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  1. Recombinant thrombomodulin protects mice against histone-induced lethal thromboembolism.

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    Mayumi Nakahara

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Recent studies have shown that histones, the chief protein component of chromatin, are released into the extracellular space during sepsis, trauma, and ischemia-reperfusion injury, and act as major mediators of the death of an organism. This study was designed to elucidate the cellular and molecular basis of histone-induced lethality and to assess the protective effects of recombinant thrombomodulin (rTM. rTM has been approved for the treatment of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC in Japan, and is currently undergoing a phase III clinical trial in the United States. METHODS: Histone H3 levels in plasma of healthy volunteers and patients with sepsis and DIC were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Male C57BL/6 mice were injected intravenously with purified histones, and pathological examinations were performed. The protective effects of rTM against histone toxicity were analyzed both in vitro and in mice. RESULTS: Histone H3 was not detectable in plasma of healthy volunteers, but significant levels were observed in patients with sepsis and DIC. These levels were higher in non-survivors than in survivors. Extracellular histones triggered platelet aggregation, leading to thrombotic occlusion of pulmonary capillaries and subsequent right-sided heart failure in mice. These mice displayed symptoms of DIC, including thrombocytopenia, prolonged prothrombin time, decreased fibrinogen, fibrin deposition in capillaries, and bleeding. Platelet depletion protected mice from histone-induced death in the first 30 minutes, suggesting that vessel occlusion by platelet-rich thrombi might be responsible for death during the early phase. Furthermore, rTM bound to extracellular histones, suppressed histone-induced platelet aggregation, thrombotic occlusion of pulmonary capillaries, and dilatation of the right ventricle, and rescued mice from lethal thromboembolism. CONCLUSIONS: Extracellular histones cause massive

  2. Ischemic preconditioning protects against ischemic brain injury

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    Xiao-meng Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we hypothesized that an increase in integrin αv ß 3 and its co-activator vascular endothelial growth factor play important neuroprotective roles in ischemic injury. We performed ischemic preconditioning with bilateral common carotid artery occlusion for 5 minutes in C57BL/6J mice. This was followed by ischemic injury with bilateral common carotid artery occlusion for 30 minutes. The time interval between ischemic preconditioning and lethal ischemia was 48 hours. Histopathological analysis showed that ischemic preconditioning substantially diminished damage to neurons in the hippocampus 7 days after ischemia. Evans Blue dye assay showed that ischemic preconditioning reduced damage to the blood-brain barrier 24 hours after ischemia. This demonstrates the neuroprotective effect of ischemic preconditioning. Western blot assay revealed a significant reduction in protein levels of integrin αv ß 3, vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptor in mice given ischemic preconditioning compared with mice not given ischemic preconditioning 24 hours after ischemia. These findings suggest that the neuroprotective effect of ischemic preconditioning is associated with lower integrin αv ß 3 and vascular endothelial growth factor levels in the brain following ischemia.

  3. Myocardial ischemic protection in natural mammalian hibernation.

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    Yan, Lin; Kudej, Raymond K; Vatner, Dorothy E; Vatner, Stephen F

    2015-03-01

    Hibernating myocardium is an important clinical syndrome protecting the heart with chronic myocardial ischemia, named for its assumed resemblance to hibernating mammals in winter. However, the effects of myocardial ischemic protection have never been studied in true mammalian hibernation, which is a unique strategy for surviving extreme winter environmental stress. The goal of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that ischemic stress may also be protected in woodchucks as they hibernate in winter. Myocardial infarction was induced by coronary occlusion followed by reperfusion in naturally hibernating woodchucks in winter with and without hibernation and in summer, when not hibernating. The ischemic area at risk was similar among groups. Myocardial infarction was significantly less in woodchucks in winter, whether hibernating or not, compared with summer, and was similar to that resulting after ischemic preconditioning. Whereas several genes were up or downregulated in both hibernating woodchuck and with ischemic preconditioning, one mechanism was unique to hibernation, i.e., activation of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB). When CREB was upregulated in summer, it induced protection similar to that observed in the woodchuck heart in winter. The cardioprotection in hibernation was also mediated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase, rather than inducible nitric oxide synthase. Thus, the hibernating woodchuck heart is a novel model to study cardioprotection for two major reasons: (1) powerful cardioprotection occurs naturally in winter months in the absence of any preconditioning stimuli, and (2) it resembles ischemic preconditioning, but with novel mechanisms, making this model potentially useful for clinical translation.

  4. Caffeine prevents protection in two human models of ischemic preconditioning.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riksen, N.P.; Zhou, Z.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Jaspers, R.A.; Ramakers, B.P.; Brouwer, R.M.H.J.; Boerman, O.C.; Steinmetz, N.; Smits, P.; Rongen, G.A.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We studied whether caffeine impairs protection by ischemic preconditioning (IP) in humans. BACKGROUND: Ischemic preconditioning is critically dependent on adenosine receptor stimulation. We hypothesize that the adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine blocks the protective effect of IP.

  5. Remote Ischemic Conditioning and Renal Protection.

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    Giannopoulos, Georgios; Vrachatis, Dimitrios A; Panagopoulou, Vasiliki; Vavuranakis, Manolis; Cleman, Michael W; Deftereos, Spyridon

    2017-07-01

    Over the course of the last 2 decades, the concept of remote ischemic conditioning (RIC) has attracted considerable research interest, because RIC, in most of its embodiments offers an inexpensive way of protecting tissues against ischemic damage inflicted by a number of medical conditions or procedures. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common side effect in the context of various medical procedures, and RIC has been suggested as a means of reducing its incidence. Outcomes regarding kidney function have been reported in numerous studies that evaluated the effects of RIC in a variety of settings (eg, cardiac surgery, interventions requiring intravenous administration of contrast media). Although several individual studies have implied a beneficial effect of RIC in preserving kidney function, 3 recently published randomized controlled trials evaluating more than 1000 patients each (Effect of Remote Ischemic Preconditioning in the Cardiac Surgery, Remote Ischaemic Preconditioning for Heart Surgery, and ERICCA) were negative. However, AKI or any other index of renal function was not a stand-alone primary end point in any of these trials. On the other hand, a range of meta-analyses (each including thousands of participants) have reported mixed results, with the most recent among them showing benefit from RIC, pinpointing at the same time a number of shortcomings in published studies, adversely affecting the quality of available data. The present review provides a critical appraisal of the current state of this field of research. It is the opinion of the authors of this review that there is a clear need for a common clinical trial framework for ischemic conditioning studies. If the current babel of definitions, procedures, outcomes, and goals persists, it is most likely that soon ischemic conditioning will be "yesterday's news" with no definitive conclusions having been reached in terms of its real clinical utility.

  6. Protective effects of ischemic postconditioning on intestinal

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    DING Jun-tao

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To explore the protective effects of two types of ischemic postconditioning (IP on intestinal mucosa barrier in rabbits with crush injury of the hind limb. Methods: This study was conducted between August and December 2008 in the Department of Trauma Surgery, Daping Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, China. The model of crush injury to the hind limb of rabbits was firstly developed by a 25 kg object with the right hind limbs fixed by wooden splints, and then two types of IP were established, including occluding/opening the common iliac artery and vein alternatively (traditional IP, IP A and binding/loosening the proximum of the injured hind limb alternatively (modified IP, IP B. Thirty-six male New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into three groups: IP A group, IP B group and control group, with 12 rabbits in each group. The serum levels of diamine oxidase (DAO and intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (I-FABP were detected at 2, 6, 12 and 24 hours after injury. Pathological changes of ileum were examined at 24 hours after injury. Results: The serum levels of I-FABP at 2, 6, 12 and 24 hours after injury in both IP A and IP B groups had a significant decrease, compared with control group. DAO levels also showed the same change trend at 2 and 6 hours after injury, but showed no significant difference between two IP groups. No difference in pathological changes of ileum was found among the three groups. Conclusions: IP can protect intestinal mucosa barrier function on the model of hind limb crush injury in rabbits. Meanwhile the modified IP B shows the same protection as the traditional IP A, and is worth applying in clinic. Key words: Ischemic postconditioning; Crush syndrome; Intestinal mucosa

  7. Protection of retinal function by sulforaphane following retinal ischemic injury.

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    Ambrecht, Lindsay A; Perlman, Jay I; McDonnell, James F; Zhai, Yougang; Qiao, Liang; Bu, Ping

    2015-09-01

    Sulforaphane, a precursor of glucosinolate in cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli and cauliflower, has been shown to protect brain ischemic injury. In this study, we examined the effect of systemic administration of sulforaphane on retinal ischemic reperfusion injury. Intraocular pressure was elevated in two groups of C57BL/6 mice (n = 8 per group) for 45 min to induce retinal ischemic reperfusion injury. Following retinal ischemic reperfusion injury, vehicle (1% DMSO saline) or sulforaphane (25 mg/kg/day) was administered intraperitoneally daily for 5 days. Scotopic electroretinography (ERG) was used to quantify retinal function prior to and one-week after retinal ischemic insult. Retinal morphology was examined one week after ischemic insult. Following ischemic reperfusion injury, ERG a- and b-wave amplitudes were significantly reduced in the control mice. Sulforaphane treatment significantly attenuated ischemic-induced loss of retinal function as compared to vehicle treated mice. In vehicle treated mice, ischemic reperfusion injury produced marked thinning of the inner retinal layers, but the thinning of the inner retinal layers appeared significantly less with sulforaphane treatment. Thus, sulforaphane may be beneficial in the treatment of retinal disorders with ischemic reperfusion injury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The relation of thrombomodulin G33A and C1418T gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. There is an increased interest in the genetic risk factors in the pathogenesis of ischemic heart disease. Thrombomodulin (TM), a natural anticoagulant, may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of AMI. Aim of the ...

  9. The relation of thrombomodulin G33A and C1418T gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wael Alkhiary

    2017-08-31

    Aug 31, 2017 ... Background: Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. There is an increased interest in the genetic risk factors in the pathogenesis of ischemic heart disease. Thrombomodulin (TM), a natural anticoagulant, may play a critical role in the pathogenesis ...

  10. The protective effect of ischemic preconditioning on rat testis

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    Ciralik Harun

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been demonstrated that brief episodes of sublethal ischemia-reperfusion, so-called ischemic preconditioning, provide powerful tissue protection in different tissues such as heart, brain, skeletal muscle, lung, liver, intestine, kidney, retina, and endothelial cells. Although a recent study has claimed that there are no protective effects of ischemic preconditioning in rat testis, the protective effects of ischemic preconditioning on testicular tissue have not been investigated adequately. The present study was thus planned to investigate whether ischemic preconditioning has a protective effect on testicular tissue. Methods Rats were divided into seven groups that each contained seven rats. In group 1 (control group, only unilateral testicular ischemia was performed by creating a testicular torsion by a 720 degree clockwise rotation for 180 min. In group 2, group 3, group 4, group 5, group 6, and group 7, unilateral testicular ischemia was performed for 180 min following different periods of ischemic preconditioning. The ischemic preconditioning periods were as follows: 10 minutes of ischemia with 10 minutes of reperfusion in group 2; 20 minutes of ischemia with 10 minutes of reperfusion in group 3; 30 minutes of ischemia with 10 minutes of reperfusion in group 4; multiple preconditioning periods were used (3 × 10 min early phase transient ischemia with 10 min reperfusion in all episodes in group 5; multiple preconditioning periods were used (5, 10, and 15 min early phase transient ischemia with 10 min reperfusion in all episodes in group 6; and, multiple preconditioning periods were used (10, 20, and 30 min early phase transient ischemia with 10 min reperfusion in all episodes in group 7. After the ischemic protocols were carried out, animals were sacrificed by cervical dislocation and testicular tissue samples were taken for biochemical measurements (protein, malondialdehyde, nitric oxide and histological examination

  11. [The protective action of nimodipine on the ischemic myocardium].

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    Tsorin, I B; Kazanova, G V; Kirsanova, G Iu; Chirkova, E Iu; Chichkanov, G G

    1992-01-01

    The experiments with unconscious cats and dogs have demonstrated that the calcium antagonist nimodipine has a profound anti-ischemic property. The drug reduces the average value of ST-segment elevation in multiple epicardial ECG leads, during acute myocardial ischemia. Nimodipine maintains cardiac pump and contractile functions, elevates ATP levels in the arbitrarily intact and ischemic myocardium of the left ventricle during 40-min occlusion and 60-min reperfusion of the coronary artery. The protective action of the drug is unassociated with enhanced collateral coronary circulation.

  12. Endogenous erythropoietin protects neuroretinal function in ischemic retinopathy.

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    Mowat, Freya M; Gonzalez, Francisco; Luhmann, Ulrich F O; Lange, Clemens A; Duran, Yanai; Smith, Alexander J; Maxwell, Patrick H; Ali, Robin R; Bainbridge, James W B

    2012-04-01

    Because retinal ischemia is a common cause of vision loss, we sought to determine the effects of ischemia on neuroretinal function and survival in murine oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) and to define the role of endogenous erythropoietin (EPO) in this model. OIR is a reproducible model of ischemia-induced retinal neovascularization; it is used commonly to develop antiangiogenic strategies. We investigated the effects of ischemia in murine OIR on retinal function and neurodegeneration by electroretinography and detailed morphology. OIR was associated with significant neuroretinal dysfunction, with reduced photopic and scotopic ERG responses and reduced b-wave/a-wave ratios consistent with specific inner-retinal dysfunction. OIR resulted in significantly increased apoptosis and atrophy of the inner retina in areas of ischemia. EPO deficiency in heterozygous Epo-Tag transgenic mice was associated with more profound retinal dysfunction after OIR, indicated by a significantly greater suppression of ERG amplitudes, but had no measurable effect on the extent of retinal ischemia, preretinal neovascularization, or neuroretinal degeneration in OIR. Systemic administration of recombinant EPO protected EPO-deficient mice against this additional suppression, but EPO supplementation in wild-type animals with OIR did not rescue neuroretinal dysfunction or degeneration. Murine OIR offers a valuable model of ischemic neuroretinal dysfunction and degeneration in which to investigate adaptive tissue responses and evaluate novel therapeutic approaches. Endogenous EPO can protect neuroretinal function in ischemic retinopathy. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Cerebrovascular ischemic protection by pre- and post-conditioning

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    Jeffrey M Gidday

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke and cardiac arrest involve injury to all the brain′s resident cells and their respective progenitors, including neurons, all glial subtypes, vascular smooth muscle, vascular endothelium, and pericytes, resulting either in the death of the individual or in a lesion that likely manifests as long-term impairments across a number of cognitive and functional domains. Thousands of studies in experimental animals and results from a few clinical trials in humans have demonstrated that the mechanisms responsible for ischemic brain injury can be blocked or slowed by survival-enhancing epigenetic responses induced by "conditioning" the brain with a stress stimulus paradigm before or even after ictus. The resultant reduction in lesion size and functional deficits are often termed endogenous "neuroprotection," but this in fact involves cytoprotective responses on the part of all the aforementioned resident brain cells and the circulating immune cells as well. The present review will summarize findings demonstrating conditioning-induced protection of the cerebral vasculature, that in turn manifests as reductions in vascularly targeted inflammatory responses; less endothelial injury and improvements in structural integrity of the circulation across all levels of organization; enhanced perfusion with less thrombosis; reductions in vascular dysregulation and reactivity impairments; and, over the longer term, more robust angiogenesis and vascular remodeling. Advancing the mechanistic basis for these innately vasculoprotective phenotypes may provide therapeutic targets for limiting cerebral circulatory injury and dysfunction following stroke and cardiac arrest.

  14. Post-ischemic inflammation regulates neural damage and protection

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    Takashi eShichita

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Post-ischemic inflammation is important in ischemic stroke pathology. However, details of the inflammation process, its resolution after stroke and its effect on pathology and neural damage have not been clarified. Brain swelling, which is often fatal in ischemic stroke patients, occurs at an early stage of stroke due to endothelial cell injury and severe inflammation by infiltrated mononuclear cells including macrophages, neutrophils, and lymphocytes. At early stage of inflammation, macrophages are activated by molecules released from necrotic cells (danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs, and inflammatory cytokines and mediators that increase ischemic brain damage by disruption of the blood-brain barrier are released. After post-ischemic inflammation, macrophages function as scavengers of necrotic cell and brain tissue debris. Such macrophages are also involved in tissue repair and neural cell regeneration by producing tropic factors. The mechanisms of inflammation resolution and conversion of inflammation to neuroprotection are largely unknown. In this review, we summarize information accumulated recently about DAMP-induced inflammation and the neuroprotective effects of inflammatory cells, and discuss next generation strategies to treat ischemic stroke.

  15. Blueberry-enriched diet protects rat heart from ischemic damage.

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    Ismayil Ahmet

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available to assess the cardioprotective properties of a blueberry enriched diet (BD.Reactive oxygen species (ROS play a major role in ischemia-related myocardial injury. The attempts to use synthetic antioxidants to block the detrimental effects of ROS have produced mixed or negative results precipitating the interest in natural products. Blueberries are readily available product with the highest antioxidant capacity among fruits and vegetables.Following 3-mo of BD or a regular control diet (CD, the threshold for mitochondrial permeability transition (t(MPT was measured in isolated cardiomyocytes obtained from young male Fischer-344 rats. Compared to CD, BD resulted in a 24% increase (p<0.001 of ROS indexed t(MPT. The remaining animals were subjected to a permanent ligation of the left descending coronary artery. 24 hrs later resulting myocardial infarction (MI in rats on BD was 22% less than in CD rats (p<0.01. Significantly less TUNEL(+ cardiomyocytes (2% vs 9% and 40% less inflammation cells were observed in the myocardial area at risk of BD compared to CD rats (p<0.01. In the subgroup of rats, after coronary ligation the original diet was either continued or switched to the opposite one, and cardiac remodeling and MI expansion were followed by serial echocardiography for 10 weeks. Measurements suggested that continuation of BD or its withdrawal after MI attenuated or accelerated rates of post MI cardiac remodeling and MI expansion.A blueberry-enriched diet protected the myocardium from induced ischemic damage and demonstrated the potential to attenuate the development of post MI chronic heart failure.

  16. Loss of Thrombomodulin in Placental Dysfunction in Preeclampsia.

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    Turner, Rosanne J; Bloemenkamp, Kitty W M; Bruijn, Jan A; Baelde, Hans J

    2016-04-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-specific syndrome characterized by placental dysfunction and an angiogenic imbalance. Systemically, levels of thrombomodulin, an endothelium- and syncytiotrophoblast-bound protein that regulates coagulation, inflammation, apoptosis, and tissue remodeling, are increased. We aimed to investigate placental thrombomodulin dysregulation and consequent downstream effects in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. Placentas from 28 preeclampsia pregnancies, 30 uncomplicated pregnancies, and 21 pregnancies complicated by growth restriction as extra controls were included. Immunohistochemical staining of thrombomodulin, caspase-3, and fibrin was performed. Placental mRNA expression of thrombomodulin, inflammatory markers, matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9, and soluble Flt-1 were measured with quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Thrombomodulin mRNA expression was determined in vascular endothelial growth factor-transfected trophoblast cell lines. Thrombomodulin protein and mRNA expression were decreased in preeclampsia as compared with both control groups (P=0.001). Thrombomodulin mRNA expression correlated with maternal body mass index (Ppreeclampsia. An increase in placental apoptotic cells was associated with preeclampsia (Ppreeclampsia, but not with fibrin deposits or inflammatory markers. Placental soluble Flt-1 expression correlated with decreased thrombomodulin expression. Vascular endothelial growth factor induced upregulation of thrombomodulin expression in trophoblast cells. Decreased thrombomodulin expression in preeclampsia may play a role in placental dysfunction in preeclampsia and is possibly caused by an angiogenic imbalance. Hypertension and obesity are associated with thrombomodulin downregulation. These results set the stage for further basic and clinical research on thrombomodulin in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia and other syndromes characterized by endothelial dysfunction. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Neonatal rat hearts cannot be protected by ischemic postconditioning

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doul, J.; Charvátová, Z.; Ošťádalová, Ivana; Kohutiar, M.; Maxová, H.; Ošťádal, Bohuslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 6 (2015), s. 789-794 ISSN 0862-8408 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : neonatal rats * ischemic postconditioning * tolerance to ischemia * contractile function * lactate dehydrogenase Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 1.643, year: 2015

  18. Exogenous Gene Transmission of Isocitrate Dehydrogenase 2 Mimics Ischemic Preconditioning Protection.

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    Kolb, Alexander L; Corridon, Peter R; Zhang, Shijun; Xu, Weimin; Witzmann, Frank A; Collett, Jason A; Rhodes, George J; Winfree, Seth; Bready, Devin; Pfeffenberger, Zechariah J; Pomerantz, Jeremy M; Hato, Takashi; Nagami, Glenn T; Molitoris, Bruce A; Basile, David P; Atkinson, Simon J; Bacallao, Robert L

    2018-04-01

    Ischemic preconditioning confers organ-wide protection against subsequent ischemic stress. A substantial body of evidence underscores the importance of mitochondria adaptation as a critical component of cell protection from ischemia. To identify changes in mitochondria protein expression in response to ischemic preconditioning, we isolated mitochondria from ischemic preconditioned kidneys and sham-treated kidneys as a basis for comparison. The proteomic screen identified highly upregulated proteins, including NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 (IDH2), and we confirmed the ability of this protein to confer cellular protection from injury in murine S3 proximal tubule cells subjected to hypoxia. To further evaluate the role of IDH2 in cell protection, we performed detailed analysis of the effects of Idh2 gene delivery on kidney susceptibility to ischemia-reperfusion injury. Gene delivery of IDH2 before injury attenuated the injury-induced rise in serum creatinine ( P <0.05) observed in controls and increased the mitochondria membrane potential ( P <0.05), maximal respiratory capacity ( P <0.05), and intracellular ATP levels ( P <0.05) above those in controls. This communication shows that gene delivery of Idh2 can confer organ-wide protection against subsequent ischemia-reperfusion injury and mimics ischemic preconditioning. Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  19. Inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitors abolished histological protection by late ischemic preconditioning in rat retina.

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    Sakamoto, Kenji; Yonoki, Yuzuru; Kubota, Yuko; Kuwagata, Mayumi; Saito, Maki; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2006-03-01

    Brief ischemia was reported to protect retinal cells against injury induced by subsequent ischemia-reperfusion with de novo protein synthesis, and this phenomenon is known as late ischemic preconditioning. The aims of the present study were to determine whether nitric oxide synthase (NOS) was involved in the mechanism of late ischemic preconditioning in rat retina using pharmacological tools. Under anesthesia with pentobarbital sodium, male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 60 min of retinal ischemia by raising intraocular pressure to 130 mm Hg. Ischemic preconditioning was achieved by applying 5 min of ischemia 24 hrs before 60 min of ischemia. Retinal sections sliced into 5 microm thick were examined 7 days after ischemia. Additional groups of rats received NG-nitro-L-arginine and NG-monomethyl-L-arginin, non-selective NO synthase inhibitors, 7-nitroindazole, a neuronal NOS inhibitor, and aminoguanidine and L-N6-(1-iminoethyl) lysine, inducible NO synthase (iNOS) inhibitors before preconditioning, and were subjected to 60 min of ischemia. In the non-preconditioned group, cell loss in the ganglion cell layer and thinning of the inner plexiform and inner nuclear layer were observed 7 days after 60 min of ischemia. Ischemic preconditioning for 5 min completely protected against the histological damage induced by 60 min of ischemia applied 24 hrs thereafter. Treatment of rats with aminoguanidine and L-N6-(1-iminoethyl) lysine, but not NG-nitro-L-arginine, NG-monomethyl-L-arginine or 7-nitroindazole, wiped off the protective effect of ischemic preconditioning. The inhibitory effect of aminoguanidine was abolished by L-arginine, but not D-arginine. The results in the present study suggest that NO synthesized by iNOS is involved in the histological protection by late ischemic preconditioning in rat retina.

  20. Azithromycin protects mice against ischemic stroke injury by promoting macrophage transition towards M2 phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amantea, Diana; Certo, Michelangelo; Petrelli, Francesco; Tassorelli, Cristina; Micieli, Giuseppe; Corasaniti, Maria Tiziana; Puccetti, Paolo; Fallarino, Francesca; Bagetta, Giacinto

    2016-01-01

    To develop novel and effective treatments for ischemic stroke, we investigated the neuroprotective effects of the macrolide antibiotic azithromycin in a mouse model system of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion. Intraperitoneal administration of azithromycin significantly reduced blood-brain barrier damage and cerebral infiltration of myeloid cells, including neutrophils and inflammatory macrophages. These effects resulted in a dose-dependent reduction of cerebral ischemic damage, and in a remarkable amelioration of neurological deficits up to 7 days after the insult. Neuroprotection was associated with increased arginase activity in peritoneal exudate cells, which was followed by the detection of Ym1- and arginase I-immunopositive M2 macrophages in the ischemic area at 24-48 h of reperfusion. Pharmacological inhibition of peritoneal arginase activity counteracted azithromycin-induced neuroprotection, pointing to a major role for drug-induced polarization of migratory macrophages towards a protective, non-inflammatory M2 phenotype. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Perilipin 5 is protective in the ischemic heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drevinge, Christina; Dalen, Knut T; Mannila, Maria Nastase; Täng, Margareta Scharin; Ståhlman, Marcus; Klevstig, Martina; Lundqvist, Annika; Mardani, Ismena; Haugen, Fred; Fogelstrand, Per; Adiels, Martin; Asin-Cayuela, Jorge; Ekestam, Charlotte; Gådin, Jesper R; Lee, Yun K; Nebb, Hilde; Svedlund, Sara; Johansson, Bengt R; Hultén, Lillemor Mattsson; Romeo, Stefano; Redfors, Björn; Omerovic, Elmir; Levin, Max; Gan, Li-Ming; Eriksson, Per; Andersson, Linda; Ehrenborg, Ewa; Kimmel, Alan R; Borén, Jan; Levin, Malin C

    2016-09-15

    Myocardial ischemia is associated with alterations in cardiac metabolism, resulting in decreased fatty acid oxidation and increased lipid accumulation. Here we investigate how myocardial lipid content and dynamics affect the function of the ischemic heart, and focus on the role of the lipid droplet protein perilipin 5 (Plin5) in the pathophysiology of myocardial ischemia. We generated Plin5(-/-) mice and found that Plin5 deficiency dramatically reduced the triglyceride content in the heart. Under normal conditions, Plin5(-/-) mice maintained a close to normal heart function by decreasing fatty acid uptake and increasing glucose uptake, thus preserving the energy balance. However, during stress or myocardial ischemia, Plin5 deficiency resulted in myocardial reduced substrate availability, severely reduced heart function and increased mortality. Importantly, analysis of a human cohort with suspected coronary artery disease showed that a common noncoding polymorphism, rs884164, decreases the cardiac expression of PLIN5 and is associated with reduced heart function following myocardial ischemia, indicating a role for Plin5 in cardiac dysfunction. Our findings indicate that Plin5 deficiency alters cardiac lipid metabolism and associates with reduced survival following myocardial ischemia, suggesting that Plin5 plays a beneficial role in the heart following ischemia. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Ischemic conditioning-induced endogenous brain protection: Applications pre-, per- or post-stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuechun; Reis, Cesar; Applegate, Richard; Stier, Gary; Martin, Robert; Zhang, John H

    2015-10-01

    In the area of brain injury and neurodegenerative diseases, a plethora of experimental and clinical evidence strongly indicates the promise of therapeutically exploiting the endogenous adaptive system at various levels like triggers, mediators and the end-effectors to stimulate and mobilize intrinsic protective capacities against brain injuries. It is believed that ischemic pre-conditioning and post-conditioning are actually the strongest known interventions to stimulate the innate neuroprotective mechanism to prevent or reverse neurodegenerative diseases including stroke and traumatic brain injury. Recently, studies showed the effectiveness of ischemic per-conditioning in some organs. Therefore the term ischemic conditioning, including all interventions applied pre-, per- and post-ischemia, which spans therapeutic windows in 3 time periods, has recently been broadly accepted by scientific communities. In addition, it is extensively acknowledged that ischemia-mediated protection not only affects the neurons but also all the components of the neurovascular network (consisting of neurons, glial cells, vascular endothelial cells, pericytes, smooth muscle cells, and venule/veins). The concept of cerebroprotection has been widely used in place of neuroprotection. Intensive studies on the cellular signaling pathways involved in ischemic conditioning have improved the mechanistic understanding of tolerance to cerebral ischemia. This has added impetus to exploration for potential pharmacologic mimetics, which could possibly induce and maximize inherent protective capacities. However, most of these studies were performed in rodents, and the efficacy of these mimetics remains to be evaluated in human patients. Several classical signaling pathways involving apoptosis, inflammation, or oxidation have been elaborated in the past decades. Newly characterized mechanisms are emerging with the advances in biotechnology and conceptual renewal. In this review we are going to focus on

  3. Ischemic conditioning protects from axoglial alterations of the optic pathway induced by experimental diabetes in rats.

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    Fernandez, Diego C; Pasquini, Laura A; Dorfman, Damián; Aldana Marcos, Hernán J; Rosenstein, Ruth E

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a leading cause of blindness. Visual function disorders have been demonstrated in diabetics even before the onset of retinopathy. At early stages of experimental diabetes, axoglial alterations occur at the distal portion of the optic nerve. Although ischemic conditioning can protect neurons and synaptic terminals against ischemic damage, there is no information on its ability to protect axons. We analyzed the effect of ischemic conditioning on the early axoglial alterations in the distal portion of the optic nerve induced by experimental diabetes. Diabetes was induced in Wistar rats by an intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. Retinal ischemia was induced by increasing intraocular pressure to 120 mm Hg for 5 min; this maneuver started 3 days after streptozotocin injection and was weekly repeated in one eye, while the contralateral eye was submitted to a sham procedure. The application of ischemia pulses prevented a deficit in the anterograde transport from the retina to the superior colliculus, as well as an increase in astrocyte reactivity, ultraestructural myelin alterations, and altered morphology of oligodendrocyte lineage in the optic nerve distal portion at early stages of experimental diabetes. Ischemia tolerance prevented a significant decrease of retinal glutamine synthetase activity induced by diabetes. These results suggest that early vision loss in diabetes could be abated by ischemic conditioning which preserved axonal function and structure.

  4. Ischemic conditioning protects from axoglial alterations of the optic pathway induced by experimental diabetes in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego C Fernandez

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy is a leading cause of blindness. Visual function disorders have been demonstrated in diabetics even before the onset of retinopathy. At early stages of experimental diabetes, axoglial alterations occur at the distal portion of the optic nerve. Although ischemic conditioning can protect neurons and synaptic terminals against ischemic damage, there is no information on its ability to protect axons. We analyzed the effect of ischemic conditioning on the early axoglial alterations in the distal portion of the optic nerve induced by experimental diabetes. Diabetes was induced in Wistar rats by an intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. Retinal ischemia was induced by increasing intraocular pressure to 120 mm Hg for 5 min; this maneuver started 3 days after streptozotocin injection and was weekly repeated in one eye, while the contralateral eye was submitted to a sham procedure. The application of ischemia pulses prevented a deficit in the anterograde transport from the retina to the superior colliculus, as well as an increase in astrocyte reactivity, ultraestructural myelin alterations, and altered morphology of oligodendrocyte lineage in the optic nerve distal portion at early stages of experimental diabetes. Ischemia tolerance prevented a significant decrease of retinal glutamine synthetase activity induced by diabetes. These results suggest that early vision loss in diabetes could be abated by ischemic conditioning which preserved axonal function and structure.

  5. Remote ischemic preconditioning: a novel protective method from ischemia reperfusion injury--a review.

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    Tapuria, Niteen; Kumar, Yogesh; Habib, Meer Mohammad; Abu Amara, Mahmoud; Seifalian, Alexander M; Davidson, Brian R

    2008-12-01

    Restoration of blood supply to an organ after a critical period of ischemia results in parenchymal injury and dysfunction of the organ referred to as reperfusion injury. Ischemia reperfusion injury is often seen in organ transplants, major organ resections and in shock. Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) is an adaptational response of briefly ischemic tissues which serves to protect against subsequent prolonged ischemic insults and reperfusion injury. Ischemic preconditioning can be mechanical or pharmacological. Direct mechanical preconditioning in which the target organ is exposed to brief ischemia prior to prolonged ischemia has the benefit of reducing ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) but its main disadvantage is trauma to major vessels and stress to the target organ. Remote (inter organ) preconditioning is a recent observation in which brief ischemia of one organ has been shown to confer protection on distant organs without direct stress to the organ. To discuss the evidence for remote IPC (RIPC), underlying mechanisms and possible clinical applications of RIPC. METHODS OF SEARCH: A Pubmed search with the keywords "ischemic preconditioning," "remote preconditioning," "remote ischemic preconditioning," and "ischemia reperfusion" was done. All articles on remote preconditioning up to September 2006 have been reviewed. Relevant reference articles from within these have been selected for further discussion. Experimental studies have demonstrated that the heart, liver, lung, intestine, brain, kidney and limbs are capable of producing remote preconditioning when subjected to brief IR. Remote intra-organ preconditioning was first described in the heart where brief ischemia in one territory led to protection in other areas. Translation of RIPC to clinical application has been demonstrated by the use of brief forearm ischemia in preconditioning the heart prior to coronary bypass and in reducing endothelial dysfunction of the contra lateral limb. Recently protection of the

  6. Diannexin protects against renal ischemia reperfusion injury and targets phosphatidylserines in ischemic tissue.

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    Kimberley E Wever

    Full Text Available Renal ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI frequently complicates shock, renal transplantation and cardiac and aortic surgery, and has prognostic significance. The translocation of phosphatidylserines to cell surfaces is an important pro-inflammatory signal for cell-stress after IRI. We hypothesized that shielding of exposed phosphatidylserines by the annexin A5 (ANXA5 homodimer Diannexin protects against renal IRI. Protective effects of Diannexin on the kidney were studied in a mouse model of mild renal IRI. Diannexin treatment before renal IRI decreased proximal tubule damage and leukocyte influx, decreased transcription and expression of renal injury markers Neutrophil Gelatinase Associated Lipocalin and Kidney Injury Molecule-1 and improved renal function. A mouse model of ischemic hind limb exercise was used to assess Diannexin biodistribution and targeting. When comparing its biodistribution and elimination to ANXA5, Diannexin was found to have a distinct distribution pattern and longer blood half-life. Diannexin targeted specifically to the ischemic muscle and its affinity exceeded that of ANXA5. Targeting of both proteins was inhibited by pre-treatment with unlabeled ANXA5, suggesting that Diannexin targets specifically to ischemic tissues via phosphatidylserine-binding. This study emphasizes the importance of phosphatidylserine translocation in the pathophysiology of IRI. We show for the first time that Diannexin protects against renal IRI, making it a promising therapeutic tool to prevent IRI in a clinical setting. Our results indicate that Diannexin is a potential new imaging agent for the study of phosphatidylserine-exposing organs in vivo.

  7. Glucose content and efficiency of glycolysis in protected ischemic kidneys of different species.

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    Kehrer, G; Blech, M; Kallerhoff, M; Kleinert, H; Langheinrich, M; Bretschneider, H J

    1990-01-01

    In ischemic canine kidneys protected by Bretschneider's HTK solution the glycolytic lactate production is limited by a low renal substrate content. However, for anaerobic energy supply ischemic organs depend on glycolysis. To evaluate the role of glycolysis in renal protection, the relationship between lactate production and anaerobic energy supply was examined in protected kidneys of dogs, sheep, and swine. Additionally, in canine kidneys an attempt was made to improve anaerobic energy provision by adding glucose to the protective solution. The results were as follows: (1) According to increasing lactate production from swine to dog to sheep, intraischemic ATP decay was delayed least in swine and most in sheep. (2) Glucose addition (10 mM) to the HTK solution roughly doubled the time for ATP to fall to 1 mumol/g dry wt (tATP) in dogs. (3) The greater the lactate production in all three species, the lower the decrease in SAN (ATP + ADP + AMP) from 5 to 120 min of ischemia. (4) A glucose additive in the protective solution led to a significant (p less than .005) increase of SAN in dogs at 120 min of ischemia. A sufficient substrate supply seems to be an essential component of a reliable renal protection.

  8. Thrombomodulin expression regulates tumorigenesis in bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Chun-Te; Chang, Ying-Hsu; Lin, Paul- Yang; Chen, Wen-Cheng; Chen, Miao-Fen

    2014-01-01

    The identification of potential tumor markers will help improve therapeutic planning and patient management. Thrombomodulin (TM) is a sensitive urothelial marker. TM was reported to be one of the endogenous anti-metastatic factors and has diagnostic and prognostic values for the progression of carcinoma. In the present study, we examine the role of TM in bladder cancer. We studied the role of TM in tumor behavior and related signaling pathways in vitro using the human bladder cancer cell lines HT1376, HT1197, J82 and T24, and in vivo using animal models. We also selected clinical specimens from 100 patients with bladder cancer for immunohistochemical staining to evaluate the predictive capacity of TM in tumor invasiveness. The data revealed that positive immunoreactivity for TM was inversely correlated with clinical stage and DNA methyltransferase 1 immunoreactivity. Decreased TM expression could predict the aggressive tumor growth and advanced clinical stage in bladder cancer. When TM was inhibited, tumor growth rate and invasion ability were augmented in vitro and in vivo. The underlying changes included increased cell proliferation, enhanced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and angiogenesis. Moreover, inhibition of NF-κB activation significantly increased TM expression and attenuated tumor aggressiveness in bladder cancer. TM plays an important role in bladder cancer tumor aggressiveness in vitro and in vivo and is a clinically significant predictor that may represent a suitable therapeutic target for bladder cancer

  9. Mitochondrial haplogroup H1 is protective for ischemic stroke in Portuguese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Alexandra; Fonseca, Benedita V; Krug, Tiago; Manso, Helena; Gouveia, Liliana; Albergaria, Isabel; Gaspar, Gisela; Correia, Manuel; Viana-Baptista, Miguel; Simões, Rita Moiron; Pinto, Amélia Nogueira; Taipa, Ricardo; Ferreira, Carla; Fontes, João Ramalho; Silva, Mário Rui; Gabriel, João Paulo; Matos, Ilda; Lopes, Gabriela; Ferro, José M; Vicente, Astrid M; Oliveira, Sofia A

    2008-07-01

    The genetic contribution to stroke is well established but it has proven difficult to identify the genes and the disease-associated alleles mediating this effect, possibly because only nuclear genes have been intensely investigated so far. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has been implicated in several disorders having stroke as one of its clinical manifestations. The aim of this case-control study was to assess the contribution of mtDNA polymorphisms and haplogroups to ischemic stroke risk. We genotyped 19 mtDNA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) defining the major European haplogroups in 534 ischemic stroke patients and 499 controls collected in Portugal, and tested their allelic and haplogroup association with ischemic stroke risk. Haplogroup H1 was found to be significantly less frequent in stroke patients than in controls (OR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.45-0.83, p = 0.001), when comparing each clade against all other haplogroups pooled together. Conversely, the pre-HV/HV and U mtDNA lineages emerge as potential genetic factors conferring risk for stroke (OR = 3.14, 95% CI = 1.41-7.01, p = 0.003, and OR = 2.87, 95% CI = 1.13-7.28, p = 0.021, respectively). SNPs m.3010G>A, m.7028C>T and m.11719G>A strongly influence ischemic stroke risk, their allelic state in haplogroup H1 corroborating its protective effect. Our data suggests that mitochondrial haplogroup H1 has an impact on ischemic stroke risk in a Portuguese sample.

  10. The Potential of Tetrandrine as a Protective Agent for Ischemic Stroke

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    Sheng-Hong Tseng

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is one of the leading causes of mortality, with a high incidence of severe morbidity in survivors. The treatment to minimize tissue injury after stroke is still unsatisfactory and it is mandatory to develop effective treatment strategies for stroke. The pathophysiology of ischemic stroke is complex and involves many processes including energy failure, loss of ion homeostasis, increased intracellular calcium level, platelet aggregation, production of reactive oxygen species, disruption of blood brain barrier, and inflammation and leukocyte infiltration, etc. Tetrandrine, a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid, has many pharmacologic effects including anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective effects. In addition, tetrandrine has been found to protect the liver, heart, small bowel and brain from ischemia/reperfusion injury. It is a calcium channel blocker, and can inhibit lipid peroxidation, reduce generation of reactive oxygen species, suppress the production of cytokines and inflammatory mediators, inhibit neutrophil recruitment and platelet aggregation, which are all devastating factors during ischemia/reperfusion injury of the brain. Because tetrandrine can counteract these important pathophysiological processes of ischemic stroke, it has the potential to be a protective agent for ischemic stroke.

  11. Combined iron sucrose and protoporphyrin treatment protects against ischemic and toxin-mediated acute renal failure.

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    Zager, Richard A; Johnson, Ali C M; Frostad, Kirsten B

    2016-07-01

    Tissue preconditioning, whereby various short-term stressors initiate organ resistance to subsequent injury, is well recognized. However, clinical preconditioning of the kidney for protection against acute kidney injury (AKI) has not been established. Here we tested whether a pro-oxidant agent, iron sucrose, combined with a protoporphyrin (Sn protoporphyrin), can induce preconditioning and protect against acute renal failure. Mice were pretreated with iron sucrose, protoporphyrin, cyanocobalamin, iron sucrose and protoporphyrin, or iron sucrose and cyanocobalamin. Eighteen hours later, ischemic, maleate, or glycerol models of AKI were induced, and its severity was assessed the following day (blood urea nitrogen, plasma creatinine concentrations; post-ischemic histology). Agent impact on cytoprotective gene expression (heme oxygenase 1, hepcidin, haptoglobin, hemopexin, α1-antitrypsin, α1-microglobulin, IL-10) was assessed as renal mRNA and protein levels. AKI-associated myocardial injury was gauged by plasma troponin I levels. Combination agent administration upregulated multiple cytoprotective genes and, unlike single agent administration, conferred marked protection against each tested model of acute renal failure. Heme oxygenase was shown to be a marked contributor to this cytoprotective effect. Preconditioning also blunted AKI-induced cardiac troponin release. Thus, iron sucrose and protoporphyrin administration can upregulate diverse cytoprotective genes and protect against acute renal failure. Associated cardiac protection implies potential relevance to both AKI and its associated adverse downstream effects. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Eriodictyol-7-O-glucoside activates Nrf2 and protects against cerebral ischemic injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, Xu; Ren, Dongmei; Wei, Xinbing; Shi, Huanying; Zhang, Xiumei; Perez, Ruth G.; Lou, Haiyan; Lou, Hongxiang

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is a complex disease that may involve oxidative stress-related pathways in its pathogenesis. The nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2/antioxidant response element (Nrf2/ARE) pathway plays an important role in inducing phase II detoxifying enzymes and antioxidant proteins and thus has been considered a potential target for neuroprotection in stroke. The aim of the present study was to determine whether eriodictyol-7-O-glucoside (E7G), a novel Nrf2 activator, can protect against cerebral ischemic injury and to understand the role of the Nrf2/ARE pathway in neuroprotection. In primary cultured astrocytes, E7G increased the nuclear localization of Nrf2 and induced the expression of the Nrf2/ARE-dependent genes. Exposure of astrocytes to E7G provided protection against oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced oxidative insult. The protective effect of E7G was abolished by RNA interference-mediated knockdown of Nrf2 expression. In vivo administration of E7G in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia significantly reduced the amount of brain damage and ameliorated neurological deficits. These data demonstrate that activation of Nrf2/ARE signaling by E7G is directly associated with its neuroprotection against oxidative stress-induced ischemic injury and suggest that targeting the Nrf2/ARE pathway may be a promising approach for therapeutic intervention in stroke. - Highlights: • E7G activates Nrf2 in astrocytes. • E7G stimulates expression of Nrf2-mediated cytoprotective proteins in astrocytes. • E7G protects astrocytes against OGD-induced cell death and apoptosis. • The neuroprotective effect of E7G involves the Nrf2/ARE pathway. • E7G protects rats against cerebral ischemic injury

  13. Ischemic preconditioning vs adenosine vs prostaglandin E1 for protection against liver ischemia/reperfusion injury

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    M. Radojkovic

    Full Text Available Ischemia/reperfusion injury is still a major cause of morbidity and mortality during liver surgery and transplantation. A variety of surgical and pharmacological therapeutic strategies have been investigated to minimize the effects of ischemia/reperfusion. The aim of our study was to analyze and compare preventive influences of ischemic preconditioning, adenosine and prostaglandin E1 in the experimental model of hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury. Adult chinchilla rabbits were divided into four groups: 10 rabbits subjected to liver ischemic preconditioning (3-min period of inflow occlusion followed by a 5-min period of reperfusion followed by 45 min of Pringle maneuver; 10 rabbits subjected to pre-treatment with intraportal injection of adenosine followed by 45 min of Pringle maneuver; 10 rabbits subjected to pre-treatment with intraportal injection of prostaglandin E1 followed by 45 min of Pringle maneuver; and control group of 10 rabbits subjected to 45 min of inflow liver ischemia without any preconditioning. On the second postoperative day, blood samples were obtained and biochemical parameters of liver function were measured and compared. Liver tissue samples were also obtained and histopathological changes were compared. Based on biochemical and histopathological parameters, it was demonstrated that ischemic preconditioning provided the best protection against hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury. This was probably due to a wider range of mechanisms of action of this method oriented to reduce oxidative stress and inflammation, and restore liver microcirculation and hepatocyte energy compared to the examined pharmacological strategies.

  14. Ischemic preconditioning vs adenosine vs prostaglandin E1 for protection against liver ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radojkovic, M; Stojanovic, M; Stanojevic, G; Radojkovic, D; Gligorijevic, J; Ilic, I; Stojanovic, N

    2017-07-20

    Ischemia/reperfusion injury is still a major cause of morbidity and mortality during liver surgery and transplantation. A variety of surgical and pharmacological therapeutic strategies have been investigated to minimize the effects of ischemia/reperfusion. The aim of our study was to analyze and compare preventive influences of ischemic preconditioning, adenosine and prostaglandin E1 in the experimental model of hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury. Adult chinchilla rabbits were divided into four groups: 10 rabbits subjected to liver ischemic preconditioning (3-min period of inflow occlusion followed by a 5-min period of reperfusion) followed by 45 min of Pringle maneuver; 10 rabbits subjected to pre-treatment with intraportal injection of adenosine followed by 45 min of Pringle maneuver; 10 rabbits subjected to pre-treatment with intraportal injection of prostaglandin E1 followed by 45 min of Pringle maneuver; and control group of 10 rabbits subjected to 45 min of inflow liver ischemia without any preconditioning. On the second postoperative day, blood samples were obtained and biochemical parameters of liver function were measured and compared. Liver tissue samples were also obtained and histopathological changes were compared. Based on biochemical and histopathological parameters, it was demonstrated that ischemic preconditioning provided the best protection against hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury. This was probably due to a wider range of mechanisms of action of this method oriented to reduce oxidative stress and inflammation, and restore liver microcirculation and hepatocyte energy compared to the examined pharmacological strategies.

  15. Paeonol Protects Memory after Ischemic Stroke via Inhibiting β-Secretase and Apoptosis

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    Shan-Yu Su

    2012-01-01

    cells, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL-positive cells decreased in the paeonol-administered group. Western blotting revealed decreased levels of Bax protein in mitochondria and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF in cytosol following paeonol treatment. In conclusion, we speculate that paeonol protected memory after ischemic stroke via reducing APP, BACE, and apoptosis. Supression the level of Bax and blocking the release of AIF into cytosol might participate in the anti-apoptosis provided by paeonol.

  16. Oenanthe Javanica Extract Protects Against Experimentally Induced Ischemic Neuronal Damage via its Antioxidant Effects

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    Joon Ha Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Water dropwort (Oenanthe javanica as a popular traditional medicine in Asia shows various biological properties including antioxidant activity. In this study, we firstly examined the neuroprotective effect of Oenanthe javanica extract (OJE in the hippocampal cornus ammonis 1 region (CA1 region of the gerbil subjected to transient cerebral ischemia. Methods: Gerbils were established by the occlusion of common carotid arteries for 5 min. The neuroprotective effect of OJE was estimated by cresyl violet staining. In addition, 4 antioxidants (copper, zinc superoxide dismutase [SOD], manganese SOD, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase immunoreactivities were investigated by immunohistochemistry. Results: Pyramidal neurons in the CA1 region showed neuronal death at 5 days postischemia; at this point in time, all antioxidants immunoreactivities disappeared in CA1 pyramidal neurons and showed in many nonpyramidal cells. Treatment with 200 mg/kg, not 100 mg/kg, OJE protected CA1 pyramidal neurons from ischemic damage. In addition, 200 mg/kg OJE treatment increased or maintained antioxidants immunoreactivities. Especially, among the antioxidants, glutathione peroxidase immunoreactivity was effectively increased in the CA1 pyramidal neurons of the OJE-treated sham-operated and ischemia-operated groups. Conclusion: Our present results indicate that treatment with OJE can protect neurons from transient ischemic damage and that the neuroprotective effect may be closely associated with increased or maintained intracellular antioxidant enzymes by OJE.

  17. Blocking of α4 integrin does not protect from acute ischemic stroke in mice.

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    Langhauser, Friederike; Kraft, Peter; Göb, Eva; Leinweber, Jonas; Schuhmann, Michael K; Lorenz, Kristina; Gelderblom, Mathias; Bittner, Stefan; Meuth, Sven G; Wiendl, Heinz; Magnus, Tim; Kleinschnitz, Christoph

    2014-06-01

    T lymphocytes have recently been identified as key mediators of tissue damage in ischemic stroke. The interaction between very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) and vascular adhesion molecule-1 is crucial for the transvascular egress of T lymphocytes, and inhibition of this interaction by specific antibodies is a powerful strategy to combat autoimmune neuroinflammation. However, whether pharmacological blocking of T-lymphocyte trafficking is also protective during brain ischemia is still unclear. We investigated the efficacy of a monoclonal antibody directed against VLA-4 in mouse models of ischemic stroke. Transient and permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion was induced in male C57Bl/6 mice. Animals treated with a monoclonal anti-CD49d antibody (300 μg) 24 hours before or 3 hours after the onset of cerebral ischemia and stroke outcome, including infarct size, functional status, and mortality, were assessed between day 1 and day 7. The numbers of immune cells invading the ischemic brain were determined by immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry. Blocking of VLA-4 significantly reduced the invasion of T lymphocytes and neutrophils on day 5 after middle cerebral artery occlusion and inhibited the upregulation of vascular adhesion molecule-1. However, the anti-CD49d antibody failed to influence stroke outcome positively irrespective of the model or the time point investigated. Pharmacological inhibition of the VLA-4/vascular adhesion molecule-1 axis in experimental stroke was ineffective in our hands. Our results cast doubt on the effectiveness of anti-CD49d as a stroke treatment. Further translational studies should be performed before testing anti-VLA-4 antibodies in patients with stroke. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. [Recent progress of mitochondrial quality control in ischemic heart disease and its role in cardio-protection of vagal nerve].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Run-Qing; Xu, Man; Yu, Xiao-Jiang; Liu, Long-Zhu; Zang, Wei-Jin

    2017-10-25

    Ischemic heart disease (IHD) is the life-threatening cardiovascular disease. Mitochondria have emerged as key participants and regulators of cellular energy demands and signal transduction. Mitochondrial quality is controlled by a number of coordinated mechanisms including mitochondrial fission, fusion and mitophagy, which plays an important role in maintaining healthy mitochondria and cardiac function. Recently, dysfunction of each process in mitochondrial quality control has been observed in the ischemic hearts. This review describes the mechanism of mitochondrial dynamics and mitophagy as well as its performance linked to myocardial ischemia. Moreover, in combination with our study, we will discuss the effect of vagal nerve on mitochondria in cardio-protection.

  19. Protective Effects of Enalapril on Reducing Sensorimotor Dysfunctions of Ischemic Stroke is enhanced by Its Combination with Alpha Tocopherol

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    Hamdollah Panahpour

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Ischemic stroke has complex pathophysiology and its treatment with single neuroprotective drugs has so far failed. Combination therapy could produce amplified protective effects via different mechanisms. We examined the neuroprotective effects of enalapril and/or alpha tocopherol against sensorimotor dysfunctions of ischemic stroke. Methods: Forty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups (n=8: sham, control ischemic, enalapril (0.03 mg/kg, alpha tocopherol (30mg/kg and enalapril plus alpha tocopherol treated groups. Transient focal cerebral ischemia (90 min was induced by occlusion of the left middle cerebral artery that followed by 24 h reperfusion periods. Infarct volumes were detected by TTC coloring technique and sensorimotor dysfunctions investigated by rotarod, grip strength and hotplate tests. Results: Induction of cerebral ischemia in the control group produced severe neurological sensorimotor deficits in conjunction with considerable cerebral infarctions. Compared with the enalapril or alpha tocopherol groups, the combined treatment significantly improved neurological motor and sensory functions (p=0.038 and p=0.034, respectively and also reduced the infarct volume (p=0.032. Conclusion: Administration of alpha tocopherol increased protective effects of enalapril. Enalapril combined with alpha tocopherol can produce an augmented protection against ischemic brain injury, and improvement in sensorimotor dysfunctions.

  20. Endogenous protection derived from activin A/Smads transduction loop stimulated via ischemic injury in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mang, Jing; Mei, Chun-Li; Wang, Jiao-Qi; Li, Zong-Shu; Chu, Ting-Ting; He, Jin-Ting; Xu, Zhong-Xin

    2013-10-17

    Activin A (ActA), a member of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-b) super- family, affects many cellular processes, including ischemic stroke. Though the neuroprotective effects of exogenous ActA on oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) injury have already been reported by us, the endogenous role of ActA remains poorly understood. To further define the role and mechanism of endogenous ActA and its signaling in response to acute ischemic damage, we used an OGD model in PC12 cells to simulate ischemic injury on neurons in vitro. Cells were pre-treated by monoclonal antibody against activin receptor type IIA (ActRII-Ab). We found that ActRII-Ab augments ischemic injury in PC12 cells. Further, the extracellular secretion of ActA as well as phosphorylation of smad3 in PC12 cells was also up-regulated by OGD, but suppressed by ActRII-Ab. Taken together, our results show that ActRII-Ab may augment ischemic injury via blocking of transmembrane signal transduction of ActA, which confirmed the existence of endogenous neuroprotective effects derived from the ActA/Smads pathway. ActRIIA plays an important role in transferring neuronal protective signals inside. It is highly possible that ActA transmembrance signaling is a part of the positive feed-back loop for extracellular ActA secretion.

  1. Endogenous Protection Derived from Activin A/Smads Transduction Loop Stimulated via Ischemic Injury in PC12 Cells

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    Zhong-Xin Xu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Activin A (ActA, a member of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-b super- family, affects many cellular processes, including ischemic stroke. Though the neuroprotective effects of exogenous ActA on oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD injury have already been reported by us, the endogenous role of ActA remains poorly understood. To further define the role and mechanism of endogenous ActA and its signaling in response to acute ischemic damage, we used an OGD model in PC12 cells to simulate ischemic injury on neurons in vitro. Cells were pre-treated by monoclonal antibody against activin receptor type IIA (ActRII-Ab. We found that ActRII-Ab augments ischemic injury in PC12 cells. Further, the extracellular secretion of ActA as well as phosphorylation of smad3 in PC12 cells was also up-regulated by OGD, but suppressed by ActRII-Ab. Taken together, our results show that ActRII-Ab may augment ischemic injury via blocking of transmembrane signal transduction of ActA, which confirmed the existence of endogenous neuroprotective effects derived from the ActA/Smads pathway. ActRIIA plays an important role in transferring neuronal protective signals inside. It is highly possible that ActA transmembrance signaling is a part of the positive feed-back loop for extracellular ActA secretion.

  2. Transgenic overexpression of adenine nucleotide translocase 1 protects ischemic hearts against oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klumpe, Inga; Savvatis, Konstantinos; Westermann, Dirk; Tschöpe, Carsten; Rauch, Ursula; Landmesser, Ulf; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Dörner, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    Ischemia impairs the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT), which transports ADP and ATP across the inner mitochondrial membrane. We investigated whether ANT1 overexpression has protective effects on ischemic hearts. Myocardial infarction was induced in wild-type (WT) and heart-specific ANT1-transgenic (ANT1-TG) rats, and hypoxia was set in isolated cardiomyocytes. ANT1 overexpression reduced the myocardial infarct area and increased the survival rate of infarcted rats. Reduced ANT1 expression and increased 4-hydroxynonenal modification of ANT paralleled to impaired ANT function in infarcted WT hearts. ANT1 overexpression improved ANT expression and function. This was accompanied by reduced mitochondrial cytochrome C release and caspase-3 activation. ANT1-TG hearts suffered less from oxidative stress, as shown by lower protein carbonylation and 4-hydroxynonenal modification of ANT. ANT1 overexpression also increased cell survival of hypoxic cardiomyocytes and attenuated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. This was linked to higher stability of mitochondrial membrane potential and lower activity of ROS detoxifying catalase. ANT1-TG cardiomyocytes also showed higher resistance against H2O2 treatment, which was independent of catalase activity. In conclusion, ANT1 overexpression compensates impaired ANT activity under oxygen-restricted conditions. It reduces ROS production and oxidative stress, stabilizes mitochondrial integrity, and increases survival, making ANT1 a component in ROS management and heart protection during ischemia. ANT1 overexpression reduces infarct size and increases survival after infarction. ANT1 overexpression compensates restricted ANT expression and function in infarcted hearts. Increased ANT1 expression enhances mitochondrial integrity. ANT1-overexpressing hearts reduce oxidative stress by decreasing ROS generation. ANT1 is a component in ROS management and heart protection.

  3. Tissue-type plasminogen activator protects the postsynaptic density in the ischemic brain.

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    Jeanneret, Valerie; Ospina, Juan P; Diaz, Ariel; Manrique, Luis G; Merino, Paola; Gutierrez, Laura; Torre, Enrique; Wu, Fang; Cheng, Lihong; Yepes, Manuel

    2018-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia causes the presynaptic release of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA). The postsynaptic density (PSD) is a postsynaptic structure that provides a matrix where signaling transduction of excitatory synapses takes place. The postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) is the most abundant scaffolding protein in the postsynaptic density (PSD), where it modulates the postsynaptic response to the presynaptic release of glutamate by regulating the anchoring of glutamate receptors to the PSD. We found that tPA induces the local translation of PSD-95 mRNA and the subsequent recruitment of PSD-95 protein to the PSD, via plasminogen-independent activation of TrkB receptors. Our data show that PSD-95 is removed from the PSD during the early stages of cerebral ischemia, and that this effect is abrogated by either the release of neuronal tPA, or intravenous administration of recombinant tPA (rtPA). We report that the effect of tPA on PSD-95 is associated with inhibition of the phosphorylation and recruitment of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors to the PSD, known to amplify the effect of the excitotoxic injury, and that this is followed by TrkB-mediated protection of dendritic spines from the harmful effects of the hypoxic insult. These data reveal that tPA is a synaptic protector in the ischemic brain.

  4. The possible protective effects of dipyridamole on ischemic reperfusion injury of priapism

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    Ersagun Karaguzel

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose To investigate the protective effects against ischemia reperfusion injury of dipyridamole in a model of induced priapism in rats. Materials and Methods Twenty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups, control, P/R, P/R+DMSO and P/R+D. 3ml blood specimens were collected from vena cava inferior in order to determine serum MDA, IMA, TAS, TOS and OSI values, and penile tissue was taken for histopathological examination in control group. Priapism was induced in P/R group. After 1h, priapism was concluded and 30 min reperfusion was performed. In P/R+DMSO group 1ml/kg DMSO was administered intraperitoneally 30 min before reperfusion, while in P/R+D group 10mg/kg dipyridamole was administered intraperitoneally 30 min before reperfusion. Blood and penis specimens were collected after the end of 30 min reperfusion period. Sinusoidal area (µm2, tears in tunica albuginea and injury parameters in sinusoidal endothelium of penis were investigated. Results Histopathological examination revealed no significant changes in term of sinusoidal area. A decrease in tears was observed in P/R+D group compared to P/R group (p0.05. There were no significant differences in MDA and IMA values between groups. A significant increase in TOS and OSI values was observed in P/R+D group compared to P/R group. A significant decrease in TAS levels was observed in P/R+D group compared to the P/R group. Conclusions The administration of dipyridamole before reperfusion in ischemic priapism model has a potential protective effect against histopathological injury of the penis.

  5. Probenecid protects against transient focal cerebral ischemic injury by inhibiting HMGB1 release and attenuating AQP4 expression in mice.

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    Xiong, Xiao-Xing; Gu, Li-Juan; Shen, Jian; Kang, Xian-Hui; Zheng, Yue-Ying; Yue, Si-Biao; Zhu, Sheng-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Stroke results in inflammation, brain edema, and neuronal death. However, effective neuroprotectants are not available. Recent studies have shown that high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), a proinflammatory cytokine, contributes to ischemic brain injury. Aquaporin 4 (AQP4), a water channel protein, is considered to play a pivotal role in ischemia-induced brain edema. More recently, studies have shown that pannexin 1 channels are involved in cerebral ischemic injury and the cellular inflammatory response. Here, we examined whether the pannexin 1 channel inhibitor probenecid could reduce focal ischemic brain injury by inhibiting cerebral inflammation and edema. Transient focal ischemia was induced in C57BL/6J mice by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) for 1 h. Infarct volume, neurological score and cerebral water content were evaluated 48 h after MCAO. Immunostaining, western blot analysis and ELISA were used to assess the effects of probenecid on the cellular inflammatory response, HMGB1 release and AQP4 expression. Administration of probenecid reduced infarct size, decreased cerebral water content, inhibited neuronal death, and reduced inflammation in the brain 48 h after stroke. In addition, HMGB1 release from neurons was significantly diminished and serum HMGB1 levels were substantially reduced following probenecid treatment. Moreover, AQP4 protein expression was downregulated in the cortical penumbra following post-stroke treatment with probenecid. These results suggest that probenecid, a powerful pannexin 1 channel inhibitor, protects against ischemic brain injury by inhibiting cerebral inflammation and edema.

  6. Evaluating the protective effects of radon inhalation or ascorbic acid treatment after transient global cerebral ischemic injury in gerbils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, Takahiro; Etani, Reo; Kanzaki, Norie; Sasaoka, Kaori; Kobashi, Yusuke; Hanamoto, Katsumi; Taguchi, Takehito; Yamaoka, Kiyonori

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we compared the protective effects of radon inhalation and ascorbic acid administration on transient global cerebral ischemic injury in gerbils. Gerbils were treated with radon inhalation (2000 Bq/m 3 , 24 hours) or ascorbic acid (100, 300, or 500 mg/kg body weight). Then, transient global cerebral ischemia was induced by bilateral occlusion of the common carotid artery. Results showed that the number of damaged neurons was significantly increased in gerbils that underwent ischemia compared with that in control gerbils. However, the number of damaged neurons in gerbils treated with radon or 500 mg/kg of ascorbic acid before ischemia was significantly lower than gerbils who were subjected to ischemia without any pretreatment, and the protective effects of radon inhalation were similar to the effects of administering 500 mg/kg ascorbic acid. The levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and total glutathione (t-GSH) in brain tissue were increased to a similar extent by pretreatment with radon inhalation or 500 mg/kg of ascorbic acid. These findings suggested that radon inhalation has a protective antioxidative effect against transient global cerebral ischemic injury similar to 500 mg/kg ascorbic acid treatment. (author)

  7. Neuroprotectin D1 upregulates Iduna expression and provides protection in cellular uncompensated oxidative stress and in experimental ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belayev, Ludmila; Mukherjee, Pranab K; Balaszczuk, Veronica; Calandria, Jorgelina M; Obenaus, Andre; Khoutorova, Larissa; Hong, Sung-Ha; Bazan, Nicolas G

    2017-06-01

    Ring finger protein 146 (Iduna) facilitates DNA repair and protects against cell death induced by NMDA receptor-mediated glutamate excitotoxicity or by cerebral ischemia. Neuroprotectin D1 (NPD1), a docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-derived lipid mediator, promotes cell survival under uncompensated oxidative stress (UOS). Our data demonstrate that NPD1 potently upregulates Iduna expression and provides remarkable cell protection against UOS. Iduna, which was increased by the lipid mediator, requires the presence of the poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) sites. Moreover, astrocytes and neurons in the penumbra display an enhanced abundance of Iduna, followed by remarkable neurological protection when DHA, a precursor of NPD1, is systemically administered 1 h after 2 h of ischemic stroke. These findings provide a conceptual advancement for survival of neural cells undergoing challenges to homeostasis because a lipid mediator, made 'on demand,' modulates the abundance of a critically important protein for cell survival.

  8. Postconditioning with repeated mild hypoxia protects neonatal hypoxia-ischemic rats against brain damage and promotes rehabilitation of brain function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Qingqing; Chang, Yanqun; Cheng, Xiaomao; Luo, Xingang; Zhang, Jing; Tang, Xiaoyuan

    2018-02-06

    Mild hypoxia conditioning induced by repeated episodes of transient ischemia is a clinically applicable method for protecting the brain against injury after hypoxia-ischemic brain damage. To assess the effect of repeated mild hypoxia postconditioning on brain damage and long-term neural functional recovery after hypoxia-ischemic brain damage. Rats received different protocols of repeated mild hypoxia postconditioning. Seven-day-old rats with hypoxia ischemic brain damage (HIBD) from the left carotid ligation procedure plus 2 h hypoxic stress (8% O 2 at 37 °C) were further receiving repeated mild hypoxia intermittently. The gross anatomy, functional analyses, hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1a) expression, and neuronal apoptosis of the rat brains were subsequently examined. Compared to the HIBD group, rats postconditioned with mild hypoxia had elevated HIF-1a expression, more Nissl-stain positive cells in their brain tissue and their brains functioned better in behavioral analyses. The recovery of the brain function may be directly linked to the inhibitory effect of HIF-1α on neuronal apoptosis. Furthermore, there were significantly less neuronal apoptosis in the hippocampal CA1 region of the rats postconditioned with mild hypoxia, which might also be related to the higher HIF-1a expression and better brain performance. Overall, these results suggested that postconditioning of neonatal rats after HIBD with mild hypoxia increased HIF-1a expression, exerted a neuroprotective effect and promoted neural functional recovery. Repeated mild hypoxia postconditioning protects neonatal rats with HIBD against brain damage and improves neural functional recovery. Our results may have clinical implications for treating infants with HIBD. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Protective effects of the angiotensin II ATreceptor agonist compound 21 in ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennion, Douglas M; Jones, Chad H; Dang, Alex N

    2018-01-01

    ) and systemic administration, are unsuitable for translation into humans; in the latter case because AT2receptor agonists are blood-brain barrier (BBB) impermeable. To circumvent this problem, in the current study we utilized the nose-to-brain (N2B) route of administration to bypass the BBB and deliver......-administered C21 did not affect blood pressure or heart rate. Thus, these data provide proof-of-principle for the idea that N2B application of an AT2receptor agonist can exert neuroprotective actions when administered following ischemic stroke. Since N2B delivery of other agents has been shown to be effective...... in certain human central nervous system diseases, the N2B application of AT2receptor agonists may become a viable mode of delivering these neuroprotective agents for human ischemic stroke patients....

  10. Inhibition of miR-15 Protects Against Cardiac Ischemic Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hullinger, Thomas G.; Montgomery, Rusty L.; Seto, Anita G.; Dickinson, Brent A.; Semus, Hillary M.; Lynch, Joshua M.; Dalby, Christina M.; Robinson, Kathryn; Stack, Christianna; Latimer, Paul A.; Hare, Joshua M.; Olson, Eric N.; van Rooij, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Myocardial infarction (MI) is a leading cause of death worldwide. Because endogenous cardiac repair mechanisms are not sufficient for meaningful tissue regeneration, MI results in loss of cardiac tissue and detrimental remodeling events. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression in a sequence dependent manner. Our previous data indicate that miRNAs are dysregulated in response to ischemic injury of the heart and actively contribute to cardiac remodeling after MI. Objective This study was designed to determine whether miRNAs are dysregulated on ischemic damage in porcine cardiac tissues and whether locked nucleic acid (LNA)-modified anti-miR chemistries can target cardiac expressed miRNAs to therapeutically inhibit miR-15 on ischemic injury. Methods and Results Our data indicate that the miR-15 family, which includes 6 closely related miRNAs, is regulated in the infarcted region of the heart in response to ischemia-reperfusion injury in mice and pigs. LNA-modified chemistries can effectively silence miR-15 family members in vitro and render cardiomyocytes resistant to hypoxia-induced cardiomyocyte cell death. Correspondingly, systemic delivery of miR-15 anti-miRs dose-dependently represses miR-15 in cardiac tissue of both mice and pigs, whereas therapeutic targeting of miR-15 in mice reduces infarct size and cardiac remodeling and enhances cardiac function in response to MI. Conclusions Oligonucleotide-based therapies using LNA-modified chemistries for modulating cardiac miRNAs in the setting of heart disease are efficacious and validate miR-15 as a potential therapeutic target for the manipulation of cardiac remodeling and function in the setting of ischemic injury. PMID:22052914

  11. Ischemic brain injury: New insights on the protective role of melatonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Eva; Patiño, Paloma; Reiter, Russel J; Gil-Martín, Emilio; Marco-Contelles, José; Parada, Esther; de Los Rios, Cristobal; Romero, Alejandro; Egea, Javier

    2017-03-01

    Stroke represents one of the most common causes of brain's vulnerability for many millions of people worldwide. The plethora of physiopathological events associated with brain ischemia are regulate through multiple signaling pathways leading to the activation of oxidative stress process, Ca 2+ dyshomeostasis, mitochondrial dysfunction, proinflammatory mediators, excitotoxicity and/or programmed neuronal cell death. Understanding this cascade of molecular events is mandatory in order to develop new therapeutic strategies for stroke. In this review article, we have highlighted the pleiotropic effects of melatonin to counteract the multiple processes of the ischemic cascade. Additionally, experimental evidence supports its actions to ameliorate ischemic long-term behavioural and neuronal deficits, preserving the functional integrity of the blood-brain barrier, inducing neurogenesis and cell proliferation through receptor-dependent mechanism, as well as improving synaptic transmission. Consequently, the synthesis of melatonin derivatives designed as new multitarget-directed products has focused a great interest in this area. This latter has been reinforced by the low cost of melatonin and its reduced toxicity. Furthermore, its spectrum of usages seems to be wide and with the potential for improving human health. Nevertheless, the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying melatonin´s actions need to be further exploration and accordingly, new clinical studies should be conducted in human patients with ischemic brain pathologies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Curcumin Protects against Ischemic Stroke by Titrating Microglia/Macrophage Polarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongjian Liu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the most common type of cerebrovascular disease and is a leading cause of disability and death. Ischemic stroke accounts for approximately 80% of all strokes. The remaining 20% of strokes are hemorrhagic in nature. To date, therapeutic options for acute ischemic stroke are very limited. Recent research suggests that shifting microglial phenotype from the pro-inflammatory M1 state toward the anti-inflammatory and tissue-reparative M2 phenotype may be an effective therapeutic strategy for ischemic stroke. The dietary phytochemical curcumin has shown promise in experimental stroke models, but its effects on microglial polarization and long-term recovery after stroke are unknown. Here we address these gaps by subjecting mice to distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (dMCAO and administering curcumin intraperitoneally (150 mg/kg immediately after ischemia and 24 h later. Histological studies revealed that curcumin post-treatment significantly reduced cerebral ischemic damage 3 days after dMCAO. Sensorimotor functions—as measured by the adhesive removal test and modified Garcia scores—were superior in curcumin-treated mice at 3, 5, 7 and 10 days after stroke. RT-PCR measurements revealed an elevation of M2 microglia/macrophage phenotypic markers and a reduction in M1 markers in curcumin-treated brains 3 days after dMCAO. Immunofluorescent staining further showed that curcumin treatment significantly increased the number of CD206+Iba1+ M2 microglia/macrophages and reduced the number of CD16+Iba1+ M1 cells 10 days after stroke. In vitro studies using the BV2 microglial cell line confirmed that curcumin inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS and interferon-γ (IFN-γ-induced M1 polarization. Curcumin treatment concentration-dependently reduced the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-12p70, in the absence of any toxic effect on microglial cell survival. In conclusion, we demonstrate that curcumin has a

  13. Cerebral ischemic lesions detected with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging after carotid artery stenting: Comparison of several anti-embolic protection devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Mahmoud M; Maeda, Masayuki; Sakaida, Hiroshi; Kawaguchi, Kenji; Toma, Naoki; Yamamoto, Akitaka; Hirose, Tomofumi; Miura, Youichi; Fujimoto, Masashi; Matsushima, Satoshi; Taki, Waro

    2009-09-01

    Distal embolism is an important periprocedural technical complication with carotid angioplasty and carotid artery stenting (CAS). We evaluated the safety and efficacy of protection devices used during CAS by detecting new cerebral ischemic lesions using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in 95 patients who underwent 98 CAS procedures: 34 using single PercuSurge GuardWire, 31 using double balloon protection, 15 using proximal flow reverse protection devices, 14 using Naviballoon, and 4 using filter anti-embolic devices. Diffusion-weighted imaging was performed preoperatively and postoperatively to evaluate the presence of any new embolic cerebral lesions. Postoperative diffusion-weighted imaging revealed 117 new ischemic lesions. Three patients had new ischemic stroke, two minor and one major, all ipsilateral to the treated carotid artery. The remaining patients had clinically silent ischemia. The incidence of new embolic lesions was lower using the proximal flow reverse protection device than with the double balloon protection (33% vs. 48.4%), but the volume of ipsilateral new ischemic lesions per patient was 136.6 mm(3) vs. 86.9 mm(3), respectively. Neuroprotection with Naviballoon yielded ipsilateral lesions of large volume (86.6 mm(3)) and higher number (5.7 lesions per patient) than using the filter anti-embolic device (34.8 mm(3) and 1 lesion per patient). New cerebral ischemic lesions after neuroprotected CAS are usually silent. The lower incidence of distal ischemia using proximal flow reverse and double balloon protection devices is limited by the larger volume and higher number of ischemic lesions.

  14. Cerebral ischemic lesions detected with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging after carotid artery stenting. Comparison of several anti-embolic protection devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taha, M.M.; Maeda, Masayuki; Sakaida, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Distal embolism is an important periprocedural technical complication with carotid angioplasty and carotid artery stenting (CAS). We evaluated the safety and efficacy of protection devices used during CAS by detecting new cerebral ischemic lesions using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in 95 patients who underwent 98 CAS procedures: 34 using single PercuSurge GuardWire, 31 using double balloon protection, 15 using proximal flow reverse protection devices, 14 using Naviballoon, and 4 using filter anti-embolic devices. Diffusion-weighted imaging was performed preoperatively and postoperatively to evaluate the presence of any new embolic cerebral lesions. Postoperative diffusion-weighted imaging revealed 117 new ischemic lesions. Three patients had new ischemic stroke, two minor and one major, all ipsilateral to the treated carotid artery. The remaining patients had clinically silent ischemia. The incidence of new embolic lesions was lower using the proximal flow reverse protection device than with the double balloon protection (33% vs. 48.4%), but the volume of ipsilateral new ischemic lesions per patient was 136.6 mm 3 vs. 86.9 mm 3 , respectively. Neuroprotection with Naviballoon yielded ipsilateral lesions of large volume (86.6 mm 3 ) and higher number (5.7 lesions per patient) than using the filter anti-embolic device (34.8 mm 3 and 1 lesion per patient). New cerebral ischemic lesions after neuroprotected CAS are usually silent. The lower incidence of distal ischemia using proximal flow reverse and double balloon protection devices is limited by the larger volume and higher number of ischemic lesions. (author)

  15. Thrombomodulin and von Willebrand factor as markers of radiation-induced endothelial injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Quansheng; Zhao Yimin; Li Peixia; Bai Xia; Ruan Changgeng

    1992-02-01

    Cultured confluent human umbilical vein endothelial cells were irradiated in vitro by 60 Co-gamma ray at doses from 0 to 50 Gy. After irradiation Thrombomodulin in the supernatants of endothelial cell culture medium, on the surface of the cells and within the cells was measured at different times over six days. At twenty-four hours after irradiation, an increase in the release of Thrombomodulin and von Willebrand factor from irradiated endothelial cells and an increase in the number of molecules and the activity of Thrombomodulin on the surface of the cells were observed, which were radiation-dose dependent. The capacity of the cells to produce and release Thrombomodulin was decreased from two to six days after exposure to 60 Co-gamma ray. Our data indicate that radiation can injure endothelial cells and that Thrombomodulin may be as a marker of radiation-induced endothelial cell injury. The relationship between dysfunction of irradiated endothelial cells and the pathological mechanisms of acute radiation sickness are discussed

  16. Effect of certain natural antioxidants in protecting against damage caused by gamma radiation in ischemic rat intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, T.A.A.

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in various clinical pathologies one of which is ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)- induced injury. Intestinal I/R enhances production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), inflammatory mediators and induces apoptosis. In other hand. the intestinal tract shows a high sensitivity to ionizing radiation due to a rapid cell turnover and is often implicated in radiation sickness the radiation damage may either be a consequence of a direct effect resulting in disruption of critical molecule (such as an enzyme or DNA) or an indirect effect through ionization of water molecules and formation of ROS. consequently, supplementation of antioxidants may be a beneficial approach to protect against cellular damages associated with oxidative stress. the current study was aimed to evaluate the possible protective effects of vitamin E (100 mg/kg p.o.), tomato extract (67 mg/kg. p.o.) and turmeric (100 mg/kg, p.o) against ileal injury induced in rats by total occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery for 30 min followed by reperfusion for another 30 min. Furthermore, this protective effect of the mentioned drugs was extended into injury that could happened in ileal tissues of rats exposed to (6 Gy) gamma radiation followed by intestinal I/R. Drugs were administered one daily for 14 consecutive days prior to the ischemic insult. Damage induced by I/R was manifested by depletion of ileal content of reduced glutathion (GSH) as well as Lactate dehydrogenas (LDH) activity, associated with elevation of ileal contents of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), nitrite, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Intestinal ischemic insults were exacerbated by radiation injury on comparing different untreated controls; except the ileal content of GSH which has elevated due to the preconditioning effect of irradiation. Vitamin E provided a significant protection against the decrease in LDH activity as well as the increase in TBARS

  17. Protection of Ischemic and Reperfused Rat Heart by Aqueous Extract of Urtica Dioica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Shackebaei

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Urtica dioica (U.D has widely been used in traditional medicine for its hypotensive and vasodilatory effects. The objective of this study was to clarify the effects of aqueous extract of Urtica dioica on isolated ischemia- reperfused heart.Methods: The heart of male wistar rats were isolated and perfused according to langendorff method. In the control group (n = 13 the hearts were subjected to three steps of stabilization (30 min, normothermic global ischemia (40 min and reperfusion (45 min. In addition, before and after ischemia, the aqueous extract of U.D (200 mg/ml was added to perfusion solution in the test group (n=14. Different cardiac variables including left ventricular pressure, heart rate and coronary flow were measured and rate pressure product was calculated.Results: Results showed that left ventricular pressure (59.11±4.7 and rate pressure product (13680±1136 in 45th minute of reperfusion in the test group were significantly (P=0.0187 and 0.0321 respectively greater than the control group (39.1±6.0, 9480±1480 respectively. These findings indicated decreased cardiac damage following ischemia in the test group, compared with that of control group.Conclusion: Results of the present study showed that the aqueous extract of U.D, increased the tolerance of isolated rat hearts against ischemic damage. This effect can be explained by potent antioxidant activity of the U.D extract, suggesting its clinical use in ischemic heart disease.

  18. Evidence That Ly6C(hi) Monocytes are Protective in Acute Ischemic Stroke by Promoting M2 Macrophage Polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hannah X; Broughton, Brad R S; Kim, Hyun Ah; Lee, Seyoung; Drummond, Grant R; Sobey, Christopher G

    2015-07-01

    Ly6C(hi) monocytes are generally thought to exert a proinflammatory role in acute tissue injury, although their impact after injuries to the central nervous system is poorly defined. CC chemokine receptor 2 is expressed on Ly6C(hi) monocytes and plays an essential role in their extravasation and transmigration into the brain after cerebral ischemia. We used a selective CC chemokine receptor 2 antagonist, INCB3344, to assess the effect of Ly6C(hi) monocytes recruited into the brain early after ischemic stroke. Male C57Bl/6J mice underwent occlusion of the middle cerebral artery for 1 hour followed by 23 hours of reperfusion. Mice were administered either vehicle (dimethyl sulfoxide/carboxymethylcellulose) or INCB3344 (10, 30 or 100 mg/kg IP) 1 hour before ischemia and at 2 and 6 hours after ischemia. At 24 hours, we assessed functional outcomes, infarct volume, and quantified the immune cells in blood and brain by flow cytometry or immunofluorescence. Gene expression of selected inflammatory markers was assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Ly6C(hi) monocytes were increased 3-fold in the blood and 10-fold in the brain after stroke, and these increases were selectively prevented by INCB3344 in a dose-dependent manner. Mice treated with INCB3344 exhibited markedly worse functional outcomes and larger infarct volumes, in association with reduced M2 polarization and increased peroxynitrite production in macrophages, compared with vehicle-treated mice. Our data suggest that Ly6C(hi) monocytes exert an acute protective effect after ischemic stroke to limit brain injury and functional deficit that involves promotion of M2 macrophage polarization. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Multiple actions of the coumarine derivative cloricromene and its protective effects on ischemic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calapai, G; Squadrito, F; Rizzo, A; Marciano, M C; Campo, G M; Caputi, A P

    1995-02-01

    The effects of different doses (0.25, 0.5, 1 and 2 mg/kg i.p.) of cloricromene, a coumarine derivative, have been investigated on brain malondialdehyde levels, brain edema, myeloperoxidase activity, survival, locomotor hyperactivity and hippocampal neuronal loss following transient cerebral ischemia induced by temporary bilateral carotid occlusion in the Mongolian gerbil. Cloricromene reduced brain lipid peroxidation, measured through the evaluation of malondialdehyde (-82.9% with the highest dose), and the formation of post-ischemic brain edema, evaluated by water content. The increase in myeloperoxidase activity observed in the hippocampus of postischemic animals was also reduced: 0.7 +/- 0.3 U x 10(-3) vs. 3.3 +/- 0.3 U x 10(-3)/g tissue. The same treatment increased survival and reduced hyperactivity linked to neurodegeneration induced by cerebral ischemia and reperfusion. Histological observations of the pyramidal layer of CA1 showed a reduction of neuronal loss in animals that received the drug before occlusion but not in those that were treated after the occlusion. These results show that cloricromene, a drug with multiple actions, improves brain injury induced by transient cerebral ischemia.

  20. Neutralization of the IL-17 axis diminishes neutrophil invasion and protects from ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelderblom, Mathias; Weymar, Anna; Bernreuther, Christian; Velden, Joachim; Arunachalam, Priyadharshini; Steinbach, Karin; Orthey, Ellen; Arumugam, Thiruma V; Leypoldt, Frank; Simova, Olga; Thom, Vivien; Friese, Manuel A; Prinz, Immo; Hölscher, Christoph; Glatzel, Markus; Korn, Thomas; Gerloff, Christian; Tolosa, Eva; Magnus, Tim

    2012-11-01

    The devastating effect of ischemic stroke is attenuated in mice lacking conventional and unconventional T cells, suggesting that inflammation enhances tissue damage in cerebral ischemia. We explored the functional role of αβ and γδ T cells in a murine model of stroke and distinguished 2 different T cell-dependent proinflammatory pathways in ischemia-reperfusion injury. IFN-γ produced by CD4(+) T cells induced TNF-α production in macrophages, whereas IL-17A secreted by γδ T cells led to neutrophil recruitment. The synergistic effect of TNF-α and IL-17A on astrocytes resulted in enhanced secretion of CXCL-1, a neutrophil chemoattractant. Application of an IL-17A-blocking antibody within 3 hours after stroke induction decreased infarct size and improved neurologic outcome in the murine model. In autoptic brain tissue of patients who had a stroke, we detected IL-17A-positive lymphocytes, suggesting that this aspect of the inflammatory cascade is also relevant in the human brain. We propose that selective targeting of IL-17A signaling might provide a new therapeutic option for the treatment of stroke.

  1. Remote ischemic preconditioning for renal and cardiac protection during endovascular aneurysm repair: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Stewart R; Boyle, Jonathan R; Tang, Tjun Y; Sadat, Umar; Cooper, David G; Lapsley, Marta; Norden, Anthony G; Varty, Kevin; Hayes, Paul D; Gaunt, Michael E

    2009-12-01

    To report a randomized clinical trial designed to determine if remote ischemic preconditioning (IP) has the ability to reduce renal and cardiac damage following endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Forty patients (all men; mean age 76+/-7 years) with abdominal aortic aneurysms averaging 6.3+/-0.8 cm in diameter were enrolled in the trial from November 2006 to January 2008. Eighteen patients (mean age 74 years, range 72-81) were randomized to preconditioning and completed the full remote IP protocol; there were no withdrawals. Twenty-two patients (mean age 76 years, range 66-80) were assigned to the control group. Remote IP was induced using sequential lower limb ischemia. Serum and urinary markers of renal and cardiac injury were compared between the groups. Urinary retinol binding protein (RBP) levels increased 10-fold from a median of 235 micromol/L to 2356 micromol/L at 24 hours (p = 0.0001). There was a lower increase in the preconditioned group, from 167 micromol/L to 413 micromol/L at 24 hours (p = 0.04). The median urinary albumin:creatinine ratio was significantly lower in the preconditioned group at 24 hours (5 versus 8.8, p = 0.06). There were no differences in the rates of renal impairment or major adverse cardiac events. Remote preconditioning reduces urinary biomarkers of renal injury in patients undergoing elective EVAR. This small pilot trial was unable to detect an effect on clinical endpoints; further trials are warranted.

  2. Protective Effect of Ischemic Preconditioning on Myocardium Against Remote Tissue Injury Following Transient Focal Cerebral Ischemia in Diabetic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumas, Meltem; Altintas, Ozge; Karatas, Ersin; Kocyigit, Abdurrahim

    2017-01-01

    Background Remote ischemic preconditioning (IPreC) could provide tissue-protective effect at a remote site by anti-inflammatory, neuronal, and humoral signaling pathways. Objectives The aim of the study was to investigate the possible protective effects of remote IPreC on myocardium after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) in streptozotocin- induced diabetic (STZ) and non-diabetic rats. Methods 48 male Spraque Dawley rats were divided into eight groups: Sham, STZ, IPreC, MCAo, IPreC+MCAo, STZ+IPreC, STZ+MCAo and STZ+IPreC+MCAo groups. We induced transient MCAo seven days after STZ-induced diabetes, and performed IPreC 72 hours before transient MCAo. Remote myocardial injury was investigated histopathologically. Bax, Bcl2 and caspase-3 protein levels were measured by Western blot analysis. Total antioxidant status (TAS), total oxidant status (TOS) of myocardial tissue were measured by colorimetric assay. Oxidative stress index(OSI) was calculated as TOS-to-TAS ratio. For all statistical analysis, p values < 0.05 were considered significant. Results We observed serious damage including necrosis, congestion and mononuclear cell infiltration in myocardial tissue of the diabetic and ischemic groups. In these groups TOS and OSI levels were significantly higher; TAS levels were lower than those of IPreC related groups (p < 0.05). IPreC had markedly improved histopathological alterations and increased TAS levels in IPreC+MCAo and STZ+IPreC+MCAo compared to MCAo and STZ+MCAo groups (p < 0.05). In non-diabetic rats, MCAo activated apoptotic cell death via increasing Bax/Bcl2 ratio and caspase-3 levels. IPreC reduced apoptotic cell death by suppressing pro-apoptotic proteins. Diabetes markedly increased apoptotic protein levels and the effect did not reversed by IPreC. Conclusions We could suggest that IPreC attenuates myocardial injury via ameliorating histological findings, activating antioxidant mechanisms, and inducing antiapoptotic activity in diabetic

  3. Protective Effect of Ischemic Preconditioning on Myocardium Against Remote Tissue Injury Following Transient Focal Cerebral Ischemia in Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meltem Kumas

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Remote ischemic preconditioning (IPreC could provide tissue-protective effect at a remote site by anti-inflammatory, neuronal, and humoral signaling pathways. Objectives: The aim of the study was to investigate the possible protective effects of remote IPreC on myocardium after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo in streptozotocin- induced diabetic (STZ and non-diabetic rats. Methods: 48 male Spraque Dawley rats were divided into eight groups: Sham, STZ, IPreC, MCAo, IPreC+MCAo, STZ+IPreC, STZ+MCAo and STZ+IPreC+MCAo groups. We induced transient MCAo seven days after STZ-induced diabetes, and performed IPreC 72 hours before transient MCAo. Remote myocardial injury was investigated histopathologically. Bax, Bcl2 and caspase-3 protein levels were measured by Western blot analysis. Total antioxidant status (TAS, total oxidant status (TOS of myocardial tissue were measured by colorimetric assay. Oxidative stress index(OSI was calculated as TOS-to-TAS ratio. For all statistical analysis, p values < 0.05 were considered significant. Results: We observed serious damage including necrosis, congestion and mononuclear cell infiltration in myocardial tissue of the diabetic and ischemic groups. In these groups TOS and OSI levels were significantly higher; TAS levels were lower than those of IPreC related groups (p < 0.05. IPreC had markedly improved histopathological alterations and increased TAS levels in IPreC+MCAo and STZ+IPreC+MCAo compared to MCAo and STZ+MCAo groups (p < 0.05. In non-diabetic rats, MCAo activated apoptotic cell death via increasing Bax/Bcl2 ratio and caspase-3 levels. IPreC reduced apoptotic cell death by suppressing pro-apoptotic proteins. Diabetes markedly increased apoptotic protein levels and the effect did not reversed by IPreC. Conclusions: We could suggest that IPreC attenuates myocardial injury via ameliorating histological findings, activating antioxidant mechanisms, and inducing

  4. P-glycoprotein-deficient mice have proximal tubule dysfunction but are protected against ischemic renal injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huls, M.; Kramers, C.; Levtchenko, E.N.; Wilmer, M.J.G.; Dijkman, H.B.P.M.; Kluijtmans, L.A.J.; Hoorn, J.W.A. van der; Russel, F.G.M.; Masereeuw, R.

    2007-01-01

    The multidrug resistance gene 1 product, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), is expressed in several excretory organs, including the apical membrane of proximal tubules. After inducing acute renal failure, P-gp expression is upregulated and this might be a protective function by pumping out toxicants and harmful

  5. Cardiac progenitor-derived exosomes protect ischemic myocardium from acute ischemia/reperfusion injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Lijuan [Department of Cardiology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School of Southeast University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Cardiovascular Disease, Internal Medicine, University of Cincinnati, 231 Albert Sabin Way, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States); Wang, Yingjie [Cardiovascular Disease, Internal Medicine, University of Cincinnati, 231 Albert Sabin Way, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States); Internal Medicine of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shuguang Hospital of Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai 201203 (China); Pan, Yaohua; Zhang, Lan [Cardiovascular Disease, Internal Medicine, University of Cincinnati, 231 Albert Sabin Way, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States); Shen, Chengxing [Department of Cardiology, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Qin, Gangjian [Feinberg Cardiovascular Research Institute, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Ashraf, Muhammad [Pathology and Lab Med, University of Cincinnati, 231 Albert Sabin Way, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States); Weintraub, Neal [Cardiovascular Disease, Internal Medicine, University of Cincinnati, 231 Albert Sabin Way, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States); Ma, Genshan, E-mail: magenshan@hotmail.com [Department of Cardiology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School of Southeast University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Tang, Yaoliang, E-mail: tangyg@ucmail.uc.edu [Cardiovascular Disease, Internal Medicine, University of Cincinnati, 231 Albert Sabin Way, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► Cardiac progenitor-derived (CPC) Exosomes protect H9C2 from apoptosis in vitro. ► CPC-exosomes protect cardiomyoyctes from MI/R induced apoptosis in vivo. ► CPC-exosomes were taken up by H9C2 with high efficiency using PKH26 labeling. ► miR-451, one of GATA4-responsive miRNA cluster, is enriched in CPC-exosomes. -- Abstract: Background: Cardiac progenitors (CPC) mediate cardioprotection via paracrine effects. To date, most of studies focused on secreted paracrine proteins. Here we investigated the CPC-derived-exosomes on protecting myocardium from acute ischemia/reperfusion (MI/R) injury. Methods and results: CPC were isolated from mouse heart using two-step protocol. Exosomes were purified from conditional medium, and confirmed by electron micrograph and Western blot using CD63 as a marker. qRT-PCR shows that CPC-exosomes have high level expression of GATA4-responsive-miR-451. Exosomes were ex vivo labeled with PKH26, We observed exosomes can be uptaken by H9C2 cardiomyoblasts with high efficiency after 12 h incubation. CPC-exosomes protect H9C2 from oxidative stress by inhibiting caspase 3/7 activation invitro. In vivo delivery of CPC-exosomes in an acute mouse myocardial ischemia/reperfusion model inhibited cardiomyocyte apoptosis by about 53% in comparison with PBS control (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Our results suggest, for the first time, the CPC-exosomes can be used as a therapeutic vehicle for cardioprotection, and highlights a new perspective for using non-cell exosomes for cardiac disease.

  6. Early and moderate sensory stimulation exerts a protective effect on perilesion representations of somatosensory cortex after focal ischemic damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xerri, Christian; Zennou-Azogui, Yoh'i

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that intensive training within an early critical time window after focal cortical ischemia increases the area of damaged tissue and is detrimental to behavioral recovery. We postulated that moderate stimulation initiated soon after the lesion could have protective effects on peri-infarct cortical somatotopic representations. Therefore, we have assessed the effects of mild cutaneous stimulation delivered in an attention-demanding behavioral context on the functional organization of the perilesion somatosensory cortex using high-density electrophysiological mapping. We compared the effects of 6-day training initiated on the 3rd day postlesion (early training; ET) to those of same-duration training started on the 8th day (delayed training; DT). Our findings confirm previous work showing that the absence of training aggravates representational loss in the perilesion zone. In addition, ET was found to be sufficient to limit expansion of the ischemic lesion and reduce tissue loss, and substantially maintain the neuronal responsiveness to tactile stimulation, thereby preserving somatotopic map arrangement in the peri-infarct cortical territories. By contrast, DT did not prevent tissue loss and only partially reinstated lost representations in a use-dependent manner within the spared peri-infarct cortical area. This study differentiates the effects of early versus delayed training on perilesion tissue and cortical map reorganization, and underscores the neuroprotective influence of mild rehabilitative stimulation on neuronal response properties in the peri-infarct cortex during an early critical period.

  7. INFLUENCE OF BONE MARROW ALLOGENEIC MULTIPOTENT MESENCHYMAL STROMAL CELLS ON THE FORMATION OF ANTI-ISCHEMIC KIDNEY PROTECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Mescherin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Аim of this work was to study the influence of intravenous injection times of bone marrow allogeneic multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (BM MMSCs on kidney function and morphology in modeled ischemicreperfusion injury of kidney (IRIK. Materials and methods. The study was conducted on 90 male Wistar rats. On the original IRI model of a single kidney (60 min, warm ischemia 4 groups of experiments were performed: in the first group the dose of 5 × 106 of BM MMSCs was administered intravenously 14 days before IRIK modeling; in the second group, the same dose of BM MMSCs was administered 7 days before IRIK; in the third group, the same dose of BM MMSCs was administered during kidney reperfusion after IRIK modeling; the fourth group served as the control group (IRIK without BM МMSCs. The study duration was 21 days since the start of IRIK modeling. In all groups the nitrogen secretory function of kidneys was examined and the histological condition of kidneys during the entire recovery period was evaluated. Besides, blood of rats of the first and the fourth groups was examined for proand anti-inflammatory cytokine levels and phagocytosis indices using the suspension of inactivated St. aureus. The significance of differences in these two groups was evaluated by Student's test at p < 0.05. Results. It has been demonstrated that the pretreatment with BM MMSCs (1 and 2 weeks before IRIK modeling increased the anti-ischemic resistance of kidney while the administration of BM MMSCs on the day of IRIK modeling (during reperfusion enhanced kidney damage, characterized by increased mortality, elevated levels of urea and creatinine in blood and structural injury of renal tissue, as compared to other groups. The comparative analysis of the first and fourth groups shows that BM MMSCs decrease the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and increase the levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines, as well as enhance potential of antimicrobial protection. Conclusion

  8. ABO Gene Polymorphism and Thrombomodulin ?33G>A Polymorphism Were Not Risk Factors for Myocardial Infarction in Javanese Men

    OpenAIRE

    Lukitasari, Mifetika; Sadewa, Ahmad Hamim; Rohman, Mohammad Saifur

    2017-01-01

    Genetic factors contribute to about a half of coronary artery diseases. During the last several decades, some studies suggested that non-O blood group and thrombomodulin polymorphism ?33G>A are the risk factors of coronary artery disease especially in Asia. There was no prior study in Indonesia regarding this issue. Hence, this study was designed to investigate the correlation of ABO polymorphism and thrombomodulin polymorphism ?33G>A with the incidence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). A...

  9. Remote Ischemic Conditioning to Protect against Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevoord, Daniel; Kranke, Peter; Kuijpers, Marijn; Weber, Nina; Hollmann, Markus; Preckel, Benedikt

    2012-01-01

    Background Remote ischemic conditioning is gaining interest as potential method to induce resistance against ischemia reperfusion injury in a variety of clinical settings. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate whether remote ischemic conditioning reduces mortality, major adverse cardiovascular events, length of stay in hospital and in the intensive care unit and biomarker release in patients who suffer from or are at risk for ischemia reperfusion injury. Methods and Results Medline, EMBASE and Cochrane databases were searched for randomized clinical trials comparing remote ischemic conditioning, regardless of timing, with no conditioning. Two investigators independently selected suitable trials, assessed trial quality and extracted data. 23 studies in patients undergoing cardiac surgery (15 studies), percutaneous coronary intervention (four studies) and vascular surgery (four studies), comprising in total 1878 patients, were included in this review. Compared to no conditioning, remote ischemic conditioning did not reduce mortality (odds ratio 1.22 [95% confidence interval 0.48, 3.07]) or major adverse cardiovascular events (0.65 [0.38, 1.14]). However, the incidence of myocardial infarction was reduced with remote ischemic conditioning (0.50 [0.31, 0.82]), as was peak troponin release (standardized mean difference −0.28 [−0.47, −0.09]). Conclusion There is no evidence that remote ischemic conditioning reduces mortality associated with ischemic events; nor does it reduce major adverse cardiovascular events. However, remote ischemic conditioning did reduce the incidence of peri-procedural myocardial infarctions, as well as the release of troponin. PMID:22860077

  10. NK Cell Regulatory Property is Involved in the Protective Role of MSC-Derived Extracellular Vesicles in Renal Ischemic Reperfusion Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xiangyu; Gu, Di; Zhang, Guangyuan; Zhong, Liang; Cheng, Zhongliang; Liu, Guohua; Zhu, Yingjian

    2016-11-01

    Immunomodulation has been regarded as an important therapeutic aspect of mesenchymal stromal cell-derived extracellular vesicles (MSC-EVs) in renal ischemic reperfusion injury (IRI), and the specific mechanism still unclear. Here, we attempt to test the function of human MSC-EVs on renal IRI by targeting the natural killer (NK) cells and to investigate the possible mechanism. Data indicated that EVs decreased NK cells in spleen and ischemic kidney. Both the EVs and antibody-dependent depletion of NK cells displayed a protective role in IRI rats. Moreover, the splenectomy model was established to evaluate the role of spleen in this process. It showed that the NK cell regulatory ability and renal protective effects by EVs still exist without spleen, which is unlike MSC properties published previously. Further, the down-regulation of chemokines in injured kidney and the delivery of RNAs through EVs in vitro were also observed. Through the microRNA array test, various inflammation-related microRNAs highly expressed in MSC-EVs compared with fibroblast EVs were tested. Thus, these results indicated that MSC-EVs could ameliorate renal ischemic reperfusion injury by decreasing NK cells and the spleen is not necessary in this process. The regulation of chemokines in injured kidney was the other factor, and the transfer of various microRNAs in the MSC-EVs may be involved. This provides direction for future clinical applications.

  11. [Low sensibility to the action of thrombomodulin in cirrhotic patients. Interest of thrombinography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinegre, Thomas; Abergel, Armand; Sapin, Anne-Françoise; Lamblin, Géraldine; Marques-Verdier, Alain; Duron, Cédric; Lebreton, Aurélien

    2016-01-01

    Cirrhosis is associated with complex hemostatic modifications. Most coagulation factors, either procoagulants or anticoagulants, are reduced. Conventional coagulation tests (prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time) don't allow to precisely identify the thrombotic risk as they are not sensible to coagulation inhibitors deficiencies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the coagulation in a population of cirrhotic patients using thrombinography. We analyzed the plasma samples from 30 cirrhotic patients (10 Child A, 10 Child B, Child C 10) compared to 10 healthy controls using thrombinography with and without thrombomodulin to sensiblise this test at the activated protein C pathway. The results of endogenous thrombin potential, the main parameter, expressed as a ratio (thrombinography with/without thrombomodulin) were significantly higher in cirrhotic patients (0.69 ± 0.16) than in controls (0.49 ± 0.10) which reflects a low sensibility to the action of thrombomodulin. This resistance increases with the severity of the disease assessed by the Child-Pugh score, demonstrating a potential hypercoagulable state. The results of the thrombinography challenge the dogma that cirrhotic patients are naturally "anticoagulated." These results highlight the potential interest of the thrombinography in the detection and monitoring of hypercoagulability in cirrhotic patient. Increasing hypercoagulability with the severity of the disease seems to be correlated with clinical observations since the occurrence of thrombosis is more common when cirrhosis is at an advanced stage.

  12. Endogenous Protection Derived from Activin A/Smads Transduction Loop Stimulated via Ischemic Injury in PC12 Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mang, Jing; Mei, Chun-Li; Wang, Jiao-Qi; Li, Zong-Shu; Chu, Ting-Ting; He, Jin-Ting; Xu, Zhong-Xin

    2013-01-01

    Activin A (ActA), a member of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-b) super- family, affects many cellular processes, including ischemic stroke. Though the neuroprotective effects of exogenous ActA on oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) injury have already been reported by us, the endogenous role of ActA remains poorly understood. To further define the role and mechanism of endogenous ActA and its signaling in response to acute ischemic damage, we used an OGD model in PC12 cells to simulate isch...

  13. Protective Effects of L-902,688, a Prostanoid EP4 Receptor Agonist, against Acute Blood-Brain Barrier Damage in Experimental Ischemic Stroke

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    Kelly M. DeMars

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke occurs when a clot forms in the brain vasculature that starves downstream tissue of oxygen and nutrients resulting in cell death. The tissue immediately downstream of the blockage, the core, dies within minutes, but the surrounding tissue, the penumbra is potentially salvageable. Prostaglandin E2 binds to four different G-protein coupled membrane receptors EP1–EP4 mediating different and sometimes opposing responses. Pharmacological activation of the EP4 receptor has already been established as neuroprotective in stroke, but the mechanism(s of protection are not well-characterized. In this study, we hypothesized that EP4 receptor activation reduces ischemic brain injury by reducing matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-3/-9 production and blood-brain barrier (BBB damage. Rats underwent transient ischemic stroke for 90 min. Animals received an intravenous injection of either the vehicle or L-902,688, a highly specific EP4 agonist, at the onset of reperfusion. Brain tissue was harvested at 24 h. We established a dose-response curve and used the optimal dose that resulted in the greatest infarct reduction to analyze BBB integrity compared to vehicle-treated rats. The presence of IgG, a blood protein, in the brain parenchyma is a marker of BBB damage, and L-902,688 (1 mg/kg; i.v. dramatically reduced IgG extravasation (P < 0.05. Consistent with these data, we assessed zona occludens-1 and occludin, tight junction proteins integral to the maintenance of the BBB, and found reduced degradation with L-902,688 administration. With immunoblotting, qRT-PCR, and/or a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET-based activity assay, we next measured MMP-3/-9 since they are key effectors of BBB breakdown in stroke. In the cerebral cortex, not only was MMP-3 activity significantly decreased (P < 0.05, but L-902,688 treatment also reduced MMP-9 mRNA, protein, and enzymatic activity (P < 0.001. In addition, post-ischemic administration of the EP4

  14. Activated protein C analog protects from ischemic stroke and extends the therapeutic window of tissue-type plasminogen activator in aged female mice and hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaoming; Zhao, Zhen; Chow, Nienwen; Rajput, Padmesh S; Griffin, John H; Lyden, Patrick D; Zlokovic, Berislav V

    2013-12-01

    3K3A-activated protein C (APC) protects young, healthy male rodents after ischemic stroke. 3K3A-APC is currently under development as a neuroprotectant for acute ischemic stroke in humans. Stroke Therapy Academic Industry Roundtable recommends that after initial studies in young, healthy male animals, further studies should be performed in females, aged animals, and animals with comorbid conditions. Here, we studied the effects of delayed 3KA-APC therapy alone and with tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) in aged female mice and spontaneously hypertensive rats. We used Stroke Therapy Academic Industry Roundtable recommendations for ensuring good scientific inquiry. Murine recombinant 3K3A-APC (0.2 mg/kg) alone or with recombinant tPA (10 mg/kg) was given intravenously 4 hours after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in aged female mice and rats and after embolic stroke in spontaneously hypertensive rat. 3K3A-APC was additionally administered within 3 to 7 days after stroke. The neuropathological analysis and neurological scores, foot-fault, forelimb asymmetry, and adhesive removal tests were performed within 7 and 28 days of stroke. In all models, tPA alone had no effects on the infarct volume or behavior. 3K3A-APC alone or with tPA reduced the infarct volume 7 days after the middle cerebral artery occlusion in aged female mice and embolic stroke in spontaneously hypertensive rat by 62% to 66% and 50% to 53%, respectively, significantly improved (Pmice, 3K3A-APC was protective within 4 weeks of stroke. 3K3A-APC protects from ischemic stroke and extends the therapeutic window of tPA in aged female mice and in spontaneously hypertensive rat with a comorbid condition.

  15. Protective effect of naringenin in experimental ischemic stroke: down-regulated NOD2, RIP2, NF-κB, MMP-9 and up-regulated claudin-5 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xue; Zhang, Xiangjian; Chen, Linyu; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Lan; Zhao, Xumeng; Zhao, Ting; Zhao, Yuan

    2014-08-01

    Inflammatory damage plays a pivotal, mainly detrimental role in cerebral ischemic pathogenesis and may represent a promising target for treatment. Naringenin (NG) has gained growing appreciation for its beneficial biological effects through its anti-inflammatory property. Whether this protective effect applies to cerebral ischemic injury, we therefore investigate the potential neuroprotective role of NG and the underlying mechanisms. Focal cerebral ischemia in male Sprague-Dawley rats was induced by permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) and NG was pre-administered intragastrically once daily for four consecutive days before surgery. Neurological deficit, brain water content and infarct volume were measured at 24 h after stroke. Immunohistochemistry, Western blot and RT-qPCR were used to explore the anti-inflammatory potential of NG in the regulation of NOD2, RIP2 and NF-κB in ischemic cerebral cortex. Additionally, the activities of MMP-9 and claudin-5 were analyzed to detect NG's influence on blood-brain barrier. Compared with pMCAO and Vehicle groups, NG noticeably improved neurological deficit, decreased infarct volume and edema at 24 h after ischemic insult. Consistent with these results, our data also indicated that NG significantly downregulated the expression of NOD2, RIP2, NF-κB and MMP-9, and upregulated the expression of claudin-5 (P < 0.05). The results provided a neuroprotective profile of NG in cerebral ischemia, this effect was likely exerted by down-regulated NOD2, RIP2, NF-κB, MMP-9 and up-regulated claudin-5 expression.

  16. Evidence that OGG1 glycosylase protects neurons against oxidative DNA damage and cell death under ischemic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Dong; Croteau, Deborah L; Souza-Pinto, Nadja

    2011-01-01

    to ischemic and oxidative stress. After exposure of cultured neurons to oxidative and metabolic stress levels of OGG1 in the nucleus were elevated and mitochondria exhibited fragmentation and increased levels of the mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) and reduced membrane potential....... Cortical neurons isolated from OGG1(-/-) mice were more vulnerable to oxidative insults than were OGG1(+/+) neurons, and OGG1(-/-) mice developed larger cortical infarcts and behavioral deficits after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion compared with OGG1(+/+) mice. Accumulations of oxidative DNA...... increased levels of a nuclear isoform OGG1, suggesting an adaptive response to oxidative nuclear DNA damage. Thus, OGG1 has a pivotal role in repairing oxidative damage to nuclear DNA under ischemic conditions, thereby reducing brain damage and improving functional outcome.Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow...

  17. Protection by the gross saponins of Tribulus terrestris against cerebral ischemic injury in rats involves the NF-κB pathway

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    En-ping Jiang

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate whether the gross saponins of Tribulus terrestris (GSTT, a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, have neuroprotective effects on rats subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO, through nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB pathway and inflammatory mediators. Cerebral ischemia was produced by MCAO in either untreated (control or GSTT-pretreated rats, and the animals were examined for infarct volume, cerebral edema, neuro-behavioral abnormality and pathological changes. Meanwhile, the expression of NF-κB protein in brain tissue was analyzed on Western blots and the serum levels of TNF-α and IL-1 were determined by ELISA. The experimental results demonstrated that, compared with the control MCAO group, GSTT-pretreated MCAO group had significantly reduced infarct volume, brain edema and neuro-behavioral abnormality, and lesser degree of pathologic changes in the brain, as well as had lower levels of serum TNF-α and IL-1β, and higher levels of brain NF-κB (P<0.05. Furthermore, treatment with an NF-κB inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC abolished the protective effects of GSTT against MCAO-induced cerebral ischemic injury. These results indicated that GSTT's ability to protect against cerebral ischemic injury was mediated through the NF-κB signaling pathway, and that GSTT may act through inhibition of the production of inflammatory mediators.

  18. Transglutaminase 2 gene ablation protects against renal ischemic injury by blocking constant NF-κB activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae-Seok; Kim, Bora; Tahk, Hongmin; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Ahn, Eu-Ree; Choi, Changsun; Jeon, Yoon; Park, Seo Young; Lee, Ho; Oh, Seung Hyun; Kim, Soo-Youl

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → No acute renal tubular necrotic lesions were found in TGase2 -/- mice with ischemic kidney injury. → NF-κB activation is reduced in TGase2 -/- mice with ischemic kidney injury. → Hypoxic stress did not increase NF-κB activity in MEFs from TGase2 -/- mice. → COX-2 induction is suppressed in TGase2 -/- mice with ischemic kidney injury. -- Abstract: Transglutaminase 2 knockout (TGase2 -/- ) mice show significantly reduced inflammation with decreased myofibroblasts in a unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) model, but the mechanism remains to be clarified. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation plays a major role in the progression of inflammation in an obstructive nephropathy model. However, the key factors extending the duration of NF-κB activation in UUO are not known. In several inflammatory diseases, we and others recently found that TGase 2 plays a key role in extending NF-κB activation, which contributes to the pathogenesis of disease. In the current study, we found that NF-κB activity in mouse embryogenic fibroblasts (MEFs) from TGase2 -/- mice remained at the control level while the NF-κB activity of wild-type (WT) MEFs was highly increased under hypoxic stress. Using the obstructive nephropathy model, we found that NF-κB activity remained at the control level in TGase2 -/- mouse kidney tissues, as measured by COX-2 expression, but was highly increased in WT tissues. We conclude that TGase 2 gene ablation reduces the duration of NF-κB activation in ischemic injury.

  19. Remote Ischemic Postconditioning Protects against Myocardial Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury by Inhibition of the RAGE-HMGB1 Pathway

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    Xiangming Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of the present study was to observe the effect of RAGE-HMGB1 signal pathway on remote ischemic postconditioning in mice with myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury. Methods. Mice model of MIRI was established and randomly divided into three groups: control group, ischemia reperfusion group, and remote ischemic postconditioning group. Infarction size was detected by Evans blue and TTC staining. Cardiac function was detected by echocardiography measurement. The protein levels of RAGE, HMGB1, P-AKT, and ERK1/2 were detected by Western blot 120 min following reperfusion. Results. RIPostC could decrease the infarct size and increase LVEF and FS compared with I/R group. Two hours after myocardial ischemia reperfusion, the levels of RAGE and HMGB1 were significantly decreased in RIPostC group compared with those in I/R group. The level of p-AKT was significantly higher in the RIPostC group than in the I/R group. LY294002 significantly attenuated RIPostC-increased levels of Akt phosphorylation. Conclusion. RIPostC may inhibit the expression of RAGE and HMGB1 and activate PI3K/Akt signaling pathway to extenuate ischemic reperfusion injury in mice. It could further suppress the oxidative stress, have antiapoptosis effect, and reduce inflammatory reaction, but this effect has certain timeliness.

  20. LFA-1 and Mac-1 integrins bind to the serine/threonine-rich domain of thrombomodulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamoto, Eiji [Department of Molecular Pathobiology and Cell Adhesion Biology, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-174 Edobashi, Tsu, Mie 514-8507 (Japan); Emergency and Critical Care Center, Mie University Hospital, 2-174 Edobashi, Tsu 514-8507 (Japan); Okamoto, Takayuki, E-mail: okamotot@doc.medic.mie-u.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Pathobiology and Cell Adhesion Biology, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-174 Edobashi, Tsu, Mie 514-8507 (Japan); Takagi, Yoshimi [Department of Molecular Pathobiology and Cell Adhesion Biology, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-174 Edobashi, Tsu, Mie 514-8507 (Japan); Honda, Goichi [Medical Affairs Department, Asahi Kasei Pharma Corporation, 1-105 Kanda Jinbo-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8101 (Japan); Suzuki, Koji [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Science, Suzuka University of Medical Science, 3500-3, Minamitamagaki-cho, Suzuka, Mie 513-8679 (Japan); Imai, Hiroshi [Emergency and Critical Care Center, Mie University Hospital, 2-174 Edobashi, Tsu 514-8507 (Japan); Shimaoka, Motomu, E-mail: shimaoka@doc.medic.mie-u.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Pathobiology and Cell Adhesion Biology, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-174 Edobashi, Tsu, Mie 514-8507 (Japan)

    2016-05-13

    LFA-1 (αLβ2) and Mac-1 (αMβ2) integrins regulate leukocyte trafficking in health and disease by binding primarily to IgSF ligand ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 on endothelial cells. Here we have shown that the anti-coagulant molecule thrombomodulin (TM), found on the surface of endothelial cells, functions as a potentially new ligand for leukocyte integrins. We generated a recombinant extracellular domain of human TM and Fc fusion protein (TM-domains 123-Fc), and showed that pheripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) bind to TM-domains 123-Fc dependent upon integrin activation. We then demonstrated that αL integrin-blocking mAb, αM integrin-blocking mAb, and β2 integrin-blocking mAb inhibited the binding of PBMCs to TM-domains 123-Fc. Furthermore, we show that the serine/threonine-rich domain (domain 3) of TM is required for the interaction with the LFA-1 (αLβ2) and Mac-1 (αMβ2) integrins to occur on PBMCs. These results demonstrate that the LFA-1 and Mac-1 integrins on leukocytes bind to TM, thereby establishing the molecular and structural basis underlying LFA-1 and Mac-1 integrin interaction with TM on endothelial cells. In fact, integrin-TM interactions might be involved in the dynamic regulation of leukocyte adhesion with endothelial cells. - Highlights: • LFA-1 and Mac-1 integrins bind to the anti-coagulant molecule thrombomodulin. • The serine/threonine-rich domain of thrombomodulin is essential to interact with the LFA-1 and Mac-1 integrins on PBMCs. • Integrin-TM interactions might be involved in the dynamic regulation of leukocyte adhesion with endothelial cells.

  1. Thrombomodulin as a New Marker of Endothelial Dysfunction in Chronic Kidney Disease in Children

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    Dorota Drożdż

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial dysfunction (ED and oxidative stress are potential new pathomechanisms of cardiovascular diseases in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. The aim of the study was to assess the association between endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress biomarkers, and cardiovascular risk factors in children with CKD. Serum oxidized LDL (oxLDL, protein carbonyl group, urea, creatinine, cystatin C, thrombomodulin, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA, von Willebrand factor, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP, lipids, high sensitivity C-reactive protein, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 levels, and albuminuria were measured. Anthropometric, ambulatory blood pressure (BP measurements and echocardiography were performed. The studied group consisted of 59 patients aged 0.7–18.6 (mean 11.1 years with stages 1 to 5 CKD. Thrombomodulin strongly correlated with creatinine (R=0.666; p<0.001, cystatin C (R=0.738; p<0.001, BNP (R=0.406; p=0.001, ADMA (R=0.353; p=0.01, oxLDL (R=0.340; p=0.009, 24-hour systolic (R=0.345; p=0.011 and mean (R=0.315; p<0.05 BP values, and left ventricular mass index (LVMI, R=0.293; p=0.024 and negatively with estimated glomerular filtration rate (R=−0.716; p<0.001. In children with CKD, TM strongly depended on kidney function parameters, oxLDL levels, and 24-hour systolic and mean BP values. Thrombomodulin seems to be a valuable marker of ED in CKD patients, correlating with CKD stage as well as oxidative stress, BP values, and LVMI.

  2. Combined preconditioning with hypoxia and GYKI-52466 protects rats from cerebral ischemic injury by HIF-1α/eNOS pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuchan; Lu, Fang; Zhuang, Lihua; Yang, Shuohui; Kong, Yingnan; Tan, Wenli; Gong, Zhigang; Zhan, Songhua

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral ischemic injury has been the leading cause of death and long term disability in the world because of the lack of successful therapies to it, leading to neurological and behavioral deficits. The present study aims to investigate the effects of combined preconditioning (PC) with hypoxia and GYKI-52466 (GYKI) on cerebral ischemic injury and to explore the mechanism. The results showed that combined preconditioning with hypoxia and GYKI-52466 increased the survival rate of cerebral ischemia rats, alleviated the neurological deficit, increased the object recognition and social recognition memory of rats and suppressed the inflammatory reaction induced by cerebral ischemia. Further experiments found that preconditioning with hypoxia and GYKI-52466 significantly increased the HIF-1α and eNOS expression as well as eNOS activity, while inhibitors of HIF-1α and eNOS abolished the protective effects of hypoxia+GYKI PC on neurological deficit. Taken together, these results indicate that combined preconditioning with hypoxia and GYKI-52466 is effective to prevent cerebral ischemia injury, while HIF-1α and eNOS may be involved in the mechanism. PMID:29312485

  3. Regional mild hypothermia in the protection of the ischemic brain A hipotermia regional moderada na proteção do encéfalo isquêmico

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    Mirto Nelso Prandini

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To demonstrate that mild hypothermia can be a protective element when an ischemic onset occurs in rabbit brains. Methods: A rabbit model of focal ischemia was used to test the protection provided by mild hypothermia regionally produced by means of the placement of ice bag on the scalp of a hemicranium which has had previously its bone removed. Twenty New Zealand White rabbits were divided into two groups as follows: (A a control group where an ischemic lesion was produced by coagulation of the middle cerebral artery and (B a brain protected group where mild hypothermia was provided during 80 to 100 minutes after the same ischemic lesion. The brains slices were stained with 2,3,5-Triphenyletrazolium (TTC. The sections were photographed with a digital camera and the infarct volume was measured through a computer program. Results: The average of infarct volume was 70.53 mm³ in the control group. In the protected group, the average of infarct volume was 41,30 mm³ only in five animals. Five animals of this group did not demonstrate macroscopically and microscopically infarct area. Conclusions: We concluded that mild hypothermia regionally produced may protect ischemic brains of rabbits.Objetivo: Demonstrar a proteção que a hipotermia moderada pode fornecer em casos de isquemia em encéfalos de coelhos. Métodos: Foi utilizado um modelo de isquemia focal em coelhos, para avaliar a proteção fornecida por meio de hipotermia moderada, produzida através da colocação de pedras de gelo contidas no interior de um pequeno saco plástico, em contato com o couro cabeludo de um hemicrânio onde a tábua óssea foi previamente removida. Vinte coelhos da raça Nova Zelândia Branca, pesando de 3,100 Kg a 3,750 Kg foram divididos em dois grupos: (A um grupo controle onde foi produzida uma lesão isquêmica por meio da coagulação da artéria cerebral média e (B um grupo submetido a neuroproteção por hipotermia moderada regional durante 80 a

  4. ICAM-1–targeted thrombomodulin mitigates tissue factor–driven inflammatory thrombosis in a human endothelialized microfluidic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Ian H.; Villa, Carlos H.; Gollomp, Kandace; Esmon, Charles T.; Cines, Douglas B.; Poncz, Mortimer

    2017-01-01

    Diverse human illnesses are characterized by loss or inactivation of endothelial thrombomodulin (TM), predisposing to microvascular inflammation, activation of coagulation, and tissue ischemia. Single-chain antibody fragment (scFv)/TM) fusion proteins, previously protective against end-organ injury in murine models of inflammation, are attractive candidates to treat inflammatory thrombosis. However, animal models have inherent differences in TM and coagulation biology, are limited in their ability to resolve and control endothelial biology, and do not allow in-depth testing of “humanized” scFv/TM fusion proteins, which are necessary for translation to the clinical domain. To address these challenges, we developed a human whole-blood, microfluidic model of inflammatory, tissue factor (TF)–driven coagulation that features a multichannel format for head-to-head comparison of therapeutic approaches. In this model, fibrin deposition, leukocyte adhesion, and platelet adhesion and aggregation showed a dose-dependent response to tumor necrosis factor-α activation and could be quantified via real-time microscopy. We used this model to compare hTM/R6.5, a humanized, intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1)–targeted scFv/TM biotherapeutic, to untargeted antithrombotic agents, including soluble human TM (shTM), anti–TF antibodies, and hirudin. The targeted hTM/R6.5 more effectively inhibited TF-driven coagulation in a protein C (PC)–dependent manner and demonstrated synergy with supplemental PC. These results support the translational prospects of ICAM-targeted scFv/TM and illustrate the utility of the microfluidic system as a platform to study humanized therapeutics at the interface of endothelium and whole blood under flow. PMID:29296786

  5. Protein C inhibitor acts as a procoagulant by inhibiting the thrombomodulin-induced activation of protein C in human plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elisen, M. G.; von dem Borne, P. A.; Bouma, B. N.; Meijers, J. C.

    1998-01-01

    Protein C inhibitor (PCI), which was originally identified as an inhibitor of activated protein C, also efficiently inhibits coagulation factors such as factor Xa and thrombin. Recently it was found, using purified proteins, that the anticoagulant thrombin-thrombomodulin complex was also inhibited

  6. ABO Gene Polymorphism and Thrombomodulin -33G>A Polymorphism Were Not Risk Factors for Myocardial Infarction in Javanese Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukitasari, Mifetika; Sadewa, Ahmad Hamim; Rohman, Mohammad Saifur

    2017-01-01

    Genetic factors contribute to about a half of coronary artery diseases. During the last several decades, some studies suggested that non-O blood group and thrombomodulin polymorphism -33G>A are the risk factors of coronary artery disease especially in Asia. There was no prior study in Indonesia regarding this issue. Hence, this study was designed to investigate the correlation of ABO polymorphism and thrombomodulin polymorphism -33G>A with the incidence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). A total of 192 subjects were enrolled in this case control study. AMI patients were diagnosed based on World Health Organization criteria. Healthy patients were subjects with AMI risk factor without any sign and symptoms of AMI. Patients with diabetes mellitus, cancer, and arrhythmia were excluded from this study. Genotyping for both polymorphisms was performed by PCR RFLP methods. The result of this study suggested that ABO polymorphism and thrombomodulin polymorphism -33G>A were not risk factors of AMI, p = 0.727 and p = 0.699, respectively. Furthermore, the analysis to identify the synergy of these polymorphisms failed to prove their correlation with AMI ( p = 0.118). Conclusively, this study showed that ABO polymorphism and thrombomodulin polymorphism -33G>A were not risk factors of AMI.

  7. Thrombomodulin Is Silenced in Malignant Mesothelioma by a Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase-1-mediated Epigenetic Mechanism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nocchi, L.; Tomasetti, M.; Amati, M.; Neužil, Jiří; Santarelli, L.; Saccucci, F.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 286, č. 22 (2011), s. 19478-19488 ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/08/0811 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : Thrombomodulin gene promoter * malignant mesothelioma * poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.773, year: 2011

  8. Ischemic Colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Leiden, may increase the risk of ischemic colitis. High cholesterol, which can lead to atherosclerosis. Reduced blood flow, due to heart failure, low blood pressure and shock. Previous abdominal surgery. Scar tissue that forms after surgery may cause ...

  9. Remote ischemic preconditioning for renal protection during elective open infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Stewart R; Sadat, Umar; Boyle, Jonathan R; Tang, Tjun Y; Lapsley, Marta; Norden, Anthony G; Gaunt, Michael E

    2010-07-01

    We aimed to determine whether remote ischemic preconditioning (IP) reduces renal damage following elective open infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. Sequential common iliac clamping was used to induce remote IP in randomized patients. Urinary retinol binding protein (RBP) and albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) were measured following induction and 3, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively. In controls (n = 22), median urinary RBP increased from 112 microg/mL (interquartile range [IQR] 96-173 microg/mL) preoperatively to 5919 microg/mL (IQR 283-17 788 microg/mL) at 3 hours. Preoperative urinary RBP in preconditioned patients was 96 microg/mL (IQR 50 to 229 microg/mL) preoperatively, rising to 1243 microg/mL (IQR 540 to 15400 microg/mL) at 3 hours. Although control patients' median urinary RBP level was 5 times greater at 3 hours, there were no statistically significant differences in renal outcome indices. This trial could not confirm that remote IP reduces renal injury following elective open aneurysm surgery.

  10. Shear Stress Induces Differentiation of Endothelial Lineage Cells to Protect Neonatal Brain from Hypoxic-Ischemic Injury through NRP1 and VEGFR2 Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Wei Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI brain injuries disrupt the integrity of neurovascular structure and lead to lifelong neurological deficit. The devastating damage can be ameliorated by preserving the endothelial network, but the source for therapeutic cells is limited. We aim to evaluate the beneficial effect of mechanical shear stress in the differentiation of endothelial lineage cells (ELCs from adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs and the possible intracellular signals to protect HI injury using cell-based therapy in the neonatal rats. The ASCs expressed early endothelial markers after biochemical stimulation of endothelial growth medium. The ELCs with full endothelial characteristics were accomplished after a subsequential shear stress application for 24 hours. When comparing the therapeutic potential of ASCs and ELCs, the ELCs treatment significantly reduced the infarction area and preserved neurovascular architecture in HI injured brain. The transplanted ELCs can migrate and engraft into the brain tissue, especially in vessels, where they promoted the angiogenesis. The activation of Akt by neuropilin 1 (NRP1 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2 was important for ELC migration and following in vivo therapeutic outcomes. Therefore, the current study demonstrated importance of mechanical factor in stem cell differentiation and showed promising protection of brain from HI injury using ELCs treatment.

  11. No evidence for activated autophagy in left ventricular myocardium at early reperfusion with protection by remote ischemic preconditioning in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilgün Gedik

    Full Text Available Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC by repeated brief limb ischemia/reperfusion reduces myocardial injury in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG. Activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5 in left ventricular (LV myocardium at early reperfusion is associated with such protection. Autophagy, i.e., removal of dysfunctional cellular components through lysosomes, has been proposed as one mechanism of cardioprotection. Therefore, we analyzed whether or not the protection by RIPC is associated with activated autophagy.CABG patients were randomized to undergo RIPC (3×5 min blood pressure cuff inflation/5 min deflation or placebo (cuff deflated before skin incision (n = 10/10. Transmural myocardial biopsies were taken from the LV before cardioplegia (baseline and at early (5-10 min reperfusion. RIPC-induced protection was reflected by decreased serum troponin I concentration area under the curve (194±17 versus 709±129 ng/ml × 72 h, p = 0.002. Western blotting for beclin-1-phosphorylation and protein expression of autophagy-related gene 5-12 (ATG5-12 complex, light chain 3 (LC3, parkin, and p62 was performed. STAT3-, STAT5- and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2-phosphorylation was used as positive control to confirm signal activation by ischemia/reperfusion.Signals of all analyzed autophagy proteins did not differ between baseline and early reperfusion and not between RIPC and placebo. STAT5-phosphorylation was greater at early reperfusion only with RIPC (2.2-fold, p = 0.02. STAT3- and ERK1/2-phosphorylation were greater at early reperfusion with placebo and RIPC (≥2.7-fold versus baseline, p≤0.05.Protection through RIPC in patients undergoing CABG surgery does not appear to be associated with enhanced autophagy in LV myocardium at early reperfusion.

  12. Histones Induce the Procoagulant Phenotype of Endothelial Cells through Tissue Factor Up-Regulation and Thrombomodulin Down-Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ji Eun; Yoo, Hyun Ju; Gu, Ja Yoon; Kim, Hyun Kyung

    2016-01-01

    The high circulating levels of histones found in various thrombotic diseases may compromise the anticoagulant barrier of endothelial cells. We determined how histones affect endothelial procoagulant tissue factor (TF) and anticoagulant thrombomodulin (TM). Surface antigens, soluble forms, and mRNA levels of TF and TM were measured by flow cytometry, ELISA, and real-time RT-PCR, respectively. TF and TM activity were measured using procoagulant activity, thrombin generation, or chromogenic assa...

  13. The polysulfide diallyl trisulfide protects the ischemic myocardium by preservation of endogenous hydrogen sulfide and increasing nitric oxide bioavailability

    OpenAIRE

    Predmore, Benjamin L.; Kondo, Kazuhisa; Bhushan, Shashi; Zlatopolsky, Maxim A.; King, Adrienne L.; Aragon, Juan Pablo; Grinsfelder, D. Bennett; Condit, Marah E.; Lefer, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Diallyl trisulfide (DATS), a polysulfide constituent found in garlic oil, is capable of the release of hydrogen sulfide (H2S). H2S is a known cardioprotective agent that protects the heart via antioxidant, antiapoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and mitochondrial actions. Here, we investigated DATS as a stable donor of H2S during myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (MI/R) injury in vivo. We investigated endogenous H2S levels, infarct size, postischemic left ventricular function, mitochondrial respirati...

  14. Inhibition of Autophagy via Activation of PI3K/Akt Pathway Contributes to the Protection of Ginsenoside Rb1 against Neuronal Death Caused by Ischemic Insults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianfei Luo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Lethal autophagy is a pathway leading to neuronal death caused by transient global ischemia. In this study, we examined the effect of Ginsenoside Rb1 (GRb1 on ischemia/reperfusion-induced autophagic neuronal death and investigated the role of PI3K/Akt. Ischemic neuronal death in vitro was induced by using oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD in SH-SY5Y cells, and transient global ischemia was produced by using two vessels occlusion in rats. Cellular viability of SH-SY5Y cells was assessed by MTT assay, and CA1 neuronal death was evaluated by Hematoxylin-eosin staining. Autophagic vacuoles were detected by using both fluorescent microscopy in combination with acridine orange (AO and Monodansylcadaverine (MDC staining and transmission electronic microscopy. Protein levels of LC3II, Beclin1, total Akt and phosphor-Akt at Ser473 were examined by western blotting analysis. GRb1 inhibited both OGD and transient ischemia-induced neuronal death and mitigated OGD-induced autophagic vacuoles in SH-SY5Y cells. By contrast, PI3K inhibitor LY294002 counteracted the protection of GRb1 against neuronal death caused by either OGD or transient ischemia. LY294002 not only mitigated the up-regulated protein level of phosphor Akt at Ser473 caused by GRb1, but also reversed the inhibitory effect of GRb1 on OGD and transient ischemia-induced elevation in protein levels of LC3II and Beclin1.

  15. Influence of ischemic preconditioning in myocardial protection in patients undergoing myocardial revascularization with intermittent crossclamping of the aorta. Analysis of ions and blood gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandes Paulo Manuel Pêgo

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that short periods of ischemia may increase the myocardial protection obtained with intermittent crossclamping of the aorta. METHODS: In the control group (18 patients, surgery was performed with systemic hypothermia at 32ºC and intermittent crossclamping of the aorta. Extracorporeal circulation was used. In the preconditioning group (17 patients, 2 crossclampings of the aorta lasting 3min each were added prior to the intermittent crossclamping of the conventional technique with an interval of 2min of reperfusion between them. Blood samples for analyses of pH, pCO2, pO2, sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium were obtained from the coronary sinus at the beginning of extracorporeal circulation (time 1, at the end of the first anastomosis (time 2, and at the end of extracorporeal circulation (time 3. RESULTS: No difference was observed in the results of the 2 groups, except for a variation in the ionic values in the different times of blood withdrawal; sodium values, however, remained stable. All patients had a good clinical outcome. CONCLUSION: The results of intermittent crossclamping of the aorta with moderate hypothermia were not altered by the use of ischemic preconditioning.

  16. Selective A2A receptor antagonist prevents microglia-mediated neuroinflammation and protects retinal ganglion cells from high intraocular pressure-induced transient ischemic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeira, Maria H; Boia, Raquel; Elvas, Filipe; Martins, Tiago; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Ambrósio, António Francisco; Santiago, Ana Raquel

    2016-03-01

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of vision loss and blindness worldwide, characterized by chronic and progressive neuronal loss. Reactive microglial cells have been recognized as a neuropathologic feature, contributing to local inflammation and retinal neurodegeneration. In a recent in vitro work (organotypic cultures), we demonstrated that blockade of adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) prevents the neuroinflammatory response and affords protection to retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) against exposure to elevated hydrostatic pressure (EHP), to mimic elevated intraocular pressure (IOP), the main risk factor for glaucoma development. Herein, we investigated whether a selective A2AR antagonist (SCH 58261) could modulate retinal microglia reactivity and their inflammatory response. Furthermore, we took advantage of the high IOP-induced transient ischemia (ischemia-reperfusion, I-R) animal model to evaluate the protective role of A2AR blockade in the control of retinal neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. Primary microglial cell cultures were challenged either with lipopolysaccharide or with EHP, in the presence or absence of A2AR antagonist SCH 58261 (50 nM). In addition, I-R injury was induced in adult Wistar rats after intravitreal administration of SCH 58261 (100 nM, 5 μL). Our results showed that SCH 58261 attenuated microglia reactivity and the increased expression and release of proinflammatory cytokines. Moreover, intravitreal administration of SCH 58261 prevented I-R-induced cell death and RGC loss, by controlling microglial-mediated neuroinflammatory response. These results prompt the proposal that A2AR blockade may have great potential in the management of retinal neurodegenerative diseases characterized by microglia reactivity and RGC death, such as glaucoma and ischemic diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Association of Serum Thrombomodulin with Endothelial Injuring Factors in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Budzyń

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the concentration of serum thrombomodulin (sTM in the AAA patients and to examine its correlation with various factors which may potentially participate in the endothelial injury. Materials and Methods. Forty-one patients with AAA were involved and divided into subgroups based on different criteria. Concentration of sTM was measured using enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The results were compared with those obtained in 30 healthy age- and sex-matched volunteers. Results. The higher concentration of sTM was observed in AAA patients compared with those in controls volunteers [2.37 (1.97–2.82 ng/mL versus 3.93 (2.43–9.20 ng/mL, P < 0.001]. An elevated sTM associated significantly with increased triglycerides (TAG [P = 0.022], cholesterol [P = 0.029], hsCRP [P = 0.031], and advanced glycation end products (AGEs [P = 0.033]. Conclusions. The elevation of serum sTM level suggests that endothelial damage occurs in AAA pathogenesis. The correlations observed indicate that lipids abnormalities, inflammation, and oxidative stress may be involved in this destructive process.

  18. The polysulfide diallyl trisulfide protects the ischemic myocardium by preservation of endogenous hydrogen sulfide and increasing nitric oxide bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predmore, Benjamin L; Kondo, Kazuhisa; Bhushan, Shashi; Zlatopolsky, Maxim A; King, Adrienne L; Aragon, Juan Pablo; Grinsfelder, D Bennett; Condit, Marah E; Lefer, David J

    2012-06-01

    Diallyl trisulfide (DATS), a polysulfide constituent found in garlic oil, is capable of the release of hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S). H(2)S is a known cardioprotective agent that protects the heart via antioxidant, antiapoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and mitochondrial actions. Here, we investigated DATS as a stable donor of H(2)S during myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (MI/R) injury in vivo. We investigated endogenous H(2)S levels, infarct size, postischemic left ventricular function, mitochondrial respiration and coupling, endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) activation, and nuclear E2-related factor (Nrf2) translocation after DATS treatment. Mice were anesthetized and subjected to a surgical model of MI/R injury with and without DATS treatment (200 μg/kg). Both circulating and myocardial H(2)S levels were determined using chemiluminescent gas chromatography. Infarct size was measured after 45 min of ischemia and 24 h of reperfusion. Troponin I release was measured at 2, 4, and 24 h after reperfusion. Cardiac function was measured at baseline and 72 h after reperfusion by echocardiography. Cardiac mitochondria were isolated after MI/R, and mitochondrial respiration was investigated. NO metabolites, eNOS phosphorylation, and Nrf2 translocation were determined 30 min and 2 h after DATS administration. Myocardial H(2)S levels markedly decreased after I/R injury but were rescued by DATS treatment (P < 0.05). DATS administration significantly reduced infarct size per area at risk and per left ventricular area compared with control (P < 0.001) as well as circulating troponin I levels at 4 and 24 h (P < 0.05). Myocardial contractile function was significantly better in DATS-treated hearts compared with vehicle treatment (P < 0.05) 72 h after reperfusion. DATS reduced mitochondrial respiration in a concentration-dependent manner and significantly improved mitochondrial coupling after reperfusion (P < 0.01). DATS activated eNOS (P < 0.05) and increased NO metabolites (P

  19. Sestrin2 induced by hypoxia inducible factor1 alpha protects the blood-brain barrier via inhibiting VEGF after severe hypoxic-ischemic injury in neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xudan; Doycheva, Desislava Met; Xu, Liang; Tang, Jiping; Yan, Min; Zhang, John H

    2016-11-01

    Hypoxic ischemic (HI) encephalopathy remains the leading cause of perinatal brain injury resulting in long term disabilities. Stabilization of blood brain barrier (BBB) after HI is an important target, therefore, in this study we aim to determine the role of sestrin2, a stress inducible protein which is elevated after various insults, on BBB stabilization after moderate and severe HI injuries. Rat pups underwent common carotid artery ligation followed by either 150min (severe model) or 100min (moderate model) of hypoxia. 1h post HI, rats were intranasally administered with recombinant human sestrin2 (rh-sestrin2) and sacrificed for infarct area, brain water content, righting reflex and geotaxis reflex. Sestrin2 was silenced using siRNA and an activator/inhibitor of hypoxia inducible factor1α (HIF1α) was used to examine their roles on BBB permeability. Rats subjected to severe HI exhibited larger infarct area and higher sestrin2 expression compared to rats in the moderate HI group. rh-sestrin2 attenuated brain infarct and edema, while silencing sestrin2 reversed these protective effects after severe HI. HIF1α induced sestrin2 activation in severe HI but not in moderate HI groups. A HIF1a agonist was shown to increase permeability of the BBB via vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) after moderate HI. However, after severe HI, HIF1α activated both VEGF and sestrin2. But HIF1α dependent sestrin2 activation was the predominant pathway after severe HI which inhibited VEGF and attenuated BBB permeability. rh-sestrin2 attenuated BBB permeability via upregulation of endogenous sestrin2 which was induced by HIF1α after severe HI. However, HIF1α's effects as a prodeath or prosurvival signal were influenced by the severity of HI injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Remote Ischemic Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusch, Gerd; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Przyklenk, Karin; Redington, Andrew; Yellon, Derek

    2014-01-01

    In remote ischemic conditioning (RIC) brief, reversible episodes of ischemia with reperfusion in one vascular bed, tissue or organ confer a global protective phenotype and render remote tissues and organs resistant to ischemia/reperfusion injury. The peripheral stimulus can be chemical, mechanical or electrical and involves activation of peripheral sensory nerves. The signal transfer to the heart or other organs is through neuronal and humoral communications. Protection can be transferred, even across species, with plasma-derived dialysate and involves nitric oxide, stromal derived factor-1α, microRNA-144, but also other, not yet identified factors. Intracardiac signal transduction involves: adenosine, bradykinin, cytokines, and chemokines, which activate specific receptors; intracellular kinases; and mitochondrial function. RIC by repeated brief inflation/deflation of a blood pressure cuff protects against endothelial dysfunction and myocardial injury in percutaneous coronary interventions, coronary artery bypass grafting and reperfused acute myocardial infarction. RIC is safe and effective, noninvasive, easily feasible and inexpensive. PMID:25593060

  1. Synthesis of an endothelial cell mimicking surface containing thrombomodulin and endothelial protein C receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kador, Karl Erich

    Synthetic materials for use in blood contacting applications have been studied for many years with limited success. One of the main areas of need for these materials is the design of synthetic vascular grafts for use in the hundreds of thousands of patients who have coronary artery bypass grafting, many without suitable veins for autologous grafts. The design of these grafts is constrained by two common modes of failure, the formation of intimal hyperplasia (IH) and thrombosis. IH formation has been previously linked to a mismatching of the mechanical properties of the graft and has been overcome by creating grafts using materials whose compliance mimics that of the native artery. Several techniques and surface modification have been designed to limit thrombosis on the surface of synthetic materials. One which has shown the greatest promise is the immobilization of Thrombomodulin (TM), a protein found on the endothelial cell membrane lining native blood vessels involved in the activation of the anticoagulant Protein C (PC). While TM immobilization has been shown to arrest thrombin formation and limit fibrous formations in in-vitro and in-vivo experiments, it has shown to be transport limiting under arterial flow. On the endothelial cell surface, TM is co-localized with Endothelial Protein C Receptor (EPCR), which increases PC transport onto the cell surface and increases PC activation via TM between 20-100 fold. This dissertation will describe the chemical modification of medical grade polyurethane (PU), whose compliance has been shown to match that of native arteries. This modification will enable the immobilization of two proteins on an enzymatically relevant scale estimated at less than 10 nm. This dissertation will further describe the immobilization of the proteins TM and EPCR, and analyze the ability of a surface co-immobilized with these proteins to activate the anticoagulant PC. Finally, it will compare the ability of this co-immobilized surface to delay

  2. Ischemic postconditioning: experimental models and protocol algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skyschally, Andreas; van Caster, Patrick; Iliodromitis, Efstathios K; Schulz, Rainer; Kremastinos, Dimitrios T; Heusch, Gerd

    2009-09-01

    Ischemic postconditioning, a simple mechanical maneuver at the onset of reperfusion, reduces infarct size after ischemia/reperfusion. After its first description in 2003 by Zhao et al. numerous experimental studies have investigated this protective phenomenon. Whereas the underlying mechanisms and signal transduction are not yet understood in detail, infarct size reduction by ischemic postconditioning was confirmed in all species tested so far, including man. We have now reviewed the literature with focus on experimental models and protocols to better understand the determinants of protection by ischemic postconditioning or lack of it. Only studies with infarct size as unequivocal endpoint were considered. In all species and models, the duration of index ischemia and the protective protocol algorithm impact on the outcome of ischemic postconditioning, and gender, age, and myocardial temperature contribute.

  3. Andrographolide stimulates p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2-heme oxygenase 1 signaling in primary cerebral endothelial cells for definite protection against ischemic stroke in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Ting-Lin; Chen, Ray-Jade; Jayakumar, Thanasekaran; Lu, Wan-Jung; Hsieh, Cheng-Ying; Hsu, Ming-Jen; Yang, Chih-Hao; Chang, Chao-Chien; Lin, Yen-Kuang; Lin, Kuan-Hung; Sheu, Joen-Rong

    2016-04-01

    Stroke pathogenesis involves complex oxidative stress-related pathways. The nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) pathways have been considered molecular targets in pharmacologic intervention for ischemic diseases. Andrographolide, a labdane diterpene, has received increasing attention in recent years because of its various pharmacologic activities. We determined that andrographolide modulates the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-Nrf2-HO-1 signaling cascade in primary cerebral endothelial cells (CECs) to provide positive protection against middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO)-induced ischemic stroke in rats. In the present study, andrographolide (10 μM) increased HO-1 protein and messenger RNA expressions, Nrf2 phosphorylation, and nuclear translocation in CECs, and these activities were disrupted by a p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB203580, but not by the extracellular signal-regulated kinase inhibitor PD98059 or c-Jun amino-terminal kinase inhibitor SP600125. Similar results were observed in confocal microscopy analysis. Moreover, andrographolide-induced Nrf2 and HO-1 protein expressions were significantly inhibited by Nrf2 small interfering RNA. Moreover, HO-1 knockdown attenuated the protective effect of andrographolide against oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced CEC death. Andrographolide (0.1 mg/kg) significantly suppressed free radical formation, blood-brain barrier disruption, and brain infarction in MCAO-insulted rats, and these effects were reversed by the HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin IX. The mechanism is attributable to HO-1 activation, as directly evidenced by andrographolide-induced pronounced HO-1 expression in brain tissues, which was highly localized in the cerebral capillary. In conclusion, andrographolide increased Nrf2-HO-1 expression through p38 MAPK regulation, confirming that it provides protection against MCAO-induced brain injury. These findings provide strong evidence that andrographolide could

  4. The Influence of Diabetes Mellitus in Myocardial Ischemic Preconditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Cury Rezende

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic preconditioning (IP is a powerful mechanism of protection discovered in the heart in which ischemia paradoxically protects the myocardium against other ischemic insults. Many factors such as diseases and medications may influence IP expression. Although diabetes poses higher cardiovascular risk, the physiopathology underlying this condition is uncertain. Moreover, although diabetes is believed to alter intracellular pathways related to myocardial protective mechanisms, it is still controversial whether diabetes may interfere with ischemic preconditioning and whether this might influence clinical outcomes. This review article looks at published reports with animal models and humans that tried to evaluate the possible influence of diabetes in myocardial ischemic preconditioning.

  5. ABO Gene Polymorphism and Thrombomodulin −33G>A Polymorphism Were Not Risk Factors for Myocardial Infarction in Javanese Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukitasari, Mifetika; Sadewa, Ahmad Hamim

    2017-01-01

    Genetic factors contribute to about a half of coronary artery diseases. During the last several decades, some studies suggested that non-O blood group and thrombomodulin polymorphism −33G>A are the risk factors of coronary artery disease especially in Asia. There was no prior study in Indonesia regarding this issue. Hence, this study was designed to investigate the correlation of ABO polymorphism and thrombomodulin polymorphism −33G>A with the incidence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). A total of 192 subjects were enrolled in this case control study. AMI patients were diagnosed based on World Health Organization criteria. Healthy patients were subjects with AMI risk factor without any sign and symptoms of AMI. Patients with diabetes mellitus, cancer, and arrhythmia were excluded from this study. Genotyping for both polymorphisms was performed by PCR RFLP methods. The result of this study suggested that ABO polymorphism and thrombomodulin polymorphism −33G>A were not risk factors of AMI, p = 0.727 and p = 0.699, respectively. Furthermore, the analysis to identify the synergy of these polymorphisms failed to prove their correlation with AMI (p = 0.118). Conclusively, this study showed that ABO polymorphism and thrombomodulin polymorphism −33G>A were not risk factors of AMI. PMID:28811939

  6. ABO Gene Polymorphism and Thrombomodulin −33G>A Polymorphism Were Not Risk Factors for Myocardial Infarction in Javanese Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mifetika Lukitasari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic factors contribute to about a half of coronary artery diseases. During the last several decades, some studies suggested that non-O blood group and thrombomodulin polymorphism −33G>A are the risk factors of coronary artery disease especially in Asia. There was no prior study in Indonesia regarding this issue. Hence, this study was designed to investigate the correlation of ABO polymorphism and thrombomodulin polymorphism −33G>A with the incidence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI. A total of 192 subjects were enrolled in this case control study. AMI patients were diagnosed based on World Health Organization criteria. Healthy patients were subjects with AMI risk factor without any sign and symptoms of AMI. Patients with diabetes mellitus, cancer, and arrhythmia were excluded from this study. Genotyping for both polymorphisms was performed by PCR RFLP methods. The result of this study suggested that ABO polymorphism and thrombomodulin polymorphism −33G>A were not risk factors of AMI, p=0.727 and p=0.699, respectively. Furthermore, the analysis to identify the synergy of these polymorphisms failed to prove their correlation with AMI (p=0.118. Conclusively, this study showed that ABO polymorphism and thrombomodulin polymorphism −33G>A were not risk factors of AMI.

  7. Thrombomodulin Induces a Quiescent Phenotype and Inhibits Migration in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Heather M; Beard, Richard S; Cha, Byeong J; Yuan, Sarah Y; Nelson, Peter R

    2016-01-01

    Loss of critical endothelial cell function and subsequent vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration is central to the pathology of injury-induced neointimal hyperplasia and recurrent stenosis. Thrombomodulin (TM), well known for its function as an endothelial surface anticoagulant, may have an unknown direct effect on VSMC physiology that would be lost after injury. Here, we examined a novel effect of TM on VSMC by testing the hypothesis that direct application of TM induces favorable changes to the morphology of VSMC and inhibits their migration. Primary human VSMC were harvested using the explant technique and used in early passage (1-4) for all experiments. Laser-scanning confocal fluorescent imaging was performed to assess the effect of soluble TM on VSMC morphology. In vitro, migration of VSMC was measured using: (1) a 4-hr modified Boyden chemotaxis assay and (2) a 24-hr electric cell-substrate impedance sensing injury migration assay. Migration experiments were conducted with VSMC exposed to increasing doses of soluble recombinant TM. Recombinant thrombin served as a positive control and serum-free media as a negative control for all experimentation. Data were analyzed using a Student's t-test or repeated measures analysis of variance where appropriate (α < 0.05). VSMC exposed to TM clearly demonstrated a quiescent morphology with organized stress fibers consistent with a quiescent, differentiated, contractile phenotype; whereas, thrombin stimulation led to an activated, dedifferentiated, synthetic phenotype. VSMC demonstrated a low, baseline level of migration in unstimulated serum-free conditions. Thrombin significantly stimulated VSMC migration as expected. TM, independent of thrombin, significantly inhibited baseline VSMC migration in a dose-response fashion. The maximal inhibition was observed at (5 μg/mL) with 70% reduction (56 ± 1.7 vs. 18 ± 3.5 cells/5 high-power fields, P = 0.0005). TM has a direct effect on VSMC resulting in a quiescent

  8. Treatment effects of recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin in patients with severe sepsis: a historical control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakawa, Kazuma; Fujimi, Satoshi; Mohri, Tomoyoshi; Matsuda, Hiroki; Nakamori, Yasushi; Hirose, Tomoya; Tasaki, Osamu; Ogura, Hiroshi; Kuwagata, Yasuyuki; Hamasaki, Toshimitsu; Shimazu, Takeshi

    2011-01-01

    Cross-talk between the coagulation system and inflammatory reactions during sepsis causes organ damage followed by multiple organ dysfunction syndrome or even death. Therefore, anticoagulant therapies have been expected to be beneficial in the treatment of severe sepsis. Recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin (rhTM) binds to thrombin to inactivate coagulation, and the thrombin-rhTM complex activates protein C to produce activated protein C. The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of rhTM for treating patients with sepsis-induced disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). This study comprised 65 patients with sepsis-induced DIC who required ventilatory management. All patients fulfilled the criteria of severe sepsis and the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis criteria for overt DIC. The initial 45 patients were treated without rhTM (control group), and the following 20 consecutive patients were treated with rhTM (0.06 mg/kg/day) for six days (rhTM group). The primary outcome measure was 28-day mortality. Stepwise multivariate Cox regression analysis was used to assess which independent variables were associated with mortality. Comparisons of Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score on sequential days between the two groups were analyzed by repeated measures analysis of variance. Cox regression analysis showed 28-day mortality to be significantly lower in the rhTM group than in the control group (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.303; 95% confidence interval, 0.106 to 0.871; P = 0.027). SOFA score in the rhTM group decreased significantly in comparison with that in the control group (P = 0.028). In the post hoc test, SOFA score decreased rapidly in the rhTM group compared with that in the control group on day 1 (P < 0.05). We found that rhTM administration may improve organ dysfunction in patients with sepsis-induced DIC. Further clinical investigations are necessary to evaluate the effect of rhTM on the pathophysiology of sepsis

  9. Transient Ischemic Attack

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ischemic Attack TIA , or transient ischemic attack, is a "mini stroke" that occurs when a blood clot blocks an artery for a short time. The only difference between a stroke ...

  10. A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Phase 2b Study to Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy of Recombinant Human Soluble Thrombomodulin, ART-123, in Patients With Sepsis and Suspected Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vincent, Jean-Louis; Ramesh, Mayakonda K.; Ernest, David; Larosa, Steven P.; Pachl, Jan; Aikawa, Naoki; Hoste, Eric; Levy, Howard; Hirman, Joe; Levi, Marcel; Daga, Mradul; Kutsogiannis, Demetrios J.; Crowther, Mark; Bernard, Gordon R.; Devriendt, Jacques; Puigserver, Joan Vidal; Blanzaco, Daniel U.; Esmon, Charles T.; Parrillo, Joseph E.; Guzzi, Louis; Henderson, Seton J.; Pothirat, Chaicharn; Mehta, Parthiv; Fareed, Jawed; Talwar, Deepak; Tsuruta, Kazuhisa; Gorelick, Kenneth J.; Osawa, Yutaka; Kaul, Inder

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the safety and efficacy of recombinant thrombomodulin (ART-123) in patients with suspected sepsis-associated disseminated intravascular coagulation. Design: Phase 2b, international, multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel group, screening trial.

  11. Successful Control of Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation by Recombinant Thrombomodulin during Arsenic Trioxide Treatment in Relapsed Patient with Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motohiro Shindo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC frequently occurs in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL. With the induction of therapy in APL using all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA, DIC can be controlled in most cases as ATRA usually shows immediate improvement of the APL. However, arsenic trioxide (ATO which has been used for the treatment of relapse in APL patients has shown to take time to suppress APL cells, therefore the control of DIC in APL with ATO treatment is a major problem. Recently, the recombinant soluble thrombomodulin fragment has received a lot of attention as the novel drug for the treatment of DIC with high efficacy. Here, we present a relapsed patient with APL in whom DIC was successfully and safely controlled by rTM during treatment with ATO.

  12. The Role Of Protective Heat Shock Protein 70 And Proinflammatory Heat Shock Protein 60 Toward The Functional Status Of Acute Thrombotic Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertha Jean Que

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Clinical experience suggests that the functional status of stroke patients is not directly proportional to the number of risk factors this means that there are other factors that influence the status of functional role. The aim of this study is to explain the changes in levels of HSP70 and HSP60 associated with changes the functional status of stroke which measured with National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale NIHSS in acute thrombotic ischemic stroke. This research is quantitative research is an observational analytic with a longitudinal observational design prospective cohort study and case control. Data was collected by consecutive sampling. Examination of serum levels of HSP 70 HSP60 and assessment of NIHSS done in three times at the same time they are the first day amp8804 48 hours the third day 72 hours and fifth day 120 hours. There is a significant difference P 0.05 levels of HSP 60 and HSP 70 between patients with acute ischemic stroke cases with normal people control. Change dynamic level of HSP70 HSP60 and NIHSS according time of examination there is a significant difference. The first day of HSP 70 levels the third and fifth shaped the decline curve according to the NIHSS improvement while the levels of HSP60 formed a pattern opposite to the NIHSS. Curve levels of HSP70 and HSP60 levels to get to the point value of HSP 60 and HSP70 normal control. In general there was no effect of risk factors on extensive infarction NIHSS HSP70 and HSP60 except the variable age to HSP70 which in the elderly 70-75 years levels of HSP70 is higher than other age groups. Changes in levels of HSP70 and HSP60 follow the pattern of change in NIHSS towards improvement. Therefore HSP70 and HSP60 can serve as a prediction for degree of functional the acute thrombotic ischemic stroke. Risk factors are the cause of stroke but do not affect the NIHSS. Age affects levels of HSP 70. In general HSP60 and HSP70 can be used as a diagnostic and prognostic

  13. A high-affinity, dimeric inhibitor of PSD-95 bivalently interacts with PDZ1-2 and protects against ischemic brain damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Anders*; Clausen, Bettina H; Møller, Magda

    2012-01-01

    Inhibition of the ternary protein complex of the synaptic scaffolding protein postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95), neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), and the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor is a potential strategy for treating ischemic brain damage, but high-affinity inhibitors are ...... of Tat-N-dimer (3 nmol/g) to mice subjected to focal cerebral ischemia reduces infarct volume with 40% and restores motor functions. Thus, Tat-N-dimer is a highly efficacious neuroprotective agent with therapeutic potential in stroke....

  14. The Influence of Diabetes Mellitus in Myocardial Ischemic Preconditioning

    OpenAIRE

    Rezende, Paulo Cury; Rahmi, Rosa Maria; Hueb, Whady

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IP) is a powerful mechanism of protection discovered in the heart in which ischemia paradoxically protects the myocardium against other ischemic insults. Many factors such as diseases and medications may influence IP expression. Although diabetes poses higher cardiovascular risk, the physiopathology underlying this condition is uncertain. Moreover, although diabetes is believed to alter intracellular pathways related to myocardial protective mechanisms, it is still c...

  15. Neurotherapeutic effect of mangiferin against hypoxic–ischemic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hypoxic–ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) in perinatal condition is highly associated with mortality and several neurological disabilities. The present experiment was blueprinted to ascertain the protective efficacy of mangiferin (MF) against hypoxic–ischemic brain injury in neonatal rats. Materials and Methods: ...

  16. Impaired mitochondrial function in chronically ischemic human heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stride, Nis Ottesen; Larsen, Steen; Hey-Mogensen, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Chronic ischemic heart disease is associated with myocardial hypoperfusion. The resulting hypoxia potentially inflicts damage upon the mitochondria, leading to a compromised energetic state. Furthermore, ischemic damage may cause excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), producing...... mitochondrial damage, hereby reinforcing a vicious circle. Ischemic preconditioning has been proven protective in acute ischemia, but the subject of chronic ischemic preconditioning has not been explored in humans. We hypothesized that mitochondrial respiratory capacity would be diminished in chronic ischemic...... regions of human myocardium but that these mitochondria would be more resistant to ex vivo ischemia and, second, that ROS generation would be higher in ischemic myocardium. The aim of this study was to test mitochondrial respiratory capacity during hyperoxia and hypoxia, to investigate ROS production...

  17. The Vitamin E Analog Gamma-Tocotrienol (GT3 and Statins Synergistically Up-Regulate Endothelial Thrombomodulin (TM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupak Pathak

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Statins; a class of routinely prescribed cholesterol-lowering drugs; inhibit 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzymeA reductase (HMGCR and strongly induce endothelial thrombomodulin (TM; which is known to have anti-inflammatory; anti-coagulation; anti-oxidant; and radioprotective properties. However; high-dose toxicity limits the clinical use of statins. The vitamin E family member gamma-tocotrienol (GT3 also suppresses HMGCR activity and induces TM expression without causing significant adverse side effects; even at high concentrations. To investigate the synergistic effect of statins and GT3 on TM; a low dose of atorvastatin and GT3 was used to treat human primary endothelial cells. Protein-level TM expression was measured by flow cytometry. TM functional activity was determined by activated protein C (APC generation assay. Expression of Kruppel-like factor 2 (KLF2, one of the key transcription factors of TM, was measured by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. TM expression increased in a dose-dependent manner after both atorvastatin and GT3 treatment. A combined treatment of a low-dose of atorvastatin and GT3 synergistically up-regulated TM expression and functional activity. Finally; atorvastatin and GT3 synergistically increased KLF2 expression. These findings suggest that combined treatment of statins with GT3 may provide significant health benefits in treating a number of pathophysiological conditions; including inflammatory and cardiovascular diseases.

  18. Histones Induce the Procoagulant Phenotype of Endothelial Cells through Tissue Factor Up-Regulation and Thrombomodulin Down-Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Eun; Yoo, Hyun Ju; Gu, Ja Yoon; Kim, Hyun Kyung

    2016-01-01

    The high circulating levels of histones found in various thrombotic diseases may compromise the anticoagulant barrier of endothelial cells. We determined how histones affect endothelial procoagulant tissue factor (TF) and anticoagulant thrombomodulin (TM). Surface antigens, soluble forms, and mRNA levels of TF and TM were measured by flow cytometry, ELISA, and real-time RT-PCR, respectively. TF and TM activity were measured using procoagulant activity, thrombin generation, or chromogenic assays. Involvement of the toll-like receptor (TLR) was assessed using the neutralizing antibodies. Histones dose-dependently induced surface antigens, activity and mRNA levels of endothelial TF. Histone-treated endothelial cells significantly shortened the lag time and enhanced the endogenous thrombin potential of normal plasma, which was normalized by a TF neutralizing antibody. Histones induced phosphatidylserine and protein-disulfide isomerase expression in endothelial cells. Histones also reduced the surface antigen, activity, and mRNA levels of endothelial TM. Polysialic acid and heparin reversed the histone-induced TF up-regulation and TM down-regulation. Activated protein C did not affect the TF up-regulation, but interrupted TM down-regulation. TLR2, and TLR4 inhibitors partially blocked the TF up-regulation. Histones induced the endothelial procoagulant phenotype through TF up-regulation and TM down-regulation. The effects of histones were partly mediated by TLR2, TLR4. Strategies to inhibit the harmful effects of histones in endothelial cells may be required in order to prevent a thrombotic environment.

  19. Remote ischemic postconditioning protects against renal ischemia/reperfusion injury by activation of T-LAK-cell-originated protein kinase (TOPK)/PTEN/Akt signaling pathway mediated anti-oxidation and anti-inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Sumin; Zhu, Yi; Li, Haobo; Xia, Zhengyuan; Wu, Qingping; Yao, Shanglong; Wang, Tingting; Yuan, Shiying

    2016-09-01

    Recent clinical and animal studies suggested that remote limb ischemic postconditioning (RIPostC) can invoke potent cardioprotection or neuroprotection. However, the effect and mechanism of RIPostC against renal ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) are poorly understood. T-LAK-cell-originated protein kinase (TOPK) is crucial for the proliferation and migration of tumor cells. However, the function of TOPK and the molecular mechanism underlying renal protection remain unknown. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the role of TOPK in renoprotection induced by RIPostC. The renal IRI model was induced by left renal pedicle clamping for 45min followed by 24h reperfusion and right nephrectomy. All mice were intraperitoneally injected with vehicle, TOPK inhibitor HI-TOPK-032 or Akt inhibitor LY294002. After 24h reperfusion, renal histology, function, and inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress were assessed. The proteins were measured by Western blotting. The results showed that RIPostC significantly protected the kidneys against IRI. The protective effects were accompanied by the attenuation of renal dysfunction, tubular damage, inflammation and oxidative stress. In addition, RIPostC increased the phosphorylation of TOPK, PTEN, Akt, GSK3β and the nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and decreased the nuclear translocation of NF-κB. However, all of the above renoprotective effects of RIPostC were eliminated either by the inhibition of TOPK or Akt with HI-TOPK-032 or LY294002. The current data reveal that RIPostC protects against renal IRI via activation of TOPK/PTEN/Akt signaling pathway mediated anti-oxidation and anti-inflammation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Protective effect of pretreatment with the calcium antagonist anipamil on the ischemic-reperfused rat myocardium;a phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirkels, J.H.; Ruigrok, T.J.C.; Echteld, C.J.A. van; Meijler, F.L.

    1988-01-01

    To assess whether the prophylactic administration of anipamil, a new calcium antagonist, protects the heart against the effects of ischemia and reperfusion, rats were injected intraperitoneally twice daily for 5 days with 5 mg/kg body weight of this drug. The heart was then isolated and perfused

  1. Transient Ischemic Attack

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... TIA , or transient ischemic attack, is a "mini stroke" that occurs when a blood clot blocks an ... a short time. The only difference between a stroke and TIA is that with TIA the blockage ...

  2. Acute ischemic cerebral attack

    OpenAIRE

    Franco-Garcia Samir; Barreiro-Pinto Belis

    2010-01-01

    The decrease of the cerebral blood flow below the threshold of autoregulation led to changes of cerebral ischemia and necrosis that traduce in signs and symtoms of focal neurologic dysfunction called acute cerebrovascular symdrome (ACS) or stroke. Two big groups according to its etiology are included in this category the hemorragic that constitue a 20% and the ischemic a 80% of cases. Great interest has wom the ischemic ACS because of its high social burden, being the third cause of no violen...

  3. A new method to determine tissue specific tissue factor thrombomodulin activities: endotoxin and particulate air pollution induced disbalance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerlofs-Nijland Miriam E

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increase in tissue factor (TF and loss in thrombomodulin (TM antigen levels has been described in various inflammatory disorders. The functional consequences of such changes in antigen concentrations in the coagulation balance are, however, not known. This study was designed to assess the consequences of inflammation-driven organ specific functional properties of the procoagulant response. Methods Tissue specific procoagulant activity was assessed by adding tissue homogenate to normal human pool plasma and recording of the thrombin generation curve. The new technique was subsequently applied on two inflammation driven animal models: 1 mouse lipopolysaccharide (LPS induced endotoxemia and 2 spontaneously hypertensive rats exposed to environmental air pollution (particulate matter (PM. Results Addition of lung tissue from untreated animals to human plasma suppressed the endogenous thrombin potential (ETP (175 ± 61 vs. 1437 ± 112 nM.min for control. This inhibitory effect was due to TM, because a it was absent in protein C deficient plasma and b lungs from TMpro/pro mice allowed full thrombin generation (ETP: 1686 ± 209 nM.min. The inhibitory effect of TM was lost after LPS administration to mice, which induced TF activity in lungs of C57Bl/6 mice as well as increased the ETP (941 ± 523 vs. 194 ± 159 nM.min for control. Another pro-inflammatory stimulus, PM dose-dependently increased TF in the lungs of spontaneously hypertensive rats at 4 and 48 hours after PM exposure. The ETP increased up to 48 hours at the highest concentration of PM (1441 ± 289 nM.min vs. saline: 164 ± 64 nM.min, p Conclusion Inflammation associated procoagulant effects in tissues are dependent on variations in activity of the TF-TM balance. The application of these novel organ specific functional assays is a useful tool to monitor inflammation-driven shifts in the coagulation balance within animal or human tissues.

  4. Histones Induce the Procoagulant Phenotype of Endothelial Cells through Tissue Factor Up-Regulation and Thrombomodulin Down-Regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Eun Kim

    Full Text Available The high circulating levels of histones found in various thrombotic diseases may compromise the anticoagulant barrier of endothelial cells. We determined how histones affect endothelial procoagulant tissue factor (TF and anticoagulant thrombomodulin (TM. Surface antigens, soluble forms, and mRNA levels of TF and TM were measured by flow cytometry, ELISA, and real-time RT-PCR, respectively. TF and TM activity were measured using procoagulant activity, thrombin generation, or chromogenic assays. Involvement of the toll-like receptor (TLR was assessed using the neutralizing antibodies. Histones dose-dependently induced surface antigens, activity and mRNA levels of endothelial TF. Histone-treated endothelial cells significantly shortened the lag time and enhanced the endogenous thrombin potential of normal plasma, which was normalized by a TF neutralizing antibody. Histones induced phosphatidylserine and protein-disulfide isomerase expression in endothelial cells. Histones also reduced the surface antigen, activity, and mRNA levels of endothelial TM. Polysialic acid and heparin reversed the histone-induced TF up-regulation and TM down-regulation. Activated protein C did not affect the TF up-regulation, but interrupted TM down-regulation. TLR2, and TLR4 inhibitors partially blocked the TF up-regulation. Histones induced the endothelial procoagulant phenotype through TF up-regulation and TM down-regulation. The effects of histones were partly mediated by TLR2, TLR4. Strategies to inhibit the harmful effects of histones in endothelial cells may be required in order to prevent a thrombotic environment.

  5. Levels of protein C and soluble thrombomodulin in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury: a multicenter prospective observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josée Bouchard

    Full Text Available Endothelial dysfunction contributes to the development of acute kidney injury (AKI in animal models of ischemia reperfusion injury and sepsis. There are limited data on markers of endothelial dysfunction in human AKI. We hypothesized that Protein C (PC and soluble thrombomodulin (sTM levels could predict AKI. We conducted a multicenter prospective study in 80 patients to assess the relationship of PC and sTM levels to AKI, defined by the AKIN creatinine (AKI Scr and urine output criteria (AKI UO. We measured marker levels for up to 10 days from intensive care unit admission. We used area under the curve (AUC and time-dependent multivariable Cox proportional hazard model to predict AKI and logistic regression to predict mortality/non-renal recovery. Protein C and sTM were not different in patients with AKI UO only versus no AKI. On intensive care unit admission, as PC levels are usually lower with AKI Scr, the AUC to predict the absence of AKI was 0.63 (95%CI 0.44-0.78. The AUC using log10 sTM levels to predict AKI was 0.77 (95%CI 0.62-0.89, which predicted AKI Scr better than serum and urine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL and cystatin C, urine kidney injury molecule-1 and liver-fatty acid-binding protein. In multivariable models, PC and urine NGAL levels independently predicted AKI (p=0.04 and 0.02 and PC levels independently predicted mortality/non-renal recovery (p=0.04. In our study, PC and sTM levels can predict AKI Scr but are not modified during AKI UO alone. PC levels could independently predict mortality/non-renal recovery. Additional larger studies are needed to define the relationship between markers of endothelial dysfunction and AKI.

  6. Mycolactone-Dependent Depletion of Endothelial Cell Thrombomodulin Is Strongly Associated with Fibrin Deposition in Buruli Ulcer Lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy Ogbechi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A well-known histopathological feature of diseased skin in Buruli ulcer (BU is coagulative necrosis caused by the Mycobacterium ulcerans macrolide exotoxin mycolactone. Since the underlying mechanism is not known, we have investigated the effect of mycolactone on endothelial cells, focussing on the expression of surface anticoagulant molecules involved in the protein C anticoagulant pathway. Congenital deficiencies in this natural anticoagulant pathway are known to induce thrombotic complications such as purpura fulimans and spontaneous necrosis. Mycolactone profoundly decreased thrombomodulin (TM expression on the surface of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMVEC at doses as low as 2 ng/ml and as early as 8 hrs after exposure. TM activates protein C by altering thrombin's substrate specificity, and exposure of HDMVEC to mycolactone for 24 hours resulted in an almost complete loss of the cells' ability to produce activated protein C. Loss of TM was shown to be due to a previously described mechanism involving mycolactone-dependent blockade of Sec61 translocation that results in proteasome-dependent degradation of newly synthesised ER-transiting proteins. Indeed, depletion from cells determined by live-cell imaging of cells stably expressing a recombinant TM-GFP fusion protein occurred at the known turnover rate. In order to determine the relevance of these findings to BU disease, immunohistochemistry of punch biopsies from 40 BU lesions (31 ulcers, nine plaques was performed. TM abundance was profoundly reduced in the subcutis of 78% of biopsies. Furthermore, it was confirmed that fibrin deposition is a common feature of BU lesions, particularly in the necrotic areas. These findings indicate that there is decreased ability to control thrombin generation in BU skin. Mycolactone's effects on normal endothelial cell function, including its ability to activate the protein C anticoagulant pathway are strongly associated with this

  7. Simvastatin pretreatment protects cerebrum from neuronal injury by decreasing the expressions of phosphor-CaMK II and AQP4 in ischemic stroke rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Min-xia; Lu, Chao; Xia, Chun-mei; Qiao, Zhong-wei; Zhu, Da-nian

    2014-12-01

    Excitotoxicity and cytotoxic edema are the two major factors resulting in neuronal injury during brain ischemia and reperfusion. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II), the downstream signal molecular of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs), is a mediator in the excitotoxicity. Aquaporin 4 (AQP4), expressed mainly in the brain, is an important aquaporin to control the flux of water. In a previous study, we had reported that pretreatment of simvastatin protected the cerebrum from ischemia and reperfusion injury by decreasing neurological deficit score and infarct area (Zhu et al. PLoS One 7:e51552, 2012). The present study used a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model to further explore the pleiotropic effect of simvastatin via CaMK II and AQP4. The results showed that simvastatin reduced degenerated cells and brain edema while decreasing the protein expressions of phosphor-CaMK II and AQP4, and increasing the ratios of Bcl-2/Bax, which was independent of cholesterol-lowering effect. Immunocomplexes formed between the subunit of NMDARs-NR3A and AQP4 were detected for the first time. It was concluded that simvastatin could protect the cerebrum from neuronal excitotoxicity and cytotoxic edema by downregulating the expressions of phosphor-CaMK II and AQP4, and that the interaction between NR3A and AQP4 might provide the base for AQP4 involving in the signaling pathways mediated by NMDARs.

  8. Complement factor H protects mice from ischemic acute kidney injury but is not critical for controlling complement activation by glomerular IgM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Lindsey; Laskowski, Jennifer; Renner, Brandon; Pickering, Matthew C; Kulik, Liudmila; Klawitter, Jelena; Stites, Erik; Christians, Uwe; van der Vlag, Johan; Ravichandran, Kameswaran; Holers, V Michael; Thurman, Joshua M

    2018-02-01

    Natural IgM binds to glomerular epitopes in several progressive kidney diseases. Previous work has shown that IgM also binds within the glomerulus after ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) but does not fully activate the complement system. Factor H is a circulating complement regulatory protein, and congenital or acquired deficiency of factor H is a strong risk factor for several types of kidney disease. We hypothesized that factor H controls complement activation by IgM in the kidney after I/R, and that heterozygous factor H deficiency would permit IgM-mediated complement activation and injury at this location. We found that mice with targeted heterozygous deletion of the gene for factor H developed more severe kidney injury after I/R than wild-type controls, as expected, but that complement activation within the glomeruli remained well controlled. Furthermore, mice that are unable to generate soluble IgM were not protected from renal I/R, even in the setting of heterozygous factor H deficiency. These results demonstrate that factor H is important for limiting injury in the kidney after I/R, but it is not critical for controlling complement activation by immunoglobulin within the glomerulus in this setting. IgM binds to glomerular epitopes after I/R, but it is not a significant source of injury. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Pre-Ischemic Treadmill Training for Prevention of Ischemic Brain Injury via Regulation of Glutamate and Its Transporter GLT-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingchun Guo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Pre-ischemic treadmill training exerts cerebral protection in the prevention of cerebral ischemia by alleviating neurotoxicity induced by excessive glutamate release following ischemic stroke. However, the underlying mechanism of this process remains unclear. Cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury was observed in a rat model after 2 weeks of pre-ischemic treadmill training. Cerebrospinal fluid was collected using the microdialysis sampling method, and the concentration of glutamate was determined every 40 min from the beginning of ischemia to 4 h after reperfusion with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-fluorescence detection. At 3, 12, 24, and 48 h after ischemia, the expression of the glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1 protein in brain tissues was determined by Western blot respectively. The effect of pre-ischemic treadmill training on glutamate concentration and GLT-1 expression after cerebral ischemia in rats along with changes in neurobehavioral score and cerebral infarct volume after 24 h ischemia yields critical information necessary to understand the protection mechanism exhibited by pre-ischemic treadmill training. The results demonstrated that pre-ischemic treadmill training up-regulates GLT-1 expression, decreases extracellular glutamate concentration, reduces cerebral infarct volume, and improves neurobehavioral score. Pre-ischemic treadmill training is likely to induce neuroprotection after cerebral ischemia by regulating GLT-1 expression, which results in re-uptake of excessive glutamate.

  10. Extracellular membrane vesicles from umbilical cord blood-derived MSC protect against ischemic acute kidney injury, a feature that is lost after inflammatory conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotta Kilpinen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC are shown to have a great therapeutic potential in many immunological disorders. Currently the therapeutic effect of MSCs is considered to be mediated via paracrine interactions with immune cells. Umbilical cord blood is an attractive but still less studied source of MSCs. We investigated the production of extracellular membrane vesicles (MVs from human umbilical cord blood derived MSCs (hUCBMSC in the presence (MVstim or absence (MVctrl of inflammatory stimulus. Methods: hUCBMSCs were cultured in serum free media with or without IFN-γ and MVs were collected from conditioned media by ultracentrifugation. The protein content of MVs were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Hypoxia induced acute kidney injury rat model was used to analyze the in vivo therapeutic potential of MVs and T-cell proliferation and induction of regulatory T cells were analyzed by co-culture assays. Results: Both MVstim and MVctrl showed similar T-cell modulation activity in vitro, but only MVctrls were able to protect rat kidneys from reperfusion injury in vivo. To clarify this difference in functionality we made a comparative mass spectrometric analysis of the MV protein contents. The IFN-γ stimulation induced dramatic changes in the protein content of the MVs. Complement factors (C3, C4A, C5 and lipid binding proteins (i.e apolipoproteins were only found in the MVctrls, whereas the MVstim contained tetraspanins (CD9, CD63, CD81 and more complete proteasome complex accompanied with MHCI. We further discovered that differently produced MV pools contained specific Rab proteins suggesting that same cells, depending on external signals, produce vesicles originating from different intracellular locations. Conclusions: We demonstrate by both in vitro and in vivo models accompanied with a detailed analysis of molecular characteristics that inflammatory conditioning of MSCs influence on the protein content and functional properties of MVs

  11. Role of Thrombin in Soluble Thrombomodulin-Induced Suppression of Peripheral HMGB1-Mediated Allodynia in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujita, Ryuichi; Tsubota, Maho; Hayashi, Yusuke; Saeki, Haruka; Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2017-12-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a nuclear protein, once released into the extracellular space under pathological conditions, plays a pronociceptive role in redox-dependent distinct active forms, all-thiol HMGB1 (at-HMGB1) and disulfide HMGB1 (ds-HMGB1), that accelerate nociception through the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), respectively. Thrombomodulin (TM), an endothelial membrane protein, and soluble TM, known as TMα, promote thrombin-mediated activation of protein C and also sequester HMGB1, which might facilitate thrombin degradation of HMGB1. The present study aimed at clarifying the role of thrombin in TMα-induced suppression of peripheral HMGB1-dependent allodynia in mice. Thrombin-induced degradation of at-HMGB1 and ds-HMGB1 was accelerated by TMα in vitro. Intraplantar (i.pl.) injection of bovine thymus-derived HMGB1 in an unknown redox state, at-HMGB1, ds-HMGB1 or lipopolysaccharide (LPS), known to cause HMGB1 secretion, produced long-lasting mechanical allodynia in mice, as assessed by von Frey test. TMα, when preadministered i.pl., prevented the allodynia caused by bovine thymus-derived HMGB1, at-HMGB1, ds-HMGB1 or LPS, in a dose-dependent manner. The TMα-induced suppression of the allodynia following i.pl. at-HMGB1, ds-HMGB1 or LPS was abolished by systemic preadministration of argatroban, a thrombin-inhibiting agent, and accelerated by i.pl. co-administered thrombin. Our data clearly indicate that TMα is capable of promoting the thrombin-induced degradation of both at-HMGB1 and ds-HMGB1, and suppresses the allodynia caused by either HMGB1 in a thrombin-dependent manner. Considering the emerging role of HMGB1 in distinct pathological pain models, the present study suggests the therapeutic usefulness of TMα for treatment of intractable and/or persistent pain.

  12. Higher skeletal muscle mass may protect against ischemic stroke in community-dwelling adults without stroke and dementia: The PRESENT project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minn, Yang-Ki; Suk, Seung-Han

    2017-02-03

    It is well known that a low skeletal muscle mass (SMM) is associated with stroke. However, it is unknown whether increasing muscle mass can prevent stroke. This community-based cross-sectional study was supported by the regional government. SMM measurements and brain computed tomography was performed in 722 stroke-free and dementia-free subjects (aged 50-75 years). Subjects were divided into quartiles (Q) by SMM, checked using the bioelectrical impedance analysis method (InBody 770, InBody, Seoul, Korea). Odds ratios (ORs) of brain white matter changes/silent infarction (WMC/SI) were calculated. The subjects were then divided into two groups by sex and evaluated. In the analysis of the four groups, the unadjusted ORs of Q2-Q4 were 0.616 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.372-1.022; P = 0.061), 0.290 (CI, 0.159-0.530; P < 0.001), and 0.209 (CI, 0.108-0.403; P < 0.001) for the risk of WMC/SI. Adjusted ORs for age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, education, hypercholesterolemia, and smoking were 0.994 (CI, 0.513-1.740; P = 0.085), 0.669 (CI, 0.329-1.362; P = 0.268), and 0.464 (CI, 0.219-0.984; P = 0.045). In the two-group (dichotomized) analysis, the unadjusted OR for the higher muscle mass groups (Q3 + Q4) was 0.313 (CI, 0.200-0.491; P < 0.001). The adjusted OR was 0.577 (CI, 0.340-0.979; P = 0.042). Considering sex, the adjusted OR were 0.351 (CI, 0.141-0.869; P = 0.024) in men and 0.771 (CI, 0.391-1.519; P = 0.452) in women. Our findings suggest that increased SMM may protect against WMC/SI, especially in men.

  13. Ischemic strokes and migraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bousser, M.G.; Baron, J.C.; Chiras, J.

    1985-01-01

    Lasting neurological deficits, though most infrequent, do occur in migrainous subjects and are well documented by clinical angiographic computed tomographic (CT scan) and even pathological studies. However the mechanism of cerebral ischemia in migraine remains widely unknown and the precise role of migraine in the pathogenesis of ischemic strokes is still debated. (orig./MG)

  14. TIA (Transient Ischemic Attack)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hemorrhagic | Cryptogenic | Understanding Stroke Risks Learn about the stroke risk factors you can control, teat and improve. Share the ... About Ischemic Strokes Let's Talk About Children and Stroke Let's Talk About Risk Factors for Stroke Let's Talk About Lifestyle Changes to ...

  15. Association of postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy with carotid atherosclerosis and soluble thrombomodulin: the vascular aging (EVA) study. Etude du Vieillissement Artériel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Laure; van Oort, Floor V A; Le Gal, Grégoire; Mennen, Louise I; Alhenc-Gelas, Martine; Touboul, Pierre-Jean; Zureik, Mahmoud; Scarabin, Pierre-Yves

    2002-02-15

    Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) may reduce atherosclerosis among postmenopausal women, partly by reducing vascular endothelium damage. We have tested this hypothesis by evaluating the association of HRT with firstly, carotid intima media thickness (IMT) and plaques, and secondly, with endothelial cell damage, indicated by soluble thrombomodulin (sTM). Then, we tested the association between the two markers of atherosclerosis and the levels of sTM. Among 747 postmenopausal women included into the EVA study, we compared 154 HRT users (including 80% transdermal treatment) with 593 never users. Carotid IMT and plaques were measured with B-mode ultrasonography and sTM with ELISA. At least one plaque was detected among 13.6% of HRT users and 27.3% of never users. After adjustment for confounding factors, the odds ratio for the presence of plaque was 0.45 (95% confidence interval, 0.25-0.78, P=0.005) in HRT users in comparison with nonusers. HRT users had a slightly lower crude mean IMT than nonusers, but the difference was not significant. sTM was positively associated with mean IMT (P for trend=0.001) but not with plaques. Finally, estrogen users had a lower sTM level than nonusers (difference 0.14 ng/ml, P=0.03). As HRT was associated with sTM and plaques, but not with IMT, while sTM was only associated with IMT, our hypothesis was not confirmed. This suggests that the possible beneficial effects of HRT on atherosclerosis may not go through the endothelial cell damage assessed by plasma thrombomodulin.

  16. Dengue virus enhances thrombomodulin and ICAM-1 expression through the macrophage migration inhibitory factor induction of the MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trai-Ming Yeh

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DV infections cause mild dengue fever (DF or severe life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF. The mechanisms that cause hemorrhage in DV infections remain poorly understood. Thrombomodulin (TM is a glycoprotein expressed on the surface of vascular endothelial cells that plays an important role in the thrombin-mediated activation of protein C. Prior studies have shown that the serum levels of soluble TM (sTM and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF are significantly increased in DHF patients compared to levels in DF patients or normal controls. In this study, we investigated how MIF and sTM concentrations are enhanced in the plasma of DHF patients and the potential effect of MIF on coagulation through its influence on two factors: thrombomodulin (TM and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 in endothelial cells and monocytes. Recombinant human macrophage migration inhibitory factor (rMIF was used to treat monocytic THP-1 cells and endothelial HMEC-1 cells or primary HUVEC cells. The subsequent expression of TM and ICAM-1 was assessed by immunofluorescent staining and flow cytometry analysis. Additionally, the co-incubation of THP-1 cells with various cell signaling pathway inhibitors was used to determine the pathways through which MIF mediated its effect. The data provided evidence that severe DV infections induce MIF expression, which in turn stimulates monocytes or endothelial cells to express TM and ICAM-1 via the Erk, JNK MAPK and the PI3K signaling pathways, supporting the idea that MIF may play an important role as a regulator of coagulation.

  17. [Genetics of ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwendtner, A; Dichgans, M

    2013-02-01

    Stroke is one of the most widespread causes of mortality und disability worldwide. Around 80 % of strokes are ischemic and different forms of intracranial bleeding account for the remaining cases. Monogenic stroke disorders are rare but the diagnosis may lead to specific therapeutic consequences for the affected patients who are predominantly young. In common sporadic stroke, genetic factors play a role in the form of susceptibility genes. Their discovery may give rise to new therapeutic options in the future.

  18. Efeito protetor do per-condicionamento isquêmico remoto nas lesões da síndrome de isquemia e reperfusão renal em ratos Protective effect of remote ischemic per-conditioning in the ischemia and reperfusion-induce renal injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Nagai Yamaki

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o efeito protetor do per-condicionamento isquêmico remoto nas lesões de isquemia e reperfusão renal induzida. MÉTODOS: Quinze ratos (Rattus Novergicus foram randomizados em três grupos (n=5: Grupo Normalidade (GN, Grupo Controle - Isquemia e Reperfusão (GIR e Grupo Per-condicionamento isquêmico remoto (GPER. Com exceção do grupo GN, todos os demais foram submetidos à isquemia renal de 30 minutos. No grupo GPER, foi realizado o per-condicionamento isquêmico remoto, constituído de três ciclos de isquemia e reperfusão de cinco minutos cada aplicado, durante o período de isquemia, no membro posterior esquerdo dos ratos, por meio de torniquete. Para quantificar as lesões, foram dosados os níveis séricos de ureia e creatinina, bem como, analisada a histopatologia renal. RESULTADOS: O grupo GPER apresentou-se com melhores níveis de ureia (83,74 ± 14,58% e creatinina (0,72 ± 26,14% quando comparado ao grupo GIR, se aproximando do grupo GN. Na histopatologia, os menores níveis de degeneração hidrópica e congestão medular foram encontrados no grupo GPER. CONCLUSÃO: O per-condicionamento isquêmico remoto apresentou importante efeito protetor na lesão de isquemia e reperfusão renal.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the protective effect of remote ischemic per-conditioning in ischemia and reperfusion-induced renal injuiry. METHODS: Fifteen rats (Rattus norvegicus were randomized into three groups (n = 5: Group Normality (GN, Control Ischemia and Reperfusion (GIR and Group remote ischemic per-conditioning (GPER. With the exception of the GN group, all others underwent renal ischemia for 30 minutes. In group GPER we performed the ischemic remote per-conditioning, consisting of three cycles of ischemia and reperfusion applied every five minutes during the ischemic period, to the left hindlimb of the rats by means of a tourniquet. To quantify the lesions we measured serum levels of creatinine and urea, as well as analyzed

  19. Acute ischemic stroke update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Kathleen; Orr, Sean; Briand, Mary; Piazza, Carolyn; Veydt, Annita; McCoy, Stacey

    2010-05-01

    Stroke is the third most common cause of death in the United States and is the number one cause of long-term disability. Legislative mandates, largely the result of the American Heart Association, American Stroke Association, and Brain Attack Coalition working cooperatively, have resulted in nationwide standardization of care for patients who experience a stroke. Transport to a skilled facility that can provide optimal care, including immediate treatment to halt or reverse the damage caused by stroke, must occur swiftly. Admission to a certified stroke center is recommended for improving outcomes. Most strokes are ischemic in nature. Acute ischemic stroke is a heterogeneous group of vascular diseases, which makes targeted treatment challenging. To provide a thorough review of the literature since the 2007 acute ischemic stroke guidelines were developed, we performed a search of the MEDLINE database (January 1, 2004-July 1, 2009) for relevant English-language studies. Results (through July 1, 2009) from clinical trials included in the Internet Stroke Center registry were also accessed. Results from several pivotal studies have contributed to our knowledge of stroke. Additional data support the efficacy and safety of intravenous alteplase, the standard of care for acute ischemic stroke since 1995. Due to these study results, the American Stroke Association changed its recommendation to extend the time window for administration of intravenous alteplase from within 3 hours to 4.5 hours of symptom onset; this recommendation enables many more patients to receive the drug. Other findings included clinically useful biomarkers, the role of inflammation and infection, an expanded role for placement of intracranial stents, a reduced role for urgent carotid endarterectomy, alternative treatments for large-vessel disease, identification of nontraditional risk factors, including risk factors for women, and newly published pediatric stroke guidelines. In addition, new devices for

  20. Protective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wessam M. Abdel-Wahab

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Many active ingredients extracted from herbal and medicinal plants are extensively studied for their beneficial effects. Antioxidant activity and free radical scavenging properties of thymoquinone (TQ have been reported. The present study evaluated the possible protective effects of TQ against the toxicity and oxidative stress of sodium fluoride (NaF in the liver of rats. Rats were divided into four groups, the first group served as the control group and was administered distilled water whereas the NaF group received NaF orally at a dose of 10 mg/kg for 4 weeks, TQ group was administered TQ orally at a dose of 10 mg/kg for 5 weeks, and the NaF-TQ group was first given TQ for 1 week and was secondly administered 10 mg/kg/day NaF in association with 10 mg/kg TQ for 4 weeks. Rats intoxicated with NaF showed a significant increase in lipid peroxidation whereas the level of reduced glutathione (GSH and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione S-transferase (GST and glutathione peroxidase (GPx were reduced in hepatic tissues. The proper functioning of the liver was also disrupted as indicated by alterations in the measured liver function indices and biochemical parameters. TQ supplementation counteracted the NaF-induced hepatotoxicity probably due to its strong antioxidant activity. In conclusion, the results obtained clearly indicated the role of oxidative stress in the induction of NaF toxicity and suggested hepatoprotective effects of TQ against the toxicity of fluoride compounds.

  1. Impact of Anesthetic Regimen on Remote Ischemic Preconditioning in the Rat Heart In Vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Behmenburg, Friederike; van Caster, Patrick; Bunte, Sebastian; Brandenburger, Timo; Heinen, André; Hollmann, Markus W.; Huhn, Ragnar

    2017-01-01

    Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) seems to be a promising cardioprotective strategy with contradictive clinical data suggesting the anesthetic regimen influencing the favorable impact of RIPC. This study aimed to investigate whether cardio protection by RIPC is abolished by anesthetic regimens.

  2. Effects of ketamine and its isomers on ischemic preconditioning in the isolated rat heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molojavyi, A.; Preckel, B.; Comfère, T.; Müllenheim, J.; Thämer, V.; Schlack, W.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ischemic preconditioning protects the heart against subsequent ischemia. Opening of the adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel is a key mechanism of preconditioning. Ketamine blocks KATP channels of isolated cardiomyocytes. The authors investigated the effects of

  3. Modulation of Intestinal Microbiome Prevents Intestinal Ischemic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Bertacco

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Butyrate protects against ischemic injury to the small intestine by reducing inflammation and maintaining the structure of the intestinal barrier, but is expensive, short-lived, and cannot be administered easily due to its odor. Lactate, both economical and more palatable, can be converted into butyrate by the intestinal microbiome. This study aimed to assess in a rat model whether lactate perfusion can also protect against intestinal ischemia.Materials and Methods: Rat intestinal segments were loaded in an in vitro bowel perfusion device, and water absorption or secretion was assessed based on fluorescence of FITC-inulin, a fluorescent marker bound to a biologically inert sugar. Change in FITC concentration was used as a measure of ischemic injury, given the tendency of ischemic cells to retain water. Hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections at light level microscopy were examined to evaluate intestinal epithelium morphology. Comparisons between the data sets were paired Student t-tests or ANOVA with p < 0.05 performed on GraphPad.Results: Lactate administration resulted in a protective effect against intestinal ischemia of similar magnitude to that observed with butyrate. Both exhibited approximately 1.5 times the secretion exhibited by control sections (p = 0.03. Perfusion with lactate and methoxyacetate, a specific inhibitor of lactate-butyrate conversion, abolished this effect (p = 0.09. Antibiotic treatment also eliminated this effect, rendering lactate-perfused sections similar to control sections (p = 0.72. Perfusion with butyrate and methoxyacetate did not eliminate the observed increased secretion, which indicates that ischemic protection was mediated by microbial conversion of lactate to butyrate (p = 0.71.Conclusions: Lactate's protective effect against intestinal ischemia due to microbial conversion to butyrate suggests possible applications in the transplant setting for reducing ischemic injury and ameliorating intestinal

  4. Hemichorea after ischemic stroke

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    Sadullah Saglam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The deterioration of the balance between direct and indirect ways in the basal ganglia causes chorea. The lesions of contralateral basal ganglia, thalamus or the connection of them all together are responsible for this. Chorea can be observed during the course of metabolic and vascular diseases, neurodegenerative or hereditary diseases. Hyperkinetic movement disorders after acute ischemic stroke are reported as rare; however, hemichorea is the most frequent developing disorder of hyperkinetic movement as a result of cerebrovascular disease. In this case report, we presented two case who applied us with choreiform movements in his left half of the body after acute thalamic stroke. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(0.100: 29-32

  5. Is opium addiction a risk factor for ischemic heart disease and ischemic stroke?

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    Mohammad Reza Rezvani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The main source of studies about effects of opium consumption on heart and brain attacks originates from Iran Therefore the aim of the present study was to assess opium addiction as a probable influencing factor for ischemic heart disease and ischemic stroke. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out in two Cardiology and Neurology clinics in Eastern Iran in 2011. Diagnosis of Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD and Ischemic Stroke (IS was made by Cardiologist and Stroke Neurologist respectively. The influence of gender, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, cigarette smoking, oral and inhaled opium consumption on distribution of IHD and IS were evaluated. Results: Five hundred fifty eight patients (307 females, 251 males with mean age 56.2 years enrolled the study. On adjusted odds ratios of our whole 558 patients, only hypertension and diabetes had a significant influence on occurrence of IHD; (P = 0.000 and P = 0.000 respectively. Oral and inhaled routes of opium addiction did not have a significant effect on occurrence of IHD; [OR = 1.172, 95% CI = 0.624-2.203, P = 0.621] and [OR = 1.820, 95% CI = 0.811-4.085, P = 0.147] respectively. Hypertension and diabetes were significant risk factors of IS in our 558 patients at multivariate analysis; (P = 0.000, P = 0.020. Oral opium addiction was as significant protective factor of IS in our study group; OR = 0.211, 95% CI = 0.079-0.564, P = 0.002, while inhaled opium addiction did not have a significant effect on occurrence of IS in our patients at; OR = 1.760, 95% CI = 0.760-4.076, P = 0.187. Conclusion: Oral opium consumption is a protective factor of IS but not IHD. Inhaled opium addiction does not have a significant influence on occur r ence of IS and IHD.

  6. Is opium addiction a risk factor for ischemic heart disease and ischemic stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvani, Mohammad Reza; Ghandehari, Kavian

    2012-10-01

    The main source of studies about effects of opium consumption on heart and brain attacks originates from Iran Therefore the aim of the present study was to assess opium addiction as a probable influencing factor for ischemic heart disease and ischemic stroke. A cross-sectional study was carried out in two Cardiology and Neurology clinics in Eastern Iran in 2011. Diagnosis of Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD) and Ischemic Stroke (IS) was made by Cardiologist and Stroke Neurologist respectively. The influence of gender, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, cigarette smoking, oral and inhaled opium consumption on distribution of IHD and IS were evaluated. Five hundred fifty eight patients (307 females, 251 males) with mean age 56.2 years enrolled the study. On adjusted odds ratios of our whole 558 patients, only hypertension and diabetes had a significant influence on occurrence of IHD; (P = 0.000 and P = 0.000) respectively. Oral and inhaled routes of opium addiction did not have a significant effect on occurrence of IHD; [OR = 1.172, 95% CI = 0.624-2.203, P = 0.621] and [OR = 1.820, 95% CI = 0.811-4.085, P = 0.147] respectively. Hypertension and diabetes were significant risk factors of IS in our 558 patients at multivariate analysis; (P = 0.000, P = 0.020). Oral opium addiction was as significant protective factor of IS in our study group; OR = 0.211, 95% CI = 0.079-0.564, P = 0.002, while inhaled opium addiction did not have a significant effect on occurrence of IS in our patients at; OR = 1.760, 95% CI = 0.760-4.076, P = 0.187. Oral opium consumption is a protective factor of IS but not IHD. Inhaled opium addiction does not have a significant influence on occurrence of IS and IHD.

  7. Shear Stress Inhibits Apoptosis of Ischemic Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiafeng Shen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available As a therapeutic strategy for ischemic stroke, to restore or increase cerebral blood flow (CBF is the most fundamental option. Laminar shear stress (LS, as an important force generated by CBF, mainly acts on brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs. In order to study whether LS was a protective factor in stroke, we investigated LS-intervented ischemic apoptosis of rat BMECs (rBMECs through PE Annexin V/7-AAD, JC-1 and Hoechst 33258 staining to observe the membranous, mitochondrial and nuclear dysfunction. Real-time PCR and western blot were also used to test the gene and protein expressions of Tie-2, Bcl-2 and Akt, which were respectively related to maintain membranous, mitochondrial and nuclear norm. The results showed that LS could be a helpful stimulus for ischemic rBMECs survival. Simultaneously, membranous, mitochondrial and nuclear regulation played an important role in this process.

  8. Thrombomodulin is a determinant of metastasis through a mechanism linked to the thrombin binding domain but not the lectin-like domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Netanel A.; Blevins, Elizabeth A.; Miller, Whitney M.; Perry, Ashley R.; Talmage, Kathryn E.; Mullins, Eric S.; Flick, Matthew J.; Queiroz, Karla C. S.; Shi, Kun; Spek, C. Arnold; Conway, Edward M.; Monia, Brett P.; Weiler, Hartmut; Degen, Jay L.

    2011-01-01

    Thrombomodulin (TM) is a predominantly endothelial transmembrane glycoprotein that modulates hemostatic function through a domain that controls thrombin-mediated proteolysis and an N-terminal lectin-like domain that controls inflammatory processes. To test the hypothesis that TM is a determinant of malignancy and dissect the importance of these functional domains in cancer biology, metastatic potential was evaluated in TMPro mice expressing a mutant form of TM with reduced thrombin affinity and TMLeD mice lacking the N-terminal lectin-like domain. Studies of TMPro mice revealed that TM is a powerful determinant of hematogenous metastasis. TMPro mice exhibited a strongly prometastatic phenotype relative to control mice that was found to result from increased survival of tumor cells newly localized to the lung rather than any alteration in tumor growth. The impact of the TMPro mutation on metastasis was dependent on both tumor cell-associated tissue factor and thrombin procoagulant function. In contrast, expression of a mutant form of TM lacking the lectin-like domain had no significant impact on metastasis. These studies directly demonstrate for the first time that TM-mediated regulation of tumor cell-driven procoagulant function strongly influences metastatic potential and suggest that endothelial cell-associated modulators of hemostasis may represent novel therapeutic targets in limiting tumor dissemination. PMID:21788337

  9. Therapeutic angiogenesis of adipose-derived stem cells for ischemic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lina; Johnson, Takerra; Liu, Dong

    2017-06-05

    Ischemic diseases, the leading cause of disability and death, are caused by the stenosis or obstruction of arterioles/capillaries that is not compensated for by vessel dilatation or collateral circulation. Angiogenesis is a complex process leading to new blood vessel formation and is triggered by ischemic conditions. Adequate angiogenesis, as a compensatory mechanism in response to ischemia, may increase oxygen and nutrient supplies to tissues and protect their function. Therapeutic angiogenesis has been the most promising therapy for treating ischemic diseases. In recent years, stem cell transplantation has been recognized as a new technique with therapeutic angiogenic effects on ischemic diseases. Adipose-derived stem cells, characterized by their ease of acquisition, high yields, proliferative growth, and low immunogenicity, are an ideal cell source. In this review, the characterization of adipose-derived stem cells and the role of angiogenesis in ischemic attack are summarized. The angiogenic effects of adipose-derived stem cells are discussed from the perspectives of in-vitro, in-vivo, and clinical trial studies for the treatment of ischemic diseases, including ischemic cardiac, cerebral, and peripheral vascular diseases and wound healing. The microvesicles/exosomes released from adipose-derived stem cells are also presented as a novel therapeutic prospect for treating ischemic diseases.

  10. Human soluble thrombomodulin-induced blockade of peripheral HMGB1-dependent allodynia in mice requires both the lectin-like and EGF-like domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yusuke; Tsujita, Ryuichi; Tsubota, Maho; Saeki, Haruka; Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Honda, Goichi; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2018-01-01

    Thrombomodulin (TM), an endothelial protein with anti-coagulant activity, is composed of 5 domains, D1-D5. Recombinant human soluble TM (TMα) consisting of D1-D3, which is generated in CHO cells, suppresses inflammatory and nociceptive signals by inactivating high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), one of damage-associated molecular patterns. TMα sequesters HMGB1 with the lectin-like D1 and promotes its degradation by thrombin binding to the EGF-like D2. We prepared TM's D123, D1 and D2 by the protein expression system of yeast, and evaluated their effects on HMGB1 degradation in vitro and on the allodynia caused by HMGB1 in distinct redox forms in mice in vivo. TMα and TM's D123, but not D1, promoted the thrombin-dependent degradation of all-thiol (at-HMGB1) and disulfide HMGB1 (ds-HMGB1), an effect mimicked by TM's D2, though to a lesser extent. Intraplantar administration of TMα and TM's D123, but not D1, D2 or D1 plus D2, strongly prevented the mechanical allodynia caused by intraplantar at-HMGB1, ds-HMGB1 or lipopolysaccharide in mice. Our data suggest that, apart from the role of D3, TMα and TM's D123 require both lectin-like D1 capable of sequestering HMGB1 and EGF-like D2 responsible for thrombin-dependent degradation of HMGB1, in abolishing the allodynia caused by exogenous or endogenous HMGB1. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The roles of selected arginine and lysine residues of TAFI (Pro-CPU) in its activation to TAFIa by the thrombin-thrombomodulin complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chengliang; Kim, Paul Y; Manuel, Reg; Seto, Marian; Whitlow, Marc; Nagashima, Mariko; Morser, John; Gils, Ann; Declerck, Paul; Nesheim, Michael E

    2009-03-13

    Thrombomodulin (TM) increases the catalytic efficiency of thrombin (IIa)-mediated activation of thrombin-activable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) 1250-fold. Negatively charged residues of the C-loop of TM-EGF-like domain 3 are required for TAFI activation. Molecular models suggested several positively charged residues of TAFI with which the C-loop residues could interact. Seven TAFI mutants were constructed to determine if these residues are required for efficient TAFI activation. TAFI wild-type or mutants were activated in the presence or absence of TM and the kinetic parameters of TAFI activation were determined. When the three consecutive lysine residues in the activation peptide of TAFI were substituted with alanine (K42/43/44A), the catalytic efficiencies for TAFI activation with TM decreased 8-fold. When other positively charged surface residues of TAFI (Lys-133, Lys-211, Lys-212, Arg-220, Lys-240, or Arg-275) were mutated to alanine, the catalytic efficiencies for TAFI activation with TM decreased by 1.7-2.7-fold. All decreases were highly statistically significant. In the absence of TM, catalytic efficiencies ranged from 2.8-fold lower to 1.24-fold higher than wild-type. None of these, except the 2.8-fold lower value, was statistically significant. The average half-life of the TAFIa mutants was 8.1+/-0.6 min, and that of wild type was 8.4+/-0.3 min at 37 degrees C. Our data show that these residues are important in the activation of TAFI by IIa, especially in the presence of TM. Whether the mutated residues promote a TAFI-TM or TAFI-IIa interaction remains to be determined. In addition, these residues do not influence spontaneous inactivation of TAFIa.

  12. Therapeutic potential of recombinant thrombomodulin for lung injury after pneumonectomy via inhibition of high-mobility group box 1 in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yusuke; Matsutani, Noriyuki; Dejima, Hitoshi; Nakayama, Takashi; Okamura, Ryo; Uehara, Hirofumi; Kawamura, Masafumi

    2016-11-01

    Surgical acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an extremely critical condition which may occur after major lung resection. Despite advances in minimally invasive surgical procedures and progress in the therapeutic management of this disease, prognosis remains poor. In this study, we investigated the contribution of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) in a surgical ARDS model and evaluated the possible therapeutic effect of recombinant thrombomodulin (rTM) for the treatment of surgical ARDS. C57BL/6J mice underwent left pneumonectomy. rTM was injected at 12 hours before surgery, followed by 12 hours for 3 days after surgery. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was administered at 2 hours after surgery. We conducted a histologic analysis and measured HMGB1, IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid on day 3 after pneumonectomy. Data were compared between the treatment groups. On histologic analysis, left pneumonectomy followed by LPS administration induced both severe inflammatory cellular infiltration and alveolar wall congestion with hemorrhage. rTM administration rescued these histologic changes. The level of HMGB1, IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was significantly increased by LPS administration after pneumonectomy and significantly decreased by rTM administration with LPS and pneumonectomy (p < 0.001). Also, LPS alone showed no statistical differences in HMGB1 or proinflammatory cytokine level compared with pneumonectomy (PNX) group. In addition, the survival outcome was also improved by rTM administration. LPS administration after left pneumonectomy could induce the severe lung injury. PNX and LPS have similar contribution to this model and may play a synergistic role in this process. rTM may have the potential therapeutic effect for surgical ARDS via suppression of HMGB1 and the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines induced by the administration of LPS after left pneumonectomy.

  13. Association DENV1 and DENV2 infection with high serum levels of soluble thrombomodulin and VEGF in patients with dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Moral-Hernández, Oscar; Martínez-Hernández, Norma E; Mosso-Pani, Manuel A; Hernández-Sotelo, Daniel; Illades-Aguiar, Berenice; Flores-Alfaro, Eugenia; Antonio-Vejar, Verónica; Leyva-Vázquez, Marco Antonio

    2014-01-01

    INFECTION BY DENGUE VIRUS (DENV) CAN BE ASYMPTOMATIC OR MANIFEST IN TWO CLINICALLY DIFFERENTIATED FORMS: dengue fever (DF) and denguehemorrhagic fever (DHF). The principal pathophysiological characteristic of DHF is the increase in vascular permeability and the loss of plasma caused by the malfunction of the vascular endothelium that induces the release of chemical mediators. However, so far there is nothing that allows for the identification the patients that are at risk of developing the more severe form of the illness. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between the serum levels of soluble thrombomodulin (sTM) and VEGF with the severity of dengue and the viral serotype. 231 serum samples were analyzed, 70 DF, 80 DHF and 81 control group, all were residents of Guerrero state in Mexico. The infection by dengue virus as well and the levels of sTM and VEGF were determined using the ELISA sandwich, while the serotype was determined by real time RT-PCR. Our results show that the concentrations of sTM correlate with the degree of severity of the disease given that they are significantly higher (p<0.001) in the DHF group (median = 10.2 ng/mL) than in the DF group (median = 7.2 ng/mL), and these in turn higher than those of the control group (median = 3.3 ng/mL). The concentration of sTM was significantly higher (p=0.0002) in the patients infected with DENV2. For the VEGF, the highest levels were found in DF (median = 291.3 pg/mL) and did not correlate with the severity of the disease. In conclusion, our results indicate that sTM is a good marker for the severity of the infection by DENV, better than VEGF, and with higher sensibility and specificity.

  14. Thrombomodulin-dependent effect of factor V Leiden mutation on the cross-linking of α2-plasmin inhibitor to fibrin and its consequences on fibrinolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koncz, Zsuzsa; Bagoly, Zsuzsa; Haramura, Gizella; Mezei, Zoltán A; Muszbek, László

    2012-09-01

    It has been shown that thrombomodulin (TM) considerably delays factor XIII (FXIII) activation and this effect is abrogated by Factor V Leiden (FV(Leiden)) mutation. The aim of the study was to explore the effect of TM on the cross-linking of α(2)-plasmin inhibitor (α(2)-PI) to fibrin in plasma samples of different FV genotypes and how this effect is related to the impaired fibrinolysis of FV(Leiden) carriers. In the plasma samples of fifteen individuals with different FV genotypes and in FV deficient plasma supplemented with wild type FV or FV(Leiden) coagulation was initiated by recombinant human tissue factor and phospholipids with or without recombinant human TM (rhTM). In the recovered clots the extent of α(2)-PI-fibrin cross-linking was evaluated by Western blotting and quantitative densitometry. The effect of rhTM on tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) induced clot lysis was measured by turbidimetric method. rhTM significantly delayed the formation of α(2)-PI-fibrin α-chain heterodimers/oligomers in plasma samples containing wild type FV. This effect of rhTM was impaired in the presence of FV(Leiden). rhTM delayed tPA-induced clot lysis and this effect of rhTM was more pronounced in plasma containing FV(Leiden). When TAFIa was inhibited by potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor, rhTM accelerated clot lysis in the presence of wild type FV, which is explained by the delayed α(2)-PI-fibrin cross-linking. This effect of rhTM did not prevail in the presence of FV(Leiden). FV(Leiden) abrogates the delaying effect of rhTM on α(2)-PI-fibrin cross-linking, which contributes to the impaired fibrinolysis observed in FV(Leiden) carriers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Pig-to-baboon heterotopic heart transplantation--exploratory preliminary experience with pigs transgenic for human thrombomodulin and comparison of three costimulation blockade-based regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwase, Hayato; Ekser, Burcin; Satyananda, Vikas; Bhama, Jay; Hara, Hidetaka; Ezzelarab, Mohamed; Klein, Edwin; Wagner, Robert; Long, Cassandra; Thacker, Jnanesh; Li, Jiang; Zhou, Hao; Jiang, Maolin; Nagaraju, Santosh; Zhou, Huidong; Veroux, Massimiliano; Bajona, Pietro; Wijkstrom, Martin; Wang, Yi; Phelps, Carol; Klymiuk, Nikolai; Wolf, Eckhard; Ayares, David; Cooper, David K C

    2015-01-01

    Three costimulation blockade-based regimens have been explored after transplantation of hearts from pigs of varying genetic backgrounds to determine whether CTLA4-Ig (abatacept) or anti-CD40mAb+CTLA4-Ig (belatacept) can successfully replace anti-CD154mAb. All pigs were on an α1,3-galactosyltransferase gene-knockout/CD46 transgenic (GTKO.CD46) background. Hearts transplanted into Group A baboons (n=4) expressed additional CD55, and those into Group B (n=3) expressed human thrombomodulin (TBM). Immunosuppression included anti-thymocyte globulin with anti-CD154mAb (Regimen 1: n=2) or abatacept (Regimen 2: n=2) or anti-CD40mAb+belatacept (Regimen 3: n=2). Regimens 1 and 2 included induction anti-CD20mAb and continuous heparin. One further baboon in Group B (B16311) received a modified Regimen 1. Baboons were followed by clinical/laboratory monitoring of immune/coagulation parameters. At biopsy, graft failure, or euthanasia, the graft was examined by microscopy. Group A baboons survived 15 to 33 days, whereas Group B survived 52, 99, and 130 days, respectively. Thrombocytopenia and reduction in fibrinogen occurred within 21 days in Group A, suggesting thrombotic microangiopathy (TM), confirmed by histopathology. In Group B, with follow-up for >4 m, areas of myofiber degeneration and scarring were seen in two hearts at necropsy. A T-cell response was documented only in baboons receiving Regimen 2. The combination of anti-CD40mAb+belatacept proved effective in preventing a T-cell response. The expression of TBM prevented thrombocytopenia and may possibly delay the development of TM and/or consumptive coagulopathy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION AND “OXIDATIVE STRESS” BY THE NONNSTABLE COURSE OF ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    A. E. Kratnov; A. G. Borodin; A. A. Kratnov; E. S. Uglov; O. V. Shilova

    2005-01-01

    Abstract. The purpose of study was to compare phagocytic indexes, free oxygen radicals generation, activity of antioxidative protection, cytokine levels and von Willebrand factor (vWF) antigen in the patients with non–stable course of ischemic heart disease of. We examined 58 patients with ischemic heart disease: 31 with unstable angina and 27 with acute myocardial infarction. The methods of study included nitro–blue tetrasolium reduction test for neutrophiles and monocytes, detection of myel...

  17. ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION AND “OXIDATIVE STRESS” BY THE NONNSTABLE COURSE OF ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    A. E. Kratnov; A. G. Borodin; A. A. Kratnov; E. S. Uglov; O. V. Shilova

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. The purpose of study was to compare phagocytic indexes, free oxygen radicals generation, activity of antioxidative protection, cytokine levels and von Willebrand factor (vWF) antigen in the patients with non–stable course of ischemic heart disease of. We examined 58 patients with ischemic heart disease: 31 with unstable angina and 27 with acute myocardial infarction. The methods of study included nitro–blue tetrasolium reduction test for neutrophiles and monocytes, detection of myel...

  18. Alcohol attenuates myocardial ischemic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrimgeour, Laura A; Potz, Brittany A; Elmadhun, Nassrene Y; Chu, Louis M; Sellke, Frank W

    2017-09-01

    Moderate alcohol consumption is cardioprotective but the mechanism of action remains unclear. Nuclear factor κ-B regulates the expression of genes involved in inflammation, stress, and apoptosis. We used a swine model of diet-induced metabolic syndrome to investigate the effects of red wine and vodka on nuclear factor κ-B signaling and cytokine activity in chronically ischemic myocardium. Yorkshire swine were given a high-fat diet for 4 weeks; an ameroid constrictor was then placed on the left circumflex artery. The high-fat diet was continued and the swine were divided into 3 groups for 7 weeks: hypercholesterolemic diet alone (control, n = 8), hypercholesterolemic diet with vodka (vodka, n = 8), and hypercholesterolemic diet with wine (wine, n = 8). Ischemic myocardium was analyzed by Western blot and cytokine array. Administration of alcohol was associated with decreased expression of inhibitor of κ-B kinase complex α, inhibitor of κ-B kinase complex β, and phosphorylated inhibitor of κ-B β in the ischemic myocardium compared with the control group. Alcohol administration demonstrated an increase in nuclear factor κ-B in the ischemic myocardium. Both wine and vodka demonstrated a significant decrease in leptin, interleukin-1α, IL-13, IL-15, and interferon-γ. Vodka demonstrated a significant decrease in phosphorylated BCL-2 and caspase-9. In ischemic myocardium, alcohol modulates the nuclear factor κ-B pathway, which may contribute to the adaptive response of tissues to the stress of ischemia. Furthermore, both wine and vodka decreased multiple proinflammatory cytokines. This study provides a mechanism by which alcohol may be cardioprotective in ischemic myocardium. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Stress signaling by Tec tyrosine kinase in the ischemic myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Michael J; Franklin, Sarah; Li, Yifeng; Wang, Sujing; Ru, Xiaochen; Mitchell-Jordan, Scherise A; Mano, Hiroyuki; Stefani, Enrico; Ping, Peipei; Vondriska, Thomas M

    2010-09-01

    Nonreceptor tyrosine kinases have an increasingly appreciated role in cardiac injury and protection. To investigate novel tasks for members of the Tec family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases in cardiac phenotype, we examined the behavior of the Tec isoform in myocardial ischemic injury. Ischemia-reperfusion, but not cardiac protective agents, induced altered intracellular localization of Tec, highlighting distinct actions of this protein compared with other isoforms, such as Bmx, in the same model. Tec is abundantly expressed in cardiac myocytes and assumes a diffuse intracellular localization under basal conditions but is recruited to striated structures upon various stimuli, including ATP. To characterize Tec signaling targets in vivo, we performed an exhaustive proteomic analysis of Tec-binding partners. These experiments expand the role of the Tec family in the heart, identifying the Tec isoform as an ischemic injury-induced isoform, and map the subproteome of its interactors in isolated cells.

  20. Characteristics of Chinese herbal medicine usage in ischemic heart disease patients among type 2 diabetes and their protection against hydrogen peroxide-mediated apoptosis in H9C2 cardiomyoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Cheng, Chi-Fung; Shiao, Yi-Tzone; Chien, Wen-Kuei; Chen, Jin-Hua; Liu, Xiang; Tsang, Hsinyi; Lin, Ting-Hsu; Liao, Chiu-Chu; Huang, Shao-Mei; Li, Ju-Pi; Lin, Cheng-Wen; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Lan, Yu-Ching; Liu, Yu-Huei; Hung, Chien-Hui; Lin, Jung-Chun; Lin, Chih-Chien; Lai, Chih-Ho; Liang, Wen-Miin; Lin, Ying-Ju

    2017-02-28

    Evidence for long-term use of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) as an adjuvant treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) remains limited. This study aimed to assess the frequency of use, utilization patterns, and therapeutic effects of adjuvant CHM for ischemic heart disease (IHD) in patients with T2D in Taiwan. We identified 4620 IHD patients with T2D. After matching for age, gender, and insulin use, 988 subjects each were allocated to a CHM group and a non-CHM group. There were no differences in baseline characteristics except for comorbidities. The CHM group contained more cases with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hepatitis, ulcer disease, and hyperlipidemia. The cumulative survival probability was higher in CHM users than in matched non-CHM users aged 60 years or older (P < .0001, log rank test) regardless of gender (P = .0046 for men, P = .0010 for women, log rank test). Among the top 12 CHM combinations, Shu-Jing-Huo-Xue-Tang and Shao-Yao-Gan-Cao-Tang (13.6%) were the most common. This dual combination improved antiapoptotic activity in H2O2-exposed H9C2 cells by enhancing phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and could increase the survival of myocardial cells. Our study suggests that adjuvant CHM therapy may increase the survival probability and provides a comprehensive list for future investigations of the safety and efficacy of CHM for IHD patients with T2D.

  1. Glibenclamide for the treatment of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffes, Nicholas; Kurland, David B; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2015-03-04

    Ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes are associated with severe functional disability and high mortality. Except for recombinant tissue plasminogen activator, therapies targeting the underlying pathophysiology of central nervous system (CNS) ischemia and hemorrhage are strikingly lacking. Sur1-regulated channels play essential roles in necrotic cell death and cerebral edema following ischemic insults, and in neuroinflammation after hemorrhagic injuries. Inhibiting endothelial, neuronal, astrocytic and oligodendroglial sulfonylurea receptor 1-transient receptor potential melastatin 4 (Sur1-Trpm4) channels and, in some cases, microglial KATP (Sur1-Kir6.2) channels, with glibenclamide is protective in a variety of contexts. Robust preclinical studies have shown that glibenclamide and other sulfonylurea agents reduce infarct volumes, edema and hemorrhagic conversion, and improve outcomes in rodent models of ischemic stroke. Retrospective studies suggest that diabetic patients on sulfonylurea drugs at stroke presentation fare better if they continue on drug. Additional laboratory investigations have implicated Sur1 in the pathophysiology of hemorrhagic CNS insults. In clinically relevant models of subarachnoid hemorrhage, glibenclamide reduces adverse neuroinflammatory and behavioral outcomes. Here, we provide an overview of the preclinical studies of glibenclamide therapy for CNS ischemia and hemorrhage, discuss the available data from clinical investigations, and conclude with promising preclinical results that suggest glibenclamide may be an effective therapeutic option for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke.

  2. Oxidative stress and pathophysiology of ischemic stroke: novel therapeutic opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, Ramón; Fernández-Gajardo, Rodrigo; Gutiérrez, Rodrigo; Matamala, José Manuel; Carrasco, Rodrigo; Miranda-Merchak, Andrés; Feuerhake, Walter

    2013-08-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death, after ischemic heart disease, and accounts for 9% of deaths worldwide. According to the World Health Organization [WHO], 15 million people suffer stroke worldwide each year. Of these, more than 6 million die and another 5 million are permanently disabled. Reactive oxygen species [ROS] have been implicated in brain injury after ischemic stroke. There is evidence that a rapid increase in the production of ROS immediately after acute ischemic stroke rapidly overwhelm antioxidant defences, causing further tissue damage. These ROS can damage cellular macromolecules leading to autophagy, apoptosis, and necrosis. Moreover, the rapid restoration of blood flow increases the level of tissue oxygenation and accountsfor a second burst of ROS generation, which leads to reperfusion injury. Current measures to protect the brain against severe stroke damage are insufficient. Thus, it is critical to investigate antioxidant strategies that lead to the diminution of oxidative injury. The antioxidant vitamins C and E, the polyphenol resveratrol, the xanthine oxidase [XO] inhibitor allopurinol, and other antioxidant strategies have been reviewed in the setting of strokes. This review focuses on the mechanisms involved in ROS generation, the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke, and the novel therapeutic strategies to be tested to reduce the cerebral damage related to both ischemia and reperfusion.

  3. Glibenclamide for the Treatment of Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Caffes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes are associated with severe functional disability and high mortality. Except for recombinant tissue plasminogen activator, therapies targeting the underlying pathophysiology of central nervous system (CNS ischemia and hemorrhage are strikingly lacking. Sur1-regulated channels play essential roles in necrotic cell death and cerebral edema following ischemic insults, and in neuroinflammation after hemorrhagic injuries. Inhibiting endothelial, neuronal, astrocytic and oligodendroglial sulfonylurea receptor 1–transient receptor potential melastatin 4 (Sur1–Trpm4 channels and, in some cases, microglial KATP (Sur1–Kir6.2 channels, with glibenclamide is protective in a variety of contexts. Robust preclinical studies have shown that glibenclamide and other sulfonylurea agents reduce infarct volumes, edema and hemorrhagic conversion, and improve outcomes in rodent models of ischemic stroke. Retrospective studies suggest that diabetic patients on sulfonylurea drugs at stroke presentation fare better if they continue on drug. Additional laboratory investigations have implicated Sur1 in the pathophysiology of hemorrhagic CNS insults. In clinically relevant models of subarachnoid hemorrhage, glibenclamide reduces adverse neuroinflammatory and behavioral outcomes. Here, we provide an overview of the preclinical studies of glibenclamide therapy for CNS ischemia and hemorrhage, discuss the available data from clinical investigations, and conclude with promising preclinical results that suggest glibenclamide may be an effective therapeutic option for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke.

  4. [Ischemic stroke in young women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ekker, M.S.; Wermer, M.J.; Riksen, N.P.; Klijn, C.J.; Leeuw, F.E. de

    2016-01-01

    - In virtually all age groups, the incidence of ischemic stroke is higher in men. However, in women aged between 25-49 years the prevalence is higher than in men. Female-specific risk factors and disorders may explain this peak.- Pregnancy and the post-partum period are associated with physiological

  5. Monocytes in ischemic heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    The link between the immune system and ischemic heart disease has been recognized for years and great improvements have been made in understanding the role of immune cells in the context of infarct healing, atherosclerosis and arteriogenesis, using experimental and in vitro models. However, the role

  6. Diabetes and ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, Natasha; Ballegaard, Søren; Holmager, Pernille

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test i) whether patients having diabetes and ischemic heart disease (IHD), i.e., patients suffering from two chronic diseases, demonstrate a higher degree of chronic stress when compared with patients suffering from IHD alone, and ii) whether suffering from the two...

  7. Sarcolemmal blebs and osmotic fragility as correlates of irreversible ischemic injury in preconditioned isolated rabbit cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, S C; Shivell, L C; Ganote, C E

    2001-01-01

    The hypothesis that irreversible ischemic injury is related to sub-sarcolemmal blebbing and an inherent osmotic fragility of the blebs was tested by subjecting isolated control and ischemically preconditioned (IPC) or calyculin A (CalA)-pretreated (protected) rabbit cardiomyocytes to ischemic pelleting followed by resuspension in 340, 170 or 85 mosmol medium containing trypan blue. At time points from 0-240 min, osmotic fragility was assessed by the percentage of trypan blue permeable cells. Membrane blebs were visualized with India ink preparations. Bleb formation, following acute hypo-osmotic swelling, developed by 75 min and increased with longer periods of ischemia. Osmotic fragility developed only after 75 min. Cells resuspended in 340 mosmol media did not form blebs and largely retained the ability to exclude trypan blue, even after 240 min ischemia. Although the latent tendency for osmotic blebbing preceded the development of osmotic fragility, most osmotically fragile cells became permeable without evident sarcolemmal bleb formation. The onset of osmotic fragility was delayed in protected cells, but protection did not reduce the bleb formation. It is concluded that blebbing and osmotic fragility are independent manifestations of ischemic injury. The principal locus of irreversible ischemic injury and the protection provided by IPC may lie within the sarcolemma rather than at sarcolemmal attachments to underlying adherens junctions.

  8. Role of histidine/histamine in carnosine-induced neuroprotection during ischemic brain damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Ok-Nam; Majid, Arshad

    2013-08-21

    Urgent need exists for new therapeutic options in ischemic stroke. We recently demonstrated that carnosine, an endogenous dipeptide consisting of alanine and histidine, is robustly neuroprotective in ischemic brain injury and has a wide clinically relevant therapeutic time window. The precise mechanistic pathways that mediate this neuroprotective effect are not known. Following in vivo administration, carnosine is hydrolyzed into histidine, a precursor of histamine. It has been hypothesized that carnosine may exert its neuroprotective activities through the histidine/histamine pathway. Herein, we investigated whether the neuroprotective effect of carnosine is mediated by the histidine/histamine pathway using in vitro primary astrocytes and cortical neurons, and an in vivo rat model of ischemic stroke. In primary astrocytes, carnosine significantly reduced ischemic cell death after oxygen-glucose deprivation, and this effect was abolished by histamine receptor type I antagonist. However, histidine or histamine did not exhibit a protective effect on ischemic astrocytic cell death. In primary neuronal cultures, carnosine was found to be neuroprotective but histamine receptor antagonists had no effect on the extent of neuroprotection. The in vivo effect of histidine and carnosine was compared using a rat model of ischemic stroke; only carnosine exhibited neuroprotection. Taken together, our data demonstrate that although the protective effects of carnosine may be partially mediated by activity at the histamine type 1 receptor on astrocytes, the histidine/histamine pathway does not appear to play a critical role in carnosine induced neuroprotection. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Ischemic stroke and incomplete infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, Javier; Lassen, N A; Weiller, C

    1996-01-01

    The concept of selective vulnerability or selective loss o f individual neurons, with survival of glial and vascular elements as one of the consequences of a systemic ischemic-hypoxic insult (eg, transient cardiac arrest or severe hypotension), has been recognized for decades. In contrast, select......, selective neuronal death as one of the lesions that may develop in the brain after occluding an intracranial artery is an idea not readily acknowledged in the current medical literature dealing with human stroke....

  10. The Siblings With Ischemic Stroke Study (SWISS): A Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meschia, James F.; Kissela, Brett M.; Brott, Thomas G.; Brown, Robert D.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Beck, Jeanne; Skarp, Alexa N.

    2006-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that genetic factors are associated with ischemic stroke, including multiple recent reports of association with the gene PDE4D, encoding phosphodiesterase 4D, on chromosome 5q12. Genetic studies of stroke are important but can be logistically difficult to perform. This article reviews the design of the Siblings With Ischemic Stroke Study (SWISS) and discusses problems in performing a sibling-based pedigree study where proband-initiated consent is used to enroll pedigree members. Proband-initiated enrollment optimizes privacy protections for family members, but it is associated with a substantial pedigree non-completion rate such that 3 to 4 probands must be identified to obtain one completed sibling pedigree. This report updates the progress of enrollment in the SWISS protocol, discusses barriers to pedigree completion and describes innovative approaches used by the SWISS investigators to enhance enrollment. PMID:16595789

  11. Role of homocysteine in the ischemic stroke nad development of ischemic tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Lehotsky

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Homocysteine (Hcy is a toxic, sulfur-containing intermediate of methionine metabolism. Hyperhomocysteinemia (hHcy, as a consequence of impaired Hcy metabolism or defects in crucial co-factors that participate in its recycling, is assumed as an independent human stroke risk factor. Neural cells are sensitive to prolonged hHcy treatment, because Hcy cannot be metabolized either by the transsulfuration pathway or by the folate/vitamin B12 independent remethylation pathway. Its detrimental effect after ischemia-induced damage includes accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and posttranslational modifications of proteins via homocysteinylation and thiolation. Ischemic preconditioning (IPC is an adaptive response of the CNS to sub-lethal ischemia, which elevates tissues tolerance to subsequent ischemia. The main focus of this review is on the recent data on homocysteine metabolism and mechanisms of its neurotoxicity. In this context, the review documents an increased oxidative stress and functional modification of enzymes involved in redox balance in experimentally induced hyperhomocysteinemia. It also gives an interpretation whether hyperhomocysteinemia alone or in combination with IPC affects the ischemia-induced neurodegenerative changes as well as intracellular signalling. Studies document that hHcy alone significantly increased Fluoro-Jade C- and TUNEL-positive cell neurodegeneration in the rat hippocampus as well as in the cortex. IPC, even if combined with hHcy, could still preserve the neuronal tissue from the lethal ischemic effects. This review also describes the changes in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK protein pathways following ischemic injury and IPC. These studies provide evidence for the interplay and tight integration between ERK and p38 MAPK signalling mechanisms in response to the hHcy and also in association of hHcy with ischemia/IPC challenge in the rat brain. Further investigations of the protective factors

  12. Conditioning techniques and ischemic reperfusion injury in relation to on-pump cardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Fredrik Eric Olof; Ottas, Konstantin Alex; Andreasen, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective was to investigate the potential protective effects of two conditioning methods, on myocardial ischemic and reperfusion injury in relation to cardiac surgery. DESIGN: Totally 68 patients were randomly assigned to either a control group (n = 23), a remote ischemic...... did not reach statistical significance. RIPC showed a trend toward lower levels (p = 0.07). We managed to establish a functional myocardial microdialysis model, but we were unable to demonstrate clear protective effects. CONCLUSIONS: We were in this prospective randomized proof-of-concept trial...

  13. A procyanidin type A trimer from cinnamon extract attenuates glial cell swelling and the reduction in glutamate uptake following ischemic injury in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietary polyphenols exert neuroprotective effects in ischemic injury. The protective effects of a procyanidin type A trimer (trimer 1) isolated from a water soluble cinnamon extract (CE) were investigated on key features of ischemic injury including cell swelling, increased free radical production, ...

  14. Intermittent peripheral tissue ischemia during coronary ischemia reduces myocardial infarction through a KATP-dependent mechanism: first demonstration of remote ischemic perconditioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Michael Rahbek; Smerup, M; Konstantinov, I E

    2006-01-01

    Remote ischemic preconditioning reduces myocardial infarction (MI) in animal models. We tested the hypothesis that the systemic protection thus induced is effective when ischemic preconditioning is administered during ischemia (PerC) and before reperfusion and examined the role of the K(+)-depend...

  15. Ischemic Stroke: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clots) (American Stroke Association) Let's Talk about Ischemic Stroke (American Heart Association) Also in Spanish Prevention and Risk Factors Carotid Endarterectomy (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute) ...

  16. MORPHOLOGY OF ISCHEMIC INJURY OF LIVER ALLOGRAFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Shkalova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature data in modern transplantology concerning morphology of ischemic injury of liver allograft are analyzed in the article. Questions of pathogenesis of liver allograft ischemic injury, histological features that indicate the possibility of donor liver transplantation are discussed in detail, as well as the role of steatosis and its reverse is highlighted. We tried to systematize the morphological changes depending on severity of ischemic injury; also we focused on the questions of persistency of the ischemic injury in the liver allograft. 

  17. Pioglitazone after Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernan, Walter N; Viscoli, Catherine M; Furie, Karen L; Young, Lawrence H; Inzucchi, Silvio E; Gorman, Mark; Guarino, Peter D; Lovejoy, Anne M; Peduzzi, Peter N; Conwit, Robin; Brass, Lawrence M; Schwartz, Gregory G; Adams, Harold P; Berger, Leo; Carolei, Antonio; Clark, Wayne; Coull, Bruce; Ford, Gary A; Kleindorfer, Dawn; O'Leary, John R; Parsons, Mark W; Ringleb, Peter; Sen, Souvik; Spence, J David; Tanne, David; Wang, David; Winder, Toni R

    2016-04-07

    Patients with ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) are at increased risk for future cardiovascular events despite current preventive therapies. The identification of insulin resistance as a risk factor for stroke and myocardial infarction raised the possibility that pioglitazone, which improves insulin sensitivity, might benefit patients with cerebrovascular disease. In this multicenter, double-blind trial, we randomly assigned 3876 patients who had had a recent ischemic stroke or TIA to receive either pioglitazone (target dose, 45 mg daily) or placebo. Eligible patients did not have diabetes but were found to have insulin resistance on the basis of a score of more than 3.0 on the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index. The primary outcome was fatal or nonfatal stroke or myocardial infarction. By 4.8 years, a primary outcome had occurred in 175 of 1939 patients (9.0%) in the pioglitazone group and in 228 of 1937 (11.8%) in the placebo group (hazard ratio in the pioglitazone group, 0.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.62 to 0.93; P=0.007). Diabetes developed in 73 patients (3.8%) and 149 patients (7.7%), respectively (hazard ratio, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.33 to 0.69; Pischemic stroke or TIA, the risk of stroke or myocardial infarction was lower among patients who received pioglitazone than among those who received placebo. Pioglitazone was also associated with a lower risk of diabetes but with higher risks of weight gain, edema, and fracture. (Funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00091949.).

  18. Post-ischemic treatment of WIB801C, standardized Cordyceps extract, reduces cerebral ischemic injury via inhibition of inflammatory cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sunyoung; Cho, Geum-Sil; Ryu, Sangwoo; Kim, Hoon J; Song, Hwa Young; Yune, Tae Y; Ju, Chung; Kim, Won-Ki

    2016-06-20

    infarct volume and neurobehavioral deficits by WIB801C was also observed in rats subjected to pMCAO. In summary, post-ischemic treatment of WIB801C reduced infiltration of inflammatory cells into ischemic lesions via inhibition of chemotaxis, which confers long-lasting histological and neurological protection in ischemic brain. WIB801C may be a promising anti-ischemic drug candidate with clinically relevant therapeutic time window and safety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Sex Hormones and Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmegard, Haya N; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Jensen, Gorm B

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Whether endogenous sex hormones are associated with ischemic stroke (IS) is unclear. We tested the hypothesis that extreme concentrations of endogenous sex hormones are associated with risk of IS in the general population. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Adult men (n...... = 4615) and women (n = 4724) with measurements of endogenous sex hormones during the 1981-1983 examination of the Copenhagen City Heart Study, Denmark, were followed for up to 29 years for incident IS, with no loss to follow-up. Mediation analyses assessed whether risk of IS was mediated through...

  20. Ischemic Conditioning in Kidney Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veighey, Kristin; MacAllister, Raymond

    2017-07-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury is a composite of the injury sustained during a period of reduced or absent blood flow to a tissue or organ and the additional insult sustained on reperfusion, which limits the amount of tissue that can be salvaged. Ischemia-reperfusion injury is the predominant insult during kidney transplantation, contributing to graft dysfunction, increased rates of acute rejection, and reduced rejection-free graft survival. In this review, we discuss the potential therapeutic benefits of a cost-effective and low-risk intervention, ischemic preconditioning, and its potential for improving kidney function following transplantation.

  1. Infections and Ischemic Stroke Outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Grabska, Katarzyna; Gromadzka, Grażyna; Członkowska, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Background. Infections increase the risk of ischemic stroke (IS) and may worsen IS prognosis. Adverse effects of in-hospital infections on stroke outcome were also reported. We aimed to study the prevalence of pre- and poststroke infections and their impact on IS outcome. Methods. We analysed clinical data of 2066 IS patients to assess the effect of pre-stroke and post-stroke infections on IS severity, as well as short-term (up to 30 days) and long-term (90 days) outcome. The independent i...

  2. Glucose metabolism in ischemic myocardium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Akira; Ono, Yukihiko; Sudo, Makiko; Araki, Kazuhiro; Shishido, Fumio; Uemura, Kazuo; Kadowaki, Ken; Kumagai, Tadayuki.

    1986-01-01

    We determined the myocardial metabolic rate for glucose (MMRGlc) in the ischemic or infarcted myocardium using 18-F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18-FDG) with positron emission tomography (PET), and studied energy metabolism in the ischemic myocardium. In some cases, we compared glucose metabolism images by 18-FDG with myocardial blood flow images using 15-oxygen water. Two normal subjects, seven patients with myocardial infarction and four patients with angina pectoris were studied. Coronary angiography was performed within two weeks before or after the PET study to detect ischemic areas. PET studies were performed for patients who did not eat for 5 to 6 hours after breakfast. Cannulation was performed in the pedal artery to measure free fatty acid, blood sugar, and insulin. After recording the transmission scan for subsequent correction of photon attenuation, blood pool images were recorded for two min. after the inhalation of carbon monoxide (oxygen-15) which labeled the red blood cells in vivo. After 20 min., oxygen-15 water (15 to 20 mCi) was injected for dynamic scans, and flow images were obtained. Thirty min. after this procedure, 18-FDG (5 to 6 mCi) was injected, and 60 min later, a static scan was performed and glucose metabolism images were obtained. Arterial blood sampling for the time activity curve of the tracer was performed at the same time. According to the method of Phelps et al, MMRGlc was calculated in each of the region of interest (ROI) which was located in the left ventricular wall. MMRGlc obtained from each ROI was 0 to 17 mg/100 ml/min. In normal subjects MMRGlc was 0.4 to 7.3 mg/100 ml/min. In patients with myocardial infarction, it ranged from 3 to 5 mg/100 ml/min in the infarcted lesion. In patients with angina pectoris and subendocardial infarction, MMRGlc was 7 to 17 mg/100 ml/min in the ischemic lesion. In this lesion, myocardial blood flow was relatively low by oxygen-15 imagings (so-called mismatch). (J.P.N.)

  3. Association of serial biochemical markers with acute ischemic stroke: the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke recombinant tissue plasminogen activator Stroke Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch, Edward C; Lindsell, Christopher; Broderick, Joseph; Fagan, Susan C; Tilley, Barbara C; Levine, Steven R

    2006-10-01

    Biochemical markers of acute neuronal injury may aid in the diagnosis and management of acute ischemic stroke. Serum samples from the National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) recombinant tissue plasminogen activator Stroke Study were analyzed for the presence of 4 biochemical markers of neuronal, glial, and endothelial cell injury. These biochemical markers, myelin basic protein (MBP), neuron-specific enolase (NSE), S100beta, and soluble thrombomodulin, were studied for an association with initial stroke severity, infarct volume, and functional outcome. In the original NINDS study, serum samples were drawn from all patients on presentation to the Emergency Department and at approximately 2 and 24 hours after initiation of study therapy. In this analysis, stored serum samples were available for 359 patients; 107 patients had samples for all 3 time points. Serum marker concentrations were measured by ELISA techniques. We examined the relation between serum concentrations of each marker and the degree of baseline neurological deficit, functional outcome, and infarct size on computed tomography at 24 hours and the effect of fibrinolytic therapy. Higher 24-hour peak concentrations of MBP, NSE, and S100beta were associated with higher National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale baseline scores (r=0.186, P<0.0001; r=0.117, P=0.032; and r=0.263, P<0.0001, respectively). Higher peak concentrations of MBP and S100beta (r=0.209, P<0.0001; r=0.239, P<0.0001) were associated with larger computed tomography lesion volumes. Patients with favorable outcomes had smaller changes in MBP and S100beta (P<0.05) concentrations in the first 24 hours. Soluble thrombomodulin was not associated with any severity or outcome measure. This study corroborates previous work demonstrating correlations of MBP, NSE, and S100beta with clinical and radiographic features in acute stroke. Despite significantly better outcomes in the tissue plasminogen activator-treated group, we

  4. Myocardial ischemic preconditioning in a porcine model leads to rapid changes in cardiac extracellular vesicle messenger RNA content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Svennerholm

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: These findings demonstrate in an in vivo model that myocardial ischemic preconditioning influences the composition of mRNA in EV, including gene transcripts for proteins associated with the protective effect of ischemic preconditioning. The finding that preconditioned parental cells release EV containing mRNA that is qualitatively different from those released by non-preconditioned cells shows the importance of the external milieu on parental cell EV production.

  5. Protein Redox Modification as a Cellular Defense Mechanism against Tissue Ischemic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-Jun Yan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein oxidative or redox modifications induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS or reactive nitrogen species (RNS not only can impair protein function, but also can regulate and expand protein function under a variety of stressful conditions. Protein oxidative modifications can generally be classified into two categories: irreversible oxidation and reversible oxidation. While irreversible oxidation usually leads to protein aggregation and degradation, reversible oxidation that usually occurs on protein cysteine residues can often serve as an “on and off” switch that regulates protein function and redox signaling pathways upon stress challenges. In the context of ischemic tolerance, including preconditioning and postconditioning, increasing evidence has indicated that reversible cysteine redox modifications such as S-sulfonation, S-nitrosylation, S-glutathionylation, and disulfide bond formation can serve as a cellular defense mechanism against tissue ischemic injury. In this review, I highlight evidence of cysteine redox modifications as protective measures in ischemic injury, demonstrating that protein redox modifications can serve as a therapeutic target for attenuating tissue ischemic injury. Prospectively, more oxidatively modified proteins will need to be identified that can play protective roles in tissue ischemic injury, in particular, when the oxidative modifications of such identified proteins can be enhanced by pharmacological agents or drugs that are available or to be developed.

  6. Hemorrhagic transformation of ischemic stroke in diabetics on sulfonylureas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunte, Hagen; Busch, Markus A.; Trostdorf, Katrin; Vollnberg, Bernd; Harms, Lutz; Mehta, Rupal; Castellani, Rudolf J.; Mandava, Pitchaiah; Kent, Thomas A.; Simard, J. Marc

    2012-01-01

    Objective Disability or death occurs more frequently in patients with hemorrhagic transformation (HT) after ischemic stroke. In rat models of stroke, sulfonylurea (SU) drugs such as glibenclamide (adopted US name, glyburide) confer protection against swelling and HT through actions on the novel SUR1-regulated NCCa-ATP channel. Here, we sought to determine whether the use of SU drugs in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) presenting with acute ischemic stroke might influence the incidence of HT. Methods We retrospectively analyzed data on 220 patients with DM who presented with acute ischemic stroke, 43 of whom were managed with and continued to receive SU drugs, and 177 of whom were managed without (controls). Results During a median length of stay in hospital of 11 days, 20 control patients (11%) experienced symptomatic HT (sHT), while no patient in the SU group experienced sHT (P=0.016). No patient in the SU group died, compared to 18 (10%) in the control group (P=0.027). Similarly favorable outcomes were observed after matching for baseline imbalances and excluding outliers. In support of the proposed mechanism, we present a case of sHT in which an analysis of brain tissues obtained intraoperatively showed prominent upregulation of SUR1, the target of SU drugs, in microvessels and neurons. Interpretation We conclude that, in diabetic patients with acute ischemic stroke, prior and continued use of SU drugs is associated with reduced sHT compared to those whose treatment regimen does not include SU drugs. PMID:23280795

  7. Ischemic preconditioning enhances integrity of coronary endothelial tight junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zhao; Jin, Zhu-Qiu

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Cardiac tight junctions are present between coronary endothelial cells. ► Ischemic preconditioning preserves the structural and functional integrity of tight junctions. ► Myocardial edema is prevented in hearts subjected to ischemic preconditioning. ► Ischemic preconditioning enhances translocation of ZO-2 from cytosol to cytoskeleton. -- Abstract: Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) is one of the most effective procedures known to protect hearts against ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury. Tight junction (TJ) barriers occur between coronary endothelial cells. TJs provide barrier function to maintain the homeostasis of the inner environment of tissues. However, the effect of IPC on the structure and function of cardiac TJs remains unknown. We tested the hypothesis that myocardial IR injury ruptures the structure of TJs and impairs endothelial permeability whereas IPC preserves the structural and functional integrity of TJs in the blood–heart barrier. Langendorff hearts from C57BL/6J mice were prepared and perfused with Krebs–Henseleit buffer. Cardiac function, creatine kinase release, and myocardial edema were measured. Cardiac TJ function was evaluated by measuring Evans blue-conjugated albumin (EBA) content in the extravascular compartment of hearts. Expression and translocation of zonula occludens (ZO)-2 in IR and IPC hearts were detected with Western blot. A subset of hearts was processed for the observation of ultra-structure of cardiac TJs with transmission electron microscopy. There were clear TJs between coronary endothelial cells of mouse hearts. IR caused the collapse of TJs whereas IPC sustained the structure of TJs. IR increased extravascular EBA content in the heart and myocardial edema but decreased the expression of ZO-2 in the cytoskeleton. IPC maintained the structure of TJs. Cardiac EBA content and edema were reduced in IPC hearts. IPC enhanced the translocation of ZO-2 from cytosol to cytoskeleton. In conclusion, TJs occur in

  8. Prospective of ischemic stroke biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szewczak Krzysztof

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Methods currently used in brain vascular disorder diagnostics are neither fast enough nor clear-out; thus, there exists a necessity of finding new types of testing which could enlarge and complete the actual panel of diagnostics or be an alternative to current methods. The discovery of sensitive and specific biomarkers of ischemic brain stroke will improve the effects of treatment and will help to assess the progress or complications of the disease. The relevant diagnosis of ischemic stroke (IS within the first 4.5 hours after the initial symptoms allows for the initiation of treatment with recombinant tissue plasminogen activators which limits the magnitude of negative changes in the brain and which enhance the final effectiveness of therapy. The potential biomarkers which are under investigation are substances involved in the processes of coagulation and fibrinolysis, and are of molecules released from damaged vascular endothelial cells and from nerves and cardiac tissue. The analyzed substances are typical of oxidative stress, apoptosis, excitotoxicity and damage of the blood brain barrier.

  9. Swallowing disorders after ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Camargo Remesso

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate occurrences of swallowing disorders after ischemic stroke. METHOD: This was a retrospective study on 596 medical files. The inclusion criterion was that the patients needed to have been hospitalized with a diagnosis of ischemic stroke; the exclusion criteria were the presence of associated cardiac problems and hospital stay already more than 14 days. RESULTS: 50.5% were men and 49.5% women; mean age 65.3 years (SD=±11.7 (p<0.001. Among the risk factors, 79.4% had hypertension, 36.7% had diabetes (p<0.001 and 42.7% were smokers. 13.3% of the patients died. Swallowing disorders occurred in 19.6%, among whom 91.5% had mild difficulty and 8.5% had severe difficulty. 87.1% had spontaneous recovery after a mean of 2.4 months. A lesion in the brainstem region occurred in 6.8% (p<0.001. CONCLUSION: Swallowing disorders occurred in almost 20% of the population and most of the difficulty in swallowing found was mild. The predictors for swallowing disorders were older age, diabetes mellitus and lesions in the brainstem region.

  10. Remote Ischemic Conditioning on Recipients of Deceased Renal Transplants Does Not Improve Early Graft Function : A Multicenter Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krogstrup, N. V.; Oltean, M.; Nieuwenhuijs-Moeke, G. J.; Dor, F. J. M. F.; Moldrup, U.; Krag, S. P.; Bibby, B. M.; Birn, H.; Jespersen, B.

    Delayed graft function is a frequent complication following deceased donor renal transplantation, and is closely related to ischemia-reperfusion injury. Experimental and clinical studies have shown protection by remote ischemic conditioning (RIC). We hypothesized that recipient RIC before kidney

  11. TIGAR regulates glycolysis in ischemic kidney proximal tubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinu; Devalaraja-Narashimha, Kishor; Padanilam, Babu J

    2015-02-15

    Tp53-induced glycolysis and apoptosis regulator (TIGAR) activation blocks glycolytic ATP synthesis by inhibiting phosphofructokinase-1 activity. Our data indicate that TIGAR is selectively induced and activated in renal outermedullary proximal straight tubules (PSTs) after ischemia-reperfusion injury in a p53-dependent manner. Under severe ischemic conditions, TIGAR expression persisted through 48 h postinjury and induced loss of renal function and histological damage. Furthermore, TIGAR upregulation inhibited phosphofructokinase-1 activity, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity, and induced ATP depletion, oxidative stress, autophagy, and apoptosis. Small interfering RNA-mediated TIGAR inhibition prevented the aforementioned malevolent effects and protected the kidneys from functional and histological damage. After mild ischemia, but not severe ischemia, G6PD activity and NADPH levels were restored, suggesting that TIGAR activation may redirect the glycolytic pathway into gluconeogenesis or the pentose phosphate pathway to produce NADPH. The increased level of NADPH maintained the level of GSH to scavenge ROS, resulting in a lower sensitivity of PST cells to injury. Under severe ischemia, G6PD activity and NADPH levels were reduced during reperfusion; however, blockade of TIGAR enhanced their levels and reduced oxidative stress and apoptosis. Collectively, these results demonstrate that inhibition of TIGAR may protect PST cells from energy depletion and apoptotic cell death in the setting of severe ischemia-reperfusion injury. However, under low ischemic burden, TIGAR activation induces the pentose phosphate pathway and autophagy as a protective mechanism. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Protective effects of ethyl acetate extraction from Gastrodia elata ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Damage of the blood brain barrier (BBB) during the process of cerebral ischemic injury is a key factor which influences the therapeutic efficacy to the cerebral ischemic injury. The present study was designed to verify the mechanisms underlying the protective effects of the ethyl acetate (EtOAc) extraction from ...

  13. Functional reconstruction of ischemic contracture in the

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TANG Hao

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To discuss the method of functional reconstruction of ischemic contracture in the lower limb and propose a classification protocol for ischemic contracture in the lower limb based on its severity and prognosis. Methods: A total of 42 patients with ischemic contracture in the lower limb were included in this study. According to different types of disturbance and degrees of severity, surgical reconstructions consisting of nerve decompression, tendon lengthening or transfer, intrinsic foot muscle release and sural-tibial nerve anastomosis were performed in every patient. Results: Postoperatively, all patients were able to walk on flat ground. Drop foot was corrected in 10 patients, and 5 patients still felt some difficulty during stair activity. Split Achilles tendon transfer to flexor hallucis longus tendon was performed in 12 patients, and their walking stability was improved. Seven patients accepted ipsilateral suraltibial nerve anastomosis, and sensitivity recovery reached to S2 in 2 patients and S3 in 5 patients. Conclusions: Ischemic contracture in the lower limb is a devastating complication after lower limb trauma. The prevention of contracture is much more important than the treatment of an established contracture. Split Achilles tendon transfer to flexor hallucis longus tendon and sural-tibial nerve anastomosis, which was initially implemented by us, could improve the functional recovery of ischemic contracture in lower limbs, and thus provides a new alternative for functional reconstruction of ischemic contracture in the lower limb. Key words: Ischemic contracture; Classification; Recovery of function

  14. Ischemic post-conditioning attenuates renal ischemic reperfusion injury via down-regulation of toll-like receptor 4 in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bo Tao; Chen, Qing Zhi; Guo, Zong Hua; Zou, Wei; Chen, Xiong; Zha, Wen Liang

    2016-10-01

    Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, which is commonly seen in the field of renal surgery or transplantation, is a major cause of acute renal failure (ARF). The ischemic ARF in diabetic rats is much more severe than that in the normal rats exposed to as same ischemic time. Ischemic post-conditioning (IPO) is a phenomenon by which intermittent interruptions of blood flow in the early phase of reperfusion can protect organs from I/R injury. To determine whether the renal protection effect of IPO mediates by toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling pathway in diabetic rats. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were randomly divided into three groups: sham operation group, I/R group, and IPO group. Except sham operation group, rats were subjected to 30 min of renal ischemia, both with and without treatment with IPO, then reperfusion 24 h. Light microscope and transmission electronic microscope were used to observe structural changes of renal tubule. RT-PCR was used to measure TLR4 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) mRNA expression level, renal TLR4 and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) protein expression was detected by Western blot. The results demonstrated that IPO markedly decreased renal ischemic injury caused by I/R and inhibited the proinflammatory expression levels of TLR4, TNF-α, and NF-κB, all of which up-regulated by I/R in diabetic rats. Taken together, our results suggest that proper IPO may have protective effect on the ischemic injury mediated by renal I/R, which might be associated with inhibition of TLR4 signaling pathway in diabetic rats.

  15. Characteristics of Misclassified CT Perfusion Ischemic Core in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geuskens, Ralph R E G; Borst, Jordi; Lucas, Marit; Boers, A M Merel; Berkhemer, Olvert A; Roos, Yvo B W E M; van Walderveen, Marianne A A; Jenniskens, Sjoerd F M; van Zwam, Wim H; Dippel, Diederik W J; Majoie, Charles B L M; Marquering, Henk A

    2015-01-01

    CT perfusion (CTP) is used to estimate the extent of ischemic core and penumbra in patients with acute ischemic stroke. CTP reliability, however, is limited. This study aims to identify regions misclassified as ischemic core on CTP, using infarct on follow-up noncontrast CT. We aim to assess differences in volumetric and perfusion characteristics in these regions compared to areas that ended up as infarct on follow-up. This study included 35 patients with >100 mm brain coverage CTP. CTP processing was performed using Philips software (IntelliSpace 7.0). Final infarct was automatically segmented on follow-up noncontrast CT and used as reference. CTP and follow-up noncontrast CT image data were registered. This allowed classification of ischemic lesion agreement (core on CTP: rMTT≥145%, aCBVCT) and misclassified ischemic core (core on CTP, not identified on follow-up noncontrast CT) regions. False discovery ratio (FDR), defined as misclassified ischemic core volume divided by total CTP ischemic core volume, was calculated. Absolute and relative CTP parameters (CBV, CBF, and MTT) were calculated for both misclassified CTP ischemic core and ischemic lesion agreement regions and compared using paired rank-sum tests. Median total CTP ischemic core volume was 49.7ml (IQR:29.9ml-132ml); median misclassified ischemic core volume was 30.4ml (IQR:20.9ml-77.0ml). Median FDR between patients was 62% (IQR:49%-80%). Median relative mean transit time was 243% (IQR:198%-289%) and 342% (IQR:249%-432%) for misclassified and ischemic lesion agreement regions, respectively. Median absolute cerebral blood volume was 1.59 (IQR:1.43-1.79) ml/100g (P<0.01) and 1.38 (IQR:1.15-1.49) ml/100g (P<0.01) for misclassified ischemic core and ischemic lesion agreement, respectively. All CTP parameter values differed significantly. For all patients a considerable region of the CTP ischemic core is misclassified. CTP parameters significantly differed between ischemic lesion agreement and

  16. Characteristics of Misclassified CT Perfusion Ischemic Core in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph R E G Geuskens

    Full Text Available CT perfusion (CTP is used to estimate the extent of ischemic core and penumbra in patients with acute ischemic stroke. CTP reliability, however, is limited. This study aims to identify regions misclassified as ischemic core on CTP, using infarct on follow-up noncontrast CT. We aim to assess differences in volumetric and perfusion characteristics in these regions compared to areas that ended up as infarct on follow-up.This study included 35 patients with >100 mm brain coverage CTP. CTP processing was performed using Philips software (IntelliSpace 7.0. Final infarct was automatically segmented on follow-up noncontrast CT and used as reference. CTP and follow-up noncontrast CT image data were registered. This allowed classification of ischemic lesion agreement (core on CTP: rMTT≥145%, aCBV<2.0 ml/100g and infarct on follow-up noncontrast CT and misclassified ischemic core (core on CTP, not identified on follow-up noncontrast CT regions. False discovery ratio (FDR, defined as misclassified ischemic core volume divided by total CTP ischemic core volume, was calculated. Absolute and relative CTP parameters (CBV, CBF, and MTT were calculated for both misclassified CTP ischemic core and ischemic lesion agreement regions and compared using paired rank-sum tests.Median total CTP ischemic core volume was 49.7ml (IQR:29.9ml-132ml; median misclassified ischemic core volume was 30.4ml (IQR:20.9ml-77.0ml. Median FDR between patients was 62% (IQR:49%-80%. Median relative mean transit time was 243% (IQR:198%-289% and 342% (IQR:249%-432% for misclassified and ischemic lesion agreement regions, respectively. Median absolute cerebral blood volume was 1.59 (IQR:1.43-1.79 ml/100g (P<0.01 and 1.38 (IQR:1.15-1.49 ml/100g (P<0.01 for misclassified ischemic core and ischemic lesion agreement, respectively. All CTP parameter values differed significantly.For all patients a considerable region of the CTP ischemic core is misclassified. CTP parameters significantly

  17. Transient ischemic attack: diagnostic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messé, Steven R; Jauch, Edward C

    2008-08-01

    A transient ischemic attack portends significant risk of a stroke. Consequently, the diagnostic evaluation in the emergency department is focused on identifying high-risk causes so that preventive strategies can be implemented. The evaluation consists of a facilitated evaluation of the patient's metabolic, cardiac, and neurovascular systems. At a minimum, the following tests are recommended: fingerstick glucose level, electrolyte levels, CBC count, urinalysis, and coagulation studies; noncontrast computed tomography (CT) of the head; electrocardiography; and continuous telemetry monitoring. Vascular imaging studies, such as carotid ultrasonography, CT angiography, or magnetic resonance angiography, should be performed on an urgent basis and prioritized according to the patient's risk stratification for disease. Consideration should be given for echocardiography if no large vessel abnormality is identified.

  18. Quantitative Measurement of Physical Activity in Acute Ischemic Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømmen, Anna Maria; Christensen, Thomas; Jensen, Kai

    2014-01-01

    the feasibility of using accelerometers to quantitatively and continuously measure physical activity simultaneously from all 4 extremities and the hip in patients with acute ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack. Our study provides quantitative evidence of physical inactivity in patients with acute......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to quantitatively measure and describe the amount and pattern of physical activity in patients within the first week after acute ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack using accelerometers. METHODS: A total of 100 patients with acute...... ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack admitted to our acute stroke unit wore Actical accelerometers attached to both wrists and ankles and the hip for ≤7 days. Patients were included within 72 hours of symptom onset. Accelerometer output was measured in activity counts (AC). Patients were tested...

  19. Collateral blood vessels in acute ischemic stroke: a physiological window to predict future outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heitor Castelo Branco Rodrigues Alves

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Collateral circulation is a physiologic pathway that protects the brain against ischemic injury and can potentially bypass the effect of a blocked artery, thereby influencing ischemic lesion size and growth. Several recent stroke trials have provided information about the role of collaterals in stroke pathophysiology, and collateral perfusion has been recognized to influence arterial recanalization, reperfusion, hemorrhagic transformation, and neurological outcomes after stroke. Our current aim is to summarize the anatomy and physiology of the collateral circulation and to present and discuss a comprehensible review of the related knowledge, particularly the effects of collateral circulation on the time course of ischemic injury and stroke severity, as well as imaging findings and therapeutic implications.

  20. Neuroprotective Mechanisms of Taurine against Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Menzie

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke exhibits a multiplicity of pathophysiological mechanisms. To address the diverse pathophysiological mechanisms observed in ischemic stroke investigators seek to find therapeutic strategies that are multifaceted in their action by either investigating multipotential compounds or by using a combination of compounds. Taurine, an endogenous amino acid, exhibits a plethora of physiological functions. It exhibits antioxidative properties, stabilizes membrane, functions as an osmoregulator, modulates ionic movements, reduces the level of pro-inflammators, regulates intracellular calcium concentration; all of which contributes to its neuroprotective effect. Data are accumulating that show the neuroprotective mechanisms of taurine against stroke pathophysiology. In this review, we describe the neuroprotective mechanisms employed by taurine against ischemic stroke and its use in clinical trial for ischemic stroke.

  1. Paraneoplastic Ischemic Stroke: Case Report and Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Sumer

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Paraneoplastic etiology is not frequent among cerebrovascular disorders. This rare disorder is interesting with different mechanisms, clinical manifestations and treatment options. Diagnosis may be overlooked for its rarity. We present a paraneoplastic ischemic stroke patient with its clinical and imaging characteristics for recalling this rare disease. CASE: A sixty years old woman with a history of ovarian and colon cancer and liver metastasis admitted with acute left sided hemiplegia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple ischemic lesions at the same age. Laboratory findings were compatible with chronic disseminated intravascular coagulopathy. She was anticoagulated but the clinical findings were not changed. She died one month after her discharge from the hospital. CONCLUSIONS: Paraneoplastic ischemic stroke is rare and it should be recognized by the clinician to differentiate from other ischemic strokes by its different mechanisms, imaging characteristics and treatment modalities. Prognosis depends on the characteristics of the primary tumor

  2. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and symptomatic ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndum-Jacobsen, Peter; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Schnohr, Peter

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that low plasma concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D are associated with increased risk of symptomatic ischemic stroke in the general population. METHODS: We measured plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D in 10,170 individuals from the general population, the Copenhagen...... City Heart Study. During 21 years of follow-up, 1,256 and 164 persons developed ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, respectively. In a meta-analysis of ischemic stroke, we included 10 studies, 58,384 participants, and 2,644 events. RESULTS: Stepwise decreasing plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations...... were associated with stepwise increasing risk of ischemic stroke both as a function of seasonally adjusted percentile categories and as a function of clinical categories of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (p for trend ≤ 2 × 10(-3) ). In a Cox regression model comparing individuals with plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D...

  3. Transient central diabetes insipidus following ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthukrishnan Jayaraman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Central Diabetes Insipidus (CDI following ischemic infarction of the brain has been described as a rare presentation. Posterior pituitary ischemia has also been postulated as a possible cause of idiopathic CDI. We encountered a young male with bilateral extensive ischemic infarction sustained at high altitude, who had transient polyuria due to central diabetes insipidus, requiring desmopressin therapy. DI completely resolved during the course of his neurological recovery.

  4. [Ocular ischemic syndrome--a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemba, M; Avram, Corina Ioana; Ochinciuc, Uliana; Stamate, Alina Cristina; Camburu, Raluca Lăcrămioara

    2013-01-01

    Ocular ischemic syndrome, also known as hypoperfusion/ hypotensive retinopathy or as ischemic oculopathy is a rare ocular disease determined by chronic arterial hypoperfusion through central retinal artery, posterior and anterior ciliary arteries. It is bilateral in 20% of the cases. Most often it appears due to severe occlusion of the carotid arteries (ICA, MCA>ECA), described in 1963 by Kearns and Hollenhorst. Occasionally it can be determined by the obstruction of ophtalmic artery or some arterities (Takayasu, giant cell arteritis). The risk factors are: age between 50-80 years, males (M:F = 2:1), arterial hypertension, diabetes, coronary diseases (5% of the cases develop ocular ischemic syndrome), vascular stroke, hemodialysis. The case we present is of an 63 years old man known with primary arterial hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes type 2 non insulin dependent and diagnosticated with ischemic cerebral stroke and bilateral obstruction of internal carotid arteries in march 2010, who is presenting for visual impairment in both eyes. The imaging investigations show important carotid occlusion and at the ophthalmologic evaluation there are ocular hypertension and rubeosis iridis at the right eye, optic atrophy at both eyes (complete in the right eye and partial in the left eye), with superior altitudinal visual field defect in left eye. The following diagnosis was established: Chronic ocular ischemic syndrome in both eyes with Neovascular glaucoma at the right eye, Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy at the left eye and laser panphotocoagulation at the right eye was started.

  5. Gender Differences in Cardiac Ischemic Injury and Protection - Experimental Aspects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ošťádal, Bohuslav; Netuka, I.; Malý, J.; Bešík, J.; Ošťádalová, Ivana

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 234, č. 9 (2009), s. 1011-1019 ISSN 1535-3702 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : gender differences * ischemia/ reperfusion injury * cardioprotection Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 2.635, year: 2009

  6. Effects Of Ischemic Preconditioning On The Renal Ischemia- Reperfusion Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anyamanesh S

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available  During kidney and other organ transplantation, the organ to be transplanted, must inevitably remain out of the body with little or no blood perfusion at all for a long period of time (ischemia. These events have been suggested to cause the formation of oxygen- derived free radicals (OFR. Reperfusion (reintroduction of blood flow will further exacerbate the initial damage caused by the ischemic insult and may result in the production of free radicals. The aim of this study was to investigate whether induction of brief periods of renal artery occlusion (ischemic pre¬conditioning, IPC can provide protection from the effects of a subsequent period of ischemia and reperfusion (IR in the rat kidney."nMaterials and Methods: In this regard, 28 white, male rats were randomly and equally divided into four groups: Control (sham- operated, IPC alone, IR alone (30 min ischemia followed by 10 min reperfusion, and IPC- IR. Preconditioning involved the sequential clamping of the right renal artery for 5 min and declamping for 5 min for a total of 3 cycles. To demonstrate the effectiveness of IPC regimen, vitamin E as an endogenous antioxidant and an index of lipid peroxidation was measured by HPLC after its extraction from right renal venous plasma and right renal tissue."nResults: Results of this study showed that the amount of vitamin E of renal tissue and venous plasma in the IR group had a significant decrease when compared to the control group (P< 0.0001. Whereas the amount of this vitamin in both renal tissue and venous plasma of the IPC- IR group was significantly higher than that in the IR group (P< 0.0001, but did not show any significant difference with the control group."nConclusion: In this study, preconditioning method prevented the reduction of the endogenous antioxidant (Vit. E in encountering the following sustained ischemic insult. Therefore, we suggest that ischemic preconditioning can be used to protect the Vit. E level of kidney from its

  7. Genetically elevated C-reactive protein and ischemic vascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zacho, J.; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A.; Jensen, J.S.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) are associated with increased risks of ischemic heart disease and ischemic cerebrovascular disease. We tested whether this is a causal association. Methods: We studied 10,276 persons from a general population cohort, including 1786 in whom...... ischemic heart disease developed and 741 in whom ischemic cerebrovascular disease developed. We examined another 31,992 persons from a cross-sectional general population study, of whom 2521 had ischemic heart disease and 1483 had ischemic cerebrovascular disease. Finally, we compared 2238 patients...... with ischemic heart disease with 4474 control subjects and 612 patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease with 1224 control subjects. We measured levels of high-sensitivity CRP and conducted genotyping for four CRP polymorphisms and two apolipoprotein E polymorphisms. Results: The risk of ischemic heart...

  8. Imaging of ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipton, Martin J.; Reba, Richard C.; Bogaert, Jan; Boxt, Larry M.

    2002-01-01

    Despite advances in the understanding and treatment of ischemic cardiomyopathy, characterized by extensive coronary artery disease and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, the prognosis remains poor with only a 50-60% 5-year survival rate. The composition of atherosclerotic lesions is currently regarded as being more important than the degree of stenosis in determining acute events. If imaging techniques could distinguish vulnerable from stable plaques, then high-risk patient subgroups could be identified. Another important concept is that LV dysfunction may be the result of either scarring due to necrosis or to the presence of myocardial hibernation, in which there is sufficient blood flow to sustain viable myocytes, but insufficient to maintain systolic contraction. This concept of myocardial viability is critical for making optimal clinical management decisions. This review describes how noninvasive imaging methods can be used to distinguish regions of irreversibly injured myocardium from viable but hibernating segments. Technical advances in CT and MR have made imaging of the beating heart possible. Considerable clinical progress has already been made and further cardiac applications are expected. Radiologists therefore have new opportunities for involvement in cardiac imaging but must recognize the political implications as well as the diagnostic potential of these modalities not only for the heart, but also for the whole vascular system. This review focuses on imaging myocardial injury. It compares state-of-the-art CT and MR with more established yet contemporary echocardiography and nuclear scintigraphy. (orig.)

  9. Neuroprotective actions of taurine on hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao-Yun; Ma, Peng-Sheng; Wu, Wei; Zhou, Ru; Hao, Yin-Ju; Niu, Yang; Sun, Tao; Li, Yu-Xiang; Yu, Jian-Qiang

    2016-06-01

    Taurine is an abundant amino acid in the nervous system, which has been proved to possess antioxidation, osmoregulation and membrane stabilization. Previously it has been demonstrated that taurine exerts ischemic brain injury protective effect. This study was designed to investigate whether the protective effect of taurine has the possibility to be applied to treat neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. Seven-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with left carotid artery ligation followed by exposure to 8% oxygen to generate the experimental group. The cerebral damage area was measured after taurine post-treatment with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining, Hematoxyline-Eosin (HE) staining and Nissl staining. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), myeloperoxtidase (MPO), ATP and Lactic Acid productions were assayed with ipsilateral hemisphere homogenates. Western-blot and immunofluorescence assay were processed to detect the expressions of AIF, Cyt C, Bax, Bcl-2 in brain. We found that taurine significantly reduced brain infarct volume and ameliorated morphological injury obviously reversed the changes of SOD, MDA, GSH-Px, T-AOC, ATP, MPO, and Lactic Acid levels. Compared with hypoxic-ischemic group, it showed marked reduction of AIF, Cyt C and Bax expressions and increase of Bcl-2 after post-treatment. We conclude that taurine possesses an efficacious neuroprotective effect after cerebral hypoxic-ischemic damage in neonatal rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Successful Administration of Recombinant Human Soluble Thrombomodulin α (Recomodulin for Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation during Induction Chemotherapy in an Elderly Patient with Acute Monoblastic Leukemia Involving the t(9;11(p22;q23 MLL/AF9 Translocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazutaka Takagi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with acute myelogenous leukemia complicate with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC, not only at the time of the initially leukemia diagnosis, but also during induction chemotherapy. In Japan, recently, a recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin alpha (Recomodulin has been introduced as a new type of anti-DIC agent for clinical use in patients with hematological cancer or infectious disease. We describe a 67-year-old female case in which 25,600 units of Recomodulin for 6 days were successfully administered for both initially complicating and therapy-induced DIC without any troubles of bleeding in an acute monoblastic leukemia (AML-M5a patient with the MLL gene translocation. Furthermore, the levels of DIC biomarkers recovered rapidly after the Recomodulin treatment. Our case suggests that DIC control using Recomodulin is one of the crucial support-therapies during remission induction chemotherapy in patients with acute leukemia of which type tends to complicate extramedullary or extranodal infiltration having potential to onset DIC.

  11. Study of retinal vessel oxygen saturation in ischemic and non-ischemic branch retinal vein occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei-Lei Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To explore how oxygen saturation in retinal blood vessels is altered in ischemic and non-ischemic branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO. METHODS: Fifty BRVO eyes were divided into ischemic (n=26 and non-ischemic (n=24 groups, based on fundus fluorescein angiography. Healthy individuals (n=52 and n=48, respectively were also recruited as controls for the two groups. The mean oxygen saturations of the occluded vessels and central vessels were measured by oximetry in the BRVO and control groups. RESULTS: In the ischemic BRVO group, the occluded arterioles oxygen saturation (SaO2-A, 106.0%±14.3%, instead of the occluded venule oxygen saturation (SaO2-V, 60.8%±9.4%, showed increases when compared with those in the same quadrant vessels (SaO2-A, 86.1%±16.5% in the contralateral eyes (P<0.05. The oxygen saturations of the central vessels showed similar trends with those of the occluded vessels. In the non-ischemic BRVO group, the occluded and central SaO2-V and SaO2-A showed no significant changes. In both the ischemic and non-ischemic BRVOs, the central SaO2-A was significantly increased when compared to healthy individuals. CONCLUSION: Obvious changes in the occluded and central SaO2-A were found in the ischemic BRVO group, indicating that disorders of oxygen metabolism in the arterioles may participate in the pathogenesis of ischemic BRVO.

  12. Study of retinal vessel oxygen saturation in ischemic and non-ischemic branch retinal vein occlusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lei-Lei; Dong, Yan-Min; Zong, Yao; Zheng, Qi-Shan; Fu, Yue; Yuan, Yong-Guang; Huang, Xia; Qian, Garrett; Gao, Qian-Ying

    2016-01-01

    AIM To explore how oxygen saturation in retinal blood vessels is altered in ischemic and non-ischemic branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO). METHODS Fifty BRVO eyes were divided into ischemic (n=26) and non-ischemic (n=24) groups, based on fundus fluorescein angiography. Healthy individuals (n=52 and n=48, respectively) were also recruited as controls for the two groups. The mean oxygen saturations of the occluded vessels and central vessels were measured by oximetry in the BRVO and control groups. RESULTS In the ischemic BRVO group, the occluded arterioles oxygen saturation (SaO2-A, 106.0%±14.3%), instead of the occluded venule oxygen saturation (SaO2-V, 60.8%±9.4%), showed increases when compared with those in the same quadrant vessels (SaO2-A, 86.1%±16.5%) in the contralateral eyes (P<0.05). The oxygen saturations of the central vessels showed similar trends with those of the occluded vessels. In the non-ischemic BRVO group, the occluded and central SaO2-V and SaO2-A showed no significant changes. In both the ischemic and non-ischemic BRVOs, the central SaO2-A was significantly increased when compared to healthy individuals. CONCLUSION Obvious changes in the occluded and central SaO2-A were found in the ischemic BRVO group, indicating that disorders of oxygen metabolism in the arterioles may participate in the pathogenesis of ischemic BRVO. PMID:26949618

  13. Thrombophilia And Arterial Ischemic Stroke

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    A.A. Abrishamizadeh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke (IS is a common cause of morbidity and mortality with significant socioeconomic impact especially when it affects young patients. Compared to the older adults, the incidence, risk factors, and etiology are distinctly different in younger IS. Hypercoagulable states are relatively more commonly detected in younger IS patients. Thrombophilic states are disorders of hemostatic mechanisms that result in a predisposition to thrombosis .Thrombophilia is an established cause of venous thrombosis. Therefore, it is tempting to assume that these disorders might have a similar relationship with arterial thrombosis. Despite this fact that 1-4 % of ischemic strokes are attributed to Thrombophillia, this   alone rarely causes arterial occlusions .Even in individuals with a positive thrombophilia screen and arterial thrombosis, the former might not be the primary etiological factor. Thrombophilic   disorders can be broadly divided into inherited or acquired conditions. Inherited thrombophilic states include deficiencies of natural anticoagulants such as protein C, protein S, and antithrombin III (AT III deficiency, polymorphisms causing resistance to activated protein C(Factor V Leiden mutation, and disturbance in the clotting balance (prothrombin gene 20210G/A variant. Of all the inherited  thrombophilic disorders, Factor V Leiden mutation is perhaps the commonest cause. On the contrary, acquired thrombophilic disorders are more common and include conditions such as the antiphospholipid syndrome, associated with lupus anticoagulant and anticardiolipin antibodies. The more useful and practical approach of ordering various diagnostic tests for the uncommon thrombophilic states tests should be determined by a detailed clinical history, physical examination, imaging studies and evaluating whether an underlying hypercoagulable state appears more likely. The laboratory thrombophilia   screening should be comprehensive and avoid missing the

  14. RECAST (Remote Ischemic Conditioning After Stroke Trial): A Pilot Randomized Placebo Controlled Phase II Trial in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Timothy J; Hedstrom, Amanda; O'Sullivan, Saoirse; Donnelly, Richard; Barrett, David A; Sarmad, Sarir; Sprigg, Nikola; Bath, Philip M

    2017-05-01

    Repeated episodes of limb ischemia and reperfusion (remote ischemic conditioning [RIC]) may improve outcome after acute stroke. We performed a pilot blinded placebo-controlled trial in patients with acute ischemic stroke, randomized 1:1 to receive 4 cycles of RIC within 24 hours of ictus. The primary outcome was tolerability and feasibility. Secondary outcomes included safety, clinical efficacy (day 90), putative biomarkers (pre- and post-intervention, day 4), and exploratory hemodynamic measures. Twenty-six patients (13 RIC and 13 sham) were recruited 15.8 hours (SD 6.2) post-onset, age 76.2 years (SD 10.5), blood pressure 159/83 mm Hg (SD 25/11), and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score 5 (interquartile range, 3.75-9.25). RIC was well tolerated with 49 out of 52 cycles completed in full. Three patients experienced vascular events in the sham group: 2 ischemic strokes and 2 myocardial infarcts versus none in the RIC group ( P =0.076, log-rank test). Compared with sham, there was a significant decrease in day 90 NIHSS score in the RIC group, median NIHSS score 1 (interquartile range, 0.5-5) versus 3 (interquartile range, 2-9.5; P =0.04); RIC augmented plasma HSP27 (heat shock protein 27; P stroke is well tolerated and appears safe and feasible. RIC may improve neurological outcome, and protective mechanisms may be mediated through HSP27. A larger trial is warranted. URL: http://www.isrctn.com. Unique identifier: ISRCTN86672015. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Ischemic Tolerance of the Brain and Spinal Cord: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunoki, Masatoshi; Kanda, Takahiro; Suzuki, Kenta; Uneda, Atsuhito; Hirashita, Koji; Yoshino, Kimihiro

    2017-11-15

    Ischemic tolerance is an endogenous neuroprotective phenomenon induced by sublethal ischemia. Ischemic preconditioning (IPC), the first discovered form of ischemic tolerance, is widely seen in many species and in various organs including the brain and the spinal cord. Ischemic tolerance of the spinal cord is less familiar among neurosurgeons, although it has been reported from the viewpoint of preventing ischemic spinal cord injury during aortic surgery. It is important for neurosurgeons to have opportunities to see patients with spinal cord ischemia, and to understand ischemic tolerance of the spinal cord as well as the brain. IPC has a strong neuroprotective effect in animal models of ischemia; however, clinical application of IPC for ischemic brain and spinal diseases is difficult because they cannot be predicted. In addition, one drawback of preconditioning stimuli is that they are also capable of producing injury with only minor changes to their intensity or duration. Numerous methods to induce ischemic tolerance have been discovered that vary in their timing and the site at which short-term ischemia occurs. These methods include ischemic postconditioning (IPoC), remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC), remote ischemic perconditioning (RIPerC) and remote ischemic postconditioning (RIPoC), which has had a great impact on clinical approaches to treatment of ischemic brain and spinal cord injury. Especially RIPerC and RIPoC to induce spinal cord tolerance are considered clinically useful, however the evidence supporting these methods is currently insufficient; further experimental or clinical research in this area is thus necessary.

  16. Genetic variation in WRN and ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mette; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Nordestgaard, Børge G.

    2017-01-01

    Background Werner syndrome, a premature genetic aging syndrome, shares many clinical features reminiscent of normal physiological aging, and ischemic vascular disease is a frequent cause of death. We tested the hypothesis that genetic variation in the WRN gene was associated with risk of ischemic...... were identified in the CCHS. In C1367R (rs1346044) TT homozygotes versus CC/CT, hazard ratios for ischemic stroke were 1.09 (95% confidence interval: 0.95–1.24; P = 0.22) in the CCHS, 1.16 (1.00–1.33; P = 0.04) in the CGPS, and 1.12 (1.01–1.23; P = 0.02) in studies combined (CCHS + CGPS), with similar...... trends for ischemic cerebrovascular disease (P = 0.06). In meta-analyses including 59,190 individuals in 5 studies, the hazard ratio for ischemic stroke for C1367R TT homozygotes versus CC/CT was 1.14 (1.04–1.25; P = 0.008). Conclusions This study suggests that common genetic variation in WRN...

  17. Ocular ischemic syndrome - a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terelak-Borys, Barbara; Skonieczna, Katarzyna; Grabska-Liberek, Iwona

    2012-08-01

    Ocular ischemic syndrome is a rare condition, which is caused by ocular hypoperfusion due to stenosis or occlusion of the common or internal carotid arteries. Atherosclerosis is the major cause of changes in the carotid arteries. Ocular ischemic syndrome is manifested as visual loss, orbital pain and, frequently, changes of the visual field, and various anterior and posterior segment signs. Anterior segment signs include iris neovascularization and secondary neovascular glaucoma, iridocyclitis, asymmetric cataract, iris atrophy and sluggish reaction to light. Posterior eye segment changes are the most characteristic, such as narrowed retinal arteries, perifoveal telangiectasias, dilated retinal veins, mid-peripheral retinal hemorrhages, microaneurysms, neovascularization at the optic disk and in the retina, a cherry-red spot, cotton-wool spots, vitreous hemorrhage and normal-tension glaucoma. Differential diagnosis of ocular ischemic syndrome includes diabetic retinopathy and moderate central retinal vein occlusion. Carotid artery imaging and fundus fluorescein angiography help to establish the diagnosis of ocular ischemic syndrome. The treatment can be local, for example, ocular (conservative, laser and surgical) or systemic (conservative and surgical treatment of the carotid artery). Since the condition does not affect the eyes alone, patients with ocular ischemic syndrome should be referred for consultation to the neurologist, vascular surgeon and cardiologist.

  18. Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC modifies plasma proteome in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Hepponstall

    Full Text Available Remote Ischemic Preconditioning (RIPC induced by brief episodes of ischemia of the limb protects against multi-organ damage by ischemia-reperfusion (IR. Although it has been demonstrated that RIPC affects gene expression, the proteomic response to RIPC has not been determined. This study aimed to examine RIPC induced changes in the plasma proteome. Five healthy adult volunteers had 4 cycles of 5 min ischemia alternating with 5 min reperfusion of the forearm. Blood samples were taken from the ipsilateral arm prior to first ischaemia, immediately after each episode of ischemia as well as, at 15 min and 24 h after the last episode of ischemia. Plasma samples from five individuals were analysed using two complementary techniques. Individual samples were analysed using 2Dimensional Difference in gel electrophoresis (2D DIGE and mass spectrometry (MS. Pooled samples for each of the time-points underwent trypsin digestion and peptides generated were analysed in triplicate using Liquid Chromatography and MS (LC-MS. Six proteins changed in response to RIPC using 2D DIGE analysis, while 48 proteins were found to be differentially regulated using LC-MS. The proteins of interest were involved in acute phase response signalling, and physiological molecular and cellular functions. The RIPC stimulus modifies the plasma protein content in blood taken from the ischemic arm in a cumulative fashion and evokes a proteomic response in peripheral blood.

  19. Herbal Medicine in Ischemic Stroke: Challenges and Prospective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaire, Bhakta Prasad

    2018-04-01

    Herbal medicines, mainly of plant source, are invaluable source for the discovery of new therapeutic agents for all sorts of human ailments. The complex pathogenesis of stroke and multifactorial effect of herbal medicine and their active constituents may suggest the promising future of natural medicine for stroke treatment. Anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, neuroprotective and vascular protective effect of herbal medicines are believed to be efficacious in stroke treatment. Herbs typically have fewer reported side effects than allopathic medicine, and may be safer to use over longer period of time. Herbal medicines are believed to be more effective for the longstanding health complaints, such as stroke. Several medicinal plants and their active constituents show the promising results in laboratory research. However failure in transformation of laboratory animal research to the clinical trials has created huge challenge for the use of herbal medicine in stroke. Until and unless scientifically comprehensive evidence of the efficacy and safety of herbal medicine in ischemic stroke patients is available, efforts should be made to continue implementing treatment strategies of proven effectiveness. More consideration should be paid to natural compounds that can have extensive therapeutic time windows, perfect pharmacological targets with few side effects. Herbal medicine has excellent prospective for the treatment of ischemic stroke, but a lot of effort should be invested to transform the success of animal research to human use.

  20. Ischemic preconditioning enhances integrity of coronary endothelial tight junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhao [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD 57007 (United States); Jin, Zhu-Qiu, E-mail: zhu-qiu.jin@sdstate.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD 57007 (United States)

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cardiac tight junctions are present between coronary endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ischemic preconditioning preserves the structural and functional integrity of tight junctions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Myocardial edema is prevented in hearts subjected to ischemic preconditioning. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ischemic preconditioning enhances translocation of ZO-2 from cytosol to cytoskeleton. -- Abstract: Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) is one of the most effective procedures known to protect hearts against ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury. Tight junction (TJ) barriers occur between coronary endothelial cells. TJs provide barrier function to maintain the homeostasis of the inner environment of tissues. However, the effect of IPC on the structure and function of cardiac TJs remains unknown. We tested the hypothesis that myocardial IR injury ruptures the structure of TJs and impairs endothelial permeability whereas IPC preserves the structural and functional integrity of TJs in the blood-heart barrier. Langendorff hearts from C57BL/6J mice were prepared and perfused with Krebs-Henseleit buffer. Cardiac function, creatine kinase release, and myocardial edema were measured. Cardiac TJ function was evaluated by measuring Evans blue-conjugated albumin (EBA) content in the extravascular compartment of hearts. Expression and translocation of zonula occludens (ZO)-2 in IR and IPC hearts were detected with Western blot. A subset of hearts was processed for the observation of ultra-structure of cardiac TJs with transmission electron microscopy. There were clear TJs between coronary endothelial cells of mouse hearts. IR caused the collapse of TJs whereas IPC sustained the structure of TJs. IR increased extravascular EBA content in the heart and myocardial edema but decreased the expression of ZO-2 in the cytoskeleton. IPC maintained the structure of TJs. Cardiac EBA content and edema were reduced in IPC hearts. IPC

  1. The iron-regulatory peptide hepcidin is upregulated in the ischemic and in the remote myocardium after myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonis, Gregor; Mueller, Katrin; Schwarz, Peggy; Wiedemann, Stephan; Adler, Guido; Strasser, Ruth H; Kulaksiz, Hasan

    2010-09-01

    Recent evidence suggests that iron metabolism contributes to the ischemic damage after myocardial infarction. Hepcidin, a recently discovered peptide hormone, regulates iron uptake and metabolism, protecting the body from iron overload. In this study we analyzed the regulation of hepcidin in the heart and blood of rats after myocardial infarction. To induce a myocardial infarction in the rats, left anterior descending coronary artery ligation was performed. After 1-24h, biopsies from the ischemic and the non-ischemic myocardium were taken. In these biopsies, the mRNA levels and the protein expression of hepcidin were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblot analysis, respectively. In parallel, the serum levels of prohepcidin were measured by ELISA. Six hours after myocardial infarction, the hepcidin mRNA expression was temporally upregulated in the ischemic and in the non-ischemic myocardium. The upregulation was specific for hepcidin, since other iron-related genes (hemojuvelin, IREG-1) remained unchanged. Furthermore, the alteration of the hepcidin protein expression in the ischemic area was connected to the level of hepcidin in the serum of the infarcted rats, where hepcidin also raised up. Angiotensin receptor blockade with candesartan did not influence the mRNA regulation of hepcidin. Together, these data show a particular upregulation of the iron-regulatory peptide hepcidin in the ischemic and the non-ischemic myocardium after myocardial infarction. It is speculated that upregulation of hepcidin may reduce iron toxicity and thus infarct size expansion in an infarcted heart. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Short Telomere Length and Ischemic Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madrid, Alexander Scheller; Rode, Line; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Short telomeres are associated with aging and have been associated with a high risk of ischemic heart disease in observational studies; however, the latter association could be due to residual confounding and/or reverse causation. We wanted to test the hypothesis that short telomeres...... are associated with high risk of ischemic heart disease using a Mendelian randomization approach free of reverse causation and of most confounding. METHODS: We genotyped 3 genetic variants in OBFC1 (oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding fold containing 1), TERT (telomerase reverse transcriptase), and TERC...... (telomerase RNA component), which code for proteins and RNA involved in telomere maintenance. We studied 105 055 individuals from Copenhagen; 17 235 of these individuals were diagnosed with ischemic heart disease between 1977 and 2013, and 66 618 had telomere length measured. For genetic studies, we further...

  3. Acute Ischemic Stroke Secondary to Glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina, Sofia; Carneiro, Ângelo; Rodrigues, Tiago; Samões, Raquel; Taipa, Ricardo; Melo-Pires, Manuel; Pereira, Cláudia

    2014-01-01

    Summary Glioblastoma is a malignant infiltrative glial tumor occurring most often over 50 years of age, with diverse clinical presentations. We describe a case of temporal lobe glioblastoma with a rare presentation as an acute ischemic stroke, discussing the imaging and histopathological findings, and reviewing the literature. A 77-year-old woman had sudden onset of left hemiparesis and hemihypoesthesia. The neuroradiological studies revealed an acute ischemic lesion in the right lenticulostriate arteries territory and a right anterior temporal lobe tumor, enhancing heterogeneously after contrast with enhancement of the right middle cerebral artery wall. Histopathological analysis of the resected temporal lesion revealed a glioblastoma multiforme with tumoral infiltration of the vascular wall. Glioblastoma should be considered in the etiology of acute ischemic stroke, where neuroimaging plays an important diagnostic role, enabling a more immediate therapeutic approach, with a consequent impact on survival. PMID:24571837

  4. Infection in the ischemic lower extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, D E; Marek, J M; Langsfeld, M

    1998-06-01

    Infections in the lower extremity of the patient with ischemia can cover a broad spectrum of different diseases. An understanding of the particular pathophysiologic circumstances in the ischemic extremity can be of great value in understanding the natural history of the disease and the potential complications that may occur. Optimizing blood flow to the extremity by using revascularization techniques is important for any patient with an ischemic lower extremity complicated by infection or ulceration. Infections in the ischemic lower extremity require local débridement and systemic antibiotics. For severe infections, such as necrotizing fasciitis or the fetid foot, more extensive local débridement and even amputation may be required. Fundamentals of managing prosthetic graft infection require removing the infected prosthesis, local wound débridement, and systemic antibiotics while attempting to preserve viability of the lower extremity using autogenous graft reconstruction.

  5. Polymorphisms in apolipoprotein B and risk of ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Marianne; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Jensen, Jan Skov

    2007-01-01

    Apolipoprotein B levels associate with risk of ischemic stroke. APOB polymorphisms may influence levels of apolipoprotein B and low-density lipoprotein (LDL), but whether they associate with risk of ischemic stroke is unknown.......Apolipoprotein B levels associate with risk of ischemic stroke. APOB polymorphisms may influence levels of apolipoprotein B and low-density lipoprotein (LDL), but whether they associate with risk of ischemic stroke is unknown....

  6. Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy following dengue fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Reshma; Shrivastava, Saurabh; Deshpande, Shrikant; Patkar, Priyanka

    2016-01-01

    Dengue fever is caused by a flavivirus. This infection is endemic in the tropics and warm temperate regions of the world. Ocular manifestations of dengue fever include subconjunctival, vitreous, and retinal haemorrhages; posterior uveitis; optic neuritis; and maculopathies, haemorrhage, and oedema. However anterior ischemic optic neuropathy is a rare presentation. Optic nerve ischemia most frequently occurs at the optic nerve head, where structural crowding of nerve fibers and reduction of the vascular supply may combine to impair perfusion to a critical degree and produce optic disc oedema. Here we present a case of anterior ischemic optic neurapathy associated with dengue fever.

  7. Clinical applications of remote ischemic preconditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veighey, Kristin; Macallister, Raymond J

    2012-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury is a composite of damage accumulated during reduced perfusion of an organ or tissue and the additional insult sustained during reperfusion. Such injury occurs in a wide variety of clinically important syndromes, such as ischemic heart disease and stroke, which are responsible for a high degree of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Basic research has identified a number of interventions that stimulate innate resistance of tissues to ischemia-reperfusion injury. Here, we summarise the experimental and clinical trial data underpinning one of these "conditioning" strategies, the phenomenon of remote ischemic preconditioning.

  8. Clinical Applications of Remote Ischemic Preconditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Veighey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischemia-reperfusion injury is a composite of damage accumulated during reduced perfusion of an organ or tissue and the additional insult sustained during reperfusion. Such injury occurs in a wide variety of clinically important syndromes, such as ischemic heart disease and stroke, which are responsible for a high degree of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Basic research has identified a number of interventions that stimulate innate resistance of tissues to ischemia-reperfusion injury. Here, we summarise the experimental and clinical trial data underpinning one of these “conditioning” strategies, the phenomenon of remote ischemic preconditioning.

  9. Hyperbilirubinemia modulates myocardial function, aortic ejection, and ischemic stress resistance in the Gunn rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakrania, Bhavisha; Du Toit, Eugene F; Ashton, Kevin J; Kiessling, Can J; Wagner, Karl-Heinz; Headrick, John P; Bulmer, Andrew C

    2014-10-15

    Mildly elevated circulating unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) is associated with protection against hypertension and ischemic heart disease. We assessed whether endogenously elevated bilirubin in Gunn rats modifies cardiovascular function and resistance to ischemic insult. Hearts were assessed ex vivo (Langendorff perfusion) and in vivo (Millar catheterization and echocardiography), and left ventricular myocardial gene expression was measured via quantitative real-time PCR. Ex vivo analysis revealed reduced intrinsic contractility in the Gunn myocardium (+dP/dt: 1,976 ± 622 vs. 2,907 ± 334 mmHg/s, P hearts exhibited improved ventricular function after 35 min of ischemia and 90 min of reperfusion (63 ± 14 vs. 35 ± 12%, P stress resistance in association with beneficial transcriptional changes. These effects may contribute to protection from cardiovascular disease with elevated bilirubin. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Ischemic stroke destabilizes circadian rhythms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borjigin Jimo

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The central circadian pacemaker is a remarkably robust regulator of daily rhythmic variations of cardiovascular, endocrine, and neural physiology. Environmental lighting conditions are powerful modulators of circadian rhythms, but regulation of circadian rhythms by disease states is less clear. Here, we examine the effect of ischemic stroke on circadian rhythms in rats using high-resolution pineal microdialysis. Methods Rats were housed in LD 12:12 h conditions and monitored by pineal microdialysis to determine baseline melatonin timing profiles. After demonstration that the circadian expression of melatonin was at steady state, rats were subjected to experimental stroke using two-hour intralumenal filament occlusion of the middle cerebral artery. The animals were returned to their cages, and melatonin monitoring was resumed. The timing of onset, offset, and duration of melatonin secretion were calculated before and after stroke to determine changes in circadian rhythms of melatonin secretion. At the end of the monitoring period, brains were analyzed to determine infarct volume. Results Rats demonstrated immediate shifts in melatonin timing after stroke. We observed a broad range of perturbations in melatonin timing in subsequent days, with rats exhibiting onset/offset patterns which included: advance/advance, advance/delay, delay/advance, and delay/delay. Melatonin rhythms displayed prolonged instability several days after stroke, with a majority of rats showing a day-to-day alternation between advance and delay in melatonin onset and duration. Duration of melatonin secretion changed in response to stroke, and this change was strongly determined by the shift in melatonin onset time. There was no correlation between infarct size and the direction or amplitude of melatonin phase shifting. Conclusion This is the first demonstration that stroke induces immediate changes in the timing of pineal melatonin secretion, indicating

  11. Neonatal ischemic brain injury: what every radiologist needs to know

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badve, Chaitra A.; Khanna, Paritosh C.; Ishak, Gisele E.

    2012-01-01

    We present a pictorial review of neonatal ischemic brain injury and look at its pathophysiology, imaging features and differential diagnoses from a radiologist's perspective. The concept of perinatal stroke is defined and its distinction from hypoxic-ischemic injury is emphasized. A brief review of recent imaging advances is included and a diagnostic approach to neonatal ischemic brain injury is suggested. (orig.)

  12. The Neuroprotective Effect Of Electro-Acupuncture Against Ischemic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Neuroprotective Effect Of Electro-Acupuncture Against Ischemic Stroke In Animal Model: A Review. ... Conclusion: An awareness of the benefits of acupuncture might lead more patients into accepting acupuncture therapy for the management of patients with ischemic stroke and patients with high risk of ischemic stroke.

  13. Blood pressure, risk of ischemic cerebrovascular and ischemic heart disease, and longevity in alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Morten; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Sillesen, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    Because elastase in alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency may attack elastin in the arterial wall, we tested whether alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency is associated with reduced blood pressure, risk of ischemic cerebrovascular (ICVD) and ischemic heart disease (IHD), and longevity.......Because elastase in alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency may attack elastin in the arterial wall, we tested whether alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency is associated with reduced blood pressure, risk of ischemic cerebrovascular (ICVD) and ischemic heart disease (IHD), and longevity....

  14. Global SUMOylation is a Molecular Mechanism Underlying Hypothermia-induced Ischemic Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang-ja eLee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms underlying hypothermic neuroprotection have yet to be fully elucidated. Herein we demonstrate that global SUMOylation, a form of post-translational modification with the Small Ubiquitin-like MOdifer, participates in the multimodal molecular induction of hypothermia-induced ischemic tolerance. Mild (32°C to moderate (28°C hypothermic treatment(s during OGD (oxygen-glucose-deprivation or ROG (restoration of oxygen/glucose increased global SUMO-conjugation levels and protected cells (both SHSY5Y and E18 rat cortical neurons from OGD and ROG-induced cell death. Hypothermic exposure either before or after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO surgery in wild type mice increased global SUMO-conjugation levels in the brain and in so doing protected these animals from pMCAO-induced ischemic damage. Of note, hypothermic exposure did not provide an additional increase in protection from pMCAO-induced ischemic brain damage in Ubc9 transgenic mice, which overexpress the sole E2 SUMO conjugating enzyme and thereby display elevated basal levels of global SUMOylation under normothermic conditions. Such evidence suggests that increases in global SUMOylation are critical and may account for a substantial part of the observed increase in cellular tolerance to brain ischemia caused via hypothermia.

  15. DJ-1 based peptide, ND-13, promote functional recovery in mouse model of focal ischemic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molcho, Lior; Ben-Zur, Tali; Barhum, Yael; Offen, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death worldwide and inflicts serious long-term damage and disability. The vasoconstrictor Endothelin-1, presenting long-term neurological deficits associated with excitotoxicity and oxidative stress is being increasingly used to induce focal ischemic injury as a model of stroke. A DJ-1 based peptide named ND-13 was shown to protect against glutamate toxicity, neurotoxic insults and oxidative stress in various animal models. Here we focus on the benefits of treatment with ND-13 on the functional outcome of focal ischemic injury. Wild type C57BL/6 mice treated with ND-13, after ischemic induction in this model, showed significant improvement in motor function, including improved body balance and motor coordination, and decreased motor asymmetry. We found that DJ-1 knockout mice are more sensitive to Endothelin-1 ischemic insult than wild type mice, contributing thereby additional evidence to the widely reported relevance of DJ-1 in neuroprotection. Furthermore, treatment of DJ-1 knockout mice with ND-13, following Endothelin-1 induced ischemia, resulted in significant improvement in motor functions, suggesting that ND-13 provides compensation for DJ-1 deficits. These preliminary results demonstrate a possible basis for clinical application of the ND-13 peptide to enhance neuroprotection in stroke patients.

  16. Rationale for ischemic conditioning to prevent stroke in patients with intracranial arterial stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Al Kasab

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial atherosclerotic arterial stenosis (ICAS is one of the most common causes of stroke worldwide and is associated with particularly a high risk of recurrent stroke. Although aggressive medical management, consisting of dual antiplatelet therapy and intensive control of vascular risk factors, has improved the prognosis of patients with ICAS, subgroups of patients remain at very high risk of stroke. More effective therapies for these high-risk patients are urgently needed. One promising treatment is remote limb ischemic conditioning, which involves producing repetitive, transient ischemia of a limb by inflating a blood pressure cuff with the intention of protecting the brain from subsequent ischemia. In this study, we review the limitations of currently available treatments, discuss the potential mechanisms of action of ischemic conditioning, describe the preclinical and clinical data suggesting a possible role of ischemic conditioning in treating patients with ICAS, and outline the questions that still need to be answered in future studies of ischemic conditioning in subjects with ICAS.

  17. Effects of Ischemic Preconditioning of Different Intraoperative Ischemic Times of Vascularized Bone Graft Rabbit Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Sukari Halim

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundIschemic preconditioning has been shown to improve the outcomes of hypoxic tolerance of the heart, brain, lung, liver, jejunum, skin, and muscle tissues. However, to date, no report of ischemic preconditioning on vascularized bone grafts has been published.MethodsSixteen rabbits were divided into four groups with ischemic times of 2, 6, 14, and 18 hours. Half of the rabbits in each group underwent ischemic preconditioning. The osteomyocutaneous flaps consisted of the tibia bone, from which the overlying muscle and skin were raised. The technique of ischemic preconditioning involved applying a vascular clamp to the pedicle for 3 cycles of 10 minutes each. The rabbits then underwent serial plain radiography and computed tomography imaging on the first, second, fourth, and sixth postoperative weeks. Following this, all of the rabbits were sacrificed and histological examinations were performed.ResultsThe results showed that for clinical analysis of the skin flaps and bone grafts, the preconditioned groups showed better survivability. In the plain radiographs, except for two non-preconditioned rabbits with intraoperative ischemic times of 6 hours, all began to show early callus formation at the fourth week. The computed tomography findings showed more callus formation in the preconditioned groups for all of the ischemic times except for the 18-hour group. The histological findings correlated with the radiological findings. There was no statistical significance in the difference between the two groups.ConclusionsIn conclusion, ischemic preconditioning improved the survivability of skin flaps and increased callus formation during the healing process of vascularized bone grafts.

  18. Smoking Cessation Intervention After Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack. A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunner Frandsen, Nicole; Sørensen, Margit; Hyldahl, Tanja Kirstine

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Smoking cessation is widely recommended for secondary stroke prevention. However, little is known about the efficacy of smoking cessation intervention after stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). METHODS: Ninety-four smokers under age 76, admitted with ischemic stroke or TIA were...... to the results from other studies. Intensive smoking cessation intervention was not superior to short smoking cessation intervention. Thus, other factors than intensity of smoking cessation intervention might influence the smoking cessation rates after stroke or TIA....

  19. Hyperglycemia Increases Susceptibility to Ischemic Necrosis

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    D. Lévigne

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic patients are at risk for spontaneous foot ulcers, chronic wounds, infections, and tissue necrosis. Current theories suggest that the development and progression of diabetic foot ulcers are mainly caused by arteriosclerosis and peripheral neuropathy. Tissue necrosis plays a primordial role in the progression of diabetic foot ulcers but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of hyperglycemia per se on the susceptibility of ischemic tissue to necrosis, using a critical ischemic hind limb animal model. We inflicted the same degree of ischemia in both euglycemic and streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemic rats by resecting the external iliac, the femoral, and the saphenous arteries. Postoperative laser Doppler flowmetry of the ischemic feet showed the same degree of reduction in skin perfusion in both hyperglycemic and euglycemic animals. Nevertheless, we found a significantly higher rate of limb necrosis in hyperglycemic rats compared to euglycemic rats (71% versus 29%, resp.. In this study, we revealed that hyperglycemia per se increases the susceptibility to limb necrosis in ischemic conditions. Our results may help to better understand the physiopathology of progressive diabetic wounds and underline the importance of strict glycemic control in patients with critical limb ischemia.

  20. Molecular Mechanisms of Renal Ischemic Conditioning Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kierulf-Lassen, Casper; Nieuwenhuijs-Moeke, Gertrude J; Krogstrup, Nicoline V

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury is the leading cause of acute kidney injury in a variety of clinical settings such as renal transplantation and hypovolemic and/or septic shock. Strategies to reduce ischemia-reperfusion injury are obviously clinically relevant. Ischemic conditioning is an inherent par...

  1. Ischemic Stroke and Neuroprotection | Onwuekwe | Annals of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stroke is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in both developed and developing countries of the world. Greater understanding of the pathophysiology of neuronal damage in ischemic stroke has generated interest in neuroprotection as a management strategy. This paper aims to review the current concept and place of ...

  2. Ischemic Stroke during Pregnancy and Puerperium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Del Zotto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke during pregnancy and puerperium represents a rare occurrence but it could be a serious and stressful event for mothers, infants, and also families. Whenever it does occur, many concerns arise about the safety of the mother and the fetus in relation to common diagnostic tests and therapies leading to a more conservative approach. The physiological adaptations in the cardiovascular system and in the coagulability that accompany the pregnant state, which are more significant around delivery and in the postpartum period, likely contribute to increasing the risk of an ischemic stroke. Most of the causes of an ischemic stroke in the young may also occur in pregnant patients. Despite this, there are specific conditions related to pregnancy which may be considered when assessing this particular group of patients such as pre-eclampsia-eclampsia, choriocarcinoma, peripartum cardiomiopathy, amniotic fluid embolization, and postpartum cerebral angiopathy. This article will consider several questions related to pregnancy-associated ischemic stroke, dwelling on epidemiological and specific etiological aspects, diagnostic issue concerning the use of neuroimaging, and the related potential risks to the embryo and fetus. Therapeutic issues surrounding the use of anticoagulant and antiplatelets agents will be discussed along with the few available reports regarding the use of thrombolytic therapy during pregnancy.

  3. hyperfibrinogenemia and ischemic stroke in young adul

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Imran Imran

    2014-11-07

    Nov 7, 2014 ... Abstract Background: Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) А148C/T which is located in b- fibrinogen gene (FGB) promoter has correlation with fibrinogen levels; however, the association of SNP А148C/T and ischemic stroke in young adult patients is contradictory. Aim: To determine the association of ...

  4. Colonic ischemic necrosis following therapeutic embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shenoy, S.S.; Satchidanand, S.; Wesp, E.H.; State Univ. of New York, Buffalo

    1981-01-01

    Transcatheter embolization of the middle colic artery for diverticular bleeding was followed by ischemic necrosis in the transverse colon at the site of previous anastomosis and stricture formation. This is a potential complication of intra-arterial embolization for colonic bleeding. (orig.)

  5. Acute ischemic stroke prognostication, comparison between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ossama Y. Mansour

    2014-11-20

    Nov 20, 2014 ... or predict all dimensions of recovery and disability after acute stroke. Several scales have proven reliability and validity in stroke trials. Objectives: The aim of the work was to evaluate the FOUR score predictability for outcome of patients with acute ischemic stroke in comparison with the NIHSS and the GCS ...

  6. Proteinuria and clinical outcomes after ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumai, Y; Kamouchi, M; Hata, J; Ago, T; Kitayama, J; Nakane, H; Sugimori, H; Kitazono, T

    2012-06-12

    The impact of chronic kidney disease (CKD) on clinical outcomes after acute ischemic stroke is still not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to elucidate how CKD and its components, proteinuria and low estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), affect the clinical outcomes after ischemic stroke. The study subjects consisted of 3,778 patients with first-ever ischemic stroke within 24 hours of onset from the Fukuoka Stroke Registry. CKD was defined as proteinuria or low eGFR (Stroke Scale during hospitalization), in-hospital mortality, and poor functional outcome (modified Rankin Scale score at discharge of 2 to 6). The effects of CKD, proteinuria, and eGFR on these outcomes were evaluated using a multiple logistic regression analysis. CKD was diagnosed in 1,320 patients (34.9%). In the multivariate analyses after adjusting for confounding factors, patients with CKD had significantly higher risks of neurologic deterioration, in-hospital mortality, and poor functional outcome (p relationship between the eGFR level and each outcome was found. CKD is an important predictor of poor clinical outcomes after acute ischemic stroke. Proteinuria independently contributes to the increased risks of neurologic deterioration, mortality, and poor functional outcome, but the eGFR may not be relevant to these outcomes.

  7. CT diagnosis of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xiang; Ma Jiwei; Wu Lide

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To explore CT characteristics of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), and to improve the accuracy of CT diagnosis. Methods: 50 cases of neonatal asphyxia in perinatal period diagnosed as hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy by CT was analyzed. Results: The main manifestation of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy is cerebral edema and intracranial hemorrhage. Focal or diffuse hypo-dense lesion and hyper-dense area in various location and morphology were seen on CT images. (1) Localized diffuse hypo-dense area in 1 or 2 cerebral lobe were found in 17 cases, and the lesions were localized in frontal lobe (n=6), in frontotemporal lobe (n=5), and in temporo-occipital lobe (n=6). (2) Hypo-density region involving more than three cerebral lobes were found in 18 cases, and abnormalities were found in frontotemporal and parietal lobe (n=8), accompanying with subarachnoid hemorrhage (n=2); in frontal, temporal and occipital lobe (n=6), in which cerebral hemorrhage was complicated (n=1); and in other cerebral lobe (n=4). (3) Diffuse low-density region in all cerebral lobe were found in 15 cases, in which subarachnoid hemorrhage was complicated in 4 cases, and ventricular hemorrhage was found in 2 case. Conclusion: CT imaging plays an important role in diagnosis of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy and has shown its clinical value

  8. Ischemic Colitis in an Endurance Runner

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    she continued during her training period. She denied any recent tobacco , alcohol, or illicit drug use and her family history was noncontributory. Her...is concern for acute arterial mesenteric infarction [10]. In mild-to-moderate cases of ischemic colitis supportive care with intravenous fluids, bowel

  9. CT findings in isolated ischemic proctosigmoiditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesner, Walter; Mortele, Koenraad J.; Ji, Hoon; Khurana, Bharti; Ros, Pablo R.; Glickman, Jonathan N.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to describe the CT features of ischemic proctosigmoiditis in correlation with clinical, laboratory, endoscopic, and histopathologic findings. Our study included seven patients with isolated ischemic proctosigmoiditis. Patients were identified by a retrospective review of all histopathologic records of colonoscopic biopsies performed during a time period of 4 years. All patients presented with left lower abdominal quadrant pain, bloody stools, and leukocytosis, and four patients had fever at the time of presentation. Four of seven patients suffered from diarrhea, one of seven was constipated and two of seven had normal stool consistency. The CT examinations were reviewed by two authors by consensus and compared with clinical and histopathologic results as well as with the initial CT diagnosis. The CT showed a wall thickening confined to the rectum and sigmoid colon in seven of seven patients, stranding of the pararectal fat in four of seven, and stranding of the perisigmoidal fat in one of seven patients. There were no enlarged lymph nodes, but five of seven patients showed coexistent diverticulosis and in three of these patients CT findings were initially misinterpreted as sigmoid diverticulitis. Endoscopies and histopathologic analyses of endoscopic biopsies confirmed non-transmural ischemic proctosigmoiditis in all patients. Isolated ischemic proctosigmoiditis often presents with unspecific CT features and potentially misleading clinical and laboratory findings. In an elderly patient or a patient with known cardiovascular risk factors the diagnosis of ischemic proctosigmoiditis should be considered when wall thickening confined to the rectum and sigmoid colon is seen that is associated with perirectal fat stranding. (orig.)

  10. CT findings in isolated ischemic proctosigmoiditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesner, Walter; Mortele, Koenraad J.; Ji, Hoon; Khurana, Bharti; Ros, Pablo R. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Glickman, Jonathan N. [Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of our study was to describe the CT features of ischemic proctosigmoiditis in correlation with clinical, laboratory, endoscopic, and histopathologic findings. Our study included seven patients with isolated ischemic proctosigmoiditis. Patients were identified by a retrospective review of all histopathologic records of colonoscopic biopsies performed during a time period of 4 years. All patients presented with left lower abdominal quadrant pain, bloody stools, and leukocytosis, and four patients had fever at the time of presentation. Four of seven patients suffered from diarrhea, one of seven was constipated and two of seven had normal stool consistency. The CT examinations were reviewed by two authors by consensus and compared with clinical and histopathologic results as well as with the initial CT diagnosis. The CT showed a wall thickening confined to the rectum and sigmoid colon in seven of seven patients, stranding of the pararectal fat in four of seven, and stranding of the perisigmoidal fat in one of seven patients. There were no enlarged lymph nodes, but five of seven patients showed coexistent diverticulosis and in three of these patients CT findings were initially misinterpreted as sigmoid diverticulitis. Endoscopies and histopathologic analyses of endoscopic biopsies confirmed non-transmural ischemic proctosigmoiditis in all patients. Isolated ischemic proctosigmoiditis often presents with unspecific CT features and potentially misleading clinical and laboratory findings. In an elderly patient or a patient with known cardiovascular risk factors the diagnosis of ischemic proctosigmoiditis should be considered when wall thickening confined to the rectum and sigmoid colon is seen that is associated with perirectal fat stranding. (orig.)

  11. Usefulness of colonoscopy in ischemic colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Maya, M; Ponferrada-Díaz, A; González-Asanza, C; Nogales-Rincón, O; Senent-Sánchez, C; Pérez-de-Ayala, V; Jiménez-Aleixandre, P; Cos-Arregui, E; Menchén-Fernández-Pacheco, P

    2010-07-01

    the ischemic colitis is intestinal the most frequent cause of ischemia. With this work we determine the demographic and clinical characteristics, and the usefulness of the colonoscopy in the patients with ischemic colitis diagnosed in our centre in relation to a change of therapeutic attitude. retrospective study in which were selected 112 patients diagnosed with ischemic colitis by colonoscopy and biopsy, in a period of five years. It was analyzed: age, sex, reason for examination, factors of cardiovascular risk, endoscopic degree of ischemia, change in the therapeutic attitude, treatment and outcome. the average age was of 73.64 + or - 12.10 years with an equal incidence in women (50.9%) and the men (49.1%). The associated factors were the HTA (61.1%), tobacco (37.2%) and antecedents of cardiovascular episode (52.2%). The most frequent reason for colonoscopy was rectorrhagia (53.6%) followed of the abdominal pain (30.4%), being urgent the 65.3%. Colonoscopy allowed a change in the therapeutic attitude in the 50 increasing in the urgent one to the 65.75%. Global mortality was of 27.67%. The serious ischemic colitis (25%) was more frequent in men (64.3%) in urgent indication (85.71%) and attends with high mortality (53.57%). Surgical treatment in the 57.14% was made with a good evolution in the 50%, whereas the patients with mild or moderate ischemic colitis had a better prognosis (favourable evolution in 80.95%) with smaller requirement of the surgical treatment (4.76%), p change of attitude according to the result of the same one. The evidence of a serious colitis supposed an increase of the necessity of surgery and worse prognosis.

  12. Ischemia preconditioning is neuroprotective in a rat cerebral ischemic injury model through autophagy activation and apoptosis inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, D.Y. [Department of Neurology, Navy General Hospital of PLA, Beijing (China); Li, W. [General Hospital of Shenyang Military Command, Department of Neurology, Shenyang, China, Department of Neurology, General Hospital of Shenyang Military Command, Shenyang (China); Qian, H.R.; Yao, S.; Liu, J.G.; Qi, X.K. [Department of Neurology, Navy General Hospital of PLA, Beijing (China)

    2013-08-10

    Sublethal ischemic preconditioning (IPC) is a powerful inducer of ischemic brain tolerance. However, its underlying mechanisms are still not well understood. In this study, we chose four different IPC paradigms, namely 5 min (5 min duration), 5×5 min (5 min duration, 2 episodes, 15-min interval), 5×5×5 min (5 min duration, 3 episodes, 15-min intervals), and 15 min (15 min duration), and demonstrated that three episodes of 5 min IPC activated autophagy to the greatest extent 24 h after IPC, as evidenced by Beclin expression and LC3-I/II conversion. Autophagic activation was mediated by the tuberous sclerosis type 1 (TSC1)-mTor signal pathway as IPC increased TSC1 but decreased mTor phosphorylation. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and hematoxylin and eosin staining confirmed that IPC protected against cerebral ischemic/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Critically, 3-methyladenine, an inhibitor of autophagy, abolished the neuroprotection of IPC and, by contrast, rapamycin, an autophagy inducer, potentiated it. Cleaved caspase-3 expression, neurological scores, and infarct volume in different groups further confirmed the protection of IPC against I/R injury. Taken together, our data indicate that autophagy activation might underlie the protection of IPC against ischemic injury by inhibiting apoptosis.

  13. Ischemia preconditioning is neuroprotective in a rat cerebral ischemic injury model through autophagy activation and apoptosis inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, D.Y.; Li, W.; Qian, H.R.; Yao, S.; Liu, J.G.; Qi, X.K.

    2013-01-01

    Sublethal ischemic preconditioning (IPC) is a powerful inducer of ischemic brain tolerance. However, its underlying mechanisms are still not well understood. In this study, we chose four different IPC paradigms, namely 5 min (5 min duration), 5×5 min (5 min duration, 2 episodes, 15-min interval), 5×5×5 min (5 min duration, 3 episodes, 15-min intervals), and 15 min (15 min duration), and demonstrated that three episodes of 5 min IPC activated autophagy to the greatest extent 24 h after IPC, as evidenced by Beclin expression and LC3-I/II conversion. Autophagic activation was mediated by the tuberous sclerosis type 1 (TSC1)-mTor signal pathway as IPC increased TSC1 but decreased mTor phosphorylation. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and hematoxylin and eosin staining confirmed that IPC protected against cerebral ischemic/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Critically, 3-methyladenine, an inhibitor of autophagy, abolished the neuroprotection of IPC and, by contrast, rapamycin, an autophagy inducer, potentiated it. Cleaved caspase-3 expression, neurological scores, and infarct volume in different groups further confirmed the protection of IPC against I/R injury. Taken together, our data indicate that autophagy activation might underlie the protection of IPC against ischemic injury by inhibiting apoptosis

  14. Extended studies on the effect of glutamate antagonists on ischemic CA-1 damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diemer, Nils Henrik; Balchen, T; Bruhn, T

    1996-01-01

    Glutamate receptors are numerous on the ischemia vulnerable CA-1 pyramidal cells. Postischemic use of the AMPA antagonist NBQX has shown up to 80% protection against cell death. Three aspects of this were studied: In the first study, male Wistar rats were given NBQX (30 mg/kg x 3) either 20 hours...... in the present model, eosinophilic CA-1 cells are seen from day 2 on. Since there could be a late, deleterious calcium influx via NMDA receptors, one group of ischemic rats was given MK-801 (5 mg/kg i.p.) 24 hours after ischemia. However, quantitation 6 days later of remaining CA-1 cells showed no protection...

  15. Surgery for nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickersin, K; Manheimer, E

    2000-01-01

    Nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy is characterized by sudden and painless loss of vision in one eye, accompanied by pallid swelling of the optic disc. Although various medical interventions, such as corticosteroids and phenytoin sodium, have been used to treat nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy, no therapy has been proven effective. The objective of this review is to assess the safety and efficacy of surgical treatment compared with other treatment or usual care in people with nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy. We searched the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register - Central and MEDLINE. The most recent searches were performed in December 1997. We included randomized trials comparing surgery to no surgery in people with nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy. We obtained full copies of all potentially relevant articles. Only one article described a randomized trial of surgery and it was eligible for inclusion. No formal assessment of quality was done. One reviewer extracted data. No synthesis was required, as there was only one trial. The one trial identified randomized 258 patients. The only published report with outcomes data for that trial presents preliminary results from 244 patients who had achieved six months of follow-up at the time of the report. Participants assigned to surgery did no better than participants assigned to careful follow-up regarding improved visual acuity of three or more lines of vision at six months: 32.6% of the surgery group improved compared with 42.7% of the careful follow-up group. The adjusted odds ratio (OR), adjusted for baseline visual acuity and diabetes, comparing the two groups for three or more lines improvement was 0.74 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.39 to 1. 38) (surgery group improvement was worse than careful follow-up). In addition, participants receiving surgery had a significantly greater risk of losing three or more lines of vision at six months: 23.9% in the surgery group worsened compared with 12.4% in

  16. Correlation between Nerve Growth Factor (NGF with Brain Derived Neurotropic Factor (BDNF in Ischemic Stroke Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joko Widodo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The neurotrophins nerve growth factor (NGF and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is a family of polypeptides that play critical role during neuronal development, appear to mediate protective role on neurorepair in ischemic stroke. Naturally in adult brain neurorepair process consist of: angiogenesis, neurogenesis, and neuronal plasticity, it can also be stimulated by endogenous neurorepair. In this study we observed correlation between NGF and BDNF ischemic stroke patient’s onset: 7-30 and over 30 days. Methods: This is cross sectional study on 46 subjects aged 38 – 74 years old with ischemic stroke from The Indonesian Central Hospital of Army Gatot Subroto Jakarta. Diagnosis of ischemic stroke was made using clinical examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI by neurologist. Subjects were divided into 2 groups based on stroke onset: 7 – 30 days (Group A: 19 subjects and > 30 days (Group B: 27 Subjects. Serum NGF levels were measured with ELISA method and BDNF levels were measured using multiplex method with Luminex Magpix. Results: Levels of NGF and BDNF were significantly different between onset group A and B (NGF p= 0.022, and BDNF p=0.008, with mean levels NGF in group A higher than group B, indicating that BDNF levels is lower in group A than group B. There was no significant correlation between NGF and BDNF levels in all groups. Conclusion: The variations in neurotrophic factor levels reflect an endogenous attempt at neuroprotection against biochemical and molecular changes after ischemic stroke. NGF represents an early marker of brain injury while BDNF recovery is most prominent during the first 14 days after onsite but continuous for more than 30 days. There is no significant correlation between NGF and BDNF in each group.  

  17. Reconsideration of Secondary Risk Management Strategies in Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiyama, Kuninobu; Sonoda, Shinjo; Otsuji, Yutaka

    2017-01-01

    The main risk factors in ischemic heart diseases, including myocardial infarction, are hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, obesity and smoking. The incidence of ischemic heart disease in Japan has been lower than that in Western countries because of differences in lifestyle and the anatomy of the coronary arteries, but the situation has been changing recently because of the westernization of lifestyle. Cardiovascular diseases have become the second most common cause of death in Japan, and 40% of those deaths are attributed to ischemic heart disease. Patients with a history of myocardial infarction, especially, have an increased risk of re-infarction, so strict management of coronary risk factors is important for the prevention of secondary ischemic heart disease. Although there are many guidelines about how to manage the risk factors, there are still many problems. Although lipid management has been demonstrated to have a protective effect against coronary artery disease and arteriosclerotic guidelines have been developed, it is reported that only about one third of patients achieved the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) target value under secondary prevention. Moreover, it is unclear whether the lower target value is required for high-risk patients. Recent research on diabetes has reported increased mortality in patients with intensive glycemic control. We should discuss when to start treatment, which medicine to use, and to what extent we should manage glycemic control. Strict management based on current therapeutic guidelines is effective for secondary prevention of ischemic heart disease, with target values of less than 135/85 mmHg for home blood pressure, less than 100 mg/dl for LDL-C, more than 40 mg/dl for HDL-C, less than 150 mg/dl for TG, and, for diabetic patients, less than 7.0% for HbA1c (NGSP).

  18. Modulation of valosin-containing protein by Kyoto University Substances (KUS as a novel therapeutic strategy for ischemic neuronal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Hata

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinal ischemia causes several vision-threatening diseases, including diabetic retinopathy, retinal artery occlusion, and retinal vein occlusion. Intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP depletion and subsequent induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress are proposed to be the underlying mechanisms of ischemic retinal cell death. Recently, we found that a naphthalene derivative can inhibit ATPase activity of valosin-containing protein, universally expressed within various types of cells, including retinal neural cells, with strong cytoprotective activity. Based on the chemical structure, we developed novel valosin-containing protein modulators, Kyoto University Substances (KUSs, that not only inhibit intracellular ATP depletion, but also ameliorate ER stress. Suppressing ER stress by KUSs is associated with neural cell survival in animal models of several neurodegenerative diseases, such as glaucoma and retinal degeneration. Given that a major pathology of ischemic retinal diseases, other than intracellular ATP depletion, is ER stress-induced cell death, KUSs may provide a novel strategy for cell protection in ischemic conditions. Hence, we investigated the efficacy of KUS121 in a rat model of retinal ischemic injury. Intravitreal injections of KUS121, which is clinically preferable route of drug administration in retinal diseases, significantly suppressed inner retinal thinning and retinal cell death, and maintained visual functions. Valosin-containing protein modulation by KUS is a promising novel therapeutic strategy for ischemic retinal diseases.

  19. Ischemic stroke: carotid and vertebral artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilela, P.; Goulao, A. [Hospital Garcia de Orta, Servico de Neurorradiologia, Almada (Portugal)

    2005-03-01

    Ischemic strokes may have distinct aetiologies, including several different intrinsic arterial pathological disorders. The diagnosis and understanding of these arterial diseases is critical for the correct management of stroke as different treatment approaches are undertaken according to the aetiology. Atherosclerosis is by far the most common arterial disease among adults, and other pathological processes include arterial dissection, small vessel disease, inflammatory and non-inflammatory vasculopathy and vasomotor disorders. In children, there are several vasculopathies responsible for vaso-occlusive disease such as sickle-cell anemia, acute regressive angiopathy and Moya-Moya disease, neurofibromatosis, dissections, vasculitis associated with intracranial and systemic infections. An overview of the major carotid and vertebral pathological diseases responsible for ischemic stroke in adults and children, highlighting the accuracy of the different imaging modalities for its diagnosis and the imaging appearance of these diseases, is given. (orig.)

  20. Isolated naratriptan-associated ischemic colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissan, George; Chaudhry, Priyanka; Rangasamy, Priya; Mudrovich, Steven

    2016-01-01

    We report a 41-year-old woman who developed histology- and colonoscopy-proven ischemic colitis with the use of naratriptan not exceeding the maximum 2 doses a day and 3 days per week and without a known medical or cardiovascular history. By exclusion of other causes of colonic ischemia, naratriptan was considered the sole causal agent. Discontinuation of naratriptan resulted in a complete clinical recovery. To date, our patient is the youngest known patient to develop ischemic colitis on isolated naratriptan in the setting of no known medical risk factors or predisposing medical condition. Even though triptans are commonly used for the abortive treatment of migraine headaches, such a reported side effect is rare; however, careful assessment and individual patient-based treatment is advised. PMID:27695179

  1. Aspirin resistant patients with recent ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla-Guerra, L; Navas-Alcántara, M S; Fernández-Moreno, M C

    2014-04-01

    Some patients with a recent ischemic stroke who are being treated with aspirin as an antiaggregant suffer a new ischemic stroke. These patients (15-25%) have been called unresponsive to aspirin or aspirin resistant. The aspirin-resistant patients have a four-time greater risk of suffering a stroke. Furthermore, these strokes are generally more severe, with increased infarct volume and greater risk of recurrence. There is currently no ideal laboratory test to detect the resistance to the antiaggregant effect of aspirin. The study of resistance to aspirin would only be indicated in selected cases. In these patients, one should first rule out any "pseudo-resistance" to aspirin (lack of compliance, concomitant treatments that interfere with the action of the aspirin). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  2. Ischemic stroke: carotid and vertebral artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilela, P.; Goulao, A.

    2005-01-01

    Ischemic strokes may have distinct aetiologies, including several different intrinsic arterial pathological disorders. The diagnosis and understanding of these arterial diseases is critical for the correct management of stroke as different treatment approaches are undertaken according to the aetiology. Atherosclerosis is by far the most common arterial disease among adults, and other pathological processes include arterial dissection, small vessel disease, inflammatory and non-inflammatory vasculopathy and vasomotor disorders. In children, there are several vasculopathies responsible for vaso-occlusive disease such as sickle-cell anemia, acute regressive angiopathy and Moya-Moya disease, neurofibromatosis, dissections, vasculitis associated with intracranial and systemic infections. An overview of the major carotid and vertebral pathological diseases responsible for ischemic stroke in adults and children, highlighting the accuracy of the different imaging modalities for its diagnosis and the imaging appearance of these diseases, is given. (orig.)

  3. [Effect of methylene chloride upon hepatic ischemic reperfusion injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ding-hua; Zhang, Hua; Huang, Yu; Zhou, Jie

    2009-12-15

    To investigate the effects and mechanisms of methylene chloride (MC) in hepatic ischemic reperfusion injury. Eighty SD-rats were divided equally into 4 groups: control group (n = 20), donors without any treatment; CoPP group (n = 20), donors injected with CoPP (5 mg/kg, ip) at 24 h; ZnPP group (n = 20), donors injected with ZnPP (20 mg/kg, ip) at 24 h; MC group (n = 20), donors fed with MC (500 mg/kg) per day for 7 days before graft procurement. Syngeneic orthotopic liver transplantation was performed in rats with modified Kamada's two-cuff technique. And SD rats were used as donors (n = 10)and recipients respectively. 5 recipients in each group were sacrificed and the grafts were procured at day 3 after transplantation, the post-operative survival time was observed in the remnant. The tests were determined as following: the level of serum ALT, AST in recipients; heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression of graft was tested by immunohistochemistry and Western blot; the index of graft apoptosis examined by TUNEL method; the pathology of graft assessed by Suzuki's criteria. The level of serum ALT [(65 +/- 28) U/L], AST [(187 +/- 43) U/L] in CoPP and ALT [(75 +/- 16) U/L], AST [(185 +/- 42) U/L] in MC group was significantly lower than that ALT [(346 +/- 45) U/L], AST [(474 +/- 90) U/L] in control group and ALT [(578 +/- 75) U/L], AST [(1084 +/- 128) U/L] in ZnPP group (P 0.05). While the median expression of HO-1 in CoPP group was higher than that in control group (P ZnPP group (P ZnPP groups (P ZnPP groups was 85 and 12 days (P < 0.05). Over-expression of HO-1 and MC both have protective effects in hepatic ischemic reperfusion injury.

  4. Clinical Applications of Remote Ischemic Preconditioning

    OpenAIRE

    Veighey, Kristin; MacAllister, Raymond J.

    2012-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury is a composite of damage accumulated during reduced perfusion of an organ or tissue and the additional insult sustained during reperfusion. Such injury occurs in a wide variety of clinically important syndromes, such as ischemic heart disease and stroke, which are responsible for a high degree of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Basic research has identified a number of interventions that stimulate innate resistance of tissues to ischemia-reperfusion injury. Here...

  5. Molecular chaperones and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Hua

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE is a disease that occurs when the brain is subjected to hypoxia, resulting in neuronal death and neurological deficits, with a poor prognosis. The mechanisms underlying hypoxic-ischemic brain injury include excitatory amino acid release, cellular proteolysis, reactive oxygen species generation, nitric oxide synthesis, and inflammation. The molecular and cellular changes in HIE include protein misfolding, aggregation, and destruction of organelles. The apoptotic pathways activated by ischemia and hypoxia include the mitochondrial pathway, the extrinsic Fas receptor pathway, and the endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced pathway. Numerous treatments for hypoxic-ischemic brain injury caused by HIE have been developed over the last half century. Hypothermia, xenon gas treatment, the use of melatonin and erythropoietin, and hypoxic-ischemic preconditioning have proven effective in HIE patients. Molecular chaperones are proteins ubiquitously present in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. A large number of molecular chaperones are induced after brain ischemia and hypoxia, among which the heat shock proteins are the most important. Heat shock proteins not only maintain protein homeostasis; they also exert anti-apoptotic effects. Heat shock proteins maintain protein homeostasis by helping to transport proteins to their target destinations, assisting in the proper folding of newly synthesized polypeptides, regulating the degradation of misfolded proteins, inhibiting the aggregation of proteins, and by controlling the refolding of misfolded proteins. In addition, heat shock proteins exert anti-apoptotic effects by interacting with various signaling pathways to block the activation of downstream effectors in numerous apoptotic pathways, including the intrinsic pathway, the endoplasmic reticulum-stress mediated pathway and the extrinsic Fas receptor pathway. Molecular chaperones play a key role in neuroprotection in HIE. In

  6. Obstructive sleep apnea in ischemic stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliye Tosun

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea in patients with ischemic stroke and to evaluate the effectiveness of nasal continuous positive airway pressure treatment. METHODS: Overnight polysomnography was performed by a computerized system in 19 subjects with ischemic stroke. Patients with an apnea-hypopnea index > 5 were considered to have obstructive sleep apnea. The appropriate level of continuous positive airway pressure for each patient was determined during an all-night continuous positive airway pressure determination study. Attended continuous positive airway pressure titration was performed with a continuous positive airway pressure auto-titrating device. RESULTS: Obstructive sleep apnea prevalence among patients with ischemic stroke was 73.7%. The minimum SaO2 was significantly lower, and the percent of total sleep time in the wake stage and stage 1 sleep was significantly longer in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. In two patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea, we observed a decrease in the apnea-hypopnea index, an increase in mean wake time, mean SaO2, and minimum SaO2, and alterations in sleep structures with continuous positive airway pressure treatment. CONCLUSION: As the diagnosis and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea is of particular importance in secondary stroke prevention, we suggest that the clinical assessment of obstructive sleep apnea be part of the evaluation of stroke patients in rehabilitation units, and early treatment should be started.

  7. [Ischemic stroke in the young adult].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvet, D

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is not rare in young adults since one in ten stroke patients are less than 50 years old. This incidence increased over the past last years, mainly due to the rise in the prevalence of traditional vascular risk factors in this sub-group of age but also of illegal drug use. Even though both survival and functional outcome of young stroke patients are better than those observed in older patients, socio-economic and quality of life consequences make this disease a main objective in terms of primary and secondary prevention. Identifying the cause of ischemic stroke in young adults is of major importance to prevent stroke recurrence. However, given the wide variety of potential underlying causes, the etiologic work-up of stroke in young adults requires a different approach from that in the elderly. In this context, a sequential diagnostic work-up is needed in order to optimize the yield of diagnostic tests, to reduce their cost and risks for the patient. Arterial dissection is the most frequent cause of stroke in young adults but other less frequent causes are numerous. Despite a comprehensive work-up, about one third of cases remains unexplained leading to the diagnosis of cryptogenic ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2015 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Refining the ischemic penumbra with topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirugnanachandran, Tharani; Ma, Henry; Singhal, Shaloo; Slater, Lee-Anne; Davis, Stephen M; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Phan, Thanh

    2018-04-01

    It has been 40 years since the ischemic penumbra was first conceptualized through work on animal models. The topography of penumbra has been portrayed as an infarcted core surrounded by penumbral tissue and an extreme rim of oligemic tissue. This picture has been used in many review articles and textbooks before the advent of modern imaging. In this paper, we review our understanding of the topography of the ischemic penumbra from the initial experimental animal models to current developments with neuroimaging which have helped to further define the temporal and spatial evolution of the penumbra and refine our knowledge. The concept of the penumbra has been successfully applied in clinical trials of endovascular therapies with a time window as long as 24 h from onset. Further, there are reports of "good" outcome even in patients with a large ischemic core. This latter observation of good outcome despite having a large core requires an understanding of the topography of the penumbra and the function of the infarcted regions. It is proposed that future research in this area takes departure from a time-dependent approach to a more individualized tissue and location-based approach.

  9. Hypercholesterolemia in patients of ischemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeed, E.; Ali, R.; Din, M.J.U.; Saeed, A.; Jadoon, R.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Stroke is a common neurological disease that results in significant mortality and morbidity globally. Several risk factors have been identified for stroke among which hyperlipidaemia is one of the modifiable risk factors. Recent clinical trials have shown a reduction in ischemic stroke for patients taking lipid lowering medications. Therefore, the aim of this study was to find out the frequency of hypercholesterolemia in patients of ischemic stroke in Hazara region. Method: This cross sectional study was carried out in the Medical Department of Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad. Ninety patients of stroke confirmed as ischemic by CT scan brain were enrolled in the study after informed consent. The frequency of hypercholesterolemia in patients was recorded. Results: There were 55 (61.1 percentage) males. The mean age of patients was 64.4±11.5 years. The mean serum cholesterol in all patients was 4.16±1.1 mmol/l. The mean serum cholesterol of male patients was 4.3±1.2 mmol/l and 4.0±10.9 mmol/l in the case of females. Conclusions: Hypercholesterolemia could not be established as a major risk factor for stroke in our setup through this study that allude to the fact that other risk factors might be contributing more to the incidence of cerebrovascular accident in our population. (author)

  10. Ischemic preconditioning—an unfulfilled promise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Timothy M. [Ashford & St. Peter' s Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Guildford Road, Surrey, KT16 0PZ (United Kingdom); Waksman, Ron [Washington Hospital Centre, 110 Irving Street, Washington, DC 20010 (United States); De Silva, Kalpa; Jacques, Adam [Ashford & St. Peter' s Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Guildford Road, Surrey, KT16 0PZ (United Kingdom); Mahmoudi, Michael, E-mail: m.mahmoudi@surrey.ac.uk [Ashford & St. Peter' s Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Guildford Road, Surrey, KT16 0PZ (United Kingdom); University of Surrey, 13AY04, Surrey, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-15

    Myocardial reperfusion injury has been identified as a key determinant of myocardial infarct size in patients undergoing percutaneous or surgical interventions. Although the molecular mechanisms underpinning reperfusion injury have been elucidated, attempts at translating this understanding into clinical benefit for patients undergoing cardiac interventions have produced mixed results. Ischemic conditioning has been applied before, during, or after an ischemic insult to the myocardium and has taken the form of local induction of ischemia or ischemia of distant tissues. Clinical studies have confirmed the safety of differing conditioning techniques, but the benefit of such techniques in reducing hard clinical event rates has produced mixed results. The aim of this article is to review the role of ischemic conditioning in patients undergoing percutaneous and surgical coronary revascularization. - Highlights: • There are a multitude of techniques for conditioning. • Conditioning has been utilized in percutaneous coronary intervention and cardiac surgery. • There is a lack of consistency in the techniques utilized and outcomes that have been measured. • The results of studies to date lack a consistency in the benefits of conditioning.

  11. TOWARD THE QUESTION OF ISCHEMIC MYOCARDIAL DYSFUNCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Kalyuzhin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors of the review have analyzed papers published on the problem of ischemic myocardial dysfunction. They begin with a definition of the term “ischemia” (derived from two Greek words: ischō, meaning to hold back, and haima, meaning blood - a condition at which the arterial blood flow is insufficient to provide enough oxygen to prevent intracellular respiration from shifting from the aerobic to the anaerobic form. The poor rate of ATP generation from this process causes a decrease in cellular ATP, a concomitant rise in ADP, and ultimately, to depression inotropic (systolic and lusitropic (diastolic function of the affected segments of the myocardium. But with such simplicity of basic concepts, the consequences of ischemia so diverse. Influence of an ischemia on myocardial function so unequally at different patients, which is almost impossible to find two identical cases (as in the case of fingerprints. It depends on the infinite variety of lesions of coronary arteries, reperfusion (time and completeness of restoration of blood flow and reactions of a myocardium which, apparently, has considerable flexibility in its response. Ischemic myocardial dysfunction includes a number of discrete states, such as acute left ventricular failure in angina, acute myocardial infarction, ischemic cardiomyopathy, stunning, hibernation, pre- and postconditioning. There are widely differing underlying pathophysiologic states. The possibility exists that several of these states can coexist.

  12. A Diagnostic Score for Insulin Resistance in Nondiabetic Patients with Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jin; Viscoli, Catherine M; Ford, Gary A; Gorman, Mark; Kernan, Walter N

    2016-07-01

    We sought to develop an instrument to screen for insulin resistance in nondiabetic patients with recent ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Subjects were 7262 nondiabetic patients aged greater than or equal to 40 years with ischemic strokes or TIA within the past 6 months. Features were analyzed in bivariate analysis for association with insulin resistance, measured by the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Features significantly associated with HOMA-IR (P validation cohort. In the enhanced model, the aROC was .78 in the validation cohort. Our 2 scoring systems performed well in identifying stroke patients with insulin resistance, but they are probably not sufficiently accurate for high-stake clinical decisions. We suggest strategies for improving the accuracy of future instruments. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of melatonin on kidney cold ischemic preservation injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslaner, Arif; Gunal, Omer; Turgut, Hamdi Taner; Celik, Erdal; Yildirim, Umran; Demirci, Rojbin Karakoyun; Gunduz, Umut Riza; Calis, Hasan; Dogan, Sami

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin is a potent free radical scavenger of reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide synthase inhibitor and a well-known antioxidant secreted from pineal gland. This hormone has been reported to protect tissue from oxidative damage. In this study, we aim to investigate the effect of melatonin on kidney cold ischemia time when added to preservation solution. Thirty male Wistar albino rats were divided equally into three groups; Ringer Lactate (RL) solution, University of Wisconsin (UW) solution with and without melatonin. The serum Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) activities of the preservation solutions at 2nd, 24th, 36th, and 48th hours were determined. Tissue malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were also measured and a histological examination was performed at 48th hour. Melatonin that added to preservation solution prevented enzyme elevation and decreased lipid peroxidation in preservation solution when compared to the control group (p<0.05). The histological examination revealed that UW solution containing melatonin significantly prevented the kidney from pathological injury (p<0.05). Melatonin added to preservation solutions such as UW solution seemed to protect the tissue preserved effectively from cold ischemic injury for up to 48 hour. PMID:24179573

  14. Fractal analysis of the ischemic transition region in chronic ischemic heart disease using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michallek, Florian; Dewey, Marc

    2017-04-01

    To introduce a novel hypothesis and method to characterise pathomechanisms underlying myocardial ischemia in chronic ischemic heart disease by local fractal analysis (FA) of the ischemic myocardial transition region in perfusion imaging. Vascular mechanisms to compensate ischemia are regulated at various vascular scales with their superimposed perfusion pattern being hypothetically self-similar. Dedicated FA software ("FraktalWandler") has been developed. Fractal dimensions during first-pass (FD first-pass ) and recirculation (FD recirculation ) are hypothesised to indicate the predominating pathomechanism and ischemic severity, respectively. Twenty-six patients with evidence of myocardial ischemia in 108 ischemic myocardial segments on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were analysed. The 40th and 60th percentiles of FD first-pass were used for pathomechanical classification, assigning lesions with FD first-pass  ≤ 2.335 to predominating coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD) and ≥2.387 to predominating coronary artery disease (CAD). Optimal classification point in ROC analysis was FD first-pass  = 2.358. FD recirculation correlated moderately with per cent diameter stenosis in invasive coronary angiography in lesions classified CAD (r = 0.472, p = 0.001) but not CMD (r = 0.082, p = 0.600). The ischemic transition region may provide information on pathomechanical composition and severity of myocardial ischemia. FA of this region is feasible and may improve diagnosis compared to traditional noninvasive myocardial perfusion analysis. • A novel hypothesis and method is introduced to pathophysiologically characterise myocardial ischemia. • The ischemic transition region appears a meaningful diagnostic target in perfusion imaging. • Fractal analysis may characterise pathomechanical composition and severity of myocardial ischemia.

  15. Neonatal ischemic brain injury: what every radiologist needs to know

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badve, Chaitra A.; Khanna, Paritosh C.; Ishak, Gisele E. [Seattle Children' s Hospital, University of Washington Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2012-05-15

    We present a pictorial review of neonatal ischemic brain injury and look at its pathophysiology, imaging features and differential diagnoses from a radiologist's perspective. The concept of perinatal stroke is defined and its distinction from hypoxic-ischemic injury is emphasized. A brief review of recent imaging advances is included and a diagnostic approach to neonatal ischemic brain injury is suggested. (orig.)

  16. Upregulation of protein phosphatase 2A and NR3A-pleiotropic effect of simvastatin on ischemic stroke rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minxia Zhu

    Full Text Available Ca(2+ influxes are regulated by the functional state of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs. Dephosphorylation of NMDARs subunits decreases Ca(2+ influxes. NR3, a novel subunit of NMDARs, also decreases Ca(2+ influxes by forming new NMDARs with NR1 and NR2. It is meaningful to uncover whether protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A and NR3A play a role in the protective effect of Simvastatin on ischemic stroke. In the present study, the Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with Simvastatin for 7 days before middle cerebral artery occlusion was performed to mimic ischemic stroke. The results showed that Simvastatin decreased brain ischemic infarct area significantly while increasing the expression levels of PP2A and NR3A, thus dephosphorylating the serine sites of NR1 (ser896 and ser897 along with increased enzymatic activities of PP2A. The protein levels of NR3A decreased as the enzymatic activities of PP2A were inhibited by okadaic acid. The results indicated that Simvastatin could protect the cerebrum from ischemic injury through a signaling mechanism involving elevated levels of PP2A and NR3A, and that PP2A might involve in the regulatory mechanism of NR3A expression.

  17. Temporal delta wave and ischemic lesions on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inui, Koji; Kawamoto, Hozumi; Kawakita, Masahiko; Wako, Kazuhisa; Nakashima, Hiromichi; Kamihara, Masanori; Nomura, Junichi

    1994-01-01

    The present study was designed to determine the clinical significance of a temporal low-voltage irregular delta wave (TLID) on EEG. Among 808 EEG records examined during one year at our hospital, the TLID was commonly detected in patients with clinically diagnosed ischemic brain diseases such as multiple infarction. Subsequently, a relation of the TLID to ischemic lesions on MRI was examined in 50 elderly depressive patients. It was found that there was a close correlation between the occurrence of the TLID and small ischemic lesions on MRI (p<0.001). These results suggest that the TLID is a valuable indicator of minor ischemic changes of the brain. (author)

  18. Succinate-induced neuronal mitochondrial fission and hexokinase II malfunction in ischemic stroke: Therapeutical effects of kaempferol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bin; Luo, Hong; Zhou, Xu; Cheng, Cai-Yi; Lin, Lin; Liu, Bao-Lin; Liu, Kang; Li, Ping; Yang, Hua

    2017-09-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is known as one of causative factors in ischemic stroke, leading to neuronal cell death. The present work was undertaken to investigate whether succinate induces neuron apoptosis by regulating mitochondrial morphology and function. In neurons, oxygen-glucose deprivation induced succinate accumulation due to the reversal of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activation, leading to mitochondrial fission. Kaempferol inhibited mitochondrial fission and maintained mitochondrial HK-II through activation of Akt, and thereby protected neurons from succinate-mediated ischemi injury. Knockdown of Akt2 with siRNA diminished the effect of kaempferol, indicating that kaempferol suppressed dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) activation and promoted HK-II mitochondrial binding dependently on Akt. Moreover, we demonstrated that kaempferol potentiated autophagy during oxygen and glucose deprivation, contributing to protecting neuron survival against succinate insult. In vivo, oral administration of kaempferol in mice attenuated the infract volume after ischemic and reperfusion (I/R) injury and reproduced the similar mitochondrial protective effect in the brain infract area. This study indicates that succinate accumulation plays a pivotal role in I/R injury-induced neuronal mitochondrial dysfunction, and suggests that modulation of Drp1 phosphorylation might be potential therapeutic strategy to protect neuron mitochondrial integrity and treat ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Tranexamic Acid Does Not Influence Cardioprotection by Ischemic Preconditioning and Remote Ischemic Preconditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Caster, Patrick; Eiling, Sandra; Boekholt, Yvonne; Behmenburg, Friederike; Dorsch, Marianne; Heinen, André; Hollmann, Markus W.; Huhn, Ragnar

    2018-01-01

    Prior studies have suggested that the antifibrinolytic drug aprotinin increases the infarct size after ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) and attenuates the effect of ischemic preconditioning (IPC). Aprotinin was replaced by tranexamic acid (TXA) in clinical practice. Here, we investigated whether TXA

  20. Cancer in young adults with ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarnio, Karoliina; Joensuu, Heikki; Haapaniemi, Elena; Melkas, Susanna; Kaste, Markku; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Putaala, Jukka

    2015-06-01

    Cancer is a risk factor for ischemic stroke. Little is known about cancer among young adults with ischemic stroke. We studied the frequency of cancer and its association with long-term risk of death among young patients with first-ever ischemic stroke. 1002 patients aged 15 to 49 years, registered in the Helsinki Young Stroke Registry, and with a median follow-up of 10.0 years (interquartile range 6.5-13.8) after stroke were included. Historical and follow-up data were derived from the Finnish Care Register and Statistics Finland. Survival between groups was compared with the Kaplan-Meier life-table method, and Cox proportional hazard models were used to identify factors associated with mortality. One or more cancer diagnosis was made in 77 (7.7%) patients, of whom 39 (3.9%) had cancer diagnosed prestroke. During the poststroke follow-up, 41 (53.2%) of the cancer patients died. Median time from prestroke cancer to stroke was 4.9 (1.0-9.5) years and from stroke to poststroke cancer was 6.7 (2.7-10.9) years. Poststroke cancer was associated with age>40 years, heavy drinking, and cigarette smoking. The cumulative mortality was significantly higher among the cancer patients (68.6%, 95% confidence interval 52.0%-85.3%) compared with patients without cancer (19.7%, 95% confidence interval 16.3%-23.2%). Active cancer at index stroke, melanoma, and lung/respiratory tract cancer had the strongest independent association with death during the follow-up when adjusted for known poststroke mortality prognosticators. Cancer, and especially active cancer and no other apparent cause for stroke, is associated with unfavorable survival among young stroke patients. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Structural genomic variation in ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matarin, Mar; Simon-Sanchez, Javier; Fung, Hon-Chung; Scholz, Sonja; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Hernandez, Dena G.; Crews, Cynthia; Britton, Angela; Wavrant De Vrieze, Fabienne; Brott, Thomas G.; Brown, Robert D.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Silliman, Scott; Case, L. Douglas; Hardy, John A.; Rich, Stephen S.; Meschia, James F.; Singleton, Andrew B.

    2008-01-01

    Technological advances in molecular genetics allow rapid and sensitive identification of genomic copy number variants (CNVs). This, in turn, has sparked interest in the function such variation may play in disease. While a role for copy number mutations as a cause of Mendelian disorders is well established, it is unclear whether CNVs may affect risk for common complex disorders. We sought to investigate whether CNVs may modulate risk for ischemic stroke (IS) and to provide a catalog of CNVs in patients with this disorder by analyzing copy number metrics produced as a part of our previous genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based association study of ischemic stroke in a North American white population. We examined CNVs in 263 patients with ischemic stroke (IS). Each identified CNV was compared with changes identified in 275 neurologically normal controls. Our analysis identified 247 CNVs, corresponding to 187 insertions (76%; 135 heterozygous; 25 homozygous duplications or triplications; 2 heterosomic) and 60 deletions (24%; 40 heterozygous deletions;3 homozygous deletions; 14 heterosomic deletions). Most alterations (81%) were the same as, or overlapped with, previously reported CNVs. We report here the first genome-wide analysis of CNVs in IS patients. In summary, our study did not detect any common genomic structural variation unequivocally linked to IS, although we cannot exclude that smaller CNVs or CNVs in genomic regions poorly covered by this methodology may confer risk for IS. The application of genome-wide SNP arrays now facilitates the evaluation of structural changes through the entire genome as part of a genome-wide genetic association study. PMID:18288507

  2. Antithrombotic and Thrombolytic Therapy for Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansberg, Maarten G.; O’Donnell, Martin J.; Khatri, Pooja; Lang, Eddy S.; Nguyen-Huynh, Mai N.; Schwartz, Neil E.; Sonnenberg, Frank A.; Schulman, Sam; Vandvik, Per Olav; Spencer, Frederick A.; Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Guyatt, Gordon H.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This article provides recommendations on the use of antithrombotic therapy in patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Methods: We generated treatment recommendations (Grade 1) and suggestions (Grade 2) based on high (A), moderate (B), and low (C) quality evidence. Results: In patients with acute ischemic stroke, we recommend IV recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-tPA) if treatment can be initiated within 3 h (Grade 1A) or 4.5 h (Grade 2C) of symptom onset; we suggest intraarterial r-tPA in patients ineligible for IV tPA if treatment can be initiated within 6 h (Grade 2C); we suggest against the use of mechanical thrombectomy (Grade 2C) although carefully selected patients may choose this intervention; and we recommend early aspirin therapy at a dose of 160 to 325 mg (Grade 1A). In patients with acute stroke and restricted mobility, we suggest the use of prophylactic-dose heparin or intermittent pneumatic compression devices (Grade 2B) and suggest against the use of elastic compression stockings (Grade 2B). In patients with a history of noncardioembolic ischemic stroke or TIA, we recommend long-term treatment with aspirin (75-100 mg once daily), clopidogrel (75 mg once daily), aspirin/extended release dipyridamole (25 mg/200 mg bid), or cilostazol (100 mg bid) over no antiplatelet therapy (Grade 1A), oral anticoagulants (Grade 1B), the combination of clopidogrel plus aspirin (Grade 1B), or triflusal (Grade 2B). Of the recommended antiplatelet regimens, we suggest clopidogrel or aspirin/extended-release dipyridamole over aspirin (Grade 2B) or cilostazol (Grade 2C). In patients with a history of stroke or TIA and atrial fibrillation we recommend oral anticoagulation over no antithrombotic therapy, aspirin, and combination therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel (Grade 1B). Conclusions: These recommendations can help clinicians make evidence-based treatment decisions with their patients who have had strokes. PMID:22315273

  3. Volkmann's ischemic contracture of the upper extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botte, M J; Keenan, M A; Gelberman, R H

    1998-08-01

    Upper extremity deformity of ischemic contracture usually includes elbow flexion, forearm pronation, wrist flexion, thumb flexion and adduction, digital metacarpophalangeal joint extension, and interphalangeal joint flexion. Treatment of mild contractures consists of either nonoperative management with a comprehensive rehabilitation program (to increase range of motion and strenght) or operative management consisting of infarct excision or tendon lengthening. Treatment of moderate-to-severe contractures consists of release of secondary nerve compression, treatment of contractures (with tendon lengthening or recession), tendon or free-tissue transfers to restore lost function, and/or salvage procedures for the severely contracted or neglected extremity.

  4. Malignant Peritoneal Mesothelioma Mimicking Ischemic Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuusuke Mitsuka

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The prognosis of malignant peritoneal mesothelioma is extremely poor with a mean survival time of 12 months. The initial symptoms are poor and atypical. Because of its rare entity and little knowledge of its treatments, there are few reports of long-term survival. We encountered a very unique case with strong impression on radiological findings of malignant peritoneal methothelioma. We had misdiagnosed it because of the findings and because the time course was similar to that of ischemic colitis. The radiological findings on CT and enema disappeared within one week after antibiotic therapy.

  5. Ventricular tachycardia in ischemic heart disease substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olujimi A. Ajijola

    2014-01-01

    This review will discuss the central role of the ischemic heart disease substrate in the development MMVT. Electrophysiologic characterization of the post-infarct myocardium using bipolar electrogram amplitudes to delineate scar border zones will be reviewed. Functional electrogram determinants of reentrant circuits such as isolated late potentials will be discussed. Strategies for catheter ablation of reentrant ventricular tachycardia, including structural and functional targets will also be examined, as will the role of the epicardial mapping and ablation in the management of recurrent MMVT.

  6. Ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack in young adults: risk factors, diagnostic yield, neuroimaging, and thrombolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Ruijun; Schwamm, Lee H; Pervez, Muhammad A; Singhal, Aneesh B

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 10% to 14% of ischemic strokes occur in young adults. To investigate the yield of diagnostic tests, neuroimaging findings, and treatment of ischemic strokes in young adults. We retrospectively reviewed data from our Get with the Guidelines-Stroke database from 2005 through 2010. University hospital tertiary stroke center. A total of 215 consecutive inpatients aged 18 to 45 years with ischemic stroke/transient ischemic attack. The mean (SD) age was 37.5 (7) years; 51% were male. There were high incidence rates of hypertension (20%), diabetes mellitus (11%), dyslipidemia (38%), and smoking (34%). Relevant abnormalities were shown on cerebral angiography in 136 of 203 patients, on cardiac ultrasonography in 100 of 195, on Holter monitoring in 2 of 192; and on hypercoagulable panel in 30 of 189 patients. Multiple infarcts were observed in 31% and were more prevalent in individuals younger than age 35 years. Relevant arterial lesions were frequently detected in the middle cerebral artery (23%), internal carotid artery (13%), and vertebrobasilar arteries (13%). Cardioembolic stroke occurred in 47% (including 17% with isolated patent foramen ovale), and 11% had undetermined stroke etiology. The median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 3 (interquartile range, 0-9) and 81% had good outcome at hospital discharge. Of the 29 patients receiving thrombolysis (median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, 14; interquartile range, 9-17), 55% had good outcome at hospital discharge and none developed symptomatic brain hemorrhage. This study shows the contemporary profile of ischemic stroke in young adults admitted to a tertiary stroke center. Stroke etiology can be determined in nearly 90% of patients with modern diagnostic tests. The causes are heterogeneous; however, young adults have a high rate of traditional vascular risk factors. Thrombolysis appears safe and short-term outcomes are favorable.

  7. Direct Evidence that Myocardial Insulin Resistance following Myocardial Ischemia Contributes to Post-Ischemic Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Feng; Zhao, Kun; Li, Jia; Xu, Jie; Zhang, Yuan; Liu, Chengfeng; Yang, Weidong; Gao, Chao; Li, Jun; Zhang, Haifeng; Li, Yan; Cui, Qin; Wang, Haichang; Tao, Ling; Wang, Jing; Quon, Michael J; Gao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    A close link between heart failure (HF) and systemic insulin resistance has been well documented, whereas myocardial insulin resistance and its association with HF are inadequately investigated. This study aims to determine the role of myocardial insulin resistance in ischemic HF and its underlying mechanisms. Male Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to myocardial infarction (MI) developed progressive left ventricular dilation with dysfunction and HF at 4 wk post-MI. Of note, myocardial insulin sensitivity was decreased as early as 1 wk after MI, which was accompanied by increased production of myocardial TNF-α. Overexpression of TNF-α in heart mimicked impaired insulin signaling and cardiac dysfunction leading to HF observed after MI. Treatment of rats with a specific TNF-α inhibitor improved myocardial insulin signaling post-MI. Insulin treatment given immediately following MI suppressed myocardial TNF-α production and improved cardiac insulin sensitivity and opposed cardiac dysfunction/remodeling. Moreover, tamoxifen-induced cardiomyocyte-specific insulin receptor knockout mice exhibited aggravated post-ischemic ventricular remodeling and dysfunction compared with controls. In conclusion, MI induces myocardial insulin resistance (without systemic insulin resistance) mediated partly by ischemia-induced myocardial TNF-α overproduction and promotes the development of HF. Our findings underscore the direct and essential role of myocardial insulin signaling in protection against post-ischemic HF. PMID:26659007

  8. Remote ischemic preconditioning versus intermittent hypoxia training: a comparative analysis for cardioprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebrovska, T V; Shatilo, V B

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) is an adaptive phenomenon that occurs after one or more short periods of ischemia/reperfusion, and consists in increasing the tolerance of an organ or tissue to the damaging effect of a long period of ischemia/reperfusion. Although IPC was shown to have a protective effect in animal models or during operative interventions, the obvious difficulties involved in subjecting the heart to direct IPC restrict its potential clinical applications. In this perspective, the phenomenon of remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC: ischemia/reperfusion cycles in the arm or leg) appears extremely encouraging. Intermittent hypoxic training (IHI, periodic exposure of an organism to hypoxic gas mixtures, or stay in the chamber or altitudes) also has powerful adaptogenic effect increasing the resistance to subsequent episodes of severe hypoxia/ischemia. This review discusses main mechanisms and clinical applications of RIPC in cardiology versus IHT technologies. Benefits and disadvantages of both methods are under consideration. Positive and negative effects of hypercapnia during the RIPC technology are also examined. We wish to stimulate a comprehensive understanding of such a complex physiological phenomenon as intermittent hypoxia and ischemic preconditioning in order to prevent or reduce their harmful consequences, while maximize their potential utility as an effective therapeutic tools.

  9. Sonographic and Endoscopic Findings in Cocaine-Induced Ischemic Colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Thomas; Wilkens, Rune; Bonderup, Ole Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine-induced ischemic colitis is a recognized entity. The diagnosis is based on clinical and endoscopic findings. However, diagnostic imaging is helpful in the evaluation of abdominal symptoms and prior studies have suggested specific sonographic findings in ischemic colitis. We report...

  10. A Mobitz type II atrioventricular block in multicentric ischemic stroke ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cardiac and cerebrovascular illnesses are major causes of mortality and morbidity. Thromboembolisms, which are the result of cardiac arrhythmia, are important causes of ischemic stroke. In this study, we present a rare case of multicentric ischemic stroke induced by Mobitz type II atrioventricular block. The Pan African ...

  11. Takayasu Arteritis Presenting with Ischemic Stroke: Two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fergane Memmodova

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Takayasu arteritis is a rare vasculitic disease characterized with inflamation of vessels. It commonly results stenosis and dilatations of aort and aortic branches. Ischemic Cerebrovascular Disease is one of the major complications of Takayasu arteritis. In this report we concluded two Takayasu arteritis cases in the light of current data whom presented with ischemic stroke clinical symptoms.

  12. Effects of glycyrrhizin pre-treatment on transient ischemic brain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of glycyrrhizin pre-treatment on transient ischemic brain injury in mice. ... on transient ischemic brain injury in mice. Chiyeon Lim, Sehyun Lim, Young-Jun Lee, Bokcheul Kong, Byoungho Lee, Chang-Hyun Kim, Buyeo Kim, Suin Cho ... induced brain damage. Keywords: Glycyrrhizin, licorice, stroke, apoptosis ...

  13. Prognostic Factors and Outcome of Management of Ischemic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to determine the nuances of management, prognostic factors, and outcome of ischemic priapism in patients seen at Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria, Nigeria. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively studied the case notes of all patients managed for ischemic ...

  14. Complications of hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke : a CT perfusion evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dankbaar, J.W.

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis the use of CT-perfusion (CTP) imaging in the evaluation of the most severe complications of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)) and ischemic stroke was explored. These complications are delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) after SAH and damage to the blood-brain barrier (BBB) after ischemic

  15. Genetics of Atrial Fibrillation and Possible Implications for Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Lemmens

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation is the most common cardiac arrhythmia mainly caused by valvular, ischemic, hypertensive, and myopathic heart disease. Atrial fibrillation can occur in families suggesting a genetic background especially in younger subjects. Additionally recent studies have identified common genetic variants to be associated with atrial fibrillation in the general population. This cardiac arrhythmia has important public health implications because of its main complications: congestive heart failure and ischemic stroke. Since atrial fibrillation can result in ischemic stroke, one might assume that genetic determinants of this cardiac arrhythmia are also implicated in cerebrovascular disease. Ischemic stroke is a multifactorial, complex disease where multiple environmental and genetic factors interact. Whether genetic variants associated with a risk factor for ischemic stroke also increase the risk of a particular vascular endpoint still needs to be confirmed in many cases. Here we review the current knowledge on the genetic background of atrial fibrillation and the consequences for cerebrovascular disease.

  16. Demethylation of Circulating Estrogen Receptor Alpha Gene in Cerebral Ischemic Stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-Fen Lin

    Full Text Available Estrogen is involved in neuron plasticity and can promote neuronal survival in stroke. Its actions are mostly exerted via estrogen receptor alpha (ERα. Previous animal studies have shown that ERα is upregulated by DNA demethylation following ischemic injury. This study investigated the methylation levels in the ERα promoter in the peripheral blood of ischemic stroke patients.The study included 201 ischemic stroke patients, and 217 age- and sex-comparable healthy controls. The quantitative methylation level in the 14 CpG sites of the ERα promoter was measured by pyrosequencing in each participant. Multivariate regression model was used to adjust for stroke traditional risk factors. Stroke subtypes and sex-specific analysis were also conducted.The results demonstrated that the stroke cases had a lower ERα methylation level than controls in all 14 CpG sites, and site 13 and site 14 had significant adjusted p-values of 0.035 and 0.026, respectively. Stroke subtypes analysis showed that large-artery atherosclerosis and cardio-embolic subtypes had significantly lower methylation levels than the healthy controls at CpG site 5, site 9, site 12, site 13 and site 14 with adjusted p = 0.039, 0.009, 0.025, 0.046 and 0.027 respectively. However, the methylation level for the patients with small vessel subtype was not significant. We combined the methylation data from the above five sites for further sex-specific analysis. The results showed that the significant association only existed in women (adjusted p = 0.011, but not in men (adjusted p = 0.300.Female stroke cases have lower ERα methylation levels than those in the controls, especially in large-artery and cardio-embolic stroke subtypes. The study implies that women suffering from ischemic stroke of specific subtype may undergo different protective mechanisms to reduce the brain injury.

  17. NURR1 involvement in recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator treatment complications after ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino-Zamorano, Cristina; Hernández-Guillamon, Mar; Jullienne, Amandine; Le Béhot, Audrey; Bardou, Isabelle; Parés, Mireia; Fernández-Cadenas, Israel; Giralt, Dolors; Carrera, Caty; Ribó, Marc; Vivien, Denis; Ali, Carine; Rosell, Anna; Montaner, Joan

    2015-02-01

    Despite the effectiveness of recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (r-tPA) during the acute phase of ischemic stroke, the therapy remains limited by a narrow time window and the occurrence of occasional vascular side effects, particularly symptomatic hemorrhages. Our aim was to investigate the mechanisms underlying the endothelial damage resulting from r-tPA treatment in ischemic-like conditions. Microarray analyses were performed on cerebral endothelial cells submitted to r-tPA treatment during oxygen and glucose deprivation to identify novel biomarker candidates. Validation was then performed in vivo in a mouse model of thromboembolic stroke and culminated in an analysis in a clinical cohort of patients with ischemic stroke treated with thrombolysis. The transcription factor NURR1 (NR4A2) was identified as a downstream target induced by r-tPA during oxygen and glucose deprivation. Silencing NURR1 expression reversed the endothelial-toxicity induced by the combined stimuli, a protective effect attributable to reduced levels of proinflammatory mediators, such as nuclear factor-kappa-beta 2 (NF-κ-B2), interleukin 1 alpha (IL1α), intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1), SMAD family member 3 (SMAD3), colony stimulating factor 2 (granulocyte-macrophage; CSF2). The detrimental effect of delayed thrombolysis, in conditions in which NURR1 gene expression was enhanced, was confirmed in the preclinical stroke model. Finally, we determined that patients with stroke who had a symptomatic hemorrhagic transformation after r-tPA treatment exhibited higher baseline serum NURR1 levels than did patients with an asymptomatic or absence of cerebral bleedings. Our results suggest that NURR1 upregulation by r-tPA during ischemic stroke is associated with endothelial dysfunction and inflammation and the enhancement of hemorrhagic complications associated to thrombolysis. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Ischemic tolerance modulates TRAIL expression and its receptors and generates a neuroprotected phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarella, G; Pignataro, G; Di Benedetto, G; Anzilotti, S; Vinciguerra, A; Cuomo, O; Di Renzo, G F; Parenti, C; Annunziato, L; Bernardini, R

    2014-07-17

    TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), a member of the TNF superfamily released by microglia, appears to be involved in the induction of apoptosis following focal brain ischemia. Indeed, brain ischemia is associated with progressive enlargement of damaged areas and prominent inflammation. As ischemic preconditioning reduces inflammatory response to brain ischemia and ameliorates brain damage, the purpose of the present study was to evaluate the role of TRAIL and its receptors in stroke and ischemic preconditioning and to propose, by modulating TRAIL pathway, a new therapeutic strategy in stroke. In order to achieve this aim a rat model of harmful focal ischemia, obtained by subjecting animals to 100 min of transient occlusion of middle cerebral artery followed by 24 h of reperfusion and a rat model of ischemic preconditioning in which the harmful ischemia was preceded by 30 mins of tMCAO, which represents the preconditioning protective stimulus, were used. Results show that the neuroprotection elicited by ischemic preconditioning occurs through both upregulation of TRAIL decoy receptors and downregulation of TRAIL itself and of its death receptors. As a counterproof, immunoneutralization of TRAIL in tMCAO animals resulted in significant restraint of tissue damage and in a marked functional recovery. Our data shed new light on the mechanisms that propagate ongoing neuronal damage after ischemia in the adult mammalian brain and provide new molecular targets for therapeutic intervention. Strategies aimed to repress the death-inducing ligands TRAIL, to antagonize the death receptors, or to activate the decoy receptors open new perspectives for the treatment of stroke.

  19. A pathophysiological role of TRPV1 in ischemic injury after transient focal cerebral ischemia in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyanohara, Jun [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University (Japan); Shirakawa, Hisashi, E-mail: shirakaw@pharm.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University (Japan); Sanpei, Kazuaki [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University (Japan); Nakagawa, Takayuki [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University (Japan); Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Kyoto University Hospital (Japan); Kaneko, Shuji [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University (Japan)

    2015-11-20

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel with high Ca{sup 2+} permeability, which functions as a polymodal nociceptor activated by heat, protons and several vanilloids, including capsaicin and anandamide. Although TRPV1 channels are widely distributed in the mammalian brain, their pathophysiological roles in the brain remain to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated whether TRPV1 is involved in cerebral ischemic injury using a middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion model in wild-type (WT) and TRPV1-knockout (KO) mice. For transient ischemia, the left MCA of C57BL/6 mice was occluded for 60 min and reperfused at 1 and 2 days after ischemia. We found that neurological and motor deficits, and infarct volumes in TRPV1-KO mice were lower than those of WT mice. Consistent with these results, intracerebroventricular injection of a TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepine (20 nmol), 30 min before the onset of ischemia attenuated neurological and motor deficits and improved infarct size without influencing cerebral blood flow in the occluded MCA territory. The protective effect of capsazepine on ischemic brain damage was not observed in TRPV1-KO mice. WT and TRPV1-KO mice did not show any differences with respect to the increased number of Iba1-positive microglia/macrophages, GFAP-positive astrocytes, and Gr1-positive neutrophils at 1 and 2 days after cerebral ischemia. Taken together, we conclude that brain TRPV1 channels are activated by ischemic stroke and cause neurological and motor deficits and infarction after brain ischemia. - Highlights: • We investigated whether TRPV1 is involved in transient ischemic brain damage in mice. • Neurological deficits and infarct volumes were lower in TRPV1-KO mice than in WT mice. • Injection of a TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepine, attenuated neurological deficits and improved infarct size. • No differences in astrocytic or microglial activation were observed between WT and TRPV1-KO mice.

  20. A pathophysiological role of TRPV1 in ischemic injury after transient focal cerebral ischemia in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyanohara, Jun; Shirakawa, Hisashi; Sanpei, Kazuaki; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Kaneko, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel with high Ca 2+ permeability, which functions as a polymodal nociceptor activated by heat, protons and several vanilloids, including capsaicin and anandamide. Although TRPV1 channels are widely distributed in the mammalian brain, their pathophysiological roles in the brain remain to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated whether TRPV1 is involved in cerebral ischemic injury using a middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion model in wild-type (WT) and TRPV1-knockout (KO) mice. For transient ischemia, the left MCA of C57BL/6 mice was occluded for 60 min and reperfused at 1 and 2 days after ischemia. We found that neurological and motor deficits, and infarct volumes in TRPV1-KO mice were lower than those of WT mice. Consistent with these results, intracerebroventricular injection of a TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepine (20 nmol), 30 min before the onset of ischemia attenuated neurological and motor deficits and improved infarct size without influencing cerebral blood flow in the occluded MCA territory. The protective effect of capsazepine on ischemic brain damage was not observed in TRPV1-KO mice. WT and TRPV1-KO mice did not show any differences with respect to the increased number of Iba1-positive microglia/macrophages, GFAP-positive astrocytes, and Gr1-positive neutrophils at 1 and 2 days after cerebral ischemia. Taken together, we conclude that brain TRPV1 channels are activated by ischemic stroke and cause neurological and motor deficits and infarction after brain ischemia. - Highlights: • We investigated whether TRPV1 is involved in transient ischemic brain damage in mice. • Neurological deficits and infarct volumes were lower in TRPV1-KO mice than in WT mice. • Injection of a TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepine, attenuated neurological deficits and improved infarct size. • No differences in astrocytic or microglial activation were observed between WT and TRPV1-KO mice.

  1. [Aortic debris in cerebrovascular ischemic disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curatolo, L M; Melcón, C M; Lourido, M A; Torres-Lynch, M F; Parisi, V L; Fernández, G G; Rubachin, S; Hernández, G; Rotta-Escalante, R

    The aortic atherosclerotic debris is considered a high risk embolic source, being an independent predictor for cerebrovascular ischemia. The incidence is higher in the elderly and in patients with coronary artery disease. Transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE) is an important diagnostic tool that allows its detection. To describe characteristics of patients with ischemic stroke and echocardiographic diagnosis of aortic debris. We analyzed the group of patients with debris diagnosis in 209 TEE performed between 01/01/99 and 31/05/02, in 835 consecutive ischemic events. The information was collected from the Stroke Database of the Neurology Department of Policlinica Bancaria. TEE was accomplished in 25% of all assisted events. The mean age was 66.56 years (SD 11.22). In 30 studies (14%) aortic debris was detected. In this group of patients, 26 men and 4 women, was also found: plaques grade IV 60%, left atrial dilatation 40% and spontaneous echo contrast 20%. The most frequent risk factors were hypertension, dislipemia and smoking, with no significative difference compared to the group without debris. 40% had a prior cerebrovascular event. They presented with clinical subtype LACI 53%, PACI 27%, POCI 17%. 63% of patients had lacunar infarct (53% anterior and 10% posterior). The contribution of TTE for detection of embolic sources is relevant. A high percentage of the population with echocardiographic diagnosis of aortic debris, had a lacunar infarct, defined radiologically and by clinical features.

  2. Psoriasis and ischemic coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahiques-Santos, L; Soriano-Navarro, C J; Perez-Pastor, G; Tomas-Cabedo, G; Pitarch-Bort, G; Valcuende-Cavero, F

    2015-03-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with an increased risk of ischemic coronary artery disease (CAD) in some populations. We aimed to determine the association between these 2 diseases in our geographic area. We performed a cross-sectional study of patient records between 2005 and 2012 in the database (Abucacis, Datamart) that contains all medical case histories in the province of Castellón, Spain. Patients diagnosed with psoriasis were compared with a control group of patients diagnosed with melanocytic nevus. The prevalence of CAD and the presence or absence of the main cardiovascular risk factors were analyzed in each group. A total of 9181 patients with psoriasis and 21925 with melanocytic nevus were studied. Univariate logistic regression analysis showed that CAD was significantly associated with psoriasis, age (in years), sex, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, and obesity (P<.05). On adjustment for age, sex, and the other cardiovascular risk factors, multivariate regression analysis established that psoriasis was independently associated with CAD (P<.029). Our findings in a large sample of patients in a Mediterranean area support the hypothesis that patients in this population have an increased risk of ischemic CAD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  3. SPECT and PET in ischemic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelidis, George; Giamouzis, Gregory; Karagiannis, Georgios; Butler, Javed; Tsougos, Ioannis; Valotassiou, Varvara; Giannakoulas, George; Dimakopoulos, Nikolaos; Xanthopoulos, Andrew; Skoularigis, John; Triposkiadis, Filippos; Georgoulias, Panagiotis

    2017-03-01

    Heart failure is a common clinical syndrome associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Ischemic heart disease is the leading cause of heart failure, at least in the industrialized countries. Proper diagnosis of the syndrome and management of patients with heart failure require anatomical and functional information obtained through various imaging modalities. Nuclear cardiology techniques play a main role in the evaluation of heart failure. Myocardial single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with thallium-201 or technetium-99 m labelled tracers offer valuable data regarding ventricular function, myocardial perfusion, viability, and intraventricular synchronism. Moreover, positron emission tomography (PET) permits accurate evaluation of myocardial perfusion, metabolism, and viability, providing high-quality images and the ability of quantitative analysis. As these imaging techniques assess different parameters of cardiac structure and function, variations of sensitivity and specificity have been reported among them. In addition, the role of SPECT and PET guided therapy remains controversial. In this comprehensive review, we address these controversies and report the advances in patient's investigation with SPECT and PET in ischemic heart failure. Furthermore, we present the innovations in technology that are expected to strengthen the role of nuclear cardiology modalities in the investigation of heart failure.

  4. Biomarkers of Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy in Newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha V. Douglas-Escobar

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available As neonatal intensive care has evolved, the focus has shifted from improving mortality alone to an effort to improve both mortality and morbidity. The most frequent source of neonatal brain injury occurs as a result of hypoxic-ischemic injury. Hypoxic-ischemic injury occurs in about 2 of 1,000 full-term infants and severe injured infants will have lifetime disabilities and neurodevelopmental delays. Most recently, remarkable efforts toward neuroprotection have been started with the advent of therapeutic hypothermia and a key step in the evolution of neonatal neuroprotection is the discovery of biomarkers that enable the clinician-scientist to screen infants for brain injury, monitor progression of disease, identify injured brain regions, and assess efficacy of neuroprotective clinical trials. Lastly, biomarkers offer great hope identifying when an injury occurred shedding light on the potential pathophysiology and the most effective therapy. In this article, we will review biomarkers of HIE including S100b, neuron specific enolase, umbilical cord IL-6, CK-BB, GFAP, myelin basic protein, UCHL-1, and pNF-H. We hope to contribute to the awareness, validation and clinical use of established as well as novel neonatal brain injury biomarkers.

  5. Metabolic Prosthesis for Oxygenation of Ischemic Tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenbaum, Elias [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    This communication discloses new ideas and preliminary results on the development of a "metabolic prosthesis" for local oxygenation of ischemic tissue under physiological neutral conditions. We report for the first time the selective electrolysis of physiological saline by repetitively pulsed charge-limited electrolysis for the production of oxygen and suppression of free chlorine. For example, using 800 A amplitude current pulses and <200 sec pulse durations, we demonstrated prompt oxygen production and delayed chlorine production at the surface of a shiny 0.85 mm diameter spherical platinum electrode. The data, interpreted in terms of the ionic structure of the electric double layer, suggest a strategy for in situ production of metabolic oxygen via a new class of "smart" prosthetic implants for dealing with ischemic disease such as diabetic retinopathy. We also present data indicating that drift of the local pH of the oxygenated environment can be held constant using a feedback-controlled three electrode electrolysis system that chooses anode and cathode pair based on pH data provided by local microsensors. The work is discussed in the context of diabetic retinopathy since surgical techniques for multielectrode prosthetic implants aimed at retinal degenerative diseases have been developed.

  6. Prediction and prevention of ischemic placental disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Alexander M; Cleary, Kirsten L

    2014-04-01

    Preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), and placental abruption are obstetrical conditions that constitute the syndrome of ischemic placental disease or IPD, the leading cause of indicated preterm birth and an important cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. While the phenotypic manifestations vary significantly for preeclampsia, IUGR, and abruption, these conditions may share a common underlying etiology as evidenced by: (1) shared clinical risk factors, (2) increased recurrence risk across pregnancies as well as increased co-occurrence of IPD conditions within a pregnancy, and (3) findings that suggest the underlying pathophysiologic processes may be similar. IPD is of major clinical importance and accounts for a large proportion of indicated preterm delivery ranging from the periviable to late preterm period. Successful prevention of IPD and resultant preterm delivery could substantially improve neonatal and maternal outcomes. This article will review the following topics: (1) The complicated research literature on aspirin and the prevention of preeclampsia and IUGR. (2) Research evidence on other medical interventions to prevent IPD. (3) New clinical interventions currently under investigations, including statins. (4) Current clinical recommendations for prevention of ischemic placental disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Noninvasive evaluation of ischemic stroke with SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, C.R.; Malik, M.M.; Gomez, S.M.; Wingkun, E.C.

    1988-01-01

    Technetium Tc 99m DTPA single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) brain scans of 20 patients with acute ischemic stroke were reviewed retrospectively and compared with clinical and radiologic (CT) data. Fourteen of the patients had abnormal SPECT studies. The abnormal findings were demonstrated by static views in eight patients, by the flow study in one patient, and by both sets of images in the other five patients. All abnormalities correlated with the clinical syndrome of presentation, and only two of the patients had no corresponding lesions on CT. Of the six patients with normal SPECT scans, two had abnormal CT studies, and in the other four, no lesions were shown at all. The ability of /sup 99m/Tc DTPA SPECT to display cerebral infarctions appears to be, at best, comparable to that of CT. SPECT also provides qualitative information regarding flow dynamics in the affected hemisphere of some patients (6/20 in our review). This, we believe, represents the objective demonstration of the preexisting insufficient collateral flow in the hemisphere at risk for ischemic stroke

  8. Thrombophilia testing in young patients with ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahus, Sidse Høst; Hansen, Anette Tarp; Hvas, Anne-Mette

    2016-01-01

    The possible significance of thrombophilia in ischemic stroke remains controversial. We aimed to study inherited and acquired thrombophilias as risk factors for ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack (TIA) and amaurosis fugax in young patients. We included patients aged 18 to 50 years with ischemic stroke, TIA or amaurosis fugax referred to thrombophilia investigation at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark from 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2012 (N=685). Clinical information was obtained from the Danish Stroke Registry and medical records. Thrombophilia investigation results were obtained from the laboratory information system. Absolute thrombophilia prevalences and associated odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were reported for ischemic stroke (N=377) and TIA or amaurosis fugax (N=308). Thrombophilia prevalences for the general population were obtained from published data. No strong associations were found between thrombophilia and ischemic stroke, but patients with persistent presence of lupus anticoagulant (3%) had an OR at 2.66 (95% CI 0.84-9.15) for ischemic stroke. A significantly higher risk of TIA/amaurosis fugax was found for factor V Leiden heterozygote (12%) (OR: 1.99 (95% CI 1.14-3.28)). No other inherited or acquired thrombophilia was associated with ischemic stroke, TIA or amaurosis fugax. In young patients, thrombophilia did not infer an increased risk of ischemic stroke. Only factor V Leiden heterozygote patients had an increased risk of TIA/amaurosis fugax, and persistent presence of lupus anticoagulant was likely associated with ischemic stroke. We suggest the testing restricted to investigation of persistent presence of lupus anticoagulant. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparison of characteristics and healing course of diabetic foot ulcers by etiological classification: neuropathic, ischemic, and neuro-ischemic type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yotsu, Rie Roselyne; Pham, Ngoc Minh; Oe, Makoto; Nagase, Takeshi; Sanada, Hiromi; Hara, Hisao; Fukuda, Shoji; Fujitani, Junko; Yamamoto-Honda, Ritsuko; Kajio, Hiroshi; Noda, Mitsuhiko; Tamaki, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    To identify differences in the characteristics of patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) according to their etiological classification and to compare their healing time. Over a 4.5-year period, 73 patients with DFUs were recruited. DFUs were etiologically classified as being of neuropathic, ischemic, or neuro-ischemic origin. Descriptive analyses were performed to characterize study subjects, foot-related factors, and healing outcome and time. Duration of healing was assessed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Healing time among the three types was compared using the log rank test. The number of patients manifesting neuropathic, ischemic, and neuro-ischemic ulcers was 30, 20, and 14, respectively. Differences were identified for age, diabetes duration, body mass index, hypertension, and estimated glomerular filtration rate. Patients with neuro-ischemic ulcers had better ankle-brachial index, skin perfusion pressure (SPP), and transcutaneous oxygen pressure values compared to those with ischemic ulcers. The average time in which 50% of patients had healed wounds was 70, 113, and 233 days for neuropathic, neuro-ischemic, and ischemic ulcers, respectively. Main factors associated with healing were age and SPP values. Based on the etiological ulcer type, DFU healing course and several patient factors differed. Failure to consider the differences in DFU etiology may have led to heterogeneity of results in previous studies on DFUs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Population-based effectiveness and safety of different antiplatelet regimens as secondary prevention for ischemic stroke/Transient ischemic attack

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noorsyahdy, Alfi; De Boer, Anthonius; Deneer, Vera H.M.; Ten Berg, Jurrien M.; Souverein, Patrick C.; Klungel, Olaf H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Different antiplatelet regimens are used for secondary prevention after ischemic stroke (IS)/transient ischemic attack (TIA), but studies on the relative effectiveness and safety of each regimen in daily practice are lacking. Objectives: To assess the relative effectiveness and safety of

  11. Silent stroke in patients with transient ischemic attack or minor ischemic stroke. The Dutch TIA Trial Study Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herderscheê, D.; Hijdra, A.; Algra, A.; Koudstaal, P. J.; Kappelle, L. J.; van Gijn, J.

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: We studied silent stroke (i.e., infarcts on computed tomographic scan not related to later symptoms) in patients after transient ischemic attack or minor ischemic stroke. METHODS: Ours is a cross-sectional study of 2,329 patients who were randomized in a secondary prevention

  12. Prevalence of electrocardiographic ST-T changes during acute ischemic stroke in patients without known ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper K; Bak, Søren; Flemming Høilund-Carlsen, Poul

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated characteristics and prevalence of ST-segment depression and/or T-wave inversion in the resting electrocardiogram of 244 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke, but without ischemic heart disease. The prevalence of ST-T changes ranged from 13% to 16% and this is what to expect...

  13. Prothrombin and risk of venous thromboembolism, ischemic heart disease and ischemic cerebrovascular disease in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weischer, Maren; Juul, Klaus; Zacho, Jeppe

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypotheses that Prothrombin G20210A heterozygosity associate with increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), ischemic heart disease (IHD), and ischemic cerebrovascular disease (ICVD) in the general population and re-tested risk of IHD and ICVD in two case...

  14. Copy number variation in glutathione S-transferases M1 and T1 and ischemic vascular disease: four studies and meta-analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Marianne S; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Loft, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) M1 and T1 detoxify products of oxidative stress and may protect against atherosclerosis and ischemic vascular disease (IVD). We tested the hypothesis that copy number variation (CNV) in GSTM1 and GSTT1 genes, known to be associated with stepwise decreases...

  15. Anti-ischemic intervention as prognosis improvement in patients with coronary artery disease, with special focus on verapamil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, C M

    1996-01-01

    thrombus formation. Verapamil significantly inhibits platelet aggregation and thrombus formation, which may be one of several reasons for the protective effect of verapamil on reinfarction in patients recovering from myocardial infarction. Ischemia may lead to left ventricular dilation and diastolic...... dysfunction, and thereby heart failure. In postinfarction patients intervention with verapamil significantly reduced the use of diuretics compared with placebo, indicating that anti-ischemic intervention may prevent heart failure. Ventricular arrhythmias are significantly associated with arrhythmic as well...

  16. Novel Therapeutic Effects of Leonurine On Ischemic Stroke: New Mechanisms of BBB Integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu-Yan Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality globally. Leonurine (also named SCM-198, a compound extracted from Herba leonuri, was effective on the prevention of various cardiovascular and brain diseases. The purpose of this study was to explore the possible therapeutic potential of SCM-198 against ischemia reperfusion injury and underlying mechanisms. In the in vivo transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO rat model, we found that treatment with SCM-198 could decrease infarct volume and improve neurological deficit by protecting against blood-brain barrier (BBB breakdown. In the in vitro model of cell oxygen-glucose deprivation and reoxygenation (OGD/R, consistent results were obtained with decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS production and maintained the BBB integrity. Further study demonstrated that SCM-198 increased the expression of histone deacetylase- (HDAC- 4 which could inhibit NADPH oxidase- (NOX- 4 and matrix metalloproteinase- (MMP- 9 expression, resulting in the elevation of tight junction proteins, including claudin-5, occludin, and zonula occluden- (ZO- 1. These results indicated SCM-198 protected BBB integrity by regulating the HDAC4/NOX4/MMP-9 tight junction pathway. Our findings provided novel insights into the protective effects and mechanisms of SCM-198 on ischemic stroke, indicating SCM-198 as a new class of potential drug against acute onset of ischemic stroke.

  17. Arctigenin attenuates ischemic stroke via SIRT1-dependent inhibition of NLRP3 inflammasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shimeng; Jiang, Liangjun; Che, Fengyuan; Lu, Yucheng; Xie, Zhongxiang; Wang, Hao

    2017-11-04

    Arctigenin (ARC), a phenylpropanoid dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan derived from Arctium lappa L, has been reported to protect against cerebral ischemia injury in rats, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. In this study, we investigated whether ARC ameliorated ischemic stroke by inhibiting NLRP3 inflammasome-derived neuroinflammation and whether SIRT1 signaling was involved in this process. ARC (20 mg/kg) or vehicle were intraperitoneally injected to Sprague-Dawley rats for 3 days before middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) surgery performed. The infarct volume, neurological score, brain water content, neuroinflammation, NLRP3 inflammasome activation and SIRT1 protein expression were assessed. Furthermore, we also investigated whether ARC protected against cerebral ischemia via SIRT1-dependent inhibition of NLRP3 inflammasome by administrating EX527, a specific SIRT1 inhibitor, under oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) condition. We found that ARC pretreatment decreased infarct volume, neurological score and brain water content. Moreover, ARC treatment effectively inhibited cerebral ischemia induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation and IL-1β, IL-18 secretion both in vivo and in vitro. Futhermore, ARC treatment activated Silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1) singnaling in the brain. Importantly, suppress of SIRT1 reversed the inhibitory effect of ARC on NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Taken together our results demonstrated that ARC may confer protection against ischemic stroke by inhibiting NLRP3 inflammasome activation. The activation of SIRT1 signaling pathway may contribute to the neuroprotection of ARC in MCAO. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Impact of Anesthetic Regimen on Remote Ischemic Preconditioning in the Rat Heart In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behmenburg, Friederike; van Caster, Patrick; Bunte, Sebastian; Brandenburger, Timo; Heinen, André; Hollmann, Markus W; Huhn, Ragnar

    2018-04-01

    Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) seems to be a promising cardioprotective strategy with contradictive clinical data suggesting the anesthetic regimen influencing the favorable impact of RIPC. This study aimed to investigate whether cardio protection by RIPC is abolished by anesthetic regimens. Male Wistar rats were randomized to 6 groups. Anesthesia was either maintained by pentobarbital (Pento) alone or a combination of sevoflurane (Sevo) and remifentanil or propofol (Prop) and remifentanil in combination with and without RIPC. RIPC reduced infarct size in Pento- and Sevo-anesthetized rats (Pento-RIPC: 30% ± 9% versus Pento-control [Con]: 65% ± 6%, P < .001; Sevo-RIPC: 31% ± 6% versus Sevo-Con: 61% ± 8%, P < .001), but RIPC did not initiate cardio protection in Prop-anesthetized animals (Prop-RIPC: 59% ± 6% versus Prop-Con: 59% ± 8%, P = 1.000). Cardio protection by RIPC is abolished by Prop.

  19. The research of melatonin in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Bin; Feng Xing; Qian Zhihong; Shi Ming

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To elucidate the function of melatonin in the pathogenesis and the prognosis of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) and provide the pathophysiology basis for therapying HIE with melatonin. Methods: The level of plasma melatonin of twenty normal term infants and twenty modest HIE and twenty middle-severity HIE in their acute phase and recovery phase were assayed respectively with radioimmunoassay (RIA). Then compare the difference of the melatonin level among these neonates. Results: (1) For modest HIE, the melatonin level was higher than that in the normal in the acute phase and there was no difference to the normal in the recovery phase. (2) There was no difference between the melatonin level in middle-severity HIE in the acute phase and that in the normal, but in the recovery phase it was higher than that in the normal. (3) For modest HIE, the melatonin level in acute phase was higher than that in the recovery phase, but for middle-severity HIE, it was adverse. (4) In the acute phase, the level in modest HIE was higher than that in the middle-severity HIE, but on the contrary in the recovery phase. Conclusion: Melatonin have protection action on HIE. The prognosis of modest HIE neonates with rising melatonin level in the acute phase is better than that with lower melatonin level of middle-severity HIE. (authors)

  20. Remote ischemic preconditioning in patients with intermittent claudication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glauco Fernandes Saes

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC is a phenomenon in which a short period of sub-lethal ischemia in one organ protects against subsequent bouts of ischemia in another organ. We hypothesized that RIPC in patients with intermittent claudication would increase muscle tissue resistance to ischemia, thereby resulting in an increased ability to walk. METHODS: In a claudication clinic, 52 ambulatory patients who presented with complaints of intermittent claudication in the lower limbs associated with an absent or reduced arterial pulse in the symptomatic limb and/or an ankle-brachial index <0.90 were recruited for this study. The patients were randomly divided into three groups (A, B and C. All of the patients underwent two tests on a treadmill according to the Gardener protocol. Group A was tested first without RIPC. Group A was subjected to RIPC prior to the second treadmill test. Group B was subjected to RIPC prior to the first treadmill test and then was subjected to a treadmill test without RIPC. In Group C (control group, both treadmill tests were performed without RIPC. The first and second tests were conducted seven days apart. Brazilian Clinical Trials: RBR-7TF6TM. RESULTS: Group A showed a significant increase in the initial claudication distance in the second test compared to the first test. CONCLUSION: RIPC increased the initial claudication distance in patients with intermittent claudication; however, RIPC did not affect the total walking distance of the patients.

  1. Ischemic postconditioning in pigs: no causal role for RISK activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skyschally, Andreas; van Caster, Patrick; Boengler, Kerstin; Gres, Petra; Musiolik, Judith; Schilawa, Dustin; Schulz, Rainer; Heusch, Gerd

    2009-01-02

    Ischemic postconditioning (IPoC) reduces infarct size following ischemia/reperfusion. Whether or not phosphorylation of RISK (reperfusion injury salvage kinases) (AKT, ERK1/2, P70S6K, GSK3beta) is causal for protection by IPoC is controversial. We therefore studied the impact of RISK on IPoC in anesthetized pigs subjected to 90 minutes of left anterior descending coronary artery hypoperfusion and 120 minutes of reperfusion. In protocol 1, IPoC, by 6 cycles of 20/20 seconds of reperfusion/reocclusion (n=13), was compared with immediate full reperfusion (IFR) (n=15). In protocol 2, IPoC (n=4) or IFR (n=4) was performed with pharmacological RISK blockade by IC coinfusion of Wortmannin and U0126. Infarct size was determined by TTC staining, and the expression of phosphorylated RISK proteins by Western blot analysis in biopsies. In protocol 1, infarct size was 20+/-3% (percentage of area at risk; mean+/-SEM) with IPoC and 33+/-4% (P<0.05) with IFR. RISK phosphorylation increased with reperfusion but was not different between IPoC and IFR. In protocol 2, Wortmannin and U0126 blocked the increases in RISK phosphorylation during reperfusion, but infarct size was still smaller with IPoC (15+/-7%) than with IFR (35+/-6%; P<0.05).

  2. Anti-ischemic effect of curcumin in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Pradeep K; Khanna, Vinay K; Ali, Mohd M; Khan, Mohd Y; Srimal, Rikhab C

    2008-06-01

    Turmeric has been in use since ancient times as a condiment and due to its medicinal properties. Curcumin, the yellow colouring principle in turmeric, is polyphenolic and major active constituent. Besides anti-inflammatory, thrombolytic and anticarcinogenic activities, curcumin also possesses strong antioxidant property. In view of the novel combination of properties, neuroprotective efficacy of curcumin was studied in rat middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model. Rats were subjected to 2 h of focal ischemia followed by 72 h of reperfusion. They were pre-treated with curcumin (100 mg/kg, po) for 5 days prior to MCAO and for another 3 days after MCAO. The parameters studied were behavioural, biochemical and histological. Treatment with curcumin could significantly improve neurobehavioral performance compared to untreated ischemic rats as judged by its effect on rota-rod performance and grid walking. A significant inhibition in lipid peroxidation and an increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in corpus striatum and cerebral cortex was observed following treatment with curcumin in MCAO rats as compared to MCAO group. Intracellular calcium levels were decreased following treatment with curcumin in MCAO rats. Histologically, a reduction in the infarct area from 33% to 24% was observed in MCAO rats treated with curcumin. The study demonstrates the protective efficacy of curcumin in rat MCAO model.

  3. Premature menopause or early menopause and risk of ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Walter A.; Grossardt, Brandon R.; Miller, Virginia M.; Shuster, Lynne T.; Brown, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The general consensus has been that estrogen is invariably a risk factor for ischemic stroke (IS). We reviewed new observational studies that challenge this simple conclusion. Methods This was a review of observational studies of the association of premature or early menopause with stroke or IS published in English from 2006 through 2010. Results Three cohort studies showed an increased risk of all stroke in women who underwent bilateral oophorectomy compared with women who conserved their ovaries before age 50 years. The increased risk of stroke was reduced by hormonal therapy (HT) in one of the studies, suggesting that estrogen deprivation is involved in the association. Four additional observational studies showed an association of all stroke or IS with the early onset of menopause or with a shorter lifespan of ovarian activity. In three of the seven studies, the association was restricted to IS. Age at menopause was more important than type of menopause (natural vs induced). Conclusions The findings from seven recent observational studies challenge the consensus that estrogen is invariably a risk factor for IS and can be reconciled by a unifying timing hypothesis. We hypothesize that estrogen is protective for IS before age 50 years and may become a risk factor for IS after age 50 years or, possibly, after age 60 years. These findings are relevant to women who experienced premature or early menopause, or to women considering prophylactic bilateral oophorectomy before the onset of natural menopause. PMID:21993082

  4. Clinical Correlates, Ethnic Differences, and Prognostic Implications of Perivascular Spaces in Transient Ischemic Attack and Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Kui-Kai; Li, Linxin; Lovelock, Caroline E; Zamboni, Giovanna; Chan, Tsz-Tai; Chiang, Man-Fung; Lo, Kin-Ting; Küker, Wilhelm; Mak, Henry Ka-Fung; Rothwell, Peter M

    2017-06-01

    Perivascular spaces (PVSs) are considered markers of small vessel disease. However, their long-term prognostic implications in transient ischemic attack/ischemic stroke patients are unknown. Ethnic differences in PVS prevalence are also unknown. Two independent prospective studies were conducted, 1 comprising predominantly whites with transient ischemic attack/ischemic stroke (OXVASC [Oxford Vascular] study) and 1 comprising predominantly Chinese with ischemic stroke (University of Hong Kong). Clinical and imaging correlates, prognostic implications for stroke and death, and ethnic differences in basal ganglia (BG) and centrum semiovale (CS) PVSs were studied with adjustment for age, sex, vascular risk factors, and scanner strength. Whites with transient ischemic attack/ischemic stroke (n=1028) had a higher prevalence of both BG and CS-PVSs compared with Chinese (n=974; >20 BG-PVSs: 22.4% versus 7.1%; >20 CS-PVSs: 45.8% versus 10.4%; P stroke (adjusted hazard ratio compared with 20 PVSs: HR, 1.82; 1.18-2.80; P =0.011) but not intracerebral hemorrhage ( P =0.10) or all-cause mortality ( P =0.16). CS-PVSs were not associated with recurrent stroke ( P =0.57) or mortality ( P =0.072). Prognostic associations were similar in both cohorts. Over and above ethnic differences in frequency of PVSs in transient ischemic attack/ischemic stroke patients, BG and CS-PVSs had similar risk factors, but although >20 BG-PVSs were associated with an increased risk of recurrent ischemic stroke, CS-PVSs were not. © 2017 The Authors.

  5. Protective Effects of Berberine on Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation/Reperfusion on Oligodendrocyte Cell Line (OLN-93

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabnam Nadjafi

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: We concluded that berberine protected OLN-93 oligodendrocyte against ischemic induced excitotoxic injury. Attenuation of intracellular Ca 2+ overload by berberine may be the key mechanism that saved OLN-93 from excitotoxicity damage.

  6. Plasma Magnesium and the Risk of Ischemic Stroke among Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akarolo-Anthony, Sally N.; Jiménez, Monik C.; Chiuve, Stephanie E.; Spiegelman, Donna; Willett, Walter C.; Rexrode, Kathryn M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Lower plasma magnesium levels may be associated with higher blood pressure and endothelial dysfunction, but sparse prospective data are available for stroke. Methods Among 32,826 participants in the Nurses’ Health Study who provided blood samples in 1989–1990, incident ischemic strokes were identified and confirmed by medical records through 2006. We conducted a nested case-control analysis of 459 cases, matched 1:1 to controls on age, race/ethnicity, smoking status, date of blood draw, fasting status, menopausal status and hormone use. We used conditional logistic regression models to estimate the multivariable adjusted association of plasma magnesium and the risk of ischemic stroke and ischemic stroke subtypes. Results Median magnesium levels did not differ between ischemic stroke cases and controls (median=0.86 mmol/l for both; p-value=0.14). Conditional on matching factors, women in the lowest magnesium quintile had a relative risk (RR) of 1.34 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.86–2.10, p trend=0.13) for total ischemic stroke, compared to women in the highest quintile. Additional adjustment for risk factors and confounders did not substantially alter the risk estimates for total ischemic stroke. Women with magnesium levels magnesium levels ≥0.82 mmol/l. No significant effect modification was observed by age, body mass index, hypertension or diabetes. Conclusions Lower plasma magnesium levels may contribute to higher risk of ischemic stroke among women. PMID:25116874

  7. Imaging of cerebral ischemic edema and neuronal death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kummer, Ruediger von [Universitaetsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus, Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Dresden (Germany); Dzialowski, Imanuel [Elblandklinikum Meissen, Neurologische Rehabilitationsklinik Grossenhain, Meissen (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    In acute cerebral ischemia, the assessment of irreversible injury is crucial for treatment decisions and the patient's prognosis. There is still uncertainty how imaging can safely differentiate reversible from irreversible ischemic brain tissue in the acute phase of stroke. We have searched PubMed and Google Scholar for experimental and clinical papers describing the pathology and pathophysiology of cerebral ischemia under controlled conditions. Within the first 6 h of stroke onset, ischemic cell injury is subtle and hard to recognize under the microscope. Functional impairment is obvious, but can be induced by ischemic blood flow allowing recovery with flow restoration. The critical cerebral blood flow (CBF) threshold for irreversible injury is ∝15 ml/100 g x min. Below this threshold, ischemic brain tissue takes up water in case of any residual capillary flow (ionic edema). Because tissue water content is linearly related to X-ray attenuation, computed tomography (CT) can detect and measure ionic edema and, thus, determine ischemic brain infarction. In contrast, diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) detects cytotoxic edema that develops at higher thresholds of ischemic CBF and is thus highly sensitive for milder levels of brain ischemia, but not specific for irreversible brain tissue injury. CT and MRI are complimentary in the detection of ischemic stroke pathology and are valuable for treatment decisions. (orig.)

  8. Imaging of cerebral ischemic edema and neuronal death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kummer, Ruediger von; Dzialowski, Imanuel

    2017-01-01

    In acute cerebral ischemia, the assessment of irreversible injury is crucial for treatment decisions and the patient's prognosis. There is still uncertainty how imaging can safely differentiate reversible from irreversible ischemic brain tissue in the acute phase of stroke. We have searched PubMed and Google Scholar for experimental and clinical papers describing the pathology and pathophysiology of cerebral ischemia under controlled conditions. Within the first 6 h of stroke onset, ischemic cell injury is subtle and hard to recognize under the microscope. Functional impairment is obvious, but can be induced by ischemic blood flow allowing recovery with flow restoration. The critical cerebral blood flow (CBF) threshold for irreversible injury is ∝15 ml/100 g x min. Below this threshold, ischemic brain tissue takes up water in case of any residual capillary flow (ionic edema). Because tissue water content is linearly related to X-ray attenuation, computed tomography (CT) can detect and measure ionic edema and, thus, determine ischemic brain infarction. In contrast, diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) detects cytotoxic edema that develops at higher thresholds of ischemic CBF and is thus highly sensitive for milder levels of brain ischemia, but not specific for irreversible brain tissue injury. CT and MRI are complimentary in the detection of ischemic stroke pathology and are valuable for treatment decisions. (orig.)

  9. Correlation study on cystatin C and ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Rong-bo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the relationship between serum cystatin C (Cys C and patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods The clinical and laboratory data of 115 patients with acute ischemic stroke and 110 controls were recorded and analyzed. Results The serum Cys C levels of patients in ischemic stroke group [(1.15 ± 0.34 mg/L] were higher than that of the control group [(0.99 ± 0.25 mg/L]. The difference between two groups was significant after correction of age and cardiovascular risk factors (t = ? 3.889, P = 0.000. It was found that age, Cys C, homocysteine (Hcy, type 2 diabetes mellitus [hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, fructosamine (FRU], smoking, alcohol consumption, hypertension and intima-media thickness (IMT were risk factors for ischemic stroke on univariate Logistic regression analysis. The difference of serum Cys C level between the patients and controls was significant (P = 0.000, but through covariance analysis, after adjusted other risk factors, it was not significant (P = 0.875. Conclusion The serum Cys C levels of patients in ischemic stroke group is higher than the control group. It can be used as an indicator in the acute phase of ischemic stroke. The elevation of serum Cys C is a risk factor for ischemic stroke, but not an independent risk factor.

  10. Post-ischemic bowel stricture: CT features in eight cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Sil [Dept. of Radiology, College of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Mokdong Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Jin; Hong, Sung Mo; Park, Seong Ho; Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, Ah Young; Ha, Hyun Kwon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-11-15

    To investigate the characteristic radiologic features of post-ischemic stricture, which can then be implemented to differentiate that specific disease from other similar bowel diseases, with an emphasis on computed tomography (CT) features. Eight patients with a diagnosis of ischemic bowel disease, who were also diagnosed with post-ischemic stricture on the basis of clinical or pathologic findings, were included. Detailed clinical data was collected from the available electronic medical records. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed all CT images. Pathologic findings were also analyzed. The mean interval between the diagnosis of ischemic bowel disease and stricture formation was 57 days. The severity of ischemic bowel disease was variable. Most post-ischemic strictures developed in the ileum (n = 5), followed by the colon (n = 2) and then the jejunum (n = 1). All colonic strictures developed in the “watershed zone.” The pathologic features of post-ischemic stricture were deep ulceration, submucosal/subserosal fibrosis and chronic transmural inflammation. The mean length of the post-ischemic stricture was 7.4 cm. All patients in this study possessed one single stricture. On contrast-enhanced CT, most strictures possessed concentric wall thickening (87.5%), with moderate enhancement (87.5%), mucosal enhancement (50%), or higher enhancement in portal phase than arterial phase (66.7%). Post-ischemic strictures develop in the ileum, jejunum and colon after an interval of several weeks. In the colonic segment, strictures mainly occur in the “watershed zone.” Typical CT findings include a single area of concentric wall thickening of medium length (mean, 7.4 cm), with moderate and higher enhancement in portal phase and vasa recta prominence.

  11. Metabolically healthy obesity and ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Louise; Netterstrøm, Marie K.; Johansen, Nanna B

    2017-01-01

    Context: Recent studies have suggested that a subgroup of obese individuals is not at increased risk of obesity-related complications. This subgroup has been referred to as metabolically healthy obese. Objective: To investigate whether obesity is a risk factor for development of ischemic heart...... Measures: IHD. Results: During follow-up, 323 participants developed IHD. Metabolically healthy obese men had increased risk of IHD compared with metabolically healthy normal-weight men [hazard ratio (HR), 3.1; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.1 to 8.2)]. The corresponding results for women were less...... healthy individuals became metabolically unhealthy after 5 years of follow-up. When these changes in exposure status were taken into account, slightly higher risk estimates were found. Conclusions: Being obese is associated with higher incidence of IHD irrespective of metabolic status, and we question...

  12. Citicoline for ischemic stroke: ICTUS trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Anatolyevich Parfenov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives data available in the literature on the use of citicoline in an experimental model of ischemic stroke (IS and in randomized multicenter placebo-controlled trials. It analyzes the results of the ICTUS trial in which 2298 patients with IS who received randomly citicoline or placebo for 24 hours after the onset of symptoms (I000 mg intravenously every I2 hours during the first 3 days, then orally as one 500-mg tablet every 12 hours during 6 weeks. The results of the trial confirmed the safety of citicoline used in IS, but failed to show its significant advantage over placebo in reducing the degree of disability (global improvement 90 days later. However, to pool the results of the ICTUS trial with those of other randomized multicenter placebo-controlled studies demonstrates a significant decrease in the degree of disability in IS patients treated with citicoline.

  13. Critical care management of acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplin, William M

    2012-06-01

    Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) can have profound and devastating effects on the CNS and several other organs. Approximately 15% to 20% of patients with AIS are admitted to an intensive care unit and cared for by a multidisciplinary team. This article discusses the critical care management of patients with AIS. Patients with AIS require attention to airway, pulmonary status, blood pressure, glucose, temperature, cardiac function, and, sometimes, life-threatening cerebral edema. The lack of disease-specific data has led to numerous management approaches and limited guidance on choosing among them. Existing guidelines emphasize risk factors, prevention, natural history, and prevention of bleeding but provide little discussion of the complex critical care issues involved in caring for patients with AIS.

  14. Remnant cholesterol and ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varbo, Anette; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review recent advances in the field of remnant cholesterol as a contributor to the development of ischemic heart disease (IHD). RECENT FINDINGS: Epidemiologic, mechanistic, and genetic studies all support a role for elevated remnant cholesterol (=cholesterol in triglyceride......-rich lipoproteins) as a contributor to the development of atherosclerosis and IHD. Observational studies show association between elevated remnant cholesterol and IHD, and mechanistic studies show remnant cholesterol accumulation in the arterial wall like LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) accumulation. Furthermore, large...... genetic studies show evidence of remnant cholesterol as a causal risk factor for IHD independent of HDL-cholesterol levels. Genetic studies also show that elevated remnant cholesterol is associated with low-grade inflammation, whereas elevated LDL-C is not. There are several pharmacologic ways of lowering...

  15. [Secondary prevention of ischemic non cardioembolic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armario, Pedro; Pinto, Xavier; Soler, Cristina; Cardona, Pere

    2015-01-01

    Stroke patients are at high risk for recurrence or new occurrence of other cardiovascular events or cardiovascular mortality. It is estimated that a high percentage of non-cardioembolic ischemic stroke can be prevented by a suitable modification of lifestyle (diet and exercise), reducing blood pressure (BP) with antihypertensive medication, platelet aggregation inhibitors, statins and high intake reducing consumption of. Unfortunately the degree of control of the different risk factors in secondary prevention of stroke is low. The clinical practice guidelines show clear recommendations with corresponding levels of evidence, but only if implemented in a general way they will get a better primary and secondary stroke prevention. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  16. Ketogenic Diet Provides Neuroprotective Effects against Ischemic Stroke Neuronal Damages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheida Shaafi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is a leading cause of death and disability in the world. Many mechanisms contribute in cell death in ischemic stroke. Ketogenic diet which has been successfully used in the drug-resistant epilepsy has been shown to be effective in many other neurologic disorders. The mechanisms underlying of its effects are not well studied, but it seems that its neuroprotective ability is mediated at least through alleviation of excitotoxicity, oxidative stress and apoptosis events. On the basis of these mechanisms, it is postulated that ketogenic diet could provide benefits to treatment of cerebral ischemic injuries.

  17. Severe ischemic colitis following olanzapine use: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Raimundo Fernandes

    Full Text Available Ischemic colitis is the most common subtype of intestinal ischemia usually resulting from vasospasm, vessel occlusion or mesenteric hypoperfusion. Neuroleptics have seldom been linked to ischemic colitis by blocking peripheral anticholinergic and antiserotonergic receptors inducing severe gastrointestinal paresis. We report a young patient with severe ischemic colitis requiring surgery due to necrosis of the bowel. After exclusion of other potential causes, olanzapine was admitted as the cause of ischemia. Clinicians should be aware of how to recognize and treat the potentially life-threatening effects of neuroleptics.

  18. Totarol prevents neuronal injury in vitro and ameliorates brain ischemic stroke: Potential roles of Akt activation and HO-1 induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Yuanxue; Xu, Xiaojun; Chang, Sai; Wang, Yunjie; Xu, Yazhou; Ran, Siqi; Huang, Zhangjian; Li, Ping; Li, Jia; Zhang, Luyong; Saavedra, Juan M.; Liao, Hong; Pang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    The natural product totarol, a phenolic diterpenoid and a major constituent isolated from the sap of Podocarpus totara, has been reported to have a potent antimicrobial activity. In this study, we determined whether totarol possessed an additional neuroprotective activity in vitro and in vivo. We found that totarol prevented glutamate- and oxygen and glucose deprivation-induced neuronal death in primary rat cerebellar granule neuronal cells and cerebral cortical neurons. Totarol increased Akt and GSK-3β phosphorylation, Nrf2 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein expressions and suppressed oxidative stress by increasing GSH and SOD activities. The PI3K/Akt inhibitor LY294002 prevented totarol neuroprotective effect by suppressing the totarol-induced changes in HO-1 expression and the activities of GSH and SOD. The HO-1 inhibitor ZnPPIX also prevented totarol-increased GSH and SOD activities. In a model of acute cerebral ischemic injury in Sprague–Dawley rats, produced by occlusion of the middle cerebral artery for 2 h followed by 22 h or 46 h of reperfusion, totarol significantly reduced infarct volume and improved the neurological deficit. In this model, totarol increased HO-1 expression and the activities of GSH and SOD. These observations suggest that totarol may be a novel activator of the Akt/HO-1 pathway protecting against ischemic stroke through reduction of oxidative stress. - Graphical abstract: It is unknown whether the natural product totarol has neuroprotective effects in vitro and in vivo. This study underscores that totarol prevents neuronal injury in vitro, not only by activating PI3K/Akt pathway, but also via induction of Nrf2, HO-1, GSH and SOD expressions. Totarol also ameliorated acute cerebral ischemic injury in a rat ischemic stroke model. The findings highlight that totarol may be exploited for protecting against ischemic stroke through Akt/HO-1 pathway. - Highlights: • Totarol protects glutamate- and OGD-induced neuronal injury in vitro.

  19. RESVERATROL PRECONDITIONING INDUCES A NOVEL EXTENDED WINDOW OF ISCHEMIC TOLERANCE IN THE MOUSE BRAIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koronowski, Kevin B.; Dave, Kunjan R.; Saul, Isabel; Camarena, Vladimir; Thompson, John W.; Neumann, Jake T.; Young, Juan I.; Perez-Pinzon, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Prophylactic treatments that afford neuroprotection against stroke may emerge from the field of preconditioning. Resveratrol mimics ischemic preconditioning, reducing ischemic brain injury when administered two days prior to global ischemia in rats. This protection is linked to Sirt1 and enhanced mitochondrial function possibly through its repression of UCP2. BDNF is another neuroprotective protein associated with Sirt1. In this study we sought to identify the conditions of resveratrol preconditioning (RPC) that most robustly induce neuroprotection against focal ischemia in mice. Methods We tested four different RPC paradigms against a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) model of stroke. Infarct volume and neurological score were calculated 24 hours following MCAo. Sirt1-chromatin binding was evaluated by ChIP-qPCR. Percoll gradients were used to isolate synaptic fractions and changes in protein expression were determined via Western blot analysis. BDNF concentration was measured using a BDNF-specific ELISA assay. Results While repetitive RPC induced neuroprotection from MCAo, strikingly one application of RPC 14 days prior to MCAo showed the most robust protection, reducing infarct volume by 33% and improving neurological score by 28%. Fourteen days following RPC, Sirt1 protein was increased 1.5 fold and differentially bound to the UCP2 and BDNF promoter regions. Accordingly, synaptic UCP2 protein decreased by 23% and cortical BDNF concentration increased 26%. Conclusions RPC induces a novel extended window of ischemic tolerance in the brain that lasts for at least 14 days. Our data suggest that this tolerance may be mediated by Sirt1, through upregulation of BDNF and downregulation of UCP2. PMID:26159789

  20. Role of central oxytocin in stress-induced cardioprotection in ischemic-reperfused heart model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghimian, Maryam; Faghihi, Mahdieh; Karimian, Seyed Morteza; Imani, AliReza; Houshmand, Fariba; Azizi, Yaser

    2013-01-01

    There is growing evidence that stress contributes to cardiovascular disease and triggers the release of oxytocin. Moreover previous studies confirmed oxytocin mimics the protection associated with ischemic preconditioning. The present study was aimed to assess the possible cardioprotective effects of the centrally released oxytocin in response to stress and intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of exogenous oxytocin in ischemic-reperfused isolated rat heart. Rats were divided in two main groups and all of them were subjected to i.c.v. infusion of vehicle or drugs: unstressed rats [control: vehicle, oxytocin (OT; 100 ng/5 μl), atosiban (ATO; 4.3 μg/5 μl) as oxytocin antagonist, ATO+OT] and stressed rats [St: stress, OT+St, ATO+St]. After anesthesia, hearts were isolated and subjected to 30 min regional ischemia and 60 min reperfusion (IR). Acute stress protocol included swimming for 10 min before anesthesia. Myocardial function, infarct size, coronary flow, ventricular arrhythmia, and biochemical parameters such as creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase were measured. Ischemia-induced ventricular arrhythmias were counted during the occlusion period. The plasma levels of oxytocin and corticosterone were significantly elevated by stress. Unexpectedly hearts of stressed rats showed a marked depression of IR injury compared to control group. I.c.v. infusion of oxytocin mimicked the cardioprotective effects of stress, yet did not elevate plasma oxytocin level. The protective effects of both stress and i.c.v. oxytocin were blocked by i.c.v. oxytocin antagonist. These findings suggest that i.c.v. infusion of exogenous oxytocin and centrally released endogenous oxytocin in response to stress could play a role in induction of a preconditioning effect in ischemic-reperfused rat heart via brain receptors. Copyright © 2012 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION AND “OXIDATIVE STRESS” BY THE NONNSTABLE COURSE OF ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Kratnov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The purpose of study was to compare phagocytic indexes, free oxygen radicals generation, activity of antioxidative protection, cytokine levels and von Willebrand factor (vWF antigen in the patients with non–stable course of ischemic heart disease of. We examined 58 patients with ischemic heart disease: 31 with unstable angina and 27 with acute myocardial infarction. The methods of study included nitro–blue tetrasolium reduction test for neutrophiles and monocytes, detection of myeloperoxidase in phagocytes, assays of glutatione reductase in neutrophiles, as well as measurements of catalase, superoxide dismutase, malonic dialdehyde, circulating immune complexes, IL–6, TNFα and vWF factor antigen in blood. Upon admission to the hospital, the patients with unstable angina, as well as with acute myocardial infarction showed significantly higher levels of vWF, C–reactive protein, neutrophile myeloperoxidase and appropriate trends in circulating immune complexes, IL–6 and TNFα. In the patients admitted to the hospital with ischemic heart disease with repeated coronary events during the last year of follow–up, as well as in acute myocardial infarction, the levels of vWF antigen were found to be significantly increased. The raise of vWF was accompanied by increased levels of malonic dialdehyde, C3R–induced generation of free oxygen radicals in the neutrophils, and drop in glutatione reductase activity, thus reflecting an “oxidative stress” condition. These patients did also exhibit higher levels of C–reactive protein, circulating immune complexes, IL–6 and TNFα. According to regression analysis data, the levels of vWF antigen and C3R–induced activation free oxygen radicals in neutrophils are the indices that were most closely connected to ischemic heart failure disease within a year of observation. The results obtained point to the important role of “oxidative stress” in the development of endothelial dysfunction

  2. Cyclical blood flow restriction resistance exercise: a potential parallel to remote ischemic preconditioning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprick, Justin D; Rickards, Caroline A

    2017-11-01

    Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) is characterized by the cyclical application of limb blood flow restriction and reperfusion and has been shown to protect vital organs during a subsequent ischemic insult. Blood flow restriction exercise (BFRE) similarly combines bouts of blood flow restriction with low-intensity exercise and thus could potentially emulate the protection demonstrated by RIPC. One concern with BFRE, however, is the potential for an augmented rise in sympathetic outflow due to greater activation of the exercise pressor reflex. Because of the use of lower workloads, however, we hypothesized that BFRE would elicit an attenuated increase in sympathetic outflow [assessed via plasma norepinephrine (NE) and mean arterial pressure (MAP)] and middle cerebral artery velocity (MCAv) when compared with conventional exercise (CE). Fifteen subjects underwent two leg press exercise interventions: 1 ) BFRE-220 mmHg bilateral thigh occlusion at 20% 1 rep-max (1RM), and 2 ) CE-65% 1RM without occlusion. Each condition consisted of 4 × 5-min cycles of exercise, with 3 × 10-reps in each cycle. Five minutes of rest and reperfusion (for BFRE) followed each cycle. MAP increased with exercise ( P exercise ( P exercise only ( P = 0.07). Plasma NE concentration increased with CE only ( P exercise ( P ≤ 0.02). The attenuated sympathetic response, combined with similar cerebrovascular responses, suggest that cyclical BFRE could be explored as an alternative to CE in the clinical setting. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  3. The Migraine-Ischemic Stroke Relation in Young Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Pezzini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the strong epidemiologic evidence linking migraine and ischemic stroke in young adults, the mechanisms explaining this association remain poorly understood. The observation that stroke occurs more frequently during the interictal phase of migraine prompts to speculation that an indirect relation between the two diseases might exist. In this regard, four major issues might be considered which may be summarized as follows: (1 the migraine-ischemic stroke relation is influenced by specific risk factors such as patent foramen ovale or endothelial dysfunction and more frequent in particular conditions like spontaneous cervical artery dissection; (2 migraine is associated with an increased prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors; (3 the link is caused by migraine-specific drugs; (4 migraine and ischemic vascular events are linked via a genetic component. In the present paper, we will review epidemiological studies, discuss potential mechanisms of migraine-induced stroke and comorbid ischemic stroke, and pose new research questions.

  4. Molecular mechanisms of ischemic preconditioning in the kidney

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, Volker H.

    2015-01-01

    More effective therapeutic strategies for the prevention and treatment of acute kidney injury (AKI) are needed to improve the high morbidity and mortality associated with this frequently encountered clinical condition. Ischemic and/or hypoxic preconditioning attenuates susceptibility to ischemic injury, which results from both oxygen and nutrient deprivation and accounts for most cases of AKI. While multiple signaling pathways have been implicated in renoprotection, this review will focus on oxygen-regulated cellular and molecular responses that enhance the kidney's tolerance to ischemia and promote renal repair. Central mediators of cellular adaptation to hypoxia are hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). HIFs play a crucial role in ischemic/hypoxic preconditioning through the reprogramming of cellular energy metabolism, and by coordinating adenosine and nitric oxide signaling with antiapoptotic, oxidative stress, and immune responses. The therapeutic potential of HIF activation for the treatment and prevention of ischemic injuries will be critically examined in this review. PMID:26311114

  5. Ischemic Preconditioning of One Forearm Enhances Static and Dynamic Apnea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeld, Thomas; Rasmussen, Mads Reinholdt; Jattu, Timo

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Ischemic preconditioning enhances ergometer cycling and swimming performance. We evaluated whether ischemic preconditioning of one forearm (four times for 5 min) also affects static breath hold and underwater swimming, whereas the effect of similar preconditioning on ergometer rowing...... served as control because the warm-up for rowing regularly encompasses intense exercise and therefore reduced muscle oxygenation. METHODS: Six divers performed a dry static breath hold, 11 divers swam underwater in an indoor pool, and 14 oarsmen rowed "1000 m" on an ergometer. RESULTS: Ischemic...... oxygenation decreased from 66% ± 7% to 33% ± 14% (P Ischemic preconditioning prolonged the breath hold from 279 ± 72 to 327 ± 39 s, and the underwater swimming distance from 110 ± 16 to 119 ± 14 m (P

  6. Sexual dimorphism in ischemic stroke: lessons from the laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manwani, Bharti; McCullough, Louise D

    2011-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is emerging as a major health problem for elderly women. Women have lower stroke incidence than men until an advanced age, when the epidemiology of ischemic stroke shifts and incidence rises dramatically in women. Experimental models of rodent stroke have replicated this clinical epidemiology, with exacerbated injury in older compared with young female rodents Many of the detrimental effects of aging on ischemic stroke outcome in females can be replicated by ovariectomy, suggesting that hormones such as estrogen play a neuroprotective role. However, emerging data suggest that the molecular mechanisms leading to ischemic cell death differ in the two sexes, and these effects may be independent of circulating hormone levels. This article highlights recent clinical and experimental literature on sex differences in stroke outcomes and mechanisms. PMID:21612353

  7. Nonfasting triglycerides, cholesterol, and ischemic stroke in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varbo, Anette; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Current guidelines on stroke prevention have recommendations on desirable cholesterol levels, but not on nonfasting triglycerides. We compared stepwise increasing levels of nonfasting triglycerides and cholesterol for their association with risk of ischemic stroke in the general population....

  8. [Preditive clinical factors for epileptic seizures after ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukujima, M M; Cardeal, J O; Lima, J G

    1996-06-01

    Preditive clinical factors for epileptic seizures after ischemic stroke. Clinical features of 35 patients with ischemic stroke who developed epilepsy (Group 1) were compared with those of 35 patients with ischemic stroke without epilepsy (Group 2). The age of the patients did not differ between the groups. There were more men than women and more white than other races in both groups. Diabetes melitus, hypertension, transient ischemic attack, previous stroke, migraine, Chagas disease, cerebral embolism of cardiac origin and use of oral contraceptive did not differ between the groups. Smokers and alcohol users were more frequent in Group 1 (p < 0.05). Most patients of Group 1 presented with hemiparesis; none presented cerebellar or brainstem involvement. Perhaps strokes in smokers have some different aspects, that let them more epileptogenic than in non smokers.

  9. Advances in endovascular therapy for ischemic cerebrovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Lu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Endovascular therapy for ischemic cerebrovascular diseases has developed rapidly in recent years. The latest clinical trials of acute ischemic stroke have shown promising results with the continued advancement of concepts, techniques, and materials. Mechanical thrombectomy is recommended in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke caused by large vessel occlusion of the anterior circulation, according to the guidelines updated in Europe, USA, and China. The long-term therapeutic efficacy of endovascular stenting for carotid artery stenosis has also been proved noninferior to that of carotid endarterectomy. However, the latest clinical trials have shown that the efficacy of stenting for intracranial artery and vertebral artery stenosis is inferior to that of medical treatment alone, which needs urgent attention through further development and studies. Keywords: Ischemic cerebrovascular diseases, Interventional surgery, Progress

  10. Stroke subtypes and factors associated with ischemic stroke in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . Better understanding and controlling factors associated will improve the prevention of the disease. This study reviews records of patients with ischemic stroke in Central Africa. Material and methods: Patients of Bantu ethnicity with clinical ...

  11. Anticoagulant treatment in patients with atrial fibrillation and ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunner-Frandsen, Nicole; Dammann Andersen, Andreas; Ashournia, Hamoun

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac dysrhythmia, with a lifetime risk of 25%, and it is a well-known independent risk factor for ischemic stroke. Over the last 15 years, efforts have been made to initiate relevant treatment in patients with AF. A retrospective study...... was observed. An explanation could be an increase in the prevalence of AF in the general population, leaving the proportion of patients admitted with ischemic stroke unchanged. Other risk factors have been sought reduced as well with the implementation of national guidelines regarding hypertension...... was set up to clarify whether this effort has resulted in a decreased proportion of patients with known AF experiencing an ischemic stroke. METHODS: Patients admitted to the Department of Neurology, Vejle Hospital, Denmark, with ischemic stroke from January 1997 to December 2012 were included in the study...

  12. Risk Factors and Biomarkers of Ischemic Stroke in Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Kwangsoo; Lee, Ji-Hun

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Stroke is common among cancer patients. However, risk factors and biomarkers of stroke in cancer patients are not well established. This study aimed to investigate risk factors and biomarkers as well as etiology of ischemic stroke in cancer patients. Methods A retrospective review was conducted in cancer patients with ischemic stroke who were admitted to a general hospital in Busan, Korea, between January 2003 and December 2012. The risk factors and biomarkers for strok...

  13. Long-Term Prognosis of Ischemic Stroke in Young Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Varona, Jose F.

    2010-01-01

    There is limited information about long-term prognosis of ischemic stroke in young adults. Giving the potentially negative impact in physical, social, and emotional aspects of an ischemic stroke in young people, providing early accurate long-term prognostic information is very important in this clinical setting. Moreover, detection of factors associated with bad outcomes (death, recurrence, moderate-to-severe disability) help physicians in optimizing secondary prevention strategies. The prese...

  14. The Migraine-Ischemic Stroke Relation in Young Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Pezzini, Alessandro; Del Zotto, Elisabetta; Giossi, Alessia; Volonghi, Irene; Costa, Paolo; Dalla Volta, Giorgio; Padovani, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    In spite of the strong epidemiologic evidence linking migraine and ischemic stroke in young adults, the mechanisms explaining this association remain poorly understood. The observation that stroke occurs more frequently during the interictal phase of migraine prompts to speculation that an indirect relation between the two diseases might exist. In this regard, four major issues might be considered which may be summarized as follows: (1) the migraine-ischemic stroke relation is influenced by s...

  15. Acute anti-inflammatory approaches to ischemic stroke

    OpenAIRE

    del Zoppo, Gregory J.

    2010-01-01

    In preparation for designing and undertaking trials of strategies that can modulate “innate inflammation” to improve outcomes of ischemic injury, consideration of approaches that have managed cellular inflammation in ischemic stroke are instructive. Robust experimental work has demonstrated the efficacy (and apparent safety) of targeting PMN leukocyte–endothelial cell interactions in the early moments following focal ischemia onset in model systems. Four clinical trial programs were undertake...

  16. The Siblings With Ischemic Stroke Study (SWISS): A Progress Report

    OpenAIRE

    Meschia, James F.; Kissela, Brett M.; Brott, Thomas G.; Brown, Robert D.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Beck, Jeanne; Skarp, Alexa N.

    2006-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that genetic factors are associated with ischemic stroke, including multiple recent reports of association with the gene PDE4D, encoding phosphodiesterase 4D, on chromosome 5q12. Genetic studies of stroke are important but can be logistically difficult to perform. This article reviews the design of the Siblings With Ischemic Stroke Study (SWISS) and discusses problems in performing a sibling-based pedigree study where proband-initiated consent is used to enroll pe...

  17. Diffusion MR Imaging of Postoperative Bilateral Acute Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kannan, Anusha; Srinivasan, Sivasubramanian [Khoo Teck Puat Hospital, Singapore (Singapore)

    2012-09-15

    We read with great interest, the case report on ischemic optic neuropathy (1). We would like to add a few points concerning the blood supply of the optic nerve and the correlation with the development of post-operative ischemic neuropathy. Actually, the perioperative or post-operative vision loss (postoperative ischemic neuropathy) is most likely due to ischemic optic neuropathy. Ischemic optic neuropathy (2) is classified as an anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION) and posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION). This classification is based on the fact that blood supply (2) to the anterior segment of the optic nerve (part of the optic nerve in the scleral canal and the optic disc) is supplied by short posterior ciliary vessels or anastamotic ring branches around the optic nerve. The posterior part of the optic canal is relatively less perfused, and is supplied by ophthalmic artery and central fibres are perfused by a central retinal artery. So, in the post-operative period, the posterior part of the optic nerve is more vulnerable for ischemia, especially, after major surgeries (3), one of the theories being hypotension or anaemia (2) and resultant decreased perfusion. The onset of PION is slower than the anterior ischemic optic neuropathy. AION on the other hand, is usually spontaneous (idiopathic) or due to arteritis, and is usually sudden in its onset. The reported case is most likely a case of PION. The role of imaging, especially the diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging, is very important because the ophthalmoscopic findings in early stages of PION is normal, and it may delay the diagnosis. On the other hand, edema of the disc is usually seen in the early stages of AION.

  18. Neuroprotective effects of scutellarin against hypoxic-ischemic-induced cerebral injury via augmentation of antioxidant defense capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hong; Hu, Li-Min; Wang, Shao-Xia; Wang, Yu-Lin; Shi, Fang; Li, Hui; Liu, Yang; Kang, Li-Yuan; Gao, Xiu-Mei

    2011-12-31

    An increasing number of studies has indicated that hypoxic-ischemic-induced cerebral injury is partly mediated via oxidative stress. Recent researches have focused on searching for drug and herbal manipulations to protect against hypoxic-ischemic-induced oxidative cell damage. Scutellarin is a flavonoid derived from the Erigeron breviscapus (vant.) and has been reported to exhibit neuroprotective properties. However, its precise mechanism, particularly its antioxidation mechanism, remains elusive. In the present study, we investigated the neuroprotective effects of scutellarin on middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO)-induced brain damage in rats, and oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced toxicity in primary culture of rat cortical neurons. In vivo, intraperitoneal injections of scutellarin (20 and 60 mg/kg) improved the neurological score and diminished the percentage of brain infarct volume. At the same time, scutellarin significantly increased superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) activities and glutathione (GSH) level in ischemic brain tissues, enhancing endogenous antioxidant activity. Moreover, pretreatment of scutellarin (25, 50 and 100 μM) protected neurons against lethal stimuli, decreased the percentage of apoptotic cells and inhibited reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in OGD-induced primary cortical neurons in vitro. These results suggest that the preventive and therapeutic potential of scutellarin in cerebral injury patients is, at least in part, ascribed to augmentation of cellular antioxidant defense capacity.

  19. TonEBP modulates the protective effect of taurine in ischemia-induced cytotoxicity in cardiomyocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Y J; Han, Y Y; Chen, K; Zhang, Y; Liu, X; Li, S; Wang, K Q; Ge, J B; Liu, W; Zuo, J

    2015-01-01

    Taurine, which is found at high concentration in the heart, exerts several protective actions on myocardium. Physically, the high level of taurine in heart is maintained by a taurine transporter (TauT), the expression of which is suppressed under ischemic insult. Although taurine supplementation upregulates TauT expression, elevates the intracellular taurine content and ameliorates the ischemic injury of cardiomyocytes (CMs), little is known about the regulatory mechanisms of taurine governin...

  20. Characterization of a preclinical model of chronic ischemic wound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sashwati; Biswas, Sabyasachi; Khanna, Savita; Gordillo, Gayle; Bergdall, Valerie; Green, Jeanne; Marsh, Clay B.; Gould, Lisa J.; Sen, Chandan K.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic ischemic wounds presenting at wound clinics are heterogeneous with respect to etiology, age of the wound, and other factors complicating wound healing. In addition, there are ethical challenges associated with collecting repeated biopsies from a patient to develop an understanding of the temporal dynamics of the mechanisms underlying chronic wounds. The need for a preclinical model of ischemic wound is therefore compelling. The porcine model is widely accepted as an excellent preclinical model for human wounds. A full-thickness bipedicle flap approach was adopted to cause skin ischemia. Closure of excisional wounds placed on ischemic tissue was severely impaired resulting in chronic wounds. Histologically, ischemic wounds suffered from impaired re-epithelialization, delayed macrophage recruitment and poorer endothelial cell abundance and organization. Compared with the pair-matched nonischemic wound, unique aspects of the ischemic wound biology were examined on days 3, 7, 14, and 28 by systematic screening of the wound tissue transcriptome using high-density porcine GeneChips. Ischemia markedly potentiated the expression of arginase-1, a cytosolic enzyme that metabolizes the precursor of nitric oxide l-arginine. Ischemia also induced the SOD2 in the wound tissue perhaps as survival response of the challenged tissue. Human chronic wounds also demonstrated elevated expression of SOD2 and arginase-1. This study provides a thorough database that may serve as a valuable reference tool to develop novel hypotheses aiming to elucidate the biology of ischemic chronic wounds in a preclinical setting. PMID:19293328

  1. Secular trends in ischemic stroke subtypes and stroke risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogiatzi, Chrysi; Hackam, Daniel G; McLeod, A Ian; Spence, J David

    2014-11-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of a stroke improves patient outcomes, and knowledge of the cause of the initial event is crucial to identification of the appropriate therapy to maximally reduce risk of recurrence. Assumptions based on historical frequency of ischemic subtypes may need revision if stroke subtypes are changing as a result of recent changes in therapy, such as increased use of statins. We analyzed secular trends in stroke risk factors and ischemic stroke subtypes among patients with transient ischemic attack or minor or moderate stroke referred to an urgent transient ischemic attack clinic from 2002 to 2012. There was a significant decline in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and blood pressure, associated with a significant decline in large artery stroke and small vessel stroke. The proportion of cardioembolic stroke increased from 26% in 2002 to 56% in 2012 (Prisk factors was observed, with a significant decline in stroke/transient ischemic attack caused by large artery atherosclerosis and small vessel disease. As a result, cardioembolic stroke/transient ischemic attack has increased significantly. Our findings suggest that more intensive investigation for cardiac sources of embolism and greater use of anticoagulation may be warranted. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Smoking and Risk of Ischemic Stroke in Young Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markidan, Janina; Cole, John W; Cronin, Carolyn A; Merino, Jose G; Phipps, Michael S; Wozniak, Marcella A; Kittner, Steven J

    2018-05-01

    There is a strong dose-response relationship between smoking and risk of ischemic stroke in young women, but there are few data examining this association in young men. We examined the dose-response relationship between the quantity of cigarettes smoked and the odds of developing an ischemic stroke in men under age 50 years. The Stroke Prevention in Young Men Study is a population-based case-control study of risk factors for ischemic stroke in men ages 15 to 49 years. The χ 2 test was used to test categorical comparisons. Logistic regression models were used to calculate the odds ratio for ischemic stroke occurrence comparing current and former smokers to never smokers. In the first model, we adjusted solely for age. In the second model, we adjusted for potential confounding factors, including age, race, education, hypertension, myocardial infarction, angina, diabetes mellitus, and body mass index. The study population consisted of 615 cases and 530 controls. The odds ratio for the current smoking group compared with never smokers was 1.88. Furthermore, when the current smoking group was stratified by number of cigarettes smoked, there was a dose-response relationship for the odds ratio, ranging from 1.46 for those smoking ischemic stroke among young men. Although complete smoking cessation is the goal, even smoking fewer cigarettes may reduce the risk of ischemic stroke in young men. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Basic and clinical research advances in ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-yuan MA

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the most common cerebrovascular disease worldwide, which seriously affects life quality of survivals and results in huge economic burden of families and society. In terms of clinical treatment for ischemic stroke, apart from thrombolytic therapy with recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA, the occurrence and successful application of endovascular thrombectomy in patients of ischemic stroke is a major breakthrough. Meanwhile, many novel clinical drugs for ischemic stroke therapy have entered into clinical trials. Most of basic and clinical researches have showed promising results in ischemic stroke therapy. This review mainly summarizes the progress of research during the period of Twelfth Five-Year Plan for National Economic and Social Development on treatment of ischemic stroke, including omics technologies, gene therapy, microRNA (miRNA interference and stem cell therapy. Stem cell therapy has shown great potential since many clinical trials have been completed or are ongoing. The development and mutual transformation of basic and clinical research will provide valuable and comprehensive information for the precise treatment of ischemic stroke.

  4. Increased circulating leukocyte-derived microparticles in ischemic cerebrovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhangping; Tang, Yanyan; Qin, Chao

    2017-06-01

    Circulating leukocyte-derived microparticles act as proinflammatory mediators that reflect vascular inflammation. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that the quantity of leukocyte-derived microparticles is increased in patients with ischemic cerebrovascular diseases, and investigated utility of various phenotypes of leukocyte-derived microparticles as specific biomarkers of vascular inflammation injury. Additionally we focused on identifying leukocyte-derived microparticles that may be correlated with stroke severity in acute ischemic stroke patients. The plasma concentration of leukocyte-derived microparticles obtained by a series of centrifugations of 76 consecutive patients with ischemic cerebrovascular diseases and 70 age-, sex-, and race-matched healthy controls were determined by flow cytometry. Significantly elevated numbers of leukocyte (CD45+), monocyte (CD14+), lymphocyte (CD4+), granulocyte (CD15+) derived microparticles were found in the plasma samples of patients ischemic cerebrovascular diseases, compared to healthy controls (pcerebrovascular diseases, compared with healthy controls. As proinflammatory mediators, leukocyte-derived microparticles may contribute to vascular inflammatory and the inflammatory process in acute ischemic stroke. Levels of CD14+ microparticles may be a promising biomarker of ischemic severity and outcome of stroke in the clinic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Potential protective role of hydrogen against cisplatininduced side ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Potential protective role of hydrogen against cisplatininduced side effects during chemotherapy: A mini-review of a novel hypothesis for antagonism of hydrogen. ... Molecular hydrogen has been shown to have therapeutic effects against damage to various organs (especially kidney, brain and liver) caused by ischemic ...

  6. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance surface coil study of ischemic preconditioned isolated perfused rat heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Yongbin; Luo Xuechun; Zhang Riqing; Wang Xiaoyin; Zuo Lin; Liu Wei

    2000-01-01

    ischemic preconditioning (IPC) will protect the heart from the damage caused by a subsequent long ischemia period. 31 P spectra of isolated perfused rat heart measured by the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) surface coil technique can be used to continually, dynamically and noninvasively obtain metabolism information. This paper explores the IPC mechanisms by NMR. This study shows that IPC has no effect on enhancing the ATP and PCr levels during reperfusion but makes significantly slows and smooths the changes of intracellular pH and ATP during ischemia periods. The ATP and PCr recovery rate of the IPC group after ischemia is significantly higher than that of the control group. In conclusion, the above results support that IPC can protect the rat heart by reducing damage during the ischemia period

  7. Hepatitis isquémica Ischemic hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Amuchástegui (h

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available La hepatitis isquémica es una complicación sumamente infrecuente de cirugía cardiovascular. Las biopsias muestran necrosis centrolobulillar. El término de "hepatitis" fue propuesto debido al aumento de transaminasas similar a aquellas de origen infeccioso, e "isquémica" por falla en la perfusión hepática. Posteriormente se definió el término de hepatitis isquémica como cuadro de elevación aguda y reversible (dentro de las 72 horas de transaminasas de hasta 20 veces el valor normal, asociado a trastornos en la perfusión hepática, luego de haber excluido otras causas de hepatitis aguda o daño hepatocelular. Se describe el caso de un paciente de 53 años que consulta por dolor epigástrico de 12 h de evolución sin fiebre, náuseas ni vómitos, resistente a la medicación. Tenía antecedentes inmediatos de reemplazo de válvula aórtica, y estaba anticoagulado. Evolucionó con shock y fallo multiorgánico. El examen evidenció marcada ictericia y signos de taponamiento pericárdico, asociado a un aumento considerable de enzimas hepáticas. Un ecocardiograma informó signos de taponamiento cardíaco y ausencia de disección aórtica. Se decidió pericardiocentesis, extrayéndose 970 cc. de líquido sanguinolento, y hemodiálisis, con notable mejoría de su estado hemodinámico. Los valores enzimáticos disminuyeron. Los marcadores virales fueron negativos.Ischemic hepatitis is an uncommon cardiovascular surgery complication. Hepatic biopsies show centrolobulillar necrosis. The term "hepatitis" was proposed because of a raise in hepatic enzymes similar with infectious disease, and "ischemic" because of failure in hepatic perfusion. Ischemic hepatitis was then defined as an acute and reversible elevation of hepatic enzymes (within 72 h, associated with disturbance in hepatic perfusion after excluding other causes of acute hepatitis. A 53 year-old male presented complaining of a 12 h epigastric pain, without nausea or vomiting, resistant

  8. Biochemical signaling by remote ischemic conditioning of the arm versus thigh: Is one raise of the cuff enough?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron Dezfulian

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Remote Ischemic Conditioning (RIC, induced by brief cycles of ischemia and reperfusion, protects vital organs from a prolonged ischemic insult. While several biochemical mediators have been implicated in RIC's mechanism of action, it remains unclear whether the localization or “dose” of RIC affects the extent of protective signaling. In this randomized crossover study of healthy individuals, we tested whether the number of cycles of RIC and its localization (arm versus thigh determines biochemical signaling and cytoprotection. Subjects received either arm or thigh RIC and then were crossed over to receive RIC in the other extremity. Blood flow, tissue perfusion, concentrations of the circulating protective mediator nitrite, and platelet mitochondrial function were measured after each RIC cycle. We found that plasma nitrite concentration peaked after the first RIC cycle and remained elevated throughout RIC. This plasma nitrite conferred cytoprotection in an in vitro myocyte model of hypoxia/reoxygenation. Notably, though plasma nitrite returned to baseline at 24 h, RIC conditioned plasma still mediated protection. Additionally, no difference in endpoints between RIC in thigh versus arm was found. These data demonstrate that localization and “dose” of RIC does not affect cytoprotection and further elucidate the mechanisms by which nitrite contributes to RIC-dependent protection.

  9. Effectiveness of home rehabilitation for ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pakaratee Chaiyawat

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to develop and examine the effectiveness of an individual home rehabilitation program for patients with ischemic stroke. This was a randomized controlled trial in 60 patients with recent middle cerebral artery infarction. After hospital discharge for acute stroke care, they were randomly assigned to receive either a home rehabilitation program for three months (intervention group or usual care (control group. We collected outcome data over three months after their discharge from the hospital. The Barthel Index (BI, the Modified Rankin Scale (MRS, the health-related quality-of-life index (EQ-5D, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression score (HADs, and the Thai Mental State Examination (TMSE were used to analyze the outcomes. In the intervention group, all outcomes were significantly better (p<0.05 than in the control group, except in the case of TMSE. A favorable outcome, which was defined as minimal or no disability as measured by BI (score 95-100, was achieved by 93.33% of patients in the intervention group, and 90% had favorable scores (0 or 1 on the MRS. This showed a benefit in reducing disability, with two being the number of patients considered as needed-to-treat (NNT (95% CI, 1.0-1.2. All dimensions of EQ-5D in the intervention group were significantly better for quality of life and generic health status than in the control group (p=0.001. Depression was found in one patient (3.33% in the intervention group and in two patients (6.67% in the control group. Dementia was found in three patients (10% in the intervention group and in four patients (13.33% in the control group. We concluded that an early home rehabilitation program for patients with ischemic stroke in the first three-month period provides significantly better outcomes in improving function, reducing disability, increasing quality of life, and reducing depression than a program of usual care does.

  10. Automatic quantification of ischemic injury on diffusion-weighted MRI of neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keelin Murphy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A fully automatic method for detection and quantification of ischemic lesions in diffusion-weighted MR images of neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE is presented. Ischemic lesions are manually segmented by two independent observers in 1.5 T data from 20 subjects and an automatic algorithm using a random forest classifier is developed and trained on the annotations of observer 1. The algorithm obtains a median sensitivity and specificity of 0.72 and 0.99 respectively. F1-scores are calculated per subject for algorithm performance (median = 0.52 and observer 2 performance (median = 0.56. A paired t-test on the F1-scores shows no statistical difference between the algorithm and observer 2 performances. The method is applied to a larger dataset including 54 additional subjects scanned at both 1.5 T and 3.0 T. The algorithm findings are shown to correspond well with the injury pattern noted by clinicians in both 1.5 T and 3.0 T data and to have a strong relationship with outcome. The results of the automatic method are condensed to a single score for each subject which has significant correlation with an MR score assigned by experienced clinicians (p < 0.0001. This work represents a quantitative method of evaluating diffusion-weighted MR images in neonatal HIE and a first step in the development of an automatic system for more in-depth analysis and prognostication.

  11. Prediction of Recurrent Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack After Noncardiogenic Posterior Circulation Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Changqing; Wang, Yilong; Zhao, Xingquan; Liu, Liping; Wang, ChunXue; Pu, Yuehua; Zou, Xinying; Pan, Yuesong; Wong, Ka Sing; Wang, Yongjun

    2017-07-01

    Posterior circulation ischemic stroke (IS) is generally considered an illness with a poor prognosis. However, there are no effective rating scales to predict recurrent stroke following it. Therefore, our aim was to identify clinical or radiological measures that could assist in predicting recurrent cerebral ischemic episodes. We prospectively enrolled 723 noncardiogenic posterior circulation IS patients with onset of symptoms Stroke risk factors, admission symptoms and signs, topographical distribution and responsible cerebral artery of acute infarcts, and any recurrent IS or transient ischemic attack (TIA) within 1 year were assessed. Cox regression was used to identify risk factors associated with recurrent IS or TIA within the year after posterior circulation IS. A total of 40 patients (5.5%) had recurrent IS or TIA within 1 year of posterior circulation IS. Multivariate Cox regression identified chief complaint with dysphagia (hazard ratio [HR], 4.16; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.69-10.2; P =0.002), repeated TIAs within 3 months before the stroke (HR, 15.4; 95% CI, 5.55-42.5; P <0.0001), responsible artery stenosis ≥70% (HR, 7.91; 95% CI, 1.00-62.6; P =0.05), multisector infarcts (HR, 5.38; 95% CI, 1.25-23.3; P =0.02), and not on antithrombotics treatment at discharge (HR, 3.06; 95% CI, 1.09-8.58; P =0.03) as independent predictors of recurrent IS or TIA. Some posterior circulation IS patients are at higher risk for recurrent IS or TIA. Urgent assessment and preventive treatment should be offered to these patients as soon as possible. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. High Prestroke Physical Activity Is Associated with Reduced Infarct Growth in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients Treated with Intravenous tPA and Randomized to Remote Ischemic Perconditioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blauenfeldt, Rolf Ankerlund; Hougaard, Kristina D; Mouridsen, Kim

    2017-01-01

    A high prestroke physical activity (PA) level is associated with reduced stroke rate, stroke mortality, better functional outcome, and possible neuroprotective abilities. The aim of the present study was to examine the possible neuroprotective effect of prestroke PA on 24-h cerebral infarct growth...... the stroke was associated with decreased 24-h infarct growth and final infarct size. These results are highly encouraging and stress the need for further exploration of the potentially protective effects of both PA and remote ischemic conditioning....... correlated significantly with reduced acute infarct growth (24 h) in the linear regression model (4th quartile prestroke PA level compared with the 1st quartile), β4th quartile = -0.82 (95% CI -1.54 to -0.10). However, the effect of prestroke PA was present mainly in patients randomized to RIPerC, β4th...

  13. Proteção funcional da enzima heme-oxigenase-1 na lesão renal aguda isquêmica e tóxica Protección funcional de la enzima heme-oxigenasa-1 en la lesión renal aguda isquémica y tóxica Functional protection of heme-oxygenase-1 enzyme in ischemic and toxic acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassiane Dezoti

    2009-01-01

    estudio demuestran que la isquemia y la PmxB inducen AKL por la elevación de los peróxidos urinarios. El inductor de HO-1 atenuó la lesión en ambos modelos por atenuación del mecanismo redox.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the functional protection of heme-oxygenase-1 enzyme (HO-1 when using its inducer (Hemin and inhibitor (zinc protoporphyrin-ZnPP in ischemic and toxic acute kidney injury by Polymixin B in mice. MATERIALS: Adult male Wistar mice divided into 8 groups were used: SHAM (control, Ischemic (Isq, Isq+Hemin (Inducer of H0-1, Isq+ZnPP (inhibitor of H0-1, SALINA (control, Polimyxin B (PmxB, PmxB+Hemin, PmxB+ZnPP. METHOD: Analysis consists of Jaffé (creatinine clearance [crCl] and FOX-2 (urinary peroxides [UP]. RESULTS: Thirty minutes renal ischemia and its treatment with PmxB reduced the crCl and maintained urinary output. Urinary peroxide levels increased in both injuries. The administration of the inducer of H0-1 resulted in improvement in renal function and reduction in the levels of urinary peroxide. CONCLUSIONS: Findings indicated that ischemia and PmxB induce LAR (acute kidney injury [AKI] by elevating the levels of urinary peroxide. The HO-1 inducer ameliorated the injury in both animal models through redox mechanism.

  14. Transient receptor potential melastatin subfamily member 2 cation channel regulates detrimental immune cell invasion in ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelderblom, Mathias; Melzer, Nico; Schattling, Benjamin; Göb, Eva; Hicking, Gordon; Arunachalam, Priyadharshini; Bittner, Stefan; Ufer, Friederike; Herrmann, Alexander M; Bernreuther, Christian; Glatzel, Markus; Gerloff, Christian; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Meuth, Sven G; Friese, Manuel A; Magnus, Tim

    2014-11-01

    Brain injury during stroke results in oxidative stress and the release of factors that include extracellular Ca(2+), hydrogen peroxide, adenosine diphosphate ribose, and nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate. These alterations of the extracellular milieu change the activity of transient receptor potential melastatin subfamily member 2 (TRPM2), a nonselective cation channel expressed in the central nervous system and the immune system. Our goal was to evaluate the contribution of TRPM2 to the tissue damage after stroke. In accordance with current quality guidelines, we independently characterized Trpm2 in a murine ischemic stroke model in 2 different laboratories. Gene deficiency of Trpm2 resulted in significantly improved neurological outcome and decreased infarct size. Besides an already known moderate neuroprotective effect of Trpm2 deficiency in vitro, ischemic brain invasion by neutrophils and macrophages was particularly reduced in Trpm2-deficient mice. Bone marrow chimeric mice revealed that Trpm2 deficiency in the peripheral immune system is responsible for the protective phenotype. Furthermore, experiments with mixed bone marrow chimeras demonstrated that Trpm2 is essential for the migration of neutrophils and, to a lesser extent, also of macrophages into ischemic hemispheres. Notably, the pharmacological TRPM2 inhibitor, N-(p-amylcinnamoyl)anthranilic acid, was equally protective in the stroke model. Although a neuroprotective effect of TRPM2 in vitro is well known, we can show for the first time that the detrimental role of TRPM2 in stroke primarily depends on its role in activating peripheral immune cells. Targeting TRPM2 systemically represents a promising therapeutic approach for ischemic stroke. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Genetics of Dyslipidemia and Ischemic Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Kavita; Baliga, Ragavendra R

    2017-05-01

    Genetic dyslipidemias contribute to the prevalence of ischemic heart disease. The field of genetic dyslipidemias and their influence on atherosclerotic heart disease is rapidly developing and accumulating increasing evidence. The purpose of this review is to describe the current state of knowledge in regard to inherited atherogenic dyslipidemias. The disorders of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) and elevated lipoprotein(a) will be detailed. Genetic technology has made rapid advancements, leading to new discoveries in inherited atherogenic dyslipidemias, which will be explored in this review, as well as a description of possible future developments. Increasing attention has come upon the genetic disorders of familial hypercholesterolemia and elevated lipoprotein(a). This review includes new knowledge of these disorders including description of these disorders, their method of diagnosis, their prevalence, their genetic underpinnings, and their effect on the development of cardiovascular disease. In addition, it discusses major advances in genetic technology, including the completion of the human genome sequence, next-generation sequencing, and genome-wide association studies. Also discussed are rare variant studies with specific genetic mechanisms involved in inherited dyslipidemias, such as in the proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) enzyme. The field of genetics of dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease is rapidly growing, which will result in a bright future of novel mechanisms of action and new therapeutics.

  16. Radiology of ischemic strokes in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raybaud, C.A.; Jiddane, M.; Livet, M.O.; Pinsard, N.

    1985-01-01

    Arterial ischemic strokes are a relatively frequent diagnostic occurrence in pediatric neuroradiology. They occur mostly in three main etiologic contexts: 1) congenital heart disease; 2) neonatal distress; 3) infections, focal or general inducing vasculitis, but many cases are considered as idiopathic. The positive diagnosis is made by CT; in neonates, however, ultrasound appears as a promising tool. The CT features are basically similar at that age and in adults, although the site of the infarct may result from pathologies more particular to children (e.g. basal ganglia infarction due to arteritis of the carotid syphon and its branches). Infarcts may be multiple and also more frequently hemorrhagic at that age, the homorrhagic phenomena affecting only the gray matter except in young infants in which the subcortical white matter may be affected also. Anatomical sequels include focal atrophy and asymmetry of the brain. Data regarding the etiology can be gathered from angiography which may show the degree of impairment of the arterial bed, its extent, the collateral blood supply and the morphological type of arterial lesion responsible for the cerebral damage. The most particular picture at that age is that of the often diffuse vasculitis, with its various expressions (segmental narrowing of the lumen, dissecting aneurysm, string-of-beads appearance). (orig.)

  17. Radiology of ischemic strokes in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raybaud, C.A.; Livet, M.O.; Jiddane, M.; Pinsard, N.

    1985-01-01

    Arterial ischemic strokes are a relatively frequent diagnostic occurrence in pediatric neuroradiology. They occur mostly in three main etiologic contexts: 1) congenital heart disease; 2) neonatal distress; 3) infections, focal or general inducing vasculitis, but many cases are considered idiopathic. The positive diagnosis is made by CT; in neonates, however, ultrasound appears as a promising tool. The CT features are basically similar at that age and in adults, although the site of the infarct may result from pathologies more particular to children (e.g. basal ganglia infarction due to arteritis of the carotid siphon and its branches). Infarcts may be multiple and also more frequently hemorrhagic at that age, the hemorrhagic phenomena affecting only the gray matter except in young infants in which the subcortical white matter may be affected also. Anatomical sequels include focal atrophy and asymmetry of the brain. Data regarding the etiology can be gathered from angiography which may show the degree of impairment of the arterial bed, its extent, the collateral blood supply and the morphological types of arterial lesion responsible for the cerebral damage. The most particular picture at that age is that of the often diffuse vasculitis, with its various expressions (segmental narrowing of the lumen, dissecting aneurysm, string-of-beads appearance)

  18. Pediatric ischemic stroke due to dengue vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Subrat Kumar; Jayalakshmi, Sita; Mohandas, Surath

    2014-10-01

    Dengue infection is an important arboviral infection in southeast Asia, especially in India. Neurological manifestations of dengue are increasingly recognized. We report an ischemic stroke due to dengue vasculitis in an 8-year-old child. We present a girl with a short febrile illness followed by episodic severe headache, with gradually progressive hemiparesis and visual impairment. Her brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple infarctions in the anterior and posterior circulation. The magnetic resonance angiogram revealed irregular narrowing of bilateral middle cerebral arteries, right anterior cerebral artery, left posterior cerebral, and bilateral vertebral arteries suggestive of vasculitis. Her dengue serology was strongly positive for immunoglobulin M with 68.9 panbio units. The rest of the evaluation for pediatric stroke was unremarkable. She was treated with intravenous followed by oral corticosteroids and recovered totally with resolution of vasculitis on magnetic resonance angiogram over the next 3 months. This child illustrates possible immune-mediated vasculitis caused by dengue infection which is rather a rare presentation in a child who subsequently recovered well. One should consider dengue in childhood strokes in endemic regions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION IN ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. E. Zakirova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess the role of endothelial vasodilating, vasoconstrictive and adhesive dysfunction in the development of angina pectoris (AP in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD.Material and methods. 83 patients with IHD were included in the study. 30 patients had AP of functional class (FC-II, 27 patients - FC-III and 26 patients - FC-IV. The control group consisted of 25 healthy persons. Bicycle ergometry, daily ECG monitoring and echocardiography were used for verification of IHD. Endothelial vasodilating function was assessed by endothelium-dependent (EDVD and endothelium-independent vasodilatation (EIDVD of brachial artery. Vasoconstrictive function was assessed by the level of endothelin (ET-1. Endothelial adhesive function was evaluated by plasma concentration of intracellular adhesion molecules – JCAM-1, VCAM-1 and Е-selectin.Results. Normal EDVD and EIDVD were observed in patients with AP of FC-II. The more severe FC of AP the more prominent endothelial vasodilating dysfunction was revealed as well as the higher levels of ET-1 and intracellular adhesion molecules. Patients with AP of FC-IV had hyperexpression of JCAM-1, VCAM-1, Е-selectin and ET-1 and low levels of EDVD and EIDVD.Conclusion. Progression of IHD related with growing endothelial vasodilating, vasoconstrictive and adhesive dysfunction.

  20. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelzer, W.

    1975-01-01

    Physical and radiological terms, quantities, and units. Basic principles of radiation protection (ICRP, IAEA, EURATOM, FRG). Biological effects of ionizing radiation. Objectives of practical radiation protection. (HP) [de

  1. Regulation of ischemic cell death by the lipoic acid-palladium complex, Poly MVA, in gerbils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonawich, Francis J; Fiore, Susan M; Welicky, Lauren M

    2004-09-01

    Modulation of ischemic cell death can be accomplished via a multitude of mechanisms, such as quenching radical species, providing alternative energy sources, or altering glutamate excitation. Transient cerebral ischemia will induce apoptotic cell death selectively to hippocampal cornus ammon's field 1 of the hippocampus (CA1) pyramidal cells, while neighboring CA3 and dentate neurons are spared. Poly MVA is a dietary supplement based on the nontoxic chemotherapeutic lipoic acid-palladium complex (LAPd). LAPd is a liquid crystal that works in cancer cells by transferring excess electrons from membrane fatty acids to DNA via the mitochondria. Therefore, by its structural nature and action as a redox shuttle, it can both quench radicals as well as provide energy to the mitochondria. To understand the role of LAPd in regulating ischemic cell death, we studied Poly MVA. Male Mongolian gerbils were subjected to 5 min of bilateral carotid artery occlusion under a controlled temperature environment (37.0-38.0 degrees C). Animals were injected with physiological saline or either 30, 50, or 70 mg/kg of Poly MVA every 24 h beginning immediately after the occlusion until being sacrificed on experimental day 4. Damage was evaluated by analyzing nesting behavior and conducting blinded measures of viable CA1 lengths. All Poly MVA treatment dosages significantly (p transient global ischemia, only the LAPd complex, which quenches radicals and provides energy to stabilize the mitochondria, offers such significant protection. Thus, the administration of Poly MVA may be a potent neuroprotective agent for victims of transient ischemic attack (TIA), cardiac arrest, anesthetic accidents, or drowning.

  2. Splenectomy exacerbates lung injury after ischemic acute kidney injury in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrés-Hernando, Ana; Altmann, Christopher; Ahuja, Nilesh; Lanaspa, Miguel A.; Nemenoff, Raphael; He, Zhibin; Ishimoto, Takuji; Simpson, Pete A.; Weiser-Evans, Mary C.; Bacalja, Jasna

    2011-01-01

    Patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) have increased serum proinflammatory cytokines and an increased occurrence of respiratory complications. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of renal and extrarenal cytokine production on AKI-mediated lung injury in mice. C57Bl/6 mice underwent sham surgery, splenectomy, ischemic AKI, or ischemic AKI with splenectomy and kidney, spleen, and liver cytokine mRNA, serum cytokines, and lung injury were examined. The proinflammatory cytokines IL-6, CXCL1, IL-1β, and TNF-α were increased in the kidney, spleen, and liver within 6 h of ischemic AKI. Since splenic proinflammatory cytokines were increased, we hypothesized that splenectomy would protect against AKI-mediated lung injury. On the contrary, splenectomy with AKI resulted in increased serum IL-6 and worse lung injury as judged by increased lung capillary leak, higher lung myeloperoxidase activity, and higher lung CXCL1 vs. AKI alone. Splenectomy itself was not associated with increased serum IL-6 or lung injury vs. sham. To investigate the mechanism of the increased proinflammatory response, splenic production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was determined and was markedly upregulated. To confirm that splenic IL-10 downregulates the proinflammatory response of AKI, IL-10 was administered to splenectomized mice with AKI, which reduced serum IL-6 and improved lung injury. Our data demonstrate that AKI in the absence of a counter anti-inflammatory response by splenic IL-10 production results in an exuberant proinflammatory response and lung injury. PMID:21677145

  3. Paradoxical centrally increased diffusivity in perinatal arterial ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stence, Nicholas V.; Mirsky, David M.; Deoni, Sean C.L. [University of Colorado Anschutz School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Aurora, CO (United States); Children' s Hospital Colorado, Department of Radiology, Aurora, CO (United States); Armstrong-Wells, Jennifer [University of Colorado Anschutz School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics (Neurology) and OB/GYN, Aurora, CO (United States); University of Colorado Hemophilia and Thrombosis Center, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Restricted diffusion on acute MRI is the diagnostic standard for perinatal arterial ischemic stroke. In a subset of children with perinatal arterial ischemic stroke, primarily those with large infarct volumes, we noted a core of centrally increased diffusivity with a periphery of restricted diffusion. Given the paradoxical diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) appearance observed in some children with perinatal arterial ischemic stroke, we sought to determine its significance and hypothesized that: (1) centrally increased diffusivity is associated with larger infarcts in perinatal arterial ischemic stroke and (2) this tissue is irreversibly injured (infarcted). We reviewed all perinatal arterial ischemic stroke cases in a prospective cohort study from Aug. 1, 2000, to Jan. 1, 2012. Infarct volumes were measured by drawing regions of interest around the periphery of the area of restricted diffusion on DWI. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare means between groups. Of 25 eligible cases, centrally increased diffusivity was seen in 4 (16%). Cases with centrally increased diffusivity had larger average infarct volumes (mean 117,182 mm{sup 3} vs. 36,995 mm{sup 3}; P = 0.008), higher average apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values in the infarct core (1,679 x 10{sup -6} mm{sup 2}/s vs. 611 x 10{sup -6} mm{sup 2}/s, P < 0.0001), and higher ADC ratio (1.2 vs. 0.5, P < 0.0001). At last clinical follow-up, children with perinatal arterial ischemic stroke and centrally increased diffusivity were more often treated for ongoing seizures (75% vs. 0%; P < 0.001) than those without. Centrally increased diffusivity was associated with larger stroke volume and the involved tissue was confirmed to be infarcted on follow-up imaging. Radiologists should be aware of this unusual appearance of perinatal arterial ischemic stroke in order to avoid underestimating infarct volume or making an incorrect early diagnosis. (orig.)

  4. Tranexamic Acid Does Not Influence Cardioprotection by Ischemic Preconditioning and Remote Ischemic Preconditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Caster, Patrick; Eiling, Sandra; Boekholt, Yvonne; Behmenburg, Friederike; Dorsch, Marianne; Heinen, André; Hollmann, Markus W; Huhn, Ragnar

    2018-02-01

    Prior studies have suggested that the antifibrinolytic drug aprotinin increases the infarct size after ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) and attenuates the effect of ischemic preconditioning (IPC). Aprotinin was replaced by tranexamic acid (TXA) in clinical practice. Here, we investigated whether TXA influences I/R injury and/or cardioprotection initiated by IPC and/or remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC). Anesthetized male Wistar rats were randomized to 6 groups. Control animals were not further treated. Administration of TXA was combined with and without IPC and RIPC. Estimated treatment effect was 20%. Compared to control group (56% ± 11%), IPC reduced infarct size by 46% (30% ± 6%; mean difference, 26%; 95% confidence interval, 19-33; P < .0001), and RIPC reduced infarct size by 29% (40% ± 8%; mean difference, 16%; 95% confidence interval, 9-24; P < .011). Additional application of TXA had no effect on I/R injury and cardioprotection by IPC or RIPC. TXA does not abolish infarct size reduction by IPC or RIPC.

  5. C-reactive protein, genetically elevated levels and risk of ischemic heart and cerebrovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zacho, Jeppe; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne

    2009-01-01

    We tested whether genetically elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) cause increased risk of ischemic heart disease and ischemic cerebrovascular disease. Levels of CRP >3mg/L, compared with levels disease and ischemic...... cerebrovascular disease. Genotype combinations of the 4 CRP polymorphisms associated with up to a 64% increase in CRP levels, resulting in a theoretically predicted increased risk of up to 32% for ischemic heart disease and up to 25% for ischemic cerebrovascular disease. However, these genotype combinations did...... not associate with increased risk of ischemic heart and cerebrovascular disease....

  6. Pantoprazole provides myocardial protection similar to ischemic preconditioning: experimental study of isolated hearts of rats Pantoprazol oferece proteção miocárdica semelhante ao pré-condicionamento isquêmico: estudo em corações isolados de ratos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otoni Moreira Gomes

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate pantoprazole effect in the functional recovery of isolated hearts of rats, submitted to ischemia and reperfusion with and without ischemic preconditioning. METHODS: In four groups of eight Wistar breed rats, the hearts were removed after anesthesia and perfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution (95% O2, 5% CO2, 37ºC. GI, GII, GIII and GIV hearts were submitted to ischemia (20 min and reperfusion (30 min. In GII and GIV, preconditioning was performed with 5 min of ischemia and 5 min of reperfusion before 20 min of the ischemia period induction. In GIII and GIV pantoprazole 100 mg was done before a 20 min-period of ischemia induction. Heart Rate (HR, Coronary Flow (CoF, Systolic Pressure (SP, +dP/dt and -dP/dt were registered before (t0 and after reperfusion (t30. Kruskal-Wallis (P0.05 between groups among HR and CoF values. Differences occurred between groups, I and II, III and IV at t30 with SP reduced for 32% mean value in GI, 65% GII, 65% GIII, and 73% GIV; The t30 + dP/dtmax were 34% in GI, 61% GII, 63% GIII and 72% GIV. The t30 -dP/dtmax were GI 28%, GII 63%, GIII 75 % and GIV 75%; (POBJETIVO: Avaliar o efeito do pantoprazol na recuperação funcional de corações isolados de ratos submetidos à isquemia e reperfusão com e sem pré-condicionamento isquêmico. MÉTODOS: Em quatro grupos de oito ratos Wistar, após anestesia os corações foram removidos e perfundidos com Krebs-Henseleit (95% O2, 5% CO2, 37ºC. Os corações de GI, GII, GIII e GIV foram submetidos a 20' de isquemia e 30'de reperfusão. Em GII e GIV realizou-se pré condicionamento com 5' de isquemia e 5' de reperfusão antes dos 20' de isquemia. Em GIII e GIV, pantoprazol 100mcg foram injetados imediatamente antes dos 20' de isquemia. Frequência cardíaca (FC, Fluxo Coronariano (FCo, Pressão Sistólica (PS, + dP/dt e -dP/dt foram registrados em (T0 e (t30. Estatística: Kruskal-Wallis (P 0,05 entre grupos nos valores de FC e de CFo. Diferenças (P <0

  7. Gender and post-ischemic recovery of hypertrophied rat hearts

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    Popov Kirill M

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gender influences the cardiac response to prolonged increases in workload, with differences at structural, functional, and molecular levels. However, it is unknown if post-ischemic function or metabolism of female hypertrophied hearts differ from male hypertrophied hearts. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that gender influences post-ischemic function of pressure-overload hypertrophied hearts and determined if the effect of gender on post-ischemic outcome could be explained by differences in metabolism, especially the catabolic fate of glucose. Methods Function and metabolism of isolated working hearts from sham-operated and aortic-constricted male and female Sprague-Dawley rats before and after 20 min of no-flow ischemia (N = 17 to 27 per group were compared. Parallel series of hearts were perfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution containing 5.5 mM [5-3H/U-14C]-glucose, 1.2 mM [1-14C]-palmitate, 0.5 mM [U-14C]-lactate, and 100 mU/L insulin to measure glycolysis and glucose oxidation in one series and oxidation of palmitate and lactate in the second. Statistical analysis was performed using two-way analysis of variance. The sequential rejective Bonferroni procedure was used to correct for multiple comparisons and tests. Results Female gender negatively influenced post-ischemic function of non-hypertrophied hearts, but did not significantly influence function of hypertrophied hearts after ischemia such that mass-corrected hypertrophied heart function did not differ between genders. Before ischemia, glycolysis was accelerated in hypertrophied hearts, but to a greater extent in males, and did not differ between male and female non-hypertrophied hearts. Glycolysis fell in all groups after ischemia, except in non-hypertrophied female hearts, with the reduction in glycolysis after ischemia being greatest in males. Post-ischemic glycolytic rates were, therefore, similarly accelerated in hypertrophied male and female hearts and higher in

  8. Neuroradiological study of transient ischemic attack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takusagawa, Yoshihiko; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Ichiki, Ken; Suga, Takeshi; Nishigaki, Shinichi

    1986-01-01

    Fifty-two patients with carotid TIAs and thirteen patients with vertebrobasilar TIAs were investigated by angiography and computed tomography. TIA was diagnosed by clinical symptoms in accordance with the criteria for TIA of the Joint Committee for Stroke Facilities in the U.S.A. (1974). The 65 patients with TIAs included 49 males and 16 females with average age of 63.5 years old at the initial episode of TIA. As for the diseases associated with TIA, hypertension (51 %), diabetes mellitus (15 %) and ischemic heart diseases (11 %) were the major disorders. Atrial fibrillation was observed in 2 cases. Intervals from last TIA attack to angiography were less than 7 days in 22 cases, 8 ∼ 30 days in 19 cases, 1 ∼ 4 monthes in 14 cases and more than 4 monthes in 10 cases, respectively. The cases in which angiography was done earlier after attacks displayed more abnormal findings. In 52 patients with caroted TIAs the artherosclerotic change of extracranial portion of the internal carotid artery was found in 14 cases (27 %), that of intracranial portion of the artery in 11 cases (21 %) and both lesions in 2 cases (4 %). On the other hand, in 13 patients with vertebrobasilar TIAs, this change was observed in 4 cases at the extracranival potion and in 1 case at the intracranial potion (siphon) of the internal carotid artery. Abnormal CT findings were found in 29 of 65 patients, namely 9 had ventricular dilatation and brain atrophy, 6 had cerebral infarction which was not associated with associated with symptoms of TIA. In carotid TIAs, Cerebral infarction was associated with symptoms of TIAs in 15 cases, namely 10 had a small low density area in the basal ganglia near the internal capsule and 5 had a low density area in the cortical or subcortical region. All of these 5 cases had cerebral embolism, which recanalized after attacks. (J.P.N.)

  9. Rescuing the ischemic penumbra: Our experience

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    Milosavljević Tamara

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Over one million strokes per year are occurring in Europe. Brain stroke is one of the most important death and disability causes in Europe and USA. The main role of perfusion is to determine the border of insult core and ischemic penumbra. Penumbra can be saved with thrombolytic therapy but core have irreversible injuries and represent death of brain cells. Aim: to determine the role of CT brain perfusion in cases of acute brain stroke and following thrombolytic therapy. Methods: We examined 64 patients with acute brain stroke who received thrombolytic therapy after that. All patients were examining on 16 MDCT with 50 ml of iodine contrast agent following the standard procedure for CT perfusion. Patients were 34 male and 30 female with middle age of 64 years. MRI was made after thrombolytic therapy and compare with perfusion results before therapy. Results: Using an artery and a vein as reference three parameters were measured - blood flow (CBF, blood volume (CBV and mean transit time (MTT, for each patient. Hemorrhagic was find in 9 (14.01% patients after thrombolytic therapy. 4 (6.25% other patients develop new stroke of same but mostly other side of brain. 8 (12.50% more patients finished lethally. From other 42 patients with thrombolytic therapy we can positively say that in 31 (48.44% patients penumbra was rescued. For other 11 (17.19% stroke was same size like firstly involved core and penumbra but not bigger. Conclusion: CT perfusion plays major role by showing a curable parts of tissue in brain strokes.

  10. Global DNA methylation of ischemic stroke subtypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Soriano-Tárraga

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke (IS, a heterogeneous multifactorial disorder, is among the leading causes of mortality and long-term disability in the western world. Epidemiological data provides evidence for a genetic component to the disease, but its epigenetic involvement is still largely unknown. Epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation, change over time and may be associated with aging processes and with modulation of the risk of various pathologies, such as cardiovascular disease and stroke. We analyzed 2 independent cohorts of IS patients. Global DNA methylation was measured by luminometric methylation assay (LUMA of DNA blood samples. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to assess the methylation differences between the 3 most common IS subtypes, large-artery atherosclerosis (LAA, small-artery disease (SAD, and cardio-aortic embolism (CE. A total of 485 IS patients from 2 independent hospital cohorts (n = 281 and n = 204 were included, distributed across 3 IS subtypes: LAA (78/281, 59/204, SAD (97/281, 53/204, and CE (106/281, 89/204. In univariate analyses, no statistical differences in LUMA levels were observed between the 3 etiologies in either cohort. Multivariate analysis, adjusted by age, sex, hyperlipidemia, and smoking habit, confirmed the lack of differences in methylation levels between the analyzed IS subtypes in both cohorts. Despite differences in pathogenesis, our results showed no global methylation differences between LAA, SAD, and CE subtypes of IS. Further work is required to establish whether the epigenetic mechanism of methylation might play a role in this complex disease.

  11. Knowledge of ischemic stroke among a Mexico City population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Góngora-Rivera, Fernando; Gutiérrez-Jiménez, Eugenio; Zenteno, Marco Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge of risk factors (RF) and warning signs of stroke by the general population is fundamental to implement efficient preventive measures and provide timely treatment. The objective of this study was to assess this knowledge in a sample population of Mexico City. Personal interview was conducted in a multifamily building complex in Mexico City. The questionnaire included sociodemographic and comorbidity factors. Knowledge was determinated according to the number of correct answers. Chi-square and Wilcoxon rank tests were performed and significant variables were included in a multivariate logistic regression model using level of knowledge as the dependent variable. A total of 330 subjects were interviewed. Of the respondents, 66.7% named one RF associated with ischemic stroke, whereas only 12.1% identified 3 or more; one warning sign was identified by 36.7% and only 2.1% identified 3 or more. The factors associated with knowledge of RF were history of hypertension, educational level, and family history of ischemic stroke. Educational level and a family history of stroke were also associated with knowledge of warning signs. A Family history of ischemic stroke was the most important way to receive information about RF and warning signs of ischemic stroke. The study shows the need for informing the public about prevention and early detection of ischemic stroke.

  12. Transthoracic echocardiography in Thai patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piriyapong, Tapawas; Dharmasaroja, Pompatr A; Muengtaweepongsa, Sombat; Piyayotai, Dilok; Hutayanon, Pisit

    2012-01-01

    Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is routinely performed to look for the cardiac sources of emboli in many Western stroke centers. Due to a limitation of resources in Thailand, echocardiography is done in only some patients with acute ischemic stroke. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the need for cardiac investigations, especially TTE, in Thai patients with acute ischemic stroke. Two-hundred and seven patients with acute ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA), who had TTE results during August 2006 to November 2008, were studied. Patients were divided into 2 groups by the risk of cardioembolism: low- versus high-risk groups. All echocardiography results were reviewed and classified by the need for management change following the echocardiography. Abnormal TTE results indicating a need for change in management were found in 4% (4/102) and 18% (18/105) in low- and high- risk patients, respectively The results of ECG alone led to change in management in 17% (36 patients). Atrial fibrillation was the most common cause of cardioembolism, which was found in 35 patients (17%). Because of limited resources in Thailand, ECG should be routinely performed on all ischemic stroke patients and TTE in patients with high risk for cardioembolism. However larger studies are still needed to clarify the benefits of echocardiography in low-risk patients.

  13. Mortality study for a decade: ischemic stroke in the elderly.

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    Javier J. García Zacarías

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrovascular diseases are among the top three causes of death in Cuba and the world, about 80 % of these patients belong to Ischemic Stroke. The objective of this paper is to describe the clinical and developmental profile of patients who died of Ischemic Stroke. A descriptive, prospective research, cross- sectional study was made, the sample included all deaths from ischemic stroke at the University Hospital "Camilo Cienfuegos" Sancti Spiritus, between January 1st, 2001 and December 31, 2010, and persons over 60 years of age with necropsy performed. Atherothrombotic stroke was the most frequent category, the highest mortality rates were observed in persons over 80 years of age and in females, hypertension, ischemic heart disease and transient ischemic attack were the main significant medical history; most patients were admitted in the stroke unit and died in Middle Progressive Care, cerebral edema and intracranial hypertension and hypostatic bronchopne umonia were complications and specific main causes of most frequent death. Value of cerebral edema and hypostatic bronchopneumonia as clinical complications and causes of death in patients investigated is confirmed.

  14. Hypothermia therapy for newborns with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Rita C; Procianoy, Renato S

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia reduces cerebral injury and improves the neurological outcome secondary to hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in newborns. It has been indicated for asphyxiated full-term or near-term newborn infants with clinical signs of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). A search was performed for articles on therapeutic hypothermia in newborns with perinatal asphyxia in PubMed; the authors chose those considered most significant. There are two therapeutic hypothermia methods: selective head cooling and total body cooling. The target body temperature is 34.5 °C for selective head cooling and 33.5 °C for total body cooling. Temperatures lower than 32 °C are less neuroprotective, and temperatures below 30 °C are very dangerous, with severe complications. Therapeutic hypothermia must start within the first 6h after birth, as studies have shown that this represents the therapeutic window for the hypoxic-ischemic event. Therapy must be maintained for 72 h, with very strict control of the newborn's body temperature. It has been shown that therapeutic hypothermia is effective in reducing neurologic impairment, especially in full-term or near-term newborns with moderate hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Therapeutic hypothermia is a neuroprotective technique indicated for newborn infants with perinatal asphyxia and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Relationship between hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage and ischemic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Shinya; Tsuchiya, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Takenori

    1991-01-01

    Patchy parenchymal lesions of increased intensity were frequently identified in patients with cerebral hemorrhage in T2-weighted image of high-fields MR imaging. We studied 64 patients with brain hemorrhage to determine the frequency and distribution of those lesions. We defined an area with high intensity in T2 weighted and low or iso-intensity area in T1 weighted images smaller than 1.5 cm in diameter to be 'ischemic lesion'. Ishemic lesions were found in 48 (75%) of all cases; in 25 (75%) of 32 patients with putaminal hemorrhage, in 15 (100%) of 15 with thalamic hemorrhage, in 3 (33%) of 9 with subcortical hemorrhage. Multiple ischemic lesions were more frequently seen in thalamic hemorrhage than in putaminal hemorrhage. Only 5 (10%) of 48 cases with associated ischemic lesions had a previous history related to those lesions. Multivariable regression analysis identified hypertension as the major predictor of the presence of ischemic lesions. Patients with brain hemorrhage frequently accompanied with incidental ischemic lesions, making it difficult to establish a guideline of blood pressure control for prevention of recurrent stroke. (author)

  16. VERBAL CHOICE IN ISCHEMIC STROKE PATIENTS WITH ANOMIC APHASIA.

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    Мaya P. Danovska

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and purposes: Anomic aphasia is common in patients with left hemispheric strokes. The purpose of this study was to explore the verbal production of ischemic stroke patients with anomic aphasia. Contingent and methods: Fifty ischemic stroke patients admitted to the Neurology Clinic of University Hospital Pleven were studied by neuropsychological battery and CT scan of the brain. Verbal productivity changes found were analyzed in relation to the speech recovery education. Results: All the patients showed lower scores at all nominative and reproductive speech subtests. Discussion: Among the ischemic stroke patients with mild anomic aphasia comparatively great was the percentage of low frequency word actualization and verbal fluency impairment. The usage of nominatives in speech expression of ischemic stroke patients is less as compared with that one of predicatives. Actualization of particles, unions, prepositions and interjections was comparatively high thus compensating the difficulty in choice of a definite lexical number. Conclusion: Future studies on testing of verbal choice in ischemic stroke patients should confirm its practical significance for the assessment of speech disorders concerning a special speech- recovery education.

  17. Pharmaceutical Sponsorship Bias Influences Thrombolytic Literature in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan P Radecki

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The efficacy of thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke remains controversial in Emergency Medicine and has not been fully endorsed by either the American College of Emergency Physicians or the American Academy of emergency medicine. A growing recognition exists of the influence of pharmaceutical sponsorship on the reported findings of published clinical trials. Sponsorship bias has been suggested as a potential criticism of the literature and guidelines favoring thrombolytic therapy. Objective: The objective of this study is to review the most influential literature regarding thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke and document the presence or absence of pharmaceutical sponsorship. Methods: A publication-citation analysis was performed to identify the most frequently cited articles pertaining to thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke. Identified articles were reviewed for disclosures of pharmaceutical funding. Results: Of the 20 most-cited articles pertaining to thrombolytic therapy for acute stroke, 17 (85% disclosed pharmaceutical sponsorship. These disclosures range from general sponsorship to direct employment of authors by pharmaceutical companies. Conclusion: An overwhelming predominance of the most influential literature regarding thrombolytic therapy for acute ischemic stroke is susceptible to sponsorship bias. This potential bias may provide a basis for physician concern regarding the efficacy and safety of thrombolytic therapy. Further, large, independent, placebo-controlled studies may be required to guide therapy and professional guidelines definitively for acute ischemic stroke. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(4:435–441.

  18. Lung Function Abnormalities in Smokers with Ischemic Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franssen, Frits M E; Soriano, Joan B; Roche, Nicolas; Bloomfield, Paul H; Brusselle, Guy; Fabbri, Leonardo M; García-Rio, Francisco; Kearney, Mark T; Kwon, Namhee; Lundbäck, Bo; Rabe, Klaus F; Raillard, Alice; Muellerova, Hana; Cockcroft, John R

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the ALICE (Airflow Limitation in Cardiac Diseases in Europe) study was to investigate the prevalence of airflow limitation in patients with ischemic heart disease and the effects on quality of life, healthcare use, and future health risk. To examine prebronchodilator and post-bronchodilator spirometry in outpatients aged greater than or equal to 40 years with clinically documented ischemic heart disease who were current or former smokers. This multicenter, cross-sectional study was conducted in 15 cardiovascular outpatient clinics in nine European countries. Airflow limitation was defined as post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC less than 0.70. Among the 3,103 patients with ischemic heart disease who were recruited, lung function was defined for 2,730 patients. Airflow limitation was observed in 30.5% of patients with ischemic heart disease: 11.3% had mild airflow limitation, 15.8% moderate airflow limitation, 3.3% severe airflow limitation, and 0.1% very severe airflow limitation. Most patients with airflow limitation (70.6%) had no previous spirometry testing or diagnosed pulmonary disease. Airflow limitation was associated with greater respiratory symptomatology, impaired health status, and more frequent emergency room visits (P < 0.05). Airflow limitation compatible with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease affects almost one-third of patients with ischemic heart disease. Although airflow limitation is associated with additional morbidity and societal burden, it is largely undiagnosed and untreated. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 01485159).

  19. Ischemic brain extract increases SDF-1 expression in astrocytes through the CXCR2/miR-223/miR-27b pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jin Hee; Park, Young Mi; Kim, Dong Hee; Moon, Gyeong Joon; Bang, Oh Young; Ohn, Takbum; Kim, Hyeon Ho

    2014-09-01

    Ischemic cerebral stroke is one of the leading global causes of mortality and morbidity. Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) refers to a sublethal ischemia and resulting in tolerance to subsequent severe ischemic injury. Although several pathways are reportedly involved in IPC-mediated neuroprotection, the functional role of astrocytes is not fully understood. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1), a CXC chemokine produced mainly in astrocytes, is a ligand for chemokine receptor CXCR4. SDF-1 is reported to play a critical role in neuroprotection after stroke by mediating the migration of neuronal progenitor cells. We hypothesized that stimuli derived from ischemic brain were involved in the protective effects of IPC. To investigate this hypothesis, the mechanism in which ischemic brain extract (IBE) induced SDF-1 expression was investigated in C6 astrocytoma cells. IBE treatment of C6 cells increased SDF-1 expression compared to that in untreated or normal brain extract (NBE)-treated cells by downregulating SDF-1 targeting miRNA, miR-27b. MiR-223 was inversely upregulated in IBE-treated cells; overexpression of miR-223 decreased the expression of miR-27b by suppressing IKKα expression. Analysis of cytokine array data revealed an IBE associated enhanced expression of CINC-1 (CXCL1) and LIX1 (CXCL5). Knockdown or inhibition of their receptor, CXCR2, abolished IBE-mediated increased expression of SDF-1. These results were confirmed in primary cultured astrocytes. Taken together, the data demonstrate that IBE-elicited signals increase SDF-1 expression through the CXCR2/miR-223/miR-27b pathway in C6 astrocytoma cells and primary astrocytes, supporting the view that increased expression of SDF-1 by ischemic insults is a possible mechanism underlying therapeutic application of IPC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Social network diversity and risks of ischemic heart disease and total mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barefoot, John C; Grønbaek, Morten; Jensen, Gorm

    2005-01-01

    Measures of various types of social contacts were used as predictors of ischemic heart disease events and total mortality in an age-stratified random sample of 9,573 adults enrolled in the Copenhagen City Heart Study (Copenhagen, Denmark). Baseline examinations were conducted in 1991-1994, and pa......Measures of various types of social contacts were used as predictors of ischemic heart disease events and total mortality in an age-stratified random sample of 9,573 adults enrolled in the Copenhagen City Heart Study (Copenhagen, Denmark). Baseline examinations were conducted in 1991...... colleagues and children differed by gender. Most types of contacts that occurred at least monthly were just as protective as those occurring more frequently. An index of intimate social contact diversity with family and friends had graded relations with both outcomes. Comparisons of persons reporting three.......82 (95% CI: 0.67, 1.00). These data suggest that health benefits are derived from the diversity of social roles, especially those involving intimate relationships....

  1. Is there any cardioprotective role of Taurine during cold ischemic period following global myocardial ischemia?

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    Gamsizkan Mehmet

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the present study was to investigate the cardioprotective effect of Taurine on the donor hearts during cold ischemic period. Methods 32 rats were divided into four groups (sham, taurine, ischemia, treatment group, 8 rats in each. All rats were fed with rat food for three weeks. Taurine and treatment groups were given a 200 mg/kg/day dose of Taurine by oral gavage besides rat feed. Cardiectomy was performed in all rats after three weeks. In ischemia and treatment groups, harvested hearts were kept in 0.9% sodium chloride at +4 degrees C for 5 hours. Tissue samples were taken from left ventricle in all groups. These samples were evaluated by histopathologic and biochemical examination. Results In the present study results of the biochemical and histopathological examination reveals the protective effects of Taurine. As a marker of lipid peroxidation, Malondialdehyde (MDA levels in ischemia group were significantly higher than both Sham and Taurine groups. MDA values were recorded; 3.62 ± 0.197 in the sham group, 2.07 ± 0.751 in the Taurine group, 9.71 ± 1.439 in the ischemia group and 7.68 ± 1.365 in the treatment group. MDA levels decreased in treatment group. (p Conclusion Taurine decreased myocardial damage during cold ischemic period following global myocardial ischemia.

  2. A wearable stimulation bandage for electrotherapy studies in a rat ischemic wound model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Daniel S; Dunning, Jeremy L; Henzel, Mary K; Graebert, Jennifer K; Bogie, Kath M

    2011-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of electro-therapy in the treatment of chronic wounds is currently debated, and a in-vivo evaluation of stimulation parameters will provide the statistical evidence needed to direct clinical guidelines. A low-cost, wearable electrical stimulation bandage has been developed for use with an established rat ischemic wound model. The bandage consists of a user-programmable stimulator PCB and a plastic bandage with two hydrogel electrodes. The battery-powered bandage may be used for up to seven days between dressing changes, and the stimulator may be reused. The microcontroller-based stimulator uses a boost converter circuit to generate pulses up to 90 V from a 3 V coin cell battery. Consistent operation of the boost converter over the wide input and output voltage ranges is achieved using voltage feedforward and soft-start techniques implemented in firmware. The bandages are laser-cut to shape, and electrical traces are applied using stencils and conductive nickel paint. Both the PCB and electrical traces are encapsulated to protect the animal. The device has been successfully demonstrated using the rat ischemic wound model for a period of seven days, and clinical experiments are ongoing.

  3. Ischemic preconditioning reduces the severity of ischemia-reperfusion injury of peripheral nerve in rats

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    Kurutas Ergul

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and aim Allow for protection of briefly ischemic tissues against the harmful effects of subsequent prolonged ischemia is a phenomennon called as Ischemic Preconditioning (IP. IP has not been studied in ischemia-reperfusion (I/R model of peripheral nerve before. We aimed to study the effects of acute IP on I/R injury of peripheral nerve in rats. Method 70 adult male rats were randomly divided into 5 groups in part 1 experimentation and 3 groups in part 2 experimentation. A rat model of severe nerve ischemia which was produced by tying iliac arteries and all idenfiable anastomotic vessels with a silk suture (6-0 was used to study the effects of I/R and IP on nerve biochemistry. The suture technique used was a slip-knot technique for rapid release at time of reperfusion in the study. Cytoplasmic vacuolar degeneration was also histopathologically evaluated by light microscopic examination in sciatic nerves of rats at 7th day in part 2 study. Results 3 hours of Reperfusion resulted in an increase in nerve malondialdehyde levels when compared with ischemia and non-ischemia groups (p 0.05. There was also a significant decrease in vacoular degeneration of sciatic nerves in IP group than I/R group (p Conclusion IP reduces the severity of I/R injury in peripheral nerve as shown by reduced tissue MDA levels at 3 th hour of reperfusion and axonal vacoulization at 7 th postischemic day.

  4. Remote Ischemic Conditioning: A Novel Non-Invasive Approach to Prevent Post-Stroke Depression

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    Wenbo Zhao

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Post-stroke depression (PSD is a common neuropsychiatric complication of stroke. However, due to the high expense and side effects of pharmacotherapy and the difficult-to-achieve of psychotherapy, the prevention and treatment of PSD are still far from satisfaction. Inflammation hypothesis is now playing an essential role in the pathophysiological mechanism of PSD, and it may be a new preventive and therapeutic target. Remote ischemic conditioning (RIC is a non-invasive and easy-to-use physical strategy, which has been used to protect brain (including ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, heart and many other organs in clinical trials. The underlying mechanisms of RIC include anti-inflammation, anti-oxidative stress, immune system regulation and other potential pathways. Our hypothesis is that RIC is a novel approach to prevent PSD. The important implications of this hypothesis are that: (1 RIC could be widely used in clinical practice to prevent PSD if our hypothesis were verified; and (2 RIC would be thoroughly explored to test its effects on other neurobehavioral disorders (e.g., cognitive impairment.

  5. Cardioprotective Effects of Pomegranate (Punica granatum) Juice in Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razani, Zahra; Dastani, Mostafa; Kazerani, Hamid Reza

    2017-11-01

    Ischemic heart disease is the leading cause of mortality worldwide. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cardioprotective effects of pomegranate juice in patients with ischemic heart disease. One hundred patients, diagnosed with unstable angina or myocardial infarction, were randomly assigned to the test and the control groups (n = 50, each). During 5 days of hospitalization, in addition to the conventional medical therapies, the test groups received 220 mL pomegranate juice, daily. During the hospitalization period, the blood pressure, heart rate, as well as the intensity, occurrence, and duration of the angina were evaluated on a regular basis. At the end of the hospitalization period, the serum levels of malondialdehyde, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha were measured in all patients. The levels of serum troponin and high-sensitive C-reactive protein levels were also assayed in patients diagnosed with myocardial infarction. Pomegranate juice caused significant reductions in the intensity, occurrence, and duration of angina pectoris in patients with unstable angina. Consistently, the test patients had significantly lower levels of serum troponin and malondialdehyde. Other studied parameters did not change significantly. The results of this study suggest protective effects of pomegranate juice against myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Physical protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    Physical protection is defined and its function in relation to other functions of a State System of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Materials is described. The need for a uniform minimum international standard for physical protection as well as the need for international cooperation in physical protection is emphasized. The IAEA's INFCIRC/225/Rev. 1 (Annex 1) is reviewed. The Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material (Annex 2) is discussed. Photographs show examples of typical physical protection technology (Annex 3)

  7. Combination of five clinical data as prognostic factors of mortality after ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizaldy Taslim Pinzon

    2017-04-01

    Age, high random blood glucose level, complications, metabolic encephalopathy risk and the use of ventilators are associated with mortality after ischemic stroke. The predictive mortality score can be used to assess the prognosis of patients with ischemic stroke.

  8. The Effects of Methylene Blue on Autophagy and Apoptosis in MRI-Defined Normal Tissue, Ischemic Penumbra and Ischemic Core.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Jiang

    Full Text Available Methylene blue (MB USP, which has energy-enhancing and antioxidant properties, is currently used to treat methemoglobinemia and cyanide poisoning in humans. We recently showed that MB administration reduces infarct volume and behavioral deficits in rat models of ischemic stroke and traumatic brain injury. This study reports the underlying molecular mechanisms of MB neuroprotection following transient ischemic stroke in rats. Rats were subjected to transient (60-mins ischemic stroke. Multimodal MRI during the acute phase and at 24 hrs were used to define three regions of interest (ROIs: i the perfusion-diffusion mismatch salvaged by reperfusion, ii the perfusion-diffusion mismatch not salvaged by reperfusion, and iii the ischemic core. The tissues from these ROIs were extracted for western blot analyses of autophagic and apoptotic markers. The major findings were: 1 MB treatment reduced infarct volume and behavioral deficits, 2 MB improved cerebral blood flow to the perfusion-diffusion mismatch tissue after reperfusion and minimized harmful hyperperfusion 24 hrs after stroke, 3 MB inhibited apoptosis and enhanced autophagy in the perfusion-diffusion mismatch, 4 MB inhibited apoptotic signaling cascades (p53-Bax-Bcl2-Caspase3, and 5 MB enhanced autophagic signaling cascades (p53-AMPK-TSC2-mTOR. MB induced neuroprotection, at least in part, by enhancing autophagy and reducing apoptosis in the perfusion-diffusion mismatch tissue following ischemic stroke.

  9. Acute ischemic stroke secondary to glioblastoma. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina, Sofia; Carneiro, Ângelo; Rodrigues, Tiago; Samões, Raquel; Taipa, Ricardo; Melo-Pires, Manuel; Pereira, Cláudia

    2014-02-01

    Glioblastoma is a malignant infiltrative glial tumor occurring most often over 50 years of age, with diverse clinical presentations. We describe a case of temporal lobe glioblastoma with a rare presentation as an acute ischemic stroke, discussing the imaging and histopathological findings, and reviewing the literature. A 77-year-old woman had sudden onset of left hemiparesis and hemihypoesthesia. The neuroradiological studies revealed an acute ischemic lesion in the right lenticulostriate arteries territory and a right anterior temporal lobe tumor, enhancing heterogeneously after contrast with enhancement of the right middle cerebral artery wall. Histopathological analysis of the resected temporal lesion revealed a glioblastoma multiforme with tumoral infiltration of the vascular wall. Glioblastoma should be considered in the etiology of acute ischemic stroke, where neuroimaging plays an important diagnostic role, enabling a more immediate therapeutic approach, with a consequent impact on survival.

  10. Inadvertent Central Arterial Catheterization: An Unusual Cause of Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katyal, Nakul; Korzep, Amanda; Newey, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    Central venous catheter (CVC) insertion is extensively utilized in Intensive Care Units for evaluation of hemodynamic status, administration of intravenous drugs, and for providing nutritional support in critically ill patients. Unfortunately, CVC use is associated with complications including lung injury, bleeding, infection, and thrombosis. We present a patient with an acute ischemic stroke from an inadvertently placed CVC into the right common carotid artery. A 57-year-old male presented to our institution for left hemiplegia and seizures 2 days after a CVC was placed. He was found to have a right frontal ischemic stroke on computed tomography (CT). CT angiography noted that the catheter was arterial and had a thrombosis around it. He was started on a low-dose heparin infusion. A combination of cardiothoracic surgery and interventional cardiology was required to safely remove the catheter. Central arterial catheterization is an unusual cause for acute ischemic stroke and presents management challenges. PMID:29456363

  11. Air Pollution and Ischemic Stroke Among Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yitshak Sade, Maayan; Novack, Victor; Ifergane, Gal; Horev, Anat; Kloog, Itai

    2015-12-01

    Studies have demonstrated consistent associations between cardiovascular illness and particulate matter (PM) stroke received less attention. We hypothesized that air pollution, an inflammation progenitor, can be associated with stroke incidence in young patients in whom the usual risk factors for stroke are less prevalent. We aimed to evaluate the association between stroke incidence and exposure to PM stroke between 2005 and 2012. Exposure assessment was based on a hybrid model incorporating daily satellite remote sensing data at 1-km spatial resolution. We performed case-crossover analysis, stratified by personal characteristics and distance from main roads. We identified 4837 stroke cases (89.4% ischemic stroke). Interquartile range of PM ischemic stroke and increases of interquartile range average concentrations of particulate matter ischemic stroke associated with PM among young adults. This finding can be explained by the inflammatory mechanism, linking air pollution and stroke. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Intermittent fasting attenuates inflammasome activity in ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fann, David Yang-Wei; Santro, Tomislav; Manzanero, Silvia; Widiapradja, Alexander; Cheng, Yi-Lin; Lee, Seung-Yoon; Chunduri, Prasad; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Stranahan, Alexis M; Mattson, Mark P; Arumugam, Thiruma V

    2014-07-01

    Recent findings have revealed a novel inflammatory mechanism that contributes to tissue injury in cerebral ischemia mediated by multi-protein complexes termed inflammasomes. Intermittent fasting (IF) can decrease the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the periphery and brain. Here we investigated the impact of IF (16h of food deprivation daily) for 4months on NLRP1 and NLRP3 inflammasome activities following cerebral ischemia. Ischemic stroke was induced in C57BL/6J mice by middle cerebral artery occlusion, followed by reperfusion (I/R). IF decreased the activation of NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways, the expression of NLRP1 and NLRP3 inflammasome proteins, and both IL-1β and IL-18 in the ischemic brain tissue. These findings demonstrate that IF can attenuate the inflammatory response and tissue damage following ischemic stroke by a mechanism involving suppression of NLRP1 and NLRP3 inflammasome activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Intracranial atherosclerosis: Causes of ischemic stroke, diagnosis, and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A Sorokoumov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews the literature on the identification of the causes of ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attacks in intracranial atherosclerosis. Symptomatic intracranial atherosclerosis is the cause of an ischemic focus in not only the cortical and subcortical structures due to hypoperfusion or arterio-arterial embolism, but also in the deep structures of the cerebral hemispheres and brainstem. Major artery dolichoectasia may make an accurate diagnosis and treatment choice difficult.Progress in the treatment of patients with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerosis depends on the availability of current brain and vessel imaging techniques and cranial artery angioplasty and stenting methods. The efficiency of aggressive medical prevention, primarily blood pressure reduction and different combinations of antiplatelet drugs, is being intensively investigated.

  14. Acute anti-inflammatory approaches to ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Zoppo, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    In preparation for designing and undertaking trials of strategies that can modulate “innate inflammation” to improve outcomes of ischemic injury, consideration of approaches that have managed cellular inflammation in ischemic stroke are instructive. Robust experimental work has demonstrated the efficacy (and apparent safety) of targeting PMN leukocyte–endothelial cell interactions in the early moments following focal ischemia onset in model systems. Four clinical trial programs were undertaken to assess the safety and efficacy of inhibitors to PMN leukocyte interactions with the endothelial cell during ischemic stroke. Experiences in those clinical trial programs indicate specific limitations that halted progress in this line of investigation before an adequate hypothesis test could be achieved. Although innate inflammation is a central part of injury evolution following focal ischemia, great care in the translation from experimental studies to Phase I/II clinical safety assessments and to the design and conduct of Phase III trials is needed. PMID:20955437

  15. An ischemic diabetic eye treated with intravenous prostaglandin E1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steigerwalt, Robert D; Belcaro, Gianni; Nebbioso, Marcella; Pascarella, Antonella; De Angelis, Mauro; Cesarone, M Rosaria

    2014-01-01

    To present the use of intravenous prostaglandin E1 (PGE1), a powerful vasodilator of the microcirculation, in the treatment of an ischemic diabetic eye. A 27-year-old diabetic man with ischemic diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma had a decreased visual acuity of no light perception in his right eye and hand motions in his left eye. He was started on intravenous PGE1 and has been treated for over 4.5 years. The visual acuity in his right eye remained unchanged and in his left eye improved gradually to 1.5/30. He has been stable for 4.5 years. Intravenous PGE1 may be useful in ischemic diabetic eyes to improve the ocular blood flow and visual acuity. It is safe and tolerated well.

  16. Ischemic colitis or melanosis coli: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadeem Mohammed

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Melanosis Coli is described as black or brown discolouration of the mucosa of the colon. Its a benign condition, which arises from anthraquinone laxative abuse and has no symptoms of its own. The main importance of diagnosing Melanosis Coli correctly lies in the fact that if its extensive, there may be difficulty in differentiating it from ischemic colitis. Case presentation We present a case of extensive Melanosis Coli involving the whole of large bowel that appeared gangrenous. A sub total colectomy was performed on presumed diagnosis of ischemic bowel. Conclusion This report reminds the clinicians that extensive Melanosis Coli may mimic ischemic colitis and thus must be considered as a differential diagnosis.

  17. Mechanism of troponin elevations in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper K.; Atar, Dan; Mickley, Hans

    2007-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular diseases frequently co-exist in the same patient, and similar risk factors are shared. For 60 years, experimental, observational, and clinical trial data have incessantly indicated that neurologically induced myocardial injury exists. Since...... the introduction of troponin in the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction, this marker has been measured in a number of other conditions as well. One of these conditions is acute ischemic stroke, causing diagnostic dilemmas for clinicians. Because various electrocardiographic alterations have also been reported...... in these patients, it has been suggested that elevated troponin levels are somehow neurologically mediated, thus not caused by direct cardiac release. In conclusion, this review examines the available studies that systematically measured troponin in patients with acute ischemic stroke to properly interpret troponin...

  18. The effects of citicoline on acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    Early reopening of the occluded artery is, thus, important in ischemic stroke, and it has been calculated that 2 million neurons die every minute in an ischemic stroke if no effective therapy is given; therefore, "Time is Brain." In massive hemispheric infarction and edema, surgical decompression...... lowers the risk of death or severe disability defined as a modified Rankin Scale score greater than 4 in selected patients. The majority, around 80%-85% of all ischemic stroke victims, does not fulfill the criteria for revascularization therapy, and also for these patients, there is no effective acute...... therapy. Also there is no established effective acute treatment of spontaneous intracerebral bleeding. Therefore, an effective therapy applicable to all stroke victims is needed. The neuroprotective drug citicoline has been extensively studied in clinical trials with volunteers and more than 11...

  19. Radioisotope heart examination during exercise to diagnose ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farsky, S.

    1986-01-01

    The radioisotope exercise test is discussed and its benefits characterized for the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease, namely the use of 99m Tc in scintiscanning heart ventricles and of 201 Tl in scintiscanning myocardial perfusion. The exercise ventricular function and perfusion scintigraphies are compared with the common exercise ECG examination, and their superior sensitivity and specificity emphasized. Considering the constraints of scintigraphic imaging, indications are outlined for patients including those with suspect serious ischemic heart disease in whom the exercise ECG test has been negative or inconclusive, patients with the so-called nondiagnostic ECG, patients with atypical symptoms, and healthy individuals for whom the exercise ECG test indicated with respect to their occupation has been positive. Both radionuclide imaging techniques are complementary and are shown to be valuable not only in improving the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease but also in identifying the high-risk patients in whom cardiac surgery is to be considered. (L.O.)

  20. Ischemic Heart Disease: Special Considerations in Cardio-Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giza, Dana Elena; Boccalandro, Fernando; Lopez-Mattei, Juan; Iliescu, Gloria; Karimzad, Kaveh; Kim, Peter; Iliescu, Cezar

    2017-05-01

    The interplay and balance between the competing morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular diseases and cancer have a significant impact on both short- and long-term health outcomes of patients who survived cancer or are being treated for cancer. Ischemic heart disease in patients with cancer or caused by cancer therapy is a clinical problem of emerging importance. Prompt recognition and optimum management of ischemic heart disease mean that patients with cancer can successfully receive therapies to treat their malignancy and reduce morbidity and mortality due to cardiovascular disease. In this sense, the presence of cancer and cancer-related comorbidities (e.g., thrombocytopenia, propensity to bleed, thrombotic status) substantially complicates the management of cardiovascular diseases in cancer patients. In this review, we will summarize the current state of knowledge on the management strategies for ischemic disease in patients with cancer, focusing on the challenges encountered when addressing these complexities.

  1. Contemporary Management of Ischemic Mitral Regurgitation: a Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Yader; Sorajja, Paul; Harris, Kevin M

    2018-02-28

    Ischemic mitral regurgitation occurs relatively frequently in patients with coronary artery disease and is associated with an increased long term risk. The pathophysiology of ischemic mitral regurgitation is vexing, and poses both diagnostic and therapeutic challenges, leading to the need for a comprehensive, multidisciplinary approach. The management is largely focused on medical therapy, and for those eligible, coronary revascularization and/or cardiac resynchronization therapy may be considered. In select patients, mitral valve surgery or catheter-based therapy may be undertaken with careful consideration of the underlying pathophysiology, surgical risk, and expected long-term outcomes. The appropriate evaluation of patients with ischemic mitral regurgitation involves a careful multidisciplinary approach that carefully considers symptomatology, the etiology and severity of the mitral regurgitation, as well as the assessment of comorbidities and operative risk to individualize the care of these patients. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Leptin suppresses non-apoptotic cell death in ischemic rat cardiomyocytes by reduction of iPLA{sub 2} activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takatani-Nakase, Tomoka, E-mail: nakase@mukogawa-u.ac.jp; Takahashi, Koichi, E-mail: koichi@mukogawa-u.ac.jp

    2015-07-17

    Caspase-independent, non-apoptotic cell death is an important therapeutic target in myocardial ischemia. Leptin, an adipose-derived hormone, is known to exhibit cytoprotective effects on the ischemic heart, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. In this research, we found that pretreatment of leptin strongly suppressed ischemic-augmented nuclear shrinkage and non-apoptotic cell death on cardiomyocytes. Leptin was also shown to significantly inhibit the activity of iPLA{sub 2}, which is considered to play crucial roles in non-apoptotic cell death, resulting in effective prevention of ischemia-induced myocyte death. These findings provide the first evidence of a protective mechanism of leptin against ischemia-induced non-apoptotic cardiomyocyte death. - Highlights: • Myocardial ischemia-model induces in caspase-independent, non-apoptotic cell death. • Leptin strongly inhibits ischemic-augmented non-apoptotic cell death. • Leptin reduces iPLA{sub 2} activity, leading to avoidance of non-apoptotic cell death.

  3. Berberine alleviates ischemic arrhythmias via recovering depressed I(to) and I(Ca) currents in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Hong; Li, Xue-Lian; Li, Qiang; Fu, Ying; Yu, Hai-Jing; Sun, Yu-Qian; Zhang, Li; Shan, Hong-Li

    2012-02-15

    The present study was designed to elucidate the potential mechanism underlying that berberine suppressed ischemic arrhythmias in a rat model of diabetes mellitus (DM). Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats were subjected to ischemia by the occlusion of left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery. Berberine was orally administered for 7 days before ischemic injury in diabetic rats. Whole-cell patch-clamp was performed to measure the transient outward K⁺ current (I(to)) and L-type Ca²⁺ current (I(Ca)). Results showed that oral administration of berberine (100 mg/kg) attenuated ischemia-induced arrhythmias in diabetic rats. Berberine significantly shortened the prolonged QTc interval from 214 ± 6ms to 189 ± 5ms in ischemic diabetic rats, and also restored the diminished I(to) and I(Ca) current densities in the same animal model rats. In conclusion, the ability of berberine to protect diabetic rats against cardiac arrhythmias makes it possible to be a prospective therapeutic agent in clinical management of cardiac disease secondary to diabetes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Association between arterial calcifications and nonlacunar and lacunar ischemic strokes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Anouk C; Fonville, Susanne; Zadi, Taihra; van Hattem, Antonius M G; Saiedie, Ghesrouw; Koudstaal, Peter J; van der Lugt, Aad

    2014-03-01

    Nonlacunar cerebral infarcts are presumed to be caused by thromboembolism from the heart or extracranial arteries, whereas lacunar infarcts are thought to be caused by small vessel disease. We investigated to what extent arterial calcifications differ between nonlacunar and lacunar ischemic strokes. We studied 820 consecutive patients with transient ischemic attack or ischemic stroke in the anterior circulation who underwent multidetector computed tomography angiography and had no rare cause of stroke. The presence of likely cardioembolic pathogenesis was determined according to the Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment criteria. The remaining 708 patients were categorized as nonlacunar or lacunar strokes, either transient ischemic attacks or strokes, based on clinical symptoms corrected by brain imaging results. We measured volume of calcifications in the aortic arch, symptomatic extracranial and intracranial carotid artery using multidetector computed tomography angiography. The difference in calcifications between nonlacunar and lacunar strokes was assessed with a multivariable logistic regression analysis. We adjusted for degree of symptomatic carotid artery stenosis and cardiovascular risk factors. We found an independent association between volume of aortic arch calcifications and nonlacunar ischemic strokes (adjusted odds ratio [95% confidence interval], 1.11 [1.02-1.21]). No independent associations between extracranial and intracranial carotid artery calcifications and nonlacunar strokes were present. The only difference we found between nonlacunar and lacunar strokes was a higher calcification volume in the aortic arch in nonlacunar strokes. Our findings only partially confirm the notion of distinct etiologies and suggest that the potential role of other plaque components, plaque morphology, and aortic arch calcifications in ischemic stroke subtypes awaits further evaluation.

  5. Genome wide analysis of blood pressure variability and ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad S; Nalls, Michael A; Bevan, Steve; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Chen, Wei-Min; Malik, Rainer; McCarthy, Nina S; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Speed, Douglas; Hasan, Nazeeha; Pucek, Mateusz; Rinne, Paul E.; Sever, Peter; Stanton, Alice; Shields, Denis C; Maguire, Jane M; McEvoy, Mark; Scott, Rodney J; Ferrucci, Luigi; Macleod, Mary J; Attia, John; Markus, Hugh S; Sale, Michele M; Worrall, Bradford B; Mitchell, Braxton D; Dichgans, Martin; Sudlow, Cathy; Meschia, James F; Rothwell, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Visit-to-visit variability in BP is associated with ischemic stroke. We sought to determine whether such variability has a genetic aetiology and whether genetic variants associated with BP variability are also associated with ischemic stroke. Methods A GWAS for loci influencing BP variability was undertaken in 3,802 individuals from the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcome Trial (ASCOT) study where long-term visit-to-visit and within visit BP measures were available. Since BP variability is strongly associated with ischemic stroke, we genotyped the sentinel SNP in an independent ischemic stroke population comprising of 8,624 cases and 12,722 controls and in 3,900 additional (Scandinavian) participants from the ASCOT study in order to replicate our findings. Results The ASCOT discovery GWAS identified a cluster of 17 correlated SNPs within the NLGN1 gene (3q26.31) associated with BP variability. The strongest association was with rs976683 (p=1.4×10−8). Conditional analysis on rs976683 provided no evidence of additional independent associations at the locus. Analysis of rs976683 in ischemic stroke patients found no association for overall stroke (OR 1.02; 95% CI 0.97-1.07; p=0.52) or its sub-types: CE (OR 1.07; 95% CI 0.97-1.16; p=0.17), LVD (OR 0.98; 95% 0.89-1.07; p=0.60) and SVD (OR 1.07; 95% CI 0.97-1.17; p=0.19). No evidence for association was found between rs976683 and BP variability in the additional (Scandinavian) ASCOT participants (p=0.18). Conclusions We identified a cluster of SNPs at the NLGN1 locus showing significant association with BP variability. Follow up analyses did not support an association with risk of ischemic stroke and its subtypes. PMID:23929743

  6. Phosphoproteomic profiling of human myocardial tissues distinguishes ischemic from non-ischemic end stage heart failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A Schechter

    Full Text Available The molecular differences between ischemic (IF and non-ischemic (NIF heart failure are poorly defined. A better understanding of the molecular differences between these two heart failure etiologies may lead to the development of more effective heart failure therapeutics. In this study extensive proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiles of myocardial tissue from patients diagnosed with IF or NIF were assembled and compared. Proteins extracted from left ventricular sections were proteolyzed and phosphopeptides were enriched using titanium dioxide resin. Gel- and label-free nanoscale capillary liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution accuracy mass tandem mass spectrometry allowed for the quantification of 4,436 peptides (corresponding to 450 proteins and 823 phosphopeptides (corresponding to 400 proteins from the unenriched and phospho-enriched fractions, respectively. Protein abundance did not distinguish NIF from IF. In contrast, 37 peptides (corresponding to 26 proteins exhibited a ≥ 2-fold alteration in phosphorylation state (p<0.05 when comparing IF and NIF. The degree of protein phosphorylation at these 37 sites was specifically dependent upon the heart failure etiology examined. Proteins exhibiting phosphorylation alterations were grouped into functional categories: transcriptional activation/RNA processing; cytoskeleton structure/function; molecular chaperones; cell adhesion/signaling; apoptosis; and energetic/metabolism. Phosphoproteomic analysis demonstrated profound post-translational differences in proteins that are involved in multiple cellular processes between different heart failure phenotypes. Understanding the roles these phosphorylation alterations play in the development of NIF and IF has the potential to generate etiology-specific heart failure therapeutics, which could be more effective than current therapeutics in addressing the growing concern of heart failure.

  7. Report of ischemic stroke mimicking isolated ulnar nerve paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çetin Kürşad Akpınar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The cortical motor hand area is the precentral gyrus. Small cortical infarcts of this area can caused isolated hand weakness. Weakness can consist of either all fingers or ulnar-sided fingers. A 71-year-old man admitted to the emergency department with sudden weakness of the right fourth and fifth fingers Diffusion-weighted brain imaging of a magnetic resonance imaging scan revealed acute infarction of right precentral gyrus. Cardioembolus is the determined ischemic stroke subtype. This report presented a case of ischemic stroke mimicking isolated ulnar nerve paralysis.

  8. Ischemic Stroke Due to Cardiac Involvement: Emery Dreifuss Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersin Kasım Ulusoy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD is a hereditary disease. It is characterized by early-onset contractures, slowly progressive weakness, fatigue related to skapulo-humero-peroneal muscle weakness, cardiomyopathy which develops in adulthood and cardiac conduction system block. Cardiac involvement has a prognostic significance in patients with EDMD and even sudden cardiac death may be the first clinical presentation. In this article, an EDMD patient with ischemic stroke clinic who didn’t have regular cardiac follow-up was reported and the importance of the treatment of cardiac diseases which could play a role in ischemic stroke etiology and the implantation of pace-maker was mentioned.

  9. Potential role of abciximab in ischemic cerebrovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkley, J M; Adams, H P

    2000-04-27

    Abciximab is an intravenously administered antiplatelet agent that could be used alone or in conjunction with thrombolytic therapy to treat patients with acute ischemic stroke. However, experience with medication for treatment of patients with stroke is limited. Symptomatic intracranial bleeding is the most common serious complication of therapies that aim at restoring or improving blood flow to the brain after stroke and it is the most likely potential serious complication of the use of abciximab in this setting. Preliminary data suggest that abciximab is not associated with a prohibitively high rate of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage. Further research is needed to determine the safety and potential efficacy of abciximab for treatment of ischemic stroke.

  10. Diffusion MR Imaging of Postoperative Bilateral Acute Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ju Young; Lee, In Ho; Song, Chang June [Chungnam National University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Hee Youn [Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon(Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    A 57-year-old woman experienced bilateral acute ischemic optic neuropathy after spine surgery. Routine MR imaging sequence, T2-weighted image, showed subtle high signal intensity on bilateral optic nerves. A contrast-enhanced T1 weighted image showed enhancement along the bilateral optic nerve sheath. Moreover, diffusion-weighted image (DWI) and an apparent diffusion coefficient map showed markedly restricted diffusion on bilateral optic nerves. Although MR findings of T2-weighted and contrast enhanced T1-weighted images may be nonspecific, the DWI finding of cytotoxic edema of bilateral optic nerves will be helpful for the diagnosis of acute ischemic optic neuropathy after spine surgery.

  11. Cerebroprotective Effect of Moringa oleifera against Focal Ischemic Stroke Induced by Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woranan Kirisattayakul

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The protection against ischemic stroke is still required due to the limitation of therapeutic efficacy. Based on the role of oxidative stress in stroke pathophysiology, we determined whether Moringa oleifera, a plant possessing potent antioxidant activity, protected against brain damage and oxidative stress in animal model of focal stroke. M. oleifera leaves extract at doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg·kg−1 was orally given to male Wistar rats (300–350 g once daily at a period of 2 weeks before the occlusion of right middle cerebral artery (Rt.MCAO and 3 weeks after Rt.MCAO. The determinations of neurological score and temperature sensation were performed every 7 days throughout the study period, while the determinations of brain infarction volume, MDA level, and the activities of SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px were performed 24 hr after Rt.MCAO. The results showed that all doses of extract decreased infarction volume in both cortex and subcortex. The protective effect of medium and low doses of extract in all areas occurred mainly via the decreased oxidative stress. The protective effect of the high dose extract in striatum and hippocampus occurred via the same mechanism, whereas other mechanisms might play a crucial role in cortex. The detailed mechanism required further exploration.

  12. Myocardial ischemic preconditioning upregulated protein 1(Mipu1):zinc finger protein 667 - a multifunctional KRAB/C{sub 2}H{sub 2} zinc finger protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, D.; Zhang, C. [Institute of Cardiovascular Disease, Key Lab for Arteriosclerology of Hunan Province, Post-doctoral Mobile Stations for Basic Medicine, University of South China, Hengyang City, Hunan Province (China); Fan, W.J. [Institute of Cardiovascular Disease, Key Lab for Arteriosclerology of Hunan Province, Post-doctoral Mobile Stations for Basic Medicine, University of South China, Hengyang City, Hunan Province (China); The Second Affiliated Hospital, University of South China, Hengyang City, Hunan Province (China); Pan, W.J.; Feng, D.M.; Qu, S.L.; Jiang, Z.S. [Institute of Cardiovascular Disease, Key Lab for Arteriosclerology of Hunan Province, Post-doctoral Mobile Stations for Basic Medicine, University of South China, Hengyang City, Hunan Province (China)

    2014-10-31

    Myocardial ischemic preconditioning upregulated protein 1 (Mipu1) is a newly discovered upregulated gene produced in rats during the myocardial ischemic preconditioning process. Mipu1 cDNA contains a 1824-base pair open reading frame and encodes a 608 amino acid protein with an N-terminal Krüppel-associated box (KRAB) domain and classical zinc finger C{sub 2}H{sub 2} motifs in the C-terminus. Mipu1 protein is located in the cell nucleus. Recent studies found that Mipu1 has a protective effect on the ischemia-reperfusion injury of heart, brain, and other organs. As a nuclear factor, Mipu1 may perform its protective function through directly transcribing and repressing the expression of proapoptotic genes to repress cell apoptosis. In addition, Mipu1 also plays an important role in regulating the gene expression of downstream inflammatory mediators by inhibiting the activation of activator protein-1 and serum response element.

  13. Neuronal SIRT1 (Silent Information Regulator 2 Homologue 1) Regulates Glycolysis and Mediates Resveratrol-Induced Ischemic Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koronowski, Kevin B; Khoury, Nathalie; Saul, Isabel; Loris, Zachary B; Cohan, Charles H; Stradecki-Cohan, Holly M; Dave, Kunjan R; Young, Juan I; Perez-Pinzon, Miguel A

    2017-11-01

    Resveratrol, at least in part via SIRT1 (silent information regulator 2 homologue 1) activation, protects against cerebral ischemia when administered 2 days before injury. However, it remains unclear if SIRT1 activation must occur, and in which brain cell types, for the induction of neuroprotection. We hypothesized that neuronal SIRT1 is essential for resveratrol-induced ischemic tolerance and sought to characterize the metabolic pathways regulated by neuronal Sirt1 at the cellular level in the brain. We assessed infarct size and functional outcome after transient 60 minute middle cerebral artery occlusion in control and inducible, neuronal-specific SIRT1 knockout mice. Nontargeted primary metabolomics analysis identified putative SIRT1-regulated pathways in brain. Glycolytic function was evaluated in acute brain slices from adult mice and primary neuronal-enriched cultures under ischemic penumbra-like conditions. Resveratrol-induced neuroprotection from stroke was lost in neuronal Sirt1 knockout mice. Metabolomics analysis revealed alterations in glucose metabolism on deletion of neuronal Sirt1 , accompanied by transcriptional changes in glucose metabolism machinery. Furthermore, glycolytic ATP production was impaired in acute brain slices from neuronal Sirt1 knockout mice. Conversely, resveratrol increased glycolytic rate in a SIRT1-dependent manner and under ischemic penumbra-like conditions in vitro. Our data demonstrate that resveratrol requires neuronal SIRT1 to elicit ischemic tolerance and identify a novel role for SIRT1 in the regulation of glycolytic function in brain. Identification of robust neuroprotective mechanisms that underlie ischemia tolerance and the metabolic adaptations mediated by SIRT1 in brain are crucial for the translation of therapies in cerebral ischemia and other neurological disorders. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Simultaneous Onset of Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Stroke Due To Intracranial Artery Dissection

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jong-Hoon; Jung, Young-Jin; Chang, Chul-Hoon

    2017-01-01

    Intracranial dissections commonly present as ischemic stroke and as hemorrhagic stroke. In general, while either ischemic stroke or hemorrhagic stroke may develop, the simultaneous onset of both may also occasionally occur. In this report, we present a case of simultaneous development of ischemic stroke and hemorrhagic stroke due to an intracranial artery dissection.

  15. Silent ischemic brain lesions after transcatheter aortic valve replacement : lesion distribution and predictors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samim, Mariam; Hendrikse, Jeroen; van der Worp, H. Bart; Agostoni, Pierfrancesco; Nijhoff, Freek; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Stella, Pieter R.

    Silent ischemic brain lesions and ischemic stroke are known complications of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). We aimed to investigate the occurrence and distribution of TAVR-related silent ischemic brain lesions using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI). Consecutive

  16. Improving prediction of ischemic cardiovascular disease in the general population using apolipoprotein B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Marianne; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Jensen, Gorm Boje

    2007-01-01

    Apolipoprotein B (apoB) levels predict fatal myocardial infarction. Whether apoB also predicts nonfatal ischemic cardiovascular events is unclear. We tested the following hypotheses: apoB predicts ischemic cardiovascular events, and apoB is a better predictor of ischemic cardiovascular events than...

  17. Sodium Valproate, a Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, Is Associated With Reduced Stroke Risk After Previous Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, Rebecca L; Crichton, Siobhan; Wolfe, Charles D A; Yi, Qilong; Li, Linxin; Hankey, Graeme J; Rothwell, Peter M; Markus, Hugh S

    2018-01-01

    A variant in the histone deacetylase 9 ( HDAC9 ) gene is associated with large artery stroke. Therefore, inhibiting HDAC9 might offer a novel secondary preventative treatment for ischemic stroke. The antiepileptic drug sodium valproate (SVA) is a nonspecific inhibitor of HDAC9. We tested whether SVA therapy given after ischemic stroke was associated with reduced recurrent stroke rate. Data were pooled from 3 prospective studies recruiting patients with previous stroke or transient ischemic attack and long-term follow-up: the South London Stroke Register, The Vitamins to Prevent Stroke Study, and the Oxford Vascular Study. Patients receiving SVA were compared with patients who received antiepileptic drugs other than SVA using survival analysis and Cox Regression. A total of 11 949 patients with confirmed ischemic event were included. Recurrent stroke rate was lower in patient taking SVA (17 of 168) than other antiepileptic drugs (105 of 530; log-rank survival analysis P =0.002). On Cox regression, controlling for potential cofounders, SVA remained associated with reduced stroke (hazard ratio=0.44; 95% confidence interval: 0.3-0.7; P =0.002). A similar result was obtained when patients taking SVA were compared with all cases not taking SVA (Cox regression, hazard ratio=0.47; 95% confidence interval: 0.29-0.77; P =0.003). These results suggest that exposure to SVA, an inhibitor of HDAC, may be associated with a lower recurrent stroke risk although we cannot exclude residual confounding in this study design. This supports the hypothesis that HDAC9 is important in the ischemic stroke pathogenesis and that its inhibition, by SVA or a more specific HDAC9 inhibitor, is worthy of evaluation as a treatment to prevent recurrent ischemic stroke. © 2017 The Authors.

  18. Negotiating Protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Mikkel

    strategies are entangled in cultural, religious, and national identities. Using ethnographic methods, I investigate protection against selected risks: harm from evil eyes, violation of domestic sanctity, and cultural heritage dilapidation. Protection against these risks is examined through studies...

  19. [Protective eyeglasses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, G

    1997-01-01

    Reminder of the materials used for the manufacture of corrective lenses. Belgian statistics concerning eye accidents at work and European legislation concerning the prevention of eye accidents, personal protective equipment, P.P.E. Eye protection for sports.

  20. Environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinda, J.; Lieskovska, Z.

    1998-01-01

    In this chapter environmental protection in the Slovak Republic in 1997 are reviewed. The economics of environmental protection, state budget, Slovak state environmental fund, economic instruments, environmental laws, environmental impact assessment, environmental management systems, and environmental education are presented

  1. Endothelial Cells and Astrocytes: A Concerto en Duo in Ischemic Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Berezowski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The neurovascular/gliovascular unit has recently gained increased attention in cerebral ischemic research, especially regarding the cellular and molecular changes that occur in astrocytes and endothelial cells. In this paper we summarize the recent knowledge of these changes in association with edema formation, interactions with the basal lamina, and blood-brain barrier dysfunctions. We also review the involvement of astrocytes and endothelial cells with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator, which is the only FDA-approved thrombolytic drug after stroke. However, it has a narrow therapeutic time window and serious clinical side effects. Lastly, we provide alternative therapeutic targets for future ischemia drug developments such as peroxisome proliferator- activated receptors and inhibitors of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway. Targeting the neurovascular unit to protect the blood-brain barrier instead of a classical neuron-centric approach in the development of neuroprotective drugs may result in improved clinical outcomes after stroke.

  2. Effects of Ischemic Postconditioning on the Hemodynamic Parameters and Heart Nitric Oxide Levels of Hypothyroid Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajad Jeddi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ischemic postconditioning (IPost is a method of protecting the heart against ischemia-reperfusion (IR injury. However, the effectiveness of IPost in cases of ischemic heart disease accompanied by co-morbidities such as hypothyroidism remains unclear. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of IPost on myocardial IR injury in hypothyroid male rats. Methods: Propylthiouracil in drinking water (500 mg/L was administered to male rats for 21 days to induce hypothyroidism. The hearts from control and hypothyroid rats were perfused in a Langendorff apparatus and exposed to 30 min of global ischemia, followed by 120 min of reperfusion. IPost was induced immediately following ischemia. Results: Hypothyroidism and IPost significantly improved the left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP and peak rates of positive and negative changes in left ventricular pressure (±dp/dt during reperfusion in control rats (p < 0.05. However, IPost had no add-on effect on the recovery of LVDP and ±dp/dt in hypothyroid rats. Furthermore, hypothyroidism significantly decreased the basal NO metabolite (NOx levels of the serum (72.5 ± 4.2 vs. 102.8 ± 3.7 μmol/L; p < 0.05 and heart (7.9 ± 1.6 vs. 18.8 ± 3.2 μmol/L; p < 0.05. Heart NOx concentration in the hypothyroid groups did not change after IR and IPost, whereas these were significantly (p < 0.05 higher and lower after IR and IPost, respectively, in the control groups. Conclusion: Hypothyroidism protects the heart from IR injury, which may be due to a decrease in basal nitric oxide (NO levels in the serum and heart and a decrease in NO after IR. IPost did not decrease the NO level and did not provide further cardioprotection in the hypothyroid group.

  3. Effects of Ischemic Postconditioning on the Hemodynamic Parameters and Heart Nitric Oxide Levels of Hypothyroid Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeddi, Sajad; Zaman, Jalal; Ghasemi, Asghar, E-mail: ghasemi@endocrine.ac.ir [Endocrine Physiology Research Center - Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences - Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Endocrine Research Center - Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences - Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Ischemic postconditioning (IPost) is a method of protecting the heart against ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury. However, the effectiveness of IPost in cases of ischemic heart disease accompanied by co-morbidities such as hypothyroidism remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of IPost on myocardial IR injury in hypothyroid male rats. Propylthiouracil in drinking water (500 mg/L) was administered to male rats for 21 days to induce hypothyroidism. The hearts from control and hypothyroid rats were perfused in a Langendorff apparatus and exposed to 30 min of global ischemia, followed by 120 min of reperfusion. IPost was induced immediately following ischemia. Hypothyroidism and IPost significantly improved the left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP) and peak rates of positive and negative changes in left ventricular pressure (±dp/dt) during reperfusion in control rats (p < 0.05). However, IPost had no add-on effect on the recovery of LVDP and ±dp/dt in hypothyroid rats. Furthermore, hypothyroidism significantly decreased the basal NO metabolite (NO{sub x}) levels of the serum (72.5 ± 4.2 vs. 102.8 ± 3.7 μmol/L; p < 0.05) and heart (7.9 ± 1.6 vs. 18.8 ± 3.2 μmol/L; p < 0.05). Heart NO{sub x} concentration in the hypothyroid groups did not change after IR and IPost, whereas these were significantly (p < 0.05) higher and lower after IR and IPost, respectively, in the control groups. Hypothyroidism protects the heart from IR injury, which may be due to a decrease in basal nitric oxide (NO) levels in the serum and heart and a decrease in NO after IR. IPost did not decrease the NO level and did not provide further cardioprotection in the hypothyroid group.

  4. Effects of Ischemic Postconditioning on the Hemodynamic Parameters and Heart Nitric Oxide Levels of Hypothyroid Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeddi, Sajad; Zaman, Jalal; Ghasemi, Asghar

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic postconditioning (IPost) is a method of protecting the heart against ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury. However, the effectiveness of IPost in cases of ischemic heart disease accompanied by co-morbidities such as hypothyroidism remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of IPost on myocardial IR injury in hypothyroid male rats. Propylthiouracil in drinking water (500 mg/L) was administered to male rats for 21 days to induce hypothyroidism. The hearts from control and hypothyroid rats were perfused in a Langendorff apparatus and exposed to 30 min of global ischemia, followed by 120 min of reperfusion. IPost was induced immediately following ischemia. Hypothyroidism and IPost significantly improved the left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP) and peak rates of positive and negative changes in left ventricular pressure (±dp/dt) during reperfusion in control rats (p < 0.05). However, IPost had no add-on effect on the recovery of LVDP and ±dp/dt in hypothyroid rats. Furthermore, hypothyroidism significantly decreased the basal NO metabolite (NO x ) levels of the serum (72.5 ± 4.2 vs. 102.8 ± 3.7 μmol/L; p < 0.05) and heart (7.9 ± 1.6 vs. 18.8 ± 3.2 μmol/L; p < 0.05). Heart NO x concentration in the hypothyroid groups did not change after IR and IPost, whereas these were significantly (p < 0.05) higher and lower after IR and IPost, respectively, in the control groups. Hypothyroidism protects the heart from IR injury, which may be due to a decrease in basal nitric oxide (NO) levels in the serum and heart and a decrease in NO after IR. IPost did not decrease the NO level and did not provide further cardioprotection in the hypothyroid group

  5. Bi-directionally protective communication between neurons and astrocytes under ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiao-Mei; Qian, Christopher; Zhou, Yu-Fu; Yan, Yick-Chun; Luo, Qian-Qian; Yung, Wing-Ho; Zhang, Fa-Li; Jiang, Li-Rong; Qian, Zhong Ming; Ke, Ya

    2017-10-01

    The extensive existing knowledge on bi-directional communication between astrocytes and neurons led us to hypothesize that not only ischemia-preconditioned (IP) astrocytes can protect neurons but also IP neurons protect astrocytes from lethal ischemic injury. Here, we demonstrated for the first time that neurons have a significant role in protecting astrocytes from ischemic injury. The cultured medium from IP neurons (IPcNCM) induced a remarkable reduction in LDH and an increase in cell viability in ischemic astrocytes in vitro. Selective neuronal loss by kainic acid injection induced a significant increase in apoptotic astrocyte numbers in the brain of ischemic rats in vivo. Furthermore, TUNEL analysis, DNA ladder assay, and the measurements of ROS, GSH, pro- and anti-apoptotic factors, anti-oxidant enzymes and signal molecules in vitro and/or in vivo demonstrated that IP neurons protect astrocytes by an EPO-mediated inhibition of pro-apoptotic signals, activation of anti-apoptotic proteins via the P13K/ERK/STAT5 pathways and activation of anti-oxidant proteins via up-regulation of anti-oxidant enzymes. We demonstrated the existence of astro-protection by IP neurons under ischemia and proposed that the bi-directionally protective communications between cells might be a common activity in the brain or peripheral organs under most if not all pathological conditions. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Bi-directionally protective communication between neurons and astrocytes under ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Mei Wu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The extensive existing knowledge on bi-directional communication between astrocytes and neurons led us to hypothesize that not only ischemia-preconditioned (IP astrocytes can protect neurons but also IP neurons protect astrocytes from lethal ischemic injury. Here, we demonstrated for the first time that neurons have a significant role in protecting astrocytes from ischemic injury. The cultured medium from IP neurons (IPcNCM induced a remarkable reduction in LDH and an increase in cell viability in ischemic astrocytes in vitro. Selective neuronal loss by kainic acid injection induced a significant increase in apoptotic astrocyte numbers in the brain of ischemic rats in vivo. Furthermore, TUNEL analysis, DNA ladder assay, and the measurements of ROS, GSH, pro- and anti-apoptotic factors, anti-oxidant enzymes and signal molecules in vitro and/or in vivo demonstrated that IP neurons protect astrocytes by an EPO-mediated inhibition of pro-apoptotic signals, activation of anti-apoptotic proteins via the P13K/ERK/STAT5 pathways and activation of anti-oxidant proteins via up-regulation of anti-oxidant enzymes. We demonstrated the existence of astro-protection by IP neurons under ischemia and proposed that the bi-directionally protective communications between cells might be a common activity in the brain or peripheral organs under most if not all pathological conditions.

  7. Phosphodiesterase 5 inhibition as a therapeutic target for ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ölmestig, Joakim N E; Marlet, Ida R; Hainsworth, Atticus H

    2017-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors (PDE5i), such as sildenafil (Viagra®) are widely used for erectile dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension. Preclinical studies suggest that PDE5i may improve functional outcome following ischemic stroke. In this systematic review we aimed to evaluate the effects...

  8. Iron and the oxygen paradox in ischemic hearts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Voogd (Arthur)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractReintroduction of oxygen into ischemic tissue causes the formation of reactive oxygen species among which the oxygen radicals. This contributes to the tissue injwy that becomes apparent upon reperfusion. The phenomenon is known as the oxygen paradox. It is known that iron enhances the

  9. Ischemic preconditioning in chronically hypoxic neonatal rat heart

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ošťádalová, Ivana; Ošťádal, Bohuslav; Jarkovská, D.; Kolář, František

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 4 (2002), s. 561-567 ISSN 0031-3998 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/00/1659; GA MŠk LN00A069 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : neonatal heart * chronix hypoxia * ischemic preconditioning Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.382, year: 2002

  10. Visible aging signs as risk markers for ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mette; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Association of common aging signs (i.e., male pattern baldness, hair graying, and facial wrinkles) as well as other age-related appearance factors (i.e., arcus corneae, xanthelasmata, and earlobe crease) with increased risk of ischemic heart disease was initially described in anecdotal reports from...

  11. Maintenance of Normoglycemia May Improve Outcome in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Sruthi S; Sylaja, P N; Sreedharan, Sapna Erat; Sarma, Sankara

    2017-01-01

    Several studies have shown that high admission glucose is associated with poor outcomes after stroke, but the impact of maintenance of normoglycemia on functional outcome during hospitalization for acute ischemic stroke is less well established. The aim of this study was to examine the independent association of postadmission glycemic status in the 1 st week with 3-month functional outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Patients with acute ischemic stroke admitted within 48 h of symptom onset with National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) of ≥4 were selected from a prospectively maintained database by chart review. Demographic data, risk factors, NIHSS, and blood glucose values in the 1 st week were collected. The primary outcome was Modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score at 3 months (good outcome-mRS ≤2). Over 3 years, 342 patients were enrolled with 220 (64.32%) males. Mean age was 60.5 ± 13.4 years, and median admission score on NIHSS was 10 (interquartile range: 6-16). Blood glucose values persistently <140 mg/dl in the 1 st week were associated with a good 3-month functional outcome in univariate analysis ( P = 0.036). Hypoglycemic episodes occurred only in 11 (3.22%) patients. Blood glucose values persistently below 140 mg/dl in the 1 st week after acute ischemic stroke were associated with a favorable outcome in our study. Future clinical trials are needed to confirm these findings.

  12. Urinary and plasma magnesium and risk of ischemic heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, Michel M.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Mukamal, Kenneth J.; van der Harst, Pim; Geleijnse, Johanna M.; Feskens, Edith J. M.; Navis, Gerjan; Bakker, Stephan J. L.

    Background: Previous studies on dietary magnesium and risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD) have yielded inconsistent results, in part because of a lack of direct measures of actual magnesium uptake. Urinary excretion of magnesium, an indicator of dietary magnesium uptake, might provide more

  13. Obesity increases risk of ischemic stroke in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Andrew B; Cole, John W; McArdle, Patrick F; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Ryan, Kathleen A; Sparks, Mary J; Mitchell, Braxton D; Kittner, Steven J

    2015-06-01

    Body mass index has been associated with ischemic stroke in older populations, but its association with stroke in younger populations is not known. In light of the current obesity epidemic in the United States, the potential impact of obesity on stroke risk in young adults deserves attention. A population-based case-control study design with 1201 cases and 1154 controls was used to investigate the relationship of obesity and young onset ischemic stroke. Stroke cases were between the ages of 15 and 49 years. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between body mass index and ischemic stroke with and without adjustment for comorbid conditions associated with stroke. In analyses adjusted for age, sex, and ethnicity, obesity (body mass index >30 kg/m(2)) was associated with an increased stroke risk (odds ratio, 1.57; 95% confidence interval, 1.28-1.94) although this increased risk was highly attenuated and not statistically significant after adjustment for smoking, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus. These results indicate that obesity is a risk factor for young onset ischemic stroke and suggest that this association may be partially mediated through hypertension, diabetes mellitus, or other variables associated with these conditions. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Rapid determination of the hypoxanthine increase in ischemic exercise tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolhuis, P. A.; Zwart, R.; Bär, P. R.; de Visser, M.; van der Helm, H. J.

    1988-01-01

    After ischemic exercise tests, performed to detect glycogenoses or myoadenylate deaminase (EC 3.5.4.6) deficiency, the increases in serum lactate and ammonia usually are measured. Determination of hypoxanthine instead of ammonia can also be used to show myoadenylate deaminase deficiency, but HPLC of

  15. Ischemic Colitis of the Left Colon in a Diabetic Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasios J. Karayiannakis

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus may affect the gastrointestinal tract possibly as a result of autonomic neuropathy. Here we present a 68-year-old male with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus who presented with prolonged watery diarrhea and in whom imaging studies demonstrated ischemic colitis of the left colon. Resection of the affected colon resulted in sustained disappearance of symptoms.

  16. Metabolic and Rheological Disorders in Acute Period of Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Ustyantseva

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the specific features of metabolism and blood rheological properties in the acute period of ischemic stroke (IS in patients aged less than 50 years.Subjects and methods. Thirty patients (mean age 45.1±1.1 years having acute IS were examined. According to its severity, the patients were divided into 3 groups: 1 8 patients with mild IS; 2 11 patients with moderate IS; 3 11 with severe IS. All Group 3 patients were treated at an intensive care unit. A control group comprised 20 healthy individuals (mean age 44.7±1.0 years. In all the patients, fasting blood homocysteine concentrations were measured on an IMMULITE One immunochemiluminescent analyzer (USA. The rheological properties of blood were examined, by measuring its viscosity on a rotary viscometer (Russia at a shear rate of 10 to 200 sec-1. Fibrinogen concentrations were determined on an ACL-100 coagulograph.Results. The patients who had experienced ischemic stroke at the age of under 50 years were found to have atherogenic dyslipidemia, elevated homocysteine and fibrinogen levels and considerably increased blood viscosity, which correlated with the severity of their condition and the outcome of stroke. The highest values were noted in patients with severe ischemic stroke and a poor outcome.Conclusion. Studies of homocysteine and fibrinogen concentrations and blood viscosity may be used as additional criteria for evaluating the severity of ischemic stroke and predicting its outcome in patients aged less than 50 years. 

  17. Urinary and plasma magnesium and risk of ischemic heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, M.M.; Gansevoort, R.T.; Mukamal, K.J.; Harst, van der P.; Geleijnse, J.M.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Navis, G.; Bakker, S.J.L.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies on dietary magnesium and risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD) have yielded inconsistent results, in part because of a lack of direct measures of actual magnesium uptake. Urinary excretion of magnesium, an indicator of dietary magnesium uptake, might provide more

  18. Perceived stress and risk of ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Naja Rod; Kristensen, Tage Søndergård; Prescott, Eva

    2006-01-01

    It is unclear whether the commonly recognized link between stress and cardiovascular disease is causal or the result of reporting bias. The objective of this study was to address the association between perceived stress and first incidence of ischemic heart disease and to evaluate the suggested...

  19. Exploring lifestyle changes in women with ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Malene; Nielsen, Karina; Jensen, Peter Errboe

    2017-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease (IHD) is a major cause of death for women worldwide, and thus it is important to focus on lifestyle changes to reduce the impact of the disease on women’s everyday lives. Nine women were interviewed using an explorative approach to describe women’s lifestyle changes after...

  20. Parvovirus B19 Infection in Children With Arterial Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, Heather J; Luna, Jorge M; Wintermark, Max; Hills, Nancy K; Tokarz, Rafal; Li, Ying; Glaser, Carol; DeVeber, Gabrielle A; Lipkin, W Ian; Elkind, Mitchell S V

    2017-10-01

    Case-control studies suggest that acute infection transiently increases the risk of childhood arterial ischemic stroke. We hypothesized that an unbiased pathogen discovery approach utilizing MassTag-polymerase chain reaction would identify pathogens in the blood of childhood arterial ischemic stroke cases. The multicenter international VIPS study (Vascular Effects of Infection in Pediatric Stroke) enrolled arterial ischemic stroke cases, and stroke-free controls, aged 29 days through 18 years. Parental interview included questions on recent infections. In this pilot study, we used MassTag-polymerase chain reaction to test the plasma of the first 161 cases and 34 controls enrolled for a panel of 28 common bacterial and viral pathogens. Pathogen DNA was detected in no controls and 14 cases (8.7%): parvovirus B19 (n=10), herpesvirus 6 (n=2), adenovirus (n=1), and rhinovirus 6C (n=1). Parvovirus B19 infection was confirmed by serologies in all 10; infection was subclinical in 8. Four cases with parvovirus B19 had underlying congenital heart disease, whereas another 5 had a distinct arteriopathy involving a long-segment stenosis of the distal internal carotid and proximal middle cerebral arteries. Using MassTag-polymerase chain reaction, we detected parvovirus B19-a virus known to infect erythrocytes and endothelial cells-in some cases of childhood arterial ischemic stroke. This approach can generate new, testable hypotheses about childhood stroke pathogenesis. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Treatment and partial recovery of ischemic stroke hemiplegy through acupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gonçalves Nordon

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT We present the case of a patient with hemiplegy and dysphonia due to an ischemic stroke in the pons who was treated through classical systemic and scalpean acupuncture and electroacupuncture, presenting considerable improvement in speaking, walking and moving her right arm after three months of treatment.

  2. Neuroprotective effects of α-lipoic acid against hypoxic– ischemic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To explore the neuroprotective efficacy of α-lipoic acid (ALA) against hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) in neonatal rats. Methods: Forty-eight rats (P7-pups) were randomly assigned to one of four groups: group I received saline; group II (HI) underwent unilateral carotid artery ligation and hypoxia (92 % N2 ...

  3. [Development of Researches on Scalp Acupuncture for Ischemic Stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Liang; Wang, Jin-hai; Sun, Run-jie; Zhang, Xing-hua; Yuan, Bo; Du, Xiao-zheng

    2016-02-01

    Ischemic stroke is one of the commonly met diseases in clinical practice nowadays. Acupuncture therapy is widly used in the treatment of sequela of ischemic stroke in China and its mechanisms have been extensively studied in recen years. In the present paper, the authors focus on the development of studies on the mechanism of scalp acupuncture therapy in the treatment of ischemic stroke. Results indicate that scalp acupuncture intervention can 1) improve cerebral blood circulation to promote regional energy metabolism, 2) up-regulate expression of glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), etc., possibly promoting proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells in the focal cerebral cortex and hippocampus, 3) reduce contents of excitatory amino acid and increase level of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to lower neurogenic toxicity, and relieve cerebral injury, 4) ease cerebral vascular immunoinflammatory reactions, 5) regulate blood lipid metabolism to resist cerebral free radical damage, and 6) inhibit cerebral cortical apoptosis. However, these results only revealed very limited intrinsic mechanisms of scalp acupuncture in improving ischemic stroke. Further studies using comprehensive techniques of multi-disciplines as molecular biology, electrophysiology, etc. are definitely needed.

  4. Outcome Prediction of Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Data for 205 neonates from the multicenter National Institute of Child Health trial of hypothermia in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE were analyzed by using clinical and laboratory variables obtained in the NICUs within 6 hours of birth, with death or moderate/severe disability at 18-22 months or death as the outcomes.

  5. Spontaneous Low Frequency Oscillations in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillip, Dorte; Schytz, Henrik Winther; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg

    2014-01-01

    patients admitted to the stroke unit with symptoms of ischemic stroke. 11/29 patients received thrombolytic therapy. NIRS examination was conducted 2 days (median time) from stroke onset. NIRS optodes were placed on each side of the head with a 3 cm source-detector distance. Using transfer function...

  6. Ischemic Segment Detection using the Support Vector Domain Description

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Sass; Ólafsdóttir, Hildur; Sjöstrand, Karl

    2007-01-01

    and registration of the myocardium provided pixel-wise signal intensity curves that were analyzed using the Support Vector Domain Description (SVDD). In contrast to normal SVDD, the entire regularization path was calculated and used to calculate a generalized distance. The results corresponded well to the ischemic...

  7. CT angiography and CT perfusion in acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seeters, T. van

    2016-01-01

    CT angiography and CT perfusion are used in patients with acute ischemic stroke for diagnostic purposes and to select patients for treatment. In this thesis, the reproducibility of CT angiography and CT perfusion is examined, the additional value of CT angiography and CT perfusion for stroke outcome

  8. Ischemic colitis complicating reconstruction of the abdominal aorta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T V; Christoffersen, J K; Andersen, J

    1985-01-01

    A review of 23 patients with ischemic colitis after surgical treatment of the abdominal aorta disclosed a pathogenetic heterogeneous finding. Ligation of the inferior mesenteric artery, abolished collateral blood supply or nonocclusive low flow state, or both, was a common feature. An incidence...

  9. Calcium antagonists for ischemic stroke: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horn, J.; Limburg, M.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Stroke is a common disease, and many trials with calcium antagonists as possible neuroprotective agents have been conducted. The aim of this review is to determine whether calcium antagonists reduce the risk of death or dependency after acute ischemic stroke. METHODS: Acute

  10. Update on ischemic heart disease and intensive cardiac care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sionis, Alessandro; Ruiz-Nodar, Juan Miguel; Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio; Marín, Francisco; Abu-Assi, Emad; Díaz-Castro, Oscar; Nuñez-Gil, Ivan J; Lidón, Rosa-Maria

    2015-03-01

    This article summarizes the main developments reported in 2014 on ischemic heart disease, together with the most important innovations in intensive cardiac care. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Update on ischemic heart disease and critical care cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Francisco; Díaz-Castro, Oscar; Ruiz-Nodar, Juan Miguel; García de la Villa, Bernardo; Sionis, Alessandro; López, Javier; Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio; Martínez-Sellés, Manuel

    2014-02-01

    This article summarizes the main developments reported in 2013 on ischemic heart disease, together with the most important innovations in the management of acute cardiac patients. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Intensive treadmill training in the acute phase after ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømmen, Anna Maria; Christensen, Thomas; Jensen, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to (a) assess the feasibility of intensive treadmill training in patients with acute ischemic stroke, (b) test whether physical activity of the legs during training increases with time, and (c) evaluate to what extent training sessions contribute toward the overall physic...

  13. Indigenous drugs in ischemic heart disease in patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Shridhar; Aggarwal, Amitesh

    2009-11-01

    India is currently facing the silent epidemic of ischemic heart disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), hypertension, and stroke. Both diabetes and ischemic heart disease appear in Indian people a decade earlier compared to whites. The recent evidence that certain medicinal plants possess hypoglycemic, lipid-lowering, and immunomodulating properties on account of their rich flavonoid and/or other glucose-lowering active constituents merits scientific scrutiny in this regard. The present communication aims to give a brief review of those plants that could be useful in T2DM associated with hypertension, ischemic heart disease, and/or dyslipidemia. Aegle marmelos (bael), Allium sativum (garlic), Curcuma domestica (turmeric), Eugenia jambolana (jamun), Murraya koenigii (curry leaves), Trigonella foenum graecum (fenugreek), and Terminalia arjuna (arjun) have been found to be useful in diabetes associated with ischemic heart disease. Their active biomolecules have been identified. They have also been demonstrated to be safe in long-term use. Further clinical research regarding their potency and efficacy vis-à-vis oral hypoglycemics needs to done.

  14. Thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke by tenecteplase in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Thrombolysis has radically changed the prognosis of acute ischemic stroke. Tenecteplase is a modified form of rt-PA with greater specificity for fibrin and a longer half-life. We report the experience of a Moroccan tertiary hospital in thrombolysis using Tenecteplase. Methods: We conducted an open prospective ...

  15. Pathophysiology and Biomarkers in Acute Ischemic Stroke – A Review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stroke is one of the major causes of death and disability, including ischemic stroke, which accounts for 85 - 87 % of cases. Currently, there are few treatment options available for minimizing tissue death following a stroke. Emerging data suggest that biomarkers may help improve current clinical outcome of stroke. As such ...

  16. Characterization of Hospitalized Ischemic Stroke Patients in Palestine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Stroke is a major health problem, yet no studies on stroke have been reported from Palestine. This one-year, hospital-based study was conducted to determine the prevalence of risk factors and the in-hospital mortality rate in patients with ischemic stroke. Method: All patients admitted to Al-Watani government ...

  17. Imaging Recommendations for Acute Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintermark, Max; Sanelli, Pina C.; Albers, Gregory W.; Bello, Jacqueline A.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; Hetts, Steven W.; Johnson, Michele H.; Kidwell, Chelsea S.; Lev, Michael H.; Liebeskind, David S.; Rowley, Howard A.; Schaefer, Pamela W.; Sunshine, Jeffrey L.; Zaharchuk, Greg; Meltzer, Carolyn C.

    2014-01-01

    In the article entitled “Imaging Recommendations for Acute Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack Patients: A Joint Statement by the American Society of Neuroradiology, the American College of Radiology and the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery”, we are proposing a simple, pragmatic approach that will allow the reader to develop an optimal imaging algorithm for stroke patients at their institution. PMID:23948676

  18. Ginsenoside Rg1 improves ischemic brain injury by balancing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To study the effects of ginsenoside Rg1 on mitochondrial dysfunction induced by ischemic stroke. Methods: Human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells, subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD), were divided into six groups: control group, OGD group, 3 OGD + Rg1 groups (6.25, 12.5 and 25 μM), and Rg1 (25 ...

  19. Multiple Silent Lacunes Are Associated with Recurrent Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Søren Due; Skjøth, Flemming; Yavarian, Yousef

    2016-01-01

    in a cohort of patients with incident ischemic stroke and no atrial fibrillation (AF). Methods: We included 786 patients (mean age 59.5 (SD 14.0); 42.9% females) in a registry-based, observational cohort study on patients with first-ever ischemic stroke. On brain MRI we assessed the number of silent lacunes....... Incidence rates per 100 person-years of ischemic stroke recurrence were 1.6, 2.5, and 5.0 for none, single, and multiple silent lacunes respectively. Corresponding incidence rates were 2.6, 2.4, and 4.4 for death, and 3.4, 4.0, and 6.6 for cardiovascular events respectively. Adjusted HRs of ischemic stroke...... recurrence were 1.53 (0.67-3.49) and 2.52 (1.25-5.09) for a single and multiple silent lacunes, respectively. Further adjustment for white matter hyperintensities maintained positive association although not significant. Corresponding adjusted HRs were 0.56 (0.25-1.25) and 0.65 (0.33-1.25) for death and 1...

  20. Relation between reperfusion and hemorrhagic transformation in acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horsch, Alexander D; Dankbaar, Jan Willem; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Niesten, Joris M; van Seeters, Tom; van der Schaaf, Irene C; Kappelle, L Jaap; Velthuis, Birgitta K

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (IV-rtPA) is given in acute ischemic stroke patients to achieve reperfusion. Hemorrhagic transformation (HT) is a serious complication of IV-rtPA treatment and related to blood-brain barrier (BBB) injury. It is unclear whether HT

  1. Relation between reperfusion and hemorrhagic transformation in acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horsch, Alexander D.; Dankbaar, Jan Willem; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Niesten, Joris M.; van Seeters, Tom; van der Schaaf, Irene C.; Kappelle, L. Jaap; Velthuis, Birgitta K.; Majoie, C. B.; Roos, Y. B.; Duijm, L. E.; Keizer, K.; van der Lugt, A.; Dippel, D. W.; Droogh-deGreve, K. E.; van Walderveen, M. A.; Wermer, M. J.; Lycklama à Nijeholt, G. J.; Boiten, J.; Duyndam, D.; Kwa, V. I.; Meijer, F. J.; van Dijk, E. J.; Kesselring, F. O.; Hofmeijer, J.; Vos, J. A.; Schonewille, W. J.; van Rooij, W. J.; de Kort, P. L.; Pleiter, C. C.; Bakker, S. L.; Bot, J.; Visser, M. C.; Velthuis, B. K.; van der Schaaf, I. C.; Dankbaar, J. W.; Mali, W. P.; van Seeters, T.; Horsch, A. D.; Niesten, J. M.; Biessels, G. J.; Kappelle, L. J.; Luitse, M. J.; van der Graaf, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (IV-rtPA) is given in acute ischemic stroke patients to achieve reperfusion. Hemorrhagic transformation (HT) is a serious complication of IV-rtPA treatment and related to blood-brain barrier (BBB) injury. It is unclear whether HT occurs secondary

  2. Improved renal function of warm ischemically damaged kidneys using polysol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreinemachers, M. C. J. M.; Doorschodt, B. M.; Florquin, S.; Idu, M. M.; Tolba, R. H.; van Gulik, T. M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We sought to assess the efficacy of POLYSOL, a low-viscosity, colloid-based organ preservation solution, for the preservation of warm ischemically damaged kidney grafts compared with histidine-tryptophane-ketoglutarate (HTK) solution. METHODS: Pigs (25-30 kg) underwent a left nephrectomy

  3. Reactive astrocytes and therapeutic potential in focal ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Gourav Roy; Ding, Shinghua

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytes are specialized and the most abundant cell type in the central nervous system (CNS). They play important roles in the physiology of the brain. Astrocytes are also critically involved in many CNS disorders including focal ischemic stroke, the leading cause of brain injury and death in patients. One of the prominent pathological features of a focal ischemic stroke is reactive astrogliosis and glial scar formation. Reactive astrogliosis is accompanied with changes in morphology, proliferation, and gene expression in the reactive astrocytes. This study provides an overview of the most recent advances in astrocytic Ca(2+) signaling, spatial, and temporal dynamics of the morphology and proliferation of reactive astrocytes as well as signaling pathways involved in the reactive astrogliosis after ischemic stroke based on results from experimental studies performed in various animal models. This review also discusses the therapeutic potential of reactive astrocytes in focal ischemic stroke. As reactive astrocytes exhibit high plasticity, we suggest that modulation of local reactive astrocytes is a promising strategy for cell-based stroke therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Ischemic pain in the extremities and Raynaud's phenomenon.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Devulder, J.; Suijlekom, H. van; Dongen, R.T.M. van; Diwan, S.; Mekhail, N.; Kleef, M. van; Huygen, F.

    2011-01-01

    Two important groups of disorders result from an insufficient blood supply to the extremities: critical vascular disease and the Raynaud's phenomenon. The latter can be subdivided into a primary and a secondary type. Critical ischemic disease is often caused by arteriosclerosis due to hypertension

  5. Relationship between vascular dysfunction in peripheral arteries and ischemic episodes during daily life in patients with ischemic heart disease and hypercholesterolemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Eva; Møller, Jacob E; Egstrup, Kenneth

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is well established that endothelial dysfunction is present in patients with ischemic heart disease and hypercholesterolemia. Some of these patients will have signs of transient myocardial ischemia during Holter monitoring. We sought to describe the correlation between daily life...... cardiovascular risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate a significant relationship between ischemic episodes and vascular dysfunction in patients with ischemic heart disease and hypercholesterolemia and may justify an aggressive preventive therapy targeted directly at the endothelium....

  6. Protecting knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sofka, Wolfgang; de Faria, Pedro; Shehu, Edlira

    2018-01-01

    Most firms use secrecy to protect their knowledge from potential imitators. However, the theoretical foundations for secrecy have not been well explored. We extend knowledge protection literature and propose theoretical mechanisms explaining how information visibility influences the importance...... of secrecy as a knowledge protection instrument. Building on mechanisms from information economics and signaling theory, we postulate that secrecy is more important for protecting knowledge for firms that have legal requirements to reveal information to shareholders. Furthermore, we argue that this effect...... and a firm's investment in fixed assets. Our findings inform both academics and managers on how firms balance information disclosure requirements with the use of secrecy as a knowledge protection instrument....

  7. Intracranial Ischemic Infarct Due to Blunt Force Trauma in a High School Football Player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esianor, Brandon I; Haider, Ali S; Engelhardt, Margaret I; Osumah, Tijani; Vayalumkal, Steven; Thakur, Richa; Leonard, Dean; Haithcock, Jeffrey; Layton, Kennith F

    2017-09-07

    Ischemic stroke is an uncommon cause of death among teenagers and young adults; however, the etiologies differ when compared to ischemic strokes in older individuals. Large-vessel atherosclerosis and small-vessel disease causing ischemic stroke are rare for the teenage population, while cervicocerebral arterial dissections account for up to 20% of ischemic strokes. Here, we present the case of a 16-year-old male who developed internal carotid artery dissection (ICAD) after a head injury and subsequently developed ischemic stroke and seizures.

  8. No influence of ischemic preconditioning on running economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gungeet; Binger, Megan; Evans, Claire; Trachte, Tiffany; Van Guilder, Gary P

    2017-02-01

    Many of the potential performance-enhancing properties of ischemic preconditioning suggest that the oxygen cost for a given endurance exercise workload will be reduced, thereby improving the economy of locomotion. The aim of this study was to identify whether ischemic preconditioning improves exercise economy in recreational runners. A randomized sham-controlled crossover study was employed in which 18 adults (age 27 ± 7 years; BMI 24.6 ± 3 kg/m 2 ) completed two, incremental submaximal (65-85% VO 2max ) treadmill running protocols (3 × 5 min stages from 7.2-14.5 km/h) coupled with indirect calorimetry to assess running economy following ischemic preconditioning (3 × 5 min bilateral upper thigh ischemia) and sham control. Running economy was expressed as mlO 2 /kg/km and as the energy in kilocalories required to cover 1 km of horizontal distance (kcal/kg/km). Ischemic preconditioning did not influence steady-state heart rate, oxygen consumption, minute ventilation, respiratory exchange ratio, energy expenditure, and blood lactate. Likewise, running economy was similar (P = 0.647) between the sham (from 201.6 ± 17.7 to 204.0 ± 16.1 mlO 2 /kg/km) and ischemic preconditioning trials (from 202.8 ± 16.2 to 203.1 ± 15.6 mlO 2 /kg/km). There was no influence (P = 0.21) of ischemic preconditioning on running economy expressed as the caloric unit cost (from 0.96 ± 0.12 to 1.01 ± 0.11 kcal/kg/km) compared with sham (from 1.00 ± 0.10 to 1.00 ± 0.08 kcal/kg/km). The properties of ischemic preconditioning thought to affect exercise performance at vigorous to severe exercise intensities, which generate more extensive physiological challenge, are ineffective at submaximal workloads and, therefore, do not change running economy.

  9. Pharmacokinetic Study of Piracetam in Focal Cerebral Ischemic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliwal, Pankaj; Dash, Debabrata; Krishnamurthy, Sairam

    2018-04-01

    Cerebral ischemia affects hepatic enzymes and brain permeability extensively. Piracetam was investigated up to phase III of clinical trials and there is lack of data on brain penetration in cerebral ischemic condition. Thus, knowledge of the pharmacokinetics and brain penetration of piracetam during ischemic condition would aid to improve pharmacotherapeutics in ischemic stroke. Focal cerebral ischemia was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion for 2 h in male Wistar rats followed by reperfusion. After 24 h of middle cerebral artery occlusion or 22 h of reperfusion, piracetam was administered for pharmacokinetic, brain penetration, and pharmacological experiments. In pharmacokinetic study, blood samples were collected at different time points after 200-mg/kg (oral) and 75-mg/kg (intravenous) administration of piracetam through right external jugular vein cannulation. In brain penetration study, the cerebrospinal fluid, systemic blood, portal blood, and brain samples were collected at pre-designated time points after 200-mg/kg oral administration of piracetam. In a separate experiment, the pharmacological effect of the single oral dose of piracetam in middle cerebral artery occlusion was assessed at a dose of 200 mg/kg. All the pharmacokinetic parameters of piracetam including area under curve (AUC 0-24 ), maximum plasma concentration (C max ), time to reach the maximum plasma concentration (t max ), elimination half-life (t 1/2 ), volume of distribution (V z ), total body clearance, mean residence time, and bioavailability were found to be similar in ischemic stroke condition except for brain penetration. Piracetam exposure (AUC 0-2 ) in brain and CSF were found to be 2.4- and 3.1-fold higher, respectively, in ischemic stroke compared to control rats. Piracetam significantly reduced infarct volume by 35.77% caused by middle cerebral artery occlusion. There was no change in the pharmacokinetic parameters of piracetam in the ischemic stroke model except for

  10. New techniques and models for assessing ischemic heart disease risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.N. Yakovina

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on tasks of creating and implementing a new technique aimed at assessing ischemic heart diseases risk. The techniques is based on a laboratory-diagnostic complex which includes oxidative, lipid-lipoprotein, inflammatory and metabolic biochemical parameters; s system of logic-mathematic models used for obtaining numeric risk assessments; and a program module which allows to calculate and analyze the results. we justified our models in the course of our re-search which included 172 patients suffering from ischemic heart diseases (IHD combined with coronary atherosclerosis verified by coronary arteriography and 167 patients who didn't have ischemic heart diseases. Our research program in-cluded demographic and social data, questioning on tobacco and alcohol addiction, questioning about dietary habits, chronic diseases case history and medications intake, cardiologic questioning as per Rose, anthropometry, 3-times meas-ured blood pressure, spirometry, and electrocardiogram taking and recording with decoding as per Minnesota code. We detected biochemical parameters of each patient and adjusted our task of creating techniques and models for assessing ischemic heart disease risks on the basis of inflammatory, oxidative, and lipid biological markers. We created a system of logic and mathematic models which is a universal scheme for laboratory parameters processing allowing for dissimilar data specificity. The system of models is universal, but a diagnostic approach to applied biochemical parameters is spe-cific. The created program module (calculator helps a physician to obtain a result on the basis of laboratory research data; the result characterizes numeric risks of coronary atherosclerosis and ischemic heart disease for a patient. It also allows to obtain a visual image of a system of parameters and their deviation from a conditional «standard – pathology» boundary. The complex is implemented into practice by the Scientific

  11. Sesame oil enhances endogenous antioxidants in ischemic myocardium of rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Mohamed Saleem

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to evaluate the potency of antioxidant activity of sesame oil in-vitro model of myocardial ischemic reperfusion injury of rat. Sesame oil was administered orally to Wistar albino rats (180-200 g in two different doses (n=6, by gastric gavage at a dose of 5 mL/kg b.w. (S1 and 10 mL/kg b.w (S2 daily for thirty days. Control and sesame oil treated rat hearts were subjected to invitro global ischemic reperfusion injury (5 min perfusion, 9 min noflow and 12 min reperfusion. A significant rise in TBARS and decrease of GSH, catalase, LDH, CK and AST occurred in the hearts subjected to in-vitro myocardial ischemic reperfusion injury indicate the myocardial damage through oxidative stress. In sesame oil treated rats there was a significant decrease in TBARS and significant increase in endogenous antioxidants and myocardial marker enzymes in all the groups. In 10 mL/kg treatment group, a significant rise in the levels of GSH, SOD and catalase were observed with marker enzymes, and it shows better recovery profile than the other groups subjected to in-vitro ischemic reperfusion injury. In histological studies, control rats which subjected to IR injury show extensive myocardial damage and all the treatment groups, shows preserved myocardium. The effect of sesame oil was compared with reference compound captopril. The present study demonstrates that the sesame oil treated by the dose 10 mL/kg augments endogenous antioxidant compounds of the rat heart and also prevents the myocardium from in-vitro model of myocardial ischemic reperfusion injury

  12. Increased Risk of Ischemic Stroke in Young Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ching-Chih; Su, Yu-Chieh; Ho, Hsu-Chueh; Hung, Shih-Kai; Lee, Moon-Sing; Chiou, Wen-Yen; Chou, Pesus; Huang, Yung-Sung

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation/chemoradiotherapy-induced carotid stenosis and cerebrovascular events in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) can cause severe disability and even death. This study aimed to estimate the risk of ischemic stroke in this patient population over more than 10 years of follow-up. Methods and Materials: The study cohorts consisted of all patients hospitalized with a principal diagnosis of NPC (n = 1094), whereas patients hospitalized for an appendectomy during 1997 and 1998 (n = 4376) acted as the control group and surrogate for the general population. Cox proportional hazard model was performed as a means of comparing the stroke-free survival rate between the two cohorts after adjusting for possible confounding and risk factors. Results: Of the 292 patients with ischemic strokes, 62 (5.7%) were from the NPC cohort and 230 (5.3%) were from the control group. NPC patients ages 35–54 had a 1.66 times (95% CI, 1.16–2.86; p = 0.009) higher risk of ischemic stroke after adjusting for patient characteristics, comorbidities, geographic region, urbanization level of residence, and socioeconomic status. There was no statistical difference in ischemic stroke risk between the NPC patients and appendectomy patients ages 55–64 years (hazard ratio = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.56–1.33; p = 0.524) after adjusting for other factors. Conclusions: Young NPC patients carry a higher risk for ischemic stroke than the general population. Besides regular examinations of carotid duplex, different irradiation strategies or using new technique of radiotherapy, such as intensity modulated radiation therapy or volumetric modulated arc therapy, should be considered in young NPC patients.

  13. Clinical studies on the pathogenesis of ischemic cerebrovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Shin-ichi

    1991-01-01

    Ischemic cerebrovascular disease represents an annually increasing percentage of cerebral apoplexy. Approaches to the improvement in its functional prognosis and the prevention of its recurrence are important in its treatment. Since the international joint researches in 1985 gave a denial to the predominance of surgical operation for ischemic cerebrovascular disease, its indications for surgery are now under re-examination. In this study, cerebral blood flow was mainly examined in order to have a good understanding of the essentials of ischemic cerebrovascular disease and also to find out the index of decision of its indications for surgery. First, normal blood flow was examined by age group via a measurement of cerebral blood flow according to 133 Xe inhalation method. Next, five types of ischemic cerebrovascular disease divided on the above basis were examined mainly for the relationship between the time-course of cerebral blood flow and the prognosis. Normal cerebral blood flow was decreased with age, with a good negative correlation. TIA, as examined for its etiology in terms of cerebral blood flow was considered to be supported by both of the thrombo-embolic theory and the hemodynamic theory rather than single. RIND, which is essentially similar to TIA, was considered to be different from only in symptomatic duration. The group of established infarction having cerebral blood flow < 30 ml/100 g/min showed very poor prognosis. Limit blood flow, as examined in terms of functional prognosis, was regarded as 40 ml/100 g/min, and this value was considered to be an important index of searching for the indication for the circulatory reconstruction. The above results suggest that a measurement of cerebral blood flow plays an important role in grasping the pathogenesis of ischemic cerebrovascular disease, thus provides us with an important index of its indications for surgery. (author) 81 refs

  14. Hyperglycemia predicts poststroke infections in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonneveld, Thomas P; Nederkoorn, Paul J; Westendorp, Willeke F; Brouwer, Matthijs C; van de Beek, Diederik; Kruyt, Nyika D

    2017-04-11

    To investigate whether admission hyperglycemia predicts poststroke infections and, if so, whether poststroke infections modify the effect of admission hyperglycemia on functional outcome in ischemic stroke. We used data from acute ischemic stroke patients in the Preventive Antibiotics in Stroke Study (PASS), a multicenter randomized controlled trial (n = 2,550) investigating the effect of preventive antibiotics on functional outcome. Admission hyperglycemia was defined as blood glucose ≥7.8 mmol/L and poststroke infection as any infection during admission judged by an expert adjudication committee. Functional outcome at 3 months was assessed with the modified Rankin Scale. Of 1,676 nondiabetic ischemic stroke patients, 338 (20%) had admission hyperglycemia. After adjustment for potential confounding variables, admission hyperglycemia was associated with poststroke infection (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.31, 95% CI 1.31-4.07), worse 3-month functional outcome (common aOR 1.40, 95% CI 1.12-1.73), and 3-month mortality (aOR 2.11, 95% CI 1.40-3.19). Additional adjustment for poststroke infection in the functional outcome analysis, done to assess poststroke infection as an intermediate in the pathway from admission hyperglycemia to functional outcome, did not substantially change the model. In patients with recorded diabetes mellitus (n = 418), admission hyperglycemia was not associated with poststroke infection (aOR 0.49, 95% CI 0.15-1.58). In nondiabetic acute ischemic stroke patients, admission hyperglycemia is associated with poststroke infection and worse functional outcome. Poststroke infections did not modify the effect of admission hyperglycemia on functional outcome in ischemic stroke. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  15. Hemodilution increases cerebral blood flow in acute ischemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorstrup, S.; Andersen, A.; Juhler, M.; Brun, B.; Boysen, G.

    1989-01-01

    We measured cerebral blood flow in 10 consecutive, but selected, patients with acute ischemic stroke (less than 48 hours after onset) before and after hemodilution. Cerebral blood flow was measured by xenon-133 inhalation and emission tomography, and only patients with focal hypoperfusion in clinically relevant areas were included. Hemodilution was done according to the hematocrit level: for a hematocrit greater than or equal to 42%, 500 ml whole blood was drawn and replaced by the same volume of dextran 40; for a hematocrit between 37% and 42%, only 250 ml whole blood was drawn and replaced by 500 cc of dextran 40. Mean hematocrit was reduced by 16%, from 46 +/- 5% (SD) to 39 +/- 5% (SD) (p less than 0.001). Cerebral blood flow increased in both hemispheres by an average of 20.9% (p less than 0.001). Regional cerebral blood flow increased in the ischemic areas in all cases, on an average of 21.4 +/- 12.0% (SD) (p less than 0.001). In three patients, a significant redistribution of flow in favor of the hypoperfused areas was observed, and in six patients, the fractional cerebral blood flow increase in the hypoperfused areas was of the same magnitude as in the remainder of the brain. In the last patient, cerebral blood flow increased relatively less in the ischemic areas. Our findings show that cerebral blood flow increases in the ischemic areas after hemodilution therapy in stroke patients. The marked regional cerebral blood flow increase seen in some patients could imply an improved oxygen delivery to the ischemic tissue

  16. Gene expression profiling of blood for the prediction of ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamova, Boryana; Xu, Huichun; Jickling, Glen; Bushnell, Cheryl; Tian, Yingfang; Ander, Bradley P; Zhan, Xinhua; Liu, Dazhi; Turner, Renee; Adamczyk, Peter; Khoury, Jane C; Pancioli, Arthur; Jauch, Edward; Broderick, Joseph P; Sharp, Frank R

    2010-10-01

    A blood-based biomarker of acute ischemic stroke would be of significant value in clinical practice. This study aimed to (1) replicate in a larger cohort our previous study using gene expression profiling to predict ischemic stroke; and (2) refine prediction of ischemic stroke by including control groups relevant to ischemic stroke. Patients with ischemic stroke (n=70, 199 samples) were compared with control subjects who were healthy (n=38), had vascular risk factors (n=52), and who had myocardial infarction (n=17). Whole blood was drawn ≤3 hours, 5 hours, and 24 hours after stroke onset and from control subjects. RNA was processed on whole genome microarrays. Genes differentially expressed in ischemic stroke were identified and analyzed for predictive ability to discriminate stroke from control subjects. The 29 probe sets previously reported predicted a new set of ischemic strokes with 93.5% sensitivity and 89.5% specificity. Sixty- and 46-probe sets differentiated control groups from 3-hour and 24-hour ischemic stroke samples, respectively. A 97-probe set correctly classified 86% of ischemic strokes (3 hour+24 hour), 84% of healthy subjects, 96% of vascular risk factor subjects, and 75% with myocardial infarction. This study replicated our previously reported gene expression profile in a larger cohort and identified additional genes that discriminate ischemic stroke from relevant control groups. This multigene approach shows potential for a point-of-care test in acute ischemic stroke.

  17. Hibernation-like state induced by an opioid peptide protects against experimental stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Tsung-Ping

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delta opioid peptide [D-ala2,D-leU5]enkephalin (DADLE induces hibernation in summer ground squirrels, and enhances preservation and survival of isolated or transplanted lungs and hearts. In the present study, we investigated the protective effect of DADLE in the central nervous system. Results Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with DADLE (4 mg/kg every 2 h × 4 injections, i.p. or saline prior to unilateral occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA. Daily behavioral tests revealed that ischemic animals treated with DADLE did not show any significant behavioral dysfunctions compared with saline-treated ischemic animals. Opioid antagonists only transiently inhibited the protective effect of DADLE, indicating the participation of non-opioid mechanisms in DADLE neuroprotection. Histological examination using triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC revealed that brains from ischemic animals treated with DADLE, either alone or with adjuvant opioid blockers, exhibited almost completely intact striata. In contrast, brains from ischemic animals that received saline showed significant infarction in the lateral striatum. Analyses of apoptotic cell death revealed a significant increase in the p-53 mRNA expression in the striatum of ischemic animals that received saline, while those that received DADLE exhibited near normal striatal p-53 expression. This protective effect was accompanied by significant increments in protein levels of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor in the striatum of DADLE-treated ischemic animals. Conclusion These results indicate that DADLE protected against necrotic and apoptotic cell death processes associated with ischemia-reperfusion injury. The present study demonstrates that delta opioids are crucially involved in stroke, suggesting that the opioid system is important in the study of brain injury and protection.

  18. Filaggrin loss-of-function mutations as risk factors for ischemic stroke in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varbo, A.; Nordestgaard, B. G.; Benn, M.

    2017-01-01

    Essentials FLG mutations cause atopic dermatitis, previously found to be associated with ischemic stroke. Association between FLG mutations and ischemic stroke was examined in 97 174 Danish individuals. FLG mutations were associated with increased ischemic stroke risk in the general population....... The association was most pronounced in younger individuals, and in current and former smokers. Summary: Background Heritability studies have shown a considerable genetic component to ischemic stroke risk; however, much is unknown as to which genes are responsible. Also, previous studies have found an association...... between atopic dermatitis and increased ischemic stroke risk. Objective To test the hypothesis that FLG loss-of-function mutations, known to be associated with atopic dermatitis, were also associated with ischemic stroke. Methods A total of 97 174 individuals, with 3597 cases of ischemic stroke, from...

  19. Transient Ischemic Attack and Ischemic Stroke in Danon Disease with Formation of Left Ventricular Apical Thrombus despite Normal Systolic Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Tsuda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Danon disease is a rare X-linked dominant skeletal and cardiac muscle disorder presenting with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, Wolf-Parkinson-White syndrome, skeletal myopathy, and mild intellectual disability. Early morbidity and mortality due to heart failure or sudden death are known in Danon disease, more in males than in females. Here, we present a 17-year-old female adolescent with Danon disease and severe concentric hypertrophy with normal left ventricular (LV systolic function, who has been complaining of intermittent headache and weakness for about 3 years, initially diagnosed with hemiplegic migraine. Subsequently, her neurological manifestation progressed to transient ischemic attack (TIA and eventually to ischemic stroke confirmed by CT scan with 1-day history of expressive aphasia followed by persistent left side weakness and numbness. Detailed echocardiogram for the first time revealed a small LV apical thrombus with unchanged severe biventricular hypertrophy and normal systolic function. This unexpected LV apical thrombus may be associated with a wide spectrum of neurological deficits ranging from TIA to ischemic stroke in Danon disease. Possibility of cerebral ischemic events should be suspected in Danon disease when presenting with neurological deficits even with normal systolic function. Careful assessment for LV apical thrombus is warranted in such cases.

  20. Cardiorespiratory Fitness after Transient Ischemic Attack and Minor Ischemic Stroke : Baseline Data of the MoveIT Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boss, H. Myrthe; Deijle, Inger A.; Van Schaik, Sander M.; de Melker, Edwin C.; van den Berg, Bob T.J.; Weinstein, Henry C.; Geerlings, Mirjam I.; Kappelle, L. Jaap; Van den Berg-Vos, Renske M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) is reduced in patients with stroke. It is unclear whether it is also reduced in patients with a transient ischemic attack (TIA) or minor stroke. We investigated the CRF in patients with a recent TIA or minor stroke and explored which determinants are