WorldWideScience

Sample records for time-frequency oscillatory bursts

  1. Understanding the Generation of Network Bursts by Adaptive Oscillatory Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanguy Fardet

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Experimental and numerical studies have revealed that isolated populations of oscillatory neurons can spontaneously synchronize and generate periodic bursts involving the whole network. Such a behavior has notably been observed for cultured neurons in rodent's cortex or hippocampus. We show here that a sufficient condition for this network bursting is the presence of an excitatory population of oscillatory neurons which displays spike-driven adaptation. We provide an analytic model to analyze network bursts generated by coupled adaptive exponential integrate-and-fire neurons. We show that, for strong synaptic coupling, intrinsically tonic spiking neurons evolve to reach a synchronized intermittent bursting state. The presence of inhibitory neurons or plastic synapses can then modulate this dynamics in many ways but is not necessary for its appearance. Thanks to a simple self-consistent equation, our model gives an intuitive and semi-quantitative tool to understand the bursting behavior. Furthermore, it suggests that after-hyperpolarization currents are sufficient to explain bursting termination. Through a thorough mapping between the theoretical parameters and ion-channel properties, we discuss the biological mechanisms that could be involved and the relevance of the explored parameter-space. Such an insight enables us to propose experimentally-testable predictions regarding how blocking fast, medium or slow after-hyperpolarization channels would affect the firing rate and burst duration, as well as the interburst interval.

  2. EMG burst presence probability: a joint time-frequency representation of muscle activity and its application to onset detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Ying, Dongwen; Rymer, William Zev

    2015-04-13

    The purpose of this study was to quantify muscle activity in the time-frequency domain, therefore providing an alternative tool to measure muscle activity. This paper presents a novel method to measure muscle activity by utilizing EMG burst presence probability (EBPP) in the time-frequency domain. The EMG signal is grouped into several Mel-scale subbands, and the logarithmic power sequence is extracted from each subband. Each log-power sequence can be regarded as a dynamic process that transits between the states of EMG burst and non-burst. The hidden Markov model (HMM) was employed to elaborate this dynamic process since HMM is intrinsically advantageous in modeling the temporal correlation of EMG burst/non-burst presence. The EBPP was eventually yielded by HMM based on the criterion of maximum likelihood. Our approach achieved comparable performance with the Bonato method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. EGC: a time-frequency augmented template-based method for gravitational wave burst search in ground-based interferometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clapson, Andre-Claude; Barsuglia, Matteo; Bizouard, Marie-Anne; Brisson, Violette; Cavalier, Fabien; Davier, Michel; Hello, Patrice; Leroy, Nicolas; Varvella, Monica

    2008-01-01

    The detection of burst-type events in the output of ground gravitational wave detectors is particularly challenging. The potential variety of astrophysical waveforms, as proposed by simulations and analytic studies in general relativity and the discrimination of actual signals from instrumental noise both are critical issues. Robust methods that achieve reasonable detection performances over a wide range of signals are required. We present here a hybrid burst-detection pipeline related to time-frequency transforms while based on matched filtering to provide robustness against noise characteristics. Studies on simulated noise show that the algorithm has a detection efficiency similar to other methods over very different waveforms and particularly good timing even for low amplitude signals: no bias for most tested waveforms and an average accuracy of 1.1 ms (down to 0.1 ms in the best case). Time-frequency-type parameters, useful for event classification, are also derived for noise spectral densities unfavourable to standard time-frequency algorithms

  4. A power filter for the detection of burst events based on time-frequency spectrum estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidi, G M; Cuoco, E; Vicere, A

    2004-01-01

    We propose as a statistic for the detection of bursts in a gravitational wave interferometer the 'energy' of the events estimated with a time-dependent calculation of the spectrum. This statistic has an asymptotic Gaussian distribution with known statistical moments, which makes it possible to perform a uniformly most powerful test (McDonough R N and Whalen A D 1995 Detection of Signals in Noise (New York: Academic)) on the energy mean. We estimate the receiver operating characteristic (ROC, from the same book) of this statistic for different levels of the signal-to-noise ratio in the specific case of a simulated noise having the spectral density expected for Virgo, using test signals taken from a library of possible waveforms emitted during the collapse of the core of type II supernovae

  5. Activation of 5-HT2A receptors by TCB-2 induces recurrent oscillatory burst discharge in layer 5 pyramidal neurons of the mPFC in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spindle, Michael S; Thomas, Mark P

    2014-05-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is a region of neocortex that plays an integral role in several cognitive processes which are abnormal in schizophrenic patients. As with other cortical regions, large-bodied layer 5 pyramidal neurons serve as the principle subcortical output of microcircuits of the mPFC. The coexpression of both inhibitory serotonin 5-HT1A receptors on the axon initial segments, and excitatory 5-HT2A receptors throughout the somatodendritic compartments, by layer 5 pyramidal neurons allows serotonin to provide potent top-down regulation of input-output relationships within cortical microcircuits. Application of 5-HT2A agonists has previously been shown to enhance synaptic input to layer 5 pyramidal neurons, as well as increase the gain in neuronal firing rate in response to increasing depolarizing current steps. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings obtained from layer 5 pyramidal neurons of the mPFC of C57/bl6 mice, the aim of our present study was to investigate the modulation of long-term spike trains by the selective 5-HT2A agonist TCB-2. We found that in the presence of synaptic blockers, TCB-2 induced recurrent oscillatory bursting (ROB) after 15-20 sec of tonic spiking in 7 of the 14 cells. In those seven cells, ROB discharge was accurately predicted by the presence of a voltage sag in response to a hyperpolarizing current injection. This effect was reversed by 5-10 min of drug washout and ROB discharge was inhibited by both synaptic activity and coapplication of the 5-HT2A/2C antagonist ketanserin. While the full implications of this work are not yet understood, it may provide important insight into serotonergic modulation of cortical networks. © 2014 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  6. Oscillatory neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selverston, A I; Moulins, M

    1985-01-01

    Despite the fact that a large number of neuronal oscillators have been described, there are only a few good examples that illustrate how they operate at the cellular level. For most, there is some isolated information about different aspects of the oscillator network, but too little to explain the whole mechanism. Two quite remarkable features do seem to be emerging from ongoing studies, however. One is that there are very few generalizable features common to neural oscillators. Many utilize reciprocal inhibitory circuits and endogenous burst-generating currents to some extent. All that have been well worked out utilize a combination of both cellular and network properties, but little else in the way of common mechanism is noteworthy. Perhaps the most interesting aspect of recent work is the ability of a particular oscillator to produce a large repertoire of different outputs. This is separate and in addition to changes occurring via phasic sensory feedback. It is in fact a radical functional "rewiring" of the network in response to neuromodulators. The CPG circuits represent only the most basic form of a given pattern. Finally, concerning the role of sensory feedback in generating oscillatory patterns, the concept of the CPG as a group of neurons able to produce oscillatory patterns without any sensory feedback is, in our opinion, still valid. There is no doubt that some oscillators may be quite weak when isolated, but they can still produce bursts with firing sequences similar to those seen in vivo. The fact that sensory feedback can both control and enhance the oscillations has never been in doubt. Similarly, entrainment of the pattern by sensory feedback does not mean that the receptor is part of the generator, only that it has access to it (as do command and coordinating fibers). The real question remains: Can a group of cells produce an oscillatory pattern without phasic sensory input? We must answer this affirmatively even for the insect-flight motor CPG

  7. Recent developments in time-frequency analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Loughlin, Patrick

    1998-01-01

    Recent Developments in Time-Frequency Analysis brings together in one place important contributions and up-to-date research results in this fast moving area. Recent Developments in Time-Frequency Analysis serves as an excellent reference, providing insight into some of the most challenging research issues in the field.

  8. Audio Classification from Time-Frequency Texture

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Guoshen; Slotine, Jean-Jacques

    2008-01-01

    Time-frequency representations of audio signals often resemble texture images. This paper derives a simple audio classification algorithm based on treating sound spectrograms as texture images. The algorithm is inspired by an earlier visual classification scheme particularly efficient at classifying textures. While solely based on time-frequency texture features, the algorithm achieves surprisingly good performance in musical instrument classification experiments.

  9. Resonance-Based Time-Frequency Manifold for Feature Extraction of Ship-Radiated Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaquan Yan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel time-frequency signature using resonance-based sparse signal decomposition (RSSD, phase space reconstruction (PSR, time-frequency distribution (TFD and manifold learning is proposed for feature extraction of ship-radiated noise, which is called resonance-based time-frequency manifold (RTFM. This is suitable for analyzing signals with oscillatory, non-stationary and non-linear characteristics in a situation of serious noise pollution. Unlike the traditional methods which are sensitive to noise and just consider one side of oscillatory, non-stationary and non-linear characteristics, the proposed RTFM can provide the intact feature signature of all these characteristics in the form of a time-frequency signature by the following steps: first, RSSD is employed on the raw signal to extract the high-oscillatory component and abandon the low-oscillatory component. Second, PSR is performed on the high-oscillatory component to map the one-dimensional signal to the high-dimensional phase space. Third, TFD is employed to reveal non-stationary information in the phase space. Finally, manifold learning is applied to the TFDs to fetch the intrinsic non-linear manifold. A proportional addition of the top two RTFMs is adopted to produce the improved RTFM signature. All of the case studies are validated on real audio recordings of ship-radiated noise. Case studies of ship-radiated noise on different datasets and various degrees of noise pollution manifest the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method.

  10. The Linear Time Frequency Analysis Toolbox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Peter Lempel; Torrésani, Bruno; Balazs, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The Linear Time Frequency Analysis Toolbox is a Matlab/Octave toolbox for computational time-frequency analysis. It is intended both as an educational and computational tool. The toolbox provides the basic Gabor, Wilson and MDCT transform along with routines for constructing windows (lter...... prototypes) and routines for manipulating coe cients. It also provides a bunch of demo scripts devoted either to demonstrating the main functions of the toolbox, or to exemplify their use in specic signal processing applications. In this paper we describe the used algorithms, their mathematical background...

  11. Some aspects of time-frequency analysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    October 2005. Keywords. Gabor frames; time-frequency analysis; discrete Heisenburg group. 1. Background and statements of theorems ... into f at different times (as is of paramount importance, for example, in music). One way to produce a 'local' Fourier analysis of a function f is to use the windowed. Fourier transform ...

  12. Parametric time-frequency domain spatial audio

    CERN Document Server

    Delikaris-Manias, Symeon; Politis, Archontis

    2018-01-01

    This book provides readers with the principles and best practices in spatial audio signal processing. It describes how sound fields and their perceptual attributes are captured and analyzed within the time-frequency domain, how essential representation parameters are coded, and how such signals are efficiently reproduced for practical applications. The book is split into four parts starting with an overview of the fundamentals. It then goes on to explain the reproduction of spatial sound before offering an examination of signal-dependent spatial filtering. The book finishes with coverage of both current and future applications and the direction that spatial audio research is heading in. Parametric Time-frequency Domain Spatial Audio focuses on applications in entertainment audio, including music, home cinema, and gaming--covering the capturing and reproduction of spatial sound as well as its generation, transduction, representation, transmission, and perception. This book will teach readers the tools needed...

  13. Time-Frequency Analysis and Hermite Projection Method Applied to Swallowing Accelerometry Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ervin Sejdić

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fast Hermite projections have been often used in image-processing procedures such as image database retrieval, projection filtering, and texture analysis. In this paper, we propose an innovative approach for the analysis of one-dimensional biomedical signals that combines the Hermite projection method with time-frequency analysis. In particular, we propose a two-step approach to characterize vibrations of various origins in swallowing accelerometry signals. First, by using time-frequency analysis we obtain the energy distribution of signal frequency content in time. Second, by using fast Hermite projections we characterize whether the analyzed time-frequency regions are associated with swallowing or other phenomena (vocalization, noise, bursts, etc.. The numerical analysis of the proposed scheme clearly shows that by using a few Hermite functions, vibrations of various origins are distinguishable. These results will be the basis for further analysis of swallowing accelerometry to detect swallowing difficulties.

  14. Mode Identification of Guided Ultrasonic Wave using Time- Frequency Algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Byung Sik; Yang, Seung Han; Cho, Yong Sang; Kim, Yong Sik; Lee, Hee Jong

    2007-01-01

    The ultrasonic guided waves are waves whose propagation characteristics depend on structural thickness and shape such as those in plates, tubes, rods, and embedded layers. If the angle of incidence or the frequency of sound is adjusted properly, the reflected and refracted energy within the structure will constructively interfere, thereby launching the guided wave. Because these waves penetrate the entire thickness of the tube and propagate parallel to the surface, a large portion of the material can be examined from a single transducer location. The guided ultrasonic wave has various merits like above. But various kind of modes are propagating through the entire thickness, so we don't know the which mode is received. Most of applications are limited from mode selection and mode identification. So the mode identification is very important process for guided ultrasonic inspection application. In this study, various time-frequency analysis methodologies are developed and compared for mode identification tool of guided ultrasonic signal. For this study, a high power tone-burst ultrasonic system set up for the generation and receive of guided waves. And artificial notches were fabricated on the Aluminum plate for the experiment on the mode identification

  15. Strobes: An oscillatory combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corbel, J.M.L.; Lingen, J.N.J. van; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Gijzeman, O.L.J.; Meijerink, A.

    2012-01-01

    Strobe compositions belong to the class of solid combustions. They are mixtures of powdered ingredients. When ignited, the combustion front evolves in an oscillatory fashion, and flashes of light are produced by intermittence. They have fascinated many scientists since their discovery at the

  16. Strobes: An Oscillatory Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corbel, J.M.L.; van Lingen, J.N.J.; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Gijzeman, O.L.J.; Meijerink, A.

    2012-01-01

    Strobe compositions belong to the class of solid combustions. They are mixtures of powdered ingredients. When ignited, the combustion front evolves in an oscillatory fashion, and flashes of light are produced by intermittence. They have fascinated many scientists since their discovery at the

  17. Emergence of Oscillatory Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugesen, Jakob Lund; Mosekilde, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Besides their systems nature, as described in the preceding chapters, the single most characteristic feature of a living organism is the self-sustained activity it displays in the form of a wide variety of different oscillatory processes [25, 9, 22, 23]. The respiratory cycle and the beating of t...

  18. Role of synchronized oscillatory brain activity for human pain perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck, Michael; Lorenz, Jürgen; Engel, Andreas K

    2008-01-01

    The understanding of cortical pain processing in humans has significantly improved since the development of modern neuroimaging techniques. Non-invasive electrophysiological approaches such as electro- and magnetoencephalography have proven to be helpful tools for the real-time investigation of neuronal signals and synchronous communication between cortical areas. In particular, time-frequency decomposition of signals recorded with these techniques seems to be a promising approach because different pain-related oscillatory changes can be observed within different frequency bands, which are likely to be linked to specific sensory and motor functions. In this review we discuss the latest evidence on pain-induced time-frequency signals and propose that changes in oscillatory activity reflect an essential communication mechanism in the brain that is modulated during pain processing. The importance of synchronization processes for normal and pathological pain processing, such as chronic pain states, is discussed.

  19. Synchronization in oscillatory networks

    CERN Document Server

    Osipov, Grigory V; Zhou, Changsong

    2007-01-01

    The formation of collective behavior in large ensembles or networks of coupled oscillatory elements is one of the oldest and most fundamental aspects of dynamical systems theory. Potential and present applications span a vast spectrum of fields ranging from physics, chemistry, geoscience, through life- and neurosciences to engineering, the economic and the social sciences. This work systematically investigates a large number of oscillatory network configurations that are able to describe many real systems such as electric power grids, lasers or the heart muscle - to name but a few. This book is conceived as an introduction to the field for graduate students in physics and applied mathematics as well as being a compendium for researchers from any field of application interested in quantitative models.

  20. Aesthetic appreciation: event-related field and time-frequency analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munar, Enric; Nadal, Marcos; Castellanos, Nazareth P; Flexas, Albert; Maestú, Fernando; Mirasso, Claudio; Cela-Conde, Camilo J

    2011-01-01

    Improvements in neuroimaging methods have afforded significant advances in our knowledge of the cognitive and neural foundations of aesthetic appreciation. We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to register brain activity while participants decided about the beauty of visual stimuli. The data were analyzed with event-related field (ERF) and Time-Frequency (TF) procedures. ERFs revealed no significant differences between brain activity related with stimuli rated as "beautiful" and "not beautiful." TF analysis showed clear differences between both conditions 400 ms after stimulus onset. Oscillatory power was greater for stimuli rated as "beautiful" than those regarded as "not beautiful" in the four frequency bands (theta, alpha, beta, and gamma). These results are interpreted in the frame of synchronization studies.

  1. Using time-frequency and wavelet analysis to assess turbulence/rotor interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley, N.D.; Osgood, R.M.; Bialasiewicz, J.T.; Jakubowski, A.

    2000-01-05

    Large loading events on wind turbine rotor blades are often associated with transient bursts of coherent turbulent energy in the turbine inflow. These coherent turbulent structures are identified as peaks in the three-dimensional, instantaneous, turbulent shearing stress field. Such organized inflow structures and the accompanying rotor aeroelastic responses typically have time scales of only a few seconds and therefore do not lend themselves for analysis by conventional Fourier spectral techniques. Time-frequency analysis (and wavelet analysis in particular) offers the ability to more closely study the spectral decomposition of short period events such as the interaction of coherent turbulence with a moving rotor blade. In this paper, the authors discuss the initial progress in the application of time-frequency analysis techniques to the decomposition and interpretation of turbulence/rotor interaction. The authors discuss the results of applying both the continuous and discrete wavelet transforms for their application. Several examples are given of the techniques applied to both observed turbulence and turbine responses and those generated using numerical simulations. They found that the presence of coherent turbulent structures, as revealed by the inflow Reynolds stress field, is a major contributor to large load excursions. These bursts of coherent turbulent energy induce a broadband aeroelastic response in the turbine rotor as it passes through them.

  2. A Time-Frequency Auditory Model Using Wavelet Packets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerkvist, Finn

    1996-01-01

    A time-frequency auditory model is presented. The model uses the wavelet packet analysis as the preprocessor. The auditory filters are modelled by the rounded exponential filters, and the excitation is smoothed by a window function. By comparing time-frequency excitation patterns it is shown...... that the change in the time-frequency excitation pattern introduced when a test tone at masked threshold is added to the masker is approximately equal to 7 dB for all types of maskers. The classic detection ratio therefore overrates the detection efficiency of the auditory system....

  3. Time-frequency modulation of ERD and EEG coherence in robot-assisted hand performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formaggio, Emanuela; Storti, Silvia Francesca; Boscolo Galazzo, Ilaria; Gandolfi, Marialuisa; Geroin, Christian; Smania, Nicola; Fiaschi, Antonio; Manganotti, Paolo

    2015-03-01

    A better understanding of cortical modifications related to movement preparation and execution after robot-assisted training could aid in refining rehabilitation therapy protocols for stroke patients. Electroencephalography (EEG) modifications of cortical activity in healthy subjects were evaluated using time-frequency event-related EEG and task-related coherence (TRCoh). Twenty-one channel EEG was recorded in eight subjects during protocols of active, passive, and imagined movements. The subjects performed robot-assisted tasks using the Bi-Manu-Track robot-assisted arm trainer. We applied time-frequency event-related synchronization/desynchronization (ERS/ERD) and TRCoh approaches to investigate where movement-related decreases in power were localized and to study the functional relationships between areas. Our results showed ERD of sensorimotor (SM) area over the contralateral side before the movement and bilateral ERD during execution of the movement. ERD during passive movements was similar in topography to that observed during voluntary movements, but without pre-movement components. No significant difference in time course ERD was observed among the three types of movement over the two SM areas. The TRCoh topography was similar for active and imagined movement; before passive movement, the frontal regions were uncoupled from the SM regions and did not contribute to task performance. This study suggests new perspectives for the evaluation of brain oscillatory activity and the neurological assessment of motor performance by means of quantitative EEG to better understand the planning and execution of movement.

  4. Oscillatory Threshold Logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borresen, Jon; Lynch, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In the 1940s, the first generation of modern computers used vacuum tube oscillators as their principle components, however, with the development of the transistor, such oscillator based computers quickly became obsolete. As the demand for faster and lower power computers continues, transistors are themselves approaching their theoretical limit and emerging technologies must eventually supersede them. With the development of optical oscillators and Josephson junction technology, we are again presented with the possibility of using oscillators as the basic components of computers, and it is possible that the next generation of computers will be composed almost entirely of oscillatory devices. Here, we demonstrate how coupled threshold oscillators may be used to perform binary logic in a manner entirely consistent with modern computer architectures. We describe a variety of computational circuitry and demonstrate working oscillator models of both computation and memory. PMID:23173034

  5. High Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AC Bryan

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available High frequency oscillatory (HFO ventilation using low tidal volume and peak airway pressures is extremely efficient at eliminating carbon dioxide and raising pH in the newborn infant with acute respiratory failure. Improvement in oxygenation requires a strategy of sustained or repetitive inflations to 25 to 30 cm H2O in order to place the lung on the deflation limb of the pressure-volume curve. This strategy has also been shown to decrease the amount of secondary lung injury in animal models. Experience of the use of HFO ventilation as a rescue therapy as well as several published controlled trials have shown improved outcomes and a decrease in the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation when it has been used in newborns.

  6. Oscillatory flow chemical reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavnić Danijela S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Global market competition, increase in energy and other production costs, demands for high quality products and reduction of waste are forcing pharmaceutical, fine chemicals and biochemical industries, to search for radical solutions. One of the most effective ways to improve the overall production (cost reduction and better control of reactions is a transition from batch to continuous processes. However, the reactions of interests for the mentioned industry sectors are often slow, thus continuous tubular reactors would be impractically long for flow regimes which provide sufficient heat and mass transfer and narrow residence time distribution. The oscillatory flow reactors (OFR are newer type of tube reactors which can offer solution by providing continuous operation with approximately plug flow pattern, low shear stress rates and enhanced mass and heat transfer. These benefits are the result of very good mixing in OFR achieved by vortex generation. OFR consists of cylindrical tube containing equally spaced orifice baffles. Fluid oscillations are superimposed on a net (laminar flow. Eddies are generated when oscillating fluid collides with baffles and passes through orifices. Generation and propagation of vortices create uniform mixing in each reactor cavity (between baffles, providing an overall flow pattern which is close to plug flow. Oscillations can be created by direct action of a piston or a diaphragm on fluid (or alternatively on baffles. This article provides an overview of oscillatory flow reactor technology, its operating principles and basic design and scale - up characteristics. Further, the article reviews the key research findings in heat and mass transfer, shear stress, residence time distribution in OFR, presenting their advantages over the conventional reactors. Finally, relevant process intensification examples from pharmaceutical, polymer and biofuels industries are presented.

  7. Time-frequency analysis and harmonic Gaussian functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranaivoson, R.T.R; Raoelina Andriambololona; Hanitriarivo, R.

    2013-01-01

    A method for time-frequency analysis is given. The approach utilizes properties of Gaussian distribution, properties of Hermite polynomials and Fourier analysis. We begin by the definitions of a set of functions called Harmonic Gaussian Functions. Then these functions are used to define a set of transformations, noted Τ n , which associate to a function ψ, of the time variable t, a set of functions Ψ n which depend on time, frequency and frequency (or time) standard deviation. Some properties of the transformations Τ n and the functions Ψ n are given. It is proved in particular that the square of the modulus of each function Ψ n can be interpreted as a representation of the energy distribution of the signal, represented by the function ψ, in the time-frequency plane for a given value of the frequency (or time) standard deviation. It is also shown that the function ψ can be recovered from the functions Ψ n .

  8. Time-frequency analysis of short-lasting modulation of EEG induced by TMS during wake, sleep deprivation and sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo eManganotti

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of dynamic changes in spontaneous electroencephalogram (EEG rhythms in the awake state or sleep is highly variable. These rhythms can be externally modulated during transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS with a perturbation method to trigger oscillatory brain activity. EEG-TMS co-registration was performed during standard wake, during wake after sleep deprivation and in sleep in 6 healthy subjects. Dynamic changes in the regional neural oscillatory activity of the cortical areas were characterized using time-frequency analysis based on the wavelet method, and the modulation of induced oscillations were related to different vigilance states. A reciprocal synchronizing/desynchronizing effect on slow and fast oscillatory activity was observed in response to focal TMS after sleep deprivation and sleep. We observed a sleep-related slight desynchronization of alpha mainly over the frontal areas, and a widespread increase in theta synchronization. These findings could be interpreted as proof of the interference external brain stimulation can exert on the cortex, and how this could be modulated by the vigilance state. Potential clinical applications may include evaluation of hyperexcitable states such as epilepsy or disturbed states of consciousness such as minimal consciousness.

  9. Stochastic subspace system identification using multivariate time-frequency distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Ming; Huang, Shieh-Kung

    2017-04-01

    Structural health monitoring assesses structural integrity by processing the measured responses of structures. One particular group in the structural health monitoring research is to conduct the operational modal analysis and then to extract the dynamic characteristics of structures from vibrational responses. These characteristics include natural frequencies, damping ratios, and mode shapes. Deviations in these characteristics represent the changes in structural properties and also imply possible damage to structures. In this study, a new stochastic system identification is developed using multivariate time-frequency distributions. These time-frequency distributions are derived from the short-time Fourier transform and subsequently yield a time-frequency matrix by stacking them with respect to time. As the derivation in the data-driven stochastic subspace system identification, the future time-frequency matrix is projected onto the past time-frequency matrix. By exploiting the singular value decomposition, the system and measurement matrices of a stochastic state-space representation are derived. Consequently, the dynamic characteristics of a structure are obtained. As compared to the time-domain stochastic subspace system identification, the proposed method utilizes the past and future matrices with a lower dimension in projection. A spectral magnitude envelope can be applied to the time-frequency matrix to highlight the major frequency components as well as to eliminate the components with less influence. To validate the proposed method, a numerical example is developed. This method is also applied to experimental data in order to evaluate its effectiveness. As a result, performance of the proposed method is superior to the time-domain stochastic subspace system identification.

  10. Electrocardiogram Signal and Linear Time-Frequency Transforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, B. T.

    2014-12-01

    The diagnostic analysis of non-stationary multi component signals such as electrocardiogram (ECG) involves the use of time-frequency transforms. So, the application of time-frequency transforms to an ECG signal is an important problem of research. In this paper, initially, linear transforms like short time Fourier transform, continuous wavelet transforms, s-transform etc. are revisited. Then the application of these transforms to normal and abnormal ECG signals is illustrated. It has been observed that s-transform provides better time and frequency resolution compared to other linear transforms. The fractional Fourier transform provides rotation to the spectrogram representation.

  11. Encapsulation Efficiency, Oscillatory Rheometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Mohammad Hassani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoliposomes are one of the most important polar lipid-based nanocarriers which can be used for encapsulation of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic active compounds. In this research, nanoliposomes based on lecithin-polyethylene glycol-gamma oryzanol were prepared by using a modified thermal method. Only one melting peak in DSC curve of gamma oryzanol bearing liposomes was observed which could be attributed to co-crystallization of both compounds. The addition of gamma oryzanol, caused to reduce the melting point of 5% (w/v lecithin-based liposome from 207°C to 163.2°C. At high level of lecithin, increasing of liposome particle size (storage at 4°C for two months was more obvious and particle size increased from 61 and 113 to 283 and 384 nanometers, respectively. The encapsulation efficiency of gamma oryzanol increased from 60% to 84.3% with increasing lecithin content. The encapsulation stability of oryzanol in liposome was determined at different concentrations of lecithin 3, 5, 10, 20% (w/v and different storage times (1, 7, 30 and 60 days. In all concentrations, the encapsulation stability slightly decreased during 30 days storage. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM images showed relatively spherical to elliptic particles which indicated to low extent of particles coalescence. The oscillatory rheometry showed that the loss modulus of liposomes were higher than storage modulus and more liquid-like behavior than solid-like behavior. The samples storage at 25°C for one month, showed higher viscoelastic parameters than those having been stored at 4°C which were attributed to higher membrane fluidity at 25°C and their final coalescence.Nanoliposomes are one of the most important polar lipid based nanocarriers which can be used for encapsulation of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic active compounds. In this research, nanoliposomes based on lecithin-polyethylene glycol-gamma oryzanol were prepared by using modified thermal method. Only one

  12. Common oscillatory mechanisms across multiple memory systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headley, Drew B.; Paré, Denis

    2017-01-01

    The cortex, hippocampus, and striatum support dissociable forms of memory. While each of these regions contains specialized circuitry supporting their respective functions, all structure their activities across time with delta, theta, and gamma rhythms. We review how these oscillations are generated and how they coordinate distinct memory systems during encoding, consolidation, and retrieval. First, gamma oscillations occur in all regions and coordinate local spiking, compressing it into short population bursts. Second, gamma oscillations are modulated by delta and theta oscillations. Third, oscillatory dynamics in these memory systems can operate in either a "slow" or "fast" mode. The slow mode happens during slow-wave sleep and is characterized by large irregular activity in the hippocampus and delta oscillations in cortical and striatal circuits. The fast mode occurs during active waking and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and is characterized by theta oscillations in the hippocampus and its targets, along with gamma oscillations in the rest of cortex. In waking, the fast mode is associated with the efficacious encoding and retrieval of declarative and procedural memories. Theta and gamma oscillations have similar relationships with encoding and retrieval across multiple forms of memory and brain regions, despite regional differences in microcircuitry and information content. Differences in the oscillatory coordination of memory systems during sleep might explain why the consolidation of some forms of memory is sensitive to slow-wave sleep, while others depend on REM. In particular, theta oscillations appear to support the consolidation of certain types of procedural memories during REM, while delta oscillations during slow-wave sleep seem to promote declarative and procedural memories.

  13. Time-frequency representation based on time-varying ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    defined in a time-frequency space and represents the evolution of signal power as a function of both time and ... the physical meaning of the intrinsic mode function (IMF) resulting from the EMD sifting process and the ... In the case of the basis function approach, each of its time-varying coefficients is expressed as a weighted ...

  14. Time-frequency representation based on time-varying ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A parametric time-frequency representation is presented based on timevarying autoregressive model (TVAR), followed by applications to non-stationary vibration signal processing. The identification of time-varying model coefficients and the determination of model order, are addressed by means of neural networks and ...

  15. Time-frequency analysis of econometric time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corinaldi, Sharif; Cohen, Leon

    2007-06-01

    We review the basic concepts of time-frequency analysis which are methods that indicate not only that which frequencies in a time series but also when they existed. A number of examples are given to illustrate the possible use of these methods to econometric series. The methods are applied to the Beveridge Wheat Price Series.

  16. Hybrid time/frequency domain modeling of nonlinear components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiechowski, Wojciech Tomasz; Lykkegaard, Jan; Bak, Claus Leth

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a novel, three-phase hybrid time/frequency methodology for modelling of nonlinear components. The algorithm has been implemented in the DIgSILENT PowerFactory software using the DIgSILENT Programming Language (DPL), as a part of the work described in [1]. Modified HVDC benchmark...

  17. Time-Frequency Learning Machines for Nonstationarity Detection Using Surrogates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgnat, Pierre; Flandrin, Patrick; Richard, Cédric; Ferrari, André; Amoud, Hassan; Honeine, Paul

    2012-03-01

    Time-frequency representations provide a powerful tool for nonstationary signal analysis and classification, supporting a wide range of applications [12]. As opposed to conventional Fourier analysis, these techniques reveal the evolution in time of the spectral content of signals. In Ref. [7,38], time-frequency analysis is used to test stationarity of any signal. The proposed method consists of a comparison between global and local time-frequency features. The originality is to make use of a family of stationary surrogate signals for defining the null hypothesis of stationarity and, based upon this information, to derive statistical tests. An open question remains, however, about how to choose relevant time-frequency features. Over the last decade, a number of new pattern recognition methods based on reproducing kernels have been introduced. These learning machines have gained popularity due to their conceptual simplicity and their outstanding performance [30]. Initiated by Vapnik’s support vector machines (SVM) [35], they offer now a wide class of supervised and unsupervised learning algorithms. In Ref. [17-19], the authors have shown how the most effective and innovative learning machines can be tuned to operate in the time-frequency domain. This chapter follows this line of research by taking advantage of learning machines to test and quantify stationarity. Based on one-class SVM, our approach uses the entire time-frequency representation and does not require arbitrary feature extraction. Applied to a set of surrogates, it provides the domain boundary that includes most of these stationarized signals. This allows us to test the stationarity of the signal under investigation. This chapter is organized as follows. In Section 22.2, we introduce the surrogate data method to generate stationarized signals, namely, the null hypothesis of stationarity. The concept of time-frequency learning machines is presented in Section 22.3, and applied to one-class SVM in order

  18. Oscillatory integration windows in neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nitin; Singh, Swikriti Saran; Stopfer, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Oscillatory synchrony among neurons occurs in many species and brain areas, and has been proposed to help neural circuits process information. One hypothesis states that oscillatory input creates cyclic integration windows: specific times in each oscillatory cycle when postsynaptic neurons become especially responsive to inputs. With paired local field potential (LFP) and intracellular recordings and controlled stimulus manipulations we directly test this idea in the locust olfactory system. We find that inputs arriving in Kenyon cells (KCs) sum most effectively in a preferred window of the oscillation cycle. With a computational model, we show that the non-uniform structure of noise in the membrane potential helps mediate this process. Further experiments performed in vivo demonstrate that integration windows can form in the absence of inhibition and at a broad range of oscillation frequencies. Our results reveal how a fundamental coincidence-detection mechanism in a neural circuit functions to decode temporally organized spiking. PMID:27976720

  19. Topographic time-frequency decomposition of the EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, T; Marti-Lopez, F; Valdes-Sosa, P

    2001-08-01

    Frequency-transformed EEG resting data has been widely used to describe normal and abnormal brain functional states as function of the spectral power in different frequency bands. This has yielded a series of clinically relevant findings. However, by transforming the EEG into the frequency domain, the initially excellent time resolution of time-domain EEG is lost. The topographic time-frequency decomposition is a novel computerized EEG analysis method that combines previously available techniques from time-domain spatial EEG analysis and time-frequency decomposition of single-channel time series. It yields a new, physiologically and statistically plausible topographic time-frequency representation of human multichannel EEG. The original EEG is accounted by the coefficients of a large set of user defined EEG like time-series, which are optimized for maximal spatial smoothness and minimal norm. These coefficients are then reduced to a small number of model scalp field configurations, which vary in intensity as a function of time and frequency. The result is thus a small number of EEG field configurations, each with a corresponding time-frequency (Wigner) plot. The method has several advantages: It does not assume that the data is composed of orthogonal elements, it does not assume stationarity, it produces topographical maps and it allows to include user-defined, specific EEG elements, such as spike and wave patterns. After a formal introduction of the method, several examples are given, which include artificial data and multichannel EEG during different physiological and pathological conditions. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  20. Applications of time-frequency signature analysis to target identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunaurd, Guillermo C.; Strifors, Hans C.

    1999-03-01

    The overlapping subjects of target identification, inverse scattering and active classification have many applications that differ depending on specific sensors. Many useful techniques for these relevant subjects have been developed in the frequency and the time domains. A more recent approach views the target signatures in the combined or coupled time-frequency domain. For either ultra-wideband (UWB) projectors, or UWB processing these joint time- frequency techniques are particularly advantageous. Such analysis requires the use of some of the scores of non- linear distributions that have been proposed and studied over the years. Basic ones, such as the Wigner distribution and its many relatives, have been shown to belong to the well-studied `Cohen Class.' We will select half-a-dozen of these distributions to study applications that we have addressed and solved in several areas such as: (1) active sonar, (2) underwater mine classification using pulses from explosive sources, (3) identification of submerged shells having different fillers using dolphin bio-sonar `clicks,' and (4) broadband radar pulses to identify aircraft, other targets covered with dielectric absorbing layers, and also (land) mine-like objects buried underground, using a ground penetrating radar. These examples illustrate how the informative identifying features required for accurate target identification are extracted and displayed in this general time-frequency domain.

  1. Time/Frequency Analysis of Terrestrial Impack Crater Records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heon-Young Chang

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The terrestrial impact cratering record recently has been examined in the time domain by Chang & Moon (2005. It was found that the ˜ 26 Myr periodicity in the impact cratering rate exists over the last ˜ 250 Myrs. Such a periodicity can be found regardless of the lower limit of the diameter up to D ˜ 35 km. It immediately called pros and cons. The aim of this paper is two-fold: (1 to test if reported periodicities can be obtained with an independent method, (2 to see, as attempted earlier, if the phase is modulated. To achieve these goals we employ the time/frequency analysis and for the first time apply this method to the terrestrial impact cratering records. We have confirmed that without exceptions noticeable peaks appear around ˜ 25 Myr, corresponding to a frequency of ˜ 0.04 (Myr^{-1}. We also find periodicities in the data base including small impact craters, which are longer. Though the time/frequency analysis allows us to observe directly phase variations, we cannot find any indications of such changes. Instead, modes display slow variations of power in time. The time/frequency analysis shows a nonstationary behavior of the modes. The power can grow from just above the noise level and then decrease back to its initial level in a time of order of 10 Myrs.

  2. Plant shoots exhibit synchronized oscillatory motions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciszak, Marzena; Masi, Elisa; Baluška, František; Mancuso, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    In animals, the ability to move has evolved as an important means of protection from predators and for enhancing nutrient uptake. In the animal kingdom, an individual's movements may become coordinated with those of other individuals that belong to the same group, which leads, for example, to the beautiful collective patterns that are observed in flocks of birds and schools of fish or in animal migration. Land plants, however, are fixed to the ground, which limits their movement and, apparently, their interactions and collective behaviors. We show that emergent maize plants grown in a group exhibit synchronized oscillatory motions that may be in-phase or anti-phase. These oscillations occur in short bursts and appear when the leaves rupture from the coleoptile tip. The appearance of these oscillations indicates an abrupt increase in the plant growth rate, which may be associated with a sudden change in the energy uptake for photosynthesis. Our results suggest that plant shoots behave as a complex network of biological oscillators, interacting through biophysical links, e.g. chemical substances or electric signals.

  3. Time-frequency characterisation of paediatric heart sounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Terence Sze-Tat

    1998-08-01

    The operation of the heart can be monitored by the sounds it emits. Structural defects or malfunction of the heart valves will cause additional abnormal sounds such as murmurs and ejection clicks. This thesis aims to characterise the heart sounds of three groups of children who either have an Atrial Septal Defect (ASD), a Ventricular Septal Defect (VSD), or are normal. Two aspects of heart sounds have been specifically investigated; the time-frequency analysis of systolic murmurs and the identification of splitting patterns in the second heart sound. The analysis is based on 42 paediatric heart sound recordings. Murmurs are sounds generated by turbulent flow of blood in the heart. They can be found in patients with both pathological and non-pathological conditions. The acoustic quality of the murmurs generated in each heart condition are different. The first aspect of this work is to characterise the three types of murmurs in the time- frequency domain. Modern time-frequency methods including, the Wigner-Ville Distribution, Smoothed Pseudo Wigner-Ville Distribution, Choi-Williams Distribution and spectrogram have been applied to characterise the murmurs. It was found that the three classes of murmurs exhibited different signatures in their time-frequency representations. By performing Discriminant Analysis, it was shown that spectral features extracted from the time- frequency representations can be used to distinguish between the three classes. The second aspect of the research is to identify splitting patterns in the second heart sound, which consists of two acoustic components due to the closure of the aortic valve and pulmonary valve. The aortic valve usually closes before the pulmonary valve, introducing a time delay known as 'split'. The split normally varies in duration over the respiratory cycle. In certain pathologies such as the ASD, the split becomes fixed over the respiration cycle. A technique based on adaptive signal decomposition is developed to

  4. Body waves separation in the time-frequency domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, R. H.; Tary, J.; Van der Baan, M.

    2013-12-01

    Arrival times of body waves generated by small magnitude microseismic events are usually very close and their limited bandwidth can cause even partial overlap in the time and frequency domains. The separation of P and S waves is then a challenging task that if solved could bring more insights about nature and location of the generating source. Differences in arrival times and frequency content of P and S waves can be seen by using time-frequency decomposition. The traditional time-frequency representation based on the Fourier Transform is limited by its trade-off between time and frequency resolutions, while other alternatives like the Wavelet Transform are still limited by the Heisenberg box. A new derivation of the Continuous Wavelet Transform, called Synchrosqueezing, stretches these boundaries using a mixture of the reassignment method with instantaneous frequency, giving a better frequency representation with improved time localization. Furthermore, all the individual components of the signal are separated in the time domain. This means that we are able to isolate the waveforms of a complex microseismic trace. Each spectral component can then be matched with a body wave plus its associated coda. Proper parameters have to be selected prior to the computation, such as the central frequency and bandwidth of the mother wavelet. We thus include a signal characterization first to find the best matching mother wavelet. In this paper we use the Synchrosqueezing transform to perform the time frequency representation of short brittle events recorded during microseismic experiments. Decomposition results for these examples show that the Synchrosqueezing transform outperforms the Short-Time Fourier Transform. The different components of each body waves (first arrival, coda, frequency components) can then be identified in the time-frequency plane. For some microseismic events, a first P-wave arrival is followed by another arrival at lower frequency that could be a P

  5. Time-Frequency Dynamics of Biofuel-Fuel-Food System

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vácha, Lukáš; Janda, K.; Krištoufek, Ladislav; Zilberman, D.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 1 (2013), s. 233-241 ISSN 0140-9883 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP402/12/G097 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GAP402/11/0948 Program:GA Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : biofuels * correlations * wavelet coherence Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 2.580, year: 2013 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2013/E/vacha-time-frequency dynamics of biofuels-fuels-food system.pdf

  6. Environmental Sound Recognition Using Time-Frequency Intersection Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Guo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental sound recognition is an important function of robots and intelligent computer systems. In this research, we use a multistage perceptron neural network system for environmental sound recognition. The input data is a combination of time-variance pattern of instantaneous powers and frequency-variance pattern with instantaneous spectrum at the power peak, referred to as a time-frequency intersection pattern. Spectra of many environmental sounds change more slowly than those of speech or voice, so the intersectional time-frequency pattern will preserve the major features of environmental sounds but with drastically reduced data requirements. Two experiments were conducted using an original database and an open database created by the RWCP project. The recognition rate for 20 kinds of environmental sounds was 92%. The recognition rate of the new method was about 12% higher than methods using only an instantaneous spectrum. The results are also comparable with HMM-based methods, although those methods need to treat the time variance of an input vector series with more complicated computations.

  7. Fault detection of gearbox using time-frequency method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widodo, A.; Satrijo, Dj.; Prahasto, T.; Haryanto, I.

    2017-04-01

    This research deals with fault detection and diagnosis of gearbox by using vibration signature. In this work, fault detection and diagnosis are approached by employing time-frequency method, and then the results are compared with cepstrum analysis. Experimental work has been conducted for data acquisition of vibration signal thru self-designed gearbox test rig. This test-rig is able to demonstrate normal and faulty gearbox i.e., wears and tooth breakage. Three accelerometers were used for vibration signal acquisition from gearbox, and optical tachometer was used for shaft rotation speed measurement. The results show that frequency domain analysis using fast-fourier transform was less sensitive to wears and tooth breakage condition. However, the method of short-time fourier transform was able to monitor the faults in gearbox. Wavelet Transform (WT) method also showed good performance in gearbox fault detection using vibration signal after employing time synchronous averaging (TSA).

  8. Semi-classical Time-frequency Analysis and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, Elena; de Gosson, Maurice; Nicola, Fabio

    2017-12-01

    This work represents a first systematic attempt to create a common ground for semi-classical and time-frequency analysis. These two different areas combined together provide interesting outcomes in terms of Schrödinger type equations. Indeed, continuity results of both Schrödinger propagators and their asymptotic solutions are obtained on \\hbar -dependent Banach spaces, the semi-classical version of the well-known modulation spaces. Moreover, their operator norm is controlled by a constant independent of the Planck's constant \\hbar . The main tool in our investigation is the joint application of standard approximation techniques from semi-classical analysis and a generalized version of Gabor frames, dependent of the parameter \\hbar . Continuity properties of more general Fourier integral operators (FIOs) and their sparsity are also investigated.

  9. Time-Frequency Methods for Structural Health Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander L. Pyayt

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Detection of early warning signals for the imminent failure of large and complex engineered structures is a daunting challenge with many open research questions. In this paper we report on novel ways to perform Structural Health Monitoring (SHM of flood protection systems (levees, earthen dikes and concrete dams using sensor data. We present a robust data-driven anomaly detection method that combines time-frequency feature extraction, using wavelet analysis and phase shift, with one-sided classification techniques to identify the onset of failure anomalies in real-time sensor measurements. The methodology has been successfully tested at three operational levees. We detected a dam leakage in the retaining dam (Germany and “strange” behaviour of sensors installed in a Boston levee (UK and a Rhine levee (Germany.

  10. Automatic traveltime picking using local time-frequency maps

    KAUST Repository

    Saragiotis, Christos

    2011-01-01

    The arrival times of distinct and sufficiently concentrated signals can be computed using Fourier transforms. In real seis- mograms, however, signals are far from distinct. We use local time-frequency maps of the seismograms and its frequency derivatives to obtain frequency-dependent (instantaneous) traveltimes. A smooth division is utilized to control the resolution of the instantaneous traveltimes to allow for a trade-off between resolution and stability. We average these traveltimes over the frequency band which is data-dependent. The resulting traveltime attribute is used to isolate different signals in seismic traces. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this automatic method for picking arrivals by applying it on synthetic and real data. © 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  11. DBS artifact suppression using a time-frequency domain filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillán-Guzmán, Alina; Heute, Ulrich; Muthuraman, Muthuraman; Stephani, Ulrich; Galka, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) is a useful tool for brain research. However, during Deep-Brain Stimulation (DBS), there are large artifacts that obscure the physiological EEG signals. In this paper, we aim at suppressing the DBS artifacts by means of a time-frequency-domain filter. As a pre-processing step, Empirical-Mode Decomposition (EMD) is applied to detrend the raw data. The detrended signals are then filtered iteratively until, by visual inspection, the quality is good enough for interpretation. The proposed algorithm is demonstrated by an application to a clinical DBS-EEG data set in resting state and in finger-tapping condition. Moreover, a comparison with a Low-Pass filter (LPF) is provided, by visual inspection and by a quantitative measure.

  12. [EMD Time-Frequency Analysis of Raman Spectrum and NIR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiao-yu; Fang, Yi-ming; Tan, Feng; Tong, Liang; Zhai, Zhe

    2016-02-01

    This paper analyzes the Raman spectrum and Near Infrared Spectrum (NIR) with time-frequency method. The empirical mode decomposition spectrum becomes intrinsic mode functions, which the proportion calculation reveals the Raman spectral energy is uniform distributed in each component, while the NIR's low order intrinsic mode functions only undertakes fewer primary spectroscopic effective information. Both the real spectrum and numerical experiments show that the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) regard Raman spectrum as the amplitude-modulated signal, which possessed with high frequency adsorption property; and EMD regards NIR as the frequency-modulated signal, which could be preferably realized high frequency narrow-band demodulation during first-order intrinsic mode functions. The first-order intrinsic mode functions Hilbert transform reveals that during the period of empirical mode decomposes Raman spectrum, modal aliasing happened. Through further analysis of corn leaf's NIR in time-frequency domain, after EMD, the first and second orders components of low energy are cut off, and reconstruct spectral signal by using the remaining intrinsic mode functions, the root-mean-square error is 1.001 1, and the correlation coefficient is 0.981 3, both of these two indexes indicated higher accuracy in re-construction; the decomposition trend term indicates the absorbency is ascending along with the decreasing to wave length in the near-infrared light wave band; and the Hilbert transform of characteristic modal component displays, 657 cm⁻¹ is the specific frequency by the corn leaf stress spectrum, which could be regarded as characteristic frequency for identification.

  13. Decomposing ERP time-frequency energy using PCA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernat, Edward M; Williams, William J; Gehring, William J

    2005-06-01

    Time-frequency transforms (TFTs) offer rich representations of event-related potential (ERP) activity, and thus add complexity. Data reduction techniques for TFTs have been slow to develop beyond time analysis of detail functions from wavelet transforms. Cohen's class of TFTs based on the reduced interference distribution (RID) offer some benefits over wavelet TFTs, but do not offer the simplicity of detail functions from wavelet decomposition. The objective of the current approach is a data reduction method to extract succinct and meaningful events from both RID and wavelet TFTs. A general energy-based principal components analysis (PCA) approach to reducing TFTs is detailed. TFT surfaces are first restructured into vectors, recasting the data as a two-dimensional matrix amenable to PCA. PCA decomposition is performed on the two-dimensional matrix, and surfaces are then reconstructed. The PCA decomposition method is conducted with RID and Morlet wavelet TFTs, as well as with PCA for time and frequency domains separately. Three simulated datasets were decomposed. These included Gabor logons and chirped signals. All simulated events were appropriately extracted from the TFTs using both wavelet and RID TFTs. Varying levels of noise were then added to the simulated data, as well as a simulated condition difference. The PCA-TFT method, particularly when used with RID TFTs, appropriately extracted the components and detected condition differences for signals where time or frequency domain analysis alone failed. Response-locked ERP data from a reaction time experiment was also decomposed. Meaningful components representing distinct neurophysiological activity were extracted from the ERP TFT data, including the error-related negativity (ERN). Effective TFT data reduction was achieved. Activity that overlapped in time, frequency, and topography were effectively separated and extracted. Methodological issues involved in the application of PCA to TFTs are detailed, and

  14. Modal depth function estimation using time-frequency analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnel, J; Gervaise, C; Roux, P; Nicolas, B; Mars, J I

    2011-07-01

    Acoustic propagation in shallow water is characterized by a set of depth-dependent modes, the modal depth functions, which propagate in range according to their horizontal wavenumbers. For inversion purposes, modal depth function estimation in shallow water is an issue when the environment is not known. Classical methods that provide blind mode estimation rely on the singular value decomposition of the received field at different frequencies over a vertical array of transducers. These methods require that the vertical array spans the full water column. This is obviously a strong limitation for the application of such methods in an operational context. To overcome these shortcomings, this study proposes to replace the spatial diversity constraint by a frequency diversity condition, and thus considers the case of a field emanating from an impulsive source. Indeed, because of the discrete nature of the wavenumber spectrum and due to their dispersive behavior, the modes are separated in the time-frequency domain. This phenomenon enables the design of a modal filtering scheme for signals received on a single receiver. In the case of a vertical receiver array, the modal contributions can be isolated for each receiver even when using a partial water column spanning array. This method thus eliminates the receiving constraints of classical methods of modal depth function estimation, although it imposes the use of an impulsive source. The developed algorithm is benchmarked on numerical simulations and validated on laboratory experimental data recorded in an ultrasonic waveguide. Practical applications are also discussed. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  15. Sparse time-frequency decomposition based on dictionary adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Thomas Y; Shi, Zuoqiang

    2016-04-13

    In this paper, we propose a time-frequency analysis method to obtain instantaneous frequencies and the corresponding decomposition by solving an optimization problem. In this optimization problem, the basis that is used to decompose the signal is not known a priori. Instead, it is adapted to the signal and is determined as part of the optimization problem. In this sense, this optimization problem can be seen as a dictionary adaptation problem, in which the dictionary is adaptive to one signal rather than a training set in dictionary learning. This dictionary adaptation problem is solved by using the augmented Lagrangian multiplier (ALM) method iteratively. We further accelerate the ALM method in each iteration by using the fast wavelet transform. We apply our method to decompose several signals, including signals with poor scale separation, signals with outliers and polluted by noise and a real signal. The results show that this method can give accurate recovery of both the instantaneous frequencies and the intrinsic mode functions. © 2016 The Author(s).

  16. Wavelet-Based Speech Enhancement Using Time-Frequency Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun-Ching

    2003-12-01

    Wavelet denoising is commonly used for speech enhancement because of the simplicity of its implementation. However, the conventional methods generate the presence of musical residual noise while thresholding the background noise. The unvoiced components of speech are often eliminated from this method. In this paper, a novel algorithm of wavelet coefficient threshold (WCT) based on time-frequency adaptation is proposed. In addition, an unvoiced speech enhancement algorithm is also integrated into the system to improve the intelligibility of speech. The wavelet coefficient threshold (WCT) of each subband is first temporally adjusted according to the value of a posterior signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). To prevent the degradation of unvoiced sounds during noise, the algorithm utilizes a simple speech/noise detector (SND) and further divides speech signal into unvoiced and voiced sounds. Then, we apply appropriate wavelet thresholding according to voiced/unvoiced (V/U) decision. Based on the masking properties of human auditory system, a perceptual gain factor is adopted into wavelet thresholding for suppressing musical residual noise. Simulation results show that the proposed method is capable of reducing noise with little speech degradation and the overall performance is superior to several competitive methods.

  17. Time-frequency Representations Application in Psychological Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    REIZ Romulus

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A psychological test is a test that is designed to measure one aspect of human behavior. These tests are usually designed to evaluate a person’s ability to complete tasks that were individual's performance on certain tasks that have usually been requested in advance. Usually a test score is used to compare with other results to measure the individual’s performance regarding cognitive ability, aptitude, personality, etc. One such test is the so called “finger tapping” test, designed to measure the integrity of the neuromuscular system and examine motor control. There are several ways to perform such a test. The purpose of this paper isn’t to study the finger tapping test which is well documented in the literature, but to develop if possible a simple way of performing such a test. Using the method presented in the paper a nonstationary signal was obtained and it was analyzed using the Short-time Fourier time frequency representation to obtain the signals frequency and its variation in time. The results presented in the paper show that this method can be used to perform the test and the frequency and spatial amplitude of the obtained tapping signal can be determined easily.

  18. LPI Radar Waveform Recognition Based on Time-Frequency Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an automatic radar waveform recognition system in a high noise environment is proposed. Signal waveform recognition techniques are widely applied in the field of cognitive radio, spectrum management and radar applications, etc. We devise a system to classify the modulating signals widely used in low probability of intercept (LPI radar detection systems. The radar signals are divided into eight types of classifications, including linear frequency modulation (LFM, BPSK (Barker code modulation, Costas codes and polyphase codes (comprising Frank, P1, P2, P3 and P4. The classifier is Elman neural network (ENN, and it is a supervised classification based on features extracted from the system. Through the techniques of image filtering, image opening operation, skeleton extraction, principal component analysis (PCA, image binarization algorithm and Pseudo–Zernike moments, etc., the features are extracted from the Choi–Williams time-frequency distribution (CWD image of the received data. In order to reduce the redundant features and simplify calculation, the features selection algorithm based on mutual information between classes and features vectors are applied. The superiority of the proposed classification system is demonstrated by the simulations and analysis. Simulation results show that the overall ratio of successful recognition (RSR is 94.7% at signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of −2 dB.

  19. Time frequency analysis of olfactory induced EEG-power change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin Alexander Schriever

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate the usefulness of time-frequency analysis (TFA of olfactory-induced EEG change with a low-cost, portable olfactometer in the clinical investigation of smell function.A total of 78 volunteers participated. The study was composed of three parts where olfactory stimuli were presented using a custom-built olfactometer. Part I was designed to optimize the stimulus as well as the recording conditions. In part II EEG-power changes after olfactory/trigeminal stimulation were compared between healthy participants and patients with olfactory impairment. In Part III the test-retest reliability of the method was evaluated in healthy subjects.Part I indicated that the most effective paradigm for stimulus presentation was cued stimulus, with an interstimulus interval of 18-20s at a stimulus duration of 1000ms with each stimulus quality presented 60 times in blocks of 20 stimuli each. In Part II we found that central processing of olfactory stimuli analyzed by TFA differed significantly between healthy controls and patients even when controlling for age. It was possible to reliably distinguish patients with olfactory impairment from healthy individuals at a high degree of accuracy (healthy controls vs anosmic patients: sensitivity 75%; specificity 89%. In addition we could show a good test-retest reliability of TFA of chemosensory induced EEG-power changes in Part III.Central processing of olfactory stimuli analyzed by TFA reliably distinguishes patients with olfactory impairment from healthy individuals at a high degree of accuracy. Importantly this can be achieved with a simple olfactometer.

  20. The Drift Burst Hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Kim; Oomen, Roel; Renò, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The Drift Burst Hypothesis postulates the existence of short-lived locally explosive trends in the price paths of financial assets. The recent US equity and Treasury flash crashes can be viewed as two high profile manifestations of such dynamics, but we argue that drift bursts of varying magnitude are an expected and regular occurrence in financial markets that can arise through established mechanisms such as feedback trading. At a theoretical level, we show how to build drift bursts into the...

  1. Multisensory stimuli elicit altered oscillatory brain responses at gamma frequencies in patients with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Stone

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Deficits in auditory and visual unisensory responses are well documented in patients with schizophrenia; however, potential abnormalities elicited from multisensory audio-visual stimuli are less understood. Further, schizophrenia patients have shown abnormal patterns in task-related and task-independent oscillatory brain activity, particularly in the gamma frequency band. We examined oscillatory responses to basic unisensory and multisensory stimuli in schizophrenia patients (N = 46 and healthy controls (N = 57 using magnetoencephalography (MEG. Time-frequency decomposition was performed to determine regions of significant changes in gamma band power by group in response to unisensory and multisensory stimuli relative to baseline levels. Results showed significant behavioral differences between groups in response to unisensory and multisensory stimuli. In addition, time-frequency analysis revealed significant decreases and increases in gamma-band power in schizophrenia patients relative to healthy controls, which emerged both early and late over both sensory and frontal regions in response to unisensory and multisensory stimuli. Unisensory gamma-band power predicted multisensory gamma-band power differently by group. Furthermore, gamma-band power in these regions predicted performance in select measures of the Measurement and Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia (MATRICS test battery differently by group. These results reveal a unique pattern of task-related gamma-band power in schizophrenia patients relative to controls that may indicate reduced inhibition in combination with impaired oscillatory mechanisms in patients with schizophrenia.

  2. Time-frequency component analysis of somatosensory evoked potentials in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Guo; Yang, Jun-Lin; Chan, Shing-Chow; Luk, Keith Dip-Kei; Hu, Yong

    2009-02-09

    Somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) signal usually contains a set of detailed temporal components measured and identified in a time domain, giving meaningful information on physiological mechanisms of the nervous system. The purpose of this study is to measure and identify detailed time-frequency components in normal SEP using time-frequency analysis (TFA) methods and to obtain their distribution pattern in the time-frequency domain. This paper proposes to apply a high-resolution time-frequency analysis algorithm, the matching pursuit (MP), to extract detailed time-frequency components of SEP signals. The MP algorithm decomposes a SEP signal into a number of elementary time-frequency components and provides a time-frequency parameter description of the components. A clustering by estimation of the probability density function in parameter space is followed to identify stable SEP time-frequency components. Experimental results on cortical SEP signals of 28 mature rats show that a series of stable SEP time-frequency components can be identified using the MP decomposition algorithm. Based on the statistical properties of the component parameters, an approximated distribution of these components in time-frequency domain is suggested to describe the complex SEP response. This study shows that there is a set of stable and minute time-frequency components in SEP signals, which are revealed by the MP decomposition and clustering. These stable SEP components have specific localizations in the time-frequency domain.

  3. Time-frequency component analysis of somatosensory evoked potentials in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luk Keith

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Somatosensory evoked potential (SEP signal usually contains a set of detailed temporal components measured and identified in a time domain, giving meaningful information on physiological mechanisms of the nervous system. The purpose of this study is to measure and identify detailed time-frequency components in normal SEP using time-frequency analysis (TFA methods and to obtain their distribution pattern in the time-frequency domain. Methods This paper proposes to apply a high-resolution time-frequency analysis algorithm, the matching pursuit (MP, to extract detailed time-frequency components of SEP signals. The MP algorithm decomposes a SEP signal into a number of elementary time-frequency components and provides a time-frequency parameter description of the components. A clustering by estimation of the probability density function in parameter space is followed to identify stable SEP time-frequency components. Results Experimental results on cortical SEP signals of 28 mature rats show that a series of stable SEP time-frequency components can be identified using the MP decomposition algorithm. Based on the statistical properties of the component parameters, an approximated distribution of these components in time-frequency domain is suggested to describe the complex SEP response. Conclusion This study shows that there is a set of stable and minute time-frequency components in SEP signals, which are revealed by the MP decomposition and clustering. These stable SEP components have specific localizations in the time-frequency domain.

  4. Time-frequency methods and voluntary ramped-frequency breathing: a powerful combination for exploration of human neurophysiological mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankovski, Tomislav; Cooke, William H.; Rudas, László; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally altered the timing of respiratory motoneuron activity as a means to modulate and better understand otherwise hidden human central neural and hemodynamic oscillatory mechanisms. We recorded the electrocardiogram, finger photoplethysmographic arterial pressure, tidal carbon dioxide concentrations, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity in 13 healthy supine young men who gradually increased or decreased their breathing frequencies between 0.05 and 0.25 Hz over 9-min periods. We analyzed results with traditional time- and frequency-domain methods, and also with time-frequency methods (wavelet transform, wavelet phase coherence, and directional coupling). We determined statistical significance and identified frequency boundaries by comparing measurements with randomly generated surrogates. Our results support several major conclusions. First, respiration causally modulates both sympathetic (weakly) and vagal motoneuron (strongly) oscillations over a wide frequency range—one that extends well below the frequency of actual breaths. Second, breathing frequency broadly modulates vagal baroreflex gain, with peak gains registered in the low frequency range. Third, breathing frequency does not influence median levels of sympathetic or vagal activity over time. Fourth, phase relations between arterial pressure and sympathetic and vagal motoneurons are unaffected by breathing, and are therefore likely secondary to intrinsic responsiveness of these motoneurons to other synaptic inputs. Finally, breathing frequency does not affect phase coherence between diastolic pressure and muscle sympathetic oscillations, but it augments phase coherence between systolic pressure and R-R interval oscillations over a limited portion of the usual breathing frequency range. These results refine understanding of autonomic oscillatory processes and those physiological mechanisms known as the human respiratory gate. PMID:24114700

  5. Oscillatory Reinstatement Enhances Declarative Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, Amir-Homayoun; Glen, James C; Halkiopoulos, Sara; Schulz, Mei; Spiers, Hugo J

    2017-10-11

    Declarative memory recall is thought to involve the reinstatement of neural activity patterns that occurred previously during encoding. Consistent with this view, greater similarity between patterns of activity recorded during encoding and retrieval has been found to predict better memory performance in a number of studies. Recent models have argued that neural oscillations may be crucial to reinstatement for successful memory retrieval. However, to date, no causal evidence has been provided to support this theory, nor has the impact of oscillatory electrical brain stimulation during encoding and retrieval been assessed. To explore this we used transcranial alternating current stimulation over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of human participants [ n = 70, 45 females; age mean (SD) = 22.12 (2.16)] during a declarative memory task. Participants received either the same frequency during encoding and retrieval (60-60 or 90-90 Hz) or different frequencies (60-90 or 90-60 Hz). When frequencies matched there was a significant memory improvement (at both 60 and 90 Hz) relative to sham stimulation. No improvement occurred when frequencies mismatched. Our results provide support for the role of oscillatory reinstatement in memory retrieval. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Recent neurobiological models of memory have argued that large-scale neural oscillations are reinstated to support successful memory retrieval. Here we used transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) to test these models. tACS has recently been shown to induce neural oscillations at the frequency stimulated. We stimulated over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex during a declarative memory task involving learning a set of words. We found that tACS applied at the same frequency during encoding and retrieval enhances memory. We also find no difference between the two applied frequencies. Thus our results are consistent with the proposal that reinstatement of neural oscillations during retrieval

  6. Brain oscillatory signatures of motor tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Murguialday, Ander; Birbaumer, Niels

    2015-06-01

    Noninvasive brain-computer-interfaces (BCI) coupled with prosthetic devices were recently introduced in the rehabilitation of chronic stroke and other disorders of the motor system. These BCI systems and motor rehabilitation in general involve several motor tasks for training. This study investigates the neurophysiological bases of an EEG-oscillation-driven BCI combined with a neuroprosthetic device to define the specific oscillatory signature of the BCI task. Controlling movements of a hand robotic orthosis with motor imagery of the same movement generates sensorimotor rhythm oscillation changes and involves three elements of tasks also used in stroke motor rehabilitation: passive and active movement, motor imagery, and motor intention. We recorded EEG while nine healthy participants performed five different motor tasks consisting of closing and opening of the hand as follows: 1) motor imagery without any external feedback and without overt hand movement, 2) motor imagery that moves the orthosis proportional to the produced brain oscillation change with online proprioceptive and visual feedback of the hand moving through a neuroprosthetic device (BCI condition), 3) passive and 4) active movement of the hand with feedback (seeing and feeling the hand moving), and 5) rest. During the BCI condition, participants received contingent online feedback of the decrease of power of the sensorimotor rhythm, which induced orthosis movement and therefore proprioceptive and visual information from the moving hand. We analyzed brain activity during the five conditions using time-frequency domain bootstrap-based statistical comparisons and Morlet transforms. Activity during rest was used as a reference. Significant contralateral and ipsilateral event-related desynchronization of sensorimotor rhythm was present during all motor tasks, largest in contralateral-postcentral, medio-central, and ipsilateral-precentral areas identifying the ipsilateral precentral cortex as an integral

  7. Brain oscillatory signatures of motor tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birbaumer, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive brain-computer-interfaces (BCI) coupled with prosthetic devices were recently introduced in the rehabilitation of chronic stroke and other disorders of the motor system. These BCI systems and motor rehabilitation in general involve several motor tasks for training. This study investigates the neurophysiological bases of an EEG-oscillation-driven BCI combined with a neuroprosthetic device to define the specific oscillatory signature of the BCI task. Controlling movements of a hand robotic orthosis with motor imagery of the same movement generates sensorimotor rhythm oscillation changes and involves three elements of tasks also used in stroke motor rehabilitation: passive and active movement, motor imagery, and motor intention. We recorded EEG while nine healthy participants performed five different motor tasks consisting of closing and opening of the hand as follows: 1) motor imagery without any external feedback and without overt hand movement, 2) motor imagery that moves the orthosis proportional to the produced brain oscillation change with online proprioceptive and visual feedback of the hand moving through a neuroprosthetic device (BCI condition), 3) passive and 4) active movement of the hand with feedback (seeing and feeling the hand moving), and 5) rest. During the BCI condition, participants received contingent online feedback of the decrease of power of the sensorimotor rhythm, which induced orthosis movement and therefore proprioceptive and visual information from the moving hand. We analyzed brain activity during the five conditions using time-frequency domain bootstrap-based statistical comparisons and Morlet transforms. Activity during rest was used as a reference. Significant contralateral and ipsilateral event-related desynchronization of sensorimotor rhythm was present during all motor tasks, largest in contralateral-postcentral, medio-central, and ipsilateral-precentral areas identifying the ipsilateral precentral cortex as an integral

  8. Bursting in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky Reaction added with Phenol in a Batch Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadena, Ariel; Agreda, Jesus; Barragan, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The classic Belousov-Zhabotinski reaction was modified by adding phenol as a second organic substrate that kinetically competes with the malonic acid in the reduction of Ce 4+ to Ce 3+ and in the removal of molecular bromine of the reaction mixture. The oscillating reaction of two substrates exhibited burst firing and an oscillatory period of long duration. Analysis of experimental data shows an increasing of the bursting phenomenon, with a greater spiking in the burst firing and with a longer quiescent state, as a function of the initial phenol concentration increase. It was hypothesized that the bursting phenomenon can be explained introducing a redox cycle between the reduced phenolic species (hydroxyphenols) and the oxidized ones (quinones). The hypothesis was experimentally and numerically tested and from the results it is possible to conclude that the bursting phenomenon exhibited by the oscillating reaction of two substrates is mainly driven by a p-di-hydroxy-benzene/p-benzoquinone redox cycle (author)

  9. The Drift Burst Hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kim; Oomen, Roel; Renò, Roberto

    . We then develop a non-parametric test statistic that allows for the identification of drift bursts from noisy high-frequency data. We apply this methodology to a comprehensive set of tick data and show that drift bursts form an integral part of the price dynamics across equities, fixed income......, currencies and commodities. We find that the majority of identified drift bursts are accompanied by strong price reversals and these can therefore be regarded as “flash crashes” that span brief periods of severe market disruption without any material longer term price impacts....

  10. Novel oscillatory flow reactors for biotechnological applications

    OpenAIRE

    Reis, N.

    2006-01-01

    Tese de Doutoramento em Engenharia Química e Biológica This thesis explores the biotechnological applications of two novel scale-down oscillatory flow reactors (OFRs). A micro-bioreactor (working mostly in batch) and a continuous meso-reactor systems were developed based on a 4.4 mm internal diameter tube with smooth periodic constrictions (SPC), both operating under oscillatory flow mixing (OFM). The first part is dedicated to the flow characterisation in the novel SPC geom...

  11. Characterization of Oscillatory Lift in MFC Airfoils

    OpenAIRE

    Lang Jr, Joseph Reagle

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to characterize the response of an airfoil with an oscillatory morphing, Macro-fiber composite (MFC) trailing edge. Correlation of the airfoil lift with the oscillatory input is presented. Modal analysis of the test airfoil and apparatus is used to determine the frequency response function. The effects of static MFC inputs on the FRF are presented and compared to the unactuated airfoil. The transfer function is then used to determine the lift component du...

  12. Critical Bursts in Filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Filippo; Thielmann, Marcel; de Arcangelis, Lucilla; Herrmann, Hans Jürgen

    2018-01-01

    Particle detachment bursts during the flow of suspensions through porous media are a phenomenon that can severely affect the efficiency of deep bed filters. Despite the relevance in several industrial fields, little is known about the statistical properties and the temporal organization of these events. We present experiments of suspensions of deionized water carrying quartz particles pushed with a peristaltic pump through a filter of glass beads measuring simultaneously the pressure drop, flux, and suspension solid fraction. We find that the burst size distribution scales consistently with a power law, suggesting that we are in the presence of a novel experimental realization of a self-organized critical system. Temporal correlations are present in the time series, like in other phenomena such as earthquakes or neuronal activity bursts, and also an analog to Omori's law can be shown. The understanding of burst statistics could provide novel insights in different fields, e.g., in the filter and petroleum industries.

  13. GLAST's GBM Burst Trigger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, D.; Briggs, M.; Connaughton, V.; Kippen, M.; Preece, R.

    2003-01-01

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will detect and localize bursts for the GLAST mission, and provide the spectral and temporal context in the traditional 10 keV to 25 MeV band for the high energy observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT). The GBM will use traditional rate triggers in up to three energy bands, and on a variety of timescales between 16 ms and 16 s.

  14. Time-Frequency-Based Speech Regions Characterization and Eigenvalue Decomposition Applied to Speech Watermarking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orović Irena

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The eigenvalues decomposition based on the S-method is employed to extract the specific time-frequency characteristics of speech signals. This approach is used to create a flexible speech watermark, shaped according to the time-frequency characteristics of the host signal. Also, the Hermite projection method is applied for characterization of speech regions. Namely, time-frequency regions that contain voiced components are selected for watermarking. The watermark detection is performed in the time-frequency domain as well. The theory is tested on several examples.

  15. Radar Image Enhancement, Feature Extraction and Motion Compensation Using Joint Time-Frequency Techniques

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ling, Hao

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes the scientific progress on the research grant "Radar image Enhancement, Feature Extraction, and Motion Compensation Using Joint Time-Frequency Techniques" during the period 15...

  16. Radar Image Enhancement, Feature Extraction and Motion Compensation Using Joint Time-Frequency Techniques

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ling, Hao

    1999-01-01

    This Report summarizes the scientific progress on the research grant "Radar Image Enhancement, Feature Extraction, and Motion Compensation Using Joint Time-Frequency Techniques" during the period 15...

  17. Advantages of Oscillatory Hydraulic Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitanidis, P. K.; Bakhos, T.; Cardiff, M. A.; Barrash, W.

    2012-12-01

    Characterizing the subsurface is significant for most hydrogeologic studies, such as those involving site remediation and groundwater resource explo¬ration. A variety of hydraulic and geophysical methods have been developed to estimate hydraulic conductivity and specific storage. Hydraulic methods based on the analysis of conventional pumping tests allow the estimation of conductivity and storage without need for approximate petrophysical relations, which is an advantage over most geophysical methods that first estimate other properties and then infer values of hydraulic parameters. However, hydraulic methods have the disadvantage that the head-change signal decays with distance from the pumping well and thus becomes difficult to separate from noise except in close proximity to the source. Oscillatory hydraulic tomography (OHT) is an emerging technology to im¬age the subsurface. This method utilizes the idea of imposing sinusoidally varying pressure or discharge signals at several points, collecting head observations at several other points, and then processing these data in a tomographic fashion to estimate conductivity and storage coefficients. After an overview of the methodology, including a description of the most important potential advantages and challenges associated with this approach, two key promising features of the approach will be discussed. First, the signal at an observation point is orthogonal to and thus can be separated from nuisance inputs like head fluctuation from production wells, evapotranspiration, irrigation, and changes in the level of adjacent streams. Second, although the signal amplitude may be weak, one can extract the phase and amplitude of the os¬cillatory signal by collecting measurements over a longer time, thus compensating for the effect of large distance through longer sampling period.

  18. Hilbert-Huang transformation-based time-frequency analysis methods in biomedical signal applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chin-Feng; Zhu, Jin-De

    2012-03-01

    Hilbert-Huang transformation, wavelet transformation, and Fourier transformation are the principal time-frequency analysis methods. These transformations can be used to discuss the frequency characteristics of linear and stationary signals, the time-frequency features of linear and non-stationary signals, the time-frequency features of non-linear and non-stationary signals, respectively. The Hilbert-Huang transformation is a combination of empirical mode decomposition and Hilbert spectral analysis. The empirical mode decomposition uses the characteristics of signals to adaptively decompose them to several intrinsic mode functions. Hilbert transforms are then used to transform the intrinsic mode functions into instantaneous frequencies, to obtain the signal's time-frequency-energy distributions and features. Hilbert-Huang transformation-based time-frequency analysis can be applied to natural physical signals such as earthquake waves, winds, ocean acoustic signals, mechanical diagnosis signals, and biomedical signals. In previous studies, we examined Hilbert-Huang transformation-based time-frequency analysis of the electroencephalogram FPI signals of clinical alcoholics, and 'sharp I' wave-based Hilbert-Huang transformation time-frequency features. In this paper, we discuss the application of Hilbert-Huang transformation-based time-frequency analysis to biomedical signals, such as electroencephalogram, electrocardiogram signals, electrogastrogram recordings, and speech signals.

  19. A Burst to See

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    On 19 March, Nature was particularly generous and provided astronomers with the wealth of four gamma-ray bursts on the same day. But that was not all: one of them is the most luminous object ever observed in the Universe. Despite being located in a distant galaxy, billions of light years away, it was so bright that it could have been seen, for a brief while, with the unaided eye. ESO PR Photo 08a/08 ESO PR Photo 08a/08 The REM Telescope and TORTORA Camera Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short flashes of energetic gamma-rays lasting from less than a second to several minutes. They release a tremendous quantity of energy in this short time making them the most powerful events since the Big Bang. It is now widely accepted that the majority of the gamma-ray bursts signal the explosion of very massive, highly evolved stars that collapse into black holes. Gamma-ray bursts, which are invisible to our eyes, are discovered by telescopes in space. After releasing their intense burst of high-energy radiation, they become detectable for a short while in the optical and in the near-infrared. This 'afterglow' fades very rapidly, making detailed analysis possible for only a few hours after the gamma-ray detection. This analysis is important in particular in order to determine the GRB's distance and, hence, intrinsic brightness. The gamma-ray burst GRB 080319B was detected by the NASA/STFC/ASI Swift satellite. "It was so bright that it almost blinded the Swift instruments for a while," says Guido Chincarini, Italian principal investigator of the mission. A bright optical counterpart was soon identified in the Boötes Constellation (the "Bear Driver" or "Herdsman"). A host of ground-based telescopes reacted promptly to study this new object in the sky. In particular, the optical emission was detected by a few wide-field cameras on telescopes that constantly monitor a large fraction of the sky, including the TORTORA camera in symbiosis with the 0.6-m REM telescope located at La Silla

  20. Catalyst Initiation in the Oscillatory Carbonylation Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Novakovic

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Palladium(II iodide is used as a catalyst in the phenylacetylene oxidative carbonylation reaction that has demonstrated oscillatory behaviour in both pH and heat of reaction. In an attempt to extract the reaction network responsible for the oscillatory nature of this reaction, the system was divided into smaller parts and they were studied. This paper focuses on understanding the reaction network responsible for the initial reactions of palladium(II iodide within this oscillatory reaction. The species researched include methanol, palladium(II iodide, potassium iodide, and carbon monoxide. Several chemical reactions were considered and applied in a modelling study. The study revealed the significant role played by traces of water contained in the standard HPLC grade methanol used.

  1. Design principles for robust oscillatory behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Hair, Sebastian M; Villota, Elizabeth R; Coronado, Alberto M

    2015-09-01

    Oscillatory responses are ubiquitous in regulatory networks of living organisms, a fact that has led to extensive efforts to study and replicate the circuits involved. However, to date, design principles that underlie the robustness of natural oscillators are not completely known. Here we study a three-component enzymatic network model in order to determine the topological requirements for robust oscillation. First, by simulating every possible topological arrangement and varying their parameter values, we demonstrate that robust oscillators can be obtained by augmenting the number of both negative feedback loops and positive autoregulations while maintaining an appropriate balance of positive and negative interactions. We then identify network motifs, whose presence in more complex topologies is a necessary condition for obtaining oscillatory responses. Finally, we pinpoint a series of simple architectural patterns that progressively render more robust oscillators. Together, these findings can help in the design of more reliable synthetic biomolecular networks and may also have implications in the understanding of other oscillatory systems.

  2. Inferring oscillatory modulation in neural spike trains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Kensuke; Kass, Robert E

    2017-10-01

    Oscillations are observed at various frequency bands in continuous-valued neural recordings like the electroencephalogram (EEG) and local field potential (LFP) in bulk brain matter, and analysis of spike-field coherence reveals that spiking of single neurons often occurs at certain phases of the global oscillation. Oscillatory modulation has been examined in relation to continuous-valued oscillatory signals, and independently from the spike train alone, but behavior or stimulus triggered firing-rate modulation, spiking sparseness, presence of slow modulation not locked to stimuli and irregular oscillations with large variability in oscillatory periods, present challenges to searching for temporal structures present in the spike train. In order to study oscillatory modulation in real data collected under a variety of experimental conditions, we describe a flexible point-process framework we call the Latent Oscillatory Spike Train (LOST) model to decompose the instantaneous firing rate in biologically and behaviorally relevant factors: spiking refractoriness, event-locked firing rate non-stationarity, and trial-to-trial variability accounted for by baseline offset and a stochastic oscillatory modulation. We also extend the LOST model to accommodate changes in the modulatory structure over the duration of the experiment, and thereby discover trial-to-trial variability in the spike-field coherence of a rat primary motor cortical neuron to the LFP theta rhythm. Because LOST incorporates a latent stochastic auto-regressive term, LOST is able to detect oscillations when the firing rate is low, the modulation is weak, and when the modulating oscillation has a broad spectral peak.

  3. Time-Frequency Data Reduction for Event Related Potentials: Combining Principal Component Analysis and Matching Pursuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviyente, Selin; Bernat, Edward M; Malone, Stephen M; Iacono, William G

    2010-01-01

    Joint time-frequency representations offer a rich representation of event related potentials (ERPs) that cannot be obtained through individual time or frequency domain analysis. This representation, however, comes at the expense of increased data volume and the difficulty of interpreting the resulting representations. Therefore, methods that can reduce the large amount of time-frequency data to experimentally relevant components are essential. In this paper, we present a method that reduces the large volume of ERP time-frequency data into a few significant time-frequency parameters. The proposed method is based on applying the widely-used matching pursuit (MP) approach, with a Gabor dictionary, to principal components extracted from the time-frequency domain. The proposed PCA-Gabor decomposition is compared with other time-frequency data reduction methods such as the time-frequency PCA approach alone and standard matching pursuit methods using a Gabor dictionary for both simulated and biological data. The results show that the proposed PCA-Gabor approach performs better than either the PCA alone or the standard MP data reduction methods, by using the smallest amount of ERP data variance to produce the strongest statistical separation between experimental conditions.

  4. Time-Frequency Data Reduction for Event Related Potentials: Combining Principal Component Analysis and Matching Pursuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selin Aviyente

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Joint time-frequency representations offer a rich representation of event related potentials (ERPs that cannot be obtained through individual time or frequency domain analysis. This representation, however, comes at the expense of increased data volume and the difficulty of interpreting the resulting representations. Therefore, methods that can reduce the large amount of time-frequency data to experimentally relevant components are essential. In this paper, we present a method that reduces the large volume of ERP time-frequency data into a few significant time-frequency parameters. The proposed method is based on applying the widely used matching pursuit (MP approach, with a Gabor dictionary, to principal components extracted from the time-frequency domain. The proposed PCA-Gabor decomposition is compared with other time-frequency data reduction methods such as the time-frequency PCA approach alone and standard matching pursuit methods using a Gabor dictionary for both simulated and biological data. The results show that the proposed PCA-Gabor approach performs better than either the PCA alone or the standard MP data reduction methods, by using the smallest amount of ERP data variance to produce the strongest statistical separation between experimental conditions.

  5. Continuous-variable quantum computing in optical time-frequency modes using quantum memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Peter C; Kolthammer, W Steven; Nunn, Joshua; Barbieri, Marco; Datta, Animesh; Walmsley, Ian A

    2014-09-26

    We develop a scheme for time-frequency encoded continuous-variable cluster-state quantum computing using quantum memories. In particular, we propose a method to produce, manipulate, and measure two-dimensional cluster states in a single spatial mode by exploiting the intrinsic time-frequency selectivity of Raman quantum memories. Time-frequency encoding enables the scheme to be extremely compact, requiring a number of memories that are a linear function of only the number of different frequencies in which the computational state is encoded, independent of its temporal duration. We therefore show that quantum memories can be a powerful component for scalable photonic quantum information processing architectures.

  6. A gravitational wave burst search method based on the S transform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clapson, Andre-Claude; Barsuglia, Matteo; Bizouard, Marie-Anne; Brisson, Violette; Cavalier, Fabien; Davier, Michel; Hello, Patrice; Kreckelberg, Stephane; Varvella, Monica

    2005-01-01

    The detection of burst-type events in the output of ground gravitational wave observatories is particularly challenging due to the expected variety of astrophysical waveforms and the issue of discriminating them from instrumental noise. Robust methods, that achieve reasonable detection performances over a wide range of signals, would be most useful. We present a burst-detection pipeline based on a time-frequency transform, the S transform. This transform offers good time-frequency localization of energy without requiring prior knowledge of the event structure. We set a simple (and robust) event extraction chain. Results are provided for a variety of signals injected in simulated Gaussian statistics data (from the LIGO-Virgo joint working group). Indications are that detection is robust with respect to event type and that efficiency compares reasonably with reference methods. The time-frequency representation is shown to be affected by spectral features such as resonant lines. This emphasizes the role of pre-processing

  7. Oscillatory regime of avalanche particle detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukin, K.A.; Cerdeira, H.A.; Colavita, A.A.

    1995-06-01

    We describe the model of an avalanche high energy particle detector consisting of two pn-junctions, connected through an intrinsic semiconductor with a reverse biased voltage applied. We show that this detector is able to generate the oscillatory response on the single particle passage through the structure. The possibility of oscillations leading to chaotic behaviour is pointed out. (author). 15 refs, 7 figs

  8. Optothermally actuated capillary burst valve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Johan; Bilenberg, Brian; Kristensen, Anders

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate the optothermal actuation of individual capillary burst valves in an all-polymer microfluidic device. The capillary burst valves are realised in a planar design by introducing a fluidic constriction in a microfluidic channel of constant depth. We show that a capillary burst valve can...

  9. Time-Frequency, Bi-Frequency Detection Analysis of Noise Technology Radar

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Heuschel, Eugene R

    2006-01-01

    .... This thesis examines the use of time-frequency, bi-frequency signal detection techniques to identify the parameters of the four types of continuous waveform noise radar recently reported. These include: (a) random noise, (b...

  10. Applications of fractional lower order S transform time frequency filtering algorithm to machine fault diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Junbo; Wang, Haibin; Zha, Daifeng; Li, Peng; Xie, Huicheng; Mao, Lili

    2017-01-01

    Stockwell transform(ST) time-frequency representation(ST-TFR) is a time frequency analysis method which combines short time Fourier transform with wavelet transform, and ST time frequency filtering(ST-TFF) method which takes advantage of time-frequency localized spectra can separate the signals from Gaussian noise. The ST-TFR and ST-TFF methods are used to analyze the fault signals, which is reasonable and effective in general Gaussian noise cases. However, it is proved that the mechanical bearing fault signal belongs to Alpha(α) stable distribution process(1 fault signal and extract their fault features under α stable distribution noise, where excellent performances can be shown.

  11. Time-Frequency Analysis of Terahertz Radar Signals for Rapid Heart and Breath Rate Detection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Massar, Melody L

    2008-01-01

    We develop new time-frequency analytic techniques which facilitate the detection of a person's heart and breath rates from the Doppler shift the movement of their body induces in a terahertz radar signal...

  12. Bilinear Time-frequency Analysis for Lamb Wave Signal Detected by Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenxiu; Liu, Guoqiang; Xia, Hui; Xia, Zhengwu

    2018-03-01

    Accurate acquisition of the detection signal travel time plays a very important role in cross-hole tomography. The experimental platform of aluminum plate under the perpendicular magnetic field is established and the bilinear time-frequency analysis methods, Wigner-Ville Distribution (WVD) and the pseudo-Wigner-Ville distribution (PWVD), are applied to analyse the Lamb wave signals detected by electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT). By extracting the same frequency component of the time-frequency spectrum as the excitation frequency, the travel time information can be obtained. In comparison with traditional linear time-frequency analysis method such as short-time Fourier transform (STFT), the bilinear time-frequency analysis method PWVD is more appropriate in extracting travel time and recognizing patterns of Lamb wave.

  13. Use of Quadratic Time-Frequency Representations to Analyze Cetacean Mammal Sounds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia

    2001-01-01

    .... Analysis of the group delay structure of the mammalian vocal communication signals was matched to the appropriate quadratic time-frequency class for proper signal processing with minimal skewing of the results...

  14. Blind Time-Frequency Analysis for Source Discrimination in Multisensor Array Processing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Amin, Moeness

    2001-01-01

    .... We pioneered the development of multi-sensor receivers based on quadratic time-frequency and joint-variable distributions, and have provided the theoretical framework for solving direction finding...

  15. Helicopter parameter extraction using joint Time-Frequency and Tomographic Techniques

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cilliers, A

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available A technique based on time-frequency and tomographic analysis to extract helicopter blade parameters for the purposes of radar non-cooperative target recognition (NCTR) is investigated. The proposed algorithm shows that (under certain conditions...

  16. Time-frequency analysis : mathematical analysis of the empirical mode decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Invented over 10 years ago, empirical mode : decomposition (EMD) provides a nonlinear : time-frequency analysis with the ability to successfully : analyze nonstationary signals. Mathematical : Analysis of the Empirical Mode Decomposition : is a...

  17. Solution of IVP of Second Order ODE with Oscillatory Solutions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Solution of IVP of Second Order ODE with Oscillatory Solutions using Variational Iterative Method (VIM) ... Abstract. A Numerical method for solution of IVP of second order with oscillatory solutions using VIM is developed. The method ... Keywords: Variational Iteration Method, Lagrange multiplier, oscillatory solutions, ODE.

  18. Joint time-frequency domain proportional fair scheduler with HARQ for 3GPP LTE systems

    OpenAIRE

    Beh, KC; Doufexi, A; Armour, SMD

    2008-01-01

    This paper explores the potential gain of joint diversity in both frequency domain and time domain which can be exploited to achieve spectral efficiency gains whilst simultaneously facilitating QoS/ fairness in an OFDMA system particularly in 3GPP Long Term Evolution (LTE)). The performance of several joint time-frequency schedulers is investigated. Simulation results show that joint time frequency schedulers achieve significantly superior performance compared to a more conventional time doma...

  19. The Double Firing Burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Astronomers from around the world combined data from ground- and space-based telescopes to paint a detailed portrait of the brightest explosion ever seen. The observations reveal that the jets of the gamma-ray burst called GRB 080319B were aimed almost directly at the Earth. Uncovering the disc ESO PR Photo 28/08 A Gamma-Ray Burst with Two Jets Read more on this illuminating blast in the additional story. GRB 080319B was so intense that, despite happening halfway across the Universe, it could have been seen briefly with the unaided eye (ESO 08/08). In a paper to appear in the 11 September issue of Nature, Judith Racusin of Penn State University, Pennsylvania (USA), and a team of 92 co-authors report observations across the electromagnetic spectrum that began 30 minutes before the explosion and followed it for months afterwards. "We conclude that the burst's extraordinary brightness arose from a jet that shot material almost directly towards Earth at almost the speed of light - the difference is only 1 part in 20 000," says Guido Chincarini, a member of the team. Gamma-ray bursts are the Universe's most luminous explosions. Most occur when massive stars run out of fuel. As a star collapses, it creates a black hole or neutron star that, through processes not fully understood, drives powerful gas jets outward. As the jets shoot into space, they strike gas previously shed by the star and heat it, thereby generating bright afterglows. The team believes the jet directed toward Earth contained an ultra-fast component just 0.4 degrees across (this is slightly smaller than the apparent size of the Full Moon). This jet is contained within another slightly less energetic jet about 20 times wider. The broad component is more typical of other bursts. "Perhaps every gamma-ray burst has a narrow jet, but astronomers miss it most of the time," says team member Stefano Covino. "We happened to view this monster down the barrel of the very narrow and energetic jet, and the chance for

  20. Gear fault diagnosis based on the structured sparsity time-frequency analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ruobin; Yang, Zhibo; Chen, Xuefeng; Tian, Shaohua; Xie, Yong

    2018-03-01

    Over the last decade, sparse representation has become a powerful paradigm in mechanical fault diagnosis due to its excellent capability and the high flexibility for complex signal description. The structured sparsity time-frequency analysis (SSTFA) is a novel signal processing method, which utilizes mixed-norm priors on time-frequency coefficients to obtain a fine match for the structure of signals. In order to extract the transient feature from gear vibration signals, a gear fault diagnosis method based on SSTFA is proposed in this work. The steady modulation components and impulsive components of the defective gear vibration signals can be extracted simultaneously by choosing different time-frequency neighborhood and generalized thresholding operators. Besides, the time-frequency distribution with high resolution is obtained by piling different components in the same diagram. The diagnostic conclusion can be made according to the envelope spectrum of the impulsive components or by the periodicity of impulses. The effectiveness of the method is verified by numerical simulations, and the vibration signals registered from a gearbox fault simulator and a wind turbine. To validate the efficiency of the presented methodology, comparisons are made among some state-of-the-art vibration separation methods and the traditional time-frequency analysis methods. The comparisons show that the proposed method possesses advantages in separating feature signals under strong noise and accounting for the inner time-frequency structure of the gear vibration signals.

  1. Damage Detection Based on Cross-Term Extraction from Bilinear Time-Frequency Distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Yuchao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abundant damage information is implicated in the bilinear time-frequency distribution of structural dynamic signals, which could provide effective support for structural damage identification. Signal time-frequency analysis methods are reviewed, and the characters of linear time-frequency distribution and bilinear time-frequency distribution typically represented by the Wigner-Ville distribution are compared. The existence of the cross-term and its application in structural damage detection are demonstrated. A method of extracting the dominant term is proposed, which combines the short-time Fourier spectrum and Wigner-Ville distribution; then two-dimensional time-frequency transformation matrix is constructed and the complete cross-term is extracted finally. The distribution character of which could be applied to the structural damage identification. Through theoretical analysis, model experiment and numerical simulation of the girder structure, the change rate of cross-term amplitude is validated to identify the damage location and degree. The effectiveness of the cross-term of bilinear time-frequency distribution for damage detection is confirmed and the analytical method of damage identification used in structural engineering is available.

  2. Maximum-likelihood methods for array processing based on time-frequency distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yimin; Mu, Weifeng; Amin, Moeness G.

    1999-11-01

    This paper proposes a novel time-frequency maximum likelihood (t-f ML) method for direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation for non- stationary signals, and compares this method with conventional maximum likelihood DOA estimation techniques. Time-frequency distributions localize the signal power in the time-frequency domain, and as such enhance the effective SNR, leading to improved DOA estimation. The localization of signals with different t-f signatures permits the division of the time-frequency domain into smaller regions, each contains fewer signals than those incident on the array. The reduction of the number of signals within different time-frequency regions not only reduces the required number of sensors, but also decreases the computational load in multi- dimensional optimizations. Compared to the recently proposed time- frequency MUSIC (t-f MUSIC), the proposed t-f ML method can be applied in coherent environments, without the need to perform any type of preprocessing that is subject to both array geometry and array aperture.

  3. Age-associated modulations of cerebral oscillatory patterns related to attention control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deiber, Marie-Pierre; Ibañez, Vicente; Missonnier, Pascal; Rodriguez, Cristelle; Giannakopoulos, Panteleimon

    2013-11-15

    Visual attention depends on bottom-up sensory activation and top-down attentional guidance. Although aging is known to affect sensory processing, its impact on the top-down control of attention remains a matter of debate. We investigated age-related modulations of brain oscillatory activity during visual attention using a variant of the attention network test (ANT) in 20 young and 28 elderly adults. We examined the EEG oscillatory responses to warning and target signals, and explored the correlates of temporal and spatial orienting as well as conflict resolution at target presentation. Time-frequency analysis was performed between 4 and 30 Hz, and the relationship between behavioral and brain oscillatory responses was analyzed. Whereas temporal cueing and conflict had similar reaction time effects in both age groups, spatial cueing was more beneficial to older than younger subjects. In the absence of cue, posterior alpha activation was drastically reduced in older adults, pointing to an age-related decline in anticipatory attention. Following both cues and targets, older adults displayed pronounced motor-related activation in the low beta frequency range at the expense of attention-related posterior alpha activation prominent in younger adults. These findings support the recruitment of alternative motor-related circuits in the elderly, in line with the dedifferentiation hypothesis. Furthermore, older adults showed reduced midparietal alpha inhibition induced by temporal orienting as well as decreased posterior alpha activation associated with both spatial orienting and conflict resolution. Altogether, the results are consistent with an overall reduction of task-related alpha activity in the elderly, and provide functional evidence that younger and older adults engage distinct brain circuits at different oscillatory frequencies during attentional functions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Burst Populations and Detector Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, David L.

    2003-01-01

    The F(sub T) (peak bolometric photon flux) vs. E(sub p) (peak energy) plane is a powerful tool to compare the burst populations detected by different detectors. Detector sensitivity curves in this plane demonstrate which burst populations the detectors will detect. For example, future CZT-based detectors will show the largest increase in sensitivity for soft bursts, and will be particularly well- suited to study X-ray rich bursts and X-ray Flashes. Identical bursts at different redshifts describe a track in the F(sub T)-E(sub p) plane.

  5. Gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Wijers, Ralph A M J; Woosley, Stan

    2012-01-01

    Cosmic gamma ray bursts (GRBs) have fascinated scientists and the public alike since their discovery in the late 1960s. Their story is told here by some of the scientists who participated in their discovery and, after many decades of false starts, solved the problem of their origin. Fourteen chapters by active researchers in the field present a detailed history of the discovery, a comprehensive theoretical description of GRB central engine and emission models, a discussion of GRB host galaxies and a guide to how GRBs can be used as cosmological tools. Observations are grouped into three sets from the satellites CGRO, BeppoSAX and Swift, and followed by a discussion of multi-wavelength observations. This is the first edited volume on GRB astrophysics that presents a fully comprehensive review of the subject. Utilizing the latest research, Gamma-ray Bursts is an essential desktop companion for graduate students and researchers in astrophysics.

  6. Identification of detailed time-frequency components in somatosensory evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiguo; Luk, Keith D K; Hu, Yong

    2010-06-01

    Somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) usually contains a set of detailed temporal components measured and identified in time domain, providing meaningful information on physiological mechanisms of the nervous system. The purpose of this study is to reveal complex and fine time-frequency features of SEP in time-frequency domain using advanced time-frequency analysis (TFA) and pattern classification methods. A high-resolution TFA algorithm, matching pursuit (MP), was proposed to decompose a SEP signal into a string of elementary waves and to provide a time-frequency feature description of the waves. After a dimension reduction by principle component analysis (PCA), a density-guided K-means clustering was followed to identify typical waves existed in SEP. Experimental results on posterior tibial nerve SEP signals of 50 normal adults showed that a series of typical waves were discovered in SEP using the proposed MP decomposition and clustering methods. The statistical properties of these SEP waves were examined and their representative waveforms were synthesized. The identified SEP waves provided a comprehensive and detailed description of time-frequency features of SEP.

  7. Stepwise oscillatory circuits of a DNA molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kunming

    2009-08-01

    A DNA molecule is characterized by a stepwise oscillatory circuit where every base pair is a capacitor, every phosphate bridge is an inductance, and every deoxyribose is a charge router. The circuitry accounts for DNA conductivity through both short and long distances in good agreement with experimental evidence that has led to the identification of the so-called super-exchange and multiple-step hopping mechanisms. However, in contrast to the haphazard hopping and super-exchanging events, the circuitry is a well-defined charge transport mechanism reflecting the great reliability of the genetic substance in delivering electrons. Stepwise oscillatory charge transport through a nucleotide sequence that directly modulates the oscillation frequency may have significant biological implications.

  8. Stability of Armour Units in Oscillatory Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Thompson, A. C.

    Despite numerous breakwater model tests very little is known today about the various phenomena and parameters that determine the hydraulic stability characteristics of different types of armour. This is because separation of parameters is extremely difficult in traditional tests.With the object...... of separating some of the factors a deterministic test, in which horizontal beds of armour units were exposed to oscillatory flow, was performed in a pulsating water tunnel....

  9. Digital data reduction of oscillatory signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebelaar, F.; Schoyer, H. F. R.

    1981-11-01

    A newly developed procedure for determining in an efficient, digital manner the amplitudes and frequencies of the oscillatory components of arbitrary signals is presented. The method is found to be especially useful in those cases where varying amplitudes and frequencies are encountered. The possibility of assigning a noise level criterion, such as minimum double amplitude (MDA) or minimum relative amplitude (MRA), enlarges the versatility of this procedure in comparison with other methods. Even for large amounts of data, computer times remain limited.

  10. Oscillatory Convection in Rotating Liquid Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, Vincent; Grannan, Alex; Aurnou, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    We have performed laboratory experiments in a aspect ratio Γ = 2 cylinder using liquid gallium (Pr = 0 . 023) as the working fluid. The Ekman number varies from E = 4 ×10-5 to 4 ×10-6 and the Rayleigh number varies from Ra = 3 ×105 to 2 ×107 . Using heat transfer and temperature measurements within the fluid, we characterize the different styles of low Pr rotating convective flow. The convection threshold is first overcome in the form of a container scale inertial oscillatory mode. At stronger forcing, wall-localized modes develop, coexisting with the inertial oscillatory modes in the bulk. When the strength of the buoyancy increases further, the bulk flow becomes turbulent while the wall modes remain. Our results imply that rotating convective flows in liquid metals do not develop in the form of quasi-steady columns, as in Pr = 1 planetary and stellar dynamo models, but in the form of oscillatory motions. Therefore, convection driven dynamo action in low Pr fluids can differ substantively than that occurring in typical Pr = 1 numerical models. Our results also suggest that low wavenumber, wall modes may be dynamically and observationally important in liquid metal dynamo systems. We thank the NSF Geophysics Program for support of this project.

  11. Gearbox fault diagnosis based on time-frequency domain synchronous averaging and feature extraction technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shengli; Tang, Jiong

    2016-04-01

    Gearbox is one of the most vulnerable subsystems in wind turbines. Its healthy status significantly affects the efficiency and function of the entire system. Vibration based fault diagnosis methods are prevalently applied nowadays. However, vibration signals are always contaminated by noise that comes from data acquisition errors, structure geometric errors, operation errors, etc. As a result, it is difficult to identify potential gear failures directly from vibration signals, especially for the early stage faults. This paper utilizes synchronous averaging technique in time-frequency domain to remove the non-synchronous noise and enhance the fault related time-frequency features. The enhanced time-frequency information is further employed in gear fault classification and identification through feature extraction algorithms including Kernel Principal Component Analysis (KPCA), Multilinear Principal Component Analysis (MPCA), and Locally Linear Embedding (LLE). Results show that the LLE approach is the most effective to classify and identify different gear faults.

  12. An application of multidimensional time-frequency analysis as a base for the unified watermarking approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankovic, Srdjan; Orovic, Irena; Zaric, Nikola

    2010-03-01

    A watermarking approach based on multidimensional time-frequency analysis is proposed. It represents a unified concept that can be used for different types of data such as audio, speech signals, images or video. Time-frequency analysis is employed for speech signals, while space/spatial-frequency analysis is used for images. Their combination is applied for video signals. Particularly, we focus on the 2-D case: space/spatial-frequency based image watermarking procedure that will be subsequently extended to video signal. A method that selects coefficients for watermarking by estimating the local frequency content is proposed. In order to provide watermark imperceptibility, the nonstationary filtering is used to model the watermark which corresponds to the host signal components. Furthermore, the watermark detection within the multidimensional time-frequency domain is proposed. The efficiency and robustness of the procedure in the presence of various attacks is proven experimentally.

  13. Single trial time-frequency domain analysis of error processing in post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemans, Zachary A; El-Baz, Ayman S; Hollifield, Michael; Sokhadze, Estate M

    2012-09-13

    Error processing studies in psychology and psychiatry are relatively common. Event-related potentials (ERPs) are often used as measures of error processing, two such response-locked ERPs being the error-related negativity (ERN) and the error-related positivity (Pe). The ERN and Pe occur following committed error in reaction time tasks as low frequency (4-8 Hz) electroencephalographic (EEG) oscillations registered at the midline fronto-central sites. We created an alternative method for analyzing error processing using time-frequency analysis in the form of a wavelet transform. A study was conducted in which subjects with PTSD and healthy control completed a forced-choice task. Single trial EEG data from errors in the task were processed using a continuous wavelet transform. Coefficients from the transform that corresponded to the theta range were averaged to isolate a theta waveform in the time-frequency domain. Measures called the time-frequency ERN and Pe were obtained from these waveforms for five different channels and then averaged to obtain a single time-frequency ERN and Pe for each error trial. A comparison of the amplitude and latency for the time-frequency ERN and Pe between the PTSD and control group was performed. A significant group effect was found on the amplitude of both measures. These results indicate that the developed single trial time-frequency error analysis method is suitable for examining error processing in PTSD and possibly other psychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Nonlinear system identification NARMAX methods in the time, frequency, and spatio-temporal domains

    CERN Document Server

    Billings, Stephen A

    2013-01-01

    Nonlinear System Identification: NARMAX Methods in the Time, Frequency, and Spatio-Temporal Domains describes a comprehensive framework for the identification and analysis of nonlinear dynamic systems in the time, frequency, and spatio-temporal domains. This book is written with an emphasis on making the algorithms accessible so that they can be applied and used in practice. Includes coverage of: The NARMAX (nonlinear autoregressive moving average with exogenous inputs) modelThe orthogonal least squares algorithm that allows models to be built term by

  15. Gamma-ray bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil; Mészáros, Péter

    2012-08-24

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day, typically last for tens of seconds, and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this Review, we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglow.

  16. Gamma Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil; Meszaros, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma-rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day ,last typically lOs of seconds and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this review we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglows.

  17. UWB dual burst transmit driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallum, Gregory E [Livermore, CA; Pratt, Garth C [Discovery Bay, CA; Haugen, Peter C [Livermore, CA; Zumstein, James M [Livermore, CA; Vigars, Mark L [Livermore, CA; Romero, Carlos E [Livermore, CA

    2012-04-17

    A dual burst transmitter for ultra-wideband (UWB) communication systems generates a pair of precisely spaced RF bursts from a single trigger event. An input trigger pulse produces two oscillator trigger pulses, an initial pulse and a delayed pulse, in a dual trigger generator. The two oscillator trigger pulses drive a gated RF burst (power output) oscillator. A bias driver circuit gates the RF output oscillator on and off and sets the RF burst packet width. The bias driver also level shifts the drive signal to the level that is required for the RF output device.

  18. Unihemispheric burst suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward C. Mader Jr.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Burst suppression (BS consists of bursts of high-voltage slow and sharp wave activity alternating with periods of background suppression in the electroencephalogram (EEG. When induced by deep anesthesia or encephalopathy, BS is bihemispheric and is often viewed as a non-epileptic phenomenon. In contrast, unihemispheric BS is rare and its clinical significance is poorly understood. We describe here two cases of unihemispheric BS. The first patient is a 56-year-old woman with a left temporoparietal tumor who presented in convulsive status epilepticus. EEG showed left hemispheric BS after clinical seizure termination with lorazepam and propofol. The second patient is a 39-year-old woman with multiple medical problems and a vague history of seizures. After abdominal surgery, she experienced a convulsive seizure prompting treatment with propofol. Her EEG also showed left hemispheric BS. In both cases, increasing the propofol infusion rate resulted in disappearance of unihemispheric BS and clinical improvement. The prevailing view that typical bihemispheric BS is non-epileptic should not be extrapolated automatically to unihemispheric BS. The fact that unihemispheric BS was associated with clinical seizure and resolved with propofol suggests that, in both cases, an epileptic mechanism was responsible for unihemispheric BS.

  19. Non-identical smoothing operators for estimating time-frequency interdependence in electrophysiological recordings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehrkanoon, S.; Breakspear, M.; Daffertshofer, A.; Boonstra, T.W.

    2013-01-01

    Synchronization of neural activity from distant parts of the brain is crucial for the coordination of cognitive activities. Because neural synchronization varies both in time and frequency, time-frequency (T-F) coherence is commonly employed to assess interdependences in electrophysiological

  20. ERPWAVELAB a toolbox for multi-channel analysis of time-frequency transformed event related potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mørup, Morten; Hansen, Lars Kai; Arnfred, Sidse M

    2007-04-15

    The open source toolbox 'ERPWAVELAB' is developed for multi-channel time-frequency analysis of event related activity of EEG and MEG data. The toolbox provides tools for data analysis and visualization of the most commonly used measures of time-frequency transformed event related data as well as data decomposition through non-negative matrix and multi-way (tensor) factorization. The decompositions provided can accommodate additional dimensions like subjects, conditions or repeats and as such they are perfected for group analysis. Furthermore, the toolbox enables tracking of phase locked activity from one channel-time-frequency instance to another as well as tools for artifact rejection in the time-frequency domain. Several other features are highlighted. ERPWAVELAB can freely be downloaded from www.erpwavelab.org, requires EEGLAB [Delorme A, Makeig S. EEGLAB: an open source toolbox for analysis of single-trial EEG dynamics including independent component analysis. J Neurosci Meth 2004;134:9-21] and runs under MATLAB (The Mathworks, Inc.).

  1. Classification of sleep stages using multi-wavelet time frequency entropy and LDA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraiwan, L; Lweesy, K; Khasawneh, N; Fraiwan, M; Wenz, H; Dickhaus, H

    2010-01-01

    The process of automatic sleep stage scoring consists of two major parts: feature extraction and classification. Features are normally extracted from the polysomnographic recordings, mainly electroencephalograph (EEG) signals. The EEG is considered a non-stationary signal which increases the complexity of the detection of different waves in it. This work presents a new technique for automatic sleep stage scoring based on employing continuous wavelet transform (CWT) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) using different mother wavelets to detect different waves embedded in the EEG signal. The use of different mother wavelets increases the ability to detect waves in the EEG signal. The extracted features were formed based on CWT time frequency entropy using three mother wavelets, and the classification was performed using the linear discriminant analysis. Thirty-two data sets from the MIT-BIH database were used to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. Features of a single EEG signal were extracted successfully based on the time frequency entropy using the continuous wavelet transform with three mother wavelets. The proposed method has shown to outperform the classification based on a CWT using a single mother wavelet. The accuracy was found to be 0.84, while the kappa coefficient was 0.78. This work has shown that wavelet time frequency entropy provides a powerful tool for feature extraction for the non-stationary EEG signal; the accuracy of the classification procedure improved when using multiple wavelets compared to the use of single wavelet time frequency entropy.

  2. Vibration sensor data denoising using a time-frequency manifold for machinery fault diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qingbo; Wang, Xiangxiang; Zhou, Qiang

    2013-12-27

    Vibration sensor data from a mechanical system are often associated with important measurement information useful for machinery fault diagnosis. However, in practice the existence of background noise makes it difficult to identify the fault signature from the sensing data. This paper introduces the time-frequency manifold (TFM) concept into sensor data denoising and proposes a novel denoising method for reliable machinery fault diagnosis. The TFM signature reflects the intrinsic time-frequency structure of a non-stationary signal. The proposed method intends to realize data denoising by synthesizing the TFM using time-frequency synthesis and phase space reconstruction (PSR) synthesis. Due to the merits of the TFM in noise suppression and resolution enhancement, the denoised signal would have satisfactory denoising effects, as well as inherent time-frequency structure keeping. Moreover, this paper presents a clustering-based statistical parameter to evaluate the proposed method, and also presents a new diagnostic approach, called frequency probability time series (FPTS) spectral analysis, to show its effectiveness in fault diagnosis. The proposed TFM-based data denoising method has been employed to deal with a set of vibration sensor data from defective bearings, and the results verify that for machinery fault diagnosis the method is superior to two traditional denoising methods.

  3. Enhanced Performance by Time-Frequency-Phase Feature for EEG-Based BCI Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baolei Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a new motor parameter imagery paradigm using clench speed and clench force motor imagery. The time-frequency-phase features are extracted from mu rhythm and beta rhythms, and the features are optimized using three process methods: no-scaled feature using “MIFS” feature selection criterion, scaled feature using “MIFS” feature selection criterion, and scaled feature using “mRMR” feature selection criterion. Support vector machines (SVMs and extreme learning machines (ELMs are compared for classification between clench speed and clench force motor imagery using the optimized feature. Our results show that no significant difference in the classification rate between SVMs and ELMs is found. The scaled feature combinations can get higher classification accuracy than the no-scaled feature combinations at significant level of 0.01, and the “mRMR” feature selection criterion can get higher classification rate than the “MIFS” feature selection criterion at significant level of 0.01. The time-frequency-phase feature can improve the classification rate by about 20% more than the time-frequency feature, and the best classification rate between clench speed motor imagery and clench force motor imagery is 92%. In conclusion, the motor parameter imagery paradigm has the potential to increase the direct control commands for BCI control and the time-frequency-phase feature has the ability to improve BCI classification accuracy.

  4. Adaptive noise cancelling and time-frequency techniques for rail surface defect detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, B.; Iwnicki, S.; Ball, A.; Young, A. E.

    2015-03-01

    Adaptive noise cancelling (ANC) is a technique which is very effective to remove additive noises from the contaminated signals. It has been widely used in the fields of telecommunication, radar and sonar signal processing. However it was seldom used for the surveillance and diagnosis of mechanical systems before late of 1990s. As a promising technique it has gradually been exploited for the purpose of condition monitoring and fault diagnosis. Time-frequency analysis is another useful tool for condition monitoring and fault diagnosis purpose as time-frequency analysis can keep both time and frequency information simultaneously. This paper presents an ANC and time-frequency application for railway wheel flat and rail surface defect detection. The experimental results from a scaled roller test rig show that this approach can significantly reduce unwanted interferences and extract the weak signals from strong background noises. The combination of ANC and time-frequency analysis may provide us one of useful tools for condition monitoring and fault diagnosis of railway vehicles.

  5. Identification of a Maximum Softening Damage Indicator of RC-Structures Using Time-Frequency Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Nielsen, Søren R.K.; Micaletti, R. C.

    This paper considers estimation of the Maximum Damage Indicator (MSDI) by using time-frequency system identification techniques for an RC-structure subjected to earthquake excitation. The MSDI relates the global damage state of the RC-structure to the relative decrease of the fundamental...

  6. Super-resolved time-frequency analysis of wideband backscattered data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, John; Ling, H.

    1995-01-01

    A time-frequency super-resolution procedure is presented for processing wideband backscattered data containing both scattering center and natural resonance information. In this procedure, Prony's method is first applied in the frequency domain to locate scattering centers. The data is processed o...

  7. Synchronization and matched filtering in time-frequency using the sunflower spiral

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korevaar, C.W.; Kokkeler, Andre B.J.; de Boer, Pieter-Tjerk; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria

    2012-01-01

    Synchronization and matched filtering of signals in time dispersive, frequency dispersive and time-frequency dispersive channels are addressed in this paper. The ‘eigenfunctions’ of these channels form the signal sets under investigation. While using channel-eigenfunctions is a first requirement for

  8. Time-Frequency Distribution of Music based on Sparse Wavelet Packet Representations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Endelt, Line Ørtoft

    We introduce a new method for generating time-frequency distributions, which is particularly useful for the analysis of music signals. The method presented here is based on $\\ell1$ sparse representations of music signals in a redundant wavelet packet dictionary. The representations are found using...

  9. Assessment of time-frequency representation techniques for thoracic sounds analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, B A; Charleston-Villalobos, S; González-Camarena, R; Aljama-Corrales, T

    2014-05-01

    A step forward in the knowledge about the underlying physiological phenomena of thoracic sounds requires a reliable estimate of their time-frequency behavior that overcomes the disadvantages of the conventional spectrogram. A more detailed time-frequency representation could lead to a better feature extraction for diseases classification and stratification purposes, among others. In this respect, the aim of this study was to look for an omnibus technique to obtain the time-frequency representation (TFR) of thoracic sounds by comparing generic goodness-of-fit criteria in different simulated thoracic sounds scenarios. The performance of ten TFRs for heart, normal tracheal and adventitious lung sounds was assessed using time-frequency patterns obtained by mathematical functions of the thoracic sounds. To find the best TFR performance measures, such as the 2D local (ρ(mean)) and global (ρ) central correlation, the normalized root-mean-square error (NRMSE), the cross-correlation coefficient (ρ(IF)) and the time-frequency resolution (res(TF)) were used. Simulation results pointed out that the Hilbert-Huang spectrum (HHS) had a superior performance as compared with other techniques and then, it can be considered as a reliable TFR for thoracic sounds. Furthermore, the goodness of HHS was assessed using noisy simulated signals. Additionally, HHS was applied to first and second heart sounds taken from a young healthy male subject, to tracheal sound from a middle-age healthy male subject, and to abnormal lung sounds acquired from a male patient with diffuse interstitial pneumonia. It is expected that the results of this research could be used to obtain a better signature of thoracic sounds for pattern recognition purpose, among other tasks. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of the oscillatory interference model of grid cell firing through analysis and measured period variance of some biological oscillators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A Zilli

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Models of the hexagonally arrayed spatial activity pattern of grid cell firing in the literature generally fall into two main categories: continuous attractor models or oscillatory interference models. Burak and Fiete (2009, PLoS Comput Biol recently examined noise in two continuous attractor models, but did not consider oscillatory interference models in detail. Here we analyze an oscillatory interference model to examine the effects of noise on its stability and spatial firing properties. We show analytically that the square of the drift in encoded position due to noise is proportional to time and inversely proportional to the number of oscillators. We also show there is a relatively fixed breakdown point, independent of many parameters of the model, past which noise overwhelms the spatial signal. Based on this result, we show that a pair of oscillators are expected to maintain a stable grid for approximately t = 5mu(3/(4pisigma(2 seconds where mu is the mean period of an oscillator in seconds and sigma(2 its variance in seconds(2. We apply this criterion to recordings of individual persistent spiking neurons in postsubiculum (dorsal presubiculum and layers III and V of entorhinal cortex, to subthreshold membrane potential oscillation recordings in layer II stellate cells of medial entorhinal cortex and to values from the literature regarding medial septum theta bursting cells. All oscillators examined have expected stability times far below those seen in experimental recordings of grid cells, suggesting the examined biological oscillators are unfit as a substrate for current implementations of oscillatory interference models. However, oscillatory interference models can tolerate small amounts of noise, suggesting the utility of circuit level effects which might reduce oscillator variability. Further implications for grid cell models are discussed.

  11. Bidirectional Frontoparietal Oscillatory Systems Support Working Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Elizabeth L; Dewar, Callum D; Solbakk, Anne-Kristin; Endestad, Tor; Meling, Torstein R; Knight, Robert T

    2017-06-19

    The ability to represent and select information in working memory provides the neurobiological infrastructure for human cognition. For 80 years, dominant views of working memory have focused on the key role of prefrontal cortex (PFC) [1-8]. However, more recent work has implicated posterior cortical regions [9-12], suggesting that PFC engagement during working memory is dependent on the degree of executive demand. We provide evidence from neurological patients with discrete PFC damage that challenges the dominant models attributing working memory to PFC-dependent systems. We show that neural oscillations, which provide a mechanism for PFC to communicate with posterior cortical regions [13], independently subserve communications both to and from PFC-uncovering parallel oscillatory mechanisms for working memory. Fourteen PFC patients and 20 healthy, age-matched controls performed a working memory task where they encoded, maintained, and actively processed information about pairs of common shapes. In controls, the electroencephalogram (EEG) exhibited oscillatory activity in the low-theta range over PFC and directional connectivity from PFC to parieto-occipital regions commensurate with executive processing demands. Concurrent alpha-beta oscillations were observed over parieto-occipital regions, with directional connectivity from parieto-occipital regions to PFC, regardless of processing demands. Accuracy, PFC low-theta activity, and PFC → parieto-occipital connectivity were attenuated in patients, revealing a PFC-independent, alpha-beta system. The PFC patients still demonstrated task proficiency, which indicates that the posterior alpha-beta system provides sufficient resources for working memory. Taken together, our findings reveal neurologically dissociable PFC and parieto-occipital systems and suggest that parallel, bidirectional oscillatory systems form the basis of working memory. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Short duration gamma ray bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. After a short review of gamma ray bursts (GRBs), we discuss the physical implications of strong statistical correlations seen among some of the parameters of short duration bursts (90 < 2 s). Finally, we conclude with a brief sketch of a new unified model for long and short GRBs.

  13. A general theory on frequency and time-frequency analysis of irregularly sampled time series based on projection methods - Part 2: Extension to time-frequency analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenoir, Guillaume; Crucifix, Michel

    2018-03-01

    Geophysical time series are sometimes sampled irregularly along the time axis. The situation is particularly frequent in palaeoclimatology. Yet, there is so far no general framework for handling the continuous wavelet transform when the time sampling is irregular. Here we provide such a framework. To this end, we define the scalogram as the continuous-wavelet-transform equivalent of the extended Lomb-Scargle periodogram defined in Part 1 of this study (Lenoir and Crucifix, 2018). The signal being analysed is modelled as the sum of a locally periodic component in the time-frequency plane, a polynomial trend, and a background noise. The mother wavelet adopted here is the Morlet wavelet classically used in geophysical applications. The background noise model is a stationary Gaussian continuous autoregressive-moving-average (CARMA) process, which is more general than the traditional Gaussian white and red noise processes. The scalogram is smoothed by averaging over neighbouring times in order to reduce its variance. The Shannon-Nyquist exclusion zone is however defined as the area corrupted by local aliasing issues. The local amplitude in the time-frequency plane is then estimated with least-squares methods. We also derive an approximate formula linking the squared amplitude and the scalogram. Based on this property, we define a new analysis tool: the weighted smoothed scalogram, which we recommend for most analyses. The estimated signal amplitude also gives access to band and ridge filtering. Finally, we design a test of significance for the weighted smoothed scalogram against the stationary Gaussian CARMA background noise, and provide algorithms for computing confidence levels, either analytically or with Monte Carlo Markov chain methods. All the analysis tools presented in this article are available to the reader in the Python package WAVEPAL.

  14. Frequency-offset separated oscillatory fields technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezginov, N.; Vutha, A. C.; Ferchichi, I.; Storry, C. H.; Hessels, E. A.

    2015-05-01

    Improved measurements in atomic hydrogen are needed to shed light on the proton radius puzzle. We are measuring the Lamb shift in hydrogen (n = 2 ,S1 / 2 -->P1 / 2) using a frequency-offset separated oscillatory fields (FOSOF) method. The advantages of this method include its insensitivity to atomic beam intensity fluctuations and the microwave-system frequency response. We present experimental results obtained with this method, towards a new measurement of the proton charge radius. We acknowledge funding from NSERC, CFI, CRC, ORF, and NIST.

  15. Power System Oscillatory Behaviors: Sources, Characteristics, & Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Follum, James D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tuffner, Francis K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dosiek, Luke A. [Union College, Schenectady, NY (United States); Pierre, John W. [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States)

    2017-05-17

    This document is intended to provide a broad overview of the sources, characteristics, and analyses of natural and forced oscillatory behaviors in power systems. These aspects are necessarily linked. Oscillations appear in measurements with distinguishing characteristics derived from the oscillation’s source. These characteristics determine which analysis methods can be appropriately applied, and the results from these analyses can only be interpreted correctly with an understanding of the oscillation’s origin. To describe oscillations both at their source within a physical power system and within measurements, a perspective from the boundary between power system and signal processing theory has been adopted.

  16. Enhancing Rotational Diffusion Using Oscillatory Shear

    KAUST Repository

    Leahy, Brian D.

    2013-05-29

    Taylor dispersion - shear-induced enhancement of translational diffusion - is an important phenomenon with applications ranging from pharmacology to geology. Through experiments and simulations, we show that rotational diffusion is also enhanced for anisotropic particles in oscillatory shear. This enhancement arises from variations in the particle\\'s rotation (Jeffery orbit) and depends on the strain amplitude, rate, and particle aspect ratio in a manner that is distinct from the translational diffusion. This separate tunability of translational and rotational diffusion opens the door to new techniques for controlling positions and orientations of suspended anisotropic colloids. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  17. Bursts de raios gama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, J.

    2003-02-01

    Nos últimos anos, graças principalmente aos dados obtidos pelo Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory e pelo satélite ítalo-holandês BeppoSAX, grandes avanços foram obtidos no nosso conhecimento sobre os fascinantes e enigmáticos fenômenos conhecidos por "bursts"de raios gama. Neste trabalho é feita uma revisão sobre a fenomenologia desses misteriosos objetos e são apresentados os desenvolvimentos recentes nessa área palpitante da astrofísica moderna, ressaltando tanto os resultados observacionais obtidos até o momento quanto os modelos teóricos propostos para explixá-los.

  18. EEG Mu (µ) rhythm spectra and oscillatory activity differentiate stuttering from non-stuttering adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltuklaroglu, Tim; Harkrider, Ashley W; Thornton, David; Jenson, David; Kittilstved, Tiffani

    2017-06-01

    Stuttering is linked to sensorimotor deficits related to internal modeling mechanisms. This study compared spectral power and oscillatory activity of EEG mu (μ) rhythms between persons who stutter (PWS) and controls in listening and auditory discrimination tasks. EEG data were analyzed from passive listening in noise and accurate (same/different) discrimination of tones or syllables in quiet and noisy backgrounds. Independent component analysis identified left and/or right μ rhythms with characteristic alpha (α) and beta (β) peaks localized to premotor/motor regions in 23 of 27 people who stutter (PWS) and 24 of 27 controls. PWS produced μ spectra with reduced β amplitudes across conditions, suggesting reduced forward modeling capacity. Group time-frequency differences were associated with noisy conditions only. PWS showed increased μ-β desynchronization when listening to noise and early in discrimination events, suggesting evidence of heightened motor activity that might be related to forward modeling deficits. PWS also showed reduced μ-α synchronization in discrimination conditions, indicating reduced sensory gating. Together these findings indicate spectral and oscillatory analyses of μ rhythms are sensitive to stuttering. More specifically, they can reveal stuttering-related sensorimotor processing differences in listening and auditory discrimination that also may be influenced by basal ganglia deficits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Significance of local synchronization and oscillatory processes of thalamic neurons in goal-directed human behavior].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedov, A S; Medvednik, R S; Raeva, S N

    2014-01-01

    The time-frequency characteristics and interneuron interaction in the cell ensembles of non-specific (CM-Pf) and motor (Voi) thalamus were analyzed. Neuronal activity was registered by microelectrode technique during 18 stereotactic neurosurgery operations in spasmodic torticollis patients. The presentation of functionally significant verbal stimuli was accompanied by the emergence of short-term (0.5-1.5 s) local synchronization and stabilization of the oscillatory (3-6 Hz) activity in nearby neurons of nonspecific (CM-Pf) thalamus. These focuses of synchronized oscillatory neuronal activity were correlated with the moment of the greatest concentration of selective attention. Similar phenomenon of short-term synchronization was observed in the motor (Voi) and nonspecific (CM-Pf) thalamus of the human brain during the voluntary movements. Synchronization of neuronal activity occurred at the height of the motor act implementation, correlating with the maximum muscle tension, as well as in aftereffect of the voluntary movement. Overall, the findings suggest an important role of the local oscillations (3-6 Hz) and synchronization ofthalamic neurons in the mechanisms of relevant information transmission during goal-directed human behavior.

  20. Burst Detector Sensitivity: Past, Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, David L.

    2005-01-01

    I compare the burst detection sensitivity of CGRO's BATSE, Swift's BAT, the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) and EXIST as a function of a burst s spectrum and duration. A detector's overall burst sensitivity depends on its energy sensitivity and set of accumulations times (Delta)t; these two factors shape the detected burst population. For example, relative to BATSE, the BAT s softer energy band decreases the detection rate of short, hard bursts, while the BAT s longer accumulation times increase the detection rate of long, soft bursts. Consequently, Swift is detecting long, low fluence bursts (2-3 x fainter than BATSE).

  1. Learning in AN Oscillatory Cortical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpetta, Silvia; Li, Zhaoping; Hertz, John

    We study a model of generalized-Hebbian learning in asymmetric oscillatory neural networks modeling cortical areas such as hippocampus and olfactory cortex. The learning rule is based on the synaptic plasticity observed experimentally, in particular long-term potentiation and long-term depression of the synaptic efficacies depending on the relative timing of the pre- and postsynaptic activities during learning. The learned memory or representational states can be encoded by both the amplitude and the phase patterns of the oscillating neural populations, enabling more efficient and robust information coding than in conventional models of associative memory or input representation. Depending on the class of nonlinearity of the activation function, the model can function as an associative memory for oscillatory patterns (nonlinearity of class II) or can generalize from or interpolate between the learned states, appropriate for the function of input representation (nonlinearity of class I). In the former case, simulations of the model exhibits a first order transition between the "disordered state" and the "ordered" memory state.

  2. Three-dimensional Oscillatory Magnetic Reconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurgood, Jonathan O.; McLaughlin, James A. [Department of Mathematics, Physics and Electrical Engineering, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 1ST (United Kingdom); Pontin, David I., E-mail: jonathan.thurgood@northumbria.ac.uk [Division of Mathematics, University of Dundee, Dundee, DD1 4HN (United Kingdom)

    2017-07-20

    Here we detail the dynamic evolution of localized reconnection regions about 3D magnetic null points using numerical simulation. We demonstrate for the first time that reconnection triggered by the localized collapse of a 3D null point that is due to an external magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave involves a self-generated oscillation, whereby the current sheet and outflow jets undergo a reconnection reversal process during which back-pressure formation at the jet heads acts to prise open the collapsed field before overshooting the equilibrium into an opposite-polarity configuration. The discovery that reconnection at fully 3D nulls can proceed naturally in a time-dependent and periodic fashion suggests that oscillatory reconnection mechanisms may play a role in explaining periodicity in astrophysical phenomena associated with magnetic reconnection, such as the observed quasi-periodicity of solar and stellar flare emission. Furthermore, we find that a consequence of oscillatory reconnection is the generation of a plethora of freely propagating MHD waves that escape the vicinity of the reconnection region.

  3. One central oscillatory drive is compatible with experimental motor unit behaviour in essential and Parkinsonian tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dideriksen, Jakob L.; Gallego, Juan A.; Holobar, Ales; Rocon, Eduardo; Pons, Jose L.; Farina, Dario

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Pathological tremors are symptomatic to several neurological disorders that are difficult to differentiate and the way by which central oscillatory networks entrain tremorogenic contractions is unknown. We considered the alternative hypotheses that tremor arises from one oscillator (at the tremor frequency) or, as suggested by recent findings from the superimposition of two separate inputs (at the tremor frequency and twice that frequency). Approach. Assuming one central oscillatory network we estimated analytically the relative amplitude of the harmonics of the tremor frequency in the motor neuron output for different temporal behaviors of the oscillator. Next, we analyzed the bias in the relative harmonics amplitude introduced by superimposing oscillations at twice the tremor frequency. These findings were validated using experimental measurements of wrist angular velocity and surface electromyography (EMG) from 22 patients (11 essential tremor, 11 Parkinson’s disease). The ensemble motor unit action potential trains identified from the EMG represented the neural drive to the muscles. Main results. The analytical results showed that the relative power of the tremor harmonics in the analytical models of the neural drive was determined by the variability and duration of the tremor bursts and the presence of the second oscillator biased this power towards higher values. The experimental findings accurately matched the analytical model assuming one oscillator, indicating a negligible functional role of secondary oscillatory inputs. Furthermore, a significant difference in the relative power of harmonics in the neural drive was found across the patient groups, suggesting a diagnostic value of this measure (classification accuracy: 86%). This diagnostic power decreased substantially when estimated from limb acceleration or the EMG. Signficance. The results indicate that the neural drive in pathological tremor is compatible with one central network

  4. Dopamine Induces Oscillatory Activities in Human Midbrain Neurons with Parkin Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Ping; Hu, Zhixing; Jiang, Houbo; Yan, Zhen; Feng, Jian

    2017-05-02

    Locomotor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) are accompanied by widespread oscillatory neuronal activities in basal ganglia. Here, we show that activation of dopamine D1-class receptors elicits a large rhythmic bursting of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) in midbrain neurons differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) of PD patients with parkin mutations, but not normal subjects. Overexpression of wild-type parkin, but not its PD-causing mutant, abolishes the oscillatory activities in patient neurons. Dopamine induces a delayed enhancement in the amplitude of spontaneous, but not miniature, EPSCs, thus increasing quantal content. The results suggest that presynaptic regulation of glutamatergic transmission by dopamine D1-class receptors is significantly potentiated by parkin mutations. The aberrant dopaminergic regulation of presynaptic glutamatergic transmission in patient-specific iPSC-derived midbrain neurons provides a mechanistic clue to PD pathophysiology, and it demonstrates the usefulness of this model system in understanding how mutations of parkin cause movement symptoms in Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Speech Enhancement with Natural Sounding Residual Noise Based on Connected Time-Frequency Speech Presence Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sørensen Karsten Vandborg

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose time-frequency domain methods for noise estimation and speech enhancement. A speech presence detection method is used to find connected time-frequency regions of speech presence. These regions are used by a noise estimation method and both the speech presence decisions and the noise estimate are used in the speech enhancement method. Different attenuation rules are applied to regions with and without speech presence to achieve enhanced speech with natural sounding attenuated background noise. The proposed speech enhancement method has a computational complexity, which makes it feasible for application in hearing aids. An informal listening test shows that the proposed speech enhancement method has significantly higher mean opinion scores than minimum mean-square error log-spectral amplitude (MMSE-LSA and decision-directed MMSE-LSA.

  6. Fatigue crack propagation of super duplex stainless steel and time-frequency analysis of acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Kee; Nam, Ki Woo; Kang, Chang Yong; Do, Jae Yoon

    2000-01-01

    On this study, the fatigue crack propagation of super duplex stainless steel is investigated in conditions of various volume fraction of austenite phase by changing heat treatment temperature. And we analysed acoustic emission signals during the fatigue test by time-frequency analysis methods. As the temperature of heat treatment increased, volume fraction of austenite decreased and coarse grain was obtained. The specimen heat treated at 1200 deg. C had longer fatigue life and slower rate of crack growth. As a result of time-frequency analyze of acoustic emission signals during fatigue test, main frequency was 200∼300 kHz having no correlation with heat treatment and crack length, and 500 kHz was obtained by dimple and separate of inclusion

  7. The leak location package for assessment of the time-frequency correlation method for leak location

    OpenAIRE

    Faerman, Vladimir Andreevich; Cheremnov, A. G.; Avramchuk, Valery Stepanovich; Shepetovsky, Denis Vladimirovich

    2017-01-01

    The paper describes the simplest implementation of a software and hardware package for acoustic correlation leak location and results of its performance assessment for location of water leaks from a metallic pipe in laboratory conditions. A distinctive feature of this leak locator is the use of the software based on the time-frequency correlation analysis of signals, which was proposed in our previous papers. Comparative analysis results are given for the information content of classical and ...

  8. Bearing performance degradation assessment based on time-frequency code features and SOM network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yan; Tang, Baoping; Han, Yan; Deng, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Bearing performance degradation assessment and prognostics are extremely important in supporting maintenance decision and guaranteeing the system’s reliability. To achieve this goal, this paper proposes a novel feature extraction method for the degradation assessment and prognostics of bearings. Features of time-frequency codes (TFCs) are extracted from the time-frequency distribution using a hybrid procedure based on short-time Fourier transform (STFT) and non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) theory. An alternative way to design the health indicator is investigated by quantifying the similarity between feature vectors using a self-organizing map (SOM) network. On the basis of this idea, a new health indicator called time-frequency code quantification error (TFCQE) is proposed to assess the performance degradation of the bearing. This indicator is constructed based on the bearing real-time behavior and the SOM model that is previously trained with only the TFC vectors under the normal condition. Vibration signals collected from the bearing run-to-failure tests are used to validate the developed method. The comparison results demonstrate the superiority of the proposed TFCQE indicator over many other traditional features in terms of feature quality metrics, incipient degradation identification and achieving accurate prediction. Highlights • Time-frequency codes are extracted to reflect the signals’ characteristics. • SOM network served as a tool to quantify the similarity between feature vectors. • A new health indicator is proposed to demonstrate the whole stage of degradation development. • The method is useful for extracting the degradation features and detecting the incipient degradation. • The superiority of the proposed method is verified using experimental data. (paper)

  9. Application of Choi—Williams Reduced Interference Time Frequency Distribution to Machinery Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard A. Gaberson

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses time frequency analysis of machinery diagnostic vibration signals. The short time Fourier transform, the Wigner, and the Choi–Williams distributions are explained and illustrated with test cases. Examples of Choi—Williams analyses of machinery vibration signals are presented. The analyses detect discontinuities in the signals and their timing, amplitude and frequency modulation, and the presence of different components in a vibration signal.

  10. Time-Frequency Characterization of Cerebral Hemodynamics of Migraine Sufferers as Assessed by NIRS Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Molinari

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS is a noninvasive system for the real-time monitoring of the concentration of oxygenated (O2Hb and reduced (HHb hemoglobin in the brain cortex. O2Hb and HHb concentrations vary in response to cerebral autoregulation. Sixty-eight women (14 migraineurs without aura, 49 migraineurs with aura, and 5 controls performed breath-holding and hyperventilation during NIRS recordings. Signals were processed using the Choi-Williams time-frequency transform in order to measure the power variation of the very-low frequencies (VLF: 20–40 mHz and of the low frequencies (LF: 40–140 mHz. Results showed that migraineurs without aura present different LF and VLF power levels than controls and migraineurs with aura. The accurate power measurement of the time-frequency analysis allowed for the discrimination of the subjects' hemodynamic patterns. The time-frequency analysis of NIRS signals can be used in clinical practice to assess cerebral hemodynamics.

  11. Time-Frequency Characterization of Cerebral Hemodynamics of Migraine Sufferers as Assessed by NIRS Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liboni William

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS is a noninvasive system for the real-time monitoring of the concentration of oxygenated ( and reduced (HHb hemoglobin in the brain cortex. and HHb concentrations vary in response to cerebral autoregulation. Sixty-eight women (14 migraineurs without aura, 49 migraineurs with aura, and 5 controls performed breath-holding and hyperventilation during NIRS recordings. Signals were processed using the Choi-Williams time-frequency transform in order to measure the power variation of the very-low frequencies (VLF: 20–40 mHz and of the low frequencies (LF: 40–140 mHz. Results showed that migraineurs without aura present different LF and VLF power levels than controls and migraineurs with aura. The accurate power measurement of the time-frequency analysis allowed for the discrimination of the subjects' hemodynamic patterns. The time-frequency analysis of NIRS signals can be used in clinical practice to assess cerebral hemodynamics.

  12. Analysis of muscle fatigue conditions using time-frequency images and GLCM features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthick P.A.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, an attempt has been made to differentiate muscle non-fatigue and fatigue conditions using sEMG signals and texture representation of the time-frequency images. The sEMG signals are recorded from the biceps brachii muscle of 25 healthy adult volunteers during dynamic fatiguing contraction. The first and last curls of these signals are considered as the non-fatigue and fatigue zones, respectively. These signals are preprocessed and the time-frequency spectrum is computed using short time fourier transform (STFT. Gray-Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM is extracted from low (15–45 Hz, medium (46–95 Hz and high (96–150 Hz frequency bands of the time-frequency images. Further, the features such as contrast, correlation, energy and homogeneity are calculated from the resultant matrices. The results show that the high frequency band based features are able to differentiate non-fatigue and fatigue conditions. The features such as correlation, contrast and homogeneity extracted at angles 0°, 45°, 90°, and 135° are found to be distinct with high statistical significance (p < 0.0001. Hence, this framework can be used for analysis of neuromuscular disorders.

  13. The time-frequency method of signal analysis in internal combustion engine diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avramchuk, V. S.; Kazmin, V. P.; Faerman, V. A.; Le, V. T.

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents the results of the study of applicability of time-frequency correlation functions to solving the problems of internal combustion engine fault diagnostics. The proposed methods are theoretically justified and experimentally tested. In particular, the method’s applicability is illustrated by the example of specially generated signals that simulate the vibration of an engine both during the normal operation and in the case of a malfunction in the system supplying fuel to the cylinders. This method was confirmed during an experiment with an automobile internal combustion engine. The study offers the main findings of the simulation and the experiment and highlights certain characteristic features of time-frequency autocorrelation functions that allow one to identify malfunctions in an engine’s cylinder. The possibility in principle of using time-frequency correlation functions in function testing of the internal combustion engine is demonstrated. The paper’s conclusion proposes further research directions including the application of the method to diagnosing automobile gearboxes.

  14. Using time-frequency analysis to determine time-resolved detonation velocity with microwave interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittell, David E; Mares, Jesus O; Son, Steven F

    2015-04-01

    Two time-frequency analysis methods based on the short-time Fourier transform (STFT) and continuous wavelet transform (CWT) were used to determine time-resolved detonation velocities with microwave interferometry (MI). The results were directly compared to well-established analysis techniques consisting of a peak-picking routine as well as a phase unwrapping method (i.e., quadrature analysis). The comparison is conducted on experimental data consisting of transient detonation phenomena observed in triaminotrinitrobenzene and ammonium nitrate-urea explosives, representing high and low quality MI signals, respectively. Time-frequency analysis proved much more capable of extracting useful and highly resolved velocity information from low quality signals than the phase unwrapping and peak-picking methods. Additionally, control of the time-frequency methods is mainly constrained to a single parameter which allows for a highly unbiased analysis method to extract velocity information. In contrast, the phase unwrapping technique introduces user based variability while the peak-picking technique does not achieve a highly resolved velocity result. Both STFT and CWT methods are proposed as improved additions to the analysis methods applied to MI detonation experiments, and may be useful in similar applications.

  15. Time-frequency manifold correlation matching for periodic fault identification in rotating machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qingbo; Wang, Xiangxiang

    2013-05-01

    For rotating machines, the localized faults of key components generally represent as periodic transient impulses in vibration signals. The existence of background noise will corrupt transient impulses in practice, and will thus increase the difficulty to identify specific faults. This paper combines the concepts of time-frequency manifold (TFM) and image template matching, and proposes a novel TFM correlation matching method to enhance identification of the periodic faults. This method is to conduct correlation matching of a vibration signal in the time-frequency domain by using the TFM with a short duration as a template. By this method, the time-frequency distribution (TFD) of a vibration signal is firstly achieved by the Smoothed Pseudo-Wigner-Ville distribution (SPWVD) method. Then the TFM template is learned to do correlation matching with the TFD of the analyzed signal. Finally, the ridge is extracted from the correlation matching image and the ridge coefficients are analyzed for periodic fault identification. The proposed method takes advantages of the TFM in noise suppression and template matching in object enhancement, and can enhance the fault impulses of interest in a unified scale. The novel method is verified to be superior to traditional enveloping method with providing smoother and clearer fault impulse component via applications to gearbox fault detection and bearing defect identification.

  16. Muscle fatigue detection in EMG using time-frequency methods, ICA and neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subasi, Abdulhamit; Kiymik, M Kemal

    2010-08-01

    The electromyography (EMG) signals give information about different features of muscle function. Real-time measurements of EMG have been used to observe the dissociation between the electrical and mechanical measures that occurs with fatigue. The purpose of this study was to detect fatigue of biceps brachia muscle using time-frequency methods and independent component analysis (ICA). In order to realize this aim, EMG activity obtained from activated muscle during a phasic voluntary movement was recorded for 14 healthy young persons and EMG signals were observed in time-frequency domain for determination of fatigue. Time-frequency methods are used for the processing of signals that are non-stationary and time varying. The EMG contains transient signals related to muscle activity. The proposed method for the detection of muscle fatigue is automated by using artificial neural networks (ANN). The results show that ANN with ICA separates EMG signals from fresh and fatigued muscles, hence providing a visualization of the onset of fatigue over time. The system is adaptable to different subjects and conditions since the techniques used are not subject or workload regime specific.

  17. Conservation properties of numerical integrators for highly oscillatory Hamiltonian systems

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, David

    2017-01-01

    Modulated Fourier expansion is used to show long-time near-conservation of the total and oscillatory energies of numerical methods for Hamiltonian systems with highly oscillatory solutions. The numerical methods considered are an extension of the trigonometric methods. A brief discussion of conservation properties in the continuous problem and in the multi-frequency case is also given

  18. Oscillatory high hydrostatic pressure inactivation of Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palou, E; López-Malo, A; Barbosa-Cánovas, G V; Welti-Chanes, J; Swanson, B G

    1998-09-01

    Zygosaccharomyces bailii inactivation was evaluated in oscillatory high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatments at sublethal pressures (207, 241, or 276 MPa) and compared with continuous HHP treatments in laboratory model systems with a water activity (aw) of 0.98 and pH 3.5. The yeast was inoculated into laboratory model systems and subjected to HHP in sterile bags. Two HHP treatments were conducted: continuous (holding times of 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 60, or 90 min) and oscillatory (two, three, or four cycles with holding times of 5 min and two cycles with holding times of 10 min). Oscillatory pressure treatments increased the effectiveness of HHP processing. For equal holding times, Z. bailii counts decreased as the number of cycles increased. Holding times of 20 min in HHP oscillatory treatments at 276 MPa assured inactivation (bailii initial inoculum. Oscillatory pressurization could be useful to decrease Z. bailii inactivation time.

  19. Structure-preserving algorithms for oscillatory differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Xinyuan; Wang, Bin

    2013-01-01

    Structure-Preserving Algorithms for Oscillatory Differential Equations describes a large number of highly effective and efficient structure-preserving algorithms for second-order oscillatory differential equations by using theoretical analysis and numerical validation. Structure-preserving algorithms for differential equations, especially for oscillatory differential equations, play an important role in the accurate simulation of oscillatory problems in applied sciences and engineering. The book discusses novel advances in the ARKN, ERKN, two-step ERKN, Falkner-type and energy-preserving methods, etc. for oscillatory differential equations. The work is intended for scientists, engineers, teachers and students who are interested in structure-preserving algorithms for differential equations. Xinyuan Wu is a professor at Nanjing University; Xiong You is an associate professor at Nanjing Agricultural University; Bin Wang is a joint Ph.D student of Nanjing University and University of Cambridge.

  20. Annual Report on Radar Image Enhancement, Feature Extraction and Motion Compensation Using Joint Time-Frequency Techniques

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hao, Ling

    2000-01-01

    This report summarizes the scientific progress on the research grant "Radar Image Enhancement, Feature Extraction, and Motion Compensation Using Joint Time-Frequency Techniques" during the period 15...

  1. Localized Oscillatory Energy Conversion in Magnetopause Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, J. L.; Ergun, R. E.; Cassak, P. A.; Webster, J. M.; Torbert, R. B.; Giles, B. L.; Dorelli, J. C.; Rager, A. C.; Hwang, K.-J.; Phan, T. D.; Genestreti, K. J.; Allen, R. C.; Chen, L.-J.; Wang, S.; Gershman, D.; Le Contel, O.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Wilder, F. D.; Graham, D. B.; Hesse, M.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.; Price, L. M.; Shay, M. A.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; Pollock, C. J.; Denton, R. E.; Newman, D. L.

    2018-02-01

    Data from the NASA Magnetospheric Multiscale mission are used to investigate asymmetric magnetic reconnection at the dayside boundary between the Earth's magnetosphere and the solar wind. High-resolution measurements of plasmas and fields are used to identify highly localized ( 15 electron Debye lengths) standing wave structures with large electric field amplitudes (up to 100 mV/m). These wave structures are associated with spatially oscillatory energy conversion, which appears as alternatingly positive and negative values of J · E. For small guide magnetic fields the wave structures occur in the electron stagnation region at the magnetosphere edge of the electron diffusion region. For larger guide fields the structures also occur near the reconnection X-line. This difference is explained in terms of channels for the out-of-plane current (agyrotropic electrons at the stagnation point and guide field-aligned electrons at the X-line).

  2. Automatic control of oscillatory penetration apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucon, Peter A

    2015-01-06

    A system and method for controlling an oscillatory penetration apparatus. An embodiment is a system and method for controlling a sonic drill having a displacement and an operating range and operating at a phase difference, said sonic drill comprising a push-pull piston and eccentrics, said method comprising: operating the push-pull piston at an initial push-pull force while the eccentrics are operated at a plurality of different operating frequencies within the operating range of the sonic drill and measuring the displacement at each operating frequency; determining an efficient operating frequency for the material being drilled and operating the eccentrics at said efficient operating frequency; determining the phase difference at which the sonic drill is operating; and if the phase difference is not substantially equal to minus ninety degrees, operating the push-pull piston at another push-pull force.

  3. Laser velocimeter application to oscillatory liquid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartrell, L. R.

    1978-01-01

    A laser velocimeter technique was used to measure the mean velocity and the frequency characteristics of an oscillatory flow component generated with a rotating flapper in liquid flow system at Reynolds numbers approximating 93,000. The velocity information was processed in the frequency domain using a tracker whose output was used to determine the flow spectrum. This was accomplished with the use of an autocorrelator/Fourier transform analyzer and a spectrum averaging analyzer where induced flow oscillations up to 40 Hz were detected. Tests were conducted at a mean flow velocity of approximately 2 m/s. The experimental results show that the laser velocimeter can provide quantitative information such as liquid flow velocity and frequency spectrum with a possible application to cryogenic fluid flows.

  4. Nonlinear dynamics of the membrane potential of a bursting pacemaker cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Miranda, J. M.

    2012-03-01

    This article presents the results of an exploration of one two-parameter space of the Chay model of a cell excitable membrane. There are two main regions: a peripheral one, where the system dynamics will relax to an equilibrium point, and a central one where the expected dynamics is oscillatory. In the second region, we observe a variety of self-sustained oscillations including periodic oscillation, as well as bursting dynamics of different types. These oscillatory dynamics can be observed as periodic oscillations with different periodicities, and in some cases, as chaotic dynamics. These results, when displayed in bifurcation diagrams, result in complex bifurcation structures, which have been suggested as relevant to understand biological cell signaling.

  5. Bursting in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky Reaction added with Phenol in a Batch Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadena, Ariel; Agreda, Jesus, E-mail: jaagredab@unal.edu.co [Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia); Barragan, Daniel [Escuela de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Medellin (Colombia)

    2013-12-01

    The classic Belousov-Zhabotinski reaction was modified by adding phenol as a second organic substrate that kinetically competes with the malonic acid in the reduction of Ce{sup 4+} to Ce{sup 3+} and in the removal of molecular bromine of the reaction mixture. The oscillating reaction of two substrates exhibited burst firing and an oscillatory period of long duration. Analysis of experimental data shows an increasing of the bursting phenomenon, with a greater spiking in the burst firing and with a longer quiescent state, as a function of the initial phenol concentration increase. It was hypothesized that the bursting phenomenon can be explained introducing a redox cycle between the reduced phenolic species (hydroxyphenols) and the oxidized ones (quinones). The hypothesis was experimentally and numerically tested and from the results it is possible to conclude that the bursting phenomenon exhibited by the oscillating reaction of two substrates is mainly driven by a p-di-hydroxy-benzene/p-benzoquinone redox cycle (author)

  6. Magnetron: Fitting bursts from magnetars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppenkothen, Daniela; Brewer, Brendon J.; Hogg, David W.; Murray, Iain; Frean, Marcus

    2015-02-01

    Magnetron, written in Python, decomposes magnetar bursts into a superposition of small spike-like features with a simple functional form, where the number of model components is itself part of the inference problem. Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling and reversible jumps between models with different numbers of parameters are used to characterize the posterior distributions of the model parameters and the number of components per burst.

  7. 30 CFR 57.3461 - Rock bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rock bursts. 57.3461 Section 57.3461 Mineral...-Underground Only § 57.3461 Rock bursts. (a) Operators of mines which have experienced a rock burst shall— (1) Within twenty four hours report to the nearest MSHA office each rock burst which: (i) Causes persons to...

  8. A Space-Time-Frequency Dictionary for Sparse Cortical Source Localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korats, Gundars; Le Cam, Steven; Ranta, Radu; Louis-Dorr, Valerie

    2016-09-01

    Cortical source imaging aims at identifying activated cortical areas on the surface of the cortex from the raw electroencephalogram (EEG) data. This problem is ill posed, the number of channels being very low compared to the number of possible source positions. In some realistic physiological situations, the active areas are sparse in space and of short time durations, and the amount of spatio-temporal data to carry the inversion is then limited. In this study, we propose an original data driven space-time-frequency (STF) dictionary which takes into account simultaneously both spatial and time-frequency sparseness while preserving smoothness in the time frequency (i.e., nonstationary smooth time courses in sparse locations). Based on these assumptions, we take benefit of the matching pursuit (MP) framework for selecting the most relevant atoms in this highly redundant dictionary. We apply two recent MP algorithms, single best replacement (SBR) and source deflated matching pursuit, and we compare the results using a spatial dictionary and the proposed STF dictionary to demonstrate the improvements of our multidimensional approach. We also provide comparison using well-established inversion methods, FOCUSS and RAP-MUSIC, analyzing performances under different degrees of nonstationarity and signal to noise ratio. Our STF dictionary combined with the SBR approach provides robust performances on realistic simulations. From a computational point of view, the algorithm is embedded in the wavelet domain, ensuring high efficiency in term of computation time. The proposed approach ensures fast and accurate sparse cortical localizations on highly nonstationary and noisy data.

  9. Study of time-frequency characteristics of single snores: extracting new information for sleep apnea diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo Escario, Y.; Blanco Almazan, D.; Camara Vazquez, M.A.; Jane Campos, R.

    2016-07-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a highly prevalent chronic disease, especially in elderly and obese population. Despite constituting a huge health and economic problem, most patients remain undiagnosed due to limitations in current strategies. Therefore, it is essential to find cost-effective diagnostic alternatives. One of these novel approaches is the analysis of acoustic snoring signals. Snoring is an early symptom of OSA which carries pathophysiological information of high diagnostic value. For this reason, the main objective of this work is to study the characteristics of single snores of different types, from healthy and OSA subjects. To do that, we analyzed snoring signals from previous databases and developed an experimental protocol to record simulated OSA-related sounds and characterize the response of two commercial tracheal microphones. Automatic programs for filtering, downsampling, event detection and time-frequency analysis were built in MATLAB. We found that time-frequency maps and spectral parameters (central, mean and peak frequency and energy in the 100-500 Hz band) allow distinguishing regular snores of healthy subjects from non-regular snores and snores of OSA subjects. Regarding the two commercial microphones, we found that one of them was a suitable snoring sensor, while the other had a too restricted frequency response. Future work shall include a higher number of episodes and subjects, but our study has contributed to show how important the differences between regular and non-regular snores can be for OSA diagnosis, and how much clinically relevant information can be extracted from time-frequency maps and spectral parameters of single snores. (Author)

  10. Spectrally Efficient OFDMA Lattice Structure via Toroidal Waveforms on the Time-Frequency Plane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan Aldirmaz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the performance of frequency division multiplexed (FDM signals, where multiple orthogonal Hermite-Gaussian carriers are used to increase the bandwidth efficiency. Multiple Hermite-Gaussian functions are modulated by a data set as a multicarrier modulation scheme in a single time-frequency region constituting toroidal waveform in a rectangular OFDMA system. The proposed work outperforms in the sense of bandwidth efficiency compared to the transmission scheme where only single Gaussian pulses are used as the transmission base. We investigate theoretical and simulation results of the proposed methods.

  11. Multiple linear regression to estimate time-frequency electrophysiological responses in single trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, L; Zhang, Z G; Mouraux, A; Iannetti, G D

    2015-05-01

    Transient sensory, motor or cognitive event elicit not only phase-locked event-related potentials (ERPs) in the ongoing electroencephalogram (EEG), but also induce non-phase-locked modulations of ongoing EEG oscillations. These modulations can be detected when single-trial waveforms are analysed in the time-frequency domain, and consist in stimulus-induced decreases (event-related desynchronization, ERD) or increases (event-related synchronization, ERS) of synchrony in the activity of the underlying neuronal populations. ERD and ERS reflect changes in the parameters that control oscillations in neuronal networks and, depending on the frequency at which they occur, represent neuronal mechanisms involved in cortical activation, inhibition and binding. ERD and ERS are commonly estimated by averaging the time-frequency decomposition of single trials. However, their trial-to-trial variability that can reflect physiologically-important information is lost by across-trial averaging. Here, we aim to (1) develop novel approaches to explore single-trial parameters (including latency, frequency and magnitude) of ERP/ERD/ERS; (2) disclose the relationship between estimated single-trial parameters and other experimental factors (e.g., perceived intensity). We found that (1) stimulus-elicited ERP/ERD/ERS can be correctly separated using principal component analysis (PCA) decomposition with Varimax rotation on the single-trial time-frequency distributions; (2) time-frequency multiple linear regression with dispersion term (TF-MLRd) enhances the signal-to-noise ratio of ERP/ERD/ERS in single trials, and provides an unbiased estimation of their latency, frequency, and magnitude at single-trial level; (3) these estimates can be meaningfully correlated with each other and with other experimental factors at single-trial level (e.g., perceived stimulus intensity and ERP magnitude). The methods described in this article allow exploring fully non-phase-locked stimulus-induced cortical

  12. Linear and Nonlinear Time-Frequency Analysis for Parameter Estimation of Resident Space Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-22

    technical report is organised as follows: • In Section 2 Time-Frequency transforms are discussed and parameters of interests are identified. • In Section...NRMSE 0,206 0,292 0,428 %NRMSE 0,375 0,405 0,501 Table 5: table 4 continued The worst behaviour is obtained in the case of RSO 2. The reason behind...quantisation effect. On the other hand, the best behaviour is produced by RSO 1, whose Doppler frequency is the highest. By looking at tables 4 and 5, and not

  13. Combining time-frequency and spatial information for the detection of sleep spindles

    OpenAIRE

    O'Reilly, Christian; Godbout, Jonathan; Carrier, Julie; Lina, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    EEG sleep spindles are short (0.5–2.0 s) bursts of activity in the 11–16 Hz band occurring during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. This sporadic activity is thought to play a role in memory consolidation, brain plasticity, and protection of sleep integrity. Many automatic detectors have been proposed to assist or replace experts for sleep spindle scoring. However, these algorithms usually detect too many events making it difficult to achieve a good tradeoff between sensitivity (Se) and fa...

  14. Cross Time-Frequency Analysis of Gastrocnemius Electromyographic Signals in Hypertensive and Nonhypertensive Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Patrick; Krotish, Debra; Shin, Yong-June; Hirth, Victor

    2010-12-01

    The effects of hypertension are chronic and continuous; it affects gait, balance, and fall risk. Therefore, it is desirable to assess gait health across hypertensive and nonhypertensive subjects in order to prevent or reduce the risk of falls. Analysis of electromyography (EMG) signals can identify age related changes of neuromuscular activation due to various neuropathies and myopathies, but it is difficult to translate these medical changes to clinical diagnosis. To examine and compare geriatrics patients with these gait-altering diseases, we acquire EMG muscle activation signals, and by use of a timesynchronized mat capable of recording pressure information, we localize the EMG data to the gait cycle, ensuring identical comparison across subjects. Using time-frequency analysis on the EMG signal, in conjunction with several parameters obtained from the time-frequency analyses, we can determine the statistical discrepancy between diseases. We base these parameters on physiological manifestations caused by hypertension, as well as other comorbities that affect the geriatrics community. Using these metrics in a small population, we identify a statistical discrepancy between a control group and subjects with hypertension, neuropathy, diabetes, osteoporosis, arthritis, and several other common diseases which severely affect the geriatrics community.

  15. Time-frequency analysis of foetal heart sound signal for the prediction of prenatal anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittra, A K; Choudhari, N K

    2009-01-01

    Motion of the foetal heart gives rise to vibrations and sounds that can be acquired through the surface of the maternal abdominal wall. The process is called foetal phonocardiography (fPCG) and its study has shown to be a very useful mechanism to evaluate the wellbeing of the unborn. These signals exhibit innate rhythms and periodicity that are more readily expressed and appreciated in terms of frequency than time units. Time-frequency distribution shows the spectral composition of signal at a particular time instant, which is also known as a spectrogram. This work investigates the analysis of foetal heart sound using time frequency distribution generated by short-time Fourier transform (STFT). An innovative method is presented for foetal heart sound acquisition, processing and coloured spectral representation, which can be used in a portable foetal home monitoring system. The outcome of the work is a numerous spectral display produced by the system for varied real and simulated foetal heart sound signals. A comparative study of normal and abnormal heart sound is presented. The spectrograms exhibit noticeable morphological differences in terms of duration and spectral composition of the sounds. The study suggests that STFT based coloured spectrograms can become an important diagnostic tool, and it is expected that the presented work will facilitate the potential use of the method in prediction of the prenatal anomalies.

  16. Time-frequency doubly selective channel estimation based on compressed sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tu Yuliang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper,considering time-frequency doubly selective channel,we utilize the channel's time correlation that the channel coefficientscorresponding tothe neighboring instants have a strong correlation.And we present a linear approximation method,which effectively reduces the number of unknown parameters.Considering the sparseness of the wireless channel in the delay domain,this paper reconstructs unknown channel parameters of the proposed model based on compressed sensing (CS theory.In the simulations,we observe the system performance of the linear approximation model and the non-linear approximation model,respectively,and present the normalized mean squared error (NMSE curves based on the least square (LS,orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP and sparse Bayesian learning (SBL algorithms.Simulation results show that the linear approximation method can effectively model the time-frequency doubly-selective channels.For the proposed linear approximation model,SBL algorithm can accurately recover the channel response,and overcome the Doppler effecteffectively.

  17. Correcting Spatial Variance of RCM for GEO SAR Imaging Based on Time-Frequency Scaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze Yu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Compared with low-Earth orbit synthetic aperture radar (SAR, a geosynchronous (GEO SAR can have a shorter revisit period and vaster coverage. However, relative motion between this SAR and targets is more complicated, which makes range cell migration (RCM spatially variant along both range and azimuth. As a result, efficient and precise imaging becomes difficult. This paper analyzes and models spatial variance for GEO SAR in the time and frequency domains. A novel algorithm for GEO SAR imaging with a resolution of 2 m in both the ground cross-range and range directions is proposed, which is composed of five steps. The first is to eliminate linear azimuth variance through the first azimuth time scaling. The second is to achieve RCM correction and range compression. The third is to correct residual azimuth variance by the second azimuth time-frequency scaling. The fourth and final steps are to accomplish azimuth focusing and correct geometric distortion. The most important innovation of this algorithm is implementation of the time-frequency scaling to correct high-order azimuth variance. As demonstrated by simulation results, this algorithm can accomplish GEO SAR imaging with good and uniform imaging quality over the entire swath.

  18. Crosslinking EEG time-frequency decomposition and fMRI in error monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Sven; Labrenz, Franziska; Themann, Maria; Wascher, Edmund; Beste, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Recent studies implicate a common response monitoring system, being active during erroneous and correct responses. Converging evidence from time-frequency decompositions of the response-related ERP revealed that evoked theta activity at fronto-central electrode positions differentiates correct from erroneous responses in simple tasks, but also in more complex tasks. However, up to now it is unclear how different electrophysiological parameters of error processing, especially at the level of neural oscillations are related, or predictive for BOLD signal changes reflecting error processing at a functional-neuroanatomical level. The present study aims to provide crosslinks between time domain information, time-frequency information, MRI BOLD signal and behavioral parameters in a task examining error monitoring due to mistakes in a mental rotation task. The results show that BOLD signal changes reflecting error processing on a functional-neuroanatomical level are best predicted by evoked oscillations in the theta frequency band. Although the fMRI results in this study account for an involvement of the anterior cingulate cortex, middle frontal gyrus, and the Insula in error processing, the correlation of evoked oscillations and BOLD signal was restricted to a coupling of evoked theta and anterior cingulate cortex BOLD activity. The current results indicate that although there is a distributed functional-neuroanatomical network mediating error processing, only distinct parts of this network seem to modulate electrophysiological properties of error monitoring.

  19. Application of Time-Frequency Domain Transform to Three-Dimensional Interpolation of Medical Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Shengqing; Chen, Yimin; Li, Zeyu; Lu, Jiahui; Gao, Mingke; Lu, Rongrong

    2017-11-01

    Medical image three-dimensional (3D) interpolation is an important means to improve the image effect in 3D reconstruction. In image processing, the time-frequency domain transform is an efficient method. In this article, several time-frequency domain transform methods are applied and compared in 3D interpolation. And a Sobel edge detection and 3D matching interpolation method based on wavelet transform is proposed. We combine wavelet transform, traditional matching interpolation methods, and Sobel edge detection together in our algorithm. What is more, the characteristics of wavelet transform and Sobel operator are used. They deal with the sub-images of wavelet decomposition separately. Sobel edge detection 3D matching interpolation method is used in low-frequency sub-images under the circumstances of ensuring high frequency undistorted. Through wavelet reconstruction, it can get the target interpolation image. In this article, we make 3D interpolation of the real computed tomography (CT) images. Compared with other interpolation methods, our proposed method is verified to be effective and superior.

  20. Epileptic Seizure Classification of EEGs Using Time-Frequency Analysis Based Multiscale Radial Basis Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Wang, Xu-Dong; Luo, Mei-Lin; Li, Ke; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Guo, Qi

    2018-03-01

    The automatic detection of epileptic seizures from electroencephalography (EEG) signals is crucial for the localization and classification of epileptic seizure activity. However, seizure processes are typically dynamic and nonstationary, and thus, distinguishing rhythmic discharges from nonstationary processes is one of the challenging problems. In this paper, an adaptive and localized time-frequency representation in EEG signals is proposed by means of multiscale radial basis functions (MRBF) and a modified particle swarm optimization (MPSO) to improve both time and frequency resolution simultaneously, which is a novel MRBF-MPSO framework of the time-frequency feature extraction for epileptic EEG signals. The dimensionality of extracted features can be greatly reduced by the principle component analysis algorithm before the most discriminative features selected are fed into a support vector machine (SVM) classifier with the radial basis function (RBF) in order to separate epileptic seizure from seizure-free EEG signals. The classification performance of the proposed method has been evaluated by using several state-of-art feature extraction algorithms and other five different classifiers like linear discriminant analysis, and logistic regression. The experimental results indicate that the proposed MRBF-MPSO-SVM classification method outperforms competing techniques in terms of classification accuracy, and shows the effectiveness of the proposed method for classification of seizure epochs and seizure-free epochs.

  1. IP Controller Design for Uncertain Two-Mass Torsional System Using Time-Frequency Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Cui

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of industrial production, drive systems are demanded for larger inertias of motors and load machines, whereas shafts should be lightweight. In this situation, it will excite mechanical vibrations in load side, which is harmful for industrial production when the motor works. Because of the complexity of the flexible shaft, it is often difficult to calculate stiffness coefficient of the flexible shaft. Furthermore, only the velocity of driving side could be measured, whereas the driving torque, the load torque, and the velocity of load side are immeasurable. Therefore, it is inconvenient to design the controller for the uncertain system. In this paper, a low-order IP controller is designed for an uncertain two-mass torsional system based on polynomial method and time-frequency analysis (TFA. IP controller parameters are calculated by inertias of driving side and load side as well as the resonant frequency based on polynomial method. Therein, the resonant frequency is identified using the time-frequency analysis (TFA of the velocity step response of the driving side under the open-loop system state, which can not only avoid harmful persistent start-stop excitation signal of the traditional method, but also obtain high recognition accuracy under the condition of weak vibration signal submerged in noise. The effectiveness of the designed IP controller is verified by groups of experiments. Experimental results show that good performance for vibration suppression is obtained for uncertain two-mass torsional system in a medium-low shaft stiffness condition.

  2. Detection of epileptiform activity in EEG signals based on time-frequency and nonlinear analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragoljub eGajic

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a new technique for detection of epileptiform activity in EEG signals. After preprocessing of EEG signals we extract representative features in time, frequency and time-frequency domain as well as using nonlinear analysis. The features are extracted in a few frequency sub-bands of clinical interest since these sub-bands showed much better discriminatory characteristics compared with the whole frequency band. Then we optimally reduce the dimension of feature space to two using scatter matrices. A decision about the presence of epileptiform activity in EEG signals is made by quadratic classifiers designed in the reduced two-dimensional feature space. The accuracy of the technique was tested on three sets of electroencephalographic (EEG signals recorded at the University Hospital Bonn: surface EEG signals from healthy volunteers, intracranial EEG signals from the epilepsy patients during the seizure free interval from within the seizure focus and intracranial EEG signals of epileptic seizures also from within the seizure focus. An overall detection accuracy of 98.7% was achieved.

  3. Robust parameterization of time-frequency characteristics for recognition of musical genres of Mexican culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Rosas, Osvaldo G.; Rivera Martínez, José L.; Maldonado Cano, Luis A.; López Rodríguez, Mario; Amaya Reyes, Laura M.; Cano Martínez, Elizabeth; García Vázquez, Mireya S.; Ramírez Acosta, Alejandro A.

    2017-09-01

    The automatic identification and classification of musical genres based on the sound similarities to form musical textures, it is a very active investigation area. In this context it has been created recognition systems of musical genres, formed by time-frequency characteristics extraction methods and by classification methods. The selection of this methods are important for a good development in the recognition systems. In this article they are proposed the Mel-Frequency Cepstral Coefficients (MFCC) methods as a characteristic extractor and Support Vector Machines (SVM) as a classifier for our system. The stablished parameters of the MFCC method in the system by our time-frequency analysis, represents the gamma of Mexican culture musical genres in this article. For the precision of a classification system of musical genres it is necessary that the descriptors represent the correct spectrum of each gender; to achieve this we must realize a correct parametrization of the MFCC like the one we present in this article. With the system developed we get satisfactory detection results, where the least identification percentage of musical genres was 66.67% and the one with the most precision was 100%.

  4. Time-frequency peak filtering for random noise attenuation of magnetic resonance sounding signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tingting; Zhang, Yang; Yi, Xiaofeng; Fan, Tiehu; Wan, Ling

    2018-05-01

    When measuring in a geomagnetic field, the method of magnetic resonance sounding (MRS) is often limited because of the notably low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Most current studies focus on discarding spiky noise and power-line harmonic noise cancellation. However, the effects of random noise should not be underestimated. The common method for random noise attenuation is stacking, but collecting multiple recordings merely to suppress random noise is time-consuming. Moreover, stacking is insufficient to suppress high-level random noise. Here, we propose the use of time-frequency peak filtering for random noise attenuation, which is performed after the traditional de-spiking and power-line harmonic removal method. By encoding the noisy signal with frequency modulation and estimating the instantaneous frequency using the peak of the time-frequency representation of the encoded signal, the desired MRS signal can be acquired from only one stack. The performance of the proposed method is tested on synthetic envelope signals and field data from different surveys. Good estimations of the signal parameters are obtained at different SNRs. Moreover, an attempt to use the proposed method to handle a single recording provides better results compared to 16 stacks. Our results suggest that the number of stacks can be appropriately reduced to shorten the measurement time and improve the measurement efficiency.

  5. Aurally-adequate time-frequency analysis for scattered sound in auditoria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Molly K.; Xiang, Ning; Kleiner, Mendel

    2005-04-01

    The goal of this work was to apply an aurally-adequate time-frequency analysis technique to the analysis of sound scattering effects in auditoria. Time-frequency representations were developed as a motivated effort that takes into account binaural hearing, with a specific implementation of interaural cross-correlation process. A model of the human auditory system was implemented in the MATLAB platform based on two previous models [A. Härmä and K. Palomäki, HUTear, Espoo, Finland; and M. A. Akeroyd, A. Binaural Cross-correlogram Toolbox for MATLAB (2001), University of Sussex, Brighton]. These stages include proper frequency selectivity, the conversion of the mechanical motion of the basilar membrane to neural impulses, and binaural hearing effects. The model was then used in the analysis of room impulse responses with varying scattering characteristics. This paper discusses the analysis results using simulated and measured room impulse responses. [Work supported by the Frank H. and Eva B. Buck Foundation.

  6. Burst Suppression for ICP Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiler, Frederick A; Akoth, Eva; Gillman, Lawrence M; West, Michael

    2017-02-01

    The goal of our study was to perform a systematic review of the literature to determine the effect that burst suppression has on intracranial pressure (ICP) control. All articles from MEDLINE, BIOSIS, EMBASE, Global Health, Scopus, Cochrane Library, the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (inception to January 2015), reference lists of relevant articles, and gray literature were searched. The strength of evidence was adjudicated using both the Oxford and the Grading of Recommendation Assessment Development and Education (GRADE) methodology. Seven articles were considered for review. A total of 108 patients were studied, all receiving burst suppression therapy. Two studies failed to document a decrease in ICP with burst suppression therapy. There were reports of severe hypotension and increased infection rates with barbiturate-based therapy. Etomidate-based suppressive therapy was linked to severe renal dysfunction. There currently exists both Oxford level 2b and GRADE C evidence to support that achieving burst suppression reduces ICP, and also has no effect on ICP, in severe traumatic brain injury. The literature suggests burst suppression therapy may be useful for ICP reduction in certain cases, although these situations are currently unclear. In addition, the impact on patient functional outcome is unclear. Further prospective study is warranted.

  7. Non-Steady Oscillatory Flow in Coarse Granular Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, O. H.; Gent, M. R. A. van; Meer, J. W. van der

    1992-01-01

    Stationary and oscillatory flow through coarse granular materials have been investigated experimentally at Delft Hydraulics in their oscillating water tunnel with the objective of determining the coefficients of the extended Forchheimer equation. Cylinders, spheres and different types of rock have...

  8. Oscillatory activity in the basal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eusebio, Alexandre; Brown, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The exact mechanisms underlying the dysfunction of the basal ganglia (BG) that leads to movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD) and dystonia still remain unclear. The classic model, based on two distinct pathways and described nearly 20 years ago by Albin and Delong, fails to explain why lesion or stimulation of the globus pallidus interna improves dyskinesias and why lesion or stimulation of the thalamus does not cause prominent bradykinesia. These paradoxes, initially highlighted out by Marsden and Obeso, led to the proposition that the pattern of neuronal discharge determines pathological function. Accordingly, over the past decade, attention has switched from considerations of discharge rate to the characterisation of synchronised activity within BG networks. Here we would like to briefly review current knowledge about synchronised oscillatory activity in the BG and focus on its relationship to abnormal motor function. In particular, we hypothesise that the frequency of synchronisation helps determine the nature of any motor deficit, perhaps as a consequence of the different tuning properties of basal ganglia-cortical sub-circuits.

  9. Processing Oscillatory Signals by Incoherent Feedforward Loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Carolyn; Tsoi, Ryan; Wu, Feilun; You, Lingchong

    2016-09-01

    From the timing of amoeba development to the maintenance of stem cell pluripotency, many biological signaling pathways exhibit the ability to differentiate between pulsatile and sustained signals in the regulation of downstream gene expression. While the networks underlying this signal decoding are diverse, many are built around a common motif, the incoherent feedforward loop (IFFL), where an input simultaneously activates an output and an inhibitor of the output. With appropriate parameters, this motif can exhibit temporal adaptation, where the system is desensitized to a sustained input. This property serves as the foundation for distinguishing input signals with varying temporal profiles. Here, we use quantitative modeling to examine another property of IFFLs-the ability to process oscillatory signals. Our results indicate that the system's ability to translate pulsatile dynamics is limited by two constraints. The kinetics of the IFFL components dictate the input range for which the network is able to decode pulsatile dynamics. In addition, a match between the network parameters and input signal characteristics is required for optimal "counting". We elucidate one potential mechanism by which information processing occurs in natural networks, and our work has implications in the design of synthetic gene circuits for this purpose.

  10. Phonon-Driven Oscillatory Plasmonic Excitonic Nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirschner, Matthew S. [Department; Ding, Wendu [Department; Li, Yuxiu [Center; College; Chapman, Craig T. [Department; Lei, Aiwen [College; Lin, Xiao-Min [Center; Chen, Lin X. [Department; Chemical; Schatz, George C. [Department; Schaller, Richard D. [Department; Center

    2017-12-08

    We demonstrate that coherent acoustic phonons derived from plasmonic nanoparticles can modulate electronic interactions with proximal excitonic molecular species. A series of gold bipyramids with systematically varied aspect ratios and corresponding localized surface plasmon resonance energies, functionalized with a J-aggregated thiacarbocyanine dye molecule, produce two hybridized states that exhibit clear anti-crossing behavior with a Rabi splitting energy of 120 meV. In metal nanoparticles, photoexcitation generates coherent acoustic phonons that cause oscillations in the plasmon resonance energy. In the coupled system, these photo-generated oscillations alter the metal nanoparticle’s energetic contribution to the hybridized system and, as a result, change the coupling between the plasmon and exciton. We demonstrate that such modulations in the hybridization is consistent across a wide range of bipyramid ensembles. We also use Finite-Difference Time Domain calculations to develop a simple model describing this behavior. Such oscillatory plasmonic-excitonic nanomaterials (OPENs) offer a route to manipulate and dynamically-tune the interactions of plasmonic/excitonic systems and unlock a range of potential applications.

  11. Oscillatory Stokes Flow Past a Slip Cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaniappan, D.

    2013-11-01

    Two-dimensional transient slow viscous flow past a circular cylinder with Navier slip boundary conditions is considered in the limit of low-Reynolds number. The oscillatory Stokes flow problem around a cylinder is solved using the stream function method leading to an analytic solution in terms of modified Bessel functions of the second kind. The corresponding steady-state behavior yields the familiar paradoxical result first detected by Stokes. It is noted that the two key parameters, viz., the frequency λ, and the slip coefficient ξ have a significant impact on the flow field in the vicinity of the cylinder contour. In the limit of very low frequency, the flow is dominated by a term containing a well-known biharmonic function found by Stokes that has a singular behavior at infinity. Local streamlines for small times show interesting flow patterns. Attached eddies due to flow separation - observed in the no-slip case - either get detached or pushed away from the cylinder surface as ξ is varied. Computed asymptotic results predict that the flow exhibits inviscid behavior far away from the cylinder in the frequency range 0 < λ << 1 . Although the frequency of oscillations is finite, our exact solutions reveal fairly rapid transitions in the flow domain. Research Enhancement grant, TAMUCC.

  12. Denoising of Ictal EEG Data Using Semi-Blind Source Separation Methods Based on Time-Frequency Priors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajipour Sardouie, Sepideh; Bagher Shamsollahi, Mohammad; Albera, Laurent; Merlet, Isabelle

    2015-05-01

    Removing muscle activity from ictal ElectroEncephaloGram (EEG) data is an essential preprocessing step in diagnosis and study of epileptic disorders. Indeed, at the very beginning of seizures, ictal EEG has a low amplitude and its morphology in the time domain is quite similar to muscular activity. Contrary to the time domain, ictal signals have specific characteristics in the time-frequency domain. In this paper, we use the time-frequency signature of ictal discharges as a priori information on the sources of interest. To extract the time-frequency signature of ictal sources, we use the Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) method. Then, we propose two time-frequency based semi-blind source separation approaches, namely the Time-Frequency-Generalized EigenValue Decomposition (TF-GEVD) and the Time-Frequency-Denoising Source Separation (TF-DSS), for the denoising of ictal signals based on these time-frequency signatures. The performance of the proposed methods is compared with that of CCA and Independent Component Analysis (ICA) approaches for the denoising of simulated ictal EEGs and of real ictal data. The results show the superiority of the proposed methods in comparison with CCA and ICA.

  13. Effect of prolonged wakefulness on electroencephalographic oscillatory activity during sleep

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The human sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) is characterized by the occurrence of distinct oscillatory events such as delta waves sleep spindles and alpha activity. We applied a previously proposed algorithm for the detection of such events and investigated their incidence and frequency in baseline and recovery sleep after 40 h of sustained wakefulness in 27 healthy young subjects. The changes in oscillatory events induced by sleep deprivation were compared to the corresponding spectral change...

  14. Instantaneous parameter estimation in cardiovascular time series by harmonic and time-frequency analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Alessandro; Médigue, Claire; Mangin, Laurence

    2002-12-01

    Time-frequency distributions, such as smoothed pseudo Wigner-Ville distribution (SPWVD), complex demodulation (CDM), and provide useful time-varying spectral parameter estimators. However, each of these methods has limitations that a joint utilization could largely reduce, due to their interesting complementary features. The aim of this paper is to validate the joint SPWVD-CDM method on synthetic and real cardiovascular time series with normal and reduced variability such as in autonomic blockade or autonomic deficiency. We propose two indexes related to the noise present in the signal and to the dispersion of the power spectrum in order to validate instantaneous parameter estimation. In the low-frequency band, the interpretation of the instantaneous frequency and phase of cardiovascular time-series should be discarded in many real-life situations. Conversely, in the high frequency band, under paced breathing, the reliability of the instantaneous parameters is demonstrated even in conditions of reduced cardiovascular variability.

  15. Time-frequency analysis of the restricted three-body problem: transport and resonance transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vela-Arevalo, Luz V; Marsden, Jerrold E

    2004-01-01

    A method of time-frequency analysis based on wavelets is applied to the problem of transport between different regions of the solar system, using the model of the circular restricted three-body problem in both the planar and the spatial versions of the problem. The method is based on the extraction of instantaneous frequencies from the wavelet transform of numerical solutions. Time-varying frequencies provide a good diagnostic tool to discern chaotic trajectories from regular ones, and we can identify resonance islands that greatly affect the dynamics. Good accuracy in the calculation of time-varying frequencies allows us to determine resonance trappings of chaotic trajectories and resonance transitions. We show the relation between resonance transitions and transport in different regions of the phase space

  16. Joint Time-Frequency-Space Classification of EEG in a Brain-Computer Interface Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molina Gary N Garcia

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain-computer interface is a growing field of interest in human-computer interaction with diverse applications ranging from medicine to entertainment. In this paper, we present a system which allows for classification of mental tasks based on a joint time-frequency-space decorrelation, in which mental tasks are measured via electroencephalogram (EEG signals. The efficiency of this approach was evaluated by means of real-time experimentations on two subjects performing three different mental tasks. To do so, a number of protocols for visualization, as well as training with and without feedback, were also developed. Obtained results show that it is possible to obtain good classification of simple mental tasks, in view of command and control, after a relatively small amount of training, with accuracies around 80%, and in real time.

  17. Time-Scale and Time-Frequency Analyses of Irregularly Sampled Astronomical Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Roques

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available We evaluate the quality of spectral restoration in the case of irregular sampled signals in astronomy. We study in details a time-scale method leading to a global wavelet spectrum comparable to the Fourier period, and a time-frequency matching pursuit allowing us to identify the frequencies and to control the error propagation. In both cases, the signals are first resampled with a linear interpolation. Both results are compared with those obtained using Lomb's periodogram and using the weighted waveletZ-transform developed in astronomy for unevenly sampled variable stars observations. These approaches are applied to simulations and to light variations of four variable stars. This leads to the conclusion that the matching pursuit is more efficient for recovering the spectral contents of a pulsating star, even with a preliminary resampling. In particular, the results are almost independent of the quality of the initial irregular sampling.

  18. The Revised Time-Frequency Analysis (R-TFA) Tool for the Swarm Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasis, Georgios; Papadimitriou, Constantinos; Daglis, Thanasis; Giannakis, Omiros; Giamini, Sigiava A.; Vasalos, Georgios; Daglis, Ioannis A.

    2016-08-01

    The time-frequency analysis (TFA) tool is a suite of algorithms based on wavelet transforms and neural networks, tailored to the analysis of Level 1b data from the Swarm mission [1], [2]. The aim of the TFA tool has been to combine the advantages of multi-spacecraft and ground-based monitoring of the geospace environment in order to analyze and study magnetospheric ultra low frequency (ULF) waves. Additionally, the tool has been offered a useful platform to monitor the wave evolution from the outer boundaries of Earth's magnetosphere through the topside ionosphere down to the surface. Here, we present the revised TFA (R-TFA) tool introducing a new user-friendly interface and presenting a number of applications and capabilities that have not been previously included in the earlier versions of the tool.

  19. Time-Frequency (Wigner Analysis of Linear and Nonlinear Pulse Propagation in Optical Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Azaña

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Time-frequency analysis, and, in particular, Wigner analysis, is applied to the study of picosecond pulse propagation through optical fibers in both the linear and nonlinear regimes. The effects of first- and second-order group velocity dispersion (GVD and self-phase modulation (SPM are first analyzed separately. The phenomena resulting from the interplay between GVD and SPM in fibers (e.g., soliton formation or optical wave breaking are also investigated in detail. Wigner analysis is demonstrated to be an extremely powerful tool for investigating pulse propagation dynamics in nonlinear dispersive systems (e.g., optical fibers, providing a clearer and deeper insight into the physical phenomena that determine the behavior of these systems.

  20. Dynamic response and time-frequency analysis for gear tooth crack detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Omar D.; Rantatalo, Matti

    2016-01-01

    Vibration health monitoring is a non-destructive technique which can be applied to detect cracks propagating in gear teeth. This paper studies gear tooth crack detection by investigating the natural frequencies and by performing time-frequency analysis of a 6 DOF dynamic gear model. The gear mesh stiffness used in the model was calculated analytically for different cases of crack sizes. The frequency response functions (FRFs) of the model were derived for healthy and faulty cases and dynamic simulation was performed to obtain the time signal responses. A new approach involving a short-time Fourier transform (STFT) was applied where a fast Fourier transform (FFT) was calculated for successive blocks with different sizes corresponding to the time segments of the varying gear mesh stiffness. The relationship between the different crack sizes and the mesh-stiffness-dependent eigenfrequencies was studied in order to detect the tooth crack and to estimate its size.

  1. Time-Frequency Characterization of Rotating Instabilities in a Centrifugal Pump with a Vaned Diffuser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Pavesi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents acoustic and flowdynamic investigations of large-scale instabilities in a radial pump with a vaned diffuser. Pressure fluctuations were measured with transducers placed flush at the inlet duct, at the impeller discharge, and in the vane diffuser walls. Two impeller rotation speeds were analyzed in the study, at design, and at off-design flow rates. A spectral analysis was carried out on the pressure signals in frequency and in time-frequency domains to identified precursors, inception, and evolution of the pressure instabilities. The results highlighted the existence of a rotating pressure structure at the impeller discharge, having a fluid-dynamical origin and propagating both in the radial direction and inside the impeller. The experimental data were then compared with the results obtained with help of ANSYS CFX computer code; focusing on the changing flow field at part load. Turbulence was reproduced by DES model.

  2. Estimation of body resonances from a time-frequency analysis of violin vibrato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellody, Maureen; Wakefield, Gregory H.

    1999-11-01

    We present a signal-based technique for evaluating a pole-zero representation of the resonant response of a violin instrument. This technique combines time-frequency signal analysis with system identification techniques to determine the pole-zero function that would account for amplitude modulation observed on the partials of violin notes performed with vibrato. Violin vibrato signals are analyzed with the modal distribution to obtain values of instantaneous amplitude and frequency for each partial. From these, input and output functions are synthesized and used to estimate the violin body's impulse response using an infinite impulse response (IIR) system identification procedure. In each case, the input and output functions share the same instantaneous frequency of the measured partial. However, the rapid amplitude variations are present only on the output function. We report on the location and spacing of these estimated resonances and discuss their relationship to those obtained from theoretical predictions and other measurement procedures.

  3. Combined Approach of PNN and Time-Frequency as the Classifier for Power System Transient Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslam Pervez Memon

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The transients in power system cause serious disturbances in the reliability, safety and economy of the system. The transient signals possess the nonstationary characteristics in which the frequency as well as varying time information is compulsory for the analysis. Hence, it is vital, first to detect and classify the type of transient fault and then to mitigate them. This article proposes time-frequency and FFNN (Feedforward Neural Network approach for the classification of power system transients problems. In this work it is suggested that all the major categories of transients are simulated, de-noised, and decomposed with DWT (Discrete Wavelet and MRA (Multiresolution Analysis algorithm and then distinctive features are extracted to get optimal vector as input for training of PNN (Probabilistic Neural Network classifier. The simulation results of proposed approach prove their simplicity, accurateness and effectiveness for the automatic detection and classification of PST (Power System Transient types

  4. A new time-frequency method for identification and classification of ball bearing faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attoui, Issam; Fergani, Nadir; Boutasseta, Nadir; Oudjani, Brahim; Deliou, Adel

    2017-06-01

    In order to fault diagnosis of ball bearing that is one of the most critical components of rotating machinery, this paper presents a time-frequency procedure incorporating a new feature extraction step that combines the classical wavelet packet decomposition energy distribution technique and a new feature extraction technique based on the selection of the most impulsive frequency bands. In the proposed procedure, firstly, as a pre-processing step, the most impulsive frequency bands are selected at different bearing conditions using a combination between Fast-Fourier-Transform FFT and Short-Frequency Energy SFE algorithms. Secondly, once the most impulsive frequency bands are selected, the measured machinery vibration signals are decomposed into different frequency sub-bands by using discrete Wavelet Packet Decomposition WPD technique to maximize the detection of their frequency contents and subsequently the most useful sub-bands are represented in the time-frequency domain by using Short Time Fourier transform STFT algorithm for knowing exactly what the frequency components presented in those frequency sub-bands are. Once the proposed feature vector is obtained, three feature dimensionality reduction techniques are employed using Linear Discriminant Analysis LDA, a feedback wrapper method and Locality Sensitive Discriminant Analysis LSDA. Lastly, the Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System ANFIS algorithm is used for instantaneous identification and classification of bearing faults. In order to evaluate the performances of the proposed method, different testing data set to the trained ANFIS model by using different conditions of healthy and faulty bearings under various load levels, fault severities and rotating speed. The conclusion resulting from this paper is highlighted by experimental results which prove that the proposed method can serve as an intelligent bearing fault diagnosis system.

  5. Word class and context affect alpha-band oscillatory dynamics in an older population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika eMellem

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Differences in the oscillatory EEG dynamics of reading open class and closed class words have previously been found (Bastiaansen et al., 2005 and are thought to reflect differences in lexical-semantic content between these word classes. In particular, the theta band (4–7 Hz seems to play a prominent role in lexical-semantic retrieval. We tested whether this theta effect is robust in an older population of subjects. Additionally, we examined how the context of a word can modulate the oscillatory dynamics underlying retrieval for the two different classes of words. Older participants (mean age 55 read words presented in either syntactically-correct sentences or in a scrambled order (scrambled sentence while their EEG was recorded. We performed time-frequency analysis to examine how power varied based on the context or class of the word. We observed larger power decreases in the alpha (8–12Hz band between 200–700 ms for the open class compared to closed class words, but this was true only for the scrambled sentence context. We did not observe differences in theta power between these conditions. Context exerted an effect on the alpha and low beta (13–18 Hz bands between 0–700 ms. These results suggest that the previously observed word class effects on theta power changes in a younger participant sample do not seem to be a robust effect in this older population. Though this is an indirect comparison between studies, it may suggest the existence of aging effects on word retrieval dynamics for different populations. Additionally, the interaction between word class and context suggests that word retrieval mechanisms interact with sentence-level comprehension mechanisms in the alpha band.

  6. Multimilling-Insert Wear Assessment Using Non-Linear Virtual Sensor, Time-Frequency Distribution and Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    James Li, C.; Tzeng, Tzong-Chyi

    2000-11-01

    The objective of this study is to establish a signal processing methodology that can infer the state of milling insert wear from translational vibration measured on the spindle housing of a milling machine. First, the tool wear signature in a translational vibration is accentuated by mapping the translational vibration into a torsional vibration using a previously identified non-linear relationship between the two, i.e. a virtual sensor. Second, a time-frequency distribution, i.e. a Choi-Williams distribution, is calculated from the torsional vibration. Third, scattering matrices and orthogonalisation are employed to identify the time-frequency components that are best correlated to the state of wear. Fourth, a neural network is trained to estimate the extent of wear from these critical time frequency components. The combination of the virtual sensor, time-frequency analysis and neural network is then validated with data obtained from real cutting tests.

  7. FERMIGBRST - Fermi GBM Burst Catalog

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This table lists all of the triggers observed by a subset of the 14 GBM detectors (12 NaI and 2 BGO) which have been classified as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Note that...

  8. Short duration gamma ray bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This suggests either larger bulk Lorentz factors or spatially closer locations for the short GRBs [13]. From luminosity function studies, the local space density of the short GRBs is likely to be lower than that of the long ones by a factor of ~3 [14]. While analysing time tagged event (TTE) data for 156 category A type bursts.

  9. Distinction between harmonic and structural components in ambient excitation tests using the time-frequency domain decomposition technique

    OpenAIRE

    Le, Thien-Phu; ARGOUL, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The time-frequency domain decomposition technique has been proposed for modal identification in ambient vibration testing. In the presence of harmonic excitations, the modal identification process can provide not only structural modes but also non-structural ones relative to harmonic components. It is thus important to distinguish between them. In this study, by using the time-frequency domain decomposition technique, it is demonstrated that the distinction between non-structural harmonic com...

  10. Cosmological Time Dilation in Gamma Ray Bursts?

    OpenAIRE

    Band, David

    1994-01-01

    Norris et al. (1994) report that the temporal structure of faint gamma ray bursts is longer than that of bright bursts, as expected for time dilation in the cosmological models of burst origin. I show that the observed trends can easily be produced by a burst luminosity function and thus may not result from cosmological effects. A cosmological signature may be present, but the tests Norris et al. present are not powerful enough to detect these signatures.

  11. Item parameters dissociate between expectation formats: A regression analysis of time-frequency decomposed EEG data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Fernández Monsalve

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available During language comprehension, semantic contextual information is used to generate expectations about upcoming items. This has been commonly studied through the N400 event-related potential (ERP, as a measure of facilitated lexical retrieval. However, the associative relationships in multi-word expressions (MWE may enable the generation of a categorical expectation, leading to lexical retrieval before target word onset. Processing of the target word would thus reflect a target-identification mechanism, possibly indexed by a P3 ERP component. However, given their time overlap (200-500 ms post-stimulus onset, differentiating between N400/P3 ERP responses (averaged over multiple linguistically variable trials is problematic. In the present study, we analyzed EEG data from a previous experiment, which compared ERP responses to highly expected words that were placed either in a MWE or a regular non-fixed compositional context, and to low predictability controls. We focused on oscillatory dynamics and regression analyses, in order to dissociate between the two contexts by modeling the electrophysiological response as a function of item-level parameters. A significant interaction between word position and condition was found in the regression model for power in a theta range (~7-9 Hz, providing evidence for the presence of qualitative differences between conditions. Power levels within this band were lower for MWE than compositional contexts then the target word appeared later on in the sentence, confirming that in the former lexical retrieval would have taken place before word onset. On the other hand, gamma-power (~50-70 Hz was also modulated by predictability of the item in all conditions, which is interpreted as an index of a similar `matching' sub-step for both types of contexts, binding an expected representation and the external input.

  12. Fine structure in fast drift storm bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, D.; Ellis, G.R.A.

    1981-01-01

    Recent observations with high time resolution of fast drift storm (FDS) solar bursts are described. A new variety of FDS bursts characterised by intensity maxima regularly placed in the frequency domain is reported. Possible interpretations of this are mentioned and the implications of the short duration of FDS bursts are discussed. (orig.)

  13. Estimation of target vibration spectra from laser radar backscatter using time-frequency distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Timothy D.; El-Dinary, Ashruf S.

    1993-10-01

    A time-frequency distribution (TFD) signal processor, developed at the Applied Physics Laboratory, is currently under evaluation using simulated signals and actual laser vibration sensor (LVS) data that we collected on various ship targets. Preliminary results for one instantaneous frequency (IF) estimator implementation, the smoothed cross Wigner-Ville Distribution (XWVD), indicate 8 to 10 dB demodulation (CNR) advantage compared to a digital FM limiter-discriminator. A second approach, using the unsmoothed XWVD TFD, demonstrated a 3-5 dB advantage. Regarding spectral estimation, we are investigating performance of our reduced interference distribution (RID) implementation through comparison with the short-time Fourier transform (STFT). From the LVS data processed, indications are that a significant increase in spectral and temporal resolution exists using our RID approach. Our processor also provided improved detectability over the STFT for transient signals and short-lived sinusoids. Significant correlation between accepted acoustic lines and LVS-derived vibration lines are indicated. Details are presented that describe our signal simulation, the LVS measurements, and signal processing implementations along with assumptions based on measured speckle-induced amplitude modulation.

  14. Seismic signal time-frequency analysis based on multi-directional window using greedy strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yingpin; Peng, Zhenming; Cheng, Zhuyuan; Tian, Lin

    2017-08-01

    Wigner-Ville distribution (WVD) is an important time-frequency analysis technology with a high energy distribution in seismic signal processing. However, it is interfered by many cross terms. To suppress the cross terms of the WVD and keep the concentration of its high energy distribution, an adaptive multi-directional filtering window in the ambiguity domain is proposed. This begins with the relationship of the Cohen distribution and the Gabor transform combining the greedy strategy and the rotational invariance property of the fractional Fourier transform in order to propose the multi-directional window, which extends the one-dimensional, one directional, optimal window function of the optimal fractional Gabor transform (OFrGT) to a two-dimensional, multi-directional window in the ambiguity domain. In this way, the multi-directional window matches the main auto terms of the WVD more precisely. Using the greedy strategy, the proposed window takes into account the optimal and other suboptimal directions, which also solves the problem of the OFrGT, called the local concentration phenomenon, when encountering a multi-component signal. Experiments on different types of both the signal models and the real seismic signals reveal that the proposed window can overcome the drawbacks of the WVD and the OFrGT mentioned above. Finally, the proposed method is applied to a seismic signal's spectral decomposition. The results show that the proposed method can explore the space distribution of a reservoir more precisely.

  15. Ship Discrimination Using Polarimetric SAR Data and Coherent Time-Frequency Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canbin Hu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new approach for the discrimination of ship responses using polarimetric SAR (PolSAR data. The PolSAR multidimensional information is analyzed using a linear Time-Frequency (TF decomposition approach, which permits to describe the polarimetric behavior of a ship and its background area for different azimuthal angles of observation and frequencies of illumination. This paper proposes to discriminate ships from their background by using characteristics of their polarimetric TF responses, which may be associated with the intrinsic nature of the observed natural or artificial scattering structures. A statistical descriptor related to polarimetric coherence of the signal in the TF domain is proposed for detecting ships in different complex backgrounds, including SAR azimuth ambiguities, artifacts, and small natural islands, which may induce numerous false alarms. Choices of the TF analysis direction, i.e., along separate azimuth or range axis, or simultaneously in both directions, are investigated and evaluated. TF decomposition modes including range direction perform better in terms of discriminating ships from range focusing artifacts. In comparison with original full-resolution polarimetric indicators, the proposed TF polarimetric coherence descriptor is shown to qualitatively enhance the ship/background contrast and improve discrimination capabilities. Using polarimetric RADARSAT-2 data acquired over complex scenes, experimental results demonstrate the efficiency of this approach in terms of ship location retrieval and response characterization.

  16. Heart sound cancellation from lung sound recordings using time-frequency filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourazad, M T; Moussavi, Z; Thomas, G

    2006-03-01

    During lung sound recordings, heart sounds (HS) interfere with clinical interpretation of lung sounds over the low frequency components which is significant especially at low flow rates. Hence, it is desirable to cancel the effect of HS on lung sound records. In this paper, a novel HS cancellation method is presented. This method first localizes HS segments using multiresolution decomposition of the wavelet transform coefficients, then removes those segments from the original lung sound record and estimates the missing data via a 2D interpolation in the time-frequency (TF) domain. Finally, the signal is reconstructed into the time domain. To evaluate the efficiency of the TF filtering, the average power spectral density (PSD) of the original lung sound segments with and without HS over four frequency bands from 20 to 300 Hz were calculated and compared with the average PSD of the filtered signals. Statistical tests show that there is no significant difference between the average PSD of the HS-free original lung sounds and the TF-filtered signal for all frequency bands at both low and medium flow rates. It was found that the proposed method successfully removes HS from lung sound signals while preserving the original fundamental components of the lung sounds.

  17. Continuous robust sound event classification using time-frequency features and deep learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLoughlin, Ian; Zhang, Haomin; Xie, Zhipeng; Song, Yan; Xiao, Wei; Phan, Huy

    2017-01-01

    The automatic detection and recognition of sound events by computers is a requirement for a number of emerging sensing and human computer interaction technologies. Recent advances in this field have been achieved by machine learning classifiers working in conjunction with time-frequency feature representations. This combination has achieved excellent accuracy for classification of discrete sounds. The ability to recognise sounds under real-world noisy conditions, called robust sound event classification, is an especially challenging task that has attracted recent research attention. Another aspect of real-word conditions is the classification of continuous, occluded or overlapping sounds, rather than classification of short isolated sound recordings. This paper addresses the classification of noise-corrupted, occluded, overlapped, continuous sound recordings. It first proposes a standard evaluation task for such sounds based upon a common existing method for evaluating isolated sound classification. It then benchmarks several high performing isolated sound classifiers to operate with continuous sound data by incorporating an energy-based event detection front end. Results are reported for each tested system using the new task, to provide the first analysis of their performance for continuous sound event detection. In addition it proposes and evaluates a novel Bayesian-inspired front end for the segmentation and detection of continuous sound recordings prior to classification.

  18. A Joint Time-Frequency and Matrix Decomposition Feature Extraction Methodology for Pathological Voice Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnaz Ghoraani

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of people affected by speech problems is increasing as the modern world places increasing demands on the human voice via mobile telephones, voice recognition software, and interpersonal verbal communications. In this paper, we propose a novel methodology for automatic pattern classification of pathological voices. The main contribution of this paper is extraction of meaningful and unique features using Adaptive time-frequency distribution (TFD and nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF. We construct Adaptive TFD as an effective signal analysis domain to dynamically track the nonstationarity in the speech and utilize NMF as a matrix decomposition (MD technique to quantify the constructed TFD. The proposed method extracts meaningful and unique features from the joint TFD of the speech, and automatically identifies and measures the abnormality of the signal. Depending on the abnormality measure of each signal, we classify the signal into normal or pathological. The proposed method is applied on the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary (MEEI voice disorders database which consists of 161 pathological and 51 normal speakers, and an overall classification accuracy of 98.6% was achieved.

  19. A Novel Adaptive Joint Time Frequency Algorithm by the Neural Network for the ISAR Rotational Compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zisheng Wang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel adaptive joint time frequency algorithm combined with the neural network (AJTF-NN to focus the distorted inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR image. In this paper, a coefficient estimator based on the artificial neural network (ANN is firstly developed to solve the time-consuming rotational motion compensation (RMC polynomial phase coefficient estimation problem. The training method, the cost function and the structure of ANN are comprehensively discussed. In addition, we originally propose a method to generate training dataset sourcing from the ISAR signal models with randomly chosen motion characteristics. Then, prediction results of the ANN estimator is used to directly compensate the ISAR image, or to provide a more accurate initial searching range to the AJTF for possible low-performance scenarios. Finally, some simulation models including the ideal point scatterers and a realistic Airbus A380 are employed to comprehensively investigate properties of the AJTF-NN, such as the stability and the efficiency under different signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs. Results show that the proposed method is much faster than other prevalent improved searching methods, the acceleration ratio are even up to 424 times without the deterioration of compensated image quality. Therefore, the proposed method is potential to the real-time application in the RMC problem of the ISAR imaging.

  20. EEG biometric identification: a thorough exploration of the time-frequency domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelPozo-Banos, Marcos; Travieso, Carlos M.; Weidemann, Christoph T.; Alonso, Jesús B.

    2015-10-01

    Objective. Although interest in using electroencephalogram (EEG) activity for subject identification has grown in recent years, the state of the art still lacks a comprehensive exploration of the discriminant information within it. This work aims to fill this gap, and in particular, it focuses on the time-frequency representation of the EEG. Approach. We executed qualitative and quantitative analyses of six publicly available data sets following a sequential experimentation approach. This approach was divided in three blocks analysing the configuration of the power spectrum density, the representation of the data and the properties of the discriminant information. A total of ten experiments were applied. Main results. Results show that EEG information below 40 Hz is unique enough to discriminate across subjects (a maximum of 100 subjects were evaluated here), regardless of the recorded cognitive task or the sensor location. Moreover, the discriminative power of rhythms follows a W-like shape between 1 and 40 Hz, with the central peak located at the posterior rhythm (around 10 Hz). This information is maximized with segments of around 2 s, and it proved to be moderately constant across montages and time. Significance. Therefore, we characterize how EEG activity differs across individuals and detail the optimal conditions to detect subject-specific information. This work helps to clarify the results of previous studies and to solve some unanswered questions. Ultimately, it will serve as guide for the design of future biometric systems.

  1. Wavelet time-frequency analysis of accelerating and decelerating flows in a tube bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indrusiak, M.L.S.; Goulart, J.V.; Olinto, C.R.; Moeller, S.V.

    2005-01-01

    In the present work, the steady approximation for accelerating and decelerating flows through tube banks is discussed. With this purpose, the experimental study of velocity and pressure fluctuations of transient turbulent cross-flow in a tube bank with square arrangement and a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.26 is performed. The Reynolds number at steady-state flow, computed with the tube diameter and the flow velocity in the narrow gap between the tubes, is 8 x 10 4 . Air is the working fluid. The accelerating and decelerating transients are obtained by means of start and stop of the centrifugal blower. Wavelet and wavelet packet multiresolution analysis were applied to decompose the signal in frequency intervals, using Daubechies 20 wavelet and scale functions, thus allowing the analysis of phenomena in a time-frequency domain. The continuous wavelet transform was also applied, using the Morlet function. The signals in the steady state, which presented a bistable behavior, were separated in two modes and analyzed with usual statistic tools. The results were compared with the steady-state assumption, demonstrating the ability of wavelets for analyzing time varying signals

  2. Acoustic emission source location in plates using wavelet analysis and cross time frequency spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafapour, A; Davoodi, S; Ghareaghaji, M

    2014-12-01

    In this study, the theories of wavelet transform and cross-time frequency spectrum (CTFS) are used to locate AE source with frequency-varying wave velocity in plate-type structures. A rectangular array of four sensors is installed on the plate. When an impact is generated by an artificial AE source such as Hsu-Nielsen method of pencil lead breaking (PLB) at any position of the plate, the AE signals will be detected by four sensors at different times. By wavelet packet decomposition, a packet of signals with frequency range of 0.125-0.25MHz is selected. The CTFS is calculated by the short-time Fourier transform of the cross-correlation between considered packets captured by AE sensors. The time delay is calculated when the CTFS reaches the maximum value and the corresponding frequency is extracted per this maximum value. The resulting frequency is used to calculate the group velocity of wave velocity in combination with dispersive curve. The resulted locating error shows the high precision of proposed algorithm. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Time-frequency analysis of transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions in children exposed to carboplatin chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, Shaum; Bass, Johnnie; Qaddoumi, Ibrahim; Brennan, Rachel; Wilson, Matthew; Wu, Jianrong; Galindo, Carlos-Rodriguez; Paglialonga, Alessia; Tognola, Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to characterize and quantify time-frequency changes in transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs) recorded in children diagnosed with retinoblastoma who were receiving carboplatin chemotherapy. A signal processing technique, the wavelet transform (WT), was used to analyze TEOAE waveforms in narrow-band frequency components. Ten children (aged 3-72 months) diagnosed with unilateral or bilateral retinoblastoma were enrolled in the study. TEOAEs were acquired from the children with linear sequences of 70 dB peak equivalent SPL clicks. After WT analysis, TEOAE energy, latency and normalized energy in the narrow-band frequency components were compared before and during carboplatin chemotherapy treatment (average dose 1693 mg/m2). On a group basis, no significant differences (p>0.05) in the TEOAE energy, latency or normalized energy before and after carboplatin treatment were observed. There were decreases in normalized energy on an individual basis in 10 out of 18 ears in the sample. Exposure to carboplatin chemotherapy did not cause significant changes in TEOAE energy, latency and normalized energy during treatment. However, long-term monitoring of hearing with measurements of TEOAEs is warranted, given the risks of delayed hearing loss in some children receiving carboplatin chemotherapy. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Interference Excision in Spread Spectrum Communications Using Adaptive Positive Time-Frequency Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnan Sridhar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a novel algorithm to excise single and multicomponent chirp-like interferences in direct sequence spread spectrum (DSSS communications. The excision algorithm consists of two stages: adaptive signal decomposition stage and directional element detection stage based on the Hough-Radon transform (HRT. Initially, the received spread spectrum signal is decomposed into its time-frequency (TF functions using an adaptive signal decomposition algorithm, and the resulting TF functions are mapped onto the TF plane. We then use a line detection algorithm based on the HRT that operates on the image of the TF plane and detects energy varying directional elements that satisfy a parametric constraint. Interference is modeled by reconstructing the corresponding TF functions detected by the HRT, and subtracted from the received signal. The proposed technique has two main advantages: (i it localizes the interferences on the TF plane with no cross-terms, thus facilitating simple filtering techniques based on thresholding of the TF functions, and is an efficient way to excise the interference; (ii it can be used for the detection of any directional interferences that can be parameterized. Simulation results with synthetic models have shown successful performance with linear and quadratic chirp interferences for single and multicomponent interference cases. The proposed method excises the interference even under very low SNR conditions of  dB, and the technique could be easily extended to any interferences that could be represented by a parametric equation in the TF plane.

  5. Oscillatory instability of interstellar medium radiative shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, J.N.

    1984-01-01

    Observations of the radiative shock waves produced during the late stages of supernova remnant evolution cannot be understood in the context of steady state shock models. As a result, several more complicated scenarios have been suggested. For example, it has been proposed that several shocks are producing the emission or that one shock, which is in the process of making the transition between the adiabatic and the radiative phases of its evolution, produces the emission. In this paper, we suggest another explanation. We propose that supernova remnant shock waves are subject to an oscillatory instability. By an oscillatory instability, we mean one where the postshock cooling region periodically varies in size on a time scale determined by the postshock plasma cooling time. An oscillatory instability may be able to produce the types of behavior exhibited by supernova remnant radiative shocks in a natural way. 16 refs., 1 fig

  6. Two-scale approach to oscillatory singularly perturbed transport equations

    CERN Document Server

    Frénod, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the classical results of the two-scale convergence theory and explains – using several figures – why it works. It then shows how to use this theory to homogenize ordinary differential equations with oscillating coefficients as well as oscillatory singularly perturbed ordinary differential equations. In addition, it explores the homogenization of hyperbolic partial differential equations with oscillating coefficients and linear oscillatory singularly perturbed hyperbolic partial differential equations. Further, it introduces readers to the two-scale numerical methods that can be built from the previous approaches to solve oscillatory singularly perturbed transport equations (ODE and hyperbolic PDE) and demonstrates how they can be used efficiently. This book appeals to master’s and PhD students interested in homogenization and numerics, as well as to the Iter community.

  7. Short duration gamma ray bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The spectral lag τl for a burst was estimated by taking the difference between time centroids obtained using arrival instants (from TTE data) corresponding to photon energies larger than 100 keV, and to energies less than 100 keV so that τl ≡ τ > 100 keV − τ < 100 keV. (1). The time centroid for an energy channel is given by.

  8. On the neutron bursts origin.

    CERN Document Server

    Stenkin, Yu V

    2002-01-01

    The origin of the neutron bursts in Extensive Air Showers (EAS) is explained using results of the experiments and CORSIKA based Monte-Carlo simulations. It is shown that events with very high neutron multiplicity observed last years in neutron monitors as well as in surrounding detectors, are caused by usual EAS core with primary energies > 1 PeV. No exotic processes were needed for the explanation.

  9. Detection of the Third Heart Sound Based on Nonlinear Signal Decomposition and Time-Frequency Localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barma, Shovan; Chen, Bo-Wei; Ji, Wen; Rho, Seungmin; Chou, Chih-Hung; Wang, Jhing-Fa

    2016-08-01

    This study presents a precise way to detect the third ( S3 ) heart sound, which is recognized as an important indication of heart failure, based on nonlinear single decomposition and time-frequency localization. The detection of the S3 is obscured due to its significantly low energy and frequency. Even more, the detected S3 may be misunderstood as an abnormal second heart sound with a fixed split, which was not addressed in the literature. To detect such S3, the Hilbert vibration decomposition method is applied to decompose the heart sound into a certain number of subcomponents while intactly preserving the phase information. Thus, the time information of all of the decomposed components are unchanged, which further expedites the identification and localization of any module/section of a signal properly. Next, the proposed localization step is applied to the decomposed subcomponents by using smoothed pseudo Wigner-Ville distribution followed by the reassignment method. Finally, based on the positional information, the S3 is distinguished and confirmed by measuring time delays between the S2 and S3. In total, 82 sets of cardiac cycles collected from different databases including Texas Heart Institute database are examined for evaluation of the proposed method. The result analysis shows that the proposed method can detect the S3 correctly, even when the normalized temporal energy of S3 is larger than 0.16, and the frequency of those is larger than 34 Hz. In a performance analysis, the proposed method demonstrates that the accuracy rate of S3 detection is as high as 93.9%, which is significantly higher compared with the other methods. Such findings prove the robustness of the proposed idea for detecting substantially low-energized S3 .

  10. Auditory Time-Frequency Masking for Spectrally and Temporally Maximally-Compact Stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necciari, Thibaud; Laback, Bernhard; Savel, Sophie; Ystad, Sølvi; Balazs, Peter; Meunier, Sabine; Kronland-Martinet, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Many audio applications perform perception-based time-frequency (TF) analysis by decomposing sounds into a set of functions with good TF localization (i.e. with a small essential support in the TF domain) using TF transforms and applying psychoacoustic models of auditory masking to the transform coefficients. To accurately predict masking interactions between coefficients, the TF properties of the model should match those of the transform. This involves having masking data for stimuli with good TF localization. However, little is known about TF masking for mathematically well-localized signals. Most existing masking studies used stimuli that are broad in time and/or frequency and few studies involved TF conditions. Consequently, the present study had two goals. The first was to collect TF masking data for well-localized stimuli in humans. Masker and target were 10-ms Gaussian-shaped sinusoids with a bandwidth of approximately one critical band. The overall pattern of results is qualitatively similar to existing data for long maskers. To facilitate implementation in audio processing algorithms, a dataset provides the measured TF masking function. The second goal was to assess the potential effect of auditory efferents on TF masking using a modeling approach. The temporal window model of masking was used to predict present and existing data in two configurations: (1) with standard model parameters (i.e. without efferents), (2) with cochlear gain reduction to simulate the activation of efferents. The ability of the model to predict the present data was quite good with the standard configuration but highly degraded with gain reduction. Conversely, the ability of the model to predict existing data for long maskers was better with than without gain reduction. Overall, the model predictions suggest that TF masking can be affected by efferent (or other) effects that reduce cochlear gain. Such effects were avoided in the experiment of this study by using maximally

  11. Auditory Time-Frequency Masking for Spectrally and Temporally Maximally-Compact Stimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibaud Necciari

    Full Text Available Many audio applications perform perception-based time-frequency (TF analysis by decomposing sounds into a set of functions with good TF localization (i.e. with a small essential support in the TF domain using TF transforms and applying psychoacoustic models of auditory masking to the transform coefficients. To accurately predict masking interactions between coefficients, the TF properties of the model should match those of the transform. This involves having masking data for stimuli with good TF localization. However, little is known about TF masking for mathematically well-localized signals. Most existing masking studies used stimuli that are broad in time and/or frequency and few studies involved TF conditions. Consequently, the present study had two goals. The first was to collect TF masking data for well-localized stimuli in humans. Masker and target were 10-ms Gaussian-shaped sinusoids with a bandwidth of approximately one critical band. The overall pattern of results is qualitatively similar to existing data for long maskers. To facilitate implementation in audio processing algorithms, a dataset provides the measured TF masking function. The second goal was to assess the potential effect of auditory efferents on TF masking using a modeling approach. The temporal window model of masking was used to predict present and existing data in two configurations: (1 with standard model parameters (i.e. without efferents, (2 with cochlear gain reduction to simulate the activation of efferents. The ability of the model to predict the present data was quite good with the standard configuration but highly degraded with gain reduction. Conversely, the ability of the model to predict existing data for long maskers was better with than without gain reduction. Overall, the model predictions suggest that TF masking can be affected by efferent (or other effects that reduce cochlear gain. Such effects were avoided in the experiment of this study by using

  12. Improving time-frequency domain sleep EEG classification via singular spectrum analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahvash Mohammadi, Sara; Kouchaki, Samaneh; Ghavami, Mohammad; Sanei, Saeid

    2016-11-01

    Manual sleep scoring is deemed to be tedious and time consuming. Even among automatic methods such as time-frequency (T-F) representations, there is still room for more improvement. To optimise the efficiency of T-F domain analysis of sleep electroencephalography (EEG) a novel approach for automatically identifying the brain waves, sleep spindles, and K-complexes from the sleep EEG signals is proposed. The proposed method is based on singular spectrum analysis (SSA). The single-channel EEG signal (C3-A2) is initially decomposed and then the desired components are automatically separated. In addition, the noise is removed to enhance the discrimination ability of features. The obtained T-F features after preprocessing stage are classified using a multi-class support vector machines (SVMs) and used for the identification of four sleep stages over three sleep types. Furthermore, to emphasise on the usefulness of the proposed method the automatically-determined spindles are parameterised to discriminate three sleep types. The four sleep stages are classified through SVM twice: with and without preprocessing stage. The mean accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity for before the preprocessing stage are: 71.5±0.11%, 56.1±0.09% and 86.8±0.04% respectively. However, these values increase significantly to 83.6±0.07%, 70.6±0.14% and 90.8±0.03% after applying SSA. The new T-F representation has been compared with the existing benchmarks. Our results prove that, the proposed method well outperforms the previous methods in terms of identification and representation of sleep stages. Experimental results confirm the performance improvement in terms of classification rate and also representative T-F domain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Perceptual Coding of Audio Signals Using Adaptive Time-Frequency Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthikeyan Umapathy

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Wide band digital audio signals have a very high data-rate associated with them due to their complex nature and demand for high-quality reproduction. Although recent technological advancements have significantly reduced the cost of bandwidth and miniaturized storage facilities, the rapid increase in the volume of digital audio content constantly compels the need for better compression algorithms. Over the years various perceptually lossless compression techniques have been introduced, and transform-based compression techniques have made a significant impact in recent years. In this paper, we propose one such transform-based compression technique, where the joint time-frequency (TF properties of the nonstationary nature of the audio signals were exploited in creating a compact energy representation of the signal in fewer coefficients. The decomposition coefficients were processed and perceptually filtered to retain only the relevant coefficients. Perceptual filtering (psychoacoustics was applied in a novel way by analyzing and performing TF specific psychoacoustics experiments. An added advantage of the proposed technique is that, due to its signal adaptive nature, it does not need predetermined segmentation of audio signals for processing. Eight stereo audio signal samples of different varieties were used in the study. Subjective (mean opinion score—MOS listening tests were performed and the subjective difference grades (SDG were used to compare the performance of the proposed coder with MP3, AAC, and HE-AAC encoders. Compression ratios in the range of 8 to 40 were achieved by the proposed technique with subjective difference grades (SDG ranging from –0.53 to –2.27.

  14. The Benefits of Using Time-Frequency Analysis with Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albright, Austin P [ORNL; Clayton, Dwight A [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Improvements in detection and resolution are always desired and needed. There are various instruments available for the inspection of concrete structures that can be used with confidence for detecting different defects. However, more often than not that confidence is heavily dependent on the experience of the operator rather than the clear, objective discernibility of the output of the instrument. The challenge of objective discernment is amplified when the concrete structures contain multiple layers of reinforcement, are of significant thickness, or both, such as concrete structures in nuclear power plants. We seek to improve and extend the usefulness of results produced using the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) on data collected from thick, complex concrete structures. A secondary goal is to improve existing SAFT results, with regards to repeatedly and objectively identifying defects and/or internal structure of concrete structures. Towards these goals, we are applying the time-frequency technique of wavelet packet decomposition and reconstruction using a mother wavelet that possesses the exact reconstruction property. However, instead of analyzing the coefficients of each decomposition node, we select and reconstruct specific nodes based on the frequency band it contains to produce a frequency band specific time-series representation. SAFT is then applied to these frequency specific reconstructions allowing SAFT to be used to visualize the reflectivity of a frequency band and that band s interaction with the contents of the concrete structure. We apply our technique to data sets collected using a commercial, ultrasonic linear array (MIRA) from two 1.5m x 2m x 25cm concrete test specimens. One specimen contains multiple layers of rebar. The other contains honeycomb, crack, and rebar bonding defect analogs. This approach opens up a multitude of possibilities for improved detection, readability, and overall improved objectivity. We will focus on

  15. The benefits of using time-frequency analysis with synthetic aperture focusing technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albright, Austin, E-mail: albrightap@ornl.gov, E-mail: claytonda@ornl.gov; Clayton, Dwight, E-mail: albrightap@ornl.gov, E-mail: claytonda@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, One Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2015-03-31

    Improvements in detection and resolution are always desired and needed. There are various instruments available for the inspection of concrete structures that can be used with confidence for detecting different defects. However, more often than not that confidence is heavily dependent on the experience of the operator rather than the clear, objective discernibility of the output of the instrument. The challenge of objective discernment is amplified when the concrete structures contain multiple layers of reinforcement, are of significant thickness, or both, such as concrete structures in nuclear power plants. We seek to improve and extend the usefulness of results produced using the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) on data collected from thick, complex concrete structures. A secondary goal is to improve existing SAFT results, with regards to repeatedly and objectively identifying defects and/or internal structure of concrete structures. Towards these goals, we are applying the time-frequency technique of wavelet packet decomposition and reconstruction using a mother wavelet that possesses the exact reconstruction property. However, instead of analyzing the coefficients of each decomposition node, we select and reconstruct specific nodes based on the frequency band it contains to produce a frequency band specific time-series representation. SAFT is then applied to these frequency specific reconstructions allowing SAFT to be used to visualize the reflectivity of a frequency band and that band's interaction with the contents of the concrete structure. We apply our technique to data sets collected using a commercial, ultrasonic linear array (MIRA) from two 1.5m × 2m × 25cm concrete test specimens. One specimen contains multiple layers of rebar. The other contains honeycomb, crack, and rebar bonding defect analogs. This approach opens up a multitude of possibilities for improved detection, readability, and overall improved objectivity. We will focus on

  16. The benefits of using time-frequency analysis with synthetic aperture focusing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, Austin; Clayton, Dwight

    2015-03-01

    Improvements in detection and resolution are always desired and needed. There are various instruments available for the inspection of concrete structures that can be used with confidence for detecting different defects. However, more often than not that confidence is heavily dependent on the experience of the operator rather than the clear, objective discernibility of the output of the instrument. The challenge of objective discernment is amplified when the concrete structures contain multiple layers of reinforcement, are of significant thickness, or both, such as concrete structures in nuclear power plants. We seek to improve and extend the usefulness of results produced using the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) on data collected from thick, complex concrete structures. A secondary goal is to improve existing SAFT results, with regards to repeatedly and objectively identifying defects and/or internal structure of concrete structures. Towards these goals, we are applying the time-frequency technique of wavelet packet decomposition and reconstruction using a mother wavelet that possesses the exact reconstruction property. However, instead of analyzing the coefficients of each decomposition node, we select and reconstruct specific nodes based on the frequency band it contains to produce a frequency band specific time-series representation. SAFT is then applied to these frequency specific reconstructions allowing SAFT to be used to visualize the reflectivity of a frequency band and that band's interaction with the contents of the concrete structure. We apply our technique to data sets collected using a commercial, ultrasonic linear array (MIRA) from two 1.5m × 2m × 25cm concrete test specimens. One specimen contains multiple layers of rebar. The other contains honeycomb, crack, and rebar bonding defect analogs. This approach opens up a multitude of possibilities for improved detection, readability, and overall improved objectivity. We will focus on

  17. Sparse representation based on local time-frequency template matching for bearing transient fault feature extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qingbo; Ding, Xiaoxi

    2016-05-01

    The transients caused by the localized fault are important measurement information for bearing fault diagnosis. Thus it is crucial to extract the transients from the bearing vibration or acoustic signals that are always corrupted by a large amount of background noise. In this paper, an iterative transient feature extraction approach is proposed based on time-frequency (TF) domain sparse representation. The approach is realized by presenting a new method, called local TF template matching. In this method, the TF atoms are constructed based on the TF distribution (TFD) of the Morlet wavelet bases and local TF templates are formulated from the TF atoms for the matching process. The instantaneous frequency (IF) ridge calculated from the TFD of an analyzed signal provides the frequency parameter values for the TF atoms as well as an effective template matching path on the TF plane. In each iteration, local TF templates are employed to do correlation with the TFD of the analyzed signal along the IF ridge tube for identifying the optimum parameters of transient wavelet model. With this iterative procedure, transients can be extracted in the TF domain from measured signals one by one. The final signal can be synthesized by combining the extracted TF atoms and the phase of the raw signal. The local TF template matching builds an effective TF matching-based sparse representation approach with the merit of satisfying the native pulse waveform structure of transients. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by practical defective bearing signals. Comparison results also show that the proposed method is superior to traditional methods in transient feature extraction.

  18. Interference Excision in Spread Spectrum Communications Using Adaptive Positive Time-Frequency Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sridhar Krishnan

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a novel algorithm to excise single and multicomponent chirp-like interferences in direct sequence spread spectrum (DSSS communications. The excision algorithm consists of two stages: adaptive signal decomposition stage and directional element detection stage based on the Hough-Radon transform (HRT. Initially, the received spread spectrum signal is decomposed into its time-frequency (TF functions using an adaptive signal decomposition algorithm, and the resulting TF functions are mapped onto the TF plane. We then use a line detection algorithm based on the HRT that operates on the image of the TF plane and detects energy varying directional elements that satisfy a parametric constraint. Interference is modeled by reconstructing the corresponding TF functions detected by the HRT, and subtracted from the received signal. The proposed technique has two main advantages: (i it localizes the interferences on the TF plane with no cross-terms, thus facilitating simple filtering techniques based on thresholding of the TF functions, and is an efficient way to excise the interference; (ii it can be used for the detection of any directional interferences that can be parameterized. Simulation results with synthetic models have shown successful performance with linear and quadratic chirp interferences for single and multicomponent interference cases. The proposed method excises the interference even under very low SNR conditions of −10 dB, and the technique could be easily extended to any interferences that could be represented by a parametric equation in the TF plane.

  19. Processing grounded-wire TEM signal in time-frequency-pseudo-seismic domain: A new paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M. Y.; Xue, G. Q.; Chen, W.; Huasen, Z.

    2017-12-01

    Grounded-wire TEM has received great attention in mineral, hydrocarbon and hydrogeological investigations for the last several years. Conventionally, TEM soundings have been presented as apparent resistivity curves as function of time. With development of sophisticated computational algorithms, it became possible to extract more realistic geoelectric information by applying inversion programs to 1-D & 3-D problems. Here, we analyze grounded-wire TEM data by carrying out analysis in time, frequency and pseudo-seismic domain supported by borehole information. At first, H, K, A & Q type geoelectric models are processed using a proven inversion program (1-D Occam inversion). Second, time-to-frequency transformation is conducted from TEM ρa(t) curves to magneto telluric MT ρa(f) curves for the same models based on all-time apparent resistivity curves. Third, 1-D Bostick's algorithm was applied to the transformed resistivity. Finally, EM diffusion field is transformed into propagating wave field obeying the standard wave equation using wavelet transformation technique and constructed pseudo-seismic section. The transformed seismic-like wave indicates that some reflection and refraction phenomena appear when the EM wave field interacts with geoelectric interface at different depth intervals due to contrast in resistivity. The resolution of the transformed TEM data is significantly improved in comparison to apparent resistivity plots. A case study illustrates the successful hydrogeophysical application of proposed approach in recovering water-filled mined-out area in a coal field located in Ye county, Henan province, China. The results support the introduction of pseudo-seismic imaging technology in short-offset version of TEM which can also be an useful aid if integrated with seismic reflection technique to explore possibilities for high resolution EM imaging in future.

  20. NICER Eyes on Bursting Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2018-03-01

    What happens to a neutron stars accretion disk when its surface briefly explodes? A new instrument recently deployed at the International Space Station (ISS) is now watching bursts from neutron stars and reporting back.Deploying a New X-Ray MissionLaunch of NICER aboard a Falcon 9 rocket in June 2017. [NASA/Tony Gray]In early June of 2017, a SpaceX Dragon capsule on a Falcon 9 rocket launched on a resupply mission to the ISS. The pressurized interior of the Dragon contained the usual manifest of crew supplies, spacewalk equipment, and vehicle hardware. But the unpressurized trunk of the capsule held something a little different: the Neutron star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER).In the two weeks following launch, NICER was extracted from the SpaceX Dragon capsule and installed on the ISS. And by the end of the month, the instrument was already collecting its first data set: observations of a bright X-ray burst from Aql X-1, a neutron star accreting matter from a low-mass binary companion.Impact of BurstsNICERs goal is to provide a new view of neutron-star physics at X-ray energies of 0.212 keV a window that allows us to explore bursts of energy that neutron stars sometimes emit from their surfaces.Artists impression of an X-ray binary, in which a compact object accretes material from a companion star. [ESA/NASA/Felix Mirabel]In X-ray burster systems, hydrogen- and helium-rich material from a low-mass companion star piles up in an accretion disk around the neutron star. This material slowly funnels onto the neutron stars surface, forming a layer that gravitationally compresses and eventually becomes so dense and hot that runaway nuclear fusion ignites.Within seconds, the layer of material is burned up, producing a burst of emission from the neutron star that outshines even the inner regions of the hot accretion disk. Then more material funnels onto the neutron star and the process begins again.Though we have a good picture of the physics that causes these bursts

  1. Bubble bursting at an interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Varun; Sajjad, Kumayl; Anand, Sushant; Fezzaa, Kamel

    2017-11-01

    Bubble bursting is crucial to understanding the life span of bubbles at an interface and more importantly the nature of interaction between the bulk liquid and the outside environment from the point of view of chemical and biological material transport. The dynamics of the bubble as it rises from inside the liquid bulk to its disappearance on the interface after bursting is an intriguing process, many aspects of which are still being explored. In our study, we make detailed high speed imaging measurements to examine carefully the hole initiation and growth in bursting bubbles that unearth some interesting features of the process. Previous analyses available in literature are revisited based on our novel experimental visualizations. Using a combination of experiments and theory we investigate the role of various forces during the rupturing process. This work aims to further our current knowledge of bubble dynamics at an interface with an aim of predicting better the bubble evolution from its growth to its eventual integration with the liquid bulk.

  2. Time-frequency analysis of band-limited EEG with BMFLC and Kalman filter for BCI applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Time-Frequency analysis of electroencephalogram (EEG) during different mental tasks received significant attention. As EEG is non-stationary, time-frequency analysis is essential to analyze brain states during different mental tasks. Further, the time-frequency information of EEG signal can be used as a feature for classification in brain-computer interface (BCI) applications. Methods To accurately model the EEG, band-limited multiple Fourier linear combiner (BMFLC), a linear combination of truncated multiple Fourier series models is employed. A state-space model for BMFLC in combination with Kalman filter/smoother is developed to obtain accurate adaptive estimation. By virtue of construction, BMFLC with Kalman filter/smoother provides accurate time-frequency decomposition of the bandlimited signal. Results The proposed method is computationally fast and is suitable for real-time BCI applications. To evaluate the proposed algorithm, a comparison with short-time Fourier transform (STFT) and continuous wavelet transform (CWT) for both synthesized and real EEG data is performed in this paper. The proposed method is applied to BCI Competition data IV for ERD detection in comparison with existing methods. Conclusions Results show that the proposed algorithm can provide optimal time-frequency resolution as compared to STFT and CWT. For ERD detection, BMFLC-KF outperforms STFT and BMFLC-KS in real-time applicability with low computational requirement. PMID:24274109

  3. Combining time-frequency and spatial information for the detection of sleep spindles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eO'Reilly

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available EEG sleep spindles are short (0.5-2.0 s bursts of activity in the 11-16 Hz band occurring during non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep. This sporadic activity is thought to play a role in memory consolidation, brain plasticity, and protection of sleep integrity. Many automatic detectors have been proposed to assist or replace experts for sleep spindle scoring. However, these algorithms usually detect too many events making it difficult to achieve a good tradeoff between sensitivity (Se and false detection rate (FDr. In this work, we propose a semi-automatic detector comprising a sensitivity phase based on well-established criteria followed by a specificity phase using spatial and spectral criteria.In the sensitivity phase, selected events are those which amplitude in the 10 – 16 Hz band and spectral ratio characteristics both reject a null hypothesis (p <0.1 stating that the considered event is not a spindle. This null hypothesis is constructed from events occurring during rapid eye movement (REM sleep epochs. In the specificity phase, a hierarchical clustering of the selected candidates is done based on events’ frequency and spatial position along the anterior-posterior axis. Only events from the classes grouping most (at least 80% spindles scored by an expert are kept. We obtain Se = 93.2% and FDr = 93.0% in the first phase and Se = 85.4% and FDr = 86.2% in the second phase. For these two phases, Matthew’s correlation coefficients are respectively 0.228 and 0.324. Results suggest that spindles are defined by specific spatio-spectral properties and that automatic detection methods can be improved by considering these features.

  4. Combining time-frequency and spatial information for the detection of sleep spindles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Christian; Godbout, Jonathan; Carrier, Julie; Lina, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    EEG sleep spindles are short (0.5-2.0 s) bursts of activity in the 11-16 Hz band occurring during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. This sporadic activity is thought to play a role in memory consolidation, brain plasticity, and protection of sleep integrity. Many automatic detectors have been proposed to assist or replace experts for sleep spindle scoring. However, these algorithms usually detect too many events making it difficult to achieve a good tradeoff between sensitivity (Se) and false detection rate (FDr). In this work, we propose a semi-automatic detector comprising a sensitivity phase based on well-established criteria followed by a specificity phase using spatial and spectral criteria. In the sensitivity phase, selected events are those which amplitude in the 10-16 Hz band and spectral ratio characteristics both reject a null hypothesis (p sleep epochs. In the specificity phase, a hierarchical clustering of the selected candidates is done based on events' frequency and spatial position along the anterior-posterior axis. Only events from the classes grouping most (at least 80%) spindles scored by an expert are kept. We obtain Se = 93.2% and FDr = 93.0% in the first phase and Se = 85.4% and FDr = 86.2% in the second phase. For these two phases, Matthew's correlation coefficients are respectively 0.228 and 0.324. Results suggest that spindles are defined by specific spatio-spectral properties and that automatic detection methods can be improved by considering these features.

  5. Oscillatory brain dynamics associated with the automatic processing of emotion in words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Bastiaansen, Marcel

    2014-10-01

    This study examines the automaticity of processing the emotional aspects of words, and characterizes the oscillatory brain dynamics that accompany this automatic processing. Participants read emotionally negative, neutral and positive nouns while performing a color detection task in which only perceptual-level analysis was required. Event-related potentials and time frequency representations were computed from the concurrently measured EEG. Negative words elicited a larger P2 and a larger late positivity than positive and neutral words, indicating deeper semantic/evaluative processing of negative words. In addition, sustained alpha power suppressions were found for the emotional compared to neutral words, in the time range from 500 to 1000ms post-stimulus. These results suggest that sustained attention was allocated to the emotional words, whereas the attention allocated to the neutral words was released after an initial analysis. This seems to hold even when the emotional content of the words is task-irrelevant. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Large Amplitude Oscillatory Extension of Soft Polymeric Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bejenariu, Anca Gabriela; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2010-01-01

    sing a filament stretching rheometer (FSR) surrounded by a thermostatic chamber and equipped with a micrometric laser it is possible to measure large amplitude oscillatory elongation (LAOE) on elastomeric based networks with no base flow as in the LAOE method for polymer melts. Poly(dimethylsilox......sing a filament stretching rheometer (FSR) surrounded by a thermostatic chamber and equipped with a micrometric laser it is possible to measure large amplitude oscillatory elongation (LAOE) on elastomeric based networks with no base flow as in the LAOE method for polymer melts. Poly...

  7. Oscillatory dependence of tunneling conductance on the barrier thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, B. C.

    2017-11-01

    Oscillatory dependence of tunneling conductance on the barrier thickness is investigated theoretically for the metal/insulator/metal junctions. The tunneling transmission is expressed with the reflection and the transmission amplitudes of each separated metal/insulator interface and the wavevectors inside the barrier. An analytical formula is obtained for the tunneling conductance. The oscillatory behavior of the tunneling conductance is possible with the complex band structure of the insulator. The oscillation period is determined not directly from the real part of the complex wavevector in the insulator, but from the extremal complex spanning vector of the complex Fermi surface of the insulator.

  8. Evaluation of Hydrologic and Meteorological Impacts on Dengue Fever Incidences in Southern Taiwan using Time- Frequency Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Christina; Yeh, Ting-Gu

    2017-04-01

    Extreme weather events are occurring more frequently as a result of climate change. Recently dengue fever has become a serious issue in southern Taiwan. It may have characteristic temporal scales that can be identified. Some researchers have hypothesized that dengue fever incidences are related to climate change. This study applies time-frequency analysis to time series data concerning dengue fever and hydrologic and meteorological variables. Results of three time-frequency analytical methods - the Hilbert Huang transform (HHT), the Wavelet Transform (WT) and the Short Time Fourier Transform (STFT) are compared and discussed. A more effective time-frequency analysis method will be identified to analyze relevant time series data. The most influential time scales of hydrologic and meteorological variables that are associated with dengue fever are determined. Finally, the linkage between hydrologic/meteorological factors and dengue fever incidences can be established.

  9. Analysis in the joint time-frequency domain of the identifying signatures of submerged targets insonified by dolphin clicks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strifors, Hans C.; Gaunaurd, Guillermo C.; Moore, Patrick W.

    1997-06-01

    We study the scattering interaction of dolphin-emitted acoustic pulses ('clicks') with various elastic shells located, underwater, in front of the animal in a large test site in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii. A carefully instrumented analog- to-digital system continuously captured the emitted clicks and also the returned, backscattered echoes. Using standard conditioning techniques and food reinforcers, the dolphin is taught to push an underwater paddle when the 'correct' target -- the one he has been trained to identify -- is presented to him. He communicates to us his consistently correct identifying choices in this manner. By means of several time- frequency distributions (TFD) of the Wigner-type, or Cohen class, we examine echoes returned by three types of cylindrical shells. The time-frequency distributions we compare in this survey are the pseudo-Wigner distribution (PWD), the Choi-Williams distribution (CWD), the adaptive spectrogram (AS), the cone-shaped distribution (CSD), the Gabor spectrogram (GS), and the spectrogram (SPEC). To be satisfactory for target identification purposes, a time- frequency representation of the echoes should display a sufficient amount of distinguishing features, and still be robust enough to suppress the interference of noise contained in the received signals. Both these properties in a time- frequency distribution depend on the distribution's capability of concentrating the featuers in time and frequency and of handling cross-term interference. With some time-frequency distributions there is a trade-off between the concentration of features and the suppression of cross-term interference. The results of our investigation serve the twofold purposes of (1) advancing the understanding of the amazing target identification capability of dolphins, and (2) to assist in assessing the possibility of identifying submerged targets using active sonar and a classifier based on target signatures in the combined time-frequency domain.

  10. Fuzzy-Based Adaptive Hybrid Burst Assembly Technique for Optical Burst Switched Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abubakar Muhammad Umaru

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The optical burst switching (OBS paradigm is perceived as an intermediate switching technology for future all-optical networks. Burst assembly that is the first process in OBS is the focus of this paper. In this paper, an intelligent hybrid burst assembly algorithm that is based on fuzzy logic is proposed. The new algorithm is evaluated against the traditional hybrid burst assembly algorithm and the fuzzy adaptive threshold (FAT burst assembly algorithm via simulation. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm outperforms the hybrid and the FAT algorithms in terms of burst end-to-end delay, packet end-to-end delay, and packet loss ratio.

  11. On oscillatory microstructure during cellular growth of directionally solidified Sn-36at.%Ni peritectic alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Peng; Li, Xinzhong; Li, Jiangong; Su, Yanqing; Guo, Jingjie

    2016-04-01

    An oscillatory microstructure has been observed during deep-cellular growth of directionally solidified Sn-36at.%Ni hyperperitectic alloy containing intermetallic compounds with narrow solubility range. This oscillatory microstructure with a dimension of tens of micrometers has been observed for the first time. The morphology of this wave-like oscillatory structure is similar to secondary dendrite arms, and can be observed only in some local positions of the sample. Through analysis such as successive sectioning of the sample, it can be concluded that this oscillatory microstructure is caused by oscillatory convection of the mushy zone during solidification. And the influence of convection on this oscillatory microstructure was characterized through comparison between experimental and calculations results on the wavelength. Besides, the change in morphology of this oscillatory microstructure has been proved to be caused by peritectic transformation during solidification. Furthermore, the melt concentration increases continuously during solidification of intermetallic compounds with narrow solubility range, which helps formation of this oscillatory microstructure.

  12. Oscillatory and electrohydrodynamic instabilities in flow over a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The stability of oscillatory flows over compliant surfaces is studied analytically and numerically. The type of compliant surfaces studied is the incompressible viscoelastic gel model. The stability is determined using the Floquet analysis, where amplitude of perturbations at time intervals separated by one time period is ...

  13. Oscillatory and electrohydrodynamic instabilities in flow over a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    is encountered in the flow of cardiovascular fluids through flexible blood vessels which are driven by the pumping of the heart. The Reynolds numbers for these flows vary over a wide range between Re < 1 and Re = 4000 (Ku 1997). The oscillatory nature of the blood flow in the vascular system is characterized by a number ...

  14. On stellar collapse: continual or oscillatory. A short comment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, P.T.

    1980-01-01

    We comment on a previously published paper on the oscillatory dynamics of stellar collapse and conclude that the Schwarzschild interior solution applied to the 'inflection points' can never give rise to a 'turning back' motion, in spite of the fact that the geodesic equation really does not always describe an attractive gravitational acceleration

  15. Unstable oscillatory Pierce modes of neutralized electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cary, J.R.; Lemons, D.S.

    1982-01-01

    Oscillatory modes of the Pierce system have been calculated. These modes are found to have growth rates comparable to the previously investigated purely growing modes. When these modes are included, it is found that the Pierce system is unstable for most values of ω/sub p/ L/V 0 >π

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of oscillatory flows in microfluidic channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J.S.; Ottesen, Johnny T.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we apply the direct non-equilibrium molecular dynamics technique to oscillatory flows of fluids in microscopic channels. Initially, we show that the microscopic simulations resemble the macroscopic predictions based on the Navier–Stokes equation very well for large channel width, hi...

  17. Oscillatory and electrohydrodynamic instabilities in flow over a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and oscillatory experiments on the flow past a gel, the gel is placed on the bottom Peltier plate, and the fluid is placed on the gel. The top plate is lowered to obtain a fluid film of the desired thickness, and the viscosity measurements are conducted. The stress is increased at a constant rate, and the viscosity is calculated by ...

  18. Numerical integrators for Stiff and Stiff oscillatory First Order initial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Numerical integrators for Stiff and Stiff oscillatory First Order initial value problems. ... Journal of the Nigerian Association of Mathematical Physics ... In this paper, efforts are geared towards the numerical solution of the first order initial value problem (I.V.P) of the form Y\\' = F(X,Y), X∈[ a, b] , Y(a) = Y0, where Y\\' is the total ...

  19. Strobes: Pyrotechnic Compositions That Show a Curious Oscillatory Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corbel, J.M.L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341356034; van Lingen, J.N.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/311441769; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Gijzeman, O.L.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073464708; Meijerink, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075044986

    2013-01-01

    Strobes are pyrotechnic compositions which show an oscillatory combustion; a dark phase and a flash phase alternate periodically. The strobe effect has applications in various fields, most notably in the fireworks industry and in the military area. All strobe compositions mentioned in the literature

  20. New insights into strobe reactions: An intriguing oscillatory combustion phenomenon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corbel, J.M.L.

    2013-01-01

    Strobes are self-sustained oscillatory combustions that have various applications in the fireworks industry and also in the military area (signaling, missile decoys and crowd control). However, most of the strobe compositions were discovered using trial and error methods. The fundamentals mechanisms

  1. Effect of vertical oscillatory pressure on disability of patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of vertical oscillatory pressure on disability of patients with chronic mechanical low back pain using Roland Morris Disability questionnaire. ... VOP was then administered to each patient twice in a week for 6 weeks making 12 treatment sessions. Pain intensity and disability were assessed regularly every week of ...

  2. Oscillatory interlayer magnetic coupling and induced magnetism in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Oscillatory interlayer magnetic coupling and induced magnetism in. Fe/Nb multilayers. NITYA NATH SHUKLA and R PRASAD*. Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208 016, India. Abstract. We present an ab initio calculation of interlayer magnetic coupling for Fe/Nb multilayers using the.

  3. Oscillatory variation of anomalous diffusion in pendulum systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... exponent , which is the rate of divergence of the mean square displacement with time, is found to vary in an oscillatory manner. We show the presence of such a variation in other statistical measures such as variance of position, kurtosis, and exponents in the power-exponential law of probability distribution of position.

  4. oscillatory ripples, evaluation of ancient wave climates and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DJFLEX

    the ripples have provided useful data in the evaluation of local paleowave climates and trends in ancient wave dominated environments as well as in the prediction of epierogenic movement related to basin subsidence. (Harms, 1969; Diem, 1985). Evans (1941) on the basis of studies on wave–induced oscillatory ripples, ...

  5. Oscillatory behaviour of solutions of linear neutral differential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper considers the contribution of space-time noise to the oscillatory behaviour of solutions of a linear neutral stochastic delay differential equation. It was established that under certain conditions on the time lags and their speed of adjustments, the presence of noise generates oscillation in the solution of the equation ...

  6. Oscillatory Dynamics Related to the Unagreement Pattern in Spanish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Alejandro; Molinaro, Nicola; Mancini, Simona; Barraza, Paulo; Carreiras, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Unagreement patterns consist in a person feature mismatch between subject and verb that is nonetheless grammatical in Spanish. The processing of this type of construction gives new insights into the understanding of agreement processes during language comprehension. Here, we contrasted oscillatory brain activity triggered by Unagreement in…

  7. Deterministic oscillatory search: a new meta-heuristic optimization ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Archana

    and UPSEB 75 bus system. Results show better performance over other standard algorithms in terms of voltage stability, real power loss and sizing and cost of FACTS devices. Keywords. Artificial intelligence; global optimization; oscillatory search; meta-heuristic optimization; power system problem. 1. Introduction.

  8. Hardness/intensity correlations among BATSE bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegan, Charles A.; Wilson, Robert B.

    1992-01-01

    Conclusions about the nature of gamma-ray bursts derived from the size-frequency distribution may be altered if a significant correlation exists between burst intensity and spectral shape. Moreover, if gamma-ray bursts have a cosmological origin, such a correlation may be expected to result from the expansion of the universe. We have performed a rudimentary search of the BATSE bursts for hardness/intensity correlations. The range of spectral shapes was determined for each burst by computing the ratio of the intensity in the range 100-300 keV to that in 55-300 keV. We find weak evidence for the existence of a correlation, the strongest effect being present when comparing the maximum hardness ratio for each burst with its maximum rate.

  9. Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) Instrument Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsons, A.; Barthelmy, S.; Cummings, J.; Gehrels, N.; Hullinger, D.; Krimm, H.; Markwardt, C.; Tueller, J.; Fenimore, E.; Palmer, D.; Sato, G.; Takahashi, T.; Nakazawa, K.; Okada, Y.; Takahashi, H.; Suzuki, M.; Tashiro, M.

    2004-01-01

    The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT), a large coded aperture instrument with a wide field-of-view (FOV), provides the gamma-ray burst triggers and locations for the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer. In addition to providing this imaging information, BAT will perform a 15 keV - 150 keV all-sky hard x-ray survey based on the serendipitous pointings resulting from the study of gamma-ray bursts, and will also monitor the sky for transient hard x-ray sources. For BAT to provide spectral and photometric information for the gamma-ray bursts, the transient sources and the all-sky survey, the BAT instrument response must be determined to an increasingly greater accuracy. This paper describes the spectral models and the ground calibration experiments used to determine the BAT response to an accuracy suitable for gamma-ray burst studies

  10. A Gamma-Ray Burst Trigger Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, David L.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The detection rate of a gamma-ray burst detector can be increased by using a count rate trigger with many accumulation times DELTAt and energy bands DELTAE Because a burst's peak flux varies when averaged over different DELTAt and DELTAE the nominal sensitivity (the numerical value of the peak flux) of a trigger system is less important than how much fainter a burst could be at the detection threshold as DELTAt and DELTAE are changed. The relative sensitivity of different triggers can be quantified by referencing the detection threshold back to the peak flux for a fiducial value of DELTAt and DELTA E. This mapping between peak flux values for different sets of DELTAt and DELTAE varies from burst to burst. Quantitative estimates of the burst detection rate for a given detector and trigger system can be based on the observed rate at a measured peak flux value in this fiducial trigger. Predictions of a proposed trigger's burst detection rate depend on the assumed burst population, and these predictions can be wildly in error for triggers that differ significantly from previous missions. I base the fiducial rate on the BATSE observations: 550 bursts per sky above a peak flux of 0.3 ph per square centimeter per second averaged over DELTAt=1.024 sec and DELTAE=50-300 keV. Using a sample of 100 burst lightcurves I find that triggering on any value of DELTAt that is a multiple of 0.064 sec decreases the average threshold peak flux on the 1.024 sec timescale by a factor of 0.6. Extending DELTAE to lower energies includes the large flux of the X-ray background, increasing the background count rate. Consequently a low energy DELTAE is advantageous only for very soft bursts. Whether a large fraction of the population of bright bursts is soft is disputed; the new population of X-ray Flashes is soft but relatively faint.

  11. Helium bubble bursting in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sefta, Faiza; Juslin, Niklas; Wirth, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to systematically study the pressure evolution and bursting behavior of sub-surface helium bubbles and the resulting tungsten surface morphology. This study specifically investigates how bubble shape and size, temperature, tungsten surface orientation, and ligament thickness above the bubble influence bubble stability and surface evolution. The tungsten surface is roughened by a combination of adatom “islands,” craters, and pinholes. The present study provides insight into the mechanisms and conditions leading to various tungsten topology changes, which we believe are the initial stages of surface evolution leading to the formation of nanoscale fuzz

  12. Chaotic bursting in semiconductor lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruschel, Stefan; Yanchuk, Serhiy

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the dynamic mechanisms for low frequency fluctuations in semiconductor lasers subjected to delayed optical feedback, using the Lang-Kobayashi model. This system of delay differential equations displays pronounced envelope dynamics, ranging from erratic, so called low frequency fluctuations to regular pulse packages, if the time scales of fast oscillations and envelope dynamics are well separated. We investigate the parameter regions where low frequency fluctuations occur and compute their Lyapunov spectra. Using the geometric singular perturbation theory, we study this intermittent chaotic behavior and characterize these solutions as bursting slow-fast oscillations.

  13. Cosmology from gamma ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouri, Athina; Basilakos, Spyros

    2010-01-01

    In this study we propose to use Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) as standard candles in order to constrain the expansion history of the universe up to redshifts of z ∼ 6. In particular, we utilize the 69 GRB dataset recently compiled by Cardone et al. (2009). Performing a joint likelihood analysis of the recent supernovae type Ia (SNIa) data and the GRBs we can put constraints on the main cosmological parameters (Ω m , w). However, the use of the current GRBs to trace the Hubble relation, as an alternative to the traditionally used SNIa, can not break the degeneracy between the Ω m and the dark energy equation of state parameter.

  14. Comparative Study of Time-Frequency Decomposition Techniques for Fault Detection in Induction Motors Using Vibration Analysis during Startup Transient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Antonio Delgado-Arredondo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Induction motors are critical components for most industries and the condition monitoring has become necessary to detect faults. There are several techniques for fault diagnosis of induction motors and analyzing the startup transient vibration signals is not as widely used as other techniques like motor current signature analysis. Vibration analysis gives a fault diagnosis focused on the location of spectral components associated with faults. Therefore, this paper presents a comparative study of different time-frequency analysis methodologies that can be used for detecting faults in induction motors analyzing vibration signals during the startup transient. The studied methodologies are the time-frequency distribution of Gabor (TFDG, the time-frequency Morlet scalogram (TFMS, multiple signal classification (MUSIC, and fast Fourier transform (FFT. The analyzed vibration signals are one broken rotor bar, two broken bars, unbalance, and bearing defects. The obtained results have shown the feasibility of detecting faults in induction motors using the time-frequency spectral analysis applied to vibration signals, and the proposed methodology is applicable when it does not have current signals and only has vibration signals. Also, the methodology has applications in motors that are not fed directly to the supply line, in such cases the analysis of current signals is not recommended due to poor current signal quality.

  15. Characterisation of two-phase horizontal flow regime transition by the application of time-frequency analysis methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seleghim, Paulo

    1996-01-01

    This work concerns the development of a methodology which objective is to characterize and diagnose two-phase flow regime transitions. The approach is based on the fundamental assumption that a transition flow is less stationary than a flow with an established regime. In a first time, the efforts focused on: 1) the design and construction of an experimental loop, allowing to reproduce the main horizontal two-phase flow patterns, in a stable and controlled way, 2) the design and construction of an electrical impedance probe, providing an imaged information of the spatial phase distribution in the pipe, the systematic study of the joint time-frequency and time-scale analysis methods, which permitted to define an adequate parameter quantifying the un-stationary degree. In a second time, in order to verify the fundamental assumption, a series of experiments were conducted, which objective was to demonstrate the correlation between un-stationary and regime transition. The un-stationary degree was quantified by calculating the Gabor's transform time-frequency covariance of the impedance probe signals. Furthermore, the phenomenology of each transition was characterized by the joint moments and entropy. The results clearly show that the regime transitions are correlated with local-time frequency covariance peaks, which demonstrates that these regime transitions are characterized by a loss of stationarity. Consequently, the time-frequency covariance constitutes an objective two-phase flow regime transition indicator. (author) [fr

  16. Cross Time-Frequency Analysis for Combining Information of Several Sources: Application to Estimation of Spontaneous Respiratory Rate from Photoplethysmography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peláez-Coca, M. D.; Orini, M.; Lázaro, J.; Bailón, R.; Gil, E.

    2013-01-01

    A methodology that combines information from several nonstationary biological signals is presented. This methodology is based on time-frequency coherence, that quantifies the similarity of two signals in the time-frequency domain. A cross time-frequency analysis method, based on quadratic time-frequency distribution, has been used for combining information of several nonstationary biomedical signals. In order to evaluate this methodology, the respiratory rate from the photoplethysmographic (PPG) signal is estimated. The respiration provokes simultaneous changes in the pulse interval, amplitude, and width of the PPG signal. This suggests that the combination of information from these sources will improve the accuracy of the estimation of the respiratory rate. Another target of this paper is to implement an algorithm which provides a robust estimation. Therefore, respiratory rate was estimated only in those intervals where the features extracted from the PPG signals are linearly coupled. In 38 spontaneous breathing subjects, among which 7 were characterized by a respiratory rate lower than 0.15 Hz, this methodology provided accurate estimates, with the median error {0.00; 0.98} mHz ({0.00; 0.31}%) and the interquartile range error {4.88; 6.59} mHz ({1.60; 1.92}%). The estimation error of the presented methodology was largely lower than the estimation error obtained without combining different PPG features related to respiration. PMID:24363777

  17. Cross Time-Frequency Analysis for Combining Information of Several Sources: Application to Estimation of Spontaneous Respiratory Rate from Photoplethysmography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Peláez-Coca

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A methodology that combines information from several nonstationary biological signals is presented. This methodology is based on time-frequency coherence, that quantifies the similarity of two signals in the time-frequency domain. A cross time-frequency analysis method, based on quadratic time-frequency distribution, has been used for combining information of several nonstationary biomedical signals. In order to evaluate this methodology, the respiratory rate from the photoplethysmographic (PPG signal is estimated. The respiration provokes simultaneous changes in the pulse interval, amplitude, and width of the PPG signal. This suggests that the combination of information from these sources will improve the accuracy of the estimation of the respiratory rate. Another target of this paper is to implement an algorithm which provides a robust estimation. Therefore, respiratory rate was estimated only in those intervals where the features extracted from the PPG signals are linearly coupled. In 38 spontaneous breathing subjects, among which 7 were characterized by a respiratory rate lower than 0.15 Hz, this methodology provided accurate estimates, with the median error {0.00; 0.98} mHz ({0.00; 0.31}% and the interquartile range error {4.88; 6.59} mHz ({1.60; 1.92}%. The estimation error of the presented methodology was largely lower than the estimation error obtained without combining different PPG features related to respiration.

  18. Ballerina - pirouettes in search of gamma bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren Kristian; Lund, Niels; Pedersen, Henrik

    1999-01-01

    The cosmological origin of gamma ray bursts has now been established with reasonable certainty, Many more bursts will need to be studied to establish the typical distance scale, and to map out the large diversity in properties which have been indicated by the first handful of events. We are propo......The cosmological origin of gamma ray bursts has now been established with reasonable certainty, Many more bursts will need to be studied to establish the typical distance scale, and to map out the large diversity in properties which have been indicated by the first handful of events. We...

  19. Ginga Gamma-Ray Burst Line Occurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, David

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this project is the statistical evaluation of the occurrence of spectral lines in the gamma-ray burst spectra detected by the Ginga burst detector, and the comparison of the Ginga results to the BATSE observations. Two significant line features were detected in the Ginga bursts, but thus far none have been detected in the bursts BATSE detected. These line features may indicate the presence of strong magnetic fields in bursts, and therefore are important physical diagnostics of the conditions in the plasma which radiates the observed gamma-rays. The issue is whether there is a discrepancy between the Ginga and BATSE results; the potential discrepancy must be evaluated statistically. Even if BATSE line detections are announced, the statistical methodology we have developed can be used to estimate the rate at which different types of spectral features occur.

  20. Burst suppression probability algorithms: state-space methods for tracking EEG burst suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemali, Jessica; Ching, ShiNung; Purdon, Patrick L.; Solt, Ken; Brown, Emery N.

    2013-10-01

    Objective. Burst suppression is an electroencephalogram pattern in which bursts of electrical activity alternate with an isoelectric state. This pattern is commonly seen in states of severely reduced brain activity such as profound general anesthesia, anoxic brain injuries, hypothermia and certain developmental disorders. Devising accurate, reliable ways to quantify burst suppression is an important clinical and research problem. Although thresholding and segmentation algorithms readily identify burst suppression periods, analysis algorithms require long intervals of data to characterize burst suppression at a given time and provide no framework for statistical inference. Approach. We introduce the concept of the burst suppression probability (BSP) to define the brain's instantaneous propensity of being in the suppressed state. To conduct dynamic analyses of burst suppression we propose a state-space model in which the observation process is a binomial model and the state equation is a Gaussian random walk. We estimate the model using an approximate expectation maximization algorithm and illustrate its application in the analysis of rodent burst suppression recordings under general anesthesia and a patient during induction of controlled hypothermia. Main result. The BSP algorithms track burst suppression on a second-to-second time scale, and make possible formal statistical comparisons of burst suppression at different times. Significance. The state-space approach suggests a principled and informative way to analyze burst suppression that can be used to monitor, and eventually to control, the brain states of patients in the operating room and in the intensive care unit.

  1. Bias-dependent oscillatory electron transport of monatomic sulfur chains

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Jing-Xin

    2012-01-01

    The bias-dependent oscillatory electron transport of monatomic sulfur chains sandwiched between gold electrodes is investigated with density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green\\'s function method. At zero bias, in contrast to the typical odd-even oscillations observed in most metallic chains, we find that the conductance oscillates with a period of four atoms. However, as the bias voltage is increased the current displays a two-atom periodicity. This emerges gradually, first for the longer chains and then, at voltages larger than 0.7 V, for lengths. The oscillatory behaviors are analyzed by the density of states and the energy-dependent and bias-dependent transmission coefficients. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  2. Joint time-frequency analysis of EEG signals based on a phase-space interpretation of the recording process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testorf, M. E.; Jobst, B. C.; Kleen, J. K.; Titiz, A.; Guillory, S.; Scott, R.; Bujarski, K. A.; Roberts, D. W.; Holmes, G. L.; Lenck-Santini, P.-P.

    2012-10-01

    Time-frequency transforms are used to identify events in clinical EEG data. Data are recorded as part of a study for correlating the performance of human subjects during a memory task with pathological events in the EEG, called spikes. The spectrogram and the scalogram are reviewed as tools for evaluating spike activity. A statistical evaluation of the continuous wavelet transform across trials is used to quantify phase-locking events. For simultaneously improving the time and frequency resolution, and for representing the EEG of several channels or trials in a single time-frequency plane, a multichannel matching pursuit algorithm is used. Fundamental properties of the algorithm are discussed as well as preliminary results, which were obtained with clinical EEG data.

  3. Adaptive extraction of emotion-related EEG segments using multidimensional directed information in time-frequency domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrantonakis, Panagiotis C; Hadjileontiadis, Leontios J

    2010-01-01

    Emotion discrimination from electroencephalogram (EEG) has gained attention the last decade as a user-friendly and effective approach to EEG-based emotion recognition (EEG-ER) systems. Nevertheless, challenging issues regarding the emotion elicitation procedure, especially its effectiveness, raise. In this work, a novel method, which not only evaluates the degree of emotion elicitation but localizes the emotion information in the time-frequency domain, as well, is proposed. The latter, incorporates multidimensional directed information at the time-frequency EEG representation, extracted using empirical mode decomposition, and introduces an asymmetry index for adaptive emotion-related EEG segment selection. Experimental results derived from 16 subjects visually stimulated with pictures from the valence/arousal space drawn from the International Affective Picture System database, justify the effectiveness of the proposed approach and its potential contribution to the enhancement of EEG-ER systems.

  4. Real-Time Time-Frequency Two-Dimensional Imaging of Ultrafast Transient Signals in Solid-State Organic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Takeda

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we demonstrate a real-time time-frequency two-dimensional (2D pump-probe imaging spectroscopy implemented on a single shot basis applicable to excited-state dynamics in solid-state organic and biological materials. Using this technique, we could successfully map ultrafast time-frequency 2D transient absorption signals of β-carotene in solid films with wide temporal and spectral ranges having very short accumulation time of 20 ms per unit frame. The results obtained indicate the high potential of this technique as a powerful and unique spectroscopic tool to observe ultrafast excited-state dynamics of organic and biological materials in solid-state, which undergo rapid photodegradation.

  5. Fatigue crack propagation of super duplex stainless steel with dispersed structure and time-frequency analysis of acoustic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Ki-Woo; Kang, Chang-Yong; Do, Jae-Yoon; Ahn, Seok-Hwan; Lee, Sang-Kee

    2001-06-01

    The fatigue crack propagation of super duplex stainless steel was investigated for the effect of various volume fractions of the austenite phase by changing the heat treatment temperature. We also analyzed acoustic emission signals obtained during the fatigue crack propagation by the time-frequency analysis method. As the temperature of the heat treatment increased, the volume fraction of austenite decreased and coarse grain was obtained. The specimen treated at 1200 had a longer fatigue life and slower rate of crack growth. Results of time-frequency analysis of acoustic emission signals during the fatigue test showed the main frequency of 200-300 kHz to have no correlation with heat treatment and crack length, and the 500 kHz signal to be due to dimples and separation of inclusion.

  6. Time-frequency energy density precipitation method for time-of-flight extraction of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.; Huang, S. L.; Wang, S.; Zhao, W.

    2016-01-01

    The time-of-flight of the Lamb wave provides an important basis for defect evaluation in metal plates and is the input signal for Lamb wave tomographic imaging. However, the time-of-flight can be difficult to acquire because of the Lamb wave dispersion characteristics. This work proposes a time-frequency energy density precipitation method to accurately extract the time-of-flight of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals in metal plates. In the proposed method, a discrete short-time Fourier transform is performed on the narrowband Lamb wave detection signals to obtain the corresponding discrete time-frequency energy density distribution. The energy density values at the center frequency for all discrete time points are then calculated by linear interpolation. Next, the time-domain energy density curve focused on that center frequency is precipitated by least squares fitting of the calculated energy density values. Finally, the peak times of the energy density curve obtained relative to the initial pulse signal are extracted as the time-of-flight for the narrowband Lamb wave detection signals. An experimental platform is established for time-of-flight extraction of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals, and sensitivity analysis of the proposed time-frequency energy density precipitation method is performed in terms of propagation distance, dispersion characteristics, center frequency, and plate thickness. For comparison, the widely used Hilbert–Huang transform method is also implemented for time-of-flight extraction. The results show that the time-frequency energy density precipitation method can accurately extract the time-of-flight with relative error of <1% and thus can act as a universal time-of-flight extraction method for narrowband Lamb wave detection signals.

  7. Changes of spontaneous oscillatory activity to tonic heat pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Peng

    Full Text Available Transient painful stimuli could induce suppression of alpha oscillatory activities and enhancement of gamma oscillatory activities that also could be greatly modulated by attention. Here, we attempted to characterize changes in cortical activities during tonic heat pain perception and investigated the influence of directed/distracted attention on these responses. We collected 5-minute long continuous Electroencephalography (EEG data from 38 healthy volunteers during four conditions presented in a counterbalanced order: (A resting condition; (B innoxious-distracted condition; (C noxious-distracted condition; (D noxious-attended condition. The effects of tonic heat pain stimulation and selective attention on oscillatory activities were investigated by comparing the EEG power spectra among the four experimental conditions and assessing the relationship between spectral power difference and subjective pain intensity. The change of oscillatory activities in condition D was characterized by stable and persistent decrease of alpha oscillation power over contralateral-central electrodes and widespread increase of gamma oscillation power, which were even significantly correlated with subjective pain intensity. Since EEG responses in the alpha and gamma frequency band were affected by attention in different manners, they are likely related to different aspects of the multidimensional sensory experience of pain. The observed contralateral-central alpha suppression (conditions D vs. B and D vs. C may reflect primarily a top-down cognitive process such as attention, while the widespread gamma enhancement (conditions D vs. A may partly reflect tonic pain processing, representing the summary effects of bottom-up stimulus-related and top-down subject-driven cognitive processes.

  8. Spontaneous spiral formation in two-dimensional oscillatory media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettunen, Petteri; Amemiya, Takashi; Ohmori, Takao; Yamaguchi, Tomohiko

    1999-08-01

    Computational studies of pattern formation in a modified Oregonator model of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction is described. Initially inactive two-dimensional reaction media with an immobilized catalyst is connected to a reservoir of fresh reactants through a set of discrete points distributed randomly over the interphase surface. It is shown that the diffusion of reactants combined with oscillatory reaction kinetics can give rise to spontaneous spiral formation and phase waves.

  9. The hyperbolic effect of density and strength of inter beta-cell coupling on islet bursting: a theoretical investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xujing

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insulin, the principal regulating hormone of blood glucose, is released through the bursting of the pancreatic islets. Increasing evidence indicates the importance of islet morphostructure in its function, and the need of a quantitative investigation. Recently we have studied this problem from the perspective of islet bursting of insulin, utilizing a new 3D hexagonal closest packing (HCP model of islet structure that we have developed. Quantitative non-linear dependence of islet function on its structure was found. In this study, we further investigate two key structural measures: the number of neighboring cells that each β-cell is coupled to, nc, and the coupling strength, gc. Results β-cell clusters of different sizes with number of β-cells nβ ranging from 1–343, nc from 0–12, and gc from 0–1000 pS, were simulated. Three functional measures of islet bursting characteristics – fraction of bursting β-cells fb, synchronization index λ, and bursting period Tb, were quantified. The results revealed a hyperbolic dependence on the combined effect of nc and gc. From this we propose to define a dimensionless cluster coupling index or CCI, as a composite measure for islet morphostructural integrity. We show that the robustness of islet oscillatory bursting depends on CCI, with all three functional measures fb, λ and Tb increasing monotonically with CCI when it is small, and plateau around CCI = 1. Conclusion CCI is a good islet function predictor. It has the potential of linking islet structure and function, and providing insight to identify therapeutic targets for the preservation and restoration of islet β-cell mass and function.

  10. The Control Packet Collision Avoidance Algorithm for the Underwater Multichannel MAC Protocols via Time-Frequency Masking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Establishing high-speed and reliable underwater acoustic networks among multiunmanned underwater vehicles (UUVs is basic to realize cooperative and intelligent control among different UUVs. Nevertheless, different from terrestrial network, the propagation speed of the underwater acoustic network is 1500 m/s, which makes the design of the underwater acoustic network MAC protocols a big challenge. In accordance with multichannel MAC protocols, data packets and control packets are transferred through different channels, which lowers the adverse effect of acoustic network and gradually becomes the popular issues of underwater acoustic networks MAC protocol research. In this paper, we proposed a control packet collision avoidance algorithm utilizing time-frequency masking to deal with the control packets collision in the control channel. This algorithm is based on the scarcity of the noncoherent underwater acoustic communication signals, which regards collision avoiding as separation of the mixtures of communication signals from different nodes. We first measure the W-Disjoint Orthogonality of the MFSK signals and the simulation result demonstrates that there exists time-frequency mask which can separate the source signals from the mixture of the communication signals. Then we present a pairwise hydrophones separation system based on deep networks and the location information of the nodes. Consequently, the time-frequency mask can be estimated.

  11. Oscillatory thermocapillary instability in liquid layer with insoluble surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allias, Razihan; Nasir, Mohd. Agos Salim; Kechil, Seripah Awang

    2017-11-01

    Oscillatory convective flow is undesirable because it can produce bubbles, striation and dendrites in the manufactured products. The ability to control the complex convective flow patterns is important in technological processes and fundamental science. One of the factors that can alter the dynamics of the surface tension of thin fluid film is the surface-active agents. In this work, the influence of the insoluble surface-active agents on thermocapillary convective instability in a liquid layer for non-deformable free surface is examined. Uniform temperature and uniform heat flux for the temperature condition at the bottom surface are considered. The linear stability analysis is used to assess the effects of elasticity number, Lewis number, Prandtl number and Biot number on the onset of oscillatory convection. The existence of insoluble surfactant stabilizes the fluid layer system. The system is more stable in the case of uniform temperature. The presence of surfactant and temperature setting at the bottom boundary can suppress the onset of oscillatory instability.

  12. Enhanced heat transfer using oscillatory flows in solar collectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, A.A.; Cuevas, S.; Rio, J.A. del [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, UNAM, A.P. 34, 62580 Temixco, Mor. (Mexico)

    2006-10-15

    In this work, we propose the use of oscillatory laminar flows to enhance the transfer of heat from solar collectors. The idea is to explore the possibility of transferring the heat collected from a solar device to a storage tank by means of a zero-mean oscillating fluid contained in a tube. This method takes advantage of the fact that the effective thermal diffusivity of a fluid in oscillatory motion is several orders of magnitude higher than the fluid molecular diffusivity. Therefore, the axial transport of heat along the tube is substantially higher when the fluid oscillates than when the fluid is static. Also, preliminary estimations show a dramatic heat transfer enhancement using oscillatory flows compared with the forced convection of heat by standard unidirectional flows. We explore the behavior of the effective thermal diffusivity using both Newtonian and viscoelastic fluids. For the Newtonian fluid a single maximum value of this quantity is exhibited for a given oscillation frequency. In contrast, several maxima for different resonant frequencies are observed for the viscoelastic fluid. Further, the absolute maximum of the enhanced thermal diffusivity for the viscoelastic fluid is several orders of magnitude larger than that of the Newtonian fluid. (author)

  13. Spectral evolution of gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, D.; Matteson, J.; Ford, L.; Schaefer, B.; Teegarden, B.; Cline, T.; Paciesas, W.; Pendleton, G.; Fishman, G.; Meegan, C.

    1992-01-01

    BATSE's Spectral Detectors provide a series of high resolution spectra over the duration of a gamma-ray burst; fits to these spectra show the evolution of the continuum as the burst progresses. The burst continuum can usually be fit by the spectral form AE sup alpha exp(-E/kT) from around 25 keV to more than 3 MeV, with varying trends in the value and evolution of the spectral parameters. As a result of limited statistics for E greater than 1 - 2 MeV in the individual spectra, a high energy power law is not required. Only long duration strong bursts can be studied by fitting a series of spectra, and therefore our conclusions concern only this class of burst. The bursts we analyzed tend to be characterized by a hard-to-soft trend both for individual intensity spikes and for the burst as a whole: the hardness leads the count rate in spectra which resolve the temporal variations, while the hardness of successive spikes decreases. We also summarize the performance of the Spectral Detectors and the development of analysis tools to date.

  14. Gamma-Ray Bursts Have Millisecond Variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, Katharine C.; Schaefer, Bradley E.; Fenimore, E. E.

    2000-01-01

    We have performed searches for isolated flares and for steady flickering in the initial ∼1 s of gamma-ray burst light curves on the microsecond to millisecond timescales. Two bursts among our sample of 20 revealed four isolated flares with timescales from 256 to 2048 μs. A wavelet analysis for our sample showed low-level flickering for all bursts on timescales from 256 μs to 33 ms, with the majority of bursts containing rise times faster than 4 ms and 30% having rise times faster than 1 ms. These results show that millisecond variability is common in classical bursts and not some exceptional activity by a possibly separate class of bursts. These fast rise times can be used to place the following severe limits on burst models. (1) The characteristic thickness of the energy generation region must be less than 1200 km along the line of sight. (2) The angular size of the gamma-ray emission region as subtended from the central source must be less than 42''. (3) The expanding ejecta must have a range of Lorentz factors along a radius line with a dispersion of less than roughly 2%. (4) Within the external shock scenario, the characteristic dimension of the impacted cloud must be smaller than 16 AU on average. (5) Within the collimated jet scenario, the collimation angle must be smaller than 42''. (c) 2000 The American Astronomical Society

  15. Bursting neurons and ultrasound avoidance in crickets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary eMarsat

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Decision making in invertebrates often relies on simple neural circuits composed of only a few identified neurons. The relative simplicity of these circuits makes it possible to identify the key computation and neural properties underlying decisions. In this review, we summarize recent research on the neural basis of ultrasound avoidance in crickets, a response that allows escape from echolocating bats. The key neural property shaping behavioral output is high-frequency bursting of an identified interneuron, AN2, which carries information about ultrasound stimuli from receptor neurons to the brain. AN2's spike train consists of clusters of spikes –bursts– that may be interspersed with isolated, non-burst spikes. AN2 firing is necessary and sufficient to trigger avoidance steering but only high-rate firing, such as occurs in bursts, evokes this response. AN2 bursts are therefore at the core of the computation involved in deciding whether or not to steer away from ultrasound. Bursts in AN2 are triggered by synaptic input from nearly synchronous bursts in ultrasound receptors. Thus the population response at the very first stage of sensory processing –the auditory receptor- already differentiates the features of the stimulus that will trigger a behavioral response from those that will not. Adaptation, both intrinsic to AN2 and within ultrasound receptors, scales the burst-generating features according to the stimulus statistics, thus filtering out background noise and ensuring that bursts occur selectively in response to salient peaks in ultrasound intensity. Furthermore AN2’s sensitivity to ultrasound varies adaptively with predation pressure, through both developmental and evolutionary mechanisms. We discuss how this key relationship between bursting and the triggering of avoidance behavior is also observed in other invertebrate systems such as the avoidance of looming visual stimuli in locusts or heat avoidance in beetles.

  16. Pharmacological characterization of the involvement of protein kinase C in oscillatory and non-oscillatory calcium increases in astrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuhiro Morita

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Evidence increasingly shows that astrocytes play a pivotal role in brain physiology and pathology via calcium dependent processes, thus the characterization of the calcium dynamics in astrocytes is of growing importance. We have previously reported that the epidermal growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor up-regulate the oscillation of the calcium releases that are induced by stimuli, including glutamate in cultured astrocytes. This calcium oscillation is assumed to involve protein kinase C (PKC, which is activated together with the calcium releases as a consequence of inositol phospholipid hydrolysis. In the present study, this issue has been investigated pharmacologically by using astrocytes cultured with and without the growth factors. The pharmacological activation of PKC largely reduced the glutamate-induced oscillatory and non-oscillatory calcium increases. Meanwhile, PKC inhibitors increased the total amounts of both calcium increases without affecting the peak amplitudes and converted the calcium oscillations to non-oscillatory sustained calcium increases by abolishing the falling phases of the repetitive calcium increases. Furthermore, the pharmacological effects were consistent between both glutamate- and histamine-induced calcium oscillations. These results suggest that PKC up-regulates the removal of cytosolic calcium in astrocytes, and this up-regulation is essential for calcium oscillation in astrocytes cultured with growth factors.

  17. The genesis of period-adding bursting without bursting-chaos in the Chay model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhuoqin; Lu Qishao; Li Li

    2006-01-01

    According to the period-adding firing patterns without chaos observed in neuronal experiments, the genesis of the period-adding 'fold/homoclinic' bursting sequence without bursting-chaos is explored by numerical simulation, fast/slow dynamics and bifurcation analysis of limit cycle in the neuronal Chay model. It is found that each periodic bursting, from period-1 to 7, is separately generated by the corresponding periodic spiking pattern through two period-doubling bifurcations, except for the period-1 bursting occurring via a Hopf bifurcation. Consequently, it can be revealed that this period-adding bursting bifurcation without chaos has a compound bifurcation structure with transitions from spiking to bursting, which is closely related to period-doubling bifurcations of periodic spiking in essence

  18. On Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Ruffini, Remo; Bianco, Carlo Luciano; Caito, Letizia; Chardonnet, Pascal; Cherubini, Christian; Dainotti, Maria Giovanna; Fraschetti, Federico; Geralico, Andrea; Guida, Roberto; Patricelli, Barbara; Rotondo, Michael; Hernandez, Jorge Armando Rueda; Vereshchagin, Gregory; Xue, She-Sheng

    2008-01-01

    (Shortened) We show by example how the uncoding of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) offers unprecedented possibilities to foster new knowledge in fundamental physics and in astrophysics. After recalling some of the classic work on vacuum polarization in uniform electric fields by Klein, Sauter, Heisenberg, Euler and Schwinger, we summarize some of the efforts to observe these effects in heavy ions and high energy ion collisions. We then turn to the theory of vacuum polarization around a Kerr-Newman black hole, leading to the extraction of the blackholic energy, to the concept of dyadosphere and dyadotorus, and to the creation of an electron-positron-photon plasma. We then present a new theoretical approach encompassing the physics of neutron stars and heavy nuclei. It is shown that configurations of nuclear matter in bulk with global charge neutrality can exist on macroscopic scales and with electric fields close to the critical value near their surfaces. These configurations may represent an initial condition for the...

  19. Complex transitions between spike, burst or chaos synchronization states in coupled neurons with coexisting bursting patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Hua-Guang; Chen Sheng-Gen; Li Yu-Ye

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the synchronization dynamics of a coupled neuronal system composed of two identical Chay model neurons. The Chay model showed coexisting period-1 and period-2 bursting patterns as a parameter and initial values are varied. We simulated multiple periodic and chaotic bursting patterns with non-(NS), burst phase (BS), spike phase (SS), complete (CS), and lag synchronization states. When the coexisting behavior is near period-2 bursting, the transitions of synchronization states of the coupled system follows very complex transitions that begins with transitions between BS and SS, moves to transitions between CS and SS, and to CS. Most initial values lead to the CS state of period-2 bursting while only a few lead to the CS state of period-1 bursting. When the coexisting behavior is near period-1 bursting, the transitions begin with NS, move to transitions between SS and BS, to transitions between SS and CS, and then to CS. Most initial values lead to the CS state of period-1 bursting but a few lead to the CS state of period-2 bursting. The BS was identified as chaos synchronization. The patterns for NS and transitions between BS and SS are insensitive to initial values. The patterns for transitions between CS and SS and the CS state are sensitive to them. The number of spikes per burst of non-CS bursting increases with increasing coupling strength. These results not only reveal the initial value- and parameter-dependent synchronization transitions of coupled systems with coexisting behaviors, but also facilitate interpretation of various bursting patterns and synchronization transitions generated in the nervous system with weak coupling strength. (paper)

  20. Surface electromyography based muscle fatigue detection using high-resolution time-frequency methods and machine learning algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthick, P A; Ghosh, Diptasree Maitra; Ramakrishnan, S

    2018-02-01

    Surface electromyography (sEMG) based muscle fatigue research is widely preferred in sports science and occupational/rehabilitation studies due to its noninvasiveness. However, these signals are complex, multicomponent and highly nonstationary with large inter-subject variations, particularly during dynamic contractions. Hence, time-frequency based machine learning methodologies can improve the design of automated system for these signals. In this work, the analysis based on high-resolution time-frequency methods, namely, Stockwell transform (S-transform), B-distribution (BD) and extended modified B-distribution (EMBD) are proposed to differentiate the dynamic muscle nonfatigue and fatigue conditions. The nonfatigue and fatigue segments of sEMG signals recorded from the biceps brachii of 52 healthy volunteers are preprocessed and subjected to S-transform, BD and EMBD. Twelve features are extracted from each method and prominent features are selected using genetic algorithm (GA) and binary particle swarm optimization (BPSO). Five machine learning algorithms, namely, naïve Bayes, support vector machine (SVM) of polynomial and radial basis kernel, random forest and rotation forests are used for the classification. The results show that all the proposed time-frequency distributions (TFDs) are able to show the nonstationary variations of sEMG signals. Most of the features exhibit statistically significant difference in the muscle fatigue and nonfatigue conditions. The maximum number of features (66%) is reduced by GA and BPSO for EMBD and BD-TFD respectively. The combination of EMBD- polynomial kernel based SVM is found to be most accurate (91% accuracy) in classifying the conditions with the features selected using GA. The proposed methods are found to be capable of handling the nonstationary and multicomponent variations of sEMG signals recorded in dynamic fatiguing contractions. Particularly, the combination of EMBD- polynomial kernel based SVM could be used to

  1. Long Burst Error Correcting Codes, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Long burst error mitigation is an enabling technology for the use of Ka band for high rate commercial and government users. Multiple NASA, government, and commercial...

  2. Relativistic effects in gamma-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksen, Erik; Groen, Oeyvind

    1999-01-01

    According to recent models of the sources of gamma-ray bursts the extremely energetic emission is caused by shells expanding with ultrarelativistic velocity. With the recent identification of optical sources at the positions of some gamma-ray bursts these ''fireball'' models have acquired an actuality that invites to use them as a motivating application when teaching special relativity. We demonstrate several relativistic effects associated with these models which are very pronounced due to the great velocity of the shell. For example a burst lasting for a month in the rest frame of an element of the shell lasts for a few seconds only, in the rest frame of our detector. It is shown how the observed properties of a burst are modified by aberration and the Doppler effect. The apparent luminosity as a function of time is calculated. Modifications due to the motion of the star away from the observer are calculated. (Author)

  3. Solar energetic particles and radio burst emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miteva Rositsa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a statistical study on the observed solar radio burst emission associated with the origin of in situ detected solar energetic particles. Several proton event catalogs in the period 1996–2016 are used. At the time of appearance of the particle origin (flare and coronal mass ejection we identified radio burst signatures of types II, III and IV by inspecting dynamic radio spectral plots. The information from observatory reports is also accounted for during the analysis. The occurrence of solar radio burst signatures is evaluated within selected wavelength ranges during the solar cycle 23 and the ongoing 24. Finally, we present the burst occurrence trends with respect to the intensity of the proton events and the location of their solar origin.

  4. Solar energetic particles and radio burst emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miteva, Rositsa; Samwel, Susan W.; Krupar, Vratislav

    2017-12-01

    We present a statistical study on the observed solar radio burst emission associated with the origin of in situ detected solar energetic particles. Several proton event catalogs in the period 1996-2016 are used. At the time of appearance of the particle origin (flare and coronal mass ejection) we identified radio burst signatures of types II, III and IV by inspecting dynamic radio spectral plots. The information from observatory reports is also accounted for during the analysis. The occurrence of solar radio burst signatures is evaluated within selected wavelength ranges during the solar cycle 23 and the ongoing 24. Finally, we present the burst occurrence trends with respect to the intensity of the proton events and the location of their solar origin.

  5. Astrophysics: Burst of support for relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amelino-Camelia, Giovanni

    2009-11-01

    Light from a distant γ-ray burst backs up a key prediction of Albert Einstein's theory of relativity - that photon speed is the same regardless of energy. But it might set the stage for evolution of the theory.

  6. Observations of gamma-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strong, I.B.; Klebesadel, R.W.; Evans, W.D.

    1975-01-01

    Observational data on gamma-ray bursts are reviewed. Information is grouped into temporal properties, energy fluxes and spectral properties, and directions and distributions of the sources in space. (BJG)

  7. Wavelength- and Time-Selective Reconfigurable Optical Add/Drop Multiplexer Using Time-Frequency Domain Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konishi Tsuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose and demonstrate a wavelength- and time-selective reconfigurable optical add/drop multiplexer (ROADM using time-frequency domain processing. The proposed ROADM is realized by allocating wavelength channels and time slots to corresponding 2D spatial channels on a MEMS optical switch. Experimental results show the wavelength- and time-selective drop operation for a signal with equivalent 3.2 Tb/s (0.64  channels, and the reconfigurability by the switching operation of the MEMS optical switch.

  8. Wavelength- and Time-Selective Reconfigurable Optical Add/Drop Multiplexer Using Time-Frequency Domain Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Konishi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose and demonstrate a wavelength- and time-selective reconfigurable optical add/drop multiplexer (ROADM using time-frequency domain processing. The proposed ROADM is realized by allocating wavelength channels and time slots to corresponding 2D spatial channels on a MEMS optical switch. Experimental results show the wavelength- and time-selective drop operation for a signal with equivalent 3.2 Tb/s (0.64 Tb/s×5 channels, and the reconfigurability by the switching operation of the MEMS optical switch.

  9. Supernovae and gamma-ray bursts connection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle, Massimo Della [INAF-Napoli, Capodimonte Observatory, Salita Moiariello, 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); International Center for Relativistic Astrophysics Network, Piazzale della Repubblica 10, I-65122, Pescara (Italy)

    2015-12-17

    I’ll review the status of the Supernova/Gamma-Ray Burst connection. Several pieces of evidence suggest that long duration Gamma-ray Bursts are associated with bright SNe-Ic. However recent works suggest that GRBs might be produced in tight binary systems composed of a massive carbon-oxygen cores and a neutron star companion. Current estimates of the SN and GRB rates yield a ratio GRB/SNe-Ibc in the range ∼ 0.4% − 3%.

  10. The Oscillatory Nature of Rotating Convection in Liquid Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurnou, J. M.; Bertin, V. L.; Grannan, A. M.

    2016-12-01

    Earth's magnetic field is assumed to be generated by fluid motions in its liquid metal core. In this fluid, the heat diffuses significantly more than momentum and thus, the ratio of these two diffusivities, the Prandtl number Pr=ν/Κ, is well below unity. The convective flow dynamics of liquid metal is very different from Pr ≈ 1 fluids like water and those used in current dynamo simulations. In order to characterize rapidly rotating thermal convection in low Pr number fluids, we have performed laboratory experiments in a cylinder using liquid gallium (Pr ≈ 0.023) as the working fluid. The Ekman number, which characterizes the effect of rotation, varies from E = 4 10-5 to 4 10-6 and the dimensionless buoyancy forcing (Rayleigh number, Ra) varies from Ra =3 105 to 2 107. Using heat transfer measurements (Nusselt number, Nu) as well as temperature measurements within the fluid, we characterize the different styles of low Pr rotating convective flow. The convection threshold is first overcome in the form of a container scale inertial oscillatory mode. At stronger forcing, wall-localized modes are identified for the first time in liquid metal laboratory experiments. These wall modes coexist with the bulk inertial oscillatory modes. When the strengh of the buoyancy increases, the bulk flow becomes turbulent while the wall modes remain. Our results imply that rotating convective flows in liquid metals do not develop in the form of quasi-steady columns, as in Pr ≈ 1 dynamo models, but in the form of oscillatory motions. Therefore, the flows that drive thermally-driven dynamo action in low Pr geophysical and astrophysical fluids can differ substantively than those occuring in current-day Pr ≈ 1 numerical models. In addition, our results suggest that relatively low wavenumber, wall-attached modes may be dynamically important in rapidly-rotating convection in liquid metals.

  11. Effect of prolonged wakefulness on electroencephalographic oscillatory activity during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olbrich, Eckehard; Landolt, Hans Peter; Achermann, Peter

    2014-06-01

    The human sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) is characterized by the occurrence of distinct oscillatory events such as delta waves, sleep spindles and alpha activity. We applied a previously proposed algorithm for the detection of such events and investigated their incidence and frequency in baseline and recovery sleep after 40 h of sustained wakefulness in 27 healthy young subjects. The changes in oscillatory events induced by sleep deprivation were compared to the corresponding spectral changes. Both approaches revealed, on average, an increase in low frequency activity and a decrease in spindle activity after sleep deprivation. However, the increase of oscillatory events in the delta range and decrease in the sigma range occurred in a more restricted frequency range compared to spectral changes. The mean relative power spectra showed a significant increase in theta and alpha activity after sleep deprivation while, on average, the event analysis showed only a weak effect in the theta band. The reason for this discrepancy is that the spectral analysis does not distinguish between diffuse activity and clearly visible temporally localized oscillations, while the event analysis would detect only the latter. Additionally, only a few individuals clearly showed activity in the theta or alpha frequency bands. Conversely, event analysis revealed that some individuals showed an increased rate of sleep spindles after sleep deprivation, a fact that was not evident in the relative power spectra due to a decrease in background activity. The two methods complement each other and facilitate the interpretation of distinct changes induced by prolonged wakefulness in sleep EEG. © 2013 European Sleep Research Society.

  12. Abnormal Task Modulation of Oscillatory Neural Activity in Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa C Dias

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia patients have deficits in cognitive function that are a core feature of the disorder. AX-CPT is commonly used to study cognition in schizophrenia, and patients have characteristic pattern of behavioral and ERP response. In AX-CPT subjects respond when a flashed cue A is followed by a target X, ignoring other letter combinations. Patients show reduced hit rate to go trials, and increased false alarms to sequences that require inhibition of a prepotent response. EEG recordings show reduced sensory (P1/N1, as well as later cognitive components (N2, P3, CNV. Behavioral deficits correlate most strongly with sensory dysfunction. Oscillatory analyses provide critical information regarding sensory/cognitive processing over and above standard ERP analyses. Recent analyses of induced oscillatory activity in single trials during AX-CPT in healthy volunteers showed characteristic response patterns in theta, alpha and beta frequencies tied to specific sensory and cognitive processes. Alpha and beta modulated during the trials and beta modulation over the frontal cortex correlated with reaction time. In this study, EEG data was obtained from 18 schizophrenia patients and 13 controls during AX-CPT performance, and single trial decomposition of the signal yielded power in the target wavelengths.Significant task-related event-related desynchronization (ERD was observed in both alpha and beta frequency bands over parieto-occipital cortex related to sensory encoding of the cue. This modulation was reduced in patients for beta, but not for alpha. In addition, significant beta ERD was observed over motor cortex, related to motor preparation for the response, and was also reduced in patients. These findings demonstrate impaired dynamic modulation of beta frequency rhythms in schizophrenia, and suggest that failures of oscillatory activity may underlie impaired sensory information processing in schizophrenia that in turn contributes to cognitive deficits.

  13. Characterization of vertical mixing in oscillatory vegetated flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolahpour, M.; Ghisalberti, M.; Lavery, P.; McMahon, K.

    2016-02-01

    Seagrass meadows are primary producers that provide important ecosystem services, such as improved water quality, sediment stabilisation and trapping and recycling of nutrients. Most of these ecological services are strongly influenced by the vertical exchange of water across the canopy-water interface. That is, vertical mixing is the main hydrodynamic process governing the large-scale ecological and environmental impact of seagrass meadows. The majority of studies into mixing in vegetated flows have focused on steady flow environments whereas many coastal canopies are subjected to oscillatory flows driven by surface waves. It is known that the rate of mass transfer will vary greatly between unidirectional and oscillatory flows, necessitating a specific investigation of mixing in oscillatory canopy flows. In this study, we conducted an extensive laboratory investigation to characterise the rate of vertical mixing through a vertical turbulent diffusivity (Dt,z). This has been done through gauging the evolution of vertical profiles of concentration (C) of a dye sheet injected into a wave-canopy flow. Instantaneous measurement of the variance of the vertical concentration distribution ( allowed the estimation of a vertical turbulent diffusivity (). Two types of model canopies, rigid and flexible, with identical heights and frontal areas, were subjected to a wide and realistic range of wave height and period. The results showed two important mechanisms that dominate vertical mixing under different conditions: a shear layer that forms at the top of the canopy and wake turbulence generated by the stems. By allowing a coupled contribution of wake and shear layer mixing, we present a relationship that can be used to predict the rate of vertical mixing in coastal canopies. The results further showed that the rate of vertical mixing within flexible vegetation was always lower than the corresponding rigid canopy, confirming the impact of plant flexibility on canopy

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations of oscillatory flows in microfluidic channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J.S.; Ottesen, Johnny T.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we apply the direct non-equilibrium molecular dynamics technique to oscillatory flows of fluids in microscopic channels. Initially, we show that the microscopic simulations resemble the macroscopic predictions based on the Navier–Stokes equation very well for large channel width, high...... density and low temperature. Further simulations for high temperature and low density show that the non-slip boundary condition traditionally used in the macroscopic equation is greatly compromised when the fluid–wall interactions are the same as the fluid–fluid interactions. Simulations of a system...

  15. Oscillatory flow about a cylinder pair with unequal radii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coenen, W, E-mail: wcoenen@ing.uc3m.es [Área de Mecánica de Fluidos, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avenida Universidad 30, E-28911 Leganés, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-10-15

    We consider the oscillating flow about a pair of circular cylinders of unequal diameter. In addition to the relative size of the cylinders, the distance between them can be varied, as can the angle that the undisturbed oscillatory flow makes with the line joining the cylinder centres. For small-amplitude vibrations a time-independent, or steady streaming, motion develops that persists beyond the Stokes layer that forms at the solid boundary. This persistent streaming is considered for large values of a suitably defined streaming Reynolds number. (paper)

  16. A simple mechanical system for studying adaptive oscillatory neural networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jouffroy, Guillaume; Jouffroy, Jerome

    that the network oscillates in a suitable way, this tuning being a non trivial task. It also appears that the link with the physical body that these oscillatory entities control has a fundamental importance, and it seems that most bodies used for experimental validation in the literature (walking robots, lamprey...... model, etc.) might be too complex to study. In this paper, we use a comparatively simple mechanical system, the nonholonomic vehicle referred to as the Roller-Racer, as a means towards testing different learning strategies for an Recurrent Neural Network-based (RNN) controller/guidance system. After...

  17. Numerical solution of highly oscillatory ordinary differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Linda R.; Jay, Laurent O.; Yen, Jeng

    One of the most difficult problems in the numerical solution of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) and in differential-algebraic equations (DAEs) is the development of methods for dealing with highly oscillatory systems. These types of systems arise, for example, in vehicle simulation when modelling the suspension system or tyres, in models for contact and impact, in flexible body simulation from vibrations in the structural model, in molecular dynamics, in orbital mechanics, and in circuit simulation. Standard numerical methods can require a huge number of time-steps to track the oscillations, and even with small stepsizes they can alter the dynamics, unless the method is chosen very carefully.

  18. Oscillatory squeeze flow for the study of linear viscoelastic behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wingstrand, Sara Lindeblad; Alvarez, Nicolas J.; Hassager, Ole

    2016-01-01

    of molten polymers and suspensions. The principal advantage of squeeze flow rheometer over rotational devices is the simplicity of the apparatus. It has no air bearing and is much less expensive and easier to use. Accuracy may be somewhat reduced, but for quality control purposes, it could be quite useful....... It might also find application as the central component of a high-throughput rheometer for evaluating experimental materials. The deformation is not simple shear, but equations have been derived to show that the oscillatory compressive (normal) force that is measured can serve as a basis for calculating...

  19. Ultrafine grained Cu processed by compression with oscillatory torsion

    OpenAIRE

    K. Rodak

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work is a study of Cu microstructure after severe plastic deformation process by usingcompression with oscillatory torsion test.Design/methodology/approach: Cu samples were deformed at torsion frequency (f) changed from 0 Hz(compression) to 1.8 Hz under a constant torsion angle (α) ≈8° and compression speed (v)=0.1mm/s. Structuralinvestigations were conducted by using light microscopy (LM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).Findings: The structural analysis ma...

  20. Performance Comparison of Time-Frequency Distributions for Estimation of Instantaneous Frequency of Heart Rate Variability Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabeel Ali Khan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The instantaneous frequency (IF of a non-stationary signal is usually estimated from a time-frequency distribution (TFD. The IF of heart rate variability (HRV is an important parameter because the power in a frequency band around the IF can be used for the interpretation and analysis of the respiratory rate but also for a more accurate analysis of heart rate (HR signals. In this study, we compare the performance of five states of the art kernel-based time-frequency distributions (TFDs in terms of their ability to accurately estimate the IF of HR signals. The selected TFDs include three widely used fixed kernel methods: the modified B distribution, the S-method and the spectrogram; and two adaptive kernel methods: the adaptive optimal kernel TFD and the recently developed adaptive directional TFD. The IF of the respiratory signal, which is usually easier to estimate as the respiratory signal is a mono-component with small amplitude variations with time, is used as a reference to examine the accuracy of the HRV IF estimates. Experimental results indicate that the most reliable estimates are obtained using the adaptive directional TFD in comparison to other commonly used methods such as the adaptive optimal kernel TFD and the modified B distribution.

  1. A novel flexible model for the extraction of features from brain signals in the time-frequency domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heideklang, R; Ivanova, G

    2013-01-01

    Electrophysiological signals such as the EEG, MEG, or LFPs have been extensively studied over the last decades, and elaborate signal processing algorithms have been developed for their analysis. Many of these methods are based on time-frequency decomposition to account for the signals' spectral properties while maintaining their temporal dynamics. However, the data typically exhibit intra- and interindividual variability. Existing algorithms often do not take into account this variability, for instance by using fixed frequency bands. This shortcoming has inspired us to develop a new robust and flexible method for time-frequency analysis and signal feature extraction using the novel smooth natural Gaussian extension (snaGe) model. The model is nonlinear, and its parameters are interpretable. We propose an algorithm to derive initial parameters based on dynamic programming for nonlinear fitting and describe an iterative refinement scheme to robustly fit high-order models. We further present distance functions to be able to compare different instances of our model. The method's functionality and robustness are demonstrated using simulated as well as real data. The snaGe model is a general tool allowing for a wide range of applications in biomedical data analysis.

  2. A Novel Flexible Model for the Extraction of Features from Brain Signals in the Time-Frequency Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Heideklang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrophysiological signals such as the EEG, MEG, or LFPs have been extensively studied over the last decades, and elaborate signal processing algorithms have been developed for their analysis. Many of these methods are based on time-frequency decomposition to account for the signals’ spectral properties while maintaining their temporal dynamics. However, the data typically exhibit intra- and interindividual variability. Existing algorithms often do not take into account this variability, for instance by using fixed frequency bands. This shortcoming has inspired us to develop a new robust and flexible method for time-frequency analysis and signal feature extraction using the novel smooth natural Gaussian extension (snaGe model. The model is nonlinear, and its parameters are interpretable. We propose an algorithm to derive initial parameters based on dynamic programming for nonlinear fitting and describe an iterative refinement scheme to robustly fit high-order models. We further present distance functions to be able to compare different instances of our model. The method’s functionality and robustness are demonstrated using simulated as well as real data. The snaGe model is a general tool allowing for a wide range of applications in biomedical data analysis.

  3. Pattern recognition based on time-frequency analysis and convolutional neural networks for vibrational events in φ-OTDR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chengjin; Guan, Junjun; Bao, Ming; Lu, Jiangang; Ye, Wei

    2018-01-01

    Based on vibration signals detected by a phase-sensitive optical time-domain reflectometer distributed optical fiber sensing system, this paper presents an implement of time-frequency analysis and convolutional neural network (CNN), used to classify different types of vibrational events. First, spectral subtraction and the short-time Fourier transform are used to enhance time-frequency features of vibration signals and transform different types of vibration signals into spectrograms, which are input to the CNN for automatic feature extraction and classification. Finally, by replacing the soft-max layer in the CNN with a multiclass support vector machine, the performance of the classifier is enhanced. Experiments show that after using this method to process 4000 vibration signal samples generated by four different vibration events, namely, digging, walking, vehicles passing, and damaging, the recognition rates of vibration events are over 90%. The experimental results prove that this method can automatically make an effective feature selection and greatly improve the classification accuracy of vibrational events in distributed optical fiber sensing systems.

  4. A Frequency Domain Extraction Based Adaptive Joint Time Frequency Decomposition Method of the Maneuvering Target Radar Echo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guochao Lao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The maneuvering target echo of high-resolution radar can be expressed as a multicomponent polynomial phase signal (mc-PPS. However, with improvements in radar resolution and increases in the synthetic period, classical time frequency analysis methods cannot satisfy the requirements of maneuvering target radar echo processing. In this paper, a novel frequency domain extraction-based adaptive joint time frequency (FDE-AJTF decomposition method was proposed with three improvements. First, the maximum frequency spectrum of the phase compensation signal was taken as the fitness function, while the fitness comparison, component extraction, and residual updating were operated in the frequency domain; second, the time window was adopted on the basis function to fit the uncertain signal component time; and third, constant false alarm ratio (CFAR detection was applied in the component extraction to reduce the ineffective components. Through these means, the stability and speed of phase parameters estimation increased with one domination ignored in the phase parameter estimation, and the accuracy and effectiveness of the signal component extraction performed better with less influence from the estimation errors, clutters, and noises. Finally, these advantages of the FDE-AJTF decomposition method were verified through a comparison with the classical method in simulation and experimental tests.

  5. Assessment of muscle load and fatigue with the usage of frequency and time-frequency analysis of the EMG signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartuzi, Paweł; Roman-Liu, Danuta

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effect of the muscle load and fatigue on the values of the parameters calculated on the basis of the time, frequency (Fourier transform) and time-frequency (wavelet transform) analysis of the EMG signal, for low levels of load. Fifteen young men took part in the study. The EMG signal was registered from right side biceps brachii (BB) and trapezius (TR) muscles in static conditions, at load 10%, 20% and 30% MVC (maximal voluntary contraction). On the basis of the analysis there were selected parameters sensitive to force (RMS) and parameters sensitive to fatigue but simultaneously insensitive to force (MPF--mean power frequency determined on the basis of Fourier transform, CMPFdb5--mean power frequency determined on the basis of the wavelet transform). The results indicate that CMPFdb5 can show similar (muscle BB) or greater (muscle TR) sensitivity to fatigue than MPF. It can suggest that, for low levels of load, the wavelet transform parameters can be more effective in assessing muscle fatigue than the parameters based on the Fourier transform. The obtained results can allow for a more precise analysis of muscle fatigue at low levels of load. Further analysis for a greater number of muscles activated at low levels of load, with the usage of the parameters tested is desirable.

  6. A novel approach to predict sudden cardiac death (SCD using nonlinear and time-frequency analyses from HRV signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Ebrahimzadeh

    Full Text Available Investigations show that millions of people all around the world die as the result of sudden cardiac death (SCD. These deaths can be reduced by using medical equipment, such as defibrillators, after detection. We need to propose suitable ways to assist doctors to predict sudden cardiac death with a high level of accuracy. To do this, Linear, Time-Frequency (TF and Nonlinear features have been extracted from HRV of ECG signal. Finally, healthy people and people at risk of SCD are classified by k-Nearest Neighbor (k-NN and Multilayer Perceptron Neural Network (MLP. To evaluate, we have compared the classification rates for both separate and combined Nonlinear and TF features. The results show that HRV signals have special features in the vicinity of the occurrence of SCD that have the ability to distinguish between patients prone to SCD and normal people. We found that the combination of Time-Frequency and Nonlinear features have a better ability to achieve higher accuracy. The experimental results show that the combination of features can predict SCD by the accuracy of 99.73%, 96.52%, 90.37% and 83.96% for the first, second, third and forth one-minute intervals, respectively, before SCD occurrence.

  7. ASKAP Joins the Hunt for Mysterious Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-05-01

    A new telescope, the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP), has joined the search for energetic and elusive fast radio bursts. And in just a few days of looking, its already had success!Elusive TransientsThe Parkes radio telescope, which has detected all but five of the fast radio bursts published to date, has a very narrow field of view. [CSIRO]Fast radio bursts are mysterious millisecond-duration radio pulses that were first discovered around a decade ago. Since that time particularly in recent years weve made some progress toward the goal of localizing them. Were now fairly convinced that fast radio bursts come from outside of the galaxy, and yet theyre enormously bright orders of magnitude more luminous than any pulse seen from the Milky Way.Better identification of where these mysterious bursts come from would help us to determine what they are. But so far, weve discovered only around 30 such bursts, despite the fact that theyre estimated to occur at a rate of 3,000 events per day across the whole sky.Why are they so hard to find? Due to their short duration, effective detection would require instantaneous coverage of a very large fraction of the sky. The Parkes radio telescope which has detected all but five of the fast radio bursts published to date has a field of view spanning less than a square degree,significantly limiting our ability to rapidly survey for these transients.FRB 170107s band-averaged pulse (top) and dynamic spectrum (bottom). [Bannister et al. 2017]A New Array in TownA new player is now on the scene, however, and its already had huge success. ASKAP is a wide-field radio telescope made up of an array of 12-meter antennas. Using phased-array-feed technology, ASKAP is able to instantaneously observe an effective area of 160 square degrees an enormous field compared to Parkes 0.6 square degrees! This capability significantly increases our chances of being able to detect fast radio bursts.In a new study led by Keith Bannister

  8. Method and apparatus for coherent burst ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, Eric A.; Fisher, Walter G.

    1998-01-01

    A high resolution ranging method is described utilizing a novel modulated waveform, hereafter referred to as coherent burst modulation. In the coherent burst method, high frequency modulation of an acoustic or electromagnetic transmitter, such as a laser, is performed at a modulation frequency. This modulation frequency is transmitted quasi-continuously in the form of interrupted bursts of radiation. Energy from the transmitter is directed onto a target, interacts with the target, and the returning energy is collected. The encoded burst pattern contained in the collected return signal is detected coherently by a receiver that is tuned so as to be principally sensitive to the modulation frequency. The receiver signal is processed to determine target range using both time-of-flight of the burst envelope and phase shift of the high frequency modulation. This approach effectively decouples the maximum unambiguous range and range resolution relationship of earlier methods, thereby allowing high precision ranging to be conducted at arbitrarily long distances using at least one burst of encoded energy. The use of a receiver tuned to the high frequency modulation contained within the coherent burst vastly improves both sensitivity in the detection of the target return signal and rejection of background interferences, such as ambient acoustic or electromagnetic noise. Simultaneous transmission at several energies (or wavelengths) is possible by encoding each energy with a separate modulation frequency or pattern; electronic demodulation at the receiver allows the return pattern for each energy to be monitored independently. Radial velocity of a target can also be determined by monitoring change in phase shift of the return signal as a function of time.

  9. Brain oscillatory substrates of visual short-term memory capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauseng, Paul; Klimesch, Wolfgang; Heise, Kirstin F; Gruber, Walter R; Holz, Elisa; Karim, Ahmed A; Glennon, Mark; Gerloff, Christian; Birbaumer, Niels; Hummel, Friedhelm C

    2009-11-17

    The amount of information that can be stored in visual short-term memory is strictly limited to about four items. Therefore, memory capacity relies not only on the successful retention of relevant information but also on efficient suppression of distracting information, visual attention, and executive functions. However, completely separable neural signatures for these memory capacity-limiting factors remain to be identified. Because of its functional diversity, oscillatory brain activity may offer a utile solution. In the present study, we show that capacity-determining mechanisms, namely retention of relevant information and suppression of distracting information, are based on neural substrates independent of each other: the successful maintenance of relevant material in short-term memory is associated with cross-frequency phase synchronization between theta (rhythmical neural activity around 5 Hz) and gamma (> 50 Hz) oscillations at posterior parietal recording sites. On the other hand, electroencephalographic alpha activity (around 10 Hz) predicts memory capacity based on efficient suppression of irrelevant information in short-term memory. Moreover, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation at alpha frequency can modulate short-term memory capacity by influencing the ability to suppress distracting information. Taken together, the current study provides evidence for a double dissociation of brain oscillatory correlates of visual short-term memory capacity.

  10. Oscillatory correlates of moral decision-making: Effect of personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyazev, Gennady G; Savostyanov, Alexander N; Bocharov, Andrey V; Dorosheva, Elena A; Tamozhnikov, Sergey S; Saprigyn, Alexander E

    2016-01-01

    The role of emotion in moral decision-making is still a matter of debate. Greene, Sommerville, Nystrom, Darley, and Cohen (2001) argue that 'personal' moral judgments are driven by emotional responses, while 'impersonal' judgments are largely driven by cognitive processes. In this study, oscillatory correlates of decision-making were compared in moral personal, moral impersonal, and nonmoral conditions, as well as in trials associated with utilitarian (i.e., favoring the 'greater good' over individual rights) and non-utilitarian choices. Event-related synchronization in delta and theta bands was greater in the right temporal lobe in personal than in both nonmoral and impersonal moral condition. Graph-theoretical analysis of connectivity patterns showed the prominent role of the orbitofrontal and cingulate cortices in personal moral decision-making, implying greater emotional and self-processing. Higher conscientiousness and intellect and lower behavioral activation were associated with greater difference in oscillatory responses between utilitarian and non-utilitarian choices in personal than in impersonal condition, indicating that sensitivity to moral issues and the ability to grasp the nuances of moral situation are essential for understanding the implications of utilitarian choices in personal and impersonal conditions.

  11. Propulsion of a microsubmarine using a thermally oscillatory approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Lei; Luo, Cheng

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, motivated by the driving mechanism of a putt-putt toy boat, we explore the feasibility to propel a microsubmarine using a thermally oscillatory approach, which only requires a simple design and does not involve any complicated propulsive systems. We investigate the design, fabrication, actuation and horizontal motions of the corresponding microsubmarines. Based on the understanding gained through preliminary tests on two manually fabricated putt-putt boats, we designed and fabricated the prototype of a microsubmarine. Similar to a putt-putt boat, the prototype also uses a thermally oscillatory process for propulsion. In a cyclic period of this process, due to the expansion and shrinkage of a vapor bubble inside the reservoir of the submarine, liquid is first ejected outside and then sucked into the reservoir. Due to the difference in liquid flow directions between ejection and suction stages, a thrust is produced to propel the submarine. At an applied voltage of 16 V and pulse frequency of 100 Hz, the submarine was found to have the highest speed of 1.8 mm s-1 and longest travel distance of 12.6 mm. The corresponding thrust was estimated to be 67.6 nN.

  12. Evidence of nonuniqueness and oscillatory solutions in computational fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunziato, J.W.; Gartling, D.K.; Kipp, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    We will review some of our recent experiences in computing solutions for nonlinear fluids in relatively simple, two-dimensional geometries. The purpose of this discussion will be to display by example some of the interesting but difficult questions that arise when ill-behaved solutions are obtained numerically. We will consider two examples. As the first example, we will consider a nonlinear elastic (compressible) fluid with chemical reactions and discuss solutions for detonation and detonation failure in a two-dimensional cylinder. In this case, the numerical algorithm utilizes a finite-difference method with artificial viscosity (von Neumann-Richtmyer method) and leads to two, distinctly different, stable solutions depending on the time step criterion used. The second example to be considered involves the convection of a viscous fluid in a rectangular container as a result of an exothermic polymerization reaction. A solidification front develops near the top of the container and propagates down through the fluid, changing the aspect ratio of the region ahead of the front. Using a Galerkin-based finite element method, a numerical solution of the partial differential equations is obtained which tracks the front and correctly predicts the fluid temperatures near the walls. However, the solution also exhibits oscillatory behavior with regard to the number of cells in the fluid ahead of the front and in the strength of the cells. More definitive experiments and analysis are required to determine whether this oscillatory phenomena is a numerical artifact or a physical reality. 20 refs., 14 figs

  13. Oscillatory correlates of vibrotactile frequency processing in human working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, Bernhard; Wacker, Evelin; Blankenburg, Felix

    2010-03-24

    Previous animal research has revealed neuronal activity underlying short-term retention of vibrotactile stimuli, providing evidence for a parametric representation of stimulus frequency in primate tactile working memory (Romo et al., 1999). Here, we investigated the neural correlates of vibrotactile frequency processing in human working memory, using noninvasive electroencephalography (EEG). Participants judged the frequencies of vibrotactile stimuli delivered to the fingertip in a delayed match-to-sample frequency discrimination task. As expected, vibrotactile stimulation elicited pronounced steady-state evoked potentials, which were source-localized in primary somatosensory cortex. Furthermore, parametric analysis of induced EEG responses revealed that the frequency of stimulation was reflected by systematic modulations of synchronized oscillatory activity in nonprimary cortical areas. Stimulus processing was accompanied by frequency-dependent alpha-band responses (8-12 Hz) over dorsal occipital cortex. The critical new finding was that, throughout the retention interval, the stimulus frequency held in working memory was systematically represented by a modulation in prefrontal beta activity (20-25 Hz), which was source-localized to the inferior frontal gyrus. This modulation in oscillatory activity during stimulus retention was related to successful frequency discrimination, thus reflecting behaviorally relevant information. Together, the results complement previous findings of parametric working memory correlates in nonhuman primates and suggest that the quantitative representation of vibrotactile frequency in sensory memory entails systematic modulations of synchronized neural activity in human prefrontal cortex.

  14. Global bifurcation criterion for oscillatory crack path instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Van-Bac; Bahr, Hans-Achim; Bahr, Ute; Balke, Herbert; Weiss, Hans-Jürgen

    2008-06-01

    A bifurcation criterion for the transition from straight to oscillatory quasistatic crack propagation in an isotropic material is derived from the requirement of pure mode I stress fields at the crack tip (K_{II}=0) on the entire crack path, henceforth called global bifurcation criterion. For a small-amplitude sine-shaped crack path which is observed in experiments at the transition, it is shown to be sufficient to postulate K_{II}=0 only for two phases of the crack path instead, which simplifies calculations. By using the measured temperature fields to solve the thermoelastic problem of dipping a hot thin glass slab into cold water, critical wavelengths of the oscillating crack growth obtained with the derived global bifurcation criterion agree remarkably well with those observed in experiments by Ronsin and Perrin. It is also shown that local bifurcation criteria, which do not take into account K_{II}=0 on the entire crack path, lead to incorrect results for the oscillatory crack path instability.

  15. Cellular and oscillatory substrates of fear extinction learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Patrick; Zaki, Yosif; Maguire, Jamie; Reijmers, Leon G

    2017-11-01

    The mammalian brain contains dedicated circuits for both the learned expression and suppression of fear. These circuits require precise coordination to facilitate the appropriate expression of fear behavior, but the mechanisms underlying this coordination remain unclear. Using a combination of chemogenetics, activity-based neuronal-ensemble labeling and in vivo electrophysiology, we found that fear extinction learning confers on parvalbumin-expressing (PV) interneurons in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) a dedicated role in the selective suppression of a previously encoded fear memory and BLA fear-encoding neurons. In addition, following extinction learning, PV interneurons enable a competing interaction between a 6-12 Hz oscillation and a fear-associated 3-6 Hz oscillation within the BLA. Loss of this competition increases a 3-6 Hz oscillatory signature, with BLA→medial prefrontal cortex directionality signaling the recurrence of fear expression. The discovery of cellular and oscillatory substrates of fear extinction learning that critically depend on BLA PV interneurons could inform therapies aimed at preventing the pathological recurrence of fear following extinction learning.

  16. Reflood modeling under oscillatory flow conditions with Cathare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.M.; Bartak, J.; Janicot, A.

    1993-01-01

    The problems and the current status in oscillatory reflood modelling with the CATHARE code are presented. The physical models used in CATHARE for reflood modelling predicted globally very well the forced reflood experiments. Significant drawbacks existed in predicting experiments with oscillatory flow (both forced and gravity driven). First, the more simple case of forced flow oscillations was analyzed. Modelling improvements within the reflooding package resolved the problem of quench front blockages and unphysical oscillations. Good agreements with experiment for the ERSEC forced oscillations reflood tests is now obtained. For gravity driven reflood, CATHARE predicted sustained flow oscillations during 100-150 s after the start of the reflood, whereas in the experiment flow oscillations were observed only during 25-30 s. Possible areas of modeling improvements are identified and several new correlations are suggested. The first test calculations of the BETHSY test 6.7A4 have shown that the oscillations are mostly sensitive to heat flux modeling downstream of the quench front. A much better agreement between CATHARE results and the experiment was obtained. However, further effort is necessary to obtain globally satisfactory predictions of gravity driven system reflood tests. (authors) 6 figs., 35 refs

  17. Normal forces of magnetorheological fluids under oscillatory shear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Chaoyang; Gong Xinglong; Xuan Shouhu; Zong Luhang; Peng Chao

    2012-01-01

    The normal forces of magnetorheological fluids under oscillatory shear are investigated by a commercial magneto-rheometer with plate–plate geometry. At the constant strain amplitude and frequency, the normal forces almost keep a steady value with the testing time if the strain amplitude is smaller than the critical value. When a larger strain is applied, they will fluctuate periodically. Under the strain sweep mode, the relationships between normal forces and strain amplitude can be divided into three regions: linear viscoelastic region, nonlinear viscoelastic region and the viscoplastic region. Under the frequency sweep method, it is found that the angular frequency show little influence on the normal forces. At last, the normal forces increase with increasing of the temperature under a low magnetic field, while they decrease under a high magnetic field. - Highlights: ► Normal forces under oscillatory shear mode are firstly systematically investigated. ► In linear viscoelastic region the normal forces keep a firm value while in nonlinear viscoelastic region the normal forces fluctuate clearly ► Three regions can be obtained through the plot of normal forces with strain amplitude. ► Temperature effect on the normal forces is opposite for the low and high magnetic field.

  18. Origin of spontaneous wave generation in an oscillatory chemical system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yi-Xue; Foerster, P.; Ross, J. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1992-10-29

    The origin of spontaneously generated chemical waves in an oscillatory Belousov-Zhabotinskii reaction has been investigated by numerical calculations of the deterministic reaction-diffusion equations of a modified Oregonator model and by equilibrium stochastic calculations. From numerical calculations, we obtain threshold perturbations in the phase of oscillations and in the concentrations of HBrO{sub 2} and Br{sup {minus}} within areas of space with varying radii necessary to initiate trigger waves. Inward propagating trigger waves initiated by a phase shift in the perturbed region with respect to the bulk solution have been observed in the calculations for the first time. Perturbations smaller than the threshold perturbations or in regions with smaller radii lead to phase-diffusion waves. Our equilibrium stochastic calculations show that the recurrence time for a thermal fluctuation to induce a change in the HBrO{sub 2} concentration of sufficient magnitude within a sufficient volume for a trigger wave to propagate is many orders of magnitude larger than the observation time of traveling wave experiments. We concluded that an internal thermal fluctuation is highly unlikely to generate a trigger wave in an oscillatory chemical solution. 22 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  19. A Nontriggered Burst Supplement to the BATSE Gamma-Ray Burst Catalogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kommers, Jefferson M.; Lewin, Walter H. G.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; vanParadijs, Jan; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Meegan, Charles A.; Fishman, Gerald J.

    2001-01-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory detects gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with a real-time burst detection (or "trigger") system running onboard the spacecraft. Under some circumstances, however, a GRB may not activate the on-board burst trigger. For example, the burst may be too faint to exceed the on-board detection threshold, or it may occur while the on-board burst trigger is disabled for technical reasons. This paper describes a catalog of 873 "nontriggered" GRBs that were detected in a search of the archival continuous data from BATSE recorded between 1991 December 9.0 and 1997 December 17.0. For each burst, the catalog gives an estimated source direction, duration, peak flux, and fluence. Similar data are presented for 50 additional bursts of unknown origin that were detected in the 25-50 keV range; these events may represent the low-energy "tail" of the GRB spectral distribution. This catalog increases the number of GRBs detected with BATSE by 48% during the time period covered by the search.

  20. 3D LDV Measurements in Oscillatory Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mier, J. M.; Garcia, M. H.

    2012-12-01

    The oscillatory boundary layer represents a particular case of unsteady wall-bounded flows in which fluid particles follow a periodic sinusoidal motion. Unlike steady boundary layer flows, the oscillatory flow regime and bed roughness character change in time along the period for every cycle, a characteristic that introduces a high degree of complexity in the analysis of these flows. Governing equations can be derived from the general Navier-Stokes equations for the motion of fluids, from which the exact solution for the laminar oscillatory boundary layer is obtained (also known as the 2nd Stokes problem). No exact solution exists for the turbulent case, thus, understanding of the main flow characteristics comes from experimental work. Several researchers have reported experimental work in oscillatory boundary layers since the 1960's; however, larger scale facilities and the development of newer measurement techniques with improved temporal and spatial resolution in recent years provides a unique opportunity to achieve a better understanding about this type of flows. Several experiments were performed in the Large Oscillatory Water and Sediment Tunnel (LOWST) facility at the Ven Te Chow Hydrosystems Laboratory, for a range of Reynolds wave numbers between 6x10^4 3D Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) system was used to measure instantaneous flow velocities with a temporal resolution up to ~ 1,000 Hz. It was mounted on a 3-axis traverse with a spatial resolution of 0.01 mm in all three directions. The closest point to the bottom was measured at z = 0.2 mm (z+ ≈ 4), which allowed to capture boundary layer features with great detail. In order to achieve true 3D measurements, 2 probes were used on a perpendicular configuration, such that u and w components were measured from a probe on the side of the flume and v component was measured from a probe pointing down through and access window on top of the flume. The top probe was submerged in a water container, such that the

  1. Bearing fault diagnosis under unknown time-varying rotational speed conditions via multiple time-frequency curve extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huan; Baddour, Natalie; Liang, Ming

    2018-02-01

    Under normal operating conditions, bearings often run under time-varying rotational speed conditions. Under such circumstances, the bearing vibrational signal is non-stationary, which renders ineffective the techniques used for bearing fault diagnosis under constant running conditions. One of the conventional methods of bearing fault diagnosis under time-varying speed conditions is resampling the non-stationary signal to a stationary signal via order tracking with the measured variable speed. With the resampled signal, the methods available for constant condition cases are thus applicable. However, the accuracy of the order tracking is often inadequate and the time-varying speed is sometimes not measurable. Thus, resampling-free methods are of interest for bearing fault diagnosis under time-varying rotational speed for use without tachometers. With the development of time-frequency analysis, the time-varying fault character manifests as curves in the time-frequency domain. By extracting the Instantaneous Fault Characteristic Frequency (IFCF) from the Time-Frequency Representation (TFR) and converting the IFCF, its harmonics, and the Instantaneous Shaft Rotational Frequency (ISRF) into straight lines, the bearing fault can be detected and diagnosed without resampling. However, so far, the extraction of the IFCF for bearing fault diagnosis is mostly based on the assumption that at each moment the IFCF has the highest amplitude in the TFR, which is not always true. Hence, a more reliable T-F curve extraction approach should be investigated. Moreover, if the T-F curves including the IFCF, its harmonic, and the ISRF can be all extracted from the TFR directly, no extra processing is needed for fault diagnosis. Therefore, this paper proposes an algorithm for multiple T-F curve extraction from the TFR based on a fast path optimization which is more reliable for T-F curve extraction. Then, a new procedure for bearing fault diagnosis under unknown time-varying speed

  2. In-cylinder pressure-based direct techniques and time frequency analysis for combustion diagnostics in IC engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D’Ambrosio, S.; Ferrari, A.; Galleani, L.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Direct pressure-based techniques have been applied successfully to spark-ignition engines. • The burned mass fraction of pressure-based techniques has been compared with that of 2- and 3-zone combustion models. • The time frequency analysis has been employed to simulate complex diesel combustion events. - Abstract: In-cylinder pressure measurement and analysis has historically been a key tool for off-line combustion diagnosis in internal combustion engines, but online applications for real-time condition monitoring and combustion management have recently become popular. The present investigation presents and compares different low computing-cost in-cylinder pressure based methods for the analyses of the main features of combustion, that is, the start of combustion, the end of combustion and the crankshaft angle that responds to half of the overall burned mass. The instantaneous pressure in the combustion chamber has been used as an input datum for the described analytical procedures and it has been measured by means of a standard piezoelectric transducer. Traditional pressure-based techniques have been shown to be able to predict the burned mass fraction time history more accurately in spark ignition engines than in diesel engines. The most suitable pressure-based techniques for both spark ignition and compression ignition engines have been chosen on the basis of the available experimental data. Time–frequency analysis has also been applied to the analysis of diesel combustion, which is richer in events than spark ignited combustion. Time frequency algorithms for the calculation of the mean instantaneous frequency are computationally efficient, allow the main events of the diesel combustion to be identified and provide the greatest benefits in the presence of multiple injection events. These algorithms can be optimized and applied to onboard diagnostics tools designed for real control, but can also be used as an advanced validation tool for

  3. Sources of type III solar microwave bursts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhdanov D.A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Microwave fine structures allow us to study plasma evolution in an energy release region. The Siberian Solar Radio Telescope (SSRT is a unique instrument designed to examine fine structures at 5.7 GHz. A complex analysis of data from RATAN-600, 4–8 GHz spectropolarimeter, and SSRT, simultaneously with EUV data, made it possible to localize sources of III type microwave bursts in August 10, 2011 event within the entire frequency band of burst occurrence, as well as to determine the most probable region of primary energy release. To localize sources of III type bursts from RATAN-600 data, an original method for data processing has been worked out. At 5.7 GHz, the source of bursts was determined along two coordinates, whereas at 4.5, 4.7, 4.9, 5.1, 5.3, 5.5, and 6.0 GHz, their locations were identified along one coordinate. The size of the burst source at 5.1 GHz was found to be maximum as compared to those at other frequencies.

  4. Scientific Applications Performance Evaluation on Burst Buffer

    KAUST Repository

    Markomanolis, George S.

    2017-10-19

    Parallel I/O is an integral component of modern high performance computing, especially in storing and processing very large datasets, such as the case of seismic imaging, CFD, combustion and weather modeling. The storage hierarchy includes nowadays additional layers, the latest being the usage of SSD-based storage as a Burst Buffer for I/O acceleration. We present an in-depth analysis on how to use Burst Buffer for specific cases and how the internal MPI I/O aggregators operate according to the options that the user provides during his job submission. We analyze the performance of a range of I/O intensive scientific applications, at various scales on a large installation of Lustre parallel file system compared to an SSD-based Burst Buffer. Our results show a performance improvement over Lustre when using Burst Buffer. Moreover, we show results from a data hierarchy library which indicate that the standard I/O approaches are not enough to get the expected performance from this technology. The performance gain on the total execution time of the studied applications is between 1.16 and 3 times compared to Lustre. One of the test cases achieved an impressive I/O throughput of 900 GB/s on Burst Buffer.

  5. Nonnegative Matrix Factorization of time frequency representation of vibration signal for local damage detection - comparison of algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodecki, Jacek

    2018-01-01

    Local damage detection in rotating machine elements is very important problem widely researched in the literature. One of the most common approaches is the vibration signal analysis. Since time domain processing is often insufficient, other representations are frequently favored. One of the most common one is time-frequency representation hence authors propose to separate internal processes occurring in the vibration signal by spectrogram matrix factorization. In order to achieve this, it is proposed to use the approach of Nonnegative Matrix Factorization (NMF). In this paper three NMF algorithms are tested using real and simulated data describing single-channel vibration signal acquired on damaged rolling bearing operating in drive pulley in belt conveyor driving station. Results are compared with filtration using Spectral Kurtosis, which is currently recognized as classical method for impulsive information extraction, to verify the validity of presented methodology.

  6. Time-frequency analysis of acoustic emission signals generated by the Glass Fibre Reinforced Polymer Composites during the tensile test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świt, G.; Adamczak, A.; Krampikowska, A.

    2017-10-01

    Fibre reinforced polymer composites are currently dominating in the composite materials market. The lack of detailed knowledge about their properties and behaviour in various conditions of exposure under load significantly limits the broad possibilities of application of these materials. Occurring and accumulation of defects in material during the exploitation of the construction lead to the changes of its technical condition. The necessity to control the condition of the composite is therefore justified. For this purpose, non-destructive method of acoustic emission can be applied. This article presents an example of application of acoustic emission method based on time analysis and time-frequency analysis for the evaluation of the progress of the destructive processes and the level of degradation of glass fibre reinforced composite tapes that were subject to tensile testing.

  7. A Sparsity-Based Approach to 3D Binaural Sound Synthesis Using Time-Frequency Array Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobos, Maximo; Lopez, JoseJ; Spors, Sascha

    2010-12-01

    Localization of sounds in physical space plays a very important role in multiple audio-related disciplines, such as music, telecommunications, and audiovisual productions. Binaural recording is the most commonly used method to provide an immersive sound experience by means of headphone reproduction. However, it requires a very specific recording setup using high-fidelity microphones mounted in a dummy head. In this paper, we present a novel processing framework for binaural sound recording and reproduction that avoids the use of dummy heads, which is specially suitable for immersive teleconferencing applications. The method is based on a time-frequency analysis of the spatial properties of the sound picked up by a simple tetrahedral microphone array, assuming source sparseness. The experiments carried out using simulations and a real-time prototype confirm the validity of the proposed approach.

  8. New Full-Diversity Space-Time-Frequency Block Codes with Simplified Decoders for MIMO-OFDM Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shahabinejad

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiple-input multiple-output orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (MIMO-OFDM is known as a promising solution for wideband wireless communications. This is why it has been considered as a powerful candidate for IEEE 802.11n standard. Numerous space-frequency block codes (SFBCs and space-time- frequency block codes (STFBCs have been proposed so far for implementing MIMO-OFDM systems. In this paper, at first we propose new full-diversity STFBCs with high coding gain in time-varying channels; the construct method for this structure is using orthogonal space-time block code for any arbitrary number of transmit antenna and then we propose a decoder with linear complexity for our proposed coding scheme. Simulation results verify that the proposed STFBCs outperform other recently published STFBCs.

  9. A Sparsity-Based Approach to 3D Binaural Sound Synthesis Using Time-Frequency Array Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spors Sascha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Localization of sounds in physical space plays a very important role in multiple audio-related disciplines, such as music, telecommunications, and audiovisual productions. Binaural recording is the most commonly used method to provide an immersive sound experience by means of headphone reproduction. However, it requires a very specific recording setup using high-fidelity microphones mounted in a dummy head. In this paper, we present a novel processing framework for binaural sound recording and reproduction that avoids the use of dummy heads, which is specially suitable for immersive teleconferencing applications. The method is based on a time-frequency analysis of the spatial properties of the sound picked up by a simple tetrahedral microphone array, assuming source sparseness. The experiments carried out using simulations and a real-time prototype confirm the validity of the proposed approach.

  10. Use of Time-Frequency Analysis and Neural Networks for Mode Identification in a Wireless Software-Defined Radio Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Gandetto

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of time-frequency distributions is proposed as a nonlinear signal processing technique that is combined with a pattern recognition approach to identify superimposed transmission modes in a reconfigurable wireless terminal based on software-defined radio techniques. In particular, a software-defined radio receiver is described aiming at the identification of two coexistent communication modes: frequency hopping code division multiple access and direct sequence code division multiple access. As a case study, two standards, based on the previous modes and operating in the same band (industrial, scientific, and medical, are considered: IEEE WLAN 802.11b (direct sequence and Bluetooth (frequency hopping. Neural classifiers are used to obtain identification results. A comparison between two different neural classifiers is made in terms of relative error frequency.

  11. Measurements of sheet flow transport in acceleration-skewed oscillatory flow and comparison with practical formulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der A, Dominic A.; O'Donoghue, Tom; Ribberink, Jan S.

    2010-01-01

    Near-bed oscillatory flows with acceleration skewness are characteristic of steep and breaking waves in shallow water. In order to isolate the effects of acceleration skewness on sheet flow sand transport, new experiments are carried out in the Aberdeen Oscillatory Flow Tunnel. The experiments have

  12. On oscillatory microstructure during cellular growth of directionally solidified Sn–36at.%Ni peritectic alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Peng; Li, Xinzhong; Li, Jiangong; Su, Yanqing; Guo, Jingjie

    2016-01-01

    An oscillatory microstructure has been observed during deep-cellular growth of directionally solidified Sn–36at.%Ni hyperperitectic alloy containing intermetallic compounds with narrow solubility range. This oscillatory microstructure with a dimension of tens of micrometers has been observed for the first time. The morphology of this wave-like oscillatory structure is similar to secondary dendrite arms, and can be observed only in some local positions of the sample. Through analysis such as successive sectioning of the sample, it can be concluded that this oscillatory microstructure is caused by oscillatory convection of the mushy zone during solidification. And the influence of convection on this oscillatory microstructure was characterized through comparison between experimental and calculations results on the wavelength. Besides, the change in morphology of this oscillatory microstructure has been proved to be caused by peritectic transformation during solidification. Furthermore, the melt concentration increases continuously during solidification of intermetallic compounds with narrow solubility range, which helps formation of this oscillatory microstructure. PMID:27066761

  13. Stimulus presentation at specific neuronal oscillatory phases experimentally controlled with tACS: implementation and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanne Ten Oever

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years it has become increasingly clear that both the power and phase of oscillatory brain activity can influence the processing and perception of sensory stimuli. Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS can phase-align and amplify endogenous brain oscillations and has often been used to control and thereby study oscillatory power. Causal investigation of oscillatory phase is more difficult, as it requires precise real-time temporal control over both oscillatory phase and sensory stimulation. Here, we present hardware and software solutions allowing temporally precise presentation of sensory stimuli during tACS at desired tACS phases, enabling causal investigations of oscillatory phase. We developed freely available and easy to use software, which can be coupled with standard commercially available hardware to allow flexible and multi-modal stimulus presentation (visual, auditory, magnetic stimuli, etc. at pre-determined tACS-phases, opening up a range of new research opportunities. We validate that stimulus presentation at tACS phase in our setup is accurate to the sub-millisecond level with high inter-trial consistency. Conventional methods investigating the role of oscillatory phase such as magneto-/electroencephalography can only provide correlational evidence. Using brain stimulation with the described methodology enables investigations of the causal role of oscillatory phase. This setup turns oscillatory phase into an independent variable, allowing innovative and systematic studies of its functional impact on perception and cognition.

  14. Stimulus Presentation at Specific Neuronal Oscillatory Phases Experimentally Controlled with tACS: Implementation and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Oever, Sanne; de Graaf, Tom A; Bonnemayer, Charlie; Ronner, Jacco; Sack, Alexander T; Riecke, Lars

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, it has become increasingly clear that both the power and phase of oscillatory brain activity can influence the processing and perception of sensory stimuli. Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) can phase-align and amplify endogenous brain oscillations and has often been used to control and thereby study oscillatory power. Causal investigation of oscillatory phase is more difficult, as it requires precise real-time temporal control over both oscillatory phase and sensory stimulation. Here, we present hardware and software solutions allowing temporally precise presentation of sensory stimuli during tACS at desired tACS phases, enabling causal investigations of oscillatory phase. We developed freely available and easy to use software, which can be coupled with standard commercially available hardware to allow flexible and multi-modal stimulus presentation (visual, auditory, magnetic stimuli, etc.) at pre-determined tACS-phases, opening up a range of new research opportunities. We validate that stimulus presentation at tACS phase in our setup is accurate to the sub-millisecond level with high inter-trial consistency. Conventional methods investigating the role of oscillatory phase such as magneto-/electroencephalography can only provide correlational evidence. Using brain stimulation with the described methodology enables investigations of the causal role of oscillatory phase. This setup turns oscillatory phase into an independent variable, allowing innovative, and systematic studies of its functional impact on perception and cognition.

  15. Experimental study of the turbulent boundary layer in acceleration-skewed oscillatory flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der A, D.A.; O' Donoghue, T.; Davies, A.G; Ribberink, Jan S.

    2011-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted in a large oscillatory flow tunnel to investigate the effects of acceleration skewness on oscillatory boundary layer flow over fixed beds. As well as enabling experimental investigation of the effects of acceleration skewness, the new experiments add substantially to

  16. Oscillatory variations in the Q factors of high quality micropillar cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reitzenstein, S.; Gregersen, Niels; Kistner, C.

    2009-01-01

    We report on the observation of oscillatory variations in the quality Q factor of quantum dot-micropillar cavities based on planar Bragg reflectors. The oscillatory behavior in the Q versus diameter dependence appears in the diameter range between 1.0 and 4.0 m, has a characteristic period of a few...

  17. RAPID COMMUNICATION: A novel time frequency-based 3D Lissajous figure method and its application to the determination of oxygen saturation from the photoplethysmogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addison, Paul S.; Watson, James N.

    2004-11-01

    We present a novel time-frequency method for the measurement of oxygen saturation using the photoplethysmogram (PPG) signals from a standard pulse oximeter machine. The method utilizes the time-frequency transformation of the red and infrared PPGs to derive a 3D Lissajous figure. By selecting the optimal Lissajous, the method provides an inherently robust basis for the determination of oxygen saturation as regions of the time-frequency plane where high- and low-frequency signal artefacts are to be found are automatically avoided.

  18. Separation of transient and oscillatory cerebral activities using over-complete rational dilation wavelet transforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaibi, S.; Lajnef, T.; Samet, M.; Kachouri, A.

    2011-01-01

    Many natural signals EEG are comprised frequency overlapping of oscillatory and transient components. In our study the intracranial EEG signals of epilepsy are composed of the superposition of oscillatory signals (HFOs: High Frequency oscillations) and a transient signals (spikes and sharp waves, etc.). The oscillatory components (HFOs) exist in the frequency band 80-500Hz. The transient components comes from nonrhythmic brain activities (spikes, sharp waves and vertex waves of varying amplitude, shape and duration) and cover a continuous wide bandwidth from low to high frequencies and resemble an HFOs events when filtered using a band pass classical filter. The classical filtering methods based on FIR filters, Wavelet transforms and the Matching Pursuit cannot separate the oscillatory from transient activities. This paper describes an approach for decomposing an iEEG signals of epilepsy into the sum of oscillatory components and a transient components based on overcomplete rational dilation wavelet transforms (overcomplete RADWT) in conjunction with morphological component analysis (MCA).

  19. Gamma-Ray Burst Intensity Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, David L.; Norris, Jay P.; Bonnell, Jerry T.

    2004-01-01

    We use the lag-luminosity relation to calculate self-consistently the redshifts, apparent peak bolometric luminosities L(sub B1), and isotropic energies E(sub iso) for a large sample of BATSE bursts. We consider two different forms of the lag-luminosity relation; for both forms the median redshift, for our burst database is 1.6. We model the resulting sample of burst energies with power law and Gaussian dis- tributions, both of which are reasonable models. The power law model has an index of a = 1.76 plus or minus 0.05 (95% confidence) as opposed to the index of a = 2 predicted by the simple universal jet profile model; however, reasonable refinements to this model permit much greater flexibility in reconciling predicted and observed energy distributions.

  20. Gamma-Ray Bursts: A Radio Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs are extremely energetic events at cosmological distances. They provide unique laboratory to investigate fundamental physical processes under extreme conditions. Due to extreme luminosities, GRBs are detectable at very high redshifts and potential tracers of cosmic star formation rate at early epoch. While the launch of Swift and Fermi has increased our understanding of GRBs tremendously, many new questions have opened up. Radio observations of GRBs uniquely probe the energetics and environments of the explosion. However, currently only 30% of the bursts are detected in radio bands. Radio observations with upcoming sensitive telescopes will potentially increase the sample size significantly and allow one to follow the individual bursts for a much longer duration and be able to answer some of the important issues related to true calorimetry, reverse shock emission, and environments around the massive stars exploding as GRBs in the early Universe.

  1. Localised Microwave Bursts During ELMs on MAST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freethy Simon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bursts of microwave emission are observed during ELM events on the Mega Ampère Spherical Tokamak. In agreement with observations on other machines, these bursts are up to 3 orders of magnitude more intense than the thermal background, but are electron cyclotron in nature. The peak in microwave emission is ~20μ before the peak in midplane Dα emission. Using the Synthetic Aperture Microwave Imaging radiometer, we are able to demonstrate that these bursts are often highly spatially localised and preferentially occur at the tokamak midplane. It is hypothesised that the localisation is a result of Doppler resonance broadening for electron Bernstein waves and the high perpendicular electron energies could be the result of pitch angle scattering in high collisionality regions of the plasma.

  2. Gamma Ray Bursts Observations and Theoretical Conjectures

    CERN Document Server

    Alagoz, E; Carrillo, C; Golup, G T; Grimes, M; Herrera, Mora C; Gallo, Palomino J L; López, Vega A; Wicht, J

    2008-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are short bursts of very high energy photons which were discovered in the late 1960s. Ever since their discovery, scientists have wondered about their origin. Nowadays it is known that they originate outside the Milky Way because of their high red shift rst measured in the afterglows thanks to the Beppo-SAX satellite and ground-based observations. However, theoreticians still do not agree about the mechanism that generates the bursts, and different competing models are animatedly debated. Current GRB experiments include the Swift satellite and the Pierre Auger Observatory that could detect GRBs with an increase of the background. A forthcoming dedicated experiment is GLAST, a satellite observatory for detecting gamma rays with energies up to 300 GeV, whose launch is scheduled for early 2008.

  3. X-ray bursts observed with JEM-X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren Kristian; Chenevez, Jérôme; Lund, Niels

    2006-01-01

    We report on the search for X-ray bursts in the JEM-X X-ray monitor on INTEGRAL during the first two years of operations. More than 350 bursts from 25 different type-I X-ray burst sources were found.......We report on the search for X-ray bursts in the JEM-X X-ray monitor on INTEGRAL during the first two years of operations. More than 350 bursts from 25 different type-I X-ray burst sources were found....

  4. Broadband Spectral Investigations of Magnetar Bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kırmızıbayrak, Demet; Şaşmaz Muş, Sinem; Kaneko, Yuki; Göğüş, Ersin, E-mail: demetk@sabanciuniv.edu [Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Sabancı University, Orhanlı Tuzla, Istanbul 34956 (Turkey)

    2017-09-01

    We present our broadband (2–250 keV) time-averaged spectral analysis of 388 bursts from SGR J1550−5418, SGR 1900+14, and SGR 1806−20 detected with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer ( RXTE ) here and as a database in a companion web-catalog. We find that two blackbody functions (BB+BB), the sum of two modified blackbody functions (LB+LB), the sum of a blackbody function and a power-law function (BB+PO), and a power law with a high-energy exponential cutoff (COMPT) all provide acceptable fits at similar levels. We performed numerical simulations to constrain the best fitting model for each burst spectrum and found that 67.6% of burst spectra with well-constrained parameters are better described by the Comptonized model. We also found that 64.7% of these burst spectra are better described with the LB+LB model, which is employed in the spectral analysis of a soft gamma repeater (SGR) for the first time here, than with the BB+BB and BB+PO models. We found a significant positive lower bound trend on photon index, suggesting a decreasing upper bound on hardness, with respect to total flux and fluence. We compare this result with bursts observed from SGR and AXP (anomalous X-ray pulsar) sources and suggest that the relationship is a distinctive characteristic between the two. We confirm a significant anticorrelation between burst emission area and blackbody temperature, and find that it varies between the hot and cool blackbody temperatures differently than previously discussed. We expand on the interpretation of our results in the framework of a strongly magnetized neutron star.

  5. Broadband Spectral Investigations of Magnetar Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kırmızıbayrak, Demet; Şaşmaz Muş, Sinem; Kaneko, Yuki; Göğüş, Ersin

    2017-09-01

    We present our broadband (2-250 keV) time-averaged spectral analysis of 388 bursts from SGR J1550-5418, SGR 1900+14, and SGR 1806-20 detected with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) here and as a database in a companion web-catalog. We find that two blackbody functions (BB+BB), the sum of two modified blackbody functions (LB+LB), the sum of a blackbody function and a power-law function (BB+PO), and a power law with a high-energy exponential cutoff (COMPT) all provide acceptable fits at similar levels. We performed numerical simulations to constrain the best fitting model for each burst spectrum and found that 67.6% of burst spectra with well-constrained parameters are better described by the Comptonized model. We also found that 64.7% of these burst spectra are better described with the LB+LB model, which is employed in the spectral analysis of a soft gamma repeater (SGR) for the first time here, than with the BB+BB and BB+PO models. We found a significant positive lower bound trend on photon index, suggesting a decreasing upper bound on hardness, with respect to total flux and fluence. We compare this result with bursts observed from SGR and AXP (anomalous X-ray pulsar) sources and suggest that the relationship is a distinctive characteristic between the two. We confirm a significant anticorrelation between burst emission area and blackbody temperature, and find that it varies between the hot and cool blackbody temperatures differently than previously discussed. We expand on the interpretation of our results in the framework of a strongly magnetized neutron star.

  6. BATSE observations of gamma-ray burst spectra. 2: Peak energy evolution in bright, long bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, L. A.; Band, D. L.; Matteson, J. L.; Briggs, M. S.; Pendleton, G. N.; Preece, R. D.; Paciesas, W. S.; Teegarden, B. J.; Palmer, D. M.; Schaefer, B. E.

    1995-01-01

    We investigate spectral evolution in 37 bright, long gamma-ray bursts observed with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) spectroscopy detectors. High-resolution spectra are chracterized by the energy of the peak of nu F(sub nu), and the evolution of this quantity is examined relative to the emission intensity. In most cases it is found that this peak energy either rises with or slightly precedes major intensity increases and softens for the remainder of the pulse. Interpulse emission is generally harder early in the burst. For bursts with multiple intensity pulses, later spikes tend to be softer than earlier ones, indicating that the energy of the peak of nu F(sub nu) is bounded by an envelope which decays with time. Evidence is found that bursts in which the bulk of the flux comes well after the event which triggers the instrument tend to show less peak energy variability and are not as hard as several bursts in which the emission occurs promptly after the trigger. Several recently proposed burst models are examined in light of these results and no qualitative conflicts with the observations presented here are found.

  7. INVESTIGATION OF PRIMORDIAL BLACK HOLE BURSTS USING INTERPLANETARY NETWORK GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ukwatta, T. N. [Director' s Postdoctoral Fellow, Space and Remote Sensing (ISR-2), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hurley, K. [University of California, Berkeley, Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); MacGibbon, J. H. [Department of Physics, University of North Florida, Jacksonville, FL 32224 (United States); Svinkin, D. S.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Frederiks, D. D.; Pal' shin, V. D. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation); Goldsten, J. [Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Boynton, W. [Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Kozyrev, A. S. [Space Research Institute, 84/32, Profsoyuznaya, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Rau, A.; Kienlin, A. von; Zhang, X. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, Postfach 1312, Garching, D-85748 (Germany); Connaughton, V. [University of Alabama in Huntsville, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Yamaoka, K. [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Aoyama Gakuin University, 5-10-1 Fuchinobe, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8558 (Japan); Ohno, M. [Department of Physics, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Ohmori, N. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Miyazaki, 1-1 Gakuen kibanadai-nishi, Miyazaki-shi, Miyazaki 889-2192 (Japan); Feroci, M. [INAF/IAPS-Roma, via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133, Roma (Italy); Frontera, F., E-mail: tilan@lanl.gov [Department of Physics and Earth Science, University of Ferrara, via Saragat 1, I-44122 Ferrara (Italy); and others

    2016-07-20

    The detection of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) in the solar neighborhood would have very important implications for GRB phenomenology. The leading theories for cosmological GRBs would not be able to explain such events. The final bursts of evaporating primordial black holes (PBHs), however, would be a natural explanation for local GRBs. We present a novel technique that can constrain the distance to GRBs using detections from widely separated, non-imaging spacecraft. This method can determine the actual distance to the burst if it is local. We applied this method to constrain distances to a sample of 36 short-duration GRBs detected by the Interplanetary Network (IPN) that show observational properties that are expected from PBH evaporations. These bursts have minimum possible distances in the 10{sup 13}–10{sup 18} cm (7–10{sup 5} au) range, which are consistent with the expected PBH energetics and with a possible origin in the solar neighborhood, although none of the bursts can be unambiguously demonstrated to be local. Assuming that these bursts are real PBH events, we estimate lower limits on the PBH burst evaporation rate in the solar neighborhood.

  8. Radon and rock bursts in deep mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulashevich, Yu.P.; Utkin, V.I.; Yurkov, A.K.; Nikolaev, V.V.

    1996-01-01

    Variation fields of radon concentration in time to ascertain stress-strain state of the North Ural bauxite mines have been studied. It is shown that dynamic changes in the stress-strain state of the rocks prior to the rock burst bring about variations in radon concentration in the observation wells. Depending on mutual positioning of the observation points and the rock burst epicenter, the above-mentioned variations differ in principle, reduction of radon concentration in the near zone and its increase in the far zone are observed [ru

  9. Spike Bursts from an Excitable Optical System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios Leite, Jose R.; Rosero, Edison J.; Barbosa, Wendson A. S.; Tredicce, Jorge R.

    Diode Lasers with double optical feedback are shown to present power drop spikes with statistical distribution controllable by the ratio of the two feedback times. The average time between spikes and the variance within long time series are studied. The system is shown to be excitable and present bursting of spikes created with specific feedback time ratios and strength. A rate equation model, extending the Lang-Kobayashi single feedback for semiconductor lasers proves to match the experimental observations. Potential applications to construct network to mimic neural systems having controlled bursting properties in each unit will be discussed. Brazilian Agency CNPQ.

  10. Multigrid methods for differential equations with highly oscillatory coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engquist, Bjorn; Luo, Erding

    1993-01-01

    New coarse grid multigrid operators for problems with highly oscillatory coefficients are developed. These types of operators are necessary when the characters of the differential equations on coarser grids or longer wavelengths are different from that on the fine grid. Elliptic problems for composite materials and different classes of hyperbolic problems are practical examples. The new coarse grid operators can be constructed directly based on the homogenized differential operators or hierarchically computed from the finest grid. Convergence analysis based on the homogenization theory is given for elliptic problems with periodic coefficients and some hyperbolic problems. These are classes of equations for which there exists a fairly complete theory for the interaction between shorter and longer wavelengths in the problems. Numerical examples are presented.

  11. Attractor in Circular Structure of Oscillatory Generalized Neural Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Konovalov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A perspective model of a neuron cell — the generalized neural element (GNE is studied in this article. The model has an universal character. It combines properties of a neuron-oscillator and a neuron-detector. In this structure cyclic sequential pulse generation elements of the ring are studied. A nonlinear mapping for mismatches between pulses of neighboring elements is constructed. We prove the existence of a fixed point of this mapping (threshold value of mismatches and its stability in a small neighborhood of the fixed point. In doing so the existence of a stable oscillatory mode of neural activity (attractor of a certain type is proved. The parameters of the attractor (threshold values of mismatches can be controlled in advance, due to the choice of synaptic weights of the links in the ring.

  12. Model of oscillatory instability in vertically-homogeneous atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. B. Rutkevich

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Existence and repeatability of tornadoes could be straightforwardly explained if there existed instability, responsible for their formation. However, it is well known that convection is the only instability in initially stable air, and the usual convective instability is not applicable for these phenomena. In the present paper we describe an instability in the atmosphere, which can be responsible for intense vortices. This instability appears in a fluid with Coriolis force and dissipation and has oscillatory behaviour, where the amplitude growth is accompanied by oscillations with frequency comparable to the growth rate of the instability. In the paper, both analytical analysis of the linear phase of the instability and nonlinear simulation of the developed stage of the air motion are addressed. This work was supported by the RFBR grant no. 09-05-00374-a.

  13. Introduction to the oscillatory movement based on the rediscovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concari, S.B.; Carreri, R.A.; Giorgi, S.M.; Camara, C.N.; Alzugaray, G.E.; Pozzo, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    In this work we present a proposal of a classroom in treating the them oscillatory movement for a basic university physics course for engineering students at university. The proposal is based on the rediscovery strategy and the active participation of the students. It is oriented to promote in the students the development of his/her operating capacities through the systematic application of a scientific method to the study of the dynamics of different types of pendulums. The criteria used to design the proposal have their fundament in the identification of psychological, didactic and epistemological variables that determine the way the student makes his/her learning process. The epistemological Gowin's V was applied as a tool to determine goals and to organizer activities. (Author) 23 refs

  14. Coherent structures in wave boundary layers. Part 1. Oscillatory motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Stefan; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    ) Vortex tubes, essentially two-dimensional vortices close to the bed extending across the width of the boundary-layer flow, caused by an inflectional-point shear layer instability. The imprint of these vortices in the bed shear stress is a series of small, insignificant kinks and dips. (ii) Turbulent......This work concerns oscillatory boundary layers over smooth beds. It comprises combined visual and quantitative techniques including bed shear stress measurements. The experiments were carried out in an oscillating water tunnel. The experiments reveal two significant coherent flow structures: (i...... spots, isolated arrowhead-shaped areas close to the bed in an otherwise laminar boundary layer where the flow ‘bursts’ with violent oscillations. The emergence of the turbulent spots marks the onset of turbulence. Turbulent spots cause single or multiple violent spikes in the bed shear stress signal...

  15. Nonequilibrium structure of colloidal dumbbells under oscillatory shear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heptner, Nils; Chu, Fangfang; Lu, Yan; Lindner, Peter; Ballauff, Matthias; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the nonequilibrium behavior of dense, plastic-crystalline suspensions of mildly anisotropic colloidal hard dumbbells under the action of an oscillatory shear field by employing Brownian dynamics computer simulations. In particular, we extend previous investigations, where we uncovered nonequilibrium phase transitions, to other aspect ratios and to a larger nonequilibrium parameter space, that is, a wider range of strains and shear frequencies. We compare and discuss selected results in the context of scattering and rheological experiments. Both simulations and experiments demonstrate that the previously found transitions from the plastic crystal phase with increasing shear strain also occur at other aspect ratios. We explore the transition behavior in the strain-frequency phase and summarize it in a nonequilibrium phase diagram. Additionally, the experimental rheology results hint at a slowing down of the colloidal dynamics with higher aspect ratio.

  16. Inhomogeneous oscillatory electric field time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrico, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    The mass-to-charge ratio of an ion can be determined from the measurement of its flight time in an inhomogeneous, oscillatory electric field produced by the potential distribution V(x, y, t) = Vsub(DC) + Vsub(AC) cos ωt) (αsub(x)X 2 + αsub(y)Y 2 + αsub(z)Z 2 ). The governing equation of motion is the Mathieu equation. The principle of operation of this novel mass spectrometer is described and results of computer calculations of the flight time and resolution are reported. An experimental apparatus and results and results demonstrating the feasibility of this mass spectrometer principle are described. (author)

  17. Structure-preserving algorithms for oscillatory differential equations II

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Xinyuan; Shi, Wei

    2015-01-01

    This book describes a variety of highly effective and efficient structure-preserving algorithms for second-order oscillatory differential equations. Such systems arise in many branches of science and engineering, and the examples in the book include systems from quantum physics, celestial mechanics and electronics. To accurately simulate the true behavior of such systems, a numerical algorithm must preserve as much as possible their key structural properties: time-reversibility, oscillation, symplecticity, and energy and momentum conservation. The book describes novel advances in RKN methods, ERKN methods, Filon-type asymptotic methods, AVF methods, and trigonometric Fourier collocation methods.  The accuracy and efficiency of each of these algorithms are tested via careful numerical simulations, and their structure-preserving properties are rigorously established by theoretical analysis. The book also gives insights into the practical implementation of the methods. This book is intended for engineers and sc...

  18. Lateral migration of electrospun hydrogel nanofilaments in an oscillatory flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakielski, Paweł; Zembrzycki, Krzysztof

    2017-01-01

    The recent progress in bioengineering has created great interest in the dynamics and manipulation of long, deformable macromolecules interacting with fluid flow. We report experimental data on the cross-flow migration, bending, and buckling of extremely deformable hydrogel nanofilaments conveyed by an oscillatory flow into a microchannel. The changes in migration velocity and filament orientation are related to the flow velocity and the filament’s initial position, deformation, and length. The observed migration dynamics of hydrogel filaments qualitatively confirms the validity of the previously developed worm-like bead-chain hydrodynamic model. The experimental data collected may help to verify the role of hydrodynamic interactions in molecular simulations of long molecular chains dynamics. PMID:29141043

  19. Oscillatory instabilities in the electrooxidation of borohydride on platinum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, Eduardo G.; Varela, Hamilton, E-mail: varela@iqsc.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Quimica

    2014-03-15

    The borohydride ion has been pointed as a promising alternative fuel. Most of the investigation on its electrochemistry is devoted to the electrocatalytic aspects of its electrooxidation on platinum and gold surfaces. Besides the known kinetic limitations and intricate mechanism, our Group has recently found the occurrence of two regions of bi-stability and autocatalysis in the electrode potential during the open circuit interaction of borohydride and oxidized platinum surfaces. Following this previous contribution, the occurrence of more complicated phenomena is here presented: namely the presence of electrochemical oscillations during the electrooxidation of borohydride on platinum in alkaline media. Current oscillations were found to be associated to two distinct instability windows and characterized in the resistance-potential parameter plane. The dynamic features of such oscillations suggest the existence of distinct mechanisms according to the potential region. Previously published results obtained under non-oscillatory regime were used to give some hints on the surface chemistry behind the observed dynamics. (author)

  20. Oscillatory EEG correlates of arithmetic strategies: A training study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland H. Grabner

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available There has been a long tradition of research on mathematics education showing that children and adults use different strategies to solve arithmetic problems. Neurophysiological studies have recently begun to investigate the brain correlates of these strategies. The existing body of data, however, reflect static end points of the learning process and do not provide information on how brain activity changes in response to training or intervention. In this study, we explicitly address this issue by training participants in using fact retrieval strategies. We also investigate whether brain activity related to arithmetic fact learning is domain-specific or whether this generalizes to other learning materials, such as the solution of figural-spatial problems. Twenty adult students were trained on sets of two-digit multiplication problems and figural-spatial problems. After the training, they were presented with the trained and untrained problems while their brain activity was recorded by means of electroencephalography (EEG . In both problem types, the training resulted in accuracies over 90 % and significant decreases in solution times. Analyses of the oscillatory EEG data also revealed training effects across both problem types. Specifically, we observed training-related activity increases in the theta band (3-6 Hz and decreases in the lower alpha band (8-10 Hz, especially over parieto-occipital and parietal brain regions. These results provide the first evidence that a short term fact retrieval training results in significant changes in oscillatory EEG activity. These findings further corroborate the role of the theta band in the retrieval of semantic information from memory and suggest that theta activity is not only sensitive to fact retrieval in mental arithmetic but also in other domains.

  1. Oscillatory EEG Correlates of Arithmetic Strategies: A Training Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabner, Roland H.; De Smedt, Bert

    2012-01-01

    There has been a long tradition of research on mathematics education showing that children and adults use different strategies to solve arithmetic problems. Neurophysiological studies have recently begun to investigate the brain correlates of these strategies. The existing body of data, however, reflect static end points of the learning process and do not provide information on how brain activity changes in response to training or intervention. In this study, we explicitly address this issue by training participants in using fact retrieval strategies. We also investigate whether brain activity related to arithmetic fact learning is domain-specific or whether this generalizes to other learning materials, such as the solution of figural-spatial problems. Twenty adult students were trained on sets of two-digit multiplication problems and figural-spatial problems. After the training, they were presented with the trained and untrained problems while their brain activity was recorded by means of electroencephalography (EEG). In both problem types, the training resulted in accuracies over 90% and significant decreases in solution times. Analyses of the oscillatory EEG data also revealed training effects across both problem types. Specifically, we observed training-related activity increases in the theta band (3–6 Hz) and decreases in the lower alpha band (8–10 Hz), especially over parietooccipital and parietal brain regions. These results provide the first evidence that a short-term fact retrieval training results in significant changes in oscillatory EEG activity. These findings further corroborate the role of the theta band in the retrieval of semantic information from memory and suggest that theta activity is sensitive to fact retrieval not only in mental arithmetic but also in other domains. PMID:23162495

  2. High frequency oscillatory ventilation in meconium aspiration syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Nona

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate and compare the management and associated morbidity in inborn and outborn babies with meconium aspiration syndrome admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and ventilated with high frequency oscillatory ventilation. Methods: A retrospective cohort study with a review of clinical data from newborns, admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit during a six-year period (from 1999 to 2004 and ventilated with early high frequency oscillatory ventilation, first intention in inborns and immediately after Neonatal Intensive Care Unit arrival in outborns. Rresults: In the present study, 27 newborns were included: 12 inborn and 15 outborn infants. Severity criteria were similar in both groups. The pulmonary morbidity associated was severe persistent pulmonary hypertension - 12 (seven outborns, pneumothorax - five (three outborns, interstitial emphysema – two (one outborn and pulmonary hemorrhage – one outborn. Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy II-III occurred in six newborns (four outborns. The therapeutic procedures were surfactant administration in 22 newborns (13 outborns, nitric oxide in 12 newborns (7 outborns and magnesium sulphate in four newborns (three outborns. The median length of ventilation was six days (inborn infants: four and half days; outborn infants: ten days and the median length of oxygenation supply was ten days (inborn infants: four and half days; outborn infants: 15 days. The median length of stay was 13 days (inborn infants: 11 days; outborn infants: 16 days. One outborn infant died. Cconclusions: With this ventilation strategy, we have found no significant statistical differences between the two newborn groups, except for the length of oxygenation supply that was longer in the Outborn Group.

  3. Spectral Tests of the Homogeneity of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, David L.

    1999-01-01

    We proposed to determine whether the spectral-hardness-intensity relation found when comparing dim and bright bursts is also found within the set of bright bursts. In the simplest cosmological burst paradigm all bursts have the same intrinsic brightness (they are "standard candles") and the faintest BATSE bursts are at a redshift of approx. 1. The cumulative intensity distribution, which is a -3/2 power law at the bright end but flatter at the low intensity end, is explained by the cosmological curvature of space. Thus bursts at the bright end should be at such low redshifts that they do not suffer cosmological redshifting of their spectra or time dilation of their lightcurves. The spectral-hardness and burst intensity are correlated when dim and bright bursts are compared, consistent with cosmological redshifting. However, the actual redshifts of a number of bursts have been determined, showing that bursts are not standard candles, and that their redshifts are frequently greater than approx. 1; the maximum redshift is 3.4! Consequently many bright bursts are at redshifts where cosmological effects are significant. We had proposed to determine A,hether the redshifting effect continued into the bright bursts; even moderately bright bursts should be at cosmological distances.

  4. Powerful Radio Burst Indicates New Astronomical Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    Astronomers studying archival data from an Australian radio telescope have discovered a powerful, short-lived burst of radio waves that they say indicates an entirely new type of astronomical phenomenon. Region of Strong Radio Burst Visible-light (negative greyscale) and radio (contours) image of Small Magellanic Cloud and area where burst originated. CREDIT: Lorimer et al., NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for high-resolution file ( 114 KB) "This burst appears to have originated from the distant Universe and may have been produced by an exotic event such as the collision of two neutron stars or the death throes of an evaporating black hole," said Duncan Lorimer, Assistant Professor of Physics at West Virginia University (WVU) and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). The research team led by Lorimer consists of Matthew Bailes of Swinburne University in Australia, Maura McLaughlin of WVU and NRAO, David Narkevic of WVU, and Fronefield Crawford of Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. The astronomers announced their findings in the September 27 issue of the online journal Science Express. The startling discovery came as WVU undergraduate student David Narkevic re-analyzed data from observations of the Small Magellanic Cloud made by the 210-foot Parkes radio telescope in Australia. The data came from a survey of the Magellanic Clouds that included 480 hours of observations. "This survey had sought to discover new pulsars, and the data already had been searched for the type of pulsating signals they produce," Lorimer said. "We re-examined the data, looking for bursts that, unlike the usual ones from pulsars, are not periodic," he added. The survey had covered the Magellanic Clouds, a pair of small galaxies in orbit around our own Milky Way Galaxy. Some 200,000 light-years from Earth, the Magellanic Clouds are prominent features in the Southern sky. Ironically, the new discovery is not part of these galaxies, but rather is much more distant

  5. BACODINE/3rd Interplanetary Network burst localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurley, K.; Barthelmy, S.; Butterworth, P.; Cline, T.; Sommer, M.; Boer, M.; Niel, M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G.; Meegan, C.

    1996-01-01

    Even with only two widely separated spacecraft (Ulysses and GRO), 3rd Interplanetary Network (IPN) localizations can reduce the areas of BATSE error circles by two orders of magnitude. Therefore it is useful to disseminate them as quickly as possible following BATSE bursts. We have implemented a system which transmits the light curves of BACODINE/BATSE bursts directly by e-mail to UC Berkeley immediately after detection. An automatic e-mail parser at Berkeley watches for these notices, determines the Ulysses crossing time window, and initiates a search for the burst data on the JPL computer as they are received. In ideal cases, it is possible to retrieve the Ulysses data within a few hours of a burst, generate an annulus of arrival directions, and e-mail it out to the astronomical community by local nightfall. Human operators remain in this loop, but we are developing a fully automated routine which should remove them, at least for intense events, and reduce turn-around times to an absolute minimum. We explain the current operations, the data types used, and the speed/accuracy tradeoffs

  6. Radio Afterglows of Gamma Ray Bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gamma ray bursts; radio astronomy. ... Even though radio band is the least explored of the afterglow spectrum, it has played an important role in the progress of GRB physics, specifically in confirming the hypothesized relativistic effects. ... Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology, Trivandrum 695 547, India.

  7. Search for bursts in air shower data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruce, T.E.G.; Clay, R.W.; Dawson, B.R.; Protheroe, R.J.; Blair, D.G.; Cinquini, P.

    1985-01-01

    There have been reports in recent years of the possible observation of bursts in air shower data. If such events are truly of an astrophysical nature then, they represent an important new class of phemonenon since no other bursts have been observed above the MeV level. The spectra of conventional gamma ray bursts are unknown at higher energies but their observed spectra at MeV energies appear generally to exhibit a steepening in the higher MeV range and are thus unlikely to extrapolate to measurable fluxes at air shower energies. An attempt has been made to look for deviations from randomness in the arrival times of air showers above approx. 10 to the 14th power eV with a number of systems and results so far are presented here. This work will be continued for a substantial period of time with a system capable of recording bursts with multiple events down to a spacing of 4 microns. Earlier data have also been searched for the possible association of air shower events with a glitch of the Vela pulsar

  8. Gamma-Ray Bursts and Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Jay P.

    2003-01-01

    The unrivalled, extreme luminosities of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) make them the favored beacons for sampling the high redshift Universe. To employ GRBs to study the cosmic terrain -- e.g., star and galaxy formation history -- GRB luminosities must be calibrated, and the luminosity function versus redshift must be measured or inferred. Several nascent relationships between gamma-ray temporal or spectral indicators and luminosity or total energy have been reported. These measures promise to further our understanding of GRBs once the connections between the luminosity indicators and GRB jets and emission mechanisms are better elucidated. The current distribution of 33 redshifts determined from host galaxies and afterglows peaks near z $\\sim$ 1, whereas for the full BATSE sample of long bursts, the lag-luminosity relation predicts a broad peak z $\\sim$ 1--4 with a tail to z $\\sim$ 20, in rough agreement with theoretical models based on star formation considerations. For some GRB subclasses and apparently related phenomena -- short bursts, long-lag bursts, and X-ray flashes -- the present information on their redshift distributions is sparse or entirely lacking, and progress is expected in Swift era when prompt alerts become numerous.

  9. Magnetized environs of a repeating radio burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Brian D.

    2018-03-01

    One of the astrophysical sources that gives rise to the mysterious transients known as fast radio bursts is embedded in a highly magnetized environment, such as the vicinity of an accreting massive black hole or the birth nebula of a highly magnetized neutron star.

  10. Spectral Lag Evolution among -Ray Burst Pulses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... We analyse the spectral lag evolution of -ray burst (GRB) pulses with observations by CGRO/BATSE. No universal spectral lag evolution feature and pulse luminosity-lag relation within a GRB is observed.Our results suggest that the spectral lag would be due to radiation physics and dynamics of a given ...

  11. Gamma-ray bursts at high redshift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijers, R.A.M.J.

    1999-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are much brighter than supernovae, and could therefore possibly probe the Universe to high redshift. The presently established GRB redshifts range from 0.83 to 5, and quite possibly even beyond that. Since most proposed mechanisms for GRB link them closely to deaths of massive

  12. Positron annihilation in gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Alice K.

    1990-01-01

    Emission features appear at energies of 350 to 450 keV in the spectra of a number of gamma ray burst sources. These features were interpreted as electron-positron annihilation lines, redshifted by the gravitational field near the surface of a neutron star. Evidence that gamma ray bursts originate at neutron stars with magnetic field strengths of approx. 10(exp 12) Gauss came from recent observations of cyclotron scattering harmonics in the spectra of two bursts. Positrons could be produced in gamma ray burst sources either by photon-photon pair production or by one-photon pair production in a strong magnetic field. The annihilation of positrons is affected by the presence of a strong neutron star magnetic field in several ways. The relaxation of transverse momentum conservation causes an intrinsic broadening of the two-photon annihilation line and there is a decrease in the annihilation cross section below the free-space value. An additional channel for one-photon annihilation also becomes possible in high magnetic fields. The physics of pair production and annihilation near strongly magnetized neutron stars will be reviewed. Results from a self-consistent model for non-thermal synchrotron radiation and pair annihilation are beginning to identify the conditions required to produce observable annihilation features from strongly magnetized plasmas.

  13. BurstMem: A High-Performance Burst Buffer System for Scientific Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Teng [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Oral, H Sarp [ORNL; Wang, Yandong [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Settlemyer, Bradley W [ORNL; Atchley, Scott [ORNL; Yu, Weikuan [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama

    2014-01-01

    The growth of computing power on large-scale sys- tems requires commensurate high-bandwidth I/O system. Many parallel file systems are designed to provide fast sustainable I/O in response to applications soaring requirements. To meet this need, a novel system is imperative to temporarily buffer the bursty I/O and gradually flush datasets to long-term parallel file systems. In this paper, we introduce the design of BurstMem, a high- performance burst buffer system. BurstMem provides a storage framework with efficient storage and communication manage- ment strategies. Our experiments demonstrate that BurstMem is able to speed up the I/O performance of scientific applications by up to 8.5 on leadership computer systems.

  14. Is there cosmological time dilation in gamma-ray bursts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, David L.

    1994-01-01

    Norris et al. report that the temporal structure of faint gamma-ray bursts is longer than that of bright bursts, as expected for time dilation in the cosmological models of burst origin. I show that the observed trends can easily be produced by a burst luminosity function and thus may not result from cosmological effects. A cosmological signature may be present, but the tests Norris et al. present are not powerful enough to detect these signatures.

  15. An Adaptive Channel Estimation Algorithm Using Time-Frequency Polynomial Model for OFDM with Fading Multipath Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu KJ Ray

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM is an effective technique for the future 3G communications because of its great immunity to impulse noise and intersymbol interference. The channel estimation is a crucial aspect in the design of OFDM systems. In this work, we propose a channel estimation algorithm based on a time-frequency polynomial model of the fading multipath channels. The algorithm exploits the correlation of the channel responses in both time and frequency domains and hence reduce more noise than the methods using only time or frequency polynomial model. The estimator is also more robust compared to the existing methods based on Fourier transform. The simulation shows that it has more than improvement in terms of mean-squared estimation error under some practical channel conditions. The algorithm needs little prior knowledge about the delay and fading properties of the channel. The algorithm can be implemented recursively and can adjust itself to follow the variation of the channel statistics.

  16. Separation of heart sound signal from noise in joint cycle frequency-time-frequency domains based on fuzzy detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hong; Li, Ting; Park, Yongwan; Qiu, Tianshuang

    2010-10-01

    Noise is generally unavoidable during recordings of heart sound signal. Therefore, noise reduction is one of the important preprocesses in the analysis of heart sound signal. This was achieved in joint cycle frequency-time-frequency domains in this study. Heart sound signal was decomposed into components (called atoms) characterized by time delay, frequency, amplitude, time width, and phase. It was discovered that atoms of heart sound signal congregate in the joint domains. On the other hand, atoms of noise were dispersed. The atoms of heart sound signal could, therefore, be separated from the atoms of noise based on fuzzy detection. In a practical experiment, heart sound signal was successfully separated from lung sounds and disturbances due to chest motion. Computer simulations for various clinical heart sound signals were also used to evaluate the performance of the proposed noise reduction. It was shown that heart sound signal can be reconstructed from simulated complex noise (perhaps non-Gaussian, nonstationary, and colored). The proposed noise reduction can recover variations in the both waveform and time delay of heart sound signal during the reconstruction. Correlation coefficient and normalized residue were used to indicate the closeness of the reconstructed and noise-free heart sound signal. Correlation coefficient may exceed 0.90 and normalized residue may be around 0.10 in 0-dB noise environment, even if the phonocardiogram signal covers only ten cardiac cycles.

  17. Time-Frequency Analysis of Non-Stationary Biological Signals with Sparse Linear Regression Based Fourier Linear Combiner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yubo; Veluvolu, Kalyana C

    2017-06-14

    It is often difficult to analyze biological signals because of their nonlinear and non-stationary characteristics. This necessitates the usage of time-frequency decomposition methods for analyzing the subtle changes in these signals that are often connected to an underlying phenomena. This paper presents a new approach to analyze the time-varying characteristics of such signals by employing a simple truncated Fourier series model, namely the band-limited multiple Fourier linear combiner (BMFLC). In contrast to the earlier designs, we first identified the sparsity imposed on the signal model in order to reformulate the model to a sparse linear regression model. The coefficients of the proposed model are then estimated by a convex optimization algorithm. The performance of the proposed method was analyzed with benchmark test signals. An energy ratio metric is employed to quantify the spectral performance and results show that the proposed method Sparse-BMFLC has high mean energy (0.9976) ratio and outperforms existing methods such as short-time Fourier transfrom (STFT), continuous Wavelet transform (CWT) and BMFLC Kalman Smoother. Furthermore, the proposed method provides an overall 6.22% in reconstruction error.

  18. Recognition of speech in noise after application of time-frequency masks: dependence on frequency and threshold parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinex, Donal G

    2013-04-01

    Binary time-frequency (TF) masks can be applied to separate speech from noise. Previous studies have shown that with appropriate parameters, ideal TF masks can extract highly intelligible speech even at very low speech-to-noise ratios (SNRs). Two psychophysical experiments provided additional information about the dependence of intelligibility on the frequency resolution and threshold criteria that define the ideal TF mask. Listeners identified AzBio Sentences in noise, before and after application of TF masks. Masks generated with 8 or 16 frequency bands per octave supported nearly-perfect identification. Word recognition accuracy was slightly lower and more variable with 4 bands per octave. When TF masks were generated with a local threshold criterion of 0 dB SNR, the mean speech reception threshold was -9.5 dB SNR, compared to -5.7 dB for unprocessed sentences in noise. Speech reception thresholds decreased by about 1 dB per dB of additional decrease in the local threshold criterion. Information reported here about the dependence of speech intelligibility on frequency and level parameters has relevance for the development of non-ideal TF masks for clinical applications such as speech processing for hearing aids.

  19. Time-frequency wavelet analysis of the interrelationship between the global macro assets and the fear indexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid, Fathi; Kaffel, Bilel

    2018-01-01

    Understanding the interrelationships of the global macro assets is crucial for global macro investing. This paper investigates the local variance and the interconnection between the stock, gold, oil, Forex and the implied volatility markets in the time/frequency domains using the wavelet methodology, including the wavelet power spectrum, the wavelet squared coherence and phase difference, the wavelet multiple correlation and cross-correlation. The univariate analysis reveals that, in some crisis periods, underlying asset markets present the same pattern in terms of the wavelet power spectrum indicating high volatility for the medium scale, and that for the other market stress periods, volatility behaves differently. Moreover, unlike the underlying asset markets, the implied volatility markets are characterized by high power regions across the entire period, even in the absence of economic events. Bivariate results show a bidirectional relationship between the underlying assets and their corresponding implied volatility indexes, and a steady co-movement between the stock index and its corresponding fear index. Multiple correlation analysis indicates a strong correlation between markets at high scales with evidence of a nearly perfect integration for a period longer than a year. In addition, the hedging strategies based on the volatility index lead to an increase in portfolio correlation. On the other hand, the results from multiple cross-correlations reveal that the lead-lag effect starts from the medium scale and that the VIX (stock market volatility index) index is the potential leader or follower of the other markets.

  20. Brain dynamics in the comprehension of action-related language. A time-frequency analysis of mu rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Iván; de Vega, Manuel; León, Inmaculada; Bastiaansen, Marcel; Glen Lewis, Ashley; Magyari, Lilla

    2015-04-01

    EEG mu rhythms (8-13 Hz) recorded at fronto-central electrodes are generally considered as markers of motor cortical activity in humans, because they are modulated when participants perform an action, when they observe another's action or even when they imagine performing an action. In this study, we analyzed the time-frequency (TF) modulation of mu rhythms while participants read action language ("You will cut the strawberry cake"), abstract language ("You will doubt the patient's argument"), and perceptive language ("You will notice the bright day"). The results indicated that mu suppression at fronto-central sites is associated with action language rather than with abstract or perceptive language. Also, the largest difference between conditions occurred quite late in the sentence, while reading the first noun, (contrast Action vs. Abstract), or the second noun following the action verb (contrast Action vs. Perceptive). This suggests that motor activation is associated with the integration of words across the sentence beyond the lexical processing of the action verb. Source reconstruction localized mu suppression associated with action sentences in premotor cortex (BA 6). The present study suggests (1) that the understanding of action language activates motor networks in the human brain, and (2) that this activation occurs online based on semantic integration across multiple words in the sentence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Timing, frequency and environmental conditions associated with mainstem-tributary movement by a lowland river fish, golden perch (Macquaria ambigua.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne M Koster

    Full Text Available Tributary and mainstem connections represent important links for the movement of fish and other biota throughout river networks. We investigated the timing, frequency and environmental conditions associated with movements by adult golden perch (Macquaria ambigua between the mainstem of the mid-Murray River and a tributary, the Goulburn River, in south-eastern Australia, using acoustic telemetry over four years (2007-2011. Fish were tagged and released in autumn 2007-2009 in the mid-Murray (n = 42 and lower Goulburn (n = 37 rivers within 3-6 km of the mid-Murray-lower Goulburn junction. 38% of tagged fish undertook mainstem-tributary movements, characterised mostly by temporary occupation followed by return of fish to the original capture river. Approximately 10% of tagged fish exhibited longer-term shifts between the mainstem and tributary. Movement of fish from the tributary into the mainstem occurred primarily during the spawning season and in some years coincided with the presence of golden perch eggs/larvae in drift samples in the mainstem. Many of the tributary-to-mainstem movements occurred during or soon after changes in flow. The movements of fish from the mainstem into the tributary were irregular and did not appear to be associated with spawning. The findings show that golden perch moved freely across the mainstem-tributary interface. This demonstrates the need to consider the spatial, behavioural and demographic interdependencies of aquatic fauna across geographic management units such as rivers.

  2. Time-frequency analysis of stimulus frequency otoacoustic emissions and their changes with efferent stimulation in guinea pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezina-Greene, Maria A.; Guinan, John J.

    2015-12-01

    To aid in understanding their origin, stimulus frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAEs) were measured at a series of tone frequencies using the suppression method, both with and without stimulation of medial olivocochlear (MOC) efferents, in anesthetized guinea pigs. Time-frequency analysis showed SFOAE energy peaks in 1-3 delay components throughout the measured frequency range (0.5-12 kHz). One component's delay usually coincided with the phase-gradient delay. When multiple delay components were present, they were usually near SFOAE dips. Below 2 kHz, SFOAE delays were shorter than predicted from mechanical measurements. With MOC stimulation, SFOAE amplitude was decreased at most frequencies, but was sometimes enhanced, and all SFOAE delay components were affected. The MOC effects and an analysis of model data suggest that the multiple SFOAE delay components arise at the edges of the traveling-wave peak, not far basal of the peak. Comparisons with published guinea-pig neural data suggest that the short latencies of low-frequency SFOAEs may arise from coherent reflection from an organ-of-Corti motion that has a shorter group delay than the traveling wave.

  3. A High-Spin Rate Measurement Method for Projectiles Using a Magnetoresistive Sensor Based on Time-Frequency Domain Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Jianyu; Deng, Zhihong; Fu, Mengyin; Wang, Shunting

    2016-06-16

    Traditional artillery guidance can significantly improve the attack accuracy and overall combat efficiency of projectiles, which makes it more adaptable to the information warfare of the future. Obviously, the accurate measurement of artillery spin rate, which has long been regarded as a daunting task, is the basis of precise guidance and control. Magnetoresistive (MR) sensors can be applied to spin rate measurement, especially in the high-spin and high-g projectile launch environment. In this paper, based on the theory of a MR sensor measuring spin rate, the mathematical relationship model between the frequency of MR sensor output and projectile spin rate was established through a fundamental derivation. By analyzing the characteristics of MR sensor output whose frequency varies with time, this paper proposed the Chirp z-Transform (CZT) time-frequency (TF) domain analysis method based on the rolling window of a Blackman window function (BCZT) which can accurately extract the projectile spin rate. To put it into practice, BCZT was applied to measure the spin rate of 155 mm artillery projectile. After extracting the spin rate, the impact that launch rotational angular velocity and aspect angle have on the extraction accuracy of the spin rate was analyzed. Simulation results show that the BCZT TF domain analysis method can effectively and accurately measure the projectile spin rate, especially in a high-spin and high-g projectile launch environment.

  4. Time-frequency analysis based on ensemble local mean decomposition and fast kurtogram for rotating machinery fault diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Zhiwen; Miao, Qiang; Zhang, Xin

    2018-03-01

    A time-frequency analysis method based on ensemble local mean decomposition (ELMD) and fast kurtogram (FK) is proposed for rotating machinery fault diagnosis. Local mean decomposition (LMD), as an adaptive non-stationary and nonlinear signal processing method, provides the capability to decompose multicomponent modulation signal into a series of demodulated mono-components. However, the occurring mode mixing is a serious drawback. To alleviate this, ELMD based on noise-assisted method was developed. Still, the existing environmental noise in the raw signal remains in corresponding PF with the component of interest. FK has good performance in impulse detection while strong environmental noise exists. But it is susceptible to non-Gaussian noise. The proposed method combines the merits of ELMD and FK to detect the fault for rotating machinery. Primarily, by applying ELMD the raw signal is decomposed into a set of product functions (PFs). Then, the PF which mostly characterizes fault information is selected according to kurtosis index. Finally, the selected PF signal is further filtered by an optimal band-pass filter based on FK to extract impulse signal. Fault identification can be deduced by the appearance of fault characteristic frequencies in the squared envelope spectrum of the filtered signal. The advantages of ELMD over LMD and EEMD are illustrated in the simulation analyses. Furthermore, the efficiency of the proposed method in fault diagnosis for rotating machinery is demonstrated on gearbox case and rolling bearing case analyses.

  5. Application of Passivity-Based Control and Time-Frequency Representation in a Doubly Fed Induction Generator System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingpei Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the performance of a doubly fed induction generator (DFIG system, we put forward a high performance nonlinear passivity-based control (PBC method on DFIG. Firstly, we build a PBC mathematical model for DFIG. We design the passive controller for the inner loop in the control system based on passivity theory. Then we calculate the rotor’s control voltages which are modulated afterwards to pulse to control the rotor side converter. The maximal wind energy capture is effectively realized. The rotor speed and DFIG currents fast track their expected values. The independent regulation of the stator active power and reactive power is achieved. Finally we perform simulations to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method. Furthermore, we employ the Wigner-Ville distribution (WVD and continuous wavelet transform (CWT as two time-frequency representation methods to indicate that the proposed method in the paper performs well from the perspective of energy distribution in time and frequency domain.

  6. Assessment of Multivariate Neural Time Series by Phase Synchrony Clustering in a Time-Frequency-Topography Representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Porta-Garcia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Most EEG phase synchrony measures are of bivariate nature. Those that are multivariate focus on producing global indices of the synchronization state of the system. Thus, better descriptions of spatial and temporal local interactions are still in demand. A framework for characterization of phase synchrony relationships between multivariate neural time series is presented, applied either in a single epoch or over an intertrial assessment, relying on a proposed clustering algorithm, termed Multivariate Time Series Clustering by Phase Synchrony, which generates fuzzy clusters for each multivalued time sample and thereupon obtains hard clusters according to a circular variance threshold; such cluster modes are then depicted in Time-Frequency-Topography representations of synchrony state beyond mere global indices. EEG signals from P300 Speller sessions of four subjects were analyzed, obtaining useful insights of synchrony patterns related to the ERP and even revealing steady-state artifacts at 7.6 Hz. Further, contrast maps of Levenshtein Distance highlight synchrony differences between ERP and no-ERP epochs, mainly at delta and theta bands. The framework, which is not limited to one synchrony measure, allows observing dynamics of phase changes and interactions among channels and can be applied to analyze other cognitive states rather than ERP versus no ERP.

  7. Time-frequency analyses of fluid–solid interaction under sinusoidal translational shear deformation of the viscoelastic rat cerebrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, Lauren N.; Haslach, Henry W.

    2018-02-01

    During normal extracellular fluid (ECF) flow in the brain glymphatic system or during pathological flow induced by trauma resulting from impacts and blast waves, ECF-solid matter interactions result from sinusoidal shear waves in the brain and cranial arterial tissue, both heterogeneous biological tissues with high fluid content. The flow in the glymphatic system is known to be forced by pulsations of the cranial arteries at about 1 Hz. The experimental shear stress response to sinusoidal translational shear deformation at 1 Hz and 25% strain amplitude and either 0% or 33% compression is compared for rat cerebrum and bovine aortic tissue. Time-frequency analyses aim to correlate the shear stress signal frequency components over time with the behavior of brain tissue constituents to identify the physical source of the shear nonlinear viscoelastic response. Discrete fast Fourier transformation analysis and the novel application to the shear stress signal of harmonic wavelet decomposition both show significant 1 Hz and 3 Hz components. The 3 Hz component in brain tissue, whose magnitude is much larger than in aortic tissue, may result from interstitial fluid induced drag forces. The harmonic wavelet decomposition locates 3 Hz harmonics whose magnitudes decrease on subsequent cycles perhaps because of bond breaking that results in easier fluid movement. Both tissues exhibit transient shear stress softening similar to the Mullins effect in rubber. The form of a new mathematical model for the drag force produced by ECF-solid matter interactions captures the third harmonic seen experimentally.

  8. Time-Frequency Analysis of Non-Stationary Biological Signals with Sparse Linear Regression Based Fourier Linear Combiner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubo Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available It is often difficult to analyze biological signals because of their nonlinear and non-stationary characteristics. This necessitates the usage of time-frequency decomposition methods for analyzing the subtle changes in these signals that are often connected to an underlying phenomena. This paper presents a new approach to analyze the time-varying characteristics of such signals by employing a simple truncated Fourier series model, namely the band-limited multiple Fourier linear combiner (BMFLC. In contrast to the earlier designs, we first identified the sparsity imposed on the signal model in order to reformulate the model to a sparse linear regression model. The coefficients of the proposed model are then estimated by a convex optimization algorithm. The performance of the proposed method was analyzed with benchmark test signals. An energy ratio metric is employed to quantify the spectral performance and results show that the proposed method Sparse-BMFLC has high mean energy (0.9976 ratio and outperforms existing methods such as short-time Fourier transfrom (STFT, continuous Wavelet transform (CWT and BMFLC Kalman Smoother. Furthermore, the proposed method provides an overall 6.22% in reconstruction error.

  9. Oscillatory dynamics of Gestalt perception in schizophrenia revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Kevin M.; Ghorashi, Shahab

    2014-01-01

    Background: Abnormalities in γ oscillations (30–100 Hz) in the scalp-recorded electroencephalogram (EEG) have been proposed to reflect neural circuitry abnormalities in schizophrenia. Oscillations in the γ band are thought to play an important role in visual perception, mediating the binding of visual features into coherent objects. However, there is relatively little evidence to date of deficits in γ-mediated processes associated with Gestalt perception in schizophrenia. Methods: Fourteen healthy control subjects (HC) and 17 chronic schizophrenia patients (SZ) discriminated between illusory Kanisza Squares and No-Square control stimuli, indicating their judgment with a manual button press. Time-frequency decomposition of the EEG was computed with the Morlet wavelet transform. Time-frequency maps of phase locking factor (PLF) values were calculated for stimulus- and response-locked oscillations. Results: HC and SZ did not differ in reaction time, error rate, an early ERP effect associated with Gestalt processing, nor an early visual-evoked γ oscillation. Two response-locked high γ effects had greater PLF for Square than No-Square stimuli in HC, and the reverse pattern in SZ. One of these effects was correlated with thought disorder symptom ratings in SZ. Conclusions: SZ demonstrated abnormalities in γ oscillations associated with the perception of Gestalt objects, while their early visual-evoked γ activity was mostly normal, contrary to previous results. This study supports the hypothesis that high-frequency oscillations are sensitive to aspects of psychosis. PMID:24550878

  10. Oscillatory Dynamics of Gestalt Perception in Schizophrenia Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin M Spencer

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Abnormalities in γ oscillations (30-100 Hz in the scalp-recorded electroencephalogram (EEG have been proposed to reflect neural circuitry abnormalities in schizophrenia. Oscillations in the γ band are thought to play an important role in visual perception, mediating the binding of visual features into coherent objects. However, there is relatively little evidence to date of deficits in γ-mediated processes associated with Gestalt perception in schizophrenia.Methods: Fourteen healthy control subjects (HC and 17 chronic schizophrenia patients (SZ discriminated between illusory Kanisza Squares and No-Square control stimuli, indicating their judgment with a manual button press. Time-frequency decomposition of the EEG was computed with the Morlet wavelet transform. Time-frequency maps of phase locking factor (PLF values were calculated for stimulus- and response-locked oscillations.Results: HC and SZ did not differ in reaction time, error rate, an early ERP effect associated with Gestalt processing, nor an early visual-evoked γ oscillation. Two response-locked high γ effects had greater PLF for Square than No-Square stimuli in HC, and the reverse pattern in SZ. One of these effects was correlated with thought disorder symptom ratings in SZ.Conclusions: SZ demonstrated abnormalities in γ oscillations associated with the perception of Gestalt objects, while their early visual-evoked γ activity was mostly normal, contrary to previous results. This study supports the hypothesis that high-frequency oscillations are sensitive to aspects of psychosis.

  11. Oscillatory dynamics of Gestalt perception in schizophrenia revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Kevin M; Ghorashi, Shahab

    2014-01-01

    Abnormalities in γ oscillations (30-100 Hz) in the scalp-recorded electroencephalogram (EEG) have been proposed to reflect neural circuitry abnormalities in schizophrenia. Oscillations in the γ band are thought to play an important role in visual perception, mediating the binding of visual features into coherent objects. However, there is relatively little evidence to date of deficits in γ-mediated processes associated with Gestalt perception in schizophrenia. Fourteen healthy control subjects (HC) and 17 chronic schizophrenia patients (SZ) discriminated between illusory Kanisza Squares and No-Square control stimuli, indicating their judgment with a manual button press. Time-frequency decomposition of the EEG was computed with the Morlet wavelet transform. Time-frequency maps of phase locking factor (PLF) values were calculated for stimulus- and response-locked oscillations. HC and SZ did not differ in reaction time, error rate, an early ERP effect associated with Gestalt processing, nor an early visual-evoked γ oscillation. Two response-locked high γ effects had greater PLF for Square than No-Square stimuli in HC, and the reverse pattern in SZ. One of these effects was correlated with thought disorder symptom ratings in SZ. SZ demonstrated abnormalities in γ oscillations associated with the perception of Gestalt objects, while their early visual-evoked γ activity was mostly normal, contrary to previous results. This study supports the hypothesis that high-frequency oscillations are sensitive to aspects of psychosis.

  12. A Turbo-Coded Burst-by-Burst Adaptive Wide-Band Speech Transceiver

    OpenAIRE

    Keller, T.; Münster, M.; Hanzo, L.

    2000-01-01

    Turbo-coded burst-by-burst adaptive orthogonal frequency division multiplex (AOFDM) wide-band speech transceivers are proposed. A constant throughput adaptive OFDM transceiver was designed and benchmarked against a time-variant rate scheme. The proposed joint adaptation of source-codec, channel-codec, and modulation regime results in attractive, robust, high-quality audio systems, capable of conveying near-unimpaired wide-band audio signals over fading dispersive channels for signal-to-noise ...

  13. IGR J17254-3257, a new bursting neutron star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chenevez, Jérôme; Falanga, M.; Kuulkers, E.

    2007-01-01

    Aims. The study of the observational properties of uncommonly long bursts from low luminosity sources is important when investigating the transition from a hydrogen - rich bursting regime to a pure helium regime and from helium burning to carbon burning as predicted by current burst theories. On ...

  14. 46 CFR 154.554 - Cargo hose: Bursting pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo hose: Bursting pressure. 154.554 Section 154.554... Hose § 154.554 Cargo hose: Bursting pressure. Cargo hose that may be exposed to the pressure in the cargo tank, the cargo pump discharge, or the vapor compressor discharge must have a bursting pressure of...

  15. Detecting Pipe Bursts Using Heuristic and CUSUM Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.; Jung, D.; Vreeburg, J.; Van de Roer, M.; Lansey, K.; Rierveld, L.

    2014-01-01

    Pipe bursts in a drinking water distribution system lead to water losses, interruption of supply, and damage to streets and houses due to the uncontrolled water flow. To minimize the negative consequences of pipe bursts, an early detection is necessary. This paper describes a heuristic burst

  16. 47 CFR 90.250 - Meteor burst communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Meteor burst communications. 90.250 Section 90... PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Non-Voice and Other Specialized Operations § 90.250 Meteor burst communications. Meteor burst communications may be authorized for the use of private radio stations subject to...

  17. Oscillatory domain wall velocity of current-induced domain wall motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, W.J.; Seo, S.M.; Lee, T.D.; Lee, K.J.

    2007-01-01

    We studied the effect of Oersted field (H Oe ) on current-induced domain wall motion (CIDWM) in magnetic nanowires. We found that H Oe generates spin waves. Because of interaction between domain wall (DW) and spin wave, time-dependent wall velocity is oscillatory at the early stage of wall motion. The period of the oscillatory DW motion is in antiphase with the period of out-of-plane (OOP) magnetization oscillation inside the DW. The oscillatory wall velocity is suppressed as the thickness of nanowire decreases because of strong demagnetization field

  18. Phantom bursting is highly sensitive to noise and unlikely to account for slow bursting in beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Gram

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic beta-cells show bursting electrical activity with a wide range of burst periods ranging from a few seconds, often seen in isolated cells, over tens of seconds (medium bursting), usually observed in intact islets, to several minutes. The phantom burster model [Bertram, R., Previte, J...

  19. Diagnostics from three rising submillimeter bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Ai-Hua; Li, Jian-Ping; Wang, Xin-Dong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we investigate three novel rising submillimeter (THz) bursts that occurred sequentially in Super Active Region NOAA 10486. The average rising rate of the flux density above 200 GHz is only 20 sfu GHz −1 (corresponding to spectral index α of 1.6) for the THz spectral components of the 2003 October 28 and November 4 bursts, but it attained values of 235 sfu GHz −1 (α = 4.8) in the 2003 November 2 burst. The steeply rising THz spectrum can be produced by a population of highly relativistic electrons with a low-energy cutoff of 1 MeV, but it only requires a low-energy cutoff of 30 keV for the two slowly rising THz bursts, via gyrosynchrotron (GS) radiation based on our numerical simulations of burst spectra in the magnetic dipole field case. The electron density variation is much larger in the THz source than in the microwave (MW) source. It is interesting that the THz source radius decreased by 20%–50% during the decay phase for the three events, but the MW source increased by 28% for the 2003 November 2 event. In the paper we will present a formula that can be used to calculate the energy released by ultrarelativistic electrons, taking the relativistic correction into account for the first time. We find that the energy released by energetic electrons in the THz source exceeds that in the MW source due to the strong GS radiation loss in the THz range, although the modeled THz source area is 3–4 orders smaller than the modeled MW source one. The total energies released by energetic electrons via the GS radiation in radio sources are estimated, respectively, to be 5.2 × 10 33 , 3.9 × 10 33 and 3.7 × 10 32 erg for the October 28, November 2 and 4 bursts, which are 131, 76 and 4 times as large as the thermal energies of 2.9 × 10 31 , 2.1 × 10 31 and 5.2 × 10 31 erg estimated from soft X-ray GOES observations. (paper)

  20. Detection of sputum by interpreting the time-frequency distribution of respiratory sound signal using image processing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Jinglong; Shi, Yan; Cai, Maolin; Cao, Zhixin; Wang, Dandan; Zhang, Zhaozhi; Zhang, Xiaohua Douglas

    2018-03-01

    Sputum in the trachea is hard to expectorate and detect directly for the patients who are unconscious, especially those in Intensive Care Unit. Medical staff should always check the condition of sputum in the trachea. This is time-consuming and the necessary skills are difficult to acquire. Currently, there are few automatic approaches to serve as alternatives to this manual approach. We develop an automatic approach to diagnose the condition of the sputum. Our approach utilizes a system involving a medical device and quantitative analytic methods. In this approach, the time-frequency distribution of respiratory sound signals, determined from the spectrum, is treated as an image. The sputum detection is performed by interpreting the patterns in the image through the procedure of preprocessing and feature extraction. In this study, 272 respiratory sound samples (145 sputum sound and 127 non-sputum sound samples) are collected from 12 patients. We apply the method of leave-one out cross-validation to the 12 patients to assess the performance of our approach. That is, out of the 12 patients, 11 are randomly selected and their sound samples are used to predict the sound samples in the remaining one patient. The results show that our automatic approach can classify the sputum condition at an accuracy rate of 83.5%. The matlab codes and examples of datasets explored in this work are available at Bioinformatics online. yesoyou@gmail.com or douglaszhang@umac.mo. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  1. Improvement of orbit determination accuracy for Beidou Navigation Satellite System with Two-way Satellite Time Frequency Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chengpan; Hu, Xiaogong; Zhou, Shanshi; Guo, Rui; He, Feng; Liu, Li; Zhu, Lingfeng; Li, Xiaojie; Wu, Shan; Zhao, Gang; Yu, Yang; Cao, Yueling

    2016-10-01

    The Beidou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) manages to estimate simultaneously the orbits and clock offsets of navigation satellites, using code and carrier phase measurements of a regional network within China. The satellite clock offsets are also directly measured with Two-way Satellite Time Frequency Transfer (TWSTFT). Satellite laser ranging (SLR) residuals and comparisons with the precise ephemeris indicate that the radial error of GEO satellites is much larger than that of IGSO and MEO satellites and that the BDS orbit accuracy is worse than GPS. In order to improve the orbit determination accuracy for BDS, a new orbit determination strategy is proposed, in which the satellite clock measurements from TWSTFT are fixed as known values, and only the orbits of the satellites are solved. However, a constant systematic error at the nanosecond level can be found in the clock measurements, which is obtained and then corrected by differencing the clock measurements and the clock estimates from orbit determination. The effectiveness of the new strategy is verified by a GPS regional network orbit determination experiment. With the IGS final clock products fixed, the orbit determination and prediction accuracy for GPS satellites improve by more than 50% and the 12-h prediction User Range Error (URE) is better than 0.12 m. By processing a 25-day of measurement from the BDS regional network, an optimal strategy for the satellite-clock-fixed orbit determination is identified. User Equivalent Ranging Error is reduced by 27.6% for GEO satellites, but no apparent reduction is found for IGSO/MEO satellites. The SLR residuals exhibit reductions by 59% and 32% for IGSO satellites but no reductions for GEO and MEO satellites.

  2. Temporal features of spike trains in the moth antennal lobe revealed by a comparative time-frequency analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Capurro

    Full Text Available The discrimination of complex sensory stimuli in a noisy environment is an immense computational task. Sensory systems often encode stimulus features in a spatiotemporal fashion through the complex firing patterns of individual neurons. To identify these temporal features, we have developed an analysis that allows the comparison of statistically significant features of spike trains localized over multiple scales of time-frequency resolution. Our approach provides an original way to utilize the discrete wavelet transform to process instantaneous rate functions derived from spike trains, and select relevant wavelet coefficients through statistical analysis. Our method uncovered localized features within olfactory projection neuron (PN responses in the moth antennal lobe coding for the presence of an odor mixture and the concentration of single component odorants, but not for compound identities. We found that odor mixtures evoked earlier responses in biphasic response type PNs compared to single components, which led to differences in the instantaneous firing rate functions with their signal power spread across multiple frequency bands (ranging from 0 to 45.71 Hz during a time window immediately preceding behavioral response latencies observed in insects. Odor concentrations were coded in excited response type PNs both in low frequency band differences (2.86 to 5.71 Hz during the stimulus and in the odor trace after stimulus offset in low (0 to 2.86 Hz and high (22.86 to 45.71 Hz frequency bands. These high frequency differences in both types of PNs could have particular relevance for recruiting cellular activity in higher brain centers such as mushroom body Kenyon cells. In contrast, neurons in the specialized pheromone-responsive area of the moth antennal lobe exhibited few stimulus-dependent differences in temporal response features. These results provide interesting insights on early insect olfactory processing and introduce a novel

  3. An adaptation method to improve secret key rates of time-frequency QKD in atmospheric turbulence channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaole; Djordjevic, Ivan B.; Neifeld, Mark A.

    2016-03-01

    Free-space optical (FSO) channels can be characterized by random power fluctuations due to atmospheric turbulence, which is known as scintillation. Weak coherent source based FSO quantum key distribution (QKD) systems suffer from the scintillation effect because during the deep channel fading the expected detection rate drops, which then gives an eavesdropper opportunity to get additional information about protocol by performing photon number splitting (PNS) attack and blocking single-photon pulses without changing QBER. To overcome this problem, in this paper, we study a large-alphabet QKD protocol, which is achieved by using pulse-position modulation (PPM)-like approach that utilizes the time-frequency uncertainty relation of the weak coherent photon state, called here TF-PPM-QKD protocol. We first complete finite size analysis for TF-PPM-QKD protocol to give practical bounds against non-negligible statistical fluctuation due to finite resources in practical implementations. The impact of scintillation under strong atmospheric turbulence regime is studied then. To overcome the secure key rate performance degradation of TF-PPM-QKD caused by scintillation, we propose an adaptation method for compensating the scintillation impact. By changing source intensity according to the channel state information (CSI), obtained by classical channel, the adaptation method improves the performance of QKD system with respect to the secret key rate. The CSI of a time-varying channel can be predicted using stochastic models, such as autoregressive (AR) models. Based on the channel state predictions, we change the source intensity to the optimal value to achieve a higher secret key rate. We demonstrate that the improvement of the adaptation method is dependent on the prediction accuracy.

  4. DropConnected neural networks trained on time-frequency and inter-beat features for classifying heart sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Edmund; Agarwal, Anurag

    2017-07-31

    Automatic heart sound analysis has the potential to improve the diagnosis of valvular heart diseases in the primary care phase, as well as in countries where there is neither the expertise nor the equipment to perform echocardiograms. An algorithm has been trained, on the PhysioNet open-access heart sounds database, to classify heart sounds as normal or abnormal. The heart sounds are segmented using an open-source algorithm based on a hidden semi-Markov model. Following this, the time-frequency behaviour of a single heartbeat is characterized by using a novel implementation of the continuous wavelet transform, mel-frequency cepstral coefficients, and certain complexity measures. These features help detect the presence of any murmurs. A number of other features are also extracted to characterise the inter-beat behaviour of the heart sounds, which helps to recognize diseases such as arrhythmia. The extracted features are normalized and their dimensionality is reduced using principal component analysis. They are then used as the input to a fully-connected, two-hidden-layer neural network, trained by error backpropagation, and regularized with DropConnect. This algorithm achieved an accuracy of 85.2% on the test data, which placed third in the PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge (first place scored 86.0%). However, this is unrealistic of real-world performance, as the test data contained a dataset (dataset-e) in which normal and abnormal heart sounds were recorded with different stethoscopes. A 10-fold cross-validation study on the training data (excluding dataset-e) gives a mean score of 74.8%, which is a more realistic estimate of accuracy. With dataset-e excluded from training, the algorithm scored only 58.1% on the test data.

  5. The use of joint time frequency analysis to quantify the effect of ventilation on the pulse oximeter waveform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, Kirk H; Awad, Aymen A; Stout, Robert G; Silverman, David G

    2006-04-01

    In the process of determining oxygen saturation, the pulse oximeter functions as a photoelectric plethysmograph. By analyzing how the frequency spectrum of the pulse oximeter waveform changes over time, new clinically relevant features can be extracted. Thirty patients undergoing general anesthesia for abdominal surgery had their pulse oximeter, airway pressure and CO(2) waveforms collected (50 Hz). The pulse oximeter waveform was analyzed with a short-time Fourier transform using a moving 4096 point Hann window of 82 seconds duration. The frequency signal created by positive pressure ventilation was extracted using a peak detection algorithm in the frequency range of ventilation (0.08-0.4 Hz = 5-24 breaths/minute). The respiratory rate derived in this manner was compared to the respiratory rate as determined by CO(2) detection. In total, 52 hours of telemetry data were analyzed. The respiratory rate measured from the pulse oximeter waveform was found to have a 0.89 linear correlation when compared to CO(2) detection and airway pressure change. the bias was 0.03 breath/min, SD was 0.557 breath/min and the upper and lower limits of agreement were 1.145 and -1.083 breath/min respectively. The presence of motion artifact proved to be the primary cause of failure of this technique. Joint time frequency analysis of the pulse oximeter waveform can be used to determine the respiratory rate of ventilated patients and to quantify the impact of ventilation on the waveform. In addition, when applied to the pulse oximeter waveform new clinically relevant features were observed.

  6. Towards Real-Time Detection of Gait Events on Different Terrains Using Time-Frequency Analysis and Peak Heuristics Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hui; Ji, Ning; Samuel, Oluwarotimi Williams; Cao, Yafei; Zhao, Zheyi; Chen, Shixiong; Li, Guanglin

    2016-10-01

    Real-time detection of gait events can be applied as a reliable input to control drop foot correction devices and lower-limb prostheses. Among the different sensors used to acquire the signals associated with walking for gait event detection, the accelerometer is considered as a preferable sensor due to its convenience of use, small size, low cost, reliability, and low power consumption. Based on the acceleration signals, different algorithms have been proposed to detect toe off (TO) and heel strike (HS) gait events in previous studies. While these algorithms could achieve a relatively reasonable performance in gait event detection, they suffer from limitations such as poor real-time performance and are less reliable in the cases of up stair and down stair terrains. In this study, a new algorithm is proposed to detect the gait events on three walking terrains in real-time based on the analysis of acceleration jerk signals with a time-frequency method to obtain gait parameters, and then the determination of the peaks of jerk signals using peak heuristics. The performance of the newly proposed algorithm was evaluated with eight healthy subjects when they were walking on level ground, up stairs, and down stairs. Our experimental results showed that the mean F1 scores of the proposed algorithm were above 0.98 for HS event detection and 0.95 for TO event detection on the three terrains. This indicates that the current algorithm would be robust and accurate for gait event detection on different terrains. Findings from the current study suggest that the proposed method may be a preferable option in some applications such as drop foot correction devices and leg prostheses.

  7. INTERPLANETARY NETWORK LOCALIZATIONS OF KONUS SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal' shin, V. D.; Svinkin, D. S.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Frederiks, D. D.; Mazets, E. P.; Oleynik, P. P.; Ulanov, M. V. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation); Hurley, K. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Cline, T.; Trombka, J.; McClanahan, T. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Mitrofanov, I. G.; Golovin, D. V.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B. [Space Research Institute, 84/32, Profsoyuznaya, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Boynton, W.; Fellows, C.; Harshman, K., E-mail: val@mail.ioffe.ru [Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); and others

    2013-08-15

    Between the launch of the Global Geospace Science Wind spacecraft in 1994 November and the end of 2010, the Konus-Wind experiment detected 296 short-duration gamma-ray bursts (including 23 bursts which can be classified as short bursts with extended emission). During this period, the Interplanetary Network (IPN) consisted of up to 11 spacecraft, and using triangulation, the localizations of 271 bursts were obtained. We present the most comprehensive IPN localization data on these events. The short burst detection rate, {approx}18 yr{sup -1}, exceeds that of many individual experiments.

  8. X-ray burst observations of Serpens X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sztajno, M.; Basinska, E. M.; Cominsky, L. R.; Marshall, F. J.; Lewin, W. H. G.

    1983-01-01

    Fifty-seven X-ray bursts observed with SAS 3 in the period 1976 July to 1979 March are reported. Their general features (e.g., maximum burst flux, integrated burst flux, spectral hardness, and rise time) and the relations between them are discussed. Also a comparison is made between these burst features and the associated persistent X-ray flux. The latter appears to be correlated with the maximum burst flux; the temperature of the plasma that produces the persistent flux is roughly proportional to this flux.

  9. Fermi/GAMMA-RAY BURST MONITOR OBSERVATIONS OF SGR J0501+4516 BURSTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Lin; Zhang Shuangnan; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Baring, Matthew G.; Van der Horst, Alexander J.; Finger, Mark H.; Guiriec, Sylvain; Preece, Robert; Chaplin, Vandiver; Bhat, Narayan; Woods, Peter M.; Goegues, Ersin; Kaneko, Yuki; Scargle, Jeffrey; Granot, Jonathan; Von Kienlin, Andreas; Watts, Anna L.; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Gehrels, Neil; Harding, Alice

    2011-01-01

    We present our temporal and spectral analyses of 29 bursts from SGR J0501+4516, detected with the gamma-ray burst monitor on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope during 13 days of the source's activation in 2008 (August 22- September 3). We find that the T 90 durations of the bursts can be fit with a log-normal distribution with a mean value of ∼123 ms. We also estimate for the first time event durations of soft gamma repeater (SGR) bursts in photon space (i.e., using their deconvolved spectra) and find that these are very similar to the T 90 values estimated in count space (following a log-normal distribution with a mean value of ∼124 ms). We fit the time-integrated spectra for each burst and the time-resolved spectra of the five brightest bursts with several models. We find that a single power law with an exponential cutoff model fits all 29 bursts well, while 18 of the events can also be fit with two blackbody functions. We expand on the physical interpretation of these two models and we compare their parameters and discuss their evolution. We show that the time-integrated and time-resolved spectra reveal that E peak decreases with energy flux (and fluence) to a minimum of ∼30 keV at F = 8.7 x 10 -6 erg cm -2 s -1 , increasing steadily afterward. Two more sources exhibit a similar trend: SGRs J1550-5418 and 1806-20. The isotropic luminosity, L iso , corresponding to these flux values is roughly similar for all sources (0.4-1.5 x 10 40 erg s -1 ).

  10. Numerical calculation of a class of highly oscillatory integrals with the Mathieu function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Yongxing

    1992-01-01

    The author describes a method for computing highly oscillatory integrals with the Mathieu function. The practice proves that not only the results are highly satisfactory, but also the method is time-saving

  11. Phenomenological approach to describe oscillatory growth or decay in different dynamical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Dibyendu; Poria, Swarup; Patra, Sankar Narayan

    2016-12-01

    The approach of the phenomenological universalities of growth is considered to describe the behaviour of a system showing an oscillatory growth. Two phenomenological classes are proposed to consider the oscillatory behaviour of a system. One of them is showing oscillatory nature with constant amplitude and the other represents oscillatory nature with a change in amplitude. The term responsible for decay (or growth) in amplitude in the proposed class is also been identified. The variations in the nature of oscillation with the dependent parameters are studied in this communication. In this connection, the variation of a specific growth rate is also been considered. The significance of the presence and the absence of each term involved in the phenomenological description are also taken into consideration. These proposed classes might be useful for the experimentalists to extract a characteristic feature from the data set and to develop a suitable model consistent with their data set.

  12. On the Existence of Oscillatory-Convective Thermohaline Flow in Sedimentary Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, T.; Diersch, H. G.; Simmons, C. T.

    2009-05-01

    In the Earth's crust, both groundwater temperature and salinity increase with depth. As a consequence, water density is variable, thereby creating density-driven thermohaline groundwater flow. While prior steady-state studies of thermohaline flow in porous media identified conductive, oscillatory and convective thermohaline flow modes, the present study numerically analyzes thermohaline flow using a transient approach. We discovered the existence of an oscillatory-convective flow mode within a specific range of thermal and haline Raleigh numbers. Oscillatory-convective thermohaline flow only exists when water temperature and salinity increase with depth (positive RaT, negative RaS). Candidate sedimentary basins of oscillatory-convective thermohaline flow may be found in Western Canada (Alberta), in the Gulf of Mexico, in Northern Germany, or in Australia.

  13. Neural oscillatory deficits in schizophrenia predict behavioral and neurocognitive impairments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antigona eMartinez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Paying attention to visual stimuli is typically accompanied by event-related desynchronizations (ERD of ongoing alpha (7-14 Hz activity in visual cortex. The present study used time-frequency based analyses to investigate the role of impaired alpha ERD in visual processing deficits in schizophrenia (Sz. Subjects viewed sinusoidal gratings of high (HSF and low (LSF spatial frequency designed to test functioning of the parvo- versus magnocellular pathways, respectively. Patients with Sz and healthy controls paid attention selectively to either the LSF or HSF gratings which were presented in random order. Event-related brain potentials (ERPs were recorded to all stimuli. As in our previous study, it was found that Sz patients were selectively impaired at detecting LSF target stimuli and that ERP amplitudes to LSF stimuli were diminished, both for the early sensory-evoked components and for the attend minus unattend difference component (the Selection Negativity, which is generally regarded as a specific index of feature-selective attention. In the time-frequency domain, the differential ERP deficits to LSF stimuli were echoed in a virtually absent theta-band phase locked response to both unattended and attended LSF stimuli (along with relatively intact theta-band activity for HSF stimuli. In contrast to the theta-band evoked responses which were tightly stimulus locked, stimulus-induced desynchronizations of ongoing alpha activity were not tightly stimulus locked and were apparent only in induced power analyses. Sz patients were significantly impaired in the attention-related modulation of ongoing alpha activity for both HSF and LSF stimuli. These deficits correlated with patients’ behavioral deficits in visual information processing as well as with visually based neurocognitive deficits. These findings suggest an additional, pathway-independent, mechanism by which deficits in early visual processing contribute to overall cognitive impairment in

  14. Oscillatory frontal theta responses are increased upon bisensory stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakowitz, O W; Schürmann, M; Başar, E

    2000-05-01

    To investigate the functional correlation of oscillatory EEG components with the interaction of sensory modalities following simultaneous audio-visual stimulation. In an experimental study (15 subjects) we compared auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) and visual evoked potentials (VEPs) to bimodal evoked potentials (BEPs; simultaneous auditory and visual stimulation). BEPs were assumed to be brain responses to complex stimuli as a marker for intermodal associative functioning. Frequency domain analysis of these EPs showed marked theta-range components in response to bimodal stimulation. These theta components could not be explained by linear addition of the unimodal responses in the time domain. Considering topography the increased theta-response showed a remarkable frontality in proximity to multimodal association cortices. Referring to methodology we try to demonstrate that, even if various behavioral correlates of brain oscillations exist, common patterns can be extracted by means of a systems-theoretical approach. Serving as an example of functionally relevant brain oscillations, theta responses could be interpreted as an indicator of associative information processing.

  15. Particle and Blood Cell Dynamics in Oscillatory Flows Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restrepo, Juan M.

    2008-01-01

    Our aim has been to uncover fundamental aspects of the suspension and dislodgement of particles in wall-bounded oscillatory flows, in flows characterized by Reynolds numbers encompassing the situation found in rivers and near shores (and perhaps in some industrial processes). Our research tools are computational and our coverage of parameter space fairly broad. Computational means circumvent many complications that make the measurement of the dynamics of particles in a laboratory setting an impractical task, especially on the broad range of parameter space we plan to report upon. The impact of this work on the geophysical problem of sedimentation is boosted considerably by the fact that the proposed calculations can be considered ab-initio, in the sense that little to no modeling is done in generating dynamics of the particles and of the moving fluid: we use a three-dimensional Navier Stokes solver along with straightforward boundary conditions. Hence, to the extent that Navier Stokes is a model for an ideal incompressible isotropic Newtonian fluid, the calculations yield benchmark values for such things as the drag, buoyancy, and lift of particles, in a highly controlled environment. Our approach will be to make measurements of the lift, drag, and buoyancy of particles, by considering progressively more complex physical configurations and physics.

  16. DYNAMICS OF FLUID IN OSCILLATORY FLOW: THE Z COMPONENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. C. -C. LEE

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In an oscillatory flow, the resistance to flow, more appropriately defined as the impedance to flow, is a function of oscillating frequency, which refers to the harmonic composition of the driving pressure wave. Flow in an elastic tube may be resisted in numerous ways such as the fluid viscosity, fluid inertia and tube elasticity. The concept of impedance arises in the dynamics of the ResistanceInductance-Capacitance. In oscillating flow, these represent the fluid viscosity, inertia and tube elasticity. This paper describes the effects of impedance, or the Z component as described in-text of an oscillating flow in a valveless impedance pump using numerical simulation. A one-dimensional lumpedsystem model is chosen to perform the analysis in this study. The simulation domain is a mimic to known experimental model previously conducted by Lee et.al. [18-21]. Impedance-induced flow has shown to be combined effects of fluid viscosity, inertia and tube elasticity. Results presented are in reasonable agreement with experimental results presented in Ref [21] with an estimate of 16% variance. This simple model has shown to predict results with significant values, using simple approximations; and further the understanding of fluid impedance’s role in a valveless impedance pump.

  17. Microstructure characterization of Cu processed by compression with oscillatory torsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodak, K.; Pawlicki, J.

    2014-01-01

    High purity Cu (99.9%) was subjected to severe plastic deformation up to a total effective strain ε ft = 130 through compression with the oscillatory torsion method at room temperature. This method produces an ultrafine grain microstructure. The microstructure evolution was investigated with respect to the value of the total effective strain using a scanning electron microscope with an electron-backscattered diffraction technique and a scanning transmission electron microscope. The results of the structural analyses show that increasing ε ft from 2 to 50 causes progress in the grain refinement. A quantitative study of the microstructure parameters, such as fraction of high angle boundaries, grain and subgrain diameter, and the area fraction of grains up to 1 μm, shows that deformation at ε ft = 45 guaranteed the best conditions for refining the microstructure of Cu. Using high values of ε ft in the range 60 to 130 restricts grain refinement because intensive recovery begins to dominate in the microstructure. - Highlights: • Cu was processed by SPD metodto an effective strain 130. • The microstructure evolution has been investigated. • The method allows to produce an ultrafine grain microstructure

  18. Microstructure characterization of Cu processed by compression with oscillatory torsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodak, K., E-mail: kinga.rodak@polsl.pl [Institute of Materials Science, Silesian University of Technology, Krasińskiego 8, 40-019 Katowice (Poland); Pawlicki, J., E-mail: jacek.pawlicki@polsl.pl [Department of Automotive Vehicle Construction, Silesian University of Technology, Krasińskiego 8, 40–019 Katowice (Poland)

    2014-08-15

    High purity Cu (99.9%) was subjected to severe plastic deformation up to a total effective strain ε{sub ft} = 130 through compression with the oscillatory torsion method at room temperature. This method produces an ultrafine grain microstructure. The microstructure evolution was investigated with respect to the value of the total effective strain using a scanning electron microscope with an electron-backscattered diffraction technique and a scanning transmission electron microscope. The results of the structural analyses show that increasing ε{sub ft} from 2 to 50 causes progress in the grain refinement. A quantitative study of the microstructure parameters, such as fraction of high angle boundaries, grain and subgrain diameter, and the area fraction of grains up to 1 μm, shows that deformation at ε{sub ft} = 45 guaranteed the best conditions for refining the microstructure of Cu. Using high values of ε{sub ft} in the range 60 to 130 restricts grain refinement because intensive recovery begins to dominate in the microstructure. - Highlights: • Cu was processed by SPD metodto an effective strain 130. • The microstructure evolution has been investigated. • The method allows to produce an ultrafine grain microstructure.

  19. [Emotional intelligence and oscillatory responses on the emotional facial expressions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kniazev, G G; Mitrofanova, L G; Bocharov, A V

    2013-01-01

    Emotional intelligence-related differences in oscillatory responses to emotional facial expressions were investigated in 48 subjects (26 men and 22 women) in age 18-30 years. Participants were instructed to evaluate emotional expression (angry, happy and neutral) of each presented face on an analog scale ranging from -100 (very hostile) to + 100 (very friendly). High emotional intelligence (EI) participants were found to be more sensitive to the emotional content of the stimuli. It showed up both in their subjective evaluation of the stimuli and in a stronger EEG theta synchronization at an earlier (between 100 and 500 ms after face presentation) processing stage. Source localization using sLORETA showed that this effect was localized in the fusiform gyrus upon the presentation of angry faces and in the posterior cingulate gyrus upon the presentation of happy faces. At a later processing stage (500-870 ms) event-related theta synchronization in high emotional intelligence subject was higher in the left prefrontal cortex upon the presentation of happy faces, but it was lower in the anterior cingulate cortex upon presentation of angry faces. This suggests the existence of a mechanism that can be selectively increase the positive emotions and reduce negative emotions.

  20. A review of gamma ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Rees, Martin J

    2000-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts, an enigma for more than 25 years, are now coming into focus. They involve extraordinary power outputs, and highly relativistic dynamics. The 'trigger' involves stellar-mass compact objects. The most plausible progenitors, ranging from neutron star binary mergers to collapsars (sometimes called 'hypernovae') eventually lead to the formation of a black hole with a torus of hot neutron-density material around it, the extractable energy being up to 10 sup 5 sup 4 ergs. Magnetic fields may exceed 10 sup 1 sup 5 G and particles may be accelerated up to > or approx. 10 sup 2 sup 0 eV. Details of the afterglow may be easier to understand than the initial trigger. Bursts at very high redshift can be astronomically-important as probes of the distant universe.

  1. Burst Mode ASIC-Based Modem

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center is sponsoring the Advanced Communication Technology Insertion (ACTION) for Commercial Space Applications program. The goal of the program is to expedite the development of new technology with a clear path towards productization and enhancing the competitiveness of U.S. manufacturers. The industry has made significant investment in developing ASIC-based modem technology for continuous-mode applications and has made investigations into East, reliable acquisition of burst-mode digital communication signals. With rapid advances in analog and digital communications ICs, it is expected that more functions will be integrated onto these parts in the near future. In addition custom ASIC's can also be developed to address the areas not covered by the other IC's. Using the commercial chips and custom ASIC's, lower-cost, compact, reliable, and high-performance modems can be built for demanding satellite communication application. This report outlines a frequency-hop burst modem design based on commercially available chips.

  2. Coherent combining pulse bursts in time domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvanauskas, Almantas

    2018-01-09

    A beam combining and pulse stacking technique is provided that enhances laser pulse energy by coherent stacking pulse bursts (i.e. non-periodic pulsed signals) in time domain. This energy enhancement is achieved by using various configurations of Fabry-Perot, Gires-Tournois and other types of resonant cavities, so that a multiple-pulse burst incident at either a single input or multiple inputs of the system produces an output with a solitary pulse, which contains the summed energy of the incident multiple pulses from all beams. This disclosure provides a substantial improvement over conventional coherent-combining methods in that it achieves very high pulse energies using a relatively small number of combined laser systems, thus providing with orders of magnitude reduction in system size, complexity, and cost compared to current combining approaches.

  3. Explaining fast radio bursts through Dicke's superradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houde, Martin; Mathews, Abhilash; Rajabi, Fereshteh

    2018-03-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs), characterized by strong bursts of radiation intensity at radio wavelengths lasting on the order of a millisecond, have yet to be firmly associated with a family, or families, of astronomical sources. It follows that despite the large number of proposed models, no well-defined physical process has been identified to explain this phenomenon. In this paper, we demonstrate how Dicke's superradiance, for which evidence has recently been found in the interstellar medium, can account for the characteristics associated with FRBs. Our analysis and modelling of previously detected FRBs suggest they could originate from regions in many ways similar to those known to harbour masers or megamasers, and result from the coherent radiation emanating from populations of molecules associated with large-scale entangled quantum mechanical states. We estimate this entanglement to involve as many as ˜1030 to ˜1032 molecules over distances spanning 100-1000 au.

  4. A nonlinear two-species oscillatory system: bifurcation and stability analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. G. Chakrabarti

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper dealing with the nonlinear bifurcation analysis of two-species oscillatory system consists of three parts. The first part deals with Hopf-bifurcation and limit cycle analysis of the homogeneous system. The second consists of travelling wave train solution and its linear stability analysis of the system in presence of diffusion. The last deals with an oscillatory chemical system as an illustrative example.

  5. PRELIMINARY DESIGN OF OSCILLATORY FLOW BIODIESEL REACTOR FOR CONTINUOUS BIODIESEL PRODUCTION FROM JATROPHA TRIGLYCERIDES

    OpenAIRE

    AZHARI T. I. MOHD. GHAZI; M. F. M. GUNAM RESUL; R. YUNUS; T. C. SHEAN YAW

    2008-01-01

    The concept of a continuous process in producing biodiesel from jatropha oil by using an Oscillatory Flow Biodiesel Reactor (OFBR) is discussed in this paper. It has been recognized that the batch stirred reactor is a primary mode used in the synthesis of biodiesel. However, pulsatile flow has been extensively researcehed and the fundamental principles have been successfully developed upon which its hydrodynamics are based. Oscillatory flow biodiesel reactor offers precise control of mixing b...

  6. Oscillatory integrals on Hilbert spaces and Schroedinger equation with magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albeverio, S.; Brzezniak, Z.

    1994-01-01

    We extend the theory of oscillatory integrals on Hilbert spaces (the mathematical version of ''Feynman path integrals'') to cover more general integrable functions, preserving the property of the integrals to have converging finite dimensional approximations. We give an application to the representation of solutions of the time dependent Schroedinger equation with a scalar and a magnetic potential by oscillatory integrals on Hilbert spaces. A relation with Ramer's functional in the corresponding probabilistic setting is found. (orig.)

  7. Digital Analysis of EBW Burst Waveforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lembke; J.R.; Tindall, A.L.; Latimer, C.

    1978-01-01

    A dual-channel digitizing capability has been established to digitally record and analyze electrical waveforms associated with exploding bridgewire (EBW) burst. The system is interfaced to a computer for data management and analysis. Programs for calibration and for analysis of voltage and current waveforms have been written. Error sources have been reduced to an acceptable level, and provisions have been made for generation of a waveform data library.

  8. Identifying crucial parameter correlations maintaining bursting activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Doloc-Mihu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent experimental and computational studies suggest that linearly correlated sets of parameters (intrinsic and synaptic properties of neurons allow central pattern-generating networks to produce and maintain their rhythmic activity regardless of changing internal and external conditions. To determine the role of correlated conductances in the robust maintenance of functional bursting activity, we used our existing database of half-center oscillator (HCO model instances of the leech heartbeat CPG. From the database, we identified functional activity groups of burster (isolated neuron and half-center oscillator model instances and realistic subgroups of each that showed burst characteristics (principally period and spike frequency similar to the animal. To find linear correlations among the conductance parameters maintaining functional leech bursting activity, we applied Principal Component Analysis (PCA to each of these four groups. PCA identified a set of three maximal conductances (leak current, [Formula: see text]Leak; a persistent K current, [Formula: see text]K2; and of a persistent Na+ current, [Formula: see text]P that correlate linearly for the two groups of burster instances but not for the HCO groups. Visualizations of HCO instances in a reduced space suggested that there might be non-linear relationships between these parameters for these instances. Experimental studies have shown that period is a key attribute influenced by modulatory inputs and temperature variations in heart interneurons. Thus, we explored the sensitivity of period to changes in maximal conductances of [Formula: see text]Leak, [Formula: see text]K2, and [Formula: see text]P, and we found that for our realistic bursters the effect of these parameters on period could not be assessed because when varied individually bursting activity was not maintained.

  9. Thermonuclear model for γ-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woosley, S.E.

    1981-01-01

    The evolution of magnetized neutron stars with field strengths of approx. 10 12 gauss that are accreting mass onto kilometer-sized polar regions at a rate of approx. 13 M 0 yr -1 is examined. Based on the results of one-dimensional calculations, one finds that stable hydrogen burning, mediated by the hot CNO-cycle, will lead to a critical helium mass in the range 10 20 to 10 22 g km -2 . Owing to the extreme degeneracy of the electron gas providing pressure support, helium burning occurs as a violent thermonuclear runaway which may propagate either as a convective deflagration (Type I burst) or as a detonation wave (Type II burst). Complete combustion of helium into 56 Ni releases from 10 38 to 10 40 erg km -2 and pushes hot plasma with β > 1 above the surface of the neutron star. Rapid expansion of the plasma channels a substantial fraction of the explosion energy into magnetic field stress. Spectral properties are expected to be complex with emission from both thermal and non-thermal processes. The hard γ-outburst of several seconds softens as the event proceeds and is followed by a period, typically of several minutes duration, of softer x-ray emission as the subsurface ashes of the thermonuclear explosion cool. In this model, most γ-ray bursts currently being observed are located at a distance of several hundred parsecs and should recur on a timescale of months to centuries with convective deflagrations (Type I bursts) being the more common variety. An explanation for Jacobson-like transients is also offered

  10. The cannonball model of gamma ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Dar, Arnon

    2003-01-01

    The cannonball model (CB) of gamma ray bursts (GRBs) is incredibly more successful than the standard blast-wave models (SM) of GRBs, which suffer from profound inadequacies and limited predictive power. The CB model is falsifiable in its hypothesis and results. Its predictions are summarized in simple analytical expressions, derived, in fair approximations, from first principles. It provides a good description on a universal basis of the properties of long-duration GRBs and of their afterglows (AGs).

  11. Adiabatic burst evaporation from bicontinuous nanoporous membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichilmann, Sachar; Rücker, Kerstin; Haase, Markus; Enke, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Evaporation of volatile liquids from nanoporous media with bicontinuous morphology and pore diameters of a few 10 nm is an ubiquitous process. For example, such drying processes occur during syntheses of nanoporous materials by sol–gel chemistry or by spinodal decomposition in the presence of solvents as well as during solution impregnation of nanoporous hosts with functional guests. It is commonly assumed that drying is endothermic and driven by non-equilibrium partial pressures of the evaporating species in the gas phase. We show that nearly half of the liquid evaporates in an adiabatic mode involving burst-like liquid-to-gas conversions. During single adiabatic burst evaporation events liquid volumes of up to 107 μm3 are converted to gas. The adiabatic liquid-to-gas conversions occur if air invasion fronts get unstable because of the built-up of high capillary pressures. Adiabatic evaporation bursts propagate avalanche-like through the nanopore systems until the air invasion fronts have reached new stable configurations. Adiabatic cavitation bursts thus compete with Haines jumps involving air invasion front relaxation by local liquid flow without enhanced mass transport out of the nanoporous medium and prevail if the mean pore diameter is in the range of a few 10 nm. The results reported here may help optimize membrane preparation via solvent-based approaches, solution-loading of nanopore systems with guest materials as well as routine use of nanoporous membranes with bicontinuous morphology and may contribute to better understanding of adsorption/desorption processes in nanoporous media. PMID:25926406

  12. A Burst Chasing X-ray Polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Joanne; Hill, Joe; Barthelmy, S.; Black, K.; Deines-Jones, P.; Jahoda, K.; Sakamoto, T.; Kaaret, P.; McConnell, M.; Bloser, P.; hide

    2007-01-01

    Tihs is a viewgraph presentation of a discussion of the X-ray Polarimeter. Gamma-ray bursts are one of the most powerful explosions in the universe and have been detected out to distances of almost 13 billion light years. The exact origin of these energetic explosions is still unknown but the resulting huge release of energy is thought to create a highly relativistic jet of material and a power-law distribution of electrons. There are several theories describing the origin of the prompt GRB emission that currently cannot be distinguished. Measurements of the linear polarization would provide unique and important constraints on the mechanisms thought to drive these powerful explosions. We present the design of a sensitive, and extremely versatile gamma-ray burst polarimeter. The instrument is a photoelectric polarimeter based on a time-projection chamber. The photoelectric time-projection technique combines high sensitivity with broad band-pass and is potentially the most powerful method between 2 and 100 keV where the photoelectric effect is the dominant interaction process We present measurements of polarized and unpolarized X-rays obtained with a prototype detector and describe the two mission concepts, the Gamma-Ray Burst Polarimeter (GRBP) for thc U S Naval Academy satellite MidSTAR-2, and thc Low Energy Polarimeter (LEP) onboard POET, a broadband polarimetry concept for a small explorer mission.

  13. Automatic Cloud Bursting under FermiCloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hao [Fermilab; Shangping, Ren [IIT; Garzoglio, Gabriele [Fermilab; Timm, Steven [Fermilab; Bernabeu, Gerard [Fermilab; Kim, Hyun Woo; Chadwick, Keith; Jang, Haengjin [KISTI, Daejeon; Noh, Seo-Young [KISTI, Daejeon

    2013-01-01

    Cloud computing is changing the infrastructure upon which scientific computing depends from supercomputers and distributed computing clusters to a more elastic cloud-based structure. The service-oriented focus and elasticity of clouds can not only facilitate technology needs of emerging business but also shorten response time and reduce operational costs of traditional scientific applications. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) is currently in the process of building its own private cloud, FermiCloud, which allows the existing grid infrastructure to use dynamically provisioned resources on FermiCloud to accommodate increased but dynamic computation demand from scientists in the domains of High Energy Physics (HEP) and other research areas. Cloud infrastructure also allows to increase a private cloud’s resource capacity through “bursting” by borrowing or renting resources from other community or commercial clouds when needed. This paper introduces a joint project on building a cloud federation to support HEP applications between Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and Korea Institution of Science and Technology Information, with technical contributions from the Illinois Institute of Technology. In particular, this paper presents two recent accomplishments of the joint project: (a) cloud bursting automation and (b) load balancer. Automatic cloud bursting allows computer resources to be dynamically reconfigured to meet users’ demands. The load balance algorithm which the cloud bursting depends on decides when and where new resources need to be allocated. Our preliminary prototyping and experiments have shown promising success, yet, they also have opened new challenges to be studied

  14. RADIO FLARES FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopač, D.; Mundell, C. G.; Kobayashi, S.; Virgili, F. J. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Harrison, R. [Department of Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel); Japelj, J.; Gomboc, A. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, Jadranska 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Guidorzi, C. [Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, University of Ferrara, Via Saragat, 1, I-44122 Ferrara (Italy); Melandri, A., E-mail: D.Kopac@ljmu.ac.uk [INAF/Brera Astronomical Observatory, via Bianchi 46, I-23807, Merate (Italy)

    2015-06-20

    We present predictions of centimeter and millimeter radio emission from reverse shocks (RSs) in the early afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with the goal of determining their detectability with current and future radio facilities. Using a range of GRB properties, such as peak optical brightness and time, isotropic equivalent gamma-ray energy, and redshift, we simulate radio light curves in a framework generalized for any circumburst medium structure and including a parameterization of the shell thickness regime that is more realistic than the simple assumption of thick- or thin-shell approximations. Building on earlier work by Mundell et al. and Melandri et al. in which the typical frequency of the RS was suggested to lie at radio rather than optical wavelengths at early times, we show that the brightest and most distinct RS radio signatures are detectable up to 0.1–1 day after the burst, emphasizing the need for rapid radio follow-up. Detection is easier for bursts with later optical peaks, high isotropic energies, lower circumburst medium densities, and at observing frequencies that are less prone to synchrotron self-absorption effects—typically above a few GHz. Given recent detections of polarized prompt gamma-ray and optical RS emission, we suggest that detection of polarized radio/millimeter emission will unambiguously confirm the presence of low-frequency RSs at early time.

  15. Black Hole Accretion in Gamma Ray Bursts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Janiuk

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We study the structure and evolution of the hyperaccreting disks and outflows in the gamma ray bursts central engines. The torus around a stellar mass black hole is composed of free nucleons, Helium, electron-positron pairs, and is cooled by neutrino emission. Accretion of matter powers the relativistic jets, responsible for the gamma ray prompt emission. The significant number density of neutrons in the disk and outflowing material will cause subsequent formation of heavier nuclei. We study the process of nucleosynthesis and its possible observational consequences. We also apply our scenario to the recent observation of the gravitational wave signal, detected on 14 September 2015 by the two Advanced LIGO detectors, and related to an inspiral and merger of a binary black hole system. A gamma ray burst that could possibly be related with the GW150914 event was observed by the Fermi satellite. It had a duration of about 1 s and appeared about 0.4 s after the gravitational-wave signal. We propose that a collapsing massive star and a black hole in a close binary could lead to the event. The gamma ray burst was powered by a weak neutrino flux produced in the star remnant’s matter. Low spin and kick velocity of the merged black hole are reproduced in our simulations. Coincident gravitational-wave emission originates from the merger of the collapsed core and the companion black hole.

  16. Content Aware Burst Assembly - Supporting Telesurgery and Telemedicine in Optical Burst Switching Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Orosco

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The emerging Telemedicine and Telesurgery technologies allow patients to share medical experts remotely through communication networks. However, network bandwidth, network latency and jitter (variation of latency, are the obstacles to the widespread use of this technology remotely. Optical Burst Switching (OBS networks greatly expand network bandwidth in existing network infrastructure by utilizing multiple DWDM channels within a single fiber, enabling high bandwidth applications. However, the burst assembly process in OBS networks introduces latency and jitter, making it unsuitable for high bandwidth, latency sensitive applications such as telesurgery and telemedicine. In this paper, we propose a content aware burst assembly scheme which dynamically adjusts the burst assembly parameters based on the content being assembled. The proposed content aware burst assembly minimizes the latency and jitter within a video frame, as well as across the left-view and right-view frames for 3D vision generation. Simulation results have shown that the proposed scheme can effectively reduce the latency and jitter experienced by video streams, making OBS a promising candidate for supporting telesurgery and telemedicine applications.

  17. Secured Hash Based Burst Header Authentication Design for Optical Burst Switched Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balamurugan, A. M.; Sivasubramanian, A.; Parvathavarthini, B.

    2017-12-01

    The optical burst switching (OBS) is a promising technology that could meet the fast growing network demand. They are featured with the ability to meet the bandwidth requirement of applications that demand intensive bandwidth. OBS proves to be a satisfactory technology to tackle the huge bandwidth constraints, but suffers from security vulnerabilities. The objective of this proposed work is to design a faster and efficient burst header authentication algorithm for core nodes. There are two important key features in this work, viz., header encryption and authentication. Since the burst header is an important in optical burst switched network, it has to be encrypted; otherwise it is be prone to attack. The proposed MD5&RC4-4S based burst header authentication algorithm runs 20.75 ns faster than the conventional algorithms. The modification suggested in the proposed RC4-4S algorithm gives a better security and solves the correlation problems between the publicly known outputs during key generation phase. The modified MD5 recommended in this work provides 7.81 % better avalanche effect than the conventional algorithm. The device utilization result also shows the suitability of the proposed algorithm for header authentication in real time applications.

  18. Comparison of air-launched and ground-coupled configurations of SFCW GPR in time, frequency and wavelet domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van De Vijver, Ellen; De Pue, Jan; Cornelis, Wim; Van Meirvenne, Marc

    2015-04-01

    A stepped frequency continuous wave (SFCW) ground penetrating radar (GPR) system produces waveforms consisting of a sequence of sine waves with linearly increasing frequency. By adopting a wide frequency bandwidth, SFCW GPR systems offer an optimal resolution at each achievable measurement depth. Furthermore, these systems anticipate an improved penetration depth and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as compared to time-domain impulse GPRs, because energy is focused in one single frequency at a time and the phase and amplitude of the reflected signal is recorded for each discrete frequency step. However, the search for the optimal practical implementation of SFCW GPR technology to fulfil these theoretical advantages is still ongoing. In this study we compare the performance of a SFCW GPR system for air-launched and ground-coupled antenna configurations. The first is represented by a 3d-Radar Geoscope GS3F system operated with a V1213 antenna array. This array contains 7 transmitting and 7 receiving antennae resulting in 13 measurement channels at a spacing of 0.075 m and providing a total scan width of 0.975 m. The ground-coupled configuration is represented by 3d-Radar's latest-generation SFCW system, GeoScope Mk IV, operated with a DXG1212 antenna array. With 6 transmitting and 5 receiving antennae this array provides 12 measurement channels and an effective scan width of 0.9 m. Both systems were tested on several sites representative of various application environments, including a test site with different road specimens (Belgian Road Research Centre) and two test areas in different agricultural fields in Flanders, Belgium. For each test, data acquisition was performed using the full available frequency bandwidth of the systems (50 to 3000 MHz). Other acquisition parameters such as the frequency step and dwell time were varied in different tests. Analyzing the data of the different tests in time, frequency and wavelet domain allows to evaluate different performance

  19. Type III Radio Burst Duration and SEP Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Makela, P.; Xie, H.

    2010-01-01

    Long-duration (>15 min), low-frequency (SEP events of solar cycle 23. The Type III durations are distributed symmetrically at 1 MHz yielding a mean value of approximately 33 min (median = 32 min) for the large SEP events. When the SEP events with ground level enhancement (GLE,) are considered, the distribution is essentially unchanged (mean = 32 min, median = 30 min). To test the importance of type III bursts in indicating SEP events, we considered a set of six type III bursts from the same active region (AR 10588) whose durations fit the "long duration" criterion. We analyzed the coronal mass ejections (CMEs), flares, and type II radio bursts associated with the type III bursts. The CMEs were of similar speeds and the flares are also of similar size and duration. All but one of the type III bursts was not associated with a type II burst in the metric or longer wavelength domains. The burst without type II burst also lacked a solar energetic particle (SEP) event at energies >25 MeV. The 1-MHz duration of the type III burst (28 rein) is near the median value of type III durations found for gradual SEP events and ground level enhancement (GLE) events. Yet, there was no sign of SEP events. On the other hand, two other type III bursts from the same active region had similar duration but accompanied by WAVES type 11 bursts; these bursts were also accompanied by SEP events detected by SOHO/ERNE. This study suggests that the type III burst duration may not be a good indicator of an SEP event, consistent with the statistical study of Cliver and Ling (2009, ApJ ).

  20. Fluid mechanics experiments in oscillatory flow. Volume 1: Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seume, J.; Friedman, G.; Simon, T. W.

    1992-01-01

    Results of a fluid mechanics measurement program in oscillating flow within a circular duct are presented. The program began with a survey of transition behavior over a range of oscillation frequency and magnitude and continued with a detailed study at a single operating point. Such measurements were made in support of Stirling engine development. Values of three dimensionless parameters, Re(sub max), Re(sub w), and A(sub R), embody the velocity amplitude, frequency of oscillation and mean fluid displacement of the cycle, respectively. Measurements were first made over a range of these parameters which included operating points of all Stirling engines. Next, a case was studied with values of these parameters that are representative of the heat exchanger tubes in the heater section of NASA's Stirling cycle Space Power Research Engine (SPRE). Measurements were taken of the axial and radial components of ensemble-averaged velocity and rms-velocity fluctuation and the dominant Reynolds shear stress, at various radial positions for each of four axial stations. In each run, transition from laminar to turbulent flow, and its reverse, were identified and sufficient data was gathered to propose the transition mechanism. Models of laminar and turbulent boundary layers were used to process the data into wall coordinates and to evaluate skin friction coefficients. Such data aids in validating computational models and is useful in comparing oscillatory flow characteristics to those of fully-developed steady flow. Data were taken with a contoured entry to each end of the test section and with flush square inlets so that the effects of test section inlet geometry on transition and turbulence are documented. Volume 1 contains the text of the report including figures and supporting appendices. Volume 2 contains data reduction program listings and tabulated data (including its graphical presentation).

  1. Autocatalytic, bistable, oscillatory networks of biologically relevant organic reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, Sergey N.; Kraft, Lewis J.; Ainla, Alar; Zhao, Mengxia; Baghbanzadeh, Mostafa; Campbell, Victoria E.; Kang, Kyungtae; Fox, Jerome M.; Whitesides, George M.

    2016-09-01

    Networks of organic chemical reactions are important in life and probably played a central part in its origin. Network dynamics regulate cell division, circadian rhythms, nerve impulses and chemotaxis, and guide the development of organisms. Although out-of-equilibrium networks of chemical reactions have the potential to display emergent network dynamics such as spontaneous pattern formation, bistability and periodic oscillations, the principles that enable networks of organic reactions to develop complex behaviours are incompletely understood. Here we describe a network of biologically relevant organic reactions (amide formation, thiolate-thioester exchange, thiolate-disulfide interchange and conjugate addition) that displays bistability and oscillations in the concentrations of organic thiols and amides. Oscillations arise from the interaction between three subcomponents of the network: an autocatalytic cycle that generates thiols and amides from thioesters and dialkyl disulfides; a trigger that controls autocatalytic growth; and inhibitory processes that remove activating thiol species that are produced during the autocatalytic cycle. In contrast to previous studies that have demonstrated oscillations and bistability using highly evolved biomolecules (enzymes and DNA) or inorganic molecules of questionable biochemical relevance (for example, those used in Belousov-Zhabotinskii-type reactions), the organic molecules we use are relevant to metabolism and similar to those that might have existed on the early Earth. By using small organic molecules to build a network of organic reactions with autocatalytic, bistable and oscillatory behaviour, we identify principles that explain the ways in which dynamic networks relevant to life could have developed. Modifications of this network will clarify the influence of molecular structure on the dynamics of reaction networks, and may enable the design of biomimetic networks and of synthetic self-regulating and evolving

  2. Exercise Oscillatory Ventilation: Interreviewer Agreement and a Novel Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brawner, Clinton A; Ehrman, Jonathan K; Myers, Jonathan; Chase, Paul; Vainshelboim, Baruch; Farha, Shadi; Saval, Matthew A; McGuire, Rita; Pozehl, Bunny; Keteyian, Steven J

    2018-02-01

    Determination of exercise oscillatory ventilation (EOV) is subjective, and the interreviewer agreement has not been reported. The purposes of this study were, among patients with heart failure (HF), as follows: 1) to determine the interreviewer agreement for EOV and 2) to describe a novel, objective, and quantifiable measure of EOV. This was a secondary analysis of the HEART Camp: Promoting Adherence to Exercise in Patients with Heart Failure study. EOV was determined through a blinded review by six individuals on the basis of their interpretation of the EOV literature. Interreviewer agreement was assessed using Fleiss kappa (κ). Final determination of EOV was based on agreement by four of the six reviewers. A new measure (ventilation dispersion index; VDI) was calculated for each test, and its ability to predict EOV was assessed with the receiver operator characteristics curve. Among 243 patients with HF (age, 60 ± 12 yr; 45% women), the interreviewer agreement for EOV was fair (κ = 0.303) with 10-s discrete data averages and significantly better, but only moderate (κ = 0.429) with 30-s rolling data averages. Prevalence rates of positive and indeterminate EOVs were 18% and 30% with the 10-s discrete averages and 14% and 13% with the 30-s rolling averages, respectively. VDI was strongly associated with EOV, with areas under the receiver operator characteristics curve of 0.852 to 0.890. Interreviewer agreement for EOV in patients with HF is fair to moderate, which can negatively affect risk stratification. VDI has strong predictive validity with EOV; as such, it might be a useful measure of prognosis in patients with HF.

  3. Fluid mechanics experiments in oscillatory flow. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seume, J.; Friedman, G.; Simon, T.W.

    1992-03-01

    Results of a fluid mechanics measurement program is oscillating flow within a circular duct are present. The program began with a survey of transition behavior over a range of oscillation frequency and magnitude and continued with a detailed study at a single operating point. Such measurements were made in support of Stirling engine development. Values of three dimensionless parameters, Re max , Re W , and A R , embody the velocity amplitude, frequency of oscillation and mean fluid displacement of the cycle, respectively. Measurements were first made over a range of these parameters which included operating points of all Stirling engines. Next, a case was studied with values of these parameters that are representative of the heat exchanger tubes in the heater section of NASA's Stirling cycle Space Power Research Engine (SPRE). Measurements were taken of the axial and radical components of ensemble-averaged velocity and rms-velocity fluctuation and the dominant Reynolds shear stress, at various radial positions for each of four axial stations. In each run, transition from laminar to turbulent flow, and in reverse, were identified and sufficient data was gathered to propose the transition mechanism. Models of laminar and turbulent boundary layers were used to process the data into wall coordinates and to evaluate skin friction coefficients. Such data aids in validating computational models and is useful in comparing oscillatory flow characteristics to those of fully-developed steady flow. Data were taken with a contoured entry to each end of the test section and with flush square inlets so that the effects of test section inlet geometry on transition and turbulence are documented. The following is presented in two-volumes. Volume I contains the text of the report including figures and supporting appendices. Volume II contains data reduction program listings and tabulated data (including its graphical presentation)

  4. Exploring the Pulse Structure of the Gamma-Ray Bursts from the Swift Burst Alert Telescop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Juan-Carlos; Team 1: Jon Hakkila, Amy Lien, Judith, Racusin, Team 2: Antonino Cucchiara, David Morris

    2018-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are one of the brightest and most intense explosions in our universe. For this project, we studied the shape of 400 single pulse GRBs using data gathered from Swift's Burst Alert Telescope (BAT). Hakkila et al. (2015) have discovered a mathematical Model that describes the GRB’s pulse shapes. Following the method in Hakkila et al. (2015), we fit GRB pulses with the Norris function and examined the residual in the fitting, to see whether the results are consistent with the one reported in Hakkila et al. (2015).

  5. Horizontal Synchronization of Neuronal Activity in the Barrel Cortex of the Neonatal Rat by Spindle-Burst Oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchkov, Dmitrii; Sharipzyanova, Lyaila; Minlebaev, Marat

    2018-01-01

    During development, activity in the somatosensory cortex is characterized by intermittent oscillatory bursts at gamma (early gamma-oscillations, EGOs) and alpha–beta (spindle-bursts, SBs) frequencies. Here, we explored the topography of EGOs and SBs in the neighbor barrels of the whisker-related barrel cortex of neonatal rats (P4-7) during responses evoked by simultaneous activation of multiple whiskers as it occurs during natural conditions. We found that brief simultaneous deflection of all whiskers evoked complex neuronal responses comprised of EGOs and SBs. In contrast to EGOs, that specifically synchronized neuronal activity in each individual barrel, SBs efficiently synchronized activity between neighboring barrels. After plucking a single whisker, synchronous stimulation of spared whiskers evoked EGO-lacking responses in the whisker-deprived barrel, even though the remaining neuronal activity was synchronized by SBs in neighboring barrels. Thus, EGOs specifically support topographic synchronization of neuronal activity within barrels, whereas SBs support horizontal synchronization between neighboring barrels during stimulation of multiple whiskers. We suggest that these two co-existing activity patterns coordinate activity-dependent formation of topographic maps and support the emergence of integrative functions in the primary somatosensory cortex during the critical period of somatosensory maps development. PMID:29403359

  6. Horizontal Synchronization of Neuronal Activity in the Barrel Cortex of the Neonatal Rat by Spindle-Burst Oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitrii Suchkov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available During development, activity in the somatosensory cortex is characterized by intermittent oscillatory bursts at gamma (early gamma-oscillations, EGOs and alpha–beta (spindle-bursts, SBs frequencies. Here, we explored the topography of EGOs and SBs in the neighbor barrels of the whisker-related barrel cortex of neonatal rats (P4-7 during responses evoked by simultaneous activation of multiple whiskers as it occurs during natural conditions. We found that brief simultaneous deflection of all whiskers evoked complex neuronal responses comprised of EGOs and SBs. In contrast to EGOs, that specifically synchronized neuronal activity in each individual barrel, SBs efficiently synchronized activity between neighboring barrels. After plucking a single whisker, synchronous stimulation of spared whiskers evoked EGO-lacking responses in the whisker-deprived barrel, even though the remaining neuronal activity was synchronized by SBs in neighboring barrels. Thus, EGOs specifically support topographic synchronization of neuronal activity within barrels, whereas SBs support horizontal synchronization between neighboring barrels during stimulation of multiple whiskers. We suggest that these two co-existing activity patterns coordinate activity-dependent formation of topographic maps and support the emergence of integrative functions in the primary somatosensory cortex during the critical period of somatosensory maps development.

  7. Machine-based classification of ADHD and nonADHD participants using time/frequency features of event-related neuroelectric activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztoprak, Hüseyin; Toycan, Mehmet; Alp, Yaşar Kemal; Arıkan, Orhan; Doğutepe, Elvin; Karakaş, Sirel

    2017-12-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most frequent diagnosis among children who are referred to psychiatry departments. Although ADHD was discovered at the beginning of the 20th century, its diagnosis is still confronted with many problems. A novel classification approach that discriminates ADHD and nonADHD groups over the time-frequency domain features of event-related potential (ERP) recordings that are taken during Stroop task is presented. Time-Frequency Hermite-Atomizer (TFHA) technique is used for the extraction of high resolution time-frequency domain features that are highly localized in time-frequency domain. Based on an extensive investigation, Support Vector Machine-Recursive Feature Elimination (SVM-RFE) was used to obtain the best discriminating features. When the best three features were used, the classification accuracy for the training dataset reached 98%, and the use of five features further improved the accuracy to 99.5%. The accuracy was 100% for the testing dataset. Based on extensive experiments, the delta band emerged as the most contributing frequency band and statistical parameters emerged as the most contributing feature group. The classification performance of this study suggests that TFHA can be employed as an auxiliary component of the diagnostic and prognostic procedures for ADHD. The features obtained in this study can potentially contribute to the neuroelectrical understanding and clinical diagnosis of ADHD. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. PWR clad ballooning: The effect of circumferential clad temperature variations on the burst strain/burst temperature relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barlow, P.

    1983-01-01

    By experiment, it has been shown by other workers that there is a reduction in the creep ductility of Zircaloy 4 in the α+β phase transition region. Results from single rod burst tests also show a reduction in burst strain in the α+β phase region. In this report it is shown theoretically that for single rod burst tests in the presence of circumferential temperature gradients, the temperature dependence of the mean burst strain is not determined by temperature variations in creep ductility, but is governed by the temperature sensitivity of the creep strain rate, which is shown to be a maximum in the α+β phase transition region. To demonstrate this effect, the mean clad strain at burst was calculated for creep straining at different temperature levels in the α, α+β and β phase regions. Cross-pin temperature gradients were applied which produced strain variations around the clad which were greatest in the α+β phase region. The mean strain at burst was determined using a maximum local burst strain (i.e. a creep ductility) which is independent of temperature. By assuming cross-pin temperature gradients which are typical of those observed during burst tests, then the calculated mean burst strain/burst temperature relationship gave good agreement with experiment. The calculations also show that when circumferential temperature differences are present, the calculated mean strain at burst is not sensitive to variations in the magnitude of the assumed creep ductility. This reduces the importance of the assumed burst criterion in the calculations. Hence a temperature independent creep ductility (e.g. 100% local strain) is adequate as a burst criterion for calculations under PWR LOCA conditions. (author)

  9. Psychoacoustic Tinnitus Loudness and Tinnitus-Related Distress Show Different Associations with Oscillatory Brain Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkenhol, Tobias; Wallhäusser-Franke, Elisabeth; Delb, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Background The phantom auditory perception of subjective tinnitus is associated with aberrant brain activity as evidenced by magneto- and electroencephalographic studies. We tested the hypotheses (1) that psychoacoustically measured tinnitus loudness is related to gamma oscillatory band power, and (2) that tinnitus loudness and tinnitus-related distress are related to distinct brain activity patterns as suggested by the distinction between loudness and distress experienced by tinnitus patients. Furthermore, we explored (3) how hearing impairment, minimum masking level, and (4) psychological comorbidities are related to spontaneous oscillatory brain activity in tinnitus patients. Methods and Findings Resting state oscillatory brain activity recorded electroencephalographically from 46 male tinnitus patients showed a positive correlation between gamma band oscillations and psychoacoustic tinnitus loudness determined with the reconstructed tinnitus sound, but not with the other psychoacoustic loudness measures that were used. Tinnitus-related distress did also correlate with delta band activity, but at electrode positions different from those associated with tinnitus loudness. Furthermore, highly distressed tinnitus patients exhibited a higher level of theta band activity. Moreover, mean hearing loss between 0.125 kHz and 16 kHz was associated with a decrease in gamma activity, whereas minimum masking levels correlated positively with delta band power. In contrast, psychological comorbidities did not express significant correlations with oscillatory brain activity. Conclusion Different clinically relevant tinnitus characteristics show distinctive associations with spontaneous brain oscillatory power. Results support hypothesis (1), but exclusively for the tinnitus loudness derived from matching to the reconstructed tinnitus sound. This suggests to preferably use the reconstructed tinnitus spectrum to determine psychoacoustic tinnitus loudness. Results also support

  10. Adapted wavelet transform improves time-frequency representations: a study of auditory elicited P300-like event-related potentials in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Nelly; Laursen, Bettina; Grupe, Morten; Drewes, Asbjørn M.; Graversen, Carina; Sørensen, Helge B. D.; Bastlund, Jesper F.

    2017-04-01

    Objective. Active auditory oddball paradigms are simple tone discrimination tasks used to study the P300 deflection of event-related potentials (ERPs). These ERPs may be quantified by time-frequency analysis. As auditory stimuli cause early high frequency and late low frequency ERP oscillations, the continuous wavelet transform (CWT) is often chosen for decomposition due to its multi-resolution properties. However, as the conventional CWT traditionally applies only one mother wavelet to represent the entire spectrum, the time-frequency resolution is not optimal across all scales. To account for this, we developed and validated a novel method specifically refined to analyse P300-like ERPs in rats. Approach. An adapted CWT (aCWT) was implemented to preserve high time-frequency resolution across all scales by commissioning of multiple wavelets operating at different scales. First, decomposition of simulated ERPs was illustrated using the classical CWT and the aCWT. Next, the two methods were applied to EEG recordings obtained from prefrontal cortex in rats performing a two-tone auditory discrimination task. Main results. While only early ERP frequency changes between responses to target and non-target tones were detected by the CWT, both early and late changes were successfully described with strong accuracy by the aCWT in rat ERPs. Increased frontal gamma power and phase synchrony was observed particularly within theta and gamma frequency bands during deviant tones. Significance. The study suggests superior performance of the aCWT over the CWT in terms of detailed quantification of time-frequency properties of ERPs. Our methodological investigation indicates that accurate and complete assessment of time-frequency components of short-time neural signals is feasible with the novel analysis approach which may be advantageous for characterisation of several types of evoked potentials in particularly rodents.

  11. Emergent synchronous bursting of oxytocin neuronal network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Rossoni

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available When young suckle, they are rewarded intermittently with a let-down of milk that results from reflex secretion of the hormone oxytocin; without oxytocin, newly born young will die unless they are fostered. Oxytocin is made by magnocellular hypothalamic neurons, and is secreted from their nerve endings in the pituitary in response to action potentials (spikes that are generated in the cell bodies and which are propagated down their axons to the nerve endings. Normally, oxytocin cells discharge asynchronously at 1-3 spikes/s, but during suckling, every 5 min or so, each discharges a brief, intense burst of spikes that release a pulse of oxytocin into the circulation. This reflex was the first, and is perhaps the best, example of a physiological role for peptide-mediated communication within the brain: it is coordinated by the release of oxytocin from the dendrites of oxytocin cells; it can be facilitated by injection of tiny amounts of oxytocin into the hypothalamus, and it can be blocked by injection of tiny amounts of oxytocin antagonist. Here we show how synchronized bursting can arise in a neuronal network model that incorporates basic observations of the physiology of oxytocin cells. In our model, bursting is an emergent behaviour of a complex system, involving both positive and negative feedbacks, between many sparsely connected cells. The oxytocin cells are regulated by independent afferent inputs, but they interact by local release of oxytocin and endocannabinoids. Oxytocin released from the dendrites of these cells has a positive-feedback effect, while endocannabinoids have an inhibitory effect by suppressing the afferent input to the cells.

  12. Infrared and X-ray bursts from the rapid burster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apparao, K.M.V.; Chitre, S.M.

    1979-01-01

    Studies on sudden bursts from the cosmic X-ray sources are reported. The processes occuring from the rise in luminosity of an x-ray source to its collapse are described. Records of the x-ray burst from the globular cluster NGC 6624 and the 'Rapid Burster' are shown. The Infra-red bursts from the Rapid Burster are also explained. (A.K.)

  13. Physical characterization of the Skua fast burst assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paternoster, R.; Bounds, J.; Sanchez, R.; Miko, D.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the system design and ongoing efforts to characterize the machine physics and operating properties of the Skua fast burst assembly. The machine is currently operating up to prompt critical while we await approval for super-prompt burst operations. Efforts have centered on characterizing neutron kinetic properties, comparing calculated and measured temperature coefficients and power distributions, improving the burst reproducibility, examining the site-wide dose characteristics, and fitting the machine with cooling and filtration systems

  14. The velocities of type II solar radio bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tlamicha, A.; Karlicky, M.

    1976-01-01

    A list is presented of type II radio bursts identified at Ondrejov between January 1973 and December 1974 in the frequency range of the dynamic spectrum 70 to 810 MHz. The velocities of shock waves in the individual cases of type II bursts are given using the fourfold Newkirk model. Some problems associated with type II radio bursts and with the propagation of the shock wave into the interplanetary space and into the region of the Earth are also discussed. (author)

  15. Detecting Pipe Bursts Using Heuristic and CUSUM Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Bakker, M.; Jung, D.; Vreeburg, J.; van de Roer, M.; Lansey, K.; Rietveld, L.

    2014-01-01

    Pipe bursts in a drinking water distribution system lead to water losses, interruption of supply, and damage to streets and houses due to the uncontrolled water flow. To minimize the negative consequences of pipe bursts, an early detection is necessary. This paper describes a heuristic burst detection method, which continuously compares forecasted and measured values of the water demand. The forecasts of the water demand were generated by an adaptive water demand forecasting model. To test th...

  16. Self-regulation of turbulence bursts and transport barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floriani, E; Ciraolo, G; Ghendrih, Ph; Sarazin, Y; Lima, R

    2013-01-01

    The interplay between turbulent bursts and transport barriers is analyzed with a simplified model of interchange turbulence in magnetically confined plasmas. The turbulent bursts spread into the transport barriers and, depending on the competing magnitude of the burst and stopping capability of the barrier, can burn through. Simulations of two models of transport barriers are presented: a hard barrier where interchange turbulence modes are stable in a prescribed region and a soft barrier with external plasma biasing. The response of the transport barriers to the non-linear perturbations of the turbulent bursts, addressed in a predator–prey approach, indicates that the barriers monitor an amplification factor of the turbulent bursts, with amplification smaller than one for most bursts and, in some cases, amplification factors that can significantly exceed unity. The weak barriers in corrugated profiles and magnetic structures, as well as the standard barriers, are characterized by these transmission properties, which then regulate the turbulent burst transport properties. The interplays of barriers and turbulent bursts are modeled as competing stochastic processes. For different classes of the probability density function (PDF) of these processes, one can predict the heavy tail properties of the bursts downstream from the barrier, either exponential for a leaky barrier, or with power laws for a tight barrier. The intrinsic probing of the transport barriers by the turbulent bursts thus gives access to the properties of the barriers. The main stochastic variables are the barrier width and the spreading distance of the turbulent bursts within the barrier, together with their level of correlation. One finds that in the case of a barrier with volumetric losses, such as radiation or particle losses as addressed in our present simulations, the stochastic model predicts a leaky behavior with an exponential PDF of escaping turbulent bursts in agreement with the simulation

  17. Burst Alert Robotic Telescope and Optical Afterglows

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nekola, Martin; Hudec, René; Jelínek, M.; Kubánek, P.; Polášek, Cyril; Štrobl, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 18, 3/4 (2009), s. 374-378 ISSN 1392-0049. [INTEGRAL/BART workshop 2009. Karlovy Vary, 26.03.2009-29.03.2009] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/08/1207 Grant - others:ESA(XE) ESA-PECS project No. 98023; Spanish Ministry of Education and Science(ES) AP2003-1407 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : gamma rays bursts, * observations * robotic telescopes Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 1.032, year: 2009

  18. Bursting frequency prediction in turbulent boundary layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LIOU,WILLIAM W.; FANG,YICHUNG

    2000-02-01

    The frequencies of the bursting events associated with the streamwise coherent structures of spatially developing incompressible turbulent boundary layers were predicted using global numerical solution of the Orr-Sommerfeld and the vertical vorticity equations of hydrodynamic stability problems. The structures were modeled as wavelike disturbances associated with the turbulent mean flow. The global method developed here involves the use of second and fourth order accurate finite difference formula for the differential equations as well as the boundary conditions. An automated prediction tool, BURFIT, was developed. The predicted resonance frequencies were found to agree very well with previous results using a local shooting technique and measured data.

  19. Prompt Emission Observations of Swift BAT Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthelmy, Scott

    2009-01-01

    We review the prompt emission properties of Swift BAT gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We present the global properties of BAT GRBs based on their spectral and temporal characteristics. The BAT T90 and T50 durations peak at 80 and 20 s, respectively. The peak energy (Epeak) of about 60% of BAT GRBs is very likely to be less than 1.00 keV. We also present the BAT characteristics of GRBs with soft spectra, so called Xray flashes (XRFs). We will compare the BAT GRBs and XRFs parameter distribution to the other missions.

  20. Decay time of type III solar bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, H.; Haddock, F.T.

    1972-01-01

    Sixty-four Type III bursts that drifted to frequencies below 600 kHz between March 1968 and February 1970 were analyzed. Decay times were measured and combined with published data ranging up to about 200 MHz. By fitting power functions to the computed and observed decay times, and using the local plasma hypothesis, it was found that the ratio rho of computed to observed values varies with radiocentric radial distance according to a power function rho = 3r 0 . 7 . (U.S.)

  1. Burst-Mode Asynchronous Controllers on FPGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duarte L. Oliveira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available FPGAs have been mainly used to design synchronous circuits. Asynchronous design on FPGAs is difficult because the resulting circuit may suffer from hazard problems. We propose a method that implements a popular class of asynchronous circuits, known as burst mode, on FPGAs based on look-up table architectures. We present two conditions that, if satisfied, guarantee essential hazard-free implementation on any LUT-based FPGA. By doing that, besides all the intrinsic advantages of asynchronous over synchronous circuits, they also take advantage of the shorter design time and lower cost associated with FPGA designs.

  2. Decreased Power but Preserved Bursting Features of Subthalamic Neuronal Signals in Advanced Parkinson's Patients under Controlled Desflurane Inhalation Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Huang Lin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Deep brain stimulation (DBS surgery of the subthalamic nucleus (STN under general anesthesia (GA had been used in Parkinson's disease (PD patients who are unable tolerate awake surgery. The effect of anesthetics on intraoperative microelectrode recording (MER remains unclear. Understanding the effect of anesthetics on MER is important in performing STN DBS surgery with general anesthesia. In this study, we retrospectively performed qualitive and quantitative analysis of STN MER in PD patients received STN DBS with controlled desflurane anesthesia or LA and compared their clinical outcome. From January 2005 to March 2006, 19 consecutive PD patients received bilateral STN DBS surgery in Hualien Tzu-Chi hospital under either desflurane GA (n = 10 or LA (n = 9. We used spike analysis (frequency and modified burst index [MBI] and the Hilbert transform to obtain signal power measurements for background and spikes, and compared the characterizations of intraoperative microelectrode signals between the two groups. Additionally, STN firing pattern characteristics were determined using a combined approach based on the autocorrelogram and power spectral analysis, which was employed to investigate differences in the oscillatory activities between the groups. Clinical outcomes were assessed using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS before and after surgery. The results revealed burst firing was observed in both groups. The firing frequencies were greater in the LA group and MBI was comparable in both groups. Both the background and spikes were of significantly greater power in the LA group. The power spectra of the autocorrelograms were significantly higher in the GA group between 4 and 8 Hz. Clinical outcomes based on the UPDRS were comparable in both groups before and after DBS surgery. Under controlled light desflurane GA, burst features of the neuronal firing patterns are preserved in the STN, but power is reduced. Enhanced low

  3. The Second SWIFT Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, T.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Baumgartner, W. H.; Cummings, J. R.; Fenimore, E. E.; Gehrels, N.; Krimm, H. A.; Markwardt, C. B.; Palmer, D. M.; Parsons, A. M.; hide

    2012-01-01

    We present the second Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) catalog of gamma-ray bursts. (GRBs), which contains 476 bursts detected by the BAT between 2004 December 19 and 2009 December 21. This catalog (hereafter the BAT2 catalog) presents burst trigger time, location, 90% error radius, duration, fluence, peak flux, time-averaged spectral parameters and time-resolved spectral parameters measured by the BAT. In the correlation study of various observed parameters extracted from the BAT prompt emission data, we distinguish among long-duration GRBs (L-GRBs), short-duration GRBs (S-GRBs), and short-duration GRBs with extended emission (S-GRBs with E.E.) to investigate differences in the prompt emission properties. The fraction of L-GRBs, S-GRBs and S-GRBs with E.E. in the catalog are 89%, 8% and 2% respectively. We compare the BAT prompt emission properties with the BATSE, BeppoSAX and HETE-2 GRB samples.. We also correlate the observed prompt emission properties with the redshifts for the GRBs with known redshift. The BAT T(sub 90) and T(sub 50) durations peak at 70 s and 30 s, respectively. We confirm that the spectra of the BAT S-GRBs are generally harder than those of the L-GRBs.

  4. Limits of the memory coefficient in measuring correlated bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Hang-Hyun; Hiraoka, Takayuki

    2018-03-01

    Temporal inhomogeneities in event sequences of natural and social phenomena have been characterized in terms of interevent times and correlations between interevent times. The inhomogeneities of interevent times have been extensively studied, while the correlations between interevent times, often called correlated bursts, are far from being fully understood. For measuring the correlated bursts, two relevant approaches were suggested, i.e., memory coefficient and burst size distribution. Here a burst size denotes the number of events in a bursty train detected for a given time window. Empirical analyses have revealed that the larger memory coefficient tends to be associated with the heavier tail of the burst size distribution. In particular, empirical findings in human activities appear inconsistent, such that the memory coefficient is close to 0, while burst size distributions follow a power law. In order to comprehend these observations, by assuming the conditional independence between consecutive interevent times, we derive the analytical form of the memory coefficient as a function of parameters describing interevent time and burst size distributions. Our analytical result can explain the general tendency of the larger memory coefficient being associated with the heavier tail of burst size distribution. We also find that the apparently inconsistent observations in human activities are compatible with each other, indicating that the memory coefficient has limits to measure the correlated bursts.

  5. Frequency of fast, narrow γ-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, J.P.; Maryland Univ., College Park; Cline, T.L.; Desai, U.D.; Teegarden, B.J.

    1984-01-01

    The paper describes the existence of two γ-ray burst populations detected by the ISEE-3 experiment. Data from the distribution of 123 Venera 13 and 14 events (60 detected by both spacecraft) also suggests two γ-ray burst populations in each experiment sample, the domains separated with a minimum near 1 or 2 s. The authors point out that the results of the Goddard ISEE-3 γ-ray burst spectrometer actually enhance the appearance of two burst populations suggested in the Venera data. (author)

  6. Observations of cosmic gamma ray bursts with WATCH on EURECA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, N.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    19 Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts were detected by the WATCH wide field X-ray monitor during the 11 months flight of EURECA. The identification of the bursts were complicated by a high frequency of background of events caused by high energy cosmic ray interactions in the detector and by low energy......, trapped particle streams. These background events may simulate the count rate increases characteristic of cosmic gamma bursts. For 12 of the detected events, their true cosmic nature have been confirmed through consistent localizations of the burst sources based on several independent WATCH data sets...

  7. Burst-Compression And -Expansion For TDMA Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budinger, James M.

    1991-01-01

    Burst-compression and -expansion technique enables interconnection of users transmitting and receiving data at rates asynchronous with respect to clocks within ground terminals of satellite-switched, time-division-multiple-access (TDMA) communication network. Matrix switch aboard satellite routes bursts of data from source users received on uplink antennas to downlink antennas illuminating ground areas containing destination users. TDMA ground terminal compresses streams of data from source users into rapid bursts for transmission and reexpands bursts of received data into slower streams of data for delivery to destination users. Greater flexibility in interconnecting widely dispersed users achieved by use of hopping beams.

  8. Study on cosmic gamma bursts in the ''KONUS'' experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazets, E.P.; Golenetskij, S.V.; Il'inskij, V.N.; Panov, V.N.; Aptekar', R.L.; Gur'yan, Yu.A.; Sokolov, I.A.; Sokolova, Z.Ya.; Kharitonova, T.V.

    1979-01-01

    Made are the investigations of cosmic gamma bursts with the help of the ''Konus'' apparatus, positioned on the ''Venera 11'' and ''Venera 12'' automatic interplanetary stations. 37 gamma bursts have been recorded in the energy range from 50 to 150 keV during the observation period from September to December 1978. Time profiles of bursts on 4, 9 and 24.11.1978 are presented. For the most events the time of burst increase and decrease constitute parts and units of seconds. Differential energy spectra are measured for all recorded bursts. In many cases the spectrum shape is similar to the grade one with the 1.5-2.3 index. In a graphical form built up are the integral distributions of gamma bursts appearence frequency in dependence on their intensity and maximum capacity in the burst peak. Galaxy coordinates of the 17-teen bursts, for which a simple localization is possible, are put on the celestial sphere map. The type of the integral distributions and the source distribution about the celestial sphere show that the gamma burst sources are whithin the Galaxy

  9. Interactions among oscillatory pathways in NF-kappa B signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    White Michael RH

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sustained stimulation with tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha induces substantial oscillations—observed at both the single cell and population levels—in the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B system. Although the mechanism has not yet been elucidated fully, a core system has been identified consisting of a negative feedback loop involving NF-kappa B (RelA:p50 hetero-dimer and its inhibitor I-kappa B-alpha. Many authors have suggested that this core oscillator should couple to other oscillatory pathways. Results First we analyse single-cell data from experiments in which the NF-kappa B system is forced by short trains of strong pulses of TNF-alpha. Power spectra of the ratio of nuclear-to-cytoplasmic concentration of NF-kappa B suggest that the cells' responses are entrained by the pulsing frequency. Using a recent model of the NF-kappa B system due to Caroline Horton, we carried out extensive numerical simulations to analyze the response frequencies induced by trains of pulses of TNF-alpha stimulation having a wide range of frequencies and amplitudes. These studies suggest that for sufficiently weak stimulation, various nonlinear resonances should be observable. To explore further the possibility of probing alternative feedback mechanisms, we also coupled the model to sinusoidal signals with a wide range of strengths and frequencies. Our results show that, at least in simulation, frequencies other than those of the forcing and the main NF-kappa B oscillator can be excited via sub- and superharmonic resonance, producing quasiperiodic and even chaotic dynamics. Conclusions Our numerical results suggest that the entrainment phenomena observed in pulse-stimulated experiments is a consequence of the high intensity of the stimulation. Computational studies based on current models suggest that resonant interactions between periodic pulsatile forcing and the system's natural frequencies may become evident for sufficiently

  10. How brain oscillations form memories--a processing based perspective on oscillatory subsequent memory effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanslmayr, Simon; Staudigl, Tobias

    2014-01-15

    Brain oscillations are increasingly recognized by memory researchers as a useful tool to unravel the neural mechanisms underlying the formation of a memory trace. However, the increasing numbers of published studies paint a rather complex picture of the relation between brain oscillations and memory formation. Concerning oscillatory amplitude, for instance, increases as well as decreases in various frequency bands (theta, alpha, beta and gamma) were associated with memory formation. These results cast doubt on frameworks putting forward the idea of an oscillatory signature that is uniquely related to memory formation. In an attempt to clarify this issue we here provide an alternative perspective, derived from classic cognitive frameworks/principles of memory. On the basis of Craik's levels of processing framework and Tulving's encoding specificity principle we hypothesize that brain oscillations during encoding might primarily reflect the perceptual and cognitive processes engaged by the encoding task. These processes may then lead to later successful retrieval depending on their overlap with the processes engaged by the memory test. As a consequence, brain oscillatory correlates of memory formation could vary dramatically depending on how the memory is encoded, and on how it is being tested later. Focusing on oscillatory amplitude changes and on theta-to-gamma cross-frequency coupling, we here review recent evidence showing how brain oscillatory subsequent memory effects can be modulated, and sometimes even be reversed, by varying encoding tasks, and the contextual overlap between encoding and retrieval. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Separating Fractal and Oscillatory Components in the Power Spectrum of Neurophysiological Signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Haiguang; Liu, Zhongming

    2016-01-01

    Neurophysiological field-potential signals consist of both arrhythmic and rhythmic patterns indicative of the fractal and oscillatory dynamics arising from likely distinct mechanisms. Here, we present a new method, namely the irregular-resampling auto-spectral analysis (IRASA), to separate fractal and oscillatory components in the power spectrum of neurophysiological signal according to their distinct temporal and spectral characteristics. In this method, we irregularly resampled the neural signal by a set of non-integer factors, and statistically summarized the auto-power spectra of the resampled signals to separate the fractal component from the oscillatory component in the frequency domain. We tested this method on simulated data and demonstrated that IRASA could robustly separate the fractal component from the oscillatory component. In addition, applications of IRASA to macaque electrocorticography and human magnetoencephalography data revealed a greater power-law exponent of fractal dynamics during sleep compared to wakefulness. The temporal fluctuation in the broadband power of the fractal component revealed characteristic dynamics within and across the eyes-closed, eyes-open and sleep states. These results demonstrate the efficacy and potential applications of this method in analyzing electrophysiological signatures of large-scale neural circuit activity. We expect that the proposed method or its future variations would potentially allow for more specific characterization of the differential contributions of oscillatory and fractal dynamics to distributed neural processes underlying various brain functions.

  12. Star bursts and giant HII regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagel, B.E.J.

    1990-01-01

    Massive star formation bursts occur in a variety of galactic environments and can temporarily dominate the light output of a galaxy even when a relatively small proportion of its mass is involved. Inferences about their ages, the IMF and its dependence on chemical composition are still somewhat wobbly owing to an excess of unknowns, but certain things can be deduced from emission spectra of associated H II regions when due regard is paid to the effects of chemical composition and ionization parameter: In particular, largest ionization parameters and effective temperatures of exciting stars, at any given oxygen abundance, are anti-correlated with the abundance, and the second effect suggests an increasing proportion of more massive stars at lower abundances, although this is not yet satisfactorily quantified. A new blue compact galaxies could be very young, but it is equally possible that there is an older population of low surface brightness. Some giant H II regions may be self-polluted with nitrogen and helium due to winds from massive stars in the associated burst. (orig.)

  13. Bouncing and bursting in a wedge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyssat, Etienne; Cohen, Caroline; Quere, David

    2015-11-01

    Placed into an inhomogeneous confined medium, non-wetting drops tend to be expelled from the tightest regions, where their contact with the walls would be maximized. They preferentially explore more open areas which are favorable from the point of view of capillary energy. Following this principle, one may thus use the geometry of confined environments to control fluid droplets in various ways : displacing, filtering, fragmenting... In this communication, we present experimental results on the dynamics of Leidenfrost drops launched into a wedge formed by two quasi-horizontal glass plates. Influenced by the gradient of confinement, these non-wetting liquid pucks approach the apex of the wedge to a minimal distance where they bounce back. At higher impact velocity, we observe that drops tend to penetrate deeper into the wedge but often burst into a large number of small fragments. We also discuss ways to control the deviation of droplets from their initial trajectory. We propose scaling law analyses to explain the characteristics of the observed bouncing and bursting phenomena.

  14. Are 'negative bursts' due to absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawyer, C.

    1977-01-01

    Optical activity near the time of two microwave negative bursts is distinctive enough to demonstrate a real relation, but does not occur simultaneously with the radio events. Such a loose association between microwave flux decreases and Hα prominence or filament activity is typical of a sample of 23 negative bursts. A model of a microwave occulting cloud differs from that of an Hα absorber: the Hα dark flocculus is relatively low, dense and compact: the microwave occulter is higher in the corona, larger, and more completely ionized. The two types of absorption are not expected to been seen simultaneously, although they could be separate phases of an ejection of chromospheric material into the corona. The association of microwave decreases with Hα activity in some cases, and their usual non-simultaneity, is consistent with interpretation of the decrease as absorption, but it does not rule out alternative interpretation such as an intrinsic change in the emission of the microwave source. The location of decrease-associated activity has a suggestive, though not statistically significant, bias toward east limb that leads one toward an absorption interpretation, with asymmetry introduced by a tendency for ejected material to move from the leading part of an active region toward the following part, agreeing with Liska's observation of asymmetry in the line-of-sight velocities of prominences. (Auth.)

  15. Q-Burst Origins in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldi, R.; Hobara, Y.; Yamashita, K.; Hayakawa, M.; Satori, G.; Bor, J.; Lyons, W. A.; Nelson, T.; Russell, B.; Williams, E.

    2006-12-01

    The generation of electromagnetic transient signatures in the SR frequency range (Q-bursts) from the energetic lightning originating in Africa were intensively studied during the AMMA (African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis) field program centered on Niamey, Niger in 2006. During this wet season many active westward- moving MCSs were observed by the MIT C-band Doppler radar. The MCSs exhibited a gust front, a leading squall line and a large spatially-extended (100-200 km) stratiform region that often passed over the observation site. Many transient events were recorded in association with local lightning both with a slow antenna and a DC electric field mill installed near the radar. During the gust front and squall line traverse, the majority of lightning exhibited normal polarity. A remarkable transition of polarity is observed once the radar site is under the stratiform region and a pronounced radar bright band has had time to develop. The majority of the ground flashes then exhibit a positive polarity (positive ground flash). In particular, very intense positive ground flashes (often topped with spider lightning structure) are registered when the radar "hbright band"h is most strongly developed. These positive flashes exhibit a large DC field change in comparison to ones observed during the earlier squall line passage. Video observations of nighttime events support the existence of the lateral extensive spider lightning. Daytime events exhibit thunder durations of a few minutes. ELF Q-bursts were recorded at MIT's Schumann resonance station in Rhode Island U.S.A. (about 8 Mm distance from Niamey) associated with several large well-established positive ground flashes observed locally near Niamey. The event identification is made by accurate GPS timing and arrival direction of the waves. The onset times of the Q-burst are in good agreement with the electric field measurement near Niamey. The arrival directions of the waves are also in good agreement assuming

  16. Phase-dependent effects of stimuli locked to oscillatory activity in cultured cortical networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegenga, J.; le Feber, Jakob; Marani, Enrico; Rutten, Wim

    The archetypal activity pattern in cultures of dissociated neurons is spontaneous network-wide bursting. Bursts may interfere with controlled activation of synaptic plasticity, but can be suppressed by the application of stimuli at a sufficient rate. We sinusoidally modulated (4 Hz) the pulse rate

  17. Pseudo-inverse Jacobian control with grey relational analysis for robot manipulators mounted on oscillatory bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J.; Lin, C. C.; Lo, H.-S.

    2009-10-01

    Interest in complex robotic systems is growing in new application areas. An example of such a robotic system is a dexterous manipulator mounted on an oscillatory base. In literature, such systems are known as macro/micro systems. This work proposes pseudo-inverse Jacobian feedback control laws and applies grey relational analysis for tuning outer-loop PID control parameters of Cartesian computed-torque control law for robotic manipulators mounted on oscillatory bases. The priority when modifying controller parameters should be the top ranking importance among parameters. Grey relational grade is utilized to investigate the sensitivity of tuning the auxiliary signal PID of the Cartesian computed-torque law to achieve desired performance. Results of this study can be feasible to numerous mechanical systems, such as mobile robots, gantry cranes, underwater robots, and other dynamic systems mounted on oscillatory bases, for moving the end-effector to a desired Cartesian position.

  18. Approximate damped oscillatory solutions and error estimates for the perturbed Klein–Gordon equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Caier; Zhang, Weiguo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Analyze the dynamical behavior of the planar dynamical system corresponding to the perturbed Klein–Gordon equation. • Present the relations between the properties of traveling wave solutions and the perturbation coefficient. • Obtain all explicit expressions of approximate damped oscillatory solutions. • Investigate error estimates between exact damped oscillatory solutions and the approximate solutions and give some numerical simulations. - Abstract: The influence of perturbation on traveling wave solutions of the perturbed Klein–Gordon equation is studied by applying the bifurcation method and qualitative theory of dynamical systems. All possible approximate damped oscillatory solutions for this equation are obtained by using undetermined coefficient method. Error estimates indicate that the approximate solutions are meaningful. The results of numerical simulations also establish our analysis

  19. Shear and loading in channels: Oscillatory shearing and edge currents of superconducting vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wambaugh, J. F.; Marchesoni, F.; Nori, Franco

    2003-04-01

    Via computer simulations we study the motion of quantized magnetic flux-lines, or vortices, confined to a straight pin-free channel in a strong-pinning superconducting sample. We find that, when a constant current is applied across this system, a very unusual oscillatory shearing appears, in which the vortices moving at the edges of the channel periodically trail behind and then suddenly leapfrog past the vortices moving in the inner rows. For small enough driving forces, this oscillatory shearing dynamic phase is replaced by a continuous shearing phase in which the distance between initially-nearby vortices grows in time, quickly destroying the order of the lattice. An animation of this novel “oscillatory leapfrogging shear” effect of the vortex edge currents appears in http://www-personal.engin.umich.edu/˜nori/channel/

  20. The effect of a laser beam displacement on parametric oscillatory instabilities for Advanced LIGO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinert, D.; Strigin, S.E.

    2011-01-01

    The arm cavities of real gravitational wave detectors can show small deviations like a tilt or a spatial shift between the cavity mirrors. These deviations lead to a separation of the optical mode centres with respect to the mirror's centre. In this Letter we perform the computation of parametric instable modes considering the described displacement. We further analyse the possibility of parametric oscillatory instability in the Advanced LIGO interferometer for the case of a displaced arm cavity. Our results reveal an additional number of optical and elastic mode combinations due to a displacement that can give rise to the undesirable effect of parametric oscillatory instability. -- Highlights: → We analyse the possibility of parametric oscillatory instability in the Advanced LIGO interferometer. → We perform the computation of parametric instable modes considering the mirror displacement. → Our results reveal an additional number of optical and elastic mode unstable combinations.