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Sample records for times solid density

  1. Excitonic effects in solids : time-dependent density functional theory versus the Bethe-Salpeter equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagmeister, S.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work is to compare two state-of-the-art methods for the investigation of excitonic effects in solids, namely Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) and Many-Body Perturbation Theory (MBPT), for selected simple gap systems as well as semiconducting polymers. Within TDDFT, the linear response framework is used and the Dyson equation for the density-density response function is solved, whereas within MBPT, the Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE) for the electron-hole correlation function is solved. The dielectric function is obtained as a last step. Both techniques take into account the excitonic effects caused by the interaction of electron-hole pairs. In the former these effects are included in the exchange-correlation (xc) kernel, whereas in the latter they are located in the interaction kernel of the BSE. Kohn-Sham single-particle wave functions obtained from Density Functional Theory within the linearized augmented planewave (LAPW) method are used to calculate all relevant quantities of the formalism. For the simple systems GaAs, Si and LiF are chosen. The role of several approximations to the xc kernel is studied and it is found that for GaAs and Si simple semi-empirical models provide a dielectric function in accordance with the BSE. For the case of LiF, being a system with a weak screening and a strongly bound exciton, only an xc kernel derived from MBPT yields reasonable results but still a slight discrepancy to the BSE is observed. Finally, the semiconducting polymers poly-acetylene and poly(phenylene-vinylene) (PPV) are studied. For both materials the concept of semi-empirical approximations to the xc kernel turns out to be ambiguous due to their low-dimensional character. In the case of poly-acetylene, the xc kernel derived from MBPT yields a dielectric function which is in close but not exact agreement with the one obtained from the BSE. (author) [de

  2. Nonlocal and Nonadiabatic Effects in the Charge-Density Response of Solids: A Time-Dependent Density-Functional Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panholzer, Martin; Gatti, Matteo; Reining, Lucia

    2018-04-01

    The charge-density response of extended materials is usually dominated by the collective oscillation of electrons, the plasmons. Beyond this feature, however, intriguing many-body effects are observed. They cannot be described by one of the most widely used approaches for the calculation of dielectric functions, which is time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) in the adiabatic local density approximation (ALDA). Here, we propose an approximation to the TDDFT exchange-correlation kernel which is nonadiabatic and nonlocal. It is extracted from correlated calculations in the homogeneous electron gas, where we have tabulated it for a wide range of wave vectors and frequencies. A simple mean density approximation allows one to use it in inhomogeneous materials where the density varies on a scale of 1.6 rs or faster. This kernel contains effects that are completely absent in the ALDA; in particular, it correctly describes the double plasmon in the dynamic structure factor of sodium, and it shows the characteristic low-energy peak that appears in systems with low electronic density. It also leads to an overall quantitative improvement of spectra.

  3. Solidity of viscous liquids. IV. Density fluctuations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, J. C.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is the fourth in a series exploring the physical consequences of the solidity of highly viscous liquids. It is argued that the two basic characteristics of a flow event (a jump between two energy minima in configuration space) are the local density change and the sum of all particle...... displacements. Based on this it is proposed that density fluctuations are described by a time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equation with rates in k space of the form C+Dk^2 with D>>C a^2 where a is the average intermolecular distance. The inequality expresses a long-wavelength dominance of the dynamics which...... with Debye behavior at low frequencies and an omega^{−1/2} decay of the loss at high frequencies. Finally, a general formalism for the description of viscous liquid dynamics, which supplements the density dynamics by including stress fields, a potential energy field, and molecular orientational fields...

  4. Charge density waves in solids

    CERN Document Server

    Gor'kov, LP

    2012-01-01

    The latest addition to this series covers a field which is commonly referred to as charge density wave dynamics.The most thoroughly investigated materials are inorganic linear chain compounds with highly anisotropic electronic properties. The volume opens with an examination of their structural properties and the essential features which allow charge density waves to develop.The behaviour of the charge density waves, where interesting phenomena are observed, is treated both from a theoretical and an experimental standpoint. The role of impurities in statics and dynamics is considered and an

  5. Nonlinear electronic excitations in crystalline solids using meta-generalized gradient approximation and hybrid functional in time-dependent density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Shunsuke A. [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan); Taniguchi, Yasutaka [Center for Computational Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan); Department of Medical and General Sciences, Nihon Institute of Medical Science, 1276 Shimogawara, Moroyama-Machi, Iruma-Gun, Saitama 350-0435 (Japan); Shinohara, Yasushi [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, 06120 Halle (Germany); Yabana, Kazuhiro [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan); Center for Computational Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan)

    2015-12-14

    We develop methods to calculate electron dynamics in crystalline solids in real-time time-dependent density functional theory employing exchange-correlation potentials which reproduce band gap energies of dielectrics; a meta-generalized gradient approximation was proposed by Tran and Blaha [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 226401 (2009)] (TBm-BJ) and a hybrid functional was proposed by Heyd, Scuseria, and Ernzerhof [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 8207 (2003)] (HSE). In time evolution calculations employing the TB-mBJ potential, we have found it necessary to adopt the predictor-corrector step for a stable time evolution. We have developed a method to evaluate electronic excitation energy without referring to the energy functional which is unknown for the TB-mBJ potential. For the HSE functional, we have developed a method for the operation of the Fock-like term in Fourier space to facilitate efficient use of massive parallel computers equipped with graphic processing units. We compare electronic excitations in silicon and germanium induced by femtosecond laser pulses using the TB-mBJ, HSE, and a simple local density approximation (LDA). At low laser intensities, electronic excitations are found to be sensitive to the band gap energy: they are close to each other using TB-mBJ and HSE and are much smaller in LDA. At high laser intensities close to the damage threshold, electronic excitation energies do not differ much among the three cases.

  6. Accurate Ground-State Energies of Solids and Molecules from Time-Dependent Density-Functional Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Thomas; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that ground-state energies approaching chemical accuracy can be obtained by combining the adiabatic-connection fluctuation-dissipation theorem with time-dependent densityfunctional theory. The key ingredient is a renormalization scheme, which eliminates the divergence...

  7. Influence of tracks densities in solid state nuclear track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guedes O, S.; Hadler N.; Lunes, P.; Saenz T, C.

    1996-01-01

    When Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTD) is employed to measure nuclear tracks produced mainly by fission fragments and alpha particles, it is considered that the tracks observation work is performed under an efficiency, ε 0 , which is independent of the track density (number of tracks/area unit). There are not published results or experimental data supporting such an assumption. In this work the dependence of ε 0 with track density is studied basing on experimental data. To perform this, pieces of CR-39 cut from a sole 'mother sheet' were coupled to thin uranium films for different exposition times and the resulting ratios between track density and exposition time were compared. Our results indicate that ε 0 is constant for track densities between 10 3 and 10 5 cm -2 . At our etching conditions track overlapping makes impossible the counting for densities around 1.7 x 10 5 cm -2 . For track densities less than 10 3 cm -2 , ε 0 , was not observed to be constant. (authors). 4 refs., 2 figs

  8. Density-functional theory for fluid-solid and solid-solid phase transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharadwaj, Atul S; Singh, Yashwant

    2017-03-01

    We develop a theory to describe solid-solid phase transitions. The density functional formalism of classical statistical mechanics is used to find an exact expression for the difference in the grand thermodynamic potentials of the two coexisting phases. The expression involves both the symmetry conserving and the symmetry broken parts of the direct pair correlation function. The theory is used to calculate phase diagram of systems of soft spheres interacting via inverse power potentials u(r)=ε(σ/r)^{n}, where parameter n measures softness of the potential. We find that for 1/nfcc) structure while for 1/n≥0.154 the body-centred-cubic (bcc) structure is preferred. The bcc structure transforms into the fcc structure upon increasing the density. The calculated phase diagram is in good agreement with the one found from molecular simulations.

  9. XUV Absorption by Solid Density Aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iglesias, C A

    2009-09-21

    An inverse bremsstrahlung model for plasmas and simple metals that approximates the cold, solid Al experimental data below the L-edge is applied to matter conditions relevant to XUV laser applications. The model involves an all-order calculation using a semi-analytical effective electron-ion interaction. The predicted increases in XUV absorption with rising temperature occur via two effects: increased availability of final states from reduced electron degeneracy and a stronger electron-ion interaction from reduced screening. Discrepancies in the temperature dependence as well as other details between the present approach and a recently proposed absorption model are discussed.

  10. Enhancing atom densities in solid hydrogen by isotopic substitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, G.W.; Souers, P.C.; Mapoles, E.R.; Magnotta, F.

    1991-01-01

    Atomic hydrogen inside solid H 2 increases the energy density by 200 MegaJoules/m 3 , for each percent mole fraction stored. How many atoms can be stored in solid hydrogen? To answer this, we need to know: (1) how to produce and trap hydrogen atoms in solid hydrogen, (2) how to keep the atoms from recombining into the ground molecular state, and (3) how to measure the atom density in solid hydrogen. Each of these topics will be addressed in this paper. Hydrogen atoms can be trapped in solid hydrogen by co-condensing atoms and molecules, external irradiation of solid H 2 , or introducing a radioactive impurity inside the hydrogen lattice. Tritium, a heavy isotope of hydrogen, is easily condensed as a radioactive isotopic impurity in solid H 2 . Although tritium will probably not be used in future rockets, it provides a way of applying a large, homogenious dose to solid hydrogen. In all of the data presented here, the atoms are produced by the decay of tritium and thus knowing how many atoms are produced from the tritium decay in the solid phase is important. 6 refs., 6 figs

  11. Global Population Density Grid Time Series Estimates

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Global Population Density Grid Time Series Estimates provide a back-cast time series of population density grids based on the year 2000 population grid from SEDAC's...

  12. Density measurements of small amounts of high-density solids by a floatation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akabori, Mitsuo; Shiba, Koreyuki

    1984-09-01

    A floatation method for determining the density of small amounts of high-density solids is described. The use of a float combined with an appropriate floatation liquid allows us to measure the density of high-density substances in small amounts. Using the sample of 0.1 g in weight, the floatation liquid of 3.0 g cm -3 in density and the float of 1.5 g cm -3 in apparent density, the sample densities of 5, 10 and 20 g cm -3 are determined to an accuracy better than +-0.002, +-0.01 and +-0.05 g cm -3 , respectively that correspond to about +-1 x 10 -5 cm 3 in volume. By means of appropriate degassing treatments, the densities of (Th,U)O 2 pellets of --0.1 g in weight and --9.55 g cm -3 in density were determined with an accuracy better than +-0.05 %. (author)

  13. Solid density, low temperature plasma formation in a capillary discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kania, D.R.; Jones, L.A.; Maestas, M.D.; Shepherd, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    This work discusses the ability of the authors to produce solid density, low temperature plasmas in polyurethane capillary discharges. The initial capillary diameter is 20 μm. The plasma is produced by discharging a one Ohm parallel plate waterline and Marx generator system through the capillary. A peak current of 340 kA in 300 ns heats the inner wall of the capillary, and the plasma expands into the surrounding material. The authors studied the evolution of the discharge using current and voltage probes, axial and radial streak photography, axial x-ray diode array and schlieren photography, and have estimated the peak temperature of the discharge to be approximately 10 eV and the density to be near 10/sup 23/cm/sup -3/. This indicates that the plasma may approach the strongly coupled regime. They discuss their interpretation of the data and compare their results with theoretical models of the plasma dynamics

  14. Comparison of exact-exchange calculations for solids in current-spin-density- and spin-density-functional theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, S.; Pittalis, S.; Kurth, S.

    2007-01-01

    The relative merits of current-spin-density- and spin-density-functional theory are investigated for solids treated within the exact-exchange-only approximation. Spin-orbit splittings and orbital magnetic moments are determined at zero external magnetic field. We find that for magnetic (Fe, Co......, and Ni) and nonmagnetic (Si and Ge) solids, the exact-exchange current-spin-density functional approach does not significantly improve the accuracy of the corresponding spin-density functional results....

  15. Influence of effective stress and dry density on the permeability of municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenying; Wang, Yingfeng; Xu, Hui; Fang, Yuehua; Wu, Dazhi

    2018-05-01

    A landfill is one of the main sites for disposal of municipal solid waste and the current landfill disposal system faces several problems. For instance, excessive leachate water is an important factor leading to landfill instability. Understanding the permeability characteristics of municipal solid waste is a relevant topic in the field of environmental geotechnical engineering. In this paper, the current research progress on permeability characteristics of municipal solid waste is discussed. A review of recent studies indicates that the research in this field is divided into two categories based on the experimental method employed: field tests and laboratory tests. This paper summarizes test methods, landfill locations, waste ages, dry densities and permeability coefficients across different studies that focus on permeability characteristics. Additionally, an experimental study on compressibility and permeability characteristics of fresh municipal solid waste under different effective stresses and compression times was carried out. Moreover, the relationships between the permeability coefficient and effective stress as well as dry density were obtained and a permeability prediction model was established. Finally, the experimental results from the existing literature and this paper were compared and the effects of effective stress and dry density on the permeability characteristics of municipal solid waste were summarized. This study provides the basis for analysis of leachate production in a landfill.

  16. Imaginary time density-density correlations for two-dimensional electron gases at high density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motta, M.; Galli, D. E. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Moroni, S. [IOM-CNR DEMOCRITOS National Simulation Center and SISSA, Via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste (Italy); Vitali, E. [Department of Physics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia 23187-8795 (United States)

    2015-10-28

    We evaluate imaginary time density-density correlation functions for two-dimensional homogeneous electron gases of up to 42 particles in the continuum using the phaseless auxiliary field quantum Monte Carlo method. We use periodic boundary conditions and up to 300 plane waves as basis set elements. We show that such methodology, once equipped with suitable numerical stabilization techniques necessary to deal with exponentials, products, and inversions of large matrices, gives access to the calculation of imaginary time correlation functions for medium-sized systems. We discuss the numerical stabilization techniques and the computational complexity of the methodology and we present the limitations related to the size of the systems on a quantitative basis. We perform the inverse Laplace transform of the obtained density-density correlation functions, assessing the ability of the phaseless auxiliary field quantum Monte Carlo method to evaluate dynamical properties of medium-sized homogeneous fermion systems.

  17. Perspective: Fundamental aspects of time-dependent density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maitra, Neepa T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Hunter College and the Physics Program at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, 695 Park Avenue, New York, New York 10065 (United States)

    2016-06-14

    In the thirty-two years since the birth of the foundational theorems, time-dependent density functional theory has had a tremendous impact on calculations of electronic spectra and dynamics in chemistry, biology, solid-state physics, and materials science. Alongside the wide-ranging applications, there has been much progress in understanding fundamental aspects of the functionals and the theory itself. This Perspective looks back to some of these developments, reports on some recent progress and current challenges for functionals, and speculates on future directions to improve the accuracy of approximations used in this relatively young theory.

  18. Dynamic density functional theory of solid tumor growth: Preliminary models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Chauviere

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a disease that can be seen as a complex system whose dynamics and growth result from nonlinear processes coupled across wide ranges of spatio-temporal scales. The current mathematical modeling literature addresses issues at various scales but the development of theoretical methodologies capable of bridging gaps across scales needs further study. We present a new theoretical framework based on Dynamic Density Functional Theory (DDFT extended, for the first time, to the dynamics of living tissues by accounting for cell density correlations, different cell types, phenotypes and cell birth/death processes, in order to provide a biophysically consistent description of processes across the scales. We present an application of this approach to tumor growth.

  19. Solid neutron matter the energy density in the relativistic harmonic approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cattani, M.; Fernandes, N.C.

    A relativistic expression for the energy density as a function of particle density for solid neutron matter is obtained using Dirac's equation with a truncated harmonic potential. Ultrabaric and superluminous effects are not found in our approach [pt

  20. Resonant transducers for solid-state plasma density modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallock, Gary A., E-mail: hallock@ece.utexas.edu [The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78701 (United States); Meier, Mark A., E-mail: mark.a.meier@exxonmobil.com [ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company, Houston, Texas 77389 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    We have developed transducers capable of modulating the plasma density and plasma density gradients in indium antimonide. These transducers make use of piezoelectric drivers to excite acoustic pressure resonance at 3λ/2, generating large amplitude standing waves and plasma density modulations. The plasma density has been directly measured using a laser diagnostic. A layered media model shows good agreement with the experimental measurements.

  1. Extended Lagrangian Density Functional Tight-Binding Molecular Dynamics for Molecules and Solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aradi, Balint; Frauenheim, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A computationally fast quantum mechanical molecular dynamics scheme using an extended Lagrangian density functional tight-binding formulation has been developed and implemented in the DFTB+ electronic structure program package for simulations of solids and molecular systems. The scheme combines the computational speed of self-consistent density functional tight-binding theory with the efficiency and long-term accuracy of extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics. Furthermore, for systems without self-consistent charge instabilities, only a single diagonalization or construction of the single-particle density matrix is required in each time step. The molecular dynamics simulation scheme can also be applied to a broad range of problems in materials science, chemistry, and biology

  2. Extended Lagrangian Density Functional Tight-Binding Molecular Dynamics for Molecules and Solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aradi, Bálint; Niklasson, Anders M N; Frauenheim, Thomas

    2015-07-14

    A computationally fast quantum mechanical molecular dynamics scheme using an extended Lagrangian density functional tight-binding formulation has been developed and implemented in the DFTB+ electronic structure program package for simulations of solids and molecular systems. The scheme combines the computational speed of self-consistent density functional tight-binding theory with the efficiency and long-term accuracy of extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics. For systems without self-consistent charge instabilities, only a single diagonalization or construction of the single-particle density matrix is required in each time step. The molecular dynamics simulation scheme can be applied to a broad range of problems in materials science, chemistry, and biology.

  3. Critic: a new program for the topological analysis of solid-state electron densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero-de-la-Roza, A.; Blanco, M. A.; Pendás, A. Martín; Luaña, Víctor

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we introduce CRITIC, a new program for the topological analysis of the electron densities of crystalline solids. Two different versions of the code are provided, one adapted to the LAPW (Linear Augmented Plane Wave) density calculated by the WIEN2K package and the other to the ab initio Perturbed Ion ( aiPI) density calculated with the PI7 code. Using the converged ground state densities, CRITIC can locate their critical points, determine atomic basins and integrate properties within them, and generate several graphical representations which include topological atomic basins and primary bundles, contour maps of ρ and ∇ρ, vector maps of ∇ρ, chemical graphs, etc. Program summaryProgram title: CRITIC Catalogue identifier: AECB_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AECB_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GPL, version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 206 843 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 12 648 065 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN 77 and 90 Computer: Any computer capable of compiling Fortran Operating system: Unix, GNU/Linux Classification: 7.3 Nature of problem: Topological analysis of the electron density in periodic solids. Solution method: The automatic localization of the electron density critical points is based on a recursive partitioning of the Wigner-Seitz cell into tetrahedra followed by a Newton search from significant points on each tetrahedra. Plotting of and integration on the atomic basins is currently based on a new implementation of Keith's promega algorithm. Running time: Variable, depending on the task. From seconds to a few minutes for the localization of critical points. Hours to days for the determination of the atomic basins shape and properties. Times correspond to a typical 2007 PC.

  4. Effect of coating density on oxidation resistance and Cr vaporization from solid oxide fuel cell interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talic, Belma; Falk-Windisch, Hannes; Venkatachalam, Vinothini; Hendriksen, Peter Vang; Wiik, Kjell; Lein, Hilde Lea

    2017-06-01

    Manganese cobalt spinel oxides are promising materials for protective coatings for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) interconnects. To achieve high density such coatings are often sintered in a two-step procedure, involving heat treatment first in reducing and then in oxidizing atmospheres. Sintering the coating inside the SOFC stack during heating would reduce production costs, but may result in a lower coating density. The importance of coating density is here assessed by characterization of the oxidation kinetics and Cr evaporation of Crofer 22 APU with MnCo1.7Fe0.3O4 spinel coatings of different density. The coating density is shown to have minor influence on the long-term oxidation behavior in air at 800 °C, evaluated over 5000 h. Sintering the spinel coating in air at 900 °C, equivalent to an in-situ heat treatment, leads to an 88% reduction of the Cr evaporation rate of Crofer 22 APU in air-3% H2O at 800 °C. The air sintered spinel coating is initially highly porous, however, densifies with time in interaction with the alloy. A two-step reduction and re-oxidation heat treatment results in a denser coating, which reduces Cr evaporation by 97%.

  5. Density Functional Calculations of Solid State Heats of Formation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Politzer, Peter

    1999-01-01

    It is now feasible to compute quite accurate gas phase heats of formation for relatively small molecules by means of ab initio or density functional techniques and one of several possible approaches...

  6. High solids emulsions produced by ultrasound as a function of energy density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consoli, Larissa; de Figueiredo Furtado, Guilherme; da Cunha, Rosiane Lopes; Hubinger, Míriam Dupas

    2017-09-01

    The use of emulsifying methods is frequently required before spray drying food ingredients, where using high concentration of solids increases the drying process yield. In this work, we used ultrasound to obtain kinetically stable palm oil-in-water emulsions with 30g solids/100g of emulsion. Sodium caseinate, maltodextrin and dried glucose syrup were used as stabilizing agents. Sonication time of 3, 7 and 11min were evaluated at power of 72, 105 and 148W (which represents 50%, 75% and 100% of power amplitude in relation to the nominal power of the equipment). Energy density required for each assay was calculated. Emulsions were characterized for droplets mean diameter and size distribution, optical microscopy, confocal microscopy, ζ-potential, creaming index (CI) and rheological behavior. Emulsions presented bimodal size distribution, with D [3,2] ranging from 0.7 to 1.4μm and CI between 5% and 12%, being these parameters inversely proportional to sonication time and power, but with a visual kinetically stabilization after the treatment at 148W at 7min sonication. D [3,2] showed to depend of energy density as a power function. Sonication presented as an effective method to be integrated to spray drying when emulsification is needed before the drying process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. High Energy Density Solid State Li-ion Battery with Enhanced Safety, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop an all solid state Li-ion battery which is capable of delivering high energy density, combined with high safety over a wide operating...

  8. The optimal density of cellular solids in axial tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihai, L Angela; Alayyash, Khulud; Wyatt, Hayley

    2017-05-01

    For cellular bodies with uniform cell size, wall thickness, and shape, an important question is whether the same volume of material has the same effect when arranged as many small cells or as fewer large cells. To answer this question, for finite element models of periodic structures of Mooney-type material with different structural geometry and subject to large strain deformations, we identify a nonlinear elastic modulus as the ratio between the mean effective stress and the mean effective strain in the solid cell walls, and show that this modulus increases when the thickness of the walls increases, as well as when the number of cells increases while the volume of solid material remains fixed. Since, under the specified conditions, this nonlinear elastic modulus increases also as the corresponding mean stress increases, either the mean modulus or the mean stress can be employed as indicator when the optimum wall thickness or number of cells is sought.

  9. Method and apparatus for the separation of solid particles having different densities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rem, P.C.; Berkhout, S.P.M.

    2011-01-01

    A method and apparatus for separating solid particles of different densities, using a magnetic process fluid. The solid particles are thoroughly mixed in a small partial flow of the process fluid. The small turbulent partial flow is added to a large laminar partial flow of the process fluid, after

  10. Fundamentals of time-dependent density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, Miguel A.L.; Rubio, Angel

    2012-01-01

    There have been many significant advances in time-dependent density functional theory over recent years, both in enlightening the fundamental theoretical basis of the theory, as well as in computational algorithms and applications. This book, as successor to the highly successful volume Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (Lect. Notes Phys. 706, 2006) brings together for the first time all recent developments in a systematic and coherent way. First, a thorough pedagogical presentation of the fundamental theory is given, clarifying aspects of the original proofs and theorems, as well as presenting fresh developments that extend the theory into new realms such as alternative proofs of the original Runge-Gross theorem, open quantum systems, and dispersion forces to name but a few. Next, all of the basic concepts are introduced sequentially and building in complexity, eventually reaching the level of open problems of interest. Contemporary applications of the theory are discussed, from real-time coupled-electron-ion dynamics, to excited-state dynamics and molecular transport. Last but not least, the authors introduce and review recent advances in computational implementation, including massively parallel architectures and graphical processing units. Special care has been taken in editing this volume as a multi-author textbook, following a coherent line of thought, and making all the relevant connections between chapters and concepts consistent throughout. As such it will prove to be the text of reference in this field, both for beginners as well as expert researchers and lecturers teaching advanced quantum mechanical methods to model complex physical systems, from molecules to nanostructures, from biocomplexes to surfaces, solids and liquids. (orig.)

  11. A density distribution algorithm for bone incorporating local orthotropy, modal analysis and theories of cellular solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impelluso, Thomas J

    2003-06-01

    An algorithm for bone remodeling is presented which allows for both a redistribution of density and a continuous change of principal material directions for the orthotropic material properties of bone. It employs a modal analysis to add density for growth and a local effective strain based analysis to redistribute density. General re-distribution functions are presented. The model utilizes theories of cellular solids to relate density and strength. The code predicts the same general density distributions and local orthotropy as observed in reality.

  12. Multicomponent density-functional theory for time-dependent systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butriy, O.; Ebadi, H.; de Boeij, P. L.; van Leeuwen, R.; Gross, E. K. U.

    2007-01-01

    We derive the basic formalism of density functional theory for time-dependent electron-nuclear systems. The basic variables of this theory are the electron density in body-fixed frame coordinates and the diagonal of the nuclear N-body density matrix. The body-fixed frame transformation is carried

  13. Method of altering the effective bulk density of solid material and the resulting product: hollow polymeric particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kool, L.B.; Nolen, R.L.; Solomon, D.E.

    1981-01-01

    Hollow spherical particles are made by spraying a mixture of powdered solid material with a solution of a film-forming polymer in a solvent therefor into a heated chamber where the solvent evaporates. The powder is thereby captured in the wall of the hollow polymer particles formed. Such particles are used to form a suspension in a fluid material. The hollow particles are of such size and wall thickness, in relation to the bulk density of the powdered solid material, that the bulk density of each hollow spherical particle is commensurate with the density of the fluid material. The particles thereby remain in suspension over a substantial period of time with little or no agitation of the fluid. (author)

  14. Effect of initial bulk density on high-solids anaerobic digestion of MSW: General mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caicedo, Luis M; Wang, Hongtao; Lu, Wenjing; De Clercq, Djavan; Liu, Yanjun; Xu, Sai; Ni, Zhe

    2017-06-01

    Initial bulk density (IBD) is an important variable in anaerobic digestion since it defines and optimizes the treatment capacity of a system. This study reveals the mechanism on how IBD might affect anaerobic digestion of waste. Four different IBD values: D 1 (500-700kgm -3 ), D 2 (900-1000kgm -3 ), D 3 (1100-1200kgm -3 ) and D 4 (1200-1400kgm -3 ) were set and tested over a period of 90days in simulated landfill reactors. The main variables affected by the IBD are the methane generation, saturation degree, extraction of organic matter, and the total population of methanogens. The study identified that IBD >1000kgm -3 may have significant effect on methane generation, either prolonging the lag time or completely inhibiting the process. This study provides a new understanding of the anaerobic digestion process in saturated high-solids systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Solid ionic: these unusual materials applications in high-energy-density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shriver, D.F.; Farrington, G.C.

    1985-01-01

    The idea that ions can diffuse as rapidly in a solid as in an aqueous salt solution may seem strange to many chemists. But a variety of solids with high ionic conductivities are known. Compounds have been discovered that conduct anions (including F - and O 2- ) and cations (including monovalent, divalent, and trivalent cations). These substances range from hard, refractory materials, such as sodium β-alumina, through softer compounds, such as silver iodide (AgI) to the very soft polymer electrolytes. They include compounds that are stoichiometric (AgI), nonstoichiometric (sodium β-alumina), or doped (calcia-stabilized zirconia). A variety of names have been applied to these materials: among them, solid electrolytes, superionic conductors, and fast-ion conductors. Fast-ion transport in solids is a lively area of study in solid-state chemistry and physics. High-conductivity solid electrolytes have revolutionized conventional concepts of ionic compounds, and their potential uses range from high-energy-density battery and fuel-cell electrolytes to chemical sensors and from lasers to phosphors. Devices using solid electrolytes are already available commercially-oxygen detectors for automotive pollution-control systems employ solid O 2- electrolytes, and solid-state batteries using solid electrolytes are employed in heart pacemakers

  16. Estimated refractive index and solid density of DT, with application to hollow-microsphere laser targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, C.K.; Tsugawa, R.T.; Hendricks, C.D.; Souers, P.C.

    1975-01-01

    The literature values for the 0.55-μm refractive index N of liquid and gaseous H 2 and D 2 are combined to yield the equation (N - 1) = [(3.15 +- 0.12) x 10 -6 ]rho, where rho is the density in moles per cubic meter. This equation can be extrapolated to 300 0 K for use on DT in solid, liquid, and gas phases. The equation is based on a review of solid-hydrogen densities measured in bulk and also by diffraction methods. By extrapolation, the estimated densities and 0.55-μm refractive indices for DT are given. Radiation-induced point defects could possibly cause optical absorption and a resulting increased refractive index in solid DT and T 2 . The effect of the DT refractive index in measuring glass and cryogenic DT laser targets is also described

  17. Understanding Intense Laser Interactions with Solid Density Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-04

    wakefield-accelerated electron bunches for time-resolved electron diffraction measurements of the structural dynamics of single-crystal silicon nano...aperture before entering a solenoidal magnetic lens. A 30 nm thick single-crystal silicon sample is placed at d=13.5 cm from the electron source. An...spatially dispersed onto a detector screen via a pair of dipole magnets. DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for public release. silicon lattice

  18. Nonparametric volatility density estimation for discrete time models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Es, van Bert; Spreij, P.J.C.; Zanten, van J.H.

    2005-01-01

    We consider discrete time models for asset prices with a stationary volatility process. We aim at estimating the multivariate density of this process at a set of consecutive time instants. A Fourier-type deconvolution kernel density estimator based on the logarithm of the squared process is proposed

  19. Modelling of interactions between variable mass and density solid particles and swirling gas stream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wardach-Święcicka, I; Kardaś, D; Pozorski, J

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the solid particles - gas interactions. For this purpose, numerical modelling was carried out by means of a commercial code for simulations of two-phase dispersed flows with the in-house models accounting for mass and density change of solid phase. In the studied case the particles are treated as spherical moving grains carried by a swirling stream of hot gases. Due to the heat and mass transfer between gas and solid phase, the particles are losing their mass and they are changing their volume. Numerical simulations were performed for turbulent regime, using two methods for turbulence modelling: RANS and LES.

  20. Low density lesion in solid mass on CT: Pathologic change and housfield number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Tae Il; Lim, Joo Won; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Ko, Young Tae; Song, Mi Jin; Lee, Dong Ho; Lee, Ju Hie

    1994-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed the pathologic changes and housfield unit of the low density lesion in solid mass on CT. Pathologically proved solid mass was evaluated in regard to the shape and margin of the low density in the mass on the CT scans of 23 patient. The CT number of the low density lesion was correlated with the pathologic changes. Pathologic changes of the low density lesions were; necrosis (n=17), hemorrhage (n=13), cyst (n=4), myxoid degeneration (n=2), hyaline degeneration (n=1), fibrosis (n=1), and mixed cellularity (n=1). In 14 cases, more than 2 pathologic changes were seen. In 11 cases, necrosis was associated with hemorrhage. The CT number ranged from 11.5 to 44.9 Housfield unit(HU) (mean, 25.2 HU). The average CT number was 26.9 HU in hemorrhage and necrosis, 17.2 HU in cystic change, 20.9 HU in myxoid degeneration, 35.7 HU in hyaline de generation, 22.3 HU in fibrosis, and 21.4 HU in mixed cellularity. The hemorrhage and necrosis in 17 cases showed irregular margin, amorphous shape, and showed centrifugal distribution. The cystic change in 4 cases showed well defined margin, round shape, and peripheral location in solid mass. The low density lesions in solid mass on CT represented variable pathologic changes; necrosis, hemorrhage, cyst, myxoid degeneration, hyaline degeneration, fibrosis, and mixed cellularity. Pathologic changes would not be differentiated on the basis of CT number

  1. Existence of time-dependent density-functional theory for open electronic systems: time-dependent holographic electron density theorem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiao; Yam, ChiYung; Wang, Fan; Chen, GuanHua

    2011-08-28

    We present the time-dependent holographic electron density theorem (TD-HEDT), which lays the foundation of time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) for open electronic systems. For any finite electronic system, the TD-HEDT formally establishes a one-to-one correspondence between the electron density inside any finite subsystem and the time-dependent external potential. As a result, any electronic property of an open system in principle can be determined uniquely by the electron density function inside the open region. Implications of the TD-HEDT on the practicality of TDDFT are also discussed.

  2. Density measurements of microsecond-conduction-time POS plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinshelwood, D.; Goodrich, P.J.; Weber, B.V.; Commisso, R.J.; Grossmann, J.M.; Kellogg, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of the electron density in a coaxial microsecond conduction time plasma opening switch during switch operation are described. Current conduction is observed to cause a radial redistribution of the switch plasma. A local reduction in axial line density of more than an order of magnitude occurs by the time opening begins. This reduction, and the scaling of conduction current with plasma density, indicate that current conduction in this experiment is limited by hydrodynamic effects. It is hypothesized that the density reduction allows the switch to open by an erosion mechanism. Initial numerical modeling efforts have reproduced the principal observed results. A model that predicts accurately the conduction current is presented

  3. Role of baseline nodule density and changes in density and nodule features in the discrimination between benign and malignant solid indeterminate pulmonary nodules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, D.M.; van Klaveren, R.J.; de Bock, G.H.; Leusveld, A.L.M.; Dorrius, M.D.; Zhao, Y.; Wang, Y.; de Koning, H.J.; Scholten, E.T.; Verschakelen, J.; Prokop, M.; Oudkerk, M.

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate whether baseline nodule density or changes in density or nodule features could be used to discriminate between benign and malignant solid indeterminate nodules. Materials and methods: Solid indeterminate nodules between 50 and 500 mm(3) (4.6-9.8 mm) were assessed

  4. Probing ultrafast dynamics of solid-density plasma generated by high-contrast intense laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Kamalesh; Blackman, David R.; Shaikh, Moniruzzaman; Lad, Amit D.; Sarkar, Deep; Dey, Indranuj; Robinson, Alex P. L.; Pasley, John; Ravindra Kumar, G.

    2018-01-01

    We present ultrafast dynamics of solid-density plasma created by high-contrast (picosecond contrast ˜10-9), high-intensity (˜4 × 1018 W/cm2) laser pulses using time-resolved pump-probe Doppler spectrometry. Experiments show a rapid rise in blue-shift at early time delay (2-4.3 ps) followed by a rapid fall (4.3-8.3 ps) and then a slow rise in blue-shift at later time delays (>8.3 ps). Simulations show that the early-time observations, specifically the absence of any red-shifting of the reflected probe, can only be reproduced if the front surface is unperturbed by the laser pre-pulse at the moment that the high intensity pulse arrives. A flexible diagnostic which is capable of diagnosing the presence of low-levels of pre-plasma formation would be useful for potential applications in laser-produced proton and ion production, such as cancer therapy and security imaging.

  5. Towards High Power Density Metal Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cell for Mobile Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Persson, Åsa H.; Muhl, Thuy Thanh

    2018-01-01

    For use of metal supported solid oxide fuel cell (MS-SOFC) in mobile applications it is important to reduce the thermal mass to enable fast startup, increase stack power density in terms of weight and volume and reduce costs. In the present study, we report on the effect of reducing the Technical...

  6. Investigating tautomeric polymorphism in crystalline anthranilic acid using terahertz spectroscopy and solid-state density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Sean P; Witko, Ewelina M; Smith, Tiffany M; Korter, Timothy M

    2012-08-02

    Terahertz spectroscopy is sensitive to the interactions between molecules in the solid-state and recently has emerged as a new analytical tool for investigating polymorphism. Here, this technique is applied for the first time to the phenomenon of tautomeric polymorphism where the crystal structures of anthranilic acid (2-aminobenzoic acid) have been investigated. Three polymorphs of anthranilic acid (denoted Forms I, II and III) were studied using terahertz spectroscopy and the vibrational modes and relative polymorph stabilities analyzed using solid-state density functional theory calculations augmented with London dispersion force corrections. Form I consists of both neutral and zwitterionic molecules and was found to be the most stable polymorph as compared to Forms II and III (both containing only neutral molecules). The simulations suggest that a balance between steric interactions and electrostatic forces is responsible for the favoring of the mixed neutral/zwitterion solid over the all neutral or all zwitterion crystalline arrangements.

  7. Learning about the energy density of liquid and semi-solid foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogenkamp, P S; Stafleu, A; Mars, M; de Graaf, C

    2012-09-01

    People learn about a food's satiating capacity by exposure and consequently adjust their energy intake. To investigate the effect of energy density and texture on subsequent energy intake adjustments during repeated consumption. In a randomized crossover design, participants (n=27, age: 21±2.4 years, body mass index: 22.2±1.6 kg m(-2)) repeatedly consumed highly novel foods that were either low-energy-dense (LE: 30 kcal per 100 g) or high-energy-dense (HE: 130 kcal per 100 g), and either liquid or semi-solid, resulting in four product conditions. In each condition, a fixed portion of test food was consumed nine times as an obligatory part of breakfast, lunch and dinner on 3 consecutive days. All meals continued with an ad libitum buffet; food items for evening consumption were provided and the intake (kcal per day) was measured. Buffet intake depended on energy density and day of consumption of the test foods (day*energy interaction: P=0.02); daily buffet intake increased from day 1 (1745±577 kcal) to day 3 (1979±567 kcal) in the LE conditions; intake did not change in the HE conditions (day 1: 1523±429 kcal, day 3: 1589±424 kcal). Food texture did not affect the intake (P=0.56). Intake did depend on energy density of the test foods; participants increased their buffet intake over days in response to learning about the satiating capacity of the LE foods, but did not change buffet intake over days when repeatedly consuming a HE food as part of their meal. The adjustments in intake were made irrespective of the food texture.

  8. Optical Absorption in Molecular Crystals from Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-23

    Our approach represents a full solid-state calculation, allowing for polarization ef- fects while still capable of capturing inter-molecular dis...AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2017-0030 Optical absorption in molecular crystals from time-dependent density functional theory Leeor Kronik WEIZMANN INSTITUTE OF...from time-dependent density functional theory 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA9550-15-1-0290 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S

  9. Pressure and surface tension of solid-liquid interface using Tara zona density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moradi, M.; Kavosh Tehrani, M.

    2001-01-01

    The weighted density functional theory proposed by Tara zona is applied to study the solid-liquid interface. In the last two decades the weighted density functional became a useful tool to consider the properties of inhomogeneous liquids. In this theory, the role of the size of molecules or the particles of which the matter is composed, was found to be important. In this research we study a hard sphere fluid beside a hard wall. For this study the liquid is an inhomogeneous system. We use the definition of the direct correlation function as a second derivative of free energy with respect to the density. We use this definition and the definition of the weighting function, then we minimize the grand potential with respect to the density to get the Euler Lagrange equation and we obtain an integral equation to find the inhomogeneous density profile. The obtained density profile as a function of the distance from the wall, for different bulk density is pitted in three dimensions. We also calculate the pressure and compare it with the Carnahan-Starling results, and finally we obtained the surface tension at liquid-solid interface and compared it with the results of Monte Carlo simulation

  10. A comprehensive tool for measuring mammographic density changes over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Mikael; Li, Jingmei; Leifland, Karin; Czene, Kamila; Hall, Per

    2018-06-01

    Mammographic density is a marker of breast cancer risk and diagnostics accuracy. Density change over time is a strong proxy for response to endocrine treatment and potentially a stronger predictor of breast cancer incidence. We developed STRATUS to analyse digital and analogue images and enable automated measurements of density changes over time. Raw and processed images from the same mammogram were randomly sampled from 41,353 healthy women. Measurements from raw images (using FDA approved software iCAD) were used as templates for STRATUS to measure density on processed images through machine learning. A similar two-step design was used to train density measures in analogue images. Relative risks of breast cancer were estimated in three unique datasets. An alignment protocol was developed using images from 11,409 women to reduce non-biological variability in density change. The protocol was evaluated in 55,073 women having two regular mammography screens. Differences and variances in densities were compared before and after image alignment. The average relative risk of breast cancer in the three datasets was 1.6 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.3-1.8] per standard deviation of percent mammographic density. The discrimination was AUC 0.62 (CI 0.60-0.64). The type of image did not significantly influence the risk associations. Alignment decreased the non-biological variability in density change and re-estimated the yearly overall percent density decrease from 1.5 to 0.9%, p density measures was not influenced by mammogram type. The alignment protocol reduced the non-biological variability between images over time. STRATUS has the potential to become a useful tool for epidemiological studies and clinical follow-up.

  11. Diagnosis of Weibel instability evolution in the rear surface density scale lengths of laser solid interactions via proton acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, G G; Brenner, C M; Clarke, R J; Green, J S; Heathcote, R I; Rusby, D R; McKenna, P; Neely, D; Bagnoud, V; Zielbauer, B; Gonzalez-Izquierdo, B; Powell, H W

    2017-01-01

    It is shown for the first time that the spatial and temporal distribution of laser accelerated protons can be used as a diagnostic of Weibel instability presence and evolution in the rear surface scale lengths of a solid density target. Numerical modelling shows that when a fast electron beam is injected into a decreasing density gradient on the target rear side, a magnetic instability is seeded with an evolution which is strongly dependent on the density scale length. This is manifested in the acceleration of a filamented proton beam, where the degree of filamentation is also found to be dependent on the target rear scale length. Furthermore, the energy dependent spatial distribution of the accelerated proton beam is shown to provide information on the instability evolution on the picosecond timescale over which the protons are accelerated. Experimentally, this is investigated by using a controlled prepulse to introduce a target rear scale length, which is varied by altering the time delay with respect to the main pulse, and similar trends are measured. This work is particularly pertinent to applications using laser pulse durations of tens of picoseconds, or where a micron level density scale length is present on the rear of a solid target, such as proton-driven fast ignition, as the resultant instability may affect the uniformity of fuel energy coupling. (paper)

  12. Picosecond Streaked K-Shell Spectroscopy of Near Solid-Density Aluminum Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillman, C. R.; Nilson, P. M.; Ivancic, S. T.; Mileham, C.; Froula, D. H.; Golovkin, I. E.

    2016-10-01

    The thermal x-ray emission from rapidly heated solid targets containing a buried-aluminum layer was measured. The targets were driven by high-contrast 1 ω or 2 ω laser pulses at focused intensities up to 1 ×1019W/Wcm2 cm2 . A streaked x-ray spectrometer recorded the Al Heα and lithium-like satellite lines with 2-ps temporal resolution and moderate resolving power (E/E ΔE 700). Time-integrated measurements over the same spectral range were used to correct the streaked data for variations in photocathode sensitivity. Line widths and intensity ratios from the streaked data were interpreted using a collisional radiative atomic model to provide the average plasma conditions in the buried layer as a function of time. It was observed that the resonance line tends toward lower photon energies at high electron densities. The measured shifts will be compared to predicted shifts from Stark-operator calculations at the inferred plasma conditions. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944, the office of Fusion Energy Sciences Award Number DE-SC0012317, and the Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship Grant Number DE-NA0002135.

  13. Decay of autoionizing states in time-dependent density functional and reduced density matrix functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapoor, Varun; Brics, Martins; Bauer, Dieter [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Rostock, 18051 Rostock (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Autoionizing states are inaccessible to time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) using known, adiabatic Kohn-Sham (KS) potentials. We determine the exact KS potential for a numerically exactly solvable model Helium atom interacting with a laser field that is populating an autoionizing state. The exact single-particle density of the population in the autoionizing state corresponds to that of the energetically lowest quasi-stationary state in the exact KS potential. We describe how this exact potential controls the decay by a barrier whose height and width allows for the density to tunnel out and decay with the same rate as in the ab initio time-dependent Schroedinger calculation. However, devising a useful exchange-correlation potential that is capable of governing such a scenario in general and in more complex systems is hopeless. As an improvement over TDDFT, time-dependent reduced density matrix functional theory has been proposed. We are able to obtain for the above described autoionization process the exact time-dependent natural orbitals (i.e., the eigenfunctions of the exact, time-dependent one-body reduced density matrix) and study the potentials that appear in the equations of motion for the natural orbitals and the structure of the two-body density matrix expanded in them.

  14. Real-Time Laser Ultrasound Tomography for Profilometry of Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarubin, V. P.; Bychkov, A. S.; Karabutov, A. A.; Simonova, V. A.; Kudinov, I. A.; Cherepetskaya, E. B.

    2018-01-01

    We studied the possibility of applying laser ultrasound tomography for profilometry of solids. The proposed approach provides high spatial resolution and efficiency, as well as profilometry of contaminated objects or objects submerged in liquids. The algorithms for the construction of tomograms and recognition of the profiles of studied objects using the parallel programming technology NDIVIA CUDA are proposed. A prototype of the real-time laser ultrasound profilometer was used to obtain the profiles of solid surfaces of revolution. The proposed method allows the real-time determination of the surface position for cylindrical objects with an approximation accuracy of up to 16 μm.

  15. High-Density Near-Field Readout Using Diamond Solid Immersion Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, Masataka; Saito, Kimihiro; Kondo, Takao; Nakaoki, Ariyoshi; Furuki, Motohiro; Takeda, Minoru; Yamamoto, Masanobu; Schaich, Thomas J.; van Oerle, Bart M.; Godfried, Herman P.; Kriele, Paul A. C.; Houwman, Evert P.; Nelissen, Wim H. M.; Pels, Gert J.; Spaaij, Paul G. M.

    2006-02-01

    We investigated high-density near-field readout using a diamond solid immersion lens (SIL). A synthetic single-crystal chemical vapor deposition diamond provides a high refractive index and a high transmission for a wide wavelength range. Since the refractive index at a wavelength of 405 nm is 2.458, we could design a solid immersion lens with an effective numerical aperture of 2.34. Using the diamond SIL, we observed the eye pattern of a 150-GB-capacity (104.3 Gbit/in.2) disk with a track pitch of 130 nm and a bit length of 47.6 nm.

  16. Excess vibrational density of states and the brittle to ductile transition in crystalline and amorphous solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Jeetu S; Mondal, Chandana; Sengupta, Surajit; Karmakar, Smarajit

    2016-01-28

    The conditions which determine whether a material behaves in a brittle or ductile fashion on mechanical loading are still elusive and comprise a topic of active research among materials physicists and engineers. In this study, we present the results of in silico mechanical deformation experiments from two very different model solids in two and three dimensions. The first consists of particles interacting with isotropic potentials and the other has strongly direction dependent interactions. We show that in both cases, the excess vibrational density of states is one of the fundamental quantities which characterizes the ductility of the material. Our results can be checked using careful experiments on colloidal solids.

  17. Experimental measurements of deep directional columnar heating by laser-generated relativistic electrons at near-solid density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, J.A.; Key, M.H.; Hatchett, S.P.; Lee, R.W.; Pennington, D.; Tabak, M.; Freeman, R.R.; Stephens, R.B.

    2002-01-01

    In our experiments, we irradiated solid CH targets with a 400 J, 5 ps, 3x10 19 W/cm 2 laser, and we used x-ray imaging and spectroscopic diagnostics to monitor the keV x-ray emission from thin Al or Au tracer layers buried within the targets. The experiments were designed to quantify the spatial distribution of the thermal electron temperature and density as a function of buried layer depth; these data provide insights into the behavior of relativistic electron currents which flow within the solid target and are directly and indirectly responsible for the heating. We measured ∼200-350 eV temperatures and near-solid densities at depths ranging from 5 to 100 μm beneath the target surface. Time-resolved x-ray spectra from Al tracers indicate that the tracers emit thermal x rays and cool slowly compared to the time scale of the laser pulse. Most intriguingly, we consistently observe annular x-ray images in all buried tracer-layer experiments, and these data show that the temperature distribution is columnar, with enhanced heating along the edges of the column. The ring diameters are much greater than the laser focal spot diameter and do not vary significantly with the depth of the tracer layer for depths greater than 30 μm. The local temperatures are 200-350 eV for all tracer depths. We discuss recent simulations of the evolution of electron currents deep within solid targets irradiated by ultra-high-intensity lasers, and we discuss how modeling and analytical results suggest that the annular patterns we observe may be related to locally strong growth of the Weibel instability. We also suggest avenues for future research in order to further illuminate the complex physics of relativistic electron transport and energy deposition inside ultra-high-intensity laser-irradiated solid targets

  18. Computational complexity of time-dependent density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitfield, J D; Yung, M-H; Tempel, D G; Aspuru-Guzik, A; Boixo, S

    2014-01-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is rapidly emerging as a premier method for solving dynamical many-body problems in physics and chemistry. The mathematical foundations of TDDFT are established through the formal existence of a fictitious non-interacting system (known as the Kohn–Sham system), which can reproduce the one-electron reduced probability density of the actual system. We build upon these works and show that on the interior of the domain of existence, the Kohn–Sham system can be efficiently obtained given the time-dependent density. We introduce a V-representability parameter which diverges at the boundary of the existence domain and serves to quantify the numerical difficulty of constructing the Kohn-Sham potential. For bounded values of V-representability, we present a polynomial time quantum algorithm to generate the time-dependent Kohn–Sham potential with controllable error bounds. (paper)

  19. Minimum entropy density method for the time series analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong Won; Park, Joongwoo Brian; Jo, Hang-Hyun; Yang, Jae-Suk; Moon, Hie-Tae

    2009-01-01

    The entropy density is an intuitive and powerful concept to study the complicated nonlinear processes derived from physical systems. We develop the minimum entropy density method (MEDM) to detect the structure scale of a given time series, which is defined as the scale in which the uncertainty is minimized, hence the pattern is revealed most. The MEDM is applied to the financial time series of Standard and Poor’s 500 index from February 1983 to April 2006. Then the temporal behavior of structure scale is obtained and analyzed in relation to the information delivery time and efficient market hypothesis.

  20. Watching excitons move: the time-dependent transition density matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Carsten

    2012-02-01

    Time-dependent density-functional theory allows one to calculate excitation energies and the associated transition densities in principle exactly. The transition density matrix (TDM) provides additional information on electron-hole localization and coherence of specific excitations of the many-body system. We have extended the TDM concept into the real-time domain in order to visualize the excited-state dynamics in conjugated molecules. The time-dependent TDM is defined as an implicit density functional, and can be approximately obtained from the time-dependent Kohn-Sham orbitals. The quality of this approximation is assessed in simple model systems. A computational scheme for real molecular systems is presented: the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equations are solved with the OCTOPUS code and the time-dependent Kohn-Sham TDM is calculated using a spatial partitioning scheme. The method is applied to show in real time how locally created electron-hole pairs spread out over neighboring conjugated molecular chains. The coupling mechanism, electron-hole coherence, and the possibility of charge separation are discussed.

  1. Space-time complexity in solid state models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, A.R.

    1985-01-01

    In this Workshop on symmetry-breaking it is appropriate to include the evolving fields of nonlinear-nonequilibrium systems in which transitions to and between various degrees of ''complexity'' (including ''chaos'') occur in time or space or both. These notions naturally bring together phenomena of pattern formation and chaos and therefore have ramifications for a huge array of natural sciences - astrophysics, plasmas and lasers, hydrodynamics, field theory, materials and solid state theory, optics and electronics, biology, pattern recognition and evolution, etc. Our particular concerns here are with examples from solid state and condensed matter

  2. Sub-micrometer-thick all-solid-state supercapacitors with high power and energy densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Fanhui [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education, and School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Ding, Yi [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education, and School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Shandong Applied Research Center for Gold Technology (Au-SDARC), Yantai 264005 (China)

    2011-09-15

    A sub-micrometer-thick, flexible, all-solid-state supercapacitor is fabricated. Through simultaneous realization of high dispersity of pseudocapacitance materials and quick electrode response, the hybrid nanostructures show enhanced volumetric capacitance and excellent stability, as well as very high power and energy densities. This suggests their potential as next-generation, high-performance energy conversion and storage devices for wearable electronics. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Measurements of continuum lowering in solid-density plasmas created from elements and compounds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ciricosta, O.; Vinko, S.M.; Barbrel, B.; Rackstraw, D.S.; Preston, T.R.; Burian, Tomáš; Chalupský, Jaromír; Cho, B.I.; Chung, H.-K.; Dakovski, G.L.; Engelhorn, K.; Hájková, Věra; Heimann, P.; Holmes, M.; Juha, Libor; Krzywinski, J.; Lee, R. W.; Toleikis, S.; Turner, J.J.; Zastrau, U.; Wark, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, May (2016), 1-7, č. článku 11713. ISSN 2041-1723 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/11/0571 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : solid-density plasmas * X-ray * Linac Coherent Light Source * ionization potential depression (IPD) * equation of state (EOS) Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 12.124, year: 2016

  4. A Quasi-Solid-State Sodium-Ion Capacitor with High Energy Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Faxing; Wang, Xiaowei; Chang, Zheng; Wu, Xiongwei; Liu, Xiang; Fu, Lijun; Zhu, Yusong; Wu, Yuping; Huang, Wei

    2015-11-18

    A quasi-solid-state sodium-ion capacitor is demonstrated with nanoporous disordered carbon and macroporous graphene as the negative and positive electrodes, respectively, using a sodium-ion-conducting gel polymer electrolyte. It can operate at a cell voltage as high as 4.2 V with an energy density of record high 168 W h kg(-1). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Probe initial parton density and formation time via jet quenching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xin-Nian

    2002-01-01

    Medium modification of jet fragmentation function due to multiple scattering and induced gluon radiation leads directly to jet quenching or suppression of leading particle distribution from jet fragmentation. One can extract an effective total parton energy loss which can be related to the total transverse momentum broadening. For an expanding medium, both are shown to be sensitive to the initial parton density and formation time. Therefore, one can extract the initial parton density and formation time from simultaneous measurements of parton energy loss and transverse momentum broadening. Implication of the recent experimental data on effects of detailed balance in parton energy loss is also discussed

  6. Biodegradation of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) by isolated fungi in solid waste medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahra, Sahebnazar; Abbas, Shojaosadati Seyed; Mahsa, Mohammad-Taheri; Mohsen, Nosrati

    2010-01-01

    In this study, biodegradation of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) by isolated landfill-source fungi was evaluated in a controlled solid waste medium. The fungi, including Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus terreus and Fusarium solani, were isolated from samples taken from an aerobic aged municipal landfill in Tehran. These fungi could degrade LDPE via the formation of a biofilm in a submerged medium. In the sterilized solid waste medium, LPDE films were buried for 100 days in a 1-L flask containing 400 g sterile solid waste raw materials at 28 deg. C. Each fungus was added to a separate flask. The moisture content and pH of the media were maintained at the optimal levels for each fungus. Photo-oxidation (25 days under UV-irradiation) was used as a pretreatment of the LDPE samples. The progress of the process was monitored by measurement of total organic carbon (TOC), pH, temperature and moisture. The results obtained from monitoring the process using isolated fungi under sterile conditions indicate that these fungi are able to grow in solid waste medium. The results of FT-IR and SEM analyses show that A. terreus and A. fumigatus, despite the availability of other organic carbon of materials, could utilize LDPE as carbon source. While there has been much research in the field of LDPE biodegradation under solid conditions, this is the first report of degradation of LDPE by A. fumigatus.

  7. Molecularly Engineered Azobenzene Derivatives for High Energy Density Solid-State Solar Thermal Fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eugene N; Zhitomirsky, David; Han, Grace G D; Liu, Yun; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2017-03-15

    Solar thermal fuels (STFs) harvest and store solar energy in a closed cycle system through conformational change of molecules and can release the energy in the form of heat on demand. With the aim of developing tunable and optimized STFs for solid-state applications, we designed three azobenzene derivatives functionalized with bulky aromatic groups (phenyl, biphenyl, and tert-butyl phenyl groups). In contrast to pristine azobenzene, which crystallizes and makes nonuniform films, the bulky azobenzene derivatives formed uniform amorphous films that can be charged and discharged with light and heat for many cycles. Thermal stability of the films, a critical metric for thermally triggerable STFs, was greatly increased by the bulky functionalization (up to 180 °C), and we were able to achieve record high energy density of 135 J/g for solid-state STFs, over a 30% improvement compared to previous solid-state reports. Furthermore, the chargeability in the solid state was improved, up to 80% charged from 40% charged in previous solid-state reports. Our results point toward molecular engineering as an effective method to increase energy storage in STFs, improve chargeability, and improve the thermal stability of the thin film.

  8. High-density equation of state for helium and its application to bubbles in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfer, W.G.

    1980-06-01

    Helium, produced by transmutations or injected, causes bubble formation in solids at elevated temperatures. For small bubbles, the gas pressure required to balance the surface tension reaches values which far exceed those obtainable in experiments to measure the equation of state for helium gas. Therefore, empirical gas laws cannot be considered applicable to the fluid-like densities existing in small bubbles. In order to remedy this situation, an equation of state for helium was developed from the theory of the liquid state. At very low densities, this theoretically derived equation of state agrees with experimental results. For high densities, however, gas pressures are predicted which are significantly higher than those derived from the ideal gas law, but also significantly lower than pressures obtained with the van der Waals law. When applied to equilibrium bubbles in solids, it is found that the high-density equation of state leads to less bubble swelling than the van der Waals law, but more than the ideal gas law. Furthermore, the number of helium atoms in equilibrium bubbles is nearly independent of temperature

  9. The evolution of solid density within a thermal explosion II. Dynamic proton radiography of cracking and solid consumption by burning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smilowitz, L.; Henson, B. F.; Romero, J. J.; Asay, B. W.; Saunders, A.; Merrill, F. E.; Morris, C. L.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Grim, G.; Mariam, F.; Schwartz, C. L.; Hogan, G.; Nedrow, P.; Murray, M. M.; Thompson, T. N.; Espinoza, C.; Lewis, D.; Bainbridge, J.; McNeil, W.; Rightley, P.

    2012-01-01

    We report proton transmission images obtained subsequent to the laser assisted thermal ignition of a sample of PBX 9501 (a plastic bonded formulation of the explosive nitramine octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX)). We describe the laser assisted thermal ignition technique as a means to synchronize a non-linear thermal ignition event while preserving the subsequent post-ignition behavior. We have obtained dynamic proton transmission images at two spatial magnifications and viewed both the radial and transverse axis of a solid cylindrical sample encased in aluminum. Images have been obtained with 3 to 15 μs temporal resolution and approximately 100 μm spatial resolution at the higher magnification. We observe case expansion from very early in the experiment, until case fragmentation. We observe spatially anisotropic features in the transmission which we attribute to cracking in the solid explosive, in agreement with previous measurements conducted on two dimensional samples with optical viewing. Digital analysis of the images also reveals spatially isotropic features which we attribute to the evolution of the loss of density by burning subsequent to thermal ignition.

  10. The evolution of solid density within a thermal explosion II. Dynamic proton radiography of cracking and solid consumption by burning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smilowitz, L.; Henson, B. F.; Romero, J. J.; Asay, B. W.; Saunders, A.; Merrill, F. E.; Morris, C. L.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Grim, G.; Mariam, F.; Schwartz, C. L.; Hogan, G.; Nedrow, P.; Murray, M. M.; Thompson, T. N.; Espinoza, C.; Lewis, D.; Bainbridge, J.; McNeil, W.; Rightley, P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); and others

    2012-05-15

    We report proton transmission images obtained subsequent to the laser assisted thermal ignition of a sample of PBX 9501 (a plastic bonded formulation of the explosive nitramine octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX)). We describe the laser assisted thermal ignition technique as a means to synchronize a non-linear thermal ignition event while preserving the subsequent post-ignition behavior. We have obtained dynamic proton transmission images at two spatial magnifications and viewed both the radial and transverse axis of a solid cylindrical sample encased in aluminum. Images have been obtained with 3 to 15 {mu}s temporal resolution and approximately 100 {mu}m spatial resolution at the higher magnification. We observe case expansion from very early in the experiment, until case fragmentation. We observe spatially anisotropic features in the transmission which we attribute to cracking in the solid explosive, in agreement with previous measurements conducted on two dimensional samples with optical viewing. Digital analysis of the images also reveals spatially isotropic features which we attribute to the evolution of the loss of density by burning subsequent to thermal ignition.

  11. Time-dependent quantum fluid density functional theory of hydrogen ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A time-dependent generalized non-linear Schrödinger equation (GNLSE) of motion was earlier derived in our laboratory by combining density functional theory and quantum fluid dynamics in threedimensional space. In continuation of the work reported previously, the GNLSE is applied to provide additional knowledge on ...

  12. Covariant Density Functionals: time-odd channel investigated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanasjev, A. V.; Abusara, H.

    2009-01-01

    The description of exotic nuclear systems and phenomena requires a detailed understanding of all channels of density functional theories. The role of time-odd mean fields, their evidence in experiment, and an accurate description of these fields are subject of current interest. Recent studies advanced the understanding of these fields in energy density functional theories based on the Skyrme force [1,2]. Time-odd mean fields are related to nuclear magnetism in covariant density functional (CDF) theories [3]. They arise from space-like components of vector mesons and Lorentz invariance requires that their coupling strengths are identical to that of time-like components. There were only few limited efforts to understand the role of time-odd mean fields in covariant density functional theory [4,5]. For example, the microscopic role of nuclear magnetism and its impact on rotational properties of nuclei has been studied in Ref. [5]. It is known that time-odd mean fields modify the angular momentum content of the single-particle orbitals and thus the moments of inertia, effective alignments, alignment gains at the band crossings and other physical observables. We aim on more detailed and systematic understanding of the role of time-odd mean fields in covariant density functional theory. This investigation covers both rotating and non-rotating systems. It is shown that contrary to the Skyrme energy density functionals time-odd mean fields of CDF theory always provide additional binding in the systems with broken time-reversal symmetry (rotating nuclei, odd mass nuclei). This additional binding increases with spin and has its maximum exactly at the terminating state [6], where it can reach several MeV. The impact of time-odd mean fields on the properties of rotating systems has been studied in a systematic way (as a function of particle number and deformation) across the nuclear chart [7]. In addition, this contribution extends these studies to non-rotating systems such as

  13. Stationary solution of a time dependent density matrix formalism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohyama, Mitsuru

    1994-01-01

    A stationary solution of a time-dependent density-matrix formalism, which is an extension of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory to include the effects of two-body correlations, is obtained for the Lipkin model hamiltonian, using an adiabatic treatment of the two-body interaction. It is found that the obtained result is a reasonable approximation for the exact solution of the model. (author)

  14. The time-dependent density matrix renormalisation group method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Haibo; Luo, Zhen; Yao, Yao

    2018-04-01

    Substantial progress of the time-dependent density matrix renormalisation group (t-DMRG) method in the recent 15 years is reviewed in this paper. By integrating the time evolution with the sweep procedures in density matrix renormalisation group (DMRG), t-DMRG provides an efficient tool for real-time simulations of the quantum dynamics for one-dimensional (1D) or quasi-1D strongly correlated systems with a large number of degrees of freedom. In the illustrative applications, the t-DMRG approach is applied to investigate the nonadiabatic processes in realistic chemical systems, including exciton dissociation and triplet fission in polymers and molecular aggregates as well as internal conversion in pyrazine molecule.

  15. Joint Mapping of Mobility and Trap Density in Colloidal Quantum Dot Solids

    KAUST Repository

    Stadler, Philipp

    2013-07-23

    Field-effect transistors have been widely used to study electronic transport and doping in colloidal quantum dot solids to great effect. However, the full power of these devices to elucidate the electronic structure of materials has yet to be harnessed. Here, we deploy nanodielectric field-effect transistors to map the energy landscape within the band gap of a colloidal quantum dot solid. We exploit the self-limiting nature of the potentiostatic anodization growth mode to produce the thinnest usable gate dielectric, subject to our voltage breakdown requirements defined by the Fermi sweep range of interest. Lead sulfide colloidal quantum dots are applied as the active region and are treated with varying solvents and ligands. In an analysis complementary to the mobility trends commonly extracted from field-effect transistor studies, we focus instead on the subthreshold regime and map out the density of trap states in these nanocrystal films. The findings point to the importance of comprehensively mapping the electronic band- and gap-structure within real quantum solids, and they suggest a new focus in investigating quantum dot solids with an aim toward improving optoelectronic device performance. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  16. Asymmetric battery having a semi-solid cathode and high energy density anode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Taison; Chiang, Yet-Ming; Ota, Naoki; Wilder, Throop; Duduta, Mihai

    2017-11-28

    Embodiments described herein relate generally to devices, systems and methods of producing high energy density batteries having a semi-solid cathode that is thicker than the anode. An electrochemical cell can include a positive electrode current collector, a negative electrode current collector and an ion-permeable membrane disposed between the positive electrode current collector and the negative electrode current collector. The ion-permeable membrane is spaced a first distance from the positive electrode current collector and at least partially defines a positive electroactive zone. The ion-permeable membrane is spaced a second distance from the negative electrode current collector and at least partially defines a negative electroactive zone. The second distance is less than the first distance. A semi-solid cathode that includes a suspension of an active material and a conductive material in a non-aqueous liquid electrolyte is disposed in the positive electroactive zone, and an anode is disposed in the negative electroactive zone.

  17. The influence of solid particles density on parameters of multijet insert

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Niedźwiedzki

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Some dependences between solid particles density, chosen geometry and exploitation parameters of multijet inserts and developmentof laminar motion in continuous multijet sedimentation process, are presented in this paper. Results are obtained from the analysis of the multijet sedimentation model considering development of laminar motion of the suspension in the multijet insert conduit of the settling tank. The range of the researches covered, in particular, quantities necessary for designing inserts of multijet settling tanks finding application in purifying suspended solids in casting processes. Discussed problem has practical and cognitive meanings and is a base for more efficient designing multijet settling tanks inserts applied in iron and steel industry. Application of most efficient construction and exploitation parameters allows designing devices of lower dimensions what is especially advantageous in casting works.

  18. Ultra-High Density Holographic Memory Module with Solid-State Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markov, Vladimir B.

    2000-01-01

    NASA's terrestrial. space, and deep-space missions require technology that allows storing. retrieving, and processing a large volume of information. Holographic memory offers high-density data storage with parallel access and high throughput. Several methods exist for data multiplexing based on the fundamental principles of volume hologram selectivity. We recently demonstrated that a spatial (amplitude-phase) encoding of the reference wave (SERW) looks promising as a way to increase the storage density. The SERW hologram offers a method other than traditional methods of selectivity, such as spatial de-correlation between recorded and reconstruction fields, In this report we present the experimental results of the SERW-hologram memory module with solid-state architecture, which is of particular interest for space operations.

  19. Microstructure characterisation of solid oxide electrolysis cells operated at high current density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bowen, Jacob R.; Bentzen, Janet Jonna; Chen, Ming

    degradation of cell components in relation to the loss of electrochemical performance specific to the mode of operation. Thus descriptive microstructure characterization methods are required in combination with electrochemical characterization methods to decipher degradation mechanisms. In the present work......High temperature solid oxide cells can be operated either as fuel cells or electrolysis cells for efficient power generation or production of hydrogen from steam or synthesis gas (H2 + CO) from steam and CO2 respectively. When operated under harsh conditions, they often exhibit microstructural...... quantified using the mean linear intercept method as a function of current density and correlated to increases in serial resistance. The above structural changes are then compared in terms of electrode degradation observed during the co-electrolysis of steam and CO2 at current densities up to -1.5 A cm-2...

  20. Weighted-density functional approach for the solid-liquid interfaces in electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherepanova, T.A.; Stekolnikov, A.V.

    1991-09-01

    A weighted-density functional method is proposed to describe the atomic structure of the crystal-melt interface in electrolytes based on a charged-hard-sphere model of salt. The contribution of long-range Coulomb interaction is taken into account in the field formulation: the electrostatic field potential is determined from the Poisson equation. The ion density profiles and crystalline order parameter at the crystal-melt interface in the 1:1 symmetric electrolytes are calculated. The structurization of liquid near the solid surface is described. The results are compared to those for the neutral hard sphere system. The impurity distributions of extremely small concentrations are calculated both for the neutral and charged hard sphere systems. (author). 24 refs, 6 figs, 1 tab

  1. Thomson scattering from near-solid density plasmas using soft x-ray free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holl, A; Bornath, T; Cao, L; Doppner, T; Dusterer, S; Forster, E; Fortmann, C; Glenzer, S H; Gregori, G; Laarmann, T; Meiwes-Broer, K H; Przystawik, A; Radcliffe, P; Redmer, R; Reinholz, H; Ropke, G; Thiele, R; Tiggesbaumker, J; Toleikis, S; Truong, N X; Tschentscher, T; Uschmann, I; Zastrau, U

    2006-11-21

    We propose a collective Thomson scattering experiment at the VUV free electron laser facility at DESY (FLASH) which aims to diagnose warm dense matter at near-solid density. The plasma region of interest marks the transition from an ideal plasma to a correlated and degenerate many-particle system and is of current interest, e.g. in ICF experiments or laboratory astrophysics. Plasma diagnostic of such plasmas is a longstanding issue. The collective electron plasma mode (plasmon) is revealed in a pump-probe scattering experiment using the high-brilliant radiation to probe the plasma. The distinctive scattering features allow to infer basic plasma properties. For plasmas in thermal equilibrium the electron density and temperature is determined from scattering off the plasmon mode.

  2. Optimization of anisotropic photonic density of states for Raman cooling of solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yin-Chung; Ghosh, Indronil; Schleife, André; Carney, P. Scott; Bahl, Gaurav

    2018-04-01

    Optical refrigeration of solids holds tremendous promise for applications in thermal management. It can be achieved through multiple mechanisms including inelastic anti-Stokes Brillouin and Raman scattering. However, engineering of these mechanisms remains relatively unexplored. The major challenge lies in the natural unfavorable imbalance in transition rates for Stokes and anti-Stokes scattering. We consider the influence of anisotropic photonic density of states on Raman scattering and derive expressions for cooling in such photonically anisotropic systems. We demonstrate optimization of the Raman cooling figure of merit considering all possible orientations for the material crystal and two example photonic crystals. We find that the anisotropic description of the photonic density of states and the optimization process is necessary to obtain the best Raman cooling efficiency for systems having lower symmetry. This general result applies to a wide array of other laser cooling methods in the presence of anisotropy.

  3. Degradation of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells Operated at High Current Densities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tao, Youkun; Ebbesen, Sune Dalgaard; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2014-01-01

    In this work the durability of solid oxide cells for co-electrolysis of steam and carbon dioxide (45 % H2O + 45 % CO2 + 10 % H2) at high current densities was investigated. The tested cells are Ni-YSZ electrode supported, with a YSZ electrolyte and either a LSM-YSZ or LSCF-CGO oxygen electrode....... A current density of -1.5 and -2.0 A/cm2 was applied to the cell and the gas conversion was 45 % and 60 %, respectively. The cells were operated for a period of up to 700 hours. The electrochemical analysis revealed significant performance degradation for the ohmic process, oxygen ion interfacial transfer...

  4. Studies on steps affecting tritium residence time in solid blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Satoru

    1987-01-01

    For the self sustaining of CTR fuel cycle, the effective tritium recovery from blankets is essential. This means that not only tritium breeding ratio must be larger than 1.0, but also high recovering speed is required for the short residence time of tritium in blankets. Short residence time means that the tritium inventory in blankets is small. In this paper, the tritium residence time and tritium inventory in a solid blanket are modeled by considering the steps constituting tritium release. Some of these tritium migration processes were experimentally evaluated. The tritium migration steps in a solid blanket using sintered breeding materials consist of diffusion in grains, desorption at grain edges, diffusion and permeation through grain boundaries, desorption at particle edges, diffusion and percolation through interconnected pores to purging stream, and convective mass transfer to stream. Corresponding to these steps, diffusive, soluble, adsorbed and trapped tritium inventories and the tritium in gas phase are conceivable. The code named TTT was made for calculating these tritium inventories and the residence time of tritium. An example of the results of calculation is shown. The blanket is REPUTER-1, which is the conceptual design of a commercial reversed field pinch fusion reactor studied at the University of Tokyo. The experimental studies on the migration steps of tritium are reported. (Kako, I.)

  5. Time dependent density matrix theory and effective interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tohyama, Mitsuru [Kyorin Univ., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-07-01

    A correlated ground state of {sup 16}O and an E2 giant resonance built on it are calculated using an extended version of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory called the time-dependent density-matrix theory (TDDM). The Skyrme force is used in the calculation of both a mean field and two-body correlations. It is found that TDDM gives reasonable ground-state correlations and a large spreading width of the E2 giant resonance when single-particle states in the continuum are treated appropriately. (author)

  6. Solid-state framing camera with multiple time frames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, K. L.; Stewart, R. E.; Steele, P. T.; Vernon, S. P.; Hsing, W. W.; Remington, B. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2013-10-07

    A high speed solid-state framing camera has been developed which can operate over a wide range of photon energies. This camera measures the two-dimensional spatial profile of the flux incident on a cadmium selenide semiconductor at multiple times. This multi-frame camera has been tested at 3.1 eV and 4.5 keV. The framing camera currently records two frames with a temporal separation between the frames of 5 ps but this separation can be varied between hundreds of femtoseconds up to nanoseconds and the number of frames can be increased by angularly multiplexing the probe beam onto the cadmium selenide semiconductor.

  7. Out-of-Time-Ordered Density Correlators in Luttinger Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dóra, Balázs; Moessner, Roderich

    2017-07-14

    Information scrambling and the butterfly effect in chaotic quantum systems can be diagnosed by out-of-time-ordered (OTO) commutators through an exponential growth and large late time value. We show that the latter feature shows up in a strongly correlated many-body system, a Luttinger liquid, whose density fluctuations we study at long and short wavelengths, both in equilibrium and after a quantum quench. We find rich behavior combining robustly universal and nonuniversal features. The OTO commutators display temperature- and initial-state-independent behavior and grow as t^{2} for short times. For the short-wavelength density operator, they reach a sizable value after the light cone only in an interacting Luttinger liquid, where the bare excitations break up into collective modes. This challenges the common interpretation of the OTO commutator in chaotic systems. We benchmark our findings numerically on an interacting spinless fermion model in 1D and find persistence of central features even in the nonintegrable case. As a nonuniversal feature, the short-time growth exhibits a distance-dependent power.

  8. A New Approach to Determine the Density of Liquids and Solids without Measuring Mass and Volume: Introducing the "Solidensimeter"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiriktas, Halit; Sahin, Mehmet; Eslek, Sinan; Kiriktas, Irem

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to design a mechanism with which the density of any solid or liquid can be determined without measuring its mass and volume in order to help students comprehend the concept of density more easily. The "solidensimeter" comprises of two scaled and nested glass containers (graduated cylinder or beaker) and sufficient water.…

  9. Time-dependent density-functional theory concepts and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ullrich, Carsten A

    2011-01-01

    Time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) describes the quantum dynamics of interacting electronic many-body systems formally exactly and in a practical and efficient manner. TDDFT has become the leading method for calculating excitation energies and optical properties of large molecules, with accuracies that rival traditional wave-function based methods, but at a fraction of the computational cost.This book is the first graduate-level text on the concepts and applications of TDDFT, including many examples and exercises, and extensive coverage of the literature. The book begins with a s

  10. Modification of K-line emission profiles in laser-created solid-density plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengebusch, A.; Reinholz, H.; Roepke, G.

    2010-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. X-ray emissions in the keV energy range have shown to be suitable radiation to investigate the properties of laser-created solid-density plasmas. We use the modifications of inner shell transitions due to the environment to characterize these plasmas. A theoretical treatment of spectral line profiles based on a self-consistent ion sphere model is applied on moderately ionized mid-Z materials, such as titanium, silicon and chlorine. We observe large contributions of satellite transitions due to M-shell ionization and excitation. To determine the composition a mixture of various excited and ionized ionic states embedded in a plasma has to be considered. Plasma polarization effects that cause shifts of the emission and ionization energies are taken into account. K-line profiles are calculated for bulk temperatures up to 100 eV and free electron densities up to 10 24 cm -3 in order to analyze recent measurements with respect to the plasma parameters of electron heated target regions. Moreover, in high-intensity laser-matter interactions, inevitable prepulses are likely to create preplasma and shocks within the target before the main pulse arrives. We investigate the influence of density gradients due to prepulses on the spectral profiles. Further, radial bulk temperature distributions as well the composition of the created warm dense matter are inferred.

  11. A Noncontact Measurement Technique for the Density and Thermal Expansion Coefficient of Solid and Liquid Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sang K.; Thiessen, David B.; Rhim, Won-Kyu

    1996-01-01

    A noncontact measurement technique for the density and the thermal expansion refractory materials in their molten as well as solid phases is presented. This technique is based on the video image processing of a levitated sample. Experiments were performed using the high-temperature electrostatic levitator (HTESL) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in which 2-3 mm diameter samples can be levitated, melted, and radiatively cooled in a vacuum. Due to the axisymmetric nature of the molten samples when levitated in the HTESL, a rather simple digital image analysis can be employed to accurately measure the volumetric change as a function of temperature. Density and the thermal expansion coefficient measurements were made on a pure nickel sample to test the accuracy of the technique in the temperature range of 1045-1565 C. The result for the liquid phase density can be expressed by p = 8.848 + (6.730 x 10(exp -4)) x T (degC) g/cu cm within 0.8% accuracy, and the corresponding thermal expansion coefficient can be expressed by Beta=(9.419 x 10(exp -5)) - (7.165 x 10(exp -9) x T (degC)/K within 0.2% accuracy.

  12. Adaptive density trajectory cluster based on time and space distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fagui; Zhang, Zhijie

    2017-10-01

    There are some hotspot problems remaining in trajectory cluster for discovering mobile behavior regularity, such as the computation of distance between sub trajectories, the setting of parameter values in cluster algorithm and the uncertainty/boundary problem of data set. As a result, based on the time and space, this paper tries to define the calculation method of distance between sub trajectories. The significance of distance calculation for sub trajectories is to clearly reveal the differences in moving trajectories and to promote the accuracy of cluster algorithm. Besides, a novel adaptive density trajectory cluster algorithm is proposed, in which cluster radius is computed through using the density of data distribution. In addition, cluster centers and number are selected by a certain strategy automatically, and uncertainty/boundary problem of data set is solved by designed weighted rough c-means. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can perform the fuzzy trajectory cluster effectively on the basis of the time and space distance, and obtain the optimal cluster centers and rich cluster results information adaptably for excavating the features of mobile behavior in mobile and sociology network.

  13. Recurrence Density Enhanced Complex Networks for Nonlinear Time Series Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Diego G. De B.; Reis, Barbara M. Da F.; Zou, Yong; Quiles, Marcos G.; Macau, Elbert E. N.

    We introduce a new method, which is entitled Recurrence Density Enhanced Complex Network (RDE-CN), to properly analyze nonlinear time series. Our method first transforms a recurrence plot into a figure of a reduced number of points yet preserving the main and fundamental recurrence properties of the original plot. This resulting figure is then reinterpreted as a complex network, which is further characterized by network statistical measures. We illustrate the computational power of RDE-CN approach by time series by both the logistic map and experimental fluid flows, which show that our method distinguishes different dynamics sufficiently well as the traditional recurrence analysis. Therefore, the proposed methodology characterizes the recurrence matrix adequately, while using a reduced set of points from the original recurrence plots.

  14. Multiscale time-dependent density functional theory: Demonstration for plasmons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jiajian; Abi Mansour, Andrew; Ortoleva, Peter J

    2017-08-07

    Plasmon properties are of significant interest in pure and applied nanoscience. While time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) can be used to study plasmons, it becomes impractical for elucidating the effect of size, geometric arrangement, and dimensionality in complex nanosystems. In this study, a new multiscale formalism that addresses this challenge is proposed. This formalism is based on Trotter factorization and the explicit introduction of a coarse-grained (CG) structure function constructed as the Weierstrass transform of the electron wavefunction. This CG structure function is shown to vary on a time scale much longer than that of the latter. A multiscale propagator that coevolves both the CG structure function and the electron wavefunction is shown to bring substantial efficiency over classical propagators used in TDDFT. This efficiency follows from the enhanced numerical stability of the multiscale method and the consequence of larger time steps that can be used in a discrete time evolution. The multiscale algorithm is demonstrated for plasmons in a group of interacting sodium nanoparticles (15-240 atoms), and it achieves improved efficiency over TDDFT without significant loss of accuracy or space-time resolution.

  15. Applications of electron density studies in molecular and solid state science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    of electron density studies in connection with the UN declared International Year of Crystallography in 2014. In addition, a number of reviews on the method have very recently appeared showing that the time is ripe to look back on the achievements of the last 10 years and also to look ahead to see where...... to the technical developments driven not least by the efforts from large commercial manufacturers such as Bruker AXS and Agilent Technologies. It is also not unwarranted to claim that the electron density community is a driving force in this technological improvement as it is essential to push these instruments...

  16. Energy density of a dissipative polarizable solid by a Lagrangean formalism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Englman, R.; Yahalom, A.

    2003-01-01

    A Lagrangean for the dynamics of an electromagnetic field in a dispersive and dissipative material is constructed (adapting some ideas by Bekenstein and Hannay) and an expression for the energy density that is positive is obtained from it. The expression contains extra (sink) degrees of freedom that represent dissipating modes. In simplified cases the sink modes can be eliminated to yield an energy density expression in terms of the electromagnetic fields, the polarization and the magnetization only, but which contains parameters associated with the sink modes. The method of adding extra modes can be used to set up a Lagrangean formalism for dissipative systems in general, such that will reinstate time-translation invariance and will yield a unique energy density

  17. Relaxation Time of High-Density Amorphous Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handle, Philip H.; Seidl, Markus; Loerting, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    Amorphous water plays a fundamental role in astrophysics, cryoelectron microscopy, hydration of matter, and our understanding of anomalous liquid water properties. Yet, the characteristics of the relaxation processes taking place in high-density amorphous ice (HDA) are unknown. We here reveal that the relaxation processes in HDA at 110-135 K at 0.1-0.2 GPa are of collective and global nature, resembling the alpha relaxation in glassy material. Measured relaxation times suggest liquid-like relaxation characteristics in the vicinity of the crystallization temperature at 145 K. By carefully relaxing pressurized HDA for several hours at 135 K, we produce a state that is closer to the ideal glass state than all HDA states discussed so far in literature.

  18. Time-dependent quantum fluid density functional theory of hydrogen ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    density functional theory; quantum fluid dynamics. 1. Introduction ... dynamics of strongly non-linear interaction of atoms with intense ... theory and quantum fluid dynamics in real space. .... clear evidence of bond softening since density in the.

  19. Bone Mineral 31P and Matrix-Bound Water Densities Measured by Solid-State 1H and 31P MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Alan C.; Li, Cheng; Rajapakse, Chamith S.; Bashoor- Zadeh, Mahdieh; Bhagat, Yusuf A.; Wright, Alexander C.; Zemel, Babette S.; Zavaliangos, Antonios; Wehrli, Felix W.

    2014-01-01

    Bone is a composite material consisting of mineral and hydrated collagen fractions. MRI of bone is challenging due to extremely short transverse relaxation times, but solid-state imaging sequences exist that can acquire the short-lived signal from bone tissue. Previous work to quantify bone density via MRI used powerful experimental scanners. This work seeks to establish the feasibility of MRI-based measurement on clinical scanners of bone mineral and collagen-bound water densities, the latter as a surrogate of matrix density, and to examine the associations of these parameters with porosity and donors’ age. Mineral and matrix-bound water images of reference phantoms and cortical bone from 16 human donors, ages 27-97 years, were acquired by zero-echo-time 31P and 1H MRI on whole body 7T and 3T scanners, respectively. Images were corrected for relaxation and RF inhomogeneity to obtain density maps. Cortical porosity was measured by micro-CT, and apparent mineral density by pQCT. MRI-derived densities were compared to x-ray-based measurements by least-squares regression. Mean bone mineral 31P density was 6.74±1.22 mol/L (corresponding to 1129±204 mg/cc mineral), and mean bound water 1H density was 31.3±4.2 mol/L (corresponding to 28.3±3.7 %v/v). Both 31P and bound water (BW) densities were correlated negatively with porosity (31P: R2 = 0.32, p bone mineralization ratio (expressed here as the ratio of 31P density to bound water density), which is proportional to true bone mineralization, was found to be uncorrelated with porosity, age, or pQCT density. This work establishes the feasibility of image-based quantification of bone mineral and bound water densities using clinical hardware. PMID:24846186

  20. First Solid Evidence for a Rocky Exoplanet - Mass and density of smallest exoplanet finally measured

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    The longest set of HARPS measurements ever made has firmly established the nature of the smallest and fastest-orbiting exoplanet known, CoRoT-7b, revealing its mass as five times that of Earth's. Combined with CoRoT-7b's known radius, which is less than twice that of our terrestrial home, this tells us that the exoplanet's density is quite similar to the Earth's, suggesting a solid, rocky world. The extensive dataset also reveals the presence of another so-called super-Earth in this alien solar system. "This is science at its thrilling and amazing best," says Didier Queloz, leader of the team that made the observations. "We did everything we could to learn what the object discovered by the CoRoT satellite looks like and we found a unique system." In February 2009, the discovery by the CoRoT satellite [1] of a small exoplanet around a rather unremarkable star named TYC 4799-1733-1 was announced one year after its detection and after several months of painstaking measurements with many telescopes on the ground, including several from ESO. The star, now known as CoRoT-7, is located towards the constellation of Monoceros (the Unicorn) at a distance of about 500 light-years. Slightly smaller and cooler than our Sun, CoRoT-7 is also thought to be younger, with an age of about 1.5 billion years. Every 20.4 hours, the planet eclipses a small fraction of the light of the star for a little over one hour by one part in 3000 [2]. This planet, designated CoRoT-7b, is only 2.5 million kilometres away from its host star, or 23 times closer than Mercury is to the Sun. It has a radius that is about 80% greater than the Earth's. The initial set of measurements, however, could not provide the mass of the exoplanet. Such a result requires extremely precise measurements of the velocity of the star, which is pulled a tiny amount by the gravitational tug of the orbiting exoplanet. The problem with CoRoT-7b is that these tiny signals are blurred by stellar activity in the form of

  1. Globally-Optimized Local Pseudopotentials for (Orbital-Free) Density Functional Theory Simulations of Liquids and Solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rio, Beatriz G; Dieterich, Johannes M; Carter, Emily A

    2017-08-08

    The accuracy of local pseudopotentials (LPSs) is one of two major determinants of the fidelity of orbital-free density functional theory (OFDFT) simulations. We present a global optimization strategy for LPSs that enables OFDFT to reproduce solid and liquid properties obtained from Kohn-Sham DFT. Our optimization strategy can fit arbitrary properties from both solid and liquid phases, so the resulting globally optimized local pseudopotentials (goLPSs) can be used in solid and/or liquid-phase simulations depending on the fitting process. We show three test cases proving that we can (1) improve solid properties compared to our previous bulk-derived local pseudopotential generation scheme; (2) refine predicted liquid and solid properties by adding force matching data; and (3) generate a from-scratch, accurate goLPS from the local channel of a non-local pseudopotential. The proposed scheme therefore serves as a full and improved LPS construction protocol.

  2. Control-oriented modeling of the plasma particle density in tokamaks and application to real-time density profile reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanken, T.C.; Felici, F.; Rapson, C.J.; de Baar, M.R.; Heemels, W.P.M.H.

    2018-01-01

    A model-based approach to real-time reconstruction of the particle density profile in tokamak plasmas is presented, based on a dynamic state estimator. Traditionally, the density profile is reconstructed in real-time by solving an ill-conditioned inversion problem using a measurement at a single

  3. Effect of coating density on oxidation resistance and Cr vaporization from solid oxide fuel cell interconnects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Talic, Belma; Falk-Windisch, Hannes; Venkatachalam, Vinothini

    2017-01-01

    •Protective action of dense and porous spinel coatings on Crofer 22 APU was compared. •Reduction and re-oxidation produces denser coatings than heat treating in air only. •Coating density has minor influence on oxidation resistance at 800 °C in air. •Dense coating resulted in three times lower Cr...... evaporation rate than porous coating....

  4. Quantum Drude friction for time-dependent density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhauser, Daniel; Lopata, Kenneth

    2008-10-01

    way to very simple finite grid description of scattering and multistage conductance using time-dependent density functional theory away from the linear regime, just as absorbing potentials and self-energies are useful for noninteracting systems and leads.

  5. Adsorption of short-chain fluids at solid substrates from density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryk, P.; Bucior, K.; Sokolowski, S.; Zukocinski, G.

    2005-01-01

    We use microscopic density functional theory to investigate the adsorption of short-chains at solid surfaces. The fluid is modeled as freely-jointed tangent spheres that interact via a short-ranged attractive potential. Within the framework of fundamental measure theory we study how the structure and surface phase behaviour of adsorbed fluid changes when the chain length is increased. We observe that the wetting temperature rescaled by the bulk critical temperature decreases with an increase of the chain length. For longer chains this temperature reaches a plateau. For the surface critical temperature an inverse effect is observed, i.e. the surface critical temperature increases with the chain length and then attains a plateau. Furthermore, we analyze how the layering transitions change with the change of the chain length and with relative strength of the fluid-solid interaction. The critical temperature of the first layering transition, rescaled by the bulk critical temperature increases slightly with an increase of the chain length. We have found that for longer chains the layering transitions within consecutive layers are shifted towards very low temperatures and that their sequence is finally replaced by a single transition. Finally we investigate capillary condensation of chain fluid in slit-like pores. We find that for a fluid of chains consisting of a larger number of segments we observe an inversion effect. Namely, the critical temperature of capillary condensation decreases with increasing pore width for a certain interval of values of the pore width. This anomalous behavior is also influenced by the interaction between molecules and pore walls. (author)

  6. A new approach to determine the density of liquids and solids without measuring mass and volume: introducing the solidensimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiriktaş, Halit; Şahin, Mehmet; Eslek, Sinan; Kiriktaş, İrem

    2018-05-01

    This study aims to design a mechanism with which the density of any solid or liquid can be determined without measuring its mass and volume in order to help students comprehend the concept of density more easily. The solidensimeter comprises of two scaled and nested glass containers (graduated cylinder or beaker) and sufficient water. In this method, the density measurement was made using the Archimedes’ principle stating that an object fully submerged in a liquid displaces the same amount of liquid as its volume, while an object partially submerged or floating displaces the same amount of liquid as its mass. Using this method, the density of any solids or liquids can be determined using a simple mathematical ratio. At the end of the process a mechanism that helps students to comprehend the density topic more easily was designed. The system is easy-to-design, uses low-cost equipment and enables one to determine the density of any solid or liquid without measuring its mass and volume.

  7. Intensity-dependent resonant transmission of x-rays in solid-density aluminum plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, M. S.; Chung, H.-K.; Cho, B. I.

    2018-05-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) provide unique opportunities to generate and investigate dense plasmas. The absorption and transmission properties of x-ray photons in dense plasmas are important in characterizing the state of the plasmas. Experimental evidence shows that the transmission of x-ray photons through dense plasmas depends greatly on the incident XFEL intensity. Here, we present a detailed analysis of intensity-dependent x-ray transmission in solid-density aluminum using collisional-radiative population kinetics calculations. Reverse saturable absorption (RSA), i.e., an increase in x-ray absorption with intensity has been observed for photon energies below the K-absorption edge and in the intensity range of 1016-1017 W/cm2 for XFEL photons with 1487 eV. At higher intensities, a transition from RSA to saturable absorption (SA) is predicted; thus, the x-ray absorption decreases with intensity above a threshold value. For XFEL photon energies of 1501 eV and 1515 eV, the transition from RSA to SA occurs at XFEL intensities between 1017-1018 W/cm2. Electron temperatures are predicted to be in the range of 30-50 eV for the given experimental conditions. Detailed population kinetics of the charge states explains the intensity-dependent absorption of x-ray photons and the fast modulation of XFEL pulses for both RSA and SA.

  8. Effect of argon implantation on solid-state dewetting: control of size and surface density of silicon nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almadori, Y; Borowik, Ł; Chevalier, N; Barbé, J-C

    2017-01-27

    Thermally induced solid-state dewetting of ultra-thin films on insulators is a process of prime interest, since it is capable of easily forming nanocrystals. If no particular treatment is performed to the film prior to the solid-state dewetting, it is already known that the size, the shape and the density of nanocrystals is governed by the initial film thickness. In this paper, we report a novel approach to control the size and the surface density of silicon nanocrystals based on an argon-implantation preliminary surface treatment. Using 7.5 nm thin layers of silicon, we show that increasing the implantation dose tends to form smaller silicon nanocrystals with diameter and height lower than 50 nm and 30 nm, respectively. Concomitantly, the surface density is increased by a factor greater than 20, going from 5 μm -2 to values over 100 μm -2 .

  9. Numerical generalized vibration density of states evaluation for inelastic neutron scattering in solid matter

    CERN Document Server

    Kazmianec, V; Aranghel, D

    2002-01-01

    A computational method for improved evaluation of the generalized vibration density of states (GVDS) is proposed. It is based on Fast Fourier Transform (FPT) technique and gives the possibility for more precise analyses of the neutron double differential scattering cross section. The method was applied to zirconium hydride investigation. The results were presented for ZrH sub 1 sub . sub 6 U sub 0 sub . sub 3 sub 2 sample at various temperatures on time-of-flight (TOF) Spectrometry at IBR-2 reactor of JINR-Dubna and were compared to GVDS values obtained by traditional single-phonon approximation method

  10. Long time-scale density peaking in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartori, R.; Saibene, G.; Becoulet, M.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses how the proximity to the L-H threshold affects the confinement of ELMy H-modes at high density. The largest reduction in confinement at high density is observed at the transition from the Type I to the Type III ELMy regime. At medium plasma triangularity, δ≅0.3 (where δ is the average triangularity at the separatrix), JET experiments show that, by increasing the margin above the L-H threshold power and maintaining the edge temperature above the critical temperature for the transition to Type III ELMs, it is possible to avoid the degradation of the pedestal pressure with density, normally observed at lower power. As a result, the range of achievable densities (both in the core and in the pedestal) is increased. At high power above the L-H threshold power the core density was equal to the Greenwald limit with H97≅0.9. There is evidence that a mixed regime of Type I and Type II ELMs has been obtained at this intermediate triangularity, possibly as a result of this increase in density. At higher triangularity, δ≅0.5, the power required to achieve similar results is lower. (author)

  11. Thermal characterizations of the paraffin wax/low density polyethylene blends as a solid fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Soojong; Moon, Heejang; Kim, Jinkon, E-mail: jkkim@kau.ac.kr

    2015-08-10

    Highlights: • Regression rate of blends fuel is higher than polymer fuel. • LDPE is an effective mixing ingredient for the combustion efficiency. • Blends fuel is a uniform mixture with two degradation steps. • LDPE plays a positive role for the low sensitivity to the thermal deformation • Blends with low LDPE content can be an effective fuel for hybrid rocket application. - Abstract: Thermal characterizations of a novel solid fuel for hybrid rocket application, based on the paraffin wax blends with low density polyethylene (LDPE) concentration of 5% (SF-5) and 10% (SF-10) were conducted. Both the increased regression rate in comparison with the polymeric fuel, and the improved combustion efficiency in comparison with the pure paraffin fuel reveal that the blend fuels achieve higher combustion performance. The morphology of the shape stabilized paraffin wax/LDPE blends was characterized by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Although the SEM observation indicated the blends have uniform mixtures, they showed two degradation steps confirming the immiscibility of components in the crystalline phase from thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) results showed that the melting temperature of LDPE in the blends decreased with an increase of paraffin wax content. The decreasing total specific melting enthalpy of blended fuels with decreasing paraffin wax content is in fairly good agreement with the additive rule. In thermomechanical analysis (TMA), the linear coefficient of thermal expansion (LCTE) seems to decrease with an increase of LDPE loading, however, the loaded LDPE do merely affect the LCTE in case of the blends with low LDPE concentration. It was found that a blend of low concentration of LDPE with a relatively high concentration of paraffin wax can lead to a potential novel fuel for rocket application, a contrary case with respect to the field of phase change materials (PCM) where a blend of high concentration

  12. Thermal characterizations of the paraffin wax/low density polyethylene blends as a solid fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soojong; Moon, Heejang; Kim, Jinkon

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Regression rate of blends fuel is higher than polymer fuel. • LDPE is an effective mixing ingredient for the combustion efficiency. • Blends fuel is a uniform mixture with two degradation steps. • LDPE plays a positive role for the low sensitivity to the thermal deformation • Blends with low LDPE content can be an effective fuel for hybrid rocket application. - Abstract: Thermal characterizations of a novel solid fuel for hybrid rocket application, based on the paraffin wax blends with low density polyethylene (LDPE) concentration of 5% (SF-5) and 10% (SF-10) were conducted. Both the increased regression rate in comparison with the polymeric fuel, and the improved combustion efficiency in comparison with the pure paraffin fuel reveal that the blend fuels achieve higher combustion performance. The morphology of the shape stabilized paraffin wax/LDPE blends was characterized by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Although the SEM observation indicated the blends have uniform mixtures, they showed two degradation steps confirming the immiscibility of components in the crystalline phase from thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) results showed that the melting temperature of LDPE in the blends decreased with an increase of paraffin wax content. The decreasing total specific melting enthalpy of blended fuels with decreasing paraffin wax content is in fairly good agreement with the additive rule. In thermomechanical analysis (TMA), the linear coefficient of thermal expansion (LCTE) seems to decrease with an increase of LDPE loading, however, the loaded LDPE do merely affect the LCTE in case of the blends with low LDPE concentration. It was found that a blend of low concentration of LDPE with a relatively high concentration of paraffin wax can lead to a potential novel fuel for rocket application, a contrary case with respect to the field of phase change materials (PCM) where a blend of high concentration

  13. High-Density Near-Field Readout Using Solid Immersion Lens Made of KTaO3 Monocrystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, Masataka; Saito, Kimihiro; Kondo, Takao; Furuki, Motohiro; Takeda, Minoru; Nakaoki, Ariyoshi; Sasaura, Masahiro; Fujiura, Kazuo

    2006-02-01

    We developed solid immersion lenses made of a KTaO3 monocrystal. The refractive index of KTaO3 is 2.382 at a wavelength of 405 nm. Using KTaO3 as the raw material of a solid immersion lens, we could design an effective numerical aperture of 2.20. We observed an eye pattern of a 150 GB capacity with a 130 nm track pitch and a 47.6 nm bit length. The areal density is 104.3 Gbit/in.2.

  14. Density functional and theoretical study of the temperature and pressure dependency of the plasmon energy of solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attarian Shandiz, M.; Gauvin, R.

    2014-01-01

    The temperature and pressure dependency of the volume plasmon energy of solids was investigated by density functional theory calculations. The volume change of crystal is the major factor responsible for the variation of valence electron density and plasmon energy in the free electron model. Hence, to introduce the effect of temperature and pressure for the density functional theory calculations of plasmon energy, the temperature and pressure dependency of lattice parameter was used. Also, by combination of the free electron model and the equation of state based on the pseudo-spinodal approach, the temperature and pressure dependency of the plasmon energy was modeled. The suggested model is in good agreement with the results of density functional theory calculations and available experimental data for elements with the free electron behavior.

  15. Time-resolved shock compression of porous rutile: Wave dispersion in porous solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, M.U.; Graham, R.A.; Holman, G.T.

    1993-08-01

    Rutile (TiO{sub 2}) samples at 60% of solid density have been shock-loaded from 0.21 to 6.1 GPa with sample thickness of 4 mm and studied with the PVDF piezoelectric polymer stress-rate gauge. The technique uses a copper capsule to contain the sample which has PVDF gauge packages in direct contact with front and rear surfaces. A precise measure is made of the compressive stress wave velocity through the sample, as well as the input and propagated shock stress. Initial density is known from sample preparation, and the amount of shock-compression is calculated from the measurement of shock velocity and input stress. Shock states and re-shock states are measured. Observed data are consistent with previously published high pressure data. It is observed that rutile has a ``crush strength`` near 6 GPa. Propagated stress-pulse rise times vary from 234 to 916 nsec. Propagated stress-pulse rise times of shock-compressed HMX, 2Al + Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 3Ni + Al, and 5Ti + 3Si are presented.

  16. Thermal expansion and density measurements of molten and solid materials at high temperatures by the gamma attenuation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drotning, W.D.

    1979-05-01

    An apparatus is described for the measurement of the density and thermal expansion of molten materials to 3200 0 K using the gamma attenuation technique. The precision of the experimental technique was analytically examined for both absolute and relative density determinations. Three analytical expressions used to reduce data for liquid density determinations were evaluated for their precision. Each allows use of a different set of input data parameters, which can be chosen based on experimental considerations. Using experimentally reasonable values for the precision of the parameters yields a similar resultant density precision from the three methods, on the order of 0.2%. The analytical method for measurements of the linear thermal expansion of solids by the gamma method is also described. To demonstrate the use of the technique on reasonably well-characterized systems, data are presented for (1) the density and thermal expansion of molten tin, lead, and aluminum to 1300 0 K, (2) the thermal expansion of solid aluminum to the melting point, and (3) the thermal expansion of a low melting point glass through the transition temperature and melting region. The data agree very well with published results using other methods where such published data exist

  17. Controlled functionalization of carbonaceous fibers for asymmetric solid-state micro-supercapacitors with high volumetric energy density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dingshan; Goh, Kunli; Zhang, Qiang; Wei, Li; Wang, Hong; Jiang, Wenchao; Chen, Yuan

    2014-10-22

    A 1.8 V asymmetric solid-state flexible micro-supercapacitor is designed with one MnO2 -coated reduced graphene oxide/single-walled carbon nanotube (rGO/SWCNT) composite fiber as positive electrode and one nitrogen-doped rGO/SWCNT fiber as negative electrode, which demonstrates ultrahigh volumetric energy density, comparable to some thin-film lithium batteries, along with high power density, long cycle life, and good flexibility. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. High-Density Near-Field Readout over 50 GB Capacity Using Solid Immersion Lens with High Refractive Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, Masataka; Saito, Kimihiro; Kondo, Takao; Ishimoto, Tsutomu; Nakaoki, Ariyoshi

    2003-02-01

    We have investigated high-density near-field readout using a solid immersion lens with a high refractive index. By using a glass material with a high refractive index of 2.08, we developed an optical pick-up with the effective numerical aperture of 1.8. We could observe a clear eye pattern for a 50 GB capacity disc in 120 mm diameter. We confirmed that the near-field readout system is promising method of realizing a high-density optical disc system.

  19. Density of Ni-Al Alloys in Liquid and Solid-Liquid Coexistence State Measured by a Modified Pycnometric Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang FANG; Feng XIAO; Zushu LI; Zainan TAO

    2004-01-01

    The density of Ni-Al alloys in both liquid state and solid-liquid coexistence state was measured with a modified pycnometric method. It was found that the density of NI-Al alloys decreases with increasing temperature and Al concentration in the alloys. The molar volume of liquid Ni-Al binary alloys increases with the increase of temperature and Al concentration. The partial molar volume of Al in NI-Al binary alloy was calculated approximately. The molar volume of liquid NI-Al alloy determined in the present work shows a negative deviation from the ideal linear molar volume.

  20. Application of nuclear techniques to the measurement of rock density and transport of solid particles suspended in rivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seddiki, A.

    1984-10-01

    In order to better understand hydron phenomens in semi-arid regions characterized by torrential rains, we measured solid particles suspended to dums and in rivers. We also determined the density profile of a drilling and density of saline solutions. We designed an automatic nuclear gauge used for measuring the concentration of particles suspended to rivers. The installation, calibration and operations of a LABEN gauge were done in BENI SLIMANE on the 27th and 28th of February, 1984. The first results we obtained were received on the 24th of April, 1984

  1. On the radiometric measurement of the density distribution occuring at the horizontal hydraulic transport of solid matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goedde, E.; Weber, M.

    1977-01-01

    In order to estimate the phenomena of the flow in horizontal hydraulic transport of solid matter, measuring the density structure along the vertical pipe diameter is of vital interest for basic investigations. The measurement technology in mixed flows of solid matter and water is very difficult and therefore only few publications on characteristic flow profiles in horizontal pipes are known. In a research programme advanced by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft investigations were made on the possibility to measure the density profile by means of plain measuring equipment based upon radiometrics. In this paper a combination of a nuclear radiometric polar and parallel scanning method is shown to be suitable for this kind of measurements. (orig.) [de

  2. Examining real-time time-dependent density functional theory nonequilibrium simulations for the calculation of electronic stopping power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, Dillon C.; Yao, Yi; Kanai, Yosuke

    2017-09-01

    In ion irradiation processes, electronic stopping power describes the energy transfer rate from the irradiating ion to the target material's electrons. Due to the scarcity and significant uncertainties in experimental electronic stopping power data for materials beyond simple solids, there has been growing interest in the use of first-principles theory for calculating electronic stopping power. In recent years, advances in high-performance computing have opened the door to fully first-principles nonequilibrium simulations based on real-time time-dependent density functional theory (RT-TDDFT). While it has been demonstrated that the RT-TDDFT approach is capable of predicting electronic stopping power for a wide range of condensed matter systems, there has yet to be an exhaustive examination of the physical and numerical approximations involved and their effects on the calculated stopping power. We discuss the results of such a study for crystalline silicon with protons as irradiating ions. We examine the influences of key approximations in RT-TDDFT nonequilibrium simulations on the calculated electronic stopping power, including approximations related to basis sets, finite size effects, exchange-correlation approximation, pseudopotentials, and more. Finally, we propose a simple and efficient correction scheme to account for the contribution from core-electron excitations to the stopping power, as it was found to be significant for large proton velocities.

  3. Achieving High-Energy-High-Power Density in a Flexible Quasi-Solid-State Sodium Ion Capacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongsen; Peng, Lele; Zhu, Yue; Zhang, Xiaogang; Yu, Guihua

    2016-09-14

    Simultaneous integration of high-energy output with high-power delivery is a major challenge for electrochemical energy storage systems, limiting dual fine attributes on a device. We introduce a quasi-solid-state sodium ion capacitor (NIC) based on a battery type urchin-like Na2Ti3O7 anode and a capacitor type peanut shell derived carbon cathode, using a sodium ion conducting gel polymer as electrolyte, achieving high-energy-high-power characteristics in solid state. Energy densities can reach 111.2 Wh kg(-1) at power density of 800 W kg(-1), and 33.2 Wh kg(-1) at power density of 11200 W kg(-1), which are among the best reported state-of-the-art NICs. The designed device also exhibits long-term cycling stability over 3000 cycles with capacity retention ∼86%. Furthermore, we demonstrate the assembly of a highly flexible quasi-solid-state NIC and it shows no obvious capacity loss under different bending conditions.

  4. Biredox ionic liquids with solid-like redox density in the liquid state for high-energy supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourad, Eléonore; Coustan, Laura; Lannelongue, Pierre; Zigah, Dodzi; Mehdi, Ahmad; Vioux, André; Freunberger, Stefan A; Favier, Frédéric; Fontaine, Olivier

    2017-04-01

    Kinetics of electrochemical reactions are several orders of magnitude slower in solids than in liquids as a result of the much lower ion diffusivity. Yet, the solid state maximizes the density of redox species, which is at least two orders of magnitude lower in liquids because of solubility limitations. With regard to electrochemical energy storage devices, this leads to high-energy batteries with limited power and high-power supercapacitors with a well-known energy deficiency. For such devices the ideal system should endow the liquid state with a density of redox species close to the solid state. Here we report an approach based on biredox ionic liquids to achieve bulk-like redox density at liquid-like fast kinetics. The cation and anion of these biredox ionic liquids bear moieties that undergo very fast reversible redox reactions. As a first demonstration of their potential for high-capacity/high-rate charge storage, we used them in redox supercapacitors. These ionic liquids are able to decouple charge storage from an ion-accessible electrode surface, by storing significant charge in the pores of the electrodes, to minimize self-discharge and leakage current as a result of retaining the redox species in the pores, and to raise working voltage due to their wide electrochemical window.

  5. Double Lacunary Density and Some Inclusion Results in Locally Solid Riesz Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Mohiuddine

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We define the notions of double statistically convergent and double lacunary statistically convergent sequences in locally solid Riesz space and establish some inclusion relations between them. We also prove an extension of a decomposition theorem in this setup. Further, we introduce the concepts of double θ-summable and double statistically lacunary summable in locally solid Riesz space and establish a relationship between these notions.

  6. Time-dependent density-functional tight-binding method with the third-order expansion of electron density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, Yoshio

    2015-09-07

    We develop a formalism for the calculation of excitation energies and excited state gradients for the self-consistent-charge density-functional tight-binding method with the third-order contributions of a Taylor series of the density functional theory energy with respect to the fluctuation of electron density (time-dependent density-functional tight-binding (TD-DFTB3)). The formulation of the excitation energy is based on the existing time-dependent density functional theory and the older TD-DFTB2 formulae. The analytical gradient is computed by solving Z-vector equations, and it requires one to calculate the third-order derivative of the total energy with respect to density matrix elements due to the inclusion of the third-order contributions. The comparison of adiabatic excitation energies for selected small and medium-size molecules using the TD-DFTB2 and TD-DFTB3 methods shows that the inclusion of the third-order contributions does not affect excitation energies significantly. A different set of parameters, which are optimized for DFTB3, slightly improves the prediction of adiabatic excitation energies statistically. The application of TD-DFTB for the prediction of absorption and fluorescence energies of cresyl violet demonstrates that TD-DFTB3 reproduced the experimental fluorescence energy quite well.

  7. Correlating defect density with growth time in continuous graphene films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Cheong; Jung, Da Hee; Nam, Ji Eun; Lee, Jin Seok

    2014-12-01

    We report that graphene flakes and films which were synthesized by copper-catalyzed atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) method using a mixture of Ar, H2, and CH4 gases. It was found that variations in the reaction parameters, such as reaction temperature, annealing time, and growth time, influenced the domain size of as-grown graphene. Besides, the reaction parameters influenced the number of layers, degree of defects and uniformity of the graphene films. The increase in growth temperature and annealing time tends to accelerate the graphene growth rate and increase the diffusion length, respectively, thereby increasing the average size of graphene domains. In addition, we confirmed that the number of pinholes reduced with increase in the growth time. Micro-Raman analysis of the as-grown graphene films confirmed that the continuous graphene monolayer film with low defects and high uniformity could be obtained with prolonged reaction time, under the appropriate annealing time and growth temperature.

  8. Carbon deposition thresholds on nickel-based solid oxide fuel cell anodes II. Steam:carbon ratio and current density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, J.; Kesler, O.

    2015-03-01

    For the second part of a two part publication, coking thresholds with respect to molar steam:carbon ratio (SC) and current density in nickel-based solid oxide fuel cells were determined. Anode-supported button cell samples were exposed to 2-component and 5-component gas mixtures with 1 ≤ SC ≤ 2 and zero fuel utilization for 10 h, followed by measurement of the resulting carbon mass. The effect of current density was explored by measuring carbon mass under conditions known to be prone to coking while increasing the current density until the cell was carbon-free. The SC coking thresholds were measured to be ∼1.04 and ∼1.18 at 600 and 700 °C, respectively. Current density experiments validated the thresholds measured with respect to fuel utilization and steam:carbon ratio. Coking thresholds at 600 °C could be predicted with thermodynamic equilibrium calculations when the Gibbs free energy of carbon was appropriately modified. Here, the Gibbs free energy of carbon on nickel-based anode support cermets was measured to be -6.91 ± 0.08 kJ mol-1. The results of this two part publication show that thermodynamic equilibrium calculations with appropriate modification to the Gibbs free energy of solid-phase carbon can be used to predict coking thresholds on nickel-based anodes at 600-700 °C.

  9. THE EFFECTS OF EXPERIMENTAL CONDITIONS ON THE REFRACTIVE INDEX AND DENSITY OF LOW-TEMPERATURE ICES: SOLID CARBON DIOXIDE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Moore, M. H.; Gerakines, P. A. [Astrochemistry Laboratory, Code 691, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-08-20

    We present the first study on the effects of the deposition technique on the measurements of the visible refractive index and the density of a low-temperature ice using solid carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) at 14–70 K as an example. While our measurements generally agree with previous studies that show a dependence of index and density on temperature below 50 K, we also find that the measured values depend on the method used to create each sample. Below 50 K, we find that the refractive index varied by as much as 4% and the density by as much as 16% at a single temperature depending on the deposition method. We also show that the Lorentz–Lorenz approximation is valid for solid CO{sub 2} across the full 14–70 K temperature range, regardless of the deposition method used. Since the refractive index and density are important in calculations of optical constants and infrared (IR) band strengths of materials, our results suggest that the deposition method must be considered in cases where n {sub vis} and ρ are not measured in the same experimental setup where the IR spectral measurements are made.

  10. The Effects of Experimental Conditions on the Refractive Index and Density of Low-Temperature Ices: Solid Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Moore, M. H.; Gerakines, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    We present the first study on the effects of the deposition technique on the measurements of the visible refractive index and the density of a low-temperature ice using solid carbon dioxide (CO2) at 14-70 K as an example. While our measurements generally agree with previous studies that show a dependence of index and density on temperature below 50 K, we also find that the measured values depend on the method used to create each sample. Below 50 K, we find that the refractive index varied by as much as 4% and the density by as much as 16% at a single temperature depending on the deposition method. We also show that the Lorentz-Lorenz approximation is valid for solid CO2 across the full 14-70 K temperature range, regardless of the deposition method used. Since the refractive index and density are important in calculations of optical constants and infrared (IR) band strengths of materials, our results suggest that the deposition method must be considered in cases where nvis and ? are not measured in the same experimental setup where the IR spectral measurements are made.

  11. Exponential integrators in time-dependent density-functional calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Daniel; Covington, Cody; Varga, Kálmán

    2017-12-01

    The integrating factor and exponential time differencing methods are implemented and tested for solving the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equations. Popular time propagation methods used in physics, as well as other robust numerical approaches, are compared to these exponential integrator methods in order to judge the relative merit of the computational schemes. We determine an improvement in accuracy of multiple orders of magnitude when describing dynamics driven primarily by a nonlinear potential. For cases of dynamics driven by a time-dependent external potential, the accuracy of the exponential integrator methods are less enhanced but still match or outperform the best of the conventional methods tested.

  12. Real time, high resolution studies of protein adsorption and structure at the solid-liquid interface using dual polarization interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, Neville J; Peel, Louise L; Swann, Marcus J; Cross, Graham H; Reeves, Andrew; Brand, Stuart; Lu, Jian R

    2004-01-01

    A novel method for the analysis of thin biological films, called dual polarization interferometry (DPI), is described. This high resolution (<1 A), laboratory-based technique allows the thickness and refractive index (density) of biological molecules adsorbing or reacting at the solid-liquid interface to be measured in real time (up to 10 measurements per second). Results from the adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on to a silicon oxynitride chip surface are presented to demonstrate how time dependent molecular behaviour can be examined using DPI. Mechanistic and structural information relating to the adsorption process is obtained as a function of the solution pH

  13. The effect of Agrobacterium densities and inoculation times on gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    2014-06-04

    Jun 4, 2014 ... rubber tree, genetic improvement has been very slow and time-consuming as the ..... Expression of human serum albumin in transgenic Hevea ... Identification of expression profiles of tapping panel dryness (TPD) associated ...

  14. 2007 Time_Dependent Density-Functional Therory (July 15-20, 2007 Colby College, Maine)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullrich Carsten

    2008-09-19

    Time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) provides an efficient, elegant, and formally exact way of describing the dynamics of interacting many-body quantum systems, circumventing the need for solving the full time-dependent Schroedinger equation. In the 20 years since it was first rigorously established in 1984, the field of TDDFT has made rapid and significant advances both formally as well as in terms of successful applications in chemistry, physics and materials science. Today, TDDFT has become the method of choice for calculating excitation energies of complex molecules, and is becoming increasingly popular for describing optical and spectroscopic properties of a variety of materials such as bulk solids, clusters and nanostructures. Other growing areas of applications of TDDFT are nonlinear dynamics of strongly excited electronic systems and molecular electronics. The purpose and scope of this Gordon Research Conference is to provide a platform for discussing the current state of the art of the rapidly progressing, highly interdisciplinary field of TDDFT, to identify and debate open questions, and to point out new promising research directions. The conference will bring together experts with a diverse background in chemistry, physics, and materials science.

  15. Benchmarks for electronically excited states: Time-dependent density functional theory and density functional theory based multireference configuration interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva-Junior, Mario R.; Schreiber, Marko; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2008-01-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) and DFT-based multireference configuration interaction (DFT/MRCI) calculations are reported for a recently proposed benchmark set of 28 medium-sized organic molecules. Vertical excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and excited-state dipole...

  16. Estimation of energy density of Li-S batteries with liquid and solid electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunmei; Zhang, Heng; Otaegui, Laida; Singh, Gurpreet; Armand, Michel; Rodriguez-Martinez, Lide M.

    2016-09-01

    With the exponential growth of technology in mobile devices and the rapid expansion of electric vehicles into the market, it appears that the energy density of the state-of-the-art Li-ion batteries (LIBs) cannot satisfy the practical requirements. Sulfur has been one of the best cathode material choices due to its high charge storage (1675 mAh g-1), natural abundance and easy accessibility. In this paper, calculations are performed for different cell design parameters such as the active material loading, the amount/thickness of electrolyte, the sulfur utilization, etc. to predict the energy density of Li-S cells based on liquid, polymeric and ceramic electrolytes. It demonstrates that Li-S battery is most likely to be competitive in gravimetric energy density, but not volumetric energy density, with current technology, when comparing with LIBs. Furthermore, the cells with polymer and thin ceramic electrolytes show promising potential in terms of high gravimetric energy density, especially the cells with the polymer electrolyte. This estimation study of Li-S energy density can be used as a good guidance for controlling the key design parameters in order to get desirable energy density at cell-level.

  17. Time-frequency energy density precipitation method for time-of-flight extraction of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y., E-mail: thuzhangyu@foxmail.com; Huang, S. L., E-mail: huangsling@tsinghua.edu.cn; Wang, S.; Zhao, W. [State Key Laboratory of Power Systems, Department of Electrical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-05-15

    The time-of-flight of the Lamb wave provides an important basis for defect evaluation in metal plates and is the input signal for Lamb wave tomographic imaging. However, the time-of-flight can be difficult to acquire because of the Lamb wave dispersion characteristics. This work proposes a time-frequency energy density precipitation method to accurately extract the time-of-flight of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals in metal plates. In the proposed method, a discrete short-time Fourier transform is performed on the narrowband Lamb wave detection signals to obtain the corresponding discrete time-frequency energy density distribution. The energy density values at the center frequency for all discrete time points are then calculated by linear interpolation. Next, the time-domain energy density curve focused on that center frequency is precipitated by least squares fitting of the calculated energy density values. Finally, the peak times of the energy density curve obtained relative to the initial pulse signal are extracted as the time-of-flight for the narrowband Lamb wave detection signals. An experimental platform is established for time-of-flight extraction of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals, and sensitivity analysis of the proposed time-frequency energy density precipitation method is performed in terms of propagation distance, dispersion characteristics, center frequency, and plate thickness. For comparison, the widely used Hilbert–Huang transform method is also implemented for time-of-flight extraction. The results show that the time-frequency energy density precipitation method can accurately extract the time-of-flight with relative error of <1% and thus can act as a universal time-of-flight extraction method for narrowband Lamb wave detection signals.

  18. Time-frequency energy density precipitation method for time-of-flight extraction of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.; Huang, S. L.; Wang, S.; Zhao, W.

    2016-01-01

    The time-of-flight of the Lamb wave provides an important basis for defect evaluation in metal plates and is the input signal for Lamb wave tomographic imaging. However, the time-of-flight can be difficult to acquire because of the Lamb wave dispersion characteristics. This work proposes a time-frequency energy density precipitation method to accurately extract the time-of-flight of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals in metal plates. In the proposed method, a discrete short-time Fourier transform is performed on the narrowband Lamb wave detection signals to obtain the corresponding discrete time-frequency energy density distribution. The energy density values at the center frequency for all discrete time points are then calculated by linear interpolation. Next, the time-domain energy density curve focused on that center frequency is precipitated by least squares fitting of the calculated energy density values. Finally, the peak times of the energy density curve obtained relative to the initial pulse signal are extracted as the time-of-flight for the narrowband Lamb wave detection signals. An experimental platform is established for time-of-flight extraction of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals, and sensitivity analysis of the proposed time-frequency energy density precipitation method is performed in terms of propagation distance, dispersion characteristics, center frequency, and plate thickness. For comparison, the widely used Hilbert–Huang transform method is also implemented for time-of-flight extraction. The results show that the time-frequency energy density precipitation method can accurately extract the time-of-flight with relative error of <1% and thus can act as a universal time-of-flight extraction method for narrowband Lamb wave detection signals.

  19. Real-time feedback control of the plasma density profile on ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mlynek, A.; Reich, M.; Giannone, L.; Treutterer, W.; Behler, K.; Blank, H.; Buhler, A.; Cole, R.; Eixenberger, H.; Fischer, R.; Lohs, A.; Lueddecke, K.; Merkel, R.; Neu, G.; Ryter, F.; Zasche, D.

    2011-01-01

    The spatial distribution of density in a fusion experiment is of significant importance as it enters in numerous analyses and contributes to the fusion performance. The reconstruction of the density profile is therefore commonly done in offline data analysis. In this paper, we present an algorithm which allows for density profile reconstruction from the data of the submillimetre interferometer and the magnetic equilibrium in real-time. We compare the obtained results to the profiles yielded by a numerically more complex offline algorithm. Furthermore, we present recent ASDEX Upgrade experiments in which we used the real-time density profile for active feedback control of the shape of the density profile.

  20. Mobile Health in Solid Organ Transplant: The Time Is Now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, J N; Taber, D J; McElligott, J; McGillicuddy, J W; Treiber, F

    2017-09-01

    Despite being in existence for >40 years, the application of telemedicine has lagged significantly in comparison to its generated interest. Detractors include the immobile design of most historic telemedicine interventions and the relative lack of smartphones among the general populace. Recently, the exponential increase in smartphone ownership and familiarity have provided the potential for the development of mobile health (mHealth) interventions that can be mirrored realistically in clinical applications. Existing studies have demonstrated some potential clinical benefits of mHealth in the various phases of solid organ transplantation (SOT). Furthermore, studies in nontransplant chronic diseases may be used to guide future studies in SOT. Nevertheless, substantially more must be accomplished before mHealth becomes mainstream. Further evidence of clinical benefits and a critical need for cost-effectiveness analysis must prove its utility to patients, clinicians, hospitals, insurers, and the federal government. The SOT population is an ideal one in which to demonstrate the benefits of mHealth. In this review, the current evidence and status of mHealth in SOT is discussed, and a general path forward is presented that will allow buy-in from the health care community, insurers, and the federal government to move mHealth from research to standard care. © 2017 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  1. Joint Mapping of Mobility and Trap Density in Colloidal Quantum Dot Solids

    KAUST Repository

    Stadler, Philipp; Sutherland, Brandon R.; Ren, Yuan; Ning, Zhijun; Simchi, Arash; Thon, Susanna M.; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Sargent, Edward H.

    2013-01-01

    to be harnessed. Here, we deploy nanodielectric field-effect transistors to map the energy landscape within the band gap of a colloidal quantum dot solid. We exploit the self-limiting nature of the potentiostatic anodization growth mode to produce the thinnest

  2. Plasma density measurements on refuelling by solid hydrogen pellets in a rotating plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joergensen, L.W.; Sillesen, A.H.

    1978-01-01

    The refuelling of a plasma by solid hydrogen pellets situated in the plasma is investigated. Nearly half of the pellet material is evaporated and seems to be completely ionized, resulting in an increase of the amount of plasma equivalent to one third of the total amount of plasma without refuelling. The gross behaviour of the plasma is not changed. (author)

  3. Time-frequency energy density precipitation method for time-of-flight extraction of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Huang, S L; Wang, S; Zhao, W

    2016-05-01

    The time-of-flight of the Lamb wave provides an important basis for defect evaluation in metal plates and is the input signal for Lamb wave tomographic imaging. However, the time-of-flight can be difficult to acquire because of the Lamb wave dispersion characteristics. This work proposes a time-frequency energy density precipitation method to accurately extract the time-of-flight of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals in metal plates. In the proposed method, a discrete short-time Fourier transform is performed on the narrowband Lamb wave detection signals to obtain the corresponding discrete time-frequency energy density distribution. The energy density values at the center frequency for all discrete time points are then calculated by linear interpolation. Next, the time-domain energy density curve focused on that center frequency is precipitated by least squares fitting of the calculated energy density values. Finally, the peak times of the energy density curve obtained relative to the initial pulse signal are extracted as the time-of-flight for the narrowband Lamb wave detection signals. An experimental platform is established for time-of-flight extraction of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals, and sensitivity analysis of the proposed time-frequency energy density precipitation method is performed in terms of propagation distance, dispersion characteristics, center frequency, and plate thickness. For comparison, the widely used Hilbert-Huang transform method is also implemented for time-of-flight extraction. The results show that the time-frequency energy density precipitation method can accurately extract the time-of-flight with relative error of wave detection signals.

  4. Recent progress in predicting structural and electronic properties of organic solids with the van der Waals density functional

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Susumu; Okuma, Koji; Inaoka, Takeshi; Hamada, Ikutaro

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Review of theoretical studies on organic solids with the density-functional methods. • van der Waals (vdW)-inclusive methods to predict cohesive properties of oligoacenes. • A variant of the vdW density functional describes the structures accurately. • The molecular configuration and conformation crucially affects the band dispersion. - Abstract: We review recent studies on electronic properties of the organic solids with the first-principles electronic structure methods, with the emphasis on the roles of the intermolecular van der Waals (vdW) interaction in electronic properties of the organic semiconductors. After a brief summary of the recent vdW inclusive first-principle theoretical methods, we discuss their performance in predicting cohesive properties of oligoacene crystals as examples of organic crystals. We show that a variant of the van der Waals density functional describes structure and energetics of organic crystals accurately. In addition, we review our recent study on the zinc phthalocyanine crystal and discuss the importance of the intermolecular distance and orientational angle in the band dispersion. Finally, we draw some general conclusions and the future perspectives.

  5. Recent progress in predicting structural and electronic properties of organic solids with the van der Waals density functional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagisawa, Susumu, E-mail: shou@sci.u-ryukyu.ac.jp [Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of the Ryukyus, 1 Senbaru, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan); Okuma, Koji; Inaoka, Takeshi [Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of the Ryukyus, 1 Senbaru, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan); Hamada, Ikutaro, E-mail: Hamada.Ikutaro@nims.go.jp [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan)

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • Review of theoretical studies on organic solids with the density-functional methods. • van der Waals (vdW)-inclusive methods to predict cohesive properties of oligoacenes. • A variant of the vdW density functional describes the structures accurately. • The molecular configuration and conformation crucially affects the band dispersion. - Abstract: We review recent studies on electronic properties of the organic solids with the first-principles electronic structure methods, with the emphasis on the roles of the intermolecular van der Waals (vdW) interaction in electronic properties of the organic semiconductors. After a brief summary of the recent vdW inclusive first-principle theoretical methods, we discuss their performance in predicting cohesive properties of oligoacene crystals as examples of organic crystals. We show that a variant of the van der Waals density functional describes structure and energetics of organic crystals accurately. In addition, we review our recent study on the zinc phthalocyanine crystal and discuss the importance of the intermolecular distance and orientational angle in the band dispersion. Finally, we draw some general conclusions and the future perspectives.

  6. A precision timing discriminator for high density detector systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turko, B.T.; Smith, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    Most high resolution time measurement techniques require discriminators that accurately make the time arrival of events regardless of their intensity. Constant fraction discriminators or zero-crossing discriminators are generally used. In this paper, the authors describe a zero-crossing discriminator that accurately determines the peak of a quasi-Gaussian waveform by differentiating it and detecting the resulting zero-crossing. Basically, it consists of a fast voltage comparator and tow integrating networks: an RC section and an LR section used in a way that keeps the input impedance purely resistive. A time walk of 100 ps in an amplitude range exceeding 100:1 has been achieved for wave-forms from 1.5 ns to 15 ns FWHM. An arming level discriminator is added to eliminate triggering by noise. Easily implemented in either monolithic or hybrid technology, the circuit is suitable for large multichannel detector systems where size and power dissipation are crucial. Circuit diagrams and typical measured data are also presented

  7. Learning about the energy density of liquid and semi-solid foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogenkamp, P.S.; Stafleu, A.; Mars, M.; Graaf, de C.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: People learn about a food's satiating capacity by exposure and consequently adjust their energy intake. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of energy density and texture on subsequent energy intake adjustments during repeated consumption. DESIGN: In a randomized crossover design,

  8. Efficient, High Power Density Hydrocarbon-Fueled Solid Oxide Stack System, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Precision Combustion, Inc. (PCI) proposes to develop and demonstrate an innovative high power density design for direct internal reforming of regolith off-gases...

  9. Efficient, high power density hydrocarbon-fueled solid oxide stack system, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Precision Combustion, Inc. (PCI) proposes to develop and demonstrate an innovative high power density design for direct internal reforming of regolith off-gases...

  10. ac loss and dc critical current densities of Nb3Sn tapes by the solid state diffusion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suenaga, M.; Klamut, C.; Bussiere, J.F.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of metallurgical processing on 60 Hz ac losses and dc critical currents in Nb 3 Sn tapes fabricated by the solid state diffusion technique were investigated. An addition of Al to the Cu--Sn alloy for the matrix resulted in large reduction in the ac losses of Nb 3 Sn tapes, but the highest linear critical current densities were observed in Nb 3 Sn tapes produced with a Nb-1 wt percent Zr core in a Cu-13 wt percent Sn matrix. Values of the losses and the critical currents in these tapes can meet the present requirements for the ac superconducting power cables

  11. Density effects in heavy ion charge-exchange processes in gaseous and solid targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teplova, Ya.A.; Dmitriev, I.S.; Belkova, Yu.A.

    2000-01-01

    Experimental results on the pre-equilibrium and equilibrium charge distributions in celluloid films for incident Be, B, C, N, O ions are analyzed in order to obtain charge-exchange cross-sections. The determined 'effective' cross-sections of electron capture and loss in celluloid together with earlier measured analogous cross-sections in nitrogen allow us to calculate charge fractions F i (t) depending on the target thickness in solid (celluloid) and gaseous (nitrogen) matter. The absolute values and the ratios A cap =σ g i,i-1 /σ s i,i-1 and A loss =σ g i-1,i /σ s i-1,i of electron capture and loss cross-sections in {s} solids (celluloid, carbon) and {g} gases (nitrogen) are under consideration

  12. Electron dynamics in solid state via time varying wavevectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaneja, Navin

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, we study electron wavepacket dynamics in electric and magnetic fields. We rigorously derive the semiclassical equations of electron dynamics in electric and magnetic fields. We do it both for free electron and electron in a periodic potential. We do this by introducing time varying wavevectors k(t). In the presence of magnetic field, our wavepacket reproduces the classical cyclotron orbits once the origin of the Schröedinger equation is correctly chosen to be center of cyclotron orbit. In the presence of both electric and magnetic fields, our equations for wavepacket dynamics differ from classical Lorentz force equations. We show that in a periodic potential, on application of electric field, the electron wave function adiabatically follows the wavefunction of a time varying Bloch wavevector k(t), with its energies suitably shifted with time. We derive the effective mass equation and discuss conduction in conductors and insulators.

  13. Two-electron Rabi oscillations in real-time time-dependent density-functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habenicht, Bradley F.; Tani, Noriyuki P.; Provorse, Makenzie R.; Isborn, Christine M.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the Rabi oscillations of electrons excited by an applied electric field in several simple molecular systems using time-dependent configuration interaction (TDCI) and real-time time-dependent density-functional theory (RT-TDDFT) dynamics. While the TDCI simulations exhibit the expected single-electron Rabi oscillations at a single resonant electric field frequency, Rabi oscillations in the RT-TDDFT simulations are a two-electron process. The existence of two-electron Rabi oscillations is determined both by full population inversion between field-free molecular orbitals and the behavior of the instantaneous dipole moment during the simulations. Furthermore, the Rabi oscillations in RT-TDDFT are subject to an intensity threshold of the electric field, below which Rabi oscillations do not occur and above which the two-electron Rabi oscillations occur at a broad range of frequencies. It is also shown that at field intensities near the threshold intensity, the field frequency predicted to induce Rabi oscillations by linear response TDDFT only produces detuned Rabi oscillations. Instead, the field frequency that yields the full two-electron population inversion and Rabi oscillation behavior is shown to be the average of single-electron transition frequencies from the ground S 0 state and the doubly-excited S 2 state. The behavior of the two-electron Rabi oscillations is rationalized via two possible models. The first model is a multi-photon process that results from the electric field interacting with the three level system such that three level Rabi oscillations may occur. The second model suggests that the mean-field nature of RT-TDDFT induces paired electron propagation

  14. Dependence of high density nitrogen-vacancy center ensemble coherence on electron irradiation doses and annealing time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C.; Yuan, H.; Zhang, N.; Xu, L. X.; Li, B.; Cheng, G. D.; Wang, Y.; Gui, Q.; Fang, J. C.

    2017-12-01

    Negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV-) center ensembles in diamond have proved to have great potential for use in highly sensitive, small-package solid-state quantum sensors. One way to improve sensitivity is to produce a high-density NV- center ensemble on a large scale with a long coherence lifetime. In this work, the NV- center ensemble is prepared in type-Ib diamond using high energy electron irradiation and annealing, and the transverse relaxation time of the ensemble—T 2—was systematically investigated as a function of the irradiation electron dose and annealing time. Dynamical decoupling sequences were used to characterize T 2. To overcome the problem of low signal-to-noise ratio in T 2 measurement, a coupled strip lines waveguide was used to synchronously manipulate NV- centers along three directions to improve fluorescence signal contrast. Finally, NV- center ensembles with a high concentration of roughly 1015 mm-3 were manipulated within a ~10 µs coherence time. By applying a multi-coupled strip-lines waveguide to improve the effective volume of the diamond, a sub-femtotesla sensitivity for AC field magnetometry can be achieved. The long-coherence high-density large-scale NV- center ensemble in diamond means that types of room-temperature micro-sized solid-state quantum sensors with ultra-high sensitivity can be further developed in the near future.

  15. Mathematical modeling of current density distribution in composite cathode of solid oxide fuel cells. Paper no. IGEC-1-099

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenney, B.; Karan, K.

    2005-01-01

    Cathodes processes in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) are thought to dominate the overall electrochemical losses. One strategy for minimizing the cathode electrochemical losses in a state-of-the-art SOFC that utilize lanthanum-strontium-manganate (LSM) electrocatalyst and yttria-stabilized-zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte is to utilize composite cathodes comprising a mixture of LSM and YSZ. Composite cathodes improve performance by extending the active reaction zone from electrolyte-electrode interface to throughout the electrode. In this study, a two-dimensional composite cathode model was developed to assess cathode performance in terms of current density distributions. The model results indicate that geometric and microstructural parameters strongly influence current density distribution. In addition electrode composition affects magnitude and distribution of current. An optimum composition for equal-sized LSM/YSZ is 40 vol% LSM and 60 vol% YSZ at 900 o C. (author)

  16. Anisotropy of the nuclear magnetic relaxation times induced in solid 3He by modulation of the dipolar interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deville, G.

    1976-01-01

    Anisotropic nuclear relaxation times have been measured in solid 3 He samples grown at constant pressure, in the Larmor frequency range 1.5MHz-5MHz where the main relaxation mechanism is the modulation of the dipolar interaction by exchange or by motion of the vacancies. The second order calculation made by Harris for the exchange induced relaxation regime is extended to the regime where vacancy motion dominates. The theory is further refined by considering the fourth moment anisotropy effect on the spectral densities. This latter calculation yields a frequency dependent anisotropic contribution to T 1 which agrees qualitatively with the data, unlike the simpler results by Harris [fr

  17. Effect of size and density on canine gastric emptying of nondigestible solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, J.H.; Dressman, J.; Fink, A.; Amidon, G.

    1985-01-01

    Previous studies suggested that the food-containing canine stomach retains large, nondigestible spheres until all food has emptied; but it is not known whether there is a threshold size or a gradation of sizes that will empty along with food. Further, nothing is known of the effects of such parameters as density, shape, and surface energy on the emptying of nondigestible particles of any given size. To answer these questions 6 dogs with chronic duodenal fistulas were studied. Radiolabeled food and spheres were collected from the fistulas to compare the rate of gastric emptying of the spheres with that of the food. After a standard test meal of /sup 99m/Tc-labeled liver, steak, and water, diverted chyme was collected over a stack of sieves in 30-min fractions over 5 postcibal hours. The percent of fed spheres and fed /sup 99m/Tc-labeled liver in each collection was counted, and liquid chyme was returned to the distal duodenum. Spheres with a density of 1 emptied progressively faster as sphere diameters were decreased from 5 to 1 mm; but 0.015-mm spheres emptied at about the same rate as those with diameters of 1 mm. Emptying of the spheres became similar to emptying of the /sup 99m/Tc-labeled liver at about 1.6 mm. Spheres with densities less than 1 or greater than 1 emptied more slowly than spheres of the same size with a density of 1, whereas paper squares emptied the same way as spheres of comparable size and density. Surface energy did not affect emptying. The findings indicated that both sphere size and density affect their emptying in the presence of food

  18. Time-dependent density functional theory for multi-component systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiecheng Li; Peiqing Tong

    1985-10-01

    The Runge-Gross version of Hohenberg-Kohn-Sham's density functional theory is generalized to multi-component systems, both for arbitrary time-dependent pure states and for arbitrary time-dependent ensembles. (author)

  19. Unipolar time-differential charge sensing in non-dispersive amorphous solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldan, A. H.; Rowlands, J. A.; Tousignant, O.; Karim, K. S.

    2013-01-01

    The use of high resistivity amorphous solids as photodetectors, especially amorphous selenium, is currently of great interest because they are readily produced over large area at substantially lower cost compared to grown crystalline solids. However, amorphous solids have been ruled out as viable radiation detection media for high frame-rate applications, such as single-photon-counting imaging, because of low carrier mobilities, transit-time-limited photoresponse, and consequently, poor time resolution. To circumvent the problem of poor charge transport in amorphous solids, we propose unipolar time-differential charge sensing by establishing a strong near-field effect using an electrostatic shield within the material. For the first time, we have fabricated a true Frisch grid inside a solid-state detector by evaporating amorphous selenium over photolithographically prepared multi-well substrates. The fabricated devices are characterized with optical, x-ray, and gamma-ray impulse-like excitations. Results prove the proposed unipolar time-differential property and show that time resolution in non-dispersive amorphous solids can be improved substantially to reach the theoretical limit set by spatial spreading of the collected Gaussian carrier cloud.

  20. Plasma density control in real-time on the COMPASS tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janky, F., E-mail: filip.janky.work@gmail.com [Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, v.v.i., Association EURATOM/IPP.CR, Za Slovankou 3, 182 00 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Department of Surface and Plasma Science, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague, V Holešovičkách 2, 180 00 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Hron, M. [Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, v.v.i., Association EURATOM/IPP.CR, Za Slovankou 3, 182 00 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Havlicek, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, v.v.i., Association EURATOM/IPP.CR, Za Slovankou 3, 182 00 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Department of Surface and Plasma Science, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague, V Holešovičkách 2, 180 00 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Varavin, M.; Zacek, F.; Seidl, J.; Panek, R. [Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, v.v.i., Association EURATOM/IPP.CR, Za Slovankou 3, 182 00 Praha 8 (Czech Republic)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • We fitted length of the chord of the interferometry crossing plasma in the different plasma scenarios. • We add correction to the actual length of the chord of the interferometry according to plasma shape and position in real-time code. • We used this correction to control plasma density in real-time. - Abstract: The electron density on COMPASS is measured using 2 mm microwave interferometer. Interferometer signal is used as an input for the feedback control loop, running under the MARTe real-time framework. Two different threads are used to calculate (fast 50 μs thread) and to control (slow 500 μs thread) the electron density. The interferometer measures a line averaged density along a measurement chord. This paper describes an approach to control the line-averaged electron density in a real-time loop, using a correction to the real plasma shape, the plasma position, and non-linear effects of the electron density measurement at high densities. Newly developed real-time electron density control give COMPASS the chance to control the electron density more accurately which is essential for parametric scans for diagnosticians, for physics experiments and also for achieving plasma scenarios with H-mode.

  1. Learning about the energy density of liquid and semi-solid foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogenkamp, P.S.; Stafleu, A.; Mars, M.; Graaf C. de

    2012-01-01

    Background:People learn about a food's satiating capacity by exposure and consequently adjust their energy intake.Objective:To investigate the effect of energy density and texture on subsequent energy intake adjustments during repeated consumption.Design:In a randomized crossover design,

  2. LCAO fitting of positron 2D-ACAR momentum densities of non-metallic solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, T.

    2001-01-01

    We present a least-squares fitting method to fit and analyze momentum densities obtained by 2D-ACAR. The method uses an LCAO-MO as a fitting basis and thus is applicable to non-metals. Here we illustrate the method by taking MgO as an example. (orig.)

  3. LCAO fitting of positron 2D-ACAR momentum densities of non-metallic solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiba, T. [National Inst. for Research in Inorganic Materials, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    We present a least-squares fitting method to fit and analyze momentum densities obtained by 2D-ACAR. The method uses an LCAO-MO as a fitting basis and thus is applicable to non-metals. Here we illustrate the method by taking MgO as an example. (orig.)

  4. Towards High Power Density Metal Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cell for Mobile Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Persson, Åsa Helen; Muhl, Thuy

    2017-01-01

    For use of metal supported SOFC in mobile applications it is important to reduce the thermal mass to enable fast start up, increase stack power density in terms of weight and volume and reduce costs. In the present study, we report on the effect of reducing the support layer thickness of 313 μm...

  5. Unexpected storm-time nightside plasmaspheric density enhancement at low L shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, X.; Bortnik, J.; Denton, R. E.; Yue, C.

    2017-12-01

    We have developed a three-dimensional dynamic electron density (DEN3D) model in the inner magnetosphere using a neural network approach. The DEN3D model can provide spatiotemporal distribution of the electron density at any location and time that spacecraft observations are not available. Given DEN3D's good performance in predicting the structure and dynamic evolution of the plasma density, the salient features of the DEN3D model can be used to gain further insight into the physics. For instance, the DEN3D models can be used to find unusual phenomena that are difficult to detect in observations or simulations. We report, for the first time, an unexpected plasmaspheric density increase at low L shell regions on the nightside during the main phase of a moderate storm during 12-16 October 2004, as opposed to the expected density decrease due to storm-time plasmaspheric erosion. The unexpected density increase is first discovered in the modeled electron density distribution using the DEN3D model, and then validated using in-situ density measurements obtained from the IMAGE satellite. The density increase was likely caused by increased earthward transverse field plasma transport due to enhanced nightside ExB drift, which coincided with enhanced solar wind electric field and substorm activity. This is consistent with the results of physics-based simulation SAMI3 model which show earthward enhanced plasma transport and electron density increase at low L shells during storm main phase.

  6. Improvements in the critical current densities of Nb3Sn by solid solution additions of Sn in Nb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luhman, T.; Suenaga, M.

    1975-01-01

    The effectiveness of solid solution additions of Sn to Nb in improving the superconducting properties of diffusion processed Nb 3 Sn conductors was examined. It was found that an increase in the superconducting critical current density, Jc, as function of layer thickness (d) may be obtained for thick Nb 3 Sn layers by solid solution additions of Sn in Nb. A large increase in J/sub c/ (d) is also achieved by increasing the Sn content in the bronze matrix material. In addition to uses of this material in magnet fabrications a potential application of these improved J/sub c/(d) values may lie in the use of Nb 3 Sn in power transmission lines. Here, a high superconducting critical current density is necessary throughout the material to carry the increased current during fault conditions. The magnetic field dependence of J/sub c/ is a function of alloy content but the alloying changes studied here do not increase the high field critical current capability of Nb 3 Sn. (auth)

  7. Life Time Performance Characterization of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells for Hydrogen Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Xiufu; Chen, Ming; Liu, Yi-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) offer a promising technological solution for efficient energy conversion and production of hydrogen or syngas. The commercialization of the SOEC technology can be promoted if SOECs can be operated at high current density with stable performance over ~5 years...... - 3 years (continuous operation, setting 1.5 V as the upper voltage defining “end of life”). The results provide technological input to future design of electrolysis plants for hydrogen production. © 2015 ECS - The Electrochemical Society...

  8. Testing the system detection unit for measuring solid minerals bulk density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voytyuk, I. N.; Kopteva, A. V.

    2017-10-01

    The paper provides a brief description of the system for measuring flux per volume of solid minerals via example of mineral coal. The paper discloses the operational principle of the detection unit. The paper provides full description of testing methodology, as well as practical implementation of the detection unit testing. This paper describes the removal of two data arrays via the channel of scattered anddirect radiation for the detection units of two generations. This paper describes Matlab software to determine the statistical characteristics of the studied objects. The mean value of pulses per cycles, and pulse counting inaccuracy relatively the mean value were determined for the calculation of the stability account of the detection units.

  9. Density of phonon-fracton states of disordered solids in the vicinity of percolation phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korzhenevskii, A.L.; Luzhkov, A.A.

    1991-01-01

    The development of a theory of phase transitions in disordered materials is still one of the central problems in solid-state physics. The model of a percolation phase transition plays the same role among the models put forward to account for phase transitions in disordered media as does the Ising model for second-order phase transitions in ideal crystals. In addition to the clear picture of the processes occurring in the course of a percolation phase transition, a scaling theory has been developed and various techniques have been used to calculate the critical exponents describing the thermodynamics of a medium in the vicinity of the percolation threshold. The authors adopt a field-theoretic approach in a study of acoustic properties of disordered solids undergoing percolation phase transitions characterized by h ∼ 1. Among these transitions they concentrate on the case with the simplest type of striction interaction when the solution of a stochastic vector differential equation of motion describing the behavior of an elastic medium in the critical region can be reduced to a scalar equation. The results of their calculations by the field renormalization group method confirmed the existence of the scaling relationships between the critical exponents and also the conclusion on the nature of short- and long-wavelength vibrations near the percolation threshold, which follow from phenomenological considerations of the scaling theory. The values of the upper critical dimensionality and of the critical exponents of the problem are shown to differ from the values applicable to percolation phase transitions characterized by h much-lt 1

  10. The implementation of real-time plasma electron density calculations on EAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Z.C., E-mail: zzc@ipp.ac.cn; Xiao, B.J.; Wang, F.; Liu, H.Q.; Yuan, Q.P.; Wang, Y.; Yang, Y.

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The real-time density calculation system (DCS) has been applied to the EAST 3-wave polarimeter-interferometer (POINT) system. • The new system based on Flex RIO acquires data at high speed and processes them in a short time. • Roll-over module is developed for density calculation. - Abstract: The plasma electron density is one of the most fundamental parameters in tokamak experiment. It is widely used in the plasma control system (PCS) real-time control, as well as plasma physics analysis. The 3-wave polarimeter-interferometer (POINT) system had been used to measure the plasma electron density on the EAST since last campaign. This paper will give the way to realize the real-time measurement of plasma electron density. All intermediate frequency (IF) signals after POINT system, in the 0.5–3 MHz range, stream to the real-time density calculation system (DCS) to extract the phase shift information. All the prototype hardware is based on NI Flex RIO device which contains a high speed Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). The original signals are sampled at 10 M Samples/s, and the data after roll-over module are transmitted to PCS by reflective memory (RFM). With this method, real-time plasma electron density data with high accuracy and low noise had been obtained in the latest EAST tokamak experiment.

  11. On the locus and spread of pseudo-density functions in the time-frequency plane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, A.J.E.M.

    1982-01-01

    Various time-frequency pseudo-density functions used in signal analysis are compared with respect to spread. Among the members of Cohen's class of pseudo-density functions satisfying the finite support property as well as Moyal's formula, the Wigner distribution is the most well-behaved one in the

  12. A novel technique for real-time estimation of edge pedestal density gradients via reflectometer time delay data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, L., E-mail: zeng@fusion.gat.com; Doyle, E. J.; Rhodes, T. L.; Wang, G.; Sung, C.; Peebles, W. A. [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Bobrek, M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6006 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    A new model-based technique for fast estimation of the pedestal electron density gradient has been developed. The technique uses ordinary mode polarization profile reflectometer time delay data and does not require direct profile inversion. Because of its simple data processing, the technique can be readily implemented via a Field-Programmable Gate Array, so as to provide a real-time density gradient estimate, suitable for use in plasma control systems such as envisioned for ITER, and possibly for DIII-D and Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak. The method is based on a simple edge plasma model with a linear pedestal density gradient and low scrape-off-layer density. By measuring reflectometer time delays for three adjacent frequencies, the pedestal density gradient can be estimated analytically via the new approach. Using existing DIII-D profile reflectometer data, the estimated density gradients obtained from the new technique are found to be in good agreement with the actual density gradients for a number of dynamic DIII-D plasma conditions.

  13. Dynamics of laser-driven proton beam focusing and transport into solid density matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.; McGuffey, C.; Beg, F.; Wei, M.; Mariscal, D.; Chen, S.; Fuchs, J.

    2016-10-01

    Isochoric heating and local energy deposition capabilities make intense proton beams appealing for studying high energy density physics and the Fast Ignition of inertial confinement fusion. To study proton beam focusing that results in high beam density, experiments have been conducted using different target geometries irradiated by a kilojoule, 10 ps pulse of the OMEGA EP laser. The beam focus was measured by imaging beam-induced Cu K-alpha emission on a Cu foil that was positioned at a fixed distance. Compared to a free target, structured targets having shapes of wedge and cone show a brighter and narrower K-alpha radiation emission spot on a Cu foil indicating higher beam focusability. Experimentally observed images with proton radiography demonstrate the existence of transverse fields on the structures. Full-scale simulations including the contribution of a long pulse duration of the laser confirm that such fields can be caused by hot electrons moving through the structures. The simulated fields are strong enough to reflect the diverging main proton beam and pinch a transverse probe beam. Detailed simulation results including the beam focusing and transport of the focused intense proton beam in Cu foil will be presented. This work was supported by the National Laser User Facility Program through Award DE-NA0002034.

  14. Technology of preparation for low density 6Li(H,D) solid micro-target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xisheng; Zeng Jiaquan; Li Qiang

    2002-01-01

    Low density 6 Li(H,D) micro-targets are prepared by loose sintering 6 LiH or 6 LiD powder in a tiny gold cylinder and soaking for 30 min up to 430 degree C at the rate of 10 degree C/h in argon. The dimension of the micro-targets is as tiny as 0.6-1.0 mm for diameter and 1-2 mm for length. Densities of 6 LiH and 6 LiD without Parylene C is (0.283 +- 0.009) g/cm 3 and (0.369 +- 0.009) g/cm 3 , respectively while 6 LiD targets with Parylene C is only (0.301 +- 0.010) g/cm 3 . The Parylene C has no effect on purity, deuterium abundance and 6 Li abundance of the sintered micro-targets. It's effective to keep 6 Li(H,D) purity by strict control of argon atmosphere

  15. Electron-density critical points analysis and catastrophe theory to forecast structure instability in periodic solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merli, Marcello; Pavese, Alessandro

    2018-03-01

    The critical points analysis of electron density, i.e. ρ(x), from ab initio calculations is used in combination with the catastrophe theory to show a correlation between ρ(x) topology and the appearance of instability that may lead to transformations of crystal structures, as a function of pressure/temperature. In particular, this study focuses on the evolution of coalescing non-degenerate critical points, i.e. such that ∇ρ(x c ) = 0 and λ 1 , λ 2 , λ 3 ≠ 0 [λ being the eigenvalues of the Hessian of ρ(x) at x c ], towards degenerate critical points, i.e. ∇ρ(x c ) = 0 and at least one λ equal to zero. The catastrophe theory formalism provides a mathematical tool to model ρ(x) in the neighbourhood of x c and allows one to rationalize the occurrence of instability in terms of electron-density topology and Gibbs energy. The phase/state transitions that TiO 2 (rutile structure), MgO (periclase structure) and Al 2 O 3 (corundum structure) undergo because of pressure and/or temperature are here discussed. An agreement of 3-5% is observed between the theoretical model and experimental pressure/temperature of transformation.

  16. Development of a poly(dimethylacrylamide) based matrix material for solid phase high density peptide array synthesis employing a laser based material transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridder, Barbara; Foertsch, Tobias C.; Welle, Alexander; Mattes, Daniela S.; Bojnicic-Kninski, Clemens M. von; Loeffler, Felix F.; Nesterov-Mueller, Alexander; Meier, Michael A.R.; Breitling, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • New matrix material for peptide array synthesis from a ‘solid solvent’. • Resolution was increased with possible spot densities of up to 20.000 spots per cm"2. • The coupling depth and the effectiveness of washing steps analyzed by ToF-SIMS. • Adaptations and custom changes of the matrix material are possible. - Abstract: Poly(dimethylacrylamide) (PDMA) based matrix materials were developed for laser-based in situ solid phase peptide synthesis to produce high density arrays. In this specific array synthesis approach, amino acid derivatives are embedded into a matrix material, serving as a “solid” solvent material at room temperature. Then, a laser pulse transfers this mixture to the target position on a synthesis slide, where the peptide array is synthesized. Upon heating above the glass transition temperature of the matrix material, it softens, allowing diffusion of the amino acid derivatives to the synthesis surface and serving as a solvent for peptide bond formation. Here, we synthesized PDMA six-arm star polymers, offering the desired matrix material properties, using atom transfer radical polymerization. With the synthesized polymers as matrix material, we structured and synthesized arrays with combinatorial laser transfer. With densities of up to 20,000 peptide spots per cm"2, the resolution could be increased compared to the commercially available standard matrix material. Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry experiments revealed the penetration behavior of an amino acid derivative into the prepared acceptor synthesis surface and the effectiveness of the washing protocols.

  17. Development of a poly(dimethylacrylamide) based matrix material for solid phase high density peptide array synthesis employing a laser based material transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridder, Barbara [Institute of Microstructure Technology (IMT), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Institute of Organic Chemistry (IOC), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Fritz-Haber-Weg 6, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Foertsch, Tobias C. [Institute of Microstructure Technology (IMT), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Welle, Alexander [Karlsruhe Nano Micro Facility (KNMF), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Mattes, Daniela S. [Institute of Microstructure Technology (IMT), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Institute of Organic Chemistry (IOC), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Fritz-Haber-Weg 6, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bojnicic-Kninski, Clemens M. von; Loeffler, Felix F.; Nesterov-Mueller, Alexander [Institute of Microstructure Technology (IMT), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Meier, Michael A.R., E-mail: m.a.r.meier@kit.edu [Institute of Organic Chemistry (IOC), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Fritz-Haber-Weg 6, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Breitling, Frank, E-mail: frank.breitling@kit.edu [Institute of Microstructure Technology (IMT), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • New matrix material for peptide array synthesis from a ‘solid solvent’. • Resolution was increased with possible spot densities of up to 20.000 spots per cm{sup 2}. • The coupling depth and the effectiveness of washing steps analyzed by ToF-SIMS. • Adaptations and custom changes of the matrix material are possible. - Abstract: Poly(dimethylacrylamide) (PDMA) based matrix materials were developed for laser-based in situ solid phase peptide synthesis to produce high density arrays. In this specific array synthesis approach, amino acid derivatives are embedded into a matrix material, serving as a “solid” solvent material at room temperature. Then, a laser pulse transfers this mixture to the target position on a synthesis slide, where the peptide array is synthesized. Upon heating above the glass transition temperature of the matrix material, it softens, allowing diffusion of the amino acid derivatives to the synthesis surface and serving as a solvent for peptide bond formation. Here, we synthesized PDMA six-arm star polymers, offering the desired matrix material properties, using atom transfer radical polymerization. With the synthesized polymers as matrix material, we structured and synthesized arrays with combinatorial laser transfer. With densities of up to 20,000 peptide spots per cm{sup 2}, the resolution could be increased compared to the commercially available standard matrix material. Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry experiments revealed the penetration behavior of an amino acid derivative into the prepared acceptor synthesis surface and the effectiveness of the washing protocols.

  18. Time dependent – density functional theory characterization of organic dyes for dye-sensitized solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Hilal, Rifaat; Aziz, Saadullah G.; Osman, Osman I.; Bredas, Jean-Luc

    2017-01-01

    We aim at providing better insight into the parameters that govern the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) and photo-injection processes in dyes for dye-sensitised solar cells (DSSC). Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TD

  19. Optical properties of Al nanostructures from time dependent density functional theory

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2016-01-01

    The optical properties of Al nanostructures are investigated by means of time dependent density functional theory, considering chains of varying length and ladders/stripes of varying aspect ratio. The absorption spectra show redshifting

  20. Novel high-density packaging of solid state diode pumped eye-safe laser for LIBS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bares, Kim; Torgerson, Justin; McNeil, Laine; Maine, Patrick; Patterson, Steve

    2018-02-01

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) has proven to be a useful research tool for material analysis for decades. However, because of the amount of energy required in a few nanosecond pulse to generate a stable and reliable LIBS signal, the lasers are often large and inefficient, relegating their implementation to research facilities, factory floors, and assembly lines. Small portable LIBS systems are now possible without having to compromise on energy needs by leveraging off of advances in high-density packaging of electronics, opto-mechanics, and highly efficient laser resonator architecture. This paper explores the integration of these techniques to achieve a mJ class eye-safe LIBS laser source, while retaining a small, light-weight package suitable for handheld systems.

  1. Acceleration of a solid-density plasma projectile to ultrahigh velocities by a short-pulse ultraviolet laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badziak, J.; Jablonski, S. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Euratom Association, 01-497 Warsaw (Poland)

    2011-08-15

    It is shown by means of particle-in-cell simulations that a high-fluence ({>=}1 GJ/cm{sup 2}) solid-density plasma projectile can be accelerated up to sub-relativistic velocities by radiation pressure of an ultraviolet (UV) picosecond laser pulse of moderate values of dimensionless laser amplitude a{sub 0}{approx}10. The efficiency of acceleration by the UV laser is significantly higher than in the case of long-wavelength ({lambda} {approx} 1 {mu}m) driver of a comparable value of a{sub 0}, and the motion of the projectile is fairly well described by the ''Light Sail'' acceleration model.

  2. Degradation of solid oxide cells during co-electrolysis of steam and carbon dioxide at high current densities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tao, Youkun; Ebbesen, Sune Dalgaard; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2016-01-01

    and ∼15 μm LSM–YSZ oxygen electrode. The gas conversion was 45% at −1.5 A cm−2 and 60% at −2.0 A cm−2, and the operating durations were up to 700 h. The detailed electrochemical analysis revealed significant increase of the ohmic resistance, oxide ion transport resistance in the Ni–YSZ composite......In this work, the durability of Ni–YSZ based solid oxide cells was investigated during co-electrolysis of steam and carbon dioxide (45% H2O + 45% CO2 + 10% H2) at current density of −1.5 or −2.0 A cm−2. The cell consists of ∼300 μm Ni–YSZ support, ∼10 μm Ni–YSZ electrode, ∼10 μm YSZ electrolyte...

  3. Creation of Novel Solid-Solution Alloy Nanoparticles on the Basis of Density-of-States Engineering by Interelement Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Kusada, Kohei; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2015-06-16

    Currently 118 known elements are represented in the periodic table. Of these 118 elements, only about 80 elements are stable, nonradioactive, and widely available for our society. From the viewpoint of the "elements strategy", we need to make full use of the 80 elements to bring out their latent ability and create innovative materials. Furthermore, there is a strong demand that the use of rare or toxic elements be reduced or replaced while their important properties are retained. Advanced science and technology could create higher-performance materials even while replacing or reducing minor or harmful elements through the combination of more abundant elements. The properties of elements are correlated directly with their electronic states. In a solid, the magnitude of the density of states (DOS) at the Fermi level affects the physical and chemical properties. In the present age, more attention has been paid to improving the properties of materials by means of alloying elements. In particular, the solid-solution-type alloy is advantageous because the properties can be continuously controlled by tuning the compositions and/or combinations of the constituent elements. However, the majority of bulk alloys are of the phase-separated type under ambient conditions, where constituent elements are immiscible with each other. To overcome the challenge of the bulk-phase metallurgical aspects, we have focused on the nanosize effect and developed methods involving "nonequilibrium synthesis" or "a process of hydrogen absorption/desorption". We propose a new concept of "density-of-states engineering" for the design of materials having the most desirable and suitable properties by means of "interelement fusion". In this Account, we describe novel solid-solution alloys of Pd-Pt, Ag-Rh, and Pd-Ru systems in which the constituent elements are immiscible in the bulk state. The homogeneous solid-solution alloys of Pd and Pt were created from Pd core/Pt shell nanoparticles using a

  4. Hot-electron-assisted femtochemistry at surfaces: A time-dependent density functional theory approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavnholt, Jeppe; Rubio, Angel; Olsen, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Using time-evolution time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) within the adiabatic local-density approximation, we study the interactions between single electrons and molecular resonances at surfaces. Our system is a nitrogen molecule adsorbed on a ruthenium surface. The surface is modele...... resonance and the lowering of the resonance energy due to an image charge effect. Finally we apply the TDDFT procedure to only consider the decay of molecular excitations and find that it agrees quite well with the width of the projected density of Kohn-Sham states....

  5. Timing of solid food introduction and association with later childhood overweight and obesity: The IDEFICS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoutsou, Stalo; Savva, Savvas C; Hunsberger, Monica; Jilani, Hannah; Michels, Nathalie; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Tornaritis, Michael; Veidebaum, Toomas; Molnár, Dénes; Siani, Alfonso; Moreno, Luis A; Hadjigeorgiou, Charis

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated associations between timing of solid food introduction and childhood obesity and explored maternal characteristics influencing early feeding practices. Cross-sectional data from children 2-9 years (n = 10,808; 50.5% boys) residing in 8 European countries of the IDEFICS study (2007-2008) were included. Late solid food introduction (≥7 months of age) was associated with an increased prevalence of later childhood overweight/obesity among exclusively breastfed children (OR [odds ratio]: 1.38, 95% CI [confidence interval] [1.01, 1.88]). In contrast, early solid food introduction (associated with lower prevalence of overweight/obesity among children that ceased exclusive breastfeeding earlier than 4 months (OR: 0.63, 95% CI [0.47, 0.84]). Children that were introduced to solids right after 6 months exclusive breastfeeding and continued to receive breastmilk (≥12 months) were less likely to become overweight/obese (OR: 0.67, 95% CI [0.51, 0.88]) compared to children that discontinued to receive breastmilk. Analyses were adjusted for age, sex, country, birth weight, parental education level, parental body mass index, tobacco use in pregnancy, gestational weight gain, and gestational diabetes. Underweight mothers, overweight mothers, mothers who reported daily smoking during pregnancy, and low-educated mothers were less likely to follow recommendations on breastfeeding and timely solids introduction. Future studies should examine whether guidelines for solid food introduction timing have to distinguish between exclusively breastfed, formula fed, and too early exclusive breastfeeding-ceased infants. There is also need for more prospective studies; recall bias was an important current limitation. In conclusion, health professionals should emphasize benefits of breastfeeding and appropriate solid food introduction, especially to mothers that are less likely to follow recommendations. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. High speed real-time wavefront processing system for a solid-state laser system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Yang, Ping; Chen, Shanqiu; Ma, Lifang; Xu, Bing

    2008-03-01

    A high speed real-time wavefront processing system for a solid-state laser beam cleanup system has been built. This system consists of a core2 Industrial PC (IPC) using Linux and real-time Linux (RT-Linux) operation system (OS), a PCI image grabber, a D/A card. More often than not, the phase aberrations of the output beam from solid-state lasers vary fast with intracavity thermal effects and environmental influence. To compensate the phase aberrations of solid-state lasers successfully, a high speed real-time wavefront processing system is presented. Compared to former systems, this system can improve the speed efficiently. In the new system, the acquisition of image data, the output of control voltage data and the implementation of reconstructor control algorithm are treated as real-time tasks in kernel-space, the display of wavefront information and man-machine conversation are treated as non real-time tasks in user-space. The parallel processing of real-time tasks in Symmetric Multi Processors (SMP) mode is the main strategy of improving the speed. In this paper, the performance and efficiency of this wavefront processing system are analyzed. The opened-loop experimental results show that the sampling frequency of this system is up to 3300Hz, and this system can well deal with phase aberrations from solid-state lasers.

  7. Applications of high order harmonic radiation to UVX-solids interaction: high excitation density in electronic relaxation dynamics and surface damaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Grazia, M.

    2007-12-01

    The new sources of radiation in the extreme-UV (X-UV: 10-100 nm), which deliver spatially coherent, ultra-short and intense pulses, allow studying high flux processes and ultra-fast dynamics in various domains. The thesis work presents two applications of the high-order laser harmonics (HH) to solid state physics. In Part I, we describe the optimization of the harmonic for studies of X-UV/solids interaction. In Part II, we investigate effects of high excitation density in the dynamics of electron relaxation in dielectric scintillator crystals - tungstates and fluorides, using time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy. Quenching of luminescence at short time gives evidence of the competition between radiative and non-radiative recombination of self-trapped excitons (STE). The non-radiative channel is identified to mutual interaction of STE at high excitation density. In Part III, we study the X-UV induced damage mechanism in various materials, either conductor (amorphous carbon) or insulators (organic polymers, e.g., PMMA). In PMMA-Plexiglas, in the desorption regime (0.2 mJ/cm 2 , i.e., below damage threshold), the surface modifications reflect X-UV induced photochemical processes that are tentatively identified, as a function of dose: at low dose, polymer chain scission followed by the blow-up of the volatile, low-molecular fragments leads to crater formation; at high dose, cross-linking in the near-surface layer of remaining material leads to surface hardening. These promising results have great perspectives considering the performances already attained and planned in the next future in the development of the harmonic sources. (author)

  8. Real-time electron density measurements from Cotton-Mouton effect in JET machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brombin, M.; Boboc, A.; Zabeo, L.; Murari, A.

    2008-01-01

    Real-time density profile measurements are essential for advanced fusion tokamak operation and interferometry is a proven method for this task. Nevertheless, as a consequence of edge localized modes, pellet injections, fast density increases, or disruptions, the interferometer is subject to fringe jumps, which produce loss of the signal preventing reliable use of the measured density in a real-time feedback controller. An alternative method to measure the density is polarimetry based on the Cotton-Mouton effect, which is proportional to the line-integrated electron density. A new analysis approach has been implemented and tested to verify the reliability of the Cotton-Mouton measurements for a wide range of plasma parameters and to compare the density evaluated from polarimetry with that from interferometry. The density measurements based on polarimetry are going to be integrated in the real-time control system of JET since the difference with the interferometry is within one fringe for more than 90% of the cases.

  9. Factors influencing delay time and coronary arterial density during coronary angiography with DSCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lijun Tang; Xiaomei Zhu; Yi Xu; Tongfu Yu; Hai Xu; Jinhua Tang; Dehang Wang; Dogra, Vikram

    2011-01-01

    Background: CT angiography (CTA) plays an important role in diagnosing coronary arterial disease. Delay time and density of the coronary arteries related with patient-specific factors are essential for getting an optimal CTA image. Purpose: To investigate various factors influencing delay time and coronary arterial density during coronary CTA with dual source CT. Material and Methods: One hundred and sixteen consecutive subjects who underwent cardiac DSCT with retrospective ECG-gating were included. Factors including gender, age, height, weight, transversal cardiac diameter (TCD), transversal thoracic diameter (TTD), heart rate (HR), body surface area (BSA = [weight x height/3600]1/2) and cardiothoracic ratio (CTR = TCD/TTD) were recorded, measured and calculated before administration of contrast media during coronary CT angiography. Delay time was determined as duration from the beginning of the injection to the density in the descending aorta at the level of right main pulmonary artery reaching a threshold of 100 HU. Coronary arterial density was measured at the mid portion of the right coronary artery. Regression analysis and stepwise regression analysis were used to investigate the influence of these factors on delay time and coronary arterial density. Results: Delay time decreased with an increasing HR and it was shorter in women than men. Delay time increased with an increasing TCD. Delay time could be predicted by the formula: DT = 16.651-0.110 x HR + 1.902 x gender + 0.394 x TCD (where DT is abbreviation for delay time, gender is 0 for women and 1 for men). Coronary arterial density decreased with an increasing HR and weight. Coronary arterial density could be predicted by the formula: CAD = 923.42-4.099 x HR-3.293 x weight (CAD = coronary arterial density). There was no relationship between the other factors mentioned above and delay time or coronary arterial density. Conclusion: Delay time is influenced by HR, gender and TCD. Coronary arterial density

  10. Factors influencing delay time and coronary arterial density during coronary angiography with DSCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lijun; Zhu, Xiaomei; Xu, Yi; Yu, Tongfu; Xu, Hai; Tang, Jinhua; Dogra, Vikram; Wang, Dehang

    2011-02-01

    CT angiography (CTA) plays an important role in diagnosing coronary arterial disease. Delay time and density of the coronary arteries related with patient-specific factors are essential for getting an optimal CTA image. To investigate various factors influencing delay time and coronary arterial density during coronary CTA with dual source CT. One hundred and sixteen consecutive subjects who underwent cardiac DSCT with retrospective ECG-gating were included. Factors including gender, age, height, weight, transversal cardiac diameter (TCD), transversal thoracic diameter (TTD), heart rate (HR), body surface area (BSA = [weight × height/3600](1/2)) and cardiothoracic ratio (CTR = TCD/TTD) were recorded, measured and calculated before administration of contrast media during coronary CT angiography. Delay time was determined as duration from the beginning of the injection to the density in the descending aorta at the level of right main pulmonary artery reaching a threshold of 100 HU. Coronary arterial density was measured at the mid portion of the right coronary artery. Regression analysis and stepwise regression analysis were used to investigate the influence of these factors on delay time and coronary arterial density. Delay time decreased with an increasing HR and it was shorter in women than men. Delay time increased with an increasing TCD. Delay time could be predicted by the formula: DT = 16.651-0.110 × HR + 1.902 × gender + 0.394 × TCD (where DT is abbreviation for delay time, gender is 0 for women and 1 for men). Coronary arterial density decreased with an increasing HR and weight. Coronary arterial density could be predicted by the formula: CAD = 923.42-4.099 × HR-3.293 × weight (CAD = coronary arterial density). There was no relationship between the other factors mentioned above and delay time or coronary arterial density. Delay time is influenced by HR, gender and TCD. Coronary arterial density also changes with HR and weight. So HR, gender, TCD and

  11. Microwave measurements of the time evolution of electron density in the T-11M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, V.G.; Petrov, A.A.; Malyshev, A.Yu.; Markov, V.K.; Babarykin, A.V.

    2004-01-01

    Unambiguous diagnostics intended for measuring the time behavior of the electron density and monitoring the line-averaged plasma density in the T-11M tokamak are described. The time behavior of the plasma density in the T-11M tokamak is measured by a multichannel phase-jump-free microwave polarization interferometer based on the Cotton-Mouton effect. After increasing the number of simultaneously operating interferometer channels and enhancing the sensitivity of measurements, it became possible to measure the time evolution of the plasma density profile in the T-11M tokamak. The first results from such measurements in various operating regimes of the T-11M tokamak are presented. The measurement and data processing techniques are described, the measurement errors are analyzed, and the results obtained are discussed. We propose using a pulsed time-of-flight refractometer to monitor the average plasma density in the T-11M tokamak. The refractometer emits nanosecond microwave probing pulses with a carrier frequency that is higher than the plasma frequency and, thus, operates in the transmission mode. A version of the instrument has been developed with a carrier frequency of 140 GHz, which allows one to measure the average density in regimes with a nominal T-11M plasma density of (3-5) x 10 13 cm -3 . Results are presented from the first measurements of the average density in the T-11M tokamak with the help of a pulsed time-of-flight refractometer by probing the plasma in the equatorial plane in a regime with the reflection of the probing radiation from the inner wall of the vacuum chamber

  12. Optimal condition of torrefaction for high energy density solid fuel of fast growing tree species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young-Hun; Na, Byeong-Il; Lee, Hyoung-Woo; Lee, Jae-Won [College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Byoung-Jun [Korea Forest Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    The torrefaction properties of Acacia (Acacia mangium) and Albasia (Paraserianthes falcataria) were investigated by response surface methodology. Torrefaction was performed at 220-280 .deg. C for 20-80 min depending on severity factor. Carbon content in the torrefied biomass increased with severity factor, whereas hydrogen and oxygen contents decreased both biomass. The calorific value of torrefied Acacia ranged from 20.03 to 21.60 MJ/kg, suggesting that the energy contained in the torrefied biomass increased by 5.09 to 13.62%, when compared with that in the untreated biomass. However, the calorific value of Albasia was relatively low, compared to that of torrefied Acacia. The weight loss of Albasia was higher than that of Acacia under a given torrefaction condition. The reaction temperature for torrefaction was an important factor to obtain high energy yield, whereas the effect of time was considerable lower. High temperature and short torrefaction time is required to obtain the highest energy yield from torrefaction using Acacia and Albasia.

  13. Predicting critical transitions in dynamical systems from time series using nonstationary probability density modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwasniok, Frank

    2013-11-01

    A time series analysis method for predicting the probability density of a dynamical system is proposed. A nonstationary parametric model of the probability density is estimated from data within a maximum likelihood framework and then extrapolated to forecast the future probability density and explore the system for critical transitions or tipping points. A full systematic account of parameter uncertainty is taken. The technique is generic, independent of the underlying dynamics of the system. The method is verified on simulated data and then applied to prediction of Arctic sea-ice extent.

  14. On the relation between texture perception and fundamental mechanical parameters for liquids and time dependent solids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, van T.

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Aspects of the relationship between texture perception in the mouth and fundamental mechanical parameters for liquids and time dependent solids are discussed. The emphasis is on the physical side of the relation. The importance is stressed of the incorporation of a thorough knowledge of

  15. Time-dependent density-functional theory in the projector augmented-wave method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walter, Michael; Häkkinen, Hannu; Lehtovaara, Lauri

    2008-01-01

    We present the implementation of the time-dependent density-functional theory both in linear-response and in time-propagation formalisms using the projector augmented-wave method in real-space grids. The two technically very different methods are compared in the linear-response regime where we...

  16. Density perturbations due to the inhomogeneous discrete spatial structure of space-time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, C.

    1998-01-01

    For the case that space-time permits an inhomogeneous discrete spatial structure due to varying gravitational fields or a foam-like structure of space-time, it is demonstrated that thermodynamic reasoning implies that matter-density perturbations will arise in the early universe

  17. A Fast Density-Based Clustering Algorithm for Real-Time Internet of Things Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying Wah, Teh

    2014-01-01

    Data streams are continuously generated over time from Internet of Things (IoT) devices. The faster all of this data is analyzed, its hidden trends and patterns discovered, and new strategies created, the faster action can be taken, creating greater value for organizations. Density-based method is a prominent class in clustering data streams. It has the ability to detect arbitrary shape clusters, to handle outlier, and it does not need the number of clusters in advance. Therefore, density-based clustering algorithm is a proper choice for clustering IoT streams. Recently, several density-based algorithms have been proposed for clustering data streams. However, density-based clustering in limited time is still a challenging issue. In this paper, we propose a density-based clustering algorithm for IoT streams. The method has fast processing time to be applicable in real-time application of IoT devices. Experimental results show that the proposed approach obtains high quality results with low computation time on real and synthetic datasets. PMID:25110753

  18. A fast density-based clustering algorithm for real-time Internet of Things stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Amineh; Saboohi, Hadi; Wah, Teh Ying; Herawan, Tutut

    2014-01-01

    Data streams are continuously generated over time from Internet of Things (IoT) devices. The faster all of this data is analyzed, its hidden trends and patterns discovered, and new strategies created, the faster action can be taken, creating greater value for organizations. Density-based method is a prominent class in clustering data streams. It has the ability to detect arbitrary shape clusters, to handle outlier, and it does not need the number of clusters in advance. Therefore, density-based clustering algorithm is a proper choice for clustering IoT streams. Recently, several density-based algorithms have been proposed for clustering data streams. However, density-based clustering in limited time is still a challenging issue. In this paper, we propose a density-based clustering algorithm for IoT streams. The method has fast processing time to be applicable in real-time application of IoT devices. Experimental results show that the proposed approach obtains high quality results with low computation time on real and synthetic datasets.

  19. Timing of solid food introduction and obesity: Hong Kong's "children of 1997" birth cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shi Lin; Leung, Gabriel M; Lam, Tai Hing; Schooling, C Mary

    2013-05-01

    Some observational studies in Western settings show that early introduction of solid food is associated with subsequent obesity. However, introduction of solid food and obesity share social patterning. We examined the association of the timing of the introduction of solid food with BMI and overweight (including obesity) into adolescence in a developed non-Western setting, in which childhood obesity is less clearly socially patterned. We used generalized estimating equation models to estimate the adjusted associations of the timing of the introduction of solid food (8 months) with BMI z score and overweight (including obesity) at different growth phases (infancy, childhood, and puberty) in 7809 children (88% follow-up) from a Chinese birth cohort, "Children of 1997." We assessed if the associations varied with gender or breastfeeding. We used multiple imputation for missing exposure and confounders. The introduction of solid food at associated with lower family socioeconomic position (SEP) but was not clearly associated with BMI or overweight (including obesity) in infancy [mean difference in BMI z score: 0.01; 95% confidence interval (CI): -0.14 to 0.17], childhood (0.14; 95% CI: -0.11 to 0.40), or at puberty (0.22; 95% CI: -0.07 to 0.52), adjusted for SEP and infant and maternal characteristics. In a non-Western developed setting, there was no clear association of the early introduction of solid food with childhood obesity. Together with the inconsistent evidence from studies in Western settings, this finding suggests that any observed associations might simply be residual confounding by SEP.

  20. Spatially heterogeneous dynamics investigated via a time-dependent four-point density correlation function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lacevic, N.; Starr, F. W.; Schrøder, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    correlation function g4(r,t) and corresponding "structure factor" S4(q,t) which measure the spatial correlations between the local liquid density at two points in space, each at two different times, and so are sensitive to dynamical heterogeneity. We study g4(r,t) and S4(q,t) via molecular dynamics......Relaxation in supercooled liquids above their glass transition and below the onset temperature of "slow" dynamics involves the correlated motion of neighboring particles. This correlated motion results in the appearance of spatially heterogeneous dynamics or "dynamical heterogeneity." Traditional...... two-point time-dependent density correlation functions, while providing information about the transient "caging" of particles on cooling, are unable to provide sufficiently detailed information about correlated motion and dynamical heterogeneity. Here, we study a four-point, time-dependent density...

  1. Continuous time random walk model with asymptotical probability density of waiting times via inverse Mittag-Leffler function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yingjie; Chen, Wen

    2018-04-01

    The mean squared displacement (MSD) of the traditional ultraslow diffusion is a logarithmic function of time. Recently, the continuous time random walk model is employed to characterize this ultraslow diffusion dynamics by connecting the heavy-tailed logarithmic function and its variation as the asymptotical waiting time density. In this study we investigate the limiting waiting time density of a general ultraslow diffusion model via the inverse Mittag-Leffler function, whose special case includes the traditional logarithmic ultraslow diffusion model. The MSD of the general ultraslow diffusion model is analytically derived as an inverse Mittag-Leffler function, and is observed to increase even more slowly than that of the logarithmic function model. The occurrence of very long waiting time in the case of the inverse Mittag-Leffler function has the largest probability compared with the power law model and the logarithmic function model. The Monte Carlo simulations of one dimensional sample path of a single particle are also performed. The results show that the inverse Mittag-Leffler waiting time density is effective in depicting the general ultraslow random motion.

  2. Effects of nest density, location, and timing on breeding success of Caspian Terns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antolos, Michelle; Roby, D.D.; Lyons, Donald E.; Anderson, Scott K.; Collis, K.

    2006-01-01

    One of the proposed benefits of colonial nesting in birds is the protection afforded against avian predators. This advantage may be counter-balanced by the negative effects of intraspecific aggression on breeding success. Effects of nest density, nest location within the colony, and timing of nest initiation on productivity of Caspian Terns (Sterna caspia) were investigated on Crescent Island in the mid-Columbia River, Washington, USA. In the absence of intense nest predation at the Crescent Island tern colony, it was hypothesized that nest density would be negatively associated with productivity. A rangefinder was used to determine spatial distribution of Caspian Tern nests, and these data used to calculate nest characteristics (nest density, nearest neighbor distance, and distance to colony edge) for a randomly-selected subset of nests monitored for nest chronology and productivity. Productivity did not differ between nests in high- and low-density areas of the colony, and was positively associated with earlier nest initiation. Early nests were more productive, were located in areas of higher nest density, and were further from the colony edge than late nests. The strong effect of timing may have been attributable to seasonal declines in prey resources for terns at this site. Our results suggest that Caspian Terns nesting at the highest densities observed in this study did not incur immediate reproductive costs, despite increased potential for encounters between chicks and aggressive conspecific adults.

  3. Quantitative density measurements from a real-time neutron radiography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McRae, D.D.; Jenkins, R.W. Jr.; Brenizer, J.S.; Tobin, K.W.; Hosticka, B.; Sulcoski, M.F.

    1986-01-01

    An advanced video system has been assembled from commercially available equipment to support the real-time neutron radiography facility established jointly by the University of Virginia Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics, and the Philip Morris Research Center. A schematic diagram of the equipment used for real-time neutron radiography is presented. To obtain quantitative density measurements with this system, several modifications of both hardware and image processing software were required. After implementation of these changes, the system was capable of determining material densities by measuring the degree of neutron attenuation

  4. A simple method to calculate first-passage time densities with arbitrary initial conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyberg, Markus; Ambjörnsson, Tobias; Lizana, Ludvig

    2016-06-01

    Numerous applications all the way from biology and physics to economics depend on the density of first crossings over a boundary. Motivated by the lack of general purpose analytical tools for computing first-passage time densities (FPTDs) for complex problems, we propose a new simple method based on the independent interval approximation (IIA). We generalise previous formulations of the IIA to include arbitrary initial conditions as well as to deal with discrete time and non-smooth continuous time processes. We derive a closed form expression for the FPTD in z and Laplace-transform space to a boundary in one dimension. Two classes of problems are analysed in detail: discrete time symmetric random walks (Markovian) and continuous time Gaussian stationary processes (Markovian and non-Markovian). Our results are in good agreement with Langevin dynamics simulations.

  5. Decay of hollow states in time-dependent density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapoor, Varun; Bauer, Dieter [Institut fuer Physik, Wismarsche Str. 43-45, Universitaet Rostock, Rostock-18051 (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Hollow or multiply excited states are inaccessible in time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) using adiabatic Kohn-Sham potentials. We determine the exact Kohn Sham (KS) potential for doubly excited states in an exactly solvable model Helium atom. The exact single-particle density corresponds to the energetically lowest quasi-stationary state in the exact KS potential. We describe how this exact potential controls the decay by a barrier whose origin is traced back to phase of the exact KS orbital. The potential controls the barrier height and width in order for the density to tunnel out and decay with the same rate as the doubly excited state in the ab initio time-dependent Schroedinger calculation. Instead, adiabatic KS potentials only show direct photoionization but no autoionization. A frequency-dependent linear response kernel would be necessary in order to capture the decay of autoionizing states.

  6. Time-dependent density functional theory for many-electron systems interacting with cavity photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokatly, I V

    2013-06-07

    Time-dependent (current) density functional theory for many-electron systems strongly coupled to quantized electromagnetic modes of a microcavity is proposed. It is shown that the electron-photon wave function is a unique functional of the electronic (current) density and the expectation values of photonic coordinates. The Kohn-Sham system is constructed, which allows us to calculate the above basic variables by solving self-consistent equations for noninteracting particles. We suggest possible approximations for the exchange-correlation potentials and discuss implications of this approach for the theory of open quantum systems. In particular we show that it naturally leads to time-dependent density functional theory for systems coupled to the Caldeira-Leggett bath.

  7. Simulating variable-density flows with time-consistent integration of Navier-Stokes equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaoyi; Pantano, Carlos

    2017-11-01

    In this talk, we present several features of a high-order semi-implicit variable-density low-Mach Navier-Stokes solver. A new formulation to solve pressure Poisson-like equation of variable-density flows is highlighted. With this formulation of the numerical method, we are able to solve all variables with a uniform order of accuracy in time (consistent with the time integrator being used). The solver is primarily designed to perform direct numerical simulations for turbulent premixed flames. Therefore, we also address other important elements, such as energy-stable boundary conditions, synthetic turbulence generation, and flame anchoring method. Numerical examples include classical non-reacting constant/variable-density flows, as well as turbulent premixed flames.

  8. Real-time control of the plasma density profile on ASDEX upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mlynek, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    The tokamak concept currently is the most promising approach to future power generation by controlled thermonuclear fusion. The spatial distribution of the particle density in the toroidally confined fusion plasma is of particular importance. This thesis work therefore focuses on the question as to what extent the shape of the density profile can be actively controlled by a feedback loop in the fusion experiment ASDEX Upgrade. There are basically two essential requirements for such feedback control of the density profile, which has been experimentally demonstrated within the scope of this thesis work: On the one hand, for this purpose the density profile must be continuously calculated under real-time constraints during a plasma discharge. The calculation of the density profile is based on the measurements of a sub-millimeter interferometer, which provides the line-integrated electron density along 5 chords through the plasma. Interferometric density measurements can suffer from counting errors by integer multiples of 2π when detecting the phase difference between a probing and a reference beam. As such measurement errors have severe impact on the reconstructed density profile, one major part of this work consists in the development of new readout electronics for the interferometer, which allows for detection of such measurement errors in real-time with high reliability. A further part of this work is the design of a computer algorithm which reconstructs the spatial distribution of the plasma density from the line-integrated measurements. This algorithm has to be implemented on a computer which communicates the measured data to other computers in real-time, especially to the tokamak control system. On the other hand, a second fundamental requirement for the successful implementation of a feedback controller is the identification of at least one actuator which enables a modification of the density profile. Here, electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) has been

  9. Vibrationally resolved UV/Vis spectroscopy with time-dependent density functional based tight binding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruger, R.; Niehaus, T.; van Lenthe, E.; Heine, T.; Visscher, L.

    2016-01-01

    We report a time-dependent density functional based tight-binding (TD-DFTB) scheme for the calculation of UV/Vis spectra, explicitly taking into account the excitation of nuclear vibrations via the adiabatic Hessian Franck-Condon method with a harmonic approximation for the nu- clear wavefunction.

  10. Effects of habitat size and quality on equilibrium density and extinction time of Sorex araneus populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klok, C.; Roos, de A.M.

    1998-01-01

    1. The effects of changes in habitat size and quality on the expected population density and the expected time to extinction of Sorex araneus are studied by means of mathematical models that incorporate demographic stochasticity. 2. Habitat size is characterized by the number of territories, while

  11. Interdependence of initial cell density, drug concentration and exposure time revealed by real-time impedance spectroscopic cytotoxicity assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caviglia, Claudia; Zor, Kinga; Canepa, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the combined effect of the initial cell density (12 500, 35 000, 75 000, and 100 000 cells cm−2) and concentration of the anti-cancer drug doxorubicin on HeLa cells by performing timedependent cytotoxicity assays using real-time electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. A correlation...... between the rate of cell death and the initial cell seeding density was found at 2.5 μM doxorubicin concentration, whereas this was not observed at 5 or 100 μM. By sensing the changes in the cell–substrate interaction using impedance spectroscopy under static conditions, the onset of cytotoxicity...... was observed 5 h earlier than when using a standard colorimetric end-point assay (MTS) which measures changes in the mitochondrial metabolism. Furthermore, with the MTS assay no cytotoxicity was observed after 15 h of incubation with 2.5 μM doxorubicin, whereas the impedance showed at this time point cell...

  12. Error Analysis of a Fractional Time-Stepping Technique for Incompressible Flows with Variable Density

    KAUST Repository

    Guermond, J.-L.; Salgado, Abner J.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the convergence properties of a new fractional time-stepping technique for the solution of the variable density incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The main feature of this method is that, contrary to other existing algorithms, the pressure is determined by just solving one Poisson equation per time step. First-order error estimates are proved, and stability of a formally second-order variant of the method is established. © 2011 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  13. Effect of fermentation time of mixture of solid and liquid wastes from tapioca industry to percentage reduction of TSS (Total Suspended Solids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandia, S.; Tanata, S.; Rachel, M.; Octiva, C.; Sialagan, N.

    2018-02-01

    The waste from tapioca industry is as an organic waste that contains many important compounds such as carbohydrate, protein, and glucose. This research as aimed to know the effect of fermentation time from solid waste combined with waste-water from the tapioca industry to percentage reduction of TSS. The study was started by mixing the solid and liquid wastes from tapioca industry at a ratio of 70:30, 60:40, 50:50, 40:60, and 30:70 (w/w) with a starter from solid waste of cattle in a batch anaerobic digester. The percentage reduction of TSS was 72.2289 at a ratio by weight of the composition of solid and liquid wastes from tapioca industry was 70:30 after 30 days of fermentation time.

  14. Correlation Between Contrast Time-Density Time on Digital Subtraction Angiography and Flow: An in Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunozzi, Denise; Shakur, Sophia F; Ismail, Rahim; Linninger, Andreas; Hsu, Chih-Yang; Charbel, Fady T; Alaraj, Ali

    2018-02-01

    Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) provides an excellent anatomic characterization of cerebral vasculature, but hemodynamic assessment is often qualitative and subjective. Various clinical algorithms have been produced to semiquantify flow from the data obtained from DSA, but few have tested them against reliable flow values. An arched flow model was created and injected with contrast material. Seventeen injections were acquired in anterior-posterior and lateral DSA projections, and 4 injections were acquired in oblique projection. Image intensity change over the angiogram cycle of each DSA run was analyzed through a custom MATLAB code. Time-density plots obtained were divided into 3 components (time-density times, TDTs): TDT 10%-100% (time needed for contrast material to change image intensity from 10% to 100%), TDT 100%-10% (time needed for contrast material to change image intensity from 100% to 10%), and TDT 25%-25% (time needed for contrast material to change from 25% image intensity to 25%). Time-density index (TDI) was defined as model cross-sectional area to TDT ratio, and it was measured against different flow rates. TDI 10%-100% , TDI 100%-10% , and TDI 25%-25% all correlated significantly with flow (P < 0.001). TDI 10%-100% , TDI 100%-10% , and TDI 25%-25% showed, respectively, a correlation coefficient of 0.91, 0.91, and 0.97 in the anterior-posterior DSA projections (P < 0.001). In the lateral DSA projection, TDI 100%-10% showed a weaker correlation (r = 0.57; P = 0.03). Also in the oblique DSA projection, TDIs correlated significantly with flow. TDI on DSA correlates significantly with flow. Although in vitro studies might overlook conditions that occur in patients, this method appears to correlate with the flow and could offer a semiquantitative method to evaluate the cerebral blood flow. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Varying plant density and harvest time to optimize cowpea leaf yield and nutrient content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohler, T. A.; Nielsen, S. S.; Mitchell, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    Plant density and harvest time were manipulated to optimize vegetative (foliar) productivity of cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.] canopies for future dietary use in controlled ecological life-support systems as vegetables or salad greens. Productivity was measured as total shoot and edible dry weights (DW), edible yield rate [(EYR) grams DW per square meter per day], shoot harvest index [(SHI) grams DW per edible gram DW total shoot], and yield-efficiency rate [(YER) grams DW edible per square meter per day per grams DW nonedible]. Cowpeas were grown in a greenhouse for leaf-only harvest at 14, 28, 42, 56, 84, or 99 plants/m2 and were harvested 20, 30, 40, or 50 days after planting (DAP). Shoot and edible dry weights increased as plant density and time to harvest increased. A maximum of 1189 g shoot DW/m2 and 594 g edible DW/m2 were achieved at an estimated plant density of 85 plants/m2 and harvest 50 DAP. EYR also increased as plant density and time to harvest increased. An EYR of 11 g m-2 day-1 was predicted to occur at 86 plants/m2 and harvest 50 DAP. SHI and YER were not affected by plant density. However, the highest values of SHI (64%) and YER (1.3 g m-2 day-1 g-1) were attained when cowpeas were harvested 20 DAP. The average fat and ash contents [dry-weight basis (dwb)] of harvested leaves remained constant regardless of harvest time. Average protein content increased from 25% DW at 30 DAP to 45% DW at 50 DAP. Carbohydrate content declined from 50% DW at 30 DAP to 45% DW at 50 DAP. Total dietary fiber content (dwb) of the leaves increased from 19% to 26% as time to harvest increased from 20 to 50 days.

  16. Universal time dependence of nighttime F region densities at high latitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaujardiere, O.D.L.; Wickwar, V.B.; Caudal, G.

    1985-01-01

    Coordinated EISCAT, Chatanika, and Millstone Hill incoherent scatter radar observations have revealed that in the auroral zone, the nighttime F region densities vary substantially with the longitude of the observing site: EISCAT's densities are the largest and Millstone Hill's are the lowest. The nighttime F region densities measured by the individual radars are not uniform: the regions where the densities are maximum are the so-called ''blobs'' or ''patches'' that have been reported previously. The observations are consistent with the hypothesis that the nighttime densities are produced in significant amounts not by particle precipitation, but by solar EUV radiation, and that they have been transported across the polar cap. The observed differences can be explained by the offset of the geographic and geomagnetic poles. A larger portion of the magnetospheric convection pattern is sunlit when EISCAT is in the midnight sector than when Chatanika is. In winter, when Millstone Hill is in the midnight sector, almost all the auroral oval is in darkness. This universal time effect, which was observed on all coordinated three-radar experiments (September 1981 to February 1982), is illustrated using two periods of coincident radar and satellite observations: November 18--19, and December 15--16, 1981. These two periods were selected because they corresponded to relatively steady conditions. Dynamics Explorer (DE) measurements are used to aid in interpreting the radar observations. De 1 auroral images show what portion of the oval was sunlit. DE 2 data are used to measure the ion drift across the polar cap. Because the altitude of the ionization peak was high, the decay time of the F region density was substantially longer than the transit time across the polar cap

  17. Nonadiabatic Dynamics in Single-Electron Tunneling Devices with Time-Dependent Density-Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmann, Niklas; Splettstoesser, Janine; Helbig, Nicole

    2018-04-01

    We simulate the dynamics of a single-electron source, modeled as a quantum dot with on-site Coulomb interaction and tunnel coupling to an adjacent lead in time-dependent density-functional theory. Based on this system, we develop a time-nonlocal exchange-correlation potential by exploiting analogies with quantum-transport theory. The time nonlocality manifests itself in a dynamical potential step. We explicitly link the time evolution of the dynamical step to physical relaxation timescales of the electron dynamics. Finally, we discuss prospects for simulations of larger mesoscopic systems.

  18. Study of combustion properties of a solid propellant by highly time-resolved passive FTIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Lin; Li, Yan; Liu, Bingping; Wang, Junde [Laboratory of Advanced Spectroscopy, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210014 (China)

    2006-10-15

    With a time resolution of 0.125 s and a spectral resolution of 4 cm{sup -1}, emission spectra of the combustion process of a solid propellant were recorded by highly time-resolved passive FTIR. Some gaseous combustion products, such as H{sub 2}O, CO, CO{sub 2}, NO and HCl, were distinguished by the characteristic emission band of each molecule. The equation for flame temperature calculation based on the diatomic molecule emission fine structure theory was improved through judicious utilization of the spectral running number 'm' which makes the temperature measurement simpler and faster. Some combustion information of the solid propellant had been given including the characteristic spectral profile, the distribution of the absolute spectral energy, the distribution of the combustion flame temperature, and the concentration distributions of HCl and NO versus burning time. The results will provide theoretical and experimental bases for improving the formula and raising combustion efficiency of solid propellant, and developing the design of rocket motor, infrared guidance and antiguidance systems. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  19. STUDY OF EFFECTIVE TIME OF UNDILUTED FIXINGSOLUTIONS INLIGHTENING OF THE HIGH DENSITY PERIAPICAL RADIOGRAPHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A ZAMANI NASER

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dental radiographs are occationally too dark because of different reasons such as over exposure, high concen-tration of developing solution and over development. Different chemicals are used to lighten these radiographs. In this research the undiluted fixed solution for the first time are tested and efficiency time of this solution in reducing the density of dark radiographs were evaluated. Method: Use of a dry mandible containing some teeth and 98 E speed periapical radiographs were prepared as foolow: A film wasexposed with 0.4 S... as positive control (ideal. 97 films were exposed with 1.8 S (dark and unreadable. Out of 97, one radiograph kept as positive control and remaining films prepared for study. All of radiographs developed and fixed with automatic processor in the same conditio. Out of 96 dark radiograph, 3 was used for pilot study and inserted in the undiluted fixing solution in different time. (2.5, 3 and 3.5 hrs. The result of pilot study showed that aii3 radiographs showed reductionin density and radiographs with her reduction time was closest to positive control for density and diognostic quality and radiograph with 2.5 hrs reduction time and 3.5 hre became darker and lighter as compared to positive control. The remaining 93 high density radiographs were divided into 3 groups, 31 in each group (group 1,2 and 3 first group 2.5 hrs, second 3 hrs and the third group 3.5 hrs were kept in undiluted fixed solution. for this, disposable glasses were used and in each glass a radiograph were inserted. The research time was spring and the temperature was about 2609 (without coolant. Evaluation of radiographs: For evaluation of radiographs 2 methods were used: First method used was: Densitometry: By this method the density of total lightened radiographs, positive control and negative control were determined. Another method was determined diagnostic quality of radiographs visually by radiologists, throng this way: Special

  20. Tile Drainage Density Reduces Groundwater Travel Times and Compromises Riparian Buffer Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Keith E; Wolter, Calvin F; Isenhart, Thomas M; Schultz, Richard C

    2015-11-01

    Strategies to reduce nitrate-nitrogen (nitrate) pollution delivered to streams often seek to increase groundwater residence time to achieve measureable results, yet the effects of tile drainage on residence time have not been well documented. In this study, we used a geographic information system groundwater travel time model to quantify the effects of artificial subsurface drainage on groundwater travel times in the 7443-ha Bear Creek watershed in north-central Iowa. Our objectives were to evaluate how mean groundwater travel times changed with increasing drainage intensity and to assess how tile drainage density reduces groundwater contributions to riparian buffers. Results indicate that mean groundwater travel times are reduced with increasing degrees of tile drainage. Mean groundwater travel times decreased from 5.6 to 1.1 yr, with drainage densities ranging from 0.005 m (7.6 mi) to 0.04 m (62 mi), respectively. Model simulations indicate that mean travel times with tile drainage are more than 150 times faster than those that existed before settlement. With intensive drainage, less than 2% of the groundwater in the basin appears to flow through a perennial stream buffer, thereby reducing the effectiveness of this practice to reduce stream nitrate loads. Hence, strategies, such as reconnecting tile drainage to buffers, are promising because they increase groundwater residence times in tile-drained watersheds. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  1. Multi-configuration time-dependent density-functional theory based on range separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fromager, E.; Knecht, S.; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard

    2013-01-01

    Multi-configuration range-separated density-functional theory is extended to the time-dependent regime. An exact variational formulation is derived. The approximation, which consists in combining a long-range Multi-Configuration- Self-Consistent Field (MCSCF) treatment with an adiabatic short...... (srGGA) approximations. As expected, when modeling long-range interactions with the MCSCF model instead of the adiabatic Buijse-Baerends density-matrix functional as recently proposed by Pernal [J. Chem. Phys. 136, 184105 (2012)10.1063/1.4712019], the description of both the 1D doubly-excited state...

  2. Predictive densities for day-ahead electricity prices using time-adaptive quantile regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jónsson, Tryggvi; Pinson, Pierre; Madsen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    A large part of the decision-making problems actors of the power system are facing on a daily basis requires scenarios for day-ahead electricity market prices. These scenarios are most likely to be generated based on marginal predictive densities for such prices, then enhanced with a temporal...... dependence structure. A semi-parametric methodology for generating such densities is presented: it includes: (i) a time-adaptive quantile regression model for the 5%–95% quantiles; and (ii) a description of the distribution tails with exponential distributions. The forecasting skill of the proposed model...

  3. Association of unipedal standing time and bone mineral density in community-dwelling Japanese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, A; Toba, N; Takeda, M; Suzuki, M; Abe, Y; Aoyagi, K; Nakamura, T

    2009-05-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) and physical performance of the lower extremities decrease with age. In community-dwelling Japanese women, unipedal standing time, timed up and go test, and age are associated with BMD while in women aged 70 years and over, unipedal standing time is associated with BMD. The aim of this study was to clarify whether unipedal standing time is significantly associated with BMD in community-dwelling women. The subjects were 90 community-dwelling Japanese women aged 54.7 years. BMD of the second metacarpal bone was measured by computed X-ray densitometry. We measured unipedal standing time as well as timed up and go test to assess physical performance of the lower extremities. Unipedal standing time decreased with increased age. Timed up and go test significantly correlated with age. Low BMD was significantly associated with old age, short unipedal standing time, and long timed up and go test. Stepwise regression analysis revealed that age, unipedal standing time, and timed up and go test were significant factors associated with BMD. In 21 participants aged 70 years and over, body weight and unipedal standing time, but not age, were significantly associated with BMD. BMD and physical performance of the lower extremities decrease with older age. Unipedal standing time, timed up and go test, and age are associated with BMD in community-dwelling Japanese women. In women aged 70 years and over, unipedal standing time is significantly associated with BMD.

  4. Tomographic reconstruction of the time-averaged density distribution in two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fincke, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    The technique of reconstructive tomography has been applied to the measurement of time-average density and density distribution in a two-phase flow field. The technique of reconstructive tomography provides a model-independent method of obtaining flow-field density information. A tomographic densitometer system for the measurement of two-phase flow has two unique problems: a limited number of data values and a correspondingly coarse reconstruction grid. These problems were studied both experimentally through the use of prototype hardware on a 3-in. pipe, and analytically through computer generation of simulated data. The prototype data were taken on phantoms constructed of all Plexiglas and Plexiglas laminated with wood and polyurethane foam. Reconstructions obtained from prototype data are compared with reconstructions from the simulated data. Also presented are some representative results in a horizontal air/water flow

  5. X-ray absorption in insulators with non-Hermitian real-time time-dependent density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Ranelka G; Balhoff, Mary C; Lopata, Kenneth

    2015-02-10

    Non-Hermitian real-time time-dependent density functional theory was used to compute the Si L-edge X-ray absorption spectrum of α-quartz using an embedded finite cluster model and atom-centered basis sets. Using tuned range-separated functionals and molecular orbital-based imaginary absorbing potentials, the excited states spanning the pre-edge to ∼20 eV above the ionization edge were obtained in good agreement with experimental data. This approach is generalizable to TDDFT studies of core-level spectroscopy and dynamics in a wide range of materials.

  6. Local activation time sampling density for atrial tachycardia contact mapping: how much is enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Steven E; Harrison, James L; Chubb, Henry; Whitaker, John; Kiedrowicz, Radek; Rinaldi, Christopher A; Cooklin, Michael; Wright, Matthew; Niederer, Steven; O'Neill, Mark D

    2018-02-01

    Local activation time (LAT) mapping forms the cornerstone of atrial tachycardia diagnosis. Although anatomic and positional accuracy of electroanatomic mapping (EAM) systems have been validated, the effect of electrode sampling density on LAT map reconstruction is not known. Here, we study the effect of chamber geometry and activation complexity on optimal LAT sampling density using a combined in silico and in vivo approach. In vivo 21 atrial tachycardia maps were studied in three groups: (1) focal activation, (2) macro-re-entry, and (3) localized re-entry. In silico activation was simulated on a 4×4cm atrial monolayer, sampled randomly at 0.25-10 points/cm2 and used to re-interpolate LAT maps. Activation patterns were studied in the geometrically simple porcine right atrium (RA) and complex human left atrium (LA). Activation complexity was introduced into the porcine RA by incomplete inter-caval linear ablation. In all cases, optimal sampling density was defined as the highest density resulting in minimal further error reduction in the re-interpolated maps. Optimal sampling densities for LA tachycardias were 0.67 ± 0.17 points/cm2 (focal activation), 1.05 ± 0.32 points/cm2 (macro-re-entry) and 1.23 ± 0.26 points/cm2 (localized re-entry), P = 0.0031. Increasing activation complexity was associated with increased optimal sampling density both in silico (focal activation 1.09 ± 0.14 points/cm2; re-entry 1.44 ± 0.49 points/cm2; spiral-wave 1.50 ± 0.34 points/cm2, P density (0.61 ± 0.22 points/cm2 vs. 1.0 ± 0.34 points/cm2, P = 0.0015). Optimal sampling densities can be identified to maximize diagnostic yield of LAT maps. Greater sampling density is required to correctly reveal complex activation and represent activation across complex geometries. Overall, the optimal sampling density for LAT map interpolation defined in this study was ∼1.0-1.5 points/cm2. Published on behalf of the European Society of

  7. Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis for functionals of the time-dependent nuclide density field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.L.; Weisbin, C.R.

    1978-04-01

    An approach to extend the present ORNL sensitivity program to include functionals of the time-dependent nuclide density field is developed. An adjoint equation for the nuclide field was derived previously by using generalized perturbation theory; the present derivation makes use of a variational principle and results in the same equation. The physical significance of this equation is discussed and compared to that of the time-dependent neutron adjoint equation. Computational requirements for determining sensitivity profiles and uncertainties for functionals of the time-dependent nuclide density vector are developed within the framework of the existing FORSS system; in this way the current capability is significantly extended. The development, testing, and use of an adjoint version of the ORIGEN isotope generation and depletion code are documented. Finally, a sample calculation is given which estimates the uncertainty in the plutonium inventory at shutdown of a PWR due to assumed uncertainties in uranium and plutonium cross sections. 8 figures, 4 tables

  8. Time dependent density functional theory of light absorption in dense plasmas: application to iron-plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimaldi, F.; Grimaldi-Lecourt, A.; Dharma-Wardana, M.W.C.

    1986-10-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a simple time-dependent calculation of the light absorption cross section for a strongly coupled partially degenerate plasma so as to transcend the usual single-particle picture. This is achieved within the density functional theory (DFT) of plasmas by generalizing the method given by Zangwill and Soven for atomic calculations at zero temperature. The essential feature of the time dependent DFT is the correct treatment of the relaxation of the system under the external field. Exploratory calculations for a Fe-plasma at 100 eV show new features in the absorption cross section which are absent in the usual single particle theory. These arise from inter-shell correlations, channel mixing and self-energy effects. These many-body effects introduce significant modifications to the radiative properties of plasmas and are shown to be efficiently calculable by time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT)

  9. Time dependent density functional theory of light absorption in dense plasmas: application to iron-plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimaldi, F.; Grimaldi-Lecourt, A.; Dharma-Wardana, M.W.C.

    1985-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a simple time-dependent calculation of the light absorption cross section for a strongly coupled partially degenerate plasma so as to transcend the usual single-particle picture. This is achieved within the density functional theory (DFT) of plasmas by generalizing the method given by Zangwill and Soven for atomic calculations at zero temperature. The essential feature of the time dependent DFT is the correct treatment of the relaxation of the system under the external field. Exploratory calculations for an Fe-plasma at 100 eV show new features in the absorption cross section which are absent in the usual single particle theory. These arise from inter-shell correlations, channel mixing and self-energy effects. These many-body effects introduce significant modifications to the radiative properties of plasma and are shown to be efficiently calculable by time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT)

  10. Real-Time X-ray Radiography Diagnostics of Components in Solid Rocket Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortopassi, A. C.; Martin, H. T.; Boyer, E.; Kuo, K. K.

    2012-01-01

    Solid rocket motors (SRMs) typically use nozzle materials which are required to maintain their shape as well as insulate the underlying support structure during the motor operation. In addition, SRMs need internal insulation materials to protect the motor case from the harsh environment resulting from the combustion of solid propellant. In the nozzle, typical materials consist of high density graphite, carbon-carbon composites and carbon phenolic composites. Internal insulation of the motor cases is typically a composite material with carbon, asbestos, Kevlar, or silica fibers in an ablative matrix such as EPDM or NBR. For both nozzle and internal insulation materials, the charring process occurs when the hot combustion products heat the material intensely. The pyrolysis of the matrix material takes away a portion of the thermal energy near the wall surface and leaves behind a char layer. The fiber reinforcement retains the porous char layer which provides continued thermal protection from the hot combustion products. It is of great interest to characterize both the total erosion rates of the material and the char layer thickness. By better understanding of the erosion process for a particular ablative material in a specific flow environment, the required insulation material thickness can be properly selected. The recession rates of internal insulation and nozzle materials of SRMs are typically determined by testing in some sort of simulated environment; either arc-jet testing, flame torch testing, or subscale SRMs of different size. Material recession rates are deduced by comparison of pre- and post-test measurements and then averaging over the duration of the test. However, these averaging techniques cannot be used to determine the instantaneous recession rates of the material. Knowledge of the variation in recession rates in response to the instantaneous flow conditions during the motor operation is of great importance. For example, in many SRM configurations

  11. Remarks on time-dependent [current]-density functional theory for open quantum systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen-Zhou, Joel; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2013-08-14

    Time-dependent [current]-density functional theory for open quantum systems (OQS) has emerged as a formalism that can incorporate dissipative effects in the dynamics of many-body quantum systems. Here, we review and clarify some formal aspects of these theories that have been recently questioned in the literature. In particular, we provide theoretical support for the following conclusions: (1) contrary to what we and others had stated before, within the master equation framework, there is in fact a one-to-one mapping between vector potentials and current densities for fixed initial state, particle-particle interaction, and memory kernel; (2) regardless of the first conclusion, all of our recently suggested Kohn-Sham (KS) schemes to reproduce the current and particle densities of the original OQS, and in particular, the use of a KS closed driven system, remains formally valid; (3) the Lindblad master equation maintains the positivity of the density matrix regardless of the time-dependence of the Hamiltonian or the dissipation operators; (4) within the stochastic Schrödinger equation picture, a one-to-one mapping from stochastic vector potential to stochastic current density for individual trajectories has not been proven so far, except in the case where the vector potential is the same for every member of the ensemble, in which case, it reduces to the Lindblad master equation picture; (5) master equations may violate certain desired properties of the density matrix, such as positivity, but they remain as one of the most useful constructs to study OQS when the environment is not easily incorporated explicitly in the calculation. The conclusions support our previous work as formally rigorous, offer new insights into it, and provide a common ground to discuss related theories.

  12. Time-dependent dielectric breakdown measurements of porous organosilicate glass using mercury and solid metal probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei, Dongfei; Nichols, Michael T.; Shohet, J. Leon; King, Sean W.; Clarke, James S.; Nishi, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    Time-dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) is one of the major concerns for low-k dielectric materials. During plasma processing, low-k dielectrics are subjected to vacuum ultraviolet photon radiation and charged-particle bombardment. To examine the change of TDDB properties, time-to-breakdown measurements are made to porous SiCOH before and after plasma exposure. Significant discrepancies between mercury and solid-metal probes are observed and have been shown to be attributed to mercury diffusion into the dielectric porosities

  13. Time-dependent dielectric breakdown measurements of porous organosilicate glass using mercury and solid metal probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, Dongfei; Nichols, Michael T.; Shohet, J. Leon, E-mail: shohet@engr.wisc.edu [Plasma Processing and Technology Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); King, Sean W.; Clarke, James S. [Intel Corporation, Hillsboro, Oregon 97124 (United States); Nishi, Yoshio [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Time-dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) is one of the major concerns for low-k dielectric materials. During plasma processing, low-k dielectrics are subjected to vacuum ultraviolet photon radiation and charged-particle bombardment. To examine the change of TDDB properties, time-to-breakdown measurements are made to porous SiCOH before and after plasma exposure. Significant discrepancies between mercury and solid-metal probes are observed and have been shown to be attributed to mercury diffusion into the dielectric porosities.

  14. Early-time particle dynamics and non-affine deformations during microstructure selection in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengupta, Surajit [Centre for Advanced Materials, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, 2A and 2B, Raja S C Mullick Road, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India); Rao, Madan [Raman Research Institute, C V Raman Avenue, Bangalore 560 080 (India); Bhattacharya, Jayee [S N Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block JD, Sector III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700 098 (India)

    2011-07-27

    Solid-solid transitions are invariably associated with groups of particles whose deformations cannot be expressed as an affine strain about a reference configuration. The dynamics of these non-affine zones (NAZ) determine the subsequent microstructure, i.e. the mesoscale patterning resulting from the structural transition. Here, we focus on early-time dynamics of individual particles within an NAZ associated with a nucleation event. We show that the early-time behavior of these particles have distinctive characteristics depending on the transition temperature. The dynamics is heterogeneous, consisting of a few active particles exhibiting complex intermittent jamming and flow in response to internal stresses generated during the transformation. At low temperatures, the dynamics of these active particles is ballistic and the structural transformation proceeds via string-like correlated movement of active particles, along ridges in the potential energy topography set up by inactive particles. On increasing temperature, the dynamics of active particles show an abrupt transition from ballistic to diffusive behavior with a diffusion coefficient which appears to be independent of temperature. This dynamical transition in the nature of the trajectories of particles is coincident with a discontinuous transition in the microstructure of the solid. Finally, we characterize this transition in terms of a dynamical order parameter in the space of trajectories and discuss its connection with the glass transition and rheology of soft and granular matter.

  15. Solid malignant neoplasms after childhood irradiation: decrease of the relative risk with time after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vathaire, F. de; Shamsaldin, A.; Grimaud, E.; Campbell, S.; Guerra, M.; Raquin, M.; Hardiman, C.; Jan, P.; Rumeau, N.; Diallo, I.; Nicolazic, G.; Lamon, A.; Oberlin, O.; Cervens, C. de; Suarez, A.; Meresse, V.; Eschwege, F.; Sancho-Garnier, H.; Chavaudra, J.; Lermerle, J.; Bessa, E.; Bell, J.; Hawkins, M.; Schlienger, J.Y.; Panis, X.; Lagrande, J.L.; Gaboriaud, G.; Zucker, J.M.; Daly-Schveitzer, N.

    1995-01-01

    The pattern of the temporal distribution of solid cancer incidence after irradiation in childhood is not well known, although, its importance in radioprotection is well known. We studied a cohort of 1 055 children from 8 European cancer centres, who received radiotherapy between 1942 and 1985 for a first cancer in childhood. After a mean follow-up of 19 years, 26 children developed a solid second malignant neoplasm (SMN), as compared to 5.6 expected from general population rates. Both the excess relative risk and the excess of absolute risk of solid SMN were higher among children who were younger at time of the irradiation. After reaching a maximum 15 to 20 years after irradiation, the excess relative risk of SMN decreased with time after irradiation, when controlling for age at irradiation and sex. The analysis of the risk of thyroid, brain and breast cancer together, as a function of the dose averaged on these 3 organs lead to similar results. (authors). 16 refs., 8 tabs., 2 figs

  16. Optimized effective potential in real time: Problems and prospects in time-dependent density-functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mundt, Michael; Kuemmel, Stephan

    2006-01-01

    The integral equation for the time-dependent optimized effective potential (TDOEP) in time-dependent density-functional theory is transformed into a set of partial-differential equations. These equations only involve occupied Kohn-Sham orbitals and orbital shifts resulting from the difference between the exchange-correlation potential and the orbital-dependent potential. Due to the success of an analog scheme in the static case, a scheme that propagates orbitals and orbital shifts in real time is a natural candidate for an exact solution of the TDOEP equation. We investigate the numerical stability of such a scheme. An approximation beyond the Krieger-Li-Iafrate approximation for the time-dependent exchange-correlation potential is analyzed

  17. Quantum electrodynamical time-dependent density functional theory for many-electron systems on a lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzanehpour, Mehdi; Tokatly, Ilya; Nano-Bio Spectroscopy Group; ETSF Scientific Development Centre Team

    2015-03-01

    We present a rigorous formulation of the time-dependent density functional theory for interacting lattice electrons strongly coupled to cavity photons. We start with an example of one particle on a Hubbard dimer coupled to a single photonic mode, which is equivalent to the single mode spin-boson model or the quantum Rabi model. For this system we prove that the electron-photon wave function is a unique functional of the electronic density and the expectation value of the photonic coordinate, provided the initial state and the density satisfy a set of well defined conditions. Then we generalize the formalism to many interacting electrons on a lattice coupled to multiple photonic modes and prove the general mapping theorem. We also show that for a system evolving from the ground state of a lattice Hamiltonian any density with a continuous second time derivative is locally v-representable. Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness (Grant No. FIS2013-46159-C3-1-P), Grupos Consolidados UPV/EHU del Gobierno Vasco (Grant No. IT578-13), COST Actions CM1204 (XLIC) and MP1306 (EUSpec).

  18. Non-linear behaviour of power density and exposure time of argon laser on ocular tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sayed, E M; Talaat, M S; Salem, E F [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt)

    1997-12-31

    In ophthalmology, the thermal effect of argon laser is the most widely used category of laser- tissue interaction. The rise in tissue temperature has to exceed a threshold value for photo coagulation of retinal blood vessels. This value mainly depends on the laser. The most suitable argon laser power P and exposure time (t) which would be more effective for thermal and electrical behaviour of chicken eye was studied. This was achieved by measuring the variations in ocular temperature in electroretinogram (ERG) records under the effect of argon experiment, while power density (P) and exposure time (t) were varied in four different ways for each dose (pt). Results indicated that for the same laser dose, the temperature distribution of the eye, using low power density and high exposure time was higher than that high power density and low exposure time, indicating non-linearity of the laser dose. This finding was confirmed by ERG records which showed similar variations in b-wave latency, amplitude and duration, for the laser exposure conditions. This indicates variations in retinal function due to laser-dependent temperature variations. 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Solid waste bin detection and classification using Dynamic Time Warping and MLP classifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, Md. Shafiqul, E-mail: shafique@eng.ukm.my [Dept. of Electrical, Electronic and Systems Engineering, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi 43600, Selangore (Malaysia); Hannan, M.A., E-mail: hannan@eng.ukm.my [Dept. of Electrical, Electronic and Systems Engineering, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi 43600, Selangore (Malaysia); Basri, Hassan [Dept. of Civil and Structural Engineering, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi 43600, Selangore (Malaysia); Hussain, Aini; Arebey, Maher [Dept. of Electrical, Electronic and Systems Engineering, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Bangi 43600, Selangore (Malaysia)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Solid waste bin level detection using Dynamic Time Warping (DTW). • Gabor wavelet filter is used to extract the solid waste image features. • Multi-Layer Perceptron classifier network is used for bin image classification. • The classification performance evaluated by ROC curve analysis. - Abstract: The increasing requirement for Solid Waste Management (SWM) has become a significant challenge for municipal authorities. A number of integrated systems and methods have introduced to overcome this challenge. Many researchers have aimed to develop an ideal SWM system, including approaches involving software-based routing, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Radio-frequency Identification (RFID), or sensor intelligent bins. Image processing solutions for the Solid Waste (SW) collection have also been developed; however, during capturing the bin image, it is challenging to position the camera for getting a bin area centralized image. As yet, there is no ideal system which can correctly estimate the amount of SW. This paper briefly discusses an efficient image processing solution to overcome these problems. Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) was used for detecting and cropping the bin area and Gabor wavelet (GW) was introduced for feature extraction of the waste bin image. Image features were used to train the classifier. A Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) classifier was used to classify the waste bin level and estimate the amount of waste inside the bin. The area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves was used to statistically evaluate classifier performance. The results of this developed system are comparable to previous image processing based system. The system demonstration using DTW with GW for feature extraction and an MLP classifier led to promising results with respect to the accuracy of waste level estimation (98.50%). The application can be used to optimize the routing of waste collection based on the estimated bin level.

  20. Time-resolved x-ray spectra from laser-generated high-density plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andiel, U.; Eidmann, Klaus; Witte, Klaus-Juergen

    2001-04-01

    We focused frequency doubled ultra short laser pulses on solid C, F, Na and Al targets, K-shell emission was systematically investigated by time resolved spectroscopy using a sub-ps streak camera. A large number of laser shots can be accumulated when triggering the camera with an Auston switch system at very high temporal precision. The system provides an outstanding time resolution of 1.7ps accumulating thousands of laser shots. The time duration of the He-(alpha) K-shell resonance lines was observed in the range of (2-4)ps and shows a decrease with the atomic number. The experimental results are well reproduced by hydro code simulations post processed with an atomic kinetics code.

  1. Comparative measurement of the neutral density and particle confinement time in EBT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glowienka, J.C.; Richards, R.K.

    1985-11-01

    The neutral density and particle confinement time in the ELMO Bumpy Torus-Scale Experiment (EBT-S) have been determined by two different techniques. These involve a spectroscopic measurement of molecular and atomic hydrogen emissions and a time-decay measurement of a fast-ion population using a diagnostic neutral beam. The results from both diagnostics exhibit identical trends for either estimate, although the absolute values differ by a factor of 2 to 3. The observed variations with fill gas pressure and microwave power from either technique are consistent with measurements of electron density and temperature. In this paper, the measurement techniques are discussed, and the results are compared in the context of consistency with independently observed plasma behavior. 6 refs., 7 figs

  2. Real-Time Counting People in Crowded Areas by Using Local Empirical Templates and Density Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Dao-Huu; Hsu, Gee-Sern; Chung, Sheng-Luen; Saito, Hideo

    In this paper, a fast and automated method of counting pedestrians in crowded areas is proposed along with three contributions. We firstly propose Local Empirical Templates (LET), which are able to outline the foregrounds, typically made by single pedestrians in a scene. LET are extracted by clustering foregrounds of single pedestrians with similar features in silhouettes. This process is done automatically for unknown scenes. Secondly, comparing the size of group foreground made by a group of pedestrians to that of appropriate LET captured in the same image patch with the group foreground produces the density ratio. Because of the local scale normalization between sizes, the density ratio appears to have a bound closely related to the number of pedestrians who induce the group foreground. Finally, to extract the bounds of density ratios for groups of different number of pedestrians, we propose a 3D human models based simulation in which camera viewpoints and pedestrians' proximity are easily manipulated. We collect hundreds of typical occluded-people patterns with distinct degrees of human proximity and under a variety of camera viewpoints. Distributions of density ratios with respect to the number of pedestrians are built based on the computed density ratios of these patterns for extracting density ratio bounds. The simulation is performed in the offline learning phase to extract the bounds from the distributions, which are used to count pedestrians in online settings. We reveal that the bounds seem to be invariant to camera viewpoints and humans' proximity. The performance of our proposed method is evaluated with our collected videos and PETS 2009's datasets. For our collected videos with the resolution of 320x240, our method runs in real-time with good accuracy and frame rate of around 30 fps, and consumes a small amount of computing resources. For PETS 2009's datasets, our proposed method achieves competitive results with other methods tested on the same

  3. Time-of-flight measurements of the plasma density in the T-11M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, V. G.; Petrov, A. A.; Malyshev, A. Yu.; Markov, V. K.; Babarykin, A. V.

    2006-01-01

    The average plasma density in the T-11M tokamak is determined by means of an O-mode time-of-flight refractometer measuring the propagation time τ of microwave pulses through the plasma. Since the front duration τ fr of these pulses is shorter than 2 ns, filtering the measured signal cannot reduce the signal-to-noise ratio below a certain level. This circumstance impedes the use of this diagnostics in larger devices, where the signals may be substantially attenuated because of the larger chamber size and larger waveguide losses. There are several ways to overcome these difficulties: to raise the microwave power, to increase the sensitivity of the receivers, etc. In this paper, a technique is described that is based on the differential method for determining the propagation time of a microwave signal through the plasma. In this method, the plasma is probed by two continuous microwaves with close frequencies and the phase difference between them Δφ 12 is measured. As long as the condition Δφ 12 < 2π is satisfied, the measurements are unambiguous, because there are no phase jumps by a value multiple of 2π, as is usually the case in conventional interferometers at an increased level of MHD activity, in regimes with a rapid density growth, etc. This method allows the signal to be filtered, thereby ensuring an appreciable improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio in comparison with the pulsed methods. The first measurements of the average density along the +3-cm chord were performed with the help of this new differential time-of-flight refractometer in the T-11M tokamak. The refractometry data agree well with the interferometric data and are used to recover the plasma-density profile

  4. Optical properties of Al nanostructures from time dependent density functional theory

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb

    2016-04-05

    The optical properties of Al nanostructures are investigated by means of time dependent density functional theory, considering chains of varying length and ladders/stripes of varying aspect ratio. The absorption spectra show redshifting for increasing length and aspect ratio. For the chains the absorption is dominated by HOMO → LUMO transitions, whereas ladders and stripes reveal more complex spectra of plasmonic nature above a specific aspect ratio.

  5. Multiple time scale analysis of pressure oscillations in solid rocket motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Waqas; Maqsood, Adnan; Riaz, Rizwan

    2018-03-01

    In this study, acoustic pressure oscillations for single and coupled longitudinal acoustic modes in Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) are investigated using Multiple Time Scales (MTS) method. Two independent time scales are introduced. The oscillations occur on fast time scale whereas the amplitude and phase changes on slow time scale. Hopf bifurcation is employed to investigate the properties of the solution. The supercritical bifurcation phenomenon is observed for linearly unstable system. The amplitude of the oscillations result from equal energy gain and loss rates of longitudinal acoustic modes. The effect of linear instability and frequency of longitudinal modes on amplitude and phase of oscillations are determined for both single and coupled modes. For both cases, the maximum amplitude of oscillations decreases with the frequency of acoustic mode and linear instability of SRM. The comparison of analytical MTS results and numerical simulations demonstrate an excellent agreement.

  6. Transport properties of the continuous-time random walk with a long-tailed waiting-time density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissman, H.; Havlin, S.; Weiss, G.H.

    1989-01-01

    The authors derive asymptotic properties of the propagator p(r, t) of a continuous-time random walk (CTRW) in which the waiting time density has the asymptotic form ψ(t) ∼ T α /t α+1 when t >> T and 0 = ∫ 0 ∞ τψ(τ)dτ is finite. One is that the asymptotic behavior of p(0, t) is demonstrated by the waiting time at the origin rather than by the dimension. The second difference is that in the presence of a field p(r, t) no longer remains symmetric around a moving peak. Rather, it is shown that the peak of this probability always occurs at r = 0, and the effect of the field is to break the symmetry that occurs when < ∞. Finally, they calculate similar properties, although in not such great detail, for the case in which the single-step jump probabilities themselves have an infinite mean

  7. Diffusion relaxation times of nonequilibrium isolated small bodies and their solid phase ensembles to equilibrium states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovbin, Yu. K.

    2017-08-01

    The possibility of obtaining analytical estimates in a diffusion approximation of the times needed by nonequilibrium small bodies to relax to their equilibrium states based on knowledge of the mass transfer coefficient is considered. This coefficient is expressed as the product of the self-diffusion coefficient and the thermodynamic factor. A set of equations for the diffusion transport of mixture components is formulated, characteristic scales of the size of microheterogeneous phases are identified, and effective mass transfer coefficients are constructed for them. Allowing for the developed interface of coexisting and immiscible phases along with the porosity of solid phases is discussed. This approach can be applied to the diffusion equalization of concentrations of solid mixture components in many physicochemical systems: the mutual diffusion of components in multicomponent systems (alloys, semiconductors, solid mixtures of inert gases) and the mass transfer of an absorbed mobile component in the voids of a matrix consisting of slow components or a mixed composition of mobile and slow components (e.g., hydrogen in metals, oxygen in oxides, and the transfer of molecules through membranes of different natures, including polymeric).

  8. Extending the range of real time density matrix renormalization group simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennes, D. M.; Karrasch, C.

    2016-03-01

    We discuss a few simple modifications to time-dependent density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithms which allow to access larger time scales. We specifically aim at beginners and present practical aspects of how to implement these modifications within any standard matrix product state (MPS) based formulation of the method. Most importantly, we show how to 'combine' the Schrödinger and Heisenberg time evolutions of arbitrary pure states | ψ 〉 and operators A in the evaluation of 〈A〉ψ(t) = 〈 ψ | A(t) | ψ 〉 . This includes quantum quenches. The generalization to (non-)thermal mixed state dynamics 〈A〉ρ(t) =Tr [ ρA(t) ] induced by an initial density matrix ρ is straightforward. In the context of linear response (ground state or finite temperature T > 0) correlation functions, one can extend the simulation time by a factor of two by 'exploiting time translation invariance', which is efficiently implementable within MPS DMRG. We present a simple analytic argument for why a recently-introduced disentangler succeeds in reducing the effort of time-dependent simulations at T > 0. Finally, we advocate the python programming language as an elegant option for beginners to set up a DMRG code.

  9. Generation of Stationary Non-Gaussian Time Histories with a Specified Cross-spectral Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David O. Smallwood

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews several methods for the generation of stationary realizations of sampled time histories with non-Gaussian distributions and introduces a new method which can be used to control the cross-spectral density matrix and the probability density functions (pdfs of the multiple input problem. Discussed first are two methods for the specialized case of matching the auto (power spectrum, the skewness, and kurtosis using generalized shot noise and using polynomial functions. It is then shown that the skewness and kurtosis can also be controlled by the phase of a complex frequency domain description of the random process. The general case of matching a target probability density function using a zero memory nonlinear (ZMNL function is then covered. Next methods for generating vectors of random variables with a specified covariance matrix for a class of spherically invariant random vectors (SIRV are discussed. Finally the general case of matching the cross-spectral density matrix of a vector of inputs with non-Gaussian marginal distributions is presented.

  10. Method for determining scan timing based on analysis of formation process of the time-density curve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Isao; Ishida, Tomokazu; Kidoya, Eiji; Higashimura, Kyoji; Suzuki, Masayuki

    2005-01-01

    A strict determination of scan timing is needed for dynamic multi-phase scanning and 3D-CT angiography (3D-CTA) by multi-detector row CT (MDCT). In the present study, contrast media arrival time (T AR ) was measured in the abdominal aorta at the bifurcation of the celiac artery for confirmation of circulatory differences in patients. In addition, we analyzed the process of formation of the time-density curve (TDC) and examined factors that affect the time to peak aortic enhancement (T PA ). Mean T AR was 15.57±3.75 s. TDCs were plotted for each duration of injection. The rising portions of TDCs were superimposed on one another. TDCs with longer injection durations were piled up upon one another. Rise angle was approximately constant in response to each flow rate. Rise time (T R ) showed a good correlation with injection duration (T ID ). T R was 1.01 T ID (R 2 =0.994) in the phantom study and 0.94 T lD -0.60 (R 2 =0.988) in the clinical study. In conclusion, for the selection of optimal scan timing it is useful to determine T R at a given point and to determine the time from T AR . (author)

  11. 77 FR 17410 - Solid Urea From the Russian Federation: Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary Results of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [A-821-801] Solid Urea From the Russian Federation: Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review AGENCY... Commerce (the Department) initiated an administrative review of the antidumping duty order on solid urea...

  12. 76 FR 17380 - Solid Urea From the Russian Federation: Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary Results of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [A-821-801] Solid Urea From the Russian Federation: Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review AGENCY... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on solid urea from the Russian Federation for the period July...

  13. Real-time evaluation of electron and current density profile parameters on TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruessau, W.D.; Soltwisch, H.

    1985-08-01

    The shapes of electron and current density profiles are monitored in real-time mode in order to get rapid qualitative information on the development of a TEXTOR tokamak plasma. The profiles are described by form parameters which relate to the signals of a 9-channel FIR-polari/interferometer in simple mathematical formulae. These profile parameters are obtained by real-time conversion of measured quantities for display on a storage oscilloscope or on a chart recorder. The application of the parameters is demonstrated in some examples. (orig.)

  14. Calculation of the time resolution of the J-PET tomograph using kernel density estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raczyński, L.; Wiślicki, W.; Krzemień, W.; Kowalski, P.; Alfs, D.; Bednarski, T.; Białas, P.; Curceanu, C.; Czerwiński, E.; Dulski, K.; Gajos, A.; Głowacz, B.; Gorgol, M.; Hiesmayr, B.; Jasińska, B.; Kamińska, D.; Korcyl, G.; Kozik, T.; Krawczyk, N.; Kubicz, E.; Mohammed, M.; Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M.; Niedźwiecki, S.; Pałka, M.; Rudy, Z.; Rundel, O.; Sharma, N. G.; Silarski, M.; Smyrski, J.; Strzelecki, A.; Wieczorek, A.; Zgardzińska, B.; Zieliński, M.; Moskal, P.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper we estimate the time resolution of the J-PET scanner built from plastic scintillators. We incorporate the method of signal processing using the Tikhonov regularization framework and the kernel density estimation method. We obtain simple, closed-form analytical formulae for time resolution. The proposed method is validated using signals registered by means of the single detection unit of the J-PET tomograph built from a 30 cm long plastic scintillator strip. It is shown that the experimental and theoretical results obtained for the J-PET scanner equipped with vacuum tube photomultipliers are consistent.

  15. Time-dependent density functional theory for open quantum systems with unitary propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen-Zhou, Joel; Tempel, David G; Rodríguez-Rosario, César A; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2010-01-29

    We extend the Runge-Gross theorem for a very general class of open quantum systems under weak assumptions about the nature of the bath and its coupling to the system. We show that for Kohn-Sham (KS) time-dependent density functional theory, it is possible to rigorously include the effects of the environment within a bath functional in the KS potential. A Markovian bath functional inspired by the theory of nonlinear Schrödinger equations is suggested, which can be readily implemented in currently existing real-time codes. Finally, calculations on a helium model system are presented.

  16. Real-Time Inhibitor Recession Measurements in Two Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhorter, B. B.; Ewing, M. E.; Bolton, D. E.; Albrechtsen, K. U.; Earnest, T. E.; Noble, T. C.; Longaker, M.

    2003-01-01

    Real-time internal motor insulation char line recession measurements have been evaluated for two full-scale static tests of the Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM). These char line recession measurements were recorded on the forward facing propellant grain inhibitors to better understand the thermal performance of these inhibitors. The RSRM propellant grain inhibitors are designed to erode away during motor operation, thus making it difficult to use post-fire observations to determine inhibitor thermal performance. Therefore, this new internal motor instrumentation is invaluable in establishing an accurate understanding of inhibitor recession versus motor operation time. The data for the first test was presented at the 37th AIAA/ASME/SAE/ASEE Joint Propulsion Conference and Exhibit (AIAA 2001-3280) in July 2001. Since that time, a second full scale static test has delivered additional real-time data on inhibitor thermal performance. The evaluation of this data is presented in this paper. The second static test, in contrast to the first test, used a slightly different arrangement of instrumentation in the inhibitors. This instrumentation has yielded a better understanding of the inhibitor time dependent inboard tip recession. Graphs of inhibitor recession profiles with time are presented. Inhibitor thermal ablation models have been created from theoretical principals. The model predictions compare favorably with data from both tests. This verified modeling effort is important to support new inhibitor designs for a five segment Space Shuttle solid rocket motor. The internal instrumentation project on RSRM static tests is providing unique opportunities for other real-time internal motor measurements that could not otherwise be directly quantified.

  17. Effects of Time, Heat, and Oxygen on K Basin Sludge Agglomeration, Strength, and Solids Volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Daniel, Richard C.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2011-01-04

    Sludge disposition will be managed in two phases under the K Basin Sludge Treatment Project. The first phase is to retrieve the sludge that currently resides in engineered containers in the K West (KW) Basin pool at ~10 to 18°C. The second phase is to retrieve the sludge from interim storage in the sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs) and treat and package it in preparation for eventual shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The work described in this report was conducted to gain insight into how sludge may change during long-term containerized storage in the STSCs. To accelerate potential physical and chemical changes, the tests were performed at temperatures and oxygen partial pressures significantly greater than those expected in the T Plant canyon cells where the STSCs will be stored. Tests were conducted to determine the effects of 50°C oxygenated water exposure on settled quiescent uraninite (UO2) slurry and a full simulant of KW containerized sludge to determine the effects of oxygen and heat on the composition and mechanical properties of sludge. Shear-strength measurements by vane rheometry also were conducted for UO2 slurry, mixtures of UO2 and metaschoepite (UO3•2H2O), and for simulated KW containerized sludge. The results from these tests and related previous tests are compared to determine whether the settled solids in the K Basin sludge materials change in volume because of oxidation of UO2 by dissolved atmospheric oxygen to form metaschoepite. The test results also are compared to determine if heating or other factors alter sludge volumes and to determine the effects of sludge composition and settling times on sludge shear strength. It has been estimated that the sludge volume will increase with time because of a uranium metal → uraninite → metaschoepite oxidation sequence. This increase could increase the number of containers required for storage and increase overall costs of sludge management activities. However, the volume

  18. Effects of Time, Heat, and Oxygen on K Basin Sludge Agglomeration, Strength, and Solids Volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Daniel, Richard C.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2011-01-01

    Sludge disposition will be managed in two phases under the K Basin Sludge Treatment Project. The first phase is to retrieve the sludge that currently resides in engineered containers in the K West (KW) Basin pool at ∼10 to 18 C. The second phase is to retrieve the sludge from interim storage in the sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs) and treat and package it in preparation for eventual shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The work described in this report was conducted to gain insight into how sludge may change during long-term containerized storage in the STSCs. To accelerate potential physical and chemical changes, the tests were performed at temperatures and oxygen partial pressures significantly greater than those expected in the T Plant canyon cells where the STSCs will be stored. Tests were conducted to determine the effects of 50 C oxygenated water exposure on settled quiescent uraninite (UO 2 ) slurry and a full simulant of KW containerized sludge to determine the effects of oxygen and heat on the composition and mechanical properties of sludge. Shear-strength measurements by vane rheometry also were conducted for UO 2 slurry, mixtures of UO2 and metaschoepite (UO 3 · 2H 2 O), and for simulated KW containerized sludge. The results from these tests and related previous tests are compared to determine whether the settled solids in the K Basin sludge materials change in volume because of oxidation of UO2 by dissolved atmospheric oxygen to form metaschoepite. The test results also are compared to determine if heating or other factors alter sludge volumes and to determine the effects of sludge composition and settling times on sludge shear strength. It has been estimated that the sludge volume will increase with time because of a uranium metal → uraninite → metaschoepite oxidation sequence. This increase could increase the number of containers required for storage and increase overall costs of sludge management activities. However, the

  19. A solid-state hybrid density functional theory study of Prussian blue analogues and related chlorides at pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middlemiss, Derek S; Lawton, Lorreta M; Wilson, Chick C [Department of Chemistry and WestCHEM Research School, University Avenue, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: c.c.wilson@chem.gla.ac.uk

    2008-08-20

    The variations with pressure in the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of a series of Prussian blue analogues (PBAs) K{sup I}M{sup II}[Cr{sup III}(CN){sub 6}] (M = V{sup II}, Mn{sup II} and Ni{sup II}) and associated isomorphous chlorides K{sup I}M{sup II}Cr{sup III}Cl{sub 6} are investigated within a series of solid-state hybrid density functional calculations. The sensitivity of the computed properties to the choice of Hamiltonian is tested by application of functionals containing 35%, 65% and 100% admixtures of Fock exchange. Magnetic coupling constants (J) are obtained at a range of cell volumes (V), with fits of the Bloch relationship (J {proportional_to} V{sup -{epsilon}}, {epsilon} typically 3-4) yielding exponents {epsilon} in the ranges 5.16-6.34, 8.48-12.07 and 4.00-4.51 for the antiferromagnetic (AF) V{sup II}Cr{sup III}-, ferrimagnetic (FI) Mn{sup II}Cr{sup III}- and ferromagnetic (FO) Ni{sup II}Cr{sup III} PBAs, respectively; and 3.33-4.99, 1.86-3.09 and 1.65-3.28 for the AF V{sup II}Cr{sup III}-, FO Mn{sup II}Cr{sup III}- and FO Ni{sup II}Cr{sup III} chlorides, respectively. The Mn{sup II}Cr{sup III} PBA range encloses the high values {epsilon}{approx}9-10 obtained in a recent joint experimental and theoretical study, and it is suggested that this strong magnetostructural effect arises due to the presence of competing AF and FO interactions in this material. Estimates of the spin ordering temperatures derived from the combination of the 35%-functional couplings with a mean field approach are in good agreement with experiment in the V{sup II}Cr{sup III} and Ni{sup II}Cr{sup III} PBAs, but are too low in the Mn{sup II}Cr{sup III} system. The variations with pressure in the structural parameters, charges and spin moments are also detailed, the PBA and chloride energy-volume data yielding bulk moduli in the ranges 39-53 and 36-50 GPa, respectively. Finally, the energies governing CN{sup -} ligand isomerization are estimated and successfully

  20. Natural excitation orbitals from linear response theories : Time-dependent density functional theory, time-dependent Hartree-Fock, and time-dependent natural orbital functional theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Meer, R.; Gritsenko, O. V.; Baerends, E. J.

    2017-01-01

    Straightforward interpretation of excitations is possible if they can be described as simple single orbital-to-orbital (or double, etc.) transitions. In linear response time-dependent density functional theory (LR-TDDFT), the (ground state) Kohn-Sham orbitals prove to be such an orbital basis. In

  1. Real-time boronization in PBX-M using erosion of solid boronized targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kugel, H.W.; Timberlake, J.; Bell, R.; LeBlanc, B.; Okabayashi, M.; Paul, S.; Tighe, W.; Hirooka, Y.

    1994-11-01

    Thirty one real-time boronizations were applied to PBX-M using the plasma erosion of solid target probes. More than 17 g of boron were deposited in PBX-M using this technique. The probes were positioned at the edge plasma to optimize vaporization and minimize spallation. Auger depth profile analysis of poloidal and toroidal deposition sample coupon arrays indicate that boron was transported by the plasma around the torus and deep into the divertors. During discharges with continuous real-time boronization, low-Z and high-Z impurities decreased rapidly as plasma surfaces were covered during the first 20-30 discharges. After boronization, a short-term improvement in plasma conditions persisted prior to significant boron erosion from plasma surfaces, and a longer term, but less significant improvement persisted as boron farther from the edge continued gettering. Real-time solid target boronization has been found to be very effective for accelerating conditioning to new regimes and maintaining high performance plasma conditions

  2. On the choice of lens density profile in time delay cosmography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenfeld, Alessandro

    2018-03-01

    Time delay lensing is a mature and competitive cosmological probe. However, it is limited in accuracy by the well-known problem of the mass-sheet degeneracy: too rigid assumptions on the density profile of the lens can potentially bias the inference on cosmological parameters. I investigate the degeneracy between the choice of the lens density profile and the inference on the Hubble constant, focusing on double image systems. By expanding lensing observables in terms of the local derivatives of the lens potential around the Einstein radius, and assuming circular symmetry, I show that 3 degrees of freedom in the radial direction are necessary to achieve a few per cent accuracy in the time-delay distance. Additionally, while the time delay is strongly dependent on the second derivative of the potential, observables typically used to constrain lens models in time-delay studies, such as image position and radial magnification information, are mostly sensitive to the first and third derivatives, making it very challenging to accurately determine time-delay distances with lensing data alone. Tests on mock observations show that the assumption of a power-law density profile results in a 5 per cent average bias on H0, with a 6 per cent scatter. Using a more flexible model and adding unbiased velocity dispersion constraints allows me to obtain an inference with 1 per cent accuracy. A power-law model can still provide 3 per cent accuracy if velocity dispersion measurements are used to constrain its slope. Although this study is based on the assumption of axisymmetry, its main findings can be generalized to cases with moderate ellipticity.

  3. Critique of the foundations of time-dependent density-functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schirmer, J.; Dreuw, A.

    2007-01-01

    The general expectation that, in principle, the time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) is an exact formulation of the time evolution of an interacting N-electron system is critically reexamined. It is demonstrated that the previous TDDFT foundation, resting on four theorems by Runge and Gross (RG) [Phys. Rev. Lett. 52, 997 (1984)], is invalid because undefined phase factors corrupt the RG action integral functionals. Our finding confirms much of a previous analysis by van Leeuwen [Int. J. Mod. Phys. B 15, 1969 (2001)]. To analyze the RG theorems and other aspects of TDDFT, an utmost simplification of the Kohn-Sham (KS) concept has been introduced, in which the ground-state density is obtained from a single KS equation for one spatial (spinless) orbital. The time-dependent (TD) form of this radical Kohn-Sham (rKS) scheme, which has the same validity status as the ordinary KS version, has proved to be a valuable tool for analysis. The rKS concept is used to clarify also the alternative nonvariational formulation of TD KS theory. We argue that it is just a formal theory, allowing one to reproduce but not predict the time development of the exact density of the interacting N-electron system. Besides the issue of the formal exactness of TDDFT, it is shown that both the static and time-dependent KS linear response equations neglect the particle-particle (p-p) and hole-hole (h-h) matrix elements of the perturbing operator. For a local (multiplicative) operator this does not lead to a loss of information due to a remarkable general property of local operators. Accordingly, no logical inconsistency arises with respect to DFT, because DFT requires any external potential to be local. For a general nonlocal operator the error resulting from the neglected matrix elements is of second order in the electronic repulsion

  4. Molecular solar thermal energy storage in photoswitch oligomers increases energy densities and storage times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansø, Mads; Petersen, Anne Ugleholdt; Wang, Zhihang; Erhart, Paul; Nielsen, Mogens Brøndsted; Moth-Poulsen, Kasper

    2018-05-16

    Molecular photoswitches can be used for solar thermal energy storage by photoisomerization into high-energy, meta-stable isomers; we present a molecular design strategy leading to photoswitches with high energy densities and long storage times. High measured energy densities of up to 559 kJ kg -1 (155 Wh kg -1 ), long storage lifetimes up to 48.5 days, and high quantum yields of conversion of up to 94% per subunit are demonstrated in norbornadiene/quadricyclane (NBD/QC) photo-/thermoswitch couples incorporated into dimeric and trimeric structures. By changing the linker unit between the NBD units, we can at the same time fine-tune light-harvesting and energy densities of the dimers and trimers so that they exceed those of their monomeric analogs. These new oligomers thereby meet several of the criteria to be met for an optimum molecule to ultimately enter actual devices being able to undergo closed cycles of solar light-harvesting, energy storage, and heat release.

  5. Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory for Open Systems and Its Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuguang; Kwok, YanHo; Chen, GuanHua

    2018-02-20

    Photovoltaic devices, electrochemical cells, catalysis processes, light emitting diodes, scanning tunneling microscopes, molecular electronics, and related devices have one thing in common: open quantum systems where energy and matter are not conserved. Traditionally quantum chemistry is confined to isolated and closed systems, while quantum dissipation theory studies open quantum systems. The key quantity in quantum dissipation theory is the reduced system density matrix. As the reduced system density matrix is an O(M! × M!) matrix, where M is the number of the particles of the system of interest, quantum dissipation theory can only be employed to simulate systems of a few particles or degrees of freedom. It is thus important to combine quantum chemistry and quantum dissipation theory so that realistic open quantum systems can be simulated from first-principles. We have developed a first-principles method to simulate the dynamics of open electronic systems, the time-dependent density functional theory for open systems (TDDFT-OS). Instead of the reduced system density matrix, the key quantity is the reduced single-electron density matrix, which is an N × N matrix where N is the number of the atomic bases of the system of interest. As the dimension of the key quantity is drastically reduced, the TDDFT-OS can thus be used to simulate the dynamics of realistic open electronic systems and efficient numerical algorithms have been developed. As an application, we apply the method to study how quantum interference develops in a molecular transistor in time domain. We include electron-phonon interaction in our simulation and show that quantum interference in the given system is robust against nuclear vibration not only in the steady state but also in the transient dynamics. As another application, by combining TDDFT-OS with Ehrenfest dynamics, we study current-induced dissociation of water molecules under scanning tunneling microscopy and follow its time dependent

  6. An atomic orbital based real-time time-dependent density functional theory for computing electronic circular dichroism band spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goings, Joshua J.; Li, Xiaosong, E-mail: xsli@uw.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2016-06-21

    One of the challenges of interpreting electronic circular dichroism (ECD) band spectra is that different states may have different rotatory strength signs, determined by their absolute configuration. If the states are closely spaced and opposite in sign, observed transitions may be washed out by nearby states, unlike absorption spectra where transitions are always positive additive. To accurately compute ECD bands, it is necessary to compute a large number of excited states, which may be prohibitively costly if one uses the linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) framework. Here we implement a real-time, atomic-orbital based TDDFT method for computing the entire ECD spectrum simultaneously. The method is advantageous for large systems with a high density of states. In contrast to previous implementations based on real-space grids, the method is variational, independent of nuclear orientation, and does not rely on pseudopotential approximations, making it suitable for computation of chiroptical properties well into the X-ray regime.

  7. Multicomponent Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory: Proton and Electron Excitation Energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Culpitt, Tanner; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2018-04-05

    The quantum mechanical treatment of both electrons and protons in the calculation of excited state properties is critical for describing nonadiabatic processes such as photoinduced proton-coupled electron transfer. Multicomponent density functional theory enables the consistent quantum mechanical treatment of more than one type of particle and has been implemented previously for studying ground state molecular properties within the nuclear-electronic orbital (NEO) framework, where all electrons and specified protons are treated quantum mechanically. To enable the study of excited state molecular properties, herein the linear response multicomponent time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is derived and implemented within the NEO framework. Initial applications to FHF - and HCN illustrate that NEO-TDDFT provides accurate proton and electron excitation energies within a single calculation. As its computational cost is similar to that of conventional electronic TDDFT, the NEO-TDDFT approach is promising for diverse applications, particularly nonadiabatic proton transfer reactions, which may exhibit mixed electron-proton vibronic excitations.

  8. Time-dependent current-density functional theory for generalized open quantum systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen-Zhou, Joel; Rodríguez-Rosario, César; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2009-06-14

    In this article, we prove the one-to-one correspondence between vector potentials and particle and current densities in the context of master equations with arbitrary memory kernels, therefore extending time-dependent current-density functional theory (TD-CDFT) to the domain of generalized many-body open quantum systems (OQS). We also analyse the issue of A-representability for the Kohn-Sham (KS) scheme proposed by D'Agosta and Di Ventra for Markovian OQS [Phys. Rev. Lett. 2007, 98, 226403] and discuss its domain of validity. We suggest ways to expand their scheme, but also propose a novel KS scheme where the auxiliary system is both closed and non-interacting. This scheme is tested numerically with a model system, and several considerations for the future development of functionals are indicated. Our results formalize the possibility of practising TD-CDFT in OQS, hence expanding the applicability of the theory to non-Hamiltonian evolutions.

  9. Stocking density, milking duration, and lying times of lactating cows on Canadian freestall dairy farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, G L; Haley, D B; Rushen, J; de Passillé, A M

    2014-05-01

    Lying time is an important measure of cow comfort, and the lying behavior of dairy cattle can now be recorded automatically with the use of accelerometers. To assess the effect that stall stocking density and the time that cows spend away from the home pen being milked has on the lying behavior of Holstein cattle, a total of 111 commercial freestall dairy farms were visited in Canada. Accelerometers were used to automatically record the lying behavior of 40 focal cows per farm. Total duration of lying, lying bout frequency, and the mean duration of lying bouts were calculated. Pen population was the total number of cows in the pen. To calculate stall stocking density (%) the number of cows in the pen and the number of useable stalls were counted and multiplied by 100, and the length × width of the pen was divided by the number of cows in the pen to calculate area/cow (m(2)). Time away from the pen per day was recorded from when the first cow in each pen was taken out of the home pen for milking until the last cow returned to the home pen after milking, and this time was multiplied by daily milking frequency. The median value for lying duration at the farm level was 10.6h/d, with 10.5 lying bouts/d, and a median lying bout duration of 1.2h. Stall stocking density ranged from 52.2 to 160.0%, with very few farms (7%) stocking at greater than 120%. Although stall stocking density was not significantly correlated with lying behavior, the results showed that no farm with stocking density greater that 100% achieved an average herd lying duration of 12h/d or higher, whereas 21.6% of farms with a stocking density of 100% or less did achieve the target lying time of ≥ 12 h/d, as recommended by the Canadian Code of Practice (χ(2)=4.86, degrees of freedom = 1). Area/cow (m(2)) was not correlated with any aspect of lying behavior, but regardless of space per cow, pen population was correlated with daily frequency and duration of lying bouts. As the number of cows in the pen

  10. Bone Density and Timing of Puberty in a Longitudinal Study of Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattran, Ashley M; Kalkwarf, Heidi J; Pinney, Susan M; Huang, Bin; Biro, Frank M

    2015-06-01

    Primary: To examine the relationship between relative timing of puberty with bone mineral density (BMD) in a group of adolescent girls; Secondary: To determine if family history of breast cancer was associated with bone mineral density. Longitudinal study of girls recruited between 6 and 7 years of age seen every 6 months for 5 years, and subsequently seen annually. BMD of the lumbar spine was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) at mean age of 12.5 years; age- and race-specific Z-scores (BMDz) were calculated. Age of pubertal onset was determined by the first occurrence of breast stage 2, and participants were categorized into race-specific early, on-time and late puberty onset groups. BMDz by timing of pubertal onset, and by family history of breast cancer. DXA scans were performed on 227 study participants, and a second scan was performed on 114 participants 2 years later. Age of onset of puberty was inversely correlated with BMDz, r = -0.31 (P puberty was associated with higher BMD. The high shared variance of BMD and timing of pubertal onset implies an underlying biologic basis. Copyright © 2015 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Real-Time Inhibitor Recession Measurements in the Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhorter, Bruce B.; Ewing, Mark E.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Real-time char line recession measurements were made on propellant inhibitors of the Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM). The RSRM FSM-8 static test motor propellant inhibitors (composed of a rubber insulation material) were successfully instrumented with eroding potentiometers and thermocouples. The data was used to establish inhibitor recession versus time relationships. Normally, pre-fire and post-fire insulation thickness measurements establish the thermal performance of an ablating insulation material. However, post-fire inhibitor decomposition and recession measurements are complicated by the fact that most of the inhibitor is back during motor operation. It is therefore a difficult task to evaluate the thermal protection offered by the inhibitor material. Real-time measurements would help this task. The instrumentation program for this static test motor marks the first time that real-time inhibitors. This report presents that data for the center and aft field joint forward facing inhibitors. The data was primarily used to measure char line recession of the forward face of the inhibitors which provides inhibitor thickness reduction versus time data. The data was also used to estimate the inhibitor height versus time relationship during motor operation.

  12. Time-Gated Raman Spectroscopy for Quantitative Determination of Solid-State Forms of Fluorescent Pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipiäinen, Tiina; Pessi, Jenni; Movahedi, Parisa; Koivistoinen, Juha; Kurki, Lauri; Tenhunen, Mari; Yliruusi, Jouko; Juppo, Anne M; Heikkonen, Jukka; Pahikkala, Tapio; Strachan, Clare J

    2018-04-03

    Raman spectroscopy is widely used for quantitative pharmaceutical analysis, but a common obstacle to its use is sample fluorescence masking the Raman signal. Time-gating provides an instrument-based method for rejecting fluorescence through temporal resolution of the spectral signal and allows Raman spectra of fluorescent materials to be obtained. An additional practical advantage is that analysis is possible in ambient lighting. This study assesses the efficacy of time-gated Raman spectroscopy for the quantitative measurement of fluorescent pharmaceuticals. Time-gated Raman spectroscopy with a 128 × (2) × 4 CMOS SPAD detector was applied for quantitative analysis of ternary mixtures of solid-state forms of the model drug, piroxicam (PRX). Partial least-squares (PLS) regression allowed quantification, with Raman-active time domain selection (based on visual inspection) improving performance. Model performance was further improved by using kernel-based regularized least-squares (RLS) regression with greedy feature selection in which the data use in both the Raman shift and time dimensions was statistically optimized. Overall, time-gated Raman spectroscopy, especially with optimized data analysis in both the spectral and time dimensions, shows potential for sensitive and relatively routine quantitative analysis of photoluminescent pharmaceuticals during drug development and manufacturing.

  13. Electron dynamics in complex environments with real-time time dependent density functional theory in a QM-MM framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morzan, Uriel N.; Ramírez, Francisco F.; Scherlis, Damián A.; Oviedo, M. Belén; Sánchez, Cristián G.; Lebrero, Mariano C. González

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) implementation to propagate the Kohn-Sham equations in real time, including the effects of a molecular environment through a Quantum-Mechanics Molecular-Mechanics (QM-MM) hamiltonian. The code delivers an all-electron description employing Gaussian basis functions, and incorporates the Amber force-field in the QM-MM treatment. The most expensive parts of the computation, comprising the commutators between the hamiltonian and the density matrix—required to propagate the electron dynamics—, and the evaluation of the exchange-correlation energy, were migrated to the CUDA platform to run on graphics processing units, which remarkably accelerates the performance of the code. The method was validated by reproducing linear-response TDDFT results for the absorption spectra of several molecular species. Two different schemes were tested to propagate the quantum dynamics: (i) a leap-frog Verlet algorithm, and (ii) the Magnus expansion to first-order. These two approaches were confronted, to find that the Magnus scheme is more efficient by a factor of six in small molecules. Interestingly, the presence of iron was found to seriously limitate the length of the integration time step, due to the high frequencies associated with the core-electrons. This highlights the importance of pseudopotentials to alleviate the cost of the propagation of the inner states when heavy nuclei are present. Finally, the methodology was applied to investigate the shifts induced by the chemical environment on the most intense UV absorption bands of two model systems of general relevance: the formamide molecule in water solution, and the carboxy-heme group in Flavohemoglobin. In both cases, shifts of several nanometers are observed, consistently with the available experimental data

  14. ANTHEM simulation of the early time magnetic field penetration of the plasma surrounding a high density Z-pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    The early time penetration of magnetic field into the low density coronal plasma of a Z-pinch fiber is studied with the implicit plasma simulation code ANTHEM. Calculations show the emission of electrons from the cathode, pinching of the electron flow, magnetic insulation of the electrons near the anode, and low density ion blow off. PIC-particle ion calculations show a late time clumping of the ion density not seen with a fluid ion treatment. 4 refs., 4 figs

  15. Real-time control of the current density and pressure profiles in Jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazon, D.; Moreau, D.; Litaudon, X.; Joffrin, E.; Laborde, L.; Zabeo, L.; Crisanti, F.; Riva, M.; Felton, R.; Murari, A.; Tala, T.

    2003-01-01

    In order to ultimately control internal transport barriers during advanced operation scenarios, new algorithms using a truncated singular value decomposition of a linearized model operator have been implemented in the JET real-time controller, with the potentiality of retaining the distributed nature of plasma parameter profiles. First experiments using the simplest, lumped-parameter, version of this technique have been dedicated to the feedback control of the current density profile in a negative shear plasma using three heating and current drive actuators, namely neutral beam injection (NBI), ion cyclotron resonant frequency heating (ICRH) and lower hybrid current drive (LHCD). Successful control of the safety factor profile has been achieved on the time scale of the current redistribution time, first during an extended preheat phase with only LHCD as actuator and, then, in quasi steady-state conditions during the main heating phase of a discharge, using the three heating and current drive actuators

  16. Hydrodynamic perspective on memory in time-dependent density-functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiele, M.; Kuemmel, S.

    2009-01-01

    The adiabatic approximation of time-dependent density-functional theory is studied in the context of nonlinear excitations of two-electron singlet systems. We compare the exact time evolution of these systems to the adiabatically exact one obtained from time-dependent Kohn-Sham calculations relying on the exact ground-state exchange-correlation potential. Thus, we can show under which conditions the adiabatic approximation breaks down and memory effects become important. The hydrodynamic formulation of quantum mechanics allows us to interpret these results and relate them to dissipative effects in the Kohn-Sham system. We show how the breakdown of the adiabatic approximation can be inferred from the rate of change of the ground-state noninteracting kinetic energy.

  17. Current density waves in open mesoscopic rings driven by time-periodic magnetic fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Conghua; Wei Lianfu

    2010-01-01

    Quantum coherent transport through open mesoscopic Aharonov-Bohm rings (driven by static fluxes) have been studied extensively. Here, by using quantum waveguide theory and the Floquet theorem we investigate the quantum transport of electrons along an open mesoscopic ring threaded by a time-periodic magnetic flux. We predicate that current density waves could be excited along such an open ring. As a consequence, a net current could be generated along the lead with only one reservoir, if the lead additionally connects to such a normal-metal loop driven by the time-dependent flux. These phenomena could be explained by photon-assisted processes, due to the interaction between the transported electrons and the applied oscillating external fields. We also discuss how the time-average currents (along the ring and the lead) depend on the amplitude and frequency of the applied oscillating fluxes.

  18. Space Shuttle Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor nozzle natural frequency variations with burn time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, C. Y.; Mason, D. R.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of erosion and thermal degradation on the Space Shuttle Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle's structural dynamic characteristics were analytically evaluated. Also considered was stiffening of the structure due to internal pressurization. A detailed NASTRAN finite element model of the nozzle was developed and used to evaluate the influence of these effects at several discrete times during motor burn. Methods were developed for treating erosion and thermal degradation, and a procedure was developed to account for internal pressure stiffening using differential stiffness matrix techniques. Results were verified using static firing test accelerometer data. Fast Fourier Transform and Maximum Entropy Method techniques were applied to the data to generate waterfall plots which track modal frequencies with burn time. Results indicate that the lower frequency nozzle 'vectoring' modes are only slightly affected by erosion, thermal effects and internal pressurization. The higher frequency shell modes of the nozzle are, however, significantly reduced.

  19. Time series analysis of pressure fluctuation in gas-solid fluidized beds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Alberto S. Felipe

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present work was to study the differentiation of states of typical fluidization (single bubble, multiple bubble and slugging in a gas-solid fluidized bed, using spectral analysis of pressure fluctuation time series. The effects of the method of measuring (differential and absolute pressure fluctuations and the axial position of the probes in the fluidization column on the identification of each of the regimes studied were evaluated. Fast Fourier Transform (FFT was the mathematic tool used to analysing the data of pressure fluctuations, which expresses the behavior of a time series in the frequency domain. Results indicated that the plenum chamber was a place for reliable measurement and that care should be taken in measurement in the dense phase. The method allowed fluid dynamic regimes to be differentiated by their dominant frequency characteristics.

  20. Correlated electron dynamics and memory in time-dependent density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiele, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is an exact reformulation of the time-dependent many-electron Schroedinger equation, where the problem of many interacting electrons is mapped onto the Kohn-Sham system of noninteracting particles which reproduces the exact electronic density. In the Kohn-Sham system all non-classical many-body effects are incorporated in the exchange-correlation potential which is in general unknown and needs to be approximated. It is the goal of this thesis to investigate the connection between memory effects and correlated electron dynamics in strong and weak fields. To this end one-dimensional two-electron singlet systems are studied. At the same time these systems include the onedimensional helium atom model, which is an established system to investigate the crucial effects of correlated electron dynamics in external fields. The studies presented in this thesis show that memory effects are negligible for typical strong field processes. Here the approximation of the spatial nonlocality is of primary importance. For the photoabsorption spectra on the other hand the neglect of memory effects leads to qualitative and quantitative errors, which are shown to be connected to transitions of double excitation character. To develop a better understanding of the conditions under which memory effects become important quantum fluid dynamics has been found to be especially suitable. It represents a further exact reformulation of the quantum mechanic many-body problem which is based on hydrodynamic quantities such as density and velocity. Memory effects are shown to be important whenever the velocity field develops strong gradients and dissipative effects contribute. (orig.)

  1. Correlated electron dynamics and memory in time-dependent density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiele, Mark

    2009-07-28

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is an exact reformulation of the time-dependent many-electron Schroedinger equation, where the problem of many interacting electrons is mapped onto the Kohn-Sham system of noninteracting particles which reproduces the exact electronic density. In the Kohn-Sham system all non-classical many-body effects are incorporated in the exchange-correlation potential which is in general unknown and needs to be approximated. It is the goal of this thesis to investigate the connection between memory effects and correlated electron dynamics in strong and weak fields. To this end one-dimensional two-electron singlet systems are studied. At the same time these systems include the onedimensional helium atom model, which is an established system to investigate the crucial effects of correlated electron dynamics in external fields. The studies presented in this thesis show that memory effects are negligible for typical strong field processes. Here the approximation of the spatial nonlocality is of primary importance. For the photoabsorption spectra on the other hand the neglect of memory effects leads to qualitative and quantitative errors, which are shown to be connected to transitions of double excitation character. To develop a better understanding of the conditions under which memory effects become important quantum fluid dynamics has been found to be especially suitable. It represents a further exact reformulation of the quantum mechanic many-body problem which is based on hydrodynamic quantities such as density and velocity. Memory effects are shown to be important whenever the velocity field develops strong gradients and dissipative effects contribute. (orig.)

  2. Wavelet-based linear-response time-dependent density-functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Bhaarathi; Genovese, Luigi; Casida, Mark E.; Deutsch, Thierry; Burchak, Olga N.; Philouze, Christian; Balakirev, Maxim Y.

    2012-06-01

    Linear-response time-dependent (TD) density-functional theory (DFT) has been implemented in the pseudopotential wavelet-based electronic structure program BIGDFT and results are compared against those obtained with the all-electron Gaussian-type orbital program DEMON2K for the calculation of electronic absorption spectra of N2 using the TD local density approximation (LDA). The two programs give comparable excitation energies and absorption spectra once suitably extensive basis sets are used. Convergence of LDA density orbitals and orbital energies to the basis-set limit is significantly faster for BIGDFT than for DEMON2K. However the number of virtual orbitals used in TD-DFT calculations is a parameter in BIGDFT, while all virtual orbitals are included in TD-DFT calculations in DEMON2K. As a reality check, we report the X-ray crystal structure and the measured and calculated absorption spectrum (excitation energies and oscillator strengths) of the small organic molecule N-cyclohexyl-2-(4-methoxyphenyl)imidazo[1, 2-a]pyridin-3-amine.

  3. Numerical implementation of time-dependent density functional theory for extended systems in extreme environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baczewski, Andrew David; Shulenburger, Luke; Desjarlais, Michael Paul; Magyar, Rudolph J.

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, DFT-MD has been shown to be a useful computational tool for exploring the properties of WDM. These calculations achieve excellent agreement with shock compression experiments, which probe the thermodynamic parameters of the Hugoniot state. New X-ray Thomson Scattering diagnostics promise to deliver independent measurements of electronic density and temperature, as well as structural information in shocked systems. However, they require the development of new levels of theory for computing the associated observables within a DFT framework. The experimentally observable x-ray scattering cross section is related to the electronic density-density response function, which is obtainable using TDDFT - a formally exact extension of conventional DFT that describes electron dynamics and excited states. In order to develop a capability for modeling XRTS data and, more generally, to establish a predictive capability for rst principles simulations of matter in extreme conditions, real-time TDDFT with Ehrenfest dynamics has been implemented in an existing PAW code for DFT-MD calculations. The purpose of this report is to record implementation details and benchmarks as the project advances from software development to delivering novel scienti c results. Results range from tests that establish the accuracy, e ciency, and scalability of our implementation, to calculations that are veri ed against accepted results in the literature. Aside from the primary XRTS goal, we identify other more general areas where this new capability will be useful, including stopping power calculations and electron-ion equilibration.

  4. Quantification of neonatal lung parenchymal density via ultrashort echo time MRI with comparison to CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higano, Nara S; Fleck, Robert J; Spielberg, David R; Walkup, Laura L; Hahn, Andrew D; Thomen, Robert P; Merhar, Stephanie L; Kingma, Paul S; Tkach, Jean A; Fain, Sean B; Woods, Jason C

    2017-10-01

    To demonstrate that ultrashort echo time (UTE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can achieve computed tomography (CT)-like quantification of lung parenchyma in free-breathing, non-sedated neonates. Because infant CTs are used sparingly, parenchymal disease evaluation via UTE MRI has potential for translational impact. Two neonatal control cohorts without suspected pulmonary morbidities underwent either a research UTE MRI (n = 5; 1.5T) or a clinically-ordered CT (n = 9). Whole-lung means and anterior-posterior gradients of UTE-measured image intensity (arbitrary units, au, normalized to muscle) and CT-measured density (g/cm 3 ) were compared (Mann-Whitney U-test). Separately, a diseased neonatal cohort (n = 5) with various pulmonary morbidities underwent both UTE MRI and CT. UTE intensity and CT density were compared with Spearman correlations within ∼33 anatomically matched regions of interest (ROIs) in each diseased subject, spanning low- to high-density tissues. Radiological classifications were evaluated in all ROIs, with mean UTE intensities and CT densities compared in each classification. In control subjects, whole-lung UTE intensities (0.51 ± 0.04 au) were similar to CT densities (0.44 ± 0.09 g/cm 3 ) (P = 0.062), as were UTE (0.021 ± 0.020 au/cm) and CT (0.034 ± 0.024 [g/cm 3 ]/cm) anterior-posterior gradients (P = 0.351). In diseased subjects' ROIs, significant correlations were observed between UTE and CT (P ≤0.007 in each case). Relative differences between UTE and CT were small in all classifications (4-25%). These results demonstrate a strong association between UTE image intensity and CT density, both between whole-lung tissue in control patients and regional radiological pathologies in diseased patients. This indicates the potential for UTE MRI to longitudinally evaluate neonatal pulmonary disease and to provide visualization of pathologies similar to CT, without sedation/anesthesia or ionizing radiation

  5. Time-dependent density functional calculation of the energy loss of antiprotons colliding with metallic nanoshells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quijada, M.; Borisov, A.G.; Muino, R.D.

    2008-01-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory is used to study the interaction between antiprotons and metallic nanoshells. The ground state electronic properties of the nanoshell are obtained in the jellium approximation. The energy lost by the antiproton during the collision is calculated and compared to that suffered by antiprotons traveling in metal clusters. The resulting energy loss per unit path length of material in thin nanoshells is larger than the corresponding quantity for clusters. It is shown that the collision process can be interpreted as the antiproton crossing of two nearly bi-dimensional independent metallic systems. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. Spectral density analysis of time correlation functions in lattice QCD using the maximum entropy method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiebig, H. Rudolf

    2002-01-01

    We study various aspects of extracting spectral information from time correlation functions of lattice QCD by means of Bayesian inference with an entropic prior, the maximum entropy method (MEM). Correlator functions of a heavy-light meson-meson system serve as a repository for lattice data with diverse statistical quality. Attention is given to spectral mass density functions, inferred from the data, and their dependence on the parameters of the MEM. We propose to employ simulated annealing, or cooling, to solve the Bayesian inference problem, and discuss the practical issues of the approach

  7. Sequential double excitations from linear-response time-dependent density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosquera, Martín A.; Ratner, Mark A.; Schatz, George C., E-mail: g-schatz@northwestern.edu [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Rd., Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Chen, Lin X. [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Rd., Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Ave., Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2016-05-28

    Traditional UV/vis and X-ray spectroscopies focus mainly on the study of excitations starting exclusively from electronic ground states. However there are many experiments where transitions from excited states, both absorption and emission, are probed. In this work we develop a formalism based on linear-response time-dependent density functional theory to investigate spectroscopic properties of excited states. We apply our model to study the excited-state absorption of a diplatinum(II) complex under X-rays, and transient vis/UV absorption of pyrene and azobenzene.

  8. Stopping of deuterium in warm dense deuterium from Ehrenfest time-dependent density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magyar, R.J.; Shulenburger, L.; Baczewski, A.D. [Sandia National Laboratories - Multi-scale Physics 1444 MS 1322, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-06-15

    In these proceedings, we show that time-dependent density functional theory is capable of stopping calculations at the extreme conditions of temperature and pressure seen in warm dense matter. The accuracy of the stopping curves tends to be up to about 20% lower than empirical models that are in use. However, TDDFT calculations are free from fitting parameters and assumptions about the model form of the dielectric function. This work allows the simulation of ion stopping in many materials that are difficult to study experimentally. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Time-dependent density functional theory description of total photoabsorption cross sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenorio, Bruno Nunes Cabral; Nascimento, Marco Antonio Chaer; Rocha, Alexandre Braga

    2018-02-01

    The time-dependent version of the density functional theory (TDDFT) has been used to calculate the total photoabsorption cross section of a number of molecules, namely, benzene, pyridine, furan, pyrrole, thiophene, phenol, naphthalene, and anthracene. The discrete electronic pseudo-spectra, obtained in a L2 basis set calculation were used in an analytic continuation procedure to obtain the photoabsorption cross sections. The ammonia molecule was chosen as a model system to compare the results obtained with TDDFT to those obtained with the linear response coupled cluster approach in order to make a link with our previous work and establish benchmarks.

  10. Plasma density control in real-time on the COMPASS tokamak

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janky, Filip; Hron, Martin; Havlíček, Josef; Varavin, Mykyta; Žáček, František; Seidl, Jakub; Pánek, Radomír

    96-97, October (2015), s. 637-640 ISSN 0920-3796. [Symposium on Fusion Technology 2014(SOFT-28)/28./. San Sebastián, 29.09.2014-03.10.2014] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011021 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 633053 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : COMPASS tokamak * Real-time control * Density control * MARTe * Interferometer * Stickiness of the valve Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics OBOR OECD: Nuclear related engineering Impact factor: 1.301, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S092037961500294X

  11. Density-Dependent Conformable Space-time Fractional Diffusion-Reaction Equation and Its Exact Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Kamyar; Mayeli, Peyman; Bekir, Ahmet; Guner, Ozkan

    2018-01-01

    In this article, a special type of fractional differential equations (FDEs) named the density-dependent conformable fractional diffusion-reaction (DDCFDR) equation is studied. Aforementioned equation has a significant role in the modelling of some phenomena arising in the applied science. The well-organized methods, including the \\exp (-φ (\\varepsilon )) -expansion and modified Kudryashov methods are exerted to generate the exact solutions of this equation such that some of the solutions are new and have been reported for the first time. Results illustrate that both methods have a great performance in handling the DDCFDR equation.

  12. A high-temperature furnace and a heating/drawing device designed for time-resolved X-ray diffraction measurements of polymer solids using imaging plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Syozo; Tanno, Kiyomitsu; Tsuji, Masaki; Kohjiya, Shinzo

    1995-01-01

    For time-resolved X-ray diffraction measurements using the imaging plate system in the drawing and/or heating process of polymer solids, a high-temperature furnace for heat treatment and a heating/drawing device were newly designed and constructed. Then, to demonstrate their performance, some experimental results obtained in the drawing process of an extruded/blown film of high-density polyethylene at room temperature and in the crystallization process of an oriented amorphous film of poly(ethylene naphthalene-2,6-dicarboxylate) by heating were presented. Other experimental results obtained using them were also briefly cited. (author)

  13. Enhancing Understanding of Magnetized High Energy Density Plasmas from Solid Liner Implosions Using Fluid Modeling with Kinetic Closures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masti, Robert; Srinivasan, Bhuvana; King, Jacob; Stoltz, Peter; Hansen, David; Held, Eric

    2017-10-01

    Recent results from experiments and simulations of magnetically driven pulsed power liners have explored the role of early-time electrothermal instability in the evolution of the MRT (magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor) instability. Understanding the development of these instabilities can lead to potential stabilization mechanisms; thereby providing a significant role in the success of fusion concepts such as MagLIF (Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion). For MagLIF the MRT instability is the most detrimental instability toward achieving fusion energy production. Experiments of high-energy density plasmas from wire-array implosions have shown the requirement for more advanced physics modeling than that of ideal magnetohydrodynamics. The overall focus of this project is on using a multi-fluid extended-MHD model with kinetic closures for thermal conductivity, resistivity, and viscosity. The extended-MHD model has been updated to include the SESAME equation-of-state tables and numerical benchmarks with this implementation will be presented. Simulations of MRT growth and evolution for MagLIF-relevant parameters will be presented using this extended-MHD model with the SESAME equation-of-state tables. This work is supported by the Department of Energy Office of Science under Grant Number DE-SC0016515.

  14. The mass spectral density in quantitative time-of-flight mass spectrometry of polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Ranjeet S.; Ebeling, Dan; Smith, Lloyd M.

    2001-03-01

    Time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) is being increasingly used for the study of polymers, for example to obtain the distribution of molecular masses for polymer samples. Serious efforts have also been underway to use TOF-MS for DNA sequencing. In TOF-MS the data is obtained in the form of a time-series that represents the distribution in arrival times of ions of various m/z ratios. This time-series data is then converted to a "mass-spectrum" via a coordinate transformation from the arrival time (t) to the corresponding mass-to-charge ratio (m/z = const. t^2). In this transformation, it is important to keep in mind that spectra are distributions, or densities of weight +1, and thus do not transform as functions. To obtain the mass-spectral density, it is necessary to include a multiplicative factor of √m/z. Common commercial instruments do not take this factor into account. Dropping this factor has no effect on qualitative analysis (detection) or local quantitative measurements, since S/N or signal-to-baseline ratios are unaffected for peaks with small dispersions. However, there are serious consequences for general quantitative analyses. In DNA sequencing applications, loss of signal intensity is in part attributed to multiple charging; however, since the √m/z factor is not taken into account, this conclusion is based on an overestimate (by a factor of √z) of the relative amount of the multiply charged species. In the study of polymers, the normalized dispersion is underestimated by approximately (M_w/Mn -1)/2. In terms of M_w/Mn itself, for example, a M_w/M_n=1.5 calculated without the √m factor corresponds in fact to a M_w/M_n=1.88.

  15. Energy density and storage capacity cost comparison of conceptual solid and liquid sorption seasonal heat storage systems for low-temperature space heating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scapino, L.; Zondag, H.A.; Van Bael, J.; Diriken, J.; Rindt, C.C.M.

    Sorption heat storage can potentially store thermal energy for long time periods with a higher energy density compared to conventional storage technologies. A performance comparison in terms of energy density and storage capacity costs of different sorption system concepts used for seasonal heat

  16. A real-time extension of density matrix embedding theory for non-equilibrium electron dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretchmer, Joshua S.; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2018-02-01

    We introduce real-time density matrix embedding theory (DMET), a dynamical quantum embedding theory for computing non-equilibrium electron dynamics in strongly correlated systems. As in the previously developed static DMET, real-time DMET partitions the system into an impurity corresponding to the region of interest coupled to the surrounding environment, which is efficiently represented by a quantum bath of the same size as the impurity. In this work, we focus on a simplified single-impurity time-dependent formulation as a first step toward a multi-impurity theory. The equations of motion of the coupled impurity and bath embedding problem are derived using the time-dependent variational principle. The accuracy of real-time DMET is compared to that of time-dependent complete active space self-consistent field (TD-CASSCF) theory and time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory for a variety of quantum quenches in the single impurity Anderson model (SIAM), in which the Hamiltonian is suddenly changed (quenched) to induce a non-equilibrium state. Real-time DMET shows a marked improvement over the mean-field TDHF, converging to the exact answer even in the non-trivial Kondo regime of the SIAM. However, as expected from analogous behavior in static DMET, the constrained structure of the real-time DMET wavefunction leads to a slower convergence with respect to active space size, in the single-impurity formulation, relative to TD-CASSCF. Our initial results suggest that real-time DMET provides a promising framework to simulate non-equilibrium electron dynamics in which strong electron correlation plays an important role, and lays the groundwork for future multi-impurity formulations.

  17. Effect of solids retention time on the bioavailability of organic carbon in anaerobically digested swine waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinyua, Maureen N; Cunningham, Jeffrey; Ergas, Sarina J

    2014-06-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) can be used to stabilize and produce energy from livestock waste; however, digester effluents may require further treatment to remove nitrogen. This paper quantifies the effects of varying solids retention time (SRT) methane yield, volatile solids (VS) reduction and organic carbon bioavailability for denitrification during swine waste AD. Four bench-scale anaerobic digesters, with SRTs of 14, 21, 28 and 42 days, operated with swine waste feed. Effluent organic carbon bioavailability was measured using anoxic microcosms and respirometry. Excellent performance was observed for all four digesters, with >60% VS removal and CH4 yields between 0.1 and 0.3(m(3)CH4)/(kg VS added). Organic carbon in the centrate as an internal organic carbon source for denitrification supported maximum specific denitrification rates between 47 and 56(mg NO3(-)-N)/(g VSS h). The digester with the 21-day SRT had the highest CH4 yield and maximum specific denitrification rates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The effect of high antigen density on solid-phase radioimmunoassays for antibody regardless of immunoglobulin class

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, R.L.; Hardtke, M.A.; Carr, R.I.

    1980-01-01

    Human sera containing antibody to casein or to bovine serum albumin were used to assess the validity and utility of a solid-phase assay for quantitating antibody activity. Rabbit anti-human immunoglobulin radiolabeled with 125 I and capable of reacting with all human immunoglobulin classes was used to detect antibody bound to antigen immobilized to polystyrene tubes by a new covalent technique. This method results in very high antigen concentrations in highly stable association with polystyrene tubes. Kinetic and absorption studies demonstrated that low avidity antibodies are better detected when antigen is immobilized by the covalent method than when passively adsorbed. Conditions are described for minimizing artifactual interactions and for obtaining results similar to those obtained with conventional, liquid-phase assays. Failure to reach equilibrium in solid-phase assays and other problems are proposed to explain, in part, the inability to obtain a better correlation between solid- and liquid-phase immunoassays. (Auth.)

  19. Time-dependent density-functional theory in massively parallel computer architectures: the OCTOPUS project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Xavier; Alberdi-Rodriguez, Joseba; Strubbe, David A; Oliveira, Micael J T; Nogueira, Fernando; Castro, Alberto; Muguerza, Javier; Arruabarrena, Agustin; Louie, Steven G; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Rubio, Angel; Marques, Miguel A L

    2012-06-13

    Octopus is a general-purpose density-functional theory (DFT) code, with a particular emphasis on the time-dependent version of DFT (TDDFT). In this paper we present the ongoing efforts to achieve the parallelization of octopus. We focus on the real-time variant of TDDFT, where the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equations are directly propagated in time. This approach has great potential for execution in massively parallel systems such as modern supercomputers with thousands of processors and graphics processing units (GPUs). For harvesting the potential of conventional supercomputers, the main strategy is a multi-level parallelization scheme that combines the inherent scalability of real-time TDDFT with a real-space grid domain-partitioning approach. A scalable Poisson solver is critical for the efficiency of this scheme. For GPUs, we show how using blocks of Kohn-Sham states provides the required level of data parallelism and that this strategy is also applicable for code optimization on standard processors. Our results show that real-time TDDFT, as implemented in octopus, can be the method of choice for studying the excited states of large molecular systems in modern parallel architectures.

  20. Time-dependent density-functional theory in massively parallel computer architectures: the octopus project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Xavier; Alberdi-Rodriguez, Joseba; Strubbe, David A.; Oliveira, Micael J. T.; Nogueira, Fernando; Castro, Alberto; Muguerza, Javier; Arruabarrena, Agustin; Louie, Steven G.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Rubio, Angel; Marques, Miguel A. L.

    2012-06-01

    Octopus is a general-purpose density-functional theory (DFT) code, with a particular emphasis on the time-dependent version of DFT (TDDFT). In this paper we present the ongoing efforts to achieve the parallelization of octopus. We focus on the real-time variant of TDDFT, where the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equations are directly propagated in time. This approach has great potential for execution in massively parallel systems such as modern supercomputers with thousands of processors and graphics processing units (GPUs). For harvesting the potential of conventional supercomputers, the main strategy is a multi-level parallelization scheme that combines the inherent scalability of real-time TDDFT with a real-space grid domain-partitioning approach. A scalable Poisson solver is critical for the efficiency of this scheme. For GPUs, we show how using blocks of Kohn-Sham states provides the required level of data parallelism and that this strategy is also applicable for code optimization on standard processors. Our results show that real-time TDDFT, as implemented in octopus, can be the method of choice for studying the excited states of large molecular systems in modern parallel architectures.

  1. Time-dependent density-functional theory in massively parallel computer architectures: the octopus project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Xavier; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Alberdi-Rodriguez, Joseba; Rubio, Angel; Strubbe, David A; Louie, Steven G; Oliveira, Micael J T; Nogueira, Fernando; Castro, Alberto; Muguerza, Javier; Arruabarrena, Agustin; Marques, Miguel A L

    2012-01-01

    Octopus is a general-purpose density-functional theory (DFT) code, with a particular emphasis on the time-dependent version of DFT (TDDFT). In this paper we present the ongoing efforts to achieve the parallelization of octopus. We focus on the real-time variant of TDDFT, where the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equations are directly propagated in time. This approach has great potential for execution in massively parallel systems such as modern supercomputers with thousands of processors and graphics processing units (GPUs). For harvesting the potential of conventional supercomputers, the main strategy is a multi-level parallelization scheme that combines the inherent scalability of real-time TDDFT with a real-space grid domain-partitioning approach. A scalable Poisson solver is critical for the efficiency of this scheme. For GPUs, we show how using blocks of Kohn-Sham states provides the required level of data parallelism and that this strategy is also applicable for code optimization on standard processors. Our results show that real-time TDDFT, as implemented in octopus, can be the method of choice for studying the excited states of large molecular systems in modern parallel architectures. (topical review)

  2. Housefly population density correlates with shigellosis among children in Mirzapur, Bangladesh: a time series analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer H Farag

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Shigella infections are a public health problem in developing and transitional countries because of high transmissibility, severity of clinical disease, widespread antibiotic resistance and lack of a licensed vaccine. Whereas Shigellae are known to be transmitted primarily by direct fecal-oral contact and less commonly by contaminated food and water, the role of the housefly Musca domestica as a mechanical vector of transmission is less appreciated. We sought to assess the contribution of houseflies to Shigella-associated moderate-to-severe diarrhea (MSD among children less than five years old in Mirzapur, Bangladesh, a site where shigellosis is hyperendemic, and to model the potential impact of a housefly control intervention. METHODS: Stool samples from 843 children presenting to Kumudini Hospital during 2009-2010 with new episodes of MSD (diarrhea accompanied by dehydration, dysentery or hospitalization were analyzed. Housefly density was measured twice weekly in six randomly selected sentinel households. Poisson time series regression was performed and autoregression-adjusted attributable fractions (AFs were calculated using the Bruzzi method, with standard errors via jackknife procedure. FINDINGS: Dramatic springtime peaks in housefly density in 2009 and 2010 were followed one to two months later by peaks of Shigella-associated MSD among toddlers and pre-school children. Poisson time series regression showed that housefly density was associated with Shigella cases at three lags (six weeks (Incidence Rate Ratio = 1.39 [95% CI: 1.23 to 1.58] for each log increase in fly count, an association that was not confounded by ambient air temperature. Autocorrelation-adjusted AF calculations showed that a housefly control intervention could have prevented approximately 37% of the Shigella cases over the study period. INTERPRETATION: Houseflies may play an important role in the seasonal transmission of Shigella in some developing

  3. Time-resolved electron thermal conduction by probing of plasma formation in transparent solids with high power subpicosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vu, Brian -Tinh Van [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1994-02-01

    This dissertation work includes a series of experimental measurements in a search for better understanding of high temperature (104-106K) and high density plasmas (1022-1024cm-3) produced by irradiating a transparent solid target with high intensity (1013 - 1015W/cm2) and subpicosecond (10-12-10-13s) laser pulses. Experimentally, pump and probe schemes with both frontside (vacuum-plasma side) and backside (plasma-bulk material side) probes are used to excite and interrogate or probe the plasma evolution, thereby providing useful insights into the plasma formation mechanisms. A series of different experiments has been carried out so as to characterize plasma parameters and the importance of various nonlinear processes. Experimental evidence shows that electron thermal conduction is supersonic in a time scale of the first picosecond after laser irradiation, so fast that it was often left unresolved in the past. The experimental results from frontside probing demonstrate that upon irradiation with a strong (pump) laser pulse, a thin high temperature (~40eV) super-critical density (~1023/cm3) plasma layer is quickly formed at the target surface which in turn becomes strongly reflective and prevents further transmission of the remainder of the laser pulse. In the bulk region behind the surface, it is also found that a large sub-critical (~1018/cm3) plasma is produced by inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption and collisional ionization. The bulk underdense plasma is evidenced by large absorption of the backside probe light. A simple and analytical model, modified from the avalanche model, for plasma evolution in transparent materials is proposed to explain the experimental results. Elimination of the bulk plasma is then experimentally illustrated by using targets overcoated with highly absorptive films.

  4. Time-resolved electron thermal conduction by probing of plasma formation in transparent solids with high power subpicosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vu, B.T.V.

    1994-02-01

    This dissertation work includes a series of experimental measurements in a search for better understanding of high temperature (10 4 -10 6 K) and high density plasmas (10 22 -10 24 cm -3 ) produced by irradiating a transparent solid target with high intensity (10 13 - 10 15 W/cm 2 ) and subpicosecond (10 -12 -10 -13 s) laser pulses. Experimentally, pump and probe schemes with both frontside (vacuum-plasma side) and backside (plasma-bulk material side) probes are used to excite and interrogate or probe the plasma evolution, thereby providing useful insights into the plasma formation mechanisms. A series of different experiments has been carried out so as to characterize plasma parameters and the importance of various nonlinear processes. Experimental evidence shows that electron thermal conduction is supersonic in a time scale of the first picosecond after laser irradiation, so fast that it was often left unresolved in the past. The experimental results from frontside probing demonstrate that upon irradiation with a strong (pump) laser pulse, a thin high temperature (∼40eV) super-critical density (∼10 23 /cm 3 ) plasma layer is quickly formed at the target surface which in turn becomes strongly reflective and prevents further transmission of the remainder of the laser pulse. In the bulk region behind the surface, it is also found that a large sub-critical (∼10 18 /cm 3 ) plasma is produced by inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption and collisional ionization. The bulk underdense plasma is evidenced by large absorption of the backside probe light. A simple and analytical model, modified from the avalanche model, for plasma evolution in transparent materials is proposed to explain the experimental results. Elimination of the bulk plasma is then experimentally illustrated by using targets overcoated with highly absorptive films

  5. The solar wind plasma density control of night-time auroral particle precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Vorobjev

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available DMSP F6 and F7 spacecraft observations of the average electron and ion energy, and energy fluxes in different night-time precipitation regions for the whole of 1986 were used to examine the precipitation features associated with solar wind density changes. It was found that during magnetic quietness |AL|<100nT, the enhancement of average ion fluxes was observed at least two times, along with the solar wind plasma density increase from 2 to 24cm–3. More pronounced was the ion flux enhancement that occurred in the b2i–b4s and b4s–b5 regions, which are approximately corresponding to the statistical auroral oval and map to the magnetospheric plasma sheet tailward of the isotropy boundary. The average ion energy decrease of about 2–4kev was registered simultaneously with this ion flux enhancement. The results verify the occurrence of effective penetration of the solar wind plasma into the magnetospheric tail plasma sheet. Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere, particle precipitation – Magnetospheric physics (solar windmagnetosphere interaction

  6. Exact-exchange time-dependent density-functional theory for static and dynamic polarizabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, So; Ivanov, Stanislav; Bartlett, Rodney J.; Grabowski, Ireneusz

    2005-01-01

    Time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) employing the exact-exchange functional has been formulated on the basis of the optimized-effective-potential (OEP) method of Talman and Shadwick for second-order molecular properties and implemented into a Gaussian-basis-set, trial-vector algorithm. The only approximation involved, apart from the lack of correlation effects and the use of Gaussian-type basis functions, was the consistent use of the adiabatic approximation in the exchange kernel and in the linear response function. The static and dynamic polarizabilities and their anisotropy predicted by the TDDFT with exact exchange (TDOEP) agree accurately with the corresponding values from time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory, the exact-exchange counterpart in the wave function theory. The TDOEP is free from the nonphysical asymptotic decay of the exchange potential of most conventional density functionals or from any other manifestations of the incomplete cancellation of the self-interaction energy. The systematic overestimation of the absolute values and dispersion of polarizabilities that plagues most conventional TDDFT cannot be seen in the TDOEP

  7. Relativistic time-dependent local-density approximation theory and applications to atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parpia, F.Z.

    1984-01-01

    A time-dependent linear-response theory appropriate to the relativistic local-density approximation (RLDA) to quantum electrodynamics (QED) is developed. The resulting theory, the relativistic time-dependent local-density approximation (RTDLDA) is specialized to the treatment of electric excitations in closed-shell atoms. This formalism is applied to the calculation of atomic photoionization parameters in the dipole approximation. The static-field limit of the RTDLDA is applied to the calculation of dipole polarizabilities. Extensive numerical calculations of the photoionization parameters for the rare gases neon, argon, krypton, and xenon, and for mercury from the RTDLDA are presented and compared in detail with the results of other theories, in particular the relativistic random-phase approximation (RRPA), and with experimental measurements. The predictions of the RTDLDA are comparable with the RRPA calculations made to date. This is remarkable in that the RTDLDA entails appreciably less computational effort. Finally, the dipole polarizabilities predicted by the static-field RTDLDA are compared with other determinations of these quantities. In view of its simplicity, the static-field RTDLDA demonstrates itself to be one of the most powerful theories available for the calculation of dipole polarizabilities

  8. The solid molecular hydrogens in the ordered state as function of density and ortho-para concentration: a far infrared study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jochemsen, R.

    1978-01-01

    In this thesis, the results of far infrared absorption experiments on solid molecular hydrogen and deuterium are presented. In Chapter I an introduction to the properties of solid molecular hydrogens in given. The experimental system used for the high pressure infrared measurements and the data handling procedures are discussed in Chapter II. The theory of infrared absorption and the averaging of the dipole moment over the motion of the molecules is contained in Chapter III. In this chapter a general sum rule for the integrated absorption is derived. The remaining chapters present the results of the measurements and the discussion. In Chapter IV the author concentrates on the phonon frequencies as a function of ortho-para concentration and density, while in Chapter V measuremtns of phonon lineshape and integrated absorption intensities are presented. Finally, in Chapter VI, a study is given of the phase transition in solid hydrogen and deuterium. This study provides accurate values for the transition temperature as a function of density (in deuterium) and as a function of ortho-para concentration (in hydrogen) as well as the dependence of the order parameter on the temperature and the ortho-para concentration. (Auth.)

  9. Formation time of hadrons and density of matter produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisut, J.; Zavada, P.

    1994-06-01

    Densities of interacting hadronic matter produced in Oxygen-Lead and Sulphur-Lead collisions at 200 GeV/nucleon are estimated as a function of the formation time of hadrons. Uncertainties in our knowledge of the critical temperature T c and of the formation time of hadrons τ 0 permit at present three scenarios: an optimistic one (QGP has already been produced in collisions of Oxygen and Sulphur with heavy ions and will be copiously in Lead collisions), a pessimistic one (QGP cannot be produced at 200 GeV/nucleon) and an intermediate one (QGP has not been produced in Oxygen and Sulphur Interactions with heavy ions and will be at best produced only marginally in Pb-collisions). The last option is found to be the most probable. (author)

  10. Real-time control of electron density in a capacitively coupled plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keville, Bernard; Gaman, Cezar; Turner, Miles M.; Zhang Yang; Daniels, Stephen; Holohan, Anthony M.

    2013-01-01

    Reactive ion etching (RIE) is sensitive to changes in chamber conditions, such as wall seasoning, which have a deleterious effect on process reproducibility. The application of real time, closed loop control to RIE may reduce this sensitivity and facilitate production with tighter tolerances. The real-time, closed loop control of plasma density with RF power in a capacitively coupled argon plasma using a hairpin resonance probe as a sensor is described. Elementary control analysis shows that an integral controller provides stable and effective set point tracking and disturbance attenuation. The trade off between performance and robustness may be quantified in terms of one parameter, namely the position of the closed loop pole. Experimental results are presented, which are consistent with the theoretical analysis.

  11. Time Evolution of Meson Density During Formation of Expanding Quark-Antiquark System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffary, Tooraj

    2018-04-01

    Recently some researchers (Sepehri and Shoorvazi Astrophys. Spaces Sci. 344(2), 521-527, 2013) have considered the Universe as an acceleration cylindrical system. Motivated by their work and using their method in QCD, this paper has been cleared that because the acceleration of expansion in quark-antiquark system is relatively very large, one horizon is appeared outside the system. To obtain the total cross section of meson near this horizon, we need to multiply the production cross section for appeared horizon by the density of meson produced outside the system. As it can be seen by an observer who is outside the meson formation process, this cross section depends on time so the event horizon is now a time depended process.

  12. Localized diffusive motion on two different time scales in solid alkane nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.-K.; Mamontov, Eugene; Bai, M.; Hansen, F.Y.; Taub, H.; Copley, J.R.D.; Garcia Sakai, V.; Gasparovic, Goran; Jenkins, Timothy; Tyagi, M.; Herwig, Kenneth W.; Neumann, D.A.; Montfrooij, W.; Volkmann, U.G.

    2010-01-01

    High-energy-resolution quasielastic neutron scattering on three complementary spectrometers has been used to investigate molecular diffusive motion in solid nano- to bulk-sized particles of the alkane n-C32H66. The crystalline-to-plastic and plastic-to-fluid phase transition temperatures are observed to decrease as the particle size decreases. In all samples, localized molecular diffusive motion in the plastic phase occurs on two different time scales: a 'fast' motion corresponding to uniaxial rotation about the long molecular axis; and a 'slow' motion attributed to conformational changes of the molecule. Contrary to the conventional interpretation in bulk alkanes, the fast uniaxial rotation begins in the low-temperature crystalline phase.

  13. Time-Domain Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Techniques Suitable for Solid-State Imaging Sensor Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K. Henderson

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We have successfully demonstrated video-rate CMOS single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD-based cameras for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM by applying innovative FLIM algorithms. We also review and compare several time-domain techniques and solid-state FLIM systems, and adapt the proposed algorithms for massive CMOS SPAD-based arrays and hardware implementations. The theoretical error equations are derived and their performances are demonstrated on the data obtained from 0.13 μm CMOS SPAD arrays and the multiple-decay data obtained from scanning PMT systems. In vivo two photon fluorescence lifetime imaging data of FITC-albumin labeled vasculature of a P22 rat carcinosarcoma (BD9 rat window chamber are used to test how different algorithms perform on bi-decay data. The proposed techniques are capable of producing lifetime images with enough contrast.

  14. Density of Trap States and Auger-mediated Electron Trapping in CdTe Quantum-Dot Solids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boehme, Simon C.; Mikel Azpiroz, Jon; Aulin, Yaroslav V.; Grozema, Ferdinand C.; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel; Siebbeles, Laurens D. A.; Infante, Ivan; Houtepen, Arjan J.

    Charge trapping is an ubiquitous process in colloidal quantum-dot solids and a major limitation to the efficiency of quantum dot based devices such as solar cells, LEDs, and thermoelectrics. Although empirical approaches led to a reduction of trapping and thereby efficiency enhancements, the exact

  15. Density of trap states and Auger-mediated electron trapping in CdTe quantum-dot solids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boehme, Simon C.; Azpiroz, Jon Mikel; Aulin, Yaroslav V.; Grozema, Ferdinand C.; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniël; Siebbeles, Laurens D A; Infante, Ivan; Houtepen, Arjan J.

    2015-01-01

    Charge trapping is an ubiquitous process in colloidal quantum-dot solids and a major limitation to the efficiency of quantum dot based devices such as solar cells, LEDs, and thermoelectrics. Although empirical approaches led to a reduction of trapping and thereby efficiency enhancements, the exact

  16. Solid state CP/MAS 13C n.m.r. analysis of particle size and density fractions of soil incubated with uniformly labelled 13C-glucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldock, J.A.; Oades, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    A soil incubated for 34 days in the absence (control) and presence (treated) of uniformly labelled 13 C-glucose was dispersed using an ultrasonic probe and fractionated by sedimentation in water and a polytungstate solution of density 2.0 Mg m -3 . Solid state CP/MAS 13 C n.m.r. (cross polarization/magic angle spinning 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy was used to characterize the chemical structure of the native soil organic carbon and the residual substrate carbon in the fractions of the control and treated soils. To obtain quantitative results it was essential to determine the spin lattice relaxation time in a rotating frame of the individual carbon types in the spectra as the relaxation behaviour of the native organic material in the clay fraction was different from that of the residual substrate carbon. The residual substrate carbon was found to accumulate in predominantly alkyl and O-alkyl structures in both fractions. However, significant amounts of acetal and carboxyl carbon were also observed in the clay fraction. Little if any aromatic or phenolic carbon was synthesized by the soil microorganisms utilizing substrate carbon. Dipolar dephasing CP/MAS 13 C n.m.r. experiments were also performed and allowed the proportion of each type of carbon which was protonated and nonprotonated to be estimated. Essentially all of the O-alkyl and acetal carbon, 25-40% of the aromatic carbon and 66-80% of the alkyl carbon was protonated in the fractions isolated from the treated soil. 24 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Nematic-smectic A and nematic-solid transitions of parallel hard spherocylinders from density functional theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    University Utrecht

    1992-01-01

    A simple density functional theory for the various liquid-crystalline phases of parallel hard spherocylinders is formulated on the basis of Pynn's ansatz for the direct correlation function of the spherocylinders. Fair agreement with the computer simulations is found.

  18. Time-dependent quantum many-body systems. Linear response, electronic transport, and reduced density matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appel, H.

    2007-05-01

    In part I of this work we present a double-pole approximation (DPA) to the response equations of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). The double-pole approximation provides an exact description of systems with two strongly coupled excitations which are isolated from the rest of the spectrum. In contrast to the traditional single-pole approximation of TDDFT the DPA also yields corrections to the Kohn-Sham oscillator strengths. We also demonstrate how to invert the double-pole solution which allows us to predict matrix elements of the exchange-correlation kernel f xc from experimental input. We attempt some first steps towards a time-dependent generalization of reduced density matrix functional theory (RDMFT). In part II we derive equations of motion for natural orbitals and occupation numbers. Using the equation of motion for the occupation numbers we show that an adiabatic extension of presently known ground-state functionals of static RDMFT always leads to occupation numbers which are constant in time. From the stationary conditions of the equations of motion for the N-body correlations (correlated parts of the N-body matrices) we derive a new class of ground-state functionals which can be used in static RDMFT. Applications are presented for a one-dimensional model system where the time-dependent many-body Schroedinger equation can be propagated numerically. We use optimal control theory to find optimized laser pulses for transitions in a model for atomic Helium. From the numerically exact correlated wavefunction we extract the exact time evolution of natural orbitals and occupation numbers for (i) laser-driven Helium and (ii) electron-ion scattering. Part III of this work considers time-dependent quantum transport within TDDFT. We present an algorithm for the calculation of extended eigenstates of single-particle Hamiltonians which is especially tailored to a finite-difference discretization of the Schroedinger equation. We consider the propagation

  19. Time-dependent quantum many-body systems. Linear response, electronic transport, and reduced density matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appel, H.

    2007-05-15

    In part I of this work we present a double-pole approximation (DPA) to the response equations of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). The double-pole approximation provides an exact description of systems with two strongly coupled excitations which are isolated from the rest of the spectrum. In contrast to the traditional single-pole approximation of TDDFT the DPA also yields corrections to the Kohn-Sham oscillator strengths. We also demonstrate how to invert the double-pole solution which allows us to predict matrix elements of the exchange-correlation kernel f{sub xc} from experimental input. We attempt some first steps towards a time-dependent generalization of reduced density matrix functional theory (RDMFT). In part II we derive equations of motion for natural orbitals and occupation numbers. Using the equation of motion for the occupation numbers we show that an adiabatic extension of presently known ground-state functionals of static RDMFT always leads to occupation numbers which are constant in time. From the stationary conditions of the equations of motion for the N-body correlations (correlated parts of the N-body matrices) we derive a new class of ground-state functionals which can be used in static RDMFT. Applications are presented for a one-dimensional model system where the time-dependent many-body Schroedinger equation can be propagated numerically. We use optimal control theory to find optimized laser pulses for transitions in a model for atomic Helium. From the numerically exact correlated wavefunction we extract the exact time evolution of natural orbitals and occupation numbers for (i) laser-driven Helium and (ii) electron-ion scattering. Part III of this work considers time-dependent quantum transport within TDDFT. We present an algorithm for the calculation of extended eigenstates of single-particle Hamiltonians which is especially tailored to a finite-difference discretization of the Schroedinger equation. We consider the

  20. High energy density matter issues related to future circular collider. Simulations of full beam impact with a solid copper cylindrical target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahir, N.A. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Burkart, F.; Schmidt, R.; Wollmann, D. [CERN-AB, Geneva (Switzerland); Shutov, A. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Piriz, A.R. [E.T.S.I. Industrials, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2017-11-15

    This paper presents numerical simulations of the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic response of a solid copper cylindrical target that is subjected to the full impact of one future circular collider (FCC) ultra-relativistic proton beam. The target is facially irradiated so that the beam axis coincides with the cylinder axis. The simulations have been carried out employing an energy deposition code, FLUKA, and a 2D hydrodynamic code, BIG2, iteratively. The simulations show that, although the static range of a single FCC proton and its shower in solid copper is ∝1.5 m, the full beam may penetrate up to 350 m into the target as a result of hydrodynamic tunnelling. Moreover, simulations also show that a major part of the target is converted into high energy density (HED) matter, including warm dense matter (WDM) and strongly coupled plasma. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Wavelet-based linear-response time-dependent density-functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natarajan, Bhaarathi; Genovese, Luigi; Casida, Mark E.; Deutsch, Thierry; Burchak, Olga N.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We has been implemented LR-TD-DFT in the pseudopotential wavelet-based program. ► We have compared the results against all-electron Gaussian-type program. ► Orbital energies converges significantly faster for BigDFT than for DEMON2K. ► We report the X-ray crystal structure of the small organic molecule flugi6. ► Measured and calculated absorption spectrum of flugi6 is also reported. - Abstract: Linear-response time-dependent (TD) density-functional theory (DFT) has been implemented in the pseudopotential wavelet-based electronic structure program BIGDFT and results are compared against those obtained with the all-electron Gaussian-type orbital program DEMON2K for the calculation of electronic absorption spectra of N 2 using the TD local density approximation (LDA). The two programs give comparable excitation energies and absorption spectra once suitably extensive basis sets are used. Convergence of LDA density orbitals and orbital energies to the basis-set limit is significantly faster for BIGDFT than for DEMON2K. However the number of virtual orbitals used in TD-DFT calculations is a parameter in BIGDFT, while all virtual orbitals are included in TD-DFT calculations in DEMON2K. As a reality check, we report the X-ray crystal structure and the measured and calculated absorption spectrum (excitation energies and oscillator strengths) of the small organic molecule N-cyclohexyl-2-(4-methoxyphenyl)imidazo[1, 2-a]pyridin-3-amine.

  2. Picosecond Time-Resolved Temperature and Density Measurements with K-Shell Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillman, C. R.; Nilson, P. M.; Ivancic, S. T.; Mileham, C.; Froula, D. H.; Golovkin, I. E.

    2017-10-01

    The thermal x-ray emission from rapidly heated solid targets containing a buried-aluminum layer was measured to track the evolution of the bulk plasma conditions. The targets were driven by high-contrast 1 ω laser pulses at focused intensities up to 1 × 1019 W/cm2. A streaked x-ray spectrometer recorded the AlHeα and lithium-like satellite lines with 2-ps temporal resolution and moderate resolving power (E E ΔE 1000 ΔE 1000) . Time-integrated measurements over the same spectral range were used to correct the streaked data for variations in photocathode sensitivity. Linewidths and intensity ratios from the streaked data were interpreted using a collisional radiative atomic kinetics model to provide the average plasma conditions in the buried layer as a function of time. Experimental uncertainties in the measured plasma conditions are quantified within a consistent model-dependent framework. The data demonstrate the production of a 330 +/-56 eV, 0.9 +/-0.3 g/cm3 plasma that evolves slowly during peak Heα emission. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  3. Time-odd mean fields in covariant density functional theory: Rotating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanasjev, A. V.; Abusara, H.

    2010-01-01

    Time-odd mean fields (nuclear magnetism) and their impact on physical observables in rotating nuclei are studied in the framework of covariant density functional theory (CDFT). It is shown that they have profound effect on the dynamic and kinematic moments of inertia. Particle number, configuration, and rotational frequency dependencies of their impact on the moments of inertia have been analyzed in a systematic way. Nuclear magnetism can also considerably modify the band crossing features such as crossing frequencies and the properties of the kinematic and dynamic moments of inertia in the band crossing region. The impact of time-odd mean fields on the moments of inertia in the regions away from band crossing only weakly depends on the relativistic mean-field parametrization, reflecting good localization of the properties of time-odd mean fields in CDFT. The moments of inertia of normal-deformed nuclei considerably deviate from the rigid-body value. On the contrary, superdeformed and hyperdeformed nuclei have the moments of inertia which are close to rigid-body value. The structure of the currents in rotating frame, their microscopic origin, and the relations to the moments of inertia have been systematically analyzed. The phenomenon of signature separation in odd-odd nuclei, induced by time-odd mean fields, has been analyzed in detail.

  4. Maximum leaf conductance driven by CO2 effects on stomatal size and density over geologic time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franks, Peter J; Beerling, David J

    2009-06-23

    Stomatal pores are microscopic structures on the epidermis of leaves formed by 2 specialized guard cells that control the exchange of water vapor and CO(2) between plants and the atmosphere. Stomatal size (S) and density (D) determine maximum leaf diffusive (stomatal) conductance of CO(2) (g(c(max))) to sites of assimilation. Although large variations in D observed in the fossil record have been correlated with atmospheric CO(2), the crucial significance of similarly large variations in S has been overlooked. Here, we use physical diffusion theory to explain why large changes in S necessarily accompanied the changes in D and atmospheric CO(2) over the last 400 million years. In particular, we show that high densities of small stomata are the only way to attain the highest g(cmax) values required to counter CO(2)"starvation" at low atmospheric CO(2) concentrations. This explains cycles of increasing D and decreasing S evident in the fossil history of stomata under the CO(2) impoverished atmospheres of the Permo-Carboniferous and Cenozoic glaciations. The pattern was reversed under rising atmospheric CO(2) regimes. Selection for small S was crucial for attaining high g(cmax) under falling atmospheric CO(2) and, therefore, may represent a mechanism linking CO(2) and the increasing gas-exchange capacity of land plants over geologic time.

  5. Densities and eccentricities of 139 Kepler planets from transit time variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadden, Sam; Lithwick, Yoram [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    We extract densities and eccentricities of 139 sub-Jovian planets by analyzing transit time variations (TTVs) obtained by the Kepler mission through Quarter 12. We partially circumvent the degeneracies that plague TTV inversion with the help of an analytical formula for the TTV. From the observed TTV phases, we find that most of these planets have eccentricities of the order of a few percent. More precisely, the rms eccentricity is 0.018{sub −0.004}{sup +0.005}, and planets smaller than 2.5 R {sub ⊕} are around twice as eccentric as those bigger than 2.5 R {sub ⊕}. We also find a best-fit density-radius relationship ρ ≈ 3 g cm{sup –3} × (R/3 R {sub ⊕}){sup –2.3} for the 56 planets that likely have small eccentricity and hence small statistical correction to their masses. Many planets larger than 2.5 R {sub ⊕} are less dense than water, implying that their radii are largely set by a massive hydrogen atmosphere.

  6. Time-dependent density functional theory of open quantum systems in the linear-response regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempel, David G; Watson, Mark A; Olivares-Amaya, Roberto; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2011-02-21

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) has recently been extended to describe many-body open quantum systems evolving under nonunitary dynamics according to a quantum master equation. In the master equation approach, electronic excitation spectra are broadened and shifted due to relaxation and dephasing of the electronic degrees of freedom by the surrounding environment. In this paper, we develop a formulation of TDDFT linear-response theory (LR-TDDFT) for many-body electronic systems evolving under a master equation, yielding broadened excitation spectra. This is done by mapping an interacting open quantum system onto a noninteracting open Kohn-Sham system yielding the correct nonequilibrium density evolution. A pseudoeigenvalue equation analogous to the Casida equations of the usual LR-TDDFT is derived for the Redfield master equation, yielding complex energies and Lamb shifts. As a simple demonstration, we calculate the spectrum of a C(2 +) atom including natural linewidths, by treating the electromagnetic field vacuum as a photon bath. The performance of an adiabatic exchange-correlation kernel is analyzed and a first-order frequency-dependent correction to the bare Kohn-Sham linewidth based on the Görling-Levy perturbation theory is calculated.

  7. Thermospheric mass density model error variance as a function of time scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmert, J. T.; Sutton, E. K.

    2017-12-01

    In the increasingly crowded low-Earth orbit environment, accurate estimation of orbit prediction uncertainties is essential for collision avoidance. Poor characterization of such uncertainty can result in unnecessary and costly avoidance maneuvers (false positives) or disregard of a collision risk (false negatives). Atmospheric drag is a major source of orbit prediction uncertainty, and is particularly challenging to account for because it exerts a cumulative influence on orbital trajectories and is therefore not amenable to representation by a single uncertainty parameter. To address this challenge, we examine the variance of measured accelerometer-derived and orbit-derived mass densities with respect to predictions by thermospheric empirical models, using the data-minus-model variance as a proxy for model uncertainty. Our analysis focuses mainly on the power spectrum of the residuals, and we construct an empirical model of the variance as a function of time scale (from 1 hour to 10 years), altitude, and solar activity. We find that the power spectral density approximately follows a power-law process but with an enhancement near the 27-day solar rotation period. The residual variance increases monotonically with altitude between 250 and 550 km. There are two components to the variance dependence on solar activity: one component is 180 degrees out of phase (largest variance at solar minimum), and the other component lags 2 years behind solar maximum (largest variance in the descending phase of the solar cycle).

  8. Reduced glomerular angiotensin II receptor density in diabetes mellitus in the rat: time course and mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkes, B.M.

    1987-01-01

    Glomerular angiotensin II receptors are reduced in number in early diabetes mellitus, which may contribute to hyperfiltration and glomerular injury. The time course and role of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in the pathogenesis of the receptor abnormality were studied in male Sprague-Dawley rats made diabetic with streptozotocin (65 mg, iv). Glomerular angiotensin II receptors were measured by Scatchard analysis; insulin, renin activity, angiotensin II, and aldosterone were measured by RIA. Diabetes mellitus was documented at 24 h by a rise in plasma glucose (vehicle-injected control, 133 +/- 4; diabetic, 482 +/- 22 mg/dl and a fall in plasma insulin (control, 53.1 +/- 5.7; diabetic, 35.6 +/- 4.0 microIU/ml. At 24 h glomerular angiotensin II receptor density was decreased by 26.5% in diabetic rats (control, 75.5 +/- 9.6 X 10(6); diabetic, 55.5 +/- 8.3 X 10(6) receptors/glomerulus. Receptor occupancy could not explain the defect, because there was reduced binding in diabetic glomeruli after pretreatment with 3 M MgCl 2 , a maneuver that caused dissociation of previously bound hormone. There was a progressive return of the receptor density toward normal over the 60 days following induction of diabetes, with diabetic glomeruli measuring 22.7%, 14.8%, and 3.7% fewer receptors than age-matched controls at 11 days, 1 month, and 2 months, respectively

  9. Creation of free excitons in solid krypton investigated by time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisand, Vambola; Kirm, Marco; Negodin, Evgeni; Sombrowski, Elke; Steeg, Barbara; Vielhauer, Sebastian; Zimmerer, Georg

    2003-01-01

    The creation and relaxation of secondary excitons in solid Kr was investigated using energy-and time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy in the vacuum ultraviolet region. The spectrally selected emission of the free exciton (FE) was used as a probe for an investigation of the different exciton creation processes. Delayed FE creation via electron-hole recombination and 'prompt' (in terms of the time-resolution of the experiment) creation of excitons were separated. The 'prompt' creation of a FE appears in the region above threshold energy E th , which is equal to the sum of the band gap energy and the free exciton energy. 'Prompt' creation of excitons above E th is ascribed to a superposition of two processes: (i) creation of the electronic polaron complex (one-step process) and (ii) inelastic scattering of photoelectrons described in the framework of the multiple-parabolic-branch band model (two-step process). In addition, the ratio spectrum of the time-integrated FE and self-trapped exciton (STE) emission was analysed. The behaviour of the ratio spectrum is a proof that electron-hole recombination leads to STE states through FE states as precursors

  10. Assessment of Real-Time Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (RT-TDDFT) in Radiation Chemistry: Ionized Water Dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalabala, Jan; Uhlig, Frank; Slavíček, Petr

    2018-03-29

    Ionization in the condensed phase and molecular clusters leads to a complicated chain of processes with coupled electron-nuclear dynamics. It is difficult to describe such dynamics with conventional nonadiabatic molecular dynamics schemes since the number of states swiftly increases as the molecular system grows. It is therefore attractive to use a direct electron and nuclear propagation such as the real-time time-dependent density functional theory (RT-TDDFT). Here we report a RT-TDDFT benchmark study on simulations of singly and doubly ionized states of a water monomer and dimer as a prototype for more complex processes in a condensed phase. We employed the RT-TDDFT based Ehrenfest molecular dynamics with a generalized gradient approximate (GGA) functional and compared it with wave-function-based surface hopping (SH) simulations. We found that the initial dynamics of a singly HOMO ionized water dimer is similar for both the RT-TDDFT/GGA and the SH simulations but leads to completely different reaction channels on a longer time scale. This failure is attributed to the self-interaction error in the GGA functionals and it can be avoided by using hybrid functionals with large fraction of exact exchange (represented here by the BHandHLYP functional). The simulations of doubly ionized states are reasonably described already at the GGA level. This suggests that the RT-TDDFT/GGA method could describe processes following the autoionization processes such as Auger emission, while its applicability to more complex processes such as intermolecular Coulombic decay remains limited.

  11. Time-dependent internal density functional theory formalism and Kohn-Sham scheme for self-bound systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messud, Jeremie

    2009-01-01

    The stationary internal density functional theory (DFT) formalism and Kohn-Sham scheme are generalized to the time-dependent case. It is proven that, in the time-dependent case, the internal properties of a self-bound system (such as an atomic nuclei or a helium droplet) are all defined by the internal one-body density and the initial state. A time-dependent internal Kohn-Sham scheme is set up as a practical way to compute the internal density. The main difference from the traditional DFT formalism and Kohn-Sham scheme is the inclusion of the center-of-mass correlations in the functional.

  12. Self-consistent RPA and the time-dependent density matrix approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuck, P. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Orsay (France); CNRS et Universite Joseph Fourier, Laboratoire de Physique et Modelisation des Milieux Condenses, Grenoble (France); Tohyama, M. [Kyorin University School of Medicine, Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-10-15

    The time-dependent density matrix (TDDM) or BBGKY (Bogoliubov, Born, Green, Kirkwood, Yvon) approach is decoupled and closed at the three-body level in finding a natural representation of the latter in terms of a quadratic form of two-body correlation functions. In the small amplitude limit an extended RPA coupled to an also extended second RPA is obtained. Since including two-body correlations means that the ground state cannot be a Hartree-Fock state, naturally the corresponding RPA is upgraded to Self-Consistent RPA (SCRPA) which was introduced independently earlier and which is built on a correlated ground state. SCRPA conserves all the properties of standard RPA. Applications to the exactly solvable Lipkin and the 1D Hubbard models show good performances of SCRPA and TDDM. (orig.)

  13. High-Density Liquid-State Machine Circuitry for Time-Series Forecasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosselló, Josep L; Alomar, Miquel L; Morro, Antoni; Oliver, Antoni; Canals, Vincent

    2016-08-01

    Spiking neural networks (SNN) are the last neural network generation that try to mimic the real behavior of biological neurons. Although most research in this area is done through software applications, it is in hardware implementations in which the intrinsic parallelism of these computing systems are more efficiently exploited. Liquid state machines (LSM) have arisen as a strategic technique to implement recurrent designs of SNN with a simple learning methodology. In this work, we show a new low-cost methodology to implement high-density LSM by using Boolean gates. The proposed method is based on the use of probabilistic computing concepts to reduce hardware requirements, thus considerably increasing the neuron count per chip. The result is a highly functional system that is applied to high-speed time series forecasting.

  14. A time-dependent density functional theory investigation of plasmon resonances of linear Au atomic chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Dan-Dan; Zhang Hong

    2011-01-01

    We report theoretical studies on the plasmon resonances in linear Au atomic chains by using ab initio time-dependent density functional theory. The dipole responses are investigated each as a function of chain length. They converge into a single resonance in the longitudinal mode but split into two transverse modes. As the chain length increases, the longitudinal plasmon mode is redshifted in energy while the transverse modes shift in the opposite direction (blueshifts). In addition, the energy gap between the two transverse modes reduces with chain length increasing. We find that there are unique characteristics, different from those of other metallic chains. These characteristics are crucial to atomic-scale engineering of single-molecule sensing, optical spectroscopy, and so on. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  15. Time-dependent density functional methods for Raman spectra in open-shell systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, Fredy W; Schatz, George C

    2014-01-16

    We present an implementation of a time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) linear response module in NWChem for unrestricted DFT calculations and apply it to the calculation of resonant Raman spectra in open-shell molecular systems using the short-time approximation. The new source code was validated and applied to simulate Raman spectra on several doublet organic radicals (e.g., benzyl, benzosemiquinone, TMPD, trans-stilbene anion and cation, and methyl viologen) and the metal complex copper phthalocyanine. We also introduce a divide-and-conquer approach for the evaluation of polarizabilities in relatively large systems (e.g., copper phthalocyanine). The implemented tool gives comparisons with experiment that are similar to what is commonly found for closed-shell systems, with good agreement for most features except for small frequency shifts, and occasionally large deviations for some modes that depend on the molecular system studied, experimental conditions not being accounted in the modeling such as solvation effects and extra solvent-based peaks, and approximations in the underlying theory. The approximations used in the quantum chemical modeling include (i) choice of exchange-correlation functional and basis set; (ii) harmonic approximation used in the frequency analysis to determine vibrational normal modes; and (iii) short-time approximation (omission of nuclear motion effects) used in calculating resonant Raman spectra.

  16. Time-dependent density functional theory beyond Kohn-Sham Slater determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuks, Johanna I; Nielsen, Søren E B; Ruggenthaler, Michael; Maitra, Neepa T

    2016-08-03

    When running time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations for real-time simulations of non-equilibrium dynamics, the user has a choice of initial Kohn-Sham state, and typically a Slater determinant is used. We explore the impact of this choice on the exchange-correlation potential when the physical system begins in a 50 : 50 superposition of the ground and first-excited state of the system. We investigate the possibility of judiciously choosing a Kohn-Sham initial state that minimizes errors when adiabatic functionals are used. We find that if the Kohn-Sham state is chosen to have a configuration matching the one that dominates the interacting state, this can be achieved for a finite time duration for some but not all such choices. When the Kohn-Sham system does not begin in a Slater determinant, we further argue that the conventional splitting of the exchange-correlation potential into exchange and correlation parts has limited value, and instead propose a decomposition into a "single-particle" contribution that we denote v, and a remainder. The single-particle contribution can be readily computed as an explicit orbital-functional, reduces to exchange in the Slater determinant case, and offers an alternative to the adiabatic approximation as a starting point for TDDFT approximations.

  17. Kinetic modeling of the effect of solids retention time on methanethiol dynamics in anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dian; Strawn, Mary; Novak, John T; Wang, Zhi-Wu

    2018-07-01

    The highly volatile methanethiol (MT) with an extremely low odor threshold and distinctive putrid smell is often identified as a major odorous compound generated under anaerobic conditions. As an intermediate compound in the course of anaerobic digestion, the extent of MT emission is closely related to the time of anaerobic reaction. In this study, lab-scale anaerobic digesters were operated at solids retention time (SRTs) of 15, 20, 25, 30, 40 and 50 days to investigate the effect of SRT on MT emission. The experimental results demonstrated a bell-shaped curve of MT emission versus SRT with a peak around 20 days SRT. In order to understand this SRT effect, a kinetic model was developed to describe MT production and utilization dynamics in the course of anaerobic digestion and calibrated with the experimental results collected from this study. The model outcome revealed that the high protein content in the feed sludge together with the large maintenance coefficient of MT fermenters are responsible for the peak MT emission emergence in the range of typical SRT used for anaerobic digestion. A further analysis of the kinetic model shows that it can be extensively simplified with reasonable approximation to a form that anaerobic digestion practitioners could easily use to predict the MT and SRT relationship. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Waste activated sludge fermentation: effect of solids retention time and biomass concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Q; Sparling, R; Oleszkiewicz, J A

    2009-12-01

    Laboratory scale, room temperature, semi-continuous reactors were set-up to investigate the effect of solids retention time (SRT, equal to HRT hydraulic retention time) and biomass concentration on generation of volatile fatty acids (VFA) from the non-methanogenic fermentation of waste activated sludge (WAS) originating from an enhanced biological phosphorus removal process. It was found that VFA yields increased with SRT. At the longest SRT (10d), improved biomass degradation resulted in the highest soluble to total COD ratio and the highest VFA yield from the influent COD (0.14g VFA-COD/g TCOD). It was also observed that under the same SRT, VFA yields increased when the biomass concentration decreased. At a 10d SRT the VFA yield increased by 46%, when the biomass concentration decreased from 13g/L to 4.8g/L. Relatively high nutrient release was observed during fermentation. The average phosphorus release was 17.3mg PO(4)-P/g TCOD and nitrogen release was 25.8mg NH(4)-N/g TCOD.

  19. Effect of distribution, interface property and density of hydrogel-embedded vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays on the properties of a flexible solid state supercapacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qi; Yuan, Xietao; Zhu, Yihao; Ni, Jiangfeng; Zhang, Xiaohua; Yang, Zhaohui

    2018-05-01

    In this paper we fabricate a robust flexible solid-state supercapacitor (FSC) device by embedding a conductive poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogel into aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays. We carefully investigate the effect of distribution, interface properties and densification of CNTs in the gel matrix on the electrochemical properties of an FSC. The total electrochemical capacitance of the device is measured to be 227 mF cm‑3 with a maximum energy density of 0.02 mWh cm‑3, which is dramatically enhanced compared with a similar device composed of non-parallel CNTs. Additionally, controllable in situ electrochemical oxidation greatly improved the compatibility between the hydrophobic CNTs and the hydrophilic hydrogel, which decreased the resistance of the device and introduced extra pseudocapacitance. After such oxidation treatment the energy storage ability further doubled to 430 mF cm‑3 with a maximum energy density of 0.04 mWh cm‑3 . The FSCs based on densified CNT arrays exhibited a much higher volumetric capacitance of 1140 mF cm‑3 and a larger energy density of 0.1 mWh cm‑3, with a large power density of 14 mW cm‑3. All devices show excellent stability of capacitance after at least 10 000 charge–discharge cycles with a loss of less than 2%. These easy-to-assemble hybrid arrays thus potentially provide a new method for manufacturing wearable devices and implantable medical devices.

  20. First measurements of the temporal evolution of the plasma density in HiPIMS discharges using THz time domain spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Steffen M.; Hecimovic, Ante; Tsankov, Tsanko V.; Luggenhölscher, Dirk; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, the novel technique of THz time domain spectroscopy has been applied to obtain time-resolved measurements of the plasma density in the active zone of a HiPIMS discharge with a titanium target. The obtained peak values are in the range of 1012-1013 cm-3 for discharge current densities of 1-4 A cm-2 at 0.5 and 2 Pa argon pressure. The measured densities show good correlation with the discharge current and voltage and the intensity of various atomic and ionic lines. The well known phases of the discharge have been identified and related to the variation of the electron density. The measurement results show that the plasma density remains nearly constant during the runaway/self-sputtering phase. Based on that, it is conjectured that singly charged titanium ions are the dominant ion species during this phase.

  1. Impact of solids residence time on biological nutrient removal performance of membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersu, Cagatayhan Bekir; Ong, Say Kee; Arslankaya, Ertan; Lee, Yong-Woo

    2010-05-01

    Impact of long solids residence times (SRTs) on nutrient removal was investigated using a submerged plate-frame membrane bioreactor with anaerobic and anoxic tanks. The system was operated at 10, 25, 50 and 75 days SRTs with hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 2 h each for the anaerobic and anoxic tanks and 8 h for the oxic tank. Recirculation of oxic tank mixed liquor into the anaerobic tank and permeate into the anoxic tank were fixed at 100% each of the influent flow. For all SRTs, percent removals of soluble chemical oxygen demand were more than 93% and nitrification was more than 98.5% but total nitrogen percent removal seemed to peak at 81% at 50 days SRT while total phosphorus (TP) percent removal showed a deterioration from approximately 80% at 50 days SRT to 60% at 75 days SRT. Before calibrating the Biowin((R)) model to the experimental data, a sensitivity analysis of the model was conducted which indicated that heterotrophic anoxic yield, anaerobic hydrolysis factors of heterotrophs, heterotrophic hydrolysis, oxic endogenous decay rate for heterotrophs and oxic endogenous decay rate of PAOs had the most impact on predicted effluent TP concentration. The final values of kinetic parameters obtained in the calibration seemed to imply that nitrogen and phosphorus removal increased with SRT due to an increase in anoxic and anaerobic hydrolysis factors up to 50 days SRT but beyond that removal of phosphorus deteriorated due to high oxic endogenous decay rates. This indirectly imply that the decrease in phosphorus removal at 75 days SRT may be due to an increase in lysis of microbial cells at high SRTs along with the low food/microorganisms ratio as a result of high suspended solids in the oxic tank. Several polynomial correlations relating the various calibrated kinetic parameters with SRTs were derived. The Biowin((R)) model and the kinetic parameters predicted by the polynomial correlations were verified and found to predict well the effluent water quality

  2. Durability of the Solid Oxide Cells for Co-Electrolysis of Steam and Carbon Dioxide under High Current Densities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tao, Youkun

    Production of hydrogen and syngas (CO + H2) using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) has become increasingly attractive due to high oil price, the capability for conversion and storage of intermittent energy from renewable sources and the general interest in hydrogen energy and carbon...... severe percolation loss of Ni particles. The blocking of the Ni-YSZ TPBs by impurities (e.g. SiOx) also contributed to the fast degradation of SOECs in the initial test period. However, the post-test observation revealed dominating SiOx inclusions inside the Ni grain close to the electrolyte, instead...

  3. Incorporating temporal variation in seabird telemetry data: time variant kernel density models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Andrew; Adams, Evan M.; Anderson, Carl; Berlin, Alicia; Bowman, Timothy D.; Connelly, Emily; Gilliland, Scott; Gray, Carrie E.; Lepage, Christine; Meattey, Dustin; Montevecchi, William; Osenkowski, Jason; Savoy, Lucas; Stenhouse, Iain; Williams, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    A key component of the Mid-Atlantic Baseline Studies project was tracking the individual movements of focal marine bird species (Red-throated Loon [Gavia stellata], Northern Gannet [Morus bassanus], and Surf Scoter [Melanitta perspicillata]) through the use of satellite telemetry. This element of the project was a collaborative effort with the Department of Energy (DOE), Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and Sea Duck Joint Venture (SDJV), among other organizations. Satellite telemetry is an effective and informative tool for understanding individual animal movement patterns, allowing researchers to mark an individual once, and thereafter follow the movements of the animal in space and time. Aggregating telemetry data from multiple individuals can provide information about the spatial use and temporal movements of populations. Tracking data is three dimensional, with the first two dimensions, X and Y, ordered along the third dimension, time. GIS software has many capabilities to store, analyze and visualize the location information, but little or no support for visualizing the temporal data, and tools for processing temporal data are lacking. We explored several ways of analyzing the movement patterns using the spatiotemporal data provided by satellite tags. Here, we present the results of one promising method: time-variant kernel density analysis (Keating and Cherry, 2009). The goal of this chapter is to demonstrate new methods in spatial analysis to visualize and interpret tracking data for a large number of individual birds across time in the mid-Atlantic study area and beyond. In this chapter, we placed greater emphasis on analytical methods than on the behavior and ecology of the animals tracked. For more detailed examinations of the ecology and wintering habitat use of the focal species in the midAtlantic, see Chapters 20-22.

  4. Influence of Sowing Times, Densities, and Soils to Biomass and Ethanol Yield of Sweet Sorghum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Dang Xuan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of biofuels helps to reduce the dependency on fossil fuels and therefore decreases CO2 emission. Ethanol mixed with gasoline in mandatory percentages has been used in many countries. However, production of ethanol mainly depends on food crops, commonly associated with problems such as governmental policies and social controversies. Sweet sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L. Moench is one of the most potential and appropriate alternative crops for biofuel production because of its high biomass and sugar content, strong tolerance to environmental stress conditions and diseases, and wide adaptability to various soils and climates. The aim of this study was to select prospective varieties of sweet sorghum, optimum sowing times and densities to achieve high yields of ethanol production and to establish stable operational conditions in cultivating this crop. The summer-autumn cropping season combined with the sowing densities of 8.3–10.9 plant m−2 obtained the highest ethanol yield. Among cultivated locations, the soil with pH of 5.5 and contents of Al and Zn of 39.4 and 0.6 g kg−1, respectively, was the best condition to have an ethanol yield >5000 L ha−1. The pH ≥ 6.0 may be responsible for the significant reduction of zinc content in soils, which decreases both biomass of sweet sorghum and ethanol yield, while contents of N, P, K, organic carbon (OC and cation exchange capacity (CEC, and Fe likely play no role. The cultivar 4A was the preferred candidate for ethanol production and resistant to pests and diseases, especially cut worm (Agrotis spp..

  5. Pyrogenic organic matter accumulation after density and particle size fractionation of burnt Cambisol using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Martín, María; Knicker, Heike

    2017-04-01

    Fires lead to formation of the pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM) which is quickly incorporated into the soil. The charring process involves chemical alterations of the litter material, where biologically available structures are transferred into aromatic polymers, such as black carbon (BC) and black nitrogen (BN). In order to reveal the medium term fate of BC and BN in soils, the top 5 cm of A horizons from unburnt, single and double burnt Cambisols of the Sierra de Aznalcóllar (Southern Spain) were collected 7 year after an intense fire and separated according to their density and their size (Golchin et al., 1994; Sohi et al., 2001). The density fractionation yielded in the free (fPOM), occluded particulate organic matter (oPOM) and the mineral-association organic fraction (MAF) and was performed using a sodium polytungstate solution with a density of 1.8 g cm-3. The MAF was further separated into the sand (2 mm to 63 μm) and coarse silt (63 to 20 μm) and fine fraction (solid-state 13C and 15N NMR spectroscopy. The 13C and 15N NMR spectra of all fPOM and oPOM fractions are dominated by signals assignable to O-alkyl C followed by resonance lines of alkyl C. The spectra indicate that fPOM is mainly composed of undecomposed plant debris whereas oPOM is rich in unsubstituted-aliphatic material. The lack of intensity in the chemical shift region from 160 to140 ppm in the spectra of the small size fractions reveals the absence of lignin residues. This, their low C/N ratios and the clear 13C-signal attributed to carboxylic C allows the conclusion that this fraction mainly composed of microbial residues. Former studies evidenced that aromaticity of the burnt bulk soil decreased with elapsing time after the fire. The present investigation revealed that most of the remaining aromatic C accumulated in the POM fractions, which is in contrast to other studies showing a preferential recovery of BC in the fine particle size fractions. Possibly, the poor interaction between Py

  6. Simulating Excitons in MoS2 with Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamant, Cedric; Kolesov, Grigory; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    Monolayer molybdenum disulfide, owing to its graphene-like two-dimensional geometry whilst still having a finite bandgap, is a material of great interest in condensed matter physics and for potential application in electronic devices. In particular, MoS2 exhibits significant excitonic effects, a desirable quality for fundamental many-body research. Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) allows us to simulate dynamical effects as well as temperature-based effects in a natural way given the direct treatment of the time evolution of the system. We present a TD-DFT study of monolayer MoS2 exciton dynamics, examining various qualitative and quantitative predictions in pure samples and in the presence of defects. In particular, we generate an absorption spectrum through simulated pulse excitation for comparison to experiment and also analyze the response of the exciton in an external electric field.In this work we also discuss the electronic structure of the exciton in MoS2 with and without vacancies.

  7. Convergence of statistical moments of particle density time series in scrape-off layer plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kube, R., E-mail: ralph.kube@uit.no; Garcia, O. E. [Department of Physics and Technology, UiT - The Arctic University of Norway, N-9037 Tromsø (Norway)

    2015-01-15

    Particle density fluctuations in the scrape-off layer of magnetically confined plasmas, as measured by gas-puff imaging or Langmuir probes, are modeled as the realization of a stochastic process in which a superposition of pulses with a fixed shape, an exponential distribution of waiting times, and amplitudes represents the radial motion of blob-like structures. With an analytic formulation of the process at hand, we derive expressions for the mean squared error on estimators of sample mean and sample variance as a function of sample length, sampling frequency, and the parameters of the stochastic process. Employing that the probability distribution function of a particularly relevant stochastic process is given by the gamma distribution, we derive estimators for sample skewness and kurtosis and expressions for the mean squared error on these estimators. Numerically, generated synthetic time series are used to verify the proposed estimators, the sample length dependency of their mean squared errors, and their performance. We find that estimators for sample skewness and kurtosis based on the gamma distribution are more precise and more accurate than common estimators based on the method of moments.

  8. Modeling solvation effects in real-space and real-time within density functional approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado, Alain [Istituto Nanoscienze - CNR, Centro S3, via Campi 213/A, 41125 Modena (Italy); Centro de Aplicaciones Tecnológicas y Desarrollo Nuclear, Calle 30 # 502, 11300 La Habana (Cuba); Corni, Stefano; Pittalis, Stefano; Rozzi, Carlo Andrea [Istituto Nanoscienze - CNR, Centro S3, via Campi 213/A, 41125 Modena (Italy)

    2015-10-14

    The Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM) can be used in conjunction with Density Functional Theory (DFT) and its time-dependent extension (TDDFT) to simulate the electronic and optical properties of molecules and nanoparticles immersed in a dielectric environment, typically liquid solvents. In this contribution, we develop a methodology to account for solvation effects in real-space (and real-time) (TD)DFT calculations. The boundary elements method is used to calculate the solvent reaction potential in terms of the apparent charges that spread over the van der Waals solute surface. In a real-space representation, this potential may exhibit a Coulomb singularity at grid points that are close to the cavity surface. We propose a simple approach to regularize such singularity by using a set of spherical Gaussian functions to distribute the apparent charges. We have implemented the proposed method in the OCTOPUS code and present results for the solvation free energies and solvatochromic shifts for a representative set of organic molecules in water.

  9. Impact of the storm-time plasma sheet ion composition on the ring current energy density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouikis, C.; Kistler, L. M.; Petrinec, S. M.; Fuselier, S. A.; Cohen, I.

    2017-12-01

    The adiabatic inward transport of the night-side near-earth ( 6 Re) hot plasma sheet is the dominant contributor to the ring current pressure during storm times. During storm times, the plasma sheet composition in the 6 - 12 Re tail region changes due to O+ entry from the lobes (from the cusp) and the direct feeding from the night side auroral region. In addition, at substorm onset the plasma sheet O+ ions can be preferentially accelerated. We use MMS and observations during two magnetic storms, 5/8/2016 and 7/16/2017, to monitor the composition changes and energization in the 6 - 12 Re plasma sheet region. For both storms the MMS apogee was in the tail. In addition, we use subsequent Van Allen Probe observations (with apogee in the dawn and dusk respectively) to test if the 6-12 Re plasma sheet, observed by MMS, is a sufficient source of the O+ in the ring current. For this we will compare the phase space density (PSD) of the plasma sheet source population and the PSD of the inner magnetosphere at constant magnetic moment values as used in Kistler et al., [2016].

  10. Convergence of statistical moments of particle density time series in scrape-off layer plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kube, R.; Garcia, O. E.

    2015-01-01

    Particle density fluctuations in the scrape-off layer of magnetically confined plasmas, as measured by gas-puff imaging or Langmuir probes, are modeled as the realization of a stochastic process in which a superposition of pulses with a fixed shape, an exponential distribution of waiting times, and amplitudes represents the radial motion of blob-like structures. With an analytic formulation of the process at hand, we derive expressions for the mean squared error on estimators of sample mean and sample variance as a function of sample length, sampling frequency, and the parameters of the stochastic process. Employing that the probability distribution function of a particularly relevant stochastic process is given by the gamma distribution, we derive estimators for sample skewness and kurtosis and expressions for the mean squared error on these estimators. Numerically, generated synthetic time series are used to verify the proposed estimators, the sample length dependency of their mean squared errors, and their performance. We find that estimators for sample skewness and kurtosis based on the gamma distribution are more precise and more accurate than common estimators based on the method of moments

  11. Pulsed time-of-flight refractometry measurements of the electron density in the T-11M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, A.A.; Petrov, V.G.; Malyshev, A.Yu.; Markov, V.K.; Babarykin, A.V.

    2002-01-01

    A new method for measuring the plasma density in magnetic confinement systems - pulsed time-of-flight refractometry - is developed and tested experimentally in the T-11M tokamak. The method is based on the measurements of the time delay of short (with a duration of several nanoseconds) microwave pulses propagating through the plasma. When the probing frequency is much higher than the plasma frequency, the measured delay in the propagation time is proportional to the line-averaged electron density regardless of the density profile. A key problem in such measurements is the short time delay of the pulse in the plasma (∼1 ns or less for small devices) and, consequently, low accuracy of the measurements of the average density. Various methods for improving the accuracy of such measurements are proposed and implemented in the T-11M experiments. The measurements of the line-averaged density in the T-11M tokamak in the low-density plasma regime are performed. The results obtained agree satisfactorily with interferometric data. The measurement errors are analyzed, and the possibility of using this technique to measure the electron density profile and the position of the plasma column is discussed

  12. Cholesteryl ester transfer activity in plasma measured by using solid-phase-bound high-density lipoprotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sparks, D.L.; Frohlich, J.; Cullis, P.; Pritchard, P.H.

    1987-01-01

    We studied the ability of lipid-transfer factors in plasma to promote transfer, to endogenous lipoproteins, of [ 3 H]cholesteryl ester from high-density lipoprotein (HDL) covalently bound to Sepharose 4B beads. After incubation for 2 h at 37 degrees C, 12 to 14% of the [ 3 H]cholesteryl ester had been transferred to the lipoproteins of the plasma, in the proportions 57% to HDL and 43% to low- and very-low-density lipoproteins. This process was a function of the amount of plasma present and was stimulated by addition of partly purified lipid-transfer protein. Transfer also depended on the concentration of donor HDL but was independent of the amount of acceptor lipoprotein. This simple evaluation of cholesteryl ester transfer does not require removal of lipoproteins from the plasma before incubation

  13. Time evolution of regional CT density changes in normal lung after IMRT for NSCLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernchou, Uffe; Schytte, Tine; Bertelsen, Anders; Bentzen, Søren M.; Hansen, Olfred; Brink, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigates the clinical radiobiology of radiation induced lung disease in terms of regional computed tomography (CT) density changes following intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: A total of 387 follow-up CT scans in 131 NSCLC patients receiving IMRT to a prescribed dose of 60 or 66 Gy in 2 Gy fractions were analyzed. The dose-dependent temporal evolution of the density change was analyzed using a two-component model, a superposition of an early, transient component and a late, persistent component. Results: The CT density of healthy lung tissue was observed to increase significantly (p 12 months. Conclusions: The radiobiology of lung injury may be analyzed in terms of CT density change. The initial transient change in density is consistent with radiation pneumonitis, while the subsequent stabilization of the density is consistent with pulmonary fibrosis

  14. Evaluation of cerebral intravascular blood flow by time density curve study of intravenous digital subtraction angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imamura, Toru; Kogure, Kyuya (Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). School of Medicine); Sekine, Teiko; Satoh, Kei; Endoh, Minoru; Tsuburaya, Kenji; Hoshi, Akihiko

    1992-01-01

    Time density curve (TDC) can be reconstructed from the data of intravenous digital subtraction angiography (IVDSA). We evaluated peak time (PT) and modal transit time (MOTT) of the TDC as the probable indicator of cerebral intravascular blood flow. Cerebral IVDSA and single photon emission CT (SPECT) were performed on 12 patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease, which consisted of 3 internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusions, one middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion, one anterior cerebral artery (ACA) branch occlusion and 7 lacunar infarctions. We classified former 4 patients as occlusion group and latter 8 as reference group. In 3 patients (2 ICA and one MCA occlusions), SPECT study revealed definite hypoaccumulation in the MCA territory of occlusive side. Two regions of interest (ROI) were placed on the territories of right and left middle cerebral arteries in the frontal view of cerebral IVDSA. Digital data processor fitted {gamma} curve to the TDC of each ROI, and calculated PT and MOTT. The absolute lateralities of PT and MOTT of MCA territory was significantly (p<0.05) larger in occlusion group than reference group. Patients with hypoaccumulation in SPECT had significantly (p<0.02) larger laterality of MOTT than patients with isoaccumulation. One ICA occluded patient without hypoaccumulation in corresponding MCA territory had relatively small laterality of MOTT similar to the patients of ACA branch occlusion and lacunar infarction. These results suggest that PT and MOTT are possible to detect the laterality of the intravascular blood flow in MCA territories caused by major artery occlusion. Cerebral TDC study of IVDSA may be useful in some clinical therapeutic situations such as hemodilution or intra-arterial thrombolysis, and worth further clinical evaluation. (author).

  15. Truncation scheme of time-dependent density-matrix approach II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tohyama, Mitsuru [Kyorin University School of Medicine, Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan); Schuck, Peter [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, IN2P3-CNRS, Universite Paris-Sud, Orsay (France); Laboratoire de Physique et de Modelisation des Milieux Condenses, CNRS et Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France)

    2017-09-15

    A truncation scheme of the Bogoliubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon hierarchy for reduced density matrices, where a three-body density matrix is approximated by two-body density matrices, is improved to take into account a normalization effect. The truncation scheme is tested for the Lipkin model. It is shown that the obtained results are in good agreement with the exact solutions. (orig.)

  16. Kernel density estimation-based real-time prediction for respiratory motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruan, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Effective delivery of adaptive radiotherapy requires locating the target with high precision in real time. System latency caused by data acquisition, streaming, processing and delivery control necessitates prediction. Prediction is particularly challenging for highly mobile targets such as thoracic and abdominal tumors undergoing respiration-induced motion. The complexity of the respiratory motion makes it difficult to build and justify explicit models. In this study, we honor the intrinsic uncertainties in respiratory motion and propose a statistical treatment of the prediction problem. Instead of asking for a deterministic covariate-response map and a unique estimate value for future target position, we aim to obtain a distribution of the future target position (response variable) conditioned on the observed historical sample values (covariate variable). The key idea is to estimate the joint probability distribution (pdf) of the covariate and response variables using an efficient kernel density estimation method. Then, the problem of identifying the distribution of the future target position reduces to identifying the section in the joint pdf based on the observed covariate. Subsequently, estimators are derived based on this estimated conditional distribution. This probabilistic perspective has some distinctive advantages over existing deterministic schemes: (1) it is compatible with potentially inconsistent training samples, i.e., when close covariate variables correspond to dramatically different response values; (2) it is not restricted by any prior structural assumption on the map between the covariate and the response; (3) the two-stage setup allows much freedom in choosing statistical estimates and provides a full nonparametric description of the uncertainty for the resulting estimate. We evaluated the prediction performance on ten patient RPM traces, using the root mean squared difference between the prediction and the observed value normalized by the

  17. (Nbx, Zr1-x)4AlC3 MAX Phase Solid Solutions: Processing, Mechanical Properties, and Density Functional Theory Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapauw, Thomas; Tytko, Darius; Vanmeensel, Kim; Huang, Shuigen; Choi, Pyuck-Pa; Raabe, Dierk; Caspi, El'ad N; Ozeri, Offir; To Baben, Moritz; Schneider, Jochen M; Lambrinou, Konstantina; Vleugels, Jozef

    2016-06-06

    The solubility of zirconium (Zr) in the Nb4AlC3 host lattice was investigated by combining the experimental synthesis of (Nbx, Zr1-x)4AlC3 solid solutions with density functional theory calculations. High-purity solid solutions were prepared by reactive hot pressing of NbH0.89, ZrH2, Al, and C starting powder mixtures. The crystal structure of the produced solid solutions was determined using X-ray and neutron diffraction. The limited Zr solubility (maximum of 18.5% of the Nb content in the host lattice) in Nb4AlC3 observed experimentally is consistent with the calculated minimum in the energy of mixing. The lattice parameters and microstructure were evaluated over the entire solubility range, while the chemical composition of (Nb0.85, Zr0.15)4AlC3 was mapped using atom probe tomography. The hardness, Young's modulus, and fracture toughness at room temperature as well as the high-temperature flexural strength and E-modulus of (Nb0.85, Zr0.15)4AlC3 were investigated and compared to those of pure Nb4AlC3. Quite remarkably, an appreciable increase in fracture toughness was observed from 6.6 ± 0.1 MPa/m(1/2) for pure Nb4AlC3 to 10.1 ± 0.3 MPa/m(1/2) for the (Nb0.85, Zr0.15)4AlC3 solid solution.

  18. Measurements of the plasma density in the FTU tokamak by a pulsed time-of-flight X-wave refractometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, V. G.; Petrov, A. A.; Malyshev, A. Yu.; De Benedetti, M.; Tudisco, O.

    2008-01-01

    On-line control over the plasma density in tokamaks (especially, in long-term discharges) requires reliable measurements of the averaged plasma density. For this purpose, a new method of density measurements-a pulsed time-of-flight plasma refractometry-was developed and tested in the T-11M tokamak. This method allows one to determine the averaged density from the measured time delay of nanosecond microwave pulses propagating through the plasma. For an O-wave, the measured time delay is proportional to the line-averaged density and is independent of the density profile (f>>f p ) τ o ∼ k o 1/f 2 ∫ l N(x)dx. Here, f is the frequency of the probing wave, f p is the plasma frequency, l= 4 a is the path length for two-pass probing in the equatorial plane, a is the plasma minor radius, k O and k X are numerical factors, f c is the electron-cyclotron frequency at the axis of the plasma column, and f p >>f c , f. Measurements of the time delay provide the same information as plasma interferometry, though they do no employ the effect of interference. When the conditions f p >>f c , f are not satisfied, the measured time delay depends on the shape of the density profile. In this case, in order to determine the average density regardless of the density profile, it is necessary to perform simultaneous measurements at several probing frequencies in order to determine the average density. In ITER (Bt ∼ 5T), a spectral window between the lower and upper cutoff frequencies in the range of 50-100 GHz can be used for pulsed time-of-flight X-wave refractometry. This appreciably simplifies the diagnostics and eliminates the problem of the first mirror. In this paper, the first results obtained in the FTU tokamak with a prototype of the ITER pulsed time-of-flight refractometer are presented. The geometry and layout of experiments similar to the planned ITER experiments are described. The density measured by pulsed time-of-flight refractometry is shown to agree well with the

  19. Prebeta-migrating high density lipoprotein: quantitation in normal and hyperlipidemic plasma by solid phase radioimmunoassay following electrophoretic transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, B.Y.; Frolich, J.; Fielding, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    A quantitative solid phase immunoassay has been developed for the determination of the mass of electrophoretically separated prebeta apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) in human plasma. Conditions have been identified for the quantitative transfer and immunoblotting of the apolipoprotein in the absence of organic solvents or detergents. In normolipidemic plasma, the prebeta-migrating fraction of apoA-I represented 4.2 +/- 1.8% of total apoA-I (61 +/- 26 micrograms of apoA-I per ml of plasma). Significantly higher levels were found in hypercholesterolemia of genetic origin, in primary and secondary hypertriglyceridemia, and in congenital lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase deficiency. In all cases prebeta-migrating apoA-I consisted in large part of low molecular weight lipoprotein species, compared to the size of the major, alpha-migrating apoA-I fraction

  20. Effect of mixture ratio, solids concentration and hydraulic retention time on the anaerobic digestion of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fongsatitkul, Prayoon; Elefsiniotis, Panagiotis; Wareham, David G

    2010-09-01

    This paper describes how the degradation of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) is affected through codigestion with varying amounts of return activated sludge (RAS). Solid waste that had its inorganic fraction selectively removed was mixed with RAS in ratios of 100% OFMSW, 50% OFMSW/50% RAS, and 25% OFMSW/75% RAS. The total solids (TS) concentration was held at 8% and three anaerobic digester systems treating the mixtures were held (for the first run) at a total hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 28 days. Increasing amounts of RAS did not however improve the mixture's digestability, as indicated by little change and/or a drop in the main performance indices [including percentage volatile solids (VS) removal and specific gas production]. The optimum ratio in this research therefore appeared to be 100% OFMSW with an associated 85.1 ± 0.6% VS removal and 0.72 ± 0.01 L total gas g(- 1) VS. In the second run, the effect of increasing percentage of TS (8, 12% and 15%) at a system HRT of 28 days was observed to yield no improvement in the main performance indices (i.e. percentage VS removal and specific gas production). Finally, during the third run, variations in the total system HRT were investigated at an 8% TS, again using 100% OFMSW. Of the HRTs explored (23, 28 and 33 days), the longest HRT yielded the best performance overall, particularly in terms of specific gas production (0.77 ± 0.01 L total gas g(-1) VS).

  1. Density matrix-based time-dependent configuration interaction approach to ultrafast spin-flip dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huihui; Bokarev, Sergey I.; Aziz, Saadullah G.; Kühn, Oliver

    2017-08-01

    Recent developments in attosecond spectroscopy yield access to the correlated motion of electrons on their intrinsic timescales. Spin-flip dynamics is usually considered in the context of valence electronic states, where spin-orbit coupling is weak and processes related to the electron spin are usually driven by nuclear motion. However, for core-excited states, where the core-hole has a nonzero angular momentum, spin-orbit coupling is strong enough to drive spin-flips on a much shorter timescale. Using density matrix-based time-dependent restricted active space configuration interaction including spin-orbit coupling, we address an unprecedentedly short spin-crossover for the example of L-edge (2p→3d) excited states of a prototypical Fe(II) complex. This process occurs on a timescale, which is faster than that of Auger decay (∼4 fs) treated here explicitly. Modest variations of carrier frequency and pulse duration can lead to substantial changes in the spin-state yield, suggesting its control by soft X-ray light.

  2. Timing A Pulsed Thin Film Pyroelectric Generator For Maximum Power Density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.N.; Hanrahan, B.M.; Neville, C.J.; Jankowski, N.R

    2016-01-01

    Pyroelectric thermal-to-electric energy conversion is accomplished by a cyclic process of thermally-inducing polarization changes in the material under an applied electric field. The pyroelectric MEMS device investigated consisted of a thin film PZT capacitor with platinum bottom and iridium oxide top electrodes. Electric fields between 1-20 kV/cm with a 30% duty cycle and frequencies from 0.1 - 100 Hz were tested with a modulated continuous wave IR laser with a duty cycle of 20% creating temperature swings from 0.15 - 26 °C on the pyroelectric receiver. The net output power of the device was highly sensitive to the phase delay between the laser power and the applied electric field. A thermal model was developed to predict and explain the power loss associated with finite charge and discharge times. Excellent agreement was achieved between the theoretical model and the experiment results for the measured power density versus phase delay. Limitations on the charging and discharging rates result in reduced power and lower efficiency due to a reduced net work per cycle. (paper)

  3. Nonadiabatic dynamics with intersystem crossings: A time-dependent density functional theory implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco de Carvalho, F. [Centre Européen de Calcul Atomique et Moléculaire, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland); Tavernelli, I. [IBM Research GmbH, Zurich Research Laboratory, 8803 Ruschlikon (Switzerland)

    2015-12-14

    In this work, we derive a method to perform trajectory-based nonadiabatic dynamics that is able to describe both nonadiabatic transitions and intersystem crossing events (transitions between states of different spin-multiplicity) at the same level of theory, namely, time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). To this end, we combined our previously developed TDDFT-based trajectory surface hopping scheme with an accurate and efficient algorithm for the calculation of the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) matrix elements. More specifically, we designed two algorithms for the calculation of intersystem crossing transitions, one based on an extended Tully’s surface hopping scheme including SOC and the second based on a Landau-Zener approximation applied to the spin sector of the electronic Hilbert space. This development allows for the design of an efficient on-the-fly nonadiabatic approach that can handle, on an equal footing, nonadiabatic and intersystem crossing transitions. The method is applied to the study of the photophysics of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) in gas and liquid phases.

  4. Time dependent – density functional theory characterization of organic dyes for dye-sensitized solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Hilal, Rifaat

    2017-06-19

    We aim at providing better insight into the parameters that govern the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) and photo-injection processes in dyes for dye-sensitised solar cells (DSSC). Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) calculations are utilized to study the geometry, electronic structure, electrostatic potential (ESP) and absorption spectrum, for a representative donor-π bridge-acceptor (D–π–A) dye for DSSC. The coplanar geometry of the dye (D1) facilitates strong conjugation and considerable delocalization originating the π CT interaction from donor to acceptor orbitals and the hyper-conjugative interactions involving Rydberg states. A model simulating the adsorption of the dye on the TiO surface is utilized to estimate binding energies. The effect of fluorine substituents in the π-spacer on the quantum efficiency of DSSCs was investigated. Gibb’s free energy values, redox potentials, excited state lifetime, non-linear optical properties (NLO) and driving forces for D1 and its fluorinated derivatives were computed.

  5. Optical rotation calculated with time-dependent density functional theory: the OR45 benchmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srebro, Monika; Govind, Niranjan; de Jong, Wibe A; Autschbach, Jochen

    2011-10-13

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) computations are performed for 42 organic molecules and three transition metal complexes, with experimental molar optical rotations ranging from 2 to 2 × 10(4) deg cm(2) dmol(-1). The performances of the global hybrid functionals B3LYP, PBE0, and BHLYP, and of the range-separated functionals CAM-B3LYP and LC-PBE0 (the latter being fully long-range corrected), are investigated. The performance of different basis sets is studied. When compared to liquid-phase experimental data, the range-separated functionals do, on average, not perform better than B3LYP and PBE0. Median relative deviations between calculations and experiment range from 25 to 29%. A basis set recently proposed for optical rotation calculations (LPol-ds) on average does not give improved results compared to aug-cc-pVDZ in TDDFT calculations with B3LYP. Individual cases are discussed in some detail, among them norbornenone for which the LC-PBE0 functional produced an optical rotation that is close to available data from coupled-cluster calculations, but significantly smaller in magnitude than the liquid-phase experimental value. Range-separated functionals and BHLYP perform well for helicenes and helicene derivatives. Metal complexes pose a challenge to first-principles calculations of optical rotation.

  6. Measurement of density distribution of fluids by real-time holographic interferometer using lenticular lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Katsumi; Okamoto, Koji; Kato, Fumitake; Shimizu, Isao

    1998-01-01

    The three-dimensional density distribution could be measured using the computer tomography technique with interferogram image. The photoconductor-plastic hologram (PPH) is a new hologram device which can easily make the hologram for the real-time interferometer. Since the image contains 2D information, lots of images taken from different angles should be needed to reconstruct the 3D information. However, the optics configuration will be too complex to obtain the multi-directional image simultaneously, even in the PPH system. Using the diffusion plate, the laser light could be diffused to multi-direction. When the hologram is recorded with the diffused laser, the multi-directional image can be obtained using only one hologram plate. In the computer tomography technique, only the holizontal direction is effective, while the diffused laser contains the whole direction, causing the noise on the hologram. In this study, the lenticular lens is used as the diffusion plate. The lenticular lens reflects the laser only in horizontal direction without the vertical (non-horizontal) direction. Therefore the multi-directional fringe images could be clearly obtained. In the experiment the helium jet was measured to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed system. (author)

  7. Efficient block preconditioned eigensolvers for linear response time-dependent density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vecharynski, Eugene [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Computational Research Division; Brabec, Jiri [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Computational Research Division; Shao, Meiyue [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Computational Research Division; Govind, Niranjan [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab.; Yang, Chao [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Computational Research Division

    2017-12-01

    We present two efficient iterative algorithms for solving the linear response eigen- value problem arising from the time dependent density functional theory. Although the matrix to be diagonalized is nonsymmetric, it has a special structure that can be exploited to save both memory and floating point operations. In particular, the nonsymmetric eigenvalue problem can be transformed into a product eigenvalue problem that is self-adjoint with respect to a K-inner product. This product eigenvalue problem can be solved efficiently by a modified Davidson algorithm and a modified locally optimal block preconditioned conjugate gradient (LOBPCG) algorithm that make use of the K-inner product. The solution of the product eigenvalue problem yields one component of the eigenvector associated with the original eigenvalue problem. However, the other component of the eigenvector can be easily recovered in a postprocessing procedure. Therefore, the algorithms we present here are more efficient than existing algorithms that try to approximate both components of the eigenvectors simultaneously. The efficiency of the new algorithms is demonstrated by numerical examples.

  8. Trajectory-based nonadiabatic dynamics with time-dependent density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curchod, Basile F E; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Tavernelli, Ivano

    2013-05-10

    Understanding the fate of an electronically excited molecule constitutes an important task for theoretical chemistry, and practical implications range from the interpretation of atto- and femtosecond spectroscopy to the development of light-driven molecular machines, the control of photochemical reactions, and the possibility of capturing sunlight energy. However, many challenging conceptual and technical problems are involved in the description of these phenomena such as 1) the failure of the well-known Born-Oppenheimer approximation; 2) the need for accurate electronic properties such as potential energy surfaces, excited nuclear forces, or nonadiabatic coupling terms; and 3) the necessity of describing the dynamics of the photoexcited nuclear wavepacket. This review provides an overview of the current methods to address points 1) and 3) and shows how time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and its linear-response extension can be used for point 2). First, the derivation of Ehrenfest dynamics and nonadiabatic Bohmian dynamics is discussed and linked to Tully's trajectory surface hopping. Second, the coupling of these trajectory-based nonadiabatic schemes with TDDFT is described in detail with special emphasis on the derivation of the required electronic structure properties. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Municipal Solid Waste Landfills: New Source Performance Standards (NSPS), Emission Guidelines (EG) and Compliance Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    learn about the NSPS for municipal solid waste landfills by reading the rule summary, rule history, code of federal regulations text, fact sheets, background information documents, related rules and compliance information.

  10. Prediction of hot electron production by ultraintense KrF laser-plasma interactions on solid-density targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Susumu; Takahashi, Eiichi; Miura, Eisuke; Owadano, Yoshiro; Nakamura, Tatsufumi; Kato, Tomokazu

    2002-01-01

    The scaling of hot electron temperature and the spectrum of electron energy by intense laser plasma interactions are reexamined from a viewpoint of the difference in laser wavelength. Laser plasma interaction such as parametric instabilities is usually determined by the Iλ2 scaling, where I and λ is the laser intensity and wavelength, respectively. However, the hot electron temperature is proportional to (ncr/ne0)1/2 [(1 + a 0 2 ) 1/2 - 1] rather than [(1 + a 0 2 ) 1/2 - 1] at the interaction with overdense plasmas, where ne0 is a electron density of overdense plasmas and a0 is a normalized laser intensity

  11. Degradation of solid oxide cells during co-electrolysis of H2O and CO2: Carbon deposition under high current densities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tao, Youkun; Ebbesen, Sune Dalgaard; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2012-01-01

    conversions of the reactants were no more than 66.8 %. Ni-YSZ electrode delamination and carbon nano-fibers could be observed after test at the Ni-YSZ | YSZ electrolyte interface for two of the cells. Thermodynamic calculation shows that the reactant conversion needed for carbon formation is above 99 %, far...... above the experimental conversions. The observed carbon formation may be caused by the gas diffusion limitations at high current densities. Carbon nano-fibers were only observed close to the YSZ electrolyte indicating a large overpotential gradient at the TPBs close to the electrolyte......During co-electrolysis of H2O and CO2 using solid oxide cells (SOCs) the risk of carbon deposition in the Ni-YSZ electrode under high current densities (∼ 2.0 A/cm2) was studied in this work. Five galvanostatic tests were performed at current density between 1.5 and 2.25 A/cm2 and the average...

  12. Kajian Pemilihan Sumber Mikroorganisme Solid Phase Microbial Fuel Cell (SMFC Berdasarkan Jenis dan Volume Sampah, Power Density dan Efisiensi Penurunan COD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganjar Samudro

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mikroorganisme merupakan salah satu komponen penting dalam proses Solid Phase Microbial Fuel Cell (SMFC untuk degradasi bahan organik dan transfer elektron. Pemilihan sumber mikroorganisme menjadi metode yang paling sederhana untuk dikaji sebagai informasi awal ketersediaan dan identifikasi jenis mikroorganisme yang mendukung proses SMFC. Tujuan kajian ini adalah untuk memilih sumber mikroorganisme tanah, septic tank dan sedimen sungai yang tepat digunakan dalam proses SMFC berdasarkan jenis dan volume sampah, power density, dan efisiensi penurunan COD. Kajian ini didasarkan pada hasil penelitian menggunakan reaktor SMFC tipe single chamber microbial fuel cell dengan variabel jenis dan volume sampah , serta sumber mikroorganisme. Metode perbandingan secara kuantitatif dilakukan berdasarkan kecenderungan nilai power density dan efisiensi penurunan COD tertinggi di antara jenis dan volume sampah kantin, dedaunan dan komposit kantin-dedaunan. Hasil yang didapatkan adalah sumber mikroorganisme tanah dan sedimen sungai tepat digunakan untuk volume sampah 1/3 dan 2/3 dari volume reaktor, sedangkan sumber mikroorganisme septic tank tepat digunakan untuk volume sampah 1/3 dan 1/2 dari volume reaktor. Sumber mikroorganisme dari septic tank menunjukkan kinerja power density dan efisiensi penurunan COD yang lebih rendah dibandingkan sumber mikroorganisme tanah dan sedimen sungai.

  13. Quantification of VX Nerve Agent in Various Food Matrices by Solid-Phase Extraction Ultra-Performance Liquid ChromatographyTime-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    QUANTIFICATION OF VX NERVE AGENT IN VARIOUS FOOD MATRICES BY SOLID - PHASE EXTRACTION ULTRA-PERFORMANCE...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Quantification of VX Nerve Agent in Various Food Matrices by Solid - Phase Extraction Ultra-Performance Liquid Chromatography...QUANTIFICATION OF VX NERVE AGENT IN VARIOUS FOOD MATRICES BY SOLID - PHASE EXTRACTION ULTRA-PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY–TIME-OF-FLIGHT MASS

  14. Long-time evolution of a low-density ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zachary, A.L.; Cohen, B.I.; Max, C.E.; Arons, J.

    1989-01-01

    With a new, orbit-averaged hybrid computer simulation code, we study a cold, fast low-density ion beam which propagates along the ambient magnetic field as it interacts with a much denser fluid background. We examine the character of the interactions as we vary the ion beam density relative to the background density over the range 1 x 10/sup -5/ to 3 x 10/sup -3/. The low beam density simulations may not be directly observable upstream of the Earth's bow shock, but they are included to help develop an understanding of the results seen in the simulations with high-beam density. However, our highest density simulation falls within the range of solar wind data. All the simulations, regardless of the relative beam density, show three distinct phases: (1) an early or ''linear'' phase; (2) an intermediate or ''trapping'' phase; and (3) a late or ''decorrelation'' phase. In the early phase, the beam excites a nearly monochromatic Alfven wave whose amplitude grows exponentially at a rate given by linear perturbation theory. The wave amplitude saturates when the linear growth rate is of the order of the trapping frequency

  15. Equilibrium finite-frequency noise of an interacting mesoscopic capacitor studied in time-dependent density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmann, Niklas; Splettstoesser, Janine; Helbig, Nicole

    2018-03-01

    We calculate the frequency-dependent equilibrium noise of a mesoscopic capacitor in time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). The capacitor is modeled as a single-level quantum dot with on-site Coulomb interaction and tunnel coupling to a nearby reservoir. The noise spectra are derived from linear-response conductances via the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. Thereby, we analyze the performance of a recently derived exchange-correlation potential with time-nonlocal density dependence in the finite-frequency linear-response regime. We compare our TDDFT noise spectra with real-time perturbation theory and find excellent agreement for noise frequencies below the reservoir temperature.

  16. The variation of the density functions on chaotic spheres in chaotic space-like Minkowski space time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Ahmady, A.E.

    2007-01-01

    In this article we introduce types of chaotic spheres in chaotic space-like Minkowski space time M n+1 . The variations of the density functions under the folding of these chaotic spheres are defined. The foldings restriction imposed on the density function are also discussed. The relations between the folding of geometry and pure chaotic manifolds are deduced. Some theorems concerning these relations are presented

  17. Gender-related differences in the apparent timing of skeletal density bands in the reef-building coral Siderastrea siderea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carricart-Ganivet, J. P.; Vásquez-Bedoya, L. F.; Cabanillas-Terán, N.; Blanchon, P.

    2013-09-01

    Density banding in skeletons of reef-building corals is a valuable source of proxy environmental data. However, skeletal growth strategy has a significant impact on the apparent timing of density-band formation. Some corals employ a strategy where the tissue occupies previously formed skeleton during as the new band forms, which leads to differences between the actual and apparent band timing. To investigate this effect, we collected cores from female and male colonies of Siderastrea siderea and report tissue thicknesses and density-related growth parameters over a 17-yr interval. Correlating these results with monthly sea surface temperature (SST) shows that maximum skeletal density in the female coincides with low winter SSTs, whereas in the male, it coincides with high summer SSTs. Furthermore, maximum skeletal densities in the female coincide with peak Sr/Ca values, whereas in the male, they coincide with low Sr/Ca values. Both results indicate a 6-month difference in the apparent timing of density-band formation between genders. Examination of skeletal extension rates also show that the male has thicker tissue and extends faster, whereas the female has thinner tissue and a denser skeleton—but both calcify at the same rate. The correlation between extension and calcification, combined with the fact that density banding arises from thickening of the skeleton throughout the depth reached by the tissue layer, implies that S. siderea has the same growth strategy as massive Porites, investing its calcification resources into linear extension. In addition, differences in tissue thicknesses suggest that females offset the greater energy requirements of gamete production by generating less tissue, resulting in differences in the apparent timing of density-band formation. Such gender-related offsets may be common in other corals and require that environmental reconstructions be made from sexed colonies and that, in fossil corals where sex cannot be determined

  18. Periodic fluctuations in correlation-based connectivity density time series: Application to wind speed-monitoring network in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laib, Mohamed; Telesca, Luciano; Kanevski, Mikhail

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we study the periodic fluctuations of connectivity density time series of a wind speed-monitoring network in Switzerland. By using the correlogram-based robust periodogram annual periodic oscillations were found in the correlation-based network. The intensity of such annual periodic oscillations is larger for lower correlation thresholds and smaller for higher. The annual periodicity in the connectivity density seems reasonably consistent with the seasonal meteo-climatic cycle.

  19. Effects of drive current rise-time and initial load density distribution on Z-pinch characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duan Yao-Yong; Guo Yong-Hui; Wang Wen-Sheng; Qiu Ai-Ci

    2005-01-01

    A two-dimensional, three-temperature radiation magneto-hydrodynamics model is applied to the investigation of evolutional trends in x-ray radiation power, energy, peak plasma temperature and density as functions of drive current rise-time and initial load density distribution by using the typical experimental parameters of tungsten wire-array Z-pinch on the Qiangguang-Ⅰ generator. The numerical results show that as the drive current rise-time is shortened, x-ray radiation peak power, energy, peak plasma density and peak ion temperature increase approximately linearly, but among them the x-ray radiation peak power increases more quickly. As the initial plasma density distribution in the radial direction becomes gradually flattened, the peak radiation power and the peak ion-temperature almost exponentially increase, while the radiation energy and the peak plasma density change only a little. The main effect of shortening drive current rise-time is to enhance compression of plasma, and the effect of flattening initial load density distribution in the radial direction is to raise the plasma temperature. Both of the approaches elevate the x-ray peak radiation power.

  20. Excited-state absorption in tetrapyridyl porphyrins: comparing real-time and quadratic-response time-dependent density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, David N. [Department of Chemistry; Supercomputing Institute and Chemical Theory Center; University of Minnesota; Minneapolis; USA; Asher, Jason C. [Department of Chemistry; Supercomputing Institute and Chemical Theory Center; University of Minnesota; Minneapolis; USA; Fischer, Sean A. [William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory; Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; P.O. Box 999; Richland; USA; Cramer, Christopher J. [Department of Chemistry; Supercomputing Institute and Chemical Theory Center; University of Minnesota; Minneapolis; USA; Govind, Niranjan [William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory; Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; P.O. Box 999; Richland; USA

    2017-01-01

    Threemeso-substituted tetrapyridyl porphyrins (free base, Ni(ii), and Cu(ii)) were investigated for their optical limiting (OL) capabilities using real-time (RT-), linear-response (LR-), and quadratic-response (QR-) time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) methods.

  1. Time-dependent broken-symmetry density functional theory simulation of the optical response of entangled paramagnetic defects: Color centers in lithium fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janesko, Benjamin G.

    2018-02-01

    Parameter-free atomistic simulations of entangled solid-state paramagnetic defects may aid in the rational design of devices for quantum information science. This work applies time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) embedded-cluster simulations to a prototype entangled-defect system, namely two adjacent singlet-coupled F color centers in lithium fluoride. TDDFT calculations accurately reproduce the experimental visible absorption of both isolated and coupled F centers. The most accurate results are obtained by combining spin symmetry breaking to simulate strong correlation, a large fraction of exact (Hartree-Fock-like) exchange to minimize the defect electrons' self-interaction error, and a standard semilocal approximation for dynamical correlations between the defect electrons and the surrounding ionic lattice. These results motivate application of two-reference correlated ab initio approximations to the M-center, and application of TDDFT in parameter-free simulations of more complex entangled paramagnetic defect architectures.

  2. Time-dependent density functional theory study of the luminescence properties of gold phosphine thiolate complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidez, Emilie B; Aikens, Christine M

    2015-04-09

    The origin of the emission of the gold phosphine thiolate complex (TPA)AuSCH(CH3)2 (TPA = 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantanetriylphosphine) is investigated using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). This system absorbs light at 3.6 eV, which corresponds mostly to a ligand-to-metal transition with some interligand character. The P-Au-S angle decreases upon relaxation in the S1 and T1 states. Our calculations show that these two states are strongly spin-orbit coupled at the ground state geometry. Ligand effects on the optical properties of this complex are also discussed by looking at the simple AuP(CH3)3SCH3 complex. The excitation energies differ by several tenths of an electronvolt. Excited state optimizations show that the excited singlet and triplet of the (TPA)AuSCH(CH3)2 complex are bent. On the other hand, the Au-S bond breaks in the excited state for the simple complex, and TDDFT is no longer an adequate method. The excited state energy landscape of gold phosphine thiolate systems is very complex, with several state crossings. This study also shows that the formation of the [(TPA)AuSCH(CH3)2]2 dimer is favorable in the ground state. The inclusion of dispersion interactions in the calculations affects the optimized geometries of both ground and excited states. Upon excitation, the formation of a Au-Au bond occurs, which results in an increase in energy of the low energy excited states in comparison to the monomer. The experimentally observed emission of the (TPA)AuSCH(CH3)2 complex at 1.86 eV cannot be unambiguously assigned and may originate from several excited states.

  3. Measurement of x-ray emission and thermal transport in near-solid-density plasmas heated by 130 fs laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, B.K.; Wilson, B.G.; Price, D.F.; Stewart, R.E.

    1998-01-01

    Near-solid-density plasmas with peak temperatures of 370±50 eV have been generated using a high-contrast (∼10 -7 ), 400 nm, 130 fs laser pulse of intensity 3x10 17 Wcm -2 at the Ultrashort Pulse Laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The x-ray-emission spectra from thin tracer layers of germanium, tamped by layers of plastic, were measured as a function of target depth. The results qualitatively agree with calculations based on detailed local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and modified non-LTE spectroscopic opacity models using plasma conditions determined using LASNEX hydrodynamic simulations. No evidence of thermal flux inhibition into the bulk target material was observed. The experiments and detailed simulations are presented. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  4. Development of Solid Ceramic Dosimeters for the Time-Integrative Passive Sampling of Volatile Organic Compounds in Waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifacio, Riza Gabriela; Nam, Go-Un; Eom, In-Yong; Hong, Yong-Seok

    2017-11-07

    Time-integrative passive sampling of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in water can now be accomplished using a solid ceramic dosimeter. A nonporous ceramic, which excludes the permeation of water, allowing only gas-phase diffusion of VOCs into the resin inside the dosimeter, effectively captured the VOCs. The mass accumulation of 11 VOCs linearly increased with time over a wide range of aqueous-phase concentrations (16.9 to 1100 μg L -1 ), and the linearity was dependent upon the Henry's constant (H). The average diffusivity of the VOCs in the solid ceramic was 1.46 × 10 -10 m 2 s -1 at 25 °C, which was 4 orders of magnitude lower than that in air (8.09 × 10 -6 m 2 s -1 ). This value was 60% greater than that in the water-permeable porous ceramic (0.92 × 10 -10 m 2 s -1 ), suggesting that its mass accumulation could be more effective than that of porous ceramic dosimeters. The mass accumulation of the VOCs in the solid ceramic dosimeter increased in the presence of salt (≥0.1 M) and with increasing temperature (4 to 40 °C) but varied only slightly with dissolved organic matter concentration. The solid ceramic dosimeter was suitable for the field testing and measurement of time-weighted average concentrations of VOC-contaminated waters.

  5. Dynamic average modeling of a bidirectional solid state transformer for feasibility studies and real-time implementation

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Velasco, Juan Antonio; Alepuz Menéndez, Salvador; Gonzalez Molina, Francisco; Martín Arnedo, Jacinto

    2014-01-01

    Detailed switching models of power electronics devices often lead to long computing times, limiting the size of the system to be simulated. This drawback is especially important when the goal is to implement the model in a real-time simulation platform. An alternative is to use dynamic average models (DAM) for analyzing the dynamic behavior of power electronic devices. This paper presents the development of a DAM for a bidirectional solid-state transformer and its implementation in a real-tim...

  6. Direct Observation of the Phenomenology of a Solid Thermal Explosion Using Time-Resolved Proton Radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smilowitz, L.; Henson, B. F.; Romero, J. J.; Asay, B. W.; Schwartz, C. L.; Saunders, A.; Merrill, F. E.; Morris, C. L.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Hogan, G.; Nedrow, P.; Murray, M. M.; Thompson, T. N.; McNeil, W.; Rightley, P.; Marr-Lyon, M.

    2008-01-01

    We present a new phenomenology for burn propagation inside a thermal explosion based on dynamic radiography. Radiographic images were obtained of an aluminum cased solid cylindrical sample of a plastic bonded formulation of octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine. The phenomenology observed is ignition followed by cracking in the solid accompanied by the propagation of a radially symmetric front of increasing proton transmission. This is followed by a further increase in transmission through the sample, ending after approximately 100 μs. We show that these processes are consistent with the propagation of a convective burn front followed by consumption of the remaining solid by conductive particle burning

  7. MN15-L: A New Local Exchange-Correlation Functional for Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory with Broad Accuracy for Atoms, Molecules, and Solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haoyu S; He, Xiao; Truhlar, Donald G

    2016-03-08

    Kohn-Sham density functional theory is widely used for applications of electronic structure theory in chemistry, materials science, and condensed-matter physics, but the accuracy depends on the quality of the exchange-correlation functional. Here, we present a new local exchange-correlation functional called MN15-L that predicts accurate results for a broad range of molecular and solid-state properties including main-group bond energies, transition metal bond energies, reaction barrier heights, noncovalent interactions, atomic excitation energies, ionization potentials, electron affinities, total atomic energies, hydrocarbon thermochemistry, and lattice constants of solids. The MN15-L functional has the same mathematical form as a previous meta-nonseparable gradient approximation exchange-correlation functional, MN12-L, but it is improved because we optimized it against a larger database, designated 2015A, and included smoothness restraints; the optimization has a much better representation of transition metals. The mean unsigned error on 422 chemical energies is 2.32 kcal/mol, which is the best among all tested functionals, with or without nonlocal exchange. The MN15-L functional also provides good results for test sets that are outside the training set. A key issue is that the functional is local (no nonlocal exchange or nonlocal correlation), which makes it relatively economical for treating large and complex systems and solids. Another key advantage is that medium-range correlation energy is built in so that one does not need to add damped dispersion by molecular mechanics in order to predict accurate noncovalent binding energies. We believe that the MN15-L functional should be useful for a wide variety of applications in chemistry, physics, materials science, and molecular biology.

  8. Charge Transfer Enhancement in the D-π-A Type Porphyrin Dyes: A Density Functional Theory (DFT and Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Jun Kang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The electronic geometries and optical properties of two D-π-A type zinc porphyrin dyes (NCH3-YD2 and TPhe-YD were systematically investigated by density functional theory (DFT and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT to reveal the origin of significantly altered charge transfer enhancement by changing the electron donor of the famous porphyrin-based sensitizer YD2-o-C8. The molecular geometries and photophysical properties of dyes before and after binding to the TiO2 cluster were fully investigated. From the analyses of natural bond orbital (NBO, extended charge decomposition analysis (ECDA, and electron density variations (Δρ between the excited state and ground state, it was found that the introduction of N(CH32 and 1,1,2-triphenylethene groups enhanced the intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT character compared to YD2-o-C8. The absorption wavelength and transition possess character were significantly influenced by N(CH32 and 1,1,2-triphenylethene groups. NCH3-YD2 with N(CH32 groups in the donor part is an effective way to improve the interactions between the dyes and TiO2 surface, light having efficiency (LHE, and free energy change (ΔGinject, which is expected to be an efficient dye for use in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs.

  9. Time-dependent occupation numbers in reduced-density-matrix-functional theory: Application to an interacting Landau-Zener model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Requist, Ryan; Pankratov, Oleg

    2011-01-01

    We prove that if the two-body terms in the equation of motion for the one-body reduced density matrix are approximated by ground-state functionals, the eigenvalues of the one-body reduced density matrix (occupation numbers) remain constant in time. This deficiency is related to the inability of such an approximation to account for relative phases in the two-body reduced density matrix. We derive an exact differential equation giving the functional dependence of these phases in an interacting Landau-Zener model and study their behavior in short- and long-time regimes. The phases undergo resonances whenever the occupation numbers approach the boundaries of the interval [0,1]. In the long-time regime, the occupation numbers display correlation-induced oscillations and the memory dependence of the functionals assumes a simple form.

  10. Probing solids and liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, D.H.

    1977-01-01

    The wide application of scattering experiments in the study of the structures of solids and liquids is surveyed. Part 1 of the review (Martin. Contemp. Phys.;vol. 18, No. 1: Jan. 1977:pp. 81-98) showed how the angular distribution of a scattered beam of photons or neutrons is related by Fourier transform to the space and time-dependent distributions of electrons and nuclei in the scattering target. The use of x-rays and of neutrons in determining time-averaged density distributions was examined. In this part the time-dependent aspects of the distributions for solids and liquids, including helium, are discussed. The dynamical distributions of magnetism (or angular momentum) density are considered, and the present limitations and future possibilities of scattering experiments are examined. (U.K.)

  11. 3-D time-domain induced polarization tomography: a new approach based on a source current density formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soueid Ahmed, A.; Revil, A.

    2018-04-01

    Induced polarization (IP) of porous rocks can be associated with a secondary source current density, which is proportional to both the intrinsic chargeability and the primary (applied) current density. This gives the possibility of reformulating the time domain induced polarization (TDIP) problem as a time-dependent self-potential-type problem. This new approach implies a change of strategy regarding data acquisition and inversion, allowing major time savings for both. For inverting TDIP data, we first retrieve the electrical resistivity distribution. Then, we use this electrical resistivity distribution to reconstruct the primary current density during the injection/retrieval of the (primary) current between the current electrodes A and B. The time-lapse secondary source current density distribution is determined given the primary source current density and a distribution of chargeability (forward modelling step). The inverse problem is linear between the secondary voltages (measured at all the electrodes) and the computed secondary source current density. A kernel matrix relating the secondary observed voltages data to the source current density model is computed once (using the electrical conductivity distribution), and then used throughout the inversion process. This recovered source current density model is in turn used to estimate the time-dependent chargeability (normalized voltages) in each cell of the domain of interest. Assuming a Cole-Cole model for simplicity, we can reconstruct the 3-D distributions of the relaxation time τ and the Cole-Cole exponent c by fitting the intrinsic chargeability decay curve to a Cole-Cole relaxation model for each cell. Two simple cases are studied in details to explain this new approach. In the first case, we estimate the Cole-Cole parameters as well as the source current density field from a synthetic TDIP data set. Our approach is successfully able to reveal the presence of the anomaly and to invert its Cole

  12. Maitra-Burke example of initial-state dependence in time-dependent density-functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holas, A.; Balawender, R.

    2002-01-01

    In a recent paper, Maitra and Burke [Phys. Rev. A 63, 042501 (2001); 64, 039901(E) (2001)] have given an interesting and instructive example that illustrates a specific feature of the time-dependent density-functional theory--the dependence of the reconstructed time-dependent potential not only on the electron density, but also on the initial state of the system. However, a concise form of its presentation by these authors is insufficient to reveal all its peculiarities. Our paper represents a very detailed study of this valuable example, intended to facilitate a better understanding and appreciation

  13. Durability of high performance Ni-yttria stabilized zirconia supported solid oxide electrolysis cells at high current density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjalmarsson, Per; Sun, Xiufu; Liu, Yi-Lin

    2014-01-01

    . The results showed rapid initial fuel electrode degradation during the first 350 h followed by partial reactivation. The serial resistance was found to increase with time but in an exponentially decaying behavior. A discussion is made based on the detailed electrochemical results together with post...

  14. Application of London-type dispersion corrections to the solid-state density functional theory simulation of the terahertz spectra of crystalline pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Matthew D; Buchanan, William D; Korter, Timothy M

    2011-03-14

    The effects of applying an empirical dispersion correction to solid-state density functional theory methods were evaluated in the simulation of the crystal structure and low-frequency (10 to 90 cm(-1)) terahertz spectrum of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, naproxen. The naproxen molecular crystal is bound largely by weak London force interactions, as well as by more prominent interactions such as hydrogen bonding, and thus serves as a good model for the assessment of the pair-wise dispersion correction term in systems influenced by intermolecular interactions of various strengths. Modifications to the dispersion parameters were tested in both fully optimized unit cell dimensions and those determined by X-ray crystallography, with subsequent simulations of the THz spectrum being performed. Use of the unmodified PBE density functional leads to an unrealistic expansion of the unit cell volume and the poor representation of the THz spectrum. Inclusion of a modified dispersion correction enabled a high-quality simulation of the THz spectrum and crystal structure of naproxen to be achieved without the need for artificially constraining the unit cell dimensions.

  15. Thermodynamic mixing properties of the UO{sub 2}–HfO{sub 2} solid solution: Density functional theory and Monte Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Ke, E-mail: keyuan@umich.edu [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Ewing, Rodney C. [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Becker, Udo [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    HfO{sub 2} is a neutron absorber and has been mechanically mixed with UO{sub 2} in nuclear fuel in order to control the core power distribution. During nuclear fission, the temperature at the center of the fuel pellet can reach above 1300 K, where hafnium may substitute uranium and form the binary solid solution of UO{sub 2}–HfO{sub 2}. UO{sub 2} adopts the cubic fluorite structure, but HfO{sub 2} can occur in monoclinic, tetragonal, and cubic structures. The distribution of Hf and U ions in the UO{sub 2}–HfO{sub 2} binary and its atomic structure influence the thermal conductivity and melting point of the fuel. However, experimental data on the UO{sub 2}–HfO{sub 2} binary are limited. Therefore, the enthalpies of mixing of the UO{sub 2}–HfO{sub 2} binary with three different structures were calculated in this study using density functional theory and subsequent Monte Carlo simulations. The free energy of mixing was obtained from thermodynamic integration of the enthalpy of mixing over temperature. From the ΔG of mixing, a phase diagram of the binary was obtained. The calculated UO{sub 2}–HfO{sub 2} binary forms extensive solid solution across the entire compositional range, but there are a variety of possible exsolution phenomena associated with the different HfO{sub 2} polymorphs. As the structure of the HfO{sub 2} end member adopts lower symmetry and becomes less similar to cubic UO{sub 2}, the miscibility gap of the phase diagram expands, accompanied by an increase in cell volume by 7–10% as the structure transforms from cubic to monoclinic. Close to the UO{sub 2} end member, which is relevant to the nuclear fuel, the isometric uranium-rich solid solutions exsolve as the fuel cools, and there is a tendency to form the monoclinic hafnium-rich phase in the matrix of the isometric, uranium-rich solid solution phase.

  16. A case of thalamic hemorrhage presenting high density on CT in a long time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoya, Takaaki; Takeda, Yoshio; Sugai, Yukio; Umetsu, Akemi; Yamaguchi, Koichi

    1988-01-01

    We presented a thalamic hemorrhage in a 29-year-old woman with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura during pregnancy showing a high density lesion at least for 50 days on CT. From beginning of the illness, this condition was considered to continue for 3 months by chronic bleeding or recurrent hemorrhage. (author)

  17. Surface of Maximums of AR(2 Process Spectral Densities and its Application in Time Series Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Ivanov

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions. The obtained formula of surface of maximums of noise spectral densities gives an opportunity to realize for which values of AR(2 process characteristic polynomial coefficients it is possible to look for greater rate of convergence to zero of the probabilities of large deviations of the considered estimates.

  18. Language and Ageing--Exploring Propositional Density in Written Language--Stability over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Elizabeth; Craig, Hugh; Ferguson, Alison; Colyvas, Kim

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the stability of propositional density (PD) in written texts, as this aspect of language shows promise as an indicator and as a predictor of language decline with ageing. This descriptive longitudinal study analysed written texts obtained from the Australian Longitudinal Study of Women's Health in which participants were…

  19. Real-time viscosity and mass density sensors requiring microliter sample volume based on nanomechanical resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bircher, Benjamin A; Duempelmann, Luc; Renggli, Kasper; Lang, Hans Peter; Gerber, Christoph; Bruns, Nico; Braun, Thomas

    2013-09-17

    A microcantilever based method for fluid viscosity and mass density measurements with high temporal resolution and microliter sample consumption is presented. Nanomechanical cantilever vibration is driven by photothermal excitation and detected by an optical beam deflection system using two laser beams of different wavelengths. The theoretical framework relating cantilever response to the viscosity and mass density of the surrounding fluid was extended to consider higher flexural modes vibrating at high Reynolds numbers. The performance of the developed sensor and extended theory was validated over a viscosity range of 1-20 mPa·s and a corresponding mass density range of 998-1176 kg/m(3) using reference fluids. Separating sample plugs from the carrier fluid by a two-phase configuration in combination with a microfluidic flow cell, allowed samples of 5 μL to be sequentially measured under continuous flow, opening the method to fast and reliable screening applications. To demonstrate the study of dynamic processes, the viscosity and mass density changes occurring during the free radical polymerization of acrylamide were monitored and compared to published data. Shear-thinning was observed in the viscosity data at higher flexural modes, which vibrate at elevated frequencies. Rheokinetic models allowed the monomer-to-polymer conversion to be tracked in spite of the shear-thinning behavior, and could be applied to study the kinetics of unknown processes.

  20. Controlling of merging electric field and IMF magnitude on storm-time changes in thermospheric mass density

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Y.L.; Ma, S.Y.; Liu, R.S.; Luehr, H.; Doornbos, E.

    2013-01-01

    The controls of merging electrical field, Em, and IMF (interplanetary magnetic field) magnitude, B, on the storm-time changes in upper thermospheric mass density are statistically investigated using GRACE accelerometer observations and the OMNI data of solar wind and IMF for 35 great storms during

  1. Time-resolved cathodoluminescence microscopy with sub-nanosecond beam blanking for direct evaluation of the local density of states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerland, R.J.; Weppelman, I.G.C.; Garming, M.W.H.; Kruit, P.; Hoogenboom, J.P.

    2016-01-01

    We show cathodoluminescence-based time-resolved electron beam spectroscopy in order to directly probe the spontaneous emission decay rate that is modified by the local density of states in a nanoscale environment. In contrast to dedicated laser-triggered electron-microscopy setups, we use commercial

  2. Experimental characterization of a strongly coupled solid density plasma generated in a short-pulse laser target interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregori, G.; Hansen, S.B.; Key, M.H.; King, J.; Mackinnon, A.J.; Park, H.; Patel, P.K.; Shepard, R.; Snavely, R.A.; Wilks, S.C.; Glenzer, S.H.

    2005-01-01

    We have measured high resolution copper Kα spectra from a picosecond high intensity laser produced plasma. By fitting the shape of the experimental spectra with a self-consistent-field model which includes all the relevant line shifts from multiply ionized atoms, we are able to infer time and spatially averaged electron temperatures (T e ) and ionization state (Z) in the foil. Our results show increasing values for T e and Z when the overall mass of the target is reduced. In particular, we measure temperatures in excess of 200 eV with Z ∼ 13-14. For these conditions the ion-ion coupling constant is Λ ii ∼ 8-9, thus suggesting the achievement of a strongly coupled plasma regime

  3. Experimental characterization of a strongly coupled solid density plasma generated in a short-pulse laser target interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregori, G; Hansen, S B; Key, M H; King, J; Mackinnon, A J; Park, H; Patel, P K; Shepard, R; Snavely, R A; Wilks, S C; Glenzer, S H

    2005-03-17

    We have measured high resolution copper K{alpha} spectra from a picosecond high intensity laser produced plasma. By fitting the shape of the experimental spectra with a self-consistent-field model which includes all the relevant line shifts from multiply ionized atoms, we are able to infer time and spatially averaged electron temperatures (T{sub e}) and ionization state (Z) in the foil. Our results show increasing values for T{sub e} and Z when the overall mass of the target is reduced. In particular, we measure temperatures in excess of 200 eV with Z {approx} 13-14. For these conditions the ion-ion coupling constant is {Lambda}{sub ii} {approx} 8-9, thus suggesting the achievement of a strongly coupled plasma regime.

  4. Type of oral solid medication packaging and medication preparation time in nursing homes: A direct observation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cready, C M; Hudson, C; Dreyer, K

    2017-12-01

    Medication administration is a substantial portion of the workday in nursing homes, with the medication preparation step being the most time-consuming. However, little is known about how medication preparation time is affected by the type of packaging used for oral solid medications (ie, tablets/capsules). We examined the effects of two types of packaging. As fewer steps are associated with strip packaging compared to bingo card packaging, we hypothesized that the increase in medication preparation seconds per resident with each additional oral solid medication would be smaller when strip packaging was used. A total of 430 medication preparations conducted by eight nurses during the regularly scheduled morning medication administration period in two nursing homes-using strip packaging and bingo card packaging, respectively-were observed. Each medication preparation observation was matched to its corresponding medication administration record and observations averaged across resident. Using the resident sample (N=149), we estimated three regression models (adjusting the standard errors for the clustering of resident by nurse). The first model regressed medication preparation seconds on the number of oral solid medications. The second model added the type of packaging used and the control variables (type of unit [long-term care, post-acute care], the number of one-half pills and the dosage form diversity in the preparation). To test our hypothesis, the third model added an interaction term between the number of oral solid medications and the type of packaging used. As hypothesized, all else equal, the number of oral solid medications tended to increase medication preparation time per resident in both nursing homes, but the increase was smaller in the strip packaging nursing home (Ppackaging nursing home increased medication preparation by an average of 13 seconds (b=13.077), whereas each oral solid medication administered in the strip packaging nursing home

  5. A computer program for estimating the power-density spectrum of advanced continuous simulation language generated time histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, H. J.

    1981-01-01

    A computer program for performing frequency analysis of time history data is presented. The program uses circular convolution and the fast Fourier transform to calculate power density spectrum (PDS) of time history data. The program interfaces with the advanced continuous simulation language (ACSL) so that a frequency analysis may be performed on ACSL generated simulation variables. An example of the calculation of the PDS of a Van de Pol oscillator is presented.

  6. Controlling of merging electric field and IMF magnitude on storm-time changes in thermospheric mass density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. L. Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The controls of merging electrical field, Em, and IMF (interplanetary magnetic field magnitude, B, on the storm-time changes in upper thermospheric mass density are statistically investigated using GRACE accelerometer observations and the OMNI data of solar wind and IMF for 35 great storms during 2002–2006. It reveals the following: (1 The correlation coefficients between the air mass density changes and the parameters of Em and B are generally larger at lower latitudes than at higher latitudes, and larger in noon and midnight sectors than in dawn and dusk. (2 The most likely delay time (MLDT of mass density changes in respect to Em is about 1.5 h (4.5 h at high (low latitudes, having no distinct local time dependence, while it is 6 h at middle latitudes in all the local time sectors except for noon, which is longer than at low latitudes. A similar fact of longer delay time at mid-latitude is also seen for B. The MLDTs for B at various latitudes are all local time dependent distinctly with shorter delay time in noon/midnight sector and larger in dawn/dusk. Despite of widely spread of the delay time, IMF B exhibits still larger correlation coefficients with mass density changes among the interplanetary parameters. (3 The linear control factor of B on the density changes increases for large B, in contrast to somewhat saturation trend for larger Em. (4 The influence of B and Em on the mass densities shows different behavior for different types of storms. The influence intensity of Em is much stronger for CIR-driven than for CME-driven storm, while it is not so distinct for B. On the local time asymmetry of the influence, both Em and B have largest influence at noon sector for CME-driven storms, while an obviously larger intensification of the influence is found in dawn/dusk sector during CIR storms, especially for parameter Em.

  7. Quantum computing without wavefunctions: time-dependent density functional theory for universal quantum computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempel, David G; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2012-01-01

    We prove that the theorems of TDDFT can be extended to a class of qubit Hamiltonians that are universal for quantum computation. The theorems of TDDFT applied to universal Hamiltonians imply that single-qubit expectation values can be used as the basic variables in quantum computation and information theory, rather than wavefunctions. From a practical standpoint this opens the possibility of approximating observables of interest in quantum computations directly in terms of single-qubit quantities (i.e. as density functionals). Additionally, we also demonstrate that TDDFT provides an exact prescription for simulating universal Hamiltonians with other universal Hamiltonians that have different, and possibly easier-to-realize two-qubit interactions. This establishes the foundations of TDDFT for quantum computation and opens the possibility of developing density functionals for use in quantum algorithms.

  8. Designing and assessment of accuracy of an algorithm for determining the accuracy of radiographic film density by changing exposure time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoorieh Bashizadeh Fakhar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims Bone density is frequently used in medical diagnosis and research. The current methods for determining bone density are expensive and not easily available in dental clinics. The aim of this study was to design and evaluate the accuracy of a digital method for hard tissue densitometry which could be applied on personal computers.   Materials and Methods: An aluminum step wedge was constructed. 50 E-speed Kodak films were exposed. Exposure time varied from 0.05s to 0.5 s with 0.05 s interval. Films were developed with automatic developer and fixer and digitized with 1240U photo Epson scanner. Images were cropped at 10 × 10mm size with Microsoft Office Picture Manager. By running the algorithm designed in MATLAB software, the mean pixel value of pictures was calculated.   Results: Finding of this study showed that by increasing the exposure time, the mean pixel value was decreased and at step 12, a significant discrimination was seen between the two subsequent times(P<0.001. By increasing the thickness of object, algorithm could define the density changes from step 4 in 0.3 s and 5 in 0.5 s, and it could determine the differences in the mean pixel value between the same steps of 0.3 s and 0.5 s from step 4.   Conclusion: By increasing the object thickness and exposure time, the accuracy of the algorithm for recognizing changes in density was increased. This software was able to determine the radiographic density changes of aluminum step wedge with at least 4mm thickness at exposure time of 0.3 s and 5 mm at 0.5 s.

  9. A case study of real-time monitoring of solid-state phase transformations in acoustically levitated particles using near infrared and Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehder, Sönke; Wu, Jian X; Laackmann, Julian; Moritz, Hans-Ulrich; Rantanen, Jukka; Rades, Thomas; Leopold, Claudia S

    2013-01-23

    The objective of this study was to monitor the amorphous-to-crystalline solid-state phase transformation kinetics of the model drug ibuprofen with spectroscopic methods during acoustic levitation. Chemical and physical information was obtained by real-time near infrared (NIRS) and Raman spectroscopy measurements. The recrystallisation kinetic parameters (overall recrystallisation rate constant β and the time needed to reach 50% of the equilibrated level t(50)), were determined using a multivariate curve resolution approach. The acoustic levitation device coupled with non-invasive spectroscopy enabled monitoring of the recrystallisation process of the difficult-to-handle (adhesive) amorphous sample. The application of multivariate curve resolution enabled isolation of the underlying pure spectra, which corresponded well with the reference spectra of amorphous and crystalline ibuprofen. The recrystallisation kinetic parameters were estimated from the recrystallisation profiles. While the empirical recrystallisation rate constant determined by NIR and Raman spectroscopy were comparable, the lag time for recrystallisation was significantly lower with Raman spectroscopy as compared to NIRS. This observation was explained by the high energy density of the Raman laser beam, which might have led to local heating effects of the sample and thus reduced the recrystallisation onset time. It was concluded that acoustic levitation with NIR and Raman spectroscopy combined with multivariate curve resolution allowed direct determination of the recrystallisation kinetics of amorphous drugs and thus is a promising technique for monitoring solid-state phase transformations of adhesive small-sized samples during the early phase of drug development. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Time-dependent reduced density matrix functional theory applied to laser-driven, correlated two-electron dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brics, Martins; Kapoor, Varun; Bauer, Dieter [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Rostock, 18051 Rostock (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) with known and practicable exchange-correlation potentials does not capture highly correlated electron dynamics such as single-photon double ionization, autoionization, or nonsequential ionization. Time-dependent reduced density matrix functional theory (TDRDMFT) may remedy these problems. The key ingredients in TDRDMFT are the natural orbitals (NOs), i.e., the eigenfunctions of the one-body reduced density matrix (1-RDM), and the occupation numbers (OCs), i.e., the respective eigenvalues. The two-body reduced density matrix (2-RDM) is then expanded in NOs, and equations of motion for the NOs can be derived. If the expansion coefficients of the 2-RDM were known exactly, the problem at hand would be solved. In practice, approximations have to be made. We study the prospects of TDRDMFT following a top-down approach. We solve the exact two-electron time-dependent Schroedinger equation for a model Helium atom in intense laser fields in order to study highly correlated phenomena such as the population of autoionizing states or single-photon double ionization. From the exact wave function we calculate the exact NOs, OCs, the exact expansion coefficients of the 2-RDM, and the exact potentials in the equations of motion. In that way we can identify how many NOs and which level of approximations are necessary to capture such phenomena.

  11. Modeling L2,3-Edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy with Real-Time Exact Two-Component Relativistic Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Joseph M; Lestrange, Patrick J; Stetina, Torin F; Li, Xiaosong

    2018-04-10

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy is a powerful technique to probe local electronic and nuclear structure. There has been extensive theoretical work modeling K-edge spectra from first principles. However, modeling L-edge spectra directly with density functional theory poses a unique challenge requiring further study. Spin-orbit coupling must be included in the model, and a noncollinear density functional theory is required. Using the real-time exact two-component method, we are able to variationally include one-electron spin-orbit coupling terms when calculating the absorption spectrum. The abilities of different basis sets and density functionals to model spectra for both closed- and open-shell systems are investigated using SiCl 4 and three transition metal complexes, TiCl 4 , CrO 2 Cl 2 , and [FeCl 6 ] 3- . Although we are working in the real-time framework, individual molecular orbital transitions can still be recovered by projecting the density onto the ground state molecular orbital space and separating contributions to the time evolving dipole moment.

  12. Fast-Rate Capable Electrode Material with Higher Energy Density than LiFePO4: 4.2V LiVPO4F Synthesized by Scalable Single-Step Solid-State Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minkyung; Lee, Seongsu; Kang, Byoungwoo

    2016-03-01

    Use of compounds that contain fluorine (F) as electrode materials in lithium ion batteries has been considered, but synthesizing single-phase samples of these compounds is a difficult task. Here, it is demonstrated that a simple scalable single-step solid-state process with additional fluorine source can obtain highly pure LiVPO 4 F. The resulting material with submicron particles achieves very high rate capability ≈100 mAh g -1 at 60 C-rate (1-min discharge) and even at 200 C-rate (18 s discharge). It retains superior capacity, ≈120 mAh g -1 at 10 C charge/10 C discharge rate (6-min) for 500 cycles with >95% retention efficiency. Furthermore, LiVPO 4 F shows low polarization even at high rates leading to higher operating potential >3.45 V (≈3.6 V at 60 C-rate), so it achieves high energy density. It is demonstrated for the first time that highly pure LiVPO 4 F can achieve high power capability comparable to LiFePO 4 and much higher energy density (≈521 Wh g -1 at 20 C-rate) than LiFePO 4 even without nanostructured particles. LiVPO 4 F can be a real substitute of LiFePO 4.

  13. Diffusion of 99TcO4- in compacted bentonite: Effect of pH, concentration, density and contact time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiangke Wang; Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe; Zuyi Tao

    2004-01-01

    In order to assess radionuclide diffusion and transport properties in compacted bentonite, the 'in-diffusion' method based on bentonite filled capillaries is used. The effect of 99 TcO 4 - concentration and pH value of the solution, the contact time and the dry density of compacted bentonite on the apparent diffusion coefficient (D a ) and on the distribution coefficient (K d ) values obtained from the capillary test was studied. The D a and K d values decrease with increasing of the bulk dry density of compacted bentonite. Ion exclusion influences the diffusion of 99 TcO 4 - 4 in the same substance. As compared to literature data, the K d values obtained from capillary tests are in most cases lower than those from batch tests, the difference between the two K d values is a strong function of dry density of the compacted bentonite. (author)

  14. Time resolved resonant inelastic X-ray scattering: A supreme tool to understand dynamics in solids and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beye, M.; Wernet, Ph.; Schüßler-Langeheine, C.; Föhlisch, A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •The high specificity of RIXS ideally suits time-resolved measurements. •Methods relating to the core hole lifetime cover the low femtosecond regime. •Pump-probe methods are used starting at sub-ps time scales. •FELs and synchrotrons are useful for pump-probe studies. •Examples from solid state dynamics and molecules are discussed. -- Abstract: Dynamics in materials typically involve different degrees of freedom, like charge, lattice, orbital and spin in a complex interplay. Time-resolved resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) as a highly selective tool can provide unique insight and follow the details of dynamical processes while resolving symmetries, chemical and charge states, momenta, spin configurations, etc. In this paper, we review examples where the intrinsic scattering duration time is used to study femtosecond phenomena. Free-electron lasers access timescales starting in the sub-ps range through pump-probe methods and synchrotrons study the time scales longer than tens of ps. In these examples, time-resolved resonant inelastic X-ray scattering is applied to solids as well as molecular systems

  15. Effect of energy density and delay time on the degree of conversion and Knoop microhardness of a dual resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainardi, Maria do Carmo A J; Giorgi, Maria Cecília C; Lima, Débora A N L; Marchi, Giselle M; Ambrosano, Gláucia M; Paulillo, Luiz A M S; Aguiar, Flávio H B

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the influence of the photo-curing delay time and energy density on the degree of conversion and the Knoop microhardness of a resin cement. Seventy-eight samples were assigned to 13 groups (n = 6), one of which received no light curing (control). The samples were made of a dual-cured resin cement (RelyX ARC) with the aid of a Teflon matrix, submitted to one of the following energy densities (J/cm²): 7, 14, 20, and 28. Delay times were immediate (0), 1 min, or 2 min. After 24 h, the degree of conversion and microhardness were measured at three segments: cervical, medium, and apical. Data were submitted to three-way anova and Tukey's and Dunnett's tests, the latest of which was used to compare the control to the experimental groups. No interaction was observed between delay time and energy density regarding the degree of conversion. The cervical segment showed the highest values, while the apical showed the lowest. Microhardness values concerning the cervical segment in all groups were statistically different from that obtained for the control. A high-irradiance light-curing unit allows for a reduced irradiation exposure time with a short delay time, aimed at tooth restorations using a dual-cured resin cement. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Real-time thermal imaging of solid oxide fuel cell cathode activity in working condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montanini, Roberto; Quattrocchi, Antonino; Piccolo, Sebastiano

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical methods such as voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy are effective for quantifying solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) operational performance, but not for identifying and monitoring the chemical processes that occur on the electrodes’ surface, which are thought...... to be strictly related to the SOFCs’ efficiency. Because of their high operating temperature, mechanical failure or cathode delamination is a common shortcoming of SOFCs that severely affects their reliability. Infrared thermography may provide a powerful tool for probing in situ SOFC electrode processes...... in detecting the onset of cell failure during normal operation and in monitoring cathode activity when the cell is fed with different types of fuels....

  17. Harmonic mode-locking and sub-round-trip time nonlinear dynamics of electro-optically controlled solid state laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbunkov, M. V.; Maslova, Yu Ya; Petukhov, V. A.; Semenov, M. A.; Shabalin, Yu V.; Tunkin, V. G.

    2018-03-01

    Harmonic mode-locking in a solid state laser due to optoelectronic control is studied numerically on the basis of two methods. The first one is detailed numeric simulation taking into account laser radiation fine time structure. It is shown that optimally chosen feedback delay leads to self-started mode-locking with generation of desired number of pulses in the laser cavity. The second method is based on discrete maps for short laser pulse energy. Both methods show that the application of combination of positive and negative feedback loops allows to reduce the period of regular nonlinear dynamics down to a fraction of a laser cavity round trip time.

  18. Angle-dependent strong-field molecular ionization rates with tuned range-separated time-dependent density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sissay, Adonay [Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Abanador, Paul; Mauger, François; Gaarde, Mette; Schafer, Kenneth J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Lopata, Kenneth, E-mail: klopata@lsu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Center for Computation and Technology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States)

    2016-09-07

    Strong-field ionization and the resulting electronic dynamics are important for a range of processes such as high harmonic generation, photodamage, charge resonance enhanced ionization, and ionization-triggered charge migration. Modeling ionization dynamics in molecular systems from first-principles can be challenging due to the large spatial extent of the wavefunction which stresses the accuracy of basis sets, and the intense fields which require non-perturbative time-dependent electronic structure methods. In this paper, we develop a time-dependent density functional theory approach which uses a Gaussian-type orbital (GTO) basis set to capture strong-field ionization rates and dynamics in atoms and small molecules. This involves propagating the electronic density matrix in time with a time-dependent laser potential and a spatial non-Hermitian complex absorbing potential which is projected onto an atom-centered basis set to remove ionized charge from the simulation. For the density functional theory (DFT) functional we use a tuned range-separated functional LC-PBE*, which has the correct asymptotic 1/r form of the potential and a reduced delocalization error compared to traditional DFT functionals. Ionization rates are computed for hydrogen, molecular nitrogen, and iodoacetylene under various field frequencies, intensities, and polarizations (angle-dependent ionization), and the results are shown to quantitatively agree with time-dependent Schrödinger equation and strong-field approximation calculations. This tuned DFT with GTO method opens the door to predictive all-electron time-dependent density functional theory simulations of ionization and ionization-triggered dynamics in molecular systems using tuned range-separated hybrid functionals.

  19. Angle-dependent strong-field molecular ionization rates with tuned range-separated time-dependent density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sissay, Adonay; Abanador, Paul; Mauger, François; Gaarde, Mette; Schafer, Kenneth J.; Lopata, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Strong-field ionization and the resulting electronic dynamics are important for a range of processes such as high harmonic generation, photodamage, charge resonance enhanced ionization, and ionization-triggered charge migration. Modeling ionization dynamics in molecular systems from first-principles can be challenging due to the large spatial extent of the wavefunction which stresses the accuracy of basis sets, and the intense fields which require non-perturbative time-dependent electronic structure methods. In this paper, we develop a time-dependent density functional theory approach which uses a Gaussian-type orbital (GTO) basis set to capture strong-field ionization rates and dynamics in atoms and small molecules. This involves propagating the electronic density matrix in time with a time-dependent laser potential and a spatial non-Hermitian complex absorbing potential which is projected onto an atom-centered basis set to remove ionized charge from the simulation. For the density functional theory (DFT) functional we use a tuned range-separated functional LC-PBE*, which has the correct asymptotic 1/r form of the potential and a reduced delocalization error compared to traditional DFT functionals. Ionization rates are computed for hydrogen, molecular nitrogen, and iodoacetylene under various field frequencies, intensities, and polarizations (angle-dependent ionization), and the results are shown to quantitatively agree with time-dependent Schrödinger equation and strong-field approximation calculations. This tuned DFT with GTO method opens the door to predictive all-electron time-dependent density functional theory simulations of ionization and ionization-triggered dynamics in molecular systems using tuned range-separated hybrid functionals.

  20. Experimental verification of agreement between thermal and real time visual melt-solid interface positions in vertical Bridgman grown germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, P. G.; Fripp, A. L.; Debnam, W. J.; Woodell, G.; Berry, R. F.; Simchick, R. T.

    1996-03-01

    Measurements of the liquid-solid interface position during crystal growth were made by observing the discontinuity of the temperature gradient with movable thermocouples in a centerline, quartz capillary placed inside a sealed quartz ampoule of germanium in a vertical Bridgman furnace. Simultaneously, in situ, real time visual observations, using X-ray imaging technology, determined the position of the melt-solid interface. The radiographically detected interface position was several millimeters from the thermal interface position and the direction of displacement depended upon the direction of thermocouple insertion. Minimization of this spurious heat flow was achieved by using an unclad thermocouple that had each of its two wire leads entering the capillary from different ends of the furnace. Using this configuration the visual interface coincided with the thermal interface. Such observations show the utility of using in situ, real time visualization to record the melt-solid interface shape and position during crystal growth; and they suggest improvements in furnace and ampoule designs for use in high thermal gradients.

  1. Bulk metal concentrations versus total suspended solids in rivers: Time-invariant & catchment-specific relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrabadi, Touraj; Ruegner, Hermann; Schwientek, Marc; Bennett, Jeremy; Fazel Valipour, Shahin; Grathwohl, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Suspended particles in rivers can act as carriers of potentially bioavailable metal species and are thus an emerging area of interest in river system monitoring. The delineation of bulk metals concentrations in river water into dissolved and particulate components is also important for risk assessment. Linear relationships between bulk metal concentrations in water (CW,tot) and total suspended solids (TSS) in water can be used to easily evaluate dissolved (CW, intercept) and particle-bound metal fluxes (CSUS, slope) in streams (CW,tot = CW + CSUS TSS). In this study, we apply this principle to catchments in Iran (Haraz) and Germany (Ammer, Goldersbach, and Steinlach) that show differences in geology, geochemistry, land use and hydrological characteristics. For each catchment, particle-bound and dissolved concentrations for a suite of metals in water were calculated based on linear regressions of total suspended solids and total metal concentrations. Results were replicable across sampling campaigns in different years and seasons (between 2013 and 2016) and could be reproduced in a laboratory sedimentation experiment. CSUS values generally showed little variability in different catchments and agree well with soil background values for some metals (e.g. lead and nickel) while other metals (e.g. copper) indicate anthropogenic influences. CW was elevated in the Haraz (Iran) catchment, indicating higher bioavailability and potential human and ecological health concerns (where higher values of CSUS/CW are considered as a risk indicator).

  2. One-dimensional time-dependent fluid model of a very high density low-pressure inductively coupled plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaplin, Vernon H.; Bellan, Paul M.

    2015-12-01

    A time-dependent two-fluid model has been developed to understand axial variations in the plasma parameters in a very high density (peak ne≳ 5 ×1019 m-3 ) argon inductively coupled discharge in a long 1.1 cm radius tube. The model equations are written in 1D with radial losses to the tube walls accounted for by the inclusion of effective particle and energy sink terms. The ambipolar diffusion equation and electron energy equation are solved to find the electron density ne(z ,t ) and temperature Te(z ,t ) , and the populations of the neutral argon 4s metastable, 4s resonant, and 4p excited state manifolds are calculated to determine the stepwise ionization rate and calculate radiative energy losses. The model has been validated through comparisons with Langmuir probe ion saturation current measurements; close agreement between the simulated and measured axial plasma density profiles and the initial density rise rate at each location was obtained at pA r=30 -60 mTorr . We present detailed results from calculations at 60 mTorr, including the time-dependent electron temperature, excited state populations, and energy budget within and downstream of the radiofrequency antenna.

  3. Biodegradation of an Organophosphate Chemical Warfare Agent Simulant by Activated Sludge with Varying Solid Retention Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    Biochemistry , 14(3), 219-222. doi: 10.1016/0038-0717(82)90028-1 Nerve agents. (2008). In F. R. Sidell, J. Newmark & J. H. McDonough (Eds.), Medical aspects...Environmental Sciences, 21(1), 76-82. doi: 10.1016/S1001-0742(09)60014-0 Yi, T., Barr, W., & Harper , W. F. (2012). Electron density-based

  4. Plasma density evolution in plasma opening switch obtained by a time-resolved sensitive He-Ne interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Ren, Jing; Guo, Fan; Zhou, LiangJi; Li, Ye; He, An; Jiang, Wei

    2014-03-01

    To understand the formation process of vacuum gap in coaxial microsecond conduction time plasma opening switch (POS), we have made measurements of the line-integrated plasma density during switch operation using a time-resolved sensitive He-Ne interferometer. The conduction current and conduction time in experiments are about 120 kA and 1 μs, respectively. As a result, more than 85% of conduction current has been transferred to an inductive load with rise time of 130 ns. The radial dependence of the density is measured by changing the radial location of the line-of-sight for shots with the same nominal POS parameters. During the conduction phase, the line-integrated plasma density in POS increases at all radial locations over the gun-only case by further ionization of material injected from the guns. The current conduction is observed to cause a radial redistribution of the switch plasma. A vacuum gap forms rapidly in the plasma at 5.5 mm from the center conductor, which is consistent with the location where magnetic pressure is the largest, allowing current to be transferred from the POS to the load.

  5. Effectiveness and feasibility of lowering playground density during recess to promote physical activity and decrease sedentary time at primary school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Haese, Sara; Van Dyck, Delfien; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Cardon, Greet

    2013-12-10

    This pilot study aimed at investigating the effectiveness of lowering playground density on increasing children's physical activity and decreasing sedentary time. Also the feasibility of this intervention was tested. Data were collected in September and October 2012 in three Belgian schools in 187, 9-12 year old children. During the intervention, playground density was decreased by splitting up recesses and decreasing the number of children sharing the playground. A within-subject design was used. Children wore accelerometers during the study week. Three-level (class - participant - measurement (baseline or intervention)) linear regression models were used to determine intervention effects. After the intervention week the school principals filled out a questionnaire concerning the feasibility of the intervention. The available play space was 12.18 ± 4.19 m²/child at baseline and increased to 24.24 ± 8.51 m²/child during intervention. During the intervention sedentary time decreased (-0.58 min/recess; -3.21%/recess) and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (+1.04 min/recess; +5.9%/recess) increased during recess and during the entire school day (sedentary time: -3.29%/school day; moderate-to-vigorous physical activity +1.16%/school day). All principals agreed that children enjoyed the intervention; but some difficulties were reported. Lowering playground density can be an effective intervention for decreasing children's sedentary time and increasing their physical activity levels during recess; especially in least active children.

  6. Using solution- and solid-state S K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy with density functional theory to evaluate M-S bonding for MS4(2-) (M = Cr, Mo, W) dianions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Angela C; Keith, Jason M; Batista, Enrique R; Boland, Kevin S; Daly, Scott R; Kozimor, Stosh A; MacInnes, Molly M; Martin, Richard L; Scott, Brian L

    2014-12-14

    Herein, we have evaluated relative changes in M-S electronic structure and orbital mixing in Group 6 MS4(2-) dianions using solid- and solution-phase S K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS; M = Mo, W), as well as density functional theory (DFT; M = Cr, Mo, W) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations. To facilitate comparison with solution measurements (conducted in acetonitrile), theoretical models included gas-phase calculations as well as those that incorporated an acetonitrile dielectric, the latter of which provided better agreement with experiment. Two pre-edge features arising from S 1s → e* and t electron excitations were observed in the S K-edge XAS spectra and were reasonably assigned as (1)A1 → (1)T2 transitions. For MoS4(2-), both solution-phase pre-edge peak intensities were consistent with results from the solid-state spectra. For WS4(2-), solution- and solid-state pre-edge peak intensities for transitions involving e* were equivalent, while transitions involving the t orbitals were less intense in solution. Experimental and computational results have been presented in comparison to recent analyses of MO4(2-) dianions, which allowed M-S and M-O orbital mixing to be evaluated as the principle quantum number (n) for the metal valence d orbitals increased (3d, 4d, 5d). Overall, the M-E (E = O, S) analyses revealed distinct trends in orbital mixing. For example, as the Group 6 triad was descended, e* (π*) orbital mixing remained constant in the M-S bonds, but increased appreciably for M-O interactions. For the t orbitals (σ* + π*), mixing decreased slightly for M-S bonding and increased only slightly for the M-O interactions. These results suggested that the metal and ligand valence orbital energies and radial extensions delicately influenced the orbital compositions for isoelectronic ME4(2-) (E = O, S) dianions.

  7. Direct modeling of the electrochemistry in the three-phase boundary of solid oxide fuel cell anodes by density functional theory: a critical overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishkin, M; Ziegler, T

    2014-02-07

    The first principles modeling of electrochemical reactions has proven useful for the development of efficient, durable and low cost solid oxide full cells (SOFCs). In this account we focus on recent advances in modeling of structural, electronic and catalytic properties of the SOFC anodes based on density functional theory (DFT) first principle calculations. As a starting point, we highlight that the adequate analysis of cell electrochemistry generally requires modeling of chemical reactions at the metal/oxide interface rather than on individual metal or oxide surfaces. The atomic models of Ni/YSZ and Ni/CeO2 interfaces, required for DFT simulations of reactions on SOFC anodes are discussed next, together with the analysis of the electronic structure of these interfaces. Then we proceed to DFT-based findings on charge transfer mechanisms during redox reactions on these two anodes. We provide a comparison of the electronic properties of Ni/YSZ and Ni/CeO2 interfaces and present an interpretation of their different chemical performances. Subsequently we discuss the computed energy pathways of fuel oxidation mechanisms, obtained by various groups to date. We also discuss the results of DFT studies combined with microkinetic modeling as well as the results of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. In conclusion we summarize the key findings of DFT modeling of metal/oxide interfaces to date and highlight possible directions in the future modeling of SOFC anodes.

  8. Density and water content of nanoscale solid C–S–H formed in alkali-activated slag (AAS) paste and implications for chemical shrinkage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Jeffrey J.; Allen, Andrew J.; Jennings, Hamlin M.

    2012-01-01

    Alkali-activated slag (AAS) paste was analyzed using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The scattering response indicates that the microstructure consists of a uniform matrix of hydration product with a high surface area studded with unhydrated cores of slag particles. In contrast with portland cement paste, no surface fractal scattering regime was detected, and elevated temperature curing (at 60 °C) had no detectable effect on the microstructure at any length scale studied. The specific surface area of the AAS pastes is about 25% higher than that of a portland cement paste cured under the same conditions. The composition and mass density of the nanoscale solid C–S–H phase formed in the AAS paste was determined using a previously developed neutron scattering method, in conjunction with a hydration model. The result ((CaO) 0.99 –SiO 2 –(Al 2 O 3 ) 0.06 –(H 2 O) 0.97 , d = (2.73 ± 0.02) g/cm 3 ) is significantly lower in calcium and in water as compared to portland cement or pure tricalcium silicate paste. These values were used to calculate the chemical shrinkage that would result from complete hydration of the AAS paste. The result, (12.2 ± 1.5) cm 3 of volumetric shrinkage per 100 g of unhydrated cement, is about twice the amount of chemical shrinkage exhibited by normal cement pastes.

  9. Time Evolution of the Wigner Operator as a Quasi-density Operator in Amplitude Dessipative Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhisong; Ren, Guihua; Yu, Ziyang; Wei, Chenhuinan; Fan, Hongyi

    2018-06-01

    For developing quantum mechanics theory in phase space, we explore how the Wigner operator {Δ } (α ,α ^{\\ast } )≡ {1}/{π } :e^{-2(α ^{\\ast } -α ^{\\dag })(α -α )}:, when viewed as a quasi-density operator correponding to the Wigner quasiprobability distribution, evolves in a damping channel. with the damping constant κ. We derive that it evolves into 1/T + 1:\\exp 2/T + 1[-(α^{\\ast} e^{-κ t}-a^{\\dag} )(α e^{-κ t}-a)]: where T ≡ 1 - e - 2 κ t . This in turn helps to directly obtain the final state ρ( t) out of the dessipative channel from the initial classical function corresponding to initial ρ(0). Throught the work, the method of integration within ordered product (IWOP) of operators is employed.

  10. Real-time crowd density mapping using a novel sensory fusion model of infrared and visual systems

    OpenAIRE

    Yaseen, S; Al-Habaibeh, A; Su, D; Otham, F

    2013-01-01

    Crowd dynamic management research has seen significant attention in recent years in research and industry in an attempt to improve safety level and management of large scale events and in large public places such as stadiums, theatres, railway stations, subways and other places where high flow of people at high densities is expected. Failure to detect the crowd behaviour at the right time could lead to unnecessary injuries and fatalities. Over the past decades there have been many incidents o...

  11. Determination of solid- and liquid-phase gastric emptying half times in cats by use of nuclear scintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, M; Papasouliotis, K; Barr, F J; Gruffydd-Jones, T J; Caney, S M

    1999-10-01

    To use nuclear scintigraphy to establish a range of gastric emptying half times (t1/2) following a liquid or solid meal in nonsedated cats. 12 clinically normal 3-year-old domestic shorthair cats. A test meal of 75 g of scrambled eggs labeled with technetium Tc 99m tin colloid was fed to 10 of the cats, and solid-phase gastric emptying t1/2 were determined by use of nuclear scintigraphy. In a separate experiment, 8 of these cats plus an additional 2 cats were fed 18 ml (n = 5) or 36 ml (n = 5) of a nutrient liquid meal labeled with technetium Tc 99m pentetate. Liquid-phase gastric emptying t1/2 then were determined by use of scintigraphy. Solid-phase gastric emptying t1/2 were between 210 and 769 minutes (median, 330 minutes). Median liquid-phase gastric emptying t1/2 after ingestion of 18 or 36 ml of the test meal were 67 minutes (range, 60 to 96 minutes) and 117 minutes (range, 101 to 170 minutes), respectively. The median t1/2 determined for cats receiving 18 ml of the radiolabeled liquid was significantly less than that determined for cats receiving 36 ml of the test meal. The protocol was tolerated by nonsedated cats. Solid-phase gastric emptying t1/2 were prolonged, compared with liquid-phase t1/2, and a major factor governing the emptying rate of liquids was the volume consumed. Nuclear scintigraphy may prove useful in assessing gastric motility disorders in cats.

  12. Form-stable paraffin/high density polyethylene composites as solid-liquid phase change material for thermal energy storage: preparation and thermal properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sari, Ahmet

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with the preparation of paraffin/high density polyethylene (HDPE) composites as form-stable, solid-liquid phase change material (PCM) for thermal energy storage and with determination of their thermal properties. In such a composite, the paraffin (P) serves as a latent heat storage material and the HDPE acts as a supporting material, which prevents leakage of the melted paraffin because of providing structural strength. Therefore, it is named form-stable composite PCM. In this study, two kinds of paraffins with melting temperatures of 42-44 deg. C (type P1) and 56-58 deg. C (type P2) and latent heats of 192.8 and 212.4 J g -1 were used. The maximum weight percentage for both paraffin types in the PCM composites without any seepage of the paraffin in the melted state were found as high as 77%. It is observed that the paraffin is dispersed into the network of the solid HDPE by investigation of the structure of the composite PCMs using a scanning electronic microscope (SEM). The melting temperatures and latent heats of the form-stable P1/HDPE and P2/HDPE composite PCMs were determined as 37.8 and 55.7 deg. C, and 147.6 and 162.2 J g -1 , respectively, by the technique of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Furthermore, to improve the thermal conductivity of the form-stable P/HDPE composite PCMs, expanded and exfoliated graphite (EG) by heat treatment was added to the samples in the ratio of 3 wt.%. Thereby, the thermal conductivity was increased about 14% for the form-stable P1/HDPE and about 24% for the P2/HDPE composite PCMs. Based on the results, it is concluded that the prepared form-stable P/HDPE blends as composite type PCM have great potential for thermal energy storage applications in terms of their satisfactory thermal properties and improved thermal conductivity. Furthermore, these composite PCMs added with EG can be considered cost effective latent heat storage materials since they do not require encapsulation and extra cost to enhance

  13. Electricity and combined heat and power from municipal solid waste; theoretically optimal investment decision time and emissions trading implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolis, Athanasios; Rentizelas, Athanasios; Aravossis, Konstantin; Tatsiopoulos, Ilias

    2010-11-01

    Waste management has become a great social concern for modern societies. Landfill emissions have been identified among the major contributors of global warming and climate changes with significant impact in national economies. The energy industry constitutes an additional greenhouse gas emitter, while at the same time it is characterized by significant costs and uncertain fuel prices. The above implications have triggered different policies and measures worldwide to address the management of municipal solid wastes on the one hand and the impacts from energy production on the other. Emerging methods of energy recovery from waste may address both concerns simultaneously. In this work a comparative study of co-generation investments based on municipal solid waste is presented, focusing on the evolution of their economical performance over time. A real-options algorithm has been adopted investigating different options of energy recovery from waste: incineration, gasification and landfill biogas exploitation. The financial contributors are identified and the impact of greenhouse gas trading is analysed in terms of financial yields, considering landfilling as the baseline scenario. The results indicate an advantage of combined heat and power over solely electricity production. Gasification, has failed in some European installations. Incineration on the other hand, proves to be more attractive than the competing alternatives, mainly due to its higher power production efficiency, lower investment costs and lower emission rates. Although these characteristics may not drastically change over time, either immediate or irreversible investment decisions might be reconsidered under the current selling prices of heat, power and CO(2) allowances.

  14. The influence of crop density and harvesting time on yield and quality of various sugar beet cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipović Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the influence of crop density and harvesting time on yield and quality of various sugar beet cultivars has been analyzed. During three year research conducted on soil of carbonate chernozem on loess terrace on experimental field of Institute Tamiš in Pančevo. Method of completely random block system in four repetitions we're analyzed the influence of crop density (80.000 plants per ha, 100.000 plants per ha and 120.000 plants per ha and harvesting time (10th Sept, 01st Oct and 20th Oct on yield and quality of various sugar beet cultivars of different technological type (Esprit N - type, Belinda Z - type and Chiara NE - type. Increase in crop density had very little effect on increase on sugar beet yield. The yield was considerably increased in the period between the first harvesting date and the second. The highest yield of consumable sugar was obtained of cultivars of N - type Esprit and lower yield was obtained of cultivars of Z - type (Belinda. .

  15. Mapping Charge Carrier Density in Organic Thin-Film Transistors by Time-Resolved Photoluminescence Lifetime Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leißner, Till; Jensen, Per Baunegaard With; Liu, Yiming

    2017-01-01

    The device performance of organic transistors is strongly influenced by the charge carrier distribution. A range of factors effect this distribution, including injection barriers at the metal-semiconductor interface, the morphology of the organic film, and charge traps at the dielectric/organic...... interface or at grain boundaries. In our comprehensive experimental and analytical work we demonstrate a method to characterize the charge carrier density in organic thin-film transistors using time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy. We developed a numerical model that describes the electrical...... and optical responses consistently. We determined the densities of free and trapped holes at the interface between the organic layer and the SiO2 gate dielectric by comparison to electrical measurements. Furthermore by applying fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy we determine the local charge carrier...

  16. Collision dynamics of H+ + N2 at low energies based on time-dependent density-functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, W.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, F. S.; Hutton, R.; Zou, Y.; Gao, C.-Z.; Wei, B.

    2018-02-01

    Using time-dependent density-functional theory at the level of local density approximation augmented by a self-interaction correction and coupled non-adiabatically to molecular dynamics, we study, from a theoretical perspective, scattering dynamics of the proton in collisions with the N2 molecule at 30 eV. Nine different collision configurations are employed to analyze the proton energy loss spectra, electron depletion, scattering angles and self-interaction effects. Our results agree qualitatively with the experimental data and previous theoretical calculations. The discrepancies are ascribed to the limitation of the theoretical models in use. We find that self-interaction effects can significantly influence the electron capture and the excited diatomic vibrational motion, which is in consistent with other calculations. In addition, it is found that the molecular structure can be readily retrieved from the proton energy loss spectra due to a significant momentum transfer in head-on collisions.

  17. Electronic Excitations in Solution: The Interplay between State Specific Approaches and a Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory Description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guido, Ciro A; Jacquemin, Denis; Adamo, Carlo; Mennucci, Benedetta

    2015-12-08

    We critically analyze the performances of continuum solvation models when coupled to time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) to predict solvent effects on both absorption and emission energies of chromophores in solution. Different polarization schemes of the polarizable continuum model (PCM), such as linear response (LR) and three different state specific (SS) approaches, are considered and compared. We show the necessity of introducing a SS model in cases where large electron density rearrangements are involved in the excitations, such as charge-transfer transitions in both twisted and quadrupolar compounds, and underline the very delicate interplay between the selected polarization method and the chosen exchange-correlation functional. This interplay originates in the different descriptions of the transition and ground/excited state multipolar moments by the different functionals. As a result, the choice of both the DFT functional and the solvent polarization scheme has to be consistent with the nature of the studied electronic excitation.

  18. Antiferromagnetic vs. non-magnetic ε phase of solid oxygen. Periodic density functional theory studies using a localized atomic basis set and the role of exact exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Solís, A; Zicovich-Wilson, C M; Hernández-Lamoneda, R; Ochoa-Calle, A J

    2017-01-25

    The question of the non-magnetic (NM) vs. antiferromagnetic (AF) nature of the ε phase of solid oxygen is a matter of great interest and continuing debate. In particular, it has been proposed that the ε phase is actually composed of two phases, a low-pressure AF ε 1 phase and a higher pressure NM ε 0 phase [Crespo et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A., 2014, 111, 10427]. We address this problem through periodic spin-restricted and spin-polarized Kohn-Sham density functional theory calculations at pressures from 10 to 50 GPa using calibrated GGA and hybrid exchange-correlation functionals with Gaussian atomic basis sets. The two possible configurations for the antiferromagnetic (AF1 and AF2) coupling of the 0 ≤ S ≤ 1 O 2 molecules in the (O 2 ) 4 unit cell were studied. Full enthalpy-driven geometry optimizations of the (O 2 ) 4 unit cells were done to study the pressure evolution of the enthalpy difference between the non-magnetic and both antiferromagnetic structures. We also address the evolution of structural parameters and the spin-per-molecule vs. pressure. We find that the spin-less solution becomes more stable than both AF structures above 50 GPa and, crucially, the spin-less solution yields lattice parameters in much better agreement with experimental data at all pressures than the AF structures. The optimized AF2 broken-symmetry structures lead to large errors of the a and b lattice parameters when compared with experiments. The results for the NM model are in much better agreement with the experimental data than those found for both AF models and are consistent with a completely non-magnetic (O 2 ) 4 unit cell for the low-pressure regime of the ε phase.

  19. The impact of steam and current density on carbon formation from biomass gasification tar on Ni/YSZ, and Ni/CGO solid oxide fuel cell anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mermelstein, Joshua; Millan, Marcos; Brandon, Nigel

    The combination of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and biomass gasification has the potential to become an attractive technology for the production of clean renewable energy. However the impact of tars, formed during biomass gasification, on the performance and durability of SOFC anodes has not been well established experimentally. This paper reports an experimental study on the mitigation of carbon formation arising from the exposure of the commonly used Ni/YSZ (yttria stabilized zirconia) and Ni/CGO (gadolinium-doped ceria) SOFC anodes to biomass gasification tars. Carbon formation and cell degradation was reduced through means of steam reforming of the tar over the nickel anode, and partial oxidation of benzene model tar via the transport of oxygen ions to the anode while operating the fuel cell under load. Thermodynamic calculations suggest that a threshold current density of 365 mA cm -2 was required to suppress carbon formation in dry conditions, which was consistent with the results of experiments conducted in this study. The importance of both anode microstructure and composition towards carbon deposition was seen in the comparison of Ni/YSZ and Ni/CGO anodes exposed to the biomass gasification tar. Under steam concentrations greater than the thermodynamic threshold for carbon deposition, Ni/YSZ anodes still exhibited cell degradation, as shown by increased polarization resistances, and carbon formation was seen using SEM imaging. Ni/CGO anodes were found to be more resilient to carbon formation than Ni/YSZ anodes, and displayed increased performance after each subsequent exposure to tar, likely due to continued reforming of condensed tar on the anode.

  20. Pseudopotential multi-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model for cavitation bubble collapse with high density ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shan Ming-Lei; Zhu Chang-Ping; Yao Cheng; Yin Cheng; Jiang Xiao-Yan

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of the cavitation bubble collapse is a fundamental issue for the bubble collapse application and prevention. In the present work, the modified forcing scheme for the pseudopotential multi-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model developed by Li Q et al. [Li Q, Luo K H and Li X J 2013 Phys. Rev. E 87 053301] is adopted to develop a cavitation bubble collapse model. In the respects of coexistence curves and Laplace law verification, the improved pseudopotential multi-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model is investigated. It is found that the thermodynamic consistency and surface tension are independent of kinematic viscosity. By homogeneous and heterogeneous cavitation simulation, the ability of the present model to describe the cavitation bubble development as well as the cavitation inception is verified. The bubble collapse between two parallel walls is simulated. The dynamic process of a collapsing bubble is consistent with the results from experiments and simulations by other numerical methods. It is demonstrated that the present pseudopotential multi-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model is applicable and efficient, and the lattice Boltzmann method is an alternative tool for collapsing bubble modeling. (paper)

  1. Development of a solid-state multi-sensor array camera for real time imaging of magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benitez, D; Gaydecki, P; Quek, S; Torres, V

    2007-01-01

    The development of a real-time magnetic field imaging camera based on solid-state sensors is described. The final laboratory comprises a 2D array of 33 x 33 solid state, tri-axial magneto-inductive sensors, and is located within a large current-carrying coil. This may be excited to produce either a steady or time-varying magnetic field. Outputs from several rows of sensors are routed to a sub-master controller and all sub-masters route to a master-controller responsible for data coordination and signal pre-processing. The data are finally streamed to a host computer via a USB interface and the image generated and displayed at a rate of several frames per second. Accurate image generation is predicated on a knowledge of the sensor response, magnetic field perturbations and the nature of the target respecting permeability and conductivity. To this end, the development of the instrumentation has been complemented by extensive numerical modelling of field distribution patterns using boundary element methods. Although it was originally intended for deployment in the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of reinforced concrete, it was soon realised during the course of the work that the magnetic field imaging system had many potential applications, for example, in medicine, security screening, quality assurance (such as the food industry), other areas of nondestructive evaluation (NDE), designs associated with magnetic fields, teaching and research

  2. Time-frequency analyses of fluid-solid interaction under sinusoidal translational shear deformation of the viscoelastic rat cerebrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, Lauren N.; Haslach, Henry W.

    2018-02-01

    During normal extracellular fluid (ECF) flow in the brain glymphatic system or during pathological flow induced by trauma resulting from impacts and blast waves, ECF-solid matter interactions result from sinusoidal shear waves in the brain and cranial arterial tissue, both heterogeneous biological tissues with high fluid content. The flow in the glymphatic system is known to be forced by pulsations of the cranial arteries at about 1 Hz. The experimental shear stress response to sinusoidal translational shear deformation at 1 Hz and 25% strain amplitude and either 0% or 33% compression is compared for rat cerebrum and bovine aortic tissue. Time-frequency analyses aim to correlate the shear stress signal frequency components over time with the behavior of brain tissue constituents to identify the physical source of the shear nonlinear viscoelastic response. Discrete fast Fourier transformation analysis and the novel application to the shear stress signal of harmonic wavelet decomposition both show significant 1 Hz and 3 Hz components. The 3 Hz component in brain tissue, whose magnitude is much larger than in aortic tissue, may result from interstitial fluid induced drag forces. The harmonic wavelet decomposition locates 3 Hz harmonics whose magnitudes decrease on subsequent cycles perhaps because of bond breaking that results in easier fluid movement. Both tissues exhibit transient shear stress softening similar to the Mullins effect in rubber. The form of a new mathematical model for the drag force produced by ECF-solid matter interactions captures the third harmonic seen experimentally.

  3. Development of a solid-state multi-sensor array camera for real time imaging of magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez, D.; Gaydecki, P.; Quek, S.; Torres, V.

    2007-07-01

    The development of a real-time magnetic field imaging camera based on solid-state sensors is described. The final laboratory comprises a 2D array of 33 x 33 solid state, tri-axial magneto-inductive sensors, and is located within a large current-carrying coil. This may be excited to produce either a steady or time-varying magnetic field. Outputs from several rows of sensors are routed to a sub-master controller and all sub-masters route to a master-controller responsible for data coordination and signal pre-processing. The data are finally streamed to a host computer via a USB interface and the image generated and displayed at a rate of several frames per second. Accurate image generation is predicated on a knowledge of the sensor response, magnetic field perturbations and the nature of the target respecting permeability and conductivity. To this end, the development of the instrumentation has been complemented by extensive numerical modelling of field distribution patterns using boundary element methods. Although it was originally intended for deployment in the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of reinforced concrete, it was soon realised during the course of the work that the magnetic field imaging system had many potential applications, for example, in medicine, security screening, quality assurance (such as the food industry), other areas of nondestructive evaluation (NDE), designs associated with magnetic fields, teaching and research.

  4. Time-dependent density functional theory for nonlinear properties of open-shell systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinkevicius, Zilvinas; Jha, Prakash Chandra; Oprea, Corneliu I; Vahtras, Olav; Agren, Hans

    2007-09-21

    This paper presents response theory based on a spin-restricted Kohn-Sham formalism for computation of time-dependent and time-independent nonlinear properties of molecules with a high spin ground state. The developed approach is capable to handle arbitrary perturbations and constitutes an efficient procedure for evaluation of electric, magnetic, and mixed properties. Apart from presenting the derivation of the proposed approach, we show results from illustrating calculations of static and dynamic hyperpolarizabilities of small Si(3n+1)H(6n+3) (n=0,1,2) clusters which mimic Si(111) surfaces with dangling bond defects. The results indicate that the first hyperpolarizability tensor components of Si(3n+1)H(6n+3) have an ordering compatible with the measurements of second harmonic generation in SiO2/Si(111) interfaces and, therefore, support the hypothesis that silicon surface defects with dangling bonds are responsible for this phenomenon. The results exhibit a strong dependence on the quality of basis set and exchange-correlation functional, showing that an appropriate set of diffuse functions is required for reliable predictions of the first hyperpolarizability of open-shell compounds.

  5. First-principles X-ray absorption dose calculation for time-dependent mass and optical density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berejnov, Viatcheslav; Rubinstein, Boris; Melo, Lis G A; Hitchcock, Adam P

    2018-05-01

    A dose integral of time-dependent X-ray absorption under conditions of variable photon energy and changing sample mass is derived from first principles starting with the Beer-Lambert (BL) absorption model. For a given photon energy the BL dose integral D(e, t) reduces to the product of an effective time integral T(t) and a dose rate R(e). Two approximations of the time-dependent optical density, i.e. exponential A(t) = c + aexp(-bt) for first-order kinetics and hyperbolic A(t) = c + a/(b + t) for second-order kinetics, were considered for BL dose evaluation. For both models three methods of evaluating the effective time integral are considered: analytical integration, approximation by a function, and calculation of the asymptotic behaviour at large times. Data for poly(methyl methacrylate) and perfluorosulfonic acid polymers measured by scanning transmission soft X-ray microscopy were used to test the BL dose calculation. It was found that a previous method to calculate time-dependent dose underestimates the dose in mass loss situations, depending on the applied exposure time. All these methods here show that the BL dose is proportional to the exposure time D(e, t) ≃ K(e)t.

  6. Time-resolved imaging of a compressible air disc under a drop impacting on a solid surface

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Erqiang

    2015-09-07

    When a drop impacts on a solid surface, its rapid deceleration is cushioned by a thin layer of air, which leads to the entrapment of a bubble under its centre. For large impact velocities the lubrication pressure in this air layer becomes large enough to compress the air. Herein we use high-speed interferometry, with 200 ns time-resolution, to directly observe the thickness evolution of the air layer during the entire bubble entrapment process. The initial disc radius and thickness shows excellent agreement with available theoretical models, based on adiabatic compression. For the largest impact velocities the air is compressed by as much as a factor of 14. Immediately following the contact, the air disc shows rapid vertical expansion. The radial speed of the surface minima just before contact, can reach 50 times the impact velocity of the drop.

  7. Performance of green LTE networks powered by the smart grid with time varying user density

    KAUST Repository

    Ghazzai, Hakim

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we implement a green heuristic algorithm involving the base station sleeping strategy that aims to ensure energy saving for the radio access network of the 4GLTE (Fourth Generation Long Term Evolution) mobile networks. We propose an energy procurement model that takes into consideration the existence of multiple energy providers in the smart grid power system (e.g. fossil fuel and renewable energy sources, etc.) in addition to deployed photovoltaic panels in base station sites. Moreover, the analysis is based on the dynamic time variation of daily traffic and aims to maintain the network quality of service. Our simulation results show an important contribution in the reduction of CO2 emissions that can be reached by optimal power allocation over the active base stations. Copyright © 2013 by the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, Inc.

  8. Time-dependent density functional theory for open systems with a positivity-preserving decomposition scheme for environment spectral functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, RuLin; Zheng, Xiao; Kwok, YanHo; Xie, Hang; Chen, GuanHua; Yam, ChiYung

    2015-01-01

    Understanding electronic dynamics on material surfaces is fundamentally important for applications including nanoelectronics, inhomogeneous catalysis, and photovoltaics. Practical approaches based on time-dependent density functional theory for open systems have been developed to characterize the dissipative dynamics of electrons in bulk materials. The accuracy and reliability of such approaches depend critically on how the electronic structure and memory effects of surrounding material environment are accounted for. In this work, we develop a novel squared-Lorentzian decomposition scheme, which preserves the positive semi-definiteness of the environment spectral matrix. The resulting electronic dynamics is guaranteed to be both accurate and convergent even in the long-time limit. The long-time stability of electronic dynamics simulation is thus greatly improved within the current decomposition scheme. The validity and usefulness of our new approach are exemplified via two prototypical model systems: quasi-one-dimensional atomic chains and two-dimensional bilayer graphene

  9. Time-dependent density functional theory for open systems with a positivity-preserving decomposition scheme for environment spectral functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, RuLin; Zheng, Xiao; Kwok, YanHo; Xie, Hang; Chen, GuanHua; Yam, ChiYung

    2015-04-14

    Understanding electronic dynamics on material surfaces is fundamentally important for applications including nanoelectronics, inhomogeneous catalysis, and photovoltaics. Practical approaches based on time-dependent density functional theory for open systems have been developed to characterize the dissipative dynamics of electrons in bulk materials. The accuracy and reliability of such approaches depend critically on how the electronic structure and memory effects of surrounding material environment are accounted for. In this work, we develop a novel squared-Lorentzian decomposition scheme, which preserves the positive semi-definiteness of the environment spectral matrix. The resulting electronic dynamics is guaranteed to be both accurate and convergent even in the long-time limit. The long-time stability of electronic dynamics simulation is thus greatly improved within the current decomposition scheme. The validity and usefulness of our new approach are exemplified via two prototypical model systems: quasi-one-dimensional atomic chains and two-dimensional bilayer graphene.

  10. Mapping axonal density and average diameter using non-monotonic time-dependent gradient-echo MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nunes, Daniel; Cruz, Tomás L; Jespersen, Sune N

    2017-01-01

    available in the clinic, or extremely long acquisition schemes to extract information from parameter-intensive models. In this study, we suggest that simple and time-efficient multi-gradient-echo (MGE) MRI can be used to extract the axon density from susceptibility-driven non-monotonic decay in the time...... the quantitative results are compared against ground-truth histology, they seem to reflect the axonal fraction (though with a bias, as evident from Bland-Altman analysis). As well, the extra-axonal fraction can be estimated. The results suggest that our model is oversimplified, yet at the same time evidencing......-dependent signal. We show, both theoretically and with simulations, that a non-monotonic signal decay will occur for multi-compartmental microstructures – such as axons and extra-axonal spaces, which we here used in a simple model for the microstructure – and that, for axons parallel to the main magnetic field...

  11. Note: Large active area solid state photon counter with 20 ps timing resolution and 60 fs detection delay stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochazka, Ivan; Kodet, Jan; Eckl, Johann; Blazej, Josef

    2017-10-01

    We are reporting on the design, construction, and performance of a photon counting detector system, which is based on single photon avalanche diode detector technology. This photon counting device has been optimized for very high timing resolution and stability of its detection delay. The foreseen application of this detector is laser ranging of space objects, laser time transfer ground to space and fundamental metrology. The single photon avalanche diode structure, manufactured on silicon using K14 technology, is used as a sensor. The active area of the sensor is circular with 200 μm diameter. Its photon detection probability exceeds 40% in the wavelength range spanning from 500 to 800 nm. The sensor is operated in active quenching and gating mode. A new control circuit was optimized to maintain high timing resolution and detection delay stability. In connection to this circuit, timing resolution of the detector is reaching 20 ps FWHM. In addition, the temperature change of the detection delay is as low as 70 fs/K. As a result, the detection delay stability of the device is exceptional: expressed in the form of time deviation, detection delay stability of better than 60 fs has been achieved. Considering the large active area aperture of the detector, this is, to our knowledge, the best timing performance reported for a solid state photon counting detector so far.

  12. Time delay occultation data of the Helios spacecraft for probing the electron density distribution in the solar corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edenhofer, P.; Lueneburg, E.; Esposito, P. B.; Martin, W. L.; Zygielbaum, A. I.; Hansen, R. T.; Hansen, S. F.

    1978-01-01

    S-band time delay measurements were collected from the spacecraft Helios A and B during three solar occultations in 1975/76 within heliocentric distances of about 3 and 215 earth radius in terms of range, Doppler frequency shift, and electron content. Characteristic features of measurement and data processing are described. Typical data sets are discussed to probe the electron density distribution near the sun (west and east limb as well) including the outer and extended corona. Steady-state and dynamical aspects of the solar corona are presented and compared with earth-bound-K-coronagraph measurements. Using a weighted least squares estimation, parameters of an average coronal electron density profile are derived in a preliminary analysis to yield electron densities at r = 3, 65, 215 earth radius. Transient phenomena are discussed and a velocity of propagation v is nearly equal to 900 km/s is determined for plasma ejecta from a solar flare observed during an extraordinary set of Helios B electron content measurements.

  13. Real-time control of ion density and ion energy in chlorine inductively coupled plasma etch processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.-H.; Leou, K.-C.; Lin Chaung; Lin, T.-L.; Tseng, C.-W.; Tsai, C.-H.

    2003-01-01

    In this study, we have experimentally demonstrated the real-time closed-loop control of both ion density and ion energy in a chlorine inductively coupled plasma etcher. To measure positive ion density, the trace rare gases-optical emission spectroscopy is used to measure the chlorine positive ion density. An rf voltage probe is adopted to measure the root-mean-square rf voltage on the electrostatic chuck which is linearly dependent on sheath voltage. One actuator is a 13.56 MHz rf generator to drive the inductive coil seated on a ceramic window. The second actuator is also a 13.56 MHz rf generator to power the electrostatic chuck. The closed-loop controller is designed to compensate for process drift, process disturbance, and pilot wafer effect and to minimize steady-state error of plasma parameters. This controller has been used to control the etch process of unpatterned polysilicon. The experimental results showed that the closed-loop control had a better repeatability of plasma parameters compared with open-loop control. The closed-loop control can eliminate the process disturbance resulting from reflected power. In addition, experimental results also demonstrated that closed-loop control has a better reproducibility in etch rate as compared with open-loop control

  14. Biomass and biomass and biogas yielding potential of sorghum as affected by planting density, sowing time and cultivar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, A.; Hussain, A.; Shahzad, A. N.; Honermeier, B.

    2015-01-01

    Biogas from biomass is a promising renewable energy source whose importance is increasing in European as well as in other countries. A field experiment at one location (Experimental Station Giessen, Justus Liebig University of Giessen, Germany) over two years was designed to study the effect of altering sowing time (ST), planting density and cultivar on the biomass yield and chemical composition of biomass sorghum, and its potential for methane production. Of the two cultivars tested, cv. Goliath (intraspecific hybrid) was more productive with respect to biomass yield than cv. Bovital (S. bicolor x S. sudanense hybrid). ST also influenced biomass yield and most of the quality parameters measured. Delayed sowing was in general advantageous. The choice of cultivar had a marked effect on biogas and methane yield. The highest biogas and methane yields were produced by late sown cv. Bovital. Sub-optimal planting densities limited biomass accumulation of the crop, however neither the chemical composition nor the methane yield was affected by planting density. (author)

  15. Real time estimation of generation, extinction and flow of muscle fibre action potentials in high density surface EMG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesin, Luca

    2015-02-01

    Developing a real time method to estimate generation, extinction and propagation of muscle fibre action potentials from bi-dimensional and high density surface electromyogram (EMG). A multi-frame generalization of an optical flow technique including a source term is considered. A model describing generation, extinction and propagation of action potentials is fit to epochs of surface EMG. The algorithm is tested on simulations of high density surface EMG (inter-electrode distance equal to 5mm) from finite length fibres generated using a multi-layer volume conductor model. The flow and source term estimated from interference EMG reflect the anatomy of the muscle, i.e. the direction of the fibres (2° of average estimation error) and the positions of innervation zone and tendons under the electrode grid (mean errors of about 1 and 2mm, respectively). The global conduction velocity of the action potentials from motor units under the detection system is also obtained from the estimated flow. The processing time is about 1 ms per channel for an epoch of EMG of duration 150 ms. A new real time image processing algorithm is proposed to investigate muscle anatomy and activity. Potential applications are proposed in prosthesis control, automatic detection of optimal channels for EMG index extraction and biofeedback. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Self-consistent DFT +U method for real-space time-dependent density functional theory calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tancogne-Dejean, Nicolas; Oliveira, Micael J. T.; Rubio, Angel

    2017-12-01

    We implemented various DFT+U schemes, including the Agapito, Curtarolo, and Buongiorno Nardelli functional (ACBN0) self-consistent density-functional version of the DFT +U method [Phys. Rev. X 5, 011006 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevX.5.011006] within the massively parallel real-space time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) code octopus. We further extended the method to the case of the calculation of response functions with real-time TDDFT+U and to the description of noncollinear spin systems. The implementation is tested by investigating the ground-state and optical properties of various transition-metal oxides, bulk topological insulators, and molecules. Our results are found to be in good agreement with previously published results for both the electronic band structure and structural properties. The self-consistent calculated values of U and J are also in good agreement with the values commonly used in the literature. We found that the time-dependent extension of the self-consistent DFT+U method yields improved optical properties when compared to the empirical TDDFT+U scheme. This work thus opens a different theoretical framework to address the nonequilibrium properties of correlated systems.

  17. Residence Time Distribution of Solid Particles in High-Aspect Ratio Multiple-Impeller Stirred Vessel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Scargiali, F.; Grisafi, F.; Čermáková, Jiřina; Machoň, V.; Brucato, A.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 17 (2004), s. 3601-3618 ISSN 0009-2509 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : retention time distribution * twin systems approach * particle tracing Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.655, year: 2004

  18. Time-dependent density-functional theory simulation of local currents in pristine and single-defect zigzag graphene nanoribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Shenglai, E-mail: shenglai.he@vanderbilt.edu; Russakoff, Arthur; Li, Yonghui; Varga, Kálmán, E-mail: kalman.varga@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States)

    2016-07-21

    The spatial current distribution in H-terminated zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs) under electrical bias is investigated using time-dependent density-functional theory solved on a real-space grid. A projected complex absorbing potential is used to minimize the effect of reflection at simulation cell boundary. The calculations show that the current flows mainly along the edge atoms in the hydrogen terminated pristine ZGNRs. When a vacancy is introduced to the ZGNRs, loop currents emerge at the ribbon edge due to electrons hopping between carbon atoms of the same sublattice. The loop currents hinder the flow of the edge current, explaining the poor electric conductance observed in recent experiments.

  19. Universal Exciton Size in Organic Polymers is Determined by Nonlocal Orbital Exchange in Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewes, Stefanie A; Plasser, Felix; Dreuw, Andreas

    2017-03-16

    The exciton size of the lowest singlet excited state in a diverse set of organic π-conjugated polymers is studied and found to be a universal, system-independent quantity of approximately 7 Å in the single-chain picture. With time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), its value as well as the overall description of the exciton is almost exclusively governed by the amount of nonlocal orbital exchange. This is traced back to the lack of the Coulomb attraction between the electron and hole quasiparticles in pure TDDFT, which is reintroduced only with the admixture of nonlocal orbital exchange.

  20. Electron-Ion Dynamics with Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory: Towards Predictive Solar Cell Modeling: Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maitra, Neepa [Hunter College City University of New York, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-07-14

    This project investigates the accuracy of currently-used functionals in time-dependent density functional theory, which is today routinely used to predict and design materials and computationally model processes in solar energy conversion. The rigorously-based electron-ion dynamics method developed here sheds light on traditional methods and overcomes challenges those methods have. The fundamental research undertaken here is important for building reliable and practical methods for materials discovery. The ultimate goal is to use these tools for the computational design of new materials for solar cell devices of high efficiency.

  1. Optimal control theory for quantum-classical systems: Ehrenfest molecular dynamics based on time-dependent density-functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, A; Gross, E K U

    2014-01-01

    We derive the fundamental equations of an optimal control theory for systems containing both quantum electrons and classical ions. The system is modeled with Ehrenfest dynamics, a non-adiabatic variant of molecular dynamics. The general formulation, that needs the fully correlated many-electron wavefunction, can be simplified by making use of time-dependent density-functional theory. In this case, the optimal control equations require some modifications that we will provide. The abstract general formulation is complemented with the simple example of the H 2 + molecule in the presence of a laser field. (paper)

  2. Localized surface plasmon resonance in silver nanoparticles: Atomistic first-principles time-dependent density-functional theory calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Kuisma, Mikael; Sakko, Arto; Rossi, Tuomas P.; Larsen, Ask H.; Enkovaara, Jussi; Lehtovaara, Lauri; Rantala, Tapio T.

    2015-01-01

    We observe using ab initio methods that localized surface plasmon resonances in icosahedral silver nanoparticles enter the asymptotic region already between diameters of 1 and 2 nm, converging close to the classical quasistatic limit around 3.4 eV. We base the observation on time-dependent density-functional theory simulations of the icosahedral silver clusters Ag$_{55}$ (1.06 nm), Ag$_{147}$ (1.60 nm), Ag$_{309}$ (2.14 nm), and Ag$_{561}$ (2.68 nm). The simulation method combines the adiabat...

  3. Efficient exact-exchange time-dependent density-functional theory methods and their relation to time-dependent Hartree-Fock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselmann, Andreas; Görling, Andreas

    2011-01-21

    A recently introduced time-dependent exact-exchange (TDEXX) method, i.e., a response method based on time-dependent density-functional theory that treats the frequency-dependent exchange kernel exactly, is reformulated. In the reformulated version of the TDEXX method electronic excitation energies can be calculated by solving a linear generalized eigenvalue problem while in the original version of the TDEXX method a laborious frequency iteration is required in the calculation of each excitation energy. The lowest eigenvalues of the new TDEXX eigenvalue equation corresponding to the lowest excitation energies can be efficiently obtained by, e.g., a version of the Davidson algorithm appropriate for generalized eigenvalue problems. Alternatively, with the help of a series expansion of the new TDEXX eigenvalue equation, standard eigensolvers for large regular eigenvalue problems, e.g., the standard Davidson algorithm, can be used to efficiently calculate the lowest excitation energies. With the help of the series expansion as well, the relation between the TDEXX method and time-dependent Hartree-Fock is analyzed. Several ways to take into account correlation in addition to the exact treatment of exchange in the TDEXX method are discussed, e.g., a scaling of the Kohn-Sham eigenvalues, the inclusion of (semi)local approximate correlation potentials, or hybrids of the exact-exchange kernel with kernels within the adiabatic local density approximation. The lowest lying excitations of the molecules ethylene, acetaldehyde, and pyridine are considered as examples.

  4. Interpretation of monoclinic hafnia valence electron energy-loss spectra by time-dependent density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, L.; Guedj, C.; Bernier, N.; Blaise, P.; Olevano, V.; Sottile, F.

    2016-04-01

    We present the valence electron energy-loss spectrum and the dielectric function of monoclinic hafnia (m -HfO2) obtained from time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) predictions and compared to energy-filtered spectroscopic imaging measurements in a high-resolution transmission-electron microscope. Fermi's golden rule density-functional theory (DFT) calculations can capture the qualitative features of the energy-loss spectrum, but we find that TDDFT, which accounts for local-field effects, provides nearly quantitative agreement with experiment. Using the DFT density of states and TDDFT dielectric functions, we characterize the excitations that result in the m -HfO2 energy-loss spectrum. The sole plasmon occurs between 13 and 16 eV, although the peaks ˜28 and above 40 eV are also due to collective excitations. We furthermore elaborate on the first-principles techniques used, their accuracy, and remaining discrepancies among spectra. More specifically, we assess the influence of Hf semicore electrons (5 p and 4 f ) on the energy-loss spectrum, and find that the inclusion of transitions from the 4 f band damps the energy-loss intensity in the region above 13 eV. We study the impact of many-body effects in a DFT framework using the adiabatic local-density approximation (ALDA) exchange-correlation kernel, as well as from a many-body perspective using "scissors operators" matched to an ab initio G W calculation to account for self-energy corrections. These results demonstrate some cancellation of errors between self-energy and excitonic effects, even for excitations from the Hf 4 f shell. We also simulate the dispersion with increasing momentum transfer for plasmon and collective excitation peaks.

  5. All-solid-state asymmetric supercapacitors based on Fe-doped mesoporous Co3O4 and three-dimensional reduced graphene oxide electrodes with high energy and power densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Wei, Jun; Chen, Leiyi; Tang, Shaolong; Deng, Mingsen; Du, Youwei

    2017-10-19

    An asymmetric supercapacitor offers opportunities to effectively utilize the full potential of the different potential windows of the two electrodes for a higher operating voltage, resulting in an enhanced specific capacitance and significantly improved energy without sacrificing the power delivery and cycle life. To achieve high energy and power densities, we have synthesized an all-solid-state asymmetric supercapacitor with a wider voltage range using Fe-doped Co 3 O 4 and three-dimensional reduced graphene oxide (3DrGO) as the positive and negative electrodes, respectively. In contrast to undoped Co 3 O 4 , the increased density of states and modified charge spatial separation endow the Fe-doped Co 3 O 4 electrode with greatly improved electrochemical capacitive performance, including high specific capacitance (1997 F g -1 and 1757 F g -1 at current densities of 1 and 20 A g -1 , respectively), excellent rate capability, and superior cycling stability. Remarkably, the optimized all-solid-state asymmetric supercapacitor can be cycled reversibly in a wide range of 0-1.8 V, thus delivering a high energy density (270.3 W h kg -1 ), high power density (9.0 kW kg -1 at 224.2 W h kg -1 ), and excellent cycling stability (91.8% capacitance retention after 10 000 charge-discharge cycles at a constant current density of 10 A g -1 ). The superior capacitive performance suggests that such an all-solid-state asymmetric supercapacitor shows great potential for developing energy storage systems with high levels of energy and power delivery.

  6. Thermal Cracking of Low Density Polyethylene (LDPE) Waste into ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Waste low density polyethylene film (table water sachets) was converted into solid, liquid oil and gaseous products by thermal process in a self- designed stainless steel laboratory reactor. The waste polymer was completely pyrolized within the temperature range of 474 – 520°C and 2hours reaction time. The solid residue ...

  7. Variations with time and age in the relative risks of solid cancer incidence after radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, M.P.; Muirhead, C.R.; de Vathaire, F.; Charles, M.W.

    1997-01-01

    The Japanese atomic bomb survivor cancer incidence dataset and data on five groups exposed to radiation for medical reasons in childhood are analysed and evidence found for a reduction in the radiation-induced relative risk of cancers other than leukaemia with increasing time since exposure and age at exposure. The rate of the reductions in relative risk with time since exposure are not significantly different for those exposed in childhood and for those exposed in adulthood, if adjustment is made for the effects on the relative risk of age at exposure. For those irradiated in childhood, there is a statistically significant annual reduction of 5.8% (95% Cl 2.8, 8.9) in excess relative risk, and there are no strong indications of inter-cohort heterogeniety in the speed of reduction of relative risk. After adjustment for the effects of age at exposure, there is a significant annual reduction of 3.6% (95% Cl 1.6, 5.6) in excess relative risk in all age-at-exposure groups. There are significant reductions of 5.2% (95% Cl 3.7, 6.8) in excess relative risk per year of age at exposure. There are statistically significant (P = 0.04) interactions between the exponential adjustments to the excess relative risk for age at exposure and time since exposure in the Japanese data, but no indications (P = 0.38) of such interactions when powers of time since exposure and attained age are used to adjust the excess relative risk, so that the fit of the model with power adjustments is to be preferred to that of the model with exponential adjustments. (author)

  8. Support for the existence of invertible maps between electronic densities and non-analytic 1-body external potentials in non-relativistic time-dependent quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquera, Martín A.

    2017-10-01

    Provided the initial state, the Runge-Gross theorem establishes that the time-dependent (TD) external potential of a system of non-relativistic electrons determines uniquely their TD electronic density, and vice versa (up to a constant in the potential). This theorem requires the TD external potential and density to be Taylor-expandable around the initial time of the propagation. This paper presents an extension without this restriction. Given the initial state of the system and evolution of the density due to some TD scalar potential, we show that a perturbative (not necessarily weak) TD potential that induces a non-zero divergence of the external force-density, inside a small spatial subset and immediately after the initial propagation time, will cause a change in the density within that subset, implying that the TD potential uniquely determines the TD density. In this proof, we assume unitary evolution of wavefunctions and first-order differentiability (which does not imply analyticity) in time of the internal and external force-densities, electronic density, current density, and their spatial derivatives over the small spatial subset and short time interval.

  9. Spin-adapted open-shell time-dependent density functional theory. II. Theory and pilot application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhendong; Liu, Wenjian; Zhang, Yong; Suo, Bingbing

    2011-04-07

    The excited states of open-shell systems calculated by unrestricted Kohn-Sham-based time-dependent density functional theory (U-TD-DFT) are often heavily spin-contaminated and hence meaningless. This is solved ultimately by the recently proposed spin-adapted time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) (S-TD-DFT) [J. Chem. Phys. 133, 064106 (2010)]. Unlike the standard restricted open-shell Kohn-Sham-based TD-DFT (R-TD-DFT) which can only access the singlet-coupled single excitations, the S-TD-DFT can capture both the singlet- and triplet-coupled single excitations with the same computational effort as the U-TD-DFT. The performances of the three approaches (U-TD-DFT, R-TD-DFT, and S-TD-DFT) are compared for both the spin-conserving and spin-flip excitations of prototypical open-shell systems, the nitrogen (N(2)(+)) and naphthalene (C(10)H(8)(+)) cations. The results show that the S-TD-DFT gives rise to balanced descriptions of excited states of open-shell systems.

  10. Time-dependent density functional theory for the charging kinetics of electric double layer containing room-temperature ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Cheng; Zhao, Shuangliang; Liu, Honglai; Wu, Jianzhong

    2016-11-28

    Understanding the charging kinetics of electric double layers is of fundamental importance for the design and development of novel electrochemical devices such as supercapacitors and field-effect transistors. In this work, we study the dynamic behavior of room-temperature ionic liquids using a classical time-dependent density functional theory that accounts for the molecular excluded volume effects, the electrostatic correlations, and the dispersion forces. While the conventional models predict a monotonic increase of the surface charge with time upon application of an electrode voltage, our results show that dispersion between ions results in a non-monotonic increase of the surface charge with the duration of charging. Furthermore, we investigate the effects of van der Waals attraction between electrode/ionic-liquid interactions on the charging processes.

  11. Effect of solids retention time and wastewater characteristics on biological phosphorus removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henze, Mogens; Aspegren, H.; Jansen, J.l.C.

    2002-01-01

    with time which has importance in relation to modelling. The overall conclusion of the comparison between the two plants is that the biological phosphorus removal efficiency under practical operating conditions is affected by the SRT in the plant and the wastewater composition. Thus great care should......The paper deals with the effect of wastewater, plant design and operation in relation to biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal and the possibilities to model the processes. Two Bio-P pilot plants were operated for 2.5 years in parallel receiving identical wastewater. The plants had SRT of 4...... and 21 days, the latter had nitrification and denitrification. The plant with 4 days SRT had much more variable biomass characteristics, than the one with the high SRT. The internal storage compounds, PHA, were affected significantly by the concentration of fatty acids or other easily degradable organics...

  12. Empirical Storm-Time Correction to the International Reference Ionosphere Model E-Region Electron and Ion Density Parameterizations Using Observations from TIMED/SABER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Christoper J.; Winick, Jeremy R.; Russell, James M., III; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Evans, David S.; Bilitza, Dieter; Xu, Xiaojing

    2007-01-01

    The response of the ionospheric E-region to solar-geomagnetic storms can be characterized using observations of infrared 4.3 micrometers emission. In particular, we utilize nighttime TIMED/SABER measurements of broadband 4.3 micrometers limb emission and derive a new data product, the NO+(v) volume emission rate, which is our primary observation-based quantity for developing an empirical storm-time correction the IRI E-region electron density. In this paper we describe our E-region proxy and outline our strategy for developing the empirical storm model. In our initial studies, we analyzed a six day storm period during the Halloween 2003 event. The results of this analysis are promising and suggest that the ap-index is a viable candidate to use as a magnetic driver for our model.

  13. Influence of solids retention time on membrane fouling: characterization of extracellular polymeric substances and soluble microbial products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Liang; Tian, Zhiyong; Song, Yonghui; Jiang, Wei; Tian, Yuan; Li, Shan

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of solids retention time (SRT) on membrane fouling and the characteristics of biomacromolecules. Four identical laboratory-scale membrane bioreactors (MBRs) were operated with SRTs for 10, 20, 40 and 80 days. The results indicated that membrane fouling occurred faster and more readily under short SRTs. Fouling resistance was the primary source of filtration resistance. The modified fouling index (MFI) results suggested that the more ready fouling at short SRTs could be attributed to higher concentrations of soluble microbial products (SMP). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra indicated that the SRT had a weak influence on the functional groups of the total extracellular polymeric substances (TEPS) and SMP. However, the MBR under a short SRT had more low-molecular-weight (MW) compounds (100 kDa). Aromatic protein and tryptophan protein-like substances were the dominant groups in the TEPS and SMP, respectively.

  14. Diversity and dynamics of dominant and rare bacterial taxa in replicate sequencing batch reactors operated under different solids retention time

    KAUST Repository

    Bagchi, Samik

    2014-10-19

    In this study, 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing was applied in order to provide a better insight on the diversity and dynamics of total, dominant, and rare bacterial taxa in replicate lab-scale sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) operated at different solids retention time (SRT). Rank-abundance curves showed few dominant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and a long tail of rare OTUs in all reactors. Results revealed that there was no detectable effect of SRT (2 vs. 10 days) on Shannon diversity index and OTU richness of both dominant and rare taxa. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling analysis showed that the total, dominant, and rare bacterial taxa were highly dynamic during the entire period of stable reactor performance. Also, the rare taxa were more dynamic than the dominant taxa despite expected low invasion rates because of the use of sterile synthetic media.

  15. The influence of solid retention time on IFAS-MBR systems: Assessment of nitrous oxide emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannina, Giorgio; Capodici, Marco; Cosenza, Alida; Laudicina, Vito Armando; Di Trapani, Daniele

    2017-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the nitrous oxide (N 2 O) emissions from a moving bed based Integrated Fixed Film Activated Sludge (IFAS) - membrane bioreactor (MBR) pilot plant, designed according to the University of Cape Town (UCT) layout. The experimental campaign had a duration of 110 days and was characterized by three different sludge retention time (SRT) values (∞, 30 d and 15 d). Results highlighted that N 2 O concentrations decreased when the biofilm concentrations increased within the aerobic reactor. Results have shown an increase of N 2 O with the decrease of SRT. Specifically, an increase of N 2 O-N emission factor occurred with the decrease of the SRT (0.13%, 0.21% and 0.76% of influent nitrogen for SRT = ∞, SRT = 30 d and SRT = 15 d, respectively). Moreover, the MBR tank resulted the key emission source (up to 70% of the total N 2 O emission during SRT = ∞ period) whereas the highest N 2 O production occurred in the anoxic reactor. Moreover, N 2 O concentrations measured in the permeate flow were not negligible, thus highlighting its potential detrimental contribution for the receiving water body. The role of each plant reactor as N 2 O-N producer/consumer varies with the SRT variation, indeed the aerobic reactor was a N 2 O consumer at SRT = ∞ and a producer at SRT = 30 d. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Hyperthermic survival of Chinese hamster ovary cells as a function of cellular population density at the time of plating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highfield, D.P.; Holahan, E.V.; Holahan, P.K.; Dewey, W.C.

    1984-01-01

    The survival of synchronous G 1 or asynchronous Chinese hamster ovary cells in vitro to heat treatment may depend on the cellular population density at the time of heating and/or as the cells are cultured after heating. The addition of lethally irradiated feeder cells may increase survival at 10 -3 by as much as 10- to 100-fold for a variety of conditions when cells are heated either in suspension culture or as monolayers with or without trypsinization. The protective effect associated with feeder cells appears to be associated with close cell-to-cell proximity. However, when cells are heated without trypsinization about 24 hr or later after plating, when adaptation to monolayer has occurred, the protective effect is reduced; i.e., addition of feeder cells enhances survival much less, for example, about 2- to 3-fold at 10 -2 -10 -3 survival. Also, the survival of a cell to heat is independent of whether the neighboring cell in a microcolony is destined to live or die. Finally, if protective effects associated with cell density do occur and are not controlled, serious artifacts can result as the interaction of heat and radiation is studied; for example, survival curves can be moved upward, and thus changed in shape as the number of cells plated is increased with an increase in the hyperthermic treatment or radiation dose following hyperthermia. Therefore, to understand mechanisms and to obtain information relevant to populations of cells in close proximity, such as those in vivo, these cellular population density effects should be considered and understood

  17. Sobre a amizade em tempos de solidão About friendship in times of solitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia Godinho Nery Gomes

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available O presente artigo analisa alguns resultados de uma pesquisa de mestrado que investigou as semânticas da amizade e analisou a qualidade política da amizade. O artigo tem como objetivo descrever e discutir as implicações da decomposição dos laços públicos e o conseqüente aniquilamento do exercício político. No líquido cenário da atualidade, os processos de individualização e da fragilidade dos laços configuram a decomposição do espaço público e o conseqüente rebaixamento da política. O mercado capitalista, ao transformar vínculos humanos e pessoas em mercadorias, tem promovido o esfacelamento da solidariedade humana e das habilidades de sociabilidade. Nesta pesquisa foram entrevistados trabalhadores de cooperativas populares sobre as suas histórias de amizade. Os resultados dessa pesquisa destacam que os laços de amizade podem compor relações de acolhimento e comprometimento com o outro, nas quais se vive o vigor da solidariedade. Não obstante, as narrativas dos sujeitos também revelaram a contemporânea fragilidade dos laços sociais, o isolamento social e o individualismo.This paper analyzes some results of a research that investigated the semantics on friendship and analyzed the political quality of the friendship. The objective of this article is to describe and to argue the implications of the decomposition of public bonds and the consequent destruction of political engagement. In the liquid scene of current times, individualization process and the weakening of social bonds configures the decomposition of public space and the consequent degradation of politics. The capitalist market when transforming human bonds and people into merchandise, has promoted the fragmentation of human solidarity and the abilities of sociability. In this research workers of a popular cooperative were interviewed on the histories of their friendships. The results of this research highlight that the bonds of friendship can form relations

  18. Spatiotemporal characteristics of elderly population's traffic accidents in Seoul using space-time cube and space-time kernel density estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Youngok; Cho, Nahye; Son, Serin

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze how the spatiotemporal characteristics of traffic accidents involving the elderly population in Seoul are changing by time period. We applied kernel density estimation and hotspot analyses to analyze the spatial characteristics of elderly people's traffic accidents, and the space-time cube, emerging hotspot, and space-time kernel density estimation analyses to analyze the spatiotemporal characteristics. In addition, we analyzed elderly people's traffic accidents by dividing cases into those in which the drivers were elderly people and those in which elderly people were victims of traffic accidents, and used the traffic accidents data in Seoul for 2013 for analysis. The main findings were as follows: (1) the hotspots for elderly people's traffic accidents differed according to whether they were drivers or victims. (2) The hourly analysis showed that the hotspots for elderly drivers' traffic accidents are in specific areas north of the Han River during the period from morning to afternoon, whereas the hotspots for elderly victims are distributed over a wide area from daytime to evening. (3) Monthly analysis showed that the hotspots are weak during winter and summer, whereas they are strong in the hiking and climbing areas in Seoul during spring and fall. Further, elderly victims' hotspots are more sporadic than elderly drivers' hotspots. (4) The analysis for the entire period of 2013 indicates that traffic accidents involving elderly people are increasing in specific areas on the north side of the Han River. We expect the results of this study to aid in reducing the number of traffic accidents involving elderly people in the future.

  19. Spatiotemporal characteristics of elderly population’s traffic accidents in Seoul using space-time cube and space-time kernel density estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Nahye; Son, Serin

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze how the spatiotemporal characteristics of traffic accidents involving the elderly population in Seoul are changing by time period. We applied kernel density estimation and hotspot analyses to analyze the spatial characteristics of elderly people’s traffic accidents, and the space-time cube, emerging hotspot, and space-time kernel density estimation analyses to analyze the spatiotemporal characteristics. In addition, we analyzed elderly people’s traffic accidents by dividing cases into those in which the drivers were elderly people and those in which elderly people were victims of traffic accidents, and used the traffic accidents data in Seoul for 2013 for analysis. The main findings were as follows: (1) the hotspots for elderly people’s traffic accidents differed according to whether they were drivers or victims. (2) The hourly analysis showed that the hotspots for elderly drivers’ traffic accidents are in specific areas north of the Han River during the period from morning to afternoon, whereas the hotspots for elderly victims are distributed over a wide area from daytime to evening. (3) Monthly analysis showed that the hotspots are weak during winter and summer, whereas they are strong in the hiking and climbing areas in Seoul during spring and fall. Further, elderly victims’ hotspots are more sporadic than elderly drivers’ hotspots. (4) The analysis for the entire period of 2013 indicates that traffic accidents involving elderly people are increasing in specific areas on the north side of the Han River. We expect the results of this study to aid in reducing the number of traffic accidents involving elderly people in the future. PMID:29768453

  20. Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory Analysis of Triphenylamine-Functionalized Graphene Doped with Transition Metals for Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Elder A V; Neto, Abel F G; Marques, Francisco C; Mota, Gunar V S; Martins, Marcelo G; Costa, Fabio L P; Borges, Rosivaldo S; Neto, Antonio M J C

    2018-07-01

    The electronic structures and optical properties of triphenylamine-functionalized graphene (G-TPA) doped with transition metals, using water as a solvent, were theoretically investigated to verify the efficiency of photocatalytic hydrogen production with the use of transition metals. This study was performed by Density Functional Theory and Time-dependent Density Functional Theory through Gaussian 09W software, adopting the B3LYP functional for all structures. The 6-31g(d) basis set was used for H, C and N atoms, and the LANL2DZ basis set for transition metals using the Effective Core Potentials method. Two approaches were adopted: (1) using single metallic dopants (Ni, Pd, Fe, Os and Pt) and (2) using combinations of Ni with the other dopants (NiPd, NiPt, NiFe and NiOs). The DOS spectra reveal an increase of accessible states in the valence shell, in addition to a gap decrease for all dopants. This doping also increases the absorption in the visible region of solar radiation where sunlight is most intense (400 nm to 700 nm), with additional absorption peaks. The results lead us to propose the G-TPA structures doped with Ni, Pd, Pt, NiPt or NiPd to be novel catalysts for the conversion of solar energy for photocatalytic hydrogen production, since they improve the absorption of solar energy in the range of interest for solar radiation; and act as reaction centers, reducing the required overpotential for hydrogen production from water.

  1. Optical sensor system for time-resolved quantification of methane densities in CH4-fueled spark ignition engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golibrzuch, Kai; Digulla, Finn-Erik; Bauke, Stephan; Wackerbarth, Hainer; Thiele, Olaf; Berg, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    We present the development and the first application of an optical sensor system that allows single-cycle determination of methane (CH 4 ) concentration inside internal combustion (IC) engines. We use non-dispersive infrared absorption spectroscopy to detect the CH 4 density with a time resolution up to 33 μs at acquisition rates of 30 kHz. The measurement scheme takes advantage of the strong temperature dependence of the absorption band applying two detection channels for CH 4 that detect different spectral regions of the ν 3 anti-symmetric C-H-stretch absorption. The strategy allows the simultaneous determination of fuel concentration as well as gas temperature. We show the proof-of-concept by validation of the measurement strategy in static pressure cell experiments as well as its application to a methane-fueled IC engine using a modified spark plug probe. Our results clearly demonstrate that it is crucial to determine the CH 4 temperature in the probe volume. Due to thermal influences of the sensor probe, the temperature needed to calculate the desired quantities (fuel density, fuel concentration) significantly differs from the gas phase temperature in the rest of the combustion chamber and estimations from standard thermodynamic models, e.g., polytropic compression, will fail.

  2. Phosphorescence lifetimes of organic light-emitting diodes from two-component time-dependent density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kühn, Michael [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Kaiserstraße 12, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Weigend, Florian, E-mail: florian.weigend@kit.edu [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Kaiserstraße 12, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Institut für Nanotechnologie, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2014-12-14

    “Spin-forbidden” transitions are calculated for an eight-membered set of iridium-containing candidate molecules for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) using two-component time-dependent density functional theory. Phosphorescence lifetimes (obtained from averaging over relevant excitations) are compared to experimental data. Assessment of parameters like non-distorted and distorted geometric structures, density functionals, relativistic Hamiltonians, and basis sets was done by a thorough study for Ir(ppy){sub 3} focussing not only on averaged phosphorescence lifetimes, but also on the agreement of the triplet substate structure with experimental data. The most favorable methods were applied to an eight-membered test set of OLED candidate molecules; Boltzmann-averaged phosphorescence lifetimes were investigated concerning the convergence with the number of excited states and the changes when including solvent effects. Finally, a simple model for sorting out molecules with long averaged phosphorescence lifetimes is developed by visual inspection of computationally easily achievable one-component frontier orbitals.

  3. Semi-continuous anaerobic digestion of solid poultry slaughterhouse waste: effect of hydraulic retention time and loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salminen, Esa A; Rintala, Jukka A

    2002-07-01

    We studied the effect of hydraulic retention time (HRT) and loading on anaerobic digestion of poultry slaughterhouse wastes, using semi-continuously fed, laboratory-scale digesters at 31 degrees C. The effect on process performance was highly significant: Anaerobic digestion appeared feasible with a loading of up to 0.8 kg volatile solids (VS)/m3 d and an HRT of 50-100 days. The specific methane yield was high, from 0.52 to 0.55 m3/kg VS(added). On the other hand, at a higher loading, in the range from 1.0 to 2.1 kg VS/m3 d, and a shorter HRT, in the range from 25 to 13 days, the process appeared inhibited and/or overloaded, as indicated by the accumulation of volatile fatty acids and long-chain fatty acids and the decline in the methane yield. However, the inhibition was reversible. The nitrogen in the feed, ca. 7.8% of total solids (TS), was organic nitrogen with little ammonia present, whereas in the digested material ammonia accounted for 52-67% (up to 3.8 g/l) of total nitrogen. The TS and VS removals amounted to 76% and 64%, respectively. Our results show that on a continuous basis under the studied conditions and with a loading of up to 0.8 kg VS/m3 d metric ton (wet weight) of the studied waste mixture could yield up to 140 m3 of methane.

  4. Excited states of ReO4-: A comprehensive time-dependent relativistic density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenhua; Ma, Jianyi; Peng, Daoling; Zou, Wenli; Liu, Wenjian; Staemmler, Volker

    2009-02-01

    The perrhenate anion, ReO4-, is taken as a showcase of heavy transition metal complexes, to examine the performance of time-dependent relativistic density functional linear response theory for electronic excitations, which is based on a newly proposed exact two-component Hamiltonian resulting from the symmetrized elimination of the small component. In total 30 scalar and 63 spinor excited states are investigated and the results are grossly in good agreement with those by the singles and doubles coupled-cluster linear response theory. It is found that only a few scalar states of 3T1 and 3T2 symmetries are split significantly by the spin-orbit coupling, whereas only those excited states involving the Rydberg-type virtual orbital are affected by the solvent effects. The nature of the optical absorption spectra is also highlighted.

  5. Excited states of ReO4-: A comprehensive time-dependent relativistic density functional theory study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Wenhua; Ma Jianyi; Peng Daoling; Zou Wenli; Liu Wenjian; Staemmler, Volker

    2009-01-01

    The perrhenate anion, ReO 4 - , is taken as a showcase of heavy transition metal complexes, to examine the performance of time-dependent relativistic density functional linear response theory for electronic excitations, which is based on a newly proposed exact two-component Hamiltonian resulting from the symmetrized elimination of the small component. In total 30 scalar and 63 spinor excited states are investigated and the results are grossly in good agreement with those by the singles and doubles coupled-cluster linear response theory. It is found that only a few scalar states of 3 T 1 and 3 T 2 symmetries are split significantly by the spin-orbit coupling, whereas only those excited states involving the Rydberg-type virtual orbital are affected by the solvent effects. The nature of the optical absorption spectra is also highlighted

  6. A real time 155 GHz millimeter wave interferometer module for electron density measurement in large plasma devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huettemann, P.W.; Waidmann, G.

    1982-09-01

    A homodyne, real time 155 GHz interferometer channel is described which is one module of a multichannel system for use on TEXTOR tokamak. A standing sine wave is generated in a phase bridge by transmitting a frequency modulated millimeter wave down two unequal interferometer branches. The presence of plasma produces a phase slip of the sine wave with respect to a reference signal. The phase shift is linear proportional to plasma density for expected TEXTOR plasmas. Long plasma paths give multiradian phase shifts which are recorded by a digital fringe counting system. The accuracy of phase measurement is ΔPHI = 2π/16. Phase changes of 7π/8 are accepted per modulation period. The microwave in the measurement branch of the interferometer is transmitted using a quasioptical technique. Components and technical details are described. The interferometer was tested in a simulation set-up and in two different plasma experiments. Experimental results are presented. (orig.)

  7. Communication: Orbital instabilities and triplet states from time-dependent density functional theory and long-range corrected functionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, John S.; Koerzdoerfer, Thomas; Zhang, Cai-Rong; Brédas, Jean-Luc

    2011-10-01

    Long-range corrected hybrids represent an increasingly popular class of functionals for density functional theory (DFT) that have proven to be very successful for a wide range of chemical applications. In this Communication, we examine the performance of these functionals for time-dependent (TD)DFT descriptions of triplet excited states. Our results reveal that the triplet energies are particularly sensitive to the range-separation parameter; this sensitivity can be traced back to triplet instabilities in the ground state coming from the large effective amounts of Hartree-Fock exchange included in these functionals. As such, the use of standard long-range corrected functionals for the description of triplet states at the TDDFT level is not recommended.

  8. Fast Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory Calculations of the X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Large Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besley, Nicholas A

    2016-10-11

    The computational cost of calculations of K-edge X-ray absorption spectra using time-dependent density functional (TDDFT) within the Tamm-Dancoff approximation is significantly reduced through the introduction of a severe integral screening procedure that includes only integrals that involve the core s basis function of the absorbing atom(s) coupled with a reduced quality numerical quadrature for integrals associated with the exchange and correlation functionals. The memory required for the calculations is reduced through construction of the TDDFT matrix within the absorbing core orbitals excitation space and exploiting further truncation of the virtual orbital space. The resulting method, denoted fTDDFTs, leads to much faster calculations and makes the study of large systems tractable. The capability of the method is demonstrated through calculations of the X-ray absorption spectra at the carbon K-edge of chlorophyll a, C 60 and C 70 .

  9. Application of an excited state LDA exchange energy functional for the calculation of transition energy of atoms within time-independent density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamim, Md; Harbola, Manoj K, E-mail: sami@iitk.ac.i, E-mail: mkh@iitk.ac.i [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208 016 (India)

    2010-11-14

    Transition energies of a new class of excited states (two-gap systems) of various atoms are calculated in time-independent density functional formalism by using a recently proposed local density approximation exchange energy functional for excited states. It is shown that the excitation energies calculated with this functional compare well with those calculated with exact exchange theories.

  10. Application of an excited state LDA exchange energy functional for the calculation of transition energy of atoms within time-independent density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamim, Md; Harbola, Manoj K

    2010-01-01

    Transition energies of a new class of excited states (two-gap systems) of various atoms are calculated in time-independent density functional formalism by using a recently proposed local density approximation exchange energy functional for excited states. It is shown that the excitation energies calculated with this functional compare well with those calculated with exact exchange theories.

  11. Real-time visualization of magnetic flux densities for transcranial magnetic stimulation on commodity and fully immersive VR systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalivarapu, Vijay K.; Serrate, Ciro; Hadimani, Ravi L.

    2017-05-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive procedure that uses time varying short pulses of magnetic fields to stimulate nerve cells in the brain. In this method, a magnetic field generator ("TMS coil") produces small electric fields in the region of the brain via electromagnetic induction. This technique can be used to excite or inhibit firing of neurons, which can then be used for treatment of various neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease, stroke, migraine, and depression. It is however challenging to focus the induced electric field from TMS coils to smaller regions of the brain. Since electric and magnetic fields are governed by laws of electromagnetism, it is possible to numerically simulate and visualize these fields to accurately determine the site of maximum stimulation and also to develop TMS coils that can focus the fields on the targeted regions. However, current software to compute and visualize these fields are not real-time and can work for only one position/orientation of TMS coil, severely limiting their usage. This paper describes the development of an application that computes magnetic flux densities (h-fields) and visualizes their distribution for different TMS coil position/orientations in real-time using GPU shaders. The application is developed for desktop, commodity VR (HTC Vive), and fully immersive VR CAVETM systems, for use by researchers, scientists, and medical professionals to quickly and effectively view the distribution of h-fields from MRI brain scans.

  12. Large-strain time-temperature equivalence in high density polyethylene for prediction of extreme deformation and damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gray G.T.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Time-temperature equivalence is a widely recognized property of many time-dependent material systems, where there is a clear predictive link relating the deformation response at a nominal temperature and a high strain-rate to an equivalent response at a depressed temperature and nominal strain-rate. It has been found that high-density polyethylene (HDPE obeys a linear empirical formulation relating test temperature and strain-rate. This observation was extended to continuous stress-strain curves, such that material response measured in a load frame at large strains and low strain-rates (at depressed temperatures could be translated into a temperature-dependent response at high strain-rates and validated against Taylor impact results. Time-temperature equivalence was used in conjuction with jump-rate compression tests to investigate isothermal response at high strain-rate while exluding adiabatic heating. The validated constitutive response was then applied to the analysis of Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion of HDPE, a tensile analog to Taylor impact developed at LANL. The Dyn-Ten-Ext test results and FEA found that HDPE deformed smoothly after exiting the die, and after substantial drawing appeared to undergo a pressure-dependent shear damage mechanism at intermediate velocities, while it fragmented at high velocities. Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion, properly coupled with a validated constitutive model, can successfully probe extreme tensile deformation and damage of polymers.

  13. Electronic and Optical Properties of Small Hydrogenated Silicon Quantum Dots Using Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Mus-’ab Anas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a systematic study of the absorption spectrum of various sizes of small hydrogenated silicon quantum dots of quasi-spherical symmetry using the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT. In this study, real-time and real-space implementation of TDDFT involving full propagation of the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equations were used. The experimental results for SiH4 and Si5H12 showed good agreement with other earlier calculations and experimental data. Then these calculations were extended to study larger hydrogenated silicon quantum dots with diameter up to 1.6 nm. It was found that, for small quantum dots, the absorption spectrum is atomic-like while, for relatively larger (1.6 nm structure, it shows bulk-like behavior with continuous plateau with noticeable peak. This paper also studied the absorption coefficient of silicon quantum dots as a function of their size. Precisely, the dependence of dot size on the absorption threshold is elucidated. It was found that the silicon quantum dots exhibit direct transition of electron from HOMO to LUMO states; hence this theoretical contribution can be very valuable in discerning the microscopic processes for the future realization of optoelectronic devices.

  14. Density fractionation of forest soils: methodological questions and interpretation of incubation results and turnover time in an ecosystem context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan E. Crow; Christopher W. Swanston; Kate Lajtha; J. Renee Brooks; Heath Keirstead

    2007-01-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is often separated by physical means to simplify a complex matrix into discrete fractions. A frequent approach to isolating two or more fractions is based on differing particle densities and uses a high density liquid such as sodium polytungstate (SPT). Soil density fractions are often interpreted as organic matter pools with different carbon...

  15. Time-Resolved Diffuse Optical Spectroscopy and Imaging Using Solid-State Detectors: Characteristics, Present Status, and Research Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alayed, Mrwan; Deen, M Jamal

    2017-09-14

    Diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) and diffuse optical imaging (DOI) are emerging non-invasive imaging modalities that have wide spread potential applications in many fields, particularly for structural and functional imaging in medicine. In this article, we review time-resolved diffuse optical imaging (TR-DOI) systems using solid-state detectors with a special focus on Single-Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPADs) and Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). These TR-DOI systems can be categorized into two types based on the operation mode of the detector (free-running or time-gated). For the TR-DOI prototypes, the physical concepts, main components, figures-of-merit of detectors, and evaluation parameters are described. The performance of TR-DOI prototypes is evaluated according to the parameters used in common protocols to test DOI systems particularly basic instrumental performance (BIP). In addition, the potential features of SPADs and SiPMs to improve TR-DOI systems and expand their applications in the foreseeable future are discussed. Lastly, research challenges and future developments for TR-DOI are discussed for each component in the prototype separately and also for the entire system.

  16. Long-time Luminescence Kinetics of Localized excitons and conduction Band Edges Smearing in ZnSe(1-c)Tec Solid Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klochikhin, O.; Ogloblin, S. G.; Permogorov, S.

    2000-01-01

    It is shown that the integrated luminescence intensity of localized excitons in solid solutions ZnSe(1 - c)Tec has a component slowly decaying with time. After the excitation above the mobility threshold, the long-time intensity decreases exponentially, with a fractional exponent changing from...

  17. Application of the Real-Time Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory to Excited-State Dynamics of Molecules and 2D Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki; Rubio, Angel

    2018-04-01

    We review our recent developments in the ab initio simulation of excited-state dynamics within the framework of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). Our targets range from molecules to 2D materials, although the methods are general and can be applied to any other finite and periodic systems. We discuss examples of excited-state dynamics obtained by real-time TDDFT coupled with molecular dynamics (MD) and the Ehrenfest approximation, including photoisomerization in molecules, photoenhancement of the weak interatomic attraction of noble gas atoms, photoenhancement of the weak interlayer interaction of 2D materials, pulse-laser-induced local bond breaking of adsorbed atoms on 2D sheets, modulation of UV light intensity by graphene nanoribbons at terahertz frequencies, and collision of high-speed ions with the 2D material to simulate the images taken by He ion microscopy. We illustrate how the real-time TDDFT approach is useful for predicting and understanding non-equilibrium dynamics in condensed matter. We also discuss recent developments that address the excited-state dynamics of systems out of equilibrium and future challenges in this fascinating field of research.

  18. Time-averaged probability density functions of soot nanoparticles along the centerline of a piloted turbulent diffusion flame using a scanning mobility particle sizer

    KAUST Repository

    Chowdhury, Snehaunshu; Boyette, Wesley; Roberts, William L.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the use of a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) as an effective tool to measure the probability density functions (PDFs) of soot nanoparticles in turbulent flames. Time-averaged soot PDFs necessary for validating

  19. Residence-Time Distributions in Laminar Flows and During the Passage of Granular Solids Through Rotary Kilns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beek, W. J.; De Ridder, H. J. [Technische Hogeschool, Delft (Netherlands); Houtman, J. P.W.; Kuiper, D. [Reactor Instituut, Delft (Netherlands)

    1967-06-15

    Data on residence-time distributions are important in the design of apparatus for the chemical industry. Radioactive tracers can be useful in many cases, e.g. where a pulse technique is desired. Two examples are given in which a pulse of radioactive tracer is used. The first example deals with the residence-time distribution of a laminar, Newtonian flow in an annulus. This problem arises especially in the extrusion and injection moulding of polymers and in the coating of wires with plastics. In these cases the fractions of polymer with long residence times may have other properties than the polymer that flows fastest, because the polymerization reaction or the degradation reactions go on during the process. Two difficulties are to be considered: (a) the tracer pulse (a radioactive Au-sol suspended in the liquid used) cannot be distributed over the cross-section in proportion to the local flow velocity, and (b) the outflowing liquid must be sampled discontinuously. Both effects have been studied and corrections are indicated. When these corrections are applied to the measured distribution curve, the result is in fair agreement with the calculated residence-time distribution. The second example considers the residence-time distribution in a granular solid (sand) passing through a rotary kiln. The response was measured at the outlet to a pulse at the inlet of radioactive material (sand impregnated with a solution of radioactive AuCl{sub 3}). When calculating the residence-time distribution from the experimental data, difficulties were encountered because the duration of the pulse was of the same order of magnitude as the average residence time. Considering this, it was found that the axial dispersion of the flow of sand could be described by an effective dispersion coefficient. This dispersion coefficient proved to be very low (order of magnitude 10{sup -5} m{sup 2}/s); hence, in practical situations, the flow of granular material through a rotary kiln may often be

  20. Relationships of storm-time changes in thermospheric mass density with solar wind/IMF parameters and ring current index of Sym-H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yunliang; Ma, S. Y.; Xiong, Chao; Luehr, Hermann

    The total air mass densities at about 500 km altitude are derived using super-STAR accelerom-eter measurements onboard GRACE satellites for 25 great magnetic storms with minimum Dst less than 100 nT during 2002 to 2006 years. Taking NRLMSISE-00 model-predicted densities without active ap index input as a reference baseline of quiet-time mass density, the storm-time changes in upper thermospheric mass densities are obtained by subtraction for all the storm events and sorted into different grids of latitude by local time sector. The relationships of the storm-time density changes with various interplanetary parameters and magnetospheric ring current index of Sym-H are statistically investigated. The parameters include Akasofu energy coupling function, the merging electric field Em, the magnitude of IMF component in the GSM y-z plane etc. as calculated from OMNI data at 1 AU. It is found that the storm-time changes in the upper thermospheric mass density have the best linear correlation with the Sym-H index in general, showing nearly zero time delay at low-latitudes and a little time ahead at high-latitudes for most cases. Unexpectedly, the magnitude of IMF component in the y-z plane, Byz, shows correlation with storm-time mass density changes better and closer than Akasofu function and even Em. And, the mass density changes lag behind Byz about 1-4 hours for most cases at low-latitudes. The correlations considered above are local time dependent, showing the lowest at dusk sectors. For the largest superstorm of November 2003, the changes in mass density are correlated very closely with Byz, Em, and Sym-H index, showing correlation coefficients averaged over all latitudes in noon sector as high as 0.93, 0.91 and 0.90 separately. The physical factors controlling the lag times between the mass density changes at mid-low-latitudes and the interplanetary parameter variations are also analyzed. The results in this study may pro-vide useful suggestions for establishing