WorldWideScience

Sample records for tip geometry effects

  1. Effect of tip geometry on photo-electron-emission from nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teki, Ranganath; Lu, Toh-Ming; Koratkar, Nikhil

    2009-03-01

    We show in this paper the strong effect of tip geometry on the photo-electron-emission behavior of nanostructured surfaces. To study the effect of tip geometry we compared the photo-emissivity of Ru and Pt nanorods with pyramidal shaped tips to that of carbon nanorods that display flat top (planar) tips. Flat top architectures gave no significant increase in the emission current, while nanostructures with pyramidal shaped tips showed 3-4 fold increase in photo-emission compared to a thin film of the same material. Pyramidal tip geometries increase the effective surface area that is exposed to the incident photon-flux thereby enhancing the photon-collection probability of the system. Such nano-structured surfaces show promise in a variety of device applications such as photo-detectors, photon counters and photo-multiplier tubes.

  2. Wind-tunnel investigation of the effects of blade tip geometry on the interaction of torsional loads and performance for an articulated helicopter rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, W. T.; Mantay, W. R.

    1981-01-01

    The Langley transonic dynamics tunnel was used to determine the degree of correlation between rotor performance and the dynamic twist generated by changes in blade tip geometry using an articulated rotor with four different tip geometries at advance ratios of 0.20, 0.30 and 0.35. Based on the data obtained, it is concluded that: (1) there appears to be no strong correlation between blade torsion loads and rotor performance prediction; (2) for a given rotor task at each advance ratio investigated, both the azimuthal variation of torsional moment and the mean torsional moment at 81% radius are configuration dependent; (3) reducing the nose down twist on the advancing blade appears to be more important to forward flight performance than increasing the nose down twist on the retreating blade; (4) the rotor inflow model used was important in predicting the performance of the adaptive rotor; and (5) neither rigid blade solidity effects, inflow environment, nor blade torsion loads can be used alone to accurately predict active rotor performance.

  3. AFM tip-sample convolution effects for cylinder protrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jian; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Fei-Hu; Gan, Yang

    2017-11-01

    A thorough understanding about the AFM tip geometry dependent artifacts and tip-sample convolution effect is essential for reliable AFM topographic characterization and dimensional metrology. Using rigid sapphire cylinder protrusions (diameter: 2.25 μm, height: 575 nm) as the model system, a systematic and quantitative study about the imaging artifacts of four types of tips-two different pyramidal tips, one tetrahedral tip and one super sharp whisker tip-is carried out through comparing tip geometry dependent variations in AFM topography of cylinders and constructing the rigid tip-cylinder convolution models. We found that the imaging artifacts and the tip-sample convolution effect are critically related to the actual inclination of the working cantilever, the tip geometry, and the obstructive contacts between the working tip's planes/edges and the cylinder. Artifact-free images can only be obtained provided that all planes and edges of the working tip are steeper than the cylinder sidewalls. The findings reported here will contribute to reliable AFM characterization of surface features of micron or hundreds of nanometers in height that are frequently met in semiconductor, biology and materials fields.

  4. CFD analysis of cloud cavitation on three tip-modified propellers with systematically varied tip geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, K. W.; Andersen, Poul

    2015-01-01

    The blade tip loading is often reduced as an effort to restrain sheet and tip vortex cavitation in the design of marine propellers. This CFD analysis demonstrates that an excessive reduction of the tip loading can cause cloud cavitation responsible for much of noise and surface erosion. Detached...

  5. CFD analysis of cloud cavitation on three tip-modified propellers with systematically varied tip geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, K. W.; Andersen, P.

    2015-12-01

    The blade tip loading is often reduced as an effort to restrain sheet and tip vortex cavitation in the design of marine propellers. This CFD analysis demonstrates that an excessive reduction of the tip loading can cause cloud cavitation responsible for much of noise and surface erosion. Detached eddy simulations (DES) are made for cavitating flows on three tip- modified propellers, of which one is a reference propeller having an experimental result from a cavitation tunnel test with a hull model, and the other two are modified from the reference propeller by altering the blade tip loading. DES results have been validated against the experiment in terms of sheet and cloud cavitation. In DES, non-uniform hull wake is modelled by using the inlet flow and momentum sources instead of including a hull model. A 4-bladed Kappel propeller with a smooth tip bending towards the suction side is used as the reference propeller. For the reference propeller, sheet cavitation extends over a whole chord length in the hull wake peak. As the blade gets out of the wake peak, the rear part of sheet cavity is detached in a form of cloud cavitation. For the reference propeller, the tip pitch reduction from the maximum is about 35%. When decreasing the tip pitch reduction to 10%, tip vortex cavitation is formed and cloud cavitation is significantly weakened. When increasing the tip pitch reduction to 60%, sheet cavitation slightly moves to inner radii and cloud cavitation grows larger.

  6. Method for estimating the tip geometry of scanning ion conductance microscope pipets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Matthew; Del Linz, Samantha J L; Smart, Trevor G; Moss, Guy W J

    2012-11-06

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) offers the ability to perform contact-free, high-resolution imaging of biological cells and tissues at physiological conditions. However, imaging resolution is highly dependent on the geometry of the SICM probe, which is generally not known. Small, high-resolution probes are too fine to image optically and, to date, geometry estimation has usually required electron microscopy (EM). This is time-consuming and prone to failure and cannot provide information about the crucial internal geometry of the probe. Here we demonstrate a new method for determining SICM tip geometry that overcomes the limitations of EM imaging. The method involves fitting an analytical model to current changes during quasi-controlled breakage of the pipet tip. The data can be routinely obtained using the SICM apparatus itself and our method thus opens the way for substantially better quantification in SICM imaging and measurement.

  7. Twelve Tips for Effective Electronic Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Joy

    1994-01-01

    Offers 12 tips for effective electronic presentation. This article is intended for readers who may be considering using electronic presentation for the first time. Offers reasons for its popularity and occasions when it may be used. The tips offer assistance in the design and presentation of electronic material. (LZ)

  8. Assigning Effective Homework. Classroom Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Federation of Teachers (NJ), 2010

    2010-01-01

    Each new school year brings high hopes, great expectations and challenges for both new and seasoned educators. The American Federation of Teachers (AFT) has developed a series called "Classroom Tips" to help educators start the year right and anticipate the year ahead. Over the past 40 years, most research studies on homework have found that…

  9. Continuous FEM simulation of the nanoindentation. Actual indenter tip geometries, material elastoplastic deformation laws and universal hardness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouzakis, K.D.; Michailidis, N.; Hadjiyiannis, S.; Skordaris, G. [Mechanical Engineering Dept., Aristoteles Univ. of Thessaloniki (Greece); Erkens, G. [CemeCon AG, Wuerselen (Germany)

    2002-09-01

    The precise knowledge of materials mechanical properties is always a core issue in every technical application. Through a developed finite elements method (FEM) continuous simulation of the nanoindentation, the applied force course versus the penetration depth is adequately simulated during the loading and unloading phases of this test, and the corresponding material stress-strain curves, as well as the universal hardness, are stepwise defined. Furthermore, the actual tip geometries of various indenters are approached and through equivalent magnitudes described. The results show that the defined material elastoplastic deformation characteristics are independent of the indenter type, as Vickers or Berkovich, since the existing indenter tip form deviations from their ideal geometry are considered. Furthermore, using the developed FEM-based nanoindentation simulation, the influence of the indenter tip geometry on the defined constitutive laws and the universal hardness is sufficiently elucidated. Various materials stress-strain curves and universal hardness courses versus the indentation depth, determined by means of the developed procedure, are presented. (orig.)

  10. Investigation into the potential for dust and gas explosions in underground coal mines with reference to pick tip geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawood, Albert D.

    2011-01-01

    In underground coal mines, methane gas, if present in sufficient concentration, may be ignited by sparks from hot spots on the picks of coal cutting machines striking hard bands of rock. During the coal cutting, wear-flat areas develop on the trailing side of the tips of picks. As pick wear progresses, the generation of frictional heat and coal dust increases and the development of hot spots at the cutting tips may lead to an explosion of methane gas. Field experience and research work over the last few years have facilitated excellent cutting performance for certain picks through the optimisation of the cutting parameters. Such performance improvements show great promise in preventing the incidence of gas or dust explosions occurring at the coal face area. This study sets out some of the fundamentals of pick geometry and cutting parameters and the methods which have been employed to achieve improvements in reducing the hazards of gas or dust explosions. It is based on the comparative trial results of two types of picks with different designs and on a range of available research information on the subject. My investigation looked at the fundamentals of pick geometry and cutting parameters and the current suppression techniques in place to control the dust and gas explosions on the coal operating face.

  11. The effect of substrate on electric field enhancement of Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahreini, Maryam

    2018-01-01

    The characterization of materials down to a few-molecule level is a key challenge in nanotechnology. Raman spectroscopy is a powerful method that provides chemical information via nondestructive vibrational fingerprinting. Unfortunately, this method suffers from signal weakness which prevents the study of small quantities. Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) which combines the chemical sensitivity of Raman spectroscopy (RS) with high spatial resolution of scanning probe microscopy (SPM), provides chemical images of surfaces at the nanometer scale. In this method, irradiation of an SPM tip by a focused laser beam results in enhancement of local electric field via two reasons of localized surface plasmon resonance and lightning rod effect. This enhancement leads to the enhancement in Raman intensity from the sample surface in the vicinity of tip. In all TERS measurements, samples should be located on a substrate. In this paper, the dependence of the electric field enhancement to the substrate has been investigated. In simulations, three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (3D-FDTD) method is used for numerical solution of Maxwell's equations. Our results show that the electric field enhancement is weak for the tip alone case. Introducing a substrate provides further electric field enhancement via near field electromagnetic dipole-dipole coupling between the tip and substrate. Since the side-illumination geometry is used for laser irradiation, the vertical component of the incident field plays a dominant role in the electric field enhancement. Therefore, the coupling effect between the tip and the substrate is the key contribution to the enhancement. For the case of silicon tip and the gold substrate, the electric field enhancement is improved considerably. There is an optimal tip size for TERS because of the competing effects of the radiation damping and the surface scattering of the tip. The results show the substrate as an effective tool for the

  12. Effects of plastic anisotropy on crack-tip behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legarth, Brian Nyvang; Tvergaard, Viggo; Kuroda, Mitsutoshi

    2002-01-01

    For a crack in a homogeneous material the effect of plastic anisotropy on crack-tip blunting and on the near-tip stress and strain fields is analyzed numerically. The full finite strain analyses are carried out for plane strain under small scale yielding conditions, with purely symmetric mode I...... loading remote from the crack-tip. In cases where the principal axes of the anisotropy are inclined to the plane of the crack it is found that the plastic zones as well as the stress and strain fields just around the blunted tip of the crack become non-symmetric. In these cases the peak strain...... on the blunted tip occurs off the center line of the crack, thus indicating that the crack may want to grow in a different direction. When the anisotropic axes are parallel to the crack symmetry is retained, but the plastic zones and the near-tip fields still differ from those predicted by standard isotropic...

  13. Discrete quantum geometries and their effective dimension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thuerigen, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    In several approaches towards a quantum theory of gravity, such as group field theory and loop quantum gravity, quantum states and histories of the geometric degrees of freedom turn out to be based on discrete spacetime. The most pressing issue is then how the smooth geometries of general relativity, expressed in terms of suitable geometric observables, arise from such discrete quantum geometries in some semiclassical and continuum limit. In this thesis I tackle the question of suitable observables focusing on the effective dimension of discrete quantum geometries. For this purpose I give a purely combinatorial description of the discrete structures which these geometries have support on. As a side topic, this allows to present an extension of group field theory to cover the combinatorially larger kinematical state space of loop quantum gravity. Moreover, I introduce a discrete calculus for fields on such fundamentally discrete geometries with a particular focus on the Laplacian. This permits to define the effective-dimension observables for quantum geometries. Analysing various classes of quantum geometries, I find as a general result that the spectral dimension is more sensitive to the underlying combinatorial structure than to the details of the additional geometric data thereon. Semiclassical states in loop quantum gravity approximate the classical geometries they are peaking on rather well and there are no indications for stronger quantum effects. On the other hand, in the context of a more general model of states which are superposition over a large number of complexes, based on analytic solutions, there is a flow of the spectral dimension from the topological dimension d on low energy scales to a real number between 0 and d on high energy scales. In the particular case of 1 these results allow to understand the quantum geometry as effectively fractal.

  14. Effect of duct geometry on Wells turbine performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaaban, S.; Abdel Hafiz, A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A Wells turbine duct design in the form of venturi duct is proposed and investigated. ► Optimum duct geometry is identified. ► Up to 14% increase of the turbine power can be achieved using the optimized duct geometry. ► Up to 9% improve of the turbine efficiency is attained by optimizing the turbine duct geometry. ► The optimized duct geometry results in tangible delay of the turbine stalling point. - Abstract: Wells turbines can represent important source of renewable energy for many countries. An essential disadvantage of Wells turbines is their low aerodynamic efficiency and consequently low power produced. In order to enhance the Wells turbine performance, the present research work proposes the use of a symmetrical duct in the form of a venturi tube with turbine rotor located at throat. The effects of duct area ratio and duct angle are investigated in order to optimize Wells turbine performance. The turbine performance is numerically investigated by solving the steady 3D incompressible Reynolds Averaged Navier–Stocks equation (RANS). A substantial improve of the turbine performance is achieved by optimizing the duct geometry. Increasing both the duct area ratio and duct angle increase the acceleration and deceleration upstream and downstream the rotor respectively. The accelerating flow with thinner boundary layer thickness upstream the rotor reduces the flow separation on the rotor suction side. The downstream diffuser reduces the interaction between tip leakage flow and blade suction side. Up to 14% increase in turbine power and 9% increase in turbine efficiency are achieved by optimizing the duct geometry. On other hand, a tangible delay of the turbine stall point is also detected.

  15. Geometry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . In the previous article we looked at the origins of synthetic and analytic geometry. More practical minded people, the builders and navigators, were studying two other aspects of geometry- trigonometry and integral calculus. These are actually ...

  16. Users Guide for Smooth-Prop: A Program for Smoothing Propeller Tip Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Department of National Defence), 2013 c© Sa Majesté la Reine en droit du Canada (Ministère de la Défense nationale), 2013 Abstract The traditional method...détaillée la géométrie d’une hélice consiste à définir une série de sections de surface portante, chacune d’entre elles étant modifiée en fonction des ...save the resulting propeller geometry in the IGES format which can be read by most flow solvers. Résumé La méthode classique pour établir de manière

  17. Strontium clusters: electronic and geometry shell effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyalin, Andrey G.; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2008-01-01

    charged strontium clusters consisting of up to 14 atoms, average bonding distances, electronic shell closures, binding energies per atom, and spectra of the density of electronic states (DOS). It is demonstrated that the size-evolution of structural and electronic properties of strontium clusters...... is governed by an interplay of the electronic and geometry shell closures. Influence of the electronic shell effects on structural rearrangements can lead to violation of the icosahedral growth motif of strontium clusters. It is shown that the excessive charge essentially affects the optimized geometry...... of strontium clusters. Ionization of small strontium clusters results in the alteration of the magic numbers. The strong dependence of the DOS spectra on details of ionic structure allows one to perform a reliable geometry identification of strontium clusters....

  18. Tip Effect of the Tapping Mode of Atomic Force Microscope in Viscous Fluid Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Hua-Ju; Shih, Po-Jen

    2015-07-28

    Atomic force microscope with applicable types of operation in a liquid environment is widely used to scan the contours of biological specimens. The contact mode of operation allows a tip to touch a specimen directly but sometimes it damages the specimen; thus, a tapping mode of operation may replace the contact mode. The tapping mode triggers the cantilever of the microscope approximately at resonance frequencies, and so the tip periodically knocks the specimen. It is well known that the cantilever induces extra liquid pressure that leads to drift in the resonance frequency. Studies have noted that the heights of protein surfaces measured via the tapping mode of an atomic force microscope are ~25% smaller than those measured by other methods. This discrepancy may be attributable to the induced superficial hydrodynamic pressure, which is worth investigating. In this paper, we introduce a semi-analytical method to analyze the pressure distribution of various tip geometries. According to our analysis, the maximum hydrodynamic pressure on the specimen caused by a cone-shaped tip is ~0.5 Pa, which can, for example, pre-deform a cell by several nanometers in compression before the tip taps it. Moreover, the pressure calculated on the surface of the specimen is 20 times larger than the pressure without considering the tip effect; these results have not been motioned in other papers. Dominating factors, such as surface heights of protein surface, mechanical stiffness of protein increasing with loading velocity, and radius of tip affecting the local pressure of specimen, are also addressed in this study.

  19. Twelve tips for effective body language for medical educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Andrew J; Freed, Jason; Ricotta, Daniel; Farris, Grace; Smith, C Christopher

    2017-09-01

    A significant proportion of human communication is nonverbal. Although the fields of business and psychology have significant literature on effectively using body language in a variety of situations, there is limited literature on effective body language for medical educators. To provide 12 tips to highlight effective body language strategies and techniques for medical educators. The tips provided are based on our experiences and reflections as clinician-educators and the available literature. The 12 tips presented offer specific strategies to engage learners, balance learner participation, and bring energy and passion to teaching. Medical educators seeking to maximize their effectiveness would benefit from an understanding of how body language affects a learning environment and how body language techniques can be used to engage audiences, maintain attention, control challenging learners, and convey passion for a topic. Understanding and using body language effectively is an important instructional skill.

  20. Effect of crack propagation on crack tip fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.V. Antunes

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Crack closure influences fatigue crack growth rate and must be included in the design of components. Plasticity induced crack closure is intimately linked with the crack tip plastic deformation, which becomes residual as the crack propagates. The objective here is to study numerically the effect of crack propagation on crack tip fields. The transient effect observed at the beginning of crack propagation is linked to the hardening behavior of material. The effect of mesh refinement is studied, and a singular behavior is evident, which is explained by the sharp crack associated with mesh topology, composed of a regular pattern of square elements. The plastic zone size measured perpendicularly to crack flank in the residual plastic wake is quantified and compared with literature models. Finally, the removal of material at the first node behind crack tip with load cycling was observed for plane strain state and some hardening models in plane stress state.

  1. Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Pedoe, Dan

    1988-01-01

    ""A lucid and masterly survey."" - Mathematics Gazette Professor Pedoe is widely known as a fine teacher and a fine geometer. His abilities in both areas are clearly evident in this self-contained, well-written, and lucid introduction to the scope and methods of elementary geometry. It covers the geometry usually included in undergraduate courses in mathematics, except for the theory of convex sets. Based on a course given by the author for several years at the University of Minnesota, the main purpose of the book is to increase geometrical, and therefore mathematical, understanding and to he

  2. Effect of ultrasonic tip designs on intraradicular post removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anny Carine Barros Aguiar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives To evaluate the effect of different ultrasonic tip designs on intraradicular post removal. Materials and Methods The crowns of forty human canine teeth were removed, and after biomechanical preparation and filling, the roots were embedded in acrylic resin blocks. The post spaces were made, and root canal molding was performed with self-cured acrylic resin. After casting (Cu-Al, the posts were cemented with zinc phosphate cement. The specimens were randomly separated into 4 groups (n = 10, as follows: G1 - no ultrasonic vibration (control; G2 - ultrasonic vibration using an elongated cylindrical-shaped and active rounded tip; G3 - ultrasonic vibration with a flattened convex and linear active tip; G4 - ultrasonic vibration with active semicircular tapered tip. Ultrasonic vibration was applied for 15 seconds on each post surface and tensile test was performed in a Universal Testing Machine (Instron 4444 - 1 mm/min. Results G4 presented the highest mean values, however, with no statistically significant difference in comparison to G3 (P > 0.05. G2 presented the lowest mean values with statistically significant difference to G3 and G4 (P < 0.05. Conclusions Ultrasonic vibration with elongated cylindrical-shaped and active rounded tip was most effective in reducing force required for intraradicular post removal.

  3. Effects of increasing tip velocity on wind turbine rotor design.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resor, Brian Ray [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Maniaci, David Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Berg, Jonathan Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Richards, Phillip William [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-05-01

    A reduction in cost of energy from wind is anticipated when maximum allowable tip velocity is allowed to increase. Rotor torque decreases as tip velocity increases and rotor size and power rating are held constant. Reduction in rotor torque yields a lighter weight gearbox, a decrease in the turbine cost, and an increase in the capacity for the turbine to deliver cost competitive electricity. The high speed rotor incurs costs attributable to rotor aero-acoustics and system loads. The increased loads of high speed rotors drive the sizing and cost of other components in the system. Rotor, drivetrain, and tower designs at 80 m/s maximum tip velocity and 100 m/s maximum tip velocity are created to quantify these effects. Component costs, annualized energy production, and cost of energy are computed for each design to quantify the change in overall cost of energy resulting from the increase in turbine tip velocity. High fidelity physics based models rather than cost and scaling models are used to perform the work. Results provide a quantitative assessment of anticipated costs and benefits for high speed rotors. Finally, important lessons regarding full system optimization of wind turbines are documented.

  4. Multi-parameter crack tip stress state description for evaluation of nonlinear zone width in silicate composite specimens in component splitting/bending test geometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Veselý, V.; Frantík, P.; Sopek, J.; Malíková, L.; Seitl, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 2 (2015), s. 200-214 ISSN 8756-758X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP104/11/0833 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : near-crack tip fields * Williams series * higher-order terms * stress field * failure criterion * nonlinear zone * quasi-brittle fracture * splitting-bending geometry Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 1.838, year: 2015

  5. Effects of crack tip plasticity on fatigue crack propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, H.B.

    1996-01-01

    A simple model for fatigue crack propagation has been proposed based on the modified Dugdale model of crack tip plasticity and energy balance approach to stable crack propagation. To verify the proposed model, fatigue tests were performed on the specimens of Type 304 stainless steel and Inconel 718. To measure the effect of crack tip bluntness on the fatigue crack propagation, specimens of different thickness were used. Results show that the theoretical prediction of fatigue crack propagation agreed well with the experimental test results. It is suggested that the prediction of fatigue crack propagation should take account of the different plasticity related to the variation of specimen thickness, stress state and material's tearing modulus in the crack tip region. (orig.)

  6. An effective disinfection protocol for plant regeneration from shoot tip ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An effective method of disinfection protocol and micropropagation with an enhanced survival rate of explants and reduced phenol induced browning in strawberry was developed. The survival rate of three genotypes was between 89.2 - 100%. Shoot tip were able to develop into plantlet on a hormone-free MS medium when ...

  7. EFFECTS OF ELECTRODE DEFORMATION OF RESISTANCE SPOT WELDING ON 304 AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL WELD GEOMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nachimani Charde

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The resistance spot welding process is accomplished by forcing huge amounts of current flow from the upper electrode tip through the base metals to the lower electrode tip, or vice versa or in both directions. A weld joint is established between the metal sheets through fusion, resulting in a strong bond between the sheets without occupying additional space. The growth of the weld nugget (bond between sheets is therefore determined from the welding current density; sufficient time for current delivery; reasonable electrode pressing force; and the area provided for current delivery (electrode tip. The welding current and weld time control the root penetration, while the electrode pressing force and electrode tips successfully accomplish the connection during the welding process. Although the welding current and weld time cause the heat generation at the areas concerned (electrode tip area, the electrode tips’ diameter and electrode pressing forces also directly influence the welding process. In this research truncated-electrode deformation and mushrooming effects are observed, which result in the welded areas being inconsistent due to the expulsion. The copper to chromium ratio is varied from the tip to the end of the electrode whilst the welding process is repeated. The welding heat affects the electrode and the electrode itself influences the shape of the weld geometry.

  8. Geometri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byg din egen boomerang, kast den, se den flyve, forstå hvorfor og hvordan den vender tilbage, og grib den. Det handler om opdriften på vingerne når du flyver, men det handler også og allermest om den mærkværdige gyroskop-effekt, du bruger til at holde balancen, når du kører på cykel. Vi vil bruge...... matematik, geometri, og fysik til at forstå, hvad det er, der foregår....

  9. Tips on effective presentation design and delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Christopher; Linte, Cristian A

    2010-01-01

    For many of us oral presentations can be the prime means for communicating our ideas and our research, not only to our peers, but also to our employers and to potential customers. As students, you are no exception the prospect of an oral presentation can be daunting, the pressure is on to make a good impression with your research. That we are scientists presenting sometimes very complicated scientific ideas and results need not necessarily be a recipe for a sleep inducing "death by PowerPoint" presentation, rather there are simple ways in which we can all try and make our presentations effective and captivating. This session aims to give you some all-round pointers on preparing and delivering an effective presentation that best conveys your ideas smoothly, understandably and, most important, succinctly.

  10. Effect of Type of Cutting Tips on Cutting Forces in Turning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polák Pavel

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to demonstrate the efect of cutting materials and geometry of cutting tips on cutting forces in turning as well as the quality and precision of machined surface. The experiment focuses on measuring cutting forces when turning a sample of steel 11 523 at a constant feed rate and cut depth and at varying speeds of a spindle. Measurements were made using exchangeable cutting tips of diferent types. The results will be evaluated in terms of the impact of diferent characteristics of cutting tips and variable spindle speeds.

  11. Multi-dimensional modelling of electrostatic force distance curve over dielectric surface: Influence of tip geometry and correlation with experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boularas, A., E-mail: boularas@laplace.univ-tlse.fr; Baudoin, F.; Villeneuve-Faure, C. [LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d' Energie), Université de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse cedex 9 (France); Clain, S. [Universidade do Minho, Centro de Matemática, Campus de Gualtar, 4710 - 057 Braga (Portugal); Université Paul Sabatier, Institut de Mathématiques de Toulouse, 31062 Toulouse (France); Teyssedre, G. [LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d' Energie), Université de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse cedex 9 (France); CNRS, LAPLACE, F-31071 Toulouse (France)

    2014-08-28

    Electric Force-Distance Curves (EFDC) is one of the ways whereby electrical charges trapped at the surface of dielectric materials can be probed. To reach a quantitative analysis of stored charge quantities, measurements using an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) must go with an appropriate simulation of electrostatic forces at play in the method. This is the objective of this work, where simulation results for the electrostatic force between an AFM sensor and the dielectric surface are presented for different bias voltages on the tip. The aim is to analyse force-distance curves modification induced by electrostatic charges. The sensor is composed by a cantilever supporting a pyramidal tip terminated by a spherical apex. The contribution to force from cantilever is neglected here. A model of force curve has been developed using the Finite Volume Method. The scheme is based on the Polynomial Reconstruction Operator—PRO-scheme. First results of the computation of electrostatic force for different tip–sample distances (from 0 to 600 nm) and for different DC voltages applied to the tip (6 to 20 V) are shown and compared with experimental data in order to validate our approach.

  12. Strontium clusters: electronic and geometry shell effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyalin, Andrey G.; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2008-01-01

    The optimized structure and electronic properties of neutral, singly and doubly charged strontium clusters have been investigated using it ab initio theoretical methods based on density-functional theory. We have systematically calculated the optimized geometries of neutral, singly and doubly...

  13. Numerical investigation of tip clearance effects on the performance of ducted propeller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Yongle

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Tip clearance loss is a limitation of the improvement of turbomachine performance. Previous studies show the Tip clearance loss is generated by the leakage flow through the tip clearance, and is roughly linearly proportional to the gap size. This study investigates the tip clearance effects on the performance of ducted propeller. The investigation was carried out by solving the Navier-Stokes equations with the commercial Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD code CFX14.5. These simulations were carried out to determine the underlying mechanisms of the tip clearance effects. The calculations were performed at three different chosen advance ratios. Simulation results showed that the tip loss slope was not linearly at high advance due to the reversed pressure at the leading edge. Three type of vortical structures were observed in the tip clearance at different clearance size.

  14. Effect of diamond trip geometries on boundary layer transition for hypersonic inlet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H. Y.; Ni, H. L.; Zhang, Z. M.; Yi, M. R.

    2016-10-01

    In order to grasp the effect of diamond trip geometries on boundary layer transition of hypersonic inlet, an experiment at Mach number 6 in a hypersonic wind tunnel was performed for a hypersonic inlet. The heat transfers at the inlet wall were measured through the infrared thermography. The transition region was judged by the comparison of heat transfer between experiment and computation. Ten diamond forced transition trips were designed according to Modern Design of Experiments. The experimental results shown that the effect order of trip geometries on transition region were the trip height, distance between diamond elements and diagonal length of diamond element from the largest to the smallest. Transition region moved forward to the model tip with increasing trip height or trip length, or with decreasing distance between diamond elements, or with increasing diagonal length of element. The optimized configuration was obtained for diamond forced-transition trip when the optimization object was transition region.

  15. Effect of Inlet Geometry on Fan Performance and Flow Field in a Half-Ducted Propeller Fan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pin Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to clarify the effect of rotor inlet geometry of half-ducted propeller fan on performance and velocity fields at rotor outlet, the experimental investigation was carried out using a hotwire anemometer. Three types of inlet geometry were tested. The first type is the one that the rotor blade tip is fully covered by a casing. The second is that the front one-third part of blade tip is opened and the rest is covered. The third is that the front two-thirds are opened and the rest is covered. Fan test and internal flow measurement at rotor outlet were conducted about three types of inlet geometry. At the internal flow measurement, a single slant hotwire probe was used and a periodical multisampling technique was adopted to obtain the three-dimensional velocity distributions. From the results of fan test, the pressure-rise characteristic drops at high flowrate region and the stall point shifts to high flowrate region, when the opened area of blade tip increases. From the results of velocity distributions at rotor outlet, the region with high axial velocity moves to radial inwards, the circumferential velocity near blade tip becomes high, and the flow field turns to radial outward, when the opened area increases.

  16. Effect of fiber geometry on macroscale friction of ordered low-density polyethylene nanofiber arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dae Ho; Kim, Yongkwan; Fearing, Ronald S; Maboudian, Roya

    2011-09-06

    Ordered low-density polyethylene (LDPE) nanofiber arrays are fabricated from silicon nanowire (SiNW) templates synthesized by a simple wet-chemical process based on metal-assisted electroless etching combined with colloidal lithography. The geometrical effect of nanofibrillar structures on their macroscale friction is investigated over a wide range of diameters and lengths under the same fiber density. The optimum geometry for contacting a smooth glass surface is presented with discussions on the compromise between fiber tip-contact area and fiber compliance. A friction design map is developed, which shows that the theoretical optimum design condition agrees well with the LDPE nanofiber geometries exhibiting high measured friction. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  17. Experimental Study of the Effects of Blade Treatments on the Tip Vortex Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimchenko, Vera

    2015-11-01

    The current study investigates the effects of blade tip treatments on the characteristics of a wind turbine blade tip vortex. Three blade tip shapes including a blunt edge, leading edge comb, and a winglet were designed and tested in a low speed wind tunnel. The rotor with a blunt edge was considered to be a baseline case corresponding to an untreated blade tip. The leading-edge comb rotor was designed with leading edge tubercles extending from the tip of the blade inward, 6 percent of rotor diameter. The winglet located at the tip of the winglet rotor had a cant angle of 45 degrees. The wind turbine operated at a tip speed ratio of 5 and a tip Reynolds number of 14,000. The tip treatments were intended to weaken the tip vortices by encouraging dissipation (leading edge comb) or promoting the formation of weaker vortices (winglet). Time-resolved and phase-averaged PIV was used to measure the velocity field behind the rotor. The time-averaged velocity field was subtracted from the phase-averaged velocity field to isolate the time-varying components of the flow. The vorticity of the phase-averaged time-varying field was calculated, and the tip vortices were identified using a vortex identification method. Vortex characteristics such as core radius and vortex strength were calculated and compared for the three rotors. The analysis of the vorticity showed that the winglet rotor had weaker tip vortices with a larger core radius, while the serrated tip rotor had strong tip vortices with the same core radius as the baseline case.

  18. Vanishing theorems and effective results in algebraic geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demailly, J.P.; Goettsche, L.; Lazarsfeld, R.

    2001-01-01

    The School on Vanishing Theorems and Effective Results in Algebraic Geometry took place in ICTP, Trieste from 25 April 2000 to 12 May 2000. It was organized by J. P. Demailly (Universite de Grenoble I) and R. Lazarsfeld (University of Michigan). The main topics considered were vanishing theorems, multiplyer ideal sheaves and effective results in algebraic geometry, tight closure, geometry of higher dimensional projective and Kahler manifolds, hyperbolic algebraic varieties. The school consisted of two weeks of lectures and one week of conference. This volume contains the lecture notes of most of the lectures in the first two weeks

  19. Effects of irradiation on physicochemical and sensory qualities of fermented shoot tip of sweet potato

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Li; Liu Chunquan; Li Dajing; Song Jiangfeng; Jiang Ning; Liu Chunju; Wu Haihong; Zhu Danyu

    2011-01-01

    The effect of irradiation on sensory quality, physicochemical and functional prosperities of fermented shoot tips of sweet potatoes were studied. The results showed that total content of free amino acids in fermented shoot tips of sweet potato were not influenced at 4 kGy irradiation, but increased at 6 kGy. Total content of organic acids in shoot tips were not influenced by 2 ∼ 6 kGy of irradiation. The total viable cells of the tips was reduced from 7.35 to 4.67 log CFU/g at 2 kGy irradiation, and no growth of total viable cells was observed at 4 and 6 kGy irradiated fermented shoot tips. It is recommended that 4 kGy was the endurance irradiation dose for fermented shoot tips of sweet potato to ensure the maximum retention of taste quality and health-relevant functionality. (authors)

  20. Effects of boundary layer forcing on wing-tip vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw-Ward, Samantha

    The nature of turbulence within wing-tip vortices has been a topic of research for decades, yet accurate measurements of Reynolds stresses within the core are inherently difficult due to the bulk motion wandering caused by initial and boundary conditions in wind tunnels. As a result, characterization of a vortex as laminar or turbulent is inconclusive and highly contradicting. This research uses several experimental techniques to study the effects of broadband turbulence, introduced within the wing boundary layer, on the development of wing-tip vortices. Two rectangular wings with a NACA 0012 profile were fabricated for the use of this research. One wing had a smooth finish and the other rough, introduced by P80 grade sandpaper. Force balance measurements showed a small reduction in wing performance due to surface roughness for both 2D and 3D configurations, although stall characteristics remained relatively unchanged. Seven-hole probes were purpose-built and used to assess the mean velocity profiles of the vortices five chord lengths downstream of the wing at multiple angles of attack. Above an incidence of 4 degrees, the vortices were nearly axisymmetric, and the wing roughness reduced both velocity gradients and peak velocity magnitudes within the vortex. Laser Doppler velocimetry was used to further assess the time-resolved vortex at an incidence of 5 degrees. Evidence of wake shedding frequencies and wing shear layer instabilities at higher frequencies were seen in power spectra within the vortex. Unlike the introduction of freestream turbulence, wing surface roughness did not appear to increase wandering amplitude. A new method for removing the effects of vortex wandering is proposed with the use of carefully selected high-pass filters. The filtered data revealed that the Reynolds stress profiles of the vortex produced by the smooth and rough wing were similar in shape, with a peak occurring away from the vortex centre but inside of the core. Single hot

  1. AFM tip effect on a thin liquid film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma-Alonso, R; Legendre, D; Tordjeman, Ph

    2013-06-25

    We study the interaction between an AFM probe and a liquid film deposited over a flat substrate. We investigate the effects of the physical and geometrical parameters, with a special focus on the film thickness E, the probe radius R, and the distance D between the probe and the free surface. Deformation profiles have been calculated from the numerical simulations of the Young-Laplace equation by taking into account the probe/liquid and the liquid/substrate interactions, characterized by the Hamaker constants, Hpl and Hls. We demonstrate that the deformation of a shallow film is determined by a particular characteristic length λF = (2πγE(4)/Hls)(1/2), resulting from the balance between the capillary force (γ is the surface tension) and the van der Waals liquid/substrate attraction. For the case of a bulk liquid, the extent of the interface deformation is simply controlled by the capillary length λC = (γ/Δρg)(1/2). These trends point out two asymptotic regimes, which in turn are bounded by two characteristic film thicknesses Eg = (Hls/2πΔρg)(1/4) and Eγ = (R(2)Hls/2πγ)(1/4). For E > Eg, the bulk behavior is recovered, and for E effect is observed. This tip effect is characterized by the small magnitude of the deformation and an important restriction of its radial extent λF localized below the probe. In addition, we have found that the film thickness has a significant effect on the threshold separation distance Dmin below which the irreversible jump-to-contact process occurs: Dmin is probe radius-dependent for the bulk whereas it is film-thickness-dependent for shallow films. These results have an important impact on the optimal AFM scanning conditions.

  2. Size-effects at a crack-tip interacting with a number of voids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2008-01-01

    A strain gradient plasticity theory is used to analyse the growth of discretely represented voids in front of a blunting crack tip, in order to study the influence of size effects on two competing mechanisms of crack growth. For a very small void volume fraction the crack tip tends to interact...

  3. Aerodynamic interaction effects of tip-mounted propellers installed on the horizontal tailplane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Arnhem, N.; Sinnige, T.; Stokkermans, T.C.A.; Eitelberg, G.; Veldhuis, L.L.M.

    2018-01-01

    This paper addresses the effects of propeller installation on the aerodynamic performance of a tailplane featuring tip-mounted propellers. A model of a low aspect ratio tailplane equipped with an elevator and a tip-mounted propeller was installed in a low-speed wind-tunnel. Measurements were

  4. CFD Analysis of Scale Effects on Conventional and Tip-Modified Propellers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, Keun Woo; Andersen, Poul

    2017-01-01

    Full-scale propeller performance is traditionally predictedby scaling model-scale test results, but the traditionalscaling methods do not take into account hydrodynamicdistinctions of tip-modified propellers in full-scaleperformance. An open-water CFD analysis is made onscale effects of tip...

  5. The Casimir effect: medium and geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marachevsky, Valery N

    2012-01-01

    Theory of the Casimir effect is presented in several examples. Casimir–Polder-type formulas, Lifshitz theory and theory of the Casimir effect for two gratings separated by a vacuum slit are derived. Equations for the electromagnetic field in the presence of a medium and dispersion are discussed. The Casimir effect for systems with a layer of 2 + 1 fermions is studied. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical in honour of Stuart Dowker's 75th birthday devoted to ‘Applications of zeta functions and other spectral functions in mathematics and physics’. (paper)

  6. Effectiveness of Discovery Learning-Based Transformation Geometry Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Febriana, R.; Haryono, Y.; Yusri, R.

    2017-09-01

    Development of transformation geometry module is conducted because the students got difficulties to understand the existing book. The purpose of the research was to find out the effectiveness of discovery learning-based transformation geometry module toward student’s activity. Model of the development was Plomp model consisting preliminary research, prototyping phase and assessment phase. The research was focused on assessment phase where it was to observe the designed product effectiveness. The instrument was observation sheet. The observed activities were visual activities, oral activities, listening activities, mental activities, emotional activities and motor activities. Based on the result of the research, it is found that visual activities, learning activities, writing activities, the student’s activity is in the criteria very effective. It can be concluded that the use of discovery learning-based transformation geometry module use can increase the positive student’s activity and decrease the negative activity.

  7. Effect of plastic prestrain on the crack tip constraint of pipeline steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eikrem, P.A.; Zhang, Z.L.; Nyhus, B.

    2007-01-01

    Before and during operation, pipelines may suffer from plastic pre-deformation due to accidental loading, cold bending and ground movement. Plastic prestrain not only modifies steel's yield and flow properties but also influences its fracture performance. This paper focuses on the effect of prestrain history on crack driving force and crack tip constraint. A single-edge notched tension specimen has been selected for the study and the crack is assumed to exist before a prestrain history was applied. The results show that prestrain history has a strong effect on the crack tip stress field. A new parameter has been proposed to characterize the prestrain-induced crack tip constraint. For the same crack tip opening displacement level, prestrain history will elevate the crack tip stress field. The prestrain-induced constraint decreases with the increase of loading

  8. CFD Study on Effective Wake of Conventional and Tip-modified Propellers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, K. W.; Andersen, Poul

    2016-01-01

    -propulsion tests. The effects of different Reynolds number on higher effective wake fraction of tip-modified propellers are investigated by open-water simulations with varying the propeller speed and evaluations of effective wake extracted from self-propulsion simulations on tip-modified and conventional...... propellers. Open-water simulations show that the advance ratio at the design thrust is higher at a higher Reynolds number for both propellers and the advance ratio increase is smaller for the tip-modified propeller, which results in a higher effective wake fraction. Effective wake fractions are evaluated...... by integrating velocity fields at a section 40% of the propeller radius upstream from the propeller plane in self-propulsion simulations. The difference of effective wake fraction from integrating velocity fields between tip-modified and conventional propellers is less than 1%. Based on the open-water simulation...

  9. Twelve tips for effective lecturing in a PBL curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Alam Sher; Malik, Rukhsana Hussain

    2012-01-01

    Retaining lectures in problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum places new demands on lecturers. In addition to subject knowledge, the lecturers must know the overall aims of the lectures, their context in the course, their relation to the subsequent examinations and the underlying educational philosophy. Aim of this communication is to propose ways that will transform the traditional didactic lectures into PBL-compliant teaching/learning sessions. Insights from the self-experience and that of colleagues and the feedback from students are synthesised with current literature regarding best teaching practices to develop these tips. These tips, ranging from involving students in the learning process to a routine practice of reflection after delivering a lecture, highlight methods of preparing and delivering lectures that follow the educational philosophy underpinning the PBL approach. We believe that these tips by advancing the driving force for meaningful learning will transform the didactic lectures of traditional curriculum to interactive sessions that would enhance understanding, augment critical thinking and promote self-directed learning among students.

  10. Effects of cloning and root-tip size on observations of fungal ITS sequences from Picea glauca roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel L. Lindner; Mark T. Banik

    2009-01-01

    To better understand the effects of cloning on observations of fungal ITS sequences from Picea glauca (white spruce) roots two techniques were compared: (i) direct sequencing of fungal ITS regions from individual root tips without cloning and (ii) cloning and sequencing of fungal ITS regions from individual root tips. Effect of root tip size was...

  11. Light depolarization effects in tip enhanced Raman spectroscopy of silicon (001 and gallium arsenide (001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. G. Gucciardi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We report on the effects of light depolarization induced by sharp metallic tips in Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (TERS. Experiments on Si(001 and GaAs(001 crystals show that the excitation field depolarization induces a selective enhancement of specific Raman modes, depending on their Raman tensor symmetry. A complete polarization analysis of the light backscattered from the tip confirms the TERS findings. The spatial confinement of the depolarization field is studied and its dependence on the excitation wavelength and power are explored.

  12. Effect of Tip-Speed Constraints on the Optimized Design of a Wind Turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dykes, K.; Resor, B.; Platt, A.; Guo, Y.; Ning, A.; King, R.; Parsons, T.; Petch, D.; Veers, P.

    2014-10-01

    This study investigates the effect of tip-velocity constraints on system levelized cost of energy (LCOE). The results indicate that a change in maximum tip speed from 80 to 100~m/s could produce a 32% decrease in gearbox weight (a 33% reduction in cost) which would result in an overall reduction of 1%-9% in system LCOE depending on the design approach. Three 100~m/s design cases were considered including a low tip-speed ratio/high-solidity rotor design, a high tip-speed ratio/ low-solidity rotor design, and finally a flexible blade design in which a high tip-speed ratio was used along with removing the tip deflection constraint on the rotor design. In all three cases, the significant reduction in gearbox weight caused by the higher tip-speed and lower overall gear ratio was counterbalanced by increased weights for the rotor and/or other drivetrain components and the tower. As a result, the increased costs of either the rotor or drivetrain components offset the overall reduction in turbine costs from down-sizing the gearbox. Other system costs were not significantly affected, whereas energy production was slightly reduced in the 100~m/s case low tip-speed ratio case and increased in the high tip-speed ratio case. This resulted in system cost of energy reductions moving from the 80~m/s design to the 100~m/s designs of 1.2% for the low tip-speed ratio, 4.6% for the high tip-speed ratio, and 9.5% for the final flexible case (the latter result is optimistic because the impact of deflection of the flexible blade on power production was not modeled). Overall, the results demonstrate that there is a trade-off in system design between the maximum tip velocity and the overall wind plant cost of energy, and there are many trade-offs within the overall system in designing a turbine for a high maximum tip velocity.

  13. Effect of tip clearance on wall shear stress of an axial LVAD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarath, S.; Vikas, R.

    2017-09-01

    Wall shear stress is a crucial parameter used for blood damage analysis, and typically a value of 400 Pa is set as a limit. Tip clearance is a major factor contributing to hemolysis and pump efficiency. In this study, different tip gap configurations are used to analyse the wall shear stress developed on the blade surface of a constant thickness blade design, and a varying thickness blade design using CFD analysis. It was found that, for a particular geometry, as the clearance gap reduces, flow rate over the high wall shear stress area decreases even though the high wall shear stress span is found to extend. For each design, the optimum clearance gap is iteratively attained, keeping the maximum WSS as a limiting factor. Thus a better pump designs is obtained, whose leakage flow patterns are lower than that of the initial design, hence also leading to higher pump efficiency.

  14. Ambient Occlusion Effects for Combined Volumes and Tubular Geometry

    KAUST Repository

    Schott, M.

    2013-06-01

    This paper details a method for interactive direct volume rendering that computes ambient occlusion effects for visualizations that combine both volumetric and geometric primitives, specifically tube-shaped geometric objects representing streamlines, magnetic field lines or DTI fiber tracts. The algorithm extends the recently presented the directional occlusion shading model to allow the rendering of those geometric shapes in combination with a context providing 3D volume, considering mutual occlusion between structures represented by a volume or geometry. Stream tube geometries are computed using an effective spline-based interpolation and approximation scheme that avoids self-intersection and maintains coherent orientation of the stream tube segments to avoid surface deforming twists. Furthermore, strategies to reduce the geometric and specular aliasing of the stream tubes are discussed.

  15. How effective is graphene nanopore geometry on DNA sequencing?

    OpenAIRE

    Satarifard, Vahid; Foroutan, Masumeh; Ejtehadi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the effects of graphene nanopore geometry on homopolymer ssDNA pulling process through nanopore using steered molecular dynamic (SMD) simulations. Different graphene nanopores are examined including axially symmetric and asymmetric monolayer graphene nanopores as well as five layer graphene polyhedral crystals (GPC). The pulling force profile, moving fashion of ssDNA, work done in irreversible DNA pulling and orientations of DNA bases near the nanopore are assesse...

  16. An Experimental Characterization of Tip Leakage Flows and Corresponding Effects on Multistage Compressor Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdanier, Reid Adam

    The effect of rotor tip clearances in turbomachinery applications has been a primary research interest for nearly 80 years. Over that time, studies have shown increased tip clearance in axial flow compressors typically has a detrimental effect on overall pressure rise capability, isentropic efficiency, and stall margin. With modern engine designs trending toward decreased core sizes to increase propulsive efficiency (by increasing bypass ratio) or additional compression stages to increase thermal efficiency by increasing the overall pressure ratio, blade heights in the rear stages of the high pressure compressor are expected to decrease. These rear stages typically feature smaller blade aspect ratios, for which endwall flows are more important, and the rotor tip clearance height represents a larger fraction of blade span. As a result, data sets collected with large relative rotor tip clearance heights are necessary to facilitate these future small core design goals. This research seeks to characterize rotor tip leakage flows for three tip clearance heights in the Purdue three-stage axial compressor facility (1.5%, 3.0%, and 4.0% as a percentage of overall annulus height). The multistage environment of this compressor provides the unique opportunity to examine tip leakage flow effects due to stage matching, stator-rotor interactions, and rotor-rotor interactions. The important tip leakage flow effects which develop as a result of these interactions are absent for previous studies which have been conducted using single-stage machines or isolated rotors. A series of compressor performance maps comprise points at four corrected speeds for each of the three rotor tip clearance heights. Steady total pressure and total temperature measurements highlight the effects of tip leakage flows on radial profiles and wake shapes throughout the compressor. These data also evaluate tip clearance effects on efficiency, stall margin, and peak pressure rise capability. An emphasis of

  17. Pin Tool Geometry Effects in Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querin, J. A.; Rubisoff, H. A.; Schneider, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW) there is significant evidence that material can take one of two different flow paths when being displaced from its original position in front of the pin tool to its final position in the wake of the weld. The geometry of the pin tool, along with the process parameters, plays an important role in dictating the path that the material takes. Each flow path will impart a different thermomechanical history on the material, consequently altering the material microstructure and subsequent weld properties. The intention of this research is to isolate the effect that different pin tool attributes have on the flow paths imparted on the FSWed material. Based on published weld tool geometries, a variety of weld tools were fabricated and used to join AA2219. Results from the tensile properties and microstructural characterization will be presented.

  18. Effect of loading condition, specimen geometry, size-effect and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IC were dependent on material prop- erties and independent of specimen geometry and size. Xu & Reinhardt (1999b, c) developed analytical methods for TPBT and CT or wedge splitting test (WST) to determine the values of double-K fracture parameters. From the available experimental results, it was also shown that.

  19. Effect of TIPS placement on portal and splanchnic arterial blood flow in 4-dimensional flow MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stankovic, Zoran [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Medical Physics, Freiburg (Germany); Roessle, Martin; Schultheiss, Michael [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Gastroenterology, Freiburg (Germany); Euringer, Wulf; Langer, Mathias [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Medical Physics, Freiburg (Germany); Salem, Riad; Barker, Alex; Carr, James; Collins, Jeremy D. [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Markl, Michael [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, McCormick School of Engineering, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-09-15

    To assess changes in portal and splanchnic arterial haemodynamics in patients undergoing transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) using four-dimensional (4D) flow MRI, a non-invasive, non-contrast imaging technique. Eleven patients undergoing TIPS implantation were enrolled. K-t GRAPPA accelerated non-contrast 4D flow MRI of the liver vasculature was applied with acceleration factor R = 5 at 3Tesla. Flow analysis included three-dimensional (3D) blood flow visualization using time-resolved 3D particle traces and semi-quantitative flow pattern grading. Quantitative evaluation entailed peak velocities and net flows throughout the arterial and portal venous (PV) systems. MRI measurements were taken within 24 h before and 4 weeks after TIPS placement. Three-dimensional flow visualization with 4D flow MRI revealed good image quality with minor limitations in PV flow. Quantitative analysis revealed a significant increase in PV flow (562 ± 373 ml/min before vs. 1831 ± 965 ml/min after TIPS), in the hepatic artery (176 ± 132 ml/min vs. 354 ± 140 ml/min) and combined flow in splenic and superior mesenteric arteries (770 ml/min vs. 1064 ml/min). Shunt-flow assessment demonstrated stenoses in two patients confirmed and treated at TIPS revision. Four-dimensional flow MRI might have the potential to give new information about the effect of TIPS placement on hepatic perfusion. It may explain some unexpected findings in clinical observation studies. (orig.)

  20. Effects of ramp negotiation, paving type and shoe sole geometry on toe clearance in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thies, S B; Jones, R K; Kenney, L P J; Howard, D; Baker, R

    2011-10-13

    Trips are a major cause of falls and result from involuntary contact of the foot with the ground during the swing phase of gait. Adequate toe clearance during swing is therefore crucial for safe locomotion. To date, little is known about the effects of environmental factors and footwear on toe clearance. This study reports on modulation of toe clearance and toe clearance variability in response to changes in ground inclination, paving type, and shoe sole geometry. Toe clearance and toe clearance variability for ten healthy young adults were calculated two-fold: a) for the commonly-used position on the foremost part of the sole of the shoe and b) for the lowest of a total of 7 sole positions, located between the metatarsals and the toe tip across the entire width of the sole. Utilizing a full-factorial design we found that toe clearance was affected by ground inclination, paving type, and sole geometry regardless of the computational method used (with p-valuesimportance of considering footwear and environmental factors when assessing the risk of tripping. Future work needs to investigate to which extent the same factors affect toe clearance in more vulnerable parts of the population. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Interplay between geometry and temperature in the Casimir effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Alexej

    2010-06-23

    In this thesis, we investigate the interplay between geometry and temperature in the Casimir effect for the inclined-plates, sphere-plate and cylinder-plate configurations. We use the worldline approach, which combines the string-inspired quantum field theoretical formalism with Monte Carlo techniques. The approach allows the precise computation of Casimir energies in arbitrary geometries. We analyze the dependence of the Casimir energy, force and torque on the separation parameter and temperature T, and find Casimir phenomena which are dominated by long-range fluctuations. We demonstrate that for open geometries, thermal energy densities are typically distributed on scales of thermal wavelengths. As an important consequence, approximation methods for thermal corrections based on local energy-density estimates, such as the proximity-force approximation, are found to become unreliable even at small surface-separations. Whereas the hightemperature behavior is always found to be linear in T, richer power-law behaviors at small temperatures emerge. In particular, thermal forces can develop a non-monotonic behavior. Many novel numerical as well as analytical results are presented. (orig.)

  2. A Numerical Analysis of Heat Transfer and Effectiveness on Film Cooled Turbine Blade Tip Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameri, A. A.; Rigby, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    A computational study has been performed to predict the distribution of convective heat transfer coefficient on a simulated blade tip with cooling holes. The purpose of the examination was to assess the ability of a three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solver to predict the rate of tip heat transfer and the distribution of cooling effectiveness. To this end, the simulation of tip clearance flow with blowing of Kim and Metzger was used. The agreement of the computed effectiveness with the data was quite good. The agreement with the heat transfer coefficient was not as good but improved away from the cooling holes. Numerical flow visualization showed that the uniformity of wetting of the surface by the film cooling jet is helped by the reverse flow due to edge separation of the main flow.

  3. Symmetric airfoil geometry effects on leading edge noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, James; Zhang, X; Joseph, P

    2013-10-01

    Computational aeroacoustic methods are applied to the modeling of noise due to interactions between gusts and the leading edge of real symmetric airfoils. Single frequency harmonic gusts are interacted with various airfoil geometries at zero angle of attack. The effects of airfoil thickness and leading edge radius on noise are investigated systematically and independently for the first time, at higher frequencies than previously used in computational methods. Increases in both leading edge radius and thickness are found to reduce the predicted noise. This noise reduction effect becomes greater with increasing frequency and Mach number. The dominant noise reduction mechanism for airfoils with real geometry is found to be related to the leading edge stagnation region. It is shown that accurate leading edge noise predictions can be made when assuming an inviscid meanflow, but that it is not valid to assume a uniform meanflow. Analytic flat plate predictions are found to over-predict the noise due to a NACA 0002 airfoil by up to 3 dB at high frequencies. The accuracy of analytic flat plate solutions can be expected to decrease with increasing airfoil thickness, leading edge radius, gust frequency, and Mach number.

  4. Mass effects and internal space geometry in triatomic reaction dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanao, Tomohiro; Koon, Wang S.; Marsden, Jerrold E.

    2006-05-01

    The effect of the distribution of mass in triatomic reaction dynamics is analyzed using the geometry of the associated internal space. Atomic masses are appropriately incorporated into internal coordinates as well as the associated non-Euclidean internal space metric tensor after a separation of the rotational degrees of freedom. Because of the non-Euclidean nature of the metric in the internal space, terms such as connection coefficients arise in the internal equations of motion, which act as velocity-dependent forces in a coordinate chart. By statistically averaging these terms, an effective force field is deduced, which accounts for the statistical tendency of geodesics in the internal space. This force field is shown to play a crucial role in determining mass-related branching ratios of isomerization and dissociation dynamics of a triatomic molecule. The methodology presented can be useful for qualitatively predicting branching ratios in general triatomic reactions, and may be applied to the study of isotope effects.

  5. Ergonomic factors related to drop-off detection with the long cane: effects of cane tips and techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Shik; Emerson, Robert S Wall; Curtis, Amy B

    2010-06-01

    This study examined the effect of cane tips and cane techniques on drop-off detection with the long cane. Blind pedestrians depend on a long cane to detect drop-offs. Missing a drop-off may result in falls or collision with moving vehicles in the street. Although cane tips appear to affect a cane user's ability to detect drop-offs, few experimental studies have examined such effect. A repeated-measures design with block randomization was used for the study. Participants were 17 adults who were legally blind and had no other disabilities. Participants attempted to detect the drop-offs of varied depths using different cane tips and cane techniques. Drop-off detection rates were similar between the marshmallow tip (77.0%) and the marshmallow roller tip (79.4%) when both tips were used with the constant contact technique, p = .294. However, participants detected drop-offs at a significantly higher percentage when they used the constant contact technique with the marshmallow roller tip (79.4%) than when they used the two-point touch technique with the marshmallow tip (63.2%), p marshmallow roller tip (perceived as a less advantageous tip) was more effective than the two-point touch technique used with a marshmallow tip (perceived as a more advantageous tip) in detecting drop-offs. The findings of the study may help cane users and orientation and mobility specialists select appropriate cane techniques and cane tips in accordance with the cane user's characteristics and the nature of the travel environment.

  6. Remembering tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memory aids; Alzheimer disease - remembering tips; Early memory loss - remembering tips; Dementia - remembering tips ... active: Read a lot if you have trouble remembering words. Keep a dictionary close by. Take part ...

  7. Twelve tips for the effective use of videos in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chaoyan; Goh, Poh Sun

    2015-02-01

    Videos can promote learning by either complementing classroom activities, or in self-paced online learning modules. Despite the wide availability of online videos in medicine, it can be a challenge for many educators to decide when videos should be used, how to best use videos, and whether to use existing videos or produce their own. We outline 12 tips based on a review of best practices in curriculum design, current research in multimedia learning and our experience in producing and using educational videos. The 12 tips review the advantages of using videos in medical education, present requirements for teachers and students, discuss how to integrate video into a teaching programme, and describe technical requirements when producing one's own videos. The 12 tips can help medical educators use videos more effectively to promote student engagement and learning.

  8. The Effects of Accretion Disk Geometry on AGN Reflection Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Corbin James; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2017-08-01

    Despite being the gravitational engines that power galactic-scale winds and mega parsec-scale jets in active galaxies, black holes are remarkably simple objects, typically being fully described by their angular momenta (spin) and masses. The modelling of AGN X-ray reflection spectra has proven fruitful in estimating the spin of AGN, as well as giving insight into their accretion histories and the properties of plasmas in the strong gravity regime. However, current models make simplifying assumptions about the geometry of the reflecting material in the accretion disk and the irradiating X-ray corona, approximating the disk as an optically thick, infinitely thin disk of material in the orbital plane. We present results from the new relativistic raytracing suite, Fenrir, that explore the effects that disk thickness may have on the reflection spectrum and the accompanying reverberation signatures. Approximating the accretion disk as an optically thick, geometrically thin, radiation pressure dominated disk (Shakura & Sunyaev 1973), one finds that the disk geometry is non-negligible in many cases, with significant changes in the broad Fe K line profile. Finally, we explore the systematic errors inherent in approximating the disk as being infinitely thin when modeling reflection spectrum, potentially biasing determinations of black hole and corona properties.

  9. Flavour Geometry and Effective Yukawa Couplings in the MSSM

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John; Lee, Jae Sik; Pilaftsis, Apostolos

    2010-01-01

    We present a new geometric approach to the flavour decomposition of an arbitrary soft supersymmetry-breaking sector in the MSSM. Our approach is based on the geometry that results from the quark and lepton Yukawa couplings, and enables us to derive the necessary and sufficient conditions for a linearly-independent basis of matrices related to the completeness of the internal [SU(3) x U(1)]^5 flavour space. In a second step, we calculate the effective Yukawa couplings that are enhanced at large values of tan(beta) for general soft supersymmetry-breaking mass parameters. We highlight the contributions due to non-universal terms in the flavour decompositions of the sfermion mass matrices. We present numerical examples illustrating how such terms are induced by renormalization-group evolution starting from universal input boundary conditions, and demonstrate their importance for the flavour-violating effective Yukawa couplings of quarks.

  10. Effects of the TIP Strategy on Problem Solving Skills of Young Adults with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Youjia; Woods-Groves, Suzanne; Kaldenberg, Erica R.; Lucas, Kristin G.; Therrien, William J.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effectiveness of teaching a three-step cognitive strategy (TIP) using the schema broadening procedures on functional mathematical problem solving skills of young adults with intellectual disability (ID). We randomly assigned 14 learners with ID to the control and experimental group before the…

  11. Tips for TIPS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuijpers, C.F.

    2015-01-01

    The transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) procedure is one of the most technically challenging procedures in interventional radiology. During the procedure, interventional radiologists (IRs) insert very thin and long instruments through a little incision in the patient’s neck. They

  12. On the effects of geometry on guided electromagnetic waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tucker Robin W.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The method of moving (Cartan coframes is used to analyze the influence of geometry on the behavior of electromagnetic fields in confining guides and the effect of such fields on their ultra-relativistic sources. Such issues are of relevance to a number of topical problems in accelerator science where the need to control the motion of high current-density micro-meter size bunches of relativistic radiating charge remains a technical and theoretical challenge. By dimensionally reducing the exterior equations for the sources and fields on spacetime using symmetries exhibited by the confining guides one achieves a unifying view that offers natural perturbative approaches for dealing with smooth non-uniform and curved guides. The issue of the back-reaction of radiation fields on the sources is approached in terms of a simple charged relativistic fluid model. .

  13. Effect of biweekly shoot tip harvests on the growth and yield of Georgia Jet sweet potato grown hydroponically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbuehi, Cyriacus R.; Loretan, Phil A.; Bonsi, C. K.; Hill, Walter A.; Morris, Carlton E.; Biswas, P. K.; Mortley, Desmond G.

    1989-01-01

    Sweet potato shoot tips have been shown to be a nutritious green vegetable. A study was conducted to determine the effect of biweekly shoot tip harvests on the growth and yield of Georgia Jet sweet potato grown in the greenhouse using the nutrient film technique (NFT). The nutrient solution consisted of a modified half Hoagland solution. Biweekly shoot tip harvests, beginning 42 days after planting, provided substantial amounts of vegetable greens and did not affect the fresh and dry foliage weights or the storage root number and fresh and dry storage root weights at final harvest. The rates of anion and cation uptake were not affected by tip harvests.

  14. The Effects of Using Dynamic Geometry on Eighth Grade Students' Achievement and Attitude towards Triangles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, Halime Samur; Akyuz, Didem

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of dynamic geometry based computer instruction on eighth grade students' achievement in geometry and their attitudes toward geometry and technology compared to traditional instruction. Central to the study was a controlled experiment, which contained experimental and control groups both instructed by the same…

  15. Film cooling effects on the tip flow characteristics of a gas turbine blade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available An experimental investigation of the tip flow characteristics between a gas turbine blade tip and the shroud was conducted by a pressure-test system and a particle image velocimetry (PIV system. A three-times scaled profile of the GE-E3 blade with five film cooling holes was used as specimen. The effects on flow characteristics by the rim width and the groove depth of the squealer tip were revealed. The rim widths were (a 0.9%, (b 2.1%, and (c 3.0% of the axial chord, and the groove depths were (a 2.8%, (b 4.8%, and (c 10% of the blade span. Several pressure taps on the top plate above the blades were connected to pressure gauges. By a CCD camera the PIV system recorded the velocity field around the leading edge zone including the five cooling holes. The flow distributions both in the tip clearance and in the passage were revealed, and the influence of the inlet velocity was determined. In this work, the tip flow characteristics with and without film cooling were investigated. The effects of different global blowing ratios of M=0.5, 1.0, 1.3 and 2.5 were established. It was found that decreasing the rim width resulted in a lower mass flow rate of the leakage flow, and the pressure distributions from the leading edge to the trailing edge showed a linearly increasing trend. It was also found that if the inlet velocity was less than 1.5 m/s, the flow field in the passage far away from the suction side appeared as a stagnation zone.

  16. Effect of Fin Porosity on Wake Geometry for Flapping Fins at Intermediate Reynolds Number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.; Xia, B.; Krueger, P. S.

    2017-11-01

    Low aspect ratio flapping fins generate interesting 3-dimensional flow structures as has been observed, for example, in studies of fish swimming. As the Reynolds number is reduced, the exact geometry of the fin is less important and even certain amounts of porosity might be allowed without significantly affecting propulsive performance. These effects are investigated experimentally using flapping rectangular fins of aspect ratio 2 at Reynolds numbers in the range 100 - 1000. The experiments were conducted using a water tunnel to supply the free stream flow and the fin flapping parameters were set to provide a Strouhal number (based on amplitude of the fin tip motion) in the range 0.15 - 0.35. Phase-averaged measurements were made of the 3-dimensional, volumetric flow field, allowing visualization of the typical shed vortex structure behind the fin and calculation of time averaged thrust and propulsive efficiency. Results comparing the flow structure in the fin wake and the resulting propulsive performance will be presented for several fins with different planform porosities where the porosities are set using arrays of holes in the fins. This material is based on the work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1510707.

  17. Investigation of the Shear Flow Effect and Tip Clearance on a Low Speed Axial Flow Compressor Cascade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Varpe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the effect of inlet shear flow on the tip leakage flow in an axial flow compressor cascade. A flow with a high shear rate is generated in the test section of an open circuit cascade wind tunnel by using a combination of screens with a prescribed solidity. It is observed that a stable shear flow of shear rate 1.33 is possible and has a gradual decay rate until 15 times the height of the shear flow generator downstream. The computational results obtained agree well with the available experimental data on the baseline configuration. The detailed numerical analysis shows that the tip clearance improves the blade loading near the tip through the promotion of favorable incidence by the tip leakage flow. The tip clearance shifts the centre of pressure on the blade surface towards the tip. It, however, has no effect on the distribution of end wall loss and deviation angle along the span up to 60% from the hub. In the presence of a shear inflow, the end wall effects are considerable. On the other hand, with a shear inflow, the effects of tip leakage flow are observed to be partly suppressed. The shear flow reduces the tip leakage losses substantially in terms of kinetic energy associated with it.

  18. The effect of the geometry on the fluorescence radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teodori, F.; Fernandez, J.E.; Molinari, V.

    2000-01-01

    In x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy a narrow photon beam is focused on the surface of the sample to stimulate the production of characteristic radiation which gives useful information about the composition of the target. Even if the interpretation of the measurement is simple, the quantification of the total emitted intensity is not straightforward because the primary photons are produced in the depth of the sample and only a fraction can reach the surface without colliding again with matter. In this work we show that the geometry of the system plays an important role in determining the properties of the 3D radiation field. By using the integral Boltzmann equation, we show that there exist a link among the source distribution, the boundary conditions, the emission points, the observation angles and the properties of the field of emitted radiation. To illustrate the influence of the geometry, the energy distribution of a continuos emission spectrum like the Compton one has been calculated, firstly. It is shown that the energy distribution of the Compton primary photons (coming out from a slab irradiated with an internal monochromatic and isotropic point source) changes with the orientation of the observation direction. Another example involves a second order effect which depends on a double collision in the specimen. It has been shown that the characteristic emission due to the photoelectric effect is accompanied by a (P,C) continuous contribution which introduces an asymmetry in the shape of the line. Computations in a 3D radiation field have shown that such asymmetry is strongly dependent on the observation direction with respect to the primary volume where the photoelectric effect is produced. This means that detection through a narrow collimator whose axis (assumed here as the observation direction) deviates from the centre of symmetry of the primary volume, will produce differently shaped characteristic lines depending on the extent and placement of the

  19. Effects of Boundary Layer Control Method on Hydrodynamic Characteristics and Tip Vortex Creation of a Hydrofoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghadimi Parviz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available There is currently a significant focus on using boundary layer control (BLC approach for controlling the flow around bodies, especially the foil sections. In marine engineering this is done with the hope of increasing the lift - to - drag ratio and efficiency of the hydrofoils. In this paper, effects of the method on hydrodynamic characteristics and tip vortex formation of a hydrofoil are studied. Steady water injection at the tip of the hydrofoil is simulated in different conditions by using ANSYS-CFX commercial software. Validity of the proposed simulations is verified by comparing the obtained results against available experimental data. Effects of the injection on the lift, drag, and lift - to - drag ratio are studied and the ranges within which the injection has the most positive or negative effects, are determined. Furthermore, flow pattern and pressure variation are studied upon the water injection to determine the most positive and negative case and to ascertain the main reasons triggering these phenomena.

  20. Effect of Relative Movement between the Shroud and Blade on Tip Leakage Flow Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaochun Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available An experimental and numerical investigation into the tip leakage flow of a turbine rotor is carried out using a particle image velocimetry (PIV system and the commercial software ANSYS CFX 14.0. The specimen used in this work is a typical GE-E3 model with a new squealer tip design. The experimental data are used to create a turbulence model and numerical strategy. Through the validated turbulence model and numerical strategy, simulations are carried out to compare the characteristics of the tip leakage flow in three cases: (1 the blade is rotating, but the shroud is stationary, which is the real status of turbine rotor operation; (2 the blade is stationary, but the shroud moves, to simulate their relative movement; (3 the blade is stationary, and the shroud is also stationary, this is a simplified case, but has been widely used in the experiments on rotor tip leakage flow. Detailed analysis of the flow phenomena shows that the second case is a reasonable alternative approach to simulate the real state. However, the flow patterns in the third case exhibit some evident differences from the real status. These differences are caused by the inaccurate viscous force arising from the stationary blade and shroud. In this work, a modification method for the experiments conducted in the third case is firstly proposed, which is realized through adding an imaginary roughness at the shroud wall to be close to the real viscous effect, and to thereby reduce the deviation of the experiment from the real case. According to the results calculated by ANSYS CFX, the flow structure in the modification case is very close to the real status. Besides, this modification case is an easy and cheap way to simulate the real tip leakage flow.

  1. Effects of Geometry on the Steady Performance of Planing Hulls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, M. K.; Andersen, Poul

    2003-01-01

    A vortex-lattice method is applied to planing hull forms. The geometry of the jet surfaces next to the wetted hull is estimated on the basis of the hull geometry while its sidewise extent has been found numerically applying a non-linear free-surface pressure condition in the jet region. The method...... of the trim. Calculated results and experiments for resistance and trim agree well for high velocities. Keywords: planing boat, vortex lattice, spray...

  2. Geometry Effects of Capillary on the Evaporation from the Meniscus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Choong Hyo; Jin, Song Wan; Yoo, Jung Yul

    2007-01-01

    The effect of capillary cross-section geometry on evaporation is investigated in terms of the meniscus shape, evaporation rate and evaporation-induced flow for circular, square and rectangular cross-sectional capillaries. The shapes of water and ethanol menisci are not much different from each other in square and rectangular capillaries even though the surface tension of water is much larger than that of ethanol. On the other hand, the shapes of water and ethanol menisci are very different from each other in circular capillary. The averaged evaporation fluxes in circular and rectangular capillaries are measured by tracking the meniscus position. At a given position, the averaged evaporation flux in rectangular capillaries in much larger than that in circular capillary with comparable hydraulic diameter. The flow near the evaporating meniscus is also measured using micro-PIV, so that the rotating vortex motion is observed near the evaporating ethanol and methanol menisci except for the case of methanol meniscus in rectangular capillary. This difference is considered to be due to the existence of corner menisci at the four corners

  3. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... death electrical fall furniture head injury product safety television tipover tv Watch the video in Adobe Flash ... tv tip-overs. The force of a large television falling from tipping furniture can be staggering. A ...

  4. Effect of Geometry on Electrokinetic Characterization of Solid Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Abhijeet; Kleinen, Jochen; Venzmer, Joachim; Gambaryan-Roisman, Tatiana

    2017-08-01

    An analytical approach is presented to describe pressure-driven streaming current (I str ) and streaming potential (U str ) generation in geometrically complex samples, for which the classical Helmholtz-Smoluchowski (H-S) equation is known to be inaccurate. The new approach is valid under the same prerequisite conditions that are used for the development of the H-S equation, that is, the electrical double layers (EDLs) are sufficiently thin and surface conductivity and electroviscous effects are negligible. The analytical methodology is developed using linear velocity profiles to describe liquid flow inside of EDLs and using simplifying approximations to describe macroscopic flow. At first, a general expression is obtained to describe the I str generated in different cross sections of an arbitrarily shaped sample. Thereafter, assuming that the generated U str varies only along the pressure-gradient direction, an expression describing the variation of generated U str along the sample length is obtained. These expressions describing I str and U str generation constitute the theoretical foundation of this work, which is first applied to a set of three nonuniform cross-sectional capillaries and thereafter to a square array of cylindrical fibers (model porous media) for both parallel and transverse fiber orientation cases. Although analytical solutions cannot be obtained for real porous substrates because of their random structure, the new theory provides useful insights into the effect of important factors such as fiber orientation, sample porosity, and sample dimensions. The solutions obtained for the model porous media are used to device strategies for more accurate zeta potential determination of porous fiber plugs. The new approach could be thus useful in resolving the long-standing problem of sample geometry dependence of zeta potential measurements.

  5. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... en español Blog About OnSafety CPSC Stands for Safety The Tipping Point Home > 60 Seconds of Safety (Videos) > The Tipping Point The Tipping Point by ... danger death electrical fall furniture head injury product safety television tipover tv Watch the video in Adobe ...

  6. Biaxial loading and shallow-flaw effects on crack-tip constraint and fracture-toughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennell, W.E.; Bass, B.R.; Bryson, J.W.; McAfee, W.J.; Theiss, T.J.; Rao, M.C.

    1993-12-01

    Uniaxial tests of single-edged notched bend (SENB) specimens with both deep- and shallow-flaws have shown elevated fracture-toughness for the shallow flaws. The elevation in fracture-toughness for shallow flaws has been shown to be the result of reduced constraint at the crack-tip. Biaxial loading has the potential to increase constraint at the crack-tip and thereby reduce some of the shallow-flaw, fracture-toughness elevation. Biaxial fracture-toughness tests have shown that the shallow-flaw, fracture-toughness elevation is reduced but not eliminated by biaxial loading. Dual-parameter, fracture-toughness correlations have been proposed to reflect the effect of crack-tip constraint on fracture-toughness. Test results from the uniaxial and biaxial tests were analyzed using the dual-parameter technology. Discrepancies between analysis results and cleavage initiation site data from fractographic examinations indicate that the analysis models are in need of further refinement. Addition of a precleavage, ductile-tearing element to the analysis model has the potential to resolve the noted discrepancies.

  7. Effect of tip vortices on membrane vibration of flexible wings with different aspect ratios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genç Mustafa Serdar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effect of the aspect ratio on the aerodynamics characteristic of flexible membrane wings with different aspect ratios (AR = 1 and AR = 3 is experimentally investigated at Reynolds number of 25000. Time accurate measurements of membrane deformation using Digital Image Correlation system (DIC is carried out while normal forces of the wing will be measured by helping a load-cell system and flow on the wing was visualized by means of smoke wire technic. The characteristics of high aspect ratio wings are shown to be affected by leading edge separation bubbles at low Reynolds number. It is concluded that the camber of membrane wing excites the separated shear layer and this situation increases the lift coefficient relatively more as compared to rigid wings. In membrane wings with low aspect ratio, unsteadiness included tip vortices and vortex shedding, and the combination of tip vortices and vortex shedding causes complex unsteady deformations of these membrane wings. The characteristic of high aspect ratio wings was shown to be affected by leading edge separation bubbles at low Reynolds numbers whereas the deformations of flexible wing with low aspect ratio affected by tip vortices and leading edge separation bubbles.

  8. Effect of geometry of rice kernels on drying modeling results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geometry of rice grain is commonly represented by sphere, spheroid or ellipsoid shapes in the drying models. Models using simpler shapes are easy to solve mathematically, however, deviation from the true grain shape might lead to large errors in predictions of drying characteristics such as, moistur...

  9. Cytological effects of space flight on root-tip cells in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Lin; Niu Yingze; Luo Yi

    2008-01-01

    The seed of rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) was carried by satellite 'Shijian 8'. The cytological effects of space mutation on the root-tip cells was studied in SP 1 generation. The results showed that the mitotic index, rate of chromosome aberration and rate of micronuclei were obviously increased in most of treated materials compared with the control, which indicated that true cytological mutations were induced by space flight. The mutagenic effects were observed higher in the maintainer lines than in the male sterile lines. (authors)

  10. Effect of Stress on Corrosion at Crack Tip on Pipeline Steel in a Near-Neutral pH Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yao; Cheng, Y. Frank

    2016-11-01

    In this work, the local corrosion at crack tip on an API 5L X46 pipeline steel specimens was investigated under various applied loads in a near-neutral pH solution. Electrochemical measurements, including potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, combined with micro-electrochemical technique and surface characterization, were conducted to investigate the effect of stress on local anodic solution of the steel at the crack tip. The stress corrosion cracking of the steel was dominated by an anodic dissolution mechanism, while the effect of hydrogen was negligible. The applied load (stress) increased the corrosion rate at the crack tip, contributing to crack propagation. The deposit of corrosion products at the crack tip could protect somewhat from further corrosion. At sufficiently large applied loads such as 740 N in the work, it was possible to generate separated cathode and anode, further accelerating the crack growth.

  11. Analysis the effect of different geometries of AFM's cantilever on the dynamic behavior and the critical forces of three-dimensional manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korayem, Moharam Habibnejad; Saraie, Maniya B.; Saraee, Mahdieh B.

    2017-01-01

    An important challenge when using an atomic force microscope (AFM) is to be able to control the force exerted by the AFM for performing various tasks. Nevertheless, the exerted force is proportional to the deflection of the AFM cantilever, which itself is affected by a cantilever's stiffness coefficient. Many papers have been published so far on the methods of obtaining the stiffness coefficients of AFM cantilevers in 2D; however, a comprehensive model is yet to be presented on 3D cantilever motion. The discrepancies between the equations of the 2D and 3D analysis are due to the number and direction of forces and moments that are applied to a cantilever. Moreover, in the 3D analysis, contrary to the 2D analysis, due to the interaction between the forces and moments applied on a cantilever, its stiffness values cannot be separately expressed for each direction; and instead, a stiffness matrix should be used to correctly derive the relevant equations. In this paper, 3D stiffness coefficient matrices have been obtained for three common cantilever geometries including the rectangular, V-shape and dagger-shape cantilevers. The obtained equations are validated by two methods. In the first approach, the Finite Element Method is combined with the cantilever deflection values computed by using the obtained stiffness matrices. In the second approach, by reducing the problem's parameters, the forces applied on a cantilever along different directions are compared with each other in 2D and 3D cases. Then the 3D manipulation of a stiff nanoparticle is modeled and simulated by using the stiffness matrices obtained for the three cantilever geometries. The obtained results indicate that during the manipulation process, the dagger-shaped and rectangular cantilevers exert the maximum and minimum amounts of forces on the stiff nanoparticle, respectively. Also, by examining the effects of different probe tip geometries, it is realized that a probe tip of cylindrical geometry

  12. Analysis the effect of different geometries of AFM's cantilever on the dynamic behavior and the critical forces of three-dimensional manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korayem, Moharam Habibnejad, E-mail: hkorayem@iust.ac.ir; Saraie, Maniya B.; Saraee, Mahdieh B.

    2017-04-15

    An important challenge when using an atomic force microscope (AFM) is to be able to control the force exerted by the AFM for performing various tasks. Nevertheless, the exerted force is proportional to the deflection of the AFM cantilever, which itself is affected by a cantilever's stiffness coefficient. Many papers have been published so far on the methods of obtaining the stiffness coefficients of AFM cantilevers in 2D; however, a comprehensive model is yet to be presented on 3D cantilever motion. The discrepancies between the equations of the 2D and 3D analysis are due to the number and direction of forces and moments that are applied to a cantilever. Moreover, in the 3D analysis, contrary to the 2D analysis, due to the interaction between the forces and moments applied on a cantilever, its stiffness values cannot be separately expressed for each direction; and instead, a stiffness matrix should be used to correctly derive the relevant equations. In this paper, 3D stiffness coefficient matrices have been obtained for three common cantilever geometries including the rectangular, V-shape and dagger-shape cantilevers. The obtained equations are validated by two methods. In the first approach, the Finite Element Method is combined with the cantilever deflection values computed by using the obtained stiffness matrices. In the second approach, by reducing the problem's parameters, the forces applied on a cantilever along different directions are compared with each other in 2D and 3D cases. Then the 3D manipulation of a stiff nanoparticle is modeled and simulated by using the stiffness matrices obtained for the three cantilever geometries. The obtained results indicate that during the manipulation process, the dagger-shaped and rectangular cantilevers exert the maximum and minimum amounts of forces on the stiff nanoparticle, respectively. Also, by examining the effects of different probe tip geometries, it is realized that a probe tip of cylindrical geometry

  13. Theoretical studies of finite size effects and screening effects caused by a STM tip in Luettinger liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guigou, Marine

    2009-01-01

    This thesis takes place in the field of condensed matter. More precisely, we focus on the finite size effects and the screening effects caused by a STM tip in a quantum wire. For that, we use, first, the Luettinger liquid theory, which allows to describe strongly correlated systems and secondly, the Keldysh formalism, which is necessary to treat the out-of-equilibrium systems. For these studies, we consider, the currant, the noise and the conductance. The noise presents a non-Poissonian behaviour, when finite size effects appear. Through the photo-assisted transport, it is shown that those effects hide the effects of the Coulomb interactions. Considering the proximity between the STM tip, used as a probe or as an injector, and a quantum wire, screening effects appear. We can conclude that they play a similar role to those of Coulomb interactions. (author) [fr

  14. Effects of Electric Field Gradient on Sub-nanometer Spatial Resolution of Tip-enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Meng, Lingyan; Yang, Zhilin; Chen, Jianing; Sun, Mengtao

    2014-01-01

    Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) with sub-nanometer spatial resolution has been recently demonstrated experimentally. However, the physical mechanism underlying is still under discussion. Here, we theoretically investigate the electric field gradient of a coupled tip-substrate system. Our calculations suggest that the ultra-high spatial resolution of TERS can be partially attributed to the electric field gradient effect owning to its tighter spatial confinement and sensitivity to the in...

  15. Twelve tips for maximizing the effectiveness of game-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, Michael B; Borman-Shoap, Emily C; Eppich, Walter J

    2015-01-01

    Game-based learning (GBL) in medical education is emerging as a valid alternative to traditional teaching methods. Well-designed GBL sessions use non-threatening competition to capitalize on heightened learner arousal, allowing for high-level engagement and dynamic group discussion. While many templates for specific educational games have been published, little has been written on strategies for educators to create their own or how to use them with maximal effectiveness. These 12 tips provide specific recommendations for the successful design and implementation of GBL sessions in medical education based on a review of the literature and insight from experienced designers.

  16. The Effect of Origami-Based Instruction on Spatial Visualization, Geometry Achievement, and Geometric Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arici, Sevil; Aslan-Tutak, Fatma

    2015-01-01

    This research study examined the effect of origami-based geometry instruction on spatial visualization, geometry achievement, and geometric reasoning of tenth-grade students in Turkey. The sample ("n" = 184) was chosen from a tenth-grade population of a public high school in Turkey. It was a quasi-experimental pretest/posttest design. A…

  17. The Effect of Learning Geometry Topics of 7th Grade in Primary Education with Dynamic Geometer's Sketchpad Geometry Software to Success and Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesan, Cenk; Caliskan, Sevdane

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of learning geometry topics of 7th grade in primary education with dynamic geometer's sketchpad geometry software to student's success and retention. The experimental research design with The Posttest-Only Control Group was used in this study. In the experimental group, dynamic geometer's…

  18. Effect of Crack Tip Stresses on Delayed Hydride Cracking in Zr-2.5Nb Tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Suk; Cheong, Yong Moo

    2007-01-01

    Delayed hydride cracking (DHC) tests have shown that the DHC velocity becomes faster in zirconium alloys with a higher yield stress. To account for this yield stress effect on the DHC velocity, they suggested a simple hypothesis that increased crack tip stresses due to a higher yield stress would raise the difference in hydrogen concentration between the crack tip and the bulk region and accordingly the DHC velocity. This hypothesis is also applied to account for a big leap in the DHC velocity of zirconium alloys after neutron irradiation. It should be noted that this is based on the old DHC models that the driving force for DHC is the stress gradient. Puls predicted that an increase in the yield stress of a cold worked Zr-2.5Nb tube due to neutron irradiation by about 300 MPa causes an increase of its DHC velocity by an order of magnitude or 2 to 3 times depending on the accommodation energy values. Recently, we proposed a new DHC model that a driving force for DHC is not the stress gradient but the concentration gradient arising from the stress-induced precipitation of hydrides at the crack tip. Our new DHC model and the supporting experimental results have demonstrated that the DHC velocity is governed primarily by hydrogen diffusion at below 300 .deg. C. Since hydrogen diffusion in Zr-2.5Nb tubes is dictated primarily by the distribution of the β-phase, the DHC velocity of the irradiated Zr-2.5Nb tube must be determined mainly by the distribution of the β-phase, not by the increased yield stress, which is in contrast with the hypothesis of the previous DHC models. In short, a controversy exists as to the effect on the DHC velocity of zirconium alloys of a change in the crack tip stresses by irradiation hardening or cold working or annealing. The aim of this study is to resolve this controversy and furthermore to prove the validity of our DHC model. To this end, we cited Pan et al.'s experiment where the delayed hydride cracking velocity, the tensile strengths

  19. Effect of tip relief on endurance characteristics of super nitralloy and AISI M-50 spur gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, D. P.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1974-01-01

    Tests were conducted with two groups of 8.89-centimeter (3.5-in.) pitch diameter spur gears with standard 20 deg involute profile with tip relief made of CVM Super-Nitralloy (5Ni-2Al) and CVM AISI M-50 at a temperature of 350 K (170 F). Super-Nitralloy gears with tip relief had a life 150 percent that of gears without tip relief. An increased scoring phenomenon was noted with the Super-Nitralloy gears with tip relief. Through-hardened AISI M-50 gears with tip relief failed due to tooth fracture. AISI M-50 gears without tip relief had a life approximately 40 times greater than the AISI M-50 gears with tip relief.

  20. Near field plasmonic gradient effects on high vacuum tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yurui; Zhang, Zhenglong; Chen, Li; Sun, Mengtao

    2015-01-14

    Near field gradient effects in high vacuum tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (HV-TERS) are a recent developing ultra-sensitive optical and spectral analysis technology on the nanoscale, based on the plasmons and plasmonic gradient enhancement in the near field and under high vacuum. HV-TERS can not only be used to detect ultra-sensitive Raman spectra enhanced by surface plasmon, but also to detect clear molecular IR-active modes enhanced by strongly plasmonic gradient. Furthermore, the molecular overtone modes and combinational modes can also be experimentally measured, where the Fermi resonance and Darling-Dennison resonance were successfully observed in HV-TERS. Theoretical calculations using electromagnetic field theory firmly supported experimental observation. The intensity ratio of the plasmon gradient term over the linear plasmon term can reach values greater than 1. Theoretical calculations also revealed that with the increase in gap distance between tip and substrate, the decrease in the plasmon gradient was more significant than the decrease in plasmon intensity, which is the reason that the gradient Raman can be only observed in the near field. Recent experimental results of near field gradient effects on HV-TERS were summarized, following the section of the theoretical analysis.

  1. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or bypass, without the risks that accompany open surgery. TIPS is a minimally invasive procedure that typically has a shorter recovery time than surgery. Your TIPS should have less of an effect ...

  2. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... OnSafety CPSC Stands for Safety The Tipping Point Home > 60 Seconds of Safety (Videos) > The Tipping Point ... 24 hours a day. For young children whose home is a playground, it’s the best way to ...

  3. CPAP Tips

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    Full Text Available ... a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device when sleeping? Here are some tips from the U.S. Food ... 395,755 views 9:28 3 Tips for Sleeping With a CPAP - Duration: 2:02. WebMD 66, ...

  4. Effects of δ-hydride precipitation at a crack tip on crack propagation in delayed hydride cracking of Zircaloy-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, T.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2013-08-01

    Delayed hydride cracking (DHC) of Zircaloy-2 is one possible mechanism for the failure of boiling water reactor fuel rods in ramp tests at high burnup. Analyses were made for hydrogen diffusion around a crack tip to estimate the crack velocity of DHC in zirconium alloys, placing importance on effects of precipitation of δ-hydride. The stress distribution around the crack tip is significantly altered by precipitation of hydride, which was strictly analyzed using a finite element computer code. Then, stress-driven hydrogen diffusion under the altered stress distribution was analyzed by a differential method. Overlapping of external stress and hydride precipitation at a crack tip induces two stress peaks; one at a crack tip and the other at the front end of the hydride precipitate. Since the latter is larger than the former, more hydrogen diffuses to the front end of the hydride precipitate, thereby accelerating hydride growth compared with that in the absence of the hydride. These results indicated that, after hydride was formed in front of the crack tip, it grew almost steadily accompanying the interaction of hydrogen diffusion, hydride growth and the stress alteration by hydride precipitation. Finally, crack velocity was estimated from the calculated hydrogen flux into the crack tip as a function of temperature, stress intensity factor and material strength. There was qualitatively good agreement between calculation results and experimental data. The stress distribution around the crack tip is significantly altered by precipitation of hydride. Overlapping of external stress and hydride precipitation at a crack tip induces two stress peaks; one at a crack tip and the other at the front end of the hydride precipitate. Since the latter is larger than the former, more hydrogen diffuses to the front end of the hydride precipitate, thereby accelerating hydride growth compared with that in the absence of the hydride. These results indicated that, after hydride was formed

  5. Tip clearance effects on loads and performances of semi-open impeller centrifugal pumps at different specific speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boitel, G.; Fedala, D.; Myon, N.

    2016-11-01

    Relevant industrial standards or customer's specifications could strictly forbid any device adjusting the axial rotor/stator position, so that tip clearance between semi-open impeller and casing might become a result of the pump machining tolerances and assembling process, leading to big tip clearance variations compared to its nominal value. Consequently, large disparities of global performances (head, power, efficiency) and axial loads are observed with high risk of both specifications noncompliance and bearing damages. This work aims at quantifying these variations by taking into account tip clearance value and pump specific speed. Computational Fluid Dynamics is used to investigate this phenomenon by means of steady simulations led on a semi-open centrifugal pump numerical model including secondary flows, based on a k-omega SST turbulence model. Four different specific speed pump sizes are simulated (from 8 to 50, SI units), with three tip clearances for each size on a wide flow range (from 40% to 120% of the best efficiency point). The numerical results clearly show that head, power and efficiency increase as the tip clearance decreases for the whole flow range. This effect is more significant when the specific speed is low. Meanwhile, the resulting axial thrust on the impeller is very sensitive to the tip clearance and can even lead to direction inversion.

  6. TIP peptide inhalation in experimental acute lung injury: effect of repetitive dosage and different synthetic variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Erik K; Thomas, Rainer; Liu, Tanghua; Stefaniak, Joanna; Ziebart, Alexander; Duenges, Bastian; Eckle, Daniel; Markstaller, Klaus; David, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Inhalation of TIP peptides that mimic the lectin-like domain of TNF-α is a novel approach to attenuate pulmonary oedema on the threshold to clinical application. A placebo-controlled porcine model of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) demonstrated a reduced thermodilution-derived extravascular lung water index (EVLWI) and improved gas exchange through TIP peptide inhalation within three hours. Based on these findings, the present study compares a single versus a repetitive inhalation of a TIP peptide (TIP-A) and two alternate peptide versions (TIP-A, TIP-B). Following animal care committee approval ARDS was induced by bronchoalveolar lavage followed by injurious ventilation in 21 anaesthetized pigs. A randomised-blinded three-group setting compared the single-dosed peptide variants TIP-A and TIP-B as well as single versus repetitive inhalation of TIP-A (n = 7 per group). Over two three-hour intervals parameters of gas exchange, transpulmonary thermodilution, calculated alveolar fluid clearance, and ventilation/perfusion-distribution were assessed. Post-mortem measurements included pulmonary wet/dry ratio and haemorrhage/congestion scoring. The repetitive TIP-A inhalation led to a significantly lower wet/dry ratio than a single dose and a small but significantly lower EVLWI. However, EVLWI changes over time and the derived alveolar fluid clearance did not differ significantly. The comparison of TIP-A and B showed no relevant differences. Gas exchange and ventilation/perfusion-distribution significantly improved in all groups without intergroup differences. No differences were found in haemorrhage/congestion scoring. In comparison to a single application the repetitive inhalation of a TIP peptide in three-hour intervals may lead to a small additional reduction the lung water content. Two alternate TIP peptide versions showed interchangeable characteristics.

  7. Experimental study of effect of stenosis geometry on flow parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veselý Ondřej

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A stenosis is a narrowing in a tubular organ or structure. In medicine, vessel stenosis poses health risks for people. In this work, experimental investigations of pressure loss coefficient for varying stenosis eccentricity and shape were performed. Five models of different geometry were studied; all models were stenosis of 75 % area reduction. The flow conditions approximate physiological flow. The measuring range of Reynolds number was from 130 to 2730, measured values of pressure loss coefficient were from 12 to 20. The steady experimental results indicated that static pressure loss coefficient is affected by the shape of stenosis, but it was affected more significantly by the eccentricity. Visualization experiments have been performed in Polycarbonate models.

  8. Spinning geometry = Twisted geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freidel, Laurent; Ziprick, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that the SU(2)-gauge invariant phase space of loop gravity can be represented in terms of twisted geometries. These are piecewise-linear-flat geometries obtained by gluing together polyhedra, but the resulting geometries are not continuous across the faces. Here we show that this phase space can also be represented by continuous, piecewise-flat three-geometries called spinning geometries. These are composed of metric-flat three-cells glued together consistently. The geometry of each cell and the manner in which they are glued is compatible with the choice of fluxes and holonomies. We first remark that the fluxes provide each edge with an angular momentum. By studying the piecewise-flat geometries which minimize edge lengths, we show that these angular momenta can be literally interpreted as the spin of the edges: the geometries of all edges are necessarily helices. We also show that the compatibility of the gluing maps with the holonomy data results in the same conclusion. This shows that a spinning geometry represents a way to glue together the three-cells of a twisted geometry to form a continuous geometry which represents a point in the loop gravity phase space. (paper)

  9. Experimental validation on the effect of material geometries and processing methodology of Polyoxymethylene (POM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafizzal, Y.; Nurulhuda, A.; Izman, S.; Khadir, AZA

    2017-08-01

    POM-copolymer bond breaking leads to change depending with respect to processing methodology and material geometries. This paper present the oversights effect on the material integrity due to different geometries and processing methodology. Thermo-analytical methods with reference were used to examine the degradation of thermomechanical while Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) was used to judge the thermal stability of sample from its major decomposition temperature. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) investigation performed to identify the thermal behaviour and thermal properties of materials. The result shown that plastic gear geometries with injection molding at higher tonnage machine more stable thermally rather than resin geometries. Injection plastic gear geometries at low tonnage machine faced major decomposition temperatures at 313.61°C, 305.76 °C and 307.91 °C while higher tonnage processing method are fully decomposed at 890°C, significantly higher compared to low tonnage condition and resin geometries specimen at 398°C. Chemical composition of plastic gear geometries with injection molding at higher and lower tonnage are compare based on their moisture and Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) content, polymeric material content and the absence of filler. Results of higher moisture and Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) content are report in resin geometries (0.120%) compared to higher tonnage of injection plastic gear geometries which is 1.264%. The higher tonnage of injection plastic gear geometry are less sensitive to thermo-mechanical degradation due to polymer chain length and molecular weight of material properties such as tensile strength, flexural strength, fatigue strength and creep resistance.

  10. Interplay of electronic and geometry shell effects in properties of neutral and charged Sr clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyalin, Andrey; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2007-01-01

    . It is shown that the excessive charge essentially affects the optimized geometry of strontium clusters. Ionization of small strontium clusters results in the alteration of the magic numbers. The strong dependence of the DOS spectra on details of ionic structure allows one to perform a reliable geometry...... that the size evolution of structural and electronic properties of strontium clusters is governed by an interplay of the electronic and geometry shell closures. Influence of the electronic shell effects on structural rearrangements can lead to violation of the icosahedral growth motif of strontium clusters...

  11. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Point by CPSC Blogger September 22, 2009 appliance child Childproofing CPSC danger death electrical fall furniture head ... see news reports about horrible accidents involving young children and furniture, appliance and tv tip-overs. The ...

  12. CPAP Tips

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    Full Text Available ... make your opinion count. Sign in Loading... Loading... Transcript The interactive transcript could not be loaded. Loading... ... Dan Uses CPAP - Duration: 4:17. Harvard Medical School 7,950 views 4:17 Tips for building ...

  13. CPAP Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... make your opinion count. Sign in Loading... Loading... Transcript The interactive transcript could not be loaded. Loading... ... Dan Uses CPAP - Duration: 4:17. Harvard Medical School 7,950 views 4:17 Tips for building ...

  14. Tipping Point

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    Full Text Available ... fall furniture head injury product safety television tipover tv Watch the video in Adobe Flash format. Almost ... accidents involving young children and furniture, appliance and tv tip-overs. The force of a large television ...

  15. Tipping Point

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... impact can kill a child or cause severe injuries. About 16,000 (mostly young children) were treated in emergency rooms for tip-over related injuries in 2006, that’s about four times more injuries ...

  16. Tipping Point

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    Full Text Available ... appliance child Childproofing CPSC danger death electrical fall furniture head injury product safety television tipover tv Watch ... reports about horrible accidents involving young children and furniture, appliance and tv tip-overs. The force of ...

  17. Tipping Point

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    Full Text Available ... third story of a building. That kind of impact can kill a child or cause severe injuries. ... to prevent a tip-over tragedy. Share Post Facebook Twitter Google Plus Reddit Connect with Me:  Visit ...

  18. Effects of tail docking and docking length on neuroanatomical changes in healed tail tips of pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herskin, M. S.; Thodberg, K.; Jensen, Henrik Elvang

    2015-01-01

    In pig production, piglets are tail docked at birth in order to prevent tail biting later in life. In order to examine the effects of tail docking and docking length on the formation of neuromas, we used 65 pigs and the following four treatments: intact tails (n=18); leaving 75% (n=17); leaving 50......% (n=19); or leaving 25% (n=11) of the tail length on the pigs. The piglets were docked between day 2 and 4 after birth using a gas-heated apparatus, and were kept under conventional conditions until slaughter at 22 weeks of age, where tails were removed and examined macroscopically and histologically...... (1.0±0.2 v. 0; Piron cautery causes formation of neuromas in the outermost part of the tail tip. The presence of neuromas might lead to altered nociceptive thresholds, which need...

  19. Effect of tool geometry on friction stir spot welding of polypropylene sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Bilici

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The effects of tool geometry and properties on friction stir spot welding properties of polypropylene sheets were studied. Four different tool pin geometries, with varying pin angles, pin lengths, shoulder diameters and shoulder angles were used for friction stir spot welding. All the welding operations were done at the room temperature. Lap-shear tensile tests were carried out to find the weld static strength. Weld cross section appearance observations were also done. From the experiments the effect of tool geometry on friction stir spot weld formation and weld strength were determined. The optimum tool geometry for 4 mm thick polypropylene sheets were determined. The tapered cylindrical pin gave the biggest and the straight cylindrical pin gave the lowest lap-shear fracture load.

  20. Physiological effects of the form of nitrogen on corn root tips: a 31P nuclear magnetic resonance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, F.H.; Anderson, I.C.

    1986-01-01

    Physiological effects of different N forms (NO − 3 , NH + 4 , or a combination of both) on corn (Zea mays L.) root tips and leaves were studied by following 31 P signals with a nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer. With root tips, both cytoplasmic and vacuolar pH could be measured, whereas with leaves, only vacuolar pH could be determined. The N treatments did not affect the cytoplasmic pH of corn root tips in contrast to proposals of previous workers. Leaf vacuolar pH was higher and root tip vacuolar pH lower with NO − 3 than with NH + 4 . Under anaerobic conditions, cytoplasmic pH was reduced because of lactic acid fermentation. Nitrate, an electron acceptor, delayed the acidification of the cytoplasm compartment because it represents an alternative way to reoxidize NADH. In conclusion, for the conditions of these experiments, the pH of the cytoplasm of corn root tips was not modified by the form of N absorbed; however, the pH of this compartment was affected by the form of N presented during development anaerobiosi. (author)

  1. Effect of target-fixture geometry on shock-wave compacted copper powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wooyeol; Ahn, Dong-Hyun; Yoon, Jae Ik; Park, Lee Ju; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2018-01-01

    In shock compaction with a single gas gun system, a target fixture is used to safely recover a powder compact processed by shock-wave dynamic impact. However, no standard fixture geometry exists, and its effect on the processed compact is not well studied. In this study, two types of fixture are used for the dynamic compaction of hydrogen-reduced copper powders, and the mechanical properties and microstructures are investigated using the Vickers microhardness test and electron backscatter diffraction, respectively. With the assistance of finite element method simulations, we analyze several shock parameters that are experimentally hard to control. The results of the simulations indicate that the target geometry clearly affects the characteristics of incident and reflected shock waves. The hardness distribution and the microstructure of the compacts also show their dependence on the geometry. With the results of the simulations and the experiment, it is concluded that the target geometry affects the shock wave propagation and wave interaction in the specimen.

  2. Effects of irradiation with low-energy nitrogen ion injection on root tip cells of broad bean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yaqin; Li Jinzhe; Huang Qunce

    2012-01-01

    In order to study the cytogenetic effects of low-energy nitrogen ion irradiation, broad bean seed embryo was irradiated by different doses of nitrogen ions. Micronucleus rate, mitotic index and chromosome aberration in root-tip cells were analyzed. The results showed that the injection of ions inhibited mitosis of root tip cells, interfered the normal process of mitosis, caused aberrations of chromosome structure, behavior and number. The frequency of micronucleus and chromosomal aberrations increased with the increasing radiation dosage, while mitotic index decreased. (authors)

  3. What is the orientation of the tip in a scanning tunneling microscope?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mándi, Gábor; Teobaldi, Gilberto; Palotás, Krisztián

    2015-05-01

    obtaining more detailed information on the structure of the tip apex and more reliable interpretation of STM data in the view of local tip geometry effects.

  4. Inhibitive effects of gamma-ray on root tip cells mitosis for different types of cultured rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Mei; Wang Cailian; Zhao Kongnan; Xu Gang

    1988-01-01

    Studies on twelve varieties of different cultured rice showed that the mitotic indexdose relationship could be fitted by linear regression equations. The mitotic index was decreased with the increase of dose. The inhibitive effects on root tip cells mitosis were similar for different types of cultured rice but rather different from variety to variety

  5. Effect of Pore Geometry on Gas Adsorption: Grand Canonical Monte Carlo Simulation Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eon Ji; Chang, Rak Woo; Han, Ji Hyung; Chung, Taek Dong

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the pure geometrical effect of porous materials in gas adsorption using the grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations of primitive gas-pore models with various pore geometries such as planar, cylindrical, and random pore geometries. Although the model does not possess atomistic level details of porous materials, our simulation results provided many insightful information in the effect of pore geometry on the adsorption behavior of gas molecules. First, the surface curvature of porous materials plays a significant role in the amount of adsorbed gas molecules: the concave surface such as in cylindrical pores induces more attraction between gas molecules and pore, which results in the enhanced gas adsorption. On the contrary, the convex surface of random pores gives the opposite effect. Second, this geometrical effect shows a nonmonotonic dependence on the gas-pore interaction strength and length. Third, as the external gas pressure is increased, the change in the gas adsorption due to pore geometry is reduced. Finally, the pore geometry also affects the collision dynamics of gas molecules. Since our model is based on primitive description of fluid molecules, our conclusion can be applied to any fluidic systems including reactant-electrode systems

  6. Modeling the manipulator and flipper pose effects on tip over stability of a tracked mobile manipulator

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dube, C

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Mobile manipulators are used in a number of different applications such as bomb disposal, mining robotics, and search and rescue operations. These mobile manipulators are highly susceptible to tip over due to the motion of the manipulator...

  7. Effect of material damage on the stress-strain state near a crack tip in creep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astaf'ev, V. I.; Grigorova, T. V.; Pastukhov, V. A.

    1992-02-01

    The asymptotic stress and damage fields near the tip of a growing crack are determined for a creep-damaged material described by Rabotnov-Hayhurst-Leckie constitutive equations. It is found that the singular stress field, characteristic of the crack theory, is absent near the crack tip, which is consistent with the results of finite element solutions for tearing cracks. A crack growth law is obtained which provides a qualitative description of the crack growth process in stainless steels under constant loading.

  8. Effects of artificial fracture geometry on geothermal well production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glowka, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of various artificial and natural fracture systems on geothermal well productivity. Two-dimensional finite element porous flow computer models are constructed and exercised under a variety of conditions. The model is verified for a planar fracture system created with hydraulic stimulation by comparing the results with an analytical solution. It is confirmed that fractures that penetrate deeply into the formation are needed to significantly improve well productivity in low permeability matrix formations. In high-permeability matrix or fractured formations, multiple artificial fractures of even limited length are more effective. This is particularly true for reservoirs that contain large, highly conductive natural fractures that the wellbore passes near but fails to penetrate. These results demonstrate that a stimulation technique capable of producing multiple fractures may be beneficial to thermal well production. 11 refs., 8 figs.

  9. Ordered Pinning Arrays with Tunable Geometry via Thermal Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trastoy, Juan; Bernard, Rozenn; Briatico, Javier; Villegas, Javier E.; Malnou, Maxime; Bergeal, Nicolas; Lesueur, Jerome; Ulysse, Christian; Faini, Giancarlo

    2015-03-01

    We have used geometrically frustrated pinning arrays to create artificial vortex-ice. The pinning arrays are fabricated via ion irradiation of high-Tc superconducting films. These arrays present a very unique characteristic: the frustration can be reversibly switched on/off using temperature as a control knob, which allows stabilizing either a vortex-ice or a square vortex lattice. We have further investigated the thermal switching mechanism by studying the matching of the flux lattice to arrays that are incrementally deformed upon fabrication by introducing minute variations of the distance between pins. The array deformation exacerbates the thermal effects, leading to dramatic variations of the vortex distribution as a function of temperature. These results illustrate the strength of the temperature-induced reconfiguration effects, which may constitute a novel knob in fluxtronic devices based on vortex manipulation. Work supported by the French ANR MASTHER, the COST Action NanoSC, the Ville de Paris and the Galician Fundacion Barrie.

  10. Non-Euclidean Geometry, Nontrivial Topology and Quantum Vacuum Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurii A. Sitenko

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Space out of a topological defect of the Abrikosov–Nielsen–Olesen (ANO vortex type is locally flat but non-Euclidean. If a spinor field is quantized in such a space, then a variety of quantum effects are induced in the vacuum. On the basis of the continuum model for long-wavelength electronic excitations originating in the tight-binding approximation for the nearest-neighbor interaction of atoms in the crystal lattice, we consider quantum ground-state effects in Dirac materials with two-dimensional monolayer structures warped into nanocones by a disclination; the nonzero size of the disclination is taken into account, and a boundary condition at the edge of the disclination is chosen to ensure self-adjointness of the Dirac–Weyl Hamiltonian operator. We show that the quantum ground-state effects are independent of the disclination size, and we find circumstances in which they are independent of parameters of the boundary condition.

  11. Solvent Effect on Morphology and Optical Properties of Poly(3-hexylthiophene):TIPS-Pentacene Blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozório, Maíza Silva; Camacho, Sabrina Alessio; Cordeiro, Neusmar Junior Artico; Duarte, José Leonil; Alves, Neri

    2018-02-01

    Optical, electrical, and morphological properties of poly(3-hexylthiophene):6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl) (TIPS)-pentacene (P3HT:TP) blend films, in the proportion of 1:1 (w/w), have been investigated using chloroform, toluene, or trichlorobenzene as solvent. The main morphological feature was formation of aggregates that tended to segregate vertically, exhibiting characteristics that were strongly influenced by the type of solvent applied. The phase segregation of TP observed for the P3HT:TP blend film obtained using chloroform, the most volatile of the investigated solvents, can be explained based on the Marangoni effect and the Flory-Huggins model. The TP molecules induce better organization of P3HT, as evidenced by the ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption spectra. Photoluminescence (PL) measurements revealed quenching and an increase in the lifetime of the carriers. The PL measurements also showed that the exciton dissociation was dependent on the characteristics of the surface on which the film was deposited. P3HT:TP blend film prepared using trichlorobenzene showed the best morphology with moderate phase segregation and better P3HT ordering. The output current from organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) with blend film prepared using trichlorobenzene was three times (3×) larger than when using the other solvents, with carrier mobility of 5.0 × 10-3 cm2 V-1 s-1.

  12. Tipping Point

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    Full Text Available ... 24 hours a day. For young children whose home is a playground, it’s the best way to prevent a tip-over tragedy. Share Post Facebook Twitter ... Security, and Legal Notice | Accessibility Policy | Open Government @ CPSC | ...

  13. CPAP Tips

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    Full Text Available ... sleeping? Here are some tips from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on how to safely ... Copyright Creators Advertise Developers +YouTube Terms Privacy Policy & Safety Send feedback Test new features Loading... Working... Sign ...

  14. Understanding of Capping Effects on the Tip Shape Evolution and on the Atom Probe Data of Bulk LaAlO3 Using Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Chang-Min; Kim, Young-Tae; Park, Chan-Gyung; Seol, Jae-Bok

    2017-04-01

    Two challenges exist in laser-assisted atom probe tomography (APT). First, a drastic decline in mass-resolving power is caused, not only by laser-induced thermal effects on the APT tips of bulk oxide materials, but also the associated asymmetric evaporation behavior; second, the field evaporation mechanisms of bulk oxide tips under laser illumination are still unclear due to the complex relations between laser pulse and oxide materials. In this study, both phenomena were investigated by depositing Ni- and Co-capping layers onto the bulk LaAlO3 tips, and using stepwise APT analysis with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation of the tip shapes. By employing the metallic capping, the heating at the surface of the oxide tips during APT analysis became more symmetrical, thereby enabling a high mass-resolving power in the mass spectrum. In addition, the stepwise microscopy technique visualized tip shape evolution during APT analysis, thereby accounting for evaporation sequences at the tip surface. The combination of "capping" and "stepwise APT with TEM," is applicable to any nonconductors; it provides a direct observation of tip shape evolution, allows determination of the field evaporation strength of oxides, and facilitates understanding of the effects of ultrafast laser illumination on an oxide tip.

  15. Effects of Hot-Spot Geometry on Backscattering and Down-Scattering Neutron Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Z. L.; Mannion, O. M.; Forrest, C. J.; Knauer, J. P.; Anderson, K. S.; Radha, P. B.

    2017-10-01

    The measured neutron spectrum produced by a fusion experiment plays a key role in inferring observable quantities. One important observable is the areal density of an implosion, which is inferred by measuring the scattering of neutrons. This project seeks to use particle-transport simulations to model the effects of hot-spot geometry on backscattering and down-scattering neutron spectra along different lines of sight. Implosions similar to those conducted at the Laboratory of Laser Energetics are modeled by neutron transport through a DT plasma and a DT ice shell using the particle transport codes MCNP and IRIS. Effects of hot-spot geometry are obtained by ``detecting'' scattered neutrons along different lines of sight. This process is repeated for various hot-spot geometries representing known shape distortions between the hot spot and the shell. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  16. Reynolds number and geometry effects in laminar axisymmetric isothermal counterflows

    KAUST Repository

    Scribano, Gianfranco

    2016-12-29

    The counterflow configuration is a canonical stagnation flow, featuring two opposed impinging round jets and a mixing layer across the stagnation plane. Although counterflows are used extensively in the study of reactive mixtures and other applications where mixing of two streams is required, quantitative data on the scaling properties of the flow field are lacking. The aim of this work is to characterize the velocity and mixing fields in isothermal counterflows over a wide range of conditions. The study features both experimental data from particle image velocimetry and results from detailed axisymmetric simulations. The scaling laws for the nondimensional velocity and mixture fraction are obtained as a function of an appropriate Reynolds number and the ratio of the separation distance of the nozzles to their diameter. In the range of flow configurations investigated, the nondimensional fields are found to depend primarily on the separation ratio and, to a lesser extent, the Reynolds number. The marked dependence of the velocity field with respect to the separation ratio is linked to a high pressure region at the stagnation point. On the other hand, Reynolds number effects highlight the role played by the wall boundary layer on the interior of the nozzles, which becomes less important as the separation ratio decreases. The normalized strain rate and scalar dissipation rate at the stagnation plane are found to attain limiting values only for high values of the Reynolds number. These asymptotic values depend markedly on the separation ratio and differ significantly from the values produced by analytical models. The scaling of the mixing field does not show a limiting behavior as the separation ratio decreases to the smallest practical value considered.

  17. Effect of Tip Shape of Frictional Stir Burnishing Tool on Processed Layer’s Hardness, Residual Stress and Surface Roughness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshimasa Takada

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir burnishing (FSB is a surface-enhancement method used after machining, without the need for an additional device. The FSB process is applied on a machine that uses rotation tools (e.g., machining center or multi-tasking machine. Therefore, the FSB process can be applied immediately after the cutting process using the same machine tool. Here, we apply the FSB to the shaft materials of 0.45% C steel using a multi-tasking machine. In the FSB process, the burnishing tool rotates at a high-revolution speed. The thin surface layer is rubbed and stirred as the temperature is increased and decreased. With the FSB process, high hardness or compressive residual stress can be obtained on the surface layer. However, when we applied the FSB process using a 3 mm diameter sphere tip shape tool, the surface roughness increased substantially (Ra = 20 µm. We therefore used four types of tip shape tools to examine the effect of burnishing tool tip radius on surface roughness, hardness, residual stress in the FSB process. Results indicated that the surface roughness was lowest (Ra = 10 µm when the tip radius tool diameter was large (30 mm.

  18. Vector geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, Gilbert de B

    2011-01-01

    This brief undergraduate-level text by a prominent Cambridge-educated mathematician explores the relationship between algebra and geometry. An elementary course in plane geometry is the sole requirement for Gilbert de B. Robinson's text, which is the result of several years of teaching and learning the most effective methods from discussions with students. Topics include lines and planes, determinants and linear equations, matrices, groups and linear transformations, and vectors and vector spaces. Additional subjects range from conics and quadrics to homogeneous coordinates and projective geom

  19. Effect of winter cold duration on spring phenology of the orange tip butterfly, Anthocharis cardamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stålhandske, Sandra; Lehmann, Philipp; Pruisscher, Peter; Leimar, Olof

    2015-12-01

    The effect of spring temperature on spring phenology is well understood in a wide range of taxa. However, studies on how winter conditions may affect spring phenology are underrepresented. Previous work on Anthocharis cardamines (orange tip butterfly) has shown population-specific reaction norms of spring development in relation to spring temperature and a speeding up of post-winter development with longer winter durations. In this experiment, we examined the effects of a greater and ecologically relevant range of winter durations on post-winter pupal development of A. cardamines of two populations from the United Kingdom and two from Sweden. By analyzing pupal weight loss and metabolic rate, we were able to separate the overall post-winter pupal development into diapause duration and post-diapause development. We found differences in the duration of cold needed to break diapause among populations, with the southern UK population requiring a shorter duration than the other populations. We also found that the overall post-winter pupal development time, following removal from winter cold, was negatively related to cold duration, through a combined effect of cold duration on diapause duration and on post-diapause development time. Longer cold durations also lead to higher population synchrony in hatching. For current winter durations in the field, the A. cardamines population of southern UK could have a reduced development rate and lower synchrony in emergence because of short winters. With future climate change, this might become an issue also for other populations. Differences in winter conditions in the field among these four populations are large enough to have driven local adaptation of characteristics controlling spring phenology in response to winter duration. The observed phenology of these populations depends on a combination of winter and spring temperatures; thus, both must be taken into account for accurate predictions of phenology.

  20. Study on the Effect of the Impact Location and the Type of Hammer Tip on the Frequency Response Function (FRF) in Experimental Modal Analysis of Rectangular Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mali, K. D.; Singru, P. M.

    2018-03-01

    In this work effect of the impact location and the type of hammer tip on the frequency response function (FRF) is studied. Experimental modal analysis of rectangular plates is carried out for this purpose by using impact hammer, accelerometer and fast Fourier transform (FFT) analyzer. It is observed that the impulse hammer hit location has, no effect on the eigenfrequency, yet a difference in amplitude of the eigenfrequencies is obtained. The effect of the hammer tip on the pulse and the force spectrum is studied for three types of tips metal, plastic and rubber. A solid rectangular plate was excited by using these tips one by one in three different tests. It is observed that for present experimental set up plastic tip excites the useful frequency range.

  1. The effect of disorder geometry on the critical force in disordered elastic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Démery, Vincent; Lecomte, Vivien; Rosso, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    We address the effect of disorder geometry on the critical force in disordered elastic systems. We focus on the model system of a long-range elastic line driven in a random landscape. In the collective pinning regime, we compute the critical force perturbatively. Not only does our expression for the critical force confirm previous results on its scaling with respect to the microscopic disorder parameters, but it also provides its precise dependence on the disorder geometry (represented by the disorder two-point correlation function). Our results are successfully compared with the results of numerical simulations for random field and random bond disorders. (paper)

  2. LISSAC - size and geometry effects on the failure behaviour of notched specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidenfuss, M.; Roos, E.

    2004-01-01

    In the current German design codes, mainly stress based concepts are used in the safety analysis of technical components. However, no reliable limit loads or safety margins can be defined with these concepts. Validated concepts on the basis of a tolerable limit strain are presently not available. In the context of the EU program LISSAC specimens with different geometry as well as geometrically similar specimens with a size ratio up to 1:50 are examined. On the basis of finite element simulations it is shown that damage models are able to predict the experimentally observed geometry and size effects on the failure strains. (orig.)

  3. Tip enhancement

    CERN Document Server

    Kawata, Satoshi

    2007-01-01

    This book discusses the recent advances in the area of near-field Raman scattering, mainly focusing on tip-enhanced and surface-enhanced Raman scattering. Some of the key features covered here are the optical structuring and manipulations, single molecule sensitivity, analysis of single-walled carbon nanotubes, and analytic applications in chemistry, biology and material sciences. This book also discusses the plasmonic materials for better enhancement, and optical antennas. Further, near-field microscopy based on second harmonic generation is also discussed. Chapters have been written by some of the leading scientists in this field, who present some of their recent work in this field.·Near-field Raman scattering·Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy·Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy·Nano-photonics·Nanoanalysis of Physical, chemical and biological materials beyond the diffraction limits·Single molecule detection

  4. Axial‐type olivine crystallographic preferred orientations: the effect of strain geometry on mantle texture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chatzaras, V.; Kruckenberg, Seth C.; Cohen, Shaina M.; Medaris Jr., L. Gordon; Withers, Anthony C.; Bagley, Brian

    The effect of finite strain geometry on crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) is poorly constrained in the upper mantle. Specifically, the relationship between shape preferred orientation (SPO) and CPO in the mantle rocks remains unclear. We analyzed a suite of 40 spinel peridotite xenoliths

  5. Effect of realistic vehicle seats, cushion length, and lap belt geometry on child ATD kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    This series of sled tests examined the effect of using real vehicle seats on child ATD performance. Cushion length was varied from production length of 450 mm to a shorter length of 350 mm. Lap belt geometry was set to rear, mid, and forward anchorag...

  6. COMPARATIVE STUDIES OF THE EFFECT OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON GEOMETRY ON THE HYDROLYSIS OF DIOL EPOXIDES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparative studies of the effect of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon geometry on the hydrolysis of diol epoxides The interaction of the diol epoxides (DEs) of both planar and non-planar PAHs with water have been examined using quantum mechanical and molecular dynamics. Th...

  7. Planar Hall effect sensor bridge geometries optimized for magnetic bead detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerberg, Frederik Westergaard; Rizzi, Giovanni; Henriksen, Anders Dahl

    2014-01-01

    Novel designs of planar Hall effect bridge sensors optimized for magnetic bead detection are presented and characterized. By constructing the sensor geometries appropriately, the sensors can be tailored to be sensitive to an external magnetic field, the magnetic field due to beads being magnetized...

  8. The Effects of Differentiation of Content in Problem-Solving in Learning Geometry in Secondary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikic, Naida; Maricic, Sanja M.; Pikula, Milenko

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effects of problem-based learning which was established on differentiation of content at three levels of complexity in the processing of the content of Analytical geometry in the plane. In this context, an experimental research was conducted, on a sample of secondary school students (N = 165) in order to…

  9. Finite geometry effect on the interaction of a hot beam with a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoucri, M.M.; Gagne, R.R.J.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of finite geometry on the interaction of a hot low-density beam with a uniform plasma filling a circular waveguide is studied. An expression is derived for the growth rate of the instabilities developing at the harmonic of the beam gyrofrequency, taking the finite beam gyroradius into account. The calculations are done in the quasistatic approximation. (author)

  10. Crossed ratchet effects on magnetic domain walls: geometry and transverse field effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alija, A; Hierro-Rodriguez, A; Perez-Junquera, A; Alameda, J M; Martin, J I; Velez, M, E-mail: mvelez@uniovi.es [Dept. Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo-CINN, 33007 Oviedo (Spain)

    2011-08-17

    Domain wall propagation across a 2D array of asymmetric holes is strongly dependent on the domain wall configuration: i.e. on whether the wall is flat or kinked. This results in interesting crossed ratchet and asymmetric accommodation effects that have been studied as a function of geometry and transverse field. Micromagnetic simulations have shown that the observation of crossed ratchet effects is easier for arrow than for triangular holes due to a larger field range in which kink propagation is the preferred mode for domain wall motion. Also, it has been found that dc transverse fields can produce a significant enhancement of the easy axis asymmetric accommodation and, also, that ac transverse fields can be rectified by the crossed ratchet potential.

  11. Effect of Mach number on thermoelectric performance of SiC ceramics nose-tip for supersonic vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Xiao-Yi; Wang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    This paper focus on the effects of Mach number on thermoelectric energy conversion for the limitation of aero-heating and the feasibility of energy harvesting on supersonic vehicles. A model of nose-tip structure constructed with SiC ceramics is developed to numerically study the thermoelectric performance in a supersonic flow field by employing the computational fluid dynamics and the thermal conduction theory. Results are given in the cases of different Mach numbers. Moreover, the thermoelectric performance in each case is predicted with and without Thomson heat, respectively. Due to the increase of Mach number, both the temperature difference and the conductive heat flux between the hot side and the cold side of nose tip are increased. This results in the growth of the thermoelectric power generated and the energy conversion efficiency. With respect to the Thomson effect, over 50% of total power generated converts to Thomson heat, which greatly reduces the thermoelectric power and efficiency. However, whether the Thomson effect is considered or not, with the Mach number increasing from 2.5 to 4.5, the thermoelectric performance can be effectively improved. -- Highlights: • Thermoelectric SiC nose-tip structure for aerodynamic heat harvesting of high-speed vehicles is studied. • Thermoelectric performance is predicted based on numerical methods and experimental thermoelectric parameters. • The effects of Mach number on thermoelectric performance are studied in the present paper. • Results with respect to the Thomson effect are also explored. • Output power and energy efficiency of the thermoelectric nose-tip are increased with the increase of Mach number

  12. Rectification properties of geometrically asymmetric metal-vacuum-metal junctions: a comparison of tungsten and silver tips to determine the effects of polarization resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, A; Cutler, P H

    2009-09-30

    We simulate with a transfer-matrix methodology the rectification properties of geometrically asymmetric metal-vacuum-metal junctions in which one of the metals is flat while the other is extended by a tip. We consider both tungsten and silver as the material for the tip and we study the influence of the dielectric function of these materials on the rectification properties of the junction. We determine in particular the power that these junctions could provide to an external load when subject to a bias whose typical frequency is in the infrared or optical domain. We also study the rectification ratio of these junctions, which characterizes their ability to rectify the external bias by providing currents with a strong dc component. The results show that these quantities exhibit a significant enhancement for frequencies Ω that correspond to a resonant polarization of the tip. With silver and the geometry considered in this paper, this arises for [Formula: see text] values of the order of 3.1 eV in the visible range. Our results hence indicate that the frequency at which the device is the most efficient for the rectification of external signals could be controlled by the geometry or the material used for the tip.

  13. Cost-Effectiveness and Clinical Practice Guidelines: Have We Reached a Tipping Point?-An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Louis P

    2016-01-01

    Given recent developments in the United States, where professional clinical societies have attempted to define "value" and consider it in their deliberations about appropriate care, this thematic article describes those recent specialty society efforts in the United States in cardiology and oncology and the multispecialty efforts in the United Kingdom for over 10 years. Despite our high levels of health spending, and our field's long and consistent approach to the basic tools of cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA), US private and public payers are not routinely or explicitly using CEAs in their reimbursement decisions. This is a puzzle that raises the following question: Why does the United States have so many skilled pharmacoeconomic practitioners and produce so many CEAs given this apparent lack of interest and trust? There are multiple reasons, but the lack of incentives to use the information certainly matters. This article identifies and discusses a number of key issues and challenges for incorporating CEA into US clinical guidelines development: potential bias in manufacturer-sponsored CEAs, the role of societal perspective, payer-subscriber and physician-patient agency relationships, the need for disease area CEA studies and modeling, patient heterogeneity, investigators' conflicts of interest, assessing the quality of economic studies, and aggregation of information using multicriteria decision analysis. These developments suggest that the application of CEA in health care decision making in the United States is evolving and may be approaching a tipping point. With increasing pressures on drug prices, perhaps reflecting challenges to industry sustainability, payers, providers, and patients are looking for value for money. CEA should be an important part of this process. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The effect of TIP on pneumovirus-induced pulmonary edema in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Elske; Bem, Reinout A.; Bos, Albert P.; Lutter, Rene; van Woensel, Job B. M.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary edema plays a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-induced respiratory failure. In this study we determined whether treatment with TIP (AP301), a synthetic cyclic peptide that mimics the lectin-like domain of human TNF, decreases pulmonary edema in a

  15. Probing the effect of tip pressure on fungal growth: Application to Aspergillus nidulans

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Bermúdez, Blanca; Li, Qingxuan; Guinea, Gustavo V.; Peñalva, Miguel A.; Plaza, Gustavo R.

    2017-08-01

    The study of fungal cells is of great interest due to their importance as pathogens and as fermenting fungi and for their appropriateness as model organisms. The differential pressure between the hyphal cytoplasm and the bordering medium is essential for the growth process, because the pressure is correlated with the growth rate. Notably, during the invasion of tissues, the external pressure at the tip of the hypha may be different from the pressure in the surrounding medium. We report the use of a method, based on the micropipette-aspiration technique, to study the influence of this external pressure at the hyphal tip. Moreover, this technique makes it possible to study hyphal growth mechanics in the case of very thin hyphae, not accessible to turgor pressure probes. We found a correlation between the local pressure at the tip and the growth rate for the species Arpergillus nidulans. Importantly, the proposed method allows one to measure the pressure at the tip required to arrest the hyphal growth. Determining that pressure could be useful to develop new medical treatments for fungal infections. Finally, we provide a mechanical model for these experiments, taking into account the cytoplasm flow and the wall deformation.

  16. Analysis of the effect of pore geometry in the physical properties of rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Alberto Oliveira Lima Roque

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Pore geometry is one of the main factors influencing the flow of reservoir fluids under pressure. Pores with narrower formats are more easily compressed when subject to pressure. Pressure modifies pore geometry by opening or closing cracks, causing increase or decrease in the elastic modulus, porosity, permeability, and other parameters. Rock physical properties depend on the size and shape of pores. Thus, in order to analyze changes on the physical properties behavior according to the pores geometry, it is necessary to study and improve mathematical models of the porous media by taking into account the pore shape factor for estimating rock elastic properties. Differential effective medium model (DEM, Hertz-Mindlin theory and coherent potential approximation (CPA are some of the theoretical paradigms that take into account pore geometry in changes in elastic moduli. Given the importance of the pore structure effect on the behavior of physical parameters, this article proposes an analysis of some mathematical models that consider the influence of pore shapes in the physical properties of rocks.

  17. Effects of Active Subsidence Vs. Existing Basin Geometry on Fluviodeltaic Channels and Stratal Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, M.; Kim, W.; Passalacqua, P.

    2015-12-01

    Tectonic subsidence and basin topography, both determining the accommodation, are fundamental controls on the basin filling processes. Their effects on the fluvial organization and the resultant subsurface patterns remain difficult to predict due to the lack of understanding about interaction between internal dynamics and external controls. Despite the intensive studies on tectonic steering effects on alluvial architecture, how the self-organization of deltaic channels, especially the distributary channel network, respond to tectonics and basin geometry is mostly unknown. Recently physical experiments and field studies have hinted dramatic differences in fluviodeltaic evolution between ones associated with active differential subsidence and existing basin depth. In this work we designed a series of numerical experiments using a reduced-complexity channel-resolving model for delta formation, and tested over a range of localized subsidence rates and topographic depression in basin geometry. We also used a set of robust delta metrics to analyze: i) shoreline planform asymmetry, ii) channel and lobe geometry, iii) channel network pattern, iv) autogenic timescales, and v) subsurface structure. The modeling results show that given a similar final thickness, active subsidence enhances channel branching with smaller channel sand bodies that are both laterally and vertically connected, whereas existing topographic depression causes more large-scale channel avulsions with larger channel sand bodies. In general, both subsidence and existing basin geometry could steer channels and/or lock channels in place but develop distinct channel patterns and thus stratal architecture.

  18. The effect of microstructure and geometry on the fatigue behaviour of bundle assembly welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surette, B.A.; Gabbani, M.

    1997-01-01

    Cracking of end plates, in the Darlington NGS, was attributed to high-cycle fatigue resulting from flow-induced vibrations. Because the cracks were predominantly associated with the bundle assembly welds and with certain element positions, a program was initiated to study whether the microstructure and geometry of the weld zone affected the fatigue behaviour of the assembly welds. Assembly weld samples were subjected to different heat treatments, resulting in different microstructures of the weld zone. Results of fatigue testing suggest that heat treatment of the welds (i.e., microstructure) had little effect on the fatigue life. Assembly welds were also produced with different weld notch geometries, and compared with samples having notches produced by machining (instead of welding). The results of these tests showed that geometry of the weld had a significant effect on fatigue life. However, the geometry of the weld notch required to significantly improve fatigue life is not achievable using the current assembly welding process. A small improvement in fatigue life of welded samples appears possible by increasing the weld diameter. (author)

  19. Effect of milling strategy and tool geometry on machining cost when cutting titanium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conradie, Pieter

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The growing demands on aerospace manufacturers to cut more difficult-to-machine materials at increasing material removal rates require that manufacturers enhance their machining capability. This requires a better understanding of the effects of milling strategies and tool geometries on cutting performance. Ti6Al4V is the most widely-used titanium alloy in the aerospace industry, due to its unique combination of properties. These properties also make the alloy very challenging to machine. Complex aerospace geometries necessitate large material removal, and are therefore generally associated with high manufacturing costs. To investigate the effect of milling strategy and tool geometry on cutting performance, the new constant engagement milling strategy was firstly compared with a conventional approach. Thereafter, a component was milled with different cutting tool geometries. Cost savings of more than 40% were realised by using a constant engagement angle milling strategy. A reduction of 38% in machining time was achieved by using tools with a land on the rake side of the cutting edge. These incremental improvements made it possible to enhance the overall performance of the cutting process.

  20. Analysis of Unsteady Tip and Endwall Heat Transfer in a Highly Loaded Transonic Turbine Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyam, Vikram; Ameri, Ali; Chen, Jen-Ping

    2010-01-01

    In a previous study, vane-rotor shock interactions and heat transfer on the rotor blade of a highly loaded transonic turbine stage were simulated. The geometry consists of a high pressure turbine vane and downstream rotor blade. This study focuses on the physics of flow and heat transfer in the rotor tip, casing and hub regions. The simulation was performed using the Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) code MSU-TURBO. A low Reynolds number k-epsilon model was utilized to model turbulence. The rotor blade in question has a tip gap height of 2.1 percent of the blade height. The Reynolds number of the flow is approximately 3x10(exp 6) per meter. Unsteadiness was observed at the tip surface that results in intermittent "hot spots". It is demonstrated that unsteadiness in the tip gap is governed by inviscid effects due to high speed flow and is not strongly dependent on pressure ratio across the tip gap contrary to published observations that have primarily dealt with subsonic tip flows. The high relative Mach numbers in the tip gap lead to a choking of the leakage flow that translates to a relative attenuation of losses at higher loading. The efficacy of new tip geometry is discussed to minimize heat flux at the tip while maintaining choked conditions. In addition, an explanation is provided that shows the mechanism behind the rise in stagnation temperature on the casing to values above the absolute total temperature at the inlet. It is concluded that even in steady mode, work transfer to the near tip fluid occurs due to relative shearing by the casing. This is believed to be the first such explanation of the work transfer phenomenon in the open literature. The difference in pattern between steady and time-averaged heat flux at the hub is also explained.

  1. Numerical study of the effect of channel geometry on the performance of Magnetohydrodynamic micro pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mushtaq Ismael Hasan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnetohydrodynamic micropumps received more attention due to its applications in pumping of biological and chemical specimens, such as blood, DNA, and saline buffers. In this paper the MHD flow in different cross section microchannels has been numerically investigated with different electromagnetic boundary conditions. Square, rectangular, circular and trapezoidal cross section microchannels have been used to explore the effect of channel geometry on the MHD micropump operation. The study covers a selected range of applied electric currents and magnetic flux to show their effects on MHD flow. Thermal characteristics of MHD flow have been also studied by calculation the temperature distribution through MHD micropump region. The results obtained show a considerable effect of channel geometry, the applied electric and magnetic fields on the velocity and flow rate. The circular cross section micropump gave higher velocity and flow rate compared with other cross sections, and there is a slight increase in temperature due to small effect of Joule heating.

  2. Cytogenetic effects of 48titanium (48ti) on meristematic cells of root tips of lens culinaris med

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sepet, H.; Bozdag, B.

    2014-01-01

    Cytogenetic effects of 48Titanium (48Ti) on meristematic cells of root tips belonging to the plant (Lens culinaris Medik.) have been Investigated. Seeds of the plant, prepared were kept in 48Ti standart for different time period as control during 1/4, 1/2, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24 hours. Seeds treated with 48Ti were made sprout and the root tips obtained were prepared for microscopic examination. At the end of the microscopic examinations, some abnormalities as chromosome breakings, chromosome dispersion, bridge chromosome, chromosome adherence, ring chromosome were observed. Abnormalities were seen at each treatment depended on the time periods. Variety and number of abnormality were usually seen to be increasing, depending on the increase of treatment time. The results obtained were evaluated statistically. (author)

  3. A scanning microscopy technique based on capacitive coupling with a field-effect transistor integrated with the tip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kumjae; Kang, Dae sil; Lee, Sang hoon; Moon, Wonkyu

    2015-12-01

    We propose a method for measuring the capacitance of a thin layer using a Tip-on-Gate of Field-Effect Transistor (ToGoFET) probe. A ToGoFET probe with a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) with an ion-implant channel was embedded at the end of a cantilever and a Pt tip was fabricated using micro-machining. The ToGoFET probe was used to detect an alternating electric field at the dielectric surface. A dielectric buried metal sample was prepared; a sinusoidal input signal was applied to the buried metal lines; and the ToGoFET probe detected the electric field at the tip via the dielectric. The AC signal detected by the ToGoFET probe was demodulated by a simple AC-to-DC converter. Experimentally, it was shown that an electric field could be measured at the surface of the dielectric layer above a buried metal line. This promising result shows that it is possible to measure the surface local capacitance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Testing accommodation or modification? The effects of integrated object representation on enhancing geometry performance in children with and without geometry difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dake; Wang, Qiu; Ding, Yi; Liu, Jeremy Jian

    2014-01-01

    According to the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, geometry and spatial sense are fundamental components of mathematics learning. However, learning disabilities (LD) research has shown that many K-12 students encounter particular geometry difficulties (GD). This study examined the effect of an integrated object representation (IOR) accommodation on the test performance of students with GD compared to students without GD. Participants were 118 elementary students who took a researcher-developed geometry problem solving test under both a standard testing condition and an IOR accommodation condition. A total of 36 students who were classified with GD scored below 40% correct in the geometry problem solving test in the standard testing condition, and 82 students who were classified without GD scored equal to or above 40% correct in the same test and condition. All students were tested in both standard testing condition and IOR accommodation condition. The results from both ANOVA and regression discontinuity (RD) analyses suggested that students with GD benefited more than students without GD from the IOR accommodation. Implications of the study are discussed in terms of providing accommodations for students with mathematics learning difficulties and recommending RD design in LD research. © Hammill Institute on Disabilities 2013.

  5. Effect of modified Wuzi Yanzong Pill () on Tip60-mediated apoptosis in testis of male rats after microwave radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hai-Xiang; Sun, Jing; Gao, Ya-Jing; Fang, Hong; Xu, Shao-Qiang; Dong, Jing; Wei, Li-Zhao; Luo, Shao-Bo; Shen, Chuan-Yun; Zhang, Qi-Long; Xie, Ya-Lan

    2017-10-24

    To investigate the effect of a modified Wuzi Yanzong Pill (, WZYZP) on the male rats' testis after microwave radiation, as well as its potential mechanism. Forty-five male rats were randomly assigned to three groups: the control group, the radiation group, and the WZYZP group. The rats in the radiation group and WZYZP group were exposed to microwave radiation for 15 min once, while the rats in the control group were not exposed to any radiation. The rats in the WZYZP group were given a modified of WZYZP by gavage daily for 7 days. Apoptosis in the testis was evaluated using terminal-deoxynucleoitidyl transferase mediated nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Histopathological alterations of the testis were observed by haematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining. Tat-interactive protein, 60kD (Tip60) and p53 expressions were determined by Western blotting. The apoptosis index (AI) in the radiation group was higher than that of the WZYZP group and control group on day 1 (D1), day 7 (D7) day 14 (D14) after radiation (Pradiation group, the partial seminiferous tubules were collapsed, basement membranes of the seminiferous epithelia became detached. WZYZP could restore the morphological changes. There was no expression of Tip60 among the three groups on D7 and D14. The expression of p53 was higher in the radiation group than in the control group (Pradiation on D7 and D14 (Peffects may partly result from its ability to intervene in Tip60 mediated apoptosis.

  6. THE EFFECT OF PROBLEM BASED LEARNING METHODS ON STUDENTS' THE SELF-EFFICACY BELIEFS TOWARDS GEOMETRY

    OpenAIRE

    GÜNHAN, Berna CANTÜRK

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of problem based learning method on seventh grade students' the self-efficacy beliefs towards geometry. Problem Based Learning method based on constructivism learning theory is one of these teaching environments. The research was designed based on an experimental pre-test post-test model. The research was conducted with 46 seventh grade students from a private school in Izmir during 2005-2006 academic years. Problem based learning and tr...

  7. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECT OF IMPLANT GEOMETRY TO STRESS DISTRIBUTIONS OF DENTAL IMPLANT SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    topkaya, tolga; solmaz, murat yavuz; dündar, serkan; Eltas, Abubekir

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: The success of dental implants is related to the quality, quantity of local bones, implant design and surgical technique. Implant diameter and length are accepted as key factors. Present work focuses to investigate the effect of titanium implant geometry to stress distributions in implant system.Materials and Methods: For this purpose three different implant models which are currently being used in clinical cases constructed by using ANSYS Workbench 12.1. The stress distribu...

  8. Collagen fiber orientation and geometry effects on the mechanical properties of secondary osteons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidaparti, R M; Burr, D B

    1992-08-01

    The effects of collagen fiber orientation and osteon geometry on the mechanical properties of secondary osteons under axial compression/tension and combined loadings (compression, bending and torsion) were investigated using a composite-beam finite-element model. Three cross-sectional shapes of secondary osteons were studied to show the effect of geometry. The results of stiffness are presented using the tension and compression properties for each lamella. The model shows that the mechanical properties of osteons are enhanced in bending and torsion when collagen fibers are oriented within 30 degrees of the loading axis. Osteons with alternating lamellar orientation are not well adapted to resist torsional moments, but alternate collagen fiber orientation has virtually no effect on the bending stiffness of osteons. Fiber orientation affects the mechanical properties less significantly when osteons are non-circular. Collagen fiber orientation and osteon geometry interact to determine the mechanical behavior of the osteon, and may act in a compensatory manner in the adaptive process.

  9. Effects of Geometry Design Parameters on the Static Strength and Dynamics for Spiral Bevel Gear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiheng Feng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the geometry design parameters, a quasi-static mesh model of spiral bevel gears was established and the mesh characteristics were computed. Considering the time-varying effects of mesh points, mesh force, line-of-action vector, mesh stiffness, transmission error, friction force direction, and friction coefficient, a nonlinear lumped parameter dynamic model was developed for the spiral bevel gear pair. Based on the mesh model and the nonlinear dynamic model, the effects of main geometry parameters on the contact and bending strength were analyzed. Also, the effects on the dynamic mesh force and dynamic transmission error were investigated. Results show that higher value for the pressure angle, root fillet radius, and the ratio of tooth thickness tend to improve the contact and bending strength and to reduce the risk of tooth fracture. Improved gears have a better vibration performance in the targeted frequency range. Finally, bench tests for both types of spiral bevel gears were performed. Results show that the main failure mode is the tooth fracture and the life was increased a lot for the spiral bevel gears with improved geometry parameters compared to the original design.

  10. Effect of 60Co γ irradiation with seed and shoot-tip of Brassica campestris L. var on its culture in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Feixiong; Yu Rangcai; Pan Ruichi

    2003-01-01

    The survival rate in vitro of shoot-tips of Brassica campestris L. var from seeds irradiated by 60 Co γ-rays decreased with the increase of dose. Irradiation inhibited proliferation of shoot-tip, induction of callus from cotyledons and differentiation of the callus. The age of explant contributed to the effect of irradiation in the culture. Irradiation stimulated the proliferation of shoot-tip with dose less than 50 Gy. Based on the effect of irradiation in the tissue culture, the effective dose recommended was about 200 Gy for seeds, 50-100 Gy for pre-soaked germinating seeds and 40-70 Gy for shoot-tips in vitro, respectively

  11. High temperature cracking of steels: effect of geometry on creep crack growth laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabiri, M.R.

    2003-12-01

    This study was performed at Centre des Materiaux de l'Ecole des Mines de Paris. It deals with identification and transferability of high temperature creep cracking laws of steels. A global approach, based on C * and J non-linear fracture mechanics parameters has been used to characterize creep crack initiation and propagation. The studied materials are: the ferritic steels 1Cr-1Mo-1/4V (hot and cold parts working at 540 and 250 C) used in the thermal power stations and the austenitic stainless steel 316 L(N) used in the nuclear power stations. During this thesis a data base was setting up, it regroups several tests of fatigue, creep, creep-fatigue, and relaxation. Its particularity is to contain several creep tests (27 tests), achieved at various temperatures (550 to 650 C) and using three different geometries. The relevance of the C * parameter to describe the creep crack propagation was analysed by a means of systematic study of elasto-viscoplastic stress singularities under several conditions (different stress triaxiality). It has been shown that, besides the C * parameter, a second non singular term, denoted here as Q * , is necessary to describe the local variables in the vicinity of the crack tip. Values of this constraint parameter are always negative. Consequently, application of typical creep crack growth laws linking the creep crack growth rate to the C * parameter (da/dt - C * ), will be conservative for industrial applications. Furthermore, we showed that for ferritic steels, crack incubation period is important, therefore a correlation of Ti - C * type has been kept to predict crack initiation time Ti. For the austenitic stainless steel, the relevant stage is the one of the crack propagation, so that a master curve (da/dt - C * ), using a new data analysis method, was established. Finally, the propagation of cracks has been simulated numerically using the node release technique, allowing to validate analytical expressions utilised for the experimental

  12. Effects of Using Dynamic Mathematics Software on Preservice Mathematics Teachers' Spatial Visualization Skills: The Case of Spatial Analytic Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kösa, Temel

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of using dynamic geometry software on preservice mathematics teachers' spatial visualization skills and to determine whether spatial visualization skills can be a predictor of success in learning analytic geometry of space. The study used a quasi-experimental design with a control group.…

  13. Effect of inclusion geometry and matrix properties on rolling contact fatigue of steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyfour, R. W.

    2000-01-01

    The work presented in this paper is aimed at studying the effect of inclusion geometry and matrix property on rolling contact fatigue of steel. Rolling contact has been stimulated in laboratory using a twin-disc machine and an on-line crack detection system. It has been shown that soft inclusions, although normally considered harmless, can be good sites for crack initiation and suitable paths for crack propagation. Enough evidence has been given to show that if inclusions can be maintained spherical, they may not affect rolling contact fatigue life. The mechanical properties of the matrix play an important role in helping or hindering the deformation of soft inclusions. Strong matrix around the inclusion makes it less likely for spherical shaped inclusions to transform to stringers, and as a result, preserves the geometry of inclusion. However, soft matrix enables deforming the inclusion and raises the stress concentration at the inclusion edges. (author). 25 refs., 7 figs. 2 tabs

  14. Effect of microneedle geometry and supporting substrate on microneedle array penetration into skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochhar, Jaspreet Singh; Quek, Ten Cheer; Soon, Wei Jun; Choi, Jaewoong; Zou, Shui; Kang, Lifeng

    2013-11-01

    Microneedles are being fast recognized as a useful alternative to injections in delivering drugs, vaccines, and cosmetics transdermally. Owing to skin's inherent elastic properties, microneedles require an optimal geometry for skin penetration. In vitro studies, using rat skin to characterize microneedle penetration in vivo, require substrates with suitable mechanical properties to mimic human skin's subcutaneous tissues. We tested the effect of these two parameters on microneedle penetration. Geometry in terms of center-to-center spacing of needles was investigated for its effect on skin penetration, when placed on substrates of different hardness. Both hard (clay) and soft (polydimethylsiloxane, PDMS) substrates underneath rat skin and full-thickness pig skin were used as animal models and human skins were used as references. It was observed that there was an increase in percentage penetration with an increase in needle spacing. Microneedle penetration with PDMS as a support under stretched rat skin correlated better with that on full-thickness human skin, while penetration observed was higher when clay was used as a substrate. We showed optimal geometries for efficient penetration together with recommendation for a substrate that could better mimic the mechanical properties of human subcutaneous tissues, when using microneedles fabricated from poly(ethylene glycol)-based materials. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  15. Effects of distance from tip of LED light-curing unit and curing time on surface hardness of nano-filled composite resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafadilla, V. A.; Usman, M.; Margono, A.

    2017-08-01

    Polymerization process depends on several variables, including the hue, thickness, and translucency of the composite resin, the size of the filler particles, the duration of exposure to light (the curing time), the intensity of the light, and the distance from the light. This study aimed to analyze the effects of the distance from the tip of the light-emitting diode (LED) light-curing unit and of curing time on the surface hardness of nano-filled composite resin. 60 specimens were prepared in a mold and divided into 6 groups based on various curing distances and times: 2 mm, 5 mm, and 8 mm and 20 seconds and 40 seconds. The highest surface hardness was seen in the group both closest to the tip and having the longest curing time, while the lowest hardness was seen in the group both farthest from the tip and having the shortest curing time. Significant differences were seen among the various tip distances, except for in the two groups that had 8-mm tip distances, which had no significant differences due to curing time. Both decreased distance from the tip of the LED light-curing unit and increased curing time increase the surface hardness of nano-filled composite resin. However, curing time increases the surface hardness only if the tip distance is ≤ 5 mm.

  16. Prom Health and Safety Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Autumn Tips Camping Tips Family Reunions Gardening Tips Halloween Tips Healthy Halloween Prom Tips Spring Break Valentine Tips Winter Holiday ... Breast Cancer Assess Your Relationships Be Safe on Halloween Be Smoke-Free Check Alarm Batteries Know Your ...

  17. Effect of CT Specimen Thickness on the Mechanical Characteristics at the Crack Tip of Stress Corrosion Cracking in Ni-based Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yinghao, Cui; He, Xue; Lingyan, Zhao

    2017-12-01

    It’s important to obtain accurate stress corrosion crack(SCC) growth rate for quantitative life prediction of components in nuclear power plants. However, the engineering practice shows that the crack tip constraint effect has a great influence on the mechanical properties and crack growth rate of SCC at crack tip. To study the influence of the specimen thickness on the crack tip mechanical properties of SCC, the stress, strain and C integral at creep crack tip are analyzed under different specimens thickness. Results show that the cracked specimen is less likely to crack due to effect of crack tip constraint. When the thickness ratio B/W is larger than 0.1, the crack tip constraint is almost ineffective. Value of C integral is the largest when B/W is 0.25. Then specimen thickness has little effect on the value of C integral. The effect of specimen thickness on the value of C integral is less significant at higher thickness ratio.

  18. Effect of Electrode Geometry on the Classification Performance of Rapid Evaporative Ionization Mass Spectrometric (REIMS) Bacterial Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodai, Zsolt; Cameron, Simon; Bolt, Frances; Simon, Daniel; Schaffer, Richard; Karancsi, Tamas; Balog, Julia; Rickards, Tony; Burke, Adam; Hardiman, Kate; Abda, Julia; Rebec, Monica; Takats, Zoltan

    2018-01-01

    The recently developed automated, high-throughput monopolar REIMS platform is suited for the identification of clinically important microorganisms. Although already comparable to the previously reported bipolar forceps method, optimization of the geometry of monopolar electrodes, at the heart of the system, holds the most scope for further improvements to be made. For this, sharp tip and round shaped electrodes were optimized to maximize species-level classification accuracy. Following optimization of the distance between the sample contact point and tube inlet with the sharp tip electrodes, the overall cross-validation accuracy improved from 77% to 93% in negative and from 33% to 63% in positive ion detection modes, compared with the original 4 mm distance electrode. As an alternative geometry, round tube shaped electrodes were developed. Geometry optimization of these included hole size, number, and position, which were also required to prevent plate pick-up due to vacuum formation. Additional features, namely a metal "X"-shaped insert and a pin in the middle were included to increase the contact surface with a microbial biomass to maximize aerosol production. Following optimization, cross-validation scores showed improvement in classification accuracy from 77% to 93% in negative and from 33% to 91% in positive ion detection modes. Supervised models were also built, and after the leave 20% out cross-validation, the overall classification accuracy was 98.5% in negative and 99% in positive ion detection modes. This suggests that the new generation of monopolar REIMS electrodes could provide substantially improved species level identification accuracies in both polarity detection modes. Graphical abstract.

  19. Effect of Electrode Geometry on the Classification Performance of Rapid Evaporative Ionization Mass Spectrometric (REIMS) Bacterial Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodai, Zsolt; Cameron, Simon; Bolt, Frances; Simon, Daniel; Schaffer, Richard; Karancsi, Tamas; Balog, Julia; Rickards, Tony; Burke, Adam; Hardiman, Kate; Abda, Julia; Rebec, Monica; Takats, Zoltan

    2018-01-01

    The recently developed automated, high-throughput monopolar REIMS platform is suited for the identification of clinically important microorganisms. Although already comparable to the previously reported bipolar forceps method, optimization of the geometry of monopolar electrodes, at the heart of the system, holds the most scope for further improvements to be made. For this, sharp tip and round shaped electrodes were optimized to maximize species-level classification accuracy. Following optimization of the distance between the sample contact point and tube inlet with the sharp tip electrodes, the overall cross-validation accuracy improved from 77% to 93% in negative and from 33% to 63% in positive ion detection modes, compared with the original 4 mm distance electrode. As an alternative geometry, round tube shaped electrodes were developed. Geometry optimization of these included hole size, number, and position, which were also required to prevent plate pick-up due to vacuum formation. Additional features, namely a metal "X"-shaped insert and a pin in the middle were included to increase the contact surface with a microbial biomass to maximize aerosol production. Following optimization, cross-validation scores showed improvement in classification accuracy from 77% to 93% in negative and from 33% to 91% in positive ion detection modes. Supervised models were also built, and after the leave 20% out cross-validation, the overall classification accuracy was 98.5% in negative and 99% in positive ion detection modes. This suggests that the new generation of monopolar REIMS electrodes could provide substantially improved species level identification accuracies in both polarity detection modes. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  20. Finite Element Simulations for Investigating the Effects of Specimen Geometry in Superplastic Tensile Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazzal, Mohammad; Abu-Farha, Fadi; Curtis, Richard

    2011-08-01

    Characterizing the behavior of superplastic materials is largely based on the uniaxial tensile test; yet the unique nature of these materials requires a particularly tailored testing methodology, different to that used with conventional materials. One of the crucial testing facets is the specimen geometry, which has a great impact on the outcome of a superplastic tensile test, as a result of the associated extreme conditions. And while researchers agree that it should take a notably different form than the typical dog-bone shape; there is no universal agreement on the specimen's particular size and dimensions, as evident by the disparities in test specimens used in the various superplastic testing efforts found throughout the literature. In view of that, this article is dedicated to understanding the effects of specimen geometry on the superplastic behavior of the material during tensile testing. Deformation of the Ti6Al4V titanium alloy is FE simulated based on a multitude of specimen geometries, covering a wide range of gauge length, gauge width, grip length, and grip width values. The study provides key insights on the influences of each geometrical parameter as well as their interactions, and provides recommendations on selecting the specimen's proportions for accurate and unified tensile testing of superplastic materials.

  1. The Effect of Combined Magnetic Geometries on Thermally Driven Winds. II. Dipolar, Quadrupolar, and Octupolar Topologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, Adam J.; Matt, Sean P.

    2018-02-01

    During the lifetime of Sun-like or low-mass stars a significant amount of angular momentum is removed through magnetized stellar winds. This process is often assumed to be governed by the dipolar component of the magnetic field. However, observed magnetic fields can host strong quadrupolar and/or octupolar components, which may influence the resulting spin-down torque on the star. In Paper I, we used the MHD code PLUTO to compute steady-state solutions for stellar winds containing a mixture of dipole and quadrupole geometries. We showed the combined winds to be more complex than a simple sum of winds with these individual components. This work follows the same method as Paper I, including the octupole geometry, which not only increases the field complexity but also, more fundamentally, looks for the first time at combining the same symmetry family of fields, with the field polarity of the dipole and octupole geometries reversing over the equator (unlike the symmetric quadrupole). We show, as in Paper I, that the lowest-order component typically dominates the spin-down torque. Specifically, the dipole component is the most significant in governing the spin-down torque for mixed geometries and under most conditions for real stars. We present a general torque formulation that includes the effects of complex, mixed fields, which predicts the torque for all the simulations to within 20% precision, and the majority to within ≈5%. This can be used as an input for rotational evolution calculations in cases where the individual magnetic components are known.

  2. Effect of inhomogeneous activity distributions and airway geometry on cellular doses in radon lung dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szoke, Istvan; Balashazy, Imre; Farkas, Arpad; Hofmann, Werner

    2007-01-01

    The human tracheobronchial system has a very complex structure including cylindrical airway ducts connected by airway bifurcation units. The deposition of the inhaled aerosols within the airways exhibits a very inhomogeneous pattern. The formation of deposition hot spots near the carinal ridge has been confirmed by experimental and computational fluid and particle dynamics (CFPD) methods. In spite of these observations, current radon lung dosimetry models apply infinitely long cylinders as models of the airway system and assume uniform deposition of the inhaled radon progenies along the airway walls. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of airway geometry and non-uniform activity distributions within bronchial bifurcations on cellular dose distributions. In order to answer these questions, the nuclear doses of the bronchial epithelium were calculated in three different irradiation situations. (1) First, CFPD methods were applied to calculate the distribution of the deposited alpha-emitting nuclides in a numerically constructed idealized airway bifurcation. (2) Second, the deposited radionuclides were randomly distributed along the surface of the above-mentioned geometry. (3) Finally, calculations were made in cylindrical geometries corresponding to the parent and daughter branches of the bifurcation geometry assuming random nuclide activity distribution. In all three models, the same 218 Po and 214 Po surface activities per tissue volumes were assumed. Two conclusions can be drawn from this analysis: (i) average nuclear doses are very similar in all three cases (minor differences can be attributed to differences in the linear energy transfer (LET) spectra) and (ii) dose distributions are significantly different in all three cases, with the highest doses at the carinal ridge in case 3. (authors)

  3. Tips for Daily Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tips and Gadgets for Daily Activities Dressing Tips Shopping Tips Modifying the Bathroom Driving After Stroke Medication ... and resources. Find a group in your area . Online Support If there is not a support group ...

  4. Effectiveness of stress release geometries on reducing residual stress in electroforming metal microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chang; Du, Liqun; Zhao, Wenjun; Zhu, Heqing; Zhao, Wen; Wang, Weitai

    2018-04-01

    Micro electroforming, as a mature micromachining technology, is widely used to fabricate metal microdevices in micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS). However, large residual stress in the local positions of the micro electroforming layer often leads to non-uniform residual stress distributions, dimension accuracy defects and reliability issues during fabrication of the metal microdevice. To solve this problem, a novel design method of presetting stress release geometries in the topological structure of the metal microstructure is proposed in this paper. First, the effect of stress release geometries (circular shape, annular groove shape and rivet shape) on the residual stress in the metal microstructure was investigated by finite element modeling (FEM) analysis. Two evaluation parameters, stress concentration factor K T and stress non-uniformity factor δ were calculated. The simulation results show that presetting stress release geometries can effectively reduce and homogenize the residual stress in the metal microstructures were measured metal microstructure. By combined use with stress release geometries of annular groove shape and rivet shape, the stress concentration factor K T and the stress non-uniformity factor δ both decreased at a maximum of 49% and 53%, respectively. Meanwhile, the average residual stress σ avg decreased at a maximum of 20% from  -292.4 MPa to  -232.6 MPa. Then, micro electroforming experiments were carried out corresponding to the simulation models. The residual stresses in the metal microstructures were measured by micro Raman spectroscopy (MRS) method. The results of the experiment proved that the stress non-uniformity factor δ and the average residual stress σ avg also decreased at a maximum with the combination use of annular groove shape and rivet shape stress release geometries, which is in agreement with the results of FEM analysis. The stress non-uniformity factor δ has a maximum decrease of 49% and the

  5. Resilience, tipping, and hydra effects in public health: emergent collective behavior in two agent-based models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Robert Keane

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Collective health behavior often demonstrates counter-intuitive dynamics, sometimes resisting interventions designed to produce change, or even producing effects that are in the opposite direction than intended by the intervention, e.g. lowering infectivity resulting in increased infections. At other times collective health behavior exhibits sudden large-scale change in response to small interventions or change in the environment, a phenomenon often called “tipping.” I hypothesize that these seemingly very different phenomena can all be explained by the same dynamic, a type of collective resilience. Methods I compared two simple agent-based models of interactions in networks: a public health behavior game, in which individuals decide whether or not to adopt protective behavior, and a microbial-level game, in which three different strains of bacteria attack each other. I examined the type of networks and other conditions that support a dynamic balance, and determined what changes of conditions will tip the balance. Results Both models show lasting dynamic equilibrium and resilience, resulting from negative feedback that supports oscillating coexistence of diversity under a range of conditions. In the public health game, health protection is followed by free-riding defectors, followed by a rise in infection, in long-lasting cycles. In the microbial game, each of three strains takes turns dominating. In both games, the dynamic balance is tipped by lowering the level of local clustering, changing the level of benefit, or lowering infectivity or attack rate. Lowering infectivity has the surprising effect of increasing the numbers of infected individuals. We see parallel results in the microbial game of three bacterial strains, where lowering one strain’s attack rate (analogous to lowering infectivity increases the numbers of the restrained attacker, a phenomenon captured by the phrase, “the enemy of my enemy is my friend

  6. The effects of geometry and fiber bundle orientation on the finite element modeling of the anterior cruciate ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wu, Changfu; Jiang, Guotai; Woo, Savio L-Y

    2008-01-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has irregular geometry and spirally oriented fiber bundle organization, which are closely related to its physiological function. In previous finite element (FE) models, however, these two features are neglected due to the difficulty of obtaining its complex geometry and spiral fiber bundle orientation. Based on a previously developed and validated FE model, this study performed parametric studies to evaluate the effects of geometry and fiber bundle orientation on the FE modeling of the ACL. To evaluate the effect of the geometry, two models were compared: 1) with realistic ACL geometry obtained by using digitizer; 2) with ACL geometry reconstructed by directly connecting the femur and tibia insertion sites as commonly used in previous studies. To evaluate the effect of fiber bundle orientation, another two models were compared: 1) with realistic fiber bundle orientation obtained by using digitizer (alpha=38 degrees ); 2) with unrealistic fiber bundle orientation (alpha=0 degrees ). The same kinematics obtained by a Robotic/Universal Force-moment Sensor (UFS) system was input into the models as boundary conditions. The resultant forces calculated by the models were compared to the experimental data. The model with unrealistic geometry had a 40% higher ACL resultant force compared to the experimental data, while the model with the realistic ACL geometry well predicted the ACL resultant force, with an error less than 10%. When evaluating the effect of fiber bundle orientation, the model with unrealistic fiber bundle orientation predicted similar ACL resultant forces and stress distribution as the model with realistic fiber bundle orientation. The results revealed that ACL geometry has a significant effect on the FE model while fiber orientation does not.

  7. Nanobits - exchangable and customisable scanning probe tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yildiz, Izzet

    Invention of atomic force microscopy (AFM) pioneered a novel aspect for the surface metrology concept. A range of scanning probe methods have been developed over the years based on different sorts of tip-surface interaction: electrical, optical, thermal, force. Reproducible and fast fabrication...... miniaturisation requires the scanning probes to adapt into finer geometries to provide higher lateral resolution. To meet these needs critical dimension AFM (CD-AFM) and deep trench AFM (DT-AFM) were invented, which use different types of AFM tips: high-aspect-ratio tips for DT-AFM and CD tips for CD...... replacement could greatly increase the efficiency and adaptability of a CD system. In this PhD study, NanoBits – nano-sized customisable and exchangeable scanning probe tips – were developed to meet the demands of current AFM applications. Two different methods were followed for the fabrication of Nano...

  8. Modeling the effects of friction and geometry on deformation path during hot rolling of aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korzekwa, D.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Div.; Beaudoin, A.J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1998-12-31

    In this work, a parametric study of hot rolling is conducted. The effect of friction model, friction coefficient, roll gap geometry and temperature on the deformation rate field is demonstrated. This parameter space is restricted to a region which is tractable, yet provides considerable variety in the features of non-uniform deformation developed in rolling. The degree and nature of redundant work (shearing) is contrasted for different stream-line locations within the bite. Recommendations for the application of material models in analysis of rolling is made with consideration of the simulation predictions.

  9. Effect of external jet-flow deflector geometry on OTW aero-acoustic characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonglahn, U.; Groesbeck, D.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of geometry variations in the design of external deflectors for use with over-the-wing (OTW) configurations was studied at model scale and subsonic jet velocities. Included in the variations were deflector size and angle as well as wing size and flap setting. A conical nozzle (5.2-cm diameter) mounted at 0.1 chord above and downstream of the wing leading edges was used. The data indicate that external deflectors provide satisfactory takeoff and approach aerodynamic performance and acoustic characteristics for OTW configurations. These characteristics together with expected good cruise aerodynamics, since external deflectors are storable, may provide optimum OTW design configurations.

  10. Effect of cosine current approximation in lattice cell calculations in cylindrical geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanakrishnan, P.

    1978-01-01

    It is found that one-dimensional cylindrical geometry reactor lattice cell calculations using cosine angular current approximation at spatial mesh interfaces give results surprisingly close to the results of accurate neutron transport calculations as well as experimental measurements. This is especially true for tight light water moderated lattices. Reasons for this close agreement are investigated here. By re-examining the effects of reflective and white cell boundary conditions in these calculations it is concluded that one major reason is the use of white boundary condition necessitated by the approximation of the two-dimensional reactor lattice cell by a one-dimensional one. (orig.) [de

  11. Hybrid RHF/MP2 geometry optimizations with the effective fragment molecular orbital method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders Steen; Svendsen, Casper Steinmann; Fedorov, Dmitri G

    2014-01-01

    The frozen domain effective fragment molecular orbital method is extended to allow for the treatment of a single fragment at the MP2 level of theory. The approach is applied to the conversion of chorismate to prephenate by Chorismate Mutase, where the substrate is treated at the MP2 level of theory...... while the rest of the system is treated at the RHF level. MP2 geometry optimization is found to lower the barrier by up to 3.5 kcal/mol compared to RHF optimzations and ONIOM energy refinement and leads to a smoother convergence with respect to the basis set for the reaction profile. For double zeta...

  12. Algebraic Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Holme, Audun

    1988-01-01

    This volume presents selected papers resulting from the meeting at Sundance on enumerative algebraic geometry. The papers are original research articles and concentrate on the underlying geometry of the subject.

  13. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of an effect than open surgical bypass on future liver transplantation surgery because the abdomen has not ... TIPS. top of page Additional Information and Resources Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) - Patient Center This page ...

  14. Twistor geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to give a detailed exposition of the relation between the geometry of twistor space and the geometry of Minkowski space. The paper has a didactical purpose; no use has been made of differential geometry and cohomology.

  15. Mini-flared Kelman tip, reverse tip, and sidewinder tip with torsional phaco: a prospective randomized comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Takashi Hida

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare the efficiency of surgical procedures using three phaco tip designs in torsional phacoemulsification using the bevel-down technique. Methods: In this prospective, comparative, masked study, patients were randomly assigned to have torsional coaxial microincision cataract surgery using the mini-flared 45-degree Kelman tip, reversed mini-flared 30-degree Kelman tip, or Sidewinder 30-degree Kelman tip. Clinical measurements included preoperative and 3-month postoperative corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA, endothelial cell counts (ECC, and preoperative and 1-day postoperative central corneal thickness (CCT. Intraoperative measurements included phaco time, torsional time, aspiration time, case time, cumulative dissipated energy (CDE, and balanced salt solution volume (BSS. Results: The study evaluated 150 eyes of 150 patients. Intraoperatively, there was no statistically significant difference in cumulative dissipated energy, case time, torsional time, and aspiration time between the three tip configurations. However, less phaco time was used with the mini-flared 45-degree Kelman tip (p=0.02 than that with the Sidewinder 30-degree Kelman tip or reversed mini-flared 30-degree Kelman tip. The mini-flared 45-degree Kelman tip and the reversed mini-flared 30-degree Kelman tip required significantly less balanced salt solution volume than that required by the Sidewinder 30-degree Kelman tip (p=0.009. There was no statistically significant difference in corrected distance visual acuity and endothelial cell counts between tips 3 months postoperatively (p>0.05. Conclusion: All three tips were effective with no intraoperative complications. When using torsional phacoemulsification through microincisions and the prefracture technique with the bevel-down technique, the mini-flared 45-degree Kelman tip required a lower mean phaco time than the reversed mini-flared 30-degree Kelman tip and the Sidewinder 30-degree Kelman tip.

  16. Effect of inserted metal at anode tip on formation of pulsed X-ray emitting zone of plasma focus device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miremad, Seyed Milad; Shirani Bidabadi, Babak

    2018-04-01

    The effect of the anode's insert material of a plasma focus device on the properties of X-ray emission zone was studied. Inserts were fabricated out of six different materials including aluminum, copper, zinc, tin, tungsten, and lead to cover a wide range of atomic numbers. For each anode's insert material at different gas pressures and different voltages, the shape of X-ray emission zone was recorded by three pinhole cameras, which were installed on sidewall and roof of the chamber of plasma focus device. The results indicated that by changing the gas pressure and the charge voltage of capacitor, the X-ray source of plasma focus emerges with different forms as a concentrated column or conical shape with sharp or cloudy edges. These structures are in the form of a combination of plasma emission and anode-tip emission with different intensities. These observations indicate that the material of the anode-tip especially affects the structure of X-ray emission zone.

  17. Effects of piston speed, compression ratio and cylinder geometry on system performance of a liquid piston

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutlu Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy storage systems are being more important to compensate irregularities of renewable energy sources and yields more profitable to invest. Compressed air energy storage (CAES systems provide sufficient of system usability, then large scale plants are found around the world. The compression process is the most critical part of these systems and different designs must be developed to improve efficiency such as liquid piston. In this study, a liquid piston is analyzed with CFD tools to look into the effect of piston speed, compression ratio and cylinder geometry on compression efficiency and required work. It is found that, increasing piston speeds do not affect the piston work but efficiency decreases. Piston work remains constant at higher than 0.05 m/s piston speeds but the efficiency decreases from 90.9 % to 74.6 %. Using variable piston speeds has not a significant improvement on the system performance. It is seen that, the effect of compression ratio is increasing with high piston speeds. The required power, when the compression ratio is 80, is 2.39 times greater than the power when the compression ratio is 5 at 0.01 m/s piston speed and 2.87 times greater at 0.15 m/s. Cylinder geometry is also very important because, efficiency, power and work alter by L/D, D and cylinder volume respectively.

  18. The effect of PSF spatial-variance and nonlinear transducer geometry on motion estimation from echocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Vahid; Amini, Amir A.

    2011-03-01

    Two-dimensional echocardiography continues to be the most widely used modality for the assessment of cardiac function due to its effectiveness, ease of use, and low costs. Echocardiographic images are derived from the mechanical interaction between the ultrasound field and the contractile heart tissue. Previously, in [6], based on B-mode echocardiographic simulations, we showed that motion estimation errors are significantly higher in shift-varying simulations when compared to shift-invariant simulations. In order to ascertain the effect of the spatial variance of the Ultrasonic field point spread function (PSF) and the transducer geometry on motion estimation, in the current paper, several simple canonical cardiac motions such as translation in axial and horizontal direction, and out-of-plane motion were simulated and the motion estimation errors were calculated. For axial motions, the greatest angular errors occurred within the lateral regions of the image, irrespective of the motion estimation technique that was adopted. We hypothesize that the transducer geometry and the PSF spatial-variance were the underlying sources of error for the motion estimation methods. No similar conclusions could be made regarding motion estimation errors for azimuthal and out-of-plane ultrasound simulations.

  19. Effect of Fractal Geometry on the Energy Balance at the Ground Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, S.; Iizawa, I.; Onishi, M.; Nakamura, M.; Kobayashi, K.; Mitsunaga, M.; Furuya, K.

    2008-12-01

    The surfaces of the urban areas are covered by large flat surfaces such as roads and walls of buildings while those of the rural areas are covered by many plants which have fractal structures. This difference in the surface geometry has great impact on the energy balance at the ground surface. A small leaf has large thermal conductivity to the surrounding air flow comparing with a anthropogenic large flat surface in an urban area even when the transpiration effect is ignored. For a cluster of many small leaves, the conductivity can be reduced by the interference, but trees have a structure to minimize its effect. We have conducted 3-dimensional laser measurements and analyzed their fractal dimensions. The analysis revealed that the trees have a fractal dimension of 2 although they are spread in a 3-dimensional space. Mathematically speaking, it means that the trees have 2-dimensional areas but do not have volume, in the limit of infinite self similarity. This geometry is favorable to absorb the sunlight using 2-dimensional area with minimum interruption of the 3-dimensional air flow. Being motivated by the results above, we have constructed a fractal sun roof consists of Sierpinski"fs tetrahedrons which have fractal dimension of 2. The roof covers an area of 100m2. The result shows that the surface temperature of the fractal roof is lower than the large flat surface with same material by more than 10 degrees.

  20. Effect of conductor geometry on source localization: Implications for epilepsy studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlitt, H.; Heller, L.; Best, E.; Ranken, D.; Aaron, R.

    1994-01-01

    We shall discuss the effects of conductor geometry on source localization for applications in epilepsy studies. The most popular conductor model for clinical MEG studies is a homogeneous sphere. However, several studies have indicated that a sphere is a poor model for the head when the sources are deep, as is the case for epileptic foci in the mesial temporal lobe. We believe that replacing the spherical model with a more realistic one in the inverse fitting procedure will improve the accuracy of localizing epileptic sources. In order to include a realistic head model in the inverse problem, we must first solve the forward problem for the realistic conductor geometry. We create a conductor geometry model from MR images, and then solve the forward problem via a boundary integral equation for the electric potential due to a specified primary source. One the electric potential is known, the magnetic field can be calculated directly. The most time-intensive part of the problem is generating the conductor model; fortunately, this needs to be done only once for each patient. It takes little time to change the primary current and calculate a new magnetic field for use in the inverse fitting procedure. We present the results of a series of computer simulations in which we investigate the localization accuracy due to replacing the spherical model with the realistic head model in the inverse fitting procedure. The data to be fit consist of a computer generated magnetic field due to a known current dipole in a realistic head model, with added noise. We compare the localization errors when this field is fit using a spherical model to the fit using a realistic head model. Using a spherical model is comparable to what is usually done when localizing epileptic sources in humans, where the conductor model used in the inverse fitting procedure does not correspond to the actual head

  1. Effect of conductor geometry on source localization: Implications for epilepsy studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlitt, H.; Heller, L.; Best, E.; Ranken, D.; Aaron, R.

    1994-07-01

    We shall discuss the effects of conductor geometry on source localization for applications in epilepsy studies. The most popular conductor model for clinical MEG studies is a homogeneous sphere. However, several studies have indicated that a sphere is a poor model for the head when the sources are deep, as is the case for epileptic foci in the mesial temporal lobe. We believe that replacing the spherical model with a more realistic one in the inverse fitting procedure will improve the accuracy of localizing epileptic sources. In order to include a realistic head model in the inverse problem, we must first solve the forward problem for the realistic conductor geometry. We create a conductor geometry model from MR images, and then solve the forward problem via a boundary integral equation for the electric potential due to a specified primary source. One the electric potential is known, the magnetic field can be calculated directly. The most time-intensive part of the problem is generating the conductor model; fortunately, this needs to be done only once for each patient. It takes little time to change the primary current and calculate a new magnetic field for use in the inverse fitting procedure. We present the results of a series of computer simulations in which we investigate the localization accuracy due to replacing the spherical model with the realistic head model in the inverse fitting procedure. The data to be fit consist of a computer generated magnetic field due to a known current dipole in a realistic head model, with added noise. We compare the localization errors when this field is fit using a spherical model to the fit using a realistic head model. Using a spherical model is comparable to what is usually done when localizing epileptic sources in humans, where the conductor model used in the inverse fitting procedure does not correspond to the actual head.

  2. Geometry effect of isolated roughness on boundary layer transition investigated by tomographic PIV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Qingqing; Schrijer, Ferry F.J.; Scarano, Fulvio

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The transition of boundary layer induced by isolated roughness elements is analyzed by using tomographic PIV. • Roughness geometry greatly modifies the wake flow topology and the evolution process towards transition. • The bluff front elements induce a horseshoe vortex, leading to more rapid transition than the slender micro-ramp. • The lateral spreading of the turbulent wedge is caused by a destabilizing mechanism involving convection and regeneration of hairpin vortices at the turbulent-non-turbulent interface. - Abstract: Boundary layer transition over isolated roughness elements is investigated in the incompressible flow regime using tomographic PIV. Four different geometries (cylinder, square, hemisphere and micro-ramp) are considered maintaining constant height and span of the element. The main target is to compare the different flow topologies and study the effect of the element shape on accelerating boundary layer transition. The measurement domain encompasses the full transition process until the turbulent regime is established. The flow behavior is described by means of vortex topology and by statistical analysis of the velocity fluctuations. The instantaneous flow topology elucidates the mechanism of transition along its stages. A main distinction is observed between the bluff front elements that induce a horseshoe vortex due to upstream flow separation, leading to more rapid transition and the slender micro-ramp. The later geometry requires significant longer distance for transition onset. The mechanism of sideward propagation of the turbulent non-turbulent interface features a continuous convection and generation of hairpin-like vortices and remains the common denominator among all elements considered.

  3. Investigating pyroclast ejection dynamics using shock-tube experiments: temperature, grain size and vent geometry effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigala, V.; Kueppers, U.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions eject large quantities of gas and particles into the atmosphere. The portion directly above the vent commonly shows characteristics of underexpanded jets. Understanding the factors that influence the initial pyroclast ejection dynamics is necessary in order to better assess the resulting near- and far-field hazards. Field observations are often insufficient for the characterization of volcanic explosions due to lack of safe access to such environments. Fortunately, their dynamics can be simulated in the laboratory where experiments are performed under controlled conditions. We ejected loose natural particles from a shock-tube while controlling temperature (25˚ and 500˚C), overpressure (15MPa), starting grain size distribution (1-2 mm, 0.5-1 mm and 0.125-0.250 mm), sample-to-vent distance and vent geometry. For each explosion we quantified the velocity of individual particles, the jet spreading angle and the production of fines. Further, we varied the setup to allow for different sample-to-gas ratios and deployed four different vent geometries: 1) cylindrical, 2) funnel with a flaring of 30˚, 3) funnel with a flaring of 15˚ and 4) nozzle. The results showed maximum particle velocities up to 296 m/s, gas spreading angles varying from 21˚ to 37˚ and particle spreading angles from 3˚ to 40˚. Moreover we observed dynamically evolving ejection characteristics and variations in the production of fines during the course of individual experiments. Our experiments mechanistically mimic the process of pyroclast ejection. Thus the capability for constraining the effects of input parameters (fragmentation conditions) and conduit/vent geometry on ballistic pyroclastic plumes has been clearly established. These data obtained in the presence of well-documented conduit and vent conditions, should greatly enhance our ability to numerically model explosive ejecta in nature.

  4. Effect of Impeller Geometry on Lift-Off Characteristics and Rotational Attitude in a Monopivot Centrifugal Blood Pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Masahiro; Nakayama, Kento; Sakota, Daisuke; Kosaka, Ryo; Maruyama, Osamu; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Kuwana, Katsuyuki; Yamane, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    The effect of the flow path geometry of the impeller on the lift-off and tilt of the rotational axis of the impeller against the hydrodynamic force was investigated in a centrifugal blood pump with an impeller supported by a single-contact pivot bearing. Four types of impeller were compared: the FR model with the flow path having both front and rear cutouts on the tip, the F model with the flow path having only a front cutout, the R model with only a rear cutout, and the N model with a straight flow path. First, the axial thrust and the movement about the pivot point, which was loaded on the surface of the impeller, were calculated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Next, the lift-off point and the tilt of the rotational axis of the impeller were measured experimentally. The CFD analysis showed that the axial thrust increased gently in the FR and R models as the flow rate increased, whereas it increased drastically in the F and N models. This difference in axial thrust was likely from the higher pressure caused by the smaller circumferential velocity in the gap between the top surface of the impeller and the casing in the FR and R models than in the F and N models, which was caused by the rear cutout. These results corresponded with the experimental results showing that the impellers lifted off in the F and N models as the flow rate increased, whereas it did not in the FR and R models. Conversely, the movement about the pivot point increased in the direction opposite the side with the pump outlet as the flow rate increased. However, the tilt of the rotational axis of the impeller, which oriented away from the pump outlet, was less than 0.8° in any model under any conditions, and was considered to negligibly affect the rotational attitude of the impeller. These results confirm that a rear cutout prevents lift-off of the impeller caused by a decrease in the axial thrust. © 2016 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley

  5. Effect of Pin Geometry on the Mechanical Strength of Friction-Stir-Welded Polypropylene Composite Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordestani, F.; Ashenai Ghasemi, F.; Arab, N. B. M.

    2017-09-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid-state welding process, which has successfully been applied in aerospace and automotive industries for joining materials. The friction stir tool is the key element in the FSW process. In this study, the effect of four different tool pin geometries on the mechanical properties of two types of polypropylene composite plates, with 30% glass and carbon fiber, respectively, were investigated. For this purpose, four pins of different geometry, namely, a threaded-tapered pin, square pin, four-flute threaded pin, and threaded-tapered pin with a chamfer were made and used to carry out the butt welding of 5-mm-thick plates. The standard tensile and Izod impact tests were performed to evaluate the tensile strength and impact toughness of welded specimens. The results indicated that the threaded-tapered pin with a chamfer produced welds with a better surface appearance and higher tensile and impact strengths. The tests also showed that, with the threaded-tapered pin with a chamfer, the impact strength of the glass- and carbon-fiber composite welds were about 40 and 50%, respectively, of that of the base materials.

  6. Effect of ablation geometry on the dynamics, composition, and geometrical shape of thin film plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Alamgir; Singh, R. K.; Kumar, Ajai

    2018-01-01

    The characteristics of plasma plume produced by front and back ablation of thin films have been investigated using fast imaging and optical emission spectroscopy. Ablation geometry dependence of the plume dynamics, its geometrical aspect and composition is emphasized. Also, the effect of an ambient environment and the beam diameter of an ablating laser on the front and back ablations is briefly discussed. Analysis of time resolved images and plasma parameters indicates that the energetic and spherical plasma formed by front ablation is strikingly different in comparison to the slow and nearly cylindrical plasma plume observed in the case of back ablation. Further shock formation, plume confinement, thermalization and validity of different expansion models in these two ablation geometries are also presented. The present study demonstrates the manipulation of kinetic energy, shape, ion/neutral compositions and directionality of the expanding plume by adjusting the experimental configuration, which is highly relevant to its utilization in various applications e.g., generation of energetic particles, tokamak edge plasma diagnostics, thin film deposition, etc.

  7. Numerical Investigation of the Effect of Radial Lip Seal Geometry on Sealing Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tok, G.; Parlar, Z.; Temiz, V.

    2018-01-01

    Sealing elements are often needed in industry and especially in machine design. With the change and development of machine technology from day to day, sealing elements show continuous development and change in parallel with these developments. Many factors influence the performance of the sealing elements such as shaft surface roughness, radial force, lip geometry etc. In addition, the radial lip seals must have a certain pre-load and interference in order to provide a good sealing. This also affects the friction torque. Researchers are developing new seal designs to reduce friction losses in mechanical systems. In the presented study, the effect of the lip seal geometry on sealing performance will be examined numerically. The numerical model created for this purpose will be verified with experimental data firstly. In the numerical model, shaft and seal will be modeled as hyper-elastic in 2D and 3D. NBR (Nitrile Butadiene Rubber) as seal material will be analyzed for the rotating shaft state at constant speed by applying a uniform radial force.

  8. Edge geometry effects on resonance response of electroplated cylindrical Ni/PZT/Ni magnetoelectric composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav Yakubov

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Trilayer Ni/PZT/Ni cylindrical magnetoelectric (ME composites were prepared by electrodeposition, a process, which creates sub-millimeter raised edges due to current concentration near sharp points. The ME response in both axial and vertical modes was measured with the edges, with only outer edges removed, and with both outer and inner edges removed. The ME voltage coefficient improved at resonance by 40% and 147% without the edges in the vertical and axial modes, respectively. The observed improvements in three different samples were only present at the ME resonance and no changes were detected outside of the ME resonance. Mechanical quality factor at resonance also improved with no effect on the resonant frequency. Experimentally demonstrated minor geometry changes resulted in substantial ME improvement at resonant frequency. This study demonstrates device performance optimization. The observed effects have been attributed to improved vibrations in terms of decreased damping coefficient and enhanced vibration amplitude at resonance.

  9. Carbon nanotube field-effect devices with asymmetric electrode configuration by contact geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yotprayoonsak, P.; Talukdar, D.; Ahlskog, M.

    2014-06-01

    We have studied experimentally the conductive properties of single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) based field-effect type devices, with different contact geometries at the connecting electrode. The device designs are asymmetric with one end of the SWNT having the metal electrode deposited on top and immersing it, while at the other end, the SWNT is on top of the electrode. The devices were made with either gold or palladium as electrode materials, of which the latter resulted in different behavior of the different contact types. This is argued to be caused by the existence of a thin insulating layer of surface adsorbents on the palladium, possibly Pd5O4, the effect of which is enhanced by the 1D nature of the contact area in the configuration with SWNT on top of electrode.

  10. Analysis of tightening process of bolted joint with tensioner. Effects of incorrect geometry at contact surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuoka, Toshimichi

    1996-01-01

    In tightening critical structural members such as pressure vessels of nuclear reactors and chemical plants and important parts of diesel engines, a hydraulic tensioner is widely used because of its high accuracy in controlling clamping force. The ratio of the desired clamping force to initial tension, which is termed the effective tensile coefficient, is the most important factor to be predicted in the actual operation of given joint configurations. It is reported, however, that a certain amount of scatter in clamping force cannot be avoided. In this paper, an elementary approach to analyze the tightening process is proposed using spring elements, where the effects of incorrect geometry at contact surface on the coefficient are taken into account. The influences of pitch error and flatness deviation at the nut-loaded surface are discussed. Finally, a simple equation for estimating the coefficient is presented, where the major factors influencing scatter in clamping force are considered. (author)

  11. Effect of In Situ Annealing Treatment on the Mobility and Morphology of TIPS-Pentacene-Based Organic Field-Effect Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fuqiang; Wang, Xiaolin; Fan, Huidong; Tang, Ying; Yang, Jianjun; Yu, Junsheng

    2017-08-01

    In this work, organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) with a bottom gate top contact structure were fabricated by using a spray-coating method, and the influence of in situ annealing treatment on the OFET performance was investigated. Compared to the conventional post-annealing method, the field-effect mobility of OFET with 60 °C in situ annealing treatment was enhanced nearly four times from 0.056 to 0.191 cm2/Vs. The surface morphologies and the crystallization of TIPS-pentacene films were characterized by optical microscope, atomic force microscope, and X-ray diffraction. We found that the increased mobility was mainly attributed to the improved crystallization and highly ordered TIPS-pentacene molecules.

  12. Effect of residual stress on crack-tip for fatigue crack propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung Mo

    1995-02-01

    Fatigue tests were performed in cyclic loading at 10Hz and stress ratios, R of 0.1 and 0.2 at room temperature. The type 304 stainless steel specimens are prepared into two different thickness (3mm and 25mm). The fatigue crack growth rate of 25mm thick specimen is faster than that of 3mm thick specimen, and this result is attributed to the difference of plasticity in the crack tip region from the elastic-plastic fracture mechanical analysis. The residual stress fields are induced by the surface hardening treatments by induction heating at temperatures of ∼600 .deg. C, 750 .deg. C and 900 .deg. C, and the induced residual stresses are verified by the X-ray measurements of the induction heating treated specimen at 750 .deg. C. It is observed that the tensile residual stress is formed at heat affected zone and, behind this zone, the compressive residual stress is formed with maximum value of ∼200 MPa. The results of fatigue tests showed the acceleration of the growth rate in tensile region, and the retardation in compressive region. The results of constant stress intensity tests illustrated that the variations of the crack growth rate are related with the change of crack closure level. A simple model for fatigue crack propagation of materials is derived with energy balance approach on the basis of the Dugdale model, and this model is verified through the experiments of two kinds of materials (type 304 stainless steel and Inconel 718). The energy balance model demonstrated that the variations of material's tearing modulus results in the change of fatigue crack propagation

  13. The effect of creep damage formulation on crack tip fields, creep stress intensity factor and crack growth assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Shlyannikov

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Fields of stress, strain rate and process zone of a mode I creep crack growth are analyzed by employing damage evolution equations. Damage models for fracture of process zone represented by stress based formulation. Two expressions are presented to describe the stress-sensitive nature of multiaxial rupture behavior. Both damage free and defective creeping solids have been studied. The variation of creep stress and the crack-tip governing parameter in the form of creep In-integral with time and the evolution of creep damage were analyzed by using the FE-model. The effect of the introduced creep stress intensity factor as a function of creep time through the continuum damage mechanics of the creep crack growth are discussed in detail.

  14. Molecular geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Rodger, Alison

    1995-01-01

    Molecular Geometry discusses topics relevant to the arrangement of atoms. The book is comprised of seven chapters that tackle several areas of molecular geometry. Chapter 1 reviews the definition and determination of molecular geometry, while Chapter 2 discusses the unified view of stereochemistry and stereochemical changes. Chapter 3 covers the geometry of molecules of second row atoms, and Chapter 4 deals with the main group elements beyond the second row. The book also talks about the complexes of transition metals and f-block elements, and then covers the organometallic compounds and trans

  15. Calibration of magnetic force microscopy tips by using nanoscale current-carrying parallel wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kebe, Th.; Carl, A.

    2004-01-01

    Experimental results on the characterization of commercially available magnetic force microscopy (MFM) thin film tips as a function of an external magnetic field are presented. Magnetic stray fields with a definitive z-component (perpendicular to the substrate) and a magnetic field strength of up to H z =±45 Oe are produced with current carrying parallel nanowires with a thickness of t=60 nm, which are fabricated by electron-beam lithography. The magnetic fields are generated by electrical dc-currents of up to ±6 mA which are directed antiparallel through the nanowires. The geometry and the dimensions of the nanowires are systematically varied by choosing different wire widths w as well as separations b between the parallel wires for two different sets of samples. On the one hand, the wire width w is varied within 380 nm< w<2460 nm while the separation b≅450 nm between the wires is kept constant. On the other hand the separation b between the parallel wires is varied within 120 nm< b<5100 nm, while the wire width w=960 nm is kept constant. For all the geometrical configurations of parallel wires the resulting magnetic contrast is imaged by MFM at various tip lift-heights. By treating the MFM tip as a point probe, the analysis of the image contrast as a function of both the magnetic field strength and the tip lift height allows one to quantitatively determine the effective magnetic dipole and monopole moments of the tip as well as their imaginary locations within the real physical tip. Our systematic study quantitatively relates the above point-probe parameters to (i) the dimensions of the parallel wires and (ii) to the characteristic decay length of the z-component of the magnetic field of parallel wires. From this the effective tip-volume of the real thin film tip is determined which is relevant in MFM-imaging. Our results confirm the reliability of earlier tip calibration schemes for which nanofabricated current carrying rings were used instead of parallel

  16. NMR Study of Solvation Effect on Geometry of Proton-Bound Homodimers of Increasing Size

    KAUST Repository

    Gurinov, Andrei A.

    2017-10-24

    Hydrogen bond geometries in the proton-bound homodimers of quinoline and acridine derivatives in an aprotic polar solution have been experimentally studied using 1H NMR at 120 K. The reported results show that increase of the dielec-tric permittivity of the medium results in contraction of the N…N distance. The degree of contraction depends on the homodimer\\'s size and its substituent-specific solvation features. Neither of these effects can be reproduced using conven-tional implicit solvent models employed in computational studies. In general, the N…N distance in the homodimers of pyridine, quinoline, and acridine derivatives decreases in the sequence gas phase > solid state > polar solvent.

  17. Effect of static mixer geometry on flow mixing and pressure drop in marine scr applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Taewha

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Flow mixing and pressure drop characteristics for marine selective catalytic reduction applications were investigated numerically to develop an efficient static mixer. Two different mixers, line- and swirl-type, were considered. The effect of vane angles on the relative intensity, uniformity index, and pressure drop was investigated in a swirl-type mixer; these parameters are dramatically affected by the mixer geometry. The presence of a mixer, regardless of the mixer type, led to an improvement of approximately 20% in the mixing performance behind the mixer in comparison to not having a mixer. In particular, there was a tradeoff relationship between the uniformity and the pressure drop. Con­sidering the mixing performance and the pressure drop, the swirl-type mixer was more suitable than the line-type mixer in this study.

  18. Effect of static mixer geometry on flow mixing and pressure drop in marine scr applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Taewha; Sung, Yonmo; Kim, Taekyung; Lee, Inwon; Choi, Gyungmin; Kim, Duckjool

    2014-03-01

    Flow mixing and pressure drop characteristics for marine selective catalytic reduction applications were investigated numerically to develop an efficient static mixer. Two different mixers, line- and swirl-type, were considered. The effect of vane angles on the relative intensity, uniformity index, and pressure drop was investigated in a swirl-type mixer; these parameters are dramatically affected by the mixer geometry. The presence of a mixer, regardless of the mixer type, led to an improvement of approximately 20% in the mixing performance behind the mixer in comparison to not having a mixer. In particular, there was a tradeoff relationship between the uniformity and the pressure drop. Con­sidering the mixing performance and the pressure drop, the swirl-type mixer was more suitable than the line-type mixer in this study.

  19. Effect of static mixer geometry on flow mixing and pressure drop in marine SCR applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taewha Park

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Flow mixing and pressure drop characteristics for marine selective catalytic reduction applications were investigated numerically to develop an efficient static mixer. Two different mixers, line- and swirl-type, were considered. The effect of vane angles on the relative intensity, uniformity index, and pressure drop was investigated in a swirl-type mixer; these parameters are dramatically affected by the mixer geometry. The presence of a mixer, regardless of the mixer type, led to an improvement of approximately 20% in the mixing performance behind the mixer in comparison to not having a mixer. In particular, there was a tradeoff relationship between the uniformity and the pressure drop. Considering the mixing performance and the pressure drop, the swirl-type mixer was more suitable than the line-type mixer in this study.

  20. The Effects of Segmentation and Spatial Geometry on the Tilt Illusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Qiu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In the tilt illusion, when the orientation of the center and surround gratings differ by a small angle, the center grating appears to tilt away from the surround orientation (repulsion; however, for a large difference in angle, the center appears to tilt towards the surround orientation (attraction. Orientation perception therefore depends strongly on the context. Changes in two-dimensional configuration or three-dimensional scene geometry may alter the segmentation features between the center and surround, and cause variations in central orientation perception. We first measured the effect of two sources of segmentation information, contrast, and stereo disparity differences, on the strength of the tilt illusion in human observers. We observed: when the center contrast was high, both low-contrast surround and stereo depth segmentation cues reduced the amplitude of both the repulsion and attraction effect, relative to a high-contrast, 2D surround; a higher surround contrast (70% relative to the center (10% decreased the repulsion effect but increased both the range and magnitude of the attraction effect. Next, we examined the effect of perceptual grouping behind a 3D occluder ring between the center and surround on perceived central orientation. We observed significantly stronger tilt repulsion effects across occlusion than the condition with a ring at the same plane as the center and surround. We also found that the tilt repulsion is selective for the peripheral location of the surround. These results suggest that scene organization plays a role in central orientation perception.

  1. Effects of the inlet boundary layer thickness on the flow in an axial compressor (I) : hub corner stall and tip leakage flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Min Suk; Baek, Je Hyun; Park, Jun Young

    2005-01-01

    A three-dimensional computation was conducted to understand effects of the inlet boundary layer thickness on the internal flow in a low-speed axial compressor operating at the design condition(φ=85%) and near stall condition(φ=65%). At the design condition, the flows in the axial compressor show, independent of the inlet boundary layer thickness, similar characteristics such as the pressure distribution, size of the hub corner-stall, tip leakage flow trajectory, limiting streamlines on the blade suction surface, etc. However, as the load is increased, the hub corner-stall grows to make a large separation region at the junction of the hub and suction surface for the inlet condition with thick boundary layers at the hub and casing. Moreover, the tip leakage flow is more vortical than that observed in case of the thin inlet boundary layer and has the critical point where the trajectory of the tip leakage flow is abruptly turned into the downstream. For the inlet condition with thin boundary layers, the hub corner-stall is diminished so it is indistinguishable from the wake. The tip leakage flow leans to the leading edge more than at the design condition but has no critical point. In addition to these, the severe reverse flow, induced by both boundary layer on the blade surface and the tip leakage flow, can be found to act as the blockage of flows near the casing, resulting in heavy loss

  2. Numerical investigation of injector geometry effects on fuel stratification in a GCI engine

    KAUST Repository

    Atef, Nour

    2017-11-24

    Injectors play an important role in direct injection (DI) gasoline compression ignition (GCI) engines by affecting the in-cylinder mixture formation and stratification, which in turn impacts combustion and emissions. In this work, the effects of two different injector geometries, a 7-hole solid-cone injector and an outwardly opening hollow-cone injector, on fuel mixture stratification in a GCI engine were investigated by computational simulations. Three fuels with similar autoignition kinetics, but with different physical properties, were studied to isolate the effect of the combustion chemistry on combustion phasing. In addition, start of injection (SOI) sweeps relevant to low-load engine operating conditions were performed. The results show that physical properties of the fuel do not have significant influence when using a hollow-cone injector. Richer mixtures were observed at all the studied SOI (−40 to −14 CAD aTDC) cases, which can be attributed to the nature of the hollow cone spray. At later SOIs (−18 and −14 CAD aTDC), the richer mixtures are accompanied by lower mean in-cylinder temperature due to the charge cooling effect, which surpasses the equivalence ratio effect. The effect of fuel physical properties on combustion phasing was evident in multi-hole injection cases, which can be attributed to the differences in mixture stratification and equivalence ratio distribution at the time of ignition.

  3. Crack-tip Stress Field of Fully Circumferential Surface Cracked Pipe Under Combined Tension and Thermal Loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Je, Jin Ho; Kim, Dong Jun; Kim, Yun Jae

    2014-01-01

    Under excessive plasticity, the fracture toughness of a material depends on its size and geometry. Under fully yielded conditions, the stresses in a material near its crack tip are not unique but rather depend on the geometry. Therefore, the single-parameter J-approach is limited to a high-constraint crack geometry. The JQ theory has been proposed for establishing the crack geometry constraints . This approach assumes that the crack-tip fields have two degrees of freedom. In this study, the crack-tip stress field of a fully circumferential surface-cracked pipe under combined loads is investigated on the basis of the JQ theory by using finite element analysis. The combined loads are a tensile axial force and the thermal gradient in the radial direction. Q-stresses of the crack geometry and its loading state are used to determine the constraint effects. The constraint effects of secondary loading are found to be greater than those of primary loading. Therefore, thermal shock is believed to be the most severe loading condition of constraint effects

  4. CPAP Tips

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on how to safely and effectively use your CPAP device. ... 4:26. Airing 377,992 views 4:26 How CPAP works 5_23_11.wmv - Duration: 3: ...

  5. CPAP Tips

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Queue __count__/__total__ It’s YouTube. Uninterrupted. Loading... Want music and videos with zero ads? Get YouTube Red. ... safely and effectively use your CPAP device. Category Education License Standard YouTube License Show more Show less ...

  6. Optical geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, I.; Trautman, A.

    1988-01-01

    The geometry of classical physics is Lorentzian; but weaker geometries are often more appropriate: null geodesics and electromagnetic fields, for example, are well known to be objects of conformal geometry. To deal with a single null congruence, or with the radiative electromagnetic fields associated with it, even less is needed: flag geometry for the first, optical geometry, with which this paper is chiefly concerned, for the second. The authors establish a natural one-to-one correspondence between optical geometries, considered locally, and three-dimensional Cauchy-Riemann structures. A number of Lorentzian geometries are shown to be equivalent from the optical point of view. For example the Goedel universe, the Taub-NUT metric and Hauser's twisting null solution have an optical geometry isomorphic to the one underlying the Robinson congruence in Minkowski space. The authors present general results on the problem of lifting a CR structure to a Lorentz manifold and, in particular, to Minkowski space; and exhibit the relevance of the deviation form to this problem

  7. Effects of obesity and race on left ventricular geometry in hypertensive children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruette, Cozumel S; Fivush, Barbara A; Flynn, Joseph T; Brady, Tammy M

    2013-10-01

    Like left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), abnormal left ventricular (LV) geometry increases cardiovascular risk, but little data utilizing age and sex-specific norms are currently available on LV geometry in hypertensive children. This was a cross-sectional study of 141 hypertensive children aimed at determining the prevalence of LVH and abnormal LV geometry in the patient population and whether clinical characteristics associated with these findings differ by race. LVH was defined as an LV mass index of ≥95th percentile or cardiologist diagnosis. Abnormal geometry was defined as the presence of LVH or a relative wall thickness of >0.41. The prevalence of LVH was 35 % overall. According to race, LVH prevalence was 49 % among African-Americans (AA) versus 30 % among non-AA (p geometry; 63 % among AA vs. 32 % among non-AA (p = 0.001). Multivariable analyses revealed a 3.8-fold increased odds of abnormal geometry among AA (p = 0.002). While LVH, abnormal geometry and overweight/obesity are more prevalent among AA hypertensive children, after multivariable adjustment, BMI and race were independently associated with LVH and abnormal geometry, respectively. This result suggests that both race and obesity have important roles in the development of end-organ damage among children with primary hypertension.

  8. Evaluating the Effectiveness of the Lateral Intercrural Suture to Decrease the Interdomal Distance to Improve the Definition of the Nasal Tip in Primary Rhinoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soares, Caio Márcio Correia

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Several surgical techniques emphasizing sutures on the lower lateral cartilage have been studied by surgeons as instruments to improve nasal tip remodeling. It is already known that the domal divergence angle and its definition angle can be modified by lateral intercrural suture (LIS. Techniques for measuring these structures are not yet standardized. Objectives Assess the efficacy of LIS using polydioxanone 4–0 absorbable thread by interdomal distance and systematize the LIS technique to improve nasal tip definition. Materials and Methods This prospective study measured and analyzed interdomal distances measured preoperatively and perioperatively compared with 3- and 6-month postoperative measurements. Results LIS was efficient on reducing interdomal distances. Conclusion LIS is statistically safe and efficient and has low morbidity when utilized in patients with mild to moderate deformities, because it reduces the domal divergence angle, effectively sustaining the nasal tip.

  9. Effect of minodronic acid hydrate on hip geometry in Japanese women with postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Masako; Sone, Teruki; Fukunaga, Masao

    2010-05-01

    Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry-based hip structural analysis was performed to evaluate the effect of a bisphosphonate, minodronic acid hydrate, on the geometry of the proximal femur in Japanese patients with osteoporosis. The subjects were 103 postmenopausal patients (average age 63.9 +/- 6.4 years) with primary osteoporosis. Minodronic acid hydrate was administered orally at a dose of 1 mg/day for 12 months. Significant early responses at 3-6 months after the start of administration were observed in all three regions of the proximal femur (narrow neck, intertrochanter, and shaft) in terms of bone density, geometry, and bone strength indices. The outcomes of therapy included a reduction of the internal diameter of the cortical bone (-0.1, -0.6, and -0.2% in the neck, intertrochanter, and shaft, respectively, at 12 months; not significant) and a significant increase in cortical thickness (3.1, 3.7, and 2.0% in the respective regions at 12 months). Furthermore, minodronic acid hydrate induced a significant enlargement of the cross-sectional bone area, which is related to compressive strength; a significant increase in cross-sectional moment of inertia and section modulus (SM 4.9, 5.8, and 2.9% in the neck, intertrochanter, and shaft, respectively, at 12 months; P < 0.001), which are related to the bending strength; and a significant reduction in buckling ratio (BR -3.0% (P < 0.001), -4.2% (P < 0.001), and -1.4% (P < 0.05) in the respective regions at 12 months), which reflects improved cortical stability. These findings show that minodronic acid hydrate reduces age-related endocortical bone resorption, leading to increased cortical thickness and sustained or enhanced bone strength.

  10. Effect of Fontan geometry on exercise haemodynamics and its potential implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Elaine; Wei, Zhenglun Alan; Whitehead, Kevin K; Khiabani, Reza H; Restrepo, Maria; Mirabella, Lucia; Bethel, James; Paridon, Stephen M; Marino, Bradley S; Fogel, Mark A; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2017-11-01

    Exercise intolerance afflicts Fontan patients with total cavopulmonary connections (TCPCs) causing a reduction in quality of life. Optimising TCPC design is hypothesised to have a beneficial effect on exercise capacity. This study investigates relationships between TCPC geometries and exercise haemodynamics and performance. This study included 47 patients who completed metabolic exercise stress test with cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Phase-contrast CMR images were acquired immediately following supine lower limb exercise. Both anatomies and exercise vessel flow rates at ventilatory anaerobic threshold (VAT) were extracted. The vascular modelling toolkits were used to analyse TCPC geometries. Computational simulations were performed to quantify TCPC indexed power loss (iPL) at VAT. A highly significant inverse correlation was found between the TCPC diameter index, which factors in the narrowing of TCPC vessels, with iPL at VAT (r=-0.723, pVAT (r=0.373, p=0.01), VO 2 at peak exercise (r=0.485, p=0.001) and work at VAT/weight (r=0.368, p=0.01). iPL at VAT was negatively correlated with VO 2 at VAT (r=-0.337, p=0.02), VO 2 at peak exercise (r=-0.394, p=0.007) and work at VAT/weight (r=-0.208, p=0.17). Eliminating vessel narrowing in TCPCs and reducing elevated iPL at VAT could enhance exercise tolerance for patients with TCPCs. These findings could help plan surgical or catheter-based strategies to improve patients' exercise capacity. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. On the Effects of Modeling As-Manufactured Geometry: Toward Digital Twin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Cerrone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple, nonstandardized material test specimen, which fails along one of two different likely crack paths, is considered herein. The result of deviations in geometry on the order of tenths of a millimeter, this ambiguity in crack path motivates the consideration of as-manufactured component geometry in the design, assessment, and certification of structural systems. Herein, finite element models of as-manufactured specimens are generated and subsequently analyzed to resolve the crack-path ambiguity. The consequence and benefit of such a “personalized” methodology is the prediction of a crack path for each specimen based on its as-manufactured geometry, rather than a distribution of possible specimen geometries or nominal geometry. The consideration of as-manufactured characteristics is central to the Digital Twin concept. Therefore, this work is also intended to motivate its development.

  12. On the Effects of Modeling As-Manufactured Geometry: Toward Digital Twin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerrone, Albert; Hochhalter, Jacob; Heber, Gerd; Ingraffea, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Asimple, nonstandardized material test specimen,which fails along one of two different likely crack paths, is considered herein.The result of deviations in geometry on the order of tenths of amillimeter, this ambiguity in crack pathmotivates the consideration of asmanufactured component geometry in the design, assessment, and certification of structural systems.Herein, finite elementmodels of as-manufactured specimens are generated and subsequently analyzed to resolve the crack-path ambiguity. The consequence and benefit of such a "personalized" methodology is the prediction of a crack path for each specimen based on its as-manufactured geometry, rather than a distribution of possible specimen geometries or nominal geometry.The consideration of as-manufactured characteristics is central to the Digital Twin concept. Therefore, this work is also intended to motivate its development.

  13. Healthy Vision Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Kids >> Healthy Vision Tips Listen All About Vision About the Eye Ask a Scientist Video Series ... Links to More Information Optical Illusions Printables Healthy Vision Tips Healthy vision starts with you! Use these ...

  14. Numerical analysis of the effects of non-conventional laser beam geometries during laser melting of metallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safdar, Shakeel; Li, Lin; Sheikh, M A

    2007-01-01

    Laser melting is an important industrial activity encountered in a variety of laser manufacturing processes, e.g. selective laser melting, welding, brazing, soldering, glazing, surface alloying, cladding etc. The majority of these processes are carried out by using either circular or rectangular beams. At present, the melt pool characteristics such as melt pool geometry, thermal gradients and cooling rate are controlled by the variation of laser power, spot size or scanning speed. However, the variations in these parameters are often limited by other processing conditions. Although different laser beam modes and intensity distributions have been studied to improve the process, no other laser beam geometries have been investigated. The effect of laser beam geometry on the laser melting process has received very little attention. This paper presents an investigation of the effects of different beam geometries including circular, rectangular and diamond shapes on laser melting of metallic materials. The finite volume method has been used to simulate the transient effects of a moving beam for laser melting of mild steel (EN-43A) taking into account Marangoni and buoyancy convection. The temperature distribution, melt pool geometry, fluid flow velocities and heating/cooling rates have been calculated. Some of the results have been compared with the experimental data

  15. Measuring Fan-Blade-Tip Displacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Robert F., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Magnets and Hall-effect transducers used to monitor tip-to-shroud clearances. Mounting permanent magnet in end of fan blade and monitoring tip-to-shroud distance by use of output of Hall-effect transducers affixed to surface of shroud. Transducers provide real-time information. By placing magnets in each fan-blade tip, complete set monitored sequentially as each blade rotates past sensor. Application in many rotating machines, providing surrounding materials nonmagnetic and temperatures not severe.

  16. Alternating current cloud point extraction on a microchip: the effect of electrode geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Naoki; Maekawa, Chisaki; Sato, Kae

    2015-02-01

    We report on the effect of electrode geometry on alternating current cloud point extraction (ACPE). ACPE is a technique utilized to extract membrane-associated biomolecules in an electrode-integrated microfluidic channel. In this study, we investigated the effect of gap size (4∼22 μm) between microband electrodes on ACPE. A decrease in gap size resulted in efficient and rapid concentration of fluorescent-labeled phospholipids, a model of membrane-associated biomolecules. We also investigated the effect of applied voltage amplitude on ACPE using devices with decreased electrode gap size. When the gap was small, ACPE was achieved with low applied voltages. ACPE of membrane proteins extracted from HeLa cells was also studied to demonstrate the applicability of the ACPE to real samples. The results provide a guideline to improve the performance of ACPE and facilitate application of the ACPE technique as part of an overall analytical process. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Enhancement of affinity-based biosensors: effect of sensing chamber geometry on sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, N Scott; Šípová, Hana; Adam, Pavel; Homola, Jiří

    2013-04-07

    Affinity-based biosensing systems have become an important analytical tool for the detection and study of numerous biomolecules. The merging of these sensing technologies with microfluidic flow cells allows for faster detection times, increased sensitivities, and lower required sample volumes. In order to obtain a higher degree of performance from the sensor, it is important to know the effects of the flow cell geometry on the sensor sensitivity. In these sensors, the sensor sensitivity is related to the overall diffusive flux of analyte to the sensing surface; therefore increases in the analyte flux will be manifested as an increase in sensitivity, resulting in a lower limit of detection (LOD). Here we present a study pertaining to the effects of the flow cell height H on the analyte flux J, where for a common biosensor design we predict that the analyte flux will scale as J ≈ H(-2/3). We verify this scaling behavior via both numerical simulations as well as an experimental surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor. We show the reduction of the flow cell height can have drastic effects on the sensor performance, where the LOD of our experimental system concerning the detection of ssDNA decreases by a factor of 4 when H is reduced from 47 μm to 7 μm. We utilize these results to discuss the applicability of this scaling behavior with respect to a generalized affinity-based biosensor.

  18. UPTF experiment: Effect of full-scale geometry on countercurrent flow behaviour in PWR downcomer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebert, J.; Weiss, P.

    1989-01-01

    Four separate effects tests (13 runs) have been performed at UPTF - a 1:1 scale test facility - to investigate the thermal-hydraulic phenomena in the full-scale downcomer of a PWR during end-of-blowdown, refill and reflood phases. Special attention has been paid to the effects of geometry - cold leg arrangement - and ECC-water subcooling on downcomer countercurrent flow and ECC bypass behaviour. A synopsis of the most significant events and a comparison of countercurrent flow limitation (CCFL) data from UPTF and 1/5 scale test facility of Creare are given. The CCFL results of UPTF are compared to data predicted by an empirical correlation developed at Creare, based on the modified dimensionless Wallis parameter J * . A significant effect of cold leg arrangement on CCFL was observed leading to strongly heterogeneous flow condition in the downcomer. CCFL in front of cold leg 1 adjacent to the broken loop exists even for very low steam flow rates. Therefore the benefit of strong water subcooling is not as much as expected. The existing flooding correlation of Creare predicts the full-scale downcomer CCFL insufficiently. New flooding correlations are required to describe the CCFL process adequately. (orig.)

  19. Architectural geometry

    KAUST Repository

    Pottmann, Helmut

    2014-11-26

    Around 2005 it became apparent in the geometry processing community that freeform architecture contains many problems of a geometric nature to be solved, and many opportunities for optimization which however require geometric understanding. This area of research, which has been called architectural geometry, meanwhile contains a great wealth of individual contributions which are relevant in various fields. For mathematicians, the relation to discrete differential geometry is significant, in particular the integrable system viewpoint. Besides, new application contexts have become available for quite some old-established concepts. Regarding graphics and geometry processing, architectural geometry yields interesting new questions but also new objects, e.g. replacing meshes by other combinatorial arrangements. Numerical optimization plays a major role but in itself would be powerless without geometric understanding. Summing up, architectural geometry has become a rewarding field of study. We here survey the main directions which have been pursued, we show real projects where geometric considerations have played a role, and we outline open problems which we think are significant for the future development of both theory and practice of architectural geometry.

  20. Digestive Health Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Digestive Health Topic / Digestive Health Tips Digestive Health Tips Basics 10 Tips on Belching, Bloating, and Flatulence Belching is caused by swallowed air from: Eating or drinking too fast Poorly fitting dentures; not chewing food completely Carbonated beverages Chewing gum or sucking on ...

  1. Beautiful geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Maor, Eli

    2014-01-01

    If you've ever thought that mathematics and art don't mix, this stunning visual history of geometry will change your mind. As much a work of art as a book about mathematics, Beautiful Geometry presents more than sixty exquisite color plates illustrating a wide range of geometric patterns and theorems, accompanied by brief accounts of the fascinating history and people behind each. With artwork by Swiss artist Eugen Jost and text by acclaimed math historian Eli Maor, this unique celebration of geometry covers numerous subjects, from straightedge-and-compass constructions to intriguing configur

  2. Projective geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Faulkner, Thomas Ewan

    1952-01-01

    This text explores the methods of the projective geometry of the plane. Some knowledge of the elements of metrical and analytical geometry is assumed; a rigorous first chapter serves to prepare readers. Following an introduction to the methods of the symbolic notation, the text advances to a consideration of the theory of one-to-one correspondence. It derives the projective properties of the conic and discusses the representation of these properties by the general equation of the second degree. A study of the relationship between Euclidean and projective geometry concludes the presentation. Nu

  3. Effects of long exposure to spent potliner on seeds, root tips, and meristematic cells of Allium cepa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade-Vieira, Larissa Fonseca; Palmieri, Marcel José; Davide, Lisete Chamma

    2017-09-07

    Spent potliner (SPL) is a solid waste generated in the aluminum mining and processing industry. It is sometimes dumped into the environment and leach in contact with water, thereupon affecting living beings, which are likely to be exposed to the waste for long periods. Considering this, we aimed to evaluate the effects of extended exposure to SPL through bioassays using Allium cepa as plant model system. Seeds of A. cepa were either directly exposed to SPL (continuous exposure) or first germinated in water and then exposed to SPL (discontinuous exposure). The germination rate was determined from 24 to 192 h of exposure. The maximum effects of SPL on germination were observed after 96 h in both exposure approaches. For the parameter root elongation, the discontinuous treatment was more efficient in demonstrating differences among the applied SPL concentrations (60% of reduction). Microscopic analysis was carried out in root tip cells discontinuously exposed to SPL for 96 h. A mitodepressive effect was observed (above 50%), as well as increased rate of chromosome abnormalities (up to 100-fold) and induction of cell death. The consequences of exposure to SPL for longer periods are discussed.

  4. Tip studies using CFD and comparison with tip loss models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Johansen, J.

    2004-01-01

    The flow past a rotating LM8.2 blade equipped with two different tips are computed using CFD. The different tip flows are analysed and a comparison with two different tip loss models is made. Keywords: tip flow, aerodynamics, CFD......The flow past a rotating LM8.2 blade equipped with two different tips are computed using CFD. The different tip flows are analysed and a comparison with two different tip loss models is made. Keywords: tip flow, aerodynamics, CFD...

  5. Analysis of Fin Tip Temperature and Fin Efficiency for Different Fingeometries and Materials Using Abaqus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imran, S.; Noor, F.; Ali, H.; Hussain, A.; Ali, Z.; Shad, R.

    2015-01-01

    Fins are widely used in various engineering applications to enhance the rate of heat transfer. The effect of fin geometry and its material on the fin efficiency and the amount of heat transferred are investigated in this study. Rectangular and triangular fin geometries have been considered and two fin materials, aluminium and carbon steel, have been selected. It is found numerically that the fin tip temperature and the fin efficiency are decreased with the increase of the convective heat transfer coefficient. ABAQUS has been used to conduct this numerical study. (author)

  6. Numerical and experimental investigation of the effect of geometry on combustion characteristics of solid-fuel ramjet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Lunkun; Chen, Xiong; Musa, Omer; Yang, Haitao; Zhou, Changsheng

    2017-12-01

    Numerical and experimental investigation on the solid-fuel ramjet was carried out to study the effect of geometry on combustion characteristics. The two-dimensional axisymmetric program developed in the present study adopted finite rate chemistry and second-order moment turbulence-chemistry models, together with k-ω shear stress transport (SST) turbulence model. Experimental data were obtained by burning cylindrical polyethylene using a connected pipe facility. The simulation results show that a fuel-rich zone near the solid fuel surface and an air-rich zone in the core exist in the chamber, and the chemical reactions occur mainly in the interface of this two regions; The physical reasons for the effect of geometry on regression rate is the variation of turbulent viscosity due to the geometry change. Port-to-inlet diameter ratio is the main parameter influencing the turbulent viscosity, and a linear relationship between port-to-inlet diameter and regression rate were obtained. The air mass flow rate and air-fuel ratio are the main influencing factors on ramjet performances. Based on the simulation results, the correlations between geometry and air-fuel ratio were obtained, and the effect of geometry on ramjet performances was analyzed according to the correlation. Three-dimensional regression rate contour obtained experimentally indicates that the regression rate which shows axisymmetric distribution due to the symmetry structure increases sharply, followed by slow decrease in axial direction. The radiation heat transfer in recirculation zone cannot be ignored. Compared with the experimental results, the deviations of calculated average regression rate and characteristic velocity are about 5%. Concerning the effect of geometry on air-fuel ratio, the deviations between experimental and theoretical results are less than 10%.

  7. Gravitational amplitudes in black hole evaporation: the effect of non-commutative geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grezia, Elisabetta Di; Esposito, Giampiero; Miele, Gennaro

    2006-01-01

    Recent work in the literature has studied the quantum-mechanical decay of a Schwarzschild-like black hole, formed by gravitational collapse, into almost-flat spacetime and weak radiation at a very late time. The relevant quantum amplitudes have been evaluated for bosonic and fermionic fields, showing that no information is lost in collapse to a black hole. On the other hand, recent developments in non-commutative geometry have shown that, in general relativity, the effects of non-commutativity can be taken into account by keeping the standard form of the Einstein tensor on the left-hand side of the field equations and introducing a modified energy-momentum tensor as a source on the right-hand side. The present paper, relying on the recently obtained non-commutativity effect on a static, spherically symmetric metric, considers from a new perspective the quantum amplitudes in black hole evaporation. The general relativity analysis of spin-2 amplitudes is shown to be modified by a multiplicative factor F depending on a constant non-commutativity parameter and on the upper limit R of the radial coordinate. Limiting forms of F are derived which are compatible with the adiabatic approximation here exploited. Approximate formulae for the particle emission rate are also obtained within this framework

  8. Effect of Annealing on Properties of Carbonaceous Materials. Part II: Porosity and Pore Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Xing; Zhang, Guangqing; Dell'Amico, Mark; Ciezki, George; Meng, Qingbo; Ostrovski, Oleg

    2013-08-01

    The pore structure of carbonaceous materials was studied using image analysis. The effect of annealing on the porosity and pore geometry of cokes, chars, and pyrolyzed coals (laboratory chars) was examined in the temperature range of 973 K to 1773 K (700 °C to 1500 °C). The porosity of chars and pyrolyzed coals significantly increased during annealing at temperatures below 1373 K (1100 °C) due to volatile matter release. Further increasing of the annealing temperature from 1373 K to 1773 K (1100 °C to 1500 °C) caused marginal porosity evolution. The porosity of cokes was not affected by annealing at temperatures below 1573 K (1300 °C) and slightly increased in the temperature range 1573 to 1773 K (1300 °C to 1500 °C). The increase in the porosity of chars and pyrolyzed coals during annealing at temperatures 1373 K to 1773 K (1100 °C to 1500 °C), and cokes at 1573 K to 1773 K (1300 °C to 1500 °C), was a result of reactions with oxides of their mineral phases. Annealing had a marginal effect on the pore shape (Feret ratio) of carbonaceous materials, but enlarged the pore size of chars and pyrolyzed coals and decreased their pore density.

  9. Vapor cell geometry effect on Rydberg atom-based microwave electric field measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linjie; Liu, Jiasheng; Jia, Yue; Zhang, Hao; Song, Zhenfei; Jia, Suotang

    2018-03-01

    The geometry effect of a vapor cell on the metrology of a microwave electric field is investigated. Based on the splitting of the electromagnetically induced transparency spectra of cesium Rydberg atoms in a vapor cell, high-resolution spatial distribution of the microwave electric field strength is achieved for both a cubic cell and a cylinder cell. The spatial distribution of the microwave field strength in two dimensions is measured with sub-wavelength resolution. The experimental results show that the shape of a vapor cell has a significant influence on the abnormal spatial distribution because of the Fabry–Pérot effect inside a vapor cell. A theoretical simulation is obtained for different vapor cell wall thicknesses and shows that a restricted wall thickness results in a measurement fluctuation smaller than 3% at the center of the vapor cell. Project supported by the National Key Research and Development Program of China (Grant Nos. 2017YFA03044200 and 2016YFF0200104), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 91536110, 61505099, and 61378013), and the Fund for Shanxi “331 Project” Key Subjects Construction, China.

  10. Geometry and temperature effects on the threshold voltage characteristics of silicon nanowire MOS transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Hei; Yu, Qanqun; Dong, Shurong; Kakushima, Kuniyuki; Iwai, Hiroshi

    2017-12-01

    This work reports the observations of different geometry and temperature dependencies of electrical characteristics of silicon nanowire transistors with gate length of a couple microns. Several abnormal characteristics degradations were observed. As the gate lengths as well as the source/drain doping level of the devices under investigation were well beyond the punchthrough conditions, these observed characteristic degradations should not be due to conventional short-channel effects. We ascribed these observations to the charge transport along the corners/boundaries of the nanowires. Current enhancements were observed because of the higher mobility and larger density of states at the corners where the surface states have opposite effects on these parameters. Temperature dependence of the threshold voltage shows a linear decrease as the temperature increases. This trend is ascribed to the charge states at oxide/nanowire interfaces. Corners and surfaces of nanowire thus should play an important role for ultra-short nanowire transistors and that calls for shape of nanowire optimization for device design.

  11. The effect of cover geometry on the productivity of a modified solar still desalination unit

    KAUST Repository

    Malaeb, Lilian

    2014-01-01

    Desalination methods based on renewable energy offer a promising solution to both water shortage and environmental degradation problems that continue to grow globally. The solar still is one such method that uses a sustainable energy source to produce potable water albeit at a relatively low productivity rate. A new modification has been introduced to the conventional solar still to enhance its productivity. The modification consists of a light weight, black finished, slowly-rotating drum, which leads to a sustainable, cost-effective, and low-tech amendment that preserves the key features of the still while considerably increasing its yield compared to a control still that does not include the drum. In this paper, three different cover geometries of the modified still are studied and the effect of cover design on the performance of the still in terms of measured temperatures and productivity is considered. The three cover designs are as follows: double-sloped or triangular, single-sloped and curved cover. In addition, a conventional double-sloped still without the rotating drum is operated in parallel as a control and the findings of this study are reported and discussed. © 2014 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Effect of filler geometry on coefficient of thermal expansion in carbon nanofiber reinforced epoxy composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, M; Jang, J; Suhr, J

    2011-02-01

    This study involves the investigation of the geometry effect of nano-fillers on thermally induced dimensional stability of epoxy composites by experimentally evaluating the linear coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). Carbon nanofibers (CNF) were chosen as the filler in epoxy matrix to investigate the effect of an aspect ratio on the CTE of the nanocomposites at three different volume fractions of 0.5, 1, and 2% of the nano-filler. The composites were fabricated using a mechanical mixing method. The CTE values were evaluated by measuring thermal strains of the composites and also compared with a micromechanics model. It was observed that the composites with short CNF (average L/d = 10) show better thermal stability than one of the composites with long CNF (average L/d = 70), and the thermal stability of the composites was proportional to the volume fraction of the filler in each composite. In addition, the CTE of mutliwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) reinforced epoxy composites was evaluated and compared with the CTE of the CNF reinforced composites. Interestingly, the MWNT reinforced composites show the greatest thermal stability with an 11.5% reduction in the CTE over the pure epoxy. The experimental data was compared with micromechanics model.

  13. Effect of leading-edge geometry on boundary-layer receptivity to freestream sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Nay; Reed, Helen L.; Saric, W. S.

    1991-01-01

    The receptivity to freestream sound of the laminar boundary layer over a semi-infinite flat plate with an elliptic leading edge is simulated numerically. The incompressible flow past the flat plate is computed by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations in general curvilinear coordinates. A finite-difference method which is second-order accurate in space and time is used. Spatial and temporal developments of the Tollmien-Schlichting wave in the boundary layer, due to small-amplitude time-harmonic oscillations of the freestream velocity that closely simulate a sound wave travelling parallel to the plate, are observed. The effect of leading-edge curvature is studied by varying the aspect ratio of the ellipse. The boundary layer over the flat plate with a sharper leading edge is found to be less receptive. The relative contribution of the discontinuity in curvature at the ellipse-flat-plate juncture to receptivity is investigated by smoothing the juncture with a polynomial. Continuous curvature leads to less receptivity. A new geometry of the leading edge, a modified super ellipse, which provides continuous curvature at the juncture with the flat plate, is used to study the effect of continuous curvature and inherent pressure gradient on receptivity.

  14. Information geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Ay, Nihat; Lê, Hông Vân; Schwachhöfer, Lorenz

    2017-01-01

    The book provides a comprehensive introduction and a novel mathematical foundation of the field of information geometry with complete proofs and detailed background material on measure theory, Riemannian geometry and Banach space theory. Parametrised measure models are defined as fundamental geometric objects, which can be both finite or infinite dimensional. Based on these models, canonical tensor fields are introduced and further studied, including the Fisher metric and the Amari-Chentsov tensor, and embeddings of statistical manifolds are investigated. This novel foundation then leads to application highlights, such as generalizations and extensions of the classical uniqueness result of Chentsov or the Cramér-Rao inequality. Additionally, several new application fields of information geometry are highlighted, for instance hierarchical and graphical models, complexity theory, population genetics, or Markov Chain Monte Carlo. The book will be of interest to mathematicians who are interested in geometry, inf...

  15. Algebraic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Lefschetz, Solomon

    2005-01-01

    An introduction to algebraic geometry and a bridge between its analytical-topological and algebraical aspects, this text for advanced undergraduate students is particularly relevant to those more familiar with analysis than algebra. 1953 edition.

  16. The TIPS Liquidity Premium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Martin Møller; Christensen, Jens H.E.; Simon Riddell, Simon

    We introduce an arbitrage-free term structure model of nominal and real yields that accounts for liquidity risk in Treasury inflation-protected securities (TIPS). The novel feature of our model is to identify liquidity risk from individual TIPS prices by accounting for the tendency that TIPS, like...... most fixed-income securities, go into buy-and-hold investors' portfolios as time passes. We find a sizable and countercyclical TIPS liquidity premium, which greatly helps our model in matching TIPS prices. Accounting for liquidity risk also improves the model's ability to forecast inflation and match...

  17. The Effects of Teaching Descriptive Geometry in General Engineering 103 on Spatial Relations Tests Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallings, William M.

    It was hypothesized that instruction in descriptive geometry produces an increase in SRT scores. The resultant data do not firmly support this hypothesis. It is suggested that this study be replicated with the use of randomly selected control groups. (MS)

  18. Effect of Soil pH on Growth and Cation Deposition in the Root Tip of Zea mays L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter; Silk; Schurr

    2000-03-01

    The effects of sandy soil pH on the distribution of growth velocities and on cation concentrations and deposition rates in root growth zones of Zea mays L. seedlings were investigated. The pH values of the rooting medium varied between 4.2 and 8.6 in sand culture (70% saturated) without external supply of nutrients. At all pH values, densities (in µmoles per g fresh weight) of potassium, magnesium, and calcium increased toward the root tip. Lower pH in the medium increased calcium tissue density fivefold and magnesium density 1.7-fold, whereas the density of potassium, the overall elongation rate, and the growth velocity distribution did not show any significant pH dependence. Throughout the growth zone the deposition rates of the divalent cations, as calculated on the basis of the continuity equation, increased with lower pH. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that the effects of pH on the cation deposition rates are due to the increase in the divalent cation concentration of the soil solution at low pH and that the abundant uronic acid residues of the young walls of the meristem provide a reservoir of storage capacity for Ca and Mg under conditions of low nutrient availability.

  19. Numerical Investigation on the Effects of Self-Excited Tip Flow Unsteadiness and Blade Row Interactions on the Performance Predictions of Low Speed and Transonic Compressor Rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Daniel H.

    The impact blade row interactions can have on the performance of compressor rotors has been well documented. It is also well known that rotor tip clearance flows can have a large effect on compressor performance and stall margin and recent research has shown that tip leakage flows can exhibit self-excited unsteadiness at near stall conditions. However, the impact of tip leakage flow on the performance and operating range of a compressor rotor, relative to other important flow features such as upstream stator wakes or downstream potential effects, has not been explored. To this end, a numerical investigation has been conducted to determine the effects of self-excited tip flow unsteadiness, upstream stator wakes, and downstream blade row interactions on the performance prediction of low speed and transonic compressor rotors. Calculations included a single blade-row rotor configuration as well as two multi-blade row configurations: one where the rotor was modeled with an upstream stator and a second where the rotor was modeled with a downstream stator. Steady-state and time accurate calculations were performed using a RANS solver and the results were compared with detailed experimental data obtained in the GE Low Speed Research Compressor and the Notre Dame Transonic Rig at several operating conditions including near stall. Differences in the performance predictions between the three configurations were then used to determine the effect of the upstream stator wakes and the downstream blade row interactions. Results obtained show that for both the low speed and transonic research compressors used in this investigation time-accurate RANS analysis is necessary to accurately predict the stalling character of the rotor. Additionally, for the first time it is demonstrated that capturing the unsteady tip flow can have a larger impact on rotor performance predictions than adjacent blade row interactions.

  20. Effects of generation time on spray aerosol transport and deposition in models of the mouth-throat geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worth Longest, P; Hindle, Michael; Das Choudhuri, Suparna

    2009-06-01

    For most newly developed spray aerosol inhalers, the generation time is a potentially important variable that can be fully controlled. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of spray aerosol generation time on transport and deposition in a standard induction port (IP) and more realistic mouth-throat (MT) geometry. Capillary aerosol generation (CAG) was selected as a representative system in which spray momentum was expected to significantly impact deposition. Sectional and total depositions in the IP and MT geometries were assessed at a constant CAG flow rate of 25 mg/sec for aerosol generation times of 1, 2, and 4 sec using both in vitro experiments and a previously developed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. Both the in vitro and numerical results indicated that extending the generation time of the spray aerosol, delivered at a constant mass flow rate, significantly reduced deposition in the IP and more realistic MT geometry. Specifically, increasing the generation time of the CAG system from 1 to 4 sec reduced the deposition fraction in the IP and MT geometries by approximately 60 and 33%, respectively. Furthermore, the CFD predictions of deposition fraction were found to be in good agreement with the in vitro results for all times considered in both the IP and MT geometries. The numerical results indicated that the reduction in deposition fraction over time was associated with temporal dissipation of what was termed the spray aerosol "burst effect." Based on these results, increasing the spray aerosol generation time, at a constant mass flow rate, may be an effective strategy for reducing deposition in the standard IP and in more realistic MT geometries.

  1. Arctic climate tipping points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenton, Timothy M

    2012-02-01

    There is widespread concern that anthropogenic global warming will trigger Arctic climate tipping points. The Arctic has a long history of natural, abrupt climate changes, which together with current observations and model projections, can help us to identify which parts of the Arctic climate system might pass future tipping points. Here the climate tipping points are defined, noting that not all of them involve bifurcations leading to irreversible change. Past abrupt climate changes in the Arctic are briefly reviewed. Then, the current behaviour of a range of Arctic systems is summarised. Looking ahead, a range of potential tipping phenomena are described. This leads to a revised and expanded list of potential Arctic climate tipping elements, whose likelihood is assessed, in terms of how much warming will be required to tip them. Finally, the available responses are considered, especially the prospects for avoiding Arctic climate tipping points.

  2. The Effects of Specimen Geometry on the Plastic Deformation of AA 2219-T8 Aluminum Alloy Under Dynamic Impact Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owolabi, G. M.; Bolling, D. T.; Odeshi, A. G.; Whitworth, H. A.; Yilmaz, N.; Zeytinci, A.

    2017-12-01

    The effects of specimen geometry on shear strain localization in AA 2219-T8 aluminum alloy under dynamic impact loading were investigated. The alloy was machined into cylindrical, cuboidal and conical (frustum) test specimens. Both deformed and transformed adiabatic shear bands developed in the alloy during the impact loading. The critical strain rate for formation of the deformed band was determined to be 2500 s-1 irrespective of the specimen geometry. The critical strain rate required for formation of transformed band is higher than 3000 s-1 depending on the specimen geometry. The critical strain rate for formation of transformed bands is lowest (3000 s-1) in the Ø5 mm × 5 mm cylindrical specimens and highest (> 6000 s-1) in the conical specimens. The cylindrical specimens showed the greatest tendency to form transformed bands, whereas the conical specimen showed the least tendency. The shape of the shear bands on the impacted plane was also observed to be dependent on the specimen geometry. Whereas the shear bands on the compression plane of the conical specimens formed elongated cycles, two elliptical shaped shear bands facing each other were observed on the cylindrical specimens. Two parallel shear bands were observed on the compression planes of the cuboidal specimens. The dynamic stress-strain curves vary slightly with the specimen geometry. The cuboidal specimens exhibit higher tendency for strain hardening and higher maximum flow stress than the other specimens. The microstructure evolution leading to the formation of transformed bands is also discussed in this paper.

  3. Numerical study on the effects of the alternative structure geometries on the groundwater flow at the Romuvaara site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koskinen, L.; Meling, K.

    1994-11-01

    The work has two aims. Firstly, it completes the numerical modelling work for the groundwater flow at the Romuvaara site in Finland performed during the preliminary site investigations by varying geometries of the most significant fracture zones. The modified fracture zone geometries are selected within the uncertainties of the structure of the bedrock model. Secondly, the work studies the effects of several potential fracture zones. The locations and geometries of these zones are decided in such a way that either they offer potential or alternative hydrogeologic connections that would explain the anomalies in the results of the earlier field investigations or their existence has been implied by geophysical studies. The field results comprise the measured hydraulic head values under the natural conditions in boreholes KR1 -KRS, and the hydraulic head responses in the pumping test. The work employs the calibrated flow model developed in the preliminary site investigations as the base case, that is modified to correspond to the alternative geometries. Before the simulations with the alternative geometries, the boundary condition for the top of the flow model is partly changed in this work in order to revoke the modification motivated by incorrect field data that were used in the calibration of the flow model. (25 refs., 27 figs., 1 tab.)

  4. Effect of capillary geometry on predicting electroosmotic volumetric flowrates in porous or fibrous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, Jennifer; Oyanader, Mario; Arce, Pedro

    2012-07-15

    Electrokinetic-based methods are used in a variety of applications including drug delivery and separation of biomolecules, among others. Many of these applications feature a fibrous or a porous medium that can be modeled by using capillary bundle models to predict the behavior of the electroosmotic flow within the particular system. The role of geometry in predicting volumetric flowrates in porous media is investigated by modeling the electroosmotic flow in idealized capillaries of rectangular, cylindrical, and annular geometries. This is achieved by the coupling of electrostatics and continuum hydrodynamics to obtain analytical expressions that govern the electrokinetically - driven volumetric flow within these idealized capillary geometries. A previous study developed a model to compare the cylindrical and annular capillary geometries by utilizing two methods that compare the areas of the two geometries. The methods used in this previous work will also be used in the present contribution to compare the volumetric flowrates in the cylindrical and annular capillaries with a rectangular capillary. Illustrative results will be presented to aid in the understanding of the influence of the various geometrical and electrostatic parameters that arise from the analysis of these volumetric flowrates. It was found that the electroosmotic volumetric flowrates are significantly affected by the capillary geometry. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Effect of the kinetics of ammonium and nitrite oxidation on nitritation success or failure for different biofilm reactor geometries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lackner, Susanne; Smets, Barth F.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of biokinetics on nitritation was investigated in two biofilm geometries, the Membrane Aerated Biofilm Reactor (MABR) and a conventional biofilm system. A 1D biofilm model was used and evaluated by global sensitivity analysis using the variance based Sobol method. The main focus...... strongly depends on the chosen kinetic parameters of AOB and NOB. The maximum specific growth rates (μmax,AOB and μmax,NOB) had the strongest impact on nitritation efficiency (NE). In comparison, the counter-diffusion geometry yielded more parameter combinations (27.5%) that resulted in high NE than the co...

  6. Effect of planetary rotation on the differentiation of a terrestrial magma ocean in spherical geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Ulrich; Maas, Christian

    2017-04-01

    About 4.5 billion years ago the early Earth experienced several giant impacts that lead to one or more deep terrestrial magma oceans of global extent. The crystallization of these vigorously convecting magma oceans is of key importance for the chemical structure of the Earth, the subsequent mantle evolution as well as for the initial conditions for the onset of plate tectonics. Due to the fast planetary rotation of the early Earth and the small magma viscosity, rotation probably had a profound effect on early differentiation processes and could for example influence the presence and distribution of chemical heterogeneities in the Earth's mantle [e.g. Matyska et al., 1994, Garnero and McNamara, 2008]. Previous work in Cartesian geometry revealed a strong influence of rotation as well as of latitude on the crystal settling in a terrestrial magma ocean [Maas and Hansen, 2015]. Based on the preceding study we developed a spherical shell model that allows to study crystal settling in-between pole and equator as well as the migration of crystals between these regions. Further we included centrifugal forces on the crystals, which significantly affect the lateral and radial distribution of the crystals. Depending on the strength of rotation the particles accumulate at mid-latitude or at the equator. At high rotation rates the dynamics of fluid and particles are dominated by jet-like motions in longitudinal direction that have different directions on northern and southern hemisphere. All in all the first numerical experiments in spherical geometry agree with Maas and Hansen [2015] that the crystal distribution crucially depends on latitude, rotational strength and crystal density. References E. J. Garnero and A. K. McNamara. Structure and dynamics of earth's lower mantle. Science, 320(5876):626-628, 2008. C. Maas and U. Hansen. Eff ects of earth's rotation on the early di erentiation of a terrestrial magma ocean. Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth, 120

  7. Assessment of MODIS sun-sensor geometry variations effect on observed NDVI using MSG SEVIRI geostationary data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fensholt, R.; Sandholt, I.; Proud, Simon Richard

    2010-01-01

    -sensor geometry variations will have a more visible impact on the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) from MODIS compared to earlier data sources, since noise related to atmosphere and sensor calibration is substantially reduced in the MODIS data stream. For this reason, the effect of varying MODIS...... viewing geometry on red, near-infrared (NIR) and NDVI needs to be quantified. Data from the geostationary MSG (Meteosat Second Generation) SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager) sensor is well suited for this purpose due to the fixed position of the sensor, the spectral resolution......, including a red and NIR band, and the high temporal resolution (15 min) of data, enabling MSG data to be used as a reference for estimating MODIS surface reflectance and NDVI variations caused by varying sun-sensor geometry. The study was performed on data covering West Africa for periods of lowest possible...

  8. THE EFFECT OF NON-ROUTINE GEOMETRY PROBLEM ON ELEMENTARY STUDENTS BELIEF IN MATHEMATICS: A CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoerul Umam

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Many learners hold traditional beliefs about perimeter and area that a shape with a larger area must have a larger perimeter while shape with the same perimeter must have the same area. To address this issue, non-routine geometry problem is given. This qualitative descriptive research used to reach the goal and to explore the effect of non-routine geometry problem on elementary student belief in mathematics. The instrument has been developed to accommodate intuitive student belief and student’s belief about the concept of perimeter. The results provide evidence that students’ intuitive belief about perimeter can be change through non-routine geometry problem which is required understanding and some mathematical analysis. Fortunately, the problem has helped the elementary students revise and correct their beliefs, thoughts, and understandings relating to the circumference of shape.

  9. Latitudinal gradient effect on the wing geometry of Auca coctei (Guérin(Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María-José Sanzana

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Latitudinal gradient effect on the wing geometry of Auca coctei (Guérin (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae. When the environmental conditions change locally, the organisms and populations may also change in response to the selection pressure, so that the development of individuals may become affected in different degrees. There have been only a few studies in which the patterns of wing morphology variation have been looked into along a latitudinal gradient by means of geometric morphometrics. The aim of this work was to assess the morphologic differentiation of wing among butterfly populations of the species Auca coctei. For this purpose, 9 sampling locations were used which are representative of the distribution range of the butterfly and cover a wide latitudinal range in Chile. The wing morphology was studied in a total of 202 specimens of A. coctei (150 males and 52 females, based on digitization of 17 morphologic landmarks. The results show variation of wing shape in both sexes; however, for the centroid size there was significant variation only in females. Females show smaller centroid size at higher latitudes, therefore in this study the Bergmann reverse rule is confirmed for females of A. coctei. Our study extends morphologic projections with latitude, suggesting that wing variation is an environmental response from diverse origins and may influence different characteristics of the life history of a butterfly.

  10. Experimental studies of the effect target geometry on the evolution of laser produced plasma plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Cuyler; Anderson, Austin; Iratcabal, Jeremy; Dutra, Eric; Covington, Aaron

    2016-10-01

    The expansion of the laser plumes was shown to be dependent on the initial target geometry. A 16 channel framing camera was used to record the plume shape and propagation speeds were determined from analysis of the images. Plastic targets were manufactured using different methods including 3D printing, CNC machining and vacuum casting. Preliminary target designs were made using a 3D printer and ABS plastic material. These targets were then tested using a 3 J laser with a 5 ns duration pulse. Targets with a deep conical depression were shown to produce highly collimated plumes when compared to flat top targets. Preliminary results of these experiments will be discussed along with planned future experiments that will use the indented targets with a 30 J laser with a 0.8 ns duration pulse in preparation for pinched laser plume experiments at the Nevada Terawatt Facility. Other polymers that are readily available in a deuterated form will also be explored as part of an effort to develop a cost effective plasma plume target for follow on neutron production experiments. Dr. Austin Anderson.

  11. Effect of pore geometry on the compressibility of a confined simple fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrzanski, Christopher D.; Maximov, Max A.; Gor, Gennady Y.

    2018-02-01

    Fluids confined in nanopores exhibit properties different from the properties of the same fluids in bulk; among these properties is the isothermal compressibility or elastic modulus. The modulus of a fluid in nanopores can be extracted from ultrasonic experiments or calculated from molecular simulations. Using Monte Carlo simulations in the grand canonical ensemble, we calculated the modulus for liquid argon at its normal boiling point (87.3 K) adsorbed in model silica pores of two different morphologies and various sizes. For spherical pores, for all the pore sizes (diameters) exceeding 2 nm, we obtained a logarithmic dependence of fluid modulus on the vapor pressure. Calculation of the modulus at saturation showed that the modulus of the fluid in spherical pores is a linear function of the reciprocal pore size. The calculation of the modulus of the fluid in cylindrical pores appeared too scattered to make quantitative conclusions. We performed additional simulations at higher temperature (119.6 K), at which Monte Carlo insertions and removals become more efficient. The results of the simulations at higher temperature confirmed both regularities for cylindrical pores and showed quantitative difference between the fluid moduli in pores of different geometries. Both of the observed regularities for the modulus stem from the Tait-Murnaghan equation applied to the confined fluid. Our results, along with the development of the effective medium theories for nanoporous media, set the groundwork for analysis of the experimentally measured elastic properties of fluid-saturated nanoporous materials.

  12. Effects of model schematisation, geometry and parameter values on urban flood modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojinovic, Z; Seyoum, S D; Mwalwaka, J M; Price, R K

    2011-01-01

    One-dimensional (1D) hydrodynamic models have been used as a standard industry practice for urban flood modelling work for many years. More recently, however, model formulations have included a 1D representation of the main channels and a 2D representation of the floodplains. Since the physical process of describing exchanges of flows with the floodplains can be represented in different ways, the predictive capability of different modelling approaches can also vary. The present paper explores effects of some of the issues that concern urban flood modelling work. Impacts from applying different model schematisation, geometry and parameter values were investigated. The study has mainly focussed on exploring how different Digital Terrain Model (DTM) resolution, presence of different features on DTM such as roads and building structures and different friction coefficients affect the simulation results. Practical implications of these issues are analysed and illustrated in a case study from St Maarten, N.A. The results from this study aim to provide users of numerical models with information that can be used in the analyses of flooding processes in urban areas.

  13. The effects of various exposure times in the detectability on the tips of the endodontic files in Digora

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Jee Young; Park, Chang Seo

    1997-01-01

    Digora-an intraoral digital radiography system utilizing image plate(IP) - has a dynamic range of exposure time which allows it to decrease the patient's exposure time and to increase diagnostic ability through image process sing, transmission and storage. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Digora system by assessing the effects of various exposure times on the detectability on the tip of the endodontic file. Examining the root canals of 45 extracted sound premolars, K-files No. 10, 15, and 20 were placed at slightly varying distances from the apex. The teeth were glued onto resin-pla ster blocks. Five exposure times varying between 0.01 seconds and 0.25 seconds were used. Four observers were asked to measure the distance between the tip of the file and a reduction of crown portion, and obtained mean errors (subtracting true file length from the measured file length), comparing Digora monitors with E-plus films, which were both obtained under the same geometrical positions. The results were as follows : 1. Comparing E-plus film with Digora at 0.01 seconds, the mean errors in E-plus film showed -4.453 mm, -4.497 mm, and -3.857 mm, while the mean errors in Digora showed 0.065 mm, 0.607 mm, and 0.719 mm according to the file groups. Therefore there was a significant difference between E-plus film and Digora (P<0.05). 2. By comparison of mean errors according to the various exposure times in the Digora system, the mean error at standard deviation was the highest at 0.01 seconds was significantly lower than that at 0.12 and 0.25 seconds in No. 10 and 20 file group (P<0.05). and the standard deviation was the highest at 0.01 seconds. 3. Comparing E-plus film at 0.25 seconds with the Digora system, the mean errors showed a significant difference between E-plus at 0.25 seconds and the Digora system at 0.25 seconds in No. 10 and 20 file groups (P<0.05). 4. Comparing E-plus film at 0.25 seconds and E-plus film at 0.01 and 0.03 seconds in 10 file group (P<0.05). In

  14. Modeling study on the effect of piston bowl geometries in a gasoline/biodiesel fueled RCCI engine at high speed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.; Yang, W.M.; Zhou, D.Z.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The RCCI engine fueled with gasoline and biodiesel is simulated. • The effect of piston bowl geometry is investigated. • The throat diameter of a piston can affect combustion process. • SCC shows superiority among three investigated geometries for RCCI combustion. - Abstract: This paper reports the numerical investigation on the effects of three bowl geometries on a gasoline/biodiesel fueled RCCI engine operated at high engine speed. The three bowl geometries are HCC (Hemispherical Combustion Chamber), SCC (Shallow depth Combustion Chamber) and OCC (Omega Combustion Chamber). To simulate the combustion in an RCCI engine, coupled KIVA4–CHEMKIN code was used. One recently developed reaction mechanism, which contains 107 species and 425 reactions, was adopted in this study to mimic the combustion of gasoline and biodiesel. During the simulation, the engine speed was fixed at 3600 rpm. The low reactivity fuel gasoline was premixed with air with energy percentages of 20% and 40%; accordingly, to maintain the same energy input, the percentages of biodiesel were 80% and 60% (B80 and B60). In addition, the SOI timing was varied at three levels: −11, −35 and −60 deg ATDC for B80 and B60, respectively. With SOI timing of −11 deg ATDC, the combustion is mixing-controlled; in contrast, advancing SOI timing to −60 deg ATDC, the combustion turns into the reactivity-controlled. Comparing the results on combustion characteristics, engine performance and emissions among different bowl geometries, it is concluded that the original OCC design for Toyota diesel engine is better for mixing-controlled combustion; whereas, SCC is the most suitable piston design for RCCI combustion among the three selected geometries under the investigated operating conditions of the engine. With SCC, better combustion and performance can be achieved while maintaining relatively lower CO, NO and soot emissions.

  15. Preventing Death by PowerPoint[R]: Tips for Effective Presentations that Inform and Engage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, Chip

    2009-01-01

    PowerPoint[R] and other familiar presentation graphics programs like Apple[R] Keynote, Corel[R] Presentations[TM], Harvard Graphics[R] Pro Presentations, Lotus[R] Freelance Graphics, and OpenOffice Impress can help one become a more effective presenter. These programs are designed to organize words and images to create slides, speaker notes, and…

  16. Effects of the Crack Tip Constraint on the Fracture Assessment of an Al 5083-O Weldment for Low Temperature Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Hyun Moon

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The constraint effect is the key issue in structural integrity assessments based on two parameter fracture mechanics (TPFM to make a precise prediction of the load-bearing capacity of cracked structural components. In this study, a constraint-based failure assessment diagram (FAD was used to assess the fracture behavior of an Al 5083-O weldment with various flaws at cryogenic temperature. The results were compared with those of BS 7910 Option 1 FAD, in terms of the maximum allowable stress. A series of fracture toughness tests were conducted with compact tension (CT specimens at room and cryogenic temperatures. The Q parameter for the Al 5083-O weldment was evaluated to quantify the constraint level, which is the difference between the actual stress, and the Hutchinson-Rice-Rosengren (HRR stress field near the crack tip. Nonlinear 3D finite element analysis was carried out to calculate the Q parameter at cryogenic temperature. Based on the experimental and numerical results, the influence of the constraint level correction on the allowable applied stress was investigated using a FAD methodology. The results showed that the constraint-based FAD procedure is essential to avoid an overly conservative allowable stress prediction in an Al 5083-O weldment with flaws.

  17. Effects of polyamines and polyamine biosynthetic inhibitors on mitotic activity of Allium cepa root tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Meral; Palavan-Unsal, Narcin; Tufekci, M A

    2008-03-01

    The genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of exogenous polyamines (PAs), putrescine (Put), spermidine (Spd), spermine (Spm) and PA biosynthetic inhibitors, alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), cyclohexilamine (CHA), methylglioxal bis-(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) were investigated in the root meristems of Allium cepa L. The reduction of mitotic index and the induction of chromosomal aberrations such as bridges, stickiness, c-mitotic anaphases, micronuclei, endoredupliction by PAs and PA biosynthetic inhibitors were observed and these were used as evidence of genotoxicity and cytotoxicity.

  18. Irrigation and fertilization effects on Nantucket Pine Tip Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) Damage levels and pupal weight in an intensively-managed pine plantation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coyle, David, R.; Nowak, John, T.; Fettig, Christopher, J.

    2003-10-01

    The widespread application of intensive forest management practices throughout the southeastern U.S. has increased loblolly pine, Pinus taeda L., yields and shortened conventional rotation lengths. Fluctuations in Nantucket pine tip moth, Rhyacionia frustrana (Comstock), population density and subsequent damage levels have been linked to variations in management intensity. We examined the effects of two practices, irrigation and fertilization, on R. frustrana damage levels and pupal weights in an intensively-managed P. taeda plantation in South Carolina. Trees received intensive weed control and one of the following treatments; irrigation only. fertilization only, irrigation + fertilization, or control. Mean whole-tree tip moth damage levels ranged from <1 to 48% during this study. Damage levels differed significantly among treatments in two tip moth generations in 2001, but not 2000. Pupal weight was significantly heavier in fertilization compared to the irrigation treatment in 2000, but no significant differences were observed in 2001. Tree diameter. height. and aboveground volume were significantly greater in the irrigation + fertilization than in the irrigation treatment after two growing seasons. Our data suggest that intensive management practices that include irrigation and fertilization do not consistently increase R. frustrana damage levels and pupal weights as is commonly believed. However, tip moth suppression efforts in areas adjacent to our study may have partially reduced the potential impacts of R. frustrana on this experiment.

  19. Effects of communication burstiness on consensus formation and tipping points in social dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, C.; Szymanski, B. K.; Korniss, G.

    2017-06-01

    Current models for opinion dynamics typically utilize a Poisson process for speaker selection, making the waiting time between events exponentially distributed. Human interaction tends to be bursty though, having higher probabilities of either extremely short waiting times or long periods of silence. To quantify the burstiness effects on the dynamics of social models, we place in competition two groups exhibiting different speakers' waiting-time distributions. These competitions are implemented in the binary naming game and show that the relevant aspect of the waiting-time distribution is the density of the head rather than that of the tail. We show that even with identical mean waiting times, a group with a higher density of short waiting times is favored in competition over the other group. This effect remains in the presence of nodes holding a single opinion that never changes, as the fraction of such committed individuals necessary for achieving consensus decreases dramatically when they have a higher head density than the holders of the competing opinion. Finally, to quantify differences in burstiness, we introduce the expected number of small-time activations and use it to characterize the early-time regime of the system.

  20. Analysis Effect of Duct Length– Nozzle Diameter Ratio and Tip Clearance Variation on the Performance of K-Series Propeller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan Syarif Arief

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available One type of ship propeller is a ducted propeller. Ducted propellers are propellers with sheath or duct that can increase thrust on the propeller and  useful for directing the flow of water that will pass through the Propeller. In addition to improving thrust, ducted propellers can also increase torque compared with no duct. The basic theory of momentum for this ducted propeller operation has been used by Horn (1940. In order for the efficiency of the thrust to be of good value, the volume of water passing through the propeller should be as large as possible, with the smallest possible flow velocity. The most important components of ducted propeller are Ld / D and tip clearance. Ld / D is a coefficient comparison between the length of the casing / duct and the diameter of the duct, while the tip clearance is the distance between the tip of the propeller with an inner diameter of the duct. Both components are discussed in this study. The purpose of this research is to know the performance of propeller after given variation on Ld / D and tip clearance. The method used for propeller analysis is Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD. Based on simulation result, the most optimal propeller performance is ducted propeller with Ld / D = 0.5 and tip clearance 40 mm

  1. Comparison of photon organ and effective dose coefficients for PIMAL stylized phantom in bent positions in standard irradiation geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewji, Shaheen; Reed, K Lisa; Hiller, Mauritius

    2017-08-01

    Computational phantoms with articulated arms and legs have been constructed to enable the estimation of radiation dose in different postures. Through a graphical user interface, the Phantom wIth Moving Arms and Legs (PIMAL) version 4.1.0 software can be employed to articulate the posture of a phantom and generate a corresponding input deck for the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code. In this work, photon fluence-to-dose coefficients were computed using PIMAL to compare organ and effective doses for a stylized phantom in the standard upright position with those for phantoms in realistic work postures. The articulated phantoms represent working positions including fully and half bent torsos with extended arms for both the male and female reference adults. Dose coefficients are compared for both the upright and bent positions across monoenergetic photon energies: 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, and 5.0 MeV. Additionally, the organ doses are compared across the International Commission on Radiological Protection's standard external radiation exposure geometries: antero-posterior, postero-anterior, left and right lateral, and isotropic (AP, PA, LLAT, RLAT, and ISO). For the AP and PA irradiation geometries, differences in organ doses compared to the upright phantom become more profound with increasing bending angles and have doses largely overestimated for all organs except the brain in AP and bladder in PA. In LLAT and RLAT irradiation geometries, energy deposition for organs is more likely to be underestimated compared to the upright phantom, with no overall change despite increased bending angle. The ISO source geometry did not cause a significant difference in absorbed organ dose between the different phantoms, regardless of position. Organ and effective fluence-to-dose coefficients are tabulated. In the AP geometry, the effective dose at the 45° bent position is overestimated compared to the upright phantom below 1 MeV by as much as 27% and 82% in the 90

  2. Comparison of photon organ and effective dose coefficients for PIMAL stylized phantom in bent positions in standard irradiation geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewji, Shaheen; Hiller, Mauritius [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge, Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Reed, K.L. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Nuclear and Radiological Engineering Program, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    Computational phantoms with articulated arms and legs have been constructed to enable the estimation of radiation dose in different postures. Through a graphical user interface, the Phantom wIth Moving Arms and Legs (PIMAL) version 4.1.0 software can be employed to articulate the posture of a phantom and generate a corresponding input deck for the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code. In this work, photon fluence-to-dose coefficients were computed using PIMAL to compare organ and effective doses for a stylized phantom in the standard upright position with those for phantoms in realistic work postures. The articulated phantoms represent working positions including fully and half bent torsos with extended arms for both the male and female reference adults. Dose coefficients are compared for both the upright and bent positions across monoenergetic photon energies: 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, and 5.0 MeV. Additionally, the organ doses are compared across the International Commission on Radiological Protection's standard external radiation exposure geometries: antero-posterior, postero-anterior, left and right lateral, and isotropic (AP, PA, LLAT, RLAT, and ISO). For the AP and PA irradiation geometries, differences in organ doses compared to the upright phantom become more profound with increasing bending angles and have doses largely overestimated for all organs except the brain in AP and bladder in PA. In LLAT and RLAT irradiation geometries, energy deposition for organs is more likely to be underestimated compared to the upright phantom, with no overall change despite increased bending angle. The ISO source geometry did not cause a significant difference in absorbed organ dose between the different phantoms, regardless of position. Organ and effective fluence-to-dose coefficients are tabulated. In the AP geometry, the effective dose at the 45 bent position is overestimated compared to the upright phantom below 1 MeV by as much as 27% and 82% in the

  3. Matter in toy dynamical geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konopka, Tomasz

    2009-01-01

    One of the objectives of theories describing quantum dynamical geometry is to compute expectation values of geometrical observables. The results of such computations can be affected by whether or not matter is taken into account. It is thus important to understand to what extent and to what effect matter can affect dynamical geometries. Using a simple model, it is shown that matter can effectively mold a geometry into an isotropic configuration. Implications for 'atomistic' models of quantum geometry are briefly discussed.

  4. Effect of the Cutting Tool Geometry on the Tool Wear Resistance When Machining Inconel 625

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Zlámal

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the design of a suitable cutting geometry of a tool for the machining of the Inconel 625 nickel alloy. This alloy is among the hard-to-machine refractory alloys that cause very rapid wear on cutting tools. Therefore, SNMG and RCMT indexable cutting insert were used to machine the alloy. The selected insert geometry should prevent notch wear and extend tool life. The alloy was machined under predetermined cutting conditions. The angle of the main edge and thus the size and nature of the wear changed with the depth of the material layer being cut. The criterion for determining a more suitable cutting geometry was the tool’s durability and the roughness of the machined surface.

  5. Geometry effects on the (e, 2e) cross section on ionic targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khajuria, Y.

    2005-01-01

    The three body distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA) with spin averaged static exchange potential has been used to calculate the electron impact triple-differential cross section of Li + , Na + and K + ions in different geometries and kinematics. In coplanar geometry at high incident energy (≥ 500 eV) and scattering angle ∼10deg, both recoil and binary peaks in case of p-orbital electrons splits into two. The value of the binary to the recoil peak ratio for the specific value of the momentum transfer has been determined to understand the collision dynamics. In the non-coplanar geometry a strong interference resulting in a dip in triple differential cross section (TDCS) has been noticed. (author)

  6. Geometry Revealed

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, Marcel

    2010-01-01

    Both classical geometry and modern differential geometry have been active subjects of research throughout the 20th century and lie at the heart of many recent advances in mathematics and physics. The underlying motivating concept for the present book is that it offers readers the elements of a modern geometric culture by means of a whole series of visually appealing unsolved (or recently solved) problems that require the creation of concepts and tools of varying abstraction. Starting with such natural, classical objects as lines, planes, circles, spheres, polygons, polyhedra, curves, surfaces,

  7. Analytic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Burdette, A C

    1971-01-01

    Analytic Geometry covers several fundamental aspects of analytic geometry needed for advanced subjects, including calculus.This book is composed of 12 chapters that review the principles, concepts, and analytic proofs of geometric theorems, families of lines, the normal equation of the line, and related matters. Other chapters highlight the application of graphing, foci, directrices, eccentricity, and conic-related topics. The remaining chapters deal with the concept polar and rectangular coordinates, surfaces and curves, and planes.This book will prove useful to undergraduate trigonometric st

  8. Study on the geometry dimension effect of heavy rail through compound roll straightening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei-long; Song, Hua; Chen, Ming

    2010-01-01

    The paper starts with the active straightening regulations of the compound-roller straightener in certain factory. It adopted the explicit dynamics FEM software ANSYS/LS-DYNA and carried out the numerical simulation calculation of the compound-roller straightening process for 60 kg/m heavy rail with original curvature. It also made post-processing program to manage the simulation results and obtained the geometry dimension changing information of heavy rail after straightening. It analysed the geometry dimension changing conditions of heavy rail after straightening. It has great reference value to improve the quality of heavy rail.

  9. Geometry Effects on Multipole Components and Beam Optics in High-Velocity Multi-Spoke Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopper, Christopher S. [ODU, JLAB; Deitrick, Kirsten E. [ODU, JLAB; Delayen, Jean R. [ODU, JLAB

    2013-12-01

    Velocity-of-light, multi-spoke cavities are being proposed to accelerate electrons in a compact light-source. There are strict requirements on the beam quality which require that the linac have only small non-uniformities in the accelerating field. Beam dynamics simulations have uncovered varying levels of focusing and defocusing in the proposed cavities, which is dependent on the geometry of the spoke in the vicinity of the beam path. Here we present results for the influence different spoke geometries have on the multipole components of the accelerating field and how these components, in turn, impact the simulated beam properties.

  10. ZBrush Professional Tips and Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Gaboury, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Learn to work effectively and creatively with all versions of ZBrush! ZBrush is used by top artists in Hollywood to model and sculpt characters in such films as Avatar, Iron Man, and Pirates of the Caribbean. In addition, this amazing technology is also used in jewelry design, forensic science, aerospace, video games, toy creation, and the medical field. Written by Pixologic's in-house ZBrush expert Paul Gaboury, this full-color, beautifully illustrated guide provides you with the ultimate tips and tricks to maximize your use of all versions of ZBrush. Reveals numerous little-known tips and tr

  11. Hemodynamic effect of bypass geometry on intracranial aneurysm: A numerical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurşun, Burak; Uğur, Levent; Keskin, Gökhan

    2018-05-01

    Hemodynamic analyzes are used in the clinical investigation and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. In the present study, the effect of bypass geometry on intracranial aneurysm hemodynamics was investigated numerically. Pressure, wall shear stress (WSS) and velocity distribution causing the aneurysm to grow and rupture were investigated and the best conditions were tried to be determined in case of bypassing between basilar (BA) and left/right posterior arteries (LPCA/RPCA) for different values of parameters. The finite volume method was used for numerical solutions and calculations were performed with the ANSYS-Fluent software. The SIMPLE algorithm was used to solve the discretized conservation equations. Second Order Upwind method was preferred for finding intermediate point values in the computational domain. As the blood flow velocity changes with time, the blood viscosity value also changes. For this reason, the Carreu model was used in determining the viscosity depending on the velocity. Numerical study results showed that when bypassed, pressure and wall shear stresses reduced in the range of 40-70% in the aneurysm. Numerical results obtained are presented in graphs including the variation of pressure, wall shear stress and velocity streamlines in the aneurysm. Considering the numerical results for all parameter values, it is seen that the most important factors affecting the pressure and WSS values in bypassing are the bypass position on the basilar artery (L b ) and the diameter of the bypass vessel (d). Pressure and wall shear stress reduced in the range of 40-70% in the aneurysm in the case of bypass for all parameters. This demonstrates that pressure and WSS values can be greatly reduced in aneurysm treatment by bypassing in cases where clipping or coil embolization methods can not be applied. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular Geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desseyn, H. O.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Compares linear-nonlinear and planar-nonplanar geometry through the valence-shell electron pairs repulsion (V.S.E.P.R.), Mulliken-Walsh, and electrostatic force theories. Indicates that although the V.S.E.P.R. theory has more advantages for elementary courses, an explanation of the best features of the different theories offers students a better…

  13. Geometry VI

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 8. Geometry VI - Space-the Final Frontier. Kapil H Paranjape. Series Article Volume 1 Issue 8 August 1996 pp 28-33. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/001/08/0028-0033 ...

  14. Geometry -----------~--------------RESONANCE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mathematicians were at war with one another because Euclid's axioms for geometry were not entirely acceptable to all. Archi- medes, Pasch and others introduced further axioms as they thought that Euclid had missed a few, while other mathematicians were bothered by the non-elementary nature of the parallel axiom.

  15. Nonlocal effective actions in semiclassical gravity: Thermal effects in stationary geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elías, M.; Mazzitelli, F. D.; Trombetta, L. G.

    2017-11-01

    We compute the gravitational effective action by integrating out quantum matter fields in a weak gravitational field, using the Schwinger-Keldysh (in-in) formalism. We pay particular attention to the role of the initial quantum state in the structure of the nonlocal terms in the effective action, with an eye to nonlinear completions of the theory that may be relevant in astrophysics and cosmology. In this first paper we consider a quantum scalar field in thermal equilibrium, in a stationary gravitational field. We obtain a covariant expression for the nonlocal effective action, which can be expressed in terms of the curvature tensor, the four-velocity of the thermal bath, and the local Tolman temperature. We discuss the connection between the results for ultrastatic and static metrics through conformal transformations, and the main features of the thermal corrections to the semiclassical Einstein equations.

  16. Effect of particle geometry and micro-structure on fast pyrolysis of beech wood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, Roel Johannes Maria; Nygard, H.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; Brilman, Derk Willem Frederik

    2012-01-01

    The influence of particle geometry and microstructure in fast pyrolysis of beech wood has been investigated. Milled wood particles (<0.08–2.4 mm) and natural wood cylinders (2–14 mm) with different lengths (10–50 mm) and artificial wood cylinders (Dp = 0.5–14 mm) made of steel walls, filled with

  17. Reconstruction of Effective Cloud Field Geometry from Series of Sunshine Number

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Badescu, V.; Paulescu, M.; Brabec, Marek

    176-177, 1 July - 1 August (2016), s. 254-266 ISSN 0169-8095 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : cloud field geometry * sunshine number * point cloud iness Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 3.778, year: 2016

  18. The Effect of Visual-Chunking-Representation Accommodation on Geometry Testing for Students with Math Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dake; Ding, Yi; Stegall, Joanna; Mo, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Students who struggle with learning mathematics often have difficulties with geometry problem solving, which requires strong visual imagery skills. These difficulties have been correlated with deficiencies in visual working memory. Cognitive psychology has shown that chunking of visual items accommodates students' working memory deficits. This…

  19. The Effect of Designed Geometry Teaching Lesson to the Candidate Teachers' Van Hiele Geometric Thinking Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Gül Kaleli; Koparan, Timur

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to find out how designed Geometry Teaching Lesson affects candidate teachers' Van Hiele Geometric Thinking Levels. For that purpose, 14 weeks long study was performed with 44 candidate teachers who were university students in Turkey. Van Hiele Geometric Thinking Test was applied to candidate teachers before and after…

  20. Effect of interior geometry on local climate inside an electronic device enclosure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshy, Salil; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2017-01-01

    Electronic enclosure design and the internal arrangement of PCBs and components influence microclimate inside the enclosure. This work features a general electronic unit with parallel PCBs. One of the PCB is considered to have heat generating components on it. The humidity and temperature profiles...... geometry of the device and related enclosure design parameters on the humidity and temperature profiles inside the electronic device enclosure....

  1. Effects of growth on geometry of gastrocnemius muscle in children: a three-dimensional ultrasound analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benard, M.R.; Harlaar, J.; Becher, J.G.; Huijing, P.A.; Jaspers, R.T.

    2011-01-01

    During development, muscle growth is usually finely adapted to meet functional demands in daily activities. However, how muscle geometry changes in typically developing children and how these changes are related to functional and mechanical properties is largely unknown. In rodents, longitudinal

  2. Modeling the Coupled Effects of Pore Space Geometry and Velocity on Colloid Transport and Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent experimental and theoretical work has demonstrated that pore space geometry and hydrodynamics can play an important role in colloid retention under unfavorable attachment conditions. Computer models that only consider the average pore-water velocity and a single attachment rate coefficient a...

  3. Influence of rheology and geometry on the teapot effect of a curtain coater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döll, H.; Gerlach, D.; Alleborn, N.; Delgado, A.

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigates the deflection of a liquid sheet forming at the die lip of a slide-fed curtain coater, known as ‘teapot effect’. The influence of the shear-rate dependent viscosity, the geometry of the lip edge and the flow rate on the degree of deflection has been considered.

  4. The Effect of Combined Magnetic Geometries on Thermally Driven Winds. I. Interaction of Dipolar and Quadrupolar Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finley, Adam J.; Matt, Sean P., E-mail: af472@exeter.ac.uk [University of Exeter (UK), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stoker Road, Devon, Exeter, EX4 4QL (United Kingdom)

    2017-08-10

    Cool stars with outer convective envelopes are observed to have magnetic fields with a variety of geometries, which on large scales are dominated by a combination of the lowest-order fields such as the dipole, quadrupole, and octupole modes. Magnetized stellar wind outflows are primarily responsible for the loss of angular momentum from these objects during the main sequence. Previous works have shown the reduced effectiveness of the stellar wind braking mechanism with increasingly complex but singular magnetic field geometries. In this paper, we quantify the impact of mixed dipolar and quadrupolar fields on the spin-down torque using 50 MHD simulations with mixed fields, along with 10 each of the pure geometries. The simulated winds include a wide range of magnetic field strength and reside in the slow-rotator regime. We find that the stellar wind braking torque from our combined geometry cases is well described by a broken power-law behavior, where the torque scaling with field strength can be predicted by the dipole component alone or the quadrupolar scaling utilizing the total field strength. The simulation results can be scaled and apply to all main-sequence cool stars. For solar parameters, the lowest-order component of the field (dipole in this paper) is the most significant in determining the angular momentum loss.

  5. The effects of treadmill exercise training on hip bone density and tibial bone geometry in stroke survivors: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Marco Y C; Lau, Ricky W K

    2010-05-01

    Individuals with stroke often sustain bone loss on the hemiparetic side and are prone to fragility fractures. Exercise training may be a viable way to promote bone mineral density (BMD) and geometry in this population. This was a pilot study to evaluate the effects of a 6-month treadmill exercise program on hip BMD and tibial bone geometry in chronic stroke survivors. Twenty-one individuals with chronic stroke, with a mean age of 64.5 years and mean post-stroke duration of 8.3 years participated in the study. The treatment group underwent a treadmill gait exercise program (two 1-hour sessions per week for 6 months), whereas the control group participated in their usual self-selected activities in the community. The primary outcomes were hip BMD and bone geometry of the midshaft tibia on the paretic side, whereas the secondary outcomes were gait velocity, endurance, leg muscle strength, balance self-efficacy, and physical activity level. Mann-Whitney U tests were used to compare the change in all outcome variables between the 2 groups after treatment. Significant between-group differences in change scores of tibial cortical thickness (P = .016), endurance ( P = .029), leg muscle strength on the paretic side (P exercise program induced a modest improvement in tibial bone geometry in individuals with chronic stroke. Further studies are required to explore the optimal training protocol for promoting favorable changes in bone parameters following stroke.

  6. Geometry Effect Investigation on a Conical Chamber with Porous Media Boundary Condition Using Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazid Bindar

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study is an attempt to introduce the method for optimizing the geometry of the unit process. The comprehensive unit process performances are generated by a CFD engine. The CFD engine can simulate the unit process performances at what ever conditions. Both design geometry and operating variables weree used on the CFD simulation. The burden on a simplified process was taken out from CFD simulation. A complex geometry of a unit process is represented by a secondary reformer. A secondary reformer has a conical volume as a space to undergo the combustion reaction before entering the catalyst bed. This complexity is added by the boundary of the porous solid surface as the top surface of catalyst bed. The spread angle affect the flow pattern in side the conical volume having a porous solid surface as a base. The spread angle above 65o results the disappearing of the recirculation flow. The inlet distance from the porous solid surface also can exhibit different characteristics of recirculation flow. The closer the distance to the porous solid surface, the stronger the recirculation is. The inlet velocity values have no significant effect on the flow pattern. The introduction of a solid volume inside the geometry creates the distortion of the flow pattern. In the application, the inserted solid volume is equivalent to a burner. It means that the use of the burner inherently produces some problems of the flow distribution

  7. Tip vortices in the actuator line model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Luis; Meneveau, Charles

    2017-11-01

    The actuator line model (ALM) is a widely used tool to represent the wind turbine blades in computational fluid dynamics without the need to resolve the full geometry of the blades. The ALM can be optimized to represent the `correct' aerodynamics of the blades by choosing an appropriate smearing length scale ɛ. This appropriate length scale creates a tip vortex which induces a downwash near the tip of the blade. A theoretical frame-work is used to establish a solution to the induced velocity created by a tip vortex as a function of the smearing length scale ɛ. A correction is presented which allows the use of a non-optimal smearing length scale but still provides the downwash which would be induced using the optimal length scale. Thanks to the National Science Foundation (NSF) who provided financial support for this research via Grants IGERT 0801471, IIA-1243482 (the WINDINSPIRE project) and ECCS-1230788.

  8. Tips for giving a memorable presentation, part VI: the effective use of questions by a speaker, and answering questions from listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harolds, Jay A

    2012-12-01

    Previous articles in this series have focused on tips for educators and leaders in giving a presentation, followed by articles on composing the talk and PowerPoint slides. This article focuses on how a speaker can effectively use questions to engage the audience and answer questions from the listeners, including members of the media. Additional comments will be given on how to give a clear presentation so that many questions will not be necessary.

  9. The Effect of Radial Head Hemiarthroplasty Geometry on Proximal Radioulnar Joint Contact Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langohr, G Daniel G; Willing, Ryan; Medley, John B; King, Graham J W; Johnson, James A

    2016-07-01

    To compare the joint contact area and peak contact stress of different radial head (RH) hemiarthroplasty articular profiles for the proximal radioulnar joint (PRUJ) to the native radial head with the hypothesis that the side radius and side angle closest to the native mating ulnar articular profile would provide the best contact mechanics. Finite element models generated from the computed tomography geometry of 14 native elbows (73 ± 17.5 years) were subjected to 12 different RH profiles having varying side radii (flat [r = ∞ mm], 16.25, 8.12, and 4.50 mm) and side angles (0°, 5°, and 10°) under a constant compressive 20-N medial load. Contact areas and peak contact stresses were computed and compared with the native joint. On average, RH implants significantly reduced PRUJ contact area by 55% ± 16% and increased peak contact stress by 337% ± 241% compared with the native RH. The prosthesis side radius had significant effects on both contact area and stress, but side angle did not. The 16.25-mm radii produced the largest contact areas, and the 4.50-mm radius model generated the smallest contact areas. As the side radius was decreased, peak contact stress was reduced as the contact migrated toward the center of the native ulnar articulation, although the 8.12-mm radius achieved the lowest peak contact stress. Whereas RH hemiarthroplasty side radius can affect both contact area and peak contact stress, the magnitude of the effect on contact area is relatively small compared with that of the peak contact stress. Furthermore, although a flat RH side profile with a side angle of 5° more closely matched the side profile of the native ulnas used in the present study, the optimal profile was found to be a smaller radius of 8.12 mm. Optimizing PRUJ contact mechanics after metallic RH hemiarthroplasty may contribute to better clinical outcomes by reducing the potential for native cartilage degeneration. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand

  10. Numerical simulation of tip leakage vortex effect on hydrogen-combustion flow around 3D turbine blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyama, Naoto; Inaba, Kazuaki; Yamamoto, Makoto

    2008-06-01

    In these years, a lot of environmental problems such as air pollution and exhaustion of fossil fuels have been discussed intensively. In our laboratory, a hydrogen-fueled propulsion system has been researched as an alternative to conventional systems. A hydrogen-fueled propulsion system is expected to have higher power, lighter weight and lower emissions. However, for the practical use, there exist many problems that must be overcome. Considering these backgrounds, jet engines with hydrogen-fueled combustion within a turbine blade passage have been studied. Although some studies have been made on injecting and burning hydrogen fuel from a stator surface, little is known about the interaction between a tip leakage vortex near the suction side of a rotor tip and hydrogen-fueled combustion. The purpose of this study is to clarify the influence of the tip leakage vortex on the characteristics of the 3-dimensional flow field with hydrogen-fueled combustion within a turbine blade passage. Reynolds-averaged compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved with incorporating a k-ɛ turbulence and a reduced chemical mechanism models. Using the computational results, the 3-dimensional turbulent flow field with chemical reactions is numerically visualized, and the three-dimensional turbulent flow fields with hydrogen combustion and the structure of the tip leakage vortex are investigated.

  11. Optical imaging beyond the diffraction limit by SNEM: Effects of AFM tip modifications with thiol monolayers on imaging quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cumurcu, Aysegul; Diaz, J.; Lindsay, I.D.; de Beer, Sissi; Duvigneau, Joost; Schön, Peter Manfred; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2015-01-01

    Tip-enhanced nanoscale optical imaging techniques such as apertureless scanning near-field optical microscopy (a-SNOM) and scanning near-field ellipsometric microscopy (SNEM) applications can suffer from a steady degradation in performance due to adhesion of atmospheric contaminants to the metal

  12. Current-Induced Joule Heating and Electrical Field Effects in Low Temperature Measurements on TIPS Pentacene Thin Film Transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikiforov, G.O.; Venkateshvaran, D.; Mooser, S.; Meneau, A.; Strobel, T.; Kronemeijer, A.; Jiang, L.; Lee, M.J.; Sirringhaus, H.

    2016-01-01

    The channel temperature (Tch) of solution-processed 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)-pentacene (TIPS pentacene) thin film transistors (TFTs) is closely monitored in real time during current–voltage (I–V) measurements carried out in a He exchange gas cryostat at various base temperatures (Tb)

  13. Needle Tip Position and Bevel Direction Have No Effect in the Fluoroscopic Epidural Spreading Pattern in Caudal Epidural Injections: A Randomized Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won Kyoung Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Caudal epidural steroid injections (CESIs are an effective treatment for pain. If the injection spreads in a specific pattern depending on the needle position or bevel direction, it would be possible to inject the agent into a specific and desired area. Objectives. We conducted a prospective randomized trial to determine if the needle position and bevel direction have any effect on the epidural spreading pattern in CESI. Methods. Demographic data of the patient were collected. During CESI, the needle position (middle or lateral and direction (ventral or dorsal were randomly allocated. Following fluoroscope-guided injection of 4 mL contrast media and 10 mL of injectates, the epidural spreading patterns (ventral or dorsal, bilateral or lateral were imaged. Results. In the 210 CESIs performed, the needle tip position and bevel direction did not influence the epidural spreading patterns at L4-5 and L5-S1 disc levels. A history of Lumbar spine surgery was associated with a significantly limited spread to each disc level. A midline needle tip position was more effective than the lateral position in spreading to the distant disc levels. Conclusions. Neither the needle tip position nor the bevel direction affected the epidural drug spreading pattern during CESI.

  14. Effect of anode--cathode geometry on performance of the HIP-1 hot ion plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauver, M.R.

    1978-04-01

    Hot-ion hydrogen plasma experiments were conducted in the NASA Lewis HIP-1 magnetic mirror facility to determine how the ion temperature was influenced by the axial position of the cathode tips relative to the anodes. A steady-state EXB plasma was formed by applying a strong radially inward dc electric field near the throats of the magnetic mirrors. The dc electric field was created between hollow cathode rods inside hollow anode cylinders, both concentric with the magnetic axis. The highest ion temperatures, 900 eV, were attained when the tip of each cathode was in the same plane as the end of its anode. These temperatures were reached with 22 kV applied to the electrodes in a field of 1.1 tesla. Scaling relations were empirically determined for ion temperature and the product of ion density and neutral particle density as a function of cathode voltage, discharge current, and electrode positions. Plasma discharge current vs voltage (I-V) characteristics were determined

  15. Effect of particle geometry on triple line motion of nano-fluid drops and deposit nano-structuring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askounis, Alexandros; Sefiane, Khellil; Koutsos, Vasileios; Shanahan, Martin E R

    2015-08-01

    We illustrate the importance of particle geometry on droplet contact line pinning, 'coffee-stain' formation and nano-structuring within the resulting rings. We present the fundamentals of pure liquid droplet evaporation and then discuss the effect of particles on the evaporation process. The resulting coffee-stain patterns and particle structuring within them are presented and discussed. In the second part, we turn our attention to the effect of particle geometry on the evaporation process. A wide range of particle shapes, categorised according to aspect ratio, from the simple shape of a sphere to the highly irregular shapes of platelets and tubes is discussed. Particle geometry effect on evaporation behaviour was quantified in terms of change in contact angle and contact radius for the stick-slip cases. Consequently the hysteretic energy barrier pinning the droplets was estimated, showing an increasing trend with particle aspect ratio. The three-phase contact line (TL) motion kinetics are complemented with analysis of the nano-structuring behaviour of each shape, leading to the identification of the two main parameters affecting nanoparticle self-assembly behaviour at the wedge. Flow velocity and wedge constraints were found to have antagonist effects on particle deposition, although these varied with particle shape. This description should help in understanding the drying behaviour of more complex fluids. Furthermore, knowing the fundamentals of this simple and inexpensive surface patterning technique should permit its tailoring to the needs of many potential applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Thermodynamic analysis of the effect of channel geometry on heat transfer in double-layered microchannel heat sinks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai, Yuling; Li, Zhouhang; Wang, Hua; Xu, Jianxin

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel geometry with rectangular and complex channels in each layer is presented. • It shows lower pressure drop and more uniform temperature distribution. • The essence of enhanced heat transfer is analyzed from thermodynamics. - Abstract: Novel double-layered microchannel heat sinks with different channel geometries in each layer (Structure 2 for short) are designed to reduce pressure drop and maintain good heat transfer performance, which is compared with structure 1 (the same of complex channel geometry in each layer). The effect of parallel flow, counter flow and different channel geometries on heat transfer is studied numerically. Moreover, the essence of heat transfer enhancement is analyzed by thermodynamics. On one hand, the synergy relationship between flow field and temperature field is analyzed by field synergy principle. On the other hand, the irreversibility of heat transfer is studied by transport efficiency of thermal energy. The results show that the temperature distribution of counter flow is more uniform than that of parallel flow. Furthermore, heat dissipation and pressure drop of structure 2 are both better and lower than that of structure 1. Form the viewpoint of temperature distribution, structure C2 (i.e., counter flow with rectangular channels in upper layer and complex channels in bottom layer) presents the most uniform bottom temperature for microelectronic cooling. However, comprehensive heat transfer performance of structure P2 (i.e., parallel flow with rectangular channels in upper layer and complex channels in bottom layer) shows the best from the viewpoint of thermodynamics. The reasons can be ascribed to the channel geometry of structure P2 can obviously improve the synergy relationship between temperature and velocity fields, reduce fluid temperature gradient and heat transfer irreversibility.

  17. Tips in Reading Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    Some tips can assist teachers in guiding each pupil to achieve more optimally, with respect to the ability to read well and reading comprehension. Among these 10 specific tips are: (1) teach individualized phonics in context; (2) assist the student to read in proper thought units by covering up words in sentences for clarification; (3) assist…

  18. ADHD: Tips to Try

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español ADHD: Tips to Try KidsHealth / For Teens / ADHD: Tips to Try Print en español TDAH: Consejos que puedes probar ADHD , short for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder , is a ...

  19. Total Telephone Tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corder, Lloyd E.; And Others

    This manual of telephone behavior tips for business and sales professionals offers ways to handle the disgruntled caller and makes suggestions on topics relevant to the telephone. The manual is divided into the following sections and subsections: (1) Common Courtesy (staff tips, answering the telephone, screening calls, transferring calls, taking…

  20. Methods for root effects, tip effects and extending the angle of attack range to {+-} 180 deg., with application to aerodynamics for blades on wind turbines and propellers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomerie, Bjoern

    2004-06-01

    For wind turbine and propeller performance calculations aerodynamic data, valid for several radial stations along the blade, are used. For wind turbines the data must be valid for the 360 degree angle of attack range. The reason is that all kinds of abnormal conditions must be analysed especially during the design of the turbine. Frequently aerodynamic data are available from wind tunnel tests where the angle of attack range is from say -5 to +20 degrees. This report describes a method to extend such data to be valid for {+-} 180 degrees. Previously the extension of data has been very approximate following the whim of the moment with the analyst. Furthermore, the Himmelskamp effect at the root and tip effects are treated in the complete method.

  1. Special geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strominger, A.

    1990-01-01

    A special manifold is an allowed target manifold for the vector multiplets of D=4, N=2 supergravity. These manifolds are of interest for string theory because the moduli spaces of Calabi-Yau threefolds and c=9, (2,2) conformal field theories are special. Previous work has given a local, coordinate-dependent characterization of special geometry. A global description of special geometries is given herein, and their properties are studied. A special manifold M of complex dimension n is characterized by the existence of a holomorphic Sp(2n+2,R)xGL(1,C) vector bundle over M with a nowhere-vanishing holomorphic section Ω. The Kaehler potential on M is the logarithm of the Sp(2n+2,R) invariant norm of Ω. (orig.)

  2. Geometrie coniugate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Paris

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Lo studio degli ingranaggi si basa sulle geometrie coniugate in cui due curve o due superfici si mantengono costantemente in contatto pur se in movimento reciproco. La teoria geometrica degli ingranaggi fino alla fine del XIX secolo era uno dei molteplici rami nelle applicazioni della Geometria Descrittiva. Lo studio si basa sulla conoscenza delle principali proprietà delle curve piane e gobbe e delle loro derivate. La specificità del tema è che queste geometrie nel momento in cui si devono relazionare con le loro coniugate, devono rispettare dei vincoli che altrimenti non avrebbero. Si vuole evidenziare attraverso casi concreti il ruolo della geometria descrittiva nel passaggio dal teorico al pratico riproponendo in chiave informatica, temi e procedure di indagine spesso passati in secondo piano se non addirittura dimenticati.

  3. Riemannian geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Petersen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Intended for a one year course, this text serves as a single source, introducing readers to the important techniques and theorems, while also containing enough background on advanced topics to appeal to those students wishing to specialize in Riemannian geometry. This is one of the few Works to combine both the geometric parts of Riemannian geometry and the analytic aspects of the theory. The book will appeal to a readership that have a basic knowledge of standard manifold theory, including tensors, forms, and Lie groups. Important revisions to the third edition include: a substantial addition of unique and enriching exercises scattered throughout the text; inclusion of an increased number of coordinate calculations of connection and curvature; addition of general formulas for curvature on Lie Groups and submersions; integration of variational calculus into the text allowing for an early treatment of the Sphere theorem using a proof by Berger; incorporation of several recent results about manifolds with posit...

  4. Effect of roughness and porosity on geometry and kinematics of lock-exchange gravity currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatto, Elena; Adduce, Claudia; Ferreira, Rui M. L.

    2017-04-01

    Gravity currents generated by lock-exchange are an important research tool to understand key features of flows driven by a density may be naturally caused by interaction of geophysical nature but may also be triggered by adverse anthropic actions, from oil spills to pollution related turbidity. Research on the fundamental geometrical and kinematic features of these currents is still necessary, especially when they propagate on complex geometries. The purpose of this work is to investigate the shape and the velocity of propagation of gravity currents over rough beds and over rough-porous beds. To attain this objective, different initial conditions were specified, namely smooth bed, rough bed composed of a single layer of 2 mm glass beads and rough and porous bed composed of 4 layers of the same beads. The dimensions of the channel are 300 × 19,6 × 40 cm in which a steel gate is inserted to define the lock. Two initial mixtures were tested: 1015 and 1030 kgm-3. The density is measured with a pycnometer on a high precision balance. The mixture is composed of fresh water, salt and rhodamine, to allow for visualization and measurements based on image analysis. A high-speed video system camera was used to record the motion of the current. The camera has a 50 mm lens and a sampling frequency of 100 fps. Gray-level images were obtained with 8 bit depth. Calibration of gray-levels was performed pixel by pixel to mixture concentrations. The current is examined in three positions: immediately after the gate ((x-x0)/x0 = 0 to 3), in the middle ((x-x0)/x0 = 5 to 8) and at the end of the channel((x - x0)/x0 = 10 to 13). It is shown that the celerity of the gravity current wave front varies with the different boundary conditions. Indeed, the current is faster for the smooth bed and slower for the rough bed conditions. No appreciable effects of porosity were registered on the wave celerity. The shape of the current varied slightly between the rough and the porous-rough tests

  5. The effect of roll gap geometry on microstructure in cold-rolled aluminum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishin, Oleg; Bay, B.; Winther, G.

    2004-01-01

    Microstructure and texture are analyzed through the thickness of two aluminum plates cold-rolled 40% with different roll gap geometries. It is found that both texture and microstructure are strongly affected by the rolling geometry. After rolling with intermediate-size draughts a rolling...... layers. In these layers, extended planar dislocation boundaries are frequently found to be inclined closely to the rolling direction. The subsurface and central layers of this plate exhibit microstructures similar to those in the plate rolled with intermediate draughts. It is suggested...... that the development of different textures and microstructures at different depths is related to the activation of different slip systems due to through-thickness strain gradients....

  6. The Effect of Strike Face Geometry on the Dynamic Delamination of Composite Back Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    delaminations visible from the back side of the target. Transparent ceramics such as AlON are expensive because of the high cost of machining and...to reduce the delamination growth velocity and delamination area respectively. More research should be done to find the optimal ceramic tile geometry...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Ceramics are often employed as a hard strike face in composite armor systems. The ceramic serves to break up and erode

  7. Probing bulk physics in the 5/2 fractional quantum Hall effect using the Corbino geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Benjamin; Bennaceur, Keyan; Bilodeau, Simon; Gaucher, Samuel; Lilly, Michael; Reno, John; Pfeiffer, Loren; West, Ken; Reulet, Bertrand; Gervais, Guillaume

    We present two- and four-point Corbino geometry transport measurements in the second Landau level in GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures. By avoiding edge transport, we are able to directly probe the physics of the bulk quasiparticles in fractional quantum Hall (FQH) states including 5/2. Our highest-quality sample shows stripe and bubble phases in high Landau levels, and most importantly well-resolved FQH minima in the second Landau level. We report Arrhenius-type fits to the activated conductance, and find that σ0 agrees well with theory and existing Hall geometry data in the first Landau level, but not in the second Landau level. We will discuss the advantages the Corbino geometry could bring to various experiments designed to detect the non-Abelian entropy at 5/2, and our progress towards realizing those schemes. The results of these experiments could complement interferometry and other edge-based measurements by providing direct evidence for non-Abelian behaviour of the bulk quasiparticles. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL8500.

  8. Effect of Random Natural Fractures on Hydraulic Fracture Propagation Geometry in Fractured Carbonate Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiyuan; Wang, Shijie; Zhao, Haiyang; Wang, Lei; Li, Wei; Geng, Yudi; Tao, Shan; Zhang, Guangqing; Chen, Mian

    2018-02-01

    Natural fractures have a significant influence on the propagation geometry of hydraulic fractures in fractured reservoirs. True triaxial volumetric fracturing experiments, in which random natural fractures are created by placing cement blocks of different dimensions in a cuboid mold and filling the mold with additional cement to create the final test specimen, were used to study the factors that influence the hydraulic fracture propagation geometry. These factors include the presence of natural fractures around the wellbore, the dimension and volumetric density of random natural fractures and the horizontal differential stress. The results show that volumetric fractures preferentially formed when natural fractures occurred around the wellbore, the natural fractures are medium to long and have a volumetric density of 6-9%, and the stress difference is less than 11 MPa. The volumetric fracture geometries are mainly major multi-branch fractures with fracture networks or major multi-branch fractures (2-4 fractures). The angles between the major fractures and the maximum horizontal in situ stress are 30°-45°, and fracture networks are located at the intersections of major multi-branch fractures. Short natural fractures rarely led to the formation of fracture networks. Thus, the interaction between hydraulic fractures and short natural fractures has little engineering significance. The conclusions are important for field applications and for gaining a deeper understanding of the formation process of volumetric fractures.

  9. General Geometry and Geometry of Electromagnetism

    OpenAIRE

    Shahverdiyev, Shervgi S.

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that Electromagnetism creates geometry different from Riemannian geometry. General geometry including Riemannian geometry as a special case is constructed. It is proven that the most simplest special case of General Geometry is geometry underlying Electromagnetism. Action for electromagnetic field and Maxwell equations are derived from curvature function of geometry underlying Electromagnetism. And it is shown that equation of motion for a particle interacting with electromagnetic...

  10. A comparison of two crystals of 6, 13-bis (tri-isopropylsilylethynyl) pentacene (TIPS-pentacene) prepared for organic field effect transistors (OFETs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtaza, Ghulam; Ahmad, Ishtiaq; Wu, Jiake

    2015-07-01

    We report on the comparative study of two single crystals grown for organic field effect transistors having different concentration, contact step height, surface roughness and crystallinity of single crystals prepared by droplet pinned crystallization (DPC) method. Organic Field-Effect Transistors (OFETs) consisting of 6, 13-bis (tri-isopropylsilyl-ethynyl) pentacene (TIPS-pentacene) as active semiconducting layer are fabricated. The concentration range of TIPS-pentacene is taken from 0.2 mg/ml to 1.0 mg/ml but for the detailed study, OFETs with concentration of 0.2 mg/ml and 0.6 mg/ml are selected. Five devices for each concentration are fabricated by varying contact positions whereas the top drain and source contacts are made of gold. The calculated values of the threshold voltage, sub threshold slope, Number of interface traps and the saturation mobility of TIPS-pentacene having concentration 0.2 mg/ml are in the range from -12 V to 13 V, -16 (V/decades) to -30 (V/decades), 1.67 × 1012 cm-2 eV-1 to 3.13 × 1012 cm-2 eV-1 and 0.2 to 1.1 cm2/V s while the values for the concentration 0.6 mg/ml are -22 V to 2.6 V,-17 (V/decade) to -22 (V/decade), 1.77 × 1012 cm-2 eV-1 to 2.29 × 1012 cm-2 eV-1 and 2.0-2.2 cm2/V s. The mobility degradation of TIPS-pentacene is found at different gate voltages.

  11. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the liver). Portal hypertension can also occur in children, although children are much less likely to require a TIPS. ... intentionally to solve the problem. Although extremely rare, children may also require a TIPS procedure. TIPS in ...

  12. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... vs. risks? What are the limitations of TIPS? What is a Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)? A ... likely to require a TIPS. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A ...

  13. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pressure. top of page How does the procedure work? A TIPS reroutes blood flow in the liver ... TIPS is a minimally invasive procedure that typically has a shorter recovery time than surgery. Your TIPS ...

  14. Effects of seed geometry on the crystal growth and the magnetic properties of single grain REBCO bulk superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hwi Joo; Lee, Hee Gyoun [Korea Polytechnic University, Siheung (Korea, Republic of); Park, Soon Dong; Jun, Bung Hyack; Kim, Chan Joong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    This study presents that the orientation and the geometry of seed affect on the growth behavior of melt processed single grain REBCO bulk superconductor and its magnetic properties. The effects of seed geometry have been investigated for thin 30mm x 30mm rectangular powder compacts. Single grain REBCO bulk superconductors have been grown successfully by a top seed melt growth method for 8-mm thick vertical thin REBCO slab. Asymmetric structures have been developed at the front surface and at the rear surface of the specimen. Higher magnetic properties have been obtained for the specimen that c-axis is normal to the specimen surface. The relationships between microstructure, grain growth and magnetic properties have been discussed.

  15. Transport spin dependent in nanostructures: Current and geometry effect of quantum dots in presence of spin-orbit interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes-Gutiérrez, H.; Pérez-Merchancano, S. T.; Beltran-Rios, C. L.

    2017-12-01

    In this work, we study the quantum electron transport through a Quantum Dots Structure (QDs), with different geometries, embedded in a Quantum Well (QW). The behaviour of the current through the nanostructure (dot and well) is studied considering the orbital spin coupling of the electrons and the Rashba effect, by means of the second quantization theory and the standard model of Green’s functions. Our results show the behaviour of the current in the quantum system as a function of the electric field, presenting resonant states for specific values of both the external field and the spin polarization. Similarly, the behaviour of the current on the nanostructure changes when the geometry of the QD and the size of the same are modified as a function of the polarization of the electron spin and the potential of quantum confinement.

  16. Economics of tipping the climate dominoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemoine, Derek; Traeger, Christian P.

    2016-05-01

    Greenhouse gas emissions can trigger irreversible regime shifts in the climate system, known as tipping points. Multiple tipping points affect each other’s probability of occurrence, potentially causing a `domino effect’. We analyse climate policy in the presence of a potential domino effect. We incorporate three different tipping points occurring at unknown thresholds into an integrated climate-economy model. The optimal emission policy considers all possible thresholds and the resulting interactions between tipping points, economic activity, and policy responses into the indefinite future. We quantify the cost of delaying optimal emission controls in the presence of uncertain tipping points and also the benefit of detecting when individual tipping points have been triggered. We show that the presence of these tipping points nearly doubles today’s optimal carbon tax and reduces peak warming along the optimal path by approximately 1 °C. The presence of these tipping points increases the cost of delaying optimal policy until mid-century by nearly 150%.

  17. A TIPS-TPDO-tetraCN-Based n-Type Organic Field-Effect Transistor with a Cross-linked PMMA Polymer Gate Dielectric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sungyeop; Albariqi, Mohammed; Gruntz, Guillaume; Al-Hathal, Thamer; Peinado, Alba; Garcia-Caurel, Enric; Nicolas, Yohann; Toupance, Thierry; Bonnassieux, Yvan; Horowitz, Gilles

    2016-06-15

    Recent improvement in the performance of the n-type organic semiconductors as well as thin gate dielectrics based on cross-linked polymers offers new opportunities to develop high-performance low-voltage n-type OFETs suitable for organic complementary circuits. Using TIPS-tetracyanotriphenodioxazine (TIPS-TPDO-tetraCN) and cross-linked poly(methyl methacrylate) (c-PMMA), respectively as n-type organic semiconductor and gate dielectric, linear regime field-effect mobility (1.8 ± 0.2) × 10(-2) cm(2) V(-1)s(-1), small spatial standard deviation of threshold voltage (∼0.1 V), and operating voltage less than 3 V are attainable with the same device structure and contact materials used commonly for p-type OFETs. Through comparative static and dynamic characterizations of c-PMMA and PMMA gate dielectrics, it is shown that both smaller thickness and larger relative permittivity of c-PMMA contributes to reduced operating voltage. Furthermore, negligible hysteresis brings evidence to small trap states in the semiconductor near gate dielectric of the n-type OFETs with c-PMMA. The use of TIPS-TPDO-tetraCN and c-PMMA is fully compatible with polyethylene terephthalate substrate, giving promise to various flexible applications.

  18. Fundamental Study of a Single Point Lean Direct Injector. Part I: Effect of Air Swirler Angle and Injector Tip Location on Spray Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedder, Sarah A.; Hicks, Yolanda R.; Tacina, Kathleen M.; Anderson, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Lean direct injection (LDI) is a combustion concept to reduce oxides of nitrogen (NOx) for next generation aircraft gas turbine engines. These newer engines have cycles that increase fuel efficiency through increased operating pressures, which increase combustor inlet temperatures. NOx formation rates increase with higher temperatures; the LDI strategy avoids high temperature by staying fuel lean and away from stoichiometric burning. Thus, LDI relies on rapid and uniform fuel/air mixing. To understand this mixing process, a series of fundamental experiments are underway in the Combustion and Dynamics Facility at NASA Glenn Research Center. This first set of experiments examines cold flow (non-combusting) mixing using air and water. Using laser diagnostics, the effects of air swirler angle and injector tip location on the spray distribution, recirculation zone, and droplet size distribution are examined. Of the three swirler angles examined, 60 degrees is determined to have the most even spray distribution. The injector tip location primarily shifts the flow without changing the structure, unless the flow includes a recirculation zone. When a recirculation zone is present, minimum axial velocity decreases as the injector tip moves downstream towards the venturi exit; also the droplets become more uniform in size and angular distribution.

  19. Theoretical Study of the Effects of Magnetic Field Geometry on the High-Energy Emission of Blazars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manasvita Joshi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of the structure of the magnetic field inside a blazar jet, as deduced from polarization observations at radio to optical wavelengths, is closely related to the formation and propagation of relativistic jets that result from accretion onto supermassive black holes. However, a largely unexplored aspect of the theoretical understanding of radiation transfer physics in blazar jets has been the magnetic field geometry as revealed by the polarized emission and the connection between the variability in polarization and flux across the spectrum. Here, we explore the effects of various magnetic geometries that can exist inside a blazar jet: parallel, oblique, toroidal, and tangled. We investigate the effects of changing the orientation of the magnetic field, according to the above-mentioned geometries, on the resulting high-energy spectral energy distributions (SEDs and spectral variability patterns (SVPs of a typical blazar. We use the MUlti-ZOne Radiation Feedback (MUZORF model of Joshi et al. (2014 to carry out this study and to relate the geometry of the field to the observed SEDs at X-ray and γ-ray energies. One of the goals of the study is to understand the relationship between synchrotron and inverse Compton peaks in blazar SEDs and the reason for the appearance of γ-ray “orphan flares” observed in some blazars. This can be associated with the directionality of the magnetic field, which creates a difference in the radiation field as seen by an observer versus that seen by the electrons in the emission region.

  20. Effects of electrode geometry on the performance of dielectric barrier/packed-bed discharge plasmas in benzene degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Nan; Lu, Na; Shang, Kefeng; Li, Jie; Wu, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Benzene was successfully degraded by dielectric barrier/packed-bed discharge plasmas. • Different electrode geometry has distinct effect on plasmas oxidation performance. • Benzene degradation and energy performance were enhanced when using the coil electrode. • The reaction products were well determined by online FTIR analysis. -- Abstract: In this study, the effects of electrode geometry on benzene degradation in a dielectric barrier/packed-bed discharge plasma reactor with different electrodes were systematically investigated. Three electrodes were employed in the experiments, these were coil, bolt, and rod geometries. The reactor using the coil electrode showed better performance in reducing the dielectric loss in the barrier compared to that using the bolt or rod electrodes. In the case of the coil electrode, both the benzene degradation efficiency and energy yield were higher than those for the other electrodes, which can be attributed to the increased role of surface mediated reactions. Irrespective of the electrode geometry, the packed-bed discharge plasma was superior to the dielectric barrier discharge plasma in benzene degradation at any specific applied voltage. The main gaseous products of benzene degradation were CO, CO 2 , H 2 O, and formic acid. Discharge products such as O 3 , N 2 O, N 2 O 5 , and HNO 3 were also detected in the outlet gas. Moreover, the presence of benzene inhibited the formation of ozone because of the competing reaction of oxygen atoms with benzene. This study is expected to offer an optimized approach combining dielectric barrier discharge and packed-bed discharge to improve the degradation of gaseous pollutants

  1. Differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Ciarlet, Philippe G

    2007-01-01

    This book gives the basic notions of differential geometry, such as the metric tensor, the Riemann curvature tensor, the fundamental forms of a surface, covariant derivatives, and the fundamental theorem of surface theory in a selfcontained and accessible manner. Although the field is often considered a classical one, it has recently been rejuvenated, thanks to the manifold applications where it plays an essential role. The book presents some important applications to shells, such as the theory of linearly and nonlinearly elastic shells, the implementation of numerical methods for shells, and

  2. The effect of FSW tool geometry on AA6061-T6 weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelrahman, M.A.; Ghoneim, M.M.; Abdelazim, M.E.; El-Kouss, M.M.R.; Abdelraheem, N.A.

    2012-01-01

    The geometry of the FSW tool plays a major role in deciding the weld quality. In this study several FSW tools (differ from each other in pin angle, shoulder diameter, and shoulder concavity) have been used to fabricate a number of joints in order to obtain a tool with which a sound weld can be produced. It was found that the FSW tool with tapered cone pin, concave shoulder, and shoulder diameter equal to four times the welded plate thickness is suitable to produce a sound weld.

  3. The effects of nozzle geometry on waterjet breakup at high Reynolds numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahedi Tafreshi, H.; Pourdeyhimi, B. [Nonwovens Cooperative Research Center, North Carolina State University, NC 27695-8301, Raleigh (United States)

    2003-10-01

    Waterjet breakup is traditionally considered to follow the Ohnesorge classification. In this classification, high Reynolds number waterjets are considered to atomize quickly after discharge. By generating a constricted waterjet where the water flow stays detached all the way through the nozzle, we have observed the first wind-induced breakup mode at high Reynolds numbers. Such a peculiar behavior, however, was not observed in non-constricted waterjets. Our results indicate that, constricted jets do not follow the Ohnesorge classification, in contrast to the non-constricted waterjets. We discuss the impact of nozzle geometry on the characteristics of waterjets and support our discussion by numerical simulations. (orig.)

  4. Introduction to combinatorial geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, T.A.; Emmett, M.B.

    1985-01-01

    The combinatorial geometry package as used in many three-dimensional multimedia Monte Carlo radiation transport codes, such as HETC, MORSE, and EGS, is becoming the preferred way to describe simple and complicated systems. Just about any system can be modeled using the package with relatively few input statements. This can be contrasted against the older style geometry packages in which the required input statements could be large even for relatively simple systems. However, with advancements come some difficulties. The users of combinatorial geometry must be able to visualize more, and, in some instances, all of the system at a time. Errors can be introduced into the modeling which, though slight, and at times hard to detect, can have devastating effects on the calculated results. As with all modeling packages, the best way to learn the combinatorial geometry is to use it, first on a simple system then on more complicated systems. The basic technique for the description of the geometry consists of defining the location and shape of the various zones in terms of the intersections and unions of geometric bodies. The geometric bodies which are generally included in most combinatorial geometry packages are: (1) box, (2) right parallelepiped, (3) sphere, (4) right circular cylinder, (5) right elliptic cylinder, (6) ellipsoid, (7) truncated right cone, (8) right angle wedge, and (9) arbitrary polyhedron. The data necessary to describe each of these bodies are given. As can be easily noted, there are some subsets included for simplicity

  5. Effects of electrode geometry on the performance of dielectric barrier/packed-bed discharge plasmas in benzene degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nan; Lu, Na; Shang, Kefeng; Li, Jie; Wu, Yan

    2013-11-15

    In this study, the effects of electrode geometry on benzene degradation in a dielectric barrier/packed-bed discharge plasma reactor with different electrodes were systematically investigated. Three electrodes were employed in the experiments, these were coil, bolt, and rod geometries. The reactor using the coil electrode showed better performance in reducing the dielectric loss in the barrier compared to that using the bolt or rod electrodes. In the case of the coil electrode, both the benzene degradation efficiency and energy yield were higher than those for the other electrodes, which can be attributed to the increased role of surface mediated reactions. Irrespective of the electrode geometry, the packed-bed discharge plasma was superior to the dielectric barrier discharge plasma in benzene degradation at any specific applied voltage. The main gaseous products of benzene degradation were CO, CO2, H2O, and formic acid. Discharge products such as O3, N2O, N2O5, and HNO3 were also detected in the outlet gas. Moreover, the presence of benzene inhibited the formation of ozone because of the competing reaction of oxygen atoms with benzene. This study is expected to offer an optimized approach combining dielectric barrier discharge and packed-bed discharge to improve the degradation of gaseous pollutants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The effect of edge interlaminar stresses on the strength of carbon/epoxy laminates of different stacking geometry

    OpenAIRE

    MOMCILO STEVANOVIC; MILAN GORDIC; DANIELA SEKULIC; ISIDOR DJORDJEVIC

    2006-01-01

    The effect of edge interlaminar stresses on strength of carbon/epoxy laminates of different stacking geometry: cross-ply, quasi-isotropic and angle-ply laminates with additional 0º and 90º ply was studied. Coupons with two widths of laminates with an inverse stacking sequence were tested in static tensile tests. The effect of edge interlaminar stresses on strength was studied, by comparing the values of the tensile strength of laminate coupons of the same width with an inverse stacking sequen...

  7. Effects of homogeneous geometry models in simulating the fuel balls in HTR-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Mengjen; Liang Jenqhorng; Peir Jinnjer; Chao Dersheng

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the core geometry of HTR-10 was simulated using four different models including: (1) model 1 - an explicit double heterogeneous geometry, (2) model 2 - a mixing of UO 2 kernel and four layers in each TRISO particle into one, (3) model 3 - a mixing of 8,335 TRISO particles and the inner graphite matrix in each fuel ball into one, and (4) model 4 - a mixing of the outer graphite shell, 8,335 TRISO particles, and the inner graphite matrix in each fuel ball into one. The associated initial core computations were performed using the MCNP version 1.51 computer code. The experimental fuel loading height of 123 cm was employed for each model. The results revealed that the multiplication factors ranged from largest to smallest with model 1, model 2, model 3, and model 4. The neutron spectrum in the fuel region of each models varied from the hardest to the softest are model 1, model 2, model 3, and model 4 while the averaged neutron spectrum in fuel ball from hardest to softest are model 4, model 3, model 2, and model 1. In addition, the CPU execution times extended from longest to shortest with model 1, model 2, model 3, and model 4. (author)

  8. Characterizing the Peano fluidic muscle and the effects of its geometry properties on its behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, Allan Joshua; Xie, Sheng Quan; Anderson, Iain Alexander

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we explore the basic static and dynamic behavior of a hydraulically actuated Peano muscle and how its geometry affects key static and dynamic performance metrics. The Peano muscle, or pouch motor is a fluid powered artificial muscle. Similar to McKibben pneumatic artificial muscles (PAMs), it has the ability to generate the high forces of biological muscles with the low threshold pressure of pleated PAMs, but in a slim, easily distributed form. We found that Peano muscles have similar characteristics to other PAMs, but produce lower free-strains. A test rig capable of measuring high-speed flow rates with a Venturi tube revealed that their efficiency peaks at about 40% during highly dynamic movements. Peano muscles with more tubes and of a greater size do not move faster. Also, their muscle tubes should have an aspect ratio of at least 1:3 and channel width greater than 20% to maximize performance. These findings suggest that finite element modeling be used to optimize more complex Peano muscle geometries.

  9. The Effects of Magnetic-field Geometry on Longitudinal Oscillaitons of Solar Prominences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, M.; Diaz, A. J.; Karpen, J.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the influence of the geometry of the solar filament magnetic structure on the large-amplitude longitudinal oscillations. A representative filament flux tube is modeled as composed of a cool thread centered in a dipped part with hot coronal regions on either side.We have found the normal modes of the system and establish that the observed longitudinal oscillations are well described with the fundamental mode. For small and intermediate curvature radii and moderate to large density contrast between the prominence and the corona, the main restoring force is the solar gravity. In this full wave description of the oscillation a simple expression for the oscillation frequencies is derived in which the pressure-driven term introduces a small correction. We have also found that the normal modes are almost independent of the geometry of the hot regions of the tube. We conclude that observed large-amplitude longitudinal oscillations are driven by the projected gravity along the flux tubes and are strongly influenced by the curvature of the dips of the magnetic field in which the threads reside.

  10. THE EFFECTS OF MAGNETIC-FIELD GEOMETRY ON LONGITUDINAL OSCILLATIONS OF SOLAR PROMINENCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luna, M.; Díaz, A. J.; Karpen, J.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the influence of the geometry of the solar filament magnetic structure on the large-amplitude longitudinal oscillations. A representative filament flux tube is modeled as composed of a cool thread centered in a dipped part with hot coronal regions on either side. We have found the normal modes of the system and establish that the observed longitudinal oscillations are well described with the fundamental mode. For small and intermediate curvature radii and moderate to large density contrast between the prominence and the corona, the main restoring force is the solar gravity. In this full wave description of the oscillation a simple expression for the oscillation frequencies is derived in which the pressure-driven term introduces a small correction. We have also found that the normal modes are almost independent of the geometry of the hot regions of the tube. We conclude that observed large-amplitude longitudinal oscillations are driven by the projected gravity along the flux tubes and are strongly influenced by the curvature of the dips of the magnetic field in which the threads reside.

  11. Effect of geometry on concentration polarization in realistic heterogeneous permselective systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Yoav; Shloush, Shahar; Yossifon, Gilad

    2014-04-01

    This study extends previous analytical solutions of concentration polarization occurring solely in the depleted region, to the more realistic geometry consisting of a three-dimensional (3D) heterogeneous ion-permselective medium connecting two opposite microchambers (i.e., a three-layer system). Under the local electroneutrality approximation, the separation of variable methods is used to derive an analytical solution of the electrodiffusive problem for the two opposing asymmetric microchambers. The assumption of an ideal permselective medium allows for the analytic calculation of the 3D concentration and electric potential distributions as well as a current-voltage relation. It is shown that any asymmetry in the microchamber geometries will result in current rectification. Moreover, it is demonstrated that for non-negligible microchamber resistances, the conductance does not exhibit the expected saturation at low concentrations but instead shows a continuous decrease. The results are intended to facilitate a more direct comparison between theory and experiments, as now the voltage drop is across a realistic 3D and three-layer system.

  12. Effect of geometry on drug release from 3D printed tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyanes, Alvaro; Robles Martinez, Pamela; Buanz, Asma; Basit, Abdul W; Gaisford, Simon

    2015-10-30

    The aim of this work was to explore the feasibility of combining hot melt extrusion (HME) with 3D printing (3DP) technology, with a view to producing different shaped tablets which would be otherwise difficult to produce using traditional methods. A filament extruder was used to obtain approx. 4% paracetamol loaded filaments of polyvinyl alcohol with characteristics suitable for use in fused-deposition modelling 3DP. Five different tablet geometries were successfully 3D-printed-cube, pyramid, cylinder, sphere and torus. The printing process did not affect the stability of the drug. Drug release from the tablets was not dependent on the surface area but instead on surface area to volume ratio, indicating the influence that geometrical shape has on drug release. An erosion-mediated process controlled drug release. This work has demonstrated the potential of 3DP to manufacture tablet shapes of different geometries, many of which would be challenging to manufacture by powder compaction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. First Aid Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Program Diversity In Vision Research & Ophthalmology (DIVRO) Student Training Programs To search for current job openings visit HHS USAJobs Home » NEI for Kids » First Aid Tips Listen All About Vision About the Eye ...

  14. Tips for Daily Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chapter Join our online community Tips for Daily Life Coping skills will help you handle day-to- ... challenges, maximize your independence and live a meaningful life with your diagnosis. Accepting changes Creating a coping ...

  15. Toilet training tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000944.htm Toilet training tips To use the sharing features on ... and 'pee'. Teaching Your Child to Use the Toilet Once your child is comfortable sitting on the ...

  16. Monte Carlo study of the effects of system geometry and antiscatter grids on cone-beam CT scatter distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisniega, A.; Zbijewski, W.; Badal, A.; Kyprianou, I. S.; Stayman, J. W.; Vaquero, J. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The proliferation of cone-beam CT (CBCT) has created interest in performance optimization, with x-ray scatter identified among the main limitations to image quality. CBCT often contends with elevated scatter, but the wide variety of imaging geometry in different CBCT configurations suggests that not all configurations are affected to the same extent. Graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerated Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are employed over a range of imaging geometries to elucidate the factors governing scatter characteristics, efficacy of antiscatter grids, guide system design, and augment development of scatter correction. Methods: A MC x-ray simulator implemented on GPU was accelerated by inclusion of variance reduction techniques (interaction splitting, forced scattering, and forced detection) and extended to include x-ray spectra and analytical models of antiscatter grids and flat-panel detectors. The simulator was applied to small animal (SA), musculoskeletal (MSK) extremity, otolaryngology (Head), breast, interventional C-arm, and on-board (kilovoltage) linear accelerator (Linac) imaging, with an axis-to-detector distance (ADD) of 5, 12, 22, 32, 60, and 50 cm, respectively. Each configuration was modeled with and without an antiscatter grid and with (i) an elliptical cylinder varying 70–280 mm in major axis; and (ii) digital murine and anthropomorphic models. The effects of scatter were evaluated in terms of the angular distribution of scatter incident upon the detector, scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR), artifact magnitude, contrast, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and visual assessment. Results: Variance reduction yielded improvements in MC simulation efficiency ranging from ∼17-fold (for SA CBCT) to ∼35-fold (for Head and C-arm), with the most significant acceleration due to interaction splitting (∼6 to ∼10-fold increase in efficiency). The benefit of a more extended geometry was evident by virtue of a larger air gap—e.g., for a 16 cm

  17. Monte Carlo study of the effects of system geometry and antiscatter grids on cone-beam CT scatter distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisniega, A; Zbijewski, W; Badal, A; Kyprianou, I S; Stayman, J W; Vaquero, J J; Siewerdsen, J H

    2013-05-01

    The proliferation of cone-beam CT (CBCT) has created interest in performance optimization, with x-ray scatter identified among the main limitations to image quality. CBCT often contends with elevated scatter, but the wide variety of imaging geometry in different CBCT configurations suggests that not all configurations are affected to the same extent. Graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerated Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are employed over a range of imaging geometries to elucidate the factors governing scatter characteristics, efficacy of antiscatter grids, guide system design, and augment development of scatter correction. A MC x-ray simulator implemented on GPU was accelerated by inclusion of variance reduction techniques (interaction splitting, forced scattering, and forced detection) and extended to include x-ray spectra and analytical models of antiscatter grids and flat-panel detectors. The simulator was applied to small animal (SA), musculoskeletal (MSK) extremity, otolaryngology (Head), breast, interventional C-arm, and on-board (kilovoltage) linear accelerator (Linac) imaging, with an axis-to-detector distance (ADD) of 5, 12, 22, 32, 60, and 50 cm, respectively. Each configuration was modeled with and without an antiscatter grid and with (i) an elliptical cylinder varying 70-280 mm in major axis; and (ii) digital murine and anthropomorphic models. The effects of scatter were evaluated in terms of the angular distribution of scatter incident upon the detector, scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR), artifact magnitude, contrast, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and visual assessment. Variance reduction yielded improvements in MC simulation efficiency ranging from ∼17-fold (for SA CBCT) to ∼35-fold (for Head and C-arm), with the most significant acceleration due to interaction splitting (∼6 to ∼10-fold increase in efficiency). The benefit of a more extended geometry was evident by virtue of a larger air gap-e.g., for a 16 cm diameter object, the SPR reduced

  18. Control of pore geometry in soil microcosms and its effect on the growth and spread of Pseudomonas and Bacillus sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, Wilfred; Juyal, Archana; Eickhorst, Thilo; Falconer, Ruth; Spiers, Andrew; Baveye, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    The way micro-organisms access C and interact with each other in heterogeneous environments is key to our understanding of soil processes. Growth and mobility of bacteria is crucial aspect of these processes in particular how this is affected by complicated pathways of water and air-filled pores. Simplified experimental systems, often referred to with the term microcosms, have played a central role in the development of modern ecological thinking ranging from competitive exclusion to examination of spatial resources and competitive mechanisms, with important model driven insights to the field. However, in the majority of cases these do not include detailed description of the soil physical conditions and hence there is still little insight in how soil structure affects these processes. Recent advances in the use of Xray CT now allow for a different approach to this as we can obtain quantitative insight in to the pathways of interaction and how these are controlled in microcosms. In the current presentation we therefor ask the following questions: - To what extent can we control the pore geometry in microcosm studies through manipulation of common variables such as density and aggregate size? Are replicated microcosms really replicated at the microscale? - What is the effect of pore geometry on the growth dynamics of bacteria following introduction into soil? - What is the effect of pore geometry on the rate and extent of spread of bacteria in soil? We focus on Pseudomonas sp. and Bacillus sp. Both species are abundantly present in the rhizosphere and bulk-soil, frequently studied for their growth promoting ability, yet there is still very little knowledge available on how the growth and spread is affected by soil physical conditions such as pore geometry and wetness. We show how pore geometry, connectivity and interface areas are affected by the way soil is packed into microcosms and how this affects growth and spread of both species. We emphasize that microscopic

  19. Effective leaf area index retrieving from terrestrial point cloud data: coupling computational geometry application and Gaussian mixture model clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, S.; Tamura, M.; Susaki, J.

    2014-09-01

    Leaf area index (LAI) is one of the most important structural parameters of forestry studies which manifests the ability of the green vegetation interacted with the solar illumination. Classic understanding about LAI is to consider the green canopy as integration of horizontal leaf layers. Since multi-angle remote sensing technique developed, LAI obliged to be deliberated according to the observation geometry. Effective LAI could formulate the leaf-light interaction virtually and precisely. To retrieve the LAI/effective LAI from remotely sensed data therefore becomes a challenge during the past decades. Laser scanning technique can provide accurate surface echoed coordinates with densely scanned intervals. To utilize the density based statistical algorithm for analyzing the voluminous amount of the 3-D points data is one of the subjects of the laser scanning applications. Computational geometry also provides some mature applications for point cloud data (PCD) processing and analysing. In this paper, authors investigated the feasibility of a new application for retrieving the effective LAI of an isolated broad leaf tree. Simplified curvature was calculated for each point in order to remove those non-photosynthetic tissues. Then PCD were discretized into voxel, and clustered by using Gaussian mixture model. Subsequently the area of each cluster was calculated by employing the computational geometry applications. In order to validate our application, we chose an indoor plant to estimate the leaf area, the correlation coefficient between calculation and measurement was 98.28 %. We finally calculated the effective LAI of the tree with 6 × 6 assumed observation directions.

  20. The effect of earthquake on architecture geometry with non-parallel system irregularity configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teddy, Livian; Hardiman, Gagoek; Nuroji; Tudjono, Sri

    2017-12-01

    Indonesia is an area prone to earthquake that may cause casualties and damage to buildings. The fatalities or the injured are not largely caused by the earthquake, but by building collapse. The collapse of the building is resulted from the building behaviour against the earthquake, and it depends on many factors, such as architectural design, geometry configuration of structural elements in horizontal and vertical plans, earthquake zone, geographical location (distance to earthquake center), soil type, material quality, and construction quality. One of the geometry configurations that may lead to the collapse of the building is irregular configuration of non-parallel system. In accordance with FEMA-451B, irregular configuration in non-parallel system is defined to have existed if the vertical lateral force-retaining elements are neither parallel nor symmetric with main orthogonal axes of the earthquake-retaining axis system. Such configuration may lead to torque, diagonal translation and local damage to buildings. It does not mean that non-parallel irregular configuration should not be formed on architectural design; however the designer must know the consequence of earthquake behaviour against buildings with irregular configuration of non-parallel system. The present research has the objective to identify earthquake behaviour in architectural geometry with irregular configuration of non-parallel system. The present research was quantitative with simulation experimental method. It consisted of 5 models, where architectural data and model structure data were inputted and analyzed using the software SAP2000 in order to find out its performance, and ETAB2015 to determine the eccentricity occurred. The output of the software analysis was tabulated, graphed, compared and analyzed with relevant theories. For areas of strong earthquake zones, avoid designing buildings which wholly form irregular configuration of non-parallel system. If it is inevitable to design a

  1. Mechanical behavior analysis of small-scale modeling of ceramic block masonry structures: geometries effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Rizzatti

    Full Text Available This paper presents the experimental results of a research program with ceramic block masonry under compression. Four different block geometries were investigated. Two of them had circular hollows with different net area. The third one had two rectangular hollow and the last block was with rectangular hollows and a double central webs. The prisms and walls were built with two mortar type 1:1:6 (I and 1:0,5:4 (II (proportions by volume of cement: lime: sand. One:three small scale blocks were used to test block, prisms and walls on compression. It was possible to conclude that the block with double central webs gave better results of compressive strength showing to be more efficient. The mortar didn't influenced the compressive strength of prisms and walls.

  2. Effect of growth plate geometry and growth direction on prediction of proximal femoral morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Priti; Shefelbine, Sandra J; Gutierrez-Farewik, Elena M

    2016-06-14

    Mechanical stimuli play a significant role in the process of endochondral growth. Thus far, approaches to understand the endochondral mechanical growth rate have been limited to the use of approximated location and geometry of the growth plate. Furthermore, growth has been simulated based on the average deflection of the growth plate or of the femoral neck. It has also been reported in the literature that the growth plate lies parallel to one of the principal stresses acting on it, to reduce the shear between epiphysis and diaphysis. Hence the current study objectives were (1) to evaluate the significance of a subject-specific finite element model of the femur and growth plate compared to a simplified growth plate model and (2) to explore the different growth direction models to better understand proximal femoral growth mechanisms. A subject-specific finite element model of an able-bodied 7-year old child was developed. The muscle forces and hip contact force were computed for one gait cycle and applied to a finite element model to determine the specific growth rate. Proximal femoral growth was simulated for two different growth direction models: femoral neck deflection direction and principal stress direction. The principal stress direction model captured the expected tendency for decreasing the neck shaft angle and femoral anteversion for both growth plate models. The results of this study suggest that the subject-specific geometry and consideration of the principal stress direction as growth direction may be a more realistic approach for correct prediction of proximal femoral growth morphology. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Dietary Pseudopurpurin Effects on Bone Mineral Density and Bone Geometry Architecture in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Wang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of our study was to evaluate whether feeding pseudopurpurin affects bone mineral density and bone geometry architecture in rats. Pseudopurpurin was extracted, analyzed and purified using an HLPC-ESI-MS. Rats were given 0% and 0.5% pseudopurpurin powder in their diet. Femurs of rats were examined at 0.5, 1 and 2 months after pseudopurpurin feeding. Compared with rats in the group 0%, the bone mineral density, and the calcium, magnesium, zinc and manganese concentrations in the rats femur in the group 0.5% increased significantly at 1 month and 2 months after pseudopurpurin feeding. Analytical results of micro-computed tomography showed that the group 0.5% displayed an increase in the trabecular volume fraction, trabecular thickness and trabecular number of the distal femur at 1 and 2 months after pseudopurpurin feeding, and the mean thickness, inner perimeter, outer perimeter, and area of the femur diaphysis were significantly increased at 2 months after pseudopurpurin feeding compared with the group 0%. In parallel, the trabecular separation and structure model index of the distal femur were decreased, compared with the group 0% at 1 and 2 months after pseudopurpurin feeding. In the 0.5% and 0% groups, there was no damage to kidney and liver by histopathology analysis. The long-term feeding of pseudopurpurin is safe for rats. The feeding of 0.5% pseudopurpurin which has specific chemical affinities for calcium for bone improvement and level of bone mineral density, enhances the geometry architecture compared with the 0% group.

  4. Dietary pseudopurpurin effects on bone mineral density and bone geometry architecture in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chen-Chen; Li, Xiao-Bing; Han, Tie-Suo; Li, Peng; Liu, Guo-Wen; Wang, Wei-Zhong; Wang, Zhe

    2012-01-01

    The objective of our study was to evaluate whether feeding pseudopurpurin affects bone mineral density and bone geometry architecture in rats. Pseudopurpurin was extracted, analyzed and purified using an HLPC-ESI-MS. Rats were given 0% and 0.5% pseudopurpurin powder in their diet. Femurs of rats were examined at 0.5, 1 and 2 months after pseudopurpurin feeding. Compared with rats in the group 0%, the bone mineral density, and the calcium, magnesium, zinc and manganese concentrations in the rats femur in the group 0.5% increased significantly at 1 month and 2 months after pseudopurpurin feeding. Analytical results of micro-computed tomography showed that the group 0.5% displayed an increase in the trabecular volume fraction, trabecular thickness and trabecular number of the distal femur at 1 and 2 months after pseudopurpurin feeding, and the mean thickness, inner perimeter, outer perimeter, and area of the femur diaphysis were significantly increased at 2 months after pseudopurpurin feeding compared with the group 0%. In parallel, the trabecular separation and structure model index of the distal femur were decreased, compared with the group 0% at 1 and 2 months after pseudopurpurin feeding. In the 0.5% and 0% groups, there was no damage to kidney and liver by histopathology analysis. The long-term feeding of pseudopurpurin is safe for rats. The feeding of 0.5% pseudopurpurin which has specific chemical affinities for calcium for bone improvement and level of bone mineral density, enhances the geometry architecture compared with the 0% group.

  5. Effect of external jet-flow deflector geometry on OTW aero-acoustic characteristics. [Over-The-Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Glahn, U.; Groesbeck, D.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of geometry variations in the design of external deflectors for use with OTW configurations was studied at model scale and subsonic jet velocities. Included in the variations were deflector size and angle as well as wing size and flap setting. A conical nozzle (5.2-cm diameter) mounted at 0.1 chord above and downstream of the wing leading edges was used. The data indicate that external deflectors provide satisfactory take-off and approach aerodynamic performance and acoustic characteristics for OTW configurations. These characteristics together with expected good cruise aerodynamics, since external deflectors are storable, may provide optimum OTW design configurations.

  6. Effect of the Van Hiele Model in Geometric Concepts Acquisition: The Attitudes towards Geometry and Learning Transfer Effect of the First Three Grades Students in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-ebous, Tahani

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of the van Hiele model in Geometric Concepts Acquisition, and the attitudes towards Geometry and learning transfer of the first three grades students in Jordan. Participants of the study consisted of 60 students from the third grade primary school students from the First Directorate, Amman, in the…

  7. Electrocardiographic-guided tip positioning technique for peripherally inserted central catheters in a Dutch teaching hospital: Feasibility and cost-effectiveness analysis in a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloemen, Arthur; Daniels, Anne M; Samyn, Martine G; Janssen, Roel Jl; Elshof, Jan-Willem

    2018-03-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters are venous devices intended for short to medium periods of intravenous treatment. Positioning of the catheter tip at the cavoatrial junction is necessary for optimum performance of a peripherally inserted central catheter. In this study, safety, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of electrocardiographic-guided peripherally inserted central catheter positioning in a Dutch teaching hospital were evaluated. All patients who received a peripherally inserted central catheter in 2016 using electrocardiographic guidance were compared to those where fluoroscopy guidance was used in a prospective non-randomized cohort study. Relevant data were extracted from electronic health records. Cost-effectiveness analysis was performed. A total of 162 patients received a peripherally inserted central catheter using fluoroscopy guidance and 103 patients using electrocardiographic guidance in 2016. No significant difference was found in malposition, infection or other complications between these groups. Due to personnel reduction and omission of fluoroscopy costs, cost reduction for each catheter insertion was €120 in the first year and, as a result of discounted acquisition costs, €190 in subsequent years. The positioning results and complication rate are comparable to the previously reported literature. The cost reduction may vary in different hospitals. Other benefits of the electrocardiographic-guided technique are omission of X-ray exposure and improved patient service. Implementation of electrocardiographic-guided tip positioning for peripherally inserted central catheter was safe and effective in this study and led to an improved high value and cost-conscious care.

  8. A neutron scattering study of the elementary excitations of superfluid 4He and the effects of confinement in restricted geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearce, Jonathan Vaughan

    2002-01-01

    Neutron inelastic scattering measurements of the low energy excitations of liquid 4 He are presented. High resolution measurements of three wavevector regions of the bulk liquid are described: at the roton, the maxon and the region beyond the roton. In the bulk liquid, a very high resolution study of the temperature dependence of the roton energy is made, and an argument as to whether or not there is a deviation from the successful theory of Bedell, Pines and Zawadowski is resolved conclusively in favour of the existing theory. The behaviour of the maxon energy at temperatures close to the transition temperature is studied, and some attempt is made to link the excitation signal to the Bose condensate. The wavevector region above the roton is studied, and the excitation spectrum is compared with the theory of Clyde and Griffin. Confining liquid 4 He in restricted geometries dramatically affects its properties. The effects of confining the liquid in disordered environments provided by porous aerogel glass, xerogel glass, and MCM-48 glass on the microscopic excitations are studied, and the excitation spectrum is found to have two main components: a sharp signal at the phonon-maxon-roton energy arising from the bulk-like three dimensional excitation, and a low-energy, low-intensity mode arising from the layer mode existing in liquid layers close to the walls of the confining medium. The characteristics of this layer mode appear to be highly dependent on the microscopic geometry of the medium. Some uncertainty within the community regarding the temperature dependence of the bulk-like excitation energy is conclusively resolved. Some work is directed at establishing a link between the microscopic and macroscopic effects of confining the helium in restricted geometries. (author)

  9. Thermal effects from modified endodontic laser tips used in the apical third of root canals with erbium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet and erbium, chromium-doped yttrium scandium gallium garnet lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Roy; Walsh, Laurence J

    2010-04-01

    To evaluate the temperature changes occurring on the apical third of root surfaces when erbium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Er:YAG) and erbium, chromium-doped yttrium scandium gallium garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser energy was delivered with a tube etched, laterally emitting conical tip and a conventional bare design optical fiber tip. Thermal effects of root canal laser treatments on periodontal ligament cells and alveolar bone are of concern in terms of safety. A total of 64 single-rooted extracted teeth were prepared 1 mm short of the working length using rotary nickel-titanium Pro-Taper files to an apical size corresponding to a F5 Pro-Taper instrument. A thermocouple located 2 mm from the apex was used to record temperature changes arising from delivery of laser energy through laterally emitting conical tips or plain tips, using an Er:YAG or Er,Cr:YSGG laser. For the Er:YAG and Er,Cr:YSGG systems, conical fibers showed greater lateral emissions (452 + 69% and 443 + 64%) and corresponding lower forward emissions (48 + 5% and 49 + 5%) than conventional plain-fiber tips. All four combinations of laser system and fiber design elicited temperature increases less than 2.5 degrees C during lasing. The use of water irrigation attenuated completely the thermal effects of individual lasing cycles. Laterally emitting conical fiber tips can be used safely under defined conditions for intracanal irradiation without harmful thermal effects on the periodontal apparatus.

  10. Defining the effect of sweep tillage tool cutting edge geometry on tillage forces using 3D discrete element modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Ucgul

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The energy required for tillage processes accounts for a significant proportion of total energy used in crop production. In many tillage processes decreasing the draft and upward vertical forces is often desired for reduced fuel use and improved penetration, respectively. Recent studies have proved that the discrete element modelling (DEM can effectively be used to model the soil–tool interaction. In his study, Fielke (1994 [1] examined the effect of the various tool cutting edge geometries, namely; cutting edge height, length of underside rub, angle of underside clearance, on draft and vertical forces. In this paper the experimental parameters of Fielke (1994 [1] were simulated using 3D discrete element modelling techniques. In the simulations a hysteretic spring contact model integrated with a linear cohesion model that considers the plastic deformation behaviour of the soil hence provides better vertical force prediction was employed. DEM parameters were determined by comparing the experimental and simulation results of angle of repose and penetration tests. The results of the study showed that the simulation results of the soil-various tool cutting edge geometries agreed well with the experimental results of Fielke (1994 [1]. The modelling was then used to simulate a further range of cutting edge geometries to better define the effect of sweep tool cutting edge geometry parameters on tillage forces. The extra simulations were able to show that by using a sharper cutting edge with zero vertical cutting edge height the draft and upward vertical force were further reduced indicating there is benefit from having a really sharp cutting edge. The extra simulations also confirmed that the interpolated trends for angle of underside clearance as suggested by Fielke (1994 [1] where correct with a linear reduction in draft and upward vertical force for angle of underside clearance between the ranges of −25 and −5°, and between −5 and 0°. The

  11. The Effect of Bilayer Graphene Nanoribbon Geometry on Schottky-Barrier Diode Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meisam Rahmani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bilayer graphene nanoribbon is a promising material with outstanding physical and electrical properties that offers a wide range of opportunities for advanced applications in future nanoelectronics. In this study, the application of bilayer graphene nanoribbon in schottky-barrier diode is explored due to its different stacking arrangements. In other words, bilayer graphene nanoribbon schottky-barrier diode is proposed as a result of contact between a semiconductor (AB stacking and metal (AA stacking layers. To this end, an analytical model joint with numerical solution of carrier concentration for bilayer graphene nanoribbon in the degenerate and nondegenerate regimes is presented. Moreover, to determine the proposed diode performance, the carrier concentration model is adopted to derive the current-voltage characteristic of the device. The simulated results indicate a strong bilayer graphene nanoribbon geometry and temperature dependence of current-voltage characteristic showing that the forward current of the diode rises by increasing of width. In addition, the lower value of turn-on voltage appears as the more temperature increases. Finally, comparative study indicates that the proposed diode has a better performance compared to the silicon schottky diode, graphene nanoribbon homo-junction contact, and graphene-silicon schottky diode in terms of electrical parameters such as turn-on voltage and forward current.

  12. A cost-effective laser scanning method for mapping stream channel geometry and roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Norris; Nathanson, Marcus; Lundgren, Niclas; Rehnström, Robin; Lyon, Steve

    2015-04-01

    In this pilot project, we combine an Arduino Uno and SICK LMS111 outdoor laser ranging camera to acquire high resolution topographic area scans for a stream channel. The microprocessor and imaging system was installed in a custom gondola and suspended from a wire cable system. To demonstrate the systems capabilities for capturing stream channel topography, a small stream (5m by 2m area. A grain size distribution of the streambed material was extracted from the point cloud using a moving window, local maxima search algorithm. The median, 84th and 90th percentiles (common metrics to describe channel roughness) of this distribution were found to be within the range of measured values while the largest modelled element was approximately 35% smaller than its measured counterpart. The laser scanning system captured grain sizes between 30mm and 255mm (coarse gravel/pebbles and boulders based on the Wentworth (1922) scale). This demonstrates that our system was capable of resolving both large-scale geometry (e.g. bed slope and stream channel width) and small-scale channel roughness elements (e.g. coarse gravel/pebbles and boulders) for the study area. We further show that the point cloud resolution is suitable for estimating ecohydraulic parameters such as Manning's n and hydraulic radius. Although more work is needed to fine-tune our system's design, these preliminary results are encouraging, specifically for those with a limited operational budget.

  13. Effect of chamfer geometry on the pressure drop of perforated plates with thin orifices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros Filho, José A.; Santos, André A.C.; Navarro, Moysés A.; Jordão, Elizabete

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • CFD estimation of pressure drop of perforated plates with chamfered thin orifices. • Different chamfer geometric features evaluated. • Calculation validated against reduced scale experiments. - Abstract: Perforated plates with thin orifices is one of the options under considerations to be used in the debris filtering bottom end pieces for the next generation of fuel assemblies for the Brazilian nuclear plants. The increase in pressure drop can be drastically reduced by optimizing the chamfer geometries. This paper describes the development and validation of a procedure devised to use Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to accurately estimate the pressure drop of water flow through perforated plates with chamfered thin orifices. The procedure comprises a scaled down calculation domain, grid configuration and a set of numerical solution parameters. The validation was performed against experiments with a set of plates with different chamfer geometric features like position (inlet, outlet and both sides), angles and sizes. Three turbulence models were evaluated with the standard k–ε giving the best result. For the range of parameters evaluated here the pressure drop decrease of a two sided chamfer plate can be estimated as a sum of both inlet and outlet chamfers individually. In both cases the pressure drop decreases rapidly for small chamfers and more slowly for larger chamfers. In the flat regions the chamfer angle has little influence at the inlet and is more important at outlet

  14. Effect of rhythmic gymnastics on volumetric bone mineral density and bone geometry in premenarcheal female athletes and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tournis, S; Michopoulou, E; Fatouros, I G; Paspati, I; Michalopoulou, M; Raptou, P; Leontsini, D; Avloniti, A; Krekoukia, M; Zouvelou, V; Galanos, A; Aggelousis, N; Kambas, A; Douroudos, I; Lyritis, G P; Taxildaris, K; Pappaioannou, N

    2010-06-01

    Weight-bearing exercise during growth exerts positive effects on the skeleton. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that long-term elite rhythmic gymnastics exerts positive effects on volumetric bone mineral density and geometry and to determine whether exercise-induced bone adaptation is associated with increased periosteal bone formation or medullary contraction using tibial peripheral quantitative computed tomography and bone turnover markers. We conducted a cross-sectional study at a tertiary center. We studied 26 elite premenarcheal female rhythmic gymnasts (RG) and 23 female controls, aged 9-13 yr. We measured bone age, volumetric bone mineral density, bone mineral content (BMC), cortical thickness, cortical and trabecular area, and polar stress strength index (SSIp) by peripheral quantitative computed tomography of the left tibia proximal to the distal metaphysis (trabecular) at 14, 38 (cortical), and 66% (muscle mass) from the distal end and bone turnover markers. The two groups were comparable according to height and chronological and bone age. After weight adjustment, cortical BMC, area, and thickness at 38% were significantly higher in RG (P < 0.005-0.001). Periosteal circumference, SSIp, and muscle area were higher in RG (P < 0.01-0.001). Muscle area was significantly associated with cortical BMC, area, and SSIp, whereas years of training showed positive association with cortical BMC, area, and thickness independent of chronological age. RG in premenarcheal girls may induce positive adaptations on the skeleton, especially in cortical bone. Increased duration of exercise is associated with a positive response of bone geometry.

  15. Analysis of Effect of Inlet Swirl In Four Stroke Single Cylinder Diesel Engine With Different Inlet Valve Geometries Using CFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobinath, R.; Mathiselvan, G.; Kumarasubramanian, R.

    2017-05-01

    Flow patterns are essential to ensure that the engine can produce high performance with the presence of swirl and tumble effect inside the engine cylinder. This paper provides the simulation of air is simulated in the software to predict the flow pattern. The flow pattern is simulated by using the steady state pressure based solver. The domain used for the simulations predicated on the particular engine parameters. Mistreatment the CFD problem solver ANSYS FLUENT, the CFD simulation is earned for four totally different geometries of the valve. The geometries consist of Horizontal, Vertical, curve and arc springs. In this simulation, only the intake strokes are simulated. From this results show that the velocity of the air flow is high during the sweeps the intake stroke takes place. This situation is produced more swirls and tumble effect during the compression, hence enhancing the combustion rate in a whole region of the clearance volume of the engine cylinder. This will initiate to the production of tumble and swirl in the engine cylinder.

  16. Effects of Cylindrical Charge Geometry and Secondary Combustion Reactions on the Internal Blast Loading of Reinforced Concrete Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Matthew A. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)

    2005-05-01

    An understanding of the detonation phenomenon and airblast behavior for cylindrical high-explosive charges is essential in developing predictive capabilities for tests and scenarios involving these charge geometries. Internal tests on reinforced concrete structures allowed for the analysis of cylindrical charges and the effect of secondary reactions occurring in confined structures. The pressure profiles that occur close to a cylindrical explosive charge are strongly dependent on the length-to-diameter ratio (L/D) of the charge. This study presents a comparison of finite-element code models (i.e., AUTODYN) to empirical methods for predicting airblast behavior from cylindrical charges. Current finite element analysis (FEA) and blast prediction codes fail to account for the effects of secondary reactions (fireballs) that occur with underoxidized explosives. Theoretical models were developed for TNT and validated against literature. These models were then applied to PBX 9501 for predictions of the spherical fireball diameter and time duration. The following relationships for PBX 9501 were derived from this analysis (units of ft, lb, s). Comparison of centrally located equivalent weight charges using cylindrical and spherical geometries showed that the average impulse on the interior of the structure is ~3%–5% higher for the spherical charge. Circular regions of high impulse that occur along the axial direction of the cylindrical charge must be considered when analyzing structural response.

  17. Magnet pole tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, Craig E.; Chasman, Chellis; Baltz, Anthony J.

    1984-04-24

    An improved magnet which more easily provides a radially increasing magnetic field, as well as reduced fringe field and requires less power for a given field intensity. The subject invention comprises a pair of spaced, opposed magnetic poles which further comprise a pair of pole roots, each having a pole tip attached to its center. The pole tips define the gap between the magnetic poles and at least a portion of each pole tip is separated from its associated pole root. The separation begins at a predetermined distance from the center of the pole root and increases with increasing radial distance while being constant with azimuth within that portion. Magnets in accordance with the subject invention have been found to be particularly advantageous for use in large isochronous cyclotrons.

  18. A Genuine Jahn-Teller System with Compressed Geometry and Quantum Effects Originating from Zero-Point Motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aramburu, José Antonio; García-Fernández, Pablo; García Lastra, Juan Maria

    2016-01-01

    that the anomalous positive g∥ shift (g∥−g0=0.065) measured at T=20 K obeys the superposition of the |3 z2−r2⟩ and |x2−y2⟩ states driven by quantum effects associated with the zero-point motion, a mechanism first put forward by O'Brien for static Jahn–Teller systems and later extended by Ham to the dynamic Jahn......–Teller case. To our knowledge, this is the first genuine Jahn–Teller system (i.e. in which exact degeneracy exists at the high-symmetry configuration) exhibiting a compressed equilibrium geometry for which large quantum effects allow experimental observation of the effect predicted by O'Brien. Analysis...

  19. Effects of system geometry and other physical factors on photon sensitivity of high-resolution positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habte, F.; Foudray, A. M. K.; Olcott, P. D.; Levin, C. S.

    2007-07-01

    We are studying two new detector technologies that directly measure the three-dimensional coordinates of 511 keV photon interactions for high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) systems designed for small animal and breast imaging. These detectors are based on (1) lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) scintillation crystal arrays coupled to position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPD) and (2) cadmium zinc telluride (CZT). The detectors have excellent measured 511 keV photon energy resolutions (oriented 'edge-on' with respect to incoming 511 keV annihilation photons and arranged to form a compact FOV with detectors very close to, or in contact with, the subject tissues. In this paper, we used Monte Carlo simulation to study various factors that limit the photon sensitivity of a high-resolution PET system dedicated to small animal imaging. To optimize the photon sensitivity, we studied several possible system geometries for a fixed 8 cm transaxial and 8 cm axial FOV. We found that using rectangular-shaped detectors arranged into a cylindrical geometry does not yield the best photon sensitivity. This is due to the fact that forming rectangular-shaped detectors into a ring produces significant wedge-shaped inter-module gaps, through which Compton-scattered photons in the detector can escape. This effect limits the center point source photon sensitivity to 8% photon sensitivity for the LSO-PSAPD box configuration and >15% for CZT box geometry, using a 350-650 keV energy window setting. These simulation results compare well with analytical estimations. The trend is different for a clinical whole-body PET system that uses conventional LSO-PMT block detectors with larger crystal elements. Simulations predict roughly the same sensitivity for both box and cylindrical detector configurations. This results from the fact that a large system diameter (>80 cm) results in relatively small inter-module gaps in clinical whole-body PET. In addition, the relatively large block

  20. Effects of system geometry and other physical factors on photon sensitivity of high-resolution positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foudray, A M K; Olcott, P D

    2013-01-01

    We are studying two new detector technologies that directly measure the three-dimensional coordinates of 511 keV photon interactions for high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) systems designed for small animal and breast imaging. These detectors are based on (1) lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) scintillation crystal arrays coupled to position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPD) and (2) cadmium zinc telluride (CZT). The detectors have excellent measured 511 keV photon energy resolutions (≤12% FWHM for LSO-PSAPD and ≤3% for CZT) and good coincidence time resolutions (2 ns FWHM for LSO-PSAPD and 8 ns for CZT). The goal is to incorporate the detectors into systems that will achieve 1 mm3 spatial resolution (~1 mm3, uniform throughout the field of view (FOV)), with excellent contrast resolution as well. In order to realize 1 mm3 spatial resolution with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), it is necessary to significantly boost coincidence photon detection efficiency (referred to as photon sensitivity). To facilitate high photon sensitivity in the proposed PET system designs, the detector arrays are oriented ‘edge-on’ with respect to incoming 511 keV annihilation photons and arranged to form a compact FOV with detectors very close to, or in contact with, the subject tissues. In this paper, we used Monte Carlo simulation to study various factors that limit the photon sensitivity of a high-resolution PET system dedicated to small animal imaging. To optimize the photon sensitivity, we studied several possible system geometries for a fixed 8 cm transaxial and 8 cm axial FOV. We found that using rectangular-shaped detectors arranged into a cylindrical geometry does not yield the best photon sensitivity. This is due to the fact that forming rectangular-shaped detectors into a ring produces significant wedge-shaped inter-module gaps, through which Compton-scattered photons in the detector can escape. This effect limits the center point source photon

  1. Effect Of Open Ended Teaching Learning Approach On Secondary School Students Mathematics Achievement In Learning Three Dimensional Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chogo C.N.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Mathematics is globally valued for use by an individual and society. It plays a significant role in the development of modern science and technology. Despite its importance students motivation to learn and achievement at national examinations globally and at the KCSE mathematics examination in Kenya particularly has been dismal over the years. The learners low achievement in the subject has been attributed to the didactic teaching methods that the teachers use among other factors. The study of geometry in Mathematics poses a number of difficulties to learners which are different in nature from those of arithmetic and algebra. This is because geometry is primarily abstract in nature. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of Open Ended Teaching and Learning Approach OETLA on Secondary School students mathematics achievement in learning Three Dimensional Geometry 3DG. The study employed Solomon four non-equivalent control group design. The two experimental groups E1amp E2 received OETLA treatment while the control groups C1ampC2 were taught using the conventional teaching and learning methods. Only E1amp C1 took a pre-test and a post test for all the groups. The target population for this study was form four 17 year old students of secondary schools in Marani Sub County in Kisii County. Purposive sampling was used to obtain the four county mixed-sex secondary schools for the study. A total of 152 students formed the sample size. Students Mathematics Achievement Test SMAT was used to collect data. The instruments were validated by three experts from the department of curriculum and instruction of Egerton University and three Secondary School Mathematics Heads of Department. The reliability of the instruments were established using Cronbachs Alpha. A reliability coefficient of 0.92 was obtained and thus considered acceptable. The SMAT was administered to two groups as a pretest before the treatment and as a posttest to all the four

  2. STABILITY OF A CYLINDRICAL SOLUTE-SOLVENT INTERFACE: EFFECT OF GEOMETRY, ELECTROSTATICS, AND HYDRODYNAMICS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, B O; Sun, Hui; Zhou, Shenggao

    The solute-solvent interface that separates biological molecules from their surrounding aqueous solvent characterizes the conformation and dynamics of such molecules. In this work, we construct a solvent fluid dielectric boundary model for the solvation of charged molecules and apply it to study the stability of a model cylindrical solute-solvent interface. The motion of the solute-solvent interface is defined to be the same as that of solvent fluid at the interface. The solvent fluid is assumed to be incompressible and is described by the Stokes equation. The solute is modeled simply by the ideal-gas law. All the viscous force, hydrostatic pressure, solute-solvent van der Waals interaction, surface tension, and electrostatic force are balanced at the solute-solvent interface. We model the electrostatics by Poisson's equation in which the solute-solvent interface is treated as a dielectric boundary that separates the low-dielectric solute from the high-dielectric solvent. For a cylindrical geometry, we find multiple cylindrically shaped equilibrium interfaces that describe polymodal (e.g., dry and wet) states of hydration of an underlying molecular system. These steady-state solutions exhibit bifurcation behavior with respect to the charge density. For their linearized systems, we use the projection method to solve the fluid equation and find the dispersion relation. Our asymptotic analysis shows that, for large wavenumbers, the decay rate is proportional to wavenumber with the proportionality half of the ratio of surface tension to solvent viscosity, indicating that the solvent viscosity does affect the stability of a solute-solvent interface. Consequences of our analysis in the context of biomolecular interactions are discussed.

  3. Investigation of the effect of tube voltage and imaging geometry on phase contrast imaging for a micro-CT system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gui Jianbao; Zou Jing; Rong Junyan; Hu Zhanli; Zhang Qiyang; Zheng Hairong; Xia Dan

    2012-01-01

    Based upon a bench-top micro-CT system, propagation-based phase-contrast imaging has been investigated using insects and a thin plastic sheet. The system mainly includes a micro-focus source with focal spot size of 13-20 μm and a cooled X-ray CCD detector with pixel size of 24 μm. The edge-enhancement effect can be found clearly in the acquired images. With a 0.5 mm thickness plastic edge phantom, the effects of X-ray tube voltage and imaging geometry on the phase-contrast imaging were investigated, and quantitative index, edge-enhancement index (EEI), were also calculated. In our study, an interesting phenomenon was observed that the phase-contrast effect becomes more pronounced as the tube voltage increases from 20 kVp to 90 kVp. Further investigation indicates that smaller focal spot size resulting from the reduction of tube current at higher tube voltage, has caused the unexpected phenomenon. Inferred from our results, phase-contrast effect is insensitive to the tube voltage in the range of 20-90 kVp (widely used in medical diagnosis); however, it is sensitive to the focal spot size. In addition, for the investigation of the effect of imaging geometry, an optimal geometric magnification range of 2.5-4.5 is suggested to get a good phase-contrast imaging for a micro-CT system with source-to-detector distance of 720 mm.

  4. Effects of temporal density variation and convergent geometry on nonlinear bubble evolution in classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharov, V N; Li, D

    2005-04-01

    Effects of temporal density variation and spherical convergence on the nonlinear bubble evolution of single-mode, classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability are studied using an analytical model based on Layzer's theory [Astrophys. J. 122, 1 (1955)]. When the temporal density variation is included, the bubble amplitude in planar geometry is shown to asymptote to integral(t)U(L)(t')rho(t')dt'/rho(t), where U(L) = square root of (g/(C(g)k)) is the Layzer bubble velocity, rho is the fluid density, and C(g) = 3 and C(g) = 1 for the two- and three-dimensional geometries, respectively. The asymptotic bubble amplitude in a converging spherical shell is predicted to evolve as eta approximately etam(-/r0//(lU(L)sp-eta/r0), where r0 is the outer shell radius, eta(t) = integral(t)U(L)sp(t')rho(t') r(0)2(t')dt'/rho(t)r(0)2(t), U(L)(sp) = square root of (-r0(t)r0(t)/l), m(t) = rho(t)r(0)3(t), and l is the mode number.

  5. Effect of Si and SiO2 Substrates on the Geometries of As-Grown Carbon Coils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semi Park

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon coils could be synthesized using C2H2/H2 as source gases and SF6 as an incorporated additive gas under thermal chemical vapor deposition system. Si substrate, SiO2 thin film deposited Si substrate (SiO2 substrate, and quartz substrate were employed to elucidate the effect of substrate on the formation of carbon coils. The characteristics (formation densities, morphologies, and geometries of the deposited carbon coils on the substrate were investigated. In case of Si substrate, the microsized carbon coils were dominant on the substrate surface. While, in case of SiO2 substrate, the nanosized carbon coils were prevailing on the substrate surface. The surface morphologies of samples were investigated step by step during the reaction process. The cause for the different geometry formation of carbon coils according to the different substrates was discussed in association with the different thermal expansion coefficient values of Si and SiO2 substrates and the different etched characteristics of Si and SiO2 substrates by SF6 + H2 flow.

  6. Examining Differential Resilience Mechanisms by Comparing ‘Tipping Points’ of the Effects of Neighborhood Conditions on Anxiety by Race/Ethnicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil Nicolae Coman

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to adverse environmental and social conditions affects physical and mental health through complex mechanisms. Different racial/ethnic (R/E groups may be more or less vulnerable to the same conditions, and the resilience mechanisms that can protect them likely operate differently in each population. We investigate how adverse neighborhood conditions (neighborhood disorder, NDis differentially impact mental health (anxiety, Anx in a sample of white and Black (African American young women from Southeast Texas, USA. We illustrate a simple yet underutilized segmented regression model where linearity is relaxed to allow for a shift in the strength of the effect with the levels of the predictor. We compare how these effects change within R/E groups with the level of the predictor, but also how the “tipping points,” where the effects change in strength, may differ by R/E. We find with classic linear regression that neighborhood disorder adversely affects Black women’s anxiety, while in white women the effect seems negligible. Segmented regressions show that the Ndis → Anx effects in both groups of women appear to shift at similar levels, about one-fifth of a standard deviation below the mean of NDis, but the effect for Black women appears to start out as negative, then shifts in sign, i.e., to increase anxiety, while for white women, the opposite pattern emerges. Our findings can aid in devising better strategies for reducing health disparities that take into account different coping or resilience mechanisms operating differentially at distinct levels of adversity. We recommend that researchers investigate when adversity becomes exceedingly harmful and whether this happens differentially in distinct populations, so that intervention policies can be planned to reverse conditions that are more amenable to change, in effect pushing back the overall social risk factors below such tipping points.

  7. Temperature effects on the geometry during the formation of micro-holes fabricated by femtosecond laser in PMMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Dong, Xinran; Yin, Kai; Song, Yuxin; Tian, Yaxiang; Wang, Cong; Duan, Ji'an

    2018-03-01

    In this study, the temperature effects on hole geometry of the PMMA during micro-holes drilling by femtosecond laser has been studied under various pulse energy and number of pulse. The laser-induced hole's diameter is considerably increased by 73% as the temperature rises from 20 °C to 90 °C. Remarkable enhancement in the removal volume of micro-hole is also observed under high temperature. The possible mechanism for such changes is discussed in detail on account of optical absorption enhancement and higher density of surface plasma. The atomic percentage of oxygen obviously increases with the increase of temperature, which is beneficial to femtosecond laser fabrication of PMMA micro-hole. The spatter area of micro-hole has been found to tremendously extend with the increase of temperature, which is due to recoil pressure effect. These results demonstrate that temperature plays a crucial role to tailor micro-hole fabrication by femtosecond laser.

  8. Tips from the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Kim Hughes; Leverett, Thomas; Barrett, Rob J.; Chur-Hansen, Anna; Dantas-Whitney, Maria; Zapata, Gabriela; Garcia, Juan Felix

    1998-01-01

    Five articles present tips for rallying English-as-a-Second-Language students to the enterprise of creating context, tools, and language itself. The articles focus on using original dramas created by students, teaching nonnative English-speaking medical students to comprehend their patients' colloquial language, conducting research with native…

  9. Air Travel Health Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Prevention and Wellness Staying Healthy Healthy Living Travel Occupational Health First Aid and Injury Prevention Crisis ... MoreDepression in Children and TeensRead MoreBMI Calculator International Travel: Tips for Staying HealthyTexting and DrivingTravel Needs for ...

  10. 10 Data Visualization Tips

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Office 2004 Test Drive User

    communicated through the use of design choices. (as indicated in tip 8). 8. Use colour, size, and position to help the reader see what is important. Colour adds emphasis, highlights particular data points, and draws connections between graphs. The hue, value, and intensity of the colour are significant and may have cultural ...

  11. Sports Dehydration Safety Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sports Dehydration Safety Tips Everything you need to know to keep your kids safe from dehydration when playing sports. To keep kids in top ... to stay hydrated by drinking plenty of fluids. Dehydration occurs when a body loses more water than ...

  12. Tip velocity tracking control for elastic manipulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sever, Manfred Dieter Martin

    A unique approach to tip velocity control of an elastic robotic manipulator is presented. This method has potential application in teleoperation control and in applications where the trajectory is generated in real-time. Control is effected by reducing the tip velocity tracking error between the desired tip velocity and the measured tip velocity. Thus, in teleoperation, the concept of dead reckoning is used, so that while the manipulator's desired tip velocity is specified, the goal is for the tip to follow a path, leading toward a desired terminal position. This is done by concentrating the controller's effort on the manipulator tip while allowing the manipulator's links to deform., The controller utilizes a gain scheduling scheme to arrive at an appropriate feedback law. The control algorithm is implemented using a parallel-processing scheme on a multiprocessor system which consists of INMOS TransputersRTM . Experimental results are obtained using Radius, the Space Robotics Laboratory Facility at the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies. Radius was designed to serve specifically as a test-bed for the development and evaluation of control methods for elastic manipulators. For the present work Radius is configured as a two-link manipulator with both links structurally flexible. One of the trajectories used for the simulations and experiment is a square, which is quite difficult for an elastic manipulator to execute. This box trajectory is more demanding than trajectories typically executed by Canadarm and so link elasticity becomes an important consideration. The effect of elasticity is demonstrated using an independent joint PD controller. In simulation, excellent tip velocity tracking was achieved using the proposed controller. In the experiment, reasonable accuracy in following the desired tip path was attained, however, disturbances, mainly a result of unmodeled joint dynamics, caused degraded performance. The controller may be improved by

  13. Effects of short-term swimming exercise on bone mineral density, geometry, and microstructural properties in sham and ovariectomized rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foong Kiew Ooi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Little information exists about the effects of swimming exercise on bone health in ovariectomized animals with estrogen deficiency, which resembles the postmenopausal state and age-related bone loss in humans. This study investigated the effects of swimming exercise on tibia and femur bone mineral density (BMD, geometry, and microstructure in sham and ovariectomized rats. Forty 3-month-old female rats were divided into four groups: sham operated-sedentary control (Sham-control, sham operated with swimming exercise group (Sham-Swim, ovariectomy-sedentary control (OVx-control, and ovariectomy and swimming exercise (OVx-Swim groups. Swimming sessions were performed by the rats 90 minutes/day for 5 days/week for a total of 8 weeks. At the end of the study, tibial and femoral proximal volumetric total BMD, midshaft cortical volumetric BMD, cross-sectional area, and cross-sectional moment of inertia (MOI, and bone microstructural properties were measured for comparison. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA. The Sham-Swim group exhibited significantly (p < 0.05; one-way ANOVA greater values in bone geometry parameters, that is, tibial midshaft cortical area and MOI compared to the Sham-control group. However, no significant differences were observed in these parameters between the Ovx-Swim and Ovx-control groups. There were no significant differences in femoral BMD between the Sham-Swim and Sham-control groups. Nevertheless, the Ovx-Swim group elicited significantly (p < 0.05; one-way ANOVA higher femoral proximal total BMD and improved bone microstructure compared to the Ovx-Sham group. In conclusion, the positive effects of swimming on bone properties in the ovariectomized rats in the present study may suggest that swimming as a non- or low-weight-bearing exercise may be beneficial for enhancing bone health in the postmenopausal population.

  14. Quantum roots in geometry : II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanas, M.I.

    2006-01-01

    The present work is a review of a series of papers, published in the last ten. years, comprising an attempt to find a suitable avenue from geometry to quantum. It shows clearly that, any non-symmetric geometry admits some built-in quantum features. These features disappear completely once the geometry becomes symmetric (torsion-less). It is shown that, torsion of space-time plays an important role in both geometry and physics. It interacts with the spin of the moving particle and with its charge. The first interaction, Spin-Torsion Interaction, has been used to overcome the discrepancy in the results of the COW-experiment. The second interaction, Charge-Torsion Interaction, is similar to the Aharonov-Bohm effect. As a byproduct, a new version of Absolute Parallelism (AP) geometry, the Parameterized Absolute Parallelism (PAP) geometry, has been established and developed. This version can be used to construct field theories that admit some quantum features. Riemannian geometry and conventional AP-geometry are special cases of PAP-geometry

  15. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy of abdominal viscera: Tips to ensure safe and effective biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Woong; Shin, Sang Soo [Chonnam National University Hospital, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju(Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Ultrasound-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy (USPCB) is used extensively in daily clinical practice for the pathologic confirmation of both focal and diffuse diseases of the abdominal viscera. As a guidance tool, US has a number of clear advantages over computerized tomography or magnetic resonance imaging: fewer false-negative biopsies, lack of ionizing radiation, portability, relatively short procedure time, real-time intra-procedural visualization of the biopsy needle, ability to guide the procedure in almost any anatomic plane, and relatively lower cost. Notably, USPCB is widely used to retrieve tissue specimens in cases of hepatic lesions. However, general radiologists, particularly beginners, find USPCB difficult to perform in abdominal organs other than the liver; indeed, a full understanding of the entire USPCB process and specific considerations for specific abdominal organs is necessary to safely obtain adequate specimens. In this review, we discuss some points and techniques that need to be borne in mind to increase the chances of successful USPCB. We believe that the tips and considerations presented in this review will help radiologists perform USPCB to successfully retrieve target tissue from different organs with minimal complications.

  16. Full tip imaging in atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Sichao [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Burgess, Timothy [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Tjing Loi, Shyeh [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Gault, Baptiste [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main St W, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L8 (Canada); Gao, Qiang [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Bao, Peite; Li, Li [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Cui, Xiangyuan; Kong Yeoh, Wai [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Hoe Tan, Hark; Jagadish, Chennupati [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Ringer, Simon P. [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Zheng, Rongkun, E-mail: rongkun.zheng@sydney.edu.au [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2013-01-15

    Atom probe tomography (APT) is capable of simultaneously revealing the chemical identities and three dimensional positions of individual atoms within a needle-shaped specimen, but suffers from a limited field-of-view (FOV), i.e., only the core of the specimen is effectively detected. Therefore, the capacity to analyze the full tip is crucial and much desired in cases that the shell of the specimen is also the region of interest. In this paper, we demonstrate that, in the analysis of III-V nanowires epitaxially grown from a substrate, the presence of the flat substrate positioned only micrometers away from the analyzed tip apex alters the field distribution and ion trajectories, which provides extra image compression that allows for the analysis of the entire specimen. An array of experimental results, including field desorption maps, elemental distributions, and crystallographic features clearly demonstrate the fact that the whole tip has been imaged, which is confirmed by electrostatic simulations. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The full tip has been imaged by atom probe tomography. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The conductive substrate close to specimen tip introduces extra image compression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The apex of the tip is far from a hemispherical shape. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This work demonstrates a way to increase the FOV of APT.

  17. Assessment of Geometry and In-Flow Effects on Contra-Rotating Open Rotor Broadband Noise Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawodny, Nikolas S.; Nark, Douglas M.; Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Application of previously formulated semi-analytical models for the prediction of broadband noise due to turbulent rotor wake interactions and rotor blade trailing edges is performed on the historical baseline F31/A31 contra-rotating open rotor configuration. Simplified two-dimensional blade element analysis is performed on cambered NACA 4-digit airfoil profiles, which are meant to serve as substitutes for the actual rotor blade sectional geometries. Rotor in-flow effects such as induced axial and tangential velocities are incorporated into the noise prediction models based on supporting computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results and simplified in-flow velocity models. Emphasis is placed on the development of simplified rotor in-flow models for the purpose of performing accurate noise predictions independent of CFD information. The broadband predictions are found to compare favorably with experimental acoustic results.

  18. Effect of surface geometry and insolation on temperature profile of green roof in Saint-Petersburg environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    С. А. Игнатьев

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses an issue of creating an environment favorable for the life in megacities by planting vegetation on the rooftops. It also provides information about rooftop greening practices adopted in other countries. The issues of ‘green roof’ building in climatic conditions of Saint Petersburg and roof vegetation impact on the urban ecosystem are examined. Vegetation composition quality- and quantity-wise has been proposed for the roof under research and a 3D model of this roof reflecting its geometric properties has been developed. A structure of roof covering and substrate qualitative composition is presented. An effect of rooftop geometry on the substrate temperature is explored. The annual substrate temperature and moisture content in different parts of the roof have been analyzed. Results of thermal imaging monitoring and insolation modelling for different parts of green roof surface are presented.

  19. A study of scaling and geometry effects on the forces between cuboidal and cylindrical magnets using analytical force solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agashe, Janhavi S; Arnold, David P

    2008-01-01

    Kelvin's formula is used to calculate forces acting on a permanent magnet in the presence of an external magnetic field from a second permanent magnet. This approach is used to derive explicit analytical solutions for the axial and lateral forces between cuboidal and cylindrical permanent magnets as functions of magnet dimensions and separation. While exact solutions can be found for cuboidal magnets, a hypergeometric expansion is used to approximate the elliptic integrals in solving for the fields and forces for the cylindrical magnets. The resulting equations are applied over a range of magnet sizes and geometries to explore scaling laws and other geometrical effects. It is shown that cuboidal magnets provide larger forces than equivalently sized cylindrical magnets. Also, the aspect ratio of the magnets significantly affects the forces. These results are intended to benefit the design and optimization of sensors, actuators and systems that rely on magnetic forces, particularly at the microscale

  20. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... TIPS. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A TIPS is used to ... the scanner by a cord. Some exams may use different transducers (with different capabilities) during a single ...

  1. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... then placed in this tunnel to keep the pathway open. Patients who typically need a TIPS have ... and stomach. A TIPS procedure involves creating a pathway through the liver that connects the portal vein ( ...

  2. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and/or hydrothorax (in the chest). Budd-Chiari syndrome , a blockage in one or more veins that ... intentionally to solve the problem. Although extremely rare, children may also require a TIPS procedure. TIPS in ...

  3. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... heart while avoiding the liver. TIPS may successfully reduce internal bleeding in the stomach and esophagus in ... TIPS reroutes blood flow in the liver and reduces abnormally high blood pressure in the veins of ...

  4. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What are the limitations of TIPS? What is a Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)? A transjugular intrahepatic ... taking our brief survey: Survey Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story ...

  5. Microneedle-assisted transdermal delivery of Zolmitriptan: effect of microneedle geometry, in vitro permeation experiments, scaling analyses and numerical simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppuluri, Chandra Teja; Devineni, Jyothirmayee; Han, Tao; Nayak, Atul; Nair, Kartik J; Whiteside, Benjamin R; Das, Diganta B; Nalluri, Buchi N

    2017-08-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the effect of salient microneedle (MN) geometry parameters like length, density, shape and type on transdermal permeation enhancement of Zolmitriptan (ZMT). Two types of MN devices viz. AdminPatch ® arrays (ADM) (0.6, 0.9, 1.2 and 1.5 mm lengths) and laboratory fabricated polymeric MNs (PM) of 0.6 mm length were employed. In the case of PMs, arrays were applied thrice at different places within a 1.77 cm 2 skin area (PM-3) to maintain the MN density closer to 0.6 mm ADM. Scaling analyses was done using dimensionless parameters like concentration of ZMT (C t /C s ), thickness (h/L) and surface area of the skin (Sa/L 2 ). Micro-injection molding technique was employed to fabricate PM. Histological studies revealed that the PM, owing to their geometry/design, formed wider and deeper microconduits when compared to ADM of similar length. Approximately 3.17- and 3.65-fold increase in ZMT flux values were observed with 1.5 mm ADM and PM-3 applications when compared to the passive studies. Good correlations were observed between different dimensionless parameters with scaling analyses. Numerical simulations, using MATLAB and COMSOL software, based on experimental data and histological images provided information regarding the ZMT skin distribution after MN application. Both from experimental studies and simulations, it was inferred that PM were more effective in enhancing the transdermal delivery of ZMT when compared to ADM. The study suggests that MN application enhances the ZMT transdermal permeation and the geometrical parameters of MNs play an important role in the degree of such enhancement.

  6. The slab geometry laser. II - Thermal effects in a finite slab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, T. J.; Byer, R. L.; Eggleston, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents two methods for calculating the thermally induced stress, focusing, and depolarization in a pumped zigzag-slab solid-state laser. A computer program capable of detailed calculations of thermal effects in the general case is described. An approximate analysis of slab thermal effects in many cases allows calculation of these effects without use of the computer model directly. The analysis predicts that slabs of square cross section can be designed to have low depolarization and thermal focusing compared to Nd:YAG laser rods.

  7. Complex analysis and geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Alessandro

    1993-01-01

    The papers in this wide-ranging collection report on the results of investigations from a number of linked disciplines, including complex algebraic geometry, complex analytic geometry of manifolds and spaces, and complex differential geometry.

  8. Non-Riemannian geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Eisenhart, Luther Pfahler

    2005-01-01

    This concise text by a prominent mathematician deals chiefly with manifolds dominated by the geometry of paths. Topics include asymmetric and symmetric connections, the projective geometry of paths, and the geometry of sub-spaces. 1927 edition.

  9. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... liver disease are at greater risk for worsening liver failure after TIPS. If your liver failure is severe, a TIPS may not be the best use and a different procedure may be needed to control your symptoms. ... ordinarily filtered out by the liver. The TIPS may cause too much of these ...

  10. The effect of urban geometry on mean radiant temperature under future climate change: a study of three European cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Kevin Ka-Lun; Lindberg, Fredrik; Rayner, David; Thorsson, Sofia

    2015-07-01

    Future anthropogenic climate change is likely to increase the air temperature (T(a)) across Europe and increase the frequency, duration and magnitude of severe heat stress events. Heat stress events are generally associated with clear-sky conditions and high T(a), which give rise to high radiant heat load, i.e. mean radiant temperature (T(mrt)). In urban environments, T mrt is strongly influenced by urban geometry. The present study examines the effect of urban geometry on daytime heat stress in three European cities (Gothenburg in Sweden, Frankfurt in Germany and Porto in Portugal) under present and future climates, using T(mrt) as an indicator of heat stress. It is found that severe heat stress occurs in all three cities. Similar maximum daytime T(mrt) is found in open areas in all three cities despite of the latitudinal differences in average daytime T(mrt). In contrast, dense urban structures like narrow street canyons are able to mitigate heat stress in the summer, without causing substantial changes in T(mrt) in the winter. Although the T(mrt) averages are similar for the north-south and east-west street canyons in each city, the number of hours when T(mrt) exceeds the threshold values of 55.5 and 59.4 °C-used as indicators of moderate and severe heat stress-in the north-south canyons is much higher than that in the east-west canyons. Using statistically downscaled data from a regional climate model, it is found that the study sites were generally warmer in the future scenario, especially Porto, which would further exacerbate heat stress in urban areas. However, a decrease in solar radiation in Gothenburg and Frankfurt reduces T(mrt) in the spring, while the reduction in T(mrt) is somewhat offset by increasing T(a) in other seasons. It suggests that changes in the T(mrt) under the future scenario are dominated by variations in T(a). Nonetheless, the intra-urban differences remain relatively stable in the future. These findings suggest that dense urban

  11. Analysis of Pulsed Laser Welding Parameters Effect on Weld Geometry of 316L Stainless Steel using DOE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Pakmanesh

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the optimization of pulsed Nd:YAG laser welding parameters was done on a lap-joint of a 316L stainless steel foil in order to predict the weld geometry through response surface methodology. For this purpose, the effects of laser power, pulse duration, and frequency were investigated. By presenting a second-order polynomial, the above-mentioned statistical method was managed to be well employed to evaluate the effect of welding parameters on weld width. The results showed that the weld width at the upper, middle and lower surfaces of weld cross section increases by increasing pulse durationand laser power; however, the effects of these parameters on the mentioned levels are different. The effect of pulse duration in the models of weld upper, middle and lower widths was calculated as 76, 73 and 68%, respectively. Moreover, the effect of power on theses widths was determined as 18, 24 and 28%, respectively. Finally, by superimposing these models, optimum conditions were obtained to attain a full penetration weld and the weld with no defects.

  12. Geometry of the Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurevich, L.Eh.; Gliner, Eh.B.

    1978-01-01

    Problems of investigating the Universe space-time geometry are described on a popular level. Immediate space-time geometries, corresponding to three cosmologic models are considered. Space-time geometry of a closed model is the spherical Riemann geonetry, of an open model - is the Lobachevskij geometry; and of a plane model - is the Euclidean geometry. The Universe real geometry in the contemporary epoch of development is based on the data testifying to the fact that the Universe is infinitely expanding

  13. Geometry of carbon nanotubes and mechanisms of phagocytosis and toxic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harik, Vasyl Michael

    2017-05-05

    A review of in vivo and in vitro toxicological studies of the potential toxic effects of carbon nanotubes is presented along with the analysis of experimental data and a hypothesis about the nanotube-asbestos similarity. Developments of the structure-activity paradigm have been reviewed along with the size effects and the classification of carbon nanotubes into eleven distinct classes (e.g., the high aspect ratio nanotubes, thick multi-wall nanotubes and short nanotubes). Scaling analysis of similarities between different classes of carbon nanotubes and asbestos fibers in the context of their potential toxicity and the efficiency of phagocytosis has been reviewed. The potential toxic effects of carbon nanotubes have been characterized by their normalized length, their aspect ratio and other parameters related to their inhalability, engulfment by macrophages and the effectiveness of phagocytosis. Geometric scaling parameters and the classification of carbon nanotubes are used to develop an updated parametric map for the extrapolation of the potential toxic effects resulting from the inhalation of long and short carbon nanotubes. An updated parametric map has been applied to the evaluation of the efficiency of phagocytosis involving distinct classes of carbon nanotubes. A critical value of an important nondimensional parameter characterizing the efficiency of phagocytosis for different nanotubes is presented along with its macrophage-based normalization. The present evaluation of the potential toxicological effects of the high aspect ratio carbon nanotubes is found to be in the agreement with other available studies and earlier scaling analyses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The effect of constraint on fuel-coolant interactions in a confined geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, H.; Corradini, M.L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1995-09-01

    A Fuel-Coolant Interaction (FCI or vapor explosion) is the phenomena in which a hot liquid rapidly transfers its internal energy into a surrounding colder and more volatile liquid. The energetics of such a complex multi-phase and multi-component phenomenon is partially determined by the surrounding boundary conditions. As one of the boundary conditions, we studied the effect of constraint on FCIs. The WFCI-D series of experiments were performed specifically to observe this effect. The results from these and our previous WFCI tests as well as those of other investigators are compared.

  15. Mathematical analysis of the effect of rotor geometry on cup anemometer response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Andrés, Ángel; Pindado, Santiago; Sorribes-Palmer, Félix

    2014-01-01

    The calibration coefficients of two commercial anemometers equipped with different rotors were studied. The rotor cups had the same conical shape, while the size and distance to the rotation axis varied. The analysis was based on the 2-cup positions analytical model, derived using perturbation methods to include second-order effects such as pressure distribution along the rotating cups and friction. The comparison with the experimental data indicates a nonuniform distribution of aerodynamic forces on the rotating cups, with higher forces closer to the rotating axis. The 2-cup analytical model is proven to be accurate enough to study the effect of complex forces on cup anemometer performance.

  16. Tip-modified Propellers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul

    1999-01-01

    The paper deals with tip-modified propellers and the methods which, over a period of two decades, have been applied to develop such propellers. The development is driven by the urge to increase the efficiency of propellers and can be seen as analogous to fitting end plates and winglets to aircraft...... propeller, have efficiency increases of a reasonable magnitude in both open-water and behind-ship conditions....

  17. Tool geometry, rotation and travel speeds effects on the properties of dissimilar magnesium/aluminum friction stir welded lap joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadi, J.; Behnamian, Y.; Mostafaei, A.; Gerlich, A.P.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Tool geometry, rotation and travel speeds show great effect on the microstructure stability of FSW joint. • Increasing rotation and travel speeds resulted in increasing the tensile strength and ductility of the joints. • Better intermixing between Al/Mg alloys was obtained by tapered threaded pin. • A mechanical interlocking mechanism proposed for higher ductility and superior tensile properties in FSW joints. - Abstract: Lap joint friction stir welding (FSW) between dissimilar AZ31B and Al 6061 alloys sheets was conducted using various welding parameters including tool geometry, rotation and travel speeds. Tapered threaded pin and tapered pin tools were applied to fabricate FSW joints, using different rotation and travel speeds. Metallurgical investigations including X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD), optical microscopy images (OM), scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM–EDS) and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) were used to characterize joints microstructures made with different welding parameters. Intermetallic phases were detected in the weld zone (WZ). Various microstructures were observed in the stir zone which can be attributed to using different travel and rotation speeds. Mechanical evaluation including lap shear fracture load test and microhardness measurements indicated that by simultaneously increasing the tool rotation and travel speeds, the joint tensile strength and ductility reached a maximum value. Microhardness studies and extracted results from stress–strain curves indicated that mechanical properties were affected by FSW process. Furthermore, phase analyses by XRD indicated the presence of intermetallic compounds in the weld zone. Finally, in the Al/Mg dissimilar weld, fractography studies showed that intermetallic compounds formation in the weld zone had an influence on the failure mode

  18. Computational study of the effect of fuel element geometry on pellets’ maximum temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vorobiev Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the factors that determine reliable operation of fuel elements in a nuclear reactor is maximum temperature of fuel pellets. This paper presents the computational study results of the effect of the pellet’s central hole on its maximum temperature when using different types of fuel.

  19. Analytical study of the effect of the system geometry on photon sensitivity and depth of interaction of positron emission mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Pablo; Lois, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission mammography (PEM) cameras are novel-dedicated PET systems optimized to image the breast. For these cameras it is essential to achieve an optimum trade-off between sensitivity and spatial resolution and therefore the main challenge for the novel cameras is to improve the sensitivity without degrading the spatial resolution. We carry out an analytical study of the effect of the different detector geometries on the photon sensitivity and the angle of incidence of the detected photons which is related to the DOI effect and therefore to the intrinsic spatial resolution. To this end, dual head detectors were compared to box and different polygon-detector configurations. Our results showed that higher sensitivity and uniformity were found for box and polygon-detector configurations compared to dual-head cameras. Thus, the optimal configuration in terms of sensitivity is a PEM scanner based on a polygon of twelve (dodecagon) or more detectors. We have shown that this configuration is clearly superior to dual-head detectors and slightly higher than box, octagon, and hexagon detectors. Nevertheless, DOI effects are increased for this configuration compared to dual head and box scanners and therefore an accurate compensation for this effect is required.

  20. Analytical Study of the Effect of the System Geometry on Photon Sensitivity and Depth of Interaction of Positron Emission Mammography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Aguiar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission mammography (PEM cameras are novel-dedicated PET systems optimized to image the breast. For these cameras it is essential to achieve an optimum trade-off between sensitivity and spatial resolution and therefore the main challenge for the novel cameras is to improve the sensitivity without degrading the spatial resolution. We carry out an analytical study of the effect of the different detector geometries on the photon sensitivity and the angle of incidence of the detected photons which is related to the DOI effect and therefore to the intrinsic spatial resolution. To this end, dual head detectors were compared to box and different polygon-detector configurations. Our results showed that higher sensitivity and uniformity were found for box and polygon-detector configurations compared to dual-head cameras. Thus, the optimal configuration in terms of sensitivity is a PEM scanner based on a polygon of twelve (dodecagon or more detectors. We have shown that this configuration is clearly superior to dual-head detectors and slightly higher than box, octagon, and hexagon detectors. Nevertheless, DOI effects are increased for this configuration compared to dual head and box scanners and therefore an accurate compensation for this effect is required.

  1. Elucidation of high-power fibre laser welding phenomena of stainless steel and effect of factors on weld geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawahito, Yousuke; Mizutani, Masami; Katayama, Seiji

    2007-01-01

    The fibre laser has been receiving great attention due to its advantages of high efficiency, high power and high beam quality, and is expected to be one of the most desirable heat sources for high-speed and deep-penetration welding. In this study, therefore, in bead-on-plate welding of Type 304 stainless steel plates with 6 kW fibre laser, the effects of laser power, power density and welding speed on the formation of sound welds were investigated with four laser beams of 130, 200, 360 and 560 μm in spot diameter, and their welding phenomena were clarified with high-speed video cameras and an x-ray transmission real-time imaging system. The weld beads showed a keyhole type of penetration at any diameter, and the maximum penetration of 11 mm in depth was obtained at 130 μm spot diameter and 0.6 m min -1 welding speed. It was found that the laser power density exerted a remarkable effect on the increase in weld penetration at higher welding speeds, and sound partially penetrated welds without welding defects such as porosity, underfilling or humping could be produced at wide process windows of welding speeds between 4.5 and 10 m min -1 with fibre laser beams of 360 μm or 560 μm in spot diameter. The high-speed video observation pictures and the x-ray images of the welding phenomena at 6 m min -1 welding speed and 360 μm spot diameter show that a sound weld bead was formed owing to a long molten pool suppressing and accommodating spattering and a stable keyhole generating no bubbles from the tip, respectively

  2. Coil geometry effects on scanning single-coil magnetic induction tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldkamp, Joe R.; Quirk, Stephen

    2017-09-01

    Alternative coil designs for single coil magnetic induction tomography are considered in this work, with the intention of improving upon the standard design used previously. In particular, we note that the blind spot associated with this coil type, a portion of space along its axis where eddy current generation can be very weak, has an important effect on performance. The seven designs tested here vary considerably in the size of their blind spot. To provide the most discerning test possible, we use laboratory phantoms containing feature dimensions similar to blind spot size. Furthermore, conductivity contrasts are set higher than what would occur naturally in biological systems, which has the effect of weakening eddy current generation at coil locations that straddle the border between high and low conductivity features. Image reconstruction results for the various coils show that coils with smaller blind spots give markedly better performance, though improvements in signal-to-noise ratio could alter that conclusion.

  3. The mechanical design of hybrid graphene/boron nitride nanotransistors: Geometry and interface effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einalipour Eshkalak, Kasra; Sadeghzadeh, Sadegh; Jalaly, Maisam

    2018-02-01

    From electronic point of view, graphene resembles a metal or semi-metal and boron nitride is a dielectric material (band gap = 5.9 eV). Hybridization of these two materials opens band gap of the graphene which has expansive applications in field-effect graphene transistors. In this paper, the effect of the interface structure on the mechanical properties of a hybrid graphene/boron nitride was studied. Young's modulus, fracture strain and tensile strength of the models were simulated. Three likely types (hexagonal, octagonal and decagonal) were found for the interface of hybrid sheet after relaxation. Although Csbnd B bonds at the interface were indicated to result in more promising electrical properties, nitrogen atoms are better choice for bonding to carbon for mechanical applications.

  4. A robust tool for photon source geometry measurements using the fractional Talbot effect

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lovric, G.; Oberta, Peter; Mohacsi, I.; Stampanoni, M.; Mokso, R.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 3 (2014), s. 2745-2760 ISSN 1094-4087 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : hard X-rays * X-ray imaging * Talbot and self-imaging effects * synchrotron radiation Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.488, year: 2014 http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/search2.cfm?reissue=J&journalList=4&fullrecord=oberta&basicsearch=Go

  5. Airlift column photobioreactors for Porphyridium sp. culturing: part I. effects of hydrodynamics and reactor geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hu-Ping; Al-Dahhan, Muthanna H

    2012-04-01

    Photosynthetic microorganisms have been attracting world attention for their great potential as renewable energy sources in recent years. Cost effective production in large scale, however, remains a major challenge to overcome. It is known to the field that turbulence could help improving the performance of photobioreactors due to the so-called flashing light effects. Better understanding of the multiphase fluid dynamics and the irradiance distribution inside the reactor that cause the flashing light effects, as well as quantifying their impacts on the reactor performance, thus, are crucial for successful design and scale-up of photobioreactors. In this study, a species of red marine microalgae, Porphyridium sp., was grown in three airlift column photobioreactors (i.e., draft tube column, bubble column, and split column). The physical properties of the culture medium, the local fluid dynamics and the photobioreactor performances were investigated and are reported in this part of the manuscript. Results indicate that the presence of microalgae considerably affected the local multiphase flow dynamics in the studied draft tube column. Results also show that the split column reactor works slightly better than the draft tube and the bubble columns due to the spiral flow pattern inside the reactor. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Effect of design geometry of the demo first wall on the plasma heat load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. Igitkhanov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work we analyse the effect of W armour surface shaping on the heat load on the W/EUROFER DEMO sandwich type first wall blanket module with the water coolant. The armour wetted area is varied by changing the inclination and height of the «roof» type armor surface. The deleterious effect of leading edge at the tiles corner caused by misalignment is replaced in current design by rounded corners. Analysis has been carried out by means of the MEMOS code to assess the influence of the thickness of the layers and effect of the magnetic field inclination. Calculations show the evolution of the maximum temperatures in the tungsten, EUROFER, Cu allow and the stainless-steel water tube for different level of surface inclination (chamfering and in the case of rounded corners used in the current design. It is shown that the blanket module materials remain within a proper temperature range only at shallow incident angle if the width of EUROFER is reduced at list twice compare with the reference case.

  7. Organic solvent-induced changes in membrane geometry in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells - a common narcotic effect?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulenberg, C.J.W.; de Groot, A.; Westerink, R.H.S.; Vijverberg, H.P.M.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to organic solvents may cause narcotic effects. At the cellular level, these narcotic effects have been associated with a reduction in neuronal excitability caused by changes in membrane structure and function. In order to critically test whether changes in membrane geometry contribute to

  8. The effect of electric field geometry on the performance of electromembrane extraction systems: Footprints of a third driving force along with migration and diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moazami, Hamid Reza; Hosseiny Davarani, Saied Saeed; Mohammadi, Jamil; Nojavan, Saeed; Abrari, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of electric field vectors was first calculated for electromembrane extraction (EME) systems in classical and cylindrical electrode geometries. The results showed that supported liquid membrane (SLM) has a general field amplifying effect due to its lower dielectric constant in comparison with aqueous donor/acceptor solutions. The calculated norms of the electric field vector showed that a DC voltage of 50 V can create huge electric field strengths up to 64 kV m −1 and 111 kV m −1 in classical and cylindrical geometries respectively. In both cases, the electric field strength reached its peak value on the inner wall of the SLM. In the case of classical geometry, the field strength was a function of the polar position of the SLM whereas the field strength in cylindrical geometry was angularly uniform. In order to investigate the effect of the electrode geometry on the performance of real EME systems, the analysis was carried out in three different geometries including classical, helical and cylindrical arrangements using naproxen and sodium diclofenac as the model analytes. Despite higher field strength and extended cross sectional area, the helical and cylindrical geometries gave lower recoveries with respect to the classical EME. The observed decline of the signal was proved to be against the relations governing migration and diffusion processes, which means that a third driving force is involved in EME. The third driving force is the interaction between the radially inhomogeneous electric field and the analyte in its neutral form. - Highlights: • Electric field vectors have been calculated in EME systems. • A new driving force has been proposed in EME systems. • EME can be theoretically applied to nonionic polarizable analytes.

  9. The effect of electric field geometry on the performance of electromembrane extraction systems: Footprints of a third driving force along with migration and diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moazami, Hamid Reza [School of Physics and Accelerators, NSTRI, P. O. Box, 11365-8486, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseiny Davarani, Saied Saeed, E-mail: ss-hosseiny@sbu.ac.ir [Faculty of Chemistry, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., 1983963113, Evin, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammadi, Jamil; Nojavan, Saeed [Faculty of Chemistry, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., 1983963113, Evin, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abrari, Masoud [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., 1983963113, Evin, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-09-03

    The distribution of electric field vectors was first calculated for electromembrane extraction (EME) systems in classical and cylindrical electrode geometries. The results showed that supported liquid membrane (SLM) has a general field amplifying effect due to its lower dielectric constant in comparison with aqueous donor/acceptor solutions. The calculated norms of the electric field vector showed that a DC voltage of 50 V can create huge electric field strengths up to 64 kV m{sup −1} and 111 kV m{sup −1} in classical and cylindrical geometries respectively. In both cases, the electric field strength reached its peak value on the inner wall of the SLM. In the case of classical geometry, the field strength was a function of the polar position of the SLM whereas the field strength in cylindrical geometry was angularly uniform. In order to investigate the effect of the electrode geometry on the performance of real EME systems, the analysis was carried out in three different geometries including classical, helical and cylindrical arrangements using naproxen and sodium diclofenac as the model analytes. Despite higher field strength and extended cross sectional area, the helical and cylindrical geometries gave lower recoveries with respect to the classical EME. The observed decline of the signal was proved to be against the relations governing migration and diffusion processes, which means that a third driving force is involved in EME. The third driving force is the interaction between the radially inhomogeneous electric field and the analyte in its neutral form. - Highlights: • Electric field vectors have been calculated in EME systems. • A new driving force has been proposed in EME systems. • EME can be theoretically applied to nonionic polarizable analytes.

  10. Note: Microelectrode-shielding tip for scanning probe electron energy spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Li, Zhean; Xu, Chunkai; Liu, Jian; Xu, Chunye; Chen, Xiangjun

    2018-04-01

    We report a novel microelectrode-shielding tip (ME tip) for scanning probe electron energy spectroscopy (SPEES). The shielding effect of this tip is studied through comparing the detection efficiency with the normal tip by both experiment and simulation. The results show that the backscattering count rate detected by the SPEES instrument using the normal tip begins to decrease as the tip approaches to the sample surface within 21 μm, while that using the ME tip only starts to drop off within 1 μm. This indicates that the electron energy spectra can be measured with the ME tip at a much closer tip-sample distance. Furthermore, it is also demonstrated that the ME tip can be used to obtain topography of the sample surface in situ simultaneously.

  11. A size dependent dynamic model for piezoelectric nanogenerators: effects of geometry, structural and environmental parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghzadeh, Sadegh; Farshad Mir Saeed Ghazi, Seyyed

    2018-03-01

    Piezoelectric Nanogenerator (PENG) is one of the novel energy harvester systems that recently, has been a subject of interest for researchers. By the use of nanogenerators, it’s possible to harvest different forms of energy in the environment like mechanical vibrations and generate electricity. The structure of a PENG consists of vertical arrays of nanowires between two electrodes. In this paper, dynamic analysis of a PENG is studied numerically. The modified couple stress theory which includes one length scale material parameter is used to study the size-dependent behavior of PENGs. Then, by application of a complete form of linear hybrid piezoelectric—pyroelectric equations, and using the Euler-Bernoulli beam model, the equations of motion has been derived. Generalized Differential Quadrature (GDQ) method was employed to solve the equations of motion. The effect of damping ratio, temperature rise, excitation frequency and length scale parameter was studied. It was found that the PENG voltage maximizes at the resonant frequency of nanowire. The temperature rise has a significant effect on PENG’s efficiency. When temperature increases about 10 {{K}}, the maximum voltage increases about 26%. Increasing the damping ratio, the maximum voltage decreases gradually.

  12. Hydrological response and thermal effect of karst springs linked to aquifer geometry and recharge processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Mingming; Chen, Zhihua; Zhou, Hong; Zhang, Liang; Han, Zhaofeng

    2018-03-01

    To be better understand the hydrological and thermal behavior of karst systems in South China, seasonal variations in flow, hydrochemistry and stable isotope ratios of five karst springs were used to delineate flow paths and recharge processes, and to interpret their thermal response. Isotopic data suggest that mean recharge elevations are 200-820 m above spring outlets. Springs that originate from high elevations have lower NO3 - concentrations than those originating from lower areas that have more agricultural activity. Measured Sr2+ concentrations reflect the strontium contents of the host carbonate aquifer and help delineate the spring catchment's saturated zone. Seasonal variations of NO3 - and Sr2+ concentrations are inversely correlated, because the former correlates with event water and the latter with baseflow. The mean annual water temperatures of springs were only slightly lower than the local mean annual surface temperature at the outlet elevations. These mean spring temperatures suggest a vertical gradient of 6 °C/vertical km, which resembles the adiabatic lapse rate of the Earth's stable atmosphere. Seasonal temperature variations in the springs are in phase with surface air temperatures, except for Heilongquan (HLQ) spring. Event-scale variations of thermal response are dramatically controlled by the circulation depth of karst systems, which determines the effectiveness of heat exchange. HLQ spring undergoes the deepest circulation depth of 820 m, and its thermal responses are determined by the thermally effective regulation processes at higher elevations and the mixing processes associated with thermally ineffective responses at lower elevations.

  13. Compound parabolic concentrator optical fiber tip for FRET-based fluorescent sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassan, Hafeez Ul; Nielsen, Kristian; Aasmul, Soren

    2015-01-01

    polymer optical fiber for an excitation and emission wavelength of 550 nm and 650nm, respectively. The model suggests an increase of a factor of 1.6 to 4 in the collected fluorescent power for an ideal CPC tip, as compared to the plane-cut fiber tip for fiber lengths between 5 and 45mm......The Compound Parabolic Concentrator (CPC) optical fiber tip shape has been proposed for intensity based fluorescent sensors working on the principle of FRET (Förster Resonance Energy Transfer). A simple numerical Zemax model has been used to optimize the CPC tip geometry for a step-index multimode...

  14. The effect of the physical state of binders on high-shear wet granulation and granule properties: a mechanistic approach to understand the high-shear wet granulation process. part IV. the impact of rheological state and tip-speeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinjiang; Tao, Li; Buckley, David; Tao, Jing; Gao, Julia; Hubert, Mario

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide a mechanistic understanding concerning the effect of tip-speed on a granulation at various binder rheological states; the in situ rheological state of a binder was controlled by exposing a granulation blend to 96% relative humidity. This approach allowed us to investigate the impact of tip-speed on granule consolidation coupled with the in situ binder state, which was not possible using a conventional granulation approach. Experimentally, the rheological state of binders was characterized using a rheometer. Granule size and granule porosity were measured by Qicpic instrument and Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry, respectively. For the granulations containing binders at viscous state (PVP K17 and PVP K29/32), the granule size increased significantly with mixing time and the growth rate increased with tip-speed until 5.8 m/s; when binders were at viscoelastic state, tip-speed had no impact on granulation. Furthermore, the granule porosity was higher for granulation with binders at viscoelastic state (HPC and PVP K90), whereas it was lower for granulation with binders at viscous state. In addition, the impeller tip-speed had minimal impact on the porosity of the final granules. Finally, Ennis' model was used for interpreting results, providing mechanistic insights on granulation. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  15. Effects of mold geometry on fiber orientation of powder injection molded metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Faiz, E-mail: faizahmad@petronas.com.my; Aslam, Muhammad, E-mail: klaira73@gmail.com; Altaf, Khurram, E-mail: khurram.altaf@petronas.com.my; Shirazi, Irfan, E-mail: irfanshirazi@hotmail.com [Mechanical Engineering Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS Malaysia (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    Fiber orientations in metal matrix composites have significant effect on improving tensile properties. Control of fiber orientations in metal injection molded metal composites is a difficult task. In this study, two mold cavities of dimensions 6x6x90 mm and 10x20x180 mm were used for comparison of fiber orientation in injection molded metal composites test parts. In both mold cavities, convergent and divergent flows were developed by modifying the sprue dimensions. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to examine the fiber orientations within the test samples. The results showed highly aligned fiber in injection molded test bars developed from the convergent melt flow. Random orientation of fibers was noted in the composites test bars produced from divergent melt flow.

  16. Integration effects of pylon geometry on a high-wing transport airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, John R.; Lamb, Milton

    1989-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the installation effects of a series of pylons that had differing cross-sectional shapes on the pressure distributions and aerodynamic characteristics of a 1/24-scale high wing transport. The tests were conducted at Mach numbers at 0.70 and 0.80 at angles of attack from -3 degrees to 4 degrees with the pylons tested at various toe angles between 5 degrees inboard and 5 degrees outboard. Results of this study indicate that the installed drag was lowest for the pylons with a compression pylon type design which kept the flow under the wing in the pylon/wing junction comparable to the clean wing velocities.

  17. Integration effects of pylon geometry and rearward mounted nacelles for a high-wing transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, John R.; Lamb, Milton

    1987-01-01

    Results of a wind-tunnel study of the effect of pylon cross-sectional shape and tow angle on airplane drag and an aft-mounted nacelle are presented. The 1/24-scale wide-body high-wing transport model was tested in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel at free-stream Mach 0.7-0.8 and angles of attack from -3 to 4 degrees. A compression-type pylon is found to have the lowest drag at both Mach 0.7 and 0.8 and to be capable of suppressing the velocities in the inboard region of the pylon-wing junction, reducing the extent of supersonic flow and the probability of flow separation. It is also shown that the D-shaped aft-mounted nacelle has a low interference drag, as do previously tested circular nacelles in the same position.

  18. Unilateral idiopathic hydrocele has a substantial effect on the ipsilateral testicular geometry and resistivity indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut, Ahmet Tuncay; Unsal, Alparslan; Ozden, Eriz; Kosar, Pinar; Kosar, Ugur; Emir, Levent

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether hydrocele has any effect on the volume and shape of the ipsilateral testis and can be implicated as a cause of testicular ischemia. Group 1 consisted of 23 patients with unilateral idiopathic hydrocele, whereas 30 healthy men constituted group 2. All patients underwent scrotal ultrasonography by which testicular dimensions in craniocaudal (D(cc)), anteroposterior (D(ap)), and mediolateral axes were measured, followed by calculation of the D(cc)/D(ap) ratio and testicular volume. By color Doppler analysis, the resistivity index of the subcapsular artery (RI(sc)) and the resistivity index of the intratesticular artery were determined. The mean D(cc)/D(ap) ratio +/- SD for group 1 was 1.7 +/- 0.3 (range, 1.1-2.3), significantly lower than that of group 2, which was 1.9 +/- 0.3 (range, 1.3-2.2) (P = .028). Mean testicular volume values of subjects having hydrocele for more than and less than 6 months were 13.4 +/- 7.3 and 22.5 +/- 5.1 cm3, respectively; the difference between the subgroups was significant (P = .003). For the ipsilateral testis, mean RI(sc) values were 0.70 +/- 0.06 (range, 0.60-0.80) in group 1 and 0.65 +/- 0.06 (range, 0.59-0.83) in group 2. The mean RI(sc) was significantly higher in group 1 (P = .006). Unilateral idiopathic hydrocele has a tendency for rounding rather than flattening the ipsilateral testis as well as elevating the RI(sc) on the affected side. To the best of our knowledge, no strict spectral Doppler analysis criteria have been proposed for testicular ischemia yet. Therefore, the impact of the difference of the RI(sc) should raise the suspicion for ischemia, and further research is needed to elucidate any effect on spermatogenesis.

  19. High temperature cracking of steels: effect of geometry on creep crack growth laws; Fissuration des aciers a haute temperature: effet de la geometrie sur la transferabilite des lois de propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabiri, M.R

    2003-12-01

    This study was performed at Centre des Materiaux de l'Ecole des Mines de Paris. It deals with identification and transferability of high temperature creep cracking laws of steels. A global approach, based on C{sup *} and J non-linear fracture mechanics parameters has been used to characterize creep crack initiation and propagation. The studied materials are: the ferritic steels 1Cr-1Mo-1/4V (hot and cold parts working at 540 and 250 C) used in the thermal power stations and the austenitic stainless steel 316 L(N) used in the nuclear power stations. During this thesis a data base was setting up, it regroups several tests of fatigue, creep, creep-fatigue, and relaxation. Its particularity is to contain several creep tests (27 tests), achieved at various temperatures (550 to 650 C) and using three different geometries. The relevance of the C{sup *} parameter to describe the creep crack propagation was analysed by a means of systematic study of elasto-viscoplastic stress singularities under several conditions (different stress triaxiality). It has been shown that, besides the C{sup *} parameter, a second non singular term, denoted here as Q{sup *}, is necessary to describe the local variables in the vicinity of the crack tip. Values of this constraint parameter are always negative. Consequently, application of typical creep crack growth laws linking the creep crack growth rate to the C{sup *} parameter (da/dt - C{sup *}), will be conservative for industrial applications. Furthermore, we showed that for ferritic steels, crack incubation period is important, therefore a correlation of Ti - C{sup *} type has been kept to predict crack initiation time Ti. For the austenitic stainless steel, the relevant stage is the one of the crack propagation, so that a master curve (da/dt - C{sup *}), using a new data analysis method, was established. Finally, the propagation of cracks has been simulated numerically using the node release technique, allowing to validate analytical

  20. Effects of elasticity and geometry on the locomotion of a model bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Frank; Graham, Michael

    2017-11-01

    The locomotion of flagellated bacteria in viscous fluid provides the blueprint for a number of micro-scale engineering applications. The elasticities of both the hook protein (connecting cell body and flagellum) and the flagella themselves play a key role in determining the stability of locomotion. We use a coarse-grained discretization of elastic flagella connected to a rigid cell body to examine trajectories and flow fields for free swimmers. We indeed find that hook and/or flagellar buckling occurs above a critical flexibility relative to the swimmer's torque input. This renders straight swimming ineffective, though not necessarily undesirable in practice. Simulations with multiple flagella show bundling may partially stabilize the buckling effect. For a single flagellum or single bundle, we define a parameter space of characteristic angles tracking the overall time-averaged shape of the swimmer while also delineating stability boundaries between different modes of buckling. Ultimately our results may provide insight on how swimmers move through complex environments and how to design microrobotic swimmers for specific applications. NHS, GERS.

  1. Effect of Roller Geometry on Roller Bearing Load-Life Relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Poplawski, Joseph V.

    2015-01-01

    Cylindrical roller bearings typically employ roller profile modification to equalize load distribution, minimize stress concentration at roller ends and allow for a small amount of misalignment. The 1947 Lundberg-Palmgren analysis reported an inverse fourth power relation between load and life for roller bearings with line contact. In 1952, Lundberg and Palmgren changed their load-life exponent to 10/3 for roller bearings, assuming mixed line and point contact. The effect of roller-crown profile was reanalyzed in this paper to determine the actual load-life relation for modified roller profiles. For uncrowned rollers (line contact), the load-life exponent is p = 4, in agreement with the 1947 Lundberg-Palmgren value but crowning reduces the value of the exponent, p. The lives of modern roller bearings made from vacuum-processed steels significantly exceed those predicted by the Lundberg-Palmgren theory. The Zaretsky rolling-element bearing life model of 1996 produces a load-life exponent of p = 5 for flat rollers, which is more consistent with test data. For the Zaretsky model with fully crowned rollers p = 4.3. For an aerospace profile and chamfered rollers, p = 4.6. Using the 1952 Lundberg-Palmgren value p = 10/3, the value incorporated in ANSI/ABMA and ISO bearing standards, can create significant life calculation errors for roller bearings.

  2. Effect of the Inner Material and Pipe Geometry on the Flow and Induced Radiated Noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Su-Jeong; Lim, Hee-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Noise and vibration, which occur in a pipe, are usually caused by the interaction between the turbulent flow and nearby wall. Although it can be estimated by a simple case of expanded pipes having complex turbulent flow, the radiated noise is highly dependent upon the size, shape, and thickness of the given model. In addition, the radiated noise propagates and has serious interference and destabilization effects on the surrounding systems, which can lead to fatigue fracture and failure. This study took advantage of the variety of commercial programs, such as FLUENT (flow solver), NASTRAN (dynamic motion solver of complex structures) and VIRTUAL LAB (radiated noise solver) based on the boundary element method (BEM), to understand the underlying physics of flow noise. The expanded pipe has separation and a high pressure drop because of the abrupt change in the cross-section. Based on the radiated noise calculations, the noise level was reduced to around 20 dB in the range of 100.500 Hz

  3. Effect of the Inner Material and Pipe Geometry on the Flow and Induced Radiated Noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Su-Jeong; Lim, Hee-Chang [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Noise and vibration, which occur in a pipe, are usually caused by the interaction between the turbulent flow and nearby wall. Although it can be estimated by a simple case of expanded pipes having complex turbulent flow, the radiated noise is highly dependent upon the size, shape, and thickness of the given model. In addition, the radiated noise propagates and has serious interference and destabilization effects on the surrounding systems, which can lead to fatigue fracture and failure. This study took advantage of the variety of commercial programs, such as FLUENT (flow solver), NASTRAN (dynamic motion solver of complex structures) and VIRTUAL LAB (radiated noise solver) based on the boundary element method (BEM), to understand the underlying physics of flow noise. The expanded pipe has separation and a high pressure drop because of the abrupt change in the cross-section. Based on the radiated noise calculations, the noise level was reduced to around 20 dB in the range of 100.500 Hz.

  4. Enhanced Thermal Conductivity of Copper Nanofluids: The Effect of Filler Geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanushali, Sushrut; Jason, Naveen Noah; Ghosh, Prakash; Ganesh, Anuradda; Simon, George P; Cheng, Wenlong

    2017-06-07

    Nanofluids are colloidal dispersions that exhibit enhanced thermal conductivity at low filler loadings and thus have been proposed for heat transfer applications. Here, we systematically investigate how particle shape determines the thermal conductivity of low-cost copper nanofluids using a range of distinct filler particle shapes: nanospheres, nanocubes, short nanowires, and long nanowires. To exclude the potential effects of surface capping ligands, all the filler particles are kept with uniform surface chemistry. We find that copper nanowires enhanced the thermal conductivity up to 40% at 0.25 vol % loadings; while the thermal conductivity was only 9.3% and 4.2% for the nanosphere- and nanocube-based nanofluids, respectively, at the same filler loading. This is consistent with a percolation mechanism in which a higher aspect ratio is beneficial for thermal conductivity enhancement. To overcome the surface oxidation of the copper nanomaterials and maintain the dispersion stability, we employed polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a dispersant and ascorbic acid as an antioxidant in the nanofluid formulations. The thermal performance of the optimized fluid formulations could be sustained for multiple heating-cooling cycles while retaining stability over 1000 h.

  5. Effects of viewing- and illumination geometry on settlement type classification of quickbird images

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van den Bergh, F

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available .96 0.60 83.15 15.21 97.84 1.89 96.63 2.15 100.00 0.00 Ad1*) Bd2 87.18 1.15 57.51 34.79 86.69 1.33 92.67 7.62 99.92 0.24 Ad2*) Bd1 88.21 3.74 65.79 33.06 92.22 8.00 82.07 14.96 99.29 0.81 Ad1*) Ad2 91.37 2.84 73.14 20.83 89.99 7.47 95... stream_source_info van den Bergh_2011.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 16634 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name van den Bergh_2011.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 THE EFFECTS...

  6. Numerical investigation of the effect of stenosis geometry on the coronary diagnostic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamangar, Sarfaraz; Kalimuthu, Govindaraju; Badruddin, Irfan Anjum; Badarudin, A; Ahmed, N J Salman; Khan, T M Yunus

    2014-01-01

    The present study deals with the functional severity of a coronary artery stenosis assessed by the fractional flow reserve (FFR). The effects of different geometrical shapes of lesion on the diagnostic parameters are unknown. In this study, 3D computational simulation of blood flow in three different geometrical shapes of stenosis (triangular, elliptical, and trapezium) is considered in steady and transient conditions for 70% (moderate), 80% (intermediate), and 90% (severe) area stenosis (AS). For a given percentage AS, the variation of diagnostic parameters which are derived from pressure drop across the stenosis was found in three different geometrical shapes of stenosis and it was observed that FFR is higher in triangular shape and lower in trapezium shape. The pressure drop coefficient (CDP) was higher in trapezium shape and lower in triangular model whereas the LFC shows opposite trend. From the clinical perspective, the relationship between percentage AS and FFR is linear and inversely related in all the three models. A cut-off value of 0.75 for FFR was observed at 76.5% AS in trapezium model, 79.5% in elliptical model, and 82.7% AS for the triangular shaped model. The misinterpretation of the functional severity of the stenosis is in the region of 76.5%-82.7 % AS from different shapes of stenosis models.

  7. Numerical Investigation of the Effect of Stenosis Geometry on the Coronary Diagnostic Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarfaraz Kamangar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with the functional severity of a coronary artery stenosis assessed by the fractional flow reserve (FFR. The effects of different geometrical shapes of lesion on the diagnostic parameters are unknown. In this study, 3D computational simulation of blood flow in three different geometrical shapes of stenosis (triangular, elliptical, and trapezium is considered in steady and transient conditions for 70% (moderate, 80% (intermediate, and 90% (severe area stenosis (AS. For a given percentage AS, the variation of diagnostic parameters which are derived from pressure drop across the stenosis was found in three different geometrical shapes of stenosis and it was observed that FFR is higher in triangular shape and lower in trapezium shape. The pressure drop coefficient (CDP was higher in trapezium shape and lower in triangular model whereas the LFC shows opposite trend. From the clinical perspective, the relationship between percentage AS and FFR is linear and inversely related in all the three models. A cut-off value of 0.75 for FFR was observed at 76.5% AS in trapezium model, 79.5% in elliptical model, and 82.7% AS for the triangular shaped model. The misinterpretation of the functional severity of the stenosis is in the region of 76.5%-82.7 % AS from different shapes of stenosis models.

  8. Comparison of Flow Characteristics of Different Sphere Geometries Under the Free Surface Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahin B.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Comparison of the experimental results of turbulent flow structures between a smooth sphere and a sphere with a vent hole, roughened, and o-ring is presented in the presence of a free-surface. Dye visualization and particle image velocimetry (PIV techniques were performed to examine effects of passive control methods on the sphere wake for Reynolds number Re = 5000 based on the sphere diameter with a 42.5mm in an open water channel. Instantaneous and time-averaged flow patterns in the wake region of the sphere were examined from point of flow physics for the different sphere locations in the range of 0≤h/D≤2.0 where h was the space between the top point of the sphere and the free surface. The ratio of ventilation hole to sphere diameter was 0.15, o-ring was located at 55° with a 2 mm from front stagnation point of the sphere and roughened surface was formed by means of totally 410 circular holes with a 3 mm diameter and around 2 mm depth in an equilateral triangle arrangement. The flow characteristics of instantaneous velocity vectors, vorticity contours, time-averaged streamline patterns, Reynolds stress correlations and streamwise and cross-stream velocity fluctuations for both the smooth and passively controlled sphere were interpreted.

  9. Effects of geometry and fluid properties during condensation in minichannels: experiments and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toninelli, Paolo; Bortolin, Stefano; Azzolin, Marco; Del, Davide, Col

    2017-10-01

    The present paper aims at investigating the condensation process inside minichannels, at low mass fluxes, where bigger discrepancies from conventional channels can be expected. At high mass flux, the condensation in minichannels is expected to be shear stress dominated. Therefore, models originally developed for conventional channels could still do a good job in predicting the heat transfer coefficient. When the mass flow rate decreases, the condensation process in minichannels starts to display differences with the same process in macro-channels. With the purpose of investigating condensation at these operating conditions, new experimental data are here reported and compared with data already published in the literature. In particular, heat transfer coefficients have been measured during R134a and R1234ze(E) condensation inside circular and square cross section minichannels at mass flux ranging between 65 and 200 kg m-2 s-1. These new data are compared with those of R32, R717, R290, R152a to show the effect of channel shape and fluid properties and to assess the applicability of correlations developed for macroscale condensation. For this purpose, a new criterion based on the Weber number is presented to decide when the macroscale condensation correlation can be applied. The present experimental data are also compared against three-dimensional Volume of Fluid (VOF) simulations of condensation in minichannels with circular and square cross section. This comparison allows to get an insight into the process and evaluate the main heat transfer mechanisms.

  10. On the effects of geometry, defects, and material asymmetry on the mechanical response of shape memory alloy cellular lattice structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravari, M R Karamooz; Kadkhodaei, M; Ghaei, A; Esfahani, S Nasr; Andani, M Taheri; Elahinia, M; Karaca, H

    2016-01-01

    Shape memory alloy (such as NiTi) cellular lattice structures are a new class of advanced materials with many potential applications. The cost of fabrication of these structures however is high. It is therefore necessary to develop modeling methods to predict the functional behavior of these alloys before fabrication. The main aim of the present study is to assess the effects of geometry, microstructural imperfections and material asymmetric response of dense shape memory alloys on the mechanical response of cellular structures. To this end, several cellular and dense NiTi samples are fabricated using a selective laser melting process. Both cellular and dense specimens were tested in compression in order to obtain their stress–strain response. For modeling purposes, a three -dimensional (3D) constitutive model based on microplane theory which is able to describe the material asymmetry was employed. Five finite element models based on unit cell and multi-cell methods were generated to predict the mechanical response of cellular lattices. The results show the considerable effects of the microstructural imperfections on the mechanical response of the cellular lattice structures. The asymmetric material response of the bulk material also affects the mechanical response of the corresponding cellular structure. (paper)

  11. Tipping point leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, W Chan; Mauborgne, Renée

    2003-04-01

    When William Bratton was appointed police commissioner of New York City in 1994, turf wars over jurisdiction and funding were rife and crime was out of control. Yet in less than two years, and without an increase in his budget, Bratton turned New York into the safest large city in the nation. And the NYPD was only the latest of five law-enforcement agencies Bratton had turned around. In each case, he succeeded in record time despite limited resources, a demotivated staff, opposition from powerful vested interests, and an organization wedded to the status quo. Bratton's turnarounds demonstrate what the authors call tipping point leadership. The theory of tipping points hinges on the insight that in any organization, fundamental changes can occur quickly when the beliefs and energies of a critical mass of people create an epidemic movement toward an idea. Bratton begins by overcoming the cognitive hurdles that block organizations from recognizing the need for change. He does this by putting managers face-to-face with operational problems. Next, he manages around limitations on funds, staff, or equipment by concentrating resources on the areas that are most in need of change and that have the biggest payoffs. He meanwhile solves the motivation problem by singling out key influencers--people with disproportionate power due to their connections or persuasive abilities. Finally, he closes off resistance from powerful opponents. Not every CEO has the personality to be a Bill Bratton, but his successes are due to much more than his personality. He relies on a remarkably consistent method that any manager looking to turn around an organization can use to overcome the forces of inertia and reach the tipping point.

  12. Tip Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy of Rhodamine 6G on nanostructured gold substrate

    KAUST Repository

    Moretti, Manola

    2015-05-01

    A new concept based setup for Tip Enhanced Raman Scattering measurement assisted by gold nanostructure is presented, that can provide a platform for gap-mode enhancement of the signal at the single molecule level conjugated with controlled spatial localization of the molecule under investigation and a method to determine the diffraction limit properties of the tip. In essence, this effect is obtained illuminating a gold coated AFM tip which is raster scanned over a nanostructured gold substrate, after chemisorption of a Raman active molecule. We expect that the near-field Raman enhancement would be given by the gap-mode effect of the two facing nano-features. Thanks to the nanostructured substrate, we verify that the resolution of the Raman mapping signal is well below the diffraction limit given by the combination of the optics geometry and the laser wavelength. We show that the gap-mode TERS can generate an estimated field- enhancement (g) of ~20 in localized areas of the sample and we demonstrate the ability to spatially define the molecule position (by Raman mapping) at the tens of nanometers scale. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Ducted fan inlet/exit and rotor tip flow improvements for vertical lift systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akturk, Ali

    elevated forward flight velocities. The (DDF) is self-adjusting in a wide forward flight velocity range. DDFs corrective aerodynamic in influence becomes more pronounced with increasing flight velocity due to its inherent design properties. RANS simulations of the flow around rotor blades and duct geometry in the rotating frame of reference provided a comprehensive description of the tip leakage and passage flow in the flow environment of the two ducted fan research facilities developed throughout this thesis. The aerodynamic measurements and results of the RANS simulation showed good agreement especially near the tip region. A number of novel tip treatments based on custom designed pressure side extensions were introduced. Various tip leakage mitigation schemes were introduced by varying the chordwise location and the width of the extension in the circumferential direction. The current study showed that a proper selection of the pressure side bump location and width were the two critical parameters in influencing the success of the tip leakage mitigation approach. Significant gains in axial mean velocity component were observed when a proper pressure side tip extension was used. It is also observed that an effective tip leakage mitigation scheme significantly reduced the tangential velocity component near the tip of the axial fan blade. Reduced tip clearance related flow interactions were essential in improving the energy efficiency and range of ducted fan based vehicle. Full and inclined pressure side tip squealers were designed. Squealer tips were effective in changing the overall trajectory of the tip vortex to a higher path in radial direction. The interaction of rotor blades and tip vortex was effectively reduced and aerodynamic performance of the rotor blades was improved. The overall aerodynamic gain was a measurable reduction in leakage mass flow rate. This leakage reduction increased thrust significantly. Full and inclined pressure side tip squealers increased

  14. Effects on bone geometry, density, and microarchitecture in the distal radius but not the tibia in women with primary hyperparathyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Stinus; Beck Jensen, Jens-Erik; Rasmussen, Lars

    2010-01-01

    -pQCT) is a new technique for in vivo assessment of geometry, volumetric density, and microarchitecture at the radius and tibia. In this study we aimed to evaluate bone status in women with PHPT compared with controls using HR-pQCT. The distal radius and tibia of 54 women--27 patients with PHPT (median age 60......, range 44-75 years) and 27 randomly recruited age-matched healthy controls (median age 60, range 44-76 years)--were imaged using HR-pQCT along with areal bone mineral density (aBMD) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiomentry (DXA) of the ultradistal forearm, femoral neck, and spine (L1-L4). Groups were......). Ct porosity did not differ. In the tibia, no differences in HR-pQCT parameters were found. Moreover, patients had lower ultradistal forearm (p =¿.005), spine (p =¿.04), and femoral neck (p = 0.04) aBMD compared with controls. In conclusion, a negative bone effect of continuously elevated PTH...

  15. Oxygen grain-boundary transport in polycrystalline alumina using wedge-geometry bilayer samples: Effect of Y-doping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, H. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States)] [Center for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States); Caram, H.S.; Schiesser, W.E. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States); Rickman, J.M.; Chan, H.M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States)] [Center for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States); Harmer, M.P., E-mail: mph2@lehigh.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States)] [Center for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    Novel wedge-geometry, dual-layer alumina samples, both undoped and 500 ppm Y{sup 3+}-doped, were studied in the temperature regime 1250-1400 deg. C to determine the effect of Y{sup 3+} on oxygen grain-boundary transport in alumina. The samples consisted of a wedge-shaped, single-phase alumina top layer, diffusion bonded to an alumina/Ni substrate containing a fine, uniform dispersion of Ni marker particles (0.5 vol.%). The extent of the alumina spinel oxidation layer was measured as a function of the wedge thickness for a series of heat-treatment conditions. Models of the transport behavior were used to derive values for the rate constants (k) in both the alumina top layer and the alumina/Ni substrate. It was found that the presence of yttrium slows oxygen grain-boundary diffusion in alumina by a factor of {approx}5 (at 1300 deg. C), and increases the corresponding activation enthalpy for oxidation from 407 {+-} 20 to 486 {+-} 34 kJ mol{sup -1}. Microstructural observations suggested that yttrium also slows Ni outward diffusion. A comparison of the different k values revealed that, at 1300 deg. C, the presence of Ni alone enhances transport by a factor of {approx}2 relative to undoped alumina.

  16. Transport phenomena and the effects of reactor geometry for epitaxial GaN growth in a vertical MOCVD reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Chien-Fu; Tsai, Tsung-Yen; Huang, Yen-Hsiu; Lee, Ming-Tsang; Horng, Ray-Hua

    2015-12-01

    In this study a numerical simulation was carried out to analyze the transport phenomena in a vertical type metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) reactor for Gallium Nitride (GaN) growth. The simulated results were compared and validated by experiment. The effects of showerhead design and chamber height are investigated and discussed. It was found that, by properly adjusting the height of the chamber, both the growth rate and film uniformity could be significantly improved. This is attributed to the suppression of the thermal and mass transfer boundary layers by the injection flow of reacting gas mixtures, as well as the confined vertical vortices caused by the geometry of the reduced space. However, inappropriate design of the distance between the showerhead and the susceptor can result in uneven distribution of the organic source in the vicinity of the substrate surface resulting in an uneven growth rate of the GaN film. Consequently, there exists an optimal chamber height that will give the best growth rate and uniformity to the GaN film as discussed in this study. This study provides comprehensive insight into the transport phenomena of GaN growth that includes coupled heat and mass transfer as well as chemical reactions. The results provide important information in a succinct format and enable decisions to be made about the showerhead and the geometrical design and size of a vertical MOCVD reactor.

  17. Effects of Video-Based Cooperative, Competitive and Individualized Instructional Strategies on the Performance of Senior Secondary Schools Students in Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambari, Amosa Isiaka; Shittu, Ahmed Tajudeen; Daramola, Florence Olutunu; James, Moses

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of video-based cooperative, competitive and individualized instructional strategies on the performance of senior secondary schools' students in geometry in Nigeria. It also examined the influence of gender on students' achievement. Pretest, posttest, experimental control group design was adopted for this study.…

  18. AERODYNAMICS OF WING TIP SAILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUSHTAK AL-ATABI

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Observers have always been fascinated by soaring birds. An interesting feature of these birds is the existence of few feathers extending from the tip of the wing. In this paper, small lifting surfaces were fitted to the tip of a NACA0012 wing in a fashion similar to that of wing tip feathers. Experimental measurements of induced drag, longitudinal static stability and trailing vortex structure were obtained.The tests showed that adding wing tip surfaces (sails decreased the induced drag factor and increased the longitudinal static stability. Results identified two discrete appositely rotated tip vortices and showed the ability of wing tip surfaces to break them down and to diffuse them.

  19. The Effect of Dynamic Geometry Software on the Vocational High School Students' Succes for Teaching Bisector and the Median Concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihriban HACISALİHOĞLU KARADENİZ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to examine the effect on the success of the students “Bisector and Median correspond at a point in a triangle” findings stated within Geometry course curriculum by using computer assisted teaching program Dynamic Geometer’s Sketchpad. During this study quasi experimental design was used on preliminary and posttest groups. This research was conducted on twenty five 10th grade students studying Computer Information Systems (CIS at Technical and Vocational High School. “A Success Test” consisting of 12 questions which had been previously formed through the observations of specialized teachers was used as preliminary and posttests. Each group was chosen without any meaningful difference between preliminary test results gathered. Two groups were formed due to preliminary test results: an experiment group T-10 class (13 students and a control group A-10A (12 students. It was targeted to access findings developed by Dynamic Geometer’s Sketchpad programmed in the experiment group but the control group wasn’t intervened. An independent sample t-test on pair comparison was used among different groups paired samples t-test was used on pair comparison among same groups. Findings achieved during the study revealed that Dynamic Geometer’s Sketchpad was more effective on students’ success than traditional teaching methods. A meaningful difference on behalf of the experiment group was determined within the independent sample t-test conducted on final test results. [t(23=3.176, p< .05]. These findings indicate that Dynamic Geometer’s Sketchpad software used in the experiment group is more effective on students’ success compared to traditional teaching methods used in control group.

  20. Real Algebraic Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Mahé, Louis; Roy, Marie-Françoise

    1992-01-01

    Ten years after the first Rennes international meeting on real algebraic geometry, the second one looked at the developments in the subject during the intervening decade - see the 6 survey papers listed below. Further contributions from the participants on recent research covered real algebra and geometry, topology of real algebraic varieties and 16thHilbert problem, classical algebraic geometry, techniques in real algebraic geometry, algorithms in real algebraic geometry, semialgebraic geometry, real analytic geometry. CONTENTS: Survey papers: M. Knebusch: Semialgebraic topology in the last ten years.- R. Parimala: Algebraic and topological invariants of real algebraic varieties.- Polotovskii, G.M.: On the classification of decomposing plane algebraic curves.- Scheiderer, C.: Real algebra and its applications to geometry in the last ten years: some major developments and results.- Shustin, E.L.: Topology of real plane algebraic curves.- Silhol, R.: Moduli problems in real algebraic geometry. Further contribu...

  1. Effect of pH and chloroauric acid concentration on the geometry of gold nanoparticles obtained by photochemical synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde Rodríguez, G. R.; Gauthier, G. H.; Ladeira, L. O.; Sanabria Cala, J. A.; Laverde Cataño, D.

    2017-12-01

    Due to their excellent surface properties, gold nanoparticles have been used in a wide range of applications from optics and catalysis to biology and cancer treatment by thermal therapy. Gold nanoparticles can absorb a large amount of radiation according to their geometry, such as nanospheres and nanorods. The importance of gold nanoparticles geometry is based on the electromagnetic spectrum wavelength where exists a greater absorption of radiation, which belongs to the visible region for nanospheres and ranges between visible and near infrared regions for nanorods, conferring greater biomedical applicability to the latter. When using photochemical synthesis method, which consists of reducing gold atoms to their metallic state with UV radiation, the geometry of gold nanoparticles depends on different variables such as: 1) pH, 2) concentration of chloroauric acid, 3) the surfactant, 4) concentration of silver nitrate, 5) temperature and 6) irradiation time. Therefore, in this study the geometry of the gold nanoparticles obtained by photochemical synthesis was determined as a function of solution pH and chloroauric acid concentration, using Spectrophotometry in the Ultraviolet Visible region (UV-vis) as characterization technique. From the analysis of the UV-vis spectra, it was determined that at an acidic pH the particles have two absorption bands corresponding to nanorods geometry, while at a basic pH only nanospheres are found and at a neutral pH the lower relative intensity of the second band indicates the simultaneous existence of the two geometries. The increase in the concentration of chloroauric acid produces a decrease in the amount of synthesized nanorods, seen as a decrease of the relative intensity of the second absorption band. Therefore, obtaining gold nanoparticles with nanorods geometry favours fields such as biomedicine, because they are capable of absorbing infrared radiation and can be used as photosensitive agents in localized thermal therapy

  2. Tip of the iceberg

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deriabyn, M. V.; Hjorth, Poul G.

    2009-01-01

    We study the stability and dynamics of melting icebergs. Specifically, we address the 'toppling' or 'rollover' observed for floating icebergs. The rollover is thought to occur because the ocean melts the iceberg from below, causing its overall mass and mass distribution to change with time. We...... be inferred from observing only the above-surface part? We show here that some information about the evolution of stability due to melting call be inferred from the surface geometry of the iceberg....

  3. Microneedles array with biodegradable tips for transdermal drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliescu, Ciprian; Chen, Bangtao; Wei, Jiashen; Tay, Francis E. H.

    2008-12-01

    The paper presented an enhancement solution for transdermal drug delivery using microneedles array with biodegradable tips. The microneedles array was fabricated by using deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) and the biodegradable tips were made to be porous by electrochemical etching process. The porous silicon microneedle tips can greatly enhance the transdermal drug delivery in a minimum invasion, painless, and convenient manner, at the same time; they are breakable and biodegradable. Basically, the main problem of the silicon microneedles consists of broken microneedles tips during the insertion. The solution proposed is to fabricate the microneedle tip from a biodegradable material - porous silicon. The silicon microneedles are fabricated using DRIE notching effect of reflected charges on mask. The process overcomes the difficulty in the undercut control of the tips during the classical isotropic silicon etching process. When the silicon tips were formed, the porous tips were then generated using a classical electrochemical anodization process in MeCN/HF/H2O solution. The paper presents the experimental results of in vitro release of calcein and BSA with animal skins using a microneedle array with biodegradable tips. Compared to the transdermal drug delivery without any enhancer, the microneedle array had presented significant enhancement of drug release.

  4. Wettability of AFM tip influences the profile of interfacial nanobubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teshima, Hideaki; Takahashi, Koji; Takata, Yasuyuki; Nishiyama, Takashi

    2018-02-01

    To accurately characterize the shape of interfacial nanobubbles using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we investigated the effect of wettability of the AFM tip while operating in the peak force tapping (PFT) mode. The AFM tips were made hydrophobic and hydrophilic by Teflon AF coating and oxygen plasma treatment, respectively. It was found that the measured base radius of nanobubbles differed between AFM height images and adhesion images, and that this difference depended on the tip wettability. The force curves obtained during the measurements were also different depending on the wettability, especially in the range of the tip/nanobubble interaction and in the magnitude of the maximum attractive force in the retraction period. The difference suggests that hydrophobic tips penetrate the gas/liquid interface of the nanobubbles, with the three phase contact line being pinned on the tip surface; hydrophilic tips on the other hand do not penetrate the interface. We then quantitatively estimated the pinning position and recalculated the true profiles of the nanobubbles by comparing the height images and adhesion images. As the AFM tip was made more hydrophilic, the penetration depth decreased and eventually approached zero. This result suggests that the PFT measurement using a hydrophilic tip is vital for the acquisition of reliable nanobubble profiles.

  5. The effect of the imaging geometry and the impact of neutron scatter on the detection of small features in accelerator-based fast neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrosi, R.M.; Watterson, J.I.W.

    2004-01-01

    In fast neutron radiography, the neutron energy spectrum, the imaging geometry, neutron scattering and the position-sensitive detector influence the feature contrast, resolution and the signal-to-noise ratio in the image. The effect of the imaging geometry can be explored by using a ray-tracing method. This requires following the path of neutrons through the imaging field, which includes the sample of interest. A relationship between imaging geometry and feature detectability can be developed. There are several important physical processes that govern image formation in fast neutron radiography. These are often examined individually in order to develop an understanding of how they affect the detectability of a feature in a radiograph; however, their combined effect is required to develop a model that can be regarded as a benchmark for future applications. In order to accomplish this, diverse techniques and tools are used. In this study it was expected that the ray-tracing experiments would show that changes in the imaging geometry would greatly affect the detectability of small features as a result of a loss in the resolution and indirectly the contrast. The effect of neutron scatter on the detectability of small features was taken into consideration by using Monte Carlo code MCNP-4A

  6. Negative electrospray ionization on porous supporting tips for mass spectrometric analysis: electrostatic charging effect on detection sensitivity and its application to explosive detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Melody Yee-Man; Man, Sin-Heng; Che, Chi-Ming; Lau, Kai-Chung; Ng, Kwan-Ming

    2014-03-21

    The simplicity and easy manipulation of a porous substrate-based ESI-MS technique have been widely applied to the direct analysis of different types of samples in positive ion mode. However, the study and application of this technique in negative ion mode are sparse. A key challenge could be due to the ease of electrical discharge on supporting tips upon the application of negative voltage. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of supporting materials, including polyester, polyethylene and wood, on the detection sensitivity of a porous substrate-based negative ESI-MS technique. By using nitrobenzene derivatives and nitrophenol derivatives as the target analytes, it was found that the hydrophobic materials (i.e., polyethylene and polyester) with a higher tendency to accumulate negative charge could enhance the detection sensitivity towards nitrobenzene derivatives via electron-capture ionization; whereas, compounds with electron affinities lower than the cut-off value (1.13 eV) were not detected. Nitrophenol derivatives with pKa smaller than 9.0 could be detected in the form of deprotonated ions; whereas polar materials (i.e., wood), which might undergo competitive deprotonation with the analytes, could suppress the detection sensitivity. With the investigation of the material effects on the detection sensitivity, the porous substrate-based negative ESI-MS method was developed and applied to the direct detection of two commonly encountered explosives in complex samples.

  7. Effects of the variation of samples geometry on radionuclide calibrator response for radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albuquerque, Antonio Morais de Sa; Fragoso, Maria Conceicao de Farias; Oliveira, Mercia L. [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    In the nuclear medicine practice, the accurate knowledge of the activity of radiopharmaceuticals which will be administered to the subjects is an important factor to ensure the success of diagnosis or therapy. The instrument used for this purpose is the radionuclide calibrator. The radiopharmaceuticals are usually contained on glass vials or syringes. However, the radionuclide calibrators response is sensitive to the measurement geometry. In addition, the calibration factors supplied by manufactures are valid only for single sample geometry. To minimize the uncertainty associated with the activity measurements, it is important to use the appropriate corrections factors for the each radionuclide in the specific geometry in which the measurement is to be made. The aims of this work were to evaluate the behavior of radionuclide calibrators varying the geometry of radioactive sources and to determine experimentally the correction factors for different volumes and containers types commonly used in nuclear medicine practice. The measurements were made in two ionization chambers of different manufacturers (Capintec and Biodex), using four radionuclides with different photon energies: {sup 18}F, {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 131}I and {sup 201}Tl. The results confirm the significant dependence of radionuclide calibrators reading on the sample geometry, showing the need of use correction factors in order to minimize the errors which affect the activity measurements. (author)

  8. Tips for Airline Travelers with Sjogren's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tips for Airline Travelers with Sjögren’s Syndrome For more information on Sjogren's syndrome, visit the SSF Web site at www.sjogrens. ... org for more information on Sjögren’s syndrome. New airline rules can have a profound effect on those ...

  9. Ten Timeless Tips for Keeping on Top of Teaching Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poling, Devereaux A.; LoSchiavo, Frank M.

    2014-01-01

    We provide tips for helping psychology faculty effectively seek, select, and place new technology into pedagogical practice. We also provide tips to help psychology departments position themselves for a future that includes teaching technologies that have not yet been created. Instead of discussing today's top innovations in teaching (which…

  10. Functional integration over geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mottola, E.

    1995-01-01

    The geometric construction of the functional integral over coset spaces M/G is reviewed. The inner product on the cotangent space of infinitesimal deformations of M defines an invariant distance and volume form, or functional integration measure on the full configuration space. Then, by a simple change of coordinates parameterizing the gauge fiber G, the functional measure on the coset space M/G is deduced. This change of integration variables leads to a Jacobian which is entirely equivalent to the Faddeev--Popov determinant of the more traditional gauge fixed approach in non-abelian gauge theory. If the general construction is applied to the case where G is the group of coordinate reparameterizations of spacetime, the continuum functional integral over geometries, i.e. metrics modulo coordinate reparameterizations may be defined. The invariant functional integration measure is used to derive the trace anomaly and effective action for the conformal part of the metric in two and four dimensional spacetime. In two dimensions this approach generates the Polyakov--Liouville action of closed bosonic non-critical string theory. In four dimensions the corresponding effective action leads to novel conclusions on the importance of quantum effects in gravity in the far infrared, and in particular, a dramatic modification of the classical Einstein theory at cosmological distance scales, signaled first by the quantum instability of classical de Sitter spacetime. Finite volume scaling relations for the functional integral of quantum gravity in two and four dimensions are derived, and comparison with the discretized dynamical triangulation approach to the integration over geometries are discussed. Outstanding unsolved problems in both the continuum definition and the simplicial approach to the functional integral over geometries are highlighted

  11. Geometry and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Walter J

    2006-01-01

    Meyer''s Geometry and Its Applications, Second Edition, combines traditional geometry with current ideas to present a modern approach that is grounded in real-world applications. It balances the deductive approach with discovery learning, and introduces axiomatic, Euclidean geometry, non-Euclidean geometry, and transformational geometry. The text integrates applications and examples throughout and includes historical notes in many chapters. The Second Edition of Geometry and Its Applications is a significant text for any college or university that focuses on geometry''s usefulness in other disciplines. It is especially appropriate for engineering and science majors, as well as future mathematics teachers.* Realistic applications integrated throughout the text, including (but not limited to): - Symmetries of artistic patterns- Physics- Robotics- Computer vision- Computer graphics- Stability of architectural structures- Molecular biology- Medicine- Pattern recognition* Historical notes included in many chapters...

  12. EFFECT OF COMBUSTOR INLET GEOMETRY ON ACOUSTIC SIGNATURE AND FLOW FIELD BEHAVIOUR OF THE LOW SWIRL INJECTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Therkelsen, Peter L.; Littlejohn, David; Cheng, Robert K.; Portillo, J. Enrique; Martin, Scott M.

    2009-11-30

    Low Swirl Injector (LSI) technology is a lean premixed combustion method that is being developed for fuel-flexible gas turbines. The objective of this study is to characterize the fuel effects and influences of combustor geometry on the LSI's overall acoustic signatures and flowfields. The experiments consist of 24 flames at atmospheric condition with bulk flows ranging between 10 and 18 m/s. The flames burn CH{sub 4} (at {phi} = 0.6 & 0.7) and a blend of 90% H{sub 2} - 10% CH{sub 4} by volume (at {phi} = 0.35 & 0.4). Two combustor configurations are used, consisting of a cylindrical chamber with and without a divergent quarl at the dump plane. The data consist of pressure spectral distributions at five positions within the system and 2D flowfield information measured by Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV). The results show that acoustic oscillations increase with U{sub 0} and {phi}. However, the levels in the 90% H{sub 2} flames are significantly higher than in the CH{sub 4} flames. For both fuels, the use of the quarl reduces the fluctuating pressures in the combustion chamber by up to a factor of 7. The PIV results suggest this to be a consequence of the quarl restricting the formation of large vortices in the outer shear layer. A Generalized Instability Model (GIM) was applied to analyze the acoustic response of baseline flames for each of the two fuels. The measured frequencies and the stability trends for these two cases are predicted and the triggered acoustic mode shapes identified.

  13. Effect of geometry on deformation of anterior implant-supported zirconia frameworks: An in vitro study using digital image correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calha, Nuno; Messias, Ana; Guerra, Fernando; Martinho, Beatriz; Neto, Maria Augusta; Nicolau, Pedro

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of geometry on the displacement and the strain distribution of anterior implant-supported zirconia frameworks under static load using the 3D digital image correlation method. Two groups (n=5) of 4-unit zirconia frameworks were produced by CAD/CAM for the implant-abutment assembly. Group 1 comprised five straight configuration frameworks and group 2 consisted of five curved configuration frameworks. Specimens were cemented and submitted to static load up to 200N. Displacements were captured with two high-speed photographic cameras and analyzed with video correlation system in three spacial axes U, V, W. Statistical analysis was made using the nonparametric Mann-Whitney test. Up to 150N loads, the vertical displacements (V axis) were statistically higher for curved frameworks (-267.83±23.76μm), when compared to the straight frameworks (-120.73±36.17μm) (p=0.008), as well as anterior displacements in the W transformed axis (589.55±64.51μm vs 224.29±50.38μm for the curved and straight frameworks), respectively (p=0.008). The mean von Mises strains over the surface frameworks were statistically higher for the curved frameworks under any load. Within the limitations of this in vitro study, it is possible to conclude that the geometric configuration influences the deformation of 4-unit anterior frameworks under static load. The higher strain distribution and micro-movements of the curved frameworks reflect less rigidity and increased risk of fractures associated to FPDs. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of insulin therapy on myocardial lipid content and cardiac geometry in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drazenka Jankovic

    Full Text Available AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Recent evidence suggests a link between myocardial steatosis and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Insulin, as a lipogenic and growth-promoting hormone, might stimulate intramyocardial lipid (MYCL deposition and hypertrophy. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the short-term effects of insulin therapy (IT on myocardial lipid content and morphology in patients with T2DM. METHODS: Eighteen patients with T2DM were recruited (age 56 ± 2 years; HbA1c: 10.5 ± 0.4%. In 10 patients with insufficient glucose control under oral medication IT was initiated due to secondary failure of oral glucose lowering therapy (IT-group, while 8 individuals did not require additional insulin substitution (OT-group. In order to assess MYCL and intrahepatic lipid (IHLC content as well as cardiac geometry and function magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS and imaging (MRI examinations were performed at baseline (IT and OT and 10 days after initiation of IT. Follow up measurements took place 181 ± 49 days after IT. RESULTS: Interestingly, basal MYCLs were 50% lower in IT- compared to OT-group (0.41 ± 0.12 vs. 0.80 ± 0.11% of water signal; p = 0.034. After 10 days of IT, an acute 80%-rise in MYCL (p = 0.008 was observed, while IHLC did not change. Likewise, myocardial mass (+13%; p = 0.004, wall thickness in end-diastole (+13%; p = 0.030 and concentricity, an index of cardiac remodeling, increased (+28%; p = 0.026. In the long-term MYCL returned to baseline, while IHCL significantly decreased (-31%; p = 0.000. No acute changes in systolic left ventricular function were observed. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: The initiation of IT in patients with T2DM was followed by an acute rise in MYCL concentration and myocardial mass.

  15. Investigating the Effect of Column Geometry on Separation Efficiency using 3D Printed Liquid Chromatographic Columns Containing Polymer Monolithic Phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vipul; Beirne, Stephen; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Paull, Brett

    2018-01-16

    Effect of column geometry on the liquid chromatographic separations using 3D printed liquid chromatographic columns with in-column polymerized monoliths has been studied. Three different liquid chromatographic columns were designed and 3D printed in titanium as 2D serpentine, 3D spiral, and 3D serpentine columns, of equal length and i.d. Successful in-column thermal polymerization of mechanically stable poly(BuMA-co-EDMA) monoliths was achieved within each design without any significant structural differences between phases. Van Deemter plots indicated higher efficiencies for the 3D serpentine chromatographic columns with higher aspect ratio turns at higher linear velocities and smaller analysis times as compared to their counterpart columns with lower aspect ratio turns. Computational fluid dynamic simulations of a basic monolithic structure indicated 44%, 90%, 100%, and 118% higher flow through narrow channels in the curved monolithic configuration as compared to the straight monolithic configuration at linear velocities of 1, 2.5, 5, and 10 mm s -1 , respectively. Isocratic RPLC separations with the 3D serpentine column resulted in an average 23% and 245% (8 solutes) increase in the number of theoretical plates as compared to the 3D spiral and 2D serpentine columns, respectively. Gradient RPLC separations with the 3D serpentine column resulted in an average 15% and 82% (8 solutes) increase in the peak capacity as compared to the 3D spiral and 2D serpentine columns, respectively. Use of the 3D serpentine column at a higher flow rate, as compared to the 3D spiral column, provided a 58% reduction in the analysis time and 74% increase in the peak capacity for the isocratic separations of the small molecules and the gradient separations of proteins, respectively.

  16. Effect of the electrograms density in detecting and ablating the tip of the rotor during chronic atrial fibrillation: an in silico study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugarte, Juan P; Tobón, Catalina; Orozco-Duque, Andrés; Becerra, Miguel A; Bustamante, John

    2015-10-01

    Identification in situ of arrhythmogenic mechanisms could improve the rate of ablation success in atrial fibrillation (AF). Our research group reported that rotors could be located through dynamic approximate entropy (DApEn) maps. However, it is unknown how much the spatial resolution of catheter electrodes could affect substrates localization. The present work looked for assessing the electrograms (EGMs) spatial resolution needed to locate the rotor tip using DApEn maps. A stable rotor in a two-dimensional computational model of human atrial tissue was simulated using the Courtemanche electrophysiological model and implementing chronic AF features. The spatial resolution is 0.4 mm (150 × 150 EGM). Six different lower resolution arrays were obtained from the initial mesh. For each array, DApEn maps were constructed using the inverse distance weighting (IDW) algorithm. Three simple ablation patterns were applied. The full DApEn map detected the rotor tip and was able to follow the small meander of the tip through the shape of the area containing the tip. Inverse distance weighting was able to reconstruct DApEn maps after applying different spatial resolutions. These results show that spatial resolutions from 0.4 to 4 mm accurately detect the rotor tip position. An ablation line terminates the rotor only if it crosses the tip and ends at a tissue boundary. A previous work has shown that DApEn maps successfully detected simulated rotor tips using a high spatial resolution. In this work, it was evinced that DApEn maps could be applied using a spatial resolution similar to that available in commercial catheters, by adding an interpolation stage. This is the first step to translate this tool into medical practice with a view to the detection of ablation targets. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Tip-of-the-tongue in a second language: the effects of brief first-language exposure and long-term use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreiner, Hamutal; Degani, Tamar

    2015-04-01

    Bilinguals have more tip-of-the-tongue (TOT) incidents than monolinguals. Whereas previous research has focused on differences in the long term language experience between these groups, the present study examined the hypothesis that both long-term and transient context factors modulate TOT rates. Russian-Hebrew bilinguals who acquired Hebrew either early (11years) were compared to native Hebrew speakers on a picture naming task in Hebrew, before and after viewing a short movie in Russian. Both the short-term context (before-after the movie) and long-term language experience modulated TOT rates: Late bilinguals exhibited significantly higher TOT rates than early bilinguals who did not significantly differ from native Hebrew speakers. Critically, following the Russian movie, bilinguals in both groups differed from the native speakers of the target language. Thus, exposure to the non-target language exerted a global, non-item-specific, cross-language interference effect. The findings highlight the dynamic nature of the bilingual system in which both short and long-term language experience operate to influence bilingual performance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of effectiveness of intraoral delivery tip on single step impressions using monophase and two-phase impression materials: An in vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Gowri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Rationale: The precise fit of prosthesis depends on the impression materials and the technique used. Addition silicone impression materials being the user-friendly material are used in monophase and two-phase techniques. Considering the paucity of data on the effectiveness of intraoral delivery tip (IODT on void, tear and bubble formation using monophase impression technique in stock tray and two-phase impression technique in custom tray the present study was initiated. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 patients requiring single complete veneer crowns were enrolled. Monophase and two-phase impressions with and without IODT were made. Evaluation of the impression were made for tears, voids, and bubbles and alpha, beta, delta scores were given. Results: A significant reduction in the total number of voids was observed with two-phase technique either with or without IODT. No significant differences were observed in the proportion of overall evaluation into alpha, beta and delta between monophase and two-phase with and without IODT. No significant association was seen in the overall evaluation between the two groups (monophase and two-phase as compared using Chi-square test for independency and a trend in association between overall evaluation as tested using Chi-square for linear trend analysis. Conclusion: Two-phase impression technique with the use of IODT produced decreased number of voids.

  19. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... liver disease are at greater risk for worsening liver failure after TIPS. If your liver failure is severe, a TIPS may not be the ... children are more likely to be performed before liver transplant in those with ascites or variceal ... 08, 2017 Send us your feedback Did you find the ...

  20. Online monitoring of dynamic tip clearance of turbine blades in high temperature environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yu; Zhong, Chong; Zhu, Xiaoliang; Zhe, Jiang

    2018-04-01

    Minimized tip clearance reduces the gas leakage over turbine blade tips and improves the thrust and efficiency of turbomachinery. An accurate tip clearance sensor, measuring the dynamic clearances between blade tips and the turbine case, is a critical component for tip clearance control. This paper presents a robust inductive tip clearance sensor capable of monitoring dynamic tip clearances of turbine machines in high-temperature environments and at high rotational speeds. The sensor can also self-sense the temperature at a blade tip in situ such that temperature effect on tip clearance measurement can be estimated and compensated. To evaluate the sensor’s performance, the sensor was tested for measuring the tip clearances of turbine blades under various working temperatures ranging from 700 K to 1300 K and at turbine rotational speeds ranging from 3000 to 10 000 rpm. The blade tip clearance was varied from 50 to 2000 µm. The experiment results proved that the sensor can accurately measure the blade tip clearances with a temporal resolution of 10 µm. The capability of accurately measuring the tip clearances at high temperatures (~1300 K) and high turbine rotation speeds (~30 000 rpm), along with its compact size, makes it promising for online monitoring and active control of blade tip clearances of high-temperature turbomachinery.

  1. Numerical investigation of J-characterization of growing crack tips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, F.

    1992-01-01

    Two different geometries, a centrally cracked panel and a three-point bend bar, are modelled with aid of the finite element program ABAQUS. Elastic-plastic behaviour with a realistic linear hardening modulus is assumed. By simulation of the growth with the aid of nodal relaxation, the J-value for a remote path around the growing tip is obtained for some different local-crack growth histories. The J F -value is compared to the J D -value that results if the crack tip is assumed to be stationary at the current length. It is found that the J C - and J F -values agree well for crack growth histories satisfying the criteria for J-characterization. However, after examination of the crack surface displacements it was found that the results for the bend geometry and the tension geometry, respectively, did not coincide for corresponding J-values, except at low load levels. This raises doubt about the abilities of J to characterize the state at a growing tip. (orig.)

  2. The Effect of Geometry Parameters on Energy and Thermal Performance of School Buildings in Cold Climates of China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, A.; Bokel, R.M.J.; van den Dobbelsteen, A.A.J.F.; Sun, Y.; Huang, Q; Zhang, Qi

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of geometry parameters including building shape, window to wall ratio, room depth, and orientation on the energy use and thermal comfort of school buildings in cold climates of China. The annual total energy demand and summer thermal discomfort time were compared

  3. Delving into the Nature of Problem Solving Processes in a Dynamic Geometry Environment: Different Technological Effects on Cognitive Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzle, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Students regularly struggle with mathematical tasks, particularly those concerning non-routine problems in geometry. Although educators would like for their learners to transfer their knowledge to non-routine and real-life situations, students run into a number of difficulties. The goal of this exploratory study was to analyze three participants'…

  4. Suture techniques in nasal tip sculpture: current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, S; Rowe-Jones, J

    2007-08-01

    The three-dimensional anatomy and conspicuous location of the nasal tip makes it one of the most challenging sites of facial plastic surgery. This article reviews literature on nasal tip sculpture using suture techniques, as well as the authors' own experience. A search was conducted using Pubmed, the Google internet search engine and the authors' files, using the keywords 'nasal tip', 'suture', 'rhinoplasty' and 'septorhinoplasty'. Common nasal tip suture techniques and suture algorithms are presented, along with a summary of the indications and side effects of each technique. Predictable long-term results are more likely to occur with minimal local tissue excision. Suture techniques remodel the shape of the nasal tip by altering the configuration of, and the relationship between, the tip cartilages and their supporting structures; they also preserve nasal tip anatomy and limit resection. Intra-operatively, the effects are immediately visible, and can be adjusted or reversed. Tip sutures should therefore be considered instead of tissue excision whenever possible.

  5. Effects of canyon geometry on the distribution of traffic-related air pollution in a large urban area: Implications of a multi-canyon air pollution dispersion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiangwen; Liu, Junfeng; Ban-Weiss, George A.; Zhang, Jiachen; Huang, Xin; Ouyang, Bin; Popoola, Olalekan; Tao, Shu

    2017-09-01

    Street canyons are ubiquitous in urban areas. Traffic-related air pollutants in street canyons can adversely affect human health. In this study, an urban-scale traffic pollution dispersion model is developed considering street distribution, canyon geometry, background meteorology, traffic assignment, traffic emissions and air pollutant dispersion. In the model, vehicle exhausts generated from traffic flows first disperse inside street canyons along the micro-scale wind field generated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. Then, pollutants leave the street canyon and further disperse over the urban area. On the basis of this model, the effects of canyon geometry on the distribution of NOx and CO from traffic emissions were studied over the center of Beijing. We found that an increase in building height leads to heavier pollution inside canyons and lower pollution outside canyons at pedestrian level, resulting in higher domain-averaged concentrations over the area. In addition, canyons with highly even or highly uneven building heights on each side of the street tend to lower the urban-scale air pollution concentrations at pedestrian level. Further, increasing street widths tends to lead to lower pollutant concentrations by reducing emissions and enhancing ventilation simultaneously. Our results indicate that canyon geometry strongly influences human exposure to traffic pollutants in the populated urban area. Carefully planning street layout and canyon geometry while considering traffic demand as well as local weather patterns may significantly reduce inhalation of unhealthy air by urban residents.

  6. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS ON THE EFFECT OF SOLDER JOINT GEOMETRY FOR THE RELIABILITY OF BALL GRID ARRAY ASSEMBLY WITH FLEXIBLE AND RIGID PCBS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHUN-SEAN LAU

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, three-dimensional (3D finite element simulation on 132 PIN fleXBGATM package was performed to predict the effect of solder joint geometry on the reliability of Ball Grid Array (BGA solder joints on flexible and rigid PCBs subjected to thermo-cyclic loading. The commercial FEA tool ABAQUS Version 6.9 was used for the simulations of various shapes of solder joints such as barrel, column and hourglass. Apart from a global modeling, the submodeling analysis technique (local modeling was also used on the critically affected solder joints, in order to enhance the computation efficiency. The accumulated creep strain and strain energy density were observed for each case, and optimum geometries were obtained. The model was validated with the published experimental data with the minimum percentage error of 3%. It was observed that the hourglass solder joint geometry was very crucial on the reliability of BGA solder joints, and for a given PCB, the optimal choice of hourglass solder joint geometry depended on its rigidity.

  7. Thulium fiber laser lithotripsy using small spherical distal fiber tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Christopher R.; Hardy, Luke A.; Kennedy, Joshua D.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2016-02-01

    This study tests a 100-μm-core fiber with 300-μm-diameter ball tip during Thulium fiber laser (TFL) lithotripsy. The TFL was operated at 1908 nm wavelength with 35-mJ pulse energy, 500-μs pulse duration, and 300-Hz pulse rate. Calcium oxalate/phosphate stone samples were weighed, laser procedure times measured, and ablation rates calculated for ball tip fibers, with comparison to bare tip fibers. Photographs of ball tips were taken before and after each procedure to observe ball tip degradation and determine number of procedures completed before need to replace fiber. Saline irrigation rates and ureteroscope deflection were measured with and without TFL fiber present. There was no statistical difference (P > 0.05) between stone ablation rates for single-use ball tip fiber (1.3 +/- 0.4 mg/s) (n=10), multiple-use ball tip fiber (1.3 +/- 0.5 mg/s) (n=44), and conventional single-use bare tip fibers (1.3 +/- 0.2 mg/s) (n=10). Ball tip durability varied widely, but fibers averaged > 4 stone procedures before decline in stone ablation rates due to mechanical damage at front surface of ball tip. The small fiber diameter did not impact ureteroscope deflection or saline flow rates. The miniature ball tip fiber may provide a cost-effective design for safe fiber insertion through the ureteroscope working channel and the ureter without risk of scope damage or tissue perforation, and without compromising stone ablation efficiency during TFL ablation of kidney stones.

  8. Noise-compliant tip-shape derivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, P. M.; Davies, M. C.; Roberts, C. J.; Tendler, S. J. B.

    Wide use of the blind tip-derivation procedure has lead to the realization of the problem of noise in experimental image data. A modification to the algorithm by which the probe shape is extracted from image data is described. By consideration of the possible levels of noise in an image, a realistic estimate of the probe geometry can be derived from unfiltered experimental image data. The new procedure is demonstrated by its application to a test image that has been deliberately degraded through the addition of random noise. The results are compared with those from the current technique. The technique has significant application in metrology through the compensation of both lateral and vertical measurement errors.

  9. Effects of Maytenus ilicifolia Mart. and Bauhinia candicans Benth infusions on onion root-tip and rat bone-marrow cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjori Leiva Camparoto

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal plants are widely used to treat various diseases, and in Brazil the plants Maytenus ilicifolia Mart. and Bauhinia candicans Benth are commonly used in popular medicine. However, there are a large number of compounds in plants which can produce alterations in genetic material, and this study was conducted to investigate any possible mutagenic and cytotoxic effects that M. ilicifolia and B. candicans infusions may have on the cell cycle and chromosomes. Infusions were prepared with in natura leaves to give two concentrations of infusions, one at the concentration normally used by the population in general and the other at 10 times this value (i.e. 3.5 and 35 mg/mL for M. ilicifolia and 0.465 and 4.65 mg/mL for B. candicans. Onion (Allium cepa L. root-tip cells (RTC and Wistar rat bone-marrow cells (BMC were used as test systems in in vivo assays. The M. ilicifolia infusions at both concentrations, and the B. candicans infusion at the lower concentration, had no statistically significant depressive mitotic effect on RTC. A statistically significant depressive mitotic effect on RTC was found with the more concentrated (4.65 mg/mL B. candicans infusion as compared with a negative control. In BMC, infusions of B. candicans and M. ilicifolia produced no statistically significant increase in the number of chromosome alterations or rates of cell division as compared to controls. The significance of these findings are discussed in the light of the use of these plants as therapeutic agents.

  10. Geometry essentials for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Ryan, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Just the critical concepts you need to score high in geometry This practical, friendly guide focuses on critical concepts taught in a typical geometry course, from the properties of triangles, parallelograms, circles, and cylinders, to the skills and strategies you need to write geometry proofs. Geometry Essentials For Dummies is perfect for cramming or doing homework, or as a reference for parents helping kids study for exams. Get down to the basics - get a handle on the basics of geometry, from lines, segments, and angles, to vertices, altitudes, and diagonals Conque

  11. Introduction to projective geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Wylie, C R

    2008-01-01

    This lucid introductory text offers both an analytic and an axiomatic approach to plane projective geometry. The analytic treatment builds and expands upon students' familiarity with elementary plane analytic geometry and provides a well-motivated approach to projective geometry. Subsequent chapters explore Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry as specializations of the projective plane, revealing the existence of an infinite number of geometries, each Euclidean in nature but characterized by a different set of distance- and angle-measurement formulas. Outstanding pedagogical features include w

  12. Investigation on the effects of guava (Psidium guajava L. infusions on germination, root tips and meristematic cells of Latuca sativa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaquelini Luber

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Guava (Psidium guajava L. is a plant often employed in popular medicine. Recently several studies have alerted about the toxicity of substances present in medicinal plants, which can pose risks to the human health. In this sense, the present work aimed to investigate the phytotoxic, cytotoxic and genotoxic action of three guava varieties - Paluma, Pedro Sato and Roxa ("purple" - on the plant test system Lactuca sativa L. Thus, macro- and microscopic evaluations were carried out for five infusion concentrations (2.5, 5.0, 10.0, 20.0 and 40.0 g.L-1 prepared from each variety. Distilled water was used as negative control. Chromatographic and spectroscopic analysis by HPLC-PAD indicated that the chemical composition of the infusion of Roxa is different than that of the infusions of the varieties Paluma and Pedro Sato. It was observed that seed germination and root growth in L. sativa exposed to infusions decreased with increasing infusion concentration, regardless of the tested cultivar. For the mitotic index, no statistical differences were observed. On the other hand, a significant increase in the frequency of cell cycle alterations was verified, especially for the highest concentrations tested. The cytogenotoxic effect was significant. Therefore, guava should not be used indiscriminately in popular medicine.

  13. Investigation on the effects of guava (Psidium guajava L.) infusions on germination, root tips and meristematic cells of Latuca sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luber, Jaquelini; Palmieri, Marcel J; Botelho, Carolina M; Rinaldo, Daniel; Andrade-Vieira, Larissa F

    2015-01-01

    Guava (Psidium guajava L.) is a plant often employed in popular medicine. Recently several studies have alerted about the toxicity of substances present in medicinal plants, which can pose risks to the human health. In this sense, the present work aimed to investigate the phytotoxic, cytotoxic and genotoxic action of three guava varieties - Paluma, Pedro Sato and Roxa ("purple") - on the plant test system Lactuca sativa L. Thus, macro- and microscopic evaluations were carried out for five infusion concentrations (2.5, 5.0, 10.0, 20.0 and 40.0 g.L(-1)) prepared from each variety. Distilled water was used as negative control. Chromatographic and spectroscopic analysis by HPLC-PAD indicated that the chemical composition of the infusion of Roxa is different than that of the infusions of the varieties Paluma and Pedro Sato. It was observed that seed germination and root growth in L. sativa exposed to infusions decreased with increasing infusion concentration, regardless of the tested cultivar. For the mitotic index, no statistical differences were observed. On the other hand, a significant increase in the frequency of cell cycle alterations was verified, especially for the highest concentrations tested. The cytogenotoxic effect was significant. Therefore, guava should not be used indiscriminately in popular medicine.

  14. Tipping the scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-12-01

    In the US, the October 1998 murder of a physician who performed abortions was an outward manifestation of the insidious battle against legal abortion being waged by radical Christian social conservatives seeking to transform the US democracy into a theocracy. This movement has been documented in a publication entitled, "Tipping the Scales: The Christian Right's Legal Crusade Against Choice" produced as a result of a 4-year investigation conducted by The Center for Reproductive Law and Policy. This publication describes how these fundamentalists have used sophisticated legal, lobbying, and communication strategies to further their goals of challenging the separation of church and state, opposing family planning and sexuality education that is not based solely on abstinence, promoting school prayer, and restricting homosexual rights. The movement has resulted in the introduction of more than 300 anti-abortion bills in states, 50 of which have passed in 23 states. Most Christian fundamentalist groups provide free legal representation to abortion clinic terrorists, and some groups solicit women to bring specious malpractice claims against providers. Sophisticated legal tactics are used by these groups to remove the taint of extremism and mask the danger posed to US constitutional principles being posed by "a well-financed and zealous brand of radical lawyers and their supporters."

  15. Torsional Phacoemulsification and Tip Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fırat Helvacıoğlu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the recent advances in cataract surgery is torsional phacoemulsification. It was developed to increase the efficacy of ultrasonic emulsification. In torsional phacoemulsification, the torsional movement of the tip is translated to side-to-side cutting action with the aid of bent phaco tips. Lens material is cut in both directions, rather than only during a forward stroke. The efficiency of this technique is further enhanced by an improvement in followability provided by the inherent non-repulsive nature of the side-to-side motion. Tip selection is very important for the efficiency of torsional phacoemulsification. Theoretically, there are 2 ways to enhance the cutting efficiency of the tip. First is the stroke length; the 22-degree bent 30-degree Kelman mini-flared tip cuts longer than the 12-degree bent 30-degree mini-flared Kelman tip. Second is the angulation or bevel; the higher the degree (45 degrees, the better cutting efficiency. Retrospective analyses of the previously published clinical studies clearly demonstrated that the efficacy of the torsional phacoemulsification has positive correlation with both the aperture angles and neck angles of the tips. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 392-5

  16. Numerical simulation of tip clearance impact on a pumpjet propulsor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Lu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulation based on the Reynolds Averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD method had been carried out with the commercial code ANSYS CFX. The structured grid and SST k–ω turbulence model had been adopted. The impact of non-condensable gas (NCG on cavitation performance had been introduced into the Schnerr and Sauer cavitation model. The numerical investigation of cavitating flow of marine propeller E779A was carried out with different advance ratios and cavitation numbers to verify the numerical simulation method. Tip clearance effects on the performance of pumpjet propulsor had been investigated. Results showed that the structure and characteristics of the tip leakage vortex and the efficiency of the propulsor dropped more sharply with the increase of the tip clearance size. Furthermore, the numerical simulation of tip clearance cavitation of pumpjet propulsor had been presented with different rotational speed and tip clearance size. The mechanism of tip clearance cavitation causing a further loss of the efficiency had been studied. The influence of rotational speed and tip clearance size on tip clearance cavitation had been investigated.

  17. Short communication: QTL mapping for ear tip-barrenness in maize

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, J.; Ma, J.; Chen, J.; Ai, T.; Li, Z.; Tian, Z.; Wu, S.; Chen, W.; Wu, J.

    2016-11-01

    Barren tip on corn ear is an important agronomic trait in maize, which is highly associated with grain yield. Understanding the genetic basis of tip-barrenness may help to reduce the ear tip-barrenness in breeding programs. In this study, ear tip-barrenness was evaluated in two environments in a F2:3 population, and it showed significant genotypic variation for ear tip-barrenness in both environments. Using mixed-model composite interval mapping method, three additive effects quantitative trait loci (QTL) for ear tip-barrenness were mapped on chromosomes 2, 3 and 6, respectively. They explained 16.6% of the phenotypic variation, and no significant QTL × Environment interactions and digenic interactions were detected. The results indicated that additive effect was the main genetic basis for ear tip-barrenness in maize. This is the first report of QTL mapped for ear tip-barrenness in maize. (Author)

  18. Independent effects of geometry and landmark in a spontaneous reorientation task: a study of two species of fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Ah; Vallortigara, Giorgio; Ruga, Vincenza; Sovrano, Valeria A

    2012-09-01

    While disoriented humans and animals use both landmarks and environmental geometry to guide their navigation, it is not clear what kinds of cognitive mechanisms underlie these behaviors. Because traditional tests of trained navigation behavior in environments containing both landmarks and geometric information may cloud our insight into the nature of these processes, the present study tested the spontaneous use of landmarks and environmental shape by two species of fish-Redtail Splitfins (Xenotoca eiseni) and Zebrafish (Danio rerio). The results suggest that while geometry is spontaneously used by both species and both sexes to compute relative position or direction, the spontaneous use of landmarks is limited to direct beaconing and complicated by attraction to features and variability across species and sex. These findings support the view that while multiple cues may ultimately guide behavior, the computation of orientation and relative positions is specified by geometric input and is independent from other navigation processes such as beaconing.

  19. Internal geometry effect of structured PLA materials manufactured by dropplet-based 3D printer on its mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicaksono, Sigit T.; Ardhyananta, Hosta; Rasyida, Amaliya; Hidayat, Mas Irfan P.

    2018-04-01

    Rapid Prototyping (RP) technologies, the manufacturing technology with less time consuming including high precission and complicated structure of products, are now become high demanding technologies. Those technologies can be base on top-down or bottom-up approaches. One of the bottom-up approach of RP technology is 3D printing machine. In this research, we have succeed to apply the droplet-based 3D printer to make the structured PLA (Polylactic Acid) materials with different internal geometry structures. The internal geometry used are triangle and honeycomb structure with different size of each symmetry axis of 4.5 mm and 9 mm and the thickness varied of 1 mm and 2 mm as well. The mechanical properties of those structures including tensile and bending stregth are evaluated by using tensile and flexural test respectively. Test results show that the best performance obtained by measuring its tensile and flexural strength is the sampel with triangle geometry of 9 mm geometrical size and 2 mm of thickness. The tensile strength and flexural strength values of the specimens are 59.2996 MPa and 123 MPa respectively.

  20. Flux compactifications and generalized geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grana, Mariana

    2006-01-01

    Following the lectures given at CERN Winter School 2006, we present a pedagogical overview of flux compactifications and generalized geometries, concentrating on closed string fluxes in type II theories. We start by reviewing the supersymmetric flux configurations with maximally symmetric four-dimensional spaces. We then discuss the no-go theorems (and their evasion) for compactifications with fluxes. We analyse the resulting four-dimensional effective theories for Calabi-Yau and Calabi-Yau orientifold compactifications, concentrating on the flux-induced superpotentials. We discuss the generic mechanism of moduli stabilization and illustrate with two examples: the conifold in IIB and a T 6 /(Z 3 x Z 3 ) torus in IIA. We finish by studying the effective action and flux vacua for generalized geometries in the context of generalized complex geometry