) of 14.0% and root mean square error (RMSE) of 14.1%. Meanwhile, in the present LFD model, which is based on the constitutive equations developed by Okawa et al., the entire data are calculated with SD of 17.1% and RMSE of 17.3%. Because of its qualitative prediction trend and universal calculation convergence, the present model was finally selected as the best LFD model to predict the CHF for narrow rectangular channels. For the assessment of the present LFD model for narrow rectangular channels, effective 284 data were selected. By using the present LFD model, these data are predicted with RMSE of 22.9% with the dryout criterion of zero-liquid film flow, but RMSE of 18.7% with rivulet formation model. This shows that the prediction error of the present LFD model for narrow rectangular channels is similar with that for circular channels.

  16. Load-Unload Response Ratio and Accelerating Moment/Energy Release Critical Region Scaling and Earthquake Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, X. C.; Mora, P.; Peng, K.; Wang, Y. C.; Weatherley, D.

    The main idea of the Load-Unload Response Ratio (LURR) is that when a system is stable, its response to loading corresponds to its response to unloading, whereas when the system is approaching an unstable state, the response to loading and unloading becomes quite different. High LURR values and observations of Accelerating Moment/Energy Release (AMR/AER) prior to large earthquakes have led different research groups to suggest intermediate-term earthquake prediction is possible and imply that the LURR and AMR/AER observations may have a similar physical origin. To study this possibility, we conducted a retrospective examination of several Australian and Chinese earthquakes with magnitudes ranging from 5.0 to 7.9, including Australia's deadly Newcastle earthquake and the devastating Tangshan earthquake. Both LURR values and best-fit power-law time-to-failure functions were computed using data within a range of distances from the epicenter. Like the best-fit power-law fits in AMR/AER, the LURR value was optimal using data within a certain epicentral distance implying a critical region for LURR. Furthermore, LURR critical region size scales with mainshock magnitude and is similar to the AMR/AER critical region size. These results suggest a common physical origin for both the AMR/AER and LURR observations. Further research may provide clues that yield an understanding of this mechanism and help lead to a solid foundation for intermediate-term earthquake prediction.

  17. SLE in self-dual critical Z(N) spin systems: CFT predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santachiara, Raoul

    2008-01-01

    The Schramm-Loewner evolution (SLE) describes the continuum limit of domain walls at phase transitions in two-dimensional statistical systems. We consider here the SLE in Z(N) spin models at their self-dual critical point. For N=2 and N=3 these models correspond to the Ising and three-state Potts model. For N≥4 the critical self-dual Z(N) spin models are described in the continuum limit by non-minimal conformal field theories with central charge c≥1. By studying the representations of the corresponding chiral algebra, we show that two particular operators satisfy a two level null vector condition which, for N≥4, presents an additional term coming from the extra symmetry currents action. For N=2,3 these operators correspond to the boundary conditions changing operators associated to the SLE 16/3 (Ising model) and to the SLE 24/5 and SLE 10/3 (three-state Potts model). We suggest a definition of the interfaces within the Z(N) lattice models. The scaling limit of these interfaces is expected to be described at the self-dual critical point and for N≥4 by the SLE 4(N+1)/(N+2) and SLE 4(N+2)/(N+1) processes

  18. A Critical Evaluation of Network and Pathway-Based Classifiers for Outcome Prediction in Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Staiger (Christine); S. Cadot; R Kooter; M. Dittrich (Marcus); T. Müller (Tobias); G.W. Klau (Gunnar); L.F.A. Wessels (Lodewyk)

    2012-01-01

    htmlabstractRecently, several classifiers that combine primary tumor data, like gene expression data, and secondary data sources, such as protein-protein interaction networks, have been proposed for predicting outcome in breast cancer. In these approaches, new composite features are typically

  19. Validation of lactate clearance at 6 h for mortality prediction in critically ill children

    OpenAIRE

    Rajeev Kumar; Nirmal Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: To validate the lactate clearance (LC) at 6 h for mortality prediction in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU)-admitted patients and its comparison with a pediatric index of mortality 2 (PIM 2) score. Design: A prospective, observational study in a tertiary care center. Materials and Methods: Children

  20. Comprehensive and critical review of the predictive properties of the various mass models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haustein, P.E.

    1984-01-01

    Since the publication of the 1975 Mass Predictions approximately 300 new atomic masses have been reported. These data come from a variety of experimental studies using diverse techniques and they span a mass range from the lightest isotopes to the very heaviest. It is instructive to compare these data with the 1975 predictions and several others (Moeller and Nix, Monahan, Serduke, Uno and Yamada which appeared latter. Extensive numerical and graphical analyses have been performed to examine the quality of the mass predictions from the various models and to identify features in these models that require correction. In general, there is only rough correlation between the ability of a particular model to reproduce the measured mass surface which had been used to refine its adjustable parameters and that model's ability to predict correctly the new masses. For some models distinct systematic features appear when the new mass data are plotted as functions of relevant physical variables. Global intercomparisons of all the models are made first, followed by several examples of types of analysis performed with individual mass models

  1. Theoretical study on new bias factor methods to effectively use critical experiments for improvement of prediction accuracy of neutronic characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kugo, Teruhiko; Mori, Takamasa; Takeda, Toshikazu

    2007-01-01

    Extended bias factor methods are proposed with two new concepts, the LC method and the PE method, in order to effectively use critical experiments and to enhance the applicability of the bias factor method for the improvement of the prediction accuracy of neutronic characteristics of a target core. Both methods utilize a number of critical experimental results and produce a semifictitious experimental value with them. The LC and PE methods define the semifictitious experimental values by a linear combination of experimental values and the product of exponentiated experimental values, respectively, and the corresponding semifictitious calculation values by those of calculation values. A bias factor is defined by the ratio of the semifictitious experimental value to the semifictitious calculation value in both methods. We formulate how to determine weights for the LC method and exponents for the PE method in order to minimize the variance of the design prediction value obtained by multiplying the design calculation value by the bias factor. From a theoretical comparison of these new methods with the conventional method which utilizes a single experimental result and the generalized bias factor method which was previously proposed to utilize a number of experimental results, it is concluded that the PE method is the most useful method for improving the prediction accuracy. The main advantages of the PE method are summarized as follows. The prediction accuracy is necessarily improved compared with the design calculation value even when experimental results include large experimental errors. This is a special feature that the other methods do not have. The prediction accuracy is most effectively improved by utilizing all the experimental results. From these facts, it can be said that the PE method effectively utilizes all the experimental results and has a possibility to make a full-scale-mockup experiment unnecessary with the use of existing and future benchmark

  2. Critical heat flux prediction by using radial basis function and multilayer perceptron neural networks: A comparison study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaziri, Nima; Hojabri, Alireza; Erfani, Ali; Monsefi, Mehrdad; Nilforooshan, Behnam

    2007-01-01

    Critical heat flux (CHF) is an important parameter for the design of nuclear reactors. Although many experimental and theoretical researches have been performed, there is not a single correlation to predict CHF because it is influenced by many parameters. These parameters are based on fixed inlet, local and fixed outlet conditions. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) have been applied to a wide variety of different areas such as prediction, approximation, modeling and classification. In this study, two types of neural networks, radial basis function (RBF) and multilayer perceptron (MLP), are trained with the experimental CHF data and their performances are compared. RBF predicts CHF with root mean square (RMS) errors of 0.24%, 7.9%, 0.16% and MLP predicts CHF with RMS errors of 1.29%, 8.31% and 2.71%, in fixed inlet conditions, local conditions and fixed outlet conditions, respectively. The results show that neural networks with RBF structure have superior performance in CHF data prediction over MLP neural networks. The parametric trends of CHF obtained by the trained ANNs are also evaluated and results reported

  3. Continuous Automated Model EvaluatiOn (CAMEO) complementing the critical assessment of structure prediction in CASP12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Jürgen; Barbato, Alessandro; Behringer, Dario; Studer, Gabriel; Roth, Steven; Bertoni, Martino; Mostaguir, Khaled; Gumienny, Rafal; Schwede, Torsten

    2018-03-01

    Every second year, the community experiment "Critical Assessment of Techniques for Structure Prediction" (CASP) is conducting an independent blind assessment of structure prediction methods, providing a framework for comparing the performance of different approaches and discussing the latest developments in the field. Yet, developers of automated computational modeling methods clearly benefit from more frequent evaluations based on larger sets of data. The "Continuous Automated Model EvaluatiOn (CAMEO)" platform complements the CASP experiment by conducting fully automated blind prediction assessments based on the weekly pre-release of sequences of those structures, which are going to be published in the next release of the PDB Protein Data Bank. CAMEO publishes weekly benchmarking results based on models collected during a 4-day prediction window, on average assessing ca. 100 targets during a time frame of 5 weeks. CAMEO benchmarking data is generated consistently for all participating methods at the same point in time, enabling developers to benchmark and cross-validate their method's performance, and directly refer to the benchmarking results in publications. In order to facilitate server development and promote shorter release cycles, CAMEO sends weekly email with submission statistics and low performance warnings. Many participants of CASP have successfully employed CAMEO when preparing their methods for upcoming community experiments. CAMEO offers a variety of scores to allow benchmarking diverse aspects of structure prediction methods. By introducing new scoring schemes, CAMEO facilitates new development in areas of active research, for example, modeling quaternary structure, complexes, or ligand binding sites. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Net Reclassification Indices for Evaluating Risk-Prediction Instruments: A Critical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Kathleen F.; Wang, Zheyu; Janes, Holly; McClelland, Robyn L.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Pepe, Margaret S.

    2014-01-01

    Net reclassification indices have recently become popular statistics for measuring the prediction increment of new biomarkers. We review the various types of net reclassification indices and their correct interpretations. We evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of quantifying the prediction increment with these indices. For pre-defined risk categories, we relate net reclassification indices to existing measures of the prediction increment. We also consider statistical methodology for constructing confidence intervals for net reclassification indices and evaluate the merits of hypothesis testing based on such indices. We recommend that investigators using net reclassification indices should report them separately for events (cases) and nonevents (controls). When there are two risk categories, the components of net reclassification indices are the same as the changes in the true-positive and false-positive rates. We advocate use of true- and false-positive rates and suggest it is more useful for investigators to retain the existing, descriptive terms. When there are three or more risk categories, we recommend against net reclassification indices because they do not adequately account for clinically important differences in shifts among risk categories. The category-free net reclassification index is a new descriptive device designed to avoid pre-defined risk categories. However, it suffers from many of the same problems as other measures such as the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. In addition, the category-free index can mislead investigators by overstating the incremental value of a biomarker, even in independent validation data. When investigators want to test a null hypothesis of no prediction increment, the well-established tests for coefficients in the regression model are superior to the net reclassification index. If investigators want to use net reclassification indices, confidence intervals should be calculated using bootstrap

  5. Deafferentation-Induced Plasticity of Visual Callosal Connections: Predicting Critical Periods and Analyzing Cortical Abnormalities Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime F. Olavarria

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Callosal connections form elaborate patterns that bear close association with striate and extrastriate visual areas. Although it is known that retinal input is required for normal callosal development, there is little information regarding the period during which the retina is critically needed and whether this period correlates with the same developmental stage across species. Here we review the timing of this critical period, identified in rodents and ferrets by the effects that timed enucleations have on mature callosal connections, and compare it to other developmental milestones in these species. Subsequently, we compare these events to diffusion tensor imaging (DTI measurements of water diffusion anisotropy within developing cerebral cortex. We observed that the relationship between the timing of the critical period and the DTI-characterized developmental trajectory is strikingly similar in rodents and ferrets, which opens the possibility of using cortical DTI trajectories for predicting the critical period in species, such as humans, in which this period likely occurs prenatally. Last, we discuss the potential of utilizing DTI to distinguish normal from abnormal cerebral cortical development, both within the context of aberrant connectivity induced by early retinal deafferentation, and more generally as a potential tool for detecting abnormalities associated with neurodevelopmental disorders.

  6. Low plasma leptin level at admission predicts delirium in critically ill patients: A prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guicheng; Lei, Xiaobao; Ai, Chenmu; Li, Tao; Chen, Zhongqing

    2017-07-01

    The pathophysiology of delirium remains poorly understood. Low leptin level has been associated with features leading to delirium such as dysregulated immune functions and loss of neuroprotective effects. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship between plasma leptin level at intensive care unit (ICU) entry and subsequent occurrence of delirium in critically ill patients. This single-center prospective cohort study in China allocated 336 critically ill patients admitted to ICU between 05/2015 and 05/2016 into a delirium group (n=102) and non-delirium group (n=234) based on whether delirium occurred during their stay at the ICU. Patients were examined at least twice daily and delirium was diagnosed using the Confusion Assessment Method for the ICU (CAM-ICU). Blood samples were obtained after ICU entry. Plasma leptin concentrations were measured by ELISA. Delirium occurred in 30.4% (102/336) of patients. Patients who developed delirium showed significantly lower leptin level at ICU entry than those who did not (6.1±3.2 vs. 9.2±5.9ng/mL; Pdelirium (OR, 0.865; 95%CI, 0.802-0.934; Pdelirium included increasing age (OR, 1.050; 95%CI, 1.020-1.080; P=0.001) and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation-II (APACHE-II) score (OR, 1.148; 95%CI, 1.092-1.208; Pdelirium had a prolonged duration of ICU stay and higher mortality. Low plasma leptin level at ICU entry was associated with the occurrence of delirium in critically ill patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Establishing Decision Trees for Predicting Successful Postpyloric Nasoenteric Tube Placement in Critically Ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weisheng; Sun, Cheng; Wei, Ru; Zhang, Yanlin; Ye, Heng; Chi, Ruibin; Zhang, Yichen; Hu, Bei; Lv, Bo; Chen, Lifang; Zhang, Xiunong; Lan, Huilan; Chen, Chunbo

    2018-01-01

    Despite the use of prokinetic agents, the overall success rate for postpyloric placement via a self-propelled spiral nasoenteric tube is quite low. This retrospective study was conducted in the intensive care units of 11 university hospitals from 2006 to 2016 among adult patients who underwent self-propelled spiral nasoenteric tube insertion. Success was defined as postpyloric nasoenteric tube placement confirmed by abdominal x-ray scan 24 hours after tube insertion. Chi-square automatic interaction detection (CHAID), simple classification and regression trees (SimpleCart), and J48 methodologies were used to develop decision tree models, and multiple logistic regression (LR) methodology was used to develop an LR model for predicting successful postpyloric nasoenteric tube placement. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used to evaluate the performance of these models. Successful postpyloric nasoenteric tube placement was confirmed in 427 of 939 patients enrolled. For predicting successful postpyloric nasoenteric tube placement, the performance of the 3 decision trees was similar in terms of the AUCs: 0.715 for the CHAID model, 0.682 for the SimpleCart model, and 0.671 for the J48 model. The AUC of the LR model was 0.729, which outperformed the J48 model. Both the CHAID and LR models achieved an acceptable discrimination for predicting successful postpyloric nasoenteric tube placement and were useful for intensivists in the setting of self-propelled spiral nasoenteric tube insertion. © 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  8. Computational multi-fluid dynamics predictions of critical heat flux in boiling flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mimouni, S.; Baudry, C.; Guingo, M.; Lavieville, J.; Merigoux, N.; Mechitoua, N.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new mechanistic model dedicated to DNB has been implemented in the Neptune_CFD code. • The model has been validated against 150 tests. • Neptune_CFD code is a CFD tool dedicated to boiling flows. - Abstract: Extensive efforts have been made in the last five decades to evaluate the boiling heat transfer coefficient and the critical heat flux in particular. Boiling crisis remains a major limiting phenomenon for the analysis of operation and safety of both nuclear reactors and conventional thermal power systems. As a consequence, models dedicated to boiling flows have being improved. For example, Reynolds Stress Transport Model, polydispersion and two-phase flow wall law have been recently implemented. In a previous work, we have evaluated computational fluid dynamics results against single-phase liquid water tests equipped with a mixing vane and against two-phase boiling cases. The objective of this paper is to propose a new mechanistic model in a computational multi-fluid dynamics tool leading to wall temperature excursion and onset of boiling crisis. Critical heat flux is calculated against 150 tests and the mean relative error between calculations and experimental values is equal to 8.3%. The model tested covers a large physics scope in terms of mass flux, pressure, quality and channel diameter. Water and R12 refrigerant fluid are considered. Furthermore, it was found that the sensitivity to the grid refinement was acceptable.

  9. Computational multi-fluid dynamics predictions of critical heat flux in boiling flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mimouni, S., E-mail: stephane.mimouni@edf.fr; Baudry, C.; Guingo, M.; Lavieville, J.; Merigoux, N.; Mechitoua, N.

    2016-04-01

    Highlights: • A new mechanistic model dedicated to DNB has been implemented in the Neptune-CFD code. • The model has been validated against 150 tests. • Neptune-CFD code is a CFD tool dedicated to boiling flows. - Abstract: Extensive efforts have been made in the last five decades to evaluate the boiling heat transfer coefficient and the critical heat flux in particular. Boiling crisis remains a major limiting phenomenon for the analysis of operation and safety of both nuclear reactors and conventional thermal power systems. As a consequence, models dedicated to boiling flows have being improved. For example, Reynolds Stress Transport Model, polydispersion and two-phase flow wall law have been recently implemented. In a previous work, we have evaluated computational fluid dynamics results against single-phase liquid water tests equipped with a mixing vane and against two-phase boiling cases. The objective of this paper is to propose a new mechanistic model in a computational multi-fluid dynamics tool leading to wall temperature excursion and onset of boiling crisis. Critical heat flux is calculated against 150 tests and the mean relative error between calculations and experimental values is equal to 8.3%. The model tested covers a large physics scope in terms of mass flux, pressure, quality and channel diameter. Water and R12 refrigerant fluid are considered. Furthermore, it was found that the sensitivity to the grid refinement was acceptable.

  10. A study on the development of advanced models to predict the critical heat flux for water and liquid metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Bum

    1994-02-01

    The critical heat flux (CHF) phenomenon in the two-phase convective flows has been an important issue in the fields of design and safety analysis of light water reactor (LWR) as well as sodium cooled liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR). Especially in the LWR application many physical aspects of the CHF phenomenon are understood and reliable correlations and mechanistic models to predict the CHF condition have been proposed. However, there are few correlations and models which are applicable to liquid metals. Compared with water, liquid metals show a divergent picture for boiling pattern. Therefore, the CHF conditions obtained from investigations with water cannot be applied to liquid metals. In this work a mechanistic model to predict the CHF of water and a correlation for liquid metals are developed. First, a mechanistic model to predict the CHF in flow boiling at low quality was developed based on the liquid sublayer dryout mechanism. In this approach the CHF is assumed to occur when a vapor blanket isolates the liquid sublayer from bulk liquid and then the liquid entering the sublayer falls short of balancing the rate of sublayer dryout by vaporization. Therefore, the vapor blanket velocity is the key parameter. In this work the vapor blanket velocity is theoretically determined based on mass, energy, and momentum balance and finally the mechanistic model to predict the CHF in flow boiling at low quality is developed. The accuracy of the present model is evaluated by comparing model predictions with the experimental data and tabular data of look-up tables. The predictions of the present model agree well with extensive CHF data. In the latter part a correlation to predict the CHF for liquid metals is developed based on the flow excursion mechanism. By using Baroczy two-phase frictional pressure drop correlation and Ledinegg instability criterion, the relationship between the CHF of liquid metals and the principal parameters is derived and finally the

  11. New Westinghouse correlation WRB-1 for predicting critical heat flux in rod bundles with mixing vane grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motley, F.E.; Hill, K.W.; Cadek, F.F.; Shefcheck, J.

    1976-07-01

    A new critical heat flux (CHF) correlation, based on local fluid conditions, has been developed from Westinghouse rod bundle data. This correlation applies to both 0.422 inch and 0.374 inch rod O.D. geometries. It accounts for typical cell and thimble cell effects, uniform and non-uniform heat flux profiles, variations in rod heated length and in grid spacing. The correlation predicts CHF for 1147 data points with a sample mean and standard deviation of measured-to-predicted heat flux ratio of 1.0043 and 0.0873, respectively. It was concluded that to meet the reactor design criterion the minimum DNBR should be 1.17

  12. A dry-spot model for the prediction of critical heat flux in water boiling in bubbly flow regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Sang Jun; No, Hee Cheon [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    This paper presents a prediction of critical heat flux (CHF) in bubbly flow regime using dry-spot model proposed recently by authors for pool and flow boiling CHF and existing correlations for forced convective heat transfer coefficient, active site density and bubble departure diameter in nucleate boiling region. Without any empirical constants always present in earlier models, comparisons of the model predictions with experimental data for upward flow of water in vertical, uniformly-heated round tubes are performed and show a good agreement. The parametric trends of CHF have been explored with respect to variations in pressure, tube diameter and length, mass flux and inlet subcooling. 16 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  13. A dry-spot model for the prediction of critical heat flux in water boiling in bubbly flow regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Sang Jun; No, Hee Cheon [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    This paper presents a prediction of critical heat flux (CHF) in bubbly flow regime using dry-spot model proposed recently by authors for pool and flow boiling CHF and existing correlations for forced convective heat transfer coefficient, active site density and bubble departure diameter in nucleate boiling region. Without any empirical constants always present in earlier models, comparisons of the model predictions with experimental data for upward flow of water in vertical, uniformly-heated round tubes are performed and show a good agreement. The parametric trends of CHF have been explored with respect to variations in pressure, tube diameter and length, mass flux and inlet subcooling. 16 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  14. Application of bias factor method using random sampling technique for prediction accuracy improvement of critical eigenvalue of BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Motohiro; Endo, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Akio; Kuroda, Yusuke; Yoshii, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    The bias factor method based on the random sampling technique is applied to the benchmark problem of Peach Bottom Unit 2. Validity and availability of the present method, i.e. correction of calculation results and reduction of uncertainty, are confirmed in addition to features and performance of the present method. In the present study, core characteristics in cycle 3 are corrected with the proposed method using predicted and 'measured' critical eigenvalues in cycles 1 and 2. As the source of uncertainty, variance-covariance of cross sections is considered. The calculation results indicate that bias between predicted and measured results, and uncertainty owing to cross section can be reduced. Extension to other uncertainties such as thermal hydraulics properties will be a future task. (author)

  15. Development of a digital reactivity meter for criticality prediction and control rod worth evaluation in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuramoto, Renato Y.R.; Miranda, Anselmo F.; Valladares, Gastao Lommez; Prado, Adelk C.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we have proposed the development of a digital reactivity meter in order to monitor subcriticality continuously during criticality approach in a PWR. A subcritical reactivity meter can provide an easy prediction of the estimated critical point prior to reactor criticality, without complicated hand calculation. Moreover, in order to reduce the interval of the Physics Tests from the economical point of view, a subcritical reactivity meter can evaluate the control rod worth from direct subcriticality measurement. In other words, count rate of Source Range (SR) detector recorded during the criticality approach could be used for subcriticality evaluation or control rod worth evaluation. Basically, a digital reactivity meter is based on the inverse solution of the kinetic equations of a reactor with the external neutron source in one-point reactor model. There are some difficulties in the direct application of a digital reactivity meter to the subcriticality measurement. When the Inverse Kinetic method is applied to a sufficiently high power level or to a core without an external neutron source, the neutron source term may be neglected. When applied to a lower power level or in the sub-critical domain, however, the source effects must be taken in account. Furthermore, some treatments are needed in using the count rate of Source Range (SR) detector as input signal to the digital reactivity meter. To overcome these difficulties, we have proposed a digital reactivity meter combined with a methodology of the modified Neutron Source Multiplication (NSM) method with correction factors for subcriticality measurements in PWR. (author)

  16. Development of a digital reactivity meter for criticality prediction and control rod worth evaluation in pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuramoto, Renato Y.R.; Miranda, Anselmo F.; Valladares, Gastao Lommez; Prado, Adelk C. [Eletrobras Termonuclear S.A. - ELETRONUCLEAR, Angra dos Reis, RJ (Brazil). Central Nuclear Almirante Alvaro Alberto], e-mail: kuramot@eletronuclear.gov.br

    2009-07-01

    In this work, we have proposed the development of a digital reactivity meter in order to monitor subcriticality continuously during criticality approach in a PWR. A subcritical reactivity meter can provide an easy prediction of the estimated critical point prior to reactor criticality, without complicated hand calculation. Moreover, in order to reduce the interval of the Physics Tests from the economical point of view, a subcritical reactivity meter can evaluate the control rod worth from direct subcriticality measurement. In other words, count rate of Source Range (SR) detector recorded during the criticality approach could be used for subcriticality evaluation or control rod worth evaluation. Basically, a digital reactivity meter is based on the inverse solution of the kinetic equations of a reactor with the external neutron source in one-point reactor model. There are some difficulties in the direct application of a digital reactivity meter to the subcriticality measurement. When the Inverse Kinetic method is applied to a sufficiently high power level or to a core without an external neutron source, the neutron source term may be neglected. When applied to a lower power level or in the sub-critical domain, however, the source effects must be taken in account. Furthermore, some treatments are needed in using the count rate of Source Range (SR) detector as input signal to the digital reactivity meter. To overcome these difficulties, we have proposed a digital reactivity meter combined with a methodology of the modified Neutron Source Multiplication (NSM) method with correction factors for subcriticality measurements in PWR. (author)

  17. Extreme value predictions and critical wave episodes for marine structures by FORM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to advocate for a very effective stochastic procedure, based on the First Order Reliability Method (FORM), for extreme value predictions related to wave induced loads. Three different applications will be illustrated. The first deals with a jack-up rig where second...... order stochastic waves are included in the analysis. The second application is parametric roll motions of ships. Finally, the motion of a TLP floating foundation for an offshore wind turbine is analysed taking into account large motions....

  18. Extreme value predictions and critical wave episodes for marine structures by FORM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to advocate for a very effective stochastic procedure, based on the First Order Reliability Method (FORM), for extreme value predictions related to wave induced loads. Three different applications will be illustrated. The first deals with a jack-up rig where second...... order stochastic waves are included in the analysis. The second application is parametric roll motions of ships. Finally, the motion of a TLP floating foundation for an offshore wind turbine is analysed taking into account large motions....

  19. Validation of the ASSERT subchannel code: Prediction of critical heat flux in standard and nonstandard CANDU bundle geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carver, M.B.; Kiteley, J.C.; Zhou, R.Q.N.; Junop, S.V.; Rowe, D.S.

    1995-01-01

    The ASSERT code has been developed to address the three-dimensional computation of flow and phase distribution and fuel element surface temperatures within the horizontal subchannels of Canada uranium deuterium (CANDU) pressurized heavy water reactor fuel channels and to provide a detailed prediction of critical heat flux (CHF) distribution throughout the bundle. The ASSERT subchannel code has been validated extensively against a wide repertoire of experiments; its combination of three-dimensional prediction of local flow conditions with a comprehensive method of predicting CHF at these local conditions makes it a unique tool for predicting CHF for situations outside the existing experimental database. In particular, ASSERT is an appropriate tool to systematically investigate CHF under conditions of local geometric variations, such as pressure tube creep and fuel element strain. The numerical methodology used in ASSERT, the constitutive relationships incorporated, and the CHF assessment methodology are discussed. The evolutionary validation plan is also discussed and early validation exercises are summarized. More recent validation exercises in standard and nonstandard geometries are emphasized

  20. A prediction method of the effect of radial heat flux distribution on critical heat flux in CANDU fuel bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Lan Qin; Yang, Jun; Harrison, Noel

    2014-01-01

    Fuel irradiation experiments to study fuel behaviors have been performed in the experimental loops of the National Research Universal (NRU) Reactor at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) in support of the development of new fuel technologies. Before initiating a fuel irradiation experiment, the experimental proposal must be approved to ensure that the test fuel strings put into the NRU loops meet safety margin requirements in critical heat flux (CHF). The fuel strings in irradiation experiments can have varying degrees of fuel enrichment and burnup, resulting in large variations in radial heat flux distribution (RFD). CHF experiments performed in Freon flow at CRL for full-scale bundle strings with a number of RFDs showed a strong effect of RFD on CHF. A prediction method was derived based on experimental CHF data to account for the RFD effect on CHF. It provides good CHF predictions for various RFDs as compared to the data. However, the range of the tested RFDs in the CHF experiments is not as wide as that required in the fuel irradiation experiments. The applicability of the prediction method needs to be examined for the RFDs beyond the range tested by the CHF experiments. The Canadian subchannel code ASSERT-PV was employed to simulate the CHF behavior for RFDs that would be encountered in fuel irradiation experiments. The CHF predictions using the derived method were compared with the ASSERT simulations. It was observed that the CHF predictions agree well with the ASSERT simulations in terms of CHF, confirming the applicability of the prediction method in fuel irradiation experiments. (author)

  1. Analysis on the Critical Rainfall Value For Predicting Large Scale Landslides Caused by Heavy Rainfall In Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Kuang-Jung; Chiang, Jie-Lun; Lee, Ming-Hsi; Chen, Yie-Ruey

    2017-04-01

    Analysis on the Critical Rainfall Value For Predicting Large Scale Landslides Caused by Heavy Rainfall In Taiwan. Kuang-Jung Tsai 1, Jie-Lun Chiang 2,Ming-Hsi Lee 2, Yie-Ruey Chen 1, 1Department of Land Management and Development, Chang Jung Christian Universityt, Tainan, Taiwan. 2Department of Soil and Water Conservation, National Pingtung University of Science and Technology, Pingtung, Taiwan. ABSTRACT The accumulated rainfall amount was recorded more than 2,900mm that were brought by Morakot typhoon in August, 2009 within continuous 3 days. Very serious landslides, and sediment related disasters were induced by this heavy rainfall event. The satellite image analysis project conducted by Soil and Water Conservation Bureau after Morakot event indicated that more than 10,904 sites of landslide with total sliding area of 18,113ha were found by this project. At the same time, all severe sediment related disaster areas are also characterized based on their disaster type, scale, topography, major bedrock formations and geologic structures during the period of extremely heavy rainfall events occurred at the southern Taiwan. Characteristics and mechanism of large scale landslide are collected on the basis of the field investigation technology integrated with GPS/GIS/RS technique. In order to decrease the risk of large scale landslides on slope land, the strategy of slope land conservation, and critical rainfall database should be set up and executed as soon as possible. Meanwhile, study on the establishment of critical rainfall value used for predicting large scale landslides induced by heavy rainfall become an important issue which was seriously concerned by the government and all people live in Taiwan. The mechanism of large scale landslide, rainfall frequency analysis ,sediment budge estimation and river hydraulic analysis under the condition of extremely climate change during the past 10 years would be seriously concerned and recognized as a required issue by this

  2. Performance of JEF2.2 based continuous energy cross sections in predicting the multiplication factor of critical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, T.M.; de Leege, P.F.A.; Hoogenboom, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    The continuous energy representation of cross sections for neutronics calculations avoids the requirement of resonance self shielding and the assumptions about the neutron spectrum used for weighing cross sections, required in the preparation of a multigroup cross sections library. The cross sections library prepared for a particular temperature of the nuclide is valid irrespective of the environment of the nuclide and can be used in calculations for many types of reactors. It is comparatively easier to incorporate them in Monte Carlo simulation of neutron transport. The Monte Carlo code MCNP is capable of using a continuous energy representation of nuclear cross sections in simulation of neutron or photon transport. The ACER module of NJOY is able to generate the continuous energy cross section of any nuclide in a format that can be used by MCNP, from any evaluated data file in ENDF/B format. Continuous energy cross sections prepared from the evaluated data file JEF2.2 was used to analyse some standard critical benchmarks and also the critical configuration of the HOR, a 2 MW research reactor at Delft, the Netherlands. Results show that continuous energy cross sections prepared from JEF2.2 evaluated file predicts the multiplication factor of critical systems very close to unity. (author). 6 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig

  3. Predicting the local impacts of energy development: a critical guide to forecasting methods and models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanderson, D.; O' Hare, M.

    1977-05-01

    Models forecasting second-order impacts from energy development vary in their methodology, output, assumptions, and quality. As a rough dichotomy, they either simulate community development over time or combine various submodels providing community snapshots at selected points in time. Using one or more methods - input/output models, gravity models, econometric models, cohort-survival models, or coefficient models - they estimate energy-development-stimulated employment, population, public and private service needs, and government revenues and expenditures at some future time (ranging from annual to average year predictions) and for different governmental jurisdictions (municipal, county, state, etc.). Underlying assumptions often conflict, reflecting their different sources - historical data, comparative data, surveys, and judgments about future conditions. Model quality, measured by special features, tests, exportability and usefulness to policy-makers, reveals careful and thorough work in some cases and hurried operations with insufficient in-depth analysis in others.

  4. Risk-Based Predictive Maintenance for Safety-Critical Systems by Using Probabilistic Inference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianhua Xu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Risk-based maintenance (RBM aims to improve maintenance planning and decision making by reducing the probability and consequences of failure of equipment. A new predictive maintenance strategy that integrates dynamic evolution model and risk assessment is proposed which can be used to calculate the optimal maintenance time with minimal cost and safety constraints. The dynamic evolution model provides qualified risks by using probabilistic inference with bucket elimination and gives the prospective degradation trend of a complex system. Based on the degradation trend, an optimal maintenance time can be determined by minimizing the expected maintenance cost per time unit. The effectiveness of the proposed method is validated and demonstrated by a collision accident of high-speed trains with obstacles in the presence of safety and cost constrains.

  5. Predictive value of skin perfusion pressure after endovascular therapy for wound healing in critical limb ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsunomiya, Makoto; Nakamura, Masato; Nagashima, Yoshinori; Sugi, Kaoru

    2014-10-01

    To determine the predictive value of skin perfusion pressure (SPP) for wound healing after endovascular therapy (EVT). Between May 2004 and March 2011, 113 consecutive patients (84 men; mean age 71.5±12.5 years) with CLI (123 limbs) underwent successful balloon angioplasty ± stenting (flow from >1 vessel to the foot without bypass) and were physically able to undergo SPP measurement before and within 48 hours after EVT. The status of wound healing was recorded over a mean follow-up of 17.4±12.4 months. The wound healing rate was 78.9% (97 limbs of 89 patients). SPP values after EVT were significantly higher in these patients than in the 24 patients (26 limbs) without wound healing (44.2±15.6 mmHg vs. 27.5±10.4 mmHg, pwound healing had an area under the curve of 0.81 (95% CI 0.723 to 0.899, pwound healing was 30 mmHg, with a sensitivity of 81.4% and a specificity of 69.2%. Binary logistic regression analysis demonstrated SPP after EVT to be an independent predictor of wound healing (pwound healing with SPP values >30 mmHg, 40 mmHg, and 50 mmHg were 69.8%, 86.3%, and 94.5%, respectively. SPP after EVT is an independent predictor of wound healing in patients with CLI. In our study, an SPP value of 30 mmHg was shown to be the best cutoff for prediction of wound healing after EVT.

  6. Development and validation of a prediction model for insulin-associated hypoglycemia in non-critically ill hospitalized adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathioudakis, Nestoras Nicolas; Everett, Estelle; Routh, Shuvodra; Pronovost, Peter J; Yeh, Hsin-Chieh; Golden, Sherita Hill; Saria, Suchi

    2018-01-01

    To develop and validate a multivariable prediction model for insulin-associated hypoglycemia in non-critically ill hospitalized adults. We collected pharmacologic, demographic, laboratory, and diagnostic data from 128 657 inpatient days in which at least 1 unit of subcutaneous insulin was administered in the absence of intravenous insulin, total parenteral nutrition, or insulin pump use (index days). These data were used to develop multivariable prediction models for biochemical and clinically significant hypoglycemia (blood glucose (BG) of ≤70 mg/dL and model development and validation, respectively. Using predictors of age, weight, admitting service, insulin doses, mean BG, nadir BG, BG coefficient of variation (CV BG ), diet status, type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease (CKD), liver disease, and digestive disease, our model achieved a c-statistic of 0.77 (95% CI 0.75 to 0.78), positive likelihood ratio (+LR) of 3.5 (95% CI 3.4 to 3.6) and negative likelihood ratio (-LR) of 0.32 (95% CI 0.30 to 0.35) for prediction of biochemical hypoglycemia. Using predictors of sex, weight, insulin doses, mean BG, nadir BG, CV BG , diet status, type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, CKD stage, and steroid use, our model achieved a c-statistic of 0.80 (95% CI 0.78 to 0.82), +LR of 3.8 (95% CI 3.7 to 4.0) and -LR of 0.2 (95% CI 0.2 to 0.3) for prediction of clinically significant hypoglycemia. Hospitalized patients at risk of insulin-associated hypoglycemia can be identified using validated prediction models, which may support the development of real-time preventive interventions.

  7. A mathematical model for predicting glucose levels in critically-ill patients: the PIGnOLI model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongheng Zhang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. Glycemic control is of paramount importance in the intensive care unit. Presently, several BG control algorithms have been developed for clinical trials, but they are mostly based on experts’ opinion and consensus. There are no validated models predicting how glucose levels will change after initiating of insulin infusion in critically ill patients. The study aimed to develop an equation for initial insulin dose setting.Methods. A large critical care database was employed for the study. Linear regression model fitting was employed. Retested blood glucose was used as the independent variable. Insulin rate was forced into the model. Multivariable fractional polynomials and interaction terms were used to explore the complex relationships among covariates. The overall fit of the model was examined by using residuals and adjusted R-squared values. Regression diagnostics were used to explore the influence of outliers on the model.Main Results. A total of 6,487 ICU admissions requiring insulin pump therapy were identified. The dataset was randomly split into two subsets at 7 to 3 ratio. The initial model comprised fractional polynomials and interactions terms. However, this model was not stable by excluding several outliers. I fitted a simple linear model without interaction. The selected prediction model (Predicting Glucose Levels in ICU, PIGnOLI included variables of initial blood glucose, insulin rate, PO volume, total parental nutrition, body mass index (BMI, lactate, congestive heart failure, renal failure, liver disease, time interval of BS recheck, dextrose rate. Insulin rate was significantly associated with blood glucose reduction (coefficient: −0.52, 95% CI [−1.03, −0.01]. The parsimonious model was well validated with the validation subset, with an adjusted R-squared value of 0.8259.Conclusion. The study developed the PIGnOLI model for the initial insulin dose setting. Furthermore, experimental study is

  8. Individual reactions to stress predict performance during a critical aviation incident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vine, Samuel J; Uiga, Liis; Lavric, Aureliu; Moore, Lee J; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; Wilson, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the influence of stress on human performance is of theoretical and practical importance. An individual's reaction to stress predicts their subsequent performance; with a "challenge" response to stress leading to better performance than a "threat" response. However, this contention has not been tested in truly stressful environments with highly skilled individuals. Furthermore, the effect of challenge and threat responses on attentional control during visuomotor tasks is poorly understood. Thus, this study aimed to examine individual reactions to stress and their influence on attentional control, among a cohort of commercial pilots performing a stressful flight assessment. Sixteen pilots performed an "engine failure on take-off" scenario, in a high-fidelity flight simulator. Reactions to stress were indexed via self-report; performance was assessed subjectively (flight instructor assessment) and objectively (simulator metrics); gaze behavior data were captured using a mobile eye tracker, and measures of attentional control were subsequently calculated (search rate, stimulus driven attention, and entropy). Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that a threat response was associated with poorer performance and disrupted attentional control. The findings add to previous research showing that individual reactions to stress influence performance and shed light on the processes through which stress influences performance.

  9. Knowledge to Predict Pathogens: Legionella pneumophila Lifecycle Critical Review Part I Uptake into Host Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis L. Mraz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila is an infectious disease agent of increasing concern due to its ability to cause Legionnaires’ Disease, a severe community pneumonia, and the difficulty in controlling it within water systems. L. pneumophila thrives within the biofilm of premise plumbing systems, utilizing protozoan hosts for protection from disinfectants and other environmental stressors. While there is a great deal of information regarding how L. pneumophila interacts with protozoa and human macrophages (host for human infection, the ability to use this data in a model to attempt to predict a concentration of L. pneumophila in a water system is not known. The lifecycle of L. pneumophila within host cells involves three processes: uptake, growth, and egression from the host cell. The complexity of these three processes would risk conflation of the concepts; therefore, this review details the available information regarding how L. pneumophila invades host cells (uptake within the context of data needed to model this process, while a second review will focus on growth and egression. The overall intent of both reviews is to detail how the steps in L. pneumophila’s lifecycle in drinking water systems affect human infectivity, as opposed to detailing just its growth and persistence in drinking water systems.

  10. A critical analysis of the Mises stress criterion used in frequency domain fatigue life prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Niesłony

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Multiaxial fatigue failure criteria are formulated in time and frequency domain. The number of frequency domain criteria is rather small and the most popular one is the equivalent von Mises stress criterion. This criterion was elaborated by Preumont and Piefort on the basis of well-known von Mises stress concept, first proposed by Huber in 1907, and well accepted by the scientific community and engineers. It is important to know, that the criterion was developed to determine the yield stress and material effort under static load. Therefore the direct use of equivalent von Mises stress criterion for fatigue life prediction can lead to some incorrectness of theoretical and practical nature. In the present study four aspects were discussed: influence of the value of fatigue strength of tension and torsion, lack of parallelism of the SN curves, abnormal behaviour of the criterion under biaxial tensioncompression and influence of phase shift between particular stress state components. Information contained in this article will help to prevent improper use of this criterion and contributes to its better understanding

  11. Predicting surgical outcome in cases of cervical myelopathy with magnetic resonance imaging. Critical parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Takashi

    1997-01-01

    In this study, the author attempted to correlate clinical factors significant in cases of cervical myelopathy with postoperative recovery. It is hoped that the results will aid in the preoperative prediction of surgical outcomes. The factors considered were the transverse area of the spinal cord, the cord compression rate, the presence of a high intensity area in T2-weighted MRI, the duration of symptoms before surgery, and age at surgery. Because there are variations in the transverse area of the spinal cord, 100 normal individuals were selected and the standard transverse area was calculated. The transverse area of the spinal cord and the cord constriction rate in the myelopathy cases was then measured and compared to the standard. The data indicated that the constriction rate was most relevant to recovery rate. Clinical thresholds found to correlate with a better than average rate of recovery in cases of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) were: a cord constriction rate; under 28.7%, cord compression rate; over 0.38, duration of symptoms before surgery; less than 9.2 months, and age at surgery; under 59.2 yrs. In patients with ossification of the longitudinal ligament (OPLL), cord constriction rate; under 36.2%, cord compression rate; over 0.30, duration of symptoms before surgery; less than 14.2 months, and age at surgery; under 57.6 yrs., all correlated with superior recovery, as did cord constriction rate; under 22.3%, and duration of symptoms before surgery; less than 3.7 months with patients suffering from cervical disc herniation (CDH). Furthermore, the absence of a T2-weighted high intensity area in CSM and OPLL patients also correlated with improved recovery. These results suggest that a favorable postoperative recovery rate can be expected in cases of cervical myelopathy that conform to the above criteria. (author)

  12. Predictive value of C-reactive protein in critically ill patients after abdominal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Sapin

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The development of sepsis after abdominal surgery is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Due to inflammation, it may be difficult to diagnose infection when it occurs, but measurement of C-reactive protein could facilitate this diagnosis. In the present study, we evaluated the predictive value and time course of C-reactive protein in relation to outcome in patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU after abdominal surgery. METHODS: We included patients admitted to the ICU after abdominal surgery over a period of two years. The patients were divided into two groups according to their outcome: favorable (F; left the ICU alive, without modification of the antibiotic regimen and unfavorable (D; death in the ICU, surgical revision with or without modification of the antibiotic regimen or just modification of the regimen. We then compared the highest C-reactive protein level on the first day of admission between the two groups. RESULTS: A total of 308 patients were included: 86 patients had an unfavorable outcome (group D and 222 had a favorable outcome (group F. The groups were similar in terms of leukocytosis, neutrophilia, and platelet count. C-reactive protein was significantly higher at admission in group D and was the best predictor of an unfavorable outcome, with a sensitivity of 74% and a specificity of 72% for a threshold of 41 mg/L. No changes in C-reactive protein, as assessed based on the delta C-reactive protein, especially at days 4 and 5, were associated with a poor prognosis. CONCLUSIONS: A C-reactive protein cut-off of 41 mg/L during the first day of ICU admission after abdominal surgery was a predictor of an adverse outcome. However, no changes in the C-reactive protein concentration, especially by day 4 or 5, could identify patients at risk of death.

  13. Severity scoring in the critically ill: part 2: maximizing value from outcome prediction scoring systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslow, Michael J; Badawi, Omar

    2012-02-01

    Part 2 of this review of ICU scoring systems examines how scoring system data should be used to assess ICU performance. There often are two different consumers of these data: lCU clinicians and quality leaders who seek to identify opportunities to improve quality of care and operational efficiency, and regulators, payors, and consumers who want to compare performance across facilities. The former need to know how to garner maximal insight into their care practices; this includes understanding how length of stay (LOS) relates to quality, analyzing the behavior of different subpopulations, and following trends over time. Segregating patients into low-, medium-, and high-risk populations is especially helpful, because care issues and outcomes may differ across this severity continuum. Also, LOS behaves paradoxically in high-risk patients (survivors often have longer LOS than nonsurvivors); failure to examine this subgroup separately can penalize ICUs with superior outcomes. Consumers of benchmarking data often focus on a single score, the standardized mortality ratio (SMR). However, simple SMRs are disproportionately affected by outcomes in high-risk patients, and differences in population composition, even when performance is otherwise identical, can result in different SMRs. Future benchmarking must incorporate strategies to adjust for differences in population composition and report performance separately for low-, medium- and high-acuity patients. Moreover, because many ICUs lack the resources to care for high-acuity patients (predicted mortality >50%), decisions about where patients should receive care must consider both ICU performance scores and their capacity to care for different types of patients.

  14. Modeling and validation of a mechanistic tool (MEFISTO) for the prediction of critical power in BWR fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamsson, Carl; Le Corre, Jean-Marie

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The MEFISTO code efficiently and accurately predicts the dryout event in a BWR fuel bundle, using a mechanistic model. → A hybrid approach between a fast and robust sub-channel analysis and a three-field two-phase analysis is adopted. → MEFISTO modeling approach, calibration, CPU usage, sensitivity, trend analysis and performance evaluation are presented. → The calibration parameters and process were carefully selected to preserve the mechanistic nature of the code. → The code dryout prediction performance is near the level of fuel-specific empirical dryout correlations. - Abstract: Westinghouse is currently developing the MEFISTO code with the main goal to achieve fast, robust, practical and reliable prediction of steady-state dryout Critical Power in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel bundle based on a mechanistic approach. A computationally efficient simulation scheme was used to achieve this goal, where the code resolves all relevant field (drop, steam and multi-film) mass balance equations, within the annular flow region, at the sub-channel level while relying on a fast and robust two-phase (liquid/steam) sub-channel solution to provide the cross-flow information. The MEFISTO code can hence provide highly detailed solution of the multi-film flow in BWR fuel bundle while enhancing flexibility and reducing the computer time by an order of magnitude as compared to a standard three-field sub-channel analysis approach. Models for the numerical computation of the one-dimensional field flowrate distributions in an open channel (e.g. a sub-channel), including the numerical treatment of field cross-flows, part-length rods, spacers grids and post-dryout conditions are presented in this paper. The MEFISTO code is then applied to dryout prediction in BWR fuel bundle using VIPRE-W as a fast and robust two-phase sub-channel driver code. The dryout power is numerically predicted by iterating on the bundle power so that the minimum film flowrate in the

  15. Development of classification and prediction methods of critical heat flux using fuzzy theory and artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Sang Ki

    1995-02-01

    This thesis applies new information techniques, artificial neural networks, (ANNs) and fuzzy theory, to the investigation of the critical heat flux (CHF) phenomenon for water flow in vertical round tubes. The work performed are (a) classification and prediction of CHF based on fuzzy clustering and ANN, (b) prediction and parametric trends analysis of CHF using ANN with the introduction of dimensionless parameters, and (c) detection of CHF occurrence using fuzzy rule and spatiotemporal neural network (STN). Fuzzy clustering and ANN are used for classification and prediction of the CHF using primary system parameters. The fuzzy clustering classifies the experimental CHF data into a few data clusters (data groups) according to the data characteristics. After classification of the experimental data, the characteristics of the resulted clusters are discussed with emphasis on the distribution of the experimental conditions and physical mechanisms. The CHF data in each group are trained in an artificial neural network to predict the CHF. The artificial neural network adjusts the weight so as to minimize the prediction error within the corresponding cluster. Application of the proposed method to the KAIST CHF data bank shows good prediction capability of the CHF, better than other existing methods. Parametric trends of the CHF are analyzed by applying artificial neural networks to a CHF data base for water flow in uniformly heated vertical round tubes. The analyses are performed from three viewpoints, i.e., for fixed inlet conditions, for fixed exit conditions, and based on local conditions hypothesis. In order to remove the necessity of data classification, Katto and Groeneveld et al.'s dimensionless parameters are introduced in training the ANNs with the experimental CHF data. The trained ANNs predict the CHF better than any other conventional correlations, showing RMS error of 8.9%, 13.1%, and 19.3% for fixed inlet conditions, for fixed exit conditions, and for local

  16. A 3-D CFD approach to the mechanistic prediction of forced convective critical heat flux at low quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jean-Marie Le Corre; Cristina H Amon; Shi-Chune Yao

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The prediction of the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) in a heat flux controlled boiling heat exchanger is important to assess the maximal thermal capability of the system. In the case of a nuclear reactor, CHF margin gain (using improved mixing vane grid design, for instance) can allow power up-rate and enhanced operating flexibility. In general, current nuclear core design procedures use quasi-1D approach to model the coolant thermal-hydraulic conditions within the fuel bundles coupled with fully empirical CHF prediction methods. In addition, several CHF mechanistic models have been developed in the past and coupled with 1D and quasi-1D thermal-hydraulic codes. These mechanistic models have demonstrated reasonable CHF prediction characteristics and, more remarkably, correct parametric trends over wide range of fluid conditions. However, since the phenomena leading to CHF are localized near the heater, models are needed to relate local quantities of interest to area-averaged quantities. As a consequence, large CHF prediction uncertainties may be introduced and 3D fluid characteristics (such as swirling flow) cannot be accounted properly. Therefore, a fully mechanistic approach to CHF prediction is, in general, not possible using the current approach. The development of CHF-enhanced fuel assembly designs requires the use of more advanced 3D coolant properties computations coupled with a CHF mechanistic modeling. In the present work, the commercial CFD code CFX-5 is used to compute 3D coolant conditions in a vertical heated tube with upward flow. Several CHF mechanistic models at low quality available in the literature are coupled with the CFD code by developing adequate models between local coolant properties and local parameters of interest to predict CHF. The prediction performances of these models are assessed using CHF databases available in the open literature and the 1995 CHF look-up table. Since CFD can reasonably capture 3D fluid

  17. Integrating artificial neural networks and empirical correlations for the prediction of water-subcooled critical heat flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzola, A.

    1997-01-01

    The critical heat flux (CHF) is an important parameter for the design of nuclear reactors, heat exchangers and other boiling heat transfer units. Recently, the CHF in water-subcooled flow boiling at high mass flux and subcooling has been thoroughly studied in relation to the cooling of high-heat-flux components in thermonuclear fusion reactors. Due to the specific thermal-hydraulic situation, very few of the existing correlations, originally developed for operating conditions typical of pressurized water reactors, are able to provide consistent predictions of water-subcooled-flow-boiling CHF at high heat fluxes. Therefore, alternative predicting techniques are being investigated. Among these, artificial neural networks (ANN) have the advantage of not requiring a formal model structure to fit the experimental data; however, their main drawbacks are the loss of model transparency ('black-box' character) and the lack of any indicator for evaluating accuracy and reliability of the ANN answer when 'never-seen' patterns are presented. In the present work, the prediction of CHF is approached by a hybrid system which couples a heuristic correlation with a neural network. The ANN role is to predict a datum-dependent parameter required by the analytical correlation; ; this parameter was instead set to a constant value obtained by usual best-fitting techniques when a pure analytical approach was adopted. Upper and lower boundaries can be possibly assigned to the parameter value, thus avoiding the case of unexpected and unpredictable answer failure. The present approach maintains the advantage of the analytical model analysis, and it partially overcomes the 'black-box' character typical of the straight application of ANNs because the neural network role is limited to the correlation tuning. The proposed methodology allows us to achieve accurate results and it is likely to be suitable for thermal-hydraulic and heat transfer data processing. (author)

  18. A computation method for mass flowrate predictions in critical flows of initially subcooled liquid in long channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celata, G.P.; D'Annibale, F.; Farello, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    It is suggested a fast and accurate computation method for the prediction of mass flowrate in critical flows initially subcooled liquid from ''long'' discharge channels (high LID values). Starting from a previous very simple correlation proposed by the authors, further improvements in the model enable to widen the method reliability up to initial saturation conditions. A comparison of computed values with 145 experimental data regarding several investigations carried out at the Heat Transfer Laboratory (TERM/ISP, ENEA Casaccia) shows an excellent agreement. The computed data shifting from experimental ones is within ±10% for almost all data, with a slight increase towards low inlet subcoolings. The average error, for all the considered data, is 4,6%

  19. Predictive modelling of survival and length of stay in critically ill patients using sequential organ failure scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houthooft, Rein; Ruyssinck, Joeri; van der Herten, Joachim; Stijven, Sean; Couckuyt, Ivo; Gadeyne, Bram; Ongenae, Femke; Colpaert, Kirsten; Decruyenaere, Johan; Dhaene, Tom; De Turck, Filip

    2015-03-01

    The length of stay of critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) is an indication of patient ICU resource usage and varies considerably. Planning of postoperative ICU admissions is important as ICUs often have no nonoccupied beds available. Estimation of the ICU bed availability for the next coming days is entirely based on clinical judgement by intensivists and therefore too inaccurate. For this reason, predictive models have much potential for improving planning for ICU patient admission. Our goal is to develop and optimize models for patient survival and ICU length of stay (LOS) based on monitored ICU patient data. Furthermore, these models are compared on their use of sequential organ failure (SOFA) scores as well as underlying raw data as input features. Different machine learning techniques are trained, using a 14,480 patient dataset, both on SOFA scores as well as their underlying raw data values from the first five days after admission, in order to predict (i) the patient LOS, and (ii) the patient mortality. Furthermore, to help physicians in assessing the prediction credibility, a probabilistic model is tailored to the output of our best-performing model, assigning a belief to each patient status prediction. A two-by-two grid is built, using the classification outputs of the mortality and prolonged stay predictors to improve the patient LOS regression models. For predicting patient mortality and a prolonged stay, the best performing model is a support vector machine (SVM) with GA,D=65.9% (area under the curve (AUC) of 0.77) and GS,L=73.2% (AUC of 0.82). In terms of LOS regression, the best performing model is support vector regression, achieving a mean absolute error of 1.79 days and a median absolute error of 1.22 days for those patients surviving a nonprolonged stay. Using a classification grid based on the predicted patient mortality and prolonged stay, allows more accurate modeling of the patient LOS. The detailed models allow to support

  20. External validation of the Intensive Care National Audit & Research Centre (ICNARC) risk prediction model in critical care units in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, David A; Lone, Nazir I; Haddow, Catriona; MacGillivray, Moranne; Khan, Angela; Cook, Brian; Rowan, Kathryn M

    2014-01-01

    Risk prediction models are used in critical care for risk stratification, summarising and communicating risk, supporting clinical decision-making and benchmarking performance. However, they require validation before they can be used with confidence, ideally using independently collected data from a different source to that used to develop the model. The aim of this study was to validate the Intensive Care National Audit & Research Centre (ICNARC) model using independently collected data from critical care units in Scotland. Data were extracted from the Scottish Intensive Care Society Audit Group (SICSAG) database for the years 2007 to 2009. Recoding and mapping of variables was performed, as required, to apply the ICNARC model (2009 recalibration) to the SICSAG data using standard computer algorithms. The performance of the ICNARC model was assessed for discrimination, calibration and overall fit and compared with that of the Acute Physiology And Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II model. There were 29,626 admissions to 24 adult, general critical care units in Scotland between 1 January 2007 and 31 December 2009. After exclusions, 23,269 admissions were included in the analysis. The ICNARC model outperformed APACHE II on measures of discrimination (c index 0.848 versus 0.806), calibration (Hosmer-Lemeshow chi-squared statistic 18.8 versus 214) and overall fit (Brier's score 0.140 versus 0.157; Shapiro's R 0.652 versus 0.621). Model performance was consistent across the three years studied. The ICNARC model performed well when validated in an external population to that in which it was developed, using independently collected data.

  1. Predicting critical temperatures of ionic and non-ionic fluids from thermophysical data obtained near the melting point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Volker C.

    2015-10-01

    In the correlation and prediction of thermophysical data of fluids based on a corresponding-states approach, the critical temperature Tc plays a central role. For some fluids, in particular ionic ones, however, the critical region is difficult or even impossible to access experimentally. For molten salts, Tc is on the order of 3000 K, which makes accurate measurements a challenging task. Room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) decompose thermally between 400 K and 600 K due to their organic constituents; this range of temperatures is hundreds of degrees below recent estimates of their Tc. In both cases, reliable methods to deduce Tc based on extrapolations of experimental data recorded at much lower temperatures near the triple or melting points are needed and useful because the critical point influences the fluid's behavior in the entire liquid region. Here, we propose to employ the scaling approach leading to universal fluid behavior [Román et al., J. Chem. Phys. 123, 124512 (2005)] to derive a very simple expression that allows one to estimate Tc from the density of the liquid, the surface tension, or the enthalpy of vaporization measured in a very narrow range of low temperatures. We demonstrate the validity of the approach for simple and polar neutral fluids, for which Tc is known, and then use the methodology to obtain estimates of Tc for ionic fluids. When comparing these estimates to those reported in the literature, good agreement is found for RTILs, whereas the ones for the molten salts NaCl and KCl are lower than previous estimates by 10%. The coexistence curve for ionic fluids is found to be more adequately described by an effective exponent of βeff = 0.5 than by βeff = 0.33.

  2. Pressure and Stress Prediction in the Nankai Accretionary Prism: A Critical State Soil Mechanics Porosity-Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemings, Peter B.; Saffer, Demian M.

    2018-02-01

    We predict pressure and stress from porosity in the Nankai accretionary prism with a critical state soil model that describes porosity as a function of mean stress and maximum shear stress, and assumes Coulomb failure within the wedge and uniaxial burial beneath it. At Ocean Drilling Program Sites 1174 and 808, we find that pore pressure in the prism supports 70% to 90% of the overburden (λu = 0.7 to 0.9), for a range of assumed friction angles (5-30°). The prism pore pressure is equal to or greater than that in the underthrust sediments even though the porosity is lower within the prism. The high pore pressures lead to a mechanically weak wedge that supports low maximum shear stress, and this in turn requires very low basal traction to remain consistent with the observed narrowly tapered wedge geometry. We estimate the décollement friction coefficient (μb) to be 0.08-0.38 (ϕb' = 4.6°-21°). Our approach defines a pathway to predict pressure in a wide range of environments from readily observed quantities (e.g., porosity and seismic velocity). Pressure and stress control the form of the Earth's collisional continental margins and play a key role in its greatest earthquakes. However, heretofore, there has been no systematic approach to relate material state (e.g., porosity), pore pressure, and stress in these systems.

  3. Spatial Variability of Soil-Water Storage in the Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory: Measurement and Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oroza, C.; Bales, R. C.; Zheng, Z.; Glaser, S. D.

    2017-12-01

    Predicting the spatial distribution of soil moisture in mountain environments is confounded by multiple factors, including complex topography, spatial variably of soil texture, sub-surface flow paths, and snow-soil interactions. While remote-sensing tools such as passive-microwave monitoring can measure spatial variability of soil moisture, they only capture near-surface soil layers. Large-scale sensor networks are increasingly providing soil-moisture measurements at high temporal resolution across a broader range of depths than are accessible from remote sensing. It may be possible to combine these in-situ measurements with high-resolution LIDAR topography and canopy cover to estimate the spatial distribution of soil moisture at high spatial resolution at multiple depths. We study the feasibility of this approach using six years (2009-2014) of daily volumetric water content measurements at 10-, 30-, and 60-cm depths from the Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory. A non-parametric, multivariate regression algorithm, Random Forest, was used to predict the spatial distribution of depth-integrated soil-water storage, based on the in-situ measurements and a combination of node attributes (topographic wetness, northness, elevation, soil texture, and location with respect to canopy cover). We observe predictable patterns of predictor accuracy and independent variable ranking during the six-year study period. Predictor accuracy is highest during the snow-cover and early recession periods but declines during the dry period. Soil texture has consistently high feature importance. Other landscape attributes exhibit seasonal trends: northness peaks during the wet-up period, and elevation and topographic-wetness index peak during the recession and dry period, respectively.

  4. Validation of the LOD score compared with APACHE II score in prediction of the hospital outcome in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khwannimit, Bodin

    2008-01-01

    The Logistic Organ Dysfunction score (LOD) is an organ dysfunction score that can predict hospital mortality. The aim of this study was to validate the performance of the LOD score compared with the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score in a mixed intensive care unit (ICU) at a tertiary referral university hospital in Thailand. The data were collected prospectively on consecutive ICU admissions over a 24 month period from July1, 2004 until June 30, 2006. Discrimination was evaluated by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC). The calibration was assessed by the Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit H statistic. The overall fit of the model was evaluated by the Brier's score. Overall, 1,429 patients were enrolled during the study period. The mortality in the ICU was 20.9% and in the hospital was 27.9%. The median ICU and hospital lengths of stay were 3 and 18 days, respectively, for all patients. Both models showed excellent discrimination. The AUROC for the LOD and APACHE II were 0.860 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.838-0.882] and 0.898 (95% Cl = 0.879-0.917), respectively. The LOD score had perfect calibration with the Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit H chi-2 = 10 (p = 0.44). However, the APACHE II had poor calibration with the Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit H chi-2 = 75.69 (p < 0.001). Brier's score showed the overall fit for both models were 0.123 (95%Cl = 0.107-0.141) and 0.114 (0.098-0.132) for the LOD and APACHE II, respectively. Thus, the LOD score was found to be accurate for predicting hospital mortality for general critically ill patients in Thailand.

  5. The size, morphology, site, and access score predicts critical outcomes of endoscopic mucosal resection in the colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Mayenaaz; Tate, David J; Desomer, Lobke; Brown, Gregor; Hourigan, Luke F; Lee, Eric Y T; Moss, Alan; Raftopoulos, Spiro; Singh, Rajvinder; Williams, Stephen J; Zanati, Simon; Burgess, Nicholas; Bourke, Michael J

    2018-01-25

    The SMSA (size, morphology, site, access) polyp scoring system is a method of stratifying the difficulty of polypectomy through assessment of four domains. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of SMSA to predict critical outcomes of endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR). We retrospectively applied SMSA to a prospectively collected multicenter database of large colonic laterally spreading lesions (LSLs) ≥ 20 mm referred for EMR. Standard inject-and-resect EMR procedures were performed. The primary end points were correlation of SMSA level with technical success, adverse events, and endoscopic recurrence. 2675 lesions in 2675 patients (52.6 % male) underwent EMR. Failed single-session EMR occurred in 124 LSLs (4.6 %) and was predicted by the SMSA score ( P  < 0.001). Intraprocedural and clinically significant postendoscopic bleeding was significantly less common for SMSA 2 LSLs (odds ratio [OR] 0.36, P  < 0.001 and OR 0.23, P  < 0.01) and SMSA 3 LSLs (OR 0.41, P  < 0.001 and OR 0.60, P  = 0.05) compared with SMSA 4 lesions. Similarly, endoscopic recurrence at first surveillance was less likely among SMSA 2 (OR 0.19, P  < 0.001) and SMSA 3 (OR 0.33, P  < 0.001) lesions compared with SMSA 4 lesions. This also extended to second surveillance among SMSA 4 LSLs. SMSA is a simple, readily applicable, clinical score that identifies a subgroup of patients who are at increased risk of failed EMR, adverse events, and adenoma recurrence at surveillance colonoscopy. This information may be useful for improving informed consent, planning endoscopy lists, and developing quality control measures for practitioners of EMR, with potential implications for EMR benchmarking and training. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Ischemia-modified albumin levels in the prediction of acute critical neurological findings in carbon monoxide poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Daş

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine whether serum ischemia-modified albumin (IMA levels in patients with carbon monoxide (CO poisoning were higher compared with a control group of healthy volunteers. In addition, the study sought to determine if there was a correlation between serum IMA levels and carboxyhemoglobin (COHB levels and other critical neurological findings (CNFs. In this prospective study, the IMA levels of 100 patients with CO poisoning and 50 control individuals were compared. In addition, the IMA and COHB levels were analyzed according to absence or presence CNFs in patients with CO poisoning. The levels of IMA (mg/dL on admittance, and during the 1st hour and 3rd hour, in patients with CO poisoning (49.90 ± 35.43, 30.21 ± 14.81, and 21.87 ± 6.03 were significantly higher, compared with the control individuals (17.30 ± 2.88. The levels of IMA in the 6th hour were not higher compared with control individuals. The levels of IMA on admittance, and during the 1st hour, 3rd hour, and 6th hour, and COHB (% levels in patients who had CNFs were higher compared with IMA levels and COHB levels in patients who had no CNFs (p < 0.001. However, when the multivariate model was created, it was observed that IMA level on admittance was a poor indicator for prediction of CNFs (odds ratio = 1.05; 95% confidence interval, 1.01–1.08. We therefore concluded that serum IMA levels could be helpful in the diagnosis of CO poisoning. However, we believe that IMA levels cannot be used to predict which patients will develop CNFs due to CO poisoning.

  7. Setting the vision: applied patient-reported outcomes and smart, connected digital healthcare systems to improve patient-centered outcomes prediction in critical illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysham, Nicholas G; Abernethy, Amy P; Cox, Christopher E

    2014-10-01

    Prediction models in critical illness are generally limited to short-term mortality and uncommonly include patient-centered outcomes. Current outcome prediction tools are also insensitive to individual context or evolution in healthcare practice, potentially limiting their value over time. Improved prognostication of patient-centered outcomes in critical illness could enhance decision-making quality in the ICU. Patient-reported outcomes have emerged as precise methodological measures of patient-centered variables and have been successfully employed using diverse platforms and technologies, enhancing the value of research in critical illness survivorship and in direct patient care. The learning health system is an emerging ideal characterized by integration of multiple data sources into a smart and interconnected health information technology infrastructure with the goal of rapidly optimizing patient care. We propose a vision of a smart, interconnected learning health system with integrated electronic patient-reported outcomes to optimize patient-centered care, including critical care outcome prediction. A learning health system infrastructure integrating electronic patient-reported outcomes may aid in the management of critical illness-associated conditions and yield tools to improve prognostication of patient-centered outcomes in critical illness.

  8. Development of an artificial neural network to predict critical heat flux based on the look up tables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terng, Nilton; Carajilescov, Pedro, E-mail: Nil.terng@gmail.com, E-mail: pedro.carajilescov@ufabc.edu.br [Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC), Santo Andre, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia, Modelagem e Ciencias Sociais

    2015-07-01

    The critical heat flux (CHF) is one of the principal thermal hydraulic limits of PWR type nuclear reactors. The present work consists in the development of an artificial neural network (ANN) to estimate the CHF, based on Look Up Table CHF data, published by Groeneveld (2006). Three parameters were considered in the development of the ANN: the pressure in the range of 1 to 21 MPa, the mass flux in the range of 50 to 8000 kg m{sup -2} s{sup -1} and the thermodynamic quality in the range of - 0.5 to 0.9. The ANN model considered was a multi feed forward net, which have two feedforward ANN. The first one, called main neural network, is used to calculate the result of CHF, and the second, denominated spacenet, is responsible to modify the main neural network according to the input. Comparing the ANN predictions with the data of the Look Up Table, it was observed an average of the ratio of 0.993 and a root mean square error of 13.3%. With the developed ANN, a parametric study of CHF was performed to observe the influence of each parameter in the CHF. It was possible to note that the CHF decreases with the increase of pressure and thermodynamic quality, while CHF increases with the mass flow rate, as expected. However, some erratic trends were also observed which can be attributed to either unknown aspect of the CHF phenomenon or uncertainties in the data. (author)

  9. Critical force during tethered swimming for the evaluation of aerobic capacity and prediction of performances in freestyle swimming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Papoti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the relationship of critical force (Fcrit with lactate threshold (LLNA and the intensity corresponding to VO2max (iVO2max in tethered swimming (TS, and their correlation with maximal performance in 400-m (V400 and 30-min (VT30 freestyle swimming (FS. Seven swimmers were submitted to a TS incremental test for the determination of LLNA and iVO2max. For the determination of Fcrit, the swimmers performed four exercises to exhaustion at intensities (F corresponding to 87%, 104%, 118% and 134% of iVO2max for the calculation of time limits (Tlim. Fcrit corresponded to the linear coefficient of the ratio between F and 1/tlim. The maximal performance in FS corresponded to the mean velocity obtained during maximal exercise of 400-m and 30-min crawl swimming. Fcrit (51.97 ± 4.02 N was significantly lower than iVO2max (60.21 ± 8.73 N but not than LLNA (45.89 ± 8.73. Fcrit was significantly correlated with iVO2max (0.97, LLNA (0.88, V400 (0.85, and VT30 (0.86. These data suggest that Fcrit can be used for the determination of aerobic capacity, prescription of a TS training program, and prediction of performance in FS.

  10. A general unified non-equilibrium model for predicting saturated and subcooled critical two-phase flow rates through short and long tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, D.W.H.; Abdelmessih, A.H.

    1995-01-01

    A general unified model is developed to predict one-component critical two-phase pipe flow. Modelling of the two-phase flow is accomplished by describing the evolution of the flow between the location of flashing inception and the exit (critical) plane. The model approximates the nonequilibrium phase change process via thermodynamic equilibrium paths. Included are the relative effects of varying the location of flashing inception, pipe geometry, fluid properties and length to diameter ratio. The model predicts that a range of critical mass fluxes exist and is bound by a maximum and minimum value for a given thermodynamic state. This range is more pronounced at lower subcooled stagnation states and can be attributed to the variation in the location of flashing inception. The model is based on the results of an experimental study of the critical two-phase flow of saturated and subcooled water through long tubes. In that study, the location of flashing inception was accurately controlled and adjusted through the use of a new device. The data obtained revealed that for fixed stagnation conditions, the maximum critical mass flux occurred with flashing inception located near the pipe exit; while minimum critical mass fluxes occurred with the flashing front located further upstream. Available data since 1970 for both short and long tubes over a wide range of conditions are compared with the model predictions. This includes test section L/D ratios from 25 to 300 and covers a temperature and pressure range of 110 to 280 degrees C and 0.16 to 6.9 MPa. respectively. The predicted maximum and minimum critical mass fluxes show an excellent agreement with the range observed in the experimental data

  11. A general unified non-equilibrium model for predicting saturated and subcooled critical two-phase flow rates through short and long tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, D.W.H. [Univ. of British Columbia (Canada); Abdelmessih, A.H. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1995-09-01

    A general unified model is developed to predict one-component critical two-phase pipe flow. Modelling of the two-phase flow is accomplished by describing the evolution of the flow between the location of flashing inception and the exit (critical) plane. The model approximates the nonequilibrium phase change process via thermodynamic equilibrium paths. Included are the relative effects of varying the location of flashing inception, pipe geometry, fluid properties and length to diameter ratio. The model predicts that a range of critical mass fluxes exist and is bound by a maximum and minimum value for a given thermodynamic state. This range is more pronounced at lower subcooled stagnation states and can be attributed to the variation in the location of flashing inception. The model is based on the results of an experimental study of the critical two-phase flow of saturated and subcooled water through long tubes. In that study, the location of flashing inception was accurately controlled and adjusted through the use of a new device. The data obtained revealed that for fixed stagnation conditions, the maximum critical mass flux occurred with flashing inception located near the pipe exit; while minimum critical mass fluxes occurred with the flashing front located further upstream. Available data since 1970 for both short and long tubes over a wide range of conditions are compared with the model predictions. This includes test section L/D ratios from 25 to 300 and covers a temperature and pressure range of 110 to 280{degrees}C and 0.16 to 6.9 MPa. respectively. The predicted maximum and minimum critical mass fluxes show an excellent agreement with the range observed in the experimental data.

  12. A Fisher’s Criterion-Based Linear Discriminant Analysis for Predicting the Critical Values of Coal and Gas Outbursts Using the Initial Gas Flow in a Borehole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowei Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The risk of coal and gas outbursts can be predicted using a method that is linear and continuous and based on the initial gas flow in the borehole (IGFB; this method is significantly superior to the traditional point prediction method. Acquiring accurate critical values is the key to ensuring accurate predictions. Based on ideal rock cross-cut coal uncovering model, the IGFB measurement device was developed. The present study measured the data of the initial gas flow over 3 min in a 1 m long borehole with a diameter of 42 mm in the laboratory. A total of 48 sets of data were obtained. These data were fuzzy and chaotic. Fisher’s discrimination method was able to transform these spatial data, which were multidimensional due to the factors influencing the IGFB, into a one-dimensional function and determine its critical value. Then, by processing the data into a normal distribution, the critical values of the outbursts were analyzed using linear discriminant analysis with Fisher’s criterion. The weak and strong outbursts had critical values of 36.63 L and 80.85 L, respectively, and the accuracy of the back-discriminant analysis for the weak and strong outbursts was 94.74% and 92.86%, respectively. Eight outburst tests were simulated in the laboratory, the reverse verification accuracy was 100%, and the accuracy of the critical value was verified.

  13. Application of the van der Waals equation of state to polymers .4. Correlation and prediction of lower critical solution temperatures for polymer solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goncalves, Ana Saraiva; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Harismiadis, Vassilis I.

    1996-01-01

    The van der Waals equation of state is used for the correlation and the prediction of the lower critical solution behavior or mixtures including a solvent and a polymer. The equation of state parameters for the polymer are estimated from experimental volumetric data at low pressures. The equation...

  14. Method for estimating critical properties of heavy compounds suitable for cubic equations of state and its application to the prediction of vapor pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Ioannis, Smirlis; Iakovos, Yakoumis

    1997-01-01

    S. The proposed scheme employs a recent group-contribution method (Constantinou et al. Fluid Phase Equilib. 1995, 103 (1), 11) for estimating the acentric factor. The two critical properties are estimated via a generalized correlation for the ratio T-c/P-c (with the van der Waals surface area) and the cubic Eo...... pressures for several nonpolar and slightly polar heavy compounds with very satisfactory results, essentially independent of the experimental point used. Furthermore, the method yields critical properties for heavy alkanes (N-c > 20) and other compounds which are in very good agreement with recent available......Cubic equations of state (EoS) are often used for correlating and predicting phase equilibria. Before extending any EoS to mixtures, reliable vapor-pressure prediction is essential. This requires experimental, if possible, critical temperatures T-c, pressures P-c, and acentric factor omega...

  15. All roads lead to Iran: Predicting landscape connectivity of the last stronghold for the critically endangered Asiatic cheetah

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. M. Moqanaki; Samuel Cushman

    2016-01-01

    Effective conservation solutions for small and isolated wildlife populations depend on identifying and preserving critical biological corridors and dispersal routes. With a worldwide population of ≤70 individuals, the critically endangered Asiatic cheetah Acinonyx jubatus venaticus persists in several fragmented nuclei in Iran. Connectivity between nuclei is...

  16. Effects of equilibrium point displacement in limit cycle oscillation amplitude, critical frequency and prediction of critical input angular velocity in minimal brake system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganji, Hamed Faghanpour; Ganji, Davood Domiri

    2017-04-01

    In the present paper, brake squeal phenomenon as a noise resource in automobiles was studied. In most cases, the modeling work is carried out assuming that deformations were small; thus, equilibrium point is set zero and linearization is performed at this point. However, the equilibrium point under certain circumstances is not zero; therefore, huge errors in prediction of brake squeal may occur. In this work, large motion domains with respect to linearization importance were subjected to investigation. Nonlinear equations of motion were considered and behavior of system for COF's model was analyzed by studying amplitude and frequency of limited cycle oscillation.

  17. Prior failed ipsilateral percutaneous endovascular intervention in patients with critical limb ischemia predicts poor outcome after lower extremity bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Brian W.; De Martino, Randall R.; Stone, David H.; Schanzer, Andres; Goodney, Philip P.; Walsh, Daniel W.; Cronenwett, Jack L.

    2017-01-01

    Background Although open surgical bypass remains the standard revascularization strategy for patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI), many centers now perform peripheral endovascular intervention (PVI) as the first-line treatment for these patients. We sought to determine the effect of a prior ipsilateral PVI (iPVI) on the outcome of subsequent lower extremity bypass (LEB) in patients with CLI. Methods A retrospective cohort analysis of all patients undergoing infrainguinal LEB between 2003 and 2009 within hospitals comprising the Vascular Study Group of New England (VSGNE) was performed. Primary study endpoints were major amputation and graft occlusion at 1 year postoperatively. Secondary outcomes included in-hospital major adverse events (MAE), 1-year mortality, and composite 1-year major adverse limb events (MALE). Event rates were determined using life table analyses and comparisons were performed using the log-rank test. Multivariate predictors were determined using a Cox proportional hazards model with multilevel hierarchical adjustment. Results Of 1880 LEBs performed, 32% (n = 603) had a prior infrainguinal revascularization procedure (iPVI, 7%; ipsilateral bypass, 15%; contralateral PVI, 3%; contralateral bypass, 17%). Patients with prior iPVI, compared with those without a prior iPVI, were more likely to be women (32 vs 41%; P = .04), less likely to have tissue loss (52% vs 63%; P = .02), more likely to require arm vein conduit (16% vs 5%; P = .001), and more likely to be on statin (71% vs 54%; P = .01) and beta blocker therapy (92% vs 81%; P = .01) at the time of their bypass procedure. Other demographic factors were similar between these groups. Prior PVI or bypass did not alter 30-day MAE and 1-year mortality after the index bypass. In contrast, 1-year major amputation and 1-year graft occlusion rates were significantly higher in patients who had prior iPVI than those without (31% vs 20%; P = .046 and 28% vs 18%; P = .009), similar to patients who

  18. External Validation and Recalibration of Risk Prediction Models for Acute Traumatic Brain Injury among Critically Ill Adult Patients in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, David A; Griggs, Kathryn A; Prabhu, Gita; Gomes, Manuel; Lecky, Fiona E; Hutchinson, Peter J A; Menon, David K; Rowan, Kathryn M

    2015-10-01

    This study validates risk prediction models for acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) in critical care units in the United Kingdom and recalibrates the models to this population. The Risk Adjustment In Neurocritical care (RAIN) Study was a prospective, observational cohort study in 67 adult critical care units. Adult patients admitted to critical care following acute TBI with a last pre-sedation Glasgow Coma Scale score of less than 15 were recruited. The primary outcomes were mortality and unfavorable outcome (death or severe disability, assessed using the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale) at six months following TBI. Of 3626 critical care unit admissions, 2975 were analyzed. Following imputation of missing outcomes, mortality at six months was 25.7% and unfavorable outcome 57.4%. Ten risk prediction models were validated from Hukkelhoven and colleagues, the Medical Research Council (MRC) Corticosteroid Randomisation After Significant Head Injury (CRASH) Trial Collaborators, and the International Mission for Prognosis and Analysis of Clinical Trials in TBI (IMPACT) group. The model with the best discrimination was the IMPACT "Lab" model (C index, 0.779 for mortality and 0.713 for unfavorable outcome). This model was well calibrated for mortality at six months but substantially under-predicted the risk of unfavorable outcome. Recalibration of the models resulted in small improvements in discrimination and excellent calibration for all models. The risk prediction models demonstrated sufficient statistical performance to support their use in research and audit but fell below the level required to guide individual patient decision-making. The published models for unfavorable outcome at six months had poor calibration in the UK critical care setting and the models recalibrated to this setting should be used in future research.

  19. Consistent Set of Experiments from ICSBEP Handbook for Evaluation of Criticality Calculation Prediction of Apparatus of External Fuel Cycle with Different Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovko, Yury E. [FSUE ' SSC RF-IPPE' , 249033, Bondarenko Square 1, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-01

    Experiments with plutonium, low enriched uranium and uranium-233 from the ICSBEP1 Handbook are being considered in this paper. Among these experiments it was selected only those, which seem to be the most relevant to the evaluation of uncertainty of critical mass of mixtures of plutonium or low enriched uranium or uranium-233 with light water. All selected experiments were examined and covariance matrices of criticality uncertainties were developed along with some uncertainties were revised. Statistical analysis of these experiments was performed and some contradictions were discovered and eliminated. Evaluation of accuracy of prediction of criticality calculations was performed using the internally consistent set of experiments with plutonium, low enriched uranium and uranium-233 remained after the statistical analyses. The application objects for the evaluation of calculational prediction of criticality were water-reflected spherical systems of homogeneous aqueous mixtures of plutonium or low enriched uranium or uranium-233 of different concentrations which are simplified models of apparatus of external fuel cycle. It is shows that the procedure allows to considerably reduce uncertainty in k{sub eff} caused by the uncertainties in neutron cross-sections. Also it is shows that the results are practically independent of initial covariance matrices of nuclear data uncertainties. (authors)

  20. Acute Pancreatitis as a Model to Predict Transition of Systemic Inflammation to Organ Failure in Trauma and Critical Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    models ); • clinical interventions; • new business creation; and • other. Nothing to report. Nothing to report. Nothing to report. 17...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0376 TITLE: Acute Pancreatitis as a Model to Predict Transition of Systemic Inflammation to Organ Failgure in Trauma...COVERED 22 Sep 2016 - 21 Sep 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Acute Pancreatitis as a Model to Predict Transition of Systemic

  1. Prediction of critical transport velocity for preventing sand deposition in gas-oil multiphase production and well systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bello, O.O.; Reinicke, K.M. [Technische Univ. Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany). Inst. of Petroleum Engineering; Teodoriu, C. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Petroleum Engineering

    2008-10-23

    The critical transport velocity is one of the key parameters for gas-oil-sand multiphase production and well system design and safe operation. Existing American Petroleum Institute Recommended Practice 14E (API RP 14E) for the sizing of multiphase flow systems suggests an equation to calculate threshold transport velocity. This equation only considers mixture density and does not account for factors such as fluid properties, gas-liquid flow patterns, sand loading, sand particle size, size distributions, shape factor and density. This work presents an improved computational methodology, which can be applied to estimate the critical transport velocity required to ensure efficient performance of gas-oil-sand multiphase production and well systems. The improved method is based on the modelling of three-phase gas-oil-sand pipe flow physics from first principle. Computations of the critical transport velocities show reasonable agreement with values calculated from mechanistic model (Danielson, 2007) for a relatively wide range of design and operating conditions. Compared with the mechanistic model (Danielson, 2007), the present method has no imposed limitations to the range of applicability. It is also takes into adequate account the effects of operating pressure, flow geometry, sand particle size, size distribution and shape factor, which have considerable influence on the critical transport velocity in gas-oil-sand multiphase production and well systems. (orig.)

  2. Test of phi(sup 2) model predictions near the (sup 3)He liquid-gas critical point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmatz, M.; Zhong, F.; Hahn, I.

    2000-01-01

    NASA is supporting the development of an experiment called MISTE (Microgravity Scaling Theory Experiment) for future International Space Station mission. The main objective of this flight experiment is to perform in-situ PVT, heat capacity at constant volume, C(sub v) and chi(sub tau), measurements in the asymptotic region near the (sup 3)He liquid-gas critical point.

  3. SU-E-T-170: Characterization of the Location, Extent, and Proximity to Critical Structures of Target Volumes Provides Detail for Improved Outcome Predictions Among Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Z; Moore, J; Rosati, L; Mian, O; Narang, A; Herman, J; McNutt, T [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In radiotherapy, size, location and proximity of the target to critical structures influence treatment decisions. It has been shown that proximity of the target predicts dosimetric sparing of critical structures. In addition to dosimetry, precise location of disease has further implications such as tumor invasion, or proximity to major arteries that inhibit surgery. Knowledge of which patients can be converted to surgical candidates by radiation may have high impact on future treat/no-treat decisions. We propose a method to improve our characterization of the location of pancreatic cancer and treatment volume extent with respect to nearby arteries with the goal of developing features to improve clinical predictions and decisions. Methods: Oncospace is a local learning health system that systematically captures clinical outcomes and all aspects of radiotherapy treatment plans, including overlap volume histograms (OVH) – a measure of spatial relationships between two structures. Minimum and maximum distances of PTV and OARs based on OVH, PTV volume, anatomic location by ICD-9 code, and surgical outcome were queried. Normalized distance to center from the left and right kidney was calculated to indicate tumor location and laterality. Distance to critical arteries (celiac, superior mesenteric, common hepatic) is validated by surgical status (borderline resectable, locally advanced converted to resectable). Results: There were 205 pancreas stereotactic body radiotherapy patients treated from 2009–2015 queried. Location/laterality of tumor based on kidney OVH show strong trends between location by OVH and by ICD-9. Compared to the locally advanced group, the borderline resectable group showed larger geometrical distance from critical arteries (p=0.03). Conclusion: Our platform enabled analysis of shape/size-location relationships. These data suggest that PTV volume and attention to distance between PTVs and surrounding OARs and major arteries may be

  4. SU-E-T-170: Characterization of the Location, Extent, and Proximity to Critical Structures of Target Volumes Provides Detail for Improved Outcome Predictions Among Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Z; Moore, J; Rosati, L; Mian, O; Narang, A; Herman, J; McNutt, T

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In radiotherapy, size, location and proximity of the target to critical structures influence treatment decisions. It has been shown that proximity of the target predicts dosimetric sparing of critical structures. In addition to dosimetry, precise location of disease has further implications such as tumor invasion, or proximity to major arteries that inhibit surgery. Knowledge of which patients can be converted to surgical candidates by radiation may have high impact on future treat/no-treat decisions. We propose a method to improve our characterization of the location of pancreatic cancer and treatment volume extent with respect to nearby arteries with the goal of developing features to improve clinical predictions and decisions. Methods: Oncospace is a local learning health system that systematically captures clinical outcomes and all aspects of radiotherapy treatment plans, including overlap volume histograms (OVH) – a measure of spatial relationships between two structures. Minimum and maximum distances of PTV and OARs based on OVH, PTV volume, anatomic location by ICD-9 code, and surgical outcome were queried. Normalized distance to center from the left and right kidney was calculated to indicate tumor location and laterality. Distance to critical arteries (celiac, superior mesenteric, common hepatic) is validated by surgical status (borderline resectable, locally advanced converted to resectable). Results: There were 205 pancreas stereotactic body radiotherapy patients treated from 2009–2015 queried. Location/laterality of tumor based on kidney OVH show strong trends between location by OVH and by ICD-9. Compared to the locally advanced group, the borderline resectable group showed larger geometrical distance from critical arteries (p=0.03). Conclusion: Our platform enabled analysis of shape/size-location relationships. These data suggest that PTV volume and attention to distance between PTVs and surrounding OARs and major arteries may be

  5. Value of American Thoracic Society guidelines in predicting infection or colonization with multidrug-resistant organisms in critically ill patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfeng Xie

    Full Text Available The incidence rate of infection by multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs can affect the accuracy of etiological diagnosis when using American Thoracic Society (ATS guidelines. We determined the accuracy of the ATS guidelines in predicting infection or colonization by MDROs over 18 months at a single ICU in eastern China.This prospective observational study examined consecutive patients who were admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU in Nanjing, China. MDROs were defined as bacteria that were resistant to at least three antimicrobial classes, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii. Screening for MDROs was performed at ICU admission and discharge. Risk factors for infection or colonization with MDROs were recorded, and the accuracy of the ATS guidelines in predicting infection or colonization with MDROs was documented.There were 610 patients, 225 (37% of whom were colonized or infected with MDROs at ICU admission, and this increased to 311 (51% at discharge. At admission, the sensitivity (70.0%, specificity (31.6%, positive predictive value (38.2%, and negative predictive value (63.5%, all based on ATS guidelines for infection or colonization with MDROs were low. The negative predictive value was greater in patients from departments with MDRO infection rates of 31-40% than in patients from departments with MDRO infection rates of 30% or less and from departments with MDRO infection rates more than 40%.ATS criteria were not reliable in predicting infection or colonization with MDROs in our ICU. The negative predictive value was greater in patients from departments with intermediate rates of MDRO infection than in patients from departments with low or high rates of MDRO infection.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01667991.

  6. Comparison of the Full Outline of UnResponsiveness score and the Glasgow Coma Scale in predicting mortality in critically ill patients*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijdicks, Eelco F M; Kramer, Andrew A; Rohs, Thomas; Hanna, Susan; Sadaka, Farid; O'Brien, Jacklyn; Bible, Shonna; Dickess, Stacy M; Foss, Michelle

    2015-02-01

    Impaired consciousness has been incorporated in prediction models that are used in the ICU. The Glasgow Coma Scale has value but is incomplete and cannot be assessed in intubated patients accurately. The Full Outline of UnResponsiveness score may be a better predictor of mortality in critically ill patients. Thirteen ICUs at five U.S. hospitals. One thousand six hundred ninety-five consecutive unselected ICU admissions during a six-month period in 2012. Glasgow Coma Scale and Full Outline of UnResponsiveness score were recorded within 1 hour of admission. Baseline characteristics and physiologic components of the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation system, as well as mortality were linked to Glasgow Coma Scale/Full Outline of UnResponsiveness score information. None. We recruited 1,695 critically ill patients, of which 1,645 with complete data could be linked to data in the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation system. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of predicting ICU mortality using the Glasgow Coma Scale was 0.715 (95% CI, 0.663-0.768) and using the Full Outline of UnResponsiveness score was 0.742 (95% CI, 0.694-0.790), statistically different (p = 0.001). A similar but nonsignificant difference was found for predicting hospital mortality (p = 0.078). The respiratory and brainstem reflex components of the Full Outline of UnResponsiveness score showed a much wider range of mortality than the verbal component of Glasgow Coma Scale. In multivariable models, the Full Outline of UnResponsiveness score was more useful than the Glasgow Coma Scale for predicting mortality. The Full Outline of UnResponsiveness score might be a better prognostic tool of ICU mortality than the Glasgow Coma Scale in critically ill patients, most likely a result of incorporating brainstem reflexes and respiration into the Full Outline of UnResponsiveness score.

  7. A critical review of predictive models for the onset of significant void in forced-convection subcooled boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorra, H.; Lee, S.C.; Bankoff, S.G.

    1993-06-01

    This predictive models for the onset of significant void (OSV) in forced-convection subcooled boiling are reviewed and compared with extensive data. Three analytical models and seven empirical correlations are considered in this review. These models and correlations are put onto a common basis and are compared, again on a common basis, with a variety of data. The evaluation of their range of validity and applicability under various operating conditions are discussed. The results show that the correlations of Saha-Zuber seems to be the best model to predict OSV in vertical subcooled boiling flow

  8. Development of a Prognostic Score Using the Complete Blood Cell Count for Survival Prediction in Unselected Critically Ill Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Chongliang, Fang; Yuzhong, Li; Qian, Shi; Xiliang, Liu; Hui, Liu

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to develop a new prognostic scoring system for critically ill patients using the simple complete blood cell count (CBC). Methods. CBC measurements in samples from 306 patients in an intensive care unit were conducted with automated analyzers, including levels of neutrophils, lymphocytes, erythrocytes, hemoglobin, and platelets. The time of sampling and the time of death were recorded. Z values were calculated according to the measured values, reference...

  9. The current status of theoretically based approaches to the prediction of the critical heat flux in flow boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisman, J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the phenomena governing the critical heat flux in flow boiling. Inducts which vary with the flow pattern. Separate models are needed for dryout in annular flow, wall overheating in plug or slug flow and formation of a vapor blanket in dispersed flow. The major theories and their current status are described for the annular and dispersed regions. The need for development of the theoretical approach in the plug and slug flow region is indicated

  10. Identification of a Critical Time with Acoustic Emission Monitoring during Static Fatigue Tests on Ceramic Matrix Composites: Towards Lifetime Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Godin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Non-oxide fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites are promising candidates for some aeronautic applications that require good thermomechanical behavior over long periods of time. This study focuses on the behavior of a SiCf/[Si-B-C] composite with a self-healing matrix at intermediate temperature under air. Static fatigue experiments were performed below 600 °C and a lifetime diagram is presented. Damage is monitored both by strain measurement and acoustic emission during the static fatigue experiments. Two methods of real-time analysis of associated energy release have been developed. They allow for the identification of a characteristic time that was found to be close to 55% of the measured rupture time. This critical time reflects a critical local energy release assessed by the applicability of the Benioff law. This critical aspect is linked to a damage phase where slow crack growth in fibers is prevailing leading to ultimate fracture of the composite.

  11. Acute Kidney Injury in Trauma Patients Admitted to Critical Care: Development and Validation of a Diagnostic Prediction Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Ryan W; Lin, Shih-Pin; Hewson, Russell; Kirwan, Christopher J; Torrance, Hew D; O'Dwyer, Michael J; West, Anita; Brohi, Karim; Pearse, Rupert M; Zolfaghari, Parjam; Prowle, John R

    2018-02-26

    Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) complicating major trauma is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. Traumatic AKI has specific risk factors and predictable time-course facilitating diagnostic modelling. In a single centre, retrospective observational study we developed risk prediction models for AKI after trauma based on data around intensive care admission. Models predicting AKI were developed using data from 830 patients, using data reduction followed by logistic regression, and were independently validated in a further 564 patients. AKI occurred in 163/830 (19.6%) with 42 (5.1%) receiving renal replacement therapy (RRT). First serum creatinine and phosphate, units of blood transfused in first 24 h, age and Charlson score discriminated need for RRT and AKI early after trauma. For RRT c-statistics were good to excellent: development: 0.92 (0.88-0.96), validation: 0.91 (0.86-0.97). Modelling AKI stage 2-3, c-statistics were also good, development: 0.81 (0.75-0.88) and validation: 0.83 (0.74-0.92). The model predicting AKI stage 1-3 performed moderately, development: c-statistic 0.77 (0.72-0.81), validation: 0.70 (0.64-0.77). Despite good discrimination of need for RRT, positive predictive values (PPV) at the optimal cut-off were only 23.0% (13.7-42.7) in development. However, PPV for the alternative endpoint of RRT and/or death improved to 41.2% (34.8-48.1) highlighting death as a clinically relevant endpoint to RRT.

  12. Sensitivity of predictions in an effective model: Application to the chiral critical end point position in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biguet, Alexandre; Hansen, Hubert; Brugiere, Timothee; Costa, Pedro; Borgnat, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of the position of the chiral critical end point (CEP) in the QCD phase diagram is under debate. While it is possible to predict its position by using effective models specifically built to reproduce some of the features of the underlying theory (QCD), the quality of the predictions (e.g., the CEP position) obtained by such effective models, depends on whether solving the model equations constitute a well- or ill-posed inverse problem. Considering these predictions as being inverse problems provides tools to evaluate if the problem is ill-conditioned, meaning that infinitesimal variations of the inputs of the model can cause comparatively large variations of the predictions. If it is ill-conditioned, it has major consequences because of finite variations that could come from experimental and/or theoretical errors. In the following, we shall apply such a reasoning on the predictions of a particular Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model within the mean field + ring approximations, with special attention to the prediction of the chiral CEP position in the (T-μ) plane. We find that the problem is ill-conditioned (i.e. very sensitive to input variations) for the T-coordinate of the CEP, whereas, it is well-posed for the μ-coordinate of the CEP. As a consequence, when the chiral condensate varies in a 10MeV range, μ CEP varies far less. As an illustration to understand how problematic this could be, we show that the main consequence when taking into account finite variation of the inputs, is that the existence of the CEP itself cannot be predicted anymore: for a deviation as low as 0.6% with respect to vacuum phenomenology (well within the estimation of the first correction to the ring approximation) the CEP may or may not exist. (orig.)

  13. Sensitivity of predictions in an effective model: Application to the chiral critical end point position in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biguet, Alexandre; Hansen, Hubert; Brugiere, Timothee [Universite Claude Bernard de Lyon, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3, Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Costa, Pedro [Universidade de Coimbra, Centro de Fisica Computacional, Departamento de Fisica, Coimbra (Portugal); Borgnat, Pierre [CNRS, l' Ecole normale superieure de Lyon, Laboratoire de Physique, Lyon Cedex 07 (France)

    2015-09-15

    The measurement of the position of the chiral critical end point (CEP) in the QCD phase diagram is under debate. While it is possible to predict its position by using effective models specifically built to reproduce some of the features of the underlying theory (QCD), the quality of the predictions (e.g., the CEP position) obtained by such effective models, depends on whether solving the model equations constitute a well- or ill-posed inverse problem. Considering these predictions as being inverse problems provides tools to evaluate if the problem is ill-conditioned, meaning that infinitesimal variations of the inputs of the model can cause comparatively large variations of the predictions. If it is ill-conditioned, it has major consequences because of finite variations that could come from experimental and/or theoretical errors. In the following, we shall apply such a reasoning on the predictions of a particular Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model within the mean field + ring approximations, with special attention to the prediction of the chiral CEP position in the (T-μ) plane. We find that the problem is ill-conditioned (i.e. very sensitive to input variations) for the T-coordinate of the CEP, whereas, it is well-posed for the μ-coordinate of the CEP. As a consequence, when the chiral condensate varies in a 10MeV range, μ {sub CEP} varies far less. As an illustration to understand how problematic this could be, we show that the main consequence when taking into account finite variation of the inputs, is that the existence of the CEP itself cannot be predicted anymore: for a deviation as low as 0.6% with respect to vacuum phenomenology (well within the estimation of the first correction to the ring approximation) the CEP may or may not exist. (orig.)

  14. Critical force during tethered swimming for the evaluation of aerobic capacity and prediction of performances in freestyle swimming

    OpenAIRE

    Marcelo Papoti; Ricardo Vitório; Gustavo Gomes Araújo; Luiz Eduardo Barreto Martins; Sérgio Augusto Cunha; Claudio Alexandre Gobatto

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated the relationship of critical force (Fcrit) with lactate threshold (LLNA) and the intensity corresponding to VO2max (iVO2max) in tethered swimming (TS), and their correlation with maximal performance in 400-m (V400) and 30-min (VT30) freestyle swimming (FS). Seven swimmers were submitted to a TS incremental test for the determination of LLNA and iVO2max. For the determination of Fcrit, the swimmers performed four exercises to exhaustion at intensities (F) corresp...

  15. System for prediction and determination of the sub critic multiplication; Sistema para previsao e determinacao da multiplicacao subcritica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Aquilino S.; Pereira, Valmir; Silva, Fernando C. da [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    1997-12-01

    It is presented a concept of a system which may be used to calculate and anticipate the subcritical multiplication of a PWR nuclear power plant. The system is divided into two different modules. The first module allows the theoretical prediction of the subcritical multiplication factor through the solution of the multigroup diffusion equation. The second module determines this factor based on the data acquired from the neutron detectors of a NPP external nuclear detection system. (author). 3 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Critical thresholds of liver function parameters for ketosis prediction in dairy cows using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuhang; Wang, Bo; Shu, Shi; Zhang, Hongyou; Xu, Chuang; Wu, Ling; Xia, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Fatty liver syndrome and ketosis are important metabolic disorders in high-producing cows during early lactation with fatty liver usually preceding ketosis. To date, parameters for early prediction of the risk of ketosis have not been investigated in China. To determine the predictive value of some parameters on the risk of ketosis in China. In a descriptive study, 48 control and 32 ketotic Holstein Friesian cows were randomly selected from one farm with a serum β-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA) concentration of 1.20 mmol/L as cutoff point. The risk prediction thresholds for ketosis were determined by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. In line with a high BHBA concentration, blood glucose concentration was significantly lower in ketotic cows compared to control animals (2.77 ± 0.24 versus 3.34 ± 0.03 mmol/L; P = 0.02). Thresholds were more than 0.76 mmol/L for nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA, with 65% sensitivity and 92% specificity), more than 104 U/L for aspartate aminotransferase (AST, 74% and 85%, respectively), less than 140 U/L for cholinesterase (CHE, 75% and 59%, respectively), and more than 3.3 µmol/L for total bilirubin (TBIL, 58% and 83%, respectively). There were significant correlations between BHBA and glucose (R = -4.74), or CHE (R = -0.262), BHBA and NEFA (R = 0.520), or AST (R = 0.525), or TBIL (R = 0.278), or direct bilirubin (DBIL, R = 0.348). AST, CHE, TBIL and NEFA may be useful parameters for risk prediction of ketosis. This study might be of value in addressing novel directions for future research on the connection between ketosis and liver dysfunction.

  17. Serial evaluation of the MODS, SOFA and LOD scores to predict ICU mortality in mixed critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khwannimit, Bodin

    2008-09-01

    To perform a serial assessment and compare ability in predicting the intensive care unit (ICU) mortality of the multiple organ dysfunction score (MODS), sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) and logistic organ dysfunction (LOD) score. The data were collected prospectively on consecutive ICU admissions over a 24-month period at a tertiary referral university hospital. The MODS, SOFA, and LOD scores were calculated on initial and repeated every 24 hrs. Two thousand fifty four patients were enrolled in the present study. The maximum and delta-scores of all the organ dysfunction scores correlated with ICU mortality. The maximum score of all models had better ability for predicting ICU mortality than initial or delta score. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for maximum scores was 0.892 for the MODS, 0.907 for the SOFA, and 0.92for the LOD. No statistical difference existed between all maximum scores and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score. Serial assessment of organ dysfunction during the ICU stay is reliable with ICU mortality. The maximum scores is the best discrimination comparable with APACHE II score in predicting ICU mortality.

  18. Changes in arterial blood pressure induced by passive leg raising predict hypotension during the induction of sedation in critically ill patients without severe cardiac dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tao; Pan, Chun; Guo, Feng-mei; Yang, Yi; Qiu, Hai-bo

    2013-07-01

    Hypotension due to the induction of sedation with dexmedetomidine infusion may be harmful in critically ill patients. Changes in pulse pressure induced by the passive leg raising test (PLR-ΔPP) as marker of fluid responsiveness, assessed prior to sedation, may predict hemodynamic changes. The present study was to investigate the power of the PLR test in critically ill patients in predicting hypotension induced by the induction of dexmedetomidine sedation. Fluid responsiveness was estimated by a passive leg raising (PLR) test before dexmedetomidine sedation. Patients were assigned to either the "Nonresponders" or "Responders" group according to their hemodynamic responses to the PLR test ("Nonresponders", PLR-ΔPP pressure, heart rate (HR), and central venous pressure (CVP) were measured at each phase of the study procedure. Hemodynamic fluctuations during the use of dexmedetomidine sedation were recorded and compared between the two groups. Fifty patients had a median (25% - 75% interquartile range) of 71 (61 - 78) years old were studied. At baseline, 39 of the 50 patients were "Nonresponders" and 11 were "Responders". Following dexmedetomidine sedation, patients classified as "Responders" had a significantly greater systolic blood pressure decrease during the induction of dexmedetomidine sedation than the "Nonresponders" ((-26.3 ± 6.8)% vs. -11.8 ± 8.5)%, P blood pressure. Finally, PLR-ΔPP was positively correlated with changes in systolic blood pressure (PLR-ΔSBP) (r(2) = 0.576; P AUC for PLR-ΔPP was 0.84 (95%CI 0.71 - 0.93). PLR-ΔPP predicted hypotension with a sensitivity of 73% and a specificity of 92%. The fluid responsiveness assessment pre-sedation was found to predict blood pressure fluctuation during the induction of dexmedetomidine sedation. The PLR test conducted prior to sedation may be a useful tool to identify patients with a high risk of hemodynamic events and may be used to indicate the need for prophylactic treatment.

  19. Use of zero power plutonium reactor measurements as a support of criticality prediction for the SNR-300

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilate, S.; de Wouters, R.; Wehmann, U.; Helm, F.; Scholtyssek, W.

    1978-01-01

    Evaluations of criticality measurements performed in various SNEAK and Zero Power Plutonium Reactor (ZPPR) cores are compared. The best available methods of calculations (including transport theory) are used. The ZPPR results support well the trend indicated by the SNEAK evaluations for clean cores and for cores with followers; for cores with absorbers partially inserted, the agreement is only rough. Evaluations of control rod worth measurements are therefore also compared, using the routine method of calculation for SNR-300 (diffusion theory). The control rod worths are largely underestimated in SNEAK (C/E = 0.89), but only slightly underestimated in the ZPPR (C/E = 0.97). The difference in the nature of core fuel (uranium in SNEAK, plutonium in the ZPPR) could be at the origin of this discrepancy

  20. Critical comparison of experimental data and theoretical predictions for N-d scattering below the breakup threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kievsky, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pisa (Italy); Rosati, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pisa (Italy)]|[Pisa Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; Tornow, W. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Dept. of Physics; Viviani, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pisa (Italy)

    1996-09-30

    The theoretical approaches for studying N-d processes using realistic, semi-phenomenological NN potentials have matured considerably during the last few years. Accurate calculations of scattering observables are now feasible. Recently, high-quality measurements of N-d scattering at energies below the deuteron breakup threshold became available. Therefore, a detailed comparison between theory and experimental data can now be performed. In this paper the various sets of experimental data for the N-d differential cross section, and the vector and tensor analyzing powers are examined in a critical way in the incident nucleon energy range from 1 to 3 MeV. In order to identify possible inadequacies of the interaction models adopted, phase-shift analyses were performed and compared to the theoretical parameters. (orig.).

  1. Use of Machine-Learning Approaches to Predict Clinical Deterioration in Critically Ill Patients: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi Kamio

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Early identification of patients with unexpected clinical deterioration is a matter of serious concern. Previous studies have shown that early intervention on a patient whose health is deteriorating improves the patient outcome, and machine-learning-based approaches to predict clinical deterioration may contribute to precision improvement. To date, however, no systematic review in this area is available. Methods: We completed a search on PubMed on January 22, 2017 as well as a review of the articles identified by study authors involved in this area of research following the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA guidelines for systematic reviews. Results: Twelve articles were selected for the current study from 273 articles initially obtained from the PubMed searches. Eleven of the 12 studies were retrospective studies, and no randomized controlled trials were performed. Although the artificial neural network techniques were the most frequently used and provided high precision and accuracy, we failed to identify articles that showed improvement in the patient outcome. Limitations were reported related to generalizability, complexity of models, and technical knowledge. Conclusions: This review shows that machine-learning approaches can improve prediction of clinical deterioration compared with traditional methods. However, these techniques will require further external validation before widespread clinical acceptance can be achieved.

  2. Addressing criticisms of existing predictive bias research: cognitive ability test scores still overpredict African Americans' job performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Christopher M; Zhao, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Predictive bias studies have generally suggested that cognitive ability test scores overpredict job performance of African Americans, meaning these tests are not predictively biased against African Americans. However, at least 2 issues call into question existing over-/underprediction evidence: (a) a bias identified by Aguinis, Culpepper, and Pierce (2010) in the intercept test typically used to assess over-/underprediction and (b) a focus on the level of observed validity instead of operational validity. The present study developed and utilized a method of assessing over-/underprediction that draws on the math of subgroup regression intercept differences, does not rely on the biased intercept test, allows for analysis at the level of operational validity, and can use meta-analytic estimates as input values. Therefore, existing meta-analytic estimates of key parameters, corrected for relevant statistical artifacts, were used to determine whether African American job performance remains overpredicted at the level of operational validity. African American job performance was typically overpredicted by cognitive ability tests across levels of job complexity and across conditions wherein African American and White regression slopes did and did not differ. Because the present study does not rely on the biased intercept test and because appropriate statistical artifact corrections were carried out, the present study's results are not affected by the 2 issues mentioned above. The present study represents strong evidence that cognitive ability tests generally overpredict job performance of African Americans. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  3. Predictions of Critical Heat Flux Using the ASSERT-PV Subchannel Code for a CANFLEX Variant Bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onder, Ebru Nihan; Leung, Laurence; Kim, Hung; Rao, Yanfei

    2009-01-01

    The ASSERT-PV subchannel code developed by AECL has been applied as a design-assist tool to the advanced CANDU 1 reactor fuel bundle. Based primarily on the CANFLEX 2 fuel bundle, several geometry changes (such as element sizes and pitchcircle diameters of various element rings) were examined to optimize the dryout power and pressure-drop performances of the new fuel bundle. An experiment was performed to obtain dryout power measurements for verification of the ASSERT-PV code predictions. It was carried out using an electrically heated, Refrigerant-134a cooled, fuel bundle string simulator. The axial power profile of the simulator was uniform, while the radial power profile of the element rings was varied simulating profiles in bundles with various fuel compositions and burn-ups. Dryout power measurements are predicted closely using the ASSERT-PV code, particularly at low flows and low pressures, but are overpredicted at high flows and high pressures. The majority of data shows that dryout powers are underpredicted at low inlet-fluid temperatures but overpredicted at high inlet-fluid temperatures

  4. An application of liquid sublayer dryout mechanism to the prediction of critical heat flux under low pressure and low velocity conditions in round tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kwang-Won; Yang, Jae-Young; Baik, Se-Jin

    1997-01-01

    Based on several experimental evidences for nucleate boiling in annular film and the existence of residual liquid film flow rate at the critical heat flux (CHF) location, the liquid sublayer dryout (LSD) mechanism under annular film is firstly introduced to evaluate the CHF data at low pressure and low velocity (LPLV) conditions, which would not be predicted by a normal annular film dryout (AFD) model. In this study, the CHF occurrence due to annular film separation or breaking down is phenomenologically modelled by applying the LSD mechanism to this situation. In this LSD mechanism, the liquid sublayer thickness, the incoming liquid velocity to the liquid sublayer, and the axial distance from the onset of annular flow to the CHF location are used as the phenomena-controlling parameters. From the model validation on the 1406 CHF data points ranging over P = 0.1 - 2 MPa, G = 4 - 499 kg/m 2 s, L/D = 4 - 402, most of CHF data (more than 1000 points) are predicted within ±30% error bounds by the LSD mechanism. However, some calculation results that critical qualities are less than 0.4 are considerably overestimated by this mechanism. These overpredictions seem to be caused by inadequate CHF mechanism classification criteria and an insufficient consideration of the flow instability effect on CHF. Further studies for a new classification criterion screening the CHF data affected by flow instabilities and a new bubble detachment model for LPLV conditions are needed to improve the model accuracy. (author)

  5. Predicting risk of unplanned hospital readmission in survivors of critical illness: a population-level cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lone, Nazir I; Lee, Robert; Salisbury, Lisa; Donaghy, Eddie; Ramsay, Pamela; Rattray, Janice; Walsh, Timothy S

    2018-04-05

    Intensive care unit (ICU) survivors experience high levels of morbidity after hospital discharge and are at high risk of unplanned hospital readmission. Identifying those at highest risk before hospital discharge may allow targeting of novel risk reduction strategies. We aimed to identify risk factors for unplanned 90-day readmission, develop a risk prediction model and assess its performance to screen for ICU survivors at highest readmission risk. Population cohort study linking registry data for patients discharged from general ICUs in Scotland (2005-2013). Independent risk factors for 90-day readmission and discriminant ability (c-index) of groups of variables were identified using multivariable logistic regression. Derivation and validation risk prediction models were constructed using a time-based split. Of 55 975 ICU survivors, 24.1% (95%CI 23.7% to 24.4%) had unplanned 90-day readmission. Pre-existing health factors were fair discriminators of readmission (c-index 0.63, 95% CI 0.63 to 0.64) but better than acute illness factors (0.60) or demographics (0.54). In a subgroup of those with no comorbidity, acute illness factors (0.62) were better discriminators than pre-existing health factors (0.56). Overall model performance and calibration in the validation cohort was fair (0.65, 95% CI 0.64 to 0.66) but did not perform sufficiently well as a screening tool, demonstrating high false-positive/false-negative rates at clinically relevant thresholds. Unplanned 90-day hospital readmission is common. Pre-existing illness indices are better predictors of readmission than acute illness factors. Identifying additional patient-centred drivers of readmission may improve risk prediction models. Improved understanding of risk factors that are amenable to intervention could improve the clinical and cost-effectiveness of post-ICU care and rehabilitation. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights

  6. An utilization of liquid sublayer dryout mechanism in predicting critical heat flux under low pressure and low velocity conditions in round tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kwang-Won; Baik, Se-Jin; Ro, Tae-Sun

    2000-01-01

    From a theoretical assessment of extensive critical heat flux (CHF) data under low pressure and low velocity (LPLV) conditions, it was found out that lots of CHF data would not be well predicted by a normal annular film dryout (AFD) mechanism, although their flow patterns were identified as annular-mist flow. To predict these CHF data, a liquid sublayer dryout (LSD) mechanism has been newly utilized in developing the mechanistic CHF model based on each identified CHF mechanism. This mechanism postulates that the CHF occurrence is caused by dryout of the thin liquid sublayer resulting from the annular film separation or breaking down due to nucleate boiling in annular film or hydrodynamic fluctuation. In principle, this mechanism well supports the experimental evidence of residual film flow rate at the CHF location, which can not be explained by the AFD mechanism. For a comparative assessment of each mechanism, the CHF model based on the LSD mechanism is developed together with that based on the AFD mechanism. The validation of these models is performed on the 1406 CHF data points ranging over P=0.1-2 MPa, G=4-499 kg m -2 s -1 , L/D=4-402. This model validation shows that 1055 and 231 CHF data are predicted within ±30 error bound by the LSD mechanism and the AFD mechanism, respectively. However, some CHF data whose critical qualities are <0.4 or whose tube length-to-diameter ratios are <70 are considerably overestimated by the CHF model based on the LSD mechanism. These overestimations seem to be caused by an inadequate CHF mechanism classification and an insufficient consideration of the flow instability effect on CHF. Further studies for a new classification criterion screening the CHF data affected by flow instabilities as well as a new bubble detachment model for LPLV conditions, are needed to improve the model accuracy.

  7. Application of a loading dose of colistin methanesulfonate in critically ill patients: population pharmacokinetics, protein binding, and prediction of bacterial kill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Ami F; Karaiskos, Ilias; Plachouras, Diamantis; Karvanen, Matti; Pontikis, Konstantinos; Jansson, Britt; Papadomichelakis, Evangelos; Antoniadou, Anastasia; Giamarellou, Helen; Armaganidis, Apostolos; Cars, Otto; Friberg, Lena E

    2012-08-01

    A previous pharmacokinetic study on dosing of colistin methanesulfonate (CMS) at 240 mg (3 million units [MU]) every 8 h indicated that colistin has a long half-life, resulting in insufficient concentrations for the first 12 to 48 h after initiation of treatment. A loading dose would therefore be beneficial. The aim of this study was to evaluate CMS and colistin pharmacokinetics following a 480-mg (6-MU) loading dose in critically ill patients and to explore the bacterial kill following the use of different dosing regimens obtained by predictions from a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model developed from an in vitro study on Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The unbound fractions of colistin A and colistin B were determined using equilibrium dialysis and considered in the predictions. Ten critically ill patients (6 males; mean age, 54 years; mean creatinine clearance, 82 ml/min) with infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria were enrolled in the study. The pharmacokinetic data collected after the first and eighth doses were analyzed simultaneously with the data from the previous study (total, 28 patients) in the NONMEM program. For CMS, a two-compartment model best described the pharmacokinetics, and the half-lives of the two phases were estimated to be 0.026 and 2.2 h, respectively. For colistin, a one-compartment model was sufficient and the estimated half-life was 18.5 h. The unbound fractions of colistin in the patients were 26 to 41% at clinical concentrations. Colistin A, but not colistin B, had a concentration-dependent binding. The predictions suggested that the time to 3-log-unit bacterial kill for a 480-mg loading dose was reduced to half of that for the dose of 240 mg.

  8. Assessment of data-assisted prediction by inclusion of crosslinking/mass-spectrometry and small angle X-ray scattering data in the 12th Critical Assessment of protein Structure Prediction experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamò, Giorgio E; Abriata, Luciano A; Fonti, Giulia; Dal Peraro, Matteo

    2018-03-01

    Integrative modeling approaches attempt to combine experiments and computation to derive structure-function relationships in complex molecular assemblies. Despite their importance for the advancement of life sciences, benchmarking of existing methodologies is rather poor. The 12 th round of the Critical Assessment of protein Structure Prediction (CASP) offered a unique niche to benchmark data and methods from two kinds of experiments often used in integrative modeling, namely residue-residue contacts obtained through crosslinking/mass-spectrometry (CLMS), and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments. Upon assessment of the models submitted by predictors for 3 targets assisted by CLMS data and 11 targets by SAXS data, we observed no significant improvement when compared to the best data-blind models, although most predictors did improve relative to their own data-blind predictions. Only for target Tx892 of the CLMS-assisted category and for target Ts947 of the SAXS-assisted category, there was a net, albeit mild, improvement relative to the best data-blind predictions. We discuss here possible reasons for the relatively poor success, which point rather to inconsistencies in the data sources rather than in the methods, to which a few groups were less sensitive. We conclude with suggestions that could improve the potential of data integration in future CASP rounds in terms of experimental data production, methods development, data management and prediction assessment. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. GIS-BASED EVALUATION AND PREDICTION OF ECOLOGICAL SITUATION IN THE COAL MINING AREAS WITH A CRITICAL TECHNOGENIC IMPACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Pyankov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper highlights the features of the creation of the basin GIS, developed to support the environmental monitoring, assessment and forecasting of negative consequences in the areas of technogenic disaster (on the example of abandoned Kizel coal basin, located in Perm Region, Russia. The world experience of applying GIS-technologies for solving environmental problems of coal-mining regions is also being discussed. The information basis and structure of the cartographic and attributive database of the Kizel coal basin GIS are presented. The main tasks of creating the GIS, including inventory of man-made impact sources, identification of the spatio-temporal distribution patterns of pollutants, quantification and mapping of the territory ecological status, forecasting of the environmental situation and planning of environmental measures have been identified. A system of spatial criteria for the integrated assessment of the territory ecological status within coal basins is proposed, which will allow monitoring of environmental changes and identifying areas with the critical environmental situation. These criteria include the pH value and the sulfates concentration in the streams, the complex of heavy metals, the species composition of microorganisms in surface waters, the area of degraded land and dead forest stands. The degree of negative impact of the abandoned coal mines on streams and groundwater is described, and the priority pollutants are identified.The estimates of the extent of contaminated streams, as well as areas of potential contamination of floodplain lands have been obtained using LANDSAT satellite imagery data. The significance of the creation of the algorithms for the integration of heterogeneous spatial information (ground-based and remote sensing observations for compiling synthetic maps that objectively estimate the ecological situation has been noted. 

  10. [Predictive values of different critical scoring systems for mortality in patients with severe acute respiratory failure supported by extracorporeal membrane oxygenation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R; Sun, B; Li, X Y; He, H Y; Tang, X; Zhan, Q Y; Tong, Z H

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the predictive values of different critical scoring systems for mortality in patients with severe acute respiratory failure (ARF) supported by venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV-ECMO). Forty-two patients with severe ARF supported by VV-ECMO were enrolled from November 2009 to July 2015.There were 25 males and 17 females. The mean age was (44±18) years (rang 18-69 years). Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) Ⅱ, Ⅲ, Ⅳ, Simplified Acute Physiology Score Ⅱ (SAPS) Ⅱ, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA), ECMO net, PRedicting dEath for SEvere ARDS on VVECMO (PRESERVE), and Respiratory ECMO Survival Prediction (RESP) scores were collected within 6 hours before VV-ECMO support. The patients were divided into the survivors group (n=17) and the nonsurvivors group (n=25) by survival at 180 d after receiving VV-ECMO. The patient clinical characteristics and aforementioned scoring systems were compared between groups. Scoring systems for predicting prognosis were assessed using the area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to draw the surviving curve, and the survival of the patients was analyzed by the Log-rank test. The risk factors were assessed for prognosis by multiple logistic regression analysis. (1) Positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) 6 hours prior to VV-ECMO support in the survivors group [(9.7±5.0)cmH2O, (1 cmH2O=0.098 kPa)] was lower than that in the nonsurvivors group [(13.2±5.4)cmH2O, t=-2.134, P=0.039]. VV-ECMO combination with continuous renal replacement therapy(CRRT) in the nonsurvivors group (32%) was used more than in the survivors group (6%, χ(2)=4.100, P=0.043). Duration of VV-ECMO support in the nonsurvivors group [(15±13) d] was longer than that in the survivors group [(12±11)d, t=-2.123, P=0.041]. APACHE Ⅱ, APACHE Ⅲ, APACHE Ⅳ, ECMO net, PRESERVE, and RESP scores in the survivors group were superior to the nonsurvivors

  11. A novel modeling to predict the critical current behavior of Nb$_{3}$Sn PIT strand under transverse load based on a scaling law and Finite Element Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Tiening; Takayasu, Makoto; Bordini, Bernardo

    2014-01-01

    Superconducting Nb$_{3}$Sn Powder-In-Tube (PIT) strands could be used for the superconducting magnets of the next generation Large Hadron Collider. The strands are cabled into the typical flat Rutherford cable configuration. During the assembly of a magnet and its operation the strands experience not only longitudinal but also transverse load due to the pre-compression applied during the assembly and the Lorentz load felt when the magnets are energized. To properly design the magnets and guarantee their safe operation, mechanical load effects on the strand superconducting properties are studied extensively; particularly, many scaling laws based on tensile load experiments have been established to predict the critical current dependence on strain. However, the dependence of the superconducting properties on transverse load has not been extensively studied so far. One of the reasons is that transverse loading experiments are difficult to conduct due to the small diameter of the strand (about 1 mm) and the data ...

  12. Numerical prediction of critical heat flux in nuclear fuel rod bundles with advanced three-fluid multidimensional porous media based model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoran Stosic; Vladimir Stevanovic

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The modern design of nuclear fuel rod bundles for Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) is characterised with increased number of rods in the bundle, introduced part-length fuel rods and a water channel positioned along the bundle asymmetrically in regard to the centre of the bundle cross section. Such design causes significant spatial differences of volumetric heat flux, steam void fraction distribution, mass flux rate and other thermal-hydraulic parameters important for efficient cooling of nuclear fuel rods during normal steady-state and transient conditions. The prediction of the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) under these complex thermal-hydraulic conditions is of the prime importance for the safe and economic BWR operation. An efficient numerical method for the CHF prediction is developed based on the porous medium concept and multi-fluid two-phase flow models. Fuel rod bundle is observed as a porous medium with a two-phase flow through it. Coolant flow from the bundle entrance to the exit is characterised with the subsequent change of one-phase and several two-phase flow patterns. One fluid (one-phase) model is used for the prediction of liquid heating up in the bundle entrance region. Two-fluid modelling approach is applied to the bubbly and churn-turbulent vapour and liquid flows. Three-fluid modelling approach is applied to the annular flow pattern: liquid film on the rods wall, steam flow and droplets entrained in the steam stream. Every fluid stream in applied multi-fluid models is described with the mass, momentum and energy balance equations. Closure laws for the prediction of interfacial transfer processes are stated with the special emphasis on the prediction of the steam-water interface drag force, through the interface drag coefficient, and droplets entrainment and deposition rates for three-fluid annular flow model. The model implies non-equilibrium thermal and flow conditions. A new mechanistic approach for the CHF prediction

  13. Summary of results for the SNEAK-9 series of critical experiments and conclusions for the accuracy of predicted physics parameters of the SNR-300

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helm, F.

    1978-08-01

    In a series of critical assembles in SNEAK physics parameters of interest for the prototype fast reactor SNR-300 were investigated and compared to the results of calculations. Since a complete mock-up of the SNR-300 was not possible with the material supply available the measurements were performed in three different assemblies, each being adapted to the investigation of a particular set of problems. Work was concentrated on the following quantities: criticality, breeding ratio, Na-void effect, control rod worths and power distribution. The calculation were performed using the diffusion and transport methods available at KFK and as a data basis the KFKINER cross section set. Detailed descriptions of the assemblies, the majority of the results and extensive discussions of the experimental and calculational methods used can be found in separate KFK reports about each assembly which were already published. This report contains a summary of the results for each quantity investigated including a basic account of the methods used, and an evaluation of the significance of these data for the prediction of parameters of the SNR-300. (orig.) 891 RW [de

  14. A new flooding correlation development and its critical heat flux predictions under low air-water flow conditions in Savannah River Site assembly channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.

    1993-01-01

    The upper limit to countercurrent flow, namely, flooding, is important to analyze the reactor coolability during an emergency cooling system (ECS) phase as a result of a large-break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) such as a double-ended guillotine break in the Savannah River Site (SRS) reactor system. During normal operation, the reactor coolant system utilizes downward flow through concentric heated tubes with ribs, which subdivided each annular channel into four subchannels. In this paper, a new flooding correlation has been developed based on the analytical models and literature data for adiabatic, steady-state, one-dimensional, air-water flow to predict flooding phenomenon in the SRS reactor assembly channel, which may have a counter-current air-water flow pattern during the ECS phase. In addition, the correlation was benchmarked against the experimental data conducted under the Oak Ridge National Laboratory multislit channel, which is close to the SRS assembly geometry. Furthermore, the correlation has also been used as a constitutive relationship in a new two-component two-phase thermal-hydraulics code FLOWTRAN-TF, which has been developed for a detailed analysis of SRS reactor assembly behavior during LOCA scenarios. Finally, the flooding correlation was applied to the predictions of critical heat flux, and the results were compared with the data taken by the SRS heat transfer laboratory under a single annular channel with ribs and a multiannular prototypic test rig

  15. Superiority of Transcutaneous Oxygen Tension Measurements in Predicting Limb Salvage After Below-the-Knee Angioplasty: A Prospective Trial in Diabetic Patients With Critical Limb Ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redlich, Ulf; Xiong, Yan Y.; Pech, Maciej; Tautenhahn, Jörg; Halloul, Zuhir; Lobmann, Ralf; Adolf, Daniela; Ricke, Jens; Dudeck, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess postprocedural angiograms, the ankle–brachial index (ABI), and transcutaneous oxygen tension (TcPO 2 ) to predict outcome after infrageniculate angioplasty (PTA) in diabetic patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI) scheduled for amputation. Materials and Methods: PTA was performed in 28 diabetic patients with CLI confined to infrapopliteal vessels. We recorded patency of crural vessels, including the vascular supply of the foot as well as the ABI and TcPO 2 of the foot. Results: Technical success rate was 92.9% (n = 26), and limb-salvage rate at 12 months was 60.7% (n = 17). The number of patent straight vessels above and below the level of the malleoli increased significantly in patients avoiding amputation. Amputation was unnecessary in 88.2% (n = 15) patients when patency of at least one tibial artery was achieved. In 72.7% (n = 8) of patients, patency of the peroneal artery alone was not sufficient for limb salvage. ABI was of no predictive value for limb salvage. TcPO 2 values increased significantly only in patients not requiring amputation (P = 0.015). In patients with only one tibial artery supplying the foot or only a patent peroneal artery in postprocedural angiograms, TcPO 2 was capable of reliably predicting the outcome. Conclusion: Below-the-knee PTA as an isolated part of therapy was effective to prevent major amputation in more than a half of diabetic patients with CLI. TcPO 2 was a valid predictor for limb salvage, even when angiographic outcome criteria failed.

  16. Development and validation of a new scoring system to predict wound healing after endovascular therapy in critical limb ischemia with tissue loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Norihiro; Hirano, Keisuke; Nakano, Masatsugu; Muramatsu, Toshiya; Tsukahara, Reiko; Ito, Yoshiaki; Ishimori, Hiroshi; Yamawaki, Masahiro; Araki, Motoharu; Takimura, Hideyuki; Sakamoto, Yasunari

    2015-02-01

    To develop a scoring system to predict wound healing in critical limb ischemia (CLI) patients treated with endovascular therapy (EVT). Between July 2007 and January 2013, 184 patients (118 men; mean age 73.0 years) with CLI (217 limbs) and tissue loss underwent EVT. From this cohort 236 separate wounds were divided into development (n = 118) and validation (n = 118) groups. Predictors of wound healing were identified using multivariable analysis. Each predictor was assigned a score based on its regression coefficient, and total scores were calculated, ranging from 0 to 1 for low risk up to ≥ 4 for high risk of a nonhealing wound. The performance of the scoring system in the prediction of wound healing was evaluated by calculating the area under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve. By multivariable analysis, a University of Texas grade ≥ 2 (HR 0.524, 95% CI 0.288-0.951, p = 0.034), an infected wound (HR 0.497, 95% CI 0.276-0.894, p = 0.020), dependence on hemodialysis (HR 0.459, 95% CI 0.259-0.814, p = 0.008), no visible blood flow to the wound (HR 0.343, 95% CI 0.146-0.802, p = 0.014), and major tissue loss (HR 0.322, 95% CI 0.165-0.630, p = 0.001) predicted a non-healing wound. The 1-year rates of wound healing in the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups were 94.6%, 67.6%, and 9.1%, respectively, in the development group (p wound healing in CLI patients after endovascular revascularization and is potentially helpful in deciding if additional adjuncts or revascularization should be considered. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Critical combinations of radiation dose and volume predict intelligence quotient and academic achievement scores after craniospinal irradiation in children with medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Thomas E; Schreiber, Jane E; Wu, Shengjie; Lukose, Renin; Xiong, Xiaoping; Gajjar, Amar

    2014-11-01

    To prospectively follow children treated with craniospinal irradiation to determine critical combinations of radiation dose and volume that would predict for cognitive effects. Between 1996 and 2003, 58 patients (median age 8.14 years, range 3.99-20.11 years) with medulloblastoma received risk-adapted craniospinal irradiation followed by dose-intense chemotherapy and were followed longitudinally with multiple cognitive evaluations (through 5 years after treatment) that included intelligence quotient (estimated intelligence quotient, full-scale, verbal, and performance) and academic achievement (math, reading, spelling) tests. Craniospinal irradiation consisted of 23.4 Gy for average-risk patients (nonmetastatic) and 36-39.6 Gy for high-risk patients (metastatic or residual disease >1.5 cm(2)). The primary site was treated using conformal or intensity modulated radiation therapy using a 2-cm clinical target volume margin. The effect of clinical variables and radiation dose to different brain volumes were modeled to estimate cognitive scores after treatment. A decline with time for all test scores was observed for the entire cohort. Sex, race, and cerebrospinal fluid shunt status had a significant impact on baseline scores. Age and mean radiation dose to specific brain volumes, including the temporal lobes and hippocampi, had a significant impact on longitudinal scores. Dichotomized dose distributions at 25 Gy, 35 Gy, 45 Gy, and 55 Gy were modeled to show the impact of the high-dose volume on longitudinal test scores. The 50% risk of a below-normal cognitive test score was calculated according to mean dose and dose intervals between 25 Gy and 55 Gy at 10-Gy increments according to brain volume and age. The ability to predict cognitive outcomes in children with medulloblastoma using dose-effects models for different brain subvolumes will improve treatment planning, guide intervention, and help estimate the value of newer methods of irradiation. Copyright © 2014

  18. Critical point predication device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Kazuhiko; Kariyama, Koji.

    1996-01-01

    An operation for predicting a critical point by using a existent reverse multiplication method has been complicated, and an effective multiplication factor could not be plotted directly to degrade the accuracy for the prediction. The present invention comprises a detector counting memory section for memorizing the counting sent from a power detector which monitors the reactor power, a reverse multiplication factor calculation section for calculating the reverse multiplication factor based on initial countings and current countings of the power detector, and a critical point prediction section for predicting the criticality by the reverse multiplication method relative to effective multiplication factors corresponding to the state of the reactor core previously determined depending on the cases. In addition, a reactor core characteristic calculation section is added for analyzing an effective multiplication factor depending on the state of the reactor core. Then, if the margin up to the criticality is reduced to lower than a predetermined value during critical operation, an alarm is generated to stop the critical operation when generation of a period of more than a predetermined value predicted by succeeding critical operation. With such procedures, forecasting for the critical point can be easily predicted upon critical operation to greatly mitigate an operator's burden and improve handling for the operation. (N.H.)

  19. CriticalEd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjellberg, Caspar Mølholt; Meredith, David

    2014-01-01

    . Since the comments are not input sequentially, with regard to position, but in arbitrary order, this list must be sorted by copy/pasting the rows into place—an error-prone and time-consuming process. Scholars who produce critical editions typically use off-the-shelf music notation software......The best text method is commonly applied among music scholars engaged in producing critical editions. In this method, a comment list is compiled, consisting of variant readings and editorial emendations. This list is maintained by inserting the comments into a document as the changes are made......, consisting of a Sibelius plug-in, a cross-platform application, called CriticalEd, and a REST-based solution, which handles data storage/retrieval. A prototype has been tested at the Danish Centre for Music Publication, and the results suggest that the system could greatly improve the efficiency...

  20. TU-G-BRA-05: Predicting Volume Change of the Tumor and Critical Structures Throughout Radiation Therapy by CT-CBCT Registration with Local Intensity Correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S; Robinson, A; Kiess, A; Quon, H; Wong, J; Lee, J [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Plishker, W [IGI Technologies Inc., College Park, MD (United States); Shekhar, R [IGI Technologies Inc., College Park, MD (United States); Children’s National Medical Center, Washington, D.C. (United States)

    2015-06-15

    can accurately predict the tumor volume change with reduced errors. Although demonstrated only on HN nodal GTVs, the results imply improved accuracy for other critical structures. This work was supported by NIH/NCI under grant R42CA137886.

  1. Critical Combinations of Radiation Dose and Volume Predict Intelligence Quotient and Academic Achievement Scores After Craniospinal Irradiation in Children With Medulloblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchant, Thomas E., E-mail: thomas.merchant@stjude.org [Division of Radiation Oncology, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Schreiber, Jane E. [Department of Psychology, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Wu, Shengjie [Department of Biostatistcs, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Lukose, Renin [Division of Radiation Oncology, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Xiong, Xiaoping [Department of Biostatistcs, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Gajjar, Amar [Department of Oncology, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To prospectively follow children treated with craniospinal irradiation to determine critical combinations of radiation dose and volume that would predict for cognitive effects. Methods and Materials: Between 1996 and 2003, 58 patients (median age 8.14 years, range 3.99-20.11 years) with medulloblastoma received risk-adapted craniospinal irradiation followed by dose-intense chemotherapy and were followed longitudinally with multiple cognitive evaluations (through 5 years after treatment) that included intelligence quotient (estimated intelligence quotient, full-scale, verbal, and performance) and academic achievement (math, reading, spelling) tests. Craniospinal irradiation consisted of 23.4 Gy for average-risk patients (nonmetastatic) and 36-39.6 Gy for high-risk patients (metastatic or residual disease >1.5 cm{sup 2}). The primary site was treated using conformal or intensity modulated radiation therapy using a 2-cm clinical target volume margin. The effect of clinical variables and radiation dose to different brain volumes were modeled to estimate cognitive scores after treatment. Results: A decline with time for all test scores was observed for the entire cohort. Sex, race, and cerebrospinal fluid shunt status had a significant impact on baseline scores. Age and mean radiation dose to specific brain volumes, including the temporal lobes and hippocampi, had a significant impact on longitudinal scores. Dichotomized dose distributions at 25 Gy, 35 Gy, 45 Gy, and 55 Gy were modeled to show the impact of the high-dose volume on longitudinal test scores. The 50% risk of a below-normal cognitive test score was calculated according to mean dose and dose intervals between 25 Gy and 55 Gy at 10-Gy increments according to brain volume and age. Conclusions: The ability to predict cognitive outcomes in children with medulloblastoma using dose-effects models for different brain subvolumes will improve treatment planning, guide intervention, and help

  2. Critical Combinations of Radiation Dose and Volume Predict Intelligence Quotient and Academic Achievement Scores After Craniospinal Irradiation in Children With Medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchant, Thomas E.; Schreiber, Jane E.; Wu, Shengjie; Lukose, Renin; Xiong, Xiaoping; Gajjar, Amar

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively follow children treated with craniospinal irradiation to determine critical combinations of radiation dose and volume that would predict for cognitive effects. Methods and Materials: Between 1996 and 2003, 58 patients (median age 8.14 years, range 3.99-20.11 years) with medulloblastoma received risk-adapted craniospinal irradiation followed by dose-intense chemotherapy and were followed longitudinally with multiple cognitive evaluations (through 5 years after treatment) that included intelligence quotient (estimated intelligence quotient, full-scale, verbal, and performance) and academic achievement (math, reading, spelling) tests. Craniospinal irradiation consisted of 23.4 Gy for average-risk patients (nonmetastatic) and 36-39.6 Gy for high-risk patients (metastatic or residual disease >1.5 cm 2 ). The primary site was treated using conformal or intensity modulated radiation therapy using a 2-cm clinical target volume margin. The effect of clinical variables and radiation dose to different brain volumes were modeled to estimate cognitive scores after treatment. Results: A decline with time for all test scores was observed for the entire cohort. Sex, race, and cerebrospinal fluid shunt status had a significant impact on baseline scores. Age and mean radiation dose to specific brain volumes, including the temporal lobes and hippocampi, had a significant impact on longitudinal scores. Dichotomized dose distributions at 25 Gy, 35 Gy, 45 Gy, and 55 Gy were modeled to show the impact of the high-dose volume on longitudinal test scores. The 50% risk of a below-normal cognitive test score was calculated according to mean dose and dose intervals between 25 Gy and 55 Gy at 10-Gy increments according to brain volume and age. Conclusions: The ability to predict cognitive outcomes in children with medulloblastoma using dose-effects models for different brain subvolumes will improve treatment planning, guide intervention, and help estimate

  3. Thinking Critically about Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulnix, Jennifer Wilson

    2012-01-01

    As a philosophy professor, one of my central goals is to teach students to think critically. However, one difficulty with determining whether critical thinking can be taught, or even measured, is that there is widespread disagreement over what critical thinking actually is. Here, I reflect on several conceptions of critical thinking, subjecting…

  4. Predicting Parental Mediation Behaviors: The Direct and Indirect Influence of Parents' Critical Thinking about Media and Attitudes about Parent-Child Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Eric C.; White, Shawna R.; King, Andy J.; Holiday, Steven; Densley, Rebecca L.

    2016-01-01

    Many parents fail to interact with their children regularly about media content and past research has identified few predictors of parents' engagement in parental mediation behaviors. This correlational study explored the relationship between parents' critical thinking about media and parents' provision of both active and restrictive mediation of…

  5. Critical Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critical care helps people with life-threatening injuries and illnesses. It might treat problems such as complications from surgery, ... attention by a team of specially-trained health care providers. Critical care usually takes place in an ...

  6. Simple approach to approximate predictions of the vapor–liquid equilibrium curve near the critical point and its application to Lennard-Jones fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staśkiewicz, B.; Okrasiński, W.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a simple analytical form of the vapor–liquid equilibrium curve near the critical point for Lennard-Jones fluids. Coexistence densities curves and vapor pressure have been determined using the Van der Waals and Dieterici equation of state. In described method the Bernoulli differential equations, critical exponent theory and some type of Maxwell's criterion have been used. Presented approach has not yet been used to determine analytical form of phase curves as done in this Letter. Lennard-Jones fluids have been considered for analysis. Comparison with experimental data is done. The accuracy of the method is described. -- Highlights: ► We propose a new analytical way to determine the VLE curve. ► Simple, mathematically straightforward form of phase curves is presented. ► Comparison with experimental data is discussed. ► The accuracy of the method has been confirmed.

  7. FORMULASI TEPUNG PENYALUT BERBASIS TEPUNG JAGUNG DAN PENENTUAN UMUR SIMPANNYA DENGAN PENDEKATAN KADAR AIR KRITIS [Formulation of Corn Flour-Based Batter and Prediction of Its Shelf Life using Critical Moisture Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugiyono1*

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to obtain the best formula for corn flour-based batter and to predict its shelf life using critical moisture approach. According to a hedonic test, the best batter formula was composed of 60% corn flour, 12.5% rice flour, 12.5% tapioca starch, and 15% glutinous rice flour. Addition of glutinous rice flour in the formula changed the proportion of amylose and amylopectin in the batter. As a result, the retrogradation of the batter decreased and the texture of its fried product was preferred. A critical moisture approach was used to predict the shelf life of the batter. The critical moisture content of the batter was 0.16 g H2O/g solid.The isotherm sorption phenomenon of the batter was best described using Hasley model. The shelf life of the product was 7 months when packaged in polypropylene (0,07 g/m2day.mmHg at 85% RH.

  8. How Critical Is Critical Thinking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Ryan D.

    2014-01-01

    Recent educational discourse is full of references to the value of critical thinking as a 21st-century skill. In music education, critical thinking has been discussed in relation to problem solving and music listening, and some researchers suggest that training in critical thinking can improve students' responses to music. But what exactly is…

  9. Prediction of the critical point and the dew- and bubble-point curves fo natural gases. Tennen gas no rinkaiten oyobi roten futten kyokusen no suisan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, T. (Hitachi, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)); Arai, D.; Uematsu, M. (Keio University, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Science and Technology)

    1993-02-25

    Related to the natural gas transport by pipeline, etc., the critical point, dew point and bubble point of natural gas were presumed by calculation through equation of state for determining the exact thermophysical values. The natural gas is multi-component mixed fluid which is represented by methane as a representative component. It considerably differs in composition by its place of origin. Because the conventional method was complicated in process for thermodynamically determining the most stable composition of phases, algorithm of phasic equilibrium was applied by the equation of state which used the discrimination method by Nitta, et al. for the therodynamic stability of phases. The method by Michelsen was applied to the flash calculation, and figuration of both dew point and bubble point curves, while that by Heidemann, et al. was done to the critical point calculation. Peng-Robinson's was applied to an equation of state. To start the calculation, the constant of seven two-component systems the main component of which was methane was determined as a function of temperature based on the actually measured gas/liquid equilibrium value. Then, possibility of calculatively presuming the thermophysical values was shown through comparison of the actually measured values with those obtained by applying the present method to the above systems. Finally, the presumption was made for the natural gas which differed in place of origin. 17 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Critical Jostling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pippin Barr

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Games can serve a critical function in many different ways, from serious games about real world subjects to self-reflexive commentaries on the nature of games themselves. In this essay we discuss critical possibilities stemming from the area of critical design, and more specifically Carl DiSalvo’s adversarial design and its concept of reconfiguring the remainder. To illustrate such an approach, we present the design and outcomes of two games, Jostle Bastard and Jostle Parent. We show how the games specifically engage with two previous games, Hotline Miami and Octodad: Dadliest Catch, reconfiguring elements of those games to create interactive critical experiences and extensions of the source material. Through the presentation of specific design concerns and decisions, we provide a grounded illustration of a particular critical function of videogames and hope to highlight this form as another valuable approach in the larger area of videogame criticism.

  11. Critical Proximity

    OpenAIRE

    Simon, Jane

    2010-01-01

    This essay considers how written language frames visual objects. Drawing on Michel Foucault’s response to Raymond Roussel’s obsessive description, the essay proposes a model of criticism where description might press up against its objects. This critical closeness is then mapped across the conceptual art practice and art criticism of Ian Burn. Burn attends to the differences between seeing and reading, and considers the conditions which frame how we look at images, including how w...

  12. Criticality Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsaed, A.

    2004-01-01

    The ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003) presents the methodology for evaluating potential criticality situations in the monitored geologic repository. As stated in the referenced Topical Report, the detailed methodology for performing the disposal criticality analyses will be documented in model reports. Many of the models developed in support of the Topical Report differ from the definition of models as given in the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management procedure AP-SIII.10Q, ''Models'', in that they are procedural, rather than mathematical. These model reports document the detailed methodology necessary to implement the approach presented in the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report and provide calculations utilizing the methodology. Thus, the governing procedure for this type of report is AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses''. The ''Criticality Model'' is of this latter type, providing a process evaluating the criticality potential of in-package and external configurations. The purpose of this analysis is to layout the process for calculating the criticality potential for various in-package and external configurations and to calculate lower-bound tolerance limit (LBTL) values and determine range of applicability (ROA) parameters. The LBTL calculations and the ROA determinations are performed using selected benchmark experiments that are applicable to various waste forms and various in-package and external configurations. The waste forms considered in this calculation are pressurized water reactor (PWR), boiling water reactor (BWR), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Training Research Isotope General Atomic (TRIGA), Enrico Fermi, Shippingport pressurized water reactor, Shippingport light water breeder reactor (LWBR), N-Reactor, Melt and Dilute, and Fort Saint Vrain Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The scope of this analysis is to document the criticality computational method. The criticality

  13. Critical Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Olsen, Stig Irving

    2018-01-01

    Manipulation and mistakes in LCA studies are as old as the tool itself, and so is its critical review. Besides preventing misuse and unsupported claims, critical review may also help identifying mistakes and more justifiable assumptions as well as generally improve the quality of a study. It thus...... supports the robustness of an LCA and increases trust in its results and conclusions. The focus of this chapter is on understanding what a critical review is, how the international standards define it, what its main elements are, and what reviewer qualifications are required. It is not the objective...... of this chapter to learn how to conduct a critical review, neither from a reviewer nor from a practitioner perspective. The foundation of this chapter and the basis for any critical review of LCA studies are the International Standards ISO 14040:2006, ISO 14044:2006 and ISO TS 14071:2014....

  14. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin is a better biomarker than cystatin C for the prediction of imminent acute kidney injury in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yegenaga, Itir; Kamis, Fatih; Baydemir, Canan; Erdem, Elizade; Celebi, Koray; Eren, Necmi; Baykara, Nur

    2018-03-01

    Aims The prevention of acute kidney injury can be lifesaving for the intensive care unit patients. However, conventional methods are not sufficient for the prediction of the risk of future acute kidney injury. In this study, the promising biomarker, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, was compared with cystatin C as an indicator for the risk of future acute kidney injury. Methods One hundred and eighty-three adult patients without chronic kidney disease or renal replacement therapy were included in this study. The plasma and urine concentrations of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and cystatin C were assessed on the second day after intensive care unit admission and were followed for seven days to monitor the development of acute kidney injury. Acute kidney injury diagnosis was based on the risk, injury, failure, loss, end-stage renal failure criteria. Results Thirty-four per cent of the patients had acute kidney injury; 17 patients who did not fulfil criteria at the beginning, developed acute kidney injury from days 3 to 7 after admission. The mean serum creatinine on admission did not significantly differ between this and control groups (0.72 ± 0.20 and 0.83 ± 0.21; P = 0.060); however, the serum and urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin concentrations on the second day were significantly different (median: 75.69 [54.18-91.18] and 123.68 [90.89-166.31], P = 0.001; and median: 17.60 [8.56-34.04] and 61.37 [24.59-96.63], P = 0.001). Notably, the 48-h serum cystatin C concentration did not differ. Conclusion Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin concentrations in the urine and serum on the second day of intensive care unit admission could be used to predict the development of acute kidney injury in the following three to seven days in the intensive care unit; however, the cystatin C concentration did not have predictive value.

  15. Experimental validation of the predicted binding site of Escherichia coli K1 outer membrane protein A to human brain microvascular endothelial cells: identification of critical mutations that prevent E. coli meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, Tod A; Abrol, Ravinder; Mittal, Rahul; Wang, Ying; Prasadarao, Nemani V; Goddard, William A

    2010-11-26

    Escherichia coli K1, the most common cause of meningitis in neonates, has been shown to interact with GlcNAc1-4GlcNAc epitopes of Ecgp96 on human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) via OmpA (outer membrane protein A). However, the precise domains of extracellular loops of OmpA interacting with the chitobiose epitopes have not been elucidated. We report the loop-barrel model of these OmpA interactions with the carbohydrate moieties of Ecgp96 predicted from molecular modeling. To test this model experimentally, we generated E. coli K1 strains expressing OmpA with mutations of residues predicted to be critical for interaction with the HBMEC and tested E. coli invasion efficiency. For these same mutations, we predicted the interaction free energies (including explicit calculation of the entropy) from molecular dynamics (MD), finding excellent correlation (R(2) = 90%) with experimental invasion efficiency. Particularly important is that mutating specific residues in loops 1, 2, and 4 to alanines resulted in significant inhibition of E. coli K1 invasion in HBMECs, which is consistent with the complete lack of binding found in the MD simulations for these two cases. These studies suggest that inhibition of the interactions of these residues of Loop 1, 2, and 4 with Ecgp96 could provide a therapeutic strategy to prevent neonatal meningitis due to E. coli K1.

  16. Blind testing cross-linking/mass spectrometry under the auspices of the 11th critical assessment of methods of protein structure prediction (CASP11 [version 1; referees: 1 approved, 2 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Belsom

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Determining the structure of a protein by any method requires various contributions from experimental and computational sides. In a recent study, high-density cross-linking/mass spectrometry (HD-CLMS data in combination with ab initio structure prediction determined the structure of human serum albumin (HSA domains, with an RMSD to X-ray structure of up to 2.5 Å, or 3.4 Å in the context of blood serum. This paper reports the blind test on the readiness of this technology through the help of Critical Assessment of protein Structure Prediction (CASP. We identified between 201-381 unique residue pairs at an estimated 5% FDR (at link level albeit with missing site assignment precision evaluation, for four target proteins. HD-CLMS proved reliable once crystal structures were released. However, improvements in structure prediction using cross-link data were slight. We identified two reasons for this. Spread of cross-links along the protein sequence and the tightness of the spatial constraints must be improved. However, for the selected targets even ideal contact data derived from crystal structures did not allow modellers to arrive at the observed structure. Consequently, the progress of HD-CLMS in conjunction with computational modeling methods as a structure determination method, depends on advances on both arms of this hybrid approach.

  17. Critical Arts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    both formal and informal) in culture and social theory. CRITICAL ARTS aims to challenge and ... Book Review: Brian McNair, An Introduction to Political Communication (3rd edition), London: Routledge, 2003, ISBN 0415307082, 272pp. Phil Joffe ...

  18. Critical Proximity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Simon

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This essay considers how written language frames visual objects. Drawing on Michel Foucault’s response to Raymond Roussel’s obsessive description, the essay proposes a model of criticism where description might press up against its objects. This critical closeness is then mapped across the conceptual art practice and art criticism of Ian Burn. Burn attends to the differences between seeing and reading, and considers the conditions which frame how we look at images, including how we look at, and through words. The essay goes on to consider Meaghan Morris’s writing on Lynn Silverman’s photographs. Both Morris and Burn offer an alternative to a parasitic model of criticism and enact a patient way of looking across and through visual landscapes.

  19. Critical proximity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay considers how written language frames visual objects. Drawing on Michel Foucault’s response to Raymond Roussel’s obsessive description, the essay proposes a model of criticism where description might press up against its objects. This critical closeness is then mapped across the conceptual art practice and art criticism of Ian Burn. Burn attends to the differences between seeing and reading, and considers the conditions which frame how we look at images, including how we look at, and through words. The essay goes on to consider Meaghan Morris’s writing on Lynn Silverman’s photographs. Both Morris and Burn offer an alternative to a parasitic model of criticism and enact a patient way of looking across and through visual landscapes.

  20. Criticality safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, G.

    1983-01-01

    When a sufficient quantity of fissile material is brought together a self-sustaining neutron chain reaction will be started in it and will continue until some change occurs in the fissile material to stop the chain reaction. The quantity of fissile material required is the 'Critical Mass'. This is not a fixed quantity even for a given type of fissile material but varies between quite wide limits depending on a number of factors. In a nuclear reactor the critical mass of fissile material is assembled under well-defined condition to produce a controllable chain reaction. The same materials have to be handled outside the reactor in all stages of fuel element manufacture, storage, transport and irradiated fuel reprocessing. At any stage it is possible (at least in principle) to assemble a critical mass and thus initiate an accidental and uncontrollable chain reaction. Avoiding this is what criticality safety is all about. A system is just critical when the rate of production of neutrons balances the rate of loss either by escape or by absorption. The factors affecting criticality are, therefore, those which effect neutron production and loss. The principal ones are:- type of nuclide and enrichment (or isotopic composition), moderation, reflection, concentration (density), shape and interaction. Each factor is considered in detail. (author)

  1. The Use of OXYGEN-18 in the Development of Methods for Controlled Sputter Deposition of High Critical Transition Temperature Material Thin Films of Predicted Composition and Good Uniformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidrow, Steven Clay

    Two primary concerns, in the sputter deposition of high T_{c} material films, are the prevention of oxygen deficiency in the films and the elimination of the negative ion effect. "Oxygen deficiency" occurs when the amount of oxygen incorporated into the film is less than the amount of oxygen required to form the superconducting material lattice. Oxygen deficiency is due to the volatile nature of oxygen. The negative ion effect occurs when an atom or molecule (typically oxygen) gains an extra electron, is accelerated away from the target and impinges upon a film being grown directly in front of the sputtering target. The impinging particle has enough energy to cause resputtering of the deposited film. The presence of Sr and to a greater extent Ba, may enhance the negative ion effect in these materials. However, it is oxygen which readily forms negative ions that is primarily responsible for the negative ion effect. Thus, oxygen must be given special attention in the sputter deposition of high T_{c} material films. A specially designed sputtering system is used to demonstrate that the negative ion effect can be reduced such that large uniform high T_{c} material films possessing predicted and repeated composition can be grown in an on-axis arrangement. Utilizing this same sputtering system and the volatile nature of oxygen, it is demonstrated that oxygen processes occurring in the chamber during growth of high T_ {c} material films can be investigated using the tracer ^{18}O. In particular, it is shown that ^{18}O can be utilized as a tool for (1) investigating the negative ion effect, (2) investigating oxygen incorporation into high T_{c} material films, (3) investigating oxygen incorporation into the target, (4) tailoring films for oxygen migration and interface investigations and (5) tailoring films for the other specific oxygen investigations. Such sputtering systems that utilize the tracer ^{18}O are necessary for systematic growth of high T_ {c} material films

  2. Critical Vidders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svegaard, Robin Sebastian Kaszmarczyk

    2015-01-01

    This article will introduce and take a look at a specific subset of the fan created remix videos known as vids, namely those that deal with feminist based critique of media. Through examples, it will show how fans construct and present their critique, and finally broach the topic of the critical ...

  3. Improving the Resilience of Major Ports and Critical Supply Chains to Extreme Coastal Flooding: a Combined Artificial Neural Network and Hydrodynamic Simulation Approach to Predicting Tidal Surge Inundation of Port Infrastructure and Impact on Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, J.

    2015-12-01

    Ports are vital to the global economy, but assessments of global exposure to flood risk have generally focused on major concentrations of population or asset values. Few studies have examined the impact of extreme inundation events on port operation and critical supply chains. Extreme water levels and recurrence intervals have conventionally been estimated via analysis of historic water level maxima, and these vary widely depending on the statistical assumptions made. This information is supplemented by near-term forecasts from operational surge-tide models, which give continuous water levels but at considerable computational cost. As part of a NERC Infrastructure and Risk project, we have investigated the impact of North Sea tidal surges on the Port of Immingham, eastern, UK. This handles the largest volume of bulk cargo in the UK and flows of coal and biomass that are critically important for national energy security. The port was partly flooded during a major tidal surge in 2013. This event highlighted the need for improved local forecasts of surge timing in relation to high water, with a better indication of flood depth and duration. We address this problem using a combination of data-driven and numerical hydrodynamic models. An Artificial Neural Network (ANN) is first used to predict the surge component of water level from meteorological data. The input vector comprises time-series of local wind (easterly and northerly wind stress) and pressure, as well as regional pressure and pressure gradients from stations between the Shetland Islands and the Humber estuary. The ANN achieves rms errors of around 0.1 m and can generate short-range (~ 3 to 12 hour) forecasts given real-time input data feeds. It can also synthesize water level events for a wider range of tidal and meteorological forcing combinations than contained in the observational records. These are used to force Telemac2D numerical floodplain simulations using a LiDAR digital elevation model of the port

  4. Critical reading and critical thinking Critical reading and critical thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loni Kreis Taglieber

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to provide, for L1 and L2 reading and writing teachers, a brief overview of the literature about critical reading and higher level thinking skills. The teaching of these skills is still neglected in some language classes in Brazil, be it in L1 or in L2 classes. Thus, this paper may also serve as a resource guide for L1 and/or L2 reading and writing teachers who want to incorporate critical reading and thinking into their classes. In modern society, even in everyday life people frequently need to deal with complicated public and political issues, make decisions, and solve problems. In order to do this efficiently and effectively, citizens must be able to evaluate critically what they see, hear, and read. Also, with the huge amount of printed material available in all areas in this age of “information explosion” it is easy to feel overwhelmed. But often the information piled up on people’s desks and in their minds is of no use due to the enormous amount of it. The purpose of this paper is to provide, for L1 and L2 reading and writing teachers, a brief overview of the literature about critical reading and higher level thinking skills. The teaching of these skills is still neglected in some language classes in Brazil, be it in L1 or in L2 classes. Thus, this paper may also serve as a resource guide for L1 and/or L2 reading and writing teachers who want to incorporate critical reading and thinking into their classes. In modern society, even in everyday life people frequently need to deal with complicated public and political issues, make decisions, and solve problems. In order to do this efficiently and effectively, citizens must be able to evaluate critically what they see, hear, and read. Also, with the huge amount of printed material available in all areas in this age of “information explosion” it is easy to feel overwhelmed. But often the information piled up on people’s desks and in their minds is of

  5. Criticality accident:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canavese, Susana I.

    2000-01-01

    A criticality accident occurred at 10:35 on September 30, 1999. It occurred in a precipitation tank in a Conversion Test Building at the JCO Tokai Works site in Tokaimura (Tokai Village) in the Ibaraki Prefecture of Japan. STA provisionally rated this accident a 4 on the seven-level, logarithmic International Nuclear Event Scale (INES). The September 30, 1999 criticality accident at the JCO Tokai Works Site in Tokaimura, Japan in described in preliminary, technical detail. Information is based on preliminary presentations to technical groups by Japanese scientists and spokespersons, translations by technical and non-technical persons of technical web postings by various nuclear authorities, and English-language non-technical reports from various news media and nuclear-interest groups. (author)

  6. Critical dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dekker, H.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown how to solve the master equation for a Markov process including a critical point by means of successive approximations in terms of a small parameter. A critical point occurs if, by adjusting an externally controlled quantity, the system shows a transition from normal monostable to bistable behaviour. The fundamental idea of the theory is to separate the master equation into its proper irreducible part and a corrective remainder. The irreducible or zeroth order stochastic approximation will be a relatively simple Fokker-Planck equation that contains the essential features of the process. Once the solution of this irreducible equation is known, the higher order corrections in the original master equation can be incorporated in a systematic manner. (Auth.)

  7. Critical scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stirling, W.G.; Perry, S.C.

    1996-01-01

    We outline the theoretical and experimental background to neutron scattering studies of critical phenomena at magnetic and structural phase transitions. The displacive phase transition of SrTiO 3 is discussed, along with examples from recent work on magnetic materials from the rare-earth (Ho, Dy) and actinide (NpAs, NpSb, USb) classes. The impact of synchrotron X-ray scattering is discussed in conclusion. (author) 13 figs., 18 refs

  8. Critical Mass

    CERN Multimedia

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2070299

    2017-01-01

    Critical Mass is a cycling event typically held on the last Friday of every month; its purpose is not usually formalized beyond the direct action of meeting at a set location and time and traveling as a group through city or town streets on bikes. The event originated in 1992 in San Francisco; by the end of 2003, the event was being held in over 300 cities around the world. At CERN it is held once a year in conjunction with the national Swiss campaing "Bike to work".

  9. Critical force during tethered swimming for the evaluation of aerobic capacity and prediction of performances in freestyle swimming DOI:10.5007/1980-0037.2010v12n1p14

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Papoti

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the relationship of critical force (Fcrit with lactate threshold (LLNA and the intensity corresponding to VO2max (iVO2max in tethered swimming (TS, and their correlation with maximal performance in 400-m (V400 and 30-min (VT30 freestyle swimming (FS. Seven swimmers were submitted to a TS incremental test for the determination of LLNA and iVO2max. For the determination of Fcrit, the swimmers performed four exercises to exhaustion at intensities (F corresponding to 87%, 104%, 118% and 134% of iVO2max for the calculation of time limits (Tlim. Fcrit corresponded to the linear coefficient of the ratio between F and 1/tlim. The maximal performance in FS corresponded to the mean velocity obtained during maximal exercise of 400-m and 30-min crawl swimming. Fcrit (51.97 ± 4.02 N was significantly lower than iVO2max (60.21 ± 8.73 N but not than LLNA (45.89 ± 8.73. Fcrit was significantly correlated with iVO2max (0.97, LLNA (0.88, V400 (0.85, and VT30 (0.86. These data suggest that Fcrit can be used for the determination of aerobic capacity, prescription of a TS training program, and prediction of performance in FS.

  10. Dictionary criticism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sandro

    2018-01-01

    Dictionary criticism is part of the lexicographical universe and reviewing of electronic and printed dictionaries is not an exercise in linguistics or in subject fields but an exercise in lexicography. It does not follow from this that dictionary reviews should not be based on a linguistic approach......, but that the linguistic approach is only one of several approaches to dictionary reviewing. Similarly, the linguistic and factual competences of reviewers should not be relegated to an insignificant position in the review process. Moreover, reviewers should define the object of their reviews, the dictionary, as a complex...... information tool with several components and in terms of significant lexicographical features: lexicographical functions, data and structures. This emphasises the fact that dictionaries are much more than mere vessels of linguistic categories, namely lexicographical tools that have been developed to fulfil...

  11. More practical critical height sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas B. Lynch; Jeffrey H. Gove

    2015-01-01

    Critical Height Sampling (CHS) (Kitamura 1964) can be used to predict cubic volumes per acre without using volume tables or equations. The critical height is defined as the height at which the tree stem appears to be in borderline condition using the point-sampling angle gauge (e.g. prism). An estimate of cubic volume per acre can be obtained from multiplication of the...

  12. Quantum Criticality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, P. D.; Chaturvedi, S.; Dechoum, K.; Comey, J.

    2001-02-01

    We investigate the theory of quantum fluctuations in non-equilibrium systems having large crit­ical fluctuations. This allows us to treat the limits imposed by nonlinearities to quantum squeezing and noise reduction, and also to envisage future tests of quantum theory in regions of macroscopic quantum fluctuations. A long-term objective of this research is to identify suitable physical sys­tems in which macroscopic 'Schrödinger cat'-like behaviour may be observed. We investigate two systems in particular of much current experimental interest, namely the degenerate parametric oscillator near threshold, and the evaporatively cooled (BEC). We compare the results obtained in the positive-P representation, as a fully quantum mechanical calculation, with the truncated Wigner phase space equation, also known as semi-classical theory. We show when these results agree and differ in calculations taken beyond the linearized approximation. In the region where the largest quantum fluctuations and Schrödinger cat-like behaviour might be expected, we find that the quantum predictions correspond very closely to the semi-classical theory. Nature abhors observing a Schrödinger cat. -Pacs: 03.65.Bz

  13. Strain dependence of the critical current and critical field in multifilamentary Nb3Sn composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekin, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    High-J/sub c/ multifilamentary Nb 3 Sn superconductors with widely varying amounts of prestrain and critical field values can be characterized fairly accurately by a single normalized critical field-strain relationship. Such a relationship permits first order prediction of critical-current degradation at arbitrary magnetic field magnitudes with knowledge of only two parameters for any conductor, the prestrain and the maximum critical field. Some of the conductor-fabrication factors affecting the parameters are considered

  14. Critical flux determination by flux-stepping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Søren; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    2010-01-01

    In membrane filtration related scientific literature, often step-by-step determined critical fluxes are reported. Using a dynamic microfiltration device, it is shown that critical fluxes determined from two different flux-stepping methods are dependent upon operational parameters such as step...... length, step height, and.flux start level. Filtrating 8 kg/m(3) yeast cell suspensions by a vibrating 0.45 x 10(-6) m pore size microfiltration hollow fiber module, critical fluxes from 5.6 x 10(-6) to 1.2 x 10(-5) m/s have been measured using various step lengths from 300 to 1200 seconds. Thus......, such values are more or less useless in itself as critical flux predictors, and constant flux verification experiments have to be conducted to check if the determined critical fluxes call predict sustainable flux regimes. However, it is shown that using the step-by-step predicted critical fluxes as start...

  15. Quantum critical Hall exponents

    CERN Document Server

    Lütken, C A

    2014-01-01

    We investigate a finite size "double scaling" hypothesis using data from an experiment on a quantum Hall system with short range disorder [1-3]. For Hall bars of width w at temperature T the scaling form is w(-mu)T(-kappa), where the critical exponent mu approximate to 0.23 we extract from the data is comparable to the multi-fractal exponent alpha(0) - 2 obtained from the Chalker-Coddington (CC) model [4]. We also use the data to find the approximate location (in the resistivity plane) of seven quantum critical points, all of which closely agree with the predictions derived long ago from the modular symmetry of a toroidal sigma-model with m matter fields [5]. The value nu(8) = 2.60513 ... of the localisation exponent obtained from the m = 8 model is in excellent agreement with the best available numerical value nu(num) = 2.607 +/- 0.004 derived from the CC-model [6]. Existing experimental data appear to favour the m = 9 model, suggesting that the quantum Hall system is not in the same universality class as th...

  16. Toward superconducting critical current by design

    OpenAIRE

    Sadovskyy, I. A.; Jia, Y.; Leroux, M.; Kwon, J.; Hu, H.; Fang, L.; Chaparro, C.; Zhu, S.; Welp, U.; Zuo, J. -M.; Zhang, Y.; Nakasaki, R.; Selvamanickam, V.; Crabtree, G. W.; Koshelev, A. E.

    2015-01-01

    We present the new paradigm of critical current by design. Analogous to materials by design, it aims at predicting the optimal defect landscape in a superconductor for targeted applications by elucidating the vortex dynamics responsible for the bulk critical current. To highlight this approach, we demonstrate the synergistic combination of critical current measurements on commercial high-temperature superconductors containing self-assembled and irradiation tailored correlated defects by using...

  17. Toward Superconducting Critical Current by Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadovskyy, Ivan A; Jia, Ying; Leroux, Maxime; Kwon, Jihwan; Hu, Hefei; Fang, Lei; Chaparro, Carlos; Zhu, Shaofei; Welp, Ulrich; Zuo, Jian-Min; Zhang, Yifei; Nakasaki, Ryusuke; Selvamanickam, Venkat; Crabtree, George W; Koshelev, Alexei E; Glatz, Andreas; Kwok, Wai-Kwong

    2016-06-01

    A new critical-current-by-design paradigm is presented. It aims at predicting the optimal defect landscape in superconductors for targeted applications by elucidating the vortex dynamics responsible for the bulk critical current. To this end, critical current measurements on commercial high-temperature superconductors are combined with large-scale time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau simulations of vortex dynamics. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Nuclear criticality safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruvost, N.L.; Paxton, H.C.

    1996-09-01

    This technical reference document cites information related to nuclear criticality safety principles, experience, and practice. The document also provides general guidance for criticality safety personnel and regulators

  19. Nuclear criticality safety guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruvost, N.L.; Paxton, H.C. [eds.

    1996-09-01

    This technical reference document cites information related to nuclear criticality safety principles, experience, and practice. The document also provides general guidance for criticality safety personnel and regulators.

  20. On the critical frontiers of Potts ferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magalhaes, A.C.N. de; Tsallis, C.

    1981-01-01

    A conjecture concerning the critical frontiers of q- state Potts ferromagnets on d- dimensional lattices (d > 1) which generalize a recent one stated for planar lattices is formulated. The present conjecture is verified within satisfactory accuracy (exactly in some cases) for all the lattices or arrays whose critical points are known. Its use leads to the prediction of: a) a considerable amount of new approximate critical points (26 on non-planar regular lattices, some others on Husimi trees and cacti); b) approximate critical frontiers for some 3- dimensional lattices; c) the possibly asymptotically exact critical point on regular lattices in the limit d→infinite for all q>=1; d) the possibly exact critical frontier for the pure Potts model on fully anisotropic Bethe lattices; e) the possibly exact critical frontier for the general quenched random-bond Potts ferromagnet (any P(J)) on isotropic Bethe lattices. (Author) [pt

  1. Safety-critical Java for embedded systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoeberl, Martin; Dalsgaard, Andreas Engelbredt; Hansen, René Rydhof

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the motivation for and outcomes of an engineering research project on certifiable Javafor embedded systems. The project supports the upcoming standard for safety-critical Java, which defines asubset of Java and libraries aiming for development of high criticality systems....... The outcome of this projectinclude prototype safety-critical Java implementations, a time-predictable Java processor, analysis tools formemory safety, and example applications to explore the usability of safety-critical Java for this applicationarea. The text summarizes developments and key contributions...

  2. Concrete and criticality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    Concrete is a widely used structural material which occurs frequently in systems requiring criticality analyses. Ordinarily, we give little thought to what its actual composition is (as compared to reference compositions), yet in criticality safety, differences in composition can cause large changes in k-effective and it may not be easy to predict in which direction the change will occur. Concrete composition is quite variable with differences in the aggregate used in the concrete in various parts of the country providing relative large differences in k-effective. The water content of concrete can also strongly affect the reactivity of a system in which it acts as a reflector or is interspersed between fissile units. Because concrete is so common and is often (but not always) a better reflector than water, one must know the concrete compositions or be prepared to use a ''worst case'' composition. It may be a problem, however, to determine just what is the worst case. At the Hanford Plant, the aggregate normally used is basalt, which gives a composition very low in carbon as opposed to those areas (e.g., Oak Ridge) where the use of limestone aggregate will result in concrete with a high carbon content. The data presented show some of the effects found in situations using ''Hanford'' concrete, but similar effects might be found with other compositions. In some cases, the use of concrete may be incidental to the effects shown. While the numbers shown are those for actual systems, the primary intent is to alert the reader that these effects can occur. In applying this information, the analyst should use material specific to the systems being analyzed

  3. Prevention of criticality accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canavese, S.I.

    1982-01-01

    These notes used in the postgraduate course on Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety discuss macro-and microscopic nuclear constants for fissile materials systems. Critical systems: their definition; criteria to analyze the critical state; determination of the critical size; analysis of practical problems about prevention of criticality. Safety of isolated units and of sets of units. Application of standards. Conception of facilities from the criticality control view point. (author) [es

  4. Genomic prediction using subsampling

    OpenAIRE

    Xavier, Alencar; Xu, Shizhong; Muir, William; Rainey, Katy Martin

    2017-01-01

    Background Genome-wide assisted selection is a critical tool for the?genetic improvement of plants and animals. Whole-genome regression models in Bayesian framework represent the main family of prediction methods. Fitting such models with a large number of observations involves a prohibitive computational burden. We propose the use of subsampling bootstrap Markov chain in genomic prediction. Such method consists of fitting whole-genome regression models by subsampling observations in each rou...

  5. Critical thinking: Not all that critical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Dietrick Price

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Critical Thinking basically says to be suspicious of everything, except the fad known as Critical Thinking. It is perhaps best understood as a new and watered-down version of an earlier fad called Deconstruction. That was just a fancy word for debunking. After you strip away all the high-minded rhetoric, Critical Thinking is typically used to tell students that they should not trust conventional wisdom, tradition, religion, parents, and all that irrelevant, old-fashioned stuff. Critical Thinking, somewhat surprisingly, also turns out to be highly contemptuous of facts and knowledge. The formulation in public schools goes like this: children must learn how to think, not what to think. WHAT is, of course, all the academic content and scholarly knowledge that schools used to teach.

  6. Critical/non-critical system methodology report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The method used to determine how the waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facilities/systems were classified as critical or non-critical to the receipt of CH waste is described within this report. All WIPP critical facilities/systems are listed in the Operational Readiness Review Dictionary. Using the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) as a guide to define the boundaries of the facilities/systems, a direct correlation of the ORR Dictionary to the FSAR can be obtained. The critical facilities/systems are those which are directly related to or have a critical support role in the receipt of CH waste. The facility/systems must meet one of the following requirements to be considered critical: (a) confinement or measure of the release of radioactive materials; (b) continued receipt and/or storage of transuranic waste (TRU) without an interruption greater than one month according to the shipping plan schedule; (c) the environmental and occupational safety of personnel meets the established site programs; and (d) the physical security of the WIPP facilities

  7. WALS Prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magnus, J.R.; Wang, W.; Zhang, Xinyu

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Prediction under model uncertainty is an important and difficult issue. Traditional prediction methods (such as pretesting) are based on model selection followed by prediction in the selected model, but the reported prediction and the reported prediction variance ignore the uncertainty

  8. California Condor Critical Habitat

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — These Data identify (in general) the areas where critical habitat for the California Condor occur. Critical habitat for the species consists of the following 10...

  9. Surgical Critical Care Initiative

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Surgical Critical Care Initiative (SC2i) is a USU research program established in October 2013 to develop, translate, and validate biology-driven critical care....

  10. Critical Care Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... often uphold the patient's wishes. The critical care nurse becomes an important part of decision-making with the patient, the family and the care team. A registered nurse (RN) who is certified in critical care is ...

  11. The Ways of Criticism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krabbe, Erik C. W.; van Laar, Jan Albert

    This paper attempts to systematically characterize critical reactions in argumentative discourse, such as objections, critical questions, rebuttals, refutations, counterarguments, and fallacy charges, in order to contribute to the dialogical approach to argumentation. We shall make use of four

  12. Education by Criticism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Stephen L.

    1986-01-01

    Argues that students should exercise criticism in the classroom, but this criticism should not take the form of mere training in technical skills, indoctrination into a particular conceptual system, or theoretical speculation ungrounded in reality. (SRT)

  13. Toward critical bioethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Árnason, Vilhjálmur

    2015-04-01

    This article deals with the question as to what makes bioethics a critical discipline. It considers different senses of criticism and evaluates their strengths and weaknesses. A primary method in bioethics as a philosophical discipline is critical thinking, which implies critical evaluation of concepts, positions, and arguments. It is argued that the type of analytical criticism that restricts its critical role to critical thinking of this type often suffers from other intellectual flaws. Three examples are taken to demonstrate this: premature criticism, uncritical self-understanding of theoretical assumptions, and narrow framing of bioethical issues. Such flaws can lead both to unfair treatment of authors and to uncritical discussion of topics. In this context, the article makes use of Häyry's analysis of different rationalities in bioethical approaches and argues for the need to recognize the importance of communicative rationality for critical bioethics. A radically different critical approach in bioethics, rooted in social theory, focuses on analyses of power relations neglected in mainstream critical thinking. It is argued that, although this kind of criticism provides an important alternative in bioethics, it suffers from other shortcomings that are rooted in a lack of normative dimensions. In order to complement these approaches and counter their shortcomings, there is a need for a bioethics enlightened by critical hermeneutics. Such hermeneutic bioethics is aware of its own assumptions, places the issues in a wide context, and reflects critically on the power relations that stand in the way of understanding them. Moreover, such an approach is dialogical, which provides both a critical exercise of speech and a normative dimension implied in the free exchange of reasons and arguments. This discussion is framed by Hedgecoe's argument that critical bioethics needs four elements: to be empirically rooted, theory challenging, reflexive, and politely skeptical.

  14. Reimagining Critical Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rexhepi, Jevdet; Torres, Carlos Alberto

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses Critical Theory, a model of theorizing in the field of the political sociology of education. We argue for a "reimagined" Critical Theory to herald an empowering, liberatory education that fosters curiosity and critical thinking, and a means for successful bottom-up, top-down political engagement. We present arguments…

  15. Foundations for Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bers, Trudy; Chun, Marc; Daly, William T.; Harrington, Christine; Tobolowsky, Barbara F.

    2015-01-01

    "Foundations for Critical Thinking" explores the landscape of critical-thinking skill development and pedagogy through foundational chapters and institutional case studies involving a range of students in diverse settings. By establishing a link between active learning and improved critical thinking, this resource encourages all higher…

  16. Creating a Critical Thinker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piergiovanni, Polly R.

    2014-01-01

    A college education is expected to improve students' critical thinking skills. Keeping students active in class--through writing activities and class discussion--has been shown to help students think critically. In this article, creative hands-on activities, which are common in engineering courses, are shown to improve students' critical thinking…

  17. International critical perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sambrook, S.A.; Poell, R.F.

    2014-01-01

    The Problem Critical perspectives on human resource development (HRD) have emerged, across Europe and America, hailed as the future of the field. However, we note the paucity of critical perspectives globally, the problematic dominance of critical HRD activities in Western sites of theory and

  18. Energy Requirements in Critically Ill Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    During the management of critical illness, optimal nutritional support is an important key for achieving positive clinical outcomes. Compared to healthy people, critically ill patients have higher energy expenditure, thereby their energy requirements and risk of malnutrition being increased. Assessing individual nutritional requirement is essential for a successful nutritional support, including the adequate energy supply. Methods to assess energy requirements include indirect calorimetry (IC) which is considered as a reference method, and the predictive equations which are commonly used due to the difficulty of using IC in certain conditions. In this study, a literature review was conducted on the energy metabolic changes in critically ill patients, and the implications for the estimation of energy requirements in this population. In addition, the issue of optimal caloric goal during nutrition support is discussed, as well as the accuracy of selected resting energy expenditure predictive equations, commonly used in critically ill patients.

  19. Energy Requirements in Critically Ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndahimana, Didace; Kim, Eun-Kyung

    2018-04-01

    During the management of critical illness, optimal nutritional support is an important key for achieving positive clinical outcomes. Compared to healthy people, critically ill patients have higher energy expenditure, thereby their energy requirements and risk of malnutrition being increased. Assessing individual nutritional requirement is essential for a successful nutritional support, including the adequate energy supply. Methods to assess energy requirements include indirect calorimetry (IC) which is considered as a reference method, and the predictive equations which are commonly used due to the difficulty of using IC in certain conditions. In this study, a literature review was conducted on the energy metabolic changes in critically ill patients, and the implications for the estimation of energy requirements in this population. In addition, the issue of optimal caloric goal during nutrition support is discussed, as well as the accuracy of selected resting energy expenditure predictive equations, commonly used in critically ill patients.

  20. Critical points in magnetic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bongaarts, A.L.M.

    1975-01-01

    The magnetical phase transitions of CsCoCl 3 .2H 2 O and CsCoCl 3 .2D 2 O are investigated by neutron diffraction techniques with special attention to the critical points in the phase diagrams. CsCoCl 3 .2H 2 O turned out to be a one-dimentional magnetic antiferromagnet with ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic interactions. In the vicinity of the Neel point, the critical behavior in zero magnetic field could be described as a three-dimentional long range ordering, while the fluctuations in the system are one-dimensional. In the presence of a magnetic field, the behavior of the system in the critical region of the magnetic phase diagram between the Neel temperature at zero field (3.3degK) and 1.85degK, was in good agreement with the theory. Below 1.85degK, the phase transition in a magnetic field changes into a line of triple points whose end point could be identified as a tricritical point, i.e., an intersection of three critical lines. The parameters derived from observations in the neighborhood of this tricritical point obey the scaling laws but are not in numerical agreement with theoretical predictions

  1. Critical market crashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sornette, D.

    2003-04-01

    patterns have been documented for essentially all crashes on developed as well as emergent stock markets, on currency markets, on company stocks, and so on. We review this discovery at length and demonstrate how to use this insight and the detailed predictions obtained from these models to forecast crashes. For this, we review the major crashes of the past that occurred on the major stock markets of the planet and describe the empirical evidence of the universal nature of the critical log-periodic precursory signature of crashes. The concept of an “anti-bubble” is also summarized, with the Japanese collapse from the beginning of 1991 to present, taken as a prominent example. A prediction issued and advertised in January 1999 has been until recently born out with remarkable precision, predicting correctly several changes of trends, a feat notoriously difficult using standard techniques of economic forecasting. We also summarize a very recent analysis the behavior of the U.S. S&P500 index from 1996 to August 2002 and the forecast for the two following years. We conclude by presenting our view of the organization of financial markets.

  2. Transportable criticality alarm system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clem, W.E.

    1988-09-01

    The Transportable Criticality Alarm System was developed at the Hanford Site in 1982 to comply with the requirements of US Department of Energy Order DOE 5480.1, 12/18/80, and ANSI/ANS-8.3- 1979. The portable unit that it replaced failed to comply with the new requirements in that it did not provide the necessary warning of malfunctions, nor did it provide the Hanford Site standard criticality alarm signal. Modern technology allowed the Transportable Criticality Alarm System to comply with the criticality requirements cited and to incorporate other features that make it more usable, maintainable, and reliable. The Transportable Criticality Alarm System (TCAS) provides temporary criticality coverage in manned areas where the facility criticality alarm system is not operable. This gamma radiation-sensitive system has been in use for the past 6 yr at the Hanford Site. 2 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  3. Criticality handbook. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinicke, W.; Krug, H.; Thomas, W.; Weber, W.; Gmal, B.

    1985-12-01

    The GRS Criticality Handbook is intended as a source of information on criticality problems for the persons concerned in industry, authorities, or research laboratories. It is to serve as a guide allowing quick and appropriate evaluation of criticality problems during design or erection of nuclear installations. This present issue replaces the one published in 1979, presenting revised and new data in a modified construction, but within the framework of the proven basic structure of the Handbook. Some fundamental knowledge is required of criticality problems and the relevant terms and definitions of nuclear safety, in order to fully deploy the information given. Part 1 of the Handbook therefore first introduces terminology and definitions, followed by experimental methods and calculation models for criticality calculations. The next chapters deal with the function and efficiency of neutron reflectors and neutron absorbers, measuring methods for criticality monitoring, organisational safety measures, and criticality accidents and their subsequent analysis. (orig./HP) [de

  4. Predicting Religion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revell, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the influence of liberal ideas on the capacity for Religious Education (RE) to consider religions critically in a climate of increasing government intervention in education. It finds that criticality in some areas of RE is absent or limited but that in key areas criticality is evident if not always deeply embedded. It…

  5. From Critical Theory to Critical Hermeneutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Øjvind Larsen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available From their beginning in the 1930s, critical theory and the Frankfurt school had their focus on a critique of disturbed social relations in western society dominated by totalitarian political regimes like Stalinism, Fascism, Nazism, and by capitalism as an oppressive and destructive economic system and culture. Now, 80 years later, this has all become history and thus it is time to leave the concept of critical theory behind us, and instead bring the concept of critique to a broader theoretical framework like hermeneutics. This allows the possibility of retaining the theoretical intentions of the old Frankfurt school and at the same time there will be no boundaries by specific dominant theoretical perspectives. In this paper, such a framework for a critical hermeneutics is discussed on the basis of Weber’s, Gadamer’s, and Habermas’ theories on hermeneutics within the social sciences.

  6. Why looking at the whole hippocampus is not enough – a critical role for anteroposterior axis, subfield and activation analyses to enhance predictive value of hippocampal changes for Alzheimer’s disease diagnosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra eMaruszak

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The hippocampus is one of the earliest affected brain regions in Alzheimer´s disease (AD and its dysfunction is believed to underlie the core feature of the disease- memory impairment. Given that hippocampal volume is one of the best AD biomarkers, our review focuses on distinct subfields within the hippocampus, pinpointing regions that might enhance the predictive value of current diagnostic methods. Our review presents how changes in hippocampal volume, shape, symmetry and activation are reflected by cognitive impairment and how they are linked with neurogenesis alterations. Moreover, we revisit the functional differentiation along the anteroposterior longitudinal axis of the hippocampus and discuss its relevance for AD diagnosis. Finally, we indicate that apart from hippocampal subfield volumetry, the characteristic pattern of hippocampal hyperactivation associated with seizures and neurogenesis changes is another promising candidate for an early AD biomarker that could become also a target for early interventions.

  7. Criticism and Counter-Criticism of Public Management: Strategy Models

    OpenAIRE

    Luis C. Ortigueira

    2007-01-01

    Critical control is very important in scientific management. This paper presents models of critical and counter-critical public-management strategies, focusing on the types of criticism and counter-criticism manifested in parliamentary political debates. The paper includes: (i) a normative model showing how rational criticism can be carried out; (ii) a normative model for oral critical intervention; and (iii) a general motivational strategy model for criticisms and counter-criticisms. The pap...

  8. Critical Psychologies for Critical Health Literacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Health education is largely informed by psychological theories and practices that pursue reductionist views of people learning. However, critical attention is moving to understand health in ways that reconsider relationships to context and the forms of life within which everyday living takes place. This shift is apparent in theoretical…

  9. Two critical tests for the Critical Point earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzanis, A.; Vallianatos, F.

    2003-04-01

    It has been credibly argued that the earthquake generation process is a critical phenomenon culminating with a large event that corresponds to some critical point. In this view, a great earthquake represents the end of a cycle on its associated fault network and the beginning of a new one. The dynamic organization of the fault network evolves as the cycle progresses and a great earthquake becomes more probable, thereby rendering possible the prediction of the cycle’s end by monitoring the approach of the fault network toward a critical state. This process may be described by a power-law time-to-failure scaling of the cumulative seismic release rate. Observational evidence has confirmed the power-law scaling in many cases and has empirically determined that the critical exponent in the power law is typically of the order n=0.3. There are also two theoretical predictions for the value of the critical exponent. Ben-Zion and Lyakhovsky (Pure appl. geophys., 159, 2385-2412, 2002) give n=1/3. Rundle et al. (Pure appl. geophys., 157, 2165-2182, 2000) show that the power-law activation associated with a spinodal instability is essentially identical to the power-law acceleration of Benioff strain observed prior to earthquakes; in this case n=0.25. More recently, the CP model has gained support from the development of more dependable models of regional seismicity with realistic fault geometry that show accelerating seismicity before large events. Essentially, these models involve stress transfer to the fault network during the cycle such, that the region of accelerating seismicity will scale with the size of the culminating event, as for instance in Bowman and King (Geophys. Res. Let., 38, 4039-4042, 2001). It is thus possible to understand the observed characteristics of distributed accelerating seismicity in terms of a simple process of increasing tectonic stress in a region already subjected to stress inhomogeneities at all scale lengths. Then, the region of

  10. Surveillance and Critical Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Fuchs

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this comment, the author reflects on surveillance from a critical theory approach, his involvement in surveillance research and projects, and the status of the study of surveillance. The comment ascertains a lack of critical thinking about surveillance, questions the existence of something called “surveillance studies” as opposed to a critical theory of society, and reflects on issues such as Edward Snowden’s revelations, and Foucault and Marx in the context of surveillance.

  11. Extending Critical Performativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spicer, André; Alvesson, Mats; Kärreman, Dan

    2016-01-01

    In this article we extend the debate about critical performativity. We begin by outlining the basic tenets of critical performativity and how this has been applied in the study of management and organization. We then address recent critiques of critical performance. We note these arguments suffer...... of public importance; engaging with non-academic groups using dialectical reasoning; scaling up insights through movement building; and propagating deliberation...

  12. Climate prediction and predictability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Myles

    2010-05-01

    Climate prediction is generally accepted to be one of the grand challenges of the Geophysical Sciences. What is less widely acknowledged is that fundamental issues have yet to be resolved concerning the nature of the challenge, even after decades of research in this area. How do we verify or falsify a probabilistic forecast of a singular event such as anthropogenic warming over the 21st century? How do we determine the information content of a climate forecast? What does it mean for a modelling system to be "good enough" to forecast a particular variable? How will we know when models and forecasting systems are "good enough" to provide detailed forecasts of weather at specific locations or, for example, the risks associated with global geo-engineering schemes. This talk will provide an overview of these questions in the light of recent developments in multi-decade climate forecasting, drawing on concepts from information theory, machine learning and statistics. I will draw extensively but not exclusively from the experience of the climateprediction.net project, running multiple versions of climate models on personal computers.

  13. Introduction: Critical Visual Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Ludes

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The studies selected for publication in this special issue on Critical Visual Theory can be divided into three thematic groups: (1 image making as power making, (2 commodification and recanonization, and (3 approaches to critical visual theory. The approaches to critical visual theory adopted by the authors of this issue may be subsumed under the following headings (3.1 critical visual discourse and visual memes in general and Anonymous visual discourse in particular, (3.2 collective memory and gendered gaze, and (3.3 visual capitalism, global north and south.

  14. Quantum criticality and black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachdev, Subir; Mueller, Markus

    2009-01-01

    Many condensed matter experiments explore the finite temperature dynamics of systems near quantum critical points. Often, there are no well-defined quasiparticle excitations, and so quantum kinetic equations do not describe the transport properties completely. The theory shows that the transport coefficients are not proportional to a mean free scattering time (as is the case in the Boltzmann theory of quasiparticles), but are completely determined by the absolute temperature and by equilibrium thermodynamic observables. Recently, explicit solutions of this quantum critical dynamics have become possible via the anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory duality discovered in string theory. This shows that the quantum critical theory provides a holographic description of the quantum theory of black holes in a negatively curved anti-de Sitter space, and relates its transport coefficients to properties of the Hawking radiation from the black hole. We review how insights from this connection have led to new results for experimental systems: (i) the vicinity of the superfluid-insulator transition in the presence of an applied magnetic field, and its possible application to measurements of the Nernst effect in the cuprates, (ii) the magnetohydrodynamics of the plasma of Dirac electrons in graphene and the prediction of a hydrodynamic cyclotron resonance.

  15. Empathy and the Critic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurecic, Ann

    2011-01-01

    "Empathy" is a much-discussed term in the humanities these days. While some critics value it and argue that literature desirably promotes it, other critics worry that appeals to this emotion will neglect important matters of social context. In the literature classroom, the best approach is to take time to consider how texts complicate the impulse…

  16. Critical Literacy: Foundational Notes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Allan

    2012-01-01

    The term "critical literacy" refers to use of the technologies of print and other media of communication to analyze, critique, and transform the norms, rule systems, and practices governing the social fields of everyday life (A. Luke, 2004). Since Freire's (1970) educational projects in Brazil, approaches to critical literacy have been…

  17. Criticality alarm device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasai, Kenji.

    1994-01-01

    The device of the present invention is utilized, for example, to a reprocessing facility for storing and processing nuclear fuels and measures and controls the nuclear fuel assembly system so as not to exceed criticality. That is, a conventional criticality alarm device applies a predetermined processing to neutron fluxes generated from a nuclear fuel assembly system containing nuclear fuels and outputs an alarm. The device of the present invention comprises (1) a neutron flux supply source for increasing and decreasing neutron fluxes periodically and supplying them to nuclear fuel assemblies, (2) a detector for detecting neutron fluxes in the nuclear fuel assemblies, (3) a critical state judging section for judging the critical state of the nuclear fuel assemblies based on the periodically changing signals obtained from the detector (2) and (4) an alarm section for outputting criticality alarms depending on the result of the judgement. The device of the present invention can accurately recognize the critical state of the nuclear fuel assembly system and can forecast reaching of the nuclear fuel assembly to criticality or prompt neutron critical state. (I.S.)

  18. Critical Response Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellingson, Charlene; Roehrig, Gillian; Bakkum, Kris; Dubinsky, Janet M.

    2016-01-01

    This article introduces the Critical Response Protocol (CRP), an arts-based technique that engages students in equitable critical discourse and aligns with the "Next Generation Science Standards" vision for providing students opportunities for language learning while advancing science learning (NGSS Lead States 2013). CRP helps teachers…

  19. Critical Chain Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, John Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Critical Chains project management focuses on holding buffers at the project level vs. task level, and managing buffers as a project resource. A number of studies have shown that Critical Chain project management can significantly improve organizational schedule fidelity (i.e., improve the proportion of projects delivered on time) and reduce…

  20. Nuclear criticality safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ro, Seong Ki; Shin, Hee Seong; Park, Seong Won; Shin, Young Joon.

    1997-06-01

    Nuclear criticality safety guide was described for handling, transportation and storage of nuclear fissile materials in this report. The major part of the report was excerpted frp, TID-7016(revision 2) and nuclear criticality safety written by Knief. (author). 16 tabs., 44 figs., 5 refs

  1. Critical Utopian Action Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birger Steen; Nielsen, Kurt Aagaard

    2016-01-01

    The specific concept of critical utopian action research is presented and discussed, as to its origin, use and potentials. The inspiration from Robert Jungk and his future creating workshops is elaborated.......The specific concept of critical utopian action research is presented and discussed, as to its origin, use and potentials. The inspiration from Robert Jungk and his future creating workshops is elaborated....

  2. Critical Habitat :: NOAA Fisheries

    Science.gov (United States)

    occupied by the species at the time of listing, if they contain physical or biological features essential essential for conservation. Critical Habitat Maps NOTE: The critical habitat maps provided here are for Data Leatherback Turtle (U.S. West Coast) » Biological Report » Economic Report 2012 77 FR 4170 Go to

  3. Self organized criticality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creutz, M.

    1993-03-01

    Self organized criticality refers to the tendency of highly dissipative systems to drive themselves to a critical state. This has been proposed to explain why observed physics often displays a wide disparity of length and time scales. The phenomenon can be studied in simple cellular automaton models

  4. Critical Pedagogy and Faith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Jacob W.

    2011-01-01

    Critical pedagogy has often been linked in the literature to faith traditions such as liberation theology, usually with the intent of improving or redirecting it. While recognizing and drawing from those previous linkages, Jacob Neumann goes further in this essay and develops the thesis that critical pedagogy can not just benefit from a connection…

  5. Critical parameters for ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, M.; Masui, G.; Uematsu, M.

    2005-01-01

    (p, ρ, T) measurements and visual observations of the meniscus for ammonia were carried out carefully in the critical region over the range of temperatures: -1 K (T - T c ) 0.04 K, and of densities: -19 kg . m -3 (ρ - ρ c ) 19 kg . m -3 by a metal-bellows volumometer with an optical cell. Vapor pressures were also measured at T = (310, 350, and 400) K. The critical parameters of T c and ρ c were determined based on the results of observation of the critical opalescence. The critical pressure p c was determined from the present measurements at T c on the vapor pressure curve. Comparisons of the critical parameters with values given in the literature are presented

  6. Critical parameters for ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, M. [Center for Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, Keio University, Hiyoshi 3-14-1, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Masui, G. [Center for Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, Keio University, Hiyoshi 3-14-1, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Uematsu, M. [Center for Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, Keio University, Hiyoshi 3-14-1, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan)]. E-mail: uematsu@mech.keio.ac.jp

    2005-09-15

    (p, {rho}, T) measurements and visual observations of the meniscus for ammonia were carried out carefully in the critical region over the range of temperatures: -1 K (T - T {sub c}) 0.04 K, and of densities: -19 kg . m{sup -3} ({rho} - {rho} {sub c}) 19 kg . m{sup -3} by a metal-bellows volumometer with an optical cell. Vapor pressures were also measured at T = (310, 350, and 400) K. The critical parameters of T {sub c} and {rho} {sub c} were determined based on the results of observation of the critical opalescence. The critical pressure p {sub c} was determined from the present measurements at T {sub c} on the vapor pressure curve. Comparisons of the critical parameters with values given in the literature are presented.

  7. Taking Critical Ontology Seriously

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigger, Angela; Horn, Laura

    2017-01-01

    To be ‘critical’ has become fashionable among social scientists in various disciplines. Only a few decades ago, the prefix ‘critical’ was almost automatically associated with Western Marxism and in particular the Frankfurt School. Today, the term critical is no longer limited to a single...... theoretical approach, but pertains to a vast range of approaches, including feminist, reflexive, postcolonial, postmodern or poststructuralist studies, and studies committed to a post-positivist epistemology more generally. But what does critical social science actually mean? Which implications does critical...... a primer on a few core dimensions of critical social science and its central premises. It discusses first what critical social science is not, and clarifies key differences between what is commonly referred to as ‘mainstream’ and ‘critical’ social science perspectives. It addresses the role of normative...

  8. Control of criticality; Kawalan kegentingan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-12-31

    The chapter briefly discussed the following subjects: basic and the principle of criticality, natural uranium, neutron utilization, criticality data for systems, criticality accidents, criticality control i.e. mass, volume and geometry control .

  9. The Possibility of Film Criticism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poague, Leland; Cadbury, William

    1989-01-01

    Examines the role of critical language in film criticism. Compares and contrasts Monroe Beardsley's philosophy on film aesthetics with the New Criticism. Outlines some of the contributions Beardsley has made to the study of film criticism. (KM)

  10. The french criticality handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maubert, L.; Puit, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    The french criticality handbook, published in 1978 by the ''Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique'', is presented with the main targets aimed by the writer and the main choices taken relating to fissile mediums, reflection conditions, dilution curves. The validation of the critical values is presented as one of the most important aspects of this handbook which is mainly intended, in the mind of the author, to specialists well advertised in the field of criticality. The complements which have been introduced since 1978 and those which are foreseen in a near future are also detailed. (author)

  11. Frustration and quantum criticality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojta, Matthias

    2018-06-01

    This review article is devoted to the interplay between frustrated magnetism and quantum critical phenomena, covering both theoretical concepts and ideas as well as recent experimental developments in correlated-electron materials. The first part deals with local-moment magnetism in Mott insulators and the second part with frustration in metallic systems. In both cases, frustration can either induce exotic phases accompanied by exotic quantum critical points or lead to conventional ordering with unconventional crossover phenomena. In addition, the competition of multiple phases inherent to frustrated systems can lead to multi-criticality.

  12. Frustration and quantum criticality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojta, Matthias

    2018-03-15

    This review article is devoted to the interplay between frustrated magnetism and quantum critical phenomena, covering both theoretical concepts and ideas as well as recent experimental developments in correlated-electron materials. The first part deals with local-moment magnetism in Mott insulators and the second part with frustration in metallic systems. In both cases, frustration can either induce exotic phases accompanied by exotic quantum critical points or lead to conventional ordering with unconventional crossover phenomena. In addition, the competition of multiple phases inherent to frustrated systems can lead to multi-criticality. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  13. Minimum critical mass systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dam, H. van; Leege, P.F.A. de

    1987-01-01

    An analysis is presented of thermal systems with minimum critical mass, based on the use of materials with optimum neutron moderating and reflecting properties. The optimum fissile material distributions in the systems are obtained by calculations with standard computer codes, extended with a routine for flat fuel importance search. It is shown that in the minimum critical mass configuration a considerable part of the fuel is positioned in the reflector region. For 239 Pu a minimum critical mass of 87 g is found, which is the lowest value reported hitherto. (author)

  14. PREPP criticality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cargo, C.H.; Becker, G.K.; Berglund, G.R.; O'Connor, N.J.

    1989-03-01

    There is a general lack of data available with regards to criticality control in the use of incineration for full scale processing of TRU waste. In addition to the new analytical tools, such as PRA, are only now starting to be applied to criticality control. These factors have made the development of the PREPP Criticality Control Plan somewhat unique. It is hoped that the PREPP experiences gained in these efforts will provide new insight which will be useful to future facilities processing waste material containing fissile material. 1 fig

  15. Critical eigenvalue in LMFBRs: a physics assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKnight, R.D.; Collins, P.J.; Olsen, D.N.

    1984-01-01

    This paper summarizes recent work to put the analysis of past critical eigenvalue measurements from the US critical experiments program on a consistent basis. The integral data base includes 53 configurations built in 11 ZPPR assemblies which simulate mixed oxide LMFBRs. Both conventional and heterogeneous designs representing 350, 700, and 900 MWe sizes and with and without simulated control rods and/or control rod positions have been studied. The review of the integral data base includes quantitative assessment of experimental uncertainties in the measured excess reactivity. Analyses have been done with design level and higher-order methods using ENDF/B-IV data. Comparisons of these analyses with the experiments are used to generate recommended bias factors for criticality predictions. Recommended methods for analysis of LMFBR fast critical assemblies and LMFBR design calculations are presented. Unresolved issues and areas which require additional experimental or analytical study are identified

  16. Designated Critical Habitat

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — Critical habitats include those areas documented as currently supporting self-sustaining populations of any threatened or endangered species of wildlife as well as...

  17. Coastal Critical Habitat Designations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Endangered Species Act (ESA) requires the Federal government to designate critical habitat, areas of habitat essential to the species' conservation, for ESA...

  18. Silencing criticism in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximena Suárez

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Journalists and human rights defenders in Mexico are being attacked in an attempt to silence their criticism. Many are forced to flee or risk being assassinated. The consequences are both personal and of wider social significance.

  19. Smalltooth Sawfish Critical Habitat

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data represent the critical habitat for smalltooth sawfish (Pristis pectinatat) as designated by 74 FR 45353, September 2, 2009, Rules and Regulations.

  20. Critical Robotic Lunar Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plescia, J. B.

    2018-04-01

    Perhaps the most critical missions to understanding lunar history are in situ dating and network missions. These would constrain the volcanic and thermal history and interior structure. These data would better constrain lunar evolution models.

  1. Critical-point nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.M.

    2004-01-01

    It has been suggested that a change of nuclear shape may be described in terms of a phase transition and that specific nuclei may lie close to the critical point of the transition. Analytical descriptions of such critical-point nuclei have been introduced recently and they are described briefly. The results of extensive searches for possible examples of critical-point behavior are presented. Alternative pictures, such as describing bands in the candidate nuclei using simple ΔK = 0 and ΔK = 2 rotational-coupling models, are discussed, and the limitations of the different approaches highlighted. A possible critical-point description of the transition from a vibrational to rotational pairing phase is suggested

  2. Probabilistic Criticality Consequence Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    P. Gottlieb; J.W. Davis; J.R. Massari

    1996-01-01

    This analysis is prepared by the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) Waste Package Development (WPD) department with the objective of providing a comprehensive, conservative estimate of the consequences of the criticality which could possibly occur as the result of commercial spent nuclear fuel emplaced in the underground repository at Yucca Mountain. The consequences of criticality are measured principally in terms of the resulting changes in radionuclide inventory as a function of the power level and duration of the criticality. The purpose of this analysis is to extend the prior estimates of increased radionuclide inventory (Refs. 5.52 and 5.54), for both internal and external criticality. This analysis, and similar estimates and refinements to be completed before the end of fiscal year 1997, will be provided as input to Total System Performance Assessment-Viability Assessment (TSPA-VA) to demonstrate compliance with the repository performance objectives

  3. Right Whale Critical Habitat

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data represent the critical habitat for Right Whale as designated by Federal Register Vol. 59, No. 28805, May 19, 1993, Rules and Regulations.

  4. Johnsons Seagrass Critical Habitat

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data represent the critical habitat for Johnson's Seagrass as designated by Federal Register Vol. 65, No. 66, Wednesday, April 5, 2000, Rules and Regulations.

  5. Green Turtle Critical Habitat

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data represent the critical habitat for green turtle as designated by Federal Register Vol. 63, No. 46701, September 2, 1998, Rules and Regulations.

  6. Neutrophils in critical illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Braedon

    2018-03-01

    During critical illness, dramatic alterations in neutrophil biology are observed including abnormalities of granulopoeisis and lifespan, cell trafficking and antimicrobial effector functions. As a result, neutrophils transition from powerful antimicrobial protectors into dangerous mediators of tissue injury and organ dysfunction. In this article, the role of neutrophils in the pathogenesis of critical illness (sepsis, trauma, burns and others) will be explored, including pathological changes to neutrophil function during critical illness and the utility of monitoring aspects of the neutrophil phenotype as biomarkers for diagnosis and prognostication. Lastly, we review findings from clinical trials of therapies that target the harmful effects of neutrophils, providing a bench-to-bedside perspective on neutrophils in critical illness.

  7. Unconventional Quantum Critical Points

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Cenke

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we review the theory of unconventional quantum critical points that are beyond the Landau's paradigm. Three types of unconventional quantum critical points will be discussed: (1). The transition between topological order and semiclassical spin ordered phase; (2). The transition between topological order and valence bond solid phase; (3). The direct second order transition between different competing orders. We focus on the field theory and universality class of these unconventio...

  8. Scale of Critical Thinking

    OpenAIRE

    Semerci, Nuriye

    2000-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to develop the scale for critical thinking. The Scale of Critical Thinking was applied to 200 student. In this scale, there are total 55 items, four of which are negative and 51 of which are positive. The KMO (Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin) value is 0.75, the Bartlett test value is 7145.41, and the Cronbach Alpha value is 0.90.

  9. Furthering critical institutionalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances Dalton Cleaver

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This special issue furthers the study of natural resource management from a critical institutional perspective. Critical institutionalism (CI is a contemporary body of thought that explores how institutions dynamically mediate relationships between people, natural resources and society. It focuses on the complexity of institutions entwined in everyday social life, their historical formation, the interplay between formal and informal, traditional and modern arrangements, and the power relations that animate them. In such perspectives a social justice lens is often used to scrutinise the outcomes of institutional processes. We argue here that critical institutional approaches have potentially much to offer commons scholarship, particularly through the explanatory power of the concept of bricolage for better understanding institutional change.  Critical institutional approaches, gathering momentum over the past 15 years or so, have excited considerable interest but the insights generated from different disciplinary perspectives remain insufficiently synthesised. Analyses emphasising complexity can be relatively illegible to policy-makers, a fact which lessens their reach. This special issue therefore aims to synthesise critical institutional ideas and so to lay the foundation for moving beyond the emergent stage to make meaningful academic and policy impact. In bringing together papers here we define and synthesise key themes of critical institutionalism, outline the concept of institutional bricolage and identity some key challenges facing this school of thought.

  10. The Critical Bricolage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim McMillan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Change in health care has become rapid and continuous. Much decision-making processes guiding change management are derived from organizational literature which is heavily reflective of managerial perspectives. These perspectives represent and aim to serve only a small subgroup of organizational members. However, change is complex, fragile, and has higher rates of success and sustainability when change management strategies reflect a multitude of organizational voices. There is a dearth of literature exploring the intersect between organizational and nursing discourses on the subject of rapid and continuous change in health care. Multitheoretical, multimethodological, and multidisciplinary informed approaches to methodological decision making are needed to link organizational and nursing discourses in ways that will offer alternative perspectives on the subject of change. Furthermore, critically guided multitheoretical, multimethodological, and multidisciplinary methodologies are timely and important in organizational research. Critically guided research seeks to analyze taken-for-granted assumptions and institutionalized practices seeking alternative perspectives and alternative sources of organizational knowledge. Exploring alternative perspectives from a critical lens recognizes the impact predominant discursive influences have on change management and the subsequent impact on organizational members’ working lives. This article will explore how Kincheloe’s discussions of the critical bricolage serve to support combining critical organizational methodologies (guided by Alvesson and Deetz with a voice-centered relational method of data analysis (guided by Brown and Gilligan to create a critical interpretive methodology that explores the voices of nurses as they experience rapid and continuous change in health care.

  11. Critical sizes and critical characteristics of nanoclusters, nanostructures and nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzdalev, I.P.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Critical sizes and characteristics of nanoclusters and nanostructures are introduced as the parameters of nanosystems and nanomaterials. The next critical characteristics are considered: atomic and electronic 'magic number', critical size of cluster nucleation, critical size of melting-freezing of cluster, critical size of quantum (laser) radiation, critical sizes for the single electron conductivity, critical energy and magnetic field for the magnetic tunneling, critical cluster sizes for the giant magnetic resistance, critical size of the first order magnetic phase transition. The critical characteristics are estimated by thermodynamic approaches, by Moessbauer spectroscopy, AFM, heat capacity, SQUID magnetometry and other technique, The influence of cluster-cluster interactions, cluster-matrix interactions and cluster defects on cluster atomic dynamics, cluster melting, cluster critical sizes, Curie or Neel points and the character of magnetic phase transitions were investigated. The applications of critical size and critical characteristic parameters for the nanomaterial characterization are considered

  12. CFD simulation of estimating critical shear stress for cleaning flat ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sumit Kawale

    2017-11-22

    Nov 22, 2017 ... Jet impingement; wall shear stress; cleaning of flat plate; turbulence model; critical shear stress; ... On comparing the theoretical predictions with wall shear ... distance and Reynolds number on peak value of local shear stress ...

  13. Critical point measurement of some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikitin, Eugene D.; Popov, Alexander P.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Critical properties of five polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were measured. • These hydrocarbons decompose at near-critical temperatures. • Pulse-heating method with short residence times was used. - Abstract: The critical temperatures and the critical pressures of five polycyclic aromatic compounds, namely, acenaphthene, fluorene, anthracene, phenanthrene, and pyrene have been measured. All the compounds studied decompose at near-critical temperatures. A pulse-heating technique applicable to measuring the critical properties of thermally unstable compounds has been used. The times from the beginning of a heating pulse to the moment of reaching the critical temperature were from (0.06 to 0.85) ms. The short residence times provide little degradation of the substances in the course of the experiments. The experimental critical parameters of the polycyclic aromatic compounds have been compared with those estimated by five predictive methods. The acentric factors of polycyclic aromatic compounds studied have been calculated

  14. Earthquake prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, P.L.

    1978-01-01

    The state of the art of earthquake prediction is summarized, the possible responses to such prediction are examined, and some needs in the present prediction program and in research related to use of this new technology are reviewed. Three basic aspects of earthquake prediction are discussed: location of the areas where large earthquakes are most likely to occur, observation within these areas of measurable changes (earthquake precursors) and determination of the area and time over which the earthquake will occur, and development of models of the earthquake source in order to interpret the precursors reliably. 6 figures

  15. Genomic prediction using subsampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Alencar; Xu, Shizhong; Muir, William; Rainey, Katy Martin

    2017-03-24

    Genome-wide assisted selection is a critical tool for the genetic improvement of plants and animals. Whole-genome regression models in Bayesian framework represent the main family of prediction methods. Fitting such models with a large number of observations involves a prohibitive computational burden. We propose the use of subsampling bootstrap Markov chain in genomic prediction. Such method consists of fitting whole-genome regression models by subsampling observations in each round of a Markov Chain Monte Carlo. We evaluated the effect of subsampling bootstrap on prediction and computational parameters. Across datasets, we observed an optimal subsampling proportion of observations around 50% with replacement, and around 33% without replacement. Subsampling provided a substantial decrease in computation time, reducing the time to fit the model by half. On average, losses on predictive properties imposed by subsampling were negligible, usually below 1%. For each dataset, an optimal subsampling point that improves prediction properties was observed, but the improvements were also negligible. Combining subsampling with Gibbs sampling is an interesting ensemble algorithm. The investigation indicates that the subsampling bootstrap Markov chain algorithm substantially reduces computational burden associated with model fitting, and it may slightly enhance prediction properties.

  16. Music critic Gustav Michel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasić Aleksandar N.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The writers whose real vocation was not music left significant traces in the history of Serbian music critics and essayism of the late 19th century and the first half of the 20th century. Numerous authors, literary historians theoreticians and critics, jurists and theatre historians, wrote successfully on music in Serbian daily newspapers, literary and other magazines, until the Second World War. This study is devoted to Gustav Michel (1868 - 1926, one of the music amateurs who ought to be remembered in the history of Serbian music critics. Gustav Michel was a pharmacist by vocation. He ran a private pharmacy in Belgrade all his life. But he was a musician as well. He played the viola in the second (in chronological order of foundation Serbian String Quartet. The ensemble mostly consisted of amateurs, and it performed standard pieces of chamber music (W. A. Mozart L. v. Beethoven, F. Schubert, F. Mendelsohn-Bartholdy, A. Dvořžak. These musicians had performed public concerts in Belgrade since 1900 up until Michel’s death. Belgrade music critics prised the performances of this string ensemble highly. Gustav Michel was also a music critic. Until now only seven articles, published by this author between 1894 and 1903, in Order (Red, Folk Newspaper (Narodne novine and Serbian Literary Magazine (Srpski književni glasnik have been found. Michel’s preserved articles unambiguously prove that their author had a solid knowledge of music theory and history, the knowledge that exceeded amateurism. Nevertheless, Michel did not burden his first critics with expert language of musicology. Later on, in Serbian Literary Magazine, the magazine which left enough room for music, Michel penetrated more into musical terminology, thus educating slowly forming Serbian concert-going public. The analysis of Michel’s texts showed that he was not, in contrast to the majority of professional music critics, an opponent of virtuosity. Gentle and liberal, he did not

  17. Nuclear criticality information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koponen, B.L.; Hampel, V.E.

    1981-01-01

    The nuclear criticality safety program at LLNL began in the 1950's with a critical measurements program which produced benchmark data until the late 1960's. This same time period saw the rapid development of computer technology useful for both computer modeling of fissile systems and for computer-aided management and display of the computational benchmark data. Database management grew in importance as the amount of information increased and as experimental programs were terminated. Within the criticality safety program at LLNL we began at that time to develop a computer library of benchmark data for validation of computer codes and cross sections. As part of this effort, we prepared a computer-based bibliography of criticality measurements on relatively simple systems. However, it is only now that some of these computer-based resources can be made available to the nuclear criticality safety community at large. This technology transfer is being accomplished by the DOE Technology Information System (TIS), a dedicated, advanced information system. The NCIS database is described

  18. Safety-Critical Java for Embedded Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rios Rivas, Juan Ricardo

    for Java aims at providing a reduced set of the Java programming language that can be used for systems that need to be certified at the highest levels of criticality. Safety-critical Java (SCJ) restricts how a developer can structure an application by providing a specific programming model...... and by restricting the set of methods and libraries that can be used. Furthermore, its memory model do not use a garbage-collected heap but scoped memories. In this thesis we examine the use of the SCJ specification through an implementation in a time-predictable, FPGA-based Java processor. The specification is now...

  19. Heavy water critical experiments on plutonium lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyawaki, Yoshio; Shiba, Kiminori

    1975-06-01

    This report is the summary of physics study on plutonium lattice made in Heavy Water Critical Experiment Section of PNC. By using Deuterium Critical Assembly, physics study on plutonium lattice has been carried out since 1972. Experiments on following items were performed in a core having 22.5 cm square lattice pitch. (1) Material buckling (2) Lattice parameters (3) Local power distribution factor (4) Gross flux distribution in two region core (5) Control rod worth. Experimental results were compared with theoretical ones calculated by METHUSELAH II code. It is concluded from this study that calculation by METHUSELAH II code has acceptable accuracy in the prediction on plutonium lattice. (author)

  20. Beyond Critical Exponents in Neuronal Avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Nir; Butler, Tom; Deville, Robert; Beggs, John; Dahmen, Karin

    2011-03-01

    Neurons form a complex network in the brain, where they interact with one another by firing electrical signals. Neurons firing can trigger other neurons to fire, potentially causing avalanches of activity in the network. In many cases these avalanches have been found to be scale independent, similar to critical phenomena in diverse systems such as magnets and earthquakes. We discuss models for neuronal activity that allow for the extraction of testable, statistical predictions. We compare these models to experimental results, and go beyond critical exponents.

  1. Predictive medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boenink, Marianne; ten Have, Henk

    2015-01-01

    In the last part of the twentieth century, predictive medicine has gained currency as an important ideal in biomedical research and health care. Research in the genetic and molecular basis of disease suggested that the insights gained might be used to develop tests that predict the future health

  2. The critical ionization velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raadu, M.A.

    1980-06-01

    The critical ionization velocity effect was first proposed in the context of space plasmas. This effect occurs for a neutral gas moving through a magnetized plasma and leads to rapid ionization and braking of the relative motion when a marginal velocity, 'the critical velocity', is exceeded. Laboratory experiments have clearly established the significance of the critical velocity and have provided evidence for an underlying mechanism which relies on the combined action of electron impact ionization and a collective plasma interaction heating electrons. There is experimental support for such a mechanism based on the heating of electrons by the modified two-stream instability as part of a feedback process. Several applications to space plasmas have been proposed and the possibility of space experiments has been discussed. (author)

  3. Critical Kinship Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    In recent decades the concept of kinship has been challenged and reinvigorated by the so-called “repatriation of anthropology” and by the influence of feminist studies, queer studies, adoption studies, and science and technology studies. These interdisciplinary approaches have been further...... developed by increases in infertility, reproductive travel, and the emergence of critical movements among transnational adoptees, all of which have served to question how kinship is now practiced. Critical Kinship Studies brings together theoretical and disciplinary perspectives and analytically sensitive...... in the Humanities and Social Sciences today. Critical Kinship Studies should be of particular interest to students and scholars in Anthropology, Sociology, Cultural Studies, Medical Humanities, Politics, Gender and Queer Studies and Globalization....

  4. Constructing criticality by classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machacek, Erika

    2017-01-01

    " in the bureaucratic practice of classification: Experts construct material criticality in assessments as they allot information on the materials to the parameters of the assessment framework. In so doing, they ascribe a new set of connotations to the materials, namely supply risk, and their importance to clean energy......, legitimizing a criticality discourse.Specifically, the paper introduces a typology delineating the inferences made by the experts from their produced recommendations in the classification of rare earth element criticality. The paper argues that the classification is a specific process of constructing risk....... It proposes that the expert bureaucratic practice of classification legitimizes (i) the valorisation that was made in the drafting of the assessment framework for the classification, and (ii) political operationalization when enacted that might have (non-)distributive implications for the allocation of public...

  5. Entrepreneurial behavior : New perspectives gained through the critical incident technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nandram, S.S.; Samsom, K.J.

    2007-01-01

    Responding to criticism of the trait approach in studying entrepreneurship, a process and context oriented methodology was applied using the Critical Incident Technique (CIT) in predicting success and failure. The actions of entrepreneurs were subsequently translated into (1) dynamic traits with a

  6. Validation of JENDL-3.3 for the HTTR criticality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Minoru; Nojiri, Naoki; Shimakawa, Satoshi

    2004-01-01

    Validation of JENDL-3.3 has been performed for the HTTR criticality using the MVP code with a ''lattice-cell'' of infinite models and a ''whole-core'' of finite models. It was found that the keff values calculated with JENDL-3.3 was decreased about 0.2-0.4%Δk from one with JENDL-3.2. The criticality prediction was closed to the experimental data in the critical approach situation of the HTTR. (author)

  7. Nuclear critical opalescence, a precursor to pion condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ericson, M.; Delorme, J.

    1978-03-01

    It is shown that pion condensation in nuclei, a long range phenomenon, has a precursor in the disordered phase, the local ordering of spins which becomes of infinite range at the critical point. A new physical effect arising from this short range order is predicted, namely the enhancement of the static nuclear pion field near the critical momentum. This phenomenon is strongly reminiscent of the critical opalescence observed in the scattering of neutrons by antiferromagnetic subtances

  8. Nuclear critical opalescence, a precursor to pion condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ericson, M.; Delorme, J.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown that pion condensation in nuclei, a long-range phenomenon, has a precursor in the disordered phase, the local ordering of spins which becomes of infinite range at the critical point. A new physical effect arising from this short-range order is predicted, namely the enhancement of the static nuclear pion field near the critical momentum. This phenomenon is strongly reminiscent of the critical opalescence observed in the scattering of neutrons by antiferromagnetic substances. (Auth.)

  9. Nuclear multifragmentation critical exponents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, W.; Friedman, W.A.; Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

    1995-01-01

    In a recent Letter, cited in a reference, the EoS collaboration presented data of fragmentation of 1 A GeV gold nuclei incident on carbon. By analyzing moments of the fragment charge distribution, the authors claim to determine the values of the critical exponents γ, β, and τ for finite nuclei. These data represent a crucial step forward in the understanding of the physics of nuclear fragmentation. However, as shown in this paper, the analysis presented in the cited reference is not sufficient to support the claim that the critical exponents for nuclear fragmentation have been unambiguously determined

  10. Critical Axial Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walt Wells

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Our objective in this paper is to solve a second order differential equation for a long, simply supported column member subjected to a lateral axial load using Heun's numerical method. We will use the solution to find the critical load at which the column member will fail due to buckling. We will calculate this load using Euler's derived analytical approach for an exact solution, as well as Euler's Numerical Method. We will then compare the three calculated values to see how much they deviate from one another. During the critical load calculation, it will be necessary to calculate the moment of inertia for the column member.

  11. Criticism in the Romantic Relationships of Individuals With Social Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Eliora; Chambless, Dianne L; Keefe, John R

    2017-07-01

    Social anxiety is associated with difficulties in intimate relationships. Because fear of negative evaluation is a cardinal feature of social anxiety disorder, perceived criticism and upset due to criticism from partners may play a significant role in socially anxious individuals' intimate relationships. In the present study, we examine associations between social anxiety and perceived, observed, and expressed criticism in interactions with romantic partners. In Study 1, we collected self-report data from 343 undergraduates and their romantic partners on social anxiety symptoms, perceived and expressed criticism, and upset due to criticism. One year later couples reported whether they were still in this relationship. Results showed that social anxiety was associated with being more critical of one's partner, and among women, being more upset by criticism from a partner. Social anxiety was not related to perceived criticism, nor did criticism variables predict relationship status at Time 2. In Study 2, undergraduate couples with a partner high (n = 26) or low (n = 26) in social anxiety completed a 10-minute, video-recorded problem-solving task. Both partners rated their perceived and expressed criticism and upset due to criticism following the interaction, and observers coded interactions for criticism. Results indicated that social anxiety was not significantly related to any of the criticism variables, but post hoc analyses cast doubts upon the external validity of the problem-solving task. Results are discussed in light of known difficulties with intimacy among individuals with social anxiety. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Trust and Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinig, John

    2018-01-01

    This article discusses the tension between trust, as an expression of interpersonal commitment, and critical thinking, which includes a demand for reasons. It explores the importance of each for individual flourishing, and then seeks to establish some ways in which they intersect, drawing on ideas of authority and trustworthiness. It argues that…

  13. Posthuman Critical Theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braidotti, R.

    2016-01-01

    This essay proposes a genealogical cartography of the emergence of a posthuman turn in critical theory, including feminist theory, based on the convergence of posthumanism with post-anthropocentrism. The former critiques the universalist posture of the idea of ‘Man’ as the alleged ‘measure of all

  14. Critical scattering by bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiedler-Ferrari, N.; Nussenzveig, H.M.

    1986-11-01

    We apply the complex angular momentum theory to the problem of the critical scattering of light by spherical cavities in the high frequency limit (permittivity greater than the external media) (e.g, air bubble in water) (M.W.O.) [pt

  15. The critical interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pold, Søren

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, I argue that aesthetics might serve the role of critical reflection on representation within the field of computing, and I demonstrate through three analytic examples from computer art how this might look like and what the contribution might be....

  16. Reply to critics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindahl, H.K.

    2014-01-01

    In my reply to critics I address a raft of issues raised by the commentators to Fault Lines of Globalization. These issues include: the radicalization of the Husserlian concept of intentionality as differance; the irreducibility of a-legality to (il)legality; the relation between legal orders and

  17. Critical Practice: Teaching "Shakespeare."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellor, Bronwyn; Patterson, Annette

    2000-01-01

    Describes how the authors taught their students to read "Hamlet" from a critical literacy perspective, analyzing how particular readings of texts and characters are constructed or produced; how they are determined by historical and cultural conventions; analyzing values that various readings support or challenge--rather than trying to…

  18. Alternative methods in criticality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedicini, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    In this thesis two new methods of calculating the criticality of a nuclear system are introduced and verified. Most methods of determining the criticality of a nuclear system depend implicitly upon knowledge of the angular flux, net currents, or moments of the angular flux, on the system surface in order to know the leakage. For small systems, leakage is the predominant element in criticality calculations. Unfortunately, in these methods the least accurate fluxes, currents, or moments are those occurring near system surfaces or interfaces. This is due to a mathematical inability to satisfy rigorously with a finite order angular polynomial expansion or angular difference technique the physical boundary conditions which occur on these surfaces. Consequently, one must accept large computational effort or less precise criticality calculations. The methods introduced in this thesis, including a direct leakage operator and an indirect multiple scattering leakage operator, obviate the need to know angular fluxes accurately at system boundaries. Instead, the system wide scalar flux, an integral quantity which is substantially easier to obtain with good precision is sufficient to obtain production, absorption, scattering, and leakage rates

  19. Critical groups - basic concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, M.W.

    1992-01-01

    The potential exposure pathways from the land application site to man are presented. It is emphasised that the critical group is not necessary the population group closest to the source. It could be the group impact by the most significant pathways(s). Only by assessing the importance of each of these pathways and then combining them can a proper choice of critical group be made. It would be wrong to select a critical group on the basis that it seems the most probable one, before the pathways have been properly assessed. A calculation in Carter (1983) suggested that for the operating mine site, the annual doses to an Aboriginal person, a service worker and a local housewife, were all about the same and were in the range 0.1 to 0.2 mSv per year. Thus it may be that for the land application area, the critical group turns out to be non-Aboriginal rather than the expected Aboriginal group. 6 refs., 3 figs

  20. Criticality accident in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, A.R. de.

    1984-01-01

    A recent criticality type accident, ocurred in Argetina, is commented. Considerations about the nature of the facility where this accident took place, its genesis, type of operation carried out on the day of the event, and the medical aspects involved are done. (Author) [pt

  1. APS Quantum Critical Higgs

    CERN Document Server

    Bellazzini, Brando; Hubisz, Jay; Lee, Seung J.; Serra, Javi; Terning, John

    2016-01-01

    The appearance of the light Higgs boson at the LHC is difficult to explain, particularly in light of naturalness arguments in quantum field theory. However light scalars can appear in condensed matter systems when parameters (like the amount of doping) are tuned to a critical point. At zero temperature these quantum critical points are directly analogous to the finely tuned standard model. In this paper we explore a class of models with a Higgs near a quantum critical point that exhibits non-mean-field behavior. We discuss the parametrization of the effects of a Higgs emerging from such a critical point in terms of form factors, and present two simple realistic scenarios based on either generalized free fields or a 5D dual in AdS space. For both of these models we consider the processes $gg\\to ZZ$ and $gg\\to hh$, which can be used to gain information about the Higgs scaling dimension and IR transition scale from the experimental data.

  2. Comment on critical instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, S.F.; Suzuki, Mahiko

    1992-01-01

    We discuss the problem of the mass splitting between top and bottom quarks, within the context of Nambu-Jona-Lasinio type models involving top and bottom quark condensates. We interpret the phenomenon of 'critical instability' recently proposed to account for such a mass splitting as the fine-tuning of two vacuum expectation values in a composite two-Higgs doublet model. (orig.)

  3. Alternative methods in criticality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedicini, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Two new methods of calculating the criticality of a nuclear system are introduced and verified. Most methods of determining the criticality of a nuclear system depend implicitly upon knowledge of the angular flux, net currents, or moments of the angular flux, on the system surface in order to know the leakage. For small systems, leakage is the predominant element in criticality calculations. Unfortunately, in these methods the least accurate fluxes, currents, or moments are those occuring near system surfaces or interfaces. This is due to a mathematical inability to satisfy rigorously with a finite order angular polynomial expansion or angular difference technique the physical boundary conditions which occur on these surfaces. Consequently, one must accept large computational effort or less precise criticality calculations. The methods introduced in this thesis, including a direct leakage operator and an indirect multiple scattering leakage operator, obviate the need to know angular fluxes accurately at system boundaries. Instead, the system wide scalar flux, an integral quantity which is substantially easier to obtain with good precision, is sufficient to obtain production, absorption, scattering, and leakage rates

  4. Quantum Critical Higgs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellazzini, Brando; Csáki, Csaba; Hubisz, Jay; Lee, Seung J.; Serra, Javi; Terning, John

    2016-10-01

    The appearance of the light Higgs boson at the LHC is difficult to explain, particularly in light of naturalness arguments in quantum field theory. However, light scalars can appear in condensed matter systems when parameters (like the amount of doping) are tuned to a critical point. At zero temperature these quantum critical points are directly analogous to the finely tuned standard model. In this paper, we explore a class of models with a Higgs near a quantum critical point that exhibits non-mean-field behavior. We discuss the parametrization of the effects of a Higgs emerging from such a critical point in terms of form factors, and present two simple realistic scenarios based on either generalized free fields or a 5D dual in anti-de Sitter space. For both of these models, we consider the processes g g →Z Z and g g →h h , which can be used to gain information about the Higgs scaling dimension and IR transition scale from the experimental data.

  5. Assessment of criticality safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, R.C.; Heaberlin, S.W.; Clayton, E.D.; Carter, R.D.

    1979-01-01

    A study was made of 100 violations of criticality safety specifications reported over a 10-y period in the operations of fuel reprocessing plants. The seriousness of each rule violation was evaluated by assigning it a severity index value. The underlying causes or reasons, for the violations were identified. A criticality event tree was constructed using the parameters, causes, and reasons found in the analysis of the infractions. The event tree provides a means for visualizing the paths to an accidental criticality. Some 65% of the violations were caused by misinterpretation on the part of the operator, being attributed to a lack of clarity in the specification and insufficient training; 33% were attributed to lack of care, whereas only 2% were caused by mechanical failure. A fault tree was constructed by assembling the events that could contribute to an accident. With suitable data on the probabilities of contributing events, the probability of the accident's occurrence can be forecast. Estimated probabilities for criticality were made, based on the limited data available, that in this case indicate a minimum time span of 244 y of plant operation per accident ranging up to approx. 3000 y subject to the various underlying assumptions made. Some general suggestions for improvement are formulated based on the cases studied. Although conclusions for other plants may differ in detail, the general method of analysis and the fault tree logic should prove applicable. 4 figures, 8 tables

  6. Correlation of superconductor strand, cable, and dipole critical currents in CBA magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannenbaum, M.J.; Garber, M.; Sampson, W.B.

    1982-01-01

    A calibration between vendor critical current data for 0.0268'' diameter superconductor strand supplied to Fermilab, and the BNL 10 -12 Ωcm critical current specification is presented. Vendor critical current data for over 400 Fermilab type billets are shown, both as supplied by the vendor and converted to BNL units. Predictions of cable critical current are made using the sum of the critical currents of the 23 strands, where all strands from the same half billet are assigned the same critical current. The measured critical current shows excellent correlation to the predicted value and is approximately 14 +- 2 percent below it. Colliding Beam Accelerator (CBA) full length dipoles reach the conductor critical current limit, essentially without training. Magnet performance is predictable from the measured critical current of a short sample of cable to within 2%

  7. Entanglement negativity in the critical Ising chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calabrese, Pasquale; Tagliacozzo, Luca; Tonni, Erik

    2013-01-01

    We study the scaling of the traces of the integer powers of the partially transposed reduced density matrix Tr(ρ A T 2 ) n and of the entanglement negativity for two spin blocks as a function of their length and separation in the critical Ising chain. For two adjacent blocks, we show that tensor network calculations agree with universal conformal field theory (CFT) predictions. In the case of two disjoint blocks the CFT predictions are recovered only after taking into account the finite size corrections induced by the finite length of the blocks. (paper)

  8. Critical theory and holocaust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krstić Predrag

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the author is attempting to establish the relationship - or the lack of it - of the Critical Theory to the "Jewish question" and justification of perceiving signs of Jewish religious heritage in the thought of the representatives of this movement. The holocaust marked out by the name of "Auschwitz", is here tested as a point where the nature of this relationship has been decided. In this encounter with the cardinal challenge for the contemporary social theory, the particularity of the Frankfurt School reaction is here revealed through Adorno installing Auschwitz as unexpected but lawful emblem of the ending of the course that modern history has assumed. The critique of this "fascination" with Auschwitz, as well as certain theoretical pacification and measured positioning of the holocaust into discontinued plane of "unfinished" and continuation and closure of the valued project, are given through communicative-theoretical pre-orientation of Jürgen Habermas’s Critical Theory and of his followers. Finally, through the work of Detlev Claussen, it is suggested that in the youngest generation of Adorno’s students there are signs of revision to once already revised Critical Theory and a kind of defractured and differentiated return to the initial understanding of the decisiveness of the holocaust experience. This shift in the attitude of the Critical Theory thinkers to the provocation of holocaust is not, however, particularly reflected towards the status of Jews and their tradition, but more to the age old questioning and explanatory patterns for which they served as a "model". The question of validity of the enlightenment project, the nature of occidental rationalism, (nonexistence of historical theology and understanding of the identity and emancipation - describe the circle of problems around which the disagreement is concentrated in the social critical theory.

  9. Critical geometry of a thermal big bang

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshordi, Niayesh; Magueijo, João

    2016-11-01

    We explore the space of scalar-tensor theories containing two nonconformal metrics, and find a discontinuity pointing to a "critical" cosmological solution. Due to the different maximal speeds of propagation for matter and gravity, the cosmological fluctuations start off inside the horizon even without inflation, and will more naturally have a thermal origin (since there is never vacuum domination). The critical model makes an unambiguous, nontuned prediction for the spectral index of the scalar fluctuations: nS=0.96478 (64 ) . Considering also that no gravitational waves are produced, we have unveiled the most predictive model on offer. The model has a simple geometrical interpretation as a probe 3-brane embedded in an E AdS2×E3 geometry.

  10. Critical Education, Critical Pedagogies, Marxist Education in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Jean Ann; Morris, Doug; Gounari, Panayota; Agostinone-Wilson, Faith

    2015-01-01

    As critical pedagogy becomes more mainstream on the educational landscape in the United States, it is important to revisit the original tenets of critical pedagogy and explore their current manifestations. Since the beginning of "criticalism" from the theoretical/foundational work of the Frankfurt School of Critical Social Theory,…

  11. Universal signatures of fractionalized quantum critical points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isakov, Sergei V; Melko, Roger G; Hastings, Matthew B

    2012-01-13

    Ground states of certain materials can support exotic excitations with a charge equal to a fraction of the fundamental electron charge. The condensation of these fractionalized particles has been predicted to drive unusual quantum phase transitions. Through numerical and theoretical analysis of a physical model of interacting lattice bosons, we establish the existence of such an exotic critical point, called XY*. We measure a highly nonclassical critical exponent η = 1.493 and construct a universal scaling function of winding number distributions that directly demonstrates the distinct topological sectors of an emergent Z(2) gauge field. The universal quantities used to establish this exotic transition can be used to detect other fractionalized quantum critical points in future model and material systems.

  12. Avoided critical behavior in dynamically forced wetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoeijer, Jacco H; Delon, Giles; Fermigier, Marc; Andreotti, Bruno

    2006-05-05

    A solid object can be coated by a nonwetting liquid since a receding contact line cannot exceed a critical speed. In this Letter we study the dynamical wetting transition at which a liquid film gets deposited by withdrawing a vertical plate out of a liquid reservoir. It has recently been predicted that this wetting transition is critical with diverging time scales and coincides with the disappearance of stationary menisci. We demonstrate experimentally and theoretically that the transition is due to the formation of a solitary wave, well below the critical point. As a consequence, relaxation times remain finite at threshold. The structure of the liquid deposited on the plate involves a capillary ridge that does not trivially match the Landau-Levich film.

  13. The critical thermal expansion of gadolinium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, K.; Lanchester, P.C.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements have been made of the critical thermal expansion of single crystals of gadolinium, prepared by solid state electrotransport processing. Although the expansion data can be fitted to a simple power law with exponents lambda + =-0.25, lambda - =-0.33, these values are not predicted by theory and a discontinuity remains at Tsub(c)=293.620 K. It is suggested that the results relate to a region of crossover to uniaxial dipolar behaviour. (Auth.)

  14. Conformal field theories and critical phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Bowei

    1993-01-01

    In this article we present a brief review of the conformal symmetry and the two dimensional conformal quantum field theories. As concrete applications of the conformal theories to the critical phenomena in statistical systems, we calculate the value of central charge and the anomalous scale dimensions of the Z 2 symmetric quantum chain with boundary condition. The results are compatible with the prediction of the conformal field theories

  15. Diameter effect on critical heat flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanase, A.; Cheng, S.C.; Groeneveld, D.C.; Shan, J.Q.

    2009-01-01

    The critical heat flux look-up table (CHF LUT) is widely used to predict CHF for various applications, including design and safety analysis of nuclear reactors. Using the CHF LUT for round tubes having inside diameters different from the reference 8 mm involves conversion of CHF to 8 mm. Different authors [Becker, K.M., 1965. An Analytical and Experimental Study of Burnout Conditions in Vertical Round Ducts, Aktiebolaget Atomenergie Report AE 177, Sweden; Boltenko, E.A., et al., 1989. Effect of tube diameter on CHF at various two phase flow regimes, Report IPE-1989; Biasi, L., Clerici, G.C., Garriba, S., Sala, R., Tozzi, A., 1967. Studies on Burnout, Part 3, Energia Nucleare, vol. 14, pp. 530-536; Groeneveld, D.C., Cheng, S.C., Doan, T., 1986. AECL-UO critical heat flux look-up table. Heat Transfer Eng., 7, 46-62; Groeneveld et al., 1996; Hall, D.D., Mudawar, I., 2000. Critical heat flux for water flow in tubes - II subcooled CHF correlations. Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 43, 2605-2640; Wong, W.C., 1996. Effect of tube diameter on critical heat flux, MaSC dissertation, Ottawa Carleton Institute for Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering, University of Ottawa] have proposed several types of correlations or factors to describe the diameter effect on CHF. The present work describes the derivation of new diameter correction factor and compares it with several existing prediction methods

  16. Data collapse and critical dynamics in neuronal avalanche data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Thomas; Friedman, Nir; Dahmen, Karin; Beggs, John; Deville, Lee; Ito, Shinya

    2012-02-01

    The tasks of information processing, computation, and response to stimuli require neural computation to be remarkably flexible and diverse. To optimally satisfy the demands of neural computation, neuronal networks have been hypothesized to operate near a non-equilibrium critical point. In spite of their importance for neural dynamics, experimental evidence for critical dynamics has been primarily limited to power law statistics that can also emerge from non-critical mechanisms. By tracking the firing of large numbers of synaptically connected cortical neurons and comparing the resulting data to the predictions of critical phenomena, we show that cortical tissues in vitro can function near criticality. Among the most striking predictions of critical dynamics is that the mean temporal profiles of avalanches of widely varying durations are quantitatively described by a single universal scaling function (data collapse). We show for the first time that this prediction is confirmed in neuronal networks. We also show that the data have three additional features predicted by critical phenomena: approximate power law distributions of avalanche sizes and durations, samples in subcritical and supercritical phases, and scaling laws between anomalous exponents.

  17. Validating analysis methodologies used in burnup credit criticality calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, M.C.; Napolitano, D.G.

    1992-01-01

    The concept of allowing reactivity credit for the depleted (or burned) state of pressurized water reactor fuel in the licensing of spent fuel facilities introduces a new challenge to members of the nuclear criticality community. The primary difference in this analysis approach is the technical ability to calculate spent fuel compositions (or inventories) and to predict their effect on the system multiplication factor. Isotopic prediction codes are used routinely for in-core physics calculations and the prediction of radiation source terms for both thermal and shielding analyses, but represent an innovation for criticality specialists. This paper discusses two methodologies currently being developed to specifically evaluate isotopic composition and reactivity for the burnup credit concept. A comprehensive approach to benchmarking and validating the methods is also presented. This approach involves the analysis of commercial reactor critical data, fuel storage critical experiments, chemical assay isotopic data, and numerical benchmark calculations

  18. Critical Digital Tourism Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyimóthy, Szilvia; Munar, Ana María

    2013-01-01

    This paper advocates the need for a critical and cross-disciplinary research agenda on the field of digital technologies and tourism. The changing virtual landscape of tourism has received increased attention by tourism scholars. However, contemporary studies on information technologies (IT......) are approached mostly from a business administration perspective and informed by conceptual frameworks developed in management and marketing. IT studies in tourism are still at a stage similar to the first advocacy phase of tourism research in general (Jafari, 1990) and are seldom inspired by relevant...... to studying digital socio-technical systems and virtual mediation in tourism. Critical Digital Tourism Studies opens a new cross-disciplinary field where the sociality of virtual tourism interactions is examined (entailing the study of structures, social rules, ideologies, power relations, sustainability...

  19. Critical Virtue Ethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Schmidt

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the publication of Anscombe’s famous paper “Modern Moral Philosophy” (1958, virtue ethics has become a matter of discussion among scholars. At least four charges have been raised against virtue ethics, one of which is the charge of promoting undue enthusiasm regarding the moral fitness of human beings. This article explores the limits of virtue ethics with regard to the frailty of human virtuousness. After giving a report of the charges raised against virtue ethics from the perspective of empirical ethics, the author presents the idea of what he would like to call critical virtue ethics as seen by three Lutheran thinkers: Immanuel Kant, Friedrich Nietzsche and Martin Luther himself. He will demonstrate that the empirical contestation of virtue ethics shows a remarkable resemblance to insights found in Luther, Kant and Nietzsche. And finally, the writer draws tentative conclusions about the future of critical virtue ethics.

  20. Criticality in Neuronal Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Nir; Ito, Shinya; Brinkman, Braden A. W.; Shimono, Masanori; Deville, R. E. Lee; Beggs, John M.; Dahmen, Karin A.; Butler, Tom C.

    2012-02-01

    In recent years, experiments detecting the electrical firing patterns in slices of in vitro brain tissue have been analyzed to suggest the presence of scale invariance and possibly criticality in the brain. Much of the work done however has been limited in two ways: 1) the data collected is from local field potentials that do not represent the firing of individual neurons; 2) the analysis has been primarily limited to histograms. In our work we examine data based on the firing of individual neurons (spike data), and greatly extend the analysis by considering shape collapse and exponents. Our results strongly suggest that the brain operates near a tuned critical point of a highly distinctive universality class.

  1. Systematics of criticality data of special actinide nuclides deduced through the Trombay criticality formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, M.; SubbaRao, K.; Garg, S.B.; Acharya, G.V.

    1989-01-01

    The authors describe a number of interesting systematics and correlations deduced by analyzing the criticality data of special actinide nuclides using concepts embodied in the Trombay critically formula (TCF). The κ ∞ of fast metal actinide nuclides gives a remarkable linear correlation with the fissility parameter Z 2 /A. The neutron leakage probability of all fast metal cores characterized using a constant parameter σ std enables computation of the critical mass value of any unknown fissile nuclide knowing only its Z 2 /A value. Since the neutron leakage probability from dilute fissile solutions is primarily governed by the scattering/slowing down properties of the hydrogen present in water, critical masses and subcritical limits can be predicted for any water-reflected system at any specified hydrogen-to-actinide atomic ratio knowing only the κ ∞ value of the given fissile solution

  2. Practical aspects of geological prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallio, W.J.; Peck, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    Nuclear waste disposal requires that geology be a predictive science. The prediction of future events rests on (1) recognizing the periodicity of geologic events; (2) defining a critical dimension of effect, such as the area of a drainage basin, the length of a fault trace, etc; and (3) using our understanding of active processes the project the frequency and magnitude of future events in the light of geological principles. Of importance to nuclear waste disposal are longer term processes such as continental denudation and removal of materials by glacial erosion. Constant testing of projections will allow the practical limits of predicting geological events to be defined. 11 refs

  3. The critical catastrophe revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Mulatier, Clélia; Rosso, Alberto; Dumonteil, Eric; Zoia, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The neutron population in a prototype model of nuclear reactor can be described in terms of a collection of particles confined in a box and undergoing three key random mechanisms: diffusion, reproduction due to fissions, and death due to absorption events. When the reactor is operated at the critical point, and fissions are exactly compensated by absorptions, the whole neutron population might in principle go to extinction because of the wild fluctuations induced by births and deaths. This phenomenon, which has been named critical catastrophe, is nonetheless never observed in practice: feedback mechanisms acting on the total population, such as human intervention, have a stabilizing effect. In this work, we revisit the critical catastrophe by investigating the spatial behaviour of the fluctuations in a confined geometry. When the system is free to evolve, the neutrons may display a wild patchiness (clustering). On the contrary, imposing a population control on the total population acts also against the local fluctuations, and may thus inhibit the spatial clustering. The effectiveness of population control in quenching spatial fluctuations will be shown to depend on the competition between the mixing time of the neutrons (i.e. the average time taken for a particle to explore the finite viable space) and the extinction time

  4. Relative Critical Points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra Lewis

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Relative equilibria of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian systems with symmetry are critical points of appropriate scalar functions parametrized by the Lie algebra (or its dual of the symmetry group. Setting aside the structures – symplectic, Poisson, or variational – generating dynamical systems from such functions highlights the common features of their construction and analysis, and supports the construction of analogous functions in non-Hamiltonian settings. If the symmetry group is nonabelian, the functions are invariant only with respect to the isotropy subgroup of the given parameter value. Replacing the parametrized family of functions with a single function on the product manifold and extending the action using the (coadjoint action on the algebra or its dual yields a fully invariant function. An invariant map can be used to reverse the usual perspective: rather than selecting a parametrized family of functions and finding their critical points, conditions under which functions will be critical on specific orbits, typically distinguished by isotropy class, can be derived. This strategy is illustrated using several well-known mechanical systems – the Lagrange top, the double spherical pendulum, the free rigid body, and the Riemann ellipsoids – and generalizations of these systems.

  5. Plant critical concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Regan, P.J.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the effort summarized in this paper is to support O and M cost reduction efforts by focusing resources on components and processes critical to plant performance. This effort will identify where resources on nonplant critical components and processes can be reduced or eliminated. This method will use a functional assessment as the basis for component-specific evaluations and ranking. This effort consists of two stages conducted in series. The first stage is to deterministically identify that set of plant components that are relevant from a plant performance perspective (i.e., safety, economics, reliability). The second stage probabilistically ranks that set of plant components from an importance perspective, where importance pertains to the particular application and is probabilistically weighted. The results of a pilot study identified that only a relatively small set of components are truly critical from an integrated plant performance perspective. These results are consistent with work being conducted at other nuclear power plants, as well as other commercial facilities. Initial implementation of this effort is estimated to reduce O and M costs on the order of $1 million per year. Subsequent applications are anticipated to increase that savings to $4--$5 million per year

  6. Criticality alarm device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Takashi.

    1995-01-01

    In a critical alarm device comprising an n-number of radiation detectors and a 2/3 logic module, the 2/3 logic module comprises a rectifier inputting an output of an AC power and outputting it as a full wave-rectified, DC voltage, an analog/digital converter inputting the output from the rectifier, putting it to analog/digital conversion and continuously storing it into a memory, a latch circuit inputting critical signals from the 2/3 logic and holding them and outputting latch signals, and a means for outputting timing signals for data storage to a memory based on clocks at a predetermined period and outputting timing signals for stopping the data storage to the memory after passing a predetermined period from the inputting time point if the latch signals are inputted from the latch circuit. Then, judgement whether the generation of criticality is caused by an actual radiation detection or by noises from the power source is enabled, to provide extremely high reliability. (N.H.)

  7. Multi-critical points in weakly anisotropic magnetic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basten, J.A.J.

    1979-02-01

    This report starts with a rather extensive presentation of the concepts and ideas which constitute the basis of the modern theory of static critical phenomena. It is shown how at a critical point the semi-phenomenological concepts of universality and scaling are directly related to the divergence of the correlation length and how they are extended to a calculational method for critical behaviour in Wilson's Renormalization-Group (RG) approach. Subsequently the predictions of the molecular-field and RG-theories on the phase transitions and critical behaviour in weakly anisotropic antiferromagnets are treated. In a magnetic field applied along the easy axis, these materials can display an (H,T) phase diagram which contains either a bicritical point or a tetracritical point. Especially the behaviour close to these multi-critical points, as predicted by the extended-scaling theory, is discussed. (Auth.)

  8. Prediction Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Christian Franz; Ivens, Bjørn Sven; Ohneberg, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, Prediction Markets gained growing interest as a forecasting tool among researchers as well as practitioners, which resulted in an increasing number of publications. In order to track the latest development of research, comprising the extent and focus of research, this article...... provides a comprehensive review and classification of the literature related to the topic of Prediction Markets. Overall, 316 relevant articles, published in the timeframe from 2007 through 2013, were identified and assigned to a herein presented classification scheme, differentiating between descriptive...... works, articles of theoretical nature, application-oriented studies and articles dealing with the topic of law and policy. The analysis of the research results reveals that more than half of the literature pool deals with the application and actual function tests of Prediction Markets. The results...

  9. Criticality accident alarm system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malenfant, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    The American National Standard ANSI/ANS-8.3-1986, Criticality Accident Alarm System provides guidance for the establishment and maintenance of an alarm system to initiate personnel evacuation in the event of inadvertent criticality. In addition to identifying the physical features of the components of the system, the characteristics of accidents of concern are carefully delineated. Unfortunately, this ANSI Standard has led to considerable confusion in interpretation, and there is evidence that the ''minimum accident of concern'' may not be appropriate. Furthermore, although intended as a guide, the provisions of the standard are being rigorously applied, sometimes with interpretations that are not consistent. Although the standard is clear in the use of absorbed dose in free air of 20 rad, at least one installation has interpreted the requirement to apply to dose in soft tissue. The standard is also clear in specifying the response to both neutrons and gamma rays. An assembly of uranyl fluoride enriched to 5% 235 U was operated to simulate a potential accident. The dose, delivered in a free run excursion 2 m from the surface of the vessel, was greater than 500 rad, without ever exceeding a rate of 20 rad/min, which is the set point for activating an alarm that meets the standard. The presence of an alarm system would not have prevented any of the five major accidents in chemical operations nor is it absolutely certain that the alarms were solely responsible for reducing personnel exposures following the accident. Nevertheless, criticality alarm systems are now the subject of great effort and expense. 13 refs

  10. Critical infrastructure protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, F. [Canadian Electricity Association, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2003-04-01

    The need to protect critical electrical infrastructure from terrorist attacks, or other physical damage, including weather related events, or the potential impact of computer viruses and other attacks on IT resources are discussed. Activities of the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) are highlighted which seek to safeguard the North American bulk electric power system principally through the Information Sharing and Analysis Sector (ES-ISAC). ES-ISAC serves the electricity sector by facilitating communication between electric sector participants, federal government and other critical infrastructure industries by disseminating threat indications, analyses and warnings, together with interpretations, to assist the industry in taking infrastructure protection actions. Attention is drawn to the numerous cyber incidents in recent years, which although resulted in no loss of service to electricity customers so far, in at least one instance (the January 25th SOL-Slammer worm incident) resulted in degradation of service in a number of sectors, including financial, transportation and telecommunication services. The increasing frequency of cyber-based attacks, coupled with the industry's growing dependence on e-commerce and electronic controls, are good reasons to believe that critical infrastructure protection (CIP) poses a serious challenge to the industry's risk management practices. The Canadian Electricity Association (CEA) is an active participant in ES-ISAC and works cooperatively with a range of partners, such as the Edison Electric Institute and the American Public Power Association to ensure coordination and effective protection program delivery for the electric power sector. The Early Warning System (EWS) developed by the CIP Working Group is one of the results of this cooperation. EWS uses the Internet, e-mail, web-enabled cell phones and Blackberry hand-held devices to deliver real-time threat information to members on a 24/7 basis. EWS

  11. Are abrupt climate changes predictable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditlevsen, Peter

    2013-04-01

    It is taken for granted that the limited predictability in the initial value problem, the weather prediction, and the predictability of the statistics are two distinct problems. Lorenz (1975) dubbed this predictability of the first and the second kind respectively. Predictability of the first kind in a chaotic dynamical system is limited due to the well-known critical dependence on initial conditions. Predictability of the second kind is possible in an ergodic system, where either the dynamics is known and the phase space attractor can be characterized by simulation or the system can be observed for such long times that the statistics can be obtained from temporal averaging, assuming that the attractor does not change in time. For the climate system the distinction between predictability of the first and the second kind is fuzzy. This difficulty in distinction between predictability of the first and of the second kind is related to the lack of scale separation between fast and slow components of the climate system. The non-linear nature of the problem furthermore opens the possibility of multiple attractors, or multiple quasi-steady states. As the ice-core records show, the climate has been jumping between different quasi-stationary climates, stadials and interstadials through the Dansgaard-Oechger events. Such a jump happens very fast when a critical tipping point has been reached. The question is: Can such a tipping point be predicted? This is a new kind of predictability: the third kind. If the tipping point is reached through a bifurcation, where the stability of the system is governed by some control parameter, changing in a predictable way to a critical value, the tipping is predictable. If the sudden jump occurs because internal chaotic fluctuations, noise, push the system across a barrier, the tipping is as unpredictable as the triggering noise. In order to hint at an answer to this question, a careful analysis of the high temporal resolution NGRIP isotope

  12. Critical Thinking versus Neurosexism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Reverter-Bañón

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to offer a view of the assumptions that guide the practice of claiming sex differences in the brain. After the realization that much of the research and publication of neuroscientific findings assume such a difference, we found a great deal of what has been called neurosexism. As a way to overcome it and from a feminist theory with a political commitment we propose a critical approach to the neurosciences. This is understood as a reflective collaboration between disciplines that could provide a framework for overcoming prejudices in thinking and designing science.

  13. Critical Zen art history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory P. A. Levin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This essay sketches a history of the study of Zen art from the late nineteenth century to post-war reconsiderations, leading towards what I term “critical Zen art studies.” The latter, I suggest, has been undertaken by historians of art and others to challenge normative definitions of Zen art based on modern constructs, revise understanding of the types and functions of visual art important to Chan/Sŏn/Zen Buddhist monasteries, and study iconographies and forms not as a transparent aesthetic indices to Zen Mind or No Mind but as rhetorically, ritually, and socially complex, even unruly, events of representation.

  14. Critical cyberculture studies

    CERN Document Server

    Silver, David; Jones, Steve

    2006-01-01

    Starting in the early 1990s, journalists and scholars began responding to and trying to take account of new technologies and their impact on our lives. By the end of the decade, the full-fledged study of cyberculture had arrived. Today, there exists a large body of critical work on the subject, with cutting-edge studies probing beyond the mere existence of virtual communities and online identities to examine the social, cultural, and economic relationships that take place online. Taking stock of the exciting work that is being done and positing what cyberculture's future might look like, Criti

  15. Predicting unpredictability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Steven J.

    2018-04-01

    Analysts and markets have struggled to predict a number of phenomena, such as the rise of natural gas, in US energy markets over the past decade or so. Research shows the challenge may grow because the industry — and consequently the market — is becoming increasingly volatile.

  16. Plant critical concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Regan, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    The achievement of operation and maintenance (O ampersand M) cost reductions is a prime concern for plant operators. Initiatives by the nuclear industry to address this concern are under way and/or in development. These efforts include plant reliability studies, reliability-centered maintenance, risk ranking and testing philosophies, performance-based testing philosophies, graded quality assurance, and so forth. This paper presents the results of an effort to develop a methodology that integrates and applies the common data and analysis requirements for a number of risk-based and performance-based initiatives. This initial phase of the effort applied the methodology and its results to two initiatives. These were the procurement function and the preventive maintenance function. This effort integrated multiple programs and functions to identify those components that are truly critical from an integrated plant performance perspective. The paper describes the scope of the effort, the development of a methodology to identify plant critical components, and the application of these results to the maintenance rule compliance, preventive maintenance, and procurement functions at the candidate plant

  17. Critical heat flux evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banner, D.

    1995-01-01

    Critical heat flux (CHF) is of importance for nuclear safety and represents the major limiting factors for reactor cores. Critical heat flux is caused by a sharp reduction in the heat transfer coefficient located at the outer surface of fuel rods. Safety requires that this phenomenon also called the boiling crisis should be precluded under nominal or incidental conditions (Class I and II events). CHF evaluation in reactor cores is basically a two-step approach. Fuel assemblies are first tested in experimental loops in order to determine CHF limits under various flow conditions. Then, core thermal-hydraulic calculations are performed for safety evaluation. The paper will go into more details about the boiling crisis in order to pinpoint complexity and lack of fundamental understanding in many areas. Experimental test sections needed to collect data over wide thermal-hydraulic and geometric ranges are described CHF safety margin evaluation in reactors cores is discussed by presenting how uncertainties are mentioned. From basic considerations to current concerns, the following topics are discussed; knowledge of the boiling crisis, CHF predictors, and advances thermal-hydraulic codes. (authors). 15 refs., 4 figs

  18. Super critical water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumaz, P.; Antoni, O; Arnoux, P.; Bergeron, A; Renault, C.; Rimpault, G.

    2005-01-01

    Water is used as a calori-porter and moderator in the most major nuclear centers which are actually in function. In the pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR), water is maintained under critical point of water (21 bar, 374 Centigrade) which limits the efficiency of thermodynamic cycle of energy conversion (yield gain of about 33%) Crossing the critical point, one can then use s upercritical water , the obtained pressure and temperature allow a significant yield gains. In addition, the supercritical water offers important properties. Particularly there is no more possible coexistence between vapor and liquid. Therefore, we don't have more boiling problem, one of the phenomena which limits the specific power of PWR and BWR. Since 1950s, the reactor of supercritical water was the subject of studies more or less detailed but neglected. From the early 1990s, this type of conception benefits of some additional interests. Therefore, in the international term G eneration IV , the supercritical water reactors had been considered as one of the big options for study as Generation IV reactors. In the CEA, an active city has engaged from 1930 with the participation to a European program: The HPWR (High Performance Light Water Reactor). In this contest, the R and D studies are focused on the fields of neutrons, thermodynamic and materials. The CEA intends to pursue a limited effort of R and D in this field, in the framework of international cooperation, preferring the study of versions of rapid spectrum. (author)

  19. The Department of Energy nuclear criticality safety program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felty, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper broadly covers key events and activities from which the Department of Energy Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) evolved. The NCSP maintains fundamental infrastructure that supports operational criticality safety programs. This infrastructure includes continued development and maintenance of key calculational tools, differential and integral data measurements, benchmark compilation, development of training resources, hands-on training, and web-based systems to enhance information preservation and dissemination. The NCSP was initiated in response to Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 97-2, Criticality Safety, and evolved from a predecessor program, the Nuclear Criticality Predictability Program, that was initiated in response to Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 93-2, The Need for Critical Experiment Capability. This paper also discusses the role Dr. Sol Pearlstein played in helping the Department of Energy lay the foundation for a robust and enduring criticality safety infrastructure.

  20. The relationship between family expressed emotion, perceived criticism and criticism sensitivity and psychiatric outcomes following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alway, Yvette; Ponsford, Jennie; McKay, Adam

    2016-12-30

    Family expressed emotion (EE) is a strong predictor of outcome in a range of psychiatric and medical conditions. This study aimed to examine the relationship between family EE-criticism, patient perceived criticism and criticism sensitivity and psychiatric disorders following moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Participants were 60 patients with TBI and their family members. Patients were assessed for psychiatric disorders using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-I) and completed the Perceived Criticism Measure (PCM) to determine levels of perceived criticism and criticism sensitivity. Family members completed the Family Questionnaire (FQ) to assess patient directed EE-criticism. Patients were reassessed approximately 12-months post-baseline. After controlling for diagnostic status at baseline, high criticism sensitivity at baseline was associated with greater probability of psychiatric diagnosis at follow-up (odds ratio=3.99, 95% CI=1.15-13.71). Family EE-criticism and perceived criticism were not predictive of patient diagnostic status at follow-up, but patients with high EE-family members were more likely to have a concurrent psychiatric diagnosis at baseline. Findings suggest that sensitivity to interpersonal criticism may have a role in the development and course of psychiatric disorders following TBI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Critical wall shear stress for the EHEDG test method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bo Boye Busk; Friis, Alan

    2004-01-01

    In order to simulate the results of practical cleaning tests on closed processing equipment, based on wall shear stress predicted by computational fluid dynamics, a critical wall shear stress is required for that particular cleaning method. This work presents investigations that provide a critical...... wall shear stress of 3 Pa for the standardised EHEDG cleaning test method. The cleaning tests were performed on a test disc placed in a radial flowcell assay. Turbulent flow conditions were generated and the corresponding wall shear stresses were predicted from CFD simulations. Combining wall shear...... stress predictions from a simulation using the low Re k-epsilon and one using the two-layer model of Norris and Reynolds were found to produce reliable predictions compared to empirical solutions for the ideal flow case. The comparison of wall shear stress curves predicted for the real RFC...

  2. What Makes Critical Thinking Critical for Adult ESL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miekley, Joshua P.

    2014-01-01

    Critical-thinking skills help to prepare adult education students for a successful transition to college degree programs and for job advancement. Yet fostering critical thinking poses a challenge to ESL instructors. Brookfield (2012) provides a way forward for adult educators when he explains that the crux of critical thinking is to discover one's…

  3. Critical Thinking in Criminology: Critical Reflections on Learning and Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Loene M.

    2017-01-01

    Fostering critical thinking abilities amongst students is one component of preparing them to navigate uncertain and complex social lives and employment circumstances. One conceptualisation of critical thinking, valuable in higher education, draws from critical theory to promote social justice and redress power inequities. This study explored how…

  4. Prediction of Chevrel superconducting phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savitskij, E.M.; Kiseleva, N.N.

    1978-01-01

    Made is an attempt of predicting the possibility of formation of compounds of Mo 3 Se 4 type structure having critical temperatures of transition into superconducting state more than 4.2 K. Cybernetic method of teaching an electronic computer to form notions is used for prediction. Prediction system constructs logic dependence of forming Chevrel superconducting phase of the Asub(x)Bsub(6)Ssub(8) composition (A being an element of the periodic system; B=Cr, Mo, W, Re) and Asub(x)Bsub(6)Ssub(8) compounds having a critical temperature of more than 4.2 K on the properties of A and B elements. A conclusion is made that W, Re, Cr do not form Chevrel phases of the Asub(x)Bsub(6)Ssub(8) composition as B component. Be, Hg, Ra, B, Ac are the reserve for obtaining Asub(x)Mosub(6)Ssub(8) phases. Agsub(x)Mosub(6)Ssub(8) compound may have a high critical temperature. The ways of a critical temperature increase for Chevrel phases are connected with the search of optimal technological conditions for already known superconducting compounds and also with introduction of impurities fixing a distance between sulfur cubes

  5. Unification predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghilencea, D.; Ross, G.G.; Lanzagorta, M.

    1997-07-01

    The unification of gauge couplings suggests that there is an underlying (supersymmetric) unification of the strong, electromagnetic and weak interactions. The prediction of the unification scale may be the first quantitative indication that this unification may extend to unification with gravity. We make a precise determination of these predictions for a class of models which extend the multiplet structure of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model to include the heavy states expected in many Grand Unified and/or superstring theories. We show that there is a strong cancellation between the 2-loop and threshold effects. As a result the net effect is smaller than previously thought, giving a small increase in both the unification scale and the value of the strong coupling at low energies. (author). 15 refs, 5 figs

  6. Mission Critical Occupation (MCO) Charts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — Agencies report resource data and targets for government-wide mission critical occupations and agency specific mission critical and/or high risk occupations. These...

  7. Endangered Species Act Critical Habitat

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Critical habitat (CH) is designated for the survival and recovery of species listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Critical...

  8. Critical Points of Contact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.; Wind, Simon; Lanng, Ditte Bendix

    2012-01-01

    In this brief article, we shall illustrate the application of the analytical and interventionist concept of ‘Critical Points of Contact’ (CPC) through a number of urban design studios. The notion of CPC has been developed over a span of the last three to four years and is reported in more detail...... elsewhere (Jensen & Morelli 2011). In this article, we will only discuss the conceptual and theoretical framing superficially, since our real interest is to show and discuss the concept's application value to spatial design in a number of urban design studios. The 'data' or the projects presented are seven...... in urban design at Aalborg University, where urban design consists of both an analytical and an interventionist field of operation. Furthermore, the content of the CPC concept links to research in mobilities, the network city, and urban design. These are among the core pillars of both the masters programme...

  9. Two-dimensional critical phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleur, H.

    1987-09-01

    Two dimensional critical systems are studied using transformation to free fields and conformal invariance methods. The relations between the two approaches are also studied. The analytical results obtained generally depend on universality hypotheses or on renormalization group trajectories which are not established rigorously, so numerical verifications, mainly using the transfer matrix approach, are presented. The exact determination of critical exponents; the partition functions of critical models on toruses; and results as the critical point is approached are discussed [fr

  10. Critical dynamics in population vaccinating behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pananos, A Demetri; Bury, Thomas M; Wang, Clara; Schonfeld, Justin; Mohanty, Sharada P; Nyhan, Brendan; Salathé, Marcel; Bauch, Chris T

    2017-12-26

    Vaccine refusal can lead to renewed outbreaks of previously eliminated diseases and even delay global eradication. Vaccinating decisions exemplify a complex, coupled system where vaccinating behavior and disease dynamics influence one another. Such systems often exhibit critical phenomena-special dynamics close to a tipping point leading to a new dynamical regime. For instance, critical slowing down (declining rate of recovery from small perturbations) may emerge as a tipping point is approached. Here, we collected and geocoded tweets about measles-mumps-rubella vaccine and classified their sentiment using machine-learning algorithms. We also extracted data on measles-related Google searches. We find critical slowing down in the data at the level of California and the United States in the years before and after the 2014-2015 Disneyland, California measles outbreak. Critical slowing down starts growing appreciably several years before the Disneyland outbreak as vaccine uptake declines and the population approaches the tipping point. However, due to the adaptive nature of coupled behavior-disease systems, the population responds to the outbreak by moving away from the tipping point, causing "critical speeding up" whereby resilience to perturbations increases. A mathematical model of measles transmission and vaccine sentiment predicts the same qualitative patterns in the neighborhood of a tipping point to greatly reduced vaccine uptake and large epidemics. These results support the hypothesis that population vaccinating behavior near the disease elimination threshold is a critical phenomenon. Developing new analytical tools to detect these patterns in digital social data might help us identify populations at heightened risk of widespread vaccine refusal. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  11. Developing Critical Curiosity in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Shelby; Seider, Scott

    2017-01-01

    Critical consciousness refers to the ways in which individuals come to understand and challenge oppressive social forces. Philosopher-educator Paulo Freire argued that critical curiosity--an eagerness to learn more about and develop a deep understanding of issues of social justice--serves as an important catalyst to critical consciousness…

  12. Critical Viewing and Participatory Democracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jodi R.

    1994-01-01

    Illustrates ways that the work of some communication scholars with resistant, oppositional, and critical audiences does not, however, endorse active public life. Attempts to realign the language of critical viewing with the goals of participatory democracy by suggesting qualities of critical viewing that are conducive to achieving and maintaining…

  13. Critical Quantitative Inquiry in Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stage, Frances K.; Wells, Ryan S.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter briefly traces the development of the concept of critical quantitative inquiry, provides an expanded conceptualization of the tasks of critical quantitative research, offers theoretical explanation and justification for critical research using quantitative methods, and previews the work of quantitative criticalists presented in this…

  14. Introductory lectures on critical phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khajehpour, M.R.H.

    1988-09-01

    After a presentation of classical models for phase transitions and critical phenomena (Van der Waals theory, Weiss theory of ferromagnetism) and theoretical models (Ising model, XY model, Heisenberg model, spherical model) the Landau theory of critical and multicritical points and some single applications of renormalization group method in static critical phenomena are presented. 115 refs, figs and tabs

  15. Critical Analysis of Multimodal Discourse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Leeuwen, Theo

    2013-01-01

    This is an encyclopaedia article which defines the fields of critical discourse analysis and multimodality studies, argues that within critical discourse analysis more attention should be paid to multimodality, and within multimodality to critical analysis, and ends reviewing a few examples of re...

  16. Using Machine Learning to Predict MCNP Bias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grechanuk, Pavel Aleksandrovi [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-09

    For many real-world applications in radiation transport where simulations are compared to experimental measurements, like in nuclear criticality safety, the bias (simulated - experimental keff) in the calculation is an extremely important quantity used for code validation. The objective of this project is to accurately predict the bias of MCNP6 [1] criticality calculations using machine learning (ML) algorithms, with the intention of creating a tool that can complement the current nuclear criticality safety methods. In the latest release of MCNP6, the Whisper tool is available for criticality safety analysts and includes a large catalogue of experimental benchmarks, sensitivity profiles, and nuclear data covariance matrices. This data, coming from 1100+ benchmark cases, is used in this study of ML algorithms for criticality safety bias predictions.

  17. Decadal climate prediction (project GCEP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Keith; Hermanson, Leon; Liu, Chunlei; Putt, Debbie; Sutton, Rowan; Iwi, Alan; Smith, Doug

    2009-03-13

    Decadal prediction uses climate models forced by changing greenhouse gases, as in the International Panel for Climate Change, but unlike longer range predictions they also require initialization with observations of the current climate. In particular, the upper-ocean heat content and circulation have a critical influence. Decadal prediction is still in its infancy and there is an urgent need to understand the important processes that determine predictability on these timescales. We have taken the first Hadley Centre Decadal Prediction System (DePreSys) and implemented it on several NERC institute compute clusters in order to study a wider range of initial condition impacts on decadal forecasting, eventually including the state of the land and cryosphere. The eScience methods are used to manage submission and output from the many ensemble model runs required to assess predictive skill. Early results suggest initial condition skill may extend for several years, even over land areas, but this depends sensitively on the definition used to measure skill, and alternatives are presented. The Grid for Coupled Ensemble Prediction (GCEP) system will allow the UK academic community to contribute to international experiments being planned to explore decadal climate predictability.

  18. Critical impact energy for the perforation of metallic plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, S.Y.; Li, Q.M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the empirical formulae used in engineering practice to predict the critical perforation energy of metallic plates struck by rigid projectiles in the sub-ordnance regime. Main factors affecting the critical perforation energy are identified and valid conditions for each empirical formula are compared. Dimensional analysis is conducted to show the dependence of the non-dimensional critical impact energy on other influential non-dimensional numbers. Available empirical formulae are re-expressed in non-dimensional forms. A modified Jowett/AEA equation is proposed to predict the critical perforation energy of a flat-ended short projectile. The present work increases the confidence of using these empirical formulae and can be regarded as a quick guide for ballistic protection design of metallic shields and steel armour plates

  19. Universal Critical Dynamics in High Resolution Neuronal Avalanche Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Nir; Ito, Shinya; Brinkman, Braden A. W.; Shimono, Masanori; DeVille, R. E. Lee; Dahmen, Karin A.; Beggs, John M.; Butler, Thomas C.

    2012-05-01

    The tasks of neural computation are remarkably diverse. To function optimally, neuronal networks have been hypothesized to operate near a nonequilibrium critical point. However, experimental evidence for critical dynamics has been inconclusive. Here, we show that the dynamics of cultured cortical networks are critical. We analyze neuronal network data collected at the individual neuron level using the framework of nonequilibrium phase transitions. Among the most striking predictions confirmed is that the mean temporal profiles of avalanches of widely varying durations are quantitatively described by a single universal scaling function. We also show that the data have three additional features predicted by critical phenomena: approximate power law distributions of avalanche sizes and durations, samples in subcritical and supercritical phases, and scaling laws between anomalous exponents.

  20. Speech Intelligibility Prediction Based on Mutual Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper; Taal, Cees H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of predicting the average intelligibility of noisy and potentially processed speech signals, as observed by a group of normal hearing listeners. We propose a model which performs this prediction based on the hypothesis that intelligibility is monotonically related...... to the mutual information between critical-band amplitude envelopes of the clean signal and the corresponding noisy/processed signal. The resulting intelligibility predictor turns out to be a simple function of the mean-square error (mse) that arises when estimating a clean critical-band amplitude using...... a minimum mean-square error (mmse) estimator based on the noisy/processed amplitude. The proposed model predicts that speech intelligibility cannot be improved by any processing of noisy critical-band amplitudes. Furthermore, the proposed intelligibility predictor performs well ( ρ > 0.95) in predicting...

  1. Towards critical aspects of Confucianism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunaj Ľubomír

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper consists of two parts. The first deals with the issue of whether it is possible to coherently employ the term ‘critical Confucian’ in general, i.e. whether it is a paradox or oxymoron. It will be argued that Confucianism should not be identified with any particular ideology and, therefore, can be critical. This critical potential, in turn, can be developed by bringing it into dialogue with Critical Theory. As such, the second part indicates, in an introductory way, some possible overlaps between Confucianism and Critical Theory by comparing Heiner Roetz’s and Axel Honneth’s respective interpretations of these traditions.

  2. Applying critical thinking to nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Bob

    2015-08-19

    Critical thinking and writing are skills that are not easy to acquire. The term 'critical' is used differently in social and clinical contexts. Nursing students need time to master the inquisitive and ruminative aspects of critical thinking that are required in academic environments. This article outlines what is meant by critical thinking in academic settings, in relation to both theory and reflective practice. It explains how the focus of a question affects the sort of critical thinking required and offers two taxonomies of learning, to which students can refer when analysing essay requirements. The article concludes with examples of analytical writing in reference to theory and reflective practice.

  3. Higgs inflation at the critical point

    CERN Document Server

    Bezrukov, Fedor

    2014-01-01

    Higgs inflation can occur if the Standard Model (SM) is a self-consistent effective field theory up to inflationary scale. This leads to a lower bound on the Higgs boson mass, $M_h \\geq M_{\\text{crit}}$. If $M_h$ is more than a few hundreds of MeV above the critical value, the Higgs inflation predicts the universal values of inflationary indexes, $r\\simeq 0.003$ and $n_s\\simeq 0.97$, independently on the Standard Model parameters. We show that in the vicinity of the critical point $M_{\\text{crit}}$ the inflationary indexes acquire an essential dependence on the mass of the top quark $m_t$ and $M_h$. In particular, the amplitude of the gravitational waves can exceed considerably the universal value.

  4. Systems biology in critical-care nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schallom, Lynn; Thimmesch, Amanda R; Pierce, Janet D

    2011-01-01

    Systems biology applies advances in technology and new fields of study including genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics to the development of new treatments and approaches of care for the critically ill and injured patient. An understanding of systems biology enhances a nurse's ability to implement evidence-based practice and to educate patients and families on novel testing and therapies. Systems biology is an integrated and holistic view of humans in relationship with the environment. Biomarkers are used to measure the presence and severity of disease and are rapidly expanding in systems biology endeavors. A systems biology approach using predictive, preventive, and participatory involvement is being utilized in a plethora of conditions of critical illness and injury including sepsis, cancer, pulmonary disease, and traumatic injuries.

  5. Dynamical Response near Quantum Critical Points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Andrew; Gazit, Snir; Podolsky, Daniel; Witczak-Krempa, William

    2017-02-03

    We study high-frequency response functions, notably the optical conductivity, in the vicinity of quantum critical points (QCPs) by allowing for both detuning from the critical coupling and finite temperature. We consider general dimensions and dynamical exponents. This leads to a unified understanding of sum rules. In systems with emergent Lorentz invariance, powerful methods from quantum field theory allow us to fix the high-frequency response in terms of universal coefficients. We test our predictions analytically in the large-N O(N) model and using the gauge-gravity duality and numerically via quantum Monte Carlo simulations on a lattice model hosting the interacting superfluid-insulator QCP. In superfluid phases, interacting Goldstone bosons qualitatively change the high-frequency optical conductivity and the corresponding sum rule.

  6. Competition-induced criticality in a model of meme popularity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, James P; Ward, Jonathan A; O'Sullivan, Kevin P; Lee, William T

    2014-01-31

    Heavy-tailed distributions of meme popularity occur naturally in a model of meme diffusion on social networks. Competition between multiple memes for the limited resource of user attention is identified as the mechanism that poises the system at criticality. The popularity growth of each meme is described by a critical branching process, and asymptotic analysis predicts power-law distributions of popularity with very heavy tails (exponent α<2, unlike preferential-attachment models), similar to those seen in empirical data.

  7. Enhancement of critical temperature in fractal metamaterial superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smolyaninov, Igor I., E-mail: smoly@umd.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Smolyaninova, Vera N. [Department of Physics Astronomy and Geosciences, Towson University, 8000 York Road, Towson, MD 21252 (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Fractal metamaterial superconductor geometry has been suggested and analyzed based on the recently developed theoretical description of critical temperature increase in epsilon near zero (ENZ) metamaterial superconductors. Considerable enhancement of critical temperature has been predicted in such materials due to appearance of large number of additional poles in the inverse dielectric response function of the fractal. Our results agree with the recent observation (Fratini et al. Nature 466, 841 (2010)) that fractal defect structure promotes superconductivity.

  8. Competition-Induced Criticality in a Model of Meme Popularity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, James P.; Ward, Jonathan A.; O'Sullivan, Kevin P.; Lee, William T.

    2014-01-01

    Heavy-tailed distributions of meme popularity occur naturally in a model of meme diffusion on social networks. Competition between multiple memes for the limited resource of user attention is identified as the mechanism that poises the system at criticality. The popularity growth of each meme is described by a critical branching process, and asymptotic analysis predicts power-law distributions of popularity with very heavy tails (exponent α <2, unlike preferential-attachment models), similar to those seen in empirical data.

  9. Teaching critical thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, N G; Wieman, Carl E; Bonn, D A

    2015-09-08

    The ability to make decisions based on data, with its inherent uncertainties and variability, is a complex and vital skill in the modern world. The need for such quantitative critical thinking occurs in many different contexts, and although it is an important goal of education, that goal is seldom being achieved. We argue that the key element for developing this ability is repeated practice in making decisions based on data, with feedback on those decisions. We demonstrate a structure for providing suitable practice that can be applied in any instructional setting that involves the acquisition of data and relating that data to scientific models. This study reports the results of applying that structure in an introductory physics laboratory course. Students in an experimental condition were repeatedly instructed to make and act on quantitative comparisons between datasets, and between data and models, an approach that is common to all science disciplines. These instructions were slowly faded across the course. After the instructions had been removed, students in the experimental condition were 12 times more likely to spontaneously propose or make changes to improve their experimental methods than a control group, who performed traditional experimental activities. The students in the experimental condition were also four times more likely to identify and explain a limitation of a physical model using their data. Students in the experimental condition also showed much more sophisticated reasoning about their data. These differences between the groups were seen to persist into a subsequent course taken the following year.

  10. Mexico's critical choices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcos, E.

    1990-01-01

    In Mexico, the 1982 fall in international oil prices shook the national conscience and pushed the Mexican people in search of a new national image and toward the choices they must make to attain that image. But, according to the author of this paper, the country as a whole has already made critical choices for overall strategy and there are reasons for optimism. In the current economic environment of growing domestic demand and enhanced international competitiveness, the author sees PEMEX (the Mexican national oil company) facing not only the challenge of responding to the rapid changes taking place in the Mexican economy, but also making a significant contribution toward the solid and stable growth of the country. The relevant question is how PEMEX will live up to these expectations. This paper describes several steps PEMEX has taken already or is preparing to take in order to meet this challenge, including: investment in the domestic petrochemical industry; entry into the Eurobond market; development of new methods of project financing

  11. Cohort: critical science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digney, Bruce L.

    2007-04-01

    Unmanned vehicle systems is an attractive technology for the military, but whose promises have remained largely undelivered. There currently exist fielded remote controlled UGVs and high altitude UAV whose benefits are based on standoff in low complexity environments with sufficiently low control reaction time requirements to allow for teleoperation. While effective within there limited operational niche such systems do not meet with the vision of future military UxV scenarios. Such scenarios envision unmanned vehicles operating effectively in complex environments and situations with high levels of independence and effective coordination with other machines and humans pursing high level, changing and sometimes conflicting goals. While these aims are clearly ambitious they do provide necessary targets and inspiration with hopes of fielding near term useful semi-autonomous unmanned systems. Autonomy involves many fields of research including machine vision, artificial intelligence, control theory, machine learning and distributed systems all of which are intertwined and have goals of creating more versatile broadly applicable algorithms. Cohort is a major Applied Research Program (ARP) led by Defence R&D Canada (DRDC) Suffield and its aim is to develop coordinated teams of unmanned vehicles (UxVs) for urban environments. This paper will discuss the critical science being addressed by DRDC developing semi-autonomous systems.

  12. Criticality in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Arcangelis, L.; Lombardi, F.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2014-03-01

    Spontaneous brain activity has been recently characterized by avalanche dynamics with critical features for systems in vitro and in vivo. In this contribution we present a review of experimental results on neuronal avalanches in cortex slices, together with numerical results from a neuronal model implementing several physiological properties of living neurons. Numerical data reproduce experimental results for avalanche statistics. The temporal organization of avalanches can be characterized by the distribution of waiting times between successive avalanches. Experimental measurements exhibit a non-monotonic behaviour, not usually found in other natural processes. Numerical simulations provide evidence that this behaviour is a consequence of the alternation between states of high and low activity, leading to a balance between excitation and inhibition controlled by a single parameter. During these periods both the single neuron state and the network excitability level, keeping memory of past activity, are tuned by homoeostatic mechanisms. Interestingly, the same homoeostatic balance is detected for neuronal activity at the scale of the whole brain. We finally review the learning abilities of this neuronal network. Learning occurs via plastic adaptation of synaptic strengths by a non-uniform negative feedback mechanism. The system is able to learn all the tested rules and the learning dynamics exhibits universal features as a function of the strength of plastic adaptation. Any rule could be learned provided that the plastic adaptation is sufficiently slow.

  13. Criticality in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Arcangelis, L; Lombardi, F; Herrmann, H J

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous brain activity has been recently characterized by avalanche dynamics with critical features for systems in vitro and in vivo. In this contribution we present a review of experimental results on neuronal avalanches in cortex slices, together with numerical results from a neuronal model implementing several physiological properties of living neurons. Numerical data reproduce experimental results for avalanche statistics. The temporal organization of avalanches can be characterized by the distribution of waiting times between successive avalanches. Experimental measurements exhibit a non-monotonic behaviour, not usually found in other natural processes. Numerical simulations provide evidence that this behaviour is a consequence of the alternation between states of high and low activity, leading to a balance between excitation and inhibition controlled by a single parameter. During these periods both the single neuron state and the network excitability level, keeping memory of past activity, are tuned by homoeostatic mechanisms. Interestingly, the same homoeostatic balance is detected for neuronal activity at the scale of the whole brain. We finally review the learning abilities of this neuronal network. Learning occurs via plastic adaptation of synaptic strengths by a non-uniform negative feedback mechanism. The system is able to learn all the tested rules and the learning dynamics exhibits universal features as a function of the strength of plastic adaptation. Any rule could be learned provided that the plastic adaptation is sufficiently slow. (paper)

  14. Droplet size and velocity at the exit of a nozzle with two-component near critical and critical flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemonnier, H.; Camelo-Cavalcanti, E.S.

    1993-01-01

    Two-component critical flow modelling is an important issue for safety studies of various hazardous industrial activities. When the flow quality is high, the critical flow rate prediction is sensitive to the modelling of gas droplet mixture interfacial area. In order to improve the description of these flows, experiments were conducted with air-water flows in converging nozzles. The pressure was 2 and 4 bar and the gas mass quality ranged between 100% and 20%. The droplets size and velocity have been measured close to the outlet section of a nozzle with a 10 mm diameter throat. Subcritical and critical conditions were observed. These data are compared with the predictions of a critical flow model which includes an interfacial area model based on the classical ideas of Hinze and Kolmogorov. (authors). 9 figs., 12 refs

  15. Comparison of Critical Flow Models' Evaluations for SBLOCA Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeon Sik; Park, Hyun Sik; Cho, Seok

    2016-01-01

    A comparison of critical flow models between the Trapp-Ransom and Henry-Fauske models for all SBLOCA (small break loss of coolant accident) scenarios of the ATLAS (Advanced thermal-hydraulic test loop for accident simulation) facility was performed using the MARS-KS code. For the comparison of the two critical models, the accumulated break mass was selected as the main parameter for the comparison between the analyses and tests. Four cases showed the same respective discharge coefficients between the two critical models, e.g., 6' CL (cold leg) break and 25%, 50%, and 100% DVI (direct vessel injection) breaks. In the case of the 4' CL break, no reasonable results were obtained with any possible Cd values. In addition, typical system behaviors, e.g., PZR (pressurizer) pressure and collapsed core water level, were also compared between the two critical models. Four cases showed the same respective discharge coefficients between the two critical models, e.g., 6' CL break and 25%, 50%, and 100% DVI breaks. In the case of the 4' CL break, no reasonable results were obtained with any possible Cd values. In addition, typical system behaviors, e.g., PZR pressure and collapsed core water level, were also compared between the two critical models. From the comparison between the two critical models for the CL breaks, the Trapp-Ransom model predicted quite well with respect to the other model for the smallest and larger breaks, e.g., 2', 6', and 8.5' CL breaks. In addition, from the comparison between the two critical models for the DVI breaks, the Trapp-Ransom model predicted quite well with respect to the other model for the smallest and larger breaks, e.g., 5%, 50%, and 100% DVI breaks. In the case of the 50% and 100% breaks, the two critical models predicted the test data quite well.

  16. Do earthquakes exhibit self-organized criticality?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xiaosong; Ma Jin; Du Shuming

    2004-01-01

    If earthquakes are phenomena of self-organized criticality (SOC), statistical characteristics of the earthquake time series should be invariant after the sequence of events in an earthquake catalog are randomly rearranged. In this Letter we argue that earthquakes are unlikely phenomena of SOC because our analysis of the Southern California Earthquake Catalog shows that the first-return-time probability P M (T) is apparently changed after the time series is rearranged. This suggests that the SOC theory should not be used to oppose the efforts of earthquake prediction

  17. Critical enrichment and critical density of infinite systems for nuclear criticality safety evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Yoshitaka; Koyama, Takashi; Komuro, Yuichi

    1986-03-01

    Critical enrichment and critical density of homogenous infinite systems, such as U-H 2 O, UO 2 -H 2 O, UO 2 F 2 aqueous solution, UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 aqueous solution, Pu-H 2 O, PuO 2 -H 2 O, Pu(NO 3 ) 4 aqueous solution and PuO 2 ·UO 2 -H 2 O, were calculated with the criticality safety evaluation computer code system JACS for nuclear criticality safety evaluation on fuel facilities. The computed results were compared with the data described in European and American criticality handbooks and showed good agreement with each other. (author)

  18. Healthcare disparities in critical illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Graciela J; Martin, Greg S; Gong, Michelle Ng

    2013-12-01

    To summarize the current literature on racial and gender disparities in critical care and the mechanisms underlying these disparities in the course of acute critical illness. MEDLINE search on the published literature addressing racial, ethnic, or gender disparities in acute critical illness, such as sepsis, acute lung injury, pneumonia, venous thromboembolism, and cardiac arrest. Clinical studies that evaluated general critically ill patient populations in the United States as well as specific critical care conditions were reviewed with a focus on studies evaluating factors and contributors to health disparities. Study findings are presented according to their association with the prevalence, clinical presentation, management, and outcomes in acute critical illness. This review presents potential contributors for racial and gender disparities related to genetic susceptibility, comorbidities, preventive health services, socioeconomic factors, cultural differences, and access to care. The data are organized along the course of acute critical illness. The literature to date shows that disparities in critical care are most likely multifactorial involving individual, community, and hospital-level factors at several points in the continuum of acute critical illness. The data presented identify potential targets as interventions to reduce disparities in critical care and future avenues for research.

  19. Photodesorption: a critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichtman, D.; Shapira, Y.

    1975-01-01

    A critical review of the literature in the field of photodesorption is presented. Material is covered through December 1975. Although it is impossible to include every paper ever published which is in some way related to photodesorption, it is felt that the material covered is sufficiently complete to permit reasonable conclusions to be reached. The literature naturally falls into two basic categories, namely, papers involved with metal substrates and those involved with semiconductor substrates. Since the effects on these two kinds of surfaces are very different, they are each considered in separate sections. Photodesorption from metals seems to be an extremely inefficient process if it occurs at all. That is, cross sections are equal to or less than 10 -23 cm 2 . The reason for this extremely low cross section is not yet well understood. Photodesorption from semiconductors seems to be a very efficient process with cross sections as high as 10 -17 cm 2 . On most substrates studied, e.g. ZnO, TiO 2 , CdS, the chrome oxide surface of stainless steel, etc., impurity carbon atoms play a very significant role. On all these materials, the single or dominant process involves chemisorption of molecular oxygen onto the impurity carbon surface atoms. Electrons are captured from the conduction band to produce a chemisorbed CO 2 - complex. The application of band gap and higher energy radiation produces electron-hole pairs. Some of the photogenerated holes migrate to the surface where they combine with the negative ion complex. The resulting physisorbed CO 2 is then thermally desorbed

  20. Nuclear criticality research at the University of New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, R.D.

    1997-01-01

    Two projects at the University of New Mexico are briefly described. The university's Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Department has completed the final draft of a primer for MCNP4A, which it plans to publish soon. The primer was written to help an analyst who has little experience with the MCNP code to perform criticality safety analyses. In addition, the department has carried out a series of approach-to-critical experiments on the SHEBA-II, a UO 2 F 2 solution critical assembly at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The results obtained differed slightly from what was predicted by the TWODANT code

  1. Slow dynamics at critical points: the field-theoretical perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambassi, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    The dynamics at a critical point provides a simple instance of slow collective evolution, characterised by aging phenomena and by a violation of the fluctuation-dissipation relation even for long times. By virtue of the universality in critical phenomena it is possible to provide quantitative predictions for some aspects of these behaviours by field-theoretical methods. We review some of the theoretical results that have been obtained in recent years for the relevant (universal) quantities, such as the fluctuation-dissipation ratio, associated with the non-equilibrium critical dynamics

  2. The exponential critical state of high-Tc ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, H.; Rinderer, L.

    1994-01-01

    The critical current in high-Tc materials is strongly reduced by a magnetic field. We studied this dependency for tubular YBCO samples. We find an exponential drop as the field is increased from zero up to some tens of oersted. This behavior was already observed by others, however little work has been done in this direction. We define what we call the ''exponential critical state'' of HTSC and compare the prediction for the magnetization with experimental data. Furthermore, the ''Kim critical state'' is obtained as the small field limit. (orig.)

  3. Uncertainty analysis in Monte Carlo criticality computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Ao

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Two types of uncertainty methods for k eff Monte Carlo computations are examined. ► Sampling method has the least restrictions on perturbation but computing resources. ► Analytical method is limited to small perturbation on material properties. ► Practicality relies on efficiency, multiparameter applicability and data availability. - Abstract: Uncertainty analysis is imperative for nuclear criticality risk assessments when using Monte Carlo neutron transport methods to predict the effective neutron multiplication factor (k eff ) for fissionable material systems. For the validation of Monte Carlo codes for criticality computations against benchmark experiments, code accuracy and precision are measured by both the computational bias and uncertainty in the bias. The uncertainty in the bias accounts for known or quantified experimental, computational and model uncertainties. For the application of Monte Carlo codes for criticality analysis of fissionable material systems, an administrative margin of subcriticality must be imposed to provide additional assurance of subcriticality for any unknown or unquantified uncertainties. Because of a substantial impact of the administrative margin of subcriticality on economics and safety of nuclear fuel cycle operations, recently increasing interests in reducing the administrative margin of subcriticality make the uncertainty analysis in criticality safety computations more risk-significant. This paper provides an overview of two most popular k eff uncertainty analysis methods for Monte Carlo criticality computations: (1) sampling-based methods, and (2) analytical methods. Examples are given to demonstrate their usage in the k eff uncertainty analysis due to uncertainties in both neutronic and non-neutronic parameters of fissionable material systems.

  4. A study on critical heat flux in gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Rae Joon; Jeong, Ji Whan; Cho, Young Ro; Chang, Young Cho; Kang, Kyung Ho; Kim, Jong Whan; Kim, Sang Baik; Kim, Hee Dong

    1999-04-01

    The scope and content of this study is to perform the test on critical heat flux in hemispherical narrow gaps using distilled water and Freon R-113 as experimental parameters, such as system pressure from 1 to 10 atm and gap thickness of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 5.0 mm. The CHFG test results have shown that the measured values of critical power are much lower than the predictions made by empirical CHF correlations applicable to flat plate gaps and annuli. The pressure effect on the critical power was found to be much milder than predictions by those CHF correlations. The values and the pressure trend of the critical powers measured in the present experiments are close to the values converted from the CCFL data. This confirms the claim that a CCFL brings about local dryout and finally, global dryout in hemispherical narrow gaps. Increases in the gap thickness lead to increase in critical power. The measured critical power using R-113 in hemispherical narrow gaps are 60 % lower than that using water due to the lower boiling point, which is different from the pool boiling condition. The CCFL (counter counter flow limit) test facility was constructed and the test is being performed to estimate the CCFL phenomena and to evaluate the CHFG test results on critical power in hemispherical narrow gaps. (Author). 35 refs., 2 tabs., 19 figs

  5. A study on critical heat flux in gap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Rae Joon; Jeong, Ji Whan; Cho, Young Ro; Chang, Young Cho; Kang, Kyung Ho; Kim, Jong Whan; Kim, Sang Baik; Kim, Hee Dong

    1999-04-01

    The scope and content of this study is to perform the test on critical heat flux in hemispherical narrow gaps using distilled water and Freon R-113 as experimental parameters, such as system pressure from 1 to 10 atm and gap thickness of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 5.0 mm. The CHFG test results have shown that the measured values of critical power are much lower than the predictions made by empirical CHF correlations applicable to flat plate gaps and annuli. The pressure effect on the critical power was found to be much milder than predictions by those CHF correlations. The values and the pressure trend of the critical powers measured in the present experiments are close to the values converted from the CCFL data. This confirms the claim that a CCFL brings about local dryout and finally, global dryout in hemispherical narrow gaps. Increases in the gap thickness lead to increase in critical power. The measured critical power using R-113 in hemispherical narrow gaps are 60 % lower than that using water due to the lower boiling point, which is different from the pool boiling condition. The CCFL (counter counter flow limit) test facility was constructed and the test is being performed to estimate the CCFL phenomena and to evaluate the CHFG test results on critical power in hemispherical narrow gaps. (Author). 35 refs., 2 tabs., 19 figs.

  6. Critical scaling of a jammed system after a quench of temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, Michio; Hayakawa, Hisao

    2012-09-01

    Critical behavior of soft repulsive particles after quench of temperature near the jamming transition is numerically investigated. It is found that the plateau of the mean-square displacement of tracer particles and the pressure satisfy critical scaling laws. The critical density for the jamming transition depends on the protocol to prepare the system, while the values of the critical exponents which are consistent with the prediction of a phenomenology are independent of the protocol.

  7. 75 FR 11918 - Hewlett Pachard Company, Business Critical Systems, Mission Critical Business Software Division...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... Pachard Company, Business Critical Systems, Mission Critical Business Software Division, Openvms Operating... Colorado, Marlborough, Massachuetts; Hewlett Pachard Company, Business Critical Systems, Mission Critical... Company, Business Critical Systems, Mission Critical Business Software Division, OpenVMS Operating System...

  8. Non-Critical Covariant Superstrings

    CERN Document Server

    Grassi, P A

    2005-01-01

    We construct a covariant description of non-critical superstrings in even dimensions. We construct explicitly supersymmetric hybrid type variables in a linear dilaton background, and study an underlying N=2 twisted superconformal algebra structure. We find similarities between non-critical superstrings in 2n+2 dimensions and critical superstrings compactified on CY_(4-n) manifolds. We study the spectrum of the non-critical strings, and in particular the Ramond-Ramond massless fields. We use the supersymmetric variables to construct the non-critical superstrings sigma-model action in curved target space backgrounds with coupling to the Ramond-Ramond fields. We consider as an example non-critical type IIA strings on AdS_2 background with Ramond-Ramond 2-form flux.

  9. The critical thickness of liners of Cu interconnects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Q; Zhang, S H; Li, J C

    2004-01-01

    A model for the size-dependence of activation energy is developed. With the model and Fick's second law, relationships among the liner thickness, the working life and the working temperature of a TaN liner for Cu interconnects are predicted. The predicted results of the TaN liner are in good agreement with the experimental results. Moreover, the critical thicknesses of liners of some elements are calculated

  10. The research agenda for trauma critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asehnoune, Karim; Balogh, Zsolt; Citerio, Giuseppe; Cap, Andre; Billiar, Timothy; Stocchetti, Nino; Cohen, Mitchell J; Pelosi, Paolo; Curry, Nicola; Gaarder, Christine; Gruen, Russell; Holcomb, John; Hunt, Beverley J; Juffermans, Nicole P; Maegele, Mark; Midwinter, Mark; Moore, Frederick A; O'Dwyer, Michael; Pittet, Jean-François; Schöchl, Herbert; Schreiber, Martin; Spinella, Philip C; Stanworth, Simon; Winfield, Robert; Brohi, Karim

    2017-09-01

    In this research agenda on the acute and critical care management of trauma patients, we concentrate on the major factors leading to death, namely haemorrhage and traumatic brain injury (TBI). In haemostasis biology, the results of randomised controlled trials have led to the therapeutic focus moving away from the augmentation of coagulation factors (such as recombinant factor VIIa) and towards fibrinogen supplementation and administration of antifibrinolytics such as tranexamic acid. Novel diagnostic techniques need to be evaluated to determine whether an individualised precision approach is superior to current empirical practice. The timing and efficacy of platelet transfusions remain in question, while new blood products need to be developed and evaluated, including whole blood variants, lyophilised products and novel red cell storage modalities. The current cornerstones of TBI management are intracranial pressure control, maintenance of cerebral perfusion pressure and avoidance of secondary insults (such as hypotension, hypoxaemia, hyperglycaemia and pyrexia). Therapeutic hypothermia and decompressive craniectomy are controversial therapies. Further research into these strategies should focus on identifying which subgroups of patients may benefit from these interventions. Prediction of the long-term outcome early after TBI remains challenging. Early magnetic resonance imaging has recently been evaluated for predicting the long-term outcome in mild and severe TBI. Novel biomarkers may also help in outcome prediction and may predict chronic neurological symptoms. For trauma in general, rehabilitation is complex and multidimensional, and the optimal timing for commencement of rehabilitation needs investigation. We propose priority areas for clinical trials in the next 10 years.

  11. Critical energy of superconducting composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayakumar, R.

    1987-01-01

    The stability of superconducting composites is studied in one-dimensional geometry and critical quench energies are calculated by solving for the steady state temperature profile which gives the minimum energy. The present calculations give lower values for the critical energy than previous estimates. The calculations are shown to be applicable to both direct cooled and impregnated conductors. Critical energies are also calculated including the effect of temperature dependence of conductor properties. (author)

  12. MCNP and OMEGA criticality calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, E.

    1998-04-01

    The reliability of OMEGA criticality calculations is shown by a comparison with calculations by the validated and widely used Monte Carlo code MCNP. The criticality of 16 assemblies with uranium as fissionable is calculated with the codes MCNP (Version 4A, ENDF/B-V cross sections), MCNP (Version 4B, ENDF/B-VI cross sections), and OMEGA. Identical calculation models are used for the three codes. The results are compared mutually and with the experimental criticality of the assemblies. (orig.)

  13. Business Ethics as Critical Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Alpár Losoncz

    2003-01-01

    The following sections discuss some issues pertaining to the status and meanings of critical reflections in business ethics. The starting point is that ethics originally always includes critical-normative perspectives and polemical aspects, and, according to this, critical approach is not supplement to business ethics, but a necessary component of it. This paper is divided into three parts. In the first part I demarcate some selected broad issues in relation to the general perspective of crit...

  14. Critical-state model for the determination of critical currents in disk-shaped superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankel, D.J.

    1979-01-01

    A series of experiments has been carried out on the flux trapping and shielding capabilities of a flat strip of Nb-Ti/Cu composite material. A circular piece of material from the strip was tested in a uniform field directed perpendicularly to the surface of the sample. Profiles of the normal component of the field along the sample diameter were measured. The critical-state model was adapted for this geometry and proved capable of reproducing the measured field profiles. Model curves agreed well with experimental field profiles generated when the full sample was in the critical state, when only a portion of the sample was in the critical state, and when profiles were obtained after the direction of the rate change of the magnetic field was reversed. The adaption of the critical-state model to disk geometry provides a possible method either to derive values of the critical current from measurements of field profiles above thin flat samples, or to predict the trapping and shielding behavior of such samples if the critical current is already known. This method of determining critical currents does not require that samples be formed into narrow strips or wires, as is required for direct measurements of J/sub c/, or into tubes or cylinders, as is usually required for magnetization-type measurements. Only a relatively small approximately circular piece of material is needed. The method relies on induced currents, so there is no need to pass large currents into the sample. The field-profile measurements are easily performed with expensive Hall probes and do not require detection of the resistive transition of the superconductor

  15. Evaluation of Saxton critical experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Hyung Kook; Noh, Jae Man; Jung, Hyung Guk; Kim, Young Il; Kim, Young Jin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    As a part of International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP), SAXTON critical experiments were reevaluated. The effects of k{sub eff} of the uncertainties in experiment parameters, fuel rod characterization, soluble boron, critical water level, core structure, {sup 241}Am and {sup 241}Pu isotope number densities, random pitch error, duplicated experiment, axial fuel position, model simplification, etc., were evaluated and added in benchmark-model k{sub eff}. In addition to detailed model, the simplified model for Saxton critical experiments was constructed by omitting the top, middle, and bottom grids and ignoring the fuel above water. 6 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs. (Author)

  16. Evaluation of Saxton critical experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Hyung Kook; Noh, Jae Man; Jung, Hyung Guk; Kim, Young Il; Kim, Young Jin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    As a part of International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP), SAXTON critical experiments were reevaluated. The effects of k{sub eff} of the uncertainties in experiment parameters, fuel rod characterization, soluble boron, critical water level, core structure, {sup 241}Am and {sup 241}Pu isotope number densities, random pitch error, duplicated experiment, axial fuel position, model simplification, etc., were evaluated and added in benchmark-model k{sub eff}. In addition to detailed model, the simplified model for Saxton critical experiments was constructed by omitting the top, middle, and bottom grids and ignoring the fuel above water. 6 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs. (Author)

  17. How Critical Is Critical Thinking? FACTC Focus, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerr, Mark, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "FACTC Focus" is a publication of Faculty Association of Community and Technical Colleges (FACTC) with the purpose of presenting diverse views on faculty issues. Included in this issue are: (1) LOL: The Easy ROUTE TO Critical Thinking (Barbara B. Parsons); (2) Critical Thinking: We Know It When We (Don't) See It (Jared Anthony); (3) Critical…

  18. Nuclear waste management in Canada: critical issues, critical perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Genevieve Fuji; Durant, Darrin

    2009-01-01

    ... on FSC-certified ancient-forest-free paper (100 percent post-consumer recycled) that is processed chlorineand acid-free. Library and Archives Canada Cataloguing in Publication Nuclear waste management in Canada : critical issues, critical perspectives / edited by Darrin Durant and Genevieve Fuji Johnson. Includes bibliographical references an...

  19. The Critical Advantage: Developing Critical Thinking Skills in School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormley, William T., Jr.

    2017-01-01

    In "The Critical Advantage," noted scholar and early childhood expert William T. Gormley, Jr. takes a wide ranging look at the important role of critical thinking in preparing students for college, careers, and civic life. Drawing on research from psychology, philosophy, business, political science, neuroscience, and other disciplines,…

  20. The critic as transvestite: the parody nature of literary criticism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Pruneda Sentíes

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores a path in the analysis of literary criticism as an object of study. In order to convey this, this essay attempts to define literary criticism as a genre that parodies the literary text it aspires to examine. Mikhail Bakhtin’s analysis of the novelistic discourse is useful to establish a connection between parody and criticism. Although Bakhtin discusses the novel, I ascertain that his arguments may be applied to the description of criticism as a parodic-travestying genre. Secondly, this paper discusses Linda Hutcheon’s work, which states that parody is a repetition of the original text. According to Hutcheon, this repetition implies a critical distance with the parodied text, which marks difference rather than similarity.

  1. Thinking Critically about Critical Thinking: Integrating Online Tools to Promote Critical Thinking

    OpenAIRE

    B. Jean Mandernach, PhD

    2006-01-01

    The value and importance of critical thinking is clearly established; the challenge for instructors lies in successfully promoting students’ critical thinking skills within the confines of a traditional classroom experience. Since instructors are faced with limited student contact time to meet their instructional objectives and facilitate learning, they are often forced to make instructional decisions between content coverage, depth of understanding, and critical analysis of course material. ...

  2. Initial conditions for critical Higgs inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvio, Alberto

    2018-05-01

    It has been pointed out that a large non-minimal coupling ξ between the Higgs and the Ricci scalar can source higher derivative operators, which may change the predictions of Higgs inflation. A variant, called critical Higgs inflation, employs the near-criticality of the top mass to introduce an inflection point in the potential and lower drastically the value of ξ. We here study whether critical Higgs inflation can occur even if the pre-inflationary initial conditions do not satisfy the slow-roll behavior (retaining translation and rotation symmetries). A positive answer is found: inflation turns out to be an attractor and therefore no fine-tuning of the initial conditions is necessary. A very large initial Higgs time-derivative (as compared to the potential energy density) is compensated by a moderate increase in the initial field value. These conclusions are reached by solving the exact Higgs equation without using the slow-roll approximation. This also allows us to consistently treat the inflection point, where the standard slow-roll approximation breaks down. Here we make use of an approach that is independent of the UV completion of gravity, by taking initial conditions that always involve sub-planckian energies.

  3. REVIEWS OF TOPICAL PROBLEMS: Critical opalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubkov, L. A.; Romanov, Vadim P.

    1988-04-01

    Studies of critical opalescence near phase transitions in different systems are reviewed. The fundamentals of the modern approach to the description of the propagation and scattering of light in media with large nonuniformities are presented. The experimental data on the coefficient of extinction and integrated intensity of the scattered light are analyzed and different models for the correlation function are discussed. Different methods for studying multiple scattering of light and methods for eliminating it from the measured intensity are examined. The kinetic properties of systems in the critical region are examined. Attention is devoted primarily to the experimental data obtained by the methods of correlation spectroscopy and to the comparison of these data with the predictions of different theoretical models. Significant attention is devoted to the study of phase transitions in liquids by the methods of light scattering as well as the problem of propagation and scattering of light in the nematic phase, where fluctuations of the director exhibit the same behavior as at the critical point. In conclusion, phase transformations in micellar solutions, to which a great deal of attention has been devoted in recent years, are studied.

  4. Blind prediction of interfacial water positions in CAPRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lensink, Marc F; Moal, Iain H; Bates, Paul A; Kastritis, Panagiotis L; Melquiond, Adrien S J; Karaca, Ezgi; Schmitz, Christophe; van Dijk, Marc; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J; Eisenstein, Miriam; Jiménez-García, Brian; Grosdidier, Solène; Solernou, Albert; Pérez-Cano, Laura; Pallara, Chiara; Fernández-Recio, Juan; Xu, Jianqing; Muthu, Pravin; Praneeth Kilambi, Krishna; Gray, Jeffrey J; Grudinin, Sergei; Derevyanko, Georgy; Mitchell, Julie C; Wieting, John; Kanamori, Eiji; Tsuchiya, Yuko; Murakami, Yoichi; Sarmiento, Joy; Standley, Daron M; Shirota, Matsuyuki; Kinoshita, Kengo; Nakamura, Haruki; Chavent, Matthieu; Ritchie, David W; Park, Hahnbeom; Ko, Junsu; Lee, Hasup; Seok, Chaok; Shen, Yang; Kozakov, Dima; Vajda, Sandor; Kundrotas, Petras J; Vakser, Ilya A; Pierce, Brian G; Hwang, Howook; Vreven, Thom; Weng, Zhiping; Buch, Idit; Farkash, Efrat; Wolfson, Haim J; Zacharias, Martin; Qin, Sanbo; Zhou, Huan-Xiang; Huang, Shen-You; Zou, Xiaoqin; Wojdyla, Justyna A; Kleanthous, Colin; Wodak, Shoshana J

    We report the first assessment of blind predictions of water positions at protein-protein interfaces, performed as part of the critical assessment of predicted interactions (CAPRI) community-wide experiment. Groups submitting docking predictions for the complex of the DNase domain of colicin E2 and

  5. Critical thinking in physics education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadidi, Farahnaz

    2016-07-01

    We agree that training the next generation of leaders of the society, who have the ability to think critically and form a better judgment is an important goal. It is a long-standing concern of Educators and a long-term desire of teachers to establish a method in order to teach to think critically. To this end, many questions arise on three central aspects: the definition, the evaluation and the design of the course: What is Critical Thinking? How can we define Critical Thinking? How can we evaluate Critical Thinking? Therefore, we want to implement Critical Thinking in physics education. How can we teach for Critical Thinking in physics? What should the course syllabus and materials be? We present examples from classical physics and give perspectives for astro-particle physics. The main aim of this paper is to answer the questions and provide teachers with the opportunity to change their classroom to an active one, in which students are encouraged to ask questions and learn to reach a good judgment. Key words: Critical Thinking, evaluation, judgment, design of the course.

  6. Intersectionality and Critical Race Parenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePouw, Christin

    2018-01-01

    This conceptual article employs critical race theory (CRT) as a theoretical framework to explore the importance of intersectionality in critical race parenting. In particular, I focus on intersectionality to understand better how Whiteness and racial power play out in intimate relationships within the family, particularly between White parents and…

  7. Educational Reform: Critiquing the Critics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Charles R.

    1990-01-01

    Reviews Walter Feinberg's criticisms of educational critics Allan Bloom and E. D. Hirsch. Supports Feinberg's argument that experimentation is the only course still open in education, but argues that his views are informed by the traditional obscurantism of the educational establishment. (FMW)

  8. The Metaethics of Critical Theories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stahl, Titus; Thompson, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Critical theories, from their beginning in Marx’s philosophy to the Frankfurt School with its different generations, have always been characterized by a certain ambivalence toward moral questions. They often conceive themselves as an alternative to traditional moral philosophy, which is criticized

  9. Critical Thinking in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Changes in American education require that teachers are evaluated more often, and expectations increasingly include teaching to develop critical thinking skills. This article uses Bloom's taxonomy in describing ways physical educators can include critical thinking in their lessons, both to enhance their teaching and to meet expectations of…

  10. Scrutiny of Critical Thinking Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atabaki, Ali Mohammad Siahi; Keshtiaray, Narges; Yarmohammadian, Mohammad H.

    2015-01-01

    Learning critical thinking skills are the goal of educational systems so the term "critical thinking" (CT) is frequently found in educational policy documents. Despite this frequency, however, precise understandings among teachers of what CT really means do not exit. The present study is designed to answer the following question. We can…

  11. Why Critical design is useless

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Toke Riis

    Critical design is proliferating. According to Raby, this kind of design creates artefacts in order to “challenge narrow assumptions, preconceptions, and givens about the role products play in everyday life” (Raby, 2008, 94). Conceived basically as "useless", the value of critical design...

  12. Education Studies: Issues & Critical Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Derek; Mufti, Emmanuel; Robinson, John

    2006-01-01

    This major text for Education Studies students provides a critical account of key issues in education today. The text features: (1) A critical analysis of key issues in Education Studies to encourage students' thinking about education in the broadest terms; (2) Themed sections with introductions to link the issues discussed in each chapter; (3)…

  13. Course Design for Critical Thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furedy, John J.; Furedy, Christine

    1979-01-01

    A fourth year honors thesis research course in psychology at the University of Toronto uses the device of adversarial interaction to improve critical thinking. Course components, including thesis submission, research seminar, student relations, and supervision, are designed to simulate the constraints, criticism, and relationships of actual…

  14. Traditional Literacy and Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, Priscille

    2016-01-01

    How school librarians focus on activating critical thinking through traditional literacy development can proactively set the stage for the deep thinking that occurs in all literacy development. The critical-thinking skills students build while becoming accomplished readers and writers provide the foundation for learning in a variety of…

  15. Australian Naturalism and Its Critics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyung, Park Sun

    1997-01-01

    Details the ongoing debate between Australian naturalists and their critics since the publication of C.W. Evers and G. Lakomski's seminal book "Knowing Educational Administration." Examines critics' views in several categories: the coherence concept, coherentism criteria, the naturalistic fallacy, and questions concerning foundations and…

  16. Strings, fields and critical phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambjoern, J.

    1987-07-01

    The connection between field theory and critical phenomena is reviewed. Emphasis is put on the use of Monte Carlo methods in the study of non-perturbative aspects of field theory. String theory is then described as a statistical theory of random surfaces and the critical behaviour is analyzed both by analytical and numerical methods. (orig.)

  17. Predictable Medea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Bertolino

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available By focusing on the tragedy of the 'unpredictable' infanticide perpetrated by Medea, the paper speculates on the possibility of a non-violent ontological subjectivity for women victims of gendered violence and whether it is possible to respond to violent actions in non-violent ways; it argues that Medea did not act in an unpredictable way, rather through the very predictable subject of resentment and violence. 'Medea' represents the story of all of us who require justice as retribution against any wrong. The presupposition is that the empowered female subjectivity of women’s rights contains the same desire of mastering others of the masculine current legal and philosophical subject. The subject of women’s rights is grounded on the emotions of resentment and retribution and refuses the categories of the private by appropriating those of the righteous, masculine and public subject. The essay opposes the essentialised stereotypes of the feminine and the maternal with an ontological approach of people as singular, corporeal, vulnerable and dependent. There is therefore an emphasis on the excluded categories of the private. Forgiveness is taken into account as a category of the private and a possibility of responding to violence with newness. A violent act is seen in relations to the community of human beings rather than through an isolated setting as in the case of the individual of human rights. In this context, forgiveness allows to risk again and being with. The result is also a rethinking of feminist actions, feminine subjectivity and of the maternal. Overall the paper opens up the Arendtian category of action and forgiveness and the Cavarerian unique and corporeal ontology of the selfhood beyond gendered stereotypes.

  18. Predictive Modelling and Time: An Experiment in Temporal Archaeological Predictive Models

    OpenAIRE

    David Ebert

    2006-01-01

    One of the most common criticisms of archaeological predictive modelling is that it fails to account for temporal or functional differences in sites. However, a practical solution to temporal or functional predictive modelling has proven to be elusive. This article discusses temporal predictive modelling, focusing on the difficulties of employing temporal variables, then introduces and tests a simple methodology for the implementation of temporal modelling. The temporal models thus created ar...

  19. Critical thinking in nurse managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zori, Susan; Morrison, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Formal education and support is needed for nurse managers to effectively function in their role in the current health care environment. Many nurse managers assume their positions based on expertise in a clinical role with little expertise in managerial and leadership skills. Operating as a manager and leader requires ongoing development of critical thinking skills and the inclination to use those skills. Critical thinking can have a powerful influence on the decision making and problem solving that nurse managers are faced with on a daily basis. The skills that typify critical thinking include analysis, evaluation, inference, and deductive and inductive reasoning. It is intuitive that nurse managers require both the skills and the dispositions of critical thinking to be successful in this pivotal role at a time of transformation in health care. Incorporating critical thinking into education and support programs for the nurse manager is necessary to position the nurse manager for success.

  20. Applying critical analysis - main methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Araujo Alonso

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available What is the usefulness of critical appraisal of literature? Critical analysis is a fundamental condition for the correct interpretation of any study that is subject to review. In epidemiology, in order to learn how to read a publication, we must be able to analyze it critically. Critical analysis allows us to check whether a study fulfills certain previously established methodological inclusion and exclusion criteria. This is frequently used in conducting systematic reviews although eligibility criteria are generally limited to the study design. Critical analysis of literature and be done implicitly while reading an article, as in reading for personal interest, or can be conducted in a structured manner, using explicit and previously established criteria. The latter is done when formally reviewing a topic.

  1. Spin dynamics in Tb studied by critical neutron scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, O. W.; Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage

    1971-01-01

    The inelasticity of the critical neutron scattering in Tb was measured at and above the Neel temperature. In the hydrodynamic region the line width Gamma (q=0, kappa 1)=C kappa z1, with z=1.4+or-0.1 and c=4.3+or-0.3 meVAAz. This result deviates from the conventional theory, which predicts...

  2. Temperature dependence of critical resolved shear stress for cubic metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashid, H.; Fazal-e-Aleem; Ali, M.

    1996-01-01

    The experimental measurements for critical resolved shear stress of various BCC and FCC metals have been explained by using Radiation Model. The temperature dependence of CRSS for different cubic metals is found to the first approximation, to upon the type of the crystal. A good agreement between experimental observations and predictions of the Radiation Model is found. (author)

  3. A fundamental study of a variable critical nozzle flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jea Hyung; Kim, Heuy Dong; Park, Kyung Am

    2003-01-01

    The mass flow rate of gas flow through critical nozzle depends on the nozzle supply conditions and the cross-sectional area at the nozzle throat. In order that the critical nozzle can be operated at a wide range of supply conditions, the nozzle throat diameter should be controlled to change the flow passage area. This can be achieved by means of a variable critical nozzle. In the present study, both experimental and computational works are performed to develop variable critical nozzle. A cone-cylinder with a diameter of d is inserted into conventional critical nozzle. It can move both upstream and downstream, thereby changing the cross-sectional area of the nozzle throat. Computational work using the axisymmetric, compressible Navier-Stokes equations is carried out to simulate the variable critical nozzle flow. An experiment is performed to measure the mass flow rate through variable critical nozzle. The present computational results are in close agreement with measured ones. The boundary layer displacement and momentum thickness are given as a function of Reynolds number. An empirical equation is obtained to predict the discharge coefficient of variable critical nozzle

  4. Critical Transition in Critical Zone of Intensively Managed Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P.

    2017-12-01

    Intensification of industrial agriculture has resulted in severe unintended global impacts, including degradation of arable land and eutrophication of receiving water bodies. Modern agricultural practices rely on significant direct and indirect human energy inputs, which have created imbalances between increased rates of biogeochemical processes related to production and background rates of natural processes. These imbalances have cascaded through the deep inter-dependencies between carbon, soil, water, nutrient and ecological processes, resulting in a critical transition of the Critical Zone and creating emergent dynamics and evolutionary trajectories. Understanding of these novel organization and function of the Critical Zone is vital for developing sustainable agricultural practices.

  5. Rethinking platelet function: thrombocytopenia induced immunodeficiency in critical illness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrowski, Sisse R; Johansson, Per Ingemar

    2011-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia in critical illness predicts a poor clinical outcome. Apart from its role in microvascular thrombus formation, it is widely anticipated that this association is indirect rather than causal. Emerging evidence however indicates that platelets are also immune competent cells. Like...... per se results in immunodeficiency through loss of platelet-mediated immune functions, and propose that thrombocytopenia induced immunodeficiency in critical illness in part explain the negative predictive value of low or declining platelet count. We propose that rethinking the risks...... of thrombocytopenia to include not only bleeding but also immunodeficiency and immune dysregulation along with the conduct of studies investigating mechanisms contributing to thrombocytopenia induced poor non-hemorrhagic outcome in critical illness, may be means to improve outcome in these patients through...

  6. A Critical Look at Critics in HTN Planning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Erol, Kutluhan; Hendler, James A; Nau, Dana S; Tsuneto, Reiko

    1995-01-01

    .... As a result, little work is available on the correctness or efficiency of critics. This paper describes a principled approach to handling conflicts, as implemented in Universal Method-Composition Planner (UMCP...

  7. The Living Indian Critical Tradition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Kumar Dwivedi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to establish the identity of something that is often considered to be missing – a living Indian critical tradition. I refer to the tradition that arises out of the work of those Indians who write in English. The chief architects of this tradition are Sri Aurobindo, C.D. Narasimhaiah, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak and Homi K. Bhabha. It is possible to believe that Indian literary theories derive almost solely from ancient Sanskrit poetics. Or, alternatively, one can be concerned about the sad state of affairs regarding Indian literary theories or criticism in English. There have been scholars who have raised the question of the pathetic state of Indian scholarship in English and have even come up with some positive suggestions. But these scholars are those who are ignorant about the living Indian critical tradition. The significance of the Indian critical tradition lies in the fact that it provides the real focus to the Indian critical scene. Without an awareness of this tradition Indian literary scholarship (which is quite a different thing from Indian literary criticism and theory as it does not have the same impact as the latter two do can easily fail to see who the real Indian literary critics and theorists are.

  8. Nitrogen critical loads using biodiversity-related critical limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posch, Maximilian; Aherne, Julian; Hettelingh, Jean-Paul

    2011-01-01

    Critical loads are widely used in the effects-based assessment of emission reduction policies. While the impacts of acidification have diminished, there is increasing concern regarding the effects of nitrogen deposition on terrestrial ecosystems. In this context much attention has been focussed on empirical critical loads as well as simulations with linked geochemistry-vegetation models. Surprisingly little attention has been paid to adapt the widely used simple mass balance approach. This approach has the well-established benefit of easy regional applicability, while incorporating specified critical chemical criteria to protect specified receptors. As plant occurrence/biodiversity is related to both the nutrient and acidity status of an ecosystem, a single abiotic factor (chemical criterion) is not sufficient. Rather than an upper limit for deposition (i.e., critical load), linked nutrient nitrogen and acidity chemical criteria for plant occurrence result in an 'optimal' nitrogen and sulphur deposition envelope. - Highlights: → Mass balance critical load approaches for nutrient nitrogen remain useful. → Biodiversity-related limits are related to nutrient and acidity status. → Nutrient and acidity chemical criteria lead to optimal deposition envelopes. → Optimal loads support effects-based emission reduction policies. - Biodiversity-related critical limits lead to optimal nitrogen and sulphur deposition envelopes for plant species or species compositions.

  9. Critical joints in large composite aircraft structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, W. D.; Bunin, B. L.; Hart-Smith, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    A program was conducted at Douglas Aircraft Company to develop the technology for critical structural joints of composite wing structure that meets design requirements for a 1990 commercial transport aircraft. The prime objective of the program was to demonstrate the ability to reliably predict the strength of large bolted composite joints. Ancillary testing of 180 specimens generated data on strength and load-deflection characteristics which provided input to the joint analysis. Load-sharing between fasteners in multirow bolted joints was computed by the nonlinear analysis program A4EJ. This program was used to predict strengths of 20 additional large subcomponents representing strips from a wing root chordwise splice. In most cases, the predictions were accurate to within a few percent of the test results. In some cases, the observed mode of failure was different than anticipated. The highlight of the subcomponent testing was the consistent ability to achieve gross-section failure strains close to 0.005. That represents a considerable improvement over the state of the art.

  10. How criticality affects student's creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter, I analyse if there is an inherent paradox between creativity and criticality. With critical thinking being among the core values in higher education, can we then also foster creative thinking? In answering this question, I use the masters degree LAICS (Leadership And Innovation...... in Complex Systems) as a case study. Interviews with students are used to shed light on creative teaching and learning. It is shown that creativity can be taught by teaching creatively. I conclude that creativity and criticality are not entirely different ways of thinking and both are important in academia...

  11. Tank farm nuclear criticality review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratzel, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    The technical basis for the nuclear criticality safety of stored wastes at the Hanford Site Tank Farm Complex was reviewed by a team of senior technical personnel whose expertise covered all appropriate aspects of fissile materials chemistry and physics. The team concluded that the detailed and documented nucleonics-related studies underlying the waste tanks criticality safety basis were sound. The team concluded that, under current plutonium inventories and operating conditions, a nuclear criticality accident is incredible in any of the Hanford single-shell tanks (SST), double-shell tanks (DST), or double-contained receiver tanks (DCRTS) on the Hanford Site

  12. Being Critical in Marketing Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dholakia, Nikilesh

    2012-01-01

    review the research spaces for critical studies of marketing in various global settings and conclude that United Kingdom and Nordic Europe have the best epistemic climate, and this region needs to take leadership in promoting greater range of macro and critical studies of marketing in the rest......In this article, I argue that an elevated macro-level perspective is imperative for conducting critical studies in the fields of marketing and consumer research. There are epistemic barriers to operating in this manner, and I offer several suggestions for overcoming these barriers. Finally, I...

  13. Domination criticality in product graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Chithra

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A connected dominating set is an important notion and has many applications in routing and management of networks. Graph products have turned out to be a good model of interconnection networks. This motivated us to study the Cartesian product of graphs G with connected domination number, γc(G=2,3 and characterize such graphs. Also, we characterize the k−γ-vertex (edge critical graphs and k−γc-vertex (edge critical graphs for k=2,3 where γ denotes the domination number of G. We also discuss the vertex criticality in grids.

  14. Critical scattering of neutrons by Fe: study of the hydrodynamic and critical regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parette, Georges

    1971-01-01

    In the present work we describe the latest experiments on the critical magnetic scattering of neutrons by iron just above the Curie temperature, performed at the Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires at Saclay. In these experiments we have tried to explore the 'hydrodynamical region' as defined by the 'scaling laws' and to determine the temperature dependence of the diffusion constant. These experiments yield a verification of the recent theoretical calculations made by P. Resibois and C. Piette. These calculations and several measurements which we have conducted show the existence of an intermediate region between the 'critical' and the 'hydrodynamical' regions, which we call the 'quasi-hydrodynamical' region. In the hydrodynamical region, whose borders are well defined by the calculations of Resibois and Piette, our results confirm the theoretical predictions concerning this region. (author) [fr

  15. Modelación de episodios críticos de contaminación por material particulado (PM10 en Santiago de Chile: Comparación de la eficiencia predictiva de los modelos paramétricos y no paramétricos Modeling critical episodes of air pollution by PM10 in Santiago, Chile: Comparison of the predictive efficiency of parametric and non-parametric statistical models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio A. Alvarado

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Evaluar la eficiencia predictiva de modelos estadísticos paramétricos y no paramétricos para predecir episodios críticos de contaminación por material particulado PM10 del día siguiente, que superen en Santiago de Chile la norma de calidad diaria. Una predicción adecuada de tales episodios permite a la autoridad decretar medidas restrictivas que aminoren la gravedad del episodio, y consecuentemente proteger la salud de la comunidad. Método: Se trabajó con las concentraciones de material particulado PM10 registradas en una estación asociada a la red de monitorización de la calidad del aire MACAM-2, considerando 152 observaciones diarias de 14 variables, y con información meteorológica registrada durante los años 2001 a 2004. Se ajustaron modelos estadísticos paramétricos Gamma usando el paquete estadístico STATA v11, y no paramétricos usando una demo del software estadístico MARS v 2.0 distribuida por Salford-Systems. Resultados: Ambos métodos de modelación presentan una alta correlación entre los valores observados y los predichos. Los modelos Gamma presentan mejores aciertos que MARS para las concentraciones de PM10 con valores Objective: To evaluate the predictive efficiency of two statistical models (one parametric and the other non-parametric to predict critical episodes of air pollution exceeding daily air quality standards in Santiago, Chile by using the next day PM10 maximum 24h value. Accurate prediction of such episodes would allow restrictive measures to be applied by health authorities to reduce their seriousness and protect the community´s health. Methods: We used the PM10 concentrations registered by a station of the Air Quality Monitoring Network (152 daily observations of 14 variables and meteorological information gathered from 2001 to 2004. To construct predictive models, we fitted a parametric Gamma model using STATA v11 software and a non-parametric MARS model by using a demo version of Salford

  16. Critical Facilities for Coastal Geographies

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The critical facilities data are derived from the USGS Structures Inventory Database (June, 2016). The structures in the derived dataset displays aggregated totals...

  17. Critical factors for EIA implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jasmine; Kørnøv, Lone; Christensen, Per

    2013-01-01

    After decades of development, the gap between expectations of Environment Impact Assessments (EIA) and their practical performance remains significant. Research has been done to identify the critical factors for an effective implementation of EIA. However, this research, to a large extent, has...... not been cumulated and analysed comprehensively according to the stages of the EIA process. This paper contributes to the critical review of the literature on EIA implementation and effectiveness by cumulating mainly empirical findings in an implementation theoretical perspective. It focuses on the links...... between different critical factors and how they relate to different stages in the EIA and thus influence the decision making process. After reviewing 33 refereed journal articles published between 1999 and 2011, we identified 203 notions of critical factors. Of these, 102 related to different stages...

  18. Critical Thinking - A Strategic Competency

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gwilliam, Jeffrey

    2002-01-01

    ... accepted, adopted or used by students. This research project explores the reasons for this outcome and provides recommendations and techniques to enhance acceptance of critical thinking as a tool for strategic leaders...

  19. Psychoanalytic Criticism and Teaching Shakespeare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Richard P.

    1987-01-01

    Presents a brief overview of previous psychoanalytically based theories of Shakespeare's plays, particularly "Hamlet," and defends the notion of introducing undergraduates to psychoanalytically based criticism because of the insights it may give students into their own lives. (JC)

  20. CRITICAL EVENTS IN CONSTRUCTION PROCESS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kirsten; Rasmussen, Grane Mikael Gregaard

    2009-01-01

    cause-effects of failures and defects in the construction industry by using an analytical approach (The bowtie model) which is developed in the accident research. Using this model clarifies the relationships within the chain of failures that causes critical events with undesirable consequences......Function failures, defects and poor communication are major problems in the construction industry. These failures and defects are caused by a row of critical events in the construction process. The purpose of this paper is to define “critical events” in the construction process and to investigate....... In this way the causes of failures and the relationships between various failures are rendered visible. A large construction site was observed from start to finish as the empirical element in the research. The research focuses on all kinds of critical events identified throughout every phase during...