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Sample records for thrust bearings

  1. Analysis of properties of thrust bearing in ship propulsion system

    Wu, Zhu-Xin; Liu, Zheng-Lin

    2010-06-01

    Thrust bearing is a key component of the propulsion system of a ship. It transfers the propulsive forces from the propeller to the ship’s hull, allowing the propeller to push the ship ahead. The performance of a thrust bearing pad is critical. When the thrust bearing becomes damaged, it can cause the ship to lose power and can also affect its operational safety. For this paper, the distribution of the pressure field of a thrust pad was calculated with numerical method, applying Reynolds equation. Thrust bearing properties for loads were analyzed, given variations in outlet thickness of the pad and variations between the load and the slope of the pad. It was noticed that the distribution of pressure was uneven. As a result, increases of both the outlet thickness and the slope coefficient of the pad were able to improve load bearing capability.

  2. THE EDDY LOSSES OF A MAGNETIC THRUST BEARING

    徐华; 王艳

    2004-01-01

    Accurate calculations of losses associated with the operation of magnetic bearings are particularly important for high speed applications where the rotor losses are expected to be large and for some particular applications where even low power losses will be critical. Power losses in the magnetic thrust bearing is often neglected, but if there is misaligned in the rotor and bearing, the magnetic field in the thrust bearing is no longer axisymmetric one, or the dynamic control current in the winding is time dependent one, eddy currents are caused to flow inside the conducting material, then the power losses are very important for magnetic bearing design. This paper presents an analytical model of a thrust magnetic bearing, and the magnetic fields, forces and losses of thrust magnetic bearing are calculated. In the calculations the frequency of dynamic control current is up to 1000Hz, rotating speed is from 60rpm to 1200rpm, and the non-linearity of material is also taken into consideration. The results shows that if the magnetic field is not saturation, the eddy losses is proportional to dynamic control current frequency and a square function of dynamic control current, and also 5/2 power function of shaft's speed.

  3. Frictional Characteristics of Thrust Bearing in Scroll Compressor

    Sato, Hajime; Itoh, Takahide; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki

    This paper presents frictional characteristics of thrust bearing in scroll compressor focusing on the behavior of sliding portion which affects the generation of oil film. The coefficient of friction and tilt angle of sliding portion in the thrust bearing are obtained through both elemental friction test and cylinder pressure measurement of actual scroll compressor. Both tests showed that the coefficient of friction in low contact pressure rose with increase of tilt angle of sliding portion. The value of contact pressure which the coefficient of friction turns into increase was in agreement of the value which tilt angle become to increase. Numerical analysis using mixed lubrication theory was also performed. Analytical result indicated the same characteristics as the experiments, and the correlation between the coefficient of friction and the behavior of sliding portion was confirmed. Based on the experimental and the analytical results obtained here, the optimization of thrust bearing for commercial scroll compressor was applied. 2% improvement of total efficiency in rated condition was archived by optimization of thrust bearing.

  4. Advanced Active-Magnetic-Bearing Thrust-Measurement System

    Imlach, Joseph; Kasarda, Mary; Blumber, Eric

    2008-01-01

    An advanced thrust-measurement system utilizes active magnetic bearings to both (1) levitate a floating frame in all six degrees of freedom and (2) measure the levitation forces between the floating frame and a grounded frame. This system was developed for original use in measuring the thrust exerted by a rocket engine mounted on the floating frame, but can just as well be used in other force-measurement applications. This system offers several advantages over prior thrust-measurement systems based on mechanical support by flexures and/or load cells: The system includes multiple active magnetic bearings for each degree of freedom, so that by selective use of one, some, or all of these bearings, it is possible to test a given article over a wide force range in the same fixture, eliminating the need to transfer the article to different test fixtures to obtain the benefit of full-scale accuracy of different force-measurement devices for different force ranges. Like other active magnetic bearings, the active magnetic bearings of this system include closed-loop control subsystems, through which the stiffness and damping characteristics of the magnetic bearings can be modified electronically. The design of the system minimizes or eliminates cross-axis force-measurement errors. The active magnetic bearings are configured to provide support against movement along all three orthogonal Cartesian axes, and such that the support along a given axis does not produce force along any other axis. Moreover, by eliminating the need for such mechanical connections as flexures used in prior thrust-measurement systems, magnetic levitation of the floating frame eliminates what would otherwise be major sources of cross-axis forces and the associated measurement errors. Overall, relative to prior mechanical-support thrust-measurement systems, this system offers greater versatility for adaptation to a variety of test conditions and requirements. The basic idea of most prior active-magnetic-bearing

  5. On the Design of Tilting-Pad Thrust Bearings

    Heinrichson, Niels

    2007-01-01

    Pockets are often machined in the surfaces of tilting-pad thrust bearings to allow for hydrostatic jacking in the start-up phase. Pockets and other recesses in the surfaces of bearing pads influence the pressure distribution and thereby the position of the pivot resulting in the most advantageous...... friction and a small pressure build-up. As in parallel-step bearings the recesses may also have a depth of the same order of magnitude as the oil film thickness. Such recesses are characterized by a strong pressure build-up caused by the reduction of the flow area at the end of the recess. Numerical models...... based on the Reynolds equation are used. They include the effects of variations of viscosity with temperature and the deformation of the bearing pads due to pressure and thermal gradients. The models are validated using measurements. Tilting-pad bearings of standard design are studied and the influences...

  6. Performance characteristics in hydrodynamic water cooled thrust bearings

    Farooq Ahmad Najar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the study of the influence on performance characteristics of a thrust bearing with the introduction of cooling circuit and flow velocity of coolant within the designed thrust bearings is described. New method of cooling circuit configuration is taken into consideration and water has been chosen as a coolant here in the present work. Flow velocity of coolant, ranging from 0.5m/s to 2.0m/s is proposed. The Finite difference based numerical model has been developed in order to notice the effect on the heat transfer on a large hydrodynamic lubrication thrust bearing in-terms of its performance characteristics. In the present work, the solution of Reynolds equation, an energy equation with viscosity variation and Fourier heat conduction equations, applied with appropriate boundary conditions. From the present investigation, it is observed significant amount of heat content is removed from the bearing with the increase of flow velocity of coolant in an embedded cooling duct within the pad. An important parameter among performance characteristics has prevailed a significant increase in hydrodynamic pressure generation which in turn subsequently increases the load carrying capacity which has been never ever documented in the background literature.

  7. TRANSIENT TEMPERATURE FIELD IN ACTIVE THRUST MAGNETIC BEARING

    Sun Shouqun; Geng Haipeng; Guo Keqian

    2005-01-01

    A transient temperature field model in a thrust magnetic bearing is built in which the heat resources come mainly from the eddy-current loss of solid cores and the copper loss of coils. The transient temperature field, system temperature rise and the thermo-equilibrium state during the rotor starting-up are calculated considering only the copper loss and the eddy-current loss. The numerical results indicate that the temperatures in coils and in magnets rise rapidly, their thermo-equilibrium states are formed within a short time. The temperatures in a thrust-disk and in a rotor rise slowly, their thermo-equilibrium states are formed after a long period time. The temperatures of the thrust-disk and the rotor are far higher than the temperatures of coils and/or magnets after the thermo-equilibrium state has come into being.

  8. Experimental Performance Study of a High Speed Oil Lubricated Polymer Thrust Bearing

    Jie Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the demand for turbomachinery to operate at higher speeds, loads, and power, fluid film bearings that support turbomachinery must be capable of operating in these more demanding applications. Thrust bearings operating at high speeds and loads can experience high surface temperatures and thin fluid film thickness. Typically, babbitt (white metal is the bearing lining material for most turbomachinery bearings but is limited in operating temperature and allowable film thickness. Polymer based materials are alternative materials that can operate at high temperatures and with thin films and have been in use for many decades in high load applications, such as electric submersible pumps (ESP. Test results of polymer lined thrust bearings subjected to modern turbomachinery speeds and loads are presented and compared to babbitt lined bearings of the same design and under similar conditions. The test results show polymer lined thrust bearings can operate at higher bearing unit loads than babbitt.

  9. Mechanical Characteristics of a Thrust Magnetic Bearing%推力轴承的力学特性

    2000-01-01

    Static and dynamic mechanical characteristics of a thrustmagnetic bearing are studied owing to the inclination of the runner disk. The application refers to a thrust magnetic bearing for a turbo-expander/compressor. The static tilt of the runner disk has remarkable influence on the mechanical characteristics of thrust magnetic bearing, it can change the static load distribution between two radial magnetic bearings and will exert violent coupling effect among a thrust magnetic bearing and two radial magnetic bearings. Such a finding can be used for the coupled electromechanical dynamics analysis of rotor system equipped with magnetic bearings.

  10. Estimation of optimum operating point for thrust magnetic bearing with solid magnet

    孙首群; 田育民

    2003-01-01

    A carrying capacity-temperature rise analysis model has been established for analysis of the carrying capacity, temperature rise and carrying capacity-temperature rise characteristic of a thrust magnetic bearing with solid magnet. The results indicate that there must be an optimal operating point for the thrust magnetic beating with solid magnet. The main factors having effect on carrying capacity-temperature rise include static gap and/or ampere-turns. With proper static gap chosen, the bearing can be run near the optimal operating point by adjhusting ampere-turns, thereby optimizing the bearing properties.

  11. Influence of hydrodynamic thrust bearings on the nonlinear oscillations of high-speed rotors

    Chatzisavvas, Ioannis; Boyaci, Aydin; Koutsovasilis, Panagiotis; Schweizer, Bernhard

    2016-10-01

    This paper investigates the effect of hydrodynamic thrust bearings on the nonlinear vibrations and the bifurcations occurring in rotor/bearing systems. In order to examine the influence of thrust bearings, run-up simulations may be carried out. To be able to perform such run-up calculations, a computationally efficient thrust bearing model is mandatory. Direct discretization of the Reynolds equation for thrust bearings by means of a Finite Element or Finite Difference approach entails rather large simulation times, since in every time-integration step a discretized model of the Reynolds equation has to be solved simultaneously with the rotor model. Implementation of such a coupled rotor/bearing model may be accomplished by a co-simulation approach. Such an approach prevents, however, a thorough analysis of the rotor/bearing system based on extensive parameter studies. A major point of this work is the derivation of a very time-efficient but rather precise model for transient simulations of rotors with hydrodynamic thrust bearings. The presented model makes use of a global Galerkin approach, where the pressure field is approximated by global trial functions. For the considered problem, an analytical evaluation of the relevant integrals is possible. As a consequence, the system of equations of the discretized bearing model is obtained symbolically. In combination with a proper decomposition of the governing system matrix, a numerically efficient implementation can be achieved. Using run-up simulations with the proposed model, the effect of thrust bearings on the bifurcations points as well as on the amplitudes and frequencies of the subsynchronous rotor oscillations is investigated. Especially, the influence of the magnitude of the axial force, the geometry of the thrust bearing and the oil parameters is examined. It is shown that the thrust bearing exerts a large influence on the nonlinear rotor oscillations, especially to those related with the conical mode of the

  12. Analysis of a Thrust Bearing with Flexible Pads and Flexible Supports

    Klit, Peder; Thomsen, Kim

    2007-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of a hydrodynamic thrust bearing is presented. The bearing investigated is used in an ndustrial product. The lubricant is water, but the results are valid also for other lubricants.At first the results from a 1-dimensional model for the fluid film forces and the associated ...... improvements in load carrying capacity is presented....... deformation of the bearing geometry is presented. This model enlightens the influence of pad flexibility and support location and flexibility. Subsequently results from a 2-dimensional model of the bearing is presented. The model is used to carry out an optimization of the bearing design, and the obtained...

  13. The Chevron Foil Thrust Bearing: Improved Performance Through Passive Thermal Management and Effective Lubricant Mixing

    Bruckner, Robert

    2013-01-01

    An improved foil thrust bearing is described that eliminates or reduces the need for forced cooling of the bearing foils while at the same time improves the load capacity of the bearing, enhances damping, provides overload tolerance, and eliminates the high speed load capacity drop-off that plagues the current state of the art. The performance improvement demonstrated by the chevron foil thrust bearing stems from a novel trailing edge shape that splays the hot lubricant in the thin film radially, thus preventing hot lubricant carry-over into the ensuing bearing sector. Additionally, the chevron shaped trailing edge induces vortical mixing of the hot lubricant with the gas that is naturally resident within the inter-pad region of a foil thrust bearing. The elimination of hot gas carry-over in combination with the enhanced mixing has enabled a completely passive thermally managed foil bearing design. Laboratory testing at NASA has confirmed the original analysis and reduced this concept to practice.

  14. Design and implementation of an active rectangular aerostatic thrust bearing stage with electromagnetic actuators

    MAO JunHong; LI LiChuan

    2009-01-01

    The design and implementation of an active rectangular aerostaUc thrust bearing stage with electro-magnetic actuators are presented. The stage is fundamentally precise and simple since the out-of-plane degree-of-freedoms (DOF) of a thrust air bearing are closed-loop controlled by electromagnetic actua-tors. The design is one-moving-part with mechanical symmetry, and a commercially available air bear-ing is rigidly attached to the table. The actuators are four independent coils mounted to the guiding surface of the table with iron cores, which are directly machined on the table. A bench level prototype system is developed and out-of-plane axes decoupled models of the system are derived. A control al-gorithm synthesized by arbitrarily placing closed-loop poles according to the model with air bearing dynamics neglected is implemented by C programming language running on the DOS platform. The stage is capable of vertical direction precision micro-positioning and guiding 3-DOF plane motions without limiting the working range of plane motions. Positioning accuracy of the stage no longer de-pends upon design and manufacturing of an air bearing, while passive preload of the stage for a flat film aerostatic thrust bearing is eliminated.

  15. A Foil Thrust Bearing Test Rig for Evaluation of High Temperature Performance and Durability

    2008-04-01

    communication faults. Test Articles Thrust runners, shown in figures 4 and 5, are rotating disks usually constructed of Inconel 718 , a nickel-based superalloy...constructed of various corrosion-resistant steels, and bearing foils are most often constructed from Inconel X750. Commercial bearings are purchased with...coatings with increased temperature capability are required for some applications. Uncoated Inconel X750 top foils run against PS304-coatings in

  16. Development of the water-lubricated thrust bearing of the hydraulic turbine generator

    Inoue, K.; Deguchi, K.; Okude, K.; Fujimoto, R.

    2012-11-01

    In hydropower plant, a large quantities of turbine oil is used as machine control pressure oil and lubricating oil. If the oil leak out from hydropower plant, it flows into a river. And such oil spill has an adverse effect on natural environment because the oil does not degrade easily. Therefore the KANSAI and Hitachi Mitsubishi Hydro developed the water-lubricated thrust bearing for vertical type hydraulic turbine generator. The water-lubricated bearing has advantages in risk avoidance of river pollution because it does not need oil. For proceeding the development of the water-lubricated thrust bearing, we studied following items. The first is the examination of the trial products of water lubricating liquid. The second is the study of bearing structure which can satisfy bearing performance such as temperature characteristic and so on. The third is the mock-up testing for actual application in the future. As a result, it was found that the water-lubricated thrust bearing was technically applicable to actual equipments.

  17. Optimal design of Tilting-Pad Thrust Bearings with High Pressure Injection Pockets

    Heinrichson, Niels; Santos, Ilmar

    2006-01-01

    A thermo-elasto-hydrodynamic(TEHD) model based on the Reynolds equation has been used to study the effect of oil injection pockets on the performance of tilting pad thrust bearings. The optimal position of the pivot both with respect to load carrying capacity and minimal power consumption is seen...

  18. Optimization of residual heat removal pump axial thrust and axial bearing

    Schubert, F.

    1996-12-01

    The residual heat removal (RHR) pumps of German 1300 megawatt pressurized-water reactor (PWR) power plants are of the single stage end suction type with volute casing or with diffuser and forged circular casing. Due to the service conditions the pumps have to cover the full capacity range as well as a big variation in suction static pressure. This results in a big difference in the axial thrust that has to be borne by the axial bearing. Because these pumps are designed to operate without auxiliary systems (things that do not exist can not fail), they are equipped with antifriction bearings and sump oil lubrication. To minimize the heat production within the bearing casing, a number of PWR plants have pumps with combined axial/radial bearings of the ball type. Due to the fact that the maximum axial thrust caused by static pressure and hydrodynamic forces on the impeller is too big to be borne by that type of axial bearing, the impellers were designed to produce a hydrodynamic axial force that counteracts the static axial force. Thus, the resulting axial thrust may change direction when the static pressure varies.

  19. Study on lift-up speed of aerodynamic compliant foil thrust bearings

    Yang Lihua; Shi Jianhua; Liu Heng; Yu Lie

    2007-01-01

    Objective The experimental study on the lift-up speed of a new kind of compliant aerodynamic foil thrust bearings was performed on the multifunctional test rig established for testing the performances of foil gas bearings. Methods The lift-up speed of foil gas thrust bearing under given axial load was analyzed through the spectrum of axial displacement response in frequency domain. Results The test results indicated that the difference in the spectrum of axial displacement responses before and after lifting up of the rotor was obvious. After lifting up of the rotor, there were only larger components of rotation frequency and lower harmanic frequencies. If the rotor wasn't lift-up, there were also larger components of other frequencies in the spectrum. Conclusion So by analyzing the spectrum of axial displacement response, the results showed that the lift-up speed was about 1 860 rpm when the axial load was 31N.

  20. The Effect of Additives on The Performance of HydrostaticThrust Bearings

    Muhammed Abdul Sattar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is concerned with, the behavior of the hydrostatic thrust bearings lubricated with liquid-solid lubricants using Einstein viscosity formula, and taking into account the centrifugal force resulting from high speed. Also studied is the effect of the bearing dimensions on the pressure, flow rate, load capacity, shear stress, power consumption and stiffness. The theoretical results show an increase in load capacity by (8.3% in the presence of solid graphite particles with concentration of (16% by weight as compared with pure oil, with increasing shear stress. . In general the performance of hydrostatic thrust bearings improve for load carrying capacity, volume flow rate, pumping power subjected to centrifugal parameter (S, recess position (r1, film thickness ratio (, particle concentration (.

  1. Demonstration, Testing and Qualification of a High Temperature, High Speed Magnetic Thrust Bearing

    DeWitt, Kenneth

    2005-01-01

    The gas turbine industry has a continued interest in improving engine performance and reducing net operating and maintenance costs. These goals are being realized because of advancements in aeroelasticity, materials, and computational tools such as CFD and engine simulations. These advancements aid in increasing engine thrust-to-weight ratios, specific fuel consumption, pressure ratios, and overall reliability through higher speed, higher temperature, and more efficient engine operation. Currently, rolling element bearing and squeeze film dampers are used to support rotors in gas turbine engines. Present ball bearing configurations are limited in speed (bearings require extensive preventative maintenance in order to assure their safe operation. Since these bearings are at their operational limits, new technologies must be found in order to take advantage of other advances. Magnetic bearings are well suited to operate at extreme temperatures and higher rotational speeds and are a promising solution to the problems that conventional rolling element bearings present. Magnetic bearing technology is being developed worldwide and is considered an enabling technology for new engine designs. Using magnetic bearings, turbine and compressor spools can be radically redesigned to be significantly larger and stiffer with better damping and higher rotational speeds. These advances, a direct result of magnetic bearing technology, will allow significant increases in engine power and efficiency. Also, magnetic bearings allow for real-time, in-situ health monitoring of the system, lower maintenance costs and down time.

  2. Experimental investigation of the flow in a simplified model of water lubricated axial thrust bearing

    Kirschner, O.; Ruprecht, A.; Riedelbauch, S.

    2014-03-01

    In hydropower plants the axial thrust bearing takes up the hydraulic axial thrust of the runner and, in case of vertical shafts, the entire weight of all rotating masses. The use of water lubricated bearings can eliminate the oil leakage risk possibly contaminating the environment. A complex flow is generated by the smaller film thickness due to the lower viscosity of water compared with oil. Measurements on a simplified hydrostatic axial trust bearing model were accomplished for validating CFD analysis of water lubricated bearings. In this simplified model, fixed pads are implemented and the width of the gap was enlarged to create a higher resolution in space for the measurements. Most parts of the model were manufactured from acrylic glass to get optical access for measurement with PIV. The focus of these measurements is on the flow within the space between two pads. Additional to the PIV- measurement, the pressure on the wall of the rotating disk is captured by pressure transducers. The model bearing measurement results are presented for varied operating conditions.

  3. Investigation of a hydrostatic azimuth thrust bearing for a large steerable antenna

    Rumbarger, J.; Castelli, V.; Rippel, H.

    1972-01-01

    The problems inherent in the design and construction of a hydrostatic azimuth thrust bearing for a tracking antenna of very large size were studied. For a load of 48,000,000 lbs., it is concluded that the hydrostatic bearing concept is feasible, provided that a particular multiple pad arrangement, high oil viscosity, and a particular load spreading arrangement are used. Presently available computer programs and techniques are deemed to be adequate for a good portion of the design job but new integrated programs will have to be developed in the area of the computation of the deflections of the supporting bearing structure. Experimental studies might also be indicated to ascertain the life characteristics of grouting under cyclic loading, and the optimization of hydraulic circuits and pipe sizes to insure the long life operation of pumps with high viscosity oil while avoiding cavitation.

  4. Active control of surge in centrifugal compressors using magnetic thrust bearing actuation

    Sanadgol, Dorsa

    This research presents a new method for active surge control in centrifugal compressors with unshrouded impellers using a magnetic thrust bearing to modulate the impeller tip clearance. Magnetic bearings offer the potential for active control of flow instabilities. This capability is highly dependent on the sensitivity of the compressor characteristics to blade tip clearance. If the position of the shaft can be actuated with sufficient authority and speed, the induced pressure modulation makes control of surge promising. The active nature of the magnetic bearing system makes the real-time static and dynamic positioning of the rotor and therefore modulation of the impeller tip clearance possible. A theoretical model is first established that describes the sensitivity of the centrifugal compressor characteristic curve to tip clearance variations induced by axial motion of the rotor. Results from simulation of the nonlinear model for a single stage high-speed centrifugal compressor show that using the proposed control method, mass flow and pressure oscillations associated with compressor surge are quickly suppressed with acceptable tip clearance excursions, typically less than 20% of the available clearance. It is shown that it is possible to produce adequate axial excursions in the clearance between the impeller blades and the adjacent stationary shroud using a magnetic thrust bearing with practical levels of drive voltage. This surge control method would allow centrifugal compressors to reliably and safely operate with a wider range than is currently done in the field. The principal advantage of the proposed approach over conventional surge control methods lies in that, in machines already equipped with magnetic bearing, the method can potentially be implemented by simply modifying controller software. This dispenses with the need to introduce additional hardware, permitting adaptation of existing machinery at virtually no cost. In addition, since the controller is

  5. Experimental Investigation of Friction Effect on Liner Model Rolling Bearings for Large Diameter Thrust Bearing Design

    S. Babu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Studying friction coefficient has significant importance, especially when dealing with high load and temperature applications that have frequent starting and stopping points. Towards that, two sets of angular contact Linear Model Mockup Bearings (LMMB were designed and fabricated. This linear model assembly was made up of high precision, grounded raceways (AISI 4140 and commercially purchased balls (AISI 52100. The experimental studies were carried out by placing different number of balls between the raceways under different loads at dry lubricating condition. The static friction coefficients were measured using two different experiments: viz gravitation-based experiment and direct linear force measurement experiment. And Digital Image Correlation (DIC technique was used to find the stiffness of LMMB set.

  6. Hardware-in-loop simulation on hydrostatic thrust bearing worktable pose

    韩桂华; 邵俊鹏; 秦柏; 董玉红

    2008-01-01

    A controllable hydrostatic thrust bearing was presented to improve rigidity. The bearing worktable poses were controlled by coupling oilfilm thickness of four controllable chambers. The chamber flow can be regulated by electro hydraulic servo valve-control variable pump according to the surface roughness, load, cutting force, and thermal effects of worktable. The mathematical models of the controllable chamber flow, servo variable mechanism and controller were built. The pose control model was established, which contained the kinematics positive and negative solution and control strategy of feedforward and hydraulic cylinder position feedback. Hardware-in-loop simulation experiment was carried out on the electro hydraulic servo test bench by means of the non-linear relation of film thickness and hydraulic cylinder displacement. Hardware-in-loop simulation experiment results show that the controllable bearings exhibit high oilfilm rigidity, the rising time is 0.24 s and the maximum overshoot is 2.23%, and can be applied in high precision heavy machine tool.

  7. Microstructural and Chemical Characterization of the Tribolayer Formation in Highly Loaded Cylindrical Roller Thrust Bearings

    Carsten Gachot

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Zinc dithiophosphates (ZDDP have been widely applied in automobile industry for over 70 years as a lubricant additive for wear protection. Tribolayers have been described as blue- and brown-colored layers on surfaces observed by microscopical observation or even bare eye presumably as a consequence of layer thickness or chemical composition. However, the reaction pathways of ZDDP tribolayers are still not yet fully understood. In the present study, the difference between the blue- and brown-colored tribolayers has been revealed by high resolution methods in cylindrical roller thrust bearings at relatively high contact pressures of around 1.92 GPa. After running a FE8 standard bearing test with a normal load of 80 kN and a temperature of 60 °C, said tribolayers could be identified on the bearing surfaces. By using Raman spectroscopy, it could be shown that the blue-colored layers are enriched by FeS and ZnS whereas the brown-colored layers show a significant amount of Fe3O4. This is an interesting finding as it clearly shows a correlation between the color appearance of the films and the chemical composition besides potential film thickness variations. Finally, transmission electron microscopy verified the amorphous nature of the formed tribolayer which is in a good agreement with literature.

  8. Numerical modelling of the flow in the annular multi-recess hydrostatic thrust bearing using CFD methods

    Drbáková S.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The current research of hydrostatic bearings and hydrostatic slide-ways is far from being over. The topic is constantly evolving, creating new geometries of the sliding bearings, developing new types of friction materials and lubricants. The control elements of hydraulic mechanisms that serve to regulation of the hydrostatic bearings tipping are still in progress. Almost every application has different requirements for the bearings, whether in terms of loading capacity, speed rotation, and also the price. All these aspects should be included in the design of hydrostatic thrust bearings. Thanks to great advances in the development of computer technology and software for numerical modelling, we can simulate real movement of viscous fluids. To create a numerical model of hydrostatic thrust bearing, Ansys Fluent 14.0 software package has been applied. The article describes the basic methods of numerical modelling of the given problem and evaluates the pressure field and the loading capacity of annular multi-recess hydrostatic thrust bearing and its dependence on the change in static pressure.

  9. Design and optimization of an active magnetic thrust bearing for flyhweel energy storage systems

    Lam, Siu Kiong

    2011-12-01

    This thesis is motivated in part by the lack of published research pertaining to active magnetic thrust bearings (AMTB), as compared to active magnetic radial bearings (AMRB). This thesis presents one method in implementing AMTBs to provide a near frictionless support to a rotor contained in a vacuum environment, mitigating the concerns of viscous drag and chemical reaction as a result of the exposure to lubricants. An analytical model was first developed to linearize the AMTB against a predefined operating point. A finite element simulation was subsequently conducted to verify the analytical model. The analytical and finite element methods both indicated that the steady state power consumption of the AMTB was approximately 12 W, and there was no occurrence of magnetic saturation within the material. The stress analysis showed that the stresses experienced by the rotor part of the AMTB as it rotated at the maximum rotation speed were well below the yield stress of the material. Lastly, a closed loop feedback network with proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controllers was designed and implemented as the control scheme for keeping the flywheel rotor at a predefined axial position, while the rotor underwent axial position variations due to the external disturbance, thermal expansion, or Poisson contraction effects. The resulting simulations showed that the PID controller was able to stabilize the flywheel rotor 0.3 s after it was disturbed by an external force equaling 10% of its weight.

  10. The Experimental Analyses of the Effects of the Geometric and Working Parameters on the Circular Hydrostatic Thrust Bearings

    Canbulut, Fazıl

    In this paper, the characteristics of disk-type hydrostatic thrust bearings supporting concentric loads; simulating the major bearing/seal parts of axial piston pumps and motors were investigated. An experimental setup was designed to determine the performance of slippers, which are capable of increasing the efficiency of axial piston pumps and motors, for different conditions. The working parameters and the slipper geometry causing the minimum frictional power loss and leakage oil loss were determined. Since slippers affect the performance of the system considerably, the effects of surface roughnesses on lubrication were studied in slippers with varying hydrostatic bearing areas and surface roughness. The results of the study suggest that the frictional power loss and leakage oil loss were caused by the surface roughness, the relative velocity, the size of the hydrostatic bearing area, supply pressure and capillary tube diameter.

  11. ON THE AXIAL TRANSIENT RESPONSE ANALYSIS OF THE SECTOR-SHAPED HYDRODYNAMIC THRUST BEARING-ROTOR SYSTEM IN A TURBOEXPANDER

    2000-01-01

    A model for the non-linear axial vibrations of the hydrodynamic thrust bearing-rotor system in a turboexpander is described.The axial transient process of the system is investigated.The timedependent form ofthe Reynolds equation is solved by a finite difference method with successive overrelaxation scheme to obtain the hydrodynamic forces of the sector-shaped thrust bearing (SSTB).Using these forces,the equation of motion is solved by the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method and the Adams method to predict the transient behaviour of the thrust bearing-rotor system (TBRS).Also,the linearized stiffness and damping coefficients of the oil film hydrodynamic SSTB are calculated.The analyses of the axial transient response of the system under both linear and non-linear conditions are performed.The non-linearity of oil film forces can significantly contribute to the axial transient response.Conclusions obtained can be applied for evaluation of the reliability of the TBRS.

  12. Study on lift-up speed of aerodynamic compliant foil thrust bearings

    2007-01-01

    The gas bearing is a newtype of bearing whichuses gas as thelubricant.Since they appearedin19thcentury,manyscholars researchedthembytheoreti-cal and experi mental methods.In order to i mprovethe capabilities of the gas bearing,manytypes of gasbearings of different structures were presented,forexample,tilting-pad gas bearing,spiral groove gasbearing,compliant foil gas bearing,andso on[1].Inthese types of gas bearings,the aerodynamic compli-ant foil bearings are more attractive and have beenwidely used in man...

  13. Numerical analysis of the static performance of an annular aerostatic gas thrust bearing applied in the cryogenic turbo-expander of the EAST subsystem

    Tianwei, LAI; Bao, FU; Shuangtao, CHEN; Qiyong, ZHANG; Yu, HOU

    2017-02-01

    The EAST superconducting tokamak, an advanced steady-state plasma physics experimental device, has been built at the Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. All the toroidal field magnets and poloidal field magnets, made of NbTi/Cu cable-in-conduit conductor, are cooled with forced flow supercritical helium at 3.8 K. The cryogenic system of EAST consists of a 2 kW/4 K helium refrigerator and a helium distribution system for the cooling of coils, structures, thermal shields, bus-lines, etc. The high-speed turbo-expander is an important refrigerating component of the EAST cryogenic system. In the turbo-expander, the axial supporting technology is critical for the smooth operation of the rotor bearing system. In this paper, hydrostatic thrust bearings are designed based on the axial load of the turbo-expander. Thereafter, a computational fluid dynamics-based numerical model of the aerostatic thrust bearing is set up to evaluate the bearing performance. Tilting effect on the pressure distribution and bearing load is analyzed for the thrust bearing. Bearing load and stiffness are compared with different static supply pressures. The net force from the thrust bearings can be calculated for different combinations of bearing clearance and supply pressure.

  14. A finite element analysis of a large thrust elastic metal-plastics bearing bush for a hydraulic turbine

    2000-01-01

    Presents the study on the pressure and friction fields of the lubricant film on the surface of a large thrust elastic metal-plastic bearing bush in a hydraulic turbine using the method of finite element analysis and the stress and displacement fields in the vertical direction of the bush surface obtained to provide a theoretical basis for the design of contour lines and investigation into the causes for destruction of bushes, and concludes with test results that 1 ) the stress on the surface of the bush is not uniform; 2) a tension stress tends to occur near the oil ingress and egress edges but it is minor; 3) the biggest displacement in the vertical direction appears where x = 84 and Y = 1 153 and has a value of 0.022 mm; 4) the deformation of the bearing bush is harmful to the maintenance of lubricant film.

  15. Numerical analysis of single pad of thrust bearing with the energy equation solved by the characteristic-based split method

    Yaoyu Hu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The solution of the energy equation of thermo-elasto-hydrodynamic analysis for bearings by the finite element method usually leads to convergence difficulties due to the presence of convection terms inherited from the Navier–Stokes equations. In this work, the numerical analysis is performed with finite element method universally by adopting the characteristic-based split method to solve the energy equation. Five case studies of fixed pad thrust bearings have been set up with different geometries, loads, and lubricants. The two-dimensional film pressure is obtained by solving the Reynolds equation with pre-defined axial load on the pad. The energy equation of the lubricant film and the heat transfer equation of the bearing pad are handled by characteristic-based split method and conventional finite element method in three-dimensional space, respectively. Hot oil carry-over effect and variable lubricant viscosity are considered in the simulations. The results of the temperature distributions in the lubricant film and the bearing pad are presented. The possible usability of characteristic-based split method for future thermo-elasto-hydrodynamic analysis is discussed.

  16. A less expensive solution for thrust-bearing failures at the Sao Simao hydroelectric power plant - Brazil

    Porto, Licinio Cesar [Sinergia Engenheiros Consultores Ltda., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mail: licinio@sinergia.eng.br; Machado, Luiz; Koury, Ricardo Nicolau Nassar; Porto, Matheus Pereira; Coelho, Fernanda Gomes [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica]. E-mails: luizm@demec.ufmg.br; koury@ufmg.br; matheusporto@oi.com.br; fernanda@sinergia.eng.br

    2008-07-01

    After twenty years without any apparent problems on their combined guides and thrust bearings operations, the six 280 MW hydrogenerators of the Sao Simao Hydroelectric Power Plant of Brazil were failing. Sao Simao is the largest Power Plant of Companhia Energetica de Minas Gerais (CEMIG), one of the major Brazilian electric utility company, with a total installed potential higher than 5,400 MW. The source of the failure was the melting of the thrust pad Babbit lining. The machines began showing performance failures, leading to a sudden interruption in their operations. This caused considerable losses with high direct and indirect costs. The solution proposed by the bearing manufacturer was an improvement to the bearing design and the installation of new water-oil heat exchangers. The direct cost of their solution was estimated at US$ 2,000,000.00 (two million dollars). In a search for a less expensive alternative, CEMIG commenced a parallel study that was to focus on the heat exchangers. A calculation model was used to consider not only the thermal features of the oil circulation system but also the suitability of its pumps and piping system. This model predicted that an increase in the surface of the heat exchange area could solve the problem. A spare heat exchanger was then installed in one machine already possessing two heat exchangers. The rated output test results fulfilled preliminary predictions, eliminating the risk of additional Babbit lining failures. As a consequence of CEMIG's successful modeling test implementation, heat exchangers were added to the remaining machines. This alternative solution had a total direct cost of US$ 600,000.00 (six hundred thousand dollars) with an indirect cost much less than the alternative presented by the manufacturer for its short cessation period. This paper discusses in detail all this study stages. (author)

  17. The influence of Injection Pockets on the Performance of Tilting-Pad Thrust Bearings: Part II - Comparison Between Theory and Experiment

    Heinrichson, Niels; Fuerst, Axel; Santos, Ilmar

    2006-01-01

    This is Part II of a two-part series of papers describing the effects of high pressure injection pockets on the operating conditions of tilting-pad thrust bearings. Measurements of the distribution of pressure and oil film thickness are presented for tilting-pad thrust bearing pads of approximately...... large discrepancies exist for the pad with an injection pocket. It is argued that this is likely to be due to the unevenness of the collar surface. The measured and theoretical values of oil film thickness compare well at low loads. At high loads discrepancies grow to up to 25 %. It is argued...

  18. Multiscale characterization of White Etching Cracks (WEC) in a 100Cr6 bearing from a thrust bearing test rig

    Danielsen, Hilmar Kjartansson; Guzmán, F. Gutiérrez; Dahl, Kristian Vinter

    2017-01-01

    A common cause for premature bearing failures in wind turbine gearboxes are the so-called White Etching Cracks (WEC). These undirected, three-dimensional cracks are bordered by regions of altered microstructure and ultimately lead to a cracking or spalling of the raceway. An accelerated WEC test...... occurs, which agrees with hypotheses based on an energetic approach for a prognosis. SEM orientation contrast imaging of the area around WEC revealed an inhomogeneous structure with varied grain sizes and a large amount of defects. Microstructure characterization around the WEA using EBSD showed...

  19. Calculation and analysis for stiffness of the thrust aerostatic bearing of ultra-precision machine tools

    Lu, Lihua; Zhao, Ziqiang; Liang, Yingchun; Zhang, Longjiang

    2010-10-01

    The single point diamond turning (SPDT) lathe of vertical flying cutting milling style is one important ultra-precision machining method for Large-aperture optics. To realize ultra-precision machining with SPDT technology, the turning spindle of the machine tools should be with higher stiffness and stability. In this paper, based on finite element method (FEM), an iterative procedure is proposed and implemented to solve the fluid dynamic model and structure model for simulation the couple of air pressure and structure flexibility. Simulation results show that pressure in the air gap makes the plate deform and this deformation produced by the pressure adversely modifies the pressure distribution. Experimental results indicate that the method can predict the aerostatic spindle stiffness accurately, the prediction error is about 2.04%. These results show a relevant influence of the structural flexibility of the bearing on its static performance.

  20. 3D Two-way coupled TEHD analysis on the lubricating characteristics of thrust bearings in pump-turbine units by combining CFD and FEA

    Zhai, Liming; Luo, Yongyao; Wang, Zhengwei; Liu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The thermal elastic hydro dynamic (TEHD) lubrication analysis for the thrust bearing is usually conducted by combining Reynolds equation with finite element analysis (FEA). But it is still a problem to conduct the computation by combining computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and FEA which can simulate the TEHD more accurately. In this paper, by using both direct and separate coupled solutions together, steady TEHD lubrication considering the viscosity-temperature effect for a bidirectional thrust bearing in a pump-turbine unit is simulated combining a 3D CFD model for the oil film with a 3D FEA model for the pad and mirror plate. Cyclic symmetry condition is used in the oil film flow as more reasonable boundary conditions which avoids the oil temperature assumption at the leading and trailing edge. Deformations of the pad and mirror plate are predicted and discussed as well as the distributions of oil film thickness, pressure, temperature. The predicted temperature shows good agreement with measurements, while the pressure shows a reasonable distribution comparing with previous studies. Further analysis of the three-coupled-field reveals the reason of the high pressure and high temperature generated in the film. Finally, the influence of rotational speed of the mirror plate on the lubrication characteristics is illustrated which shows the thrust load should be balanced against the oil film temperature and pressure in optimized designs. This research proposes a thrust bearing computation method by combining CFD and FEA which can do the TEHD analysis more accurately.

  1. 三峡右岸发电机推力轴承热弹流性能分析%Performance Analysis of Thrust Bearing for Three Gorges Generator

    武中德; 张宏

    2011-01-01

    对三峡右岸小支柱簇双层瓦推力轴承进行了热弹性流体动力润滑性能有限元分析.采用推力轴承润滑计算的有限元程序,并借助ANSYS软件的热传导和热弹变形分析功能,形成了一套完整的推力轴承热弹流动力润滑性能分析软件.物理模型包括润滑油膜、推力轴承和镜板推力头.对三峡试验推力轴承性能的计算结果和测量结果进行了对比分析,计算结果和实测的结果吻合,优化设计了三峡右岸推力轴承.%The thermo-elastic-hydrodynamic lubrication performance of three gorges thrust bearing (right) with pins and double layer system have bean analyzed by the finite element methods. The lubrication calculation is programmed with the finite element methods. Together with ANSYS soft, a complete software of the thermo-elastic-hydrodynamic(TEHD) lubrication performance analysis is obtained in this paper, where the physical model includes lubricating oil film, thrust bearing, runner and thrust head. The thermo-elastic-deformation of thrust bearing and runner is analyzed with ANSYS. The calculated results are compared with the measured ones in real operation. It shows that calculated characteristics are coincident with the experimental measurement. Three Gorges thrust beating (right) have bean optimized.

  2. Improvement of thrust bearing technology and tooling%推力轴承工艺与工装的改进

    郭兆军; 史光龙; 吕国新

    2016-01-01

    In view of the problems in the process of machining thrust bearing such as the backward forging process, big allowance, poor precision and big cutting off width,etc, the forging process was improved, 4 pieces combined forging by free forging were changed to 8 pieces combined forging by rolling forging to reduce the machining allowance and improves the efifciency;workpiece was separated by the blade sawing instead of turning to cut off to Reduces the cutting allowance and end face allowance,save raw materials, improve the machining efifciency and reduce the production cost;sawing machine for the technical reformation, and making the new tooling, which laid a foundation for process improvement.%针对推力轴承加工过程中存在的锻造工艺落后、留量大、精度差、切断宽度大等问题,对锻造工艺进行了改进,由自由锻4件合锻改为碾环锻造8件合锻,减少了加工留量,提高了效率;工件分离由车刀切断改为锯片锯断,减少了切断留量和端面留量,节约了原材料,提高了加工工效,降低了生产成本;对锯床进行了技术改造,并制作了新工装,为工艺改进奠定了基础。

  3. The Development of Open Water-lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond (PCD) Thrust Bearings for Use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines

    Cooley, Craig, H.; Khonsari, Michael,, M; Lingwall, Brent

    2012-11-28

    Polycrstalline diamond (PCD) bearings were designed, fabricated and tested for marine-hydro-kinetic (MHK) application. Bearing efficiency and life were evaluated using the US Synthetic bearing test facility. Three iterations of design, build and test were conducted to arrive at the best bearing design. In addition life testing that simulated the starting and stopping and the loading of real MHK applications were performed. Results showed polycrystalline diamond bearings are well suited for MHK applications and that diamond bearing technology is TRL4 ready. Based on life tests results bearing life is estimated to be at least 11.5 years. A calculation method for evaluating the performance of diamond bearings of round geometry was also investigated and developed. Finally, as part of this effort test bearings were supplied free of charge to the University of Alaska for further evaluation. The University of Alaska test program will subject the diamond bearings to sediment laden lubricating fluid.

  4. 2D THD and 3D TEHD analysis of large spindle supported thrust bearings with pins and double layer system used in the three gorges hydroelectric generators

    Huang, B.; Wu, Z. D.; Wu, J. L.; Wang, L. Q.

    2012-11-01

    A 2D THD model and a 3DTEHD model for large spindle supported thrust bearings were set up and used to analyze the lubrication performance of the Three Gorges test thrust beating withpins and double layer system developed by Alstom Power. The finite difference method was employed to solve the THD model, and the thermal-elasticdeformations in the pad and runner were obtained by the finite element software ANSYS11.0. The data transfer between the THD model and ANSYS11.0 was carried out automatically by an interface program.A detailed comparison between the experimental results and numerical predictions by the two different modelsset up in this paper was carried out. Poor agreement has been found between the theoretical results obtained by 2D THD model and experimental data, while 3D TEHD provides fairly good agreement, confirming the importance of thermal effects and thermal-elastic deformations in both pad and runner.

  5. 大型水轮发电机推力轴承热弹流润滑性能分析%Analysis of Thermoelastic Hydrodynamic Lubrication Performance of Thrust Bearings for Large Hydrogenerators

    武中德; 王黎钦; 曲大庄; 齐毓霖

    2001-01-01

    The thermo-elastic-hydrodynamic (TEHD) lubrication performance ofthe thrust bearings with Babbitt layer and/or teflon layer of large hydrogenerators was investigated by means of finite element analysis. The physical model established takes into account the lubricating oil film, thrust bearing, runner and thrust head. The thermo-elastic-deformation (TED) of the thrust bearing and runner was analyzed based on ADINA(T) program. It has been found that the calculated results of the thrust bearings conform well to the measured ones.%以巴氏合金瓦和弹性金属塑料瓦推力轴承为例,介绍了大型水轮发电机推力轴承热弹性流体动力润滑性能的有限元分析方法.物理模型包括润滑油膜、推力轴承和镜板推力头.采用ADINA(T)程序计算水口巴氏合金瓦和三峡弹性金属塑料瓦推力轴承和镜板推力头的热弹性变形,并对轴承性能的计算结果和测量结果进行了对比分析.结果表明,计算结果和实测结果吻合.

  6. Analysis of Temperature Fields of High-speed Centripetal Thrust Ball Bearing%高速向心推力球轴承温度场分析

    涂亦虓; 马希直

    2012-01-01

    轴承作为重要热源,对系统工作时的温度上升产生重要影响.分别采用热网络法和有限体积法,对高速向心推力球轴承的稳态温度场进行分析计算.比较两种算法的优劣,获得其稳态温度分布场,总结出诸如转速、预紧载荷等因素对轴承温升的影响规律,为合理选择轴承参数,提高其工作可靠性提供理论依据.%The bearing is considered as the important heat source, It has great influence on the temperature rise during working . In this paper, the transient and steady temperature fields of the high-speed centripetal thrust ball bearing are analysised based on thermal network analysis & finite volume method. Ultimately, steady-state temperature fields are built. As compared with these two methods, this paper sums up the influence law caused by the speed, load and other factors, in order to select the perfect bearing parameter and provide the theoretical basis of the working reliability.

  7. Bear

    2005-01-01

    The famous physicist made for his scholars this riddle. A fellow encountered a bear in a wasteland. There was nobody else there. Both were frightened and ran away. Fellow to the north, bear to the west. Suddenly the fellow stopped, aimed his gun to the south and shot the bear. What colour was the bear?

  8. 直升机旋翼系统弹性轴承刚度特性试验方法研究%RESEARCH OF STIFFNESS CHARACTERISTICS TEST METHOD FOR HELICOPTER ROTOR SYSTEM SPHERICAL THRUST BEARING

    黄晓东; 王卫卫; 蒋玮光

    2012-01-01

    直升机旋翼系统是直升机的核心部件,弹性轴承将桨叶与桨毂相连,提供桨叶的挥舞、摆振和变距自由度,刚度特性是其主要的力学性能.通过采用松紧螺套驱动半圆形夹具转动来测试弹性轴承压缩、扭转和弯曲刚度特性,结果表明该试验方法新颖独特,具有一定的通用性,能准确判定弹性轴承是否合格,可为不同机型的弹性轴承提供装机前试验的方法.%Rotor system is the core component of the helicopter, flexible blade with the spherical thrust bearing connected to provide the wielding, shimmy and pitch degrees of freedom, the stiffness characteristics is one of the main mechanical properties. Test the spherical thrust bearing compression, torsion and bending stiffness characteristics by twisting the screw to drive the semicircular fixture. These results indicated that the test method is distinctive and general. It can accurately determine whether the spherical thrust bearing is qualified and provide a test before installing for different type of spherical thrust bearings.

  9. 推力滑动轴承表面织构的优化设计%Optimal Design of Surface Texture in Parallel Thrust Bearings

    张金煜; 孟永钢

    2012-01-01

    Surface textures of fan-shaped grooves of axisymmetrical distribution are designed on one of the parallel thrust bearing surfaces to improve the hydrodynamic lubrication performance of the bearing. In order to optimize the groove parameters (including the groove number, depth and area ratio), a regressive formula of the bearing load carrying capacity is obtained, based on the calculation results of the load carrying capacity by solving Reynolds equation under various combinations of bearing inner and outer diameters, rotation speed, lubricant viscosity, bearing clearance as well as the groove parameters. A formula of the bearing friction coefficient is derived using the regressive formula of the load carrying capacity. Based on these formulae, the optimal groove parameters are found under the four different kinds of constraints and optimization goals: Given the bearing clearance, requiring the maximal load carrying capacity or minimal friction coefficient; given the load carrying capacity, requiring the maximal bearing clearance or minimal friction coefficient. Furthermore, the validity of the optimal design is confirmed by comparing the load carrying capacity, bearing clearance and friction coefficient calculated by the regressive formulae with the full simulation results of Reynolds equation. Friction experiments are carried out on three surface textures of fan-shaped grooves with different groove numbers and depths. It is found that the trend of the calculated friction coefficient is the same as that of the experimental one, and the optimal results of the groove parameters are credible.%在推力滑动轴承表面设计轴对称分布的扇形直槽织构,以提高轴承的流体动压润滑性能.为对扇形直槽的参数(直槽的数目、深度和面积比)进行优化设计,将轴承的内外径、转速、润滑油黏度、轴承间隙以及直槽参数作为变量,求解不同变量值下的Reynolds方程,得到油膜承载力,运用最小二乘法对

  10. Hydrodynamic film thickness measurements and CFD analysis identify the root causes of repetitive thrust bearing failures on a 45 MW hydro generating unit at Hydro-Québec

    Gauvin, P.; Huard, P.

    2016-11-01

    High temperature level recorded on the thrust bearing of a 45 MW hydro generating unit was resulting in frequent production stoppage. In spite of improvements brought to the oil cooling system since the rehabilitation in 2008, the operator had to activate the bearing oil lift system to keep the temperature below acceptable limits. Primary root cause analysis first pointed to the design of the shoe that was centrally pivoted, not allowing the formation of a thick hydrodynamic film. The removal of a strip of the soft metal layer near the trailing edge of the shoe resulted in a significant surface temperature reduction (about 15 deg. C), as predicted by a CFD model of the oil film. The goal of this machining was to increase the pivoting angle by moving the centre of hydrodynamic pressure. Proximity sensors were installed at each corner of the redesigned shoe to measure the film thickness and the bearing attitude. Signal analysis revealed a step of a magnitude close to the oil film thickness between the two halves of the rotating thrust block. This was the cause of another failure few hours since restarting the unit. The lessons learnt through these measurements and analyses were carefully applied to the ultimate build. The unit now runs with a robust thrust bearing and even survived a significant cooling flow reduction event. This paper presents the CFD analysis results and the measurements acquired during these events.

  11. 推力轴承基座对艇体振动及其辐射噪声的影响%Influence of Thrust Bearing Pedestal Form on Vibration and Radiated Noise of Submarine

    丁科; 王永生; 魏应三

    2013-01-01

    FEM/BEM method is used to calculate the structure vibration and underwater radiated noise of the single-shell submarine which is full-scale caused by the propeller fluctuating thrust force. The influence of vibration and radiated noise caused by the propeller of the two kinds thrust bearing pedestal forms (flanged thrust bearing pedestal and common pedestal) is analysed and com-pared. The study shows that the flanged thrust bearing pedestal can reduce the underwater radiated noise up to 25 dB in frequency region except around 28 Hz. The common pedestal is combined with the submarine hull, it causes the longitudinal vibration and the lateral vibration, and the normal vi-bration is much stronger; but the flanged thrust bearing pedestal transfers the propeller fluctuating force equally to the submarine hull along the circumference, it mainly causes longitudinal vibration, only the head and tail of the hull cause normal vibration, and so the noise level is lower.%  利用FEM/BEM方法计算了实尺度单壳体潜艇在螺旋桨激振力作用下的结构振动和水下声辐射特性。分析比较了两种推力轴承基座形式(法兰盘式基座和普通基座)对潜艇在螺旋桨激励下振动与噪声性能的影响。结果表明,安装法兰盘式推力轴承基座能在除28 Hz附近降低潜艇辐射噪声,最大降低25 dB左右。普通推力轴承基座形式只将螺旋桨脉动推力加载到与其相连的艇体结构上,引起纵向振动和横向振动,其壳体的法向振动较强烈;而法兰盘式推力轴承基座可以将螺旋桨脉动推力沿周向均匀地加载到艇体上,它主要引起纵向振动,只有艇体首尾处有法向振动,因而,噪声较低。

  12. Technological transformation of temperature resistance wire in thrust bearing of hydrogenerator Unit%水轮发电机组推力轴承测温电阻布线优化

    郭齐柯

    2016-01-01

    分析了某水电站因推力轴承测温电阻测温值跳变而引起机组事故停机的原因,介绍了防止测温电阻显示跳变的改造方法。%This paper analyzes the reasons of the emergency outage of the unit caused by the temperature junm in the thrust bearing of hydropower plant, and introduces the method to prevent the temperature measurement jump from the temperature resistance.

  13. 不同镜板转速对推力轴承油膜流场的影响%Influence of Different Rotor Speed to Fluid Field in Oil Film of Thrust Bearing

    郅刚锁; 陈志澜; 朱均

    2001-01-01

    以推力轴承中的油膜层作为控制体系,建立 了油膜层的非等温三维流场偏微分方程组数学模型,通过采用有限差分方法对其所构成的偏 微分方程组进行数值求解。在数值计算的基础上,详细分析了镜板不同转速对推力轴承油膜 层速度场分布的影响、油膜层速度矢量分布和油膜层与层之间速度分布规律。研究结果表明 :油膜层中的速度矢量分布主要由周向速度和径向速度所组成,其速度矢量分布是构成油膜 层对流换热的主要因素。%With the object of study in oil film stratum of thrust bearing, the non-isothermal three-dimensional mathematical model of oil film stratum is formulated and the finite difference method is deduced in this paper. Based on numerical calculation, the influences on the fluid field distribution in oil film of thrust bearing caused by different rotor speed, the velocity vector distribution and the rule of velocity between oil film layers are analyzed in detail. It is thought that the velocity vector distribution in oil film stratum is composed of radial velocity and circumferential velocity and is the dominant factor influencing the heat convection.

  14. 双向推力轴承支承结构对润滑性能的影响%Effects of support structure on lubricating properties of bi-directional thrust bearings

    黄滨; 吴军令; 武中德; 焦磊; 王乐勤

    2012-01-01

    为分析水泵水轮机双向推力轴承支承结构对润滑性能的影响,建立了推力轴承的三维热弹流动力润滑数学模型,并给出了合理的边界条件.分别通过有限差分法和大型有限元软件Ansys1 1.0求解热流体动力润滑模型和瓦块的热弹变形,二者之间的数据传递通过自编接口自动实现.将文中所建立的计算模型应用于算例分析,得到额定工况下的油膜厚度、油膜压力和瓦块温度分布情况,通过对理论计算结果和试验测量结果对比发现两者吻合较好.在此基础上分析了3种不同支承结构下的轴承静特性分布和瓦面热弹变形分布趋势.结果表明:选择合理的支承结构将明显提高轴承的润滑性能,条形支承结构和双托盘支承结构的瓦面热弹变形分布比单托盘支承结构更加合理,因此润滑性能要明显优于单托盘支承结构.%A three-dimensional thermo-elastic-hydrodynamic mathematical model of thrust bearing was set up and the boundary conditions was adopted for analysis of the effects of support structure on hydrodynamic lubrication performance of bi-directional thrust bearing in pump-turbine. The finite difference method was employed to solve the THD model, and the thermal-elastic deformations in the pad were obtained by the finite element software ANSYS11.0. The data transfer between the THD model and ANSYS11.0 was carried out automatically by an interface program. The calculation model set up in this paper was then applied to a calculating example. The oil film thickness distribution, oil film pressure distribution and pad temperature distribution were obtained. Good agreement between the theoretical calculating results and experimental test was obtained. On this basis, the static performance distribution and thermo-elastic deformation distribution on the pad surface of three different support disks were analyzed. The results show that improving lubricant performance can be obtained if

  15. 圆形腔多油垫恒流静压推力轴承流场数值分析%Numerical Analysis of Flow Field of Circular Cavity Multi-pad Constant Current Hydrostatic Thrust Bearing

    于晓东; 李欢欢; 谭力; 周启慧; 王志强; 田维镇

    2013-01-01

    The paper studied the gap fluid in the hydrostatic thrust bearing with circular cavity multi-pad and constant current which is applied in the heavy numerical control equipment, simulated the three-dimensional velocity field and the pressure field, found the influence law the cavity area has on the performance of the gap flow field based on the computer fluid dynamics and lubrication theory, and presented the flow characteristics of the gap flow field. The results show that the cavity pressure will increase and decrease with the increase of the cavity area and a-chieve the maximum value, and the optimal area was obtained. However, the cavity area has little effect on the velocity field.%对重型数控设备中所应用的圆形腔多油垫恒流静压推力轴承间隙流体进行研究,应用计算流体动力学和润滑理论,数值求解间隙流体的三维速度场和压力场,发现了油腔腔面积对间隙流场性能的影响规律,揭示了间隙流场的流动特性.计算结果表明:油腔压力随着油腔面积增大先增加后减小,在某一位置油腔压力达到极大值,得到油腔面积最优值;而腔面积对流动速度场影响不大.

  16. 抽蓄机组稳态工况下推力轴承油膜运行机理的数值分析%Numerical Analysis of Operation Mechanism of Thrust Bearing Oil Film Under the Stable Working Conditions of Pumped Storage Power

    姚泽; 亚南; 屈波; 黄青松; 毛秀丽; 时志能; 熊妍

    2014-01-01

    基于N2 S方程、J2E湍流模型和周期性边界,在额定转速下对不同油膜厚度和瓦面倾角下的推力油槽进行了CFD数值模拟。利用Autocad和Proe建立了1/12推力油箱模型,并作适当简化,采用分块网格技术对计算区域进行了网格划分;然后在Fluent 中采用SIMPLEC算法进行了计算;最后通过后处理得到了瓦面各部分的压力分布、不同膜厚和倾角与瓦面承载力的关系曲线以及油膜不同厚度层下的速度分布,这对推力轴承的设计、检修、运行有着重要的指导意义。%Based on the N2S equation, J2E turbulent model, and periodic boundary, CFD numerical calculation and analysis w as performed on the tank of thrust bearing under the rated speed with different oil film thicknesses and tile surface angles. The 1/12modelofthethrusttankwasestablishedusingthetoolofAutocadandProeandthecomputationaldomainwasdiscretized using the clumpy gridding technology. SIMPLEC algorithm in Fluent was used to perform the simulation. The calculation re2 sults w ere post2processed to determine the pressure distribution of tile surface, the relation curves between oil film thickness, tile surface angle, and bearing capacity of tile surface, and the velocity distribution with different thicknesses of oil film,which can better guide the design, maintenance, and operation of thrust bearing.

  17. EXPERIMENTAL APPARATUS FOR EXAMINATION OF MAGNETIC FLUID LUBRICATED THURST BEARING

    Józef SALWIŃSKI

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been development of the structure of thrust bearing with magnetic fluids . The essence of this type of bearing is to maintain a liquid lubricant in a very narrow gap with magnetic fluid by a magnetic field. Such systems can act as the bearing lubrication and sealing. This paper presents description of the experimental apparatus for examination magnetic fluid lubricated thrust bearing. Description of the construction and characteristics of the measuring possibilities ware presented.

  18. Hydrostatic and hybrid bearing design

    Rowe, W B

    1983-01-01

    Hydrostatic and Hybrid Bearing Design is a 15-chapter book that focuses on the bearing design and testing. This book first describes the application of hydrostatic bearings, as well as the device pressure, flow, force, power, and temperature. Subsequent chapters discuss the load and flow rate of thrust pads; circuit design, flow control, load, and stiffness; and the basis of the design procedures and selection of tolerances. The specific types of bearings, their design, dynamics, and experimental methods and testing are also shown. This book will be very valuable to students of engineering des

  19. Reducing Thrusts In Solid-Fuel Rockets

    Bement, Laurence J.

    1989-01-01

    Thrust-terminating system conceived to reduce thrust of solid-propellant rocket motor in controlled manner such that thrust loads not increased or decreased beyond predictable levels. Concept involves explosively cutting opposing venting pairs in case of rocket motor above nozzles to initiate venting of chamber and reduction of thrust. Vents sized and numbered to control amount and rate of reduction in thrust.

  20. Low-thrust rocket trajectories

    Keaton, P.W.

    1986-01-01

    The development of low-thrust propulsion systems to complement chemical propulsion systems will greatly enhance the evolution of future space programs. Two advantages of low-thrust rockets are stressed: first, in a strong gravitational field, such as occurs near the Earth, freighter missions with low-thrust engines require one-tenth as much propellant as do chemical engines. Second, in a weak gravitational field, such as occurs in the region between Venus and Mars, low-thrust rockets are faster than chemical rockets with comparable propellant mass. The purpose here is to address the physics of low-thrust trajectories and to interpret the results with two simple models. Analytic analyses are used where possible - otherwise, the results of numerical calculations are presented in graphs. The author has attempted to make this a self-contained report. 57 refs., 10 figs.

  1. Low-thrust rocket trajectories

    Keaton, P.W.

    1987-03-01

    The development of low-thrust propulsion systems to complement chemical propulsion systems will greatly enhance the evolution of future space programs. Two advantages of low-thrust rockets are stressed: first, in a strong gravitational field, such as occurs near the Earth, freighter missions with low-thrust engines require one-tenth as much propellant as do chemical engines. Second, in a weak gravitational field, such as occurs in the region between Venus and Mars, low-thrust rockets are faster than chemical rockets with comparable propellant mass. The purpose here is to address the physics of low-thrust trajectories and to interpret the results with two simple models. Analytic analyses are used where possible - otherwise, the results of numerical calculations are presented in graphs. The author has attempted to make this a self-contained report.

  2. Aircraft Horizontal Thrust Measurement Facility

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility is designed to support the DoD mission by providing unique air vehicle installed engine performance (thrust output) measurements. This system consists...

  3. Evaluation of fluidic thrust vectoring nozzle via thrust pitching angle and thrust pitching moment

    Li, L.; Hirota, M.; Ouchi, K.; Saito, T.

    2016-03-01

    Shock vector control (SVC) in a converging-diverging nozzle with a rectangular cross-section is discussed as a fluidic thrust vectoring (FTV) method. The interaction between the primary nozzle flow and the secondary jet is examined using experiments and numerical simulations. The relationships between FTV parameters [nozzle pressure ratio (NPR) and secondary jet pressure ratio (SPR)] and FTV performance (thrust pitching angle and thrust pitching moment) are investigated. The experiments are conducted with an NPR of up to 10 and an SPR of up to 2.7. Numerical simulations of the nozzle flow are performed using a Navier-Stokes solver with input parameters set to match the experimental conditions. The thrust pitching angle and moment computed from the force-moment balance are used to evaluate FTV performance. The experiment and numerical results indicate that the FTV parameters (NPR and SPR) directly affect FTV performance. Conventionally, FTV performance evaluated by the common method using thrust pitching angle is highly dependent on the location of evaluation. Hence, in this study, we show that the thrust pitching moment, a parameter which is independent of the location, is the appropriate figure of merit to evaluate the performance of FTV systems.

  4. Post-burnout thrust measurements

    McKenna, E. F.; Smith, H. T.

    1980-06-01

    Research was conducted into the problems of avoiding collision between separated payloads and spent rocket motors due to post burnout thrust, and the problem of contamination of scientific instrumentation due to outgassing of the smoldering insulation. The post burnout thrust was measured using a payload instrument module separated from an instrumented Black Brant VC Rocket in the exoatmosphere. In addition to measuring acceleration and velocities the spent motor was observed by a TV camera on board the command attitude controlled payload module. Analysis shows that the payload separated cleanly from the vehicle at a relative separation velocity of 0.69 m/sec, however the residual thrust of the spent motor overcame this differential, catching up to the payload 37 sec after separation and continuing on a parallel velocity vector at about 1.03 m/sec.

  5. Another Look at Rocket Thrust

    Hester, Brooke; Burris, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Rocket propulsion is often introduced as an example of Newton's third law. The rocket exerts a force on the exhaust gas being ejected; the gas exerts an equal and opposite force--the thrust--on the rocket. Equivalently, in the absence of a net external force, the total momentum of the system, rocket plus ejected gas, remains constant. The law of…

  6. Journal bearing

    Menke, John R.; Boeker, Gilbert F.

    1976-05-11

    1. An improved journal bearing comprising in combination a non-rotatable cylindrical bearing member having a first bearing surface, a rotatable cylindrical bearing member having a confronting second bearing surface having a plurality of bearing elements, a source of lubricant adjacent said bearing elements for supplying lubricant thereto, each bearing element consisting of a pair of elongated relatively shallowly depressed surfaces lying in a cylindrical surface co-axial with the non-depressed surface and diverging from one another in the direction of rotation and obliquely arranged with respect to the axis of rotation of said rotatable member to cause a flow of lubricant longitudinally along said depressed surfaces from their distal ends toward their proximal ends as said bearing members are rotated relative to one another, each depressed surface subtending a radial angle of less than 360.degree., and means for rotating said rotatable bearing member to cause the lubricant to flow across and along said depressed surfaces, the flow of lubricant being impeded by the non-depressed portions of said second bearing surface to cause an increase in the lubricant pressure.

  7. High Thrust-Density Electrostaic Engines Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — These issues are addressable by: increasing the thrust, power, and thrust-to-power ratio capability of EP systems; reducing the non-recurring engineering systems...

  8. Nonlinear dynamics of a vectored thrust aircraft

    Sørensen, C.B; Mosekilde, Erik

    1996-01-01

    With realistic relations for the aerodynamic coefficients, numerical simulations are applied to study the longitudional dynamics of a thrust vectored aircraft. As function of the thrust magnitude and the thrust vectoring angle the equilibrium state exhibits two saddle-node bifurcations and three ...

  9. Summarization on variable liquid thrust rocket engines

    2009-01-01

    The technology actuality and development trend of variable thrust rocket engines at home and abroad are summarized. Key technologies of developing variable thrust rocket engines are analyzed. Development advices on developing variable thrust rocket engines that are adapted to the situation of our country are brought forward.

  10. Grizzly bear

    Schwartz, C.C.; Miller, S.D.; Haroldson, M.A.; Feldhamer, G.; Thompson, B.; Chapman, J.

    2003-01-01

    The grizzly bear inspires fear, awe, and respect in humans to a degree unmatched by any other North American wild mammal. Like other bear species, it can inflict serious injury and death on humans and sometimes does. Unlike the polar bear (Ursus maritimus) of the sparsely inhabited northern arctic, however, grizzly bears still live in areas visited by crowds of people, where presence of the grizzly remains physically real and emotionally dominant. A hike in the wilderness that includes grizzly bears is different from a stroll in a forest from which grizzly bears have been purged; nighttime conversations around the campfire and dreams in the tent reflect the presence of the great bear. Contributing to the aura of the grizzly bear is the mixture of myth and reality about its ferocity. unpredictable disposition, large size, strength, huge canines, long claws, keen senses, swiftness, and playfulness. They share characteristics with humans such as generalist life history strategies. extended periods of maternal care, and omnivorous diets. These factors capture the human imagination in ways distinct from other North American mammals. Precontact Native American legends reflected the same fascination with the grizzly bear as modern stories and legends (Rockwell 1991).

  11. Formation of chlorite during thrust fault reactivation. Record of fluid origin and P-T conditions in the Monte Perdido thrust fault (southern Pyrenees)

    Lacroix, B.; Charpentier, D.; Buatier, M.; Vennemann, T.; Labaume, P.; Adatte, T.; Travé, A.; Dubois, M.

    2012-06-01

    The chemical and isotopic compositions of clay minerals such as illite and chlorite are commonly used to quantify diagenetic and low-grade metamorphic conditions, an approach that is also used in the present study of the Monte Perdido thrust fault from the South Pyrenean fold-and-thrust belt. The Monte Perdido thrust fault is a shallow thrust juxtaposing upper Cretaceous-Paleocene platform carbonates and Lower Eocene marls and turbidites from the Jaca basin. The core zone of the fault, about 6 m thick, consists of intensely deformed clay-bearing rocks bounded by major shear surfaces. Illite and chlorite are the main hydrous minerals in the fault zone. Illite is oriented along cleavage planes while chlorite formed along shear veins (<50 μm in thickness). Authigenic chlorite provides essential information about the origin of fluids and their temperature. δ18O and δD values of newly formed chlorite support equilibration with sedimentary interstitial water, directly derived from the local hanging wall and footwall during deformation. Given the absence of large-scale fluid flow, the mineralization observed in the thrust faults records the P-T conditions of thrust activity. Temperatures of chlorite formation of about 240°C are obtained via two independent methods: chlorite compositional thermometers and oxygen isotope fractionation between cogenetic chlorite and quartz. Burial depth conditions of 7 km are determined for the Monte Perdido thrust reactivation, coupling calculated temperature and fluid inclusion isochores. The present study demonstrates that both isotopic and thermodynamic methods applied to clay minerals formed in thrust fault are useful to help constrain diagenetic and low-grade metamorphic conditions.

  12. Foil bearings

    Elrod, David A.

    1993-11-01

    The rolling element bearings (REB's) which support many turbomachinery rotors offer high load capacity, low power requirements, and durability. Two disadvantages of REB's are: (1) rolling or sliding contact within the bearing has life-limiting consequences; and (2) REB's provide essentially no damping. The REB's in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopumps must sustain high static and dynamic loads, at high speeds, with a cryogenic fluid as lubricant and coolant. The pump end ball bearings limit the life of the SSME high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP). Compliant foil bearing (CFB) manufacturers have proposed replacing turbopump REB's with CFB's CFB's work well in aircraft air cycle machines, auxiliary power units, and refrigeration compressors. In a CFB, the rotor only contracts the foil support structure during start up and shut down. CFB damping is higher than REB damping. However, the load capacity of the CFB is low, compared to a REB. Furthermore, little stiffness and damping data exists for the CFB. A rotordynamic analysis for turbomachinery critical speeds and stability requires the input of bearing stiffness and damping coefficients. The two basic types of CFB are the tension-dominated bearing and the bending-dominated bearing. Many investigators have analyzed and measured characteristics of tension-dominated foil bearings, which are applied principally in magnetic tape recording. The bending-dominated CFB is used more in rotating machinery. This report describes the first phase of a structural analysis of a bending-dominated, multileaf CFB. A brief discussion of CFB literature is followed by a description and results of the present analysis.

  13. Foil bearings

    Elrod, David A.

    1993-01-01

    The rolling element bearings (REB's) which support many turbomachinery rotors offer high load capacity, low power requirements, and durability. Two disadvantages of REB's are: (1) rolling or sliding contact within the bearing has life-limiting consequences; and (2) REB's provide essentially no damping. The REB's in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopumps must sustain high static and dynamic loads, at high speeds, with a cryogenic fluid as lubricant and coolant. The pump end ball bearings limit the life of the SSME high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP). Compliant foil bearing (CFB) manufacturers have proposed replacing turbopump REB's with CFB's CFB's work well in aircraft air cycle machines, auxiliary power units, and refrigeration compressors. In a CFB, the rotor only contracts the foil support structure during start up and shut down. CFB damping is higher than REB damping. However, the load capacity of the CFB is low, compared to a REB. Furthermore, little stiffness and damping data exists for the CFB. A rotordynamic analysis for turbomachinery critical speeds and stability requires the input of bearing stiffness and damping coefficients. The two basic types of CFB are the tension-dominated bearing and the bending-dominated bearing. Many investigators have analyzed and measured characteristics of tension-dominated foil bearings, which are applied principally in magnetic tape recording. The bending-dominated CFB is used more in rotating machinery. This report describes the first phase of a structural analysis of a bending-dominated, multileaf CFB. A brief discussion of CFB literature is followed by a description and results of the present analysis.

  14. Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) Plasma Actuators Thrust-Measurement Methodology Incorporating New Anti-Thrust Hypothesis

    Ashpis, David E.; Laun, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    We discuss thrust measurements of Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) plasma actuators devices used for aerodynamic active flow control. After a review of our experience with conventional thrust measurement and significant non-repeatability of the results, we devised a suspended actuator test setup, and now present a methodology of thrust measurements with decreased uncertainty. The methodology consists of frequency scans at constant voltages. The procedure consists of increasing the frequency in a step-wise fashion from several Hz to the maximum frequency of several kHz, followed by frequency decrease back down to the start frequency of several Hz. This sequence is performed first at the highest voltage of interest, then repeated at lower voltages. The data in the descending frequency direction is more consistent and selected for reporting. Sample results show strong dependence of thrust on humidity which also affects the consistency and fluctuations of the measurements. We also observed negative values of thrust or "anti-thrust", at low frequencies between 4 Hz and up to 64 Hz. The anti-thrust is proportional to the mean-squared voltage and is frequency independent. Departures from the parabolic anti-thrust curve are correlated with appearance of visible plasma discharges. We propose the anti-thrust hypothesis. It states that the measured thrust is a sum of plasma thrust and anti-thrust, and assumes that the anti-thrust exists at all frequencies and voltages. The anti-thrust depends on actuator geometry and materials and on the test installation. It enables the separation of the plasma thrust from the measured total thrust. This approach enables more meaningful comparisons between actuators at different installations and laboratories. The dependence on test installation was validated by surrounding the actuator with a large diameter, grounded, metal sleeve.

  15. Measuring Model Rocket Engine Thrust Curves

    Penn, Kim; Slaton, William V.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a method and setup to quickly and easily measure a model rocket engine's thrust curve using a computer data logger and force probe. Horst describes using Vernier's LabPro and force probe to measure the rocket engine's thrust curve; however, the method of attaching the rocket to the force probe is not discussed. We show how a…

  16. Lubrication of an 85-mm ball bearing with RP-1

    Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Schuller, Fredrick T.

    1993-01-01

    A parametric experimental investigation of an 85 millimeter bore angular contact ball bearing running in RP-1 fuel was performed at speeds of 10,000 to 24,000 rpm. Thrust loads were varied from 4450 to 17,800 Newtons (1000 to 4000 lbs.). Radial loads were varied from 1335 to 13,350 Newtons (300 to 3000 lbs.). RP-1 lubrication for the bearing was provided through a stationary jet ring located adjacent to the test bearing outer ring. Increases in both the thrust and radial loads resulted in increased bearing temperature, while increases in shaft speed resulted in much more dramatic increases in bearing temperature. These trends are typical for ball bearings operating under these types of conditions. Results are given for outer ring temperatures of the test bearing at the various test conditions employed. In addition, the heat energy removed from the bearing by the RP-1 was determined by measuring the increase in temperature as the RP-1 passed through the bearing. Results showed that the amount of heat energy removed by the RP-1 increased with both shaft speed and RP-1 flow rate to the bearing.

  17. Static Load Distribution in Ball Bearings

    Ricci, Mario

    2010-01-01

    A numerical procedure for computing the internal loading distribution in statically loaded, single-row, angular-contact ball bearings when subjected to a known combined radial and thrust load is presented. The combined radial and thrust load must be applied in order to avoid tilting between inner and outer rings. The numerical procedure requires the iterative solution of Z + 2 simultaneous nonlinear equations - where Z is the number of the balls - to yield an exact solution for axial and radial deflections, and contact angles. Numerical results for a 218 angular-contact ball bearing have been compared with those from the literature and show significant differences in the magnitudes of the ball loads, contact angles, and the extent of the loading zone.

  18. The preliminary design of bearings for the control system of a high-temperature lithium-cooled nuclear reactor

    Yacobucci, H. G.; Waldron, W. D.; Walowit, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    The design of bearings for the control system of a fast reactor concept is presented. The bearings are required to operate at temperatures up to 2200 F in one of two fluids, lithium or argon. Basic bearing types are the same regardless of the fluid. Crowned cylindrical journals were selected for radially loaded bearings and modified spherical bearings were selected for bearings under combined thrust and radial loads. Graphite and aluminum oxide are the materials selected for the argon atmosphere bearings while cermet compositions (carbides or nitrides bonded with refractory metals) were selected for the lithium lubricated bearings. Mounting of components is by shrink fit or by axial clamping utilizing differential thermal expansion.

  19. Hydrodynamic bearings

    Bonneau, Dominique; Souchet, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    This Series provides the necessary elements to the development and validation of numerical prediction models for hydrodynamic bearings. This book describes the rheological models and the equations of lubrication. It also presents the numerical approaches used to solve the above equations by finite differences, finite volumes and finite elements methods.

  20. Conical Magnetic Bearing Development and Magnetic Bearing Testing for Extreme Temperature Environments

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Jansen, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The main proposed research of this grant were: to design a high-temperature, conical magnetic bearing facility, to test the high-temperature, radial magnetic bearing facility to higher speeds, to investigate different backup bearing designs and materials, to retrofit the high-temperature test facility with a magnetic thrust bearing, to evaluate test bearings at various conditions, and test several lubricants using a spiral orbit tribometer. A high-temperature, conical magnetic bearing facility has been fully developed using Solidworks. The facility can reuse many of the parts of the current high-temperature, radial magnetic bearing, helping to reduce overall build costs. The facility has the ability to measure bearing force capacity in the X, Y, and Z directions through a novel bearing mounting design. The high temperature coils and laminations, a main component of the facility, are based upon the current radial design and can be fabricated at Texas A&M University. The coil design was highly successful in the radial magnetic bearing. Vendors were contacted about fabrication of the high temperature lamination stack. Stress analysis was done on the laminations. Some of the components were procured, but due to budget cuts, the facility build up was stopped.

  1. Computer-aided selection of materials for cryogenic turbopump bearings

    Maurer, R. E.; Pallini, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    The life requirement for the angular contact ball bearings in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) high-pressure-oxygen turbopump (HPOTP) is 7.5 hours. In actual operation, significantly shorter service life has been experienced. The objective of this current program is to identify bearing materials and/or materials processing techniques offering significant potential for extending HPOTP bearing performance life. A thermomechanical analysis of the HPOTP shaft/bearing system was performed with the SHABERTH (SHaft-BEaring-THermal) computer program. Bearing fatigue life, ball-race contact stress, heat generation rate, bulk ring temperatures, and circumferential stress in the inner rings were quantified as functions of radial load, thrust load, and ball-race contact friction. The analysis results were used to formulate criteria that are being used for the selection of special materials for future turbopump bearings.

  2. Collar nut and thrust ring

    Lowery, Guy B.

    1991-01-01

    A collar nut comprises a hollow cylinder having fine interior threads at one end for threadably engaging a pump mechanical seal assembly and an inwardly depending flange at the other end. The flange has an enlarged portion with a groove for receiving an O-ring for sealing against the intrusion of pumpage from the exterior. The enlarged portion engages a thrust ring about the pump shaft for crushing a hard O-ring, such as a graphite O-ring. The hard O-ring seals the interior of the mechanical seal assembly and pump housing against the loss of lubricants or leakage of pumpage. The fine threads of the hollow cylinder provide the mechanical advantage for crushing the hard O-ring evenly and easily with a hand tool from the side of the collar nut rather than by tightening a plurality of bolts from the end and streamlines the exterior surface of the mechanical seal. The collar nut avoids the spatial requirements of bolt heads at the end of a seal and associated bolt head turbulence.

  3. Benchmarking numerical models of brittle thrust wedges

    Buiter, Susanne J. H.; Schreurs, Guido; Albertz, Markus; Gerya, Taras V.; Kaus, Boris; Landry, Walter; le Pourhiet, Laetitia; Mishin, Yury; Egholm, David L.; Cooke, Michele; Maillot, Bertrand; Thieulot, Cedric; Crook, Tony; May, Dave; Souloumiac, Pauline; Beaumont, Christopher

    2016-11-01

    We report quantitative results from three brittle thrust wedge experiments, comparing numerical results directly with each other and with corresponding analogue results. We first test whether the participating codes reproduce predictions from analytical critical taper theory. Eleven codes pass the stable wedge test, showing negligible internal deformation and maintaining the initial surface slope upon horizontal translation over a frictional interface. Eight codes participated in the unstable wedge test that examines the evolution of a wedge by thrust formation from a subcritical state to the critical taper geometry. The critical taper is recovered, but the models show two deformation modes characterised by either mainly forward dipping thrusts or a series of thrust pop-ups. We speculate that the two modes are caused by differences in effective basal boundary friction related to different algorithms for modelling boundary friction. The third experiment examines stacking of forward thrusts that are translated upward along a backward thrust. The results of the seven codes that run this experiment show variability in deformation style, number of thrusts, thrust dip angles and surface slope. Overall, our experiments show that numerical models run with different numerical techniques can successfully simulate laboratory brittle thrust wedge models at the cm-scale. In more detail, however, we find that it is challenging to reproduce sandbox-type setups numerically, because of frictional boundary conditions and velocity discontinuities. We recommend that future numerical-analogue comparisons use simple boundary conditions and that the numerical Earth Science community defines a plasticity test to resolve the variability in model shear zones.

  4. Porous Squeeze Film Bearing with Rough Surfaces Lubricated by a Bingham Fluid

    Walicka, A.; Walicki, E.; Jurczak, P.; Falicki, J.

    2014-11-01

    In the paper the effect of both bearing surfaces and the porosity of one bearing surface on the pressure distribution and load-carrying capacity of a squeeze film bearing is discussed. The equations of motion of a Bingham fluid in a bearing clearance and in a porous layer are presented. Using the Morgan-Cameron approximation and Christensen theory of rough lubrication the modified Reynolds equation is obtained. The analytical solutions of this equation for a squeeze film bearing are presented. As a result one obtains the formulae expressing pressure distribution and load-carrying capacity. A thrust radial bearing is considered as a numerical example.

  5. Porous Squeeze Film Bearing with Rough Surfaces Lubricated by a Bingham Fluid

    Walicka A.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In the paper the effect of both bearing surfaces and the porosity of one bearing surface on the pressure distribution and load-carrying capacity of a squeeze film bearing is discussed. The equations of motion of a Bingham fluid in a bearing clearance and in a porous layer are presented. Using the Morgan-Cameron approximation and Christensen theory of rough lubrication the modified Reynolds equation is obtained. The analytical solutions of this equation for a squeeze film bearing are presented. As a result one obtains the formulae expressing pressure distribution and load-carrying capacity. A thrust radial bearing is considered as a numerical example.

  6. 14 CFR 33.97 - Thrust reversers.

    2010-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.97 Thrust reversers. (a) If the engine incorporates a reverser, the endurance calibration, operation, and vibration tests prescribed...

  7. High Performance Methane Thrust Chamber (HPMTC) Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop a High-Performance Methane Thrust Chamber (HPMRE) to meet the demands of advanced chemical propulsion systems for deep-space mission...

  8. Evolution of the Puente Hills Thrust Fault

    Bergen, K. J.; Shaw, J. H.; Dolan, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    This study aims to assess the evolution of the blind Puente Hills thrust fault system (PHT) by determining its age of initiation, lateral propagation history, and changes in slip rate over time. The PHT presents one of the largest seismic hazards in the United States, given its location beneath downtown Los Angeles. The PHT is comprised of three fault segments: the Los Angeles (LA), Santa Fe Springs (SFS), and Coyote Hills (CH). The LA and SFS segments are characterized by growth stratigraphy where folds formed by uplift on the fault segments have been continually buried by sediment from the Los Angeles and San Gabriel rivers. The CH segment has developed topography and is characterized by onlapping growth stratigraphy. This depositional setting gives us the unique opportunity to measure uplift on the LA and SFS fault segments, and minimum uplift on the CH fault segment, as the difference in sediment thicknesses across the buried folds. We utilize depth converted oil industry seismic reflection data to image the fold geometries. Identifying time-correlative stratigraphic markers for slip rate determination in the basin has been a problem for researchers in the past, however, as the faunal assemblages observed in wells are time-transgressive by nature. To overcome this, we utilize the sequence stratigraphic model and well picks of Ponti et al. (2007) as a basis for mapping time-correlative sequence boundaries throughout our industry seismic reflection data from the present to the Pleistocene. From the Pleistocene to Miocene we identify additional sequence boundaries in our seismic reflection data from imaged sequence geometries and by correlating industry well formation tops. The sequence and formation top picks are then used to build 3-dimensional surfaces in the modeling program Gocad. From these surfaces we measure the change in thicknesses across the folds to obtain uplift rates between each sequence boundary. Our results show three distinct phases of

  9. Multiphysics Nuclear Thermal Rocket Thrust Chamber Analysis

    Wang, Ten-See

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this effort is t o develop an efficient and accurate thermo-fluid computational methodology to predict environments for hypothetical thrust chamber design and analysis. The current task scope is to perform multidimensional, multiphysics analysis of thrust performance and heat transfer analysis for a hypothetical solid-core, nuclear thermal engine including thrust chamber and nozzle. The multiphysics aspects of the model include: real fluid dynamics, chemical reactivity, turbulent flow, and conjugate heat transfer. The model will be designed to identify thermal, fluid, and hydrogen environments in all flow paths and materials. This model would then be used to perform non- nuclear reproduction of the flow element failures demonstrated in the Rover/NERVA testing, investigate performance of specific configurations and assess potential issues and enhancements. A two-pronged approach will be employed in this effort: a detailed analysis of a multi-channel, flow-element, and global modeling of the entire thrust chamber assembly with a porosity modeling technique. It is expected that the detailed analysis of a single flow element would provide detailed fluid, thermal, and hydrogen environments for stress analysis, while the global thrust chamber assembly analysis would promote understanding of the effects of hydrogen dissociation and heat transfer on thrust performance. These modeling activities will be validated as much as possible by testing performed by other related efforts.

  10. Modes of thrust generation in flying animals

    Luo, Haoxiang; Song, Jialei; Tobalske, Bret; Luo Team; Tobalske Team

    2016-11-01

    For flying animals in forward flight, thrust is usually much smaller as compared with weight support and has not been given the same amount of attention. Several modes of thrust generation are discussed in this presentation. For insects performing slow flight that is characterized by low advance ratios (i.e., the ratio between flight speed and wing speed), thrust is usually generated by a "backward flick" mode, in which the wings moves upward and backward at a faster speed than the flight speed. Paddling mode is another mode used by some insects like fruit flies who row their wings backward during upstroke like paddles (Ristroph et al., PRL, 2011). Birds wings have high advance ratios and produce thrust during downstroke by directing aerodynamic lift forward. At intermediate advance ratios around one (e.g., hummingbirds and bats), the animal wings generate thrust during both downstroke and upstroke, and thrust generation during upstroke may come at cost of negative weight support. These conclusions are supported by previous experiment studies of insects, birds, and bats, as well as our recent computational modeling of hummingbirds. Supported by the NSF.

  11. Control of Active Axial Magnetic Bearings for Flywheel-based Energy Storage System

    Morís Gómez, Juan

    2014-01-01

    This thesis deals with the design and implementation of the control system for a Flywheel-based Energy Storage System (FESS) with active magnetic bearings. The thesis focuses on the construction of realistic model of the system according to experimental tests. The simulation model will be used to control the thrust magnetic bearings in order to withstand the flywheel in levitation.

  12. Control of a Thrust Alignment Table for Modeling the Coning Dynamics of a Spinning Spacecraft with a Follower Force

    Halsmer, Dominic; Bennett, J. Damon; DeHaven, Max; Ligard, Vidar

    1999-01-01

    This document presents a system controlling the motion of a spherical air bearing used in the modeling of spacecraft dynamics and controls in a laboratory environment. The system is part of the Spinning Rocket Simulator (SRS), used to simulate the coning of spacecraft during a thrusting stage. The reaction force at the spherical air bearing supporting the spacecraft model must coincide with the thrust axis of the model for proper simulation. Therefore, the bearing is translated in a circular path to introduce a centrifugal force. This horizontal force along with the gravitational reaction force at the bearing combines to simulate the direction of the spacecraft's thrust force. The control system receives attitude information from the spacecraft model via a laser beam embedded in the model that impinges on a photosensitive array. The non-linear system is controlled using high-speed lookup tables and digital techniques. A vector-controlled motor and a stepper motor are given the necessary signals to accurately control the turntable and platform supporting the air bearing. Preliminary performance data is presented. Mechanical elements of the table and platform are described in detail. A wireless (RF) data path for all devices on the spacecraft model to an off-table command computer is also described.

  13. Thrust distribution for attitude control in a variable thrust propulsion system with four ACS nozzles

    Lim, Yeerang; Lee, Wonsuk; Bang, Hyochoong; Lee, Hosung

    2017-04-01

    A thrust distribution approach is proposed in this paper for a variable thrust solid propulsion system with an attitude control system (ACS) that uses a reduced number of nozzles for a three-axis attitude maneuver. Although a conventional variable thrust solid propulsion system needs six ACS nozzles, this paper proposes a thrust system with four ACS nozzles to reduce the complexity and mass of the system. The performance of the new system was analyzed with numerical simulations, and the results show that the performance of the system with four ACS nozzles was similar to the original system while the mass of the whole system was simultaneously reduced. Moreover, a feasibility analysis was performed to determine whether a thrust system with three ACS nozzles is possible.

  14. Thrust and Torque Characteristics Based on a New cutter-head Load Model

    LIU Jianqin; REN Jiabao; GUO Wei

    2015-01-01

    Full face rock tunnel boring machine(TBM) has been widely used in hard rock tunnels, however, there are few published theory about cutter-head design, and the design criteria of cutter-head under complex geological is not clear yet. To deal with the complex relationship among geological parameters, cutter parameters, and operating parameters during tunneling processes, a cutter-head load model is established by using CSM(Colorado school of mines) prediction model. Force distribution on cutter-head under a certain geology is calculated with the new established load model, and result shows that inner cutters bear more force than outer cutters, combining with disc cutters abrasion; a general principle of disc cutters’ layout design is proposed. Within the model, the relationship among rock uniaxial compressive strength(UCS), penetration and thrust on cutter-head are analyzed, and the results shows that with increasing penetration, cutter thrust increases, but the growth rate slows and higher penetration makes lower special energy(SE). Finally, a fitting mathematical model of ZT(ratio of cutter-head torque and thrust) and penetration is established, and verified by TB880E, which can be used to direct how to set thrust and torque on cutter-head. When penetration is small, the cutter-head thrust is the main limiting factor in tunneling;when the penetration is large, cutter-head torque is the major limiting factor in tunneling. Based on the new cutter-head load model, thrust and torque characteristics of TBM further are researched and a new way for cutter-head layout design and TBM tunneling operations is proposed.

  15. Misalignment in Gas Foil Journal Bearings: An Experimental Study

    Howard, Samuel A.

    2008-01-01

    As gas foil journal bearings become more prevalent in production machines, such as small gas turbine propulsion systems and microturbines, system-level performance issues must be identified and quantified in order to provide for successful design practices. Several examples of system-level design parameters that are not fully understood in foil bearing systems are thermal management schemes, alignment requirements, balance requirements, thrust load balancing, and others. In order to address some of these deficiencies and begin to develop guidelines, this paper presents a preliminary experimental investigation of the misalignment tolerance of gas foil journal bearing systems. Using a notional gas foil bearing supported rotor and a laser-based shaft alignment system, increasing levels of misalignment are imparted to the bearing supports while monitoring temperature at the bearing edges. The amount of misalignment that induces bearing failure is identified and compared to other conventional bearing types such as cylindrical roller bearings and angular contact ball bearings. Additionally, the dynamic response of the rotor indicates that the gas foil bearing force coefficients may be affected by misalignment.

  16. Pulsed thrust measurements using electromagnetic calibration techniques

    Tang Haibin; Shi Chenbo; Zhang Xin' ai; Zhang Zun; Cheng Jiao [School of Astronautics, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2011-03-15

    A thrust stand for accurately measuring impulse bits, which ranged from 10-1000 {mu}N s using a noncontact electromagnetic calibration technique is described. In particular, a permanent magnet structure was designed to produce a uniform magnetic field, and a multiturn coil was made to produce a calibration force less than 10 mN. The electromagnetic calibration force for pulsed thrust measurements was linear to the coil current and changed less than 2.5% when the distance between the coil and magnet changed 6 mm. A pulsed plasma thruster was first tested on the thrust stand, and afterward five single impulse bits were measured to give a 310 {mu}N s average impulse bit. Uncertainty of the measured impulse bit was analyzed to evaluate the quality of the measurement and was found to be 10 {mu}N s with 95% credibility.

  17. Status of Low Thrust Work at JSC

    Condon, Gerald L.

    2004-01-01

    High performance low thrust (solar electric, nuclear electric, variable specific impulse magnetoplasma rocket) propulsion offers a significant benefit to NASA missions beyond low Earth orbit. As NASA (e.g., Prometheus Project) endeavors to develop these propulsion systems and associated power supplies, it becomes necessary to develop a refined trajectory design capability that will allow engineers to develop future robotic and human mission designs that take advantage of this new technology. This ongoing work addresses development of a trajectory design and optimization tool for assessing low thrust (and other types) trajectories. This work targets to advance the state of the art, enable future NASA missions, enable science drivers, and enhance education. This presentation provides a summary of the low thrust-related JSC activities under the ISP program and specifically, provides a look at a new release of a multi-gravity, multispacecraft trajectory optimization tool (Copernicus) along with analysis performed using this tool over the past year.

  18. Role of wing morphing in thrust generation

    Mehdi Ghommem

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate the role of morphing on flight dynamics of two birds by simulating the flow over rigid and morphing wings that have the characteristics of two different birds, namely the Giant Petrel and Dove Prion. The simulation of a flapping rigid wing shows that the root of the wing should be placed at a specific angle of attack in order to generate enough lift to balance the weight of the bird. However, in this case the generated thrust is either very small, or even negative, depending on the wing shape. Further, results show that morphing of the wing enables a significant increase in the thrust and propulsive efficiency. This indicates that the birds actually utilize some sort of active wing twisting and bending to produce enough thrust. This study should facilitate better guidance for the design of flapping air vehicles.

  19. A microNewton thrust stand for average thrust measurement of pulsed microthruster

    Zhou, Wei-Jing; Hong, Yan-Ji; Chang, Hao

    2013-12-01

    A torsional thrust stand has been developed for the study of the average thrust for microNewton pulsed thrusters. The main body of the thrust stand mainly consists of a torsional balance, a pair of flexural pivots, a capacitive displacement sensor, a calibration assembly, and an eddy current damper. The behavior of the stand was thoroughly studied. The principle of thrust measurement was analyzed. The average thrust is determined as a function of the average equilibrium angle displacement of the balance and the spring stiffness. The thrust stand has a load capacity up to 10 kg, and it can theoretically measure the force up to 609.6 μN with a resolution of 24.4 nN. The static calibrations were performed based on the calibration assembly composed of the multiturn coil and the permanent magnet. The calibration results demonstrated good repeatability (less than 0.68% FSO) and good linearity (less than 0.88% FSO). The assembly of the multiturn coil and the permanent magnet was also used as an exciter to simulate the microthruster to further research the performance of the thrust stand. Three sets of force pulses at 17, 33.5, and 55 Hz with the same amplitude and pulse width were tested. The repeatability error at each frequency was 7.04%, 1.78%, and 5.08%, respectively.

  20. A microNewton thrust stand for average thrust measurement of pulsed microthruster.

    Zhou, Wei-Jing; Hong, Yan-Ji; Chang, Hao

    2013-12-01

    A torsional thrust stand has been developed for the study of the average thrust for microNewton pulsed thrusters. The main body of the thrust stand mainly consists of a torsional balance, a pair of flexural pivots, a capacitive displacement sensor, a calibration assembly, and an eddy current damper. The behavior of the stand was thoroughly studied. The principle of thrust measurement was analyzed. The average thrust is determined as a function of the average equilibrium angle displacement of the balance and the spring stiffness. The thrust stand has a load capacity up to 10 kg, and it can theoretically measure the force up to 609.6 μN with a resolution of 24.4 nN. The static calibrations were performed based on the calibration assembly composed of the multiturn coil and the permanent magnet. The calibration results demonstrated good repeatability (less than 0.68% FSO) and good linearity (less than 0.88% FSO). The assembly of the multiturn coil and the permanent magnet was also used as an exciter to simulate the microthruster to further research the performance of the thrust stand. Three sets of force pulses at 17, 33.5, and 55 Hz with the same amplitude and pulse width were tested. The repeatability error at each frequency was 7.04%, 1.78%, and 5.08%, respectively.

  1. Benchmarking numerical models of brittle thrust wedges

    Buiter, Susanne J H; Schreurs, Guido; Albertz, Markus; Gerya, Taras V.; Kaus, Boris; Landry, Walter; le Pourhiet, Laetitia; Mishin, Yury; Egholm, David L.; Cooke, Michele; Maillot, Bertrand; Thieulot, Cedric; Crook, Tony; May, Dave; Souloumiac, Pauline; Beaumont, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    We report quantitative results from three brittle thrust wedge experiments, comparing numerical results directly with each other and with corresponding analogue results. We first test whether the participating codes reproduce predictions from analytical critical taper theory. Eleven codes pass the s

  2. Conceptual Design and Feasibility of Foil Bearings for Rotorcraft Engines: Hot Core Bearings

    Howard, Samuel A.

    2007-01-01

    Recent developments in gas foil bearing technology have led to numerous advanced high-speed rotating system concepts, many of which have become either commercial products or experimental test articles. Examples include oil-free microturbines, motors, generators and turbochargers. The driving forces for integrating gas foil bearings into these high-speed systems are the benefits promised by removing the oil lubrication system. Elimination of the oil system leads to reduced emissions, increased reliability, and decreased maintenance costs. Another benefit is reduced power plant weight. For rotorcraft applications, this would be a major advantage, as every pound removed from the propulsion system results in a payload benefit.. Implementing foil gas bearings throughout a rotorcraft gas turbine engine is an important long-term goal that requires overcoming numerous technological hurdles. Adequate thrust bearing load capacity and potentially large gearbox applied radial loads are among them. However, by replacing the turbine end, or hot section, rolling element bearing with a gas foil bearing many of the above benefits can be realized. To this end, engine manufacturers are beginning to explore the possibilities of hot section gas foil bearings in propulsion engines. This overview presents a logical follow-on activity by analyzing a conceptual rotorcraft engine to determine the feasibility of a foil bearing supported core. Using a combination of rotordynamic analyses and a load capacity model, it is shown to be reasonable to consider a gas foil bearing core section. In addition, system level foil bearing testing capabilities at NASA Glenn Research Center are presented along with analysis work being conducted under NRA Cooperative Agreements.

  3. Precise Thrust Actuation by a Micro RF Ion Engine Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Busek proposes to develop a radio-frequency discharge, gridded micro ion engine that produces 5N level of thrust precisely adjustable over a wide dynamic thrust...

  4. Relationship between Biomechanical Characteristics of Spinal Manipulation and Neural Responses in an Animal Model: Effect of Linear Control of Thrust Displacement versus Force, Thrust Amplitude, Thrust Duration, and Thrust Rate

    William R. Reed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available High velocity low amplitude spinal manipulation (HVLA-SM is used frequently to treat musculoskeletal complaints. Little is known about the intervention’s biomechanical characteristics that determine its clinical benefit. Using an animal preparation, we determined how neural activity from lumbar muscle spindles during a lumbar HVLA-SM is affected by the type of thrust control and by the thrust's amplitude, duration, and rate. A mechanical device was used to apply a linear increase in thrust displacement or force and to control thrust duration. Under displacement control, neural responses during the HVLA-SM increased in a fashion graded with thrust amplitude. Under force control neural responses were similar regardless of the thrust amplitude. Decreasing thrust durations at all thrust amplitudes except the smallest thrust displacement had an overall significant effect on increasing muscle spindle activity during the HVLA-SMs. Under force control, spindle responses specifically and significantly increased between thrust durations of 75 and 150 ms suggesting the presence of a threshold value. Thrust velocities greater than 20–30 mm/s and thrust rates greater than 300 N/s tended to maximize the spindle responses. This study provides a basis for considering biomechanical characteristics of an HVLA-SM that should be measured and reported in clinical efficacy studies to help define effective clinical dosages.

  5. Relationship between Biomechanical Characteristics of Spinal Manipulation and Neural Responses in an Animal Model: Effect of Linear Control of Thrust Displacement versus Force, Thrust Amplitude, Thrust Duration, and Thrust Rate.

    Reed, William R; Cao, Dong-Yuan; Long, Cynthia R; Kawchuk, Gregory N; Pickar, Joel G

    2013-01-01

    High velocity low amplitude spinal manipulation (HVLA-SM) is used frequently to treat musculoskeletal complaints. Little is known about the intervention's biomechanical characteristics that determine its clinical benefit. Using an animal preparation, we determined how neural activity from lumbar muscle spindles during a lumbar HVLA-SM is affected by the type of thrust control and by the thrust's amplitude, duration, and rate. A mechanical device was used to apply a linear increase in thrust displacement or force and to control thrust duration. Under displacement control, neural responses during the HVLA-SM increased in a fashion graded with thrust amplitude. Under force control neural responses were similar regardless of the thrust amplitude. Decreasing thrust durations at all thrust amplitudes except the smallest thrust displacement had an overall significant effect on increasing muscle spindle activity during the HVLA-SMs. Under force control, spindle responses specifically and significantly increased between thrust durations of 75 and 150 ms suggesting the presence of a threshold value. Thrust velocities greater than 20-30 mm/s and thrust rates greater than 300 N/s tended to maximize the spindle responses. This study provides a basis for considering biomechanical characteristics of an HVLA-SM that should be measured and reported in clinical efficacy studies to help define effective clinical dosages.

  6. Thrust and Propulsive Efficiency from an Instructive Viewpoint

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    In a typical engineering or physics curriculum, the momentum equation is used for the determination of jet engine thrust. Even a simple thrust analysis requires a heavy emphasis on mathematics that can cause students and engineers to lose a physical perspective on thrust. This article provides for this physical understanding using only static…

  7. 40Ar/39Ar dating of Daqingshan thrust

    LIU Zhenghong; XU Zhongyuan; YANG Zhensheng

    2003-01-01

    The Daqingshan thrust system, to the south of the Shiguai Mesozoic basin, is a complex system of top-to- the-north thrusting tectonic sheets. The thrust system has a complicated evolution due to multi-stage thrusting. In order to date the thrusting events, syntectonic muscovite and biotite grains are respectively analyzed with normal 40Ar/39Ar dating and laser 40Ar/39Ar dating, which yield 2 isochron ages, i.e. 193.74 ± 3.88 Ma and 121.6 ± 1.6 Ma. These ages suggest that faults within the Daqingshan thrust system formed during 2 stages of thrusting, one the early Indosinian and the other the late Yanshanian. The isotopic dating is consistent with field geological relations. Indosinan deformation is evidenced by top-to-the-north thrusting, with the occurrence of a series of large-scale east-west trending thrust faults and folds, while the Yanshanian thrusting is characterized by top-to-the-NNW thrusting. It is superposed on and modifies early Indosinian thrust faults.

  8. MATERIALS PERFORMANCE TARGETED THRUST FY 2004 PROJECTS

    DOE

    2005-09-13

    The Yucca Mountain site was recommended by the President to be a geological repository for commercial spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The multi-barrier approach was adopted for assessing and predicting system behavior, including both natural barriers and engineered barriers. A major component of the long-term strategy for safe disposal of nuclear waste is first to completely isolate the radionuclides in waste packages for long times and then to greatly retard the egress and transport of radionuclides from penetrated packages. The goal of the Materials Performance Targeted Thrust program is to further enhance the understanding of the role of engineered barriers in waste isolation. In addition, the Thrust will explore technical enhancements and seek to offer improvements in materials costs and reliability.

  9. NATURAL BARRIERS TARGETED THRUST FY 2004 PROJECTS

    NA

    2005-07-27

    This booklet contains project descriptions of work performed by the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), Office of Science and Technology and International's (OST&I) Natural Barriers Targeted Thrust during Fiscal Year (FY) 2004. The Natural Barriers Targeted Thrust is part of OST&I's Science and Technology Program which supports the OCRWM mission to manage and dispose of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel in a manner that protects health, safety, and the environment; enhances national and energy security; and merits public confidence. In general, the projects described will continue beyond FY 2004 assuming that the technical work remains relevant to the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository and sufficient funding is made available to the Science and Technology Program.

  10. Lubrication of Space Shuttle Main Engine Turbopump Bearings

    Gibson, Howard; Munafo, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Space Shuttle has three main engines that are used for propulsion into orbit. These engines are fed propellants by four turbopumps on each engine. A main element in the turbopump is the bearings supporting the rotor that spins the turbine blades and the pump impeller. These bearings are required to spin at very high speeds, support radial and thrust loads, and have high wear resistance without the benefit of lubrication. The liquid hydrogen and oxygen propellants flow through the bearings to cool the surfaces. The volatile nature of the propellants excludes any conventional means of lubrication. Lubrication for these bearings is provided by the ball separator inside the bearing. The separator is a composite material that supplies a transfer film of lubrication to the rings and balls. New separator materials and lubrication schemes have been investigated at Marshall Space Flight Center in a bearing test rig with promising results. Hybrid bearings with silicon nitride balls have also been evaluated. The use of hybrid, silicon nitride ball bearings in conjunction -with better separator materials has shown excellent results. The work that Marshall has done is being utilized in turbopumps flying on the space shuttle fleet and will be utilized in future space travel. This result of this work is valuable for all aerospace and commercial applications where high-speed bearings are used.

  11. Benchmarking analogue models of brittle thrust wedges

    Schreurs, Guido; Buiter, Susanne J. H.; Boutelier, Jennifer; Burberry, Caroline; Callot, Jean-Paul; Cavozzi, Cristian; Cerca, Mariano; Chen, Jian-Hong; Cristallini, Ernesto; Cruden, Alexander R.; Cruz, Leonardo; Daniel, Jean-Marc; Da Poian, Gabriela; Garcia, Victor H.; Gomes, Caroline J. S.; Grall, Céline; Guillot, Yannick; Guzmán, Cecilia; Hidayah, Triyani Nur; Hilley, George; Klinkmüller, Matthias; Koyi, Hemin A.; Lu, Chia-Yu; Maillot, Bertrand; Meriaux, Catherine; Nilfouroushan, Faramarz; Pan, Chang-Chih; Pillot, Daniel; Portillo, Rodrigo; Rosenau, Matthias; Schellart, Wouter P.; Schlische, Roy W.; Take, Andy; Vendeville, Bruno; Vergnaud, Marine; Vettori, Matteo; Wang, Shih-Hsien; Withjack, Martha O.; Yagupsky, Daniel; Yamada, Yasuhiro

    2016-11-01

    We performed a quantitative comparison of brittle thrust wedge experiments to evaluate the variability among analogue models and to appraise the reproducibility and limits of model interpretation. Fifteen analogue modeling laboratories participated in this benchmark initiative. Each laboratory received a shipment of the same type of quartz and corundum sand and all laboratories adhered to a stringent model building protocol and used the same type of foil to cover base and sidewalls of the sandbox. Sieve structure, sifting height, filling rate, and details on off-scraping of excess sand followed prescribed procedures. Our analogue benchmark shows that even for simple plane-strain experiments with prescribed stringent model construction techniques, quantitative model results show variability, most notably for surface slope, thrust spacing and number of forward and backthrusts. One of the sources of the variability in model results is related to slight variations in how sand is deposited in the sandbox. Small changes in sifting height, sifting rate, and scraping will result in slightly heterogeneous material bulk densities, which will affect the mechanical properties of the sand, and will result in lateral and vertical differences in peak and boundary friction angles, as well as cohesion values once the model is constructed. Initial variations in basal friction are inferred to play the most important role in causing model variability. Our comparison shows that the human factor plays a decisive role, and even when one modeler repeats the same experiment, quantitative model results still show variability. Our observations highlight the limits of up-scaling quantitative analogue model results to nature or for making comparisons with numerical models. The frictional behavior of sand is highly sensitive to small variations in material state or experimental set-up, and hence, it will remain difficult to scale quantitative results such as number of thrusts, thrust spacing

  12. Conical Magnetic Bearings Developed for Active Stall Control in Gas Turbine Engines

    Trudell, Jeffrey J.; Kascak, Albert F.; Provenza, Andrew J.; Buccieri, Carl J.

    2004-01-01

    Active stall control is a current research area at the NASA Glenn Research Center that offers a great benefit in specific fuel consumption by allowing the gas turbine to operate beyond the onset of stall. Magnetic bearings are being investigated as a new method to perform active stall control. This enabling global aviation safety technology would result in improved fuel efficiency and decreased carbon dioxide emissions, as well as improve safety and reliability by eliminating oil-related delays and failures of engine components, which account for 40 percent of the commercial aircraft departure delays. Active stall control works by perturbing the flow in front of the compressor stage such that it cancels the pressure wave, which causes the compressor to go into stall. Radial magnetic bearings are able to whirl the shaft so that variations in blade tip leakage would flow upstream causing a perturbation wave that could cancel the rotating stall cell. Axial or thrust magnetic bearings cannot be used to cancel the surge mode in the compressor because they have a very low bandwidth and thus cannot modulate at a high enough frequency. Frequency response is limited because the thrust runner cannot be laminated. To improve the bandwidth of magnetic thrust bearings, researchers must use laminations to suppress the eddy currents. A conical magnetic bearing can be laminated, resulting in increased bandwidth in the axial direction. In addition, this design can produce both radial and thrust force in a single bearing, simplifying the installation. The proposed solution combines the radial and thrust bearing into one design that can be laminated--a conical magnetic bearing. The new conical magnetic bearing test rig, funded by a Glenn fiscal year 2002 Director's Discretionary Fund, was needed because none of the existing rigs has an axial degree of freedom. The rotor bearing configuration will simulate that of the main shaft on a gas turbine engine. One conical magnetic bearing

  13. MHD thrust vectoring of a rocket engine

    Labaune, Julien; Packan, Denis; Tholin, Fabien; Chemartin, Laurent; Stillace, Thierry; Masson, Frederic

    2016-09-01

    In this work, the possibility to use MagnetoHydroDynamics (MHD) to vectorize the thrust of a solid propellant rocket engine exhaust is investigated. Using a magnetic field for vectoring offers a mass gain and a reusability advantage compared to standard gimbaled, elastomer-joint systems. Analytical and numerical models were used to evaluate the flow deviation with a 1 Tesla magnetic field inside the nozzle. The fluid flow in the resistive MHD approximation is calculated using the KRONOS code from ONERA, coupling the hypersonic CFD platform CEDRE and the electrical code SATURNE from EDF. A critical parameter of these simulations is the electrical conductivity, which was evaluated using a set of equilibrium calculations with 25 species. Two models were used: local thermodynamic equilibrium and frozen flow. In both cases, chlorine captures a large fraction of free electrons, limiting the electrical conductivity to a value inadequate for thrust vectoring applications. However, when using chlorine-free propergols with 1% in mass of alkali, an MHD thrust vectoring of several degrees was obtained.

  14. Thrust Vector Control for Nuclear Thermal Rockets

    Ensworth, Clinton B. F.

    2013-01-01

    Future space missions may use Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) stages for human and cargo missions to Mars and other destinations. The vehicles are likely to require engine thrust vector control (TVC) to maintain desired flight trajectories. This paper explores requirements and concepts for TVC systems for representative NTR missions. Requirements for TVC systems were derived using 6 degree-of-freedom models of NTR vehicles. Various flight scenarios were evaluated to determine vehicle attitude control needs and to determine the applicability of TVC. Outputs from the models yielded key characteristics including engine gimbal angles, gimbal rates and gimbal actuator power. Additional factors such as engine thrust variability and engine thrust alignment errors were examined for impacts to gimbal requirements. Various technologies are surveyed for TVC systems for the NTR applications. A key factor in technology selection is the unique radiation environment present in NTR stages. Other considerations including mission duration and thermal environments influence the selection of optimal TVC technologies. Candidate technologies are compared to see which technologies, or combinations of technologies best fit the requirements for selected NTR missions. Representative TVC systems are proposed and key properties such as mass and power requirements are defined. The outputs from this effort can be used to refine NTR system sizing models, providing higher fidelity definition for TVC systems for future studies.

  15. The thrust belts of Western North America

    Moulton, F.C.

    1993-08-01

    Most of the Basin and Range physiographic province of western North America is now believed to be part of the overthrust. The more obvious overthrust belt along the eastern edge of the Basin and Range Province is named the Sevier orogenic belt, where older rocks are observed thrust onto younger rocks. More detailed surface geological mapping, plus deep multiple-fold geophysical work and many oil and gas wildcat wells, have confirmed an east-vergent shortened and stacked sequence is present in many places in the Basin and Range. This western compressive deformed area in east central Nevada is now named the Elko orogenic belt by the U.S. Geological Survey. This older compressed Elko orogenic belt started forming approximately 250 m.y. ago when the North American plate started to move west as the Pangaea supercontinent started to fragment. The North American plate moved west under the sediments of the Miogeocline that were also moving west. Surface-formed highlands and oceanic island arcs on the west edge of the North American plate restricted the westward movement of the sediments in the Miogeocline, causing east-vergent ramp thrusts to form above the westward-moving North American plate. The flat, eastward-up-cutting thrust assemblages moved on the detachment surfaces.

  16. Relationships between thrusting and joint systems in the Jaca thrust-top basin, Spanish Pyrenees

    Turner, J. P.; Hancock, P. L.

    The Oligo-Miocene rocks of the West Jaca thrust-top basin and adjacent parts of the Ebro basin are cut by up to eight sets of joints and allied mesofractures. The fractures belong to three groups that can be distinguished on the basis of their relative ages and geometry. An older group of joints strikes normal or subnormal to the Pyrenean mountain front and is restricted to subareas (here called front-normal joint domains) coincident with the immediate footwalls of thrusts. Joints striking parallel to a buried lateral ramp characterize a lateral ramp joint domain. Younger joints striking parallel or subparallel to the mountain front occur throughout most of the West Jaca and Ebro basins, and define front-parallel joint domains. The joint domains appear to reflect the geometry and evolution of thrust sheets. Joints in front-normal domains were formed during stretching of footwalls as a result of their loading by overriding thrust sheets. Stretching above a lateral ramp is thought to be responsible for the development of joints in the lateral ramp domain. Joints in the front-parallel domains of the West Jaca basin are related to stretching in growth folds that were amplifying during salt doming. Front-parallel joints in the Ebro basin are attributed to stretching of a foreland basin sequence above a basement flexure related to thrust loading.

  17. A fully superconducting bearing system for flywheel applications

    Xu, Ke-xi; Wu, Dong-jie; Jiao, Y. L.; Zheng, M. H.

    2016-06-01

    A fully superconducting magnetic suspension structure has been designed and constructed for the purpose of superconducting bearing applications in flywheel energy storage systems. A thrust type bearing and two journal type bearings, those that are composed of melt textured high-Tc superconductor YBCO bulks and Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets, are used in the bearing system. The rotor dynamical behaviors, including critical speeds and rotational loss, are studied. Driven by a variable-frequency three-phase induction motor, the rotor shaft attached with a 25 kg flywheel disc can be speeded up to 15 000 rpm without serious resonance occurring. Although the flywheel system runs stably in the supercritical speeds region, very obvious rotational loss is unavoidable. The loss mechanism has been discussed in terms of eddy current loss and hysteresis loss.

  18. Design, fabrication, and performance of foil journal bearing for the brayton rotating unit

    Licht, L.; Branger, M.

    1973-01-01

    Foil bearings were designed and manufactured to replace pivoted-shoe journal bearings in an existing Brayton Cycle turbo-alternator-compressor. The design of this unconventional rotor support was accomplished within the constraints and space limitations imposed by the present machine, and the substitution of foil bearings was effected without changes or modification other machine components. A housing and a test rig were constructed to incorporate the new foil-bearing support into a unified assemble with an air-driven rotor and the gimbal-mounted thrust bearing, seals, and shrouds of an actual Brayton Rotating Unit. The foil bearing required no external pressure source, and stable self-acting rotation was achieved at all speeds up to 43,200 rpm. Excellent wipe-wear characteristics of the foil bearing permitted well over 1000 start-stop cycles with no deterioriation of performance in the entire speed range.

  19. Development and Testing of an Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearing

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has developed and tested a revolutionary Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearing. The objective of this work is to develop a viable non-contact magnetic thrust bearing utilizing Halbach arrays for all-electric flight, and many other applications. This concept will help to reduce harmful emissions, reduce the Nation s dependence on fossil fuels and mitigate many of the concerns and limitations encountered in conventional axial bearings such as bearing wear, leaks, seals and friction loss. The Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearing is inherently stable and requires no active feedback control system or superconductivity as required in many magnetic bearing designs. The Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearing is useful for very high speed applications including turbines, instrumentation, medical systems, computer memory systems, and space power systems such as flywheels. Magnetic fields suspend and support a rotor assembly within a stator. Advanced technologies developed for particle accelerators, and currently under development for maglev trains and rocket launchers, served as the basis for this application. Experimental hardware was successfully designed and developed to validate the basic principles and analyses. The report concludes that the implementation of Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearings can provide significant improvements in rotational system performance and reliability.

  20. Initiation of a thrust fault revealed by analog experiments

    Dotare, Tatsuya; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Adam, Juergen; Hori, Takane; Sakaguchi, Hide

    2016-08-01

    To reveal in detail the process of initiation of a thrust fault, we conducted analog experiments with dry quartz sand using a high-resolution digital image correlation technique to identify minor shear-strain patterns for every 27 μm of shortening (with an absolute displacement accuracy of 0.5 μm). The experimental results identified a number of "weak shear bands" and minor uplift prior to the initiation of a thrust in cross-section view. The observations suggest that the process is closely linked to the activity of an adjacent existing thrust, and can be divided into three stages. Stage 1 is characterized by a series of abrupt and short-lived weak shear bands at the location where the thrust will subsequently be generated. The area that will eventually be the hanging wall starts to uplift before the fault forms. The shear strain along the existing thrust decreases linearly during this stage. Stage 2 is defined by the generation of the new thrust and active displacements along it, identified by the shear strain along the thrust. The location of the new thrust may be constrained by its back-thrust, generally produced at the foot of the surface slope. The activity of the existing thrust falls to zero once the new thrust is generated, although these two events are not synchronous. Stage 3 of the thrust is characterized by a constant displacement that corresponds to the shortening applied to the model. Similar minor shear bands have been reported in the toe area of the Nankai accretionary prism, SW Japan. By comparing several transects across this subduction margin, we can classify the lateral variations in the structural geometry into the same stages of deformation identified in our experiments. Our findings may also be applied to the evaluation of fracture distributions in thrust belts during unconventional hydrocarbon exploration and production.

  1. Study on seal improvement and rotor thrust control of centrifugal compressor

    2007-01-01

    Fluid pressure variations due to process fluctuations or balance drum seal degradation can result in rotor thrust increasing that may jeopardize thrust bearing and compressor's reliability. Also, the leakage flow through balance drum seal can seriously affect the efficiency of compressor. A method that can improve both the efficiency and reliability of centrifugal compressor is presented. The method focused on rotor thrust control and balance drum seal upgrading. The low leakage feature of Dry-Gas-Seal(DGS), high reliability of labyrinth, and the feasibility of upgrading existing structure are taken into account at the same time to design a combined labyrinth-dry gas seal system on the balancing drum. Based on the combined seal system, a Fault Self-Recovering(FSR) system for the fault of rotor shaft displacement is introduced to assure the safety and reliability of centrifugal compressor. The modern Computational Fluid Dynamics(CFD) is used to validate this envision. The numerical result and relevant information indicate that the combined sealing system could improve the efficiency of the centrifugal compressor by about 4%.

  2. Optimum Staging with Varying Thrust Attitude Angle

    T. N. Srivastava

    1966-07-01

    Full Text Available Optimum staging programme for step rockets of arbitrary number of stages having different specific impulses and mass fractions with stages is derived, the optimization criterion being minimum take-off weight for a desired burntout velocity at an assigned altitude. Variation of thrust attitude angle from stage to stage and effects of gravity factor are taken into account. Analysis is performed for a degenerate problem obtained by relaxing the altitude constraint and it has been shown that problems of Weisbord, Subotowicz, Hall & Zambelli and Malina & Summerfield are the particular cases of the degenerate problem.

  3. Fluid storage and transport in thrust belts: the Gavarnie Thrust system revisited

    McCaig, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    There has been renewed interest in the pressure and movement of fluids in thrust systems in recent years with the discovery and increasing importance of slow slip earthquakes. Unfortunately the overpressured regime thought to be the source region for both normal and slow-slip earthquakes is inaccessible to direct observation, so information about the actual water content, flow regimes and permeability structure at the time of thrusting can only be obtained in exhumed rocks. The Gavarnie Thrust System in the Pyrenees (including the immediate footwall of the thrust and overlying thrust sheets) is exceptionally well studied in terms of structural and microstructural work, fluid inclusions, and isotopic tracing of fluid flow. Southward thrusting by 12-15 km occurred during the Eocene, and the current geometry of the thrust is a broad dome, allowing sampling at many locations. There is abundant evidence for near-lithostatic fluid pressures at depths of 8-15 km in the crust and temperatures of 300-400 °C, and fluids at these levels are dominated by hypersaline brines with Cl/Br ratios indicating evaporation of seawater. They are inferred to be derived from widespread Triassic evaporates, and stored in underlying redbeds and fractured basement rocks. There is also evidence from fluid inclusions for periodic pressure cycling down to near-hydrostatic values. This is thought to be related to co-seismic fault valve behaviour with release of fluid both into the shallow thrust and into steeply dipping shear zones in the hangingwall. Isotopic studies of carbonate mylonites along the Gavarnie thrust indicate unidirectional southward (structurally upward) flow of fluid , again probably mainly during transient veining events. These relatively slow moving fluids appear to have fed into a hydrostatic regime with topographically driven flow at higher levels. If time averaged permeability was high, most of the fluid would have rapidly escaped, since there is little opportunity to

  4. Emergency Control Aircraft System Using Thrust Modulation

    Burken, John J. (Inventor); Burcham, Frank W., Jr. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A digital longitudinal Aircraft Propulsion Control (APC system of a multiengine aircraft is provided by engine thrust modulation in response to comparing an input flightpath angle signal (gamma)c from a pilot thumbwheel. or an ILS system with a sensed flightpath angle y to produce an error signal (gamma)e that is then integrated (with reasonable limits) to generate a drift correction signal to be added to the error signal (gamma)e after first subtracting a lowpass filtered velocity signal Vel(sub f) for phugoid damping. The output error signal is multiplied by a constant to produce an aircraft thrust control signal ATC of suitable amplitude to drive a throttle servo for all engines. each of which includes its own full-authority digital engine control (FADEC) computer. An alternative APC system omits sensed flightpath angle feedback and instead controls the flightpath angle by feedback of the lowpass filtered velocity signal Vel(sub f) which also inherently provides phugoid damping. The feature of drift compensation is retained.

  5. Experimental Results of Schlicher's Thrusting Antenna

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Niedra, Janis M.

    2001-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to test the claims by Rex L. Schlicher, et al., (Patent 5,142,86 1) that a certain antenna geometry produces thrust greatly exceeding radiation reaction, when driven by repetitive, fast rise, and relatively slower decay current pulses. In order to test this hypothesis, the antenna was suspended by strings as a 3 in pendulum. Current pulses were fed to the antenna along the suspension path by a very flexible coaxial line constructed from loudspeaker cable and copper braid sheath. When driving the antenna via this cabling, our pulser was capable of sustaining 1200 A pulses at a rate of 30 per second up to a minute. In this way, bursts of pulses could be delivered in synch with the pendulum period in order to build up any motion. However, when using a laser beam passing through a lens attached to the antenna to amplify linear displacement by a factor of at least 25, no correlated motion of the beam spot could be detected on a distant wall. We conclude, in agreement with the momentum theorem of classical electromagnetic theory, that any thrust produced is far below practically useful levels. Hence, within classical electrodynamics, there is little hope of detecting any low level motion that cannot be explained by interactions with surrounding structural steel and the Earth's magnetic field.

  6. A 3-D Model of Stacked Thrusts in the Sevier Thrust Belt, Eastern Idaho

    Clayton, R. W.; Clayton, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    Using published and new geologic map data and two exploratory wells for control, we constructed a three-dimensional geological model of the Pine Creek area in the Big Hole Mountains of eastern Idaho, where stacked Sevier thrust sheets are exposed at the surface. In this area, Cretaceous crustal shortening displaced and folded strata from Cambrian to Cretaceous in age. Using geologic map data as a primary input to a 3-D model presents a number of challenges, especially representing fault geometries at depth and maintaining strata thicknesses. The highly variable attitudes measured at the surface are also difficult to represent in a subsurface model because they require extensive extrapolation to depth. To overcome these challenges we EarthVision software, which has tools for model construction with minimal data inputs and uses a minimum tension algorithm to create geologically realistic surfaces. We also constructed two primary cross-sections to constrain strata and fault geometries according to structural principles, and used these to guide construction of fault and horizon surfaces. We then designated horizons with the best control as reference horizons to constrain strata geometries, and built the remaining horizons using isochores to add or subtract from those surfaces. The model shows classic flat-ramp thrust geometries as seen farther southeast in the Wyoming section of the thrust belt. The model also shows uniform southwestward tilting of faults and strata in the north end above younger thrusts, but strong effects from a duplex on a younger thrust fault encountered in the southern well, which rotated the strata and older faults above it.

  7. Versatile and Extensible, Continuous-Thrust Trajectory Optimization Tool Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop an innovative, versatile and extensible, continuous-thrust trajectory optimization tool for planetary mission design and optimization of...

  8. Cryogenic Hybrid Magnetic Bearing

    Meeks, Crawford R.; Dirusso, Eliseo; Brown, Gerald V.

    1994-01-01

    Cryogenic hybrid magnetic bearing is example of class of magnetic bearings in which permanent magnets and electromagnets used to suspend shafts. Electromagnets provide active control of position of shaft. Bearing operates at temperatures from -320 degrees F (-196 degrees C) to 650 degrees F (343 degrees C); designed for possible use in rocket-engine turbopumps, where effects of cryogenic environment and fluid severely limit lubrication of conventional ball bearings. This and similar bearings also suitable for terrestrial rotating machinery; for example, gas-turbine engines, high-vacuum pumps, canned pumps, precise gimbals that suspend sensors, and pumps that handle corrosive or gritty fluids.

  9. TOPICAL REVIEW: Superconducting bearings

    Hull, John R.

    2000-02-01

    The physics and technology of superconducting bearings is reviewed. Particular attention is given to the use of high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) in rotating bearings. The basic phenomenology of levitational forces is presented, followed by a brief discussion of the theoretical models that can be used for conceptual understanding and calculations. The merits of various HTS bearing designs are presented, and the behaviour of HTS bearings in typical situations is discussed. The article concludes with a brief survey of various proposed applications for HTS bearings.

  10. Teddy Bear Stories

    van Leeuwen, Theo; Caldas-Coulthardt, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a semiotic analysis of a key cultural artefact, the teddy bear. After introducing the iconography of the teddy bear, it analyses different kinds of stories to show how teddy bears are endowed with meaning in everyday life: stories from children's books, reminiscenses by adults...... about their childhood teddy bears, and children's accounts of what they do with teddy bears, both written for school and told 'out of school', The chapter sees teddy bears as artefacts that provide a cultural channeling for the child's need of a transitional object and argues that the meanings of teddy...... bears have traditionally centred on interpersonal relations within the nuclear family, but have recently been institutionalized and commercialized....

  11. Secondary production of massive quarks in thrust

    Hoang, André H. [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, Boltzmanngasse 5, A-1090 Wien (Austria); Erwin Schrödinger International Institute for Mathematical Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 9, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Mateu, Vicent [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, Boltzmanngasse 5, A-1090 Wien (Austria); Pietrulewicz, Piotr [Theory Group, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), D-22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-01-22

    We present a factorization framework that takes into account the production of heavy quarks through gluon splitting in the thrust distribution for e{sup +}e{sup −} → hadrons. The explicit factorization theorems and some numerical results are displayed in the dijet region where the kinematic scales are widely separated, which can be extended systematically to the whole spectrum. We account for the necessary two-loop matrix elements, threshold corrections, and include resummation up to N{sup 3}LL order. We include nonperturbative power corrections through a field theoretical shape function, and remove the O(Λ{sub QCD}) renormalon in the partonic soft function by appropriate mass-dependent subtractions. Our results hold for any value of the quark mass, from an infinitesimally small (merging to the known massless result) to an infinitely large one (achieving the decoupling limit). This is the first example of an application of a variable flavor number scheme to final state jets.

  12. Secondary production of massive quarks in thrust

    Hoang, Andre H. [Wien Univ. (Austria). Fakultaet fuer Physik; Vienna Univ. (Austria). Erwin Schroedinger International Institute for Mathematical Physics; Mateu, Vicent [Wien Univ. (Austria). Fakultaet fuer Physik; Pietrulewicz, Piotr [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). Gruppe Theorie

    2014-12-15

    We present a factorization framework that takes into account the production of heavy quarks through gluon splitting in the thrust distribution for e{sup +}e{sup -}→hadrons. The explicit factorization theorems and some numerical results are displayed in the dijet region where the kinematic scales are widely separated, which can be extended systematically to the whole spectrum. We account for the necessary two-loop matrix elements, threshold corrections, and include resummation up to N{sup 3}LL order. We include nonperturbative power corrections through a field theoretical shape function, and remove the O(Λ{sub QCD}) renormalon in the partonic soft function by appropriate mass-dependent subtractions. Our results hold for any value of the quark mass, from an infinitesimally small (merging to the known massless result) to an infinitely large one (achieving the decoupling limit). This is the first example of an application of a variable flavor number scheme to final state jets.

  13. A magnetic coupling thrust stand for microthrust measurements

    Wright, W. P.; Ferrer, P.

    2016-01-01

    A direct thrust measurement system that is based on a horizontal lever and utilizes a novel magnetic coupling mechanism to measure thrust has been developed. The system is capable of measuring thrusts as low as 10’s of μN. While zero drift is observed in the balance, tests have shown that they do not have an appreciable effect on thrust measurements. The thrust stand’s sensitivity can be adjusted by shifting the position of the coupling magnet inside the stand’s thrust support member, which allows flexibility for testing both higher and lower powered thrusters. The thrust stand has been modeled theoretically and the predicted results from the model are compared with experimentally measured data. The system was tested using a simple cold gas thruster and provided credible results that can be compared with other systems studied in the literature. Advantages include that the thrust stand is very cheap and easy to construct and further, the calibration process takes no longer than half an hour, facilitating rapid turnaround times while still retaining accuracy. Repeatability tests have shown that the balance gives consistent results.

  14. Impact of plasma noise on a direct thrust measurement system

    Pottinger, S. J.; Lamprou, D.; Knoll, A. K.; Lappas, V. J.

    2012-03-01

    In order to evaluate the accuracy and sensitivity of a pendulum-type thrust measurement system, a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) and a laser optical displacement sensor have been used simultaneously to determine the displacement resulting from an applied thrust. The LVDT sensor uses an analog interface, whereas the laser sensor uses a digital interface to communicate the displacement readings to the data acquisition equipment. The data collected by both sensors show good agreement for static mass calibrations and validation with a cold gas thruster. However, the data obtained using the LVDT deviate significantly from that of the laser sensor when operating two varieties of plasma thrusters: a radio frequency (RF) driven plasma thruster, and a DC powered plasma thruster. Results establish that even with appropriate shielding and signal filtering the LVDT sensor is subject to plasma noise and radio frequency interactions which result in anomalous thrust readings. Experimental data show that the thrust determined using the LVDT system in a direct current plasma environment and a RF discharge is approximately a factor of three higher than the thrust values obtained using a laser sensor system for the operating conditions investigated. These findings are of significance to the electric propulsion community as LVDT sensors are often utilized in thrust measurement systems and accurate thrust measurement and the reproducibility of thrust data is key to analyzing thruster performance. Methods are proposed to evaluate system susceptibility to plasma noise and an effective filtering scheme presented for DC discharges.

  15. Electronics Engineering Department Thrust Area report FY'84

    Minichino, C.; Phelps, P.L. (eds.)

    1984-01-01

    This report describes the work of the Electronics Engineering Department Thrust Areas for FY'84: diagnostics and microelectronic engineering; signal and control engineering; microwave and pulsed power engineering; computer-aided engineering; engineering modeling and simulation; and systems engineering. For each Thrust Area, an overview and a description of the goals and achievements of each project is provided.

  16. Morphological Considerations of Fish Fin Shape on Thrust Generation

    Kenji Kikuchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we aimed to determine the relationship between thrust generation and fish fin shape. To compare the effect fin shape had on thrust generation, we categorized the morphological shapes of fish fins into equilateral polygonal shapes. Polygonal fins were used to generate thrust that depended only on shape. These fins were constructed of a hard elastic material to eliminate any influence of shape deformation. A servomotor with a reciprocal rotation moved a fin cyclically, and thrust was experimentally measured using a strain gage system. Thrust tended to be proportional to the inertia moment of a fin, which indicated difficulty with rotation. Moreover, this trend for thrust generation was directly related to the number of apexes of a polygonal fin. The force translated ratio, which was thrust divided by the force required for fin rotation, was evaluated to determine the hydrodynamic characteristics of fins. This finding showed that the force translated ratio of a fin increased with increased movable perimeter length. The greatest thrust was generated by a triangular fin rotated at its apex, which is often seen in general fish tail fins, whereas the hydrodynamic characteristics were the worst in polygonal fins.

  17. Simulations of directed energy thrust on rotating asteroids

    Griswold, Janelle; Madajian, Jonathan; Johansson, Isabella; Pfau, Krysten; Lubin, Philip; Hughes, Gary B.; Gilkes, Aidan; Meinhold, Peter; Motta, Caio; Brashears, Travis; Zhang, Qicheng

    2015-09-01

    Asteroids that threaten Earth could be deflected from their orbits using directed energy to vaporize the surface, because the ejected plume creates a reaction thrust that alters the asteroid's trajectory. One concern regarding directed energy deflection is the rotation of the asteroid, as this will reduce the average thrust magnitude and modify the thrust direction. Flux levels required to evaporate surface material depend on surface material composition and albedo, thermal, and bulk mechanical properties of the asteroid, and rotation rate. The observed distribution of asteroid rotation rates is used, along with an estimated range of material and mechanical properties, as input to a 3D thermal-physical model to calculate the resultant thrust vector. The model uses a directed energy beam, striking the surface of a rotating sphere with specified material properties, beam profile, and rotation rate. The model calculates thermal changes in the sphere, including vaporization and mass ejection of the target material. The amount of vaporization is used to determine a thrust magnitude that is normal to the surface at each point on the sphere. As the object rotates beneath the beam, vaporization decreases, as the temperature drops and causes both a phase shift and magnitude decrease in the average thrust vector. A surface integral is calculated to determine the thrust vector, at each point in time, producing a 4D analytical model of the expected thrust profile for rotating objects.

  18. New Highly Dynamic Approach for Thrust Vector Control

    Hecht, M.; Ettl, J.; Grothe, D.; Hrbud, I.

    2015-09-01

    For a new launcher system a thrust vector control system is needed. This launch vehicle system consists of two rockets which are namely the VS-50 (two-stage suborbital vehicle) and the VLM-1 (three-stage microsatellite launch vehicle). VLM-1 and VS-50 are developed in a cooperation between the German Aerospace Center (DLR) and the Brazilian Aeronautics and Space Institute (IAE). To keep these two rockets on its trajectory during flight a highly dynamic thrust vector control system is required. For the purpose of developing such a highly dynamic thrust vector control system a master thesis was written by the author. The development includes all mechanical constructions as well as control algorithms and electronics design. Moreover an optimization of control algorithms was made to increase the dynamic capabilities of the thrust vector control system. The composition of the right components plus the sophisticated control algorithm make the thrust vector control system highly dynamic.

  19. Reaction thrust of water jet for conical nozzles

    HUANG Guo-qin; YANG You-sheng; LI Xiao-hui; ZHU Yu-quan

    2009-01-01

    Clear knowledge on the reaction thrust of water jet is valuable for better design of water jet propulsion system.In this paper,theoretical,numerical and experimental studies were carried out to investigate the effects of the nozzle geometry as well as the inlet conditions on the reaction thrust of water jet.Comparison analyses reveal that the reaction thrust has a direct proportional relationship with the product of the inlet pressure,the square of flow rate and two-thirds power exponent of the input power.The results also indicate that the diameter of the cylinder column for the conical nozzle has great influence on the reaction thrust characteristics.In addition,the best values of the half cone angle and the cylinder column length exist to make the reaction thrust reach its maximum under the same inlet conditions.

  20. Microtectonic and geochemical characterization of thrusting in a foreland basin: Example of the South-Pyrenean orogenic wedge (Spain)

    Lacroix, B.; Buatier, M.; Labaume, P.; Travé, A.; Dubois, M.; Charpentier, D.; Ventalon, S.; Convert-Gaubier, D.

    2011-09-01

    In orogenic systems, thrust faults play a major role in stacking different tectonic units and may act as conduits for the expulsion of large amounts of fluid of different origins (metamorphic, diagenetic, meteoric). This study focuses on the Monte Perdido thrust unit emplaced in the Paleogene Jaca thrust-sheet-top basin, in the SW-central Pyrenees. We aim to decipher the mechanisms and P-T conditions of deformation in fault zones and characterize the related fluid involvement, through combined microstructural, geochemical and microthermometry analyses. Two thrust faults cutting platform limestones, marls and siliciclastic turbidites of the lower part of the basin-fill (Paleocene-lower Eocene) have been studied. The fault zones are characterized by metre-thick shear zones with highly deformed, foliated clay-rich sediments. Foliation is underlined by preferentially oriented phyllosilicates. Several generations of shear and extension calcite, quartz and chlorite-bearing veins attest to fluid-rock interactions during a multi-stage deformation. Microstructural observations and stable isotope analyses on calcite from veins and host sediments suggest that deformation was aseismic and dominated by diffusive mass transfer from pressure solution sites along cleavage and stylolites to the precipitation sites in veins, with mineralizing fluids in equilibrium with the host sediments. Our results suggest an essentially closed hydrologic system, and imply the absence of significant fluid flow along the studied fault zones. Microthermometric study on fluid inclusions present in calcite and quartz veins, and calcite-quartz oxygen isotopic fractionation determined for the first generation shear veins, allow a geothermal gradient of 34 °C/km to be estimated. Analytical results demonstrate an evolution of the fault zones in three stages. The first stage was related to the emplacement of the Monte Perdido thrust unit during the middle Eocene at a temperature of ˜208 °C and a burial

  1. EcoBears

    Nielsen, Nick; Pedersen, Sandra Bleuenn; Sørensen, Jens Ager

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce the EcoBears concept that aims to augment household appliances with functional and aesthetic features to promote their "use'' and "longevity of use'' to prevent their disposal. The EcoBears also aim to support the communication of environmental issues in the home setting....... We present our initial design and implementation of the EcoBears that consist of two bear modules (a mother and her cub). We also present our preliminary concept validations and lessons learned to be considered for future directions....

  2. Some limitations in applying classical EHD film-thickness formulae to a high-speed bearing

    Coy, J. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1980-01-01

    Elastohydrodynamic film thickness was measured for a 20 mm ball bearing using the capacitance technique. The bearing was thrust loaded to 90, 448, and 778 N. The corresponding maximum stresses on the inner race were 1.28, 2.09, and 2.45 GPa. Test speeds ranged from 400 to 14,000 rpm. Film thickness measurements were taken with four different lubricants: (1) synthetic paraffinic; (2) synthetic paraffinic with additives; (3) neopentylpolyol (tetra) ester; and (4) synthetic cycloaliphatic hydrocarbon traction fluid. The test bearing was mist lubricated. Test temperatures were 300, 338, and 393 K. The measured results were compared to theoretical predictions and are presented.

  3. Sandbox modelling of sequential thrusting in a mechanically two-layered system and its implications in fold-and-thrust belts

    Saha, Puspendu; Bose, Santanu; Mandal, Nibir

    2016-10-01

    Many fold-and-thrust belts display multi-storied thrust sequences, characterizing a composite architecture of the thrust wedges. Despite dramatic progress in sandbox modelling over the last three decades, our understanding of such composite thrust-wedge mechanics is limited and demands a re-visit to the problem of sequential thrusting in mechanically layered systems. This study offers a new approach to sandbox modelling, designed with a two-layered sandpack simulating a mechanically weak Coulomb layer, resting coherently upon a stronger Coulomb layer. Our experimental models reproduce strikingly similar styles of the multi-storied frontal thrust sequences observed in natural fold-and- thrust belts. The upper weak horizon undergoes sequential thrusting at a high spatial frequency, forming numerous, closely spaced frontal thrusts, whereas the lower strong horizon produces widely spaced thrusts with progressive horizontal shortening. This contrasting thrust progression behaviour gives rise to composite thrust architecture in the layered sandpack. We show the evolution of such composite thrust sequences as a function of frictional strength (μb) at the basal detachment and thickness ratio (Tr) between the weak and strong layers. For any given values of Tr and μb, the two thrust sequences progress at different rates; the closely-spaced, upper thrust sequence advances forelandward at a faster rate than the widely-spaced, lower thrust sequence. Basal friction (μb) has little effects on the vergence of thrusts in the upper weak layer; they verge always towards foreland, irrespective of Tr values. But, the lower strong layer develops back-vergent thrusts when μb is low (∼0.36). In our experiments, closely spaced thrusts in the upper sequence experience intense reactivation due to their interaction with widely spaced thrusts in the lower sequence. The interaction eventually affects the wedge topography, leading to two distinct parts: inner and outer wedges

  4. Damper bearing rotordynamics

    Elrod, David A.

    1990-01-01

    High side loads reduce the life of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump (HPOTP) bearings. High stiffness damper seals were recommended to reduce the loads on the pump and turbine end bearings in the HPOTP. The seals designed for use on the pump end are expected to adequately reduce the bearing loads; the predicted performance of the planned turbine end seal is marginal. An alternative to the suggested turbine end seal design is a damper bearing with radial holes from the pressurized center of the turbopump rotor, feeding a smooth land region between two rough-stator/smooth-rotor annular seals. An analysis was prepared to predict the leakage and rotor dynamic coefficients (stiffness, damping, and added mass) of the damper bearing. Governing equations of the seal analysis modified to model the damper bearing; differences between the upstream conditions of the damper bearing and a typical annular seal; prediction of the damper bearing analysis; and assumptions of the analysis which require further investigation are described.

  5. Structural style of the Marathon thrust belt, West Texas

    Hickman, Robert G.; Varga, Robert J.; Altany, Robert M.

    2009-09-01

    The Marathon portion of the Ouachita thrust belt consists of a highly deformed allochthonous wedge of Cambrian-Pennsylvanian slope strata (Marathon facies) that was transported to the northwest and emplaced over Pennsylvanian foredeep sediments. The foredeep strata in turn overlie early-middle Paleozoic shelfal sediments which are deformed by late Paleozoic basement-involved reverse faults. The Dugout Creek thrust is the basal thrust of the allochthon. Shortening in this sheet and overlying sheets is ˜80%. Steep imbricate faults link the Dugout Creek thrust to upper level detachments forming complex duplex zones. Progressive thrusting and shortening within the allochthon folded the upper level detachments and associated thrust sheets. The Caballos Novaculite is the most competent unit within the Marathon facies and controlled development of prominent detachment folds. Deeper imbricate sheets composed of the Late Pennsylvanian foredeep strata, and possibly early-middle Paleozoic shelfal sediments developed concurrently with emplacement of the Marathon allochthon and folded the overlying allochthon. Following termination of thrusting in the earliest Permian, subsidence and deposition shifted northward to the Delaware, Midland and Val Verde foreland basins.

  6. Thrust Stand Characterization of the NASA Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT)

    Diamant, Kevin D.; Pollard, James E.; Crofton, Mark W.; Patterson, Michael J.; Soulas, George C.

    2010-01-01

    Direct thrust measurements have been made on the NASA Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) ion engine using a standard pendulum style thrust stand constructed specifically for this application. Values have been obtained for the full 40-level throttle table, as well as for a few off-nominal operating conditions. Measurements differ from the nominal NASA throttle table 10 (TT10) values by 3.1 percent at most, while at 30 throttle levels (TLs) the difference is less than 2.0 percent. When measurements are compared to TT10 values that have been corrected using ion beam current density and charge state data obtained at The Aerospace Corporation, they differ by 1.2 percent at most, and by 1.0 percent or less at 37 TLs. Thrust correction factors calculated from direct thrust measurements and from The Aerospace Corporation s plume data agree to within measurement error for all but one TL. Thrust due to cold flow and "discharge only" operation has been measured, and analytical expressions are presented which accurately predict thrust based on thermal thrust generation mechanisms.

  7. Early history and reactivation of the rand thrust, southern California

    Postlethwaite, Clay E.; Jacobson, Carl E.

    The Rand thrust of the Rand Mountains in the northwestern Mojave Desert separates an upper plate of quartz monzonite and quartzofeldspathic to amphibolitic gneiss from a lower plate of metagraywacke and mafic schist (Rand Schist). The Rand thrust is considered part of the regionally extensive Vincent/Chocolate Mountain thrust system, which is commonly believed to represent a Late Cretaceous subduction zone. The initial direction of dip and sense of movement along the Vincent/Chocolate Mountain thrust are controversial. Microfabrics of mylonites and quartzites from the Rand Mountains were analyzed in an attempt to determine transport direction for this region, but the results are ambiguous. In addition, the southwestern portion of the Rand thrust was found to have been reactivated as a low-angle normal fault after subduction. Reactivation might have occurred shortly after subduction, in which case it could account for the preservation of high-pressure mineral assemblages in the Rand Schist, or it could be related to mid-Tertiary extension in the western United States. In either event, the reactivation might be responsible for the complicated nature of the microfabrics. The Rand Schist exhibits an inverted metamorphic zonation. Isograds in the schist are not significantly truncated by the reactivated segment of the Rand thrust. This indicates that other segments of the Vincent/Chocolate Mountain thrust should be re-evaluated for the possibility of late movement, even if they show an apparently undisturbed inverted metamorphic zonation.

  8. Thrust measurement method verification and analytical studies on a liquid-fueled pulse detonation engine

    Lu Jie; Zheng Longxi; Wang Zhiwu; Peng Changxin; Chen Xinggu

    2014-01-01

    In order to test the feasibility of a new thrust stand system based on impulse thrust mea-surement method, a liquid-fueled pulse detonation engine (PDE) is designed and built. Thrust per-formance of the engine is obtained by direct thrust measurement with a force transducer and indirect thrust measurement with an eddy current displacement sensor (ECDS). These two sets of thrust data are compared with each other to verify the accuracy of the thrust performance. Then thrust data measured by the new thrust stand system are compared with the verified thrust data to test its feasibility. The results indicate that thrust data from the force transducer and ECDS system are consistent with each other within the range of measurement error. Though the thrust data from the impulse thrust measurement system is a litter lower than that from the force transducer due to the axial momentum losses of the detonation jet, the impulse thrust measurement method is valid when applied to measure the averaged thrust of PDE. Analytical models of PDE are also discussed in this paper. The analytical thrust performance is higher than the experimental data due to ignor-ing the losses during the deflagration to detonation transition process. Effect of equivalence ratio on the engine thrust performance is investigated by utilizing the modified analytical model. Thrust reaches maximum at the equivalence ratio of about 1.1.

  9. Thrust measurement method verification and analytical studies on a liquid-fueled pulse detonation engine

    Lu Jie

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to test the feasibility of a new thrust stand system based on impulse thrust measurement method, a liquid-fueled pulse detonation engine (PDE is designed and built. Thrust performance of the engine is obtained by direct thrust measurement with a force transducer and indirect thrust measurement with an eddy current displacement sensor (ECDS. These two sets of thrust data are compared with each other to verify the accuracy of the thrust performance. Then thrust data measured by the new thrust stand system are compared with the verified thrust data to test its feasibility. The results indicate that thrust data from the force transducer and ECDS system are consistent with each other within the range of measurement error. Though the thrust data from the impulse thrust measurement system is a litter lower than that from the force transducer due to the axial momentum losses of the detonation jet, the impulse thrust measurement method is valid when applied to measure the averaged thrust of PDE. Analytical models of PDE are also discussed in this paper. The analytical thrust performance is higher than the experimental data due to ignoring the losses during the deflagration to detonation transition process. Effect of equivalence ratio on the engine thrust performance is investigated by utilizing the modified analytical model. Thrust reaches maximum at the equivalence ratio of about 1.1.

  10. Interplay of thrust, back-thrust, strike-slip and salt tectonics in a fold and thrust belt system: an example from Zakynthos Island, Greece

    Zelilidis, A.; Papatheodorou, G.; Maravelis, A. G.; Christodoulou, D.; Tserolas, P.; Fakiris, E.; Dimas, X.; Georgiou, N.; Ferentinos, G.

    2016-10-01

    The southwestern flank of the Hellenic fold and thrust belt, situated along the southern edge of the Dinarides-Albanides-Hellenides continental convergent zone, was examined for reconstructing the tectonic deformation. This investigation presents an integrated study of onshore sedimentological and structural analyses, as well as offshore seismic lines, across the Pliocene-Pleistocene sedimentary succession in Zakynthos Island. Back-thrust faults, using the Triassic evaporites as decollement surface, during the Pliocene, and coeval diapiric intrusions formed three sub-basins on the hangingwall of the Kalamaki back-thrust fault. This interaction is responsible for the growth of the Skopos Mountain and the soft sediment deformation that formed synclines and slumps, respectively. Back-thrust and strike-slip faults were active during the early Pleistocene, and diapiric intrusions modified the bathymetry on the sea floor, giving rise to slumps and recumbent folds. At least five events of synsedimentary diapiric intrusions have been recognized and are marked by five slump horizons. During the Holocene, the diapiric intrusions between the Kalamaki back-thrust and the Vrachionas anticline could be either related to normal faults or gravitationally driven.

  11. Out-of-sequence thrusting in polycyclic thrust belts: An example from the Mesozoic Yanshan belt, North China Craton

    Li, Chengming; Zhang, Changhou; Cope, Tim D.; Lin, Yi

    2016-09-01

    The EW trending Yanshan belt, an intraplate fold-thrust belt located in the northern North China Craton that has experienced several episodes of deformation widely separated in time, is characterized by out-of-sequence thrusts. According to detailed mapping in the central Yanshan belt, five geometric and stratigraphic criteria used to aid in determining whether a thrust has an out-of-sequence geometry or not can be recognized. They are (1) unconformable relationships, (2) inclination of fault surfaces, (3) irregular changes in apparent offset along strike, (4) short fault length relative to apparent offset, and (5) in-sequence geometry. With the help of these criteria, two generations of out-of-sequence thrusts that postdate the original in-sequence thrusting in the central Yanshan belt are recognized. The ancestral southward verging fold-and-thrust belt that formed prior to 180 Ma was deformed and cut by two younger generations of faults that are probably more deeply rooted and are constrained to between 172-165 Ma and 152-135 Ma. A series of thrusts with opposite vergence formed during the last period, resulting in abundant abnormal field relationships such as younger-on-older thrust relations, fold truncation, and cutting down-section. The nature and occurrence of faults in the Yanshan belt implies that superimposed deformation, a common feature in polycyclic orogenic belts, is a mechanism for the generation of out-of-sequence thrusting. This adds to mechanisms already described in the literature, such as maintaining constant critical taper at an orogenic scale, inhibition of the deformation front, and lateral changes in the nature of the décollement horizons.

  12. Improved Rhenium Thrust Chambers for In-Space Propulsion Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Radiation-cooled, bipropellant thrust chambers are being considered for the ascent/descent engines and reaction control systems (RCS) for future NASA missions such...

  13. Fourth Programme Cycle in Population Education Addresses New Thrusts.

    Population Education Newsletter and Forum, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the developments of the Regional Population Education Program of the Unesco Principal Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific during the period 1984-87. Discusses new projects, technical assistance activities, national capabilities, and new program thrusts. (TW)

  14. Improved Rhenium Thrust Chambers for In-Space Propulsion Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Radiation-cooled, bipropellant thrust chambers are being considered for the ascent/descent engines and reaction control systems for NASA missions such as Mars Sample...

  15. Aerodynamics of thrust vectoring by Navier-Stokes solutions

    Tseng, Jing-Biau; Lan, C. Edward

    1991-01-01

    Induced aerodynamics from thrust vectoring are investigated by a computational fluid dynamic method. A thin-layer Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes code with multiblock capability is used. Jet properties are specified on the nozzle exit plane to simulate the jet momentum. Results for a rectangular jet in a cross flow are compared with data to verify the code. Further verification of the calculation is made by comparing the numerical results with transonic data for a wing-body combination. Additional calculations were performed to elucidate the following thrust vectoring effects: the thrust vectoring effect on shock and expansion waves, induced effects on nearby surfaces, and the thrust vectoring effect on the leading edge vortex.

  16. Optimal Thrust Vectoring for an Annular Aerospike Nozzle Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Recent success of an annular aerospike flight test by NASA Dryden has prompted keen interest in providing thrust vector capability to the annular aerospike nozzle...

  17. Nitrous Oxide Liquid Injection Thrust Vector Control System Testing Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A Nitrous Oxide-fed Liquid Thrust Vector Control system is proposed as an efficient method for vehicle attitude control during powered flight. Pulled from a N2O main...

  18. Ultra-precision bearings

    Wardle, F

    2015-01-01

    Ultra-precision bearings can achieve extreme accuracy of rotation, making them ideal for use in numerous applications across a variety of fields, including hard disk drives, roundness measuring machines and optical scanners. Ultraprecision Bearings provides a detailed review of the different types of bearing and their properties, as well as an analysis of the factors that influence motion error, stiffness and damping. Following an introduction to basic principles of motion error, each chapter of the book is then devoted to the basic principles and properties of a specific type of bearin

  19. Lower extremity thrust and non-thrust joint mobilization for patellofemoral pain syndrome: a case report.

    Simpson, Brad G; Simon, Corey B

    2014-05-01

    A 40-year old female presented to physical therapy with a one-year history of insidious right anteromedial and anterolateral knee pain. Additionally, the patient had a history of multiple lateral ankle sprains bilaterally, the last sprain occurring on the right ankle 1 year prior to the onset of knee pain. The patient was evaluated and given a physical therapy diagnosis of patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS), with associated talocrural and tibiofemoral joint hypomobility limiting ankle dorsiflexion and knee extension, respectively. Treatment included a high-velocity low amplitude thrust manipulation to the talocrural joint, which helped restore normal ankle dorsiflexion range of motion. The patient also received tibiofemoral joint non-thrust manual therapy to regain normal knee extension mobility prior to implementing further functional progression exercises to her home program (HEP). This case report highlights the importance of a detailed evaluation of knee and ankle joint mobility in patients presenting with anterior knee pain. Further, manual physical therapy to the lower extremity was found to be successful in restoring normal movement patterns and pain-free function in a patient with chronic anterior knee pain.

  20. Acoustically shielded exhaust system for high thrust jet engines

    Carey, John P. (Inventor); Lee, Robert (Inventor); Majjigi, Rudramuni K. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A flade exhaust nozzle for a high thrust jet engine is configured to form an acoustic shield around the core engine exhaust flowstream while supplementing engine thrust during all flight conditions, particularly during takeoff. The flade airflow is converted from an annular 360.degree. flowstream to an arcuate flowstream extending around the lower half of the core engine exhaust flowstream so as to suppress exhaust noise directed at the surrounding community.

  1. The Prevalence of Tongue Thrusting in Patients with Periodontal Disease

    S.A Miremadi; A.A. Khoshkhounejad; E. Mahdavi

    2005-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Tongue thrust and/or its consequent swallowing pattern are amongst the parafunctional habits that have always been considered as etiological factors for dental disorders by different investigators.Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of tongue thrusting and the incidence of periodontal disorders associated with this habit among patients referred to the Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Tehran University of Medical Sciences.Mat...

  2. Aerodynamics of indirect thrust measurement by the impulse method

    Cheng-Kang Wu; Hai-Xing Wang; Xian Meng; Xi Chen; Wen-Xia Pan

    2011-01-01

    The aerodynamic aspects of indirect thrust measurement by the impulse method have been studied both experimentally and numerically.The underlying basic aerodynamic principle is outlined, the phenomena in subsonic,supersonic and arc-heated jets are explored, and factors affecting the accuracy of the method are studied and discussed.Results show that the impulse method is reliable for indirect thrust measurement if certain basic requirements are met,and a simple guideline for its proper application is given.

  3. Anomalous Thrust Production from an RF Test Device Measured on a Low-Thrust Torsion Pendulum

    Brady, David; White, Harold G.; March, Paul; Lawrence, James T.; Davies, Frank J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the eight-day August 2013 test campaign designed to investigate and demonstrate viability of using classical magnetoplasmadynamics to obtain a propulsive momentum transfer via the quantum vacuum virtual plasma. This paper will not address the physics of the quantum vacuum plasma thruster, but instead will describe the test integration, test operations, and the results obtained from the test campaign. Approximately 30-50 micro-Newtons of thrust were recorded from an electric propulsion test article consisting primarily of a radio frequency (RF) resonant cavity excited at approximately 935 megahertz. Testing was performed on a low-thrust torsion pendulum that is capable of detecting force at a single-digit micronewton level, within a stainless steel vacuum chamber with the door closed but at ambient atmospheric pressure. Several different test configurations were used, including two different test articles as well as a reversal of the test article orientation. In addition, the test article was replaced by an RF load to verify that the force was not being generated by effects not associated with the test article. The two test articles were designed by Cannae LLC of Doylestown, Pennsylvania. The torsion pendulum was designed, built, and operated by Eagleworks Laboratories at the NASA Johnson Space Center of Houston, Texas. Approximately six days of test integration were required, followed by two days of test operations, during which, technical issues were discovered and resolved. Integration of the two test articles and their supporting equipment was performed in an iterative fashion between the test bench and the vacuum chamber. In other words, the test article was tested on the bench, then moved to the chamber, then moved back as needed to resolve issues. Manual frequency control was required throughout the test. Thrust was observed on both test articles, even though one of the test articles was designed with the expectation that it would not

  4. Full Flight Envelope Direct Thrust Measurement on a Supersonic Aircraft

    Conners, Timothy R.; Sims, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    Direct thrust measurement using strain gages offers advantages over analytically-based thrust calculation methods. For flight test applications, the direct measurement method typically uses a simpler sensor arrangement and minimal data processing compared to analytical techniques, which normally require costly engine modeling and multisensor arrangements throughout the engine. Conversely, direct thrust measurement has historically produced less than desirable accuracy because of difficulty in mounting and calibrating the strain gages and the inability to account for secondary forces that influence the thrust reading at the engine mounts. Consequently, the strain-gage technique has normally been used for simple engine arrangements and primarily in the subsonic speed range. This paper presents the results of a strain gage-based direct thrust-measurement technique developed by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center and successfully applied to the full flight envelope of an F-15 aircraft powered by two F100-PW-229 turbofan engines. Measurements have been obtained at quasi-steady-state operating conditions at maximum non-augmented and maximum augmented power throughout the altitude range of the vehicle and to a maximum speed of Mach 2.0 and are compared against results from two analytically-based thrust calculation methods. The strain-gage installation and calibration processes are also described.

  5. Thrust stand for vertically oriented electric propulsion performance evaluation

    Moeller, Trevor [University of Tennessee Space Institute, Tullahoma, Tennessee 37388 (United States); Polzin, Kurt A. [NASA, Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama 35812 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    A variation of a hanging pendulum thrust stand capable of measuring the performance of an electric thruster operating in the vertical orientation is presented. The vertical orientation of the thruster dictates that the thruster must be horizontally offset from the pendulum pivot arm, necessitating the use of a counterweight system to provide a neutrally stable system. Motion of the pendulum arm is transferred through a balance mechanism to a secondary arm on which deflection is measured. A noncontact light-based transducer is used to measure displacement of the secondary beam. The members experience very little friction, rotating on twisting torsional pivots with oscillatory motion attenuated by a passive, eddy-current damper. Displacement is calibrated using an in situ thrust calibration system. Thermal management and self-leveling systems are incorporated to mitigate thermal and mechanical drifts. Gravitational force and torsional spring constants associated with flexure pivots provide restoring moments. An analysis of the design indicates that the thrust measurement range spans roughly four decades, with the stand capable of measuring thrust up to 12 N for a 200 kg thruster and up to approximately 800 mN for a 10 kg thruster. Data obtained from calibration tests performed using a 26.8 lbm simulated thruster indicated a resolution of 1 mN on 100 mN level thrusts, while those tests conducted on a 200 lbm thruster yielded a resolution of roughly 2.5 mN at thrust levels of 0.5 N and greater.

  6. Thrust Stand for Vertically Oriented Electric Propulsion Performance Evaluation

    Moeller, Trevor; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2010-01-01

    A variation of a hanging pendulum thrust stand capable of measuring the performance of an electric thruster operating in the vertical orientation is presented. The vertical orientation of the thruster dictates that the thruster must be horizontally offset from the pendulum pivot arm, necessitating the use of a counterweight system to provide a neutrally-stable system. Motion of the pendulum arm is transferred through a balance mechanism to a secondary arm on which deflection is measured. A non-contact light-based transducer is used to measure displacement of the secondary beam. The members experience very little friction, rotating on twisting torsional pivots with oscillatory motion attenuated by a passive, eddy current damper. Displacement is calibrated using an in situ thrust calibration system. Thermal management and self-leveling systems are incorporated to mitigate thermal and mechanical drifts. Gravitational restoring force and torsional spring constants associated with flexure pivots provide restoring moments. An analysis of the design indicates that the thrust measurement range spans roughly four decades, with the stand capable of measuring thrust up to 12 N for a 200 kg thruster and up to approximately 800 mN for a 10 kg thruster. Data obtained from calibration tests performed using a 26.8 lbm simulated thruster indicated a resolution of 1 mN on 100 mN-level thrusts, while those tests conducted on 200 lbm thruster yielded a resolution of roughly 2.5 micro at thrust levels of 0.5 N and greater.

  7. Characterization of aircraft noise during thrust reverser engagement

    Gutierrez, Remy M.; Atchley, Anthony A.; Hodgdon, Kathleen K.

    2005-09-01

    Airport noise impact on communities has been an area of considerable study. However, it has been determined that thrust reverser engagement is an area requiring further research. This paper presents findings on thrust reverser from a noise study done at Washington-Dulles International Airport (IAD) in October of 2004. Previous studies have found that high levels of acoustic energy in commercial aircraft during takeoff are contained below 300 Hz [Sharp, Ben H., Guovich, Yuri A., and Albee, William, W., ``Status of Low-Frequency Aircraft Noise Research and Mitigation,'' Wyle Report WR 01-21, San Francisco, September 2001]. Preliminary analysis of thrust reverser signatures indicates similar findings. A categorization of aircraft noise during thrust reverser engagement is given and looks at factors that may affect the noise characteristics. Some of these factors include: plane type, engine type, and thrust ratings. In addition, a brief analysis of frequency weightings of the Equivalent Sound Level (Leq) and Sound Exposure Level (SEL) metrics, and their application to thrust reverser noise is discussed. [Work supported by the Federal Aviation Administration.

  8. Gear bearing drive

    Weinberg, Brian (Inventor); Mavroidis, Constantinos (Inventor); Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A gear bearing drive provides a compact mechanism that operates as an actuator providing torque and as a joint providing support. The drive includes a gear arrangement integrating an external rotor DC motor within a sun gear. Locking surfaces maintain the components of the drive in alignment and provide support for axial loads and moments. The gear bearing drive has a variety of applications, including as a joint in robotic arms and prosthetic limbs.

  9. Rolling bearing analysis

    Harris, Tedric A

    2001-01-01

    One of the most well-known experts in the field brings cutting-edge research to practitioners in the new edition of this important reference. Covers the improved mathematical calculations for rolling bearing endurance developed by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and the Society of Lubrication and Tribology Engineers. Updated with new material on Condition-Based Maintenance, new testing methods, and new bearing materials.

  10. My Little Teddy Bear

    钱佳楠

    2005-01-01

    @@ As Valentine's Day came closer,every shop was full of colourful gifts such as cookies in the shape of heart, chocolates,Teddy Bears and so on.When I step into a shop on February 14th,I felt most lonely as I was alone.With mv eves fixed on a lovely Teddy Bear, I wished that someone could send me this stuffed toy.

  11. Performance of hybrid ball bearings in oil and jet fuel

    Schrader, Stephen M.; Pfaffenberger, Eugene E.

    1992-07-01

    A 308-size hybrid ball bearing, with ceramic balls and steel rings, was tested using a diester oil and gas turbine fuel as lubricants at several speeds and loads. Heat generation data from this test work was then correlated with the heat generation model from a widely used computer code. The ability of this hybrid split inner ring bearing design to endure thrust reversals, which are expected in many turbine applications, was demonstrated. Finally, the bearing was successfully endurance tested in JP-10 fuel for 25 hours at 7560 N axial load and 36,000 rpm. This work has successfully demonstrated the technology necessary to use fuel-lubricated hybrid bearings in limited-life gas turbine engine applications such as missiles, drones, and other unmanned air vehicles (UAVs). In addition, it has provided guidance for use in designing such bearing systems. As a result, the benefits of removing the conventional oil lubricant system, i.e., design simplification and reduced maintenance, can be realized.

  12. Thrust calculation of electric solar wind sail by particle-in-cell simulation

    Hoshi, Kento [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Kojima, Hirotsugu; Yamakawa, Hiroshi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Sustainable Humanosphere; Muranaka, Takanobu [Chukyo Univ., Nagoya (Japan). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    2016-07-01

    In this study, thrust characteristics of an electric solar wind sail were numerically evaluated using full threedimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. The thrust obtained from the PIC simulation was lower than the thrust estimations obtained in previous studies. The PIC simulation indicated that ambient electrons strongly shield the electrostatic potential of the tether of the sail, and the strong shield effect causes a greater thrust reduction than has been obtained in previous studies. Additionally, previous expressions of the thrust estimation were modified by using the shielded potential structure derived from the present simulation results. The modified thrust estimation agreed very well with the thrust obtained from the PIC simulation.

  13. Bilateral and multiple cavitation sounds during upper cervical thrust manipulation

    Dunning James

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The popping produced during high-velocity, low-amplitude (HVLA thrust manipulation is a common sound; however to our knowledge, no study has previously investigated the location of cavitation sounds during manipulation of the upper cervical spine. The primary purpose was to determine which side of the spine cavitates during C1-2 rotatory HVLA thrust manipulation. Secondary aims were to calculate the average number of pops, the duration of upper cervical thrust manipulation, and the duration of a single cavitation. Methods Nineteen asymptomatic participants received two upper cervical thrust manipulations targeting the right and left C1-2 articulation, respectively. Skin mounted microphones were secured bilaterally over the transverse process of C1, and sound wave signals were recorded. Identification of the side, duration, and number of popping sounds were determined by simultaneous analysis of spectrograms with audio feedback using custom software developed in Matlab. Results Bilateral popping sounds were detected in 34 (91.9% of 37 manipulations while unilateral popping sounds were detected in just 3 (8.1% manipulations; that is, cavitation was significantly (P Conclusions Cavitation was significantly more likely to occur bilaterally than unilaterally during upper cervical HVLA thrust manipulation. Most subjects produced 3–4 pops during a single rotatory HVLA thrust manipulation targeting the right or left C1-2 articulation; therefore, practitioners of spinal manipulative therapy should expect multiple popping sounds when performing upper cervical thrust manipulation to the atlanto-axial joint. Furthermore, the traditional manual therapy approach of targeting a single ipsilateral or contralateral facet joint in the upper cervical spine may not be realistic.

  14. Magnetic Bearing Consumes Low Power

    Studer, P. A.

    1982-01-01

    Energy-efficient linear magnetic bearing maintains a precise small separation between its moving and stationary parts. Originally designed for cryogenic compressors on spacecraft, proposed magnetic bearing offers an alternative to roller or gas bearing in linear motion system. Linear noncontacting bearing operates in environments where lubricants cannot be used.

  15. Evaluation of erythrocyte flow at a bearing gap in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

    Murashige, Tomotaka; Kosaka, Ryo; Sakota, Daisuke; Nishida, Masahiro; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Yamane, Takashi; Maruyama, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump for extracorporeal circulatory support. In the blood pump, a spiral groove bearing was adopted for a thrust bearing. In the spiral groove bearing, separation of erythrocytes and plasma by plasma skimming has been postulated to occur. However, it is not clarified that plasma skimming occurs in a spiral groove bearing. The purpose of this study is to verify whether plasma skimming occurs in the spiral groove bearing of a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump. For evaluation of plasma skimming in the spiral groove bearing, an impeller levitation performance test using a laser focus displacement meter and a microscopic visualization test of erythrocyte flow using a high-speed microscope were conducted. Bovine blood diluted with autologous plasma to adjust hematocrit to 1.0% was used as a working fluid. Hematocrit on the ridge region in the spiral groove bearing was estimated using image analysis. As a result, hematocrits on the ridge region with gaps of 45 μm, 31 μm, and 25 μm were calculated as 1.0%, 0.6%, and 0.3%, respectively. Maximum skimming efficiency in this study was calculated as 70% with a gap of 25 μm. We confirmed that separation of erythrocyte and plasma occurred in the spiral groove bearing with decrease in bearing gap in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

  16. Hybrid Superconducting Magnetic Bearing (HSMB) for high load devices

    McMichael, C. K.; Ma, K. B.; Lamb, M. A.; Lin, M. W.; Chow, L.; Meng, R. L.; Hor, P. H.; Chu, W. K.

    1992-05-01

    Lifting capacities greater than 41 N/cm(exp 2) (60 psi) at 77 K have been achieved with a new type of levitation (hybrid) using a combination of permanent magnets and high quality melt-mixtured YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) (YBCO). The key concept of the hybrid superconducting magnetic bearing (HSMB) is the use of strong magnetic repulsion and attraction from permanent magnets for high levitation or suspension forces in conjunction with a superconductor's flux pinning characteristics to counteract the inherent instabilities in a system consisting of magnets only. To illustrate this concept, radial and axial forces between magnet/superconductor, magnet/magnet, and magnet/superconductor/magnet, were measured and compared for the thrust bearing configuration

  17. Gas Foil Bearing Misalignment and Unbalance Effects

    Howard, Samuel A.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of misalignment and unbalance on gas foil bearings are presented. The future of U.S. space exploration includes plans to conduct science missions aboard space vehicles, return humans to the Moon, and place humans on Mars. All of these endeavors are of long duration, and require high amounts of electrical power for propulsion, life support, mission operations, etc. One potential source of electrical power of sufficient magnitude and duration is a nuclear-fission-based system. The system architecture would consist of a nuclear reactor heat source with the resulting thermal energy converted to electrical energy through a dynamic power conversion and heat rejection system. Various types of power conversion systems can be utilized, but the Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) turboalternator is one of the leading candidates. In the CBC, an inert gas heated by the reactor drives a turboalternator, rejects excess heat to space through a heat exchanger, and returns to the reactor in a closed loop configuration. The use of the CBC for space power and propulsion is described in more detail in the literature (Mason, 2003). In the CBC system just described, the process fluid is a high pressure inert gas such as argon, krypton, or a helium-xenon mixture. Due to the closed loop nature of the system and the associated potential for damage to components in the system, contamination of the working fluid is intolerable. Since a potential source of contamination is the lubricant used in conventional turbomachinery bearings, Gas Foil Bearings (GFB) have high potential for the rotor support system. GFBs are compliant, hydrodynamic journal and thrust bearings that use a gas, such as the CBC working fluid, as their lubricant. Thus, GFBs eliminate the possibility of contamination due to lubricant leaks into the closed loop system. Gas foil bearings are currently used in many commercial applications, both terrestrial and aerospace. Aircraft Air Cycle Machines (ACMs) and ground

  18. Tribology of alternative bearings.

    Fisher, John; Jin, Zhongmin; Tipper, Joanne; Stone, Martin; Ingham, Eileen

    2006-12-01

    The tribological performance and biological activity of the wear debris produced has been compared for highly cross-linked polyethylene, ceramic-on-ceramic, metal-on-metal, and modified metal bearings in a series of in vitro studies from a single laboratory. The functional lifetime demand of young and active patients is 10-fold greater than the estimated functional lifetime of traditional polyethylene. There is considerable interest in using larger diameter heads in these high demand patients. Highly cross-linked polyethylene show a four-fold reduction in functional biological activity. Ceramic-on-ceramic bearings have the lowest wear rates and least reactive wear debris. The functional biological activity is 20-fold lower than with highly cross-linked polyethylene. Hence, ceramic-on-ceramic bearings address the tribological lifetime demand of highly active patients. Metal-on-metal bearings have substantially lower wear rates than highly cross-linked polyethylene and wear decreases with head diameter. Bedding in wear is also lower with reduced radial clearance. Differential hardness ceramic-on-metal bearings and the application of ceramic-like coatings reduce metal wear and ion levels.

  19. Practical compensation for nonlinear dynamic thrust measurement system

    Chen Lin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The real dynamic thrust measurement system usually tends to be nonlinear due to the complex characteristics of the rig, pipes connection, etc. For a real dynamic measuring system, the nonlinearity must be eliminated by some adequate methods. In this paper, a nonlinear model of dynamic thrust measurement system is established by using radial basis function neural network (RBF-NN, where a novel multi-step force generator is designed to stimulate the nonlinearity of the system, and a practical compensation method for the measurement system using left inverse model is proposed. Left inverse model can be considered as a perfect dynamic compensation of the dynamic thrust measurement system, and in practice, it can be approximated by RBF-NN based on least mean square (LMS algorithms. Different weights are set for producing the multi-step force, which is the ideal input signal of the nonlinear dynamic thrust measurement system. The validity of the compensation method depends on the engine’s performance and the tolerance error 0.5%, which is commonly demanded in engineering. Results from simulations and experiments show that the practical compensation using left inverse model based on RBF-NN in dynamic thrust measuring system can yield high tracking accuracy than the conventional methods.

  20. Sandbox modeling of evolving thrust wedges with different preexisting topographic relief: Implications for the Longmen Shan thrust belt, eastern Tibet

    Sun, Chuang; Jia, Dong; Yin, Hongwei; Chen, Zhuxin; Li, Zhigang; Shen, Li; Wei, Dongtao; Li, Yiquan; Yan, Bin; Wang, Maomao; Fang, Shaozhi; Cui, Jian

    2016-06-01

    To understand the effects of substantial topographic relief on deformation localization in the seismically active mountains, like the Longmen Shan thrust belt in the eastern Tibet, sandbox experiments were performed based on the framework of the critical taper theory. First, a reference experiment revealed that the critical taper angle was 12° for our experimental materials. Subsequently, different proto wedges (subcritical (6° in taper angle), critical (12°), and supercritical (20°)) were introduced to cover the range of natural topographic relief, and we used two setups: setup A considered only across-strike topographic relief, whereas setup B investigated along-strike segmentation of topography, consist of two adjacent proto wedges. In all experiments, thrust wedges grew by in-sequence accretion of thrust sheets. Setup A revealed an alternating mode of slip partitioning on the accreted thrusts, with large-displacement thrust and small-displacement thrust developing in turn. And contrasting wedge evolutions occurred according to whether the proto wedge was subcritical or critical-supercritical. In setup B, the differential deformation along the strike produced transverse structures such as tear fault and lateral ramp during frontal accretion. The observed tear fault and its associated thrust system resemble the seismogenic fault system of the 2008 Mw7.9 Wenchuan earthquake. Our experimental results could also explain first-order deformation features observed in the Longmen Shan. Consequently, we conclude that topographic features, including topographic relief across the range and along-strike segmentation of topography, contribute significantly to the kinematics and deformation localization in such active mountains.

  1. Wedge equilibrium in fold-and-thrust belts: prediction of out-of-sequence thrusting based on sandbox experiments and natural examples

    Nieuwland, D.A.; Leutscher, J.H.; Gast, J.

    2000-01-01

    Thrust tectonics are dealt with on the basis of primarily experiments focusing on the dynamics of a developing thrust belt and on understanding and predicting normal-sequence and out-of-sequence thrusting. Field examples are presented in addition to the examples of sandbox-model experiments. The res

  2. Radial Halbach Magnetic Bearings

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.

    2009-01-01

    Radial Halbach magnetic bearings have been investigated as part of an effort to develop increasingly reliable noncontact bearings for future high-speed rotary machines that may be used in such applications as aircraft, industrial, and land-vehicle power systems and in some medical and scientific instrumentation systems. Radial Halbach magnetic bearings are based on the same principle as that of axial Halbach magnetic bearings, differing in geometry as the names of these two types of bearings suggest. Both radial and axial Halbach magnetic bearings are passive in the sense that unlike most other magnetic bearings that have been developed in recent years, they effect stable magnetic levitation without need for complex active control. Axial Halbach magnetic bearings were described in Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearings (LEW-18066-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 32, No. 7 (July 2008), page 85. In the remainder of this article, the description of the principle of operation from the cited prior article is recapitulated and updated to incorporate the present radial geometry. In simplest terms, the basic principle of levitation in an axial or radial Halbach magnetic bearing is that of the repulsive electromagnetic force between (1) a moving permanent magnet and (2) an electric current induced in a stationary electrical conductor by the motion of the magnetic field. An axial or radial Halbach bearing includes multiple permanent magnets arranged in a Halbach array ("Halbach array" is defined below) in a rotor and multiple conductors in the form of wire coils in a stator, all arranged so the rotary motion produces an axial or radial repulsion that is sufficient to levitate the rotor. A basic Halbach array (see Figure 1) consists of a row of permanent magnets, each oriented so that its magnetic field is at a right angle to that of the adjacent magnet, and the right-angle turns are sequenced so as to maximize the magnitude of the magnetic flux density on one side of the row while

  3. Partial tooth gear bearings

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A partial gear bearing including an upper half, comprising peak partial teeth, and a lower, or bottom, half, comprising valley partial teeth. The upper half also has an integrated roller section between each of the peak partial teeth with a radius equal to the gear pitch radius of the radially outwardly extending peak partial teeth. Conversely, the lower half has an integrated roller section between each of the valley half teeth with a radius also equal to the gear pitch radius of the peak partial teeth. The valley partial teeth extend radially inwardly from its roller section. The peak and valley partial teeth are exactly out of phase with each other, as are the roller sections of the upper and lower halves. Essentially, the end roller bearing of the typical gear bearing has been integrated into the normal gear tooth pattern.

  4. The Little Bear

    林战峰; 乐伟国

    2007-01-01

    @@ 一、故事内容 A little bear has a magic stick.It can make his wishes come true. One day,the little bear is walking in the forest.He sees a bird.It is flying in the sky.It has two beautiful wings."I want two beautiful wings.I wish I can fly like a bird,"he says to the magic stick.Two beautiful wings come out from his back and he can fly like a bird now.He is very happy.

  5. Modular gear bearings

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A gearing system using modular gear bearing components. Each component is composed of a core, one or more modules attached to the core and two or more fastening modules rigidly attaching the modules to the core. The modules, which are attached to the core, may consist of gears, rollers or gear bearing components. The core orientation affects the orientation of the modules attached to the core. This is achieved via the keying arrangement of the core and the component modules that attach to the core. Such an arrangement will also facilitate the phase tuning of gear modules with respect to the core and other gear modules attached to the core.

  6. Variation of Extreme and Fatigue Design Loads on the Main Bearing of a Front Mounted Direct Drive System

    Abrahamsen, Asger Bech; Natarajan, Anand

    on the thrust and bending moments at the main bearing, both for ultimate design and in fatigue. It is found that the initial superconductor generator weight of 363 tons must be reduced by 25% in order not to result in higher extreme loads on main and yaw bearing than the reference10 MW geared reference drive...... train. A weight reduction of 50% is needed in order to maintain main bearing fatigue damage equivalent to the reference drive train. Thus a target mass of front mounted superconducting direct drive generators is found to be between 183-272 tons....

  7. Separability of drag and thrust in undulatory animals and machines

    Bale, Rahul; Neveln, Izaak D; Bhalla, Amneet Pal Singh; MacIver, Malcolm A; Patankar, Neelesh A

    2014-01-01

    For nearly a century, researchers have tried to understand the swimming of aquatic animals in terms of a balance between the forward thrust from swimming movements and drag on the body. Prior approaches have failed to provide a separation of these two forces for undulatory swimmers such as lamprey and eels, where most parts of the body are simultaneously generating drag and thrust. We nonetheless show that this separation is possible, and delineate its fundamental basis in undulatory swimmers. Our approach unifies a vast diversity of undulatory aquatic animals (anguilliform, sub-carangiform, gymnotiform, bal- istiform, rajiform) and provides design principles for highly agile bioinspired underwater vehicles. This approach has practical utility within biology as well as engineering. It is a predictive tool for use in understanding the role of the mechanics of movement in the evolutionary emergence of morphological features relating to locomotion. For example, we demonstrate that the drag-thrust separation fram...

  8. Parametric study of thermal behavior of thrust chamber cooling channels

    Karima E. Amori

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical investigation is adopted for two dimensional thermal analysis of rocket thrust chamber wall (RL10, employing finite difference model with iterative scheme (implemented under relaxation factor of 0.9 for convergence to compute temperature distribution within thrust chamber wall (which is composed of Nickel and Copper layers. The analysis is conducted for different boundary conditions: only convection boundary conditions then combined radiation, convection boundary conditions also for different aspect ratio (AR of cooling channel. The results show that Utilizing cooling channels of high aspect ratio leads to decrease in temperature variation across thrust chamber wall, while no effects on heat transferred to the coolant is indicated. The radiation has a considerable effect on the computed wall temperature values.

  9. Subleading Corrections To Thrust Using Effective Field Theory

    Freedman, Simon M

    2013-01-01

    We calculate the subleading corrections to the thrust rate using Soft-Collinear Effective Theory to factorize the rate and match onto jet and soft operators that describe the degrees of freedom of the relevant scales. We work in the perturbative regime where all the scales are well above \\Lambda_QCD. The thrust rate involves an incomplete sum over final states that is enforced by a measurement operator. Subleading corrections require matching onto not only the higher dimensional dijet operators, but also matching onto subleading measurement operators in the effective theory. We explicitly show how to factorize the O(\\alpha_s \\tau) thrust rate into a hard function multiplied by the convolution of the vacuum expectation value of jet and soft operators. Our approach can be generalized to other jet shapes and rates.

  10. Design and Fabrication of the Large Thrust Force Piezoelectric Actuator

    Shyang-Jye Chang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel piezoelectric actuator containing double pushers. By using finite element analysis software, this study simulated the vibration mode and amplitude of piezoelectric actuators. The Taguchi method was used to design the parameters of piezoelectric actuators including length, width, height, and electrodes setting. This paper also presents a discussion regarding the influence that the design parameters had on the actuator amplitudes. Based on optimal design parameters, a novel piezoelectric actuator containing double pushers is produced and some thrust tests are also carried out. From the experiment results, the piezoelectric actuator containing double pushers can provide a greater thrust force than that of traditional actuators containing a single pusher as the preload is greater. Comparing with the traditional actuators, the thrust force of new actuator can be increased by 48% with the double preload.

  11. Foil bearings for axial and radial support of high speed rotors: Design, development, and determination of operating characteristics

    Licht, L.

    1978-01-01

    Flexible surface thrust and journal foil bearings were fabricated, and their performance was demonstrated, both individually and jointly as a unified rotor support system. Experimental results are documented with graphs and oscilloscopic data of trajectories, waveforms, and scans of amplitude response. At speeds of 40,000 to 45,000 rpm and a mean clearance of the order of 15 to 20 micrometers (600 to 800 micrometers, the resilient, air lubricated, spiral groove thrust bearings support a load of 127 N (29 lb; 13 kgf), equivalent to 3.0 N/sq cm (4.5 lb/sq in 0.31 kgf sq cm). Journal bearings with polygonal sections provided stable and highly damped supports at speeds up to 50,000 rpm.

  12. Methods for determining atypical gate valve thrust requirements

    Steele, R. Jr.; Watkins, J.C.; DeWall, K.G. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-01

    Evaluating the performance of rising stem, wedge type, gate valves used in nuclear power plant is not a problem when the valves can be design-basis tested and their operability margins determined diagnostically. The problem occurs when they cannot be tested because of plant system limitations or when they can be tested only at some less-than-design-basis condition. To evaluate the performance of these valves requires various analytical and/or extrapolation methods by which the design-basis stem thrust requirement can be determined. This has been typically accomplished with valve stem thrust models used to calculate the requirements or by extrapolating the results from a less-than-design-basis test. The stem thrust models used by the nuclear industry to determine the opening or closing stem thrust requirements for these gate valves have generally assumed that the highest load the valve experiences during closure (but before seating) is at flow isolation and during unwedging or before flow initiation in the opening direction. However, during full-scale valve testing conducted for the USNRC, several of the valves produced stem thrust histories that showed peak closing stem forces occurring before flow isolation in the closing direction and after flow initiation in the opening direction. All of the valves that exhibited this behavior in the closing direction also showed signs of internal damage. Initially, we dismissed the early peak in the closing stem thrust requirement as damage-induced and labeled it nonpredictable behavior. Opening responses were not a priority in our early research, so that phenomenon was set aside for later evaluation.

  13. Problems of millipound thrust measurement. The "Hansen Suspension"

    Carta, David G.

    2014-03-31

    Considered in detail are problems which led to the need and use of the 'Hansen Suspension'. Also discussed are problems which are likely to be encountered in any low level thrust measuring system. The methods of calibration and the accuracies involved are given careful attention. With all parameters optimized and calibration techniques perfected, the system was found capable of a resolution of 10 {mu} lbs. A comparison of thrust measurements made by the 'Hansen Suspension' with measurements of a less sophisticated device leads to some surprising results.

  14. Dynamic Model for Thrust Generation of Marine Propellers

    Blanke, Mogens; Lindegaard, Karl-Petter; Fossen, Thor I.

    2000-01-01

    Mathematical models of propeller thrust and torque are traditionally based on steady state thrust and torque characteristics obtained in model basin or cavitation tunnel tests. Experimental results showed that these quasi steady state models do not accurately describe the transient phenomena...... in a thruster. A recently published dynamic model was based on the experimental observations. Describing zero advance speed conditions accurately, this model, however, does not work for a vessel at non- zero relative water speed. This paper derives a large signal dynamic model of propeller that includes...

  15. Robotic Pectoral Fin Thrust Vectoring Using Weighted Gait Combinations

    John S. Palmisano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A method was devised to vector propulsion of a robotic pectoral fin by means of actively controlling fin surface curvature. Separate flapping fin gaits were designed to maximize thrust for each of three different thrust vectors: forward, reverse, and lift. By using weighted combinations of these three pre-determined main gaits, new intermediate hybrid gaits for any desired propulsion vector can be created with smooth transitioning between these gaits. This weighted gait combination (WGC method is applicable to other difficult-to-model actuators. Both 3D unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD and experimental results are presented.

  16. High-speed, high-temperature magnetic bearings for jet turbine engine application

    Mekhiche, M.; Nichols, S.; Hevenhill, D.; Oleksy, J.; Young, J.; Kirtley, J.L. [SatCon Technology Corporation, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2000-08-01

    In order to double today's jet turbine engines' propulsion capability, lightweight, high-efficiency, high-speed and hightemperature components are sought. These requirements put the conventional components such as the mechanical bearings under excessive constraints and make them obsolete. In this context, SatCon Technology Corporation has developed a high-speed, high- temperature (50 krpm, 600 deg. C) magnetic bearing system that has the potential of meeting the requirements described above. This magnetic bearing system, comprised of two radial and one double acting thrust bearings, was successfully tested to 50,000 rpm. This paper describes the development of this system from its design, through its fabrication and final testing. Details on the system and component requirements are presented, along with a step-by step design and trade-off analysis. Test data and their discussion are provided as well. (orig.)

  17. Rotordynamics of Automotive Turbochargers Linear and Nonlinear Rotordynamics – Bearing Design – Rotor Balancing

    Nguyen-Schäfer, Hung

    2012-01-01

    This book deals with rotordynamics of automotive turbochargers while encompassing the analysis of the dynamics of rotating machines at very high rotor speeds of 300,000 rpm and above. This interdisciplinary field involves 1. thermodynamics and turbo-matching knowledge to compute working conditions of turbochargers, 2. fluid and bearing dynamics to calculate various operating thrust loads and to design the rotating floating ring bearings (two-oil-film bearings), and 3. tribology to improve the rotor stability and to reduce the bearing friction. Mathematical background in modeling and simulation methods is necessary; however, the prerequisites have been kept to a minimum. The book addresses both practitioners working in the field of rotordynamics of automotive turbochargers and graduate students in mechanical engineering.

  18. Rotordynamics of automotive turbochargers. Linear and nonlinear rotordynamics - Bearing design - Rotor balancing

    Nguyen-Schaefer, Hung [Bosch Mahle Turbo Systems GmbH und Co. KG, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    Describes the rotordynamics of automotive turbochargers. Requires only a minimum of mathematical background. Written by an R and D expert from industry. This book deals with rotordynamics of automotive turbochargers while encompassing the analysis of the dynamics of rotating machines at very high rotor speeds of 300,000 rpm and above. This interdisciplinary field involves 1. thermodynamics and turbo-matching knowledge to compute working conditions of turbochargers, 2. fluid and bearing dynamics to calculate various operating thrust loads and to design the rotating floating ring bearings (two-oil-film bearings), and 3. tribology to improve the rotor stability and to reduce the bearing friction. Mathematical background in modeling and simulation methods is necessary; however, the prerequisites have been kept to a minimum. The book addresses both practitioners working in the field of rotordynamics of automotive turbochargers and graduate students in mechanical engineering.

  19. Silver Bear for Screenplay

    LIU YUNYUN

    2010-01-01

    @@ Chinese director Wang Quan'an won the Silver Bear Prize at the 60th Berlin International Film Festival that lasted during February 11 to 21 tor the best screenplay for his movie Apart Together.The film also opened the festival.

  20. Hybrid superconductor magnet bearings

    Chu, Wei-Kan

    1995-01-01

    Hybrid superconductor magnet bearings (HSMB's) utilize high temperature superconductors (HTS's) together with permanent magnets to form a frictionless interface between relatively rotating parts. They are low mass, stable, and do not incur expenditure of energy during normal operation. There is no direct physical contact between rotor and stator, and hence there is no wear and tear. However, just as any other applications of HTS's, it requires a very cold temperature to function. Whereas this might be perceived as a disadvantage on earth, it is of no great concern in space or on the moon. To astronomers, the moon is an excellent site for an observatory, but the cold and dusty vacuum environment on the moon precludes the use of mechanical bearings on the telescope mounts. Furthermore, drive mechanisms with very fine steps, and hence bearings with extremely low friction are needed to track a star from the moon, because the moon rotates very slowly. All aspects considered, the HSMB is about the only candidate that fits in naturally. Here, we present a design for one such bearing, capable of supporting a telescope that weighs about 3 lbs on Earth.

  1. A Novel Integral 5-DOFs Hybrid Magnetic Bearing with One Permanent Magnet Ring Used for Turboexpander

    Bangcheng Han

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel combined five-degrees-of-freedom (5-DOFs hybrid magnetic bearing (HMB with only one permanent magnet ring (PMR used for turboexpanders. It has two radial magnetic bearing (RMB units; each has four poles and one thrust magnetic bearing (TMB to control 5-DOFs. Based on one PMR, the bias flux of the two radial magnetic bearing units and the one thrust magnetic bearing unit is constructed. As a result, ultra-high-speed, lower power loss, small size, and low cost can be achieved. Furthermore, the equivalent magnetic circuit method and 3D finite element method (FEM are used to model and analyze the combined 5-DOFs HMB. The force-current, force-position, torque-coil currents, the torque-angle position, and the stiffness models of the combined 5-DOFs HMB are given. Moreover, its coupling problems between the RMB units and the AMB unit are also proposed in this paper. An example is given to clarify the mathematical models and the coupling problems, and the linearized models are proposed for the follow-up controller design.

  2. Magnetic bearings for cryogenic turbomachines

    Iannello, Victor; Sixsmith, Herbert

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic bearings offer a number of advantages over gas bearings for the support of rotors in cryogenic turboexpanders and compressors. Their performance is relatively independent of the temperature or pressure of the process gas for a large range of conditions. Active magnetic bearing systems that use capacitive sensors have been developed for high speed compressors for use in cryogenic refrigerators. Here, the development of a magnetic bearing system for a miniature ultra high speed compressor is discussed. The magnetic bearing has demonstrated stability at rotational speeds exceeding 250,000 rpm. This paper describes the important features of the magnetic bearing and presents test results demonstrating its performance characteristics.

  3. Tectonothermal history of an exhumed thrust-sheet-top basin: An example from the south Pyrenean thrust belt

    Labaume, Pierre; Meresse, Florian; Jolivet, Marc; Teixell, Antonio; Lahfid, Abdeltif

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a new balanced structural cross section of the Jaca thrust-sheet-top basin of the southern Pyrenees combined with paleothermometry and apatite fission track (AFT) thermochronology data. The cross section, based on field data and interpretation of industrial seismic reflection profiles, allows refinement of previous interpretations of the south directed thrust system, involving the identification of new thrust faults, and of the kinematic relationships between basement and cover thrusts from the middle Eocene to the early Miocene. AFT analysis shows a southward decrease in the level of fission track resetting, from totally reset Paleozoic rocks and lower Eocene turbidites (indicative of heating to Tmax > ~120°C), to partially reset middle Eocene turbidites and no/very weak resetting in the upper Eocene-lower Oligocene molasse (Tmax < ~60°C). AFT results indicate a late Oligocene-early Miocene cooling event throughout the Axial Zone and Jaca Basin. Paleomaximum temperatures determined by vitrinite reflectance measurements and Raman spectroscopy of carbonaceous material reach up to ~240°C at the base of the turbidite succession. Inverse modeling of AFT and vitrinite reflectance data with the QTQt software for key samples show compatibility between vitrinite-derived Tmax and the AFT reset level for most of the samples. However, they also suggest that the highest temperatures determined in the lowermost turbidites correspond to a thermal anomaly rather than burial heating, possibly due to fluid circulation during thrust activity. From these results, we propose a new sequential restoration of the south Pyrenean thrust system propagation and related basin evolution.

  4. The Effect of Atmospheric Pressure on Rocket Thrust -- Part I.

    Leitner, Alfred

    1982-01-01

    The first of a two-part question asks: Does the total thrust of a rocket depend on the surrounding pressure? The answer to this question is provided, with accompanying diagrams of rockets. The second part of the question (and answer) are provided in v20 n7, p479, Oct 1982 of this journal. (Author/JN)

  5. Engineering Research, Development and Technology, FY95: Thrust area report

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the knowledge base, process technologies, specialized equipment, tools and facilities to support current and future LLNL programs. Engineering`s efforts are guided by a strategy that results in dual benefit: first, in support of Department of Energy missions, such as national security through nuclear deterrence; and second, in enhancing the nation`s economic competitiveness through their collaboration with US industry in pursuit of the most cost-effective engineering solutions to LLNL programs. To accomplish this mission, the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program has two important goals: (1) identify key technologies relevant to LLNL programs where they can establish unique competencies, and (2) conduct high-quality research and development to enhance their capabilities and establish themselves as the world leaders in these technologies. To focus Engineering`s efforts, technology thrust areas are identified and technical leaders are selected for each area. The thrust areas are comprised of integrated engineering activities, staffed by personnel from the nine electronics and mechanical engineering divisions, and from other LLNL organizations. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes Engineering`s activities for fiscal year 1995. The report provides timely summaries of objectives methods, and key results from eight thrust areas: computational electronics and electromagnetics; computational mechanics; microtechnology; manufacturing technology; materials science and engineering; power conversion technologies; nondestructive evaluation; and information engineering.

  6. A Theoretical Study of Two Stage Thrust Augmenting Ejectors,

    1984-11-01

    been found to increase the availability of thrust experimentally (Morrison 1942), and analitically (Nagaraja et al. 1973), no further work to the best...Applied Mechanics Reviews The John Crerar Library The Chemical Abstracts Service Allis Chalmers Corporation, Library Kentex Research Library United

  7. Structural setting of the Apennine-Maghrebian thrust belt

    PieroElter; MarioGrasso; MaurizioParotto; LivioVezzani

    2003-01-01

    The Apennine-Maghrebian fold-and-thrust belt devel-oped from the latest Cretaceous to Early Pleistocene at the subduction-collisional boundary between the Euro-pean and the westward-subducted Ionian and Adria plates. Large parts of the Mesozoic oceanic lithosphere were subducted during an Alpine phase from the Late Cretaceous to Middle Eocene. The chain developed through the deformation of major paleogeographic internal domains (tectono-sedimentary sequences of the Ligurian-Piedmont Ocean) and external domains (sedi-mentary sequences derived from the deformation of the continental Adria-African passive mareinL The continu-ity of the Apennine chain is abruptly interrupted in the Calabrian Arc by the extensive klippe of Kabylo-Calabrian crystalline exotic terranes, derived from deformation of the European passive margin.Major complexities (sharp deflections in the arcuate configuration of the thrust belt, out-of-sequence propagation of the thrusts) are referred to contrasting rheology and differential buoyancy of the subducted lithosphere (transitional from conti-nental to oceanic) and consequent differential roll-back of the Adria plate margin, and to competence contrasts in the Mesozoic stratigraphic sequences,where multiple décollement horizons at different stratigraphic levels may have favored significant differential shortening.From the Late Miocene, the geometry of the thrust belt was strongly modified by extensional fault-ing, volcanic activity, crustal thinning and formation of oceanic crust correlated with the development of the Tyrrhenian Basin.

  8. Measuring thrust and predicting trajectory in model rocketry

    Courtney, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Methods are presented for measuring thrust using common force sensors and data acquisition to construct a dynamic force plate. A spreadsheet can be used to compute trajectory by integrating the equations of motion numerically. These techniques can be used in college physics courses, and have also been used with high school students concurrently enrolled in algebra 2.

  9. Operant Control of Pathological Tongue Thrust in Spastic Cerebral Palsy.

    Thompson, George A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The behavior modification procedure, carried out at mealtime with a ten-year-old retarded boy who had spastic cerebral palsy, consisted of differential reinforcement and punishment, and resulted in substantial decreases in tongue thrust (reverse swallowing) and food expulsion, and a large increase in observed chewing. (Author/DLS)

  10. Magnetic bearings grow more attractive

    1993-10-01

    Advances in materials and electronics have enabled designers to devise simpler, smaller magnetic bearings. As a result, costs have dropped, widening the applications for these very-low-friction devices. Avcon (Advanced Controls Technology) has patented a permanent-magnet bias actively controlled bearing. Here high-energy rare earth permanent-magnet materials supply the basic bearing load levitation, while servo-driven electromagnets generate stabilization and centering forces for motion contol. Previous heavy-duty magnetic bearings used electromagnets entirely for suspension and control, which led to large bearings and control systems with higher power requirements. Avcon has developed several types of permanent-magnet bias bearings. The simplest is the radial repulsion bearing. Avcon's homopolar permanent-magnet bias active bearing is the most versatile of the company's designs.

  11. Effect of a bearing gap on hemolytic property in a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a semi-open impeller.

    Kosaka, Ryo; Nishida, Masahiro; Maruyama, Osamu; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Imachi, Kou; Yamane, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a semi-open impeller for long-term circulatory assist. The pump uses hydrodynamic bearings to enhance durability and reliability without additional displacement-sensors or control circuits. However, a narrow bearing gap of the pump has a potential for hemolysis. The purpose of this study is to develop the hydrodynamically levitated centrifugal blood pump with a semi-open impeller, and to evaluate the effect of a bearing gap on hemolytic property. The impeller levitates using a spiral-groove type thrust bearing, and a herringbone-groove type radial bearing. The pump design was improved by adopting a step type thrust bearing and optimizing the pull-up magnetic force. The pump performance was evaluated by a levitation performance test, a hemolysis test and an animal experiment. In these tests, the bearing gap increased from 1 to 63 μm. In addition, the normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) improved from 0.415 to 0.005 g/100 l, corresponding to the expansion of the bearing gap. In the animal experiment for 24 h, the plasma-free hemoglobin remained within normal ranges (pump was improved to the acceptable level by expanding the bearing gap greater than 60 μm.

  12. A 10 nN resolution thrust-stand for micro-propulsion devices

    Chakraborty, Subha; Courtney, Daniel G.; Shea, Herbert, E-mail: herbert.shea@epfl.ch [Microsystems for Space Technologies Laboratory (LMTS), Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Neuchatel (Switzerland)

    2015-11-15

    We report on the development of a nano-Newton thrust-stand that can measure up to 100 μN thrust from different types of microthrusters with 10 nN resolution. The compact thrust-stand measures the impingement force of the particles emitted from a microthruster onto a suspended plate of size 45 mm × 45 mm and with a natural frequency over 50 Hz. Using a homodyne (lock-in) readout provides strong immunity to facility vibrations, which historically has been a major challenge for nano-Newton thrust-stands. A cold-gas thruster generating up to 50 μN thrust in air was first used to validate the thrust-stand. Better than 10 nN resolution and a minimum detectable thrust of 10 nN were achieved. Thrust from a miniature electrospray propulsion system generating up to 3 μN of thrust was measured with our thrust-stand in vacuum, and the thrust was compared with that computed from beam diagnostics, obtaining agreement within 50 nN to 150 nN. The 10 nN resolution obtained from this thrust-stand matches that from state-of-the-art nano-Newton thrust-stands, which measure thrust directly from the thruster by mounting it on a moving arm (but whose natural frequency is well below 1 Hz). The thrust-stand is the first of its kind to demonstrate less than 3 μN resolution by measuring the impingement force, making it capable of measuring thrust from different types of microthrusters, with the potential of easy upscaling for thrust measurement at much higher levels, simply by replacing the force sensor with other force sensors.

  13. A 10 nN resolution thrust-stand for micro-propulsion devices

    Chakraborty, Subha; Courtney, Daniel G.; Shea, Herbert

    2015-11-01

    We report on the development of a nano-Newton thrust-stand that can measure up to 100 μN thrust from different types of microthrusters with 10 nN resolution. The compact thrust-stand measures the impingement force of the particles emitted from a microthruster onto a suspended plate of size 45 mm × 45 mm and with a natural frequency over 50 Hz. Using a homodyne (lock-in) readout provides strong immunity to facility vibrations, which historically has been a major challenge for nano-Newton thrust-stands. A cold-gas thruster generating up to 50 μN thrust in air was first used to validate the thrust-stand. Better than 10 nN resolution and a minimum detectable thrust of 10 nN were achieved. Thrust from a miniature electrospray propulsion system generating up to 3 μN of thrust was measured with our thrust-stand in vacuum, and the thrust was compared with that computed from beam diagnostics, obtaining agreement within 50 nN to 150 nN. The 10 nN resolution obtained from this thrust-stand matches that from state-of-the-art nano-Newton thrust-stands, which measure thrust directly from the thruster by mounting it on a moving arm (but whose natural frequency is well below 1 Hz). The thrust-stand is the first of its kind to demonstrate less than 3 μN resolution by measuring the impingement force, making it capable of measuring thrust from different types of microthrusters, with the potential of easy upscaling for thrust measurement at much higher levels, simply by replacing the force sensor with other force sensors.

  14. Why style matters - uncertainty and structural interpretation in thrust belts.

    Butler, Rob; Bond, Clare; Watkins, Hannah

    2016-04-01

    Structural complexity together with challenging seismic imaging make for significant uncertainty in developing geometric interpretations of fold and thrust belts. Here we examine these issues and develop more realistic approaches to building interpretations. At all scales, the best tests of the internal consistency of individual interpretations come from structural restoration (section balancing), provided allowance is made for heterogeneity in stratigraphy and strain. However, many existing balancing approaches give misleading perceptions of interpretational risk - both on the scale of individual fold-thrust (trap) structures and in regional cross-sections. At the trap-scale, idealised models are widely cited - fault-bend-fold, fault-propagation folding and trishear. These make entirely arbitrary choices for fault localisation and layer-by-layer deformation: precise relationships between faults and fold geometry are generally invalidated by real-world conditions of stratigraphic variation and distributed strain. Furthermore, subsurface predictions made using these idealisations for hydrocarbon exploration commonly fail the test of drilling. Rarely acknowledged, the geometric reliability of seismic images depends on the assigned seismic velocity model, which in turn relies on geological interpretation. Thus iterative approaches are required between geology and geophysics. The portfolio of commonly cited outcrop analogues is strongly biased to examples that simply conform to idealised models - apparently abnormal structures are rarely described - or even photographed! Insight can come from gravity-driven deep-water fold-belts where part of the spectrum of fold-thrust complexity is resolved through seismic imaging. This imagery shows deformation complexity in fold forelimbs and backlimbs. However, the applicability of these, weakly lithified systems to well-lithified successions (e.g. carbonates) of many foreland thrust belts remains conjectural. Examples of

  15. Thrust Area Report, Engineering Research, Development and Technology

    Langland, R. T.

    1997-02-01

    The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the knowledge base, process technologies, specialized equipment, tools and facilities to support current and future LLNL programs. Engineering`s efforts are guided by a strategy that results in dual benefit: first, in support of Department of Energy missions, such as national security through nuclear deterrence; and second, in enhancing the nation`s economic competitiveness through our collaboration with U.S. industry in pursuit of the most cost- effective engineering solutions to LLNL programs. To accomplish this mission, the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program has two important goals: (1) identify key technologies relevant to LLNL programs where we can establish unique competencies, and (2) conduct high-quality research and development to enhance our capabilities and establish ourselves as the world leaders in these technologies. To focus Engineering`s efforts technology {ital thrust areas} are identified and technical leaders are selected for each area. The thrust areas are comprised of integrated engineering activities, staffed by personnel from the nine electronics and mechanical engineering divisions, and from other LLNL organizations. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes Engineering`s activities for fiscal year 1996. The report provides timely summaries of objectives, methods, and key results from eight thrust areas: Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics; Computational Mechanics; Microtechnology; Manufacturing Technology; Materials Science and Engineering; Power Conversion Technologies; Nondestructive Evaluation; and Information Engineering. Readers desiring more information are encouraged to contact the individual thrust area leaders or authors. 198 refs., 206 figs., 16 tabs.

  16. Centrifugally decoupling touchdown bearings

    Post, Richard F

    2014-06-24

    Centrifugally decoupling mechanical bearing systems provide thin tensioned metallic ribbons contained in a support structure. This assembly rotates around a stationary shaft being centered at low speeds by the action of the metal ribbons. Tension springs are connected on one end to the ribbons and on the other end to the support structure. The ribbons pass through slots in the inner ring of the support structure. The spring preloading thus insures contact (or near-contact) between the ribbons and the shaft at rotation speeds below the transition speed. Above this speed, however, the centrifugal force on the ribbons produces a tensile force on them that exceeds the spring tensile force so that the ribbons curve outward, effectively decoupling them from mechanical contact with the shaft. They still remain, however, in position to act as a touchdown bearing in case of abnormally high transverse accelerations.

  17. Government Risk-Bearing

    1993-01-01

    The u.s. government bulks large in the nation's financial markets. The huge volume of government-issued and -sponsored debt affects the pricing and volume ofprivate debt and, consequently, resource allocation between competing alternatives. What is often not fully appreciated is the substantial influence the federal government wields overresource allocation through its provisionofcreditandrisk-bearing services to the private economy. Because peopleand firms generally seekto avoid risk, atsomeprice they are willing to pay another party to assume the risk they would otherwise face. Insurance companies are a class of private-sector firms one commonly thinks of as providing these services. As the federal government has expanded its presence in the U.S. economy during this century, it has increasingly developed programs aimed at bearing risks that the private sector either would not take on at any price, or would take on but atapricethoughtto besogreatthatmostpotentialbeneficiarieswouldnotpurchase the coverage. To...

  18. Leakage-free journal bearings

    Pinkus, O.; Etsion, I.

    1976-01-01

    A new concept of a journal bearing is developed which prevents side leakage of the lubricant, thus eliminating the need for sealing and collecting this leakage. The cooling of the bearing is accomplished by the prevailing circumferential flow. An analysis is performed and solutions are given for the bearing geometries and inlet pressures required to achieve the above purpose.

  19. Performance of high speed ball bearings with lead plated retainers in liquid hydrogen for potential use in a radiation environment

    Wisander, D. W.; Brewe, D. E.; Scibbe, H. W.

    1972-01-01

    Ball bearings (40-mm bore) with lead coated, aluminum-bronze retainers were operated successfully in liquid hydrogen at 30,000 rpm under a thrust load of 1780 newtons (400 lb) for running times up to 15 hours. The lead transfer films on the bearing surfaces prevented galling of bearing components. The lead coated retainers used in this investigation show promise for use in the high radiation environments, where polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) based materials are not suitable. Failure was a result of the loss of lead lubricant on the retainer-inner-land and ball-pocket surfaces. The longest bearing life (15 hr) was achieved with a lead coating thickness of 50 micrometers (0.002 in.) on the retainer. Other bearings had lives of 2 to 6 hours.

  20. Syntectonic fluid-flow along thrust faults: Example of the South Pyrenean fold-and-thrust belt

    Lacroix, B.; Travé, A.; Buatier, M.; Labaume, P.

    2012-04-01

    Estimation of the P-T conditions during evolution of sedimentary basins and characterization of petrophysical properties of fault zone are of major interests to oil companies, since they could allow to understand paleohydrological characteristics of potential reservoirs. In fold-and-thrust belts, faults are supposed to constitute channelized pathways for fluids coming from external, either deep or meteoric sources. However, the different available studies suggest that fluid flow through such discontinuities is not so evident. In order to constrain the paleofluid flow through the south Pyrenean fold-and-thrust belt we focus on thrust faults located at different structural levels. The microstructures observed in the different studied fault zones are similar and consist of pervasive cleavage, calcite shear and extension veins (respectively SV1 and EV1) and late dilatation veins (EV3). Thus, the presence of veins attests to the involvement of fluids during deformation. In order to characterize the nature and origin of fluid, petrological and geochemical (stable isotopes and trace elements) analyses were performed on calcite veins. The results suggest a high complexity in the hydrological behaviours of thrust faults evidencing a reservoir compartmentalization in the South-Pyrenean fold-and-thrust belt. In the southern part of the Axial Zone, different studies evidence the contribution of deep metamorphic water, probably derived from the Paleozoic basement, along Gavarnie related fault zones during deformation. In the Jaca basin, during the Monte Perdido thrust fault activity, we evidence the contribution of formation water. These data suggest a very closed hydrological fluid system where fluid flow didn't exceeded 70 m. In the other hand, the Jaca and Cotiella thrust faults located in the southern part of the basin, are characterized by a composite fluid-flow system. Indeed, stable isotopes and trace elements compositions of the first generation of calcite veins

  1. Anti-backlash gear bearings

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A gear bearing having a first gear and a second gear, each having a plurality of teeth. Each gear operates on two non-parallel surfaces of the opposing gear teeth to perform both gear and bearing functions simultaneously. The gears are moving at substantially the same speed at their contact points. The gears may be roller gear bearings or phase-shifted gear bearings, and may be arranged in a planet/sun system or used as a transmission. One preferred embodiment discloses and describes an anti-backlash feature to counter ''dead zones'' in the gear bearing movement.

  2. Interseismic Strain Accumulation Across Metropolitan Los Angeles: Puente Hills Thrust

    Argus, D.; Liu, Z.; Heflin, M. B.; Moore, A. W.; Owen, S. E.; Lundgren, P.; Drake, V. G.; Rodriguez, I. I.

    2012-12-01

    Twelve years of observation of the Southern California Integrated GPS Network (SCIGN) are tightly constraining the distribution of shortening across metropolitan Los Angeles, providing information on strain accumulation across blind thrust faults. Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) and water well records are allowing the effects of water and oil management to be distinguished. The Mojave segment of the San Andreas fault is at a 25° angle to Pacific-North America plate motion. GPS shows that NNE-SSW shortening due to this big restraining bend is fastest not immediately south of the San Andreas fault across the San Gabriel mountains, but rather 50 km south of the fault in northern metropolitan Los Angeles. The GPS results we quote next are for a NNE profile through downtown Los Angeles. Just 2 mm/yr of shortening is being taken up across the San Gabriel mountains, 40 km wide (0.05 micro strain/yr); 4 mm/yr of shortening is being taken up between the Sierra Madre fault, at the southern front of the San Gabriel mountains, and South Central Los Angeles, also 40 km wide (0.10 micro strain/yr). We find shortening to be more evenly distributed across metropolitan Los Angeles than we found before [Argus et al. 2005], though within the 95% confidence limits. An elastic models of interseismic strain accumulation is fit to the GPS observations using the Back Slip model of Savage [1983]. Rheology differences between crystalline basement and sedimentary basin rocks are incorporated using the EDGRN/EDCMP algorithm of Wang et al. [2003]. We attempt to place the Back Slip model into the context of the Elastic Subducting Plate Model of Kanda and Simons [2010]. We find, along the NNE profile through downtown, that: (1) The deep Sierra Madre Thrust cannot be slipping faster than 2 mm/yr, and (2) The Puente Hills Thrust and nearby thrust faults (such as the upper Elysian Park Thrust) are slipping at 9 ±2 mm/yr beneath a locking depth of 12 ±5 km (95% confidence limits

  3. Recent movements along the Main Boundary Thrust of the Himalayas: Normal faulting in an over-critical thrust wedge?

    Mugnier, Jean-Louis; Huyghe, Pascale; Chalaron, Edouard; Mascle, Georges

    1994-11-01

    The Main Boundary Thrust (MBT) is one of the major Himalayan thrusts occurring during the Cainozoic, and it is presently incorporated within the Himalayan thrust wedge (Lesser and Outer Himalayas) displaced above the Indian lithosphere. Nonetheless the MBT shows recent normal displacement along most of its length. We suggest that the orientation of the major principal stress within the Himalayan thrust wedge deviates significantly from the horizontal and when this deviation exceeds the dip of the vectors normal to back-tilted thrusts, the normal component of displacement may act along these faults. Steep north-dipping segments of the MBT therefore show a normal component of displacement if a geometrical definition is used, but they are faults in a compressional regime where the major principal stress axis has deviated from the horizontal. Micro-structural data recorded along the Surkhet-Ghorahi segment of the MBT are consistent with a strong deviation of the state of stress. The presence of such peculiar normal faulting along the MBT is used to calibrate the mechanical characteristics of the belt considered as a Coulomb wedge. The following characteristics are suggested: (a) very poor strength contrast between basal decollement and rocks in the wedge body, (b) a high pore fluid pressure ratio (probably close to 0.8-0.9) and a higher fluid pressure ratio (close to 1.0) along the active normal faults if a high internal friction angle (close to the Byerlee value) is considered. The strong deviation in principal stress direction may have recently increased, due to a taper of the Himalayan wedge exceeding the stability boundary and may be controlled by erosion and isostatic uplift rebound of the Himalayan range.

  4. Transition from external imbricate zone to foreland thrust sheet in the Caledonides, N. Scandinavia

    Rice, A. H. N.

    2010-05-01

    Thrust front geometries vary considerably between orogens, although erosion has usually removed external parts of the foreland thrust belt in older collision zones. This is the case in most of the Scandinavian Caledonides, where a well-defined basal decollement separates the nappe pile from the Autochthon. However, in both S and N Norway (E. Finnmark) thrust deformation dies out gradually towards the foreland. In Finnmark, the foreland thrust belt (Gaissa Thrust Belt) shows dominantly E-directed shortening. The internal part comprises the 50 km long (parallel to shortening) Munkavarri Imbricate Zone, with 50% shortening on 0.25-1.0 km spaced major imbricate thrusts. Minor thrusts/back-thrusts, are abundant near the basal decollement. Over ca. 12 km, major imbricate thrusts gradually cut up-section to lower stratigraphic levels, passing into tip-folds within the overlying Vuonjalrassa Thrust Sheet (20% shortening). The 10 km wide Låkkaskaidi Duplex (50% shortening), also underlies the Vuonjalrassa TS some 14 km to the foreland of the leading edge of the Munkavarri IZ. Stratigraphic overlap with the underlying Autochthon indicates that the Munkavarri IZ, Låkkaskaidi D and Vuonjalrassa TS were also transported en bloc towards the foreland by up to 25 km, along the Ruok'sadas Thrust. Below this, 20% shortening continues eastwards to the Hanadalen Thrust, in the footwall of which thrust ramps are no longer developed, although bedding-parallel slip continues further to the east. Sequentially, shortening in the Munkavarri IZ was likely of a continuously out-of-sequence nature, with all imbricate thrusts moving essentially together at the same time and older thrusts thus reaching higher stratigraphic levels as the basal decollement progressed towards the foreland. The decrease in shortening suggests a lower taper angle and/or faster thrust propagation. The cause of this is unknown, but much of the basal decollement under the Vuonjalrassa TS lies between pelitic rocks

  5. Thrust calculation of electric solar wind sail by particle-in-cell simulation

    Hoshi, Kento; Kojima, Hirotsugu; Muranaka, Takanobu; YAMAKAWA, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, thrust characteristics of an electric solar wind sail were numerically evaluated using full three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. The thrust obtained from the PIC simulation was lower than the thrust estimations obtained in previous studies. The PIC simulation indicated that ambient electrons strongly shield the electrostatic potential of the tether of the sail, and the strong shield effect causes a greater thrust reduction than has been obtaine...

  6. Thrust Measurement of Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) Plasma Actuators: New Anti-Thrust Hypothesis, Frequency Sweeps Methodology, Humidity and Enclosure Effects

    Ashpis, David E.; Laun, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    We discuss thrust measurements of Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) plasma actuators devices used for aerodynamic active flow control. After a review of our experience with conventional thrust measurement and significant non-repeatability of the results, we devised a suspended actuator test setup, and now present a methodology of thrust measurements with decreased uncertainty. The methodology consists of frequency scans at constant voltages. The procedure consists of increasing the frequency in a step-wise fashion from several Hz to the maximum frequency of several kHz, followed by frequency decrease back down to the start frequency of several Hz. This sequence is performed first at the highest voltage of interest, then repeated at lower voltages. The data in the descending frequency direction is more consistent and selected for reporting. Sample results show strong dependence of thrust on humidity which also affects the consistency and fluctuations of the measurements. We also observed negative values of thrust, or "anti-thrust", at low frequencies between 4 Hz and up to 64 Hz. The anti-thrust is proportional to the mean-squared voltage and is frequency independent. Departures from the parabolic anti-thrust curve are correlated with appearance of visible plasma discharges. We propose the anti-thrust hypothesis. It states that the measured thrust is a sum of plasma thrust and anti-thrust, and assumes that the anti-thrust exists at all frequencies and voltages. The anti-thrust depends on actuator geometry and materials and on the test installation. It enables the separation of the plasma thrust from the measured total thrust. This approach enables more meaningful comparisons between actuators at different installations and laboratories. The dependence on test installation was validated by surrounding the actuator with a grounded large-diameter metal sleeve. Strong dependence on humidity is also shown; the thrust significantly increased with decreasing humidity, e

  7. Damping Bearings In High-Speed Turbomachines

    Von Pragenau, George L.

    1994-01-01

    Paper presents comparison of damping bearings with traditional ball, roller, and hydrostatic bearings in high-speed cryogenic turbopumps. Concept of damping bearings described in "Damping Seals and Bearings for a Turbomachine" (MFS-28345).

  8. 14 CFR Appendix I to Part 25 - Installation of an Automatic Takeoff Thrust Control System (ATTCS)

    2010-01-01

    ... Appendix I to Part 25—Installation of an Automatic Takeoff Thrust Control System (ATTCS) I25.1General. (a... crew to increase thrust or power. I25.2Definitions. (a) Automatic Takeoff Thrust Control System (ATTCS... Control System (ATTCS) I Appendix I to Part 25 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION...

  9. 14 CFR 25.904 - Automatic takeoff thrust control system (ATTCS).

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Automatic takeoff thrust control system... Automatic takeoff thrust control system (ATTCS). Each applicant seeking approval for installation of an engine power control system that automatically resets the power or thrust on the operating engine(s)...

  10. Using laterally compatible cross sections to infer fault growth and linkage models in foreland thrust belts

    Watkins, Hannah; Butler, Robert W. H.; Bond, Clare E.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate changes in shortening, displacement and fold geometry to understand the detailed along-strike structural variation within fold-thrust belts, and infer thrust growth and linkage mechanisms. Field observations from the Vercors in SE France are used to characterise deformation style in the region. Parallel cross sections are constructed, analysed and used to create shortening and thrust displacement profiles from the northern to southern Vercors. Sections show changes in structural style and shortening accommodation from thrust-dominated in the north to fold-dominated in the south. The total shortening distance in the Vercors does not change significantly along strike (3400-4650 m), however displacements along individual thrust zones do vary significantly and displacement profiles show a range in displacement gradients (16-107 m/km). Despite relatively simple shortening patterns in the Vercors, sections show a more complex 3D internal structure of the fold-thrust belt. Thrust displacements and geometries suggest both large-scale thrust zones and small-scale thrusts are soft linked, transferring displacement along strike through transfer zones. Short, soft-linked thrust segments indicate an intermediate stage of thrust growth and linkage, well documented for normal fault systems, which form prior to the formation of thrust branches and hard-linked displacement transfer.

  11. Cenozoic thrust emplacement of a Devonian batholith, northeastern Brooks Range: Involvement of crystalline rocks in a foreland fold-and-thrust belt

    Wallace, W.K.; Hanks, C.L. (Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Involvement of crystalline rocks in thrusting near the foreland basin of a fold-and-thrust belt is relatively uncommon. In the northeastern Brooks Range, the Devonian Okpilak batholith was thrust northward and structurally elevated above adjacent foreland basin deposits during Cenozoic fold-and-thrust deformation. The batholith may have acted initially as a regional structural buttress, but a drop in the basal detachment surface to greater depth south of the batholith resulted in northward transport of the batholith. Shortening within the batholith was accommodated by (1) the development of discrete thrust slices bounded by ductile shear zones, (2) simple shear and development of penetrative mesoscopic and microscopic fabrics throughout the batholith, or both. The Mississippian Kayak Shale, a regional detachment horizon at the base of the overlying cover sequence, is depositionally thin or absent adjacent to the batholith. Thus, most of the cover sequence remained structurally coupled to the batholith during thrusting and was shortened by the development of penetrative structures.

  12. Endurance and failure characteristic of main-shaft jet engine bearing at 3 million DN

    Bamberger, E. N.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Signer, H.

    1976-01-01

    Groups of thirty 120-mm bore angular-contact ball bearings were endurance tested at a speed of 12,000 and 25,000 rpm (1.44 million and 3.0 million DN, where DN is the product of the bearing bore in mm and the shaft speed in rpm) and a thrust load of 66,721 N. The bearings were manufactured from a single heat of VIM-VAR AISI M-50 steel. At 1.44 million and 3.0 million DN, 84,483 and 74,800 bearing test hours were accumulated, respectively. Test results were compared with similar bearings made from CVM AISI M-50 steel run under the same conditions. Bearing lives at speeds of 3 million DN with the VIM-VAR AISI M-50 steel were nearly equivalent to those obtained at lower speeds. A combined processing and material life factor of 44 was found for VIM-VAR AISI M-50 steel. Continuous running after a spall has occurred at 3.0 million DN can result in a destructive fracture of the bearing inner race.

  13. Integration of magnetic bearings in the design of advanced gas turbine engines

    Storace, Albert F.; Sood, Devendra K.; Lyons, James P.; Preston, Mark A.

    1994-01-01

    Active magnetic bearings provide revolutionary advantages for gas turbine engine rotor support. These advantages include tremendously improved vibration and stability characteristics, reduced power loss, improved reliability, fault-tolerance, and greatly extended bearing service life. The marriage of these advantages with innovative structural network design and advanced materials utilization will permit major increases in thrust to weight performance and structural efficiency for future gas turbine engines. However, obtaining the maximum payoff requires two key ingredients. The first key ingredient is the use of modern magnetic bearing technologies such as innovative digital control techniques, high-density power electronics, high-density magnetic actuators, fault-tolerant system architecture, and electronic (sensorless) position estimation. This paper describes these technologies. The second key ingredient is to go beyond the simple replacement of rolling element bearings with magnetic bearings by incorporating magnetic bearings as an integral part of the overall engine design. This is analogous to the proper approach to designing with composites, whereby the designer tailors the geometry and load carrying function of the structural system or component for the composite instead of simply substituting composites in a design originally intended for metal material. This paper describes methodologies for the design integration of magnetic bearings in gas turbine engines.

  14. The interaction between deepwater channel systems and growing thrusts and folds, toe-thrust region of the deepwater Niger Delta

    Jolly, Byami; Whittaker, Alex; Lonergan, Lidia

    2015-04-01

    Gravity-driven seaward-verging thrusts, landward-verging back-thrusts and associated folds often characterize the slope and deepwater settings of passive margins. These structures, found in the 'toe-thrust' region of the system, exert a significant control on sediment gravity flows because they create and determine the location and configuration of sediment depocentres and transport systems. Consequently, a quantitative understanding of the interaction between sediment gravity flows and seabed topography is required to understand these systems effectively. Here we make quantitative measurements of the geomorphic response of submarine channels to growing tectonic structures with the aim of providing new constraints on the long-term erosional dynamics of submarine channel systems. This study exploits 3D seismic data in the outer toe-thrust region of the deepwater Niger Delta to analyze the interaction between Plio-Pleistocene channel systems and actively growing folds and thrusts. We mapped folds and thrusts from the seismic data and we used this data to reconstruct the history of fold growth. We then used the sea-bed seismic horizon to build a 50 m resolution Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the sea floor in Arc-GIS. We extracted channel long- profiles across growing structures from the DEM, and made measurements of channel geometries at regular intervals along the channel length. This information was used to infer morphodyanamic processes that sculpted the channel systems through time, and to estimate the bed shear stresses and fluid velocities of typical flow events. The bathymetric long profiles of these channels are relatively linear with concavity that range from -0.08 to -0.34, and an average gradient of ~1o. Actively growing thrusts are typically associated with a local steepening in channel gradient by a factor of up to 3, and this effect extends 0.5 - 2 km upstream of the thrust. Within these knickzones, channel incision increases by approximately by a

  15. Minimum-fuel rocket trajectories involving intermediate-thrust arcs

    Breakwell, J. V.; Dixon, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    The optimal trajectories in the neighborhood of an optimal intermediate-thrust arc are investigated for the minimum-fuel orbit rendezvous problem with fixed specific impulse. Since such an arc is singular, the thrust acceleration magnitude being the singular control component, a second-variation analysis leads to the identification of a field of neighboring, singular arcs in a state space of dimension four rather than six, provided that a suitable Jacobi condition is met. A given neighboring initial six-dimensional state vector does not generally lie on a neighboring singular arc, and junction onto the appropriate singular arc must be accomplished by a short period of strong variations in the acceleration. The neighboring singular arc meets the final condition in 4 dimensions, rather than 6 dimensions, and rendezvous must be completed by another, terminal short period of strong variations in the acceleration. Implications for midcourse guidance near a singular arc are discussed.

  16. A space tethered towing method using tension and platform thrusts

    Meng, Zhongjie; Wang, Bingheng; Huang, Panfeng

    2017-01-01

    Orbit maneuver via tether is a promising countermeasure for space debris removal and satellite orbit transfer. A space tethered towing method is explored that utilizes thrust to fulfill transfer and bounded tension to stabilize tether heading. For this purpose, a time-energy optimal orbit is designed by Gauss pseudospectral method. The theoretical attitude commands are obtained by equilibria analysis. An effective attitude control strategy is presented where the commands are optimized first and then feedback controller is designed. To deal with the underactuated problem with tension constraint, hierarchical sliding mode theory is employed and an adaptive anti-windup module is added to mitigate the actuator saturation. Simulation results show that the target is towed effectively by the thrusts, and a smooth tracking for the commands of tether length and in-plane tether heading is guaranteed by the bounded tension. In addition, the designed controller also presents appreciable robustness to model error and determination error.

  17. Engineering research, development and technology. Thrust area report, FY93

    1994-05-01

    The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the technical staff, tools, and facilities needed to support current and future LLNL programs. The efforts are guided by a dual-benefit research and development strategy that supports Department of Energy missions, such as national security through nuclear deterrence and economic competitiveness through partnerships with U.S. industry. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes the activities for the fiscal year 1993. The report provides timely summaries of objectives, methods, and results from nine thrust areas for this fiscal year: Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics; Computational Mechanics; Diagnostics and Microelectronics; Fabrication Technology; Materials Science and Engineering; Power Conversion Technologies; Nondestructive Evaluation; Remote Sensing, Imaging, and Signal Engineering; and Emerging Technologies. Separate abstracts were prepared for 47 papers in this report.

  18. Improvement of azimuthal homogeneity in permanent-magnet bearing rotors

    Hull, J. R.; Rossing, T. D.; Mulcahy, T. M.; Uherka, K. L.

    1992-10-01

    Permanent magnets that are levitated and rotating over a bulk high-temperature superconductor (HTS) form the basis of many superconducting bearing designs. Experiments have shown that the rotational-loss 'coefficient of friction' for thrust bearings of this type can be as low as 8 x 10(exp -6). While the loss mechanisms of such bearings are not well understood, the azimuthal homogeneity of the rotating permanent magnet is believed to play an important role in determining the loss. One possible loss mechanism is magnetic hysteresis in the HTS, where the energy loss E per cycle is derived from the critical state model and given by E = K (Delta B)(sup 3)/J(sub c) where K is a geometric coefficient, Delta B is the variation in magnetic field at the surface of the HTS experienced during a rotation of the levitated magnet, and J(sub c) is the critical current density of the HTS. It is clear that a small decrease in Delta B (i.e., decreasing the azimuthal inhomogeneity of the rotating magnetic field) could have profound effects on decreasing E and the rotational coefficient of friction. The role of Delta B is also expected to be significant in reducing losses from eddy currents and other mechanisms. Low rotational losses in HTS bearings have been demonstrated only for levitated masses of several grams. For practical bearings, it is important to obtain these low losses with larger levitated masses. There are two main routes toward decreasing Delta B. The first is to improve the alignment of the magnetic particles during fabrication and to maintain close tolerances on grinding angles during manufacture of the permanent magnet. The second, the subject of this paper, is to provide correctional procedures after the magnet is fabricated.

  19. Aerospace applications of magnetic bearings

    Downer, James; Goldie, James; Gondhalekar, Vijay; Hockney, Richard

    1994-01-01

    Magnetic bearings have traditionally been considered for use in aerospace applications only where performance advantages have been the primary, if not only, consideration. Conventional wisdom has been that magnetic bearings have certain performance advantages which must be traded off against increased weight, volume, electric power consumption, and system complexity. These perceptions have hampered the use of magnetic bearings in many aerospace applications because weight, volume, and power are almost always primary considerations. This paper will review progress on several active aerospace magnetic bearings programs at SatCon Technology Corporation. The magnetic bearing programs at SatCon cover a broad spectrum of applications including: a magnetically-suspended spacecraft integrated power and attitude control system (IPACS), a magnetically-suspended momentum wheel, magnetic bearings for the gas generator rotor of a turboshaft engine, a vibration-attenuating magnetic bearing system for an airborne telescope, and magnetic bearings for the compressor of a space-rated heat pump system. The emphasis of these programs is to develop magnetic bearing technologies to the point where magnetic bearings can be truly useful, reliable, and well tested components for the aerospace community.

  20. Magnetic Nozzles for Plasma Thrusters: Acceleration, Thrust, and Detachment Mechanisms

    2011-10-01

    A. Plasma flow layer features and Non - Maxwellian EEDF Essentially, a quasineutral steepening layer (QSL) is an electric potential fall of the order of...nozzle. It is needed to analyze the far beam. It requires a more sophisticated integration technique. 5. Plasma detachment via non -neutral...Magnetic nozzles for plasma thrusters: acceleration, thrust, and detachment mechanisms Eduardo Ahedo Mario Merino Plasmas and Space

  1. Jet-Engine Exhaust Nozzle With Thrust-Directing Flaps

    Wing, David J.

    1996-01-01

    Convergent/divergent jet-engine exhaust nozzle has cruciform divergent passage containing flaps that move to deflect flow of exhaust in either or both planes perpendicular to main fore-and-aft axis of undeflected flow. Prototype of thrust-vector-control nozzles installed in advanced, high-performance airplanes to provide large pitching (usually, vertical) and yawing (usually, horizontal) attitude-control forces independent of attitude-control forces produced by usual aerodynamic control surfaces.

  2. The Prevalence of Tongue Thrusting in Patients with Periodontal Disease

    S.A. Miremadi

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Tongue thrust and/or its consequent swallowing pattern are amongst the parafunctional habits that have always been considered as etiological factors for dental disorders by different investigators.Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of tongue thrusting and the incidence of periodontal disorders associated with this habit among patients referred to the Department of Periodontology, School of Dentistry, Tehran University of Medical Sciences.Material and Methods: Two hundred and eighty patients, undergoing first phase of periodontal therapy, were selected. Among them, those who had tongue thrusting were diagnosed and periodontal indices (probing depth, gingival recession, spacing and gingival enlargement were measured. Also, crown-root ratio was assessed for each anterior tooth.Results: Tongue thrusting was seen in 27.3%of patients, whereas 29.8% and 33.8% of them showed an increase in periodontal pocket depths in their upper and lower jaws,respectively. Gingival recession was found in the upper jaw in 12.98% and in the lowerjaw in 49.35% of the cases. Crown to root length ratio in 24.6% of the upper incisors and 35.1% of the lower incisors were found to be higher than normal. Spacing was observed between the incisors in 31.2% and 41.6% of the patients in the upper and lower jaws, respectively. Finally 31.2% of the patients showed gingival enlargement.Conclusion: The results of the present study revealed a considerable increase in the prevalence of various periodontal diseases among these subjects. To minimize the clinical problems of such patients, prevention of periodontal diseases through excellent oral hygiene and regular dental visits are suggested.

  3. Gravity as Archimedes' thrust and a bifurcation in that theory

    Arminjon, Mayeul

    2004-01-01

    Euler's interpretation of Newton's gravity (NG) as Archimedes' thrust in a fluid ether is presented in some detail. Then a semi-heuristic mechanism for gravity, close to Euler's, is recalled and compared with the latter. None of these two "gravitational ethers" can obey classical mechanics. This is logical since the ether defines the very reference frame, in which mechanics is defined. This concept is used to build a scalar theory of gravity: NG corresponds to an incompressible ether, a compr...

  4. Electric sail control mode for amplified transverse thrust

    Toivanen, Petri; Envall, Jouni

    2014-01-01

    The electric solar wind sail produces thrust by centrifugally spanned high voltage tethers interacting with the solar wind protons. The sail attitude can be controlled and attitude maneuvers are possible by tether voltage modulation synchronous with the sail rotation. Especially, the sail can be inclined with respect to the solar wind direction to obtain transverse thrust to change the osculating orbit angular momentum. Such an inclination has to be maintained by a continual control voltage modulation. Consequently, the tether voltage available for the thrust is less than the maximum voltage provided by the power system. Using a spherical pendulum as a model for a single rotating tether, we derive analytical estimations for the control efficiency for two separate sail control modes. One is a continuous control modulation that corresponds to strictly planar tether tip motion. The other is an on-off modulation with the tether tip moving along a closed loop on a saddle surface. The novel on-off mode is introduce...

  5. CFD evaluation of an advanced thrust vector control concept

    Tiarn, Weihnurng; Cavalleri, Robert

    1990-01-01

    A potential concept that can offer an alternate method for thrust vector control of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster is the use of a cylindrical probe that is inserted (on demand) through the wall of the rocket nozzle. This Probe Thrust Vector Control (PTVC) concept is an alternate to that of a gimbaled nozzle or a Liquid Injection Thrust Vector (LITVC) system. The viability of the PTVC concept can be assessed either experimentally and/or with the use of CFD. A purely experimental assessment can be time consuming and expensive, whereas a CFD assessment can be very time- and cost-effective. Two key requirements of the proposed concept are PTVC vectoring performance and the active cooling requirements for the probe to maintain its thermal and structural integrity. An active thermal cooling method is the injection of coolant around the pheriphery of the probe. How much coolant is required and how this coolant distributes itself in the flow field is of major concern. The objective of the work reported here is the use of CFD to answer these question and in the design of test hardware to substantiate the results of the CFD predictions.

  6. The NPL/ESA Micro-Newton Thrust Balance

    Hughes, Ben; Perez Luna, Jaime

    2012-07-01

    Europe is pursuing a number of unique science missions which require extremely high performance micro- propulsion systems to perform precision attitude control to meet their challenging scientific goals. A number of different propulsion systems are under development to try and meet these needs, including systems based on FEEP, mini-ion and cold gas thruster technologies. The critical performance requirements for the thrusters are related to thrust accuracy, dynamic response and noise, where very challenging requirements are set. Although it is anticipated that the thruster technologies can meet these challenging requirements, verification of these performances by test presents its own difficulties, since the magnitude of the thrust noise required is close to the limit of available measurement devices, and the practicalities of testing thrusters under vacuum provide their own challenges. To address the complex measurement requirements, the UK’s National Physical Laboratory (NPL) is working closely with ESTEC to develop a state-of-the-art thrust balance that will provide traceable (to international measurement standards) measurements with a target measurement uncertainty of 1 μN (k = 2) and measurement bandwidth of 0 Hz to 10 Hz. The paper will focus on the design of the instrument, the detrimental effects of external vibration noise on the measurement, how this problem is being addressed and how we determine the measurement uncertainty in the presence of noise.

  7. Pressure drop and thrust predictions for transonic micronozzle flows

    Gomez, J.; Groll, R.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the expansion of xenon, argon, krypton, and neon gases through a Laval nozzle is studied experimentally and numerically. The pressurized gases are accelerated through the nozzle into a vacuum chamber in an attempt to simulate the operating conditions of a cold-gas thruster for attitude control of a micro-satellite. The gases are evaluated at several mass flow rates ranging between 0.178 mg/s and 3.568 mg/s. The Re numbers are low (8-256) and the estimated values of Kn number lie between 0.33 and 0.02 (transition and slip-flow regime). Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) and continuum-based simulations with a no-slip boundary condition are performed. The DSMC and the experimental results show good agreement in the range Kn > 0.1, while the Navier-Stokes results describe the experimental data more accurately for Kn gas-independent accommodation coefficients. The thrust delivered by the cold-gas thruster and the specific impulse is determined based on the numerical results. Furthermore, an increase of the thickness of the viscous boundary layer through the diffuser of the micronozzle is observed. This results in a shock-less decrease of the Mach number and the flow velocity, which penalizes thrust efficiency. The negative effect of the viscous boundary layer on thrust efficiency can be lowered through higher values of Re and a reduction of the diffuser length.

  8. Low Thrust, Deep Throttling, US/CIS Integrated NTRE

    Culver, Donald W.; Kolganov, Vyacheslav; Rochow, Richard F.

    1994-07-01

    In 1993 our international team performed a follow-on ``Nuclear Thermal Rocket Engine (NTRE) Extended Life Feasibility Assessment'' study for the Nuclear Propulsion Office (NPO) at NASAs Lewis Research Center. The main purpose of this study was to complete the 1992 study matrix to assess NTRE designs at thrust levels of 22.5, 11.3, and 6.8 tonnes, using Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) reactor technology. An additional Aerojet goal was to continue improving the NTRE concept we had generated. Deep throttling, mission performance optimized engine design parametrics, and reliability/cost enhancing engine system simplifications were studied, because they seem to be the last three basic design improvements sorely needed by post-NERVA NTRE. Deep throttling improves engine life by eliminating damaging thermal and mechanical shocks caused by after-cooling with pulsed coolant flow. Alternately, it improves mission performance with steady flow after-cooling by minimizing reactor over-cooling. Deep throttling also provides a practical transition from high pressures and powers of the high thrust power cycle to the low pressures and powers of our electric power generating mode. Two deep throttling designs are discussed; a workable system that was studied and a simplified system that is recommended for future study. Mission-optimized engine thrust/weight (T/W) and Isp predictions are included along with system flow schemes and concept sketches.

  9. Camera Layout Design for the Upper Stage Thrust Cone

    Wooten, Tevin; Fowler, Bart

    2010-01-01

    Engineers in the Integrated Design and Analysis Division (EV30) use a variety of different tools to aid in the design and analysis of the Ares I vehicle. One primary tool in use is Pro-Engineer. Pro-Engineer is a computer-aided design (CAD) software that allows designers to create computer generated structural models of vehicle structures. For the Upper State thrust cone, Pro-Engineer was used to assist in the design of a layout for two camera housings. These cameras observe the separation between the first and second stage of the Ares I vehicle. For the Ares I-X, one standard speed camera was used. The Ares I design calls for two separate housings, three cameras, and a lighting system. With previous design concepts and verification strategies in mind, a new layout for the two camera design concept was developed with members of the EV32 team. With the new design, Pro-Engineer was used to draw the layout to observe how the two camera housings fit with the thrust cone assembly. Future analysis of the camera housing design will verify the stability and clearance of the camera with other hardware present on the thrust cone.

  10. The technology of the bearings used in the nuclear power generation system turbine generator units; Technologie des paliers equipant les groupes turbo-alternateurs du parc nucleaire

    Vialettes, J.M.; Rossato, M. [Service Ensembles de Production, Departement Machines, Direction des Etudes et Recherches, Electricite de France (EDF), 92 - Clamart (France)

    1997-01-01

    A bearing consists of all the stationary part which allow the relative motion in rotation or in translation, of a shaft line. Inside the bearing there is a journal bearing with a metallic anti-friction coating (the babbitt metal). The high power turbine generator unit rotors are supported by smooth transversal journal bearings fed with oil which fills the empty space and runs along the shaft. The technologies used for the bearings and the thrust bearings of the turbine generator units and the various shaft lines of the French CP0/CP1- and CP2/1300 MW-type nuclear power plants are described. The experience feedback is then discussed in terms of the dynamics of the shaft line, i.e. vibrational problems, the influence of the alignment and the babbitt metal incidents. (author) 4 refs., 11 figs.

  11. Research on Instantaneous Thrust Measurement for Attitude-control Solid Rocket Motor

    OUYANG Hua-bing; WANG Jian-ping; LIN Feng; XU Wen-gan

    2008-01-01

    In order to measure the instantaneous thrust of a certain attitude-control solid rocket motor, based on the analysis of the measurement principles, the difference between the instantaneous thrust and steady thrust measurements is pointed out. According to the measurement characteristics, a dynamic digital filter compensation method is presented. Combined the identification-modeling, dynamic compensation and simulation, the system's dynamic mathematic model is established. And then, a compensation digital filter is also designed. Thus, the dynamic response of the system is improved and the instantaneous thrust measurement can be implemented. The measurement results for the rocket motor show that the digital filter compensation is effective in the instantaneous thrust measurement.

  12. Nanoprecipitation in bearing steels

    Barrow, A.T.W. [SKF University Technology Centre, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Rivera-Diaz-del-Castillo, P.E.J., E-mail: pejr2@cam.ac.uk [SKF University Technology Centre, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    {theta}-phase is the main hardening species in bearing steels and appears in both martensitically and bainitically hardened microstructures. This work presents a survey of the microstrucural features accompanying nanoprecipitation in bearing steels. Nanoprecipitate structures formed in 1C-1.5Cr wt.% with additions of Cr, Mn, Mo, Si and Ni are studied. The work is combined with thermodynamic calculations and neural networks to predict the expected matrix composition, and whether this will transform martensitically or bainitically. Martensite tetragonality, composition and the amount of retained austenite are related to hardness and the type of nanoprecipitate structures in martensitic grades. The {theta}-phase volume fraction, the duration of the bainite to austenite transformation and the amount of retained austenite are related to hardness and a detailed quantitative description of the precipitate nanostructures. Such description includes compositional studies using energy-dispersive spectroscopy, which shows that nanoprecipitate formation takes place under paraequilibrium. Special attention is devoted to a novel two-step bainite tempering process which shows maximum hardness; we prove that this is the most effective process for incorporating solute into the precipitates, which are finer than those resulting from one-step banitic transformation processes.

  13. Evaluation of thrusting and folding of the Deadman Creek Thrust Fault, Sangre de Cristo range, Saguache County, Colorado

    Weigel, Jacob F., II

    The Deadman Creek Thrust Fault was mapped in a structural window on the west side of the Sangre de Cristo Range. The study area, located in southern Colorado, is a two square mile area halfway between the town of Crestone and the Great Sand Dunes National Park. The Deadman Creek Thrust Fault is the center of this study because it delineates the fold structure in the structural window. The fault is a northeast-directed low-angle thrust folded by subsequent additional compression. This study was directed at understanding the motion of the Deadman Creek Thrust Fault as affected by subsequent folding, and the driving mechanism behind the folding of the Pole Creek Anticline as part of a broader study of Laramide thrust faulting in the range. This study aids in the interpretation of the geologic structure of the San Luis Valley, which is being studied by staff of the United States Geological Survey (USGS), to understand Rio Grande Rift basin evolution by focusing on rift and pre-rift tectonic activity. It also provides a geologic interpretation for the Saguache County Forest Service, Great Sand Dunes National Park, and its visitors. The Sangre de Cristo Mountain Range has undergone tectonic events in the Proterozoic, Pennsylvanian (Ancestral Rocky Mountains), Cretaceous-Tertiary (Laramide Orogeny) and mid-Tertiary (Rio Grande Rift). During the Laramide Orogeny the Deadman Creek Thrust Fault emplaced Proterozoic gneiss over Paleozoic sedimentary rocks and Proterozoic granodiorite in the area. Continued deformation resulted in folding of the fault to form the Pole Creek Anticline. The direction of motion of both the fault and fold is northeastward. A self-consistent net of cross-sections and stereonet plots generated from existing and new field data show that the anticline is an overturned isoclinal fold in Pole Creek Canyon, which shows an increasing inter-limb angle and a more vertical axial surface northwestward toward Deadman Creek Canyon. Southwest-directed apparent

  14. Computational design of rolling bearings

    Nguyen-Schäfer, Hung

    2016-01-01

    This book comprehensively presents the computational design of rolling bearings dealing with many interdisciplinary difficult working fields. They encompass elastohydrodynamics (EHD), Hertzian contact theory, oil-film thickness in elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL), bearing dynamics, tribology of surface textures, fatigue failure mechanisms, fatigue lifetimes of rolling bearings and lubricating greases, Weibull distribution, rotor balancing, and airborne noises (NVH) in the rolling bearings. Furthermore, the readers are provided with hands-on essential formulas based on the up-to-date DIN ISO norms and helpful examples for computational design of rolling bearings. The topics are intended for undergraduate and graduate students in mechanical and material engineering, research scientists, and practicing engineers who want to understand the interactions between these working fields and to know how to design the rolling bearings for automotive industry and many other industries.

  15. Near Earth Asteroid Scout Solar Sail Thrust and Torque Model

    Heaton, Andy; Ahmad, Naeem; Miller, Kyle

    2017-01-01

    The Near Earth Asteroid (NEA) Scout is a solar sail mission whose objective is to scout at least one Near Earth Asteroid to help prepare for human missions to Near Earth Asteroids. NEA Scout will launch as a secondary payload on the first SLS-Orion mission. NEA Scout will perform a small trim maneuver shortly after deploy from the spent SLS upper stage using a cold gas propulsion system, but from that point on will depend entirely on the solar sail for thrust. As such, it is important to accurately characterize the thrust of the sail in order to achieve mission success. Additionally, the solar sail creates a relatively large solar disturbance torque that must be mitigated. For early mission design studies a flat plate model of the solar sail with a fixed center of pressure was adequate, but as mission concepts and the sail design matured, greater fidelity was required. Here we discuss the progress to a three-dimensional sail model that includes the effects of tension and thermal deformation that has been derived from a large structural Finite Element Model (FEM) developed by the Langley Research Center. We have found that the deformed sail membrane affects torque relatively much more than thrust; a flat plate model could potentially model thrust well enough to close mission design studies, but a three-dimensional solar sail is essential to control system design. The three-dimensional solar sail model revealed that thermal deformations of unshielded booms would create unacceptably large solar disturbance torques. The original large FEM model was used in control and mission simulations, but was resulted in simulations with prohibitive run times. This led us to adapt the Generalized Sail Model (GSM) of Rios-Reyes. A design reference sail model has been baselined for NEA Scout and has been used to design the mission and control system for the sailcraft. Additionally, since NEA Scout uses reaction wheels for attitude pointing and control, the solar torque model is

  16. A Comparison Study of Magnetic Bearing Controllers for a Fully Suspended Dynamic Spin Rig

    Choi, Benjamin; Johnson, Dexter; Morrison, Carlos; Mehmed, Oral; Huff, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has developed a fully suspended magnetic bearing system for the Dynamic Spin Rig (DSR) that is used to perform vibration tests of turbomachinery blades and components under spinning conditions in a vacuum. Two heteropolar radial magnetic bearings and a thrust bearing and the associated control system were integrated into the DSR to provide noncontact magnetic suspension and mechanical excitation of the 35 lb vertical rotor with blades to induce turbomachinery blade vibration. A simple proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller with a special feature for multidirectional radial excitation worked very well to both support and shake the shaft with blades. However, more advanced controllers were developed and successfully tested to determine the optimal controller in terms of sensor and processing noise reduction, smaller rotor orbits, and energy savings for the system. The test results of a variety of controllers we demonstrated up to the rig's maximum allowable speed of 10,000 rpm are shown.

  17. MATLAB WEB SERVER AND ITS APPLICATION IN REMOTE COLLABORATIVE DESIGN OF MAGNETIC BEARING SYSTEMS

    2001-01-01

    Acclimatizing itself to the development of network,Math Works Inc constructed a MATLAB Web Server environment by dint of which one can browse the calculation and plots of MATLAB through Internet directly.The installation and use of the environment is introduced.A code established on the platform of MATLAB,which deals with the modal analysis of magnetic bearing system(MBS) supporting rotors of five degrees of freedom and considering the coupling of thrust bearing with radical bearings is modified to work in the environment.The purpose is to realize a remote call of the code by users through Internet for the performance analysis of the system.Such an application is very important to the concurrent design of MBS and for the utilization of distributive knowledge acquisition resources in collaborative design.The work on modification and realization is described and the results are discussed.

  18. Grease lubrication in rolling bearings

    Lugt, Piet M

    2012-01-01

    The definitive book on the science of grease lubrication for roller and needle bearings in industrial and vehicle engineering. Grease Lubrication in Rolling Bearings provides an overview of the existing knowledge on the various aspects of grease lubrication (including lubrication systems) and the state of the art models that exist today. The book reviews the physical and chemical aspects of grease lubrication, primarily directed towards lubrication of rolling bearings. The first part of the book covers grease composition, properties and rheology, including thermal

  19. Thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) for high heat flux thrust chambers

    Bradley, Christopher M.

    The last 30 years materials engineers have been under continual pressure to develop materials with a greater temperature potential or to produce configurations that can be effectively cooled or otherwise protected at elevated temperature conditions. Turbines and thrust chambers produce some of the harshest service conditions for materials which lead to the challenges engineers face in order to increase the efficiencies of current technologies due to the energy crisis that the world is facing. The key tasks for the future of gas turbines are to increase overall efficiencies to meet energy demands of a growing world population and reduce the harmful emissions to protect the environment. Airfoils or blades tend to be the limiting factor when it comes to the performance of the turbine because of their complex design making them difficult to cool as well as limitations of their thermal properties. Key tasks for space transportation it to lower costs while increasing operational efficiency and reliability of our space launchers. The important factor to take into consideration is the rocket nozzle design. The design of the rocket nozzle or thrust chamber has to take into account many constraints including external loads, heat transfer, transients, and the fluid dynamics of expanded hot gases. Turbine engines can have increased efficiencies if the inlet temperature for combustion is higher, increased compressor capacity and lighter weight materials. In order to push for higher temperatures, engineers need to come up with a way to compensate for increased temperatures because material systems that are being used are either at or near their useful properties limit. Before thermal barrier coatings were applied to hot-section components, material alloy systems were able to withstand the service conditions necessary. But, with the increased demand for performance, higher temperatures and pressures have become too much for those alloy systems. Controlled chemistry of hot

  20. EVALUATION OF A LOW FRICTION - HIGH EFFICIENCY ROLLER BEARING ENGINE

    Kolarik, Robert V. II; Shattuck, Charles W.; Copper, Anthony P.

    2009-06-30

    machining and heat treatment. Timken designed and manufactured all of the roller bearing related components such as the thrust bearing package. The production connecting rods and camshafts could not be used for the roller bearing engine, so new ones were produced according to the team’s designs using Timken steel. The remaining miscellaneous components were designed and procured by FEV. Timken prepared a display version of the crankshaft portion of the production engine without connecting rods which could be driven by a motor through a cogged-belt and electrically actuated clutch arrangement. A modified version was also made in which the engine was outfitted with roller bearings on the main bearing positions. Preliminary tests showed that the rollerized engine was running with 1/3 less friction than the standard display engine. Additional friction testing and noise characterization was cut short because of shipping damage to the rollerized engine display and because of other project priorities. The team did successfully demonstrate the ability to package roller bearings satisfactorily in numerous locations in a typical automotive engine. The scope of this project did not include durability demonstration and that subject would have to be addressed in any follow-on work. In the actual test phase, the rollerized engine did show significantly less friction in motored dynamometer tests compared to its production equivalent. The 5-10% improvement measured in this study was about half that seen in other studies. However, the fired test results did not show a reduction in friction which did not match prior experience or expectations. Subsequent teardown and inspection of the rollerized engine revealed potential sources of excessive friction in the experimental application. These features would be eliminated in a design not based on modification of production parts. The team is confident (based on experience) that friction reduction would be realized with proper modifications.

  1. Cyanines Bearing Quaternary Azaaromatic Moieties

    Sbliwa, Wanda; Matusiak, Grazyna; Bachowska, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    Selected cyanines bearing quaternary azaaromatic moieties are presented, showing their monomers, dimers and polymers, as well as their possible applications. Cyanines having NLO properties are also briefly described.

  2. Flywheel Energy Storage System Suspended by Hybrid Magnetic Bearing

    Owusu-Ansah, Prince; Hu, Yefa; Misbawu, Adam

    This work presents a prototype flywheel energy storage system (FESS) suspended by hybrid magnetic bearing (HMB) rotating at a speed of 20000rpm with a maximum storage power capacity of 30W with a maximum tip speed of 300m/s. The design presented is an improvement of most existing FESS, as the design incorporates a unique feature in that the upper and the lower rotor and stator core are tapered which enhances larger thrust and much lower radial force to be exerted on the system. Without any adverse effect being experienced by the model. The work also focuses on the description of developing a prototype FESS suspended by HMB using solid works as a basis of developing in the nearer future a more improved FESS suspended by HMB capable of injecting the ever increasing high energy demand situation in the 21st century and beyond.

  3. Variation of Extreme and Fatigue Design Loads on the Main Bearing of a Front Mounted Direct Drive System

    Abrahamsen, Asger Bech; Natarajan, Anand

    2016-01-01

    The drivetrain of a 10 MW wind turbine has been designed as a direct drive transmission with a superconducting generator mounted in front of the hub and connected to the main frame through a King-pin stiff assembly by DNV-GL. The aeroelastic design loads of such an arrangement are evaluated based...... on the thrust and bending moments at the main bearing, both for ultimate design and in fatigue. It is found that the initial superconductor generator weight of 363 tons must be reduced by 25% in order not to result in higher extreme loads on main and yaw bearing than the reference10 MW geared reference drive...

  4. Gas-lubricated foil bearings for high speed turboalternator - Construction and performance

    Licht, L.; Branger, M.; Anderson, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    Foil bearings were designed and fabricated to replace pivoted-shoe journal bearings in a Brayton cycle turboalternator, within space limitations and constraints imposed by the existing machine. The foil bearings were integrated into a unified assembly with the rotor, housing, seals, and gimbal-mounted thrust bearing, without changes and modifications of machine components other than the journal bearings. The gas-lubricated foil bearings, which require no external pressure-source, furnished a stable support for a 21.9 pound rotor in the vertical attitude at speeds to 43,200 rpm. Excellent wipe-wear characteristics permitted well over 1000 start-stop cycles, without deterioration of performance in the entire speed range. The paper reviews salient aspects of design, fabrication, and performance. An account is given of rotor dynamics during starting, stopping, and traversing the region of resonances. The state of journal and foil surfaces is examined following intensive start-stop cycling and high-speed runs over extended periods of time.

  5. Structural evidence for northeastward movement on the Chocolate Mountains thrust, southeasternmost Calfornia

    Dillon, J.T. (Alaska Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, Fairbanks (USA)); Haxel, G.B. (Geological Survey, Flagstaff, AZ (USA)); Tosdal, R.M. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

    1990-11-10

    The Late Cretaceous Chocolate Mountains thrust of southeastern California and southwestern Arizona places a block of Proterozoic and Mesozoic continental crust over the late Mesozoic continental margin oceanic sedimentary and volcanic rocks of the regionally distinctive Orocopia Schist. The Chocolate Mountains thrust is interpreted as a thrust (burial, subduction) fault rather than a low-angle normal (exhumation, unroofing, uplift) fault. The Chocolate Mountains thrust zone contains sparse to locally abundant mesoscopic asymmetric folds. Fabric relations indicate that these folds are an integral part of and coeval with the thrust zone. On a lower hemisphere equal-area plot representing the orientation and sense of asymmetry of 80 thrust zone folds from 36 localities, spread over an area 60 by 10 km, Z folds plot northwest of and S folds plot southeast of a northeast-southwest striking vertical plane of overall monoclinic symmetry. The only sense of movement consistent with the collective asymmetry of the thrust zone folds is top to the northeast. Paleomagnetic data suggest that the original sense of thrusting, prior to Neogene vertical axis tectonic rotation related to the San Andreas fault system, was northward. The essential point is that movement of the upper plate of the Chocolate Mountains thrust evidently was continentward. Continentward thrusting suggests a tectonic scenario in which an insular or peninsular microcontinental fragment collided with mainland southern California. Alternative tectonic models involving subduction of the Orocopia Schist eastward beneath continental southern California circumvent the suture problem but are presently not supported by any direct structural evidence.

  6. Permanent-Magnet Meissner Bearing

    Robertson, Glen A.

    1994-01-01

    Permanent-magnet meissner bearing features inherently stable, self-centering conical configuration. Bearing made stiffer or less stiff by selection of magnets, springs, and spring adjustments. Cylindrical permanent magnets with axial magnetization stacked coaxially on rotor with alternating polarity. Typically, rare-earth magnets used. Magnets machined and fitted together to form conical outer surface.

  7. High-Performance Ball Bearing

    Bursey, Roger W., Jr.; Haluck, David A.; Olinger, John B.; Owen, Samuel S.; Poole, William E.

    1995-01-01

    High-performance bearing features strong, lightweight, self-lubricating cage with self-lubricating liners in ball apertures. Designed to operate at high speed (tens of thousands of revolutions per minute) in cryogenic environment like liquid-oxygen or liquid-hydrogen turbopump. Includes inner race, outer race, and cage keeping bearing balls equally spaced.

  8. Superconducting bearings for flywheel applications

    Abrahamsen, A.B.

    2001-01-01

    A literature study on the application of superconducting bearings in energy storage flywheel systems. The physics of magnetic levitation and superconductors are presented in the first part of the report, followed by a discussion of the literature found onthe applications of superconducting bearings...

  9. What about the Javan Bear?

    Jentink, F.A.

    1898-01-01

    The other day I read in a dutch popular periodical a paper dealing with the different species of Bears and their geographical distribution. To my great surprise the Malayan Bear was mentioned from Java: the locality Java being quite new to me I wrote to the author of that paper and asked him some in

  10. Geophagy by yellowstone grizzly bears

    Mattson, D.J.; Green, G.I.; Swalley, R.

    1999-01-01

    We documented 12 sites in the Yellowstone ecosystem where grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) had purposefully consumed soil (an activity known as geophagy). We also documented soil in numerous grizzly bear feces. Geophagy primarily occurred at sites barren of vegetation where surficial geology had been modified by geothermal activity. There was no evidence of ungulate use at most sites. Purposeful consumption of soil by bears peaked first from March to May and again from August to October, synchronous with peaks in consumption of ungulate meat and mushrooms. Geophageous soils were distinguished from ungulate mineral licks and soils in general by exceptionally high concentrations of potassium (K) and high concentrations of magnesium (Mg) and sulphur (S). Our results do not support the hypotheses that bears were consuming soil to detoxify secondary compounds in grazed foliage, as postulated for primates, or to supplement dietary sodium, as known for ungulates. Our results suggest that grizzly bears could have been consuming soil as an anti-diarrheal.

  11. Emergency Flight Control Using Computer-Controlled Thrust

    Burcham, Frank W., Jr.; Fullerton, C. Gordon; Stewart, James F.; Gilyard, Glenn B.; Conley, Joseph A.

    1995-01-01

    Propulsion Controlled Aircraft (PCA) systems are digital electronic control systems undergoing development to provide limited maneuvering ability through variations of individual engine thrusts in multiple-engine airplanes. Provide landing capability when control surfaces inoperable. Incorporated on existing and future airplanes that include digital engine controls, digital flight controls, and digital data buses, adding no weight for additional hardware to airplane. Possible to handle total failure of hydraulic system, depending on how surfaces respond to loss of hydraulic pressure, and broken control cables or linkages. Future airplanes incorporate data from Global Positioning System for guidance to any suitable emergency runway in world.

  12. Earth tides can trigger shallow thrust fault earthquakes.

    Cochran, Elizabeth S; Vidale, John E; Tanaka, Sachiko

    2004-11-12

    We show a correlation between the occurrence of shallow thrust earthquakes and the occurrence of the strongest tides. The rate of earthquakes varies from the background rate by a factor of 3 with the tidal stress. The highest correlation is found when we assume a coefficient of friction of mu = 0.4 for the crust, although we see good correlation for mu between 0.2 and 0.6. Our results quantify the effect of applied stress on earthquake triggering, a key factor in understanding earthquake nucleation and cascades whereby one earthquake triggers others.

  13. Basic Characteristics and Design of a Novel Hybrid Magnetic Bearing for Wind Turbines

    Yanjun Yu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a five-degree-of-freedom (5-DOF hybrid magnetic bearing (HMB for direct-drive wind turbines, which can realize suspension in the 4-DOF radial and 1-DOF axial directions. Only two sets of radial control windings are employed in the proposed HMB because only one set of radial control windings can achieve the 2-DOF suspension in the radial direction. Unlike the traditional active thrust magnetic bearings, this paper uses a cylindrical rotor core without a large thrust disc in the novel HMB. The numbers of the controller, power amplifier and system volume can be reduced in the magnetic suspension system. This paper also presents the structure and basic characteristics of the proposed magnetic bearing. A precision equivalent magnetic circuit analysis of the permanent magnet ring and control magnetic field is conducted in this study, in consideration of the non-uniform distribution of magnetic density. Accordingly, the mathematical models, including the suspension force expression, are derived based on the accurate equivalent magnetic circuit. The basic principle of the structure parameter design is presented, based on the given key parameters. The accuracy of the analytical method is further validated by 3D finite element analysis.

  14. Shock unsteadiness in a thrust optimized parabolic nozzle

    Verma, S. B.

    2009-07-01

    This paper discusses the nature of shock unsteadiness, in an overexpanded thrust optimized parabolic nozzle, prevalent in various flow separation modes experienced during start up {(δ P0 /δ t > 0)} and shut down {(δ P0/δ t tube. Shock unsteadiness in the separation region is seen to increase significantly just before the onset of each flow transition, even during steady nozzle operation. The intensity of this measure ( rms level) is seen to be strongly influenced by relative locations of normal and overexpansion shock, the decrease in radial size of re-circulation zone in the back-flow region, and finally, the local nozzle wall contour. During restricted shock separation, the pressure fluctuations in separation region exhibit periodic characteristics rather than the usually observed characteristics of intermittent separation. The possible physical mechanisms responsible for the generation of flow unsteadiness in various separation modes are discussed. The results are from an experimental study conducted in P6.2 cold-gas subscale test facility using a thrust optimized parabolic nozzle of area-ratio 30.

  15. Thrust producing mechanisms in ray-inspired underwater vehicle propulsion

    Geng Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a computational study of the hydrodynamics of a ray-inspired underwater vehicle conducted concurrently with experimental measurements. High-resolution stereo-videos of the vehicle’s fin motions during steady swimming are obtained and used as a foundation for developing a high fidelity geometrical model of the oscillatory fin. A Cartesian grid based immersed boundary solver is used to examine the flow fields produced due to these complex artificial pectoral fin kinematics. Simulations are carried out at a smaller Reynolds number in order to examine the hydrodynamic performance and understand the resultant wake topology. Results show that the vehicle’s fins experience large spanwise inflexion of the distal part as well as moderate chordwise pitching during the oscillatory motion. Most thrust force is generated by the distal part of the fin, and it is highly correlated with the spanwise inflexion. Two sets of inter-connected vortex rings are observed in the wake right behind each fin. Those vortex rings induce strong backward flow jets which are mainly responsible for the fin thrust generation.

  16. Near Earth Asteroid Scout Thrust and Torque Model

    Heaton, Andrew; Ahmad, Naeem; Miller, Kyle

    2017-01-01

    The Near Earth Asteroid (NEA) Scout is a solar sail mission whose objective is to scout at least one Near Earth Asteroid in preparation for manned missions to asteroids. NEA Scout will use a solar sail as the primary means of propulsion. Thus it is important for mission planning to accurately characterize the thrust of the sail. Additionally, the solar sail creates a relatively large solar disturbance torque that must be mitigated. For early mission design studies a flat plate model of the solar sail with a fixed center of pressure was adequate, but as mission concepts and the sail design matured, greater fidelity was required. Here we discuss the progress to a three-dimensional sail model that includes the effects of tension and thermal deformation that has been derived from a large structural Finite Element Model (FEM) developed by the Langley Research Center. We have found that the deformed sail membrane affects torque relatively much more than thrust. We have also found that other than uncertainty over the precise shape, the effect of small (approximately millimeter scale) wrinkles on the diffusivity of the sail is the leading remaining source of uncertainty. We demonstrate that millimeter-scale wrinkles can be modeled analytically as a change in the fraction of specular reflection. Finally we discuss the implications of these results for the NEA Scout mission.

  17. An Autonomous Onboard Targeting Algorithm Using Finite Thrust Maneuvers

    Scarritt, Sara K.; Marchand, Belinda G.; Brown, Aaron J.; Tracy, William H.; Weeks, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    In earlier investigations, the adaptation and implementation of a modified two-level corrections (or targeting) process as the onboard targeting algorithm for the Trans-Earth Injection phase of Orion is presented. The objective of that targeting algorithm is to generate the times of ignition and magnitudes of the required maneuvers such that the desired state at entry interface is achieved. In an actual onboard flight software implementation, these times of ignition and maneuvers are relayed onto Flight Control for command and execution. Although this process works well when the burn durations or burn arcs are small, this might not be the case during a contingency situation when lower thrust engines are employed to perform the maneuvers. Therefore, a new model for the two-level corrections process is formulated here to accommodate finite burn arcs. This paper presents the development and formulation of the finite burn two-level corrector, used as an onboard targeting algorithm for the Trans-Earth Injection phase of Orion. A performance comparison between the impulsive and finite burn models is also presented. The present formulation ensures all entry constraints are met, without violating the available fuel budget, while allowing for low-thrust scenarios with long burn durations.

  18. Resin Transfer Moulding Of An Engine Thrust Frame Cone Cap

    Brodsjo, Anders; Fatemi, Javad; de Vries, Henri

    2012-07-01

    For the Ariane 5 Midlife Evolution, a new Engine Thrust Frame for the upper stage is being developed. Part of this Engine Thrust Frame is the so-called Cone Cap, which closes the inverted cone shape of the structure. This part is highly loaded, as it transfers all the loads from the engines to the cone shape, and includes the hinge points for the mechanism that steer the engines. Besides strength to cope with the loads, stiffness is a very important design parameter. A composite design of this structure has been developed, which is approximately 15 kg’s lighter than the aluminium structure. To manufacture such a part in composites is challenging, because of the complexity of the shape and large laminate thickness. Due to these requirements, Resin Transfer Moulding has been selected as manufacturing method, which allows this highly integrated structure to be made in one step. As part of this project, a quarter segment of the full-scale design has been manufactured. From the design model, a detailed design for the dry fibre preform has been made using advanced composite laminate software tools. This preform was placed inside a heated, double sided tool and injected with the resin.

  19. Research at IMU: achievements, thrust areas and future challenges

    Wan-Loy Chu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available There have been significant achievements inresearch at IMU as indicated by the increasing amountof external funds obtained, and number of publicationsand postgraduate students produced since it startedits research activities in the year 2000. However, it isa great challenge indeed to ensure sustainability ofour research, which is currently heavily dependent oninternal funding. There is a need to realign our strategiesto further enhance our competitiveness in securingexternal funding for research. In line with this, theInstitute for Research, Development and Innovation(IRDI was officially established on 18 September2012. The Institute will serve as a platform to supportall research activities at IMU. There are four Centresof Excellence based on the identified thrust areas underIRDI, namely 1 Centre for Bioactive Molecules andDrug Discovery; 2 Centre for Environmental andPopulation Health; 3 Centre for Cancer and StemCell Research, and 4 Centre for Health ProfessionalEducation Research. Major findings based on research inthese four thrust areas are reviewed in this paper. Withthe strategic planning and establishment of IRDI, it isour aspiration to bring research at IMU to a higher level.

  20. A review of definitions of the Himalayan Main Central Thrust

    Martin, Aaron J.

    2016-11-01

    Most workers regard the Main Central Thrust (MCT) as one of the key high strain zones in the Himalaya because it accommodated at least 90 km of shortening, because that shortening exhumed and buried hanging wall and footwall rocks, and due to geometric and kinematic connections between the Main Central Thrust and the structurally overlying South Tibet Detachment. Geologists currently employ three unrelated definitions of the MCT: metamorphic-rheological, age of motion-structural, or protolith boundary-structural. These disparate definitions generate map and cross-section MCT positions that vary by up to 5 km of structural distance. The lack of consensus and consequent shifting locations impede advances in our understanding of the tectonic development of the orogen. Here, I review pros and cons of the three MCT definitions in current use. None of these definitions is flawless. The metamorphic-rheological and age of motion-structural definitions routinely fail throughout the orogen, whereas the protolith boundary-structural definition may fail only in rare cases, all limited to sectors of the eastern Himalaya. Accordingly, a definition based on high strain zone geometry and kinematics combined with identification of a protolith boundary is the best working definition of the MCT.

  1. Three-dimensional geometry of thrust surfaces and the origin of sinuous thrust traces in orogenic belts: Insights from scaled sandbox experiments

    Chattopadhyay, A.; Jain, M.; Bhattacharjee, D.

    2014-12-01

    Sinuous traces of emerging thrust tips, comprising multiple salients and recesses, are commonly observed in orogenic belts (e.g. Lesser Himalayas of India, Nepal and Bhutan) and in accretionary prisms (e.g. Nankai Trough off the coast of Japan). Lateral (along the strike of the deformation zone) variation in the depths of foreland basins (i.e. variable sediment thickness) or in the strength of the basal detachment, or presence of a curved indenter has been traditionally cited to explain the formation of salients in fold-and-thrust belts, although they are not applicable in all cases. In the present work, we have carried out four series of scaled analog model experiments using dry quartz sand, changing the dip of the basal decollément (β = 0° or 5°) and the basal friction (μb = 0.5 or 0.3) to investigate the 3D shape of thrust surfaces under varying overall boundary conditions, but without any lateral variation of these parameters, within the models. The experimental results show that under all boundary conditions, thrust surfaces are curved both in their dip and strike directions (i.e. spoon-shaped in 3D). Multiple concave-upward and convex-upward segments constitute a thrust surface, which produces a sinuous trace when the tip line intersects the Earth's surface. It is also shown that thrust surface curvatures occur at different scales, and the overall thrust surface roughness (corrugations) has a self-affine fractal geometry.

  2. Analytical Equations for Orbital Transfer Maneuvers of a Vehicle Using Constant Low Thrust

    1981-12-01

    136auks" ,b , .. .. a. AFIT/GA/AA/81D -3 ANALITICAL EQUATIOIS FOR OR.BITAL TRASFER MANIUVRS OF A V 1CI, USING CONSTANT LOW THRUST THESIS AFIT/GA/AA...conventional chemical propulsion system- (Ref 1). Changing the velocity of a satellite such as described above can be used to boost a satellite into...taneously. This is a valid assumption for high thrust chemical propulsion, but not for low thrust electric propulsion. Therefore, a set of equations

  3. Eastern slopes grizzly bear project

    NONE

    2001-01-01

    The cumulative effects of human activities on the grizzly bears in the central Canadian Rockies are not well known. As a result, a project was initiated in 1994 to address the urgent requirement for accurate scientific information on the habitat and populations of grizzly bears in the area of the Banff National Park and Kananaskis Country. This area is probably the most heavily used and developed area where the grizzly still survives. The information gathered throughout the course of this study will be used to better protect and manage the bears and other sensitive carnivores in the region. Using telemetry, researchers are monitoring 25 grizzly bears which were radio-collared in a 22,000 square-kilometer area in the upper Bow Valley drainage of the eastern Alberta slopes. The researchers involved in the project are working with representatives from Husky Oil and Talisman Energy on the sound development of the Moose Mountain oil and gas field without adversely affecting the grizzly bear population. Information collected over seven years indicated that the grizzly bears have few and infrequent offspring. Using the information gathered so far, the location of the Moose Mountain to Jumping Pound pipeline was carefully selected, since the bears recover very slowly from high mortality, and also considering that the food and cover had already been compromised by the high number of roads, trails and other human activities in the area. The status of the population and habitat of the grizzly bear will be assessed upon the conclusion of the field research phase in 2001. Models will be updated using the data obtained during eight years and will assist in the understanding of complex variables that affect grizzly bears.

  4. EFFECT OF BEARING MACROGEOMETRY ON BEARING PERFORMANCE IN ELASTOHYDRODYNAMIC LUBRICATION

    Emin GÜLLÜ

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available During manufacturing, ideal dimension and mutual positioning of machine elements proposed in project desing can be achieved only within certain range of tolerances. These tolerances, being classified in two groups, related to micro and macro geometry of machine elements, don't have to effect the functioning of these elements. So, as for all machine elements, investigation of the effects of macro and micro tolerances for journal bearings is important. In this study, we have investigated the effect of macro geometric irregularities of journal bearings on performance characteristics. In this regard, we have studied the change of bearing performance in respect to deviation from ideal circle for an elliptic shaft with small ovality rolling in circular journal bearing.

  5. Bears, Big and Little. Young Discovery Library Series.

    Pfeffer, Pierre

    This book is written for children 5 through 10. Part of a series designed to develop their curiosity, fascinate them and educate them, this volume describes: (1) the eight species of bears, including black bear, brown bear, grizzly bear, spectacled bear, sun bear, sloth bear, polar bear, and giant panda; (2) geographical habitats of bears; (3)…

  6. Performance of high speed ball bearings with lead and lead alloy plated retainers in liquid hydrogen at 1.2 million DN

    Brewe, D. E.; Scibbe, H. W.; Wisander, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    Ball bearings with lead- and lead-alloy-coated retainers were operated in liquid hydrogen at 30,000 rpm under a thrust load of 400 lb. Bearing lives were compared using different: (1) lead- and lead-alloy coatings, (2) coating thicknesses, (3) substrate materials, (4) retainer locating surfaces, and (5) plating techniques. Longer bearing run times were achieved using retainers with a lead-tin-copper alloy coating electroplated onto a leaded-bronze material and an aluminum-bronze alloy. Thirty percent of the bearings tested achieved the desired objective of 10 hours. All of the lead-alloy coated retainers exceeded this objective. A coating thickness of at least 0.0014 in. was used for all bearings exceeding the 10-hour goal.

  7. A cislunar guidance methodology and model for low thrust trajectory generation

    Korsmeyer, David J.

    1992-01-01

    A guidance methodology for generating low-thrust cislunar trajectories was developed and incorporated in a computer model. The guidance methodology divides the cislunar transfer into three phases. Each phase is discussed in turn. To establish the effectiveness of the methodology and algorithms the computer model generated three example cases for the cislunar transfer of a low-thrust electric orbital transfer vehicle (EOTV). Transfers from both earth orbit to lunar orbit and from lunar orbit back to earth orbit are considered. The model allows the determination of the low-thrust EOTV's time-of-flight, propellant mass, payload mass, and thrusting history.

  8. Finite-thrust optimization of interplanetary transfers of space vehicle with bimodal nuclear thermal propulsion

    Kharytonov, Oleksii M.; Kiforenko, Boris M.

    2011-08-01

    The nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) propulsion is one of the leading promising technologies for primary space propulsion for manned exploration of the solar system due to its high specific impulse capability and sufficiently high thrust-to-weight ratio. Another benefit of NTR is its possible bimodal design, when nuclear reactor is used for generation of a jet thrust in a high-thrust mode and (with an appropriate power conversion system) as a source of electric power to supply the payload and the electric engines in a low-thrust mode. The model of the NTR thrust control was developed considering high-thrust NTR as a propulsion system of limited power and exhaust velocity. For the proposed model the control of the thrust value is accomplished by the regulation of reactor thermal power and propellant mass flow rate. The problem of joint optimization of the combination of high- and low-thrust arcs and the parameters of bimodal NTR (BNTR) propulsion system is considered for the interplanetary transfers. The interplanetary trajectory of the space vehicle is formed by the high-thrust NTR burns, which define planet-centric maneuvers and by the low-thrust heliocentric arcs where the nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) is used. The high-thrust arcs are analyzed using finite-thrust approach. The motion of the corresponding dynamical system is realized in three phase spaces concerning the departure planet-centric maneuver by means of high-thrust NTR propulsion, the low-thrust NEP heliocentric maneuver and the approach high-thrust NTR planet-centric maneuver. The phase coordinates are related at the time instants of the change of the phase spaces due to the relations between the space vehicle masses. The optimal control analysis is performed using Pontryagin's maximum principle. The numerical results are analyzed for Earth-Mars "sprint" transfer. The optimal values of the parameters that define the masses of NTR and NEP subsystems have been evaluated. It is shown that the low-thrust

  9. Seafloor expression and shallow structure of a fold-and-thrust system, Isfjorden, west Spitsbergen

    Maria Blinova

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A detailed map of the structure of the west Spitsbergen fold-and-thrust belt in the Isfjorden area, Spitsbergen, is presented. The map was constructed from a dense grid of two-dimensional multichannel reflection seismic and bathymetric data. Joint interpretation of two data sets allowed a comparison of tectonic structures detected along the uppermost parts of the seismic sections and those reflected in the morphology of the seafloor. Three major, predominantly north-west–south-east striking faults were identified. The westernmost fault (T1 is a hinterland-directed (most likely out of sequence thrust, while the central and easternmost faults (T2 and T3 are foreland-directed (in-sequence thrusts. The thrusts divide Isfjorden into three subareas. Subarea 1 is bounded by thrust faults T1 and T2 and comprises Tertiary rocks surrounded by Jurassic–Cretaceous strata. The structural signature of Subarea 1 is that of a system of hinterland- and foreland-directed thrust faults, resulting in a seafloor relief characterized by parallel ridges and troughs. Subarea 2 is limited by thrust faults T2 and T3 and shows Jurassic–Cretaceous outcrops on the seafloor. Subarea 3 is situated east of the main thrust fault T3 and mainly involves outcrops of Triassic–Jurassic rocks. Together, Subareas 2 and 3 are dominated by foreland-directed, north-west–south-east and NNW–SSE-striking thrusts that are hardly detectable in bathymetric data.

  10. Myrmecophagy by Yellowstone grizzly bears

    Mattson, D.J.

    2001-01-01

    I used data collected during a study of radio-marked grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) in the Yellowstone region from 1977 to 1992 to investigate myrmecophagy by this population. Although generally not an important source of energy for the bears (averaging 8 mm long) nested in logs over small ants (6 mm long) nested under stones. Optimal conditions for consumption of ants occurred on the warmest sites with ample substrate suitable for ant nests. For ants in mounds, this occurred at low elevations at non-forested sites. For ants in logs, this occurred at low elevations or on southerly aspects where there was abundant, large-diameter, well-decomposed woody debris under an open forest canopy. Grizzly bears selected moderately decomposed logs 4a??5 dm in diameter at midpoint. Ants will likely become a more important food for Yellowstone's grizzly bears as currently important foods decline, owing to disease and warming of the regional climate.

  11. Segmented Hybrid Gasostatic Bearing Optimization

    Prodan Nikolay Vasilevich

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of research-development of methods of numerical optimization rotatable support pads gasostatic hybrid bearing. In the world‘s aerospace engineering the gas-dynamic bearings are currently most common. They are characterized by the supporting layer of different designs, which ensures the workability of the rotors during starts and stops. The main problem of this bearing type, apart from the construction complexity is the wear of this supporting layer. Gas-static bearing has no such defect, since there is no physical contact between solid surfaces. This study presents the results of the hybrid bearing’s calculation, combining both technologies. The slotted nozzle of non-conventional shape that mirrors the solution of Reynolds equation’s isoline is studied. The dependences of the main parameters on the speed of the shaft’s rotation are discussed. The aerodynamic resistance of pads for different regimes of operation is investigated.

  12. Gas bearing operates in vacuum

    Perkins, G. S.

    1975-01-01

    Bearing has restrictions to reduce air leaks and is connected to external pumpout facility which removes exhausted air. Token amount of air which is lost to vacuum is easily removed by conventional vacuum pump.

  13. Mixed-mu superconducting bearings

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Mulcahy, Thomas M. (Western Springs, IL)

    1998-01-01

    A mixed-mu superconducting bearing including a ferrite structure disposed for rotation adjacent a stationary superconductor material structure and a stationary permanent magnet structure. The ferrite structure is levitated by said stationary permanent magnet structure.

  14. Nonlinear Control of Magnetic Bearings

    Khac Duc Do; Dang Hoe Nguyen; Thanh Binh Nguyen

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, recent results controling nonlinear systems with output tracking error constraints are applied to the design of new tracking controllers for magnetic bearings. The proposed controllers can force the rotor to track a bounded and sufficiently smooth refer-ence trajectory asymptotically and guarantee non-contactedness be-tween the rotor and the stator of the magnetic bearings. Simulation results are included to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed con-trollers.

  15. Structural Evolution of a Fold-And-Thrust Belt in Hsinchu-Miaoli area, Taiwan

    Chen, T. W.; Huang, S. T.; Hu, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Hsinchu-Miaoli area is the major hydrocarbon producing fields in Taiwan. Oil and gas production in the area have been explored and produced since 1861, and the oldest gas field is still producing gas until now. To understand the nature and the geometry of the reservoirs in this area, 82 wells were drilled in the Chinshui Field, which is one of the important gas fields in the Hsinchu-Miaoli area. However, the subsurface structures and fracture distribution of these fields are still unclear, and the reason for the long time producing is also unknown. Fractures in the oil-bearing reservoir might be one of the important factors of the long time gas producing, but the fracture reservoirs attaining hydrocarbons associated with fault-related folding need to be further clarified. First, we represent a new structural interpretation of Chinshui and adjacent Chuhuangkeng anticlines by a geological cross section across from Miaoli offshore to inner foothills. By comparing the total shortening distances among several published cross sections and the profile in this study, we construct the deformation pattern model in Hsinchu-Miaoli area. Furthermore, we then use Discrete Element Method (DEM) to reconstruct the evolution model of the Chinshui anticline based on the cross sections in the study area. This model can provide fracture densities of Chinshui anticline and also the geometry of potential hydrocarbon reservoirs. According to the result of our restoration, the total shortening distance of the geological cross section is about 20.3km and the entire slip of the deep thrust faults in Chinshui anticline is 5.8 km. This result is similar with previous published cross sections around this region. And the structural evolution of Chinshui anticline would further apply in the model of fracture distribution and densities.

  16. 77 FR 70423 - Black Bear Hydro Partners, LLC and Black Bear Development Holdings, LLC and Black Bear SO, LLC...

    2012-11-26

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Black Bear Hydro Partners, LLC and Black Bear Development Holdings, LLC and Black Bear SO, LLC; Notice of Application for Partial Transfer of Licenses, and Soliciting Comments and Motions To Intervene On October 25, 2012, Black Bear Hydro Partners, LLC, sole licensee (transferor)...

  17. Minimum Thrust Load Control for Floating Wind Turbine

    Christiansen, Søren; Bak, Thomas; Knudsen, Torben

    2012-01-01

    — Offshore wind energy capitalizes on the higher and less turbulent wind at sea. Shallow water sites are profitable for deployment of monopile wind turbines at water depths of up to 30 meters. Beyond 30 meters, the wind is even stronger and less turbulent. At these depths, floating wind turbines...... become profitable, capable of accessing unexploited wind resources while reaching regions of new consumers. However, floating wind turbines are subject to reduced structural stiffness which results in instabilities when standard wind turbine control systems are applied. Based on optimal control, this paper...... presents a new minimum thrust control strategy capable of stabilizing a floating wind turbine. The new control strategy explores the freedom of variable generator speed above rated wind speed. A comparison to the traditional constant speed strategy, shows improvements in structural fore-aft oscillations...

  18. Procedure for utilizing the lift and thrust forces of ornithopters

    Bezard, C.

    1985-01-01

    This procedure is distinguished by two beating wings which together describe, in space, a succession of interlaced triangles. On these wings, whose incidence varies automatically, identical forces are exerted: simultaneous lift and thrust when they make their descent, which is inclined toward the front of the craft, and lift alone when they make their ascent, which is inclined toward the rear of the craft and follows a slide horizontal movement. A mechanical device makes these movements possible. It includes: two wings with hollow profiles, connected by a framework located above a rigid frame and attached to it by bars with joints. These bars are moved with control rods which gear down the drive force. A mechanism with elastic bands or springs automatically varies the incidence of the wings.

  19. Thrusts and Prospects on Understanding and Predicting Asian Monsoon Climate

    WANG Bin

    2008-01-01

    Development of monsoon climate prediction through integrated research efforts to improve our understanding of monsoon variability and predictability is a primary goal of the Asian Monsoon Years (2007-2011) and International Monsoon Study under the leadership of the World Climate Research Programme.The present paper reviews recent progress in Asian monsoon research focusing on (1) understanding and modeling of the monsoon variability, (2) determining the sources and limits of predictability, and (3) assessing the current status of climate prediction, with emphasis on the weekly to interannual time scales. Particular attention is paid to identify scientific issues and thrust areas, as well as potential directions to move forward in an attempt to stimulate future research to advance our understanding of monsoon climate dynamics and improve our capability to forecast Asian monsoon climate variation.

  20. Real-time seam tracking for rocket thrust chamber manufacturing

    Schmitt, D.J.; Novak, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Starr, G.P. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Maslakowski, J.E. [Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.

    1993-11-01

    A sensor-based control approach for real-time seam tracking of rocket thrust chamber assemblies has been developed to enable automation of a braze paste dispensing process. This approach utilizes a non-contact Multi-Axis Seam Tracking (MAST) sensor to track the seams. Thee MAST sensor measures capacitance variations between the sensor and the workpiece and produces four varying voltages which are read directly into the robot controller. A PID control algorithm which runs at the application program level has been designed based upon a simple dynamic model of the combined robot and sensor plant. The control algorithm acts on the incoming sensor signals in real-time to guide the robot motion along the seam path. Experiments demonstrate that seams can be tracked at 100 mm/sec within the accuracy required for braze paste dispensing.

  1. Data Archive and Portal Thrust Area Strategy Report

    Sivaraman, Chitra [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stephan, Eric G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Macduff, Matt C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hagler, Clay D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This report describes the Data Archive and Portal (DAP), a key capability of the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmosphere to Electron (A2e) initiative. The DAP Thrust Area Planning Group was organized to develop a plan for deploying this capability. Primarily, the report focuses on a distributed system--a DOE Wind Cloud--that functions as a repository for all A2e data. The Wind Cloud will be accessible via an open, easy-to-navigate user interface that facilitates community data access, interaction, and collaboration. DAP management will work with the community, industry, and international standards bodies to develop standards for wind data and to capture important characteristics of all data in the Wind Cloud.

  2. Tectonics of the Himalayan thrust belt in northern Pakistan

    Yeats, R. S.; Lawrence, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    It is pointed out that the Himalayan ranges of southern Asia represent a dilemma in modern plate tectonic theory. Alvarez (1982) has tried to resolve some of the problems, but inconsistencies remain. The present investigation considers some of the problems which are now encountered in light of present knowledge. The investigation is concerned mainly with the evolution of the Himalaya south of the Main Mantle Thrust (MMT) and the Indus-Tsangpo suture zone, taking into account the neotectonic setting of northern Pakistan. Attention is given to subdivisions of the central Indian Himalaya, the transition from central Himalaya to northern Pakistan, subdivisions of the Himalaya of northern Pakistan, and aspects of neotectonics. Problems for future work are also discussed.

  3. Data Archive and Portal Thrust Area Strategy Report

    Sivaraman, Chitra; Stephan, Eric G.; Macduff, Matt C.; Hagler, Clay D.

    2014-09-30

    This report describes the Data Archive and Portal (DAP), a key capability of the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmosphere to Electron (A2e) initiative. The DAP Thrust Area Planning Group was organized to develop a plan for deploying this capability. Primarily, the report focuses on a distributed system--a DOE Wind Cloud--that functions as a repository for all A2e data. The Wind Cloud will be accessible via an open, easy-to-navigate user interface that facilitates community data access, interaction, and collaboration. DAP management will work with the community, industry, and international standards bodies to develop standards for wind data and to capture important characteristics of all data in the Wind Cloud.

  4. Momentum Management Tool for Low-Thrust Missions

    Swenka, Edward R.; Smith, Brett A.; Vanelli, Charles A.

    2010-01-01

    A momentum management tool was designed for the Dawn low-thrust interplanetary spacecraft en route to the asteroids Vesta and Ceres, in an effort to better understand the early creation of the solar system. Momentum must be managed to ensure the spacecraft has enough control authority to perform necessary turns and hold a fixed inertial attitude against external torques. Along with torques from solar pressure and gravity-gradients, ion-propulsion engines produce a torque about the thrust axis that must be countered by the four reaction wheel assemblies (RWA). MomProf is a ground operations tool built to address these concerns. The momentum management tool was developed during initial checkout and early cruise, and has been refined to accommodate a wide range of momentum-management issues. With every activity or sequence, wheel speeds and momentum state must be checked to avoid undesirable conditions and use of consumables. MomProf was developed to operate in the MATLAB environment. All data are loaded into MATLAB as a structure to provide consistent access to all inputs by individual functions within the tool. Used in its most basic application, the Dawn momentum tool uses the basic principle of angular momentum conservation, computing momentum in the body frame, and RWA wheel speeds, for all given orientations in the input file. MomProf was designed specifically to be able to handle the changing external torques and frequent de - saturations. Incorporating significant external torques adds complexity since there are various external torques that act under different operational modes.

  5. Experimental investigation of thrust augmentation by ejectors on a pulse detonation engine

    Huang Xi-Qiao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Utilizing gasoline as the fuel, air as oxidizer, a series of multi-cycle detonation experiments was conducted to study thrust augmentation by PDE-driven ejectors. The straight cylindrical ejectors with different inner diameter, length and inlet geometry were designed. The effects of the axial location of the ejectors relative to the end of the detonation tube, ejector length-to-diameter ratio on thrust augmentation were investigated, with the operating frequency of 25 Hz. A peak thrust augmentation level of 80.5% was achieved by adding an ejector to the exit of the detonation tube. Performance measurements of the PDE-ejector system showed that thrust augmentation is a strong function of the ejector axial position. The result indicated that there exists a maximum thrust augmentation with ejector upstream of the detonation tube exit at least. The exact location at which the maximum thrust augmentation was obtained varies with the ejector-to-PDE diameter ratio and the ejector inlet geometry. With the increase of the length-to-diameter ratio, thrust augmentation was noticeably enhanced and finally tended to a constant. There exists an optimum ejector length. In the present study, the optimum length-to-diameter ratio of ejector was 4.58. Furthermore, the effect of operating frequency on ejector thrust augmentation also investigated. The operating frequency was varied from 15 Hz to 35 Hz.

  6. Comparison of Thrust Characteristics in Pencil Sized Cylinder-type Linear Motors with Different Magnet Arrays

    Nakaiwa, K; Yamada, A; Tashiro, K.; Wakiwaka, H.

    2009-01-01

    From a strong demand on the miniaturization of a chip mounter or a semiconductor device, the thrust improvement considering the magnets arrangement is studied. We accept a core stator with a Halbach type magnet array for a current linear motor. The thrust characteristics are compared with two kinds of mover, a NS magnet array and a Halbach magnet array.

  7. Tongue Strength: Its Relationship to Tongue Thrusting, Open-Bite, and Articulatory Proficiency.

    Dworkin, James P.; Culatta, Richard A.

    1980-01-01

    No significant differences in tongue strength were found between any of the three groups of 7- to 16-year old children: normal speaking with anterior tongue thrusting during swallow and open bite malocclusion, frontal lisping with anterior tongue thrusting during swallow and open bite malocclusion, and normal controls. (Author/DLS)

  8. Thermal ground water flow systems in the thrust zone in southeastern Idaho

    Ralston, D.R.

    1983-05-01

    The results of a regional study of thermal and non-thermal ground water flow systems in the thrust zone of southern Idaho and western Wyoming are presented. The study involved hydrogeologic and hydrochemical data collection and interpretation. Particular emphasis was placed on analyzing the role that thrust zones play in controlling the movement of thermal and non-thermal fluids.

  9. Fuel-optimal low-thrust formation reconfiguration via Radau pseudospectral method

    Li, Jing

    2016-07-01

    This paper investigates fuel-optimal low-thrust formation reconfiguration near circular orbit. Based on the Clohessy-Wiltshire equations, first-order necessary optimality conditions are derived from the Pontryagin's maximum principle. The fuel-optimal impulsive solution is utilized to divide the low-thrust trajectory into thrust and coast arcs. By introducing the switching times as optimization variables, the fuel-optimal low-thrust formation reconfiguration is posed as a nonlinear programming problem (NLP) via direct transcription using multiple-phase Radau pseudospectral method (RPM), which is then solved by a sparse nonlinear optimization software SNOPT. To facilitate optimality verification and, if necessary, further refinement of the optimized solution of the NLP, formulas for mass costate estimation and initial costates scaling are presented. Numerical examples are given to show the application of the proposed optimization method. To fix the problem, generic fuel-optimal low-thrust formation reconfiguration can be simplified as reconfiguration without any initial and terminal coast arcs, whose optimal solutions can be efficiently obtained from the multiple-phase RPM at the cost of a slight fuel increment. Finally, influence of the specific impulse and maximum thrust magnitude on the fuel-optimal low-thrust formation reconfiguration is analyzed. Numerical results shown the links and differences between the fuel-optimal impulsive and low-thrust solutions.

  10. Superconductor bearings, flywheels and transportation

    Werfel, F. N.; Floegel-Delor, U.; Rothfeld, R.; Riedel, T.; Goebel, B.; Wippich, D.; Schirrmeister, P.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the present status of high temperature superconductors (HTS) and of bulk superconducting magnet devices, their use in bearings, in flywheel energy storage systems (FESS) and linear transport magnetic levitation (Maglev) systems. We report and review the concepts of multi-seeded REBCO bulk superconductor fabrication. The multi-grain bulks increase the averaged trapped magnetic flux density up to 40% compared to single-grain assembly in large-scale applications. HTS magnetic bearings with permanent magnet (PM) excitation were studied and scaled up to maximum forces of 10 kN axially and 4.5 kN radially. We examine the technology of the high-gradient magnetic bearing concept and verify it experimentally. A large HTS bearing is tested for stabilizing a 600 kg rotor of a 5 kWh/250 kW flywheel system. The flywheel rotor tests show the requirement for additional damping. Our compact flywheel system is compared with similar HTS-FESS projects. A small-scale compact YBCO bearing with in situ Stirling cryocooler is constructed and investigated for mobile applications. Next we show a successfully developed modular linear Maglev system for magnetic train operation. Each module levitates 0.25t at 10 mm distance during one-day operation without refilling LN2. More than 30 vacuum cryostats containing multi-seeded YBCO blocks are fabricated and are tested now in Germany, China and Brazil.

  11. Capacidad de carga estática en rodamientos. Normalización y tendencias. // Basic static load rating of rolling bearing. Standardization and trends.

    A. García Toll

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Para ilustrar la funcionalidad de la norma NC-ISO 76: 2006, establecida a partir de una adopción idéntica de la Norma ISO76: 1987/ amd.1: 1999 (E “Cojinetes de Rodamiento – Capacidad de Carga Estática”, son mostradas las correspondenciasentre las magnitudes de capacidad de carga estática declaradas en los catálogos técnicos de reconocidos fabricantes derodamientos con los valores presentes en NC-ISO 76 y considerando diferentes geometrías de rodamientos radiales debolas rígidos y de contacto angular, rodamientos axiales de bolas y rodamientos de rodillos cilíndricos. Adicionalmente, elestudio ha permitido establecer las dependencias entre la capacidad de carga nominal estática del rodamiento y algunosparámetros geométricos, como el diámetro del elemento rodante, el diámetro interior y la relación diámetro interior -diámetro exterior del cojinetePalabras claves: Rodamientos, capacidad de carga estática, Norma Cubana NC, Norma ISO.___________________________________________________________________________Abstract:At the present time, Standard NC-ISO 76: 2006 is a national standard established as identical adoption of ISOstandard 76:1987 / amd.1: 1999 (E "Rolling Bearings - Static Load Rating¨. In this sense, the static load rating ofrolling bearings declared in technical catalogs of renowned bearing manufacturers and the basic static load ratingaccording to calculation procedures stated in Standard NC-ISO 76 are compared. The evaluation has taken intoaccount different geometries of radial groove ball bearings, angular contact ball bearings, thrust ball bearings andradial roller bearings. Additionally, they are established dependences between the static load rating of rolling bearingsand the interior diameter of different types of radial and thrust bearings.Key words: static load rating, rolling bearing, NC/ISO Standard.

  12. Variation of Extreme and Fatigue Design Loads on the Main Bearing of a Front Mounted Direct Drive System

    Abrahamsen, Asger Bech; Natarajan, Anand

    2016-09-01

    The drivetrain of a 10 MW wind turbine has been designed as a direct drive transmission with a superconducting generator mounted in front of the hub and connected to the main frame through a King-pin stiff assembly by DNV-GL. The aeroelastic design loads of such an arrangement are evaluated based on the thrust and bending moments at the main bearing, both for ultimate design and in fatigue. It is found that the initial superconductor generator weight of 363 tons must be reduced by 25% in order not to result in higher extreme loads on main and yaw bearing than the reference10 MW geared reference drive train. A weight reduction of 50% is needed in order to maintain main bearing fatigue damage equivalent to the reference drive train. Thus a target mass of front mounted superconducting direct drive generators is found to be between 183-272 tons.

  13. Magnetic bearings with zero bias

    Brown, Gerald V.; Grodsinsky, Carlos M.

    1991-01-01

    A magnetic bearing operating without a bias field has supported a shaft rotating at speeds up to 12,000 rpm with the usual four power supplies and with only two. A magnetic bearing is commonly operated with a bias current equal to half of the maximum current allowable in its coils. This linearizes the relation between net force and control current and improves the force slewing rate and hence the band width. The steady bias current dissipates power, even when no force is required from the bearing. The power wasted is equal to two-thirds of the power at maximum force output. Examined here is the zero bias idea. The advantages and disadvantages are noted.

  14. Recent Mega-Thrust Tsunamigenic Earthquakes and PTHA

    Lorito, S.

    2013-05-01

    The occurrence of several mega-thrust tsunamigenic earthquakes in the last decade, including but not limited to the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman, the 2010 Maule, and 2011 Tohoku earthquakes, has been a dramatic reminder of the limitations in our capability of assessing earthquake and tsunami hazard and risk. However, the increasingly high-quality geophysical observational networks allowed the retrieval of most accurate than ever models of the rupture process of mega-thrust earthquakes, thus paving the way for future improved hazard assessments. Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Analysis (PTHA) methodology, in particular, is less mature than its seismic counterpart, PSHA. Worldwide recent research efforts of the tsunami science community allowed to start filling this gap, and to define some best practices that are being progressively employed in PTHA for different regions and coasts at threat. In the first part of my talk, I will briefly review some rupture models of recent mega-thrust earthquakes, and highlight some of their surprising features that likely result in bigger error bars associated to PTHA results. More specifically, recent events of unexpected size at a given location, and with unexpected rupture process features, posed first-order open questions which prevent the definition of an heterogeneous rupture probability along a subduction zone, despite of several recent promising results on the subduction zone seismic cycle. In the second part of the talk, I will dig a bit more into a specific ongoing effort for improving PTHA methods, in particular as regards epistemic and aleatory uncertainties determination, and the computational PTHA feasibility when considering the full assumed source variability. Only logic trees are usually explicated in PTHA studies, accounting for different possible assumptions on the source zone properties and behavior. The selection of the earthquakes to be actually modelled is then in general made on a qualitative basis or remains implicit

  15. Mylonitic volcanics near Puging, Upper Siang district, Arunachal Pradesh: Evidence of oblique-slip thrusting

    T K Goswami; P Bhattacharyya; D Bezbaruah

    2016-08-01

    The Abor volcanics of the continental flood basalt affinity are extensively exposed in different parts of the Siang valley. These are associated with Yinkiong Group of rocks of Paleocene–Eocene age and represent syn-sedimentary volcanism in a rift setting. Subsequent folding and thrusting of the Siyom and Rikor sequences above the Yinkiong Group of rocks represent changes from syn-to-post collisionalbrittle-ductile tectonic episodes. Mylonitic Abor volcanics in the thrust contacts are studied at several locations in the north and south of Puging in the Siang valley. Both the Abor volcanics and associated Rikor and Yinkiong Group of rocks preserve meso to micro-scale fabric asymmetries indicating that the thrust contacts are shear zones of brittle-ductile nature containing mylonitic textures of high shear strain.Two distinct hitherto unrecognised shear zones in the north and south of Puging are named as North Puging Shear Zone (NPSZ) and South Puging Shear Zone (SPSZ). The kinematic indicators along the thrust contact indicate oblique slip thrusting of the Rikor and Siyom thrust sheets above the Yinkiong Group of rocks. This paper provides field evidence proving that the compression due the Burmese plate made oblique slip thrusting and zones of mylonitised volcanics possible and associated metasediments were formed. The kinematic indicators in the NPSZ and SPSZ respectively indicate top-to-SSE and top-to-NNW sense of shears.

  16. Computational Study of an Axisymmetric Dual Throat Fluidic Thrust Vectoring Nozzle for a Supersonic Aircraft Application

    Deere, Karen A.; Flamm, Jeffrey D.; Berrier, Bobby L.; Johnson, Stuart K.

    2007-01-01

    A computational investigation of an axisymmetric Dual Throat Nozzle concept has been conducted. This fluidic thrust-vectoring nozzle was designed with a recessed cavity to enhance the throat shifting technique for improved thrust vectoring. The structured-grid, unsteady Reynolds- Averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver PAB3D was used to guide the nozzle design and analyze performance. Nozzle design variables included extent of circumferential injection, cavity divergence angle, cavity length, and cavity convergence angle. Internal nozzle performance (wind-off conditions) and thrust vector angles were computed for several configurations over a range of nozzle pressure ratios from 1.89 to 10, with the fluidic injection flow rate equal to zero and up to 4 percent of the primary flow rate. The effect of a variable expansion ratio on nozzle performance over a range of freestream Mach numbers up to 2 was investigated. Results indicated that a 60 circumferential injection was a good compromise between large thrust vector angles and efficient internal nozzle performance. A cavity divergence angle greater than 10 was detrimental to thrust vector angle. Shortening the cavity length improved internal nozzle performance with a small penalty to thrust vector angle. Contrary to expectations, a variable expansion ratio did not improve thrust efficiency at the flight conditions investigated.

  17. Static Thrust and Vectoring Performance of a Spherical Convergent Flap Nozzle with a Nonrectangular Divergent Duct

    Wing, David J.

    1998-01-01

    The static internal performance of a multiaxis-thrust-vectoring, spherical convergent flap (SCF) nozzle with a non-rectangular divergent duct was obtained in the model preparation area of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. Duct cross sections of hexagonal and bowtie shapes were tested. Additional geometric parameters included throat area (power setting), pitch flap deflection angle, and yaw gimbal angle. Nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 2 to 12 for dry power configurations and from 2 to 6 for afterburning power configurations. Approximately a 1-percent loss in thrust efficiency from SCF nozzles with a rectangular divergent duct was incurred as a result of internal oblique shocks in the flow field. The internal oblique shocks were the result of cross flow generated by the vee-shaped geometric throat. The hexagonal and bowtie nozzles had mirror-imaged flow fields and therefore similar thrust performance. Thrust vectoring was not hampered by the three-dimensional internal geometry of the nozzles. Flow visualization indicates pitch thrust-vector angles larger than 10' may be achievable with minimal adverse effect on or a possible gain in resultant thrust efficiency as compared with the performance at a pitch thrust-vector angle of 10 deg.

  18. Thrust vector control of upper stage with a gimbaled thruster during orbit transfer

    Wang, Zhaohui; Jia, Yinghong; Jin, Lei; Duan, Jiajia

    2016-10-01

    In launching Multi-Satellite with One-Vehicle, the main thruster provided by the upper stage is mounted on a two-axis gimbal. During orbit transfer, the thrust vector of this gimbaled thruster (GT) should theoretically pass through the mass center of the upper stage and align with the command direction to provide orbit transfer impetus. However, it is hard to be implemented from the viewpoint of the engineering mission. The deviations of the thrust vector from the command direction would result in large velocity errors. Moreover, the deviations of the thrust vector from the upper stage mass center would produce large disturbance torques. This paper discusses the thrust vector control (TVC) of the upper stage during its orbit transfer. Firstly, the accurate nonlinear coupled kinematic and dynamic equations of the upper stage body, the two-axis gimbal and the GT are derived by taking the upper stage as a multi-body system. Then, a thrust vector control system consisting of the special attitude control of the upper stage and the gimbal rotation of the gimbaled thruster is proposed. The special attitude control defined by the desired attitude that draws the thrust vector to align with the command direction when the gimbal control makes the thrust vector passes through the upper stage mass center. Finally, the validity of the proposed method is verified through numerical simulations.

  19. The Star Thrust Experiment, FRC Formation and Sustainment Using RMF

    Miller, Kenneth; Slough, John

    1998-11-01

    The same qualities that make the FRC attractive as a terrestrial power source make them even more attractive as a fusion engine for space missions due to strict constraints on size, complexity and weight. The first step toward attaining a viable FRC reactor/propulsion unit is the development of a simplified formation process that allows for subsequent sustainment. The Star Thrust Experiment (STX) has been designed to do this using a 50G 330 kHz Rotating Magnetic Field (RMF) for current drive. Two 10 MW solid state supplies (IGBT switched) drive the RMF antennas for milliseconds through a 20:1 99% efficient air core transformer. The 2 m long by 0.35 m radius RMF antennas are the inductors of LC resonant circuits. With Q ~ 60, the square wave IGBT output is filtered into a clean sinusoid, and 60 MW of circulating power is attained. Solenoidal magnets create ~ 1 kG axial confining field in the STX vacuum chamber, a 3 m long by 0.4 m diameter quartz tube. An axial discharge, 100 MW Alfven heater, and confining field reversal are available for plasma ionization and heating. At densities of 10^20 m-3, temperatures of ~ 15 eV are needed for RMF field penetration and effective current drive. Major system development and construction has been completed, and initial operation has begun. Supported by NASA and USDOE.

  20. An Autonomous Onboard Targeting Algorithm Using Finite Thrust Maneuvers

    Scarritt, Sara K.; Marchand, Belinda G.; Weeks, Michael W.

    2009-01-01

    In earlier investigations, the adaptation and implementation of a modified two-level corrections process as the onboard targeting algorithm for the Trans-Earth Injection phase of Orion is presented. The objective of that targeting algorithm is to generate the times of ignition and magnitudes of the required maneuvers such that the desired state at entry interface is achieved. In an actual onboard flight software implementation, these times of ignition and maneuvers are relayed onto Flight Control for command and execution. Although this process works well when the burn durations or burn arcs are small, this might not be the case during a contingency situation when lower thrust engines are employed to perform the maneuvers. Therefore, a new version of the modified two-level corrections process is formulated to handle the case of finite burn arcs. This paper presents the development and formulation of that finite burn modified two-level corrections process which can again be used as an onboard targeting algorithm for the Trans-Earth Injection phase of Orion. Additionally, performance results and a comparison between the two methods are presented. The finite burn two-level corrector formulation presented here ensures the entry constraints at entry interface are still met without violating the available fuel budget, while still accounting for much longer burn times in its design.

  1. Design Enhancements of the Two-Dimensional, Dual Throat Fluidic Thrust Vectoring Nozzle Concept

    Flamm, Jeffrey D.; Deere, Karen A.; Mason, Mary L.; Berrier, Bobby L.; Johnson, Stuart K.

    2006-01-01

    A Dual Throat Nozzle fluidic thrust vectoring technique that achieves higher thrust-vectoring efficiencies than other fluidic techniques, without sacrificing thrust efficiency has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The nozzle concept was designed with the aid of the structured-grid, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes computational fluidic dynamics code PAB3D. This new concept combines the thrust efficiency of sonic-plane skewing with increased thrust-vectoring efficiencies obtained by maximizing pressure differentials in a separated cavity located downstream of the nozzle throat. By injecting secondary flow asymmetrically at the upstream minimum area, a new aerodynamic minimum area is formed downstream of the geometric minimum and the sonic line is skewed, thus vectoring the exhaust flow. The nozzle was tested in the NASA Langley Research Center Jet Exit Test Facility. Internal nozzle performance characteristics were defined for nozzle pressure ratios up to 10, with a range of secondary injection flow rates up to 10 percent of the primary flow rate. Most of the data included in this paper shows the effect of secondary injection rate at a nozzle pressure ratio of 4. The effects of modifying cavity divergence angle, convergence angle and cavity shape on internal nozzle performance were investigated, as were effects of injection geometry, hole or slot. In agreement with computationally predicted data, experimental data verified that decreasing cavity divergence angle had a negative impact and increasing cavity convergence angle had a positive impact on thrust vector angle and thrust efficiency. A curved cavity apex provided improved thrust ratios at some injection rates. However, overall nozzle performance suffered with no secondary injection. Injection holes were more efficient than the injection slot over the range of injection rates, but the slot generated larger thrust vector angles for injection rates less than 4 percent of the primary flow rate.

  2. Non-Contact Thrust Stand Calibration Method for Repetitively-Pulsed Electric Thrusters

    Wong, Andrea R.; Toftul, Alexandra; Polzin, Kurt A.; Pearson, J. Boise

    2011-01-01

    A thrust stand calibration technique for use in testing repetitively-pulsed electric thrusters for in-space propulsion has been developed and tested using a modified hanging pendulum thrust stand. In the implementation of this technique, current pulses are applied to a solenoidal coil to produce a pulsed magnetic field that acts against the magnetic field produced by a permanent magnet mounted to the thrust stand pendulum arm. The force on the magnet is applied in this non-contact manner, with the entire pulsed force transferred to the pendulum arm through a piezoelectric force transducer to provide a time-accurate force measurement. Modeling of the pendulum arm dynamics reveals that after an initial transient in thrust stand motion the quasisteady average deflection of the thrust stand arm away from the unforced or zero position can be related to the average applied force through a simple linear Hooke s law relationship. Modeling demonstrates that this technique is universally applicable except when the pulsing period is increased to the point where it approaches the period of natural thrust stand motion. Calibration data were obtained using a modified hanging pendulum thrust stand previously used for steady-state thrust measurements. Data were obtained for varying impulse bit at constant pulse frequency and for varying pulse frequency. The two data sets exhibit excellent quantitative agreement with each other as the constant relating average deflection and average thrust match within the errors on the linear regression curve fit of the data. Quantitatively, the error on the calibration coefficient is roughly 1% of the coefficient value.

  3. Performance of 40-millimeter-bore ball bearings with lead- and lead-alloy-plated retainers in liquid hydrogen at 1.2 million DN

    Brewe, D. E.; Wisander, D. W.; Scribbe, H. W.

    1972-01-01

    Forty-millimeter-bore ball bearings with lead- and lead-alloy-coated retainers were operated in liquid hydrogen at 30,000 rpm under a thrust load of 1780 N (400 lb.) Four different substrate materials were used for the retainer. Longer bearing run times were achieved with a lead-tin-copper alloy coating plated onto a leaded-bronze material (22.5 hr) and an aluminum-bronze alloy (19.3 hr). One bearing with a pure lead coating achieved the desired objective of 10 hr. This bearing had an aluminum - bronze substrate retainer and ran successfully for 12.4 hr. Additions of antimony to the lead provided an alloy coating with better wear resistance than pure lead; however, this coating was abrasive to the outer-race lands.

  4. The correct "ball bearings" data.

    Caroni, C

    2002-12-01

    The famous data on fatigue failure times of ball bearings have been quoted incorrectly from Lieblein and Zelen's original paper. The correct data include censored values, as well as non-fatigue failures that must be handled appropriately. They could be described by a mixture of Weibull distributions, corresponding to different modes of failure.

  5. Losses of Superconductor Journal Bearing

    Han, Y. H.; Hull, J. R.; Han, S. C.; Jeong, N. H.; Oh, J. M.; Sung, T. H.

    2004-06-01

    A high-temperature superconductor (HTS) journal bearing was studied for rotational loss. Two HTS bearings support the rotor at top and bottom. The rotor weight is 4 kg and the length is about 300 mm. Both the top and bottom bearings have two permanent magnet (PM) rings with an iron pole piece separating them. Each HTS journal bearing is composed of six pieces of superconductor blocks of size 35×25×10 mm. The HTS blocks are encased in a cryochamber through which liquid nitrogen flows. The inner spool of the cryochamber is made from G-10 to reduce eddy current loss, and the rest of the cryochamber is stainless steel. The magnetic field from the PM rings is < 10 mT on the stainless part. The rotational drag was measured over the same speed range at several chamber pressures. Results indicate that a chamber pressure of 0.4 mtorr is sufficiently low to minimize windage loss, and the 10 mT design criterion for the magnetic field on the stainless part of the cryochamber is too high.

  6. Dynamic Spin Rig Upgraded With a Five- Axis-Controlled Three-Magnetic-Bearing Support System With Forward Excitation

    Morrison, Carlos R.; Mehmed, Oral

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center Dynamic Spin Rig is used for experimental evaluation of vibration analysis methods and dynamic characteristics for rotating systems. Measurements are made while rotors are spun and vibrated in a vacuum chamber. The rig has been upgraded with a new active magnetic bearing rotor support and excitation system. This design is expected to provide operational improvements over the existing rig. The rig will be able to be operated in either the old or new configuration. In the old configuration, two ball bearings support the vertical shaft of the rig, with the test article located between the bearings. Because the bearings operate in a vacuum, lubrication is limited to grease. This limits bearing life and speed. In addition, the old configuration employs two voice-coil electromagnetic shakers to apply oscillatory axial forces or transverse moments to the rotor shaft through a thrust bearing. The excitation amplitudes that can be imparted to the test article with this system are not adequate for components that are highly damped. It is expected that the new design will overcome these limitations.

  7. Characterization of Fault Size in Bearings

    2014-12-23

    0.3 and 1.2 mm into the outer-race of the bearing, which simulates realistic faults that often can be found in damaged bearings. A 3D dynamic model ...3 4. MODEL DESCRIPTION A 3D dynamic ball bearing model was developed to study the effect of faults on the bearing dynamic behavior. The aim of the...understanding of the effects of fault size on the bearing dynamics. The research methodology combines dynamic modeling of the faulty bearing with

  8. Is tongue thrust that develops during orthodontic treatment an unrecognized potential road block?

    Chawla H

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The role of tongue thrust has often been suspected, long debated and largely dispelled as a primary etiological factor of malocclusion. However, tongue thrust may contribute to poor occlusal intercuspation both during and after treatment. A tongue thrust may also develop during orthodontic mechanotherapy as a result of the transient creation of intra and interarch spaces and this little recognized phenomenon was found to occur in many randomly followed cases. In many instances, this seemingly adaptive and secondary response of the tongue posture and function may persist and thereafter impede the resolution of intra and interarch problems.

  9. Static performance of an axisymmetric nozzle with post-exit vanes for multiaxis thrust vectoring

    Berrier, Bobby L.; Mason, Mary L.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the static test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the flow-turning capability and the nozzle internal performance of an axisymmetric convergent-divergent nozzle with post-exit vanes installed for multiaxis thrust vectoring. The effects of vane curvature, vane location relative to the nozzle exit, number of vanes, and vane deflection angle were determined. A comparison of the post-exit-vane thrust-vectoring concept with other thrust-vectoring concepts is provided. All tests were conducted with no external flow, and nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 1.6 to 6.0.

  10. Thrust estimator design based on least squares support vector regression machine

    ZHAO Yong-ping; SUN Jian-guo

    2010-01-01

    In order to realize direct thrust control instead of traditional sensor-based control for nero-engines,it is indispensable to design a thrust estimator with high accuracy,so a scheme for thrust estimator design based on the least square support vector regression machine is proposed to solve this problem.Furthermore,numerical simulations confirm the effectiveness of our presented scheme.During the process of estimator design,a wrap per criterion that can not only reduce the computational complexity but also enhance the generalization performance is proposed to select variables as input variables for estimator.

  11. Low-Thrust Many-Revolution Trajectory Optimization via Differential Dynamic Programming and a Sundman Transformation

    Aziz, Jonathan D.; Parker, Jeffrey S.; Scheeres, Daniel J.; Englander, Jacob A.

    2017-01-01

    Low-thrust trajectories about planetary bodies characteristically span a high count of orbital revolutions. Directing the thrust vector over many revolutions presents a challenging optimization problem for any conventional strategy. This paper demonstrates the tractability of low-thrust trajectory optimization about planetary bodies by applying a Sundman transformation to change the independent variable of the spacecraft equations of motion to the eccentric anomaly and performing the optimization with differential dynamic programming. Fuel-optimal geocentric transfers are shown in excess of 1000 revolutions while subject to Earths J2 perturbation and lunar gravity.

  12. Optimum Design and Analysis of Axial Hybrid Magnetic Bearings Using Multi-Objective Genetic Algorithms

    Rao, J. S.; Tiwari, R.

    2012-01-01

    Design optimization of axial hybrid magnetic thrust bearings (with bias magnets) was carried out using multi-objective evolutionary algorithms (MOEAs) and compared with the case of electromagnetic bearings (without bias magnets). Mathematical models of objective functions and associated constraints are presented and discussed. The different aspects of implemented MOEA are discussed. It is observed that the size of the bearing with bias magnets is considerably reduced as compared to the case of those without bias magnets, with the objective function as the minimization of weight for the same operating conditions. Similarly, current densities aret reduced drastically with biased magnets when the objective function is chosen as the minimization of the power loss. For illustration of various performances of the bearing, a typical design has been chosen from the final optimized population by an "a posteriori" approach. Sensitivities for both the objective functions with respect to the outer radius, the inner radius, and the height of coil are observed to be approximately in the ratio 2.5:1.6:1. Analysis of final optimized population has been carried out and is compared with the case without bias magnets and some salient points are observed in the case of using bias magnets.

  13. Journal and Wave Bearing Impedance Calculation Software

    Hanford, Amanda; Campbell, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The wave bearing software suite is a MALTA application that computes bearing properties for user-specified wave bearing conditions, as well as plain journal bearings. Wave bearings are fluid film journal bearings with multi-lobed wave patterns around the circumference of the bearing surface. In this software suite, the dynamic coefficients are outputted in a way for easy implementation in a finite element model used in rotor dynamics analysis. The software has a graphical user interface (GUI) for inputting bearing geometry parameters, and uses MATLAB s structure interface for ease of interpreting data. This innovation was developed to provide the stiffness and damping components of wave bearing impedances. The computational method for computing bearing coefficients was originally designed for plain journal bearings and tilting pad bearings. Modifications to include a wave bearing profile consisted of changing the film thickness profile given by an equation, and writing an algorithm to locate the integration limits for each fluid region. Careful consideration was needed to implement the correct integration limits while computing the dynamic coefficients, depending on the form of the input/output variables specified in the algorithm.

  14. Applying the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility technique to the study of the tectonic evolution of the West Spitsbergen Fold-and-Thrust Belt

    Katarzyna Dudzisz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the use of the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS method to determine the orientation of the principal tectonic strain directions developed during the formation of the West Spitsbergen Fold-and-Thrust Belt (WSFTB. The AMS measurements and extensive rock-magnetic studies of the Lower Triassic rocks reported here were focused on the recognition of the magnetic fabric, the identification of ferromagnetic minerals and an estimation of the influence of ferro- and paramagnetic minerals on magnetic susceptibility. At most sites, the paramagnetic minerals controlled the magnetic susceptibility, and at only one site the impact of ferromagnetic minerals was higher. The AMS technique documented the presence of different types of magnetic fabrics within the sampled sites. At two sites, a normal (Kmin perpendicular to the bedding magnetic fabric of sedimentary origin was detected. This was associated with a good clustering of the maximum AMS axes imposed by tectonic strain. The Kmax magnetic lineation directions obtained here parallel the general NNW–SSE trend of the WSFTB fold axial traces and thrust fronts. The two other investigated sites possessed mixed and inverted fabrics, the latter of which appear to reflect the presence of iron-bearing carbonates.

  15. Brown bear telemetry and trapping: Special report

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Brown bear studies were continued during the 1967 field season with emphasis on development of techniques for instrumenting bears with radio transmitters and...

  16. Live-trapping and handling brown bear

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This paper reports techniques developed to live trap and handle brown bears on the Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge. The brown bears (Ursus middendorffi) on the...

  17. Rolling Element Bearing Stiffness Matrix Determination (Presentation)

    Guo, Y.; Parker, R.

    2014-01-01

    Current theoretical bearing models differ in their stiffness estimates because of different model assumptions. In this study, a finite element/contact mechanics model is developed for rolling element bearings with the focus of obtaining accurate bearing stiffness for a wide range of bearing types and parameters. A combined surface integral and finite element method is used to solve for the contact mechanics between the rolling elements and races. This model captures the time-dependent characteristics of the bearing contact due to the orbital motion of the rolling elements. A numerical method is developed to determine the full bearing stiffness matrix corresponding to two radial, one axial, and two angular coordinates; the rotation about the shaft axis is free by design. This proposed stiffness determination method is validated against experiments in the literature and compared to existing analytical models and widely used advanced computational methods. The fully-populated stiffness matrix demonstrates the coupling between bearing radial, axial, and tilting bearing deflections.

  18. Goose Eggs Could Save Polar Bears

    孙淑敏

    2009-01-01

    Polar bears could avoid extinction despitemany starving to death in coming years, ac-cording to scientists and other observers whohave discovered that some of the bears havefound a new food source--goose and duckeggs.

  19. Potential applications of skip SMV with thrust engine

    Wang, Weilin; Savvaris, Al

    2016-11-01

    This paper investigates the potential applications of Space Maneuver Vehicles (SMV) with skip trajectory. Due to soaring space operations over the past decades, the risk of space debris has considerably increased such as collision risks with space asset, human property on ground and even aviation. Many active debris removal methods have been investigated and in this paper, a debris remediation method is first proposed based on skip SMV. The key point is to perform controlled re-entry. These vehicles are expected to achieve a trans-atmospheric maneuver with thrust engine. If debris is released at altitude below 80 km, debris could be captured by the atmosphere drag force and re-entry interface prediction accuracy is improved. Moreover if the debris is released in a cargo at a much lower altitude, this technique protects high value space asset from break up by the atmosphere and improves landing accuracy. To demonstrate the feasibility of this concept, the present paper presents the simulation results for two specific mission profiles: (1) descent to predetermined altitude; (2) descent to predetermined point (altitude, longitude and latitude). The evolutionary collocation method is adopted for skip trajectory optimization due to its global optimality and high-accuracy. This method is actually a two-step optimization approach based on the heuristic algorithm and the collocation method. The optimal-control problem is transformed into a nonlinear programming problem (NLP) which can be efficiently and accurately solved by the sequential quadratic programming (SQP) procedure. However, such a method is sensitive to initial values. To reduce the sensitivity problem, genetic algorithm (GA) is adopted to refine the grids and provide near optimum initial values. By comparing the simulation data from different scenarios, it is found that skip SMV is feasible in active debris removal and the evolutionary collocation method gives a truthful re-entry trajectory that satisfies the

  20. Thrust Enhancement in Hypervelocity Nozzles by Chemical Catalysis

    Singh, D. J.; Carpenter, Mark H.; Drummond, J. P.

    1997-01-01

    In the hypersonic flight regime, the air-breathing supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) has been shown to be a viable propulsion system. The current designs of scramjet engines provide performance benefits only up to a Mach number of 14. Performance losses increase rapidly as the Mach number increases. To extend the applicability of scram'jets beyond Mach 14, research is being conducted in the area of inlet and wave drag reduction, skin-friction and heat-transfer reduction, nozzle loss minimization, low-loss mixing, and combustion enhancement. For high Mach number applications, hydrogen is the obvious fuel choice because of its high energy content per unit mass in comparison with conventional fuels. These flight conditions require engines to operate at supersonic internal velocities, high combustor temperatures, and low static pressures. The high static temperature condition enhances the production of radicals such as H and OH, and the low-pressure condition slows the reaction rates, particularly the recombination reactions. High-temperature and low-pressure constraints, in combination with a small residence time, result in a radical-rich exhaust gas mixture exiting the combustor. At high Mach number conditions (due to low residence time), H and OH do not have enough time to recombine ; thus, a significant amount of energy is lost as these high-energy free radical are exhausted. The objective of the present study is to conduct a flowfield analysis for a typical nozzle geometry for NASP-type vehicle to assess for thrust enhancement in hypervelocity nozzles by substituting small amount of phosphine for hydrogen.

  1. Stable isotopes to detect food-conditioned bears and to evaluate human-bear management

    Hopkins, John B.; Koch, Paul L.; Schwartz, Charles C.; Ferguson, Jake M.; Greenleaf, Schuyler S.; Kalinowski, Steven T.

    2012-01-01

    We used genetic and stable isotope analysis of hair from free-ranging black bears (Ursus americanus) in Yosemite National Park, California, USA to: 1) identify bears that consume human food, 2) estimate the diets of these bears, and 3) evaluate the Yosemite human–bear management program. Specifically, we analyzed the isotopic composition of hair from bears known a priori to be food-conditioned or non-food-conditioned and used these data to predict whether bears with an unknown management status were food-conditioned (FC) or non-food-conditioned (NFC). We used a stable isotope mixing model to estimate the proportional contribution of natural foods (plants and animals) versus human food in the diets of FC bears. We then used results from both analyses to evaluate proactive (population-level) and reactive (individual-level) human–bear management, and discussed new metrics to evaluate the overall human–bear management program in Yosemite. Our results indicated that 19 out of 145 (13%) unknown bears sampled from 2005 to 2007 were food-conditioned. The proportion of human food in the diets of known FC bears likely declined from 2001–2003 to 2005–2007, suggesting proactive management was successful in reducing the amount of human food available to bears. In contrast, reactive management was not successful in changing the management status of known FC bears to NFC bears, or in reducing the contribution of human food to the diets of FC bears. Nine known FC bears were recaptured on 14 occasions from 2001 to 2007; all bears were classified as FC during subsequent recaptures, and human–bear management did not reduce the amount of human food in the diets of FC bears. Based on our results, we suggest Yosemite continue implementing proactive human–bear management, reevaluate reactive management, and consider removing problem bears (those involved in repeated bear incidents) from the population.

  2. A Simple Method to Measure Nematodes' Propulsive Thrust and the Nematode Ratchet.

    Bau, Haim; Yuan, Jinzhou; Raizen, David

    2015-11-01

    Since the propulsive thrust of micro organisms provides a more sensitive indicator of the animal's health and response to drugs than motility, a simple, high throughput, direct measurement of the thrust is desired. Taking advantage of the nematode C. elegans being heavier than water, we devised a simple method to determine the propulsive thrust of the animals by monitoring their velocity when swimming along an inclined plane. We find that the swimming velocity is a linear function of the sin of the inclination angle. This method allows us to determine, among other things, the animas' propulsive thrust as a function of genotype, drugs, and age. Furthermore, taking advantage of the animals' inability to swim over a stiff incline, we constructed a sawteeth ratchet-like track that restricts the animals to swim in a predetermined direction. This research was supported, in part, by NIH NIA Grant 5R03AG042690-02.

  3. Influence of Structural Parameters on the Performance of Vortex Valve Variable-Thrust Solid Rocket Motor

    Wei, Xianggeng; Li, Jiang; He, Guoqiang

    2017-04-01

    The vortex valve solid variable thrust motor is a new solid motor which can achieve Vehicle system trajectory optimization and motor energy management. Numerical calculation was performed to investigate the influence of vortex chamber diameter, vortex chamber shape, and vortex chamber height of the vortex valve solid variable thrust motor on modulation performance. The test results verified that the calculation results are consistent with laboratory results with a maximum error of 9.5%. The research drew the following major conclusions: the optimal modulation performance was achieved in a cylindrical vortex chamber, increasing the vortex chamber diameter improved the modulation performance of the vortex valve solid variable thrust motor, optimal modulation performance could be achieved when the height of the vortex chamber is half of the vortex chamber outlet diameter, and the hot gas control flow could result in an enhancement of modulation performance. The results can provide the basis for establishing the design method of the vortex valve solid variable thrust motor.

  4. Low-Cost and Light-Weight Transpiration-Cooled Thrust Chambers Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed effort aims to evaluate the feasibility of using transpiration-cooled Titanium as the primary material in small-scale thrust chambers for in-space...

  5. Precise timing of the Early Paleozoic metamorphism and thrust deformation in the Eastern Kunlun Orogen

    2002-01-01

    In Dulan County, Qinghai Province NW China, the arc volcanic sequences in the northern side of the Central Fault of the East Kunlun were metamorphosed progressively from upper greenschist facies in the south to epidote-amphibolite facies in the north. High-angle thrust deforma-tion was developed synchronously with the peak metamor-phim and superimposed with later low-angle striking-slip deformation. Zircon U-Pb dating yields a concordant age of (448 ± 4) Ma for the metavolcanics. Syn-kinematic horn-blende and muscovite separated from the high-angle thrust-ing belt give 40Ar-39Ar plateau age of (427 ± 4) Ma and 408 Ma, respectively. These results precisely constrain the timing of the closure of early Paleozoic volcanic basin (Proto-Tethys) over the eastern portion of the East Kunlun Orogen, and the thrust tectonic slice had a cool rate of ca. 9℃/Ma.

  6. Low thrust chemical orbit to orbit propulsion system propellant management study

    Dergance, R. H.; Hamlyn, K. M.; Tegart, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Low thrust chemical propulsion systems were sized for transfer of large space systems from LEO to GEO. The influence of propellant combination, tankage and insulation requirements, and propellant management techniques on the LTPS mass and volume were studied. Liquid oxygen combined with hydrogen, methane or kerosene were the propellant combinations. Thrust levels of 445, 2230, and 4450 N were combined with 1, 4 and 8 perigee burn strategies. This matrix of systems was evaluated using multilayer insulation and spray-on-foam insulation systems. Various combinations of toroidal, cylindrical with ellipsoidal domes, and ellipsoidal tank shapes were investigated. Results indicate that low thrust (445 N) and single perigee burn approaches are considerably less efficient than the higher thrust level and multiple burn strategies. A modified propellant settling approach minimized propellant residuals and decreased system complexity, in addition, the toroid/ellipsoidal tank combination was predicted to be shortest.

  7. Effectiveness of Nitrous Oxide as a Liquid Injection Thrust Vector Control Fluid Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Nitrous Oxide is proposed as an energetic liquid injection thrust vector control fluid for vehicle attitude control during dynamic vehicle maneuvers. Pulled from the...

  8. Thrust ripple optimization and experiment for a permanent magnet linear synchronous motor

    XU Yue-tong; FU Jian-zhong; CHEN Zi-chen

    2006-01-01

    Thrust ripple such as end force,slot force and normal force are key factors that affect the properties of permanent magnet linear synchronous motors (PMLSM).According to different mechanics and analytical models,end force resulting from open magnetic circuit of PMLSM was greatly decreased by optimizing the length of the PMLSM mover.Slot force caused by slot effect was greatly reduced by using fraction slot structure,and normal force was calculated through the finite element method (FEM).After thrust ripple was calculated,its uniform formula was obtained through Fourier series nonlinear regression.An experimental system was set up to measure thrust ripple,and experiment results demonstrated that experimental force ripple was quite in line with that calculated by the fitting formula.The optimal theory and analysis method is effective,and the obtained formula can be utilized to compensate thrust ripple in practical applications and improve the motion performance of PMLSM.

  9. Back-thrusting in Lesser Himalaya: Evidences from magnetic fabric studies in parts of Almora crystalline zone, Kumaun Lesser Himalaya

    Amar Agarwal; K K K K Agarwal; R Bali; Chandra Prakash; Gaurav Joshi

    2016-06-01

    The present study aims to understand evolution of the Lesser Himalaya, which consists of (meta) sedimentaryand crystalline rocks. Field studies, microscopic and rock magnetic investigations have beencarried out on the rocks near the South Almora Thrust (SAT) and the North Almora Thrust (NAT),which separates the Almora Crystalline Zone (ACZ) from the Lesser Himalayan sequences (LHS). Theresults show that along the South Almora Thrust, the deformation is persistent; however, near theNAT deformation pattern is complex and implies overprinting of original shear sense by a youngerdeformational event. We attribute this overprinting to late stage back-thrusting along NAT, active afterthe emplacement of ACZ. During this late stage back-thrusting, rocks of the ACZ and LHS were coupled.Back-thrusts originated below the Lesser Himalayan rocks, probably from the Main Boundary Thrust,and propagated across the sedimentary and crystalline rocks. This study provides new results frommultiple investigations, and enhances our understanding of the evolution of the ACZ.

  10. Grease lubrication mechanisms in bearing seals

    2011-01-01

    Rolling bearings contain seals to keep lubricant inside and contaminants outside the bearing system. These systems are often lubricated with grease; the grease acts as a lubricant for the bearing and seal and improves the sealing efficiency. In this thesis, the influence of lubricating grease on bearing seal performance is studied. Rheological properties of the grease, i.e. shear stress and normal stress difference, are evaluated and related to the lubricating and sealing performance of the s...

  11. Static performance investigation of a skewed-throat multiaxis thrust-vectoring nozzle concept

    Wing, David J.

    1994-01-01

    The static performance of a jet exhaust nozzle which achieves multiaxis thrust vectoring by physically skewing the geometric throat has been characterized in the static test facility of the 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. The nozzle has an asymmetric internal geometry defined by four surfaces: a convergent-divergent upper surface with its ridge perpendicular to the nozzle centerline, a convergent-divergent lower surface with its ridge skewed relative to the nozzle centerline, an outwardly deflected sidewall, and a straight sidewall. The primary goal of the concept is to provide efficient yaw thrust vectoring by forcing the sonic plane (nozzle throat) to form at a yaw angle defined by the skewed ridge of the lower surface contour. A secondary goal is to provide multiaxis thrust vectoring by combining the skewed-throat yaw-vectoring concept with upper and lower pitch flap deflections. The geometric parameters varied in this investigation included lower surface ridge skew angle, nozzle expansion ratio (divergence angle), aspect ratio, pitch flap deflection angle, and sidewall deflection angle. Nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 2 to a high of 11.5 for some configurations. The results of the investigation indicate that efficient, substantial multiaxis thrust vectoring was achieved by the skewed-throat nozzle concept. However, certain control surface deflections destabilized the internal flow field, which resulted in substantial shifts in the position and orientation of the sonic plane and had an adverse effect on thrust-vectoring and weight flow characteristics. By increasing the expansion ratio, the location of the sonic plane was stabilized. The asymmetric design resulted in interdependent pitch and yaw thrust vectoring as well as nonzero thrust-vector angles with undeflected control surfaces. By skewing the ridges of both the upper and lower surface contours, the interdependency between pitch and yaw thrust vectoring may be eliminated

  12. A Review of High Thrust, High Delta-V Options for Microsatellite Missions

    2009-06-25

    millinewtons of thrust. Pushing the limits of microsatellite capability is the Hall thruster design of Berti, et al.23 and Biagioni , et al.,24...of thrust with an Isp greater than 1000 s. Biagioni , et al. further specify that their thruster weighs 0.6 kg and that the power and flow control...Sept. 2002, AIAA-2002-5714. 23Berti, M., Biagioni , L., Cesari, U., Saverdi, M., and Andrenucci, M., “Development and Preliminary Characterization of a

  13. Thin film superconductor magnetic bearings

    Weinberger, Bernard R.

    1995-12-26

    A superconductor magnetic bearing includes a shaft (10) that is subject to a load (L) and rotatable around an axis of rotation, a magnet (12) mounted to the shaft, and a stator (14) in proximity to the shaft. The stator (14) has a superconductor thin film assembly (16) positioned to interact with the magnet (12) to produce a levitation force on the shaft (10) that supports the load (L). The thin film assembly (16) includes at least two superconductor thin films (18) and at least one substrate (20). Each thin film (18) is positioned on a substrate (20) and all the thin films are positioned such that an applied magnetic field from the magnet (12) passes through all the thin films. A similar bearing in which the thin film assembly (16) is mounted on the shaft (10) and the magnet (12) is part of the stator (14) also can be constructed.

  14. Cryptosporidiosis in a black bear in Virginia.

    Duncan, R B; Caudell, D; Lindsay, D S; Moll, H D

    1999-04-01

    Cryptosporidiosis has not been previously reported in black bears in North America, either free-roaming or captive. However, oocysts have been documented in two captive Malayan sun bears (Helarctos malayanus) located in zoological parks in Taiwan. Developmental stages of Cryptosporidium parvum were observed in tissue sections from the small intestine of a black bear cub found dead in Virginia (USA).

  15. Bearing-Mounting Concept Accommodates Thermal Expansion

    Nespodzany, Robert; Davis, Toren S.

    1995-01-01

    Pins or splines allow radial expansion without slippage. Design concept for mounting rotary bearing accommodates differential thermal expansion between bearing and any structure(s) to which bearing connected. Prevents buildup of thermal stresses by allowing thermal expansion to occur freely but accommodating expansion in such way not to introduce looseness. Pin-in-slot configuration also maintains concentricity.

  16. A Computational Study of a New Dual Throat Fluidic Thrust Vectoring Nozzle Concept

    Deere, Karen A.; Berrier, Bobby L.; Flamm, Jeffrey D.; Johnson, Stuart K.

    2005-01-01

    A computational investigation of a two-dimensional nozzle was completed to assess the use of fluidic injection to manipulate flow separation and cause thrust vectoring of the primary jet thrust. The nozzle was designed with a recessed cavity to enhance the throat shifting method of fluidic thrust vectoring. Several design cycles with the structured-grid, computational fluid dynamics code PAB3D and with experiments in the NASA Langley Research Center Jet Exit Test Facility have been completed to guide the nozzle design and analyze performance. This paper presents computational results on potential design improvements for best experimental configuration tested to date. Nozzle design variables included cavity divergence angle, cavity convergence angle and upstream throat height. Pulsed fluidic injection was also investigated for its ability to decrease mass flow requirements. Internal nozzle performance (wind-off conditions) and thrust vector angles were computed for several configurations over a range of nozzle pressure ratios from 2 to 7, with the fluidic injection flow rate equal to 3 percent of the primary flow rate. Computational results indicate that increasing cavity divergence angle beyond 10 is detrimental to thrust vectoring efficiency, while increasing cavity convergence angle from 20 to 30 improves thrust vectoring efficiency at nozzle pressure ratios greater than 2, albeit at the expense of discharge coefficient. Pulsed injection was no more efficient than steady injection for the Dual Throat Nozzle concept.

  17. Deformation in thrust-ramp anticlines and duplexes: implications for geometry and porosity

    Groshong, R.H. Jr.; Usdansky, S.I.

    1986-05-01

    A computerized kinematic model of thrust-ramp anticline geometry allows workers to predict the zones of greatest deformation in ramp anticlines and fault duplexes. The model assumes a constant cross-section area, symmetrical fold hinges, and slip in the hanging wall parallel to the ramp and forelimb. Assuming that the collapse of original porosity or the generation of secondary fracture porosity is proportional to deformation, the model can be used to predict porosity changes. Deformation in a single ramp anticline is greatest in the forelimb and backlimb, and may be absent in the crest. A duplex structure results from comparatively closely spaced thrusts that have a common upper detachment horizon. Relatively wide spacing between the duplex faults yields a bumpy roofed duplex as in the central Appalachians. Forelimbs may be deformed twice and should show greater porosity modification. Relatively close spacing between ramp-and-flat thrusts can produce a listric-fault, snakehead anticline geometry because younger faults deform the preexisting thrust slices. The resulting geometry is here called a snakehead duplex and appears to be fairly common, as in the Jumpingpound field in the Canadian Rockies. Each thrust slice within the duplex is deformed six times or more, providing the maximum opportunity for deformation-related porosity changes. Maximum fracture porosity should occur in thrusts having listric-fan or snakehead duplex geometry. Structures involving duplexes generally should be better than isolated ramp anticlines.

  18. Fault Characteristics in Longmen Mountain Thrust Belt,Western Sichuan Foreland Basin,China

    Wan Guimei; Tang Liangjie; Yang Keming; Jin Wenzheng; LU Zhizhou; Yu Yixin

    2008-01-01

    Through field geological survey,the authors found that abundant thrust faults developed in the Longmen (龙门) Mountain thrust belt.These faults can be divided into thrust faults and strike-slip faults according to their formation mechanisms and characteristics.Furthermore,these faults can be graded into primary fault,secondary fault,third-level fault,and fourth-level fault according to their scale and role in the tectonic evolution of Longmen Mountain thrust belt.Each thrust fault is composed of several secondary faults,such as Qingchuan (青川)-Maowen (茂汶) fault zone is composed of Qiaozhuang (乔庄) fault,Qingxi (青溪) fault,Maowen fault,Ganyanggou (赶羊沟) fault,etc..The Longmen Mountain thrust belt experienced early Indosinian movement,Anxian (安县) movement,Yanshan (燕山)movement,and Himalayan movement,and the faults formed gradually from north to south.

  19. Cannibalism and predation on black bears by grizzly bears in the Yellowstone ecosystem, 1975-1990

    Mattson, D.J.; Knight, R.R.; Blanchard, B.M.

    1992-01-01

    We documented one instance of an adult male grizzly bear preying upon a black bear and four instances where circumstantial evidence suggested that grizzly bears (two cubs-of-the-year, one yearling female that was injured, and one adult male) had been preyed upon by conspecifics. We also examined feces of grizzly bears for bear remains. Remains of bears tended to be more common in spring feces and did not differ in frequency between early and late years of the study. Our observations generally support existing hypotheses concerning cannibalism among bears.

  20. Improvement of journal bearing operation at heavy misalignment using bearing flexibility and compliant liners

    Thomsen, Kim; Klit, Peder

    2012-01-01

    A flexure journal bearing design is proposed that will improve operational behaviour of a journal bearing at pronounced misalignment. Using a thermoelastohydrodynamic model, it is shown that the proposed flexure journal bearing has vastly increased the hydrodynamic performance compared to the stiff...... bearing when misaligned. The hydrodynamic performance is evaluated on lubricant film thickness, pressure and temperature. Furthermore, the influence of a compliant bearing liner is investigated and it is found that it increases the hydrodynamic performance when applied to a stiff bearing, whereas...... the liner has practically no influence on the flexure journal bearing's performance....

  1. Ball Bearing Stacking Automation System

    Shafeequerrahman S . Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This document is an effort to introduce the concept of automation in small scale industries and or small workshops that are involved in the manufacturing of small objects such as nuts, bolts and ball bearing in this case. This an electromechanical system which includes certain mechanical parts that involves one base stand on which one vertical metallic frame is mounted and hinged to this vertical stand is an in humanized effort seems inadequate in this era making necessary the use of Electronics, Computer in the manufacturing processes leading to the concept of Automated Manufacturing System (AMS.The ball bearing stack automation is an effort in this regard. In our project we go for stack automation for any object for example a ball bearing, be that is still a manual system there. It will be microcontroller based project control system equipped with microcontroller 89C51 from any manufacturer like Atmel or Philips. This could have been easily implemented if a PLC could be used for manufacturing the staking unit but I adopted the microcontroller based system so that some more modification in the system can be effected at will as to use the same hardware .Although a very small object i.e. ball bearig or small nut and fixture will be tried to be stacked, the system with more precision and more power handling capacity could be built for various requirements of the industry. For increasing more control capacity, we can use another module of this series. When the bearing is ready, it will be sent for packing. This is sensed by an inductive sensor. The output will be proceeds by PLC and microcontroller card which will be driving the assembly in order to put it into pads or flaps. This project will also count the total number of bearings to be packed and will display it on a LCD for real time reference and a provision is made using a higher level language using hyper terminal of the computer

  2. Shaft Center Orbit in Dynamically Loaded Bearings

    Klit, Peder

    The aim of this work is to demonstrate how to utilize the bearings damping coefficients to estimate the orbit for a dynamically loaded journal bearing. The classical method for this analysis was developed by Booker in 1965 and described further in 1972. Several authors have refined this method over...... Jorgen W. Lund pointed out in lecture notes that the dynamic damping coefficients of the bearing could be used to find the shaft orbit for dynamically loaded bearings. For simplicity the "Short-Width-Journal-Bearing Theory" is used as a basis for finding the damping coefficients in this work...

  3. Chromatographic (TLC) differentiation of grizzly bear and black bear scats

    Picton, Harold D.; Kendall, Katherine C.

    1994-01-01

    While past work concluded that thin-layer chromatography (TLC) was inadequate for the separation of grizzly (Ursus arctos horribilis) and black bear (U. americanus) scats, our study found differences adequate for species separation. A key was constructed using 19 of 40 data points recorded on each(N)=356 profiles of 178) know-species scat. Accuracy was best for late summer scats (94%). Methods for specimen preparation, analysis, and reading the TLC profiles are discussed. Factors involved in scat variation were tested.

  4. Pratt and Whitney cryogenic turbopump bearing experience

    Poole, W. E.; Bursey, R. W., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Successful, reusable bearings require lubrication, traditionally, a transfer film from sacrificial cage wear. Early testing included materials screening programs to identify suitable cryogenic cage materials. A specially developed element tester that simulated the function of a ball bearing cage was used. Suitable materials must provide lubrication with an acceptably low wear rate, without abrading contacting surfaces. The most promising materials were tested in full scale bearings at speeds up to 4 MDN. Teflon, filled with 40 percent bronze powder, was the best performing material. A variety of bearings were designed and successfully tested in LH2 and LOX. Bearings with bronze filled Teflon cages were successfully tested for 150 hrs. In overload tests, the same design was tested for 5 hrs at maximum Hertz stresses above 450 ksi and an additional 5 hrs with a maximum Hertz stress exceeding 500 ksi. Four bearings were tested in LOX for 25 hrs, with a maximum time per bearing of 10 hrs.

  5. Performance characteristics of two multiaxis thrust-vectoring nozzles at Mach numbers up to 1.28

    Wing, David J.; Capone, Francis J.

    1993-01-01

    The thrust-vectoring axisymmetric (VA) nozzle and a spherical convergent flap (SCF) thrust-vectoring nozzle were tested along with a baseline nonvectoring axisymmetric (NVA) nozzle in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel at Mach numbers from 0 to 1.28 and nozzle pressure ratios from 1 to 8. Test parameters included geometric yaw vector angle and unvectored divergent flap length. No pitch vectoring was studied. Nozzle drag, thrust minus drag, yaw thrust vector angle, discharge coefficient, and static thrust performance were measured and analyzed, as well as external static pressure distributions. The NVA nozzle and the VA nozzle displayed higher static thrust performance than the SCF nozzle throughout the nozzle pressure ratio (NPR) range tested. The NVA nozzle had higher overall thrust minus drag than the other nozzles throughout the NPR and Mach number ranges tested. The SCF nozzle had the lowest jet-on nozzle drag of the three nozzles throughout the test conditions. The SCF nozzle provided yaw thrust angles that were equal to the geometric angle and constant with NPR. The VA nozzle achieved yaw thrust vector angles that were significantly higher than the geometric angle but not constant with NPR. Nozzle drag generally increased with increases in thrust vectoring for all the nozzles tested.

  6. Study of thrust and nappe tectonics in the eastern Jiaodong Peninsula, China

    ZHANG HongYuan; HOU QuanLin; CAO DaiYong

    2007-01-01

    Thrust and nappe tectonics have affected the eastern Jiaodong Peninsula, the easternmost terminal of the Sulu Ultra-high Pressure Metamorphic Belt. Four nappes have been mapped, named respectively the Shidao, Rongcheng, Mishan and Mouping nappes. The methods used included multi-scale structural analysis and structural chronology analysis. These nappes define four deep level slip-thrust shear zones that were mainly active in the Mesozoic. The amount of ductile deformation decreases from the Shidao to Rongcheng to Mouping to Mishan shear zones, and shows an inverse relationship with temperature. 40Ar/39Ar chronological analysis and the chronological results of former workers reveal four movement steps defined by the development of thrusts and nappes in the late Triassic (210-180 Ma), extensional movement from the Jurassic to early Cretaceous (180-130 Ma), slip-thrust movement in the Early Cretaceous (130-120 Ma), and extensional movement since the Late Cretaceous (120 Ma). The order of boundary shear zone motion in the period of slip-thrust movement during the Early Cretaceous (130-120 Ma) was along the Shidao, Rongcheng, Mouping and finally the Mishan shear zone. This resulted in clockwise rotation of the nappes relative to block west to the Tan-Lu Faults. Because of the similar evolutionary history of the Tan-Lu Faults and the thrust and nappe structure in the eastern Jiaodong Peninsula, slip dislocation along the Tan-Lu Faults might have been absorbed by thrust and nappe tectonics in the Jiaodong area in the Mesozoic era, resulting in much less dislocation on the Tan-Lu faults in North Eastern China than that in south along the Jiaodong Peninsula.

  7. Study of thrust and nappe tectonics in the eastern Jiaodong Peninsula, China

    2007-01-01

    Thrust and nappe tectonics have affected the eastern Jiaodong Peninsula, the easternmost terminal of the Sulu Ultra-high Pressure Metamorphic Belt. Four nappes have been mapped, named respectively the Shidao, Rongcheng, Mishan and Mouping nappes. The methods used included multi-scale struc- tural analysis and structural chronology analysis. These nappes define four deep level slip-thrust shear zones that were mainly active in the Mesozoic. The amount of ductile deformation decreases from the Shidao to Rongcheng to Mouping to Mishan shear zones, and shows an inverse relationship with temperature. 40Ar/39Ar chronological analysis and the chronological results of former workers reveal four movement steps defined by the development of thrusts and nappes in the late Triassic (210-180 Ma), extensional movement from the Jurassic to early Cretaceous (180-130 Ma), slip-thrust movement in the Early Cretaceous (130-120 Ma), and extensional movement since the Late Cretaceous (120 Ma). The order of boundary shear zone motion in the period of slip-thrust movement during the Early Cre- taceous (130-120 Ma) was along the Shidao, Rongcheng, Mouping and finally the Mishan shear zone. This resulted in clockwise rotation of the nappes relative to block west to the Tan-Lu Faults. Because of the similar evolutionary history of the Tan-Lu Faults and the thrust and nappe structure in the eastern Jiaodong Peninsula, slip dislocation along the Tan-Lu Faults might have been absorbed by thrust and nappe tectonics in the Jiaodong area in the Mesozoic era, resulting in much less dislocation on the Tan-Lu faults in North Eastern China than that in south along the Jiaodong Peninsula.

  8. Current leads and magnetic bearings

    Hull, J. R.

    1993-10-01

    Since the discovery of high temperature superconductors (HTS's), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has been active in a broad spectrum of activities in developing these materials for applications. Work at every stage of development has involved industrial collaboration in order to accelerate commercialization. While most of the development work has been devoted to improving the properties of current-carrying wires, some effort has been devoted to applications that can utilize HTS's with properties available now or in the near future. In this paper, advances made in the area of current leads and magnetic bearings are discussed.

  9. Fully Suspended, Five-Axis, Three-Magnetic-Bearing Dynamic Spin Rig With Forced Excitation

    Morrison, Carlos R.; Provenza, Andrew; Kurkov, Anatole; Montague, Gerald; Duffy, Kirsten; Mehmed, Oral; Johnson, Dexter; Jansen, Ralph

    2004-01-01

    The Five-Axis, Three-Magnetic-Bearing Dynamic Spin Rig, a significant advancement in the Dynamic Spin Rig (DSR), is used to perform vibration tests of turbomachinery blades and components under rotating and nonrotating conditions in a vacuum. The rig has as its critical components three magnetic bearings: two heteropolar radial active magnetic bearings and a magnetic thrust bearing. The bearing configuration allows full vertical rotor magnetic suspension along with a feed-forward control feature, which will enable the excitation of various natural blade modes in bladed disk test articles. The theoretical, mechanical, electrical, and electronic aspects of the rig are discussed. Also presented are the forced-excitation results of a fully levitated, rotating and nonrotating, unbladed rotor and a fully levitated, rotating and nonrotating, bladed rotor in which a pair of blades was arranged 180 degrees apart from each other. These tests include the bounce mode excitation of the rotor in which the rotor was excited at the blade natural frequency of 144 Hz. The rotor natural mode frequency of 355 Hz was discerned from the plot of acceleration versus frequency. For nonrotating blades, a blade-tip excitation amplitude of approximately 100 g/A was achieved at the first-bending critical (approximately 144 Hz) and at the first-torsional and second-bending blade modes. A blade-tip displacement of 70 mils was achieved at the first-bending critical by exciting the blades at a forced-excitation phase angle of 908 relative to the vertical plane containing the blades while simultaneously rotating the shaft at 3000 rpm.

  10. A workflow for 3D model building in fold-thrust belts

    Watkins, Hannah; Bond, Clare; Butler, Rob

    2016-04-01

    3D geological models can be used in fold-thrust belts for many purposes such as analysing geometric variation in folds, kinematic modelling to restore fold surfaces, generating strain distribution maps and predicting fracture network distribution. We present a workflow for 3D model building using outcrop bedding data, geological maps, Digital Terrain Models (DTM's), air photos and field photographs. We discuss the challenges of software limitations for 3D kinematic restoration and forward modelling in fold-thrust belt settings. We then discuss the sensitivity of model building approaches to the application of 3D geological models in fold-thrust belts for further analysis e.g. changes in along strike fold geometry, restoration using kinematic and geomechanical modelling, strain prediction and Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) modelling. To create 3D models geological maps and bedding data are digitised using Move software; digitised maps and data are then draped onto DTM's. A series of closely spaced cross section lines are selected; the orientation of these is calculated by determining the average orientation of bedding dip direction. Fault and horizon line intersections, along with bedding data from within a narrow margin of the section lines are projected onto each cross section. Field photographs and sketches are integrated into the cross sections to determine thrust angles at the surface. Horizon lines are then constructed using bedding data. Displacement profiles for thrusts are plotted to ensure thrust displacements are valid with respect to neighbouring cross section interpretations; any discrepancies are alleviated by making minor adjustments to horizon and thrust lines, while ensuring that resultant cross section geometries still adhere to bedding data and other field observations. Once the cross sections have been finalised, 3D surfaces are created using the horizon and thrust line interpretations on each cross section. The simple curvature of 3D surfaces

  11. Growth of the Zagros Fold-Thrust Belt and Foreland Basin, Northern Iraq, Kurdistan

    Koshnaw, Renas; Horton, Brian; Stockli, Daniel; Barber, Douglas; Ghalib, Hafidh; Dara, Rebwar

    2016-04-01

    The Zagros orogenic belt in the Middle Eastern segment of the Alpine-Himalayan system is among the youngest seismically active continental collision zones on Earth. However, due to diachronous and incremental collision, the precise ages and kinematics of shortening and deposition remain poorly understood. The Kurdistan region of the Zagros fold-thrust belt and foreland basin contains well-preserved Neogene wedge-top and foredeep deposits that include clastic nonmarine fill of the Upper Fars, Lower Bakhtiari, and Upper Bakhtiari Formations. These deposits record significant information about orogenic growth, fold-thrust dynamics, and advance of the deformation front. Thermochronologic and geochronologic data from thrust sheets and stratigraphic archives combined with local earthquake data provide a unique opportunity to address the linkages between surface and subsurface geologic relationships. This research seeks to constrain the timing and geometry of exhumation and deformation by addressing two key questions: (1) Did the northwestern Zagros fold-thrust belt evolve from initial thin-skinned shortening to later thick-skinned deformation or vice-versa? (2) Did the fold-thrust belt advance steadily under critical/supercritical wedge conditions involving in-sequence thrusting or propagate intermittently under subcritical conditions with out-of-sequence deformation? From north to south, apatite (U-Th)/He ages from the Main Zagros Thrust, the Mountain Front Flexure (MFF), and additional frontal thrusts suggest rapid exhumation by ~10 Ma, ~5 Ma, and ~8 Ma respectively. Field observations and seismic sections indicate progressive tilting and development of growth strata within the Lower Bakhtiari Formation adjacent to the frontal thrusts and within the Upper Bakhtiari Formation near the MFF. In the Kurdistan region of Iraq, a regional balanced cross section constrained by new thermochronometric results, proprietary seismic reflection profiles, and earthquake hypocenters

  12. A kinematic model for the formation of duplex systems with a perfectly planar roof thrust

    Contreras, Juan; Suter, Max

    1997-03-01

    We present a cross-sectional kinematic forward model for the formation of duplexes with a perfectly planar roof thrust. The major assumptions are a constant dip and constant spacing of the ramps in the undeformed state and sequential deformation in the direction of tectonic transport, with equal displacement along each ramp. The model is based on a coordinate transformation that simulates flexural slip parallel to the active fault surface. This causes angular parallel folds and keeps the layer thickness constant, except in the forelimbs of the horses. Attempts by previous workers to simulate the formation of duplexes with a perfectly planar roof thrust, on the other hand, were based on the assumptions of constant bed thickness and bed length, or a different topology of the axial planes delimiting the forelimbs of the horses, and resulted in corrugated roof thrusts. We show that it is not possible to form a flat roof duplex type and preserve the forelimb thickness of the horses under flexural slip parallel to the active fault. We describe duplexes by three parameters which are the separation s between ramps, the ramp length l, and the displacement u along the ramps. In a {u}/{s} vs {l}/{s} diagram, duplexes with a perfectly planar roof thrust, resulting from numerical experiments with our kinematic algorithm, occupy specific families of straight lines. Our results are independent of the dip or internal geometry of the thrust ramps.

  13. Engineering Research and Development and Technology thrust area report FY92

    Langland, R.T.; Minichino, C. [eds.

    1993-03-01

    The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the technical staff and the technology needed to support current and future LLNL programs. To accomplish this mission, the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program has two important goals: (1) to identify key technologies and (2) to conduct high-quality work to enhance our capabilities in these key technologies. To help focus our efforts, we identify technology thrust areas and select technical leaders for each area. The thrust areas are integrated engineering activities and, rather than being based on individual disciplines, they are staffed by personnel from Electronics Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and other LLNL organizations, as appropriate. The thrust area leaders are expected to establish strong links to LLNL program leaders and to industry; to use outside and inside experts to review the quality and direction of the work; to use university contacts to supplement and complement their efforts; and to be certain that we are not duplicating the work of others. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes activities conducted within the Program for the fiscal year 1992. Its intent is to provide timely summaries of objectives, theories, methods, and results. The nine thrust areas for this fiscal year are: Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics; Computational Mechanics; Diagnostics and Microelectronics; Emerging Technologies; Fabrication Technology; Materials Science and Engineering; Microwave and Pulsed Power; Nondestructive Evaluation; and Remote Sensing and Imaging, and Signal Engineering.

  14. Exploring for hydrocarbons under thrust belts - A challenging new frontier in the Carpathians and elsewhere

    Picha, F.J. [Chevron Overseas Petroleum, Inc., San Ramon, CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    New significant reserves of hydrocarbons may occur in subthrust autochthonous and parautochthonous series buried below the frontal zones of thin-skinned thrust belts. The subthrust plays have been tested in several orogenic belts of the world, the Carpathians being one of the best examples. The arcuate thin-skinned Carpathian orogenic belt, which evolved during the Mesozoic and Cenozoic, is thrust tens of kilometers over its Neogene foredeeps and the underlying. European plate. Various structural and stratigraphic settings and potential hydrocarbon plays have been recognized within the buried margins of the European plate, including a late Paleozoic Hercynian compressional system, Mesozoic rifted margins of the Tethys, and a Cenozoic synorogenic foreland-type fault system. Possibly, deeper parautochthonous structures, documented on examples from the southern Apennines, may also be present below the thin-skinned frontal zone of the Carpathian thrust belt. In addition to these structural settings, large Paleogene valleys/submarine canyons have been found within the margins of the European plate. These structural and morphologic features, if combined with source rocks, reservoirs, and proper burial history, represent potential hydrocarbon plays. Generation of hydrocarbons from sources within the subthrust plate was greatly enhanced by emplacement of the wedge-shaped thrust belt, which may also provide a regional seal; therefore, the combination of the long and complex geological history of the European plate with the impact of the Alpine thrusting and foreland deformation created unique conditions for generation, entrapment, and preservation of hydrocarbons in subthrust settings.

  15. CFD simulation of propeller and rudder performance when using additional thrust fins

    2007-01-01

    To analyse a possible way to improve the propulsion performance of ships, the unstructured grid and the Reynolds Average Navier-Stokes equations were used to calculate the performance of a propeller and rudder fitted with additional thrust fins in the viscous flow field.The computational fluid dynamics software FLUENT was used to simulate the thrust and torque coefficient as a function of the advance coefficient of propeller and the thrust efficiency of additional thrust fins.The pressure and velocity flow behind the propeller was calculated.The geometrical nodes of the propeller were constituted by FORTRAN program and the NUMBS method was used to create a configuration of the propeller, which was then used by GAMMBIT to generate the calculation model.The thrust efficiency of fins was calculated as a function of the number of additional fins and the attack angles.The results of the calculations agree fairly well with experimental data, which shows that the viscous flow solution we present is useful in simulating the performance of propellers and rudders with additional fins.

  16. Traceable Calibration of the 3 axis Thrust Vector in the mN range

    Hughes, B.; Oldfield, S.

    2004-10-01

    The possibility of measuring the three force components i.e. the main axial component and the two orthogonal radial components, generated by an electric propulsion system is important for two reasons. Firstly, to assess the impact of spacecraft/propulsion system integration issues, for example to verify the alignment of the thrust vector with the spacecraft centre-of-mass for spacecraft stability. Secondly, to operate the thruster properly during flight, for example to determine the thrust vector relative to the mechanical axis of the thruster. Furthermore, a three-axis measurement capability will be useful for the experimental performance verification of the next generation of vectored electric propulsion devices, especially regarding the many unresolved issues connected with indirect thrust measurement using electrostatic probes. The capability to monitor thrust vector drift in real time and with significant bandwidth is also important. Thus enabling vector drift during thruster warm-up, to be measured, and the response of vectored thrusters to change in vector demand can be assessed. In this paper we describe the design, construction and testing of an instrument proof of concept. The instrument was designed to accommodate a dummy thruster mass of 0.5 kg and operate in the 0 to 10 mN range. The directional resolution that has been demonstrated is better than 0.05 ° in both axes when operating at full thrust.

  17. Optimal low-thrust spiral trajectories using Lyapunov-based guidance

    Yang, Da-lin; Xu, Bo; Zhang, Lei

    2016-09-01

    For an increasing number of electric propulsion systems used for real missions, it is very important to design optimal low-thrust spiral trajectories for these missions. However, it is particularly challenging to search for optimal low-thrust transfers. This paper describes an efficient optimal guidance scheme for the design of time-optimal and time-fixed fuel-optimal low-thrust spiral trajectories. The time-optimal solution is obtained with Lyapunov-based guidance, in which the artificial neural network (ANN) is adopted to implement control gains steering and the evolutionary algorithm is used as the learning algorithm for ANN. Moreover, the relative efficiency introduced in Q-law is analyzed and a periapis-and-apoapsis-centered burn structure is proposed for solving time-fixed fuel-optimal low-thrust orbit transfer problem. In this guidance scheme, the ANN is adopted to determine the burn structure within each orbital revolution and the optimal low-thrust orbit transfer problem is converted to the parameter optimization problem. This guidance scheme runs without an initial guess and provides closed form solutions. In addition, Earth J2 perturbation and Earth-shadow eclipse effects are considered in this paper. Finally, a comparison with solutions given by the literature demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  18. Medical diagnosis of cubital tunnel syndrome ameliorated with thrust manipulation of the elbow and carpals.

    Kearns, Gary; Wang, Sharon

    2012-05-01

    This case report describes the effectiveness of thrust manipulation to the elbow and carpals in the management of a patient referred with a medical diagnosis of cubital tunnel syndrome (CuTS). The patient was a 45-year-old woman with a 6-week history of right medial elbow pain, ulnar wrist pain, and intermittent paresthesia in the ulnar nerve distribution. Upon initial assessment, she presented with a positive elbow flexion test and upper limb neurodynamic test with ulnar nerve bias. A biomechanical assessment of the elbow and carpals revealed a loss of lateral glide of the humerus on the ulna and a loss of palmar glide of the triquetral on the hamate. After the patient received two thrust manipulations of the elbow and one thrust manipulation of the carpals over the course of four sessions, her pain and paresthesia were resolved. This case demonstrates that the use of thrust manipulation to the elbow and carpals may be an effective approach in the management of insidious onset CuTS. This patient was successfully treated with thrust manipulation when joint dysfunction of the elbow and wrist were appropriately identified. This case report may shed light on the examination and management of insidious onset CuTS.

  19. Control Study for Five-axis Dynamic Spin Rig Using Magnetic Bearings

    Choi, Benjamin; Johnson, Dexter; Provenza, Andrew; Morrison, Carlos; Montague, Gerald

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has developed a magnetic bearing system for the Dynamic Spin Rig (DSR) with a fully suspended shaft that is used to perform vibration tests of turbomachinery blades and components under spinning conditions in a vacuum. Two heteropolar radial magnetic bearings and a thrust magnetic bearing and the associated control system were integrated into the DSR to provide magnetic excitation as well as non-contact mag- netic suspension of a 15.88 kg (35 lb) vertical rotor with blades to induce turbomachinery blade vibration. For rotor levitation, a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller with a special feature for multidirectional radial excitation worked well to both support and shake the shaft with blades. However, more advanced controllers were developed and successfully tested to determine the optimal controller in terms of sensor and processing noise reduction, smaller rotor orbits, more blade vibration amplitude, and energy savings for the system. The test results of a variety of controllers that were demonstrated up to 10.000 rpm are shown. Furthermore, rotor excitation operation and conceptual study of active blade vibration control are addressed.

  20. Low-friction coatings for air bearings in fuel cell air compressors

    Ajayi, O. O.; Fenske, G. R.; Erdemir, A.; Woodford, J.; Sitts, J.; Elshot, K.; Griffey, K.

    2000-01-06

    In an effort to reduce fuel consumption and emissions, hybrid vehicles incorporating fuel cell systems are being developed by automotive manufacturers, their suppliers, federal agencies (specifically, the US Department of Energy) and national laboratories. The fuel cell system will require an air management subsystem that includes a compressor/expander. Certain components in the compressor will require innovative lubrication technology in order to reduce parasitic energy losses and improve their reliability and durability. One such component is the air bearing for air turbocompressors designed and fabricated by Meruit, Inc. Argonne National Laboratory recently developed a carbon-based coating with low friction and wear attributes; this near-frictionless-carbon (NFC) coating is a potential candidate for use in turbocompressor air bearings. The authors present here an evaluation of the Argonne coating for air compressor thrust bearings. With two parallel 440C stainless steel discs in unidirectional sliding contact, the NFC reduced the frictional force four times and the wear rate by more than two orders of magnitude. Wear mechanism on the uncoated surface involved oxidation and production of iron oxide debris. Wear occurred on the coated surfaces primarily by a polishing mechanism.

  1. Bearing Health Assessment Based on Chaotic Characteristics

    Chen Lu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibration signals extracted from rotating parts of machinery carry a lot of useful information about the condition of operating machine. Due to the strong non-linear, complex and non-stationary characteristics of vibration signals from working bearings, an accurate and reliable health assessment method for bearing is necessary. This paper proposes to utilize the selected chaotic characteristics of vibration signal for health assessment of a bearing by using self-organizing map (SOM. Both Grassberger-Procaccia algorithm and Takens' theory are employed to calculate the characteristic vector which includes three chaotic characteristics, such as correlation dimension, largest Lyapunov exponent and Kolmogorov entropy. After that, SOM is used to map the three corresponding characteristics into a confidence value (CV which represents the health state of the bearing. Finally, a case study based on vibration datasets of a group of testing bearings was conducted to demonstrate that the proposed method can reliably assess the health state of bearing.

  2. Microstructures and strain variation: Evidence of multiple splays in the North Almora Thrust Zone, Kumaun Lesser Himalaya, Uttarakhand, India

    Joshi, Gaurav; Agarwal, Amar; Agarwal, K. K.; Srivastava, Samriddhi; Alva Valdivia, L. M.

    2017-01-01

    The North Almora Thrust zone (NATZ) marks the boundary of the Almora Crystalline Complex (ACC) against the Lesser Himalayan Sedimentary sequence (LHS) in the north. Its southern counterpart, the South Almora Thrust (SAT), is a sharply marked contact between the ACC and the LHS in the south. Published studies argue various contradictory emplacement modes of the North Almora Thrust. Recent studies have implied splays of smaller back thrusts in the NATZ. The present study investigates meso- and microstructures, and strain distribution in the NATZ and compares it with strain distribution across the SAT. In the NATZ, field evidence reveals repeated sequence of 10-500 m thick slices of proto- to ultra-mylonite, thrust over the Lesser Himalayan Rautgara quartzite. In accordance with the field evidence, the strain analysis reveals effects of splays of smaller thrust in the NATZ. The study therefore, argues that contrary to popular nomenclature the northern contact of the ACC with the LHS is not a single thrust plane, but a thrust zone marked by numerous thrust splays.

  3. Electromechanical properties of radial active magnetic bearings

    Antila, Matti

    1998-01-01

    Nonideal properties of the electromagnetic actuators in radial active magnetic bearings are studied. The two dimensional nonlinear stationary finite element method is used to determine the linearised parameters of a radial active magnetic bearing. The method is verified on two test machines. The accuracy is 10-15 % in the magnetic saturation region. The effect of magnetic saturation on the bearing dynamics is studied based on the root locus diagrams of the closed loop system. These diagrams s...

  4. Powder-Metallurgical Bearings For Turbopumps

    Bhat, B. N.; Humphries, T. S.; Thom, R. L.; Moxson, V.; Friedman, G. I.; Dolan, F. J.; Shipley, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    Bearings fabricated by powder metallurgy developed for use in machines subjected to extremes of temperature, rolling-contact cyclic stresses, and oxidizing or otherwise corrosive fluids. Bearings also extend operating lives of other machines in which bearings required to resist extreme thermal, mechanical, and chemical stresses. One alloy exhibiting outstanding properties was MRC-2001. Resistance to fatigue, stress corrosion cracking, and wear found superior to that of 440C stainless steel.

  5. Are organohalogen contaminants a bears (Ursus maritimus)?

    Sonne, Christian; Dietz, Rune; Leifsson, PS

    2006-01-01

    Tissues of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from East Greenland contain the highest concentrations of organohalogen contaminants (OHCs) among subpopulations of any mammalian species in the Arctic. Negative associations also have been found between OHC concentrations and bone mineral density and liver...... histology parameters for this subpopulation of polar bears. The present study examined the OHC concentrations and adverse effects on renal tissue for 75 polar bears collected during 1999 to 2002. Specific lesions were diffuse glomerular capillary wall thickening, mesangial glomerular deposits, tubular...

  6. Aeroelastic response of an aircraft wing with mounted engine subjected to time-dependent thrust

    Mazidi, A.; Kalantari, H.; Fazelzadeh, S. A.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, the aeroelastic response of a wing containing an engine subjected to different types of time-dependent thrust excitations is presented. In order to precisely consider the spanwise and chordwise locations of the engine and the time-dependent follower force in governing equations, derived through Lagrange's method, the generalized function theory is used. Unsteady aerodynamic lift and moment in the time domain are considered in terms of Wagner's function. Numerical simulations of the aeroelastic response to different types of time-dependent thrust excitation and comparisons with the previously published results are supplied. Effects of the engine mass and location and also the type of time-dependent thrust on the wing aeroelastic response are studied and pertinent conclusions are outlined.

  7. Experimental and theoretical comparison of the Probe Thrust Vector Control concept

    Cavalleri, Robert; Tiarn, Weihnurng; Lewis, Lynn

    1991-01-01

    A concept that offers an alternate method for thrust vector control of liquid or solid propellant rockets is the use of a solid body or probe that is inserted on demand through the wall of the rocket nozzle. This Probe Thrust Vector Control (PTVC) concept is an alternative to that of a gimbaled nozzle or a Liquid Injection Thrust Vector control system. The viability of the PTVC concept can be assessed either experimentally and/or with the use of CFD. A purely experimental assessment is time consuming and expensive, whereas a CFD assessment is time- and cost-effective. Two key requirements of the concept are PTVC vectoring performance and active cooling requirements for the probe to maintain its thermal and structural integrity. The objective of the work reported here is presentation of experimental subscale cold flow tests and comparison of these tests with CFD predictions and the response time of the PTVC system.

  8. Prediction and experimental measurement of the electromagnetic thrust generated by a microwave thruster system

    Yang Juan; Wang Yu-Quan; Ma Yan-Jie; Li Peng-Fei; Yang Le; Wang Yang; He Guo-Qiang

    2013-01-01

    A microwave thruster system that can convert microwave power directly to thrust without a gas propellant is developed.In the system,a cylindrical tapered resonance cavity and a magnetron microwave source are used respectively as the thruster cavity and the energy source to generate the electromagnetic wave.The wave is radiated into and then reflected from the cavity to form a pure standing wave with non-uniform electromagnetic pressure distribution.Consequently,a net electromagnetic thrust exerted on the axis of the thruster cavity appears,which is demonstrated through theoretical calculation based on the electromagnetic theory.The net electromagnetic thrust is also experimentally measured in the range from 70 mN to 720 mN when the microwave output power is from 80 W to 2500 W.

  9. Optimal low-thrust trajectories for nuclear and solar electric propulsion

    Genta, G.; Maffione, P. F.

    2016-01-01

    The optimization of the trajectory and of the thrust profile of a low-thrust interplanetary transfer is usually solved under the assumption that the specific mass of the power generator is constant. While this is reasonable in the case of nuclear electric propulsion, if solar electric propulsion is used the specific mass depends on the distance of the spacecraft from the Sun. In the present paper the optimization of the trajectory of the spacecraft and of the thrust profile is solved under the latter assumption, to obtain optimized interplanetary trajectories for solar electric spacecraft, also taking into account all phases of the journey, from low orbit about the starting planet to low orbit about the destination one. General plots linking together the travel time, the specific mass of the generator and the propellant consumption are obtained.

  10. Global Optimization of Low-Thrust Interplanetary Trajectories Subject to Operational Constraints

    Englander, Jacob A.; Vavrina, Matthew A.; Hinckley, David

    2016-01-01

    Low-thrust interplanetary space missions are highly complex and there can be many locally optimal solutions. While several techniques exist to search for globally optimal solutions to low-thrust trajectory design problems, they are typically limited to unconstrained trajectories. The operational design community in turn has largely avoided using such techniques and has primarily focused on accurate constrained local optimization combined with grid searches and intuitive design processes at the expense of efficient exploration of the global design space. This work is an attempt to bridge the gap between the global optimization and operational design communities by presenting a mathematical framework for global optimization of low-thrust trajectories subject to complex constraints including the targeting of planetary landing sites, a solar range constraint to simplify the thermal design of the spacecraft, and a real-world multi-thruster electric propulsion system that must switch thrusters on and off as available power changes over the course of a mission.

  11. Thrust Reduction of Magnetic Levitation Vehicle Driven by Long Stator Linear Synchronous Motor

    Wan-Tsun Tseng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The propulsion technology of long stator linear synchronous motors is used to drive high-speed maglev trains. The linear synchronous motor stator is divided into sections placed on guideway. The electric power supplies to stator sections in which the train just passes in change-step mode for long-distance operation. However, a thrust drop will be caused by change-step machinery for driving magnetic vehicle. According to the train speed and vehicle data, the change-step mode has three types of operation, namely premature commutation, simultaneous commutation, and late commutation. Each type of operation has a different thrust drop which can be affected by several parameters such as jerk, running speed, motor section length, and vehicle data. This paper focuses on determining the thrust drop of the change-step mode. The study results of this paper can be used to improve the operation system of high-speed maglev trains.

  12. Resistive thrust production can be as crucial as added mass mechanisms for inertial undulatory swimmers

    Piñeirua, Miguel; Thiria, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we address a crucial point regarding the description of moderate to high Reynolds numbers aquatic swimmers. For decades, swimming animals have been classified in two different families of propulsive mechanisms based on the Reynolds number: the "resistive" swimmers, using local friction to produce the necessary thrust force for locomotion at low Reynolds number and the "reactive" swimmers, lying in the high Reynolds range, and using added mass acceleration (described by perfect fluid theory). However, inertial swimmers are also systems that dissipate energy, due to their finite size, therefore involving strong resistive contributions, even for high Reynolds numbers. Using a complete model for the hydrodynamic forces, involving both reactive and resistive contributions, we revisit here the physical mechanisms responsible for the thrust production of such swimmers. We show, for instance, that the resistive part of the force balance is as crucial as added mass effects in the modeling of the thrust ...

  13. Nuclear-thermal rocket thrust transient effects on minimum-fuel lunar trajectories

    Rivas, Matthew L.

    1995-01-01

    A technically viable option for low-cost minimum-fuel Lunar transfers with short trip times is the use of nuclear thermal rockets. However, little work has been done on the effects the associated thrust transients have on these optimal trajectories. The nominal thrust level of an engine is not immediately reached when the rocket is turned ``on.'' Similarly, when the engine is turned ``off'', the thrust and specific impulse levels decrease over a period of time which is directly related to both the flow effecs of the engine and cooling requirements. This paper presents an analysis of these effects on a typical optimal Lunar transfer. Several different models simulating the transient effects are used. They range from simple ``mass dumps'' to account for the extra required propellant to curve-fits of actual engine characteristics obtained from the NERVA nuclear rocket program.

  14. Investigation and Comparison Effects of Fluid Injection Type in Thrust Vector Control

    M.R Heidari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the effects of some liquid side injection from nozzle wall into exhaust gas of combustion chamber are studied. The side injection against main flow is as elliptical solid thing that change the symmetric of flow field on nozzle wall and causes some different pressure distribution on wall, and finally causes thrust vector deviation. Flows interaction causes some physical phenomena as bow shock wave in front of injection region. This paper explain the effects of this wave and variation velocity & pressure distribution at different cross sections of flow field and comparison results of air and other liquid fluid in thrust vector control system. The results are compared with experimental data and have well agreement with them. The results show that Freon is one of best injection liquid for this type of thrust vector control. Performance of Injection is optimum in relative position 35 to 40% nozzle divergence length.

  15. Feedback Optimal Control of Low-thrust Orbit Transfer in Central Gravity Field

    Ashraf H. Owis

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Low-thrust trajectories with variable radial thrust is studied in this paper. The problem is tackled by solving the Hamilton- Jacobi-Bellman equation via State Dependent Riccati Equation( STDE technique devised for nonlinear systems. Instead of solving the two-point boundary value problem in which the classical optimal control is stated, this technique allows us to derive closed-loop solutions. The idea of the work consists in factorizing the original nonlinear dynamical system into a quasi-linear state dependent system of ordinary differential equations. The generating function technique is then applied to this new dynamical system, the feedback optimal control is solved. We circumvent in this way the problem of expanding the vector field and truncating higher-order terms because no remainders are lost in the undertaken approach. This technique can be applied to any planet-to-planet transfer; it has been applied here to the Earth-Mars low-thrust transfer

  16. Gorringe Ridge gravity and magnetic anomalies are compatible with thrusting at a crustal scale

    Galindo-Zaldívar, J.; Maldonado, A.; Schreider, A. A.

    2003-06-01

    The main features of the deep structure of the Gorringe Ridge are analysed on the basis of gravity and magnetic measurements, as well as seismic profiles, drill holes, rock dredges, submersible observations and seismicity data. The gravity and magnetic models of the Gettysburg and Ormonde seamounts, which form the Gorringe Ridge, suggest that the Moho is approximately flat and the upper part of the ridge corresponds to a northwestwards vergent fold. This structure is the result of a northwestward vergent thrust that deformed the oceanic crust, with a minimum slip of approximately 20 km. The activity of the thrust probably started 20 Myr, and produced the recent stages of seamount uplift. The seamount is mainly composed of gabbros of the oceanic crust, serpentinized rocks and alkaline basalts. The large antiform, located in the hangingwall of the thrust, is probably deformed by minor faults. This oceanic ridge is a consequence of the oblique convergence between the African Plate and the overlapping Eurasian Plate.

  17. Static internal performance including thrust vectoring and reversing of two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles

    Re, R. J.; Leavitt, L. D.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of geometric design parameters on two dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles were investigated at nozzle pressure ratios up to 12 in the static test facility. Forward flight (dry and afterburning power settings), vectored-thrust (afterburning power setting), and reverse-thrust (dry power setting) nozzles were investigated. The nozzles had thrust vector angles from 0 deg to 20.26 deg, throat aspect ratios of 3.696 to 7.612, throat radii from sharp to 2.738 cm, expansion ratios from 1.089 to 1.797, and various sidewall lengths. The results indicate that unvectored two dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles have static internal performance comparable to axisymmetric nozzles with similar expansion ratios.

  18. Internal performance of two nozzles utilizing gimbal concepts for thrust vectoring

    Berrier, Bobby L.; Taylor, John G.

    1990-01-01

    The internal performance of an axisymmetric convergent-divergent nozzle and a nonaxisymmetric convergent-divergent nozzle, both of which utilized a gimbal type mechanism for thrust vectoring was evaluated in the Static Test Facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. The nonaxisymmetric nozzle used the gimbal concept for yaw thrust vectoring only; pitch thrust vectoring was accomplished by simultaneous deflection of the upper and lower divergent flaps. The model geometric parameters investigated were pitch vector angle for the axisymmetric nozzle and pitch vector angle, yaw vector angle, nozzle throat aspect ratio, and nozzle expansion ratio for the nonaxisymmetric nozzle. All tests were conducted with no external flow, and nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 2.0 to approximately 12.0.

  19. Low-Thrust Orbital Transfers in the Two-Body Problem

    A. A. Sukhanov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-thrust transfers between given orbits within the two-body problem are considered; the thrust is assumed power limited. A simple method for obtaining the transfer trajectories based on the linearization of the motion near reference orbits is suggested. Required calculation accuracy can be reached by means of use of a proper number of the reference orbits. The method may be used in the case of a large number of the orbits around the attracting center; no averaging is necessary in this case. The suggested method also is applicable to the cases of partly given final orbit and if there are constraints on the thrust direction. The method gives an optimal solution to the linearized problem which is not optimal for the original nonlinear problem; the difference between the optimal solutions to the original and linearized problems is estimated using a numerical example. Also examples illustrating the method capacities are given.

  20. A computer program for wing subsonic aerodynamic performance estimates including attainable thrust and vortex lift effects

    Carlson, H. W.; Walkley, K. B.

    1982-01-01

    Numerical methods incorporated into a computer program to provide estimates of the subsonic aerodynamic performance of twisted and cambered wings of arbitrary planform with attainable thrust and vortex lift considerations are described. The computational system is based on a linearized theory lifting surface solution which provides a spanwise distribution of theoretical leading edge thrust in addition to the surface distribution of perturbation velocities. The approach used relies on a solution by iteration. The method also features a superposition of independent solutions for a cambered and twisted wing and a flat wing of the same planform to provide, at little additional expense, results for a large number of angles of attack or lift coefficients. A previously developed method is employed to assess the portion of the theoretical thrust actually attainable and the portion that is felt as a vortex normal force.

  1. Bubble mass center and fluid feedback force fluctuations activated by constant lateral impulse with variable thrust

    Hung, R. J.; Long, Y. T.

    1995-01-01

    Sloshing dynamics within a partially filled rotating dewar of superfluid helium 2 are investigated in response to constant lateral impulse with variable thrust. The study, including how the rotating bubble of superfluid helium 2 reacts to the constant impulse with variable time period of thrust action in microgravity, how amplitudes of bubble mass center fluctuates with growth and decay of disturbances, and how fluid feedback forces fluctuates in activating on the rotating dewar through the dynamics of sloshing waves are investigated. The numerical computation of sloshing dynamics is based on the non-inertial frame spacecraft bound coordinate with lateral impulses actuating on the rotating dewar in both inertial and non-inertial frames of thrust. Results of the simulations are illustrated.

  2. Modifications of plasma density profile and thrust by neutral injection in a helicon plasma thruster

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Takao, Yoshinori; Ando, Akira

    2016-11-01

    Argon propellant is introduced from the upstream and downstream sides of a high power helicon plasma thruster. The plasma density profile and the imparted thrust are measured for various upstream and downstream argon flow rates, where the total gas flow rate of 70 sccm and the resultant vacuum chamber pressure of 0.2 mTorr are maintained. It is observed that the imparted thrust increases with an increase in the downstream gas flow rate; simultaneously an upstream-peaking profile of the plasma density observed for the upstream gas injection becomes uniform for the downstream gas injection. The difference in the thrust between the upstream and downstream gas injections is enhanced by increasing the rf power. The observed density profiles are qualitatively consistent with theoretical predictions taking a neutral depletion effect into account.

  3. Sandbox Experimental Study on the Influence of Rock Strength and Gravity on Formation of Thrusts

    2006-01-01

    A sandbox experiment model was designed to simulate how differences in rock strength and gravity between two blocks can influence the formation characteristics of thrusts. In the experiment the compression was from one direction with basement shortening and the initial surfaces of the model were oblique. The results show that if the initial surface was horizontal or the slope angle was smaller than 7°,the compression induced two groups of thrusts with opposite dip orientations. If the slope angle of the initial surface was greater than 7°, the compression induced only one group of thrusts with a dip orientation contrary to the original compression direction. This result is similar to the actual section of a collision zone between two continental blocks. By applying stress analysis, rock strength is shown to be an important factor in deformation. As other boundary conditions are changeless, it is the change of gravitational potential energy that leads to different deformation styles.

  4. Recognition of Paleoearthquakes on the Puente Hills Blind Thrust Fault, California

    Dolan, James F.; Christofferson, Shari A.; Shaw, John H.

    2003-04-01

    Borehole data from young sediments folded above the Puente Hills blind thrust fault beneath Los Angeles reveal that the folding extends to the surface as a discrete zone (-145 meters wide). Buried fold scarps within an upward- narrowing zone of deformation, which extends from the upward termination of the thrust ramp at 3 kilometers depth to the surface, document the occurrence of at least four large (moment-magnitude 7.2 to 7.5) earthquakes on this fault during the past 11,000 years. Future events of this type pose a seismic hazard to metropolitan Los Angeles. Moreover, the methods developed in this study can be used to refine seismic hazard assessments of blind thrusts in other metropolitan regions.

  5. Effect of Spinal Manipulation Thrust Magnitude on Trunk Mechanical Thresholds of Lateral Thalamic Neurons

    Reed, William R.; Pickar, Joel G.; Sozio, Randall S.; Long, Cynthia R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives High velocity low amplitude spinal manipulation (HVLA-SM), as performed by manual therapists (eg, doctors of chiropractic and osteopathy) results in mechanical hypoalgesia in clinical settings. This hypoalgesic effect has previously been attributed to alterations in peripheral and/or central pain processing. The objective of this study was to determine whether thrust magnitude of a simulated HVLA-SM alters mechanical trunk response thresholds in wide dynamic range (WDR) and/or nociceptive specific (NS) lateral thalamic neurons. Methods Extracellular recordings were carried out in the thalamus of 15 anesthetized Wistar rats. Lateral thalamic neurons having receptive fields which included the lumbar dorsal-lateral trunk were characterized as either WDR (n=22) or NS (n=25). Response thresholds to electronic von Frey (rigid tip) mechanical trunk stimuli were determined in three directions (dorsal-ventral, 45°caudalward, and 45°cranialward) prior to and immediately following the dorsal-ventral delivery of a 100ms HVLA-SM at three thrust magnitudes (control, 55%, 85% body weight; (BW)). Results There was a significant difference in mechanical threshold between 85% BW manipulation and control thrust magnitudes in the dorsal-ventral direction in NS neurons (p=.01). No changes were found in WDR neurons at either HVLA-SM thrust magnitude. Conclusions This study is the first to investigate the effect of HVLA-SM thrust magnitude on WDR and NS lateral thalamic mechanical response threshold. Our data suggest that at the single lateral thalamic neuron level, there may be a minimal spinal manipulative thrust magnitude required to elicit an increase in trunk mechanical response thresholds. PMID:24928636

  6. East-west thrusting and anomalous magnetic declinations in the Sierra Gorda, Betic Cordillera, southern Spain

    Platzman, E. S.

    1994-01-01

    Structural and palaeomagnetic studies in the Sierra Gorda (Sierra de Loja), located in the External zone of the Betic Cordillera, indicate that westward-directed thrusting is not associated with significant rotations about a vertical axis. Detailed mapping and slip vector analysis show that the Sierra Gorda is a thrust complex composed of three thrust sheets. The uppermost thrust places Early Jurassic pelagic carbonates on top of Jurassic to Oligocene sediments that form a large doubly-plunging footwall syncline. The eastern limb of this syncline has been overturned and is tectonically thinned as a result of the overthrusting. Palaeomagnetic results from Mesozoic and Tertiary sediments both within and around the perimeter of the Sierra Gorda indicate that: (1) the average remanence vector of the seven Late Jurassic localities sampled within the Sierra Gorda has a direction (D = 328° and I = 38°) that is not significantly different from the expected declination for the Upper Jurassic of stable Iberia; and (2) there is no significant difference between the remanences in the two upper thrust sheets indicating that differential rotation did not occur during the initiation and displacement on the thrusts. In contrast, the one Late Jurassic site that was sampled to the west of the Sierra Gorda is rotated, like the rest of the Subbetics, 60° clockwise of the reference direction. The unrotated directions obtained in the Sierra suggest, either that it has rotated in a clockwise sense concordant with the rest of the Subbetic zone and has then been backrotated, or that it has never rotated relative to stable Iberia. In the latter, simpler hypothesis the unrotated declinations may be explained in terms of orthogonal convergence along an irregular continental margin.

  7. Fault-related fold styles and progressions in fold-thrust belts: Insights from sandbox modeling

    Yan, Dan-Ping; Xu, Yan-Bo; Dong, Zhou-Bin; Qiu, Liang; Zhang, Sen; Wells, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Fault-related folds of variable structural styles and assemblages commonly coexist in orogenic belts with competent-incompetent interlayered sequences. Despite their commonality, the kinematic evolution of these structural styles and assemblages are often loosely constrained because multiple solutions exist in their structural progression during tectonic restoration. We use a sandbox modeling instrument with a particle image velocimetry monitor to test four designed sandbox models with multilayer competent-incompetent materials. Test results reveal that decollement folds initiate along selected incompetent layers with decreasing velocity difference and constant vorticity difference between the hanging wall and footwall of the initial fault tips. The decollement folds are progressively converted to fault-propagation folds and fault-bend folds through development of fault ramps breaking across competent layers and are followed by propagation into fault flats within an upper incompetent layer. Thick-skinned thrust is produced by initiating a decollement fault within the metamorphic basement. Progressive thrusting and uplifting of the thick-skinned thrust trigger initiation of the uppermost incompetent decollement with formation of a decollement fold and subsequent converting to fault-propagation and fault-bend folds, which combine together to form imbricate thrust. Breakouts at the base of the early formed fault ramps along the lowest incompetent layers, which may correspond to basement-cover contacts, domes the upmost decollement and imbricate thrusts to form passive roof duplexes and constitute the thin-skinned thrust belt. Structural styles and assemblages in each of tectonic stages are similar to that in the representative orogenic belts in the South China, Southern Appalachians, and Alpine orogenic belts.

  8. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Bearing Calibration

    van Dam, J.

    2011-10-01

    NREL has initiated the Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) to investigate the root cause of the low wind turbine gearbox reliability. The GRC follows a multi-pronged approach based on a collaborative of manufacturers, owners, researchers and consultants. The project combines analysis, field testing, dynamometer testing, condition monitoring, and the development and population of a gearbox failure database. At the core of the project are two 750kW gearboxes that have been redesigned and rebuilt so that they are representative of the multi-megawatt gearbox topology currently used in the industry. These gearboxes are heavily instrumented and are tested in the field and on the dynamometer. This report discusses the bearing calibrations of the gearboxes.

  9. FORMATION AND EVOLUTION OF THE CENOZOIC THRUST FOLD BELT IN JINPING, SICHUAN

    LIAO Zhongli; DENG Yongfu; LIAO Guangyu

    2003-01-01

    The Jinping orogenic belt in Sichuan, China consists mainly of the Jinpingshan intracontinental thrust-nappe belt, foreland thrust-nappe belt and foreland uplift belt. Based on analyses about the characteristics of the structural units in this area, the authors propose in this paper that Chapuzi-Bazhe revival fault belt is the regional boundary fault, and points out that after the formation of the Pre-Sinian basement, the western edge of the Yangtze paraplatform was turned into the passive continental margin in Sinian to Triassic, then into the Mesozoic collision orogenic belt, and finally into the Cenozoic orogenic belt through intracontinental orogeny.

  10. A reevaluation of the age of the Vincent-Chocolate Mountains thrust system, southern California

    Jacobsen, C.E. (Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Dept. of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences); Barth, A.P. (Indiana Univ.--Purdue Univ., Indianapolis, IN (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    The Vincent-Chocolate Mountains (VCM) thrust superposes Mesozoic arc plutons and associated Precambrian country rock above subduction-related Pelona-Orocopia schist. The thrust is disrupted in many areas by postmetamorphic deformation, but appears to be intact in the San Gabriel Mountains. Two Rb-Sr mineral-isochron ages from Pelona Schist and mylonite in the San Gabriel Mountains led Ehlig (1981) to conclude that the original thrusting event occurred at c. 60 Ma. However, biotite K-Ar ages determined by Miller and Morton (1980) for upper plate in the same area caused Dillon (1986) to reach a different conclusion. The biotite ages range mainly from 74--60 Ma and increase structurally upward from the VCM thrust. Dillon (1986) inferred that the age gradient was due to uplift and cooling of the upper plate during underthrusting of Pelona Schist. This would indicate that the VCM thrust was at least 74 Ma in age. An alternative to the interpretation of Dillon (1986) is that the biotite age gradient largely predates the VCM thrust. Upward heat flow, leading to older ages at higher structural levels, could have resulted from either static cooling of Cretaceous plutons or uplift and erosion induced by crustal thickening during possible west-directed intra-arc thrusting at c. 88--78 Ma (May and Walker, 1989). Subsequent underthrusting of Pelona Schist would establish a cold lower boundary to the crust and cause the closure of isotopic systems in the base of the upper plate. A 60 Ma time of thrusting is also suggested by two amphibole [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar ages from the Pelona Schist of the San Gabriel Mountains. Peak metamorphic temperature in this area was below 480 C and amphibole ages should thus indicate time of crystallization rather than subsequent cooling. Four phengite [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar ages of 55--61 Ma from Pelona Schist and mylonite indicate rapid cooling from peak metamorphic temperatures, consistent with subduction refrigeration.

  11. Analysis and Control of Axial Thrust in Centrifugal Pump by Use of J-Groove

    Abe, Heishiro; Matsumoto, Kazunari; Kurokawa, Junichi; Matsui, Jun; Choi, Young-Do

    2006-01-01

    In order to control and balance axial thrust of turbo machine, many types of balancing devices are used but most of them are complicated and sometimes cause troubles. In this study, a very simple device of using shallow grooves mounted on a casing wall, known as "J-Groove", is proposed and studied experimentally and theoretically. The result shows that 70% of axial thrust in an industry, 4-stage centrifugal pump can be reduced at the best efficiency point. Moreover, the analytical method of "...

  12. Orbital Maneuvers Using Low Thrust to Place a Satellite in a Constellation

    Vivian Martins Gomes

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the problem of low thrust suboptimal maneuvers to insert a satellite in a constellation. It is assumed that a satellite constellation is given with all the Keplerian elements of the satellite members having known values. Then, it is necessary to maneuver a new satellite from a parking orbit to its position in the constellation. The control available to perform this maneuver is the application of a low thrust to the satellite and the objective is to perform this maneuver with minimum fuel consumption.

  13. Evaluation of bearing configurations using the single bearing tester in liquid nitrogen

    Jett, T.; Hall, P.; Thom, R.

    1991-01-01

    Various bearing configurations were tested using the Marshall Space Flight Center single bearing tester with LN2 as the cryogenic coolant. The baseline was one Rocketdyne phase one high pressure oxidizer turbopump (HPOTP) pump end 45-mm bore bearing. The bearing configurations that were tested included a Salox/M cage configuration, a silicon nitride ball configuration, an elongated cage configuration, and a Bray 601 grease configuration.

  14. Rotor-Bearing Dynamics Technology Design Guide. Part 4. Cylindrical Roller Bearings

    1979-12-01

    ýbluck ,,lb.,mb i Tapered Roller Bearings Roller Beating Stiffness Tapered Roller Bearing Stiffness Turbine Bearings VRoller Bearings Rotordynamics ...input for rotordynamic response programs. The complete stiffness matrix is calculated including centrifugal effects. Considerations such as elastohydro...those parts directly connected with preparation of input for the rotordynamic response programs (Part 1(5) of the revised series) were retained. The

  15. Estimation of debonded area in bearing babbitt metal by C-Scan method

    Jung, Gye-jo; Park, Sang-ki [Korea Electric Power Research Inst., Taejeon (Korea); Cha, Seok-ju [Korea South Eastern Power Corp., Seoul (Korea). GEN Sector; Park, Young-woo [Chungnam National Univ., Taejeon (Korea). Mechatronics

    2006-07-01

    The debonding area which had a complex boundary was imaged with a immersion technique, and the acoustic image was compared with the actual area. The amplitude information from focused transducer can discriminate between a defected boundary area and a sound interface of dissimilar metal. The shape of irregular boundary and area was processed by a histogram equalization, after that, through the clustering and labelling, it makes the defect area cleared. Each pixel has ultrasonic intensity rate and represents a position data. The estimation error in measuring debonding area was within 4% by image processing technique. The validity of this immersion method and image equalizing technique has been done for the inspection of power plant turbine's thrust bearings. (orig.)

  16. Kinematics of swimming and thrust production during powerstroking bouts of the swim frenzy in green turtle hatchlings

    David T. Booth

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hatchling sea turtles emerge from nests, crawl down the beach and enter the sea where they typically enter a stereotypical hyperactive swimming frenzy. During this swim the front flippers are moved up and down in a flapping motion and are the primary source of thrust production. I used high-speed video linked with simultaneous measurement of thrust production in tethered hatchlings, along with high-speed video of free swimming hatchlings swimming at different water speeds in a swim flume to investigate the links between kinematics of front flipper movement, thrust production and swimming speed. In particular I tested the hypotheses that (1 increased swimming speed is achieved through an increased stroke rate; (2 force produced per stroke is proportional to stroke amplitude, (3 that forward thrust is produced during both the down and up phases of stroking; and (4 that peak thrust is produced towards the end of the downstroke cycle. Front flipper stroke rate was independent of water speed refuting the hypothesis that swimming speed is increased by increasing stroke rate. Instead differences in swimming speed were caused by a combination of varying flipper amplitude and the proportion of time spent powerstroking. Peak thrust produced per stroke varied within and between bouts of powerstroking, and these peaks in thrust were correlated with both flipper amplitude and flipper angular momentum during the downstroke supporting the hypothesis that stroke force is a function of stroke amplitude. Two distinct thrust production patterns were identified, monophasic in which a single peak in thrust was recorded during the later stages of the downstroke, and biphasic in which a small peak in thrust was recorded at the very end of the upstroke and this followed by a large peak in thrust during the later stages of the downstroke. The biphasic cycle occurs in ∼20% of hatchlings when they first started swimming, but disappeared after one to two hours of

  17. Kinematics of swimming and thrust production during powerstroking bouts of the swim frenzy in green turtle hatchlings.

    Booth, David T

    2014-09-04

    Hatchling sea turtles emerge from nests, crawl down the beach and enter the sea where they typically enter a stereotypical hyperactive swimming frenzy. During this swim the front flippers are moved up and down in a flapping motion and are the primary source of thrust production. I used high-speed video linked with simultaneous measurement of thrust production in tethered hatchlings, along with high-speed video of free swimming hatchlings swimming at different water speeds in a swim flume to investigate the links between kinematics of front flipper movement, thrust production and swimming speed. In particular I tested the hypotheses that (1) increased swimming speed is achieved through an increased stroke rate; (2) force produced per stroke is proportional to stroke amplitude, (3) that forward thrust is produced during both the down and up phases of stroking; and (4) that peak thrust is produced towards the end of the downstroke cycle. Front flipper stroke rate was independent of water speed refuting the hypothesis that swimming speed is increased by increasing stroke rate. Instead differences in swimming speed were caused by a combination of varying flipper amplitude and the proportion of time spent powerstroking. Peak thrust produced per stroke varied within and between bouts of powerstroking, and these peaks in thrust were correlated with both flipper amplitude and flipper angular momentum during the downstroke supporting the hypothesis that stroke force is a function of stroke amplitude. Two distinct thrust production patterns were identified, monophasic in which a single peak in thrust was recorded during the later stages of the downstroke, and biphasic in which a small peak in thrust was recorded at the very end of the upstroke and this followed by a large peak in thrust during the later stages of the downstroke. The biphasic cycle occurs in ∼20% of hatchlings when they first started swimming, but disappeared after one to two hours of swimming. The

  18. State Space Formulation of Nonlinear Vibration Responses Collected from a Dynamic Rotor-Bearing System: An Extension of Bearing Diagnostics to Bearing Prognostics

    Peter W. Tse

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Bearings are widely used in various industries to support rotating shafts. Their failures accelerate failures of other adjacent components and may cause unexpected machine breakdowns. In recent years, nonlinear vibration responses collected from a dynamic rotor-bearing system have been widely analyzed for bearing diagnostics. Numerous methods have been proposed to identify different bearing faults. However, these methods are unable to predict the future health conditions of bearings. To extend bearing diagnostics to bearing prognostics, this paper reports the design of a state space formulation of nonlinear vibration responses collected from a dynamic rotor-bearing system in order to intelligently predict bearing remaining useful life (RUL. Firstly, analyses of nonlinear vibration responses were conducted to construct a bearing health indicator (BHI so as to assess the current bearing health condition. Secondly, a state space model of the BHI was developed to mathematically track the health evolution of the BHI. Thirdly, unscented particle filtering was used to predict bearing RUL. Lastly, a new bearing acceleration life testing setup was designed to collect natural bearing degradation data, which were used to validate the effectiveness of the proposed bearing prognostic method. Results show that the prediction accuracy of the proposed bearing prognostic method is promising and the proposed bearing prognostic method is able to reflect future bearing health conditions.

  19. Control of structural inheritance on thrust initiation and material transfer in accretionary wedges

    Leever, Karen; Geersen, Jacob; Ritter, Malte; Lieser, Kathrin; Behrmann, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Faults in the incoming sediment layer are commonly observed in subduction zone settings and well developed in the incoming plate off Sumatra. To investigate how they affect the structural development of the accretionary wedge, we conducted a series of 2D analogue tectonic experiments in which a 2 cm thick quartz sand layer on top of a thin detachment layer of glass beads was pulled against a rigid backstop by a basal conveyor belt in a 20cm wide box with glass walls. A gap at the base of the back wall avoids entrainment of the glass beads. At regular spacing of either 2.3, 5.5 or 7.8 cm (fractions of the thrust sheet length in the reference model), conjugate pairs of weakness zones dipping 60deg were created by cutting the sand layer with a thin (1 mm) metal blade. Both the undisturbed sand and the pre-cuts have an angle of internal friction of ~29o, but their cohesion is different by 50 Pa (110 Pa for the undisturbed material, 60 Pa along the pre-cuts). Friction of the glass beads is ~24deg. The experiments are monitored with high resolution digital cameras; displacement fields derived from digital image correlation are used to constrain fault activity. In all experiments, a critically tapered wedge developed with a surface slope of 7.5deg. In the reference model (no weakness zones in the input section), the position of new thrust faults is controlled by the frontal slope break. The average length of the thrust sheets is 11 cm and the individual thrusts accommodate on average 8 cm displacement each. The presence of weakness zones causes thrust initiation at a position different from the reference case, and affects their dip. For a fault spacing of 7.8 cm (or 75% of the reference thrust sheet length), every single incoming weakness zone causes the formation of a new thrust, thus resulting in thrust sheets shorter than the equilibrium case. In addition, less displacement is accommodated on each thrust. As a consequence, the frontal taper is smaller than expected

  20. Endurance and failure characteristics of main-shaft jet engine bearings at 3x10 to the 6th power DN

    Bamberger, E. N.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Signer, H.

    1976-01-01

    Groups of thirty 120-mm bore angular contact ball bearings were endurance tested at a speed of 12,000 and 25,000 rpm and a thrust load of 66 721 N. The bearings were manufactured from a single heat of VIM-VAR AISI M-50 steel. At 1.44X1 million and 3.0x1 million DN, 84 483 and 74 800 bearing test hours were accumulated, respectively. Test results were compared with similar bearings made from CVM AISI M-50 steel run under the same conditions. Bearing lives at speeds of 3x1 million DN with the VIM-VAR AISI M-50 steel were nearly equivalent to those obtained at lower speeds. A combined processing and material life factor of 44 was found for VIM-VAR AISI M-50 steel. Continuous running after a spall has occurred at 3.0x1 million DN can result in a destructive fracture of the bearing inner race.

  1. Precision instrumentation for rolling element bearing characterization

    Marsh, Eric R.; Vigliano, Vincent C.; Weiss, Jeffrey R.; Moerlein, Alex W.; Vallance, R. Ryan

    2007-03-01

    This article describes an instrument to measure the error motion of rolling element bearings. This challenge is met by simultaneously satisfying four requirements. First, an axial preload must be applied to seat the rolling elements in the bearing races. Second, one of the races must spin under the influence of an applied torque. Third, rotation of the remaining race must be prevented in a way that leaves the radial, axial/face, and tilt displacements free to move. Finally, the bearing must be fixtured and measured without introducing off-axis loading or other distorting influences. In the design presented here, an air bearing reference spindle with error motion of less than 10 nm rotates the inner race of the bearing under test. Noninfluencing couplings are used to prevent rotation of the bearing outer race and apply an axial preload without distorting the bearing or influencing the measurement. Capacitive displacement sensors with 2 nm resolution target the nonrotating outer race. The error motion measurement repeatability is shown to be less than 25 nm. The article closes with a discussion of how the instrument may be used to gather data with sufficient resolution to accurately estimate the contact angle of deep groove ball bearings.

  2. Can polar bear hairs absorb environmental energy?

    He Ji-Huan; Wang Qing-Li; Sun Jie

    2011-01-01

    A polar bear (Ursus maritimus) has superior ability to survive in harsh Arctic regions, why does the animal have such an excellent thermal protection? The present paper finds that the unique labyrinth cavity structure of the polar bear hair plays an important role. The hair can not only prevent body temperature loss but can also absorb energy from the environment.

  3. Can polar bear hairs absorb environmental energy?

    He Ji-Huan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A polar bear (Ursus maritimus has superior ability to survive in harsh Arctic regions, why does the animal have such an excellent thermal protection? The present paper finds that the unique labyrinth cavity structure of the polar bear hair plays an important role. The hair can not only prevent body temperature loss but can also absorb energy from the environment.

  4. Movie Director Bags a Silver Bear

    2008-01-01

    Chinese director and film writer Wang Xiaoshuai has walked away with the Silver Bear award at the 58th Berlin International Film Festival for best script of Zuo You, or In Love We Trust. Back in 2001, Wang won his first Silver Bear award for directing Beijing

  5. Application of Thrust Nappe Structure Theory on Coal Exploration in Muri Coalfield%逆冲推覆构造理论在木里煤田煤炭勘查中的应用

    毛晓勇; 李永红; 张文龙; 邵龙义; 耿庆明; 牛索安; 王伟超

    2016-01-01

    逆冲断层是以挤压性应力为主的构造复杂区常见的构造类型,含煤地层受逆冲断层影响,常隐伏在老地层之下,逆冲推覆构造的组合型式、分布规律和几何形态研究成果,能够在煤炭资源勘查中发挥较好的指导作用。青海省中祁连地区木里煤田是我国西北重要的焦煤生产基地,其构造应力场演化大致可分为3个阶段,其中第Ⅲ阶段NNE—SSW向的挤压对该地区控煤构造起到主要作用,形成了一系列NNW—SSE向展布的含煤向斜褶皱,同时形成了大量逆冲推覆构造。以木里煤田的聚乎更矿区和江仓矿区为研究对象,应用推覆构造下找煤理论,经过钻探验证,在逆冲推覆断层的下盘发现了侏罗系含煤地层及煤层,证实了逆冲推覆找煤理论对寻找新的煤炭资源具有重要指导意义。%The thrust is a common structural type in structurally complex area with mainly compressive stress. Impacting from thrust, the coal-bearing strata are often hidden under older strata. The research findings of thrust nappe structure association form, distribu⁃tion pattern and geometry can play a good guiding role in coal resource exploration. The Muri coalfield in middle Qilian Mountains, Qin⁃ghai Province is an important coking coal production base in Northwest China. The evolution of tectonic stress field can be divided into 3 stages roughly;the NNE-SSW compression during third stage has played a major role on coal controlling structures in the area and formed a series of NNW-SSE extending coal-bearing synclines and abundant thrust nappe structures. Taking the Juhugeng and Jiang⁃cang mine areas in Muri coalfield as subjects investigated, using coal looking theory under nappe structures, have found Jurassic coal-bearing strata and coal seams in footwall of thrust nappe structures then verified by drilling, thus confirmed the significance of coal looking theory under thrust nappe structures

  6. Shaft Center Orbit in Dynamically Loaded Bearings

    Klit, Peder

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this work is to demonstrate how to utilize the bearings damping coe±cients to estimate the orbit for a dynamically loaded journal bearing. The classical method for this analysis was developed by Booker in 1965 [1]and described further in 1972 [2]. Several authors have re¯ned this method...... seventies Jorgen W. Lund pointed out in lecture notes that the dynamic damping coe±cients of the bearing could be used to ¯nd the shaft orbit for dynamically loaded bearings. For simplicity the "Short-Width-Journal-Bearing Theory" is used as a basis for ¯nding the damping coe±cients in this work...

  7. Trends in Controllable Oil Film Bearings

    Santos, Ilmar

    2011-01-01

    This work gives an overview about the theoretical and experimental achievements of mechatronics applied to oil film bearings, with the aim of: controlling the lateral vibration of flexible rotating shafts; modifying bearing dynamic characteristics, as stiffness and damping properties; increasing...... the rotational speed ranges by improving damping and eliminating instability problems, for example, by compensating cross-coupling destabilizing effects; reducing startup torque and energy dissipation in bearings; compensating thermal effects. It is shown that such controllable bearings can act as "smart......" components and be applied to rotating machines with the goal of avoiding unexpected stops of plants, performing rotordynamic tests and identifying model parameters "on site". Emphasis is given to the controllable lubrication (active lubrication) applied to different types of oil film bearings, i...

  8. Geology and geomorphology of Bear Lake Valley and upper Bear River, Utah and Idaho

    Reheis, M.C.; Laabs, B.J.C.; Kaufman, D.S.

    2009-01-01

    Bear Lake, on the Idaho-Utah border, lies in a fault-bounded valley through which the Bear River flows en route to the Great Salt Lake. Surficial deposits in the Bear Lake drainage basin provide a geologic context for interpretation of cores from Bear Lake deposits. In addition to groundwater discharge, Bear Lake received water and sediment from its own small drainage basin and sometimes from the Bear River and its glaciated headwaters. The lake basin interacts with the river in complex ways that are modulated by climatically induced lake-level changes, by the distribution of active Quaternary faults, and by the migration of the river across its fluvial fan north of the present lake. The upper Bear River flows northward for ???150 km from its headwaters in the northwestern Uinta Mountains, generally following the strike of regional Laramide and late Cenozoic structures. These structures likely also control the flow paths of groundwater that feeds Bear Lake, and groundwater-fed streams are the largest source of water when the lake is isolated from the Bear River. The present configuration of the Bear River with respect to Bear Lake Valley may not have been established until the late Pliocene. The absence of Uinta Range-derived quartzites in fluvial gravel on the crest of the Bear Lake Plateau east of Bear Lake suggests that the present headwaters were not part of the drainage basin in the late Tertiary. Newly mapped glacial deposits in the Bear River Range west of Bear Lake indicate several advances of valley glaciers that were probably coeval with glaciations in the Uinta Mountains. Much of the meltwater from these glaciers may have reached Bear Lake via groundwater pathways through infiltration in the karst terrain of the Bear River Range. At times during the Pleistocene, the Bear River flowed into Bear Lake and water level rose to the valley threshold at Nounan narrows. This threshold has been modified by aggradation, downcutting, and tectonics. Maximum lake

  9. Image based measurement techniques for aircraft propeller flow diagnostics: Propeller slipstream investigations at high-lift conditions and thrust reverse

    Roosenboom, E.W.M.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the thesis is to measure the propeller slipstream properties (velocity and vorticity) and to assess the unsteady and instantaneous behavior of the propeller flow field at high disk loadings, zero thrust and thrust reverse using the image based measurement techniques. Along with its implem

  10. Quark mass corrections to the perturbative thrust and its effect on the determination of s

    Sunanda Banerjee; Rahul Basu

    2002-09-01

    We consider the effects of quark masses to the perturbative thrust in +- annihilation. In particular we show that perturbative power corrections resulting from non-zero quark masses considerably alters the size of the non-perturbative power corrections and consequently, significantly changes the fitted value of s.

  11. Optimization of Low-Thrust Earth-Moon Transfers Using Evolutionary Neurocontrol

    Ohndorf, A.; Dachwald, B.; Gill, E.K.A.

    2009-01-01

    Although low-thrust propulsion is an interesting option for scientific and reconnaissance missions to targets in planetary space, like the Moon, associated transfer strategies pose challenging requirements in terms of optimal control. The method of Evolutionary Neurocontrol (ENC), which has been app

  12. Neandertal humeri may reflect adaptation to scraping tasks, but not spear thrusting.

    Shaw, Colin N; Hofmann, Cory L; Petraglia, Michael D; Stock, Jay T; Gottschall, Jinger S

    2012-01-01

    Unique compared with recent and prehistoric Homo sapiens, Neandertal humeri are characterised by a pronounced right-dominant bilateral strength asymmetry and an anteroposteriorly strengthened diaphyseal shape. Remodeling in response to asymmetric forces imposed during regular underhanded spear thrusting is the most influential explanatory hypothesis. The core tenet of the "Spear Thrusting Hypothesis", that underhand thrusting requires greater muscle activity on the right side of the body compared to the left, remains untested. It is unclear whether alternative subsistence behaviours, such as hide processing, might better explain this morphology. To test this, electromyography was used to measure muscle activity at the primary movers of the humerus (pectoralis major (PM), anterior (AD) and posterior deltoid (PD)) during three distinct spear-thrusting tasks and four separate scraping tasks. Contrary to predictions, maximum muscle activity (MAX) and total muscle activity (TOT) were significantly higher (all values, pscraping tasks, right side MAX and TOT were significantly greater at the AD (all values, pscraping activities, such as hide preparation, may be a key behaviour in determining the unusual pattern of Neandertal arm morphology. Overall, these results yield important insight into the Neandertal behavioural repertoire that aided survival throughout Pleistocene Eurasia.

  13. Investigation on Novel Methods to Increase Specific Thrust in Pulse Detonation Engines via Imploding Detonations

    2009-12-01

    to-Detonation Transition, Specific Thrust 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT Unclassified 18. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS...hydrocarbon fuel-air mixtures such as acetylene -air, ethylene-air, propane-air and even JP10-air mixtures based on the required length of the induction zone

  14. Differential Tectonic Deformation of the Longmen Mountain Thrust Belt,Western Sichuan Basin,China

    TANG Liangjie; YANG Keming; JIN Wenzheng; WAN Guime; L(U) Zhizhou; YU Yixin

    2009-01-01

    Field investigation and seismic section explanation showed that the Longmen Mountain Thrust Belt has obvious differential deformation:zonation,segmentation and stratification.Zonation means that, from NW to NE.the Longmen Mountain Thrust Belt can be divided into the Songpan. foreland depression.Segmentation means that it can be divided into five segments from north to South: the northern segment,the Anxian Transfer Zone,the center segment,the Guanxian Transfer Zone and the southern segment.Stratification means that the detachment layers partition the structural styles in profile.The detachment layers in the Longmen Mountain Thrust Belt can be classified into three categories:the deep-level detachment layers,including the crust-mantle system detachment layer. intracrustaI detachment layer.and Presinian system basal detachment layer;the middle.1evel detachment layers, including Cambrian-Ordovician detachment layer, Silurian detachment layer,etc.: and shallow-level detachment layers,including Upper Triassic Xujiahe Formation detachment layer and the Jurassic detachment layers.The multi-level detachment layers have a very important effect on the shaping and evolution of Longmen Mountain Thrust Belt.

  15. Geometric factors affecting noise suppresion and thrust loss of divergent-lobe supersonic jet noise suppressor

    Huff, R. G.; Groesbeck, D. E.

    1973-01-01

    The thrust loss and noise suppression of a divergent-lobe supersonic jet noise suppressor were experimentally determined over a range of nozzle pressure ratios of 1.5 to 4.0. These small-scale cold flow tests were made to determine the effect on thrust and noise of: suppressor length, rearward facing step height, suppressor divergence angle, and ejector shroud length and location. Noise suppression was achieved at nozzle pressure ratios of 2.5 and greater. Maximum lobe jet noise attenuation of 15 db with thrust loss differences of 1.5 percent compared to the convergent nozzle were obtained at a nozzle pressure ratio of 3.5 with an ejector shroud two nozzle diameters long. Without the ejector the attenuation was 13 db with thrust loss differences of 11 percent. Short suppressors approximately one primary nozzle throat diameter long performed as well as longer suppressors. Rearward facing step height had a significant effect on noise suppression. Ejector shrouds two nozzle diameters in length are feasible.

  16. Static performance of nonaxisymmetric nozzles with yaw thrust-vectoring vanes

    Mason, Mary L.; Berrier, Bobby L.

    1988-01-01

    A static test was conducted in the static test facility of the Langley 16 ft Transonic Tunnel to evaluate the effects of post exit vane vectoring on nonaxisymmetric nozzles. Three baseline nozzles were tested: an unvectored two dimensional convergent nozzle, an unvectored two dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle, and a pitch vectored two dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle. Each nozzle geometry was tested with 3 exit aspect ratios (exit width divided by exit height) of 1.5, 2.5 and 4.0. Two post exit yaw vanes were externally mounted on the nozzle sidewalls at the nozzle exit to generate yaw thrust vectoring. Vane deflection angle (0, -20 and -30 deg), vane planform and vane curvature were varied during the test. Results indicate that the post exit vane concept produced resultant yaw vector angles which were always smaller than the geometric yaw vector angle. Losses in resultant thrust ratio increased with the magnitude of resultant yaw vector angle. The widest post exit vane produced the largest degree of flow turning, but vane curvature had little effect on thrust vectoring. Pitch vectoring was independent of yaw vectoring, indicating that multiaxis thrust vectoring is feasible for the nozzle concepts tested.

  17. Two-dimensional confined jet thrust vector control: Operating mechanisms and performance

    Caton, Jeffrey L.

    1989-03-01

    An experimental investigation of two-dimensional confined jet thrust vector control nozzles was performed. Thrust vector control was accomplished by using secondary flow injection in the diverging section of the nozzle. Schlieren photographs and video tapes were used to study flow separation and internal shock structures. Nozzle performance parameters were determined for nozzle flow with and without secondary flows. These parameters included nozzles forces, vector angles, thrust efficiencies, and flow switching response times. Vector angles as great as 18 degrees with thrust efficiencies of 0.79 were measured. Several confined jet nozzles with variations in secondary flow port design were tested and results were compared to each other. Converging-diverging nozzles of similar design to the confined jet nozzles were also tested and results were compared to the confined jet nozzle results. Existing prediction models for nozzle side to axial force ratio were evaluated. A model for nozzle total forces based on shock losses that predicted values very close to actual results was developed.

  18. Static investigation of two STOL nozzle concepts with pitch thrust-vectoring capability

    Mason, M. L.; Burley, J. R., II

    1986-01-01

    A static investigation of the internal performance of two short take-off and landing (STOL) nozzle concepts with pitch thrust-vectoring capability has been conducted. An axisymmetric nozzle concept and a nonaxisymmetric nozzle concept were tested at dry and afterburning power settings. The axisymmetric concept consisted of a circular approach duct with a convergent-divergent nozzle. Pitch thrust vectoring was accomplished by vectoring the approach duct without changing the nozzle geometry. The nonaxisymmetric concept consisted of a two dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle. Pitch thrust vectoring was implemented by blocking the nozzle exit and deflecting a door in the lower nozzle flap. The test nozzle pressure ratio was varied up to 10.0, depending on model geometry. Results indicate that both pitch vectoring concepts produced resultant pitch vector angles which were nearly equal to the geometric pitch deflection angles. The axisymmetric nozzle concept had only small thrust losses at the largest pitch deflection angle of 70 deg., but the two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle concept had large performance losses at both of the two pitch deflection angles tested, 60 deg. and 70 deg.

  19. Lateral continuity of the Blarney Creek Thrust, Doonerak Windown, Central Brooks Range, Alaska

    Seidensticker, C.M.; Julian, F.E.; Phelps, J.C.; Oldow, J.S.; Avellemant, H.G.

    1985-04-01

    The contact between Carboniferous and lower Paleozoic rocks, exposed along the northern margin of the Doonerak window in the central Brooks Range, is a major thrust fault called the Blarney Creek thrust (BCT). The BCT has been traced over a distance of 25 km, from Falsoola Mountain to Wien Mountain. The tectonic nature of this contact is demonstrated by: (1) omission of stratigraphic units above and below the BCT; (2) large angular discordance in orientation of first-generation cleavage at the BCT; (3) numerous thrust imbricates developed in the upper-plate Carboniferous section that sole into the BCT; and (4) truncation of an upper-plate graben structure at the BCT. Lack of evidence for pre-Carboniferous deformation in the lower plate casts doubt on the interpretation of the contact as an angular unconformity. However, the localized presence below the BCT of Mississippian Kekiktuk Conglomerate and Kayak Shale, in apparent depositional contact with lower Paleozoic rocks, suggests that the BCT follows an originally disconformable contact between the Carboniferous and lower Paleozoic rocks. The juxtaposition of younger over older rocks at the BCT is explained by calling upon the BCT to act as the upper detachment surface of a duplex structure. Duplex development involves initial imbrication of the Carboniferous section using the BCT as a basal decollement, followed by formation of deeper thrusts in the lower Paleozoic section, which ramp up and merge into the BCT.

  20. Thrust-wrench fault interference in a brittle medium: new insights from analogue modelling experiments

    Rosas, Filipe; Duarte, Joao; Schellart, Wouter; Tomas, Ricardo; Grigorova, Vili; Terrinha, Pedro

    2015-04-01

    We present analogue modelling experimental results concerning thrust-wrench fault interference in a brittle medium, to try to evaluate the influence exerted by different prescribed interference angles in the formation of morpho-structural interference fault patterns. All the experiments were conceived to simulate simultaneous reactivation of confining strike-slip and thrust faults defining a (corner) zone of interference, contrasting with previously reported discrete (time and space) superposition of alternating thrust and strike-slip events. Different interference angles of 60°, 90° and 120° were experimentally investigated by comparing the specific structural configurations obtained in each case. Results show that a deltoid-shaped morpho-structural pattern is consistently formed in the fault interference (corner) zone, exhibiting a specific geometry that is fundamentally determined by the different prescribed fault interference angle. Such angle determines the orientation of the displacement vector shear component along the main frontal thrust direction, determining different fault confinement conditions in each case, and imposing a complying geometry and kinematics of the interference deltoid structure. Model comparison with natural examples worldwide shows good geometric and kinematic similarity, pointing to the existence of matching underlying dynamic process. Acknowledgments This work was sponsored by the Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia (FCT) through project MODELINK EXPL/GEO-GEO/0714/2013.

  1. Optimization of Process Parameters with Minimum Thrust Force and Torque in Drilling Operation Using Taguchi Method

    Suleyman Neseli

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This research outlines the Taguchi optimization methodology, which is applied to optimize cutting parameters in drilling of AISI 1040 steel. The drilling parameters evaluated are cutting speed, feed rate, and helix angle. Series of experiments are conducted to relate the cutting parameters on the thrust force and torque. L27(313 orthogonal array, signal-to-noise ratio is employed to analyze the influence of these parameters on thrust force and torque during drilling. Analysis of variance (ANOVA is used to study the effect of process parameters on machining process. The study shows that the Taguchi method is suitable to solve the stated problem with the minimum number of trials. The main objective is to find the important factors and combination of factors that influence the machining process to achieve low thrust force and torque. The analysis of the Taguchi method indicates that the feed rate is the most significant factor affecting the thrust force, while the cutting speed contributes the most to the torque.

  2. Structural Geochemical Study of the Yuxi Fold-Thrust Belt in the Southern North China Plate

    Li Wenyong; Xia Bin; Li Dongxu

    2006-01-01

    The Yuxi (豫西) fold-thrust fracture belt is part of the gigantic fold-thrust fracture belt that extends NW in the southern North China plate. The contents of major elements of tectonites were analyzed by ICP-AES. The analysis of chemical compositions and new stress minerals indicates: extending from the surrounding country rocks to the center of the fracture belt, the Fe2 O3 content gradually increases while the FeO content gradually decreases; regular increase, decrease or peak changes are shown for chemical compositions likeSiO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, MgO, CaO, FeO, loss on ignition, TiO2,K2O, Na2O, etc.. New stress minerals are developed for the south branch and few for the north branch.The characteristics of chemical compositions and new stress minerals of the thrust fracture demonstrate that the fracture belt has undergone a process from a closed reducing environmental system to a relatively open, oxidizing environmental system, and compressive fractures have resulted from compression in the late stages of evolution, and the dynamothermal metamorphism and thrusting intensities are different between the south and north branches of the belt, which is strong for the south branch but relatively weak for the north branch.

  3. Study on development of ejector of Bubble Jet Engine (BJE) - measurement of thrust -

    Ono, B; Nakashima, K; Shigematsu, T; Morishita, K, E-mail: ono@post.cc.sasebo.ac.j [Sasebo National College of Technology1-1, Okishin-cho, Sasebo City, Nagasaki Pref., 857-1193 (Japan)

    2009-02-01

    The AUV (Autonomous Under-water Vehicle), which is used for the present seabed investigations, has obtained the thrust with the screw driven by the battery. However, it has a disadvantage because of its size and cost. Therefore, this research is carried out to propose the Bubble Jet Engine (BJE) as an alternative propulsion device. It can directly transform combustion energy into kinetic energy, so it is expected that BJE can also rise the level of propulsion efficiency. This research aims at measuring exhaled mass flow rate and thrust to design ejectors, which become the core of BJE, and exploring practical possibility of BJE. Vertical type gas-water ejector experimental apparatus for measuring water entrainment was employed in order to understand the characteristics of operation conditions, such as inlet distance, air pressure of nozzle, diameter of nozzle, and so on. In addition, experiments for measuring the thrust in the condition of ejector were executed with horizontal type apparatus in water. However, the influence of the ejector to improve thrust can't have been recognized with high-pressure air at room temperature yet.

  4. Study on development of ejector of Bubble Jet Engine (BJE) - measurement of thrust -

    Ono, B.; Nakashima, K.; Shigematsu, T.; Morishita, K.

    2009-02-01

    The AUV (Autonomous Under-water Vehicle), which is used for the present seabed investigations, has obtained the thrust with the screw driven by the battery. However, it has a disadvantage because of its size and cost. Therefore, this research is carried out to propose the Bubble Jet Engine (BJE) as an alternative propulsion device. It can directly transform combustion energy into kinetic energy, so it is expected that BJE can also rise the level of propulsion efficiency. This research aims at measuring exhaled mass flow rate and thrust to design ejectors, which become the core of BJE, and exploring practical possibility of BJE. Vertical type gas-water ejector experimental apparatus for measuring water entrainment was employed in order to understand the characteristics of operation conditions, such as inlet distance, air pressure of nozzle, diameter of nozzle, and so on. In addition, experiments for measuring the thrust in the condition of ejector were executed with horizontal type apparatus in water. However, the influence of the ejector to improve thrust can't have been recognized with high-pressure air at room temperature yet.

  5. Flow measurement and thrust estimation of a vibrating ionic polymer metal composite

    Chae, Woojin; Cha, Youngsu; Peterson, Sean D.; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-09-01

    Ionic polymer metal composites (IPMCs) are an emerging class of soft active materials that are finding growing application as underwater propulsors for miniature biomimetic swimmers. Understanding the hydrodynamics generated by an IPMC vibrating under water is central to the design of such biomimetic swimmers. In this paper, we propose the use of time-resolved particle image velocimetry to detail the fluid kinematics and kinetics in the vicinity of an IPMC vibrating along its fundamental structural mode. The reconstructed pressure field is ultimately used to estimate the thrust produced by the IPMC. The vibration frequency is systematically varied to elucidate the role of the Reynolds number on the flow physics and the thrust production. Experimental results indicate the formation and shedding of vortical structures from the IPMC tip during its vibration. Vorticity shedding is sustained by the pressure gradients along each side of the IPMC, which are most severe in the vicinity of the tip. The mean thrust is found to robustly increase with the Reynolds number, closely following a power law that has been derived from direct three-dimensional numerical simulations. A reduced order distributed model is proposed to describe IPMC underwater vibration and estimate thrust production, offering insight into the physics of underwater propulsion and aiding in the design of IPMC-based propulsors.

  6. Potential Applications of the Ceramic Thrust Chamber Technology for Future Transpiration Cooled Rocket Engines

    Herbertz, Armin; Ortelt, Markus; Müller, Ilja; Hald, Hermann

    The long-term development of ceramic rocket engine thrust chambers at the German Aerospace Center(DLR) currently leads to designs of self-sustaining, transpiration-cooled, fiber-reinforced ceramic rocket engine chamber structures.This paper discusses characteristic issues and potential benefits introduced by this technology. Achievable benefits are the reduction of weight and manufacturing cost, as well as an increased reliability and higher lifetime due to thermal cycle stability.Experiments with porous Ceramic Matrix Composite(CMC) materials for rocket engine chamber walls have been conducted at the DLR since the end of the 1990s.This paper discusses the current status of DLR's ceramic thrust chamber technology and potential applications for high thrust engines.The manufacturing process and the design concept are explained.The impact of variations of engine parameters(chamber pressure and diam-eter)on the required coolant mass flow are discussed.Due to favorable scaling effects a high thrust application utilizes all benefits of the discussed technology, while avoiding the most significant performance drawbacks.

  7. Structural Evolution of the Eastern Qiulitagh Fold and Thrust Belt, Northern Tarim Basin, China

    YANG Minghui; JIN Zhijun; LU Xiuxiang; SUN Dongsheng; TANG Xuan; PENG Gengxin; LEI Ganglin

    2009-01-01

    The eastern Qiulitagh fold and thrust belt (EQFTB) is part of the active Kuqa fold and thrust belts of the northern Tarirn Basin. Seismic reflection profiles have been integrated with surface geologic and drill data to examine the deformation and structure style of the EQFTB, particularly the deformational history of the Dina 2 gas field. Seismic interpretations suggest that Dongqiu 8 is overall a duplex structure developed beneath a passive roof thrust, which generated from a tipline in the Miocene Jidike Formation, and the sole thrust was initiated from the same Jidike Formation evaporite zone that extends westward beneath the Kuqatawu anticline. Dongqiu 5 is a pop-up structure at the western part of the EQFTB, also developed beneath the Jidike Formation evaporite. Very gentle basement dip and steep dipping topographic slope in the EQFTB suggest that the Jidike Formation salt provides effective decoupling. The strong deformation in the EQFTB appears to have developed further south, in an area where evaporite may be lacking. Since the Pliocene, the EQFTB has moved farther south over the evaporite and reached the Yaken area. Restoring a balanced cross-section suggests that the minimum shortening across the EQFTB is more than 7800 m. Assuming that this shortening occurred during the 5.3 Ma timespan, the shortening rate is approximately 1.47 ram/year.

  8. Estimates of trapped radiation encountered on low-thrust trajectories through the Van Allen belts

    Karp, I. M.

    1973-01-01

    Estimates were made of the number of trapped protons and electrons encountered by vehicles on low-thrust trajectories through the Van Allen belts. The estimates serve as a first step in assessing whether these radiations present a problem to on-board sensitive components and payload. The integrated proton spectra and electron spectra are presented for the case of a trajectory described by a vehicle with a constant-thrust acceleration A sub c equal to 0.001 meter/sq sec. This value of acceleration corresponds to a trip time of about 54 days from low earth orbit to synchronous orbit. It is shown that the time spent in the belts and hence the radiation encountered vary nearly inversely with the value of thrust acceleration. Thus, the integrated spectral values presented for the case of A sub c = 0.001 meter/sq sec can be generalized for any other value of thrust acceleration by multiplying them by the factor 0.001/A sub c.

  9. Coupled heat transfer analysis of thrust chambers with recessed shear coaxial injectors

    Song, Jiawen; Sun, Bing

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the effects of recessed lengths on combustion performance and heat loads in LOX/methane thrust chambers with shear coaxial injectors, a coupled numerical methodology is developed to solve the combustion and heat transfer in thrust chambers with regenerative cooling. In this methodology, the transcritical turbulent combustion is modeled by a validated non-adiabatic flamelet model considering real-fluid properties; turbulent flows within the thrust chamber and cooling channels are computed by a pressure-based coupled algorithm. The validation indicates that the prediction with detailed chemistry mechanism and the Chung method confirms quantitatively to literature experimental data. The results reveal that the recess causes an increase of wall heat flux in the whole thrust chamber and makes the heat flux peak in the combustion chamber moves downstream. Furthermore, both the heat flux peaks in the combustion chamber and nozzle increase first and then decrease as recessed lengths increase. Meanwhile, chamber pressure, hot-gas temperature, and the averaging heat flux of the combustion chamber wall are positively correlated with recessed lengths. However, the heat loads are more sensitive to the recessed lengths than chamber pressure and hot-gas temperature. Much attention should be paid to the protection of chamber wall.

  10. The complete two-loop integrated jet thrust distribution in soft-collinear effective theory

    von Manteuffel, Andreas; Schabinger, Robert M.; Zhu, Hua Xing

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we complete the calculation of the soft part of the two-loop integrated jet thrust distribution in e+e- annihilation. This jet mass observable is based on the thrust cone jet algorithm, which involves a veto scale for out-of-jet radiation. The previously uncomputed part of our result depends in a complicated way on the jet cone size, r, and at intermediate stages of the calculation we actually encounter a new class of multiple polylogarithms. We employ an extension of the coproduct calculus to systematically exploit functional relations and represent our results concisely. In contrast to the individual contributions, the sum of all global terms can be expressed in terms of classical polylogarithms. Our explicit two-loop calculation enables us to clarify the small r picture discussed in earlier work. In particular, we show that the resummation of the logarithms of r that appear in the previously uncomputed part of the two-loop integrated jet thrust distribution is inextricably linked to the resummation of the non-global logarithms. Furthermore, we find that the logarithms of r which cannot be absorbed into the non-global logarithms in the way advocated in earlier work have coefficients fixed by the two-loop cusp anomalous dimension. We also show that in many cases one can straightforwardly predict potentially large logarithmic contributions to the integrated jet thrust distribution at L loops by making use of analogous contributions to the simpler integrated hemisphere soft function.

  11. Thrust Belts and Foreland Basins——SGF/SGE Joint Earth Science Meeting

    Olivier Lacombe; Jér(o)me Lavé; Fran(c)ois Roure

    2006-01-01

    @@ What is the important geologic information that thrust belts and foreland basins have recorded on the erogenic evolution of adjacent mountain belts? How can they reveal the coupled influence of deep (flexure, plate rheology and kinematics) and surficial (erosion, sedimentation) geological processes?

  12. Experimental measurement of dolphin thrust generated during a tail stand using DPIV

    Wei, Timothy; Fish, Frank; Williams, Terrie; Wu, Vicki; Sherman, Erica; Misfeldt, Mitchel; Ringenberg, Hunter; Rogers, Dylan

    2016-11-01

    The thrust generated by dolphins doing tail stands was measured using DPIV. The technique entailed measuring vortex strength associated with the tail motion and correlating it to above water video sequences showing the amount of the dolphin's body that was being lifted out of the water. The underlying drivers for this research included: i) understanding the physiology, hydrodynamics and efficiency of dolphin locomotion, ii) developing non-invasive measurement techniques for studying marine swimming and iii) quantifying the actual propulsive capabilities of these animals. Two different bottlenose dolphins at the Long Marine Lab at UC-Santa Cruz were used as test subjects. Application of the Kutta-Joukowski Theorem on measured vortex circulations yielded thrust values that were well correlated with estimates of dolphin body weight being supported above water. This demonstrates that the tail motion can be interpreted as a flapping hydrofoil that can generate a sustained thrust roughly equal to the dolphin's weight. Videos of DPIV measurements overlaid with the dolphins will be presented along with thrust/weight data.

  13. Contouring Control for a CNC Milling Machine Driven by Direct thrust Controlled Linear Induction Motors

    Khaled N. Faris

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available According to various advantages of linear induction motor (LIM, such as high starting thrust force, high speed operation and reduction of mechanical losses, more applications have utilized this type of motors. Direct Thrust Control (DTC technique is considered as one of the most efficient techniques that can be used for LIM. DTC is preferable to give a fast and good dynamic thrust response. So, to improve the accuracy and robustness of contouring control for CNC machine tools, linear induction motors with a direct thrust control technique are introduced for driving these machines. An industry standard motion control system is applied for reducing the tracking error and improving the desired accuracy. Different loading conditions are simulated to validate the reliability and robustness of the introduced system to match the application field. The proposed system is simulated using the MATLAB/SIMULINK Package; simulation results validated both tracking accuracy and robustness of the proposed motion control system for contouring control for a CNC (Computer Numerical Control milling machine.

  14. Upper crustal mechanical stratigraphy and the evolution of thrust wedges: insights from sandbox analogue experiments

    Milazzo, Flavio; Storti, Fabrizio; Nestola, Yago; Cavozzi, Cristian; Magistroni, Corrado; Meda, Marco; Salvi, Francesca

    2016-04-01

    Crustal mechanical stratigraphy i.e. alternating mechanically weaker and stronger layers within the crust, plays a key role in determining how contractional deformations are accommodated at convergent plate boundaries. In the upper crust, evaporites typically provide preferential décollement layers for fault localization and foreland ward propagation, thus significantly influencing evolution of thrust-fold belts in terms of mechanical balance, geometries, and chronological sequences of faulting. Evaporites occur at the base of many passive margin successions that underwent positive inversion within orogenic systems. They typically produce salient geometries in deformation fronts, as in the Jura in the Northern Alps, the Salakh Arch in the Oman Mountains, or the Ainsa oblique thrust-fold belt in the Spanish Pyrenees. Evaporites frequently occur also in foredeep deposits, as in the Apennines, the Pyrenees, the Zagros etc. causing development of additional structural complexity. Low-friction décollement layers also occur within sedimentary successions involved in thrust-fold belts and they contribute to the development of staircase fault trajectories. The role of décollement layers in thrust wedge evolution has been investigated in many experimental works, particularly by sandbox analogue experiments that have demonstrated the impact of basal weak layers on many first order features of thrust wedges, including the dominant fold vergence, the timing of fault activity, and the critical taper. Some experiments also investigated on the effects of weak layers within accreting sedimentary successions, showing how this triggers kinematic decoupling of the stratigraphy above and below the décollements, thus enhancing disharmonic deformation. However, at present a systematic experimental study of the deformation modes of an upper crustal mechanical stratigraphy consisting of both low-friction and viscous décollement layers is still missing in the specific literature. In

  15. A Thrust Allocation Method for Efficient Dynamic Positioning of a Semisubmersible Drilling Rig Based on the Hybrid Optimization Algorithm

    Luman Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A thrust allocation method was proposed based on a hybrid optimization algorithm to efficiently and dynamically position a semisubmersible drilling rig. That is, the thrust allocation was optimized to produce the generalized forces and moment required while at the same time minimizing the total power consumption under the premise that forbidden zones should be taken into account. An optimization problem was mathematically formulated to provide the optimal thrust allocation by introducing the corresponding design variables, objective function, and constraints. A hybrid optimization algorithm consisting of a genetic algorithm and a sequential quadratic programming (SQP algorithm was selected and used to solve this problem. The proposed method was evaluated by applying it to a thrust allocation problem for a semisubmersible drilling rig. The results indicate that the proposed method can be used as part of a cost-effective strategy for thrust allocation of the rig.

  16. THE STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF STEEL SILOS WITH CYLINDRICAL-WALL BEARING AND PROFILE-STEEL BEARING

    Zhengjun Tang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The silos are widely used in bulk material in many fields such as agriculture, mining, chemical, electric power storage, etc. Thin metal cylindrical silo shells are vulnerable to buckling failure caused by the compressive wall friction force. In this paper, the structural analysis of two types of steel silo with cylindrical-wall bearing and profile-steel bearing is implemented by Abaqus finite element analysis. The results indicate that under the same loading conditions, steel silos with profile-steel bearing and cylindrical-Wall bearing have similar values in Mises stress, but the steel silo with profile-steel bearing has a smaller radial displacement and a better capability of buckling resistance. Meanwhile, the total steel volumes reduced 8.0% comparing to the steel silo with cylindrical-wall bearing. Therefore, steel soil with profile-steel bearing not only has a less steel volumes but also a good stability.

  17. Radiation tolerance in water bears.

    Horikawa, D. D.; Sakashita, T.; Katagiri, C.; Watanabe, M.; Nakahara, Y.; Okuda, T.; Hamada, N.; Wada, S.; Funayama, T.; Kobayashi, Y.

    Tardigrades water bears are tiny invertebrates forming a phylum and inhabit various environments on the earth Terrestrial tardigrades enter a form called as anhydrobiosis when the surrounding water disappears Anhyydrobiosis is defined as an ametabolic dry state and followed by recovering their activity when rehydrated Anhydrobiotic tardigrades show incredible tolerance to a variety of extreme environmental conditions such as temperatures -273 r C to 151 r C vacuum high pressure 600 MPa and chemicals that include alcohols and methyl bromide In these views there have been some discussions about their potential for surviving outer space In the present study we demonstrated the survival limit not merely against gamma-rays but against heavy ions in the tardigrade Milnesium tardigradum in order to evaluate the effects of radiations on them The animals were exposure to 500 to 7000 Gy of gamma-rays or 500 to 8000 Gy of heavy ions 4 He in their hydrated or anhydrobiotic state The results showed that both of hydrated and anhydrobiotic animals have high radio-tolerance median lethal dose LD50 48 h of gamma-rays or heavy ions in M tardigradum was more than 4000 Gy indicating that this species is categorized into the most radio-tolerant animals We suggest that tardigrades will be suitable model animals for extremophilic multicellular organisms and may provide a survival strategy in extraterrestrial environments

  18. Neandertal humeri may reflect adaptation to scraping tasks, but not spear thrusting.

    Colin N Shaw

    Full Text Available Unique compared with recent and prehistoric Homo sapiens, Neandertal humeri are characterised by a pronounced right-dominant bilateral strength asymmetry and an anteroposteriorly strengthened diaphyseal shape. Remodeling in response to asymmetric forces imposed during regular underhanded spear thrusting is the most influential explanatory hypothesis. The core tenet of the "Spear Thrusting Hypothesis", that underhand thrusting requires greater muscle activity on the right side of the body compared to the left, remains untested. It is unclear whether alternative subsistence behaviours, such as hide processing, might better explain this morphology. To test this, electromyography was used to measure muscle activity at the primary movers of the humerus (pectoralis major (PM, anterior (AD and posterior deltoid (PD during three distinct spear-thrusting tasks and four separate scraping tasks. Contrary to predictions, maximum muscle activity (MAX and total muscle activity (TOT were significantly higher (all values, p<.05 at the left (non-dominant AD, PD and PM compared to the right side of the body during spear thrusting tasks. Thus, the muscle activity required during underhanded spearing tasks does not lend itself to explaining the pronounced right dominant strength asymmetry found in Neandertal humeri. In contrast, during the performance of all three unimanual scraping tasks, right side MAX and TOT were significantly greater at the AD (all values, p<.01 and PM (all values, p<.02 compared to the left. The consistency of the results provides evidence that scraping activities, such as hide preparation, may be a key behaviour in determining the unusual pattern of Neandertal arm morphology. Overall, these results yield important insight into the Neandertal behavioural repertoire that aided survival throughout Pleistocene Eurasia.

  19. One-equation modeling and validation of dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator thrust

    Yoon, Jae-San; Han, Jae-Hung

    2014-10-01

    Dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators with an asymmetric electrode configuration can generate a wall-bounded jet without mechanical moving parts, which require considerable modifications of existing aeronautical objects and which incur high maintenance costs. Despite this potential, one factor preventing the wider application of such actuators is the lack of a reliable actuator model. It is difficult to develop such a model because calculating the ion-electric field and fluid interaction consume a high amount calculation effort during the numerical analysis. Thus, the authors proposed a semi-empirical model which predicted the thrust of plasma actuators with a simple equation. It gave a numeric thrust value, and we implemented the value on a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver to describe the two-dimensional flow field induced by the actuator. However, the model had a narrow validation range, depending on the empirical formula, and it did not fully consider environment variables. This study presents an improved model by replacing the empirical formulae in the previous model with physical equations that take into account physical phenomena and environmental variables. During this process, additional operation parameters, such as pressure, temperature and ac waveforms, are newly taken to predict the thrust performance of the actuators with a wider range of existing parameters, the thickness of the dielectric barrier, the exposed electrode, the dielectric constant, the ac frequency and the voltage amplitude. Thrust prediction curves from the model are compared to those of earlier experimental results, showing that the average error is less than 5% for more than one hundred instances of data. As in the earlier work, the predicted thrust value is implemented on a CFD solver, and two-dimensional wall-jet velocity profiles induced by the actuator are compared to the previous experimental results.

  20. Thrust vectoring of an electric solar wind sail with a realistic sail shape

    Toivanen, P.; Janhunen, P.

    2017-02-01

    The shape of a rotating electric solar wind sail under the centrifugal force and solar wind dynamic pressure is modeled to address the sail attitude maintenance and thrust vectoring. The sail rig assumes centrifugally stretched main tethers that extend radially outward from the spacecraft in the sail spin plane. Furthermore, the tips of the main tethers host remote units that are connected by auxiliary tethers at the sail rim. Here, we derive the equation of main tether shape and present both a numerical solution and an analytical approximation for the shape as parametrized both by the ratio of the electric sail force to the centrifugal force and the sail orientation with respect to the solar wind direction. The resulting shape is such that near the spacecraft, the roots of the main tethers form a cone, whereas towards the rim, this coning is flattened by the centrifugal force, and the sail is coplanar with the sail spin plane. Our approximation for the sail shape is parametrized only by the tether root coning angle and the main tether length. Using the approximate shape, we obtain the torque and thrust of the electric sail force applied to the sail. As a result, the amplitude of the tether voltage modulation required for the maintenance of the sail attitude is given as a torque-free solution. The amplitude is smaller than that previously obtained for a rigid single tether resembling a spherical pendulum. This implies that less thrusting margin is required for the maintenance of the sail attitude. For a given voltage modulation, the thrust vectoring is then considered in terms of the radial and transverse thrust components.

  1. Bivergent thrust wedges surrounding oceanic island arcs: Insight from observations and sandbox models of the northeastern caribbean plate

    ten Brink, U.S.; Marshak, S.; Granja, Bruna J. L.

    2009-01-01

    At several localities around the world, thrust belts have developed on both sides of oceanic island arcs (e.g., Java-Timor, Panama, Vanuatu, and the northeastern Caribbean). In these localities, the overall vergence of the backarc thrust belt is opposite to that of the forearc thrust belt. For example, in the northeastern Caribbean, a north-verging accretionary prism lies to the north of the Eastern Greater Antilles arc (Hispaniola and Puerto Rico), whereas a south-verging thrust belt called the Muertos thrust belt lies to the south. Researchers have attributed such bivergent geometry to several processes, including: reversal of subduction polarity; subduction-driven mantle flow; stress transmission across the arc; gravitational spreading of the arc; and magmatic inflation within the arc. New observations of deformational features in the Muertos thrust belt and of fault geometries produced in sandbox kinematic models, along with examination of published studies of island arcs, lead to the conclusion that the bivergence of thrusting in island arcs can develop without reversal of subduction polarity, without subarc mantle flow, and without magmatic inflation. We suggest that the Eastern Greater Antilles arc and comparable arcs are simply crustalscale bivergent (or "doubly vergent") thrust wedges formed during unidirectional subduction. Sandbox kinematic modeling suggests, in addition, that a broad retrowedge containing an imbricate fan of thrusts develops only where the arc behaves relatively rigidly. In such cases, the arc acts as a backstop that transmits compressive stress into the backarc region. Further, modeling shows that when arcs behave as rigid blocks, the strike-slip component of oblique convergence is accommodated entirely within the prowedge and the arc-the retrowedge hosts only dip-slip faulting ("frontal thrusting"). The existence of large retrowedges and the distribution of faulting in an island arc may, therefore, be evidence that the arc is

  2. Low eddy loss axial hybrid magnetic bearing with gimballing control ability for momentum flywheel

    Tang, Jiqiang, E-mail: tjq_72@163.com [School of Instrument Science and Opto-electronics Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Sun, Jinji; Fang, Jiancheng [School of Instrument Science and Opto-electronics Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Shuzhi Sam, Ge [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2013-03-15

    For a magnetically suspended momentum flywheel (MSMF), the spinning rotor can be tilted by a pair of the presented axial hybrid magnetic bearing (AHMB) with eight poles and rotates around the radial axes to generate a large torque to maneuver the spacecraft. To improve the control performance and gimballing control ability of the AHMB, characteristics such as magnetic suspension force, angular stiffness and tilting momentum are researched. These segmented stator poles cause the magnetic density in the thrust rotor plate to be uneven unavoidably and the rotational loss is large at high speed, but we optimized the stator poles configuration and caused the thrust rotor plate formed by bulk DT4C and laminated material to make the magnetic density in the thrust rotor plate change less and be smoother. Laminated material such as 1J50 film with a thickness of 0.1 mm can make the variation of the magnetic density in DT4C become very small and the eddy loss of it be negligible, but the stress produced in the 'O' shape stacks by reeling has a bad effect on its power loss. Nanocrystalline can reduce eddy losses and is not affected by the reeling process. Based on the AHBM consisting of the stator with eight improved poles and the presented thrust rotor plate with DT4 and nanocrystalline, the rotational loss of 5-DOF magnetically suspended momentum flywheel with angular momentum of 15 N m s at 5000 rpm has reduced from 23.4 W to 3.2 W, which proved that this AHMB has low eddy loss for the gimballing control ability. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Control methods of rotor driven by AHMBs and their characteristics are researched. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optimized stator and rotor of AHMB reduce its eddy losses greatly. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presented the factors affecting the eddy losses of AHMBs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The good performances of AHMB with low eddy loss are proved by experiments.

  3. Grizzly bear diet shifting on reclaimed mines

    Bogdan Cristescu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Industrial developments and reclamation change habitat, possibly altering large carnivore food base. We monitored the diet of a low-density population of grizzly bears occupying a landscape with open-pit coal mines in Canada. During 2009–2010 we instrumented 10 bears with GPS radiocollars and compared their feeding on reclaimed coal mines and neighboring Rocky Mountains and their foothills. In addition, we compared our data with historical bear diet for the same population collected in 2001–2003, before extensive mine reclamation occurred. Diet on mines (n=331 scats was dominated by non-native forbs and graminoids, while diets in the Foothills and Mountains consisted primarily of ungulates and Hedysarum spp. roots respectively, showing diet shifting with availability. Field visitation of feeding sites (n=234 GPS relocation clusters also showed that ungulates were the main diet component in the Foothills, whereas on reclaimed mines bears were least carnivorous. These differences illustrate a shift to feeding on non-native forbs while comparisons with historical diet reveal emergence of elk as an important bear food. Food resources on reclaimed mines attract bears from wilderness areas and bears may be more adaptable to landscape change than previously thought. The grizzly bear’s ready use of mines cautions the universal view of this species as umbrella indicative of biodiversity.

  4. Genomic sequencing of Pleistocene cave bears

    Noonan, James P.; Hofreiter, Michael; Smith, Doug; Priest, JamesR.; Rohland, Nadin; Rabeder, Gernot; Krause, Johannes; Detter, J. Chris; Paabo, Svante; Rubin, Edward M.

    2005-04-01

    Despite the information content of genomic DNA, ancient DNA studies to date have largely been limited to amplification of mitochondrial DNA due to technical hurdles such as contamination and degradation of ancient DNAs. In this study, we describe two metagenomic libraries constructed using unamplified DNA extracted from the bones of two 40,000-year-old extinct cave bears. Analysis of {approx}1 Mb of sequence from each library showed that, despite significant microbial contamination, 5.8 percent and 1.1 percent of clones in the libraries contain cave bear inserts, yielding 26,861 bp of cave bear genome sequence. Alignment of this sequence to the dog genome, the closest sequenced genome to cave bear in terms of evolutionary distance, revealed roughly the expected ratio of cave bear exons, repeats and conserved noncoding sequences. Only 0.04 percent of all clones sequenced were derived from contamination with modern human DNA. Comparison of cave bear with orthologous sequences from several modern bear species revealed the evolutionary relationship of these lineages. Using the metagenomic approach described here, we have recovered substantial quantities of mammalian genomic sequence more than twice as old as any previously reported, establishing the feasibility of ancient DNA genomic sequencing programs.

  5. Space Telescope Fine Guidance Sensor Bearing Anomaly

    Loewenthal, S.; Esper, J.; Pan, J.; Decker, J.

    1996-01-01

    Early in 1993, a servo motor within one of three Fine Guidance Sensors (FGS) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) reached stall torque levels on several occasions. Little time was left to plan replacement during the first servicing mission, scheduled at the end of '93. Accelerated bearing life tests confirmed that a small angle rocking motion, known as Coarse Track (CT), accelerated bearing degradation. Saturation torque levels were reached after approximately 20 million test cycles, similar to the flight bearings. Reduction in CT operation, implemented in flight software, extended FGS life well beyond the first servicing mission. However in recent years, bearing torques have resumed upward trends and together with a second, recent bearing torque anomaly has necessitated a scheduled FGS replacement during the upcoming second servicing mission in '97. The results from two series of life tests to quantify FGS bearing remaining life, discussion of bearing on-orbit performance, and future plans to service the FGS servos are presented in this paper.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Beare-Stevenson cutis gyrata syndrome

    ... Health Conditions Beare-Stevenson cutis gyrata syndrome Beare-Stevenson cutis gyrata syndrome Enable Javascript to view the ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Beare-Stevenson cutis gyrata syndrome is a genetic disorder characterized ...

  7. Eastern slopes grizzly bear project : project update

    NONE

    2002-01-01

    This report updates a study to examine the cumulative effects of human activities on the grizzly bears in the central Canadian Rockies. The project was initiated in 1994 to acquire accurate scientific information on the habitat and populations of grizzly bears in the area of the Banff National Park and Kananaskis Country. This area is probably the most heavily used and developed area where the grizzly still survives. The information gathered throughout the course of the study is used to better protect and manage the bears and other sensitive carnivores in the region. Using telemetry, researchers monitored 25 grizzly bears which were radio-collared in a 22,000 square-kilometer area in the upper Bow Valley drainage of the eastern Alberta slopes. The researchers worked with representatives from Husky Oil and Rigel Energy on the development of the Moose Mountain oil and gas field without adversely affecting the grizzly bear population. Information collected over eight years indicates that the grizzly bears have few and infrequent offspring. Using the information gathered thus far, the location of the Moose Mountain to Jumping Pound pipeline was carefully selected, since the bears suffer from high mortality, and the food and cover had already been compromised by the high number of roads, trails and other human activities in the area. The research concluded in November 2001 provides sufficient information to accurately asses the status of the grizzly bear population and habitat. The data will be analyzed and integrated in 2002 into models that reflect the variables affecting grizzly bears and a final report will be published.

  8. Titanium carbide coatings for aerospace ball bearings

    Boving, Hans J.; Haenni, Werner; Hintermann, HANS-E.

    1988-01-01

    In conventional ball bearings, steel to steel contacts between the balls and the raceways are at the origin of microwelds which lead to material transfer, surface roughening, lubricant breakdown, and finally to a loss in the bearing performances. To minimize the microwelding tendencies of the contacting partners it is necessary to modify their surface materials; the solid to solid collisions themselves are difficult to avoid. The use of titanium carbide coated steel balls can bring spectacular improvements in the performances and lifetimes of both oil-grease lubricated and oil-grease free bearings in a series of severe applications.

  9. Hydrostatic, aerostatic and hybrid bearing design

    Rowe, W Brian

    2012-01-01

    Solve your bearing design problems with step-by-step procedures and hard-won performance data from a leading expert and consultant Compiled for ease of use in practical design scenarios, Hydrostatic, Aerostatic and Hybrid Bearing Design provides the basic principles, design procedures and data you need to create the right bearing solution for your requirements. In this valuable reference and design companion, author and expert W. Brian Rowe shares the hard-won lessons and figures from a lifetime's research and consultancy experience. Coverage includes: Clear e

  10. Microeconomic analysis of military aircraft bearing restoration

    Hein, G. F.

    1976-01-01

    The risk and cost of a bearing restoration by grinding program was analyzed. A microeconomic impact analysis was performed. The annual cost savings to U.S. Army aviation is approximately $950,000.00 for three engines and three transmissions. The capital value over an indefinite life is approximately ten million dollars. The annual cost savings for U.S. Air Force engines is approximately $313,000.00 with a capital value of approximately 3.1 million dollars. The program will result in the government obtaining bearings at lower costs at equivalent reliability. The bearing industry can recover lost profits during a period of reduced demand and higher costs.

  11. Active magnetic bearings applied to industrial compressors

    Kirk, R. G.; Hustak, J. F.; Schoeneck, K. A.

    1993-01-01

    The design and shop test results are given for a high-speed eight-stage centrifugal compressor supported by active magnetic bearings. A brief summary of the basic operation of active magnetic bearings and the required rotor dynamics analysis are presented with specific attention given to design considerations for optimum rotor stability. The concerns for retrofits of magnetic bearings in existing machinery are discussed with supporting analysis of a four-stage centrifugal compressor. The current status of industrial machinery in North America using this new support system is presented and recommendations are given on design and analysis requirements for successful machinery operation of either retrofit or new design turbomachinery.

  12. Rotor Vibration Reduction via Active Hybrid Bearings

    Nicoletti, Rodrigo; Santos, Ilmar

    2002-01-01

    The use of fluid power to reduce and control rotor vibration in rotating machines is investigated. An active hybrid bearing is studied, whose main objective is to reduce wear and vibration between rotating and stationary machinery parts. By injecting pressurised oil into the oil film, through...... orifices machined in the bearing pads, one can alter the machine dynamic characteristics, thus enhancing its operational range. A mathematical model of the rotor-bearing system, as well as of the hydraulic system, is presented. Numerical results of the system frequency response show good agreement...

  13. On Controllable Elastohydrodynamic Fluid Film Bearings

    Haugaard, Martin Asger

    This thesis gives a theoretical description of the active tilting-pad journal bearing (ATPJB). It provides the qualified reader with the tools to model an ATPJB, while staying clear of pitfalls. The model is based on well known techniques and allows for local stability analyses, harmonic stationary...... are performed for a tilting-pad journal bearing (TPJB) and an ATPJB under static conditions, followed by a generalisation to dynamic conditions (transient as well as stationary harmonic). These analyses will be of interest to experimentalists, since they permit experiments performed on scaled down test rigs...... the addition of a control system may just as well harm rotor-bearing performance as improve it....

  14. Polyphase evolution of the Chaîne des Matheux frontal thrust (Haiti)

    Wessels, Richard; Ellouz-Zimmermann, Nadine; Rosenberg, Claudio; Bellahsen, Nicolas; Hamon, Youri; Deschamps, Remy; Battani, Anne; Leroy, Sylvie; Momplaisir, Roberte

    2016-04-01

    The NW - SE trending Haitian fold-and-thrust belt (HFTB) is located in the western part of the Caribbean island of Hispaniola. It covers the suture between the Cretaceous Caribbean island arc in the north and the Late Cretaceous thickened oceanic crust in the south. The HFTB is bounded to the north and south by the left-lateral Septentrional (SFZ) and Enriquillo-Plantain Garden (EPGFZ) fault zones, respectively. Compressional deformation on the HFTB commenced as early as Eocene times. It was followed by transpressional deformation from the early Miocene onwards, with in sequence progressive stacking of thrust sheets towards the SW. Seismicity at the junction between the HFTB and the EPGFZ is recorded by the 12 January 2010 Mw 7.0 earthquake. Surface mapping did not reveal a rupture, as the main activity occurred on the steep NNW dipping oblique transpressional Léogâne fault, while aftershocks documented motion on a shallow SW dipping thrust segment. The structural style of deformation of the HFTB, either the stacking of thrust sheets on basement heterogeneities or basement-involved thrusting, has not been studied in detail. Also lacking are conceptual models addressing the amount of convergence between the northern and southern domains, and describing how convergence was accommodated. To address these problems we conducted a detailed fieldwork on the southernmost thrust sheet, known as the Chaîne des Matheux front. Using stratigraphy, geological mapping, cross sections, kinematic fault slip data, analysis of mineralizations and fluid inclusions, and geochemical analysis of fluid seeps, we decipher the evolution of this anticlinal structure. Stratigraphic data reveal stable Eocene platform sedimentation over the whole region, which preceded deepening of the basin throughout Oligocene and early Miocene times. A diachronous evolution is evident from the middle Miocene onwards. The NE flank displays a shallowing upwards trend and clastic sedimentation, while the

  15. Vibration Characteristics of Hydrodynamic Fluid Film Pocket Journal Bearings

    N. S. Feng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical analyses of hydrodynamic fluid film bearings with different bearing profiles rely on solutions of the Reynolds equation. This paper presents an approach used for analysing the so-called pocket bearings formed from a combination of offset circular bearing profiles. The results show that the variation of the dynamic bearing characteristics with different load inclinations for the pocket bearings is less than that for the elliptic bearing counterpart. It is shown that the natural frequencies as well as the critical speeds, and hence the vibrational behaviour, can also be significantly different for an industrial rotor supported by the different bearings.

  16. Computer program for analysis of high speed, single row, angular contact, spherical roller bearing, SASHBEAN. Volume 1: User's guide

    Aggarwal, Arun K.

    1993-09-01

    The computer program SASHBEAN (Sikorsky Aircraft Spherical Roller High Speed Bearing Analysis) analyzes and predicts the operating characteristics of a Single Row, Angular Contact, Spherical Roller Bearing (SRACSRB). The program runs on an IBM or IBM compatible personal computer, and for a given set of input data analyzes the bearing design for it's ring deflections (axial and radial), roller deflections, contact areas and stresses, induced axial thrust, rolling element and cage rotation speeds, lubrication parameters, fatigue lives, and amount of heat generated in the bearing. The dynamic loading of rollers due to centrifugal forces and gyroscopic moments, which becomes quite significant at high speeds, is fully considered in this analysis. For a known application and it's parameters, the program is also capable of performing steady-state and time-transient thermal analyses of the bearing system. The steady-state analysis capability allows the user to estimate the expected steady-state temperature map in and around the bearing under normal operating conditions. On the other hand, the transient analysis feature provides the user a means to simulate the 'lost lubricant' condition and predict a time-temperature history of various critical points in the system. The bearing's 'time-to-failure' estimate may also be made from this (transient) analysis by considering the bearing as failed when a certain temperature limit is reached in the bearing components. The program is fully interactive and allows the user to get started and access most of its features with a minimal of training. For the most part, the program is menu driven, and adequate help messages were provided to guide a new user through various menu options and data input screens. All input data, both for mechanical and thermal analyses, are read through graphical input screens, thereby eliminating any need of a separate text editor/word processor to edit/create data files. Provision is also available to select

  17. Thrust fault growth within accretionary wedges: New Insights from 3D seismic reflection data

    Orme, H.; Bell, R. E.; Jackson, C. A. L.

    2015-12-01

    The shallow parts of subduction megathrust faults are typically thought to be aseismic and incapable of propagating seismic rupture. The 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake, however, ruptured all the way to the trench, proving that in some locations rupture can propagate through the accretionary wedge. An improved understanding of the structural character and physical properties of accretionary wedges is therefore crucial to begin to assess why such anomalously shallow seismic rupture occurs. Despite its importance, we know surprisingly little regarding the 3D geometry and kinematics of thrust network development in accretionary prisms, largely due to a lack of 3D seismic reflection data providing high-resolution, 3D images of entire networks. Thus our current understanding is largely underpinned by observations from analogue and numerical modelling, with limited observational data from natural examples. In this contribution we use PSDM, 3D seismic reflection data from the Nankai margin (3D Muroto dataset, available from the UTIG Academic Seismic Portal, Marine Geoscience Data System) to examine how imbricate thrust fault networks evolve during accretionary wedge growth. Previous studies have reported en-echelon thrust fault geometries from the NW part of the dataset, and have related this complex structure to seamount subduction. We unravel the evolution of faults within the protothrust and imbricate thrust zones by interpreting multiple horizons across faults and measuring fault displacement and fold amplitude along-strike; by doing this, we are able to investigate the three dimensional accrual of strain. We document a number of local displacement minima along-strike of faults, suggesting that, the protothrust and imbricate thrusts developed from the linkage of smaller, previously isolated fault segments. We also demonstrate that the majority of faults grew upward from the décollement, although there is some evidence for downward fault propagation. Our observations

  18. Investigation of Pneumatic Inlet and Diffuser Blowing on a Ducted Fan Propulsor in Static Thrust Operation

    Kondor, Shayne; Englar, Robert J.; Lee, Warren J.

    2003-01-01

    Tilting ducted fans present a solution for the lifting and forward flight propulsion requirements of VTOL aircraft. However, the geometry of the duct enshrouding the propeller has great a effect on the efficiency of the fan in various flight modes. Shroud geometry controls the velocity and pressure at the face of the fan, while maintaining a finite loading out at the tips of the fan blades. A duct tailored for most efficient generation of static lifting thrust will generally suffer from performance deficiencies in forward flight. The converse is true as well, leaving the designer with a difficult trade affecting the overall performance and sizing of the aircraft. Ideally, the shroud of a vertical lifting fan features a generous bell mouth inlet promoting acceleration of flow into the face of the fan, and terminating in a converging nozzle at the exit. Flow entering the inlet is accelerated into the fan by the circulation about the shroud, resulting in an overall increase in thrust compared to an open propeller operating under the same conditions . The accelerating shroud design is often employed in lifting ducted fans to benefit from the thrust augmentation; however, such shroud designs produce significant drag penalties in axial flight, thus are unsuitable for efficient forward flight applications. Decelerating, or diffusing, duct designs are employed for higher speed forward flight configurations. The lower circulation on the shroud tends to decelerate the flow into the face of the fan, which is detrimental to static thrust development; however, net thrust is developed on the shroud while the benefits of finite blade loading are retained. With judicious shroud design for intended flight speeds, a net increase in efficiency can be obtained over an open propeller. In this experiment, conducted under contract to NASA LaRC (contract NAG-1-02093) circulation control is being applied to a mildly diffusing shroud design, intended for improved forward flight performance

  19. Static investigation of two fluidic thrust-vectoring concepts on a two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle

    Wing, David J.

    1994-01-01

    A static investigation was conducted in the static test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel of two thrust-vectoring concepts which utilize fluidic mechanisms for deflecting the jet of a two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle. One concept involved using the Coanda effect to turn a sheet of injected secondary air along a curved sidewall flap and, through entrainment, draw the primary jet in the same direction to produce yaw thrust vectoring. The other concept involved deflecting the primary jet to produce pitch thrust vectoring by injecting secondary air through a transverse slot in the divergent flap, creating an oblique shock in the divergent channel. Utilizing the Coanda effect to produce yaw thrust vectoring was largely unsuccessful. Small vector angles were produced at low primary nozzle pressure ratios, probably because the momentum of the primary jet was low. Significant pitch thrust vector angles were produced by injecting secondary flow through a slot in the divergent flap. Thrust vector angle decreased with increasing nozzle pressure ratio but moderate levels were maintained at the highest nozzle pressure ratio tested. Thrust performance generally increased at low nozzle pressure ratios and decreased near the design pressure ratio with the addition of secondary flow.

  20. Comparison of soft-tissue, dental, and skeletal characteristics in children with and without tongue thrusting habit

    Uma B Dixit

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tongue thrusting habit is a condition in which the tongue makes contact with any teeth anterior to the molars during swallowing. Abnormal positioning of tongue may result in dental and skeletal abnormalities. Objective: The aim of the present study was to study and compare soft-tissue, dental, and skeletal morphologic characteristics in children with and without tongue thrusting habit. Materials and Methods: A total of 21 children with tongue thrusting habit and 21 children without any habit between age 10 and 14 years were selected for the study. Various soft-issue, dental and cephalometric parameters were measured and compared statistically. Results: Significantly, higher number of children with tongue thrusting showed lip incompetency (86% vs. 14%, mouth-breathing habit (38% vs. none, hyperactive mentalis muscle activity (24% vs. none, Open-bite (52% vs. none and lisping (86% vs. none when compared to children without tongue thrust. Children with tongue thrust showed increased upper lip thickness and proclination of maxillary incisors No differences were found in angulation of mandibular incisors, inter-premolar or inter-molar widths and all the skeletal parameters studied. Conclusions: Tongue thrust seemed to affect some of the soft-tissue and dental characteristics causing lip incompetency, mouth-breathing habit, and hyperactive mentalis muscle activity, lisping, open-bite, and proclination of maxillary incisors; however, no significant skeletal changes were observed.

  1. North Cascades Grizzly Bear Ecosystem Evaluation

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory — We conducted a 6-year evaluation of the North Cascades Grizzly Bear Ecosystem (NCGBE) in north-central Washington to determine the suitability of the area to support...

  2. Polar bear research in Alaska, spring 1982

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — An investigation of the ecology and population dynamics of Alaskan polar bears has continued since 1967. As part of that program, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service...

  3. Telemetry techniques used on Kodiak brown bear

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the results of a study on the techniques used to monitor the movements of Kodiak brown bears instrumented with radio transmitters. Methods...

  4. Mercury biomagnification in polar bears ( Ursus maritimus)

    Horton, T. W.; Blum, J. D.; Xie, Z.; Hren, M.; Chamberlain, C. P.

    2007-12-01

    Mercury biomagnification occurs in a variety of ecosystems resulting in greater potential for toxicological effects in higher-level trophic feeders. However, Hg transport pathways through different foodweb channels are not well known, particularly in high-latitude systems affected by atmospheric Hg deposition associated with snow and ice. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios and Hg concentrations determined for 26 late 19th and early 20th century polar bear hair specimens collected from cataloged museum collections elucidate relationships between high latitude marine foodweb structure and Hg transport pathways. Nitrogen and carbon isotopic compositions suggest that polar bears derive nutrition from both open water (pelagic) and ice associated (sympagic) foodweb channels. Correlation between Hg concentrations and nitrogen isotope compositions indicate mercury biomagnification occurred in most of the polar bears investigated. Interpretation of stable isotope based foodweb structure in concert with Hg concentrations further suggests that Hg biomagnification occurred to a greater degree in polar bears participating in pelagic foodweb channels.

  5. Bear Lake-Minidoka - Phragmites Control

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Bear Lake: Phragmites patches were sprayed on the refuge & north of the lake proper. Minidoka: patches along the Snake River & Lake Walcott were treated with...

  6. Polar bear research in Alaska, spring 1981

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — An investigation of the ecology and population dynamics of Alaskan polar bears has continued since 1967. As part of that program, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service...

  7. AX-5 space suit bearing torque investigation

    Loewenthal, Stuart; Vykukal, Vic; Mackendrick, Robert; Culbertson, Philip, Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The symptoms and eventual resolution of a torque increase problem occurring with ball bearings in the joints of the AX-5 space suit are described. Starting torques that rose 5 to 10 times initial levels were observed in crew evaluation tests of the suit in a zero-g water tank. This bearing problem was identified as a blocking torque anomaly, observed previously in oscillatory gimbal bearings. A large matrix of lubricants, ball separator designs and materials were evaluated. None of these combinations showed sufficient tolerance to lubricant washout when repeatedly cycled in water. The problem was resolved by retrofitting a pressure compensated, water exclusion seal to the outboard side of the bearing cavity. The symptoms and possible remedies to blocking are discussed.

  8. Cavitation Peening of Aerospace Bearings Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High-value bearings are a critical part of the safety, reliability, cost and performance of modern aircraft. A typical passenger jet will have 100 to 175 high-valve...

  9. The polar bear and its protection

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — No census has been made of the polar bear population and indeed the general movements of the animals within their range are poorly known. At present it is not...

  10. LIGHT-WEIGHT LOAD-BEARING STRUCTURE

    2009-01-01

    The invention relates to a light-weight load-bearing structure (1) with optimized compression zone (2), where along one or more compression zones (2) in the structure (1) to be cast a core (3) of strong concrete is provided, which core (3) is surrounded by concrete of less strength (4) compared...... to the core (3) of strong concrete. The invention also relates to a method of casting of light-weight load-bearing structures (1) with optimized compression zone (2) where one or more channels, grooves, ducts, pipes and/or hoses (5) formed in the load-bearing structure (1) serves as moulds for moulding one...... or more cores (3) of strong concrete in the light-weight load-bearing structure (1)....

  11. Active Magnetic Bearings – Magnetic Forces

    Kjølhede, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    Parameter identification procedures and model validation are major steps towards intelligent machines supported by active magnetic bearings (AMB). The ability of measuring the electromagnetic bearing forces, or deriving them from measuring the magnetic flux, strongly contributes to the model...... validation and leads to novel approaches in identifying crucial rotor parameters. This is the main focus of this paper, where an intelligent AMB is being developed with the aim of aiding the accurate identification of damping and stiffness coefficients of journal bearings and seals. The main contribution...... of the magnetic forces are led by using different experimental tests: (I) by using hall sensors mounted directly on the poles (precise measurements of the magnetic flux) and by an auxiliary system, composed of strain gages and flexible beams attached to the rotor; (II) by measuring the input current and bearing...

  12. Novel nano bearings constructed by physical adsorption

    Zhang, Yongbin

    2015-09-01

    The paper proposes a novel nano bearing formed by the physical adsorption of the confined fluid to the solid wall. The bearing is formed between two parallel smooth solid plane walls sliding against one another, where conventional hydrodynamic lubrication theory predicted no lubricating effect. In this bearing, the stationary solid wall is divided into two subzones which respectively have different interaction strengths with the lubricating fluid. It leads to different physical adsorption and slip properties of the lubricating fluid at the stationary solid wall respectively in these two subzones. It was found that a significant load-carrying capacity of the bearing can be generated for low lubricating film thicknesses, because of the strong physical adsorption and non-continuum effects of the lubricating film.

  13. Active magnetic bearings used as exciters for rolling element bearing outer race defect diagnosis.

    Xu, Yuanping; Di, Long; Zhou, Jin; Jin, Chaowu; Guo, Qintao

    2016-03-01

    The active health monitoring of rotordynamic systems in the presence of bearing outer race defect is considered in this paper. The shaft is assumed to be supported by conventional mechanical bearings and an active magnetic bearing (AMB) is used in the mid of the shaft location as an exciter to apply electromagnetic force to the system. We investigate a nonlinear bearing-pedestal system model with the outer race defect under the electromagnetic force. The nonlinear differential equations are integrated using the fourth-order Runge-Kutta algorithm. The simulation and experimental results show that the characteristic signal of outer race incipient defect is significantly amplified under the electromagnetic force through the AMBs, which is helpful to improve the diagnosis accuracy of rolling element bearing׳s incipient outer race defect.

  14. Effects of fluid inertia and bearing flexibility on the performance of finite length journal bearing

    Javorova, Juliana; Alexandrov, Vassil

    2017-02-01

    The paper describes the theoretical study concerning the effect of lubricant inertia forces and deformability of the bearing elastic layer on the performance of a plane journal bearing. The problem is investigated for a Newtonian lubricant under isothermal and isoviscous conditions. The analysis considers the generalized Reynolds equation governing the flow of lubricant in the clearance space and the linear elasticity equation governing the displacement field in the bearing shell. An iterative numerical procedure with successive over relaxation is used to pressure distribution within the lubricated conjunction. Bearing performance characteristics have been presented for typically selected values of generalized Reynolds number Re* and elasticity parameters of the elastic liner. It has been observed that the combined effect of fluid inertia forces and bearing flexibility affects the performance characteristics of dynamically loaded journal bearing.

  15. Passive magnetic bearings for vehicular electromechanical batteries

    Post, R

    1996-03-01

    This report describes the design of a passive magnetic bearing system to be used in electromechanical batteries (flywheel energy storage modules) suitable for vehicular use. One or two such EMB modules might, for example, be employed in a hybrid-electric automobile, providing efficient means for power peaking, i.e., for handling acceleration and regenerative braking power demands at high power levels. The bearing design described herein will be based on a ''dual-mode'' operating regime.

  16. Silicon Nitride Balls For Cryogenic Bearings

    Butner, Myles F.; Ng, Lillian W.

    1990-01-01

    Resistance to wear greater than that of 440C steel. Experiments show lives of ball bearings immersed in liquid nitrogen or liquid oxygen increased significantly when 440C steel balls (running on 440C steel races) replaced by balls of silicon nitride. Developed for use at high temperatures, where lubrication poor or nonexistent. Best wear life of any bearing tested to date and ball material spalls without fracturing. Plans for future tests call for use of liquid oxygen as working fluid.

  17. Flywheel energy storage with superconductor magnetic bearings

    Weinberger, Bernard R. (Avon, CT); Lynds, Jr., Lahmer (Glastonbury, CT); Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL)

    1993-01-01

    A flywheel having superconductor bearings has a lower drag to lift ratio that translates to an improvement of a factor of ten in the rotational decay rate. The lower drag results from the lower dissipation of melt-processed YBCO, improved uniformity of the permanent magnet portion of the bearings, operation in a different range of vacuum pressure from that taught by the art, and greater separation distance from the rotating members of conductive materials.

  18. Active magnetic bearings for optimum turbomachinery design

    Hustak, J.; Kirk, R. G.; Schoeneck, K. A.

    1985-01-01

    The design and shop test results are given for a high speed eight stage centrifugal compressor supported by active magnetic bearings. A brief summary of the rotor dynamics analysis is presented with specific attention given to design considerations for optimum rotor stability. The concerns for retrofit of magnetic bearings in existing machinery are discussed with supporting analysis of a four stage centrifugal compressor. Recommendations are given on design and analysis requirements for successful machinery operation of either retrofit or new design turbomachinery.

  19. Rotordynamics and bearing design of turbochargers

    Chen, Wen Jeng

    2012-05-01

    Turbochargers have gained significant attention in recent years. They are already widely used in automotive, locomotive, and marine applications with diesel engines. They are also applied in the aerospace application to increase the engine performance now. The turbochargers used in automotive and aerospace industry are very light-weight with operating speeds above 100,000 rpm. The turbochargers used in locomotive and marine applications are relatively heavy in size and power compared to the automotive and aerospace applications, and the maximum continuous operating speeds are around 30,000 rpm depending on the diesel engine power rating. Floating ring bushings, semi-floating dampers, ball bearings, and ball bearings with dampers are commonly used in automotive applications for small turbochargers. However, these bearings may not be appropriate for large turbochargers in locomotive and marine applications. Instead, multi-lobed bearings with and without squeeze film dampers are commonly used in these heavy-duty turbochargers. This paper deals with the rotordynamic characteristics of larger turbochargers in locomotive and marine applications. Various bearing designs are discussed. Bearing design parameters are studied and optimal values are suggested. Test results are also presented to support the analytical simulation.

  20. Bearing and gear steels for aerospace applications

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1990-01-01

    Research in metallurgy and processing for bearing and gear steels has resulted in improvements in rolling-element bearing and gear life for aerospace application by a factor of approximately 200 over that obtained in the early 1940's. The selection and specification of a bearing or gear steel is dependent on the integration of multiple metallurgical and physical variables. For most aerospace bearings, through-hardened VIM-VAR AISI M-50 steel is the material of preference. For gears, the preferential material is case-carburized VAR AISI 9310. However, the VAR processing for this material is being replaced by VIM-VAR processing. Since case-carburized VIM-VAR M-50NiL incorporates the desirable qualities of both the AISI M-50 and AISI 9310 materials, optimal life and reliability can be achieved in both bearings and gears with a single steel. Hence, this material offers the promise of a common steel for both bearings and gears for future aerospace applications.